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Sample records for acids proteins lipids

  1. New fluorescent octadecapentaenoic acids as probes of lipid membranes and protein-lipid interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Mateo, C R; Souto, A A; Amat-Guerri, F; Acuña, A U

    1996-01-01

    The chemical and spectroscopic properties of the new fluorescent acids all(E)-8, 10, 12, 14, 16-octadecapentaenoic acid (t-COPA) and its (8Z)-isomer (c-COPA) have been characterized in solvents of different polarity, synthetic lipid bilayers, and lipid/protein systems. These compounds are reasonably photostable in solution, present an intense UV absorption band (epsilon(350 nm) approximately 10(5) M(-1) cm(-1)) strongly overlapped by tryptophan fluorescence and their emission, centered at 470 nm, is strongly polarized (r(O) = 0.385 +/- 0.005) and decays with a major component (85%) of lifetime 23 ns and a faster minor one of lifetime 2 ns (D,L-alpha-dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), 15 degrees C). Both COPA isomers incorporate readily into vesicles and membranes (K(p) approximately 10(6)) and align parallel to the lipids. t-COPA distributes homogeneously between gel and fluid lipid domains and the changes in polarization accurately reflect the lipid T(m) values. From the decay of the fluorescence anisotropy in spherical bilayers of DMPC and POPC it is shown that t-COPA also correctly reflects the lipid order parameters, determined by 2H NMR techniques. Resonance energy transfer from tryptophan to the bound pentaenoic acid in serum albumin in solution, and from the tryptophan residues of gramicidin in lipid bilayers also containing the pentaenoic acid, show that this probe is a useful acceptor of protein tryptophan excitation, with R(O) values of 30-34 A. Images FIGURE 10 PMID:8889194

  2. The fusogenic lipid phosphatidic acid promotes the biogenesis of mitochondrial outer membrane protein Ugo1

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Michael; Taskin, Asli A.; Horvath, Susanne E.; Guan, Xue Li; Prinz, Claudia; Opalińska, Magdalena; Zorzin, Carina; van der Laan, Martin; Wenk, Markus R.; Schubert, Rolf; Wiedemann, Nils; Holzer, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Import and assembly of mitochondrial proteins depend on a complex interplay of proteinaceous translocation machineries. The role of lipids in this process has been studied only marginally and so far no direct role for a specific lipid in mitochondrial protein biogenesis has been shown. Here we analyzed a potential role of phosphatidic acid (PA) in biogenesis of mitochondrial proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In vivo remodeling of the mitochondrial lipid composition by lithocholic acid treatment or by ablation of the lipid transport protein Ups1, both leading to an increase of mitochondrial PA levels, specifically stimulated the biogenesis of the outer membrane protein Ugo1, a component of the mitochondrial fusion machinery. We reconstituted the import and assembly pathway of Ugo1 in protein-free liposomes, mimicking the outer membrane phospholipid composition, and found a direct dependency of Ugo1 biogenesis on PA. Thus, PA represents the first lipid that is directly involved in the biogenesis pathway of a mitochondrial membrane protein. PMID:26347140

  3. A special acyl carrier protein for transferring long hydroxylated fatty acids to lipid A in Rhizobium.

    PubMed

    Brozek, K A; Carlson, R W; Raetz, C R

    1996-12-13

    Lipid A, the hydrophobic anchor of lipopolysaccharides in the outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria, varies in structure among different Rhizobiaceae. The Rhizobium meliloti lipid A backbone, like that of Escherichia coli, is a beta1'-6-linked glucosamine disaccharide that is phosphorylated at positions 1 and 4'. Rhizobium leguminosarum lipid A lacks both phosphates, but contains aminogluconate in place of the proximal glucosamine 1-phosphate, and galacturonic acid instead of the 4'-phosphate. A peculiar feature of the lipid As of all Rhizobiaceae is acylation with 27-hydroxyoctacosanoic acid, a long hydroxylated fatty acid not found in E. coli. We now describe an in vitro system, consisting of a membrane enzyme and a cytosolic acyl donor from R. leguminosarum, that transfers 27-hydroxyoctacosanoic acid to (Kdo)2-lipid IVA, a key lipid A precursor common to both E. coli and R. leguminosarum. The 27-hydroxyoctacosanoic acid moiety was detected in the lipid product by mass spectrometry. The membrane enzyme required the presence of Kdo residues in the acceptor substrate for activity. The cytosolic acyl donor was purified from wild-type R. leguminosarum using the acylation of (Kdo)2-[4'-32P]-lipid IVA as the assay. Amino-terminal sequencing of the purified acyl donor revealed an exact 19-amino acid match with a partially sequenced gene (orf*) of R. leguminosarum. Orf* contains the consensus sequence, DSLD, for attachment of 4'-phosphopantetheine. When the entire orf* gene was sequenced, it was found to encode a protein of 92 amino acids. Orf* is a new kind of acyl carrier protein because it is only approximately 25% identical both to the constitutive acyl carrier protein (AcpP) and to the inducible acyl carrier protein (NodF) of R. leguminosarum. Mass spectrometry of purified active Orf* confirmed the presence of 4'-phosphopantetheine and 27-hydroxyoctacosanoic acid in the major species. Smaller mass peaks indicative of Orf* acylation with hydroxylated 20, 22, 24

  4. Lipid modification of proteins in Archaea: attachment of a mevalonic acid-based lipid moiety to the surface-layer glycoprotein of Haloferax volcanii follows protein translocation.

    PubMed Central

    Konrad, Zvia; Eichler, Jerry

    2002-01-01

    Once the newly synthesized surface (S)-layer glycoprotein of the halophilic archaeaon Haloferax volcanii has traversed the plasma membrane, the protein undergoes a membrane-related, Mg(2+)-dependent maturation event, revealed as an increase in the apparent molecular mass and hydrophobicity of the protein. To test whether lipid modification of the S-layer glycoprotein could explain these observations, H. volcanii cells were incubated with a radiolabelled precursor of isoprene, [(3)H]mevalonic acid. In Archaea, isoprenoids serve as the major hydrophobic component of archaeal membrane lipids and have been shown to modify other haloarchaeal S-layer glycoproteins, although little is known of the mechanism, site or purpose of such modification. In the present study we report that the H. volcanii S-layer glycoprotein is modified by a derivative of mevalonic acid and that maturation of the protein was prevented upon treatment with mevinolin (lovastatin), an inhibitor of mevalonic acid biosynthesis. These findings suggest that lipid modification of S-layer glycoproteins is a general property of halophilic archaea and, like S-layer glycoprotein glycosylation, lipid-modification of the S-layer glycoproteins takes place on the external cell surface, i.e. following protein translocation across the membrane. PMID:12069685

  5. Lipid and protein oxidation in hepatic homogenates and cell membranes exposed to bile acids.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Broto, Lorena; Martínez-Ballarín, Enrique; Miana-Mena, Javier; Berzosa, Cesar; Piedrafita, Eduardo; Cebrián, Igor; Reiter, Russel J; García, Joaquín J

    2009-01-01

    Cholestasis occurs in a variety of hepatic diseases and causes damage due to accumulation of bile acids in the liver. The aim was to investigate the effect of several bile acids, i.e. chenodeoxycholic, taurochenodeoxycholic, deoxycholic, taurodeoxycholic, ursodeoxycholic, lithocholic and taurolithocholic (TLC), in inducing oxidative damage. Hepatic tissue of male Sprague-Dawley rats was incubated with or without 1 mM of each bile acid, with or without 0.1 mM FeCl(3) and 0.1 mM ascorbic acid for the purpose of generating free radicals. Several bile acids increased lipid and protein oxidation, with TLC being the most pro-oxidative (657% and 175% in homogenates and 350% and 311% in membranes, respectively). TLC also enhanced iron-induced oxidative stress to lipids (21% in homogenates and 29% in membranes) and to proteins (74% in membranes). This enhancement was dose- and time-dependent and was reduced by melatonin. These results suggest that bile acids differentially mediate hepatic oxidative stress and may be involved in the physiopathology of cholestasis.

  6. Self-assembled multicompartment liquid crystalline lipid carriers for protein, peptide, and nucleic acid drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Angelova, Angelina; Angelov, Borislav; Mutafchieva, Rada; Lesieur, Sylviane; Couvreur, Patrick

    2011-02-15

    Lipids and lipopolymers self-assembled into biocompatible nano- and mesostructured functional materials offer many potential applications in medicine and diagnostics. In this Account, we demonstrate how high-resolution structural investigations of bicontinuous cubic templates made from lyotropic thermosensitive liquid-crystalline (LC) materials have initiated the development of innovative lipidopolymeric self-assembled nanocarriers. Such structures have tunable nanochannel sizes, morphologies, and hierarchical inner organizations and provide potential vehicles for the predictable loading and release of therapeutic proteins, peptides, or nucleic acids. This Account shows that structural studies of swelling of bicontinuous cubic lipid/water phases are essential for overcoming the nanoscale constraints for encapsulation of large therapeutic molecules in multicompartment lipid carriers. For the systems described here, we have employed time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and high-resolution freeze-fracture electronic microscopy (FF-EM) to study the morphology and the dynamic topological transitions of these nanostructured multicomponent amphiphilic assemblies. Quasi-elastic light scattering and circular dichroism spectroscopy can provide additional information at the nanoscale about the behavior of lipid/protein self-assemblies under conditions that approximate physiological hydration. We wanted to generalize these findings to control the stability and the hydration of the water nanochannels in liquid-crystalline lipid nanovehicles and confine therapeutic biomolecules within these structures. Therefore we analyzed the influence of amphiphilic and soluble additives (e.g. poly(ethylene glycol)monooleate (MO-PEG), octyl glucoside (OG), proteins) on the nanochannels' size in a diamond (D)-type bicontinuous cubic phase of the lipid glycerol monooleate (MO). At body temperature, we can stabilize long-living swollen states, corresponding to a diamond cubic phase

  7. Amino acid sequences of two nonspecific lipid-transfer proteins from germinated castor bean.

    PubMed

    Takishima, K; Watanabe, S; Yamada, M; Suga, T; Mamiya, G

    1988-11-01

    The amino acid sequence of two nonspecific lipid-transfer proteins (nsLTP) B and C from germinated castor bean seeds have been determined. Both the proteins consist of 92 residues, as for nsLTP previously reported, and their calculated Mr values are 9847 and 9593 for nsLTP-B and nsLTP-C, respectively. The sequences of nsLTP-B and nsLTP-C, compared to the known sequence of nsLTP-A from the same source, are 68% and 35% similar, respectively. No variation was found at the positions of the cysteine residues, indicating that they might be involved in disulfide bridges.

  8. StAR-related lipid transfer domain protein 5 binds primary bile acids[S

    PubMed Central

    Létourneau, Danny; Lorin, Aurélien; Lefebvre, Andrée; Frappier, Vincent; Gaudreault, Francis; Najmanovich, Rafael; Lavigne, Pierre; LeHoux, Jean-Guy

    2012-01-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory-related lipid transfer (START) domain proteins are involved in the nonvesicular intracellular transport of lipids and sterols. The STARD1 (STARD1 and STARD3) and STARD4 subfamilies (STARD4–6) have an internal cavity large enough to accommodate sterols. To provide a deeper understanding on the structural biology of this domain, the binding of sterols to STARD5, a member of the STARD4 subfamily, was monitored. The SAR by NMR [1H-15N heteronuclear single-quantum coherence (HSQC)] approach, complemented by circular dichroism (CD) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), was used. Titration of STARD5 with cholic (CA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), ligands of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), leads to drastic perturbation of the 1H-15N HSQC spectra and the identification of the residues in contact with those ligands. The most perturbed residues in presence of ligands are lining the internal cavity of the protein. Ka values of 1.8·10−4 M−1 and 6.3·104 M−1 were measured for CA and CDCA, respectively. This is the first report of a START domain protein in complex with a sterol ligand. Our original findings indicate that STARD5 may be involved in the transport of bile acids rather than cholesterol. PMID:23018617

  9. Improved Experimental Techniques for Analyzing Nucleic Acid Transport Through Protein Nanopores in Planar Lipid Bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Justin A.

    The translocation of nucleic acid polymers across cell membranes is a fundamental requirement for complex life and has greatly contributed to genomic molecular evolution. The diversity of pathways that have evolved to transport DNA and RNA across membranes include protein receptors, active and passive transporters, endocytic and pinocytic processes, and various types of nucleic acid conducting channels known as nanopores. We have developed a series of experimental techniques, collectively known as "Wicking", that greatly improves the biophysical analysis of nucleic acid transport through protein nanopores in planar lipid bilayers. We have verified the Wicking method using numerous types of classical ion channels including the well-studied chloride selective channel, CLIC1. We used the Wicking technique to reconstitute α-hemolysin and found that DNA translocation events of types A and B could be routinely observed using this method. Furthermore, measurable differences were observed in the duration of blockade events as DNA length and composition was varied, consistent with previous reports. Finally, we tested the ability of the Wicking technology to reconstitute the dsRNA transporter Sid-1. Exposure to dsRNAs of increasing length and complexity showed measurable differences in the current transitions suggesting that the charge carrier was dsRNA. However, the translocation events occurred so infrequently that a meaningful electrophysiological analysis was not possible. Alterations in the lipid composition of the bilayer had a minor effect on the frequency of translocation events but not to such a degree as to permit rigorous statistical analysis. We conclude that in many instances the Wicking method is a significant improvement to the lipid bilayer technique, but is not an optimal method for analyzing transport through Sid-1. Further refinements to the Wicking method might have future applications in high throughput DNA sequencing, DNA computation, and

  10. Lipid, fatty acid and protein content of late larval to early juvenile stages of the western rock lobster, Panulirus cygnus.

    PubMed

    Limbourn, Andrew J; Nichols, Peter D

    2009-03-01

    Lipid, fatty acid and protein content were determined individually on 7 phyllosomata, 69 clear pueruli, 286 pre-moult pueruli, and 86 juvenile western rock lobster (WRL) collected from four locations between the settlement seasons 2000 to 2006 to evaluate compositional changes during the non-feeding puerulus stage. Only the lipid content, particularly the phospholipids, decreased significantly with development. Protein declined sharply following moult to the juvenile. PL comprised between 86-94% of total lipid in all animals, and declined most between phyllosomata and clear pueruli (238.5 to 121.4 mg g(-1) DW) (p<0.001). Triacylglycerols were the only lipid to increase in absolute amounts with development, but declined 53% on average following moult to juvenile. This increase in TAG is likely due to the conversion of phospholipids to triacylglycerols. Monounsaturated fatty acids were the main energy form utilised during benthic development while polyunsaturated fatty acids showed a high degree of sparing. The n-3:n-6 fatty acid ratio of juveniles indicates that they may be approaching critically low levels of stored lipid energy reserves. Both protein, and lipid, declined sharply from the final puerulus phase to the juvenile confirming that a high energetic demand is required to fuel the moulting process.

  11. Phospholipase D and phosphatidic acid in plant defence response: from protein-protein and lipid-protein interactions to hormone signalling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian

    2015-04-01

    Phospholipase Ds (PLDs) and PLD-derived phosphatidic acids (PAs) play vital roles in plant hormonal and environmental responses and various cellular dynamics. Recent studies have further expanded the functions of PLDs and PAs into plant-microbe interaction. The molecular diversities and redundant functions make PLD-PA an important signalling complex regulating lipid metabolism, cytoskeleton dynamics, vesicle trafficking, and hormonal signalling in plant defence through protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions or hormone signalling. Different PLD-PA signalling complexes and their targets have emerged as fast-growing research topics for understanding their numerous but not yet established roles in modifying pathogen perception, signal transduction, and downstream defence responses. Meanwhile, advanced lipidomics tools have allowed researchers to reveal further the mechanisms of PLD-PA signalling complexes in regulating lipid metabolism and signalling, and their impacts on jasmonic acid/oxylipins, salicylic acid, and other hormone signalling pathways that essentially mediate plant defence responses. This review attempts to summarize the progress made in spatial and temporal PLD/PA signalling as well as PLD/PA-mediated modification of plant defence. It presents an in-depth discussion on the functions and potential mechanisms of PLD-PA complexes in regulating actin filament/microtubule cytoskeleton, vesicle trafficking, and hormonal signalling, and in influencing lipid metabolism-derived metabolites as critical signalling components in plant defence responses. The discussion puts PLD-PA in a broader context in order to guide future research.

  12. Lipoic acid entrains the hepatic circadian clock and lipid metabolic proteins that have been desynchronized with advanced age

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, Dove; Finlay, Liam; Butler, Judy; Gómez, Luis; Smith, Eric; Moreau, Régis; Hagen, Tory

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • 24 month old rats were supplemented with 0.2% lipoic acid in the diet for 2 weeks. • Lipoic acid shifts phase of core circadian clock proteins. • Lipoic acid corrects age-induced desynchronized lipid metabolism rhythms. - Abstract: It is well established that lipid metabolism is controlled, in part, by circadian clocks. However, circadian clocks lose temporal precision with age and correlates with elevated incidence in dyslipidemia and metabolic syndrome in older adults. Because our lab has shown that lipoic acid (LA) improves lipid homeostasis in aged animals, we hypothesized that LA affects the circadian clock to achieve these results. We fed 24 month old male F344 rats a diet supplemented with 0.2% (w/w) LA for 2 weeks prior to sacrifice and quantified hepatic circadian clock protein levels and clock-controlled lipid metabolic enzymes. LA treatment caused a significant phase-shift in the expression patterns of the circadian clock proteins Period (Per) 2, Brain and Muscle Arnt-Like1 (BMAL1), and Reverse Erythroblastosis virus (Rev-erb) β without altering the amplitude of protein levels during the light phase of the day. LA also significantly altered the oscillatory patterns of clock-controlled proteins associated with lipid metabolism. The level of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α was significantly increased and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and fatty acid synthase (FAS) were both significantly reduced, suggesting that the LA-supplemented aged animals are in a catabolic state. We conclude that LA remediates some of the dyslipidemic processes associated with advanced age, and this mechanism may be at least partially through entrainment of circadian clocks.

  13. Interfacial regulation of acid ceramidase activity. Stimulation of ceramide degradation by lysosomal lipids and sphingolipid activator proteins.

    PubMed

    Linke, T; Wilkening, G; Sadeghlar, F; Mozcall, H; Bernardo, K; Schuchman, E; Sandhoff, K

    2001-02-23

    The lysosomal degradation of ceramide is catalyzed by acid ceramidase and requires sphingolipid activator proteins (SAP) as cofactors in vivo. The aim of this study was to investigate how ceramide is hydrolyzed by acid ceramidase at the water-membrane interface in the presence of sphingolipid activator proteins in a liposomal assay system. The degradation of membrane-bound ceramide was significantly increased both in the absence and presence of SAP-D when anionic lysosomal phospholipids such as bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate, phosphatidylinositol, and dolichol phosphate were incorporated into substrate-bearing liposomes. Higher ceramide degradation rates were observed in vesicles with increased membrane curvature. Dilution assays indicated that acid ceramidase remained bound to the liposomal surface during catalysis. Not only SAP-D, but also SAP-C and SAP-A, were found to be stimulators of ceramide hydrolysis in the presence of anionic phospholipids. This finding was confirmed by cell culture studies, in which SAP-A, -C, and -D reduced the amount of ceramide storage observed in fibroblasts of a patient suffering from prosaposin deficiency. Strong protein-lipid interactions were observed for both SAP-D and acid ceramidase in surface plasmon resonance experiments. Maximum binding of SAP-D and acid ceramidase to lipid bilayers occurred at pH 4.0. Our results demonstrate that anionic, lysosomal lipids are required for efficient hydrolysis of ceramide by acid ceramidase.

  14. Lipoic acid entrains the hepatic circadian clock and lipid metabolic proteins that have been desynchronized with advanced age

    PubMed Central

    Keith, Dove; Finlay, Liam; Butler, Judy; Gómez, Luis; Smith, Eric; Moreau, Régis; Hagen, Tory

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that lipid metabolism is controlled, in part, by circadian clocks. However, circadian clocks lose temporal precision with age and correlates with elevated incidence in dyslipidemia and metabolic syndrome in older adults. Because our lab has shown that lipoic acid (LA) improves lipid homeostasis in aged animals, we hypothesized that LA affects the circadian clock to achieve these results. We fed 24 month old male F344 rats a diet supplemented with 0.2% (w/w) LA for 2 weeks prior to sacrifice and quantified hepatic circadian clock protein levels and clock-controlled lipid metabolic enzymes. LA treatment caused a significant phase-shift in the expression patterns of the circadian clock proteins Period (Per) 2, Brain and Muscle Arnt-Like1 (BMAL1), and Reverse Erythroblastosis virus (Rev-erb) β without altering the amplitude of protein levels during the light phase of the day. LA also significantly altered the oscillatory patterns of clock-controlled proteins associated with lipid metabolism. The level of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α was significantly increased and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and fatty acid synthase (FAS) were both significantly reduced, suggesting that the LA-supplemented aged animals are in a catabolic state. We conclude that LA remediates some of the dyslipidemic processes associated with advanced age, and this mechanism may be at least partially through entrainment of circadian clocks. PMID:24944020

  15. Metformin reduces lipid accumulation in macrophages by inhibiting FOXO1-mediated transcription of fatty acid-binding protein 4

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Jun; Ren, Pingping; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Xing Li; Chen, Li; Shen, Ying H.

    2010-02-26

    Objective: The accumulation of lipids in macrophages contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. Strategies to reduce lipid accumulation in macrophages may have therapeutic potential for preventing and treating atherosclerosis and cardiovascular complications. The antidiabetic drug metformin has been reported to reduce lipid accumulation in adipocytes. In this study, we examined the effects of metformin on lipid accumulation in macrophages and investigated the mechanisms involved. Methods and results: We observed that metformin significantly reduced palmitic acid (PA)-induced intracellular lipid accumulation in macrophages. Metformin promoted the expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-1), while reduced the expression of fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4) which was involved in PA-induced lipid accumulation. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that metformin regulates FABP4 expression at the transcriptional level. We identified forkhead transcription factor FOXO1 as a positive regulator of FABP4 expression. Inhibiting FOXO1 expression with FOXO1 siRNA significantly reduced basal and PA-induced FABP4 expression. Overexpression of wild-type FOXO1 and constitutively active FOXO1 significantly increased FABP4 expression, whereas dominant negative FOXO1 dramatically decreased FABP4 expression. Metformin reduced FABP4 expression by promoting FOXO1 nuclear exclusion and subsequently inhibiting its activity. Conclusions: Taken together, these results suggest that metformin reduces lipid accumulation in macrophages by repressing FOXO1-mediated FABP4 transcription. Thus, metformin may have a protective effect against lipid accumulation in macrophages and may serve as a therapeutic agent for preventing and treating atherosclerosis in metabolic syndrome.

  16. The fatty acid transport protein Fat1p is involved in the export of fatty acids from lipid bodies in Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Dulermo, Rémi; Gamboa-Meléndez, Heber; Dulermo, Thierry; Thevenieau, France; Nicaud, Jean-Marc

    2014-09-01

    In order to live, cells need to import different molecules, such as sugars, amino acids or lipids, using transporters. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the ScFAT1 gene encodes the long-chain fatty acid transporter; however, the transport of fatty acids (FAs) in the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica has not yet been studied. In contrast to what has previously been found for ΔScfat1 strains, ΔYlfat1 yeast was still able to grow on substrates containing short-, medium- or long-chain FAs. We observed a notable difference in cell lipid content between wild-type (WT) and deletion mutant strains after 24 h of culture in minimal oleate medium: in the WT strain, lipids represented 24% of cell dry weight (CDW), while they accounted for 37% of CDW in the ΔYlfat1 strain. This result indicates that YlFat1p is not involved in cell lipid uptake. Moreover, we also observed that fatty acid remobilisation was decreased in the ΔYlfat1 strain and that fluorescence-tagged YlFat1p proteins localised to the interfaces between lipid bodies, which suggests that YlFat1p may play a role in the export of FAs from lipid bodies.

  17. Fatty acid transport protein 4 is dispensable for intestinal lipid absorption in mice.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jien; Moulson, Casey L; Newberry, Elizabeth P; Lin, Meei-Hua; Xie, Yan; Kennedy, Susan M; Miner, Jeffrey H; Davidson, Nicholas O

    2009-03-01

    FA transport protein 4 (FATP4), one member of a multigene family of FA transporters, was proposed as a major FA transporter in intestinal lipid absorption. Due to the fact that Fatp4(-/-) mice die because of a perinatal skin defect, we rescued the skin phenotype using an FATP4 transgene driven by a keratinocyte-specific promoter (Fatp4(-/-);Ivl-Fatp4(tg/+) mice) to elucidate the role of intestinal FATP4 in dietary lipid absorption. Fatp4(-/-);Ivl-Fatp4(tg/+) mice and wild-type littermates displayed indistinguishable food consumption, growth, and weight gain on either low or high fat (Western) diets, with no differences in intestinal triglyceride (TG) absorption or fecal fat losses. Cholesterol absorption and intestinal TG absorption kinetics were indistinguishable between the genotypes, although Western diet fed Fatp4(-/-);Ivl-Fatp4(tg/+) mice showed a significant increase in enterocyte TG and FA content. There was no compensatory upregulation of other FATP family members or any other FA or cholesterol transporters in Fatp4(-/-);Ivl-Fatp4(tg/+) mice. Furthermore, although serum cholesterol levels were lower in Fatp4(-/-);Ivl-Fatp4(tg/+) mice, there was no difference in hepatic VLDL secretion in-vivo or in hepatic lipid content on either a chow or Western diet. Taken together, our studies find no evidence for a physiological role of intestinal FATP4 in dietary lipid absorption in mice.

  18. Counteracting foaming caused by lipids or proteins in biogas reactors using rapeseed oil or oleic acid as antifoaming agents.

    PubMed

    Kougias, P G; Boe, K; Einarsdottir, E S; Angelidaki, I

    2015-08-01

    Foaming is one of the major operational problems in biogas plants, and dealing with foaming incidents is still based on empirical practices. Various types of antifoams are used arbitrarily to combat foaming in biogas plants, but without any scientific support this action can lead to serious deterioration of the methanogenic process. Many commercial antifoams are derivatives of fatty acids or oils. However, it is well known that lipids can induce foaming in manure based biogas plants. This study aimed to elucidate the effect of rapeseed oil and oleic acid on foam reduction and process performance in biogas reactors fed with protein or lipid rich substrates. The results showed that both antifoams efficiently suppressed foaming. Moreover rapeseed oil resulted in stimulation of the biogas production. Finally, it was reckoned that the chemical structure of lipids, and more specifically their carboxylic ends, is responsible for their foam promoting or foam counteracting behaviour. Thus, it was concluded that the fatty acids and oils could suppress foaming, while salt of fatty acids could generate foam.

  19. Combined nitrogen limitation and cadmium stress stimulate total carbohydrates, lipids, protein and amino acid accumulation in Chlorella vulgaris (Trebouxiophyceae).

    PubMed

    Chia, Mathias Ahii; Lombardi, Ana Teresa; da Graça Gama Melão, Maria; Parrish, Christopher C

    2015-03-01

    Metals have interactive effects on the uptake and metabolism of nutrients in microalgae. However, the effect of trace metal toxicity on amino acid composition of Chlorella vulgaris as a function of varying nitrogen concentrations is not known. In this research, C. vulgaris was used to investigate the influence of cadmium (10(-7) and 2.0×10(-8)molL(-1) Cd) under varying nitrogen (2.9×10(-6), 1.1×10(-5) and 1.1×10(-3)molL(-1)N) concentrations on its growth rate, biomass and biochemical composition. Total carbohydrates, total proteins, total lipids, as well as individual amino acid proportions were determined. The combination of Cd stress and N limitation significantly inhibited growth rate and cell density of C. vulgaris. However, increasing N limitation and Cd stress stimulated higher dry weight and chlorophyll a production per cell. Furthermore, biomolecules like total proteins, carbohydrates and lipids increased with increasing N limitation and Cd stress. Ketogenic and glucogenic amino acids were accumulated under the stress conditions investigated in the present study. Amino acids involved in metal chelation like proline, histidine and glutamine were significantly increased after exposure to combined Cd stress and N limitation. We conclude that N limitation and Cd stress affects the physiology of C. vulgaris by not only decreasing its growth but also stimulating biomolecule production.

  20. Fatty Acid Transport Protein-2 inhibitor Grassofermata/CB5 protects cells against lipid accumulation and toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Nipun; Black, Paul N.; Montefusco, David; DiRusso, Concetta C.

    2015-01-01

    The inhibition of the fatty acid uptake into non-adipose tissues provides an attractive target for prevention of lipotoxicity leading to obesity-associated non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and type 2 diabetes. Fatty acid transport proteins (FATPs) are bifunctional proteins involved in the uptake and activation of fatty acids by esterification with coenzyme A. Here we characterize Grassofermata/CB5, previously identified as a fatty acid uptake inhibitor directed against HsFATP2. The compound was effective in inhibiting the uptake of fatty acids in the low micro-molar range (IC50 8–11μM) and prevented palmitate-mediated lipid accumulation and cell death in cell lines that are models for intestines, liver, muscle and pancreas. In adipocytes, uptake inhibition was less effective (IC50 58μM). Inhibition was specific for long chain fatty acids and was ineffective toward medium chain fatty acids, which are transported by diffusion. Kinetic analysis of Grassofermata-dependent FA transport inhibition verified a non-competitive mechanism. By comparison with Grassofermata, several atypical antipsychotic drugs previously implicated as inhibitors of FA uptake were ineffectual. In mice Grassofermata decreased absorption of 13C-oleate demonstrating its potential as a therapeutic agent. PMID:26284975

  1. Potential cytoprotection: antioxidant defence by caffeic acid phenethyl ester against free radical-induced damage of lipids, DNA, and proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Chen, Lixiang; Wu, Weimin; Long, Yuan; Wang, Rui

    2008-05-01

    Oxidative stress is considered to be a major cause of cellular injuries in a variety of chronic health problems, such as carcinogenesis and neurodegenerative disorders. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), derived from the propolis of honeybee hives, possesses a variety of biological and pharmacological properties including antioxidant and anticancer activity. In the present study, we focused on the diverse antioxidative functionalities of CAPE and its related polyphenolic acid esters on cellular macromolecules in vitro. The effects on human erythrocyte membrane ghost lipid peroxidation, plasmid pBR322 DNA, and protein damage initiated by the water-soluble initiator 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) hydrochloride (AAPH) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) were monitored by formation of hydroperoxides and by DNA nicking assay, single-cell alkaline electrophoresis, and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Our results showed that CAPE and its related polyphenolic acid esters elicited remarkable inhibitory effects on erythrocyte membrane lipid peroxidation, cellular DNA strand breakage, and protein fragmentation. The results suggest that CAPE is a potent exogenous cytoprotective and antigenotoxic agent against cell oxidative damage that could be used as a template for designing novel drugs to combat diseases induced by oxidative stress components, such as various types of cancer.

  2. Fatty acid acylation of rat brain myelin proteolipid protein in vitro: identification of the lipid donor.

    PubMed

    Bizzozero, O A; Lees, M B

    1986-02-01

    The immediate acyl chain donor for fatty acid esterification of proteolipid protein (PLP) was identified in an in vitro system. Rat brain total membranes, after removal of crude nuclear and mitochondrial fractions, were incubated with radioactive acyl donors, extracted with chloroform/methanol, and analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In the presence of [3H]palmitic acid, CoA, ATP, and Mg2+, acylation of endogenous PLP occurred at a linear rate for at least 2 h. The radioactivity was associated with the protein via an ester linkage, mainly as palmitic acid. Omission of ATP, CoA, Mg2+, or all three reduced fatty acid incorporation into PLP to 44, 27, 8, and 4%, respectively, of the values in the complete system. Incubation of the membrane fraction with [3H]palmitoyl-CoA in the absence of CoA and ATP led to highly labeled PLP. These data demonstrate that activation of free fatty acid is required for acylation. Phospholipids and glycolipids were not able to acylate the PLP directly. Finally, when isolated myelin was incubated with [3H]palmitoyl-CoA in the absence of cofactors, only PLP was labeled, thus confirming the identity of palmitoyl-CoA as the direct acyl chain donor and suggesting that the acylating activity and the PLP pool available for acylation are both in the myelin.

  3. Fatty acid transport protein-2 inhibitor Grassofermata/CB5 protects cells against lipid accumulation and toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Saini, Nipun; Black, Paul N.; Montefusco, David; DiRusso, Concetta C.

    2015-09-25

    The inhibition of the fatty acid uptake into non-adipose tissues provides an attractive target for prevention of lipotoxicity leading to obesity-associated non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and type 2 diabetes. Fatty acid transport proteins (FATPs) are bifunctional proteins involved in the uptake and activation of fatty acids by esterification with coenzyme A. Here we characterize Grassofermata/CB5, previously identified as a fatty acid uptake inhibitor directed against HsFATP2. The compound was effective in inhibiting the uptake of fatty acids in the low micro-molar range (IC{sub 50} 8–11 μM) and prevented palmitate-mediated lipid accumulation and cell death in cell lines that are models for intestines, liver, muscle and pancreas. In adipocytes, uptake inhibition was less effective (IC{sub 50} 58 μM). Inhibition was specific for long chain fatty acids and was ineffective toward medium chain fatty acids, which are transported by diffusion. Kinetic analysis of Grassofermata-dependent FA transport inhibition verified a non-competitive mechanism. By comparison with Grassofermata, several atypical antipsychotic drugs previously implicated as inhibitors of FA uptake were ineffectual. In mice Grassofermata decreased absorption of {sup 13}C-oleate demonstrating its potential as a therapeutic agent. - Highlights: • Grassofermata is a small compound inhibitor of FATP2. • Uptake inhibition is specific for long chain fatty acids. • Uptake kinetics shows low specificity for adipocytes compared to other cell types. • Inhibition is by a non-competitive mechanism. • Atypical antipsychotics do not inhibit FA uptake by comparison with Grassofermata.

  4. The brown adipocyte protein CIDEA promotes lipid droplet fusion via a phosphatidic acid-binding amphipathic helix

    PubMed Central

    Barneda, David; Planas-Iglesias, Joan; Gaspar, Maria L; Mohammadyani, Dariush; Prasannan, Sunil; Dormann, Dirk; Han, Gil-Soo; Jesch, Stephen A; Carman, George M; Kagan, Valerian; Parker, Malcolm G; Ktistakis, Nicholas T; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Dixon, Ann M; Henry, Susan A; Christian, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of energy homeostasis depends on the highly regulated storage and release of triacylglycerol primarily in adipose tissue, and excessive storage is a feature of common metabolic disorders. CIDEA is a lipid droplet (LD)-protein enriched in brown adipocytes promoting the enlargement of LDs, which are dynamic, ubiquitous organelles specialized for storing neutral lipids. We demonstrate an essential role in this process for an amphipathic helix in CIDEA, which facilitates embedding in the LD phospholipid monolayer and binds phosphatidic acid (PA). LD pairs are docked by CIDEA trans-complexes through contributions of the N-terminal domain and a C-terminal dimerization region. These complexes, enriched at the LD–LD contact site, interact with the cone-shaped phospholipid PA and likely increase phospholipid barrier permeability, promoting LD fusion by transference of lipids. This physiological process is essential in adipocyte differentiation as well as serving to facilitate the tight coupling of lipolysis and lipogenesis in activated brown fat. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07485.001 PMID:26609809

  5. Dictyostelium Lipid Droplets Host Novel Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiaoli; Barisch, Caroline; Paschke, Peggy; Herrfurth, Cornelia; Bertinetti, Oliver; Pawolleck, Nadine; Otto, Heike; Rühling, Harald; Feussner, Ivo; Herberg, Friedrich W.

    2013-01-01

    Across all kingdoms of life, cells store energy in a specialized organelle, the lipid droplet. In general, it consists of a hydrophobic core of triglycerides and steryl esters surrounded by only one leaflet derived from the endoplasmic reticulum membrane to which a specific set of proteins is bound. We have chosen the unicellular organism Dictyostelium discoideum to establish kinetics of lipid droplet formation and degradation and to further identify the lipid constituents and proteins of lipid droplets. Here, we show that the lipid composition is similar to what is found in mammalian lipid droplets. In addition, phospholipids preferentially consist of mainly saturated fatty acids, whereas neutral lipids are enriched in unsaturated fatty acids. Among the novel protein components are LdpA, a protein specific to Dictyostelium, and Net4, which has strong homologies to mammalian DUF829/Tmem53/NET4 that was previously only known as a constituent of the mammalian nuclear envelope. The proteins analyzed so far appear to move from the endoplasmic reticulum to the lipid droplets, supporting the concept that lipid droplets are formed on this membrane. PMID:24036346

  6. meso-Dihydroguaiaretic acid inhibits hepatic lipid accumulation by activating AMP-activated protein kinase in human HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myoung-Su; Kim, Kyung Jin; Kim, Daeyoung; Lee, Kyung-Eun; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic lipid accumulation is a major risk factor for dyslipidemia, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and insulin resistance. The present study was conducted to evaluate hypolipidemic effects of meso-dihydroguaiaretic acid (MDA), anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory compound isolated from the Myristica fragrans HOUTT., by oil red O staining, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and Western blot. MDA significantly inhibited insulin-induced hepatic lipid accumulation in a dose-dependent manner. The lipid-lowering effect of MDA was accompanied by increased expression of proteins involved in fatty acid oxidation and decreased expression of lipid synthetic proteins. In addition, MDA activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) as determined by phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), a downstream target of AMPK. The effects of MDA on lipogenic protein expression were suppressed by pretreatment with compound C, an AMPK inhibitor. Taken together, these findings show that MDA inhibits insulin-induced lipid accumulation in human HepG2 cells by suppressing expression of lipogenic proteins through AMPK signaling, suggesting a potent lipid-lowering agent.

  7. Lipid binding proteins from parasitic platyhelminthes.

    PubMed

    Alvite, Gabriela; Esteves, Adriana

    2012-01-01

    TWO MAIN FAMILIES OF LIPID BINDING PROTEINS HAVE BEEN IDENTIFIED IN PARASITIC PLATYHELMINTHES: hydrophobic ligand binding proteins (HLBPs) and fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs). Members of the former family of proteins are specific to the Cestoda class, while FABPs are conserved across a wide range of animal species. Because Platyhelminthes are unable to synthesize their own lipids, these lipid-binding proteins are important molecules in these organisms. HLBPs are a high molecular mass complex of proteins and lipids. They are composed of subunits of low molecular mass proteins and a wide array of lipid molecules ranging from CoA esters to cholesterol. These proteins are excretory-secretory molecules and are key serological tools for diagnosis of diseases caused by cestodes. FABPs are mainly intracellular proteins of low molecular weight. They are also vaccine candidates. Despite that the knowledge of their function is scarce, the differences in their molecular organization, ligand preferences, intra/extracellular localization, evolution, and phylogenetic distribution, suggest that platyhelminths HLBPs and FABPs should play different functions. FABPs might be involved in the removal of fatty acids from the inner surface of the cell membrane and in their subsequent targeting to specific cellular destinations. In contrast, HLBPs might be involved in fatty acid uptake from the host environment.

  8. Selective fermentation of carbohydrate and protein fractions of Scenedesmus, and biohydrogenation of its lipid fraction for enhanced recovery of saturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Lai, YenJung Sean; Parameswaran, Prathap; Li, Ang; Aguinaga, Alyssa; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2016-02-01

    Biofuels derived from microalgae have promise as carbon-neutral replacements for petroleum. However, difficulty extracting microalgae-derived lipids and the co-extraction of non-lipid components add major costs that detract from the benefits of microalgae-based biofuel. Selective fermentation could alleviate these problems by managing microbial degradation so that carbohydrates and proteins are hydrolyzed and fermented, but lipids remain intact. We evaluated selective fermentation of Scenedesmus biomass in batch experiments buffered at pH 5.5, 7, or 9. Carbohydrates were fermented up to 45% within the first 6 days, protein fermentation followed after about 20 days, and lipids (measured as fatty acid methyl esters, FAME) were conserved. Fermentation of the non-lipid components generated volatile fatty acids, with acetate, butyrate, and propionate being the dominant products. Selective fermentation of Scenedesmus biomass increased the amount of extractable FAME and the ratio of FAME to crude lipids. It also led to biohydrogenation of unsaturated FAME to more desirable saturated FAME (especially to C16:0 and C18:0), and the degree of saturation was inversely related to the accumulation of hydrogen gas after fermentation. Moreover, the microbial communities after selective fermentation were enriched in bacteria from families known to perform biohydrogenation, i.e., Porphyromonadaceae and Ruminococcaceae. Thus, this study provides proof-of-concept that selective fermentation can improve the quantity and quality of lipids that can be extracted from Scenedesmus.

  9. Effect of olive leaf (Olea europea L.) extracts on protein and lipid oxidation of long-term frozen n-3 fatty acids-enriched pork patties.

    PubMed

    Botsoglou, Evropi; Govaris, Alexander; Ambrosiadis, Ioannis; Fletouris, Dimitrios; Botsoglou, Nikolas

    2014-10-01

    Our previous study has demonstrated the protective effects of olive leaf extracts on the oxidation of pork patties from n-3 fatty acid-enriched meat during refrigerated storage. The target of the present study was to examine these effects during frozen storage. Results showed that frozen storage accelerated (P=0.05) both lipid and protein oxidation in pork patties, but an addition of olive leaf extract at 200mg gallic acid equivalent/kg improved sensory attributes by delaying oxidation of lipids (reduction (P=0.05) of conjugated dienes, hydroperoxides and malondialdehyde), and of proteins (reduction (P=0.05) of protein carbonyls and inhibition (P=0.05) of the decrease of protein sulfhydryls).

  10. Individual and combined usefulness of lipid associated sialic acid, mucoid proteins and hexoses as tumor markers in breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Patel, P S; Baxi, B R; Adhvaryu, S G; Balar, D B

    1990-06-15

    Serum levels of lipid associated sialic acid (LASA), mucoid proteins (MP) and hexoses (galactose + mannose) were measured in 41 breast cancer patients, 14 patients with benign breast diseases and 36 healthy age matched female individuals. In breast carcinoma patients, we have observed significant increase in the levels of the three markers compared with the controls (P less than 0.001) and in MP and hexoses compared to the patients with benign breast diseases (P less than 0.001). LASA and hexoses levels were significantly higher in benign breast diseases with respect to controls (P less than 0.001 and P less than 0.01, respectively). We evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of the markers individually and in combination. MP were most sensitive (71.8%) and specific (71.4%). Both sensitivity and specificity were increased when combinations of the markers were studied. Combination of MP with LASA was most sensitive (97.4%) while the combination of MP and hexoses was most specific (92.9%). LASA was significantly elevated in infiltrating duct carcinoma compared to lobular carcinoma (P less than 0.001). MP and hexoses also showed higher mean value in infiltrating duct carcinoma than lobular carcinoma. The present study suggests that the combination of the markers investigated might be useful for diagnosis and classification of breast carcinoma.

  11. Impact of lipid content and composition on lipid oxidation and protein carbonylation in experimental fermented sausages.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Verónica; Estévez, Mario; Ventanas, Jesús; Ventanas, Sonia

    2014-03-15

    This study aims to investigate the effect of lipid content (∼4%, ∼10% and ∼15%) and composition (different lipid sources; animal fat and sunflower oil) on the oxidative stability of proteins and lipids in experimental fermented sausages. Increasing the lipid content of sausages enhanced the susceptibility of lipids to oxidation whereas the effect on the formation of specific carbonyls from protein oxidation was not so evident. Sausages manufactured with different lipid sources affected the susceptibility of lipids and proteins to oxidation as a likely result of the modifications in the fatty acid profile, as well as to the presence of antioxidant compounds. While the fatty acid profile had a major effect on the occurrence and extent of lipid oxidation, the presence of compounds with potential antioxidant activity may be more influential on the extent of protein carbonylation.

  12. Increased placental fatty acid transporter 6 and binding protein 3 expression and fetal liver lipid accumulation in a mouse model of obesity in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Paula; Harris, Jessica; Rosario, Fredrick J; Powell, Theresa L; Jansson, Thomas

    2015-12-15

    Obesity in pregnancy is associated with increased fetal growth and adiposity, which, in part, is determined by transplacental nutrient supply. Trophoblast uptake and intracellular trafficking of lipids are dependent on placental fatty acid transport proteins (FATP), translocase (FAT/CD36), and fatty acid binding proteins (FABP). We hypothesized that maternal obesity in mice leads to increased placental expression of FAT/CD36, FATPs, and FABPs, and lipid accumulation in the fetal liver. C57/BL6J female mice were fed either a control (C; n = 10) or an obesogenic (OB; n = 10) high-fat, high-sugar diet before mating and throughout pregnancy. At E18.5, placentas and fetal livers were collected. Trophoblast plasma membranes (TPM) were isolated from placental homogenates. Expression of FAT/CD36 and FATP (TPM) and FABP (homogenates) was determined by immunoblotting. Gene expression was assessed by RT-quantitative PCR. Sections of fetal livers were stained for Oil Red O, and lipid droplets were quantified. TPM protein expression of FAT/CD36, FATP 2, and FATP 4 was comparable between C and OB groups. Conversely, TPM FATP 6 expression was increased by 35% in OB compared with C placentas without changes in mRNA expression. FABPs 1, 3-5 and PPARγ were expressed in homogenates, and FABP 3 expression increased 27% in OB compared with C placentas; however, no changes were observed in mRNA expression. Lipid droplet accumulation was 10-fold higher in the livers of fetuses from OB compared with C group. We propose that increased lipid transport capacity in obese mice promotes transplacental fatty acid transport and contributes to excess lipid accumulation in the fetal liver.

  13. Role of the C-terminal basic amino acids and the lipid anchor of the Gγ2 protein in membrane interactions and cell localization.

    PubMed

    Noguera-Salvà, Maria A; Guardiola-Serrano, Francisca; Martin, M Laura; Marcilla-Etxenike, Amaia; Bergo, Martin O; Busquets, Xavier; Escribá, Pablo V

    2017-02-21

    Heterotrimeric G proteins are peripheral membrane proteins that frequently localize to the plasma membrane where their presence in molar excess over G protein coupled receptors permits signal amplification. Their distribution is regulated by protein-lipid interactions, which has a clear influence on their activity. Gβγ dimer drives the interaction between G protein heterotrimers with cell membranes. We focused our study on the role of the C-terminal region of the Gγ2 protein in G protein interactions with cell membranes. The Gγ2 subunit is modified at cysteine (Cys) 68 by the addition of an isoprenyl lipid, which is followed by the proteolytic removal of the last three residues that leaves an isoprenylated and carboxyl methylated Cys-68 as the terminal amino acid. The role of Cys isoprenylation of the CAAX box has been defined for other proteins, yet the importance of proteolysis and carboxyl methylation of isoprenylated proteins is less clear. Here, we showed that not only geranylgeranylation but also proteolysis and carboxyl methylation are essential for the correct localization of Gγ2 in the plasma membrane. Moreover, we showed the importance of electrostatic interactions between the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane and the positively charged C-terminal domain of the Gγ2 subunit (amino acids Arg-62, Lys-64 and Lys-65) as a second signal to reach the plasma membrane. Indeed, single or multiple point mutations at Gγ2 C-terminal amino acids have a significant effect on Gγ2 protein-plasma membrane interactions and its localization to charged Ld (liquid disordered) membrane microdomains. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Lipid Therapy: Drugs Targeting Biomembranes edited by Pablo Escríba-Ruíz.

  14. Effect of carnosic acid, quercetin and α-tocopherol on lipid and protein oxidation in an in vitro simulated gastric digestion model.

    PubMed

    Raes, Katleen; Doolaege, Evelyne H A; Deman, Steven; Vossen, Els; De Smet, Stefaan

    2015-03-01

    Carnosic acid, quercetin and α-tocopherol are well-known antioxidants in many biological systems. However, their antioxidative effect during food digestion against lipid and protein oxidation is not well known. Therefore, in this study, an in vitro simulated gastric digestion model was used to investigate their stability during gastrointestinal conditions and their antioxidative properties during low pH digestion. In general, the stability of the antioxidants in the different steps of digestion was in the order of α-tocopherol > quercetin > carnosic acid. Salivary components, as well as the acidity of the gastric juice, were responsible for the reduction in antioxidants. Both α-tocopherol and quercetin were able to lower lipid oxidation during digestion, while the effect on protein oxidation was not clear. In contrast, carnosic acid did not have any effect on lipid oxidation and tended to stimulate protein oxidation. This study clearly demonstrated that the environmental conditions are of major importance to the properties of antioxidant compounds.

  15. Urinary loss of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates as revealed by metabolomics studies: an underlying mechanism to reduce lipid accretion by whey protein ingestion?

    PubMed

    Lillefosse, Haldis H; Clausen, Morten R; Yde, Christian C; Ditlev, Ditte B; Zhang, Xumin; Du, Zhen-Yu; Bertram, Hanne C; Madsen, Lise; Kristiansen, Karsten; Liaset, Bjørn

    2014-05-02

    Whey protein intake is associated with the modulation of energy metabolism and altered body composition both in human subjects and in animals, but the underlying mechanisms are not yet elucidated. We fed obesity-prone C57BL/6J mice high-fat diets with either casein (HF casein) or whey (HF whey) for 6 weeks. At equal energy intake and apparent fat and nitrogen digestibility, mice fed HF whey stored less energy as lipids, evident both as lower white adipose tissue mass and as reduced liver lipids, compared with HF-casein-fed mice. Explorative analyses of 48 h urine, both by (1)H NMR and LC-MS metabolomic platforms, demonstrated higher urinary excretion of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates citric acid and succinic acid (identified by both platforms), and cis-aconitic acid and isocitric acid (identified by LC-MS platform) in the HF whey, relative to in the HF-casein-fed mice. Targeted LC-MS analyses revealed higher citric acid and cis-aconitic acid concentrations in fed state plasma, but not in liver of HF-whey-fed mice. We propose that enhanced urinary loss of TCA cycle metabolites drain available substrates for anabolic processes, such as lipogenesis, thereby leading to reduced lipid accretion in HF-whey-fed compared to HF-casein-fed mice.

  16. Influence of the dietary protein:lipid ratio and fish oil substitution on fatty acid composition and metabolism of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) reared at high water temperatures.

    PubMed

    Karalazos, Vasileios; Bendiksen, Eldar Å; Dick, James R; Tocher, Douglas R; Bell, John Gordon

    2011-04-01

    A factorial, two-way, experimental design was used for this 10-week nutritional trial, aiming to elucidate the interactive effects of decreasing dietary protein:lipid level and substitution of fish oil (FO) with rapeseed oil (RO) on tissue fatty acid (FA) composition and metabolism of large Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) reared at high water temperatures (sub-optimal, summer temperatures: 11·6°C). The six experimental diets were isoenergetic and formulated to include either FO or RO (60 % of the added oil) at three dietary protein:lipid levels, specifically (1) 350 g/kg protein and 350 g/kg lipid, (2) 330 g/kg protein and 360 g/kg lipid, (3) 290 g/kg protein and 380 g/kg lipid. Final weight, specific growth rate and thermal growth coefficient were positively affected by the dietary RO inclusion at the expense of FO, while no significant effects were seen on growth due to the decreasing protein level. The oil source had a significant effect on muscle and liver FA composition. However, the changes in muscle and liver FA indicate selective utilisation or retention of individual FA and moderate reductions in tissue EPA and DHA. Pyloric caeca phospholipid FA composition was significantly affected by the two factors and, in some cases, significant interactions were also revealed. Liver and red muscle β-oxidation capacities were significantly increased due to RO inclusion, while an interactive effect of protein level and oil source was shown for white muscle β-oxidation capacity. The results could explain, at least partially, the better performance that was shown for the RO groups and the enhanced protein-sparing effect.

  17. Lipid metabolism in response to individual short chain fatty acids during mixotrophic mode of microalgal cultivation: Influence on biodiesel saturation and protein profile.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Rashmi; Arora, Somya; Rohit, M V; Venkata Mohan, S

    2015-01-01

    Critical influence of different short chain fatty acids as organic carbon source, during growth (GP) and nutrient stress lipogenic phase (NSLP) was investigated on biomass and lipid productivity, in mixotrophic fed-batch microalgae cultivation. Nutrient deprivation induced physiological stress stimulated highest lipid productivity with acetate (total/neutral lipids, 35/17) with saturation index of 80.53% by the end of NSLP followed by butyrate (12/7%; 78%). Biomass growth followed the order of acetate (2.23 g/l) >butyrate (0.99 g/l) >propionate (0.77 g/l). VFA removal (as COD) was maximum with acetate (87%) followed by butyrate (55.09%) and propionate (10.60%). Palmitic acid was the most dominant fatty acid found in the fatty acid composition of all variants and butyrate fed system yielded a maximum of 44% palmitic acid. Protein profiling illustrated prominence of acetyl CoA-synthetase activity in acetate system. Thus, fatty acids provide a promising alternative feedstock for biodiesel production with integrated microalgae-biorefinery.

  18. Low-ω3 Fatty Acid and Soy Protein Attenuate Alcohol-Induced Fatty Liver and Injury by Regulating the Opposing Lipid Oxidation and Lipogenic Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Gordillo, Karina; Shah, Ruchi; Varatharajalu, Ravi; Garige, Mamatha; Leckey, Leslie C.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic ethanol-induced downregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC1α) and upregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-beta (PGC1β) affect hepatic lipid oxidation and lipogenesis, respectively, leading to fatty liver injury. Low-ω3 fatty acid (Low-ω3FA) that primarily regulates PGC1α and soy protein (SP) that seems to have its major regulatory effect on PGC1β were evaluated for their protective effects against ethanol-induced hepatosteatosis in rats fed with Lieber-deCarli control or ethanol liquid diets with high or low ω3FA fish oil and soy protein. Low-ω3FA and SP opposed the actions of chronic ethanol by reducing serum and liver lipids with concomitant decreased fatty liver. They also prevented the downregulation of hepatic Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and PGC1α and their target fatty acid oxidation pathway genes and attenuated the upregulation of hepatic PGC1β and sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP1c) and their target lipogenic pathway genes via the phosphorylation of 5′ adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Thus, these two novel modulators attenuate ethanol-induced hepatosteatosis and consequent liver injury potentially by regulating the two opposing lipid oxidation and lipogenic pathways. PMID:28074114

  19. Low-ω3 Fatty Acid and Soy Protein Attenuate Alcohol-Induced Fatty Liver and Injury by Regulating the Opposing Lipid Oxidation and Lipogenic Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Gordillo, Karina; Shah, Ruchi; Varatharajalu, Ravi; Garige, Mamatha; Leckey, Leslie C; Lakshman, M Raj

    2016-01-01

    Chronic ethanol-induced downregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC1α) and upregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-beta (PGC1β) affect hepatic lipid oxidation and lipogenesis, respectively, leading to fatty liver injury. Low-ω3 fatty acid (Low-ω3FA) that primarily regulates PGC1α and soy protein (SP) that seems to have its major regulatory effect on PGC1β were evaluated for their protective effects against ethanol-induced hepatosteatosis in rats fed with Lieber-deCarli control or ethanol liquid diets with high or low ω3FA fish oil and soy protein. Low-ω3FA and SP opposed the actions of chronic ethanol by reducing serum and liver lipids with concomitant decreased fatty liver. They also prevented the downregulation of hepatic Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and PGC1α and their target fatty acid oxidation pathway genes and attenuated the upregulation of hepatic PGC1β and sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP1c) and their target lipogenic pathway genes via the phosphorylation of 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Thus, these two novel modulators attenuate ethanol-induced hepatosteatosis and consequent liver injury potentially by regulating the two opposing lipid oxidation and lipogenic pathways.

  20. p-Coumaric acid modulates glucose and lipid metabolism via AMP-activated protein kinase in L6 skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Seon-A; Kang, Seong-Il; Shin, Hye-Sun; Kang, Seung-Woo; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Ko, Hee-Chul; Kim, Se-Jae

    2013-03-22

    p-Coumaric acid (3-[4-hydroxyphenyl]-2-propenoic acid) is a ubiquitous plant metabolite with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties. In this study, we examined whether p-coumaric acid modulates glucose and lipid metabolism via AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in L6 skeletal muscle cells. p-Coumaric acid increased the phosphorylation of AMPK in a dose-dependent manner in differentiated L6 skeletal muscle cells. It also increased the phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and the expression of CPT-1 mRNA and PPARα, suggesting that it promotes the β-oxidation of fatty acids. Also, it suppressed oleic acid-induced triglyceride accumulation, and enhanced 2-NBDG uptake in differentiated L6 muscle cells. Pretreatment with compound C inhibited AMPK activation, reduced ACC phosphorylation and 2-NBDG uptake, and increased triglyceride accumulation. However, p-coumaric acid counterbalanced the inhibitory effects of compound C. Taken together, these results suggest that p-coumaric acid modulates glucose and lipid metabolism via AMPK activation in L6 skeletal muscle cells and that it has potentially beneficial effects in improving or treating metabolic disorders.

  1. Identification of lipids and lipid-binding proteins in phloem exudates from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Guelette, Brandon S; Benning, Urs F; Hoffmann-Benning, Susanne

    2012-06-01

    The phloem plays a crucial role in assimilate and nutrient transport, pathogen response, and plant growth and development. Yet, few species have yielded pure phloem exudate and, if proteins need to be analysed, those species may not have sequenced genomes, making identification difficult. The enrichment of Arabidopsis thaliana phloem exudate in amounts large enough to allow for metabolite and protein analysis is described. Using this method, it was possible to identify 65 proteins present in the Arabidopsis phloem exudate. The majority of these proteins could be grouped by response to pathogens, stress, or hormones, carbon metabolism, protein interaction, modification, and turnover, and transcription factors. It was also possible to detect 11 proteins that play a role in lipid/fatty acid metabolism (aspartic protease, putative 3-β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, UDP-sulphoquinovose synthase/SQD1, lipase, PIG-P-like protein: phosphatidylinositol-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase), storage (glycine-rich protein), binding (annexin, lipid-associated family protein, GRP17/oleosin), and/or signalling (annexin, putative lipase, PIG-P-like protein). Along with putative lipid-binding proteins, several lipids and fatty acids could be identified. Only a few examples exist of lipids (jasmonic acid, oxylipins) or lipid-binding proteins (DIR1, acyl-CoA-binding protein) in the phloem. Finding hydrophobic compounds in an aqueous environment is not without precedence in biological systems: human blood contains a variety of lipids, many of which play a significant role in human health. In blood, lipids are transported while bound to proteins. The present findings of lipids and lipid-binding proteins in phloem exudates suggest that a similar long-distance lipid signalling exists in plants and may play an important role in plant growth and development.

  2. Study of the effects of salicylic acid on soybean mitochondrial lipids and respiratory properties using the alternative oxidase as a stress-reporter protein.

    PubMed

    Matos, Ana Rita; Mendes, Ana Teresa; Scotti-Campos, Paula; Arrabaça, João Daniel

    2009-12-01

    Biotic and abiotic stresses can lead to modifications in the lipid composition of cell membranes. Although mitochondria appear to be implicated in stress responses, little is known about the membrane lipid changes that occur in these organelles in plants. Besides cytochrome c oxidase, plant mitochondria have an alternative oxidase (AOX) that accepts electrons directly from ubiquinol, dissipating energy as heat. AOX upregulation occurs under a variety of stresses and its induction by salicylic acid (SA) has been observed in different plant species. AOX was also suggested to be used as a functional marker for cell reprogramming under stress. In the present study, we have used etiolated soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr. cv Cresir) seedlings to study the effects of SA treatment on the lipid composition and the respiratory properties of hypocotyl mitochondria. AOX expression was studied in detail, as a reporter protein, to evaluate whether modifications in mitochondrial energy metabolism were occurring. In mitochondria extracted from SA-treated seedlings, AOX capacity and protein contents increased. Both AOX1 and AOX2b transcripts accumulated in response to SA, but with different kinetics. A reduction in external NADH oxidation capacity was observed, whereas succinate respiration remained unchanged. The phospholipid composition of mitochondria remained similar in control and SA-treated plants, but a reduction in the relative amount of linolenic acid was observed in phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and cardiolipin. The possible causes of the fatty acid modifications observed, and the implications for mitochondrial metabolism are discussed.

  3. [Lipid synthesis by an acidic acid tolerant Rhodotorula glutinis].

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhangnan; Liu, Hongjuan; Zhang, Jian'an; Wang, Gehua

    2016-03-01

    Acetic acid, as a main by-product generated in the pretreatment process of lignocellulose hydrolysis, significantly affects cell growth and lipid synthesis of oleaginous microorganisms. Therefore, we studied the tolerance of Rhodotorula glutinis to acetic acid and its lipid synthesis from substrate containing acetic acid. In the mixed sugar medium containing 6 g/L glucose and 44 g/L xylose, and supplemented with acetic acid, the cell growth was not:inhibited when the acetic acid concentration was below 10 g/L. Compared with the control, the biomass, lipid concentration and lipid content of R. glutinis increased 21.5%, 171% and 122% respectively when acetic acid concentration was 10 g/L. Furthermore, R. glutinis could accumulate lipid with acetate as the sole carbon source. Lipid concentration and lipid yield reached 3.20 g/L and 13% respectively with the initial acetic acid concentration of 25 g/L. The lipid composition was analyzed by gas chromatograph. The main composition of lipid produced with acetic acid was palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and linolenic acid, including 40.9% saturated fatty acids and 59.1% unsaturated fatty acids. The lipid composition was similar to that of plant oil, indicating that lipid from oleaginous yeast R. glutinis had potential as the feedstock of biodiesel production. These results demonstrated that a certain concentration of acetic acid need not to be removed in the detoxification process when using lignocelluloses hydrolysate to produce microbial lipid by R. glutinis.

  4. Lactation Affects Isolated Mitochondria and Its Fatty Acid Composition but Has No Effect on Tissue Protein Oxidation, Lipid Peroxidation or DNA-Damage in Laboratory Mice

    PubMed Central

    Valencak, Teresa G.; Raith, Johannes; Staniek, Katrin; Gille, Lars; Strasser, Alois

    2016-01-01

    Linking peak energy metabolism to lifespan and aging remains a major question especially when focusing on lactation in females. We studied, if and how lactation affects in vitro mitochondrial oxygen consumption and mitochondrial fatty acid composition. In addition, we assessed DNA damage, lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyls to extrapolate on oxidative stress in mothers. As model system we used C57BL/6NCrl mice and exposed lactating females to two ambient temperatures (15 °C and 22 °C) while they nursed their offspring until weaning. We found that state II and state IV respiration rates of liver mitochondria were significantly higher in the lactating animals than in non-lactating mice. Fatty acid composition of isolated liver and heart mitochondria differed between lactating and non-lactating mice with higher n-6, and lower n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the lactating females. Surprisingly, lactation did not affect protein carbonyls, lipid peroxidation and DNA damage, nor did moderate cold exposure of 15 °C. We conclude that lactation increases rates of mitochondrial uncoupling and alters mitochondrial fatty acid composition thus supporting the “uncoupling to survive” hypothesis. Regarding oxidative stress, we found no impact of lactation and lower ambient temperature and contribute to growing evidence that there is no linear relationship between oxidative damage and lactation. PMID:26805895

  5. Leucine-enriched protein feeding does not impair exercise-induced free fatty acid availability and lipid oxidation: beneficial implications for training in carbohydrate-restricted states.

    PubMed

    Impey, Samuel G; Smith, Dominic; Robinson, Amy L; Owens, Daniel J; Bartlett, Jonathan D; Smith, Kenneth; Limb, Marie; Tang, Jonathan; Fraser, William D; Close, Graeme L; Morton, James P

    2015-02-01

    Given that the enhanced oxidative adaptations observed when training in carbohydrate (CHO)-restricted states is potentially regulated through free fatty acid (FFA)-mediated signalling and that leucine-rich protein elevates muscle protein synthesis, the present study aimed to test the hypothesis that leucine-enriched protein feeding enhances circulating leucine concentration but does not impair FFA availability or whole body lipid oxidation during exercise. Nine males cycled for 2 h at 70% VO2peak when fasted (PLACEBO) or having consumed a whey protein solution (WHEY) or a leucine-enriched whey protein gel (GEL), administered as 22 g 1 h pre-exercise, 11 g/h during and 22 g 30 min post-exercise. Total leucine administration was 14.4 g and 6.3 in GEL and WHEY, respectively. Mean plasma leucine concentrations were elevated in GEL (P = 0.001) compared with WHEY and PLACEBO (375 ± 100, 272 ± 51, 146 ± 14 µmol L(-1), respectively). No differences (P = 0.153) in plasma FFA (WHEY 0.53 ± 0.30, GEL 0.45 ± 0.25, PLACEBO 0.65 ± 0.30, mmol L(-1)) or whole body lipid oxidation during exercise (WHEY 0.37 ± 0.26, GEL 0.36 ± 0.24, PLACEBO 0.34 ± 0.24 g/min) were apparent between trials, despite elevated (P = 0.001) insulin in WHEY and GEL compared with PLACEBO (38 ± 16, 35 ± 16, 22 ± 11 pmol L(-1), respectively). We conclude that leucine-enriched protein feeding does not impair FFA availability or whole body lipid oxidation during exercise, thus having practical applications for athletes who deliberately train in CHO-restricted states to promote skeletal muscle adaptations.

  6. The Ileal Lipid Binding Protein Is Required for Efficient Absorption and Transport of Bile Acids in the Distal Portion of the Murine Small Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Praslickova, Dana; Torchia, Enrique C.; Sugiyama, Michael G.; Magrane, Elijah J.; Zwicker, Brittnee L.; Kolodzieyski, Lev; Agellon, Luis B.

    2012-01-01

    The ileal lipid binding protein (ilbp) is a cytoplasmic protein that binds bile acids with high affinity. However evidence demonstrating the role of this protein in bile acid transport and homeostasis is missing. We created a mouse strain lacking ilbp (Fabp6−/− mice) and assessed the impact of ilbp deficiency on bile acid homeostasis and transport in vivo. Elimination of ilbp increased fecal bile acid excretion (54.2%, P<0.05) in female but not male Fabp6−/− mice. The activity of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (cyp7a1), the rate-controlling enzyme of the classical bile acid biosynthetic pathway, was significantly increased in female (63.5%, P<0.05) but not in male Fabp6−/− mice. The amount of [3H]taurocholic acid (TCA) excreted by 24 h after oral administration was 102% (P<0.025) higher for female Fabp6−/− mice whereas it was 57.3% (P<0.01) lower for male Fabp6−/− mice, compared to wild-type mice. The retained fraction of the [3H]TCA localized in the small and large intestines was increased by 22% (P<0.02) and decreased by 62.7% (P<0.01), respectively, in male Fabp6−/− mice relative wild-type mice, whereas no changes were seen in female Fabp6−/− mice. Mucosal to serosal bile acid transport using everted distal gut sacs was decreased by 74% (P<0.03) in both sexes of Fabp6−/− mice as compared to wild-type mice. The results demonstrate that ilbp is involved in the apical to basolateral transport of bile acids in ileal enterocytes, and is vital for the maintenance of bile acid homeostasis in the enterohepatic circulation (EHC) in mice. PMID:23251388

  7. Comparison of the Folding Mechanism of Highly Homologous Proteins in the Lipid-binding Protein Family

    EPA Science Inventory

    The folding mechanism of two closely related proteins in the intracellular lipid binding protein family, human bile acid binding protein (hBABP) and rat bile acid binding protein (rBABP) were examined. These proteins are 77% identical (93% similar) in sequence Both of these singl...

  8. Fatty Acid-binding Proteins Interact with Comparative Gene Identification-58 Linking Lipolysis with Lipid Ligand Shuttling*

    PubMed Central

    Hofer, Peter; Boeszoermenyi, Andras; Jaeger, Doris; Feiler, Ursula; Arthanari, Haribabu; Mayer, Nicole; Zehender, Fabian; Rechberger, Gerald; Oberer, Monika; Zimmermann, Robert; Lass, Achim; Haemmerle, Guenter; Breinbauer, Rolf; Zechner, Rudolf; Preiss-Landl, Karina

    2015-01-01

    The coordinated breakdown of intracellular triglyceride (TG) stores requires the exquisitely regulated interaction of lipolytic enzymes with regulatory, accessory, and scaffolding proteins. Together they form a dynamic multiprotein network designated as the “lipolysome.” Adipose triglyceride lipase (Atgl) catalyzes the initiating step of TG hydrolysis and requires comparative gene identification-58 (Cgi-58) as a potent activator of enzyme activity. Here, we identify adipocyte-type fatty acid-binding protein (A-Fabp) and other members of the fatty acid-binding protein (Fabp) family as interaction partners of Cgi-58. Co-immunoprecipitation, microscale thermophoresis, and solid phase assays proved direct protein/protein interaction between A-Fabp and Cgi-58. Using nuclear magnetic resonance titration experiments and site-directed mutagenesis, we located a potential contact region on A-Fabp. In functional terms, A-Fabp stimulates Atgl-catalyzed TG hydrolysis in a Cgi-58-dependent manner. Additionally, transcriptional transactivation assays with a luciferase reporter system revealed that Fabps enhance the ability of Atgl/Cgi-58-mediated lipolysis to induce the activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors. Our studies identify Fabps as crucial structural and functional components of the lipolysome. PMID:25953897

  9. Introduction to fatty acids and lipids.

    PubMed

    Burdge, Graham C; Calder, Philip C

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the structure, function and metabolism of fatty acids and lipids that are of particular importance in the context of parenteral nutrition. Lipids are a heterogeneous group of molecules that share the common property of hydrophobicity. Lipids range in structure from simple short hydrocarbon chains to more complex molecules, including triacylglycerols, phospholipids and sterols and their esters. Lipids within each class may differ structurally. Fatty acids are common components of complex lipids, and these differ according to chain length and the presence, number and position of double bonds in the hydrocarbon chain. Structural variation among complex lipids and among fatty acids gives rise to functional differences that result in different impacts upon metabolism and upon cell and tissue responses. Fatty acids and complex lipids exhibit a variety of structural variations that influence their metabolism and their functional effects.

  10. Adipocyte Fatty Acid Binding Protein Potentiates Toxic Lipids-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Macrophages via Inhibition of Janus Kinase 2-dependent Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Hoo, Ruby L. C.; Shu, Lingling; Cheng, Kenneth K. Y.; Wu, Xiaoping; Liao, Boya; Wu, Donghai; Zhou, Zhiguang; Xu, Aimin

    2017-01-01

    Lipotoxicity is implicated in the pathogenesis of obesity-related inflammatory complications by promoting macrophage infiltration and activation. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (A-FABP) play key roles in obesity and mediate inflammatory activity through similar signaling pathways. However, little is known about their interplay in lipid-induced inflammatory responses. Here, we showed that prolonged treatment of palmitic acid (PA) increased ER stress and expression of A-FABP, which was accompanied by reduced autophagic flux in macrophages. Over-expression of A-FABP impaired PA-induced autophagy associating with enhanced ER stress and pro-inflammatory cytokine production, while genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of A-FABP reversed the conditions. PA-induced expression of autophagy-related protein (Atg)7 was attenuated in A-FABP over-expressed macrophages, but was elevated in A-FABP-deficient macrophages. Mechanistically, A-FABP potentiated the effects of PA by inhibition of Janus Kinase (JAK)2 activity, thus diminished PA-induced Atg7 expression contributing to impaired autophagy and further augmentation of ER stress. These findings suggest that A-FABP acts as autophagy inhibitor to instigate toxic lipids-induced ER stress through inhibition of JAK2-dependent autophagy, which in turn triggers inflammatory responses in macrophages. A-FABP-JAK2 axis may represent an important pathological pathway contributing to obesity-related inflammatory diseases. PMID:28094778

  11. Raman spectroscopic studies of dimyristoylphosphatidic acid and its interactions with ferricytochrome c in cationic binary and ternary lipid-protein complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, J. S.; Levin, I. W.

    1991-01-01

    The vibrational Raman spectra of both pure 1-alpha-dimyristoylphosphatidic acid (DMPA) liposomes and DMPA multilayers reconstituted with ferricytochrome c at pH 7 and pH 4, with either sodium or calcium as the cation, are reported as a function of temperature. Multilayers composed of a 1:1 mol ratio DMPA and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine with perdeuterated acyl chains (DMPC-d54) have also been reconstituted with approximately 10(-4) M ferricytochrome c for Raman spectroscopic observation. Total integrated band intensities and relative peak height intensity ratios, two spectral Raman scattering parameters used to characterize bilayer properties, are sensitive to the presence of both ferricytochrome c and the cation in the reconstituted liposomes. Temperature profiles, derived from the various Raman intensity parameters for the 3,100-2,800 cm-1 lipid acyl chain C-H stretching mode region specifically reflect bilayer perturbations due to the interactions of ferricytochrome c. At pH 4 the calcium DMPA multilamellar gel to liquid crystalline phase transition temperatures Tm, defined by either the C-H stretching mode I2850/I2880 and I2935/I2880 peak height intensity ratios, are 58.5 +/- 0.5 degrees C and 60.0 +/- 0.3 degrees C, respectively. This difference in Tm's resolves the phase transition process into first an expansion of the lipid lattice and then a melting of the lipid acyl chains. At pH 7 the calcium DMPA liposomes show no distinct phase transition characteristics below 75 degrees C. For sodium DMPA liposomes reconstituted with ferricytochrome c at either pH 4.0 or pH 7.0, spontaneous Raman spectra show altered lipid structures at temperatures above 40 degrees C. Resonance Raman spectra indicate that ferricytochrome c reconstituted in either calcium or sodium DMPA liposomes changes irreversibly above Tm. For either the binary lipid or ternary lipid-protein systems reconstituted with DMPC-d54, linewidth parameters of the DMPC-d54 acyl chain CD2 symmetric

  12. Lipids, fatty acids, and more

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Energy is the most expensive component in livestock diets. Lipids are concentrated energy sources and are known to affect growth, feed efficiency, feed dust, and diet palatability. A large majority of research evaluating lipids in livestock has utilized lipids of high quality, dealt mainly with anim...

  13. The effect of membrane fluidization on protein kinase C: Inhibition by ethanol and higher alcohols and stimulation by increased lipid unsaturation or addition non-esterified fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, K.J.A.; Rubin, E.; Stubbs, C.D. )

    1992-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is a membrane bound enzyme that is dependent on calcium, anionic phospholipids, and sn-1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG) to be fully active. The relationship between membrane fluidity and PKC activity was investigated using model vesicle systems composed of phosphatidylserine alone or in combination with phosphatidylcholine. Effects on membrane fluidity were assessed using the fluorescence anisotropy of diphenylhexatriene. When membrane fluidity was increased by the addition of short chain n-alkanols, PKC activity was inhibited. There was a linear relationship for a given level of inhibition and the membrane-buffer partition coefficient. By contrast, when the degree of unsaturation in the phosphatidylcholine was increased, although the bilayer was again fluidized, PKC activity was enhanced. The addition of non-esterified fatty acid also activated PKC, either when directly added to the vesicles or when generated by the addition of exogenous phospholipase A[sub 2], and again the bilayer was fluidized. It is proposed that a more fluid membrane lipid bilayer, induced by increased unsaturation or non-esterified fatty acids, facilitated optimal interaction at the DAG site since the effect could be demonstrated in a lipid free system using protamine sulfate.

  14. Fatty Acids from Membrane Lipids Become Incorporated into Lipid Bodies during Myxococcus xanthus Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Swapna; Boynton, Tye O.; Pham, Dan; Shimkets, Lawrence J.

    2014-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus responds to amino acid limitation by producing fruiting bodies containing dormant spores. During development, cells produce triacylglycerides in lipid bodies that become consumed during spore maturation. As the cells are starved to induce development, the production of triglycerides represents a counterintuitive metabolic switch. In this paper, lipid bodies were quantified in wild-type strain DK1622 and 33 developmental mutants at the cellular level by measuring the cross sectional area of the cell stained with the lipophilic dye Nile red. We provide five lines of evidence that triacylglycerides are derived from membrane phospholipids as cells shorten in length and then differentiate into myxospores. First, in wild type cells, lipid bodies appear early in development and their size increases concurrent with an 87% decline in membrane surface area. Second, developmental mutants blocked at different stages of shortening and differentiation accumulated lipid bodies proportionate with their cell length with a Pearson's correlation coefficient of 0.76. Third, peripheral rods, developing cells that do not produce lipid bodies, fail to shorten. Fourth, genes for fatty acid synthesis are down-regulated while genes for fatty acid degradation are up regulated. Finally, direct movement of fatty acids from membrane lipids in growing cells to lipid bodies in developing cells was observed by pulse labeling cells with palmitate. Recycling of lipids released by Programmed Cell Death appears not to be necessary for lipid body production as a fadL mutant was defective in fatty acid uptake but proficient in lipid body production. The lipid body regulon involves many developmental genes that are not specifically involved in fatty acid synthesis or degradation. MazF RNA interferase and its target, enhancer-binding protein Nla6, appear to negatively regulate cell shortening and TAG accumulation whereas most cell-cell signals activate these processes. PMID:24906161

  15. Thermosensing via transmembrane protein-lipid interactions.

    PubMed

    Saita, Emilio A; de Mendoza, Diego

    2015-09-01

    Cell membranes are composed of a lipid bilayer containing proteins that cross and/or interact with lipids on either side of the two leaflets. The basic structure of cell membranes is this bilayer, composed of two opposing lipid monolayers with fascinating properties designed to perform all the functions the cell requires. To coordinate these functions, lipid composition of cellular membranes is tailored to suit their specialized tasks. In this review, we describe the general mechanisms of membrane-protein interactions and relate them to some of the molecular strategies organisms use to adjust the membrane lipid composition in response to a decrease in environmental temperature. While the activities of all biomolecules are altered as a function of temperature, the thermosensors we focus on here are molecules whose temperature sensitivity appears to be linked to changes in the biophysical properties of membrane lipids. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid-protein interactions.

  16. Crystallizing Membrane Proteins in Lipidic Mesophases. A Host Lipid Screen

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dianfan; Lee, Jean; Caffrey, Martin

    2011-11-30

    The default lipid for the bulk of the crystallogenesis studies performed to date using the cubic mesophase method is monoolein. There is no good reason, however, why this 18-carbon, cis-monounsaturated monoacylglycerol should be the preferred lipid for all target membrane proteins. The latter come from an array of biomembrane types with varying properties that include hydrophobic thickness, intrinsic curvature, lateral pressure profile, lipid and protein makeup, and compositional asymmetry. Thus, it seems reasonable that screening for crystallizability based on the identity of the lipid creating the hosting mesophase would be worthwhile. For this, monoacylglycerols with differing acyl chain characteristics, such as length and olefinic bond position, must be available. A lipid synthesis and purification program is in place in the author's laboratory to serve this need. In the current study with the outer membrane sugar transporter, OprB, we demonstrate the utility of host lipid screening as a means for generating diffraction-quality crystals. Host lipid screening is likely to prove a generally useful strategy for mesophase-based crystallization of membrane proteins.

  17. Membrane protein simulations with a united-atom lipid and all-atom protein model: lipid protein interactions, side chain transfer free energies and model proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tieleman, D. Peter; MacCallum, Justin L.; Ash, Walter L.; Kandt, Christian; Xu, Zhitao; Monticelli, Luca

    2006-07-01

    We have reparameterized the dihedral parameters in a commonly used united-atom lipid force field so that they can be used with the all-atom OPLS force field for proteins implemented in the molecular dynamics simulation software GROMACS. Simulations with this new combination give stable trajectories and sensible behaviour of both lipids and protein. We have calculated the free energy of transfer of amino acid side chains between water and 'lipid-cyclohexane', made of lipid force field methylene groups, as a hydrophobic mimic of the membrane interior, for both the OPLS-AA and a modified OPLS-AA force field which gives better hydration free energies under simulation conditions close to those preferred for the lipid force field. The average error is 4.3 kJ mol-1 for water-'lipid-cyclohexane' compared to 3.2 kJ mol-1 for OPLS-AA cyclohexane and 2.4 kJ mol-1 for the modified OPLS-AA water-'lipid-cyclohexane'. We have also investigated the effect of different methods to combine parameters between the united-atom lipid force field and the united-atom protein force field ffgmx. In a widely used combination, the strength of interactions between hydrocarbon lipid tails and proteins is significantly overestimated, causing a decrease in the area per lipid and an increase in lipid ordering. Using straight combination rules improves the results. Combined, we suggest that using OPLS-AA together with the united-atom lipid force field implemented in GROMACS is a reasonable approach to membrane protein simulations. We also suggest that using partial volume information and free energies of transfer may help to improve the parameterization of lipid-protein interactions and point out the need for accurate experimental data to validate and improve force field descriptions of such interactions.

  18. Membrane protein simulations with a united-atom lipid and all-atom protein model: lipid-protein interactions, side chain transfer free energies and model proteins.

    PubMed

    Tieleman, D Peter; Maccallum, Justin L; Ash, Walter L; Kandt, Christian; Xu, Zhitao; Monticelli, Luca

    2006-07-19

    We have reparameterized the dihedral parameters in a commonly used united-atom lipid force field so that they can be used with the all-atom OPLS force field for proteins implemented in the molecular dynamics simulation software GROMACS. Simulations with this new combination give stable trajectories and sensible behaviour of both lipids and protein. We have calculated the free energy of transfer of amino acid side chains between water and 'lipid-cyclohexane', made of lipid force field methylene groups, as a hydrophobic mimic of the membrane interior, for both the OPLS-AA and a modified OPLS-AA force field which gives better hydration free energies under simulation conditions close to those preferred for the lipid force field. The average error is 4.3 kJ mol(-1) for water-'lipid-cyclohexane' compared to 3.2 kJ mol(-1) for OPLS-AA cyclohexane and 2.4 kJ mol(-1) for the modified OPLS-AA water-'lipid-cyclohexane'. We have also investigated the effect of different methods to combine parameters between the united-atom lipid force field and the united-atom protein force field ffgmx. In a widely used combination, the strength of interactions between hydrocarbon lipid tails and proteins is significantly overestimated, causing a decrease in the area per lipid and an increase in lipid ordering. Using straight combination rules improves the results. Combined, we suggest that using OPLS-AA together with the united-atom lipid force field implemented in GROMACS is a reasonable approach to membrane protein simulations. We also suggest that using partial volume information and free energies of transfer may help to improve the parameterization of lipid-protein interactions and point out the need for accurate experimental data to validate and improve force field descriptions of such interactions.

  19. Salt modulates the stability and lipid binding affinity of the adipocyte lipid-binding proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeffler, Allyn J.; Ruiz, Carmen R.; Joubert, Allison M.; Yang, Xuemei; LiCata, Vince J.

    2003-01-01

    Adipocyte lipid-binding protein (ALBP or aP2) is an intracellular fatty acid-binding protein that is found in adipocytes and macrophages and binds a large variety of intracellular lipids with high affinity. Although intracellular lipids are frequently charged, biochemical studies of lipid-binding proteins and their interactions often focus most heavily on the hydrophobic aspects of these proteins and their interactions. In this study, we have characterized the effects of KCl on the stability and lipid binding properties of ALBP. We find that added salt dramatically stabilizes ALBP, increasing its Delta G of unfolding by 3-5 kcal/mol. At 37 degrees C salt can more than double the stability of the protein. At the same time, salt inhibits the binding of the fluorescent lipid 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (ANS) to the protein and induces direct displacement of the lipid from the protein. Thermodynamic linkage analysis of the salt inhibition of ANS binding shows a nearly 1:1 reciprocal linkage: i.e. one ion is released from ALBP when ANS binds, and vice versa. Kinetic experiments show that salt reduces the rate of association between ANS and ALBP while simultaneously increasing the dissociation rate of ANS from the protein. We depict and discuss the thermodynamic linkages among stability, lipid binding, and salt effects for ALBP, including the use of these linkages to calculate the affinity of ANS for the denatured state of ALBP and its dependence on salt concentration. We also discuss the potential molecular origins and potential intracellular consequences of the demonstrated salt linkages to stability and lipid binding in ALBP.

  20. Fatty acid binding protein 3 (fabp3) is associated with insulin, lipids and cardiovascular phenotypes of the metabolic syndrome through epigenetic modifications in a northern european family population

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) play regulatory roles at the nexus of lipid metabolism and signaling. Dyslipidemia in clinical manifestation frequently co-occurs with obesity, insulin resistance and hypertension in the Metabolic Syndrome (MetS). Animal studies have suggested FABPs play regulatory roles in expressing MetS phenotypes. In our family cohort of Northern European descent, transcript levels in peripheral white blood cells (PWBCs) of a key FABPs, FABP3, is correlated with the MetS leading components. However, evidence supporting the functions of FABPs in humans using genetic approaches has been scarce, suggesting FABPs may be under epigenetic regulation. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that CpG methylation status of a key regulator of lipid homeostasis, FABP3, is a quantitative trait associated with status of MetS phenotypes in humans. Methods We used a mass-spec based quantitative method, EpiTYPER®, to profile a CpG island that extends from the promoter to the first exon of the FABP3 gene in our family-based cohort of Northern European descent (n=517). We then conducted statistical analysis of the quantitative relationship of CpG methylation and MetS measures following the variance-component association model. Heritability of each methylation and the effect of age and sex on CpG methylation were also assessed in our families. Results We find that methylation levels of individual CpG units and the regional average are heritable and significantly influenced by age and sex. Regional methylation was strongly associated with plasma total cholesterol (p=0.00028) and suggestively associated with LDL-cholesterol (p=0.00495). Methylation at individual units was significantly associated with insulin sensitivity, lipid particle sizing and diastolic blood pressure (p<0.0028, corrected for multiple testing for each trait). Peripheral white blood cell (PWBC) expression of FABP3 in a separate group of subjects (n=128) negatively

  1. Effects of Tannic Acid on Lipid and Protein Oxidation, Color, and Volatiles of Raw and Cooked Chicken Breast Meat during Storage.

    PubMed

    Al-Hijazeen, Marwan; Lee, Eun Joo; Mendonca, Aubrey; Ahn, Dong Uk

    2016-06-13

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of tannic acid (TA) on the oxidative stability and the quality characteristics of ground chicken breast meat. Five treatments including (1) control (none added), (2) 2.5 ppm TA, (3) 5 ppm TA, (4) 10 ppm TA, and (5) 5 ppm butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) were added to boneless, skinless ground chicken breast meat, and used for both raw and cooked meat studies. For the raw meat study, the ground chicken breast meat was packaged in oxygen-permeable bags and stored at 4 °C for 7 days. For the cooked study, raw ground meat samples were vacuum-packaged in oxygen-impermeable vacuum bags, cooked in-bag to the internal temperature of 75 °C, re-packaged in oxygen-permeable bags, and then stored. Both raw and cooked meats were analyzed for lipid and protein oxidation, color, and volatiles (cooked meat only) at 0, 3, and 7 days of storage. Raw meats with 10 ppm of TA added had significantly (p ≤ 0.05) lower lipid and protein oxidation than other treatments during storage. In addition, TA at 10 ppm level maintained the highest color a*- and L*-values during storage. Cooked chicken breast meat with 5 and 10 ppm TA added produced significantly (p ≤ 0.05) lower amounts of off-odor volatiles than other treatments. Among the volatile compounds, the amount of hexanal increased rapidly during storage for cooked meat. However, meats with 5 and 10 ppm TA added showed the lowest amount of hexanal and other aldehydes related to lipid oxidation, indicating a strong antioxidant effect of TA in cooked chicken breast meat. Furthermore, the differences in aldehydes among the treatments were bigger in cooked than in raw meat, indicating that the antioxidant effect of TA in cooked meat was greater than that in raw meat. Therefore, TA at >5 ppm can be used as a good natural preservative in cooked chicken meat to maintain its quality during storage.

  2. Effects of Tannic Acid on Lipid and Protein Oxidation, Color, and Volatiles of Raw and Cooked Chicken Breast Meat during Storage

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hijazeen, Marwan; Lee, Eun Joo; Mendonca, Aubrey; Ahn, Dong Uk

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of tannic acid (TA) on the oxidative stability and the quality characteristics of ground chicken breast meat. Five treatments including (1) control (none added), (2) 2.5 ppm TA, (3) 5 ppm TA, (4) 10 ppm TA, and (5) 5 ppm butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) were added to boneless, skinless ground chicken breast meat, and used for both raw and cooked meat studies. For the raw meat study, the ground chicken breast meat was packaged in oxygen-permeable bags and stored at 4 °C for 7 days. For the cooked study, raw ground meat samples were vacuum-packaged in oxygen-impermeable vacuum bags, cooked in-bag to the internal temperature of 75 °C, re-packaged in oxygen-permeable bags, and then stored. Both raw and cooked meats were analyzed for lipid and protein oxidation, color, and volatiles (cooked meat only) at 0, 3, and 7 days of storage. Raw meats with 10 ppm of TA added had significantly (p ≤ 0.05) lower lipid and protein oxidation than other treatments during storage. In addition, TA at 10 ppm level maintained the highest color a*- and L*-values during storage. Cooked chicken breast meat with 5 and 10 ppm TA added produced significantly (p ≤ 0.05) lower amounts of off-odor volatiles than other treatments. Among the volatile compounds, the amount of hexanal increased rapidly during storage for cooked meat. However, meats with 5 and 10 ppm TA added showed the lowest amount of hexanal and other aldehydes related to lipid oxidation, indicating a strong antioxidant effect of TA in cooked chicken breast meat. Furthermore, the differences in aldehydes among the treatments were bigger in cooked than in raw meat, indicating that the antioxidant effect of TA in cooked meat was greater than that in raw meat. Therefore, TA at >5 ppm can be used as a good natural preservative in cooked chicken meat to maintain its quality during storage. PMID:27304971

  3. Ionic protein-lipid interaction at the plasma membrane: what can the charge do?

    PubMed

    Li, Lunyi; Shi, Xiaoshan; Guo, Xingdong; Li, Hua; Xu, Chenqi

    2014-03-01

    Phospholipids are the major components of cell membranes, but they have functional roles beyond forming lipid bilayers. In particular, acidic phospholipids form microdomains in the plasma membrane and can ionically interact with proteins via polybasic sequences, which can have functional consequences for the protein. The list of proteins regulated by ionic protein-lipid interaction has been quickly expanding, and now includes membrane proteins, cytoplasmic soluble proteins, and viral proteins. Here we review how acidic phospholipids in the plasma membrane regulate protein structure and function via ionic interactions, and how Ca(2+) regulates ionic protein-lipid interactions via direct and indirect mechanisms.

  4. Lipidomic and proteomic analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans lipid droplets and identification of ACS-4 as a lipid droplet-associated protein

    SciTech Connect

    Vrablik, Tracy L.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Larson, Emily M.; Smith, Richard D.; Watts, Jennifer

    2015-06-27

    Lipid droplets are cytoplasmic organelles that store neutral lipids for membrane synthesis and energy reserves. In this study, we characterized the lipid and protein composition of purified C. elegans lipid droplets. These lipid droplets are composed mainly of triacylglycerols, surrounded by a phospholipid monolayer composed primarily of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine. The fatty acid composition of the triacylglycerols was rich in fatty acid species obtained from the dietary E. coli, including cyclopropane fatty acids and cis-vaccenic acid. Unlike other organisms, C. elegans lipid droplets contain very little cholesterol or cholesterol esters. Comparison of the lipid droplet proteomes of wild type and high-fat daf-2 mutant strains shows a relative decrease of MDT-28 abundance in lipid droplets isolated from daf-2 mutants. Functional analysis of lipid droplet proteins identified in our proteomic studies indicated an enrichment of proteins required for growth and fat homeostasis in C. elegans.

  5. Structure of a Specialized Acyl Carrier Protein Essential for Lipid A Biosynthesis with Very Long-chain Fatty Acids in Open and Closed Conformations

    SciTech Connect

    Ramelot, Theresa A.; Rossi, Paolo M.; Forouhar, Farhad; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Yang, Yunhuang; Ni, Shuisong; Unser, Sarah; Lew, Scott; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Xiao, Rong; Acton, Thomas; Everett, John K.; Prestegard, James H.; Hunt, John F.; Montelione, Gaetano; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2012-09-18

    The solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structures and backbone (15)N dynamics of the specialized acyl carrier protein (ACP), RpAcpXL, from Rhodopseudomonas palustris, in both the apo form and holo form modified by covalent attachment of 4'-phosphopantetheine at S37, are virtually identical, monomeric, and correspond to the closed conformation. The structures have an extra α-helix compared to the archetypical ACP from Escherichia coli, which has four helices, resulting in a larger opening to the hydrophobic cavity. Chemical shift differences between apo- and holo-RpAcpXL indicated some differences in the hinge region between α2 and α3 and in the hydrophobic cavity environment, but corresponding changes in nuclear Overhauser effect cross-peak patterns were not detected. In contrast to the NMR structures, apo-RpAcpXL was observed in an open conformation in crystals that diffracted to 2.0 Å resolution, which resulted from movement of α3. On the basis of the crystal structure, the predicted biological assembly is a homodimer. Although the possible biological significance of dimerization is unknown, there is potential that the resulting large shared hydrophobic cavity could accommodate the very long-chain fatty acid (28-30 carbons) that this specialized ACP is known to synthesize and transfer to lipid A. These structures are the first representatives of the AcpXL family and the first to indicate that dimerization may be important for the function of these specialized ACPs.

  6. Renal mass reduction results in accumulation of lipids and dysregulation of lipid regulatory proteins in the remnant kidney.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Ju; Moradi, Hamid; Yuan, Jun; Norris, Keith; Vaziri, Nosratola D

    2009-06-01

    A significant reduction of renal mass results in proteinuria, glomerulosclerosis, and tubulointerstitial injury, culminating in end-stage chronic renal failure (CRF). The accumulation of lipids in the kidney can cause renal disease. Uptake of oxidized lipoproteins via scavenger receptors, reabsorption of filtered protein-bound lipids via the megalin-cubilin complex, and increased glucose load per nephron can promote lipid accumulation in glomerular, tubular, and interstitial cells in CRF. Cellular lipid homeostasis is regulated by lipid influx, synthesis, catabolism, and efflux. We examined lipid-regulatory factors in the remnant kidney of rats 11 wk after nephrectomy (CRF) or sham operation. CRF resulted in azotemia, proteinuria, lipid accumulation in the kidney, upregulation of megalin, cubilin, mediators of lipid influx (scavenger receptor class A and lectin-like oxidized receptor-1), lipid efflux (liver X receptor alpha/beta and ATP-binding cassette transporter), and fatty acid biosynthesis (carbohydrate-response element binding protein, fatty acid synthase, and acetyl-CoA carboxylase). However, factors involved in cholesterol biosynthesis (sterol regulatory element binding protein, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, SCAP, Insig-1, and Insig-2) and fatty acid oxidation (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, acyl-CoA oxidase, and liver-type fatty acid binding protein) were reduced in the remnant kidney. Thus CRF results in heavy lipid accumulation in the remnant kidney, which is mediated by upregulation of pathways involved in tubular reabsorption of filtered protein-bound lipids, influx of oxidized lipoproteins and synthesis of fatty acids, and downregulation of pathways involved in fatty acid catabolism.

  7. Oral mucosal lipids are antibacterial against Porphyromonas gingivalis, induce ultrastructural damage, and alter bacterial lipid and protein compositions.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Carol L; Walters, Katherine S; Drake, David R; Dawson, Deborah V; Blanchette, Derek R; Brogden, Kim A; Wertz, Philip W

    2013-09-01

    Oral mucosal and salivary lipids exhibit potent antimicrobial activity for a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria; however, little is known about their spectrum of antimicrobial activity or mechanisms of action against oral bacteria. In this study, we examine the activity of two fatty acids and three sphingoid bases against Porphyromonas gingivalis, an important colonizer of the oral cavity implicated in periodontitis. Minimal inhibitory concentrations, minimal bactericidal concentrations, and kill kinetics revealed variable, but potent, activity of oral mucosal and salivary lipids against P. gingivalis, indicating that lipid structure may be an important determinant in lipid mechanisms of activity against bacteria, although specific components of bacterial membranes are also likely important. Electron micrographs showed ultrastructural damage induced by sapienic acid and phytosphingosine and confirmed disruption of the bacterial plasma membrane. This information, coupled with the association of treatment lipids with P. gingivalis lipids revealed via thin layer chromatography, suggests that the plasma membrane is a likely target of lipid antibacterial activity. Utilizing a combination of two-dimensional in-gel electrophoresis and Western blot followed by mass spectroscopy and N-terminus degradation sequencing we also show that treatment with sapienic acid induces upregulation of a set of proteins comprising a unique P. gingivalis stress response, including proteins important in fatty acid biosynthesis, metabolism and energy production, protein processing, cell adhesion and virulence. Prophylactic or therapeutic lipid treatments may be beneficial for intervention of infection by supplementing the natural immune function of endogenous lipids on mucosal surfaces.

  8. Oral mucosal lipids are antibacterial against Porphyromonas gingivalis, induce ultrastructural damage, and alter bacterial lipid and protein compositions

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Carol L; Walters, Katherine S; Drake, David R; Dawson, Deborah V; Blanchette, Derek R; Brogden, Kim A; Wertz, Philip W

    2013-01-01

    Oral mucosal and salivary lipids exhibit potent antimicrobial activity for a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria; however, little is known about their spectrum of antimicrobial activity or mechanisms of action against oral bacteria. In this study, we examine the activity of two fatty acids and three sphingoid bases against Porphyromonas gingivalis, an important colonizer of the oral cavity implicated in periodontitis. Minimal inhibitory concentrations, minimal bactericidal concentrations, and kill kinetics revealed variable, but potent, activity of oral mucosal and salivary lipids against P. gingivalis, indicating that lipid structure may be an important determinant in lipid mechanisms of activity against bacteria, although specific components of bacterial membranes are also likely important. Electron micrographs showed ultrastructural damage induced by sapienic acid and phytosphingosine and confirmed disruption of the bacterial plasma membrane. This information, coupled with the association of treatment lipids with P. gingivalis lipids revealed via thin layer chromatography, suggests that the plasma membrane is a likely target of lipid antibacterial activity. Utilizing a combination of two-dimensional in-gel electrophoresis and Western blot followed by mass spectroscopy and N-terminus degradation sequencing we also show that treatment with sapienic acid induces upregulation of a set of proteins comprising a unique P. gingivalis stress response, including proteins important in fatty acid biosynthesis, metabolism and energy production, protein processing, cell adhesion and virulence. Prophylactic or therapeutic lipid treatments may be beneficial for intervention of infection by supplementing the natural immune function of endogenous lipids on mucosal surfaces. PMID:23867843

  9. Stability of lipid encapsulated ferulic acid particles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Encapsulation of bioactive compounds by a solid lipid matrix provides stability and a mechanism for controlled release in formulated products. Phenolic compounds exhibit antioxidant and antimicrobial activities and have applications as functional food and feed additives. Ferulic acid, a common pheno...

  10. Phytic acid inhibits lipid peroxidation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zajdel, Alicja; Wilczok, Adam; Węglarz, Ludmiła; Dzierżewicz, Zofia

    2013-01-01

    Phytic acid (PA) has been recognized as a potent antioxidant and inhibitor of iron-catalyzed hydroxyl radical formation under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate, with the use of HPLC/MS/MS, whether PA is capable of inhibiting linoleic acid autoxidation and Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced peroxidation, as well as Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation in human colonic epithelial cells. PA at 100 μM and 500 μM effectively inhibited the decay of linoleic acid, both in the absence and presence of Fe(II)/ascorbate. The observed inhibitory effect of PA on Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation was lower (10-20%) compared to that of autoxidation. PA did not change linoleic acid hydroperoxides concentration levels after 24 hours of Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced peroxidation. In the absence of Fe(II)/ascorbate, PA at 100 μM and 500 μM significantly suppressed decomposition of linoleic acid hydroperoxides. Moreover, PA at the tested nontoxic concentrations (100 μM and 500 μM) significantly decreased 4-hydroxyalkenal levels in Caco-2 cells which structurally and functionally resemble the small intestinal epithelium. It is concluded that PA inhibits linoleic acid oxidation and reduces the formation of 4-hydroxyalkenals. Acting as an antioxidant it may help to prevent intestinal diseases induced by oxygen radicals and lipid peroxidation products.

  11. Phytic Acid Inhibits Lipid Peroxidation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Węglarz, Ludmiła; Dzierżewicz, Zofia

    2013-01-01

    Phytic acid (PA) has been recognized as a potent antioxidant and inhibitor of iron-catalyzed hydroxyl radical formation under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate, with the use of HPLC/MS/MS, whether PA is capable of inhibiting linoleic acid autoxidation and Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced peroxidation, as well as Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation in human colonic epithelial cells. PA at 100 μM and 500 μM effectively inhibited the decay of linoleic acid, both in the absence and presence of Fe(II)/ascorbate. The observed inhibitory effect of PA on Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation was lower (10–20%) compared to that of autoxidation. PA did not change linoleic acid hydroperoxides concentration levels after 24 hours of Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced peroxidation. In the absence of Fe(II)/ascorbate, PA at 100 μM and 500 μM significantly suppressed decomposition of linoleic acid hydroperoxides. Moreover, PA at the tested nontoxic concentrations (100 μM and 500 μM) significantly decreased 4-hydroxyalkenal levels in Caco-2 cells which structurally and functionally resemble the small intestinal epithelium. It is concluded that PA inhibits linoleic acid oxidation and reduces the formation of 4-hydroxyalkenals. Acting as an antioxidant it may help to prevent intestinal diseases induced by oxygen radicals and lipid peroxidation products. PMID:24260736

  12. Lipid Dependent Mechanisms of Protein Pump Activity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-23

    properties which result form the colligative interactions of many lipid molecules. Important materials properties include . . . i I I II II I i I 1 the...d identify by olock number) *This project is aime at investigating if a lipid elastic property , known as the spontaneous radius of curvature Ro’, is...a regulated membrane property and if its value modulates membrane protein activity. Specific aims reported on here include: 1) Correlation of ion pump

  13. Chemical synthesis and biological function of lipidated proteins.

    PubMed

    Yang, Aimin; Zhao, Lei; Wu, Yao-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Lipidated proteins play a key role in many essential biological processes in eukaryotic cells, including signal transduction, membrane trafficking, immune response and pathology. The investigation of the function of lipidated proteins requires access to a reasonable amount of homogenous lipid-modified proteins with defined structures and functional groups. Chemical approaches have provided useful tools to perform such studies. In this review we summarize synthetic methods of lipidated peptides and developments in the chemoselective ligation for the production of lipidated proteins. We introduce the biology of lipidated proteins and highlight the application of synthetic lipidated proteins to tackle important biological questions.

  14. Lipid interaction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A. Acid-triggered permeabilization and aggregation of lipid vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Menestrina, G; Pederzolli, C; Forti, S; Gambale, F

    1991-01-01

    We have investigated the interaction of Pseudomonas exotoxin A with small unilamellar vesicles comprised of different phospholipids as a function of pH, toxin, and lipid concentration. We have found that this toxin induces vesicle permeabilization, as measured by the release of a fluorescent dye. Permeabilization is due to the formation of ion-conductive channels which we have directly observed in planar lipid bilayers. The toxin also produces vesicle aggregation, as indicated by an increase of the turbidity. Aggregation and permeabilization have completely different time course and extent upon toxin dose and lipid composition, thus suggesting that they are two independent events. Both time constants decrease by lowering the pH of the bulk phase or by introducing a negative lipid into the vesicles. Our results indicate that at least three steps are involved in the interaction of Pseudomonas exotoxin A with lipid vesicles. After protonation of one charged group the toxin becomes competent to bind to the surface of the vesicles. Binding is probably initiated by an electrostatic interaction because it is absolutely dependent on the presence of acidic phospholipids. Binding is a prerequisite for the subsequent insertion of the toxin into the lipid bilayer, with a special preference for phosphatidylglycerol-containing membranes, to form ionic channels. At high toxin and vesicle concentrations, bound toxin may also induce aggregation of the vesicles, particularly when phosphatidic acid is present in the lipid mixture. A quenching of the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of the protein, which is induced by lowering the pH of the solution, becomes more drastic in the presence of lipid vesicles. However, this further quenching takes so long that it cannot be a prerequisite to either vesicle permeabilization or aggregation. Pseudomonas exotoxin A shares many of these properties with other bacterial toxins like diphtheria and tetanus toxin. Images FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 12

  15. Lipidomic and proteomic analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans lipid droplets and identification of ACS-4 as a lipid droplet-associated protein.

    PubMed

    Vrablik, Tracy L; Petyuk, Vladislav A; Larson, Emily M; Smith, Richard D; Watts, Jennifer L

    2015-10-01

    Lipid droplets are cytoplasmic organelles that store neutral lipids for membrane synthesis and energy reserves. In this study, we characterized the lipid and protein composition of purified Caenorhabditis elegans lipid droplets. These lipid droplets are composed mainly of triacylglycerols, surrounded by a phospholipid monolayer composed primarily of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine. The fatty acid composition of the triacylglycerols is rich in fatty acid species obtained from the dietary Escherichia coli, including cyclopropane fatty acids and cis-vaccenic acid. Unlike other organisms, C. elegans lipid droplets contain very little cholesterol or cholesterol esters. Comparison of the lipid droplet proteomes of wild type and high-fat daf-2 mutant strains shows a very similar proteome in both strains, except that the most abundant protein in the C. elegans lipid droplet proteome, MDT-28, is relatively less abundant in lipid droplets isolated from daf-2 mutants. Functional analysis of lipid droplet proteins identified in our proteomic studies indicated an enrichment of proteins required for growth and fat homeostasis in C. elegans. Finally, we confirmed the localization of one of the newly identified lipid droplet proteins, ACS-4. We found that ACS-4 localizes to the surface of lipid droplets in the C. elegans intestine and skin. This study bolsters C. elegans as a model to study the dynamics and functions of lipid droplets in a multicellular organism.

  16. Crystallizing Membrane Proteins Using Lipidic Mesophases

    PubMed Central

    Caffrey, Martin; Cherezov, Vadim

    2009-01-01

    A detailed protocol for crystallizing membrane proteins that makes use of lipidic mesophases is described. This has variously been referred to as the lipid cubic phase or in meso method. The method has been shown to be quite general in that it has been used to solve X-ray crystallographic structures of prokaryotic and eukaryotic proteins, proteins that are monomeric, homo- and hetero-multimeric, chromophore-containing and chromophore-free, and α-helical and β-barrel proteins. Its most recent successes are the human engineered β2-adrenergic and adenosine A2A G protein-coupled receptors. Protocols are provided for preparing and characterizing the lipidic mesophase, for reconstituting the protein into the monoolein-based mesophase, for functional assay of the protein in the mesophase, and for setting up crystallizations in manual mode. Methods for harvesting micro-crystals are also described. The time required to prepare the protein-loaded mesophase and to set up a crystallization plate manually is about one hour. PMID:19390528

  17. Role of beer lipid-binding proteins in preventing lipid destabilization of foam.

    PubMed

    Cooper, D J; Husband, F A; Mills, E N C; Wilde, P J

    2002-12-18

    The negative effect of fatty acids on the foam stability of beer has been assessed. Long-chain fatty acids are far more damaging than short-chain fatty acids on the foam stability of beer at the concentrations employed. Polypeptides have been isolated from an all malt beer by hydrophobic interaction chromatography. Using this technique five groups of polypeptides were isolated, group 1 being the least hydrophobic and group 5 the most hydrophobic, all of which exhibited similar polypeptide compositions by SDS-PAGE. All five hydrophobic polypeptide groups bound [(14)C]linoleic acid; however, group 5, the most hydrophobic group, bound the most linoleic acid. Groups 1 and 5 were titrated with cis-parinaric acid (CPA) to produce binding curves, which were compared with a binding curve obtained for bovine serum albumin (BSA). Groups 1 and 5 both produced binding curves that saturated at approximately 5.5 microM and 4 microM CPA and had association constants (K(a)) of 6.27 x 10(7) and 1.62 x 10(7) M(-1), respectively. In comparison, BSA produced a binding curve that saturated at 6 microM CPA and had a K(a) of 3.95 x 10(7) M(-1). Further investigation has shown that group 1 is pH sensitive and group 5 pH insensitive with respect to lipid binding. The lipid-binding activity of group 5 was also shown to be unaffected by ethanol concentration. Linoleic acid (5 microM) when added to beer resulted in unstable foam. Group 5 was added to the lipid-damaged beer and was shown to restore the foam stability to values that were obtained for the control beer. It has therefore been demonstrated that proteins isolated from beer have a lipid-binding capacity and that they can convey a degree of protection against lipid-induced foam destabilization.

  18. The mammalian START domain protein family in lipid transport in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Clark, Barbara J

    2012-03-01

    Lipid transfer proteins of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein-related lipid transfer (START) domain family are defined by the presence of a conserved ∼210 amino acid sequence that folds into an α/β helix-grip structure forming a hydrophobic pocket for ligand binding. The mammalian START proteins bind diverse ligands, such as cholesterol, oxysterols, phospholipids, sphingolipids, and possibly fatty acids, and have putative roles in non-vesicular lipid transport, thioesterase enzymatic activity, and tumor suppression. However, the biological functions of many members of the START domain protein family are not well established. Recent research has focused on characterizing the cell-type distribution and regulation of the START proteins, examining the specificity and directionality of lipid transport, and identifying disease states associated with dysregulation of START protein expression. This review summarizes the current concepts of the proposed physiological and pathological roles for the mammalian START domain proteins in cholesterol and lipid trafficking.

  19. Travelling lipid domains in a dynamic model for protein-induced pattern formation in biomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Karin; Bär, Markus

    2005-06-01

    Cell membranes are composed of a mixture of lipids. Many biological processes require the formation of spatial domains in the lipid distribution of the plasma membrane. We have developed a mathematical model that describes the dynamic spatial distribution of acidic lipids in response to the presence of GMC proteins and regulating enzymes. The model encompasses diffusion of lipids and GMC proteins, electrostatic attraction between acidic lipids and GMC proteins as well as the kinetics of membrane attachment/detachment of GMC proteins. If the lipid-protein interaction is strong enough, phase separation occurs in the membrane as a result of free energy minimization and protein/lipid domains are formed. The picture is changed if a constant activity of enzymes is included into the model. We chose the myristoyl-electrostatic switch as a regulatory module. It consists of a protein kinase C that phosphorylates and removes the GMC proteins from the membrane and a phosphatase that dephosphorylates the proteins and enables them to rebind to the membrane. For sufficiently high enzymatic activity, the phase separation is replaced by travelling domains of acidic lipids and proteins. The latter active process is typical for nonequilibrium systems. It allows for a faster restructuring and polarization of the membrane since it acts on a larger length scale than the passive phase separation. The travelling domains can be pinned by spatial gradients in the activity; thus the membrane is able to detect spatial clues and can adapt its polarity dynamically to changes in the environment.

  20. Omega-3 fatty acids, lipid rafts, and T cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Hou, Tim Y; McMurray, David N; Chapkin, Robert S

    2016-08-15

    n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) have been shown in many clinical studies to attenuate inflammatory responses. Although inflammatory responses are orchestrated by a wide spectrum of cells, CD4(+) T cells play an important role in the etiology of many chronic inflammatory diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease and obesity. In light of recent concerns over the safety profiles of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), alternatives such as bioactive nutraceuticals are becoming more attractive. In order for these agents to be accepted into mainstream medicine, however, the mechanisms by which nutraceuticals such as n-3 PUFA exert their anti-inflammatory effects must be fully elucidated. Lipid rafts are nanoscale, dynamic domains in the plasma membrane that are formed through favorable lipid-lipid (cholesterol, sphingolipids, and saturated fatty acids) and lipid-protein (membrane-actin cytoskeleton) interactions. These domains optimize the clustering of signaling proteins at the membrane to facilitate efficient cell signaling which is required for CD4(+) T cell activation and differentiation. This review summarizes novel emerging data documenting the ability of n-3 PUFA to perturb membrane-cytoskeletal structure and function in CD4(+) T cells. An understanding of these underlying mechanisms will provide a rationale for the use of n-3 PUFA in the treatment of chronic inflammation.

  1. How lipids modulate mitochondrial protein import.

    PubMed

    Böttinger, Lena; Ellenrieder, Lars; Becker, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondria have to import the vast majority of their proteins, which are synthesized as precursors on cytosolic ribosomes. The translocase of the outer membrane (TOM complex) forms the general entry gate for the precursor proteins, which are subsequently sorted by protein machineries into the mitochondrial subcompartments: the outer and inner membrane, the intermembrane space and the mitochondrial matrix. The transport across and into the inner membrane is driven by the membrane potential, which is generated by the respiratory chain. Recent studies revealed that the lipid composition of mitochondrial membranes is important for the biogenesis of mitochondrial proteins. Cardiolipin and phosphatidylethanolamine exhibit unexpectedly specific functions for the activity of distinct protein translocases. Both phospholipids are required for full activity of respiratory chain complexes and thus to maintain the membrane potential for protein import. In addition, cardiolipin is required to maintain structural integrity of mitochondrial protein translocases. Finally, the low sterol content in the mitochondrial outer membrane may contribute to the targeting of some outer membrane proteins with a single α-helical membrane anchor. Altogether, mitochondrial lipids modulate protein import on various levels involving precursor targeting, membrane potential generation, stability and activity of protein translocases.

  2. Protein-Associated Lipid of Bacillus stearothermophilus

    PubMed Central

    Card, George L.; Szuba, Joan C.; Shimizu, Marilyn

    1979-01-01

    The composition and patterns of metabolism of phospholipids isolated as part of a lipid-depleted membrane fragment (LDM fragment) and associated with the membrane adenosine triphosphatase complex have been compared with those of the bulk membrane phospholipid. The bulk lipid was extracted from washed membranes with sodium cholate. The LDM fragments, which contained a portion of the electron transport system and the membrane adenosine triphosphatase complex, were purified by chromatography with Sepharose 6B. The LDM fragment preparations contained 0.10 ± 0.02 μmol of lipid phosphorus per mg of protein, compared with 0.54 ± 0.05 μmol of lipid phosphorus per mg of protein for washed membranes. The phospholipid associated with the LDM fragments consisted of 78 ± 4% cardiolipin, 7 ± 1% phosphatidylglycerol, and 15 ± 3% phosphatidylethanolamine. Changes in the total membrane lipid composition (produced by culture conditions) did not alter the phospholipid composition of the LDM fragments. The adenosine triphosphate complex was separated from the other components of the LDM fragments by suspension of the fragments in 1% Triton X-100 and precipitation with antibody specific for the F1 component of the adenosine triphosphatase complex. The phospholipid isolated with the adenosine triphosphatase complex consisted of 86% cardiolipin, 8% phosphatidylglycerol, and 6% phosphatidylethanolamine. In pulse-chase experiments with 32P and [2-3H]glycerol, the labeling patterns of the phosphatididylglycerol and phosphatidylethanolamine associated with the LDM fragments were different from those of the bulk membrane phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylethanolamine. It was concluded that at least a portion of the phospholipid isolated with the LDM fragments was part of a native lipid-protein complex. PMID:159285

  3. Engineering Lipid Bilayer Membranes for Protein Studies

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad Shuja; Dosoky, Noura Sayed; Williams, John Dalton

    2013-01-01

    Lipid membranes regulate the flow of nutrients and communication signaling between cells and protect the sub-cellular structures. Recent attempts to fabricate artificial systems using nanostructures that mimic the physiological properties of natural lipid bilayer membranes (LBM) fused with transmembrane proteins have helped demonstrate the importance of temperature, pH, ionic strength, adsorption behavior, conformational reorientation and surface density in cellular membranes which all affect the incorporation of proteins on solid surfaces. Much of this work is performed on artificial templates made of polymer sponges or porous materials based on alumina, mica, and porous silicon (PSi) surfaces. For example, porous silicon materials have high biocompatibility, biodegradability, and photoluminescence, which allow them to be used both as a support structure for lipid bilayers or a template to measure the electrochemical functionality of living cells grown over the surface as in vivo. The variety of these media, coupled with the complex physiological conditions present in living systems, warrant a summary and prospectus detailing which artificial systems provide the most promise for different biological conditions. This study summarizes the use of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) data on artificial biological membranes that are closely matched with previously published biological systems using both black lipid membrane and patch clamp techniques. PMID:24185908

  4. Phloem proteomics reveals new lipid-binding proteins with a putative role in lipid-mediated signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Barbaglia, Allison M.; Tamot, Banita; Greve, Veronica; Hoffmann-Benning, Susanne

    2016-04-28

    Global climate changes inversely affect our ability to grow the food required for an increasing world population. To combat future crop loss due to abiotic stress, we need to understand the signals responsible for changes in plant development and the resulting adaptations, especially the signaling molecules traveling long-distance through the plant phloem. Using a proteomics approach, we had identified several putative lipid-binding proteins in the phloem exudates. Simultaneously, we identified several complex lipids as well as jasmonates. These findings prompted us to propose that phloem (phospho-) lipids could act as long-distance developmental signals in response to abiotic stress, and that they are released, sensed, and moved by phloem lipid-binding proteins (Benning et al., 2012). Indeed, the proteins we identified include lipases that could release a signaling lipid into the phloem, putative receptor components, and proteins that could mediate lipid-movement. To test this possible protein-based lipid-signaling pathway, three of the proteins, which could potentially act in a relay, are characterized here: (I) a putative GDSL-motif lipase (II) a PIG-P-like protein, with a possible receptor-like function; (III) and PLAFP (phloem lipid-associated family protein), a predicted lipid-binding protein of unknown function. Here we show that all three proteins bind lipids, in particular phosphatidic acid (PtdOH), which is known to participate in intracellular stress signaling. Genes encoding these proteins are expressed in the vasculature, a prerequisite for phloem transport. Cellular localization studies show that the proteins are not retained in the endoplasmic reticulum but surround the cell in a spotted pattern that has been previously observed with receptors and plasmodesmatal proteins. Abiotic signals that induce the production of PtdOH also regulate the expression of GDSL-lipase and PLAFP, albeit in opposite patterns. Our findings suggest that while all three

  5. Phloem proteomics reveals new lipid-binding proteins with a putative role in lipid-mediated signaling

    DOE PAGES

    Barbaglia, Allison M.; Tamot, Banita; Greve, Veronica; ...

    2016-04-28

    Global climate changes inversely affect our ability to grow the food required for an increasing world population. To combat future crop loss due to abiotic stress, we need to understand the signals responsible for changes in plant development and the resulting adaptations, especially the signaling molecules traveling long-distance through the plant phloem. Using a proteomics approach, we had identified several putative lipid-binding proteins in the phloem exudates. Simultaneously, we identified several complex lipids as well as jasmonates. These findings prompted us to propose that phloem (phospho-) lipids could act as long-distance developmental signals in response to abiotic stress, and thatmore » they are released, sensed, and moved by phloem lipid-binding proteins (Benning et al., 2012). Indeed, the proteins we identified include lipases that could release a signaling lipid into the phloem, putative receptor components, and proteins that could mediate lipid-movement. To test this possible protein-based lipid-signaling pathway, three of the proteins, which could potentially act in a relay, are characterized here: (I) a putative GDSL-motif lipase (II) a PIG-P-like protein, with a possible receptor-like function; (III) and PLAFP (phloem lipid-associated family protein), a predicted lipid-binding protein of unknown function. Here we show that all three proteins bind lipids, in particular phosphatidic acid (PtdOH), which is known to participate in intracellular stress signaling. Genes encoding these proteins are expressed in the vasculature, a prerequisite for phloem transport. Cellular localization studies show that the proteins are not retained in the endoplasmic reticulum but surround the cell in a spotted pattern that has been previously observed with receptors and plasmodesmatal proteins. Abiotic signals that induce the production of PtdOH also regulate the expression of GDSL-lipase and PLAFP, albeit in opposite patterns. Our findings suggest that while all

  6. Phloem Proteomics Reveals New Lipid-Binding Proteins with a Putative Role in Lipid-Mediated Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Barbaglia, Allison M.; Tamot, Banita; Greve, Veronica; Hoffmann-Benning, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Global climate changes inversely affect our ability to grow the food required for an increasing world population. To combat future crop loss due to abiotic stress, we need to understand the signals responsible for changes in plant development and the resulting adaptations, especially the signaling molecules traveling long-distance through the plant phloem. Using a proteomics approach, we had identified several putative lipid-binding proteins in the phloem exudates. Simultaneously, we identified several complex lipids as well as jasmonates. These findings prompted us to propose that phloem (phospho-) lipids could act as long-distance developmental signals in response to abiotic stress, and that they are released, sensed, and moved by phloem lipid-binding proteins (Benning et al., 2012). Indeed, the proteins we identified include lipases that could release a signaling lipid into the phloem, putative receptor components, and proteins that could mediate lipid-movement. To test this possible protein-based lipid-signaling pathway, three of the proteins, which could potentially act in a relay, are characterized here: (I) a putative GDSL-motif lipase (II) a PIG-P-like protein, with a possible receptor-like function; (III) and PLAFP (phloem lipid-associated family protein), a predicted lipid-binding protein of unknown function. Here we show that all three proteins bind lipids, in particular phosphatidic acid (PtdOH), which is known to participate in intracellular stress signaling. Genes encoding these proteins are expressed in the vasculature, a prerequisite for phloem transport. Cellular localization studies show that the proteins are not retained in the endoplasmic reticulum but surround the cell in a spotted pattern that has been previously observed with receptors and plasmodesmatal proteins. Abiotic signals that induce the production of PtdOH also regulate the expression of GDSL-lipase and PLAFP, albeit in opposite patterns. Our findings suggest that while all three

  7. Effects of pelleted or powdered diets containing soy protein or sodium caseinate on lipid concentrations and bile acid excretion in golden Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Butteiger, Dustie N; Krul, Elaine S

    2015-08-01

    Custom diets are a convenient vector for oral administration of test articles, but the processing and physical form of a diet can affect its nutritional properties and how it is consumed. Here, the authors evaluated the feeding behavior and physiology of golden Syrian hamsters fed diets of either soy or caseinate protein in pelleted or powdered forms for 28 d to determine whether dietary processing and form mediates the physiological effects of dietary proteins. The authors compared body weight, food consumption, serum cholesterol concentration, serum triglyceride concentration, fecal weight and fecal excretion of bile acids between treatment groups. Hamsters fed powdered diets showed higher food consumption than hamsters fed pelleted diets, regardless of protein source. Hamsters fed soy pelleted diets showed lower serum cholesterol concentration and higher fecal excretion of bile acid than hamsters fed caseinate pelleted diets, and serum cholesterol concentration correlated strongly with fecal excretion of bile acid. This correlation suggests that the physiological effects of soy protein on cholesterol and excretion of bile acid might be related or similarly mediated through diet. The differences observed between hamsters on different diets indicate that dietary form can influence both feeding behavior and the physiological effects of a diet in hamsters.

  8. Localization and Ordering of Lipids Around Aquaporin-0: Protein and Lipid Mobility Effects

    PubMed Central

    Briones, Rodolfo; Aponte-Santamaría, Camilo; de Groot, Bert L.

    2017-01-01

    Hydrophobic matching, lipid sorting, and protein oligomerization are key principles by which lipids and proteins organize in biological membranes. The Aquaporin-0 channel (AQP0), solved by electron crystallography (EC) at cryogenic temperatures, is one of the few protein-lipid complexes of which the structure is available in atomic detail. EC and room-temperature molecular dynamics (MD) of dimyristoylglycerophosphocholine (DMPC) annular lipids around AQP0 show similarities, however, crystal-packing and temperature might affect the protein surface or the lipids distribution. To understand the role of temperature, lipid phase, and protein mobility in the localization and ordering of AQP0-lipids, we used MD simulations of an AQP0-DMPC bilayer system. Simulations were performed at physiological and at DMPC gel-phase temperatures. To decouple the protein and lipid mobility effects, we induced gel-phase in the lipids or restrained the protein. We monitored the lipid ordering effects around the protein. Reducing the system temperature or inducing lipid gel-phase had a marginal effect on the annular lipid localization. However, restraining the protein mobility increased the annular lipid localization around the whole AQP0 surface, resembling EC. The distribution of the inter-phosphate and hydrophobic thicknesses showed that stretching of the DMPC annular layer around AQP0 surface is the mechanism that compensates the hydrophobic mismatch in this system. The distribution of the local area-per-lipid and the acyl-chain order parameters showed particular fluid- and gel-like areas that involved several lipid layers. These areas were in contact with the surfaces of higher and lower protein mobility, respectively. We conclude that the AQP0 surfaces induce specific fluid- and gel-phase prone areas. The presence of these areas might guide the AQP0 lipid sorting interactions with other membrane components, and is compatible with the squared array oligomerization of AQP0 tetramers

  9. Amino acid- and lipid-induced insulin resistance in rat heart: molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Terruzzi, Ileana; Allibardi, Sonia; Bendinelli, Paola; Maroni, Paola; Piccoletti, Roberta; Vesco, Flavio; Samaja, Michele; Luzi, Livio

    2002-04-25

    Lipids compete with glucose for utilization by the myocardium. Amino acids are an important energetic substrate in the heart but it is unknown whether they reduce glucose disposal. The molecular mechanisms by which lipids and amino acids impair insulin-mediated glucose disposal in the myocardium are unknown. We evaluated the effect of lipids and amino acids on the insulin stimulated glucose uptake in the isolated rat heart and explored the involved target proteins. The hearts were perfused with 16 mM glucose alone or with 6% lipid or 10% amino acid solutions at the rate of 15 ml/min. After 1 h of perfusion (basal period), insulin (240 nmol/l) was added and maintained for an additional hour. Both lipids and amino acids blocked the insulin effect on glucose uptake (P<0.01) and reduced the activity of the IRSs/PI 3-kinase/Akt/GSK3 axis leading to the activation of glucose transport and glycogen synthesis. Amino acids, but not lipids, increased the activity of the p70 S6 kinase leading to the stimulation of protein synthesis. Amino acids induce myocardial insulin resistance recruiting the same molecular mechanisms as lipids. Amino acids retain an insulin-like stimulatory effect on p70 S6 kinase, which is independent from the PI 3-Kinase downstream effectors.

  10. Long-chain n-3 fatty acids enhance neonatal insulin-regulated protein metabolism in piglets by differentially altering muscle lipid composition

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, Karen; Julien, Pierre; Davis, Teresa A.; Myre, Alexandre; Thivierge, M. Carole

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the role of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCn-3PUFAs) of muscle phospholipids in the regulation of neonatal metabolism. Twenty-eight piglets were weaned at 2 days of age and raised on one of two milk formulas that consisted of either a control formula supplying 0% or a formula containing 3.5% LCn-3PUFAs until 10 or 28 days of age. There was a developmental decline in the insulin sensitivity of amino acid disposal in control pigs during the first month of life, with a slope of −2.24 μmol·kg−1·h−1 (P = 0.01) per unit of insulin increment, as assessed using hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic-euaminoacidemic clamps. LCn-3PUFA feeding blunted this developmental decline, resulting in differing insulin sensitivities (P < 0.001). When protein metabolism was assessed under parenteral feeding-induced hyperinsulinemia, LCn-3PUFAs reduced by 16% whole body oxidative losses of amino acids (from 238 to 231 μmol·kg−1·h−1; P = 0.06), allowing 41% more amino acids to accrete into body proteins (from 90 to 127 μmol·kg−1·h−1; P = 0.06). The fractional synthetic rate of muscle mixed proteins remained unaltered by the LCn-3PUFA feeding. However, LCn-3PUFAs retarded a developmental increase in the essential-to-nonessential amino acid ratio of the muscle intracellular free pool (P = 0.05). Overall, alterations in metabolism were concomitant with a preferential incorporation of LCn-3PUFAs into muscle total membrane phospholipids (P < 0.001), in contrast to intramuscular triglycerides. These results underscore the potential role of LCn-3PUFAs as regulators of different aspects of protein metabolism in the neonate. PMID:17673528

  11. Effect of brown seaweed lipids on fatty acid composition and lipid hydroperoxide levels of mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Airanthi, M K Widjaja-Adhi; Sasaki, Naoya; Iwasaki, Sayaka; Baba, Nobuko; Abe, Masayuki; Hosokawa, Masashi; Miyashita, Kazuo

    2011-04-27

    Brown seaweed lipids from Undaria pinnatifida (Wakame), Sargassum horneri (Akamoku), and Cystoseira hakodatensis (Uganomoku) contained several bioactive compounds, namely, fucoxanthin, polyphenols, and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Fucoxanthin and polyphenol contents of Akamoku and Uganomoku lipids were higher than those of Wakame lipids, while Wakame lipids showed higher total omega-3 PUFA content than Akamoku and Uganomoku lipids. The levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (AA) in liver lipids of KK-A(y) mouse significantly increased by Akamoku and Uganomoku lipid feeding as compared with the control, but not by Wakame lipid feeding. Fucoxanthin has been reported to accelerate the bioconversion of omega-3 PUFA and omega-6 PUFA to DHA and AA, respectively. The higher hepatic DHA and AA level of mice fed Akamoku and Uganomoku lipids would be attributed to the higher content of fucoxanthin of Akamoku and Uganomoku lipids. The lipid hydroperoxide levels of the liver of mice fed brown seaweed lipids were significantly lower than those of control mice, even though total PUFA content was higher in the liver of mice fed brown seaweed lipids. This would be, at least in part, due to the antioxidant activity of fucoxanthin metabolites in the liver.

  12. Membrane Binding of HIV-1 Matrix Protein: Dependence on Bilayer Composition and Protein Lipidation

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Marilia; Nanda, Hirsh

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT By assembling in a protein lattice on the host's plasma membrane, the retroviral Gag polyprotein triggers formation of the viral protein/membrane shell. The MA domain of Gag employs multiple signals—electrostatic, hydrophobic, and lipid-specific—to bring the protein to the plasma membrane, thereby complementing protein-protein interactions, located in full-length Gag, in lattice formation. We report the interaction of myristoylated and unmyristoylated HIV-1 Gag MA domains with bilayers composed of purified lipid components to dissect these complex membrane signals and quantify their contributions to the overall interaction. Surface plasmon resonance on well-defined planar membrane models is used to quantify binding affinities and amounts of protein and yields free binding energy contributions, ΔG, of the various signals. Charge-charge interactions in the absence of the phosphatidylinositide PI(4,5)P2 attract the protein to acidic membrane surfaces, and myristoylation increases the affinity by a factor of 10; thus, our data do not provide evidence for a PI(4,5)P2 trigger of myristate exposure. Lipid-specific interactions with PI(4,5)P2, the major signal lipid in the inner plasma membrane, increase membrane attraction at a level similar to that of protein lipidation. While cholesterol does not directly engage in interactions, it augments protein affinity strongly by facilitating efficient myristate insertion and PI(4,5)P2 binding. We thus observe that the isolated MA protein, in the absence of protein-protein interaction conferred by the full-length Gag, binds the membrane with submicromolar affinities. IMPORTANCE Like other retroviral species, the Gag polyprotein of HIV-1 contains three major domains: the N-terminal, myristoylated MA domain that targets the protein to the plasma membrane of the host; a central capsid-forming domain; and the C-terminal, genome-binding nucleocapsid domain. These domains act in concert to condense Gag into a membrane

  13. Lipid transport mediated by Arabidopsis TGD proteins is unidirectional from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plastid

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, C.; Moellering, E. R., Muthan, B.; Fan, J.; Benning, C.

    2010-06-01

    The transfer of lipids between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the plastid in Arabidopsis involves the TRIGALACTOSYLDIACYLGLYCEROL (TGD) proteins. Lipid exchange is thought to be bidirectional based on the presence of specific lipid molecular species in Arabidopsis mutants impaired in the desaturation of fatty acids of membrane lipids in the ER and plastid. However, it was unclear whether TGD proteins were required for lipid trafficking in both directions. This question was addressed through the analysis of double mutants of tgd1-1 or tgd4-3 in genetic mutant backgrounds leading to a defect in lipid fatty acid desaturation either in the ER (fad2) or the plastid (fad6). The fad6 tgd1-1 and fad6 tgd4-3 double mutants showed drastic reductions in the relative levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids and of galactolipids. The growth of these plants and the development of photosynthetic membrane systems were severely compromised, suggesting a disruption in the import of polyunsaturated fatty acid-containing lipid species from the ER. Furthermore, a forward-genetic screen in the tgd1-2 dgd1 mutant background led to the isolation of a new fad6-2 allele with a marked reduction in the amount of digalactosyldiacylglycerol. In contrast, the introduction of fad2, affecting fatty acid desaturation of lipids in the ER, into the two tgd mutant backgrounds did not further decrease the level of fatty acid desaturation in lipids of extraplastidic membranes. These results suggest that the role of TGD proteins is limited to plastid lipid import, but does not extend to lipid export from the plastid to extraplastidic membranes.

  14. A sliding selectivity scale for lipid binding to membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Landreh, Michael; Marty, Michael T.; Gault, Joseph; Robinson, Carol V.

    2017-01-01

    Biological membranes form barriers that are essential for cellular integrity and compartmentalisation. Proteins that reside in the membrane have co-evolved with their hydrophobic lipid environment which serves as a solvent for proteins with very diverse requirements. As a result, membrane protein-lipid interactions range from completely non-selective to highly discriminating. Mass spectrometry (MS), in combination with X-ray crystallography and molecular dynamics simulations, enables us to monitor how lipids interact with intact membrane protein complexes and assess their effects on structure and dynamics. Recent studies illustrate the ability to differentiate specific lipid binding, preferential interactions with lipid subsets, and nonselective annular contacts. In this review, we consider the biological implications of different lipid-binding scenarios and propose that binding occurs on a sliding selectivity scale, in line with the view of biological membranes as facilitators of dynamic protein and lipid organization. PMID:27155089

  15. Fatty acid profile of 25 alternative lipid feedstocks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study reports the fatty acid profiles of 25 alternative lipid feedstocks for the production of bio-based fuels and chemicals. Lipids were extracted using hexane from oil-bearing seeds using a standard Soxhlet apparatus. Fatty acid profiles were measured using gas chromatography-flame ionization...

  16. Lipids and topological rules of membrane protein assembly: balance between long and short range lipid-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Vitrac, Heidi; Bogdanov, Mikhail; Heacock, Phil; Dowhan, William

    2011-04-29

    The N-terminal six-transmembrane domain (TM) bundle of lactose permease of Escherichia coli is uniformly inverted when assembled in membranes lacking phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). Inversion is dependent on the net charge of cytoplasmically exposed protein domains containing positive and negative residues, net charge of the membrane surface, and low hydrophobicity of TM VII acting as a molecular hinge between the two halves of lactose permease (Bogdanov, M., Xie, J., Heacock, P., and Dowhan, W. (2008) J. Cell Biol. 182, 925-935). Net neutral lipids suppress the membrane translocation potential of negatively charged amino acids, thus increasing the cytoplasmic retention potential of positively charged amino acids. Herein, TM organization of sucrose permease (CscB) and phenylalanine permease (PheP) as a function of membrane lipid composition was investigated to extend these principles to other proteins. For CscB, topological dependence on PE only becomes evident after a significant increase in the net negative charge of the cytoplasmic surface of the N-terminal TM bundle. High negative charge is required to overcome the thermodynamic block to inversion due to the high hydrophobicity of TM VII. Increasing the positive charge of the cytoplasmic surface of the N-terminal TM hairpin of PheP, which is misoriented in PE-lacking cells, favors native orientation in the absence of PE. PheP and CscB also display co-existing dual topologies dependent on changes in the charge balance between protein domains and the membrane lipids. Therefore, the topology of both permeases is dependent on PE. However, CscB topology is governed by thermodynamic balance between opposing lipid-dependent electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions.

  17. Chlorogenic acid from honeysuckle improves hepatic lipid dysregulation and modulates hepatic fatty acid composition in rats with chronic endotoxin infusion.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Ruan, Zheng; Wen, Yanmei; Yang, Yuhui; Mi, Shumei; Zhou, Lili; Wu, Xin; Ding, Sheng; Deng, Zeyuan; Wu, Guoyao; Yin, Yulong

    2016-03-01

    Chlorogenic acid as a natural hydroxycinnamic acid has protective effect for liver. Endotoxin induced metabolic disorder, such as lipid dysregulation and hyperlipidemia. In this study, we investigated the effect of chlorogenic acid in rats with chronic endotoxin infusion. The Sprague-Dawley rats with lipid metabolic disorder (LD group) were intraperitoneally injected endotoxin. And the rats of chlorogenic acid-LD group were daily received chlorogenic acid by intragastric administration. In chlorogenic acid-LD group, the area of visceral adipocyte was decreased and liver injury was ameliorated, as compared to LD group. In chlorogenic acid-LD group, serum triglycerides, free fatty acids, hepatic triglycerides and cholesterol were decreased, the proportion of C20:1, C24:1 and C18:3n-6, Δ9-18 and Δ6-desaturase activity index in the liver were decreased, and the proportion of C18:3n-3 acid was increased, compared to the LD group. Moreover, levels of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase, carnitine palmitoyltransferase-I, and fatty acid β-oxidation were increased in chlorogenic acid-LD group compared to LD rats, whereas levels of fatty acid synthase and acetyl-CoA carboxylase were decreased. These findings demonstrate that chlorogenic acid effectively improves hepatic lipid dysregulation in rats by regulating fatty acid metabolism enzymes, stimulating AMP-activated protein kinase activation, and modulating levels of hepatic fatty acids.

  18. Permeability of lipid bilayers to amino acids and phosphate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarti, A. C.; Deamer, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    Permeability coefficients for amino acid classes, including neutral, polar, hydrophobic, and charged species, were measured and compared with values for other ionic solutes such as phosphate. The rates of efflux of glycine, lysine, phenylalanine, serine and tryptophan were determined after they were passively entrapped in large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) composed of egg phosphatidylcholine (EPC) or dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC). The following permeability coefficients were obtained for: glycine, 5.7 x 10(-12) cm s-1 (EPC), 2.0 x 10(-11) cm s-1 (DMPC); serine, 5.5 x 10(-12) cm s-1 (EPC), 1.6 x 10(-11) cm s-1 (DMPC); lysine, 5.1 x 10(-12) cm s-1 (EPC), 1.9 x 10(-11) cm s-1 (DMPC); tryptophan, 4.1 x 10(-10) cm s-1 (EPC); and phenylalanine, 2.5 x 10(-10) cm s-1 (EPC). Decreasing lipid chain length increased permeability slightly, while variations in pH had only minor effects on the permeability coefficients of the amino acids tested. Phosphate permeability was in the range of 10(-12)-10(-13) cm s-1 depending on the pH of the medium. The values for the polar and charged amino acids were surprisingly similar to those previously measured for monovalent cations such as sodium and potassium, which are in the range of 10(-12)-10(-13) cm s-1, depending on conditions and the lipid species used. This observation suggests that the permeation rates for the neutral, polar and charged amino acids are controlled by bilayer fluctuations and transient defects, rather than partition coefficients and Born energy barriers. The results are relevant to the permeation of certain peptides into lipid bilayers during protein translocation and membrane biogenesis.

  19. Modulation of lipid rafts by Omega-3 fatty acids in inflammation and cancer: implications for use of lipids during nutrition support.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Rafat A; Harvey, Kevin A; Zaloga, Gary P; Stillwell, William

    2007-02-01

    Current understanding of biologic membrane structure and function is largely based on the concept of lipid rafts. Lipid rafts are composed primarily of tightly packed, liquid-ordered sphingolipids/cholesterol/saturated phospholipids that float in a sea of more unsaturated and loosely packed, liquid-disordered lipids. Lipid rafts have important clinical implications because many important membrane-signaling proteins are located within the raft regions of the membrane, and alterations in raft structure can alter activity of these signaling proteins. Because rafts are lipid-based, their composition, structure, and function are susceptible to manipulation by dietary components such as omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and by cholesterol depletion. We review how alteration of raft lipids affects the raft/nonraft localization and hence the function of several proteins involved in cell signaling. We focus our discussion of raft-signaling proteins on inflammation and cancer.

  20. Regulation of Lipid and Glucose Metabolism by Phosphatidylcholine Transfer Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hye Won; Wei, Jie; Cohen, David E.

    2010-01-01

    Phosphatidylcholine transfer protein (PC-TP, a.k.a. StARD2) binds phosphatidylcholines and catalyzes their intermembrane transfer and exchange in vitro. The structure of PC-TP comprises a hydrophobic pocket and a well-defined head-group binding site, and its gene expression is regulated by peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α. Recent studies have revealed key regulatory roles for PC-TP in lipid and glucose metabolism. Notably, Pctp−/− mice are sensitized to insulin action and exhibit more efficient brown fat-mediated thermogenesis. PC-TP appears to limit access of fatty acids to mitochondria by stimulating the activity of thioesterase superfamily member 2, a newly characterized long-chain fatty acyl-CoA thioesterase. Because PC-TP discriminates among phosphatidylcholines within lipid bilayers, it may function as a sensor that links metabolic regulation to membrane composition. PMID:20338778

  1. Dropping in on the lipid droplet- tumor protein D52 (TPD52) as a new regulator and resident protein

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuyan; Frost, Sarah; Byrne, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lipid droplets are essential for both the storage and retrieval of excess cellular nutrients, and their biology is regulated by a diverse range of cellular proteins, some of which function at the lipid droplet. Numerous studies have characterized lipid droplet proteomes in different organisms and cell types, and RNAi whole genome screening studies have examined the genetic regulation of lipid storage in C. elegans and D. melanogaster. While tumor protein D52 (TPD52) did not emerge from earlier studies as a strong candidate, exogenous expression of human TPD52 in cultured cells resulted in significantly increased numbers of lipid droplets, and oleic acid supplementation increased TPD52 detection at both lipid droplets and the Golgi apparatus. These results suggest that direct testing of proteins that are infrequently but recurrently identified in proteomic and RNAi screening studies may identify novel lipid droplet regulators. While the analysis of these possibly lower-abundance or itinerant lipid droplet proteins may be more technically challenging, such proteins could facilitate a more detailed interrogation of emerging aspects of lipid droplet biology. PMID:27617178

  2. Membrane proteins, lipids and detergents: not just a soap opera.

    PubMed

    Seddon, Annela M; Curnow, Paul; Booth, Paula J

    2004-11-03

    Studying membrane proteins represents a major challenge in protein biochemistry, with one of the major difficulties being the problems encountered when working outside the natural lipid environment. In vitro studies such as crystallization are reliant on the successful solubilization or reconstitution of membrane proteins, which generally involves the careful selection of solubilizing detergents and mixed lipid/detergent systems. This review will concentrate on the methods currently available for efficient reconstitution and solubilization of membrane proteins through the use of detergent micelles, mixed lipid/detergent micelles and bicelles or liposomes. We focus on the relevant molecular properties of the detergents and lipids that aid understanding of these processes. A significant barrier to membrane protein research is retaining the stability and function of the protein during solubilization, reconstitution and crystallization. We highlight some of the lessons learnt from studies of membrane protein folding in vitro and give an overview of the role that lipids can play in stabilizing the proteins.

  3. Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Lipid Bilayers and Tubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirst, Linda S.; Yuan, Jing; Pramudya, Yohannes; Nguyen, Lam T.

    2007-03-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are found in a variety of biological membranes and have been implicated with lipid raft formation and possible function, typical molecules include DHA (Docosahexanoic Acid) and AA (Alphalinoleic Acid) which have been the focus of considerable attention in recent years. We are interested in the phase behavior of these molecules in the lipid bilayer. The addition of lipid molecules with polyunsaturated chains has a clear effect on the fluidity and curvature of the membrane and we investigate the effects the addition of polyunsaturated lipids on bilayer structure and tubule formation. Self-assembled cylindrical lipid tubules have attracted considerable attention because of their interesting structures and potential technological applications. Using x-ray diffraction techniques, Atomic Force Microscopy and confocal fluorescence imaging, both symmetric and mixed chain lipids were incorporated into model membranes and the effects on bilayer structure and tubule formation investigated.

  4. Lipid demixing and protein-protein interactions in the adsorption of charged proteins on mixed membranes.

    PubMed Central

    May, S; Harries, D; Ben-Shaul, A

    2000-01-01

    The adsorption free energy of charged proteins on mixed membranes, containing varying amounts of (oppositely) charged lipids, is calculated based on a mean-field free energy expression that accounts explicitly for the ability of the lipids to demix locally, and for lateral interactions between the adsorbed proteins. Minimization of this free energy functional yields the familiar nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation and the boundary condition at the membrane surface that allows for lipid charge rearrangement. These two self-consistent equations are solved simultaneously. The proteins are modeled as uniformly charged spheres and the (bare) membrane as an ideal two-dimensional binary mixture of charged and neutral lipids. Substantial variations in the lipid charge density profiles are found when highly charged proteins adsorb on weakly charged membranes; the lipids, at a certain demixing entropy penalty, adjust their concentration in the vicinity of the adsorbed protein to achieve optimal charge matching. Lateral repulsive interactions between the adsorbed proteins affect the lipid modulation profile and, at high densities, result in substantial lowering of the binding energy. Adsorption isotherms demonstrating the importance of lipid mobility and protein-protein interactions are calculated using an adsorption equation with a coverage-dependent binding constant. Typically, at bulk-surface equilibrium (i.e., when the membrane surface is "saturated" by adsorbed proteins), the membrane charges are "overcompensated" by the protein charges, because only about half of the protein charges (those on the hemispheres facing the membrane) are involved in charge neutralization. Finally, it is argued that the formation of lipid-protein domains may be enhanced by electrostatic adsorption of proteins, but its origin (e.g., elastic deformations associated with lipid demixing) is not purely electrostatic. PMID:11023883

  5. Investigation of heat induced reactions between lipid oxidation products and amino acids in lipid rich model systems and hazelnuts.

    PubMed

    Karademir, Yeşim; Göncüoğlu, Neslihan; Gökmen, Vural

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the contribution of lipid oxidation to non-enzymatic browning reactions in lipid rich model and actual food systems. Hazelnut oil and model reaction mixtures consisting of different amino acids were heated under certain conditions to determine possible lipid oxidation and non-enzymatic browning reaction products. In model systems, the Schiff base of 2,4-decadienal, its decarboxylated form, and reaction products formed after hydrolytic cleavage of the Schiff base or decarboxylated form were identified by high resolution mass spectrometry. No furosine was detected in hazelnuts after roasting at 160 °C while the concentration of free amino acids significantly decreased. 2,4-Decadienal reacted effectively with all amino acids studied through a Maillard type carbonyl-amine condensation pathway. (2E,4E)-Deca-2,4-dien-1-amine was identified as a typical reaction product in model systems and roasted hazelnuts. In lipid-rich foods like hazelnuts, lipid-derived carbonyls might be responsible for potential modifications of free and protein bound amino acids during heating.

  6. Prion protein accumulation in lipid rafts of mouse aging brain.

    PubMed

    Agostini, Federica; Dotti, Carlos G; Pérez-Cañamás, Azucena; Ledesma, Maria Dolores; Benetti, Federico; Legname, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    The cellular form of the prion protein (PrP(C)) is a normal constituent of neuronal cell membranes. The protein misfolding causes rare neurodegenerative disorders known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies or prion diseases. These maladies can be sporadic, genetic or infectious. Sporadic prion diseases are the most common form mainly affecting aging people. In this work, we investigate the biochemical environment in which sporadic prion diseases may develop, focusing our attention on the cell membrane of neurons in the aging brain. It is well established that with aging the ratio between the most abundant lipid components of rafts undergoes a major change: while cholesterol decreases, sphingomyelin content rises. Our results indicate that the aging process modifies the compartmentalization of PrP(C). In old mice, this change favors PrP(C) accumulation in detergent-resistant membranes, particularly in hippocampi. To confirm the relationship between lipid content changes and PrP(C) translocation into detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs), we looked at PrP(C) compartmentalization in hippocampi from acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) knockout (KO) mice and synaptosomes enriched in sphingomyelin. In the presence of high sphingomyelin content, we observed a significant increase of PrP(C) in DRMS. This process is not due to higher levels of total protein and it could, in turn, favor the onset of sporadic prion diseases during aging as it increases the PrP intermolecular contacts into lipid rafts. We observed that lowering sphingomyelin in scrapie-infected cells by using fumonisin B1 led to a 50% decrease in protease-resistant PrP formation. This may suggest an involvement of PrP lipid environment in prion formation and consequently it may play a role in the onset or development of sporadic forms of prion diseases.

  7. Prion Protein Accumulation in Lipid Rafts of Mouse Aging Brain

    PubMed Central

    Agostini, Federica; Dotti, Carlos G.; Pérez-Cañamás, Azucena; Ledesma, Maria Dolores; Benetti, Federico; Legname, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    The cellular form of the prion protein (PrPC) is a normal constituent of neuronal cell membranes. The protein misfolding causes rare neurodegenerative disorders known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies or prion diseases. These maladies can be sporadic, genetic or infectious. Sporadic prion diseases are the most common form mainly affecting aging people. In this work, we investigate the biochemical environment in which sporadic prion diseases may develop, focusing our attention on the cell membrane of neurons in the aging brain. It is well established that with aging the ratio between the most abundant lipid components of rafts undergoes a major change: while cholesterol decreases, sphingomyelin content rises. Our results indicate that the aging process modifies the compartmentalization of PrPC. In old mice, this change favors PrPC accumulation in detergent-resistant membranes, particularly in hippocampi. To confirm the relationship between lipid content changes and PrPC translocation into detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs), we looked at PrPC compartmentalization in hippocampi from acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) knockout (KO) mice and synaptosomes enriched in sphingomyelin. In the presence of high sphingomyelin content, we observed a significant increase of PrPC in DRMS. This process is not due to higher levels of total protein and it could, in turn, favor the onset of sporadic prion diseases during aging as it increases the PrP intermolecular contacts into lipid rafts. We observed that lowering sphingomyelin in scrapie-infected cells by using fumonisin B1 led to a 50% decrease in protease-resistant PrP formation. This may suggest an involvement of PrP lipid environment in prion formation and consequently it may play a role in the onset or development of sporadic forms of prion diseases. PMID:24040215

  8. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation in human cataractous lens epithelium.

    PubMed

    Vasavada, A R; Thampi, P; Yadav, S; Rawal, U M

    1993-12-01

    The anterior lens epithelial cells undergo a variety of degenerative and proliferative changes during cataract formation. Acid phosphatase is primarily responsible for tissue regeneration and tissue repair. The lipid hydroperoxides that are obtained by lipid peroxidation of polysaturated or unsaturated fatty acids bring about deterioration of biological membranes at cellular and tissue levels. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation activities were studied on the lens epithelial cells of nuclear cataract, posterior subcapsular cataract, mature cataract, and mixed cataract. Of these, mature cataractous lens epithelium showed maximum activity for acid phosphatase (516.83 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium) and maximum levels of lipid peroxidation (86.29 O.D./min/g lens epithelium). In contrast, mixed cataractous lens epithelium showed minimum activity of acid phosphatase (222.61 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium) and minimum levels of lipid peroxidation (54.23 O.D./min/g lens epithelium). From our study, we correlated the maximum activity of acid phosphatase in mature cataractous lens epithelium with the increased areas of superimposed cells associated with the formation of mature cataract. Likewise, the maximum levels of lipid peroxidation in mature cataractous lens epithelium was correlated with increased permeability of the plasma membrane. Conversely, the minimum levels of lipid peroxidation in mixed cataractous lens epithelium makes us presume that factors other than lipid peroxidation may also account for the formation of mixed type of cataract.

  9. Ascorbic acid protects lipids in human plasma and low-density lipoprotein against oxidative damage

    SciTech Connect

    Frei, B. )

    1991-12-01

    The authors exposed human blood plasma and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) to many different oxidative challenges and followed the temporal consumption of endogenous antioxidants in relation to the initiation of oxidative damage. Under all types of oxidizing conditions, ascorbic acid completely protects lipids in plasma and LDL against detectable peroxidative damage as assessed by a specific and highly sensitive assay for lipid peroxidation. Ascorbic acid proved to be superior to the other water-soluble plasma antioxidants bilirubin, uric acid, and protein thiols as well as to the lipoprotein-associated antioxidants alpha-tocopherol, ubiquinol-10, lycopene, and beta-carotene. Although these antioxidants can lower the rate of detectable lipid peroxidation, they are not able to prevent its initiation. Only ascorbic acid is reactive enough to effectively intercept oxidants in the aqueous phase before they can attack and cause detectable oxidative damage to lipids.

  10. Heterologous expression of AtClo1, a plant oil body protein, induces lipid accumulation in yeast.

    PubMed

    Froissard, Marine; D'andréa, Sabine; Boulard, Céline; Chardot, Thierry

    2009-05-01

    Proteomic approaches on lipid bodies have led to the identification of proteins associated with this compartment, showing that, rather than the inert fat depot, lipid droplets appear as complex dynamic organelles with roles in metabolism control and cell signaling. We focused our investigations on caleosin [Arabidopsis thaliana caleosin 1 (AtClo1)], a minor protein of the Arabidopsis thaliana seed lipid body. AtClo1 shares an original triblock structure, which confers to the protein the capacity to insert at the lipid body surface. In addition, AtClo1 possesses a calcium-binding domain. The study of plants deficient in caleosin revealed its involvement in storage lipid degradation during seed germination. Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a heterologous expression system, we investigated the potential role of AtClo1 in lipid body biogenesis and filling. The green fluorescent protein-tagged protein was correctly targeted to lipid bodies. We observed an increase in the number and size of lipid bodies. Moreover, transformed yeasts accumulated more fatty acids (+46.6%). We confirmed that this excess of fatty acids was due to overaccumulation of lipid body neutral lipids, triacylglycerols and steryl esters. We showed that the original intrinsic properties of AtClo1 protein were sufficient to generate a functional lipid body membrane and to promote overaccumulation of storage lipids in yeast oil bodies.

  11. Site-directed lipid modification of IgG-binding protein by intracellular bacterial lipoprotein process.

    PubMed

    Shigematsu, H; Ebihara, T; Yanagida, Y; Haruyama, T; Kobatake, E; Aizawa, M

    1999-09-24

    IgG-binding protein was genetically expressed and lipid-modified in a site-directed manner in Escherichia coli. The DNA sequence encoding the signal peptide and the nine N-terminal amino acid residues of the major lipoprotein of E. coli (lpp) was fused to the sequence of B-domain which was one of the IgG binding domains of Staphylococcal Protein A (SpA). The N-terminal cysteine residue of the resulting protein was enzymatically linked with lipids in the bacterial membrane. The lipid-modified protein was translocated at the bacterial membrane in a manner similar to native bacterial lipoprotein, and it was purified with IgG-Sepharose by affinity chromatography. The lipid modified proteins (lppB1 and lppB5) showed a similar IgG binding activity to unmodified proteins, which was estimated by competitive ELISA. Proteoliposomes of lipid modified proteins were prepared in an elegant fashion so that the IgG binding site should be properly oriented on the surface of an individual liposome by anchoring the lipid-tail into the hydrophobic layer of the liposome membrane. As compared with the unmodified one, the lipid modified protein incorporated into the proteoliposome exhibited higher IgG binding activity.

  12. Effect of surface charge distribution on the adsorption orientation of proteins to lipid monolayers.

    PubMed

    Tiemeyer, Sebastian; Paulus, Michael; Tolan, Metin

    2010-09-07

    The adsorption orientation of the proteins lysozyme and ribonuclease A (RNase A) to a neutral 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and a negatively charged stearic acid lipid film was investigated by means of X-ray reflectivity. Both proteins adsorbed to the negatively charged lipid monolayer, whereas at the neutral monolayer, no adsorption was observed. For acquiring comprehensive information on the proteins' adsorption, X-ray reflectivity data were combined with electron densities obtained from crystallographic data. With this method, it is possible to determine the orientation of adsorbed proteins in solution underneath lipid monolayers. While RNase A specifically coupled with its positively charged active site to the negatively charged lipid monolayer, lysozyme prefers an orientation with its long axis parallel to the Langmuir film. In comparison to the electrostatic maps of the proteins, our results can be explained by the discriminative surface charge distribution of lysozyme and RNase A.

  13. The multiple roles of fatty acid handling proteins in brain

    PubMed Central

    Moullé, Valentine S. F.; Cansell, Céline; Luquet, Serge; Cruciani-Guglielmacci, Céline

    2012-01-01

    Lipids are essential components of a living organism as energy source but also as constituent of the membrane lipid bilayer. In addition fatty acid (FA) derivatives interact with many signaling pathways. FAs have amphipathic properties and therefore require being associated to protein for both transport and intracellular trafficking. Here we will focus on several FA handling proteins, among which the fatty acid translocase/CD36 (FAT/CD36), members of fatty acid transport proteins (FATPs), and lipid chaperones fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs). A decade of extensive studies has helped decipher the mechanism of action of these proteins in peripheral tissue with high lipid metabolism. However, considerably less information is available regarding their role in the brain, despite the high lipid content of this tissue. This review will primarily focus on the recent studies that have highlighted the crucial role of lipid handling proteins in brain FA transport, neuronal differentiation and development, cognitive processes and brain diseases. Finally a special focus will be made on the recent studies that have revealed the role of FAT/CD36 in brain lipid sensing and nervous control of energy balance. PMID:23060810

  14. Performance of structured lipids incorporating selected phenolic and ascorbic acids.

    PubMed

    Gruczynska, Eliza; Przybylski, Roman; Aladedunye, Felix

    2015-04-15

    Conditions applied during frying require antioxidant which is stable at these conditions and provides protection for frying oil and fried food. Novel structured lipids containing nutraceuticals and antioxidants were formed by enzymatic transesterification, exploring canola oil and naturally occurring antioxidants such as ascorbic and selected phenolic acids as substrates. Lipozyme RM IM lipase from Rhizomucor miehei was used as biocatalyst. Frying performance and oxidative stability of the final transesterification products were evaluated. The novel lipids showed significantly improved frying performance compared to canola oil. Oxidative stability assessment of the structured lipids showed significant improvement in resistance to oxidative deterioration compared to original canola oil. Interestingly, the presence of ascorbic acid in an acylglycerol structure protected α-tocopherol against thermal degradation, which was not observed for the phenolic acids. Developed structured lipids containing nutraceuticals and antioxidants may directly affect nutritional properties of lipids also offering nutraceutical ingredients for food formulation.

  15. Effects of protein and peptide addition on lipid oxidation in powder model system.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun Young; Murakami, Hiroshi; Mori, Tomohiko; Matsumura, Yasuki

    2005-01-12

    The effect of protein and peptide addition on the oxidation of eicosapentaenoic acid ethyl ester (EPE) encapsulated by maltodextrin (MD) was investigated. The encapsulated lipid (powder lipid) was prepared in two steps, i.e., mixing of EPE with MD solutions (+/- protein and peptides) to produce emulsions and freeze-drying of the resultant emulsions. EPE oxidation in MD powder progressed more rapidly in the humid state [relative humidity (RH) = 70%] than in the dry state (RH = 10%). The addition of soy protein, soy peptide, and gelatin peptides improved the oxidation stability of EPE encapsulated by MD, and the inhibition of lipid oxidation by the protein and the peptides was more dramatic in the humid state. Especially, the oxidation of EPE was almost perfectly suppressed when the lipid was encapsulated with MD + soy peptide during storage in the humid state for 7 days. Several physical properties such as the lipid particle size of the emulsions, the fraction of nonencapsulated lipids, scanning electron microscopy images of powder lipids, and the mobility of the MD matrix were investigated to find the modification of encapsulation behavior by the addition of the protein and peptides, but no significant change was observed. On the other hand, the protein and peptides exhibited a strong radical scavenging activity in the powder systems as well as in the solution systems. These results suggest that a chemical mechanism such as radical scavenging ability plays an important role in the suppression of EPE oxidation in MD powder by soy proteins, soy peptides, and gelatin peptides.

  16. The effectiveness of a lipid peroxide in oxidizing protein and non-protein thiols

    PubMed Central

    Little, C.; O'Brien, P. J.

    1968-01-01

    1. Thiol oxidation by a lipid peroxide or hydrogen peroxide was as efficient in denatured non-haem proteins as in small thiols. Both peroxides were relatively ineffective in oxidizing haemoprotein thiols, especially at low pH. Increased amounts of haematin decreased greatly the efficiency of GSH oxidation by peroxides especially at low pH. 2. Other than the haematin ring, the thiol group was found to be probably the group in proteins most sensitive to modification by peroxides. 3. At low concentrations, the fatty acid moiety of a lipid peroxide appeared to impede thiol oxidation in proteins, probably by hydrophobic bonding to the protein, rather than to stimulate thiol oxidation by denaturing the protein and thereby increasing the exposure and reactivity of the thiol group. 4. The relative rates of thiol oxidation by peroxides in the different thiols were: haemoprotein thiols>small thiols>other protein thiols. In all cases, thiol oxidation was much more rapid by the lipid peroxide than by hydrogen peroxide. PMID:5637351

  17. Acid test: lipid antigens get into the groove.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Mitchell; Sullivan, Barbara A

    2008-06-01

    How do CD1 molecules load lipid antigens? In this issue of Immunity, Relloso et al. (2008) uncover how lysosomal pH targets amino acids in CD1b, causing it to open and attain a conformation more receptive to lipid antigens.

  18. Ala54Thr polymorphism of the fatty acid binding protein 2 gene and saturated fat intake in relation to lipid levels and insulin resistance: The Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Alanna M.; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Fornage, Myriam; Loria, Catherine M.; Siscovick, David; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2009-01-01

    The Thr54 allele of the intestinal fatty acid-binding protein Ala54Thr functional polymorphism (FABP2) is associated with increased fat oxidation and insulin resistance. We determined the cross-sectional associations of the FABP2 gene with lipid levels and insulin resistance in 2148 participants who completed the year 20 exam of the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study. No significant difference in total cholesterol, low-density or high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol to total cholesterol ratio, or HOMA-IR was found between FABP2 genotypes. However, in the presence of a high saturated fat diet (≥ 53.2 grams per day, the 90th percentile for the population), the AA/AG genotypes (carriers of the Thr54 allele) of FABP2 had statistically significantly higher levels of log(HOMA-IR) (p=0.006) and a lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol to total cholesterol ratio (p=0.03), and borderline statistically significantly higher levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and log(triglycerides) (p-values = 0.08, 0.07, and 0.05, respectively) compared to those with the GG genotype (Ala54 homozygotes). Lipid levels and log(HOMA-IR) did not vary by genotype with saturated fat intake below 53.2 grams per day. Limiting dietary saturated fat intake may be particularly important among carriers of the A allele of FABP2. PMID:19439328

  19. Lipid-protein interactions in Escherichia coli membranes over-expressing the sugar-H(+) symporter, GalP EPR of spin-labelled lipids.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Anne; Henderson, Peter J F; Marsh, Derek

    2003-04-01

    The D-galactose-H(+) symport protein (GalP) of Escherichia coli is a homologue of the human glucose transport protein, GLUT1. After amplified expression of the GalP transporter in E. coli, lipid-protein interactions were studied in gradient-purified inner membranes by using spin-label electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Phosphatidylethanolamine, -glycerol, -choline and -serine, in addition to phosphatidic and stearic acids, were spin-labelled at the 14 C-atom of the sn-2 chain. EPR spectra of these spin labels at probe amounts in GalP membranes consist of two components. One component corresponds to a lipid population whose motion is restricted by direct interaction with the transmembrane sections of the integral protein. The other component corresponds to a lipid population with greater chain mobility, and is similar to the single-component EPR spectrum of the spin-labelled lipids in membranes of E. coli lipid extract. Quantitation of the protein-interacting spin-label component allows determination of the stoichiometry and selectivity of lipid-protein interactions. On average, approximately 20 mol of lipid are motionally restricted per 52 kDa of protein in GalP membranes. At the pH of the transport assay, there is relatively little selectivity between the different phospholipids tested. Only stearic acid displays a stronger preferential interaction with this protein.

  20. FRET microscopy demonstrates molecular association of non-specific lipid transfer protein (nsL-TP) with fatty acid oxidation enzymes in peroxisomes.

    PubMed Central

    Wouters, F S; Bastiaens, P I; Wirtz, K W; Jovin, T M

    1998-01-01

    The fate of fluorescently labeled pre-nsL-TP (Cy3-pre-nsL-TP) microinjected into BALB/c 3T3 fibroblasts was investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The protein exhibited a distinct punctate fluorescence pattern and colocalized to a high degree with the immunofluorescence pattern for the peroxisomal enzyme acyl-CoA oxidase. Proteolytic removal of the C-terminal leucine of the putative peroxisomal targeting sequence (AKL) resulted in a diffuse cytosolic fluorescence. These results indicate that microinjected Cy3-pre-nsL-TP is targeted to peroxisomes. The association of nsL-TP with peroxisomal enzymes was investigated in cells by measuring fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the microinjected Cy3-pre-nsL-TP and Cy5-labeled antibodies against the peroxisomal enzymes acyl-CoA oxidase, 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase, bifunctional enzyme, PMP70 and catalase. The technique of photobleaching digital imaging microscopy (pbDIM), used to quantitate the FRET efficiency on a pixel-by-pixel basis, revealed a specific association of nsL-TP with acyl-CoA oxidase, 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase and bifunctional enzyme in the peroxisomes. These observations were corroborated by subjecting a peroxisomal matrix protein fraction to affinity chromatography on Sepharose-immobilized pre-nsL-TP. Acyl-CoA oxidase was retained. These studies provide strong evidence for a role of nsL-TP in the regulation of peroxisomal fatty acid beta-oxidation, e.g. by facilitating the presentation of substrates and/or stabilization of the enzymes. PMID:9857175

  1. Sasa quelpaertensis and p-coumaric acid attenuate oleic acid-induced lipid accumulation in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Kang, Seong-Il; Shin, Hye-Sun; Yoon, Seon-A; Kang, Seung-Woo; Ko, Hee-Chul; Kim, Se-Jae

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we examined the effects of Jeju dwarf bamboo (Sasa quelpaertensis Nakai) extract (JBE) and p-coumaric acid (CA) on oleic acid (OA)-induced lipid accumulation in HepG2 cells. JBE and CA increased the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and the expression of carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1a (CPT1a) in OA-treated HepG2 cells. Additionally, these compounds decreased sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), fatty acid synthase (FAS), and OA-induced lipid accumulation, suggesting that JBE and CA modulate lipid metabolism in HepG2 cells via the AMPK activation pathway.

  2. Pinolenic Acid Downregulates Lipid Anabolic Pathway in HepG2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ah Ron; Han, Sung Nim

    2016-07-01

    Pine nut oil (PNO) was reported to reduce lipid accumulation in the liver. However, the specific effect of pinolenic acid (18:3, all-cis-Δ5,9,12), a unique component of PNO, on lipid metabolism has not been studied. We hypothesized that pinolenic acid downregulates the lipid anabolic pathway in HepG2 cells. HepG2 cells were incubated in serum-free medium supplemented with 50 μM bovine serum albumin (BSA), palmitic acid, oleic acid, γ-linolenic acid, pinolenic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), or α-linolenic acid for 24 h. Lipid accumulation was determined by Oil Red O (ORO) staining. The mRNA levels of genes related to fatty acid biosynthesis (SREBP1c, FAS, SCD1, and ACC1), fatty acid oxidation (ACC2, PPARα, CPT1A, and ACADL), cholesterol synthesis (SREBP2 and HMGCR), and lipoprotein uptake (LDLr) and of genes that may be involved in the downregulation of the lipogenic pathway (ACSL3, ACSL4, and ACSL5) were determined by qPCR. LDLR protein levels were measured by Western blot analysis. The mRNA levels of SREBP1c, FAS, and SCD1 were significantly downregulated by pinolenic acid treatment compared to BSA control (53, 54, and 38 % lower, respectively). In addition, the mRNA levels of HMGCR, ACSL3, and LDLr were significantly lower (30, 30, and 43 % lower, respectively), and ACSL4 tended to be lower in the pinolenic acid group (20 % lower, P = 0.082) relative to the control group. In conclusion, pinolenic acid downregulated the lipid anabolic pathway in HepG2 cells by reducing expression of genes related to lipid synthesis, lipoprotein uptake, and the regulation of the lipogenic pathway.

  3. Membranes: a meeting point for lipids, proteins and therapies

    PubMed Central

    Escribá, Pablo V; González-Ros, José M; Goñi, Félix M; Kinnunen, Paavo K J; Vigh, Lászlo; Sánchez-Magraner, Lissete; Fernández, Asia M; Busquets, Xavier; Horváth, Ibolya; Barceló-Coblijn, Gwendolyn

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Membranes constitute a meeting point for lipids and proteins. Not only do they define the entity of cells and cytosolic organelles but they also display a wide variety of important functions previously ascribed to the activity of proteins alone. Indeed, lipids have commonly been considered a mere support for the transient or permanent association of membrane proteins, while acting as a selective cell/organelle barrier. However, mounting evidence demonstrates that lipids themselves regulate the location and activity of many membrane proteins, as well as defining membrane microdomains that serve as spatio-temporal platforms for interacting signalling proteins. Membrane lipids are crucial in the fission and fusion of lipid bilayers and they also act as sensors to control environmental or physiological conditions. Lipids and lipid structures participate directly as messengers or regulators of signal transduction. Moreover, their alteration has been associated with the development of numerous diseases. Proteins can interact with membranes through lipid co-/post-translational modifications, and electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions, van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonding are all involved in the associations among membrane proteins and lipids. The present study reviews these interactions from the molecular and biomedical point of view, and the effects of their modulation on the physiological activity of cells, the aetiology of human diseases and the design of clinical drugs. In fact, the influence of lipids on protein function is reflected in the possibility to use these molecular species as targets for therapies against cancer, obesity, neurodegenerative disorders, cardiovascular pathologies and other diseases, using a new approach called membrane-lipid therapy. PMID:18266954

  4. Membranes: a meeting point for lipids, proteins and therapies.

    PubMed

    Escribá, Pablo V; González-Ros, José M; Goñi, Félix M; Kinnunen, Paavo K J; Vigh, Lászlo; Sánchez-Magraner, Lissete; Fernández, Asia M; Busquets, Xavier; Horváth, Ibolya; Barceló-Coblijn, Gwendolyn

    2008-06-01

    Membranes constitute a meeting point for lipids and proteins. Not only do they define the entity of cells and cytosolic organelles but they also display a wide variety of important functions previously ascribed to the activity of proteins alone. Indeed, lipids have commonly been considered a mere support for the transient or permanent association of membrane proteins, while acting as a selective cell/organelle barrier. However, mounting evidence demonstrates that lipids themselves regulate the location and activity of many membrane proteins, as well as defining membrane microdomains that serve as spatio-temporal platforms for interacting signalling proteins. Membrane lipids are crucial in the fission and fusion of lipid bilayers and they also act as sensors to control environmental or physiological conditions. Lipids and lipid structures participate directly as messengers or regulators of signal transduction. Moreover, their alteration has been associated with the development of numerous diseases. Proteins can interact with membranes through lipid co-/post-translational modifications, and electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions, van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonding are all involved in the associations among membrane proteins and lipids. The present study reviews these interactions from the molecular and biomedical point of view, and the effects of their modulation on the physiological activity of cells, the aetiology of human diseases and the design of clinical drugs. In fact, the influence of lipids on protein function is reflected in the possibility to use these molecular species as targets for therapies against cancer, obesity, neurodegenerative disorders, cardiovascular pathologies and other diseases, using a new approach called membrane-lipid therapy.

  5. Ultraviolet and 5'fluorodeoxyuridine induced random mutagenesis in Chlorella vulgaris and its impact on fatty acid profile: a new insight on lipid-metabolizing genes and structural characterization of related proteins.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Josephine; Rangamaran, Vijaya Raghavan; Gopal, Dharani; Shivasankarasubbiah, Kumar T; Thilagam, Mary Leema J; Peter Dhassiah, Magesh; Padinjattayil, Divya Shridhar M; Valsalan, VinithKumar N; Manambrakat, Vijayakumaran; Dakshinamurthy, Sivakumar; Thirunavukkarasu, Sivaraman; Ramalingam, Kirubagaran

    2015-02-01

    The present study was aimed at randomly mutating the microalga, Chlorella vulgaris, in order to alter its cellular behaviour towards increased lipid production for efficient biodiesel production from algal biomass. Individual mutants from ultraviolet light (UV-1 (30 s exposure), UV-2 (60 s exposure) and UV-3 (90 s exposure)) and 5'fluorodeoxyuridine (5'FDU-1 (0.25 mM) and 5'FDU-2 (0.50 mM)) exposed cells were identified to explore an alternative method for lipid enhancement. A marginally significant decrease in biomass in the UV mutants; marked increase in the lipid content in UV-2 and 5'FDU-1 mutants; significant increase in saturated fatty acids level, especially in UV-2 mutant; insignificant increase in lipid production when these mutants were subjected to an additional stress of nitrogen starvation and predominantly enhanced level of unsaturated fatty acids in all the strains except UV-2 were noted. Chloroplast ultrastructural alterations and defective biosynthesis of chloroplast specific lipid constituents were observed in the mutants. Modelling of three-dimensional structures of acetyl coA carboxylase (ACCase), omega-6, plastid delta-12 and microsomal delta-12 fatty acid desaturases for the first time and ligand-interaction studies greatly substantiated our findings. A replacement of leucine by a serine residue in the acetyl coA carboxylase gene of UV-2 mutant suggests the reason behind lipid enhancement in UV-2 mutant. Higher activity of ACCase in UV-2 and 5'FDU-1 strongly proves the functional consequences of gene mutation to lipid production. In conclusion, algal mutants exhibited significant impact on biodiesel production through structural alterations in the lipid-metabolizing genes, thereby enhancing lipid production and saturated fatty acid levels.

  6. Fatty acid methyl ester profiles of bat wing surface lipids.

    PubMed

    Pannkuk, Evan L; Fuller, Nathan W; Moore, Patrick R; Gilmore, David F; Savary, Brett J; Risch, Thomas S

    2014-11-01

    Sebocytes are specialized epithelial cells that rupture to secrete sebaceous lipids (sebum) across the mammalian integument. Sebum protects the integument from UV radiation, and maintains host microbial communities among other functions. Native glandular sebum is composed primarily of triacylglycerides (TAG) and wax esters (WE). Upon secretion (mature sebum), these lipids combine with minor cellular membrane components comprising total surface lipids. TAG and WE are further cleaved to smaller molecules through oxidation or host enzymatic digestion, resulting in a complex mixture of glycerolipids (e.g., TAG), sterols, unesterified fatty acids (FFA), WE, cholesteryl esters, and squalene comprising surface lipid. We are interested if fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profiling of bat surface lipid could predict species specificity to the cutaneous fungal disease, white nose syndrome (WNS). We collected sebaceous secretions from 13 bat spp. using Sebutape(®) and converted them to FAME with an acid catalyzed transesterification. We found that Sebutape(®) adhesive patches removed ~6× more total lipid than Sebutape(®) indicator strips. Juvenile eastern red bats (Lasiurus borealis) had significantly higher 18:1 than adults, but 14:0, 16:1, and 20:0 were higher in adults. FAME profiles among several bat species were similar. We concluded that bat surface lipid FAME profiling does not provide a robust model predicting species susceptibility to WNS. However, these results provide baseline data that can be used for lipid roles in future ecological studies, such as life history, diet, or migration.

  7. Nucleic acid-lipid membrane interactions studied by DSC.

    PubMed

    Giatrellis, Sarantis; Nounesis, George

    2011-01-01

    The interactions of nucleic acids with lipid membranes are of great importance for biological mechanisms as well as for biotechnological applications in gene delivery and drug carriers. The optimization of liposomal vectors for clinical use is absolutely dependent upon the formation mechanisms, the morphology, and the molecular organization of the lipoplexes, that is, the complexes of lipid membranes with DNA. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) has emerged as an efficient and relatively easy-to-operate experimental technique that can straightforwardly provide data related to the thermodynamics and the kinetics of the DNA-lipid complexation and especially to the lipid organization and phase transitions within the membrane. In this review, we summarize DSC studies considering nucleic acid-membrane systems, accentuating DSC capabilities, and data analysis. Published work involving cationic, anionic, and zwitterionic lipids as well as lipid mixtures interacting with RNA and DNA of different sizes and conformations are included. It is shown that despite limitations, issues such as DNA- or RNA-induced phase separation and microdomain lipid segregation, liposomal aggregation and fusion, alterations of the lipid long-range molecular order, as well as membrane-induced structural changes of the nucleic acids can be efficiently treated by systematic high-sensitivity DSC studies.

  8. Enhanced lipid extraction from algae using free nitrous acid pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xue; Naghdi, Forough Ghasemi; Ye, Liu; Lant, Paul; Pratt, Steven

    2014-05-01

    Lipid extraction has been identified as a major bottleneck for large-scale algal biodiesel production. In this work free nitrous acid (FNA) is presented as an effective and low cost pretreatment to enhance lipid recovery from algae. Two batch tests, with a range of FNA additions, were conducted to disrupt algal cells prior to lipid extraction by organic solvents. Total accessible lipid content was quantified by the Bligh and Dyer method, and was found to increase with pretreatment time (up to 48 h) and FNA concentration (up to 2.19 mg HNO2-N/L). Hexane extraction was used to study industrially accessible lipids. The mass transfer coefficient (k) for lipid extraction using hexane from algae treated with 2.19 mg HNO2-N/L FNA was found to be dramatically higher than for extraction from untreated algae. Consistent with extraction results, cell disruption analysis indicated the disruption of the cell membrane barrier.

  9. Perilipin-related protein regulates lipid metabolism in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chughtai, Ahmed Ali; Kaššák, Filip; Kostrouchová, Markéta; Novotný, Jan Philipp; Krause, Michael W.; Kostrouch, Zdenek

    2015-01-01

    Perilipins are lipid droplet surface proteins that contribute to fat metabolism by controlling the access of lipids to lipolytic enzymes. Perilipins have been identified in organisms as diverse as metazoa, fungi, and amoebas but strikingly not in nematodes. Here we identify the protein encoded by the W01A8.1 gene in Caenorhabditis elegans as the closest homologue and likely orthologue of metazoan perilipin. We demonstrate that nematode W01A8.1 is a cytoplasmic protein residing on lipid droplets similarly as human perilipins 1 and 2. Downregulation or elimination of W01A8.1 affects the appearance of lipid droplets resulting in the formation of large lipid droplets localized around the dividing nucleus during the early zygotic divisions. Visualization of lipid containing structures by CARS microscopy in vivo showed that lipid-containing structures become gradually enlarged during oogenesis and relocate during the first zygotic division around the dividing nucleus. In mutant embryos, the lipid containing structures show defective intracellular distribution in subsequent embryonic divisions and become gradually smaller during further development. In contrast to embryos, lipid-containing structures in enterocytes and in epidermal cells of adult animals are smaller in mutants than in wild type animals. Our results demonstrate the existence of a perilipin-related regulation of fat metabolism in nematodes and provide new possibilities for functional studies of lipid metabolism. PMID:26357594

  10. Silkworm pupae (Bombyx mori) are new sources of high quality protein and lipid.

    PubMed

    Tomotake, Hiroyuki; Katagiri, Mitsuaki; Yamato, Masayuki

    2010-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the nutritional value of silkworm pupae (Bombyx mori) and the content of α-glucosidase inhibitor. The percentages of total protein and lipid contents by dry weight were 55.6 and 32.2%, respectively. Silkworm pupae protein had high levels of essential amino acids such as valine, methionine and phenylalanine. The contents of essential amino acids in silkworm pupae protein satisfied the FAO/WHO/UNU suggested requirements (2007). In addition, they also possessed n-3 fatty acids, especially α-linolenic acid (36.3%), as a major component. The 50% ethanol extract of silkworm pupae contained 1-deoxynojirimycin (DNJ), which is a potent α-glucosidase inhibitor. These results suggest that silkworm pupae are a new source of high quality protein, lipid, and α-glucosidase inhibitor.

  11. Lipids and topological rules governing membrane protein assembly☆

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanov, Mikhail; Dowhan, William; Vitrac, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    Membrane protein folding and topogenesis are tuned to a given lipid profile since lipids and proteins have co-evolved to follow a set of interdependent rules governing final protein topological organization. Transmembrane domain (TMD) topology is determined via a dynamic process in which topogenic signals in the nascent protein are recognized and interpreted initially by the translocon followed by a given lipid profile in accordance with the Positive Inside Rule. The net zero charged phospholipid phosphatidylethanolamine and other neutral lipids dampen the translocation potential of negatively charged residues in favor of the cytoplasmic retention potential of positively charged residues (Charge Balance Rule). This explains why positively charged residues are more potent topological signals than negatively charged residues. Dynamic changes in orientation of TMDs during or after membrane insertion are attributed to non-sequential cooperative and collective lipid–protein charge interactions as well as long-term interactions within a protein. The proportion of dual topological conformers of a membrane protein varies in a dose responsive manner with changes in the membrane lipid composition not only in vivo but also in vitro and therefore is determined by the membrane lipid composition. Switching between two opposite TMD topologies can occur in either direction in vivo and also in liposomes (designated as fliposomes) independent of any other cellular factors. Such lipid-dependent post-insertional reversibility of TMD orientation indicates a thermodynamically driven process that can occur at any time and in any cell membrane driven by changes in the lipid composition. This dynamic view of protein topological organization influenced by the lipid environment reveals previously unrecognized possibilities for cellular regulation and understanding of disease states resulting from mis-folded proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein Trafficking

  12. Interaction of aldehydes derived from lipid peroxidation and membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pizzimenti, Stefania; Ciamporcero, Eric; Daga, Martina; Pettazzoni, Piergiorgio; Arcaro, Alessia; Cetrangolo, Gianpaolo; Minelli, Rosalba; Dianzani, Chiara; Lepore, Alessio; Gentile, Fabrizio; Barrera, Giuseppina

    2013-01-01

    A great variety of compounds are formed during lipid peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids of membrane phospholipids. Among them, bioactive aldehydes, such as 4-hydroxyalkenals, malondialdehyde (MDA) and acrolein, have received particular attention since they have been considered as toxic messengers that can propagate and amplify oxidative injury. In the 4-hydroxyalkenal class, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) is the most intensively studied aldehyde, in relation not only to its toxic function, but also to its physiological role. Indeed, HNE can be found at low concentrations in human tissues and plasma and participates in the control of biological processes, such as signal transduction, cell proliferation, and differentiation. Moreover, at low doses, HNE exerts an anti-cancer effect, by inhibiting cell proliferation, angiogenesis, cell adhesion and by inducing differentiation and/or apoptosis in various tumor cell lines. It is very likely that a substantial fraction of the effects observed in cellular responses, induced by HNE and related aldehydes, be mediated by their interaction with proteins, resulting in the formation of covalent adducts or in the modulation of their expression and/or activity. In this review we focus on membrane proteins affected by lipid peroxidation-derived aldehydes, under physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:24027536

  13. Steady-state compartmentalization of lipid membranes by active proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Sabra, M C; Mouritsen, O G

    1998-01-01

    Using a simple microscopic model of lipid-protein interactions, based on the hydrophobic matching principle, we study some generic aspects of lipid-membrane compartmentalization controlled by a dispersion of active integral membrane proteins. The activity of the proteins is simulated by conformational excitations governed by an external drive, and the deexcitation is controlled by interaction of the protein with its lipid surroundings. In response to the flux of energy into the proteins from the environment and the subsequent dissipation of energy into the lipid bilayer, the lipid-protein assembly reorganizes into a steady-state structure with a typical length scale determined by the strength of the external drive. In the specific case of a mixed dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine-distearoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer in the gel-fluid coexistence region, it is shown explicitly by computer simulation that the activity of an integral membrane protein can lead to a compartmentalization of the lipid-bilayer membrane. The compartmentalization is related to the dynamical process of phase separation and lipid domain formation. PMID:9533687

  14. Curvature forces in membrane lipid-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Brown, Michael F

    2012-12-11

    Membrane biochemists are becoming increasingly aware of the role of lipid-protein interactions in diverse cellular functions. This review describes how conformational changes in membrane proteins, involving folding, stability, and membrane shape transitions, potentially involve elastic remodeling of the lipid bilayer. Evidence suggests that membrane lipids affect proteins through interactions of a relatively long-range nature, extending beyond a single annulus of next-neighbor boundary lipids. It is assumed the distance scale of the forces is large compared to the molecular range of action. Application of the theory of elasticity to flexible soft surfaces derives from classical physics and explains the polymorphism of both detergents and membrane phospholipids. A flexible surface model (FSM) describes the balance of curvature and hydrophobic forces in lipid-protein interactions. Chemically nonspecific properties of the lipid bilayer modulate the conformational energetics of membrane proteins. The new biomembrane model challenges the standard model (the fluid mosaic model) found in biochemistry texts. The idea of a curvature force field based on data first introduced for rhodopsin gives a bridge between theory and experiment. Influences of bilayer thickness, nonlamellar-forming lipids, detergents, and osmotic stress are all explained by the FSM. An increased awareness of curvature forces suggests that research will accelerate as structural biology becomes more closely entwined with the physical chemistry of lipids in explaining membrane structure and function.

  15. Arabidopsis chloroplast lipid transport protein TGD2 disrupts membranes and is part of a large complex.

    PubMed

    Roston, Rebecca; Gao, Jinpeng; Xu, Changcheng; Benning, Christoph

    2011-06-01

    In most plants the assembly of the photosynthetic thylakoid membrane requires lipid precursors synthesized at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Thus, the transport of lipids from the ER to the chloroplast is essential for biogenesis of the thylakoids. TGD2 is one of four proteins in Arabidopsis required for lipid import into the chloroplast, and was found to bind phosphatidic acid in vitro. However, the significance of phosphatidic acid binding for the function of TGD2 in vivo and TGD2 interaction with membranes remained unclear. Developing three functional assays probing how TGD2 affects lipid bilayers in vitro, we show that it perturbs membranes to the point of fusion, causes liposome leakage and redistributes lipids in the bilayer. By identifying and characterizing five new mutant alleles, we demonstrate that these functions are impaired in specific mutants with lipid phenotypes in vivo. At the structural level, we show that TGD2 is part of a protein complex larger than 500 kDa, the formation of which is disrupted in two mutant alleles, indicative of the biological relevance of this TGD2-containing complex. Based on the data presented, we propose that TGD2, as part of a larger complex, forms a lipid transport conduit between the inner and outer chloroplast envelope membranes, with its N terminus anchored in the inner membrane and its C terminus binding phosphatidic acid in the outer membrane.

  16. Protein restriction during pregnancy affects maternal liver lipid metabolism and fetal brain lipid composition in the rat.

    PubMed

    Torres, Nimbe; Bautista, Claudia J; Tovar, Armando R; Ordáz, Guillermo; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Ortiz, Victor; Granados, Omar; Nathanielsz, Peter W; Larrea, Fernando; Zambrano, Elena

    2010-02-01

    Suboptimal developmental environments program offspring to lifelong metabolic problems. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of protein restriction in pregnancy on maternal liver lipid metabolism at 19 days of gestation (dG) and its effect on fetal brain development. Control (C) and restricted (R) mothers were fed with isocaloric diets containing 20 and 10% of casein. At 19 dG, maternal blood and livers and fetal livers and brains were collected. Serum insulin and leptin levels were determinate in mothers. Maternal and fetal liver lipid and fetal brain lipid quantification were performed. Maternal liver and fetal brain fatty acids were quantified by gas chromatography. In mothers, liver desaturase and elongase mRNAs were measured by RT-PCR. Maternal body and liver weights were similar in both groups. However, fat body composition, including liver lipids, was lower in R mothers. A higher fasting insulin at 19 dG in the R group was observed (C = 0.2 +/- 0.04 vs. R = 0.9 +/- 0.16 ng/ml, P < 0.01) and was inversely related to early growth retardation. Serum leptin in R mothers was significantly higher than that observed in C rats (C = 5 +/- 0.1 vs. R = 7 +/- 0.7 ng/ml, P < 0.05). In addition, protein restriction significantly reduced gene expression in maternal liver of desaturases and elongases and the concentration of arachidonic (AA) and docosahexanoic (DHA) acids. In fetus from R mothers, a low body weight (C = 3 +/- 0.3 vs. R = 2 +/- 0.1 g, P < 0.05), as well as liver and brain lipids, including the content of DHA in the brain, was reduced. This study showed that protein restriction during pregnancy may negatively impact normal fetal brain development by changes in maternal lipid metabolism.

  17. Expression, purification, crystallization and structure of human adipocyte lipid-binding protein (aP2)

    SciTech Connect

    Marr, Eric; Tardie, Mark; Carty, Maynard; Brown Phillips, Tracy; Wang, Ing-Kae; Soeller, Walt; Qiu, Xiayang Karam, George

    2006-11-01

    The crystal structure of human adipocyte lipid-binding protein (aP2) with a bound palmitate is reported at 1.5 Å resolution. Human adipocyte lipid-binding protein (aP2) belongs to a family of intracellular lipid-binding proteins involved in the transport and storage of lipids. Here, the crystal structure of human aP2 with a bound palmitate is described at 1.5 Å resolution. Unlike the known crystal structure of murine aP2 in complex with palmitate, this structure shows that the fatty acid is in a folded conformation and that the loop containing Phe57 acts as a lid to regulate ligand binding by excluding solvent exposure to the central binding cavity.

  18. Perfluorononanoic acid disturbed the metabolism of lipid in the liver of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xuemei; Gao, Guizhen; Zhang, Xingtao; Wang, Haichao

    2015-01-01

    Most studies on the liver toxicity of perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) are focused on healthy individuals, whereas the effects of PFCs on individuals with diabetes mellitus have not been fully characterized. This study aimed to investigate the acute exposure of perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) on the metabolism of lipid in the liver of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Male diabetic rats were orally dosed by gavage for 7 days with 0, 0.2, 1 and 5 mg/kg/day PFNA. The contents of lipid, the activities of enzyme, the expressions of protein in the liver and the serum parameters were detected. The results indicate that dose-dependent accumulation of triglyceride and total cholesterol occurred in the livers of diabetic rats after PFNA treatment. PFNA increased the activities of lipid synthetase, fatty acid synthease, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and decreased the activity of lipolytic enzyme, hepatic lipase, in the liver of diabetic rats. The changes of the isocitrate dehydrogenase, malicenzyme and lipoprotein lipase were not obvious. The expressions of protein related to lipid homeostasis, liver X receptor α and apolipoprotein E, were decreased after PFNA administration. Exposure to PFNA also increased the activity of serum alanine aminotransferase in diabetic rats. In conclusion, this study discloses that exposure to PFNA impacts on enzymes and proteins related to liver lipid metabolism and lead to obvious accumulation of lipid in the liver of diabetic rats, which may be responsible for hepatotoxicity of this compound in individuals with diabetes mellitus.

  19. Curvature Forces in Membrane Lipid-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    Membrane biochemists are becoming increasingly aware of the role of lipid-protein interactions in diverse cellular functions. This review describes how conformational changes of membrane proteins—involving folding, stability, and membrane shape transitions—potentially involve elastic remodeling of the lipid bilayer. Evidence suggests that membrane lipids affect proteins through interactions of a relatively long-range nature, extending beyond a single annulus of next-neighbor boundary lipids. It is assumed the distance scale of the forces is large compared to the molecular range of action. Application of the theory of elasticity to flexible soft surfaces derives from classical physics, and explains the polymorphism of both detergents and membrane phospholipids. A flexible surface model (FSM) describes the balance of curvature and hydrophobic forces in lipid-protein interactions. Chemically nonspecific properties of the lipid bilayer modulate the conformational energetics of membrane proteins. The new biomembrane model challenges the standard model (the fluid mosaic model) found in biochemistry texts. The idea of a curvature force field based on data first introduced for rhodopsin gives a bridge between theory and experiment. Influences of bilayer thickness, nonlamellar-forming lipids, detergents, and osmotic stress are all explained by the FSM. An increased awareness of curvature forces suggests that research will accelerate as structural biology becomes more closely entwined with the physical chemistry of lipids in explaining membrane structure and function. PMID:23163284

  20. Acid Base Equilibrium in a Lipid/Water Gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streb, Kristina K.; Ilich, Predrag-Peter

    2003-12-01

    A new and original experiment in which partition of bromophenol blue dye between water and lipid/water gel causes a shift in the acid base equilibrium of the dye is described. The dye-absorbing material is a monoglyceride food additive of plant origin that mixes freely with water to form a stable cubic phase gel; the nascent gel absorbs the dye from aqueous solution and converts it to the acidic form. There are three concurrent processes taking place in the experiment: (a) formation of the lipid/water gel, (b) absorption of the dye by the gel, and (c) protonation of the dye in the lipid/water gel environment. As the aqueous solution of the dye is a deep purple-blue color at neutral pH and yellow at acidic pH the result of these processes is visually striking: the strongly green-yellow particles of lipid/water gel are suspended in purple-blue aqueous solution. The local acidity of the lipid/water gel is estimated by UV vis spectrophotometry. This experiment is an example of host-guest (lipid/water gel dye) interaction and is suitable for project-type biophysics, physical chemistry, or biochemistry labs. The experiment requires three, 3-hour lab sessions, two of which must not be separated by more than two days.

  1. [Linoleic acid and the immune system. Controversies about lipid emulsions].

    PubMed

    García de Lorenzo, A; Culebras, J M

    1992-01-01

    The selection of a given lipidic function for nutritional backup requires not only knowledge of the metabolism of the different existing lipidic emulsions and of their specific therapeutic indications, but also of their contraindications and controversies because, apart from their calorific value, the contribution of liposoluble vitamins and their function in preventing essential fatty acid deficiencies, we know that they are powerful metabolic modulators. This in associated with the fact that manipulation of dietary lipids (enteral or parenteral) can affect and modulate the response to the disease, attack or infection by improving or impairing the different immune functions. This review is focused on the scientific publications which have examined the varying effects of lipidic emulsions, in quantity and in quality (particularly linoleic acid) on the immune system, on the fatty acid composition of the cellular membranes and on the production of and prostaglandins and leukotrienes. An update is given of the known interrelation between lipids and immunity, with appraisal of triglycerides and long-medium -- and short-chain fatty acids, mixtures of medium -- and long-chain triglycerides, the proportions between infinity-3/infinity-6, and structured lipids.

  2. Probing the thermodynamics of protein-lipid interactions by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Swamy, Musti J; Sankhala, Rajeshwer S

    2013-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry is a highly sensitive technique for the study of molecular interactions. This method has been applied quite extensively to investigate the interaction of proteins with small ligands, other proteins, and nucleic acids as well as with drugs and metal ions. In this chapter, we describe the application of ITC for the investigation of thermodynamics of protein-lipid interaction. A number of parameters such as enthalpy of binding (ΔH), entropy of binding (ΔS), association constant (K (a)), binding stoichiometry (n), and free energy of binding (ΔG) can be obtained from a single calorimetric titration, providing a complete thermodynamic characterization of the interaction. The method is described in detail taking the major protein of the bovine seminal plasma, PDC-109, which exhibits a high preference for interaction with choline-containing lipids, as an example. The method can be applied to investigate the thermodynamics of the interaction of other soluble proteins with lipid membranes.

  3. Novel interference in thiobarbituric acid assay for lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, W A; Baker, N; Hill, V A; Wright, E T

    1975-05-01

    The thiobarbituric acid test for lipid peroxidation, when applied to a mixture of acetaldehyde and sucrose, produces a 532 nm aborbing chromogen which is indistinguishable from that formed by malonaldehyde and thiobarbituric acid. Unless special procedures are adopted to correct for this effect, the combined action of acetaldehyde and sucrose interferes seriously with the assay of lipid peroxidation reactions, notably those implicated in alcohol-induced liver injuries. However, this unusual thiobarbituric acid effect also can be used as a sensitive method for the detection of acetaldehyde.

  4. Lipids in the assembly of membrane proteins and organization of protein supercomplexes: implications for lipid-linked disorders.

    PubMed

    Bogdanov, Mikhail; Mileykovskaya, Eugenia; Dowhan, William

    2008-01-01

    Lipids play important roles in cellular dysfunction leading to disease. Although a major role for phospholipids is in defining the membrane permeability barrier, phospholipids play a central role in a diverse range of cellular processes and therefore are important factors in cellular dysfunction and disease. This review is focused on the role of phospholipids in normal assembly and organization of the membrane proteins, multimeric protein complexes, and higher order supercomplexes. Since lipids have no catalytic activity, it is difficult to determine their function at the molecular level. Lipid function has generally been defined by affects on protein function or cellular processes. Molecular details derived from genetic, biochemical, and structural approaches are presented for involvement of phosphatidylethanolamine and cardiolipin in protein organization. Experimental evidence is presented that changes in phosphatidylethanolamine levels results in misfolding and topological misorientation of membrane proteins leading to dysfunctional proteins. Examples are presented for diseases in which proper protein folding or topological organization is not attained due to either demonstrated or proposed involvement of a lipid. Similar changes in cardiolipin levels affects the structure and function of individual components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain and their organization into supercomplexes resulting in reduced mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation efficiency and apoptosis. Diseases in which mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to reduced cardiolipin levels are described. Therefore, understanding the principles governing lipid-dependent assembly and organization of membrane proteins and protein complexes will be useful in developing novel therapeutic approaches for disorders in which lipids play an important role.

  5. The Interactions between SP-B Protein and Anionic Lipids Found in Human Lung Surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ka Yee C.; Lipp, Michael M.; Zasadzinski, Joseph A.; Waring, Alan J.

    1997-03-01

    Several lung pathologies, including neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, are characterized by a failure of the lung surfactant (LS) system to function properly. Utilizing fluorescence and Brewster angle microscopy, we have investigated the phase behavior of monolayers of binary mixtures of anionic lipids found in LS (palmitic acid, and both saturated and unsaturated phosphatidylglycerol) with both the full length SP-B protein and a shorter, 25-amino acid sequence based on its amino terminus. We found that both protein candidates interact specifically yet differently with each of the lipid components, altering their phase behavior to resemble more closely to that of an ideal LS monolayer. The SP-B protein incorporates itself in the lipid monolayer in all cases, and partitions preferentially into the fluid-type phases during phase transitions; its presence drastically changes the collapse mechanism of the monolayer.

  6. Direct comparison of fatty acid ratios in single cellular lipid droplets as determined by comparative Raman spectroscopy and gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Schie, Iwan W; Nolte, Lena; Pedersen, Theresa L; Smith, Zach; Wu, Jian; Yahiatène, Idir; Newman, John W; Huser, Thomas

    2013-11-07

    Cellular lipid droplets are the least studied and least understood cellular organelles in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Despite a significant body of research studying the physiology of lipid droplets it has not yet been possible to fully determine the composition of individual cellular lipid droplets. In this paper we use Raman spectroscopy on single cellular lipid droplets and least-squares fitting of pure fatty acid spectra to determine the composition of individual lipid droplets in cells after treatment with different ratios of oleic and palmitic acid. We validate the results of the Raman spectroscopy-based single lipid droplet analysis with results obtained by gas chromatography analysis of millions of cells, and find that our approach can accurately predict the relative amount of a specific fatty acid in the lipid droplet. Based on these results we show that the fatty acid composition in individual lipid droplets is on average similar to that of all lipid droplets found in the sample. Furthermore, we expand this approach to the investigation of the lipid composition in single cellular peroxisomes. We determine the location of cellular peroxisomes based on two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) imaging of peroxisomes labeled with the green fluorescent protein, and successive Raman spectroscopy of peroxisomes. We find that in some cases peroxisomes can produce a detectable CARS signal, and that the peroxisomal Raman spectra exhibit an oleic acid-like signature.

  7. Dynamic Lipid-dependent Modulation of Protein Topology by Post-translational Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Vitrac, Heidi; MacLean, David M; Karlstaedt, Anja; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Jayaraman, Vasanthi; Bogdanov, Mikhail; Dowhan, William

    2017-02-03

    Membrane protein topology and folding are governed by structural principles and topogenic signals that are recognized and decoded by the protein insertion and translocation machineries at the time of initial membrane insertion and folding. We previously demonstrated that the lipid environment is also a determinant of initial protein topology, which is dynamically responsive to post-assembly changes in membrane lipid composition. However, the effect on protein topology of post-assembly phosphorylation of amino acids localized within initially cytoplasmically oriented extramembrane domains has never been investigated. Here, we show in a controlled in vitro system that phosphorylation of a membrane protein can trigger a change in topological arrangement. The rate of change occurred on a scale of seconds, comparable with the rates observed upon changes in the protein lipid environment. The rate and extent of topological rearrangement were dependent on the charges of extramembrane domains and the lipid bilayer surface. Using model membranes mimicking the lipid compositions of eukaryotic organelles, we determined that anionic lipids, cholesterol, sphingomyelin, and membrane fluidity play critical roles in these processes. Our results demonstrate how post-translational modifications may influence membrane protein topology in a lipid-dependent manner, both along the organelle trafficking pathway and at their final destination. The results provide further evidence that membrane protein topology is dynamic, integrating for the first time the effect of changes in lipid composition and regulators of cellular processes. The discovery of a new topology regulatory mechanism opens additional avenues for understanding unexplored structure-function relationships and the development of optimized topology prediction tools.

  8. Lipid Dependent Mechanisms of Protein Pump Activity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-29

    AD -A26 4 48~_ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ IDF C~ tl~,’ ApiZ’ C, tdfii 1111iII~iji .. rirTATION PAGE OWNo0MB ý8 2a SECURITY CLASSiFICAT ON. A 3 0SR37...between lipid composition and the spontaneous curva - ture of native membranes. The first two specific objectives were successfully met, while the...1992). Basically, the results show that the spontaneous curva - tures of lipids extracted from mycoplasma membranes cluster tightly, even under growth

  9. The role of lipid-protein interactions in amyloid-type protein fibril formation.

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, Galyna P; Kinnunen, Paavo K J

    2006-06-01

    Structural transition of polypeptide chains into the beta-sheet state followed by amyloid fibril formation is the key characteristic of a number of the so-called conformational diseases. The multistep process of protein fibrillization can be modulated by a variety of factors, in particular by lipid-protein interactions. A wealth of experimental evidence provides support to the notion that amyloid fibril assembly and the toxicity of pre-fibrillar aggregates are closely related and are both intimately membrane associated phenomena. The present review summarizes the principal factors responsible for the enhancement of fibril formation in a membrane environment, viz. (i) structural transformation of polypeptide chain into a partially folded conformation, (ii) increase of the local concentration of a protein upon its membrane binding, (iii) aggregation-favoring orientation of the bound protein, and (iv) variation in the depth of bilayer penetration affecting the nucleation propensity of the membrane associated protein. The molecular mechanisms of membrane-mediated protein fibrillization are discussed. Importantly, the toxicity of lipid-induced pre-fibrillar aggregates is likely to have presented a very strong negative selection pressure in the evolution of amino acid sequences.

  10. Solubilization of lipids and lipid phases by the styrene-maleic acid copolymer.

    PubMed

    Dominguez Pardo, Juan J; Dörr, Jonas M; Iyer, Aditya; Cox, Ruud C; Scheidelaar, Stefan; Koorengevel, Martijn C; Subramaniam, Vinod; Killian, J Antoinette

    2017-01-01

    A promising tool in membrane research is the use of the styrene-maleic acid (SMA) copolymer to solubilize membranes in the form of nanodiscs. Since membranes are heterogeneous in composition, it is important to know whether SMA thereby has a preference for solubilization of either specific types of lipids or specific bilayer phases. Here, we investigated this by performing partial solubilization of model membranes and analyzing the lipid composition of the solubilized fraction. We found that SMA displays no significant lipid preference in homogeneous binary lipid mixtures in the fluid phase, even when using lipids that by themselves show very different solubilization kinetics. By contrast, in heterogeneous phase-separated bilayers, SMA was found to have a strong preference for solubilization of lipids in the fluid phase as compared to those in either a gel phase or a liquid-ordered phase. Together the results suggest that (1) SMA is a reliable tool to characterize native interactions between membrane constituents, (2) any solubilization preference of SMA is not due to properties of individual lipids but rather due to properties of the membrane or membrane domains in which these lipids reside and (3) exploiting SMA resistance rather than detergent resistance may be an attractive approach for the isolation of ordered domains from biological membranes.

  11. Lipid and fatty acid analysis of the Plodia interpunctella granulosis virus (PiGV) envelope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shastri-Bhalla, K.; Funk, C. J.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Virus envelope was isolated from Plodia interpunctella granulosis virus, produced in early fourth-instar larvae. Both polar and neutral lipids were analyzed by two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography. Fatty acid composition of various individual neutral and polar lipids was determined by gas-liquid chromatography. The major components of envelope neutral lipid were diacylglycerols. Palmitic acid and stearic acid were the major saturated fatty acids in both polar and neutral lipids. Whereas palmitoleic acid was the major unsaturated fatty acids in neutral lipids, oleic acid was the major unsaturated fatty acid in the polar lipids.

  12. Reduced Lateral Mobility of Lipids and Proteins in Crowded Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Goose, Joseph E.; Sansom, Mark S. P.

    2013-01-01

    Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of the E. coli outer membrane proteins FhuA, LamB, NanC, OmpA and OmpF in a POPE/POPG (3∶1) bilayer were performed to characterise the diffusive nature of each component of the membrane. At small observation times (<10 ns) particle vibrations dominate phospholipid diffusion elevating the calculated values from the longer time-scale bulk value (>50 ns) of 8.5×10−7 cm2 s−1. The phospholipid diffusion around each protein was found to vary based on distance from protein. An asymmetry in the diffusion of annular lipids in the inner and outer leaflets was observed and correlated with an asymmetry in charged residues in the vicinity of the inner and outer leaflet head-groups. Protein rotational and translational diffusion were also found to vary with observation time and were inversely correlated with the radius of gyration of the protein in the plane of the bilayer. As the concentration of protein within the bilayer was increased, the overall mobility of the membrane decreased reflected in reduced lipid diffusion coefficients for both lipid and protein components. The increase in protein concentration also resulted in a decrease in the anomalous diffusion exponent α of the lipid. Formation of extended clusters and networks of proteins led to compartmentalisation of lipids in extreme cases. PMID:23592975

  13. Fatty Acids and Bioactive Lipids of Potato Cultivars: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, Mohamed Fawzy; Oraby, Hesahm Farouk

    2016-01-01

    Potato tuber is a highly nutritious, wherein genotype and environmental differences are known to exist in the shape, size and nutritional value of potatoes. Owing to its high consumption, potato could be an ideal carrier of health-promoting phytochemicals. Potato cultivars contain many bioactive lipidic compounds such as fatty acids, glycolipids, phospholipids, sterols, tocols and carotenoids, which are highly desirable in diet because of their health-promoting effects. In the scientific literature, information on the content and profile of bioactive lipidic compounds in potato cultivars are few. The concentration and stability of bioactive lipids are affected by many factors such as genotype, agronomic factors, postharvest storage, cooking and processing conditions. In this review levels and composition of bioactive lipids in terms of lipid classes, fatty acids, phytosterols, tocopherols, and caroteinoids distribution in different potato cultivars including genetically modified potato (GMP) were highlighted and discussed. In addition, factors affecting bioactive lipids levels, stability and health benefits are reviewed. In consideration of potential nutritional value, detailed knowledge on lipids of potato cultivars is of major importance.

  14. Heat shock protein coinducers with no effect on protein denaturation specifically modulate the membrane lipid phase

    PubMed Central

    Török, Zsolt; Tsvetkova, Nelly M.; Balogh, Gábor; Horváth, Ibolya; Nagy, Enikő; Pénzes, Zoltán; Hargitai, Judit; Bensaude, Olivier; Csermely, Péter; Crowe, John H.; Maresca, Bruno; Vígh, László

    2003-01-01

    The hydroxylamine derivative bimoclomol (BM) has been shown to activate natural cytoprotective homeostatic responses by enhancing the capability of cells to cope with various pathophysiological conditions. It exerts its effect in synergy with low levels of stress to induce the synthesis of members of major stress protein families. We show here that the presence of BM does not influence protein denaturation in the cells. BM and its derivatives selectively interact with acidic lipids and modulate their thermal and dynamic properties. BM acts as a membrane fluidizer at normal temperature, but it is a highly efficient membrane stabilizer, inhibiting the bilayer–nonbilayer phase transitions during severe heat shock. We suggest that BM and the related compounds modify those domains of membrane lipids where the thermally or chemically induced perturbation of lipid phase is sensed and transduced into a cellular signal, leading to enhanced activation of heat shock genes. BM may be a prototype for clinically safe membrane-interacting drug candidates that rebalance the level and composition of heat shock proteins. PMID:12615993

  15. Simultaneous hydrolysis-esterification of wet microalgal lipid using acid.

    PubMed

    Takisawa, Kenji; Kanemoto, Kazuyo; Kartikawati, Muliasari; Kitamura, Yutaka

    2013-12-01

    This research demonstrated hydrolysis of wet microalgal lipid and esterification of free fatty acid (FFA) using acid in one-step process. The investigation of simultaneous hydrolysis-esterification (SHE) of wet microalgal lipid was conducted by using L27 orthogonal design and the effects of water content, volume of sulphuric acid, volume of methanol, temperature and time on SHE were examined. As a result, water content was found to be the most effective factor. The effects of various parameters on fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) content and equilibrium relation between FAME and FFA were also examined under water content 80%. Equimolar amounts of sulphuric acid and hydrochloric acid showed similar results. This method has great potential in terms of biodiesel production from microalgae since no organic solvents are used.

  16. Lipid and polymeric carrier-mediated nucleic acid delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lin; Mahato, Ram I

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Nucleic acids such as plasmid DNA, antisense oligonucleotide, and RNA interference (RNAi) molecules, have a great potential to be used as therapeutics for the treatment of various genetic and acquired diseases. To design a successful nucleic acid delivery system, the pharmacological effect of nucleic acids, the physiological condition of the subjects or sites, and the physicochemical properties of nucleic acid and carriers have to be thoroughly examined. Areas covered in this review The commonly used lipids, polymers and corresponding delivery systems are reviewed in terms of their characteristics, applications, advantages and limitations. What the reader will gain This article aims to provide an overview of biological barriers and strategies to overcome these barriers by properly designing effective synthetic carriers for nucleic acid delivery. Take home message A thorough understanding of biological barriers and the structure–activity relationship of lipid and polymeric carriers is the key for effective nucleic acid therapy. PMID:20836625

  17. Interactions of Lipid Membranes with Fibrillar Protein Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, Galyna; Trusova, Valeriya; Girych, Mykhailo; Adachi, Emi; Mizuguchi, Chiharu; Saito, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are an intriguing class of protein aggregates with distinct physicochemical, structural and morphological properties. They display peculiar membrane-binding behavior, thus adding complexity to the problem of protein-lipid interactions. The consensus that emerged during the past decade is that amyloid cytotoxicity arises from a continuum of cross-β-sheet assemblies including mature fibrils. Based on literature survey and our own data, in this chapter we address several aspects of fibril-lipid interactions, including (i) the effects of amyloid assemblies on molecular organization of lipid bilayer; (ii) competition between fibrillar and monomeric membrane-associating proteins for binding to the lipid surface; and (iii) the effects of lipids on the structural morphology of fibrillar aggregates. To illustrate some of the processes occurring in fibril-lipid systems, we present and analyze fluorescence data reporting on lipid bilayer interactions with fibrillar lysozyme and with the N-terminal 83-residue fragment of amyloidogenic mutant apolipoprotein A-I, 1-83/G26R/W@8. The results help understand possible mechanisms of interaction and mutual remodeling of amyloid fibers and lipid membranes, which may contribute to amyloid cytotoxicity.

  18. Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein is required for yolk lipid utilization and absorption of dietary lipids in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Schlegel, Amnon; Stainier, Didier Y R

    2006-12-26

    Although the absorption, transport, and catabolism of dietary lipids have been studied extensively in great detail in mammals and other vertebrates, a tractable genetic system for identifying novel genes involved in these physiologic processes is not available. To establish such a model, we monitored neutral lipid by staining fixed zebrafish larvae with oil red o (ORO). The head structures, heart, vasculature, and swim bladder stained with ORO until the yolk was consumed 6 days after fertilization (6 dpf). Thereafter, the heart and vasculature no longer had stainable neutral lipids. Following a high-fat meal, ORO stained the intestine and vasculature of 6 dpf larvae, and whole-larval triacylglycerol (TAG) and apolipoprotein B levels increased. Levels of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (Mtp), the protein responsible for packaging TAG and betalipoproteins into lipoprotein particles, were unchanged by feeding. Since the developing zebrafish embryo expresses mtp in the yolk cell layer, liver, and intestine, we determined the effect of targeted knockdown of Mtp expression using an antisense morpholino oligonucleotide approach (Mtp MO) on the transport of yolk and dietary lipids. Mtp MO injection led to loss of Mtp expression and of lipid staining in the vasculature, heart, and head structures. Mtp MO-injected larvae were smaller than age-matched, uninjected larvae, consumed very little yolk, and did not absorb dietary neutral lipids; however, they absorbed a short chain fatty acid that does not require Mtp for transport. Importantly, the vasculature appeared unaffected in Mtp MO-injected larvae. These studies indicate that zebrafish larvae are suitable for genetic studies of lipid transport and metabolism.

  19. Anomalies occurring in lipid profiles and protein distribution in frontal cortex lipid rafts in dementia with Lewy bodies disclose neurochemical traits partially shared by Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

    PubMed

    Marin, Raquel; Fabelo, Noemí; Martín, Virginia; Garcia-Esparcia, Paula; Ferrer, Isidre; Quinto-Alemany, David; Díaz, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Lipid rafts are highly dynamic membrane microdomains intimately associated with cell signaling. Compelling evidence has demonstrated that alterations in lipid rafts are associated with neurodegenerative diseases such Alzheimer's disease, but at present, whether alterations in lipid raft microdomains occur in other types of dementia such dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) remains unknown. Our analyses reveal that lipid rafts from DLB exhibit aberrant lipid profiles including low levels of n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (mainly docosahexaenoic acid), plasmalogens and cholesterol, and reduced unsaturation and peroxidability indexes. As a consequence, lipid raft resident proteins holding principal factors of the β-amyloidogenic pathway, including β-amyloid precursor protein, presenilin 1, β-secretase, and PrP, are redistributed between lipid rafts and nonraft domains in DLB frontal cortex. Meta-analysis discloses certain similarities in the altered composition of lipid rafts between DLB and Parkinson's disease which are in line with the spectrum of Lewy body diseases. In addition, redistribution of proteins linked to the β-amyloidogenic pathway in DLB can facilitate generation of β-amyloid, thus providing mechanistic clues to the intriguing convergence of Alzheimer's disease pathology, particularly β-amyloid deposition, in DLB.

  20. Long-chain n-3 fatty acids enhance neonatal insulin-regulated protein metabolism in piglets by differentially altering muscle lipid composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated the role of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCn-3PUFAs) of muscle phospholipids in the regulation of neonatal metabolism. Twenty-eight piglets were weaned at 2 days of age and raised on one of two milk formulas that consisted of either a control formula supplying ...

  1. Lipid Rafts and Alzheimer’s Disease: Protein-Lipid Interactions and Perturbation of Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, David A.; Nalivaeva, Natalia N.; Turner, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Lipid rafts are membrane domains, more ordered than the bulk membrane and enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids. They represent a platform for protein-lipid and protein–protein interactions and for cellular signaling events. In addition to their normal functions, including membrane trafficking, ligand binding (including viruses), axonal development and maintenance of synaptic integrity, rafts have also been implicated in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Lipid rafts promote interaction of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) with the secretase (BACE-1) responsible for generation of the amyloid β peptide, Aβ. Rafts also regulate cholinergic signaling as well as acetylcholinesterase and Aβ interaction. In addition, such major lipid raft components as cholesterol and GM1 ganglioside have been directly implicated in pathogenesis of the disease. Perturbation of lipid raft integrity can also affect various signaling pathways leading to cellular death and AD. In this review, we discuss modulation of APP cleavage by lipid rafts and their components, while also looking at more recent findings on the role of lipid rafts in signaling events. PMID:22737128

  2. Pathophysiology of lipid droplet proteins in liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Carr, Rotonya M; Ahima, Rexford S

    2016-01-15

    Cytosolic lipid droplets (LDs) are present in most cell types, and consist of a core comprising neutral lipids, mainly triglycerides and sterol esters, surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids. LDs are heterogeneous in their structure, chemical composition, and tissue distribution. LDs are coated by several proteins, including perilipins and other structural proteins, lipogenic enzymes, lipases and membrane-trafficking proteins. Five proteins of the perilipin (PLIN) family (PLIN1 (perilipin), PLIN2 (adipose differentiation-related protein), PLIN3 (tail-interacting protein of 47kDa), PLIN4 (S3-12), and PLIN5 (myocardial lipid droplet protein)), are associated with LD formation. More recently, the CIDE family of proteins, hypoxia-inducible protein 2 (HIG2), and patanin-like phospholipase domain-containing 3 (PNPLA3) have also gained attention in hepatic LD biology. Evidence suggests that LD proteins are involved in the pathophysiology of fatty liver diseases characterized by excessive lipid accumulation in hepatocytes. This review article will focus on how hepatic LDs and their associated proteins are involved in the pathogenesis of three chronic liver conditions: hepatitis C virus infection, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and alcoholic liver disease.

  3. Effect of pomegranate peel extract on lipid and protein oxidation in beef meatballs during refrigerated storage.

    PubMed

    Turgut, Sebahattin Serhat; Soyer, Ayla; Işıkçı, Fatma

    2016-06-01

    Antioxidant effect of pomegranate peel extract (PE) to retard lipid and protein oxidation was investigated in meatballs during refrigerated storage at 4±1°C. Concentrated lyophilised water extract of pomegranate peel was incorporated into freshly minced beef meat at 0.5% and 1% concentrations and compared with 0.01% butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) as a reference and control (without any antioxidant). PE showed high phenolic content and antioxidant activity. In PE added samples, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) value, peroxide formation, loss of sulfhydryl groups and formation of protein carbonyls were lower than control (P<0.01) after 8 days of storage. Sensory evaluation with respect to colour and rancid odour revealed that PE incorporation in meatballs prolonged the refrigerated storage up to 8 days. Addition of both 0.5 and 1% PE in meatballs reduced lipid and protein oxidation and improved sensory scores. These results indicated that PE was effective on retarding lipid and protein oxidation.

  4. Rutin inhibits oleic acid induced lipid accumulation via reducing lipogenesis and oxidative stress in hepatocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cheng-Hsun; Lin, Ming-Cheng; Wang, Hsueh-Chun; Yang, Mon-Yuan; Jou, Ming-Jia; Wang, Chau-Jong

    2011-03-01

    Excessive lipid accumulation within liver has been proposed to cause obesity, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, and fatty liver disease. Rutin, a common dietary flavonoid that is consumed in fruits, vegetables, and plant-derived beverages, has various biological functions, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer effects. However, a hypolipidemic effect of rutin on fatty liver disease has not been reported. In this study, we examined the effect of rutin on reducing lipid accumulation in hepatic cells. Hepatocytes were treated with oleic acid (OA) containing with or without rutin to observe the lipid accumulation by Nile red stain. The result showed rutin suppressed OA-induced lipid accumulation and increased adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity in hepatocytes. The expression of critical molecule involved in lipid synthesis, sterol regulatory element binding proteins-1 (SREBP-1), was attenuated in rutin-treated cells. Moreover, long-term incubation of rutin inhibited the transcriptions of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase (HMGCR), glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT), fatty acid synthase (FAS), and acetyl-coenzyme carboxylase (ACC). Besides, we also found out the antioxidative effect of rutin by increasing the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α and antioxidative enzymes. Taken together, our findings suggest rutin could attenuate lipid accumulation by decreasing lipogenesis and oxidative stress in hepatocyte.

  5. Effects of dietary fats on plasma lipids and lipoproteins: an hypothesis for the lipid-lowering effect of unsaturated fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Spritz, Norton; Mishkel, Maurice A.

    1969-01-01

    Several aspects of the effects of dietary fat on plasma lipids and lipoproteins were investigated in 12 subjects during the long-term feeding of formulas containing 40% of their calories as either saturated or unsaturated fats. The changes in fatty acid composition of plasma lipids, shown previously to occur after prolonged feedings of a dietary fat, required 10-14 days to be complete and were synchronous with the effect of the fat on plasma lipid concentrations. The change in lipid concentration occurred in low but not in high density lipoproteins. The effects on lipid levels of the low density lipoproteins were found to occur with little or no effect on the concentration of the protein moiety of these lipoproteins; as a result, cholesterol- and phospholipid to protein ratios in low density lipoproteins fell during unsaturated fat feeding. The effects of dietary fat on plasma phospholipids were studied in detail: the relative amounts of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, sphingomyelin, and lysophosphatidylcholine were unaffected by the type of dietary fat. However, the molecular species of phosphatidylcholine were markedly affected. More than 90% of the fatty acids at the α-position were saturated during both saturated and unsaturated feedings. In contrast, during unsaturated feedings, linoleate at the β-position outnumbered oleate by approximately 4:1, whereas during saturated feedings these two types of fatty acids were present in nearly equal amounts. This paper also presents the following hypothesis for the lipid-lowering effect of unsaturated dietary fat: since unsaturated fatty acids occupy a greater area than saturated acids, they alter the spatial configuration of the lipids into which they are incorporated; as a result, fewer lipid molecules can be accommodated by the apoprotein of the low-density lipoproteins (LDL), and thus the lipid content of the lipoprotein is lowered. The experimental findings of this study, while not proving this

  6. SMA-SH: Modified Styrene-Maleic Acid Copolymer for Functionalization of Lipid Nanodiscs.

    PubMed

    Lindhoud, Simon; Carvalho, Vanessa; Pronk, Joachim W; Aubin-Tam, Marie-Eve

    2016-04-11

    Challenges in purification and subsequent functionalization of membrane proteins often complicate their biochemical and biophysical characterization. Purification of membrane proteins generally involves replacing the lipids surrounding the protein with detergent molecules, which can affect protein structure and function. Recently, it was shown that styrene-maleic acid copolymers (SMA) can dissolve integral membrane proteins from biological membranes into nanosized discs. Within these nanoparticles, proteins are embedded in a patch of their native lipid bilayer that is stabilized in solution by the amphipathic polymer that wraps the disc like a bracelet. This approach for detergent-free purification of membrane proteins has the potential to greatly simplify purification but does not facilitate conjugation of functional compounds to the membrane proteins. Often, such functionalization involves laborious preparation of protein variants and optimization of labeling procedures to ensure only minimal perturbation of the protein. Here, we present a strategy that circumvents several of these complications through modifying SMA by grafting the polymer with cysteamine. The reaction results in SMA that has solvent-exposed sulfhydrils (SMA-SH) and allows tuning of the coverage with SH groups. Size exclusion chromatography, dynamic light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy demonstrate that SMA-SH dissolves lipid bilayer membranes into lipid nanodiscs, just like SMA. In addition, we demonstrate that, just like SMA, SMA-SH solubilizes proteoliposomes into protein-loaded nanodiscs. We covalently modify SMA-SH-lipid nanodiscs using thiol-reactive derivatives of Alexa Fluor 488 and biotin. Thus, SMA-SH promises to simultaneously tackle challenges in purification and functionalization of membrane proteins.

  7. Water penetration profile at the protein-lipid interface in Na,K-ATPase membranes.

    PubMed

    Bartucci, Rosa; Guzzi, Rita; Esmann, Mikael; Marsh, Derek

    2014-09-16

    The affinity of ionized fatty acids for the Na,K-ATPase is used to determine the transmembrane profile of water penetration at the protein-lipid interface. The standardized intensity of the electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) from (2)H-hyperfine interaction with D2O is determined for stearic acid, n-SASL, spin-labeled systematically at the C-n atoms throughout the chain. In both native Na,K-ATPase membranes from shark salt gland and bilayers of the extracted membrane lipids, the D2O-ESEEM intensities of fully charged n-SASL decrease progressively with position down the fatty acid chain toward the terminal methyl group. Whereas the D2O intensities decrease sharply at the n = 9 position in the lipid bilayers, a much broader transition region in the range n = 6 to 10 is found with Na,K-ATPase membranes. Correction for the bilayer population in the membranes yields the intrinsic D2O-intensity profile at the protein-lipid interface. For positions at either end of the chains, the D2O concentrations at the protein interface are greater than in the lipid bilayer, and the positional profile is much broader. This reveals the higher polarity, and consequently higher intramembrane water concentration, at the protein-lipid interface. In particular, there is a significant water concentration adjacent to the protein at the membrane midplane, unlike the situation in the bilayer regions of this cholesterol-rich membrane. Experiments with protonated fatty acid and phosphatidylcholine spin labels, both of which have a considerably lower affinity for the Na,K-ATPase, confirm these results.

  8. Probing protein-lipid interactions by FRET between membrane fluorophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trusova, Valeriya M.; Gorbenko, Galyna P.; Deligeorgiev, Todor; Gadjev, Nikolai

    2016-09-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a powerful fluorescence technique that has found numerous applications in medicine and biology. One area where FRET proved to be especially informative involves the intermolecular interactions in biological membranes. The present study was focused on developing and verifying a Monte-Carlo approach to analyzing the results of FRET between the membrane-bound fluorophores. This approach was employed to quantify FRET from benzanthrone dye ABM to squaraine dye SQ-1 in the model protein-lipid system containing a polycationic globular protein lysozyme and negatively charged lipid vesicles composed of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol. It was found that acceptor redistribution between the lipid bilayer and protein binding sites resulted in the decrease of FRET efficiency. Quantification of this effect in terms of the proposed methodology yielded both structural and binding parameters of lysozyme-lipid complexes.

  9. Protein and amino acid nutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dairy cow protein and amino acid nutrition have a significant role in sustainable dairying. Protein, amino acids, and nitrogen are inextricably linked through effects in the rumen, metabolism of the cow, and environmental nutrient management. Feeding systems have been making progress toward emphasiz...

  10. Interactions of legionella effector proteins with host phosphoinositide lipids.

    PubMed

    Weber, Stephen; Dolinsky, Stephanie; Hilbi, Hubert

    2013-01-01

    By means of the Icm/Dot type IV secretion system Legionella pneumophila translocates several effector proteins into host cells, where they anchor to the cytoplasmic face of the LCV membrane by binding to phosphoinositide (PI) lipids. Thus, phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate anchors the effector proteins SidC and SidM, which promote the interaction of LCVs with the ER and the secretory vesicle trafficking -pathway. In this chapter, we describe protocols to (1) identify PI-binding proteins in Legionella lysates using PI-beads, (2) determine PI-binding specificities and affinities of recombinant Legionella effector proteins by protein-lipid overlays, and (3) use Legionella effectors to identify cellular PI lipids.

  11. Selective detection of the rotational dynamics of the protein-associated lipid hydrocarbon chains in sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Squier, T C; Thomas, D D

    1989-01-01

    We have developed a saturation transfer EPR (ST-EPR) method to measure selectively the rotational dynamics of those lipids that are motionally restricted by integral membrane proteins and have applied this methodology to measure lipid-protein interactions in native sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membranes. This analysis involves the measurement of spectral saturation using a series of six stearic acid spin labels that are labeled with a nitroxide at different carbon atom positions. A large amount of spectral saturation is observed for spin labels in native SR membranes, but not for spin labels in dispersions of extracted SR lipids, implying that the motional properties of those lipids interacting with the Ca-ATPase, i.e., the boundary or annular lipid, can be directly measured without the need for spectral subtraction procedures. A comparison of the motional properties of the restricted lipid, measured by ST-EPR, with those measured by digital subtraction of conventional EPR spectra qualitatively agree, for in both cases the Ca-ATPase restricts the rotational mobility of a population of lipids, whose rotational mobility increases as the nitroxide is positioned toward the center of the bilayer. However, the ability of ST-EPR to directly measure the motionally restricted lipid in a model-independent means provides the greater precision necessary to measure small changes in the rotational dynamics of the lipid at the protein-lipid interface, providing a valuable tool in clarifying the relationship between the physical nature of the protein-lipid interface and membrane function. PMID:2554990

  12. Abscisic acid-lipid interactions: a phospholipid monolayer study.

    PubMed

    Bürner, H; Benz, R; Gimmler, H; Hartung, W; Stillwell, W

    1993-08-15

    Lipid monolayer studies were performed on a Langmuir trough in the absence and in the presence of the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA). The ABA-induced effects on the lipid monolayers can be summarized as follows: (i) ABA as the free acid (pH below 5.3) increased the molecular area and slightly decreased the surface pressure in the collapse points of monolayers made of saturated, unsaturated and of mixed lipids; ABA as the anion showed only minor effects. (ii) The ABA-induced area increase of the lipid monolayers decreased when the surface pressure increased, but some ABA remained in the monolayers made of unsaturated phospholipids even at collapse pressure. (iii) The incorporation of ABA into the monolayers could be inhibited by adding the plant sterol beta-sitosterol to the monolayer forming phospholipids. (iv) There was no substantial difference of ABA action on plant phospholipids as compared with other phospholipids. (v) ABA had a much stronger influence on unsaturated phospholipids than on saturated ones. (vi) ABA decreased the phase-transition temperature of saturated phospholipids. These results, which agree with those obtained from phospholipid vesicle studies, indicate that the physical state of the lipid is important for the ability of ABA penetrating into the lipid monolayer. Finally, a possible relevance of these results is discussed in terms of the action of ABA on guard cell membranes of plants.

  13. RNA interference silencing of a major lipid droplet protein affects lipid droplet size in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Moellering, Eric R; Benning, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells store oils in the chemical form of triacylglycerols in distinct organelles, often called lipid droplets. These dynamic storage compartments have been intensely studied in the context of human health and also in plants as a source of vegetable oils for human consumption and for chemical or biofuel feedstocks. Many microalgae accumulate oils, particularly under conditions limiting to growth, and thus have gained renewed attention as a potentially sustainable feedstock for biofuel production. However, little is currently known at the cellular or molecular levels with regard to oil accumulation in microalgae, and the structural proteins and enzymes involved in the biogenesis, maintenance, and degradation of algal oil storage compartments are not well studied. Focusing on the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, the accumulation of triacylglycerols and the formation of lipid droplets during nitrogen deprivation were investigated. Mass spectrometry identified 259 proteins in a lipid droplet-enriched fraction, among them a major protein, tentatively designated major lipid droplet protein (MLDP). This protein is specific to the green algal lineage of photosynthetic organisms. Repression of MLDP gene expression using an RNA interference approach led to increased lipid droplet size, but no change in triacylglycerol content or metabolism was observed.

  14. Lipid Rafts Promote trans Fatty Acid-Induced Inflammation in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yao; Liu, Benxin; Deng, Zeyuan; Fan, Yawei; Li, Jing; Li, Hongyan

    2017-01-01

    The effects of two fatty acids, oleic acid (OLA) and elaidic acid (ELA) on normal human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and non-rafts HUVEC were investigated in this study. The expression levels of inflammatory cytokines (ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and IL-6) were analyzed. Western blot was used to analyze the expression levels of inflammation-related proteins (NF-κB, ERK1/2) and toll-like receptors 4 (TLR4). The results showed that the levels of nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 and phosphorylated ERK1/2 were significantly decreased only in non-lipid rafts cells pretreated with trans fatty acid (TFA). The expression of TLR4 in the ELA-treated normal cells was higher than that in non-lipid rafts HUVEC. When the lipid rafts was destroyed by methyl-β-cyclodextrin, the levels of nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65, phosphorylated ERK1/2 and TLR4 were decreased significantly. Therefore, lipid rafts may be involved in TFA induced-inflammation in HUVEC through blocking the inflammatory signal pathway. Lipid rafts might be a platform for specific receptors such as TLR4 for TFA to activate the pro-inflammation on cell membranes.

  15. The Immunosuppressant Mycophenolic Acid Alters Nucleotide and Lipid Metabolism in an Intestinal Cell Model

    PubMed Central

    Heischmann, Svenja; Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Hansen, Kirk; Leibfritz, Dieter; Christians, Uwe

    2017-01-01

    The study objective was to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the negative effects of mycophenolic acid (MPA) on human intestinal cells. Effects of MPA exposure and guanosine supplementation on nucleotide concentrations in LS180 cells were assessed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Proteomics analysis was carried out using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture combined with gel-based liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and lipidome analysis using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Despite supplementation, depletion of guanosine nucleotides (p < 0.001 at 24 and 72 h; 5, 100, and 250 μM MPA) and upregulation of uridine and cytidine nucleotides (p < 0.001 at 24 h; 5 μM MPA) occurred after exposure to MPA. MPA significantly altered 35 proteins mainly related to nucleotide-dependent processes and lipid metabolism. Cross-reference with previous studies of MPA-associated protein changes widely corroborated these results, but showed differences that may be model- and/or method-dependent. MPA exposure increased intracellular concentrations of fatty acids, cholesterol, and phosphatidylcholine (p < 0.01 at 72 h; 100 μM MPA) which corresponded to the changes in lipid-metabolizing proteins. MPA affected intracellular nucleotide levels, nucleotide-dependent processes, expression of structural proteins, fatty acid and lipid metabolism in LS180 cells. These changes may compromise intestinal membrane integrity and contribute to gastrointestinal toxicity. PMID:28327659

  16. Acid sphingomyelinase activity is regulated by membrane lipids and facilitates cholesterol transfer by NPC2[S

    PubMed Central

    Oninla, Vincent O.; Breiden, Bernadette; Babalola, Jonathan O.; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2014-01-01

    During endocytosis, membrane components move to intraluminal vesicles of the endolysosomal compartment for digestion. At the late endosomes, cholesterol is sorted out mainly by two sterol-binding proteins, Niemann-Pick protein type C (NPC)1 and NPC2. To study the NPC2-mediated intervesicular cholesterol transfer, we developed a liposomal assay system. (Abdul-Hammed, M., B. Breiden, M. A. Adebayo, J. O. Babalola, G. Schwarzmann, and K. Sandhoff. 2010. Role of endosomal membrane lipids and NPC2 in cholesterol transfer and membrane fusion. J. Lipid Res. 51: 1747–1760.) Anionic lipids stimulate cholesterol transfer between liposomes while SM inhibits it, even in the presence of anionic bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP). Preincubation of vesicles containing SM with acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) (SM phosphodiesterase, EC 3.1.4.12) results in hydrolysis of SM to ceramide (Cer), which enhances cholesterol transfer. Besides SM, ASM also cleaves liposomal phosphatidylcholine. Anionic phospholipids derived from the plasma membrane (phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidic acid) stimulate SM and phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis by ASM more effectively than BMP, which is generated during endocytosis. ASM-mediated hydrolysis of liposomal SM was also stimulated by incorporation of diacylglycerol (DAG), Cer, and free fatty acids into the liposomal membranes. Conversely, phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis was inhibited by incorporation of cholesterol, Cer, DAG, monoacylglycerol, and fatty acids. Our data suggest that SM degradation by ASM is required for physiological secretion of cholesterol from the late endosomal compartment, and is a key regulator of endolysosomal lipid digestion. PMID:25339683

  17. Multiscale structures of lipids in foods as parameters affecting fatty acid bioavailability and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Michalski, M C; Genot, C; Gayet, C; Lopez, C; Fine, F; Joffre, F; Vendeuvre, J L; Bouvier, J; Chardigny, J M; Raynal-Ljutovac, K

    2013-10-01

    On a nutritional standpoint, lipids are now being studied beyond their energy content and fatty acid (FA) profiles. Dietary FA are building blocks of a huge diversity of more complex molecules such as triacylglycerols (TAG) and phospholipids (PL), themselves organised in supramolecular structures presenting different thermal behaviours. They are generally embedded in complex food matrixes. Recent reports have revealed that molecular and supramolecular structures of lipids and their liquid or solid state at the body temperature influence both the digestibility and metabolism of dietary FA. The aim of the present review is to highlight recent knowledge on the impact on FA digestion, absorption and metabolism of: (i) the intramolecular structure of TAG; (ii) the nature of the lipid molecules carrying FA; (iii) the supramolecular organization and physical state of lipids in native and formulated food products and (iv) the food matrix. Further work should be accomplished now to obtain a more reliable body of evidence and integrate these data in future dietary recommendations. Additionally, innovative lipid formulations in which the health beneficial effects of either native or recomposed structures of lipids will be taken into account can be foreseen.

  18. The electrical interplay between proteins and lipids in membranes.

    PubMed

    Richens, Joanna L; Lane, Jordan S; Bramble, Jonathan P; O'Shea, Paul

    2015-09-01

    All molecular interactions that are relevant to cellular and molecular structures are electrical in nature but manifest in a rich variety of forms that each has its own range and influences on the net effect of how molecular species interact. This article outlines how electrical interactions between the protein and lipid membrane components underlie many of the activities of membrane function. Particular emphasis is placed on spatially localised behaviour in membranes involving modulation of protein activity and microdomain structure. The interactions between membrane lipids and membrane proteins together with their role within cell biology represent an enormous body of work. Broad conclusions are not easy given the complexities of the various systems and even consensus with model membrane systems containing two or three lipid types is difficult. By defining two types of broad lipid-protein interaction, respectively Type I as specific and Type II as more non-specific and focussing on the electrical interactions mostly in the extra-membrane regions it is possible to assemble broad rules or a consensus of the dominant features of the interplay between these two fundamentally important classes of membrane component. This article is part of a special issue entitled: Lipid-protein interactions.

  19. Reversible Nuclear-Lipid-Droplet Morphology Induced by Oleic Acid: A Link to Cellular-Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lagrutta, Lucía C.; Montero-Villegas, Sandra; Layerenza, Juan P.; Sisti, Martín S.; García de Bravo, Margarita M.

    2017-01-01

    Neutral lipids—involved in many cellular processes—are stored as lipid droplets (LD), those mainly cytosolic (cLD) along with a small nuclear population (nLD). nLD could be involved in nuclear-lipid homeostasis serving as an endonuclear buffering system that would provide or incorporate lipids and proteins involved in signalling pathways as transcription factors and as enzymes of lipid metabolism and nuclear processes. Our aim was to determine if nLD constituted a dynamic domain. Oleic-acid (OA) added to rat hepatocytes or HepG2 cells in culture produced cellular-phenotypic LD modifications: increases in TAG, CE, C, and PL content and in cLD and nLD numbers and sizes. LD increments were reversed on exclusion of OA and were prevented by inhibition of acyl-CoA synthetase (with Triacsin C) and thus lipid biosynthesis. Under all conditions, nLD corresponded to a small population (2–10%) of total cellular LD. The anabolism triggered by OA, involving morphologic and size changes within the cLD and nLD populations, was reversed by a net balance of catabolism, upon eliminating OA. These catabolic processes included lipolysis and the mobilization of hydrolyzed FA from the LD to cytosolic-oxidation sites. These results would imply that nLD are actively involved in nuclear processes that include lipids. In conclusion, nLD are a dynamic nuclear domain since they are modified by OA through a reversible mechanism in combination with cLD; this process involves acyl-CoA-synthetase activity; ongoing TAG, CE, and PL biosynthesis. Thus, liver nLD and cLD are both dynamic cellular organelles. PMID:28125673

  20. A coarse grained protein-lipid model with application to lipoprotein particles

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Amy Y.; Arkhipov, Anton; Freddolino, Peter L.; Schulten, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    A coarse-grained model for molecular dynamics simulations is extended from lipids to proteins. In the framework of such models pioneered by Klein, atoms are described group-wise by beads, with the interactions between beads governed by effective potentials. The extension developed here is based on a coarse-grained lipid model previously developed by Marrink et al., though further versions will reconcile the approach taken with the systematic approach of Klein and other authors. Each amino acid of the protein is represented by two coarse-grained beads, one for the backbone (identical for all residues) and one for the side-chain (which differs depending on the residue type). The coarse-graining reduces system size about ten-fold and allows integration time steps of 25 to 50 fs. The model is applied to simulations of discoidal high-density lipoprotein particles, involving water, lipids, and two primarily helical proteins. These particles are an ideal test system for the extension of coarse-grained models. Our model proved reliable in maintaining the shape of pre-assembled particles and in accurately reproducing overall structural features of high-density lipoproteins. Microsecond simulations of lipoprotein assembly revealed formation of a protein-lipid complex in which two proteins are attached to either side of a discoidal lipid bilayer. PMID:16494423

  1. Carotenoid binding to proteins: Modeling pigment transport to lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Reszczynska, Emilia; Welc, Renata; Grudzinski, Wojciech; Trebacz, Kazimierz; Gruszecki, Wieslaw I

    2015-10-15

    Carotenoid pigments play numerous important physiological functions in human organism. Very special is a role of lutein and zeaxanthin in the retina of an eye and in particular in its central part, the macula lutea. In the retina, carotenoids can be directly present in the lipid phase of the membranes or remain bound to the protein-pigment complexes. In this work we address a problem of binding of carotenoids to proteins and possible role of such structures in pigment transport to lipid membranes. Interaction of three carotenoids, beta-carotene, lutein and zeaxanthin with two proteins: bovine serum albumin and glutathione S-transferase (GST) was investigated with application of molecular spectroscopy techniques: UV-Vis absorption, circular dichroism and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Interaction of pigment-protein complexes with model lipid bilayers formed with egg yolk phosphatidylcholine was investigated with application of FTIR, Raman imaging of liposomes and electrophysiological technique, in the planar lipid bilayer models. The results show that in all the cases of protein and pigment studied, carotenoids bind to protein and that the complexes formed can interact with membranes. This means that protein-carotenoid complexes are capable of playing physiological role in pigment transport to biomembranes.

  2. Isolation, purification and characterization of a nonspecific lipid transfer protein from Cuminum cyminum.

    PubMed

    Zaman, Uzma; Abbasi, Atiya

    2009-05-01

    Cuminum cyminum, an aromatic plant from the family Umbelliferae, is used as a flavoring and seasoning agent in foods. This communication reports the characterization of a nonspecific lipid transfer protein nsLTP1 from its seeds. Plant nsLTPs are small basic proteins involved in transport of lipids between membranes. These proteins are known to participate in plant defense; however, the exact mechanism of their antimicrobial action against fungi or bacteria is still unclear. The cumin nsLTP1 has been purified using a combination of chromatographic procedures and further characterized using mass spectrometry, circular dichroism spectroscopy and Edman degradation. Amino acid sequence has been used to predict homology model of cumin nsLTP1 in complex with myristic acid, and lyso-myristoyl phosphatidyl choline (LMPC). Cumin nsLTP1 is a monomeric protein with a molecular weight of 9.7 kDa as estimated by SDS-PAGE and ESIMS. The protein shows an isoelectric point of 7.8 on 6% PAGE. The primary structure consists of 92 amino acids with eight conserved cysteine residues. The global fold of cumin nsLTP1 includes four alpha-helices stabilized by four disulfide bonds and a C-terminal tail. The role of internal hydrophobic cavity of the protein in lipid transfer is discussed.

  3. Lipid dynamics in yeast under haem-induced unsaturated fatty acid and/or sterol depletion.

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Thierry; Régnacq, Matthieu; Alimardani, Parissa; Moreau-Vauzelle, Carole; Bergès, Thierry

    2004-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, UFA (unsaturated fatty acids) and ergosterol syntheses are aerobic processes that require haem. We took advantage of a strain affected in haem synthesis ( hem1 Delta) to starve specifically for one or the other of these essential lipids in order to examine the consequences on the overall lipid composition. Our results demonstrate that reserve lipids (i.e. triacylglycerols and steryl esters) are depleted independently of haem availability and that their UFA and sterol content is not crucial to sustain residual growth under lipid depletion. In parallel to UFA starvation, a net accumulation of SFA (saturated fatty acids) is observed as a consequence of haem biosynthesis preclusion. Interestingly, the excess SFA are not mainly stored within triacylglycerols and steryl esters but rather within specific phospholipid species, with a marked preference for PtdIns. This results in an increase in the cellular PtdIns content. However, neutral lipid homoeostasis is perturbed under haem starvation. The contribution of two lipid particle-associated proteins (namely Tgl1p and Dga1p) to this process is described. PMID:14640980

  4. Entry of Bluetongue Virus Capsid Requires the Late Endosome-specific Lipid Lysobisphosphatidic Acid*

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Avnish; Mohl, Bjorn-Patrick; Roy, Polly

    2016-01-01

    The entry of viruses into host cells is one of the key processes of infection. The mechanisms of cellular entry for enveloped virus have been well studied. The fusion proteins as well as the facilitating cellular lipid factors involved in the viral fusion entry process have been well characterized. The process of non-enveloped virus cell entry, in comparison, remains poorly defined, particularly for large complex capsid viruses of the family Reoviridae, which comprises a range of mammalian pathogens. These viruses enter cells without the aid of a limiting membrane and thus cannot fuse with host cell membranes to enter cells. Instead, these viruses are believed to penetrate membranes of the host cell during endocytosis. However, the molecular mechanism of this process is largely undefined. Here we show, utilizing an in vitro liposome penetration assay and cell biology, that bluetongue virus (BTV), an archetypal member of the Reoviridae, utilizes the late endosome-specific lipid lysobisphosphatidic acid for productive membrane penetration and viral entry. Further, we provide preliminary evidence that lipid lysobisphosphatidic acid facilitates pore expansion during membrane penetration, suggesting a mechanism for lipid factor requirement of BTV. This finding indicates that despite the lack of a membrane envelope, the entry process of BTV is similar in specific lipid requirements to enveloped viruses that enter cells through the late endosome. These results are the first, to our knowledge, to demonstrate that a large non-enveloped virus of the Reoviridae has specific lipid requirements for membrane penetration and host cell entry. PMID:27036941

  5. Lipid domains control myelin basic protein adsorption and membrane interactions between model myelin lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Woog; Banquy, Xavier; Kristiansen, Kai; Kaufman, Yair; Boggs, Joan M; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2014-02-25

    The surface forces apparatus and atomic force microscope were used to study the effects of lipid composition and concentrations of myelin basic protein (MBP) on the structure of model lipid bilayers, as well as the interaction forces and adhesion between them. The lipid bilayers had a lipid composition characteristic of the cytoplasmic leaflets of myelin from "normal" (healthy) and "disease-like" [experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE)] animals. They showed significant differences in the adsorption mechanism of MBP. MBP adsorbs on normal bilayers to form a compact film (3-4 nm) with strong intermembrane adhesion (∼0.36 mJ/m(2)), in contrast to its formation of thicker (7-8 nm) swelled films with weaker intermembrane adhesion (∼0.13 mJ/m(2)) on EAE bilayers. MBP preferentially adsorbs to liquid-disordered submicron domains within the lipid membranes, attributed to hydrophobic attractions. These results show a direct connection between the lipid composition of membranes and membrane-protein adsorption mechanisms that affects intermembrane spacing and adhesion and has direct implications for demyelinating diseases.

  6. Molecular mechanisms of protein and lipid targeting to ciliary membranes

    PubMed Central

    Emmer, Brian T.; Maric, Danijela; Engman, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Cilia are specialized surface regions of eukaryotic cells that serve a variety of functions, ranging from motility to sensation and to regulation of cell growth and differentiation. The discovery that a number of human diseases, collectively known as ciliopathies, result from defective cilium function has expanded interest in these structures. Among the many properties of cilia, motility and intraflagellar transport have been most extensively studied. The latter is the process by which multiprotein complexes associate with microtubule motors to transport structural subunits along the axoneme to and from the ciliary tip. By contrast, the mechanisms by which membrane proteins and lipids are specifically targeted to the cilium are still largely unknown. In this Commentary, we review the current knowledge of protein and lipid targeting to ciliary membranes and outline important issues for future study. We also integrate this information into a proposed model of how the cell specifically targets proteins and lipids to the specialized membrane of this unique organelle. PMID:20145001

  7. Stimuli responsive charge-switchable lipids: Capture and release of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Hersey, Joseph S; LaManna, Caroline M; Lusic, Hrvoje; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2016-03-01

    Stimuli responsive lipids, which enable control over the formation, transformation, and disruption of supramolecular assemblies, are of interest for biosensing, diagnostics, drug delivery, and basic transmembrane protein studies. In particular, spatiotemporal control over a supramolecular structure can be achieved using light activated compounds to induce significant supramolecular rearrangements. As such, a family of cationic lipids are described which undergo a permanent switch in charge upon exposure to 365 nm ultraviolet (UV) light to enable the capture of negatively charged nucleic acids within the self-assembled supramolecular structure of the lipids and subsequent release of these macromolecules upon exposure to UV light and disruption of the assemblies. The lipids are composed of either two different tripeptide head groups, Lysine-Glycine-Glycine (KGG) and Glycine-Glycine-Glycine (GGG) and three different hydrocarbon chain lengths (C6, C10, or C14) terminated by a UV light responsive 1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethanol (NPE) protected carboxylic acid. The photolysis of the NPE protected lipid is measured as a function of time, and the resulting changes in net molecular charge are observed using zeta potential analysis for each head group and chain length combination. A proof of concept study for the capture and release of both linear DNA (calf thymus) and siRNA is presented using an ethidium bromide quenching assay where a balance between binding affinity and supramolecular stability are found to be the key to optimal nucleic acid capture and release.

  8. Lipid transfer proteins: classification, nomenclature, structure, and function.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Tiina A; Blomqvist, Kristina; Edqvist, Johan

    2016-11-01

    The non-specific lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) constitute a large protein family found in all land plants. They are small proteins characterized by a tunnel-like hydrophobic cavity, which makes them suitable for binding and transporting various lipids. The LTPs are abundantly expressed in most tissues. In general, they are synthesized with an N-terminal signal peptide that localizes the protein to spaces exterior to the plasma membrane. The in vivo functions of LTPs are still disputed, although evidence has accumulated for a role in the synthesis of lipid barrier polymers, such as cuticular waxes, suberin, and sporopollenin. There are also reports suggesting that LTPs are involved in signaling during pathogen attacks. LTPs are considered as key proteins for the plant's survival and colonization of land. In this review, we aim to present an overview of the current status of LTP research and also to discuss potential future applications of these proteins. We update the knowledge on 3D structures and lipid binding and review the most recent data from functional investigations, such as from knockout or overexpressing experiments. We also propose and argument for a novel system for the classification and naming of the LTPs.

  9. Major membrane surface proteins of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae selectively modified by covalently bound lipid

    SciTech Connect

    Wise K.S.; Kim, M.F.

    1987-12-01

    Surface protein antigens of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae were identified by direct antibody-surface binding or by radioimmunoprecipitation of surface /sup 125/I-labeled proteins with a series of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Radioimmunoprecipitation of TX-114-phase proteins from cells labeled with (/sup 35/S) methionine, /sup 14/C-amino acids, or (/sup 3/H) palmitic acid showed that proteins p65, p50, and p44 were abundant and (with one other hydrophobic protein, p60) were selectively labeled with lipid. Alkaline hydroxylamine treatment of labeled proteins indicated linkage of lipids by amide or stable O-linked ester bonds. Proteins p65, p50, and p44 were highly immunogenic in the natural host as measured by immunoblots of TX-114-phase proteins with antisera from swine inoculated with whole organisms. These proteins were antigenically and structurally unrelated, since hyperimmune mouse antibodies to individual gel-purified proteins were monospecific and gave distinct proteolytic epitope maps. Intraspecies size variants of one surface antigen of M. hyopneumoniae were revealed by a MAb to p70 (defined in strain J, ATCC 25934), which recognized a large p73 component on strain VPP11 (ATCC 25617). In addition, MAb to internal, aqueous-phase protein p82 of strain J failed to bind an analogous antigen in strain VPP11.

  10. Interactions of polyphenols with carbohydrates, lipids and proteins.

    PubMed

    Jakobek, Lidija

    2015-05-15

    Polyphenols are secondary metabolites in plants, investigated intensively because of their potential positive effects on human health. Their bioavailability and mechanism of positive effects have been studied, in vitro and in vivo. Lately, a high number of studies takes into account the interactions of polyphenols with compounds present in foods, like carbohydrates, proteins or lipids, because these food constituents can have significant effects on the activity of phenolic compounds. This paper reviews the interactions between phenolic compounds and lipids, carbohydrates and proteins and their impact on polyphenol activity.

  11. Balancing of lipid, protein, and carbohydrate intake in a predatory beetle following hibernation, and consequences for lipid restoration.

    PubMed

    Noreika, Norbertas; Madsen, Natalia E L; Jensen, Kim; Toft, Søren

    2016-05-01

    Carnivorous animals are known to balance their consumption of lipid and protein, and recent studies indicate that some mammalian carnivores also regulate their intake of carbohydrate. We investigated macronutrient balancing and lipid restoration following hibernation in the ground beetle Anchomenus dorsalis, hypothesizing that carbohydrates might be important energy sources upon hibernation when predator lipid stores are exhausted and prey are equally lean. We recorded the consumption of lipid, protein, and carbohydrate over nine days following hibernation, as the beetles foraged to refill their lipid stores. Each beetle was given the opportunity to regulate consumption from two semi-artificial foods differing in the proportion of two of the three macronutrients, while the third macronutrient was kept constant. When analyzing consumption of the three macronutrients on an energetic basis, it became apparent that the beetles regulated lipid and carbohydrate energy interchangeably and balanced the combined energy intake from the two macronutrients against protein intake. Restoration of lipid stores was independent of the availability of any specific macronutrient. However, the energetic consumption required to refill lipid stores was higher when a low proportion of lipids was ingested, suggesting that lipids were readily converted into lipid stores while there were energetic costs associated with converting carbohydrate and protein into stored lipids. Our experiment demonstrates that carbohydrates are consumed and regulated as a non-protein energy source by A. dorsalis despite an expectedly low occurrence of carbohydrates in their natural diet. Perhaps carbohydrates are in fact an overlooked supplementary energy source in the diet of carnivorous arthropods.

  12. In vitro effects of alloxan/copper combinations on lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Alexandrova, Albena; Petrov, L; Kessiova, Mila; Kirkova, Margarita

    2007-12-01

    The in vitro effects of alloxan and the product of its reduction dialuric acid (alone or in combination with copper ions) on lipid peroxidation, carbonyl content, GSH level and antioxidant enzyme activities in rat liver and kidney have been studied. The effects of Cu2+/alloxan and Cu2+/dialuric acid were compared with those of Fe3+/alloxan and Fe3+/dialuric acid. Unlike alloxan, dialuric acid increased liver and kidney lipid peroxidation; similar effects were registered in the presence of Fe3+. In the presence of Cu2+/dialuric acid, the lipid peroxidation was strongly inhibited and vice versa--the liver protein oxidation was increased. Alloxan and dialuric acid, as well as their combinations with Fe3+ had no effect on the total GSH level. Both substances did not affect the Cu2+-induced changes in GSH level, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and gluthatione reductase activities. In contrast, Cu2+ had no effect on dialuric-acid induced changes in gluthatione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities. The present in vitro results, concerning the metal dependence of the effects of alloxan and dialuric acid, are a premise for in vivo study of alloxan effects in metal-loaded animals.

  13. Modifications of proteins by polyunsaturated fatty acid peroxidation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refsgaard, Hanne H. F.; Tsai, Lin; Stadtman, Earl R.

    2000-01-01

    The ability of unsaturated fatty acid methyl esters to modify amino acid residues in bovine serum albumin (BSA), glutamine synthetase, and insulin in the presence of a metal-catalyzed oxidation system [ascorbate/Fe(III)/O2] depends on the degree of unsaturation of the fatty acid. The fatty acid-dependent generation of carbonyl groups and loss of lysine residues increased in the order methyl linoleate < methyl linolenate < methyl arachidonate. The amounts of alkyl hydroperoxides, malondialdehyde, and a number of other aldehydes that accumulated when polyunsaturated fatty acids were oxidized in the presence of BSA were significantly lower than that observed in the absence of BSA. Direct treatment of proteins with various lipid hydroperoxides led to a slight increase in the formation of protein carbonyl derivatives, whereas treatment with the hydroperoxides together with Fe(II) led to a substantial increase in the formation of protein carbonyls. These results are consistent with the proposition that metal-catalyzed oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids can contribute to the generation of protein carbonyls by direct interaction of lipid oxidation products (α,β-unsaturated aldehydes) with lysine residues (Michael addition reactions) and also by interactions with alkoxyl radicals obtained by Fe(II) cleavage of lipid hydroperoxides that are formed. In addition, saturated aldehydes derived from the polyunsaturated fatty acids likely react with lysine residues to form Schiff base adducts.

  14. Protein-lipid interactions during liposome oxidation with added anthocyanin and other phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Viljanen, Kaarina; Kivikari, Riitta; Heinonen, Marina

    2004-03-10

    Oxidation of bovine serum albumin, casein, and lactalbumin and the effect of different procyanidins, anthocyanins, and their aglycons (10 and 20 microM) on lactalbumin oxidation were investigated in a liposome system. Samples were incubated in the dark at 37 degrees C with copper, and the extent of oxidation was measured by determining the loss of tryptophan fluorescence and the formation of protein carbonyls, conjugated diene hydroperoxides, and hexanal. The correlation between different protein and lipid oxidation measurements was good and statistically significant. Casein was the most stable protein in the liposome model, and it was also the best inhibitor of liposome oxidation. All tested anthocyanins and other phenolic compounds inhibited both lipid and protein oxidation. There were no systematic differences with anthocyanins and their aglycons in relation to the concentrations used or glycosylation with either glucose or rutinose. Procyanidins B1 and B2 and ellagic acid were potentially better antioxidants than anthocyanins due to their several hydroxyl groups as measured by both protein and lipid oxidation. In conclusion, oxidative deterioration of liposomes due to protein-lipid interaction is inhibited by anthocyanins, procyanidins, and ellagitannin present, for example, in berries.

  15. Lipid insertion domain unfolding regulates protein orientational transition behavior in a lipid bilayer.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kwan Hon; Qiu, Liming; Cheng, Sara Y; Vaughn, Mark W

    2015-11-01

    We have used coarse-grained (CG) and united atom (UA) molecular dynamics simulations to explore the mechanisms of protein orientational transition of a model peptide (Aβ42) in a phosphatidylcholine/cholesterol (PC/CHO) lipid bilayer. We started with an inserted state of Aβ42 containing a folded (I) or unfolded (II) K28-A42 lipid insertion domain (LID), which was stabilized by the K28-snorkeling and A42-anchoring to the PC polar groups in the lipid bilayer. After a UA-to-CG transformation and a 1000ns-CG simulation for enhancing the sampling of protein orientations, we discovered two transitions: I-to-"deep inserted" state with disrupted K28-snorkeling and II-to-"deep surface" state with disrupted A42-anchoring. The new states remained stable after a CG-to-UA transformation and a 200ns-UA simulation relaxation. Significant changes in the cholesterol-binding domain of Aβ42 and protein-induced membrane disruptions were evident after the transitions. We propose that the conformation of the LID regulates protein orientational transitions in the lipid membrane.

  16. Association of lipids with integral membrane surface proteins of Mycoplasma hyorhinis

    SciTech Connect

    Bricker, T.M.; Boyer, M.J.; Keith, J.; Watson-McKown, R.; Wise, K.S.

    1988-02-01

    Triton X-114 (TX-114)-phase fractionation was used to identify and characterize integral membrane surface proteins of the wall-less procaryote Mycoplasma hyorhinis GDL. Phase fractionation of mycoplasmas followed by analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed selective partitioning of approximately 30 (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled intrinsic membrane proteins into the TX-114 phase. Similar analysis of (/sup 3/H)palmitate-labeled cells showed that approximately 20 proteins of this organism were associated with lipid, all of which also efficiently partitioned as integral membrane components into the detergent phase. Immunoblotting and immunoprecipitation of TX-114-phase proteins from /sup 125/I-surface-labeled cells with four monoclonal antibodies to distinct surface epitopes of M. hyorhinis identified surface proteins p120, p70, p42, and p23 as intrinsic membrane components. Immunoprecipitation of (/sup 3/H)palmitate-labeled TX-114-phase proteins further established that surface proteins p120, p70, and p23 (a molecule that mediates complement-dependent mycoplasmacidal monoclonal antibody activity) were among the lipid-associated proteins of this organism. Two of these proteins, p120 and p123, were acidic (pI less than or equal to 4.5), as shown by two-dimensional isoelectric focusing. This study established that M. hyorhinis contains an abundance of integral membrane proteins tightly associated with lipids and that many of these proteins are exposed at the external surface of the single limiting plasma membrane. Monoclonal antibodies are reported that will allow detailed analysis of the structure and processing of lipid-associated mycoplasma proteins.

  17. Plant-Derived Phenolics Inhibit the Accrual of Structurally Characterised Protein and Lipid Oxidative Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Naudí, Alba; Romero, Maria-Paz; Cassanyé, Anna; Serrano, José C. E.; Arola, Lluis; Valls, Josep; Bellmunt, Maria Josep; Prat, Joan; Pamplona, Reinald; Portero-Otin, Manuel; Motilva, Maria-José

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological data suggest that plant-derived phenolics beneficial effects include an inhibition of LDL oxidation. After applying a screening method based on 2,4-dinitrophenyl hydrazine- protein carbonyl reaction to 21 different plant-derived phenolic acids, we selected the most antioxidant ones. Their effect was assessed in 5 different oxidation systems, as well as in other model proteins. Mass-spectrometry was then used, evidencing a heterogeneous effect on the accumulation of the structurally characterized protein carbonyl glutamic and aminoadipic semialdehydes as well as for malondialdehyde-lysine in LDL apoprotein. After TOF based lipidomics, we identified the most abundant differential lipids in Cu++-incubated LDL as 1-palmitoyllysophosphatidylcholine and 1-stearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. Most of selected phenolic compounds prevented the accumulation of those phospholipids and the cellular impairment induced by oxidized LDL. Finally, to validate these effects in vivo, we evaluated the effect of the intake of a phenolic-enriched extract in plasma protein and lipid modifications in a well-established model of atherosclerosis (diet-induced hypercholesterolemia in hamsters). This showed that a dietary supplement with a phenolic-enriched extract diminished plasma protein oxidative and lipid damage. Globally, these data show structural basis of antioxidant properties of plant-derived phenolic acids in protein oxidation that may be relevant for the health-promoting effects of its dietary intake. PMID:22952663

  18. Intrinsic stability of Brassicaceae plasma membrane in relation to changes in proteins and lipids as a response to salinity.

    PubMed

    Chalbi, Najla; Martínez-Ballesta, Ma Carmen; Youssef, Nabil Ben; Carvajal, Micaela

    2015-03-01

    Changes in plasma membrane lipids, such as sterols and fatty acids, have been observed as a result of salt stress. These alterations, together with modification of the plasma membrane protein profile, confer changes in the physical properties of the membrane to be taken into account for biotechnological uses. In our experiments, the relationship between lipids and proteins in three different Brassicaceae species differing in salinity tolerance (Brassica oleracea, B. napus and Cakile maritima) and the final plasma membrane stability were studied. The observed changes in the sterol (mainly an increase in sitosterol) and fatty acid composition (increase in RUFA) in each species led to physical adaptation of the plasma membrane to salt stress. The in vitro vesicles stability was higher in the less tolerant (B. oleracea) plants together with low lipoxygenase activity. These results indicate that the proteins/lipids ratio and lipid composition is an important aspect to take into account for the use of natural vesicles in plant biotechnology.

  19. G protein-membrane interactions I: Gαi1 myristoyl and palmitoyl modifications in protein-lipid interactions and its implications in membrane microdomain localization.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Rafael; López, David J; Casas, Jesús; Lladó, Victoria; Higuera, Mónica; Nagy, Tünde; Barceló, Miquel; Busquets, Xavier; Escribá, Pablo V

    2015-11-01

    G proteins are fundamental elements in signal transduction involved in key cell responses, and their interactions with cell membrane lipids are critical events whose nature is not fully understood. Here, we have studied how the presence of myristic and palmitic acid moieties affects the interaction of the Gαi1 protein with model and biological membranes. For this purpose, we quantified the binding of purified Gαi1 protein and Gαi1 protein acylation mutants to model membranes, with lipid compositions that resemble different membrane microdomains. We observed that myristic and palmitic acids not only act as membrane anchors but also regulate Gαi1 subunit interaction with lipids characteristics of certain membrane microdomains. Thus, when the Gαi1 subunit contains both fatty acids it prefers raft-like lamellar membranes, with a high sphingomyelin and cholesterol content and little phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine. By contrast, the myristoylated and non-palmitoylated Gαi1 subunit prefers other types of ordered lipid microdomains with higher phosphatidylserine content. These results in part explain the mobility of Gαi1 protein upon reversible palmitoylation to meet one or another type of signaling protein partner. These results also serve as an example of how membrane lipid alterations can change membrane signaling or how membrane lipid therapy can regulate the cell's physiology.

  20. Effects of different biomass drying and lipid extraction methods on algal lipid yield, fatty acid profile, and biodiesel quality.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Javid; Liu, Yan; Lopes, Wilson A; Druzian, Janice I; Souza, Carolina O; Carvalho, Gilson C; Nascimento, Iracema A; Liao, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Three lipid extraction methods of hexane Soxhlet (Sox-Hex), Halim (HIP), and Bligh and Dyer (BD) were applied on freeze-dried (FD) and oven-dried (OD) Chlorella vulgaris biomass to evaluate their effects on lipid yield, fatty acid profile, and algal biodiesel quality. Among these three methods, HIP was the preferred one for C. vulgaris lipid recovery considering both extraction efficiency and solvent toxicity. It had the highest lipid yields of 20.0 and 22.0% on FD and OD biomass, respectively, with corresponding neutral lipid yields of 14.8 and 12.7%. The lipid profiling analysis showed that palmitic, oleic, linoleic, and α-linolenic acids were the major fatty acids in the algal lipids, and there were no significant differences on the amount of these acids between different drying and extraction methods. Correlative models applied to the fatty acid profiles concluded that high contents of palmitic and oleic acids in algal lipids contributed to balancing the ratio of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids and led to a high-quality algal biodiesel.

  1. Computational redesign of the lipid-facing surface of the outer membrane protein OmpA.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, James A; Whitehead, Timothy A; Nanda, Vikas

    2015-08-04

    Advances in computational design methods have made possible extensive engineering of soluble proteins, but designed β-barrel membrane proteins await improvements in our understanding of the sequence determinants of folding and stability. A subset of the amino acid residues of membrane proteins interact with the cell membrane, and the design rules that govern this lipid-facing surface are poorly understood. We applied a residue-level depth potential for β-barrel membrane proteins to the complete redesign of the lipid-facing surface of Escherichia coli OmpA. Initial designs failed to fold correctly, but reversion of a small number of mutations indicated by backcross experiments yielded designs with substitutions to up to 60% of the surface that did support folding and membrane insertion.

  2. Membrane Structure: Lipid-Protein Interactions in Microsomal Membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Trump, Benjamin F.; Duttera, Sue M.; Byrne, William L.; Arstila, Antti U.

    1970-01-01

    The relationships of phospholipid to membrane structure and function were examined in hepatic microsomes. Findings indicate that normal microsomal membrane structure is dependent on lipid-protein interactions and that it correlates closely with glucose-6-phosphatase activity. Modification of most phospholipid with phospholipase-C is associated with widening of the membrane which can be reversed following readdition of phospholipid. Images PMID:4317915

  3. Lipid droplet meets a mitochondrial protein to regulate adipocyte lipolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In response to adrenergic stimulation, adipocytes undergo protein kinase A (PKA)-stimulated lipolysis. A key PKA target in this context is perilipin 1, a major regulator of lipolysis on lipid droplets (LDs). A study published in this issue of The EMBO Journal (Pidoux et al, 2011) identifies optic at...

  4. Waste lipids to energy: how to optimize methane production from long‐chain fatty acids (LCFA)

    PubMed Central

    Alves, M. Madalena; Pereira, M. Alcina; Sousa, Diana Z.; Cavaleiro, Ana J.; Picavet, Merijn; Smidt, Hauke; Stams, Alfons J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The position of high‐rate anaerobic technology (HR‐AnWT) in the wastewater treatment and bioenergy market can be enhanced if the range of suitable substrates is expanded. Analyzing existing technologies, applications and problems, it is clear that, until now, wastewaters with high lipids content are not effectively treated by HR‐AnWT. Nevertheless, waste lipids are ideal potential substrates for biogas production, since theoretically more methane can be produced, when compared with proteins or carbohydrates. In this minireview, the classical problems of lipids methanization in anaerobic processes are discussed and new concepts to enhance lipids degradation are presented. Reactors operation, feeding strategies and prospects of technological developments for wastewater treatment are discussed. Long‐chain fatty acids (LCFA) degradation is accomplished by syntrophic communities of anaerobic bacteria and methanogenic archaea. For optimal performance these syntrophic communities need to be clustered in compact aggregates, which is often difficult to achieve with wastewaters that contain fats and lipids. Driving the methane production from lipids/LCFA at industrial scale without risk of overloading and inhibition is still a challenge that has the potential for filling a gap in the existing processes and technologies for biological methane production associated to waste and wastewater treatment. PMID:21255287

  5. Waste lipids to energy: how to optimize methane production from long-chain fatty acids (LCFA).

    PubMed

    Alves, M Madalena; Pereira, M Alcina; Sousa, Diana Z; Cavaleiro, Ana J; Picavet, Merijn; Smidt, Hauke; Stams, Alfons J M

    2009-09-01

    The position of high-rate anaerobic technology (HR-AnWT) in the wastewater treatment and bioenergy market can be enhanced if the range of suitable substrates is expanded. Analyzing existing technologies, applications and problems, it is clear that, until now, wastewaters with high lipids content are not effectively treated by HR-AnWT. Nevertheless, waste lipids are ideal potential substrates for biogas production, since theoretically more methane can be produced, when compared with proteins or carbohydrates. In this minireview, the classical problems of lipids methanization in anaerobic processes are discussed and new concepts to enhance lipids degradation are presented. Reactors operation, feeding strategies and prospects of technological developments for wastewater treatment are discussed. Long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) degradation is accomplished by syntrophic communities of anaerobic bacteria and methanogenic archaea. For optimal performance these syntrophic communities need to be clustered in compact aggregates, which is often difficult to achieve with wastewaters that contain fats and lipids. Driving the methane production from lipids/LCFA at industrial scale without risk of overloading and inhibition is still a challenge that has the potential for filling a gap in the existing processes and technologies for biological methane production associated to waste and wastewater treatment.

  6. Lipids as modulators of membrane fusion mediated by viral fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Teissier, Elodie; Pécheur, Eve-Isabelle

    2007-11-01

    Enveloped viruses infect host cells by fusion of viral and target membranes. This fusion event is triggered by specific glycoproteins in the viral envelope. Fusion glycoproteins belong to either class I, class II or the newly described third class, depending upon their arrangement at the surface of the virion, their tri-dimensional structure and the location within the protein of a short stretch of hydrophobic amino acids called the fusion peptide, which is able to induce the initial lipid destabilization at the onset of fusion. Viral fusion occurs either with the plasma membrane for pH-independent viruses, or with the endosomal membranes for pH-dependent viruses. Although, viral fusion proteins are parted in three classes and the subcellular localization of fusion might vary, these proteins have to act, in common, on lipid assemblies. Lipids contribute to fusion through their physical, mechanical and/or chemical properties. Lipids can thus play a role as chemically defined entities, or through their preferential partitioning into membrane microdomains called "rafts", or by modulating the curvature of the membranes involved in the fusion process. The purpose of this review is to make a state of the art on recent findings on the contribution of cholesterol, sphingolipids and glycolipids in cell entry and membrane fusion of a number of viral families, whose members bear either class I or class II fusion proteins, or fusion proteins of the recently discovered third class.

  7. Thioredoxin-interacting protein regulates lipid metabolism via Akt/mTOR pathway in diabetic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Du, Chunyang; Wu, Ming; Liu, Huan; Ren, Yunzhuo; Du, Yunxia; Wu, Haijiang; Wei, Jinying; Liu, Chuxin; Yao, Fang; Wang, Hui; Zhu, Yan; Duan, Huijun; Shi, Yonghong

    2016-10-01

    Abnormal lipid metabolism contributes to the renal lipid accumulation, which is associated with diabetic kidney disease, but its precise mechanism remains unclear. The growing evidence demonstrates that thioredoxin-interacting protein is involved in regulating cellular glucose and lipid metabolism. Here, we investigated the effects of thioredoxin-interacting protein on lipid accumulation in diabetic kidney disease. In contrast to the diabetic wild-type mice, the physical and biochemical parameters were improved in the diabetic thioredoxin-interacting protein knockout mice. The increased renal lipid accumulation, expression of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, fatty acid synthase and sterol regulatory element binding protein-1, and phosphorylated Akt and mTOR associated with diabetes in wild-type mice was attenuated in diabetic thioredoxin-interacting protein knockout mice. Furthermore, thioredoxin-interacting protein knockout significantly increased the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α, acyl-coenzyme A oxidase 1 and carnitine palmitoyltransferaser 1 in diabetic kidneys. In vitro experiments, using HK-2 cells, revealed that knockdown of thioredoxin-interacting protein inhibited high glucose-mediated lipid accumulation, expression of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, fatty acid synthase and sterol regulatory element binding protein-1, as well as activation of Akt and mTOR. Moreover, knockdown of thioredoxin-interacting protein reversed high glucose-induced reduction of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α, acyl-coenzyme A oxidase 1 and carnitine palmitoyltransferaser 1 expression in HK-2 cells. Importantly, blockade of Akt/mTOR signaling pathway with LY294002, a specific PI3K inhibitor, replicated these effects of thioredoxin-interacting protein silencing. Taken together, these data suggest that thioredoxin-interacting protein deficiency alleviates diabetic renal lipid accumulation through regulation of Akt/mTOR pathway, thioredoxin

  8. Localization of lipid raft proteins to the plasma membrane is a major function of the phospholipid transfer protein Sec14.

    PubMed

    Curwin, Amy J; Leblanc, Marissa A; Fairn, Gregory D; McMaster, Christopher R

    2013-01-01

    The Sec14 protein domain is a conserved tertiary structure that binds hydrophobic ligands. The Sec14 protein from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is essential with studies of S. cerevisiae Sec14 cellular function facilitated by a sole temperature sensitive allele, sec14(ts). The sec14(ts) allele encodes a protein with a point mutation resulting in a single amino acid change, Sec14(G266D). In this study results from a genome-wide genetic screen, and pharmacological data, provide evidence that the Sec14(G266D) protein is present at a reduced level compared to wild type Sec14 due to its being targeted to the proteosome. Increased expression of the sec14(ts) allele ameliorated growth arrest, but did not restore the defects in membrane accumulation or vesicular transport known to be defective in sec14(ts) cells. We determined that trafficking and localization of two well characterized lipid raft resident proteins, Pma1 and Fus-Mid-GFP, were aberrant in sec14(ts) cells. Localization of both lipid raft proteins was restored upon increased expression of the sec14(ts) allele. We suggest that a major function provided by Sec14 is trafficking and localization of lipid raft proteins.

  9. Hydrophobic-cluster analysis of plant protein sequences. A domain homology between storage and lipid-transfer proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Henrissat, B; Popineau, Y; Kader, J C

    1988-01-01

    Hydrophobic-cluster analysis was used to characterize a conserved domain located near the C-terminal amino acid sequence of wheat (Triticum aestivum) storage proteins. This domain was transformed into a linear template for a global search for similarities in over 5200 protein sequences. In addition to proteins that had already been found to exhibit homology to wheat storage proteins, a previously unreported homology was found with non-specific lipid-transfer proteins from castor bean (Ricinus communis) and from spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaf. Hydrophobic-cluster analysis of various members of the present protein group clearly shows a typical domain structure where (i) variable and conserved domains are located along the sequence at precise positions, (ii) the conserved domains probably reflect a common ancestor, and (iii) the unique properties of a given protein (chain cut into subunits, repetitive domains, trypsin-inhibitor active site) are associated with the variable domains. PMID:3214430

  10. Recombinant production and solution structure of lipid transfer protein from lentil Lens culinaris

    SciTech Connect

    Gizatullina, Albina K.; Finkina, Ekaterina I.; Mineev, Konstantin S.; Melnikova, Daria N.; Bogdanov, Ivan V.; Shenkarev, Zakhar O.; Ovchinnikova, Tatiana V.

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Lipid transfer protein from lentil seeds (Lc-LTP2) was overexpressed in E. coli. •Antimicrobial activity and spatial structure of the recombinant Lc-LTP2 were examined. •Internal tunnel-like lipid-binding cavity occupies ∼7% of the total Lc-LTP2 volume. •Binding of DMPG lipid induces moderate rearrangements in the Lc-LTP2 structure. •Lc-LTP2/DMPG complex has limited lifetime and dissociates within tens of hours. -- Abstract: Lipid transfer protein, designated as Lc-LTP2, was isolated from seeds of the lentil Lens culinaris. The protein has molecular mass 9282.7 Da, consists of 93 amino acid residues including 8 cysteines forming 4 disulfide bonds. Lc-LTP2 and its stable isotope labeled analogues were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Antimicrobial activity of the recombinant protein was examined, and its spatial structure was studied by NMR spectroscopy. The polypeptide chain of Lc-LTP2 forms four α-helices (Cys4-Leu18, Pro26-Ala37, Thr42-Ala56, Thr64-Lys73) and a long C-terminal tail without regular secondary structure. Side chains of the hydrophobic residues form a relatively large internal tunnel-like lipid-binding cavity (van der Waals volume comes up to ∼600 Å{sup 3}). The side-chains of Arg45, Pro79, and Tyr80 are located near an assumed mouth of the cavity. Titration with dimyristoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) revealed formation of the Lc-LTP2/lipid non-covalent complex accompanied by rearrangements in the protein spatial structure and expansion of the internal cavity. The resultant Lc-LTP2/DMPG complex demonstrates limited lifetime and dissociates within tens of hours.

  11. Molecular Theory Applied to Lipid Bilayers and Lipid-Protein Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frischknecht, Amalie L.; Frink, Laura J. D.

    The fundamental, necessary components of biomembranes are the lipids that form the membrane bilayer. Although a typical plasma membrane is composed of about 50% percent proteins by mass [1], the lipids provide the structure of the membrane through their self-assembly into a bilayer. The self-assembly is driven by the amphiphilic nature of the lipids: they contain a headgroup that is hydrophilic and a tailgroup that is hydrophobic. The basic principles of lipid self-assembly are well understood [2]. The physical properties and behavior of the lipid bilayer have been studied theoretically using a variety of models and techniques. With increasing computational resources available, a popular approach has been to study membranes using atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In such simulations, all the atoms are represented explicitly. The interactions between atoms are described by effective potentials which must be obtained through either quantum mechanical calculations or by fitting various properties to experiment. Such simulations istic MD simulations have been able to treat patches of membrane up to a few tens of nanometers in lateral extent, over timescales of a few tens of nanoseconds.

  12. Alkylation damage by lipid electrophiles targets functional protein systems.

    PubMed

    Codreanu, Simona G; Ullery, Jody C; Zhu, Jing; Tallman, Keri A; Beavers, William N; Porter, Ned A; Marnett, Lawrence J; Zhang, Bing; Liebler, Daniel C

    2014-03-01

    Protein alkylation by reactive electrophiles contributes to chemical toxicities and oxidative stress, but the functional impact of alkylation damage across proteomes is poorly understood. We used Click chemistry and shotgun proteomics to profile the accumulation of proteome damage in human cells treated with lipid electrophile probes. Protein target profiles revealed three damage susceptibility classes, as well as proteins that were highly resistant to alkylation. Damage occurred selectively across functional protein interaction networks, with the most highly alkylation-susceptible proteins mapping to networks involved in cytoskeletal regulation. Proteins with lower damage susceptibility mapped to networks involved in protein synthesis and turnover and were alkylated only at electrophile concentrations that caused significant toxicity. Hierarchical susceptibility of proteome systems to alkylation may allow cells to survive sublethal damage while protecting critical cell functions.

  13. Digesting pythons quickly oxidize the proteins in their meals and save the lipids for later.

    PubMed

    McCue, Marshall D; Guzman, R Marena; Passement, Celeste A

    2015-07-01

    Pythons digesting rodent meals exhibit up to 10-fold increases in their resting metabolic rate (RMR); this increase in RMR is termed specific dynamic action (SDA). Studies have shown that SDA is partially fueled by oxidizing dietary nutrients, yet it remains unclear whether the proteins and the lipids in their meals contribute equally to this energy demand. We raised two populations of mice on diets labeled with either [(13)C]leucine or [(13)C]palmitic acid to intrinsically enrich the proteins and lipids in their bodies, respectively. Ball pythons (Python regius) were fed whole mice (and pureed mice 3 weeks later), after which we measured their metabolic rates and the δ(13)C in the breath. The δ(13)C values in the whole bodies of the protein- and lipid-labeled mice were generally similar (i.e. 5.7±4.7‰ and 2.8±5.4‰, respectively) but the oxidative kinetics of these two macronutrient pools were quite different. We found that the snakes oxidized 5% of the protein and only 0.24% of the lipids in their meals within 14 days. Oxidation of the dietary proteins peaked 24 h after ingestion, at which point these proteins provided ∼90% of the metabolic requirement of the snakes, and by 14 days the oxidation of these proteins decreased to nearly zero. The oxidation of the dietary lipids peaked 1 day later, at which point these lipids supplied ∼25% of the energy demand. Fourteen days after ingestion, these lipids were still being oxidized and continued to account for ∼25% of the metabolic rate. Pureeing the mice reduced the cost of gastric digestion and decreased SDA by 24%. Pureeing also reduced the oxidation of dietary proteins by 43%, but it had no effect on the rates of dietary lipid oxidation. Collectively, these results demonstrate that pythons are able to effectively partition the two primary metabolic fuels in their meals. This approach of uniquely labeling the different components of the diet will allow researchers to examine new questions about

  14. Effects of EPA and DHA on lipid droplet accumulation and mRNA abundance of PAT proteins in caprine monocytes.

    PubMed

    Lecchi, Cristina; Invernizzi, Guido; Agazzi, Alessandro; Modina, Silvia; Sartorelli, Paola; Savoini, Giovanni; Ceciliani, Fabrizio

    2013-04-01

    The present study investigated the in vitro effects on caprine monocytes of two ω-3 PUFAs, namely eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on lipid droplet formation, an emerging process of fundamental importance in innate immunity regulation. The mRNA abundance of PAT protein family (PLIN1, PLIN2 and PLIN3), involved in the formation and trafficking of the droplets, was also assessed. The effects of EPA and DHA on monocyte apoptosis were studied as well. The number of lipid droplets per cell was found to be dependent on both type and concentration of fatty acid. ω-3 PUFAs upregulated PLIN3 and PLIN2 gene expression, as well as apoptosis rate. The present findings suggest that PUFA might modify innate immune functions of goat monocytes by interfering with the formation of lipid droplets and by upregulating proteins belonging to PAT protein family.

  15. Exocytotic fusion pores are composed of both lipids and proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Huan; Goldschen-Ohm, Marcel; Jeggle, Pia; Chanda, Baron; Edwardson, J Michael; Chapman, Edwin R

    2016-01-01

    During exocytosis, fusion pores form the first aqueous connection that allows escape of neurotransmitters and hormones from secretory vesicles. Although it is well established that SNARE proteins catalyze fusion, the structure and composition of fusion pores remain unknown. Here, we exploited the rigid framework and defined size of nanodiscs to interrogate the properties of reconstituted fusion pores, using the neurotransmitter glutamate as a content-mixing marker. Efficient Ca2+-stimulated bilayer fusion, and glutamate release, occurred with approximately two molecules of mouse synaptobrevin 2 reconstituted into ~6-nm nanodiscs. The transmembrane domains of SNARE proteins assumed distinct roles in lipid mixing versus content release and were exposed to polar solvent during fusion. Additionally, tryptophan substitutions at specific positions in these transmembrane domains decreased glutamate flux. Together, these findings indicate that the fusion pore is a hybrid structure composed of both lipids and proteins. PMID:26656855

  16. Evidence that oleic acid exists in a separate phase within stratum corneum lipids

    SciTech Connect

    Ongpipattanakul, B.; Burnette, R.R.; Potts, R.O.; Francoeur, M.L. )

    1991-03-01

    Oleic acid is known to be a penetration enhancer for polar to moderately polar molecules. A mechanism related to lipid phase separation has been previously proposed by this laboratory to explain the increases in skin transport. In the studies presented here, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) was utilized to investigate whether or not oleic acid exists in a separate phase within stratum corneum (SC) lipids. Per-deuterated oleic acid was employed allowing the conformational phase behavior of the exogenously added fatty acid and the endogenous SC lipids to be monitored independently of each other. The results indicated that oleic acid exerts a significant effect on the SC lipids, lowering the lipid transition temperature (Tm) in addition to increasing the conformational freedom or flexibility of the endogenous lipid alkyl chains above their Tm. At temperatures lower than Tm, however, oleic acid did not significantly change the chain disorder of the SC lipids. Similar results were obtained with lipids isolated from the SC by chloroform:methanol extraction. Oleic acid, itself, was almost fully disordered at temperatures both above and below the endogenous lipid Tm in the intact SC and extracted lipid samples. This finding suggested that oleic acid does exist as a liquid within the SC lipids. The coexistence of fluid oleic acid and ordered SC lipids, at physiological temperatures, is consistent with the previously proposed phase-separation transport mechanism for enhanced diffusion.

  17. A comparative study of the fatty acid composition of prochloron lipids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenrick, J. R.; Deane, E. M.; Bishop, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    The chemical analysis of lipids of Prochloron isolated from several hosts is discussed. The object was to determine whether differences in lipid composition could be used to characterize organisms from different sources. Major lipid components are given. An analysis of fatty acid composition of individual lipids slowed a distinctive disstribution of fatty acids. While present results do not justify the use of fatty acid content in the taxonomy of Prochlon, the variations found in the lipids of cells from the same host harvested from different areas, or at different times in the same area, suggest that a study of the effects of temperature and light intensity on lipid composition would be rewarding.

  18. An ER protein functionally couples neutral lipid metabolism on lipid droplets to membrane lipid synthesis in the ER.

    PubMed

    Markgraf, Daniel F; Klemm, Robin W; Junker, Mirco; Hannibal-Bach, Hans K; Ejsing, Christer S; Rapoport, Tom A

    2014-01-16

    Eukaryotic cells store neutral lipids such as triacylglycerol (TAG) in lipid droplets (LDs). Here, we have addressed how LDs are functionally linked to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We show that, in S. cerevisiae, LD growth is sustained by LD-localized enzymes. When LDs grow in early stationary phase, the diacylglycerol acyl-transferase Dga1p moves from the ER to LDs and is responsible for all TAG synthesis from diacylglycerol (DAG). During LD breakdown in early exponential phase, an ER membrane protein (Ice2p) facilitates TAG utilization for membrane-lipid synthesis. Ice2p has a cytosolic domain with affinity for LDs and is required for the efficient utilization of LD-derived DAG in the ER. Ice2p breaks a futile cycle on LDs between TAG degradation and synthesis, promoting the rapid relocalization of Dga1p to the ER. Our results show that Ice2p functionally links LDs with the ER and explain how cells switch neutral lipid metabolism from storage to consumption.

  19. Role of adipose specific lipid droplet proteins in maintaining whole body energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Konige, Manige; Wang, Hong; Sztalryd, Carole

    2014-03-01

    Excess or insufficient lipid storage in white adipose tissue lipid droplets is associated with dyslipidemia, insulin resistance and increased risk for diabetes type 2. Thus, maintenance of adipose lipid droplet growth and function is critical to preserve whole body insulin sensitivity and energy homeostasis. Progress in understanding biology of lipid droplets has underscored the role of proteins that interact with lipid droplets. Here, we review the current knowledge of adipose specific lipid droplet proteins, which share unique functions controlling adipocyte lipid storage, limiting lipid spill-over and lipotoxic effects thought to contribute to disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Modulation of Adipose Tissue in Health and Disease.

  20. A role for lipid rafts in the protection afforded by docosahexaenoic acid against ethanol toxicity in primary rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Aliche-Djoudi, Fatiha; Podechard, Normand; Collin, Aurore; Chevanne, Martine; Provost, Emilie; Poul, Martine; Le Hégarat, Ludovic; Catheline, Daniel; Legrand, Philippe; Dimanche-Boitrel, Marie-Thérèse; Lagadic-Gossmann, Dominique; Sergent, Odile

    2013-10-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that eicosapentaenoic acid enhanced ethanol-induced oxidative stress and cell death in primary rat hepatocytes via an increase in membrane fluidity and lipid raft clustering. In this context, another n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), was tested with a special emphasis on physical and chemical alteration of lipid rafts. Pretreatment of hepatocytes with DHA reduced significantly ethanol-induced oxidative stress and cell death. DHA protection could be related to an alteration of lipid rafts. Indeed, rafts exhibited a marked increase in membrane fluidity and packing defects leading to the exclusion of a raft protein marker, flotillin. Furthermore, DHA strongly inhibited disulfide bridge formation, even in control cells, thus suggesting a disruption of protein-protein interactions inside lipid rafts. This particular spatial organization of lipid rafts due to DHA subsequently prevented the ethanol-induced lipid raft clustering. Such a prevention was then responsible for the inhibition of phospholipase C-γ translocation into rafts, and consequently of both lysosome accumulation and elevation in cellular low-molecular-weight iron content, a prooxidant factor. In total, the present study suggests that DHA supplementation could represent a new preventive approach for patients with alcoholic liver disease based upon modulation of the membrane structures.

  1. Significance of Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored Protein Enrichment in Lipid Rafts for the Control of Autoimmunity*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yetao; Murakami, Yoshiko; Yasui, Teruhito; Wakana, Shigeharu; Kikutani, Hitoshi; Kinoshita, Taroh; Maeda, Yusuke

    2013-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositols (GPI) are complex glycolipids that are covalently linked to the C terminus of proteins as a post-translational modification and tether proteins to the plasma membrane. One of the most striking features of GPI-anchored proteins (APs) is their enrichment in lipid rafts. The biosynthesis of GPI and its attachment to proteins occur in the endoplasmic reticulum. In the Golgi, GPI-APs are subjected to fatty acid remodeling, which replaces an unsaturated fatty acid at the sn-2 position of the phosphatidylinositol moiety with a saturated fatty acid. We previously reported that fatty acid remodeling is critical for the enrichment of GPI-APs in lipid rafts. To investigate the biological significance of GPI-AP enrichment in lipid rafts, we generated a PGAP3 knock-out mouse (PGAP3−/−) in which fatty acid remodeling of GPI-APs does not occur. We report here that a significant number of aged PGAP3−/− mice developed autoimmune-like symptoms, such as increased anti-DNA antibodies, spontaneous germinal center formation, and enlarged renal glomeruli with deposition of immune complexes and matrix expansion. A possible cause for this was the impaired engulfment of apoptotic cells by resident peritoneal macrophages in PGAP3−/− mice. Mice with conditional targeting of PGAP3 in either B or T cells did not develop such autoimmune-like symptoms. In addition, PGAP3−/− mice exhibited the tendency of Th2 polarization. These data demonstrate that PGAP3-dependent fatty acid remodeling of GPI-APs has a significant role in the control of autoimmunity, possibly by the regulation of apoptotic cell clearance and Th1/Th2 balance. PMID:23864655

  2. [Intensity of lipid peroxidation and protein oxidative modification of goat and cow milk].

    PubMed

    Vysokogorskiĭ, V E; Gavrilova, N B; Arkhipenko, Iu A

    2014-01-01

    Indices of free-radical peroxidation have been estimated: intensity of lipid per- oxidation and protein oxidative modification of goat and cow milk of specific breeds of forest-steppe zone of Omsk region. The obtained results indicate that processes of lipid peroxidation and protein oxidative destruction in goat and cow milk of different breeds occur with different gradation. The content of carbonile derivatives in goat milk of Saan breed 1.4 (0.95; 1.5) u/ml was lower than in cow's milk of black-and-white breed 4.6 (1.1; 6.0) u/ml (p = 0.005) what could be caused by large content of protein thiol groups of this kind of milk and lower quantity of amino acid residues that are available for carbonylation. This kind of milk is characterized by higher SH-group content than cow milk for 31% and Switzerland goat milk for 20% (p = 0.005). The content of cetodiens and attached triens in isopropanol phase of the lipid extract of goat milk of Swiss breed is lower by 30% than in cow milk. In isopropanol phase of the milk lipid extracts contain- ing phospholipids the level of Schiff grounding did not differ. The results obtained prove that goat milk contain less protein subjected to oxidative modification.

  3. Pyrolysis characteristics and pathways of protein, lipid and carbohydrate isolated from microalgae Nannochloropsis sp.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Sheng, Lili; Yang, Xiaoyi

    2017-04-01

    Microalgal components were isolated gradually to get lipid-rich, protein-rich and carbohydrate-rich components. The aim of this work was to study pyrolysis mechanism of microalgae by real isolated real algae components. Thermogrametric analysis (DTG) curve of microalgae was fitted by single pyrolysis curves of protein, lipid and carbohydrate except special zones, which likely affected by cell disruption and hydrolysis mass loss. Experimental microalgae liquefaction without water index N was 0.6776, 0.3861 and 0.2856 for isolated lipid, protein and carbohydrate. Pyrolysis pathways of lipid are decarboxylation, decarbonylation, fragmentation of glycerin moieties and steroid to form hydrocarbons, carboxylic acids and esters. Pyrolysis pathways of protein are decarboxylation, deamination, hydrocarbon residue fragmentation, dimerization and fragmentation of peptide bonds to form amide/amines/nitriles, esters, hydrocarbons and N-heterocyclic compounds, especially diketopiperazines (DKPs). Pyrolysis pathways of carbohydrate are dehydrated reactions and further fragmentation to form ketones and aldehyde, decomposition of lignin to form phenols, and fragmentation of lipopolysaccharides.

  4. High fatty acid availability after exercise alters the regulation of muscle lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Newsom, Sean A; Schenk, Simon; Li, Minghua; Everett, Allison C; Horowitz, Jeffrey F

    2011-06-01

    We previously reported that a single exercise session protects against fatty acid (FA)-induced insulin resistance, perhaps in part through augmented intramyocellular triacylglycerol (IMTG) synthesis. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of elevated FA availability after exercise on factors regulating IMTG metabolism. After exercise (90 minutes, 65% peak oxygen uptake), 7 healthy women (body mass index, 23 ± 1 kg/m(2)) were infused overnight (16 hours) with either a lipid and heparin solution (LIPID, 0.11 g fat per kilogram per hour) or saline (SALINE). We measured resting FA oxidation (indirect calorimetry) and obtained a skeletal muscle biopsy sample the next morning. The 4-fold increase in overnight plasma FA concentration during LIPID increased IMTG by approximately 30% during LIPID vs SALINE. This was accompanied by an approximately 25% greater membrane-associated abundance of the FA transporter FAT/CD36 (P < .01) and an approximately 8% increase in the activity of the IMTG synthesis enzyme glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT, P < .01). In contrast, resting FA oxidation was not affected. We also found no difference in the protein abundance of GPAT1 and diacylglycerol acyltransferase-1, diacylglycerol acyltransferase activity, or the abundance of the lipid droplet coat proteins (perilipins 2, 3, 4, and 5) between treatments. Our findings suggest that augmented capacity for FA flux into muscle (ie, via membrane-associated FAT/CD36), perhaps together with a slight yet significant increase in activity of a key IMTG synthesis enzyme (GPAT), may enhance IMTG storage when FA availability is high after exercise. The importance of the absence of a change in perilipin protein abundance despite increased muscle lipid storage remains to be determined.

  5. Chemical modification of proteins by lipids in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Baynes, John W

    2003-09-01

    Advanced glycation and lipoxidation end-products (AGE/ALE) increase in tissue proteins with age and at an accelerated rate in diabetes. This Review focuses on the nature and source of AGEs/ALEs and the factors affecting their formation in tissue and plasma proteins. Lipids are identified as an important source of chemical modification of proteins in diabetes, and the role of diabetes, dyslipidemia and renal disease in formation of AGEs/ALEs is reviewed. The article concludes with a discussion of ELISA assays for AGEs/ALEs and the merits of measuring AGEs/ALEs in the clinical laboratory.

  6. Stearoyl CoA desaturase is required to produce active, lipid-modified Wnt proteins.

    PubMed

    Rios-Esteves, Jessica; Resh, Marilyn D

    2013-09-26

    Wnt proteins contain palmitoleic acid, an unusual lipid modification. Production of an active Wnt signal requires the acyltransferase Porcupine and depends on the attachment of palmitoleic acid to Wnt. The source of this monounsaturated fatty acid has not been identified, and it is not known how Porcupine recognizes its substrate and whether desaturation occurs before or after fatty acid transfer to Wnt. Here, we show that stearoyl desaturase (SCD) generates a monounsaturated fatty acid substrate that is then transferred by Porcupine to Wnt. Treatment of cells with SCD inhibitors blocked incorporation of palmitate analogs into Wnt3a and Wnt5a and reduced Wnt secretion as well as autocrine and paracrine Wnt signaling. The SCD inhibitor effects were rescued by exogenous addition of monounsaturated fatty acids. We propose that SCD is a key molecular player responsible for Wnt biogenesis and processing and that SCD inhibition provides an alternative mechanism for blocking Wnt pathway activation.

  7. Very long chain fatty acid and lipid signaling in the response of plants to pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Raffaele, Sylvain; Leger, Amandine

    2009-01-01

    Recent findings indicate that lipid signaling is essential for plant resistance to pathogens. Besides oxylipins and unsaturated fatty acids known to play important signaling functions during plant-pathogen interactions, the very long chain fatty acid (VLCFA) biosynthesis pathway has been recently associated to plant defense through different aspects. VLCFAs are indeed required for the biosynthesis of the plant cuticle and the generation of sphingolipids. Elucidation of the roles of these lipids in biotic stress responses is the result of the use of genetic approaches together with the identification of the genes/proteins involved in their biosynthesis. This review focuses on recent observations which revealed the complex function of the cuticle and cuticle-derived signals, and the key role of sphingolipids as bioactive molecules involved in signal transduction and cell death regulation during plant-pathogen interactions. PMID:19649180

  8. Modifications and oxidation of lipids and proteins in human serum detected by thermochemiluminescence.

    PubMed

    Shnizer, Sergei; Kagan, Tamara; Lanir, Amos; Maor, Irit; Reznick, Abraham Z

    2003-01-01

    Detection of electronically excited species (EES) in body fluids may constitute an important diagnostic tool in various pathologies. Examples of such products are triplet excited carbonyls (TEC), which can be a source for photon emission in the 400-550 nm range. The aim of the present study was to determine the actual contribution of lipid and protein components (protein carbonyls) to photon emission generated by thermochemiluminescence (TCL) during the heating of biological fluids. In this study, a new TCL Photometer device, designed by Lumitest Ltd, Israel, was used. Samples were heated to a constant temperature of 80 +/- 0.5 degrees C for 280 s and photon emission was measured at several time points. In order to compare the results of TCL measurements to conventional methods of detecting lipid and protein oxidation, each examined sample was also heated in a waterbath at 80 degrees C for 10-280 s. Lipid and protein oxidation were subsequently measured using conventional methods. The TCL of four polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) with three to six double bonds was measured. The elevation of the PUFA TCL amplitude correlated with the increase in the number of double bonds of PUFA. A correlation between the increase in TCL intensity and protein carbonyl generation in bovine serum albumin (BSA) was also observed. In the venous blood serum, our study showed that an increase of TCL intensity during heating reflected the cleavage of TEC of lipid origin. Our study suggests that biological molecules such as proteins, lipids and other molecules, which may become unstable during heating, are capable of generating EES. We demonstrated that a TCL curve can be used as a kinetic model for measuring oxidative processes, which reflects modifications of different molecules involved in the oxidative stress phenomena.

  9. Determinants of the tumor suppressor INPP4B protein and lipid phosphatase activities.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Sandra M; Hodgson, Myles C; Packianathan, Charles; Bingol-Ozakpinar, Ozlem; Uras, Fikriye; Rosen, Barry P; Agoulnik, Irina U

    2013-10-18

    The tumor suppressor INPP4B is an important regulator of phosphatidyl-inositol signaling in the cell. Reduced INPP4B expression is associated with poor outcomes for breast, prostate, and ovarian cancer patients. INPP4B contains a CX5R catalytic motif characteristic of dual-specificity phosphatases, such as PTEN. Lipid phosphatase activity of INPP4B has previously been described. In this report we show that INPP4B can dephosphorylate para-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP) and 6,8-difluoro-4-methylumbelliferyl (DiFMUP), synthetic phosphotyrosine analogs, suggesting that INPP4B has protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity. Using mutagenesis, we examined the functional role of specific amino acids within the INPP4B C842KSAKDR catalytic site. The K843M mutant displayed increased pNPP hydrolysis, the K846M mutant lost lipid phosphatase activity with no effect on PTP activity, and the D847E substitution ablated PTP activity and significantly reduced lipid phosphatase activity. Further, we show that INPP4B but not PTEN is able to reduce tyrosine phosphorylation of Akt1 and both the lipid and PTP activity of INPP4B likely contribute to the reduction of Akt1 phosphorylation. Taken together our data identified key residues in the INPP4B catalytic domain associated with lipid and protein phosphatase activities and found a robust downstream target regulated by INPP4B but not PTEN.

  10. Five Decades with Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids: Chemical Synthesis, Enzymatic Formation, Lipid Peroxidation and Its Biological Effects

    PubMed Central

    Catalá, Angel

    2013-01-01

    I have been involved in research on polyunsaturated fatty acids since 1964 and this review is intended to cover some of the most important aspects of this work. Polyunsaturated fatty acids have followed me during my whole scientific career and I have published a number of studies concerned with different aspects of them such as chemical synthesis, enzymatic formation, metabolism, transport, physical, chemical, and catalytic properties of a reconstructed desaturase system in liposomes, lipid peroxidation, and their effects. The first project I became involved in was the organic synthesis of [1-14C] eicosa-11,14-dienoic acid, with the aim of demonstrating the participation of that compound as a possible intermediary in the biosynthesis of arachidonic acid “in vivo.” From 1966 to 1982, I was involved in several projects that study the metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids. In the eighties, we studied fatty acid binding protein. From 1990 up to now, our laboratory has been interested in the lipid peroxidation of biological membranes from various tissues and different species as well as liposomes prepared with phospholipids rich in PUFAs. We tested the effect of many antioxidants such as alpha tocopherol, vitamin A, melatonin and its structural analogues, and conjugated linoleic acid, among others. PMID:24490074

  11. Expression of Lipid Metabolism-Related Proteins Differs between Invasive Lobular Carcinoma and Invasive Ductal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Yoon Jin; Kim, Hye Min; Koo, Ja Seung

    2017-01-01

    We comparatively investigated the expression and clinical implications of lipid metabolism-related proteins in invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the breast. A total of 584 breast cancers (108 ILC and 476 IDC) were subjected to tissue microarray and immunohistochemical analysis for lipid metabolism-related proteins including hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), perilipin A, fatty acid binding protein (FABP)4, carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT)-1, acyl-CoA oxidase 1, and fatty acid synthetase (FASN). HSL, perilipin A, and FABP4 expression (all p < 0.001) differed significantly: HSL and FABP4 were more frequently present in ILC, whereas perilipin A was more frequently detected in IDC. Among all invasive cancers, HSL and FABP4 were highly expressed in luminal A-type ILC (p < 0.001) and perilipin A in luminal A-type IDC (p = 0.007). Among luminal B-type cancers, HSL and FABP4 were more highly expressed in ILC (p < 0.001). Univariate analysis found associations of shorter disease-free survival with CPT-1 positivity (p = 0.004) and acyl-CoA oxidase 1 positivity (p = 0.032) and of shorter overall survival with acyl-CoA oxidase 1 positivity (p = 0.027). In conclusion, ILC and IDC exhibited different immunohistochemical lipid metabolism-related protein expression profiles. Notably, ILC exhibited high HSL and FABP4 and low perilipin A expression. PMID:28124996

  12. Effects of carbohydrate, protein and lipid content of organic waste on hydrogen production and fermentation products.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, Luca; Cossu, Raffaello

    2016-01-01

    Organic waste from municipalities, food waste and agro-industrial residues are ideal feedstocks for use in biological conversion processes in biorefinery chains, representing biodegradable materials containing a series of substances belonging to the three main groups of the organic matter: carbohydrates, proteins and lipids. Biological hydrogen production by dark fermentation may assume a central role in the biorefinery concept, representing an up-front treatment for organic waste capable of hydrolysing complex organics and producing biohydrogen. This research study was aimed at evaluating the effects of carbohydrate, protein and lipid content of organic waste on hydrogen yields, volatile fatty acid production and carbon-fate. Biogas and hydrogen productions were linearly correlated to carbohydrate content of substrates while proteins and lipids failed to produce significant contributions. Chemical composition also produced effects on the final products of dark fermentation. Acetic and butyric acids were the main fermentation products, with their ratio proving to correlate with carbohydrate and protein content. The results obtained in this research study enhance the understanding of data variability on hydrogen yields from organic waste. Detailed information on waste composition and chemical characterisation are essential to clearly identify the potential performances of the dark fermentation process.

  13. The effect of occupational lead exposure on lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation, and plasma viscosity.

    PubMed

    Kasperczyk, Sławomir; Słowińska-Łożyńska, Ludmiła; Kasperczyk, Aleksandra; Wielkoszyński, Tomasz; Birkner, Ewa

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of occupational lead (Pb) exposure on lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation, and plasma viscosity in workers. The examined group included 283 healthy male employees of manufacturing facilities using zinc and Pb. The mean blood concentrations of Pb and zinc protoporphyrin as well as the mean urine δ-aminolevulinic acid levels were used as markers of exposure for the examined group. Taking into account the obtained mean values of blood lead level, the examined group was divided into three subgroups. When comparing the control group with the subgroups, Pb exposure markers were significantly elevated in all the three subgroups. Concentrations of conjugated dienes (CD), lipid hydroperoxides, malondialdehyde (MDA), and protein carbonyl groups were also significantly increased. Conversely, the levels of total protein and protein sulfhydryls were significantly decreased in the subgroups compared with the controls. The plasma viscosity was significantly elevated in the subgroups. A dose-response between Pb levels and plasma viscosity was not observed. Pb supposedly elevates MDA and CD in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, occupational Pb exposure induces oxidative stress that results in lipid and protein damage. Moreover, Pb-induced oxidative stress is likely the primary factor that elevates plasma viscosity, despite decreased protein levels.

  14. Dynamics of Lipid Transfer by Phosphatidylinositol Transfer Proteins in Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shadan, Sadaf; Holic, Roman; Carvou, Nicolas; Ee, Patrick; Li, Michelle; Murray-Rust, Judith; Cockcroft, Shamshad

    2008-01-01

    Of many lipid transfer proteins identified, all have been implicated in essential cellular processes, but the activity of none has been demonstrated in intact cells. Among these, phosphatidylinositol transfer proteins (PITP) are of particular interest as they can bind to and transfer phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) – the precursor of important signalling molecules, phosphoinositides – and because they have essential functions in neuronal development (PITPα) and cytokinesis (PITPβ). Structural analysis indicates that, in the cytosol, PITPs are in a ‘closed’ conformation completely shielding the lipid within them. But during lipid exchange at the membrane, they must transiently ‘open’. To study PITP dynamics in intact cells, we chemically targeted their C95 residue that, although non-essential for lipid transfer, is buried within the phospholipid-binding cavity, and so, its chemical modification prevents PtdIns binding because of steric hindrance. This treatment resulted in entrapment of open conformation PITPs at the membrane and inactivation of the cytosolic pool of PITPs within few minutes. PITP isoforms were differentially inactivated with the dynamics of PITPβ faster than PITPα. We identify two tryptophan residues essential for membrane docking of PITPs. PMID:18636990

  15. Dynamics of lipid transfer by phosphatidylinositol transfer proteins in cells.

    PubMed

    Shadan, Sadaf; Holic, Roman; Carvou, Nicolas; Ee, Patrick; Li, Michelle; Murray-Rust, Judith; Cockcroft, Shamshad

    2008-09-01

    Of many lipid transfer proteins identified, all have been implicated in essential cellular processes, but the activity of none has been demonstrated in intact cells. Among these, phosphatidylinositol transfer proteins (PITP) are of particular interest as they can bind to and transfer phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns)--the precursor of important signalling molecules, phosphoinositides--and because they have essential functions in neuronal development (PITPalpha) and cytokinesis (PITPbeta). Structural analysis indicates that, in the cytosol, PITPs are in a 'closed' conformation completely shielding the lipid within them. But during lipid exchange at the membrane, they must transiently 'open'. To study PITP dynamics in intact cells, we chemically targeted their C95 residue that, although non-essential for lipid transfer, is buried within the phospholipid-binding cavity, and so, its chemical modification prevents PtdIns binding because of steric hindrance. This treatment resulted in entrapment of open conformation PITPs at the membrane and inactivation of the cytosolic pool of PITPs within few minutes. PITP isoforms were differentially inactivated with the dynamics of PITPbeta faster than PITPalpha. We identify two tryptophan residues essential for membrane docking of PITPs.

  16. Testing Models of Fatty Acid Transfer and Lipid Synthesis in Spinach Leaf Using in Vivo Oxygen-18 Labeling1

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, Mike; Ohlrogge, John

    1999-01-01

    Oxygen-18 labeling has been applied to the study of plant lipid biosynthesis for the first time. [13C218O2]Acetate was incubated with spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaves and the 18O content in fatty acid methyl esters isolated from different lipid classes measured by gas chromatography-mass spectometry. Fatty acids isolated from lipids synthesized within the plastid, such as monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, show an 18O content consistent with the exogenous acetate undergoing a single activation step and with the direct utilization of acyl-acyl carrier protein by the acyl transferases of the chloroplast. In contrast, fatty acids isolated from lipids assembled in the cytosol, such as phosphatidylcholine, show a 50% reduction in the 18O content. This is indicative of export of the fatty acyl groups from the plastid via a free carboxylate anion, and is consistent with the acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterase:acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) synthetase mediated export mechanism. If this were not the case and the acyl group was transferred directly from acyl-acyl carrier protein to an acyl acceptor on the cytosolic side, there would be either complete retention of 18O or, less likely, complete loss of 18O, but not a 50% loss of 18O. Thus, existing models for fatty acid transfer from the plastid and for spatially separate synthesis of “prokaryotic” and “eukaryotic” lipids have both been confirmed. PMID:10594108

  17. Testing models of fatty acid transfer and lipid synthesis in spinach leaf using in vivo oxygen-18 labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Pollard, M.; Ohlrogge, J.

    1999-12-01

    Oxygen-18 labeling has been applied to the study of plant lipid biosynthesis for the first time. [{sup 13}C{sub 2}{sup 18}O{sub 2}]Acetate was incubated with spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaves and the {sup 18}O content in fatty acid methyl esters isolated from different lipid classes measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Fatty acids isolated from lipids synthesized within the plastid, such as monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, show an {sup 18}O content consistent with the exogenous acetate undergoing a single activation step and with the direct utilization of acyl-acyl carrier protein by the acyl transferases of the chloroplast. In contrast, fatty acids isolated from lipids assembled in the cytosol, such as phosphatidylcholine, show a 50% reduction in the {sup 18}O content. This is indicative of export of the fatty acyl groups from the plastid via a free carboxylate anion, and is consistent with the acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterase:acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) synthetase mediated export mechanism. If this were not the case and the acyl group was transferred directly from acyl-acyl carrier protein to an acyl acceptor on the cytosolic side, there would be either complete retention of {sup 18}O or, less likely, complete loss of {sup 18}O, but not a 50% loss of {sup 18}O. Thus, existing models for fatty acid transfer from the plastid and for spatially separate synthesis of prokaryotic and eukaryotic lipids have both been confirmed.

  18. Fish Lipids as a Valuable Source of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merdzhanova, Albena; Ivanov, Ivaylo; Dobreva, Diana A.; Makedonski, Lyubomir

    2017-03-01

    This article presents information about omega-3 (h-3) and omega-6 (n-6) polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) contents in a broad range of commercially important fish species available on Bulgarian fish markets. The aim is to raise consumers' awareness and encourage them to eat fish. Fish species from the Black Sea coast have relatively high proportion of n-3 PUFAs, of which more than 80% is by EPf (eicosapentaenoic acid, C 20:5 n-3) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid, C 22:6 n-3). Extensive epidemiological studies show that fish consumption is inversely associated with the incidence of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), stroke and the functioning of the brain. About 0.5 g of omega-3 (EPA+DHA) a day or two savings of oily fish a week are required to reduce the risk of death from CVD. PUFAs needs should be satisfied not only with food additives but with fish lipids containing food.

  19. Ferulic acid improves lipid and glucose homeostasis in high-fat diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Naowaboot, Jarinyaporn; Piyabhan, Pritsana; Munkong, Narongsuk; Parklak, Wason; Pannangpetch, Patchareewan

    2016-02-01

    Ferulic acid (FA) is a plant phenolic acid that has several pharmacological effects including antihyperglycaemic activity. Thus, the objective of this study is to investigate the effect of FA on glucose and lipid metabolism in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mice. Institute for Cancer Research (ICR) mice were fed a HFD (45 kcal% fat) for 16 weeks. At the ninth week of induction, the obese mice were orally administered with daily FA doses of 25 and 50 mg/kg for the next eight weeks. The results show that FA significantly reduced the elevated blood glucose and serum leptin levels, lowered the insulin resistance, and increased the serum adiponectin level. Moreover, serum lipid level, and liver cholesterol and triglyceride accumulations were also reduced. The histological examination showed clear evidence of a decrease in the lipid droplets in liver tissues and smaller size of fat cells in the adipose tissue in the obese mice treated with FA. Interestingly, FA reduced the expression of hepatic lipogenic genes such as sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP1c), fatty acid synthase (FAS), and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC). It could also up-regulate hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a (CPT1a) gene and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) proteins. The FA treatment was also found to suppress the protein expressions of hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase). In conclusion, the findings of this study demonstrate that FA improves the glucose and lipid homeostasis in HFD-induced obese mice probably via modulating the expression of lipogenic and gluconeogenic genes in liver tissues.

  20. Effect of Lipid-Based Nanostructure on Protein Encapsulation within the Membrane Bilayer Mimetic Lipidic Cubic Phase Using Transmembrane and Lipo-proteins from the Beta-Barrel Assembly Machinery.

    PubMed

    van 't Hag, Leonie; Shen, Hsin-Hui; Lin, Tsung-Wu; Gras, Sally L; Drummond, Calum J; Conn, Charlotte E

    2016-11-29

    A fundamental understanding of the effect of amphiphilic protein encapsulation on the nanostructure of the bicontinuous cubic phase is crucial to progressing biomedical and biological applications of these hybrid protein-lipid materials, including as drug delivery vehicles, as biosensors, biofuel cells and for in meso crystallization. The relationship between the lipid nanomaterial and the encapsulated protein, however, remains poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of incorporating the five transmembrane and lipo-proteins which make up the β-barrel assembly machinery from Gram-negative bacteria within a series of bicontinuous cubic phases. The transmembrane β-barrel BamA caused an increase in lattice parameter of the cubic phase upon encapsulation. By contrast, the mainly hydrophilic lipo-proteins BamB-E caused the cubic phase lattice parameters to decrease, despite their large size relative to the diameter of the cubic phase water channels. Analysis of the primary amino acid sequence was used to rationalize this effect, based on specific interactions between aromatic amino acids within the proteins and the polar-apolar interface. Other factors that were found to have an effect were lateral bilayer pressure and rigidity within the lipid bilayer, water channel diameter, and size and structure of the lipo-proteins. The data presented suggest that hydrophilic bioactive molecules can be selectively encapsulated within the cubic phase by using a lipid anchor or aromatic amino acids, for drug delivery or biosensing applications.

  1. Immunomodulatory lipids in plants: plant fatty acid amides and the human endocannabinoid system.

    PubMed

    Gertsch, Jürg

    2008-05-01

    Since the discovery that endogenous lipid mediators show similar cannabimimetic effects as phytocannabinoids from CANNABIS SATIVA, our knowledge about the endocannabinoid system has rapidly expanded. Today, endocannabinoid action is known to be involved in various diseases, including inflammation and pain. As a consequence, the G-protein coupled cannabinoid receptors, endocannabinoid transport, as well as endocannabinoid metabolizing enzymes represent targets to block or enhance cannabinoid receptor-mediated signalling for therapeutic intervention. Based on the finding that certain endocannabinoid-like fatty acid N-alkylamides from purple coneflower ( ECHINACEA spp.) potently activate CB2 cannabinoid receptors we have focused our interest on plant fatty acid amides (FAAs) and their overall cannabinomodulatory effects. Certain FAAs are also able to partially inhibit the action of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), which controls the breakdown of endocannabinoids. Intriguingly, plants lack CB receptors and do not synthesize endocannabinoids, but express FAAH homologues capable of metabolizing plant endogenous N-acylethanolamines (NAEs). While the site of action of these NAEs in plants is unknown, endogenous NAEs and arachidonic acid glycerols in animals interact with distinct physiological lipid receptors, including cannabinoid receptors. There is increasing evidence that also plant FAAs other than NAEs can pharmacologically modulate the action of these endogenous lipid signals. The interference of plant FAAs with the animal endocannabinoid system could thus be a fortunate evolutionary cross point with yet unexplored therapeutic potential.

  2. Hyperbaric nitrogen and pentobarbital on synaptosomal membrane lipids and free fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Kostopanagiotou, G; Hamamoto, I; Hartwell, V; Nemoto, E M

    2006-01-01

    Nitrogen at high pressures and anesthetics increase lipid monolayer surface pressure and in turn modulates monolayer associated lipolytic enzyme activity that could alter membrane lipids. We tested the hypothesis that nitrogen at pressures of 5 and 10 megapascals (MPa) and pentobarbital induce alterations in synaptosomal membrane phospholipid and free fatty acid (FFA). Rat cortical synaptosomes in Krebs-Henseleit buffer were placed in steel chambers and incubated for four hours at 37 degrees C: at 5 or 10 MPa of O2/balance N2; at one 0.1 MPa on room air, and with 10 mg pentobarbital. Free fatty acids (FFA) were quantified by thin-layer and gas chromatography, and neutral and acidic lipids by high-pressure thin layer chromatography and protein by Biorad colorimetric assay. Statistical analyses were by ANOVA and posthoc analysis by Neuman-Keuls and Kruskal-Wallis tests at p < 0.05. Sphyngomyelin, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, cerebroside and cholesterol were unchanged by 5 and 10 MPa nitrogen and pentobarbital. Free fatty acids (16:00, 18:00, 18:01, 20:00, 22:0, 22:01 and 24:01) at 10 MPa were reduced compared to 5 MPa (p < 0.05) but unaffected by pentobarbital. The decrease in synaptosomal membrane FFA at 10 MPa suggests attenuated hydrolysis of membrane phospholipids without detectable alterations in membrane phospholipid composition.

  3. Relationship between lipid saturation and lipid-protein interaction in liver mitochondria modified by catalytic hydrogenation with reference to cardiolipin molecular species.

    PubMed Central

    Schlame, M; Horvàth, L; Vìgh, L

    1990-01-01

    Lipid acyl double bonds in isolated mitochondrial membranes were gradually reduced by palladium-complex-catalysed hydrogenation, and the resulting saturation was monitored by fatty acid analysis of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and cardiolipin. The courses of hydrogenation of these phospholipids suggested that cardiolipin is in a membrane compartment which is less accessible to the applied catalyst. Native cardiolipin and its hydrogenation products were further characterized by analysis of their molecular diacylglycerol species. A decrease in the double bond content was accompanied by an increased amount of motionally restricted lipids at the hydrophobic interface of proteins as measured by two different spin-labelled lipids (C-14 positional isomers of spin-labelled stearic acid and phosphatidylcholine analogues). The protein-immobilized fraction of spin-labelled stearic acid increased in parallel with the hydrogenation of cardiolipin rather than of phosphatidylcholine or phosphatidylethanolamine. These data are interpreted in terms of a tight association of cardiolipin with membrane proteins, which becomes looser upon double bond reduction leading to the replacement of cardiolipin by spin-labelled stearic acid in the solvation shell. Thus the hydrophobic moiety of cardiolipin, characterized by double-unsaturated C18-C18 diacylglycerol species, seems to be an important structural requirement for the high protein affinity of this compound. PMID:2154183

  4. Increased non-protein bound iron in Down syndrome: contribution to lipid peroxidation and cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Manna, Caterina; Officioso, Arbace; Trojsi, Francesca; Tedeschi, Gioacchino; Leoncini, Silvia; Signorini, Cinzia; Ciccoli, Lucia; De Felice, Claudio

    2016-12-01

    Down syndrome (DS, trisomy 21) is the leading cause of chromosomal-related intellectual disability. At an early age, adults with DS develop with the neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease, associated with a chronic oxidative stress. To investigate if non-protein bound iron (NPBI) can contribute to building up a pro-oxidative microenvironment, we evaluated NPBI in both plasma and erythrocytes from DS and age-matched controls, together with in vivo markers of lipid peroxidation (F2-isoprostanes, F2-dihomo-isoprostanes, F4-neuroprostanes) and in vitro reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in erythrocytes. The serum iron panel and uric acid were also measured. Second, we explored possible correlation between NPBI, lipid peroxidation and cognitive performance. Here, we report NPBI increase in DS, which correlates with increased serum ferritin and uric acid. High levels of lipid peroxidation markers and intraerythrocyte ROS formations were also reported. Furthermore, the scores of Raven's Colored Progressive Matrices (RCPM) test, performed as a measure of current cognitive function, are inversely related to NPBI, serum uric acid, and ferritin. Likewise, ROS production, F2-isoprostanes, and F4-neuroprostanes were also inversely related to cognitive performance, whereas serum transferrin positively correlated to RCPM scores. Our data reveal that increased availability of free redox-active iron, associated with enhanced lipid peroxidation, may be involved in neurodegeneration and cognitive decline in DS. In this respect, we propose chelation therapy as a potential preventive/therapeutic tool in DS.

  5. Protein oxidation: examination of potential lipid-independent mechanisms for protein carbonyl formation.

    PubMed

    Blakeman, D P; Ryan, T P; Jolly, R A; Petry, T W

    1998-01-01

    Previous data indicated that diquat-mediated protein oxidation (protein carbonyl formation) occurs through multiple pathways, one of which is lipid dependent, and the other, lipid independent. Studies reported here investigated potential mechanisms of the lipid-independent pathway in greater detail, using bovine serum albumin as the target protein. One hypothesized mechanism of protein carbonyl formation involved diquat-dependent production of H2O2, which would then react with site-specifically bound ferrous iron as proposed by Stadtman and colleagues. This hypothesis was supported by the inhibitory effect of catalase on diquat-mediated protein carbonyl formation. However, exogenous H2O2 alone did not induce protein carbonyl formation. Hydroxyl radical-generating reactions may result from the H2O2-catalyzed oxidation of ferrous iron, which normally is bound to protein in the ferric state. Therefore, the possible reduction of site-specifically bound Fe3+ to Fe2+ by the diquat cation radical (which could then react with H2O2) was also investigated. The combination of H2O2 and an iron reductant, ascorbate, however, also failed to induce significant protein carbonyl formation. In a phospholipid-containing system, an ADP:Fe2+ complex induced both lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl formation; both indices were largely inhibitable by antioxidants. There was no substantial ADP:Fe(2+)-dependent protein carbonyl formation in the absence of phospholipid under otherwise identical conditions. Based on the lipid requirement and antioxidant sensitivity, these data suggest that ADP:Fe(2+)-dependent protein carbonyl formation occurs through reaction of BSA with aldehydic lipid peroxidation products. The precise mechanism of diquat-mediated protein carbonyl formation remains unclear, but it appears not to be a function of H2O2 generation or diquat cation radical-dependent reduction of bound Fe3+.

  6. Lipid and protein maps defining arterial layers in atherosclerotic aorta

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Lorenzo, Marta; Balluff, Benjamin; Maroto, Aroa S.; Carreira, Ricardo J.; van Zeijl, Rene J.M.; Gonzalez-Calero, Laura; de la Cuesta, Fernando; Barderas, Maria G; Lopez-Almodovar, Luis F; Padial, Luis R; McDonnell, Liam A.; Vivanco, Fernando; Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Subclinical atherosclerosis cannot be predicted and novel therapeutic targets are needed. The molecular anatomy of healthy and atherosclerotic tissue is pursued to identify ongoing molecular changes in atherosclerosis development. Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MSI) accounts with the unique advantage of analyzing proteins and metabolites (lipids) while preserving their original localization; thus two dimensional maps can be obtained. Main molecular alterations were investigated in a rabbit model in response to early development of atherosclerosis. Aortic arterial layers (intima and media) and calcified regions were investigated in detail by MALDI-MSI and proteins and lipids specifically defining those areas of interest were identified. These data further complement main findings previously published in J Proteomics (M. Martin-Lorenzo et al., J. Proteomics. (In press); M. Martin-Lorenzo et al., J. Proteomics 108 (2014) 465–468.) [1,2]. PMID:26217810

  7. Serial femtosecond crystallography of soluble proteins in lipidic cubic phase

    DOE PAGES

    Fromme, Raimund; Ishchenko, Andrii; Metz, Markus; ...

    2015-08-04

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) at X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) enables high-resolution protein structure determination using micrometre-sized crystals at room temperature with minimal effects from radiation damage. SFX requires a steady supply of microcrystals intersecting the XFEL beam at random orientations. An LCP–SFX method has recently been introduced in which microcrystals of membrane proteins are grown and delivered for SFX data collection inside a gel-like membrane-mimetic matrix, known as lipidic cubic phase (LCP), using a special LCP microextrusion injector. Here, it is shown enabling a dramatic reduction in the amount of crystallized protein required for data collection compared with crystals deliveredmore » by liquid injectors. High-quality LCP–SFX data sets were collected for two soluble proteins, lysozyme and phycocyanin, using less than 0.1 mg of each protein.« less

  8. Serial femtosecond crystallography of soluble proteins in lipidic cubic phase

    SciTech Connect

    Fromme, Raimund; Ishchenko, Andrii; Metz, Markus; Chowdhury, Shatabdi Roy; Basu, Shibom; Boutet, Sébastien; Fromme, Petra; White, Thomas A.; Barty, Anton; Spence, John C. H.; Weierstall, Uwe; Liu, Wei; Cherezov, Vadim

    2015-08-04

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) at X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) enables high-resolution protein structure determination using micrometre-sized crystals at room temperature with minimal effects from radiation damage. SFX requires a steady supply of microcrystals intersecting the XFEL beam at random orientations. An LCP–SFX method has recently been introduced in which microcrystals of membrane proteins are grown and delivered for SFX data collection inside a gel-like membrane-mimetic matrix, known as lipidic cubic phase (LCP), using a special LCP microextrusion injector. Here, it is shown enabling a dramatic reduction in the amount of crystallized protein required for data collection compared with crystals delivered by liquid injectors. High-quality LCP–SFX data sets were collected for two soluble proteins, lysozyme and phycocyanin, using less than 0.1 mg of each protein.

  9. Branched short-chain fatty acids modulate glucose and lipid metabolism in primary adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Heimann, Emilia; Nyman, Margareta; Pålbrink, Ann-Ki; Lindkvist-Petersson, Karin; Degerman, Eva

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), e.g. acetic acid, propionic acid and butyric acid, generated through colonic fermentation of dietary fibers, have been shown to reach the systemic circulation at micromolar concentrations. Moreover, SCFAs have been conferred anti-obesity properties in both animal models and human subjects. Branched SCFAs (BSCFAs), e.g., isobutyric and isovaleric acid, are generated by fermentation of branched amino acids, generated from undigested protein reaching colon. However, BSCFAs have been sparsely investigated when referring to effects on energy metabolism. Here we primarily investigate the effects of isobutyric acid and isovaleric acid on glucose and lipid metabolism in primary rat and human adipocytes. BSCFAs inhibited both cAMP-mediated lipolysis and insulin-stimulated de novo lipogenesis at 10 mM, whereas isobutyric acid potentiated insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by all concentrations (1, 3 and 10 mM) in rat adipocytes. For human adipocytes, only SCFAs inhibited lipolysis at 10 mM. In both in vitro models, BSCFAs and SCFAs reduced phosphorylation of hormone sensitive lipase, a rate limiting enzyme in lipolysis. In addition, BSCFAs and SCFAs, in contrast to insulin, inhibited lipolysis in the presence of wortmannin, a phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase inhibitor and OPC3911, a phosphodiesterase 3 inhibitor in rat adipocytes. Furthermore, BSCFAs and SCFAs reduced insulin-mediated phosphorylation of protein kinase B. To conclude, BSCFAs have effects on adipocyte lipid and glucose metabolism that can contribute to improved insulin sensitivity in individuals with disturbed metabolism. PMID:27994949

  10. Effects of Aminoguanidine on Lipid and Protein Oxidation in Diabetic Rat Kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Küçükkaya, Belgin; Ersöz, H. önder; Yalçin, A. Süha; Emerk, Kaya; Akalin, Sema

    2002-01-01

    Nonenzymatic glycation of tissue and plasma proteins may stimulate the production of oxidant and carbonyl stress in diabetes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of aminoguanidine (AG) on lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and nitric oxide (NO) release in diabetic rat kidneys. After induction of diabetes with streptozotocin, female Wistar rats were divided into 2 groups. Group DAG (n=9) rats were given AG hydrogen carbonate (1 g/L) in drinking water and group D (n=8) was diabetic control rats given only tap water. Group H (n=8) was followed as healthy controls. At the end of an 8 week period, NO release, lipid and protein oxidation were determined in kidney tissues. NO release was significantly lower in diabetic rats compared with healthy controls (p<0.05). Lipid peroxidation was significantly high in group D (3.9 ± 0.3 nmol MDA/g tissue) compared with the group DAG (2.6 ± 0.1 nmol MDA/g tissue, p<0.01) and group H (2.4 ± 0.2 nmol MDA/g tissue). Protein oxidation was significantly higher in diabetics than healthy controls (563.8 ± 23.9, 655.8 ± 7.2 , 431.5 ± 8.8 mmol carbonyl / g tissue for group DAG, D and H, respectively, p< 0.05). A positive correlation between albuminuria and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) levels (r= 0.54,p<0.005) and carbonyl content (r=0.70, p<0.0005) in kidney homogenate were observed. Although AG treatment had no effect on NO release, it significantly decreased lipid peroxidation in diabetic rat cortices. Consequently increased lipid peroxidation -as well as- protein oxidation could be involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic albuminuria. PMID:11991200

  11. Structural characterization of the pulmonary innate immune protein SPLUNC1 and identification of lipid ligands

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Fangkun; Wang, Chao; Berry, Karin Zemski; Kandasamy, Pitchaimani; Liu, Haolin; Murphy, Robert C.; Voelker, Dennis R.; Nho, Chu Won; Pan, Choel-Ho; Dai, Shaodong; Niu, Liwen; Chu, Hong-Wei; Zhang, Gongyi

    2014-01-01

    The short palate, lung and nasal epithelial clone 1 (SPLUNC1) protein is a member of the palate, lung, and nasal epithelium clone (PLUNC) family, also known as bactericidal/permeability-increasing (BPI) fold-containing protein, family A, member 1 (BPIFA1). SPLUNC1 is an abundant protein in human airways, but its function remains poorly understood. The lipid ligands of SPLUNC1 as well as other PLUNC family members are largely unknown, although some reports provide evidence that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) could be a lipid ligand. Unlike previous hypotheses, we found significant structural differences between SPLUNC1 and BPI. Recombinant SPLUNC1 produced in HEK 293 cells harbored several molecular species of sphingomyelin and phosphatidylcholine as its ligands. Significantly, in vitro lipid-binding studies failed to demonstrate interactions between SPLUNC1 and LPS, lipoteichoic acid, or polymyxin B. Instead, one of the major and most important pulmonary surfactant phospholipids, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), bound to SPLUNC1 with high affinity and specificity. We found that SPLUNC1 could be the first protein receptor for DPPC. These discoveries provide insight into the specific determinants governing the interaction between SPLUNC1 and lipids and also shed light on novel functions that SPLUNC1 and other PLUNC family members perform in host defense.—Ning, F., Wang, C., Berry, K. Z., Kandasamy, P., Liu, H., Murphy, R. C., Voelker, D. R., Nho, C. W., Pan, C.-H., Dai, S., Niu, L., Chu, H.-W., Zhang, G. Structural characterization of the pulmonary innate immune protein SPLUNC1 and identification of lipid ligands. PMID:25223608

  12. Co-Association of Cytochrome f Catabolites and Plastid-Lipid-Associated Protein with Chloroplast Lipid Particles1

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Matthew D.; Licatalosi, Donny D.; Thompson, John E.

    2000-01-01

    Distinguishable populations of lipid particles isolated from chloroplasts of yellow wax bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv Kinghorn Wax) leaves have been found to contain plastid-lipid-associated protein (J. Pozueta-Romero, F. Rafia, G. Houlné, C. Cheniclet, J.P. Carde, M.-L. Schantz, R. Schantz [1997] Plant Physiol 115: 1185–1194). One population is comprised of plastoglobuli obtained from sonicated chloroplasts by flotation centrifugation. Higher density lipid-protein particles isolated from chloroplast stroma by ultrafiltration constitute a second population. Inasmuch as the stromal lipid-protein particles contain plastid-lipid-associated protein, but are distinguishable from plastoglobuli in terms of their lipid and protein composition, they appear to be plastoglobuli-like particles. Of particular interest is the finding that plastoglobuli and the higher density lipid-protein particles both contain catabolites of the thylakoid protein, cytochrome f. These observations support the view that there are distinguishable populations of plastoglobuli-like particles in chloroplasts. They further suggest that the formation of these particles may allow removal of protein catabolites from the thylakoid membrane that are destined for degradation as part of normal thylakoid turnover. PMID:10982436

  13. Effects of serum, its protein and lipid extracts, and commercial serum proteins and lipid on the isolated frog heart.

    PubMed

    Singh, J; Hutton, T; Hussain, M; Waring, J J

    1991-01-01

    This study investigates the inotropic effects of serum, its protein and lipid extracts, and commercial serum proteins and lipid on the isolated, spontaneously-beating heart and superfused, hypodynamic ventricle of the frog. Serum taken from either man, horse, calf, frog, or rabbit evoked marked positive inotropic responses which were unaffected by cholinergic, serotonergic, and adrenergic receptor antagonists. Dialysed serum (dialisand) and void volume fractions from Sephadex G200-120 columns corresponding to large molecular weight constituents evoked marked positive inotropic responses. When serum was separated into fractions containing either proteins or lipids/lipoproteins by high-density ultracentrifugation or activated charcoal, both extracts evoked marked positive inotropic responses. Commercial serum globulins and serum containing a high proportion of immunoglobulins elicited large increases in contractile force, whereas serum albumin evoked a negative inotropic effect. Serum which was either boiled and/or treated with chymotrypsin to denature proteins also caused a marked increase in isometric twitch tension in the frog heart. Similar inotropic response was obtained with fractions of boiled serum eluted on columns of Sephadex G200-120. These fractions corresponded to molecular weight in the region of 60-70 kDa. However, the inotropic effect of boiled serum was abolished following pretreatment with lipase. Superfusion of frog hearts with commercial cardiolipin resulted in marked dose-dependent increases in contractile force. The results demonstrate the presence of at least two large molecular weight cardioactive principles in serum. These substances are comparable in size to constituents of serum proteins (e.g., globulins and immunoglobulins) and serum lipids/lipoproteins (e.g., cardiolipin) and may serve as physiological regulators of cardiac function.

  14. Identification of lipid synthesis and secretion proteins in bovine milk.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; van Hooijdonk, Toon; Boeren, Sjef; Vervoort, Jacques; Hettinga, Kasper

    2014-02-01

    Lactation physiology is a process that is only partly understood. Proteomics techniques have shown to be useful to help advance the knowledge on lactation physiology in human and rodent species but have not been used as major tools for dairy cows, except for mastitis. In this paper, advanced non-targeted proteomics techniques (Filter aided sample preparation and NanoLC-Orbitrap-MS/MS) were applied to study the milk fat globule membrane and milk serum fraction, resulting in the identification of 246 proteins. Of these, 23 transporters and enzymes were related to lipid synthesis and secretion in mammary gland and their functions are discussed in detail. The identification of these intracellular transporters and enzymes in milk provides a possibility of using milk itself to study lipid synthesis and secretion pathways. This full-scale scan of milk proteins by using non-targeted proteomic analysis helps to reveal the important proteins involved in lipid synthesis and secretion for further examination in targeted studies.

  15. Reaction conditions affecting the relationship between thiobarbituric acid reactivity and lipid peroxides in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Lapenna, D; Ciofani, G; Pierdomenico, S D; Giamberardino, M A; Cuccurullo, F

    2001-08-01

    The thiobarbituric acid (TBA) reactivity of human plasma was studied to evaluate its adequacy in quantifying lipid peroxidation as an index of systemic oxidative stress. Two spectrophotometric TBA tests based on the use of either phosphoric acid (pH 2.0, method A) or trichloroacetic plus hydrochloric acid (pH 0.9, method B) were employed with and without sodium sulfate (SS) to inhibit sialic acid (SA) reactivity with TBA. To correct for background absorption, the absorbance values at 572 nm were subtracted from those at 532 nm, which represent the absorption maximum of the TBA:MDA adduct. Method B gave values of TBA-reactive substances (TBARS) 2-fold higher than those detected with method A. SS lowered TBARS by about 50% with both methods, indicating a significant involvement of SA in plasma TBA reactivity. Standard SA, at a physiologically relevant concentration of 1.5 mM, reacted with TBA, creating interference problems, which were substantially eliminated by SS plus correction for background absorbance. When method B was carried out in the lipid and protein fraction of plasma, SS inhibited by 65% TBARS formation only in the latter. Protein TBARS may be largely ascribed to SA-containing glycoproteins and, to a minor extent, protein-bound MDA. Indeed, EDTA did not affect protein TBARS assessed in the presence of SS. TBA reactivity of whole plasma and of its lipid fraction was instead inhibited by EDTA, suggesting that lipoperoxides (and possibly monofunctional lipoperoxidation aldehydes) are involved as MDA precursors in the TBA test. Pretreatment of plasma with KI, a specific reductant of hydroperoxides, decreased TBARS by about 27%. Moreover, aspirin administration to humans to inhibit prostaglandin endoperoxide generation reduced plasma TBARS by 40%. In conclusion, reaction conditions affect the relationship between TBA reactivity and lipid peroxidation in human plasma. After correction for the interfering effects of SA in the TBA test, 40% of plasma TBARS

  16. Quantifying protein by bicinchoninic Acid.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Richard J

    2008-08-01

    INTRODUCTIONThis protocol describes a method of quantifying protein that is a variation of the Lowry assay. It uses bicinchoninic acid (BCA) to enhance the detection of Cu(+) generated under alkaline conditions at sites of complexes between Cu(2+) and protein. The resulting chromophore absorbs at 562 nm. This technique is divided into three parts: Standard Procedure, Microprocedure, and 96-Well Microtiter Plate Procedure. For each procedure, test samples are assayed in parallel with protein standards that are used to generate a calibration curve, and the exact concentration of protein in the test samples is interpolated. The standard BCA assay uses large volumes of both reagents and samples and cannot easily be automated. If these issues are important, the Microprocedure is recommended. This in turn can be adapted for use with a microplate reader in the 96-Well Microtiter Plate Procedure. If the microplate reader is interfaced with a computer, more than 1000 samples can be read per hour.

  17. Solid Lipid Nanoparticles Loaded with Retinoic Acid and Lauric Acid as an Alternative for Topical Treatment of Acne Vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Silva, Elton Luiz; Carneiro, Guilherme; De Araújo, Lidiane Advíncula; Trindade, Mariana de Jesus Vaz; Yoshida, Maria Irene; Oréfice, Rodrigo Lambert; Farias, Luis de Macêdo; De Carvalho, Maria Auxiliadora Roque; Dos Santos, Simone Gonçalves; Goulart, Gisele Assis Castro; Alves, Ricardo José; Ferreira, Lucas Antônio Miranda

    2015-01-01

    Topical therapy is the first choice for the treatment of mild to moderate acne and all-trans retinoic acid is one of the most used drugs. The combination of retinoids and antimicrobials is an innovative approach for acne therapy. Recently, lauric acid, a saturated fatty acid, has shown strong antimicrobial activity against Propionibacterium acnes. However, topical application of retinoic acid is followed by high incidence of side-effects, including erythema and irritation. Solid lipid nanoparticles represent an alternative to overcome these side-effects. This work aims to develop solid lipid nanoparticles loaded with retinoic acid and lauric acid and evaluate their antibacterial activity. The influence of lipophilic stearylamine on the characteristics of solid lipid nanoparticles was investigated. Solid lipid nanoparticles were characterized for size, zeta potential, encapsulation efficiency, differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction. The in vitro inhibitory activity of retinoic acid-lauric acid-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles was evaluated against Propionibacterium acnes, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. High encapsulation efficiency was obtained at initial time (94 ± 7% and 100 ± 4% for retinoic acid and lauric acid, respectively) and it was demonstrated that lauric acid-loaded-solid lipid nanoparticles provided the incorporation of retinoic acid. However, the presence of stearylamine is necessary to ensure stability of encapsulation. Moreover, retinoic acid-lauric acid-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles showed growth inhibitory activity against Staphylococcus epidermidis, Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus aureus, representing an interesting alternative for the topical therapy of acne vulgaris.

  18. Membrane binding of a lipidated N-Ras protein studied in lipid monolayers.

    PubMed

    Bringezu, Frank; Majerowicz, Monika; Wen, Shaoying; Reuther, Guido; Tan, Kui-Thong; Kuhlmann, Jürgen; Waldmann, Herbert; Huster, Daniel

    2007-04-01

    The adsorption of doubly lipidated full-length N-Ras protein on 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) monolayers was studied by lateral pressure analysis, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD), and specular reflectivity (XR). N-Ras protein adsorbs to the DPPC monolayer (lateral pressure of 20 mN/m) from the subphase thereby increasing the lateral pressure in the monolayer by 4 mN/m. The protein insertion does not alter the tilt angle and structure of the lipid molecules at the air/water interface but influences the electron density profile of the monolayer. Further, electron density differences into the subphase were observed. The Fresnel normalized reflectivity could be reconstructed in the analysis using box models yielding electron density profiles of the DPPC monolayer in the absence and in the presence of N-Ras protein. The electron density profiles of the DPPC monolayer in the presence of Ras showed clear intensity variations in the headgroup/glycerol/upper chain region, the so-called interface region where previous bilayer studies had confirmed Ras binding.

  19. Identification of a new class of lipid droplet-associated proteins in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipid droplets in plants (also known as oil bodies, lipid bodies or oleosomes) are well characterized in seeds, and oleosins, the major proteins associated with their surface, were shown to be important for stabilizing lipid droplets during seed desiccation and rehydration. However, lipid droplets ...

  20. Anomalous and normal diffusion of proteins and lipids in crowded lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Javanainen, Matti; Hammaren, Henrik; Monticelli, Luca; Jeon, Jae-Hyung; Miettinen, Markus S; Martinez-Seara, Hector; Metzler, Ralf; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2013-01-01

    Lateral diffusion plays a crucial role in numerous processes that take place in cell membranes, yet it is quite poorly understood in native membranes characterized by, e.g., domain formation and large concentration of proteins. In this article, we use atomistic and coarse-grained simulations to consider how packing of membranes and crowding with proteins affect the lateral dynamics of lipids and membrane proteins. We find that both packing and protein crowding have a profound effect on lateral diffusion, slowing it down. Anomalous diffusion is observed to be an inherent property in both protein-free and protein-rich membranes, and the time scales of anomalous diffusion and the exponent associated with anomalous diffusion are found to strongly depend on packing and crowding. Crowding with proteins also has a striking effect on the decay rate of dynamical correlations associated with lateral single-particle motion, as the transition from anomalous to normal diffusion is found to take place at macroscopic time scales: while in protein-poor conditions normal diffusion is typically observed in hundreds of nanoseconds, in protein-rich conditions the onset of normal diffusion is tens of microseconds, and in the most crowded systems as large as milliseconds. The computational challenge which results from these time scales is not easy to deal with, not even in coarse-grained simulations. We also briefly discuss the physical limits of protein motion. Our results suggest that protein concentration is anything but constant in the plane of cell membranes. Instead, it is strongly dependent on proteins' preference for aggregation.

  1. Lipid-protein interactions of integral membrane proteins: a comparative simulation study.

    PubMed

    Deol, Sundeep S; Bond, Peter J; Domene, Carmen; Sansom, Mark S P

    2004-12-01

    The interactions between membrane proteins and their lipid bilayer environment play important roles in the stability and function of such proteins. Extended (15-20 ns) molecular dynamics simulations have been used to explore the interactions of two membrane proteins with phosphatidylcholine bilayers. One protein (KcsA) is an alpha-helix bundle and embedded in a palmitoyl oleoyl phosphatidylcholine bilayer; the other (OmpA) is a beta-barrel outer-membrane protein and is in a dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine bilayer. The simulations enable analysis in detail of a number of aspects of lipid-protein interactions. In particular, the interactions of aromatic amphipathic side chains (i.e., Trp, Tyr) with lipid headgroups, and "snorkeling" interactions of basic side chains (i.e., Lys, Arg) with phosphate groups are explored. Analysis of the number of contacts and of H-bonds reveal fluctuations on an approximately 1- to 5-ns timescale. There are two clear bands of interacting residues on the surface of KcsA, whereas there are three such bands on OmpA. A large number of Arg-phosphate interactions are seen for KcsA; for OmpA, the number of basic-phosphate interactions is smaller and shows more marked fluctuations with respect to time. Both classes of interaction occur in clearly defined interfacial regions of width approximately 1 nm. Analysis of lateral diffusion of lipid molecules reveals that "boundary" lipid molecules diffuse at about half the rate of bulk lipid. Overall, these simulations present a dynamic picture of lipid-protein interactions: there are a number of more specific interactions but even these fluctuate on an approximately 1- to 5-ns timescale.

  2. Lipid growth requirement and influence of lipid supplement on fatty acid and aldehyde composition of Syntrophococcus sucromutans.

    PubMed Central

    Doré, J; Bryant, M P

    1989-01-01

    Results concerning the ruminal fluid growth requirement of the ruminal acetogen, Syntrophococcus sucromutans, indicate that octadecenoic acid isomers satisfy this essential requirement. Complex lipids, such as triglycerides and phospholipids, can also support growth. The cellular fatty acid and aldehyde composition closely reflects that of the lipid supplement provided to the cells. Up to 98% of the fatty acids and 80% of the fatty aldehydes are identical in chain length and degree of unsaturation to the octadecenoic acid supplement provided in the medium. S. sucromutans shows a tendency to have a greater proportion of the aldehyde form among its 18 carbon chains than it does with the shorter-chain simple lipids, which may be interpreted as a strategy to maintain membrane fluidity. 14C labeling showed that most of the oleic acid taken up from the medium was incorporated into the membrane fraction of the cells. PMID:2729991

  3. Scaling and alpha-helix regulation of protein relaxation in a lipid bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Liming; Buie, Creighton; Cheng, Kwan Hon; Vaughn, Mark W.

    2014-12-01

    Protein conformation and orientation in the lipid membrane plays a key role in many cellular processes. Here we use molecular dynamics simulation to investigate the relaxation and C-terminus diffusion of a model helical peptide: beta-amyloid (Aβ) in a lipid membrane. We observed that after the helical peptide was initially half-embedded in the extracelluar leaflet of phosphatidylcholine (PC) or PC/cholesterol (PC/CHOL) membrane, the C-terminus diffused across the membrane and anchored to PC headgroups of the cytofacial lipid leaflet. In some cases, the membrane insertion domain of the Aβ was observed to partially unfold. Applying a sigmoidal fit to the process, we found that the characteristic velocity of the C-terminus, as it moved to its anchor site, scaled with θu-4/3, where θu is the fraction of the original helix that was lost during a helix to coil transition. Comparing this scaling with that of bead-spring models of polymer relaxation suggests that the C-terminus velocity is highly regulated by the peptide helical content, but that it is independent of the amino acid type. The Aβ was stabilized by the attachment of the positive Lys28 side chain to the negative phosphate of PC or 3β oxygen of CHOL in the extracellular lipid leaflet and of the C-terminus to its anchor site in the cytofacial lipid leaflet.

  4. Bioactive vegetable proteins and peptides in lipid-lowering; nutraceutical potential.

    PubMed

    Ruiz Ruiz, Jorge Carlos; Betancur Ancona, David Abram; Segura Campos, Maira Rubi

    2014-04-01

    As the last century saw a decline in the burden of nutritional deficiency and infectious disease, the global burden of chronic disease, cardiovascular disease (CVD) in particular, is increasing. CVD is the leading cause of death in the developed countries. Significant research efforts on the prevention and treatment of this disease have identified elevated plasma cholesterol as a primary risk factor for CVD. Although CVD progresses with hypercholesterolemia, it seems possibility to delay and prevent its development through improvement of diet. Recent findings demonstrate that protein concentrates, protein hydrolysates, and peptides derived from vegetables may promote a significant decrease in blood cholesterol concentration. This reduction in cholesterol and lipid levels by protein, protein hydrolysates, and peptides can be the result of dietary changes, reduced cholesterol biosynthesis, changes in bile acid synthesis, and reduced absorption of lipid cholesterol and bile acid. Combination drug/diet therapies may reduce the number of drug prescriptions, the progressive rise in "optimal" drug dosage and costs associated with pharmaceutical management of disease. These bioactive vegetable proteins, hydrolysates and peptides may be used in formulation of functional foods, nutraceuticals, and natural drugs because of their health benefit effects suggesting their use as an alternative in treatment of various dyslipidemias, and a potential agent for reducing cardiovascular diseases risk factors.

  5. The Lipid Droplet Protein Hypoxia-inducible Gene 2 Promotes Hepatic Triglyceride Deposition by Inhibiting Lipolysis*

    PubMed Central

    DiStefano, Marina T.; Danai, Laura V.; Roth Flach, Rachel J.; Chawla, Anil; Pedersen, David J.; Guilherme, Adilson; Czech, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    The liver is a major site of glucose, fatty acid, and triglyceride (TG) synthesis and serves as a major regulator of whole body nutrient homeostasis. Chronic exposure of humans or rodents to high-calorie diets promotes non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, characterized by neutral lipid accumulation in lipid droplets (LD) of hepatocytes. Here we show that the LD protein hypoxia-inducible gene 2 (Hig2/Hilpda) functions to enhance lipid accumulation in hepatocytes by attenuating TG hydrolysis. Hig2 expression increased in livers of mice on a high-fat diet and during fasting, two states associated with enhanced hepatic TG content. Hig2 expressed in primary mouse hepatocytes localized to LDs and promoted LD TG deposition in the presence of oleate. Conversely, tamoxifen-inducible Hig2 deletion reduced both TG content and LD size in primary hepatocytes from mice harboring floxed alleles of Hig2 and a cre/ERT2 transgene controlled by the ubiquitin C promoter. Hepatic TG was also decreased by liver-specific deletion of Hig2 in mice with floxed Hig2 expressing cre controlled by the albumin promoter. Importantly, we demonstrate that Hig2-deficient hepatocytes exhibit increased TG lipolysis, TG turnover, and fatty acid oxidation as compared with controls. Interestingly, mice with liver-specific Hig2 deletion also display improved glucose tolerance. Taken together, these data indicate that Hig2 plays a major role in promoting lipid sequestration within LDs in mouse hepatocytes through a mechanism that impairs TG degradation. PMID:25922078

  6. The Lipid Droplet Protein Hypoxia-inducible Gene 2 Promotes Hepatic Triglyceride Deposition by Inhibiting Lipolysis.

    PubMed

    DiStefano, Marina T; Danai, Laura V; Roth Flach, Rachel J; Chawla, Anil; Pedersen, David J; Guilherme, Adilson; Czech, Michael P

    2015-06-12

    The liver is a major site of glucose, fatty acid, and triglyceride (TG) synthesis and serves as a major regulator of whole body nutrient homeostasis. Chronic exposure of humans or rodents to high-calorie diets promotes non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, characterized by neutral lipid accumulation in lipid droplets (LD) of hepatocytes. Here we show that the LD protein hypoxia-inducible gene 2 (Hig2/Hilpda) functions to enhance lipid accumulation in hepatocytes by attenuating TG hydrolysis. Hig2 expression increased in livers of mice on a high-fat diet and during fasting, two states associated with enhanced hepatic TG content. Hig2 expressed in primary mouse hepatocytes localized to LDs and promoted LD TG deposition in the presence of oleate. Conversely, tamoxifen-inducible Hig2 deletion reduced both TG content and LD size in primary hepatocytes from mice harboring floxed alleles of Hig2 and a cre/ERT2 transgene controlled by the ubiquitin C promoter. Hepatic TG was also decreased by liver-specific deletion of Hig2 in mice with floxed Hig2 expressing cre controlled by the albumin promoter. Importantly, we demonstrate that Hig2-deficient hepatocytes exhibit increased TG lipolysis, TG turnover, and fatty acid oxidation as compared with controls. Interestingly, mice with liver-specific Hig2 deletion also display improved glucose tolerance. Taken together, these data indicate that Hig2 plays a major role in promoting lipid sequestration within LDs in mouse hepatocytes through a mechanism that impairs TG degradation.

  7. Determination of the primary structure of two lipid transfer proteins from apricot (Prunus armeniaca).

    PubMed

    Conti, A; Fortunato, D; Ortolani, C; Giuffrida, M G; Pravettoni, V; Napolitano, L; Farioli, L; Perono Garoffo, L; Trambaioli, C; Pastorello, E A

    2001-05-25

    It has been recently demonstrated that the major allergen of apricot is a protein of molecular mass (Mr) 9000 belonging to the family of Lipid Transfer Protein. The aim of this study was the determination of the primary structure of apricot LTP by micro-sequencing and mass spectrometric analyses. Apricot LTP is a 91 amino acids protein like peach and almond LTPs with a sequence identity of 91% and 94%, respectively. Like for the peach LTP, out of the 25 amino acids forming the inner surface of the tunnel-like hydrophobic cavity in maize ns-LTP, 16 are identical and 7 similar in the apricot LTP, supporting the hypothesis of a similar function.

  8. Recombinant production and solution structure of lipid transfer protein from lentil Lens culinaris.

    PubMed

    Gizatullina, Albina K; Finkina, Ekaterina I; Mineev, Konstantin S; Melnikova, Daria N; Bogdanov, Ivan V; Telezhinskaya, Irina N; Balandin, Sergey V; Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Arseniev, Alexander S; Ovchinnikova, Tatiana V

    2013-10-04

    Lipid transfer protein, designated as Lc-LTP2, was isolated from seeds of the lentil Lens culinaris. The protein has molecular mass 9282.7Da, consists of 93 amino acid residues including 8 cysteines forming 4 disulfide bonds. Lc-LTP2 and its stable isotope labeled analogues were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Antimicrobial activity of the recombinant protein was examined, and its spatial structure was studied by NMR spectroscopy. The polypeptide chain of Lc-LTP2 forms four α-helices (Cys4-Leu18, Pro26-Ala37, Thr42-Ala56, Thr64-Lys73) and a long C-terminal tail without regular secondary structure. Side chains of the hydrophobic residues form a relatively large internal tunnel-like lipid-binding cavity (van der Waals volume comes up to ∼600Å(3)). The side-chains of Arg45, Pro79, and Tyr80 are located near an assumed mouth of the cavity. Titration with dimyristoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) revealed formation of the Lc-LTP2/lipid non-covalent complex accompanied by rearrangements in the protein spatial structure and expansion of the internal cavity. The resultant Lc-LTP2/DMPG complex demonstrates limited lifetime and dissociates within tens of hours.

  9. Tight binding of NAP-22 with acidic membrane lipids.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Shohei; Kobayashi, Yuumi; Morita, Mitsuhiro; Suzaki, Toshinobu

    2015-07-23

    Recovery of various signal transduction molecules in the detergent-resistant membrane microdomain (DRM) fraction suggests the importance of this region in cellular functions. Insolubility of the outer leaflet of DRM to the non-ionic detergent is ascribed to the tight association of cholesterol and sphingolipid. Since, poor localization of sphingolipid is observed in the inner leaflet, the physicochemical background of the insolubility of the inner leaflet is hence still an enigma. NAP-22 (also called BASP1 or CAP-23) is a neuron-enriched calmodulin-binding protein and one of the major proteins in the DRM of the neuronal cell membrane. A previous study showed the presence of several lipids in a NAP-22 fraction after the process of extraction and column chromatography. In this study, the effect of lipid extraction on NAP-22 was studied through native-gel electrophoresis, ultracentrifugation, and electron microscopic observation. The mobility of NAP-22 in native-PAGE was shifted from low to high after delipidation. Delipidated NAP-22 bound phosphatidylserine (PS), phosphatidylinosotol, and ganglioside. Some part of the mixture of PS and NAP-22 was recovered in the insoluble fraction after Triton X-100 treatment and the addition of cholesterol enhanced the amount of NAP-22 in the insoluble fraction.

  10. The importance of lipid modified proteins in plants.

    PubMed

    Hemsley, Piers A

    2015-01-01

    Membranes have long been known to act as more than physical barriers within and between plant cells. Trafficking of membrane proteins, signalling from and across membranes, organisation of membranes and transport through membranes are all essential processes for plant cellular function. These processes rely on a myriad array of proteins regulated in a variety of manners and are frequently required to be directly associated with membranes. For integral membrane proteins, the mode of membrane association is readily apparent, but many peripherally associated membrane proteins are outwardly soluble proteins. In these cases the proteins are frequently modified by the addition of lipids allowing direct interaction with the hydrophobic core of membranes. These modifications include N-myristoylation, S-acylation (palmitoylation), prenylation and GPI anchors but until recently little was truly known about their function in plants. New data suggest that these modifications are able to act as more than just membrane anchors, and dynamic S-acylation in particular is emerging as a means of regulating protein function in a similar manner to phosphorylation. This review discusses how these modifications occur, their impact on protein function, how they are regulated, recent advances in the field and technical approaches for studying these modifications.

  11. Mercury distribution and lipid oxidation in fish muscle: Effects of washing and isoelectric protein precipitation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gong, Y.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.; Ren, L.; Egelandsdal, B.; Richards, M.P.

    2011-01-01

    Nearly all the mercury (Hg) in whole muscle from whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) and walleye (Sander vitreus) was present as methyl mercury (MeHg). The Hg content in whole muscle from whitefish and walleye was 0.04-0.09 and 0.14-0.81 ppm, respectively. The myofibril fraction contained approximately three-fourths of the Hg in whitefish and walleye whole muscle. The sarcoplasmic protein fraction (e.g., press juice) was the next most abundant source of Hg. Isolated myosin, triacylglycerols, and cellular membranes contained the least Hg. Protein isolates prepared by pH shifting in the presence of citric acid did not decrease Hg levels. Addition of cysteine during washing decreased the Hg content in washed muscle probably through the interaction of the sulfhydryl group in cysteine with MeHg. Primary and secondary lipid oxidation products were lower during 2 ??C storage in isolates prepared by pH shifting compared to those of washed or unwashed mince from whole muscle. This was attributed to removing some of the cellular membranes by pH shifting. Washing the mince accelerated lipid peroxide formation but decreased secondary lipid oxidation products compared to that of the unwashed mince. This suggested that there was a lipid hydroperoxide generating system that was active upon dilution of aqueous antioxidants and pro-oxidants. ?? 2011 American Chemical Society.

  12. Activation of protein kinase C by the lipid moieties of lipopolysaccharide

    SciTech Connect

    Wightman, P.D.; Raetz, C.R.H.

    1986-03-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) was partially purified from the RAW264.7 macrophage-like cell and characterized by its activation by phosphatidylserine (PS) in the presence of calcium and its insensitivity to cyclic nucleotides or calmodulin. This PKC can also be activated by the acidic lipid moieties of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The LPS lipids activate PKC in the absence of PS and, like PS, synergize with diacylglycerol (DAG). Intact RAW264.7 cells were prelabelled with /sup 32/Pi and treated with the well characterized PKC ligands, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) or DAG. The phosphoproteins thereby induced were separated in 2-D gels and visualized by autoradiography. These phosphoproteins were used as standards to identify the PKC-associated phosphoproteins induced in these cells using other stimulators. The authors demonstrate that the LPS lipids as well as LPS itself induce the formation of phosphoproteins common to those induced by PMA or DAG. PMA, DAG, the LPS lipids, and LPS itself activate the RAW264.7 cell and stimulate the release of prostaglandin D/sub 2/ at the same concentration that stimulate new protein phosphorylation. These results suggest that the activation of PKC is an early event in the activation of the RAW264.7 macrophage by LPS.

  13. Alkali-aided protein extraction of chicken dark meat: composition and stability to lipid oxidation of the recovered proteins.

    PubMed

    Moayedi, V; Omana, D A; Chan, J; Xu, Y; Betti, M

    2010-04-01

    Chicken dark meat has been considered as a major underused commodity due to the increasing demand for further-processed breast meat products. One option to increase the utilization of chicken dark meat is to extract myofibrillar proteins and separate them from fat and pigments to enhance their application for the preparation of further-processed meat products. The objective of the current study was to determine the effect of pH, in the range of 10.5 to 12.0, on the alkaline solubilization process of chicken dark meat. Aspects studied were the effect of the alkali-aided process on protein content, lipid composition, lipid oxidation, and color characteristics of the extracted meat. Each experiment and each assay were done at least in triplicate. Lipid content of the extracted meat showed a 50% reduction compared with the chicken dark meat. Neutral lipids were reduced by 61.51%, whereas polar lipids were not affected by the alkali treatments. There was a higher amount of TBA reactive substances observed in the extracted meat compared with chicken dark meat, indicating that extracted meat was more susceptible to oxidation. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (22:4n-6, 20:3n-3, 20:5n-3, 22:5n-3, and 22:6n-3), which were detected only in the polar lipids, were responsible for increasing lipid oxidation susceptibility of extracted meat compared with chicken dark meat. Alkali-aided extraction of chicken dark meat lightened the color of the meat. The redness, yellowness, and total heme pigments in extracted meat significantly decreased by 83, 11, and 53%, respectively, compared with chicken dark meat. Even though this process did not remove polar lipids, based on our early findings, the extracted meat had considerable physicochemical and textural properties for product preparation compared with those of raw dark meat. Hence, alkali recovery of protein can be considered a potentially useful method to increase the utilization of dark chicken meat.

  14. Characterization of the GPI-anchored lipid transfer proteins in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Edstam, Monika M; Laurila, Maiju; Höglund, Andrey; Raman, Amitha; Dahlström, Käthe M; Salminen, Tiina A; Edqvist, Johan; Blomqvist, Kristina

    2014-02-01

    The non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs) are characterized by a compact structure with a central hydrophobic cavity very suitable for binding hydrophobic ligands, such as lipids. The nsLTPs are encoded by large gene families in all land plant lineages, but seem to be absent from green algae. The nsLTPs are classified to different types based on molecular weight, sequence similarity, intron position or spacing between the cysteine residues. The Type G nsLTPs (LTPGs) have a GPI-anchor in the C-terminal region which may attach the protein to the exterior side of the plasma membrane. Here, we present the first characterization of nsLTPs from an early diverged plant, the moss Physcomitrella patens. Moss LTPGs were heterologously produced and purified from Pichia pastoris. The purified moss LTPGs were found to be extremely heat stable and showed a binding preference for unsaturated fatty acids. Structural modeling implied that high alanine content could be important for the heat stability. Lipid profiling revealed that cutin monomers, such as C16 and C18 mono- and di-hydroxylated fatty acids, could be identified in P. patens. Expression of a moss LTPG-YFP fusion revealed localization to the plasma membrane. The expressions of many of the moss LTPGs were found to be upregulated during drought and cold treatments.

  15. Bioreducible Lipid-like Nanoparticles for Intracellular Protein Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arellano, Carlos Luis

    Protein-based therapy is one of the most direct ways to manipulate cell function and treat human disease. Although protein therapeutics has made its way to clinical practice, with five of the top fifteen global pharmaceuticals being peptide or protein-based drugs, one common limitation is that the effects of protein therapy are only achieved through the targeting of cell surface receptors and intracellular domains. Due to the impermeability of the cell membrane to most foreign materials, entire classes of potentially therapeutic proteins cannot thoroughly be studied without a safe and efficient method of transporting proteins into the cytosol. We report the use of a combinatorially-designed bioreducible lipid-like material (termed "lipidoid") - based protein delivery platform for the transfection of human cancer cell lines. Lipidoid nanoparticles are synthesized through a thin film dispersion method. The degradation of the bioreducible nanoparticles was observed when exposed to glutathione, a highly reductive compound present in the cytosol. We demonstrate that the nanoparticles are capable of transfecting a dose-dependent concentration of our model protein, beta-galactosidase into HeLa cells. Furthermore, formulations of the lipidoid containing the cytotoxic proteins saporin and RNase-A are both capable of inhibiting tumor cell proliferation as observed in in vitro treatment of different human cancer cell lines. There was no observed loss in protein activity after lyophilization and long--term storage, indicating the potential of pre-clinical applications. Overall, we demonstrate an effective approach to protein formulation and intracellular delivery. We believe that our formulations will lead to the study of a whole class of previously untapped therapeutics that may generate new solutions for previously untreatable diseases.

  16. Drosophila TRF2 and TAF9 regulate lipid droplet size and phospholipid fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wei; Lam, Sin Man; Xin, Jingxue; Yang, Xiao; Liu, Zhonghua; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Yong; Shui, Guanghou; Huang, Xun

    2017-03-01

    The general transcription factor TBP (TATA-box binding protein) and its associated factors (TAFs) together form the TFIID complex, which directs transcription initiation. Through RNAi and mutant analysis, we identified a specific TBP family protein, TRF2, and a set of TAFs that regulate lipid droplet (LD) size in the Drosophila larval fat body. Among the three Drosophila TBP genes, trf2, tbp and trf1, only loss of function of trf2 results in increased LD size. Moreover, TRF2 and TAF9 regulate fatty acid composition of several classes of phospholipids. Through RNA profiling, we found that TRF2 and TAF9 affects the transcription of a common set of genes, including peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation-related genes that affect phospholipid fatty acid composition. We also found that knockdown of several TRF2 and TAF9 target genes results in large LDs, a phenotype which is similar to that of trf2 mutants. Together, these findings provide new insights into the specific role of the general transcription machinery in lipid homeostasis.

  17. Drosophila TRF2 and TAF9 regulate lipid droplet size and phospholipid fatty acid composition

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Wei; Lam, Sin Man; Xin, Jingxue; Yang, Xiao; Liu, Zhonghua; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Yong; Shui, Guanghou

    2017-01-01

    The general transcription factor TBP (TATA-box binding protein) and its associated factors (TAFs) together form the TFIID complex, which directs transcription initiation. Through RNAi and mutant analysis, we identified a specific TBP family protein, TRF2, and a set of TAFs that regulate lipid droplet (LD) size in the Drosophila larval fat body. Among the three Drosophila TBP genes, trf2, tbp and trf1, only loss of function of trf2 results in increased LD size. Moreover, TRF2 and TAF9 regulate fatty acid composition of several classes of phospholipids. Through RNA profiling, we found that TRF2 and TAF9 affects the transcription of a common set of genes, including peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation-related genes that affect phospholipid fatty acid composition. We also found that knockdown of several TRF2 and TAF9 target genes results in large LDs, a phenotype which is similar to that of trf2 mutants. Together, these findings provide new insights into the specific role of the general transcription machinery in lipid homeostasis. PMID:28273089

  18. Protein surface-distribution and protein-protein interactions in the binding of peripheral proteins to charged lipid membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Heimburg, T; Marsh, D

    1995-01-01

    The binding of native cytochrome c to negatively charged lipid dispersions of dioleoyl phosphatidylglycerol has been studied over a wide range of ionic strengths. Not only is the strength of protein binding found to decrease rapidly with increasing ionic strength, but also the binding curves reach an apparent saturation level that decreases rapidly with increasing ionic strength. Analysis of the binding isotherms with a general statistical thermodynamic model that takes into account not only the free energy of the electrostatic double layer, but also the free energy of the surface distribution of the protein, demonstrates that the apparent saturation effects could arise from a competition between the out-of-plane binding reaction and the lateral in-plane interactions between proteins at the surface. It is found that association with nonlocalized sites results in binding isotherms that display the apparent saturation effect to a much more pronounced extent than does the Langmuir adsorption isotherm for binding to localized sites. With the model for nonlocalized sites, the binding isotherms of native cytochrome c can be described adequately by taking into account only the entropy of the surface distribution of the protein, without appreciable enthalpic interactions between the bound proteins. The binding of cytochrome c to dioleoyl phosphatidylglycerol dispersions at a temperature at which the bound protein is denatured on the lipid surface, but is nondenatured when free in solution, has also been studied. The binding curves for the surface-denatured protein differ from those for the native protein in that the apparent saturation at high ionic strength is less pronounced. This indicates the tendency of the denatured protein to aggregate on the lipid surface, and can be described by the binding isotherms for nonlocalized sites only if attractive interactions between the surface-bound proteins are included in addition to the distributional entropic terms. Additionally

  19. Optimised purification and characterisation of lipid transfer protein 1 (LTP1) and its lipid-bound isoform LTP1b from barley malt.

    PubMed

    Nieuwoudt, Melanie; Lombard, Nicolaas; Rautenbach, Marina

    2014-08-15

    In beer brewing, brewers worldwide strive to obtain product consistency in terms of flavour, colour and foam. Important proteins contributing to beer foam are lipid transfer proteins (LTPs), in particular LTP1 and its lipid-bound isoform LTP1b, which are known to transport lipids in vivo and prevent lipids from destabilising the beer foam. LTP1 and LTP1b were successfully purified using only five purification steps with a high purified protein yield (160 mg LTP1 and LTP1b from 200 g barley). Circular dichroism of LTP1 and LTP1b confirmed that both proteins are highly tolerant to high temperatures (>90 °C) and are pH stable, particularly at a neutral to a more basic pH. Only LTP1 exhibited antiyeast and thermo-stable lytic activity, while LTP1b was inactive, indicating that the fatty acid moiety compromised the antimicrobial activity of LTP1. This lack in antiyeast activity and the positive foam properties of LTP1b would benefit beer fermentation and quality.

  20. A case study of apple seed and grape allergy with sensitisation to nonspecific lipid transfer protein

    PubMed Central

    Katelaris, Constance H; Baumgart, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Lipid transfer proteins can be an important cause of allergy given their stability and high degree of protein sequence homology. We describe the case of a child who developed two separate episodes of anaphylaxis after consuming apple seed and grape, with evidence that nonspecific lipid transfer proteins may have been responsible for these reactions. Lipid transfer protein allergy should be considered when anaphylaxis is inconsistent, such as in patients who can tolerate fruit pulp but react to fresh whole fruit juices. PMID:27141487

  1. Lipid droplet proteins, Lds1p, Lds2p, and Rrt8p, are implicated in membrane protein transport associated with ergosterol.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Kazuma; Nagano, Makoto; Shimizu, Shigeki; Toshima, Junko Y; Toshima, Jiro

    2016-07-08

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are ubiquitous organelles, enclosed in a monolayer of phospholipid, which store excess fatty acids as neutral lipids such as triacylglycerol and sterol esters. Previous studies have revealed that LDs contain many proteins with various functions required for lipid metabolism and vesicular trafficking. Among them, Lds (Lipid Droplet in Sporulation) proteins, Lds1p and Lds2p, are reportedly induced and localized to LDs during yeast sporulation, but their cellular function has not been clarified. Here we show that the Lds proteins, Lds1p, Lds2p and Rrt8p, are expressed and localized at LDs in vegetative cells, being required for proper localization of plasma membrane proteins. We found that deletion of Lds genes led to mis-sorting of Wsc1p, a cell wall stress sensor, from the plasma membrane to the vacuole. We also demonstrated that lack of these proteins partially suppressed the growth defect and mis-sorting of the high-affinity tryptophan transporter Tat2p, induced by impairment of ergosterol biosynthesis. Furthermore, we identified Sec39p/Dsl3p, a component of the DSL1 tethering complex that mediates the interaction with COPI vesicles, as a binding partner for Lds2p. These results suggest a possible role of Lds proteins in maintenance of membrane lipid homeostasis and accompanying membrane protein transport.

  2. The effect of natural antioxidants on haemoglobin-mediated lipid oxidation during enzymatic hydrolysis of cod protein.

    PubMed

    Halldorsdottir, Sigrun M; Kristinsson, Hordur G; Sveinsdottir, Holmfridur; Thorkelsson, Gudjon; Hamaguchi, Patricia Y

    2013-11-15

    Heating and changes in pH often practised during fish protein hydrolysis can cause lipid oxidation. The effect of natural antioxidants towards haemoglobin-mediated lipid oxidation during enzymatic hydrolysis of cod proteins was investigated. Different variants of a washed cod model system, containing different combinations of haemoglobin and natural antioxidants (l-ascorbic acid and Fuscus vesiculosus extract), were hydrolysed using Protease P "Amano" 6 at pH 8 and 36°C to achieve 20% degree of hydrolysis. Lipid hydroperoxides and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were analysed periodically during the hydrolysis process. The in vitro antioxidant activity of the final products was investigated. Results indicate that oxidation can develop rapidly during hydrolysis and antioxidant strategies are preferable to produce good quality products. Oxidation products did not have an impact on the in vitro antioxidant activity of the hydrolysates. The natural antioxidants inhibited oxidation during hydrolysis and contributed to the antioxidant activity of the final product.

  3. Identification of the major functional proteins of prokaryotic lipid droplets[S

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yunfeng; Yang, Li; Zhang, Shuyan; Wang, Yang; Du, Yalan; Pu, Jing; Peng, Gong; Chen, Yong; Zhang, Huina; Yu, Jinhai; Hang, Haiying; Wu, Peng; Yang, Fuquan; Yang, Hongyuan; Steinbüchel, Alexander; Liu, Pingsheng

    2012-01-01

    Storage of cellular triacylglycerols (TAGs) in lipid droplets (LDs) has been linked to the progression of many metabolic diseases in humans, and to the development of biofuels from plants and microorganisms. However, the biogenesis and dynamics of LDs are poorly understood. Compared with other organisms, bacteria seem to be a better model system for studying LD biology, because they are relatively simple and are highly efficient in converting biomass to TAG. We obtained highly purified LDs from Rhodococcus sp. RHA1, a bacterium that can produce TAG from many carbon sources, and then comprehensively characterized the LD proteome. Of the 228 LD-associated proteins identified, two major proteins, ro02104 and PspA, constituted about 15% of the total LD protein. The structure predicted for ro02104 resembles that of apolipoproteins, the structural proteins of plasma lipoproteins in mammals. Deletion of ro02104 resulted in the formation of supersized LDs, indicating that ro02104 plays a critical role in cellular LD dynamics. The putative α helix of the ro02104 LD-targeting domain (amino acids 83–146) is also similar to that of apolipoproteins. We report the identification of 228 proteins in the proteome of prokaryotic LDs, identify a putative structural protein of this organelle, and suggest that apolipoproteins may have an evolutionarily conserved role in the storage and trafficking of neutral lipids. PMID:22180631

  4. First isolation and antinociceptive activity of a lipid transfer protein from noni (Morinda citrifolia) seeds.

    PubMed

    Campos, Dyély C O; Costa, Andrea S; Lima, Amanda D R; Silva, Fredy D A; Lobo, Marina D P; Monteiro-Moreira, Ana Cristina O; Moreira, Renato A; Leal, Luzia K A M; Miron, Diogo; Vasconcelos, Ilka M; Oliveira, Hermógenes D

    2016-05-01

    In this study a novel heat-stable lipid transfer protein, designated McLTP1, was purified from noni (Morinda citrifolia L.) seeds, using four purification steps which resulted in a high-purified protein yield (72 mg McLTP1 from 100g of noni seeds). McLTP1 exhibited molecular masses of 9.450 and 9.466 kDa, determined by electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry. The N-terminal sequence of McLTP1 (AVPCGQVSSALSPCMSYLTGGGDDPEARCCAGV), as analysed by NCBI-BLAST database, revealed a high degree of identity with other reported plant lipid transfer proteins. In addition, this protein proved to be resistant to pepsin, trypsin and chymotrypsin digestion. McLTP1 given intraperitoneally (1, 2, 4 and 8 mg/kg) and orally (8 mg/kg) caused an inhibition of the writhing response induced by acetic acid in mice. This protein displayed thermostability, retaining 100% of its antinociceptive activity after 30 min incubation at 80 °C. Pretreatment of mice with McLTP1 (8 mg/kg, i.p. and p.o.) also decreased neurogenic and inflammatory phases of nociception in the formalin test. Naloxone (2 mg/kg, i.p.) antagonised the antinociceptive effect of McLTP1 suggesting that the opioid mechanisms mediate the analgesic properties of this protein.

  5. [The action of week inorganic acids and lower carboxylic acids on the conductivity of bilayer lipid membranes].

    PubMed

    Kilivnik, K E; Khmarskaia, L A; Ksenzhek, O S

    2009-01-01

    The ability of weak inorganic acids (H2S, HCN) and lower carboxylic acids to interact with bilayer lipid membranes, change their conductivity, and act as protonophores has been investigated. The mechanism of changes in BLM conductivity was studied. Factors influencing the interaction of acids with model lipid membranes were determined. Maximum changes in conductivity were observed at pH values equal to the dissociation constants of weak acids and depend on the coefficients of distribution "octanol-water".

  6. Longitudinal Metabolomic Profiling of Amino Acids and Lipids across Healthy Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Karen L.; Hellmuth, Christian; Uhl, Olaf; Buss, Claudia; Wadhwa, Pathik D.; Koletzko, Berthold; Entringer, Sonja

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy is characterized by a complexity of metabolic processes that may impact fetal development and ultimately, infant health outcomes. However, our understanding of whole body maternal and fetal metabolism during this critical life stage remains incomplete. The objective of this study is to utilize metabolomics to profile longitudinal patterns of fasting maternal metabolites among a cohort of non-diabetic, healthy pregnant women in order to advance our understanding of changes in protein and lipid concentrations across gestation, the biochemical pathways by which they are metabolized and to describe variation in maternal metabolites between ethnic groups. Among 160 pregnant women, amino acids, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates, keto-bodies and non-esterified fatty acids were detected by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, while polar lipids were detected through flow-injected mass spectrometry. The maternal plasma concentration of several essential and non-essential amino acids, long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, free carnitine, acetylcarnitine, phosphatidylcholines and sphingomyelins significantly decreased across pregnancy. Concentrations of several TCA intermediates increase as pregnancy progresses, as well as the keto-body β-hydroxybutyrate. Ratios of specific acylcarnitines used as indicators of metabolic pathways suggest a decreased beta-oxidation rate and increased carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 enzyme activity with advancing gestation. Decreasing amino acid concentrations likely reflects placental uptake and tissue biosynthesis. The absence of any increase in plasma non-esterified fatty acids is unexpected in the catabolic phase of later pregnancy and may reflect enhanced placental fatty acid uptake and utilization for fetal tissue growth. While it appears that energy production through the TCA cycle increases as pregnancy progresses, decreasing patterns of free carnitine and acetylcarnitine as well as increased

  7. Arabidopsis LTPG Is a Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-Anchored Lipid Transfer Protein Required for Export of Lipids to the Plant Surface[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    DeBono, Allan; Yeats, Trevor H.; Rose, Jocelyn K.C.; Bird, David; Jetter, Reinhard; Kunst, Ljerka; Samuels, Lacey

    2009-01-01

    Plant epidermal cells dedicate more than half of their lipid metabolism to the synthesis of cuticular lipids, which seal and protect the plant shoot. The cuticle is made up of a cutin polymer and waxes, diverse hydrophobic compounds including very-long-chain fatty acids and their derivatives. How such hydrophobic compounds are exported to the cuticle, especially through the hydrophilic plant cell wall, is not known. By performing a reverse genetic screen, we have identified LTPG, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored lipid transfer protein that is highly expressed in the epidermis during cuticle biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana inflorescence stems. Mutant plant lines with decreased LTPG expression had reduced wax load on the stem surface, showing that LTPG is involved either directly or indirectly in cuticular lipid deposition. In vitro 2-p-toluidinonaphthalene-6-sulfonate assays showed that recombinant LTPG has the capacity to bind to this lipid probe. LTPG was primarily localized to the plasma membrane on all faces of stem epidermal cells in the growing regions of inflorescence stems where wax is actively secreted. These data suggest that LTPG may function as a component of the cuticular lipid export machinery. PMID:19366900

  8. Isolation of a cDNA clone for spinach lipid transfer protein and evidence that the protein is synthesized by the secretory pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhard, W.R.; Thoma, S.; Botella, J.; Somerville, C.R. )

    1991-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a nonspecific lipid transfer protein from spinach (Spinacia oleracea) was isolated by probing a library with synthetic oligonucleotides based on the amino acid sequence of the protein. Determination of the DNA sequence indicated a 354-nucleotide open reading frame which encodes a 118-amino acid residue polypeptide. The first 26 amino acids of the open reading frame, which are not present in the mature protein, have all the characteristics of a signal sequence which is normally associated with the synthesis of membrane proteins or secreted proteins. In vitro transcription of the cDNA and translation in the presence of canine pancreatic microsomes or microsomes from cultured maize endosperm cells indicated that proteolytic processing of the preprotein to the mature form was associated with cotranslational insertion into the microsomal membranes. Because there is no known mechanism by which the polypeptide could be transferred from the microsomal membranes to the cytoplasm, the proposed role of this protein in catalyzing lipid transfer between intracellular membranes is in doubt. Although the lipid transfer protein is one of the most abundant proteins in leaf cells, the results of genomic Southern analysis were consistent with the presence of only one gene. Analysis of the level of mRNA by Northern blotting indicated that the transcript was several-fold more abundant than an actin transcript in leaf and petiole tissue, but was present in roots at less than 1% of the level in petioles.

  9. The environmental light influences the circulatory levels of retinoic acid and associates with hepatic lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pang, Wenqiang; Li, Chunying; Zhao, Yue; Wang, Shiming; Dong, Wei; Jiang, Pengjiu; Zhang, Jianfa

    2008-12-01

    Environmental light is involved in the regulation of photochemical reaction in mouse retina. It remains unclear whether light-mediated increase in all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) synthesis in retina will result in altering the circulatory levels of ATRA and regulating downstream gene expression and physiological function. Here we showed circulatory levels of ATRA decreased in mice under constant darkness and elevated by light exposure. Fat gene pancreatic lipase-related protein 2 (mPlrp2) and its partner procolipase (mClps), but not hepatic lipase (mHl), activated in livers for responding to lack of light illuminating. Light-triggered alterations in circulatory ATRA levels regulated ecto-5'-nucleotidase gene expression by retinoic acid receptor retinoic acid receptor-alpha and modulated 5'-AMP levels in blood and were associated with mPlrp2 and mClps expression in the livers. Mice deficient in adenosine receptors displayed mPlrp2 and mClps expression in livers under 12-h light, 12-h dark cycles. Caffeine blocked adenosine receptors and induced hepatic mPlrp2 and mClps expression in wild-type mice. Mice activated in hepatic mPlrp2 and mClps expression lowered hepatic and serum lipid levels and markedly elevated circulatory levels of all-trans retinol. Our results suggest environmental light influence hepatic lipid homeostasis by light-modulated retinoic acid signaling associated with mPlrp2 and mClps gene expression in livers.

  10. Serial femtosecond crystallography of soluble proteins in lipidic cubic phase

    SciTech Connect

    Fromme, Raimund; Ishchenko, Andrii; Metz, Markus; Chowdhury, Shatabdi Roy; Basu, Shibom; Boutet, Sébastien; Fromme, Petra; White, Thomas A.; Barty, Anton; Spence, John C. H.; Weierstall, Uwe; Liu, Wei; Cherezov, Vadim

    2015-08-04

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) at X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) enables high-resolution protein structure determination using micrometre-sized crystals at room temperature with minimal effects from radiation damage. SFX requires a steady supply of microcrystals intersecting the XFEL beam at random orientations. An LCP–SFX method has recently been introduced in which microcrystals of membrane proteins are grown and delivered for SFX data collection inside a gel-like membrane-mimetic matrix, known as lipidic cubic phase (LCP), using a special LCP microextrusion injector. Here, it is demonstrated that LCP can also be used as a suitable carrier medium for microcrystals of soluble proteins, enabling a dramatic reduction in the amount of crystallized protein required for data collection compared with crystals delivered by liquid injectors. High-quality LCP–SFX data sets were collected for two soluble proteins, lysozyme and phycocyanin, using less than 0.1 mg of each protein.

  11. Serial femtosecond crystallography of soluble proteins in lipidic cubic phase

    PubMed Central

    Fromme, Raimund; Ishchenko, Andrii; Metz, Markus; Chowdhury, Shatabdi Roy; Basu, Shibom; Boutet, Sébastien; Fromme, Petra; White, Thomas A.; Barty, Anton; Spence, John C. H.; Weierstall, Uwe; Liu, Wei; Cherezov, Vadim

    2015-01-01

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) at X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) enables high-resolution protein structure determination using micrometre-sized crystals at room temperature with minimal effects from radiation damage. SFX requires a steady supply of microcrystals intersecting the XFEL beam at random orientations. An LCP–SFX method has recently been introduced in which microcrystals of membrane proteins are grown and delivered for SFX data collection inside a gel-like membrane-mimetic matrix, known as lipidic cubic phase (LCP), using a special LCP microextrusion injector. Here, it is demonstrated that LCP can also be used as a suitable carrier medium for microcrystals of soluble proteins, enabling a dramatic reduction in the amount of crystallized protein required for data collection compared with crystals delivered by liquid injectors. High-quality LCP–SFX data sets were collected for two soluble proteins, lysozyme and phycocyanin, using less than 0.1 mg of each protein. PMID:26306196

  12. Adsorption of alpha-synuclein on lipid bilayers: modulating the structure and stability of protein assemblies.

    PubMed

    Haque, Farzin; Pandey, Anjan P; Cambrea, Lee R; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Hovis, Jennifer S

    2010-03-25

    The interaction of alpha-synuclein with phospholipid membranes has been examined using supported lipid bilayers and epi-fluorescence microscopy. The membranes contained phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidic acid (PA), which mix at physiological pH. Upon protein adsorption, the lipids undergo fluid-fluid phase separation into PC-rich and PA-rich regions. The protein preferentially adsorbs to the PA-rich regions. The adsorption and subsequent aggregation of alpha-synuclein was probed by tuning several parameters: the charge on the lipids, the charge on the protein, and the screening environment. Conditions which promoted the greatest extent of adsorption resulted in structurally heterogeneous aggregates, while comparatively homogeneous aggregates were observed under conditions whereby adsorption did not occur as readily. Our observation that different alterations to the system lead to different degrees of aggregation and different aggregate structures poses a challenge for drug discovery. Namely, therapies aimed at neutralizing alpha-synuclein must target a broad range of potentially toxic, membrane-bound assemblies.

  13. Acid-Catalyzed Algal Biomass Pretreatment for Integrated Lipid and Carbohydrate-Based Biofuels Production

    SciTech Connect

    Laurens, L. M. L.; Nagle, N.; Davis, R.; Sweeney, N.; Van Wychen, S.; Lowell, A.; Pienkos, P. T.

    2014-11-12

    One of the major challenges associated with algal biofuels production in a biorefinery-type setting is improving biomass utilization in its entirety, increasing the process energetic yields and providing economically viable and scalable co-product concepts. We demonstrate the effectiveness of a novel, integrated technology based on moderate temperatures and low pH to convert the carbohydrates in wet algal biomass to soluble sugars for fermentation, while making lipids more accessible for downstream extraction and leaving a protein-enriched fraction behind. We studied the effect of harvest timing on the conversion yields, using two algal strains; Chlorella and Scenedesmus, generating biomass with distinctive compositional ratios of protein, carbohydrate, and lipids. We found that the late harvest Scenedesmus biomass had the maximum theoretical biofuel potential at 143 gasoline gallon equivalent (GGE) combined fuel yield per dry ton biomass, followed by late harvest Chlorella at 128 GGE per ton. Our experimental data show a clear difference between the two strains, as Scenedesmus was more successfully converted in this process with a demonstrated 97 GGE per ton. Our measurements indicated a release of >90% of the available glucose in the hydrolysate liquors and an extraction and recovery of up to 97% of the fatty acids from wet biomass. Techno-economic analysis for the combined product yields indicates that this process exhibits the potential to improve per-gallon fuel costs by up to 33% compared to a lipids-only process for one strain, Scenedesmus, grown to the mid-point harvest condition.

  14. Role of acyl carrier protein isoforms in plant lipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Although acyl carrier protein (ACP) is the best studied protein in plant fatty acid biosynthesis, the in vivo forms of ACPs and their steady state pools have not been examined previously in either seed or leaf. Information about the relative pool sizes of free ACP and its acyl-ACP intermediates is essential for understanding regulation of de novo fatty acid biosynthesis in plants. In this study we utilized antibodies directed against spinach ACP as a sensitive assay to analyze the acyl groups while they were still covalently attached to ACPs. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Impact of Lipid and Protein Co-oxidation on Digestibility of Dairy Proteins in Oil-in-Water (O/W) Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Obando, Mónica; Papastergiadis, Antonios; Li, Shanshan; De Meulenaer, Bruno

    2015-11-11

    Enrichment of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) is a growing trend in the food industry. However, PUFAs are known to be susceptible to lipid oxidation. It has been shown that oxidizing lipids react with proteins present in the food and that as a result polymeric protein complexes are produced. Therefore, the aim of this work was to investigate the impact of lipid and protein co-oxidation on protein digestibility. Casein and whey protein (6 mg/mL) based emulsions with 1% oil with different levels of PUFAs were subjected to respectively autoxidation and photo-oxidation. Upon autoxidation at 70 °C, protein digestibility of whey protein based emulsions containing fish oil decreased to 47.7 ± 0.8% after 48 h, whereas in the controls without oil 67.8 ± 0.7% was observed. Upon photo-oxidation at 4 °C during 30 days, mainly casein-based emulsions containing fish oil were affected: the digestibility amounted to 43.9 ± 1.2%, whereas in the control casein solutions without oil, 72.6 ± 0.2% of the proteins were digestible. Emulsions containing oils with high PUFA levels were more prone to lipid oxidation and thus upon progressive oxidation showed a higher impact on protein digestibility.

  16. Protein and lipid sources affect cholesterol concentrations of juvenile Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei (Boone).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Z J; Hardy, R W

    2004-04-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of protein and lipid sources on cholesterol, AA, and fatty acid content, and on biological performance of juvenile Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei (Boone). In Exp. 1, seven isonitrogenous and isocaloric diets were prepared using fish meal; soybean meal; casein; fish meal + soybean meal; fish meal + casein; soybean meal + casein; and fish meal + soybean meal + casein. In Exp. 2, seven isonitrogenous and isocaloric diets were prepared using fish oil; soy oil; poultry fat; fish oil + soy oil; fish oil + poultry fat; soy oil + poultry fat; and fish oil + soy oil + poultry fat. Nine shrimp (average BW 570 mg) were stocked per 60-L tank, with three tanks per diet in each experiment. Shrimp were fed to apparent satiation twice daily for 28 d. Protein sources affected shrimp cholesterol, feed consumption, feed efficiency, protein consumption, protein efficiency ratio, and crude body fat (P < or = 0.05), but not weight gain, survival, hepatosomatic index, body protein, ash, and AA composition. Body (without hepatopancreas) cholesterol concentrations were the highest in shrimp fed the diet containing fish meal (0.81%), lowest for those fed the casein diet (0.64%), and intermediate in the other dietary treatment groups (range 0.71 to 0.74%). Lipid source also affected shrimp body cholesterol, body fatty acid profiles, and fatty acid profiles in the hepatopancreas (P < or = 0.05), but not growth performance, body protein, fat, ash, and cholesterol concentrations in the hepatopancreas. Shrimp fed the fish oil diet had the highest body cholesterol (0.75%), whereas those fed the soy oil or poultry fat diets were lowest (0.66 and 0.65%, respectively). Results indicate that by replacing fish meal and fish oil with soybean meal and soy oil, shrimp growth performance is not affected, but body cholesterol concentration is reduced.

  17. Effect of fulvic acid induction on the physiology, metabolism, and lipid biosynthesis-related gene transcription of Monoraphidium sp. FXY-10.

    PubMed

    Che, Raoqiong; Huang, Li; Xu, Jun-Wei; Zhao, Peng; Li, Tao; Ma, Huixian; Yu, Xuya

    2017-03-01

    Fulvic acid (FA) triggers lipid accumulation in Monoraphidium sp. FXY-10, which can produce biofuels. Therefore, the metabolism shift and gene expression changes influenced by fulvic acid should be investigated. In this study, lipid and protein contents increased rapidly from 44.6% to 54.3% and from 31.4% to 39.7% under FA treatment, respectively. By contrast, carbohydrate content sharply declined from 49.5% to 32.5%. The correlation between lipid content and gene expression was also analyzed. Results revealed that accD, ME, and GPAT genes were significantly correlated with lipid accumulation. These genes could likely influence lipid accumulation and could be selected as modification candidates. These results demonstrated that FA significantly increased microalgal lipid accumulation by changing the intracellular reactive oxygen species, gene expression, and enzyme activities of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, malic enzyme, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase.

  18. The TULIP superfamily of eukaryotic lipid-binding proteins as a mediator of lipid sensing and transport.

    PubMed

    Alva, Vikram; Lupas, Andrei N

    2016-08-01

    The tubular lipid-binding (TULIP) superfamily has emerged in recent years as a major mediator of lipid sensing and transport in eukaryotes. It currently encompasses three protein families, SMP-like, BPI-like, and Takeout-like, which share a common fold. This fold consists of a long helix wrapped in a highly curved anti-parallel β-sheet, enclosing a central, lipophilic cavity. The SMP-like proteins, which include subunits of the ERMES complex and the extended synaptotagmins (E-Syts), appear to be mainly located at membrane contacts sites (MCSs) between organelles, mediating inter-organelle lipid exchange. The BPI-like proteins, which include the bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI), the LPS (lipopolysaccharide)-binding protein (LBP), the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), and the phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), are either involved in innate immunity against bacteria through their ability to sense lipopolysaccharides, as is the case for BPI and LBP, or in lipid exchange between lipoprotein particles, as is the case for CETP and PLTP. The Takeout-like proteins, which are comprised of insect juvenile hormone-binding proteins and arthropod allergens, transport, where known, lipid hormones to target tissues during insect development. In all cases, the activity of these proteins is underpinned by their ability to bind large, hydrophobic ligands in their central cavity and segregate them away from the aqueous environment. Furthermore, where they are involved in lipid exchange, recent structural studies have highlighted their ability to establish lipophilic, tubular channels, either between organelles in the case of SMP domains or between lipoprotein particles in the case of CETP. Here, we review the current knowledge on the structure, versatile functions, and evolution of the TULIP superfamily. We propose a deep evolutionary split in this superfamily, predating the Last Eukaryotic Common Ancestor, between the SMP-like proteins, which act on

  19. Protein-mediated transbilayer movement of lipids in eukaryotes and prokaryotes: the relevance of ABC transporters.

    PubMed

    Tannert, Astrid; Pohl, Antje; Pomorski, Thomas; Herrmann, Andreas

    2003-09-01

    Lipid distribution across cellular membranes is regulated by specific membrane proteins controlling transbilayer movement of lipids. Flippases facilitate flip-flop of lipids and allow them to equilibrate between the two membrane leaflets independent of ATP. Distinct P-Type-ATPases transport specific lipids unidirectionally across the membrane at the expense of ATP. A group of ATP-dependent lipid transporters, the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family, was identified in studies originally related to multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells. Meanwhile, lipid transport activity has been shown for full and half size ABC proteins in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. This activity may not only modify the organisation of lipids in membranes, but could also be of significant consequence for cell homeostasis. The various types of lipid movement mediating proteins and their cellular localisation in eukaryotes and prokaryotes are reviewed.

  20. HCV core protein induces hepatic lipid accumulation by activating SREBP1 and PPAR{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kook Hwan; Hong, Sung Pyo; Kim, KyeongJin; Park, Min Jung; Kim, Kwang Jin; Cheong, JaeHun . E-mail: molecule85@pusan.ac.kr

    2007-04-20

    Hepatic steatosis is a common feature in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. HCV core protein plays an important role in the development of hepatic steatosis in HCV infection. Because SREBP1 (sterol regulatory element binding protein 1) and PPAR{gamma} (peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor {gamma}) are involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism of hepatocyte, we sought to determine whether HCV core protein may impair the expression and activity of SREBP1 and PPAR{gamma}. In this study, it was demonstrated that HCV core protein increases the gene expression of SREBP1 not only in Chang liver, Huh7, and HepG2 cells transiently transfected with HCV core protein expression plasmid, but also in Chang liver-core stable cells. Furthermore, HCV core protein enhanced the transcriptional activity of SREBP1. In addition, HCV core protein elevated PPAR{gamma} transcriptional activity. However, HCV core protein had no effect on PPAR{gamma} gene expression. Finally, we showed that HCV core protein stimulates the genes expression of lipogenic enzyme and fatty acid uptake associated protein. Therefore, our finding provides a new insight into the mechanism of hepatic steatosis by HCV infection.

  1. Improvement in Lipid and Protein Trafficking in Niemann-Pick C1 Cells by Correction of a Secondary Enzyme Defect

    PubMed Central

    Devlin, Cecilia; Pipalia, Nina H.; Liao, Xianghai; Schuchman, Edward H.; Maxfield, Frederick R.; Tabas, Ira

    2010-01-01

    Different primary lysosomal trafficking defects lead to common alterations in lipid trafficking, suggesting cooperative interactions among lysosomal lipids. However, cellular analysis of the functional consequences of this phenomenon is lacking. As a test case, we studied cells with defective Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) protein, a cholesterol trafficking protein whose defect gives rise to lysosomal accumulation of cholesterol and other lipids, leading to NPC disease. NPC1 cells also develop a secondary defect in acid sphingomyelinase (SMase) activity despite a normal acid SMase gene (SMPD1). When acid SMase activity was restored to normal levels in NPC1-deficient CHO cells through SMPD1 transfection, there was a dramatic reduction in lysosomal cholesterol. Two other defects, excess lysosomal bis-(monoacylglycerol) phosphate (BMP) and defective transferrin receptor (TfR) recycling, were also markedly improved. To test its relevance in human cells, the acid SMase activity defect in fibroblasts from NPC1 patients was corrected by SMPD1 transfection or acid SMase enzyme replacement. Both treatments resulted in a dramatic reduction in lysosomal cholesterol. These data show that correcting one aspect of a complex lysosomal lipid storage disease can reduce the cellular consequences even if the primary genetic defect is not corrected. PMID:20412078

  2. Protein kinase Cη is targeted to lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Michitaka; Iio, Yuri; Saito, Naoaki; Fujimoto, Toyoshi

    2013-04-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is a family of kinases that regulate numerous cellular functions. They are classified into three subfamilies, i.e., conventional PKCs, novel PKCs, and atypical PKCs, that have different domain structures. Generally, PKCs exist as a soluble protein in the cytosol in resting cells and they are recruited to target membranes upon stimulation. In the present study, we found that PKCη tagged with EGFP distributed in lipid droplets (LD) and induced a significant reduction in LD size. Two other novel PKCs, PKCδ and PKCε, also showed some concentration around LDs, but it was less distinct and less frequent than that of PKCη. Conventional and atypical PKCs (α, βII, γ, and ζ) did not show any preferential distribution around LDs. 1,2-Diacylglycerol, which can activate novel PKCs without an increase of Ca(2+) concentration, is the immediate precursor of triacylglycerol and exists in LDs. The present results suggest that PKCη modifies lipid metabolism by phosphorylating unidentified targets in LDs.

  3. The effect of dietary fat and omega-3 fatty acids on whole body lipid oxidation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipid peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids yields several electrophilic, reactive carbonyl metabolites. We hypothesized that an increased intake of omega-3 fatty acids (n-3) would lead to increased lipid peroxidation metabolites compared to a diet low in n-3. As part of a randomized crossov...

  4. LIPID CLASS DISTRIBUTION OF HIGHLY UNSATURATED LONG CHAIN FATTY ACIDS IN MARINE DINOFLAGELLATES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The very long chain highly unsaturated C28 fatty acids, octacosaheptaenoic [28:7(n-6)] and octacosaoctaenoic acid [28:8(n-3)], were found to be associated with phospholipids, obtained by fractionation of total lipid extracts into distinct lipid classes, in 4 and 6, respectively, ...

  5. Process strategies to maximize lipid accumulations of novel yeast in acid and base treated hydrolyzates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oleaginous yeasts can accumulate up to 70% of cell biomass as lipids, predominantly as triacylglycerols. Yeast lipid fatty acid profiles have been reported to be similar to that of vegetable oils and consist primarily of oleic, palmitic, stearic, and linoleic acids. This capability provides the oppo...

  6. The role of polyglutamine expansion and protein context in disease-related huntingtin/lipid interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Kathleen Anne

    Huntington's Disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that is defined by the accumulation of nanoscale aggregates comprised of the huntingtin (htt) protein. Aggregation is directly caused by an expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) domain in htt, leading to a diverse population of aggregate species, such as oligomers, fibrils, and annular aggregates. Furthermore, the length of this polyQ domain is directly related to onset and severity of disease. The first 17 amino acids on the N-terminus (N17) and the polyproline domain on the C-terminal side of the polyQ domain have been shown to further modulate the aggregation process. Additionally, N17 appears to have lipid binding properties as htt interacts with a variety of membrane-containing structures present in cells, such as organelles, and interactions with these membrane surfaces may further modulate htt aggregation. To investigate the interaction between htt exon1 and lipid bilayers, in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to directly monitor the aggregation of htt exon1 constructs with varying Q-length (35Q, 46Q, 51Q, and myc- 53Q) or synthetic peptides with different polyQ domain flanking sequences (KK-Q35-KK, KK-Q 35-P10-KK, N17-Q35-KK, and N 17-Q35-P10-KK) on supported lipid membranes comprised of total brain lipid extract. The exon1 fragments accumulated on the lipid membranes, causing disruption of the membrane, in a polyQ dependent manner. By adding N-terminal tags to the htt exon1 fragments, the interaction with the lipid bilayer was impeded. The KK-Q35-KK and KK-Q 35-P10-KK peptides had no appreciable interaction with lipid bilayers. Interestingly, polyQ peptides with the N17 flanking sequence interacted with the bilayer. N17-Q35-KK formed discrete aggregates on the bilayer, but there was minimal membrane disruption. The N17-Q35-P10-KK peptide interacted more aggressively with the lipid bilayer in a manner reminiscent of the htt exon1 proteins.

  7. Detergent interaction with tethered bilayer lipid membranes for protein reconstitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broccio, Matteo; Zan Goh, Haw; Loesche, Mathias

    2009-03-01

    Tethered bilayer lipid membranes (tBLMs) are self-assembled biomimetic structures in which the membrane is separated from a solid substrate by a nm-thick hydrated submembrane space. These model systems are being used in binding studies of peripheral proteins and exotoxins. Here we aim at their application for the reconstitution of water-insoluble integral membrane proteins. As an alternative to fusion of preformed proteoliposomes we study the direct reconstitution of such proteins for applications in biosensing and pharmaceutical screening. For reconstitution, highly insulating tBLMs (R˜10^5-10^6 φ) were temporarily incubated with a detergent to screen for conditions that keep the detergent-saturated membranestable and ready to incorporate detergent-solubilized proteins. We assess the electrical characteristics, i.e. specific resistance and capacitance, by means of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) under timed incubation with decylmaltoside and dodecylmaltoside detergents in a regime around their critical micelle concentration, 1.8 mM and 0.17 mM respectively and demonstrate the restoration of the tBLM upon detergent removal. Thereby a range of concentration and incubation times was identified, that represents optimal conditions for the subsequent membrane protein reconstitution.

  8. A soy protein diet alters hepatic lipid metabolism gene expression and reduces serum lipids and renal fibrogenic cytokines in rats with chronic nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tovar, Armando R; Murguía, Fernanda; Cruz, Cristino; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Correa-Rotter, Ricardo; Torres, Nimbe

    2002-09-01

    Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is characterized by the presence of proteinuria and hyperlipidemia. However, ingestion of soy protein has a hypolipidemic effect. The present study was designed to determine whether the ingestion of a 20% soy protein diet regulates the expression of hepatic sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1, fatty acid synthase (FAS), malic enzyme, beta-hydroxy-beta-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase (r) and synthase (s), and LDL receptor (r), and to assess whether soy protein improves lipid and renal abnormalities in rats with chronic NS. Male Wistar rats were injected with vehicle or with puromycin aminonucleoside to induce NS and were fed either 20% casein or soy protein diets for 64 d. NS rats fed 20% soy protein had improved creatinine clearance and reduced proteinuria, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, as well as VLDL-triglycerides and LDL cholesterol compared with NS rats fed the 20% casein diet. In addition, the soy protein diet decreased the incidence of glomerular sclerosis, and proinflammatory cytokines in kidney. Ingestion of the soy protein diet by control rats reduced the gene expression of SREBP-1, malic enzyme, FAS and increased HMG-CoAr, HMG-CoAs and LDLr. However, NS rats fed either casein or soy protein diets had low insulin concentrations with reductions in SREBP-1, FAS and malic enzyme expression compared with control rats fed the casein diet. NS rats fed the soy diet also had lower HMG-CoAr and LDLr mRNA levels than NS rats fed casein. In conclusion, the beneficial effects of soy protein on lipid metabolism are modulated in part by SREBP-1. However, in NS rats, the benefit may be through a direct effect of this protein on kidney rather than mediated by changes in expression of hepatic lipid metabolism genes.

  9. Length and sequence dependence in the association of Huntingtin protein with lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawahery, Sudi; Nagarajan, Anu; Matysiak, Silvina

    2013-03-01

    There is a fundamental gap in our understanding of how aggregates of mutant Huntingtin protein (htt) with overextended polyglutamine (polyQ) sequences gain the toxic properties that cause Huntington's disease (HD). Experimental studies have shown that the most important step associated with toxicity is the binding of mutant htt aggregates to lipid membranes. Studies have also shown that flanking amino acid sequences around the polyQ sequence directly affect interactions with the lipid bilayer, and that polyQ sequences of greater than 35 glutamine repeats in htt are a characteristic of HD. The key steps that determine how flanking sequences and polyQ length affect the structure of lipid bilayers remain unknown. In this study, we use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to study the interactions between lipid membranes of varying compositions and polyQ peptides of varying lengths and flanking sequences. We find that overextended polyQ interactions do cause deformation in model membranes, and that the flanking sequences do play a role in intensifying this deformation by altering the shape of the affected regions.

  10. Smart polymer brush nanostructures guide the self-assembly of pore-spanning lipid bilayers with integrated membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelmina de Groot, G.; Demarche, Sophie; Santonicola, M. Gabriella; Tiefenauer, Louis; Vancso, G. Julius

    2014-01-01

    Nanopores in arrays on silicon chips are functionalized with pH-responsive poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA) brushes and used as supports for pore-spanning lipid bilayers with integrated membrane proteins. Robust platforms are created by the covalent grafting of polymer brushes using surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), resulting in sensor chips that can be successfully reused over several assays. His-tagged proteins are selectively and reversibly bound to the nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) functionalization of the PMAA brush, and consequently lipid bilayer membranes are formed. The enhanced membrane resistance as determined by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and free diffusion of dyed lipids observed as fluorescence recovery after photobleaching confirmed the presence of lipid bilayers. Immobilization of the His-tagged membrane proteins on the NTA-modified PMAA brush near the pore edges is characterized by fluorescence microscopy. This system allows us to adjust the protein density in free-standing bilayers, which are stabilized by the polymer brush underneath. The potential application of the integrated platform for ion channel protein assays is demonstrated.

  11. MOLECULAR GENETIC AND BIOCHEMICAL APPROACHES FOR DEFINING LIPID-DEPENDENT MEMBRANE PROTEIN FOLDING

    PubMed Central

    Dowhan, William; Bogdanov, Mikhail

    2011-01-01

    We provide an overview of lipid-dependent polytopic membrane protein folding and topogenesis. Lipid dependence of this process was determined by employing Escherichia coli cells in which specific lipids can be eliminated, substituted, tightly titrated or controlled temporally during membrane protein synthesis and assembly. The secondary transport protein lactose permease (LacY) was used to establish general principles underlying the molecular basis of lipid-dependent effects on protein domain folding, protein transmembrane domain (TM) orientation, and function. These principles were then extended to several other secondary transport proteins of E. coli. The methods used to follow proper conformational organization of protein domains and the topological organization of protein TMs in whole cells and membranes are described. The proper folding of an extramembrane domain of LacY that is crucial for energy dependent uphill transport function depends on specific lipids acting as non-protein molecular chaperones. Correct TM topogenesis is dependent on charge interactions between the cytoplasmic surface of membrane proteins and a proper balance of the membrane surface net charge defined by the lipid head groups. Short-range interactions between the nascent protein chain and the translocon are necessary but not sufficient for establishment of final topology. After release from the translocon short-range interactions between lipid head groups and the nascent protein chain, partitioning of protein hydrophobic domains into the membrane bilayer, and long–range interactions within the protein thermodynamically drive final membrane protein organization. Given the diversity of membrane lipid compositions throughout nature, it is tempting to speculate that during the course of evolution the physical and chemical properties of proteins and lipids have co-evolved in the context of the lipid environment of membrane systems in which both are mutually depend on each other for

  12. CALCIUM-INDUCED LIPID PEROXIDATION IS MEDIATED BY RHODNIUS HEME-BINDING PROTEIN (RHBP) AND PREVENTED BY VITELLIN.

    PubMed

    Paes, Marcia C; Silveira, Alan B; Ventura-Martins, Guilherme; Luciano, Monalisa; Coelho, Marsen G P; Todeschini, Adriane R; Bianconi, M Lucia; Atella, Georgia C; Silva-Neto, Mário A C

    2015-10-01

    Lipid peroxidation is promoted by the quasi-lipoxygenase (QL) activity of heme proteins and enhanced by the presence of free calcium. Unlike mammalian plasma, the hemolymph of Rhodnius prolixus, a vector of Chagas disease, contains both a free heme-binding protein (RHBP) and circulating lipoproteins. RHBP binds and prevents the heme groups of the proteins from participating in lipid peroxidation reactions. Herein, we show that despite being bound to RHBP, heme groups promote lipid peroxidation through a calcium-dependent QL reaction. This reaction is readily inhibited by the presence of ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA), the antioxidant butylated hydroxytoluene or micromolar levels of the main yolk phosphoprotein vitellin (Vt). The inhibition of lipid peroxidation is eliminated by the in vitro dephosphorylation of Vt, indicating that this reaction depends on the interaction of free calcium ions with negatively charged phosphoamino acids. Our results demonstrate that calcium chelation mediated by phosphoproteins occurs via an antioxidant mechanism that protects living organisms from lipid peroxidation.

  13. MemProtMD: Automated Insertion of Membrane Protein Structures into Explicit Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Stansfeld, Phillip J.; Goose, Joseph E.; Caffrey, Martin; Carpenter, Elisabeth P.; Parker, Joanne L.; Newstead, Simon; Sansom, Mark S.P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary There has been exponential growth in the number of membrane protein structures determined. Nevertheless, these structures are usually resolved in the absence of their lipid environment. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) simulations enable insertion of membrane proteins into explicit models of lipid bilayers. We have automated the CGMD methodology, enabling membrane protein structures to be identified upon their release into the PDB and embedded into a membrane. The simulations are analyzed for protein-lipid interactions, identifying lipid binding sites, and revealing local bilayer deformations plus molecular access pathways within the membrane. The coarse-grained models of membrane protein/bilayer complexes are transformed to atomistic resolution for further analysis and simulation. Using this automated simulation pipeline, we have analyzed a number of recently determined membrane protein structures to predict their locations within a membrane, their lipid/protein interactions, and the functional implications of an enhanced understanding of the local membrane environment of each protein. PMID:26073602

  14. Lipid transfer protein-mediated resistance to a trichothecene mycotoxin – Novel players in FHB resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipid transfer proteins are a class of basic cysteine rich proteins characterized by an eight cysteine motif backbone with intrinsic antimicrobial activities against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Previously, we identified two type IV nonspecific lipid transfer protein (nsLTP) genes (LTP4.4 and LTP...

  15. Lipid metabolism and tissue composition in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.)--effects of capelin oil, palm oil, and oleic acid-enriched sunflower oil as dietary lipid sources.

    PubMed

    Torstensen, B E; Lie, O; Frøyland, L

    2000-06-01

    Triplicate groups of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) were fed four diets containing different oils as the sole lipid source, i.e., capelin oil, oleic acid-enriched sunflower oil, a 1:1 (w/w) mixture of capelin oil and oleic acid-enriched sunflower oil, and palm oil (PO). The beta-oxidation capacity, protein utilization, digestibility of dietary fatty acids and fatty acid composition of lipoproteins, plasma, liver, belly flap, red and white muscle were measured. Further, the lipid class and protein levels in the lipoproteins were analyzed. The different dietary fatty acid compositions did not significantly affect protein utilization or beta-oxidation capacity in red muscle. The levels of total cholesterol, triacylglycerols, and protein in very low density lipoprotein (VLDL), low density lipoprotein (LDL), high density lipoprotein (HDL), and plasma were not significantly affected by the dietary fatty acids. VLDL, LDL, and HDL fatty acid compositions were decreasingly affected by dietary fatty acid composition. Dietary fatty acid composition significantly affected both the relative fatty acid composition and the amount of fatty acids (mg fatty acid per g tissue, wet weight) in belly flap, liver, red and white muscle. Apparent digestibility of the fatty acids, measured by adding yttrium oxide as inert marker, was significantly lower in fish fed the PO diet compared to the other three diets.

  16. Effect of Growth on Fatty Acid Composition of Total Intramuscular Lipid and Phospholipids in Ira Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Xue, Shan; He, Zhifei; Lu, Jingzhi; Tao, Xiaoqi; Zheng, Li; Xie, Yuejie; Xiao, Xia; Peng, Rong; Li, Hongjun

    2015-01-01

    The changes in fatty acid composition of total intramuscular lipid and phospholipids were investigated in the longissimus dorsi, left-hind leg muscle, and abdominal muscle of male Ira rabbits. Changes were monitored at 35, 45, 60, 75, and 90 d. Analysis using gas chromatography identified 21 types of fatty acids. Results showed that the intramuscular lipid increased and the intramuscular phospholipids (total intramuscular lipid %) decreased in all muscles with increasing age (p<0.05). An abundant amount of unsaturated fatty acids, especially polyunsaturated fatty acids, was distributed in male Ira rabbits at different ages and muscles. Palmitic acid (C16:0), stearic acid (C18:0), oleic acid (C18:1), linoleic acid (C18:2), and arachidonic acid (C20:4) were the major fatty acids, which account to the dynamic changes of the n-6/n-3 value in Ira rabbit meat.

  17. Kaempferol Isolated from Nelumbo nucifera Inhibits Lipid Accumulation and Increases Fatty Acid Oxidation Signaling in Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bonggi; Kwon, Misung; Choi, Jae Sue; Jeong, Hyoung Oh; Chung, Hae Young; Kim, Hyeung-Rak

    2015-12-01

    Stamens of Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn have been used as a Chinese medicine due to its antioxidant, hypoglycemic, and antiatherogenic activity. However, the effects of kaempferol, a main component of N. nucifera, on obesity are not fully understood. We examined the effect of kaempferol on adipogenesis and fatty acid oxidation signaling pathways in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Kaempferol reduced cytoplasmic triglyceride (TG) accumulation in dose and time-dependent manners during adipocyte differentiation. Accumulation of TG was rapidly reversed by retrieving kaempferol treatment. Kaempferol broadly decreased mRNA or protein levels of adipogenic transcription factors and their target genes related to lipid accumulation. Kaempferol also suppressed glucose uptake and glucose transporter GLUT4 mRNA expression in adipocytes. Furthermore, protein docking simulation suggests that Kaempferol can directly bind to and activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α by forming hydrophobic interactions with VAL324, THR279, and LEU321 residues of PPARα. The binding affinity was higher than a well-known PPARα agonist fenofibrate. Consistently, mRNA expression levels of PPARα target genes were increased. Our study indicates while kaempferol inhibits lipogenic transcription factors and lipid accumulation, it may bind to PPARα and stimulate fatty acid oxidation signaling in adipocytes.

  18. β2-Microglobulin Amyloid Fibril-Induced Membrane Disruption Is Enhanced by Endosomal Lipids and Acidic pH

    PubMed Central

    Goodchild, Sophia C.; Sheynis, Tania; Thompson, Rebecca; Tipping, Kevin W.; Xue, Wei-Feng; Ranson, Neil A.; Beales, Paul A.; Hewitt, Eric W.; Radford, Sheena E.

    2014-01-01

    Although the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathology of amyloidoses are not well understood, the interaction between amyloid proteins and cell membranes is thought to play a role in several amyloid diseases. Amyloid fibrils of β2-microglobulin (β2m), associated with dialysis-related amyloidosis (DRA), have been shown to cause disruption of anionic lipid bilayers in vitro. However, the effect of lipid composition and the chemical environment in which β2m-lipid interactions occur have not been investigated previously. Here we examine membrane damage resulting from the interaction of β2m monomers and fibrils with lipid bilayers. Using dye release, tryptophan fluorescence quenching and fluorescence confocal microscopy assays we investigate the effect of anionic lipid composition and pH on the susceptibility of liposomes to fibril-induced membrane damage. We show that β2m fibril-induced membrane disruption is modulated by anionic lipid composition and is enhanced by acidic pH. Most strikingly, the greatest degree of membrane disruption is observed for liposomes containing bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP) at acidic pH, conditions likely to reflect those encountered in the endocytic pathway. The results suggest that the interaction between β2m fibrils and membranes of endosomal origin may play a role in the molecular mechanism of β2m amyloid-associated osteoarticular tissue destruction in DRA. PMID:25100247

  19. Dietary fish protein alters blood lipid concentrations and hepatic genes involved in cholesterol homeostasis in the rat model.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Anjali; Bettzieche, Anja; Hirche, Frank; Brandsch, Corinna; Stangl, Gabriele I; Eder, Klaus

    2006-10-01

    It is known that various dietary plant proteins are capable of influencing the lipid metabolism of human subjects and animals when compared with casein. Less, however, is known about the effects of fish protein on the cholesterol and triacylglycerol metabolism. Therefore, two experiments were conducted in which rats were fed diets containing 200 g of either fish protein, prepared from Alaska pollack fillets, or casein, which served as control, per kilogram, over 20 and 22 d, respectively. As parameters of lipid metabolism, the concentrations of cholesterol and triacylglycerols in the plasma and liver, the faecal excretion of bile acids and the hepatic expression of genes encoding proteins involved in lipid homeostasis were determined. In both experiments, rats fed fish protein had higher concentrations of cholesteryl esters in the liver, a lower concentration of cholesterol in the HDL fraction (rho > 1.063 kg/l) and lower plasma triacylglycerol concentrations than rats fed casein (P < 0.05). The gene expression analysis performed in experiment 2 showed that rats fed fish protein had higher relative mRNA concentrations of sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-2, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, LDL receptor, apo AI, scavenger receptor B1 and lecithin-cholesterol-acyltransferase in their liver than did rats fed casein (P < 0.05). The faecal excretion of bile acids and the mRNA concentrations of cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase, SREBP-1c and corresponding target genes were not altered. These findings show that fish protein had multiple effects on plasma and liver lipids that were at least in part caused by an altered expression of the hepatic genes involved in lipid homeostasis.

  20. Electroporation of the photosynthetic membrane: structural changes in protein and lipid-protein domains.

    PubMed Central

    Rosemberg, Y; Rotenberg, M; Korenstein, R

    1994-01-01

    A biological membrane undergoes a reversible permeability increase through structural changes in the lipid domain when exposed to high external electric fields. The present study shows the occurrence of electric field-induced changes in the conductance of the proton channel of the H(+)-ATPase as well as electric field-induced structural changes in the lipid-protein domain of photosystem (PS) II in the photosynthetic membrane. The study was carried out by analyzing the electric field-stimulated delayed luminescence (EPL), which originates from charge recombination in the protein complexes of PS I and II of photosynthetic vesicles. We established that a small fraction of the total electric field-induced conductance change was abolished by N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD), an inhibitor of the H(+)-ATPase. This reversible electric field-induced conductance change has characteristics of a small channel and possesses a lifetime < or = 1 ms. To detect electric field-induced changes in the lipid-protein domains of PS II, we examined the effects of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) on EPL. Higher values of EPL were observed from vesicles that were exposed in the presence of PLA2 to an electroporating electric field than to a nonelectroporating electric field. The effect of the electroporating field was a long-lived one, lasting for a period > or = 2 min. This effect was attributed to long-lived electric field-induced structural changes in the lipid-protein domains of PS II. PMID:7811916

  1. Non-acidic activation of pain-related Acid-Sensing Ion Channel 3 by lipids.

    PubMed

    Marra, Sébastien; Ferru-Clément, Romain; Breuil, Véronique; Delaunay, Anne; Christin, Marine; Friend, Valérie; Sebille, Stéphane; Cognard, Christian; Ferreira, Thierry; Roux, Christian; Euller-Ziegler, Liana; Noel, Jacques; Lingueglia, Eric; Deval, Emmanuel

    2016-02-15

    Extracellular pH variations are seen as the principal endogenous signal that triggers activation of Acid-Sensing Ion Channels (ASICs), which are basically considered as proton sensors, and are involved in various processes associated with tissue acidification. Here, we show that human painful inflammatory exudates, displaying non-acidic pH, induce a slow constitutive activation of human ASIC3 channels. This effect is largely driven by lipids, and we identify lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) and arachidonic acid (AA) as endogenous activators of ASIC3 in the absence of any extracellular acidification. The combination of LPC and AA evokes robust depolarizing current in DRG neurons at physiological pH 7.4, increases nociceptive C-fiber firing, and induces pain behavior in rats, effects that are all prevented by ASIC3 blockers. Lipid-induced pain is also significantly reduced in ASIC3 knockout mice. These findings open new perspectives on the roles of ASIC3 in the absence of tissue pH variation, as well as on the contribution of those channels to lipid-mediated signaling.

  2. Purification, biochemical characterization, and antimicrobial activity of a new lipid transfer protein from Coffea canephora seeds.

    PubMed

    Bard, G C V; Zottich, U; Souza, T A M; Ribeiro, S F F; Dias, G B; Pireda, S; Da Cunha, M; Rodrigues, R; Pereira, L S; Machado, O L T; Carvalho, A O; Gomes, V M

    2016-10-24

    Coffee, an agronomical crop of great economic importance, is also among the most commonly traded commodities in worldwide markets. Antimicrobial peptides, which play a role in plant defense, have been identified and isolated particularly from seeds. We isolated and immunolocalized Cc-LTP2, a new lipid transfer protein (LTP) from Coffea canephora seeds. We report its antimicrobial activity against various phytopathogenic fungi of economic importance, and against the bacterium Xanthomonas euvesicatoria. Peptides from C. canephora seeds were initially extracted using acid buffer and subjected to ion-exchange and reverse-phase chromatographies. A purified peptide of approximately 9 kDa, which we named Cc-LTP2, was then subjected to amino acid sequencing. The analyses showed that it was similar to LTPs isolated from various plants. The tissue and subcellular localization of C. canephora LTPs indicated that they were located in cell walls and intracellular palisade parenchyma, mainly in large vacuoles. The results of immunohistochemistry and histochemistry superposed from C. canephora seed tissues showed that LTPs and lipid bodies are present in organelles, supporting the hypothesis that LTPs from seeds are involved in lipid mobilization during germination. Cc-LTP2 did inhibit the development of the phytopathogenic fungi Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Fusarium solani, Fusarium lateritium, and Colletotrichum sp, but did inhibit X. euvesicatoria. Cc-LTP2 also increased membrane permeability and induced endogenous production of reactive oxygen species in all the fungi tested.

  3. Improved insulin loading in poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanoparticles upon self-assembly with lipids.

    PubMed

    García-Díaz, María; Foged, Camilla; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck

    2015-03-30

    Polymeric nanoparticles are widely investigated as drug delivery systems for oral administration. However, the hydrophobic nature of many polymers hampers effective loading of the particles with hydrophilic macromolecules such as insulin. Thus, the aim of this work was to improve the loading of insulin into poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanoparticles by pre-assembly with amphiphilic lipids. Insulin was complexed with soybean phosphatidylcholine or sodium caprate by self-assembly and subsequently loaded into PLGA nanoparticles by using the double emulsion-solvent evaporation technique. The nanoparticles were characterized in terms of size, zeta potential, insulin encapsulation efficiency and loading capacity. Upon pre-assembly with lipids, there was an increased distribution of insulin into the organic phase of the emulsion, eventually resulting in significantly enhanced encapsulation efficiencies (90% as compared to 24% in the absence of lipids). Importantly, the insulin loading capacity was increased up to 20% by using the lipid-insulin complexes. The results further showed that a main fraction of the lipid was incorporated into the nanoparticles and remained associated to the polymer during release studies in buffers, whereas insulin was released in a non-complexed form as a burst of approximately 80% of the loaded insulin. In conclusion, the protein load in PLGA nanoparticles can be significantly increased by employing self-assembled protein-lipid complexes.

  4. Femtosecond crystallography of membrane proteins in the lipidic cubic phase

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Wacker, Daniel; Wang, Chong; Abola, Enrique; Cherezov, Vadim

    2014-01-01

    Despite recent technological advances in heterologous expression, stabilization and crystallization of membrane proteins (MPs), their structural studies remain difficult and require new transformative approaches. During the past two years, crystallization in lipidic cubic phase (LCP) has started gaining a widespread acceptance, owing to the spectacular success in high-resolution structure determination of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and to the introduction of commercial instrumentation, tools and protocols. The recent appearance of X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) has enabled structure determination from substantially smaller crystals than previously possible with minimal effects of radiation damage, offering new exciting opportunities in structural biology. The unique properties of LCP material have been exploited to develop special protocols and devices that have established a new method of serial femtosecond crystallography of MPs in LCP (LCP-SFX). In this method, microcrystals are generated in LCP and streamed continuously inside the same media across the intersection with a pulsed XFEL beam at a flow rate that can be adjusted to minimize sample consumption. Pioneering studies that yielded the first room temperature GPCR structures, using a few hundred micrograms of purified protein, validate the LCP-SFX approach and make it attractive for structure determination of difficult-to-crystallize MPs and their complexes with interacting partners. Together with the potential of femtosecond data acquisition to interrogate unstable intermediate functional states of MPs, LCP-SFX holds promise to advance our understanding of this biomedically important class of proteins. PMID:24914147

  5. Lipids and proteins in the Rathke's gland secretions of the North American mud turtle (Kinosternon subrubrum)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seifert, W.E.; Gotte, S.W.; Leto, T.L.; Weldon, P.J.

    1994-01-01

    Lipids and proteins in the Rathke's gland secretions of the North American mud turtle (Kinosternon subrubrum, Kinosternidae) were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), respectively. Analysis by GC-MS indicates 2,3-dihydroxypropanal and C3?C24 free or esterified fatty acids. Analysis by SDS-PAGE indicates a major protein component with an approximate molecular mass of 60 kDa and minor components ranging from ca. 23 to 34 kDa. The major component of K. subrubrum glandular secretions exhibits a mobility that matches that of the Kemp's ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys kempi, Cheloniidae), suggesting that these proteins are evolutionarily conserved.

  6. Plasticity of lipid-protein interactions in the function and topogenesis of the membrane protein lactose permease from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bogdanov, Mikhail; Heacock, Philip; Guan, Ziqiang; Dowhan, William

    2010-08-24

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) has been widely used in place of naturally occurring phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) in reconstitution of bacterial membrane proteins. However, PC does not support native structure or function for several reconstituted transport proteins. Lactose permease (LacY) of Escherichia coli, when reconstituted in E. coli phospholipids, exhibits energy-dependent uphill and energy-independent downhill transport function and proper conformation of periplasmic domain P7, which is tightly linked to uphill transport function. LacY expressed in cells lacking PE and containing only anionic phospholipids exhibits only downhill transport and lacks native P7 conformation. Reconstitution of LacY in the presence of E. coli-derived PE, but not dioleoyl-PC, results in uphill transport. We now show that LacY exhibits uphill transport and native conformation of P7 when expressed in a mutant of E. coli in which PC completely replaces PE even though the structure is not completely native. E. coli-derived PC and synthetic PC species containing at least one saturated fatty acid also support the native conformation of P7 dependent on the presence of anionic phospholipids. Our results demonstrate that the different effects of PE and PC species on LacY structure and function cannot be explained by differences in the direct interaction of the lipid head groups with specific amino acid residues alone but are due to more complex effects of the physical and chemical properties of the lipid environment on protein structure. This conclusion is supported by the effect of different lipids on the proper folding of domain P7, which indirectly influences uphill transport function.

  7. Plasticity of lipid-protein interactions in the function and topogenesis of the membrane protein lactose permease from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanov, Mikhail; Heacock, Philip; Guan, Ziqiang; Dowhan, William

    2010-01-01

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) has been widely used in place of naturally occurring phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) in reconstitution of bacterial membrane proteins. However, PC does not support native structure or function for several reconstituted transport proteins. Lactose permease (LacY) of Escherichia coli, when reconstituted in E. coli phospholipids, exhibits energy-dependent uphill and energy-independent downhill transport function and proper conformation of periplasmic domain P7, which is tightly linked to uphill transport function. LacY expressed in cells lacking PE and containing only anionic phospholipids exhibits only downhill transport and lacks native P7 conformation. Reconstitution of LacY in the presence of E. coli-derived PE, but not dioleoyl-PC, results in uphill transport. We now show that LacY exhibits uphill transport and native conformation of P7 when expressed in a mutant of E. coli in which PC completely replaces PE even though the structure is not completely native. E. coli-derived PC and synthetic PC species containing at least one saturated fatty acid also support the native conformation of P7 dependent on the presence of anionic phospholipids. Our results demonstrate that the different effects of PE and PC species on LacY structure and function cannot be explained by differences in the direct interaction of the lipid head groups with specific amino acid residues alone but are due to more complex effects of the physical and chemical properties of the lipid environment on protein structure. This conclusion is supported by the effect of different lipids on the proper folding of domain P7, which indirectly influences uphill transport function. PMID:20696931

  8. Advanced oxidation protein products are more related to metabolic syndrome components than biomarkers of lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Venturini, Danielle; Simão, Andréa Name Colado; Dichi, Isaias

    2015-09-01

    Although advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs) have been reported as the most appropriate parameter for determination of oxidative stress in patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS), a direct comparison between protein and lipid peroxidation has not been performed yet. The aim of this study was to compare protein peroxidation with lipid peroxidation measured by 2 different methodologies (tert-butyl hydroperoxide-initiated chemiluminescence and ferrous oxidation-xylenol orange assay). The hypothesis of this study was that AOPPs would be more related to MetS than to oxidative markers of lipid peroxidation. This cross-sectional study evaluated 76 patients with MetS and 20 healthy subjects. Prooxidant-antioxidant index (PAI) assessed as AOPP/total radical-trapping antioxidant parameter ratio progressively increased (P < .05) according to the number of MetS components, whereas AOPPs and total radical-trapping antioxidant parameter increased (P < .05) when 5 components were compared with 3 components. Spearman test showed a positive correlation between AOPPs and waist circumference (r = 0.318, P < .01), fasting glucose (r = 0.250, P < .05), homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance (r = 0.043, P < .01), triacylglycerol (r = 0.713, P < .0001), highly sensitive C-reactive protein (r = 0.275, P < .05), and uric acid (r = 0.356, P < .01), whereas there was an inverse correlation with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r = -0.399, P < .001). Prooxidant-antioxidant index demonstrated a positive correlation with waist circumference (r = 0.386, P < .01), fasting glucose (r = 0.388, P < .01), fasting insulin (r = 0.344, P < .05), homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance (r = 0.519, P < .001), triacylglycerol (r = 0.687, P < .0001), highly sensitive C-reactive protein (r = 0.278, P < .05), and uric acid (r = 0.557, P < .0001), whereas there was an inverse correlation with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r = -0.480, P < .0001). In conclusion, protein

  9. Lipid Composition and Protein Dynamics in Thylakoids of Two Wheat Cultivars Differently Sensitive to Drought.

    PubMed Central

    Quartacci, M. F.; Pinzino, C.; Sgherri, CLM.; Navari-Izzo, F.

    1995-01-01

    Two wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) cultivars with different sensitivities to drought were either grown under regular irrigation or subjected to water deficit by withholding water for 14 d. Water-stressed plants of both cultivars underwent similar decreases in leaf water potential, but the drought-tolerant cultivar showed higher relative water content and turgor. Neither osmotic nor elastic adjustment mechanisms appeared to be active under the conditions described here. Thylakoids isolated from the stressed, drought-tolerant wheat showed an increase in lipid-to-protein ratio, in comparison with the control, whereas this ratio remained unchanged in the sensitive wheat. In both cultivars, water deficit determined different rearrangements in the composition of the thylakoid individual polar lipids, but their unsaturation level remained unaffected with the exception of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol. In the drought-sensitive cultivar, an accumulation of free fatty acids together with a reduction in polar lipid amount was observed. Electron paramagnetic resonance measurements of spin-labeled proteins of stressed plants from the sensitive cv Adamello showed a higher spin label rotational correlation time together with lower sulphydryl group and mobile proteic portion levels, in comparison with the control. In the tolerant cv Ofanto, the first two parameters changed to a lesser extent following water depletion, and the mobile proteic portion was not altered. PMID:12228463

  10. Deciphering the mechanisms for targeting and interaction of Arabidopsis Lipid Droplet Associated Protein (LDAP) to the lipid droplet surface

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We recently identified a new class of lipid-droplet associated proteins (LDAPs) in plants that share extensive sequence similarity with abundant structural proteins that coat rubber particles in rubber-producing plants. A majority of higher plants, however, including those that do not produce rubber...

  11. A lipid-regulated docking site on vinculin for protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Wolfgang H; Tigges, Ulrich; Zieseniss, Anke; Jockusch, Brigitte M

    2002-03-01

    During cell spreading, binding of actin-organizing proteins to acidic phospholipids and phosphorylation are important for localization and activity of these proteins at nascent cell-matrix adhesion sites. Here, we report on a transient interaction between the lipid-dependent protein kinase Calpha and vinculin, an early component of these sites, during spreading of HeLa cells on collagen. In vitro binding of protein kinase Calpha to vinculin tail was found dependent on free calcium and acidic phospholipids but independent of a functional kinase domain. The interaction was enhanced by conditions that favor the oligomerization of vinculin. Phosphorylation by protein kinase Calpha reached 1.5 mol of phosphate/mol of vinculin tail and required the C-terminal hydrophobic hairpin, a putative phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate-binding site. Mass spectroscopy of peptides derived from in vitro phosphorylated vinculin tail identified phosphorylation of serines 1033 and 1045. Inhibition of C-terminal phospholipid binding at the vinculin tail by mutagenesis or deletion reduced the rate of phosphorylation to < or =50%. We suggest a possible mechanism whereby phospholipid-regulated conformational changes in vinculin may lead to exposure of a docking site for protein kinase Calpha and subsequent phosphorylation of vinculin and/or vinculin interaction partners, thereby affecting the formation of cell adhesion complexes.

  12. The role of membrane thickness in charged protein-lipid interactions.

    PubMed

    Li, Libo B; Vorobyov, Igor; Allen, Toby W

    2012-02-01

    Charged amino acids are known to be important in controlling the actions of integral and peripheral membrane proteins and cell disrupting peptides. Atomistic molecular dynamics studies have shed much light on the mechanisms of membrane binding and translocation of charged protein groups, yet the impact of the full diversity of membrane physico-chemical properties and topologies has yet to be explored. Here we have performed a systematic study of an arginine (Arg) side chain analog moving across saturated phosphatidylcholine (PC) bilayers of variable hydrocarbon tail length from 10 to 18 carbons. For all bilayers we observe similar ion-induced defects, where Arg draws water molecules and lipid head groups into the bilayers to avoid large dehydration energy costs. The free energy profiles all exhibit sharp climbs with increasing penetration into the hydrocarbon core, with predictable shifts between bilayers of different thickness, leading to barrier reduction from 26 kcal/mol for 18 carbons to 6 kcal/mol for 10 carbons. For lipids of 10 and 12 carbons we observe narrow transmembrane pores and corresponding plateaus in the free energy profiles. Allowing for movements of the protein and side chain snorkeling, we argue that the energetic cost for burying Arg inside a thin bilayer will be small, consistent with recent experiments, also leading to a dramatic reduction in pK(a) shifts for Arg. We provide evidence that Arg translocation occurs via an ion-induced defect mechanism, except in thick bilayers (of at least 18 carbons) where solubility-diffusion becomes energetically favored. Our findings shed light on the mechanisms of ion movement through membranes of varying composition, with implications for a range of charged protein-lipid interactions and the actions of cell-perturbing peptides. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane protein structure and function.

  13. Tempol protects blood proteins and lipids against peroxynitrite-mediated oxidative damage

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Ayman G; Bani-Ahmad, Mohammad A; Jaradat, Ahmad Q

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is characterized by excessive production of various free radicals and reactive species among which, peroxynitrite is most frequently produced in several pathological conditions. Peroxynitrite is the product of the superoxide anion reaction with nitric oxide, which is reported to take place in the intravascular compartment. Several studies have reported that peroxynitrite targets red blood cells, platelets and plasma proteins, and induces various forms of oxidative damage. This in vitro study was designed to further characterize the types of oxidative damage induced in platelets and plasma proteins by peroxynitrite. This study also determined the ability of tempol to protect blood plasma and platelets against peroxynitrite-induced oxidative damage. The ability of various concentrations of tempol (25, 50, 75, and 100 µM) to antagonize peroxynitrite-induced oxidation was evaluated by measuring the levels of protein carbonyl groups and thiobarbituric-acid-reactive substances in experimental groups. Exposure of platelets and plasma to 100 µM peroxynitrite resulted in an increased levels of carbonyl groups and lipid peroxidation (P < 0.05). Tempol significantly inhibited carbonyl group formation in plasma and platelet proteins (P < 0.05). In addition, tempol significantly reduced the levels of lipid peroxidation in both plasma and platelet samples (P < 0.05). Thus, tempol has antioxidative properties against peroxynitrite-induced oxidative damage in blood plasma and platelets. PMID:25107897

  14. Effect of sterol carrier protein-2 expression on sphingolipid distribution in plasma membrane lipid rafts/caveolae.

    PubMed

    Atshaves, Barbara P; Jefferson, John R; McIntosh, Avery L; Gallegos, Adalberto; McCann, Bonnie M; Landrock, Kerstin K; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2007-10-01

    Although sphingolipids are highly important signaling molecules enriched in lipid rafts/caveolae, relatively little is known regarding factors such as sphingolipid binding proteins that may regulate the distribution of sphingolipids to lipid rafts/caveolae of living cells. Since early work demonstrated that sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP-2) enhanced glycosphingolipid transfer from membranes in vitro, the effect of SCP-2 expression on sphingolipid distribution to lipid rafts/caveolae in living cells was examined. Using a non-detergent affinity chromatography method to isolate lipid rafts/caveolae and non-rafts from purified L-cell plasma membranes, it was shown that lipid rafts/caveolae were highly enriched in multiple sphingolipid species including ceramides, acidic glycosphingolipids (ganglioside GM1); neutral glycosphingolipids (monohexosides, dihexosides, globosides), and sphingomyelin as compared to non-raft domains. SCP-2 overexpression further enriched the content of total sphingolipids and select sphingolipid species in the lipid rafts/caveolae domains. Analysis of fluorescence binding and displacement data revealed that purified human recombinant SCP-2 exhibited high binding affinity (nanomolar range) for all sphingolipid classes tested. The binding affinity decreased in the following order: ceramides > acidic glycosphingolipid (ganglioside GM1) > neutral glycosphingolipid (monohexosides, hexosides, globosides) > sphingomyelin. Enrichment of individual sphingolipid classes to lipid rafts/caveolae versus non-rafts in SCP-2 expressing plasma membranes followed closely with those classes most strongly bound to SCP-2 (ceramides, GM1 > the neutral glycosphingolipids (monohexosides, dihexosides, and globosides) > sphingomyelin). Taken together these data suggested that SCP-2 acts to selectively regulate sphingolipid distribution to lipid rafts/caveolae in living cells.

  15. Examining protein-lipid interactions in model systems with a new squarylium fluorescent dye.

    PubMed

    Ioffe, Valeriya M; Gorbenko, Galyna P; Tatarets, Anatoliy L; Patsenker, Leonid D; Terpechnig, Ewald A

    2006-07-01

    The applicability of newly synthesized squarylium dye Sq to probing the changes in physical characteristics of lipid bilayer on the formation of protein-lipid complexes has been evaluated. Lipid vesicles composed of zwitterionic phospholipid phosphatidylcholine (PC) and its mixtures with positively charged detergent cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), anionic phospholipid cardiolipin (CL), and cholesterol (Chol) were employed as lipid component of model membrane systems while protein constituent was represented by lysozyme (Lz). Fluorescence intensity of Sq was found to decrease on Lz association with lipid bilayer. This effect was observed in all kinds of model systems suggesting that Sq is sensitive to modification of lipid bilayer physical properties on hydrophobic protein-lipid interactions. It was found that Sq spectral response to variations in Chol content depends on relative contributions of electrostatic and hydrophobic components of Lz-membrane binding.

  16. Parsing the life-shortening effects of dietary protein: effects of individual amino acids.

    PubMed

    Arganda, Sara; Bouchebti, Sofia; Bazazi, Sepideh; Le Hesran, Sophie; Puga, Camille; Latil, Gérard; Simpson, Stephen J; Dussutour, Audrey

    2017-01-11

    High-protein diets shorten lifespan in many organisms. Is it because protein digestion is energetically costly or because the final products (the amino acids) are harmful? To answer this question while circumventing the life-history trade-off between reproduction and longevity, we fed sterile ant workers on diets based on whole proteins or free amino acids. We found that (i) free amino acids shortened lifespan even more than proteins; (ii) the higher the amino acid-to-carbohydrate ratio, the shorter ants lived and the lower their lipid reserves; (iii) for the same amino acid-to-carbohydrate ratio, ants eating free amino acids had more lipid reserves than those eating whole proteins; and (iv) on whole protein diets, ants seem to regulate food intake by prioritizing sugar, while on free amino acid diets, they seem to prioritize amino acids. To test the effect of the amino acid profile, we tested diets containing proportions of each amino acid that matched the ant's exome; surprisingly, longevity was unaffected by this change. We further tested diets with all amino acids under-represented except one, finding that methionine, serine, threonine and phenylalanine are especially harmful. All together, our results show certain amino acids are key elements behind the high-protein diet reduction in lifespan.

  17. Plasma lipid-bound sialic acid and carcinoembryonic antigen in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Dnistrian, A M; Schwartz, M K

    1981-10-01

    We evaluated lipid-bound sialic acid as a "marker" in cancer patients and assessed the individual and combined value of lipid-bound sialic acid and carcinoembryonic antigen determinations in these patients. Plasma was sampled from 62 normal subjects and 125 cancer patients. Lipid-bound sialic acid was determined by the resorcinol method after total lipid extraction and isolation of the sialolipid fraction from plasma. Neither marker was increased in many breast cancer patients. Carcinoembryonic antigen was increased more commonly and to a greater degree in colon cancer patients and seems to be the preferred marker. Both markers were increased in lung cancer patients and their combined evaluation improved the rate of detection. Lipid-bound sialic acid was increased in more patients with leukemias, lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease, and melanomas, suggesting that it may be a useful biochemical marker in these types of cancer.

  18. Effect of lipid supplementation on milk odd- and branched-chain fatty acids in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Baumann, E; Chouinard, P Y; Lebeuf, Y; Rico, D E; Gervais, R

    2016-08-01

    Eight ruminally fistulated, multiparous Holstein cows were arranged in a double 4×4 Latin square with 14-d periods to investigate the effects of lipid supplementation on performance, rumen parameters, the milk odd- and branched-chain fatty acid (OBCFA) profile, and the relationships between milk OBCFA and rumen parameters. Lipid supplementation is known to inhibit microbial growth in the rumen, decrease de novo microbial fatty acid synthesis, and increase the uptake of circulating fatty acids by the mammary gland; treatments were selected to isolate these effects on the milk OBCFA profile. The 4 treatments were (1) a lipid-free emulsion medium infused in the rumen (CTL), (2) soybean oil as a source of polyunsaturated fatty acids infused in the rumen (RSO), (3) saturated fatty acids (38% 16:0, 40% 18:0) infused in the rumen (RSF), and (4) saturated fatty acids infused in the abomasum (ASF). Fat supplements were provided continuously as emulsions at a rate of 450g/d. Preplanned contrasts compared CTL to RSO, RSO to RSF, and RSF to ASF. Infusing RSO slightly decreased ruminal pH, but did not affect volatile fatty acids profile and milk fat concentration as compared with CTL. The yields of energy-corrected milk, fat, and protein were greater with RSF compared with RSO. The concentration of odd-chain fatty acids was decreased by RSO, whereas even-chain iso fatty acids were not affected. Milk fat concentration of 17:0 + cis-9 17:1 was higher for RSF than for RSO, due to the saturated fatty acids supplement containing 2% 17:0 + cis-9 17:1. Limited differences were observed in the milk OBCFA profile between RSF and ASF. A multiple regression analysis yielded the following equation for predicting rumen pH based on milk fatty acids: pH=6.24 - (0.56×4:0) + (1.67 × iso 14:0) + (4.22 × iso 15:0) + (9.41×22:0). Rumen propionate concentration was negatively correlated with milk fat concentration of iso 14:0 and positively correlated with milk 15:0, whereas the acetate

  19. Contribution of the starch, protein, and lipid fractions to the physical, thermal, and structural properties of amaranth (Amaranthus caudatus) flour films.

    PubMed

    Tapia-Blácido, D; Mauri, A N; Menegalli, F C; Sobral, P J A; Añón, M C

    2007-06-01

    Amaranth protein-lipid (PL) and protein (P) films were elaborated and compared with amaranth flour films in order to determine the contribution of the interactions between the biopolymer (starch and protein) and the lipids to the film properties. The films were made by the casting method, using the same glycerol concentration (0.9 g glycerol/100 g solution). A separation of the lipid fraction in the PL films and a polymorphic transformation of the corresponding fatty acids were observed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and verified by an analysis of the microstructure by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The flour films showed no separation of the lipid fraction, evidence that the lipids were strongly associated with the proteins and homogenously distributed throughout the starch network, contributing to the good mechanical properties when compared to the PL films and to the excellent barrier properties when compared to both the PL and P films. The protein-protein interactions also contributed to the mechanical properties of the flour films. The presence of proteins and lipids in the flour films had an important effect on film solubility, and also on the color and opacity of the films. This study showed that the flour film properties depended on the interactions formed by their polymers (starches and proteins) and by the lipid, on the distribution of these interactions within the film matrix and on the concentrations of each component in the film.

  20. Lipid-protein interactions in plasma membranes of fiber cells isolated from the human eye lens.

    PubMed

    Raguz, Marija; Mainali, Laxman; O'Brien, William J; Subczynski, Witold K

    2014-03-01

    The protein content in human lens membranes is extremely high, increases with age, and is higher in the nucleus as compared with the cortex, which should strongly affect the organization and properties of the lipid bilayer portion of intact membranes. To assess these effects, the intact cortical and nuclear fiber cell plasma membranes isolated from human lenses from 41- to 60-year-old donors were studied using electron paramagnetic resonance spin-labeling methods. Results were compared with those obtained for lens lipid membranes prepared from total lipid extracts from human eyes of the same age group [Mainali, L., Raguz, M., O'Brien, W. J., and Subczynski, W. K. (2013) Biochim. Biophys. Acta]. Differences were considered to be mainly due to the effect of membrane proteins. The lipid-bilayer portions of intact membranes were significantly less fluid than lipid bilayers of lens lipid membranes, prepared without proteins. The intact membranes were found to contain three distinct lipid environments termed the bulk lipid domain, boundary lipid domain, and trapped lipid domain. However, the cholesterol bilayer domain, which was detected in cortical and nuclear lens lipid membranes, was not detected in intact membranes. The relative amounts of bulk and trapped lipids were evaluated. The amount of lipids in domains uniquely formed due to the presence of membrane proteins was greater in nuclear membranes than in cortical membranes. Thus, it is evident that the rigidity of nuclear membranes is greater than that of cortical membranes. Also the permeability coefficients for oxygen measured in domains of nuclear membranes were significantly lower than appropriate coefficients measured in cortical membranes. Relationships between the organization of lipids into lipid domains in fiber cells plasma membranes and the organization of membrane proteins are discussed.

  1. Lipid-Protein Interactions in Plasma Membranes of Fiber Cells Isolated from the Human Eye Lens

    PubMed Central

    Raguz, Marija; Mainali, Laxman; O’Brien, William J.; Subczynski, Witold K.

    2014-01-01

    The protein content in human lens membranes is extremely high, increases with age, and is higher in the nucleus as compared with the cortex, which should strongly affect the organization and properties of the lipid bilayer portion of intact membranes. To assess these effects, the intact cortical and nuclear fiber cell plasma membranes isolated from human lenses from 41- to 60-year-old donors were studied using electron paramagnetic resonance spin-labeling methods. Results were compared with those obtained for lens lipid membranes prepared from total lipid extracts from human eyes of the same age group [Mainali,L., Raguz, M., O’Brien, W. J., and Subczynski, W. K. (2013) Biochim. Biophys. Acta]. Differences were considered to be mainly due to the effect of membrane proteins. The lipid-bilayer portions of intact membranes were significantly less fluid than lipid bilayers of lens lipid membranes, prepared without proteins. The intact membranes were found to contain three distinct lipid environments termed the bulk lipid domain, boundary lipid domain, and trapped lipid domain. However, the cholesterol bilayer domain, which was detected in cortical and nuclear lens lipid membranes, was not detected in intact membranes. The relative amounts of bulk and trapped lipids were evaluated. The amount of lipids in domains uniquely formed due to the presence of membrane proteins was greater in nuclear membranes than in cortical membranes. Thus, it is evident that the rigidity of nuclear membranes is greater than that of cortical membranes. Also the permeability coefficients for oxygen measured in domains of nuclear membranes were significantly lower than appropriate coefficients measured in cortical membranes. Relationships between the organization of lipids into lipid domains in fiber cells plasma membranes and the organization of membrane proteins are discussed. PMID:24486794

  2. Vaccinia Virus Immunomodulator A46: A Lipid and Protein-Binding Scaffold for Sequestering Host TIR-Domain Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Radakovics, Katharina; Smith, Terry K.; Bobik, Nina; Round, Adam; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina; Usón, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Vaccinia virus interferes with early events of the activation pathway of the transcriptional factor NF-kB by binding to numerous host TIR-domain containing adaptor proteins. We have previously determined the X-ray structure of the A46 C-terminal domain; however, the structure and function of the A46 N-terminal domain and its relationship to the C-terminal domain have remained unclear. Here, we biophysically characterize residues 1–83 of the N-terminal domain of A46 and present the X-ray structure at 1.55 Å. Crystallographic phases were obtained by a recently developed ab initio method entitled ARCIMBOLDO_BORGES that employs tertiary structure libraries extracted from the Protein Data Bank; data analysis revealed an all β-sheet structure. This is the first such structure solved by this method which should be applicable to any protein composed entirely of β-sheets. The A46(1–83) structure itself is a β-sandwich containing a co-purified molecule of myristic acid inside a hydrophobic pocket and represents a previously unknown lipid-binding fold. Mass spectrometry analysis confirmed the presence of long-chain fatty acids in both N-terminal and full-length A46; mutation of the hydrophobic pocket reduced the lipid content. Using a combination of high resolution X-ray structures of the N- and C-terminal domains and SAXS analysis of full-length protein A46(1–240), we present here a structural model of A46 in a tetrameric assembly. Integrating affinity measurements and structural data, we propose how A46 simultaneously interferes with several TIR-domain containing proteins to inhibit NF-κB activation and postulate that A46 employs a bipartite binding arrangement to sequester the host immune adaptors TRAM and MyD88. PMID:27973613

  3. Response of laying hens to feeding low-protein amino acid-supplemented diets under high ambient temperature: performance, egg quality, leukocyte profile, blood lipids, and excreta pH.

    PubMed

    Torki, Mehran; Mohebbifar, Ahmad; Ghasemi, Hossein Ali; Zardast, Afshin

    2015-05-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine whether, by using a low-protein amino acid-supplemented diet, the health status, stress response, and excreta quality could be improved without affecting the productive performance of heat-stressed laying hens. The requirements for egg production, egg mass, and feed conversion ratio were also estimated using second-order equations and broken-line regression. A total of 150 Lohmann Selected Leghorn (LSL-Lite) hens were divided randomly into five groups of 30 with five replicates of six hens. The hens were raised for an 8-week period (52 to 60 weeks) in wire cages situated in high ambient temperature in an open-sided housing system. The five experimental diets (ME; 2,720 kcal/kg) varied according to five crude protein (CP) levels: normal-CP diet (control, 16.5 % CP) and low-CP diets containing 15.0, 13.5, 12.0, or 10.5 % CP. All experimental diets were supplemented with crystalline amino acids at the levels sufficient to meet their requirements. The results showed that under high temperature conditions, all productive performance and egg quality parameters in the birds fed with 15.0, 13.5, and 12.0 % CP diets were similar to those of birds fed with control diet (16.5 % CP), whereas feeding 10.5 % CP diet significantly decreased egg production and egg mass. Estimations of requirements were of 13.93 and 12.77 % CP for egg production, 14.62 and 13.22 % CP for egg mass, and 12.93 and 12.26 % CP for feed conversion ratio using quadratic and broken-line models, respectively. Egg yolk color index, blood triglyceride level, and excreta acidity were also significantly higher in birds fed with 12.0 and 10.5 % CP diets compared with those of control birds. The heterophil to lymphocyte ratio, as a stress indicator, was significantly decreased by 15.0, 13.5, and 12 % CP diets. On the basis of our findings, reducing dietary CP from 16.5 to 12.0 % and supplementing the diets with the essential amino acids showed merit for improving the

  4. Response of laying hens to feeding low-protein amino acid-supplemented diets under high ambient temperature: performance, egg quality, leukocyte profile, blood lipids, and excreta pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torki, Mehran; Mohebbifar, Ahmad; Ghasemi, Hossein Ali; Zardast, Afshin

    2015-05-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine whether, by using a low-protein amino acid-supplemented diet, the health status, stress response, and excreta quality could be improved without affecting the productive performance of heat-stressed laying hens. The requirements for egg production, egg mass, and feed conversion ratio were also estimated using second-order equations and broken-line regression. A total of 150 Lohmann Selected Leghorn (LSL-Lite) hens were divided randomly into five groups of 30 with five replicates of six hens. The hens were raised for an 8-week period (52 to 60 weeks) in wire cages situated in high ambient temperature in an open-sided housing system. The five experimental diets (ME; 2,720 kcal/kg) varied according to five crude protein (CP) levels: normal-CP diet (control, 16.5 % CP) and low-CP diets containing 15.0, 13.5, 12.0, or 10.5 % CP. All experimental diets were supplemented with crystalline amino acids at the levels sufficient to meet their requirements. The results showed that under high temperature conditions, all productive performance and egg quality parameters in the birds fed with 15.0, 13.5, and 12.0 % CP diets were similar to those of birds fed with control diet (16.5 % CP), whereas feeding 10.5 % CP diet significantly decreased egg production and egg mass. Estimations of requirements were of 13.93 and 12.77 % CP for egg production, 14.62 and 13.22 % CP for egg mass, and 12.93 and 12.26 % CP for feed conversion ratio using quadratic and broken-line models, respectively. Egg yolk color index, blood triglyceride level, and excreta acidity were also significantly higher in birds fed with 12.0 and 10.5 % CP diets compared with those of control birds. The heterophil to lymphocyte ratio, as a stress indicator, was significantly decreased by 15.0, 13.5, and 12 % CP diets. On the basis of our findings, reducing dietary CP from 16.5 to 12.0 % and supplementing the diets with the essential amino acids showed merit for improving the

  5. Plasma lipid-bound sialic acid alterations in neoplastic diseases.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, C; Dixit, M; Hardy, R E

    1990-01-15

    Plasma lipid-bound sialic acid (LSA) was assayed in normal volunteers, patients with non-malignant diseases, and a variety of cancer patients. Mean plasma LSA in 50 normal volunteers, 16 patients with non-malignant diseases, 54 breast cancer, 17 lung cancer, 15 colon cancer, 7 ovarian cancer, 5 prostate cancer, 4 leukemia, 4 gastrointestinal, 3 thyroid cancer, 3 pancreas cancer and 2 adrenal cancer patients were 17.7, 23.2, 58, 85, 56.7, 46.2, 56.7, 53.3, 31.1, 33.2 and 119.5 mg/dl, respectively. None of the normal volunteers had elevated plasma LSA values. Plasma LSA level was not significantly different in male and female volunteers. Two out of 114 different cancer patients had plasma LSA levels within normal range exhibiting 98.2% sensitivity of the assay. Plasma LSA, which is relatively simple to assay, may be used as a tumor marker in wide variety of neoplastic diseases.

  6. Distinguishing Proteins From Arbitrary Amino Acid Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Stephen S.-T.; Mao, Wei-Guang; Benson, Max; He, Rong Lucy

    2015-01-01

    What kinds of amino acid sequences could possibly be protein sequences? From all existing databases that we can find, known proteins are only a small fraction of all possible combinations of amino acids. Beginning with Sanger's first detailed determination of a protein sequence in 1952, previous studies have focused on describing the structure of existing protein sequences in order to construct the protein universe. No one, however, has developed a criteria for determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Here we show that when the collection of arbitrary amino acid sequences is viewed in an appropriate geometric context, the protein sequences cluster together. This leads to a new computational test, described here, that has proved to be remarkably accurate at determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Even more, if the results of this test indicate that the sequence can be a protein, and it is indeed a protein sequence, then its identity as a protein sequence is uniquely defined. We anticipate our computational test will be useful for those who are attempting to complete the job of discovering all proteins, or constructing the protein universe. PMID:25609314

  7. Effects of microwave resonance therapy on erythrocyte and plasma proteins and lipids in alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Patisheva, E V; Prokopyeva, V D; Bokhan, N A

    2009-07-01

    The content of lipid peroxides and protein carbonyls in erythrocytes and plasma were elevated in patients with alcoholism during abstinence. A course of microwave resonance therapy reduced the level of lipid peroxide in erythrocytes, but not in the plasma, and significantly decreased the content of protein carbonyls in the plasma and erythrocytes.

  8. Determining Membrane Protein-Lipid Binding Thermodynamics Using Native Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cong, Xiao; Liu, Yang; Liu, Wen; Liang, Xiaowen; Russell, David H; Laganowsky, Arthur

    2016-04-06

    Membrane proteins are embedded in the biological membrane where the chemically diverse lipid environment can modulate their structure and function. However, the thermodynamics governing the molecular recognition and interaction of lipids with membrane proteins is poorly understood. Here, we report a method using native mass spectrometry (MS), to determine thermodynamics of individual ligand binding events to proteins. Unlike conventional methods, native MS can resolve individual ligand binding events and, coupled with an apparatus to control the temperature, determine binding thermodynamic parameters, such as for protein-lipid interactions. We validated our approach using three soluble protein-ligand systems (maltose binding protein, lysozyme, and nitrogen regulatory protein) and obtained similar results to those using isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance. We also determined for the first time the thermodynamics of individual lipid binding to the ammonia channel (AmtB), an integral membrane protein from Escherichia coli. Remarkably, we observed distinct thermodynamic signatures for the binding of different lipids and entropy-enthalpy compensation for binding lipids of variable chain length. Additionally, using a mutant form of AmtB that abolishes a specific phosphatidylglycerol (PG) binding site, we observed distinct changes in the thermodynamic signatures for binding PG, implying these signatures can identify key residues involved in specific lipid binding and potentially differentiate between specific lipid binding sites.

  9. Cutin monomer induces expression of the rice OsLTP5 lipid transfer protein gene.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Park, Jong Ho; Kim, Moon Chul; Cho, Sung Ho

    2008-01-01

    Treatment with the cutin monomer 16-hydroxypalmitic acid (HPA), a major component of cutin, elicited the synthesis of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in rice leaves and induced the expression of the lipid transfer protein gene OsLTP5. Treatment with HPA also induced expression of OsLTP1, OsLTP2, and the pathogen-related PR-10 genes to a lesser extent. The OsLTP5 transcript was expressed prominently in stems and flowers, but was barely detectable in leaves. Expression of OsLTP5 was induced in shoots in response to ABA and salicylic acid. It is proposed that HPA is perceived by rice as a signal, inducing defense reactions.

  10. Changes of biomass, lipid content and fatty acids composition under a light-dark cyclic culture of Chlorella pyrenoidosa in response to different temperature.

    PubMed

    Han, Feifei; Wang, Weiliang; Li, Yuanguang; Shen, Guomin; Wan, Minxi; Wang, Jun

    2013-03-01

    For outdoor culture with light-dark cycle, the biomass and lipid losing at night resulted in lowering the biomass and lipid productivity. Previous studies focused on the contents of carbohydrate and protein in response to temperature for production of animal feed and nutritional supplements. In this study, the effects of temperature on the variations of biomass concentration, lipid content and fatty acids composition for production of biofuels were investigated under a light-dark cyclic culture. The results showed that 30 °C was the optimal daytime temperature for achieving high biomass and lipid; raising daytime temperature can lessen night biomass loss and stimulate lipid accumulation. Subsequently, outdoor culture strategy has been improved: keeping culture broth no less than 30 °C during the daytime. Consequently, the net biomass and lipid productivity were increased by 37.8% and 44.9% when compared to the former culture process in the same outdoor climatic conditions.

  11. Chronic administration of ursodeoxycholic and tauroursodeoxycholic acid changes microsomal membrane lipid content and fatty acid compositions in rats.

    PubMed

    Bellentani, S; Chao, Y C; Ferretti, I; Panini, R; Tiribelli, C

    1996-03-27

    We studied the effect of oral supplementation with ursodeoxycholate (UDCA) or tauroursodeoxycholate (TUDCA) on the lipid content and fatty acid composition of rat hepatic microsomes. UDCA and TUDCA significantly increased the total amount of lipids with the exception of cholesteryl-esters. UDCA significantly increased the triglycerides and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) microsomal content, and decreased the cholesterol/phospholipids and the phosphatidylcholine (PC)/PE ratio. Both treatments increased the percentage oleic acid and of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in each class of lipids. UDCA and TUDCA had a different action on PUFA microsomal molar percentage of phospholipids: UDCA increased the relative percentage of PUFA in the PE fraction, while TUDCA increased the relative percentage of PUFA in the PC fraction. These changes in the hepatic lipid content and composition might in part explain both cytoprotective action of these hydrophillic bile acids and their effect on membrane fluidity.

  12. VAMP-associated Proteins (VAP) as Receptors That Couple Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Proteostasis with Lipid Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Wayne L; Shome, Kuntala; Wu, Christine C; Gong, Xiaoyan; Frizzell, Raymond A; Aridor, Meir

    2016-03-04

    Unesterified cholesterol accumulates in late endosomes in cells expressing the misfolded cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). CFTR misfolding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or general activation of ER stress led to dynein-mediated clustering of cholesterol-loaded late endosomes at the Golgi region, a process regulated by ER-localized VAMP-associated proteins (VAPs). We hypothesized that VAPs serve as intracellular receptors that couple lipid homeostasis through interactions with two phenylalanines in an acidic track (FFAT) binding signals (found in lipid sorting and sensing proteins, LSS) with proteostasis regulation. VAPB inhibited the degradation of ΔF508-CFTR. The activity was mapped to the ligand-binding major sperm protein (MSP) domain, which was sufficient in regulating CFTR biogenesis. We identified mutations in an unstructured loop within the MSP that uncoupled VAPB-regulated CFTR biogenesis from basic interactions with FFAT. Using this information, we defined functional and physical interactions between VAPB and proteostasis regulators (ligands), including the unfolded protein response sensor ATF6 and the ER degradation cluster that included FAF1, VCP, BAP31, and Derlin-1. VAPB inhibited the degradation of ΔF508-CFTR in the ER through interactions with the RMA1-Derlin-BAP31-VCP pathway. Analysis of pseudoligands containing tandem FFAT signals supports a competitive model for VAP interactions that direct CFTR biogenesis. The results suggest a model in which VAP-ligand binding couples proteostasis and lipid homeostasis leading to observed phenotypes of lipid abnormalities in protein folding diseases.

  13. Lipid concentrations of fillets, liver, plasma and lipoproteins of African catfish, Clarias gariepinus (Burchell 1822), fed diets with varying protein concentrations.

    PubMed

    Matter, F; Peganova, S; Eder, K

    2004-08-01

    This study investigated the effect of the dietary protein concentration on lipid concentrations in fillet and liver and concentrations of lipids in plasma and lipoproteins in African catfish. Two experiments were carried out, in which African catfish were fed diets with various protein concentrations. In experiment 1, semisynthetic diets with various concentrations of casein (350, 450 or 550 g protein/kg) were used. In experiment 2, diets were based on a commercial trout diet supplemented with various amounts of casein or carbohydrates, resulting in protein concentrations between 282 and 545 g/kg diet. In both experiments, the dietary protein concentration had a significant effect on growth, feed conversion ratio and carcass composition. Maximum of body weight gains and feed efficiency ratios were reached in both experiments at the highest dietary protein concentrations. Increasing the dietary protein concentration continuously increased masses of fillets and reduced masses of the liver and adipose tissue in the abdominal cavity. Fish fed the diets with the highest protein concentrations had the lowest concentration of total lipids, triglycerides and cholesterol in the fillets, the highest percentage of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in total lipids of fillets and the lowest concentrations of saturated fatty acids (SFA). Fish fed the diets with the highest protein concentration also had the lowest concentrations of triglycerides in the liver, the highest percentages of PUFA in liver total lipids and the lowest percentages of SFA. Moreover, fish fed diets with high protein concentrations (501 and 545 g/kg) had significantly lower concentrations of triglycerides, cholesterol and phospholipids in plasma than fish fed diets with lower protein concentrations. In conclusion, this study shows that the dietary protein concentration does not only influence growth, feed efficiency and carcass composition in African catfish, but also influences their lipid metabolism and

  14. Monoolein lipid phases as incorporation and enrichment materials for membrane protein crystallization.

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, E.; Dranow, D.; Laible, P. D.; Christensen, J.; Nollert, P.

    2011-01-01

    The crystallization of membrane proteins in amphiphile-rich materials such as lipidic cubic phases is an established methodology in many structural biology laboratories. The standard procedure employed with this methodology requires the generation of a highly viscous lipidic material by mixing lipid, for instance monoolein, with a solution of the detergent solubilized membrane protein. This preparation is often carried out with specialized mixing tools that allow handling of the highly viscous materials while minimizing dead volume to save precious membrane protein sample. The processes that occur during the initial mixing of the lipid with the membrane protein are not well understood. Here we show that the formation of the lipidic phases and the incorporation of the membrane protein into such materials can be separated experimentally. Specifically, we have investigated the effect of different initial monoolein-based lipid phase states on the crystallization behavior of the colored photosynthetic reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. We find that the detergent solubilized photosynthetic reaction center spontaneously inserts into and concentrates in the lipid matrix without any mixing, and that the initial lipid material phase state is irrelevant for productive crystallization. A substantial in-situ enrichment of the membrane protein to concentration levels that are otherwise unobtainable occurs in a thin layer on the surface of the lipidic material. These results have important practical applications and hence we suggest a simplified protocol for membrane protein crystallization within amphiphile rich materials, eliminating any specialized mixing tools to prepare crystallization experiments within lipidic cubic phases. Furthermore, by virtue of sampling a membrane protein concentration gradient within a single crystallization experiment, this crystallization technique is more robust and increases the efficiency of identifying productive crystallization

  15. Regulation of polar auxin transport by protein and lipid kinases

    PubMed Central

    Jaillais, Yvon

    2016-01-01

    The directional transport of auxin, known as polar auxin transport, allows asymmetric distribution of this hormone in different cells and tissues. This system creates local auxin maxima, minima and gradients that are instrumental in both organ initiation and shape determination. As such, polar auxin transport is crucial for all aspects of plant development but also for environmental interaction, notably in shaping plant architecture to its environment. Cell-to-cell auxin transport is mediated by a network of auxin carriers that are regulated at the transcriptional and post-translational levels. Here we review our current knowledge on some aspects of the ‘non-genomic’ regulation of auxin transport, putting an emphasis on how phosphorylation by protein and lipid kinases controls the polarity, intracellular trafficking, stability and activity of auxin carriers. We describe the role of several AGC kinases, including PINOID, D6PK and the blue light photoreceptor phot1, in phosphorylating auxin carriers from the PIN and ABCB families. We also highlight the function of some Receptor-Like Kinases (RLK) and two-component histidine kinase receptors in polar auxin transport, noticing that there are likely RLKs involved in coordinating auxin distribution yet to be discovered. In addition, we describe the emerging role of phospholipid phosphorylation in polarity establishment and intracellular trafficking of PIN proteins. We outline these various phosphorylation mechanisms in the context of primary and lateral root development, leaf cell shape acquisition as well as root gravitropism and shoot phototropism. PMID:27242371

  16. Isolation and characterization of lipid-protein particles containing platelet factor 3 released from human platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, H; Andersson, L O; Höglund, S

    1982-01-01

    Lipid-protein particles with platelet factor 3 measured by the Stypven clotting-time test [Hardisty & Hutton (1966) Br. J. Haematol. 12, 764-776] have been isolated from platelet-release supernatant. Starting material was washed platelets, which were released by treatment with collagen. Purification of the particles from other components in the release material was accomplished by gel filtration on Sepharose CL-4B followed by affinity chromatography on poly-L-lysine-Sepharose CL-4B gel. Chemical characterization showed that the particles were composed of 40% protein, 42% phospholipids, 13% cholesterol and 5% triacylglycerols. The phospholipid composition was 38% phosphatidylcholine, 25% phosphatidylethanolamine, 9% phosphatidylserine, 2% phosphatidic acid and 26% sphingomyelin. No carbohydrate was detected. Electron-microscopic studies revealed the presence of membranous particles with diameters between 70 and 170 nm. Images PLATE 1 Fig. 3. PMID:7103943

  17. Infrared Reflection-Absorption Spectroscopy: Principles and Applications to Lipid-Protein Interaction in Langmuir Films

    PubMed Central

    Mendelsohn, Richard; Mao, Guangru; Flach, Carol R.

    2010-01-01

    Infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) of lipid/protein monolayer films in situ at the air/water interface provides unique molecular structure and orientation information from the film constituents. The technique is thus well suited for studies of lipid/protein interaction in a physiologically relevant environment. Initially, the nature of the IRRAS experiment is described and the molecular structure information that may be obtained is recapitulated. Subsequently, several types of applications, including the determination of lipid chain conformation and tilt as well as elucidation of protein secondary structure are reviewed. The current article attempts to provide the reader with an understanding of the current capabilities of IRRAS instrumentation and the type of results that have been achieved to date from IRRAS studies of lipids, proteins and lipid/protein films of progressively increasing complexity. Finally, possible extensions of the technology are briefly considered. PMID:20004639

  18. Effect of acetic acid on lipid accumulation by glucose-fed activated sludge cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Mondala, Andro; Hernandez, Rafael; French, Todd; McFarland, Linda; Sparks, Darrell; Holmes, William; Haque, Monica

    2012-01-01

    The effect of acetic acid, a lignocellulose hydrolysis by-product, on lipid accumulation by activated sludge cultures grown on glucose was investigated. This was done to assess the possible application of lignocellulose as low-cost and renewable fermentation substrates for biofuel feedstock production. Results: Biomass yield was reduced by around 54% at a 2 g L -1 acetic acid dosage but was increased by around 18% at 10 g L -1 acetic acid dosage relative to the control run. The final gravimetric lipid contents at 2 and 10 g L -1 acetic acid levels were 12.5 + 0.7% and 8.8 + 3.2% w/w, respectively, which were lower than the control (17.8 + 2.8% w/w). However, biodiesel yields from activated sludge grown with acetic acid (5.6 + 0.6% w/w for 2 g L -1 acetic acid and 4.2 + 3.0% w/w for 10 g L -1 acetic acid) were higher than in raw activated sludge (1-2% w/w). The fatty acid profiles of the accumulated lipids were similar with conventional plant oil biodiesel feedstocks. Conclusions: Acetic acid enhanced biomass production by activated sludge at high levels but reduced lipid production. Further studies are needed to enhance acetic acid utilization by activated sludge microorganisms for lipid biosynthesis.

  19. Dietary linoleic acid-induced alterations in pro- and anti-nociceptive lipid autacoids

    PubMed Central

    Ringel, Amit; Majchrzak-Hong, Sharon F; Yang, Jun; Blanchard, Helene; Zamora, Daisy; Loewke, James D; Rapoport, Stanley I; Hibbeln, Joseph R; Davis, John M; Hammock, Bruce D; Taha, Ameer Y

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic idiopathic pain syndromes are major causes of personal suffering, disability, and societal expense. Dietary n-6 linoleic acid has increased markedly in modern industrialized populations over the past century. These high amounts of linoleic acid could hypothetically predispose to physical pain by increasing the production of pro-nociceptive linoleic acid-derived lipid autacoids and by interfering with the production of anti-nociceptive lipid autacoids derived from n-3 fatty acids. Here, we used a rat model to determine the effect of increasing dietary linoleic acid as a controlled variable for 15 weeks on nociceptive lipid autacoids and their precursor n-6 and n-3 fatty acids in tissues associated with idiopathic pain syndromes. Results Increasing dietary linoleic acid markedly increased the abundance of linoleic acid and its pro-nociceptive derivatives and reduced the abundance of n-3 eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid and their anti-nociceptive monoepoxide derivatives. Diet-induced changes occurred in a tissue-specific manner, with marked alterations of nociceptive lipid autacoids in both peripheral and central tissues, and the most pronounced changes in their fatty acid precursors in peripheral tissues. Conclusions The present findings provide biochemical support for the hypothesis that the high linoleic acid content of modern industrialized diets may create a biochemical susceptibility to develop chronic pain. Dietary linoleic acid lowering should be further investigated as part of an integrative strategy for the prevention and management of idiopathic pain syndromes. PMID:27030719

  20. Utilization of non-conventional systems for conversion of biomass to food components: Recovery optimization and characterizations of algal proteins and lipids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karel, M.; Nakhost, Z.

    1986-01-01

    Protein isolate obtained from green algae (Scenedesmus obliquus) cultivated under controlled conditions was characterized. Molecular weight determination of fractionated algal proteins using SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed a wide spectrum of molecular weights ranging from 15,000 to 220,000. Isoelectric points of dissociated proteins were in the range of 3.95 to 6.20. Amino acid composition of protein isolate compared favorably with FAO standards. High content of essential amino acids leucine, valine, phenylalanine and lysine makes algal protein isolate a high quality component of closed environment life support system (CELSS) diets. To optimize the removal of algal lipids and pigments supercritical carbon dioxide extraction (with and without ethanol as a co-solvent) was used. Addition of ethanol to supercritical CO2 resulted in more efficient removal of algal lipids and produced protein isolate with a good yield and protein recovery. The protein isolate extracted by the above mixture had an improved water solubility.

  1. Identification of Dynamic Changes in Proteins Associated with the Cellular Cytoskeleton after Exposure to Okadaic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Opsahl, Jill A.; Ljostveit, Sonja; Solstad, Therese; Risa, Kristin; Roepstorff, Peter; Fladmark, Kari E.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of cells to the diarrhetic shellfish poison, okadaic acid, leads to a dramatic reorganization of cytoskeletal architecture and loss of cell-cell contact. When cells are exposed to high concentrations of okadaic acid (100–500 nM), the morphological rearrangement is followed by apoptotic cell death. Okadaic acid inhibits the broad acting Ser/Thr protein phosphatases 1 and 2A, which results in hyperphosphorylation of a large number of proteins. Some of these hyperphosphorylated proteins are most likely key players in the reorganization of the cell morphology induced by okadaic acid. We wanted to identify these phosphoproteins and searched for them in the cellular lipid rafts, which have been found to contain proteins that regulate cytoskeletal dynamics and cell adhesion. By using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture cells treated with okadaic acid (400 nM) could be combined with control cells before the isolation of lipid rafts. Protein phosphorylation events and translocations induced by okadaic acid were identified by mass spectrometry. Okadaic acid was shown to regulate the phosphorylation status and location of proteins associated with the actin cytoskeleton, microtubules and cell adhesion structures. A large number of these okadaic acid-regulated proteins have previously also been shown to be similarly regulated prior to cell proliferation and migration. Our results suggest that okadaic acid activates general cell signaling pathways that induce breakdown of the cortical actin cytoskeleton and cell detachment. PMID:23708184

  2. Review: biogenesis of the multifunctional lipid droplet: lipids, proteins, and sites.

    PubMed

    Pol, Albert; Gross, Steven P; Parton, Robert G

    2014-03-03

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are ubiquitous dynamic organelles that store and supply lipids in all eukaryotic and some prokaryotic cells for energy metabolism, membrane synthesis, and production of essential lipid-derived molecules. Interest in the organelle's cell biology has exponentially increased over the last decade due to the link between LDs and prevalent human diseases and the discovery of new and unexpected functions of LDs. As a result, there has been significant recent progress toward understanding where and how LDs are formed, and the specific lipid pathways that coordinate LD biogenesis.

  3. Plant pentacyclic triterpenic acids as modulators of lipid membrane physical properties.

    PubMed

    Prades, Jesús; Vögler, Oliver; Alemany, Regina; Gomez-Florit, Manuel; Funari, Sérgio S; Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Valentina; Barceló, Francisca

    2011-03-01

    Free triterpenic acids (TTPs) present in plants are bioactive compounds exhibiting multiple nutriceutical activities. The underlying molecular mechanisms have only been examined in part and mainly focused on anti-inflammatory properties, cancer and cardiovascular diseases, in all of which TTPs frequently affect membrane-related proteins. Based on the structural characteristics of TTPs, we assume that their effect on biophysical properties of cell membranes could play a role for their biological activity. In this context, our study is focused on the compounds, oleanolic (3β-hydroxy-12-oleanen-28-oic acid, OLA), maslinic (2α,3β-dihydroxy-12-oleanen-28-oic acid, MSL) and ursolic ((3β)-3-hydroxyurs-12-en-28-oic acid, URL) as the most important TTPs present in orujo olive oil. X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance and Laurdan fluorescence data provide experimental evidence that OLA, MSL and URL altered the structural properties of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and DPPC-Cholesterol (Cho) rich membranes, being located into the polar-hydrophobic interphase. Specifically, in DPPC membranes, TTPs altered the structural order of the L(β'), phase without destabilizing the lipid bilayer. The existence of a nonbilayer isotropic phase in coexistence with the liquid crystalline L(α) phase, as observed in DPPC:URL samples, indicated the presence of lipid structures with high curvature (probably inverted micelles). In DPPC:Cho membranes, TTPs affected the membrane phase properties increasing the Laurdan GP values above 40°C. MSL and URL induced segregation of Cho within the bilayer, in contrast to OLA, that reduced the structural organization of the membrane. These results strengthen the relevance of TTP interactions with cell membranes as a molecular mechanism underlying their broad spectrum of biological effects.

  4. Saturated fatty acids modulate autophagy's proteins in the hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Portovedo, Mariana; Ignacio-Souza, Letícia M; Bombassaro, Bruna; Coope, Andressa; Reginato, Andressa; Razolli, Daniela S; Torsoni, Márcio A; Torsoni, Adriana S; Leal, Raquel F; Velloso, Licio A; Milanski, Marciane

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an important process that regulates cellular homeostasis by degrading dysfunctional proteins, organelles and lipids. In this study, the hypothesis that obesity could lead to impairment in hypothalamic autophagy in mice was evaluated by examining the hypothalamic distribution and content of autophagic proteins in animal with obesity induced by 8 or 16 weeks high fat diet to induce obesity and in response to intracerebroventricular injections of palmitic acid. The results showed that chronic exposure to a high fat diet leads to an increased expression of inflammatory markers and downregulation of autophagic proteins. In obese mice, autophagic induction leads to the downregulation of proteins, such as JNK and Bax, which are involved in the stress pathways. In neuron cell-line, palmitate has a direct effect on autophagy even without inflammatory activity. Understanding the cellular and molecular bases of overnutrition is essential for identifying new diagnostic and therapeutic targets for obesity.

  5. Electrophoretic separation method for membrane pore-forming proteins in multilayer lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Yukihiro; Tsujimoto, Yusuke; Umakoshi, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we report on a novel electrophoretic separation and analysis method for membrane pore-forming proteins in multilayer lipid membranes (MLMs) in order to overcome the problems related to current separation and analysis methods of membrane proteins, and to obtain a high-performance separation method on the basis of specific properties of the lipid membranes. We constructed MLMs, and subsequently characterized membrane pore-forming protein behavior in MLMs. Through the use of these MLMs, we were able to successfully separate and analyze membrane pore-forming proteins in MLMs. To the best of our knowledge, this research is the first example of membrane pore-forming protein separation in lipid membranes. Our method can be expected to be applied for the separation and analysis of other membrane proteins including intrinsic membrane proteins and to result in high-performance by utilizing the specific properties of lipid membranes.

  6. Acid-Catalyzed Algal Biomass Pretreatment for Integrated Lipid and Carbohydrate-Based Biofuels Production

    DOE PAGES

    Laurens, L. M. L.; Nagle, N.; Davis, R.; ...

    2014-11-12

    One of the major challenges associated with algal biofuels production in a biorefinery-type setting is improving biomass utilization in its entirety, increasing the process energetic yields and providing economically viable and scalable co-product concepts. We demonstrate the effectiveness of a novel, integrated technology based on moderate temperatures and low pH to convert the carbohydrates in wet algal biomass to soluble sugars for fermentation, while making lipids more accessible for downstream extraction and leaving a protein-enriched fraction behind. We studied the effect of harvest timing on the conversion yields, using two algal strains; Chlorella and Scenedesmus, generating biomass with distinctive compositionalmore » ratios of protein, carbohydrate, and lipids. We found that the late harvest Scenedesmus biomass had the maximum theoretical biofuel potential at 143 gasoline gallon equivalent (GGE) combined fuel yield per dry ton biomass, followed by late harvest Chlorella at 128 GGE per ton. Our experimental data show a clear difference between the two strains, as Scenedesmus was more successfully converted in this process with a demonstrated 97 GGE per ton. Our measurements indicated a release of >90% of the available glucose in the hydrolysate liquors and an extraction and recovery of up to 97% of the fatty acids from wet biomass. Techno-economic analysis for the combined product yields indicates that this process exhibits the potential to improve per-gallon fuel costs by up to 33% compared to a lipids-only process for one strain, Scenedesmus, grown to the mid-point harvest condition.« less

  7. Bilirubin scavenges chloramines and inhibits myeloperoxidase-induced protein/lipid oxidation in physiologically relevant hyperbilirubinemic serum.

    PubMed

    Boon, A C; Hawkins, C L; Coombes, J S; Wagner, K H; Bulmer, A C

    2015-09-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl), an oxidant produced by myeloperoxidase (MPO), induces protein and lipid oxidation, which is implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Individuals with mildly elevated bilirubin concentrations (i.e., Gilbert syndrome; GS) are protected from atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease, and related mortality. We aimed to investigate whether exogenous/endogenous unconjugated bilirubin (UCB), at physiological concentrations, can protect proteins/lipids from oxidation induced by reagent and enzymatically generated HOCl. Serum/plasma samples supplemented with exogenous UCB (≤250µM) were assessed for their susceptibility to HOCl and MPO/H2O2/Cl(-) oxidation, by measuring chloramine, protein carbonyl, and malondialdehyde (MDA) formation. Serum/plasma samples from hyperbilirubinemic Gunn rats and humans with GS were also exposed to MPO/H2O2/Cl(-) to: (1) validate in vitro data and (2) determine the relevance of endogenously elevated UCB in preventing protein and lipid oxidation. Exogenous UCB dose-dependently (P<0.05) inhibited HOCl and MPO/H2O2/Cl(-)-induced chloramine formation. Albumin-bound UCB efficiently and specifically (3.9-125µM; P<0.05) scavenged taurine, glycine, and N-α-acetyllysine chloramines. These results were translated into Gunn rat and GS serum/plasma, which showed significantly (P<0.01) reduced chloramine formation after MPO-induced oxidation. Protein carbonyl and MDA formation was also reduced after MPO oxidation in plasma supplemented with UCB (P<0.05; 25 and 50µM, respectively). Significant inhibition of protein and lipid oxidation was demonstrated within the physiological range of UCB, providing a hypothetical link to protection from atherosclerosis in hyperbilirubinemic individuals. These data demonstrate a novel and physiologically relevant mechanism whereby UCB could inhibit protein and lipid modification by quenching chloramines induced by MPO-induced HOCl.

  8. LIPID CLASS DISTRIBUTION OF HIGHLY UNSATURATED LONG-CHAIN FATTY ACIDS IN MARINE DINOFLAGELLATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Very-long-chain highly unsaturated C28 fatty acids (HUFAs), found in a number of dinoflagellates, are released as methyl esters from phospholipids obtained by fractionation of lipid extracts. By contrast, the highly unsaturated C18 fatty acid octadecapentaenoic acid (18:5n-3), co...

  9. Endothelial cell palmitoylproteomics identifies novel lipid modified targets and potential substrates for protein acyl transferases

    PubMed Central

    Marin, Ethan P.; Derakhshan, Behrad; Lam, TuKiet T.; Davalos, Alberto; Sessa, William C.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Protein S-palmitoylation is the post-translational attachment of a saturated 16-carbon palmitic acid to a cysteine side chain via a thioester bond. Palmitoylation can affect protein localization, trafficking, stability, and function. The extent and roles of palmitoylation in endothelial cell (EC) biology is not well understood, in part due to technological limits on palmitoylprotein detection. Objective To develop a method using acyl-biotinyl exchange (ABE) technology coupled with mass spectrometry to globally isolate and identify palmitoylproteins in EC. Methods and Results More than 150 putative palmitoyl proteins were identified in EC using ABE and mass spectrometry. Among the novel palmitoylproteins identified is superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), an intensively studied enzyme that protects all cells from oxidative damage. Mutation of cysteine 6 prevents palmitoylation, leads to reduction in SOD1 activity in vivo and in vitro, and inhibits nuclear localization, thereby supporting a functional role for SOD1 palmitoylation. Moreover, we used ABE to search for substrates of particular protein acyl transferases in EC. We found that palmitoylation of the cell adhesion protein PECAM1 is dependent on the protein acyl transferase ZDHHC21. We show that knockdown of ZDHHC21 leads to reduced levels of PECAM1 at the cell surface. Conclusions Our data demonstrate the utility of EC palmitoylproteomics to reveal new insights into the role of this important post-translational lipid modification in EC biology. PMID:22496122

  10. Enhancement effect of ethanol on lipid and fatty acid accumulation and composition of Scenedesmus sp.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chengchen; Wang, Wei; Yue, Long; Yang, Zhen; Fu, Qiuguo; Ye, Qingfu

    2013-07-01

    The effects of ethanol concentration gradients along with varied cultivation times on lipid and fatty acid accumulation and composition of Scenedesmus sp. were studied. The maximum increment of algal density, lipid productivity, lipid content and fatty acid content were 6.61, 11.75, 1.34 and 3.14 times higher than the control group under 12h photoperiod. Algal light deprivation inhibited ethanol positive effects on algal growth and lipid biomass. The cumulative quantity of C16:0 and C18:0 decreased correspondingly with the increase of ethanol concentrations and cultivation times. Besides, unsaturated fatty acids appeared early in algal cells and increased 57.02% in maximum. However, only 2.27% (14)C was transferred from ethanol to fatty acids. The results indicated that adding proper amount of ethanol in algal culture medium was beneficial to biodiesel feedstock production and biodiesel properties.

  11. Lower weight gain and hepatic lipid content in hamsters fed high fat diets supplemented with white rice protein, brown rice protein, soy protein, and their hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huijuan; Bartley, Glenn E; Mitchell, Cheryl R; Zhang, Hui; Yokoyama, Wallace

    2011-10-26

    The physiological effects of the hydrolysates of white rice protein (WRP), brown rice protein (BRP), and soy protein (SP) hydrolyzed by the food grade enzyme, alcalase2.4 L, were compared to the original protein source. Male Syrian Golden hamsters were fed high-fat diets containing either 20% casein (control) or 20% extracted proteins or their hydrolysates as the protein source for 3 weeks. The brown rice protein hydrolysate (BRPH) diet group reduced weight gain 76% compared with the control. Animals fed the BRPH supplemented diet also had lower final body weight, liver weight, very low density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL-C), and liver cholesterol, and higher fecal fat and bile acid excretion than the control. Expression levels of hepatic genes for lipid oxidation, PPARα, ACOX1, and CPT1, were highest for hamsters fed the BRPH supplemented diet. Expression of CYP7A1, the gene regulating bile acid synthesis, was higher in all test groups. Expression of CYP51, a gene coding for an enzyme involved in cholesterol synthesis, was highest in the BRPH diet group. The results suggest that BRPH includes unique peptides that reduce weight gain and hepatic cholesterol synthesis.

  12. Atomic-level description of protein-lipid interactions using an accelerated membrane model.

    PubMed

    Baylon, Javier L; Vermaas, Josh V; Muller, Melanie P; Arcario, Mark J; Pogorelov, Taras V; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2016-07-01

    Peripheral membrane proteins are structurally diverse proteins that are involved in fundamental cellular processes. Their activity of these proteins is frequently modulated through their interaction with cellular membranes, and as a result techniques to study the interfacial interaction between peripheral proteins and the membrane are in high demand. Due to the fluid nature of the membrane and the reversibility of protein-membrane interactions, the experimental study of these systems remains a challenging task. Molecular dynamics simulations offer a suitable approach to study protein-lipid interactions; however, the slow dynamics of the lipids often prevents sufficient sampling of specific membrane-protein interactions in atomistic simulations. To increase lipid dynamics while preserving the atomistic detail of protein-lipid interactions, in the highly mobile membrane-mimetic (HMMM) model the membrane core is replaced by an organic solvent, while short-tailed lipids provide a nearly complete representation of natural lipids at the organic solvent/water interface. Here, we present a brief introduction and a summary of recent applications of the HMMM to study different membrane proteins, complementing the experimental characterization of the presented systems, and we offer a perspective of future applications of the HMMM to study other classes of membrane proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane proteins edited by J.C. Gumbart and Sergei Noskov.

  13. Effect of tachycardia on lipid metabolism and expression of fatty acid transporters in heart ventricles of the rat.

    PubMed

    Wojcik, B; Harasim, E; Zabielski, P; Chabowski, A; Gorski, J

    2015-10-01

    Tachycardia increases oxidation of the plasma-borne long chain fatty acids in the heart. The aim of the present study was to examine effect of tachycardia on: 1) the total level of free fatty acids, diacylglycerols, triacylglycerols and phospholipids in both heart ventricles; 2) (14)C-palmitate incorporation in the lipid fractions; 3) expression of fatty acid and glucose transporters in the ventricles. Tachycardia was induced in anesthetized rats by electrical atrial pacing at the rate of 600/min. Samples of the left (LV) and right (RV) ventricle were taken after 30 and 60 min pacing. The level free fatty acids, diacylglycerols, triacylglycerols and phospholipids was determined by means of gas-liquid chromatography and (14)C-palmitate incorporation by liquid scintillation counting, respectively. Expression of fatty acid- and glucose-transporters was determined using Western blot technique. In LV, 30min pacing increased the content of diacylglycerols whereas the content of other lipids remained stable. After 60 min of pacing the levels of the examined lipid fractions did not differ from the respective control values. In RV, the content of diacylglycerols and triacylglycerols was reduced both after 30 and 60 min pacing. Tachycardia also affected incorporation of (14)C-palmitate in lipid fractions of goth ventricles. 30 min pacing up-regulated plasmalemmal expression of FAT/CD36 (fatty acid translocase) in both ventricles and reduced its microsomal expression in LV. After 60 min pacing they did not differ from the respective control values. Plasmalemmal expression of FATP-1 (fatty acid transport protein 1) increased and its microsomal expression decreased in RV after 30 min pacing. After 60 min pacing the plasmalemmal FATP-1 expression remained elevated whereas the microsomal expression did not differ from the control value. Pacing did not affect or expression of FABPpm (plasma membrane associated fatty acid binding protein) in either plasma membranes and microsomal

  14. Fatty Acid and Lipid Profiles with Emphasis on n-3 Fatty Acids and Phospholipids from Ciona intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yadong; Wang, Miao; Lindström, Mikael E; Li, Jiebing

    2015-10-01

    In order to establish Ciona intestinalis as a new bioresource for n-3 fatty acids-rich marine lipids, the animal was fractionated into tunic and inner body tissues prior to lipid extraction. The lipids obtained were further classified into neutral lipids (NL), glycolipids (GL) and phospholipids (PL) followed by qualitative and quantitative analysis using GC-FID, GC-MS, (1)H NMR, 2D NMR, MALDI-TOF-MS and LC-ESI-MS methods. It was found that the tunic and inner body tissues contained 3.42-4.08% and 15.9-23.4% of lipids respectively. PL was the dominant lipid class (42-60%) irrespective of the anatomic fractions. From all lipid fractions and classes, the major fatty acids were 16:0, 18:1n-9, C20:1n-9, C20:5n-3 (EPA) and C22:6n-3 (DHA). The highest amounts of long chain n-3 fatty acids, mainly EPA and DHA, were located in PL from both body fractions. Cholestanol and cholesterol were the dominant sterols together with noticeable amounts of stellasterol, 22 (Z)-dehydrocholesterol and lathosterol. Several other identified and two yet unidentified sterols were observed for the first time from C. intestinalis. Different molecular species of phosphatidylcholine (34 species), sphingomyelin (2 species), phosphatidylethanolamine (2 species), phosphatidylserine (10 species), phosphatidylglycerol (9 species), ceramide (38 species) and lysophospholipid (5 species) were identified, representing the most systematic PL profiling knowledge so far for the animal. It could be concluded that C. intestinalis lipids should be a good alternative for fish oil with high contents of n-3 fatty acids. The lipids would be more bioavailable due to the presence of the fatty acids being mainly in the form of PL.

  15. Lipid Classes and Fatty Acids in Ophryotrocha cyclops, a Dorvilleid from Newfoundland Aquaculture Sites.

    PubMed

    Salvo, Flora; Dufour, Suzanne C; Hamoutene, Dounia; Parrish, Christopher C

    2015-01-01

    A new opportunistic annelid (Ophryotrocha cyclops) discovered on benthic substrates underneath finfish aquaculture sites in Newfoundland (NL) may be involved in the remediation of organic wastes. At those aquaculture sites, bacterial mats and O. cyclops often coexist and are used as indicators of organic enrichment. Little is known on the trophic strategies used by these annelids, including whether they might consume bacteria or other aquaculture-derived wastes. We studied the lipid and fatty acid composition of the annelids and their potential food sources (degraded flocculent organic matter, fresh fish pellets and bacterial mats) to investigate feeding relationships in these habitats and compared the lipid and fatty acid composition of annelids before and after starvation. Fish pellets were rich in lipids, mainly terrestrially derived C18 fatty acids (18:1ω9, 18:2ω6, 18:3ω3), while bacterial samples were mainly composed of ω7 fatty acids, and flocculent matter appeared to be a mixture of fresh and degrading fish pellets, feces and bacteria. Ophryotrocha cyclops did not appear to store excessive amounts of lipids (13%) but showed a high concentration of ω3 and ω6 fatty acids, as well as a high proportion of the main fatty acids contained in fresh fish pellets and bacterial mats. The dorvilleids and all potential food sources differed significantly in their lipid and fatty acid composition. Interestingly, while all food sources contained low proportions of 20:5ω3 and 20:2ω6, the annelids showed high concentrations of these two fatty acids, along with 20:4ω6. A starvation period of 13 days did not result in a major decrease in total lipid content; however, microscopic observations revealed that very few visible lipid droplets remained in the gut epithelium after three months of starvation. Ophryotrocha cyclops appears well adapted to extreme environments and may rely on lipid-rich organic matter for survival and dispersal in cold environments.

  16. Protein-lipid nanohybrids as emerging platforms for drug and gene delivery: Challenges and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gaber, Mohamed; Medhat, Waseem; Hany, Mark; Saher, Nourhan; Fang, Jia-You; Elzoghby, Ahmed

    2017-03-30

    Nanoparticulate drug delivery systems have been long used to deliver a vast range of drugs and bioactives owing to their ability to demonstrate novel physical, chemical, and/or biological properties. An exponential growth has spurred in research and development of these nanocarriers which led to the evolution of a great number of diverse nanosystems including liposomes, nanoemulsions, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs), micelles, dendrimers, polymeric nanoparticles (NPs), metallic NPs, and carbon nanotubes. Among them, lipid-based nanocarriers have made the largest progress whether commercially or under development. Despite this progress, these lipid-based nanocarriers suffer from several limitations that led to the development of many protein-coated lipid nanocarriers. To less extent, protein-based nanocarriers suffer from limitations that led to the fabrication of some lipid bilayer enveloping protein nanocarriers. This review discusses in-depth some limitations associated with the lipid-based or protein-based nanocarriers and the fruitful outcomes brought by protein-lipid hybridization. Also discussed are the various hybridization techniques utilized to formulate these protein-lipid nanohybrids and the mechanisms involved in the drug loading process.

  17. Fluorescence study of protein-lipid complexes with a new symmetric squarylium probe.

    PubMed

    Ioffe, Valeriya M; Gorbenko, Galyna P; Deligeorgiev, Todor; Gadjev, Nikolai; Vasilev, Aleksey

    2007-06-01

    The novel symmetric squarylium derivative SQ-1 has been synthesized and tested for its sensitivity to the formation of protein-lipid complexes. SQ-1 binding to the model membranes composed of zwitterionic lipid phosphatidylcholine (PC) and its mixtures with anionic lipid cardiolipin (CL) in different molar ratios was found to be controlled mainly by hydrophobic interactions. Lysozyme (Lz) and ribonuclease A (RNase) exerted an influence on the probe association with lipid vesicles resulting presumably from the competition between SQ-1 and the proteins for bilayer free volume and modification of its properties. The magnitude of this effect was much higher for lysozyme which may stem from the amphipathy of protein alpha-helix involved in the membrane binding. Varying membrane composition provides evidence for the dye sensitivity to both hydrophobic and electrostatic protein-lipid interactions. Fluorescence anisotropy studies uncovered the restriction of SQ-1 rotational mobility in lipid environment in the presence of Lz and RNase being indicative of the incorporation of the proteins into bilayer interior. The results of binding, fluorescence quenching and kinetic experiments suggested lysozyme-induced local lipid demixing upon protein association with negatively charged membranes with threshold concentration of CL for the lipid demixing being 10 mol%.

  18. Effects of UV radiation on the lipids and proteins of bacteria studied by mid-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Santos, Ana L; Moreirinha, Catarina; Lopes, Diana; Esteves, Ana Cristina; Henriques, Isabel; Almeida, Adelaide; Domingues, M Rosário M; Delgadillo, Ivonne; Correia, António; Cunha, Angela

    2013-06-18

    Knowledge of the molecular effects of UV radiation (UVR) on bacteria can contribute to a better understanding of the environmental consequences of enhanced UV levels associated with global climate changes and will help to optimize UV-based disinfection strategies. In the present work, the effects of exposure to UVR in different spectral regions (UVC, 100-280 nm; UVB, 280-320 nm; and UVA, 320-400 nm) on the lipids and proteins of two bacterial strains ( Acinetobacter sp. strain PT5I1.2G and Pseudomonas sp. strain NT5I1.2B) with distinct UV sensitivities were studied by mid-infrared spectroscopy. Exposure to UVR caused an increase in methyl groups associated with lipids, lipid oxidation, and also led to alterations in lipid composition, which were confirmed by gas chromatography. Additionally, mid-infrared spectroscopy revealed the effects of UVR on protein conformation and protein composition, which were confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), oxidative damage to amino acids, and changes in the propionylation, glycosylation and/or phosphorylation status of cell proteins. Differences in the targets of UVR in the two strains tested were identified and may explain their discrepant UV sensitivities. The significance of the results is discussed from an ecological standpoint and with respect to potential improvements in UV-based disinfection technologies.

  19. Lipids as cofactors in protein folding: Stereo-specific lipid–protein interactions are required to form HAMLET (human α-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells)

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Malin; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Pettersson, Jenny; Linse, Sara; Svanborg, Catharina

    2003-01-01

    Proteins can adjust their structure and function in response to shifting environments. Functional diversity is created not only by the sequence but by changes in tertiary structure. Here we present evidence that lipid cofactors may enable otherwise unstable protein folding variants to maintain their conformation and to form novel, biologically active complexes. We have identified unsaturated C18 fatty acids in the cis conformation as the cofactors that bind apo α-lactalbumin and form HAMLET (human α-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells). The complexes were formed on an ion exchange column, were stable in a molten globule-like conformation, and had attained the novel biological activity. The protein–fatty acid interaction was specific, as saturated C18 fatty acids, or unsaturated C18:1trans conformers were unable to form complexes with apo α-lactalbumin, as were fatty acids with shorter or longer carbon chains. Unsaturated cis fatty acids other than C18:1:9cis were able to form stable complexes, but these were not active in the apoptosis assay. The results demonstrate that stereo-specific lipid–protein interactions can stabilize partially unfolded conformations and form molecular complexes with novel biological activity. The results offer a new mechanism for the functional diversity of proteins, by exploiting lipids as essential, tissue-specific cofactors in this process. PMID:14627740

  20. Impact of amino acid and CP restriction from 20 to 140 kg BW on performance and dynamics in empty body protein and lipid deposition of entire male, castrated and female pigs.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Ascacibar, I; Stoll, P; Kreuzer, M; Boillat, V; Spring, P; Bee, G

    2017-03-01

    Breeding leaner pigs during the last decades may have changed pig's empty body (EB) composition, a key trait for elaborating feeding recommendations. This research aimed to provide new experimental data on changes in the chemical composition of the EB of pigs from 20 to 140 kg BW. In addition, the impact of a reduction in the dietary CP associated with lower lysine, methionine+cystine, threonine and tryptophan levels was determined. In total, 48 males, castrates and females weighing 20 kg BW were allocated either to a control grower-finisher diet formulated according to current Swiss feeding recommendations, or a low CP grower-finisher diet (80% of control). Feed intake was monitored and pigs were weighed weekly. The chemical composition of EB (blood, hairs and hoofs, offals, bile, carcass) was determined at 20, 40, 60, 80, 100, 120 and 140 kg BW on four pigs per gender and diet (eight pigs per gender at 20 kg). The five fractions were weighed and samples were analysed for dry matter, protein, fat and energy. Nutrient deposition rates and N efficiency were calculated by using the 20 kg BW category as reference. Analysis revealed an accurate feed optimisation for the aforementioned essential amino acids (EAA), whereas digestible isoleucine content in the low CP diet was at 70% of the control diet. Despite similar feed intake, daily gain and feed efficiency were impaired (P<0.01) from 20 to 100 kg BW in the low CP compared with the control pigs. In the same growth period, castrates had the greatest feed intake but, together with females, displayed the lowest (P<0.01) feed efficiency. Protein deposition was reduced (P<0.01) by up to 31% with low CP diet and was lower (P<0.01) in castrates and females than males at 100 kg BW. The greatest fat deposition rates were found with low CP diet and castrates. N efficiency improved (P<0.05) by 10% with the low CP diet from 100 to 140 kg. The males displayed the greatest (P<0.05) N efficiency. These findings suggest that the CP

  1. A novel lipid transfer protein from the dill Anethum graveolens L.: isolation, structure, heterologous expression, and functional characteristics.

    PubMed

    Melnikova, Daria N; Mineev, Konstantin S; Finkina, Ekaterina I; Arseniev, Alexander S; Ovchinnikova, Tatiana V

    2016-01-01

    A novel lipid transfer protein, designated as Ag-LTP, was isolated from aerial parts of the dill Anethum graveolens L. Structural, antimicrobial, and lipid binding properties of the protein were studied. Complete amino acid sequence of Ag-LTP was determined. The protein has molecular mass of 9524.4 Da, consists of 93 amino acid residues including eight cysteines forming four disulfide bonds. The recombinant Ag-LTP was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. NMR investigation shows that the Ag-LTP spatial structure contains four α-helices, forming the internal hydrophobic cavity, and a long C-terminal tail. The measured volume of the Ag-LTP hydrophobic cavity is equal to ~800 A(3), which is much larger than those of other plant LTP1s. Ag-LTP has weak antifungal activity and unpronounced lipid binding specificity but effectively binds plant hormone jasmonic acid. Our results afford further molecular insight into biological functions of LTP in plants.

  2. Maternal omega-3 fatty acids and micronutrients modulate fetal lipid metabolism: A review.

    PubMed

    Khaire, Amrita A; Kale, Anvita A; Joshi, Sadhana R

    2015-07-01

    It is well established that alterations in the mother's diet or metabolism during pregnancy has long-term adverse effects on the lipid metabolism in the offspring. There is growing interest in the role of specific nutrients especially omega-3 fatty acids in the pathophysiology of lipid disorders. A series of studies carried out in humans and rodents in our department have consistently suggested a link between omega-3 fatty acids especially docosahexaenoic acid and micronutrients (vitamin B12 and folic acid) in the one carbon metabolic cycle and its effect on the fatty acid metabolism, hepatic transcription factors and DNA methylation patterns. However the association of maternal intake or metabolism of these nutrients with fetal lipid metabolism is relatively less explored. In this review, we provide insights into the role of maternal omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin B12 and their influence on fetal lipid metabolism through various mechanisms which influence phosphatidylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase activity, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor, adiponectin signaling pathway and epigenetic process like chromatin methylation. This will help understand the possible mechanisms involved in fetal lipid metabolism and may provide important clues for the prevention of lipid disorders in the offspring.

  3. A repressor activator protein1 homologue from an oleaginous strain of Candida tropicalis increases storage lipid production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Atrayee; Dey, Prabuddha; Barik, Amita; Bahadur, Ranjit P; Maiti, Mrinal K

    2015-06-01

    The repressor activator protein1 (Rap1) has been studied over the years as a multifunctional regulator in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, its role in storage lipid accumulation has not been investigated. This report documents the identification and isolation of a putative transcription factor CtRap1 gene from an oleaginous strain of Candida tropicalis, and establishes the direct effect of its expression on the storage lipid accumulation in S. cerevisiae, usually a non-oleaginous yeast. In silico analysis revealed that the CtRap1 polypeptide binds relatively more strongly to the promoter of fatty acid synthase1 (FAS1) gene of S. cerevisiae than ScRap1. The expression level of CtRap1 transcript in vivo was found to correlate directly with the amount of lipid produced in oleaginous native host C. tropicalis. Heterologous expression of the CtRap1 gene resulted in ∼ 4-fold enhancement of storage lipid content (57.3%) in S. cerevisiae. We also showed that the functionally active CtRap1 upregulates the endogenous ScFAS1 and ScDGAT genes of S. cerevisiae, and this, in turn, might be responsible for the increased lipid production in the transformed yeast. Our findings pave the way for the possible utility of the CtRap1 gene in suitable microorganisms to increase their storage lipid content through transcription factor engineering.

  4. Bioconversion of volatile fatty acids derived from waste activated sludge into lipids by Cryptococcus curvatus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Liu, Jia-Nan; Yuan, Ming; Shen, Zi-Heng; Peng, Kai-Ming; Lu, Li-Jun; Huang, Xiang-Feng

    2016-07-01

    Pure volatile fatty acid (VFA) solution derived from waste activated sludge (WAS) was used to produce microbial lipids as culture medium in this study, which aimed to realize the resource recovery of WAS and provide low-cost feedstock for biodiesel production simultaneously. Cryptococcus curvatus was selected among three oleaginous yeast to produce lipids with VFAs derived from WAS. In batch cultivation, lipid contents increased from 10.2% to 16.8% when carbon to nitrogen ratio increased from about 3.5 to 165 after removal of ammonia nitrogen by struvite precipitation. The lipid content further increased to 39.6% and the biomass increased from 1.56g/L to 4.53g/L after cultivation for five cycles using sequencing batch culture (SBC) strategy. The lipids produced from WAS-derived VFA solution contained nearly 50% of monounsaturated fatty acids, including palmitic acid, heptadecanoic acid, ginkgolic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, and linoleic acid, which showed the adequacy of biodiesel production.

  5. Identification of furan fatty acids in the lipids of common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.).

    PubMed

    Chvalová, Daniela; Špička, Jiří

    2016-06-01

    Fatty acid (FA) composition was analyzed in muscle and gonad tissues of marketed common carp (Cyprinus carpio). The extracted lipids were separated into four fractions: polar lipids (PL), diacylglycerols, free fatty acids and triacylglycerols (TAG) using thin layer chromatography. FA content within the lipid fractions was determined by gas chromatography with flame ionization detector (GC/FID). The muscle lipids consisted primarily of TAG (96.9% of total FA), while PL were the major component of both male (67.6%) and female gonad (58.6%) lipids. Polyunsaturated fatty acids predominated in PL of all tissues (52.2-55.8% of total FA); monounsaturated fatty acids were the most abundant FA group in TAG of muscle (51.8%) and female gonads (47.8%) whereas high proportion of furan fatty acids (F-acids) (38.2%) was detected in TAG of male gonads. Eight F-acids were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) in male gonad samples, including less common 12,15-epoxy-13,14-dimethylnonadeca-12,14-dienoic acid with even-numbered alkyl moiety.

  6. Lipid and fatty acid composition of Gluconobacter oxydans before and after intracytoplasmic membrane formation.

    PubMed Central

    Heefner, D L; Claus, G W

    1978-01-01

    Gluconobacter oxydans differentiates by forming quantities of intracytoplasmic membranes at the end of exponential growth, and this formation occurs concurrently with a 60% increase in cellular lipid. The present study was initiated to determine whether this newly synthesized lipid differed from that extracted before intracytoplasmic membrane synthesis. Undifferentiated exponential-phase cells were found to contain 30% phosphatidylcholine, 27.1% caridolipin, 25% phosphatidylethanolamine, 12.5% phosphatidylglycerol, 0.4% phosphatidic acid, 0.2% phosphatidylserine, and four additional unidentified lipids totaling less than 5%. The only change detected after formation of intracytoplasmic membranes was a slight decrease in phosphatidylethanolamine and a corresponding increase in phosphatidylcholine. An examination of lipid hydrolysates revealed 11 different fatty acids in the lipids from each cell type. Hexadecanoic acid and monounsaturated octadecenoic accounted for more than 75% of the total fatty acids for both cell types. Proportional changes were noted in all fatty acids except octadecenoate. Anteiso-pentadecanoate comprised less than 1% of the fatty acids from undifferentiated cells but more than 13% of the total fatty acids from cells containing intracytoplasmic membranes. These results suggest that anteiso-pentadecanoate formation closely parallels the formation of intracytoplasmic membranes. Increased concentrations of this fatty acid may contribute to the fluidity necessary for plasma membrane convolution during intracytoplasmic membrane development. PMID:649571

  7. Role of polysaccharide and lipid in lipopolysaccharide induced prion protein conversion

    PubMed Central

    LeVatte, Marcia; Wishart, David S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Conversion of native cellular prion protein (PrPc) from an α-helical structure to a toxic and infectious β-sheet structure (PrPSc) is a critical step in the development of prion disease. There are some indications that the formation of PrPSc is preceded by a β-sheet rich PrP (PrPβ) form which is non-infectious, but is an intermediate in the formation of infectious PrPSc. Furthermore the presence of lipid cofactors is thought to be critical in the formation of both intermediate-PrPβ and lethal, infectious PrPSc. We previously discovered that the endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), interacts with recombinant PrPc and induces rapid conformational change to a β-sheet rich structure. This LPS induced PrPβ structure exhibits PrPSc-like features including proteinase K (PK) resistance and the capacity to form large oligomers and rod-like fibrils. LPS is a large, complex molecule with lipid, polysaccharide, 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate (Kdo) and glucosamine components. To learn more about which LPS chemical constituents are critical for binding PrPc and inducing β-sheet conversion we systematically investigated which chemical components of LPS either bind or induce PrP conversion to PrPβ. We analyzed this PrP conversion using resolution enhanced native acidic gel electrophoresis (RENAGE), tryptophan fluorescence, circular dichroism, electron microscopy and PK resistance. Our results indicate that a minimal version of LPS (called detoxified and partially de-acylated LPS or dLPS) containing a portion of the polysaccharide and a portion of the lipid component is sufficient for PrP conversion. Lipid components, alone, and saccharide components, alone, are insufficient for conversion. PMID:27906600

  8. Membrane proteins bind lipids selectively to modulate their structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Timothy M.; Ulmschneider, Martin B.; Degiacomi, Matteo T.; Baldwin, Andrew J.; Robinson, Carol V.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have established that the folding, structure and function of membrane proteins are influenced by their lipid environments1-7 and that lipids can bind to specific sites, for example in potassium channels8. Fundamental questions remain however regarding the extent of membrane protein selectivity toward lipids. Here we report a mass spectrometry (MS) approach designed to determine the selectivity of lipid binding to membrane protein complexes. We investigate the mechanosensitive channel of large conductance (MscL), aquaporin Z (AqpZ), and the ammonia channel (AmtB) using ion mobility MS (IM-MS), which reports gas-phase collision cross sections. We demonstrate that folded conformations of membrane protein complexes can exist in the gas-phase. By resolving lipid-bound states we then rank bound lipids based on their ability to resist gas phase unfolding and thereby stabilize membrane protein structure. Results show that lipids bind non-selectively and with high avidity to MscL, all imparting comparable stability, the highest-ranking lipid however is phosphatidylinositol phosphate, in line with its proposed functional role in mechanosensation9. AqpZ is also stabilized by many lipids with cardiolipin imparting the most significant resistance to unfolding. Subsequently, through functional assays, we discover that cardiolipin modulates AqpZ function. Analogous experiments identify AmtB as being highly selective for phosphatidylglycerol prompting us to obtain an X-ray structure in this lipid membrane-like environment. The 2.3Å resolution structure, when compared with others obtained without lipid bound, reveals distinct conformational changes that reposition AmtB residues to interact with the lipid bilayer. Overall our results demonstrate that resistance to unfolding correlates with specific lipid-binding events enabling distinction of lipids that merely bind from those that modulate membrane protein structure and/or function. We anticipate that these

  9. Host humoral immune response to Leishmania lipid-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Maache, M; Azzouz, S; Diaz de la Guardia, R; Alvarez, P; Gil, R; de Pablos, L M; Osuna, A

    2005-06-01

    SUMMARY We report on the use of Leishmania donovani lipid-binding proteins (LBPs) as antigens capable of being recognized by serum from immunocompetent patients from southern Spain suffering from visceral leishmaniasis and from Peruvian patients with localized cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania braziliensis. The absorbance found by immunoenzymatic techniques gave significantly different results for the serum samples from patients with and without leishmaniasis. Specificity by ELISA testing was 93.2% and sensibility 100%. Dot blots from human patient serum samples or naturally infected dogs from Spain gave similarly significant results. All the human serum samples from individuals with visceral leishmaniasis and the Leishmania-positive canine samples recognized two bands, with molecular weights of 8 and 57 kDa. The serum from individuals with cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by L. braziliensis recognized an additional band of 16 kDa. We discuss the role of Leishmania FABP and compare the immunological reactions found with serum samples from other protozoan infections such as toxoplasma and Chagas as well as bacterial infections such as tuberculosis and syphilis.

  10. HAMLET - A protein-lipid complex with broad tumoricidal activity.

    PubMed

    Ho, James C S; Nadeem, Aftab; Svanborg, Catharina

    2017-01-15

    HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) is a tumoricidal protein-lipid complex with broad effects against cancer cells of different origin. The therapeutic potential is emphasized by a high degree of specificity for tumor tissue. Here we review early studies of HAMLET, in collaboration with the Orrenius laboratory, and some key features of the subsequent development of the HAMLET project. The early studies focused on the apoptotic response that accompanies death in HAMLET treated tumor cells and the role of mitochondria in this process. In subsequent studies, we have identified a sequence of interactions that starts with the membrane integration of HAMLET and the activation of ion fluxes followed by HAMLET internalization, progressive inhibition of MAPK kinases and GTPases and sorting of HAMLET to different cellular compartments, including the nuclei. Therapeutic efficacy of HAMLET has been demonstrated in animal models of glioblastoma, bladder cancer and intestinal cancer. In clinical studies, HAMLET has been shown to target skin papillomas and bladder cancers. The findings identify HAMLET as a new drug candidate with promising selectivity for cancer cells and a strong therapeutic potential.

  11. Enterocyte Fatty Acid Binding Proteins (FABPs): Different Functions of Liver- and Intestinal- FABPs in the Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Gajda, Angela M.; Storch, Judith

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Fatty acid binding proteins (FABP) are highly abundant cytosolic proteins that are expressed in most mammalian tissues. In the intestinal enterocyte, both Liver- (LFABP; FABP1) and Intestinal-fatty acid binding proteins (IFABP; FABP2) are expressed. These proteins display high affinity binding for long chain fatty acids (FA) and other hydrophobic ligands, thus they are believed to be involved with uptake and trafficking of lipids in the intestine. In vitro studies have identified differences in ligand binding stoichiometry and specificity, and in mechanisms of FA transfer to membranes, and it has been hypothesized that LFABP and IFABP have difference functions in the enterocyte. Studies directly comparing LFABP- and IFABP-null mice have revealed markedly different phenotypes, indicating that these proteins indeed have different functions in intestinal lipid metabolism and whole body energy homeostasis. In this review, we discuss the evolving knowledge of the functions of LFABP and IFABP in the intestinal enterocyte. PMID:25458898

  12. Yeast fermentation of carboxylic acids obtained from pyrolytic aqueous phases for lipid production.

    PubMed

    Lian, Jieni; Garcia-Perez, Manuel; Coates, Ralph; Wu, Hongwei; Chen, Shulin

    2012-08-01

    The presence of very reactive C1-C4 molecules adversely affects the quality bio-oils produced from the pyrolysis of lignocellulosic materials. In this paper a scheme to produce lipids with Cryptococcus curvatus from the carboxylic acids in the pyrolytic aqueous phase collected in fractional condensers is proposed. The capacities of three oleaginous yeasts C. curvatus, Rhodotorula glutinis, Lipomyces starkeyi to ferment acetate, formate, hydroxylacat-aldehyde, phenol and acetol were investigated. While acetate could be a good carbon source for lipid production, formate provides additional energy and contributes to yeast growth and lipid production as auxiliary energy resource. Acetol could slightly support yeast growth, but it inhibits lipid accumulation. Hydroxyacetaldehyde and phenols showed high yeast growth and lipid accumulation inhibition. A pyrolytic aqueous phase with 20 g/L acetate was fermented with C. curvatus, after neutralization and detoxification to produce 6.9 g/L dry biomass and 2.2 g/L lipid.

  13. Hydroxycarboxylic acid receptors are essential for breast cancer cells to control their lipid/fatty acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Stäubert, Claudia; Broom, Oliver Jay; Nordström, Anders

    2015-08-14

    Cancer cells exhibit characteristic changes in their metabolism with efforts being made to address them therapeutically. However, targeting metabolic enzymes as such is a major challenge due to their essentiality for normal proliferating cells. The most successful pharmaceutical targets are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), with more than 40% of all currently available drugs acting through them.We show that, a family of metabolite-sensing GPCRs, the Hydroxycarboxylic acid receptor family (HCAs), is crucial for breast cancer cells to control their metabolism and proliferation.We found HCA1 and HCA3 mRNA expression were significantly increased in breast cancer patient samples and detectable in primary human breast cancer patient cells. Furthermore, siRNA mediated knock-down of HCA3 induced considerable breast cancer cell death as did knock-down of HCA1, although to a lesser extent. Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry based analyses of breast cancer cell medium revealed a role for HCA3 in controlling intracellular lipid/fatty acid metabolism. The presence of etomoxir or perhexiline, both inhibitors of fatty acid β-oxidation rescues breast cancer cells with knocked-down HCA3 from cell death.Our data encourages the development of drugs acting on cancer-specific metabolite-sensing GPCRs as novel anti-proliferative agents for cancer therapy.

  14. Rice protein improves adiposity, body weight and reduces lipids level in rats through modification of triglyceride metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To elucidate whether rice protein can possess a vital function in improving lipids level and adiposity, the effects of rice proteins extracted by alkaline (RP-A) and α-amylase (RP-E) on triglyceride metabolism were investigated in 7-week-old male Wistar rats fed cholesterol-enriched diets for 2 weeks, as compared with casein (CAS). Results Compared with CAS, plasma concentrations of glucose and lipids were significantly reduced by RP-feeding (P < 0.05), as well as hepatic accumulation of lipids (P < 0.05). RP-A and RP-E significantly depressed the hepatic activities of fatty acid synthase (FAS), glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) (P < 0.05), whereas the activities of lipoprotein lipase (PL) and hepatic lipase (HL) were significantly stimulated (P < 0.05), as compared to CAS. Neither lipids level nor activities of enzymes were different between RP-A and RP-E (P > 0.05). There was a significant positive correlation between protein digestibility and deposit fat (r = 0.8567, P < 0.05), as well as the plasma TG concentration (r = 0.8627, P < 0.05). Conclusions The present study demonstrates that rice protein can modify triglyceride metabolism, leading to an improvement of body weight and adiposity. Results suggest that the triglyceride-lowering action as well as the potential of anti-adiposity induced by rice protein is attributed to upregulation of lipolysis and downregulation of lipogenesis, and the lower digestibility of rice protein may be the main modulator responsible for the lipid-lowering action. PMID:22330327

  15. Fluorescence labeling of carbonylated lipids and proteins in cells using coumarin-hydrazide.

    PubMed

    Vemula, Venukumar; Ni, Zhixu; Fedorova, Maria

    2015-08-01

    Carbonylation is a generic term which refers to reactive carbonyl groups present in biomolecules due to oxidative reactions induced by reactive oxygen species. Carbonylated proteins, lipids and nucleic acids have been intensively studied and often associated with onset or progression of oxidative stress related disorders. In order to reveal underlying carbonylation pathways and biological relevance, it is crucial to study their intracellular formation and spatial distribution. Carbonylated species are usually identified and quantified in cell lysates and body fluids after derivatization using specific chemical probes. However, spatial cellular and tissue distribution have been less often investigated. Here, we report coumarin-hydrazide, a fluorescent chemical probe for time- and cost-efficient labeling of cellular carbonyls followed by fluorescence microscopy to evaluate their intracellular formation both in time and space. The specificity of coumarin-hydrazide was confirmed in time- and dose-dependent experiments using human primary fibroblasts stressed with paraquat and compared with conventional DNPH-based immunocytochemistry. Both techniques stained carbonylated species accumulated in cytoplasm with strong perinuclear clustering. Using a complimentary array of analytical methods specificity of coumarin-hydrazide probe towards both protein- and lipid-bound carbonyls has been shown. Additionally, co-distribution of carbonylated species and oxidized phospholipids was demonstrated.

  16. Dietary conjugated linoleic acid isomers change the unsaturation degree of hepatic fatty acids in neutral lipids but not in polar lipids.

    PubMed

    Martins, Susana V; Lopes, Paula A; Alves, Susana P; Alfaia, Cristina M; Nascimento, Mafalda; Castro, Matilde F; Bessa, Rui J B; Prates, José António Mestre

    2011-03-01

    The fatty acid composition of phospholipids plays a key role in the structural and functional properties of cellular membrane. In this study, it was hypothesized that conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomer supplementation changes the unsaturation degree of the fatty acids of neutral lipids (NLs) but not those of polar lipids (PLs). Thus, the main goal was to determine the pattern of fatty acid incorporation into hepatic PL and NL fractions. Wistar male rats were fed cis(c)9,trans(t)11 and t10,c12 CLA isomers, separately or as a mixture. Whereas the t10,c12 isomer incorporation in the PL fraction was similar when supplemented either individually or as a mixture, the c9,t11 isomer reached the highest values of incorporation when combined with t10,c12. In the PL fraction, the linoleic acid did not change; but the arachidonic acid decreased, especially in the rats given the mixture. Also in this fraction, the t10,c12 isomer, either separately or as a mixture, decreased the amounts of n-6 long-chain (LC) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and increased those of the n-3 LC PUFA relative to the control. In the NL fraction, linoleic acid incorporation followed the diet composition, whereas the arachidonic acid was similar among treatments. Facing CLA isomer supplementation, the present study suggests that fatty acid incorporation into phospholipids, through the balance between n-6 and n-3 LC PUFA, is dependent upon maintaining the unsaturation degree of cellular membrane.

  17. Amyloid beta-protein and lipid rafts: focused on biogenesis and catabolism.

    PubMed

    Araki, Wataru; Tamaoka, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral accumulation of amyloid β-protein (Aβ) is thought to play a key role in the molecular pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Three secretases (β-, γ-, and α-secretase) are proteases that control the production of Aβ from amyloid precursor protein. Increasing evidence suggests that cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains termed 'lipid rafts' are involved in the biogenesis and accumulation of Aβ as well as Aβ-mediated neurotoxicity. γ-Secretase is enriched in lipid rafts, which are considered an important site for Aβ generation. Additionally, Aβ-degrading peptidases located in lipid rafts, such as neprilysin, appear to play a role in Aβ catabolism. This mini-review focuses on the roles of lipid rafts in the biogenesis and catabolism of Aβ, covering recent research on the relationship between lipid rafts and the three secretases or Aβ-degrading peptidases. Furthermore, the significance of lipid rafts in Aβ aggregation and neurotoxicity is briefly summarized.

  18. Genetically programmed expression of proteins containing the unnatural amino acid phenylselenocysteine

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jiangyun; Schultz, Peter G.

    2010-09-07

    The invention relates to orthogonal pairs of tRNAs and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases that can incorporate the unnatural amino acid phenylselenocysteine into proteins produced in eubacterial host cells such as E. coli. The invention provides, for example but not limited to, novel orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, polynucleotides encoding the novel synthetase molecules, methods for identifying and making the novel synthetases, methods for producing proteins containing the unnatural amino acid phenylselenocysteine and translation systems. The invention further provides methods for producing modified proteins (e.g., lipidated proteins) through targeted modification of the phenylselenocysteine residue in a protein.

  19. Genetically programmed expression of proteins containing the unnatural amino acid phenylselenocysteine

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jiangyun; Schultz, Peter G.

    2012-07-10

    The invention relates to orthogonal pairs of tRNAs and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases that can incorporate the unnatural amino acid phenylselenocysteine into proteins produced in eubacterial host cells such as E. coli. The invention provides, for example but not limited to, novel orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, polynucleotides encoding the novel synthetase molecules, methods for identifying and making the novel synthetases, methods for producing proteins containing the unnatural amino acid phenylselenocysteine and translation systems. The invention further provides methods for producing modified proteins (e.g., lipidated proteins) through targeted modification of the phenylselenocysteine residue in a protein.

  20. Helix-helix interactions in membrane domains of bitopic proteins: Specificity and role of lipid environment.

    PubMed

    Bocharov, Eduard V; Mineev, Konstantin S; Pavlov, Konstantin V; Akimov, Sergey A; Kuznetsov, Andrey S; Efremov, Roman G; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2017-04-01

    Interaction between transmembrane helices often determines biological activity of membrane proteins. Bitopic proteins, a broad subclass of membrane proteins, form dimers containing two membrane-spanning helices. Some aspects of their structure-function relationship cannot be fully understood without considering the protein-lipid interaction, which can determine the protein conformational ensemble. Experimental and computer modeling data concerning transmembrane parts of bitopic proteins are reviewed in the present paper. They highlight the importance of lipid-protein interactions and resolve certain paradoxes in the behavior of such proteins. Besides, some properties of membrane organization provided a clue to understanding of allosteric interactions between distant parts of proteins. Interactions of these kinds appear to underlie a signaling mechanism, which could be widely employed in the functioning of many membrane proteins. Treatment of membrane proteins as parts of integrated fine-tuned proteolipid system promises new insights into biological function mechanisms and approaches to drug design. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid order/lipid defects and lipid-control of protein activity edited by Dirk Schneider.

  1. Parenteral lipid fatty acid composition directly determines the fatty acid composition of red blood cell and brain lipids in preterm pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies in enterally-fed infants have shown a positive effect of n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LCPUFA) supplementatin on neurodevelopment. The effect of n-3 LCPUFA in fish oil-based parenteral (PN) lipid emulsions on neuronal tissues of PN-fed preterm infants is unknown. The objective ...

  2. Oleic acid stimulates complete oxidation of fatty acids through protein kinase A-dependent activation of SIRT1-PGC1α complex.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ji-Hong; Gerhart-Hines, Zachary; Dominy, John E; Lee, Yoonjin; Kim, Sungjin; Tabata, Mitsuhisa; Xiang, Yang K; Puigserver, Pere

    2013-03-08

    Fatty acids are essential components of the dynamic lipid metabolism in cells. Fatty acids can also signal to intracellular pathways to trigger a broad range of cellular responses. Oleic acid is an abundant monounsaturated omega-9 fatty acid that impinges on different biological processes, but the mechanisms of action are not completely understood. Here, we report that oleic acid stimulates the cAMP/protein kinase A pathway and activates the SIRT1-PGC1α transcriptional complex to modulate rates of fatty acid oxidation. In skeletal muscle cells, oleic acid treatment increased intracellular levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) that turned on protein kinase A activity. This resulted in SIRT1 phosphorylation at Ser-434 and elevation of its catalytic deacetylase activity. A direct SIRT1 substrate is the transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1-α (PGC1α), which became deacetylated and hyperactive after oleic acid treatment. Importantly, oleic acid, but not other long chain fatty acids such as palmitate, increased the expression of genes linked to fatty acid oxidation pathway in a SIRT1-PGC1α-dependent mechanism. As a result, oleic acid potently accelerated rates of complete fatty acid oxidation in skeletal muscle cells. These results illustrate how a single long chain fatty acid specifically controls lipid oxidation through a signaling/transcriptional pathway. Pharmacological manipulation of this lipid signaling pathway might provide therapeutic possibilities to treat metabolic diseases associated with lipid dysregulation.

  3. Alterations of the lipid content and fatty acid profile of Chlorella protothecoides under different light intensities.

    PubMed

    Krzemińska, Izabela; Piasecka, Agata; Nosalewicz, Artur; Simionato, Diana; Wawrzykowski, Jacek

    2015-11-01

    Chlorella protothecoides is a valuable source of lipids that may be used for biodiesel production. The present work shows analysis of the potential of photoheterotrophic cultivation of C. protothecoides under various light intensities aiming to identify the conditions with maximal biomass and lipid content. An increase in light intensity was associated with an increased specific growth rate and a shortened doubling time. Also, the relative total lipid content increased from 24.8% to 37.5% with increase of light intensity. The composition of fatty acid methyl esters was affected by light intensity with the C16-18 fatty acids increased from 76.97% to 90.24% of total fatty acids. However, the content of linolenic acids decreased with the increase of the culture irradiance. These studies indicate that cultures irradiated with high light intensities achieve the minimal specifications for biodiesel quality on linolenic acids and thus are suitable for biodiesel production.

  4. ω-Alkynyl lipid surrogates for polyunsaturated fatty acids: free radical and enzymatic oxidations.

    PubMed

    Beavers, William N; Serwa, Remigiusz; Shimozu, Yuki; Tallman, Keri A; Vaught, Melissa; Dalvie, Esha D; Marnett, Lawrence J; Porter, Ned A

    2014-08-13

    Lipid and lipid metabolite profiling are important parameters in understanding the pathogenesis of many diseases. Alkynylated polyunsaturated fatty acids are potentially useful probes for tracking the fate of fatty acid metabolites. The nonenzymatic and enzymatic oxidations of ω-alkynyl linoleic acid and ω-alkynyl arachidonic acid were compared to that of linoleic and arachidonic acid. There was no detectable difference in the primary products of nonenzymatic oxidation, which comprised cis,trans-hydroxy fatty acids. Similar hydroxy fatty acid products were formed when ω-alkynyl linoleic acid and ω-alkynyl arachidonic acid were reacted with lipoxygenase enzymes that introduce oxygen at different positions in the carbon chains. The rates of oxidation of ω-alkynylated fatty acids were reduced compared to those of the natural fatty acids. Cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 did not oxidize alkynyl linoleic but efficiently oxidized alkynyl arachidonic acid. The products were identified as alkynyl 11-hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acid, alkynyl 11-hydroxy-8,9-epoxy-eicosatrienoic acid, and alkynyl prostaglandins. This deviation from the metabolic profile of arachidonic acid may limit the utility of alkynyl arachidonic acid in the tracking of cyclooxygenase-based lipid oxidation. The formation of alkynyl 11-hydroxy-8,9-epoxy-eicosatrienoic acid compared to alkynyl prostaglandins suggests that the ω-alkyne group causes a conformational change in the fatty acid bound to the enzyme, which reduces the efficiency of cyclization of dioxalanyl intermediates to endoperoxide intermediates. Overall, ω-alkynyl linoleic acid and ω-alkynyl arachidonic acid appear to be metabolically competent surrogates for tracking the fate of polyunsaturated fatty acids when looking at models involving autoxidation and oxidation by lipoxygenases.

  5. SLC27 fatty acid transport proteins.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Courtney M; Stahl, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The uptake and metabolism of long chain fatty acids (LCFA) are critical to many physiological and cellular processes. Aberrant accumulation or depletion of LCFA underlie the pathology of numerous metabolic diseases. Protein-mediated transport of LCFA has been proposed as the major mode of LCFA uptake and activation. Several proteins have been identified to be involved in LCFA uptake. This review focuses on the SLC27 family of fatty acid transport proteins, also known as FATPs, with an emphasis on the gain- and loss-of-function animal models that elucidate the functions of FATPs in vivo and how these transport proteins play a role in physiological and pathological situations.

  6. Proteomic study and marker protein identification of Caenorhabditis elegans lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Na, Huimin; Liu, Zhenglong; Zhang, Shuyan; Xue, Peng; Chen, Yong; Pu, Jing; Peng, Gong; Huang, Xun; Yang, Fuquan; Xie, Zhensheng; Xu, Tao; Xu, Pingyong; Ou, Guangshuo; Zhang, Shaobing O; Liu, Pingsheng

    2012-08-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are a neutral lipid storage organelle that is conserved across almost all species. Many metabolic syndromes are directly linked to the over-storage of neutral lipids in LDs. The study of LDs in Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) has been difficult because of the lack of specific LD marker proteins. Here we report the purification and proteomic analysis of C. elegans lipid droplets for the first time. We identified 306 proteins, 63% of these proteins were previously known to be LD-proteins, suggesting a similarity between mammalian and C. elegans LDs. Using morphological and biochemical analyses, we show that short-chain dehydrogenase, DHS-3 is almost exclusively localized on C. elegans LDs, indicating that it can be used as a LD marker protein in C. elegans. These results will facilitate further mechanistic studies of LDs in this powerful genetic system, C. elegans.

  7. Proteomic Study and Marker Protein Identification of Caenorhabditis elegans Lipid Droplets*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Na, Huimin; Liu, Zhenglong; Zhang, Shuyan; Xue, Peng; Chen, Yong; Pu, Jing; Peng, Gong; Huang, Xun; Yang, Fuquan; Xie, Zhensheng; Xu, Tao; Xu, Pingyong; Ou, Guangshuo; Zhang, Shaobing O.; Liu, Pingsheng

    2012-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are a neutral lipid storage organelle that is conserved across almost all species. Many metabolic syndromes are directly linked to the over-storage of neutral lipids in LDs. The study of LDs in Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) has been difficult because of the lack of specific LD marker proteins. Here we report the purification and proteomic analysis of C. elegans lipid droplets for the first time. We identified 306 proteins, 63% of these proteins were previously known to be LD-proteins, suggesting a similarity between mammalian and C. elegans LDs. Using morphological and biochemical analyses, we show that short-chain dehydrogenase, DHS-3 is almost exclusively localized on C. elegans LDs, indicating that it can be used as a LD marker protein in C. elegans. These results will facilitate further mechanistic studies of LDs in this powerful genetic system, C. elegans. PMID:22493183

  8. More Than a Pore: The Interplay of Pore-Forming Proteins and Lipid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Ros, Uris; García-Sáez, Ana J

    2015-06-01

    Pore-forming proteins (PFPs) punch holes in their target cell membrane to alter their permeability. Permeabilization of lipid membranes by PFPs has received special attention to study the basic molecular mechanisms of protein insertion into membranes and the development of biotechnological tools. PFPs act through a general multi-step mechanism that involves (i) membrane partitioning, (ii) insertion into the hydrophobic core of the bilayer, (iii) oligomerization, and (iv) pore formation. Interestingly, PFPs and membranes show a dynamic interplay. As PFPs are usually produced as soluble proteins, they require a large conformational change for membrane insertion. Moreover, membrane structure is modified upon PFPs insertion. In this context, the toroidal pore model has been proposed to describe a pore architecture in which not only protein molecules but also lipids are directly involved in the structure. Here, we discuss how PFPs and lipids cooperate and remodel each other to achieve pore formation, and explore new evidences of protein-lipid pore structures.

  9. FAX1, a Novel Membrane Protein Mediating Plastid Fatty Acid Export

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nannan; Gügel, Irene Luise; Giavalisco, Patrick; Zeisler, Viktoria; Schreiber, Lukas; Soll, Jürgen; Philippar, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid synthesis in plants occurs in plastids, and thus, export for subsequent acyl editing and lipid assembly in the cytosol and endoplasmatic reticulum is required. Yet, the transport mechanism for plastid fatty acids still remains enigmatic. We isolated FAX1 (fatty acid export 1), a novel protein, which inserts into the chloroplast inner envelope by α-helical membrane-spanning domains. Detailed phenotypic and ultrastructural analyses of FAX1 mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana showed that FAX1 function is crucial for biomass production, male fertility and synthesis of fatty acid-derived compounds such as lipids, ketone waxes, or pollen cell wall material. Determination of lipid, fatty acid, and wax contents by mass spectrometry revealed that endoplasmatic reticulum (ER)-derived lipids decreased when FAX1 was missing, but levels of several plastid-produced species increased. FAX1 over-expressing lines showed the opposite behavior, including a pronounced increase of triacyglycerol oils in flowers and leaves. Furthermore, the cuticular layer of stems from fax1 knockout lines was specifically reduced in C29 ketone wax compounds. Differential gene expression in FAX1 mutants as determined by DNA microarray analysis confirmed phenotypes and metabolic imbalances. Since in yeast FAX1 could complement for fatty acid transport, we concluded that FAX1 mediates fatty acid export from plastids. In vertebrates, FAX1 relatives are structurally related, mitochondrial membrane proteins of so-far unknown function. Therefore, this protein family might represent a powerful tool not only to increase lipid/biofuel production in plants but also to explore novel transport systems involved in vertebrate fatty acid and lipid metabolism. PMID:25646734

  10. Protein aggregation in food models: effect of. gamma. -irradiation and lipid oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Delincee, H.; Paul, P.

    1981-09-01

    Myoglobin and serum albumin have been irradiated in aqueous solution in the presence of varying amounts of carbohydrates and lipids, and the yield of protein aggregates has been determined by gel filtration. With myoglobin the formation of aggregates evolving from the reaction with oxidizing lipids was observed, which was not found for serum albumin. The production of protein-lipid complexes, in which lipid material was occluded in the high-molecular aggregates by physical forces was demonstrated. Gel filtration and gel electrophoresis, both in the presence of SDS, and thin-layer isoelectric focusing revealed distinct structural differenes between the protein aggregates induced by irradiation and the aggregates formed by interaction with oxidizing lipids.

  11. Apoptosis inhibitor of macrophage (AIM) diminishes lipid droplet-coating proteins leading to lipolysis in adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Iwamura, Yoshihiro; Mori, Mayumi; Nakashima, Katsuhiko; Mikami, Toshiyuki; Murayama, Katsuhisa; Arai, Satoko; Miyazaki, Toru

    2012-06-08

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AIM induces lipolysis in a distinct manner from that of hormone-dependent lipolysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AIM ablates activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor in adipocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AIM reduces mRNA levels of lipid-droplet coating proteins leading to lipolysis. -- Abstract: Under fasting conditions, triacylglycerol in adipose tissue undergoes lipolysis to supply fatty acids as energy substrates. Such lipolysis is regulated by hormones, which activate lipases via stimulation of specific signalling cascades. We previously showed that macrophage-derived soluble protein, AIM induces obesity-associated lipolysis, triggering chronic inflammation in fat tissue which causes insulin resistance. However, the mechanism of how AIM mediates lipolysis remains unknown. Here we show that AIM induces lipolysis in a manner distinct from that of hormone-dependent lipolysis, without activation or augmentation of lipases. In vivo and in vitro, AIM did not enhance phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) in adipocytes, a hallmark of hormone-dependent lipolysis activation. Similarly, adipose tissue from obese AIM-deficient and wild-type mice showed comparable HSL phosphorylation. Consistent with the suppressive effect of AIM on fatty acid synthase activity, the amount of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids was reduced in adipocytes treated with AIM. This response ablated transcriptional activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR{gamma}), leading to diminished gene expression of lipid-droplet coating proteins including fat-specific protein 27 (FSP27) and Perilipin, which are indispensable for triacylglycerol storage in adipocytes. Accordingly, the lipolytic effect of AIM was overcome by a PPAR{gamma}-agonist or forced expression of FSP27, while it was synergized by a PPAR{gamma}-antagonist. Overall, distinct modes of lipolysis appear to take place in different physiological

  12. Self-assembling complexes between binary mixtures of lipids with different linkers and nucleic acids promote universal mRNA, DNA and siRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Colombani, Thibault; Peuziat, Pauline; Dallet, Laurence; Haudebourg, Thomas; Mével, Mathieu; Berchel, Mathieu; Lambert, Olivier; Habrant, Damien; Pitard, Bruno

    2017-03-10

    Protein expression and RNA interference require efficient delivery of DNA or mRNA and small double stranded RNA into cells, respectively. Although cationic lipids are the most commonly used synthetic delivery vectors, a clear need still exists for a better delivery of various types of nucleic acids molecules to improve their biological activity. To optimize the transfection efficiency, a molecular approach consisting in modifying the chemical structure of a given cationic lipid is usually performed, but an alternative strategy could rely on modulating the supramolecular assembly of lipidic lamellar phases sandwiching the nucleic acids molecules. To validate this new concept, we synthesized on one hand two paromomycin-based cationic lipids, with either an amide or a phosphoramide linker, and on the other hand two imidazole-based neutral lipids, having as well either an amide or a phosphoramide function as linker. Combinations of cationic and helper lipids containing the same amide or phosphoramide linkers led to the formation of homogeneous lamellar phases, while hybrid lamellar phases were obtained when the linkers on the cationic and helper lipids were different. Cryo-transmission electron microscopy and fluorescence experiments showed that liposomes/nucleic acids complexes resulting from the association of nucleic acids with hybrid lamellar phases led to complexes that were more stable in the extracellular compartment compared to those obtained with homogeneous systems. In addition, we observed that the most active supramolecular assemblies for the delivery of DNA, mRNA and siRNA were obtained when the cationic and helper lipids possess linkers of different natures. The results clearly show that this supramolecular strategy modulating the property of the lipidic lamellar phase constitutes a new approach for increasing the delivery of various types of nucleic acid molecules.

  13. The N-terminal region of acyl-CoA synthetase 3 is essential for both the localization on lipid droplets and the function in fatty acid uptake.

    PubMed

    Poppelreuther, Margarete; Rudolph, Berenice; Du, Chen; Großmann, Regina; Becker, Melanie; Thiele, Christoph; Ehehalt, Robert; Füllekrug, Joachim

    2012-05-01

    Cytosolic lipid droplets (LDs) are storage organelles for neutral lipids derived from endogenous metabolism. Acyl-CoA synthetase family proteins are essential enzymes in this biosynthetic pathway, contributing activated fatty acids. Fluorescence microscopy showed that ACSL3 is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and LDs, with the distribution dependent on the cell type and the supply of fatty acids. The N-terminus of ACSL3 was necessary and sufficient for targeting reporter proteins correctly, as demonstrated by subcellular fractionation and confocal microscopy. The N-terminal region of ACSL3 was also found to be functionally required for the enzyme activity. Selective permeabilization and in silico analysis suggest that ACSL3 assumes a hairpin membrane topology, with the N-terminal hydrophobic amino acids forming an amphipathic helix restricted to the cytosolic leaflet of the ER membrane. ACSL3 was effectively translocated from the ER to nascent LDs when neutral lipid synthesis was stimulated by the external addition of fatty acids. Cellular fatty acid uptake was increased by overexpression and reduced by RNA interference of ACSL3. In conclusion, the structural organization of ACSL3 allows the fast and efficient movement from the ER to emerging LDs. ACSL3 not only esterifies fatty acids with CoA but is also involved in the cellular uptake of fatty acids, presumably indirectly by metabolic trapping. The unique localization of the acyl-CoA synthetase ACSL3 on LDs suggests a function in the local synthesis of lipids.

  14. Total and lipid-bound serum sialic acid in benign and malignant breast disease.

    PubMed

    Romppanen, J; Eskelinen, M; Tikanoja, S; Mononen, I

    1997-01-01

    Elevation in the total sialic acid (TSA), TSA/total protein (TSA/TP) and lipid-bound sialic acid (LASA) concentration in serum occurs in breast cancer and we have studied the applicability of the assays in classification of undefined breast tumors. Sialic acid was determined by HPLC and the statistical evaluation included the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) and Youden's index analyses. In cancer patients, the serum LASA and TSA concentration was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than in patients with benign breast disease and all the markers were significantly higher (p < 0.0001) than in normal controls. All the markers had a low accuracy (AUCs < 0.75) in differentiating between breast cancer and benign breast disease and at the specificity level of 0.95 the corresponding sensitivities were 0.32 (TSA), 0.14 (TSA/TP) and 0.23 (LASA). The results indicate that both breast cancer and benign breast disease cause elevation of TSA, TSA/TP and LASA values in serum and do not provide reliable classification of undefined breast tumors.

  15. Global Profiling and Inhibition of Protein Lipidation in Vector and Host Stages of the Sleeping Sickness Parasite Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The enzyme N-myristoyltransferase (NMT) catalyzes the essential fatty acylation of substrate proteins with myristic acid in eukaryotes and is a validated drug target in the parasite Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness). N-Myristoylation typically mediates membrane localization of proteins and is essential to the function of many. However, only a handful of proteins are experimentally validated as N-myristoylated in T. brucei. Here, we perform metabolic labeling with an alkyne-tagged myristic acid analogue, enabling the capture of lipidated proteins in insect and host life stages of T. brucei. We further compare this with a longer chain palmitate analogue to explore the chain length-specific incorporation of fatty acids into proteins. Finally, we combine the alkynyl-myristate analogue with NMT inhibitors and quantitative chemical proteomics to globally define N-myristoylated proteins in the clinically relevant bloodstream form parasites. This analysis reveals five ARF family small GTPases, calpain-like proteins, phosphatases, and many uncharacterized proteins as substrates of NMT in the parasite, providing a global view of the scope of this important protein modification and further evidence for the crucial and pleiotropic role of NMT in the cell. PMID:27331140

  16. Studying the role of lipid rafts on protein receptor bindings with cellular automata.

    PubMed

    Haack, Fiete; Burrage, Kevin; Redmer, Ronald; Uhrmacher, Adelinde M

    2013-01-01

    It is widely accepted that lipid rafts promote receptor clustering and thereby facilitate signaling transduction. The role of lipid rafts in inducing and promoting receptor accumulation within the cell membrane has been explored by several computational and experimental studies. However, it remains unclear whether lipid rafts influence the recruitment and binding of proteins from the cytosol as well. To provide an answer to this question a spatial membrane model has been developed based on cellular automata. Our results indicate that lipid rafts indeed influence protein receptor bindings. In particular processes with slow dissociation and binding kinetics are promoted by lipid rafts, whereas fast binding processes are slightly hampered. However, the impact depends on a variety of parameters, such as the size and mobility of the lipid rafts, the induced slow down of receptors within rafts, and also the dissociation and binding kinetics of the cytosolic proteins. Thus, for any individual signaling pathway the influence of lipid rafts on protein binding might be different. To facilitate analyzing this influence given a specific pathway, our approach has been generalized into LiRaM, a modeling and simulation tool for lipid rafts models.

  17. Enhanced detection of lipid transfer inhibitor protein activity by an assay involving only low density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Morton, R E; Greene, D J

    1994-11-01

    Lipid transfer inhibitor protein (LTIP) activity has been typically quantitated by its ability to suppress lipid transfer protein-mediated lipid movement between low density lipoprotein (LDL) and high density lipoprotein (HDL). In an attempt to establish an LTIP activity assay that is more sensitive, we have exploited the reported preference of the inhibitor protein to interact with LDL. A lipid transfer assay was established that involves LDL as both the donor and the acceptor; LDL in one of these two pools was biotinylated to facilitate its removal with immobilized avidin. Compared to the standard LDL to HDL assay, LTIP inhibited lipid transfer from radiolabeled LDL to biotin-LDL 7-fold more. In the absence of LTIP, lipid transfer activity was the same in both assays. An added benefit of this assay was the near linearity (up to 85%) of the inhibitory response, in contrast to the highly curvilinear response of LTIP in LDL to HDL transfer assays. The high sensitivity of the LDL to biotin-LDL transfer assay in measuring LTIP activity could not be duplicated by other transfer assays including assays containing only HDL (HDL to biotin-HDL), assays between liposomes and LDL, or assays between LDL and HDL where the concentration of lipoproteins was reduced 10-fold. Thus, LTIP activity is most effectively measured in homologous lipid transfer assays involving only LDL (and its biotin derivative). This increased sensitivity to LTIP suggests that the inhibitor binds more avidly to the LDL surface than does lipid transfer protein.

  18. Autoinhibition mechanism of the plasma membrane calcium pump isoforms 2 and 4 studied through lipid-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Mangialavori, Irene C; Corradi, Gerardo; Rinaldi, Débora E; de la Fuente, María Candelaria; Adamo, Hugo P; Rossi, Juan Pablo F C

    2012-04-01

    The autoinhibition/activation of the PMCA (plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase) involves conformational changes in the membrane region of the protein that affect the amount of lipids directly associated with the transmembrane domain. The lipid-protein-dependence of PMCA isoforms 2 and 4 expressed and obtained in purified form from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated using the phosphatidylcholine analogue [125I]TID-PC/16 {l-O-hexadecanoyl-2-O-[9-[[[2-[125I]iodo-4-(trifluoromemyl-3H-diazirin-3-yl)benzyl]oxy]carbonyl]nonanoyl]-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine}, which was incorporated into mixtures of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine and the non-ionic detergent C12E10 [deca(ethylene glycol) dodecyl ether]. We found no differences between the recombinant PMCA4 and PMCA purified from erythrocytes (ePMCA). However, titration of the half-maximal activation by Ca2+/calmodulin of PMCA2 showed 30-fold higher affinity than PMCA4. PMCA2 exhibited a lower level of labelling in the autoinhibited conformation relative to PMCA4, indicating that the lower autoinhibition was correlated with a lower exposure to lipids in the autoinhibited state. Analysis of the lipid-protein stoichiometry showed that the lipid annulus of PMCA varies: (i) in accordance to the conformational state of the enzyme; and (ii) depending on the different isoforms of PMCA. PMCA2 during Ca2+ transport changes its conformation to a lesser extent than PMCA4, an isoform more sensitive to modulation by calmodulin and acidic phospholipids. This is the first demonstration of a dynamic behaviour of annular lipids and PMCA.

  19. Evening primrose oil in rheumatoid arthritis: changes in serum lipids and fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Jäntti, J; Nikkari, T; Solakivi, T; Vapaatalo, H; Isomäki, H

    1989-01-01

    The serum concentration of lipids and composition of fatty acids after overnight fasting were studied in 18 patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated for 12 weeks with either 20 ml of evening primrose oil containing 9% of gamma-linolenic acid or olive oil. The serum concentrations of oleic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, and apolipoprotein B decreased and those of linoleic acid, gamma-linolenic acid, dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, and arachidonic acid increased during treatment with evening primrose oil. During olive oil treatment the serum concentration of eicosapentaenoic acid decreased and those of high density lipoprotein-cholesterol and apolipoprotein A-I increased slightly. The decrease in serum eicosapentaenoic acid and the increase in arachidonic acid concentrations induced by evening primrose oil may not be favourable effects in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in the light of the roles of these fatty acids as precursors of eicosanoids. PMID:2649022

  20. A conditional mutant of the fatty acid synthase unveils unexpected cross talks in mycobacterial lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Cabruja, Matías; Mondino, Sonia; Tsai, Yi Ting; Lara, Julia; Gramajo, Hugo; Gago, Gabriela

    2017-02-01

    Unlike most bacteria, mycobacteria rely on the multi-domain enzyme eukaryote-like fatty acid synthase I (FAS I) to make fatty acids de novo. These metabolites are precursors of the biosynthesis of most of the lipids present both in the complex mycobacteria cell wall and in the storage lipids inside the cell. In order to study the role of the type I FAS system in Mycobacterium lipid metabolism in vivo, we constructed a conditional mutant in the fas-acpS operon of Mycobacterium smegmatis and analysed in detail the impact of reduced de novo fatty acid biosynthesis on the global architecture of the cell envelope. As expected, the mutant exhibited growth defect in the non-permissive condition that correlated well with the lower expression of fas-acpS and the concomitant reduction of FAS I, confirming that FAS I is essential for survival. The reduction observed in FAS I provoked an accumulation of its substrates, acetyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA, and a strong reduction of C12 to C18 acyl-CoAs, but not of long-chain acyl-CoAs (C19 to C24). The most intriguing result was the ability of the mutant to keep synthesizing mycolic acids when fatty acid biosynthesis was impaired. A detailed comparative lipidomic analysis showed that although reduced FAS I levels had a strong impact on fatty acid and phospholipid biosynthesis, mycolic acids were still being synthesized in the mutant, although with a different relative species distribution. However, when triacylglycerol degradation was inhibited, mycolic acid biosynthesis was significantly reduced, suggesting that storage lipids could be an intracellular reservoir of fatty acids for the biosynthesis of complex lipids in mycobacteria. Understanding the interaction between FAS I and the metabolic pathways that rely on FAS I products is a key step to better understand how lipid homeostasis is regulated in this microorganism and how this regulation could play a role during infection in pathogenic mycobacteria.

  1. Polyunsaturated Branched-Chain Fatty Acid Geranylgeranoic Acid Induces Unfolded Protein Response in Human Hepatoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Iwao, Chieko; Shidoji, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    The acyclic diterpenoid acid geranylgeranoic acid (GGA) has been reported to induce autophagic cell death in several human hepatoma-derived cell lines; however, the molecular mechanism for this remains unknown. In the present study, several diterpenoids were examined for ability to induce XBP1 splicing and/or lipotoxicity for human hepatoma cell lines. Here we show that three groups of diterpenoids emerged: 1) GGA, 2,3-dihydro GGA and 9-cis retinoic acid induce cell death and XBP1 splicing; 2) all-trans retinoic acid induces XBP1 splicing but little cell death; and 3) phytanic acid, phytenic acid and geranylgeraniol induce neither cell death nor XBP1 splicing. GGA-induced ER stress/ unfolded protein response (UPR) and its lipotoxicity were both blocked by co-treatment with oleic acid. The blocking activity of oleic acid for GGA-induced XBP1 splicing was not attenuated by methylation of oleic acid. These findings strongly suggest that GGA at micromolar concentrations induces the so-called lipid-induced ER stress response/UPR, which is oleate-suppressive, and shows its lipotoxicity in human hepatoma cells. PMID:26186544

  2. Production of Fatty Acids and Protein by Nannochloropsis in Flat-Plate Photobioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Wijffels, René H.; Bolla, Sylvie; Kiron, Viswanath

    2017-01-01

    Nannochloropsis is an industrially-promising microalga that may be cultivated for alternative sources of nutrition due to its high productivity, protein content and lipid composition. We studied the growth and biochemical profile of Nannochloropsis 211/78 (CCAP) in optimized flat-plate photobioreactors. Eighteen cultivations were performed at two nutrient concentrations. The fatty acid, protein content and calorific values were analyzed after 8, 12 and 16 days. Neutral lipids were separated and the changes in fatty acids in triglycerides (TAGs) during nutrient depletion were recorded. The maximum cell density reached 4.7 g∙L-1 and the maximum productivity was 0.51 g∙L-1∙d-1. During nutrient-replete conditions, eicosapentaneoic acid (EPA) and total protein concentrations measured 4.2–4.9% and 50–55% of the dry mass, respectively. Nutrient starvation induced the accumulation of fatty acids up to 28.3% of the cell dry weight, largely due to the incorporation of C16:0 and C16:1n-7 fatty acyl chains into neutral lipids. During nutrient starvation the total EPA content did not detectibly change, but up to 37% was transferred from polar membrane lipids to the neutral lipid fraction. PMID:28103296

  3. Production of Fatty Acids and Protein by Nannochloropsis in Flat-Plate Photobioreactors.

    PubMed

    Hulatt, Chris J; Wijffels, René H; Bolla, Sylvie; Kiron, Viswanath

    2017-01-01

    Nannochloropsis is an industrially-promising microalga that may be cultivated for alternative sources of nutrition due to its high productivity, protein content and lipid composition. We studied the growth and biochemical profile of Nannochloropsis 211/78 (CCAP) in optimized flat-plate photobioreactors. Eighteen cultivations were performed at two nutrient concentrations. The fatty acid, protein content and calorific values were analyzed after 8, 12 and 16 days. Neutral lipids were separated and the changes in fatty acids in triglycerides (TAGs) during nutrient depletion were recorded. The maximum cell density reached 4.7 g∙L-1 and the maximum productivity was 0.51 g∙L-1∙d-1. During nutrient-replete conditions, eicosapentaneoic acid (EPA) and total protein concentrations measured 4.2-4.9% and 50-55% of the dry mass, respectively. Nutrient starvation induced the accumulation of fatty acids up to 28.3% of the cell dry weight, largely due to the incorporation of C16:0 and C16:1n-7 fatty acyl chains into neutral lipids. During nutrient starvation the total EPA content did not detectibly change, but up to 37% was transferred from polar membrane lipids to the neutral lipid fraction.

  4. Efficient delivery of genome-editing proteins using bioreducible lipid nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ming; Zuris, John A.; Meng, Fantao; Rees, Holly; Sun, Shuo; Deng, Pu; Han, Yong; Gao, Xue; Pouli, Dimitra; Wu, Qi; Georgakoudi, Irene; Liu, David R.; Xu, Qiaobing

    2016-01-01

    A central challenge to the development of protein-based therapeutics is the inefficiency of delivery of protein cargo across the mammalian cell membrane, including escape from endosomes. Here we report that combining bioreducible lipid nanoparticles with negatively supercharged Cre recombinase or anionic Cas9:single-guide (sg)RNA complexes drives the electrostatic assembly of nanoparticles that mediate potent protein delivery and genome editing. These bioreducible lipids efficiently deliver protein cargo into cells, facilitate the escape of protein from endosomes in response to the reductive intracellular environment, and direct protein to its intracellular target sites. The delivery of supercharged Cre protein and Cas9:sgRNA complexed with bioreducible lipids into cultured human cells enables gene recombination and genome editing with efficiencies greater than 70%. In addition, we demonstrate that these lipids are effective for functional protein delivery into mouse brain for gene recombination in vivo. Therefore, the integration of this bioreducible lipid platform with protein engineering has the potential to advance the therapeutic relevance of protein-based genome editing. PMID:26929348

  5. How cholesterol interacts with proteins and lipids during its intracellular transport.

    PubMed

    Wüstner, Daniel; Solanko, Katarzyna

    2015-09-01

    Sterols, as cholesterol in mammalian cells and ergosterol in fungi, are indispensable molecules for proper functioning and nanoscale organization of the plasma membrane. Synthesis, uptake and efflux of cholesterol are regulated by a variety of protein-lipid and protein-protein interactions. Similarly, membrane lipids and their physico-chemical properties directly affect cholesterol partitioning and thereby contribute to the highly heterogeneous intracellular cholesterol distribution. Movement of cholesterol in cells is mediated by vesicle trafficking along the endocytic and secretory pathways as well as by non-vesicular sterol exchange between organelles. In this article, we will review recent progress in elucidating sterol-lipid and sterol-protein interactions contributing to proper sterol transport in living cells. We outline recent biophysical models of cholesterol distribution and dynamics in membranes and explain how such models are related to sterol flux between organelles. An overview of various sterol-transfer proteins is given, and the physico-chemical principles of their function in non-vesicular sterol transport are explained. We also discuss selected experimental approaches for characterization of sterol-protein interactions and for monitoring intracellular sterol transport. Finally, we review recent work on the molecular mechanisms underlying lipoprotein-mediated cholesterol import into mammalian cells and describe the process of cellular cholesterol efflux. Overall, we emphasize how specific protein-lipid and protein-protein interactions help overcoming the extremely low water solubility of cholesterol, thereby controlling intracellular cholesterol movement. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid-protein interactions.

  6. The Lipid Transfer Protein StarD7: Structure, Function, and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Martin, Jésica; Rena, Viviana; Angeletti, Sofía; Panzetta-Dutari, Graciela M.; Genti-Raimondi, Susana

    2013-01-01

    The steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein-related lipid transfer (START) domain proteins constitute a family of evolutionarily conserved and widely expressed proteins that have been implicated in lipid transport, metabolism, and signaling. The 15 well-characterized mammalian START domain-containing proteins are grouped into six subfamilies. The START domain containing 7 mRNA encodes StarD7, a member of the StarD2/phosphatidylcholine transfer protein (PCTP) subfamily, which was first identified as a gene overexpressed in a choriocarcinoma cell line. Recent studies show that the StarD7 protein facilitates the delivery of phosphatidylcholine to the mitochondria. This review summarizes the latest advances in StarD7 research, focusing on the structural and biochemical features, protein-lipid interactions, and mechanisms that regulate StarD7 expression. The implications of the role of StarD7 in cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation are also discussed. PMID:23507753

  7. OSBP-Related Protein Family: Mediators of Lipid Transport and Signaling at Membrane Contact Sites.

    PubMed

    Kentala, Henriikka; Weber-Boyvat, Marion; Olkkonen, Vesa M

    2016-01-01

    Oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP) and its related protein homologs, ORPs, constitute a conserved family of lipid-binding/transfer proteins (LTPs) expressed ubiquitously in eukaryotes. The ligand-binding domain of ORPs accommodates cholesterol and oxysterols, but also glycerophospholipids, particularly phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PI4P). ORPs have been implicated as intracellular lipid sensors or transporters. Most ORPs carry targeting determinants for the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and non-ER organelle membrane. ORPs are located and function at membrane contact sites (MCSs), at which ER is closely apposed with other organelle limiting membranes. Such sites have roles in lipid transport and metabolism, control of Ca(2+) fluxes, and signaling events. ORPs are postulated either to transport lipids over MCSs to maintain the distinct lipid compositions of organelle membranes, or to control the activity of enzymes/protein complexes with functions in signaling and lipid metabolism. ORPs may transfer PI4P and another lipid class bidirectionally. Transport of PI4P followed by its hydrolysis would in this model provide the energy for transfer of the other lipid against its concentration gradient. Control of organelle lipid compositions by OSBP/ORPs is important for the life cycles of several pathogenic viruses. Targeting ORPs with small-molecular antagonists is proposed as a new strategy to combat viral infections. Several ORPs are reported to modulate vesicle transport along the secretory or endocytic pathways. Moreover, antagonists of certain ORPs inhibit cancer cell proliferation. Thus, ORPs are LTPs, which mediate interorganelle lipid transport and coordinate lipid signals with a variety of cellular regimes.

  8. Characterization of Membrane Protein-Lipid Interactions by Mass Spectrometry Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Cong, Xiao; Liu, Wen; Laganowsky, Arthur

    2016-12-01

    Lipids in the biological membrane can modulate the structure and function of integral and peripheral membrane proteins. Distinguishing individual lipids that bind selectively to membrane protein complexes from an ensemble of lipid-bound species remains a daunting task. Recently, ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) has proven to be invaluable for interrogating the interactions between protein and individual lipids, where the complex undergoes collision induced unfolding followed by quantification of the unfolding pathway to assess the effect of these interactions. However, gas-phase unfolding experiments for membrane proteins are typically performed on the entire ensemble (apo and lipid bound species), raising uncertainty to the contribution of individual lipids and the species that are ejected in the unfolding process. Here, we describe the application of mass spectrometry ion mobility mass spectrometry (MS-IM-MS) for isolating ions corresponding to lipid-bound states of a model integral memb