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Sample records for acinar cell injury

  1. Cluster of Differentiation 38 (CD38) Mediates Bile Acid-induced Acinar Cell Injury and Pancreatitis through Cyclic ADP-ribose and Intracellular Calcium Release*

    PubMed Central

    Orabi, Abrahim I.; Muili, Kamaldeen A.; Javed, Tanveer A.; Jin, Shunqian; Jayaraman, Thottala; Lund, Frances E.; Husain, Sohail Z.

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant Ca2+ signals within pancreatic acinar cells are an early and critical feature in acute pancreatitis, yet it is unclear how these signals are generated. An important mediator of the aberrant Ca2+ signals due to bile acid exposure is the intracellular Ca2+ channel ryanodine receptor. One putative activator of the ryanodine receptor is the nucleotide second messenger cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR), which is generated by an ectoenzyme ADP-ribosyl cyclase, CD38. In this study, we examined the role of CD38 and cADPR in acinar cell Ca2+ signals and acinar injury due to bile acids using pharmacologic inhibitors of CD38 and cADPR as well as mice deficient in Cd38 (Cd38−/−). Cytosolic Ca2+ signals were imaged using live time-lapse confocal microscopy in freshly isolated mouse acinar cells during perifusion with the bile acid taurolithocholic acid 3-sulfate (TLCS; 500 μm). To focus on intracellular Ca2+ release and to specifically exclude Ca2+ influx, cells were perifused in Ca2+-free medium. Cell injury was assessed by lactate dehydrogenase leakage and propidium iodide uptake. Pretreatment with either nicotinamide (20 mm) or the cADPR antagonist 8-Br-cADPR (30 μm) abrogated TLCS-induced Ca2+ signals and cell injury. TLCS-induced Ca2+ release and cell injury were reduced by 30 and 95%, respectively, in Cd38-deficient acinar cells compared with wild-type cells (p < 0.05). Cd38-deficient mice were protected against a model of bile acid infusion pancreatitis. In summary, these data indicate that CD38-cADPR mediates bile acid-induced pancreatitis and acinar cell injury through aberrant intracellular Ca2+ signaling. PMID:23940051

  2. Pancreatic Acinar Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Béchade, Dominique; Desjardin, Marie; Salmon, Emma; Désolneux, Grégoire; Bécouarn, Yves; Evrard, Serge; Fonck, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) is a rare malignant neoplasm that accounts for 1–2% of all pancreatic neoplasms. Here we report two cases of ACC and describe their clinical features, the therapies used to treat them, and their prognosis. The first patient was a 65-year-old woman who had an abdominal CT scan for a urinary infection. Fortuitously, a rounded and well-delimited corporeal pancreatic tumor was discovered. An endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine needle aspiration revealed an ACC. During the puncture, a hypoechoic cavity appeared inside the lesion, corresponding to a probable necrotic area. Treatment consisted of a distal splenopancreatectomy. The second patient was a 75-year-old man who complained of abdominal pain. An abdominal CT scan showed a cephalic pancreatic lesion and two hepatic metastases. An EUS-guided fine needle aspiration showed a pancreatic ACC. The patient received chemotherapy with gemcitabine plus oxaliplatin (GEMOX regimen), which enabled an objective response after 6 cycles.

  3. Src Dependent Pancreatic Acinar Injury Can Be Initiated Independent of an Increase in Cytosolic Calcium

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Vivek; Cline, Rachel; Noel, Pawan; Karlsson, Jenny; Baty, Catherine J.; Orlichenko, Lidiya; Patel, Krutika; Trivedi, Ram Narayan; Husain, Sohail Z.; Acharya, Chathur; Durgampudi, Chandra; Stolz, Donna B.; Navina, Sarah; Singh, Vijay P.

    2013-01-01

    Several deleterious intra-acinar phenomena are simultaneously triggered on initiating acute pancreatitis. These culminate in acinar injury or inflammatory mediator generation in vitro and parenchymal damage in vivo. Supraphysiologic caerulein is one such initiator which simultaneously activates numerous signaling pathways including non-receptor tyrosine kinases such as of the Src family. It also causes a sustained increase in cytosolic calcium- a player thought to be crucial in regulating deleterious phenomena. We have shown Src to be involved in caerulein induced actin remodeling, and caerulein induced changes in the Golgi and post-Golgi trafficking to be involved in trypsinogen activation, which initiates acinar cell injury. However, it remains unclear whether an increase in cytosolic calcium is necessary to initiate acinar injury or if injury can be initiated at basal cytosolic calcium levels by an alternate pathway. To study the interplay between tyrosine kinase signaling and calcium, we treated mouse pancreatic acinar cells with the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor pervanadate. We studied the effect of the clinically used Src inhibitor Dasatinib (BMS-354825) on pervanadate or caerulein induced changes in Src activation, trypsinogen activation, cell injury, upstream cytosolic calcium, actin and Golgi morphology. Pervanadate, like supraphysiologic caerulein, induced Src activation, redistribution of the F-actin from its normal location in the sub-apical area to the basolateral areas, and caused antegrade fragmentation of the Golgi. These changes, like those induced by supraphysiologic caerulein, were associated with trypsinogen activation and acinar injury, all of which were prevented by Dasatinib. Interestingly, however, pervanadate did not cause an increase in cytosolic calcium, and the caerulein induced increase in cytosolic calcium was not affected by Dasatinib. These findings suggest that intra-acinar deleterious phenomena may be initiated independent of an

  4. Duct Cells Contribute to Regeneration of Endocrine and Acinar Cells Following Pancreatic Damage in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    CRISCIMANNA, ANGELA; SPEICHER, JULIE A.; HOUSHMAND, GOLBAHAR; SHIOTA, CHIYO; PRASADAN, KRISHNA; Ji, BAOAN; LOGSDON, CRAIG D.; GITTES, GEORGE K.; ESNI, FARZAD

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS There have been conflicting results on a cell of origin in pancreatic regeneration. These discrepancies predominantly stem from lack of specific markers for the pancreatic precursors/stem cells, as well as differences in the targeted cells and severity of tissue injury in the experimental models so far proposed. We attempted to create a model that used diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) to ablate specific cell populations, control the extent of injury, and avoid induction of the inflammatory response. METHODS To target specific types of pancreatic cells, we crossed R26DTR or R26dtR/lacZ mice with transgenic mice that express the Cre recombinase in the pancreas, under control of the Pdx1 (global pancreatic) or elastase (acinar-specific) promoters. RESULTS Exposure of PdxCre;R26DTR mice to diphtheria toxin resulted in extensive ablation of acinar and endocrine tissues but not ductal cells. Surviving cells within the ductal compartment contributed to regeneration of endocrine and acinar cells via recapitulation of the embryonic pancreatic developmental program. However, following selective ablation of acinar tissue in ElaCre-ERT2;R26DTR mice, regeneration likely occurred by reprogramming of ductal cells to acinar lineage. CONCLUSIONS In the pancreas of adult mice, epithelial cells within the ductal compartment contribute to regeneration of endocrine and acinar cells. The severity of injury determines the regenerative mechanisms and cell types that contribute to this process. PMID:21763240

  5. PD2/Paf1 depletion in pancreatic acinar cells promotes acinar-to-ductal metaplasia

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Parama; Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Vaz, Arokia P.; Ponnusamy, Moorthy P.; Batra, Surinder K.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic differentiation 2 (PD2), a PAF (RNA Polymerase II Associated Factor) complex subunit, is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer cells and has demonstrated potential oncogenic property. Here, we report that PD2/Paf1 expression was restricted to acinar cells in the normal murine pancreas, but its expression increased in the ductal cells of Pdx1Cre; KrasG12D (KC) mouse model of pancreatic cancer with increasing age, showing highest expression in neoplastic ductal cells of 50 weeks old mice. PD2/Paf1 was specifically expressed in amylase and CK19 double positive metaplastic ducts, representing intermediate structures during pancreatic acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM). Similar PD2/Paf1 expression was observed in murine pancreas that exhibited ADM-like histology upon cerulein challenge. In normal mice, cerulein-mediated inflammation induced a decrease in PD2/Paf1 expression, which was later restored upon recovery of the pancreatic parenchyma. In KC mice, however, PD2/Paf1 mRNA level continued to decrease with progressive dysplasia and subsequent neoplastic transformation. Additionally, knockdown of PD2/Paf1 in pancreatic acinar cells resulted in the abrogation of Amylase, Elastase and Lipase (acinar marker) mRNA levels with simultaneous increase in CK19 and CAII (ductal marker) transcripts. In conclusion, our studies indicate loss of PD2/Paf1 expression during acinar transdifferentiation in pancreatic cancer initiation and PD2/Paf1 mediated regulation of lineage specific markers. PMID:24947474

  6. PD2/Paf1 depletion in pancreatic acinar cells promotes acinar-to-ductal metaplasia.

    PubMed

    Dey, Parama; Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Vaz, Arokia P; Ponnusamy, Moorthy P; Batra, Surinder K

    2014-06-30

    Pancreatic differentiation 2 (PD2), a PAF (RNA Polymerase II Associated Factor) complex subunit, is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer cells and has demonstrated potential oncogenic property. Here, we report that PD2/Paf1 expression was restricted to acinar cells in the normal murine pancreas, but its expression increased in the ductal cells of KrasG12D/Pdx1Cre (KC) mouse model of pancreatic cancer with increasing age, showing highest expression in neoplastic ductal cells of 50 weeks old mice. PD2/Paf1 was specifically expressed in amylase and CK19 double positive metaplastic ducts, representing intermediate structures during pancreatic acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM). Similar PD2/Paf1 expression was observed in murine pancreas that exhibited ADM-like histology upon cerulein challenge. In normal mice, cerulein-mediated inflammation induced a decrease in PD2/Paf1 expression, which was later restored upon recovery of the pancreatic parenchyma. In KC mice, however, PD2/Paf1 mRNA level continued to decrease with progressive dysplasia and subsequent neoplastic transformation. Additionally, knockdown of PD2/Paf1 in pancreatic acinar cells resulted in the abrogation of Amylase, Elastase and Lipase (acinar marker) mRNA levels with simultaneous increase in CK19 and CAII (ductal marker) transcripts. In conclusion, our studies indicate loss of PD2/Paf1 expression during acinar transdifferentiation in pancreatic cancer initiation and PD2/Paf1 mediated regulation of lineage specific markers. PMID:24947474

  7. Gabapentin-induced mitogenic activity in rat pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Dethloff, L; Barr, B; Bestervelt, L; Bulera, S; Sigler, R; LaGattuta, M; de La Iglesia, F

    2000-05-01

    Gabapentin induces pancreatic acinar cell tumors in rats through unknown, yet apparently nongenotoxic mechanisms. The primary objective of this study was to determine whether gabapentin acts as a tumor promoter by stimulating acinar cell proliferation in rat pancreas. To this end, indices of pancreatic growth, including increased pancreatic weight, stimulation of acinar cell proliferation, and/or enhanced expression of immediate-early oncogenes were monitored in rats given gabapentin in the diet at 2 g/kg/day for up to 12 months. Rats fed raw soy flour (RSF), a known inducer of pancreatic acinar cell tumors through cholecystokinin-mediated mitogenic stimulation, were used throughout as positive controls. In addition, recent data suggests that gabapentin binds to the alpha(2)delta subunit of a voltage-gated, L-type calcium channel. Because signaling pathways for proliferative processes in pancreatic acinar cells involve intracellular calcium mobilization, the effects of gabapentin on intracellular calcium mobilization ([Ca(2+)](i)) and (3)H-thymidine incorporation were investigated in pancreatic acinar cells isolated from normal rat pancreas and in the AR42J rat pancreatic tumor cell line. As indicated by BrdU labeling indices, acinar cell proliferation increased 3-fold by Day 3 of RSF treatment and remained slightly greater than controls throughout the experiment. Pancreatic weights of RSF-fed rats were 32 to 56% greater than controls throughout the experiment. In contrast, gabapentin had no effect on pancreatic weight or acinar cell labeling index, and therefore had no apparent effect on pancreatic growth. In isolated pancreatic acinar cells, however, gabapentin induced mobilization of intracellular calcium and caused a slight increase in (3)H-thymidine incorporation. The data suggest that gabapentin may possess low level mitogenic activity, which is not easily detectable in in vivo assays. PMID:10788559

  8. TGF-β1 promotes acinar to ductal metaplasia of human pancreatic acinar cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Akanuma, Naoki; Liu, Chengyang; Naji, Ali; Halff, Glenn A.; Washburn, William K.; Sun, Luzhe; Wang, Pei

    2016-01-01

    Animal studies suggest that pancreatitis-induced acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM) is a key event for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) initiation. However, there has not been an adequate system to explore the mechanisms of human ADM induction. We have developed a flow cytometry-based, high resolution lineage tracing method and 3D culture system to analyse ADM in human cells. In this system, well-known mouse ADM inducers did not promote ADM in human cells. In contrast, TGF-β1 efficiently converted human acinar cells to duct-like cells (AD) in a SMAD-dependent manner, highlighting fundamental differences between the species. Functionally, AD cells gained transient proliferative capacity. Furthermore, oncogenic KRAS did not induce acinar cell proliferation, but did sustain the proliferation of AD cells, suggesting that oncogenic KRAS requires ADM-associated-changes to promote PDAC initiation. This ADM model provides a novel platform to explore the mechanisms involved in the development of human pancreatic diseases. PMID:27485764

  9. TGF-β1 promotes acinar to ductal metaplasia of human pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Akanuma, Naoki; Liu, Chengyang; Naji, Ali; Halff, Glenn A; Washburn, William K; Sun, Luzhe; Wang, Pei

    2016-01-01

    Animal studies suggest that pancreatitis-induced acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM) is a key event for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) initiation. However, there has not been an adequate system to explore the mechanisms of human ADM induction. We have developed a flow cytometry-based, high resolution lineage tracing method and 3D culture system to analyse ADM in human cells. In this system, well-known mouse ADM inducers did not promote ADM in human cells. In contrast, TGF-β1 efficiently converted human acinar cells to duct-like cells (AD) in a SMAD-dependent manner, highlighting fundamental differences between the species. Functionally, AD cells gained transient proliferative capacity. Furthermore, oncogenic KRAS did not induce acinar cell proliferation, but did sustain the proliferation of AD cells, suggesting that oncogenic KRAS requires ADM-associated-changes to promote PDAC initiation. This ADM model provides a novel platform to explore the mechanisms involved in the development of human pancreatic diseases. PMID:27485764

  10. Protein kinase D1 drives pancreatic acinar cell reprogramming and progression to intraepithelial neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, Geou-Yarh; Döppler, Heike; Braun, Ursula B.; Panayiotou, Richard; Scotti Buzhardt, Michele; Radisky, Derek C.; Crawford, Howard C.; Fields, Alan P.; Murray, Nicole R.; Wang, Q. Jane; Leitges, Michael; Storz, Peter

    2015-02-01

    The transdifferentiation of pancreatic acinar cells to a ductal phenotype (acinar-to-ductal metaplasia, ADM) occurs after injury or inflammation of the pancreas and is a reversible process. However, in the presence of activating Kras mutations or persistent epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) signalling, cells that underwent ADM can progress to pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and eventually pancreatic cancer. In transgenic animal models, ADM and PanINs are initiated by high-affinity ligands for EGF-R or activating Kras mutations, but the underlying signalling mechanisms are not well understood. Here, using a conditional knockout approach, we show that protein kinase D1 (PKD1) is sufficient to drive the reprogramming process to a ductal phenotype and progression to PanINs. Moreover, using 3D explant culture of primary pancreatic acinar cells, we show that PKD1 acts downstream of TGFα and Kras, to mediate formation of ductal structures through activation of the Notch pathway.

  11. Therapeutic potential of targeting acinar cell reprogramming in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chi-Hin; Li, You-Jia; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a common pancreatic cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Treating this life-threatening disease remains challenging due to the lack of effective prognosis, diagnosis and therapy. Apart from pancreatic duct cells, acinar cells may also be the origin of PDAC. During pancreatitis or combined with activating KRasG12D mutation, acinar cells lose their cellular identity and undergo a transdifferentiation process called acinar-to-ductal-metaplasia (ADM), forming duct cells which may then transform into pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and eventually PDAC. During ADM, the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, Wnt, Notch and phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases/Akt signaling inhibits the transcription of acinar-specific genes, including Mist and amylase, but promotes the expression of ductal genes, such as cytokeratin-19. Inhibition of this transdifferentiation process hinders the development of PanIN and PDAC. In addition, the transdifferentiated cells regain acinar identity, indicating ADM may be a reversible process. This provides a new therapeutic direction in treating PDAC through cancer reprogramming. Many studies have already demonstrated the success of switching PanIN/PDAC back to normal cells through the use of PD325901, the expression of E47, and the knockdown of Dickkopf-3. In this review, we discuss the signaling pathways involved in ADM and the therapeutic potential of targeting reprogramming in order to treat PDAC. PMID:27610015

  12. Therapeutic potential of targeting acinar cell reprogramming in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chi-Hin; Li, You-Jia; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2016-08-21

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a common pancreatic cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Treating this life-threatening disease remains challenging due to the lack of effective prognosis, diagnosis and therapy. Apart from pancreatic duct cells, acinar cells may also be the origin of PDAC. During pancreatitis or combined with activating KRas(G12D) mutation, acinar cells lose their cellular identity and undergo a transdifferentiation process called acinar-to-ductal-metaplasia (ADM), forming duct cells which may then transform into pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and eventually PDAC. During ADM, the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, Wnt, Notch and phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases/Akt signaling inhibits the transcription of acinar-specific genes, including Mist and amylase, but promotes the expression of ductal genes, such as cytokeratin-19. Inhibition of this transdifferentiation process hinders the development of PanIN and PDAC. In addition, the transdifferentiated cells regain acinar identity, indicating ADM may be a reversible process. This provides a new therapeutic direction in treating PDAC through cancer reprogramming. Many studies have already demonstrated the success of switching PanIN/PDAC back to normal cells through the use of PD325901, the expression of E47, and the knockdown of Dickkopf-3. In this review, we discuss the signaling pathways involved in ADM and the therapeutic potential of targeting reprogramming in order to treat PDAC. PMID:27610015

  13. Effects of Benzodiazepines on Acinar and Myoepithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mattioli, Tatiana M. F.; Alanis, Luciana R. A.; Sapelli, Silvana da Silva; de Lima, Antonio A. S.; de Noronha, Lucia; Rosa, Edvaldo A. R.; Althobaiti, Yusuf S.; Almalki, Atiah H.; Sari, Youssef; Ignacio, Sergio A.; Johann, Aline C. B. R.; Gregio, Ana M. T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Benzodiazepines (BZDs), the most commonly prescribed psychotropic drugs with anxiolytic action, may cause hyposalivation. It has been previously shown that BZDs can cause hypertrophy and decrease the acini cell number. In this study, we investigated the effects of BZDs and pilocarpine on rat parotid glands, specifically on acinar, ductal, and myoepithelial cells. Methods: Ninety male Wistar rats were divided into nine groups. Control groups received a saline solution for 30 days (C30) and 60 days (C60), and pilocarpine (PILO) for 60 days. Experimental groups received lorazepam (L30) and midazolam (M30) for 30 days. Another group (LS60 or MS60) received lorazepam or midazolam for 30 days, respectively, and saline for additional 30 days. Finally, other groups (LP60 or MP60) received either lorazepam or midazolam for 30 days, respectively, and pilocarpine for additional 30 days. The expression of calponin in myoepithelial cells and the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in acinar and ductal cells were evaluated. Results: Animals treated with lorazepam showed an increase in the number of positive staining cells for calponin as compared to control animals (p < 0.05). Midazolam administered with pilocarpine (MP60) induced an increase in the proliferation of acinar and ductal cells and a decrease in the positive staining cells for calponin as compared to midazolam administered with saline (MS60). Conclusion: We found that myoepithelial cells might be more sensitive to the effects of BZD than acinar and ductal cells in rat parotid glands. PMID:27445812

  14. Loss of acinar cell IKKα triggers spontaneous pancreatitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Wu, Xuefeng; Holzer, Ryan G.; Lee, Jun-Hee; Todoric, Jelena; Park, Eek-Joong; Ogata, Hisanobu; Gukovskaya, Anna S.; Gukovsky, Ilya; Pizzo, Donald P.; VandenBerg, Scott; Tarin, David; Atay, Çiǧdem; Arkan, Melek C.; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Moscat, Jorge; Diaz-Meco, Maria; Dawson, David; Erkan, Mert; Kleeff, Jörg; Karin, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease that causes progressive destruction of pancreatic acinar cells and, ultimately, loss of pancreatic function. We investigated the role of IκB kinase α (IKKα) in pancreatic homeostasis. Pancreas-specific ablation of IKKα (IkkαΔpan) caused spontaneous and progressive acinar cell vacuolization and death, interstitial fibrosis, inflammation, and circulatory release of pancreatic enzymes, clinical signs resembling those of human chronic pancreatitis. Loss of pancreatic IKKα causes defective autophagic protein degradation, leading to accumulation of p62-mediated protein aggregates and enhanced oxidative and ER stress in acinar cells, but none of these effects is related to NF-κB. Pancreas-specific p62 ablation prevented ER and oxidative stresses and attenuated pancreatitis in IkkαΔpan mice, suggesting that cellular stress induced by p62 aggregates promotes development of pancreatitis. Importantly, downregulation of IKKα and accumulation of p62 aggregates were also observed in chronic human pancreatitis. Our studies demonstrate that IKKα, which may control autophagic protein degradation through its interaction with ATG16L2, plays a critical role in maintaining pancreatic acinar cell homeostasis, whose dysregulation promotes pancreatitis through p62 aggregate accumulation. PMID:23563314

  15. Acinar Cell Carcinoma of the Pancreas: Clinical and Cytomorphologic Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Toll, Adam D.; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2013-01-01

    Acinar cell carcinoma is a rare malignant epithelial neoplasm with predominantly exocrine acinar differentiation and is seen primarily in older men (mean age, 62 years). The presenting symptoms are usually non-specific, and jaundice is often not present. Symptoms relating to the overproduction and release of lipase into the circulation are present in 10-15% of patients. Characteristic cytomorphologic features include a population of cells with minimal pleomorphism, eccentrically placed nuclei with a single prominent nucleoli and moderate hyperchromasia. The cytoplasm is finely granular, and the background may contain granular debris secondary to cytolysis. A significant proportion of the cases also have a minor neuroendocrine component or scattered neuroendocrine cells. Approximately 50% of patients have metastatic disease at presentation, often restricted to the regional lymph nodes and liver. The prognosis is poor, only slightly better than that of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. PMID:23667367

  16. Transient cytokine treatment induces acinar cell reprogramming and regenerates functional beta cell mass in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Baeyens, Luc; Lemper, Marie; Leuckx, Gunter; De Groef, Sofie; Bonfanti, Paola; Stangé, Geert; Shemer, Ruth; Nord, Christoffer; Scheel, David W.; Pan, Fong C.; Ahlgren, Ulf; Gu, Guoqiang; Stoffers, Doris A.; Dor, Yuval; Ferrer, Jorge; Gradwohl, Gerard; Wright, Christopher VE; Van de Casteele, Mark; German, Michael S.; Bouwens, Luc; Heimberg, Harry

    2014-01-01

    Reprogramming of pancreatic exocrine cells into cells resembling beta cells may provide a strategy for treating diabetes. Here we show that transient administration of epidermal growth factor and ciliary neurotrophic factor to adult mice with chronic hyperglycemia efficiently stimulates the conversion of terminally differentiated acinar cells to beta-like cells. Newly generated beta-like cells are epigenetically reprogrammed, functional and glucose-responsive, and reinstate normal glycemic control for up to 248 days. The regenerative process depends on Stat3 signaling and requires a threshold number of Neurogenin 3 (Ngn3) expressing acinar cells. In contrast to previous work demonstrating in vivo conversion of acinar cells to beta-like cells by viral delivery of exogenous transcription factors, our approach achieves acinar-to-beta cell reprogramming through transient cytokine exposure rather than genetic modification. PMID:24240391

  17. Functional somatostatin receptors on a rat pancreatic acinar cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Viguerie, N.; Tahiri-Jouti, N.; Esteve, J.P.; Clerc, P.; Logsdon, C.; Svoboda, M.; Susini, C.; Vaysse, N.; Ribet, A. Mount Zion Hospital and Medical Center, San Francisco, CA Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels )

    1988-07-01

    Somatostatin receptors from a rat pancreatic acinar cell line, AR4-2J, were characterized biochemically, structurally, and functionally. Binding of {sup 125}I-(Tyr{sup 11})Somatostatin to AR4-2J cells was saturable, exhibiting a single class of high-affinity binding sites with a maximal binding capacity of 258 {plus minus} 20 fmol/10{sup 6} cells. Somatostatin receptor structure was analyzed by covalently cross-linking {sup 125}I-(Tyr{sup 11})somatostatin to its plasma membrane receptors. Gel electrophoresis and autoradiography of cross-linked proteins revealed a peptide containing the somatostatin receptor. Somatostatin inhibited vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-stimulated adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) formation in a dose-dependent manner. The concentration of somatostatin that caused half-maximal inhibition of cAMP formation was close to the receptor affinity for somatostatin. Pertussis toxin pretreatment of AR4-2J cells prevented somatostatin inhibition of VIP-stimulated cAMP formation as well as somatostatin binding. The authors conclude that AR4-2J cells exhibit functional somatostatin receptors that retain both specificity and affinity of the pancreatic acinar cell somatostatin receptors and act via the pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide-binding protein N{sub i} to inhibit adenylate cyclase.

  18. Proteoglycans support proper granule formation in pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Aroso, Miguel; Agricola, Brigitte; Hacker, Christian; Schrader, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Zymogen granules (ZG) are specialized organelles in the exocrine pancreas which allow digestive enzyme storage and regulated secretion. The molecular mechanisms of their biogenesis and the sorting of zymogens are still incompletely understood. Here, we investigated the role of proteoglycans in granule formation and secretion of zymogens in pancreatic AR42J cells, an acinar model system. Cupromeronic Blue cytochemistry and biochemical studies revealed an association of proteoglycans primarily with the granule membrane. Removal of proteoglycans by carbonate treatment led to a loss of membrane curvature indicating a supportive role in the maintenance of membrane shape and stability. Chemical inhibition of proteoglycan synthesis impaired the formation of normal electron-dense granules in AR42J cells and resulted in the formation of unusually small granule structures. These structures still contained the zymogen carboxypeptidase, a cargo molecule of secretory granules, but migrated to lighter fractions after density gradient centrifugation. Furthermore, the basal secretion of amylase was increased in AR42J cells after inhibitor treatment. In addition, irregular-shaped granules appeared in pancreatic lobules. We conclude that the assembly of a proteoglycan scaffold at the ZG membrane is supporting efficient packaging of zymogens and the proper formation of stimulus-competent storage granules in acinar cells of the pancreas. PMID:26105026

  19. PNA lectin for purifying mouse acinar cells from the inflamed pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xiangwei; Fischbach, Shane; Fusco, Joseph; Zimmerman, Ray; Song, Zewen; Nebres, Philip; Ricks, David Matthew; Prasadan, Krishna; Shiota, Chiyo; Husain, Sohail Z.; Gittes, George K.

    2016-01-01

    Better methods for purifying human or mouse acinar cells without the need for genetic modification are needed. Such techniques would be advantageous for the specific study of certain mechanisms, such as acinar-to-beta-cell reprogramming and pancreatitis. Ulex Europaeus Agglutinin I (UEA-I) lectin has been used to label and isolate acinar cells from the pancreas. However, the purity of the UEA-I-positive cell fraction has not been fully evaluated. Here, we screened 20 widely used lectins for their binding specificity for major pancreatic cell types, and found that UEA-I and Peanut agglutinin (PNA) have a specific affinity for acinar cells in the mouse pancreas, with minimal affinity for other major pancreatic cell types including endocrine cells, duct cells and endothelial cells. Moreover, PNA-purified acinar cells were less contaminated with mesenchymal and inflammatory cells, compared to UEA-I purified acinar cells. Thus, UEA-I and PNA appear to be excellent lectins for pancreatic acinar cell purification. PNA may be a better choice in situations where mesenchymal cells or inflammatory cells are significantly increased in the pancreas, such as type 1 diabetes, pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. PMID:26884345

  20. Derivation of ductlike cell lines from a transplantable acinar cell carcinoma of the rat pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    Pettengill, O. S.; Faris, R. A.; Bell, R. H.; Kuhlmann, E. T.; Longnecker, D. S.

    1993-01-01

    Two cell lines were derived from a transplantable acinar cell carcinoma that had been established from a primary carcinoma of the pancreas in an azaserine-treated Lewis rat. The cultured tumor cells initially produced amylase, but production of exocrine enzymes ceased after 1-2 weeks in culture. The cultured cells were tumorigenic in Lewis rats, and one line produced solid tumors composed of ductlike structures surrounded by dense fibrous tissue. The second cell line produced partially solid and partially cystic tumors with a mixed phenotype of squamous, mucinous, and glandular areas when it grew in vivo following regrafting. Both cell lines lost structural and immunohistochemical acinar cell markers while acquiring duct cell markers during culture and regrafting. These studies provide strong support for the hypothesis that ductlike carcinomas can arise from neoplastic pancreatic acinar cells in rats. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:8391218

  1. KRAS Mutations in Canine and Feline Pancreatic Acinar Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Crozier, C; Wood, G A; Foster, R A; Stasi, S; Liu, J H W; Bartlett, J M S; Coomber, B L; Sabine, V S

    2016-07-01

    Companion animals may serve as valuable models for studying human cancers. Although KRAS is the most commonly mutated gene in human ductal pancreatic cancers (57%), with mutations frequently occurring at codons 12, 13 and 61, human pancreatic acinar cell carcinomas (ACCs) lack activating KRAS mutations. In the present study, 32 pancreatic ACC samples obtained from 14 dogs and 18 cats, including seven metastases, were analyzed for six common activating KRAS mutations located in codons 12 (n = 5) and 13 (n = 1) using Sequenom MassARRAY. No KRAS mutations were found, suggesting that, similar to human pancreatic ACC, KRAS mutations do not play a critical role in feline or canine pancreatic ACC. Due to the similarity of the clinical disease in dogs and cats to that of man, this study confirms that companion animals offer potential as a suitable model for investigating this rare subtype of pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:27290644

  2. Cathepsin B Activity Initiates Apoptosis via Digestive Protease Activation in Pancreatic Acinar Cells and Experimental Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Sendler, Matthias; Maertin, Sandrina; John, Daniel; Persike, Maria; Weiss, F Ulrich; Krüger, Burkhard; Wartmann, Thomas; Wagh, Preshit; Halangk, Walter; Schaschke, Norbert; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M

    2016-07-01

    Pancreatitis is associated with premature activation of digestive proteases in the pancreas. The lysosomal hydrolase cathepsin B (CTSB) is a known activator of trypsinogen, and its deletion reduces disease severity in experimental pancreatitis. Here we studied the activation mechanism and subcellular compartment in which CTSB regulates protease activation and cellular injury. Cholecystokinin (CCK) increased the activity of CTSB, cathepsin L, trypsin, chymotrypsin, and caspase 3 in vivo and in vitro and induced redistribution of CTSB to a secretory vesicle-enriched fraction. Neither CTSB protein nor activity redistributed to the cytosol, where the CTSB inhibitors cystatin-B/C were abundantly present. Deletion of CTSB reduced and deletion of cathepsin L increased intracellular trypsin activation. CTSB deletion also abolished CCK-induced caspase 3 activation, apoptosis-inducing factor, as well as X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein degradation, but these depended on trypsinogen activation via CTSB. Raising the vesicular pH, but not trypsin inhibition, reduced CTSB activity. Trypsin inhibition did not affect apoptosis in hepatocytes. Deletion of CTSB affected apoptotic but not necrotic acinar cell death. In summary, CTSB in pancreatitis undergoes activation in a secretory, vesicular, and acidic compartment where it activates trypsinogen. Its deletion or inhibition regulates acinar cell apoptosis but not necrosis in two models of pancreatitis. Caspase 3-mediated apoptosis depends on intravesicular trypsinogen activation induced by CTSB, not CTSB activity directly, and this mechanism is pancreas-specific. PMID:27226576

  3. Basal autophagy maintains pancreatic acinar cell homeostasis and protein synthesis and prevents ER stress

    PubMed Central

    Antonucci, Laura; Fagman, Johan B.; Kim, Ju Youn; Todoric, Jelena; Gukovsky, Ilya; Mackey, Mason; Ellisman, Mark H.; Karin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar cells possess very high protein synthetic rates as they need to produce and secrete large amounts of digestive enzymes. Acinar cell damage and dysfunction cause malnutrition and pancreatitis, and inflammation of the exocrine pancreas that promotes development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), a deadly pancreatic neoplasm. The cellular and molecular mechanisms that maintain acinar cell function and whose dysregulation can lead to tissue damage and chronic pancreatitis are poorly understood. It was suggested that autophagy, the principal cellular degradative pathway, is impaired in pancreatitis, but it is unknown whether impaired autophagy is a cause or a consequence of pancreatitis. To address this question, we generated Atg7Δpan mice that lack the essential autophagy-related protein 7 (ATG7) in pancreatic epithelial cells. Atg7Δpan mice exhibit severe acinar cell degeneration, leading to pancreatic inflammation and extensive fibrosis. Whereas ATG7 loss leads to the expected decrease in autophagic flux, it also results in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria, oxidative stress, activation of AMPK, and a marked decrease in protein synthetic capacity that is accompanied by loss of rough ER. Atg7Δpan mice also exhibit spontaneous activation of regenerative mechanisms that initiate acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM), a process that replaces damaged acinar cells with duct-like structures. PMID:26512112

  4. Cell cycle control in isoproterenol-induced murine salivary acinar cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, T; Yamamoto, H; Bowen, E; Broverman, R L; Nguyen, K H; Humphreys-Beher, M G

    1996-11-01

    The eukaryotic cell cycle is a summary of a complex network of signal transduction pathways resulting in both DNA replication and cell division. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) control the cell cycle in all eukaryotes, whereas other proteins, known as cyclins, act as their regulatory subunits. Chronic injection with isoproterenol (ISO) can induce acinar cell proliferation in rodent salivary glands. Cyclins and CDK proteins from control and ISO-treated murine parotid acinar cells were detected by using Western blotting techniques. By comparing the expression of these cell cycle regulatory kinases in the parotid acinar cell transition from a quiescent state to a hypertrophic state, we found rapid increases in the protein levels of all CDKs, cyclin D and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). The highest protein levels for CDKs and cyclins appeared at about 72 hr of ISO stimulation and were coincident with the highest rate of increase in gland wet weight. After 72 hr, the increase of both cell cycle protein and gland wet weight began to subside. By using a co-immunoprecipitation method, the following cell cycle regulators (CDK-cyclin complexes) were detected, CDK4-cyclin D, CDK2-cyclin E, CDK2-cyclin A, and cdc2-cyclin B, along with an increase in kinase activity over control untreated animals. Additionally, we detected significant decreases in the newly isolated CDK inhibitor (CKI) p27kip but not Wee 1 kinase. The increased levels of CKI correlated with a decrease in kinase activity of CDK/cyclin complexes by 144 hr of chronic isoproterenol treatment. Our data suggest that the holoenzymes for cell cycle control (cyclin-CDK complexes) function as a final regulatory mechanism leading to salivary gland acinar cell proliferation. The gradual decline in protein levels of the CDKs and cyclins after 3 days of chronic treatment further indicates that ISO-induced proliferation of parotid acinar cells is self-limiting and non-tumorigenic. PMID:9375366

  5. Characterization of single potassium channels in mouse pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, A; Schulz, I

    1995-01-01

    1. Single K(+)-selective channels with a conductance of about 48 pS (pipette, 145 mM KCl; bath, 140 mM NaCl + 4.7 mM KCl) were recorded in the patch-clamp whole-cell configuration in isolated mouse pancreatic acinar cells. 2. Neither application of the secretagogues acetylcholine (second messenger, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate) or secretin (second messenger, cAMP), nor addition of the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A to the pipette solution changed the activity of the 48 pS K+ channel. 3. Intracellular acidification with sodium propionate (20 mM) diminished activity of the 48 pS channel, whereas channel open probability was increased by cytosolic alkalization with 20 mM NH4Cl. 4. BaCl2 (5 mM), TEA (10 mM) or apamin (1 microM) added to the bath solution had no obvious effect on the kinetics of the 48 pS channel. Similarly, glibenclamide and diazoxide failed to influence the channel activity. 5. When extracellular NaCl was replaced by KCl, whole-cell recordings revealed an inwardly rectifying K+ current carried by a 17 pS K+ channel. 6. The inwardly rectifying K+ current was not pH dependent and could largely be blocked by Ba2+ but not by TEA. 7. Since the 48 pS K+ channel is neither Ca2+ nor cAMP regulated, we suggest that this channel could play a role in the maintenance of the negative cell resting potential. PMID:7623283

  6. Identification of miRNAs Involved in Reprogramming Acinar Cells into Insulin Producing Cells

    PubMed Central

    Teichenne, Joan; Morró, Meritxell; Casellas, Alba; Jimenez, Veronica; Tellez, Noelia; Leger, Adrien; Bosch, Fatima; Ayuso, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    Reprogramming acinar cells into insulin producing cells using adenoviral (Ad)-mediated delivery of Pdx1, Ngn3 and MafA (PNM) is an innovative approach for the treatment of diabetes. Here, we aimed to investigate the molecular mechanisms involved in this process and in particular, the role of microRNAs. To this end, we performed a comparative study of acinar-to-β cell reprogramming efficiency in the rat acinar cell line AR42J and its subclone B13 after transduction with Ad-PNM. B13 cells were more efficiently reprogrammed than AR42J cells, which was demonstrated by a strong activation of β cell markers (Ins1, Ins2, IAPP, NeuroD1 and Pax4). miRNome panels were used to analyze differentially expressed miRNAs in acinar cells under four experimental conditions (i) non-transduced AR42J cells, (ii) non-transduced B13 cells, (iii) B13 cells transduced with Ad-GFP vectors and (iv) B13 cells transduced with Ad-PNM vectors. A total of 59 miRNAs were found to be differentially expressed between non-transduced AR42J and B13 cells. Specifically, the miR-200 family was completely repressed in B13 cells, suggesting that these cells exist in a less differentiated state than AR42J cells and as a consequence they present a greater plasticity. Adenoviral transduction per se induced dedifferentiation of acinar cells and 11 miRNAs were putatively involved in this process, whereas 8 miRNAs were found to be associated with PNM expression. Of note, Ad-PNM reprogrammed B13 cells presented the same levels of miR-137-3p, miR-135a-5p, miR-204-5p and miR-210-3p of those detected in islets, highlighting their role in the process. In conclusion, this study led to the identification of miRNAs that might be of compelling importance to improve acinar-to-β cell conversion for the future treatment of diabetes. PMID:26690959

  7. Acinar cell-specific knockout of the PTHrP gene decreases the proinflammatory and profibrotic responses in pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Vandanajay; Rastellini, Cristiana; Han, Song; Aronson, Judith F.; Greeley, George H.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatitis is a necroinflammatory disease with acute and chronic manifestations. Accumulated damage incurred during repeated bouts of acute pancreatitis (AP) can lead to chronic pancreatitis (CP). Pancreatic parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) levels are elevated in a mouse model of cerulein-induced AP. Here, we show elevated PTHrP levels in mouse models of pancreatitis induced by chronic cerulein administration and pancreatic duct ligation. Because acinar cells play a major role in the pathophysiology of pancreatitis, mice with acinar cell-specific targeted disruption of the Pthrp gene (PTHrPΔacinar) were generated to assess the role of acinar cell-secreted PTHrP in pancreatitis. These mice were generated using Cre-LoxP technology and the acinar cell-specific elastase promoter. PTHrPΔacinar exerted protective effects in cerulein and pancreatic duct ligation models, evident as decreased edema, histological damage, amylase secretion, pancreatic stellate cell (PSC) activation, and extracellular matrix deposition. Treating acinar cells in vitro with cerulein increased IL-6 expression and NF-κB activity; these effects were attenuated in PTHrPΔacinar cells, as were the cerulein- and carbachol-induced elevations in amylase secretion. The cerulein-induced upregulation of procollagen I expression was lost in PSCs from PTHrPΔacinar mice. PTHrP immunostaining was elevated in human CP sections. The cerulein-induced upregulation of IL-6 and ICAM-1 (human acinar cells) and procollagen I (human PSCs) was suppressed by pretreatment with the PTH1R antagonist, PTHrP (7–34). These findings establish PTHrP as a novel mediator of inflammation and fibrosis associated with CP. Acinar cell-secreted PTHrP modulates acinar cell function via its effects on proinflammatory cytokine release and functions via a paracrine pathway to activate PSCs. PMID:25035110

  8. Exocyst subunits are involved in isoproterenol-induced amylase release from rat parotid acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Imai, Akane; Yoshie, Sumio; Haga-Tsujimura, Maiko; Nashida, Tomoko; Shimomura, Hiromi

    2012-04-01

    Exocytosis of secretory granules in parotid acinar cells requires multiple events: tethering, docking, priming, and fusion with a luminal plasma membrane. The exocyst complex, which is composed of eight subunits (Sec3, Sec5, Sec6, Sec8, Sec10, Sec15, Exo70, and Exo84) that are conserved in yeast and mammalian cells, is thought to participate in the exocytotic pathway. However, to date, no exocyst subunit has been identified in salivary glands. In the present study, we investigated the expression and function of exocyst subunits in rat parotid acinar cells. The expression of mRNA for all eight exocyst subunits was detected in parotid acinar cells by RT-PCR, and Sec6 and Sec8 proteins were localized on the luminal plasma membrane. Sec6 interacted with Sec8 after 5 min of stimulation with isoproterenol. In addition, antibodies to-Sec6 and Sec8 inhibited isoproterenol-induced amylase release from streptolysin O-permeabilized parotid acinar cells. These results suggest that an exocyst complex of eight subunits is required for amylase release from parotid acinar cells. PMID:22409218

  9. Pancreatic acinar cells-derived cyclophilin A promotes pancreatic damage by activating NF-κB pathway in experimental pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Ge; Wan, Rong; Hu, Yanling; Ni, Jianbo; Yin, Guojian; Xing, Miao; Shen, Jie; Tang, Maochun; Chen, Congying; Fan, Yuting; Xiao, Wenqin; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Xingpeng; and others

    2014-01-31

    Highlights: • CypA is upregulated in experimental pancreatitis. • CCK induces expression and release of CypA in acinar cell in vitro. • rCypA aggravates CCK-induced acinar cell death and inflammatory cytokine production. • rCypA activates the NF-κB pathway in acinar cells in vitro. - Abstract: Inflammation triggered by necrotic acinar cells contributes to the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis (AP), but its precise mechanism remains unclear. Recent studies have shown that Cyclophilin A (CypA) released from necrotic cells is involved in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory diseases. We therefore investigated the role of CypA in experimental AP induced by administration of sodium taurocholate (STC). CypA was markedly upregulated and widely expressed in disrupted acinar cells, infiltrated inflammatory cells, and tubular complexes. In vitro, it was released from damaged acinar cells by cholecystokinin (CCK) induction. rCypA (recombinant CypA) aggravated CCK-induced acinar cell necrosis, promoted nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65 activation, and increased cytokine production. In conclusion, CypA promotes pancreatic damage by upregulating expression of inflammatory cytokines of acinar cells via the NF-κB pathway.

  10. Acinar phenotype is preserved in human exocrine pancreas cells cultured at low temperature: implications for lineage-tracing of β-cell neogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mfopou, Josué K; Houbracken, Isabelle; Wauters, Elke; Mathijs, Iris; Song, Imane; Himpe, Eddy; Baldan, Jonathan; Heimberg, Harry; Bouwens, Luc

    2016-06-01

    The regenerative medicine field is expanding with great successes in laboratory and preclinical settings. Pancreatic acinar cells in diabetic mice were recently converted into β-cells by treatment with ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF). This suggests that human acinar cells might become a cornerstone for diabetes cell therapy in the future, if they can also be converted into glucose-responsive insulin-producing cells. Presently, studying pancreatic acinar cell biology in vitro is limited by their high plasticity, as they rapidly lose their phenotype and spontaneously transdifferentiate to a duct-like phenotype in culture. We questioned whether human pancreatic acinar cell phenotype could be preserved in vitro by physico-chemical manipulations and whether this could be valuable in the study of β-cell neogenesis. We found that culture at low temperature (4°C) resulted in the maintenance of morphological and molecular acinar cell characteristics. Specifically, chilled acinar cells did not form the spherical clusters observed in controls (culture at 37°C), and they maintained high levels of acinar-specific transcripts and proteins. Five-day chilled acinar cells still transdifferentiated into duct-like cells upon transfer to 37°C. Moreover, adenoviral-mediated gene transfer evidenced an active Amylase promoter in the 7-day chilled acinar cells, and transduction performed in chilled conditions improved acinar cell labelling. Together, our findings indicate the maintenance of human pancreatic acinar cell phenotype at low temperature and the possibility to efficiently label acinar cells, which opens new perspectives for the study of human acinar-to-β-cell transdifferentiation. PMID:26987985

  11. Acinar phenotype is preserved in human exocrine pancreas cells cultured at low temperature: implications for lineage-tracing of β-cell neogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mfopou, Josué K.; Houbracken, Isabelle; Wauters, Elke; Mathijs, Iris; Song, Imane; Himpe, Eddy; Baldan, Jonathan; Heimberg, Harry; Bouwens, Luc

    2016-01-01

    The regenerative medicine field is expanding with great successes in laboratory and preclinical settings. Pancreatic acinar cells in diabetic mice were recently converted into β-cells by treatment with ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF). This suggests that human acinar cells might become a cornerstone for diabetes cell therapy in the future, if they can also be converted into glucose-responsive insulin-producing cells. Presently, studying pancreatic acinar cell biology in vitro is limited by their high plasticity, as they rapidly lose their phenotype and spontaneously transdifferentiate to a duct-like phenotype in culture. We questioned whether human pancreatic acinar cell phenotype could be preserved in vitro by physico-chemical manipulations and whether this could be valuable in the study of β-cell neogenesis. We found that culture at low temperature (4°C) resulted in the maintenance of morphological and molecular acinar cell characteristics. Specifically, chilled acinar cells did not form the spherical clusters observed in controls (culture at 37°C), and they maintained high levels of acinar-specific transcripts and proteins. Five-day chilled acinar cells still transdifferentiated into duct-like cells upon transfer to 37°C. Moreover, adenoviral-mediated gene transfer evidenced an active Amylase promoter in the 7-day chilled acinar cells, and transduction performed in chilled conditions improved acinar cell labelling. Together, our findings indicate the maintenance of human pancreatic acinar cell phenotype at low temperature and the possibility to efficiently label acinar cells, which opens new perspectives for the study of human acinar-to-β-cell transdifferentiation. PMID:26987985

  12. Transgenic Expression of a Single Transcription Factor Pdx1 Induces Transdifferentiation of Pancreatic Acinar Cells to Endocrine Cells in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Satsuki; Tashiro, Fumi; Miyazaki, Jun-ichi

    2016-01-01

    A promising approach to new diabetes therapies is to generate β cells from other differentiated pancreatic cells in vivo. Because the acinar cells represent the most abundant cell type in the pancreas, an attractive possibility is to reprogram acinar cells into β cells. The transcription factor Pdx1 (Pancreas/duodenum homeobox protein 1) is essential for pancreatic development and cell lineage determination. Our objective is to examine whether exogenous expression of Pdx1 in acinar cells of adult mice might induce reprogramming of acinar cells into β cells. We established a transgenic mouse line in which Pdx1 and EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein) could be inducibly expressed in the acinar cells. After induction of Pdx1, we followed the acinar cells for their expression of exocrine and endocrine markers using cell-lineage tracing with EGFP. The acinar cell-specific expression of Pdx1 in adult mice reprogrammed the acinar cells as endocrine precursor cells, which migrated into the pancreatic islets and differentiated into insulin-, somatostatin-, or PP (pancreatic polypeptide)-producing endocrine cells, but not into glucagon-producing cells. When the mice undergoing such pancreatic reprogramming were treated with streptozotocin (STZ), the newly generated insulin-producing cells were able to ameliorate STZ-induced diabetes. This paradigm of in vivo reprogramming indicates that acinar cells hold promise as a source for new islet cells in regenerative therapies for diabetes. PMID:27526291

  13. Transgenic Expression of a Single Transcription Factor Pdx1 Induces Transdifferentiation of Pancreatic Acinar Cells to Endocrine Cells in Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Satsuki; Tashiro, Fumi; Miyazaki, Jun-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    A promising approach to new diabetes therapies is to generate β cells from other differentiated pancreatic cells in vivo. Because the acinar cells represent the most abundant cell type in the pancreas, an attractive possibility is to reprogram acinar cells into β cells. The transcription factor Pdx1 (Pancreas/duodenum homeobox protein 1) is essential for pancreatic development and cell lineage determination. Our objective is to examine whether exogenous expression of Pdx1 in acinar cells of adult mice might induce reprogramming of acinar cells into β cells. We established a transgenic mouse line in which Pdx1 and EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein) could be inducibly expressed in the acinar cells. After induction of Pdx1, we followed the acinar cells for their expression of exocrine and endocrine markers using cell-lineage tracing with EGFP. The acinar cell-specific expression of Pdx1 in adult mice reprogrammed the acinar cells as endocrine precursor cells, which migrated into the pancreatic islets and differentiated into insulin-, somatostatin-, or PP (pancreatic polypeptide)-producing endocrine cells, but not into glucagon-producing cells. When the mice undergoing such pancreatic reprogramming were treated with streptozotocin (STZ), the newly generated insulin-producing cells were able to ameliorate STZ-induced diabetes. This paradigm of in vivo reprogramming indicates that acinar cells hold promise as a source for new islet cells in regenerative therapies for diabetes. PMID:27526291

  14. Constitutive IKK2 activation in acinar cells is sufficient to induce pancreatitis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Bernd; Wagner, Martin; Aleksic, Tamara; von Wichert, Götz; Weber, Christoph K; Adler, Guido; Wirth, Thomas

    2007-06-01

    Activation of the inhibitor of NF-kappaB kinase/NF-kappaB (IKK/NF-kappaB) system and expression of proinflammatory mediators are major events in acute pancreatitis. However, the in vivo consequences of IKK activation on the onset and progression of acute pancreatitis remain unclear. Therefore, we modulated IKK activity conditionally in pancreatic acinar cells. Transgenic mice expressing the reverse tetracycline-responsive transactivator (rtTA) gene under the control of the rat elastase promoter were generated to mediate acinar cell-specific expression of IKK2 alleles. Expression of dominant-negative IKK2 ameliorated cerulein-induced pancreatitis but did not affect activation of trypsin, an initial event in experimental pancreatitis. Notably, expression of constitutively active IKK2 was sufficient to induce acute pancreatitis. This acinar cell-specific phenotype included edema, cellular infiltrates, necrosis, and elevation of serum lipase levels as well as pancreatic fibrosis. IKK2 activation caused increased expression of known NF-kappaB target genes, including mediators of the inflammatory response such as TNF-alpha and ICAM-1. Indeed, inhibition of TNF-alpha activity identified this cytokine as an important effector of IKK2-induced pancreatitis. Our data identify the IKK/NF-kappaB pathway in acinar cells as being key to the development of experimental pancreatitis and the major factor in the inflammatory response typical of this disease. PMID:17525799

  15. Omental acinar cell carcinoma of pancreatic origin in a child: a clinicopathological rarity.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shilpa; Agarwal, Shipra; Nagendla, Murali Krishna; Gupta, Devendra K

    2016-03-01

    A 6-year-old boy presented with a large subhepatic mass associated with pain abdomen. Exploration revealed a tumor in lesser omentum, completely separate from the normal pancreas that was excised completely. Histopathology suggested acinar cell carcinoma of pancreatic origin in an ectopic location. The child is well at 5 months follow-up. PMID:26694824

  16. Internalization and cellular processing of cholecystokinin in rat pancreatic acinar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Izzo, R.S.; Pellecchia, C.; Praissman, M. )

    1988-12-01

    To evaluate the internalization of cholecystokinin, monoiodinated imidoester of cholecystokinin octapeptide ({sup 125}I-(IE)-CCK-8) was bound to dispersed pancreatic acinar cells, and surface-bound and internalized radioligand were differentiated by treating with an acidified glycine buffer. The amount of internalized radioligand was four- and sevenfold greater at 24 and 37{degree}C than at 4{degree}C between 5 and 60 min of association. Specific binding of radioligand to cell surface receptors was not significantly different at these temperatures. Chloroquine, a lysosomotropic agent that blocks intracellular proteolysis, significantly increased the amount of CCK-8 internalized by 18 and 16% at 30 and 60 min of binding, respectively, compared with control. Dithiothreitol (DTT), a sulfhydryl reducing agent, also augmented the amount of CCK-8 radioligand internalized by 25 and 29% at 30 and 60 min, respectively. The effect of chloroquine and DTT on the processing of internalized radioligand was also considered after an initial 60 min of binding of radioligand to acinar cells. After 180 min of processing, the amount of radioligand internalized was significantly greater in the presence of chloroquine compared with controls, whereas the amount of radioligand declined in acinar cells treated with DTT. Internalized and released radioactivity from acinar cells was rebound to pancreatic membrane homogenates to determine the amount of intact radioligand during intracellular processing. Chloroquine significantly increased the amount of intact {sup 125}I-(IE)-CCK-8 radioligand in released and internalized radioactivity while DTT increased the amount of intact radioligand only in internalized samples. This study shows that pancreatic acinar cells rapidly internalize large amounts of CCK-8 and that chloroquine and DTT inhibit intracellular degradation.

  17. [Vital fluorochrome staining of isolated pancreatic acinar cells for the characterization of cell-structural changes].

    PubMed

    Dietzmann, K; Letko, G; Spormann, H

    1986-01-01

    Rhodamine 6 G as a cationic fluorophore is demonstrated to be selectively accumulated by mitochondria of living pancreatic acinar cells (cell isolation see Spormann et al. [1986]. The accumulation of rhodamine was studied under using of electron transport inhibitors, ionophores and some hydrogen donors. The application of DNP as wellknown protonophore resulted in a rapid dissipation of any fluorescent signals, whereas application of sodium succinate, hyperosmolaric exhibited a remarkable increase of fluorescence intensity. Using this technique it is possible to estimate the energy state of living cells under various conditions of energy supply and demand. PMID:2426729

  18. Transdifferentiation of human amniotic epithelial cells into acinar cells using a double-chamber system.

    PubMed

    Huang, Gui-Lin; Zhang, Ni-Ni; Wang, Jun-Sheng; Yao, Li; Zhao, Yu-Jie; Wang, Yu-Ying

    2012-08-01

    This study investigated the transdifferentiation of stem cells from human amnion tissue into functional acinar cells (ACs) using a co-culture system. Human amniotic epithelial cells (hAECs) were isolated from amnion tissue by mechanical mincing and enzymatic digestion. After primary culture, the phenotype of the cells was identified by flow cytometry (FCM) and immunocytochemical staining. hAECs were co-cultured with submandibular gland acinar cells of SD rats using a double-chamber system. The expression of α-amylase was determined by immunocytochemical method and fluorescent real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) after induction for 1 and 2 weeks, respectively. Digestion with trypsin is an effective method for isolating hAECs from amnion tissue. These cells were positive for CD29 and CK19 and weakly positive for CD44 and α-amylase. Within 2 weeks, α-amylase in hAECs increased with induction time. The expression of α-amylase in hAECs was increased 3.38-fold after co-culturing for 1 week. This ratio increased to 6.6-fold, and these cells were positive for mucins, after co-culturing for 2 weeks. hAECs possess the potential to differentiate into ACs in vitro. They might be a stem cell resource for clinical applications of cell replacement therapy in salivary gland dysfunction diseases. PMID:22800093

  19. Salivary gland acinar cells regenerate functional glandular structures in modified hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Swati

    Xerostomia, a condition resulting from irradiation of the head and neck, affects over 40,000 cancer patients each year in the United States. Direct radiation damage of the acinar cells that secrete fluid and protein results in salivary gland hypofunction. Present medical management for xerostomia for patients treated for upper respiratory cancer is largely ineffective. Patients who have survived their terminal diagnosis are often left with a diminished quality of life and are unable to enjoy the simple pleasures of eating and drinking. This project aims to ultimately reduce human suffering by developing a functional implantable artificial salivary gland. The goal was to create an extracellular matrix (ECM) modified hyaluronic acid (HA) based hydrogel culture system that allows for the growth and differentiation of salivary acinar cells into functional acini-like structures capable of secreting large amounts of protein and fluid unidirectionally and to ultimately engineer a functional artificial salivary gland that can be implanted into an animal model. A tissue collection protocol was established and salivary gland tissue was obtained from patients undergoing head and neck surgery. The tissue specimen was assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry to establish the phenotype of normal salivary gland cells including the native basement membranes. Hematoxylin and eosin staining confirmed normal glandular tissue structures including intercalated ducts, striated ducts and acini. alpha-Amylase and periodic acid schiff stain, used for structures with a high proportion of carbohydrate macromolecules, preferentially stained acinar cells in the tissue. Intercalated and striated duct structures were identified using cytokeratins 19 and 7 staining. Myoepithelial cells positive for cytokeratin 14 were found wrapped around the serous and mucous acini. Tight junction components including ZO-1 and E-cadherin were present between both ductal and acinar cells. Ductal and acinar

  20. Loss of Ifnar1 in Pancreatic Acinar Cells Ameliorates the Disease Course of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Miller, Katharina J; Raulefs, Susanne; Kong, Bo; Steiger, Katja; Regel, Ivonne; Gewies, Andreas; Kleeff, Jörg; Michalski, Christoph W

    2015-01-01

    Type I interferon constitutes an essential component of the combinational therapy against viral disease. Acute pancreatitis is one side effect of type I interferon-based therapy, implying that activation of type I interferon signaling affects the homeostasis and integrity of pancreatic acinar cells. Here, we investigated the role of type I interferon signaling in pancreatic acinar cells using a caerulein-induced murine model of acute pancreatitis. Pancreas-specific ablation of interferon (alpha and beta) receptor 1 (Ifnar1) partially protected animals from caerulein-induced pancreatitis, as demonstrated by reduced tissue damage. Profiling of infiltrating immune cells revealed that this dampened tissue damage response correlated with the number of macrophages in the pancreas. Pharmacologic depletion of macrophages reversed the protective effect of Ifnar1 deficiency. Furthermore, expression of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (Ccl2), a potent factor for macrophage recruitment, was significantly increased in the Ifnar1-deficient pancreas. Thus, type I interferon signaling in pancreatic acinar cells controls pancreatic homeostasis by affecting the macrophage-mediated inflammatory response in the pancreas. PMID:26618925

  1. Rab27b regulates exocytosis of secretory vesicles in acinar epithelial cells from the lacrimal gland

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Lilian; Ngo, Julie; Schechter, Joel E.; Karvar, Serhan; Tolmachova, Tanya; Seabra, Miguel C.; Hume, Alistair N.

    2011-01-01

    Tear proteins are supplied by the regulated fusion of secretory vesicles at the apical surface of lacrimal gland acinar cells, utilizing trafficking mechanisms largely yet uncharacterized. We investigated the role of Rab27b in the terminal release of these secretory vesicles. Confocal fluorescence microscopy analysis of primary cultured rabbit lacrimal gland acinar cells revealed that Rab27b was enriched on the membrane of large subapical vesicles that were significantly colocalized with Rab3D and Myosin 5C. Stimulation of cultured acinar cells with the secretagogue carbachol resulted in apical fusion of these secretory vesicles with the plasma membrane. Evaluation of morphological changes by transmission electron microscopy of lacrimal glands from Rab27b−/− and Rab27ash/ash/Rab27b−/− mice, but not ashen mice deficient in Rab27a, showed changes in abundance and organization of secretory vesicles, further confirming a role for this protein in secretory vesicle exocytosis. Glands lacking Rab27b also showed increased lysosomes, damaged mitochondria, and autophagosome-like organelles. In vitro, expression of constitutively active Rab27b increased the average size but retained the subapical distribution of Rab27b-enriched secretory vesicles, whereas dominant-negative Rab27b redistributed this protein from membrane to the cytoplasm. Functional studies measuring release of a cotransduced secretory protein, syncollin-GFP, showed that constitutively active Rab27b enhanced, whereas dominant-negative Rab27b suppressed, stimulated release. Disruption of actin filaments inhibited vesicle fusion to the apical membrane but did not disrupt homotypic fusion. These data show that Rab27b participates in aspects of lacrimal gland acinar cell secretory vesicle formation and release. PMID:21525430

  2. Functional differences in the acinar cells of the murine major salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Y; Nakamoto, T; Jaramillo, Y; Choi, S; Catalan, M A; Melvin, J E

    2015-05-01

    In humans, approximately 90% of saliva is secreted by the 3 major salivary glands: the parotid (PG), the submandibular (SMG), and the sublingual glands (SLG). Even though it is known that all 3 major salivary glands secrete saliva by a Cl(-)-dependent mechanism, salivary secretion rates differ greatly among these glands. The goal of this study was to gain insight into the properties of the ion-transporting pathways in acinar cells that might account for the differences among the major salivary glands. Pilocarpine-induced saliva was simultaneously collected in vivo from the 3 major salivary glands of mice. When normalized by gland weight, the amount of saliva secreted by the PG was more than 2-fold larger than that obtained from the SMG and SLG. At the cellular level, carbachol induced an increase in the intracellular [Ca(2+)] that was more than 2-fold larger in PG and SMG than in SLG acinar cells. Carbachol-stimulated Cl(-) efflux and the protein levels of the Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channel TMEM16A, the major apical Cl(-) efflux pathway in salivary acinar cells, were significantly greater in PG compared with SMG and SLG. In addition, we evaluated the transporter activity of the Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporters (NKCC1) and anion exchangers (AE), the 2 primary basolateral Cl(-) uptake mechanisms in acinar cells. The SMG NKCC1 activity was about twice that of the PG and more than 12-fold greater than that of the SLG. AE activity was similar in PG and SLG, and both PG and SLG AE activity was about 2-fold larger than that of SMG. In summary, the salivation kinetics of the 3 major glands are distinct, and these differences can be explained by the unique functional properties of each gland related to Cl(-) movement, including the transporter activities of the Cl(-) uptake and efflux pathways, and intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization. PMID:25680367

  3. Effect of ethanol on cholecystokinin-stimulated zymogen conversion in pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Katz, M; Carangelo, R; Miller, L J; Gorelick, F

    1996-01-01

    Exocrine pancreatic zymogens are proteolytically processed to active forms after they are secreted into the small intestine. However, intracellular conversion of zymogens to active forms can be stimulated by treating pancreatic acinar cells with high doses of cholecystokinin (0.1 microM) or carbamylcholine (0.1 mM). The high doses of cholecystokinin are unlikely to be achieved physiologically. The ability of ethanol to sensitize the acinar cell to zymogen conversion Induced by cholecystokinin or carbamylcholine was examined. Ethanol (10-200 mM) had no effect alone or when combined with carbamylcholine. However, ethanol (25 mM) added with low-dose cholecystokinin (0.1 nM) generated zymogen conversion that was 1) sixfold higher than cholecystokinin alone and 2) equivalent to that generated by highdose cholecystokinin (10 microM). The ability of ethanol to enhance cholecystokinin-induced zymogen conversion was dependent on the dose of ethanol and the duration of ethanol treatment. The cholecystokinin receptor antagonist, L-364,718, blocked the conversion stimulated by the addition of ethanol with cholecystokinin. This effect of ethanol did not change the affinity or number of cholecystokinin receptors, suggesting an effect more distal in the stimulus-activation cascade. These findings demonstrate that ethanol selectively sensitizes the pancreatic acinar cell to cholecystokinin-stimulated zymogen proteolysis. PMID:8772515

  4. Serotonin promotes acinar dedifferentiation following pancreatitis-induced regeneration in the adult pancreas.

    PubMed

    Saponara, Enrica; Grabliauskaite, Kamile; Bombardo, Marta; Buzzi, Raphael; Silva, Alberto B; Malagola, Ermanno; Tian, Yinghua; Hehl, Adrian B; Schraner, Elisabeth M; Seleznik, Gitta M; Zabel, Anja; Reding, Theresia; Sonda, Sabrina; Graf, Rolf

    2015-12-01

    The exocrine pancreas exhibits a distinctive capacity for tissue regeneration and renewal following injury. This regenerative ability has important implications for a variety of disorders, including pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, diseases associated with high morbidity and mortality. Thus, understanding its underlying mechanisms may help in developing therapeutic interventions. Serotonin has been recognized as a potent mitogen for a variety of cells and tissues. Here we investigated whether serotonin exerts a mitogenic effect in pancreatic acinar cells in three regenerative models, inflammatory tissue injury following pancreatitis, tissue loss following partial pancreatectomy, and thyroid hormone-stimulated acinar proliferation. Genetic and pharmacological techniques were used to modulate serotonin levels in vivo. Acinar dedifferentiation and cell cycle progression during the regenerative phase were investigated over the course of 2 weeks. By comparing acinar proliferation in the different murine models of regeneration, we found that serotonin did not affect the clonal regeneration of mature acinar cells. Serotonin was, however, required for acinar dedifferentiation following inflammation-mediated tissue injury. Specifically, lack of serotonin resulted in delayed up-regulation of progenitor genes and delayed the formation of acinar-to-ductal metaplasia and defective acinar cell proliferation. We identified serotonin-dependent acinar secretion as a key step in progenitor-based regeneration, as it promoted acinar cell dedifferentiation and the recruitment of type 2 macrophages. Finally, we identified a regulatory Hes1-Ptfa axis in the uninjured adult pancreas, activated by zymogen secretion. Our findings indicated that serotonin plays a critical role in the regeneration of the adult pancreas following pancreatitis by promoting the dedifferentiation of acinar cells. PMID:26235267

  5. Inactivation of TGFβ receptor II signalling in pancreatic epithelial cells promotes acinar cell proliferation, acinar-to-ductal metaplasia and fibrosis during pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Grabliauskaite, Kamile; Saponara, Enrica; Reding, Theresia; Bombardo, Marta; Seleznik, Gitta M; Malagola, Ermanno; Zabel, Anja; Faso, Carmen; Sonda, Sabrina; Graf, Rolf

    2016-02-01

    Determining signalling pathways that regulate pancreatic regeneration following pancreatitis is critical for implementing therapeutic interventions. In this study we elucidated the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) in pancreatic epithelial cells during tissue regeneration. To this end, we conditionally inactivated TGFβ receptor II (TGFβ-RII) using a Cre-LoxP system under the control of pancreas transcription factor 1a (PTF1a) promoter, specific for the pancreatic epithelium, and evaluated the molecular and cellular changes in a mouse model of cerulein-induced pancreatitis. We show that TGFβ-RII signalling does not mediate the initial acinar cell damage observed at the onset of pancreatitis. However, TGFβ-RII signalling not only restricts acinar cell replication during the regenerative phase of the disease but also limits ADM formation in vivo and in vitro in a cell-autonomous manner. Analyses of molecular mechanisms underlying the observed phenotype revealed that TGFβ-RII signalling stimulates the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors and intersects with the EGFR signalling axis. Finally, TGFβ-RII ablation in epithelial cells resulted in increased infiltration of inflammatory cells in the early phases of pancreatitis and increased activation of pancreatic stellate cells in the later stages of pancreatitis, thus highlighting a TGFβ-based crosstalk between epithelial and stromal cells regulating the development of pancreatic inflammation and fibrosis. Collectively, our data not only contribute to clarifying the cellular processes governing pancreatic tissue regeneration, but also emphasize the conserved role of TGFβ as a tumour suppressor, both in the regenerative process following pancreatitis and in the initial phases of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26510396

  6. Replacement of Rbpj with Rbpjl in the PTF1 complex controls the final maturation of pancreatic acinar cells

    PubMed Central

    Masui, Toshihiko; Swift, Galvin H.; Deering, Tye; Shen, Chengcheng; Coats, Ward S.; Long, Qiaoming; Elsässer, Hans-Peter; Magnuson, Mark A.; MacDonald, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims The mature pancreatic acinar cell is dedicated to the production of very large amounts of digestive enzymes. The early stages of pancreatic development require the Rbpj-form of the trimeric transcription factor complex PTF1 (PTF1-J). As acinar development commences, Rbpjl gradually replaces Rbpj; in the mature pancreas, PTF1 contains Rbpjl (PTF1-L). We investigated whether PTF1-L controls the expression of genes that complete the final stage of acinar differentiation. Methods We analyzed acinar development and transcription in mice with disrupted Rbpjl (Rbpjlko/ko mice). We performed comprehensive analyses of the mRNA population and PTF1 target genes in pancreatic acinar cells from these and wild-type mice. Results In Rbpjlko/ko mice, acinar differentiation was incomplete and characterized by decreased expression (as much as 99%) of genes that encode digestive enzymes or proteins of regulated exocytosis and mitochondrial metabolism. Whereas PTF1-L bound regulatory sites of genes in normal adult pancreatic cells, the embryonic form (PTF1-J) persisted in the absence of Rbpjl and replaced PTF1-L; the extent of replacement determined gene expression levels. Loss of PTF1-L reduced expression (>2-fold) of only about 50 genes, 90% of which were direct targets of PTF1-L. The magnitude of the effects on individual digestive enzyme genes correlated with the developmental timing of gene activation. Absence of Rbpjl increased pancreatic expression of liver-restricted mRNAs. Conclusions Replacement of Rbpj by Rbpjl in the PTF1 complex drives acinar differentiation by maximizing secretory protein synthesis, stimulating mitochondrial metabolism and cytoplasmic creatine-phosphate energy stores, completing the packaging and secretory apparatus, and maintaining acinar-cell homeostasis. PMID:20398665

  7. Genetic deletion of Rab27B in pancreatic acinar cells affects granules size and has inhibitory effects on amylase secretion.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yanan; Ernst, Stephen A; Lentz, Stephen I; Williams, John A

    2016-03-18

    Small G protein Rab27B is expressed in various secretory cell types and plays a role in mediating secretion. In pancreatic acinar cells, Rab27B was found to be expressed on the zymogen granule membrane and by overexpression to regulate the secretion of zymogen granules. However, the effect of Rab27B deletion on the physiology of pancreatic acinar cells is unknown. In the current study, we utilized the Rab27B KO mouse model to better understand the role of Rab27B in the secretion of pancreatic acinar cells. Our data show that Rab27B deficiency had no obvious effects on the expression of major digestive enzymes and other closely related proteins, e.g. similar small G proteins, such as Rab3D and Rab27A, and putative downstream effectors. The overall morphology of acinar cells was not changed in the knockout pancreas. However, the size of zymogen granules was decreased in KO acinar cells, suggesting a role of Rab27B in regulating the maturation of secretory granules. The secretion of digestive enzymes was moderately decreased in KO acini, compared with the WT control. These data indicate that Rab27B is involved at a different steps of zymogen granule maturation and secretion, which is distinct from that of Rab3D. PMID:26845357

  8. Amylase release from dissociated mouse pancreatic acinar cells stimulated by glucagon: effect of membrane stabilizers.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, M

    1980-01-01

    1. The effect of membrane stabilizers and cytochalasin-B on amylase secretion, basal and induced by ionophore A23187, CCK-PZ, bethanechol and glucagon, was studied in dissociated mouse pancreatic acinar cells. 2. Cytochalasin-B did not affect basal or secretagogue-stimulated amylase secretion. 3. Membrane stabilizers [thymol (10(-7)-10(-4) M), chlorpromazine (10(-7)-10(-4) M) and propranolol (10(-7)-10(-5) M) did not alter basal release of amylase. At higher concentrations of thymol (10(-3) M), chlorpromazine (10(-3) M) and propranolol (10(-4) M), dissociated acinar cells were lysed as indicated by an increase in release of lactic dehydrogenase (LDH). 4. Ionophore A23187, CCK-PZ (maximal effective concentrations, 0.01 u. ml.-1), bethanechol (maximal effective concentrations, 10(-4) M) and glucagon increased amylase secretion in a dose-dependent fashion. Concentrations of CCK-PZ and bethanechol beyond optimal levels decreased amylase secretion. Concentrations of ionophore A23187 and glucagon when tested beyond 10(-6) M and 10(-4) M respectively increased the release of LDH. In concentrations that were non-toxic, membrane stabilizers blocked the stimulating effect of cholecystokinin-pancreozymin and bethanechol on amylase secretion but did not alter the response to A23187 and glucagon. 5. Unlike bethanechol, glucagon neither increased the uptake of 45Ca nor did it alter the release of 45Ca from cells previously loaded with 45CaCl2. 6. These data provide evidence that stimulus-secretion coupling in dissociated pancreatic acinar cells is basically similar to cells in situ. The effect of glucagon is consistent with the model in which hormone-dependent mobilization of Ca2+ from intra- or extracellular sources is bypassed leading to digestive enzyme secretion. PMID:6166745

  9. A comparative ultrastructural study of the parotid gland acinar cells of nine wild ruminant species (mammalia, artiodactyla).

    PubMed

    Stolte, M; Ito, S

    1996-01-01

    The ultrastructural similarities and differences of the parotid gland acinar cells of nine wild ruminants (roe deer, nyala, tahr, Eld's deer, red deer, Pere David's deer, European mouflon, African buffalo, sable antelope) representing three feeding types i.e. concentrate selectors (CS), grass and roughage eaters (GR) and intermediate feeders (IM) were compared. The parotid acinar cells of the CS contained more granular endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi-complexes and secretory granules than those of the GR. The acinar cells of the latter were characterized by numerous mitochondria, folded plasma membranes and intercellular secretory canaliculi. The ultrastructure of the secretory granules varied in different species but their morphology was not related to feeding type. An unusual feature of the parotid acinar cells of all feeding types was the evidence of an apocrine-like mode of secretion. A typical morphological change of some parotid acinar cells was the compression of the nucleus by large vacuoles. No distinctive differences were found in the ultrastructure of the parotid gland of wild and captive ruminants. PMID:9090994

  10. Ligand-bound Thyroid Hormone Receptor Contributes to Reprogramming of Pancreatic Acinar Cells into Insulin-producing Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Furuya, Fumihiko; Shimura, Hiroki; Asami, Keiichi; Ichijo, Sayaka; Takahashi, Kazuya; Kaneshige, Masahiro; Oikawa, Yoichi; Aida, Kaoru; Endo, Toyoshi; Kobayashi, Tetsuro

    2013-01-01

    One goal of diabetic regenerative medicine is to instructively convert mature pancreatic exocrine cells into insulin-producing cells. We recently reported that ligand-bound thyroid hormone receptor α (TRα) plays a critical role in expansion of the β-cell mass during postnatal development. Here, we used an adenovirus vector that expresses TRα driven by the amylase 2 promoter (AdAmy2TRα) to induce the reprogramming of pancreatic acinar cells into insulin-producing cells. Treatment with l-3,5,3-triiodothyronine increases the association of TRα with the p85α subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), leading to the phosphorylation and activation of Akt and the expression of Pdx1, Ngn3, and MafA in purified acinar cells. Analyses performed with the lectin-associated cell lineage tracing system and the Cre/loxP-based direct cell lineage tracing system indicate that newly synthesized insulin-producing cells originate from elastase-expressing pancreatic acinar cells. Insulin-containing secretory granules were identified in these cells by electron microscopy. The inhibition of p85α expression by siRNA or the inhibition of PI3K by LY294002 prevents the expression of Pdx1, Ngn3, and MafA and the reprogramming to insulin-producing cells. In immunodeficient mice with streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemia, treatment with AdAmy2TRα leads to the reprogramming of pancreatic acinar cells to insulin-producing cells in vivo. Our findings suggest that ligand-bound TRα plays a critical role in β-cell regeneration during postnatal development via activation of PI3K signaling. PMID:23595988

  11. Ligand-bound thyroid hormone receptor contributes to reprogramming of pancreatic acinar cells into insulin-producing cells.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Fumihiko; Shimura, Hiroki; Asami, Keiichi; Ichijo, Sayaka; Takahashi, Kazuya; Kaneshige, Masahiro; Oikawa, Yoichi; Aida, Kaoru; Endo, Toyoshi; Kobayashi, Tetsuro

    2013-05-31

    One goal of diabetic regenerative medicine is to instructively convert mature pancreatic exocrine cells into insulin-producing cells. We recently reported that ligand-bound thyroid hormone receptor α (TRα) plays a critical role in expansion of the β-cell mass during postnatal development. Here, we used an adenovirus vector that expresses TRα driven by the amylase 2 promoter (AdAmy2TRα) to induce the reprogramming of pancreatic acinar cells into insulin-producing cells. Treatment with l-3,5,3-triiodothyronine increases the association of TRα with the p85α subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), leading to the phosphorylation and activation of Akt and the expression of Pdx1, Ngn3, and MafA in purified acinar cells. Analyses performed with the lectin-associated cell lineage tracing system and the Cre/loxP-based direct cell lineage tracing system indicate that newly synthesized insulin-producing cells originate from elastase-expressing pancreatic acinar cells. Insulin-containing secretory granules were identified in these cells by electron microscopy. The inhibition of p85α expression by siRNA or the inhibition of PI3K by LY294002 prevents the expression of Pdx1, Ngn3, and MafA and the reprogramming to insulin-producing cells. In immunodeficient mice with streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemia, treatment with AdAmy2TRα leads to the reprogramming of pancreatic acinar cells to insulin-producing cells in vivo. Our findings suggest that ligand-bound TRα plays a critical role in β-cell regeneration during postnatal development via activation of PI3K signaling. PMID:23595988

  12. Pancreatic acinar cells: effect of acetylcholine, pancreozymin, gastrin and secretin on membrane potential and resistance in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, O H; Ueda, N

    1975-01-01

    1. Intracellular recordings of membrane potential and input resistance have been made in vivo and in vitro from the exocrine acinar cells of rat pancreas using indwelling glass micro-electrodes. 2. The resting cell membrane potential and input resistance in the in vivo experiments were not markedly different from the values obtained in the in vitro experiments. The effect of both acetylcholine (ACh) and pancreozymin (CCK-Pz) on the pancreas in vivo as well as in vitro was to reduce both the acinar cell membrane potential and the input resistance narkedly. The amplitude of the evoked depolarization and the change in input resistance evoked by supramaximal stimuli were of the same magnitude in both types of preparations. 3. Gastrin had an effect on the acinar cell potential and resistance which was indistinguishable from that of CCK-Pz or ACh. The effect of gastrin or CCK-Pz was, in contrast to that of ACh, not influenced by the presence of atropine. The reversal potential for the gastrin evoked potential change was about -20 mV. 4. Secretin in doses producing maximal volume secretion in vivo had no effect on acinar cell membrane potential and input resistance. 5. Dibutyryl cyclic AMP (5mM) and cyclic GMP (1mM) had no effect on cell membrane potential or resistance. 6. It is concluded that the in vitro superfused pancreas segment preparation is a useful model system in electrophysiological studies since it functions essentially as the in vivo preparation. In contrast to both gastrin and CCK-Pz, secretin has no effect on the bioelectrical properties of the acinar cells, indicating that there are no physiologically important secretin receptors in rat acinar cells. PMID:168355

  13. Glycyrrhizin down-regulates CCL2 and CXCL2 expression in cerulein-stimulated pancreatic acinar cells

    PubMed Central

    Panahi, Yaser; Fakhari, Shohreh; Mohammadi, Mehdi; Rahmani, Mohammad Reza; Hakhamaneshi, Mohammad Saeid; Jalili, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Many inflammatory chemokines release from leukocytes and pancreatic acinar cells which play important roles in pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis (AP). Of interests, CXCL2 and CCL2 have been shown elevated in the plasma of patients with AP. We have recently found that Glycyrrhizin (GZ) attenuates AP in mice model. In this study, we aimed to investigate the direct effect of GZ on expression levels of CCL2 and CXCl2 in isolated pancreatic acinar cells. Isolated acinar cells were isolated from the pancreas of healthy C57BL/6 mice, stimulated with cerulein (10-7 M) and then treated with either PBS or different doses of GZ. The levels of CCL2 and CXCL2 expression at mRNA were assessed by qRT-PCR. Conditioned media from supernatants of each cells culture condition were collected for detection of CCL2 and CXCL2 levels by ELISA. First, we observed that cerulein significantly upregulates both cytokines expression in acinar cells. Moreover, we treated the acinar cells with GZ and found that GZ significantly downregulates CCL2 and CXCL2 expression at mRNA levels in a dose-dependent manner. Consistently, the conditioned media of GZ-treated cells contained a significant lower levels of CCL2 and CXCL2 (p<0.05). In conclusion, our data demonstrate for the first time that GZ directly downregulates CCL2 and CXCL2 levels in cerulein-stimulated acinar cells which may explain the mechanism of therapeutic effects of GZ in cerulein-induced AP in mice. PMID:26155433

  14. Functional involvement of Noc2, a Rab27 effector, in rat parotid acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Imai, Akane; Yoshie, Sumio; Nashida, Tomoko; Shimomura, Hiromi; Fukuda, Mitsunori

    2006-11-15

    Noc2 has recently been proposed to regulate exocytosis in both endocrine and exocrine cells; however, protein expression, subcellular localization and function of Noc2 in exocrine cells have never been elucidated. In this study, we investigated whether Noc2, a Rab27 effector, is involved in isoproterenol (IPR)-stimulated amylase release from acinar cells. Rab27 was detected in the apical plasma membrane (APM) and secretory granule membrane (SGM) fractions, and was translocated to the APM after IPR stimulation for 5 min, but was detected at lower levels in the APM after 30 min. In contrast, although Noc2 was expressed in SGM bound to Rab27, Noc2 was not translocated to APM and the Noc2/Rab27 complex was disrupted after stimulation with IPR for short time. In addition, the anti-Noc2-Rab-binding-domain antibody inhibited IPR-stimulated amylase release from streptolysin O-permeabilized parotid acinar cells. Our results suggest that the Noc2/Rab27 complex is an important constituent of the early stages of IPR-stimulated amylase release. PMID:17067543

  15. Salivary gland acinar cells regenerate functional glandular structures in modified hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Swati

    Xerostomia, a condition resulting from irradiation of the head and neck, affects over 40,000 cancer patients each year in the United States. Direct radiation damage of the acinar cells that secrete fluid and protein results in salivary gland hypofunction. Present medical management for xerostomia for patients treated for upper respiratory cancer is largely ineffective. Patients who have survived their terminal diagnosis are often left with a diminished quality of life and are unable to enjoy the simple pleasures of eating and drinking. This project aims to ultimately reduce human suffering by developing a functional implantable artificial salivary gland. The goal was to create an extracellular matrix (ECM) modified hyaluronic acid (HA) based hydrogel culture system that allows for the growth and differentiation of salivary acinar cells into functional acini-like structures capable of secreting large amounts of protein and fluid unidirectionally and to ultimately engineer a functional artificial salivary gland that can be implanted into an animal model. A tissue collection protocol was established and salivary gland tissue was obtained from patients undergoing head and neck surgery. The tissue specimen was assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry to establish the phenotype of normal salivary gland cells including the native basement membranes. Hematoxylin and eosin staining confirmed normal glandular tissue structures including intercalated ducts, striated ducts and acini. alpha-Amylase and periodic acid schiff stain, used for structures with a high proportion of carbohydrate macromolecules, preferentially stained acinar cells in the tissue. Intercalated and striated duct structures were identified using cytokeratins 19 and 7 staining. Myoepithelial cells positive for cytokeratin 14 were found wrapped around the serous and mucous acini. Tight junction components including ZO-1 and E-cadherin were present between both ductal and acinar cells. Ductal and acinar

  16. The econobiology of pancreatic acinar cells granule inventory and the stealthy nano-machine behind it.

    PubMed

    Hammel, Ilan; Meilijson, Isaac

    2016-03-01

    The pancreatic gland secretes most of the enzymes and many other macromolecules needed for food digestion in the gastrointestinal tract. These molecules play an important role in digestion, host defense and lubrication. The secretion of pancreatic proteins ensures the availability of the correct mix of proteins when needed. This review describes model systems available for the study of the econobiology of secretory granule content. The secretory pancreatic molecules are stored in large dense-core secretory granules that may undergo either constitutive or evoked secretion, and constitute the granule inventory of the cell. It is proposed that the Golgi complex functions as a distribution center for secretory proteins in pancreatic acinar cells, packing the newly formed secretory molecules into maturing secretory granules, also known functionally as condensing vacuoles. Mathematical modelling brings forward a process underlying granule inventory maintenance at various physiological states of condensation and aggregation by homotypic fusion. These models suggest unique but simple mechanisms accountable for inventory buildup and size, as well as for the distribution of secretory molecules into different secretory pathways in pancreatic acinar cells. PMID:26702787

  17. Kinetic Control of Multiple Forms of Ca2+ Spikes by Inositol Trisphosphate in Pancreatic Acinar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Koichi; Miyashita, Yasushi; Kasai, Haruo

    1999-01-01

    The mechanisms of agonist-induced Ca2+ spikes have been investigated using a caged inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) and a low-affinity Ca2+ indicator, BTC, in pancreatic acinar cells. Rapid photolysis of caged IP3 was able to reproduce acetylcholine (ACh)-induced three forms of Ca2+ spikes: local Ca2+ spikes and submicromolar (<1 μM) and micromolar (1–15 μM) global Ca2+ spikes (Ca2+ waves). These observations indicate that subcellular gradients of IP3 sensitivity underlie all forms of ACh-induced Ca2+ spikes, and that the amplitude and extent of Ca2+ spikes are determined by the concentration of IP3. IP3-induced local Ca2+ spikes exhibited similar time courses to those generated by ACh, supporting a role for Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release in local Ca2+ spikes. In contrast, IP3- induced global Ca2+ spikes were consistently faster than those evoked with ACh at all concentrations of IP3 and ACh, suggesting that production of IP3 via phospholipase C was slow and limited the spread of the Ca2+ spikes. Indeed, gradual photolysis of caged IP3 reproduced ACh-induced slow Ca2+ spikes. Thus, local and global Ca2+ spikes involve distinct mechanisms, and the kinetics of global Ca2+ spikes depends on that of IP3 production particularly in those cells such as acinar cells where heterogeneity in IP3 sensitivity plays critical role. PMID:10427093

  18. Polyethylenimine-mediated expression of transgenes in the acinar cells of rats salivary glands in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sramkova, Monika; Parente, Laura; Wigand, Timothy; Aye, Myo-Pale'; Shitara, Akiko; Weigert, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Non viral-mediated transfection of plasmid DNA provides a fast and reliable way to express various transgenes in selected cell populations in live animals. Here, we show an improvement of a previously published method that is based on injecting plasmid DNA into the ductal system of the salivary glands in live rats. Specifically, using complexes between plasmid DNA and polyethyleneimine (PEI) we show that the expression of the transgenes is directed selectively to the salivary acinar cells. PEI does not affect the ability of cells to undergo regulated exocytosis, which was one of the main drawbacks of the previous methods. Moreover PEI does not affect the proper localization and targeting of transfected proteins, as shown for the apical plasma membrane water channel aquaporin 5 (AQP5). Overall, this approach, coupled with the use of intravital microscopy, permits to conduct localization and functional studies under physiological conditions, in a rapid, reliable, and affordable fashion. PMID:25621283

  19. Effect of glucagon on digestive enzyme synthesis, transport and secretion in mouse pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, M

    1980-01-01

    1. Effect of glucagon on amylase secretion and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) release from functionally intact dissociated pancreatic acinar cells and acini was studied. 2. In dissociated rat pancreatic acinar cells, the rate of amylase secretion was increased by 70% with bethanechol (maximally effective concentration, 10(-4) M) and 125% with A23187 (10(-5) M), but the response to cholecystokinin-pancreozymin (CCK-PZ) was inconsistent. In dissociated cells from mouse pancreas, the increases amounted to 78% with bethanechol (10(-4) M), 134% with A23187 (10(-5) M) and 82% with CCK-PZ (maximally effective concentration, 0 . 01 u. ml.-1). Glucagon in concentrations ranging from 10(-7) to 10(-4) M increased amylase secretion by 3, 26, 67 and 80%, whereas secretin (10(-8)--10(-5) M) increased amylase secretion by 8, 39, 88 and 138%. LDH release was increased with A23187 in concentrations greater than 10(-6) M. 3. CCK-PZ, bethanechol and A23187 used in maximal concentrations potentiated the effect of a submaximal dose of glucagon whereas secretin did not have an additive or a potentiating effect. 4. Pancreatic acini were approximately 3 times more responsive to secretagogues than cells. The dose--response curves to bethanechol, glucagon and CCK-PZ for increase in amylase secretion were similar. LDH release was not increased by these agents. Cytochalasin B (5 microgram ml.-1) which is known to disrupt the integrity of luminal membrane inhibited the amylase secretion stimulated by glucagon, bethanechol and CCK-PZ. 5. Glucagon inhibited incorporation of a mixture of fifteen 14C-labelled amino acids (algal profile, Schwarz Mann) into perchloric acid precipitable proteins in dissociated mouse pancreatic acini within 30 min. 6. In 'pulse-chase' experiments, glucagon decreased the specific activity of zymogen granules isolated by differential centrifugation, from pancreatic lobules (120 min) and increased the specific activity of radiolabelled proteins in the medium (60 and 120 min

  20. Activation of neurokinin-1 receptors up-regulates substance P and neurokinin-1 receptor expression in murine pancreatic acinar cells

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Yung-Hua; Moochhala, Shabbir; Bhatia, Madhav

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Acute pancreatitis (AP) has been associated with an up-regulation of substance P (SP) and neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R) in the pancreas. Increased SP-NK1R interaction was suggested to be pro-inflammatory during AP. Previously, we showed that caerulein treatment increased SP/NK1R expression in mouse pancreatic acinar cells, but the effect of SP treatment was not evaluated. Pancreatic acinar cells were obtained from pancreas of male swiss mice (25–30 g). We measured mRNA expression of preprotachykinin-A (PPTA) and NK1R following treatment of SP (10−6M). SP treatment increased PPTA and NK1R expression in isolated pancreatic acinar cells, which was abolished by pretreatment of a selective NK1R antagonist, CP96,345. SP also time dependently increased protein expression of NK1R. Treatment of cells with a specific NK1R agonist, GR73,632, up-regulated SP protein levels in the cells. Using previously established concentrations, pre-treatment of pancreatic acinar cells with Gö6976 (10 nM), rottlerin (5 μM), PD98059 (30 μM), SP600125 (30 μM) or Bay11-7082 (30 μM) significantly inhibited up-regulation of SP and NK1R. These observations suggested that the PKC-ERK/JNK-NF-κB pathway is necessary for the modulation of expression levels. In comparison, pre-treatment of CP96,345 reversed gene expression in SP-induced cells, but not in caerulein-treated cells. Overall, the findings in this study suggested a possible auto-regulatory mechanism of SP/NK1R expression in mouse pancreatic acinar cells, via activation of NK1R. Elevated SP levels during AP might increase the occurrence of a positive feedback loop that contributes to abnormally high expression of SP and NK1R. PMID:22040127

  1. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor is present in pancreatic acinar cells and regulates amylase secretion through cAMP.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yanan; Ernst, Stephen A; Heidenreich, Kaeli; Williams, John A

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a glucoincretin hormone that can act through its receptor (GLP-1R) on pancreatic β-cells and increase insulin secretion and production. GLP-1R agonists are used clinically to treat type 2 diabetes. GLP-1 may also regulate the exocrine pancreas at multiple levels, including inhibition through the central nervous system, stimulation indirectly through insulin, and stimulation directly on acinar cells. However, it has been unclear whether GLP-1R is present in pancreatic acini and what physiological functions these receptors regulate. In the current study we utilized GLP-1R knockout (KO) mice to study the role of GLP-1R in acinar cells. RNA expression of GLP-1R was detected in acutely isolated pancreatic acini. Acinar cell morphology and expression of digestive enzymes were not affected by loss of GLP-1R. GLP-1 induced amylase secretion in wild-type (WT) acini. In GLP-1R KO mice, this effect was abolished, whereas vasoactive intestinal peptide-induced amylase release in KO acini showed a pattern similar to that in WT acini. GLP-1 stimulated cAMP production and increased protein kinase A-mediated protein phosphorylation in WT acini, and these effects were absent in KO acini. These data show that GLP-1R is present in pancreatic acinar cells and that GLP-1 can regulate secretion through its receptor and cAMP signaling pathway. PMID:26542397

  2. A Systems Biology Approach Identifies a Regulatory Network in Parotid Acinar Cell Terminal Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Metzler, Melissa A.; Venkatesh, Srirangapatnam G.; Lakshmanan, Jaganathan; Carenbauer, Anne L.; Perez, Sara M.; Andres, Sarah A.; Appana, Savitri; Brock, Guy N.; Wittliff, James L.; Darling, Douglas S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The transcription factor networks that drive parotid salivary gland progenitor cells to terminally differentiate, remain largely unknown and are vital to understanding the regeneration process. Methodology A systems biology approach was taken to measure mRNA and microRNA expression in vivo across acinar cell terminal differentiation in the rat parotid salivary gland. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) was used to specifically isolate acinar cell RNA at times spanning the month-long period of parotid differentiation. Results Clustering of microarray measurements suggests that expression occurs in four stages. mRNA expression patterns suggest a novel role for Pparg which is transiently increased during mid postnatal differentiation in concert with several target gene mRNAs. 79 microRNAs are significantly differentially expressed across time. Profiles of statistically significant changes of mRNA expression, combined with reciprocal correlations of microRNAs and their target mRNAs, suggest a putative network involving Klf4, a differentiation inhibiting transcription factor, which decreases as several targeting microRNAs increase late in differentiation. The network suggests a molecular switch (involving Prdm1, Sox11, Pax5, miR-200a, and miR-30a) progressively decreases repression of Xbp1 gene transcription, in concert with decreased translational repression by miR-214. The transcription factor Xbp1 mRNA is initially low, increases progressively, and may be maintained by a positive feedback loop with Atf6. Transfection studies show that Xbp1Mist1 promoter. In addition, Xbp1 and Mist1 each activate the parotid secretory protein (Psp) gene, which encodes an abundant salivary protein, and is a marker of terminal differentiation. Conclusion This study identifies novel expression patterns of Pparg, Klf4, and Sox11 during parotid acinar cell differentiation, as well as numerous differentially expressed microRNAs. Network analysis identifies a novel stemness arm, a

  3. Tmem16A Encodes the Ca2+-activated Cl− Channel in Mouse Submandibular Salivary Gland Acinar Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Romanenko, Victor G.; Catalán, Marcelo A.; Brown, David A.; Putzier, Ilva; Hartzell, H. Criss; Marmorstein, Alan D.; Gonzalez-Begne, Mireya; Rock, Jason R.; Harfe, Brian D.; Melvin, James E.

    2010-01-01

    Activation of an apical Ca2+-dependent Cl− channel (CaCC) is the rate-limiting step for fluid secretion in many exocrine tissues. Here, we compared the properties of native CaCC in mouse submandibular salivary gland acinar cells to the Ca2+-gated Cl− currents generated by Tmem16A and Best2, members from two distinct families of Ca2+-activated Cl− channels found in salivary glands. Heterologous expression of Tmem16A and Best2 transcripts in HEK293 cells produced Ca2+-activated Cl− currents with time and voltage dependence and inhibitor sensitivity that resembled the Ca2+-activated Cl− current found in native salivary acinar cells. Best2−/− and Tmem16A−/− mice were used to further characterize the role of these channels in the exocrine salivary gland. The amplitude and the biophysical footprint of the Ca2+-activated Cl− current in submandibular gland acinar cells from Best2-deficient mice were the same as in wild type cells. Consistent with this observation, the fluid secretion rate in Best2 null mice was comparable with that in wild type mice. In contrast, submandibular gland acinar cells from Tmem16A−/− mice lacked a Ca2+-activated Cl− current and a Ca2+-mobilizing agonist failed to stimulate Cl− efflux, requirements for fluid secretion. Furthermore, saliva secretion was abolished by the CaCC inhibitor niflumic acid in wild type and Best2−/− mice. Our results demonstrate that both Tmem16A and Best2 generate Ca2+-activated Cl− current in vitro with similar properties to those expressed in native cells, yet only Tmem16A appears to be a critical component of the acinar Ca2+-activated Cl− channel complex that is essential for saliva production by the submandibular gland. PMID:20177062

  4. A resected case of symptomatic acinar cell cystadenoma of the pancreas displacing the main pancreatic duct.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Haruyoshi; Hatsuno, Tsuyoshi; Kinoshita, Mitsuru; Hasegawa, Kazuya; Ishihara, Hiromasa; Takano, Nao; Shimoyama, Satofumi; Nakayama, Hiroshi; Kataoka, Masato; Ichihara, Shu; Kanda, Mitsuro; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Ken

    2016-12-01

    Acinar cell cystadenoma (ACA) of the pancreas has been newly recognized as an entity by the World Health Organization (WHO) definition (2010), and its pathogenesis has not been known adequately because of the rarity. Here, we report a case of a 22-year-old female who had been followed up for a cystic lesion at the tail of the pancreas pointed out by a screening computed tomography (CT) scan 7 years ago. The tumor grew in size from 3.3 to 5.1 cm in diameter for 6 years (0.3 cm per year). Particularly, it rapidly grew up to 6.3 cm in the latest 3 months in concurrence with the emergence of epigastralgia. A contrasted CT scan revealed the irregularly formed, multilocular cystic tumor having thin septum and calcification. The intratumoral magnetic resonance imaging intensity in the T1 and T2 weighted images were low and high, respectively. No communications between the tumor and the main pancreatic duct (MPD) were found, but the tumor displaced the MPD. She underwent surgical resection because the tumor was growing, turned symptomatic, and it seemed difficult to be diagnosed correctly until totally biopsied. Spleen-preserved distal pancreatectomy was performed. It was pathologically diagnosed as ACA; the cyst was lined by cells with normal acinar differentiation; cuboidal cells with round, basally oriented nuclei and eosinophilic granules in its apical cytoplasm. The abdominal pain has disappeared, and no recurrences have been found during a 5-year follow-up. Clinicians are recommended to consider an ACA as one of differential diagnoses of cystic tumors of the pancreas to provide appropriate diagnostics and therapeutics. PMID:27108123

  5. Cannabinoid receptor subtype 2 (CB2R) agonist, GW405833 reduces agonist-induced Ca2+ oscillations in mouse pancreatic acinar cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zebing; Wang, Haiyan; Wang, Jingke; Zhao, Mengqin; Sun, Nana; Sun, Fangfang; Shen, Jianxin; Zhang, Haiying; Xia, Kunkun; Chen, Dejie; Gao, Ming; Hammer, Ronald P.; Liu, Qingrong; Xi, Zhengxiong; Fan, Xuegong; Wu, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence demonstrates that the blockade of intracellular Ca2+ signals may protect pancreatic acinar cells against Ca2+ overload, intracellular protease activation, and necrosis. The activation of cannabinoid receptor subtype 2 (CB2R) prevents acinar cell pathogenesis in animal models of acute pancreatitis. However, whether CB2Rs modulate intracellular Ca2+ signals in pancreatic acinar cells is largely unknown. We evaluated the roles of CB2R agonist, GW405833 (GW) in agonist-induced Ca2+ oscillations in pancreatic acinar cells using multiple experimental approaches with acute dissociated pancreatic acinar cells prepared from wild type, CB1R-knockout (KO), and CB2R-KO mice. Immunohistochemical labeling revealed that CB2R protein was expressed in mouse pancreatic acinar cells. Electrophysiological experiments showed that activation of CB2Rs by GW reduced acetylcholine (ACh)-, but not cholecystokinin (CCK)-induced Ca2+ oscillations in a concentration-dependent manner; this inhibition was prevented by a selective CB2R antagonist, AM630, or was absent in CB2R-KO but not CB1R-KO mice. In addition, GW eliminated L-arginine-induced enhancement of Ca2+ oscillations, pancreatic amylase, and pulmonary myeloperoxidase. Collectively, we provide novel evidence that activation of CB2Rs eliminates ACh-induced Ca2+ oscillations and L-arginine-induced enhancement of Ca2+ signaling in mouse pancreatic acinar cells, which suggests a potential cellular mechanism of CB2R-mediated protection in acute pancreatitis. PMID:27432473

  6. Cannabinoid receptor subtype 2 (CB2R) agonist, GW405833 reduces agonist-induced Ca(2+) oscillations in mouse pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zebing; Wang, Haiyan; Wang, Jingke; Zhao, Mengqin; Sun, Nana; Sun, Fangfang; Shen, Jianxin; Zhang, Haiying; Xia, Kunkun; Chen, Dejie; Gao, Ming; Hammer, Ronald P; Liu, Qingrong; Xi, Zhengxiong; Fan, Xuegong; Wu, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence demonstrates that the blockade of intracellular Ca(2+) signals may protect pancreatic acinar cells against Ca(2+) overload, intracellular protease activation, and necrosis. The activation of cannabinoid receptor subtype 2 (CB2R) prevents acinar cell pathogenesis in animal models of acute pancreatitis. However, whether CB2Rs modulate intracellular Ca(2+) signals in pancreatic acinar cells is largely unknown. We evaluated the roles of CB2R agonist, GW405833 (GW) in agonist-induced Ca(2+) oscillations in pancreatic acinar cells using multiple experimental approaches with acute dissociated pancreatic acinar cells prepared from wild type, CB1R-knockout (KO), and CB2R-KO mice. Immunohistochemical labeling revealed that CB2R protein was expressed in mouse pancreatic acinar cells. Electrophysiological experiments showed that activation of CB2Rs by GW reduced acetylcholine (ACh)-, but not cholecystokinin (CCK)-induced Ca(2+) oscillations in a concentration-dependent manner; this inhibition was prevented by a selective CB2R antagonist, AM630, or was absent in CB2R-KO but not CB1R-KO mice. In addition, GW eliminated L-arginine-induced enhancement of Ca(2+) oscillations, pancreatic amylase, and pulmonary myeloperoxidase. Collectively, we provide novel evidence that activation of CB2Rs eliminates ACh-induced Ca(2+) oscillations and L-arginine-induced enhancement of Ca(2+) signaling in mouse pancreatic acinar cells, which suggests a potential cellular mechanism of CB2R-mediated protection in acute pancreatitis. PMID:27432473

  7. Autophagy in pancreatic acinar cells in caerulein-treated mice: immunolocalization of related proteins and their potential as markers of pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Leshuai; Zhang, Jun; Shea, Katherine; Xu, Lin; Tobin, Grainne; Knapton, Alan; Sharron, Stewart; Rouse, Rodney

    2014-01-01

    Drug-induced pancreatitis (DIP) is an underdiagnosed condition that lacks sensitive and specific biomarkers. To better understand the mechanisms of DIP and to identify potential tissue biomarkers, we studied experimental pancreatitis induced in male C57BL/6 mice by intraperitoneal injection of caerulein (10 or 50 μg/kg) at 1-hr intervals for a total of 7 injections. Pancreata from caerulein-treated mice exhibited consistent acinar cell autophagy and apoptosis with infrequent necrosis. Kinetic assays for serum amylase and lipase also showed a dose-dependent increase. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated biotin-dNTP nick labeling (TUNEL) detected dose-dependent acinar cell apoptosis. By light microscopy, autophagy was characterized by the formation of autophagosomes and autolysosomes (ALs) within the cytoplasm of acinar cells. Immunohistochemical studies with specific antibodies for proteins related to autophagy and pancreatic stress were conducted to evaluate these proteins as potential biomarkers of pancreatitis. Western blots were used to confirm immunohistochemical results using pancreatic lysates from control and treated animals. Autophagy was identified as a contributing process in caerulein-induced pancreatitis and proteins previously associated with autophagy were upregulated following caerulein treatment. Autophagosomes and ALs were found to be a common pathway, in which cathepsins, lysosome-associated membrane protein 2, vacuole membrane protein 1, microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3), autophagy-related protein 9, Beclin1, and pancreatitis-associated proteins were simultaneously involved in response to caerulein stimulus. Regenerating islet-derived 3 gamma (Reg3γ), a pancreatic acute response protein, was dose-dependently induced in caerulein-treated mice and colocalized with the autophagosomal marker, LC3. This finding supports Reg3γ as a candidate biomarker for pancreatic injury. PMID:23640381

  8. Acinar Cell Carcinoma of the Pancreas: Overview of Clinicopathologic Features and Insights into the Molecular Pathology

    PubMed Central

    La Rosa, Stefano; Sessa, Fausto; Capella, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Acinar cell carcinomas (ACCs) of the pancreas are rare pancreatic neoplasms accounting for about 1–2% of pancreatic tumors in adults and about 15% in pediatric subjects. They show different clinical symptoms at presentation, different morphological features, different outcomes, and different molecular alterations. This heterogeneous clinicopathological spectrum may give rise to difficulties in the clinical and pathological diagnosis with consequential therapeutic and prognostic implications. The molecular mechanisms involved in the onset and progression of ACCs are still not completely understood, although in recent years, several attempts have been made to clarify the molecular mechanisms involved in ACC biology. In this paper, we will review the main clinicopathological and molecular features of pancreatic ACCs of both adult and pediatric subjects to give the reader a comprehensive overview of this rare tumor type. PMID:26137463

  9. Prolonged Survival in a Patient with a Pancreatic Acinar Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ploquin, Anne; Baldini, Capucine; Vuagnat, Perrine; Makhloufi, Samira; Desauw, Christophe; Hebbar, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) is a rare entity. Herein we present the case of a 50-year-old male patient with an unlimited mass on the pancreatic corpus and tail with peripancreatic effusion and multiple metastases in the liver and spleen. A liver biopsy showed a pancreatic ACC. The patient received 9 cycles of gemcitabine plus oxaliplatin (GEMOX regimen), which had to be stopped because of a persistent grade 2 neuropathy. A CT scan showed complete response after 14 years. At the age of 61 years, a localized prostatic cancer was diagnosed, treated by prostatectomy. The patient carried a BRCA2 mutation. None of the precedent case reports describe a chemosensibility to the GEMOX regimen. In spite of the lack of study in these patients, chemotherapy with oxaliplatin seems to be the most effective. Long survival can be expected. PMID:26600777

  10. Prolonged Survival in a Patient with a Pancreatic Acinar Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ploquin, Anne; Baldini, Capucine; Vuagnat, Perrine; Makhloufi, Samira; Desauw, Christophe; Hebbar, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) is a rare entity. Herein we present the case of a 50-year-old male patient with an unlimited mass on the pancreatic corpus and tail with peripancreatic effusion and multiple metastases in the liver and spleen. A liver biopsy showed a pancreatic ACC. The patient received 9 cycles of gemcitabine plus oxaliplatin (GEMOX regimen), which had to be stopped because of a persistent grade 2 neuropathy. A CT scan showed complete response after 14 years. At the age of 61 years, a localized prostatic cancer was diagnosed, treated by prostatectomy. The patient carried a BRCA2 mutation. None of the precedent case reports describe a chemosensibility to the GEMOX regimen. In spite of the lack of study in these patients, chemotherapy with oxaliplatin seems to be the most effective. Long survival can be expected. PMID:26600777

  11. The Acinar Cage: Basement Membranes Determine Molecule Exchange and Mechanical Stability of Human Breast Cell Acini

    PubMed Central

    Gaiko-Shcherbak, Aljona; Fabris, Gloria; Dreissen, Georg; Merkel, Rudolf; Hoffmann, Bernd; Noetzel, Erik

    2015-01-01

    The biophysical properties of the basement membrane that surrounds human breast glands are poorly understood, but are thought to be decisive for normal organ function and malignancy. Here, we characterize the breast gland basement membrane with a focus on molecule permeation and mechanical stability, both crucial for organ function. We used well-established and nature-mimicking MCF10A acini as 3D cell model for human breast glands, with ether low- or highly-developed basement membrane scaffolds. Semi-quantitative dextran tracer (3 to 40 kDa) experiments allowed us to investigate the basement membrane scaffold as a molecule diffusion barrier in human breast acini in vitro. We demonstrated that molecule permeation correlated positively with macromolecule size and intriguingly also with basement membrane development state, revealing a pore size of at least 9 nm. Notably, an intact collagen IV mesh proved to be essential for this permeation function. Furthermore, we performed ultra-sensitive atomic force microscopy to quantify the response of native breast acini and of decellularized basement membrane shells against mechanical indentation. We found a clear correlation between increasing acinar force resistance and basement membrane formation stage. Most important native acini with highly-developed basement membranes as well as cell-free basement membrane shells could both withstand physiologically relevant loads (≤ 20 nN) without loss of structural integrity. In contrast, low-developed basement membranes were significantly softer and more fragile. In conclusion, our study emphasizes the key role of the basement membrane as conductor of acinar molecule influx and mechanical stability of human breast glands, which are fundamental for normal organ function. PMID:26674091

  12. Effect of ionizing radiation on acinar morphogenesis of human prostatic epithelial cells under three-dimensional culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, T; X, S Ma; Kong, D; Yi, H; Wang, X; Liang, B; Xu, H; He, M; Jia, L; Qased, A B; Yang, Y; Liu, X

    2012-01-01

    Homeostasis is maintained by the interplay of multiple factors that directly or indirectly regulate cell proliferation and cell death. Complex multiple interactions between cells and the extracellular matrix occur during acinar morphogenesis and changes in these might indicate carcinogenesis of cells from a normal to a malignant, invasive phenotype. In this study, the human prostatic epithelial cell line RWPE-1 was cultured under three-dimensional (3-D) culture conditions, and the effect of ionizing radiation on acinar morphogenesis and its association with autophagy were discussed. The results illustrated that formation of specific spheroid (acinar) structures was detectable under 3-D culture conditions. Radiation induced the disruption of acini in different cell models using either gene overexpression (Akt) or gene knock-down (Beclin 1 and ATG7). Introduction of Akt not only accelerated the growth of cells (i.e., caused the cells to manifest elongating and microspike-like structures that are obviously different from structures seen in wild-type RWPE-1 cells under two-dimensional conditions), but also changed their morphological characteristics under 3-D culture conditions. Knock-down of autophagy-related genes (Beclin 1 and ATG7) increased the radiosensitivity of cells under 3-D culture conditions, and cells died of non-apoptotic death after radiation. The results suggested that ionizing radiation may change the cell phenotype and the formation of acini. Additionally even the autophagy mechanism may play a role in these processes. PMID:22296497

  13. Up-regulation of Store-operated Ca2+ Entry and Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells Promote the Acinar Phenotype of the Primary Human Salivary Gland Cells.

    PubMed

    Jang, Shyh-Ing; Ong, Hwei Ling; Liu, Xibao; Alevizos, Ilias; Ambudkar, Indu S

    2016-04-15

    The signaling pathways involved in the generation and maintenance of exocrine gland acinar cells have not yet been established. Primary human salivary gland epithelial cells, derived from salivary gland biopsies, acquired an acinar-like phenotype when the [Ca(2+)] in the serum-free medium (keratinocyte growth medium, KGM) was increased from 0.05 mm (KGM-L) to 1.2 mm (KGM-H). Here we examined the mechanism underlying this Ca(2+)-dependent generation of the acinar cell phenotype. Compared with cells in KGM-L, those in KGM-H display enhancement of Orai1, STIM1, STIM2, and nuclear factor of activated T cells 1 (NFAT1) expression together with an increase in store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE), SOCE-dependent nuclear translocation of pGFP-NFAT1, and NFAT-dependent but not NFκB-dependent gene expression. Importantly, AQP5, an acinar-specific protein critical for function, is up-regulated in KGM-H via SOCE/NFAT-dependent gene expression. We identified critical NFAT binding motifs in the AQP5 promoter that are involved in Ca(2+)-dependent up-regulation of AQP5. These important findings reveal that the Ca(2+)-induced switch of salivary epithelial cells to an acinar-like phenotype involves remodeling of SOCE and NFAT signaling, which together control the expression of proteins critically relevant for acinar cell function. Our data provide a novel strategy for generating and maintaining acinar cells in culture. PMID:26903518

  14. The monoclonal anti-BCL10 antibody (clone 331.1) is a sensitive and specific marker of pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma and pancreatic metaplasia.

    PubMed

    La Rosa, Stefano; Franzi, Francesca; Marchet, Silvia; Finzi, Giovanna; Clerici, Moira; Vigetti, Davide; Chiaravalli, Anna Maria; Sessa, Fausto; Capella, Carlo

    2009-02-01

    Acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) is a rare pancreatic cancer which may be difficult to distinguish from other solid nonadenocarcinoma tumors. The diagnosis depends on the demonstration of acinar differentiation, obtained with antibodies recognizing various pancreatic enzymes that, although specific, show different sensitivity. The C-terminal portion of the BCL10 protein shows homology with carboxyl ester hydrolase (CEH), an enzyme produced by pancreatic acinar cells. We investigated the usefulness of a C-terminal BCL10 monoclonal antibody in the diagnosis of ACCs. We examined normal pancreases and different pancreatic tumors including ACCs, mixed acinar-endocrine carcinomas, ductal adenocarcinomas, mucinous, serous, solid pseudopapillary, and endocrine neoplasms. In addition, various normal tissues and cases of pancreatic metaplasia of the gastroesophageal mucosa, cases of ectopic pancreas, gastrointestinal endocrine tumors, salivary and breast acinic cell carcinomas, gastric adenocarcinomas with and without acinar differentiation, and hepatocellular carcinomas were studied. BCL10 immunoreactivity paralleled that of CEH and was restricted to acinar cells of normal and ectopic pancreas, of pancreatic metaplasia, and of ACCs. The anti-BCL10 antibody was more sensitive in detecting ACCs and pancreatic metaplasia than antibodies directed against other pancreatic enzymes. We suggest using BCL10 antibody for diagnosing pancreatic tumors and whenever an acinar differentiation is suspected in gastrointestinal neoplastic and metaplastic lesions. PMID:19066953

  15. The Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor E47 Reprograms Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells to a Quiescent Acinar State With Reduced Tumorigenic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Kim, SangWun; Lahmy, Reyhaneh; Riha, Chelsea; Yang, Challeng; Jakubison, Brad L.; van Niekerk, Jaco; Staub, Claudio; Wu, Yifan; Gates, Keith; Dong, Duc Si; Konieczny, Stephen F.; Itkin-Ansari, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) initiates from quiescent acinar cells that attain a Kras mutation, lose signaling from basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors, undergo acinar-ductal metaplasia, and rapidly acquire increased growth potential. We queried whether PDA cells can be reprogrammed to revert to their original quiescent acinar cell state by shifting key transcription programs. Methods Human PDA cell lines were engineered to express an inducible form of the bHLH protein E47. Gene expression, growth, and functional studies were investigated using microarray, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, immunoblots, immunohistochemistry, small interfering RNA, chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses, and cell transplantation into mice. Results In human PDA cells, E47 activity triggers stable G0/G1 arrest, which requires the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 and the stress response protein TP53INP1. Concurrently, E47 induces high level expression of acinar digestive enzymes and feed forward activation of the acinar maturation network regulated by the bHLH factor MIST1. Moreover, induction of E47 in human PDA cells in vitro is sufficient to inhibit tumorigenesis. Conclusions Human PDA cells retain a high degree of plasticity, which can be exploited to induce a quiescent acinar cell state with reduced tumorigenic potential. Moreover, bHLH activity is a critical node coordinately regulating human PDA cell growth versus cell fate. PMID:25894862

  16. Activation of Ca2+ entry into acinar cells by a non-phosphorylatable inositol trisphosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, G. S. J.; Rossier, M. F.; Hughes, A. R.; Shears, S. B.; Armstrong, D. L.; , J. W. Putney, Jr.

    1991-07-01

    IN many cell types, receptor activation of phosphoinositidase C results in an initial release of intracellular Ca2+ stores followed by sustained Ca2+ entry across the plasma membrane. Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate is the mediator of the initial Ca2+ release1, although its role in the mechanism underlying Ca2+ entry remains controversial1-6. We have now used two techniques to introduce inositol phosphates into mouse lacrimal acinar cells and measure their effects on Ca2+ entry: microinjection into cells loaded with Fura-2, a fluorescent dye which allows the measurement of intra-cellular free calcium concentration by microspectrofluorimetry, and perfusion of patch clamp pipettes in the whole-cell configuration while monitoring the activity of Ca2+-activated K+ channels as an indicator of intracellular Ca2+. We report here that inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate serves as a signal that is both necessary and sufficient for receptor activation of Ca2+ entry across the plasma membrane in these cells.

  17. A model system for the study of stimulus - enzyme secretion coupling in rat pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Guderley, H; Heisler, S

    1980-08-01

    A superfusion technique was developed as a model system for the study of stimulus-secretion coupling in collagenase-dispersed rat pancreatic acinar cells. Cells (10(7)) were combined with a slurry of Biogel P-4 beads and the mixture was decanted into a plastic column (1.5 cm X 8.5 cm) and perfused with Krebs-Ringer. Amylase activity was determined in sequentially collected effusate fractions and used to estimate the secretory rate. Carbachol, carbachol plus dibutyryl cyclic AMP, cholecystokinin-pancreozymin, and the ionophore A-23187 all stimulated a rapid increase in the rate of secretion. Cell integrity was unaffected by these stimulants as evidenced microscopically and by the lack of lactate dehydrogenase activity in the effusates. Enzymes secreted in response to secretagogues were collected, concentrated, and isoelectrofocused on polyacrylamide gels. A film detection technique was developed to localize amylase activity. The model system has the following advantages: (1) secreted proteolytic products are removed from the vicinity of cells, thereby preventing direct cellular damage and hydrolysis of peptide agonist; (2) the need to add trypsin inhibitors is eliminated and only a minimal addition of albumin (0.001%) is required, thus allowing the separation and distortion-free analysis of secreted proteins; (3) the perfusion conditions can be changed rapidly without disturbing the cells. The model described is therefore well suited to the study of both molecular and kinetic events involved in the enzyme secretory phenomenon in exocrine pancreas. PMID:6164455

  18. Rab27A Is Present in Mouse Pancreatic Acinar Cells and Is Required for Digestive Enzyme Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yanan; Ernst, Stephen A.; Stuenkel, Edward L.; Lentz, Stephen I.; Williams, John A.

    2015-01-01

    The small G-protein Rab27A has been shown to regulate the intracellular trafficking of secretory granules in various cell types. However, the presence, subcellular localization and functional impact of Rab27A on digestive enzyme secretion by mouse pancreatic acinar cells are poorly understood. Ashen mice, which lack the expression of Rab27A due to a spontaneous mutation, were used to investigate the function of Rab27A in pancreatic acinar cells. Isolated pancreatic acini were prepared from wild-type or ashen mouse pancreas by collagenase digestion, and CCK- or carbachol-induced amylase secretion was measured. Secretion occurring through the major-regulated secretory pathway, which is characterized by zymogen granules secretion, was visualized by Dextran-Texas Red labeling of exocytotic granules. The minor-regulated secretory pathway, which operates through the endosomal/lysosomal pathway, was characterized by luminal cell surface labeling of lysosomal associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1). Compared to wild-type, expression of Rab27B was slightly increased in ashen mouse acini, while Rab3D and digestive enzymes (amylase, lipase, chymotrypsin and elastase) were not affected. Localization of Rab27B, Rab3D and amylase by immunofluorescence was similar in both wild-type and ashen acinar cells. The GTP-bound states of Rab27B and Rab3D in wild-type and ashen mouse acini also remained similar in amount. In contrast, acini from ashen mice showed decreased amylase release induced by CCK- or carbachol. Rab27A deficiency reduced the apical cell surface labeling of LAMP1, but did not affect that of Dextran-Texas Red incorporation into the fusion pockets at luminal surface. These results show that Rab27A is present in mouse pancreatic acinar cells and mainly regulates secretion through the minor-regulated pathway. PMID:25951179

  19. A Novel Function of Noc2 in Agonist-Induced Intracellular Ca2+ Increase during Zymogen-Granule Exocytosis in Pancreatic Acinar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, Sho; Miki, Takashi; Seino, Susumu; Tamai, Seiichi; Kasai, Haruo; Nemoto, Tomomi

    2012-01-01

    Noc2, a putative Rab effector, contributes to secretory-granule exocytosis in neuroendocrine and exocrine cells. Here, using two-photon excitation live-cell imaging, we investigated its role in Ca2+-dependent zymogen granule (ZG) exocytosis in pancreatic acinar cells from wild-type (WT) and Noc2-knockout (KO) mice. Imaging of a KO acinar cell revealed an expanded granular area, indicating ZG accumulation. In our spatiotemporal analysis of the ZG exocytosis induced by agonist (cholecystokinin or acetylcholine) stimulation, the location and rate of progress of ZG exocytosis did not differ significantly between the two strains. ZG exocytosis from KO acinar cells was seldom observed at physiological concentrations of agonists, but was normal (vs. WT) at high concentrations. Flash photolysis of a caged calcium compound confirmed the integrity of the fusion step of ZG exocytosis in KO acinar cells. The decreased ZG exocytosis present at physiological concentrations of agonists raised the possibility of impaired elicitation of calcium spikes. When calcium spikes were evoked in KO acinar cells by a high agonist concentration: (a) they always started at the apical portion and traveled to the basal portion, and (b) calcium oscillations over the 10 µM level were observed, as in WT acinar cells. At physiological concentrations of agonists, however, sufficient calcium spikes were not observed, suggesting an impaired [Ca2+]i-increase mechanism in KO acinar cells. We propose that in pancreatic acinar cells, Noc2 is not indispensable for the membrane fusion of ZG per se, but instead performs a novel function favoring agonist-induced physiological [Ca2+]i increases. PMID:22615885

  20. A novel function of Noc2 in agonist-induced intracellular Ca2+ increase during zymogen-granule exocytosis in pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Sho; Miki, Takashi; Seino, Susumu; Tamai, Seiichi; Kasai, Haruo; Nemoto, Tomomi

    2012-01-01

    Noc2, a putative Rab effector, contributes to secretory-granule exocytosis in neuroendocrine and exocrine cells. Here, using two-photon excitation live-cell imaging, we investigated its role in Ca(2+)-dependent zymogen granule (ZG) exocytosis in pancreatic acinar cells from wild-type (WT) and Noc2-knockout (KO) mice. Imaging of a KO acinar cell revealed an expanded granular area, indicating ZG accumulation. In our spatiotemporal analysis of the ZG exocytosis induced by agonist (cholecystokinin or acetylcholine) stimulation, the location and rate of progress of ZG exocytosis did not differ significantly between the two strains. ZG exocytosis from KO acinar cells was seldom observed at physiological concentrations of agonists, but was normal (vs. WT) at high concentrations. Flash photolysis of a caged calcium compound confirmed the integrity of the fusion step of ZG exocytosis in KO acinar cells. The decreased ZG exocytosis present at physiological concentrations of agonists raised the possibility of impaired elicitation of calcium spikes. When calcium spikes were evoked in KO acinar cells by a high agonist concentration: (a) they always started at the apical portion and traveled to the basal portion, and (b) calcium oscillations over the 10 µM level were observed, as in WT acinar cells. At physiological concentrations of agonists, however, sufficient calcium spikes were not observed, suggesting an impaired [Ca(2+)](i)-increase mechanism in KO acinar cells. We propose that in pancreatic acinar cells, Noc2 is not indispensable for the membrane fusion of ZG per se, but instead performs a novel function favoring agonist-induced physiological [Ca(2+)](i) increases. PMID:22615885

  1. CCK independently activates intracellular trypsinogen and NF-kappaB in rat pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Han, B; Ji, B; Logsdon, C D

    2001-03-01

    In the cholecystokinin (CCK) hyperstimulation model of acute pancreatitis, two early intracellular events, activation of trypsinogen and activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), are thought to be important in the development of the disease. In this study, the relationship between these two events was investigated. NF-kappaB activity was monitored by using a DNA binding assay and mob-1 chemokine gene expression. Intracellular trypsin activity was measured by using a fluorogenic substrate. Protease inhibitors including FUT-175, Pefabloc, and E-64d prevented CCK stimulation of intracellular trypsinogen and NF-kappaB activation. Likewise, the NF-kappaB inhibitors pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and N-acetyl-L-cysteine inhibited CCK stimulation of NF-kappaB and intracellular trypsinogen activation. These results suggested a possible codependency of these two events. However, CCK stimulated NF-kappaB activation in Chinese hamster ovary-CCK(A) cells, which do not express trypsinogen, indicating that trypsin is not necessary for CCK activation of NF-kappaB. Furthermore, adenovirus-mediated expression in acinar cells of active p65 subunits to stimulate NF-kappaB, or of inhibitory kappaB-alpha molecules to inhibit NF-kappaB, did not affect either basal or CCK-mediated trypsinogen activation. Thus trypsinogen and NF-kappaB activation are independent events stimulated by CCK. PMID:11171565

  2. Quantitative description of the spatial arrangement of organelles in a polarised secretory epithelial cell: the salivary gland acinar cell

    PubMed Central

    MAYHEW, TERRY M.

    1999-01-01

    Previous quantitative descriptions of cellular ultrastructure have focused on spatial content (volume, surface area and number of organelles and membrane domains). It is possible to complement such descriptions by also quantifying spatial arrangements. Hitherto, applications of stereological methods for achieving this (notably, estimation of covariance and pair correlation functions) have been confined to organ and tissue levels. This study explores 3-dimensional subcellular arrangements of key organelles within acinar cells of rabbit parotid salivary glands, highly polarised epithelial cells specialised for exocrine secretion of α-amylase. It focuses on spatial arrangements of secretion product stores (zymogen granules), rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) and mitochondria. Systematic random samples of electron microscopical fields of view from 3 rabbits were analysed using test grids bearing linear dipole probes of different sizes. Unbiased estimates of organelle volume densities were obtained by point counting and estimates of covariance and pair correlation functions by dipole counting. Plots of pair correlation functions against dipole length identified spatial arrangement differences between organelle types. Volumes within RER and mitochondrial compartments were positively correlated with themselves at distances below 4 μm and 2 μm respectively but were essentially randomly arranged at longer distances. In sharp contrast, zymogen granules were not randomly arranged. They were clustered at distances below 6–7 μm and more widely scattered at greater distances. These findings provide quantitative confirmation of the polarised arrangement of zymogen granules within acinar cells and further support for the relative invariance of biological organisation between subjects. PMID:10337960

  3. Whole exome sequencing reveals recurrent mutations in BRCA2 and FAT genes in acinar cell carcinomas of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Toru; Sakamoto, Hitomi; Takeuchi, Shoko; Ameri, Mitra; Kuboki, Yuko; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Hatori, Takashi; Yamamoto, Masakazu; Sugiyama, Masanori; Ohike, Nobuyuki; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Michio; Shibata, Noriyuki; Shimizu, Kyoko; Shiratori, Keiko

    2015-01-01

    Acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas is a rare tumor with a poor prognosis. Compared to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, its molecular features are poorly known. We studied a total of 11 acinar cell carcinomas, including 3 by exome and 4 by target sequencing. Exome sequencing revealed 65 nonsynonymous mutations and 22 indels with a mutation rate of 3.4 mutations/Mb per tumor, on average. By accounting for not only somatic but also germline mutations with loss of the wild-type allele, we identified recurrent mutations of BRCA2 and FAT genes. BRCA2 showed somatic or germline premature termination mutations, with loss of the wild-type allele in 3 of 7 tumors. FAT1, FAT3, and FAT4 showed somatic or germline missense mutations in 4 of 7 tumors. The germline FAT mutations were with loss of the wild-type allele. Loss of BRCA2 expression was observed in 5 of 11 tumors. One patient with a BRCA2-mutated tumor experienced complete remission of liver metastasis following cisplatinum chemotherapy. In conclusion, acinar cell carcinomas show a distinct mutation pattern and often harbor somatic or germline mutations of BRCA2 and FAT genes. This result may warrant assessment of BRCA2 abrogation in patients with the carcinoma to determine their sensitivity to chemotherapy. PMID:25743105

  4. Effects of caerulein on the apical cytoskeleton of the pancreatic acinar cell.

    PubMed Central

    O'Konski, M S; Pandol, S J

    1990-01-01

    In this study experiments were performed to correlate the rate of digestive enzyme secretion to morphologic observations of the apical cytoskeleton using dispersed rat pancreatic acini with various concentrations of caerulein. Caerulein at concentrations of 10 pM to 0.1 nM stimulated increasing rates of secretion of amylase, a digestive enzyme. Greater concentrations of caerulein caused progressively less amylase secretion. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated several characteristics of the apical cytoskeleton in untreated acini that were altered with the "inhibitory" concentrations of caerulein. In control acini and acini stimulated with concentrations of caerulein up to 0.1 nM, the micrographs reveal an apical actin network extending into microvilli, an intermediate filament band, and electron-dense structures contained in both the actin filament network and the intermediate filament band. With concentrations of caerulein greater than 0.1 nM, these structures were progressively ablated. The findings with respect to the actin filament network were confirmed with light microscopic observations of dispersed acini stained with rhodamine-phalloidin. These results indicate that caerulein has marked morphologic effects on the pancreatic acinar cell cytoskeleton and that the cytoskeletal changes may modulate the secretory response. Images PMID:1700797

  5. Characterization of receptors for VIP on pancreatic acinar cell plasma membranes using covalent cross-linking

    SciTech Connect

    McArthur, K.E.; Wood, C.L.; O'Dorisio, M.S.; Zhou, Z.C.; Gardner, J.D.; Jensen, R.T.

    1987-03-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptors on guinea pig pancreatic acini differ from those on all other tissues in containing a high-affinity VIP receptor and a low-affinity VIP receptor that has a high affinity for secretin. To characterize the molecular components of these receptors, /sup 125/I-VIP was covalently cross-linked to these receptors by four different cross-linking agents: disuccinimidyl suberate, ethylene glycol bis (succinimidyl succinate), dithiobis (succinimidylpropionate), and m-maleimidobenzoyl N-hydroxysuccinimide ester. Analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated a single major polypeptide band of M/sub r/ 45,000 and a minor polypeptide band of M/sub r/ 30,000 were cross-linked to /sup 125/I-VIP. Covalent cross-linking only occurred when a cross-linking agent was added, was inhibited by GTP, was inhibited by VIP receptor agonist or antagonists that interact with VIP receptors, and not by other pancreatic secretagogues that interact with difference receptors. Thus the high-affinity VIP receptor on pancreatic acinar cell membranes consists of a single major polypeptide of M/sub r/ 45,000, and this polypeptide is not a subunit of a larger disulfide-linked structure. Furthermore, either the low-affinity VIP/secretin-preferring receptor was not covalently cross-linked under the experimental conditions or it consist of a major polypeptide with the same molecular weight as the high-affinity VIP receptor.

  6. Endogenous and monoclonal antibodies to the rat pancreatic acinar cell Golgi complex

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Normal, unimmunized mouse serum from several strains (BALB/c, C57/b, DBA/2, NZB, SJL, CD/1) contains an endogenous IgG antibody that localizes to the Golgi complex of rat pancreatic acinar cells. Treatment of pancreatic acini with 5 microM monensin resulted in the swelling and vacuolization of the Golgi cisternae, and in a corresponding annular staining by the mouse serum as observed by immunofluorescence, suggesting that the antigen recognized is on the Golgi complex cisternal membrane. The antiserum did not react with pancreatic secretory proteins, and its binding to smooth microsomal membranes was retained following sodium carbonate washing, supporting a Golgi membrane localization. Advantage was taken of the existence of the endogenous murine antibody for the isolation of monoclonal antibodies directed to the Golgi complex of the rat pancreas. Two antibodies, antiGolgi 1 and antiGolgi 2, are described. Both antibodies are IgMs that recognize integral membrane proteins of the trans-Golgi cisternae, with lighter and patchy staining of the pancreatic lumen membrane, as observed both by light and electron microscopy. AntiGolgi 1 recognizes predominately a protein of molecular weight 103,000- 108,000, whereas antiGolgi 2 shows a strong reaction to a 180-kd band as well as the 103-108-kd protein. PMID:6373788

  7. Recovery of pancreas from mild puromycin-induced injury. A histologic and ultrastructure study in rats.

    PubMed

    Longnecker, D S; Crawford, B G; Nadler, D J

    1975-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar cells undergo degeneration or necrosis following injection of puromycin intraperitoneally in rats. The purpose of this study was to characterize recovery following injection of four hourly doses of puromycin, 40mg/kg of body weight, examining the pancreas histologically and by electron microscopy. The number of dividing acinar cells increased following injury. By 12 to 24 hours following treatment, electron microscopy showed numerous autophagic vacuoles and intracisternal granules in the cells. By 48 hours, these were largely cleared from surviving cells although the intracisternal granules persisted in isolated acinar cells as long as 144 hours. At 24 hours, there was debris in the acinar lumens and interstitial space. We conclude that some acinar cells injured by puromycin may survive and be restored to normal structure; that surviving acinar cells can extrude autophagic vacuoles; and that necrotic acinar cells are replaced by regeneration following puromycin-induced injury in rats. PMID:1111495

  8. Mechanisms underlying InsP3-evoked global Ca2+ signals in mouse pancreatic acinar cells

    PubMed Central

    Fogarty, Kevin E; Kidd, Jackie F; Tuft, Dick A; Thorn, Peter

    2000-01-01

    In secretory epithelial cells, complex patterns of Ca2+ signals regulate physiological processes. How these patterns are generated is still not fully understood. In particular, the basis of global Ca2+ waves is not clear. We have studied regional differences in InsP3-evoked Ca2+ release in single mouse pancreatic acinar cells, using high-speed (∼90 frames s−1), high-sensitivity Ca2+ imaging combined with rapid (10 ms) spot photolysis (2 μm diameter) of caged InsP3. Within a single region we measured Ca2+ response latency and rate of rise to construct an InsP3 dose-response relationship. Spot InsP3 liberation in the secretory pole region consistently elicited a dose-dependent, rapid release of Ca2+. Spot InsP3 liberation in the basal pole region of ∼50 % of cells elicited a similar dose-response relationship but with a lower apparent InsP3 affinity than in the secretory pole. In the other cells, basal pole InsP3 liberation did not elicit active Ca2+ release, even at the highest stimulus intensities we employed, although these same cells did respond when the stimulus spot was moved to different regions. We conclude that in the basal pole active sites of rapid Ca2+ release have a lower functional affinity for InsP3 than those in the secretory pole and are spread out in discrete sites across the basal pole. These properties explain the propagation of Ca2+ waves across the basal pole that are only observed at higher stimulus levels. PMID:10922004

  9. Functional role of an islet transcription factor, INSM1/IA-1, on pancreatic acinar cell trans-differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tao; Saunee, Nicolle A.; Breslin, Mary B.; Song, Kejing; Lan, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the functional role of INSM1 is examined with an AR42J acinar cell model for trans-differentiation into insulin-positive cells. Islet transcription factors (ITFs: INSM1, Pdx-1, and NeuroD1) are over-expressed in AR42J cells using adenoviral vectors. Addition of Ad-INSM1 alone or the combination of three ITFs to the AR42J cells triggers cellular trans-differentiation. Ectopic expression of INSM1 directly induces insulin, Pax6, and Nkx6.1 expression, whereas Pdx-1 and NeuroD1 were slightly suppressed by INSM1. Addition of Pdx-1 and NeuroD1 with INSM1 further enhances endocrine trans-differentiation by increasing both the numbers and intensity of the insulin positive cells with simultaneous activation of ITFs, Ngn3 and MafA. INSM1 expression alone partially inhibits dexamethasone-induced exocrine amylase expression. The combination of the three ITFs completely inhibits amylase expression and concomitantly induces greater acinar cell trans-differentiation into endocrine cells. Also, addition of the three ITFs promotes EGF and TGFβ receptors expression. Stimulation by the three ITFs along with the EGF/TGFβ growth factors strongly promotes insulin gene expression. The combination of the three ITFs and EGF/TGFβ growth factors with the primary cultured pancreatic acini also facilitates exocrine to endocrine cell differentiation. Taken together, both the AR42J cell line and the primary cultured mouse acinar cells support INSM1 induced acini trans-differentiation model. PMID:21830214

  10. Apical Ca2+-activated potassium channels in mouse parotid acinar cells

    PubMed Central

    Almassy, Janos; Won, Jong Hak; Begenisich, Ted B.

    2012-01-01

    Ca2+ activation of Cl and K channels is a key event underlying stimulated fluid secretion from parotid salivary glands. Cl channels are exclusively present on the apical plasma membrane (PM), whereas the localization of K channels has not been established. Mathematical models have suggested that localization of some K channels to the apical PM is optimum for fluid secretion. A combination of whole cell electrophysiology and temporally resolved digital imaging with local manipulation of intracellular [Ca2+] was used to investigate if Ca2+-activated K channels are present in the apical PM of parotid acinar cells. Initial experiments established Ca2+-buffering conditions that produced brief, localized increases in [Ca2+] after focal laser photolysis of caged Ca2+. Conditions were used to isolate K+ and Cl− conductances. Photolysis at the apical PM resulted in a robust increase in K+ and Cl− currents. A localized reduction in [Ca2+] at the apical PM after photolysis of Diazo-2, a caged Ca2+ chelator, resulted in a decrease in both K+ and Cl− currents. The K+ currents evoked by apical photolysis were partially blocked by both paxilline and TRAM-34, specific blockers of large-conductance “maxi-K” (BK) and intermediate K (IK), respectively, and almost abolished by incubation with both antagonists. Apical TRAM-34–sensitive K+ currents were also observed in BK-null parotid acini. In contrast, when the [Ca2+] was increased at the basal or lateral PM, no increase in either K+ or Cl− currents was evoked. These data provide strong evidence that K and Cl channels are similarly distributed in the apical PM. Furthermore, both IK and BK channels are present in this domain, and the density of these channels appears higher in the apical versus basolateral PM. Collectively, this study provides support for a model in which fluid secretion is optimized after expression of K channels specifically in the apical PM. PMID:22291145

  11. Depletion of intracellular calcium stores activates a calcium conducting nonselective cation current in mouse pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Krause, E; Pfeiffer, F; Schmid, A; Schulz, I

    1996-12-20

    Receptor-mediated Ca2+ release from inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate (IP3)-sensitive Ca2+ stores causes "capacitative calcium entry" in many cell types (Putney, J. W., Jr. (1986) Cell Calcium 7, 1-12; Putney, J. W., Jr. (1990) Cell Calcium 11, 611-624). We used patch-clamp and fluorescence techniques in isolated mouse pancreatic acinar cells to identify ion currents and cytosolic calcium concentrations under conditions in which intracellular Ca2+ stores were emptied. We found that depletion of Ca2+ stores activated a calcium-release-activated nonselective cation current (ICRANC) which did not discriminate between monovalent cations. ICRANC possessed a significant conductance for Ca2+ and Ba2+. It was not inhibited by La3+, Gd3+, Co2+, or Cd2+ but was completely abolished by flufenamic acid or genistein. In whole cell and cell-attached recordings, a 40-45 pS nonselective cation channel was identified which was activated by Ca2+ store depletion. Calcium entry as detected by single cell fluorescence measurements with fluo-3 or fura-2, showed the same pharmacological properties as ICRANC. We conclude that in mouse pancreatic acinar cells 40-45 pS nonselective cation channels serve as a pathway for capacitative Ca2+ entry. This entry pathway differs from the previously described ICRAC (Hoth, M., and Penner, R. (1992) Nature 355, 353-356) in its ion-selectivity, pharmacological profile, and single-channel conductance. PMID:8955076

  12. G protein in stimulation of PI hydrolysis by CCK (cholecystokinin) in isolated rat pancreatic acinar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Matozaki, Takashi; Sakamoto, Choitsu; Nagao, Munehiko; Nishizaki, Hogara; Baba, Shigeaki )

    1988-11-01

    To clarify the possible role of a guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein) in the signal transducing system activated by cholecystokinin (CCK), actions of CCK on rat pancreatic acini were compared with those of fluoride, a well-known activator of stimulatory (G{sub s}) or inhibitory (G{sub i}) G protein. When acini were incubated with increasing concentrations of either CCK-octapeptide (CCK8) or NaF, a maximal stimulation of amylase release from acini occurred at 100 pM CCK8 or 10 mM NaF, respectively; this secretory rate decreased as CCK8 or NaF concentration was increased. NaF caused an increase in cytoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} concentration from the internal Ca{sup 2+} store and stimulated accumulation of inositol phosphates in acini, as observed with CCK. Guanylimidodiphosphate activated the generation of inositol phosphates in the ({sup 3}H)inositol-labeled pancreatic acinar cell membrane preparation, with half-maximal and maximal stimulation at 1 and 10 {mu}M, respectively. Furthermore, the effects of submaximal CCK concentrations on inositol phosphate accumulation in membranes were markedly potentiated in the presence of 100 {mu}M GTP, which alone was ineffective. Combined findings of the present study strongly suggest that pancreatic CCK receptors are probably coupled to the activation of polyphosphoinositide (PI) breakdown by a G protein, which appears to be fluoride sensitive but is other than G{sub s}- or G{sub i}-like protein.

  13. Atp2c2 Is Transcribed From a Unique Transcriptional Start Site in Mouse Pancreatic Acinar Cells.

    PubMed

    Fenech, Melissa A; Sullivan, Caitlin M; Ferreira, Lucimar T; Mehmood, Rashid; MacDonald, William A; Stathopulos, Peter B; Pin, Christopher L

    2016-12-01

    Proper regulation of cytosolic Ca(2+) is critical for pancreatic acinar cell function. Disruptions in normal Ca(2+) concentrations affect numerous cellular functions and are associated with pancreatitis. Membrane pumps and channels regulate cytosolic Ca(2+) homeostasis by promoting rapid Ca(2+) movement. Determining how expression of Ca(2+) modulators is regulated and the cellular alterations that occur upon changes in expression can provide insight into initiating events of pancreatitis. The goal of this study was to delineate the gene structure and regulation of a novel pancreas-specific isoform for Secretory Pathway Ca(2+) ATPase 2 (termed SPCA2C), which is encoded from the Atp2c2 gene. Using Next Generation Sequencing of RNA (RNA-seq), chromatin immunoprecipitation for epigenetic modifications and promoter-reporter assays, a novel transcriptional start site was identified that promotes expression of a transcript containing the last four exons of the Atp2c2 gene (Atp2c2c). This region was enriched for epigenetic marks and pancreatic transcription factors that promote gene activation. Promoter activity for regions upstream of the ATG codon in Atp2c2's 24th exon was observed in vitro but not in in vivo. Translation from this ATG encodes a protein aligned with the carboxy terminal of SPCA2. Functional analysis in HEK 293A cells indicates a unique role for SPCA2C in increasing cytosolic Ca(2+) . RNA analysis indicates that the decreased Atp2c2c expression observed early in experimental pancreatitis reflects a global molecular response of acinar cells to reduce cytosolic Ca(2+) levels. Combined, these results suggest SPCA2C affects Ca(2+) homeostasis in pancreatic acinar cells in a unique fashion relative to other Ca(2+) ATPases. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2768-2778, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27017909

  14. DNA quantification as prognostic factor in a case of acinar cell carcinoma of the parotid gland, diagnosed by FNA.

    PubMed

    Azúa-Romeo, Javier; Sánchez-Garnica, Juan Carlos; Azúa-Blanco, Javier; Tovar-Lázaro, Mayte

    2005-01-01

    Hereby we present a case of a 43-years-old male who complained of a three years history preauricular painful mass. Fine needle aspiration cytology was performed, diagnosing of compatible with acinar cell carcinoma, thus DNA quantification by image cytometry was carried out. Biological parameters studied (ploidy, S-phase, 5-c exceeding rate) showed that it is a low grade of malignancy lesion. Total parotidectomy conservative of facial nerve was recommended, without regional lymphadenectomy. Patient remains, one year later, asymptomatic and free of disease. PMID:16056182

  15. Potential role of CXCL10 in the induction of cell injury and mitochondrial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Lipi; Arora, Sunil Kumar; Bakshi, Dapinder K; Majumdar, Siddarth; Wig, Jai Dev

    2010-01-01

    Chemokines have been known to play a critical role in pathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis and acinar cell death. However, the role played by one of the CXC chemokines: CXCL10 in regulation of acinar cell death has remained unexplored. Hence, this study was designed to assess the role of CXCL10 promoting apoptosis in ex vivo cultured acinar cells. Primary human pancreatic acinar cell cultures were established and exposed to varying doses of CXCL10 for different time intervals. Apoptotic induction was evaluated by both qualitative as well as quantitative analyses. Various mediators of apoptosis were also studied by Western blotting, membrane potential (Ψm) and ATP depletion in acinar cells. Analysis of apoptosis via DNA ladder and cell death detection – ELISA demonstrated that CXCL10 induced 3.9-fold apoptosis when administrated at an optimal dose of 0.1 μg of recombinant CXCL10 for 8 h. Quantitative analysis using FACS and dual staining by PI-annexin showed increased apoptosis (48.98 and 53.78% respectively). The involvement of upstream apoptotic regulators like pJNK, p38 and Bax was established on the basis of their increased expression of CXCL10. The change of Ψm by 50% was observed in the presence of CXCL10 in treated acinar cells along with enhanced expression of Cytochrome C, apaf-1 and caspase 9/3 activation. In addition, ATP depletion was also noticed in CXCL10 stimulated acinar cells. CXCL10 induces cell death in human cultured pancreatic cells leading to apoptosis and DNA fragmentation via CXCR3 signalling. These signalling mechanisms may play an important role in parenchymal cell loss and injury in pancreatitis. PMID:20041963

  16. Delayed expression of large conductance K+ channels reshaping agonist-induced currents in mouse pancreatic acinar cells

    PubMed Central

    Oshiro, Takako; Takahashi, Hidenori; Ohsaga, Atsushi; Ebihara, Satoru; Sasaki, Hidetada; Maruyama, Yoshio

    2005-01-01

    Epithelial secretory cells display cell-specific mechanisms of fluid secretion and express large conductance voltage- and Ca2+-activated K+ (Maxi-K) channels that generate the membrane negativity for effective Cl− exit to the lumen. Rat and mouse pancreatic acinar cells had been thought to be peculiar in this sense because of the previously reported lack of Maxi-K channels. However, this view is not entirely correct as evidenced in the present paper. Searching for their presence in pancreatic acinar cells in mice from 5 to 84 weeks of age with patch-clamp current measurements, we demonstrated that the expression of Maxi-K channels is regulated in an age-associated manner after birth. The expression started at approximately 12 postnatal weeks and increased steadily up to 84 weeks. In support of this, RT-PCR could not detect mSlo mRNA, the Maxi-K gene, at either 7 or 8 weeks but could at 58 and 64 postnatal weeks. These results suggest that a key steering element for fluid secretion, the Maxi-K channel, is progressively re-organized in rodent pancreas. A pancreatic secretagogue, acetylcholine, evoked Maxi-K channel current overlapping to various degrees on the previously known current response. This suggests that the rise in internal Ca2+ activates Maxi-K channels which reshape the mode of secretagogue-evoked current response and contribute to Cl− driving in fluid secretion in an age-associated fashion. PMID:15611028

  17. Evidence that zymogen granules do not function as an intracellular Ca2+ store for the generation of the Ca2+ signal in rat parotid acinar cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nezu, Akihiro; Tanimura, Akihiko; Morita, Takao; Irie, Kazuharu; Yajima, Toshihiko; Tojyo, Yosuke

    2002-01-01

    Rat parotid acinar cells lacking zymogen granules were obtained by inducing granule discharge with the beta-adrenoceptor agonist isoproterenol. To assess whether zymogen granules are involved in the regulation of Ca(2+) signalling as intracellular Ca(2+) stores, changes in cytosolic free Ca(2+) ion concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) were studied with imaging microscopy in fura-2-loaded parotid acinar cells lacking zymogen granules. The increase in [Ca(2+)](i) induced by muscarinic receptor stimulation was initiated at the apical pole of the acinar cells, and rapidly spread as a Ca(2+) wave towards the basolateral region. The magnitude of the [Ca(2+)](i) response and the speed of the Ca(2+) wave were essentially similar to those in control acinar cells containing zymogen granules. Western blot analysis of the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP(3)R) was performed on zymogen granule membranes and microsomes using anti-IP(3)R antibodies. The immunoreactivity of all three IP(3)Rs was clearly observed in the microsomal preparations. Although a weak band of IP(3)R type-2 was detected in the zymogen granule membranes, this band probably resulted from contamination by the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), because calnexin, a marker protein of the ER, was also detected in the same preparation. Furthermore, Western blotting and reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis failed to provide evidence for the expression of ryanodine receptors in rat parotid acinar cells, whereas expression was clearly detectable in rat skeletal muscle, heart and brain. These results suggest that zymogen granules do not have a critical role in Ca(2+) signalling in rat parotid acinar cells. PMID:11903047

  18. Insulation of a G protein-coupled receptor on the plasmalemmal surface of the pancreatic acinar cell

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Receptor desensitization is a key process for the protection of the cell from continuous or repeated exposure to high concentrations of an agonist. Well-established mechanisms for desensitization of guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptors include phosphorylation, sequestration/internalization, and down-regulation. In this work, we have examined some mechanisms for desensitization of the cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor which is native to the pancreatic acinar cell, and have found the predominant mechanism to be distinct from these recognized processes. Upon fluorescent agonist occupancy of the native receptor, it becomes "insulated" from the effects of acid washing and becomes immobilized on the surface of the plasma membrane in a time- and temperature-dependent manner. This localization was assessed by ultrastructural studies using a colloidal gold conjugate of CCK, and lateral mobility of the receptor was assessed using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. Of note, recent application of the same morphologic techniques to a CCK receptor-bearing Chinese hamster ovary cell line demonstrated prominent internalization via the clathrin-dependent endocytic pathway, as well as entry into caveolae (Roettger, B.F., R.U. Rentsch, D. Pinon, E. Holicky, E. Hadac, J.M. Larkin, and L.J. Miller, 1995, J. Cell Biol. 128: 1029-1041). These organelles are not observed to represent prominent compartments for the same receptor to traverse in the acinar cell, although fluorescent insulin is clearly internalized in these cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis. In this work, the rate of lateral mobility of the CCK receptor is observed to be similar in both cell types (1-3 x 10(-10) cm2/s), while the fate of the agonist-occupied receptor is quite distinct in each cell. This supports the unique nature of desensitization processes which occur in a cell-specific manner. A plasmalemmal site of insulation of this important receptor on the pancreatic acinar cell

  19. Morphometric studies of secretory granule formation in mouse pancreatic acinar cells. Dissecting the early structural changes following pilocarpine injection

    PubMed Central

    HAMMEL, ILAN; SHOR-HAZAN, OSNAT; ELDAR, TORA; AMIHAI, DINA; LEW, SYLVIA

    1999-01-01

    Secretory granule formation in pancreatic acinar cells is known to involve massive membrane flow. In previous studies we have undertaken morphometry of the regranulation mechanism in these cells and in mast cells as a model for cellular membrane movement. In our current work, electron micrographs of pancreatic acinar cells from ICR mice were taken at several time points after extensive degranulation induced by pilocarpine injection in order to investigate the volume changes of rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER), nucleus, mitochondria and autophagosomes. At 2–4 h after stimulation, when the pancreatic cells demonstrated a complete loss of granules, this was accompanied by an increased proportion of autophagosomal activity. This change primarily reflected a greatly increased proportion of profiles retaining autophagic vacuoles containing recognisable cytoplasmic structures such as mitochondria, granule profiles and fragments of RER. The mitochondrial structures reached a significant maximal size 4 h following injection (before degranulation 0.178±0.028 μm3; at 4 h peak value, 0.535±0.109 μm3). Nucleus size showed an early volume increase approaching a maximum value 2 h following degranulation. The regranulation span was thus divided into 3 stages. The first was the membrane remodelling stage (0–2 h). During this period the volume of the RER and secretory granules was greatly decreased. At the intermediate stage (2–4 h) a significant increase of the synthesis zone was observed within the nucleus. The volume of the mitochondria was increasing. At the last step, the major finding was a significant granule accumulation in parallel with an active Golgi zone. PMID:10227666

  20. Role of protein kinase C in caerulein induced expression of substance P and neurokinin-1-receptors in murine pancreatic acinar cells

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Yung-Hua; Tamizhselvi, Ramasamy; Moochhala, Shabbir; Bian, Jin-Song; Bhatia, Madhav

    2011-01-01

    Substance P (SP) is involved in the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis (AP) via binding to its high-affinity receptor, neurokinin-1-receptor (NK1R). An up-regulation of SP and NK1R expression was observed in experimental AP and in caerulein-stimulated pancreatic acinar cells. However, the mechanisms that lead to this up-regulation are not fully understood. In this study, we showed the role of protein kinase C (PKC) in caerulein-induced SP and NK1R production in isolated mouse pancreatic acinar cells. Caerulein (10−7 M) stimulation rapidly activated the conventional PKC-α and novel PKC-δ as observed by the phosphorylation of these molecules. Pre-treatment of pancreatic acinar cells with Gö6976 (1–10 nM) and rottlerin (1–10 μM) inhibited PKC-α and PKC-δ phosphorylation, respectively, but not the other way round. At these concentrations used, PKC-α and PKC-δ inhibition reversed the caerulein-induced up-regulation of SP and NK1R, indicating an important role of PKCs in the modulation of SP and NK1R expression. Further experiments looking into signalling mechanisms showed that treatment of pancreatic acinar cells with both Gö6976 and rottlerin inhibited the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Inhibition of PKC-α or PKC-δ also affected caerulein-induced transcription factor activation, as represented by nuclear factor-κB and AP-1 DNA-binding activity. The findings in this study suggested that PKC is upstream of the mitogen-activated protein kinases and transcription factors, which then lead to the up-regulation of SP/NK1R expression in caerulein-treated mouse pancreatic acinar cells. PMID:20973912

  1. Ae4 (Slc4a9) Anion Exchanger Drives Cl- Uptake-dependent Fluid Secretion by Mouse Submandibular Gland Acinar Cells.

    PubMed

    Peña-Münzenmayer, Gaspar; Catalán, Marcelo A; Kondo, Yusuke; Jaramillo, Yasna; Liu, Frances; Shull, Gary E; Melvin, James E

    2015-04-24

    Transcellular Cl(-) movement across acinar cells is the rate-limiting step for salivary gland fluid secretion. Basolateral Nkcc1 Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporters play a critical role in fluid secretion by promoting the intracellular accumulation of Cl(-) above its equilibrium potential. However, salivation is only partially abolished in the absence of Nkcc1 cotransporter activity, suggesting that another Cl(-) uptake pathway concentrates Cl(-) ions in acinar cells. To identify alternative molecular mechanisms, we studied mice lacking Ae2 and Ae4 Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchangers. We found that salivation stimulated by muscarinic and β-adrenergic receptor agonists was normal in the submandibular glands of Ae2(-/-) mice. In contrast, saliva secretion was reduced by 35% in Ae4(-/-) mice. The decrease in salivation was not related to loss of Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter or Na(+)/H(+) exchanger activity in Ae4(-/-) mice but correlated with reduced Cl(-) uptake during β-adrenergic receptor activation of cAMP signaling. Direct measurements of Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchanger activity revealed that HCO3 (-)-dependent Cl(-) uptake was reduced in the acinar cells of Ae2(-/-) and Ae4(-/-) mice. Moreover, Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchanger activity was nearly abolished in double Ae4/Ae2 knock-out mice, suggesting that most of the Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchanger activity in submandibular acinar cells depends on Ae2 and Ae4 expression. In conclusion, both Ae2 and Ae4 anion exchangers are functionally expressed in submandibular acinar cells; however, only Ae4 expression appears to be important for cAMP-dependent regulation of fluid secretion. PMID:25745107

  2. Platelet-activating factor promotes motility in breast cancer cells and disrupts non-transformed breast acinar structures.

    PubMed

    Anandi, V Libi; Ashiq, K A; Nitheesh, K; Lahiri, M

    2016-01-01

    A plethora of studies have demonstrated that chronic inflammatory microenvironment influences the genesis and progression of tumors. Such microenvironments are enriched with various lipid mediators. Platelet activating factor (PAF, 1-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) is one such lipid mediator that is secreted by different immune cell types during inflammation and by breast cancer cells upon stimulation with growth factors. Overexpression of PAF-receptor has also been observed in many other cancers. Here we report the possible roles of PAF in tumor initiation and progression. MCF10A, a non-transformed and non-malignant mammary epithelial cell line, when grown as 3D 'on-top' cultures form spheroids that have a distinct hollow lumen surrounded by a monolayer of epithelial cells. Exposure of these spheroids to PAF resulted in the formation of large deformed acinar structures with disrupted lumen, implying transformation. We then examined the response of transformed cells such as MDA-MB 231 to stimulation with PAF. We observed collective cell migration as well as motility at the single cell level on PAF induction, suggesting its role during metastasis. This increase in collective cell migration is mediated via PI3-kinase and/or JNK pathway and is independent of the MAP-kinase pathway. Taken together this study signifies a novel role of PAF in inducing transformation of non-tumorigenic cells and the vital role in promotion of breast cancer cell migration. PMID:26531049

  3. Actin and non-muscle myosin II facilitate apical exocytosis of tear proteins in rabbit lacrimal acinar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Jerdeva, Galina V.; Wu, Kaijin; Yarber, Francie A.; Rhodes, Christopher J.; Kalman, Daniel; Schechter, Joel E.; Hamm-Alvarez, Sarah F.

    2006-01-01

    Summary The acinar epithelial cells of the lacrimal gland exocytose the contents of mature secretory vesicles containing tear proteins at their apical membranes in response to secretagogues. Here we use time-lapse confocal fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching to investigate the changes in actin filaments located beneath the apical membrane during exocytosis evoked by the muscarinic agonist, carbachol (100 μM). Time-lapse confocal fluorescence microscopy of apical actin filaments in reconstituted rabbit lacrimal acini transduced with replication-deficient adenovirus containing GFP-actin revealed a relatively quiescent apical actin array in resting acini. Carbachol markedly increased apical actin filament turnover and also promoted transient actin assembly around apparent fusion intermediates. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching measurements revealed significant (p≤0.05) increases and decreases, respectively, in mobile fraction (Mf) and turnover times (t½) for apical actin filaments in carbachol-stimulated acini relative to untreated acini. The myosin inhibitors, 2,3-butanedione monoxime (BDM, 10 mM, 15 min) and ML-7 (40 μM, 15 min), significantly decreased carbachol-stimulated secretion of bulk protein and the exogenous secretory vesicle marker, syncollin-GFP; these agents also promoted accumulation of actin-coated structures which were enriched, in transduced acini, in syncollin-GFP, confirming their identity as fusion intermediates. Actin-coated fusion intermediates were sized consistent with incorporation of multiple rather than single secretory vesicles; moreover, BDM and ML-7 caused a shift towards formation of multiple secretory vesicle aggregates while significantly increasing the diameter of actin-coated fusion intermediates. Our findings suggest that the increased turnover of apical actin filaments and the interaction of actin with non-muscle myosin II assembled around aggregates of secretory vesicles facilitate

  4. Adenovirus-mediated hAQP1 expression in irradiated mouse salivary glands causes recovery of saliva secretion by enhancing acinar cell volume decrease.

    PubMed

    Teos, L Y; Zheng, C-Y; Liu, X; Swaim, W D; Goldsmith, C M; Cotrim, A P; Baum, B J; Ambudkar, I S

    2016-07-01

    Head and neck irradiation (IR) during cancer treatment causes by-stander effects on the salivary glands leading to irreversible loss of saliva secretion. The mechanism underlying loss of fluid secretion is not understood and no adequate therapy is currently available. Delivery of an adenoviral vector encoding human aquaporin-1 (hAQP1) into the salivary glands of human subjects and animal models with radiation-induced salivary hypofunction leads to significant recovery of saliva secretion and symptomatic relief in subjects. To elucidate the mechanism underlying loss of salivary secretion and the basis for AdhAQP1-dependent recovery of salivary gland function we assessed submandibular gland function in control mice and mice 2 and 8 months after treatment with a single 15-Gy dose of IR (delivered to the salivary gland region). Salivary secretion and neurotransmitter-stimulated changes in acinar cell volume, an in vitro read-out for fluid secretion, were monitored. Consistent with the sustained 60% loss of fluid secretion following IR, a carbachol (CCh)-induced decrease in acinar cell volume from the glands of mice post IR was transient and attenuated as compared with that in cells from non-IR age-matched mice. The hAQP1 expression in non-IR mice induced no significant effect on salivary fluid secretion or CCh-stimulated cell volume changes, except in acinar cells from 8-month group where the initial rate of cell shrinkage was increased. Importantly, the expression of hAQP1 in the glands of mice post IR induced recovery of salivary fluid secretion and a volume decrease in acinar cells to levels similar to those in cells from non-IR mice. The initial rates of CCh-stimulated cell volume reduction in acinar cells from hAQP1-expressing glands post IR were similar to those from control cells. Altogether, the data suggest that expression of hAQP1 increases the water permeability of acinar cells, which underlies the recovery of fluid secretion in the salivary glands

  5. HCO3(-) secretion by murine nasal submucosal gland serous acinar cells during Ca2+-stimulated fluid secretion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Robert J; Harlow, Janice M; Limberis, Maria P; Wilson, James M; Foskett, J Kevin

    2008-07-01

    Airway submucosal glands contribute to airway surface liquid (ASL) composition and volume, both important for lung mucociliary clearance. Serous acini generate most of the fluid secreted by glands, but the molecular mechanisms remain poorly characterized. We previously described cholinergic-regulated fluid secretion driven by Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) secretion in primary murine serous acinar cells revealed by simultaneous differential interference contrast (DIC) and fluorescence microscopy. Here, we evaluated whether Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) secretion was accompanied by secretion of HCO(3)(-), possibly a critical ASL component, by simultaneous measurements of intracellular pH (pH(i)) and cell volume. Resting pH(i) was 7.17 +/- 0.01 in physiological medium (5% CO(2)-25 mM HCO(3)(-)). During carbachol (CCh) stimulation, pH(i) fell transiently by 0.08 +/- 0.01 U concomitantly with a fall in Cl(-) content revealed by cell shrinkage, reflecting Cl(-) secretion. A subsequent alkalinization elevated pH(i) to above resting levels until agonist removal, whereupon it returned to prestimulation values. In nominally CO(2)-HCO(3)(-)-free media, the CCh-induced acidification was reduced, whereas the alkalinization remained intact. Elimination of driving forces for conductive HCO(3)(-) efflux by ion substitution or exposure to the Cl(-) channel inhibitor niflumic acid (100 microM) strongly inhibited agonist-induced acidification by >80% and >70%, respectively. The Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE) inhibitor dimethylamiloride (DMA) increased the magnitude (greater than twofold) and duration of the CCh-induced acidification. Gene expression profiling suggested that serous cells express NHE isoforms 1-4 and 6-9, but pharmacological sensitivities demonstrated that alkalinization observed during both CCh stimulation and pH(i) recovery from agonist-induced acidification was primarily due to NHE1, localized to the basolateral membrane. These results suggest that serous acinar cells secrete HCO(3

  6. Differentially expressed microRNA identification and target gene function analysis in starvation-induced autophagy of AR42J pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bo; Wang, Duanping; Sun, Wang; Meng, Xianzhi; Zhang, Weihui; Xue, Dongbo

    2016-07-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common acute digestive tract disease, with increased morbidity and mortality, and an unclear pathogenesis. Trypsinogen activation in pancreatic acinar cells may be the primary mechanism underlying the development of AP. Previous studies reported that autophagy participates in the formation of acinar cell vacuoles in AP and in the process of trypsinogen activation as an important cause of AP. Furthermore, microRNAs (miRNAs) maintain the autophagy process by regulating the expression of autophagy‑associated genes. In the present study, an in vitro pancreatic acinar cell autophagy model was established using the AR42J starvation‑induced pancreatic acinar cell line. Twenty differentially expressed microRNAs were identified using miRNA microarray. Bioinformatics analysis was used to predict the target genes of miRNAs and analyze the functions of differentially expressed miRNAs. The results demonstrated that only the downregulated miRNA rno‑miR‑148b‑3p predicted 593 target genes with a statistical significance (P<0.05), from which 10 genes were autophagy‑associated. The results of gene ontology and pathway analyses demonstrated that the target genes of miRNAs were enriched in the Response to insulin stimulus, Regulation of cell death and the Insulin signaling pathways (P<0.05, FDR<0.05). In addition, protein‑protein interaction network analysis demonstrated a widespread interaction among the 593 target genes. The results of the present study may provide novel targets for research on the mechanisms of autophagy-promoted AP and AP treatment. PMID:27175615

  7. E-cadherin-negative acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas: report of a case showing a solid pseudopapillary growth pattern.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Shogo; Waki, Michihiko; Azuma, Masaki; Koda, Kenji; Ohata, Akihiko

    2016-09-01

    E-cadherin expression patterns in acinar cell carcinomas (ACCs) of the pancreas have not been well documented. Herein, we present a hitherto undescribed case of E-cadherin-negative ACC with a solid pseudopapillary growth pattern in a 65-year-old man. We used an antibody against the extracellular domain of E-cadherin. As a further unusual status in ACC, faint β-catenin expression was observed in the cytoplasm of carcinoma cells. Morphological distinction from a solid pseudopapillary neoplasm (SPN) of the pancreas might be problematic in such a case, because of their similarities concerned with the growth pattern and E-cadherin negativity. Without nuclear accumulation of β-catenin, a diagnosis of SPN was almost excluded. Immunoreactivity for trypsin and BCL10 made an accurate diagnosis of ACC to this case. The tumor recurred 10 months post-surgery as rapidly enlarging masses in the liver, presumably indicating the aggressiveness of the E-cadherin-negative phenotype among ACCs. PMID:25600280

  8. Exocytosis in the dissociated pancreatic acinar cells of the guinea pig directly visualized by VEC-DIC microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Y; Sakurai, T; Habara, Y; Busik, J V; Kanno, T; Terakawa, S

    2000-10-14

    To elucidate the detailed process of exocytosis at the highest possible accuracy, we dissociated the pancreatic acinus of the guinea pig and observed zymogen granules under a video-enhanced contrast differential interference contrast (VEC-DIC) microscope. The preparation was thin enough to resolve each zymogen granule with the best clarity. When acinar cells were stimulated with ACh (20 microM), many zymogen granules near the lumen showed an abrupt light intensity change. For a period of 10 s immediately before exocytosis, zymogen granules neither shifted their position nor altered their shape within an accuracy of 38 nm. The time required for individual granules to change the light intensity (the releasing time) ranged from 0.15 to 0.70 s. After each response, the granule maintained its altered contrast for a few seconds until it was retrieved to a planar membrane. No compound exocytosis including granule-granule fusion was observed. We concluded that the exocytosis is not directly initiated by any supramolecular change but by a purely molecular event. PMID:11027653

  9. Clinicopathologic study of 62 acinar cell carcinomas of the pancreas: insights into the morphology and immunophenotype and search for prognostic markers.

    PubMed

    La Rosa, Stefano; Adsay, Volkan; Albarello, Luca; Asioli, Sofia; Casnedi, Selenia; Franzi, Francesca; Marando, Alessandro; Notohara, Kenji; Sessa, Fausto; Vanoli, Alessandro; Zhang, Lizhi; Capella, Carlo

    2012-12-01

    Acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) of the pancreas is a very rare tumor that has various morphologic features, which may give rise to diagnostic difficulties. Because of its rarity, many clinicopathologic characteristics remain to be further elucidated, and prognostic factors are yet to be well established. With the aim of better characterizing this carcinoma and searching for prognostic indicators, we collected 62 ACCs and investigated the following parameters: site, size, local infiltration, node and distant metastases, architectural pattern, nuclear atypia, presence of necrosis, lymphovascular and perineural invasion, proliferation, BCL10, trypsin, carboxyl ester lipase, amylase, lipase, PDX1, cytokeratin 19 (CK19), CK7, p53, and β-catenin expression. Twelve cases showing >30% of endocrine cells were reclassified as mixed acinar-neuroendocrine carcinomas, whereas 1 tumor was reclassified as a mixed ductal-acinar carcinoma and was excluded from the statistical prognostic evaluations. BCL10 and trypsin were the most reliable immunohistochemical markers, whereas amylase and lipase were not. Surgery was statistically correlated with a better prognosis (P=0.0008). Among resected tumors there was no difference in survival between ACCs and mixed acinar-neuroendocrine carcinomas, and factors that significantly correlated with poor prognosis were size >6.5 cm (P=0.004), lymph node (P=0.0039) and distant (P=0.008) metastases, and UICC stage (P=0.009). Stage was the only independent prognostic factor at multivariable analysis, and the best prognostic discrimination was observed on grouping together stages I and II and grouping together stages III and IV, suggesting a simplification of the UICC staging for such cancers. In addition, vascular and perineural invasion and CK19 and p53 expression showed a trend for poor prognosis, not reaching statistical significance. PMID:23026929

  10. Transdifferentiation of mouse adipose-derived stromal cells into acinar cells of the submandibular gland using a co-culture system

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jingu; Park, Sangkyu; Roh, Sangho

    2015-05-15

    A loss of salivary gland function often occurs after radiation therapy in head and neck tumors, though secretion of saliva by the salivary glands is essential for the health and maintenance of the oral environment. Transplantation of salivary acinar cells (ACs), in part, may overcome the side effects of therapy. Here we directly differentiated mouse adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) into ACs using a co-culture system. Multipotent ADSCs can be easily collected from stromal vascular fractions of adipose tissues. The isolated ADSCs showed positive expression of markers such as integrin beta-1 (CD29), cell surface glycoprotein (CD44), endoglin (CD105), and Nanog. The cells were able to differentiate into adipocytes, osteoblasts, and neural-like cells after 14 days in culture. ADSCs at passage 2 were co-cultured with mouse ACs in AC culture medium using the double-chamber (co-culture system) to avoid mixing the cell types. The ADSCs in this co-culture system expressed markers of ACs, such as α-amylases and aquaporin5, in both mRNA and protein. ADSCs cultured in AC-conditioned medium also expressed AC markers. Cellular proliferation and senescence analyses demonstrated that cells in the co-culture group showed lower senescence and a higher proliferation rate than the AC-conditioned medium group at Days 14 and 21. The results above imply direct conversion of ADSCs into ACs under the co-culture system; therefore, ADSCs may be a stem cell source for the therapy for salivary gland damage. - Highlights: • ADSCs could transdifferentiate into acinar cells (ACs) using ACs co-culture (CCA). • Transdifferentiated ADSCs expressed ACs markers such as α-amylase and aquaporin5. • High proliferation and low senescence were presented in CCA at Day 14. • Transdifferentiation of ADSCs into ACs using CCA may be an appropriate method for cell-based therapy.

  11. Ionizing irradiation induces apoptotic damage of salivary gland acinar cells via NADPH oxidase 1-dependent superoxide generation

    SciTech Connect

    Tateishi, Yoshihisa Sasabe, Eri; Ueta, Eisaku; Yamamoto, Tetsuya

    2008-02-08

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have important roles in various physiological processes. Recently, several novel homologues of the phagocytic NADPH oxidase have been discovered and this protein family is now designated as the Nox family. We investigated the involvement of Nox family proteins in ionizing irradiation-induced ROS generation and impairment in immortalized salivary gland acinar cells (NS-SV-AC), which are radiosensitive, and immortalized ductal cells (NS-SV-DC), which are radioresistant. Nox1-mRNA was upregulated by {gamma}-ray irradiation in NS-SV-AC, and the ROS level in NS-SV-AC was increased to approximately threefold of the control level after 10 Gy irradiation. The increase of ROS level in NS-SV-AC was suppressed by Nox1-siRNA-transfection. In parallel with the suppression of ROS generation and Nox1-mRNA expression by Nox1-siRNA, ionizing irradiation-induced apoptosis was strongly decreased in Nox1-siRNA-transfected NS-SV-AC. There were no large differences in total SOD or catalase activities between NS-SV-AC and NS-SV-DC although the post-irradiation ROS level in NS-SV-AC was higher than that in NS-SV-DC. In conclusion, these results indicate that Nox1 plays a crucial role in irradiation-induced ROS generation and ROS-associated impairment of salivary gland cells and that Nox1 gene may be targeted for preservation of the salivary gland function from radiation-induced impairment.

  12. Cholecystokinin activates Gi1-, Gi2-, Gi3- and several Gs-proteins in rat pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed Central

    Schnefel, S; Pröfrock, A; Hinsch, K D; Schulz, I

    1990-01-01

    On separation of rat pancreatic plasma membrane proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, 15 GTP-binding protein (G-protein) alpha-subunits could be detected immunochemically using an alpha common antibody. These consisted of five 48 kDa proteins (pI 5.70, 5.80, 5.90, 6.10 and 6.25) and five 45 kDa proteins (pI 5.90, 6.05, 6.25, 6.30 and 6.70), presumably corresponding to low- and high-molecular mass forms of the Gs-protein, as well as three 40/41 kDa proteins (pI 5.50, 5.70 and 6.00) and two 39 kDa proteins (pI 5.50 and 6.00). All of these proteins except for the more acidic 39 kDa protein were ADP-ribosylated by cholera toxin (CT). In addition, the three 40/41 kDa proteins and the more alkaline 39 kDa protein were also ADP-ribosylated by pertussis toxin (PT). CT- and PT-induced ADP-ribosylation changed the pI values of G-protein alpha-subunits by 0.2 pI units to more acidic values. Preincubation of isolated pancreatic membranes with cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-OP), which stimulates phospholipase C in acinar cells, decreased CT-induced as well as PT-induced ADP-ribosylation of the three 40/41 kDa proteins, whereas CT-induced ADP-ribosylation of one 45 kDa (pI 5.80) and all 48 kDa proteins was enhanced in the presence of CCK. Carbachol, another stimulant of phospholipase C, had no effect. The three 40/41 kDa proteins and one 48 kDa protein could be labelled with the GTP analogue [alpha-32P]GTP-gamma-azidoanilide. CCK, but not carbachol, stimulated incorporation of the GTP analogue into all of these four proteins. Using different anti-peptide antisera specific for alpha-subunits of G-proteins we identified the three 40/41 kDa Gi-proteins as Gi1 (pI 6.00), Gi2 (pI 5.50) and Gi3 (pI 5.70). The Gi3-protein was found to be the major Gi-protein of pancreatic plasma membranes. One of the 39 kDa proteins (pI 6.0) was identified as Go. These results indicate that CCK receptors functionally interact with six Gs-proteins and with Gi1, Gi2 and Gi3-proteins. Since

  13. Chronic Nicotine Exposure In Vivo and In Vitro Inhibits Vitamin B1 (Thiamin) Uptake by Pancreatic Acinar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Padmanabhan; Thrower, Edwin C.; Loganathan, Gopalakrishnan; Balamurugan, A. N.; Subramanian, Veedamali S.; Gorelick, Fred S.; Said, Hamid M.

    2015-01-01

    Thiamin (vitamin B1), a member of the water-soluble family of vitamins, is essential for normal cellular functions; its deficiency results in oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Pancreatic acinar cells (PAC) obtain thiamin from the circulation using a specific carrier-mediated process mediated by both thiamin transporters -1 and -2 (THTR-1 and THTR-2; encoded by the SLC19A2 and SLC19A3 genes, respectively). The aim of the current study was to examine the effect of chronic exposure of mouse PAC in vivo and human PAC in vitro to nicotine (a major component of cigarette smoke that has been implicated in pancreatic diseases) on thiamin uptake and to delineate the mechanism involved. The results showed that chronic exposure of mice to nicotine significantly inhibits thiamin uptake in murine PAC, and that this inhibition is associated with a marked decrease in expression of THTR-1 and THTR-2 at the protein, mRNA and hnRNAs level. Furthermore, expression of the important thiamin-metabolizing enzyme, thiamin pyrophosphokinase (TPKase), was significantly reduced in PAC of mice exposed to nicotine. Similarly, chronic exposure of cultured human PAC to nicotine (0.5 μM, 48 h) significantly inhibited thiamin uptake, which was also associated with a decrease in expression of THTR-1 and THTR-2 proteins and mRNAs. This study demonstrates that chronic exposure of PAC to nicotine impairs the physiology and the molecular biology of the thiamin uptake process. Furthermore, the study suggests that the effect is, in part, mediated through transcriptional mechanism(s) affecting the SLC19A2 and SLC19A3 genes. PMID:26633299

  14. Chronic Nicotine Exposure In Vivo and In Vitro Inhibits Vitamin B1 (Thiamin) Uptake by Pancreatic Acinar Cells.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Padmanabhan; Thrower, Edwin C; Loganathan, Gopalakrishnan; Balamurugan, A N; Subramanian, Veedamali S; Gorelick, Fred S; Said, Hamid M

    2015-01-01

    Thiamin (vitamin B1), a member of the water-soluble family of vitamins, is essential for normal cellular functions; its deficiency results in oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Pancreatic acinar cells (PAC) obtain thiamin from the circulation using a specific carrier-mediated process mediated by both thiamin transporters -1 and -2 (THTR-1 and THTR-2; encoded by the SLC19A2 and SLC19A3 genes, respectively). The aim of the current study was to examine the effect of chronic exposure of mouse PAC in vivo and human PAC in vitro to nicotine (a major component of cigarette smoke that has been implicated in pancreatic diseases) on thiamin uptake and to delineate the mechanism involved. The results showed that chronic exposure of mice to nicotine significantly inhibits thiamin uptake in murine PAC, and that this inhibition is associated with a marked decrease in expression of THTR-1 and THTR-2 at the protein, mRNA and hnRNAs level. Furthermore, expression of the important thiamin-metabolizing enzyme, thiamin pyrophosphokinase (TPKase), was significantly reduced in PAC of mice exposed to nicotine. Similarly, chronic exposure of cultured human PAC to nicotine (0.5 μM, 48 h) significantly inhibited thiamin uptake, which was also associated with a decrease in expression of THTR-1 and THTR-2 proteins and mRNAs. This study demonstrates that chronic exposure of PAC to nicotine impairs the physiology and the molecular biology of the thiamin uptake process. Furthermore, the study suggests that the effect is, in part, mediated through transcriptional mechanism(s) affecting the SLC19A2 and SLC19A3 genes. PMID:26633299

  15. Blockade of ATP binding site of P2 purinoceptors in rat parotid acinar cells by isothiocyanate compounds.

    PubMed

    Soltoff, S P; McMillian, M K; Talamo, B R; Cantley, L C

    1993-05-01

    Extracellular ATP activates a P2Z-type purinergic receptor (purinoceptor) in rat parotid acinar cells that increases the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration via the entry of extracellular Ca2+ through an ATP-sensitive cation channel (Soltoff et al., Am J Physiol 262: C934-C940, 1992). To learn more about the ATP binding site of the purinoceptor, we examined the effects of several stilbene isothiocyanate analogs of DIDS (4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid), which block the binding of [32P]ATP to intact parotid cells (McMillian et al., Biochem J 255:291-300, 1988) and blocked the activation of the P2Z purinoceptor. The ATP-stimulated 45Ca2+ uptake was blocked by DIDS, H2DIDS (dihydro-DIDS; 4,4'-diisothiocyanatodihydrostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid), and SITS (4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid), but not by DNDS (4,4'-dinitrostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid), a stilbene disulfonate compound lacking isothiocyanate (SCN-) groups, or by KSCN. The potency of the stilbene disulfonates was related to the number of isothiocyanate groups on each compound. Under the experimental conditions, the IC50 value of DIDS (approximately 35 microM), which has two SCN-groups, was much lower than that of SITS (approximately 125 microM), which has only one SCN-group. The inhibitory effects of DIDS appeared to be much more potent than those of SITS due to the kinetics of their binding to the purinoceptors. Eosin-5-isothiocyanate (EITC) and fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate (FITC), non-stilbene isothiocyanate compounds with single SCN-groups, also blocked the response to ATP and were less potent than DIDS. Trinitrophenyl-ATP (TNP-ATP), an ATP derivative that is not an effective agonist of the parotid P2Z receptor, blocked the covalent binding of DIDS to the plasma membrane, suggesting that ATP and DIDS bind to the same site. Reactive Blue 2 (Cibacron Blue 3GA), an anthraquinone-sulfonic acid derivative that is a noncovalent purinergic antagonist, also blocked

  16. Quantitative characterization of the protein contents of the exocrine pancreatic acinar cell by soft x-ray microscopy and advanced digital imaging methods

    SciTech Connect

    Loo Jr., Billy W.

    2000-06-09

    The study of the exocrine pancreatic acinar cell has been central to the development of models of many cellular processes, especially of protein transport and secretion. Traditional methods used to examine this system have provided a wealth of qualitative information from which mechanistic models have been inferred. However they have lacked the ability to make quantitative measurements, particularly of the distribution of protein in the cell, information critical for grounding of models in terms of magnitude and relative significance. This dissertation describes the development and application of new tools that were used to measure the protein content of the major intracellular compartments in the acinar cell, particularly the zymogen granule. Soft x-ray microscopy permits image formation with high resolution and contrast determined by the underlying protein content of tissue rather than staining avidity. A sample preparation method compatible with x-ray microscopy was developed and its properties evaluated. Automatic computerized methods were developed to acquire, calibrate, and analyze large volumes of x-ray microscopic images of exocrine pancreatic tissue sections. Statistics were compiled on the protein density of several organelles, and on the protein density, size, and spatial distribution of tens of thousands of zymogen granules. The results of these measurements, and how they compare to predictions of different models of protein transport, are discussed.

  17. PKCαβγ- and PKCδ-dependent endocytosis of NBCe1-A and NBCe1-B in salivary parotid acinar cells

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Clint; Baker, Olga J.; Reyland, Mary E.

    2009-01-01

    We examined membrane trafficking of NBCe1-A and NBCe1-B variants of the electrogenic Na+-HCO3− cotransporter (NBCe1) encoded by the SLC4A4 gene, using confocal fluorescent microscopy in rat parotid acinar cells (ParC5 and ParC10). We showed that yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-tagged NBCe1-A and green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged NBCe1-B are colocalized with E-cadherin in the basolateral membrane (BLM) but not with the apical membrane marker zona occludens 1 (ZO-1). We inhibited constitutive recycling with monensin and W13 and detected that NBCe1-A and NBCe1-B accumulated in vesicles marked with the early endosomal marker early endosome antigen-1 (EEA1), with a parallel loss from the BLM. We observed that NBCe1-A and NBCe1-B undergo massive carbachol (CCh)-stimulated redistribution from the BLM into early endosomes. We showed that internalization of NBCe1-A and NBCe1-B was prevented by the general PKC inhibitor GF-109203X, the PKCαβγ-specific inhibitor Gö-6976, and the PKCδ-specific inhibitor rottlerin. We verified the involvement of PKCδ by blocking CCh-induced internalization of NBCe1-A-cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) in cells transfected with dominant-negative kinase-dead (Lys376Arg) PKCδ-GFP. Our data suggest that NBCe1-A and NBCe1-B undergo constitutive and CCh-stimulated endocytosis regulated by conventional PKCs (PKCαβγ) and by novel PKCδ in rat epithelial cells. To help develop a more complete model of the role of NBCe1 in parotid acinar cells we also investigated the initial phase of the secretory response to cholinergic agonist. In an Ussing chamber study we showed that inhibition of basolateral NBCe1 with 5-chloro-2,3-dihydro-3-(hydroxy-2-thienylmethylene)-2-oxo-1H-indole-1-carboxamide (tenidap) significantly decreases an initial phase of luminal anion secretion measured as a transient short-circuit current (Isc) across ParC10 cell monolayers. Using trafficking and functional data we propose a model that describes a physiological role of

  18. Lung Cell Oxidant Injury

    PubMed Central

    Suttorp, Norbert; Simon, Lawrence M.

    1982-01-01

    The oxidant damage of lung tissue during in vivo hyperoxic exposure appears to be amplified by neutrophils that release toxic amounts of oxygen metabolites. In our studies cloned lung epithelial cells (L2 cells), lung fibroblasts, and pulmonary artery endothelial cells were cultured under either ambient (Po2 ∼ 140 torr) or hyperoxic (Po2 ∼ 630 torr) conditions for 48 h (24 h for endothelial cells). After cultivation, phorbol myristate acetate- or opsonized zymosan-stimulated neutrophils were added to the cultivated monolayers for 4 h, and lung cell damage was quantitated using 51Cr release as an index. The data show that stimulated neutrophils are able to injure the three lung cell lines tested, with endothelial cells being highly susceptible to this injury and L2 cells being slightly more susceptible than lung fibroblasts. The studies also demonstrate that all three lung cell lines exposed to sustained hyperoxia are more susceptible to neutrophil-mediated cytotoxicity than their time-matched air controls. Hydrogen peroxide was the main toxic oxygen metabolite because catalase (2,500 U/ml) completely protected the target cells. Equivalent quantities of hydrogen peroxide generated by glucose oxidase instead of by neutrophils gave a similar degree of target cell injury. Superoxide dismutase at high concentrations (250 μg/ml) provided some protection. Other systems that detoxify oxygen metabolites were without protective effect. These findings indicate that the increase in susceptibility of lung cells to neutrophil-mediated oxidant damage is a toxic effect of hyperoxia on lung cells. This specific manifestation of oxygen damage provides insight into the integration between primary mechanisms (oxygen exposure) and secondary mechanisms (release of oxygen metabolites by neutrophils) with respect to the cellular basis for pulmonary oxygen toxicity. PMID:6284800

  19. Valproic Acid Limits Pancreatic Recovery after Pancreatitis by Inhibiting Histone Deacetylases and Preventing Acinar Redifferentiation Programs.

    PubMed

    Eisses, John F; Criscimanna, Angela; Dionise, Zachary R; Orabi, Abrahim I; Javed, Tanveer A; Sarwar, Sheharyar; Jin, Shunqian; Zhou, Lili; Singh, Sucha; Poddar, Minakshi; Davis, Amy W; Tosun, Akif Burak; Ozolek, John A; Lowe, Mark E; Monga, Satdarshan P; Rohde, Gustavo K; Esni, Farzad; Husain, Sohail Z

    2015-12-01

    The mechanisms by which drugs induce pancreatitis are unknown. A definite cause of pancreatitis is due to the antiepileptic drug valproic acid (VPA). On the basis of three crucial observations-that VPA inhibits histone deacetylases (HDACs), HDACs mediate pancreas development, and aspects of pancreas development are recapitulated during recovery of the pancreas after injury-we hypothesized that VPA does not cause injury on its own, but it predisposes patients to pancreatitis by inhibiting HDACs and provoking an imbalance in pancreatic recovery. In an experimental model of pancreatic injury, we found that VPA delayed recovery of the pancreas and reduced acinar cell proliferation. In addition, pancreatic expression of class I HDACs (which are the primary VPA targets) increased in the midphase of pancreatic recovery. VPA administration inhibited pancreatic HDAC activity and led to the persistence of acinar-to-ductal metaplastic complexes, with prolonged Sox9 expression and sustained β-catenin nuclear activation, findings that characterize a delay in regenerative reprogramming. These effects were not observed with valpromide, an analog of VPA that lacks HDAC inhibition. This is the first report, to our knowledge, that VPA shifts the balance toward pancreatic injury and pancreatitis through HDAC inhibition. The work also identifies a new paradigm for therapies that could exploit epigenetic reprogramming to enhance pancreatic recovery and disorders of pancreatic injury. PMID:26476347

  20. The Distribution of Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate in Acinar Cells of Rat Pancreas Revealed with the Freeze-Fracture Replica Labeling Method

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Toyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] is a phospholipid that has been implicated in multiple cellular activities. The distribution of PI(4,5)P2 has been analyzed extensively using live imaging of the GFP-coupled phospholipase C-δ1 pleckstrin homology domain in cultured cell lines. However, technical difficulties have prevented the study of PI(4,5)P2 in cells of in vivo tissues. We recently developed a method to analyze the nanoscale distribution of PI(4,5)P2 in cultured cells by using the quick-freezing and freeze-fracture replica labeling method. In principle, this method can be applied to any cell because it does not require the expression of artificial probes. In the present study, we modified the method to study cells of in vivo tissues and applied it to pancreatic exocrine acinar cells of the rat. We found that PI(4,5)P2 in the plasma membrane is distributed in an equivalent density in the apical and basolateral domains, but exists in a significantly higher concentration in the gap junction. The intracellular organelles did not show labeling for PI(4,5)P2. The results are novel or different from the reported distribution patterns in cell lines and highlight the importance of studying cells differentiated in vivo. PMID:21858170

  1. Pancreatic Acinar Cells Employ miRNAs as Mediators of Intercellular Communication to Participate in the Regulation of Pancreatitis-Associated Macrophage Activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yong; Wang, Hao; Qiao, Xin; Sun, Bei

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage activation plays an important role in the inflammatory response in acute pancreatitis. In the present study, the activation of AR42J pancreatic acinar cells was induced by taurolithocholate treatment. The results showed that the culture medium from the activated AR42J cells significantly enhanced NFκB activation in the macrophages compared to that without taurolithocholate treatment. Additionally, the precipitates obtained from ultracentrifugation of the culture media that were rich in exosomes were markedly more potent in activating macrophages compared with the supernatant fraction lacking exosomes. The results indicated that the mediators carried by the exosomes played important roles in macrophage activation. Exosomal miRNAs were extracted and examined using microarrays. A total of 115 differentially expressed miRNAs were identified, and 30 showed upregulated expression, while 85 displayed downregulated expression. Target genes of the differentially expressed miRNAs were predicted using TargetScan, MiRanda, and PicTar software programs. The putative target genes were subjected to KEGG functional analysis. The functions of the target genes were primarily enriched in MAPK pathways. Specifically, the target genes regulated macrophage activation through the TRAF6-TAB2-TAK1-NIK/IKK-NFκB pathway. As the mediators of signal transduction, miRNAs and their predicted target mRNAs regulate every step in the MAPK pathway. PMID:27546996

  2. Pancreatic Acinar Cells Employ miRNAs as Mediators of Intercellular Communication to Participate in the Regulation of Pancreatitis-Associated Macrophage Activation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong; Wang, Hao; Lu, Ming; Qiao, Xin; Sun, Bei; Zhang, Weihui; Xue, Dongbo

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage activation plays an important role in the inflammatory response in acute pancreatitis. In the present study, the activation of AR42J pancreatic acinar cells was induced by taurolithocholate treatment. The results showed that the culture medium from the activated AR42J cells significantly enhanced NFκB activation in the macrophages compared to that without taurolithocholate treatment. Additionally, the precipitates obtained from ultracentrifugation of the culture media that were rich in exosomes were markedly more potent in activating macrophages compared with the supernatant fraction lacking exosomes. The results indicated that the mediators carried by the exosomes played important roles in macrophage activation. Exosomal miRNAs were extracted and examined using microarrays. A total of 115 differentially expressed miRNAs were identified, and 30 showed upregulated expression, while 85 displayed downregulated expression. Target genes of the differentially expressed miRNAs were predicted using TargetScan, MiRanda, and PicTar software programs. The putative target genes were subjected to KEGG functional analysis. The functions of the target genes were primarily enriched in MAPK pathways. Specifically, the target genes regulated macrophage activation through the TRAF6-TAB2-TAK1-NIK/IKK-NFκB pathway. As the mediators of signal transduction, miRNAs and their predicted target mRNAs regulate every step in the MAPK pathway. PMID:27546996

  3. APC alterations are frequently involved in the pathogenesis of acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas, mainly through gene loss and promoter hypermethylation.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Daniela; Sahnane, Nora; Bernasconi, Barbara; Frattini, Milo; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Molinari, Francesca; Marando, Alessandro; Zhang, Lizhi; Vanoli, Alessandro; Casnedi, Selenia; Adsay, Volkan; Notohara, Kenji; Albarello, Luca; Asioli, Sofia; Sessa, Fausto; Capella, Carlo; La Rosa, Stefano

    2014-05-01

    Genetic and epigenetic alterations involved in the pathogenesis of pancreatic acinar cell carcinomas (ACCs) are poorly characterized, including the frequency and role of gene-specific hypermethylation, chromosome aberrations, and copy number alterations (CNAs). A subset of ACCs is known to show alterations in the APC/β-catenin pathway which includes mutations of APC gene. However, it is not known whether, in addition to mutation, loss of APC gene function can occur through alternative genetic and epigenetic mechanisms such as gene loss or promoter methylation. We investigated the global methylation profile of 34 tumor suppressor genes, CNAs of 52 chromosomal regions, and APC gene alterations (mutation, methylation, and loss) together with APC mRNA level in 45 ACCs and related peritumoral pancreatic tissues using methylation-specific multiplex ligation probe amplification (MS-MLPA), fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), mutation analysis, and reverse transcription-droplet digital PCR. ACCs did not show an extensive global gene hypermethylation profile. RASSF1 and APC were the only two genes frequently methylated. APC mutations were found in only 7 % of cases, while APC loss and methylation were more frequently observed (48 and 56 % of ACCs, respectively). APC mRNA low levels were found in 58 % of cases and correlated with CNAs. In conclusion, ACCs do not show extensive global gene hypermethylation. APC alterations are frequently involved in the pathogenesis of ACCs mainly through gene loss and promoter hypermethylation, along with reduction of APC mRNA levels. PMID:24590585

  4. Allograft pancreas: pale acinar nodules.

    PubMed

    Troxell, Megan L; Drachenberg, Cinthia

    2016-08-01

    Microscopic pale-staining acinar nodules were characterized in native pancreas in the 1980s under a variety of names but have been infrequently reported since. We retrospectively studied the frequency and characteristics of pale acinar nodules in allograft pancreas biopsies, as compared to a sampling of native pancreas specimens at our center. Pale acinar nodules were present in 13% (9/69) of allograft biopsies from 22% (7/32) of transplant patients, and 23% (5/22) of native pancreas surgical specimens, although more nodules per pancreas area were present in allograft needle biopsies. Acinar nodules had size of 100 to 700 μm, were periodic acid-Schiff pale, were synaptophysin negative, stained more weakly with keratin CAM 5.2 compared to surrounding parenchyma, and had a low proliferative rate. Ultrastructural evaluation revealed paucity of zymogen granules with dilated cistern-like structures. In our experience, pale acinar nodules have similar features in allograft and native pancreas specimens, yet remain of uncertain etiology and significance. PMID:27063474

  5. Novel Lipophilic Probe for Detecting Near-Membrane Reactive Oxygen Species Responses and Its Application for Studies of Pancreatic Acinar Cells: Effects of Pyocyanin and L-Ornithine

    PubMed Central

    Chvanov, Michael; Huang, Wei; Jin, Tao; Wen, Li; Armstrong, Jane; Elliot, Vicky; Alston, Ben; Burdyga, Alex; Criddle, David N.; Sutton, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The aim of this study was to develop a fluorescent reactive oxygen species (ROS) probe, which is preferentially localized in cellular membranes and displays a strong change in fluorescence upon oxidation. We also aimed to test the performance of this probe for detecting pathophysiologically relevant ROS responses in isolated cells. Results: We introduced a novel lipophilic ROS probe dihydrorhodamine B octadecyl ester (H2RB-C18). We then applied the new probe to characterize the ROS changes triggered by inducers of acute pancreatitis in pancreatic acinar cells. We resolved ROS changes produced by L-ornithine, L-arginine, cholecystokinin-8, acetylcholine, taurolithocholic acid 3-sulfate, palmitoleic acid ethyl ester, and the bacterial toxin pyocyanin. Particularly prominent ROS responses were induced by pyocyanin and L-ornithine. These ROS responses were accompanied by changes in cytosolic Ca2+concentration ([Ca2+]i), mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ), and NAD(P)H concentration. Innovation: The study describes a novel sensitive lipophilic ROS probe. The probe is particularly suitable for detecting ROS in near-membrane regions and therefore for reporting the ROS environment of plasma membrane channels and pumps. Conclusions: In our experimental conditions, the novel probe was more sensitive than 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein (CM-H2DCF) and dihydrorhodamine123 (H2R123) and allowed us to resolve ROS responses to secretagogues, pyocyanin, and L-ornithine. Changes in the fluorescence of the new probe were particularly prominent in the peripheral plasma membrane-associated regions. Our findings suggest that the new probe will be a useful tool in studies of the contribution of ROS to the pathophysiology of exocrine pancreas and other organs/tissues. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 451–464. PMID:24635199

  6. The p21-activated kinase, PAK2, is important in the activation of numerous pancreatic acinar cell signaling cascades and in the onset of early pancreatitis events.

    PubMed

    Nuche-Berenguer, Bernardo; Ramos-Álvarez, Irene; Jensen, R T

    2016-06-01

    In a recent study we explored Group-1-p21-activated kinases (GP.1-PAKs) in rat pancreatic acini. Only PAK2 was present; it was activated by gastrointestinal-hormones/neurotransmitters and growth factors in a PKC-, Src- and small-GTPase-mediated manner. PAK2 was required for enzyme-secretion and ERK/1-2-activation. In the present study we examined PAK2's role in CCK and TPA-activation of important distal signaling cascades mediating their physiological/pathophysiological effects and analyzed its role in pathophysiological processes important in early pancreatitis. In rat pancreatic acini, PAK2-inhibition by the specific, GP.1.PAK-inhibitor, IPA-3-suppressed cholecystokinin (CCK)/TPA-stimulated activation of focal-adhesion kinases and mitogen-activated protein-kinases. PAK2-inhibition reversed the dual stimulatory/inhibitory effect of CCK/TPA on the PI3K/Akt/GSK-3β pathway. However, its inhibition did not affect PKC activation. PAK2-inhibition protected acini from CCK-induced ROS-generation; caspase/trypsin-activation, important in early pancreatitis; as well as from cell-necrosis. Furthermore, PAK2-inhibition reduced proteolytic-activation of PAK-2p34, which is involved in programmed-cell-death. To ensure that the study did not only rely in the specificity of IPA-3 as a PAK inhibitor, we used two other approaches for PAK inhibition, FRAX597 a ATP-competitive-GP.1-PAKs-inhibitor and infection with a PAK2-dominant negative(DN)-Advirus. Those two approaches confirmed the results obtained with IPA-3. This study demonstrates that PAK2 is important in mediating CCK's effect on the activation of signaling-pathways known to mediate its physiological/pathophysiological responses including several cellular processes linked to the onset of pancreatitis. Our results suggest that PAK2 could be a new, important therapeutic target to consider for the treatment of diseases involving deregulation of pancreatic acinar cells. PMID:26912410

  7. Nonenzymatic cryogenic isolation of therapeutic cells: novel approach for enzyme-free isolation of pancreatic islets using in situ cryopreservation of islets and concurrent selective freeze destruction of acinar tissue.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Michael J; Baicu, Simona C

    2014-01-01

    Cell-based therapies, which all involve processes for procurement and reimplantation of living cells, currently rely upon expensive, inconsistent, and even toxic enzyme digestion processes. A prime example is the preparation of isolated pancreatic islets for the treatment of type 1 diabetes by transplantation. To avoid the inherent pitfalls of these enzymatic methods, we have conceptualized an alternative approach based on the hypothesis that cryobiological techniques can be used for differential freeze destruction of the pancreas (Px) to release islets that are selectively cryopreserved in situ. Pancreata were procured from juvenile pigs using approved procedures. The concept of cryoisolation is based on differential processing of the pancreas in five stages: 1) infiltrating islets in situ preferentially with a cryoprotectant (CPA) cocktail via antegrade perfusion of the major arteries; 2) retrograde ductal infusion of water to distend the acinar; 3) freezing the entire Px solid to < -160°C for storage in liquid nitrogen; 4) mechanically crushing and pulverizing the frozen Px into small fragments; 5) thawing the frozen fragments, filtering, and washing to remove the CPA. Finally, the filtered effluent (cryoisolate) was stained with dithizone for identification of intact islets and with Syto 13/PI for fluorescence viability testing and glucose-stimulated insulin release assessment. As predicted, the cryoisolate contained small fragments of residual tissue comprising an amorphous mass of acinar tissue with largely intact and viable (>90%) embedded islets. Islets were typically larger (range 50-500 µm diameter) than their counterparts isolated from juvenile pigs using conventional enzyme digestion techniques. Functionally, the islets from replicate cryoisolates responded to a glucose challenge with a mean stimulation index = 3.3 ± 0.7. An enzyme-free method of islet isolation relying on in situ cryopreservation of islets with simultaneous freeze

  8. Cell injury with viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Tamm, I.

    1975-01-01

    The inhibitions of cellular protein and RNA synthesis in picornavirus-infected cells are early events which require only limited synthesis of virus-specific proteins. The inhibition of cellular protein synthesis appears to be due to blocking of the association of ribosomes with host messenger RNA. Inhibition of cellular RNA synthesis involves inactivation of the template-enzyme complex and affects ribosomal RNA synthesis before messenger RNA synthesis. Inhibition of cellular DNA synthesis also occurs early and may be secondary to inhibition of cellular protein synthesis. Early chromatid breaks may be related to inhibitions of cellular protein and nucleic acid synthesis. Stimulation of phospholipid synthesis in picornavirus-infected cells also requires only limited synthesis of virus-specific proteins. In contrast, release of lysosomal enzymes, proliferation of smooth cytoplasmic membranes, cellular vacuolization, retraction, and rounding, and diffuse chromosomal changes related to karyorrhexis and pyknosis are all dependent on considerable synthesis of virus-specific proteins during the middle part of the picornavirus growth cycle. The early virus-induced alterations in cellular biosynthetic processes are not the direct or sole cause of the subsequent marked pathologic changes in the membranes and chromosomes of the cell. Images Figure 1 PMID:1180330

  9. Damage to pancreatic acinar cells and preservation of islets of Langerhans in a rat model of acute pancreatitis induced by Karwinskia humboldtiana (buckthorn).

    PubMed

    Carcano-Diaz, Katya; Garcia-Garcia, Aracely; Segoviano-Ramirez, Juan Carlos; Rodriguez-Rocha, Humberto; Loera-Arias, Maria de Jesus; Garcia-Juarez, Jaime

    2016-09-01

    Karwinskia humboldtiana (Kh) is a poisonous plant that grows in some regions of the American continent. Consuming large amounts of Kh fruit results in acute intoxication leading to respiratory failure, culminating in death within days. There is evidence of histological damage to the lungs, liver, and kidneys following accidental and experimental Kh intoxication. To date, the microscopic effect of Kh consumption on the pancreas has not been described. We examined the early effects of Kh fruit on pancreatic tissue at different stages of acute intoxication in the Wistar rat. We found progressive damage confined to the exocrine pancreas, starting with a reduction in the number of zymogen granules, loss of acinar architecture, the presence of autophagy-like vesicles, apoptosis and inflammatory infiltrate. The pancreatic pathology culminated in damaged acini characterized by necrosis and edema, with a complete loss of lobular architecture. Interestingly, the morphology of the islets of Langerhans was conserved throughout our evaluations. Taken together, our results indicate the damage induced by a high dose of Kh fruit in the Wistar rat is consistent with an early acute necrotizing pancreatitis that exclusively affects the exocrine pancreas. Therefore, this system might be useful as an animal model to study the treatment of pancreatic diseases. More importantly, as the islets of Langerhans were preserved, the active compounds of Kh fruit could be utilized for the treatment of acinar pancreatic cancer. Further studies might provide insight into the severity of acute Kh intoxication in humans and influence the design of treatments for pancreatic diseases and acinar pancreatic cancer. PMID:26877198

  10. The cell cycle and acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Price, Peter M.; Safirstein, Robert L.; Megyesi, Judit

    2009-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) activates pathways of cell death and cell proliferation. Although seemingly discrete and unrelated mechanisms, these pathways can now be shown to be connected and even to be controlled by similar pathways. The dependence of the severity of renal-cell injury on cell cycle pathways can be used to control and perhaps to prevent acute kidney injury. This review is written to address the correlation between cellular life and death in kidney tubules, especially in acute kidney injury. PMID:19536080

  11. Slug inhibits pancreatic cancer initiation by blocking Kras-induced acinar-ductal metaplasia

    PubMed Central

    Ebine, Kazumi; Chow, Christina R.; DeCant, Brian T.; Hattaway, Holly Z.; Grippo, Paul J.; Kumar, Krishan; Munshi, Hidayatullah G.

    2016-01-01

    Cells in the pancreas that have undergone acinar-ductal metaplasia (ADM) can transform into premalignant cells that can eventually become cancerous. Although the epithelial-mesenchymal transition regulator Snail (Snai1) can cooperate with Kras in acinar cells to enhance ADM development, the contribution of Snail-related protein Slug (Snai2) to ADM development is not known. Thus, transgenic mice expressing Slug and Kras in acinar cells were generated. Surprisingly, Slug attenuated Kras-induced ADM development, ERK1/2 phosphorylation and proliferation. Co-expression of Slug with Kras also attenuated chronic pancreatitis-induced changes in ADM development and fibrosis. In addition, Slug attenuated TGF-α-induced acinar cell metaplasia to ductal structures and TGF-α-induced expression of ductal markers in ex vivo acinar explant cultures. Significantly, blocking the Rho-associated protein kinase ROCK1/2 in the ex vivo cultures induced expression of ductal markers and reversed the effects of Slug by inducing ductal structures. In addition, blocking ROCK1/2 activity in Slug-expressing Kras mice reversed the inhibitory effects of Slug on ADM, ERK1/2 phosphorylation, proliferation and fibrosis. Overall, these results increase our understanding of the role of Slug in ADM, an early event that can eventually lead to pancreatic cancer development. PMID:27364947

  12. STEM CELL HOMING IN MUSCULOSKELETAL INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Li Shan E.; Chan, Casey K.; Goodman, Stuart B.

    2010-01-01

    The regenerative potential of injured adult tissue suggests the physiological existence of cells capable of participating in the reparative process. Recent studies indicate that stem-like cells residing in tissues contribute to tissue repair and are replenished by precursor bone marrow–derived cells. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are among the candidates for reparative cells. These cells can potentially be mobilized into the circulation in response to injury signals and exert their reparative effects at the site of injury. Current therapies for musculoskeletal injuries pose unavoidable risks which can impede full recovery. Trafficking of MSC to the injury site and their subsequent participation in the regenerative process is thought to be a natural healing response that can be imitated or augmented by enhancing the endogenous MSC pool with exogenously administered MSC. Therefore, a promising alternative to the existing strategies employed in the treatment of musculoskeletal injuries is to reinforce the inherent reparative capacity of the body by delivering MSC harvested from the patient’s own tissues to the site of injury. The aim of this review is to inform the reader of studies that have evaluated the intrinsic homing and regenerative abilities of MSC, with particular emphasis on the repair of musculoskeletal injuries. Research that supports the direct use of MSC (without in vitro differentiation into tissue-specific cells) will also be reported. Based on accruing evidence that the natural healing mechanism involves the recruitment of MSC and their subsequent reparative actions at the site of injury, as well as documented therapeutic response after the exogenous administration of MSC, the feasibility of the emerging strategy of instant stem-cell therapy will be proposed. PMID:20933277

  13. The acinar differentiation determinant PTF1A inhibits initiation of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Krah, Nathan M; De La O, Jean-Paul; Swift, Galvin H; Hoang, Chinh Q; Willet, Spencer G; Chen Pan, Fong; Cash, Gabriela M; Bronner, Mary P; Wright, Christopher VE; MacDonald, Raymond J; Murtaugh, L Charles

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the initiation and progression of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) may provide therapeutic strategies for this deadly disease. Recently, we and others made the surprising finding that PDAC and its preinvasive precursors, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN), arise via reprogramming of mature acinar cells. We therefore hypothesized that the master regulator of acinar differentiation, PTF1A, could play a central role in suppressing PDAC initiation. In this study, we demonstrate that PTF1A expression is lost in both mouse and human PanINs, and that this downregulation is functionally imperative in mice for acinar reprogramming by oncogenic KRAS. Loss of Ptf1a alone is sufficient to induce acinar-to-ductal metaplasia, potentiate inflammation, and induce a KRAS-permissive, PDAC-like gene expression profile. As a result, Ptf1a-deficient acinar cells are dramatically sensitized to KRAS transformation, and reduced Ptf1a greatly accelerates development of invasive PDAC. Together, these data indicate that cell differentiation regulators constitute a new tumor suppressive mechanism in the pancreas. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07125.001 PMID:26151762

  14. RADIAL TRANSPORT ALONG THE HUMAN ACINAR TREE

    PubMed Central

    Henry, F.S.; Tsuda, A.

    2013-01-01

    A numerical model of an expanding asymmetric alveolated duct was developed and used to investigate lateral transport between the central acinar channel and the surrounding alveoli along the acinar tree. Our results indicate that some degree of recirculation occurs in all but the terminal generations. We found that the rate of diffusional transport of axial momentum, from the duct to the alveolus, was by far the largest contributor to the resulting momentum in the alveolar flow but that the magnitude of the axial momentum is critical in determining the nature of the flow in the alveolus. Further, we found that alveolar flow rotation, and by implication chaotic mixing, are strongest in the entrance generations. We also found that the expanding alveolus provides a pathway by which particles with little intrinsic motion can enter the alveoli. Thus, our results offer a possible explanation for why submicron particles deposit preferentially in acinar entrance region. PMID:20887011

  15. Root bark extracts of Juncus effusus and Paeonia suffruticosa protect salivary gland acinar cells from apoptotic cell death induced by cis-platinum (II) diammine dichloride.

    PubMed

    Mukudai, Yoshiki; Kondo, Seiji; Shiogama, Sunao; Koyama, Tomoyuki; Li, Chunnan; Yazawa, Kazunaga; Shintani, Satoru

    2013-12-01

    Cis-platinum (II) diammine dichloride (CDDP) is a platinum-based anticancer agent, and is often used for chemotherapy for malignant tumors, albeit CDDP has serious side-effects, including xerostomia (dry mouth). Since patients with xerostomia have reduced quality of life, it is urgent and important to identify nontoxic and natural agents capable of reducing the adverse effect of chemotherapy on salivary gland function. Therefore, we commenced an institutional collaborative project in which candidates of herbal extracts were selected from more than 400 bioactive herbal products for their potential therapeutic effects not only on xerostomia, but also on oral diseases. In the present study, we report on two Chinese medical herbal extracts from the root barks of Juncus effusus and Paeonia suffruticosa. The two extracts showed a protective effect in NS-SV-Ac cells from the cytotoxicity and apoptosis caused by CDDP. The effect was dependent on the p53 pathway, protein kinase B/Akt 1 and mitochondrial apoptosis-related proteins (i.e. Bcl-2 and Bax), but was not dependent on nuclear factor κB. Notably, the apoptosis-protective effect of the extracts was not observed in adenocystic carcinoma cell lines. Although these extracts have been utilized in traditional Chinese medicine for hundreds of years, there are no reports to our knowledge, on their therapeutic effects on xerostomia. Thus, in the present study, we elucidated the potency of these herbal extracts as novel candidates for xerostomia to improve the quality of life of patients undergoing chemotherapy. PMID:24064583

  16. Mixed acinar-neuroendocrine carcinoma of the pancreas with neuroendocrine predominance.

    PubMed

    Ogbonna, Onyekachi Henry; Garcon, Marie Carmel; Syrigos, Kostas N; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2013-01-01

    Background. Pancreatic tumors are rare and could arise from either the exocrine (ductal and acinar cells) or the endocrine (neuroendocrine cells) components of the pancreas. In some instances, the occurrence of pancreatic tumors comprising both acinar cells and neuroendocrine cells, with neuroendocrine cells making up more than 30% of the tumor, has been identified. This unique entity has been referred to as mixed acinar-neuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC). Only about 20 such cases have been reported in the literature. Case Report. We report an interesting case of MANEC with neuroendocrine cell predominance in a woman presenting with epigastric pain secondary to a pancreatic mass with acinar and endocrine differentiation. She underwent surgical resection of the tumor and was offered adjuvant treatment chemotherapy with carboplatin, etoposide, and radiotherapy for positive tumor resection margins. Conclusions. Given the paucity of the cases of MANEC, continuous reporting of these cases when identified should be encouraged to aid oncologists in understanding the disease and help establish standardized management. PMID:24348574

  17. Mixed Acinar-Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Pancreas with Neuroendocrine Predominance

    PubMed Central

    Ogbonna, Onyekachi Henry; Syrigos, Kostas N.; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2013-01-01

    Background. Pancreatic tumors are rare and could arise from either the exocrine (ductal and acinar cells) or the endocrine (neuroendocrine cells) components of the pancreas. In some instances, the occurrence of pancreatic tumors comprising both acinar cells and neuroendocrine cells, with neuroendocrine cells making up more than 30% of the tumor, has been identified. This unique entity has been referred to as mixed acinar-neuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC). Only about 20 such cases have been reported in the literature. Case Report. We report an interesting case of MANEC with neuroendocrine cell predominance in a woman presenting with epigastric pain secondary to a pancreatic mass with acinar and endocrine differentiation. She underwent surgical resection of the tumor and was offered adjuvant treatment chemotherapy with carboplatin, etoposide, and radiotherapy for positive tumor resection margins. Conclusions. Given the paucity of the cases of MANEC, continuous reporting of these cases when identified should be encouraged to aid oncologists in understanding the disease and help establish standardized management. PMID:24348574

  18. Snail1 is required for the maintenance of the pancreatic acinar phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Loubat-Casanovas, Jordina; Peña, Raúl; Gonzàlez, Núria; Alba-Castellón, Lorena; Rosell, Santi; Francí, Clara; Navarro, Pilar; de Herreros, Antonio García

    2016-01-01

    The Snail1 transcriptional factor is required for correct embryonic development, yet its expression in adult animals is very limited and its functional roles are not evident. We have now conditionally inactivated Snail1 in adult mice and analyzed the phenotype of these animals. Snail1 ablation rapidly altered pancreas structure: one month after Snail1 depletion, acinar cells were markedly depleted, and pancreas accumulated adipose tissue. Snail1 expression was not detected in the epithelium but was in pancreatic mesenchymal cells (PMCs). Snail1 ablation in cultured PMCs downregulated the expression of several β-catenin/Tcf-4 target genes, modified the secretome of these cells and decreased their ability to maintain acinar markers in cultured pancreas cells. Finally, Snail1 deficiency modified the phenotype of pancreatic tumors generated in transgenic mice expressing c-myc under the control of the elastase promoter. Specifically, Snail1 depletion did not significantly alter the size of the tumors but accelerated acinar-ductal metaplasia. These results demonstrate that Snail1 is expressed in PMCs and plays a pivotal role in maintaining acinar cells within the pancreas in normal and pathological conditions. PMID:26735179

  19. Airway epithelial cell responses to ozone injury

    SciTech Connect

    Leikauf, G.D.; Simpson, L.G.; Zhao, Qiyu

    1995-03-01

    The airway epithelial cell is an important target in ozone injury. Once activated, the airway epithelium responds in three phases. The initial, or immediate phase, involves activation of constitutive cells, often through direct covalent interactions including the formation of secondary ozonolysis products-hydroxyhydroperoxides, aldehydes, and hydrogen peroxide. Recently, we found hydroxyhydroperoxides to be potent agonists; of bioactive eicosanoid formation by human airway epithelial cells in culture. Other probable immediate events include activation and inactivation of enzymes present on the epithelial surface (e.g., neutral endopeptidase). During the next 2 to 24 hr, or early phase, epithelial cells respond by synthesis and release of chemotactic factors, including chemokines-macrophage inflammatory protein-2, RANTES, and interleukin-8. Infiltrating leukocytes during this period also release elastase, an important agonist of epithelial cell mucus secretion and additional chemokine formation. The third (late) phase of ozone injury is characterized by eosinophil or monocyte infiltration. Cytokine expression leads to alteration of structural protein synthesis, with increases in fibronectin evident by in situ hybridization. Synthesis of epithelial antiproteases, e.g., secretary leukocyte protease inhibitor, may also increase locally 24 to 48 hr after elastase concentrations become excessive. Thus, the epithelium is not merely a passive barrier to ozone injury but has a dynamic role in directing the migration, activating, and then counteracting inflammatory cells. Through these complex interactions, epithelial cells can be viewed as the initiators (alpha) and the receptors (omega) of ozone-induced airway disease. 51 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Chondrogenic Progenitor Cells Respond to Cartilage Injury

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Hyeonghun; Zheng, Hongjun; Yu, Yin; Jang, Keewoong; Walter, Morgan W.; Lehman, Abigail D.; Ding, Lei; Buckwalter, Joseph A.; Martin, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Hypocellularity resulting from chondrocyte death in the aftermath of mechanical injury is thought to contribute to posttraumatic osteoarthritis. However, we observed that nonviable areas in cartilage injured by blunt impact were repopulated within 7–14 days by cells that appeared to migrate from the surrounding matrix. The aim of this study was to assess our hypothesis that the migrating cell population included chondrogenic progenitor cells that were drawn to injured cartilage by alarmins. Methods Osteochondral explants obtained from mature cattle were injured by blunt impact or scratching, resulting in localized chondrocyte death. Injured sites were serially imaged by confocal microscopy, and migrating cells were evaluated for chondrogenic progenitor characteristics. Chemotaxis assays were used to measure the responses to chemokines, injury-conditioned medium, dead cell debris, and high mobility group box chromosomal protein 1 (HMGB-1). Results Migrating cells were highly clonogenic and multipotent and expressed markers associated with chondrogenic progenitor cells. Compared with chondrocytes, these cells overexpressed genes involved in proliferation and migration and underexpressed cartilage matrix genes. They were more active than chondrocytes in chemotaxis assays and responded to cell lysates, conditioned medium, and HMGB-1. Glycyrrhizin, a chelator of HMGB-1 and a blocking antibody to receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), inhibited responses to cell debris and conditioned medium and reduced the numbers of migrating cells on injured explants. Conclusion Injuries that caused chondrocyte death stimulated the emergence and homing of chondrogenic progenitor cells, in part via HMGB-1 release and RAGE-mediated chemotaxis. Their repopulation of the matrix could promote the repair of chondral damage that might otherwise contribute to progressive cartilage loss. PMID:22777600

  1. Adult Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Radiation Injury.

    PubMed

    Kiang, Juliann G

    2016-08-01

    Recent understanding of the cellular and molecular signaling activations in adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has provided new insights into their potential clinical applications, particularly for tissue repair and regeneration. This review focuses on these advances, specifically in the context of self-renewal for tissue repair and recovery after radiation injury. Thus far, MSCs have been characterized extensively and shown to be useful in mitigation and therapy for acute radiation syndrome and cognitive dysfunction. Use of MSCs for treating radiation injury alone or in combination with additional trauma is foreseeable. PMID:27356065

  2. Stem cells and repair of lung injuries

    PubMed Central

    Neuringer, Isabel P; Randell, Scott H

    2004-01-01

    Fueled by the promise of regenerative medicine, currently there is unprecedented interest in stem cells. Furthermore, there have been revolutionary, but somewhat controversial, advances in our understanding of stem cell biology. Stem cells likely play key roles in the repair of diverse lung injuries. However, due to very low rates of cellular proliferation in vivo in the normal steady state, cellular and architectural complexity of the respiratory tract, and the lack of an intensive research effort, lung stem cells remain poorly understood compared to those in other major organ systems. In the present review, we concisely explore the conceptual framework of stem cell biology and recent advances pertinent to the lungs. We illustrate lung diseases in which manipulation of stem cells may be physiologically significant and highlight the challenges facing stem cell-related therapy in the lung. PMID:15285789

  3. Acinar autolysis and mucous extravasation in human sublingual glands: a microscopic postmortem study

    PubMed Central

    AZEVEDO-ALANIS, Luciana Reis; TOLENTINO, Elen de Souza; de ASSIS, Gerson Francisco; CESTARI, Tânia Mary; LARA, Vanessa Soares; DAMANTE, José Humberto

    2015-01-01

    Although some morphological investigations on aged human sublingual glands (HSG) found eventual phenomena identified as autolysis and mucous extravasation, the exact meaning of these findings has not been elucidated. Objective The aim of this work is to investigate whether acinar autolysis and mucous extravasation are related to the aging process in human sublingual glands. We also speculate if autolytic changes may assist forensic pathologists in determining time of death. Material and Methods 186 cadavers’ glands were allocated to age groups: I (0–30 years); II (31–60), and III (61–90). Time and mode of death were also recorded. Acinar autolysis and mucous extravasation were classified as present or absent. Ultrastructural analysis was performed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Data were compared using Mann-Whitney U, Spearman’s correlation coefficient, Kruskal-Wallis, and Dunn tests (p<0.05). Results There was correlation between age and acinar autolysis (r=0.38; p=0.0001). However, there was no correlation between autolysis and time of death. No differences were observed between genders. TEM showed mucous and serous cells presenting nuclear and membrane alterations and mucous cells were more susceptible to autolysis. Conclusion Acinar autolysis occurred in all age groups and increased with age while mucous extravasation was rarely found. Both findings are independent. Autolysis degrees in HSG could not be used to determine time of death. PMID:26537715

  4. Mechanical injury and repair of cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyake, Katsuya; McNeil, Paul L.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To concisely review the field of cell plasma membrane disruption (torn cell surface) and repair. MAIN POINTS: Plasma membrane disruption is a common form of cell injury under physiologic conditions, after trauma, in certain muscular dystrophies, and during certain forms of clinical intervention. Rapid repair of a disruption is essential to cell survival and involves a complex and active cell response that includes membrane fusion and cytoskeletal activation. Tissues, such as cardiac and skeletal muscle, adapt to a disruption injury by hypertrophying. Cells adapt by increasing the efficiency of their resealing response. CONCLUSION: Plasma membrane disruption is an important cellular event in both health and disease. The disruption repair mechanism is now well understood at the cellular level, but much remains to be learned at the molecular level. Cell and tissue level adaptational responses to the disruption either prevent its further occurrence or facilitate future repairs. Therapeutically useful drugs might result if, using this accumulating knowledge, chemical agents can be developed that can enhance repair or adaptive responses.

  5. Cell Biology of Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kalogeris, Theodore; Baines, Christopher P.; Krenz, Maike; Korthuis, Ronald J.

    2014-01-01

    Disorders characterized by ischemia/reperfusion (I/R), such as myocardial infarction, stroke, and peripheral vascular disease, continue to be among the most frequent causes of debilitating disease and death. Tissue injury and/or death occur as a result of the initial ischemic insult, which is determined primarily by the magnitude and duration of the interruption in the blood supply, and then subsequent damage induced by reperfusion. During prolonged ischemia, ATP levels and intracellular pH decrease as a result of anaerobic metabolism and lactate accumulation. As a consequence, ATPase-dependent ion transport mechanisms become dysfunctional, contributing to increased intracellular and mitochondrial calcium levels (calcium overload), cell swelling and rupture, and cell death by necrotic, necroptotic, apoptotic, and autophagic mechanisms. Although oxygen levels are restored upon reperfusion, a surge in the generation of reactive oxygen species occurs and proinflammatory neutrophils infiltrate ischemic tissues to exacerbate ischemic injury. The pathologic events induced by I/R orchestrate the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, which appears to represent a common end-effector of the pathologic events initiated by I/R. The aim of this treatise is to provide a comprehensive review of the mechanisms underlying the development of I/R injury, from which it should be apparent that a combination of molecular and cellular approaches targeting multiple pathologic processes to limit the extent of I/R injury must be adopted to enhance resistance to cell death and increase regenerative capacity in order to effect long-lasting repair of ischemic tissues. PMID:22878108

  6. Research progress of stem cells on glaucomatous optic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ya-Sha; Xu, Jian; Peng, Jun; Li, Ping; Wen, Xiao-Juan; Liu, Yue; Chen, Ke-Zhu; Liu, Jia-Qi; Wang, Ying; Peng, Qing-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma, the second leading cause of blindness, is an irreversible optic neuropathy. The mechanism of optic nerve injury caused by glaucoma is undefined at present. There is no effective treatment method for the injury. Stem cells have the capacity of self-renewal and differentiation. These two features have made them become the research focus on improving the injury at present. This paper reviews the application progress on different types of stem cells therapy for optic nerve injury caused by glaucoma. PMID:27588279

  7. Research progress of stem cells on glaucomatous optic nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ya-Sha; Xu, Jian; Peng, Jun; Li, Ping; Wen, Xiao-Juan; Liu, Yue; Chen, Ke-Zhu; Liu, Jia-Qi; Wang, Ying; Peng, Qing-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma, the second leading cause of blindness, is an irreversible optic neuropathy. The mechanism of optic nerve injury caused by glaucoma is undefined at present. There is no effective treatment method for the injury. Stem cells have the capacity of self-renewal and differentiation. These two features have made them become the research focus on improving the injury at present. This paper reviews the application progress on different types of stem cells therapy for optic nerve injury caused by glaucoma. PMID:27588279

  8. p21(WAF1) (/Cip1) limits senescence and acinar-to-ductal metaplasia formation during pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Grabliauskaite, Kamile; Hehl, Adrian B; Seleznik, Gitta M; Saponara, Enrica; Schlesinger, Kathryn; Zuellig, Richard A; Dittmann, Anja; Bain, Martha; Reding, Theresia; Sonda, Sabrina; Graf, Rolf

    2015-02-01

    Trans-differentiation of pancreatic acinar cells into ductal-like lesions, a process defined as acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM), is observed in the course of organ regeneration following pancreatitis. In addition, ADM is found in association with pre-malignant PanIN lesions and correlates with an increased risk of pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Human PDAC samples show down-regulation of p21(WAF1) (/Cip1) , a key regulator of cell cycle and cell differentiation. Here we investigated whether p21 down-regulation is implicated in controlling the early events of acinar cell trans-differentiation and ADM formation. p21-mediated regulation of ADM formation and regression was analysed in vivo during the course of cerulein-induced pancreatitis, using wild-type (WT) and p21-deficient (p21(-/-) ) mice. Biochemical and immunohistochemical methods were used to evaluate disease progression over 2 weeks of the disease and during a recovery phase. We found that p21 was strongly up-regulated in WT acinar cells during pancreatitis, while it was absent in ADM areas, suggesting that p21 down-regulation is associated with ADM formation. In support of this hypothesis, p21(-/-) mice showed a significant increase in number and size of metaplasia. In addition, p21 over-expression in acinar cells reduced ADM formation in vitro, suggesting that the protein regulates the metaplastic transition in a cell-autonomous manner. p21(-/-) mice displayed increased expression and relocalization of β-catenin both during pancreatitis and in the subsequent recovery phase. Finally, loss of p21 was accompanied by increased DNA damage and development of senescence. Our findings are consistent with a gate-keeper role of p21 in acinar cells to limit senescence activation and ADM formation during pancreatic regeneration. PMID:25212177

  9. The control of vascular endothelial cell injury.

    PubMed

    Murota, S; Morita, I; Suda, N

    1990-01-01

    The mechanism by which MCI-186 showed a potent cytoprotective effect on the in vitro endothelial cell injury due to 15-HPETE was studied. Stimulation of human leukocytes with various chemical mediators such as TPA, f-Met-Leu-Phe, LTB4, etc. elicited the production of active oxygens, which could be detected by luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. Among the chemical mediators tested, TPA elicited the chemiluminescence the most, and f-Met-Leu-Phe and LTB4 came next. When the leukocytes were directly placed on a monolayer of cultured endothelial cells, followed by stimulating the leukocytes with TPA, severe endothelial cell injury was observed. The effect of TPA was dose dependent. There was good correlation between the active oxygen releasing activity and the cytotoxic activity. When the leukocytes were placed on a filter which was set apart from the monolayer of endothelial cell in a culture dish, and stimulated the leukocytes with TPA, no cytotoxicity was observed. These data strongly suggest that the substance responsible for the cytotoxicity must be a very labile and short-lived substance, presumably active oxygens. On the other hand, MCI-186 was found to have a complete quenching activity to the chemiluminescence due to active oxygens in the TPA-leukocyte system. Taken together, these factors indicate that the potent cytoprotective effect of MCI-186 may be due to its specific radical scavenging activity. PMID:2248437

  10. Alveolar mechanics using realistic acinar models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Haribalan; Lin, Ching-Long; Tawhai, Merryn H.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    2009-11-01

    Accurate modeling of the mechanics in terminal airspaces of the lung is desirable for study of particle transport and pathology. The flow in the acinar region is traditionally studied by employing prescribed boundary conditions to represent rhythmic breathing and volumetric expansion. Conventional models utilize simplified spherical or polygonal units to represent the alveolar duct and sac. Accurate prediction of flow and transport characteristics may require geometries reconstructed from CT-based images and serve to understand the importance of physiologically realistic representation of the acinus. In this effort, we present a stabilized finite element framework, supplemented with appropriate boundary conditions at the alveolar mouth and septal borders for simulation of the alveolar mechanics and the resulting airflow. Results of material advection based on Lagrangian tracking are presented to complete the study of transport and compare the results with simplified acinar models. The current formulation provides improved understanding and realization of a dynamic framework for parenchymal mechanics with incorporation of alveolar pressure and traction stresses.

  11. Dynamics of photoinduced cell plasma membrane injury.

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, W P; Toner, M; Ezzell, R M; Tompkins, R G; Yarmush, M L

    1995-01-01

    We have developed a video microscopy system designed for real-time measurement of single cell damage during photolysis under well defined physicochemical and photophysical conditions. Melanoma cells cultured in vitro were treated with the photosensitizer (PS), tin chlorin e6 (SnCe6) or immunoconjugate (SnCe6 conjugated to a anti-ICAM monoclonal antibody), and illuminated with a 10 mW He/Ne laser at a 630 nm wavelength. Cell membrane integrity was assessed using the vital dye calcein-AM. In experiments in which the laser power density and PS concentration were varied, it was determined that the time lag before cell rupture was inversely proportional to the estimated singlet oxygen flux to the cell surface. Microscopic examination of the lytic event indicated that photo-induced lysis was caused by a point rupture of the plasma membrane. The on-line nature of this microscopy system offers an opportunity to monitor the dynamics of the cell damage process and to gain insights into the mechanism governing photolytic cell injury processes. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 PMID:7612864

  12. Stem Cells for the Treatment of Skeletal Muscle Injury

    PubMed Central

    Quintero, Andres J; Wright, Vonda J; Fu, Freddie H; Huard, Johhny

    2009-01-01

    Skeletal muscle injuries are extremely common, accounting for up to 35-55% of all sports injuries and quite possibly impacting all musculoskeletal traumas. These injuries result in the formation of fibrosis that may lead to development of painful contractures, increases their risk for repeat injuries, and limits their ability to return to a baseline or pre-injury level of function. The development of successful therapies for these injuries must consider the pathophysiology of these musculoskeletal conditions. We discuss the direct use of muscle-derived stem cells and some key cell population dynamics, as well as the use of clinically applicable modalities which may enhance the local supply of stem cells to the zone of injury by promoting angiogenesis. PMID:19064161

  13. A Microfluidic Model of Biomimetically Breathing Pulmonary Acinar Airways.

    PubMed

    Fishler, Rami; Sznitman, Josué

    2016-01-01

    Quantifying respiratory flow characteristics in the pulmonary acinar depths and how they influence inhaled aerosol transport is critical towards optimizing drug inhalation techniques as well as predicting deposition patterns of potentially toxic airborne particles in the pulmonary alveoli. Here, soft-lithography techniques are used to fabricate complex acinar-like airway structures at the truthful anatomical length-scales that reproduce physiological acinar flow phenomena in an optically accessible system. The microfluidic device features 5 generations of bifurcating alveolated ducts with periodically expanding and contracting walls. Wall actuation is achieved by altering the pressure inside water-filled chambers surrounding the thin PDMS acinar channel walls both from the sides and the top of the device. In contrast to common multilayer microfluidic devices, where the stacking of several PDMS molds is required, a simple method is presented to fabricate the top chamber by embedding the barrel section of a syringe into the PDMS mold. This novel microfluidic setup delivers physiological breathing motions which in turn give rise to characteristic acinar air-flows. In the current study, micro particle image velocimetry (µPIV) with liquid suspended particles was used to quantify such air flows based on hydrodynamic similarity matching. The good agreement between µPIV results and expected acinar flow phenomena suggest that the microfluidic platform may serve in the near future as an attractive in vitro tool to investigate directly airborne representative particle transport and deposition in the acinar regions of the lungs. PMID:27214269

  14. Role of Endothelial Cells in Myocardial Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Arun K.; Symons, J. David; Boudina, Sihem; Jaishy, Bharat; Shiu, Yan-Ting

    2014-01-01

    Minimizing myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury has broad clinical implications and is a critical mediator of cardiac surgical outcomes. “Ischemic injury” results from a restriction in blood supply leading to a mismatch between oxygen supply and demand of a sufficient intensity and/or duration that leads to cell necrosis, whereas ischemia-reperfusion injury occurs when blood supply is restored after a period of ischemia and is usually associated with apoptosis (i.e. programmed cell death). Compared to vascular endothelial cells, cardiac myocytes are more sensitive to ischemic injury and have received the most attention in preventing myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. Many comprehensive reviews exist on various aspects of myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. The purpose of this review is to examine the role of vascular endothelial cells in myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury, and to stimulate further research in this exciting and clinically relevant area. Two specific areas that are addressed include: 1) data suggesting that coronary endothelial cells are critical mediators of myocardial dysfunction after ischemia-reperfusion injury; and 2) the involvement of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in endothelial cell death as a result of an ischemia-reperfusion insult. Elucidating the cellular signaling pathway(s) that leads to endothelial cell injury and/or death in response to ischemia-reperfusion is a key component to developing clinically applicable strategies that might minimize myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:25558187

  15. Epiplakin Deficiency Aggravates Murine Caerulein-Induced Acute Pancreatitis and Favors the Formation of Acinar Keratin Granules

    PubMed Central

    Wögenstein, Karl L.; Szabo, Sandra; Lunova, Mariia; Wiche, Gerhard; Haybaeck, Johannes; Strnad, Pavel; Boor, Peter; Wagner, Martin; Fuchs, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Epiplakin, a member of the plakin protein family, is exclusively expressed in epithelial tissues and was shown to bind to keratins. Epiplakin-deficient (EPPK−/−) mice showed no obvious spontaneous phenotype, however, EPPK−/− keratinocytes displayed faster keratin network breakdown in response to stress. The role of epiplakin in pancreas, a tissue with abundant keratin expression, was not yet known. We analyzed epiplakin’s expression in healthy and inflamed pancreatic tissue and compared wild-type and EPPK−/− mice during caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. We found that epiplakin was expressed primarily in ductal cells of the pancreas and colocalized with apicolateral keratin bundles in murine pancreatic acinar cells. Epiplakin’s diffuse subcellular localization in keratin filament-free acini of K8-deficient mice indicated that its filament-associated localization in acinar cells completely depends on its binding partner keratin. During acute pancreatitis, epiplakin was upregulated in acinar cells and its redistribution closely paralleled keratin reorganization. EPPK−/− mice suffered from aggravated pancreatitis but showed no obvious regeneration phenotype. At the most severe stage of the disease, EPPK−/− acinar cells displayed more keratin aggregates than those of wild-type mice. Our data propose epiplakin to be a protective protein during acute pancreatitis, and that its loss causes impaired disease-associated keratin reorganization. PMID:25232867

  16. Acinar inflammatory response to lipid derivatives generated in necrotic fat during acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Mateu, A; Ramudo, L; Manso, M A; Closa, D; De Dios, I

    2014-09-01

    Lipids play a role in acute pancreatitis (AP) progression. We investigate the ability of pancreatic acinar cells to trigger inflammatory response in the presence of lipid compounds generated in necrotic areas of peripancreatic adipose tissue (AT) during AP induced in rats by 5% sodium taurocholate. Lipid composition of AT was analyzed by HPLC-mass spectrometry. Acinar inflammatory response to total lipids as well as to either the free fatty acid (FFA) fraction or their chlorinated products (Cl-FFAs) was evaluated. For this, mRNA expression of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) and P-selectin as well as the activation of MAPKs, NF-κB and STAT-3 were analyzed in pancreatic acini. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, as an inducer of Cl-FFA generation, was also analyzed in AT. MPO activity significantly increased in necrotic (AT-N) induced changes in lipid composition of necrotic fat, such as increase in FFA and phospholipid (PL) content, generation of Cl-FFAs and increases in saturated FFAs and in the poly-:mono-unsaturated FFA ratio. Total lipids from AT-N induced overexpression of CCL2 and P-selectin in pancreatic acini as well as MAPKs phosphorylation and activation of NF-κB and STAT3. FFAs, but not Cl-FFAs, up-regulated CCL2 and P-selectin in acinar cells. We conclude that FFAs are capable of up-regulating inflammatory mediators in pancreatic acini and given that they are highly produced during AP, mainly may contribute to the inflammatory response triggered in acinar cells by fat necrosis. No role is played by Cl-FFAs generated as a result of neutrophil infiltration. PMID:24959971

  17. Studies on Freezing Injury of Plant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Shizuo

    1984-01-01

    The thermotropic transition of plasma membrane of Dactylis glomerata was studied by using fluorescence polarization of embedded fluorophore, 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene. Under the presence of 35% ethylene glycol, reversible thermotropic transitions were observed in isolated plasma membrane vesicles in nearly the same temperature range as the temperature of freezing injury to cells. In liposomes prepared from isolated plasma membranes, however, the thermotropic transitions occurred at much lower temperatures in comparison with those of intact membrane vesicles. Following treatment with pronase, the thermotropic transition also shifted downward. Thus, the thermotropic properties of plasma membranes appeared to be dependent on the membrane proteins. In vitro freezing of the isolated plasma membrane vesicles without addition of any cryoprotectant, such as sorbitol, resulted in an irreversible alteration both in the fluorescence anisotropy values and the temperatures for the thermotropic transition, suggesting an irreversible alteration in the membrane structure, presumably changes in lipid-protein interactions and protein conformation. PMID:16663597

  18. Amniotic fluid stem cells prevent β-cell injury

    PubMed Central

    VILLANI, VALENTINA; MILANESI, ANNA; SEDRAKYAN, SARGIS; DA SACCO, STEFANO; ANGELOW, SUSANNE; CONCONI, MARIA TERESA; DI LIDDO, ROSA; DE FILIPPO, ROGER; PERIN, LAURA

    2015-01-01

    Background aims The contribution of amniotic fluid stem cells (AFSC) to tissue protection and regeneration in models of acute and chronic kidney injuries and lung failure has been shown in recent years. In the present study, we used a chemically induced mouse model of type 1 diabetes to determine whether AFSC could play a role in modulating β-cell injury and restoring β-cell function. Methods Streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice were given intracardial injection of AFSC; morphological and physiological parameters and gene expression profile for the insulin pathway were evaluated after cell transplantation. Results AFSC injection resulted in protection from β-cell damage and increased β-cell regeneration in a subset of mice as indicated by glucose and insulin levels, increased islet mass and preservation of islet structure. Moreover, β-cell preservation/regeneration correlated with activation of the insulin receptor/Pi3K/Akt signaling pathway and vascular endothelial growth factor-A expression involved in maintaining β-cell mass and function. Conclusions Our results suggest a therapeutic role for AFSC in preserving and promoting endogenous β-cell functionality and proliferation. The protective role of AFSC is evident when stem cell transplantation is performed before severe hyperglycemia occurs, which suggests the importance of early intervention. The present study demonstrates the possible benefits of the application of a non–genetically engineered stem cell population derived from amniotic fluid for the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus and gives new insight on the mechanism by which the beneficial effect is achieved. PMID:24210784

  19. Inductive and Deductive Approaches to Acute Cell Injury

    PubMed Central

    DeGracia, Donald J.; Tri Anggraini, Fika; Taha, Doaa Taha Metwally; Huang, Zhi-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Many clinically relevant forms of acute injury, such as stroke, traumatic brain injury, and myocardial infarction, have resisted treatments to prevent cell death following injury. The clinical failures can be linked to the currently used inductive models based on biological specifics of the injury system. Here we contrast the application of inductive and deductive models of acute cell injury. Using brain ischemia as a case study, we discuss limitations in inductive inferences, including the inability to unambiguously assign cell death causality and the lack of a systematic quantitative framework. These limitations follow from an overemphasis on qualitative molecular pathways specific to the injured system. Our recently developed nonlinear dynamical theory of cell injury provides a generic, systematic approach to cell injury in which attractor states and system parameters are used to quantitatively characterize acute injury systems. The theoretical, empirical, and therapeutic implications of shifting to a deductive framework are discussed. We illustrate how a deductive mathematical framework offers tangible advantages over qualitative inductive models for the development of therapeutics of acutely injured biological systems. PMID:27437490

  20. Renin lineage cells repopulate the glomerular mesangium after injury.

    PubMed

    Starke, Charlotte; Betz, Hannah; Hickmann, Linda; Lachmann, Peter; Neubauer, Björn; Kopp, Jeffrey B; Sequeira-Lopez, Maria Luisa S; Gomez, R Ariel; Hohenstein, Bernd; Todorov, Vladimir T; Hugo, Christian P M

    2015-01-01

    Mesangial cell injury has a major role in many CKDs. Because renin-positive precursor cells give rise to mesangial cells during nephrogenesis, this study tested the hypothesis that the same phenomenon contributes to glomerular regeneration after murine experimental mesangial injury. Mesangiolysis was induced by administration of an anti-mesangial cell serum in combination with LPS. In enhanced green fluorescent protein-reporter mice with constitutively labeled renin lineage cells, the size of the enhanced green fluorescent protein-positive area in the glomerular tufts increased after mesangial injury. Furthermore, we generated a novel Tet-on inducible triple-transgenic LacZ reporter line that allowed selective labeling of renin cells along renal afferent arterioles of adult mice. Although no intraglomerular LacZ expression was detected in healthy mice, about two-thirds of the glomerular tufts became LacZ positive during the regenerative phase after severe mesangial injury. Intraglomerular renin descendant LacZ-expressing cells colocalized with mesangial cell markers α8-integrin and PDGF receptor-β but not with endothelial, podocyte, or parietal epithelial cell markers. In contrast with LacZ-positive cells in the afferent arterioles, LacZ-positive cells in the glomerular tuft did not express renin. These data demonstrate that extraglomerular renin lineage cells represent a major source of repopulating cells for reconstitution of the intraglomerular mesangium after injury. PMID:24904091

  1. Nonlinear Dynamic Theory of Acute Cell Injuries and Brain Ischemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taha, Doaa; Anggraini, Fika; Degracia, Donald; Huang, Zhi-Feng

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral ischemia in the form of stroke and cardiac arrest brain damage affect over 1 million people per year in the USA alone. In spite of close to 200 clinical trials and decades of research, there are no treatments to stop post-ischemic neuron death. We have argued that a major weakness of current brain ischemia research is lack of a deductive theoretical framework of acute cell injury to guide empirical studies. A previously published autonomous model based on the concept of nonlinear dynamic network was shown to capture important facets of cell injury, linking the concept of therapeutic to bistable dynamics. Here we present an improved, non-autonomous formulation of the nonlinear dynamic model of cell injury that allows multiple acute injuries over time, thereby allowing simulations of both therapeutic treatment and preconditioning. Our results are connected to the experimental data of gene expression and proteomics of neuron cells. Importantly, this new model may be construed as a novel approach to pharmacodynamics of acute cell injury. The model makes explicit that any pro-survival therapy is always a form of sub-lethal injury. This insight is expected to widely influence treatment of acute injury conditions that have defied successful treatment to date. This work is supported by NIH NINDS (NS081347) and Wayne State University President's Research Enhancement Award.

  2. Radiation combined with thermal injury induces immature myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, April Elizabeth; Neely, Crystal Judith; Charles, Anthony G; Kartchner, Laurel Briane; Brickey, Willie June; Khoury, Amal Lina; Sempowski, Gregory D; Ting, Jenny P Y; Cairns, Bruce A; Maile, Robert

    2012-11-01

    The continued development of nuclear weapons and the potential for thermonuclear injury necessitates the further understanding of the immune consequences after radiation combined with injury (RCI). We hypothesized that sublethal ionization radiation exposure combined with a full-thickness thermal injury would result in the production of immature myeloid cells. Mice underwent either a full-thickness contact burn of 20% total body surface area or sham procedure followed by a single whole-body dose of 5-Gy radiation. Serum, spleen, and peripheral lymph nodes were harvested at 3 and 14 days after injury. Flow cytometry was performed to identify and characterize adaptive and innate cell compartments. Elevated proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory serum cytokines and profound leukopenia were observed after RCI. A population of cells with dual expression of the cell surface markers Gr-1 and CD11b were identified in all experimental groups, but were significantly elevated after burn alone and RCI at 14 days after injury. In contrast to the T-cell-suppressive nature of myeloid-derived suppressor cells found after trauma and sepsis, myeloid cells after RCI augmented T-cell proliferation and were associated with a weak but significant increase in interferon γ and a decrease in interleukin 10. This is consistent with previous work in burn injury indicating that a myeloid-derived suppressor cell-like population increases innate immunity. Radiation combined injury results in the increase in distinct populations of Gr-1CD11b cells within the secondary lymphoid organs, and we propose these immature inflammatory myeloid cells provide innate immunity to the severely injured and immunocompromised host. PMID:23042190

  3. Dynamic regulation of Schwann cell enhancers after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Hung, Holly A; Sun, Guannan; Keles, Sunduz; Svaren, John

    2015-03-13

    Myelination of the peripheral nervous system is required for axonal function and long term stability. After peripheral nerve injury, Schwann cells transition from axon myelination to a demyelinated state that supports neuronal survival and ultimately remyelination of axons. Reprogramming of gene expression patterns during development and injury responses is shaped by the actions of distal regulatory elements that integrate the actions of multiple transcription factors. We used ChIP-seq to measure changes in histone H3K27 acetylation, a mark of active enhancers, to identify enhancers in myelinating rat peripheral nerve and their dynamics after demyelinating nerve injury. Analysis of injury-induced enhancers identified enriched motifs for c-Jun, a transcription factor required for Schwann cells to support nerve regeneration. We identify a c-Jun-bound enhancer in the gene for Runx2, a transcription factor induced after nerve injury, and we show that Runx2 is required for activation of other induced genes. In contrast, enhancers that lose H3K27ac after nerve injury are enriched for binding sites of the Sox10 and early growth response 2 (Egr2/Krox20) transcription factors, which are critical determinants of Schwann cell differentiation. Egr2 expression is lost after nerve injury, and many Egr2-binding sites lose H3K27ac after nerve injury. However, the majority of Egr2-bound enhancers retain H3K27ac, indicating that other transcription factors maintain active enhancer status after nerve injury. The global epigenomic changes in H3K27ac deposition pinpoint dynamic changes in enhancers that mediate the effects of transcription factors that control Schwann cell myelination and peripheral nervous system responses to nerve injury. PMID:25614629

  4. Paneth cell-mediated multiorgan dysfunction after acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Won; Kim, Mihwa; Kim, Joo Yun; Ham, Ahrom; Brown, Kevin M.; Mori-Akiyama, Yuko; Ouellette, André J.; D’Agati, Vivette D.; Lee, H. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is frequently complicated by extra-renal multi-organ injury including intestinal and hepatic dysfunction. In this study, we hypothesized that a discrete intestinal source of pro-inflammatory mediators drives multi-organ injury in response to AKI. After induction of AKI in mice by renal ischemia-reperfusion or bilateral nephrectomy, small intestinal Paneth cells increased the synthesis and release of IL-17A in conjunction with severe intestinal apoptosis and inflammation. We also detected significantly increased IL-17A in portal and systemic circulation after AKI. Intestinal macrophages appear to transport released Paneth cell granule constituents induced by AKI, away from the base of the crypts into the liver. Genetic or pharmacologic depletion of Paneth cells decreased small intestinal IL-17A secretion and plasma IL-17A levels significantly and attenuated intestinal, hepatic, and renal injury after AKI. Similarly, portal delivery of IL-17A in macrophage depleted mice decreased markedly, and intestinal, hepatic, and renal injury following AKI was attenuated without affecting intestinal IL-17A generation. In conclusion, AKI induces IL-17A synthesis and secretion by Paneth cells to initiate intestinal and hepatic injury by hepatic and systemic delivery of IL-17A by macrophages. Modulation of Paneth cell dysregulation may have therapeutic implications by reducing systemic complications arising from AKI. PMID:23109723

  5. Intrinsic epithelial cells repair the kidney after injury.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, Benjamin D; Valerius, M Todd; Kobayashi, Akio; Mugford, Joshua W; Soeung, Savuth; Duffield, Jeremy S; McMahon, Andrew P; Bonventre, Joseph V

    2008-03-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of nephron repair is critical for the design of new therapeutic approaches to treat kidney disease. The kidney can repair after even a severe insult, but whether adult stem or progenitor cells contribute to epithelial renewal after injury and the cellular origin of regenerating cells remain controversial. Using genetic fate-mapping techniques, we generated transgenic mice in which 94%-95% of tubular epithelial cells, but no interstitial cells, were labeled with either beta-galactosidase (lacZ) or red fluorescent protein (RFP). Two days after ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), 50.5% of outer medullary epithelial cells coexpress Ki67 and RFP, indicating that differentiated epithelial cells that survived injury undergo proliferative expansion. After repair was complete, 66.9% of epithelial cells had incorporated BrdU, compared to only 3.5% of cells in the uninjured kidney. Despite this extensive cell proliferation, no dilution of either cell-fate marker was observed after repair. These results indicate that regeneration by surviving tubular epithelial cells is the predominant mechanism of repair after ischemic tubular injury in the adult mammalian kidney. PMID:18371453

  6. The Use of Cell Transplantation in Spinal Cord Injuries.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Gregory D; Kepler, Christopher K; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2016-04-01

    Acute spinal cord injuries are life-changing events that lead to substantial morbidity and mortality, but the role of cell-based treatment for these injuries is unclear. Cell therapy is a rapidly evolving treatment methodology, with basic science and early phase I/II human trials showing promise. Multiple cell lines can be used in cell therapy, including adult or embryonic stem cells, Schwann cells, olfactory ensheathing cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells. Adult stem cells, Schwann cells, and olfactory ensheathing cells are readily available but lack the ability to differentiate into cells of the central nervous system. Mesenchymal stem cells can decrease cell death by modifying the local environment into which they are introduced. Peripheral nerve cells, such as Schwann cells and olfactory ensheathing cells, can myelinate existing axons and foster axonal growth in the central nervous system, and embryonic stem cells can differentiate into neural progenitor stem cells of the central nervous system. Induced pluripotent stem cells are the basis of an emerging technology that has yet to be implemented in human trials but may offer a means of cell therapy without the ethical dilemmas associated with embryonic cells. PMID:26945167

  7. Radiation Combined with Thermal Injury Induces Immature Myeloid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, April Elizabeth; Neely, Crystal Judith; Charles, Anthony G.; Kartchner, Laurel Briane; Brickey, Willie June; Khoury, Amal Lina; Sempowski, Gregory D.; Ting, Jenny P.Y.; Cairns, Bruce A.; Maile, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The continued development of nuclear weapons and the potential for thermonuclear injury necessitates the further understanding of the immune consequences after radiation combined with injury (RCI). We hypothesized that sub-lethal ionization radiation exposure combined with a full thickness thermal injury would result in the production of immature myeloid cells. Mice underwent either a 20% total body surface area (TBSA) full-thickness contact burn or sham procedure followed by a single whole body dose of 5-Gy radiation. Serum, spleen and peripheral lymph nodes were harvested at 3 and 14 days post-injury. Flow cytometry was performed to identify and characterize adaptive and innate cell compartments. Elevated pro- and anti-inflammatory serum cytokines and profound leukopenia were observed after RCI. A population of cells with dual expression of the cell surface markers Gr-1 and CD11b were identified in all experimental groups, but was significantly elevated after burn alone and RCI at 14 days post-injury. In contrast to the T-cell suppressive nature of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) found after trauma and sepsis, myeloid cells after RCI augmented T-cell proliferation and were associated with a weak but significant increase in IFN-γ and a decrease in IL-10. This is consistent with previous work in burn injury indicating that a MDSC-like population increases innate immunity. RCI results in the increase of distinct populations of Gr-1+ CD11b+cells within the secondary lymphoid organs, and we propose these immature inflammatory myeloid cells provide innate immunity to the severely injured and immunocompromised host. PMID:23042190

  8. Cell therapy for spinal cord injury informed by electromagnetic waves.

    PubMed

    Finnegan, Jack; Ye, Hui

    2016-10-01

    Spinal cord injury devastates the CNS, besetting patients with symptoms including but not limited to: paralysis, autonomic nervous dysfunction, pain disorders and depression. Despite the identification of several molecular and genetic factors, a reliable regenerative therapy has yet to be produced for this terminal disease. Perhaps the missing piece of this puzzle will be discovered within endogenous electrotactic cellular behaviors. Neurons and stem cells both show mediated responses (growth rate, migration, differentiation) to electromagnetic waves, including direct current electric fields. This review analyzes the pathophysiology of spinal cord injury, the rationale for regenerative cell therapy and the evidence for directing cell therapy via electromagnetic waves shown by in vitro experiments. PMID:27599240

  9. Nerve growth factor enhances Clara cell proliferation after lung injury.

    PubMed

    Sonar, S S; Schwinge, D; Kilic, A; Yildirim, A O; Conrad, M L; Seidler, K; Müller, B; Renz, H; Nockher, W A

    2010-07-01

    The lung epithelia facilitate wound closure by secretion of various cytokines and growth factors. Nerve growth factor (NGF) has been well described in airway inflammation; however, its likely role in lung repair has not been examined thus far. To investigate the repair function of NGF, experiments were performed in vitro using cultured alveolar epithelial cells and in vivo using a naphthalene-induced model of Clara epithelial cell injury. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments revealed airway epithelial cell proliferation following injury to be dependent on NGF and the expression of its receptor, tropomyosin-receptor-kinase A. Additionally, NGF also augmented in vitro migration of alveolar type II cells. In vivo, transgenic mice over-expressing NGF in Clara cells (NGFtg) did not reveal any proliferation or alteration in Clara cell phenotype. However, following Clara cell specific injury, proliferation was increased in NGFtg and impaired upon inhibition of NGF. Furthermore, NGF also promoted the expression of collagen I and fibronectin in vitro and in vivo during repair, where significantly higher levels were measured in re-epithelialising NGFtg mice. Our study demonstrates that NGF promotes the proliferation of lung epithelium in vitro and the renewal of Clara cells following lung injury in vivo. PMID:20075049

  10. Cell-specific translational profiling in acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Krautzberger, A. Michaela; Sui, Shannan H.; Hofmann, Oliver M.; Chen, Ying; Baetscher, Manfred; Grgic, Ivica; Kumar, Sanjeev; Humphreys, Benjamin; Hide, Winston A.; McMahon, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) promotes an abrupt loss of kidney function that results in substantial morbidity and mortality. Considerable effort has gone toward identification of diagnostic biomarkers and analysis of AKI-associated molecular events; however, most studies have adopted organ-wide approaches and have not elucidated the interplay among different cell types involved in AKI pathophysiology. To better characterize AKI-associated molecular and cellular events, we developed a mouse line that enables the identification of translational profiles in specific cell types. This strategy relies on CRE recombinase–dependent activation of an EGFP-tagged L10a ribosomal protein subunit, which allows translating ribosome affinity purification (TRAP) of mRNA populations in CRE-expressing cells. Combining this mouse line with cell type–specific CRE-driver lines, we identified distinct cellular responses in an ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) model of AKI. Twenty-four hours following IRI, distinct translational signatures were identified in the nephron, kidney interstitial cell populations, vascular endothelium, and macrophages/monocytes. Furthermore, TRAP captured known IRI-associated markers, validating this approach. Biological function annotation, canonical pathway analysis, and in situ analysis of identified response genes provided insight into cell-specific injury signatures. Our study provides a deep, cell-based view of early injury-associated molecular events in AKI and documents a versatile, genetic tool to monitor cell-specific and temporal-specific biological processes in disease modeling. PMID:24569379

  11. Transcranial amelioration of inflammation and cell death after brain injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Theodore L.; Nayak, Debasis; Atanasijevic, Tatjana; Koretsky, Alan P.; Latour, Lawrence L.; McGavern, Dorian B.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is increasingly appreciated to be highly prevalent and deleterious to neurological function. At present, no effective treatment options are available, and little is known about the complex cellular response to TBI during its acute phase. To gain insights into TBI pathogenesis, we developed a novel murine closed-skull brain injury model that mirrors some pathological features associated with mild TBI in humans and used long-term intravital microscopy to study the dynamics of the injury response from its inception. Here we demonstrate that acute brain injury induces vascular damage, meningeal cell death, and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that ultimately breach the glial limitans and promote spread of the injury into the parenchyma. In response, the brain elicits a neuroprotective, purinergic-receptor-dependent inflammatory response characterized by meningeal neutrophil swarming and microglial reconstitution of the damaged glial limitans. We also show that the skull bone is permeable to small-molecular-weight compounds, and use this delivery route to modulate inflammation and therapeutically ameliorate brain injury through transcranial administration of the ROS scavenger, glutathione. Our results shed light on the acute cellular response to TBI and provide a means to locally deliver therapeutic compounds to the site of injury.

  12. Adrenomedullin regulates club cell recovery following lung epithelial injury.

    PubMed

    García-Sanmartín, Josune; Larrayoz, Ignacio M; Martínez, Alfredo

    2016-06-01

    The equilibrium between lung epithelium damage and recovery in the context of chronic injury is at the basis of numerous lung diseases, including lung cancer and COPD. Understanding the contribution of growth factors and other molecular intermediates to this crosstalk may help in devising new therapeutic approaches. To better understand the contribution of adrenomedullin (AM) to lung homeostasis, we built club cell-specific conditional knockout (KO) mice for AM and subjected them to naphthalene injury. Untreated KO mice had lower levels of club cell 10 KDa protein (CC10) immunoreactivity than their wild type (WT) littermates in both terminal and regular bronchioles. Naphthalene injury resulted in a rapid necrosis of club cells followed by a progressive recovery of the epithelium. Club cells proliferated at higher rates in the KO mice and at 21 days post-injury the club cell coverage of the main bronchioles was higher and more homogeneous than in the WT animals. In conclusion, the paracrine/autocrine influence of AM in club cells subtly modulates their proliferation and spreading kinetics during lung epithelium recovery. PMID:26661726

  13. Transplantation of neural progenitor cells in chronic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Jin, Y; Bouyer, J; Shumsky, J S; Haas, C; Fischer, I

    2016-04-21

    Previous studies demonstrated that neural progenitor cells (NPCs) transplanted into a subacute contusion injury improve motor, sensory, and bladder function. In this study we tested whether transplanted NPCs can also improve functional recovery after chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) alone or in combination with the reduction of glial scar and neurotrophic support. Adult rats received a T10 moderate contusion. Thirteen weeks after the injury they were divided into four groups and received either: 1. Medium (control), 2. NPC transplants, 3. NPC+lentivirus vector expressing chondroitinase, or 4. NPC+lentivirus vectors expressing chondroitinase and neurotrophic factors. During the 8weeks post-transplantation the animals were tested for functional recovery and eventually analyzed by anatomical and immunohistochemical assays. The behavioral tests for motor and sensory function were performed before and after injury, and weekly after transplantation, with some animals also tested for bladder function at the end of the experiment. Transplant survival in the chronic injury model was variable and showed NPCs at the injury site in 60% of the animals in all transplantation groups. The NPC transplants comprised less than 40% of the injury site, without significant anatomical or histological differences among the groups. All groups also showed similar patterns of functional deficits and recovery in the 12weeks after injury and in the 8weeks after transplantation using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan rating score, the grid test, and the Von Frey test for mechanical allodynia. A notable exception was group 4 (NPC together with chondroitinase and neurotrophins), which showed a significant improvement in bladder function. This study underscores the therapeutic challenges facing transplantation strategies in a chronic SCI in which even the inclusion of treatments designed to reduce scarring and increase neurotrophic support produce only modest functional improvements. Further

  14. Cell injury, retrodifferentiation and the cancer treatment paradox.

    PubMed

    Uriel, José

    2015-09-01

    This "opinion article" is an attempt to take an overview of some significant changes that have happened in our understanding of cancer status during the last half century and its evolution under the progressive influence of molecular biology. As an active worker in cancer research and developmental biology during most of this period, I would like to comment briefly on these changes and to give my critical appreciation of their outcome as it affects our knowledge of cancer development as well as the current treatment of the disease. A recall of my own contribution to the subject is also included. Two subjects are particularly developed: cell injury and cell-killing therapies. Cell injury, whatever its origin, has acquired the status of a pivotal event for the initiation of cancer emergence. It is postulated that cell injury, a potential case of cellular death, may also be the origin of a process of stepwise cell reversion (retrodifferentiation or retroprogrammation) leading, by division, mature or stem cells to progressive immaturity. The genetic instability and mutational changes that accompanies this process of cell injury and rejuvenation put normal cells in a status favourable to neoplastic transformation or may evolve cancer cells toward clones with higher malignant potentiality. Thus, cell injury suggests lifestyle as the major upstream initiator of cancer development although this not exclude randomness as an unavoidable contributor to the disease. Cell-killing agents (mainly cytotoxic drugs and radiotherapy) are currently used to treat cancer. At the same time, it is agreed that agents with high cell injury potential (ultraviolet light, ionising radiations, tobacco, environmental pollutants, etc.) contribute to the emergence of malignant tumours. This represents a real paradox. In spite of the progress accomplished in cancer survival, one is tempted to suggest that we have very few chances of really cure cancer as long as we continue to treat malignancies

  15. Pathogenesis of Kupffer Cells in Cholestatic Liver Injury.

    PubMed

    Sato, Keisaku; Hall, Chad; Glaser, Shannon; Francis, Heather; Meng, Fanyin; Alpini, Gianfranco

    2016-09-01

    Kupffer cells are the resident macrophages in the liver. They are located in hepatic sinusoid, which allows them to remove foreign materials, pathogens, and apoptotic cells efficiently. Activated Kupffer cells secrete various mediators, including cytokines and chemokines, to initiate immune responses, inflammation, or recruitment of other liver cells. Bile duct ligation (BDL) surgery in rodents is often studied as an animal model of cholestatic liver disease, characterized by obstruction of bile flow. BDL mice show altered functional activities of Kupffer cells compared with sham-operated mice, including elevated cytokine secretion and impaired bacterial clearance. Various mediators produced by other liver cells can regulate Kupffer cell activation, which suggest that Kupffer cells orchestrate with other liver cells to relay inflammatory signals and to maintain liver homeostasis during BDL-induced liver injury. Blocking or depletion of Kupffer cells, an approach for the treatment of liver diseases, has shown controversial implications. Procedures in Kupffer cell research have limitations and may produce various results in Kupffer cell research. It is important, however, to reveal underlying mechanisms of activation and functions of Kupffer cells, followed by hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. This review summarizes present Kupffer cell studies in cholestatic liver injury. PMID:27452297

  16. Could Cord Blood Cell Therapy Reduce Preterm Brain Injury?

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingang; McDonald, Courtney A.; Fahey, Michael C.; Jenkin, Graham; Miller, Suzanne L.

    2014-01-01

    Major advances in neonatal care have led to significant improvements in survival rates for preterm infants, but this occurs at a cost, with a strong causal link between preterm birth and neurological deficits, including cerebral palsy (CP). Indeed, in high-income countries, up to 50% of children with CP were born preterm. The pathways that link preterm birth and brain injury are complex and multifactorial, but it is clear that preterm birth is strongly associated with damage to the white matter of the developing brain. Nearly 90% of preterm infants who later develop spastic CP have evidence of periventricular white matter injury. There are currently no treatments targeted at protecting the immature preterm brain. Umbilical cord blood (UCB) contains a diverse mix of stem and progenitor cells, and is a particularly promising source of cells for clinical applications, due to ethical and practical advantages over other potential therapeutic cell types. Recent studies have documented the potential benefits of UCB cells in reducing brain injury, particularly in rodent models of term neonatal hypoxia–ischemia. These studies indicate that UCB cells act via anti-inflammatory and immuno-modulatory effects, and release neurotrophic growth factors to support the damaged and surrounding brain tissue. The etiology of brain injury in preterm-born infants is less well understood than in term infants, but likely results from episodes of hypoperfusion, hypoxia–ischemia, and/or inflammation over a developmental period of white matter vulnerability. This review will explore current knowledge about the neuroprotective actions of UCB cells and their potential to ameliorate preterm brain injury through neonatal cell administration. We will also discuss the characteristics of UCB-derived from preterm and term infants for use in clinical applications. PMID:25346720

  17. Research Progress on Regulatory T Cells in Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yamei; Tao, Yuhong

    2015-01-01

    Immune inflammation is crucial in mediating acute kidney injury (AKI). Immune cells of both the innate and adaptive immune systems substantially contribute to overall renal damage in AKI. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are key regulator of immunological function and have been demonstrated to ameliorate injury in several murine experimental models of renal inflammation. Recent studies have illuminated the renal-protective function of Tregs in AKI. Tregs appear to exert beneficial effects in both the acute injury phase and the recovery phase of AKI. Additionally, Tregs-based immunotherapy may represent a promising approach to ameliorate AKI and promote recovery from AKI. This review will highlight the recent insights into the role of Tregs and their therapeutic potential in AKI. PMID:26273681

  18. Hydrogels and Cell Based Therapies in Spinal Cord Injury Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Assunção-Silva, Rita C.; Gomes, Eduardo D.; Silva, Nuno A.; Salgado, António J.

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a central nervous system- (CNS-) related disorder for which there is yet no successful treatment. Within the past several years, cell-based therapies have been explored for SCI repair, including the use of pluripotent human stem cells, and a number of adult-derived stem and mature cells such as mesenchymal stem cells, olfactory ensheathing cells, and Schwann cells. Although promising, cell transplantation is often overturned by the poor cell survival in the treatment of spinal cord injuries. Alternatively, the therapeutic role of different cells has been used in tissue engineering approaches by engrafting cells with biomaterials. The latter have the advantages of physically mimicking the CNS tissue, while promoting a more permissive environment for cell survival, growth, and differentiation. The roles of both cell- and biomaterial-based therapies as single therapeutic approaches for SCI repair will be discussed in this review. Moreover, as the multifactorial inhibitory environment of a SCI suggests that combinatorial approaches would be more effective, the importance of using biomaterials as cell carriers will be herein highlighted, as well as the recent advances and achievements of these promising tools for neural tissue regeneration. PMID:26124844

  19. Comparison of stem cell therapies for acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Carol J; Distaso, Casey T; Spitz, Kristin M; Verdun, Valerie A; Haramati, Aviad

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is the rapid onset of decreased kidney function that ultimately increases mortality and morbidity. Stem cell research is a promising avenue for curative and preventative therapies of kidney injury, however, there are many types of stem cells under investigation. Currently there is no research to compare the value of one stem cell method over another. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) have been shown to differentiate into renal cells, though further clinical research is needed to fully explore potential therapeutic strategies. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have long been investigated in the preclinical setting and have recently been successful in Phase I clinical trials. MSCs may represent a promising new therapeutic approach to treat AKI as they demonstrate renoprotective effects post-injury via the secretion of promitotic, anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulatory factors. Given the most current research, MSCs appear to offer a promising course of treatment for AKI. PMID:27335697

  20. Intestinal stem cell response to injury: lessons from Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Huaqi; Tian, Aiguo; Jiang, Jin

    2016-09-01

    Many adult tissues and organs are maintained by resident stem cells that are activated in response to injury but the mechanisms that regulate stem cell activity during regeneration are still poorly understood. An emerging system to study such problem is the Drosophila adult midgut. Recent studies have identified both intrinsic factors and extrinsic niche signals that control the proliferation, self-renewal, and lineage differentiation of Drosophila adult intestinal stem cells (ISCs). These findings set up the stage to interrogate how niche signals are regulated and how they are integrated with cell-intrinsic factors to control ISC activity during normal homeostasis and regeneration. Here we review the current understanding of the mechanisms that control ISC self-renewal, proliferation, and lineage differentiation in Drosophila adult midgut with a focus on the niche signaling network that governs ISC activity in response to injury. PMID:27137186

  1. Nitrative Stress Participates in Endothelial Progenitor Cell Injury in Hyperhomocysteinemia

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yu; Sun, Qi; Liu, Teng; Wang, Huanyuan; Jiao, Kun; Xu, Jiahui; Liu, Xin; Liu, Huirong; Wang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    In order to investigate the role of nitrative stress in vascular endothelial injury in hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy), thirty healthy adult female Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups: control, hyperhomocysteinemia model, and hyperhomocysteinemia with FeTMPyP (peroxynitrite scavenger) treatment. The endothelium-dependent dilatation of thoracic aorta in vitro was determined by response to acetylcholine (ACh). The histological changes in endothelium were assessed by HE staining and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The expression of 3-nitrotyrosine (NT) in thoracic aorta was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence, and the number of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) was quantified by flow cytometry. Hyperhomocysteinemia caused significant endothelial injury and dysfunction including vasodilative and histologic changes, associated with higher expression of NT in thoracic aorta. FeTMPyP treatment reversed these injuries significantly. Further, the effect of nitrative stress on cultured EPCs in vitro was investigated by administering peroxynitrite donor (3-morpholino-sydnonimine, SIN-1) and peroxynitrite scavenger (FeTMPyP). The roles of nitrative stress on cell viability, necrosis and apoptosis were evaluated with 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay, respectively. Also, the phospho-eNOS expression and tube formation in Matrigel of cultured EPCs was detected. Our data showed that the survival of EPCs was much lower in SIN-1 group than in vehicle group, both the apoptosis and necrosis of EPCs were much more severe, and the p-eNOS expression and tube formation in Matrigel were obviously declined. Subsequent pretreatment with FeTMPyP reversed these changes. Further, pretreatment with FeTMPyP reversed homocysteine-induced EPC injury. In conclusion, this study indicates that

  2. Nitrative Stress Participates in Endothelial Progenitor Cell Injury in Hyperhomocysteinemia.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yu; Sun, Qi; Liu, Teng; Wang, Huanyuan; Jiao, Kun; Xu, Jiahui; Liu, Xin; Liu, Huirong; Wang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    In order to investigate the role of nitrative stress in vascular endothelial injury in hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy), thirty healthy adult female Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups: control, hyperhomocysteinemia model, and hyperhomocysteinemia with FeTMPyP (peroxynitrite scavenger) treatment. The endothelium-dependent dilatation of thoracic aorta in vitro was determined by response to acetylcholine (ACh). The histological changes in endothelium were assessed by HE staining and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The expression of 3-nitrotyrosine (NT) in thoracic aorta was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence, and the number of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) was quantified by flow cytometry. Hyperhomocysteinemia caused significant endothelial injury and dysfunction including vasodilative and histologic changes, associated with higher expression of NT in thoracic aorta. FeTMPyP treatment reversed these injuries significantly. Further, the effect of nitrative stress on cultured EPCs in vitro was investigated by administering peroxynitrite donor (3-morpholino-sydnonimine, SIN-1) and peroxynitrite scavenger (FeTMPyP). The roles of nitrative stress on cell viability, necrosis and apoptosis were evaluated with 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay, respectively. Also, the phospho-eNOS expression and tube formation in Matrigel of cultured EPCs was detected. Our data showed that the survival of EPCs was much lower in SIN-1 group than in vehicle group, both the apoptosis and necrosis of EPCs were much more severe, and the p-eNOS expression and tube formation in Matrigel were obviously declined. Subsequent pretreatment with FeTMPyP reversed these changes. Further, pretreatment with FeTMPyP reversed homocysteine-induced EPC injury. In conclusion, this study indicates that

  3. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Therapies for Cervical Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Doulames, Vanessa M; Plant, Giles W

    2016-01-01

    Cervical-level injuries account for the majority of presented spinal cord injuries (SCIs) to date. Despite the increase in survival rates due to emergency medicine improvements, overall quality of life remains poor, with patients facing variable deficits in respiratory and motor function. Therapies aiming to ameliorate symptoms and restore function, even partially, are urgently needed. Current therapeutic avenues in SCI seek to increase regenerative capacities through trophic and immunomodulatory factors, provide scaffolding to bridge the lesion site and promote regeneration of native axons, and to replace SCI-lost neurons and glia via intraspinal transplantation. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a clinically viable means to accomplish this; they have no major ethical barriers, sources can be patient-matched and collected using non-invasive methods. In addition, the patient's own cells can be used to establish a starter population capable of producing multiple cell types. To date, there is only a limited pool of research examining iPSC-derived transplants in SCI-even less research that is specific to cervical injury. The purpose of the review herein is to explore both preclinical and clinical recent advances in iPSC therapies with a detailed focus on cervical spinal cord injury. PMID:27070598

  4. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Therapies for Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Doulames, Vanessa M.; Plant, Giles W.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical-level injuries account for the majority of presented spinal cord injuries (SCIs) to date. Despite the increase in survival rates due to emergency medicine improvements, overall quality of life remains poor, with patients facing variable deficits in respiratory and motor function. Therapies aiming to ameliorate symptoms and restore function, even partially, are urgently needed. Current therapeutic avenues in SCI seek to increase regenerative capacities through trophic and immunomodulatory factors, provide scaffolding to bridge the lesion site and promote regeneration of native axons, and to replace SCI-lost neurons and glia via intraspinal transplantation. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a clinically viable means to accomplish this; they have no major ethical barriers, sources can be patient-matched and collected using non-invasive methods. In addition, the patient’s own cells can be used to establish a starter population capable of producing multiple cell types. To date, there is only a limited pool of research examining iPSC-derived transplants in SCI—even less research that is specific to cervical injury. The purpose of the review herein is to explore both preclinical and clinical recent advances in iPSC therapies with a detailed focus on cervical spinal cord injury. PMID:27070598

  5. Mesenchymal stem cells induce dermal fibroblast responses to injury

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Andria N.; Willis, Elise; Chan, Vincent T.; Muffley, Lara A.; Isik, F. Frank; Gibran, Nicole S.; Hocking, Anne M.

    2010-01-01

    Although bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells have been shown to promote repair when applied to cutaneous wounds, the mechanism for this response remains to be determined. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of paracrine signaling from mesenchymal stem cells on dermal fibroblast responses to injury including proliferation, migration and expression of genes important in wound repair. Dermal fibroblasts were co-cultured with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells grown in inserts, which allowed for paracrine interactions without direct cell contact. In this co-culture model, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells regulate dermal fibroblast proliferation, migration and gene expression. When co-cultured with mesenchymal stem cells, dermal fibroblasts show increased proliferation and accelerated migration in a scratch assay. A chemotaxis assay also demonstrated that dermal fibroblasts migrate towards bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. A PCR array was used to analyze the effect of mesenchymal stem cells on dermal fibroblast gene expression. In response to mesenchymal stem cells, dermal fibroblasts up-regulate integrin alpha 7 expression and down-regulate expression of ICAM1, VCAM1 and MMP11. These observations suggest that mesenchymal stem cells may provide an important early signal for dermal fibroblast responses to cutaneous injury.

  6. Cell Adhesion Molecules in Chemically-Induced Renal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Prozialeck, Walter C.; Edwards, Joshua R.

    2007-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules are integral cell-membrane proteins that maintain cell-cell and cell-substrate adhesion, and in some cases, act as regulators of intracellular signaling cascades. In the kidney, cell adhesion molecules such as the cadherins, the catenins, ZO-1, occludin and the claudins are essential for maintaining the epithelial polarity and barrier integrity that are necessary for the normal absorption/excretion of fluid and solutes. A growing volume of evidence indicates that these cell adhesion molecules are important early targets for a variety of nephrotoxic substances including metals, drugs, and venom components. In addition, it is now widely appreciated that molecules such as ICAM-1, the integrins and selectins play important roles in the recruitment of leukocytes and inflammatory responses that are associated with nephrotoxic injury. This review summarizes the results of recent in vitro and in vivo studies indicating that these cell adhesion molecules may be primary molecular targets in many types of chemically-induced renal injury. Some of the specific agents that are discussed include Cd, Hg, Bi, cisplatin, aminoglycoside antibiotics, S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl-L-cysteine) (DCVC) and various venom toxins. This review also includes a discussion of the various mechanisms by which these substances can affect cell adhesion molecules in the kidney. PMID:17316817

  7. Human periodontal ligament stem cells repair mental nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bohan; Jung, Hun-Jong; Kim, Soung-Min; Kim, Myung-Jin; Jahng, Jeong Won; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Human periodontal ligament stem cells are easily accessible and can differentiate into Schwann cells. We hypothesized that human periodontal ligament stem cells can be used as an alternative source for the autologous Schwann cells in promoting the regeneration of injured peripheral nerve. To validate this hypothesis, human periodontal ligament stem cells (1 × 106) were injected into the crush-injured left mental nerve in rats. Simultaneously, autologous Schwann cells (1 × 106) and PBS were also injected as controls. Real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction showed that at 5 days after injection, mRNA expression of low affinity nerve growth factor receptor was significantaly increased in the left trigeminal ganglion of rats with mental nerve injury. Sensory tests, histomorphometric evaluation and retrograde labeling demonstrated that at 2 and 4 weeks after injection, sensory function was significantly improved, the numbers of retrograde labeled sensory neurons and myelinated axons were significantly increased, and human periodontal ligament stem cells and autologous Schwann cells exhibited similar therapeutic effects. These findings suggest that transplantation of human periodontal ligament stem cells show a potential value in repair of mental nerve injury. PMID:25206604

  8. Susceptibility of irradiated bovine aortic endothelial cells to injury

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, M.H.; Dong, Q.; Ts'ao, C.

    1988-11-01

    Using cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC), the authors attempted to determine whether prior irradiation would alter the susceptibility of these cells to three known injurious stimuli and, if so, whether the alteration would be related to radiation dose. BAEC were irradiated with 0, 5, or 10 Gy of gamma rays and, on the third postirradiation day, exposed to fibrin, nicotine, or bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS). Release of prelabeled 51Cr, representing cell lysis, cell detachment, or a combination of the two, was determined. Significant differences between irradiated and control cells were determined by using paired Student's t-tests. Irradiation did not appear to have altered the sensitivity of BAEC to fibrin-induced injury. Cells irradiated with 10 Gy of gamma rays, but generally not those irradiated with half this dose, showed a heightened susceptibility to nicotine. Contrary to the nicotine results, irradiated cells showed less cell detachment and lysis after exposure to LPS. These results suggest that the susceptibility of irradiated BAEC to harmful stimuli depends largely on the nature of the stimulus as well as the radiation dose.

  9. Liver injury-on-a-chip: microfluidic co-cultures with integrated biosensors for monitoring liver cell signaling during injury.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qing; Patel, Dipali; Kwa, Timothy; Haque, Amranul; Matharu, Zimple; Stybayeva, Gulnaz; Gao, Yandong; Diehl, Anna Mae; Revzin, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    Tissue injury triggers complex communication between cells via secreted signaling molecules such as cytokines and growth factors. Discerning when and where these signals begin and how they propagate over time is very challenging with existing cell culture and analysis tools. The goal of this study was to develop new tools in the form of microfluidic co-cultures with integrated biosensors for local and continuous monitoring of secreted signals. Specifically, we focused on how alcohol injury affects TGF-β signaling between two liver cell types, hepatocytes and stellate cells. Activation of stellate cells happens early during liver injury and is at the center of liver fibrosis. We demonstrated that alcohol injury to microfluidic co-cultures caused significantly higher levels of stellate cell activation compared to conditioned media and transwell injury experiments. This highlighted the advantage of the microfluidic co-culture: placement of two cell types in close proximity to ensure high local concentrations of injury-promoting secreted signals. Next, we developed a microsystem consisting of five chambers, two for co-culturing hepatocytes with stellate cells and three additional chambers containing miniature aptamer-modified electrodes for monitoring secreted TGF-β. Importantly, the walls separating microfluidic chambers were actuatable; they could be raised or lowered to create different configurations of the device. The use of reconfigurable microfluidics and miniature biosensors revealed that alcohol injury causes hepatocytes to secrete TGF-β molecules, which diffuse over to neighboring stellate cells and trigger production of additional TGF-β from stellate cells. Our results lend credence to the emerging view of hepatocytes as active participants of liver injury. Broadly speaking, our microsystem makes it possible to monitor paracrine crosstalk between two cell types communicating via the same signaling molecule (e.g. TGF-β). PMID:26480303

  10. The cell injury device: a high-throughput platform for traumatic brain injury research.

    PubMed

    Jowers, Casey T; Taberner, Andrew J; Dragunow, Mike; Anderson, Iain A

    2013-08-15

    A novel, automated system for delivering controlled scratch-induced trauma to brain cells cultured in multi-well plates was created and characterized. The system is equipped with high-throughput imaging and analysis capabilities, enabling quantitative measurements of cell migration. The scratch-area coefficient of variation of the device was between 3.9% and 8.4%, a significant improvement over traditional manual methods, which provided a scratch-area coefficient of variation of between 10.7% and 19.6%. The device's inexpensive imaging and analysis capabilities were comparable to a well-known system, the Discovery-1 (Molecular Devices), with no significant difference found between the two. When used for drug screening, the gap area of Neuro2a cells after 72h was significantly larger in samples containing UO126 (20μM), averaging 0.89mm(2)±0.21mm(2); compared with an average vehicle control gap area of 0.42mm(2)±0.1mm(2). A gradient response could also be detected among samples with increasing UO126 concentrations (0-20μM), due to decreased migration and/or proliferation of cells into the gap over the time period. Our device provides an inexpensive method for delivering a standardized, closely controlled pressure/scratch to brain cells cultured in multi-well plates. The system provides more consistent patterns of scratch-induced trauma to cultured cells when compared to traditional methods. This device is an effective platform for quantifying the injury response of cells, and has applications in testing the effectiveness of drugs on cell migration and proliferation which might potentially treat traumatic brain injury. PMID:23660525

  11. Cell selectivity to laser-induced photoacoustic injury of skin.

    PubMed

    Yashima, Y; McAuliffe, D J; Flotte, T J

    1990-01-01

    Cell selectivity to photoacoustic injury induced by argon-fluoride excimer laser (193 nm) was studied. Rats were irradiated through air or water and a 2.5 mm aperture. The laser was adjusted to deliver 150 mJ/cm2 at the skin surface with 12 and 24 pulses. Immediate damage was assessed by transmission electron microscopy. Cell selectivity was observed in dermis and epidermis. Fibroblasts showed alteration of nuclear chromatin and cytoplasmic organelles, while some of the migratory cells adjacent to fibroblasts did not. Similar difference of damage was observed between keratinocytes and Langerhans cells in epidermis. Considering the relationship between cells and their microenvironment in tissue, this selectivity may be due to the difference of acoustical coupling of propagation of acoustic waves rather than to differential sensitivity of the cells to damage. PMID:2345477

  12. Role of stem cells during diabetic liver injury.

    PubMed

    Wan, Ying; Garner, Jessica; Wu, Nan; Phillip, Levine; Han, Yuyan; McDaniel, Kelly; Annable, Tami; Zhou, Tianhao; Francis, Heather; Glaser, Shannon; Huang, Qiaobing; Alpini, Gianfranco; Meng, Fanyin

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most severe endocrine metabolic disorders in the world that has serious medical consequences with substantial impacts on the quality of life. Type 2 diabetes is one of the main causes of diabetic liver diseases with the most common being non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Several factors that may explain the mechanisms related to pathological and functional changes of diabetic liver injury include: insulin resistance, oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress. The realization that these factors are important in hepatocyte damage and lack of donor livers has led to studies concentrating on the role of stem cells (SCs) in the prevention and treatment of liver injury. Possible avenues that the application of SCs may improve liver injury include but are not limited to: the ability to differentiate into pancreatic β-cells (insulin producing cells), the contribution for hepatocyte regeneration, regulation of lipogenesis, glucogenesis and anti-inflammatory actions. Once further studies are performed to explore the underlying protective mechanisms of SCs and the advantages and disadvantages of its application, there will be a greater understand of the mechanism and therapeutic potential. In this review, we summarize the findings regarding the role of SCs in diabetic liver diseases. PMID:26645107

  13. Proteome Profiling in Lung Injury after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Maneesh; Viken, Kevin J; Dey, Sanjoy; Steinbach, Michael S; Wu, Baolin; Jagtap, Pratik D; Higgins, LeeAnn; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Kumar, Vipin; Arora, Mukta; Bitterman, Peter B; Ingbar, David H; Wendt, Chris H

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary complications due to infection and idiopathic pneumonia syndrome (IPS), a noninfectious lung injury in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients, are frequent causes of transplantation-related mortality and morbidity. Our objective was to characterize the global bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) protein expression of IPS to identify proteins and pathways that differentiate IPS from infectious lung injury after HSCT. We studied 30 BALF samples from patients who developed lung injury within 180 days of HSCT or cellular therapy transfusion (natural killer cell transfusion). Adult subjects were classified as having IPS or infectious lung injury by the criteria outlined in the 2011 American Thoracic Society statement. BALF was depleted of hemoglobin and 14 high-abundance proteins, treated with trypsin, and labeled with isobaric tagging for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) 8-plex reagent for two-dimensional capillary liquid chromatography (LC) and data dependent peptide tandem mass spectrometry (MS) on an Orbitrap Velos system in higher-energy collision-induced dissociation activation mode. Protein identification employed a target-decoy strategy using ProteinPilot within Galaxy P. The relative protein abundance was determined with reference to a global internal standard consisting of pooled BALF from patients with respiratory failure and no history of HSCT. A variance weighted t-test controlling for a false discovery rate of ≤5% was used to identify proteins that showed differential expression between IPS and infectious lung injury. The biological relevance of these proteins was determined by using gene ontology enrichment analysis and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. We characterized 12 IPS and 18 infectious lung injury BALF samples. In the 5 iTRAQ LC-MS/MS experiments 845, 735, 532, 615, and 594 proteins were identified for a total of 1125 unique proteins and 368 common proteins across all 5 LC-MS/MS experiments. When comparing IPS to

  14. microRNA-22 attenuates neuronal cell apoptosis in a cell model of traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ji; Shui, Shaofeng; Han, Xinwei; Guo, Dong; Li, Tengfei; Yan, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of injury-related deaths, and the mechanism of TBI has become a research focus, but little is known about the mechanism of microRNAs in TBI. The aim of this study is the role of microRNA-22 (miR-22) in TBI-induced neuronal cell apoptosis. Rat cortical neurons were cultured and the TBI model was induced by scratch injury in vitro, before which miR-22 level was altered by transfection of agomir or antagomir. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and TUNEL assays were performed to examine neuronal cell injury and apoptosis. The activity of caspase 3 (CASP3) and level changes of several apoptosis factors including B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2), BCL2-associated X protein (BAX), phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and v-AKT murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1 (AKT1) were detected. Results showed that TBI model cells possessed a downregulated miR-22 level (P < 0.001) and more LDH release and apoptotic cells indicating the aggravated neuronal cell injury and apoptosis induced by TBI. miR-22 agomir attenuated neuronal cell injury and apoptosis of the TBI model. It also caused the corresponding changes in CASP3 activity and other apoptosis factors, with cleaved CASP3, BAX and PTEN inhibited and BCL2 and phosphorylated AKT1 promoted, while miR-22 antagomir had the opposite effects. So miR-22 has neuroprotective roles of attenuating neuronal cell injury and apoptosis induced by TBI, which may be associated with its regulation on apoptosis factors. This study reveals miR-22 as a potential approach to TBI treatment and detailed mechanism remains to be uncovered. PMID:27186313

  15. The role played by perivascular cells in kidney interstitial injury

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Andres; Chang, Fan-Chi; Lin, Shuei-Liong; Duffield, Jeremy S.

    2012-01-01

    Fibrosis of the kidney is a disease affecting millions worldwide and is a harbinger of progressive loss of organ function resulting in organ failure. Recent findings suggest that understanding mechanisms of development and progression of fibrosis will lead to new therapies urgently required to counteract loss of organ function. Recently, little-known cells that line the kidney microvasculature, known as pericytes, were identified as the precursor cells which become the scar-forming myofibroblasts. Kidney pericytes are extensively branched cells located in the wall of capillaries, embedded within the microvascular basement membrane, and incompletely envelope endothelial cells with which they establish focal contacts. In response to kidney injuries, pericytes detach from endothelial cells and migrate into the interstitial space where they undergo a transition into myofibroblasts. Detachment leads to fibrosis but also leaves an unstable endothelium, prone to rarefaction. Endothelial-pericyte crosstalk at the vascular endothelial growth factor receptors and platelet derived growth factor receptors in response to injury have been identified as major new targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:22551886

  16. Injury mechanism dictates contribution of bone marrow-derived cells to murine hepatic vascular regeneration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stem and progenitor cells derived from adult marrow have been shown to regenerate vascular cells in response to injury. However, it is unclear whether the type of injury dictates the contribution of such cells to neovascularization and which subpopulations of cells contribute to vascular regeneratio...

  17. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cell therapies for spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Lee-Kubli, Corinne A; Lu, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The greatest challenge to successful treatment of spinal cord injury is the limited regenerative capacity of the central nervous system and its inability to replace lost neurons and severed axons following injury. Neural stem cell grafts derived from fetal central nervous system tissue or embryonic stem cells have shown therapeutic promise by differentiation into neurons and glia that have the potential to form functional neuronal relays across injured spinal cord segments. However, implementation of fetal-derived or embryonic stem cell-derived neural stem cell therapies for patients with spinal cord injury raises ethical concerns. Induced pluripotent stem cells can be generated from adult somatic cells and differentiated into neural stem cells suitable for therapeutic use, thereby providing an ethical source of implantable cells that can be made in an autologous fashion to avoid problems of immune rejection. This review discusses the therapeutic potential of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cell transplantation for treatment of spinal cord injury, as well as addressing potential mechanisms, future perspectives and challenges. PMID:25788906

  18. Simple and sensitive method for monitoring drug-induced cell injury in cultured cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shirhatti, V.; Krishna, G.

    1985-06-01

    A simple, sensitive method has been developed for evaluating cell injury noninvasively in monolayer cells in culture. The cell ATP pool was radiolabeled by incubating the cells with (/sup 14/C)adenine. The uptake and incorporation of (/sup 14/C)adenine was shown to proportional to the number of cells. As determined by HPLC, about 65-70% of the incorporated /sup 14/C label was in the ATP pool, 15-20% was in the ADP pool, and the rest was in the 5'-AMP pool. When prelabeled cells were exposed to toxic drugs (acetaminophen, calcium ionophore A-23187, or daunomycin) there was a marked decrease in cell ATP with a concomitant increase in leakage of labeled nucleotides, mainly 5'-AMP and 5'IMP. The authors have shown that leakage of /sup 14/C label into the medium from the prelabeled cells may be employed for quantitation of cell injury. This new measure of toxicity was shown to correlate very well with LDH leakage from the cells, which is a well accepted measure of cell injury. The leakage of 5'-(/sup 14/C)AMP also correlated very well with the reduction of cell ATP in cardiac myocytes. This method has been used for monitoring drug-induced toxicity in liver cells, cardiac myocytes, and LB cells.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging and cell-based neurorestorative therapy after brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Restorative cell-based therapies for experimental brain injury, such as stroke and traumatic brain injury, substantially improve functional outcome. We discuss and review state of the art magnetic resonance imaging methodologies and their applications related to cell-based treatment after brain injury. We focus on the potential of magnetic resonance imaging technique and its associated challenges to obtain useful new information related to cell migration, distribution, and quantitation, as well as vascular and neuronal remodeling in response to cell-based therapy after brain injury. The noninvasive nature of imaging might more readily help with translation of cell-based therapy from the laboratory to the clinic. PMID:26981068

  20. iPS cell transplantation for traumatic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Goulão, Miguel; Lepore, Angelo C.

    2016-01-01

    A large body of work has been published on transplantation of a wide range of neural stem and progenitor cell types derived from the developing and adult CNS, as well as from pluripotent embryonic stem cells, in models of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). However, many of these cell-based approaches present practical issues for clinical translation such as ethical cell derivation, generation of potentially large numbers of homogenously prepared cells, and immune rejection. With the advent of induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS) cell technology, many of these issues may potentially be overcome. To date, a number of studies have demonstrated integration, differentiation into mature CNS lineages, migration and long-term safety of iPS cell transplants in a variety of SCI models, as well as therapeutic benefits in some cases. Given the clinical potential of this advance in stem cell biology, we present a concise review of studies published to date involving iPS cell transplantation in animal models of SCI. PMID:26201863

  1. Injury-associated reacquiring of intestinal stem cell function

    PubMed Central

    Sipos, Ferenc; Műzes, Györgyi

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial layer of the intestine relies upon stem cells for maintaining homeostasis and regeneration. Two types of stem cells are currently defined in intestinal crypts: the cycling crypt base columnar cells and quiescent cells. Though several candidate markers and regulators of rapidly cycling and quiescent stem cells have been identified so far, the exact nature of quiescent cells is still questionable since investigations mainly focused on candidate markers rather than the label-retaining population itself. Recent results, however, have strengthened the argument for functional plasticity. Using a lineage tracing strategy label-retaining cells (LRCs) of the intestinal epithelium were marked, then followed by a pulse-chase analysis it was found that during homeostasis, LRCs were Lgr5-positive and were destined to become Paneth and neuroendocrine cells. Nevertheless, it was demonstrated that LRCs are capable of clonogenic growth by recall to the self-renewing pool of stem cells in case of epithelial injury. These new findings highlight on the hierarchical and spatial organization of intestinal epithelial homeostasis and the important plasticity of progenitors during tissue regeneration, moreover, provide a motivation for studying their role in disorders like colorectal cancer. PMID:25717233

  2. Cell Transplantation for Spinal Cord Injury: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Lepski, Guilherme

    2013-01-01

    Cell transplantation, as a therapeutic intervention for spinal cord injury (SCI), has been extensively studied by researchers in recent years. A number of different kinds of stem cells, neural progenitors, and glial cells have been tested in basic research, and most have been excluded from clinical studies because of a variety of reasons, including safety and efficacy. The signaling pathways, protein interactions, cellular behavior, and the differentiated fates of experimental cells have been studied in vitro in detail. Furthermore, the survival, proliferation, differentiation, and effects on promoting functional recovery of transplanted cells have also been examined in different animal SCI models. However, despite significant progress, a “bench to bedside” gap still exists. In this paper, we comprehensively cover publications in the field from the last years. The most commonly utilized cell lineages were covered in this paper and specific areas covered include survival of grafted cells, axonal regeneration and remyelination, sensory and motor functional recovery, and electrophysiological improvements. Finally we also review the literature on the in vivo tracking techniques for transplanted cells. PMID:23484157

  3. Endothelial progenitor cells and burn injury - exploring the relationship.

    PubMed

    Banyard, Derek A; Adnani, Blake O; Melkumyan, Satenik; Araniego, Cheryl Ann; Widgerow, Alan D

    2016-01-01

    Burn wounds result in varying degrees of soft tissue damage that are typically graded clinically. Recently a key participant in neovascularization, the endothelial progenitor cell, has been the subject of intense cardiovascular research to explore whether it can serve as a biomarker for vascular injury. In this review, we examine the identity of the endothelial progenitor cell as well as the evidence that support its role as a key responder after burn insult. While there is conflicting evidence with regards to the delta of endothelial progenitor cell mobilization and burn severity, it is clear that they play an important role in wound healing. Systematic and controlled studies are needed to clarify this relationship, and whether this population can serve as a biomarker for burn severity. PMID:27574674

  4. Requirement of JNK1 for endothelial cell injury in atherogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Narges; Boyle, Joseph J.; Moers, Britta; Warboys, Christina M.; Malik, Talat H.; Zakkar, Mustafa; Francis, Sheila E.; Mason, Justin C.; Haskard, Dorian O.; Evans, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) family regulates fundamental physiological processes including apoptosis and metabolism. Although JNK2 is known to promote foam cell formation during atherosclerosis, the potential role of JNK1 is uncertain. We examined the potential influence of JNK1 and its negative regulator, MAP kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1), on endothelial cell (EC) injury and early lesion formation using hypercholesterolemic LDLR−/− mice. Methods and results To assess the function of JNK1 in early atherogenesis, we measured EC apoptosis and lesion formation in LDLR−/− or LDLR−/−/JNK1−/− mice exposed to a high fat diet for 6 weeks. En face staining using antibodies that recognise active, cleaved caspase-3 (apoptosis) or using Sudan IV (lipid deposition) revealed that genetic deletion of JNK1 reduced EC apoptosis and lesion formation in hypercholesterolemic mice. By contrast, although EC apoptosis was enhanced in LDLR−/−/MKP-1−/− mice compared to LDLR−/− mice, lesion formation was unaltered. Conclusion We conclude that JNK1 is required for EC apoptosis and lipid deposition during early atherogenesis. Thus pharmacological inhibitors of JNK may reduce atherosclerosis by preventing EC injury as well as by influencing foam cell formation. PMID:24956536

  5. Cell elimination as a strategy for repair in acute spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kalderon, Nurit

    2005-01-01

    Following injury, as part of the wound-healing process, cell proliferation occurs mostly to replace damaged cells and to reconstitute the tissue back to normal condition/function. In the spinal cord some of the dividing cells following injury interfere with the repair processes. This interference occurs at the later stages of wound healing (the third week after injury) triggering chronic inflammation and progressive tissue decay that is the characteristic pathology of spinal cord injury. Specific cell elimination within a critical time window after injury can lead to repair in the acutely injured spinal cord. Cell proliferation events can be manipulated/modified by x-irradiation. Clinically, numerous radiation protocols (i.e., radiation therapy) have been developed that specifically eliminate the rapidly dividing cells without causing any noticeable/significant damage to the tissue as a whole. Radiation therapy when applied within the critical time window after injury prevents the onset of chronic inflammation thus leading to repair of structure and function. Various aspects of the development of this cell-elimination strategy for repair in acute spinal cord injury by utilizing radiation therapy are being reviewed. Topics reviewed here: identifying the window of opportunity; and the beneficial repair effects of radiation therapy in a transection injury model and in a model relevant to human injury, the contusion injury model. The possible involvement of cellular components of the blood-spinal cord barrier as the trigger of chronic inflammation and/or target of the radiation therapy is discussed. PMID:15853680

  6. Metastatic mixed acinar-neuroendocrine carcinoma of the pancreas to the liver: a cytopathology case report with review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lili; Bajor-Dattilo, Ewa B; Das, Kasturi

    2013-02-01

    A case of metastatic mixed acinar-neuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC) of the pancreas to the liver is reported. A diagnostic percutaneous US-guided FNA and core biopsy of a liver nodule was performed. The FNA smears were cellular and showed neoplastic cells in clusters with acinar formation, isolated single cells, and scattered naked nuclei. The cytoplasm was finely granular. The nuclei were relatively uniform, some with speckled chromatin and prominent nucleoli. The immunohistochemistry performed on the cell block showed strong positivity for cytokeratin AE1/AE3, chromogranin, and synaptophysin. Furthermore, the tumor cells were weakly positive for α1-antichymotrypsin. The Ki-67 mitotic index was up to 50%. Based on the morphology and supporting immunohistochemical stains, the final cytopathologic diagnosis rendered was "Positive for malignant cells. Carcinoma with mixed acinar and endocrine features." To our knowledge, this is the first report of a metastatic MANEC to the liver diagnosed based on cytology with confirmatory histology. The difficulties in the cytopathologic diagnosis and differential diagnosis of MANEC are discussed in this article. PMID:22903971

  7. Mitofusin-2 protects against cold stress-induced cell injury in HEK293 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wenbin; Chen, Yaomin; Yang, Qun; Che, Honglei; Chen, Xiangjun; Yao, Ting; Zhao, Fang; Liu, Mingchao; Ke, Tao; Chen, Jingyuan; Luo, Wenjing

    2010-06-25

    Mitochondrial impairment is hypothesized to contribute to cell injury during cold stress. Mitochondria fission and fusion are closely related in the function of the mitochondria, but the precise mechanisms whereby these processes regulate cell injury during cold stress remain to be determined. HEK293 cells were cultured in a cold environment (4.0 {+-} 0.1 {sup o}C) for 2, 4, 8, or 12 h. Western blot analyses showed that these cells expressed decreased fission-related protein Drp1 and increased fusion-related protein Mfn2 at 4 h; meanwhile, electron microscopy analysis revealed large and long mitochondrial morphology within these cells, indicating increased mitochondrial fusion. With silencing of Mfn2 but not of Mfn1 by siRNA promoted cold-stress-induced cell death with decreased ATP production in HEK293 cells. Our results show that increased expression of Mfn2 and mitochondrial fusion are important for mitochondrial function as well as cell survival during cold stress. These findings have important implications for understanding the mechanisms of mitochondrial fusion and fission in cold-stress-induced cell injury.

  8. Cell-Type Specific Expression of Apc in Lung Development, Injury and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Li, Aimin; Xing, Yiming; Chan, Belinda; Heisterkamp, Nora; Groffen, John; Borok, Zea; Minoo, Parviz; Li, Changgong

    2010-01-01

    Adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) is critical for Wnt signaling and cell migration. The current study examined Apc expression during lung development, injury and repair. Apc was first detectable in smooth muscle layers in early lung morphogenesis, and was highly expressed in ciliated and neuroendocrine cells in the advanced stages. No Apc immunoreactivity was detected in Clara or basal cells, which function as stem/progenitor cell in adult lung. In ciliated cells, Apc is associated mainly with apical cytoplasmic domain. In response to naphthalene induced injury, Apcpositive cells underwent squamous metaplasia, accompanied by changes in Apc subcellular distribution. In conclusion, both spatial and temporal expression of Apc is dynamically regulated during lung development and injury repair. Differential expression of Apc in progenitor vs. non-progenitor cells suggests a functional role in cell type specification. Subcellular localization changes of Apc in response to naphthalene injury suggest a role in cell shape and cell migration. PMID:20658693

  9. Hepatic progenitor cells, stem cells, and AFP expression in models of liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Kuhlmann, Wolf D; Peschke, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Adult hepatocytes and liver-cell progenitors play a role in restoring liver tissue after injury. For the study of progenitor cells in liver repair, experimental models included (a) surgical removal of liver tissue by partial hepatectomy; (b) acute injury by carbontetrachloride; (c) acute injury by d-galactosamine (GalN) and N-nitrosomorpholine (NNM); and (d) chemical hepatocarcinogenesis by feeding NNM in low and high doses. Serological and immunohistological detection of alpha-fetoprotein gene expression served to follow pathways of cellular differentiation. Stem cells were not required in models of surgical removal of parenchyma and in carbon tetrachloride intoxication of adult hepatocytes. In contrast, regeneration of liver occurred through biliary epithelial cells in injuries induced by GalN and NNM. These biliary epithelial cells, collectively called oval cells, are most probably derived from the canals of Hering. Proliferating bile duct cells reached a level of differentiation with reactivation of foetal genes and significant alpha-1-fetoprotein (AFP) synthesis signalling a certain degree of retrodifferentiation with potential stemness. Due to the same embryonic origin of bile ducts and hepatocytes, biliary epithelium and its proliferating progeny (oval cells) have a defined role in liver regeneration as a transit and amplification compartment. In their early proliferation stage, oval cells were heavily engaged in DNA synthesis ([3H]thymidine labelling). Pulse-chase experiments during experimental hepatocarcinogenesis exhibited their development into hepatocytes with high risk for transformation and leading to foci of altered hepatocytes. Hepatocellular carcinomas may arise either from proliferating/differentiating oval cells or from adult hepatocytes; both cell types have stem-like properties. AFP-positive and AFP-negative carcinomas occurred in the same liver. They may represent random clonal origin. The heterogeneity of phenotypic marker (AFP) correlated

  10. Temporal patterns of cortical proliferation of glial cell populations after traumatic brain injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Susarla, Bala T.S.; Villapol, Sonia; Yi, Jae-Hyuk; Geller, Herbert M.; Symes, Aviva J.

    2014-01-01

    TBI (traumatic brain injury) triggers an inflammatory cascade, gliosis and cell proliferation following cell death in the pericontusional area and surrounding the site of injury. In order to better understand the proliferative response following CCI (controlled cortical impact) injury, we systematically analyzed the phenotype of dividing cells at several time points post-lesion. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to mild to moderate CCI over the left sensory motor cortex. At different time points following injury, mice were injected with BrdU (bromodeoxyuridine) four times at 3-h intervals and then killed. The greatest number of proliferating cells in the pericontusional region was detected at 3 dpi (days post-injury). At 1 dpi, NG2+ cells were the most proliferative population, and at 3 and 7 dpi the Iba-1+ microglial cells were proliferating more. A smaller, but significant number of GFAP+ (glial fibrillary acidic protein) astrocytes proliferated at all three time points. Interestingly, at 3 dpi we found a small number of proliferating neuroblasts [DCX+ (doublecortin)] in the injured cortex. To determine the cell fate of proliferative cells, mice were injected four times with BrdU at 3 dpi and killed at 28 dpi. Approximately 70% of proliferative cells observed at 28 dpi were GFAP+ astrocytes. In conclusion, our data suggest that the specific glial cell types respond differentially to injury, suggesting that each cell type responds to a specific pattern of growth factor stimulation at each time point after injury. PMID:24670035

  11. In delicate balance: stem cells and spinal cord injury advocacy.

    PubMed

    Parke, Sara; Illes, Judy

    2011-09-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a major focus for stem cell therapy (SCT). However, the science of SCT has not been well matched with an understanding of perspectives of persons with SCI. The online advocacy community is a key source of health information for primary stakeholders and their caregivers. In this study, we sought to characterize the content of SCI advocacy websites with respect to their discussion of SCT and stem cell tourism. We performed a comprehensive analysis of SCI advocacy websites identified through a web search and verified by expert opinion. Two independent researchers coded the information for major themes (e.g., scientific & clinical facts, research & funding, policy, ethics) and valence (positive, negative, balanced, neutral). Of the 40 SCI advocacy websites that met inclusion criteria, 50% (N=20) contained information about SCT. Less than 18% (N=7) contained information on stem cell tourism. There were more than ten times as many statements about SCT with a positive valence (N=67) as with a negative valence (N=6). Ethics-related SCT information comprised 20% (N=37) of the total content; the largest proportion of ethics-related content was devoted to stem cell tourism (80%, N=30 statements). Of those, the majority focused on the risks of stem cell tourism (N=16). Given the still-developing science behind SCT, the presence of cautionary information about stem cell tourism at advocacy sites is ethically appropriate. The absence of stem cell tourism information at the majority of advocacy sites represents a lost educational opportunity. PMID:21161442

  12. Postnatal Neural Stem Cells in Treating Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Gazalah, Hussein; Mantash, Sarah; Ramadan, Naify; Al Lafi, Sawsan; El Sitt, Sally; Darwish, Hala; Azari, Hassan; Fawaz, Lama; Ghanem, Noël; Zibara, Kazem; Boustany, Rose-Mary; Kobeissy, Firas; Soueid, Jihane

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the leading causes of death and disabilities worldwide. It affects approximately 1.5 million people each year and is associated with severe post-TBI symptoms such as sensory and motor deficits. Several neuro-therapeutic approaches ranging from cell therapy interventions such as the use of neural stem cells (NSCs) to drug-based therapies have been proposed for TBI management. Successful cell-based therapies are tightly dependent on reproducible preclinical animal models to ensure safety and optimal therapeutic benefits. In this chapter, we describe the isolation of NSCs from neonatal mouse brain using the neurosphere assay in culture. Subsequently, dissociated neurosphere-derived cells are used for transplantation into the ipsilateral cortex of a controlled cortical impact (CCI) TBI model in C57BL/6 mice. Following intra-cardiac perfusion and brain removal, the success of NSC transplantation is then evaluated using immunofluorescence in order to assess neurogenesis along with gliosis in the ipsilateral coronal brain sections. Behavioral tests including rotarod and pole climbing are conducted to evaluate the motor activity post-treatment intervention. PMID:27604746

  13. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Injury Induced by Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Lijian; Luo, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) as the result of nuclear accidents or terrorist attacks is a significant threat and a major medical concern. Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) injury is the primary cause of death after accidental or intentional exposure to a moderate or high dose of IR. Protecting HSCs from IR should be a primary goal in the development of novel medical countermeasures against radiation. Recent Advances: Significant progress has been made in our understanding of the mechanisms by which IR causes HSC damage. The mechanisms include (i) induction of HSC apoptosis via the p53-Puma pathway; (ii) promotion of HSC differentiation via the activation of the G-CSF/Stat3/BATF-dependent differentiation checkpoint; (iii) induction of HSC senescence via the ROS-p38 pathway; and (iv) damage to the HSC niche. Critical Issues: Induction of apoptosis in HSCs and hematopoietic progenitor cells is primarily responsible for IR-induced acute bone marrow (BM) injury. Long-term BM suppression caused by IR is mainly attributable to the induction of HSC senescence. However, the promotion of HSC differentiation and damage to the HSC niche can contribute to both the acute and long-term effects of IR on the hematopoietic system. Future Directions: In this review, we have summarized a number of recent findings that provide new insights into the mechanisms whereby IR damages HSCs. These findings will provide new opportunities for developing a mechanism-based strategy to prevent and/or mitigate IR-induced BM suppression. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1447–1462. PMID:24124731

  14. Epithelial cell apoptosis causes acute lung injury masquerading as emphysema.

    PubMed

    Mouded, Majd; Egea, Eduardo E; Brown, Matthew J; Hanlon, Shane M; Houghton, A McGarry; Tsai, Larry W; Ingenito, Edward P; Shapiro, Steven D

    2009-10-01

    Theories of emphysema traditionally revolved around proteolytic destruction of extracellular matrix. Models have recently been developed that show airspace enlargement with the induction of pulmonary cell apoptosis. The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanism by which a model of epithelial cell apoptosis caused airspace enlargement. Mice were treated with either intratracheal microcystin (MC) to induce apoptosis, intratracheal porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE), or their respective vehicles. Mice from all groups were inflated and morphometry was measured at various time points. Physiology measurements were performed for airway resistance, tissue elastance, and lung volumes. The groups were further analyzed by air-saline quasistatic measurements, surfactant staining, and surfactant functional studies. Mice treated with MC showed evidence of reversible airspace enlargement. In contrast, PPE-treated mice showed irreversible airspace enlargement. The airspace enlargement in MC-treated mice was associated with an increase in elastic recoil due to an increase in alveolar surface tension. PPE-treated mice showed a loss of lung elastic recoil and normal alveolar surface tension, a pattern more consistent with human emphysema. Airspace enlargement that occurs with the MC model of pulmonary epithelial cell apoptosis displays physiology distinct from human emphysema. Reversibility, restrictive physiology due to changes in surface tension, and alveolar enlargement associated with heterogeneous alveolar collapse are most consistent with a mild acute lung injury. Inflation near total lung capacity gives the appearance of enlarged alveoli as neighboring collapsed alveoli exert tethering forces. PMID:19188661

  15. Clonal tracing of Sox9+ liver progenitors in oval cell injury

    PubMed Central

    Tarlow, Branden D.; Finegold, Milton J.; Grompe, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Proliferating ducts, termed “oval cells”, have long thought to be bipotential, i.e. produce both biliary ducts and hepatocytes during chronic liver injury. The precursor to oval cells is considered to be a facultative liver stem cell (LSC). Recent lineage tracing experiments indicated that the LSC is Sox9+ and can replace the bulk of hepatocyte mass in several settings. However, no clonal relationship between Sox9+ cells and the two epithelial liver lineages was established. We labeled Sox9+ mouse liver cells at low density with a multicolor fluorescent confetti reporter. Organoid formation validated the progenitor activity of the labeled population. Sox9+ cells were traced in multiple oval cell injury models using both histology and FACS. Surprisingly, only rare clones containing both hepatocytes and oval cells were found in any experiment. Quantitative analysis showed that Sox9+ cells contributed only minimally (<1%) to the hepatocyte pool, even in classic oval cell injury models. In contrast, clonally marked mature hepatocytes demonstrated the ability to self-renew in all classic mouse oval cell activation injuries. A hepatocyte chimera model to trace hepatocytes and non-parenchymal cells also demonstrated the prevalence of hepatocyte-driven regeneration in mouse oval cell injury models. Conclusion Sox9+ ductal progenitor cells give rise to clonal oval cell proliferation and bipotential organoids but rarely produce hepatocytes in vivo. Hepatocytes themselves are the predominant source of new parenchyma cells in prototypical mouse models of oval cell activation. PMID:24700457

  16. Renal Impairment with Sublethal Tubular Cell Injury in a Chronic Liver Disease Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Tokiko; Kotani, Hirokazu; Miyao, Masashi; Kawai, Chihiro; Jemail, Leila; Abiru, Hitoshi; Tamaki, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of renal impairment in chronic liver diseases (CLDs) has been primarily studied in the advanced stages of hepatic injury. Meanwhile, the pathology of renal impairment in the early phase of CLDs is poorly understood, and animal models to elucidate its mechanisms are needed. Thus, we investigated whether an existing mouse model of CLD induced by 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC) shows renal impairment in the early phase. Renal injury markers, renal histology (including immunohistochemistry for tubular injury markers and transmission electron microscopy), autophagy, and oxidative stress were studied longitudinally in DDC- and standard diet–fed BALB/c mice. Slight but significant renal dysfunction was evident in DDC-fed mice from the early phase. Meanwhile, histological examinations of the kidneys with routine light microscopy did not show definitive morphological findings, and electron microscopic analyses were required to detect limited injuries such as loss of brush border microvilli and mitochondrial deformities. Limited injuries have been recently designated as sublethal tubular cell injury. As humans with renal impairment, either with or without CLD, often show almost normal tubules, sublethal injury has been of particular interest. In this study, the injuries were associated with mitochondrial aberrations and oxidative stress, a possible mechanism for sublethal injury. Intriguingly, two defense mechanisms were associated with this injury that prevent it from progressing to apparent cell death: autophagy and single-cell extrusion with regeneration. Furthermore, the renal impairment of this model progressed to chronic kidney disease with interstitial fibrosis after long-term DDC feeding. These findings indicated that DDC induces renal impairment with sublethal tubular cell injury from the early phase, leading to chronic kidney disease. Importantly, this CLD mouse model could be useful for studying the pathophysiological mechanisms

  17. Intravenous transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells promotes neural regeneration after traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Anbari, Fatemeh; Khalili, Mohammad Ali; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza; Khoradmehr, Arezoo; Sadeghian, Fatemeh; Fesahat, Farzaneh; Nabi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the supplement of lost nerve cells in rats with traumatic brain injury by intravenous administration of allogenic bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, this study established a Wistar rat model of traumatic brain injury by weight drop impact acceleration method and administered 3 × 106 rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells via the lateral tail vein. At 14 days after cell transplantation, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells differentiated into neurons and astrocytes in injured rat cerebral cortex and rat neurological function was improved significantly. These findings suggest that intravenously administered bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can promote nerve cell regeneration in injured cerebral cortex, which supplement the lost nerve cells. PMID:25206912

  18. Mebendazole Reduces Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Neointimal Formation Following Vascular Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jintao; Wang, Hui; Guo, Chiao; Luo, Wei; Lawler, Alyssa; Reddy, Aswin; Wang, Julia; Sun, Eddy B.; Eitzman, Daniel T.

    2014-01-01

    Mebendazole is an antihelminthic drug that exerts its effects via interference with microtubule function in parasites. To determine the utility of mebendazole as a potential treatment for vascular diseases involving proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells, the effects of mebendazole on vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation were tested in vitro and in a mouse model of arterial injury. In vitro, mebendazole inhibited proliferation and migration of murine vascular smooth muscle cells and this was associated with altered intracellular microtubule organization. To determine in vivo effects of mebendazole following vascular injury, femoral arterial wire injury was induced in wild-type mice treated with either mebendazole or placebo control. Compared with placebo-treated mice, mebendazole-treated mice formed less neointima at the site of injury. Mebendazole is effective at inhibiting vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration, and neointimal formation following arterial injury in mice. PMID:24587248

  19. Unsteady diffusional screening in 3D pulmonary acinar structures: from infancy to adulthood.

    PubMed

    Hofemeier, Philipp; Shachar-Berman, Lihi; Tenenbaum-Katan, Janna; Filoche, Marcel; Sznitman, Josué

    2016-07-26

    Diffusional screening in the lungs is a physical phenomenon where the specific topological arrangement of alveolated airways of the respiratory region leads to a depletion, or 'screening', of oxygen molecules with increasing acinar generation. Here, we revisit diffusional screening phenomena in anatomically-inspired pulmonary acinar models under realistic breathing maneuvers. By modelling 3D bifurcating alveolated airways capturing both convection and diffusion, unsteady oxygen transport is investigated under cyclic breathing motion. To evaluate screening characteristics in the developing lungs during growth, four representative stages of lung development were chosen (i.e. 3 months, 1 year and 9 months, 3 years and adulthood) that capture distinct morphological acinar changes spanning alveolarization phases to isotropic alveolar growth. Numerical simulations unveil the dramatic changes in O2 transport occurring during lung development, where young infants exhibit highest acinar efficiencies that rapidly converge with age to predictions at adulthood. With increased ventilatory effort, transient dynamics of oxygen transport is fundamentally altered compared to tidal breathing and emphasizes the augmented role of convection. Resolving the complex convective acinar flow patterns in 3D acinar trees allows for the first time a spatially-localized and time-resolved characterization of oxygen transport in the pulmonary acinus, from infancy to adulthood. PMID:26699945

  20. Impact of neural cell adhesion molecule deletion on regeneration after mouse spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Saini, Vedangana; Loers, Gabriele; Kaur, Gurcharan; Schachner, Melitta; Jakovcevski, Igor

    2016-07-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) plays important functional roles in development of the nervous system. We investigated the influence of a constitutive ablation of NCAM on the outcome of spinal cord injury. Transgenic mice lacking NCAM (NCAM-/-) were subjected to severe compression injury of the lower thoracic spinal cord using wild-type (NCAM+/+) littermates as controls. According to the single-frame motion analysis, the NCAM-/- mice showed reduced locomotor recovery in comparison to control mice at 3 and 6 weeks after injury, indicating an overall positive impact of NCAM on recovery after injury. Also the Basso Mouse Scale score was lower in NCAM-/- mice at 3 weeks after injury, whereas at 6 weeks after injury the difference between genotypes was not statistically significant. Worse locomotor function was associated with decreased monoaminergic and cholinergic innervation of the spinal cord caudal to the injury site and decreased axonal regrowth/sprouting at the site of injury. Astrocytic scar formation at the injury site, as assessed by immunohistology for glial fibrillary acidic protein at and around the lesion site was increased in NCAM-/- compared with NCAM+/+ mice. Migration of cultured monolayer astrocytes from NCAM-/- mice was reduced as assayed by scratch wounding. Numbers of Iba-1 immunopositive microglia were not different between genotypes. We conclude that constitutive NCAM deletion in young adult mice reduces recovery after spinal cord injury, validating the hypothesized beneficial role of this molecule in recovery after injury. PMID:27178448

  1. Novel S-MSPQC cell sensor for real time monitoring the injury of endothelial cell by LPS and assessing the drug effect on this injury.

    PubMed

    Tong, Feifei; Lian, Yan; He, Fengjiao

    2015-09-15

    A novel square Au microelectrode multi-channel series piezoelectric quartz crystal (S-MSPQC) cell sensor was constructed by square Au microelectrode in series connected with quartz crystal sensor in MSPQC. The experimental results showed square shape Au microelectrode was more sensitive than normally used interdigital microelectrode. New constructed S-MSPQC was successfully used for real time monitoring the injury of human umbilical vein endothelial cells which induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and assessing the drug effects of two anti-oxidative vitamins, VC and VE and their combination against this injury. The detection results showed that the low concentration of LPS may promote the proliferation of the HUVEC cells at first 12h, then it caused the cell apoptosis. The pretreatment of VC or VE on the cells for 12h before adding the LPS could partially reduced the injury of LPS on HUVEC cells. The sensor detection results were all consisted with the results detected by MTT assay and microscopy observation. The synergistic effect of the combination of VC-VE on LPS-induced cell injury was also observed by sensor. Compared with the traditional biological methods, the proposed method is sensitive, label-free, non-invasive, cheap, simple, and automatic. It provides a new automatic tool for cell monitor in the field of cell biology, cytobiology, and drug effects research. PMID:25889345

  2. Baicalin protects against thrombin induced cell injury in SH-SY5Y cells

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Xiao-Ning; Mu, Wei-Na; Liu, Yuan-Tao; Wang, Mei-Hong; Kong, Feng; Sun, Chao; Zhou, Qing-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Baicalin, an extract from the dried root of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, was shown to be neuroprotective. However, the precise mechanisms are incompletely known. In this study, we determined the effect of baicalin on thrombin induced cell injury in SH-SY5Y cells, and explored the possible mechanisms. SH-SY5Y cells was treated with thrombin alone or pre-treated with baicalin (5, 10, 20 μM) for 2 h followed by thrombin treatment. Cells without thrombin and baicalin treatment were used as controls. Cell viability was detected by MTT assay. Cell apoptosis was analyzed by flow cytometry. Real-time PCR was performed to determine the mRNA expression of protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1). Western blotting was conducted to determine the protein expression of PAR-1, Caspase-3 and NF-κB. Baicalin reduced cell death following thrombin treatment in a dose-dependent manner, with concomitant inhibition of NF-κB activation and suppression of PAR-1 expression. In addition, baicalin reduced Caspase-3 expression. The above findings indicated that baicalin prevents against cell injury after thrombin stimulation possibly through inhibition of PAR-1 expression and NF-κB activation. PMID:26823714

  3. Endothelial cells mitigate DNA damage and promote the regeneration of hematopoietic stem cells after radiation injury

    PubMed Central

    Zachman, Derek K.; Leon, Ronald P.; Das, Prerna; Goldman, Devorah C.; Hamlin, Kimberly L.; Guha, Chandan; Fleming, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are an essential component of the hematopoietic microenvironment, which maintains and regulates hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Although ECs can support the regeneration of otherwise lethally-irradiated HSCs, the mechanisms are not well understood. To further understand this phenomenon, we studied HSC regeneration from irradiated bone marrow using co-culture with human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). Co-culture with HAECs induced a 24-fold expansion of long-term HSCs (CD150+, lineagelo, Sca-1+, c-Kit+; CD150+LSK cells) in vitro. These cells gave rise to functional hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) with colony-forming activity, multilineage reconstitution and serial transplantation potential. Furthermore, HAECs significantly reduced DNA damage in irradiated LSK cells within 24 hours. Remarkably, we were able to delay the exposure of irradiated bone marrow to the regenerative, HAEC-derived signals for up to 48 hours and still rescue functional HSCs. G-CSF is the gold standard for promoting hematopoietic regeneration in vivo. However, when compared to HAECs, in vitro G-CSF treatment promoted lineage differentiation and regenerated 5-fold fewer CD150+LSK cells. Together, our results show that HAECs are powerful, direct mitigators of HSC injury and DNA damage. Identification of the HAEC-derived factors that rescue HSCs may lead to improved therapies for hematopoietic regeneration after radiation injury. PMID:23939266

  4. CD4(+)CD25(+) T Cells in primary malignant hypertension related kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hongdong; Luo, Yang; Liang, Yumei; Long, Xidai; Peng, Youming; Liu, Zhihua; Wen, Xiaojun; Jia, Meng; Tian, Ru; Bai, Chengli; Li, Cui; He, Fuliang; Lin, Qiushi; Wang, Xueyan; Dong, Xiaoqun

    2016-01-01

    CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells are critical for maintenance of immunologic self-tolerance. We measured the number of CD4(+)CD25(+) cells in the patients with primary malignant hypertension related kidney injury, to explore the molecular pathogenesis of this disease. We selected 30 patients with primary malignant hypertension related kidney injury and 30 healthy volunteers. Information on clinical characteristics and laboratory tests was obtained from each subject. The number of CD4(+)CD25(+) cells and glomerular injury were assessed by flow cytometry and histopathology, respectively. Both serum IL-2, IL-4, and IL-6 and endothelial cell markers were analyzed by ELISA. ADAMTS13 antibody was detected by Western blotting. CD4(+)CD25(+) cells were significantly reduced in patients with primary malignant hypertension related kidney injury compared to controls (P < 0.05). The number of CD4(+)CD25(+) cells was negatively related to blood urea nitrogen, serum uric acid, proteinuria, and supernatant IL-4; whereas positively associated with estimated glomerular filtration rate in patients. Gradually decreasing CD4(+)CD25(+) cells were also found as increasing renal injury. Additionally, patients exhibited increasing supernatant IL-4, serum IL-2 and IL-6, endothelial cell markers, and anti-ADAMTS13 antibody compared with controls (all P < 0.05). CD4(+)CD25(+) cells may play a key role in the pathogenesis of primary malignant hypertension related kidney injury. PMID:27278520

  5. CD4+CD25+ T Cells in primary malignant hypertension related kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hongdong; Luo, Yang; Liang, Yumei; Long, Xidai; Peng, Youming; Liu, Zhihua; Wen, Xiaojun; Jia, Meng; Tian, Ru; Bai, Chengli; Li, Cui; He, Fuliang; Lin, Qiushi; Wang, Xueyan; Dong, Xiaoqun

    2016-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ T cells are critical for maintenance of immunologic self-tolerance. We measured the number of CD4+CD25+ cells in the patients with primary malignant hypertension related kidney injury, to explore the molecular pathogenesis of this disease. We selected 30 patients with primary malignant hypertension related kidney injury and 30 healthy volunteers. Information on clinical characteristics and laboratory tests was obtained from each subject. The number of CD4+CD25+ cells and glomerular injury were assessed by flow cytometry and histopathology, respectively. Both serum IL-2, IL-4, and IL-6 and endothelial cell markers were analyzed by ELISA. ADAMTS13 antibody was detected by Western blotting. CD4+CD25+ cells were significantly reduced in patients with primary malignant hypertension related kidney injury compared to controls (P < 0.05). The number of CD4+CD25+ cells was negatively related to blood urea nitrogen, serum uric acid, proteinuria, and supernatant IL-4; whereas positively associated with estimated glomerular filtration rate in patients. Gradually decreasing CD4+CD25+ cells were also found as increasing renal injury. Additionally, patients exhibited increasing supernatant IL-4, serum IL-2 and IL-6, endothelial cell markers, and anti-ADAMTS13 antibody compared with controls (all P < 0.05). CD4+CD25+ cells may play a key role in the pathogenesis of primary malignant hypertension related kidney injury. PMID:27278520

  6. Bridging long gap peripheral nerve injury using skeletal muscle-derived multipotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Tetsuro

    2014-07-15

    Long gap peripheral nerve injuries usually reulting in life-changing problems for patients. Skeletal muscle derived-multipotent stem cells (Sk-MSCs) can differentiate into Schwann and perineurial/endoneurial cells, vascular relating pericytes, and endothelial and smooth muscle cells in the damaged peripheral nerve niche. Application of the Sk-MSCs in the bridging conduit for repairing long nerve gap injury resulted favorable axonal regeneration, which showing superior effects than gold standard therapy--healthy nerve autograft. This means that it does not need to sacrifice of healthy nerves or loss of related functions for repairing peripheral nerve injury. PMID:25221587

  7. Injury induces direct lineage segregation of functionally distinct airway basal stem/progenitor cell subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Pardo-Saganta, Ana; Law, Brandon M; Tata, Purushothama Rao; Villoria, Jorge; Saez, Borja; Mou, Hongmei; Zhao, Rui; Rajagopal, Jayaraj

    2015-02-01

    Following injury, stem cells restore normal tissue architecture by producing the proper number and proportions of differentiated cells. Current models of airway epithelial regeneration propose that distinct cytokeratin 8-expressing progenitor cells, arising from p63(+) basal stem cells, subsequently differentiate into secretory and ciliated cell lineages. We now show that immediately following injury, discrete subpopulations of p63(+) airway basal stem/progenitor cells themselves express Notch pathway components associated with either secretory or ciliated cell fate commitment. One basal cell population displays intracellular Notch2 activation and directly generates secretory cells; the other expresses c-myb and directly yields ciliated cells. Furthermore, disrupting Notch ligand activity within the basal cell population at large disrupts the normal pattern of lineage segregation. These non-cell-autonomous effects demonstrate that effective airway epithelial regeneration requires intercellular communication within the broader basal stem/progenitor cell population. These findings have broad implications for understanding epithelial regeneration and stem cell heterogeneity. PMID:25658372

  8. Propofol Attenuates Small Intestinal Ischemia Reperfusion Injury through Inhibiting NADPH Oxidase Mediated Mast Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Xiaoliang; Xing, Dandan; Su, Guangjie; Li, Shun; Luo, Chenfang; Irwin, Michael G.; Xia, Zhengyuan; Li, Haobo; Hei, Ziqing

    2015-01-01

    Both oxidative stress and mast cell (MC) degranulation participate in the process of small intestinal ischemia reperfusion (IIR) injury, and oxidative stress induces MC degranulation. Propofol, an anesthetic with antioxidant property, can attenuate IIR injury. We postulated that propofol can protect against IIR injury by inhibiting oxidative stress subsequent from NADPH oxidase mediated MC activation. Cultured RBL-2H3 cells were pretreated with antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) or propofol and subjected to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) stimulation without or with MC degranulator compound 48/80 (CP). H2O2 significantly increased cells degranulation, which was abolished by NAC or propofol. MC degranulation by CP further aggravated H2O2 induced cell degranulation of small intestinal epithelial cell, IEC-6 cells, stimulated by tryptase. Rats subjected to IIR showed significant increases in cellular injury and elevations of NADPH oxidase subunits p47phox and gp91phox protein expression, increases of the specific lipid peroxidation product 15-F2t-Isoprostane and interleukin-6, and reductions in superoxide dismutase activity with concomitant enhancements in tryptase and β-hexosaminidase. MC degranulation by CP further aggravated IIR injury. And all these changes were attenuated by NAC or propofol pretreatment, which also abrogated CP-mediated exacerbation of IIR injury. It is concluded that pretreatment of propofol confers protection against IIR injury by suppressing NADPH oxidase mediated MC activation. PMID:26246867

  9. Inflammation and Inflammatory Cells in Myocardial Infarction and Reperfusion Injury: A Double-Edged Sword

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiaqi; Wang, Haijuan; Li, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is the most common cause of cardiac injury, and subsequent reperfusion further enhances the activation of innate and adaptive immune responses and cell death programs. Therefore, inflammation and inflammatory cell infiltration are the hallmarks of MI and reperfusion injury. Ischemic cardiac injury activates the innate immune response via toll-like receptors and upregulates chemokine and cytokine expressions in the infarcted heart. The recruitment of inflammatory cells is a dynamic and superbly orchestrated process. Sequential infiltration of the injured myocardium with neutrophils, monocytes and their descendant macrophages, dendritic cells, and lymphocytes contributes to the initiation and resolution of inflammation, infarct healing, angiogenesis, and ventricular remodeling. Both detrimental effects and a beneficial role in the pathophysiology of MI and reperfusion injury may be attributed to the subset heterogeneity and functional diversity of these inflammatory cells. PMID:27279755

  10. Transplantation of Neural Stem Cells Cultured in Alginate Scaffold for Spinal Cord Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sharafkhah, Ali; Koohi-Hosseinabadi, Omid; Semsar-Kazerooni, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Study Design This study investigated the effects of transplantation of alginate encapsulated neural stem cells (NSCs) on spinal cord injury in Sprague-Dawley male rats. The neurological functions were assessed for 6 weeks after transplantation along with a histological study and measurement of caspase-3 levels. Purpose The aim of this study was to discover whether NSCs cultured in alginate transplantation improve recovery from spinal cord injury. Overview of Literature Spinal cord injury is one of the leading causes of disability and it has no effective treatment. Spinal cord injury can also cause sensory impairment. With an impetus on using stem cells therapy in various central nervous system settings, there is an interest in using stem cells for addressing spinal cord injury. Neural stem cell is one type of stem cells that is able to differentiate to all three neural lineages and it shows promise in spinal injury treatment. Furthermore, a number of studies have shown that culturing NSCs in three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds like alginate could enhance neural differentiation. Methods The NSCs were isolated from 14-day-old rat embryos. The isolated NSCs were cultured in growth media containing basic fibroblast growth factor and endothelial growth factor. The cells were characterized by differentiating to three neural lineages and they were cultured in an alginate scaffold. After 7 days the cells were encapsulated and transplanted in a rat model of spinal cord injury. Results Our data showed that culturing in an alginate 3D scaffold and transplantation of the NSCs could improve neurological outcome in a rat model of spinal cord injury. The inflammation scores and lesion sizes and also the activity of caspase-3 (for apoptosis evaluation) were less in encapsulated neural stem cell transplantation cases. Conclusions Transplantation of NSCs that were cultured in an alginate scaffold led to a better clinical and histological outcome for recovery from spinal cord injury in

  11. Transplantation of ocular stem cells: the role of injury in incorporation and differentiation of grafted cells in the retina.

    PubMed

    Chacko, David M; Das, Ani V; Zhao, Xing; James, Jackson; Bhattacharya, Sumitra; Ahmad, Iqbal

    2003-04-01

    The incorporation of transplanted cells into the host retina is one of the prerequisites for successful cell replacement therapy to treat retinal degeneration. To test the hypothesis that injury promotes cell incorporation, stem cells/progenitors were isolated from the retina, ciliary epithelium or limbal epithelium and transplanted into the eyes of rats with retinal injury. Different stem cell/progenitor populations incorporated into traumatized or diseased retina but not into the normal retina. The proportion of cells incorporated into the inner retina was consistently higher than in the outer retina. The transplanted cells expressed markers specific to cells of the lamina into which they were incorporated suggesting that cues for specific differentiation are localized within the inner and outer retina. These findings demonstrate that injury-induced cues play a significant role in promoting the incorporation of ocular stem cells/progenitors regardless of their origin or their differentiation along specific retinal sublineage. PMID:12668063

  12. Edaravone combined with Schwann cell transplantation may repair spinal cord injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shu-quan; Wu, Min-fei; Piao, Zhe; Yao, Jin; Li, Ji-hai; Wang, Xin-gang; Liu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Edaravone has been shown to delay neuronal apoptosis, thereby improving nerve function and the microenvironment after spinal cord injury. Edaravone can provide a favorable environment for the treatment of spinal cord injury using Schwann cell transplantation. This study used rat models of complete spinal cord transection at T9. Six hours later, Schwann cells were transplanted in the head and tail ends of the injury site. Simultaneously, edaravone was injected through the caudal vein. Eight weeks later, the PKH-26-labeled Schwann cells had survived and migrated to the center of the spinal cord injury region in rats after combined treatment with edaravone and Schwann cells. Moreover, the number of PKH-26-labeled Schwann cells in the rat spinal cord was more than that in rats undergoing Schwann cell transplantation alone or rats without any treatment. Horseradish peroxidase retrograde tracing revealed that the number of horseradish peroxidase-positive nerve fibers was greater in rats treated with edaravone combined withSchwann cells than in rats with Schwann cell transplantation alone. The results demonstrated that lower extremity motor function and neurophysiological function were better in rats treated with edaravone and Schwann cells than in rats with Schwann cell transplantation only. These data confirmed that Schwann cell transplantation combined with edaravone injection promoted the regeneration of nerve fibers of rats with spinal cord injury and improved neurological function. PMID:25883621

  13. Mast Cells Mediate Acute Kidney Injury through the Production of TNF

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Shaun A.; Chan, Jacky; Gan, Poh-Yi; Dewage, Lakshi; Nozaki, Yuji; Steinmetz, Oliver M.; Nikolic-Paterson, David J.; Kitching, A. Richard

    2011-01-01

    Leukocyte recruitment contributes to acute kidney injury (AKI), but the mechanisms by which leukocytes promote injury are not completely understood. The degranulation of mast cells releases inflammatory molecules, including TNF, but whether these cells participate in the pathogenesis of AKI is unknown. Here, we induced AKI with cisplatin in mast cell-deficient and wild-type mice. Compared with wild-type mice, deficiency of mast cells attenuated renal injury, reduced serum levels of TNF, and reduced recruitment of leukocytes to the inflamed kidney. Mast cell-deficient mice also exhibited significantly lower intrarenal expression of leukocyte chemoattractants. Mast cell-deficient mice reconstituted with mast cells from wild-type mice exhibited similar cisplastin-induced renal damage and serum levels of TNF as wild-type mice. In contrast, mast cell-deficient mice reconstituted with mast cells from TNF-deficient mice continued to demonstrate significant attenuation of cisplatin-induced renal injury. Furthermore, the mast-cell stabilizer sodium chromoglycate also significantly abrogated renal injury in this model of AKI. Taken together, these results suggest that mast cells mediate AKI through the production of TNF. PMID:22021718

  14. The Influence of Copper (Cu) Deficiency in a Cardiomyocyte Cell Model (HL-1 Cell) of Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mitochondria are important mediators of cell death and this study examines whether mitochondrial dysfunction caused by Cu deprivation promotes cell death in a cell culture model for ischemia/reperfusion injury in cardiomyocytes. HL-1 cells (kindly donated by Dr. William C. Claycomb, LSU Health Scien...

  15. Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Cells Improve Muscle Function in a Skeletal Muscle Re-Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Karla C.; Porto, Anderson; Peçanha, Ramon; Fortes, Fabio S. A.; Zapata-Sudo, Gisele; Campos-de-Carvalho, Antonio C.; Goldenberg, Regina C. S.; Werneck-de-Castro, João Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle injury is the most common problem in orthopedic and sports medicine, and severe injury leads to fibrosis and muscle dysfunction. Conventional treatment for successive muscle injury is currently controversial, although new therapies, like cell therapy, seem to be promise. We developed a model of successive injuries in rat to evaluate the therapeutic potential of bone marrow mesenchymal cells (BMMC) injected directly into the injured muscle. Functional and histological assays were performed 14 and 28 days after the injury protocol by isometric tension recording and picrosirius/Hematoxilin & Eosin staining, respectively. We also evaluated the presence and the fate of BMMC on treated muscles; and muscle fiber regeneration. BMMC treatment increased maximal skeletal muscle contraction 14 and 28 days after muscle injury compared to non-treated group (4.5 ± 1.7 vs 2.5 ± 0.98 N/cm2, p<0.05 and 8.4 ± 2.3 vs. 5.7 ± 1.3 N/cm2, p<0.05 respectively). Furthermore, BMMC treatment increased muscle fiber cross-sectional area and the presence of mature muscle fiber 28 days after muscle injury. However, there was no difference in collagen deposition between groups. Immunoassays for cytoskeleton markers of skeletal and smooth muscle cells revealed an apparent integration of the BMMC within the muscle. These data suggest that BMMC transplantation accelerates and improves muscle function recovery in our extensive muscle re-injury model. PMID:26039243

  16. Studies on Freezing Injury in Plant Cells 12

    PubMed Central

    Uemura, Matsuo; Yoshida, Shizuo

    1986-01-01

    Plasma membranes were isolated from both unfrozen and frozen tissues of Jerusalem artichoke tubers (Helianthus tuberosus L.) in high purity utilizing an aqueous two-polymer phase partition system. Although the recovery of the plasma membranes was decreased significantly by freezing of tissues even at the nonlethal temperature (−5°C), the isolated plasma membrane samples were considered to be representative of the plasma membranes in situ. Freezing of the tissues at sublethal temperatures resulted in marked changes in the chemical composition of the plasma membrane. Those are losses of sterols and phosphatidylethanolamine from the plasma membranes, and a change of specific proteins with relatively high molecular weights into low molecular weight peptides. These specific proteins were designated as frost susceptible proteins. The properties of the plasma membrane ATPase seem to be not affected so much by the in vivo freezing of cells. However, inhibition of the plasma membrane ATPase by N,N′-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD) was relatively low before and after freezing in vivo at the nonlethal temperature at −5°C, but was markedly enhanced by freezing in vivo at sublethal temperatures below −10°C. From the results, it is assumed either that the enzyme molecule was partially modified, especially at the presumed DCCD binding sites or that the DCCD had become more accessible to the enzyme as a result of increased permeability of the plasma membranes. These observed changes are discussed in connection with the mechanism of cell injury. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:16664579

  17. Tranexamic Acid and Hyaluronate/Carboxymethylcellulose Create Cell Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz, Bayram; Dilbaz, Serdar; Üstün, Yusuf; Kumru, Selahattin

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Postoperative pelvic adhesions are associated with chronic pelvic pain, dyspareunia, and infertility. The aim of this study was to evaluate the adhesion prevention effects of tranexamic acid (TA) and hyaluronate/carboxymethylcellulose (HA/CMC) barrier in the rat uterine horn models on the basis of macroscopic and microscopic adhesion scores and histopathological as well as biochemical parameters of inflammation. Methods: Twenty-one Wistar rats were randomly divided into 3 groups. Ten lesions were created on the antimesenteric surface of both uterine horns by bipolar cautery. Three milliliters of 0.9% sodium chloride solution were administered in the control group. A single layer of 2 × 2 cm HA/CMC was plated in group 2. Two milliliters of TA was applied in the last group. All rats were sacrificed at postoperative day 21. Results: No significant difference was found among the control group, the HA/CMC group, and the TA group in terms of macro-adhesion score (P = .206) and microadhesion score (P = .056). No significant difference was found among the 3 groups in terms of inflammation score (P = .815) and inflammatory cell activity (P = .835). Malondialdehyde levels were significantly lower in the control group than in the TA group and HA/CMC group (P = .028). Superoxide dismutase and glutathione S-transferase activities were found to be higher in the control group than in the TA group (P = .005) and HA/CMC group (P = .009). Conclusions: TA and HA/CMC had no efficacy in preventing macroscopic or microscopic adhesion formation and decreasing inflammatory cell activity or inflammation score in our rat models. TA and HA/CMC increased the levels of free radicals and reduced the activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione S-transferase enzymes, which act to reduce tissue injury. PMID:25392658

  18. Urinary Elafin and Kidney Injury in Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Laura S.; Pao, Emily; Lawler, Rick; Schoch, Gary; McDonald, George B.; Najafian, Behzad; Sandmaier, Brenda; Gooley, Ted

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is associated with kidney injury after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Because plasma elafin levels correlate with skin GVHD, this study examined urinary elafin as a potential marker of renal inflammation and injury. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Urine was collected prospectively on 205 patients undergoing their first HCT from 2003 to 2010. Collections were done at baseline, weekly through day 100, and monthly through year 1 to measure elafin and urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR). Associations between urinary elafin levels and microalbuminuria, macroalbuminuria, AKI and CKD, and mortality were examined using Cox proportional hazards or linear regression models. Available kidney biopsy specimens were processed for immunohistochemistry. Results Mean urinary elafin levels to day 100 were higher in patients with micro- or macroalbuminuria (adjusted mean difference, 529 pg/ml; P=0.03) at day 100 than in those with a normal ACR (adjusted mean difference, 1295 pg/ml; P<0.001). Mean urinary elafin levels were higher in patients with AKI compared with patients without AKI (adjusted mean difference, 558 pg/ml; P<0.01). The average urinary elafin levels within the first 100 days after HCT were higher in patients who developed CKD at 1 year than in patients without CKD (adjusted mean difference, 894 pg/ml; P=0.002). Among allogeneic recipients, a higher proportion of patients with micro- or macroalbuminuria at day 100 also had grade II-IV acute GVHD (80% and 86%, respectively) compared with patients with a normal ACR (58%; global P<0.01). Each increase in elafin of 500 pg/ml resulted in a 10% increase in risk of persistent macroalbuminuria (hazard ratio, 1.10; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.06 to 1.13; P<0.001) and a 7% increase in the risk of overall mortality (95% CI, 1.02 to 1.13, P<0.01). Renal biopsy specimens from a separate cohort of HCT survivors demonstrated elafin staining

  19. Macrophage polarization in nerve injury: do Schwann cells play a role?

    PubMed Central

    Stratton, Jo Anne; Shah, Prajay T.

    2016-01-01

    In response to peripheral nerve injury, the inflammatory response is almost entirely comprised of infiltrating macrophages. Macrophages are a highly plastic, heterogenic immune cell, playing an indispensable role in peripheral nerve injury, clearing debris and regulating the microenvironment to allow for efficient regeneration. There are several cells within the microenvironment that likely interact with macrophages to support their function – most notably the Schwann cell, the glial cell of the peripheral nervous system. Schwann cells express several ligands that are known to interact with receptors expressed by macrophages, yet the effects of Schwann cells in regulating macrophage phenotype remains largely unexplored. This review discusses macrophages in peripheral nerve injury and how Schwann cells may regulate their behavior. PMID:26981078

  20. Chronic alcohol exposure exacerbates inflammation and triggers pancreatic acinar-to-ductal metaplasia through PI3K/Akt/IKK

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, XIN; LI, XUQI; MA, QINGYONG; XU, QINHONG; DUAN, WANXING; LEI, JIANJUN; ZHANG, LUN; WU, ZHENG

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM) has been identified as an initiating event that can progress to pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) or pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Acini transdifferentiation can be induced by persistent inflammation. Notably, compelling evidence has emerged that chronic alcohol exposure may trigger an inflammatory response of macrophages/monocytes stimulated by endotoxins. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the role of inflammation induced by chronic alcohol and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure in the progression of pancreatic ADM, as well as to elucidate the possible mechanisms involved. For this purpose, cultured macrophages were exposed to varying doses of alcohol for 1 week prior to stimulation with LPS. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and regulated upon activation, normal T cell expression and secreted (RANTES) expression were upregulated in the intoxicated macrophages with activated nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). Following treatment with the supernatant of intoxicated macrophages, ADM of primary acinar cells was induced. Furthermore, the expression of TNF-α and RANTES, as well as the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B(Akt)/inhibitory κB kinase (IKK) signaling pathway have been proven to be involved in the ADM of acinar cells. Moreover, Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were employed to further explore the induction of pancreatic ADM by chronic alcohol and LPS exposure in vivo. At the end of the treatment period, a number of physiological parameters, such as body weight, liver weight and pancreatic weight were reduced in the exposed rats. Plasma alcohol concentrations and oxidative stress levels in the serum, as well as TNF-α and RANTES expression in monocytes were also induced following chronic alcohol and LPS exposure. In addition, pancreatic ADM was induced through the PI3K/Akt/IKK signaling pathway by the augmented TNF-α and RANTES expression levels in the exposed rats. Overall, we

  1. Mixed acinar-neuroendocrine-ductal carcinoma of the pancreas: a tale of three lineages.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Mark J; Kwong, Christina A; Atieh, Mohammed; Pappas, Sam G

    2016-01-01

    Most pancreatic cancers arise from a single cell type, although mixed pancreatic carcinomas represent a rare exception. The rarity of these aggressive malignancies and the limitations of fine-needle aspiration (FNA) pose significant barriers to diagnosis and appropriate management. We report a case of a 54-year-old man presenting with abdominal pain, jaundice and a hypodense lesion within the uncinate process on CT. FNA suggested poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma, which was subsequently resected via pancreaticoduodenectomy. Pathological analysis yielded diagnosis of invasive mixed acinar-neuroendocrine-ductal pancreatic carcinoma. Given the rare and deadly nature of these tumours, clinicians must be aware of their pathophysiology and do practice with a high degree of clinical suspicion, when appropriate. Surgical resection and thorough pathological analysis with immunohistochemical staining and electron microscopy remain the standards of care for mixed pancreatic tumours without gross evidence of metastasis. Diligent characterisation of the presentation and histological findings associated with these neoplasms should continue in order to promote optimal diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. PMID:27257019

  2. In vitro evidence that phosphatidylcholine protects against indomethacin/bile acid-induced injury to cells

    PubMed Central

    Dial, Elizabeth J.; Dawson, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Indomethacin is a powerful analgesic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), but is limited in use by its primary side effect to cause gastrointestinal bleeding and serious injury. One factor important for exacerbating NSAID injury is the presence of bile acids, which may interact with indomethacin to form toxic mixed micelles in the gut. The development of a safer gastrointestinal formulation of indomethacin that is chemically complexed with phosphatidylcholine (PC-indomethacin) may offer an improved therapeutic agent, particularly in the presence of bile acid, but its potential protective mechanism is incompletely understood. Intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6) were tested for injury with indomethacin (alone and plus various bile acids) compared with PC-indomethacin (alone and plus bile acids). To explore a role for bile acid uptake into cells as a requirement for NSAID injury, studies were performed using Madin-Darby canine kidney cells transfected with the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT). Indomethacin, but not PC-indomethacin, was directly and dose-dependently injurious to IEC-6 cells. Similarly, the combination of any bile acid plus indomethacin, but not PC-indomethacin, induced cell injury. The expression of ASBT had a modest effect on the acute cytotoxicity of indomethacin in the presence of some conjugated bile acids. Complexing PC with indomethacin protected against the acute intestinal epithelial injury caused by indomethacin regardless of the presence of bile acids. The presence of luminal bile acid, but not its carrier-mediated uptake into the enterocyte, is required for acute indomethacin-induced cell injury. It is likely that initial cell damage induced by indomethacin occurs at or near the cell membrane, an effect exacerbated by bile acids and attenuated by PC. PMID:25477376

  3. Mononuclear Phagocyte-Derived Microparticulate Caspase-1 Induces Pulmonary Vascular Endothelial Cell Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Srabani

    2015-01-01

    Lung endothelial cell apoptosis and injury occurs throughout all stages of acute lung injury (ALI/ARDS) and impacts disease progression. Lung endothelial injury has traditionally been focused on the role of neutrophil trafficking to lung vascular integrin receptors induced by proinflammatory cytokine expression. Although much is known about the pathogenesis of cell injury and death in ALI/ARDS, gaps remain in our knowledge; as a result of which there is currently no effective pharmacologic therapy. Enzymes known as caspases are essential for completion of the apoptotic program and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. We hypothesized that caspase-1 may serve as a key regulator of human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell (HPMVEC) apoptosis in ALI/ARDS. Our recent experiments confirm that microparticles released from stimulated monocytic cells (THP1) induce lung endothelial cell apoptosis. Microparticles pretreated with the caspase-1 inhibitor, YVAD, or pan-caspase inhibitor, ZVAD, were unable to induce cell death of HPMVEC, suggesting the role of caspase-1 or its substrate in the induction of HPMVEC cell death. Neither un-induced microparticles (control) nor direct treatment with LPS induced apoptosis of HPMVEC. Further experiments showed that caspase-1 uptake into HPMVEC and the induction of HPMVEC apoptosis was facilitated by caspase-1 interactions with microparticulate vesicles. Altering vesicle integrity completely abrogated apoptosis of HPMVEC suggesting an encapsulation requirement for target cell uptake of active caspase-1. Taken together, we confirm that microparticle centered caspase-1 can play a regulator role in endothelial cell injury. PMID:26710067

  4. Differential Activation of Infiltrating Monocyte-Derived Cells After Mild and Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Trahanas, Diane M; Cuda, Carla M; Perlman, Harris; Schwulst, Steven J

    2015-03-01

    Microglia are the resident innate immune cells of the brain. Although embryologically and functionally distinct, they are morphologically similar to peripheral monocyte-derived cells, resulting in a poor ability to discriminate between the two cell types. The purpose of this study was to develop a rapid and reliable method to simultaneously characterize, quantify, and discriminate between whole populations of myeloid cells from the brain in a murine model of traumatic brain injury. Male C57BL/6 mice underwent traumatic brain injury (n = 16) or sham injury (n = 14). Brains were harvested at 24 h after injury. Multiparameter flow cytometry and sequential gating analysis were performed, allowing for discrimination between microglia and infiltrating leukocytes as well as for the characterization and quantification of individual subtypes within the infiltrating population. The proportion of infiltrating leukocytes within the brain increased with the severity of injury, and the predominant cell types within the infiltrating population were monocyte derived (P = 0.01). In addition, the severity of injury altered the overall makeup of the infiltrating monocyte-derived cells. In conclusion, we describe a flow cytometry-based technique for gross discrimination between infiltrating leukocytes and microglia as well as the ability to simultaneously characterize and quantify individual myeloid subtypes and their maturation states within these populations. PMID:26091024

  5. A population of Pax7-expressing muscle progenitor cells show differential responses to muscle injury dependent on developmental stage and injury extent

    PubMed Central

    Knappe, Stefanie; Zammit, Peter S.; Knight, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle regeneration in vertebrates occurs by the activation of quiescent progenitor cells that express pax7 to repair and replace damaged myofibers. We have developed a mechanical injury paradigm in zebrafish to determine whether developmental stage and injury size affect the regeneration dynamics of skeletal muscle. We found that both small focal injuries, and large injuries affecting the entire myotome, lead to expression of myf5 and myogenin, which was prolonged in older larvae, indicating a slower process of regeneration. We characterized the endogenous behavior of a population of muscle-resident Pax7-expressing cells using a pax7a:eGFP transgenic line and found that GFP+ cell migration in the myotome dramatically declined between 5 and 7 days post-fertilization (dpf). Following a small single myotome injury, GFP+ cells responded by extending processes, before migrating to the injured myofibers. Furthermore, these cells responded more rapidly to injury in 4 dpf larvae compared to 7 dpf. Interestingly, we did not see GFP+ myofibers after repair of small injuries, indicating that pax7a-expressing cells did not contribute to myofiber formation in this injury context. On the contrary, numerous GFP+ myofibers could be observed after an extensive single myotome injury. Both injury models were accompanied by an increased number of proliferating GFP+ cells, which was more pronounced in larvae injured at 4 dpf than 7 dpf. This indicates intriguing developmental differences, at these early ages. Our data also suggests an interesting disparity in the role that pax7a-expressing muscle progenitor cells play during skeletal muscle regeneration, which may reflect the extent of muscle damage. PMID:26379543

  6. Cell injury releases endogenous adjuvants that stimulate cytotoxic T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yan; Zheng, Wanyong; Rock, Kenneth L.

    2000-01-01

    General immunostimulants (adjuvants) are essential for generating immunity to many antigens. In bacterial infections, adjuvants are provided by components of the microorganism, e.g., lipopolysaccharide. However, it is unclear what provides the adjuvant effect for immune responses that are generated to tumors and many viruses. Here we show that cell injury and death of tumor or even normal cells provide a potent adjuvant effect for the stimulation of cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses. This adjuvant activity is constitutively present in the cytoplasm of cells and is increased in the cytoplasm of cells dying by apoptosis. The release of these components stimulates immune responses both locally and at a distance, and provides a simple mechanism to alert the immune system to potential danger in almost all pathological situations. PMID:11106387

  7. Changes in phagocytosis and expression of microglial cells in craniocerebral injury mice models.

    PubMed

    Guo, F Y; Liu, T; Chen, J J; Gao, W; Yang, F; Zhou, X Y; Liao, Y L

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the changes in phagocytic function and expression quantities of CD11b and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) among microglia cells of craniocerebral injury mice. Modified Feeney method was used to establish the craniocerebral injury mice models. Twenty-one male SPF mice were divided into a control group and a trauma group. The scalp was incised and a bone window was opened in the control group without cerebral injury. In the trauma group, the mice were sacrificed after the craniocerebral injury at 1, 3, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h to make frozen sections of cerebral tissues. The phagocytic rate of microglia cells was observed by using fluorescent microsphere. The changes in the expression quantities of CD11b and TNF-α were detected by enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA). The phagocytic ability of the microglia cells after the craniocerebral injury increased at 1 h after injury compared with that of the control group (P less than 0.01). The expression of surface antigen CD11b of the microglia cells and the expression of TNF-α increased at 1, 3, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h after the injury compared with those of the control group (P less than 0.01). The phagocytic ability of the microglia cells increased. The expressions of CD11b and TNF-α were also gradually enhanced in the acute phase after craniocerebral injury, and then gradually decreased to the normal level. The expressions of CD11b and TNF-α indicated a high consistency with the changing trend of the phagocytic ability, suggesting that the microglia cells may participate in the regulation of the inflammatory process of the central nervous system through absorbing apoptotic cells and increasing and secreting inflammatory and anti-inflammatory factors. PMID:27358141

  8. Magnesium sulfate protects oligodendrocyte lineage cells in a rat cell-culture model of hypoxic-ischemic injury.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Kanako; Maki, Takakuni; Shindo, Akihiro; Egawa, Naohiro; Liang, Anna C; Itoh, Naoki; Lo, Eng H; Lok, Josephine; Arai, Ken

    2016-05-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injury in newborns results in serious damage. Magnesium sulfate has been clinically used as a cyto-protective agent against HI brain injury in newborns in some countries, including Japan. However, it is not clear how magnesium exerts this effect and how it acts on the individual types of cells within the newborn brain. In this study, we exposed cultured rat oligodendrocyte precursor cells to magnesium sulfate during the period when they differentiate into oligodendrocytes, and showed that magnesium-exposed oligodendrocytes exhibited more resistance to HI injury. Our data may support the use of magnesium sulfate in the clinical setting. PMID:26699082

  9. Pretreatment With TCDD Exacerbates Liver Injury From Concanavalin A: Critical Role for NK Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ganey, Patricia E.

    2013-01-01

    For many liver diseases, including viral and autoimmune hepatitis, immune cells play an important role in the development and progression of liver injury. Concanavalin A (Con A) administration to rodents has been used as a model of immune-mediated liver injury resembling human autoimmune hepatitis. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) has been demonstrated to alter the development of immune-mediated diseases. Mice pretreated with TCDD developed exacerbated liver injury in response to administration of a mild dose (6mg/kg) of Con A. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that TCDD pretreatment exacerbates Con A-induced liver injury by enhancing the activation and recruitment of accessory cell types including neutrophils, macrophages, and natural killer (NK) cells. Mice were treated with 0, 0.3, 3, or 30 μg/kg TCDD and 4 days later with Con A or saline. TCDD pretreatment with doses of 3 and 30 μg/kg significantly increased liver injury from Con A administration. The plasma concentrations of neutrophil chemokines were significantly increased in TCDD-pretreated mice after Con A administration. NKT cell-deficient (CD1d KO) mice were used to examine whether NKT cells were required for TCDD/Con A-induced liver injury. CD1d KO mice were completely protected from liver injury induced by treatment with Con A alone, whereas the injury from TCDD/Con A treatment was reduced but not eliminated. However, T-cell deficient (RAG1 KO) mice were protected from liver injury induced by Con A irrespective of pretreatment with TCDD. TCDD/Con A treatment increased the percentage of NK cells expressing the activation marker CD69. Depletion of NK cells prior to treatment resulted in significant reductions in plasma interferon-γ and liver injury from TCDD/Con A treatment. In summary, exposure to TCDD exacerbated the immune-mediated liver injury induced by Con A, and our findings suggest that NK cells play a critical role in this response. PMID:23970800

  10. Pretreatment with TCDD exacerbates liver injury from Concanavalin A: critical role for NK cells.

    PubMed

    Fullerton, Aaron M; Roth, Robert A; Ganey, Patricia E

    2013-11-01

    For many liver diseases, including viral and autoimmune hepatitis, immune cells play an important role in the development and progression of liver injury. Concanavalin A (Con A) administration to rodents has been used as a model of immune-mediated liver injury resembling human autoimmune hepatitis. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) has been demonstrated to alter the development of immune-mediated diseases. Mice pretreated with TCDD developed exacerbated liver injury in response to administration of a mild dose (6 mg/kg) of Con A. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that TCDD pretreatment exacerbates Con A-induced liver injury by enhancing the activation and recruitment of accessory cell types including neutrophils, macrophages, and natural killer (NK) cells. Mice were treated with 0, 0.3, 3, or 30 μg/kg TCDD and 4 days later with Con A or saline. TCDD pretreatment with doses of 3 and 30 μg/kg significantly increased liver injury from Con A administration. The plasma concentrations of neutrophil chemokines were significantly increased in TCDD-pretreated mice after Con A administration. NKT cell-deficient (CD1d KO) mice were used to examine whether NKT cells were required for TCDD/Con A-induced liver injury. CD1d KO mice were completely protected from liver injury induced by treatment with Con A alone, whereas the injury from TCDD/Con A treatment was reduced but not eliminated. However, T-cell deficient (RAG1 KO) mice were protected from liver injury induced by Con A irrespective of pretreatment with TCDD. TCDD/Con A treatment increased the percentage of NK cells expressing the activation marker CD69. Depletion of NK cells prior to treatment resulted in significant reductions in plasma interferon-γ and liver injury from TCDD/Con A treatment. In summary, exposure to TCDD exacerbated the immune-mediated liver injury induced by Con A, and our findings suggest that NK cells play a critical role in this response. PMID:23970800

  11. Injury induces a change in the functional characteristics of cells recovered from equine tendon.

    PubMed

    Kihara, Rina; Kasashima, Yoshinori; Arai, Katsuhiko; Miyamoto, Yasunori

    2011-01-01

    Injury initiates a repair process characterized by influx of fibroblasts and the rapid formation of fibrous scar tissue and subsequent tissue contraction. The response to injury and behavior of the different tendon fibroblast populations, however, has been poorly characterized. We hypothesized that the fibroblasts recovered from tendon with acute injury would exhibit different cell properties relating to adhesion, migration and tensegrity. To test this hypothesis we evaluated the ability of fibroblasts recovered from normal and injured equine superficial digital flexor tendons (SDFTs). The injured tendon-derived cells showed greater contraction of the collagen gel but poorer adhesion to pepsin-digested collagen, and migration over extracellular matrix proteins compared to normal SDFT-derived fibroblasts. Thus, the cells present within the tendon after injury display different behavior related to wound healing. PMID:24833988

  12. Pulmonary natural killer T cells play an essential role in mediating hyperoxic acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Nowak-Machen, Martina; Schmelzle, Moritz; Hanidziar, Dusan; Junger, Wolfgang; Exley, Mark; Otterbein, Leo; Wu, Yan; Csizmadia, Eva; Doherty, Glen; Sitkovsky, Michail; Robson, Simon C

    2013-05-01

    Critically ill patients are routinely exposed to high concentrations of supplemental oxygen for prolonged periods of time, which can be life-saving in the short term, but such exposure also causes severe lung injury and increases mortality. To address this therapeutic dilemma, we studied the mechanisms of the tissue-damaging effects of oxygen in mice. We show that pulmonary invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are unexpectedly crucial in the development of acute oxygen-induced lung injury. iNKT cells express high concentrations of the ectonucleotidase CD39, which regulates their state of activation. Both iNKT cell-deficient (Jα18(-/-)) and CD39-null mice tolerate hyperoxia, compared with wild-type control mice that exhibit severe lung injury. An adoptive transfer of wild-type iNKT cells into Jα18(-/-) mice results in hyperoxic lung injury, whereas the transfer of CD39-null iNKT cells does not. Pulmonary iNKT cell activation and proliferation are modulated by ATP-dependent purinergic signaling responses. Hyperoxic lung injury can be induced by selective P2X7-receptor blockade in CD39-null mice. Our data indicate that iNKT cells are involved in the pathogenesis of hyperoxic lung injury, and that tissue protection can be mediated through ATP-induced P2X7 receptor signaling, resulting in iNKT cell death. In conclusion, our data suggest that iNKT cells and purinergic signaling should be evaluated as potential novel therapeutic targets to prevent hyperoxic lung injury. PMID:23349052

  13. Phenotypic expansion of TBX4 mutations to include acinar dysplasia of the lungs.

    PubMed

    Szafranski, Przemyslaw; Coban-Akdemir, Zeynep H; Rupps, Rosemarie; Grazioli, Serge; Wensley, David; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Popek, Edwina; Lee, Anna F; Lupski, James R; Boerkoel, Cornelius F; Stankiewicz, Paweł

    2016-09-01

    Mutations in the T-box transcription factor TBX4 gene have been reported in patients with Ischiocoxopodopatellar syndrome (MIM# 147891) and childhood-onset pulmonary arterial hypertension. Whole exome sequencing of DNA from a 1 day old deceased newborn, with severe diffuse developmental lung disorder exhibiting features of acinar dysplasia, and her unaffected parents identified a de novo TBX4 missense mutation p.E86Q (c.256G>C) in the DNA-binding T-box domain. We propose phenotypic expansion of the TBX4-related clinical disease spectrum to include acinar dysplasia of the lungs. The reported mutation is the first identified genetic variant causative for acinar dysplasia. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27374786

  14. Evidence of apoptotic cell death after experimental traumatic brain injury in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Rink, A.; Fung, K. M.; Trojanowski, J. Q.; Lee, V. M.; Neugebauer, E.; McIntosh, T. K.

    1995-01-01

    Apoptosis plays an important role in many developmental and pathological processes of the central nervous system. However, the role of apoptosis in traumatic brain injury has not been determined. Using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated biotinylated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end labeling (TUNEL) method, we detected many cells with extensive DNA fragmentation in different regions of the brains of rats subjected to experimental traumatic brain injury. Two types of TUNEL-positive cells were demonstrated by light and electron microscopy, including type I cells that displayed morphological features of necrotic cell death and type II cells that displayed morphological features of classic apoptotic cell death. TUNEL-positive cells were detectable for up to 72 hours after the initial injury. Gel electrophoresis of DNA extracted from affected areas of the injured brain containing both type I and II cells revealed only internucleosomal fragmentation at 185-bp intervals, a feature originally described in apoptotic cell death. These data suggest that apoptosis, in addition to necrotic cell death, occurs after traumatic brain injury, and that internucleosomal fragmentation of DNA may be associated with certain types of necrotic cell death. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:7495282

  15. Experimental evidence of age-related adaptive changes in human acinar airways.

    PubMed

    Quirk, James D; Sukstanskii, Alexander L; Woods, Jason C; Lutey, Barbara A; Conradi, Mark S; Gierada, David S; Yusen, Roger D; Castro, Mario; Yablonskiy, Dmitriy A

    2016-01-15

    The progressive decline of lung function with aging is associated with changes in lung structure at all levels, from conducting airways to acinar airways (alveolar ducts and sacs). While information on conducting airways is becoming available from computed tomography, in vivo information on the acinar airways is not conventionally available, even though acini occupy 95% of lung volume and serve as major gas exchange units of the lung. The objectives of this study are to measure morphometric parameters of lung acinar airways in living adult humans over a broad range of ages by using an innovative MRI-based technique, in vivo lung morphometry with hyperpolarized (3)He gas, and to determine the influence of age-related differences in acinar airway morphometry on lung function. Pulmonary function tests and MRI with hyperpolarized (3)He gas were performed on 24 healthy nonsmokers aged 19-71 years. The most significant age-related difference across this population was a 27% loss of alveolar depth, h, leading to a 46% increased acinar airway lumen radius, hence, decreased resistance to acinar air transport. Importantly, the data show a negative correlation between h and the pulmonary function measures forced expiratory volume in 1 s and forced vital capacity. In vivo lung morphometry provides unique information on age-related changes in lung microstructure and their influence on lung function. We hypothesize that the observed reduction of alveolar depth in subjects with advanced aging represents a remodeling process that might be a compensatory mechanism, without which the pulmonary functional decline due to other biological factors with advancing age would be significantly larger. PMID:26542518

  16. Influence of airway wall compliance on epithelial cell injury and adhesion during interfacial flows

    PubMed Central

    Higuita-Castro, Natalia; Mihai, Cosmin; Hansford, Derek J.

    2014-01-01

    Interfacial flows during cyclic airway reopening are an important source of ventilator-induced lung injury. However, it is not known how changes in airway wall compliance influence cell injury during airway reopening. We used an in vitro model of airway reopening in a compliant microchannel to investigate how airway wall stiffness influences epithelial cell injury. Epithelial cells were grown on gel substrates with different rigidities, and cellular responses to substrate stiffness were evaluated in terms of metabolic activity, mechanics, morphology, and adhesion. Repeated microbubble propagations were used to simulate cyclic airway reopening, and cell injury and detachment were quantified via live/dead staining. Although cells cultured on softer gels exhibited a reduced elastic modulus, these cells experienced less plasma membrane rupture/necrosis. Cells on rigid gels exhibited a minor, but statistically significant, increase in the power law exponent and also exhibited a significantly larger height-to-length aspect ratio. Previous studies indicate that this change in morphology amplifies interfacial stresses and, therefore, correlates with the increased necrosis observed during airway reopening. Although cells cultured on stiff substrates exhibited more plasma membrane rupture, these cells experienced significantly less detachment and monolayer disruption during airway reopening. Western blotting and immunofluorescence indicate that this protection from detachment and monolayer disruption correlates with increased focal adhesion kinase and phosphorylated paxillin expression. Therefore, changes in cell morphology and focal adhesion structure may govern injury responses during compliant airway reopening. In addition, these results indicate that changes in airway compliance, as occurs during fibrosis or emphysema, may significantly influence cell injury during mechanical ventilation. PMID:25213636

  17. Treatment of acute lung injury by targeting MG53-mediated cell membrane repair.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yanlin; Chen, Ken; Lin, Peihui; Lieber, Gissela; Nishi, Miyuki; Yan, Rosalie; Wang, Zhen; Yao, Yonggang; Li, Yu; Whitson, Bryan A; Duann, Pu; Li, Haichang; Zhou, Xinyu; Zhu, Hua; Takeshima, Hiroshi; Hunter, John C; McLeod, Robbie L; Weisleder, Noah; Zeng, Chunyu; Ma, Jianjie

    2014-01-01

    Injury to lung epithelial cells has a role in multiple lung diseases. We previously identified mitsugumin 53 (MG53) as a component of the cell membrane repair machinery in striated muscle cells. Here we show that MG53 also has a physiological role in the lung and may be used as a treatment in animal models of acute lung injury. Mice lacking MG53 show increased susceptibility to ischaemia-reperfusion and overventilation-induced injury to the lung when compared with wild-type mice. Extracellular application of recombinant human MG53 (rhMG53) protein protects cultured lung epithelial cells against anoxia/reoxygenation-induced injuries. Intravenous delivery or inhalation of rhMG53 reduces symptoms in rodent models of acute lung injury and emphysema. Repetitive administration of rhMG53 improves pulmonary structure associated with chronic lung injury in mice. Our data indicate a physiological function for MG53 in the lung and suggest that targeting membrane repair may be an effective means for treatment or prevention of lung diseases. PMID:25034454

  18. Importance of adenosine triphosphate in phospholipase A2-induced rabbit renal proximal tubule cell injury.

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, V D; Cieslinski, D A; Humes, H D

    1988-01-01

    The pathogenesis of ischemic renal tubular cell injury involves a complex interaction of different processes, including membrane phospholipid alterations and depletion of high-energy phosphate stores. To assess the role of membrane phospholipid changes due to activation of phospholipases in renal tubule cell injury, suspensions enriched in rabbit renal proximal tubule segments were incubated with exogenous phospholipase A2 (PLA2). Exogenous PLA2 did not produce any significant change in various metabolic parameters reflective of cell injury in control nonhypoxic preparations despite a significant decrease in phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and moderate increases in lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) and lysophosphatidylethanolamine (LPE). In contrast, exogenous PLA2 treatment of hypoxic tubules resulted in a severe degree of cell injury, as demonstrated by marked declines in tubule K+ and ATP contents and significant decreases in tubule uncoupled respiratory rates, and was associated with significant phospholipid alterations, including marked declines in phosphatidylcholine (PC) and PE and significant rises in LPC, LPE, and free fatty acids (FFA). The injurious metabolic effects of exogenous PLA2 on hypoxic tubules were reversed by addition of ATP-MgCl2 to the tubules. The protective effect of ATP-MgCl2 was associated with increases in tubule PC and PE contents and declines in LPC, LPE, and FFA contents. These experiments thus indicate that an increase in exogenous PLA2 activity produces renal proximal tubule cell injury when cell ATP levels decline, at which point phospholipid resynthesis cannot keep pace with phospholipid degradation with resulting depletion of phospholipids and accumulation of lipid by-products. High-energy phosphate store depletion appears to be an important condition for exogenous PLA2 activity to induce renal tubule cell injury. PMID:3417866

  19. LOXL2 induces aberrant acinar morphogenesis via ErbB2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2) is a matrix-remodeling enzyme that has been shown to play a key role in invasion and metastasis of breast carcinoma cells. However, very little is known about its role in normal tissue homeostasis. Here, we investigated the effects of LOXL2 expression in normal mammary epithelial cells to gain insight into how LOXL2 mediates cancer progression. Methods LOXL2 was expressed in MCF10A normal human mammary epithelial cells. The 3D acinar morphogenesis of these cells was assessed, as well as the ability of the cells to form branching structures on extracellular matrix (ECM)-coated surfaces. Transwell-invasion assays were used to assess the invasive properties of the cells. Clinically relevant inhibitors of ErbB2, lapatinib and Herceptin (traztuzumab), were used to investigate the role of ErbB2 signaling in this model. A retrospective study on a previously published breast cancer patient dataset was carried out by using Disease Specific Genomic Analysis (DSGA) to investigate the correlation of LOXL2 mRNA expression level with metastasis and survival of ErbB2-positive breast cancer patients. Results Fluorescence staining of the acini revealed increased proliferation, decreased apoptosis, and disrupted polarity, leading to abnormal lumen formation in response to LOXL2 expression in MCF10A cells. When plated onto ECM, the LOXL2-expressing cells formed branching structures and displayed increased invasion. We noted that LOXL2 induced ErbB2 activation through reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and ErbB2 inhibition by using Herceptin or lapatinib abrogated the effects of LOXL2 on MCF10A cells. Finally, we found LOXL2 expression to be correlated with decreased overall survival and metastasis-free survival in breast cancer patients with ErbB2-positive tumors. Conclusions These findings suggest that LOXL2 expression in normal epithelial cells can induce abnormal changes that resemble oncogenic transformation and cancer progression

  20. Mesothelial cells give rise to hepatic stellate cells and myofibroblasts via mesothelial-mesenchymal transition in liver injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuchang; Wang, Jiaohong; Asahina, Kinji

    2013-02-01

    In many organs, myofibroblasts play a major role in the scarring process in response to injury. In liver fibrogenesis, hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are thought to transdifferentiate into myofibroblasts, but the origins of both HSCs and myofibroblasts remain elusive. In the developing liver, lung, and intestine, mesothelial cells (MCs) differentiate into specific mesenchymal cell types; however, the contribution of this differentiation to organ injury is unknown. In the present study, using mouse models, conditional cell lineage analysis has demonstrated that MCs expressing Wilms tumor 1 give rise to HSCs and myofibroblasts during liver fibrogenesis. Primary MCs, isolated from adult mouse liver using antibodies against glycoprotein M6a, undergo myofibroblastic transdifferentiation. Antagonism of TGF-β signaling suppresses transition of MCs to mesenchymal cells both in vitro and in vivo. These results indicate that MCs undergo mesothelial-mesenchymal transition and participate in liver injury via differentiation to HSCs and myofibroblasts. PMID:23345421

  1. Magnolol pretreatment attenuates heat stress-induced IEC-6 cell injury*

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Chen; He, Sha-sha; Yin, Peng; Xu, Lei; Shi, Ya-ran; Yu, Xiao-hong; Lyu, An; Liu, Feng-hua; Jiang, Lin-shu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Heat stress (HS) is an important environmental stressor that adversely influences livestock during the summer. The aim of this study was to investigate whether magnolol protects against HS-induced intestinal epithelial cell injury. Materials and methods: An intestinal epithelial cell line (IEC-6) was subjected to HS at 42 °C, with and without magnolol pretreatment. Cell injury was detected by monitoring lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. MTS (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium) assay was used to assess cell proliferation and viability, including identifying effective concentrations of magnolol. Flow cytometry confirmed G1-phase cell-cycle arrest and its alleviation by magnolol. Active DNA synthesis was measured by incorporation of nucleic acid 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU). G1-phase cell-cycle-related gene expression was assessed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and levels of G1-phase-related proteins by Western blotting. Results: HS induced IEC-6 cell injury and decreased cell viability, as demonstrated by data from LDH and MTS assays, respectively. Based on a number of criteria, IEC-6 cells subjected to HS were arrested in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Magnolol pretreatment decreased HS-induced cell injury through relief of this cell-cycle arrest. Conclusions: Magnolol pretreatment attenuates HS-induced injury in IEC-6 cells. Magnolol is potentially promising as a protective strategy for HS in livestock. PMID:27256675

  2. Immune cell distribution and immunoglobulin levels change following sciatic nerve injury in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Wei; Feng, Xinhong

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): To investigate the systemic and local immune status of two surgical rat models of sciatic nerve injury, a crushed sciatic nerve, and a sciatic nerve transection Materials and Methods: Twenty-four adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: sham-operation (control group), sciatic nerve crush, and sciatic nerve transaction. Sciatic nerve surgery was performed. The percentage of CD4+ cells and the CD4+/CD8+ratio were determined by flow cytometry. Serum IgM and IgG levels were analyzed by ELISA. T-cells (CD3) and macrophages (CD68) in sciatic nerve tissue sections were identified through immunohistochemistry. Results: Compared to sham-operated controls, in rats that underwent nerve injury, the percentage of CD4+ cells and the CD4+/CD8+ ratio in the peripheral blood were significantly decreased 7 days after surgery, serum IgM levels were increased 14 days after surgery, and serum IgG levels were increased 21 days after surgery. There were a large number of CD3+ cells and a small number of CD68+ cells in sciatic nerve tissue sections 21 days after surgery, indicating T-cell and macrophage activation and infiltration. Local IgG deposition was also detected at the nerve injury site 21 days after surgery. Conclusion: Rat humoral and cellular immune status changed following sciatic nerve injury, particularly with regard to the cellular immune response at the nerve injury site.

  3. Differential activation of infiltrating monocyte-derived cells after mild and severe traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Trahanas, Diane M.; Cuda, Carla M.; Perlman, Harris; Schwulst, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Microglia are the resident innate immune cells of the brain. Although embryologically and functionally distinct, they are morphologically similar to peripheral monocyte-derived cells resulting in a poor ability to discriminate between the two cell types. The purpose of this study was to develop a rapid and reliable method to simultaneously characterize, quantify, and discriminate between whole populations of myeloid cells from the brain in a murine model of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Male C57BL/6 mice underwent TBI (n=16) or sham injury (n=14). Brains were harvested at 24 hours post injury. Multiparameter flow cytometry and sequential gating analysis was performed allowing for discrimination between microglia and infiltrating leukocytes as well as for the characterization and quantification of individual subtypes within the infiltrating population. The proportion of infiltrating leukocytes within the brain increased with the severity of injury and the predominate cell types within the infiltrating population were monocyte-derived (p=0.01). Additionally, the severity of injury altered the overall makeup of the infiltrating monocyte-derived cells. In conclusion, we describe a flow cytometry based technique for gross discrimination between infiltrating leukocytes and microglia as well as the ability to simultaneously characterize and quantify individual myeloid subtypes and their maturation states within these populations. PMID:26091024

  4. The role of purinergic signaling on deformation induced injury and repair responses of alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Belete, Hewan A; Hubmayr, Rolf D; Wang, Shaohua; Singh, Raman-Deep

    2011-01-01

    Cell wounding is an important driver of the innate immune response of ventilator-injured lungs. We had previously shown that the majority of wounded alveolus resident cells repair and survive deformation induced insults. This is important insofar as wounded and repaired cells may contribute to injurious deformation responses commonly referred to as biotrauma. The central hypothesis of this communication states that extracellular adenosine-5' triphosphate (ATP) promotes the repair of wounded alveolus resident cells by a P2Y2-Receptor dependent mechanism. Using primary type 1 alveolar epithelial rat cell models subjected to micropuncture injury and/or deforming stress we show that 1) stretch causes a dose dependent increase in cell injury and ATP media concentrations; 2) enzymatic depletion of extracellular ATP reduces the probability of stretch induced wound repair; 3) enriching extracellular ATP concentrations facilitates wound repair; 4) purinergic effects on cell repair are mediated by ATP and not by one of its metabolites; and 5) ATP mediated cell salvage depends at least in part on P2Y2-R activation. While rescuing cells from wounding induced death may seem appealing, it is possible that survivors of membrane wounding become governors of a sustained pro-inflammatory state and thereby perpetuate and worsen organ function in the early stages of lung injury syndromes. Means to uncouple P2Y2-R mediated cytoprotection from P2Y2-R mediated inflammation and to test the preclinical efficacy of such an undertaking deserve to be explored. PMID:22087324

  5. The immunodominant myeloperoxidase T-cell epitope induces local cell-mediated injury in antimyeloperoxidase glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Joshua D; Chang, Janet; Hickey, Michael J; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan; Fugger, Lars; Holdsworth, Stephen R; Kitching, A Richard

    2012-09-25

    Microscopic polyangiitis is an autoimmune small-vessel vasculitis that often manifests as focal and necrotizing glomerulonephritis and renal failure. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic Abs (ANCAs) specific for myeloperoxidase (MPO) play a role in this disease, but the role of autoreactive MPO-specific CD4(+) T cells is uncertain. By screening overlapping peptides of 20 amino acids spanning the MPO molecule, we identified an immunodominant MPO CD4(+) T-cell epitope (MPO(409-428)). Immunizing C57BL/6 mice with MPO(409-428) induced focal necrotizing glomerulonephritis similar to that seen after whole MPO immunization, when MPO was deposited in glomeruli. Transfer of an MPO(409-428)-specific CD4(+) T-cell clone to Rag1(-/-) mice induced focal necrotizing glomerulonephritis when glomerular MPO deposition was induced either by passive transfer of MPO-ANCA and LPS or by planting MPO(409-428) conjugated to a murine antiglomerular basement membrane mAb. MPO(409-428) also induced biologically active anti-MPO Abs in mice. The MPO(409-428) epitope has a minimum immunogenic core region of 11 amino acids, MPO(415-426), with several critical residues. ANCA-activated neutrophils not only induce injury but lodged the autoantigen MPO in glomeruli, allowing autoreactive anti-MPO CD4(+) cells to induce delayed type hypersensitivity-like necrotizing glomerular lesions. These studies identify an immunodominant MPO T-cell epitope and redefine how effector responses can induce injury in MPO-ANCA-associated microscopic polyangiitis. PMID:22955884

  6. Progenitor cell therapies for traumatic brain injury: barriers and opportunities in translation

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Peter A.; Shah, Shinil K.; Harting, Matthew T.; Cox, Charles S.

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) directly affects nearly 1.5 million new patients per year in the USA, adding to the almost 6 million cases in patients who are permanently affected by the irreversible physical, cognitive and psychosocial deficits from a prior injury. Adult stem cell therapy has shown preliminary promise as an option for treatment, much of which is limited currently to supportive care. Preclinical research focused on cell therapy has grown significantly over the last decade. One of the challenges in the translation of this burgeoning field is interpretation of the promising experimental results obtained from a variety of cell types, injury models and techniques. Although these variables can become barriers to a collective understanding and to evidence-based translation, they provide crucial information that, when correctly placed, offers the opportunity for discovery. Here, we review the preclinical evidence that is currently guiding the translation of adult stem cell therapy for TBI. PMID:19132123

  7. Kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) mediates renal epithelial cell repair via ERK MAPK signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiwei; Cai, Cindy X

    2016-01-01

    The expression of kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), a very promising sensitive and specific urinary biomarker for acute renal injury, is markedly upregulated in injured and regenerating renal proximal tubular epithelial cells following ischemic or toxic insults, suggesting a possible role for this molecule in renal repair process. In the present study we report that expression of KIM-1 facilitates renal tubular epithelial cell repair by promoting cell migration and proliferation. KIM-1 expression also enhances ERK MAPK activation, and the modulatory effect of KIM-1 on cellular repair process is likely mediated via ERK MAPK signaling pathway. PMID:27084535

  8. Kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) mediates renal epithelial cell repair via ERK MAPK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiwei; Cai, Cindy X

    2016-05-01

    The expression of kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), a very promising sensitive and specific urinary biomarker for acute renal injury, is markedly upregulated in injured and regenerating renal proximal tubular epithelial cells following ischemic or toxic insults, suggesting a possible role for this molecule in renal repair process. In the present study, we report that expression of KIM-1 facilitates renal tubular epithelial cell repair by promoting cell migration and proliferation. KIM-1 expression also enhances ERK MAPK activation, and the modulatory effect of KIM-1 on cellular repair process is likely mediated via ERK MAPK signaling pathway. PMID:27084535

  9. Cell-based therapy for acute organ injury: preclinical evidence and ongoing clinical trials using mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Monsel, Antoine; Zhu, Ying-Gang; Gennai, Stephane; Hao, Qi; Liu, Jia; Lee, Jae W

    2014-11-01

    Critically ill patients often suffer from multiple organ failures involving lung, kidney, liver, or brain. Genomic, proteomic, and metabolomic approaches highlight common injury mechanisms leading to acute organ failure. This underlines the need to focus on therapeutic strategies affecting multiple injury pathways. The use of adult stem cells such as mesenchymal stem or stromal cells (MSC) may represent a promising new therapeutic approach as increasing evidence shows that MSC can exert protective effects following injury through the release of promitotic, antiapoptotic, antiinflammatory, and immunomodulatory soluble factors. Furthermore, they can mitigate metabolomic and oxidative stress imbalance. In this work, the authors review the biological capabilities of MSC and the results of clinical trials using MSC as therapy in acute organ injuries. Although preliminary results are encouraging, more studies concerning safety and efficacy of MSC therapy are needed to determine their optimal clinical use. (ANESTHESIOLOGY 2014; 121:1099-121). PMID:25211170

  10. Cell-based Therapy for Acute Organ Injury: Preclinical Evidence and On-going Clinical Trials Using Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Monsel, Antoine; Zhu, Ying-gang; Gennai, Stephane; Hao, Qi; Liu, Jia; Lee, Jae W.

    2014-01-01

    Critically ill patients often suffer from multiple organ failures involving lung, kidney, liver or brain. Genomic, proteomic and metabolomic approaches highlight common injury mechanisms leading to acute organ failure. This underlines the need to focus on therapeutic strategies affecting multiple injury pathways. The use of adult stem cells such as mesenchymal stem or stromal cells (MSC) may represent a promising new therapeutic approach as increasing evidence shows that MSC can exert protective effects following injury through the release of pro-mitotic, anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory soluble factors. Furthermore, they can mitigate metabolomic and oxidative stress imbalance. In this work, we review the biological capabilities of MSC and the results of clinical trials using MSC as therapy in acute organ injuries. Although preliminary results are encouraging, more studies concerning safety and efficacy of MSC therapy are needed to determine their optimal clinical use. PMID:25211170

  11. Stem cell therapy in spinal cord injuries: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, H S

    2012-05-01

    The list of experimental therapies that have been developed in animal models to improve functional outcomes after spinal cord injury is extensive. Though preclinical trials have shown a good potential for cellular therapies in spinal cord injury, there is no documentary proof as of now that any form of cellular therapy definitely improves outcome in management of human spinal cord injury. The adverse effects of many such therapies are well-documented. There is a need to conduct proper clinical trials. Some early-stage spinal cord injury clinical trials have recently been done and some have been started. However, some experimental therapies have been introduced into clinical practice without a clinical trial being completed. Undue hype by the media and claims by professionals have a profound psychological effect on the spinal cord injured and interferes in their rehabilitation. While we know that the future holds a good promise, this should not prevent patients from aggressively pursuing rehabilitation since we are not sure when a clinical breakthrough will be achieved. PMID:23155794

  12. Amniotic Fluid Stem Cells from EGFP Transgenic Mice Attenuate Hyperoxia-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Cheng-Wei; Yen, Chih-Ching; Lee, Kun-Hsiung; Wu, Shinn-Chih; Chen, Chuan-Mu

    2013-01-01

    High concentrations of oxygen aggravate the severity of lung injury in patients requiring mechanical ventilation. Although mesenchymal stem cells have been shown to effectively attenuate various injured tissues, there is limited information regarding a role for amniotic fluid stem cells (AFSCs) in treating acute lung injury. We hypothesized that intravenous delivery of AFSCs would attenuate lung injury in an experimental model of hyperoxia-induced lung injury. AFSCs were isolated from EGFP transgenic mice. The in vitro differentiation, surface markers, and migration of the AFSCs were assessed by specific staining, flow cytometry, and a co-culture system, respectively. The in vivo therapeutic potential of AFSCs was evaluated in a model of acute hyperoxia-induced lung injury in mice. The administration of AFSCs significantly reduced the hyperoxia-induced pulmonary inflammation, as reflected by significant reductions in lung wet/dry ratio, neutrophil counts, and the level of apoptosis, as well as reducing the levels of inflammatory cytokine (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α) and early-stage fibrosis in lung tissues. Moreover, EGFP-expressing AFSCs were detected and engrafted into a peripheral lung epithelial cell lineage by fluorescence microscopy and DAPI stain. Intravenous administration of AFSCs may offer a new therapeutic strategy for acute lung injury (ALI), for which efficient treatments are currently unavailable. PMID:24040409

  13. Temporal Response of Endogenous Neural Progenitor Cells Following Injury to the Adult Rat Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yilin; Mathews, Kathryn; Gorrie, Catherine A.

    2016-01-01

    A pool of endogenous neural progenitor cells (NPCs) found in the ependymal layer and the sub-ependymal area of the spinal cord are reported to upregulate Nestin in response to traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). These cells could potentially be manipulated within a critical time period offering an innovative approach to the repair of SCI. However, little is known about the temporal response of endogenous NPCs following SCI. This study used a mild contusion injury in rat spinal cord and immunohistochemistry to determine the temporal response of ependymal NPCs following injury and their correlation to astrocyte activation at the lesion edge. The results from the study demonstrated that Nestin staining intensity at the central canal peaked at 24 h post-injury and then gradually declined over time. Reactive astrocytes double labeled by Nestin and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) were found at the lesion edge and commenced to form the glial scar from 1 week after injury. We conclude that the critical time period for manipulating endogenous NPCs following a spinal cod injury in rats is between 24 h when Nestin expression in ependymal cells is increased and 1 week when astrocytes are activated in large numbers. PMID:27013972

  14. Analysis of non-thermal plasma-induced cell injury in human lung cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, Hirofumi; Sano, Kaori; Wada, Motoi; Mizuno, Kazue; Ono, Ryo; Yasuda, Hachiro; Takashima, Kazunori; Mizuno, Akira

    2015-09-01

    Recent progress of biomedical application of atmospheric pressure plasma shows that the biological effects are mainly due to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in liquid produced by the plasma exposure. To elucidate the cellular responses induced by exposure to the plasma, we focused on identification and quantification of reactive chemical species in plasma-exposed cell culture medium, and cell injury in mammalian cells after treatment of the plasma-exposed medium. In this study, we examined human lung cancer cell lines. The contribution of H2O2 to the cellular responses was considered. Here, an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) sustained by a pulsed power supply in argon was used. After APPJ exposure to cell culture medium, RONS detection in liquid was conducted. It showed that OH radical, ONOO-, NO2-, NO3-, and H2O2 were produced in the plasma-exposed medium. Cellular responses of human lung cancer cell lines to the plasma-exposed medium in a concentration-dependence manner were also studied. It showed that the plasma-exposed medium and the H2O2 treatment gave similar reduction in viability and induction of apoptosis. This work was partly supported by MEXT KAKENHI Grant Number 24108005 and JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 26390096.

  15. Overexpression of heme oxygenase-1 protects smooth muscle cells against oxidative injury and inhibits cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Zhang, Bao Hui; Chen, Li; An, Wei

    2002-06-01

    To investigate whether the expression of exogenous heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) gene within vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) could protect the cells from free radical attack and inhibit cell proliferation, we established an in vitro transfection of human HO-1 gene into rat VSMC mediated by a retroviral vector. The results showed that the profound expression of HO-1 protein as well as HO activity was 1.8- and 2.0-fold increased respectively in the transfected cells compared to the non-transfected ones. The treatment of VSMC with different concentrations of H2O2 led to the remarkable cell damage as indicated by survival rate and LDH leakage. However, the resistance of the HO-1 transfected VSMC against H2O2 was significantly raised. This protective effect was dramatically diminished when the transfected VSMC were pretreated with ZnPP-IX, a specific inhibitor of HO, for 24 h. In addition, we found that the growth potential of the transfected cells was significantly inhibited directly by increased activity of HO-1, and this effect might be related to decreased phosphorylation of MAPK. These results suggest that the overexpression of introduced hHO-1 is potentially able to reduce the risk factors of atherosclerosis, partially due to its cellular protection against oxidative injury and to its inhibitory effect on cellular proliferation. PMID:12118938

  16. Lumbar Myeloid Cell Trafficking into Locomotor Networks after Thoracic Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Christopher N; Norden, Diana M; Faw, Timothy D; Deibert, Rochelle; Wohleb, Eric S; Sheridan, John F; Godbout, Jonathan P; Basso, D Michele

    2016-08-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) promotes inflammation along the neuroaxis that jeopardizes plasticity, intrinsic repair and recovery. While inflammation at the injury site is well-established, less is known within remote spinal networks. The presence of bone marrow-derived immune (myeloid) cells in these areas may further impede functional recovery. Previously, high levels of the gelatinase, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) occurred within the lumbar enlargement after thoracic SCI and impeded activity-dependent recovery. Since SCI-induced MMP-9 potentially increases vascular permeability, myeloid cell infiltration may drive inflammatory toxicity in locomotor networks. Therefore, we examined neurovascular reactivity and myeloid cell infiltration in the lumbar cord after thoracic SCI. We show evidence of region-specific recruitment of myeloid cells into the lumbar but not cervical region. Myeloid infiltration occurred with concomitant increases in chemoattractants (CCL2) and cell adhesion molecules (ICAM-1) around lumbar vasculature 24h and 7days post injury. Bone marrow GFP chimeric mice established robust infiltration of bone marrow-derived myeloid cells into the lumbar gray matter 24h after SCI. This cell infiltration occurred when the blood-spinal cord barrier was intact, suggesting active recruitment across the endothelium. Myeloid cells persisted as ramified macrophages at 7days post injury in parallel with increased inhibitory GAD67 labeling. Importantly, macrophage infiltration required MMP-9. PMID:27191729

  17. Retinal Ganglion Cell Damage in an Experimental Rodent Model of Blast-Mediated Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Kabhilan; Kecova, Helga; Hernandez-Merino, Elena; Kardon, Randy H.; Harper, Matthew M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate retina and optic nerve damage following experimental blast injury. Methods. Healthy adult mice were exposed to an overpressure blast wave using a custom-built blast chamber. The effects of blast exposure on retina and optic nerve function and structure were evaluated using the pattern electroretinogram (pERG), spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT), and the chromatic pupil light reflex. Results. Assessment of the pupil response to light demonstrated decreased maximum pupil constriction diameter in blast-injured mice using red light or blue light stimuli 24 hours after injury compared with baseline in the eye exposed to direct blast injury. A decrease in the pupil light reflex was not observed chronically following blast exposure. We observed a biphasic pERG decrease with the acute injury recovering by 24 hours postblast and the chronic injury appearing at 4 months postblast injury. Furthermore, at 3 months following injury, a significant decrease in the retinal nerve fiber layer was observed using OCT compared with controls. Histologic analysis of the retina and optic nerve revealed punctate regions of reduced cellularity in the ganglion cell layer and damage to optic nerves. Additionally, a significant upregulation of proteins associated with oxidative stress was observed acutely following blast exposure compared with control mice. Conclusions. Our study demonstrates that decrements in retinal ganglion cell responses can be detected after blast injury using noninvasive functional and structural tests. These objective responses may serve as surrogate tests for higher CNS functions following traumatic brain injury that are difficult to quantify. PMID:23620426

  18. Vagal nerve stimulation protects against burn-induced intestinal injury through activation of enteric glia cells.

    PubMed

    Costantini, Todd W; Bansal, Vishal; Krzyzaniak, Michael; Putnam, James G; Peterson, Carrie Y; Loomis, William H; Wolf, Paul; Baird, Andrew; Eliceiri, Brian P; Coimbra, Raul

    2010-12-01

    The enteric nervous system may have an important role in modulating gastrointestinal barrier response to disease through activation of enteric glia cells. In vitro studies have shown that enteric glia activation improves intestinal epithelial barrier function by altering the expression of tight junction proteins. We hypothesized that severe injury would increase expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a marker of enteric glial activation. We also sought to define the effects of vagal nerve stimulation on enteric glia activation and intestinal barrier function using a model of systemic injury and local gut mucosal involvement. Mice with 30% total body surface area steam burn were used as model of severe injury. Vagal nerve stimulation was performed to assess the role of parasympathetic signaling on enteric glia activation. In vivo intestinal permeability was measured to assess barrier function. Intestine was collected to investigate changes in histology; GFAP expression was assessed by quantitative PCR, by confocal microscopy, and in GFAP-luciferase transgenic mice. Stimulation of the vagus nerve prevented injury-induced intestinal barrier injury. Intestinal GFAP expression increased at early time points following burn and returned to baseline by 24 h after injury. Vagal nerve stimulation prior to injury increased GFAP expression to a greater degree than burn alone. Gastrointestinal bioluminescence was imaged in GFAP-luciferase transgenic animals following either severe burn or vagal stimulation and confirmed the increased expression of intestinal GFAP. Injection of S-nitrosoglutathione, a signaling molecule released by activated enteric glia cells, following burn exerts protective effects similar to vagal nerve stimulation. Intestinal expression of GFAP increases following severe burn injury. Stimulation of the vagus nerve increases enteric glia activation, which is associated with improved intestinal barrier function. The vagus nerve may mediate the

  19. Biochemical detection of type I cell damage after nitrogen dioxide-induced lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    McElroy, M C; Pittet, J F; Allen, L; Wiener-Kronish, J P; Dobbs, L G

    1997-12-01

    We have previously shown that injury to lung epithelial type I cells can be detected biochemically by measuring the airway fluid content of a type I cell-specific protein, rTI40, in a model of severe acute lung injury [M. C. McElroy, J.-F. Pittet, S. Hashimoto, L. Allen, J. P. Wiener-Kronish, and L. G. Dobbs. Am. J. Physiol. 268 (Lung Cell. Mol. Physiol. 12): L181-L186, 1995]. The first objective of the present study was to evaluate the utility of rTI40 in the assessment of alveolar injury in a model of milder acute lung injury. Rats were exposed to 18 parts/ million NO2 for 12 h; control rats received filtered air for 12 h. In NO2-exposed rats, the total amount of rTI40 in bronchoalveolar fluid was elevated 2-fold compared with control values (P < 0.001); protein concentration was 8.5-fold of control values (P < 0.001). The increase in rTI40 was associated with morphological evidence of injury to type I cells limited to the proximal alveolar regions of the lung. The second objective was to correlate the severity of alveolar type I cell injury with functional measurements of lung epithelial barrier integrity. NO2 inhalation stimulated distal air space fluid clearance despite a significant increase in lung endothelial and epithelial permeability to protein. These data demonstrate that rTI40 is a useful biochemical marker for mild focal injury and that exposure to NO2 alters lung barrier function. Taken together with our earlier studies, these results suggest that the quantity of recoverable rTI40 can be used as an index of the severity of damage to the alveolar epithelium. PMID:9435578

  20. Micro-behavior and Injury of Biological Cell during Thawing Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tada, Yukio; Momose, Noboru; Jiang, Rong; Hayashi, Yujiro

    This study has been conducted to pursue the relation between microscale behavior and the injury of biological cell during freezing and thawing. As a sample of biological cells, protoplasts isolated from cultured wheat cells were selectively used. As the results of microscopic observation using a cold stage whose cooling and heating velocities were controlled, the recovery of cell by water influx due to osmotic pressure difference, and the fusion of intracellular ice were clarified with heating velocity. It was found that the osmotic stress acting on the ce11 membrane causes the thawing injuries connecting with swell and rupture of cell. The survival of cells was also inspected by dye-exclusion test using Evans Blue. The results suggested rapid temperature-rising is more harmful for slowly-frozen cell.

  1. THE POTENTIAL FOR CELL-BASED THERAPY IN PERINATAL BRAIN INJURIES

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Andre W.; Johnston, Michael V.; Fatemi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Perinatal brain injuries are a leading cause of cerebral palsy worldwide. The potential of stem cell therapy to prevent or reduce these impairments has been widely discussed within the medical and scientific communities and an increasing amount of research is being conducted in this field. Animal studies support the idea that a number of stem cells types, including cord blood and mesenchymal stem cells have a neuroprotective effect in neonatal hypoxia-ischemia. Both these cell types are readily available in a clinical setting. The mechanisms of action appear to be diverse, including immunomodulation, activation of endogenous stem cells, release of growth factors, and anti-apoptotic effects. Here, we review the different types of stem cells and progenitor cells that are potential candidates for therapeutic strategies in perinatal brain injuries, and summarize recent preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:23814628

  2. Histones activate the NLRP3 Inflammasome in Kupffer Cells during Sterile Inflammatory Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hai; Chen, Hui-Wei; Evankovich, John; Yan, Wei; Rosborough, Brian R.; Nace, Gary W.; Ding, Qing; Loughran, Patricia; Beer-Stolz, Donna; Billiar, Timothy R.; Esmon, Charles T.; Tsung, Allan

    2013-01-01

    Cellular processes that drive sterile inflammatory injury after hepatic ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury are not completely understood. Activation of the inflammasome plays a key role in response to invading intracellular pathogens, but mounting evidence suggests it also plays a role in inflammation driven by endogenous danger-associate molecular pattern (DAMP) molecules released after ischemic injury. The nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat containing protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome is one such process, and the mechanism by which its activation results in damage and inflammatory responses following liver I/R is unknown. Here we report that both NLRP3 and its downstream target Caspase-1 are activated I/R and are essential for hepatic I/R injury as both NLRP3 and Caspase-1 KO mice are protected from injury. Furthermore, inflammasome-mediated injury is dependent on Caspase-1 expression in liver non-parenchymal cells. While upstream signals that activate the inflammasome during ischemic injury are not well characterized, we show that endogenous extracellular histones activate the NLRP3 inflammasome during liver I/R through Toll-like Receptor-9 (TLR9). This occurs through TLR9-dependent generation of reactive oxygen species. This mechanism is operant in resident liver Kupffer cells, which drive innate immune responses after I/R injury by recruiting additional cell types, including neutrophils and inflammatory monocytes. These novel findings illustrate a new mechanism by which extracellular histones and activation of NLRP3 inflammasome contribute to liver damage and activation of innate immunity during sterile inflammation. PMID:23904166

  3. Autophagic Cell Death and Apoptosis Jointly Mediate Cisatracurium Besylate-Induced Cell Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Haixia; Tian, Weili; Li, Wen; Zhang, Xingli; Wang, Jingjing; Yang, Yue; Liu, Xin; Xia, Zhengyuan; Feng, Du; Zhang, Liangqing

    2016-01-01

    Cisatracurium besylate is an ideal non-depolarizing muscle relaxant which is widely used in clinical application. However, some studies have suggested that cisatracurium besylate can affect cell proliferation. Moreover, its specific mechanism of action remains unclear. Here, we found that the number of GFP-LC3 (green fluoresent protein-light chain 3) positive autophagosomes and the rate of mitochondria fracture both increased significantly in drug-treated GFP-LC3 and MitoDsRed stable HeLa cells. Moreover, cisatracurium promoted the co-localization of LC3 and mitochondria and induced formation of autolysosomes. Levels of mitochondrial proteins decreased, which were reversed by the lysosome inhibitor Bafinomycin A1. Similar results with evidence of dose-dependent effects were found in both HeLa and Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVECs). Cisatracurium lowered HUVEC viability to 0.16 (OD490) at 100 µM and to 0.05 (OD490) after 48 h in vitro; it increased the cell death rate to 56% at 100 µM and to 60% after 24 h in a concentration- and time-dependent manner (p < 0.01). Cell proliferation decreased significantly by four fold in Atg5 WT (wildtype) MEF (mouse embryonic fibroblast) (p < 0.01) but was unaffected in Atg5 KO (Knockout) MEF, even upon treatment with a high dose of cisatracurium. Cisatracurium induced significant increase in cell death of wild-type MEFs even in the presence of the apoptosis inhibitor zVAD. Thus, we conclude that activation of both the autophagic cell death and cell apoptosis pathways contributes to cisatracurium-mediated cell injury. PMID:27058536

  4. Geometrical influence of pulmonary acinar models on respiratory flows and particle deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofemeier, Philipp; Sznitman, Josue

    2012-11-01

    Due to experimental challenges in assessing respiratory flows in the deep regions of the lungs, computational simulations are typically sought to quantify inhaled aerosol transport and deposition in the acinus. Most commonly, simulations are performed using generic geometries of alveoli, including spheres, toroids and polyhedra to mimic the acinar region. However, local respiratory flows and ensuing particle trajectories are anticipated to be highly influenced by the specific geometrical structures chosen. To date, geometrical influences have not yet been thoroughly quantified. Knowing beforehand how geometries affect acinar flows and particle transport is critical in translating simulated data to predictions of aerosol deposition in real lungs. Here, we conduct a systematic investigation on a number of generic acinar models. Simulations are conducted for simple alveolated airways featuring a selection of geometries. Deposition patterns and efficiencies are quantified both for massless particles, highlighting details of the local flow, and micron-scale aerosols. This latter group of particles represents an important class of inhaled aerosols known to reach and deposit in the acinus. Our work emphasizes the subtleties of acinar geometry in determining the fate of inhaled aerosols.

  5. Ectrodactyly and Lethal Pulmonary Acinar Dysplasia Associated with Homozygous FGFR2 Mutations Identified by Exome Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Christopher P; Nataren, Nathalie J; Klingler-Hoffmann, Manuela; Schwarz, Quenten; Chong, Chan-Eng; Lee, Young K; Bruno, Damien L; Lipsett, Jill; McPhee, Andrew J; Schreiber, Andreas W; Feng, Jinghua; Hahn, Christopher N; Scott, Hamish S

    2016-09-01

    Ectrodactyly/split hand-foot malformation is genetically heterogeneous with more than 100 syndromic associations. Acinar dysplasia is a rare congenital lung lesion of unknown etiology, which is frequently lethal postnatally. To date, there have been no reports of combinations of these two phenotypes. Here, we present an infant from a consanguineous union with both ectrodactyly and autopsy confirmed acinar dysplasia. SNP array and whole-exome sequencing analyses of the affected infant identified a novel homozygous Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 2 (FGFR2) missense mutation (p.R255Q) in the IgIII domain (D3). Expression studies of Fgfr2 in development show localization to the affected limbs and organs. Molecular modeling and genetic and functional assays support that this mutation is at least a partial loss-of-function mutation, and contributes to ectrodactyly and acinar dysplasia only in homozygosity, unlike previously reported heterozygous activating FGFR2 mutations that cause Crouzon, Apert, and Pfeiffer syndromes. This is the first report of mutations in a human disease with ectrodactyly with pulmonary acinar dysplasia and, as such, homozygous loss-of-function FGFR2 mutations represent a unique syndrome. PMID:27323706

  6. Minocycline protects PC12 cells against NMDA-induced injury via inhibiting 5-lipoxygenase activation.

    PubMed

    Song, Ying; Wei, Er-Qing; Zhang, Wei-Ping; Ge, Qiu-Fu; Liu, Jian-Ren; Wang, Meng-Ling; Huang, Xiao-Jia; Hu, Xin; Chen, Zhong

    2006-04-26

    Recently, we have reported that minocycline, a semi-synthetic tetracycline with neuroprotective effects, inhibits the in vitro ischemic-like injury and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) activation in PC12 cells. In the present study, we further determined whether minocycline protects PC12 cells from excitotoxicity via inhibiting 5-LOX activation. We used N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA, 200 microM) to induce early (exposure for 6 h) and delayed (exposure for 6 h followed by 24 h recovery) injuries. We found that NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine, 5-LOX inhibitor caffeic acid and minocycline concentration dependently attenuated NMDA-induced early and delayed cell injuries (viability reduction and cell death). However, only ketamine (1 microM) inhibited NMDA-evoked elevation of intracellular calcium. In addition, immunohistochemical analysis showed that NMDA induced 5-LOX translocation to the nuclear membrane after 1- to 6-h exposure which was confirmed by Western blotting, indicating that 5-LOX was activated. Ketamine, caffeic acid and minocycline (each at 1 microM) inhibited 5-LOX translocation after early injury. After delayed injury, PC12 cells were shrunk, and 5-LOX was translocated to the nuclei and nuclear membrane; ketamine, caffeic acid and minocycline inhibited both cell shrinking and 5-LOX translocation. As a control, 12-LOX inhibitor baicalein showed a weak effect on cell viability and death, but no effect on 5-LOX translocation. Therefore, we conclude that the protective effect of minocycline on NMDA-induced injury is partly mediated by inhibiting 5-LOX activation. PMID:16574083

  7. Glomerular endothelial cell injury and cross talk in diabetic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jia; Lee, Kyung; Chuang, Peter Y; Liu, Zhihong; He, John Cijiang

    2015-02-15

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) remains a leading cause of new-onset end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and yet, at present, the treatment is still very limited. A better understanding of the pathogenesis of DKD is therefore necessary to develop more effective therapies. Increasing evidence suggests that glomerular endothelial cell (GEC) injury plays a major role in the development and progression of DKD. Alteration of the glomerular endothelial cell surface layer, including its major component, glycocalyx, is a leading cause of microalbuminuria observed in early DKD. Many studies suggest a presence of cross talk between glomerular cells, such as between GEC and mesangial cells or GEC and podocytes. PDGFB/PDGFRβ is a major mediator for GEC and mesangial cell cross talk, while vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), angiopoietins, and endothelin-1 are the major mediators for GEC and podocyte communication. In DKD, GEC injury may lead to podocyte damage, while podocyte loss further exacerbates GEC injury, forming a vicious cycle. Therefore, GEC injury may predispose to albuminuria in diabetes either directly or indirectly by communication with neighboring podocytes and mesangial cells via secreted mediators. Identification of novel mediators of glomerular cell cross talk, such as microRNAs, will lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of DKD. Targeting these mediators may be a novel approach to develop more effective therapy for DKD. PMID:25411387

  8. Glomerular endothelial cell injury and cross talk in diabetic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jia; Lee, Kyung; Chuang, Peter Y.; Liu, Zhihong

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) remains a leading cause of new-onset end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and yet, at present, the treatment is still very limited. A better understanding of the pathogenesis of DKD is therefore necessary to develop more effective therapies. Increasing evidence suggests that glomerular endothelial cell (GEC) injury plays a major role in the development and progression of DKD. Alteration of the glomerular endothelial cell surface layer, including its major component, glycocalyx, is a leading cause of microalbuminuria observed in early DKD. Many studies suggest a presence of cross talk between glomerular cells, such as between GEC and mesangial cells or GEC and podocytes. PDGFB/PDGFRβ is a major mediator for GEC and mesangial cell cross talk, while vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), angiopoietins, and endothelin-1 are the major mediators for GEC and podocyte communication. In DKD, GEC injury may lead to podocyte damage, while podocyte loss further exacerbates GEC injury, forming a vicious cycle. Therefore, GEC injury may predispose to albuminuria in diabetes either directly or indirectly by communication with neighboring podocytes and mesangial cells via secreted mediators. Identification of novel mediators of glomerular cell cross talk, such as microRNAs, will lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of DKD. Targeting these mediators may be a novel approach to develop more effective therapy for DKD. PMID:25411387

  9. Downregulation of connexin 32 attenuates hypoxia/reoxygenation injury in liver cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ren; Huang, Fei; Chen, Zhangyan; Li, Shangrong

    2015-04-01

    Gap junction intercellular communication is involved in ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury of organs. Connexins are proteins that are critical to the function of gap junctions. To clarify the role of gap junctions in IR injury in liver cells, the function of gap junctions was modulated in an in vitro hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) model. BRL-3A rat liver cells, endogenously expressing connexins Cx32 and Cx43, were used to model the process of hepatic IR injury. Suppression of gap junction activity was achieved genetically, using Cx32-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA), or chemically, with pharmacological inhibitors, oleamide, and 18-α-GA. BRL-3A cells subjected to H/R exhibited reduced cell survival and pathologies indicative of IR injury. Cx32-specific siRNA, oleamide, and 18-α-GA, respectively, decreased gap junction permeability, as assessed by the parachute assay. Pretreatment with Cx32-specific siRNA increased cell survival. Pretreatment with oleamide or 18-α-GA did not improve cell survival. Modulating gap junction by Cx32 gene silencing protected BRL-3A liver cells from H/R. PMID:25530438

  10. Repair of Ischemic Injury by Pluripotent Stem Cell Based Cell Therapy without Teratoma through Selective Photosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Seung-Ju; Kim, So-Yeon; Jeong, Ho-Chang; Cheong, Hyeonsik; Kim, Doseok; Park, Soon-Jung; Choi, Jong-Jin; Kim, Hyongbum; Chung, Hyung-Min; Moon, Sung-Hwan; Cha, Hyuk-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Summary Stem-toxic small molecules have been developed to induce selective cell death of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) to lower the risk of teratoma formation. However, despite their high efficacies, chemical-based approaches may carry unexpected toxicities on specific differentiated cell types. Herein, we took advantage of KillerRed (KR) as a suicide gene, to selectively induce phototoxicity using visible light via the production of reactive oxygen species. PSCs in an undifferentiated state that exclusively expressed KR (KR-PSCs) were eliminated by a single exposure to visible light. This highly selective cell death in KR-PSCs was exploited to successfully inhibit teratoma formation. In particular, endothelial cells from KR-mPSCs remained fully functional in vitro and sufficient to repair ischemic injury in vivo regardless of light exposure, suggesting that a genetic approach in which KR is expressed in a tightly controlled manner would be a viable strategy to inhibit teratoma formation for future safe PSC-based therapies. PMID:26584542

  11. Repair of Ischemic Injury by Pluripotent Stem Cell Based Cell Therapy without Teratoma through Selective Photosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seung-Ju; Kim, So-Yeon; Jeong, Ho-Chang; Cheong, Hyeonsik; Kim, Doseok; Park, Soon-Jung; Choi, Jong-Jin; Kim, Hyongbum; Chung, Hyung-Min; Moon, Sung-Hwan; Cha, Hyuk-Jin

    2015-12-01

    Stem-toxic small molecules have been developed to induce selective cell death of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) to lower the risk of teratoma formation. However, despite their high efficacies, chemical-based approaches may carry unexpected toxicities on specific differentiated cell types. Herein, we took advantage of KillerRed (KR) as a suicide gene, to selectively induce phototoxicity using visible light via the production of reactive oxygen species. PSCs in an undifferentiated state that exclusively expressed KR (KR-PSCs) were eliminated by a single exposure to visible light. This highly selective cell death in KR-PSCs was exploited to successfully inhibit teratoma formation. In particular, endothelial cells from KR-mPSCs remained fully functional in vitro and sufficient to repair ischemic injury in vivo regardless of light exposure, suggesting that a genetic approach in which KR is expressed in a tightly controlled manner would be a viable strategy to inhibit teratoma formation for future safe PSC-based therapies. PMID:26584542

  12. The efficacy of mesenchymal stem cell transplantation in caustic esophagus injury: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Kantarcioglu, Murat; Caliskan, Bahadir; Demirci, Hakan; Karacalioglu, Ozgur; Kekilli, Murat; Polat, Zulfikar; Gunal, Armagan; Akinci, Melih; Uysal, Cagri; Eksert, Sami; Gurel, Hasan; Celebi, Gurkan; Avcu, Ferit; Ural, Ali Ugur; Bagci, Sait

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Ingestion of corrosive substances may lead to stricture formation in esophagus as a late complication. Full thickness injury seems to exterminate tissue stem cells of esophagus. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can differentiate into specific cell lineages and have the capacity of homing in sites of injury. Aim and Methods. We aimed to investigate the efficacy of MSC transplantation, on prevention of esophageal damage and stricture formation after caustic esophagus injury in rats. 54 rats were allocated into four groups; 4 rats were sacrificed for MSC production. Group 1, untreated controls (n: 10). Group 2, membrane labeled MSCs-treated rats (n: 20). Group 3, biodistribution of fluorodeoxyglucose labeled MSCs via positron emission tomography (PET) imaging (n: 10). Group 4, sham operated (n: 10). Standard caustic esophageal burns were created and MSCs were transplanted 24 hours after. All rats were sacrificed at the 21st days. Results. PET scan images revealed the homing behavior of MSCs to the injury site. The histopathology damage score was not significantly different from controls. However, we demonstrated Dil labeled epithelial and muscle cells which were originating from transplanted MSCs. Conclusion. MSC transplantation after caustic esophageal injury may be a helpful treatment modality; however, probably repeated infusions are needed. PMID:24876849

  13. The Efficacy of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation in Caustic Esophagus Injury: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Kantarcioglu, Murat; Caliskan, Bahadir; Demirci, Hakan; Karacalioglu, Ozgur; Kekilli, Murat; Polat, Zulfikar; Gunal, Armagan; Akinci, Melih; Uysal, Cagri; Eksert, Sami; Gurel, Hasan; Celebi, Gurkan; Avcu, Ferit; Ural, Ali Ugur; Bagci, Sait

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Ingestion of corrosive substances may lead to stricture formation in esophagus as a late complication. Full thickness injury seems to exterminate tissue stem cells of esophagus. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can differentiate into specific cell lineages and have the capacity of homing in sites of injury. Aim and Methods. We aimed to investigate the efficacy of MSC transplantation, on prevention of esophageal damage and stricture formation after caustic esophagus injury in rats. 54 rats were allocated into four groups; 4 rats were sacrificed for MSC production. Group 1, untreated controls (n: 10). Group 2, membrane labeled MSCs-treated rats (n: 20). Group 3, biodistribution of fluorodeoxyglucose labeled MSCs via positron emission tomography (PET) imaging (n: 10). Group 4, sham operated (n: 10). Standard caustic esophageal burns were created and MSCs were transplanted 24 hours after. All rats were sacrificed at the 21st days. Results. PET scan images revealed the homing behavior of MSCs to the injury site. The histopathology damage score was not significantly different from controls. However, we demonstrated Dil labeled epithelial and muscle cells which were originating from transplanted MSCs. Conclusion. MSC transplantation after caustic esophageal injury may be a helpful treatment modality; however, probably repeated infusions are needed. PMID:24876849

  14. Kupffer cell-mediated exacerbation of methimazole-induced acute liver injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Akai, Sho; Uematsu, Yasuaki; Tsuneyama, Koichi; Oda, Shingo; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi

    2016-05-01

    Methimazole (MTZ), an anti-thyroid drug, is known to cause liver injury in humans. It has been demonstrated that MTZ-induced liver injury in Balb/c mice is accompanied by T helper (Th) 2 cytokine-mediated immune responses; however, there is little evidence for immune responses associated with MTZ-induced liver injury in rats. To investigate species differences in MTZ-induced liver injury, we administered MTZ with a glutathione biosynthesis inhibitor, L-buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine (BSO), to F344 rats and subsequently observed an increase in plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), which are associated with hepatic lesions. The hepatic mRNA expression of innate immune-related genes significantly increased in BSO- and MTZ-treated rats, but the change in Th2-related genes was not much greater than the change observed in the previous mouse study. Moreover, an increase in Kupffer cells and an induction of the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) proteins were accompanied by an increase in Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression, indicating that Kupffer cell activation occurs through HMGB1-TLR4 signaling. To elucidate the mechanism of liver injury in rats, gadolinium chloride, which inactivates the function of Kupffer cells, was administered before BSO and MTZ administration. The gadolinium chloride treatment significantly suppressed the increased ALT, which was accompanied by decreased hepatic mRNA expression related to innate immune responses and ERK/JNK phosphorylation. In conclusion, Kupffer cell-mediated immune responses are crucial factors for the exacerbation of MTZ-induced liver injury in rats, indicating apparent species differences in the immune-mediated exacerbation of liver injury between mice and rats. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26177832

  15. Cell-Specific Cre Strains For Genetic Manipulation in Salivary Glands

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Eri O.; Aure, Marit H.; Xie, Xiaoling; Myal, Yvonne; Gan, Lin; Ovitt, Catherine E.

    2016-01-01

    The secretory acinar cells of the salivary gland are essential for saliva secretion, but are also the cell type preferentially lost following radiation treatment for head and neck cancer. The source of replacement acinar cells is currently a matter of debate. There is evidence for the presence of adult stem cells located within specific ductal regions of the salivary glands, but our laboratory recently demonstrated that differentiated acinar cells are maintained without significant stem cell contribution. To enable further investigation of salivary gland cell lineages and their origins, we generated three cell-specific Cre driver mouse strains. For genetic manipulation in acinar cells, an inducible Cre recombinase (Cre-ER) was targeted to the prolactin-induced protein (Pip) gene locus. Targeting of the Dcpp1 gene, encoding demilune cell and parotid protein, labels intercalated duct cells, a putative site of salivary gland stem cells, and serous demilune cells of the sublingual gland. Duct cell-specific Cre expression was attempted by targeting the inducible Cre to the Tcfcp2l1 gene locus. Using the R26Tomato Red reporter mouse, we demonstrate that these strains direct inducible, cell-specific expression. Genetic tracing of acinar cells using PipGCE supports the recent finding that differentiated acinar cells clonally expand. Moreover, tracing of intercalated duct cells expressing DcppGCE confirms evidence of duct cell proliferation, but further analysis is required to establish that renewal of secretory acinar cells is dependent on stem cells within these ducts. PMID:26751783

  16. Multiparameter digitized video microscopy of toxic and hypoxic injury in single cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lemasters, J J; Gores, G J; Nieminen, A L; Dawson, T L; Wray, B E; Herman, B

    1990-01-01

    There is no clear picture of the critical events that lead to the transition from reversible to irreversible injury. Many studies have suggested that a rise in cytosolic free Ca2+ initiates plasma membrane bleb formation and a sequence of events that lead ultimately to cell death. In recent studies, we have measured changes in cytosolic free Ca2+, mitochondrial membrane potential, cytosolic pH, and cell surface blebbing in relation to the onset of irreversible injury and cell death following anoxic and toxic injury to single hepatocytes by using multiparameter digitized video microscopy (MDVM). MDVM is an emerging new technology that permits single living cells to be labeled with multiple probes whose fluorescence is responsive to specific cellular parameters of interest. Fluorescence images specific for each probe are collected over time, digitized, and stored. Image analysis and processing then permits quantitation of the spatial distribution of the various parameters with the single living cells. Our results indicate the following: The formation of plasma membrane blebs accompanies all types of injury in hepatocytes. Cell death is a rapid event initiated by rupture of a plasma membrane bleb, and it is coincident with the onset of irreversible injury. An increase of cytosolic free Ca2+ is not the stimulus for bleb formation or the final common pathway leading to cell death. A decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential precedes the loss of cell viability. Cytosolic pH falls by more than 1 pH unit during chemical hypoxia. This acidosis protects against the onset of cell death. Images FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 10. FIGURE 13. FIGURE 15. PMID:2190822

  17. Molecular response of chorioretinal endothelial cells to complement injury: implications for macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Shemin; Whitmore, S Scott; Sohn, Elliott H; Riker, Megan J; Wiley, Luke A; Scheetz, Todd E; Stone, Edwin M; Tucker, Budd A; Mullins, Robert F

    2016-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common, blinding disease of the elderly in which macular photoreceptor cells, retinal pigment epithelium and choriocapillaris endothelial cells ultimately degenerate. Recent studies have found that degeneration of the choriocapillaris occurs early in this disease and that endothelial cell drop-out is concomitant with increased deposition of the complement membrane attack complex (MAC) at the choroidal endothelium. However, the impact of MAC injury to choroidal endothelial cells is poorly understood. To model this event in vitro, and to study the downstream consequences of MAC injury, endothelial cells were exposed to complement from human serum, compared to heat-inactivated serum, which lacks complement components. Cells exposed to complement components in human serum showed increased labelling with antibodies directed against the MAC, time- and dose-dependent cell death, as assessed by lactate dehydrogenase assay and increased permeability. RNA-Seq analysis following complement injury revealed increased expression of genes associated with angiogenesis including matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3 and -9, and VEGF-A. The MAC-induced increase in MMP9 RNA expression was validated using C5-depleted serum compared to C5-reconstituted serum. Increased levels of MMP9 were also established, using western blot and zymography. These data suggest that, in addition to cell lysis, complement attack on choroidal endothelial cells promotes an angiogenic phenotype in surviving cells. PMID:26564985

  18. Myeloid Cell 5-Lipoxygenase Activating Protein Modulates the Response to Vascular Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhou; Ricciotti, Emanuela; Miwa, Takashi; Liu, Shulin; Ihida-Stansbury, Kaori; Landersberg, Gavin; Jones, Peter L.; Scalia, Rosario; Song, Wenchao; Assoian, Richard K.; FitzGerald, Garret A.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Human genetics have implicated the 5- lipoxygenase (5-LO) enzyme in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease and an inhibitor of the 5-LO activating protein (FLAP) is in clinical development for asthma. Objective Here we determined whether FLAP deletion modifies the response to vascular injury. Methods and Results Vascular remodeling was characterized 4 weeks after femoral arterial injury in FLAP knockout (FLAP KO) mice and wild type (WT) controls. Both neointimal hyperplasia and the intima/media ratio of the injured artery were significantly reduced in the FLAP KOs while endothelial integrity was preserved. Lesional myeloid cells were depleted and vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation, as reflected by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation, was markedly attenuated by FLAP deletion. Inflammatory cytokine release from FLAP KO macrophages was depressed and their restricted ability to induce VSMC migration ex vivo was rescued with leukotriene B4 (LTB4). FLAP deletion restrained injury and attenuated upregulation of the extracellular matrix protein, tenascin C (TNC), which affords a scaffold for VSMC migration. Correspondingly, the phenotypic modulation of VSMC to a more synthetic phenotype, reflected by morphological change, loss of α-smooth muscle cell actin and upregulation of vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM) -1 was also suppressed in FLAP KO mice. Transplantation of FLAP replete myeloid cells rescued the proliferative response to vascular injury. Conclusion Expression of lesional FLAP in myeloid cells promotes LTB4 dependent VSMC phenotypic modulation, intimal migration and proliferation. PMID:23250985

  19. Parabronchial smooth muscle constitutes an airway epithelial stem cell niche in the mouse lung after injury.

    PubMed

    Volckaert, Thomas; Dill, Erik; Campbell, Alice; Tiozzo, Caterina; Majka, Susan; Bellusci, Saverio; De Langhe, Stijn P

    2011-11-01

    During lung development, parabronchial SMC (PSMC) progenitors in the distal mesenchyme secrete fibroblast growth factor 10 (Fgf10), which acts on distal epithelial progenitors to promote their proliferation. β-catenin signaling within PSMC progenitors is essential for their maintenance, proliferation, and expression of Fgf10. Here, we report that this Wnt/Fgf10 embryonic signaling cascade is reactivated in mature PSMCs after naphthalene-induced injury to airway epithelium. Furthermore, we found that this paracrine Fgf10 action was essential for activating surviving variant Clara cells (the cells in the airway epithelium from which replacement epithelial cells originate) located at the bronchoalveolar duct junctions and adjacent to neuroendocrine bodies. After naphthalene injury, PSMCs secreted Fgf10 to activate Notch signaling and induce Snai1 expression in surviving variant Clara cells, which subsequently underwent a transient epithelial to mesenchymal transition to initiate the repair process. Epithelial Snai1 expression was important for regeneration after injury. We have therefore identified PSMCs as a stem cell niche for the variant Clara cells in the lung and established that paracrine Fgf10 signaling from the niche is critical for epithelial repair after naphthalene injury. These findings also have implications for understanding the misregulation of lung repair in asthma and cancer. PMID:21985786

  20. Arginase-1 is expressed exclusively by infiltrating myeloid cells in CNS injury and disease.

    PubMed

    Greenhalgh, Andrew D; Passos Dos Santos, Rosmarini; Zarruk, Juan Guillermo; Salmon, Christopher K; Kroner, Antje; David, Samuel

    2016-08-01

    Resident microglia and infiltrating myeloid cells play important roles in the onset, propagation, and resolution of inflammation in central nervous system (CNS) injury and disease. Identifying cell type-specific mechanisms will help to appropriately target interventions for tissue repair. Arginase-1 (Arg-1) is a well characterised modulator of tissue repair and its expression correlates with recovery after CNS injury. Here we assessed the cellular localisation of Arg-1 in two models of CNS damage. Using microglia specific antibodies, P2ry12 and Fc receptor-like S (FCRLS), we show the LysM-EGFP reporter mouse is an excellent model to distinguish infiltrating myeloid cells from resident microglia. We show that Arg-1 is expressed exclusively in infiltrating myeloid cells but not microglia in models of spinal cord injury (SCI) and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Our in vitro studies suggest that factors in the CNS environment prevent expression of Arg-1 in microglia in vivo. This work suggests different functional roles for these cells in CNS injury and repair and shows that such repair pathways can be switched on in infiltrating myeloid cells in pro-inflammatory environments. PMID:27126514

  1. Single Cell Analysis of Complex Thymus Stromal Cell Populations: Rapid Thymic Epithelia Preparation Characterizes Radiation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Kirsten M.; Mella, Heather; Lucas, Philip J.; Williams, Joy A.; Telford, William; Gress, Ronald E.

    2009-01-01

    Thymic epithelial cells (TECs) and dendritic cells are essential for the maintenance of thymopoiesis. Because these stromal elements define the progenitor niche, provide critical survival signals and growth factors, and direct positive and negative selection, detailed study of these populations is necessary to understand important elements for thymic renewal after cytotoxic injury. Study of TEC is currently hindered by lengthy enzymatic separation techniques with decreased viability. We present a new rapid separation technique that yields consistent viable TEC numbers in a quarter of the prior preparation time. Using this new procedure, we identify changes in stroma populations following total body irradiation (TBI). By flow cytometry, we show that TBI significantly depletes UEA+ medullary TEC, while sparing Ly51+ CD45− cells. Further characterization of the Ly51+ subset reveals enrichment of fibroblasts (CD45− Ly51+ MHCII−), while cortical TECs (CD45− Ly51+ MHCII+) were markedly reduced. Dendritic cells (CD11lc+ CD45+) were also decreased following TBI. These data suggest that cytotoxic preparative regimens may impair thymic renewal by reducing critical populations of cortical and medullary TEC, and that such thymic damage can be assessed by this new rapid separation technique, thereby providing a means of assessing optimal conditioning pretransplantfor enhancing thymic-dependent immune reconstitution posttranspiant. PMID:19750208

  2. Collagen formation by transformed smooth muscle cells after arterial injury.

    PubMed

    Chidi, C C; DePalma, R G

    1981-01-01

    Twenty-five normocholesterolemic rabbits were sacrificed at intervals up to 60 days after the thoracic aortas were de-endothelialized. Ultrastructural studies of both the re-endothelialized and nonendothelialized intima were done. The smooth muscle cells in the re-endothelialized intima showed segmental structural changes typically associated with transformation to a secretory cell type; abundant accumulations of collagen were in juxtaposition with these cells. The nonendothelialized intima did not demonstrate similar smooth muscle cell changes and collagen accumulation. These observations suggest that regenerating endothelial cells and intimal smooth muscle cells interact to cause smooth muscle cell transformation and collagen accumulation during arterial repair. PMID:7455897

  3. Effect of Adoptive Transfer or Depletion of Regulatory T Cells on Triptolide-induced Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinzhi; Sun, Lixin; Zhang, Luyong; Jiang, Zhenzhou

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to clarify the role of regulatory T cell (Treg) in triptolide (TP)-induced hepatotoxicity. Methods: Female C57BL/6 mice received either adoptive transfer of Tregs or depletion of Tregs, then underwent TP administration and were sacrificed 24 h after TP administration. Liver injury was determined according to alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST) levels in serum and histopathological change in liver tissue. Hepatic frequencies of Treg cells and the mRNA expression levels of transcription factor Forkhead box P3 and retinoid orphan nuclear receptor γt (RORγt), interleukin-10 (IL-10), suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS), and Notch/Notch ligand were investigated. Results: During TP-induced liver injury, hepatic Treg and IL-10 decreased, while T helper 17 cells cell-transcription factor RORγt, SOCS and Notch signaling increased, accompanied with liver inflammation. Adoptive transfer of Tregs ameliorated the severity of TP-induced liver injury, accompanied with increased levels of hepatic Treg and IL-10. Adoptive transfer of Tregs remarkably inhibited the expression of RORγt, SOCS3, Notch1, and Notch3. On the contrary, depletion of Treg cells in TP-administered mice resulted in a notable increase of RORγt, SOCS1, SOCS3, and Notch3, while the Treg and IL-10 of liver decreased. Consistent with the exacerbation of liver injury, higher serum levels of ALT and AST were detected in Treg-depleted mice. Conclusion: These results showed that adoptive transfer or depletion of Tregs attenuated or aggravated TP-induced liver injury, suggesting that Tregs could play important roles in the progression of liver injury. SOCS proteins and Notch signaling affected Tregs, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of TP-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:27148057

  4. Challenges of stem cell therapy for spinal cord injury: human embryonic stem cells, endogenous neural stem cells, or induced pluripotent stem cells?

    PubMed

    Ronaghi, Mohammad; Erceg, Slaven; Moreno-Manzano, Victoria; Stojkovic, Miodrag

    2010-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes myelopathy, damage to white matter, and myelinated fiber tracts that carry sensation and motor signals to and from the brain. The gray matter damage causes segmental losses of interneurons and motoneurons and restricts therapeutic options. Recent advances in stem cell biology, neural injury, and repair, and the progress toward development of neuroprotective and regenerative interventions are the basis for increased optimism. This review summarizes the pathophysiological mechanisms following SCI and compares human embryonic, adult neural, and the induced pluripotent stem cell-based therapeutic strategies for SCI. PMID:19904738

  5. Neurogenin 3 Expressing Cells in the Human Exocrine Pancreas Have the Capacity for Endocrine Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Danielle L.; O’Driscoll, Marci; Sheets, Timothy P.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Oberholzer, Jose; McGarrigle, James J.; Shamblott, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenin 3 (NGN3) is necessary and sufficient for endocrine differentiation during pancreatic development and is expressed by a population of progenitor cells that give rise exclusively to hormone-secreting cells within islets. NGN3 protein can be detected in the adult rodent pancreas only following certain types of injury, when it is transiently expressed by exocrine cells undergoing reprogramming to an endocrine cell fate. Here, NGN3 protein can be detected in 2% of acinar and duct cells in living biopsies of histologically normal adult human pancreata and 10% in cadaveric biopsies of organ donor pancreata. The percentage and total number of NGN3+ cells increase during culture without evidence of proliferation or selective cell death. Isolation of highly purified and viable NGN3+ cell populations can be achieved based on coexpression of the cell surface glycoprotein CD133. Transcriptome and targeted expression analyses of isolated CD133+ / NGN3+ cells indicate that they are distinct from surrounding exocrine tissue with respect to expression phenotype and Notch signaling activity, but retain high level mRNA expression of genes indicative of acinar and duct cell function. NGN3+ cells have an mRNA expression profile that resembles that of mouse early endocrine progenitor cells. During in vitro differentiation, NGN3+ cells express genes in a pattern characteristic of endocrine development and result in cells that resemble beta cells on the basis of coexpression of insulin C-peptide, chromogranin A and pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1. NGN3 expression in the adult human exocrine pancreas marks a dedifferentiating cell population with the capacity to take on an endocrine cell fate. These cells represent a potential source for the treatment of diabetes either through ex vivo manipulation, or in vivo by targeting mechanisms controlling their population size and endocrine cell fate commitment. PMID:26288179

  6. BrdU-positive cells in the neonatal mouse hippocampus following hypoxic-ischemic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Bartley, John; Soltau, Thomas; Wimborne, Hereward; Kim, Sunjun; Martin-Studdard, Angeline; Hess, David; Hill, William; Waller, Jennifer; Carroll, James

    2005-01-01

    Background Mechanisms that affect recovery from fetal and neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (H-I) brain injury have not been fully elucidated. The incidence of intrapartum asphyxia is approximately 2.5%, but the occurrence of adverse clinical outcome is much lower. One of the factors which may account for this relatively good outcome is the process of neurogenesis, which has been described in adult animals. We used a neonatal mouse model to assess new cells in the hippocampus after H-I injury. Results Neonatal mice underwent permanent unilateral carotid ligation on the seventh postnatal day followed by exposure to 8% hypoxia for 75 minutes. The presence of new cells was determined by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation into cells with sacrifice of the animals at intervals. Brain sections were stained for BrdU in combination with neuronal, glial, endothelial and microglial stains. We found a significant increase in BrdU-positive cells in the neonatal mouse hippocampus in the injured area compared to the non-injured area, most prominent in the dentate gyrus (DG) (154.5 ± 59.6 v. 92.9 ± 32.7 at 3 days after injury; 68.9 ± 23.4 v. 52.4 ± 17.1 at 35 days after injury, p < 0.0011). Among the cells which showed differentiation, those which were stained as either microglial or endothelial cells showed a peak increase at three days after the injury in the DG, injured versus non-injured side (30.5 ± 17.8 v. 2.7 ± 2.6, p < 0.0002). As in the adult animal, neurogenesis was significantly increased in the DG with injury (15.0 ± 4.6 v. 5.2 ± 1.6 at 35 days after injury, p < 0.0002), and this increase was subsequent to the appearance of the other dividing cells. Numbers of new oligodendrocytes were significantly higher in the DG on the non-injured side (7.0 ± 24.2 v. 0.1 ± 0.3, p < 0.0002), suggesting that oligodendrocyte synthesis was reduced in the injured hippocampus. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that the neonatal animal responds to brain injury with neurogenesis

  7. Dynamic membrane depolarization is an early regulator of ependymoglial cell response to spinal cord injury in axolotl.

    PubMed

    Sabin, Keith; Santos-Ferreira, Tiago; Essig, Jaclyn; Rudasill, Sarah; Echeverri, Karen

    2015-12-01

    Salamanders, such as the Mexican axolotl, are some of the few vertebrates fortunate in their ability to regenerate diverse structures after injury. Unlike mammals they are able to regenerate a fully functional spinal cord after injury. However, the molecular circuitry required to initiate a pro-regenerative response after spinal cord injury is not well understood. To address this question we developed a spinal cord injury model in axolotls and used in vivo imaging of labeled ependymoglial cells to characterize the response of these cells to injury. Using in vivo imaging of ion sensitive dyes we identified that spinal cord injury induces a rapid and dynamic change in the resting membrane potential of ependymoglial cells. Prolonged depolarization of ependymoglial cells after injury inhibits ependymoglial cell proliferation and subsequent axon regeneration. Using transcriptional profiling we identified c-Fos as a key voltage sensitive early response gene that is expressed specifically in the ependymoglial cells after injury. This data establishes that dynamic changes in the membrane potential after injury are essential for regulating the specific spatiotemporal expression of c-Fos that is critical for promoting faithful spinal cord regeneration in axolotl. PMID:26477559

  8. CD11b(+) Mononuclear Cells Mitigate Hyperoxia-Induced Lung Injury in Neonatal Mice.

    PubMed

    Eldredge, Laurie C; Treuting, Piper M; Manicone, Anne M; Ziegler, Steven F; Parks, William C; McGuire, John K

    2016-02-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a common consequence of life-saving interventions for infants born with immature lungs. Resident tissue myeloid cells regulate lung pathology, but their role in BPD is poorly understood. To determine the role of lung interstitial myeloid cells in neonatal responses to lung injury, we exposed newborn mice to hyperoxia, a neonatal mouse lung injury model with features of human BPD. In newborn mice raised in normoxia, we identified a CD45(+) F4/80(+) CD11b(+), Ly6G(lo-int) CD71(+) population of cells in lungs of neonatal mice present in significantly greater percentages than in adult mice. In response to hyperoxia, surface marker and gene expression in whole lung macrophages/monocytes was biased to an alternatively activated phenotype. Partial depletion of these CD11b(+) mononuclear cells using CD11b-diphtheria toxin (DT) receptor transgenic mice resulted in 60% mortality by 40 hours of hyperoxia exposure with more severe lung injury, perivascular edema, and alveolar hemorrhage compared with DT-treated CD11b-DT receptor-negative controls, which displayed no mortality. These results identify an antiinflammatory population of CD11b(+) mononuclear cells that are protective in hyperoxia-induced neonatal lung injury in mice, and suggest that enhancing their beneficial functions may be a treatment strategy in infants at risk for BPD. PMID:26192732

  9. Biocompatability of carbon nanotubes with stem cells to treat CNS injuries

    PubMed Central

    Bokara, Kiran Kumar; Kim, Jong Youl; Lee, Young Il; Yun, Kyungeun; Webster, Tom J

    2013-01-01

    Cases reporting traumatic injuries to the brain and spinal cord are extended range of disorders that affect a large percentage of the world's population. But, there are only few effective treatments available for central nervous system (CNS) injuries because the CNS is refractory to axonal regeneration and relatively inaccessible to many pharmacological treatments. The use of stem cell therapy in regenerative medicine has been extensively examined to replace lost cells during CNS injuries. But, given the complexity of CNS injuries oxidative stress, toxic byproducts, which prevails in the microenvironment during the diseased condition, may limit the survival of the transplanted stem cells affecting tissue regeneration and even longevity. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are a new class of nanomaterials, which have been shown to be promising in different areas of nanomedicine for the prevention, diagnosis and therapy of certain diseases, including CNS diseases. In particular, the use of CNTs as substrates/scaffolds for supporting the stem cell differentiation has been an area of active research. Single-walled and multi-walled CNT's have been increasingly used as scaffolds for neuronal growth and more recently for neural stem cell growth and differentiation. This review summarizes recent research on the application of CNT-based materials to direct the differentiation of progenitor and stem cells toward specific neurons and to enhance axon regeneration and synaptogenesis for the effective treatment of CNS injuries. Nonetheless, accumulating data support the use of CNTs as a biocompatible and permissive substrate/scaffold for neural cells and such application holds great potential in neurological research. PMID:23869255

  10. Biocompatability of carbon nanotubes with stem cells to treat CNS injuries.

    PubMed

    Bokara, Kiran Kumar; Kim, Jong Youl; Lee, Young Il; Yun, Kyungeun; Webster, Tom J; Lee, Jong Eun

    2013-06-01

    Cases reporting traumatic injuries to the brain and spinal cord are extended range of disorders that affect a large percentage of the world's population. But, there are only few effective treatments available for central nervous system (CNS) injuries because the CNS is refractory to axonal regeneration and relatively inaccessible to many pharmacological treatments. The use of stem cell therapy in regenerative medicine has been extensively examined to replace lost cells during CNS injuries. But, given the complexity of CNS injuries oxidative stress, toxic byproducts, which prevails in the microenvironment during the diseased condition, may limit the survival of the transplanted stem cells affecting tissue regeneration and even longevity. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are a new class of nanomaterials, which have been shown to be promising in different areas of nanomedicine for the prevention, diagnosis and therapy of certain diseases, including CNS diseases. In particular, the use of CNTs as substrates/scaffolds for supporting the stem cell differentiation has been an area of active research. Single-walled and multi-walled CNT's have been increasingly used as scaffolds for neuronal growth and more recently for neural stem cell growth and differentiation. This review summarizes recent research on the application of CNT-based materials to direct the differentiation of progenitor and stem cells toward specific neurons and to enhance axon regeneration and synaptogenesis for the effective treatment of CNS injuries. Nonetheless, accumulating data support the use of CNTs as a biocompatible and permissive substrate/scaffold for neural cells and such application holds great potential in neurological research. PMID:23869255

  11. Cell-level temperature distributions in skeletal muscle post spinal cord injury as related to deep tissue injury.

    PubMed

    Ruschkewitz, Yael; Gefen, Amit

    2010-02-01

    Deep tissue injury (DTI) is a severe pressure ulcer, which initiates in skeletal muscle tissue under intact skin. Patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) are especially vulnerable to DTI, due to their impaired motosensory capacities. The underlying mechanisms that lead to DTI are, however, still poorly understood. This study focuses on cell-level temperature distributions in muscles of patients with SCI, which typically contain thinner muscle fibers and fewer capillaries. It has been shown previously by our group that ischemic muscles of rat models of DTI cool down mildly and locally, which is very likely to slow the diffusivity of metabolites in the ischemic regions. However, it is unclear how these temperature decreases affect diffusivity at the scale of individual muscle cells in the microanatomy of SCI patients. We hypothesize that a 2 degrees C drop in the temperature of inflowing capillary blood, as shown in our animal studies, has a substantial effect on lowering the diffusivity of metabolites in skeletal muscle, but the pathological microanatomy in the chronic phase of SCI is less dominant in affecting the local temperatures in and around muscle cells. In order to test this hypothesis, two-dimensional finite element (FE) models of cross sections through the microanatomy of muscle tissue were developed using COMSOL Multiphysics software for normal and SCI muscles. The models included muscle cells, extracellular matrix (ECM), and capillaries, each with its own geometrical, thermal, and heat production properties. The SCI model configuration specifically included reduced cross section of myofibrils in favor of more ECM, less capillaries, and decreased blood inflow rate. After a 20-s heat transfer simulation, it was found that temperatures around the cells of the SCI muscle were approximately 2 degrees C lower than that in the normal muscle, that is, heat production from the muscle cell metabolism did not compensate for the lower inflowing blood temperature in

  12. A review on the use of cell therapy in the treatment of tendon disease and injuries

    PubMed Central

    Sawadkar, Prasad; Mudera, Vivek

    2014-01-01

    Tendon disease and injuries carry significant morbidity worldwide in both athletic and non-athletic populations. It is estimated that tendon injuries account for 30%−50% of all musculoskeletal injuries globally. Current treatments have been inadequate in providing an accelerated process of repair resulting in high relapse rates. Modern concepts in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have led to increasing interest in the application of cell therapy for the treatment of tendon disease. This review will explore the use of cell therapy, by bringing together up-to-date evidence from in vivo human and animal studies, and discuss the issues surrounding the safety and efficacy of its use in the treatment of tendon disease. PMID:25383170

  13. Image-based finite element modeling of alveolar epithelial cell injury during airway reopening.

    PubMed

    Dailey, H L; Ricles, L M; Yalcin, H C; Ghadiali, S N

    2009-01-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by fluid accumulation in small pulmonary airways. The reopening of these fluid-filled airways involves the propagation of an air-liquid interface that exerts injurious hydrodynamic stresses on the epithelial cells (EpC) lining the airway walls. Previous experimental studies have demonstrated that these hydrodynamic stresses may cause rupture of the plasma membrane (i.e., cell necrosis) and have postulated that cell morphology plays a role in cell death. However, direct experimental measurement of stress and strain within the cell is intractable, and limited data are available on the mechanical response (i.e., deformation) of the epithelium during airway reopening. The goal of this study is to use image-based finite element models of cell deformation during airway reopening to investigate how cell morphology and mechanics influence the risk of cell injury/necrosis. Confocal microscopy images of EpC in subconfluent and confluent monolayers were used to generate morphologically accurate three-dimensional finite element models. Hydrodynamic stresses on the cells were calculated from boundary element solutions of bubble propagation in a fluid-filled parallel-plate flow channel. Results indicate that for equivalent cell mechanical properties and hydrodynamic load conditions, subconfluent cells develop higher membrane strains than confluent cells. Strain magnitudes were also found to decrease with increasing stiffness of the cell and membrane/cortex region but were most sensitive to changes in the cell's interior stiffness. These models may be useful in identifying pharmacological treatments that mitigate cell injury during airway reopening by altering specific biomechanical properties of the EpC. PMID:19008489

  14. Visual bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation in the repair of spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui-ping; Xu, Cheng; Liu, Yin; Li, Jian-ding; Xie, Jun

    2015-01-01

    An important factor in improving functional recovery from spinal cord injury using stem cells is maximizing the number of transplanted cells at the lesion site. Here, we established a contusion model of spinal cord injury by dropping a weight onto the spinal cord at T7-8. Superparamagnetic iron oxide-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were transplanted into the injured spinal cord via the subarachnoid space. An outer magnetic field was used to successfully guide the labeled cells to the lesion site. Prussian blue staining showed that more bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells reached the lesion site in these rats than in those without magnetic guidance or superparamagnetic iron oxide labeling, and immunofluorescence revealed a greater number of complete axons at the lesion site. Moreover, the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scale scores were the highest in rats with superparamagnetic labeling and magnetic guidance. Our data confirm that superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles effectively label bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and impart sufficient magnetism to respond to the external magnetic field guides. More importantly, superparamagnetic iron oxide-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can be dynamically and non-invasively tracked in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging. Superparamagnetic iron oxide labeling of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells coupled with magnetic guidance offers a promising avenue for the clinical treatment of spinal cord injury. PMID:25878588

  15. IGF-1 protects tubular epithelial cells during injury via activation of ERK/MAPK signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zengbin; Yu, Yang; Niu, Lei; Fei, Aihua; Pan, Shuming

    2016-01-01

    Injury of renal tubular epithelial cells can induce acute renal failure and obstructive nephropathy. Previous studies have shown that administration of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) ameliorates the renal injury in a mouse unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) model, whereas the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. Here, we addressed this question. We found that the administration of IGF-1 significantly reduced the severity of the renal fibrosis in UUO. By analyzing purified renal epithelial cells, we found that IGF-1 significantly reduced the apoptotic cell death of renal epithelial cells, seemingly through upregulation of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, at protein but not mRNA level. Bioinformatics analyses and luciferase-reporter assay showed that miR-429 targeted the 3′-UTR of Bcl-2 mRNA to inhibit its protein translation in renal epithelial cells. Moreover, IGF-1 suppressed miR-429 to increase Bcl-2 in renal epithelial cells to improve survival after UUO. Furthermore, inhibition of ERK/MAPK signaling pathway in renal epithelial cells abolished the suppressive effects of IGF-1 on miR-429 activation, and then the enhanced effects on Bcl-2 in UUO. Thus, our data suggest that IGF-1 may protect renal tubular epithelial cells via activation of ERK/MAPK signaling pathway during renal injury. PMID:27301852

  16. Cell Injury and Repair Resulting from Sleep Loss and Sleep Recovery in Laboratory Rats

    PubMed Central

    Everson, Carol A.; Henchen, Christopher J.; Szabo, Aniko; Hogg, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Increased cell injury would provide the type of change in constitution that would underlie sleep disruption as a risk factor for multiple diseases. The current study was undertaken to investigate cell injury and altered cell fate as consequences of sleep deprivation, which were predicted from systemic clues. Design: Partial (35% sleep reduction) and total sleep deprivation were produced in rats for 10 days, which was tolerated and without overtly deteriorated health. Recovery rats were similarly sleep deprived for 10 days, then allowed undisturbed sleep for 2 days. The plasma, liver, lung, intestine, heart, and spleen were analyzed and compared to control values for damage to DNA, proteins, and lipids; apoptotic cell signaling and death; cell proliferation; and concentrations of glutathione peroxidase and catalase. Measurements and Results: Oxidative DNA damage in totally sleep deprived rats was 139% of control values, with organ-specific effects in the liver (247%), lung (166%), and small intestine (145%). Overall and organ-specific DNA damage was also increased in partially sleep deprived rats. In the intestinal epithelium, total sleep deprivation resulted in 5.3-fold increases in dying cells and 1.5-fold increases in proliferating cells, compared with control. Two days of recovery sleep restored the balance between DNA damage and repair, and resulted in normal or below-normal metabolic burdens and oxidative damage. Conclusions: These findings provide physical evidence that sleep loss causes cell damage, and in a manner expected to predispose to replication errors and metabolic abnormalities; thereby providing linkage between sleep loss and disease risk observed in epidemiological findings. Properties of recovery sleep include biochemical and molecular events that restore balance and decrease cell injury. Citation: Everson CA, Henchen CJ, Szabo A, Hogg N. Cell injury and repair resulting from sleep loss and sleep recovery in laboratory rats

  17. A Novel Role for Connexin Hemichannel in Oxidative Stress and Smoking-Induced Cell Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Xie, Lai-Hua; John, Scott A.; Subramaniam, Shankar; Lal, Ratnesh

    2007-01-01

    Oxidative stress is linked to many pathological conditions, including ischemia, atherosclerosis and neurodegenerative disorders. The molecular mechanisms of oxidative stress induced pathophysiology and cell death are currently poorly understood. Our present work demonstrates that oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species and cigarette smoke extract depolarize the cell membrane and open connexin hemichannels. Under oxidative stress, connexin expression and connexin silencing resulted in increased and reduced cell deaths, respectively. Morphological and live/dead assays indicate that cell death is likely through apoptosis. Our studies provide new insights into the mechanistic role of hemichannels in oxidative stress induced cell injury. PMID:17684558

  18. Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4 Signalling in Neural Stem and Progenitor Cells during Development and after Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Alistair E.; Murray, Simon S.; Xiao, Junhua

    2016-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in identifying the extracellular signalling pathways that regulate neural stem and precursor cell biology in the central nervous system (CNS). The bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), in particular BMP4, are key players regulating neuronal and glial cell development from neural precursor cells in the embryonic, postnatal, and injured CNS. Here we review recent studies on BMP4 signalling in the generation of neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendroglial cells in the CNS. We also discuss putative mechanisms that BMP4 may utilise to influence glial cell development following CNS injury and highlight some questions for further research. PMID:27293450

  19. Inhibition of Injury-Induced Cell Proliferation in the Dentate Gyrus of the Hippocampus Impairs Spontaneous Cognitive Recovery after Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Teresa E.; Rolfe, Andrew; Waters, Michael; Hamm, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Neurogenesis persists throughout life in the neurogenic regions of the mature mammalian brain, and this response is enhanced after traumatic brain injury (TBI). In the hippocampus, adult neurogenesis plays an important role in hippocampal-dependent learning and memory functions and is thought to contribute to the spontaneous cognitive recovery observed after TBI. Utilizing an antimitotic agent, arabinofuranosyl cytidine (Ara-C), the current study investigated the direct association of injury-induced hippocampal neurogenesis with cognitive recovery. In this study, adult rats received a moderate lateral fluid percussion injury followed by a 7-day intraventricular infusion of 2% Ara-C or vehicle. To examine the effect of Ara-C on cell proliferation, animals received intraperitoneal injections of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU), to label dividing cells, and were sacrificed at 7 days after injury. Brain sections were immunostained for BrdU or doublecortin (DCX), and the total number of BrdU+ or DCX+ cells in the hippocampus was quantified. To examine the outcome of inhibiting the injury-induced cell proliferative response on cognitive recovery, animals were assessed on Morris water maze (MWM) tasks at 21–25 or 56–60 days postinjury. We found that a 7-day infusion of Ara-C significantly reduced the total number of BrdU+ and DCX+ cells in the dentate gyrus (DG) in both hemispheres. Moreover, inhibition of the injury-induced cell proliferative response in the DG completely abolished the innate cognitive recovery on MWM performance at 56–60 days postinjury. These results support the causal relationship of injury-induced hippocampal neurogenesis on cognitive functional recovery and suggest the importance of this endogenous repair mechanism on restoration of hippocampal function. PMID:25242459

  20. Expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 in smooth muscle cells after vascular injury

    SciTech Connect

    Eto, Hideyuki; Miyata, Masaaki . E-mail: miyatam@m3.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp; Kume, Noriaki; Minami, Manabu; Itabe, Hiroyuki; Orihara, Koji; Hamasaki, Shuichi; Biro, Sadatoshi; Otsuji, Yutaka; Kita, Toru; Tei, Chuwa

    2006-03-10

    Lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) is an oxidized LDL receptor, and its role in restenosis after angioplasty remains unknown. We used a balloon-injury model of rabbit aorta, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed that LOX-1 mRNA expression was modest in the non-injured aorta, reached a peak level 2 days after injury, and remained elevated until 24 weeks after injury. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization showed that LOX-1 was not detected in the media of non-injured aorta but expressed in both medial and neointimal smooth muscle cells (SMC) at 2 and 24 weeks after injury. Low concentrations of ox-LDL (10 {mu}g/mL) stimulated the cultured SMC proliferation, which was inhibited by antisense oligonucleotides of LOX-1 mRNA. Double immunofluorescense staining showed the colocalization of LOX-1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen in human restenotic lesion. These results suggest that LOX-1 mediates ox-LDL-induced SMC proliferation and plays a role in neointimal formation after vascular injury.

  1. Th17 Cell Response in SOD1G93A Mice following Motor Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Allen; Yang, Tao; Mesnard-Hoaglin, Nichole A.; Gutierrez, Rafael; Stubbs, Evan B.; McGuire, Susan O.; Sanders, Virginia M.; Jones, Kathryn J.; Foecking, Eileen M.; Xin, Junping

    2016-01-01

    An increased risk of ALS has been reported for veterans, varsity athletes, and professional football players. The mechanism underlying the increased risk in these populations has not been identified; however, it has been proposed that motor nerve injury may trigger immune responses which, in turn, can accelerate the progression of ALS. Accumulating evidence indicates that abnormal immune reactions and inflammation are involved in the pathogenesis of ALS, but the specific immune cells involved have not been clearly defined. To understand how nerve injury and immune responses may contribute to ALS development, we investigated responses of CD4+ T cell after facial motor nerve axotomy (FNA) at a presymptomatic stage in a transgenic mouse model of ALS (B6SJL SOD1G93A). SOD1G93A mice, compared with WT mice, displayed an increase in the basal activation state of CD4+ T cells and higher frequency of Th17 cells, which were further enhanced by FNA. In conclusion, SOD1G93A mice exhibit abnormal CD4+ T cell activation with increased levels of Th17 cells prior to the onset of neurological symptoms. Motor nerve injury exacerbates Th17 cell responses and may contribute to the development of ALS, especially in those who carry genetic susceptibility to this disease. PMID:27194826

  2. B cells produce pathogenic antibodies and impair recovery after spinal cord injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ankeny, Daniel P.; Guan, Zhen; Popovich, Phillip G.

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic injury to the mammalian spinal cord activates B cells, which culminates in the synthesis of autoantibodies. The functional significance of this immune response is unclear. Here, we show that locomotor recovery was improved and lesion pathology was reduced after spinal cord injury (SCI) in mice lacking B cells. After SCI, antibody-secreting B cells and Igs were present in the cerebrospinal fluid and/or injured spinal cord of WT mice but not mice lacking B cells. In mice with normal B cell function, large deposits of antibody and complement component 1q (C1q) accumulated at sites of axon pathology and demyelination. Antibodies produced after SCI caused pathology, in part by activating intraspinal complement and cells bearing Fc receptors. These data indicate that B cells, through the production of antibodies, affect pathology in SCI. One or more components of this pathologic immune response could be considered as novel therapeutic targets for minimizing tissue injury and/or promoting repair after SCI. PMID:19770513

  3. Protective Effect of Puerarin Against Oxidative Stress Injury of Neural Cells and Related Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yuan; Leng, Wei; Zhang, Jingshu

    2016-01-01

    Background Parkinson’s disease (PD) is manifested as degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra compacta. The mitochondrial dysfunction induced by oxidative stress is believed to a major cause of PD. Puerarin has been widely applied due to its estrogen nature and anti-oxidative function. This study thus investigated the protective role of puerarin against oxidative stress injury on PC12 neural cells, in addition to related mechanisms. Material/Methods PC12 cells were pre-treated with gradient concentrations of puerarin, followed by the induction of 0.5 mM H2O2. MTT assay was used to detect cell viability. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was employed to detect intracellular level of superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), and glutathione (GSH). Cell apoptosis was determined by Annexin-V/7-AAD double labelling. Reactive oxidative species (ROS) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities were then measured. Cellular levels of caspase-3 and caspase-9 were also determined. Results The pre-treatment using puerarin significantly reversed H2O2-induced oxidative stress injury, as it can increase proliferation, SOD and GSH activities, decrease MDA activity, suppress apoptosis of PC12 cells, and decrease ROS and LDH production (p<0.05 in all cases). Further assays showed depressed up-regulation of caspase-3 and caspase-9 after puerarin pretreatment. Conclusions Puerarin pretreatment can decrease activity of caspase-3 and caspase-9 activity in PC12 cells, thus protecting cells from oxidative injury. PMID:27074962

  4. The protein PprI provides protection against radiation injury in human and mouse cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yi; Wu, Wei; Qiao, Huiping; Yue, Ling; Ren, Lili; Zhang, Shuyu; Yang, Wei; Yang, Zhanshan

    2016-01-01

    Severe acute radiation injuries are both very lethal and exceptionally difficult to treat. Though the radioresistant bacterium D. radiodurans was first characterized in 1956, genes and proteins key to its radioprotection have not yet to be applied in radiation injury therapy for humans. In this work, we express the D. radiodurans protein PprI in Pichia pastoris yeast cells transfected with the designed vector plasmid pHBM905A-pprI. We then treat human umbilical endothelial vein cells and BALB/c mouse cells with the yeast-derived PprI and elucidate the radioprotective effects the protein provides upon gamma irradiation. We see that PprI significantly increases the survival rate, antioxidant viability, and DNA-repair capacity in irradiated cells and decreases concomitant apoptosis rates and counts of damage-indicative γH2AX foci. Furthermore, we find that PprI reduces mortality and enhances bone marrow cell clone formation and white blood cell and platelet counts in irradiated mice. PprI also seems to alleviate pathological injuries to multiple organs and improve antioxidant viability in some tissues. Our results thus suggest that PprI has crucial radioprotective effects on irradiated human and mouse cells. PMID:27222438

  5. The protein PprI provides protection against radiation injury in human and mouse cells

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yi; Wu, Wei; Qiao, Huiping; Yue, Ling; Ren, Lili; Zhang, Shuyu; Yang, Wei; Yang, Zhanshan

    2016-01-01

    Severe acute radiation injuries are both very lethal and exceptionally difficult to treat. Though the radioresistant bacterium D. radiodurans was first characterized in 1956, genes and proteins key to its radioprotection have not yet to be applied in radiation injury therapy for humans. In this work, we express the D. radiodurans protein PprI in Pichia pastoris yeast cells transfected with the designed vector plasmid pHBM905A-pprI. We then treat human umbilical endothelial vein cells and BALB/c mouse cells with the yeast-derived PprI and elucidate the radioprotective effects the protein provides upon gamma irradiation. We see that PprI significantly increases the survival rate, antioxidant viability, and DNA-repair capacity in irradiated cells and decreases concomitant apoptosis rates and counts of damage-indicative γH2AX foci. Furthermore, we find that PprI reduces mortality and enhances bone marrow cell clone formation and white blood cell and platelet counts in irradiated mice. PprI also seems to alleviate pathological injuries to multiple organs and improve antioxidant viability in some tissues. Our results thus suggest that PprI has crucial radioprotective effects on irradiated human and mouse cells. PMID:27222438

  6. Markers of endothelial cell activation and injury in childhood haemolytic uraemic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nevard, C H; Blann, A D; Jurd, K M; Haycock, G B; Hunt, B J

    1999-08-01

    Diarrhoea-associated haemolytic uraemic syndrome (D+ HUS) is usually caused by verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli. Histology shows endothelial swelling with localised thrombus. Activation of coagulation and fibrinolysis also occurs. These facts, combined with the knowledge that recovery usually follows within weeks, led us to hypothesise that verotoxin causes localised endothelial cell activation but not injury. Markers of endothelial cell activation and injury were measured serially in 30 children with acute D+ HUS, healthy children, and children receiving chronic dialysis. Interpretation of markers was complicated by the renal dysfunction characteristic of D+ HUS. Nevertheless there was no evidence for endothelial cell injury, as soluble tissue factor levels were not increased and soluble thrombomodulin levels were lower than dialysed controls (P<0.001). In the acute phase, soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule levels were raised above normal (P<0.001), but were lower than dialysed controls (P<0.001), and soluble E-selectin levels were not significantly increased compared with normal controls (P=0.2). Hence, there was no evidence for endothelial cell damage or endothelial cell activation by the time children reached hospital; but this study did not exclude the possibility that endothelial cell activation occurred prior to hospital admission. PMID:10452276

  7. Th17 Cell Response in SOD1(G93A) Mice following Motor Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Ni, Allen; Yang, Tao; Mesnard-Hoaglin, Nichole A; Gutierrez, Rafael; Stubbs, Evan B; McGuire, Susan O; Sanders, Virginia M; Jones, Kathryn J; Foecking, Eileen M; Xin, Junping

    2016-01-01

    An increased risk of ALS has been reported for veterans, varsity athletes, and professional football players. The mechanism underlying the increased risk in these populations has not been identified; however, it has been proposed that motor nerve injury may trigger immune responses which, in turn, can accelerate the progression of ALS. Accumulating evidence indicates that abnormal immune reactions and inflammation are involved in the pathogenesis of ALS, but the specific immune cells involved have not been clearly defined. To understand how nerve injury and immune responses may contribute to ALS development, we investigated responses of CD4(+) T cell after facial motor nerve axotomy (FNA) at a presymptomatic stage in a transgenic mouse model of ALS (B6SJL SOD1(G93A)). SOD1(G93A) mice, compared with WT mice, displayed an increase in the basal activation state of CD4(+) T cells and higher frequency of Th17 cells, which were further enhanced by FNA. In conclusion, SOD1(G93A) mice exhibit abnormal CD4(+) T cell activation with increased levels of Th17 cells prior to the onset of neurological symptoms. Motor nerve injury exacerbates Th17 cell responses and may contribute to the development of ALS, especially in those who carry genetic susceptibility to this disease. PMID:27194826

  8. Neuronal cell death in nervous system development, disease, and injury (Review).

    PubMed

    Martin, L J

    2001-05-01

    Neuronal death is normal during nervous system development but is abnormal in brain and spinal cord disease and injury. Apoptosis and necrosis are types of cell death. They are generally considered to be distinct forms of cell death. The re-emergence of apoptosis may contribute to the neuronal degeneration in chronic neurodegenerative disease, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease, and in neurological injury such as cerebral ischemia and trauma. There is also mounting evidence supporting an apoptosis-necrosis cell death continuum. In this continuum, neuronal death can result from varying contributions of coexisting apoptotic and necrotic mechanisms; thus, some of the distinctions between apoptosis and necrosis are becoming blurred. Cell culture and animal model systems are revealing the mechanisms of cell death. Necrosis can result from acute oxidative stress. Apoptosis can be induced by cell surface receptor engagement, growth factor withdrawal, and DNA damage. Several families of proteins and specific biochemical signal-transduction pathways regulate cell death. Cell death signaling can involve plasma membrane death receptors, mitochondrial death proteins, proteases, kinases, and transcription factors. Players in the cell death and cell survival orchestra include Fas receptor, Bcl-2 and Bax (and their homologues), cytochrome c, caspases, p53, and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases. Some forms of cell death require gene activation, RNA synthesis, and protein synthesis, whereas others forms are transcriptionally-translationally-independent and are driven by posttranslational mechanisms such as protein phosphorylation and protein translocation. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of neuronal cell death in nervous system development, injury and disease can lead to new therapeutic approaches for the prevention of neurodegeneration and neurological disabilities and will expand the field of cell death biology. PMID

  9. Autophagy prevents irradiation injury and maintains stemness through decreasing ROS generation in mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Hou, J; Han, Z-p; Jing, Y-y; Yang, X; Zhang, S-s; Sun, K; Hao, C; Meng, Y; Yu, F-h; Liu, X-q; Shi, Y-f; Wu, M-c; Zhang, L; Wei, L-x

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells were characterized by their stemness: self-renewal and pluripotency. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a unique type of adult stem cells that have been proven to be involved in tissue repair, immunoloregulation and tumorigenesis. Irradiation is a well-known factor that leads to functional obstacle in stem cells. However, the mechanism of stemness maintenance in human MSCs exposed to irradiation remains unknown. We demonstrated that irradiation could induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation that resulted in DNA damage and stemness injury in MSCs. Autophagy induced by starvation or rapamycin can reduce ROS accumulation-associated DNA damage and maintain stemness in MSCs. Further, inhibition of autophagy leads to augment of ROS accumulation and DNA damage, which results in the loss of stemness in MSCs. Our results indicate that autophagy may have an important role in protecting stemness of MSCs from irradiation injury. PMID:24113178

  10. Role of Immune Cells in the Course of Central Nervous System Injury: Modulation with Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Magrone, Thea; Russo, Matteo Antonio; Jirillo, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Immune cells actively participate to the central nervous system (CNS) injury either damaging or protecting neural tissue with release of various mediators. Residential microglia and monocyte-derived macrophages play a fundamental role within the injured CNS and, here, special emphasis will be placed on M1 and M2 macrophages for their different functional activities. On the other hand, peripheral T regulatory (Treg) cells exert antiinflammatory activities in the diseased host. In this respect, activation of Treg cells by nutraceuticals may represent a novel approach to treat neuroinflammation. Omega-3 fatty acids and polyphenols will be described as substances endowed with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. However, taking into account that Treg cells act in the later phase of CNS injury, favoring immune suppression, manipulation of host immune system with both substances requires caution to avoid undesired side effects. PMID:26635268

  11. Cell tracking technologies for acute ischemic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Gavins, Felicity NE; Smith, Helen K

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell therapy has showed considerable potential in the treatment of stroke over the last decade. In order that these therapies may be optimized, the relative benefits of growth factor release, immunomodulation, and direct tissue replacement by therapeutic stem cells are widely under investigation. Fundamental to the progress of this research are effective imaging techniques that enable cell tracking in vivo. Direct analysis of the benefit of cell therapy includes the study of cell migration, localization, division and/or differentiation, and survival. This review explores the various imaging tools currently used in clinics and laboratories, addressing image resolution, long-term cell monitoring, imaging agents/isotopes, as well as safety and costs associated with each technique. Finally, burgeoning tracking techniques are discussed, with emphasis on multimodal imaging. PMID:25966948

  12. Impaired autophagy flux is associated with neuronal cell death after traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Chinmoy; Zhao, Zaorui; Aungst, Stephanie; Sabirzhanov, Boris; Faden, Alan I; Lipinski, Marta M

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of autophagy contributes to neuronal cell death in several neurodegenerative and lysosomal storage diseases. Markers of autophagy are also increased after traumatic brain injury (TBI), but its mechanisms and function are not known. Following controlled cortical impact (CCI) brain injury in GFP-Lc3 (green fluorescent protein-LC3) transgenic mice, we observed accumulation of autophagosomes in ipsilateral cortex and hippocampus between 1 and 7 d. This accumulation was not due to increased initiation of autophagy but rather to a decrease in clearance of autophagosomes, as reflected by accumulation of the autophagic substrate SQSTM1/p62 (sequestosome 1). This was confirmed by ex vivo studies, which demonstrated impaired autophagic flux in brain slices from injured as compared to control animals. Increased SQSTM1 peaked at d 1–3 but resolved by d 7, suggesting that the defect in autophagy flux is temporary. The early impairment of autophagy is at least in part caused by lysosomal dysfunction, as evidenced by lower protein levels and enzymatic activity of CTSD (cathepsin D). Furthermore, immediately after injury both autophagosomes and SQSTM1 accumulated predominantly in neurons. This was accompanied by appearance of SQSTM1 and ubiquitin-positive puncta in the affected cells, suggesting that, similar to the situation observed in neurodegenerative diseases, impaired autophagy may contribute to neuronal injury. Consistently, GFP-LC3 and SQSTM1 colocalized with markers of both caspase-dependent and caspase-independent cell death in neuronal cells proximal to the injury site. Taken together, our data indicated for the first time that autophagic clearance is impaired early after TBI due to lysosomal dysfunction, and correlates with neuronal cell death. PMID:25484084

  13. Cell-free hemoglobin: a novel mediator of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Shaver, Ciara M; Upchurch, Cameron P; Janz, David R; Grove, Brandon S; Putz, Nathan D; Wickersham, Nancy E; Dikalov, Sergey I; Ware, Lorraine B; Bastarache, Julie A

    2016-03-15

    Patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) have elevated levels of cell-free hemoglobin (CFH) in the air space, but the contribution of CFH to the pathogenesis of acute lung injury is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that levels of CFH in the air space correlate with measures of alveolar-capillary barrier dysfunction in humans with ARDS (r = 0.89, P < 0.001) and in mice with ventilator-induced acute lung injury (r = 0.89, P < 0.001). To investigate the specific contribution of CFH to ARDS, we studied the impact of purified CFH in the mouse lung and on cultured mouse lung epithelial (MLE-12) cells. Intratracheal delivery of CFH in mice causes acute lung injury with air space inflammation and alveolar-capillary barrier disruption. Similarly, in MLE-12 cells, CFH increases proinflammatory cytokine expression and increases paracellular permeability as measured by electrical cell-substrate impedance sensing. Next, to determine whether these effects are mediated by the iron-containing heme moiety of CFH, we treated mice with intratracheal hemin, the chloride salt of heme, and found that hemin was sufficient to increase alveolar permeability but failed to induce proinflammatory cytokine expression or epithelial cell injury. Together, these data identify CFH in the air space as a previously unrecognized driver of lung epithelial injury in human and experimental ARDS and suggest that CFH and hemin may contribute to ARDS through different mechanisms. Interventions targeting CFH and heme in the air space could provide a new therapeutic approach for ARDS. PMID:26773065

  14. Anthracycline-induced cardiac injury using a cardiac cell line: potential for gene therapy studies.

    PubMed

    L'Ecuyer, T; Horenstein, M S; Thomas, R; Vander Heide, R

    2001-11-01

    Anthracyclines are effective antitumor agents whose chief limitation has been cardiotoxicity directly related to free radical production. Therefore, strategies designed to selectively overexpress antioxidant proteins in the heart could protect against drug-induced toxicity and allow higher doses of chemotherapy. However, to date an adequate cardiac model system that is susceptible to anthracycline injury and can express foreign genes in a controlled fashion has been lacking. Developing a cardiac model system would permit examination of the relationship between the expression level of a potentially protective foreign gene and the degree of protection from injury. In this study we have examined the potential of the H9C2 rat cardiac myocyte cell line in this regard. H9C2 cells differentiate in a reproducible fashion, as shown by progressive increases in muscle tropomyosin-expressing cells, the organization of this thin filament protein, and the percentage of muscle cells contained within myotubes. Exposure of this cell line to the anthracycline doxorubicin produces cell injury as indicated by release of the intracellular enzyme lactate dehydrogenase into the culture medium. This injury is preceded by generation of reactive oxygen species, indicated by fluorescence after loading with carboxy-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. Stable transfection of H9C2 cells with a plasmid producing a tetracycline transactivator protein allows foreign genes to be expressed at a level tightly controlled by the concentration of tetracycline in the culture medium. Since H9C2 cells differentiate, can be injured by anthracycline exposure, and can express foreign genes at controllable levels, this is a suitable system in which to design genetic approaches to prevent this important clinical problem. PMID:11708868

  15. Cell cycle re-entry sensitizes podocytes to injury induced death.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Manuel; Pfister, Eva; Kosel, Andrea; Shankland, Stuart; Pippin, Jeffrey; Amann, Kerstin; Daniel, Christoph

    2016-07-17

    Podocytes are terminally differentiated renal cells, lacking the ability to regenerate by proliferation. However, during renal injury, podocytes re-enter into the cell cycle but fail to divide. Earlier studies suggested that re-entry into cell cycle results in loss of podocytes, but a direct evidence for this is lacking. Therefore, we established an in vitro model to test the consequences of re-entry into the cell cycle on podocyte survival. A mouse immortalized podocyte cell line was differentiated to non-permissive podocytes and stimulated with e.g. growth factors. Stimulated cells were analyzed for mRNA-expression or stained for cell cycle analysis using flow cytometry and immunocytofluorescence microscopy. After stimulation to re-entry into cell cycle, podocytes were stressed with puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN) and analyzed for survival. During permissive stage more than 40% of immortalized podocytes were in the S-phase. In contrast, S-phase in non-permissive differentiated podocytes was reduced to 5%. Treatment with b-FGF dose dependently induced re-entry into cell cycle increasing the number of podocytes in the S-phase to 10.7% at an optimal bFGF dosage of 10 ng/ml. Forty eight hours after stimulation with bFGF the number of bi-nucleated podocytes significantly increased. A secondary injury stimulus significantly reduced podocyte survival preferentially in bi-nucleated podocytes In conclusion, stimulation of podocytes using bFGF was able to induce re-entry of podocytes into the cell cycle and to sensitize the cells for cell death by secondary injuries. Therefore, this model is appropriate for testing new podocyte protective substances that can be used for therapy. PMID:27232327

  16. Inflammatory reaction after traumatic brain injury: Therapeutic potential of targeting cell-cell communication by chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Gyoneva, Stefka; Ransohoff, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) affects millions of people worldwide every year. The primary impact initiates the secretion of pro- and anti-inflammatory factors, subsequent recruitment of peripheral immune cells and activation of brain-resident microglia and astrocytes. Chemokines are major mediators of peripheral blood cell recruitment to damaged tissue, including the TBI brain. Here we review the involvement of specific chemokine pathways in TBI pathology and attempts to modulate these pathways for therapeutic purposes. We focus on chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2/chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 2 (CCL2/CCR2) and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 12/chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 (CXCL12/CXCR4). Recent micro-array and multiplex expression profiling have also implicated CXCL10 and CCL5 in TBI pathology. Chemokine (C-X3-C motif) ligand 1/ chemokine (C-X3-C motif) receptor 1 (CX3CL1/CX3CR1) signaling in the context of TBI is also discussed. Current literature suggests that modulating chemokine signaling, especially CCL2/CCR2, may be beneficial in TBI treatment. PMID:25979813

  17. Cell-cycle arrest and acute kidney injury: the light and the dark sides

    PubMed Central

    Kellum, John A.; Chawla, Lakhmir S.

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common consequence of systemic illness or injury and it complicates several forms of major surgery. Two major difficulties have hampered progress in AKI research and clinical management. AKI is difficult to detect early and its pathogenesis is still poorly understood. We recently reported results from multi-center studies where two urinary markers of cell-cycle arrest, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2 (TIMP-2) and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7 (IGFBP7) were validated for development of AKI well ahead of clinical manifestations—azotemia and oliguria. Cell-cycle arrest is known to be involved in the pathogenesis of AKI and this ‘dark side’ may also involve progression to chronic kidney disease. However, cell-cycle arrest has a ‘light side’ as well, since this mechanism can protect cells from the disastrous consequences of entering cell division with damaged DNA or insufficient bioenergetic resources during injury or stress. Whether we can use the light side to help prevent AKI remains to be seen, but there is already evidence that cell-cycle arrest biomarkers are indicators of both sides of this complex physiology. PMID:26044835

  18. Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell transplantation ameliorates burn-induced acute kidney injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Lu, Gang; Huang, Sha; Chen, Yongbin; Ma, Kui

    2013-09-01

    Excessive systemic inflammation following burns could lead to acute kidney injury (AKI). Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) suppress immune cell responses and have beneficial effects in various inflammatory-related immune disorders. However, autologous MSCs are not vital enough for the treatment because of the severely burned patients' deleterious condition. Umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) could be a suitable substitute cell candidate but no data are available on the therapeutic effectiveness of UC-MSCs transplantation for burn injury and its consequences. In this study, UC-MSCs or ulinastatin was administered intravenously in the rats with burn trauma, and the therapeutic effects of UC-MSCs on the survival of severe burn-induced AKI rats and functional protection of kidney were analyzed. Results showed that UC-MSCs promoted the survival and prevented commitment to apoptosis of resident kidney cells and reduced organ microscopic damage in kidneys after thermal trauma. Thus, our study demonstrates that intravenously delivered UC-MSCs protected the host from death caused by kidney injury subsequent to severe burn, identifying UC-MSCs transplantation may be an attractive candidate for cell-based treatments for burns and induced organ damage. PMID:24043673

  19. STAT3 and SOCS3 regulate NG2 cell proliferation and differentiation after contusive spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Hackett, Amber R; Lee, Do-Hun; Dawood, Abdul; Rodriguez, Mario; Funk, Lucy; Tsoulfas, Pantelis; Lee, Jae K

    2016-05-01

    NG2 cells, also known as oligodendrocyte progenitors or polydendrocytes, are a major component of the glial scar that forms after spinal cord injury. NG2 cells react to injury by proliferating around the lesion site and differentiating into oligodendrocytes and astrocytes, but the molecular mechanism is poorly understood. In this study, we tested the role of the transcription factor STAT3, and its suppressor SOCS3, in NG2 cell proliferation and differentiation after spinal cord injury. Using knockout mice in which STAT3 or SOCS3 are genetically deleted specifically in NG2 cells, we found that deletion of STAT3 led to a reduction in oligodendrogenesis, while deletion of SOCS3 led to enhanced proliferation of NG2 cells within the glial scar after spinal cord injury. Additionally, STAT3 and SOCS3 were not required for astrogliogenesis from NG2 cells after spinal cord injury. Interestingly, genetic deletion of STAT3 and SOCS3 did not have opposing effects, suggesting that SOCS3 may have targets other than the STAT3 pathway in NG2 cells after spinal cord injury. Altogether, our data show that both STAT3 and SOCS3 play important, yet unexpected, roles in NG2 cell proliferation and differentiation after spinal cord injury. PMID:26804026

  20. Cell density signal protein suitable for treatment of connective tissue injuries and defects

    DOEpatents

    Schwarz, Richard I.

    2002-08-13

    Identification, isolation and partial sequencing of a cell density protein produced by fibroblastic cells. The cell density signal protein comprising a 14 amino acid peptide or a fragment, variant, mutant or analog thereof, the deduced cDNA sequence from the 14 amino acid peptide, a recombinant protein, protein and peptide-specific antibodies, and the use of the peptide and peptide-specific antibodies as therapeutic agents for regulation of cell differentiation and proliferation. A method for treatment and repair of connective tissue and tendon injuries, collagen deficiency, and connective tissue defects.

  1. Tetrandrine protects mouse retinal ganglion cells from ischemic injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weiyi; Yang, Chen; Lu, Jing; Huang, Ping; Barnstable, Colin J; Zhang, Chun; Zhang, Samuel S

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the protective effects of tetrandrine (Tet) on murine ischemia-injured retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). For this, we used serum deprivation cell model, glutamate and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced RGC-5 cell death models, and staurosporine-differentiated neuron-like RGC-5 in vitro. We also investigated cell survival of purified primary-cultured RGCs treated with Tet. An in vivo retinal ischemia/reperfusion model was used to examine RGC survival after Tet administration 1 day before ischemia. We found that Tet affected RGC-5 survival in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Compared to dimethyl sulfoxide treatment, Tet increased the numbers of RGC-5 cells by 30% at 72 hours. After 48 hours, Tet protected staurosporine-induced RGC-5 cells from serum deprivation-induced cell death and significantly increased the relative number of cells cultured with 1 mM H2O2 (P<0.01). Several concentrations of Tet significantly prevented 25-mM-glutamate-induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner. Tet also increased primary RGC survival after 72 and 96 hours. Tet administration (10 μM, 2 μL) 1 day before retinal ischemia showed RGC layer loss (greater survival), which was less than those in groups with phosphate-buffered saline intravitreal injection plus ischemia in the central (P=0.005, n=6), middle (P=0.018, n=6), and peripheral (P=0.017, n=6) parts of the retina. Thus, Tet conferred protective effects on serum deprivation models of staurosporine-differentiated neuron-like RGC-5 cells and primary cultured murine RGCs. Furthermore, Tet showed greater in vivo protective effects on RGCs 1 day after ischemia. Tet and ciliary neurotrophic factor maintained the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) of primary cultured RGCs and inhibited the expression of activated caspase-3 and bcl-2 in ischemia/reperfusion-insult retinas. PMID:24711693

  2. Suppressed smooth muscle proliferation and inflammatory cell invasion after arterial injury in elafin-overexpressing mice

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Syed H.E.; You, Xiao-Mang; Ciura, Sorana; O’Blenes, Stacey; Husain, Mansoor; Rabinovitch, Marlene

    2000-01-01

    Elastases degrade the extracellular matrix, releasing growth factors and chemotactic peptides, inducing glycoproteins such as tenascin, and thereby promoting vascular cell proliferation and migration. Administration of serine elastase inhibitors reduces experimentally induced vascular disease. The ability to mount an intrinsic anti-elastase response may, therefore, protect against intimal/medial thickening after vascular injury. To investigate this, we showed that wire-induced endothelial denudation of the carotid artery is associated with transient elevation in elastase activity and confirmed that this is abolished in transgenic mice overexpressing the serine elastase inhibitor, elafin, targeted to the cardiovascular system. Ten days after injury, nontransgenic littermates show vessel enlargement, intimal thickening, increased medial area and cellularity, and 2-fold increase in tenascin. Injured vessels in transgenic mice become enlarged but are otherwise similar to sham-operated controls. Injury-induced vessel wall thickening, which is observed only in nontransgenic mice, is related to foci of neutrophils and macrophages, in addition to smooth muscle cells that fail to stain for α-actin and are likely dedifferentiated. Our study therefore suggests that a major determinant of the vascular response to injury is the early transient induction of serine elastase activity, which leads to cellular proliferation and inflammatory cell migration. PMID:10862784

  3. Salidroside Suppresses HUVECs Cell Injury Induced by Oxidative Stress through Activating the Nrf2 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yao; Zhang, Ya-Jie; Liu, Wei-Wei; Shi, Ai-Wu; Gu, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. Salidroside (SAL), one of the main effective constituents of Rhodiola rosea, has been reported to suppress oxidative stress-induced cardiomyocyte injury and necrosis by promoting transcription of nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-regulated genes such as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (quinone1) (NQO1). However, it has not been indicated whether SAL might ameliorate endothelial injury induced by oxidative stress. Here, our study demonstrated that SAL might suppress HUVEC cell injury induced by oxidative stress through activating the Nrf2 signaling pathway. The results of our study indicated that SAL decreased the levels of intercellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde (MDA), and improved the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), resulting in protective effects against oxidative stress-induced cell damage in HUVECs. It suppressed oxidative stress damage by inducing Nrf2 nuclear translocation and activating the expression of Nrf2-regulated antioxidant enzyme genes such as HO-1 and NQO1 in HUVECs. Knockdown of Nrf2 with siRNA abolished the cytoprotective effects against oxidative stress, decreased the expression of Nrf2, HO-1, and NQO1, and inhibited the nucleus translocation of Nrf2 in HUVECs. This study is the first to demonstrate that SAL suppresses HUVECs cell injury induced by oxidative stress through activating the Nrf2 signaling pathway. PMID:27517893

  4. Agmatine Attenuates Brain Edema and Apoptotic Cell Death after Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Young; Lee, Yong Woo; Kim, Jae Hwan; Lee, Won Taek; Park, Kyung Ah; Lee, Jong Eun

    2015-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with poor neurological outcome, including necrosis and brain edema. In this study, we investigated whether agmatine treatment reduces edema and apoptotic cell death after TBI. TBI was produced by cold injury to the cerebral primary motor cortex of rats. Agmatine was administered 30 min after injury and once daily until the end of the experiment. Animals were sacrificed for analysis at 1, 2, or 7 days after the injury. Various neurological analyses were performed to investigate disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and neurological dysfunction after TBI. To examine the extent of brain edema after TBI, the expression of aquaporins (AQPs), phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) were investigated. Our findings demonstrated that agmatine treatment significantly reduces brain edema after TBI by suppressing the expression of AQP1, 4, and 9. In addition, agmatine treatment significantly reduced apoptotic cell death by suppressing the phosphorylation of MAPKs and by increasing the nuclear translocation of NF-κB after TBI. These results suggest that agmatine treatment may have therapeutic potential for brain edema and neural cell death in various central nervous system diseases. PMID:26130959

  5. Aerosol deposition characteristics in distal acinar airways under cyclic breathing conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Baoshun

    2011-01-01

    Although the major mechanisms of aerosol deposition in the lung are known, detailed quantitative data in anatomically realistic models are still lacking, especially in the acinar airways. In this study, an algorithm was developed to build multigenerational three-dimensional models of alveolated airways with arbitrary bifurcation angles and spherical alveolar shape. Using computational fluid dynamics, the deposition of 1- and 3-μm aerosol particles was predicted in models of human alveolar sac and terminal acinar bifurcation under rhythmic wall motion for two breathing conditions (functional residual capacity = 3 liter, tidal volume = 0.5 and 0.9 liter, breathing period = 4 s). Particles entering the model during one inspiration period were tracked for multiple breathing cycles until all particles deposited or escaped from the model. Flow recirculation inside alveoli occurred only during transition between inspiration and expiration and accounted for no more than 1% of the whole cycle. Weak flow irreversibility and convective transport were observed in both models. The average deposition efficiency was similar for both breathing conditions and for both models. Under normal gravity, total deposition was ∼33 and 75%, of which ∼67 and 96% occurred during the first cycle, for 1- and 3-μm particles, respectively. Under zero gravity, total deposition was ∼2–5% for both particle sizes. These results support previous findings that gravitational sedimentation is the dominant deposition mechanism for micrometer-sized aerosols in acinar airways. The results also showed that moving walls and multiple breathing cycles are needed for accurate estimation of aerosol deposition in acinar airways. PMID:21330617

  6. Cell proliferation and apoptosis in optic nerve and brain integration centers of adult trout Oncorhynchus mykiss after optic nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Pushchina, Evgeniya V.; Shukla, Sachin; Varaksin, Anatoly A.; Obukhov, Dmitry K.

    2016-01-01

    Fishes have remarkable ability to effectively rebuild the structure of nerve cells and nerve fibers after central nervous system injury. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In order to address this issue, we investigated the proliferation and apoptosis of cells in contralateral and ipsilateral optic nerves, after stab wound injury to the eye of an adult trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. Heterogenous population of proliferating cells was investigated at 1 week after injury. TUNEL labeling gave a qualitative and quantitative assessment of apoptosis in the cells of optic nerve of trout 2 days after injury. After optic nerve injury, apoptotic response was investigated, and mass patterns of cell migration were found. The maximal concentration of apoptotic bodies was detected in the areas of mass clumps of cells. It is probably indicative of massive cell death in the area of high phagocytic activity of macrophages/microglia. At 1 week after optic nerve injury, we observed nerve cell proliferation in the trout brain integration centers: the cerebellum and the optic tectum. In the optic tectum, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-immunopositive radial glia-like cells were identified. Proliferative activity of nerve cells was detected in the dorsal proliferative (matrix) area of the cerebellum and in parenchymal cells of the molecular and granular layers whereas local clusters of undifferentiated cells which formed neurogenic niches were observed in both the optic tectum and cerebellum after optic nerve injury. In vitro analysis of brain cells of trout showed that suspension cells compared with monolayer cells retain higher proliferative activity, as evidenced by PCNA immunolabeling. Phase contrast observation showed mitosis in individual cells and the formation of neurospheres which gradually increased during 1–4 days of culture. The present findings suggest that trout can be used as a novel model for studying neuronal regeneration. PMID:27212918

  7. Cell proliferation and apoptosis in optic nerve and brain integration centers of adult trout Oncorhynchus mykiss after optic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Pushchina, Evgeniya V; Shukla, Sachin; Varaksin, Anatoly A; Obukhov, Dmitry K

    2016-04-01

    Fishes have remarkable ability to effectively rebuild the structure of nerve cells and nerve fibers after central nervous system injury. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In order to address this issue, we investigated the proliferation and apoptosis of cells in contralateral and ipsilateral optic nerves, after stab wound injury to the eye of an adult trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. Heterogenous population of proliferating cells was investigated at 1 week after injury. TUNEL labeling gave a qualitative and quantitative assessment of apoptosis in the cells of optic nerve of trout 2 days after injury. After optic nerve injury, apoptotic response was investigated, and mass patterns of cell migration were found. The maximal concentration of apoptotic bodies was detected in the areas of mass clumps of cells. It is probably indicative of massive cell death in the area of high phagocytic activity of macrophages/microglia. At 1 week after optic nerve injury, we observed nerve cell proliferation in the trout brain integration centers: the cerebellum and the optic tectum. In the optic tectum, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-immunopositive radial glia-like cells were identified. Proliferative activity of nerve cells was detected in the dorsal proliferative (matrix) area of the cerebellum and in parenchymal cells of the molecular and granular layers whereas local clusters of undifferentiated cells which formed neurogenic niches were observed in both the optic tectum and cerebellum after optic nerve injury. In vitro analysis of brain cells of trout showed that suspension cells compared with monolayer cells retain higher proliferative activity, as evidenced by PCNA immunolabeling. Phase contrast observation showed mitosis in individual cells and the formation of neurospheres which gradually increased during 1-4 days of culture. The present findings suggest that trout can be used as a novel model for studying neuronal regeneration. PMID:27212918

  8. Diabetes increases susceptibility of primary cultures of rat proximal tubular cells to chemically induced injury

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong Qing; Terlecky, Stanley R.; Lash, Lawrence H.

    2009-11-15

    Diabetic nephropathy is characterized by increased oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. In the present study, we prepared primary cultures of proximal tubular (PT) cells from diabetic rats 30 days after an ip injection of streptozotocin and compared their susceptibility to oxidants (tert-butyl hydroperoxide, methyl vinyl ketone) and a mitochondrial toxicant (antimycin A) with that of PT cells isolated from age-matched control rats, to test the hypothesis that PT cells from diabetic rats exhibit more cellular and mitochondrial injury than those from control rats when exposed to these toxicants. PT cells from diabetic rats exhibited higher basal levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and higher mitochondrial membrane potential, demonstrating that the PT cells maintain the diabetic phenotype in primary culture. Incubation with either the oxidants or mitochondrial toxicant resulted in greater necrotic and apoptotic cell death, greater evidence of morphological damage, greater increases in ROS, and greater decreases in mitochondrial membrane potential in PT cells from diabetic rats than in those from control rats. Pretreatment with either the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine or a catalase mimetic provided equivalent protection of PT cells from both diabetic and control rats. Despite the greater susceptibility to oxidative and mitochondrial injury, both cytoplasmic and mitochondrial glutathione concentrations were markedly higher in PT cells from diabetic rats, suggesting an upregulation of antioxidant processes in diabetic kidney. These results support the hypothesis that primary cultures of PT cells from diabetic rats are a valid model in which to study renal cellular function in the diabetic state.

  9. Highly efficient magnetic targeting of mesenchymal stem cells in spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Vaněček, Václav; Zablotskii, Vitalii; Forostyak, Serhiy; Růřička, Jiří; Herynek, Vít; Babič, Michal; Jendelová, Pavla; Kubinová, Šárka; Dejneka, Alexandr; Syková, Eva

    2012-01-01

    The transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) is currently under study as a therapeutic approach for spinal cord injury, and the number of transplanted cells that reach the lesioned tissue is one of the critical parameters. In this study, intrathecally transplanted cells labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were guided by a magnetic field and successfully targeted near the lesion site in the rat spinal cord. Magnetic resonance imaging and histological analysis revealed significant differences in cell numbers and cell distribution near the lesion site under the magnet in comparison to control groups. The cell distribution correlated well with the calculated distribution of magnetic forces exerted on the transplanted cells in the subarachnoid space and lesion site. The kinetics of the cells’ accumulation near the lesion site is described within the framework of a mathematical model that reveals those parameters critical for cell targeting and suggests ways to enhance the efficiency of magnetic cell delivery. In particular, we show that the targeting efficiency can be increased by using magnets that produce spatially modulated stray fields. Such magnetic systems with tunable geometric parameters may provide the additional level of control needed to enhance the efficiency of stem cell delivery in spinal cord injury. PMID:22888231

  10. Runx1 modulates developmental, but not injury-driven, hair follicle stem cell activation.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Karen M; Lee, Song Eun; McDermitt, David J; Waghmare, Sanjeev K; Zhang, Ying V; Woo, Hyun Nyun; Tumbar, Tudorita

    2008-03-01

    Aml1/Runx1 controls developmental aspects of several tissues, is a master regulator of blood stem cells, and plays a role in leukemia. However, it is unclear whether it functions in tissue stem cells other than blood. Here, we have investigated the role of Runx1 in mouse hair follicle stem cells by conditional ablation in epithelial cells. Runx1 disruption affects hair follicle stem cell activation, but not their maintenance, proliferation or differentiation potential. Adult mutant mice exhibit impaired de novo production of hair shafts and all temporary hair cell lineages, owing to a prolonged quiescent phase of the first hair cycle. The lag of stem cell activity is reversed by skin injury. Our work suggests a degree of functional overlap in Runx1 regulation of blood and hair follicle stem cells at an equivalent time point in the development of these two tissues. PMID:18256199

  11. Coupling of guanine nucleotide inhibitory protein to somatostatin receptors on pancreatic acinar membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, C.; Matozaki, T.; Nagao, M.; Baba, S.

    1987-09-01

    Guanine nucleotides and pertussis toxin were used to investigate whether somatostatin receptors interact with the guanine nucleotide inhibitory protein (NI) on pancreatic acinar membranes in the rat. Guanine nucleotides reduced /sup 125/I-(Tyr/sup 1/)somatostatin binding to acinar membranes up to 80%, with rank order of potency being 5'-guanylyl imidodiphosphate (Gpp(NH)p)>GTP>TDP>GMP. Scatchard analysis revealed that the decrease in somatostatin binding caused by Gpp(NH)p was due to the decrease in the maximum binding capacity without a significant change in the binding affinity. The inhibitory effect of Gpp(NH)p was partially abolished in the absence of Mg/sup 2 +/. When pancreatic acini were treated with 1 ..mu..g/ml pertussis toxin for 4 h, subsequent /sup 125/I-(Tyr/sup 1/)somatostatin binding to acinar membranes was reduced. Pertussis toxin treatment also abolished the inhibitory effect of somatostatin on vasoactive intestinal peptide-stimulated increase in cellular content of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) in the acini. The present results suggest that 1) somatostatin probably functions in the pancreas to regulate adenylate cyclase enzyme system via Ni, 2) the extent of modification of Ni is correlated with the ability of somatostatin to inhibit cAMP accumulation in acini, and 3) guanine nucleotides also inhibit somatostatin binding to its receptor.

  12. Acinus-on-a-chip: a microfluidic platform for pulmonary acinar flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishler, Rami; Mulligan, Molly; Sznitman, Josue; Sznitman Biofluids Team

    2013-11-01

    Convective respiratory flows in the pulmonary acinus and their influence on the fate of inhaled particles are typically studied using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) or scaled-up experimental models. However, current experiments generally capture only flow dynamics, without inhaled particle dynamics, due to difficulties in simultaneously matching flow and particle dynamics. In an effort to overcome these limitations, we have designed a novel microfluidic device mimicking acinar flow conditions directly at the physiological scale. The model features an anatomically-inspired acinar geometry with five dichotomously branching airway generations lined with periodically expanding and contracting alveoli. Using micro-particle image velocimetry (PIV), we reveal experimentally a gradual transition of alveolar flow patterns along the acinar tree from recirculating to radial streamlines, in support of previous predictions from CFD simulations. We demonstrate the applicability of the device for studying the mechanisms of particle deposition in the pulmonary acinus by mapping deposition sites of airborne fluorescent micro-particles (0.1-1 μm) and visualizing trajectories of airborne incense particles inside the system.

  13. Particle dynamics and deposition in true-scale pulmonary acinar models

    PubMed Central

    Fishler, Rami; Hofemeier, Philipp; Etzion, Yael; Dubowski, Yael; Sznitman, Josué

    2015-01-01

    Particle transport phenomena in the deep alveolated airways of the lungs (i.e. pulmonary acinus) govern deposition outcomes following inhalation of hazardous or pharmaceutical aerosols. Yet, there is still a dearth of experimental tools for resolving acinar particle dynamics and validating numerical simulations. Here, we present a true-scale experimental model of acinar structures consisting of bifurcating alveolated ducts that capture breathing-like wall motion and ensuing respiratory acinar flows. We study experimentally captured trajectories of inhaled polydispersed smoke particles (0.2 to 1 μm in diameter), demonstrating how intrinsic particle motion, i.e. gravity and diffusion, is crucial in determining dispersion and deposition of aerosols through a streamline crossing mechanism, a phenomenon paramount during flow reversal and locally within alveolar cavities. A simple conceptual framework is constructed for predicting the fate of inhaled particles near an alveolus by identifying capture and escape zones and considering how streamline crossing may shift particles between them. In addition, we examine the effect of particle size on detailed deposition patterns of monodispersed microspheres between 0.1–2 μm. Our experiments underline local modifications in the deposition patterns due to gravity for particles ≥0.5 μm compared to smaller particles, and show good agreement with corresponding numerical simulations. PMID:26358580

  14. Steady streaming: A key mixing mechanism in low-Reynolds-number acinar flows

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Haribalan; Tawhai, Merryn H.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Lin, Ching-Long

    2011-01-01

    Study of mixing is important in understanding transport of submicron sized particles in the acinar region of the lung. In this article, we investigate transport in view of advective mixing utilizing Lagrangian particle tracking techniques: tracer advection, stretch rate and dispersion analysis. The phenomenon of steady streaming in an oscillatory flow is found to hold the key to the origin of kinematic mixing in the alveolus, the alveolar mouth and the alveolated duct. This mechanism provides the common route to folding of material lines and surfaces in any region of the acinar flow, and has no bearing on whether the geometry is expanding or if flow separates within the cavity or not. All analyses consistently indicate a significant decrease in mixing with decreasing Reynolds number (Re). For a given Re, dispersion is found to increase with degree of alveolation, indicating that geometry effects are important. These effects of Re and geometry can also be explained by the streaming mechanism. Based on flow conditions and resultant convective mixing measures, we conclude that significant convective mixing in the duct and within an alveolus could originate only in the first few generations of the acinar tree as a result of nonzero inertia, flow asymmetry, and large Keulegan–Carpenter (KC) number. PMID:21580803

  15. Steady streaming: A key mixing mechanism in low-Reynolds-number acinar flows.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Haribalan; Tawhai, Merryn H; Hoffman, Eric A; Lin, Ching-Long

    2011-04-01

    Study of mixing is important in understanding transport of submicron sized particles in the acinar region of the lung. In this article, we investigate transport in view of advective mixing utilizing Lagrangian particle tracking techniques: tracer advection, stretch rate and dispersion analysis. The phenomenon of steady streaming in an oscillatory flow is found to hold the key to the origin of kinematic mixing in the alveolus, the alveolar mouth and the alveolated duct. This mechanism provides the common route to folding of material lines and surfaces in any region of the acinar flow, and has no bearing on whether the geometry is expanding or if flow separates within the cavity or not. All analyses consistently indicate a significant decrease in mixing with decreasing Reynolds number (Re). For a given Re, dispersion is found to increase with degree of alveolation, indicating that geometry effects are important. These effects of Re and geometry can also be explained by the streaming mechanism. Based on flow conditions and resultant convective mixing measures, we conclude that significant convective mixing in the duct and within an alveolus could originate only in the first few generations of the acinar tree as a result of nonzero inertia, flow asymmetry, and large Keulegan-Carpenter (K(C)) number. PMID:21580803

  16. Chronic hypoxia does not cause wall thickening of intra-acinar pulmonary supernumerary arteries.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Kaori; McLendon, Jared M; Wagner, Wiltz W; McMurtry, Ivan F; Oka, Masahiko

    2016-02-01

    Chronic exposure to hypoxia causes pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary arterial remodeling. Although the exact mechanisms of this remodeling are unclear, there is evidence that it is dependent on hemodynamic stress, rather than on hypoxia alone. Pulmonary supernumerary arteries experience low hemodynamic stress as a consequence of reduced perfusion due to 90° branching angles, small diameters, and "valve-like" structures at their orifices. We investigated whether or not intra-acinar supernumerary arteries undergo structural remodeling during the moderate pulmonary hypertension induced by chronic hypoxia. Rats were exposed to either normoxia or hypoxia for 6 weeks. The chronically hypoxic rats developed pulmonary hypertension. For both groups, pulmonary arteries were selectively filled with barium-gelatin mixture, and the wall thickness of intra-acinar pulmonary arteries was measured in histological samples. Only thin-walled arteries were observed in normoxic lungs. In hypertensive lungs, we found both thin- and thick-walled pulmonary arteries with similar diameters. Disproportionate degrees of arterial wall thickening between parent and daughter branches were observed with supernumerary branching patterns. While parent arteries developed significant wall thickening, their supernumerary branches did not. Thus, chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension did not cause wall thickening of intra-acinar pulmonary supernumerary arteries. These findings are consistent with the idea that hemodynamic stress, rather than hypoxia alone, is the cause of structural remodeling during chronic exposure to hypoxia. PMID:26811053

  17. Elevation of susceptibility to ozone-induced acute tracheobronchial injury in transgenic mice deficient in Clara cell secretory protein

    SciTech Connect

    Plopper, C.G. . E-mail: cgplopper@ucdavis.edu; Mango, G.W.; Hatch, G.E.; Wong, V.J.; Toskala, E.; Reynolds, S.D.; Tarkington, B.K.; Stripp, B.R.

    2006-05-15

    Increases in Clara cell abundance or cellular expression of Clara cell secretory protein (CCSP) may cause increased tolerance of the lung to acute oxidant injury by repeated exposure to ozone (O{sub 3}). This study defines how disruption of the gene for CCSP synthesis affects the susceptibility of tracheobronchial epithelium to acute oxidant injury. Mice homozygous for a null allele of the CCSP gene (CCSP-/-) and wild type (CCSP+/+) littermates were exposed to ozone (0.2 ppm, 8 h; 1 ppm, 8 h) or filtered air. Injury was evaluated by light and scanning electron microscopy, and the abundance of necrotic, ciliated, and nonciliated cells was estimated by morphometry. Proximal and midlevel intrapulmonary airways and terminal bronchioles were evaluated. There was no difference in airway epithelial composition between CCSP+/+ and CCSP-/- mice exposed to filtered air, and exposure to 0.2 ppm ozone caused little injury to the epithelium of both CCSP+/+ and CCSP-/- mice. After exposure to 1.0 ppm ozone, CCSP-/- mice suffered from a greater degree of epithelial injury throughout the airways compared to CCSP+/+ mice. CCSP-/- mice had both ciliated and nonciliated cell injury. Furthermore, lack of CCSP was associated with a shift in airway injury to include proximal airway generations. Therefore, we conclude that CCSP modulates the susceptibility of the epithelium to oxidant-induced injury. Whether this is due to the presence of CCSP on the acellular lining layer surface and/or its intracellular distribution in the secretory cell population needs to be defined.

  18. Drug delivery, cell-based therapies, and tissue engineering approaches for spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kabu, Shushi; Gao, Yue; Kwon, Brian K; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2015-12-10

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in devastating neurological and pathological consequences, causing major dysfunction to the motor, sensory, and autonomic systems. The primary traumatic injury to the spinal cord triggers a cascade of acute and chronic degenerative events, leading to further secondary injury. Many therapeutic strategies have been developed to potentially intervene in these progressive neurodegenerative events and minimize secondary damage to the spinal cord. Additionally, significant efforts have been directed toward regenerative therapies that may facilitate neuronal repair and establish connectivity across the injury site. Despite the promise that these approaches have shown in preclinical animal models of SCI, challenges with respect to successful clinical translation still remain. The factors that could have contributed to failure include important biologic and physiologic differences between the preclinical models and the human condition, study designs that do not mirror clinical reality, discrepancies in dosing and the timing of therapeutic interventions, and dose-limiting toxicity. With a better understanding of the pathobiology of events following acute SCI, developing integrated approaches aimed at preventing secondary damage and also facilitating neuroregenerative recovery is possible and hopefully will lead to effective treatments for this devastating injury. The focus of this review is to highlight the progress that has been made in drug therapies and delivery systems, and also cell-based and tissue engineering approaches for SCI. PMID:26343846

  19. Endothelial Progenitor Cells Correlate with Clinical Outcome of Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li; Wei, Huijie; Chen, Fanglian; Wang, Jinghua; Dong, Jing-fei; Zhang, Jianning

    2012-01-01

    Objective Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play an active role in vascular repair and revascularization of tissue damaged by traumatic, inflammatory, and ischemic injures. We correlate the changes in circulating EPCs with the severity of traumatic brain injury (TBI). The study is designed to investigate the EPC mobilization after injury and a potential use of circulating EPCs as a prognostic marker for evaluating trauma severity and clinical outcomes. Design A prospective cohort study conducted in two neurosurgical intensive care units (NSICU) of Tianjin Medical University General Hospital and Tianjin Huanhu Hospital. Patients Patients with traumatic brain injury and age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Interventions None Measurements and Main Results Changes in the levels of circulating EPCs were monitored for up to 21 days in 84 patients with TBI. Results were correlated with the clinical assessment of injury severity as determined by Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). The level of circulating EPCs was found to be suppressed 24–48 hrs after injury, but rapidly increased, reaching the highest at day 5–7 posttrauma. Circulating EPCs in patients with improved GCS were significantly higher than those with deteriorated conditions, and remained persistently low in patients who died of trauma. Conclusions The results suggest that the level of circulating EPCs correlates with the clinical severity and outcome of TBI, and may offer potentials as a prognostic marker for TBI. A long-term follow up of these patients is ongoing. PMID:21460712

  20. (-)-Epigallocatechin Gallate Inhibits Asymmetric Dimethylarginine-Induced Injury in Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Zhang, Zhiming; Lv, Lianjie; Qiao, Haibo; Chen, Xiuju; Zou, Changlin

    2016-08-01

    (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) is the main polyphenol component of green tea (leaves of the Camellia sinensis plant). EGCG has been reported to protect human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) against injury in several models. However, the exact mechanism is still unclear. In the current study we found that EGCG protected against asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA)-induced HBMEC injury, and inhibited ADMA-induced reactive oxygen species production and malondialdehyde expression. At the same time, we found that pretreatment with EGCG attenuated the upregulation of Bax and the downregulation of Bcl-2, thus confirming the cellular protective properties of EGCG against ADMA-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, we found that EGCG inhibited ADMA-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p-38, whose inhibitors relieved HBMEC injury. In conclusion, EGCG can protect against ADMA-induced HBMEC injury via the ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK pathways, which are involved in the underlying mechanisms of HBMEC injury in cerebral infarction. PMID:27038929

  1. The role of cell-extracellular matrix interactions in glomerular injury.

    PubMed

    Borza, Corina M; Pozzi, Ambra

    2012-05-15

    Glomerulosclerosis is characterized by excessive deposition of extracellular matrix within the glomeruli of the kidney, glomerular cell death, and subsequent loss of functional glomeruli. While in physiological situations the levels of extracellular matrix components are kept constant by a tight balance between formation and degradation, in the case of injury that results in fibrosis there is increased matrix deposition relative to its breakdown. Multiple factors control matrix synthesis and degradation, thus contributing to the development of glomerulosclerosis. This review focuses primarily on the role of cell-matrix interactions, which play a critical role in governing glomerular cell cues in both healthy and diseased kidneys. Cell-extracellular matrix interactions are made possible by various cellular receptors including integrins, discoidin domain receptors, and dystroglycan. Upon binding to a selective extracellular matrix protein, these receptors activate intracellular signaling pathways that can either downregulate or upregulate matrix synthesis and deposition. This, together with the observation that changes in the expression levels of matrix receptors have been documented in glomerular disease, clearly emphasizes the contribution of cell-matrix interactions in glomerular injury. Understanding the molecular mechanisms whereby extracellular matrix receptors regulate matrix homeostasis in the course of glomerular injury is therefore critical for devising more effective therapies to treat and ideally prevent glomerulosclerosis. PMID:22417893

  2. THE ROLE OF CELL-EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX INTERACTIONS IN GLOMERULAR INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Borza, Corina M.; Pozzi, Ambra

    2013-01-01

    Glomerulosclerosis is characterized by excessive deposition of extracellular matrix within the glomeruli of the kidney, glomerular cell death, and subsequent loss of functional glomeruli. While in physiological situations the levels of extracellular matrix components are kept constant by a tight balance between formation and degradation, in the case of injury that results in fibrosis there is increased matrix deposition relative to its breakdown. Multiple factors control matrix synthesis and degradation, thus contributing to the development of glomerulosclerosis. This review focuses primarily on the role of cell-matrix interactions, which play a critical role in governing glomerular cell cues in both healthy and diseased kidneys. Cell-extracellular matrix interactions are made possible by various cellular receptors including integrins, discoidin domain receptors, and dystroglycan. Upon binding to a selective extracellular matrix protein, these receptors activate intracellular signaling pathways that can either downregulate or upregulate matrix synthesis and deposition. This, together with the observation that changes in the expression levels of matrix receptors have been documented in glomerular disease, clearly emphasizes the contribution of cell-matrix interactions in glomerular injury. Understanding the molecular mechanisms whereby extracellular matrix receptors regulate matrix homeostasis in the course of glomerular injury is therefore critical for devising more effective therapies to treat and ideally prevent glomerulosclerosis. PMID:22417893

  3. Role of mitochondrial-derived oxidants in renal tubular cell cold storage injury

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Tanecia; Saba, Hamida; Laakman, Joe; Parajuli, Nirmala; MacMillan-Crow, Lee Ann

    2013-01-01

    Cold storage (CS) is regarded as a necessary procedure during donation of a deceased donor kidney that helps to optimize organ viability. Increased oxidant generation during both CS as well as during the reperfusion (or rewarming/CS.RW) phase have been suggested to be a major contributor to renal injury; although the source and/or biochemical pathways involved with oxidant production remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine if renal tubular mitochondrial superoxide is capable of inducing oxidant production and mitochondrial damage in response to a CS.RW insult. To test the role of mitochondrial superoxide in CS.RW injury, we used rat renal proximal tubular (NRK) cells overexpressing manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), the major mitochondrial antioxidant. Oxidant production, mitochondrial membrane potential, respiratory complex function, and cell death were all altered following exposure of NRK cells to CS.RW. MnSOD overexpression or inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) provided significant protection against oxidant generation, respiratory complex inactivation, and cell death. These findings implicate mitochondrial superoxide, nitric oxide, and their reaction product, peroxynitrite, as key signaling molecules involved in CS.RW injury of renal tubular cells, and suggest that therapeutic inhibition of these pathways may protect the donor kidney. PMID:20659553

  4. Adult stem cells for acute lung injury: remaining questions and concerns.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying-Gang; Hao, Qi; Monsel, Antoine; Feng, Xiao-Mei; Lee, Jae-Woo

    2013-07-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) or acute respiratory distress syndrome remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. The pathophysiology of ALI involves complex interactions between the inciting event, such as pneumonia, sepsis or aspiration, and the host immune response resulting in lung protein permeability, impaired resolution of pulmonary oedema, an intense inflammatory response in the injured alveolus and hypoxemia. In multiple preclinical studies, adult stem cells have been shown to be therapeutic due to both the ability to mitigate injury and inflammation through paracrine mechanisms and perhaps to regenerate tissue by virtue of their multi-potency. These characteristics have stimulated intensive research efforts to explore the possibility of using stem or progenitor cells for the treatment of lung injury. A variety of stem or progenitor cells have been isolated, characterized and tested experimentally in preclinical animal models of ALI. However, questions remain concerning the optimal dose, route and the adult stem or progenitor cell to use. Here, the current mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effect of stem cells in ALI as well as the questions that will arise as clinical trials for ALI are planned are reviewed. PMID:23578018

  5. Diacylglycerol kinase regulation of protein kinase D during oxidative stress-induced intestinal cell injury

    SciTech Connect

    Song Jun; Li Jing; Mourot, Joshua M.; Mark Evers, B.; Chung, Dai H.

    2008-10-17

    We recently demonstrated that protein kinase D (PKD) exerts a protective function during oxidative stress-induced intestinal epithelial cell injury; however, the exact role of DAG kinase (DGK){zeta}, an isoform expressed in intestine, during this process is unknown. We sought to determine the role of DGK during oxidative stress-induced intestinal cell injury and whether DGK acts as an upstream regulator of PKD. Inhibition of DGK with R59022 compound or DGK{zeta} siRNA transfection decreased H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced RIE-1 cell apoptosis as measured by DNA fragmentation and increased PKD phosphorylation. Overexpression of kinase-dead DGK{zeta} also significantly increased PKD phosphorylation. Additionally, endogenous nuclear DGK{zeta} rapidly translocated to the cytoplasm following H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment. Our findings demonstrate that DGK is involved in the regulation of oxidative stress-induced intestinal cell injury. PKD activation is induced by DGK{zeta}, suggesting DGK is an upstream regulator of oxidative stress-induced activation of the PKD signaling pathway in intestinal epithelial cells.

  6. Endothelial cell FGF signaling is required for injury response but not for vascular homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Oladipupo, Sunday S.; Smith, Craig; Santeford, Andrea; Park, Changwon; Sene, Abdoulaye; Wiley, Luke A.; Osei-Owusu, Patrick; Hsu, Joann; Zapata, Nicole; Liu, Fang; Nakamura, Rei; Lavine, Kory J.; Blumer, Kendall J.; Choi, Kyunghee; Apte, Rajendra S.; Ornitz, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) express fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) and are exquisitely sensitive to FGF signals. However, whether the EC or another vascular cell type requires FGF signaling during development, homeostasis, and response to injury is not known. Here, we show that Flk1-Cre or Tie2-Cre mediated deletion of FGFR1 and FGFR2 (Fgfr1/2Flk1-Cre or Fgfr1/2Tie2-Cre mice), which results in deletion in endothelial and hematopoietic cells, is compatible with normal embryonic development. As adults, Fgfr1/2Flk1-Cre mice maintain normal blood pressure and vascular reactivity and integrity under homeostatic conditions. However, neovascularization after skin or eye injury was significantly impaired in both Fgfr1/2Flk1-Cre and Fgfr1/2Tie2-Cre mice, independent of either hematopoietic cell loss of FGFR1/2 or vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (Vegfr2) haploinsufficiency. Also, impaired neovascularization was associated with delayed cutaneous wound healing. These findings reveal a key requirement for cell-autonomous EC FGFR signaling in injury-induced angiogenesis, but not for vascular homeostasis, identifying the EC FGFR signaling pathway as a target for diseases associated with aberrant vascular proliferation, such as age-related macular degeneration, and for modulating wound healing without the potential toxicity associated with direct manipulation of systemic FGF or VEGF activity. PMID:25139991

  7. Controversies on the Origin of Proliferating Epithelial Cells after Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kusaba, Tetsuro; Humphreys, Benjamin D.

    2014-01-01

    The kidney possesses the capacity to repair after an acute insult, even one that causes complete organ failure. This regenerative response is characterized by robust proliferation of epithelial cells, principally those located in the proximal tubule. Because defining the origin of these reparative cells has important consequences for stem cell and regenerative approaches to treat kidney injury, this area has been the subject of intense investigation and debate. While progress has been made in narrowing the possible origin of these cells to an intratubular source, there has been no consensus between the possibility of a preexisting intratubular stem or progenitor cell versus the possibility that fully differentiated epithelial cells re-enter the cell cycle after injury and generate new proximal tubule cells through self-duplication. This review will summarize the evidence on both sides of this active controversy and provide support for the notion that no preexisting proximal tubule stem cell population exists, but rather all differentiated proximal tubule epithelia have the capacity to proliferate during repair by a mechanism of dedifferentiation and self-duplication. PMID:24322596

  8. Stem cell therapy in spinal cord injury: Hollow promise or promising science?

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Aimee

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) remains one of the most physically, psychologically and socially debilitating conditions worldwide. While rehabilitation measures may help limit disability to some extent, there is no effective primary treatment yet available. The efficacy of stem cells as a primary therapeutic option in spinal cord injury is currently an area under much scrutiny and debate. Several laboratory and some primary clinical studies into the use of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells or embryonic stem cell-derived oligodentrocyte precursor cells have shown some promising results in terms of remyelination and regeneration of damaged spinal nerve tracts. More recently,laboratory and early clinical experiments into the use of Olfactory Ensheathing Cells, a type of glial cell derived from olfactory bulb and mucosa have provided some phenomenal preliminary evidence as to their neuroregenerative and neural bridging capacity. This report compares and evaluates some current research into selected forms of embryonic and mesenchymal stem cell therapy as well as olfactory ensheathing cell therapy in SCI, and also highlights some legal and ethical issues surrounding their use. While early results shows promise, more rigorous large scaleclinical trials are needed to shed light on the safety, efficacy and long term viability of stem cell and cellular transplant techniques in SCI.

  9. Stem cell therapy: A novel & futuristic treatment modality for disaster injuries

    PubMed Central

    Gurudutta, G.U.; Satija, Neeraj Kumar; Singh, Vimal Kishor; Verma, Yogesh Kumar; Gupta, Pallavi; Tripathi, R.P.

    2012-01-01

    Stem cell therapy hold the potential to meet the demand for transplant cells/tissues needed for treating damages resulting from both natural and man-made disasters. Pluripotency makes embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells ideal for use, but their teratogenic character is a major hindrance. Therapeutic benefits of bone marrow transplantation are well known but characterizing the potentialities of haematopoietic and mesenchymal cells is essential. Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have been used for treating both haematopoietic and non-haematopoietic disorders. Ease of isolation, in vitro expansion, and hypoimmunogenecity have brought mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into limelight. Though differentiation of MSCs into tissue-specific cells has been reported, differentiation-independent mechanisms seem to play a more significant role in tissue repair which need to be addressed further. The safety and feasibility of MSCs have been demonstrated in clinical trials, and their use in combination with HSC for radiation injury treatment seems to have extended benefit. Therefore, using stem cells for treatment of disaster injuries along with the conventional medical practice would likely accelerate the repair process and improve the quality of life of the victim. PMID:22382178

  10. Mesenchymal stem cells preconditioned with trimetazidine promote neovascularization of hearts under hypoxia/reoxygenation injury

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaowu; Yang, Junjie; Wang, Ying; Zhang, You; Ii, Masaaki; Shen, Zhenya; Hui, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cell-based angiogenesis is a promising treatment for ischemic diseases; however, survival of implanted cells is impaired by the ischemic microenvironment. In this study, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for cell transplantation were preconditioned with trimetazidine (TMZ). We hypothesized that TMZ enhances the survival rate of MSCs under hypoxic stimuli through up-regulation of HIF1-α. Methods and results: Bone marrow-derived rat mesenchymal stem cells were preconditioned with 10 μM TMZ for 6 h. TMZ preconditioning of MSCs remarkably increased cell viability and the expression of HIF1-α and Bcl-2, when cells were under hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) stimuli. But the protective effects of TMZ were abolished after knocking down of HIF-1α. Three days after implantation of the cells into the peri-ischemic zone of rat myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury model, survival of the TMZ-preconditioned MSCs was high. Furthermore, capillary density and cardiac function were significantly better in the rats implanted with TMZ-preconditioned MSCs 28 days after cell injection. Conclusions: TMZ preconditioning increased the survival rate of MSCs, through up-regulation of HIF1-α, thus contributing to neovascularization and improved cardiac function of rats subjected to myocardial I/R injury. PMID:26629255

  11. Stem cell therapy in spinal cord injury: Hollow promise or promising science?

    PubMed

    Goel, Aimee

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) remains one of the most physically, psychologically and socially debilitating conditions worldwide. While rehabilitation measures may help limit disability to some extent, there is no effective primary treatment yet available. The efficacy of stem cells as a primary therapeutic option in spinal cord injury is currently an area under much scrutiny and debate. Several laboratory and some primary clinical studies into the use of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells or embryonic stem cell-derived oligodentrocyte precursor cells have shown some promising results in terms of remyelination and regeneration of damaged spinal nerve tracts. More recently,laboratory and early clinical experiments into the use of Olfactory Ensheathing Cells, a type of glial cell derived from olfactory bulb and mucosa have provided some phenomenal preliminary evidence as to their neuroregenerative and neural bridging capacity. This report compares and evaluates some current research into selected forms of embryonic and mesenchymal stem cell therapy as well as olfactory ensheathing cell therapy in SCI, and also highlights some legal and ethical issues surrounding their use. While early results shows promise, more rigorous large scaleclinical trials are needed to shed light on the safety, efficacy and long term viability of stem cell and cellular transplant techniques in SCI. PMID:27217662

  12. Biomarkers distinguish apoptotic and necrotic cell death during hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Antoine, Daniel J; Weemhoff, James L; Jenkins, Rosalind E; Farhood, Anwar; Park, B Kevin; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2014-11-01

    Hepatic ischemia/reperfusion (IRP) injury is a significant clinical problem during tumor-resection surgery (Pringle maneuver) and liver transplantation. However, the relative contribution of necrotic and apoptotic cell death to the overall liver injury is still controversial. To address this important issue with a standard murine model of hepatic IRP injury, plasma biomarkers of necrotic cell death such as micro-RNA 122, full-length cytokeratin 18 (FK18), and high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein and plasma biomarkers of apoptosis such as plasma caspase-3 activity and caspase-cleaved fragment of cytokeratin 18 (CK18) coupled with markers of inflammation (hyperacetylated HMGB1) were compared by histological features in hematoxylin and eosin-stained and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling (TUNEL)-stained liver sections. After 45 minutes of hepatic ischemia and 1 to 24 hours of reperfusion, all necrosis markers increased dramatically in plasma by 40- to >10,000-fold over the baseline with a time course similar to that of alanine aminotransferase. These data correlated well with histological characteristics of necrosis. Within the area of necrosis, most cells were TUNEL positive; initially (≤3 hours of reperfusion), the staining was restricted to nuclei, but it later spread to the cytosol, and this is characteristic of karyorrhexis during necrotic cell death. In contrast, the lack of morphological evidence of apoptotic cell death and relevant caspase-3 activity in the postischemic liver correlated well with the absence of caspase-3 activity and CK18 (except for a minor increase at 3 hours of reperfusion) in plasma. A quantitative comparison of FK18 (necrosis) and CK18 (apoptosis) release indicated dominant cell death by necrosis during IRP and only a temporary and very minor degree of apoptosis. These data suggest that the focus of future research should be the elucidation of necrotic signaling mechanisms to

  13. BIOMARKERS DISTINGUISH APOPTOTIC AND NECROTIC CELL DEATH DURING HEPATIC ISCHEMIA-REPERFUSION INJURY IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min; Antoine, Daniel J.; Weemhoff, James L.; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Farhood, Anwar; Park, B. Kevin; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic ischemia-reperfusion (IRP) injury is a significant clinical problem during tumor resection surgery (Pringle maneuver), and liver transplantation. However, the relative contribution of necrotic and apoptotic cell death to the overall liver injury is still controversial. In order to address this important issue in a standard murine model of hepatic IRP injury, plasma biomarkers of necrotic cell death such as micro-RNA-122, full-length cytokeratin-18 (FK18) and high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) protein, and apoptosis including plasma caspase-3 activity and caspase-cleaved cytokeratin-18 (CK18), coupled with markers of inflammation (hyper-acetylated HMGB1) were compared with histological features in H&E- and TUNEL-stained liver sections. After 45 min of hepatic ischemia and 1–24h of reperfusion, all necrosis markers increased dramatically in plasma by 40-to->10,000-fold over baseline with a time course similar to ALT. These data correlated well with histological characteristics of necrosis. Within the area of necrosis, most cells were TUNEL-positive; initially (≤ 3h of RP) the staining was restricted to nuclei but later spread to the cytosol characteristic for karyorrhexis during necrotic cell death. In contrast, the lack of morphological evidence of apoptotic cell death and relevant caspase-3 activity in the postischemic liver correlated well with the absence of caspase-3 activity and CK18 (except a minor increase at 3h RP) in plasma. The quantitative comparison of FK18 (necrosis) and CK18 (apoptosis) release indicated the dominant cell death by necrosis during IRP and only a temporary and very minor degree of apoptosis. These data suggest that the focus of future research should be on the elucidation of necrotic signaling mechanisms to identify relevant targets, which may be used to attenuate hepatic IRP injury. PMID:25046819

  14. γδ T cells protect against LPS-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Wehrmann, Fabian; Lavelle, James C; Collins, Colm B; Tinega, Alex N; Thurman, Joshua M; Burnham, Ellen L; Simonian, Philip L

    2016-02-01

    γδ T lymphocytes are a unique T cell population with important anti-inflammatory capabilities. Their role in acute lung injury, however, is poorly understood but may provide significant insight into lung-protective mechanisms occurring after injury. In a murine model of lung injury, wild-type C57BL/6 and TCRδ(-/-) mice were exposed to Escherichia coli LPS, followed by analysis of γδ T cell and macrophage subsets. In the absence of γδ T cells, TCRδ(-/-) mice developed increased inflammation and alveolar-capillary leak compared with wild-type C57BL/6 mice after LPS exposure that correlated with expansion of distinct macrophage populations. Classically activated M1 macrophages were increased in the lung of TCRδ(-/-) mice at d 1, 4, and 7 after LPS exposure that peaked at d 4 and persisted at d 7 compared with wild-type animals. In response to LPS, Vγ1 and Vγ7 γδ T cells were expanded in the lung and expressed IL-4. Coculture experiments showed decreased expression of TNF-α by resident alveolar macrophages in the presence of γδ T cells that was reversed in the presence of an anti-IL-4-blocking antibody. Treatment of mice with rIL4 resulted in reduced numbers of M1 macrophages, inflammation, and alveolar-capillary leak. Therefore, one mechanism by which Vγ1 and Vγ7 γδ T cells protect against LPS-induced lung injury is through IL-4 expression, which decreases TNF-α production by resident alveolar macrophages, thus reducing accumulation of M1 macrophages, inflammation, and alveolar-capillary leak. PMID:26428678

  15. Mast cells promote scar remodeling and functional recovery after spinal cord injury via mouse mast cell protease 6.

    PubMed

    Vangansewinkel, Tim; Geurts, Nathalie; Quanten, Kirsten; Nelissen, Sofie; Lemmens, Stefanie; Geboes, Lies; Dooley, Dearbhaile; Vidal, Pia M; Pejler, Gunnar; Hendrix, Sven

    2016-05-01

    An important barrier for axon regeneration and recovery after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is attributed to the scar that is formed at the lesion site. Here, we investigated the effect of mouse mast cell protease (mMCP) 6, a mast cell (MC)-specific tryptase, on scarring and functional recovery after a spinal cord hemisection injury. Functional recovery was significantly impaired in both MC-deficient and mMCP6-knockout (mMCP6(-/-)) mice after SCI compared with wild-type control mice. This decrease in locomotor performance was associated with an increased lesion size and excessive scarring at the injury site. Axon growth-inhibitory chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans and the extracellular matrix components fibronectin, laminin, and collagen IV were significantly up-regulated in MC-deficient and mMCP6(-/-) mice, with an increase in scar volume between 23 and 32%. A degradation assay revealed that mMCP6 directly cleaves fibronectin and collagen IV in vitro In addition, gene expression levels of the scar components fibronectin, aggrecan, and collagen IV were increased up to 6.8-fold in mMCP6(-/-) mice in the subacute phase after injury. These data indicate that endogenous mMCP6 has scar-suppressing properties after SCI via indirect cleavage of axon growth-inhibitory scar components and alteration of the gene expression profile of these factors.-Vangansewinkel, T., Geurts, N., Quanten, K., Nelissen, S., Lemmens, S., Geboes, L., Dooley, D., Vidal, P. M., Pejler, G., Hendrix, S. Mast cells promote scar remodeling and functional recovery after spinal cord injury via mouse mast cell protease 6. PMID:26917739

  16. A unified cell biological perspective on axon–myelin injury

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Demyelination and axon loss are pathological hallmarks of the neuroinflammatory disorder multiple sclerosis (MS). Although we have an increasingly detailed understanding of how immune cells can damage axons and myelin individually, we lack a unified view of how the axon–myelin unit as a whole is affected by immune-mediated attack. In this review, we propose that as a result of the tight cell biological interconnection of axons and myelin, damage to either can spread, which might convert a local inflammatory disease process early in MS into the global progressive disorder seen during later stages. This mode of spreading could also apply to other neurological disorders. PMID:25092654

  17. Nonapoptotic cell death in acute kidney injury and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Linkermann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Acute tubular necrosis causes a loss of renal function, which clinically presents as acute kidney failure (AKI). The biochemical signaling pathways that trigger necrosis have been investigated in detail over the past 5 years. It is now clear that necrosis (regulated necrosis, RN) represents a genetically driven process that contributes to the pathophysiology of AKI. RN pathways such as necroptosis, ferroptosis, parthanatos, and mitochondrial permeability transition-induced regulated necrosis (MPT-RN) may be mechanistically distinct, and the relative contributions to overall organ damage during AKI in living organisms largely remain elusive. In a synchronized manner, some necrotic programs induce the breakdown of tubular segments and multicellular functional units, whereas others are limited to killing single cells in the tubular compartment. Importantly, the means by which a renal cell dies may have implications for the subsequent inflammatory response. In this review, the recent advances in the field of renal cell death in AKI and key enzymes that might serve as novel therapeutic targets will be discussed. As a consequence of the interference with RN, the immunogenicity of dying cells in AKI in renal transplants will be diminished, rendering inhibitors of RN indirect immunosuppressive agents. PMID:26759047

  18. Cross-Activating Invariant NKT Cells and Kupffer Cells Suppress Cholestatic Liver Injury in a Mouse Model of Biliary Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Duwaerts, Caroline C.; Sun, Eric P.; Cheng, Chao-Wen; van Rooijen, Nico; Gregory, Stephen H.

    2013-01-01

    Both Kupffer cells and invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells suppress neutrophil-dependent liver injury in a mouse model of biliary obstruction. We hypothesize that these roles are interdependent and require iNKT cell-Kupffer cell cross-activation. Female, wild-type and iNKT cell-deficient C57Bl/6 mice were injected with magnetic beads 3 days prior to bile duct ligation (BDL) in order to facilitate subsequent Kupffer cell isolation. On day three post-BDL, the animals were euthanized and the livers dissected. Necrosis was scored; Kupffer cells were isolated and cell surface marker expression (flow cytometry), mRNA expression (qtPCR), nitric oxide (NO.) production (Griess reaction), and protein secretion (cytometric bead-array or ELISAs) were determined. To address the potential role of NO. in suppressing neutrophil accumulation, a group of WT mice received 1400W, a specific inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor, prior to BDL. To clarify the mechanisms underlying Kupffer cell-iNKT cell cross-activation, WT animals were administered anti-IFN-γ or anti-lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1 antibody prior to BDL. Compared to their WT counterparts, Kupffer cells obtained from BDL iNKT cell-deficient mice expressed lower iNOS mRNA levels, produced less NO., and secreted more neutrophil chemoattractants. Both iNOS inhibition and IFN-γ neutralization increased neutrophil accumulation in the livers of BDL WT mice. Anti-LFA-1 pre-treatment reduced iNKT cell accumulation in these same animals. These data indicate that the LFA-1-dependent cross-activation of iNKT cells and Kupffer cells inhibits neutrophil accumulation and cholestatic liver injury. PMID:24260285

  19. Cross-activating invariant NKT cells and kupffer cells suppress cholestatic liver injury in a mouse model of biliary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Duwaerts, Caroline C; Sun, Eric P; Cheng, Chao-Wen; van Rooijen, Nico; Gregory, Stephen H

    2013-01-01

    Both Kupffer cells and invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells suppress neutrophil-dependent liver injury in a mouse model of biliary obstruction. We hypothesize that these roles are interdependent and require iNKT cell-Kupffer cell cross-activation. Female, wild-type and iNKT cell-deficient C57Bl/6 mice were injected with magnetic beads 3 days prior to bile duct ligation (BDL) in order to facilitate subsequent Kupffer cell isolation. On day three post-BDL, the animals were euthanized and the livers dissected. Necrosis was scored; Kupffer cells were isolated and cell surface marker expression (flow cytometry), mRNA expression (qtPCR), nitric oxide (NO (.) ) production (Griess reaction), and protein secretion (cytometric bead-array or ELISAs) were determined. To address the potential role of NO (.) in suppressing neutrophil accumulation, a group of WT mice received 1400W, a specific inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor, prior to BDL. To clarify the mechanisms underlying Kupffer cell-iNKT cell cross-activation, WT animals were administered anti-IFN-γ or anti-lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1 antibody prior to BDL. Compared to their WT counterparts, Kupffer cells obtained from BDL iNKT cell-deficient mice expressed lower iNOS mRNA levels, produced less NO (.) , and secreted more neutrophil chemoattractants. Both iNOS inhibition and IFN-γ neutralization increased neutrophil accumulation in the livers of BDL WT mice. Anti-LFA-1 pre-treatment reduced iNKT cell accumulation in these same animals. These data indicate that the LFA-1-dependent cross-activation of iNKT cells and Kupffer cells inhibits neutrophil accumulation and cholestatic liver injury. PMID:24260285

  20. Responses of Proximal Tubular Cells to Injury in Congenital Renal Disease: Fight or Flight

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, Robert L.; Forbes, Michael S.; Galarreta, Carolina I.; Thornhill, Barbara A.

    2013-01-01

    Most chronic kidney disease in children results from congenital or inherited disorders, which can be studied in mouse models. Following 2 weeks of unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) in the adult mouse, nephron loss is due to proximal tubular mitochondrial injury and cell death. In neonatal mice, proximal tubular cell death is delayed beyond 2 weeks of complete UUO, and release of partial UUO allows remodeling of remaining nephrons. Progressive cyst expansion develops in polycystic kidney disease (PKD), a common inherited renal disorder. The PCY mutant mouse (which develops late-onset PKD) develops thinning of the glomerulotubular junction in parallel with growth of cysts in adulthood. Renal insufficiency in nephropathic cystinosis, a rare inherited renal disorder, results from progressive tubular cystine accumulation. In the Ctns knock out mouse (a model of cystinosis), proximal tubular cells become flattened, with loss of mitochondria and thickening of tubular basement membrane. In each model, persistent obstructive or metabolic stress leads ultimately to the formation of atubular glomeruli. The initial “fight” response (proximal tubular survival) switches to a “flight” response (proximal tubular cell death) with ongoing oxidative injury and mitochondrial damage. Therapies should be directed at reducing proximal tubular mitochondrial oxidative injury to enhance repair and regeneration. PMID:23949631

  1. Surgical Injury to the Mouse Pancreas through Ligation of the Pancreatic Duct as a Model for Endocrine and Exocrine Reprogramming and Proliferation.

    PubMed

    De Groef, Sofie; Leuckx, Gunter; Van Gassen, Naomi; Staels, Willem; Cai, Ying; Yuchi, Yixing; Coppens, Violette; De Leu, Nico; Heremans, Yves; Baeyens, Luc; Van de Casteele, Mark; Heimberg, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Expansion of pancreatic beta cells in vivo or ex vivo, or generation of beta cells by differentiation from an embryonic or adult stem cell, can provide new expandable sources of beta cells to alleviate the donor scarcity in human islet transplantation as therapy for diabetes. Although recent advances have been made towards this aim, mechanisms that regulate beta cell expansion and differentiation from a stem/progenitor cell remain to be characterized. Here, we describe a protocol for an injury model in the adult mouse pancreas that can function as a tool to study mechanisms of tissue remodeling and beta cell proliferation and differentiation. Partial duct ligation (PDL) is an experimentally induced injury of the rodent pancreas involving surgical ligation of the main pancreatic duct resulting in an obstruction of drainage of exocrine products out of the tail region of the pancreas. The inflicted damage induces acinar atrophy, immune cell infiltration and severe tissue remodeling. We have previously reported the activation of Neurogenin (Ngn) 3 expressing endogenous progenitor-like cells and an increase in beta cell proliferation after PDL. Therefore, PDL provides a basis to study signals involved in beta cell dynamics and the properties of an endocrine progenitor in adult pancreas. Since, it still remains largely unclear, which factors and pathways contribute to beta cell neogenesis and proliferation in PDL, a standardized protocol for PDL will allow for comparison across laboratories. PMID:26273954

  2. Human CD34+ Progenitor Cells Freshly Isolated from Umbilical Cord Blood Attenuate Inflammatory Lung Injury following LPS Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaojia; Sun, Kai; Zhao, Yidan D.; Vogel, Stephen M.; Song, Yuanling; Mahmud, Nadim; Zhao, You-Yang

    2014-01-01

    Adult stem cell-based therapy is a promising novel approach for treatment of acute lung injury. Here we investigated the therapeutic potential of freshly isolated human umbilical cord blood CD34+ progenitor cells (fCB-CD34+ cells) in a mouse model of acute lung injury. At 3 h post-lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge, fCB-CD34+ cells were transplanted i.v. to mice while CD34− cells or PBS were administered as controls in separate cohorts of mice. We observed that fCB-CD34+ cell treatment inhibited lung vascular injury evident by decreased lung vascular permeability. In contrast, CD34− cells had no effects on lung vascular injury. Lung inflammation determined by myeloperoxidase activity, neutrophil sequestration and expression of pro-inflammatory mediators was attenuated in fCB-CD34+ cell-treated mice at 26 h post-LPS challenge compared to PBS or CD34− cell-treated controls. Importantly, lung inflammation in fCB-CD34+ cell-treated mice was returned to normal levels as seen in basal mice at 52 h post-LPS challenge whereas PBS or CD34− cell-treated control mice exhibited persistent lung inflammation. Accordingly, fCB-CD34+ cell-treated mice exhibited a marked increase of survival rate. Employing in vivo 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine incorporation assay, we found a drastic induction of lung endothelial proliferation in fCB-CD34+ cell-treated mice at 52 h post-LPS compared to PBS or CD34− cell-treated controls, which contributed to restoration of vascular integrity and thereby inhibition of lung inflammation. Taken together, these data have demonstrated the protective effects of fCB-CD34+ cell on acute lung injury induced by LPS challenge, suggesting fCB-CD34+ cells are an important source of stem cells for the treatment of acute lung injury. PMID:24558433

  3. Transplanted Neural Progenitor Cells from Distinct Sources Migrate Differentially in an Organotypic Model of Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ngalula, Kapinga P.; Cramer, Nathan; Schell, Michael J.; Juliano, Sharon L.

    2015-01-01

    Brain injury is a major cause of long-term disability. The possibility exists for exogenously derived neural progenitor cells to repair damage resulting from brain injury, although more information is needed to successfully implement this promising therapy. To test the ability of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) obtained from rats to repair damaged neocortex, we transplanted neural progenitor cell suspensions into normal and injured slice cultures of the neocortex acquired from rats on postnatal day 0–3. Donor cells from E16 embryos were obtained from either the neocortex, including the ventricular zone (VZ) for excitatory cells, ganglionic eminence (GE) for inhibitory cells or a mixed population of the two. Cells were injected into the ventricular/subventricular zone (VZ/SVZ) or directly into the wounded region. Transplanted cells migrated throughout the cortical plate with GE and mixed population donor cells predominately targeting the upper cortical layers, while neocortically derived NPCs from the VZ/SVZ migrated less extensively. In the injured neocortex, transplanted cells moved predominantly into the wounded area. NPCs derived from the GE tended to be immunoreactive for GABAergic markers while those derived from the neocortex were more strongly immunoreactive for other neuronal markers such as MAP2, TUJ1, or Milli-Mark. Cells transplanted in vitro acquired the electrophysiological characteristics of neurons, including action potential generation and reception of spontaneous synaptic activity. This suggests that transplanted cells differentiate into neurons capable of functionally integrating with the host tissue. Together, our data suggest that transplantation of neural progenitor cells holds great potential as an emerging therapeutic intervention for restoring function lost to brain damage. PMID:26500604

  4. Toll Like Receptor 4 Dependent Kupffer Cell Activation and Liver Injury in a Novel Mouse Model of Parenteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    El Kasmi, Karim C.; Anderson, Aimee L.; Devereaux, Michael W.; Fillon, Sophie A.; Harris, J. Kirk; Lovell, Mark A.; Finegold, Milton J.; Sokol, Ronald J.

    2011-01-01

    Infants with intestinal failure who are parenteral nutrition (PN)-dependent may develop cholestatic liver injury and cirrhosis (PN-associated liver injury: PNALI). The pathogenesis of PNALI remains incompletely understood. We hypothesized that intestinal injury with increased intestinal permeability combined with administration of PN promotes LPS-TLR4 signaling dependent Kupffer cell activation as an early event in the pathogenesis of PNALI. We developed a mouse model in which intestinal injury and increased permeability were induced by oral treatment for 4 days with dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) followed by continuous infusion of soy lipid-based PN solution through a central venous catheter for 7 (PN/DSS7d) and 28 (PN/DSS28d) days. Liver injury and cholestasis were evaluated by serum AST, ALT, bile acids, total bilirubin, and by histology. Purified Kupffer cells were probed for transcription of pro-inflammatory cytokines. PN/DSS7d mice showed elevated portal vein LPS levels, evidence of hepatocyte injury and cholestasis, and increased Kupffer cell expression of IL6, TNFα, and TGFβ. Serological markers of liver injury remained elevated in PN/DSS28d mice associated with focal inflammation, hepatocyte apoptosis, peliosis, and Kupffer cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia. PN infusion without DSS pre-treatment or DSS pre-treatment alone did not result in liver injury or Kupffer cell activation. Suppression of the intestinal microbiota with broad spectrum antibiotics or ablation of TLR4 signaling in TLR4 mutant mice resulted in significantly reduced Kupffer cell activation and markedly attenuated liver injury in PN/DSS7d mice. Conclusion These data suggest that intestinal-derived LPS activates Kupffer cells through TLR4 signaling in early stages of PNALI. PMID:22120983

  5. Transplantation of human amniotic epithelial cells repairs brachial plexus injury: pathological and biomechanical analyses

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qi; Luo, Min; Li, Peng; Jin, Hai

    2014-01-01

    A brachial plexus injury model was established in rabbits by stretching the C6 nerve root. Immediately after the stretching, a suspension of human amniotic epithelial cells was injected into the injured brachial plexus. The results of tensile mechanical testing of the brachial plexus showed that the tensile elastic limit strain, elastic limit stress, maximum stress, and maximum strain of the injured brachial plexuses were significantly increased at 24 weeks after the injection. The treatment clearly improved the pathological morphology of the injured brachial plexus nerve, as seen by hematoxylin eosin staining, and the functions of the rabbit forepaw were restored. These data indicate that the injection of human amniotic epithelial cells contributed to the repair of brachial plexus injury, and that this technique may transform into current clinical treatment strategies. PMID:25657737

  6. DAMPs and autophagy: cellular adaptation to injury and unscheduled cell death.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiuhong; Kang, Rui; Zeh, Herbert J; Lotze, Michael T; Tang, Daolin

    2013-04-01

    Autophagy is a lysosome-mediated catabolic process involving the degradation of intracellular contents (e.g., proteins and organelles) as well as invading microbes (e.g., parasites, bacteria and viruses). Multiple forms of cellular stress can stimulate this pathway, including nutritional imbalances, oxygen deprivation, immunological response, genetic defects, chromosomal anomalies and cytotoxic stress. Damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (DAMPs) are released by stressed cells undergoing autophagy or injury, and act as endogenous danger signals to regulate the subsequent inflammatory and immune response. A complex relationship exists between DAMPs and autophagy in cellular adaption to injury and unscheduled cell death. Since both autophagy and DAMPs are important for pathogenesis of human disease, it is crucial to understand how they interplay to sustain homeostasis in stressful or dangerous environments. PMID:23388380

  7. Long-Distance Growth and Connectivity of Neural Stem Cells After Severe Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Paul; Wang, Yaozhi; Graham, Lori; McHale, Karla; Gao, Mingyong; Wu, Di; Brock, John; Blesch, Armin; Rosenzweig, Ephron S.; Havton, Leif A.; Zheng, Binhai; Conner, James M.; Marsala, Martin; Tuszynski, Mark H.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Neural stem cells (NSCs) expressing GFP were embedded into fibrin matrices containing growth factor cocktails and grafted to sites of severe spinal cord injury. Grafted cells differentiated into multiple cellular phenotypes, including neurons, which extended large numbers of axons over remarkable distances. Extending axons formed abundant synapses with host cells. Axonal growth was partially dependent on mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) but not Nogo signaling. Grafted neurons supported formation of electrophysiological relays across sites of complete spinal transection, resulting in functional recovery. Two human stem cell lines (566RSC and HUES7) embedded in growth factor-containing fibrin exhibited similar growth, and 566RSC cells supported functional recovery. Thus, properties intrinsic to early stage neurons can overcome the inhibitory milieu of the injured adult spinal cord to mount remarkable axonal growth resulting in formation of novel relay circuits that significantly improve function. These therapeutic properties extend across stem cell sources and species. PMID:22980985

  8. Feasibility of combination allogeneic stem cell therapy for spinal cord injury: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Cellular therapy for spinal cord injury (SCI) is overviewed focusing on bone marrow mononuclear cells, olfactory ensheathing cells, and mesenchymal stem cells. A case is made for the possibility of combining cell types, as well as for allogeneic use. We report the case of 29 year old male who suffered a crush fracture of the L1 vertebral body, lacking lower sensorimotor function, being a score A on the ASIA scale. Stem cell therapy comprised of intrathecal administration of allogeneic umbilical cord blood ex-vivo expanded CD34 and umbilical cord matrix MSC was performed 5 months, 8 months, and 14 months after injury. Cell administration was well tolerated with no adverse effects observed. Neuropathic pain subsided from intermittent 10/10 to once a week 3/10 VAS. Recovery of muscle, bowel and sexual function was noted, along with a decrease in ASIA score to "D". This case supports further investigation into allogeneic-based stem cell therapies for SCI. PMID:21070647

  9. Lineage Tracing Reveals Distinctive Fates for Mesothelial Cells and Submesothelial Fibroblasts during Peritoneal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Ting; Chang, Yu-Ting; Pan, Szu-Yu; Chou, Yu-Hsiang; Chang, Fan-Chi; Yeh, Pei-Ying; Liu, Yuan-Hung; Chiang, Wen-Chih; Chen, Yung-Ming; Wu, Kwan-Dun; Tsai, Tun-Jun; Duffield, Jeremy S.

    2014-01-01

    Fibrosis of the peritoneal cavity remains a serious, life-threatening problem in the treatment of kidney failure with peritoneal dialysis. The mechanism of fibrosis remains unclear partly because the fibrogenic cells have not been identified with certainty. Recent studies have proposed mesothelial cells to be an important source of myofibroblasts through the epithelial–mesenchymal transition; however, confirmatory studies in vivo are lacking. Here, we show by inducible genetic fate mapping that type I collagen–producing submesothelial fibroblasts are specific progenitors of α-smooth muscle actin–positive myofibroblasts that accumulate progressively in models of peritoneal fibrosis induced by sodium hypochlorite, hyperglycemic dialysis solutions, or TGF-β1. Similar genetic mapping of Wilms’ tumor-1–positive mesothelial cells indicated that peritoneal membrane disruption is repaired and replaced by surviving mesothelial cells in peritoneal injury, and not by submesothelial fibroblasts. Although primary cultures of mesothelial cells or submesothelial fibroblasts each expressed α-smooth muscle actin under the influence of TGF-β1, only submesothelial fibroblasts expressed α-smooth muscle actin after induction of peritoneal fibrosis in mice. Furthermore, pharmacologic inhibition of the PDGF receptor, which is expressed by submesothelial fibroblasts but not mesothelial cells, attenuated the peritoneal fibrosis but not the remesothelialization induced by hypochlorite. Thus, our data identify distinctive fates for injured mesothelial cells and submesothelial fibroblasts during peritoneal injury and fibrosis. PMID:24854266

  10. β-Arrestin-2 modulates radiation-induced intestinal crypt progenitor/stem cell injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z; Tian, H; Jiang, J; Yang, Y; Tan, S; Lin, X; Liu, H; Wu, B

    2016-09-01

    Intestinal crypt progenitor/stem (ICPS) cell apoptosis and vascular endothelial cell apoptosis are responsible for the initiation and development of ionizing radiation (IR)-evoked gastrointestinal syndrome. The signaling mechanisms underlying IR-induced ICPS cell apoptosis remain largely unclear. Our findings provide evidence that β-arrestin-2 (βarr2)-mediated ICPS cell apoptosis is crucial for IR-stimulated intestinal injury. βArr2-deficient mice exhibited decreased ICPS cell and intestinal Lgr5(+) (leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptor 5-positive) stem cell apoptosis, promoted crypt proliferation and reproduction, and protracted survival following lethal doses of radiation. Radioprotection in the ICPS cells isolated from βarr2-deficient mice depended on prolonged nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation via direct interaction of βarr2 with IκBα and subsequent inhibition of p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA)-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction. Unexpectedly, βarr2 deficiency had little effect on IR-induced intestinal vascular endothelial cell apoptosis in mice. Consistently, βarr2 knockdown also provided significant radioresistance by manipulating NF-κB/PUMA signaling in Lgr5(+) cells in vitro. Collectively, these observations show that targeting the βarr2/NF-κB/PUMA novel pathway is a potential radiomitigator for limiting the damaging effect of radiotherapy on the gastrointestinal system. Significance statement: acute injury to the intestinal mucosa is a major dose-limiting complication of abdominal radiotherapy. The issue of whether the critical factor for the initiation of radiation-induced intestinal injury is intestinal stem cell apoptosis or endothelial cell apoptosis remains unresolved. βArrs have recently been found to be multifunctional adaptor of apoptosis. Here, we found that β-arrestin-2 (βarr2) deficiency was associated with decreased radiation-induced ICPS cell apoptosis, which prolonged survival in

  11. Tonsil-derived mesenchymal stem cells alleviate concanavalin A-induced acute liver injury.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Kyung-Ha; Kim, So-Yeon; Kim, Ye-Ryung; Woo, So-Youn; Sung, Sun Hee; Kim, Han Su; Jung, Sung-Chul; Jo, Inho; Park, Joo-Won

    2014-08-01

    Acute liver failure, the fatal deterioration of liver function, is the most common indication for emergency liver transplantation, and drug-induced liver injury and viral hepatitis are frequent in young adults. Stem cell therapy has come into the limelight as a potential therapeutic approach for various diseases, including liver failure and cirrhosis. In this study, we investigated therapeutic effects of tonsil-derived mesenchymal stem cells (T-MSCs) in concanavalin A (ConA)- and acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury. ConA-induced hepatitis resembles viral and immune-mediated hepatic injury, and acetaminophen overdose is the most frequent cause of acute liver failure in the United States and Europe. Intravenous administration of T-MSCs significantly reduced ConA-induced hepatic toxicity, but not acetaminophen-induced liver injury, affirming the immunoregulatory capacity of T-MSCs. T-MSCs were successfully recruited to damaged liver and suppressed inflammatory cytokine secretion. T-MSCs expressed high levels of galectin-1 and -3, and galectin-1 knockdown which partially diminished interleukin-2 and tumor necrosis factor α secretion from cultured T-cells. Galectin-1 knockdown in T-MSCs also reversed the protective effect of T-MSCs on ConA-induced hepatitis. These results suggest that galectin-1 plays an important role in immunoregulation of T-MSCs, which contributes to their protective effect in immune-mediated hepatitis. Further, suppression of T-cell activation by frozen and thawed T-MSCs implies great potential of T-MSC banking for clinical utilization in immune-mediated disease. PMID:24954408

  12. Targeted Type 2 Alveolar Cell Depletion. A Dynamic Functional Model for Lung Injury Repair.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Orquidea; Hiatt, Michael J; Lundin, Amber; Lee, Jooeun; Reddy, Raghava; Navarro, Sonia; Kikuchi, Alex; Driscoll, Barbara

    2016-03-01

    Type 2 alveolar epithelial cells (AEC2) are regarded as the progenitor population of the alveolus responsible for injury repair and homeostatic maintenance. Depletion of this population is hypothesized to underlie various lung pathologies. Current models of lung injury rely on either uncontrolled, nonspecific destruction of alveolar epithelia or on targeted, nontitratable levels of fixed AEC2 ablation. We hypothesized that discrete levels of AEC2 ablation would trigger stereotypical and informative patterns of repair. To this end, we created a transgenic mouse model in which the surfactant protein-C promoter drives expression of a mutant SR39TK herpes simplex virus-1 thymidine kinase specifically in AEC2. Because of the sensitivity of SR39TK, low doses of ganciclovir can be administered to these animals to induce dose-dependent AEC2 depletion ranging from mild (50%) to lethal (82%) levels. We demonstrate that specific levels of AEC2 depletion cause altered expression patterns of apoptosis and repair proteins in surviving AEC2 as well as distinct changes in distal lung morphology, pulmonary function, collagen deposition, and expression of remodeling proteins in whole lung that persist for up to 60 days. We believe SPCTK mice demonstrate the utility of cell-specific expression of the SR39TK transgene for exerting fine control of target cell depletion. Our data demonstrate, for the first time, that specific levels of type 2 alveolar epithelial cell depletion produce characteristic injury repair outcomes. Most importantly, use of these mice will contribute to a better understanding of the role of AEC2 in the initiation of, and response to, lung injury. PMID:26203800

  13. Ginkgolide B protects human umbilical vein endothelial cells against xenobiotic injuries via PXR activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tao; You, Wen-ting; Ma, Zeng-chun; Liang, Qian-de; Tan, Hong-ling; Xiao, Cheng-rong; Tang, Xiang-lin; Zhang, Bo-li; Wang, Yu-guang; Gao, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Pregnane X receptor (PXR) is a nuclear receptor that regulates a number of genes encoding drug metabolism enzymes and transporters and plays a key role in xeno- and endobiotic detoxification. Ginkgolide B has shown to increase the activity of PXR. Here we examined whether ginkgolide B activated PXR and attenuated xenobiotic-induced injuries in endothelial cells. Methods: Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were treated with ginkgolide B. The expression of PXR, CYP3A4, MDR1, VCAM-1, E-selectin and caspase-3 were quantified with qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Cell apoptosis was analyzed with flow cytometry. Fluorescently labeled human acute monocytic leukemia cells (THP-1 cells) were used to examine cell adhesion. Results: Ginkgolide B (30–300 μmol/L) did not change the mRNA and protein levels of PXR in the cells, but dose-dependently increased nuclear translocation of PXR protein. Ginkgolide B increased the expression of CYP3A4 and MDR1 in the cells, which was partially reversed by pretreatment with the selective PXR signaling antagonist sulforaphane, or transfection with PXR siRNA. Functionally, ginkgolide B dose-dependently attenuated doxorubicin- or staurosporine-induced apoptosis, which was reversed by transfection with PXR siRNA. Moreover, ginkgolide B suppressed TNF-α-induced THP-1 cell adhesion and TNF-α-induced expression of vascular adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) and E-selectin in the cells, which was also reversed by transfection with PXR siRNA. Conclusion: Ginkgolide B exerts anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory effects on endothelial cells via PXR activation, suggesting that a PXR-mediated endothelial detoxification program may be important for protecting endothelial cells from xeno- and endobiotic-induced injuries. PMID:26775663

  14. Cell Injury-Induced Release of Fibroblast Growth Factor 2: Relevance to Intracerebral Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Transplantations.

    PubMed

    Aizman, Irina; Vinodkumar, Deepti; McGrogan, Michael; Bates, Damien

    2015-07-15

    Beneficial effects of intracerebral transplantation of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) and their derivatives are believed to be mediated mostly by factors produced by engrafted cells. However, the mesenchymal cell engraftment rate is low, and the majority of grafted cells disappear within a short post-transplantation period. Here, we hypothesize that dying transplanted cells can affect surrounding tissues by releasing their active intracellular components. To elucidate the type, amounts, and potency of these putative intracellular factors, freeze/thaw extracts of MSC or their derivatives were tested in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and bioassays. We found that fibroblast growth factor (FGF)2 and FGF1, but not vascular endothelial growth factor and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 levels were high in extracts despite being low in conditioned media. Extracts induced concentration-dependent proliferation of rat cortical neural progenitor cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells; these proliferative responses were specifically blocked by FGF2-neutralizing antibody. In the neuropoiesis assay with rat cortical cells, both MSC extracts and killed cells induced expression of nestin, but not astrocyte differentiation. However, suspensions of killed cells strongly potentiated the astrogenic effects of live MSC. In transplantation-relevant MSC injury models (peripheral blood cell-mediated cytotoxicity and high cell density plating), MSC death coincided with the release of intracellular FGF2. The data showed that MSC contain a major depot of active FGF2 that is released upon cell injury and is capable of acutely stimulating neuropoiesis and angiogenesis. We therefore propose that both dying and surviving grafted MSC contribute to tissue regeneration. PMID:25873141

  15. Transplantation of Neural Stem Cells Clonally Derived from Embryonic Stem Cells Promotes Recovery After Murine Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Salewski, Ryan P.; Mitchell, Robert A.; Shen, Carl

    2015-01-01

    The pathology of spinal cord injury (SCI) makes it appropriate for cell-based therapies. Treatments using neural stem cells (NSCs) in animal models of SCI have shown positive outcomes, although uncertainty remains regarding the optimal cell source. Pluripotent cell sources such as embryonic stem cells (ESCs) provide a limitless supply of therapeutic cells. NSCs derived using embryoid bodies (EB) from ESCs have shown tumorigenic potential. Clonal neurosphere generation is an alternative method to generate safer and more clinically relevant NSCs without the use of an EB stage for use in cell-based therapies. We generated clonally derived definitive NSCs (dNSCs) from ESC. These cells were transplanted into a mouse thoracic SCI model. Embryonic stem cell-derived definitive neural stem cell (ES-dNSC)-transplanted mice were compared with controls using behavioral measures and histopathological analysis of tissue. In addition, the role of remyelination in injury recovery was investigated using transmission electron microscopy. The SCI group that received ES-dNSC transplantation showed significant improvements in locomotor function compared with controls in open field and gait analysis. The cell treatment group had a significant enhancement of spared neural tissue. Immunohistological assessments showed that dNSCs differentiated primarily to oligodendrocytes. These cells were shown to express myelin basic protein, associate with axons, and support nodal architecture as well as display proper compact, multilayer myelination in electron microscopic analysis. This study provides strong evidence that dNSCs clonally derived from pluripotent cells using the default pathway of neuralization improve motor function after SCI and enhance sparing of neural tissue, while remaining safe and clinically relevant. PMID:25119334

  16. Enhancement of tumor necrosis factor-induced endothelial cell injury by cycloheximide

    SciTech Connect

    Nolop, K.B.; Ryan, U.S. )

    1990-08-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a potent polypeptide mediator released by activated monocytes and macrophages, has a number of proinflammatory effects on endothelial cells. TNF is cytotoxic to tumor cells in vivo and in vitro, but TNF-induced toxicity to endothelial cells is less well established. We now report that cycloheximide (CHX), an inhibitor of protein synthesis, renders endothelial cells highly susceptible to TNF-induced lysis. TNF alone did not change the overall rate of protein synthesis by endothelial cells, whereas the addition of CHX completely abolished protein synthesis. Endothelial cells incubated in TNF alone in high concentrations (up to 1,000 U/ml) showed minimal rounding up and release of 51Cr. Likewise, CHX alone (5 micrograms/ml) had no significant effect on endothelial cell morphology and release of 51Cr. However, incubation of endothelial cells in both CHX and TNF caused injury in a dose-dependent manner. Morphological evidence of cell retraction, rounding, and detachment began within 2 h, but specific 51Cr release did not begin to rise until after 4 h. These changes were not observed when endothelial cells were incubated with TNF/CHX at 4 degrees C. The combination of TNF/CHX was lethal to all endothelial cells tested (bovine pulmonary artery, human umbilical vein, and human aorta), with human aortic cells showing the most pronounced changes. We conclude that healthy endothelial cells are resistant to TNF-induced lysis, but inhibition of their ability to make protein renders them highly susceptible.

  17. Soluble platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1, a biomarker of ventilator-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Endothelial cell injury is an important component of acute lung injury. Platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM1) is a transmembrane protein that connects endothelial cells to one another and can be detected as a soluble, truncated protein (sPECAM1) in serum. We hypothesized that injurious mechanical ventilation (MV) leads to shedding of PECAM1 from lung endothelial cells resulting in increasing sPECAM1 levels in the systemic circulation. Methods We studied 36 Sprague–Dawley rats in two prospective, randomized, controlled studies (healthy and septic) using established animal models of ventilator-induced lung injury. Animals (n = 6 in each group) were randomized to spontaneous breathing or two MV strategies: low tidal volume (VT) (6 ml/kg) and high-VT (20 ml/kg) on 2 cmH2O of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). In low-VT septic animals, 10 cmH2O of PEEP was applied. We performed pulmonary histological and physiological evaluation and measured lung PECAM1 protein content and serum sPECAM1 levels after four hours ventilation period. Results High-VT MV caused severe lung injury in healthy and septic animals, and decreased lung PECAM1 protein content (P < 0.001). Animals on high-VT had a four- to six-fold increase of mean sPECAM1 serum levels than the unventilated counterpart (35.4 ± 10.4 versus 5.6 ± 1.7 ng/ml in healthy rats; 156.8 ± 47.6 versus 35.6 ± 12.6 ng/ml in septic rats) (P < 0.0001). Low-VT MV prevented these changes. Levels of sPECAM1 in healthy animals on high-VT MV paralleled the sPECAM1 levels of non-ventilated septic animals. Conclusions Our findings suggest that circulating sPECAM1 may represent a promising biomarker for the detection and monitoring of ventilator-induced lung injury. PMID:24588994

  18. Increased growth factor expression and cell proliferation after contusive spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Zai, Laila J; Yoo, Soonmoon; Wrathall, Jean R

    2005-08-01

    The damage caused by traumatic central nervous system (CNS) injury can be divided into two phases: primary and secondary. The initial injury destroys many of the local neurons and glia and triggers secondary mechanisms that result in further cell loss. Approximately 50% of the astrocytes and oligodendrocytes in the spared white matter of the epicenter die by 24 h after spinal cord injury (SCI), but their densities return to normal levels by 6 weeks. This repopulation is largely due to the proliferation of local progenitors that divide in response of CNS injury. Previous studies indicate that the secondary events that cause cell death after SCI also increase the local levels of several growth factors that stimulate the proliferation of these endogenous progenitors. We compared the spatial pattern of the post-injury up-regulation of the pro-mitotic growth factors with that of 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation to determine if each could play a role in proliferation. Three days after a standard contusive SCI or laminectomy, animals received intraperitoneal BrdU injections to label dividing cells and were perfused 2 h after the last injection. Immunohistochemistry for BrdU and basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2) and in situ hybridization for ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and glial growth factor (GGF2) mRNA were used to compare the number of dividing cells with growth factor levels in sections 2 and 4 mm from the epicenter. All three growth factors are significantly up-regulated 3 days after SCI, when cell proliferation is maximal. The increase in GGF2 and FGF2 levels is highest in sections 2 mm rostral to the epicenter, mimicking BrdU incorporation. Addition of rhGGF2 to cultured cells isolated from the spinal cord 3 days after SCI increased the number of NG2+ glial progenitors. These data suggest that FGF2 and GGF2 may contribute to the spontaneous recovery observed after SCI by stimulating the proliferation of local progenitors that help repopulate the

  19. Markers of coagulation activation and acute kidney injury in patients after hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hingorani, S R; Seidel, K; Pao, E; Lawler, R; McDonald, G B

    2015-05-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common after hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT). The etiology of AKI is unknown because biopsies are rarely performed. The pathophysiology of injury is inferred from clinical data. Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is often invoked as the cause of renal injury. Patients >2 years old undergoing their first HCT at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center participated in this study. We prospectively measured plasma markers of coagulation activation, (PAI-1 and tPA) and fibrinolyis (D-dimer) weekly in 149 patients during the first 100 days post transplant. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to determine associations between these markers and AKI (doubling of baseline serum creatinine). Kruskal-Wallis test was used to determine the associations between day 100 urinary albumin to creatinine ratios and these markers. Thirty one percent of patients developed AKI. Though elevations in these markers occurred frequently, neither PAI-1 nor tPA were associated with the development of AKI. D-dimer was associated with a slightly increased risk of AKI (relative risk=1.76; P-value 0.04). None of these markers were associated with micro- or macroalbuminuria at day 100. The lack of an association with AKI suggests that endothelial injury in the form of TMA is not a common cause of AKI early after transplant. PMID:25665045

  20. Markers of coagulation activation and acute kidney injury in patients after hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hingorani, Sangeeta R; Seidel, Kristy; Pao, Emily; Lawler, Rick; McDonald, George B.

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common after hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT). The etiology of AKI is unknown because biopsies are rarely performed. The pathophysiology of injury is inferred from clinical data. Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is often invoked as the cause of renal injury. Patients > 2 years undergoing their first HCT at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (FHCRC) participated in this study. We prospectively measured plasma markers of coagulation activation, (PAI-1 and tPA) and fibrinolyis (D-dimer) weekly in 149 patients during the first 100 days post-transplant. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to determine associations between these markers and AKI (doubling of baseline serum creatinine). Kruskal-Wallis test was used to determine associations between day 100 urinary albumin to creatinine ratios (ACR) and these markers. Thirty one percent of patients developed AKI. Though elevations in these markers occurred frequently, neither PAI-1 nor tPA were associated with development of AKI. D-dimer was associated with a slightly increased risk of AKI (RR=1.76; p-value 0.04). None of these markers were associated with micro- or macroalbuminuria at day 100. The lack of an association with AKI suggests that endothelial injury in the form of TMA is not a common cause of AKI early after transplant. PMID:25665045

  1. Regulatory T cells suppress muscle inflammation and injury in muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Villalta, S. Armando; Rosenthal, Wendy; Martinez, Leonel; Kaur, Amanjot; Sparwasser, Tim; Tidball, James G.; Margeta, Marta; Spencer, Melissa J.; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    We examined the hypothesis that regulatory T cells (Tregs) modulate muscle injury and inflammation in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Although Tregs were largely absent in the muscle of wildtype mice and normal human muscle, they were present in necrotic lesions, displayed an activated phenotype and showed increased expression of interleukin (IL)-10 in dystrophic muscle from mdx mice. Depletion of Tregs exacerbated muscle injury and the severity of muscle inflammation, which was characterized by an enhanced interferon-gamma (IFNγ) response and activation of M1 macrophages. To test the therapeutic value of targeting Tregs in muscular dystrophy, we treated mdx mice with IL-2/anti-IL-2 complexes (IL-2c), and found that Tregs and IL-10 concentrations were increased in muscle, resulting in reduced expression of cyclooygenase-2 and decreased myofiber injury. These findings suggest that Tregs modulate the progression of muscular dystrophy by suppressing type 1 inflammation in muscle associated with muscle fiber injury, and highlight the potential of Treg-modulating agents as therapeutics for DMD. PMID:25320234

  2. Autophagy Limits Endotoxemic Acute Kidney Injury and Alters Renal Tubular Epithelial Cell Cytokine Expression

    PubMed Central

    Leventhal, Jeremy S.; Ni, Jie; Osmond, Morgan; Lee, Kyung; Gusella, G. Luca; Salem, Fadi; Ross, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis related acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common in-hospital complication with a dismal prognosis. Our incomplete understanding of disease pathogenesis has prevented the identification of hypothesis-driven preventive or therapeutic interventions. Increasing evidence in ischemia-reperfusion and nephrotoxic mouse models of AKI support the theory that autophagy protects renal tubular epithelial cells (RTEC) from injury. However, the role of RTEC autophagy in septic AKI remains unclear. We observed that lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a mediator of gram-negative bacterial sepsis, induces RTEC autophagy in vivo and in vitro through TLR4-initiated signaling. We modeled septic AKI through intraperitoneal LPS injection in mice in which autophagy-related protein 7 was specifically knocked out in the renal proximal tubules (ATG7KO). Compared to control littermates, ATG7KO mice developed more severe renal dysfunction (24hr BUN 100.1mg/dl +/- 14.8 vs 54.6mg/dl +/- 11.3) and parenchymal injury. After injection with LPS, analysis of kidney lysates identified higher IL-6 expression and increased STAT3 activation in kidney lysates from ATG7KO mice compared to controls. In vitro experiments confirmed an altered response to LPS in RTEC with genetic or pharmacological impairment of autophagy. In conclusion, RTEC autophagy protects against endotoxin induced injury and regulates downstream effects of RTEC TLR4 signaling. PMID:26990086

  3. Smooth muscle cell expression of extracellular matrix genes after arterial injury.

    PubMed Central

    Nikkari, S. T.; Järveläinen, H. T.; Wight, T. N.; Ferguson, M.; Clowes, A. W.

    1994-01-01

    Accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) after arterial injury is an important event in the development of intimal thickening and is modulated by heparin. To investigate the regulation of matrix protein expression, we have analyzed messenger RNA levels by Northern blotting for various ECM proteins in the rat carotid artery balloon injury model. RNA was extracted from normal arteries and from intima-medial preparations at 2 days, 1 week, 2 weeks, and 4 weeks after balloon injury of arteries in animals receiving either saline or heparin infusion. Transcripts for the heparan sulfate proteoglycans perlecan, syndecan, and ryudocan; the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan versican; the dermatan sulfate proteoglycan biglycan; type I procollagen; and tropoelastin all were increased on Northern blots beginning at 1 week after injury. By in situ hybridization, the transcripts for elastin nd biglycan were primarily localized to smooth muscle cells in the intima and were diminished by heparin in proportion to the decrease in intimal mass. Other matrix genes (perlecan, ryudocan) were expressed in the intima and media and were not affected by heparin. The results support the conclusion that ECM gene expression is a relatively late event in the response of the carotid artery, and that some of the genes are expressed only in the intima whereas others are expressed in both the intima and media. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8203472

  4. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoenzyme Y impairs endothelial cell proliferation and vascular repair following lung injury.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Trevor C; Ochoa, Cristhiaan D; Morrow, K Adam; Robson, Matthew J; Prasain, Nutan; Zhou, Chun; Alvarez, Diego F; Frank, Dara W; Balczon, Ron; Stevens, Troy

    2014-05-15

    Exoenzyme Y (ExoY) is a Pseudomonas aeruginosa toxin that is introduced into host cells through the type 3 secretion system (T3SS). Once inside the host cell cytoplasm, ExoY generates cyclic nucleotides that cause tau phosphorylation and microtubule breakdown. Microtubule breakdown causes interendothelial cell gap formation and tissue edema. Although ExoY transiently induces interendothelial cell gap formation, it remains unclear whether ExoY prevents repair of the endothelial cell barrier. Here, we test the hypothesis that ExoY intoxication impairs recovery of the endothelial cell barrier following gap formation, decreasing migration, proliferation, and lung repair. Pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs) were infected with P. aeruginosa strains for 6 h, including one possessing an active ExoY (PA103 exoUexoT::Tc pUCPexoY; ExoY(+)), one with an inactive ExoY (PA103ΔexoUexoT::Tc pUCPexoY(K81M); ExoY(K81M)), and one that lacks PcrV required for a functional T3SS (ΔPcrV). ExoY(+) induced interendothelial cell gaps, whereas ExoY(K81M) and ΔPcrV did not promote gap formation. Following gap formation, bacteria were removed and endothelial cell repair was examined. PMVECs were unable to repair gaps even 3-5 days after infection. Serum-stimulated growth was greatly diminished following ExoY intoxication. Intratracheal inoculation of ExoY(+) and ExoY(K81M) caused severe pneumonia and acute lung injury. However, whereas the pulmonary endothelial cell barrier was functionally improved 1 wk following ExoY(K81M) infection, pulmonary endothelium was unable to restrict the hyperpermeability response to elevated hydrostatic pressure following ExoY(+) infection. In conclusion, ExoY is an edema factor that chronically impairs endothelial cell barrier integrity following lung injury. PMID:24705722

  5. Alteration of Fatty Acid Oxidation in Tubular Epithelial Cells: From Acute Kidney Injury to Renal Fibrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Noémie; Hertig, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Renal proximal tubular cells are the most energy-demanding cells in the body. The ATP that they use is mostly produced in their mitochondrial and peroxisomal compartments, by the oxidation of fatty acids. When those cells are placed under a biological stress, such as a transient hypoxia, fatty acid oxidation (FAO) is shut down for a period of time that outlasts injury, and carbohydrate oxidation does not take over. Facing those metabolic constraints, surviving tubular epithelial cells exhibit a phenotypic switch that includes cytoskeletal rearrangement and production of extracellular matrix proteins, most probably contributing to acute kidney injury-induced renal fibrogenesis, thence to the development of chronic kidney disease. Here, we review experimental evidence that dysregulation of FAO profoundly affects the fate of tubular epithelial cells, by promoting epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, inflammation, and eventually interstitial fibrosis. Restoring physiological production of energy is undoubtedly a possible therapeutic approach to unlock the mesenchymal reprograming of tubular epithelial cells in the kidney. In this respect, the benefit of the use of fibrates is uncertain, but new drugs that could specifically target this metabolic pathway, and, hopefully, attenuate renal fibrosis merit future research. PMID:26301223

  6. Intra-Arterial Administration of Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Promotes Functional Recovery of the Brain After Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Silachev, D N; Plotnikov, E Yu; Babenko, V A; Danilina, T I; Zorov, L D; Pevzner, I B; Zorov, D B; Sukhikh, G T

    2015-08-01

    We compared the efficiency of delivery of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells into the brain after their intravenous and intra-arterial injection. Analysis of the therapeutic effects of cells after experimental traumatic brain injury revealed improvement of the neurological status and motor functions of the damaged hemisphere, the effect being more pronounced after intraarterial injection of cells. Intra-arterial administration was followed by rapid infiltration of the cells into the brain tissue and their number considerably surpassed that after intravenous infusion. Targeted delivery of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells into the brain after their injection into the carotid arteries substantially potentiated their neuroprotective effects in traumatic brain injury. PMID:26388566

  7. Hypergravity Alters the Susceptibility of Cells to Anoxia-Reoxygenation Injury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCloud, Henry; Pink, Yulondo; Harris-Hooker, Sandra A.; Melhado, Caroline D.; Sanford, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    Gravity is a physical force, much like shear stress or mechanical stretch, and should affect organ and cellular function. Researchers have shown that gravity plays a role in ventilation and blood flow distribution, gas exchange, alveolar size and mechanical stresses within the lung. Short exposure to microgravity produced marked alterations in lung blood flow and ventilation distribution while hypergravity exaggerated the regional differences in lung structure and function resulting in reduced ventilation at the base and no ventilation of the upper half of the lung. Microgravity also decreased metabolic activity in cardiac cells, WI-38 embryonic lung cells, and human lymphocytes. Rats, in the tail-suspended head-down tilt model, experienced transient loss of lung water, contrary to an expected increase due to pooling of blood in the pulmonary vasculature. Hypergravity has also been found to increase the proliferation of several different cell lines (e.g., chick embryo fibroblasts) while decreasing cell motility and slowing liver regeneration following partial hepatectomy. These studies show that changes in the gravity environment will affect several aspects of organ and cellular function and produce major change in blood flow and tissue/organ perfusion. However, these past studies have not addressed whether ischemia-reperfusion injury will be exacerbated or ameliorated by changes in the gravity environment, e.g., space flight. Currently, nothing is known about how gravity will affect the susceptibility of different lung and vascular cells to this type of injury. We conducted studies that addressed the following question: Does the susceptibility of lung fibroblasts, vascular smooth muscle, and endothelial cells to anoxia/reoxygenation injury change following exposure to hypergravity conditions?

  8. Bone marrow-derived cells in the population of spinal microglia after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Tashima, Ryoichi; Mikuriya, Satsuki; Tomiyama, Daisuke; Shiratori-Hayashi, Miho; Yamashita, Tomohiro; Kohro, Yuta; Tozaki-Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Inoue, Kazuhide; Tsuda, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that peripheral nerve injury (PNI) activates spinal microglia that are necessary for neuropathic pain. Recent studies using bone marrow (BM) chimeric mice have reported that after PNI, circulating BM-derived cells infiltrate into the spinal cord and differentiate into microglia-like cells. This raises the possibility that the population of spinal microglia after PNI may be heterogeneous. However, the infiltration of BM cells in the spinal cord remains controversial because of experimental adverse effects of strong irradiation used for generating BM chimeric mice. In this study, we evaluated the PNI-induced spinal infiltration of BM-derived cells not only by irradiation-induced myeloablation with various conditioning regimens, but also by parabiosis and mice with genetically labelled microglia, models without irradiation and BM transplantation. Results obtained from these independent approaches provide compelling evidence indicating little contribution of circulating BM-derived cells to the population of spinal microglia after PNI. PMID:27005516

  9. Glucocorticoid signaling in myeloid cells worsens acute CNS injury and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sorrells, Shawn F; Caso, Javier R; Munhoz, Carolina D; Hu, Caroline K; Tran, Kevin V; Miguel, Zurine D; Chien, Bonnie Y; Sapolsky, Robert M

    2013-05-01

    Glucocorticoid stress hormones (GCs) are well known for being anti-inflammatory, but some reports suggest that GCs can also augment aspects of inflammation during acute brain injury. Because the GC receptor (GR) is ubiquitously expressed throughout the brain, it is difficult to know which cell types might mediate these unusual "proinflammatory" GC actions. We examined this with cell type-specific deletion or overexpression of GR in mice experiencing seizure or ischemia. Counter to their classical anti-inflammatory actions, GR signaling in myeloid cells increased Iba-1 and CD68 staining as well as nuclear p65 levels in the injured tissue. GCs also reduced levels of occludin, claudin 5, and caveolin 1, proteins central to blood-brain-barrier integrity; these effects required GR in endothelial cells. Finally, GCs compromised neuron survival, an effect mediated by GR in myeloid and endothelial cells to a greater extent than by neuronal GR. PMID:23637179

  10. Bone marrow-derived cells in the population of spinal microglia after peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Tashima, Ryoichi; Mikuriya, Satsuki; Tomiyama, Daisuke; Shiratori-Hayashi, Miho; Yamashita, Tomohiro; Kohro, Yuta; Tozaki-Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Inoue, Kazuhide; Tsuda, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that peripheral nerve injury (PNI) activates spinal microglia that are necessary for neuropathic pain. Recent studies using bone marrow (BM) chimeric mice have reported that after PNI, circulating BM-derived cells infiltrate into the spinal cord and differentiate into microglia-like cells. This raises the possibility that the population of spinal microglia after PNI may be heterogeneous. However, the infiltration of BM cells in the spinal cord remains controversial because of experimental adverse effects of strong irradiation used for generating BM chimeric mice. In this study, we evaluated the PNI-induced spinal infiltration of BM-derived cells not only by irradiation-induced myeloablation with various conditioning regimens, but also by parabiosis and mice with genetically labelled microglia, models without irradiation and BM transplantation. Results obtained from these independent approaches provide compelling evidence indicating little contribution of circulating BM-derived cells to the population of spinal microglia after PNI. PMID:27005516

  11. Moderate Hypothermia Significantly Decreases Hippocampal Cell Death Involving Autophagy Pathway after Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yichao; Lin, Yingying; Feng, Jun-feng; Jia, Feng; Gao, Guo-yi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Here, we evaluated changes in autophagy after post-traumatic brain injury (TBI) followed by moderate hypothermia in rats. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups: sham injury with normothermia group (37°C); sham injury with hypothermia group (32°C); TBI with normothermia group (TNG; 37°C); and TBI with hypothermia group (THG; 32°C). Injury was induced by a fluid percussion TBI device. Moderate hypothermia (32°C) was achieved by partial immersion in a water bath (0°C) under general anesthesia for 4 h. All rats were killed at 24 h after fluid percussion TBI. The ipsilateral hippocampus in all rats was analyzed with hematoxylin and eosin staining; terminal deoxynucleoitidyl transferase-mediated nick end labeling staining was used to determine cell death in ipsilateral hippocampus. Immunohistochemistry and western blotting of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3), Beclin-1, as well as transmission electron microscopy performed to assess changes in autophagy. At 24 h after TBI, the cell death index was 27.90±2.36% in TNG and 14.90±1.52% in THG. Expression level of LC3 and Beclin-1 were significantly increased after TBI and were further up-regulated after post-TBI hypothermia. Further, ultrastructural observations showed that there was a marked increase of autophagosomes and autolysosomes in ipsilateral hippocampus after post-TBI hypothermia. Our data demonstrated that moderate hypothermia significantly attenuated cell death and increased autophagy in ipsilateral hippocampus after fluid percussion TBI. In conclusion, autophagy pathway may participate in the neuroprotective effect of post-TBI hypothermia. PMID:25942484

  12. Caveolin-1 protects against hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury through ameliorating peroxynitrite-mediated cell death.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lei; Chen, Xingmiao; Peng, Tao; Yang, Dan; Wang, Qi; Lv, Zhiping; Shen, Jiangang

    2016-06-01

    Nitrative stress is considered as an important pathological process of hepatic ischemia and reperfusion injury but its regulating mechanisms are largely unknown. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that caveolin-1 (Cav-1), a plasma membrane scaffolding protein, could be an important cellular signaling against hepatic I/R injury through inhibiting peroxynitrite (ONOO(-))-induced cellular damage. Male wild-type mice and Cav-1 knockout (Cav-1(-/-)) were subjected to 1h hepatic ischemia following 1, 6 and 12h of reperfusion by clipping and releasing portal vessels respectively. Immortalized human hepatocyte cell line (L02) was subjected to 1h hypoxia and 6h reoxygenation and treated with Cav-1 scaffolding domain peptide. The major discoveries included: (1) the expression of Cav-1 in serum and liver tissues of wild-type mice was time-dependently elevated during hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury. (2) Cav-1 scaffolding domain peptide treatment inhibited cleaved caspase-3 expression in the hypoxia-reoxygenated L02 cells; (3) Cav-1 knockout (Cav-1(-/-)) mice had significantly higher levels of serum transaminases (ALT&AST) and TNF-α, and higher rates of apoptotic cell death in liver tissues than wild-type mice after subjected to 1h hepatic ischemia and 6hour reperfusion; (4) Cav-1(-/-) mice revealed higher expression levels of iNOS, ONOO(-) and 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) in the liver than wild-type mice, and Fe-TMPyP, a representative peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst (PDC), remarkably reduced level of ONOO(-) and 3-NT and ameliorated the serum ALT, AST and TNF-α levels in both wild-type and Cav-1(-/-) mice. Taken together, we conclude that Cav-1 could play a critical role in preventing nitrative stress-induced liver damage during hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:27021966

  13. The contribution of apoptosis and necrosis in freezing injury of sea urchin embryonic cells.

    PubMed

    Boroda, Andrey V; Kipryushina, Yulia O; Yakovlev, Konstantin V; Odintsova, Nelly A

    2016-08-01

    Sea urchins have recently been reported to be a promising tool for investigations of oxidative stress, UV light perturbations and senescence. However, few available data describe the pathway of cell death that occurs in sea urchin embryonic cells after cryopreservation. Our study is focused on the morphological and functional alterations that occur in cells of these animals during the induction of different cell death pathways in response to cold injury. To estimate the effect of cryopreservation on sea urchin cell cultures and identify the involved cell death pathways, we analyzed cell viability (via trypan blue exclusion test, MTT assay and DAPI staining), caspase activity (via flow cytometry and spectrophotometry), the level of apoptosis (via annexin V-FITC staining), and cell ultrastructure alterations (via transmission electron microscopy). Using general caspase detection, we found that the level of caspase activity was low in unfrozen control cells, whereas the number of apoptotic cells with activated caspases rose after freezing-thawing depending on cryoprotectants used, also as the number of dead cells and cells in a late apoptosis. The data using annexin V-binding assay revealed a very high apoptosis level in all tested samples, even in unfrozen cells (about 66%). Thus, annexin V assay appears to be unsuitable for sea urchin embryonic cells. Typical necrotic cells with damaged mitochondria were not detected after freezing in sea urchin cell cultures. Our results assume that physical cell disruption but not freezing-induced apoptosis or necrosis is the predominant reason of cell death in sea urchin cultures after freezing-thawing with any cryoprotectant combination. PMID:27364314

  14. Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Contribute to APOL1-induced Podocyte Injury in HIV milieu

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Xiqian; Wen, Hongxiu; Saleem, Moin A.; Mikulak, Joanna; Malhotra, Ashwani; Skorecki, Karl; Singhal, Pravin C

    2015-01-01

    Clinical reports have demonstrated that higher rates of non-diabetic glomerulosclerosis in African Americans can be attributed to two coding sequence variants (G1 and G2) in the APOL1 gene; however, the underlying mechanism is still unknown. Kidney biopsy data suggest enhanced expression of APOL1/APOL1 variants (Vs) in smooth muscle cells (SMCs) of renal vasculature. Since APOL1 is a secretory protein of relatively low molecular weight (41 kDa), SMCs may be a contributory endocrine/paracrine source of APOL1 wild type (WT)/APOL1Vs in the glomerular capillary perfusate percolating podocytes. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that an HIV milieu stimulated secretion of APOL1 and its risk variants by arterial SMCs contributes to podocyte injury. Human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells (HSMCs)-treated with conditioned media (CM) of HIV-infected peripheral mononuclear cells (PBMC/HIV-CM), CM of HIV-infected U939 cells, or recombinant IFN-γ displayed enhanced expression of APOL1. Podocytes co-cultured in trans-wells with HSMCs-over expressing APOL1WT showed induction of injury; however, podocytes co-cultured with HSMC-over expressing either APOL1G1 or APOL1G2 showed several fold greater injury when compared to HSMC- over expressing APOL1WT. Conditioned media collected from HSMC-over-expressing APOL1G1/APOL1G2 (HSMC/APOL1G1-CM or HSMC/APOL1G2-CM) also displayed higher percentages of injured podocytes in the form of swollen cells, leaky lysosomes, loss of viability, and enhanced sensitivity to adverse host factors when compared to HSMC/APOL1WT-CM. Notably, HSMC/APOL1WT-CM promoted podocyte injury only at a significantly higher concentrations compared to HSMC/APOL1G1/G2-CM. We conclude that HSMCs could serve as an endocrine/paracrine source of APOL1Vs, which mediate accelerated podocyte injury in HIV milieu. PMID:25796344

  15. Protein carbonylation after traumatic brain injury: cell specificity, regional susceptibility, and gender differences.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, Rachel C; Buonora, John E; Jacobowitz, David M; Mueller, Gregory P

    2015-01-01

    Protein carbonylation is a well-documented and quantifiable consequence of oxidative stress in several neuropathologies, including multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer׳s disease, and Parkinson׳s disease. Although oxidative stress is a hallmark of traumatic brain injury (TBI), little work has explored the specific neural regions and cell types in which protein carbonylation occurs. Furthermore, the effect of gender on protein carbonylation after TBI has not been studied. The present investigation was designed to determine the regional and cell specificity of TBI-induced protein carbonylation and how this response to injury is affected by gender. Immunohistochemistry was used to visualize protein carbonylation in the brains of adult male and female Sprague-Dawley rats subjected to controlled cortical impact (CCI) as an injury model of TBI. Cell-specific markers were used to colocalize the presence of carbonylated proteins in specific cell types, including astrocytes, neurons, microglia, and oligodendrocytes. Results also indicated that the injury lesion site, ventral portion of the dorsal third ventricle, and ventricular lining above the median eminence showed dramatic increases in protein carbonylation after injury. Specifically, astrocytes and limited regions of ependymal cells adjacent to the dorsal third ventricle and the median eminence were most susceptible to postinjury protein carbonylation. However, these patterns of differential susceptibility to protein carbonylation were gender dependent, with males showing significantly greater protein carbonylation at sites distant from the lesion. Proteomic analyses were also conducted and determined that the proteins most affected by carbonylation in response to TBI include glial fibrillary acidic protein, dihydropyrimidase-related protein 2, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase C, and fructose-bisphosphate aldolase A. Many other proteins, however, were not carbonylated by CCI. These findings indicate that there is both regional

  16. Bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells inhibit gastric aspiration lung injury and inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing; Jiang, Liyan; Long, Xuan; Fu, Cuiping; Wang, Xiangdong; Wu, Xiaodan; Liu, Zilong; Zhu, Fen; Shi, Jindong; Li, Shanqun

    2016-09-01

    Gastric aspiration lung injury is one of the most common clinical events. This study investigated the effects of bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) on combined acid plus small non-acidified particle (CASP)-induced aspiration lung injury. Enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP(+) ) or EGFP(-) BMSCs or 15d-PGJ2 were injected via the tail vein into rats immediately after CASP-induced aspiration lung injury. Pathological changes in lung tissues, blood gas analysis, the wet/dry weight ratio (W/D) of the lung, levels of total proteins and number of total cells and neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were determined. The cytokine levels were measured using ELISA. Protein expression was determined by Western blot. Bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells treatment significantly reduced alveolar oedema, exudation and lung inflammation; increased the arterial partial pressure of oxygen; and decreased the W/D of the lung, the levels of total proteins and the number of total cells and neutrophils in BALF in the rats with CASP-induced lung injury. Bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells treatment decreased the levels of tumour necrosis factor-α and Cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC)-1 and the expression of p-p65 and increased the levels of interleukin-10 and 15d-PGJ2 and the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ in the lung tissue in CASP-induced rats. Tumour necrosis factor-α stimulated BMSCs to secrete 15d-PGJ2 . A tracking experiment showed that EGFP(+) BMSCs were able to migrate to local lung tissues. Treatment with 15d-PGJ2 also significantly inhibited CASP-induced lung inflammation and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Our results show that BMSCs can protect lung tissues from gastric aspiration injury and inhibit lung inflammation in rats. A beneficial effect might be achieved through BMSC-derived 15d-PGJ2 activation of the PPAR-γ receptor, reducing the production of

  17. Roles of NAD+, PARP-1, and Sirtuins in Cell Death, Ischemic Brain Injury, and Synchrotron Radiation X-Ray-Induced Tissue Injury

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    NAD+ plays crucial roles in a variety of biological processes including energy metabolism, aging, and calcium homeostasis. Multiple studies have also shown that NAD+ administration can profoundly decrease oxidative cell death and ischemic brain injury. A number of recent studies have further indicated that NAD+ administration can decrease ischemic brain damage, traumatic brain damage and synchrotron radiation X-ray-induced tissue injury by such mechanisms as inhibiting inflammation, decreasing autophagy, and reducing DNA damage. Our latest study that applies nano-particles as a NAD+ carrier has also provided first direct evidence demonstrating a key role of NAD+ depletion in oxidative stress-induced ATP depletion. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) and sirtuins are key NAD+-consuming enzymes that mediate multiple biological processes. Recent studies have provided new information regarding PARP-1 and sirtuins in cell death, ischemic brain damage and synchrotron radiation X-ray-induced tissue damage. These findings have collectively supported the hypothesis that NAD+ metabolism, PARP-1 and sirtuins play fundamental roles in oxidative stress-induced cell death, ischemic brain injury, and radiation injury. The findings have also supported “the Central Regulatory Network Hypothesis”, which proposes that a fundamental network that consists of ATP, NAD+ and Ca2+ as its key components is the essential network regulating various biological processes. PMID:24386592

  18. Freezing injury: the special case of the sperm cell.

    PubMed

    John Morris, G; Acton, Elizabeth; Murray, Benjamin J; Fonseca, Fernanda

    2012-04-01

    The cellular damage that spermatozoa encounter at rapid rates of cooling has often been attributed to the formation of intracellular ice although no convincing evidence of intracellular ice formation has ever been obtained. We demonstrate that the high intracellular protein content together with the osmotic shrinkage associated with extracellular ice formation leads to intracellular vitrification of spermatozoa during cooling. At rapid rates of cooling the cell damage to spermatozoa is a result of an osmotic imbalance encountered during thawing, not intracellular ice formation. The osmotic imbalance occurs at rapid cooling rates due to a diffusion limited ice crystallisation in the extracellular fluid, i.e. the amount of ice forming during the cooling is less than expected from the equilibrium phase diagram. This explanation allows insights into other aspects of the cryobiology of spermatozoa and it is anticipated that this understanding will lead to specific improved methods of conventional cryopreservation for mammalian spermatozoa. It is also likely that this model will be relevant to the development of novel technologies for sperm preservation including vitrification and freeze drying. PMID:22197768

  19. Protective effect of Hibiscus sabdariffa against serum/glucose deprivation-induced PC12 cells injury

    PubMed Central

    Bakhtiari, Elham; Hosseini, Azar; Mousavi, Seyed Hadi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Findings natural products with antioxidant and antiapoptotic properties has been one of the interesting challenges in the search for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases including ischemic stroke. Serum/glucose deprivation (SGD) has been used as a model for the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of neuronal damage during ischemia in vitro and for the expansion of neuroprotective drugs against ischemia-induced brain injury. Recent studies showed that Hibiscus sabdariffa exert pharmacological actions such as potent antioxidant. Therefore, in this study we investigated the protective effect of extract of H. sabdariffa against SGD-induced PC12 cells injury. Materials and Methods: Cells were pretreated with different concentrations of H. sabdariffa extract (HSE) for 2 hr, and then exposed to SGD condition for 6, 12 and 18 hr. Results: SGD caused a major reduction in cell viability after 6, 12, and 18 hr as compared with control cells (p< 0.001). Pretreatment with HSE (30-500 𝜇g/mL) significantly increased cell viability following SGD insult for 6, 12 and 18 hr. A significant increase in cell apoptosis was seen in cells under SGD condition after 12hr as compared with control cells (p< 0.001). Pretreatment with HSE significantly decreased cell apoptosis subsequent SGD conditionafter12hr at concentration of 60, 125 and 250. Conclusion: These data showed that HSE had a protective property under SGD condition in PC12 cells, suggesting that H. sabdariffa has the potential to be used as a new therapeutic approach for neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26101756

  20. An effective strategy of magnetic stem cell delivery for spinal cord injury therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tukmachev, Dmitry; Lunov, Oleg; Zablotskii, Vitalii; Dejneka, Alexandr; Babic, Michal; Syková, Eva; Kubinová, Šárka

    2015-02-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a condition that results in significant mortality and morbidity. Treatment of SCI utilizing stem cell transplantation represents a promising therapy. However, current conventional treatments are limited by inefficient delivery strategies of cells into the injured tissue. In this study, we designed a magnetic system and used it to accumulate stem cells labelled with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) at a specific site of a SCI lesion. The loading of stem cells with engineered SPIONs that guarantees sufficient attractive magnetic forces was achieved. Further, the magnetic system allowed rapid guidance of the SPION-labelled cells precisely to the lesion location. Histological analysis of cell distribution throughout the cerebrospinal channel showed a good correlation with the calculated distribution of magnetic forces exerted onto the transplanted cells. The results suggest that focused targeting and fast delivery of stem cells can be achieved using the proposed non-invasive magnetic system. With future implementation the proposed targeting and delivery strategy bears advantages for the treatment of disease requiring fast stem cell transplantation.Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a condition that results in significant mortality and morbidity. Treatment of SCI utilizing stem cell transplantation represents a promising therapy. However, current conventional treatments are limited by inefficient delivery strategies of cells into the injured tissue. In this study, we designed a magnetic system and used it to accumulate stem cells labelled with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) at a specific site of a SCI lesion. The loading of stem cells with engineered SPIONs that guarantees sufficient attractive magnetic forces was achieved. Further, the magnetic system allowed rapid guidance of the SPION-labelled cells precisely to the lesion location. Histological analysis of cell distribution throughout the cerebrospinal

  1. Circulating progenitor epithelial cells traffic via CXCR4/CXCL12 in response to airway injury.

    PubMed

    Gomperts, Brigitte N; Belperio, John A; Rao, P Nagesh; Randell, Scott H; Fishbein, Michael C; Burdick, Marie D; Strieter, Robert M

    2006-02-01

    Recipient airway epithelial cells are found in human sex-mismatched lung transplants, implying that circulating progenitor epithelial cells contribute to the repair of the airway epithelium. Markers of circulating progenitor epithelial cells and mechanisms for their trafficking remain to be elucidated. We demonstrate that a population of progenitor epithelial cells exists in the bone marrow and the circulation of mice that is positive for the early epithelial marker cytokeratin 5 (CK5) and the chemokine receptor CXCR4. We used a mouse model of sex-mismatched tracheal transplantation and found that CK5+ circulating progenitor epithelial cells contribute to re-epithelialization of the airway and re-establishment of the pseudostratified epithelium. The presence of CXCL12 in tracheal transplants provided a mechanism for CXCR4+ circulating progenitor epithelial cell recruitment to the airway. Depletion of CXCL12 resulted in the epithelium defaulting to squamous metaplasia, which was derived solely from the resident tissue progenitor epithelial cells. Our findings demonstrate that CK5+CXCR4+ cells are markers of circulating progenitor epithelial cells in the bone marrow and circulation and that CXCR4/CXCL12-mediated recruitment of circulating progenitor epithelial cells is necessary for the re-establishment of a normal pseudostratified epithelium after airway injury. These findings support a novel paradigm for the development of squamous metaplasia of the airway epithelium and for developing therapeutic strategies for circulating progenitor epithelial cells in airway diseases. PMID:16424223

  2. Neural stem/progenitor cell transplantation for spinal cord injury treatment; A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yousefifard, M; Rahimi-Movaghar, V; Nasirinezhad, F; Baikpour, M; Safari, S; Saadat, S; Moghadas Jafari, A; Asady, H; Razavi Tousi, S M T; Hosseini, M

    2016-05-13

    Despite the vast improvements of cell therapy in spinal cord injury treatment, no optimum protocol has been developed for application of neural stem/progenitor cells. In this regard, the present meta-analysis showed that the efficacy of the neural stem/progenitor cell (NSPC) transplantation depends mainly on injury model, intervention phase, transplanted cell count, immunosuppressive use, and probably stem cell source. Improved functional recovery post NSPC transplantation was found to be higher in transection and contusion models. Moreover, NSPC transplantation in acute phase of spinal injury was found to have better functional recovery. Higher doses (>3×10(6)cell/kg) were also shown to be optimum for transplantation, but immunosuppressive agent administration negatively affected the motor function recovery. Scaffold use in NSPC transplantation could also effectively raise functional recovery. PMID:26917272

  3. Genistein prevents ultraviolet B radiation-induced nitrosative skin injury and promotes cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Terra, V A; Souza-Neto, F P; Frade, M A C; Ramalho, L N Z; Andrade, T A M; Pasta, A A C; Conchon, A C; Guedes, F A; Luiz, R C; Cecchini, R; Cecchini, A L

    2015-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) levels increase considerably after 24h of exposure of skin to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation, which leads to nitrosative skin injury. In addition, increased NO levels after exposure to UVB radiation are associated with inhibition of cell proliferation. Compared to the UV-control group, UV-genistein at 10 mg/kg (UV-GEN10) group showed tissue protection, decreased lipid peroxide and nitrotyrosine formation, and low CAT activity. Furthermore, NO levels and iNOS labeling remained high. In this group, the reduction in lipid peroxides and nitrotyrosine was accompanied by upregulation of cell proliferation factors (Ki67 and PCNA), which indicated that prevention of nitrosative skin injury promoted cell proliferation and DNA repair. Genistein also prevented nitrosative events, inhibited ONOO(-) formation, which leads to tissue protection and cell proliferation. The UV-GEN15 group did not result in a greater protective effect compared to that with UV-GEN10 group. In the UV-GEN15 group, histological examination of the epidermis showed morphological alterations without efficient protection against lipid peroxide formation, as well as inhibition of Ki67 and PCNA, and VEGF labeling, which suggested inhibition of cell proliferation. These results help to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the photoprotective effect of genistein and reveal the importance of UVB radiation-induced nitrosative damage. PMID:25668145