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Sample records for acinetobacter sp adp1

  1. areABC Genes Determine the Catabolism of Aryl Esters in Acinetobacter sp. Strain ADP1

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Rheinallt M.; Collier, Lauren S.; Neidle, Ellen L.; Williams, Peter A.

    1999-01-01

    Acinetobacter sp. strain ADP1 is able to grow on a range of esters of aromatic alcohols, converting them to the corresponding aromatic carboxylic acids by the sequential action of three inducible enzymes: an areA-encoded esterase, an areB-encoded benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase, and an areC-encoded benzaldehyde dehydrogenase. The are genes, adjacent to each other on the chromosome and transcribed in the order areCBA, were located 3.5 kbp upstream of benK. benK, encoding a permease implicated in benzoate uptake, is at one end of the ben-cat supraoperonic cluster for benzoate catabolism by the β-ketoadipate pathway. Two open reading frames which may encode a transcriptional regulator, areR, and a porin, benP, separate benK from areC. Each are gene was individually expressed to high specific activity in Escherichia coli. The relative activities against different substrates of the cloned enzymes were, within experimental error, identical to that of wild-type Acinetobacter sp. strain ADP1 grown on either benzyl acetate, benzyl alcohol, or 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol as the carbon source. The substrate preferences of all three enzymes were broad, encompassing a range of substituted aromatic compounds and in the case of the AreA esterase, different carboxylic acids. The areA, areB, and areC genes were individually disrupted on the chromosome by insertion of a kanamycin resistance cassette, and the rates at which the resultant strains utilized substrates of the aryl ester catabolic pathway were severely reduced as determined by growth competitions between the mutant and wild-type strains. PMID:10419955

  2. Unique features revealed by the genome sequence of Acinetobacter sp. ADP1, a versatile and naturally transformation competent bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Barbe, Valérie; Vallenet, David; Fonknechten, Nuria; Kreimeyer, Annett; Oztas, Sophie; Labarre, Laurent; Cruveiller, Stéphane; Robert, Catherine; Duprat, Simone; Wincker, Patrick; Ornston, L. Nicholas; Weissenbach, Jean; Marlière, Philippe; Cohen, Georges N.; Médigue, Claudine

    2004-01-01

    Acinetobacter sp. strain ADP1 is a nutritionally versatile soil bacterium closely related to representatives of the well-characterized Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida. Unlike these bacteria, the Acinetobacter ADP1 is highly competent for natural transformation which affords extraordinary convenience for genetic manipulation. The circular chromosome of the Acinetobacter ADP1, presented here, encodes 3325 predicted coding sequences, of which 60% have been classified based on sequence similarity to other documented proteins. The close evolutionary proximity of Acinetobacter and Pseudomonas species, as judged by the sequences of their 16S RNA genes and by the highest level of bidirectional best hits, contrasts with the extensive divergence in the GC content of their DNA (40 versus 62%). The chromosomes also differ significantly in size, with the Acinetobacter ADP1 chromosome <60% of the length of the Pseudomonas counterparts. Genome analysis of the Acinetobacter ADP1 revealed genes for metabolic pathways involved in utilization of a large variety of compounds. Almost all of these genes, with orthologs that are scattered in other species, are located in five major ‘islands of catabolic diversity’, now an apparent ‘archipelago of catabolic diversity’, within one-quarter of the overall genome. Acinetobacter ADP1 displays many features of other aerobic soil bacteria with metabolism oriented toward the degradation of organic compounds found in their natural habitat. A distinguishing feature of this genome is the absence of a gene corresponding to pyruvate kinase, the enzyme that generally catalyzes the terminal step in conversion of carbohydrates to pyruvate for respiration by the citric acid cycle. This finding supports the view that the cycle itself is centrally geared to the catabolic capabilities of this exceptionally versatile organism. PMID:15514110

  3. Effects Exerted by Transcriptional Regulator PcaU from Acinetobacter sp. Strain ADP1

    PubMed Central

    Trautwein, Gaby; Gerischer, Ulrike

    2001-01-01

    Protocatechuate degradation is accomplished in a multistep inducible catabolic pathway in Acinetobacter sp. strain ADP1. The induction is brought about by the transcriptional regulator PcaU in concert with the inducer protocatechuate. PcaU, a member of the new IclR family of transcriptional regulators, was shown to play a role in the activation of transcription at the promoter for the structural pca genes, leaving open the participation of additional activators. In this work we show that there is no PcaU-independent transcriptional activation at the pca gene promoter. The minimal inducer concentration leading to an induction response is 10−5 M protocatechuate. The extent of expression of the pca genes was observed to depend on the nature of the inducing carbon source, and this is assumed to be caused by different internal levels of protocatechuate in the cells. The basal level of expression was shown to be comparatively high and to vary depending on the noninducing carbon source independent of PcaU. In addition to the activating function, in vivo results suggest a repressing function for PcaU at the pca gene promoter in the absence of an elevated inducer concentration. Expression at the pcaU gene promoter is independent of the growth condition but is subject to strong negative autoregulation. We propose a model in which PcaU exerts a repressor function both at its own promoter and at the structural gene promoter and in addition functions as an activator of transcription at the structural gene promoter at elevated inducer concentration. PMID:11208784

  4. The wax ester synthase/acyl coenzyme A:diacylglycerol acyltransferase from Acinetobacter sp. strain ADP1: characterization of a novel type of acyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Stöveken, Tim; Kalscheuer, Rainer; Malkus, Ursula; Reichelt, Rudolf; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2005-02-01

    The wax ester synthase/acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA):diacylglycerol acyltransferase (WS/DGAT) catalyzes the final steps in triacylglycerol (TAG) and wax ester (WE) biosynthesis in the gram-negative bacterium Acinetobacter sp. strain ADP1. It constitutes a novel class of acyltransferases which is fundamentally different from acyltransferases involved in TAG and WE synthesis in eukaryotes. The enzyme was purified by a three-step purification protocol to apparent homogeneity from the soluble fraction of recombinant Escherichia coli Rosetta (DE3)pLysS (pET23a::atfA). Purified WS/DGAT revealed a remarkably low substrate specificity, accepting a broad range of various substances as alternative acceptor molecules. Besides having DGAT and WS activity, the enzyme possesses acyl-CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferase (MGAT) activity. The sn-1 and sn-3 positions of acylglycerols are accepted with higher specificity than the sn-2 position. Linear alcohols ranging from ethanol to triacontanol are efficiently acylated by the enzyme, which exhibits highest specificities towards medium-chain-length alcohols. The acylation of cyclic and aromatic alcohols, such as cyclohexanol or phenylethanol, further underlines the unspecific character of this enzyme. The broad range of possible substrates may lead to biotechnological production of interesting wax ester derivatives. Determination of the native molecular weight revealed organization as a homodimer. The large number of WS/DGAT-homologous genes identified in pathogenic mycobacteria and their possible importance for the pathogenesis and latency of these bacteria makes the purified WS/DGAT from Acinetobacter sp. strain ADP1 a valuable model for studying this group of proteins in pathogenic mycobacteria.

  5. Improved Triacylglycerol Production in Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1 by Metabolic Engineering

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Triacylglycerols are used in various purposes including food applications, cosmetics, oleochemicals and biofuels. Currently the main sources for triacylglycerol are vegetable oils, and microbial triacylglycerol has been suggested as an alternative for these. Due to the low production rates and yields of microbial processes, the role of metabolic engineering has become more significant. As a robust model organism for genetic and metabolic studies, and for the natural capability to produce triacylglycerol, Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1 serves as an excellent organism for modelling the effects of metabolic engineering for energy molecule biosynthesis. Results Beneficial gene deletions regarding triacylglycerol production were screened by computational means exploiting the metabolic model of ADP1. Four deletions, acr1, poxB, dgkA, and a triacylglycerol lipase were chosen to be studied experimentally both separately and concurrently by constructing a knock-out strain (MT) with three of the deletions. Improvements in triacylglycerol production were observed: the strain MT produced 5.6 fold more triacylglycerol (mg/g cell dry weight) compared to the wild type strain, and the proportion of triacylglycerol in total lipids was increased by 8-fold. Conclusions In silico predictions of beneficial gene deletions were verified experimentally. The chosen single and multiple gene deletions affected beneficially the natural triacylglycerol metabolism of A. baylyi ADP1. This study demonstrates the importance of single gene deletions in triacylglycerol metabolism, and proposes Acinetobacter sp. ADP1 as a model system for bioenergetic studies regarding metabolic engineering. PMID:21592360

  6. Rewiring the wax ester production pathway of Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1.

    PubMed

    Santala, Suvi; Efimova, Elena; Koskinen, Perttu; Karp, Matti Tapani; Santala, Ville

    2014-03-21

    Wax esters are industrially relevant high-value molecules. For sustainable production of wax esters, bacterial cell factories are suggested to replace the chemical processes exploiting expensive starting materials. However, it is well recognized that new sophisticated solutions employing synthetic biology toolbox are required to improve and tune the cellular production platform to meet the product requirements. For example, saturated wax esters with alkanol chain lengths C12 or C14 that are convenient for industrial uses are rare among bacteria. Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1, a natural producer of wax esters, is a convenient model organism for studying the potentiality and modifiability of wax esters in a natural host by means of synthetic biology. In order to establish a controllable production platform exploiting well-characterized biocomponents, and to modify the wax ester synthesis pathway of A. baylyi ADP1 in terms product quality, a fatty acid reductase complex LuxCDE with an inducible arabinose promoter was employed to replace the natural fatty acyl-CoA reductase acr1 in ADP1. The engineered strain was able to produce wax esters by the introduced synthetic pathway. Moreover, the fatty alkanol chain length profile of wax esters was found to shift toward shorter and more saturated carbon chains, C16:0 accounting for most of the alkanols. The study demonstrates the potentiality of recircuiting a biosynthesis pathway in a natural producer, enabling a regulated production of a customized bioproduct. Furthermore, the LuxCDE complex can be potentially used as a well-characterized biopart in a variety of synthetic biology applications involving the production of long-chain hydrocarbons.

  7. Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1 as a model for metabolic system biology.

    PubMed

    de Berardinis, Véronique; Durot, Maxime; Weissenbach, Jean; Salanoubat, Marcel

    2009-10-01

    Information produced by the annotation of an 'average bacterial genome' can be separated into three parts. One-third represents what we know, another third what we think we know, and the last third what we know we do not know. Knowledge of metabolism is also described by this three thirds rule. Understanding how a cell operates will require a better knowledge of the two ignored thirds of its parts. Moreover, metabolism needs to be further investigated using organisms whose life styles are different from those of model organisms. In this short review, we present Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1 as an environmental model especially suitable for large-scale genetic manipulation. Resources have been constructed in the past few years that can form the basis for diverse metabolic studies: the genome sequence, a single gene mutant collection, and a genome-scale metabolic model.

  8. Physiological Conditions Conducive to High Cyanophycin Content in Biomass of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus Strain ADP1

    PubMed Central

    Elbahloul, Yasser; Krehenbrink, Martin; Reichelt, Rudolf; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    The effects of the inorganic medium components, the initial pH, the incubation temperature, the oxygen supply, the carbon-to-nitrogen ratio, and chloramphenicol on the synthesis of cyanophycin (CGP) by Acinetobacter calcoaceticus strain ADP1 were studied in a mineral salts medium containing sodium glutamate and ammonium sulfate as carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively. Variation of all these factors resulted in maximum CGP contents of only about 3.5% (wt/wt) of the cell dry matter (CDM), and phosphate depletion triggered CGP accumulation most substantially. However, addition of arginine to the medium as the sole carbon source for growth promoted CGP accumulation most strikingly. This effect was systematically studied, and an optimized phosphate-limited medium containing 75 mM arginine and 10 mM ammonium sulfate yielded a CGP content of 41.4% (wt/wt) of the CDM at 30°C. The CGP content of the cells was further increased to 46.0% (wt/wt) of the CDM by adding 2.5 μg of chloramphenicol per ml of medium in the accumulation phase. These contents are by far the highest CGP contents of bacterial cells ever reported. CGP was easily isolated from the cells by using an acid extraction method, and this CGP contained about equimolar amounts of aspartic acid and arginine and no detectable lysine; the molecular masses ranged from 21 to 29 kDa, and the average molecular mass was about 25 kDa. Transmission electron micrographs of thin sections of cells revealed large CGP granules that frequently had an irregular shape with protuberances at the surface and often severely deformed the cells. A cphI::ΩKm mutant of strain ADP1 with a disrupted putative cyanophycinase gene accumulated significantly less CGP than the wild type accumulated, although the cells expressed cyanophycin synthetase at about the same high level. It is possible that the intact CphI protein is involved in the release of CGP primer molecules from initially synthesized CGP. The resulting lower concentration of

  9. Growth and wax ester production of an Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1 mutant deficient in exopolysaccharide capsule synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kannisto, Matti; Efimova, Elena; Karp, Matti; Santala, Ville

    2017-01-01

    Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1 naturally produces wax esters that could be used as a raw material in industrial applications. We attempted to improve wax ester yield of A. baylyi ADP1 by removing rmlA, a gene involved in exopolysaccharide production. Growth rate, biomass formation and wax ester yield on 4-hydroxybenzoate were not affected, but the rmlA (-) strain grew slower on acetate, while reaching similar biomass and wax ester yield. The rmlA (-) cells had malformed shape and large size and grew poorly on glucose without expression of the gene for pyruvate kinase (pykF) from Escherichia coli. The pykF-expressing rmlA (-) strain had similar growth rate, lowered biomass formation and improved wax ester production on glucose as compared to the wild-type strain expressing pykF. Cultivation of the pykF-expressing rmlA (-) strain on an elevated glucose concentration in a medium supplemented with amino acids resulted in doubled molar wax ester yield and acetate production.

  10. Complete Nucleotide Sequence and Organization of the Atrazine Catabolic Plasmid pADP-1 from Pseudomonas sp. Strain ADP

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Betsy; Tomkins, Jeffrey; Wackett, Lawrence P.; Wing, Rod; Sadowsky, Michael J.

    2001-01-01

    The complete 108,845-nucleotide sequence of catabolic plasmid pADP-1 from Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP was determined. Plasmid pADP-1 was previously shown to encode AtzA, AtzB, and AtzC, which catalyze the sequential hydrolytic removal of s-triazine ring substituents from the herbicide atrazine to yield cyanuric acid. Computational analyses indicated that pADP-1 encodes 104 putative open reading frames (ORFs), which are predicted to function in catabolism, transposition, and plasmid maintenance, transfer, and replication. Regions encoding transfer and replication functions of pADP-1 had 80 to 100% amino acid sequence identity to pR751, an IncPβ plasmid previously isolated from Enterobacter aerogenes. pADP-1 was shown to contain a functional mercury resistance operon with 99% identity to Tn5053. Complete copies of transposases with 99% amino acid sequence identity to TnpA from IS1071 and TnpA from Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes were identified and flank each of the atzA, atzB, and atzC genes, forming structures resembling nested catabolic transposons. Functional analyses identified three new catabolic genes, atzD, atzE, and atzF, which participate in atrazine catabolism. Crude extracts from Escherichia coli expressing AtzD hydrolyzed cyanuric acid to biuret. AtzD showed 58% amino acid sequence identity to TrzD, a cyanuric acid amidohydrolase, from Pseudomonas sp. strain NRRLB-12227. Two other genes encoding the further catabolism of cyanuric acid, atzE and atzF, reside in a contiguous cluster adjacent to a potential LysR-type transcriptional regulator. E. coli strains bearing atzE and atzF were shown to encode a biuret hydrolase and allophanate hydrolase, respectively. atzDEF are cotranscribed. AtzE and AtzF are members of a common amidase protein family. These data reveal the complete structure of a catabolic plasmid and show that the atrazine catabolic genes are dispersed on three disparate regions of the plasmid. These results begin to provide insight into how

  11. A novel bifunctional wax ester synthase/acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase mediates wax ester and triacylglycerol biosynthesis in Acinetobacter calcoaceticus ADP1.

    PubMed

    Kalscheuer, Rainer; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2003-03-07

    Triacylglycerols (TAGs) and wax esters are neutral lipids with considerable importance for dietetic, technical, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical applications. Acinetobacter calcoaceticus ADP1 accumulates wax esters and TAGs as intracellular storage lipids. We describe here the identification of a bifunctional enzyme from this bacterium exhibiting acyl-CoA:fatty alcohol acyltransferase (wax ester synthase, WS) as well as acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) activity. Experiments with a knock-out mutant demonstrated the key role of the bifunctional WS/DGAT for biosynthesis of both storage lipids in A. calcoaceticus. This novel type of long-chain acyl-CoA acyltransferase is not related to known acyltransferases including the WS from jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis), the DGAT1 or DGAT2 families present in yeast, plants, and animals, and the phospholipid:diacylglycerol acyltransferase catalyzing TAG formation in yeast and plants. A large number of WS/DGAT-related proteins were identified in Mycobacterium and Arabidopsis thaliana indicating an important function of these proteins. WS and DGAT activity was demonstrated for the translational product of one WS/DGAT homologous gene from M. smegmatis mc(2)155. The potential of WS/DGAT to establish novel processes for biotechnological production of jojoba-like wax esters was demonstrated by heterologous expression in recombinant Pseudomonas citronellolis. The potential of WS/DGAT as a selective therapeutic target of mycobacterial infections is discussed.

  12. Taxonomy of haemolytic and/or proteolytic strains of the genus Acinetobacter with the proposal of Acinetobacter courvalinii sp. nov. (genomic species 14 sensu Bouvet & Jeanjean), Acinetobacter dispersus sp. nov. (genomic species 17), Acinetobacter modestus sp. nov., Acinetobacter proteolyticus sp. nov. and Acinetobacter vivianii sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Nemec, Alexandr; Radolfova-Krizova, Lenka; Maixnerova, Martina; Vrestiakova, Eliska; Jezek, Petr; Sedo, Ondrej

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to define the taxonomic status of 40 haemolytic and/or proteolytic strains of the genus Acinetobacter which were previously classified into five putative species termed as genomic species 14BJ (n=9), genomic species 17 (n=9), taxon 18 (n=7), taxon 19 (n=6) and taxon 20 (n=9). The strains were recovered mostly from human clinical specimens or soil and water ecosystems and were highly diverse in geographical origin and time of isolation. Comparative analysis of the rpoB and gyrB gene sequences of all strains, and the whole-genome sequences of selected strains, showed that these putative species formed five respective, well-supported clusters within a distinct clade of the genus Acinetobacter which typically, although not exclusively, encompasses strains with strong haemolytic activity. The whole-genome-based average nucleotide identity (ANIb) values supported the species status of each of these clusters. Moreover, the distinctness and coherence of the clusters were supported by whole-cell profiling based on MALDI-TOF MS. Congruent with these findings were the results of metabolic and physiological testing. We conclude that the five putative taxa represent respective novel species, for which the names Acinetobacter courvalinii sp. nov. (type strain ANC 3623T=CCUG 67960T=CIP 110480T=CCM 8635T), Acinetobacter dispersus sp. nov. (type strain ANC 4105T=CCUG 67961T=CIP 110500T=CCM 8636T), Acinetobacter modestus sp. nov. (type strain NIPH 236T=CCUG 67964T=CIP 110444T=CCM 8639T), Acinetobacter proteolyticus sp. nov. (type strain NIPH 809T=CCUG 67965T=CIP 110482T = CCM 8640T) and Acinetobacter vivianii sp. nov. (type strain NIPH 2168T=CCUG 67967T=CIP 110483T=CCM 8642T) are proposed.

  13. Acinetobacter seifertii sp. nov., a member of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex isolated from human clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Nemec, Alexandr; Krizova, Lenka; Maixnerova, Martina; Sedo, Ondrej; Brisse, Sylvain; Higgins, Paul G

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to define the taxonomic status of a phenetically distinct group of 16 strains that corresponds to Acinetobacter genomic species 'close to 13TU', a provisional genomic species of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii (ACB) complex recognized by Gerner-Smidt and Tjernberg in 1993. These strains have been isolated in different countries since the early 1990s and were mostly recovered from human clinical specimens. They were compared with 45 reference strains representing the known taxa of the ACB complex using taxonomic methods relevant to the genus Acinetobacter. Based on sequence analysis of the concatenated partial sequences (2976 bp) of seven housekeeping genes, the 16 strains formed a tight and well-supported cluster (intracluster sequence identity of ≥98.4 %) that was clearly separated from the other members of the ACB complex (≤94.7 %). The species status of the group was supported by average nucleotide identity values of ≤91.7 % between the whole genome sequence of representative strain NIPH 973(T) (NCBI accession no. APOO00000000) and those of the other species. In addition, whole-cell matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) MS analyses indicated the distinctness of the group at the protein level. Metabolic and physiological tests revealed several typical features of the group, although they did not allow its reliable differentiation from the other members of the ACB complex. We conclude that the 16 strains represent a distinct novel species, for which we propose the name Acinetobacter seifertii sp. nov. The type strain is NIPH 973(T) ( = CIP 110471(T) = CCUG 34785(T) = CCM 8535(T)).

  14. Acinetobacter plantarum sp. nov. isolated from wheat seedlings plant.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Singh, Hina; Yu, Hongshan; Jin, Feng-Xie; Yi, Tae-Hoo

    2016-07-01

    Strain THG-SQM11(T), a Gram-negative, aerobic, non-motile, coccus-shaped bacterium, was isolated from wheat seedlings plant in P. R. China. Strain THG-SQM11(T) was closely related to members of the genus Acinetobacter and showed the highest 16S rRNA sequence similarities with Acinetobacter junii (97.9 %) and Acinetobacter kookii (96.1 %). DNA-DNA hybridization showed 41.3 ± 2.4 % DNA reassociation with A. junii KCTC 12416(T). Chemotaxonomic data revealed that strain THG-SQM11(T) possesses ubiquinone-9 as the predominant respiratory quinone, C18:1 ω9c, summed feature 3 (C16:1 ω7c and/or C16:1 ω6c), and C16:0 as the major fatty acids. The major polar lipids were found to be diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, and phosphatidylcholine. The DNA G+C content was 41.7 mol %. These data, together with phenotypic characterization, suggest that the isolate represents a novel species, for which the name Acinetobacter plantarum sp. nov. is proposed, with THG-SQM11(T) as the type strain (=CCTCC AB 2015123(T) =KCTC 42611(T)).

  15. Acinetobacter indicus sp. nov., isolated from a hexachlorocyclohexane dump site.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Jaya; Anand, Shailly; Jindal, Swati; Rajagopal, Raman; Lal, Rup

    2012-12-01

    The taxonomic position of a Gram-negative, non-motile, oxidase negative and catalase positive strain, A648(T), isolated from a hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) dump site located in Lucknow, India, was ascertained by using a polyphasic approach. A comparative analysis of a partial sequence of the rpoB gene and the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain A648(T) belonged to the genus Acinetobacter. DNA-DNA relatedness values between strain A648(T) and other closely related members (16S rRNA gene sequence similarity greater than 97%), namely Acinetobacter radioresistens DSM 6976(T), A. venetianus ATCC 31012(T), A. baumannii LMG 1041(T), A. parvus LMG 21765(T) A. junii LMG 998(T) and A. soli JCM 15062(T), were found to be less than 8%. The major cellular fatty acids of strain A648(T) were 18:1ω9c (19.6%), summed feature 3 (15.9%), 16:0 (10.6%) and 12:0 (6.4%). The DNA G+C content was 40.4 mol%. The polar lipid profile of strain A648(T) indicated the presence of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, followed by phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylcholine. The predominant polyamine of strain A648(T) was 1,3-diaminopropane and moderate amounts of putrescine, spermidine and spermine were also detected. The respiratory quinone consisted of ubiquinone with nine isoprene units (Q-9). On the basis of DNA-DNA hybridization, phenotypic characteristics and chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic comparisons with other members of the genus Acinetobacter, strain A648(T) is found to be a novel species of the genus Acinetobacter, for which the name Acinetobacter indicus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is A648(T) ( = DSM 25388(T) = CCM 7832(T)).

  16. Coculture degradation of selected PCB congeners by two Acinetobacter sp

    SciTech Connect

    Adriaens, P.

    1989-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been introduced in the environment for nearly six decades and are considered to be refractile to microbial attack, since PCBs have to be degraded via cometabolic processes, which occur in the obligate presence of an alternative growth substrate. However, cometabolism of PCBs has been demonstrated to accumulate chlorobenzoates as the main intermediates. Therefore, the complete mineralization of PCBs can only be obtained by coculturing at least a PCB cometabolizing and a chlorobenzoate utilizing microorganism, or by constructing a recombinant strain harboring the complementary pathways of both strains. Therefore, coculture mineralization of PCBs in suspended culture was obtained by providing biphenyl or 4-chlorobiphenyl as the growth substrate for Acinetobacter sp. strain P6, a PCB cometabolizer, while the chlorobenzoates were used as growth substrates by Acinetobacter sp. strain 4-CB1, which was isolated on 4-chlorobenzoate. 4-Chlorobenzoate (4-CB) was metabolized after hydrolytic dehalogenation to 4-hydroxybenzoate (4-HB) via the protocatechuate pathway. Acinetobacter sp. strain 4-CB1 has the metabolic ability to carry out the degradation of 3,4-DCB. Although this strain does not grow on this compound, it cometabolizes 3,4-DCB to 3-chloro-4-hydroxybenzoate (3-C-4-OHB), which is used as a growth substrate and further metabolized via 4-carboxy-1,2-benzoquinone. This degradation process was termed cryptic cometabolism. 3,4-DCB has shown to be a substrate inhibitor (Ki = 1,840 {mu}M) and an uncompetitive inhibitor for 4-CB metabolism. Additionally, 3-C-4-OHB was a competitive inhibitor (Ki = 12 {mu}M) for the 4-HB monooxygenase, while the quinone uncompetitively inhibited 4-CB metabolism (Ki = 50 {mu}M).

  17. Acinetobacter gandensis sp. nov. isolated from horse and cattle.

    PubMed

    Smet, Annemieke; Cools, Piet; Krizova, Lenka; Maixnerova, Martina; Sedo, Ondrej; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Kempf, Marie; Nemec, Alexandr; Vaneechoutte, Mario

    2014-12-01

    We previously reported the presence of an OXA-23 carbapenemase in an undescribed species of the genus Acinetobacter isolated from horse dung at the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Belgium. Here we include six strains to corroborate the delineation of this taxon by phenotypic characterization, DNA-DNA hybridization, 16S rRNA gene and rpoB sequence analysis, % G+C determination, MALDI-TOF MS and fatty acid analysis. The nearly complete 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain UG 60467(T) showed the highest similarities with those of the type strains of Acinetobacter bouvetii (98.4 %), Acinetobacter haemolyticus (97.7 %), and Acinetobacter schindleri (97.2 %). The partial rpoB sequence of strain UG 60467(T) showed the highest similarities with 'Acinetobacter bohemicus' ANC 3994 (88.6 %), A. bouvetii NIPH 2281 (88.6 %) and A. schindleri CIP 107287T (87.3 %). Whole-cell MALDI-TOF MS analyses supported the distinctness of the group at the protein level. The predominant fatty acids of strain UG 60467(T) were C12 : 0 3-OH, C12 : 0, C16 : 0, C18 : 1ω9c and summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or iso-C15 : 0 2-OH). Strains UG 60467(T) and UG 60716 showed a DNA-DNA relatedness of 84 % with each other and a DNA-DNA relatedness with A. schindleri LMG 19576(T) of 17 % and 20 %, respectively. The DNA G+C content of strain UG 60467(T) was 39.6 mol%. The name Acinetobacter gandensis sp. nov. is proposed for the novel taxon. The type strain is UG 60467(T) ( = ANC 4275(T) = LMG 27960(T) = DSM 28097(T)).

  18. Acinetobacter sp. isolates from emergency departments in two hospitals of South Korea.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji-Young; Ko, Eun Ah; Kwon, Ki Tae; Lee, Shinwon; Kang, Choel In; Chung, Doo-Ryeon; Peck, Kyong Ran; Song, Jae-Hoon; Ko, Kwan Soo

    2014-10-01

    A total of 114 Acinetobacter sp. isolates were collected from patients in the emergency departments (EDs) of two Korean hospitals. Most isolates belonged to the Acinetobacter baumannii complex (105 isolates, 92.1 %). Imipenem resistance was found in 39 isolates (34.2 %) of the Acinetobacter sp. isolates, and 6 colistin-resistant isolates were also identified. Species distribution and antimicrobial-resistance rates were different between the two hospitals. In addition, two main clones were identified in the imipenem-resistant A. baumannii isolates from hospital B, but very diverse and novel genotypes were found in those from hospital A. Many Acinetobacter sp. isolates, including the imipenem-resistant A. baumannii, are considered to be associated with the community. The evidence of high antimicrobial resistance and different features in these Acinetobacter sp. isolates between the two EDs suggests the need for continuous testing to monitor changes in epidemiology.

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of Acinetobacter sp. Strain NCu2D-2 Isolated from a Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Blaschke, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Whole-genome sequencing of Acinetobacter sp. strain NCu2D-2, isolated from the trachea of a mouse, revealed the presence of a plasmid of 309,964 bp with little overall similarity to known plasmids and enriched in insertion sequences (ISs) closely related to IS elements known from the nosocomial pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii. PMID:28126932

  20. Genome Sequence of Airborne Acinetobacter sp. Strain 5-2Ac02 in the Hospital Environment, Close to the Species of Acinetobacter towneri.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Beathriz G V; Fernandez-García, Laura; Gato, Eva; López, Maria; Blasco, Lucia; Leão, Robson Souza; Albano, Rodolpho M; Fernández, Begoña; Cuenca, Felipe-Fernández; Pascual, Álvaro; Bou, German; Marques, Elizabeth A; Tomás, María

    2016-12-08

    Acinetobacter spp. are found in 53% of air colonization samples from the hospital environment. In this work, we sequenced all the genome of airborne Acinetobacter sp. strain 5-2Ac02. We found important features at the genomic level in regards to the rhizome. By phylogenetic analysis, A. towneri was the species most closely related to Acinetobacter sp. 5-2Ac02.

  1. Genome Sequence of Airborne Acinetobacter sp. Strain 5-2Ac02 in the Hospital Environment, Close to the Species of Acinetobacter towneri

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Beathriz G. V.; Fernandez-García, Laura; Gato, Eva; López, Maria; Blasco, Lucia; Leão, Robson Souza; Albano, Rodolpho M.; Fernández, Begoña; Cuenca, Felipe-Fernández; Pascual, Álvaro; Bou, German; Marques, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter spp. are found in 53% of air colonization samples from the hospital environment. In this work, we sequenced all the genome of airborne Acinetobacter sp. strain 5-2Ac02. We found important features at the genomic level in regards to the rhizome. By phylogenetic analysis, A. towneri was the species most closely related to Acinetobacter sp. 5-2Ac02. PMID:27932646

  2. Isolation of a bacterial strain, Acinetobacter sp. from centrate wastewater and study of its cooperation with algae in nutrients removal.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Lu, Qian; Wang, Qin; Liu, Wen; Wei, Qian; Ren, Hongyan; Ming, Caibing; Min, Min; Chen, Paul; Ruan, Roger

    2017-03-22

    Algae were able to grow healthy on bacteria-containing centrate wastewater in a pilot-scale bioreactor. The batch experiment indicated that the co-cultivation of algae and wastewater-borne bacteria improved the removal efficiencies of chemical oxygen demand and total phosphorus in centrate wastewater to 93.01% and 98.78%, respectively. A strain of beneficial aerobic bacteria, Acinetobacter sp., was isolated and its biochemical characteristics were explored. Synergistic cooperation was observed in the growth of algae and Acinetobacter sp. Removal efficiencies of some nutrients were improved significantly by the co-cultivation of algae and Acinetobacter sp. After treatment, residual nutrients in centrate wastewater reached the permissible discharge limit. The cooperation between algae and Acinetobacter sp. was in part attributed to the exchange of carbon dioxide and oxygen between the algae and bacteria. This synergetic relationship between algae and Acinetobacter sp. provided a promising way to treat the wastewater by improving the nutrients removal and biomass production.

  3. Phenotypic and physiological changes in Acinetobacter sp. strain DR1 with exogenous plasmid.

    PubMed

    Park, Jungsoon; Park, Woojun

    2011-01-01

    The genus Acinetobacter has been recognized to take up exogenous DNA from the environment. In this study, we conducted natural transformation with a novel diesel-degrading Acinetobacter sp. strain, designated strain DR1, using the broad host range plasmid pRK415. Many factors, including temperature, quantities of DNA, and aeration have proven critically important for efficient natural transformation. Interestingly, the Acinetobacter sp. strain DR1 (pRK415) differed both phenotypically and physiologically from the wild-type strain in several regards, including motility, biofilm formation ability, and responses to oxidative stress: the transformed cells were rendered more sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and cumene hydroperoxide, and their motilities and biofilm formation activity were also attenuated. Our data demonstrated that caution should be exercised when conducting genetic manipulation with plasmids, due to the possibility that phenotypic and physiological changes in the host might occur along with the uptake of plasmids.

  4. Gene Structures and Regulation of the Alkane Hydroxylase Complex in Acinetobacter sp. Strain M-1

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Akio; Ishige, Takeru; Sakai, Yasuyoshi; Kato, Nobuo

    2001-01-01

    In the long-chain n-alkane degrader Acinetobacter sp. strain M-1, two alkane hydroxylase complexes are switched by controlling the expression of two n-alkane hydroxylase-encoding genes in response to the chain length of n-alkanes, while rubredoxin and rubredoxin ruductase are encoded by a single gene and expressed constitutively. PMID:11160120

  5. Acinetobacter bohemicus sp. nov. widespread in natural soil and water ecosystems in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Krizova, Lenka; Maixnerova, Martina; Sedo, Ondrej; Nemec, Alexandr

    2014-10-01

    We investigated the taxonomic status of a phenetically unique group of 25 Acinetobacter strains which were isolated from multiple soil and water samples collected in natural ecosystems in the Czech Republic. Based on the comparative sequence analyses of the rpoB, gyrB, and 16S rRNA genes, the strains formed a coherent and well separated branch within the genus Acinetobacter. The genomic uniqueness of the group at the species level was supported by the low average nucleotide identity values (≤77.37%) between the whole genome sequences of strain ANC 3994(T) (NCBI accession no. APOH00000000) and the representatives of the known Acinetobacter species. Moreover, all 25 strains created a tight cluster clearly separated from all hitherto described species based on whole-cell protein profiling by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and shared a unique combination of metabolic and physiological properties. The capacity to assimilate l-histidine and the inability to grow at 35°C differentiated them from their phenotypically closest neighbor, Acinetobacter johnsonii. We conclude that the 25 strains represent a novel Acinetobacter species, for which the name Acinetobacter bohemicus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of A. bohemicus is ANC 3994(T) (=CIP 110496(T)=CCUG 63842(T)=CCM 8462(T)).

  6. Description of Acinetobacter populi sp. nov. isolated from symptomatic bark of Populus x euramericana canker.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Chang, Jupu; Guo, Li-min; Wang, Hai-Ming; Xie, Shou-jiang; Piao, Chun-gen; He, Wei

    2015-12-01

    Five Gram-negative, non-motile, rod-shaped bacterial strains were isolated from cankers of Populus x euramericana collected from different locations in Puyang city, Henan Province, China. The five strains were characterized by nutritional and physiological testing and DNA sequence analysis. Haemolysis was not observed on agar media supplemented with sheep erythrocytes. The strains could be distinguished from members of most species of the genus Acinetobacter by their inability to assimilate L-arginine and benzoate. The five strains formed a single branch in phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA, gyrB and rpoB individual gene sequence analysis,indicating that they all belonged to a single taxon within the genus Acinetobacter. DNA-DNA hybridization results indicated that the five isolates represented to a single species that was separate from Acinetobacter puyangensis. On the basis of the phenotypic, genotypic and phylogenetic characteristics, the five strains are considered to represent a novel species of the genus Acinetobacter, for which the name Acinetobacter populi sp. nov. is proposed. The typestrain of A. populi sp. nov. is PBJ7T (CFCC 11170T=KCTC 42272T).

  7. Transformation of Acinetobacter sp. strain BD413 by transgenic sugar beet DNA.

    PubMed

    Gebhard, F; Smalla, K

    1998-04-01

    The ability of Acinetobacter sp. strain BD413(pFG4 delta nptII) to take up and integrate transgenic plant DNA based on homologous recombination was studied under optimized laboratory conditions. Restoration of nptII, resulting in kanamycin-resistant transformants, was observed with plasmid DNA, plant DNA, and homogenates carrying the gene nptII. Molecular analysis showed that some transformants not only restored the 317-bp deletion but also obtained additional DNA.

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Ammonia-Producing Acinetobacter sp. Strain MCC2139 from Dairy Effluent

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Debasmita; Thakur, Ashoke Ranjan

    2013-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of an ammonia-producing, esculin-hydrolyzing, catalase-positive, gram-negative bacterium, Acinetobacter sp. strain MCC2139. This bacterium, isolated from dairy sludge and with optimum growth at 37°C, has a genome size of 2,967,280 bp with a G+C content of 42.3%. PMID:23814111

  9. Acinetobacter lactucae sp. nov., isolated from iceberg lettuce (Asteraceae: Lactuca sativa).

    PubMed

    Rooney, Alejandro P; Dunlap, Christopher A; Flor-Weiler, Lina B

    2016-09-01

    Strain NRRL B-41902T and three closely related strains were isolated from iceberg lettuce. The strain was found to consist of strictly aerobic, Gram-stain-negative rods that formed cocci in late stationary phase. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that strain NRRL B-41902T was most closely related to species within the genera Acinetobacter, and that a grouping of it and the three other closely related strains was most closely related to the type strain of Acinetobacter pittii, which was also confirmed through a phylogenomic analysis. Moreover, in silico DNA-DNA hybridization analysis revealed a substantial amount of genomic divergence (39.1 %) between strain NRRL B-41902T and the type strain of A. pittii, which is expected if the strains represent distinct species. Further phenotypic analysis revealed that strain NRRL B-41902T was able to utilize a combination of l-serine, citraconic acid and citramalic acid, which differentiated it from other, closely related Acinetobacter species. Therefore, strain NRRL B-41902T (=CCUG 68785T) is proposed as the type strain of a novel species, Acinetobacter lactucae sp. nov.

  10. Isolation and characterization of diesel degrading bacteria, Sphingomonas sp. and Acinetobacter junii from petroleum contaminated soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiuzhuo; Wang, Duanchao; Li, Mengmeng; Xiang, Wei-Ning; Achal, Varenyam

    2014-03-01

    Two indigenous bacteria of petroleum contaminated soil were characterized to utilize diesel fuel as the sole carbon and energy sources in this work. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis identified these bacteria as Sphingomonas sp. and Acinetobacter junii. The ability to degrade diesel fuel has been demonstrated for the first time by these isolates. The results of IR analyses showed that Sphingomonas sp. VA1 and A. junii VA2 degraded up to 82.6% and 75.8% of applied diesel over 15 days, respectively. In addition, Sphingomonas sp. VA1 possessed the higher cellular hydrophobicities of 94% for diesel compared to 81% by A. junii VA2. The isolates Sphingomonas sp. VA1 and A. junii VA2 exhibited 24% and 18%, respectively emulsification activity. This study reports two new diesel degrading bacterial species, which can be effectively used for bioremediation of petroleum contaminated sites.

  11. Acinetobacter variabilis sp. nov. (formerly DNA group 15 sensu Tjernberg & Ursing), isolated from humans and animals.

    PubMed

    Krizova, Lenka; McGinnis, Jana; Maixnerova, Martina; Nemec, Matej; Poirel, Laurent; Mingle, Lisa; Sedo, Ondrej; Wolfgang, William; Nemec, Alexandr

    2015-03-01

    We aimed to define the taxonomic status of 16 strains which were phenetically congruent with Acinetobacter DNA group 15 described by Tjernberg & Ursing in 1989. The strains were isolated from a variety of human and animal specimens in geographically distant places over the last three decades. Taxonomic analysis was based on an Acinetobacter-targeted, genus-wide approach that included the comparative sequence analysis of housekeeping, protein-coding genes, whole-cell profiling based on matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), an array of in-house physiological and metabolic tests, and whole-genome comparative analysis. Based on analyses of the rpoB and gyrB genes, the 16 strains formed respective, strongly supported clusters clearly separated from the other species of the genus Acinetobacter. The distinctness of the group at the species level was indicated by average nucleotide identity values of ≤82 % between the whole genome sequences of two of the 16 strains (NIPH 2171(T) and NIPH 899) and those of the known species. In addition, the coherence of the group was also supported by MALDI-TOF MS. All 16 strains were non-haemolytic and non-gelatinase-producing, grown at 41 °C and utilized a rather limited number of carbon sources. Virtually every strain displayed a unique combination of metabolic and physiological features. We conclude that the 16 strains represent a distinct species of the genus Acinetobacter, for which the name Acinetobacter variabilis sp. nov. is proposed to reflect its marked phenotypic heterogeneity. The type strain is NIPH 2171(T) ( = CIP 110486(T) = CCUG 26390(T) = CCM 8555(T)).

  12. Effect of Acinetobacter sp on metalaxyl degradation and metabolite profile of potato seedlings (Solanum tuberosum L.) alpha variety.

    PubMed

    Zuno-Floriano, Fabiola G; Miller, Marion G; Aldana-Madrid, Maria L; Hengel, Matt J; Gaikwad, Nilesh W; Tolstikov, Vladimir; Contreras-Cortés, Ana G

    2012-01-01

    One of the most serious diseases in potato cultivars is caused by the pathogen Phytophthora infestans, which affects leaves, stems and tubers. Metalaxyl is a fungicide that protects potato plants from Phytophthora infestans. In Mexico, farmers apply metalaxyl 35 times during the cycle of potato production and the last application is typically 15 days before harvest. There are no records related to the presence of metalaxyl in potato tubers in Mexico. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of Acinetobacter sp on metalaxyl degradation in potato seedlings. The effect of bacteria and metalaxyl on the growth of potato seedlings was also evaluated. A metabolite profile analysis was conducted to determine potential molecular biomarkers produced by potato seedlings in the presence of Acinetobacter sp and metalaxyl. Metalaxyl did not affect the growth of potato seedlings. However, Acinetobacter sp strongly affected the growth of inoculated seedlings, as confirmed by plant length and plant fresh weights which were lower in inoculated potato seedlings (40% and 27%, respectively) compared to the controls. Acinetobacter sp also affected root formation. Inoculated potato seedlings showed a decrease in root formation compared to the controls. LC-MS/MS analysis of metalaxyl residues in potato seedlings suggests that Acinetobacter sp did not degrade metalaxyl. GC-TOF-MS platform was used in metabolic profiling studies. Statistical data analysis and metabolic pathway analysis allowed suggesting the alteration of metabolic pathways by both Acinetobacter sp infection and metalaxyl treatment. Several hundred metabolites were detected, 137 metabolites were identified and 15 metabolic markers were suggested based on statistical change significance found with PLS-DA analysis. These results are important for better understanding the interactions of putative endophytic bacteria and pesticides on plants and their possible effects on plant metabolism.

  13. Effect of Acinetobacter sp on Metalaxyl Degradation and Metabolite Profile of Potato Seedlings (Solanum tuberosum L.) Alpha Variety

    PubMed Central

    Zuno-Floriano, Fabiola G.; Miller, Marion G.; Aldana-Madrid, Maria L.; Hengel, Matt J.; Gaikwad, Nilesh W.; Tolstikov, Vladimir; Contreras-Cortés, Ana G.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most serious diseases in potato cultivars is caused by the pathogen Phytophthora infestans, which affects leaves, stems and tubers. Metalaxyl is a fungicide that protects potato plants from Phytophthora infestans. In Mexico, farmers apply metalaxyl 35 times during the cycle of potato production and the last application is typically 15 days before harvest. There are no records related to the presence of metalaxyl in potato tubers in Mexico. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of Acinetobacter sp on metalaxyl degradation in potato seedlings. The effect of bacteria and metalaxyl on the growth of potato seedlings was also evaluated. A metabolite profile analysis was conducted to determine potential molecular biomarkers produced by potato seedlings in the presence of Acinetobacter sp and metalaxyl. Metalaxyl did not affect the growth of potato seedlings. However, Acinetobacter sp strongly affected the growth of inoculated seedlings, as confirmed by plant length and plant fresh weights which were lower in inoculated potato seedlings (40% and 27%, respectively) compared to the controls. Acinetobacter sp also affected root formation. Inoculated potato seedlings showed a decrease in root formation compared to the controls. LC-MS/MS analysis of metalaxyl residues in potato seedlings suggests that Acinetobacter sp did not degrade metalaxyl. GC–TOF–MS platform was used in metabolic profiling studies. Statistical data analysis and metabolic pathway analysis allowed suggesting the alteration of metabolic pathways by both Acinetobacter sp infection and metalaxyl treatment. Several hundred metabolites were detected, 137 metabolites were identified and 15 metabolic markers were suggested based on statistical change significance found with PLS-DA analysis. These results are important for better understanding the interactions of putative endophytic bacteria and pesticides on plants and their possible effects on plant metabolism. PMID:22363586

  14. Heterotrophic nitrogen removal by Acinetobacter sp. Y1 isolated from coke plant wastewater.

    PubMed

    Liu, YuXiang; Hu, Tingting; Song, Yujie; Chen, Hongping; Lv, YongKang

    2015-11-01

    A strain of Acinetobacter sp. Y1, which exhibited an amazing ability to remove ammonium, nitrite and nitrate, was isolated from the activated sludge of a coking wastewater treatment plant. The aim of this work was to study the ability, influence factors and possible pathway of nitrogen removal by Acinetobacter sp. Y1. Results showed that maximum removal rate of NH4(+)-N by the strain was 10.28 mg-N/L/h. Carbon source had significant influence on the growth and ammonium removal efficiencies of strain Y1. Pyruvate, citrate and acetate were favourable carbon sources for the strain. Temperature, pH value and shaking speed could affect the growth and nitrogen removal ability. Nitrate or nitrite could be used as a sole nitrogen source for the growth and removed efficiently by the strain. N2 levels increased to 53.74%, 50.21% and 55.13% within 36 h when 100 mg/L NH4(+)-N, NO2(-)-N or NO3(-) -N was used as sole nitrogen source in the gas detection experiment. The activities of hydroxylamine oxidoreductase (HAO), nitrate reductase (NR) and nitrite reductase (NiR), which are key enzymes in heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification, were all detectable in the strain. Consequently, a possible pathway for ammonium removal by the strain was also suggested.

  15. Production of S-(+)-ibuprofen from a nitrile compound by Acinetobacter sp. strain AK226.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, K; Ueno, Y; Otsubo, K; Kawakami, K; Komatsu, K

    1990-01-01

    S-(+)-2-(4'-Isobutylphenyl)propionic acid [S-(+)-ibuprofen] was produced from racemic 2-(4'-isobutylphenyl)propionitrile (Ibu-CN) by an isolated bacterial strain, Acinetobacter sp. strain AK226. Ammonium acetate, acetonitrile, or n-butyronitrile as a carbon source in the culture medium was effective for bacterial growth and induction of this activity. The optimum pH of the reaction was around 8.0. S-(+)-Ibuprofen formed from Ibu-CN by resting cells was present in a 95% enantiomeric excess. Acinetobacter sp. strain AK226 appeared to possess a nitrilase for Ibu-CN because 2-(4'-isobutylphenyl)propionamide was not detected in the reaction mixture and 2-(4'-isobutylphenyl)propionamide was not hydrolyzed to S-(+)-ibuprofen. Since S-(+)-ibuprofen was preferentially produced while the R enantiomer of Ibu-CN was left almost intact over the time course of the reaction, the putative nitrilase appeared to be highly specific for the S enantiomer of Ibu-CN. PMID:2285318

  16. Transcriptional Analysis of Acinetobacter sp. neg1 Capable of Degrading Ochratoxin A

    PubMed Central

    Liuzzi, Vania C.; Fanelli, Francesca; Tristezza, Mariana; Haidukowski, Miriam; Picardi, Ernesto; Manzari, Caterina; Lionetti, Claudia; Grieco, Francesco; Logrieco, Antonio F.; Thon, Michael R.; Pesole, Graziano; Mulè, Giuseppina

    2017-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a nephrotoxic and potentially carcinogenic mycotoxin produced by several species of Aspergillus and Penicillium, contaminating grapes, wine and a variety of food products. We recently isolated from OTA contaminated soil vineyard a novel free-living strain of Acinetobacter sp. neg1, ITEM 17016, able to degrade OTA into the non-toxic catabolic product ochratoxin α. Biochemical studies suggested that the degradation reaction proceeds via peptide bond hydrolysis with phenylalanine (Phe) release. In order to identify genes responsible for OTA degradation we performed a differential gene expression analysis of ITEM 17016 grown in the presence or absence of the toxin. Among the differentially expressed genes, six peptidases up-regulated at 6 h were identified. The degrading activity of the carboxypeptidase PJ_1540 was confirmed in vitro in a heterologous system. The enrichment analysis for Gene Ontology terms confirmed that OTA degradation proceeds through peptidase activities and revealed the over-representation of pathways related to Phe catabolism. These results indicate that Phe may represent an energy source for this Acinetobacter sp. neg1 strain and that OTA degrading reaction triggers the modulation of further catabolic activities. PMID:28119679

  17. Biodegradation of 4-nitroaniline by plant-growth promoting Acinetobacter sp. AVLB2 and toxicological analysis of its biodegradation metabolites.

    PubMed

    Silambarasan, Sivagnanam; Vangnai, Alisa S

    2016-01-25

    4-nitroaniline (4-NA) is one of the major priority pollutants generated from industrial productions and pesticide transformation; however very limited biodegradation details have been reported. This work is the first to report 4-NA biodegradation kinetics and toxicity reduction using a newly isolated plant-growth promoting bacterium, Acinetobacter sp. AVLB2. The 4-NA-dependent growth kinetics parameters: μmax, Ks and Ki, were determined to be 0.039 h(-1), 6.623 mg L(-1) and 25.57 mg L(-1), respectively using Haldane inhibition model, while the maximum biodegradation rate (Vmax) of 4-NA was at 0.541 mg L(-1) h(-1) and 0.551 mg L(-1) h(-1), following Michaelis-Menten and Hanes-Woolf models, respectively. Biodegradation pathway of 4-NA by Acinetobacter sp. AVLB2 was proposed, and successfully led to the reduction of 4-NA toxicity according to the following toxicity assessments: microbial toxicity using Escherichia coli DH5α, phytotoxicity with Vigna radiata and Crotalaria juncea, and cytogenotoxicity with Allium cepa root-tip cells. In addition, Acinetobacter sp. AVLB2 possess important plant-growth promoting traits, both in the presence and absence of 4-NA. This study has provided a new insight into 4-NA biodegradation ability and concurrent plant-growth promoting activities of Acinetobacter sp. AVLB2, which may indicate its potential role for rhizoremediation, while sustaining crop production even under 4-NA stressed environment.

  18. Biodegradation of phenol by using free and immobilized cells of Acinetobacter sp. BS8Y.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lichun; Ruan, Qiping; Li, Rulan; Li, Tiandong

    2013-03-01

    Strain BS8Y with high biodegradation activity and high tolerance of phenol was isolated from activated sludge in an insulating material plant of China. This strain was capable of removing 99.2% of the initial 600 mg/l phenol in liquid minimal medium within 24 h and tolerating phenol at concentrations of up to 1,200 mg/ml. DNA sequencing and homologous analysis of the 16S rRNA gene identified that the strain BS8Y belonged to an Acinetobacter species. Polyvinyl alcohol was used as gel matrix to immobilize the strain BS8Y. The factors affecting the phenol degradation by immobilized cells and the phenol removal efficiency of free and immobilized cells were investigated; the stability of the immobilized cells is also reported. The results show that the immobilized cells could tolerate a higher phenol level and protected the bacteria much more effectively against changes in temperature and pH. The phenol degradation efficiency was high at up to 96% within 30 h, with an initial concentration of 800 mg/l phenol, and the immobilized cells showed better performance than the suspended cells. Reusability tests revealed that the immobilized cells were stable enough even after reuse for ten times or storing at 4°C for 35 d. These results demonstrate that immobilized Acinetobacter sp. BS8Y possesses a good application potential in the treatment of phenol-containing wastewater.

  19. Purification and characterization of novel extracellular cholesterol esterase from Acinetobacter sp.

    PubMed

    Du, Liangjun; Huo, Ying; Ge, Fanglan; Yu, Jiajun; Li, Wei; Cheng, Guiying; Yong, Bin; Zeng, Lihuang; Huang, Min

    2010-12-01

    CHE4-1, a bacterial strain that belongs to the genus Acinetobacter and expresses high level of inducible extracellular cholesterol esterase (CHE), was isolated from feces of carnivore Panthera pardus var. The cholesterol esterase of the strain CHE4-1 was purified by ultrafiltration followed with DEAE-Sepharose FF chromatography and Phenyl-Sepharose CL-4B chromatography, and then by Sephadex G-50 gel filtration. Different from other known microbial cholesterol esterase, the purified CHE from CHE4-1 strain is a monomer with molecular weight of 6.5 kD and has high activity to both long-chain and short-chain cholesterol ester. Enzymatic activity was enhanced in the presence of metal ion Ca(2+), Zn(2+) and boracic acid, and was not significantly affected by several detergents including sodium cholate, Triton X100 and Tween-80. The enzyme was found to be stable during long-term aqueous storage at 4 °C, indicating its potential as a clinical diagnostic reagent. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report regarding purification and characterization of CHE from Acinetobacter sp. The results demonstrated that this particular CHE is a novel cholesterol esterase.

  20. Cometabolism of 3,4-dichlorobenzoate by Acinetobacter sp. strain 4-CB1.

    PubMed Central

    Adriaens, P; Focht, D D

    1991-01-01

    When Acinetobacter sp. strain 4-CB1 was grown on 4-chlorobenzoate (4-CB), it cometabolized 3,4-dichlorobenzoate (3,4-DCB) to 3-chloro-4-hydroxybenzoate (3-C-4-OHB), which could be used as a growth substrate. No cometabolism of 3,4-DCB was observed when Acinetobacter sp. strain 4-CB1 was grown on benzoate. 4-Carboxyl-1,2-benzoquinone was formed as an intermediate from 3,4-DCB and 3-C-4-OHB in aerobic and anaerobic resting-cell incubations and was the major transient intermediate found when cells were grown on 3-C-4-OHB. The first dechlorination step of 3,4-DCB was catalyzed by the 4-CB dehalogenase, while a soluble dehalogenase was responsible for dechlorination of 3-C-4-OHB. Both enzymes were inducible by the respective chlorinated substrates, as indicated by oxygen uptake experiments. The dehalogenase activity on 3-C-4-OHB, observed in crude cell extracts, was 109 and 44 nmol of 3-C-4-OHB min-1 mg of protein-1 under anaerobic and aerobic conditions, respectively. 3-Chloro-4-hydroxybenzoate served as a pseudosubstrate for the 4-hydroxybenzoate monooxygenase by effecting oxygen and NADH consumption without being hydroxylated. Contrary to 4-CB metabolism, the results suggest that 3-C-4-OHB was not metabolized via the protocatechuate pathway. Despite the ability of resting cells grown on 4-CB or 3-C-4-OHB to carry out all of the necessary steps for dehalogenation and catabolism of 3,4-DCB, it appeared that 3,4-DCB was unable to induce the necessary 4-CB dehalogenase for the initial p-dehalogenation step.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2036004

  1. Draft Genome Sequences of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter sp. Strains from Colombian Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Falquet, Laurent; Reguero, María T.; Mantilla, José R.; Valenzuela, Emilia M.; González, Elsa; Cepeda, Alexandra; Escalante, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The draft genome sequences of the strains Acinetobacter baumannii 107m, Acinetobacter nosocomialis 28F, and Acinetobacter pittii 42F, isolated from Colombian hospitals, are reported here. These isolates are causative of nosocomial infections and are classified as multidrug resistant, as they showed resistance to four different antibiotic groups. PMID:24285656

  2. Fatty aldehyde dehydrogenases in Acinetobacter sp. strain HO1-N: role in hexadecanol metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Singer, M E; Finnerty, W R

    1985-01-01

    The role of fatty aldehyde dehydrogenases (FALDHs) in hexadecane and hexadecanol metabolism was studied in Acinetobacter sp. strain HO1-N. Two distinct FALDHs were demonstrated in Acinetobacter sp. strain HO1-N: a membrane-bound, NADP-dependent FALDH activity induced 5-, 15-, and 9-fold by growth on hexadecanol, dodecyl aldehyde, and hexadecane, respectively, and a constitutive, NAD-dependent, membrane-localized FALDH. The NADP-dependent FALDH exhibited apparent Km and Vmax values for decyl aldehyde of 5.0, 13.0, 18.0, and 18.3 microM and 537.0, 500.0, 25.0, and 38.0 nmol/min in hexadecane-, hexadecanol-, ethanol-, palmitate-grown cells, respectively. FALDH isozymes ald-a, ald-b, and ald-c were demonstrated by gel electrophoresis in extracts of hexadecane- and hexadecanol-grown cells. ald-a, ald-b, and ald-d were present in dodecyl aldehyde-grown cells, while palmitate-grown control cells contained ald-b and ald-d. Dodecyl aldehyde-negative mutants were isolated and grouped into two phenotypic classes based on growth: class 1 mutants were hexadecane and hexadecanol negative and class 2 mutants were hexadecane and hexadecanol positive. Specific activity of NADP-dependent FALDH in Ald21 (class 1 mutant) was 85% lower than that of wild-type FALDH, while the specific activity of Ald24 (class 2 mutant) was 55% greater than that of wild-type FALDH. Ald21R, a dodecyl aldehyde-positive revertant able to grow on hexadecane, hexadecanol, and dodecyl aldehyde, exhibited a 100% increase in the specific activity of the NADP-dependent FALDH. The oxidation of [3H]hexadecane byAld21 yielded the accumulation of 61% more fatty aldehyde than the wild type, while Ald24 accumulated 27% more fatty aldehyde, 95% more fatty alcohol, and 65% more wax ester than the wild type. This study provides genetic and physiological evidence for the role of fatty aldehyde as an essential metabolic intermediate and NADP-dependent FALDH as a key enzyme in the dissimilation of hexadecane, hexadecanol

  3. Optimization of Fermentation Medium for the Production of Atrazine Degrading Strain Acinetobacter sp. DNS32 by Statistical Analysis System

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Yang; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Wang, Xi; Guo, Huo-Sheng; Meng, Dong-Fang; Wong, Po-keung

    2012-01-01

    Statistical experimental designs provided by statistical analysis system (SAS) software were applied to optimize the fermentation medium composition for the production of atrazine-degrading Acinetobacter sp. DNS32 in shake-flask cultures. A “Plackett-Burman Design” was employed to evaluate the effects of different components in the medium. The concentrations of corn flour, soybean flour, and K2HPO4 were found to significantly influence Acinetobacter sp. DNS32 production. The steepest ascent method was employed to determine the optimal regions of these three significant factors. Then, these three factors were optimized using central composite design of “response surface methodology.” The optimized fermentation medium composition was composed as follows (g/L): corn flour 39.49, soybean flour 25.64, CaCO3 3, K2HPO4 3.27, MgSO4·7H2O 0.2, and NaCl 0.2. The predicted and verifiable values in the medium with optimized concentration of components in shake flasks experiments were 7.079 × 108 CFU/mL and 7.194 × 108 CFU/mL, respectively. The validated model can precisely predict the growth of atrazine-degraing bacterium, Acinetobacter sp. DNS32. PMID:23093851

  4. Optimization of fermentation medium for the production of atrazine degrading strain Acinetobacter sp. DNS(32) by statistical analysis system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Yang; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Wang, Xi; Guo, Huo-Sheng; Meng, Dong-Fang; Wong, Po-Keung

    2012-01-01

    Statistical experimental designs provided by statistical analysis system (SAS) software were applied to optimize the fermentation medium composition for the production of atrazine-degrading Acinetobacter sp. DNS(32) in shake-flask cultures. A "Plackett-Burman Design" was employed to evaluate the effects of different components in the medium. The concentrations of corn flour, soybean flour, and K(2)HPO(4) were found to significantly influence Acinetobacter sp. DNS(32) production. The steepest ascent method was employed to determine the optimal regions of these three significant factors. Then, these three factors were optimized using central composite design of "response surface methodology." The optimized fermentation medium composition was composed as follows (g/L): corn flour 39.49, soybean flour 25.64, CaCO(3) 3, K(2)HPO(4) 3.27, MgSO(4)·7H(2)O 0.2, and NaCl 0.2. The predicted and verifiable values in the medium with optimized concentration of components in shake flasks experiments were 7.079 × 10(8) CFU/mL and 7.194 × 10(8) CFU/mL, respectively. The validated model can precisely predict the growth of atrazine-degraing bacterium, Acinetobacter sp. DNS(32).

  5. A novel competence gene, comP, is essential for natural transformation of Acinetobacter sp. strain BD413.

    PubMed Central

    Porstendörfer, D; Drotschmann, U; Averhoff, B

    1997-01-01

    Acinetobacter sp. strain BD413 (= ATCC 33305), a nutritionally versatile bacterium, has an extremely efficient natural transformation system. Here we describe the generation of eight transformation-affected mutants of Acinetobacter sp. strain BD413 by insertional mutagenesis. These mutants were found by Southern blot analysis and complementation studies to result from single nptII marker insertions at different chromosomal loci. DNA binding and uptake studies with one mutant, T205, revealed that the transformation deficiency of this mutant results from a complete lack of DNA binding and, therefore, uptake activity. A novel competence gene essential for natural transformation, named comP, was cloned by complementation of mutant T205. The nucleotide sequence of comP was determined, and its deduced 15-kDa polypeptide displays significant similarities to type IV pilins. Analysis of the ultrastructure of a transformation-deficient comP mutant and the transformation-competent wild-type strain revealed that both are covered with bundle-forming thin fimbriae (3 to 4 nm in diameter) and individual thick fimbriae (6 nm in diameter). These results provide evidence that the pilinlike ComP is unrelated to the piluslike structures of strain BD413. Taking all data into account, we propose that ComP functions as a major subunit of an organelle acting as a channel or pore mediating DNA binding and/or uptake in Acinetobacter sp. strain BD413. PMID:9361398

  6. Biotechnological tools to improve bioremediation of phenol by Acinetobacter sp. RTE1.4.

    PubMed

    Paisio, Cintia E; Talano, Melina A; González, Paola S; Magallanes-Noguera, Cynthia; Kurina-Sanz, Marcela; Agostini, Elizabeth

    2016-09-01

    The use of native bacteria is a useful strategy to decontaminate industrial effluents as well as the environment. Acinetobacter sp. RTE1.4 was previously isolated from polluted environments and constitutes a promising alternative for this purpose due to its capability to remove phenol from synthetic solutions and industrial effluents. In this work, this strain was identified at species level as A. tandoii RTE1.4. Phenol degradation pathway was studied and some reaction intermediates were detected, confirming that this strain degraded phenol through ortho-cleavage of the aromatic ring. Phenol removal assays were carried out in a stirred tank bioreactor and a complete degradation of the contaminant was achieved after only 7 h, at an aeration rate of 3 vvm and at agitation of 600 rpm. Moreover, this bacterium was immobilized into calcium alginate beads and an increase in phenol biodegradation with respect to free cells was observed. The immobilized cells were reused for four consecutive cycles and stored at 4°C for 9 months, during which phenol removal efficiency was maintained. Post-removal solutions were evaluated by Microtox® test, showing a toxicity reduction after bacterial treatment. These findings demonstrated that A. tandoii RTE1.4 might be considered as a useful biotechnological tool for an efficient treatment of different solutions contaminated with phenol in bioreactors, using either free or immobilized cells.

  7. Production and characterization of L-fucose dehydrogenase from newly isolated Acinetobacter sp. strain SA-134.

    PubMed

    Ohshiro, Takashi; Morita, Noriyuki

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms producing L-fucose dehydrogenase were screened from soil samples, and one of the isolated bacterial strains SA-134 was identified as Acinetobacter sp. by 16S rDNA gene analysis. The strain grew well utilizing L-fucose as a sole source of carbon, but all other monosaccharides tested such as D-glucose and D-arabinose did not support the growth of the strain in the absence of L-fucose. D-Arabinose inhibited the growth even in the culture medium containing L-fucose. Although the strain grew on some organic acids and amino acids such as citric acid and L-alanine as sole sources of carbon, the enzyme was produced only in the presence of L-fucose. The fucose dehydrogenase was purified to apparently homogeneity from the strain, and the native enzyme was a monomer of 25 kD. L-Fucose and D-arabinose were good substrates for the enzyme, but L-galactose was a poor substrate. The enzyme acted on both NAD(+) and NADP(+) in the similar manner.

  8. A metallo-keratinase from a newly isolated Acinetobacter sp. R-1 with low collagenase activity and its biotechnological application potential in leather industry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong-Xian; Gong, Jin-Song; Zhang, Dan-Dan; Su, Chang; Hou, Ying-Shuo; Li, Heng; Shi, Jin-Song; Xu, Zheng-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Microbial keratinase is a well-recognized enzyme that can specifically degrade insoluble keratins. A keratinase-producing bacterium was isolated from a duck ranch soil and identified as Acinetobacter sp. R-1 based on the biochemical characteristics and 16S rDNA gene sequencing. It showed high keratinase activity and low collagenase activity. The keratinase was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity with 6.69% recovery, 2.68-fold purification and an estimated molecular weight of 25 kDa. Additionally, the keratinase showed optimal activity at 50 °C and pH11. Keratinase activity of Acinetobacter sp. significantly increased in the presence of Li(+), Na(+), and Ca(2+), while it was completely inhibited by EDTA, indicating it was a metallo-keratinase. Moreover, the crude keratinase from Acinetobacter sp. R-1 could thoroughly depilate goat skin and simultaneously modify the wool surface, which indicated its applicable potential in leather and textile industries.

  9. AmiE, a novel N-acylhomoserine lactone acylase belonging to the amidase family, from the activated-sludge isolate Acinetobacter sp. strain Ooi24.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Seiji; Yasumoto, Sera; Morohoshi, Tomohiro; Ikeda, Tsukasa

    2014-11-01

    Many Gram-negative bacteria use N-acyl-l-homoserine lactones (AHLs) as quorum-sensing signal molecules. We have reported that Acinetobacter strains isolated from activated sludge have AHL-degrading activity. In this study, we cloned the amiE gene as an AHL-degradative gene from the genomic library of Acinetobacter sp. strain Ooi24. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed that AmiE functions as an AHL acylase, which hydrolyzes the amide bond of AHL. AmiE showed a high level of degrading activity against AHLs with long acyl chains but no activity against AHLs with acyl chains shorter than eight carbons. AmiE showed homology with a member of the amidases (EC 3.5.1.4) but not with any known AHL acylase enzymes. An amino acid sequence of AmiE from Ooi24 showed greater than 99% identities with uncharacterized proteins from Acinetobacter ursingii CIP 107286 and Acinetobacter sp. strain CIP 102129, but it was not found in the draft or complete genome sequences of other Acinetobacter strains. The presence of transposase-like genes around the amiE genes of these three Acinetobacter strains suggests that amiE is transferred by a putative transposon. Furthermore, the expression of AmiE in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 reduced AHL accumulation and elastase activity, which were regulated by AHL-mediated quorum sensing.

  10. Novel polyhedral gold nanoparticles: green synthesis, optimization and characterization by environmental isolate of Acinetobacter sp. SW30.

    PubMed

    Wadhwani, Sweety A; Shedbalkar, Utkarsha U; Singh, Richa; Karve, Meena S; Chopade, Balu A

    2014-10-01

    Gold nanoparticles have enormous applications in cancer treatment, drug delivery and nanobiosensor due to their biocompatibility. Biological route of synthesis of metal nanoparticles are cost effective and eco-friendly. Acinetobacter sp. SW 30 isolated from activated sewage sludge produced cell bound as well as intracellular gold nanoparticles when challenged with HAuCl4 salt solution. We first time report the optimization of various physiological parameters such as age of culture, cell density and physicochemical parameters viz HAuCl4 concentration, temperature and pH which influence the synthesis of gold nanoparticles. Gold nanoparticles thus produced were characterized by various analytical techniques viz. UV-Visible spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, cyclic voltammetry, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, environmental scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Polyhedral gold nanoparticles of size 20 ± 10 nm were synthesized by 24 h grown culture of cell density 2.4 × 10(9) cfu/ml at 50 °C and pH 9 in 0.5 mM HAuCl4. It was found that most of the gold nanoparticles were released into solution from bacterial cell surface of Acinetobacter sp. at pH 9 and 50 °C.

  11. Characterization of a fluoride-resistant bacterium Acinetobacter sp. RH5 towards assessment of its water defluoridation capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Shraboni; Yadav, Vaibhav; Mondal, Madhumanti; Banerjee, Soumya; Halder, Gopinath

    2015-12-01

    The present study investigates the defluoridation capability of fluoride-resistant bacteria from contaminated groundwater collected from Asanjola and Madhabpur, West Bengal, India. Seven strains of fluoride-resistant bacteria were isolated employing culture media containing 10-250 mg/L of fluoride to evaluate their ability in reducing fluoride concentration in water. Five isolates exhibited significant amount of reduction in fluoride. Isolate RH5 achieved a maximum fluoride removal of 25.7 % from the media at 30 °C and pH 7 after 8 days of incubation. Based on morphological, physiological characteristics and analysis of 16S rDNA gene sequence, isolate RH5 was identified as Acinetobacter sp. RH5. Growth of RH5 was analysed at a diverse pH range, and it could thrive at pH 5-10. The present investigation revealed that the selective pressure of fluoride results in growth of fluoride-resistant bacteria capable of secreting high-affinity anion-binding compounds. This bacterium played a dominant bioremediative role by concentrating the anions so that they become less available. Hence, the fluoride-resistant bacteria, Acinetobacter sp. RH5, could be used as a promising strain for application in water defluoridation from contaminated sites.

  12. Acinetobacter apis sp. nov., isolated from the intestinal tract of a honey bee, Apis mellifera.

    PubMed

    Kim, Pil Soo; Shin, Na-Ri; Kim, Joon Yong; Yun, Ji-Hyun; Hyun, Dong-Wook; Bae, Jin-Woo

    2014-08-01

    A novel Gram-negative, obligate aerobic, non-motile, and both coccobacillus- and bacillus-shaped bacterium, designated strain HYN18(T), was isolated from the intestinal tract of a honey bee (Apis mellifera). The isolate was oxidase-negative and catalase-positive. Strain HYN18(T) showed optimum growth at 25°C, pH 6-7, and in the presence of 1% (w/v) NaCl in trypticase soy broth medium. The isolate was negative for hydrolyses of starch, casein, gelatin and urea, indole production from tryptone and hemolysis on sheep blood agar. A phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene and rpoB gene sequence showed that strain HYN18(T) was most closely related to Acinetobacter nectaris SAP 763.2(T) and A. boissieri SAP 284.1(T) with 98.3% and 98.1% similarity (16S rRNA gene), respectively, and 84.4% similarity with Acinetobacter nectaris SAP 763.2(T) (rpoB gene). The major cellular fatty acids were summed features 3 (comprising C16:1ω7c /C16:1ω6c ), C12:0 and C16:0. The main isoprenoid quinone was ubiquinone-9 (Q-9). The polar lipids of strain HYN18(T) were phosphatidylethanolamine, three unidentified lipids, an unidentified phospholipid and an unidentified glycolipid. The DNA G+C content was 40.6 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization experiments indicated less than 33 ± 10% relatedness to the closest phylogenetic species, Acinetobacter nectaris SAP 763.2(T). Thus, the phenotypic, phylogenetic and genotypic analyses indicate that strain HYN18(T) is a novel species within the genus Acinetobacter, for which the name Acinetobacter apis is proposed. The type strain is HYN18(T) (=KACC 16906(T) =JCM 18575(T)).

  13. Genomic and proteomic evidences unravel the UV-resistome of the poly-extremophile Acinetobacter sp. Ver3

    PubMed Central

    Kurth, Daniel; Belfiore, Carolina; Gorriti, Marta F.; Cortez, Néstor; Farias, María E.; Albarracín, Virginia H.

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation can damage biomolecules, with detrimental or even lethal effects for life. Even though lower wavelengths are filtered by the ozone layer, a significant amount of harmful UV-B and UV-A radiation reach Earth’s surface, particularly in high altitude environments. high-altitude Andean lakes (HAALs) are a group of disperse shallow lakes and salterns, located at the Dry Central Andes region in South America at altitudes above 3,000 m. As it is considered one of the highest UV-exposed environments, HAAL microbes constitute model systems to study UV-resistance mechanisms in environmental bacteria at various complexity levels. Herein, we present the genome sequence of Acinetobacter sp. Ver3, a gammaproteobacterium isolated from Lake Verde (4,400 m), together with further experimental evidence supporting the phenomenological observations regarding this bacterium ability to cope with increased UV-induced DNA damage. Comparison with the genomes of other Acinetobacter strains highlighted a number of unique genes, such as a novel cryptochrome. Proteomic profiling of UV-exposed cells identified up-regulated proteins such as a specific cytoplasmic catalase, a putative regulator, and proteins associated to amino acid and protein synthesis. Down-regulated proteins were related to several energy-generating pathways such as glycolysis, beta-oxidation of fatty acids, and electronic respiratory chain. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on a genome from a polyextremophilic Acinetobacter strain. From the genomic and proteomic data, an “UV-resistome” was defined, encompassing the genes that would support the outstanding UV-resistance of this strain. PMID:25954258

  14. Genomic and proteomic evidences unravel the UV-resistome of the poly-extremophile Acinetobacter sp. Ver3.

    PubMed

    Kurth, Daniel; Belfiore, Carolina; Gorriti, Marta F; Cortez, Néstor; Farias, María E; Albarracín, Virginia H

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation can damage biomolecules, with detrimental or even lethal effects for life. Even though lower wavelengths are filtered by the ozone layer, a significant amount of harmful UV-B and UV-A radiation reach Earth's surface, particularly in high altitude environments. high-altitude Andean lakes (HAALs) are a group of disperse shallow lakes and salterns, located at the Dry Central Andes region in South America at altitudes above 3,000 m. As it is considered one of the highest UV-exposed environments, HAAL microbes constitute model systems to study UV-resistance mechanisms in environmental bacteria at various complexity levels. Herein, we present the genome sequence of Acinetobacter sp. Ver3, a gammaproteobacterium isolated from Lake Verde (4,400 m), together with further experimental evidence supporting the phenomenological observations regarding this bacterium ability to cope with increased UV-induced DNA damage. Comparison with the genomes of other Acinetobacter strains highlighted a number of unique genes, such as a novel cryptochrome. Proteomic profiling of UV-exposed cells identified up-regulated proteins such as a specific cytoplasmic catalase, a putative regulator, and proteins associated to amino acid and protein synthesis. Down-regulated proteins were related to several energy-generating pathways such as glycolysis, beta-oxidation of fatty acids, and electronic respiratory chain. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on a genome from a polyextremophilic Acinetobacter strain. From the genomic and proteomic data, an "UV-resistome" was defined, encompassing the genes that would support the outstanding UV-resistance of this strain.

  15. Structure and biosynthesis of fimsbactins A-F, siderophores from Acinetobacter baumannii and Acinetobacter baylyi.

    PubMed

    Proschak, Anna; Lubuta, Patrice; Grün, Peter; Löhr, Frank; Wilharm, Gottfried; De Berardinis, Veronique; Bode, Helge B

    2013-03-18

    Novel chatechol/hydroxamate siderophores (named "fimsbactins") were identified in Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 17978 and Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1. The major compound, fimsbactin A, was isolated from low-iron cultures of A. baylyi ADP1, and its chemical structure was elucidated by mass spectrometry, and detailed (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR spectroscopy. From inverse feeding experiments following HPLC-MS analysis, the structures of five additional derivatives were elucidated. The gene cluster encoding the fimsbactin synthetase (fbs) was identified in both genomes, and mutants in fbs genes in A. baylyi were analyzed, thus allowing prediction of the fimsbactin biosynthesis pathway.

  16. Ammonium removal by a novel oligotrophic Acinetobacter sp. Y16 capable of heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaofei; Li, Weiguang; Zhang, Duoying; Qin, Wen

    2013-10-01

    Ammonium removal from source water is usually inhibited by insufficient carbon sources and low temperature in Northeastern China. A strain Y16 was isolated from oligotrophic niche and was identified as Acinetobacter sp. Y16. It demonstrated excellent capability for ammonium removal at 2 °C, and simultaneously produced nitrogen gas as the end product. About 66% of ammonium was removed after 36 h of incubation. Only trace accumulation of nitrate was observed during the process. The utilization of nitrite and nitrate as well as the existence of napA gene further proved the aerobic denitrification ability of strain Y16. Sodium acetate was the most favorable carbon source for ammonium oxidation by strain Y16. High rotation speed was beneficial for ammonium oxidation. Furthermore, strain Y16 could efficiently remove ammonium at low C/N ratio and low temperature conditions, which was advantageous for nitrogen removal from source water under cold temperatures.

  17. Vitroprocines, new antibiotics against Acinetobacter baumannii, discovered from marine Vibrio sp. QWI-06 using mass-spectrometry-based metabolomics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liaw, Chih-Chuang; Chen, Pei-Chin; Shih, Chao-Jen; Tseng, Sung-Pin; Lai, Ying-Mi; Hsu, Chi-Hsin; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Yang, Yu-Liang

    2015-08-01

    A robust and convenient research strategy integrating state-of-the-art analytical techniques is needed to efficiently discover novel compounds from marine microbial resources. In this study, we identified a series of amino-polyketide derivatives, vitroprocines A-J, from the marine bacterium Vibrio sp. QWI-06 by an integrated approach using imaging mass spectroscopy and molecular networking, as well as conventional bioactivity-guided fractionation and isolation. The structure-activity relationship of vitroprocines against Acinetobacter baumannii is proposed. In addition, feeding experiments with 13C-labeled precursors indicated that a pyridoxal 5‧-phosphate-dependent mechanism is involved in the biosynthesis of vitroprocines. Elucidation of amino-polyketide derivatives from a species of marine bacteria for the first time demonstrates the potential of this integrated metabolomics approach to uncover marine bacterial biodiversity.

  18. Vitroprocines, new antibiotics against Acinetobacter baumannii, discovered from marine Vibrio sp. QWI-06 using mass-spectrometry-based metabolomics approach.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Chih-Chuang; Chen, Pei-Chin; Shih, Chao-Jen; Tseng, Sung-Pin; Lai, Ying-Mi; Hsu, Chi-Hsin; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Yang, Yu-Liang

    2015-08-04

    A robust and convenient research strategy integrating state-of-the-art analytical techniques is needed to efficiently discover novel compounds from marine microbial resources. In this study, we identified a series of amino-polyketide derivatives, vitroprocines A-J, from the marine bacterium Vibrio sp. QWI-06 by an integrated approach using imaging mass spectroscopy and molecular networking, as well as conventional bioactivity-guided fractionation and isolation. The structure-activity relationship of vitroprocines against Acinetobacter baumannii is proposed. In addition, feeding experiments with (13)C-labeled precursors indicated that a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent mechanism is involved in the biosynthesis of vitroprocines. Elucidation of amino-polyketide derivatives from a species of marine bacteria for the first time demonstrates the potential of this integrated metabolomics approach to uncover marine bacterial biodiversity.

  19. ADP1 Affects Plant Architecture by Regulating Local Auxin Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shibai; Qin, Genji; Novák, Ondřej; Pěnčík, Aleš; Ljung, Karin; Aoyama, Takashi; Liu, Jingjing; Murphy, Angus; Gu, Hongya; Tsuge, Tomohiko; Qu, Li-Jia

    2014-01-01

    Plant architecture is one of the key factors that affect plant survival and productivity. Plant body structure is established through the iterative initiation and outgrowth of lateral organs, which are derived from the shoot apical meristem and root apical meristem, after embryogenesis. Here we report that ADP1, a putative MATE (multidrug and toxic compound extrusion) transporter, plays an essential role in regulating lateral organ outgrowth, and thus in maintaining normal architecture of Arabidopsis. Elevated expression levels of ADP1 resulted in accelerated plant growth rate, and increased the numbers of axillary branches and flowers. Our molecular and genetic evidence demonstrated that the phenotypes of plants over-expressing ADP1 were caused by reduction of local auxin levels in the meristematic regions. We further discovered that this reduction was probably due to decreased levels of auxin biosynthesis in the local meristematic regions based on the measured reduction in IAA levels and the gene expression data. Simultaneous inactivation of ADP1 and its three closest homologs led to growth retardation, relative reduction of lateral organ number and slightly elevated auxin level. Our results indicated that ADP1-mediated regulation of the local auxin level in meristematic regions is an essential determinant for plant architecture maintenance by restraining the outgrowth of lateral organs. PMID:24391508

  20. ADP1 affects plant architecture by regulating local auxin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruixi; Li, Jieru; Li, Shibai; Qin, Genji; Novák, Ondřej; Pěnčík, Aleš; Ljung, Karin; Aoyama, Takashi; Liu, Jingjing; Murphy, Angus; Gu, Hongya; Tsuge, Tomohiko; Qu, Li-Jia

    2014-01-01

    Plant architecture is one of the key factors that affect plant survival and productivity. Plant body structure is established through the iterative initiation and outgrowth of lateral organs, which are derived from the shoot apical meristem and root apical meristem, after embryogenesis. Here we report that ADP1, a putative MATE (multidrug and toxic compound extrusion) transporter, plays an essential role in regulating lateral organ outgrowth, and thus in maintaining normal architecture of Arabidopsis. Elevated expression levels of ADP1 resulted in accelerated plant growth rate, and increased the numbers of axillary branches and flowers. Our molecular and genetic evidence demonstrated that the phenotypes of plants over-expressing ADP1 were caused by reduction of local auxin levels in the meristematic regions. We further discovered that this reduction was probably due to decreased levels of auxin biosynthesis in the local meristematic regions based on the measured reduction in IAA levels and the gene expression data. Simultaneous inactivation of ADP1 and its three closest homologs led to growth retardation, relative reduction of lateral organ number and slightly elevated auxin level. Our results indicated that ADP1-mediated regulation of the local auxin level in meristematic regions is an essential determinant for plant architecture maintenance by restraining the outgrowth of lateral organs.

  1. Two step purification of Acinetobacter sp. lipase and its evaluation as a detergent additive at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Saisubramanian, N; Sivasubramanian, S; Nandakumar, N; Indirakumar, B; Chaudhary, N Amaranath; Puvanakrishnan, R

    2008-08-01

    Acinetobacter sp. lipase was purified to homogeneity by a two-step process. The crude enzyme (along with biomass) was subjected to partial purification by aqueous two phase system (ATPS), avoiding centrifugation and filtration steps. Conditions for lipase partitioning by ATPS were optimized by response surface methodology (RSM) and a combination of 29.45% polyethylene glycol 8000, 15.5% phosphate, and a pH of 7.0 resulted in an optimal partition coefficient. Partially pure lipase was further purified by a modified batch process using Octyl Sepharose CL-4B in a vacuum filtration apparatus. This two-step process resulted in a purified lipase with a yield of 74.6% having a specific activity of 88.8 U/mg of protein and a purification fold of 14.92. The homogeneity of the lipase preparation obtained by the purification process was confirmed by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography profile. The molecular weight of the purified lipase was found to be around 32 kDa as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The purified lipase exhibited pH and temperature optima of 8.5 and 37 degrees C, respectively. The lipase was active at low temperatures and it retained 86.8% activity at 10 degrees C. It also displayed other features such as stability over a broad range of pH (3.0-9.0) as well as stability in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and commercial detergents. Based on these characteristics, the potential of this lipase as an additive in laundry detergent formulation was evaluated under low temperature wash conditions. The results indicated that Acinetobacter sp. lipase increased the washing efficiency of the detergent Nirma by 21-24% at 15 degrees C-20 degrees C, respectively.

  2. Purification and Characterization of Catechol 1,2-Dioxygenase from Acinetobacter sp. Y64 Strain and Escherichia coli Transformants.

    PubMed

    Lin, J; Milase, R N

    2015-12-01

    This study intends to purify and characterize catechol 1,2-dioxygenase (C1,2O) of phenol-degrading Acinetobacter sp. Y64 and of E. coli transformant. Acinetobacter sp. Y64 was capable of degrading 1000 mg/L of phenol within 14 ± 2 h at 30 °C, 160 rpm and pH of 7. One C1,2O of 36 kDa was purified using ammonium sulphate precipitation and Hitrap QFF column chromatograph with 49% recovery and a 10.6-fold increase in purity. Purified Y64 C1,2O had temperature and pH optimum at 37 °C and pH 7.7 respectively with the Michaelis constant of 17.53 µM and the maximal velocity of 1.95 U/mg, respectively. The presence of Fe(3+) or Fe(2+) enhanced the activity of Y64 C1,2O while other compounds such as Ca(2+), and EDTA had an inhibitory effect. 80% of C1,2O activity remained using 4-nitrocatechol as substrate while 2% remained using 3-methylcatechol compared with that using catechol. Y64 catA gene encoding C1,2O was amplified using PCR cloned into pET22b vector and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 DE3 (pLysS) after transformation. Purified and cloned Y64 C1,2O show no significant differences in the biochemical properties. The phylogenetic tree based on the protein sequences indicates that these C1,2Os possess a common ancestry.

  3. Acinetobacter sp. strain Ths, a novel psychrotolerant and alkalitolerant bacterium that utilizes hydrocarbon.

    PubMed

    Yamahira, Keiko; Hirota, Kikue; Nakajima, Kenji; Morita, Naoki; Nodasaka, Yoshinobu; Yumoto, Isao

    2008-09-01

    A novel psychrotolerant, alkalitolerant bacterium, strain Ths, was isolated from a soil sample immersed in hot spring water containing hydrocarbons and grown on a chemically defined medium containing n-tetradecane as the sole carbon source. The isolate grew at 0 degrees C but not at temperatures higher than 45 degrees C; its optimum growth temperature was 27 degrees C. It grew in the pH range of 7-9. The strain utilized C(13)-C(30) n-alkane and fluorene at pH 9 and 4 degrees C. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the bacterium that utilizes a wide range of hydrocarbons at a high pH and a low temperature. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain Ths is closely related to genomic species 6 ATCC 17979 (99.1% similarity), genomic species BJ13/TU14 ATCC 17905 (97.8% similarity), genomic species 9 ATCC 9957 (97.6% similarity) belonging to the genus Acinetobacter and to Acinetobacter calcoaceticus JCM 6842(T) (97.5% similarity). DNA-DNA hybridization revealed that the isolate has 62, 25, 18 and 19% relatedness, respectively, to genomic species 6 ATCC 17979, genomic species BJ13/TU14 ATCC 17905, genomic species 9 ATCC 9957 and A. calcoaceticus, respectively.

  4. Identification and Characterization of a Novel Competence Gene, comC, Required for DNA Binding and Uptake in Acinetobacter sp. Strain BD413

    PubMed Central

    Link, Caroline; Eickernjäger, Sandra; Porstendörfer, Dirk; Averhoff, Beate

    1998-01-01

    A gene (comC) essential for natural transformation was identified in Acinetobacter sp. strain BD413. ComC has a typical leader sequence and is similar to different type IV pilus assembly factors. A comC mutant (T308) is not able to bind or take up DNA but exhibits a piliation phenotype indistinguishable from the transformation wild type as revealed by electron microscopy. PMID:9515934

  5. Cold-active lipolytic activity of psychrotrophic Acinetobacter sp. strain no. 6.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Nakayama, T; Kurihara, T; Nishino, T; Esaki, N

    2001-01-01

    A lipolytic bacterium, strain no. 6, was isolated from Siberian tundra soil. It was a gram-negative coccoid rod capable of growing at 4 degrees C but not at 37 degrees C and was identified as a psychrotrophic strain of the genus Acinetobacter. Strain no. 6 extracellularly produced a lipolytic enzyme that efficiently hydrolyzed triglycerides such as soybean oil during bacterial growth even at 4 degrees C; it degraded 60% of added soybean oil (initial concentration, 1% w/v) after cultivation in LB medium at 4 degrees C for 7 d. Thus, the bacterium is potentially applicable to in-situ bioremediation or bioaugumentation of fat-contaminated cold environments. We partially purified the lipolytic enzyme from the culture filtrate by acetone fractionation and characterized it. The enzyme preparation contained a single species of cold-active lipase with significant activity at 4 degrees C, which was 57% of the activity at the optimum temperature (20 degrees C). The enzyme showed a broad specificity toward the acyl group (C8-C16) of substrate ethyl esters.

  6. Unravelling the genome of long chain N-acylhomoserine lactone-producing Acinetobacter sp. strain GG2 and identification of its quorum sensing synthase gene

    PubMed Central

    How, Kah Yan; Hong, Kar-Wai; Sam, Choon-Kook; Koh, Chong-Lek; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2015-01-01

    Myriad proteobacteria use N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) molecules as quorum sensing (QS) signals to regulate different physiological functions, including virulence, antibiotic production, and biofilm formation. Many of these proteobacteria possess LuxI/LuxR system as the QS mechanism. Recently, we reported the 3.89 Mb genome of Acinetobacter sp. strain GG2. In this work, the genome of this long chain AHL-producing bacterium was unravelled which led to the molecular characterization of luxI homologue, designated as aciI. This 552 bp gene was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The purified protein was ∼20.5 kDa and is highly similar to several autoinducer proteins of LuxI family among Acinetobacter species. To verify the AHL synthesis activity of this protein, high-resolution liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry analysis revealed the production of 3-oxo-dodecanoyl-homoserine lactone and 3-hydroxy-dodecanoyl-homoserine lactone from induced E. coli harboring the recombinant AciI. Our data show for the first time, the cloning and characterization of the luxI homologue from Acinetobacter sp. strain GG2, and confirmation of its AHLs production. These data are of great significance as the annotated genome of strain GG2 has provided a valuable insight in the study of autoinducer molecules and its roles in QS mechanism of the bacterium. PMID:25926817

  7. Wax Ester Production from n-Alkanes by Acinetobacter sp. Strain M-1: Ultrastructure of Cellular Inclusions and Role of Acyl Coenzyme A Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Ishige, Takeru; Tani, Akio; Takabe, Keiji; Kawasaki, Kazunori; Sakai, Yasuyoshi; Kato, Nobuo

    2002-01-01

    Acinetobacter sp. strain M-1 accumulated a large amount of wax esters from an n-alkane under nitrogen-limiting conditions. Under the optimized conditions with n-hexadecane as the substrate, the amount of hexadecyl hexadecanoate in the cells reached 0.17 g/g of cells (dry weight). Electron microscopic analysis revealed that multilayered disk-shaped intracellular inclusions were formed concomitant with wax ester formation. The contribution of acyl-CoA reductase to wax ester synthesis was evaluated by gene disruption analysis. PMID:11872467

  8. Long-Chain Aldehyde Dehydrogenase That Participates in n-Alkane Utilization and Wax Ester Synthesis in Acinetobacter sp. Strain M-1

    PubMed Central

    Ishige, Takeru; Tani, Akio; Sakai, Yasuyoshi; Kato, Nobuo

    2000-01-01

    A long-chain aldehyde dehydrogenase, Ald1, was found in a soluble fraction of Acinetobacter sp. strain M-1 cells grown on n-hexadecane as a sole carbon source. The gene (ald1) was cloned from the chromosomal DNA of the bacterium. The open reading frame of ald1 was 1,512 bp long, corresponding to a protein of 503 amino acid residues (molecular mass, 55,496 Da), and the deduced amino acid sequence showed high similarity to those of various aldehyde dehydrogenases. The ald1 gene was stably expressed in Escherichia coli, and the gene product (recombinant Ald1 [rAld1]) was purified to apparent homogeneity by gel electrophoresis. rAld1 showed enzyme activity toward n-alkanals (C4 to C14), with a preference for longer carbon chains within the tested range; the highest activity was obtained with tetradecanal. The ald1 gene was disrupted by homologous recombination on the Acinetobacter genome. Although the ald1 disruptant (ald1Δ) strain still had the ability to grow on n-hexadecane to some extent, its aldehyde dehydrogenase activity toward n-tetradecanal was reduced to half the level of the wild-type strain. Under nitrogen-limiting conditions, the accumulation of intracellular wax esters in the ald1Δ strain became much lower than that in the wild-type strain. These and other results imply that a soluble long-chain aldehyde dehydrogenase indeed plays important roles both in growth on n-alkane and in wax ester formation in Acinetobacter sp. strain M-1. PMID:10919810

  9. Purification and partial characterization of novel penicillin V acylase from Acinetobacter sp. AP24 isolated from Loktak Lake, an Indo-Burma biodiversity hotspot.

    PubMed

    Philem, Pushparani Devi; Sonalkar, Vidya V; Dharne, Mahesh S; Prabhune, Asmita A

    2016-07-03

    Members of the bacterial genus Acinetobacter have attracted great attention over the past few decades, on account of their various biotechnological applications and clinical implications. In this study, we are reporting the first experimental penicillin V acylase (PVA) activity from this genus. Penicillin acylases are pharmaceutically important enzymes widely used in the synthesis of semisynthetic beta-lactam antibiotics. The bacterium, identified as Acinetobacter sp. AP24, was isolated from the water of Loktak Lake (Manipur, India), an Indo-Burma biodiversity hotspot. PVA production was increased threefold in an optimized medium with 0.2% sodium glutamate and 1% glucose as nitrogen and carbon sources respectively, after 24 hr of fermentation at 28°C and pH 7.0 with shaking at 180 rpm. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity by cation-exchange chromatography using SP-sepharose resin. The PVA is a homotetramer with subunit molecular mass of 34 kD. The enzyme was highly specific toward penicillin V with optimal hydrolytic activity at 40°C and pH 7.5. The enzyme was stable from pH 5.0 to 9.0 at 25 °C for 2 hr. The enzyme retained 75% activity after 1 hr of incubation at 40°C at pH 7.5.

  10. Diverse responses to UV light exposure in Acinetobacter include the capacity for DNA damage-induced mutagenesis in the opportunistic pathogens Acinetobacter baumannii and Acinetobacter ursingii.

    PubMed

    Hare, Janelle M; Bradley, James A; Lin, Ching-li; Elam, Tyler J

    2012-03-01

    Error-prone and error-free DNA damage repair responses that are induced in most bacteria after exposure to various chemicals, antibiotics or radiation sources were surveyed across the genus Acinetobacter. The error-prone SOS mutagenesis response occurs when DNA damage induces a cell's umuDC- or dinP-encoded error-prone polymerases. The model strain Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1 possesses an unusual, regulatory umuD allele (umuDAb) with an extended 5' region and only incomplete fragments of umuC. Diverse Acinetobacter species were investigated for the presence of umuDC and their ability to conduct UV-induced mutagenesis. Unlike ADP1, most Acinetobacter strains possessed multiple umuDC loci containing either umuDAb or a umuD allele resembling that of Escherichia coli. The nearly omnipresent umuDAb allele was the ancestral umuD in Acinetobacter, with horizontal gene transfer accounting for over half of the umuDC operons. Despite multiple umuD(Ab)C operons in many strains, only three species conducted UV-induced mutagenesis: Acinetobacter baumannii, Acinetobacter ursingii and Acinetobacter beijerinckii. The type of umuDC locus or mutagenesis phenotype a strain possessed was not correlated with its error-free response of survival after UV exposure, but similar diversity was apparent. The survival of 30 Acinetobacter strains after UV treatment ranged over five orders of magnitude, with the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-A. baumannii (Acb) complex and haemolytic strains having lower survival than non-Acb or non-haemolytic strains. These observations demonstrate that a genus can possess a range of DNA damage response mechanisms, and suggest that DNA damage-induced mutation could be an important part of the evolution of the emerging pathogens A. baumannii and A. ursingii.

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Acinetobacter sp. Strain BMW17, a Cellulolytic and Plant Growth-Promoting Bacterium Isolated from the Rhizospheric Region of Phragmites karka of Chilika Lake, India.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Samir R; Ray, Lopamudra; Panda, Ananta Narayan; Sahu, Neha; Xess, Sonal S; Jadhao, Sudhir; Suar, Mrutyunjay; Adhya, Tapan Kumar; Rastogi, Gurdeep; Pattnaik, Ajit Kumar; Raina, Vishakha

    2016-06-30

    We report the 3.16 Mb draft genome of Acinetobacter sp. strain BMW17, a Gram-negative bacterium in the class of Gammaproteobacteria, isolated from the rhizospheric region of Phragmites karka, an invasive weed in Chilika Lake, Odisha, India. The strain BMW17(T) is capable of degrading cellulose and is also an efficient plant growth promoter that can be useful for various phytoremedial and commercial applications.

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Acinetobacter sp. Strain BMW17, a Cellulolytic and Plant Growth-Promoting Bacterium Isolated from the Rhizospheric Region of Phragmites karka of Chilika Lake, India

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Samir R.; Ray, Lopamudra; Panda, Ananta Narayan; Sahu, Neha; Xess, Sonal S.; Jadhao, Sudhir; Suar, Mrutyunjay; Adhya, Tapan Kumar; Rastogi, Gurdeep; Pattnaik, Ajit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    We report the 3.16 Mb draft genome of Acinetobacter sp. strain BMW17, a Gram-negative bacterium in the class of Gammaproteobacteria, isolated from the rhizospheric region of Phragmites karka, an invasive weed in Chilika Lake, Odisha, India. The strain BMW17T is capable of degrading cellulose and is also an efficient plant growth promoter that can be useful for various phytoremedial and commercial applications. PMID:27365343

  13. Screening and Evaluation of the Bioremediation Potential of Cu/Zn-Resistant, Autochthonous Acinetobacter sp. FQ-44 from Sonchus oleraceus L.

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Qing; Fan, Zhengqiu; Xie, Yujing; Wang, Xiangrong; Li, Kun; Liu, Yafeng

    2016-01-01

    The quest for new, promising and indigenous plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria and a deeper understanding of their relationship with plants are important considerations in the improvement of phytoremediation. This study focuses on the screening of plant beneficial Cu/Zn-resistant strains and assessment of their bioremediation potential (metal solubilization/tolerance/biosorption and effects on growth of Brassica napus seedlings) to identify suitable rhizobacteria and examine their roles in microbes-assisted phytoremediation. Sixty Cu/Zn-resistant rhizobacteria were initially isolated from Sonchus oleraceus grown at a multi-metal-polluted site in Shanghai, China. From these strains, 19 isolates that were all resistant to 300 mg⋅L-1 Cu as well as 300 mg⋅L-1 Zn, and could simultaneously grow on Dworkin–Foster salt minimal medium containing 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid were preliminarily selected. Of those 19 isolates, 10 isolates with superior plant growth-promoting properties (indole-3-acetic acid production, siderophore production, and insoluble phosphate solubilization) were secondly chosen and further evaluated to identify those with the highest bioremediation potential and capacity for bioaugmentation. Strain S44, identified as Acinetobacter sp. FQ-44 based on 16S rDNA sequencing, was specifically chosen as the most favorable strain owing to its strong capabilities to (1) promote the growth of rape seedlings (significantly increased root length, shoot length, and fresh weight by 92.60%, 31.00%, and 41.96%, respectively) under gnotobiotic conditions; (2) tolerate up to 1000 mg⋅L-1 Cu and 800 mg⋅L-1 Zn; (3) mobilize the highest concentrations of water-soluble Cu, Zn, Pb, and Fe (16.99, 0.98, 0.08, and 3.03 mg⋅L-1, respectively); and (4) adsorb the greatest quantities of Cu and Zn (7.53 and 6.61 mg⋅g-1 dry cell, respectively). Our findings suggest that Acinetobacter sp. FQ-44 could be exploited for bacteria-assisted phytoextraction. Moreover

  14. Screening and Evaluation of the Bioremediation Potential of Cu/Zn-Resistant, Autochthonous Acinetobacter sp. FQ-44 from Sonchus oleraceus L.

    PubMed

    Fang, Qing; Fan, Zhengqiu; Xie, Yujing; Wang, Xiangrong; Li, Kun; Liu, Yafeng

    2016-01-01

    The quest for new, promising and indigenous plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria and a deeper understanding of their relationship with plants are important considerations in the improvement of phytoremediation. This study focuses on the screening of plant beneficial Cu/Zn-resistant strains and assessment of their bioremediation potential (metal solubilization/tolerance/biosorption and effects on growth of Brassica napus seedlings) to identify suitable rhizobacteria and examine their roles in microbes-assisted phytoremediation. Sixty Cu/Zn-resistant rhizobacteria were initially isolated from Sonchus oleraceus grown at a multi-metal-polluted site in Shanghai, China. From these strains, 19 isolates that were all resistant to 300 mg⋅L(-1) Cu as well as 300 mg⋅L(-1) Zn, and could simultaneously grow on Dworkin-Foster salt minimal medium containing 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid were preliminarily selected. Of those 19 isolates, 10 isolates with superior plant growth-promoting properties (indole-3-acetic acid production, siderophore production, and insoluble phosphate solubilization) were secondly chosen and further evaluated to identify those with the highest bioremediation potential and capacity for bioaugmentation. Strain S44, identified as Acinetobacter sp. FQ-44 based on 16S rDNA sequencing, was specifically chosen as the most favorable strain owing to its strong capabilities to (1) promote the growth of rape seedlings (significantly increased root length, shoot length, and fresh weight by 92.60%, 31.00%, and 41.96%, respectively) under gnotobiotic conditions; (2) tolerate up to 1000 mg⋅L(-1) Cu and 800 mg⋅L(-1) Zn; (3) mobilize the highest concentrations of water-soluble Cu, Zn, Pb, and Fe (16.99, 0.98, 0.08, and 3.03 mg⋅L(-1), respectively); and (4) adsorb the greatest quantities of Cu and Zn (7.53 and 6.61 mg⋅g(-1) dry cell, respectively). Our findings suggest that Acinetobacter sp. FQ-44 could be exploited for bacteria-assisted phytoextraction

  15. [Acinetobacter spp].

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Naohisa

    2012-02-01

    Acinetobacter species are aerobic, glucose non-fermenting gram-negative rods, and ubiquitous in the environment. Acinetobacter spp. can survive for months on dry surfaces. Acinetobacter spp. have been grown from skin, pharynx, sputum, urine and feces. The most common Acinetobacter infection is pneumonia. According to Japan Nosocomial Infection Surveillance, 0.34% of the Acinetobacter spp. was multidrug-resistant in 2010. In Japan, Acinetobacter spp. whose imipenem MICs were > or = 16 microg/mL, amikacin > or = 32 microg/mL, and ciprofloxacin > or = 4 microg/mL were defined as multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter species (MDRA) in 2011 in the amended Infectious Diseases Control Law. Break-point Checkerboard Plate can help to infer an effective combination antimicrobial therapy. A selective medium for the isolation of MDRA is a great tool for active surveillance cultures. Treatment options for MDRA infections in Japan are very limited, because colistin, polymyxin B, or tigecycline is not approved. Keys to control MDRA are high levels of compliance with standard and contact precautions, appropriate cleaning and disinfection of the environment, and judicious antimicrobial use.

  16. Production of a Solvent, Detergent, and Thermotolerant Lipase by a Newly Isolated Acinetobacter sp. in Submerged and Solid-State Fermentations

    PubMed Central

    Khoramnia, Anahita; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Beh, Boon Kee; Lai, Oi Ming

    2011-01-01

    The lipase production ability of a newly isolated Acinetobacter sp. in submerged (SmF) and solid-state (SSF) fermentations was evaluated. The results demonstrated this strain as one of the rare bacterium, which is able to grow and produce lipase in SSF even more than SmF. Coconut oil cake as a cheap agroindustrial residue was employed as the solid substrate. The lipase production was optimized in both media using artificial neural network. Multilayer normal and full feed forward backpropagation networks were selected to build predictive models to optimize the culture parameters for lipase production in SmF and SSF systems, respectively. The produced models for both systems showed high predictive accuracy where the obtained conditions were close together. The produced enzyme was characterized as a thermotolerant lipase, although the organism was mesophile. The optimum temperature for the enzyme activity was 45°C where 63% of its activity remained at 70°C after 2 h. This lipase remained active after 24 h in a broad range of pH (6–11). The lipase demonstrated strong solvent and detergent tolerance potentials. Therefore, this inexpensive lipase production for such a potent and industrially valuable lipase is promising and of considerable commercial interest for biotechnological applications. PMID:21960739

  17. Induction of Diverse Bioactive Secondary Metabolites from the Mangrove Endophytic Fungus Trichoderma sp. (Strain 307) by Co-Cultivation with Acinetobacter johnsonii (Strain B2)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liuhong; Niaz, Shah Iram; Khan, Dilfaraz; Wang, Zhen; Zhu, Yonghong; Zhou, Haiyun; Lin, Yongcheng; Li, Jing; Liu, Lan

    2017-01-01

    Two new sesquiterpenes, microsphaeropsisin B (1) and C (2), and two new de-O-methyllasiodiplodins, (3R, 7R)-7-hydroxy-de-O-methyllasiodiplodin (4) and (3R)-5-oxo-de-O-methyllasiodiplodin (5), together with one new natural product (6) and twelve known compounds (3, 7–17), were isolated from the co-cultivation of mangrove endophytic fungus Trichoderma sp. 307 and aquatic pathogenic bacterium Acinetobacter johnsonii B2. Their structures, including absolute configurations, were elucidated by extensive analysis of spectroscopic data, electronic circular dichroism, Mo2(AcO)4-induced circular dichroism, and comparison with reported data. All of the isolated compounds were tested for their α-glucosidase inhibitory activity and cytotoxicity. New compounds 4 and 5 exhibited potent α-glucosidase inhibitory activity with IC50 values of 25.8 and 54.6 µM, respectively, which were more potent than the positive control (acarbose, IC50 = 703.8 µM). The good results of the tested bioactivity allowed us to explore α-glucosidase inhibitors in lasiodiplodins. PMID:28208607

  18. Evaluation of Acinetobacter sp. B9 for Cr (VI) resistance and detoxification with potential application in bioremediation of heavy-metals-rich industrial wastewater.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Amrik; Gupta, Anshu

    2013-09-01

    Present work demonstrates Cr (VI) detoxification and resistance mechanism of a newly isolated strain (B9) of Acinetobacter sp. Bioremediation potential of the strain B9 is shown by simultaneous removal of major heavy metals including chromium from heavy-metals-rich metal finishing industrial wastewater. Strain B9 tolerate up to 350 mg L(-1) of Cr (VI) and also shows level of tolerance to Ni (II), Zn (II), Pb (II), and Cd (II). The strain was capable of reducing 67 % of initial 7.0 mg L(-1) of Cr (VI) within 24 h of incubation, while in presence of Cu ions 100 % removal of initial 7.0 and 10 mg L(-1) of Cr (VI) was observed with in 24 h. pH in the range of 6.0-8.0 and inoculum size of 2 % (v/v) were determined to be optimum for dichromate reduction. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy studies suggested absorption or intracellular accumulation and that might be one of the major mechanisms behind the chromium resistance by strain B9. Scanning electron microscopy showed morphological changes in the strain due to chromium stress. Relevance of the strain for treatment of heavy-metals-rich industrial wastewater resulted in 93.7, 55.4, and 68.94 % removal of initial 30 mg L(-1) Cr (VI), 246 mg L(-1) total Cr, and 51 mg L(-1) Ni, respectively, after 144 h of treatment in a batch mode.

  19. Cr(VI) reduction and Cr(III) immobilization by Acinetobacter sp. HK-1 with the assistance of a novel quinone/graphene oxide composite.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Kun; Lu, Hong; Wang, Jing; Zhou, Ji-Ti; Sui, Meng

    2014-11-04

    Cr(VI) biotreatment has attracted a substantial amount of interest due to its cost effectiveness and environmental friendliness. However, the slow Cr(VI) bioreduction rate and the formed organo-Cr(III) in solution are bottlenecks for biotechnology application. In this study, a novel strain, Acinetobacter sp. HK-1, capable of reducing Cr(VI) and immobilizing Cr(III) was isolated. Under optimal conditions, the Cr(VI) reduction rate could reach 3.82 mg h(-1) g cell(-1). To improve the Cr(VI) reduction rate, two quinone/graphene oxide composites (Q-GOs) were first prepared via a one-step covalent chemical reaction. The results showed that 2-amino-3-chloro-1,4-naphthoquinone-GO (NQ-GO) exhibited a better catalytic performance in Cr(VI) reduction compared to 2-aminoanthraquinone-GO. Specifically, in the presence of 50 mg L(-1) NQ-GO, a Cr(VI) removal rate of 190 mg h(-1) g cell(-1), which was the highest rate obtained, was achieved. The increased Cr(VI) reduction rate is mainly the result of NQ-GO significantly increasing the Cr(VI) reduction activity of cell membrane proteins containing dominant Cr(VI) reductases. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis found that Cr(VI) was reduced to insoluble Cr(III), which was immobilized by glycolipids secreted by strain HK-1. These findings indicate that the application of strain HK-1 and NQ-GO is a promising strategy for enhancing the treatment of Cr(VI)-containing wastewater.

  20. Unusual features of the sequences of copies of the 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer regions of Acinetobacter bereziniae, Acinetobacter guillouiae and Acinetobacter baylyi arise from horizontal gene transfer events.

    PubMed

    Maslunka, Christopher; Gürtler, Volker; Seviour, Robert

    2015-02-01

    The highly variable nature of the internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) has been claimed to represent an ideal target for designing species-specific probes/primers capable of differentiating between closely related Acinetobacter species. However, several Acinetobacter species contain multiple ITS copies of variable lengths, and these include Acinetobacter bereziniae, Acinetobacter guillouiae and Acinetobacter baylyi. This study shows these length variations result from inter-genomic insertion/deletion events (indels) involving horizontal transfer of ITS fragments of other Acinetobacter species and possibly unrelated bacteria, as shown previously by us. In some instances, indel incorporation results in the loss of probe target sites in the recipient cell ITS. In other cases, some indel sequences contain target sites for probes designed from a single ITS sequence to target other Acinetobacter species. Hence, these can generate false positives. The largest of the indels that remove probe sites is 683 bp (labelled bay/i1-0), and it derives from the horizontal transfer of a complete ITS between A. bereziniae BCRC15423(T) and A. baylyi strain ADP1. As a consequence, ITS sequencing or fingerprinting cannot be used to distinguish between the 683 bp ITS in these two strains.

  1. Engineering an Acinetobacter regulon for biosensing and high-throughput enzyme screening in E. coli via flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Ramesh K.; Kern, Theresa L.; Fox, David T.; M. Strauss, Charlie E.

    2014-01-01

    We created a single cell sorting system to screen for enzyme activity in Escherichia coli producing 3,4 dihydroxy benzoate (34DHB). To do so, we engineered a transcription factor regulon controlling the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) for induction by 34DHB. An autoregulated transcription factor, pcaU, was borrowed from Acinetobacter sp ADP1 to E. coli and its promoter region adapted for activity in E. Coli. The engineered pcaU regulon was inducible at >5 μM exogenous 34DHB, making it a sensitive biosensor for this industrially significant nylon precursor. Addition of a second plasmid provided IPTG inducible expression of dehydroshikimate dehydratase enzyme (AsbF), which converts endogenous dehydroshikimate to 34DHB. This system produced GFP fluorescence in an IPTG dose-dependent manner, and was easily detected in single cell on flow cytometer despite a moderate catalytic efficiency of AsbF. Using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), individual cells carrying the active AsbF could be isolated even when diluted into a decoy population of cells carrying a mutant (inactivated) AsbF variant at one part in a million. The same biosensor was also effective for further optimization of itself. FACS on E. coli carrying randomized loci in the promoter showed several variants with enhanced response to 34DHB. PMID:24861620

  2. A New Double Digestion Ligation Mediated Suppression PCR Method for Simultaneous Bacteria DNA-Typing and Confirmation of Species: An Acinetobacter sp. Model

    PubMed Central

    Stojowska, Karolina; Krawczyk, Beata

    2014-01-01

    We have designed a new ddLMS PCR (double digestion Ligation Mediated Suppression PCR) method based on restriction site polymorphism upstream from the specific target sequence for the simultaneous identification and differentiation of bacterial strains. The ddLMS PCR combines a simple PCR used for species or genus identification and the LM PCR strategy for strain differentiation. The bacterial identification is confirmed in the form of the PCR product(s), while the length of the PCR product makes it possible to differentiate between bacterial strains. If there is a single copy of the target sequence within genomic DNA, one specific PCR product is created (simplex ddLMS PCR), whereas for multiple copies of the gene the fingerprinting patterns can be obtained (multiplex ddLMS PCR). The described ddLMS PCR method is designed for rapid and specific strain differentiation in medical and microbiological studies. In comparison to other LM PCR it has substantial advantages: enables specific species' DNA-typing without the need for pure bacterial culture selection, is not sensitive to contamination with other cells or genomic DNA, and gives univocal “band-based” results, which are easy to interpret. The utility of ddLMS PCR was shown for Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii (Acb) complex, the genetically closely related and phenotypically similar species and also important nosocomial pathogens, for which currently, there are no recommended methods for screening, typing and identification. In this article two models are proposed: 3′ recA-ddLMS PCR-MaeII/RsaI for Acb complex interspecific typing and 5′ rrn-ddLMS PCR-HindIII/ApaI for Acinetobacter baumannii intraspecific typing. ddLMS PCR allows not only for DNA-typing but also for confirmation of species in one reaction. Also, practical guidelines for designing a diagnostic test based on ddLMS PCR for genotyping different species of bacteria are provided. PMID:25522278

  3. Radiation resistance of acinetobacter spp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitby, James L.

    1995-02-01

    The radiation resistance of 78 different strains of Acinetobacter sp. 42 from clinical isolates and 36 from other sources were compared with 15 clinical isolates and 12 other strains from Denmark. None of the Canadian strains was as resistant as resistant-enhanced Danish strains. Four strains had D 10 values of 3.1-3.6 kGy. Irradiated and unirradiated cells from all strains grew well, when cultured in Trypticase-Soy Broth at 30°C. Most cultures grew after overnight incubation. It was concluded that there would be no difficulty in detecting these strains, using ISO methodology for establishing the radiation sterilization dose for devices.

  4. Acinetobacter Pneumonia: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Hartzell, Joshua D.; Kim, Andrew S.; Kortepeter, Mark G.; Moran, Kimberly A.

    2007-01-01

    Acinetobacter species are becoming a major cause of nosocomial infections, including hospital-acquired and ventilator-associated pneumonia. Acinetobacter species have become increasingly resistant to antibiotics over the past several years and currently present a significant challenge in treating these infections. Physicians now rely on older agents, such as polymyxins (colistin), for treatment. This paper reviews the epidemiology, treatment, and prevention of this emerging pathogen. PMID:18092011

  5. The Physiological Contribution of Acinetobacter PcaK, a Transport System That Acts upon Protocatechuate, Can Be Masked by the Overlapping Specificity of VanK†

    PubMed Central

    D’Argenio, David A.; Segura, Ana; Coco, Wayne M.; Bünz, Patricia V.; Ornston, L. Nicholas

    1999-01-01

    VanK is the fourth member of the ubiquitous major facilitator superfamily of transport proteins to be identified that, together with PcaK, BenK, and MucK, contributes to aromatic catabolism in Acinetobacter sp. strain ADP1. VanK and PcaK have overlapping specificity for p-hydroxybenzoate and, most clearly, for protocatechuate: inactivation of both proteins severely impairs growth with protocatechuate, and the activity of either protein alone can mask the phenotype associated with inactivation of its homolog. Furthermore, vanK pcaK double-knockout mutants appear completely unable to grow in liquid culture with the hydroaromatic compound quinate, although such cells on plates convert quinate to protocatechuate, which then accumulates extracellularly and is readily visible as purple staining. This provides genetic evidence that quinate is converted to protocatechuate in the periplasm and is in line with the early argument that quinate catabolism should be physically separated from aromatic amino acid biosynthesis in the cytoplasm so as to avoid potential competition for intermediates common to both pathways. Previous studies of aromatic catabolism in Acinetobacter have taken advantage of the ability to select directly strains that contain a spontaneous mutation blocking the β-ketoadipate pathway and preventing the toxic accumulation of carboxymuconate. By using this procedure, strains with a mutation in structural or regulatory genes blocking degradation of vanillate, p-hydroxybenzoate, or protocatechuate were selected. In this study, the overlapping specificity of the VanK and PcaK permeases was exploited to directly select strains with a mutation in either vanK or pcaK. Spontaneous mutations identified in vanK include a hot spot for frameshift mutation due to contraction of a G6 mononucleotide repeat as well as point mutations producing amino acid substitutions useful for analysis of VanK structure and function. Preliminary second-site suppression analysis using

  6. Multidrug Resistant Acinetobacter

    PubMed Central

    Manchanda, Vikas; Sanchaita, Sinha; Singh, NP

    2010-01-01

    Emergence and spread of Acinetobacter species, resistant to most of the available antimicrobial agents, is an area of great concern. It is now being frequently associated with healthcare associated infections. Literature was searched at PUBMED, Google Scholar, and Cochrane Library, using the terms ‘Acinetobacter Resistance, multidrug resistant (MDR), Antimicrobial Therapy, Outbreak, Colistin, Tigecycline, AmpC enzymes, and carbapenemases in various combinations. The terms such as MDR, Extensively Drug Resistant (XDR), and Pan Drug Resistant (PDR) have been used in published literature with varied definitions, leading to confusion in the correlation of data from various studies. In this review various mechanisms of resistance in the Acinetobacter species have been discussed. The review also probes upon the current therapeutic options, including combination therapies available to treat infections due to resistant Acinetobacter species in adults as well as children. There is an urgent need to enforce infection control measures and antimicrobial stewardship programs to prevent the further spread of these resistant Acinetobacter species and to delay the emergence of increased resistance in the bacteria. PMID:20927292

  7. Successful Eradication of Multidrug Resistant Acinetobacter in the Helsinki Burn Centre.

    PubMed

    Lindford, Andrew; Kiuru, Valtteri; Anttila, Veli-Jukka; Vuola, Jyrki

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter is an important pathogen implicated in nosocomial infections in healthcare environments. Virulence factors, resistance mechanisms, and limited therapeutic options make this pathogen a major problem currently facing burn intensive care units (ICUs) worldwide. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of infection control measures taken in Helsinki Burn Centre in 2001 on MDR Acinetobacter prevalence in ICU burn patients. Data were retrospectively collected from patient files from 1998 to 2012. ICU burn patients were defined as those with either over 30% of total body surface area burnt or requiring mechanical ventilation. Inclusion criteria consisted of patients who tested positive for Acinetobacter sp. in routine bacterial cultures or cultures taken because of a clinically suspected infection. Infection control interventions performed in 2001 consisted of various shower room renovations and changes in hospital hygiene and burn treatment regimes. Between 1998 and 2012, 75 patients were diagnosed with Acinetobacter sp. colonization. Following the infection control interventions the incidence of Acinetobacter sp. radically declined. Between 1998 and 2001, there were 31 cases of MDR Acinetobacter colonizations diagnosed, but from 2002 to 2012 no MDR strains were found. Changes to hospital hygiene and wound treatment protocols as well as structural changes to the hospital environment can have a major impact on preventing and treating Acinetobacter outbreaks in burn centers.

  8. Staring at the cold sun: blue light regulation is distributed within the genus Acinetobacter.

    PubMed

    Golic, Adrián; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Nemec, Alexandr; Viale, Alejandro M; Actis, Luis A; Mussi, María Alejandra

    2013-01-01

    We previously showed that the opportunistic nosocomial pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii is able to sense and respond to light via BlsA, a BLUF (Blue-Light-sensing Using FAD)-domain photoreceptor protein. Here, we extend our previous studies showing that light regulation is not restricted to A. baumannii, but rather widespread within the genus Acinetobacter. First, we found that blue light modulates motility and biofilm formation in many species of the genus, including members of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex. In many of these species blue light acts as a key factor guiding the decision between motility or sessility at 24°C, whereas in A. baumannii, light inhibits both motility and biofilm formation. We also show that light regulation of motility occurred not only at 24°C but also at 37°C in non-A. baumannii species, contrasting the situation of A. baumannii which only shows photoregulation at 24°C. Second, we show that Acinetobacter baylyi (strain ADP1) BLUF-photoreceptors can functionally replace in vivo the A. baumannii 17978 BlsA protein and that the pathways leading to biofilm formation are inversely regulated at 24°C between these two microorganisms. Finally, we found the presence of predicted genes coding BLUF-containing proteins in all Acinetobacter sequenced genomes, even though the copy number is variable among them. Phylogenetic analysis suggests a common origin for all BLUF domains present in members of this genus, and could distinguish well-differentiated clusters that group together BLUF homologs from different species, a situation particularly clear for members of the ACB complex. Despite a role played by these BLUF domain-containing proteins in the photoregulation observed in the members of the genus Acinetobacter is a likely scenario given our findings in A. baumannii and A. baylyi, further research will contribute to confirm this possibility.

  9. Whole-genome pyrosequencing of an epidemic multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strain belonging to the European clone II group.

    PubMed

    Iacono, Michele; Villa, Laura; Fortini, Daniela; Bordoni, Roberta; Imperi, Francesco; Bonnal, Raoul J P; Sicheritz-Ponten, Thomas; De Bellis, Gianluca; Visca, Paolo; Cassone, Antonio; Carattoli, Alessandra

    2008-07-01

    The whole-genome sequence of an epidemic, multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strain (strain ACICU) belonging to the European clone II group and carrying the plasmid-mediated bla(OXA)(-)(58) carbapenem resistance gene was determined. The A. baumannii ACICU genome was compared with the genomes of A. baumannii ATCC 17978 and Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1, with the aim of identifying novel genes related to virulence and drug resistance. A. baumannii ACICU has a single chromosome of 3,904,116 bp (which is predicted to contain 3,758 genes) and two plasmids, pACICU1 and pACICU2, of 28,279 and 64,366 bp, respectively. Genome comparison showed 86.4% synteny with A. baumannii ATCC 17978 and 14.8% synteny with A. baylyi ADP1. A conspicuous number of transporters belonging to different superfamilies was predicted for A. baumannii ACICU. The relative number of transporters was much higher in ACICU than in ATCC 17978 and ADP1 (76.2, 57.2, and 62.5 transporters per Mb of genome, respectively). An antibiotic resistance island, AbaR2, was identified in ACICU and had plausibly evolved by reductive evolution from the AbaR1 island previously described in multiresistant strain A. baumannii AYE. Moreover, 36 putative alien islands (pAs) were detected in the ACICU genome; 24 of these had previously been described in the ATCC 17978 genome, 4 are proposed here for the first time and are present in both ATCC 17978 and ACICU, and 8 are unique to the ACICU genome. Fifteen of the pAs in the ACICU genome encode genes related to drug resistance, including membrane transporters and ex novo acquired resistance genes. These findings provide novel insight into the genetic basis of A. baumannii resistance.

  10. Enrichment of Acinetobacter spp. from food samples.

    PubMed

    Carvalheira, Ana; Ferreira, Vânia; Silva, Joana; Teixeira, Paula

    2016-05-01

    Relatively little is known about the role of foods in the chain of transmission of acinetobacters and the occurrence of different Acinetobacter spp. in foods. Currently, there is no standard procedure to recover acinetobacters from food in order to gain insight into the food-related ecology and epidemiology of acinetobacters. This study aimed to assess whether enrichment in Dijkshoorn enrichment medium followed by plating in CHROMagar™ Acinetobacter medium is a useful method for the isolation of Acinetobacter spp. from foods. Recovery of six Acinetobacter species from food spiked with these organisms was compared for two selective enrichment media (Baumann's enrichment and Dijkshoorn's enrichment). Significantly (p < 0.01) higher cell counts were obtained in Dijkshoorn's enrichment. Next, the Dijkshoorn's enrichment followed by direct plating on CHROMagar™ Acinetobacter was applied to detect Acinetobacter spp. in different foods. Fourteen different presumptive acinetobacters were recovered and assumed to represent nine different strains on the basis of REP-PCR typing. Eight of these strains were identified by rpoB gene analysis as belonging to the species Acinetobacter johnsonii, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Acinetobacter guillouiae and Acinetobacter gandensis. It was not possible to identify the species level of one strain which may suggests that it represents a distinct species.

  11. Evaluation of thioesterases from Acinetobacter baylyi for production of free fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Ukey, Rahul; Holmes, William E; Bajpai, Rakesh; Chistoserdov, Andrei Y

    2017-04-01

    Acinetobacter baylyi is one of few Gram-negative bacteria capable of accumulating storage lipids in the form of triacylglycerides and wax esters, which makes it an attractive candidate for production of lipophilic products, including biofuel precursors. Thioesterases play a significant dual role in the triacylglyceride and wax ester biosynthesis by either providing or removing acyl-CoA from this pathway. Therefore, 4 different thioesterase genes were cloned from Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1 and expressed in Escherichia coli to investigate their contribution to free fatty acids (FFAs) accumulation. Overexpression of the genes tesA' (a leaderless form of the gene tesA) and tesC resulted in increased accumulation of FFAs when compared with the host E. coli strain. Overexpression of tesA' showed a 1.87-fold increase in production of long-chain fatty acids (C16 to C18) over the host strain. Unlike TesC and the other investigated thioesterases, the TesA' thioesterase also produced shorter chain FFAs (e.g., myristic acid) and unsaturated FFAs (e.g., cis-vaccenic acid (18:1Δ11)). A comparison of the remaining 3 A. baylyi ADP1 thioesterases (encoded by the tesB, tesC, and tesD genes) revealed that only the strain containing the tesC gene produced statistically higher levels of FFAs over the control, suggesting that it possesses the acyl-ACP thioesterase activity. Both E. coli strains containing the tesB and tesD genes produced levels of FFAs similar to those of the plasmid-free control E. coli strain, which indicates that TesB and TesD lack the acyl-ACP thioesterase activity.

  12. A taxonomically unique Acinetobacter strain with proteolytic and hemolytic activities recovered from a patient with a soft tissue injury.

    PubMed

    Almuzara, Marisa; Traglia, German Matías; Krizova, Lenka; Barberis, Claudia; Montaña, Sabrina; Bakai, Romina; Tuduri, Alicia; Vay, Carlos; Nemec, Alexandr; Ramírez, María Soledad

    2015-01-01

    A taxonomically unique bacterial strain, Acinetobacter sp. A47, has been recovered from several soft tissue samples from a patient undergoing reconstructive surgery owing to a traumatic amputation. The results of 16S rRNA, rpoB, and gyrB gene comparative sequence analyses showed that A47 does not belong to any of the hitherto-known taxa and may represent an as-yet-unknown Acinetobacter species. The recognition of this novel organism contributes to our knowledge of the taxonomic complexity underlying infections caused by Acinetobacter.

  13. Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter meningitis in children

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ira; Kapdi, Muznah

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter species have emerged as one of the most troublesome pathogens for healthcare institutions globally. In more recent times, nosocomial infections involving the central nervous system, skin and soft tissue, and bone have emerged as highly problematic. Acinetobacter species infection is common in intensive care units; however, Acinetobacter baumannii meningitis is rarely reported. Here, we report two cases of Acinetobacter baumannii meningitis which was multidrug resistance and ultimately required the carbapenem group of drugs for the treatment.

  14. Comparative Genome Sequence Analysis of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Mark D.; Goglin, Karrie; Molyneaux, Neil; Hujer, Kristine M.; Lavender, Heather; Jamison, Jennifer J.; MacDonald, Ian J.; Martin, Kristienna M.; Russo, Thomas; Campagnari, Anthony A.; Hujer, Andrea M.; Bonomo, Robert A.; Gill, Steven R.

    2008-01-01

    The recent emergence of multidrug resistance (MDR) in Acinetobacter baumannii has raised concern in health care settings worldwide. In order to understand the repertoire of resistance determinants and their organization and origins, we compared the genome sequences of three MDR and three drug-susceptible A. baumannii isolates. The entire MDR phenotype can be explained by the acquisition of discrete resistance determinants distributed throughout the genome. A comparison of closely related MDR and drug-susceptible isolates suggests that drug efflux may be a less significant contributor to resistance to certain classes of antibiotics than inactivation enzymes are. A resistance island with a variable composition of resistance determinants interspersed with transposons, integrons, and other mobile genetic elements is a significant but not universal contributor to the MDR phenotype. Four hundred seventy-five genes are shared among all six clinical isolates but absent from the related environmental species Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1. These genes are enriched for transcription factors and transporters and suggest physiological features of A. baumannii that are related to adaptation for growth in association with humans. PMID:18931120

  15. Acinetobacter: an underrated foodborne pathogen?

    PubMed

    Amorim, Angelo Maximo Batista de; Nascimento, Janaína Dos Santos

    2017-02-28

    The increasing prevalence of foodborne diseases observed in developing countries has been linked to a rise in the consumption of raw foods. However, unlike the classical pathogens that are commonly implicated in foodborne illnesses, members of the genus Acinetobacter are rarely associated with diarrheal disease, probably because of the difficulty in isolating these Gram-negative bacteria from food sources. Nevertheless, several species of Acinetobacter, especially A. baumannii, possess many of the characteristics associated with successful pathogens and exhibit a prodigious ability to acquire the multiple-drug resistance (MDR) phenotype. In this mini-review, we summarize the epidemiological data relating to MDR Acinetobacter and consider evidence suggesting that contaminated dairy products, along with raw fruit and vegetables, constitute extra-hospital reservoirs of this underrated pathogen, and may represent an increased risk to immunocompromised individuals and young children in healthcare settings.

  16. Rapid identification of Acinetobacter baumannii, Acinetobacter nosocomialis and Acinetobacter pittii with a multiplex PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Chen, Te-Li; Lee, Yi-Tzu; Kuo, Shu-Chen; Yang, Su-Pen; Fung, Chang-Phone; Lee, Shou-Dong

    2014-09-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii, Acinetobacter nosocomialis and Acinetobacter pittii are clinically relevant members of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-A. baumannii (Acb) complex and important nosocomial pathogens. These three species are genetically closely related and phenotypically similar; however, they differ in their epidemiology, antibiotic resistance and pathogenicity. In this study, we investigated the use of a multiplex PCR-based assay designed to detect internal fragments of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic region and the gyrB and recA genes. The assay was capable of differentiating A. baumannii, A. nosocomialis and A. pittii in a reliable manner. In 23 different reference strains and 89 clinical isolates of Acinetobacter species, the assay accurately identified clinically relevant Acb complex species except those 'between 1 and 3' or 'close to 13TU'. None of the non-Acb complex species was misidentified. In an analysis of 1034 positive blood cultures, the assay had a sensitivity of 92.4 % and specificity of 98.2 % for Acb complex identification. Our results show that a single multiplex PCR assay can reliably differentiate clinically relevant Acb complex species. Thus, this method may be used to better understand the clinical differences between infections caused by these species.

  17. Whole-Genome Pyrosequencing of an Epidemic Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Strain Belonging to the European Clone II Group ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Iacono, Michele; Villa, Laura; Fortini, Daniela; Bordoni, Roberta; Imperi, Francesco; Bonnal, Raoul J. P.; Sicheritz-Ponten, Thomas; De Bellis, Gianluca; Visca, Paolo; Cassone, Antonio; Carattoli, Alessandra

    2008-01-01

    The whole-genome sequence of an epidemic, multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strain (strain ACICU) belonging to the European clone II group and carrying the plasmid-mediated blaOXA-58 carbapenem resistance gene was determined. The A. baumannii ACICU genome was compared with the genomes of A. baumannii ATCC 17978 and Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1, with the aim of identifying novel genes related to virulence and drug resistance. A. baumannii ACICU has a single chromosome of 3,904,116 bp (which is predicted to contain 3,758 genes) and two plasmids, pACICU1 and pACICU2, of 28,279 and 64,366 bp, respectively. Genome comparison showed 86.4% synteny with A. baumannii ATCC 17978 and 14.8% synteny with A. baylyi ADP1. A conspicuous number of transporters belonging to different superfamilies was predicted for A. baumannii ACICU. The relative number of transporters was much higher in ACICU than in ATCC 17978 and ADP1 (76.2, 57.2, and 62.5 transporters per Mb of genome, respectively). An antibiotic resistance island, AbaR2, was identified in ACICU and had plausibly evolved by reductive evolution from the AbaR1 island previously described in multiresistant strain A. baumannii AYE. Moreover, 36 putative alien islands (pAs) were detected in the ACICU genome; 24 of these had previously been described in the ATCC 17978 genome, 4 are proposed here for the first time and are present in both ATCC 17978 and ACICU, and 8 are unique to the ACICU genome. Fifteen of the pAs in the ACICU genome encode genes related to drug resistance, including membrane transporters and ex novo acquired resistance genes. These findings provide novel insight into the genetic basis of A. baumannii resistance. PMID:18411315

  18. Horizontal gene transfer of atrazine-degrading genes (atz) from Agrobacterium tumefaciens St96-4 pADP1::Tn5 to bacteria of maize-cultivated soil.

    PubMed

    Devers, Marion; Henry, Sonia; Hartmann, Alain; Martin-Laurent, Fabrice

    2005-09-01

    The plasmid pADP1::Tn5 derived from pADP1[Atr+] carrying a Tn5 transposon conferring kanamycin and streptomycin resistances was constructed and introduced in Agrobacterium tumefaciens St96-4. This genetically modified strain was inoculated (approximately 10(8) cfu g(-1)) in potted soils planted with maize and treated or not with atrazine (1.5 mg kg(-1)). Bulk and maize rhizosphere soils were sampled 39 days after planting to look for soil indigenous bacteria that had acquired pADP1::Tn5. Four transconjugants were isolated from four different soil samples. The estimated transfer frequency of pADP1::Tn5 was 10(-4) per donor. Maize rhizosphere and atrazine treatment had no obvious effect on pADP1::Tn5 transfer frequency. The sequencing of the 16S rDNA sequences of the transconjugants revealed that they were almost identical and highly similar to that of Variovorax spp (97%). In addition, their characterization suggested that the atzA and atzB genes had been transferred from pADP1::Tn5 to the bacterial chromosome in two of the four transconjugants. These data suggest that the atz degrading genes are horizontally transferred in soil and possibly subjected to gene rearrangement.

  19. Longitudinal surveillance for meningitis by Acinetobacter in a large urban setting in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Coelho-Souza, Talita; Reis, Joice N.; Martins, Natacha; Martins, Ianick Souto; Menezes, Ana Paula O.; Reis, Mitermayer G.; Silva, Neide O.; Dias, Rubens C. S.; Riley, Lee W.; Moreira, Beatriz Meurer

    2013-01-01

    The study aim was to describe the emergency of carbapenem resistance and clonal complexes (CC), defined by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), in Acinetobacter baumannii in a surveillance system for meningitis. Starting in 1996 at an urban setting of Brazil, surveillance detected meningitis by Acinetobacter sp for the first time in 2002. Until 2008, 35 isolates were saved. Carbapenem resistance emerged in 2006, reaching 70% of A. baumannii isolates in 2008, including one colistin-resistant. A. baumannii belonged to CC113/79 (University of Oxford/ Institute Pasteur schemes), CC235/162 and CC103/15. Dissemination of infections resistant to all antimicrobial agents may occur in the future. PMID:23398654

  20. Prophage induction and differential RecA and UmuDAb transcriptome regulation in the DNA damage responses of Acinetobacter baumannii and Acinetobacter baylyi.

    PubMed

    Hare, Janelle M; Ferrell, Joshua C; Witkowski, Travis A; Grice, Alison N

    2014-01-01

    The SOS response to DNA damage that induces up to 10% of the prokaryotic genome requires RecA action to relieve LexA transcriptional repression. In Acinetobacter species, which lack LexA, the error-prone polymerase accessory UmuDAb is instead required for ddrR induction after DNA damage, suggesting it might be a LexA analog. RNA-Seq experiments defined the DNA damage transcriptome (mitomycin C-induced) of wild type, recA and umuDAb mutant strains of both A. baylyi ADP1 and A. baumannii ATCC 17978. Of the typical SOS response genes, few were differentially regulated in these species; many were repressed or absent. A striking 38.4% of all ADP1 genes, and 11.4% of all 17978 genes, were repressed under these conditions. In A. baylyi ADP1, 66 genes (2.0% of the genome), including a CRISPR/Cas system, were DNA damage-induced, and belonged to four regulons defined by differential use of recA and umuDAb. In A. baumannii ATCC 17978, however, induction of 99% of the 152 mitomycin C-induced genes depended on recA, and only 28 of these genes required umuDAb for their induction. 90% of the induced A. baumannii genes were clustered in three prophage regions, and bacteriophage particles were observed after mitomycin C treatment. These prophages encoded esvI, esvK1, and esvK2, ethanol-stimulated virulence genes previously identified in a Caenorhabditis elegans model, as well as error-prone polymerase alleles. The induction of all 17978 error-prone polymerase alleles, whether prophage-encoded or not, was recA dependent, but only these DNA polymerase V-related genes were de-repressed in the umuDAb mutant in the absence of DNA damage. These results suggest that both species possess a robust and complex DNA damage response involving both recA-dependent and recA-independent regulons, and further demonstrates that although umuDAb has a specialized role in repressing error-prone polymerases, additional regulators likely participate in these species' transcriptional response to DNA damage.

  1. Extremotolerant survival and proteomics of Acinetobacter isolated from spacecraft assembly facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogul, Rakesh; Vaishampayan, Parag; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; McCoy, Kelly; Derecho, Ivy; Dallal, Freida

    2012-07-01

    Herein, we report on the extreme hydrogen peroxide resistance of Acinetobacter isolated from the assembly facilities for the Mars Odyssey orbiter and Phoenix lander. Specific activity experiments on 10 different spacecraft-associated Acinetobacter strains show that the catalase contents are 15-250-fold greater than that of E. coli. Among this group, the highest and lowest catalase-containing strains, which were Acinetobacter nov. sp. 2P01AA and Acinetobacter radioresistens 50v1, demonstrated no significant and 2-log reductions in survivability upon exposure to 100 mM hydrogen peroxide (1 hr), respectively. These survivals are among the highest reported for non-spore forming Gram-negative bacteria. Comparative proteomics on these strains reveals that alkyl hydroperoxide reductase, ATP synthase, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase, and peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase also contribute to the hydrogen peroxide extremotolerance. Together, the survival and metabolic features of the spacecraft-associated Acinetobacter indicate that survival in the dry and low-nutrient environments of clean rooms is supported by factors such as oxidant degradation, energy management, and protein biosynthesis.

  2. Reservoirs of Non-baumannii Acinetobacter Species

    PubMed Central

    Al Atrouni, Ahmad; Joly-Guillou, Marie-Laure; Hamze, Monzer; Kempf, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter spp. are ubiquitous gram negative and non-fermenting coccobacilli that have the ability to occupy several ecological niches including environment, animals and human. Among the different species, Acinetobacter baumannii has evolved as global pathogen causing wide range of infection. Since the implementation of molecular techniques, the habitat and the role of non-baumannii Acinetobacter in human infection have been elucidated. In addition, several new species have been described. In the present review, we summarize the recent data about the natural reservoir of non-baumannii Acinetobacter including the novel species that have been described for the first time from environmental sources and reported during the last years. PMID:26870013

  3. Acinetobacter baumannii: An Emerging and Important Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Alsan, Marcella; Klompas, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Objective To review the clinical significance, management, and control of Acinetobacter infections. Methods Literature review. Results Acinetobacter infections have become a major cause of hospital-acquired infections worldwide. Acinetobacter is noted for its ability to survive for long periods on hospital surfaces and equipment, its predilection to develop resistance to multiple antibiotics, its affinity to cause serious infections in critically ill patients, and many well described outbreaks attributable to contamination of a common source. The crude ICU mortality is approximately 40%. Rigorous antibiotic stewardship and infection control measures are critical to prevent the spread of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter infections. There is also a pressing need for new therapeutic options. Conclusion Acinetobacter is an emerging pathogen of increasing significance. PMID:26966345

  4. Intergeneric coaggregation among drinking water bacteria: evidence of a role for Acinetobacter calcoaceticus as a bridging bacterium.

    PubMed

    Simões, Lúcia Chaves; Simões, Manuel; Vieira, Maria João

    2008-02-01

    Intergeneric coaggregation of drinking water bacteria was tested. Acinetobacter calcoaceticus was found not only to autoaggregate but also to coaggregate with four of the five other isolates (Burkholderia cepacia, Methylobacterium sp., Mycobacterium mucogenicum, Sphingomonas capsulata, and Staphylococcus sp.). In its absence, no coaggregation was found. Interactions were lectin-saccharide mediated. The putative bridging function of A. calcoaceticus was evidenced by multispecies biofilm studies, through a strain exclusion process.

  5. Comparative genomic analysis of Acinetobacter oleivorans DR1 to determine strain-specific genomic regions and gentisate biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaejoon; Madsen, Eugene L; Jeon, Che Ok; Park, Woojun

    2011-10-01

    The comparative genomics of Acinetobacter oleivorans DR1 assayed with A. baylyi ADP1, A. calcoaceticus PHEA-2, and A. baumannii ATCC 17978 revealed that the incorporation of phage-related genomic regions and the absence of transposable elements have contributed to the large size (4.15 Mb) of the DR1 genome. A horizontally transferred genomic region and a higher proportion of transcriptional regulator- and signal peptide-coding genes were identified as characteristics of the DR1 genome. Incomplete glucose metabolism, metabolic pathways of aromatic compounds, biofilm formation, antibiotics and metal resistance, and natural competence genes were conserved in four compared genomes. Interestingly, only strain DR1 possesses gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase (nagI) and grows on gentisate, whereas other species cannot. Expression of the nagI gene was upregulated during gentisate utilization, and four downstream open reading frames (ORFs) were cotranscribed, supporting the notion that gentisate metabolism is a unique characteristic of strain DR1. The genomic analysis of strain DR1 provides additional insights into the function, ecology, and evolution of Acinetobacter species.

  6. Culturable populations of Acinetobacter can promptly respond to contamination by alkanes in mangrove sediments.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Lidianne L; Colares, Geórgia B; Angelim, Alysson L; Grangeiro, Thalles B; Melo, Vânia M M

    2013-11-15

    This study evaluated the potential of bacterial isolates from mangrove sediments to degrade hexadecane, an paraffin hydrocarbon that is a large constituent of diesel and automobile lubricants. From a total of 18 oil-degrading isolates obtained by an enrichment technique, four isolates showed a great potential to degrade hexadecane. The strain MSIC01, which was identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing as Acinetobacter sp., showed the best performance in degrading this hydrocarbon, being capable of completely degrading 1% (v/v) hexadecane within 48 h without releasing biosurfactants. Its hydrophobic surface probably justifies its potential to degrade high concentrations of hexadecane. Thus, the sediments from the studied mangrove harbour bacterial communities that are able to use oil as a carbon source, which is a particularly interesting feature due to the risk of oil spills in coastal areas. Moreover, Acinetobacter sp. MSIC01 emerged as a promising candidate for applications in bioremediation of contaminated mangrove sediments.

  7. Quantification of chemotaxis-related alkane accumulation in Acinetobacter baylyi using Raman microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Hanbing; L Martin, Francis Luke; Zhang, Dayi

    2017-03-03

    Alkanes are one of the most widespread contaminants in the natural environment, primarily as a consequence of biological synthesis and oil spills. Many indigenous microbes metabolize alkanes, and the chemotaxis and accumulation in some strains has been identified. For the first time, we apply Raman microspectroscopy to identify such chemotaxis-related affinity, and quantify the alkane concentrations via spectral alterations. Raman spectral alterations were only found for the alkane chemo-attractant bacteria Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1, not for Pseudomonas fluorescence, which exhibits limited chemotaxis towards alkane. The significant alterations were attributed to the strong chemotactic ability of A. baylyi enhancing the affinity and accumulation of alkane molecules on cell membranes or cellular internalization. Spectral fingerprints of A. baylyi significantly altered after 1-h exposure to pure alkanes (dodecane or tetradecane) and alkane mixtures (mineral oil or crude oil), but not monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs) or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A semi-log linear regression relationship between Raman spectral alterations and alkane concentrations showed its feasibility in quantifying alkane concentration in environmental samples. Pure alkanes or alkane mixtures exhibited different limits of detection and regression slopes, indicating that the chemotaxis-related alkane accumulation in A. baylyi is dependent on the carbon chain length. This work provides a novel biospectroscopy approach to characterize the chemotaxis-related alkane bioaccumulation, and has immense potential for fast and high-throughput screening bacterial chemotaxis.

  8. Postcataract surgery endophthalmitis caused by acinetobacter lwoffii.

    PubMed

    Roy, Rupak; Das, Debmalya; Kumar, Saurabh; Mukherjee, Anjan

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter lwoffii is a rare cause of endophthalmitis. We report a case of acute postoperative endophthalmitis in a female, who was treated successfully with pars plana vitrectomy and intravitreal antibiotics.

  9. Hemolytic uremic syndrome associated with Acinetobacter hemolyticus.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Paulo Sérgio Lucas; Lipinski, Rubens Wolfe

    2014-08-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli and Shigella dysenteriae have been associated with bloody diarrhea and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) in humans. However, there have been only a couple of reports describing bloody diarrhea associated with Acinetobacter spp. and there are no reports of these bacteria causing HUS in children. Here, we report the case of a nine-month-old boy with bloody diarrhea who developed non-oliguric renal failure. The clinical and laboratory findings supported the diagnosis of Acinetobacter hemolyticus infection associated with HUS. The patient responded favorably to antibiotic therapy plus conservative treatment. In conclusion, Acinetobacter infection should be considered as a plausible cause of HUS in cases where E. coli infection is not involved. The rapid transformation ability of Acinetobacter is a matter of concern.

  10. Phenotypic and Molecular Characterization of Acinetobacter Clinical Isolates Obtained from Inmates of California Correctional Facilities▿†

    PubMed Central

    Golanbar, Galarah D.; Lam, Christopher K.; Chu, Yi-Ming; Cueva, Carla; Tan, Stephanie W.; Silva, Isba; Xu, H. Howard

    2011-01-01

    Acinetobacter spp. increasingly have been wreaking havoc in hospitals and communities worldwide. Although much has been reported regarding Acinetobacter isolates responsible for nosocomial infections, little is known about these organisms in correctional facilities. In this study, we performed species identification, examined the antibiotic resistance profiles, and determined the mechanisms of resistance and clonal relationships of 123 Acinetobacter isolates obtained from inmates of 20 California correctional facilities (CCFs). We found that 57.7% of the isolates belong to A. baumannii, followed by isolates of Acinetobacter genomic species 3 (gen. sp. 3; 23.6%) and of Acinetobacter gen. sp. 13TU (10.6%). Multidrug-resistant (MDR) CCF isolates were found in only six CCFs. Additionally, DNA sequences of gyrA and parC genes were consistent with fluoroquinolone (FQ) susceptibility phenotypes. Furthermore, the presence of class 1 integrons was detected in 15 CCF isolates, all of which are MDR. Integron-associated gene cassettes encode several aminoglycoside modification enzymes, which correlate with most of the aminoglycoside-resistant phenotypes. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing in the presence of Phe-Arg-β-naphthylamide dihydrochloride and 1-(1-naphthylmethyl)-piperazine indicated the involvement of efflux pumps in the FQ resistance of only a few CCF isolates. Finally, genetic profiling showed that there was no evidence of A. baumannii outbreaks in CCFs. Instead, our analyses revealed only limited clonal dissemination of mostly non-MDR A. baumannii strains in a few facilities. This study represents the first report to characterize phenotypic and molecular features of Acinetobacter isolates in correctional facilities, which provides a baseline for monitoring the antimicrobial resistance changes and dissemination patterns of these organisms in such specialized institutions. PMID:21450955

  11. Continuous coculture degradation of selected polychlorinated biphenyl congeners by Acinetobacter spp. in an aerobic reactor system

    SciTech Connect

    Adriaens, P.; Focht, D.D. )

    1990-07-01

    A coculture of two Acinetobacter spp. was applied to degrade polychlorinated biphenyls during a 42-day incubation study in a continuous aerobic fixed-bed reactor system, filled with polyurethane foam boards as support for bacterial biofilm development. The reactor was supplied with mineral medium containing 500 ppm sodium benzoate as a growth (primary) substrate, while the incoming airstream was saturated with biphenyl vapors to induce for PCB cometabolism in Acinetobacter sp. strain P6. The chlorobenzoates thus generated from 4,4{prime}-dichlorobiphenyl (4,4{prime}-DCBP), 3,4-dichlorobiphenyl (3,4-DCBP), and 3,3{prime},4,4{prime}-tetrachlorobiphenyl were further metabolized by Acinetobacter sp. strain 4-CB1. The chlorobenzoate metabolites, as well as ring-fission product ({lambda}{sub max} = 442 nm) from the PCB congeners, accounted for the degradation of 63% (2.8 mM) of the 4,4{prime}-DCBP, 100% (0.5 mM) of the 3,4-DCBP, and 32% (0.12 mM) of the 3,3{prime},4,4{prime}-TCBP, the biofilm responded with a concurrent higher release of chlorobenzoates and chloride through cosubstrate utilization.

  12. Acinetobacter infections prevalence and frequency of the antibiotics resistance: comparative study of intensive care units versus other hospital units

    PubMed Central

    Uwingabiye, Jean; Frikh, Mohammed; Lemnouer, Abdelhay; Bssaibis, Fatna; Belefquih, Bouchra; Maleb, Adil; Dahraoui, Souhail; Belyamani, Lahcen; Bait, Abdelouahed; Haimeur, Charki; Louzi, Lhoussain; Ibrahimi, Azeddine; Elouennass, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study aims to determine the Acinetobacter sp clinical isolates frequency and its antibiotic susceptibility pattern by comparing results obtained from the Intensive Care Units (ICUs) to that of other units at the Mohammed V Military Teaching Hospital in Rabat. Methods This is a retrospective study over a 2-years period where we collected all clinical isolates of Acinetobacter sp obtained from samples for infection diagnosis performed on hospitalized patients between 2012 to 2014. Results During the study period, 441 clinical and non-repetitive isolates of Acinetobacter sp were collected representing 6.94% of all bacterial clinical isolates (n = 6352) and 9.6% of Gram negative rods (n = 4569). More than a half of the isolates were from the ICUs and were obtained from 293 infected patients of which 65, 2% (191 cases) were males (sex ratio = 1.9) and the median age was 56 years (interquartile range: 42-68 years). Acinetobacter clinical isolates were obtained from respiratory samples (44.67%) followed by blood cultures (14.51%). The resistance to ciprofloxacin, ceftazidime, piperacillin / tazobactam, imipenem, amikacin, tobramycin, netilmicin, rifampicin and colistin was respectively 87%, 86%, 79%, 76%; 52%, 43%, 33% 32% and 1.7%. The difference in resistance between the ICUs and the other units was statistically significant (p <0.05) except for colistin, tetracycline and rifampicin. Conclusion This paper shows that solving the problem of prevalence and high rate of multidrug resistant Acinetobacter infection which represents a therapeutic impasse, requires the control of the hospital environment and optimizing hands hygiene and antibiotics use in the hospital. PMID:27347280

  13. Identification of NDM-1 in a Putatively Novel Acinetobacter Species ("NB14") Closely Related to Acinetobacter pittii.

    PubMed

    Espinal, Paula; Mosqueda, Noraida; Telli, Murat; van der Reijden, Tanny; Rolo, Dora; Fernández-Orth, Dietmar; Dijkshoorn, Lenie; Roca, Ignasi; Vila, Jordi

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we describe the molecular characterization of a plasmid-located blaNDM-1 harbored by an Acinetobacter clinical isolate recovered from a patient in Turkey that putatively constitutes a novel Acinetobacter species, as shown by its distinct ARDRA (amplified 16S ribosomal DNA restriction analysis) profile and molecular sequencing techniques. blaNDM-1 was carried by a conjugative plasmid widespread among non-baumannii Acinetobacter isolates, suggesting its potential for dissemination before reaching more clinically relevant Acinetobacter species.

  14. High frequency of Acinetobacter soli among Acinetobacter isolates causing bacteremia at a tertiary hospital in Japan.

    PubMed

    Endo, Shiro; Yano, Hisakazu; Kanamori, Hajime; Inomata, Shinya; Aoyagi, Tetsuji; Hatta, Masumitsu; Gu, Yoshiaki; Tokuda, Koichi; Kitagawa, Miho; Kaku, Mitsuo

    2014-03-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is generally the most frequently isolated Acinetobacter species. Sequence analysis techniques allow reliable identification of Acinetobacter isolates at the species level. Forty-eight clinical isolates of Acinetobacter spp. were obtained from blood cultures at Tohoku University Hospital. These isolates were identified at the species level by partial sequencing of the RNA polymerase β-subunit (rpoB), 16S rRNA, and gyrB genes. Then further characterization was done by using the PCR for detection of OXA-type β-lactamase gene clusters, metallo-β-lactamases, and carO genes. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing were also performed. The most frequent isolate was Acinetobacter soli (27.1%). Six of the 13 A. soli isolates were carbapenem nonsusceptible, and all of these isolates produced IMP-1. PFGE revealed that the 13 A. soli isolates were divided into 8 clusters. This study demonstrated that A. soli accounted for a high proportion of Acinetobacter isolates causing bacteremia at a Japanese tertiary hospital. Non-A. baumannii species were identified more frequently than A. baumannii and carbapenem-nonsusceptible isolates were found among the non-A. baumannii strains. These results emphasize the importance of performing epidemiological investigations of Acinetobacter species.

  15. Identification of an osmo-dependent and an osmo-independent choline transporter in Acinetobacter baylyi: implications in osmostress protection and metabolic adaptation.

    PubMed

    Sand, Miriam; Stahl, Julia; Waclawska, Izabela; Ziegler, Christine; Averhoff, Beate

    2014-06-01

    Members of the genus Acinetobacter are well known for their metabolic versatility that allows them to adapt to different ecological niches. In previous studies, we have demonstrated that Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1 can cope with high salinities by uptake and accumulation of the well-known compatible solute glycine betaine. Here, we demonstrate that addition of choline restores growth at high salinities. We further show that choline was actively taken up by the cells and converted to glycine betaine. Uptake of choline was induced by high salinity and the presence of choline in the growth medium. At high salinities, glycine betaine was accumulated in the cells whereas in the absence of osmotic stress it was exported. Inspection of the genome sequence followed by mutant studies led to the identification of two genes encoding secondary transporters (BetT1 and BetT2) of the betaine-choline-carnitine transporter (BCCT) family. The BetT1 transporter lacks an extended C-terminal domain usually found in osmoregulated choline BCCTs. BetT1 was found to facilitate osmolarity-independent choline transport most likely by a uniport mechanism. We propose that BetT1 does not primarily function in osmoadaptation but might play a role in metabolic adaptation to choline-rich environments.

  16. Clinical implications of glycoproteomics for Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Kinsella, Rachel L; Scott, Nichollas E; Feldman, Mario F

    2015-02-01

    The opportunistic human pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii persists in the healthcare setting because of its ability to survive exposure to various antimicrobial and sterilization agents. A. baumannii's ability to cause multiple infection types complicates diagnosis and treatment. Rapid detection of A. baumannii infections would likely improve treatment outcomes. Recently published Acinetobacter glycoproteomic data show the prevalence of O-linked glycoproteins, suggesting the possibility for an O-glycan-based detection technology. O-glycan biosynthesis is required for protein glycosylation and capsular polysaccharide production in A. baumannii. Recent publications demonstrate key roles for protein glycosylation and capsular polysaccharide in the pathogenicity of A. baumannii. Targeted antimicrobial development against O-glycan biosynthesis may produce new effective treatment options for A. baumannii infections. Here, we discuss how the data gathered through Acinetobacter glycoproteomics can be used to develop technologies for rapid diagnosis and reveal potential antimicrobial targets. In addition, we consider the efficacy of glycoconjugate vaccine development against A. baumannii.

  17. Pillows, an unexpected source of Acinetobacter.

    PubMed

    Weernink, A; Severin, W P; Tjernberg, I; Dijkshoorn, L

    1995-03-01

    From 1989 until 1992 an increase in the number of isolations of Acinetobacter was observed in a community hospital in The Netherlands. The organisms were spread throughout the hospital and a common source was suspected. Feather pillows were found to harbour high numbers of acinetobacters. Replacement with synthetic pillows and correction of the laundry procedure resulted in a significant reduction of Acinetobacter isolations. A number of isolates from patients and from pillows were indistinguishable using biotyping, antibiogram typing and cell envelope protein typing. By the use of DNA-DNA hybridization most isolates were identified to A. baumannii and the unnamed closely related genomic species 13. A number of isolates, mostly from pillows, were identified as A. radioresistens. The outcome of cultivation, intervention and typing suggests that the feather pillows played an important role in the outbreak.

  18. Pathogenic Acinetobacter: from the Cell Surface to Infinity and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Brent S.; Harding, Christian M.

    2015-01-01

    The genus Acinetobacter encompasses multiple nosocomial opportunistic pathogens that are of increasing worldwide relevance because of their ability to survive exposure to various antimicrobial and sterilization agents. Among these, Acinetobacter baumannii, Acinetobacter nosocomialis, and Acinetobacter pittii are the most frequently isolated in hospitals around the world. Despite the growing incidence of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter spp., little is known about the factors that contribute to pathogenesis. New strategies for treating and managing infections caused by multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter strains are urgently needed, and this requires a detailed understanding of the pathobiology of these organisms. In recent years, some virulence factors important for Acinetobacter colonization have started to emerge. In this review, we focus on several recently described virulence factors that act at the bacterial surface level, such as the capsule, O-linked protein glycosylation, and adhesins. Furthermore, we describe the current knowledge regarding the type II and type VI secretion systems present in these strains. PMID:26712938

  19. Pathogenic Acinetobacter: from the Cell Surface to Infinity and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Weber, Brent S; Harding, Christian M; Feldman, Mario F

    2015-12-28

    The genus Acinetobacter encompasses multiple nosocomial opportunistic pathogens that are of increasing worldwide relevance because of their ability to survive exposure to various antimicrobial and sterilization agents. Among these, Acinetobacter baumannii, Acinetobacter nosocomialis, and Acinetobacter pittii are the most frequently isolated in hospitals around the world. Despite the growing incidence of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter spp., little is known about the factors that contribute to pathogenesis. New strategies for treating and managing infections caused by multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter strains are urgently needed, and this requires a detailed understanding of the pathobiology of these organisms. In recent years, some virulence factors important for Acinetobacter colonization have started to emerge. In this review, we focus on several recently described virulence factors that act at the bacterial surface level, such as the capsule, O-linked protein glycosylation, and adhesins. Furthermore, we describe the current knowledge regarding the type II and type VI secretion systems present in these strains.

  20. Emulsifier formation with Acinetobacter: search for an excretion-reduced mutant of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus 69-V.

    PubMed

    Müller, R H; Babel, W

    1986-01-01

    After growth on acetate three groups of Acinetobacter strains could be identified with respect to the excretion of a bioemulsifier. Mutants of A. calcoaceticus 69-V were selected which produced reduced amounts of emulsifier.

  1. Characterization and molecular epidemiology of extensively prevalent nosocomial isolates of drug-resistant Acinetobacter spp.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, A A; Cardoso, L L; Nogueira, H S; Menezes, E V; Xavier, M A S; Barreto, N A P; Fernandes, L F; Xavier, A R E O

    2016-08-19

    Acinetobacter sp isolates deserve special attention once they have emerged globally in healthcare institutions because they display numerous intrinsic and acquired drug-resistance mechanisms. This study assessed the antibiotic susceptibility profile, the presence of the genetic marker blaOXA-23, and the clonal relationship among 34 nosocomial isolates of Acinetobacter spp obtained at a hospital in southeastern Brazil. Antibiotic sensitivity analysis was performed by the standard disc-diffusion method. All isolates were found to be extensively resistant to several drugs, but sensitive to polymyxin B. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used to detect the blaOXA-23 gene, which is associated with carbapenem resistance. The genetic profile and the clonal relationship among isolates were analyzed via enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-PCR. The Acinetobacter spp were divided into four groups with 22 distinct genetic subgroups. ERIC-PCR analysis revealed the genetic diversity among isolates, which, despite having a heterogeneous profile, displayed 100% clonality among 56% (19/34) of them.

  2. Colistin bladder instillation, an alternative way of treating multi-resistant Acinetobacter urinary tract infection: a case series and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Giua, R; Pedone, C; Cortese, L; Antonelli Incalzi, R

    2014-02-01

    The multiresistant Acinetobacter species bacteria are frequently involved in urinary or respiratory tract infections, and one of the most effective drugs, colistine, is associated with significant nephrotoxicity and neurotoxicity. Given that very high concentrations of colistine into biological fluids are safe for the human organism, attempts have been made at delivering the drug topically, by aerosol, or, occasionally, intratechally or intraventricularly for meningitis. These topical treatments could eradicate the Pseudomonas sp. from the lung of patients with cystic fibrosis or bronchiectasis and the Acinetobacter baumannii from lung and meninges. However, only one case of colistin topic treatment in urinary tract infection is described. We report a case series of three patients successfully undergone colistin bladder instillations for multi drug resistant Acinetobacter urinary tract infection, and we review the literature about colistin topic treatment.

  3. Impact of Acinetobacter infection on the Mortality of Burn Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii on a burns unit—clinical risk factors and prognosis. Burns 2002;28:349–357. 4. Sengupta S, Kumar P, Ciraj A, Shivananda P... Acinetobacter baumannii —an emerging nosocomial pathogen in the burns unit Manipal, India. Burns 2001;27:140–144. 5. Simor A, Lee M, Vearncombe M, et al. An...outbreak due to multiresistant Acinetobacter baumannii in a burn unit: risk fac- tors for acquisition and management. Infect Control Hosp Epi- demiol

  4. Identification of NDM-1 in a Putatively Novel Acinetobacter Species (“NB14”) Closely Related to Acinetobacter pittii

    PubMed Central

    Espinal, Paula; Mosqueda, Noraida; Telli, Murat; van der Reijden, Tanny; Rolo, Dora; Fernández-Orth, Dietmar; Dijkshoorn, Lenie; Vila, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we describe the molecular characterization of a plasmid-located blaNDM-1 harbored by an Acinetobacter clinical isolate recovered from a patient in Turkey that putatively constitutes a novel Acinetobacter species, as shown by its distinct ARDRA (amplified 16S ribosomal DNA restriction analysis) profile and molecular sequencing techniques. blaNDM-1 was carried by a conjugative plasmid widespread among non-baumannii Acinetobacter isolates, suggesting its potential for dissemination before reaching more clinically relevant Acinetobacter species. PMID:26259796

  5. Simultaneous Microcystis Algicidal and Microcystin Degrading Capability by a Single Acinetobacter Bacterial Strain.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Ai, Hainan; Kang, Li; Sun, Xingfu; He, Qiang

    2016-11-01

    Measures for removal of toxic harmful algal blooms often cause lysis of algal cells and release of microcystins (MCs). In this study, Acinetobacter sp. CMDB-2 that exhibits distinct algal lysing activity and MCs degradation capability was isolated. The physiological response and morphological characteristics of toxin-producing Microcystis aeruginosa, the dynamics of intra- and extracellular MC-LR concentration were studied in an algal/bacterial cocultured system. The results demonstrated that Acinetobacter sp. CMDB-2 caused thorough decomposition of algal cells and impairment of photosynthesis within 24 h. Enhanced algal lysis and MC-LR release appeared with increasing bacterial density from 1 × 10(3) to 1 × 10(7) cells/mL; however, the MC-LR was reduced by nearly 94% within 14 h irrespective of bacterial density. Measurement of extracellular and intracellular MC-LR revealed that the toxin was decreased by 92% in bacterial cell incubated systems relative to control and bacterial cell-free filtrate systems. The results confirmed that the bacterial metabolite caused 92% lysis of Microcystis aeruginosa cells, whereas the bacterial cells were responsible for approximately 91% reduction of MC-LR. The joint efforts of the bacterium and its metabolite accomplished the sustainable removal of algae and MC-LR. This is the first report of a single bacterial strain that achieves these dual actions.

  6. Development and Evaluation of Species-Specific PCR for Detection of Nine Acinetobacter Species.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue Min; Choi, Ji Ae; Choi, In Sun; Kook, Joong Ki; Chang, Young-Hyo; Park, Geon; Jang, Sook Jin; Kang, Seong Ho; Moon, Dae Soo

    2016-05-01

    Molecular methods have the potential to improve the speed and accuracy of Acinetobacter species identification in clinical settings. The goal of this study is to develop species-specific PCR assays based on differences in the RNA polymerase beta-subunit gene (rpoB) to detect nine commonly isolated Acinetobacter species including Acinetobacter baumannii, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Acinetobacter pittii, Acinetobacter nosocomialis, Acinetobacter lwoffii, Acinetobacter ursingii, Acinetobacter bereziniae, Acinetobacter haemolyticus, and Acinetobacter schindleri. The sensitivity and specificity of these nine assays were measured using genomic DNA templates from 55 reference strains and from 474 Acinetobacter clinical isolates. The sensitivity of A. baumannii-specific PCR assay was 98.9%, and the sensitivity of species-specific PCR assays for all other species was 100%. The specificities of A. lwoffii- and A. schindleri-specific PCR were 97.8 and 98.9%, respectively. The specificity of species-specific PCR for all other tested Acinetobacter species was 100%. The lower limit of detection for the nine species-specific PCR assays developed in this study was 20 or 200 pg of genomic DNA from type strains of each species. The Acinetobacter species-specific PCR assay would be useful to determine the correct species among suggested candidate Acinetobacter species when conventional methods including MALDI-TOF MS identify Acinetobacter only to the genus level. The species-specific assay can be used to screen large numbers of clinical and environmental samples obtained for epidemiologic study of Acinetobacter for the presence of target species.

  7. Prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by Bordetella holmesii, an Acinetobacter lookalike.

    PubMed

    Jonckheere, Stijn; De Baere, Thierry; Schroeyers, Pascal; Soetens, Oriane; De Bel, Annelies; Surmont, Ignace

    2012-06-01

    We report a case of fulminant endocarditis on a prosthetic homograft aortic valve caused by Bordetella holmesii, which was successfully managed by surgical valve replacement and antibiotic treatment. B. holmesii, a strictly aerobic, small, Gram-negative coccobacillus, has been implicated as an infrequent cause of a pertussis-like syndrome and other respiratory illnesses. However, B. holmesii is also a rare cause of septicaemia and infective endocarditis, mostly in immunocompromised patients. To our knowledge, this is the first report of B. holmesii endocarditis on a prosthetic aortic valve. Routine laboratory testing initially misidentified the strain as Acinetobacter sp. Correct identification was achieved by 16S rRNA gene and outer-membrane protein A (ompA) gene sequencing. Interestingly, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry also produced an accurate species-level identification. Subsequent susceptibility testing and review of the literature revealed ceftazidime, cefepime, carbapenems, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, piperacillin/tazobactam, tigecycline and colistin as possible candidates to treat infections caused by B. holmesii.

  8. Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of Acinetobacter spp. isolated from meat.

    PubMed

    Carvalheira, Ana; Casquete, Rocio; Silva, Joana; Teixeira, Paula

    2017-02-21

    The prevalence and antibiotic resistance of Acinetobacter spp. from fifty samples of meat (chicken, turkey, beef and pork) were evaluated. Acinetobacter spp. was recovered from all samples and the clonal relatedness of 223 isolates identified to belong to the genus Acinetobacter was established by PFGE. A high genetic diversity was observed and 166 isolates from different samples, 141 representing different PFGE profiles, were further identified to the species level by rpoB gene sequencing. Thirteen distinct Acinetobacter species were identified among 156 isolates. The remaining ten isolates may represent three putatively novel species since rpoB sequence homologies with type strains of all available described Acinetobacter species, were <95%. The most common species was Acinetobacter guillouiae with a prevalence of 34.9%. However 18.7% of the strains belong to the Acinetobacter baumannii group (n=31) which include the species Acinetobacter baumannii (n=7), Acinetobacter pittii (n=12), Acinetobacter seifertii (n=8) and Acinetobacter nosocomialis (n=4) that are the species most frequently associated with nosocomial infections worldwide. In general, strains were resistant to some of the antimicrobials most frequently used to treat Acinetobacter infections such as piperacillin-tazobactam (64.9% of strains resistant), ceftazidime (43.5%), ciprofloxacin (42.9%), as well as to colistin (41.7%) and polymyxin B (35.1%), the last-resort drugs to treat infections caused by multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter. The percentage of resistant strains to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, aminoglycosides (amikacin and tobramycin) and ampicillin-sulbactam was >10% (23.2%, 23.2%, 14.3%, 12.5%, 12.5%, respectively). However, resistances to meropenem, imipenem and minocycline were only sporadically observed (8.3%, 1.2% and 1.2%, respectively). Overall, 51.2% of the strains were considered as multidrug-resistant (MDR) and 9.6% as extensively drug-resistant (XDR). The prevalence

  9. Quantitative proteomics to study carbapenem resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Vishvanath; Tiwari, Monalisa

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic pathogen causing pneumonia, respiratory infections and urinary tract infections. The prevalence of this lethal pathogen increases gradually in the clinical setup where it can grow on artificial surfaces, utilize ethanol as a carbon source. Moreover it resists desiccation. Carbapenems, a β-lactam, are the most commonly prescribed drugs against A. baumannii. Resistance against carbapenem has emerged in Acinetobacter baumannii which can create significant health problems and is responsible for high morbidity and mortality. With the development of quantitative proteomics, a considerable progress has been made in the study of carbapenem resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii. Recent updates showed that quantitative proteomics has now emerged as an important tool to understand the carbapenem resistance mechanism in Acinetobacter baumannii. Present review also highlights the complementary nature of different quantitative proteomic methods used to study carbapenem resistance and suggests to combine multiple proteomic methods for understanding the response to antibiotics by Acinetobacter baumannii. PMID:25309531

  10. Worldwide dissemination of acquired carbapenem-hydrolysing class D β-lactamases in Acinetobacter spp. other than Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Zander, Esther; Fernández-González, Ana; Schleicher, Xenia; Dammhayn, Cathrin; Kamolvit, Witchuda; Seifert, Harald; Higgins, Paul G

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to identify acquired OXA-type carbapenemases in Acinetobacter spp. other than Acinetobacter baumannii. From a total of 453 carbapenem-susceptible and -resistant Acinetobacter isolates collected worldwide, 23 were positive for blaOXA genes by multiplex PCR. These isolates were identified as Acinetobacter pittii (n=18), Acinetobacter nosocomialis (n=2), Acinetobacter junii (n=1) and Acinetobacter genomic species 14TU/13BJ (n=2). The blaOXA genes and associated insertion sequence (IS) elements were sequenced by primer walking. In 11 of these isolates, sequencing of the PCR products revealed that they were false-positive for blaOXA. The remaining 12 isolates, originating from Europe, Asia, South America, North America and South Africa, harboured OXA-23 (n=4), OXA-58 (n=5), OXA-40-like (n=1) and OXA-143-like (n=1); one A. pittii isolate harboured both OXA-23 and OXA-58. IS elements were associated with blaOXA in 10 isolates. OXA multiplex PCR showed a high degree of false-positive results (47.8%), indicating that detection of blaOXA in non-baumanniiAcinetobacter spp. should be confirmed using additional methods.

  11. The complete sequence of a 10.8 kb segment distal of SUF2 on the right arm of chromosome III from Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals seven open reading frames including the RVS161, ADP1 and PGK genes.

    PubMed

    Skala, J; Purnelle, B; Goffeau, A

    1992-05-01

    We have entirely sequenced a 10,835 bp segment of the right arm from chromosome III contained in the J11D and J11D-K3B GF clones. The segment contains seven open reading frames longer then 100 amino acids. Three of them, RVS161 (Urdaci et al., 1990; Crouzet et al., 1991), ADP1 (Purnelle et al., 1991) and PGK1 (Hitzeman et al., 1982) have been described previously. YCR10C encodes a putative membrane protein. YCR8W (encoding a putative protein kinase) and YCR14C extend inside the D10H (Skala et al., 1991) and 62B5-2D clones respectively. Four ARS elements previously reported by Palzkill et al. (1986) are located between RVS161 and YCR10C.

  12. Acinetobacter Species Infections among Navy and Marine Corps Beneficiaries: 2012 Annual Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-18

    phenotypic tests, several other Acinetobacter species are difficult to distinguish from A. baumannii , namely A. calcoaceticus, Acinetobacter genomic...the A. baumannii -calcoaceticus complex, or ABC. 1-4 Geographic distribution contributes to the growing concern surrounding Acinetobacter . The... Acinetobacter cases was A. baumannii in the DON (42.7%) and ABC in the DOD (38.8%). In the DON, 9.3% of Acinetobacter isolates were MDR and 1.3% were XDR

  13. Dissemination of blaOXA-23 in Acinetobacter spp. in China: Main Roles of Conjugative Plasmid pAZJ221 and Transposon Tn2009

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li-Lin; Ji, Shu-Juan; Ruan, Zhi; Fu, Ying; Fu, Yi-Qi; Wang, Yan-Fei

    2015-01-01

    Production of the OXA-23 carbapenemase is the most common reason for the increasing carbapenem resistance in Acinetobacter spp. This study was conducted to reveal the genetic basis of blaOXA-23 dissemination in Acinetobacter spp. in China. A total of 63 carbapenem-resistant OXA-23-producing Acinetobacter sp. isolates, representing different backgrounds, were selected from 28 hospitals in 18 provinces for this study. Generally, two patterns of plasmids carrying blaOXA-23 were detected according to S1-nuclease pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and Southern blot hybridization. A ca. 78-kb plasmid, designated pAZJ221, was found in 23 Acinetobacter baumannii and three Acinetobacter nosocomialis isolates, while a novel ca. 50-kb plasmid was carried by only two other A. baumannii isolates. Three of these isolates had an additional copy of blaOXA-23 on the chromosome. Transformation of the two plasmids succeeded, but only pAZJ221 was conjugative. Plasmid pAZJ221 was sequenced completely and found to carry no previously known resistance genes except blaOXA-23. The blaOXA-23 gene of the remaining 35 isolates was chromosome borne. The blaOXA-23 genetic environments were correlated with Tn2009 in 57 isolates, Tn2008 in 5 isolates, and Tn2006 in 1 isolate. The MIC values for the carbapenems with these isolates were not significantly associated with the genomic locations or the copy numbers of blaOXA-23. Overall, these observations suggest that the plasmid pAZJ221 and Tn2009 have effectively contributed to the wide dissemination of blaOXA-23 in Acinetobacter spp. in China and that horizontal gene transfer may play an important role in dissemination of the blaOXA-23 gene. PMID:25605357

  14. Dissemination of blaOXA-23 in Acinetobacter spp. in China: main roles of conjugative plasmid pAZJ221 and transposon Tn2009.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-Lin; Ji, Shu-Juan; Ruan, Zhi; Fu, Ying; Fu, Yi-Qi; Wang, Yan-Fei; Yu, Yun-Song

    2015-04-01

    Production of the OXA-23 carbapenemase is the most common reason for the increasing carbapenem resistance in Acinetobacter spp. This study was conducted to reveal the genetic basis of blaOXA-23 dissemination in Acinetobacter spp. in China. A total of 63 carbapenem-resistant OXA-23-producing Acinetobacter sp. isolates, representing different backgrounds, were selected from 28 hospitals in 18 provinces for this study. Generally, two patterns of plasmids carrying blaOXA-23 were detected according to S1-nuclease pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and Southern blot hybridization. A ca. 78-kb plasmid, designated pAZJ221, was found in 23 Acinetobacter baumannii and three Acinetobacter nosocomialis isolates, while a novel ca. 50-kb plasmid was carried by only two other A. baumannii isolates. Three of these isolates had an additional copy of blaOXA-23 on the chromosome. Transformation of the two plasmids succeeded, but only pAZJ221 was conjugative. Plasmid pAZJ221 was sequenced completely and found to carry no previously known resistance genes except blaOXA-23. The blaOXA-23 gene of the remaining 35 isolates was chromosome borne. The blaOXA-23 genetic environments were correlated with Tn2009 in 57 isolates, Tn2008 in 5 isolates, and Tn2006 in 1 isolate. The MIC values for the carbapenems with these isolates were not significantly associated with the genomic locations or the copy numbers of blaOXA-23. Overall, these observations suggest that the plasmid pAZJ221 and Tn2009 have effectively contributed to the wide dissemination of blaOXA-23 in Acinetobacter spp. in China and that horizontal gene transfer may play an important role in dissemination of the blaOXA-23 gene.

  15. Acinetobacter baumannii: an emerging opportunistic pathogen.

    PubMed

    Howard, Aoife; O'Donoghue, Michael; Feeney, Audrey; Sleator, Roy D

    2012-05-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic bacterial pathogen primarily associated with hospital-acquired infections. The recent increase in incidence, largely associated with infected combat troops returning from conflict zones, coupled with a dramatic increase in the incidence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains, has significantly raised the profile of this emerging opportunistic pathogen. Herein, we provide an overview of the pathogen, discuss some of the major factors that have led to its clinical prominence and outline some of the novel therapeutic strategies currently in development.

  16. Extended-Spectrum Cephalosporinase in Acinetobacter baumannii▿

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Martínez, José-Manuel; Nordmann, Patrice; Ronco, Esthel; Poirel, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    An AmpC-type β-lactamase conferring high-level resistance to expanded-spectrum cephalosporins and monobactams was characterized from an Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolate. This class C β-lactamase (named ADC-33) possessed a Pro210Arg substitution together with a duplication of an Ala residue at position 215 (inside the Ω-loop) compared to a reference AmpC cephalosporinase from A. baumannii. ADC-33 hydrolyzed ceftazidime, cefepime, and aztreonam at high levels, which allows the classification of this enzyme as an extended-spectrum AmpC (ESAC). Site-directed mutagenesis confirmed the role of both substitutions in its ESAC property. PMID:20547808

  17. [Toxigenic effect of Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from children with acute diarrhoea].

    PubMed

    Polanco, Nina; Manzi, Lorna

    2008-03-01

    Diarrheal diseases with diarrhea are the most frequent cause of morbidity and mortality in children; however the causative agent cannot be identified always, which suggests the presence of unknown enteropathogens inducing diarrhea. The isolation of Acinetobacter sp. from feces of children with acute diarrhea, unrelated to known enteropathogens motivated this investigation to detect a possible enterotoxigenic effect on HT-29 cells. The study population comprised 150 children with an age range from 0 to 5 years old; 120 were assisted in the "Hospital Materno Infantil del Este'' with gastrointestinal syndrome and 30 healthy controls who went to the center for routine analysis. In 25% of symptomatic patients were diagnosed parasites and bacteria, identified routinely. From four symptomatic patients were isolated three Acinetobacter baumannii strains and two A. calcoaceticus strains. The strains were cultured in brain-heart infusion for 24 and 48 hrs, at 35 degrees C, and the supernatants were obtained by centrifugation and filtration and their activity tested on HT-29 cell monolayers. The supernatants of the three strains of A. baumannii induced alterations of the cell monolayer, showed by detachments of cell monolayers, cell segregation, cell rounding and swelling. These effects were more intense with the 48 h culture exoproducts of the 016 strain, which were higher than the positive control. This toxigenic effect of A. baumannii, could represent a pathogenic mechanism whose definition requires more studies to determine the possible role in the pathogenicity of this bacillus.

  18. Characterization of blaOXA-143 variants in Acinetobacter baumannii and Acinetobacter pittii.

    PubMed

    Zander, Esther; Bonnin, Rémy A; Seifert, Harald; Higgins, Paul G

    2014-05-01

    The acquired carbapenem-hydrolyzing oxacillinase (OXA) OXA-143 has thus far been detected only in Acinetobacter baumannii isolates from Brazil. The aim of this study was to characterize three OXA-143 variants: OXA-231 and OXA-253 from carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii isolates and OXA-255 in a carbapenem-susceptible Acinetobacter pittii isolate originating from Brazil, Honduras, and the United States, respectively. The 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) technique identified the same transcription initiation site for all blaOXA-143-like genes and revealed differences in the putative promoter regions. However, all cloned OXA-143 variants conferred carbapenem resistance on A. baumannii ATCC 17978 and OXA-255 conferred carbapenem resistance on A. pittii SH024, which was correlated with blaOXA-255 gene expression. This is the first description of OXA-143-like outside A. baumannii. Detection of OXA-143-like in the United States and Honduras indicates its dissemination through the American continent.

  19. Association of class 1 and 2 integrons with multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii international clones and Acinetobacter nosocomialis isolates.

    PubMed

    Martins, Natacha; Picão, Renata Cristina; Adams-Sapper, Sheila; Riley, Lee W; Moreira, Beatriz Meurer

    2015-01-01

    The Acinetobacter baumannii clonal complex 113/79 (CC113/79) and class 2 integrons predominate in Latin America; a relationship between these characteristics was explored. The presence of integrases was determined in successive hospital Acinetobacter isolates (163 A. baumannii isolates and 72 Acinetobacter nosocomialis isolates). Most isolates had integrons, but class 1 and 2 integrons were present significantly more often in CC109/1 and CC113/79, respectively. The high prevalence of CC113/79 in Latin America may account for the predominance of class 2 integrons.

  20. Complete Genome Sequence and Methylome Analysis of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus 65

    PubMed Central

    Fomenkov, Alexey; Vincze, Tamas; Degtyarev, Sergey K.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acinetobacter calcoaceticus 65 is the original source strain for the restriction enzyme Acc65I. Its complete sequence and full methylome were determined using single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing. PMID:28336599

  1. Acinetobacter junii as an aetiological agent of corneal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Broniek, G; Langwińska-Wośko, E; Szaflik, J; Wróblewska, M

    2014-12-01

    Rods of the Acinetobacter genus are present mainly in the external environment (e.g. water, soil) and in animals, while in humans they may comprise physiological flora. The main pathogenic species is Acinetobacter baumannii complex, which constitutes a common cause of nosocomial infections, particularly in patients with underlying diseases and risk factors (e.g. prior broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy, malignancy, central venous catheter, mechanical ventilation); however, infections of the eye caused by strains of Acinetobacter spp. are very rare. We report a unique case of community-acquired corneal ulcer caused by Acinetobacter non-baumannii (possibly A. junii), in a patient with no risk factors identified. The case highlights the need for obtaining a sample from the cornea for bacteriological culture in the case of suspected ophthalmic infection as identification of the pathogen, and assessment of its susceptibility profile enables proper antibiotic therapy, improves the outcome and may constitute an eyesight-saving management.

  2. A review of intravenous minocycline for treatment of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter infections.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, David J; Garavaglia-Wilson, Alexandria

    2014-12-01

    Options for treatment of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii infections are extremely limited. Minocycline intravenous is active against many MDR strains of Acinetobacter, and Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute breakpoints exist to guide interpretation of minocycline susceptibility results with Acinetobacter. In addition, minocycline intravenous holds a US Food and Drug Administration indication for treatment of infections caused by Acinetobacter. There is an accumulating amount of literature reporting successful use of minocycline intravenous for treatment of serious MDR Acinetobacter infections, particularly for nosocomial pneumonia. These results, coupled with the generally favorable tolerability of minocycline intravenous, support its use as a viable therapeutic option for treatment of MDR Acinetobacter infections.

  3. [Degradation of oil derivatives by Acinetobacter calcoaceticus MM5].

    PubMed

    Marín, M M; Ortiz, M L; Laborda, F

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the isolation of microorganisms from polluted heating oil. The growth of one of them has been studied (Acinetobacter calcoaceticus MM5) in several linear and branched hydrocarbons as well as the effect of its growth on commercial diesel oil. Acinetobacter calcoaceticus MM5 is not capable of using glucose as its only source of carbon, and it needs the presence of nitrogen and phosphorus sources to degrade any petroleum by-product.

  4. Improved homology model of cyclohexanone monooxygenase from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus based on multiple templates.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez, Eduardo; Ventura, Oscar N; Eriksson, Leif A; Saenz-Méndez, Patricia

    2014-04-01

    A new homology model of cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus is derived based on multiple templates, and in particular the crystal structure of CHMO from Rhodococcus sp. The derived model was fully evaluated, showing that the quality of the new structure was improved over previous models. Critically, the nicotinamide cofactor is included in the model for the first time. Analysis of several molecular dynamics snapshots of intermediates in the enzymatic mechanism led to a description of key residues for cofactor binding and intermediate stabilization during the reaction, in particular Arg327 and the well known conserved motif (FxGxxxHxxxW) in Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases, in excellent agreement with known experimental and computational data.

  5. Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter spp.: Increasingly Problematic Nosocomial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyungwon; Yong, Dongeun; Jeong, Seok Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria have increasingly been resisting to antimicrobial therapy. Recently, resistance problem has been relatively much worsened in Gram-negative bacilli. Acinetobacter spp. are typical nosocomial pathogens causing infections and high mortality, almost exclusively in compromised hospital patients. Acinetobacter spp. are intrinsically less susceptible to antibiotics than Enterobacteriaceae, and have propensity to acquire resistance. A surveillance study in Korea in 2009 showed that resistance rates of Acinetobacter spp. were very high: to fluoroquinolone 67%, to amikacin 48%, to ceftazidime 66% and to imipenem 51%. Carbapenem resistance was mostly due to OXA type carbapenemase production in A. baumannii isolates, whereas it was due to metallo-β-lactamase production in non-baumannii Acinetobacter isolates. Colistin-resistant isolates were rare but started to be isolated in Korea. Currently, the infection caused by multidrug-resistant A. baumannii is among the most difficult ones to treat. Analysis at tertiary care hospital in 2010 showed that among the 1,085 isolates of Acinetobacter spp., 14.9% and 41.8% were resistant to seven, and to all eight antimicrobial agents tested, respectively. It is known to be difficult to prevent Acinetobacter spp. infection in hospitalized patients, because the organisms are ubiquitous in hospital environment. Efforts to control resistant bacteria in Korea by hospitals, relevant scientific societies and government agencies have only partially been successful. We need concerted multidisciplinary efforts to preserve the efficacy of currently available antimicrobial agents, by following the principles of antimicrobial stewardship. PMID:22028150

  6. Acinetobacter baumannii: Emergence of a Successful Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Peleg, Anton Y.; Seifert, Harald; Paterson, David L.

    2008-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a highly troublesome pathogen for many institutions globally. As a consequence of its immense ability to acquire or upregulate antibiotic drug resistance determinants, it has justifiably been propelled to the forefront of scientific attention. Apart from its predilection for the seriously ill within intensive care units, A. baumannii has more recently caused a range of infectious syndromes in military personnel injured in the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts. This review details the significant advances that have been made in our understanding of this remarkable organism over the last 10 years, including current taxonomy and species identification, issues with susceptibility testing, mechanisms of antibiotic resistance, global epidemiology, clinical impact of infection, host-pathogen interactions, and infection control and therapeutic considerations. PMID:18625687

  7. Extrahuman Epidemiology of Acinetobacter baumannii in Lebanon

    PubMed Central

    Rafei, Rayane; Hamze, Monzer; Pailhoriès, Hélène; Eveillard, Matthieu; Marsollier, Laurent; Joly-Guillou, Marie-Laure; Dabboussi, Fouad

    2015-01-01

    The presence of Acinetobacter baumannii outside hospitals is still a controversial issue. The objective of our study was to explore the extrahospital epidemiology of A. baumannii in Lebanon. From February 2012 to October 2013, a total of 73 water samples, 51 soil samples, 37 raw cow milk samples, 50 cow meat samples, 7 raw cheese samples, and 379 animal samples were analyzed by cultural methods for the presence of A. baumannii. Species identification was performed by rpoB gene sequencing. Antibiotic susceptibility was investigated, and the A. baumannii population was studied by two genotyping approaches: multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and blaOXA-51 sequence-based typing (SBT). A. baumannii was detected in 6.9% of water samples, 2.7% of milk samples, 8.0% of meat samples, 14.3% of cheese samples, and 7.7% of animal samples. All isolates showed a susceptible phenotype against most of the antibiotics tested and lacked carbapenemase-encoding genes, except one that harbored a blaOXA-143 gene. MLST analysis revealed the presence of 36 sequence types (STs), among which 24 were novel STs reported for the first time in this study. blaOXA-51 SBT showed the presence of 34 variants, among which 21 were novel and all were isolated from animal origins. Finally, 30 isolates had new partial rpoB sequences and were considered putative new Acinetobacter species. In conclusion, animals can be a potential reservoir for A. baumannii and the dissemination of new emerging carbapenemases. The roles of the novel animal clones identified in community-acquired infections should be investigated. PMID:25616788

  8. An OmpA-Like Protein from Acinetobacter spp. Stimulates Gastrin and Interleukin-8 Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Ofori-Darko, Ernest; Zavros, Yana; Rieder, Gabriele; Tarlé, Susan A.; Van Antwerp, Mary; Merchant, Juanita L.

    2000-01-01

    Bacterial overgrowth in the stomach may occur under conditions of diminished or absent acid secretion. Under these conditions, secretion of the hormone gastrin is elevated. Alternatively, bacterial factors may directly stimulate gastrin. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found that mice colonized for 2 months with a mixed bacterial culture of opportunistic pathogens showed an increase in serum gastrin. To examine regulation of gene expression by bacterial proteins, stable transformants of AGS cells expressing gastrin or interleukin-8 (IL-8) promoters were cocultured with live organisms. Both whole-cell sonicates and a heat-stable fraction were also coincubated with the cells. A level of 108 organisms per ml stimulated both the gastrin and IL-8 promoters. Heat-stable proteins prepared from these bacterial sonicates stimulated the promoter significantly more than the live organism or unheated sonicates. A 38-kDa heat-stable protein stimulating the gastrin and IL-8 promoters was cloned and found to be an OmpA-related protein. Immunoblotting using antibody to the OmpA-like protein identified an Acinetobacter sp. as the bacterial species that expressed this protein and colonized the mouse stomach. Moreover, reintubation of mice with a pure culture of the Acinetobacter sp. caused gastritis. We conclude that bacterial colonization of the stomach may increase serum gastrin levels in part through the ability of the bacteria to produce OmpA-like proteins that directly stimulate gastrin and IL-8 gene expression. These results implicate OmpA-secreting bacteria in the activation of gastrin gene expression and raise the possibility that a variety of organisms may contribute to the increase in serum gastrin and subsequent epithelial cell proliferation in the hypochlorhydric stomach. PMID:10816525

  9. Identification of genetic recombination between Acinetobacter species based on multilocus sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Hun; Park, Young Kyoung; Choi, Ji Young; Ko, Kwan Soo

    2012-07-01

    During multilocus sequence analysis of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex, we identified the evidence of recent genetic recombination between 2 Acinetobacter species. While 3 isolates belonged to A. nosocomialis based on 16S rRNA, gyrB, fusA, gdhB, and rplB gene sequences, they showed close relationships with Acinetobacter genomic species 'close to 13TU' in rpoB, recA, cpn60, rpoD, and gltA gene trees.

  10. Polymicrobial Chronic Infection Including Acinetobacter Baumannii in a Plated Segmental Defect in the Rat Femur

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    Including Acinetobacter baumannii in a Plated Segmental Defect in the Rat Femur PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dean T. Tsukayama, MD...FEB 2007 - 31 DEC 2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Polymicrobial Chronic Infection Including Acinetobacter baumannii 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER in a Plated...bone isolate of Acinetobacter baumannii exhibited very little osteolytic involvement when used alone in the model. Qualitative cultures indicated very

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of the Environmentally Isolated Acinetobacter pittii Strain IPK_TSA6.1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yunmi

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter pittii is an opportunistic pathogen frequently isolated from Acinetobacter infections other than those from Acinetobacter baumannii. Multidrug resistance in A. pittii, including resistance to carbapenems, has been increasingly reported worldwide. Here, we report the 4.14-Mbp draft genome sequence of A. pittii IPK_TSA6.1 that was isolated from a nonhospital setting. PMID:27688336

  12. Molecular epidemiology of Acinetobacter baumannii and Acinetobacter nosocomialis in Germany over a 5-year period (2005-2009).

    PubMed

    Schleicher, X; Higgins, P G; Wisplinghoff, H; Körber-Irrgang, B; Kresken, M; Seifert, H

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the species distribution within the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex and the molecular epidemiology of A. baumannii and Acinetobacter nosocomialis, 376 Acinetobacter isolates were collected prospectively from hospitalized patients at 15 medical centres in Germany during three surveillance studies conducted over a 5-year period. Species identification was performed by molecular methods. Imipenem minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined by broth microdilution. The prevalence of the most common carbapenemase-encoding genes was investigated by oxacillinase (OXA) -multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The molecular epidemiology was investigated by repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR; DiversiLab™). Acinetobacter pittii was the most prevalent Acinetobacter species (n = 193), followed by A. baumannii (n = 140), A. calcoaceticus (n = 10) and A. nosocomialis (n = 8). The majority of A. baumannii was represented by sporadic isolates (n = 70, 50%) that showed unique rep-PCR patterns, 25 isolates (18%) clustered with one or two other isolates, and only 45 isolates (32%) belonged to one of the previously described international clonal lineages. The most prevalent clonal lineage was international clone (IC) 2 (n = 34) and IC 1 (n = 6). According to CLSI, 25 A. baumannii isolates were non-susceptible to imipenem (MIC ≥ 8 mg/L), all of which produced an OXA-58-like or OXA-23-like carbapenemase. The rate of imipenem susceptibility among A. baumannii isolates decreased from 96% in 2005 to 76% in 2009. All other Acinetobacter isolates were susceptible to imipenem. The population structure of carbapenem-susceptible A. baumannii in Germany is highly diverse. Imipenem non-susceptibility was strongly associated with the clonal lineages IC 2 and IC 1. These data underscore the high clonality of carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii isolates.

  13. Iron and Acinetobacter baumannii Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Gentile, Valentina; Frangipani, Emanuela; Bonchi, Carlo; Minandri, Fabrizia; Runci, Federica; Visca, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging nosocomial pathogen, responsible for infection outbreaks worldwide. The pathogenicity of this bacterium is mainly due to its multidrug-resistance and ability to form biofilm on abiotic surfaces, which facilitate long-term persistence in the hospital setting. Given the crucial role of iron in A. baumannii nutrition and pathogenicity, iron metabolism has been considered as a possible target for chelation-based antibacterial chemotherapy. In this study, we investigated the effect of iron restriction on A. baumannii growth and biofilm formation using different iron chelators and culture conditions. We report substantial inter-strain variability and growth medium-dependence for biofilm formation by A. baumannii isolates from veterinary and clinical sources. Neither planktonic nor biofilm growth of A. baumannii was affected by exogenous chelators. Biofilm formation was either stimulated by iron or not responsive to iron in the majority of isolates tested, indicating that iron starvation is not sensed as an overall biofilm-inducing stimulus by A. baumannii. The impressive iron withholding capacity of this bacterium should be taken into account for future development of chelation-based antimicrobial and anti-biofilm therapies. PMID:25438019

  14. Modified CHROMagar Acinetobacter Medium for Direct Detection of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter Strains in Nasal and Rectal Swab Samples

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jacob; Kim, Taek-Kyung; Park, Min-Jeong; Kim, Han-Sung; Kim, Jae-Seok

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether CHROMagar Acinetobacter medium (CHROMagar, France) in combination with an antimicrobial supplement (modified CHROMagar Acinetobacter; CHROMagar, France) can be used for detecting and isolating multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter species (MRA) in nasal and rectal surveillance cultures. Nasal and rectal swab samples were collected from patients in an intensive care unit at a teaching hospital. The samples were used to inoculate modified CHROMagar Acinetobacter plates, which were examined after 24 and 48 hr of incubation at 37℃. Their susceptibility against the antimicrobial agents meropenem, imipenem, ciprofloxacin, and amikacin was analyzed using the Etest (bioMerieux, France). A total of 406 paired samples (406 nasal swabs and 406 rectal swabs) were obtained from 226 patients, and 120 samples (28 nasal and 28 rectal cultures, 47 nasal cultures only, and 17 rectal cultures only) yielded MRA. Seventy-five MRA isolates (18.5%) were recovered from the 406 nasal samples, and 45 MRA isolates (11.1%) were recovered from the 406 rectal samples. Of the 120 MRA isolates, 3 (2.5%) were detected only after 48 hr of incubation. The use of modified CHROMagar Acinetobacter together with nasal and rectal swabs and 1-day incubation is an effective surveillance tool for detecting MRA colonization. PMID:23667846

  15. A case of community-acquired Acinetobacter junii-johnsonii cellulitis.

    PubMed

    Henao-Martínez, Andrés F; González-Fontal, Guido R; Johnson, Steven

    2012-06-01

    Acinetobacter skin and soft tissue infection outside of the traumatic wound setting are rare occurrences. The majority of cases occur in the presence of significant comorbilities and by Acinetobacter baumanii. Herein a case is reported of community-onset, health-care-associated, non-traumatic cellulitis caused by Acinetobacter, species junii-johnsonii with bacteremia. This is the first reported case of Acinetobacter junii-johnsonii skin and soft tissue infection. Hemorrhagic bullae might be one of the clinical features of Acinetobacter cellulitis.

  16. Morphine, but not trauma, sensitizes to systemic Acinetobacter baumannii infection.

    PubMed

    Breslow, Jessica M; Monroy, M Alexandra; Daly, John M; Meissler, Joseph J; Gaughan, John; Adler, Martin W; Eisenstein, Toby K

    2011-12-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important nosocomial pathogen in civilian intensive care units. Recently the incidence has increased in wounded military personnel. Morphine is documented in numerous animal studies to be immunosuppressive and to sensitize to infection. The hypotheses were tested that morphine, administered for analgesia in the battlefield, predisposes to Acinetobacter infection, and that the opioid may have an additive or synergistic effect with trauma. To test these hypotheses, an intraperitoneal infection model was established in mice using several Acinetobacter strains. Morphine administered for 48 h by implantation of a slow-release morphine pellet increased mortality compared to animals receiving a placebo pellet, an effect that was blocked by the mu-opioid receptor antagonist, naltrexone. Acinetobacter burdens in the blood, spleens, livers, and lungs of morphine-treated mice, were significantly higher than those in placebo-treated animals, confirming that mortality was due to potentiated growth of the bacteria. There were also elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in morphine-treated versus placebo-treated mice. Morphine caused a reduction in the total number of cells in the peritoneal cavity, a decrease in the percentage and total numbers of neutrophils, and a decrease in the total number of macrophages. Morphine treatment also suppressed levels of the neutrophil-inducing molecules, IL-17A and KC/CXCL1. However, IL-17A(-/-) mice given morphine were not sensitized to Acintobacter infection to a greater degree than similarly treated wild-type mice. Trauma alone did not sensitize to Acinetobacter infection, and there was no additive effect between morphine and trauma. These results support the hypothesis that morphine potentiates Acinetobacter infection.

  17. Community-Acquired Bacteremic Acinetobacter Pneumonia in Tropical Australia Is Caused by Diverse Strains of Acinetobacter baumannii, with Carriage in the Throat in At-Risk Groups

    PubMed Central

    Anstey, Nicholas M.; Currie, Bart J.; Hassell, Marilyn; Palmer, Didier; Dwyer, Brian; Seifert, Harald

    2002-01-01

    Acinetobacter isolates from eight subjects with community-acquired Acinetobacter pneumonia (CAAP), a major cause of fatal community-acquired pneumonia in tropical Australia, were phenotypically and genotypically confirmed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis to be broadly diverse Acinetobacter baumannii strains. Wet-season throat carriage of A. baumannii was found in 10% of community residents with excess levels of alcohol consumption, the major at-risk group for CAAP. PMID:11825997

  18. Genome organization of epidemic Acinetobacter baumannii strains

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic pathogen responsible for hospital-acquired infections. A. baumannii epidemics described world-wide were caused by few genotypic clusters of strains. The occurrence of epidemics caused by multi-drug resistant strains assigned to novel genotypes have been reported over the last few years. Results In the present study, we compared whole genome sequences of three A. baumannii strains assigned to genotypes ST2, ST25 and ST78, representative of the most frequent genotypes responsible for epidemics in several Mediterranean hospitals, and four complete genome sequences of A. baumannii strains assigned to genotypes ST1, ST2 and ST77. Comparative genome analysis showed extensive synteny and identified 3068 coding regions which are conserved, at the same chromosomal position, in all A. baumannii genomes. Genome alignments also identified 63 DNA regions, ranging in size from 4 o 126 kb, all defined as genomic islands, which were present in some genomes, but were either missing or replaced by non-homologous DNA sequences in others. Some islands are involved in resistance to drugs and metals, others carry genes encoding surface proteins or enzymes involved in specific metabolic pathways, and others correspond to prophage-like elements. Accessory DNA regions encode 12 to 19% of the potential gene products of the analyzed strains. The analysis of a collection of epidemic A. baumannii strains showed that some islands were restricted to specific genotypes. Conclusion The definition of the genome components of A. baumannii provides a scaffold to rapidly evaluate the genomic organization of novel clinical A. baumannii isolates. Changes in island profiling will be useful in genomic epidemiology of A. baumannii population. PMID:21985032

  19. 21 CFR 866.3010 - Acinetobacter calcoaceticus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acinetobacter calcoaceticus serological reagents. 866.3010 Section 866.3010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3010 - Acinetobacter calcoaceticus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acinetobacter calcoaceticus serological reagents. 866.3010 Section 866.3010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  1. 21 CFR 866.3010 - Acinetobacter calcoaceticus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Acinetobacter calcoaceticus serological reagents. 866.3010 Section 866.3010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  2. 21 CFR 866.3010 - Acinetobacter calcoaceticus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acinetobacter calcoaceticus serological reagents. 866.3010 Section 866.3010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  3. 21 CFR 866.3010 - Acinetobacter calcoaceticus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acinetobacter calcoaceticus serological reagents. 866.3010 Section 866.3010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  4. Acinetobacter infection--an emerging threat to human health.

    PubMed

    Visca, Paolo; Seifert, Harald; Towner, Kevin J

    2011-12-01

    The genus Acinetobacter comprises a complex and heterogeneous group of bacteria, many of which are capable of causing a range of opportunistic, often catheter-related, infections in humans. However, Acinetobacter baumannii, as well as its close relatives belonging to genomic species 3 ("Acinetobacter pittii") and 13TU ("Acinetobacter nosocomialis"), are important nosocomial pathogens, often associated with epidemic outbreaks of infection, that are only rarely found outside of a clinical setting. These organisms are frequently pandrug-resistant and are capable of causing substantial morbidity and mortality in patients with severe underlying disease, both in the hospital and in the community. Several epidemic clonal lineages of A. baumannii have disseminated worldwide and seem to have a selective advantage over non-epidemic strains. The reasons for the success of these epidemic lineages remain to be elucidated, but could be related to the potential of these organisms to achieve very dynamic reorganization and rapid evolution of their genome, including the acquisition and expression of additional antibiotic resistance determinants, under fluctuating environmental and selective conditions.

  5. Characterization of Acinetobacter baumannii biofilm associated components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brossard, Kari A.

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative aerobic coccobaccillus that is a major cause of nosocomial infections worldwide. Infected individuals may develop pneumonia, urinary tract, wound, and other infections that are associated with the use of indwelling medical devices such as catheters and mechanical ventilation. Treatment is difficult because many A. baumannii isolates have developed multi-drug resistance and the bacterium can persist on abiotic surfaces. Persistence and resistance may be due to formation of biofilms, which leads to long-term colonization, evasion of the host immune system and resistance to treatment with antibiotics and disinfectants. While biofilms are complex multifaceted structures, two bacterial components that have been shown to be important in formation and stability are exopolysaccharides (EPS) and the biofilm-associated protein (Bap). An EPS, poly-beta-1,6-N-acetylglucosamine, PNAG, has been described for E. coli and S. epidermidis. PNAG acts as an intercellular adhesin. Production of this adhesin is dependent on the pga/icaABCD locus. We have identified a homologous locus in A. baumannii 307-0294 that is involved in production of an exopolysaccharide, recognized by an anti-PNAG antibody. We hypothesized that the A. baumannii pgaABCD locus plays a role in biofilm formation, and protection against host innate defenses and disinfectants suggesting that PNAG is a possible virulence factor for the organism. The first aim of this thesis will define the pgaABCD locus. We have previously identified Bap, a protein with similarity to those described for S. aureus and we have demonstrated that this protein is involved in maintaining the stability of biofilms on glass. We hypothesized that A. baumannii Bap plays a role in persistence and pathogenesis and is regulated by quorum sensing. In our second aim we will examine the role of Bap in attachment and biofilm formation on medically relevant surfaces and also determine if Bap is involved in

  6. Evaluation of CHROMagar Acinetobacter for Detection of Enteric Carriage of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in Samples from Critically Ill Patients▿

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, N. C.; Wareham, D. W.

    2009-01-01

    CHROMagar Acinetobacter was used to screen stool and perineal swabs for enteric carriage of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in samples from critically ill patients. Results were compared with a molecular assay resulting in sensitivity and specificity of culture compared to PCR of 91.7% and 89.6%, respectively. PMID:19439546

  7. The activity of silver nanoparticles (Axonnite) on clinical and environmental strains of Acinetobacter spp.

    PubMed

    Łysakowska, Monika E; Ciebiada-Adamiec, Anna; Klimek, Leszek; Sienkiewicz, Monika

    2015-03-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii isolates are responsible for a high number of wound infections. The reason of this study was to evaluate the activity of silver nanoparticles obtained by microexplosion against wide range of Acinetobacter spp. Susceptibility to silver nanoparticles was tested by microdilution method, susceptibility to antibiotics was evaluated by the disc-diffusion method. All strains of Acinetobacter spp. were sensitive to AgNPs at low concentrations. The values of the MIC for strains of Acinetobacter spp. were 0.39 and 0.78μg/mL. In general, strains inhibited by 0.78μg/mL of AgNPs were more resistant to antibiotics than Acinetobacter strains for which MIC=0.39μg/mL (p=0.023). The AgNPs in Axonnite seems to be a good alternative for other antimicrobials to treat wound infections caused by multidrug resistant Acinetobacter spp. strains because of its high activity.

  8. Clinical outcomes of hospital-acquired infection with Acinetobacter nosocomialis and Acinetobacter pittii.

    PubMed

    Chusri, Sarunyou; Chongsuvivatwong, Virasakdi; Rivera, Jesabel I; Silpapojakul, Kachornsakdi; Singkhamanan, Kamonnut; McNeil, Edward; Doi, Yohei

    2014-07-01

    The role of Acinetobacter nosocomialis and Acinetobacter pittii, which belong to the A. calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex, in hospital-acquired infections is increasingly recognized. Here we describe a retrospective cohort study of hospital-acquired A. calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex infections at a university hospital in Thailand. A total of 222 unique cases were identified between January 2010 and December 2011. The genomospecies of the A. calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex isolates were classified as follows: A. baumannii, 197 (89%); A. nosocomialis, 18 (8%); and A. pittii, 7 (3%). All A. nosocomialis and A. pittii isolates were susceptible to imipenem and meropenem. The patients infected with A. nosocomialis and A. pittii had lower 30-day mortality than those infected with carbapenem-susceptible A. baumannii (P = 0.025) and carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii (P = 0.013). The factors influencing 30-day mortality were infection with non-baumannii A. calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex (hazard ratio [HR], 0.12; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.03 to 0.51; P = 0.004), infection with carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii (HR, 1.57; 95% CI, 0.89 to 2.79; P = 0.105), appropriate empirical antimicrobial therapy (HR, 0.38; 95% CI, 0.23 to 0.61; P < 0.001), and higher acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II) score (HR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.10 to 1.19; P < 0.001). In Galleria mellonella assays, the survival rates were significantly higher for the larvae infected with A. nosocomialis or A. pittii than for those infected with either carbapenem-susceptible A. baumannii or carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii, but no differences in survival rates were observed between carbapenem-susceptible A. baumannii and carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii. These findings suggest intrinsic differences in virulence between non-baumannii A. calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex species and A. baumannii but not between carbapenem-susceptible and resistant A. baumannii.

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of JVAP01T, the Type Strain of the Novel Species Acinetobacter dijkshoorniae

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Orth, Dietmar; Cosgaya, Clara; Telli, Murat; Mosqueda, Noraida; Marí-Almirall, Marta

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the type strain of Acinetobacter dijkshoorniae, a novel human pathogen within the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus–Acinetobacter baumannii (ACB) complex. Strain JVAP01T has an estimated genome size of 3.9 Mb, exhibits a 38.8% G+C content, and carries a plasmid with the blaNDM-1 carbapenemase gene. PMID:28082506

  10. Plasmid carriage of bla NDM-1 in clinical Acinetobacter baumannii isolates from India.

    PubMed

    Jones, Lim S; Toleman, Mark A; Weeks, Janis L; Howe, Robin A; Walsh, Timothy R; Kumarasamy, Karthikeyan K

    2014-07-01

    NDM-1 probably emerged in Acinetobacter species prior to its dissemination among Enterobacteriaceae, and NDM-1-like enzymes are increasingly reported in Acinetobacter species. Here, we report on the genetic context of blaNDM-1 in the earliest known NDM-1-producing organisms, clinical isolates of Acinetobacter from India in 2005. These strains harbor blaNDM-1 plasmids of different sizes. The gene is associated with the remnants of the Tn125 transposon normally associated with blaNDM-1 in Acinetobacter spp. The transposon has been disrupted by the IS26 insertion and subsequent movement events.

  11. [Ecological aspects and prophylaxis of Acinetobacter baumannii nosocomial infection].

    PubMed

    Boukadida, J

    2000-01-01

    Acinetobacter Baumannii is an aerobic strit gram negative bacteria cause of epidemic infection in intensive care units this bacteria is isolated from the patient and its environment. The detection of AB infection require the isolation of patients and decontamination of the material despite the virulence of the germ, these measures are necessary due to the rapid extension of epidemic in the absence of adequate means.

  12. First report of OXA-72 producing Acinetobacter baumannii in Romania.

    PubMed

    Georgescu, M; Gheorghe, I; Dudu, A; Czobor, I; Costache, M; Cristea, V-C; Lazăr, V; Chifiriuc, M C

    2016-09-01

    This is the first report of an OXA-72-producing Acinetobacter baumannii strain in Romania, isolated from chronic leg ulcer samples. Identification of the strain was performed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Presence of carbapenem resistance genes was investigated by PCR and sequencing. Our data support the spread of the bla OXA-72 gene in Eastern Europe.

  13. Membrane proteomes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Dé, E; Cosette, P; Coquet, L; Siroy, A; Alexandre, S; Duncan, A; Naudin, B; Rihouey, C; Schaumann, A; Junter, G A; Jouenne, T

    2011-12-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are known for their intrinsic resistance to antibiotics. Between mechanisms involved in this resistance, diminished expression of outer membrane proteins and up-regulation of efflux pumps play an important role. The characterization of membrane proteins is consequently necessary because of their importance in the antibiotic resistance but also in virulence. This review presents proteomic investigations aiming to describe the protein content of the membranes of these two bacterial species.

  14. Thai ethnomedicinal plants as resistant modifying agents for combating Acinetobacter baumannii infections

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstracts Background Acinetobacter baumannii is well-recognized as an important nosocomial pathogen, however, due to their intrinsic resistance to several antibiotics, treatment options are limited. Synergistic effects between antibiotics and medicinal plants, particularly their active components, have intensively been studied as alternative approaches. Methods Fifty-one ethanol extracts obtained from 44 different selected medicinal plant species were tested for resistance modifying agents (RMAs) of novobiocin against A. baumannii using growth inhibition assay. Results At 250 μg/ml, Holarrhena antidysenterica, Punica granatum, Quisqualis indica, Terminalia bellirica, Terminalia chebula, and Terminalia sp. that possessed low intrinsic antibacterial activity significantly enhanced the activity of novobiocin at 1 μg/ml (1/8xminimum inhibitory concentration) against this pathogen. Holarrhena antidysenterica at 7.8 μg/ml demonstrated remarkable resistant modifying ability against A. baumannii in combination with novobiocin. The phytochemical study revealed that constituents of this medicinal plant contain alkaloids, condensed tannins, and triterpenoids. Conclusion The use of Holarrhena antidysenterica in combination with novobiocin provides an effective alternative treatment for multidrug resistant A. baumannii infections. PMID:22536985

  15. Acinetobacter lactucae sp. nov., isolated from iceberg lettuce (Asteraceae: Lactuca sativa)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Strain NRRL B-41902 and three closely related strains were isolated from iceberg lettuce. The strain was found to consist of strictly aerobic, gram-negative rods that formed cocci in late stationary phase. Subsequent to sequencing the 16S ribosomal RNA gene, it was found that strain NRRL B-41902 was...

  16. Improvement of MALDI-TOF MS profiling for the differentiation of species within the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex.

    PubMed

    Šedo, Ondrej; Nemec, Alexandr; Křížová, Lenka; Kačalová, Magdaléna; Zdráhal, Zbyněk

    2013-12-01

    MALDI-TOF MS is currently becoming the method of choice for rapid identification of bacterial species in routine diagnostics. Yet, this method suffers from the inability to differentiate reliably between some closely related bacterial species including those of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii (ACB) complex, namely A. baumannii and Acinetobacter nosocomialis. In the present study, we evaluated a protocol which was different from that used in the Bruker Daltonics identification system (MALDI BioTyper) to improve species identification using a taxonomically precisely defined set of 105 strains representing the four validly named species of the ACB complex. The novel protocol is based on the change in matrix composition from alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (saturated solution in water:acetonitrile:trifluoroacetic acid, 47.5:50:2.5, v/v) to ferulic acid (12.5mgml(-1) solution in water:acetonitrile:formic acid 50:33:17, v/v), while the other steps of sample processing remain unchanged. Compared to the standard protocol, the novel one extended the range of detected compounds towards higher molecular weight, produced signals with better mass resolution, and allowed the detection of species-specific signals. As a result, differentiation of A. nosocomialis and A. baumannii strains by cluster analysis was improved and 13 A. nosocomialis strains, assigned erroneously or ambiguously by using the standard protocol, were correctly identified.

  17. Species identification within Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii complex using MALDI-TOF MS.

    PubMed

    Toh, Benjamin E W; Paterson, David L; Kamolvit, Witchuda; Zowawi, Hosam; Kvaskoff, David; Sidjabat, Hanna; Wailan, Alexander; Peleg, Anton Y; Huber, Charlotte A

    2015-11-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii, one of the more clinically relevant species in the Acinetobacter genus is well known to be multi-drug resistant and associated with bacteremia, urinary tract infection, pneumonia, wound infection and meningitis. However, it cannot be differentiated from closely related species such as Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Acinetobacter pittii and Acinetobacter nosocomialis by most phenotypic tests and can only be differentiated by specific, time consuming genotypic tests with very limited use in clinical microbiological laboratories. As a result, these species are grouped into the A. calcoaceticus-A. baumannii (Acb) complex. Herein we investigated the mass spectra of 73 Acinetobacter spp., representing ten different species, using an AB SCIEX 5800 MALDI-TOF MS to differentiate members of the Acinetobacter genus, including the species of the Acb complex. RpoB gene sequencing, 16S rRNA sequencing, and gyrB multiplex PCR were also evaluated as orthogonal methods to identify the organisms used in this study. We found that whilst 16S rRNA and rpoB gene sequencing could not differentiate A. pittii or A. calcoaceticus, they can be differentiated using gyrB multiplex PCR and MALDI-TOF MS. All ten Acinetobacter species investigated could be differentiated by their MALDI-TOF mass spectra.

  18. Genome Sequence of an Acinetobacter baumannii Strain Carrying Three Acquired Carbapenemase Genes

    PubMed Central

    Oinuma, Ken-Ichi; Suzuki, Masato; Sato, Kanako; Nakaie, Kiyotaka; Niki, Makoto; Takizawa, Etsuko; Niki, Mamiko; Shibayama, Keigo; Yamada, Koichi; Kakeya, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of multiple-carbapenemase-producing Acinetobacter strains has been a serious concern during the past decade. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of an Acinetobacter baumannii strain isolated from a Japanese patient with three acquired carbapenemase genes: blaNDM-1, blaTMB-1, and blaOXA-58. PMID:27856588

  19. Draft genome sequence of Acinetobacter pittii ST643 shared by cystic fibrosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Géssica A; Ferreira, Alex G; Lima, Danielle F; Leão, Robson S; Carvalho-Assef, Ana Paula D; Folescu, Tânia W; Albano, Rodolpho M; Marques, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter pittii has emerged as an important hospital pathogen that is associated with outbreaks and drug resistance. In cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, the detection of Acinetobacter spp. is rare; however, we isolated the A. pittii sequence type ST643 in several Brazilian CF patients treated in the same centre. The current study describes the draft genome of A. pittii ST643. PMID:27653362

  20. Pathogenic Acinetobacter Species have a Functional Type I Secretion System and Contact-Dependent Inhibition Systems.

    PubMed

    Harding, Christian M; Pulido, Marina R; Di Venanzio, Gisela; Kinsella, Rachel L; Webb, Andrew I; Scott, Nichollas E; Pachón, Jerónimo; Feldman, Mario F

    2017-04-03

    Pathogenic Acinetobacter species, including A. baumannii and A. nosocomialis, are opportunistic human pathogens of increasing relevance worldwide. Although their mechanisms of drug resistance are well studied, the virulence factors that govern Acinetobacter pathogenesis are incompletely characterized. Here we define the complete secretome of A. nosocomialis strain M2 in minimal media and demonstrate that pathogenic Acinetobacter species produce both a functional type I secretion system (T1SS) and a contact dependent inhibition (CDI) system. Using bioinformatics, quantitative proteomics, and mutational analyses we show that Acinetobacter uses its T1SS for exporting two putative T1SS effectors, an RTX-Serralysin-like toxin and the biofilm associated protein (Bap). Moreover, we found that mutation of any component of the T1SS system abrogated type VI secretion activity under nutrient-limited conditions, indicating a previously unrecognized crosstalk between these two systems. We also demonstrate that the Acinetobacter T1SS is required for biofilm formation. Lastly, we show that both A. nosocomialis and A. baumannii produce functioning CDI systems that mediate growth inhibition of sister cells lacking the cognate immunity protein. The Acinetobacter CDI systems are widely distributed across pathogenic Acinetobacter species, with many A. baumannii isolates harboring two distinct CDI systems. Collectively, these data demonstrate the power of differential, quantitative proteomics approaches to study secreted proteins, define the role of previously uncharacterized protein export systems, and observe crosstalk between secretion systems in the pathobiology of medically relevant Acinetobacter The data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD005881.

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of an Acinetobacter Strain Harboring the NDM-1 Gene.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yang; Song, Yang; Song, Hongbin; Liu, Jun; Wang, Pengzhi; Qiu, Shaofu; Chen, Shuo; Zhu, Lingwei; Ji, Xue; Wang, Zhongqiang; Liu, Nan; Xia, Liliang; Chen, Weijun; Feng, Shuzhang

    2013-04-18

    The NDM-1 gene is a significant public health concern. Acinetobacter is one of the most prevalent opportunistic pathogens causing recent nosocomial infections with NDM-1, and drug-resistant strains pose serious threats to public health worldwide. Herein, we present the genomic sequence of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus subsp. anitratus XM1570, a multidrug-resistant isolate that carries the blaNDM-1 gene.

  2. [Frequency and antimicrobial resistance of Acinetobacter species in a university hospital of Buenos Aires City].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Carlos Hernán; Nastro, Marcela; Dabos, Laura; Vay, Carlos; Famiglietti, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Two-hundred Acinetobacter isolates belonging to 200 patients admitted to Hospital de Clínicas José de San Martín during the period March 2013-June 2014 were analyzed. The identification was performed by mass spectrometry and was confirmed by molecular methods. Susceptibility to antimicrobials was studied by the Vitek-2 system. A 94% correlation of both identification methods was found. Multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii was the predominant genomic species (92.6%) in hospital-acquired infections, whereas Acinetobacter pitti and Acinetobacter nosocomialis accounted for 3.5% and 0.5% of the isolates recovered, respectively. In community-acquired infections a major predominance of the different genomic species was observed. Acinetobacter johnsonii and A. baumannii are the most frequent species, accounting for 45.9% of the isolates recovered. Resistance to carbapenems and minocycline was only observed in A. baumannii. Mass spectrophotometry was an effective tool for the identification of the different genomic species.

  3. Acinetobacter baumannii and A. pittii clinical isolates lack adherence and cytotoxicity to lung epithelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lázaro-Díez, María; Navascués-Lejarza, Teresa; Remuzgo-Martínez, Sara; Navas, Jesús; Icardo, José Manuel; Acosta, Felix; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Ramos-Vivas, José

    2016-09-01

    The molecular and genetic basis of Acinetobacter baumannii and Acinetobacter pittii virulence remains poorly understood, and there is still lack of knowledge in host cell response to these bacteria. In this study, we have used eleven clinical Acinetobacter strains (A. baumannii n = 5; A. pittii n = 6) to unravel bacterial adherence, invasion and cytotoxicity to human lung epithelial cells. Our results showed that adherence to epithelial cells by Acinetobacter strains is scarce and cellular invasion was not truly detected. In addition, all Acinetobacter strains failed to induce any cytotoxic effect on A549 cells.

  4. Proliferation of spacecraft-associated Acinetobacter on alcohol solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogul, Rakesh; Cepeda, Ivonne; Brasali, Hania; Gornick, Trevor; Jain, Chirag; Kim, Eun Jin; Nguyen, Vinh Bao; Oei, Alex; Rodriguez, Joseph; Walker, Jillian; Savla, Gautam

    The Acinetobacter are the most abundant Gram-negative and non-spore forming bacteria found in the cleanroom facilities for Mars spacecraft. The spacecraft-associated Acinetobacter are extremotolerant towards hydrogen peroxide and have been shown to increase in abundance as a result of the spacecraft assembly process. To better understand the oligotrophic growth in the cleanroom environments, we have measured the growth of several Acinetobacter strains against ethanol and isopropanol, which are cleaning solvents used in the spacecraft assembly process. Our studies show that A. radioresistens 50v1, which was isolated from Mars Odyssey orbiter, optimally proliferates on 300 mM ethanol under minimal conditions at a growth rate that is 2-fold higher than that of the A. radioresistens type strain (strain 43998 (T) ). The impact of transition metals on the growth rates followed the trend of Fe (2+) > Mn (2+) > Zn (2+) , where Zn (2+) was inhibitory. In contrast, no growth on ethanol was observed for the novel species A. phoenicis 2P01AA, which was isolated from the facilities for the Mars Phoenix lander. Alcohol dehydrogenase activities measured in rich and minimal media paralleled these observations with the 50v1 strain possessing higher specific activities than the type strain, and the 2P01AA strain displaying no measurable activity in rich media. Preliminary studies indicate that isopropanol is insufficient as an energy source when in culture. The significance of these results as well as the observed differences between the Odyssey and Phoenix-associated strains will be discussed.

  5. Reliability of phenotypic tests for identification of Acinetobacter species.

    PubMed Central

    Gerner-Smidt, P; Tjernberg, I; Ursing, J

    1991-01-01

    A numerical approach was used for identification of 198 Acinetobacter strains assigned to DNA groups according to the classification of Tjernberg and Ursing (I. Tjernberg and J. Ursing, APMIS 97:595-605, 1989). The matrix used was constructed from data published by Bouvet and Grimont (P.J.M. Bouvet and P.A.D. Grimont, Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 36:228-240, 1986) and Bouvet and Jeanjean (P.J.M. Bouvet and S. Jeanjean, Res. Microbiol. 140:291-299, 1989). The tests chosen were those of the simplified identification scheme for Acinetobacter species devised by Bouvet and Grimont (P.J.M. Bouvet and P.A.D. Grimont, Ann. Inst. Pasteur/Microbiol. 138:569-578, 1987), namely, growth at 37, 41, and 44 degrees C, oxidation of glucose, gelatin hydrolysis, and assimilation of 14 carbon sources. Of the strains tested, 181 represented 12 DNA groups in the matrix; at a probability level of greater than or equal to 0.95, 78% of them were correctly identified, 2.2% were misidentified, and 19.8% were not identified. Seventeen strains represented two DNA groups not included in the matrix; nine of them were incorrectly assigned to a DNA group by these phenotypic tests. Because of problems of separating strains belonging to DNA groups 1, 2, 3, and 13 by using the phenotypic tests proposed by Bouvet and Grimont (Ann. Inst. Pasteur/Microbiol.), we suggest that these groups should be referred to as the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex. PMID:2007635

  6. Identification of Lama glama as Reservoirs for Acinetobacter lwoffii

    PubMed Central

    Ledesma, Martín M.; Díaz, Ailén M.; Barberis, Claudia; Vay, Carlos; Manghi, Marcela A.; Leoni, Juliana; Castro, Marisa S.; Ferrari, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    South American Camelids have an increasing relevance in local economies, worldwide. These animals are bred for their meat, fur and as companion and therapy animals. Thus, their sanitary status should be well-established. According to the OIE (World Organization for Animal Health), respiratory infections mainly produced by Pasteurella spp. have been reported for camelids. It has been stated that this microorganism causes a mild disease, although many authors report it is an important cause of mortality among alpacas. Nevertheless, the incidence of infection by Pasteurella spp. in camelids still needs to be investigated. The aim of the present study was to analyze the occurrence of nasopharyngeal colonization of Lama glama by respiratory bacteria, and to assess the usefulness of serological tests for clinical diagnosis. The colonization was studied by culture techniques carried out with material taken by nasopharyngeal swabs. Bacterial isolates were first phenotypically characterized and then identified by MALDI/TOF-MS. The presence of specific serum antibodies was studied by ELISA and Western blot. In the present work Pasteurella spp. was not found. Nevertheless, we report for the first time, the colonization of L. glama by bacteria of the Acinetobacter lwoffii, at a reliable level in 19.4% of the animals. Acinetobacter species are found in different environmental sources, as well as vegetables, animals, and humans, and their role in infections has recently gained relevance. The results presented herein contribute to a better understanding of the respiratory microbiota in camelids, and increase the knowledge about environmental distribution of Acinetobacter non-baumanii species. Given that these respiratory bacteria might be the cause of infection among cattle, and even humans, this report highlights the need for further research. PMID:28303121

  7. Identification of Lama glama as Reservoirs for Acinetobacter lwoffii.

    PubMed

    Ledesma, Martín M; Díaz, Ailén M; Barberis, Claudia; Vay, Carlos; Manghi, Marcela A; Leoni, Juliana; Castro, Marisa S; Ferrari, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    South American Camelids have an increasing relevance in local economies, worldwide. These animals are bred for their meat, fur and as companion and therapy animals. Thus, their sanitary status should be well-established. According to the OIE (World Organization for Animal Health), respiratory infections mainly produced by Pasteurella spp. have been reported for camelids. It has been stated that this microorganism causes a mild disease, although many authors report it is an important cause of mortality among alpacas. Nevertheless, the incidence of infection by Pasteurella spp. in camelids still needs to be investigated. The aim of the present study was to analyze the occurrence of nasopharyngeal colonization of Lama glama by respiratory bacteria, and to assess the usefulness of serological tests for clinical diagnosis. The colonization was studied by culture techniques carried out with material taken by nasopharyngeal swabs. Bacterial isolates were first phenotypically characterized and then identified by MALDI/TOF-MS. The presence of specific serum antibodies was studied by ELISA and Western blot. In the present work Pasteurella spp. was not found. Nevertheless, we report for the first time, the colonization of L. glama by bacteria of the Acinetobacter lwoffii, at a reliable level in 19.4% of the animals. Acinetobacter species are found in different environmental sources, as well as vegetables, animals, and humans, and their role in infections has recently gained relevance. The results presented herein contribute to a better understanding of the respiratory microbiota in camelids, and increase the knowledge about environmental distribution of Acinetobacter non-baumanii species. Given that these respiratory bacteria might be the cause of infection among cattle, and even humans, this report highlights the need for further research.

  8. Chemicals and heat generate different protein patterns in Acinetobacter calcoaceticus.

    PubMed

    Benndorf, D; Loffhagen, N; Babel, W

    1997-01-01

    The effect of exposing Acinetobacter calcoaceticus 69-V to DNP-stress and heat shock was examined by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of proteins, which were detected either by autoradiography or by silver staining. Both DNP stress and heat shock led to altered patterns of protein synthesis or concentration. About 10% of the proteins which were synthesized newly or at an increased rate and about 25% of those which were found newly or with an increased concentration after DNP treatment were identified after heat shock, too.

  9. Copper Resistance of the Emerging Pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Caitlin L.; Neu, Heather M.; Gilbreath, Jeremy J.; Michel, Sarah L. J.; Zurawski, Daniel V.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acinetobacter baumannii is an important emerging pathogen that is capable of causing many types of severe infection, especially in immunocompromised hosts. Since A. baumannii can rapidly acquire antibiotic resistance genes, many infections are on the verge of being untreatable, and novel therapies are desperately needed. To investigate the potential utility of copper-based antibacterial strategies against Acinetobacter infections, we characterized copper resistance in a panel of recent clinical A. baumannii isolates. Exposure to increasing concentrations of copper in liquid culture and on solid surfaces resulted in dose-dependent and strain-dependent effects; levels of copper resistance varied broadly across isolates, possibly resulting from identified genotypic variation among strains. Examination of the growth-phase-dependent effect of copper on A. baumannii revealed that resistance to copper increased dramatically in stationary phase. Moreover, A. baumannii biofilms were more resistant to copper than planktonic cells but were still susceptible to copper toxicity. Exposure of bacteria to subinhibitory concentrations of copper allowed them to better adapt to and grow in high concentrations of copper; this copper tolerance response is likely achieved via increased expression of copper resistance mechanisms. Indeed, genomic analysis revealed numerous putative copper resistance proteins that share amino acid homology to known proteins in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Transcriptional analysis revealed significant upregulation of these putative copper resistance genes following brief copper exposure. Future characterization of copper resistance mechanisms may aid in the search for novel antibiotics against Acinetobacter and other highly antibiotic-resistant pathogens. IMPORTANCE Acinetobacter baumannii causes many types of severe nosocomial infections; unfortunately, some isolates have acquired resistance to almost every available antibiotic

  10. Structural Basis for Toughness and Flexibility in the C-terminal Passenger Domain of an Acinetobacter Trimeric Autotransporter Adhesin*

    PubMed Central

    Koiwai, Kotaro; Hartmann, Marcus D.; Linke, Dirk; Lupas, Andrei N.; Hori, Katsutoshi

    2016-01-01

    Trimeric autotransporter adhesins (TAAs) on the cell surface of Gram-negative pathogens mediate bacterial adhesion to host cells and extracellular matrix proteins. However, AtaA, a TAA in the nonpathogenic Acinetobacter sp. strain Tol 5, shows nonspecific high adhesiveness to abiotic material surfaces as well as to biotic surfaces. It consists of a passenger domain secreted by the C-terminal transmembrane anchor domain (TM), and the passenger domain contains an N-terminal head, N-terminal stalk, C-terminal head (Chead), and C-terminal stalk (Cstalk). The Chead-Cstalk-TM fragment, which is conserved in many Acinetobacter TAAs, has by itself the head-stalk-anchor architecture of a complete TAA. Here, we show the crystal structure of the Chead-Cstalk fragment, AtaA_C-terminal passenger domain (CPSD), providing the first view of several conserved TAA domains. The YadA-like head (Ylhead) of the fragment is capped by a unique structure (headCap), composed of three β-hairpins and a connector motif; it also contains a head insert motif (HIM1) before its last inner β-strand. The headCap, Ylhead, and HIM1 integrally form a stable Chead structure. Some of the major domains of the CPSD fragment are inherently flexible and provide bending sites for the fiber between segments whose toughness is ensured by topological chain exchange and hydrophobic core formation inside the trimer. Thus, although adherence assays using in-frame deletion mutants revealed that the characteristic adhesive sites of AtaA reside in its N-terminal part, the flexibility and toughness of the CPSD part provide the resilience that enables the adhesive properties of the full-length fiber across a wide range of conditions. PMID:26698633

  11. Blood stream infections caused by Acinetobacter baumannii group in Japan - Epidemiological and clinical investigation.

    PubMed

    Fujikura, Yuji; Yuki, Atsushi; Hamamoto, Takaaki; Kawana, Akihiko; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Matsumoto, Tetsuya

    2016-06-01

    Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex, especially A. baumannii, Acinetobacter pittii and Acinetobacter nosocomialis, constitutes an important group of nosocomial pathogens; however, epidemiological or clinical characteristics and prognosis is limited in Japan. From 2009 to 2013, 47 blood stream infection cases resulting from A. baumannii group were reviewed at the National Defense Medical College, an 800-bed tertiary hospital. To determine the genospecies, further comparative nucleotide sequence analyses of the RNA polymerase b-subunit (rpoB) gene were performed. Sequence analysis of rpoB gene showed that 25 (49.0%), 17 (33.3%) and 5 (9.8%) cases were caused by A. baumannii, A. pittii and A. nosocomialis, respectively. The 30-day and in-hospital mortality rates of A. baumannii were 8.5% and 25.5%, respectively, and there were no significant differences between Acinetobacter species. Clinical characteristics were statistically insignificant. Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter species were detected in 3 cases (5.9%) with same pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) pattern and A. baumannii was less susceptible to amikacin and levofloxacin. In this study, the mortality and clinical characteristics were similar among A. baumannii group isolate cases despite some showing drug resistance. However, identification of Acinetobacter species helps to initiate appropriate antibiotic therapy in earlier treatment phase, because A. baumannii shows some drug resistance.

  12. Distribution of Acinetobacter species on human skin: comparison of phenotypic and genotypic identification methods.

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, H; Dijkshoorn, L; Gerner-Smidt, P; Pelzer, N; Tjernberg, I; Vaneechoutte, M

    1997-01-01

    At least 19 genomic species are recognized as constituting the genus Acinetobacter. However, little is known about the natural reservoirs of the various members of the genus. An epidemiological study was therefore performed to investigate the colonization with Acinetobacter spp. of the skin and mucous membranes of 40 patients hospitalized in a cardiology ward and 40 healthy controls. Single samples were obtained once from each of nine different body sites, i.e., forehead, ear, nose, throat, axilla, hand, groin, perineum, and toe web. Identification of Acinetobacter isolates was achieved by using phenotypic properties and was compared to identification by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis. Selected isolates were further investigated with sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, ribotyping, and DNA-DNA hybridization. Plasmid profile analysis was used for epidemiological typing. Thirty patients (75%) and 17 controls (42.5%) were found to be colonized with Acinetobacter spp., and the colonization rates of patients increased during their hospital stay. The most frequently isolated species were Acinetobacter lwoffii (47%), A. johnsonii (21%), A. radioresistens (12%), and DNA group 3 (11%). In contrast, A. baumannii and DNA group 13TU, the most important nosocomial Acinetobacter spp., were found only rarely on human skin (0.5 and 1%, respectively) and their natural habitat remains to be defined. A good correlation between phenotypic and genotypic methods for identification of Acinetobacter spp. was observed, and only two isolates could not be assigned to any of the known DNA groups. PMID:9350741

  13. Antimicrobial active herbal compounds against Acinetobacter baumannii and other pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Vishvanath; Roy, Ranita; Tiwari, Monalisa

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens cause a number of lethal diseases. Opportunistic bacterial pathogens grouped into ESKAPE pathogens that are linked to the high degree of morbidity, mortality and increased costs as described by Infectious Disease Society of America. Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the ESKAPE pathogens which cause respiratory infection, pneumonia and urinary tract infections. The prevalence of this pathogen increases gradually in the clinical setup where it can grow on artificial surfaces, utilize ethanol as a carbon source and resists desiccation. Carbapenems, a β-lactam, are the most commonly prescribed drugs against A. baumannii. The high level of acquired and intrinsic carbapenem resistance mechanisms acquired by these bacteria makes their eradication difficult. The pharmaceutical industry has no solution to this problem. Hence, it is an urgent requirement to find a suitable alternative to carbapenem, a commonly prescribed drug for Acinetobacter infection. In order to do this, here we have made an effort to review the active compounds of plants that have potent antibacterial activity against many bacteria including carbapenem resistant strain of A. baumannii. We have also briefly highlighted the separation and identification methods used for these active compounds. This review will help researchers involved in the screening of herbal active compounds that might act as a replacement for carbapenem. PMID:26150810

  14. Novel Oxadiazole Thioglycosides as Potential Anti-Acinetobacter Agents

    PubMed Central

    Akbari Dilmaghani, Karim; Nasuhi Pur, Fazel; Mahammad pour, Majid; Mahammad nejad, Jafar

    2016-01-01

    The glycosylation of 1,3,4-oxadiazole-2-thiones has been performed with peracetylated β-pyranosyl bromide in the presence of potassium carbonate. Deprotection of acetylated thioglycosides was necessary for increasing their antibacterial effects. The structures of nucleosides were confirmed by 1H NMR, 13C NMR and HRMS. The anomeric protons of nucleosides c1–4 were assigned to the doublet, confirming the β-configuration. The synthesized compounds were tested for their antimicrobial activity against Acinetobacter calcoaceticus (Gram-negetive) strain in-vitro in comparison with Ampicillin as a reference drug which is normally used for treating such infections. The synthetic compounds showed different inhibition zones against tested bacterial strain. Thioglycoside derivatives of 1,3,4-oxadiazole-2-thiones (c set) were more active against Acinetobacter calcoaceticus ATCC 23055 than “parent” 1,3,4-oxadiazole-2-thiones (a set), confirming the relation between glyco-conjugation and increasing of antiproliferative activity of antibiotic agents. The best result belonged to nucleoside bearing 2-furyl moiety in its heterocyclic nucleus (c4). The existence of m-PhNO2 group as Ar in structures of a set and their corresponding sugar derivatives decreased the antibacterial activity of them in comparison with the rest of synthetic compounds. PMID:28243273

  15. Genetic Regulation of Virulence and Antibiotic Resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Kröger, Carsten; Kary, Stefani C.; Schauer, Kristina; Cameron, Andrew D. S.

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistant microorganisms are forecast to become the single biggest challenge to medical care in the 21st century. Over the last decades, members of the genus Acinetobacter have emerged as bacterial opportunistic pathogens, in particular as challenging nosocomial pathogens because of the rapid evolution of antimicrobial resistances. Although we lack fundamental biological insight into virulence mechanisms, an increasing number of researchers are working to identify virulence factors and to study antibiotic resistance. Here, we review current knowledge regarding the regulation of virulence genes and antibiotic resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii. A survey of the two-component systems AdeRS, BaeSR, GacSA and PmrAB explains how each contributes to antibiotic resistance and virulence gene expression, while BfmRS regulates cell envelope structures important for pathogen persistence. A. baumannii uses the transcription factors Fur and Zur to sense iron or zinc depletion and upregulate genes for metal scavenging as a critical survival tool in an animal host. Quorum sensing, nucleoid-associated proteins, and non-classical transcription factors such as AtfA and small regulatory RNAs are discussed in the context of virulence and antibiotic resistance. PMID:28036056

  16. Actinobacteria Associated with the Marine Sponges Cinachyra sp., Petrosia sp., and Ulosa sp. and Their Culturability

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shams Tabrez; Takagi, Motoki; Shin-ya, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    Actinobacteria associated with 3 marine sponges, Cinachyra sp., Petrosia sp., and Ulosa sp., were investigated. Analyses of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries revealed that actinobacterial diversity varied greatly and that Ulosa sp. was most diverse, while Cinachyra sp. was least diverse. Culture-based approaches failed to isolate actinobacteria from Petrosia sp. or Ulosa sp., but strains belonging to 10 different genera and 3 novel species were isolated from Cinachyra sp. PMID:22214828

  17. Antibiotic susceptibility of Acinetobacter species in intensive care unit in Montenegro.

    PubMed

    Mijovic, Gordana; Pejakov, Ljubica; Vujosevic, Danijela

    2016-08-01

    The global increase in multidrug resistance of Acinetobacter has created widespread problems in the treatment of patients in intensive care units (ICUs). The aim of this study was to assess the current level of antimicrobial susceptibility of Acinetobacter species in ICU of Clinical Centre of Montenegro and determine their epidemiology. Antibiotic susceptibility was tested in 70 isolates of Acinetobacter collected from non-repeating samples taken from 40 patients. The first nine isolates were genotyped by repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR). Tigecycline was found to be the most active antimicrobial agent with 80.6% of susceptibility. All the isolates were multidrug resistant with fully resistance to cefalosporinas, piperacillin and piperacillin/tazobactam. More than half of them (58.5%) were probably extensively resistant. Seven out of nine examined strains were clonally related by rep-PCR. Our results showed extremely high rate of multidrug resistance (MDR) of Acinetobacter isolates and high percentage of its clonally spreading.

  18. Occurrence of High Catalase-containing Acinetobacter in Spacecraft Assembly Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, K. B.; Derecho, I.; La Duc, M. T.; Vaishampayan, P.; Venkateswaran, K. J.; Mogul, R.

    2010-04-01

    In summary, the measurement of high catalase specific activity values for spacecraft-associated Acinetobacter strains is potentially the result of adaptation towards the harsh conditions of the clean rooms and assembly process.

  19. The first cases of human bacteremia caused by Acinetobacter seifertii in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kishii, Kozue; Kikuchi, Ken; Tomida, Junko; Kawamura, Yoshiaki; Yoshida, Atsushi; Okuzumi, Katsuko; Moriya, Kyoji

    2016-05-01

    Acinetobacter seifertii, a novel species of Acinetobacter, was first reported in 2015. A. seifertii strains were isolated from human clinical specimens (blood, respiratory tract, and ulcer) and hospital environments. Here, we report the first cases of bacteremia caused by A. seifertii in patients with catheter-related bloodstream infection in Japan. The patients favorably recovered, without any complications, after removal of the peripheral intravenous catheters and administration of antibiotics. The pathogens were initially identified as Acinetobacter baumannii, using phenotypic methods and the MicroScan Walkaway System; however, rpoB gene sequence analysis indicated 99.54% similarity to A. seifertii. Moreover, antimicrobial susceptibility testing revealed that one of the strains was not susceptible to gentamicin and ceftazidime. Our report shows that Acinetobacter species other than A. baumannii can also cause nosocomial infections and that accurate methods for the identification of causative agents should be developed.

  20. [Problem of treatment for pyo-inflammatory complications caused by Acinetobacter].

    PubMed

    Bogomolova, N S; Bol'shakov, L V; Kuznetsova, S M

    2014-01-01

    The article deals with analysis of a detection frequency and antibacterial treatment resistance of Acinetobacter spp.of different species affiliation. Strains of bacteria detected in patients with pyo-inflammatory complications after surgeries (period from 2010 to 2012) were involved in the study 137 strains of Acinetobacter spp. were detected and studied Fraction of Acinetobacter spp. in 2010, 2011 and 2012 was 2.3, 3 and 3.4% respectively. Fraction of P. aeruginosain all non-fermentative Gram-negative bacteria (NFGNB) decreased by 120% and fraction of Acinetobacter spp. increased by 200-250%. Acinetobacter spp. detection frequency was not significantly changed in the period from 2006 to 2012. However the fraction of Acinetobacter spp. in NFGNB increased by 150% and was 29% in 2012. Detection frequency of A. baumanii sharply increased in 2012. A study of antibacterial treatment resistance of Acinetobacter spp. (10 antibacterial medicines) showed that Polymyxin B and E (Colistin) was the most effective medicine for A. baumanii and A. calcoaceticus infection. 85-95% of Acinetobacter spp.strains kept sensitivity to this antibacterial medicine. 66-88.9% of A. baumanii strains, 66.7-81.8% of A. alcoaceticus and 66.6% of other Acinetobacter spp. were sensitive to Tigecycline. Dioxidine effectiveness was close to Tigecycline in 66.7-80% of A. baumanii strains. 85-100% of A. calcoaceticus strains were sensitive to Dioxidine. There is a trend of decreasing of A. baumanii sensitivity to Carbapenems by 200%. Fraction of strains sensitive to Meropenem and Imipenem in 2012 was 21.4% and 16.7% respectively. All studied strains of A. lwoffi and A. haemolyticus kept sensitivity to Carbapenems. In 2012 23.8% of A. baumanii and 50% of A. calcoaceticus strains were sensitivity to Amikacin, meanwhile A. lwoffi and A. haemolyticus were not sensitive to this medicine. 31.3% of A. baumanii and 50% of A. calcoaceticus strains were sensitive to Ceftazidime/Sulbactam. 5.3% of A. baumanii

  1. Acinetobacter Species Infections among Navy and Marine Corps Beneficiaries: 2014 Annual Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-20

    Acinetobacter Species Infections among Navy and Marine Corps Beneficiaries: 2014 Annual Report NMCPHC-EDC-TR-371-2015 By Paul...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Acinetobacter Species Infections among Navy and Marine Corps Beneficiaries: 2014 Annual Report 5b. GRANT...ORGANIZATION NAME(SI AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center NUMBER EpiData Center Department

  2. Draft Genome Sequences of Acinetobacter baumannii Isolates from Wounded Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Arivett, Brock A; Ream, Dave C; Fiester, Steven E; Kidane, Destaalem; Actis, Luis A

    2016-08-25

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative bacterium capable of causing hospital-acquired infections that has been grouped with Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species as ESKAPE pathogens because of their extensive drug resistance phenotypes and increasing risk to human health. Twenty-four multidrug-resistant A. baumannii strains isolated from wounded military personnel were sequenced and annotated.

  3. Acinetobacter Species Infections Among Navy and Marine Corps Beneficiaries: 2013 Annual Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-19

    the propagation of Acinetobacter, which flourishes in warm , humid environments . 3,5-7 DON and DOD rates peaked during the summer months (June-August...locations of the MCRDs. Another contributing factor to the high Marine recruit prevalence could be related to the unique environmental conditions...Acinetobacter Species Infections among Navy and Marine Corps Beneficiaries: 2013 Annual Report NMCPHC-EDC-TR-168-2014 By Paul Meddaugh and

  4. Characterization and identification of newly isolated Acinetobacter baumannii strain serdang 1 for phenol removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadzir, Z. H. M.; Shukor, M. Y.; Nazir, M. S.; Abdullah, M. A.

    2012-09-01

    A new indigenous bacterial strain from Malaysian soil contaminated with petroleum waste had been successfully isolated, characterized and identified for phenol removal. The gram negative bacteria showed 98% identity with Acinetobacter baumannii based on Biolog{trade mark, serif} Identification System and the determination of a partial 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequence. The isolate clustered with species belonging to Acinetobacter clade in a 16S rDNA-based neighbour-joining phylogenetic tree.

  5. Combined therapy for multi-drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infection--is there evidence outside the laboratory?

    PubMed

    Tuon, Felipe F; Rocha, Jaime L; Merlini, Alexandre B

    2015-09-01

    Acinetobacter are among the most common bacteria isolated in hospital infections, especially in developing countries. Multi-drug, extended-drug or pan-drug resistance makes treatment a real medical challenge. In the present review, the authors describe clinical and experimental data in order to present different current and potential future strategies to treat infections caused by multi-drug-resistant Acinetobacter. The therapeutic options for carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter are scarce, and the current options have poor pharmacokinetic aspects and several side effects. Combined therapy has been an alternative for multi-drug-resistant Acinetobacter. However, this issue is always controversial. In some studies combined therapy has shown superiority for some strains of Acinetobacter in animal models and in vitro studies. However, studies with humans are scarce and too poor quality to suggest the best approach for the treatment of infections caused by multi-drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

  6. More Than Just Light: Clinical Relevance of Light Perception in the Nosocomial Pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii and Other Members of the Genus Acinetobacter.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, María Soledad; Müller, Gabriela Leticia; Pérez, Jorgelina Fernanda; Golic, Adrián Ezequiel; Mussi, María Alejandra

    2015-11-01

    A summary of the major findings concerning light modulation in Acinetobacter baumannii, which governs aspects related to the success of this microorganism as a nosocomial pathogen, is presented. Particularly, the evidence shows that light modulates the ability of the bacteria to persist in the environment, its virulence against eukaryotic hosts and even susceptibility to certain antibiotics. The light signal is sensed through different mechanisms, in some cases involving specialized photoreceptors of the BLUF-type, whereas in others, directly by a photosensitizer molecule. We also provide new data concerning the genomic context of BLUF-domain containing proteins within the genus Acinetobacter, as well as further insights into the mechanism of light-mediated reduction in susceptibility to antibiotics. The overall information points toward light being a crucial stimulus in the lifestyle of members of the genus Acinetobacter as well as in other clinically relevant species, such as members of the ESKAPE group, playing therefore an important role in the clinical settings.

  7. Anticipating the Unpredictable: A Review of Antimicrobial Stewardship and Acinetobacter Infections.

    PubMed

    Wenzler, Eric; Goff, Debra A; Humphries, Romney; Goldstein, Ellie J C

    2017-03-04

    Acinetobacter remains one of the most challenging pathogens in the field of infectious diseases owing primarily to the uniqueness and multiplicity of its resistance mechanisms. This resistance often leads to devastatingly long delays in time to appropriate therapy and increased mortality for patients afflicted with Acinetobacter infections. Selecting appropriate empiric and definitive antibacterial therapy for Acinetobacter is further complicated by the lack of reliability in commercial antimicrobial susceptibility testing devices and limited breakpoint interpretations for available agents. Existing treatment options for infections due to Acinetobacter are limited by a lack of robust efficacy and safety data along with concerns regarding appropriate dosing, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic targets, and toxicity. Antimicrobial stewardship programs are essential to combat this unpredictable pathogen through use of infection prevention, rapid diagnostics, antibiogram-optimized treatment regimens, and avoidance of overuse of antimicrobials. The drug development pipeline includes several agents with encouraging in vitro activity against Acinetobacter, but their place in therapy and contribution to the armamentarium against this pathogen remain to be defined. The objective of this review is to highlight the unique challenge of treating infections due to Acinetobacter and summarize recent literature regarding optimal antimicrobial treatment for this pathogen. The drug development pipeline is also explored for future potentially effective treatment options.

  8. Acinetobacter baumannii Infection and IL-17 Mediated Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Zihe; Yang, Junjun; Hu, Renjing; Hu, Xichi; Chen, Kong

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a significant cause of severe hospital-acquired infections with a recent rise in multidrug-resistant infections involving traumatic wounds of military personnel. The interleukin-17 (IL-17) pathway is essential for neutrophil recruitment in response to a variety of pathogens, while the control of A. baumannii infection is known to be dependent on neutrophils. This suggests that IL-17 may play an important role in A. baumannii infection; however, this has yet to be studied. Here, we summarize the recent advances in understanding the host-pathogen interaction of A. baumannii and propose a potential role of the IL-17 pathway in generating a protective immune response. PMID:26977122

  9. Stress responses in the opportunistic pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Fiester, Steven E; Actis, Luis A

    2013-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii causes a wide range of severe infections among compromised and injured patients worldwide. The relevance of these infections are, in part, due to the ability of this pathogen to sense and react to environmental and host stress signals, allowing it to persist and disseminate in medical settings and the human host. This review summarizes current knowledge on the roles that environmental and cellular stressors play in the ability of A. baumannii to resist nutrient deprivation, oxidative and nitrosative injury, and even the presence of the commonly used antiseptic ethanol, which could serve as a nutrient- and virulence-enhancing signal rather than just being a convenient disinfectant. Emerging experimental evidence supports the role of some of these responses in the pathogenesis of the infections A. baumannii causes in humans and its capacity to resist antibiotics and host response effectors. PMID:23464372

  10. Inactivation of Phospholipase D Diminishes Acinetobacter baumannii Pathogenesis▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Anna C.; Hood, Indriati; Boyd, Kelli L.; Olson, Patrick D.; Morrison, John M.; Carson, Steven; Sayood, Khalid; Iwen, Peter C.; Skaar, Eric P.; Dunman, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging bacterial pathogen of considerable health care concern. Nonetheless, relatively little is known about the organism's virulence factors or their regulatory networks. Septicemia and ventilator-associated pneumonia are two of the more severe forms of A. baumannii disease. To identify virulence factors that may contribute to these disease processes, genetically diverse A. baumannii clinical isolates were evaluated for the ability to proliferate in human serum. A transposon mutant library was created in a strain background that propagated well in serum and screened for members with decreased serum growth. The results revealed that disruption of A. baumannii phospholipase D (PLD) caused a reduction in the organism's ability to thrive in serum, a deficiency in epithelial cell invasion, and diminished pathogenesis in a murine model of pneumonia. Collectively, these results suggest that PLD is an A. baumannii virulence factor. PMID:20194595

  11. Characterization of newly isolated lytic bacteriophages active against Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Merabishvili, Maia; Vandenheuvel, Dieter; Kropinski, Andrew M; Mast, Jan; De Vos, Daniel; Verbeken, Gilbert; Noben, Jean-Paul; Lavigne, Rob; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Pirnay, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Based on genotyping and host range, two newly isolated lytic bacteriophages, myovirus vB_AbaM_Acibel004 and podovirus vB_AbaP_Acibel007, active against Acinetobacter baumannii clinical strains, were selected from a new phage library for further characterization. The complete genomes of the two phages were analyzed. Both phages are characterized by broad host range and essential features of potential therapeutic phages, such as short latent period (27 and 21 min, respectively), high burst size (125 and 145, respectively), stability of activity in liquid culture and low frequency of occurrence of phage-resistant mutant bacterial cells. Genomic analysis showed that while Acibel004 represents a novel bacteriophage with resemblance to some unclassified Pseudomonas aeruginosa phages, Acibel007 belongs to the well-characterized genus of the Phikmvlikevirus. The newly isolated phages can serve as potential candidates for phage cocktails to control A. baumannii infections.

  12. Community-acquired Acinetobacter baumannii: clinical characteristics, epidemiology and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dexter, Carina; Murray, Gerald L; Paulsen, Ian T; Peleg, Anton Y

    2015-05-01

    Community-acquired Acinetobacter baumannii (CA-Ab) is a rare but serious cause of community-acquired pneumonia in tropical regions of the world. CA-Ab infections predominantly affect individuals with risk factors, which include excess alcohol consumption, diabetes mellitus, smoking and chronic lung disease. CA-Ab pneumonia presents as a surprisingly fulminant course and is characterized by a rapid onset of fever, severe respiratory symptoms and multi-organ dysfunction, with a mortality rate reported as high as 64%. It is unclear whether the distinct clinical syndrome caused by CA-Ab is because of host predisposing factors or unique bacterial characteristics, or a combination of both. Deepening our understanding of the drivers of overwhelming CA-Ab infection will provide important insights into preventative and therapeutic strategies.

  13. The structure of alanine racemase from Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Davis, Emily; Scaletti-Hutchinson, Emma; Opel-Reading, Helen; Nakatani, Yoshio; Krause, Kurt L

    2014-09-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic Gram-negative bacterium which is a common cause of hospital-acquired infections. Numerous antibiotic-resistant strains exist, emphasizing the need for the development of new antimicrobials. Alanine racemase (Alr) is a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate dependent enzyme that is responsible for racemization between enantiomers of alanine. As D-alanine is an essential component of the bacterial cell wall, its inhibition is lethal to prokaryotes, making it an excellent antibiotic drug target. The crystal structure of A. baumannii alanine racemase (AlrAba) from the highly antibiotic-resistant NCTC13302 strain has been solved to 1.9 Å resolution. Comparison of AlrAba with alanine racemases from closely related bacteria demonstrates a conserved overall fold. The substrate entryway and active site of the enzymes were shown to be highly conserved. The structure of AlrAba will provide the template required for future structure-based drug-design studies.

  14. Identification of Ata, a Multifunctional Trimeric Autotransporter of Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Bentancor, Leticia V.; Camacho-Peiro, Ana; Bozkurt-Guzel, Cagla; Pier, Gerald B.

    2012-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has recently emerged as a highly troublesome nosocomial pathogen, especially in patients in intensive care units and in those undergoing mechanical ventilation. We have identified a surface protein adhesin of A. baumannii, designated the Acinetobacter trimeric autotransporter (Ata), that contains all of the typical features of trimeric autotransporters (TA), including a long signal peptide followed by an N-terminal, surface-exposed passenger domain and a C-terminal domain encoding 4 β-strands. To demonstrate that Ata encoded a TA, we created a fusion protein in which we replaced the entire passenger domain of Ata with the epitope tag V5, which can be tracked with specific monoclonal antibodies, and demonstrated that the C-terminal 101 amino acids of Ata were capable of exporting the heterologous V5 tag to the surface of A. baumannii in a trimeric form. We found that Ata played a role in biofilm formation and bound to various extracellular matrix/basal membrane (ECM/BM) components, including collagen types I, III, IV, and V and laminin. Moreover, Ata mediated the adhesion of whole A. baumannii cells to immobilized collagen type IV and played a role in the survival of A. baumannii in a lethal model of systemic infection in immunocompetent mice. Taken together, these results reveal that Ata is a TA of A. baumannii involved in virulence, including biofilm formation, binding to ECM/BM proteins, mediating the adhesion of A. baumannii cells to collagen type IV, and contributing to the survival of A. baumannii in a mouse model of lethal infection. PMID:22609912

  15. Crystal Structure of Carbapenemase OXA-58 from Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Nuno Tiago; Toth, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Class D β-lactamases capable of hydrolyzing last-resort carbapenem antibiotics represent a major challenge for treatment of bacterial infections. Wide dissemination of these enzymes in Acinetobacter baumannii elevated this pathogen to the category of most deadly and difficult to treat. We present here the structure of the OXA-58 β-lactamase, a major class D carbapenemase of A. baumannii, determined to 1.30-Å resolution. Unlike two other Acinetobacter carbapenemases, OXA23 and OXA-24, the OXA-58 enzyme lacks the characteristic hydrophobic bridge over the active site, despite conservation of the residues which participate in its formation. The active-site residues in OXA-58 are spatially conserved in comparison to those in other class D β-lactamases. Lys86, which activates water molecules during the acylation and deacylation steps, is fully carboxylated in the OXA-58 structure. In the absence of a substrate, a water molecule is observed in the active site of the enzyme and is positioned in the pocket that is usually occupied by the 6α-hydroxyethyl moiety of carbapenems. A water molecule in this location would efficiently deacylate good substrates, such as the penicillins, but in the case of carbapenems, it would be expelled by the 6α-hydroxyethyl moiety of the antibiotics and a water from the surrounding medium would find its way to the vicinity of the carboxylated Lys86 to perform deacylation. Subtle differences in the position of this water in the acyl-enzyme complexes of class D β-lactamases could ultimately be responsible for differences in the catalytic efficiencies of these enzymes against last-resort carbapenem antibiotics. PMID:24468777

  16. Enrichment for Hydrogen-Oxidizing Acinetobacter spp. in the Rhizosphere of Hydrogen-Evolving Soybean Root Nodules †

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Tit-Yee; Graham, Lennox; O'Hara, Eileen; Maier, Robert J.

    1986-01-01

    Field soybean plants were inoculated with Hup+ wild-type or H2 uptake-negative (Hup−) mutants of Bradyrhizobium japonicum. For two consecutive summers we found an enrichment for acinetobacters associated with the surfaces of the H2-evolving nodules. Soybean root nodules that evolved H2 had up to 12 times more Acinetobacter spp. bacteria associated with their surfaces than did nodules incapable of evolving H2. All of the newly isolated strains identified as Acinetobacter obtained from the surfaces of root nodules, as well as known established Acinetobacter strains, were capable of oxidizing H2, a property not previously described for this alkane-degrading soil bacterium. Images PMID:16347197

  17. Bacteremic nosocomial pneumonia caused by Acinetobacter baumannii and Acinetobacter nosocomialis: a single or two distinct clinical entities?

    PubMed

    Lee, Y-T; Kuo, S-C; Yang, S-P; Lin, Y-T; Chiang, D-H; Tseng, F-C; Chen, T-L; Fung, C-P

    2013-07-01

    The phenotypically indistinguishable Acinetobacter baumannii and Acinetobacter nosocomialis have become leading pathogens causing nosocomial pneumonia in critically ill patients. A. baumannii and A. nosocomialis nosocomial pneumonias were grouped as a single clinical entity previously. This study aimed to determine whether they are the same or a different clinical entity. A total of 121 patients with A. baumannii and 131 with A. nosocomialis bacteremic nosocomial pneumonia were included during an 8-year period. Despite the similar Charlson co-morbidity scores at admission, patients with A. baumannii pneumonia were more likely to have abnormal haematological findings, lobar pneumonia, significantly higher Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II scores and higher frequency of shock at the onset of bacteraemia than those with A. nosocomialis pneumoni. A. baumannii isolates were resistant to more classes of antimicrobials, except colistin, and therefore the patients with A. baumannii pneumonia were more likely to receive inappropriate antimicrobial therapy. The 14-day mortality was significantly higher in patients with A. baumannii pneumonia (34.7% vs. 15.3%, p 0.001). A. baumannii was an independent risk factor for mortality (OR, 2.03; 95% CI, 1.05-3.90; p 0.035) in the overall cohort after adjustment for other risk factors for death, including inappropriate antimicrobial therapy. The results demonstrated the difference in clinical presentation, microbial characteristics and outcomes between A. baumannii and A. nosocomialis nosocomial pneumonia, and supported that they are two distinct clinical entities.

  18. An Acinetobacter trimeric autotransporter adhesin reaped from cells exhibits its nonspecific stickiness via a highly stable 3D structure

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimoto, Shogo; Nakatani, Hajime; Iwasaki, Keita; Hori, Katsutoshi

    2016-01-01

    Trimeric autotransporter adhesins (TAAs), cell surface proteins of Gram-negative bacteria, mediate bacterial adhesion to host cells and extracellular matrix proteins. However, AtaA, a TAA in the nonpathogenic Acinetobacter sp. strain Tol 5, shows nonspecific, high adhesiveness to abiotic material surfaces as well as to biotic surfaces. AtaA is a homotrimer of polypeptides comprising 3,630 amino acids and forms long nanofibers; therefore, it is too large and structurally complex to be produced as a recombinant protein. In this study, we isolated AtaA’s passenger domain (AtaA PSD), which is translocated to the cell surface through the C-terminal transmembrane domain and exhibits biological functions, using a new method. We introduced a protease recognition site and reaped AtaA nanofibers 225 nm in length from the cell surface through proteolytic cleavage with a specific protease. Biochemical and biophysical analyses of the purified native AtaA PSD revealed that it has a stable structure under alkaline and acidic conditions. Temperatures above 80 °C, which disrupted AtaA’s higher-order structure but maintained the full-length AtaA polypeptide, inactivated AtaA’s nonspecific adhesiveness, suggesting that the stickiness of AtaA requires its 3D structure. This finding refutes the widespread but vague speculation that large unfolded polypeptides readily stick to various surfaces. PMID:27305955

  19. Characterization of Plasmids in Extensively Drug-Resistant Acinetobacter Strains Isolated in India and Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Maria J.; Toleman, Mark A.; White, P. Lewis; Connor, Thomas R.; Mushtaq, Ammara; Weeks, Janis L.; Kumarasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Raven, Katherine E.; Török, M. Estée; Peacock, Sharon J.; Howe, Robin A.; Walsh, Timothy R.

    2014-01-01

    The blaNDM-1 gene is associated with extensive drug resistance in Gram-negative bacteria. This probably spread to Enterobacteriaceae from Acinetobacter spp., and we characterized plasmids associated with blaNDM-1 in Acinetobacter spp. to gain insight into their role in this dissemination. Four clinical NDM-1-producing Acinetobacter species strains from India and Pakistan were investigated. A plasmid harboring blaNDM-1, pNDM-40-1, was characterized by whole-genome sequencing of Acinetobacter bereziniae CHI-40-1 and comparison with related plasmids. The presence of similar plasmids in strains from Pakistan was sought by PCR and sequencing of amplicons. Conjugation frequency was tested and stability of pNDM-40-1 investigated by real-time PCR of isolates passaged with and without antimicrobial selection pressure. A. bereziniae and Acinetobacter haemolyticus strains contained plasmids similar to the pNDM-BJ01-like plasmids identified in Acinetobacter spp. in China. The backbone of pNDM-40-1 was almost identical to that of pNDM-BJ01-like plasmids, but the transposon harboring blaNDM-1, Tn125, contained two short deletions. Escherichia coli and Acinetobacter pittii transconjugants were readily obtained. Transconjugants retained pNDM-40-1 after a 14-day passage experiment, although stability was greater with meropenem selection. Fragments of pNDM-BJ01-like plasmid backbones are found near blaNDM-1 in some genetic contexts from Enterobacteriaceae, suggesting that cross-genus transfer has occurred. pNDM-BJ01-like plasmids have been described in isolates originating from a wide geographical region in southern Asia. In vitro data on plasmid transfer and stability suggest that these plasmids could have contributed to the spread of blaNDM-1 into Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:25421466

  20. Characterization of plasmids in extensively drug-resistant acinetobacter strains isolated in India and Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Jones, Lim S; Carvalho, Maria J; Toleman, Mark A; White, P Lewis; Connor, Thomas R; Mushtaq, Ammara; Weeks, Janis L; Kumarasamy, Karthikeyan K; Raven, Katherine E; Török, M Estée; Peacock, Sharon J; Howe, Robin A; Walsh, Timothy R

    2015-02-01

    The blaNDM-1 gene is associated with extensive drug resistance in Gram-negative bacteria. This probably spread to Enterobacteriaceae from Acinetobacter spp., and we characterized plasmids associated with blaNDM-1 in Acinetobacter spp. to gain insight into their role in this dissemination. Four clinical NDM-1-producing Acinetobacter species strains from India and Pakistan were investigated. A plasmid harboring blaNDM-1, pNDM-40-1, was characterized by whole-genome sequencing of Acinetobacter bereziniae CHI-40-1 and comparison with related plasmids. The presence of similar plasmids in strains from Pakistan was sought by PCR and sequencing of amplicons. Conjugation frequency was tested and stability of pNDM-40-1 investigated by real-time PCR of isolates passaged with and without antimicrobial selection pressure. A. bereziniae and Acinetobacter haemolyticus strains contained plasmids similar to the pNDM-BJ01-like plasmids identified in Acinetobacter spp. in China. The backbone of pNDM-40-1 was almost identical to that of pNDM-BJ01-like plasmids, but the transposon harboring blaNDM-1, Tn125, contained two short deletions. Escherichia coli and Acinetobacter pittii transconjugants were readily obtained. Transconjugants retained pNDM-40-1 after a 14-day passage experiment, although stability was greater with meropenem selection. Fragments of pNDM-BJ01-like plasmid backbones are found near blaNDM-1 in some genetic contexts from Enterobacteriaceae, suggesting that cross-genus transfer has occurred. pNDM-BJ01-like plasmids have been described in isolates originating from a wide geographical region in southern Asia. In vitro data on plasmid transfer and stability suggest that these plasmids could have contributed to the spread of blaNDM-1 into Enterobacteriaceae.

  1. Using Vitek MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry to identify species belonging to the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex: a relevant alternative to molecular biology?

    PubMed

    Pailhoriès, Hélène; Daure, Sophie; Eveillard, Matthieu; Joly-Guillou, Marie-Laure; Kempf, Marie

    2015-10-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii belongs to the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii complex (Acb) containing 2 other pathogenic species: Acinetobacter pittii and Acinetobacter nosocomialis. Identification of these bacteria remains problematic despite the use of matrix-assisted laser ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Here, we enriched the SARAMIS™ database of the Vitek MS® plus mass spectrometer to improve the identification of species of the Acb complex. For each species, we incremented reference spectra. Then, a SuperSpectrum was created based on the selection of 40 specific masses. In a second step, we validated reference spectra and SuperSpectra with 100 isolates identified by rpoB gene sequencing. All the isolates were correctly identified by MALDI-TOF MS with the database we created as compared to the identifications obtained by rpoB sequencing. Our database enabled rapid and reliable identification of the pathogen species belonging to the Acb complex. Identification by MALDI-TOF MS with our database is a good alternative to molecular biology.

  2. Longitudinal Characterization of Acinetobacter baumannii-calcoaceticus Complex, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Colonizing and Infecting Combat Casualties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Brief report Longitudinal characterization of Acinetobacter baumannii-calcoaceticus complex, Klebsiella pneumoniae , and methicillin-resistant...resistant Acinetobacter baumannii-calcoaceticus complex Klebsiella pneumoniae Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus MRSA Drug-resistant...Acinetobacter baumannii-calcoaceticus complex, Klebsiella pneumoniae , and methicillin- resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonize and infect combat casualties

  3. Influence of relative humidity and suspending menstrua on survival of Acinetobacter spp. on dry surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Jawad, A; Heritage, J; Snelling, A M; Gascoyne-Binzi, D M; Hawkey, P M

    1996-01-01

    Acinetobacter spp. are being reported with increasing frequency as a cause of nosocomial infection and have been isolated from the skin of healthy individuals, patients, hospital staff, dry nonbiotic objects, and different pieces of medical equipment. Factors affecting the survival of Acinetobacter spp. under conditions closely similar to those found in the hospital environment were investigated in the present study to help us understand the epidemiology of nosocomial Acinetobacter infection. Bacterial cells were suspended in distilled water or bovine serum albumin and were dried onto glass coverslips and kept at different relative humidities. Cells washed from coverslips were used to determined viable counts. Freshly isolated strains of Acinetobacter spp. belonging to the clinically important Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex were found to be more resistant to drying conditions (e.g., 30 days for A. baumannii 16/49) than American Type Culture Collection strains (e.g., 2 days for A. baumannii ATCC 9955). The majority of strains belonging to the Acb complex had survival times similar to those observed for the gram-positive organism Staphylococcus aureus tested in the experiment. Survival times were prolonged for almost all the strains tested when they were suspended in bovine serum albumin (e.g., 60 days for A. baumannii R 447) compared with those for strains suspended in distilled water (11 days for R 447). The survival times for strains at higher relative humidity (31 or 93%) were longer than those for strains of Acinetobacter kept at a relative humidity of 10% (11 days at 31% relative humidity and 4 days at 10% relative humidity for R447). These findings are consistent with the observed tendency of Acinetobacter spp. to survive on dry surfaces, and they can be transferred not only by moist vectors but also under dry conditions in a hospital environment during nosocomial infection outbreaks. The results obtained in the experiment support

  4. Lettuce and fruits as a source of multidrug resistant Acinetobacter spp.

    PubMed

    Carvalheira, Ana; Silva, Joana; Teixeira, Paula

    2017-06-01

    The role of ready-to-eat products as a reservoir of pathogenic species of Acinetobacter remains unclear. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the presence of Acinetobacter species in lettuces and fruits marketed in Portugal, and their susceptibility to antimicrobials. Acinetobacter spp. were isolated from 77.9% of the samples and these microorganisms were also found as endophytes (i.e. present within the plant tissue) in 12 of 20 samples of lettuces analysed. Among 253 isolates that were identified as belonging to this genus, 181 presented different PFGE profiles, representing different strains. Based on the analysis of the partial sequence of rpoB, 175 strains were identified as members of eighteen distinct species and the remaining six strains may represent five new candidate species since their rpoB sequence similarities with type strains were less than 95%. Acinetobacter calcoaceticus and Acinetobacter johnsonii were the most common species, both with the frequency of 26.5%; and 11% of the strains belong to the Acinetobacter baumannii group (i.e. A. baumannii, Acinetobacter pittii, Acinetobacter seifertii and Acinetobacter nosocomialis), which is most frequently associated with nosocomial infections. Overall, the strains were least susceptible to piperacillin (80.1%), piperacillin-tazobactam (64.1%), ceftazidime (43.1%), ciprofloxacin (16.6%), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (14.9%), imipenem (14.4%) and colistin (13.3%). The most active antimicrobials were minocycline and tetracycline, with 0.6% and 3.9% of strains resistant, respectively. About 29.8% of the strains were classified as multidrug-resistant (MDR), 4.4% as extensively drug-resistant (XDR) and the prevalence of MDR strains within the A. baumannii group (25%) was similar to other species (30.4%). The presence of clinically important species as well as MDR strains in lettuces and fruits may be a threat to public health considering that they may transmit these pathogens to environments

  5. Comparative genomic analysis of novel Acinetobacter symbionts: A combined systems biology and genomics approach

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vipin; Haider, Shazia; Sood, Utkarsh; Gilbert, Jack A.; Ramjee, Meenakshi; Forbes, Ken; Singh, Yogendra; Lopes, Bruno S.; Lal, Rup

    2016-01-01

    The increasing trend of antibiotic resistance in Acinetobacter drastically limits the range of therapeutic agents required to treat multidrug resistant (MDR) infections. This study focused on analysis of novel Acinetobacter strains using a genomics and systems biology approach. Here we used a network theory method for pathogenic and non-pathogenic Acinetobacter spp. to identify the key regulatory proteins (hubs) in each strain. We identified nine key regulatory proteins, guaA, guaB, rpsB, rpsI, rpsL, rpsE, rpsC, rplM and trmD, which have functional roles as hubs in a hierarchical scale-free fractal protein-protein interaction network. Two key hubs (guaA and guaB) were important for insect-associated strains, and comparative analysis identified guaA as more important than guaB due to its role in effective module regulation. rpsI played a significant role in all the novel strains, while rplM was unique to sheep-associated strains. rpsM, rpsB and rpsI were involved in the regulation of overall network topology across all Acinetobacter strains analyzed in this study. Future analysis will investigate whether these hubs are useful as drug targets for treating Acinetobacter infections. PMID:27378055

  6. Outbreak of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in an intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Dettori, Marco; Piana, Andrea; Deriu, Maria Grazia; Lo Curto, Paola; Cossu, Andrea; Musumeci, Rosario; Cocuzza, Clementina; Astone, Vito; Contu, Maria Antonietta; Sotgiu, Giovanni

    2014-04-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a ubiquitous microrganism often able to colonize and survive in different environments. Currently it is one of the most common pathogens responsible for nosocomial infections, including outbreaks, especially in long-term care facilities. The aim of this study was to show the results of an environmental investigation and genotyping analysis of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii associated with an outbreak in an intensive care unit of a tertiary hospital located in Northern Sardinia, Italy. Positive cultures of MDR Acinetobacter baumannii were reported during the month of June 2012, after the collection of biological samples from ten patients. Acinetobacter baumannii was isolated during the following environmental investigation from the headboard of two beds. All the strains were genotyped by performing multiplex PCR to identify the presence of genes encoding carbapenemases. The results showed specific bands of bla(OXA-51-like) gene and of the bla(OXA-23-like) gene. PFGE highlighted minimal differences in genomic fingerprints, while the cluster analysis grouped the isolated microorganisms into two closely related clusters, characterized by Dice's similarity coefficient equal to 95.1%. MLST showed that the strains belonged to ST31. The results of the study highlight the need, especially in high-risk areas, to adopt strict hygiene practices, particularly hand hygiene, and to ensure an appropriate turnover of personal protective equipment, which could be responsible for the spread of biological agents, such as MDR Acinetobacter baumannii.

  7. Characterisation and genome sequence of the lytic Acinetobacter baumannii bacteriophage vB_AbaS_Loki.

    PubMed

    Turner, Dann; Wand, Matthew E; Briers, Yves; Lavigne, Rob; Sutton, J Mark; Reynolds, Darren M

    2017-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as an important nosocomial pathogen in healthcare and community settings. While over 100 of Acinetobacter phages have been described in the literature, relatively few have been sequenced. This work describes the characterisation and genome annotation of a new lytic Acinetobacter siphovirus, vB_AbaS_Loki, isolated from activated sewage sludge. Sequencing revealed that Loki encapsulates a 41,308 bp genome, encoding 51 predicted open reading frames. Loki is most closely related to Acinetobacter phage IME_AB3 and more distantly related to Burkholderia phage KL1, Paracoccus phage vB_PmaS_IMEP1 and Pseudomonas phages vB_Pae_Kakheti25, vB_PaeS_SCH_Ab26 and PA73. Loki is characterised by a narrow host range, among the 40 Acinetobacter isolates tested, productive infection was only observed for the propagating host, A. baumannii ATCC 17978. Plaque formation was found to be dependent upon the presence of Ca2+ ions and adsorption to host cells was abolished upon incubation with a mutant of ATCC 17978 encoding a premature stop codon in lpxA. The complete genome sequence of vB_AbaS_Loki was deposited in the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) under the accession number LN890663.

  8. Characterisation and genome sequence of the lytic Acinetobacter baumannii bacteriophage vB_AbaS_Loki

    PubMed Central

    Wand, Matthew E.; Briers, Yves; Lavigne, Rob; Sutton, J. Mark; Reynolds, Darren M.

    2017-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as an important nosocomial pathogen in healthcare and community settings. While over 100 of Acinetobacter phages have been described in the literature, relatively few have been sequenced. This work describes the characterisation and genome annotation of a new lytic Acinetobacter siphovirus, vB_AbaS_Loki, isolated from activated sewage sludge. Sequencing revealed that Loki encapsulates a 41,308 bp genome, encoding 51 predicted open reading frames. Loki is most closely related to Acinetobacter phage IME_AB3 and more distantly related to Burkholderia phage KL1, Paracoccus phage vB_PmaS_IMEP1 and Pseudomonas phages vB_Pae_Kakheti25, vB_PaeS_SCH_Ab26 and PA73. Loki is characterised by a narrow host range, among the 40 Acinetobacter isolates tested, productive infection was only observed for the propagating host, A. baumannii ATCC 17978. Plaque formation was found to be dependent upon the presence of Ca2+ ions and adsorption to host cells was abolished upon incubation with a mutant of ATCC 17978 encoding a premature stop codon in lpxA. The complete genome sequence of vB_AbaS_Loki was deposited in the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) under the accession number LN890663. PMID:28207864

  9. Acinetobacter species as model microorganisms in environmental microbiology: current state and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaejoon; Park, Woojun

    2015-03-01

    Acinetobacter occupies an important position in nature because of its ubiquitous presence in diverse environments such as soils, fresh water, oceans, sediments, and contaminated sites. Versatile metabolic characteristics allow species of this genus to catabolize a wide range of natural compounds, implying active participation in the nutrient cycle in the ecosystem. On the other hand, multi-drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii causing nosocomial infections with high mortality has been raising serious concerns in medicine. Due to the ecological and clinical importance of the genus, Acinetobacter was proposed as a model microorganism for environmental microbiological studies, pathogenicity tests, and industrial production of chemicals. For these reasons, Acinetobacter has attracted significant attention in scientific and biotechnological fields, but only limited research areas such as natural transformation and aromatic compound degradation have been intensively investigated, while important physiological characteristics including quorum sensing, motility, and stress response have been neglected. The aim of this review is to summarize the recent achievements in Acinetobacter research with a special focus on strain DR1 and to compare the similarities and differences between species or other genera. Research areas that require more attention in future research are also suggested.

  10. Essential Biological Processes of an Emerging Pathogen: DNA Replication, Transcription, and Cell Division in Acinetobacter spp.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Andrew; Brzoska, Anthony J.; Turner, Kylie M.; Withers, Ryan; Harry, Elizabeth J.; Lewis, Peter J.; Dixon, Nicholas E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Within the last 15 years, members of the bacterial genus Acinetobacter have risen from relative obscurity to be among the most important sources of hospital-acquired infections. The driving force for this has been the remarkable ability of these organisms to acquire antibiotic resistance determinants, with some strains now showing resistance to every antibiotic in clinical use. There is an urgent need for new antibacterial compounds to combat the threat imposed by Acinetobacter spp. and other intractable bacterial pathogens. The essential processes of chromosomal DNA replication, transcription, and cell division are attractive targets for the rational design of antimicrobial drugs. The goal of this review is to examine the wealth of genome sequence and gene knockout data now available for Acinetobacter spp., highlighting those aspects of essential systems that are most suitable as drug targets. Acinetobacter spp. show several key differences from other pathogenic gammaproteobacteria, particularly in global stress response pathways. The involvement of these pathways in short- and long-term antibiotic survival suggests that Acinetobacter spp. cope with antibiotic-induced stress differently from other microorganisms. PMID:20508250

  11. Genomic sequencing of a strain of Acinetobacter baumannii and potential mechanisms to antibiotics resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Li, Hongru; Zhu, Ziwen; Wakefield, Mark R; Fang, Yujiang; Ye, Ying

    2017-02-09

    Acinetobacter baumannii has been becoming a great challenge to clinicians due to their resistance to almost all available antibiotics. In this study, we sequenced the genome from a multiple antibiotics resistant Acinetobacter baumannii stain which was named A. baumannii-1isolated from China by SMRT sequencing technology to explore its potential mechanisms to antibiotic resistance. We found that several mechanisms might contribute to the antibiotic resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii. Specifically, we found that SNP in genes associated with nucleotide excision repair and ABC transporter might contribute to its resistance to multiple antibiotics; we also found that specific genes associated with bacterial DNA integration and recombination, DNA-mediated transposition and response to antibiotics might contribute to its resistance to multiple antibiotics; Furthermore, specific genes associated with penicillin and cephalosporin biosynthetic pathway and specific genes associated with CHDL and MBL β-lactamase genes might contribute to its resistance to multiple antibiotics. Thus, the detailed mechanisms by which Acinetobacter baumannii show extensive resistance to multiple antibiotics are very complicated. Such a study might be helpful to develop new strategies to control Acinetobacter baumannii infection.

  12. Actinobacillus rossii sp. nov., Actinobacillus seminis sp. nov., nom. rev., Pasteurella bettii sp. nov., Pasteurella lymphangitidis sp. nov., Pasteurella mairi sp. nov., and Pasteurella trehalosi sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Sneath, P H; Stevens, M

    1990-04-01

    Evidence from numerical taxonomic analysis and DNA-DNA hybridization supports the proposal of new species in the genera Actinobacillus and Pasteurella. The following new species are proposed: Actinobacillus rossii sp. nov., from the vaginas of postparturient sows; Actinobacillus seminis sp. nov., nom. rev., associated with epididymitis of sheep; Pasteurella bettii sp. nov., associated with human Bartholin gland abscess and finger infections; Pasteurella lymphangitidis sp. nov. (the BLG group), which causes bovine lymphangitis; Pasteurella mairi sp. nov., which causes abortion in sows; and Pasteurella trehalosi sp. nov., formerly biovar T of Pasteurella haemolytica, which causes septicemia in older lambs.

  13. A new subclass of intrinsic aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferases, ANT(3")-II, is horizontally transferred among Acinetobacter spp. by homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gang; Leclercq, Sébastien Olivier; Tian, Jingjing; Wang, Chao; Ai, Guomin; Liu, Shuangjiang

    2017-01-01

    The emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance among Acinetobacter spp. have been investigated extensively. Most studies focused on the multiple antibiotic resistance genes located on plasmids or genomic resistance islands. On the other hand, the mechanisms controlling intrinsic resistance are still not well understood. In this study, we identified the novel subclass of aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase ANT(3")-II in Acinetobacter spp., which comprised numerous variants distributed among three main clades. All members of this subclass can inactivate streptomycin and spectinomycin. The three ant(3")-II genes, encoding for the three ANT(3")-II clades, are widely distributed in the genus Acinetobacter and always located in the same conserved genomic region. According to their prevalence, these genes are intrinsic in Acinetobacter baumannii, Acinetobacter pittii, and Acinetobacter gyllenbergii. We also demonstrated that the ant(3")-II genes are located in a homologous recombination hotspot and were recurrently transferred among Acinetobacter species. In conclusion, our findings demonstrated a novel mechanism of natural resistance in Acinetobacter spp., identified a novel subclass of aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase and provided new insight into the evolutionary history of intrinsic resistance genes. PMID:28152054

  14. Bloodstream infection caused by Acinetobacter junii in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia after allogenic haematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cayô, Rodrigo; Yañez San Segundo, Lucrecia; Pérez del Molino Bernal, Inmaculada Concepción; García de la Fuente, Celia; Bermúdez Rodríguez, Maria Aranzazu; Calvo, Jorge; Martínez-Martínez, Luis

    2011-03-01

    Acinetobacter junii is a rare human pathogen associated with bacteraemia in neonates and paediatric oncology patients. We present a case of A. junii causing bacteraemia in an adult transplant patient with leukaemia. The correct identification of Acinetobacter species can highlight the clinical significance of the different species of this genus.

  15. Insertion sequence transposition determines imipenem resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Han-Yueh; Chang, Kai-Chih; Liu, Chih-Chin; Tang, Chuan Yi; Peng, Jhih-Hua; Lu, Chia-Wei; Tu, Chi-Chao; Liou, Ming-Li

    2014-10-01

    This study employed genomewide analysis to investigate potential resistance mechanisms in Acinetobacter baumannii following imipenem exposure. Imipenem-selected mutants were generated from the imipenem-susceptible strain ATCC 17978 by multistep selection resistance. Antibiotic susceptibilities were examined, and the selected mutants originated from the ATCC 17978 strain were confirmed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The genomic sequence of a resistant mutant was analyzed using a next-generation sequencing platform, and genetic recombination was further confirmed by PCR. The result showed that phenotypic resistance was observed with carbapenem upon exposure to various concentrations of imipenem. Genomewide analysis showed that ISAba1 transposition was initiated by imipenem exposure at concentrations up to 0.5 mg/L. Transposition of ISAba1 upstream of blaOXA-95 was detected in all the selected mutants. The expression of blaOXA-95 was further analyzed by quantitative PCR, and the results demonstrated that a 200-fold increase in gene expression was required for resistance to imipenem. This study concluded that imipenem exposure at a concentration of 0.5 mg/L mediated the transposition of ISAba1 upstream of the blaOXA-95 gene and resulted in the overexpression of blaOXA-95 gene, which may play a major role in the resistance to imipenem in A. baumannii.

  16. Evaluation of Parameters for High Efficiency Transformation of Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Suleyman; Thompson, Mitchell G.; Jacobs, Anna C.; Zurawski, Daniel V.; Kirkup, Benjamin C.

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging, nosocomial pathogen that is poorly characterized due to a paucity of genetic tools and methods. While whole genome sequence data from several epidemic and environmental strains have recently become available, the functional characterization of genes is significantly lagging. Efficient transformation is one of the first steps to develop molecular tools that can be used to address these shortcomings. Here we report parameters allowing high efficiency transformation of A. baumannii. Using a multi-factorial experimental design we found that growth phase, voltage, and resistance all significantly contribute to transformation efficiency. The highest efficiency (4.3 × 108 Transformants/μg DNA) was obtained at the stationary growth phase of the bacterium (OD 6.0) using 25 ng of plasmid DNA under 100 Ohms resistance and 1.7 kV/cm voltage. The optimized electroporation parameters reported here provide a useful tool for genetic manipulation of A. baumannii. PMID:26911658

  17. Deciphering the Multifactorial Nature of Acinetobacter baumannii Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Luísa C. S.; Imperi, Francesco; Carattoli, Alessandra; Visca, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Background Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging bacterial pathogen that causes a broad array of infections, particularly in hospitalized patients. Many studies have focused on the epidemiology and antibiotic resistance of A. baumannii, but little is currently known with respect to its virulence potential. Methodology/Principal Findings The aim of this work was to analyze a number of virulence-related traits of four A. baumannii strains of different origin and clinical impact for which complete genome sequences were available, in order to tentatively identify novel determinants of A. baumannii pathogenicity. Clinical strains showed comparable virulence in the Galleria mellonella model of infection, irrespective of their status as outbreak or sporadic strains, whereas a non-human isolate was avirulent. A combined approach of genomic and phenotypic analyses led to the identification of several virulence factors, including exoproducts with hemolytic, phospholipase, protease and iron-chelating activities, as well as a number of multifactorial phenotypes, such as biofilm formation, surface motility and stress resistance, which were differentially expressed and could play a role in A. baumannii pathogenicity. Conclusion/Significance This work provides evidence of the multifactorial nature of A. baumannii virulence. While A. baumannii clinical isolates could represent a selected population of strains adapted to infect the human host, subpopulations of highly genotypically and phenotypically diverse A. baumannii strains may exist outside the hospital environment, whose relevance and distribution deserve further investigation. PMID:21829642

  18. Acinetobacter baumannii: Evolution of Antimicrobial Resistance—Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Yohei; Murray, Gerald L.; Peleg, Anton Y.

    2015-01-01

    The first decade of the 20th century witnessed a surge in the incidence of infections due to several highly antimicrobial-resistant bacteria in hospitals worldwide. Acinetobacter baumannii is one such organism that turned from an occasional respiratory pathogen into a major nosocomial pathogen. An increasing number of A. baumannii genome sequences have broadened our understanding of the genetic makeup of these bacteria and highlighted the extent of horizontal transfer of DNA. Animal models of disease combined with bacterial mutagenesis have provided some valuable insights into mechanisms of A. baumannii pathogenesis. Bacterial factors known to be important for disease include outer membrane porins, surface structures including capsule and lipopolysaccharide, enzymes such as phospholipase D, iron acquisition systems, and regulatory proteins. A. baumannii has a propensity to accumulate resistance to various groups of antimicrobial agents. In particular, carbapenem resistance has become commonplace, accounting for the majority of A. baumannii strains in many hospitals today. Carbapenem-resistant strains are often resistant to all other routinely tested agents. Treatment of carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii infection therefore involves the use of combinations of last resort agents such as colistin and tigecycline, but the efficacy and safety of these approaches are yet to be defined. Antimicrobial-resistant A. baumannii has high potential to spread among ill patients in intensive care units. Early recognition and timely implementation of appropriate infection control measures is crucial in preventing outbreaks. PMID:25643273

  19. Stress Conditions Induced by Carvacrol and Cinnamaldehyde on Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Montagu, Angélique; Joly-Guillou, Marie-Laure; Rossines, Elisabeth; Cayon, Jérome; Kempf, Marie; Saulnier, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a major cause of nosocomial infections. The ability of A. baumannii to display various resistance mechanisms against antibiotics has transformed it into a successful nosocomial pathogen. The limited number of antibiotics in development and the disengagement of the pharmaceutical industry have prompted the development of innovative strategies. One of these strategies is the use of essential oils, especially aromatic compounds that are potent antibacterial molecules. Among them, the combination of carvacrol and cinnamaldehyde has already demonstrated antibacterial efficacy against A. baumannii. The aim of this study was to determine the biological effects of these two compounds in A. baumannii, describing their effect on the rRNA and gene regulation under environmental stress conditions. Results demonstrated rRNA degradation by the carvacrol/cinnamaldehyde mixture, and this effect was due to carvacrol. Degradation was conserved after encapsulation of the mixture in lipid nanocapsules. Results showed an upregulation of the genes coding for heat shock proteins, such as groES, groEL, dnaK, clpB, and the catalase katE, after exposure to carvacrol/cinnamaldehyde mixture. The catalase was upregulated after carvacrol exposure wich is related to an oxidative stress. The combination of thiourea (hydroxyl radical scavenger) and carvacrol demonstrated a potent bactericidal effect. These results underline the development of defense strategies of the bacteria by synthesis of reactive oxygen species in response to environmental stress conditions, such as carvacrol.

  20. Genomic and phenotypic characterization of the species Acinetobacter venetianus

    PubMed Central

    Fondi, Marco; Maida, Isabel; Perrin, Elena; Orlandini, Valerio; La Torre, Laura; Bosi, Emanuele; Negroni, Andrea; Zanaroli, Giulio; Fava, Fabio; Decorosi, Francesca; Giovannetti, Luciana; Viti, Carlo; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Dijkshoorn, Lenie; Fani, Renato

    2016-01-01

    Crude oil is a complex mixture of hydrocarbons and other organic compounds that can produce serious environmental problems and whose removal is highly demanding in terms of human and technological resources. The potential use of microbes as bioremediation agents is one of the most promising fields in this area. Members of the species Acinetobacter venetianus have been previously characterized for their capability to degrade n-alkanes and thus may represent interesting model systems to implement this process. Although a preliminary experimental characterization of the overall hydrocarbon degradation capability has been performed for five of them, to date, the genetic/genomic features underlying such molecular processes have not been identified. Here we have integrated genomic and phenotypic information for six A. venetianus strains, i.e. VE-C3, RAG-1T, LUH 13518, LUH 7437, LUH 5627 and LUH 8758. Besides providing a thorough description of the A. venetianus species, these data were exploited to infer the genetic features (presence/absence patterns of genes) and the short-term evolutionary events possibly responsible for the variability in n-alkane degradation efficiency of these strains, including the mechanisms of interaction with the fuel droplet and the subsequent catabolism of this pollutant. PMID:26902269

  1. Genomic and phenotypic characterization of the species Acinetobacter venetianus.

    PubMed

    Fondi, Marco; Maida, Isabel; Perrin, Elena; Orlandini, Valerio; La Torre, Laura; Bosi, Emanuele; Negroni, Andrea; Zanaroli, Giulio; Fava, Fabio; Decorosi, Francesca; Giovannetti, Luciana; Viti, Carlo; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Dijkshoorn, Lenie; Fani, Renato

    2016-02-23

    Crude oil is a complex mixture of hydrocarbons and other organic compounds that can produce serious environmental problems and whose removal is highly demanding in terms of human and technological resources. The potential use of microbes as bioremediation agents is one of the most promising fields in this area. Members of the species Acinetobacter venetianus have been previously characterized for their capability to degrade n-alkanes and thus may represent interesting model systems to implement this process. Although a preliminary experimental characterization of the overall hydrocarbon degradation capability has been performed for five of them, to date, the genetic/genomic features underlying such molecular processes have not been identified. Here we have integrated genomic and phenotypic information for six A. venetianus strains, i.e. VE-C3, RAG-1(T), LUH 13518, LUH 7437, LUH 5627 and LUH 8758. Besides providing a thorough description of the A. venetianus species, these data were exploited to infer the genetic features (presence/absence patterns of genes) and the short-term evolutionary events possibly responsible for the variability in n-alkane degradation efficiency of these strains, including the mechanisms of interaction with the fuel droplet and the subsequent catabolism of this pollutant.

  2. Transcriptome Remodeling of Acinetobacter baumannii during Infection and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Meredith S.; Jacobs, Michael R.; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acinetobacter baumannii is an increasingly common multidrug-resistant pathogen in health care settings. Although the genetic basis of antibiotic resistance mechanisms has been extensively studied, much less is known about how genetic variation contributes to other aspects of successful infections. Genetic changes that occur during host infection and treatment have the potential to remodel gene expression patterns related to resistance and pathogenesis. Longitudinal sets of multidrug-resistant A. baumannii isolates from eight patients were analyzed by RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to identify differentially expressed genes and link them to genetic changes contributing to transcriptional variation at both within-patient and population levels. The number of differentially expressed genes among isolates from the same patient ranged from 26 (patient 588) to 145 (patient 475). Multiple patients had isolates with differential gene expression patterns related to mutations in the pmrAB and adeRS two-component regulatory system genes, as well as significant differences in genes related to antibiotic resistance, iron acquisition, amino acid metabolism, and surface-associated proteins. Population level analysis revealed 39 genetic regions with clade-specific differentially expressed genes, for which 19, 8, and 3 of these could be explained by insertion sequence mobilization, recombination-driven sequence variation, and intergenic mutations, respectively. Multiple types of mutations that arise during infection can significantly remodel the expression of genes that are known to be important in pathogenesis. PMID:28270585

  3. Hexavalent molybdenum reduction to Mo-blue by Acinetobacter calcoaceticus.

    PubMed

    Shukor, M Y; Rahman, M F; Suhaili, Z; Shamaan, N A; Syed, M A

    2010-03-01

    A local molybdenum-reducing bacterium was isolated and tentatively identified as Acinetobacter calcoaceticus strain Dr.Y12 based on carbon utilization profiles using Biolog GN plates and 16S rDNA comparative analysis. Molybdate reduction was optimized under conditions of low dissolved oxygen (37 degrees C and pH 6.5). Of the electron donors tested, glucose, fructose, maltose and sucrose supported molybdate reduction after 1 d of incubation, glucose and fructose supporting the highest Mo-blue production. Optimum Mo-blue production was reached at 20 mmol/L molybdate and 5 mmol/L phosphate; increasing the phosphate concentrations inhibited the production. An increase in an overall absorption profiles, especially at peak maximum at 865 nm and the shoulder at 700 nm, was observed in direct correlation with the increased in Mo-blue amounts. Metal ions, such as chromium, cadmium, copper, mercury and lead (2 mmol/L final concentration) caused approximately 88, 53, 80, 100, and 20 % inhibition, respectively. Respiratory inhibitors, such as antimycin A, rotenone, sodium azide and cyanide showed in this bacterium no inhibition of the Mo-blue production, suggesting that the electron transport system is not a site of molybdate reduction.

  4. [Emerging Acinetobacter baumannii infections and factors favouring their occurrence].

    PubMed

    Eveillard, M; Joly-Guillou, M-L

    2012-10-01

    During the last decade, Acinetobacter baumannii (AB) has been increasingly responsible for infections occurring in three particular contexts (in terms of patients and environment). Community AB pneumonia is severe infections, mainly described around the Indian Ocean, and which mainly concern patients with major co-morbidities. AB is also responsible for infections occurring among soldiers wounded in action during operations conducted in Iraq or Afghanistan. Lastly, this bacterium is responsible for infections occurring among casualties from natural disasters like earthquakes and tsunamis. Those infections are often due to multidrug-resistant strains, which can be implicated in nosocomial outbreaks when patients are hospitalized in a local casualty department or during their repatriation thereafter. The source of the contaminations which lead to AB infections following injuries (warfare or natural disasters) is still poorly known. Three hypotheses are usually considered: a contamination of wounds with environmental bacteria, a wound contamination from a previous cutaneous or oropharyngeal endogenous reservoir, or hospital acquisition. The implication of telluric or agricultural primary reservoirs in human AB infections is a common hypothesis which remains to be demonstrated by further specifically designed studies.

  5. Antimicrobial resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii: From bench to bedside

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ming-Feng; Lan, Chung-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) is undoubtedly one of the most successful pathogens in the modern healthcare system. With invasive procedures, antibiotic use and immunocompromised hosts increasing in recent years, A. baumannii has become endemic in hospitals due to its versatile genetic machinery, which allows it to quickly evolve resistance factors, and to its remarkable ability to tolerate harsh environments. Infections and outbreaks caused by multidrug-resistant A. baumannii (MDRAB) are prevalent and have been reported worldwide over the past twenty or more years. To address this problem effectively, knowledge of species identification, typing methods, clinical manifestations, risk factors, and virulence factors is essential. The global epidemiology of MDRAB is monitored by persistent surveillance programs. Because few effective antibiotics are available, clinicians often face serious challenges when treating patients with MDRAB. Therefore, a deep understanding of the resistance mechanisms used by MDRAB can shed light on two possible strategies to combat the dissemination of antimicrobial resistance: stringent infection control and antibiotic treatments, of which colistin-based combination therapy is the mainstream strategy. However, due to the current unsatisfying therapeutic outcomes, there is a great need to develop and evaluate the efficacy of new antibiotics and to understand the role of other potential alternatives, such as antimicrobial peptides, in the treatment of MDRAB infections. PMID:25516853

  6. Stress Conditions Induced by Carvacrol and Cinnamaldehyde on Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Montagu, Angélique; Joly-Guillou, Marie-Laure; Rossines, Elisabeth; Cayon, Jérome; Kempf, Marie; Saulnier, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a major cause of nosocomial infections. The ability of A. baumannii to display various resistance mechanisms against antibiotics has transformed it into a successful nosocomial pathogen. The limited number of antibiotics in development and the disengagement of the pharmaceutical industry have prompted the development of innovative strategies. One of these strategies is the use of essential oils, especially aromatic compounds that are potent antibacterial molecules. Among them, the combination of carvacrol and cinnamaldehyde has already demonstrated antibacterial efficacy against A. baumannii. The aim of this study was to determine the biological effects of these two compounds in A. baumannii, describing their effect on the rRNA and gene regulation under environmental stress conditions. Results demonstrated rRNA degradation by the carvacrol/cinnamaldehyde mixture, and this effect was due to carvacrol. Degradation was conserved after encapsulation of the mixture in lipid nanocapsules. Results showed an upregulation of the genes coding for heat shock proteins, such as groES, groEL, dnaK, clpB, and the catalase katE, after exposure to carvacrol/cinnamaldehyde mixture. The catalase was upregulated after carvacrol exposure wich is related to an oxidative stress. The combination of thiourea (hydroxyl radical scavenger) and carvacrol demonstrated a potent bactericidal effect. These results underline the development of defense strategies of the bacteria by synthesis of reactive oxygen species in response to environmental stress conditions, such as carvacrol. PMID:27486453

  7. [Evolution of antimicrobial susceptibility of Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates].

    PubMed

    López-Hernández, S; Alarcón, T; López-Brea, M

    2000-12-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a microorganism frequently implicated in colonization and infection in hospitalized patients. An increase of resistance has been observed in recent years making these infections difficult to treat. The in vitro activity of 24 antibiotics, 15 betalactam agents and nine nonbetalactams, was studied in 156 A. baumannii clinical isolates. The strains were collected from different clinical samples obtained from inpatients (92%) and 8% were from outpatients. Evolution of susceptibility from January 1995 to December 1997 was studied. MIC of the following antibiotics was determined by the agar dilution method: ampicillin, ticarcillin, piperacillin, ampicillin-sulbactam, amoxicillin- clavulanic acid, ticarcillin-clavulanic acid, piperacillin-tazobactam, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, cefepime, imipenem, meropenem, clavulanic acid, sulbactam, tazobactam, amikacin, gentamicin, tobramycin, ofloxacin, doxycycline, fosfomycin, rifampin, azithromycin and colistin. Low antimicrobial susceptibility was observed in most A. baumannii strains. Colistin, imipenem, meropenem and ampicillin-sulbactam showed the greatest susceptibility (100, 88.4, 88.4 and 84.6%, respectively). A. baumannii strains from inpatients showed a lower antimicrobial susceptibility than strains from outpatients, who showed a high percentage of susceptibility to most antibiotics. Rifampin and azithromycin showed certain in vitro activity against the most susceptible A. baumannii strains. A progressive decrease in susceptibility to most antibiotics was observed during the period studied. Carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii emerged in 1996 and increased in 1997.

  8. Early dissemination of OXA-72-producing Acinetobacter baumannii strain in Colombia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, Sandra Yamile; Cayô, Rodrigo; Gales, Ana Cristina; Leal, Aura Lucia; Saavedra, Carlos Humberto

    2014-01-01

    Nosocomial infections caused by carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolates have reached epidemic levels in past decades. Currently this microorganism is responsible for outbreaks of difficult eradication and with high mortality rates worldwide. We herein report a rare case of an OXA-72-producing A. baumannii isolate colonizing a 47-year-old male patient with peritonitis due to abdominal stab wound, four years earlier than the first report of this carbapenemase in Acinetobacter pittii in Colombia. Although OXA-72 presents a low prevalence compared with OXA-23, our study demonstrated that A. baumannii isolates carrying the blaOXA-72 gene were present in the hospital environment in Colombia and could act as a reservoir for further spread to other Acinetobacter species, like A. pittii, causing carbapenem-resistance.

  9. Antimicrobial susceptibility profile of Acinetobacter species isolated from blood cultures in two Japanese university hospitals.

    PubMed

    Kishii, Kozue; Kikuchi, Ken; Yoshida, Atsushi; Okuzumi, Katsuko; Uetera, Yushi; Yasuhara, Hiroshi; Moriya, Kyoji

    2014-02-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii has rapidly spread worldwide. This study investigated antibiotic susceptibility and genotypic resistance of 123 consecutive blood culture isolates of Acinetobacter species collected between 2003 and 2011 in two Japanese hospitals. The isolates were assigned to 13 species. Carbapenem resistance was detected in four isolates. Only one A. baumannii isolate had blaOXA-23 together with ISAba1; the remaining three isolates had IMP-1 metallo-β-lactamase. Quinolone resistance was detected in five isolates that had point mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining region. The predominance of various non-A. baumannii species and low prevalence of carbapenem resistance among blood culture isolates of Acinetobacter species in two Japanese hospitals were confirmed.

  10. Short communication: Genetic characterization of antimicrobial resistance in Acinetobacter isolates recovered from bulk tank milk.

    PubMed

    Tamang, M D; Gurung, M; Nam, H M; Kim, S R; Jang, G C; Jung, S C; Lim, S K

    2014-02-01

    A total of 176 Acinetobacter isolates, including 57 Acinetobacter baumannii originally obtained from 2,287 bulk tank milk (BTM) samples in Korea was investigated for the genetic basis of antimicrobial resistance using molecular methods. In addition, the occurrence and cassette content of integrons were examined and the genetic diversity of A. baumannii strains identified was evaluated. Aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme genes were detected in 15 (88.2%) of the 17 aminoglycoside-resistant Acinetobacter isolates tested. The most common aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme gene identified was adenylyltransferase gene aadB (n = 9), followed by phosphotransferase genes aphA6 (n = 7) and aphA1 (n = 5). Of the 31 isolates resistant to tetracycline, tet(39) was detected in 20 of them. The genetic basis of resistance to sulfonamide was identified in 15 (53.6%) of 28 trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole-resistant isolates and 9 (32.1%) of them carried both sul1 and sul2 genes. A blaADC-7-like gene was detected in 1 β-lactam-resistant A. baumannii. Furthermore, class 1 integron was identified in 11 Acinetobacter isolates. Two gene cassettes dfrA15, conferring resistance to trimethoprim, and aadA2, conferring resistance to aminoglycosides, were identified in 8 Acinetobacter isolates. None of the isolates was positive for class 2 or class 3 integrons. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed that most of the A. baumannii strains from BTM samples were genetically diverse, indicating that the occurrence of A. baumannii strains in BTM was not the result of dissemination of a single clone. Elucidation of resistance mechanisms associated with the resistance phenotype and a better understanding of resistance genes may help in the development of strategies to control infections, such as mastitis, and to prevent further dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of molecular characterization of antimicrobial-resistant Acinetobacter spp. from

  11. Prognostic differences between VAP from Acinetobacter baumanii and VAP from other microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Di Bonito, Marianna; Caiazzo, Simona; Iannazzone, Marta; Miccichè, Viviana; De Marco, Giuseppe; De Robertis, Edoardo; Tufano, Rosalba; Piazza, Ornella

    2012-05-01

    Nosocomial infection, in particular pneumonia, is an important risk factor for hospital mortality and morbidity. Acinetobacter baumanii is a common multi-resistant microorganism responsible of Ventilator Associated Pneumonia (VAP). Currently Colistin is a rescue therapy for this pathogen. The purpose of this retrospective study is to compare the outcome of VAP caused by Acinetobacter baumanii and VAP from other microorganisms in critical patients. Comorbidity, prognostic scores, mortality and eradication frequency did not turn out significantly different between the two study groups. Colistin safety was tested.

  12. Biofilm formation at the solid-liquid and air-liquid interfaces by Acinetobacter species

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The members of the genus Acinetobacter are Gram-negative cocobacilli that are frequently found in the environment but also in the hospital setting where they have been associated with outbreaks of nosocomial infections. Among them, Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as the most common pathogenic species involved in hospital-acquired infections. One reason for this emergence may be its persistence in the hospital wards, in particular in the intensive care unit; this persistence could be partially explained by the capacity of these microorganisms to form biofilm. Therefore, our main objective was to study the prevalence of the two main types of biofilm formed by the most relevant Acinetobacter species, comparing biofilm formation between the different species. Findings Biofilm formation at the air-liquid and solid-liquid interfaces was investigated in different Acinetobacter spp. and it appeared to be generally more important at 25°C than at 37°C. The biofilm formation at the solid-liquid interface by the members of the ACB-complex was at least 3 times higher than the other species (80-91% versus 5-24%). In addition, only the isolates belonging to this complex were able to form biofilm at the air-liquid interface; between 9% and 36% of the tested isolates formed this type of pellicle. Finally, within the ACB-complex, the biofilm formed at the air-liquid interface was almost 4 times higher for A. baumannii and Acinetobacter G13TU than for Acinetobacter G3 (36%, 27% & 9% respectively). Conclusions Overall, this study has shown the capacity of the Acinetobacter spp to form two different types of biofilm: solid-liquid and air-liquid interfaces. This ability was generally higher at 25°C which might contribute to their persistence in the inanimate hospital environment. Our work has also demonstrated for the first time the ability of the members of the ACB-complex to form biofilm at the air-liquid interface, a feature that was not observed in other

  13. Carbapenem resistance in a human clinical isolate identified to be closely related to Acinetobacter indicus.

    PubMed

    Bonnin, Rémy A; Poirel, Laurent; van der Reijden, Tanny J K; Dijkshoorn, Lenie; Lescat, Mathilde; Nordmann, Patrice

    2014-10-01

    Here we report a case of carbapenem resistance in a human clinical isolate that was found to be closely related to the newly described environmental species Acinetobacter indicus. This strain harboured the blaOXA-23 carbapenemase gene located on a conjugative plasmid. Partial sequencing of 16S rDNA and rpoB genes, together with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) analysis, showed that this strain was distantly related to the Acinetobacter baumannii-calcoaceticus complex and was closely related to A. indicus.

  14. Epithelial Innate Immune Response to Acinetobacter baumannii Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhimin; Jia, Xun; Adams, Mark D.; Ghosh, Santosh K.; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, Acinetobacter baumannii is recognized as one of the major pathogens seriously threatening our health care delivery system. Aspects of the innate immune response to A. baumannii infection are not yet well understood. Human β-defensins (hBDs) are epithelial cell-derived cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) that also function to bridge the innate and adaptive immune system. We tested the induction of hBD-2 and -3 by A. baumannii on primary oral and skin epithelial cells and found that A. baumannii induces hBD-3 transcripts to a greater extent than it induces hBD-2 transcripts on both types of cells. In addition, we found that A. baumannii is susceptible to hBD-2 and -3 killing at submicromolar concentrations. Moreover, hBD-3 induction by A. baumannii was found to be dependent on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling. Inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase resulted in reduced expression of both hBD-2 and -3. Lastly, a disintegrin and metalloprotease 17 (ADAM17; also known as TACE) was found to be critical for hBD-3 induction, while ADAM10 and dual oxidase 1 (Duox1) were not required for hBD-3 induction. Induction of AMPs is an important component of innate sensing of pathogens and may play an important role in triggering systemic immune responses to A. baumannii infection. Further studies on the interactions between epithelial cells and A. baumannii will help us understand early stages of infection and may shed light on why some individuals are more vulnerable to A. baumannii infection. PMID:25114113

  15. Molecular Analysis of the Acinetobacter baumannii Biofilm-Associated Protein

    PubMed Central

    Goh, H. M. Sharon; Beatson, Scott A.; Totsika, Makrina; Moriel, Danilo G.; Phan, Minh-Duy; Szubert, Jan; Runnegar, Naomi; Sidjabat, Hanna E.; Paterson, David L.; Nimmo, Graeme R.; Lipman, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a multidrug-resistant pathogen associated with hospital outbreaks of infection across the globe, particularly in the intensive care unit. The ability of A. baumannii to survive in the hospital environment for long periods is linked to antibiotic resistance and its capacity to form biofilms. Here we studied the prevalence, expression, and function of the A. baumannii biofilm-associated protein (Bap) in 24 carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii ST92 strains isolated from a single institution over a 10-year period. The bap gene was highly prevalent, with 22/24 strains being positive for bap by PCR. Partial sequencing of bap was performed on the index case strain MS1968 and revealed it to be a large and highly repetitive gene approximately 16 kb in size. Phylogenetic analysis employing a 1,948-amino-acid region corresponding to the C terminus of Bap showed that BapMS1968 clusters with Bap sequences from clonal complex 2 (CC2) strains ACICU, TCDC-AB0715, and 1656-2 and is distinct from Bap in CC1 strains. By using overlapping PCR, the bapMS1968 gene was cloned, and its expression in a recombinant Escherichia coli strain resulted in increased biofilm formation. A Bap-specific antibody was generated, and Western blot analysis showed that the majority of A. baumannii strains expressed an ∼200-kDa Bap protein. Further analysis of three Bap-positive A. baumannii strains demonstrated that Bap is expressed at the cell surface and is associated with biofilm formation. Finally, biofilm formation by these Bap-positive strains could be inhibited by affinity-purified Bap antibodies, demonstrating the direct contribution of Bap to biofilm growth by A. baumannii clinical isolates. PMID:23956398

  16. Acinetobacter baumannii: biology and drug resistance - role of carbapenemases.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Pawel; Paluchowska, Paulina

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative, glucose-non-fermenting, oxidase-negative coccobacillus, most commonly associated with the hospital settings. The ability to survive in adverse environmental conditions as well as high level of natural and acquired antimicrobial resistance make A. baumannii one of the most important nosocomial pathogens. While carbapenems have long been considered as antimicrobials of last-resort, the rates of clinical A. baumannii strains resistant to these antibiotics are increasing worldwide. Carbapenem resistance among A. baumannii is conferred by coexisting mechanisms including: decrease in permeability of the outer membrane, efflux pumps, production of beta-lactamases, and modification of penicillin-binding proteins. The most prevalent mechanism of carbapenem resistance among A. baumannii is associated with carbapenem-hydro-lysing enzymes that belong to Ambler class D and B beta-lactamases. In addition, there have also been reports of resistance mediated by selected Ambler class A carbapenemases among A. baumannii strains. Resistance determinants in A. baumannii are located on chromosome and plasmids, while acquisition of new mechanisms can be mediated by insertion sequences, integrons, transposons, and plasmids. Clinical relevance of carbapen-em resistance among strains isolated from infected patients, carriers and hospital environment underlines the need for carbapenemase screening. Currently available methods vary in principle, accuracy and efficiency. The techniques that deserve particular attention belong to both easily accessible unsophisticated methods as well as advanced techniques based on mass spectrometry or molecular biology. While carbapenemases limit the therapeutic options in A. baumannii infections, studies concerning novel beta-lactamase inhibitors offer a new insight into effective therapy.

  17. Inverse PCR for subtyping of Acinetobacter baumannii carrying ISAba1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shukho; Park, Yun-Ju; Kim, Jungmin

    2016-05-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has been prevalent in nosocomial infections, often causing outbreaks in intensive care units. ISAba1 is an insertion sequence that has been identified only in A. baumannii and its copy number varies among strains. It has been reported that ISAba1 provides a promoter for bla(OXA-51-like), bla(OXA-23-like), and bla(ampC), which are associated with the resistance of A. baumannii to carbapenems and cephalosporins. The main purpose of this study was to develop a novel inverse PCR method capable of typing A. baumannii strains. The method involves three major steps: cutting of genomic DNA with a restriction enzyme, ligation, and PCR. In the first step, bacterial genomic DNA was digested with DpnI. In the second step, the digested genomic DNAs were ligated to form intramolecular circular DNAs. In the last step, the ligated circular DNAs were amplified by PCR with primers specific for ISAba1 and the amplified PCR products were electrophoresed. Twenty-two clinical isolates of A. baumannii were used for the evaluation of the inverse PCR (iPCR) typing method. Dendrogram analysis revealed two major clusters, similar to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) results. Three ISAba1-associated genes--bla(ampC), bla(OXA-66-like), and csuD--were amplified and detected in the clinical isolates. This novel iPCR typing method is comparable to PFGE in its ability to discriminate A. baumannii strains, and is a promising molecular epidemiological tool for investigating A. baumannii carrying ISAba1.

  18. Regional differences and trends in antimicrobial susceptibility of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Lob, Sibylle H; Hoban, Daryl J; Sahm, Daniel F; Badal, Robert E

    2016-04-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii, although representing a small percentage of Gram-negative bacilli isolates in intra-abdominal infections (IAIs) and urinary tract infections (UTIs), is frequently multidrug-resistant (MDR) and can pose difficult therapeutic challenges. From 2011 to 2014, 2337 A. baumannii were collected from IAIs and UTIs at 453 hospital sites in 48 countries as part of the SMART ongoing surveillance initiative. Current susceptibility and multidrug resistance, defined as resistance to at least three of the tested drug classes, were determined in a subset of 1011 isolates from 2013 to 2014. A. baumannii comprised 0.7-4.6% of all aerobic and facultative Gram-negative bacilli isolated in six global regions. MDR rates were lowest in North America (47%) and highest in Europe and the Middle East (>93%), with higher rates in ICUs than in non-ICU wards in almost all regions. Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles varied by region but resistance was high everywhere, with no drug inhibiting >70% of A. baumannii isolates in any region. Susceptibility to imipenem was highest in North America (64%) and lowest in Europe and the Middle East (≤11%). Amikacin overall was the most active of the studied agents, including against MDR isolates (of which 11-38% were susceptible). Trend analysis of only those countries that contributed isolates in each study year (2011-2014) demonstrated an increasing trend in MDR rates in the Middle East as well as decreasing susceptibility to several single antimicrobial agents in Africa, Europe and the Middle East. These patterns and trends can help direct antimicrobial therapy and infection control efforts.

  19. Epithelial innate immune response to Acinetobacter baumannii challenge.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhimin; Jia, Xun; Adams, Mark D; Ghosh, Santosh K; Bonomo, Robert A; Weinberg, Aaron

    2014-11-01

    Currently, Acinetobacter baumannii is recognized as one of the major pathogens seriously threatening our health care delivery system. Aspects of the innate immune response to A. baumannii infection are not yet well understood. Human β-defensins (hBDs) are epithelial cell-derived cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) that also function to bridge the innate and adaptive immune system. We tested the induction of hBD-2 and -3 by A. baumannii on primary oral and skin epithelial cells and found that A. baumannii induces hBD-3 transcripts to a greater extent than it induces hBD-2 transcripts on both types of cells. In addition, we found that A. baumannii is susceptible to hBD-2 and -3 killing at submicromolar concentrations. Moreover, hBD-3 induction by A. baumannii was found to be dependent on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling. Inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase resulted in reduced expression of both hBD-2 and -3. Lastly, a disintegrin and metalloprotease 17 (ADAM17; also known as TACE) was found to be critical for hBD-3 induction, while ADAM10 and dual oxidase 1 (Duox1) were not required for hBD-3 induction. Induction of AMPs is an important component of innate sensing of pathogens and may play an important role in triggering systemic immune responses to A. baumannii infection. Further studies on the interactions between epithelial cells and A. baumannii will help us understand early stages of infection and may shed light on why some individuals are more vulnerable to A. baumannii infection.

  20. Imipenem: a potent inducer of multidrug resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Han-Yueh; Chang, Kai-Chih; Kuo, Jai-Wei; Yueh, Hui-Wen; Liou, Ming-Li

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the progression of multidrug resistance upon exposure to imipenem in Acinetobacter baumannii. Eighteen A. baumannii strains, including two reference strains (ATCC 19606 and ATCC 17978), four clinical strains (AB56, AB242, AB273 and AB279) and 12 antibiotic-selected mutant strains, were used in this study. Imipenem-selected mutants were generated from imipenem-susceptible strains (ATCC 19606, ATCC 17978 and AB242) by multistep selection resistance. Amikacin-, ciprofloxacin-, colistin-, meropenem- and ceftazidime-selected mutants were also generated from the two reference strains and were used for comparison. Antibiotic susceptibilities in the absence and presence of the efflux pump inhibitors carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) and 1-(1-naphthylmethyl)-piperazine (NMP) were examined in the three imipenem-selected mutants and the three clinical multidrug-resistant (MDR) isolates. Expression profiles of the antimicrobial resistance genes in the imipenem-selected mutants and their parental strains were also determined. The results showed that imipenem was more likely, compared with the other antibiotics, to induce a MDR phenotype in the two reference strains. Differences in OXA-51-like carbapenemase, efflux pumps or/and AmpC β-lactamase expression were observed in the three imipenem-selected mutants. Moreover, a reduction in imipenem or amikacin resistance was observed when the imipenem-selected mutants and clinical isolates were exposed to NMP and CCCP. This study concluded that imipenem might be a potent inducer of multidrug resistance in A. baumannii strains. OXA-51-like carbapenemase combined with other resistance mechanisms may contribute to the development of multidrug resistance in A. baumannii. Monitoring the use of carbapenems is required to reduce the spread of MDR A. baumannii in hospitals.

  1. Towards the complete small RNome of Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Andy; Broach, William H.; Lee, Mackenzie C.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the Gram-negative bacterium Acinetobacter baumannii has garnered considerable attention for its unprecedented capacity to rapidly develop resistance to antibacterial therapeutics. This is coupled with the seemingly epidemic emergence of new hyper-virulent strains. Although strain-specific differences for A. baumannii isolates have been well described, these studies have primarily focused on proteinaceous factors. At present, only limited publications have investigated the presence and role of small regulatory RNA (sRNA) transcripts. Herein, we perform such an analysis, describing the RNA-seq-based identification of 78 A. baumannii sRNAs in the AB5075 background. Together with six previously identified elements, we include each of these in a new genome annotation file, which will serve as a tool to investigate regulatory events in this organism. Our work reveals that the sRNAs display high expression, accounting for >50 % of the 20 most strongly expressed genes. Through conservation analysis we identified six classes of similar sRNAs, with one found to be particularly abundant and homologous to regulatory, C4 antisense RNAs found in bacteriophages. These elements appear to be processed from larger transcripts in an analogous manner to the phage C4 molecule and are putatively controlled by two further sRNAs that are strongly antisense to them. Collectively, this study offers a detailed view of the sRNA content of A. baumannii, exposing sequence and structural conservation amongst these elements, and provides novel insight into the potential evolution, and role, of these understudied regulatory molecules. PMID:28348845

  2. Antibiotic modulation of capsular exopolysaccharide and virulence in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Geisinger, Edward; Isberg, Ralph R

    2015-02-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic pathogen of increasing importance due to its propensity for intractable multidrug-resistant infections in hospitals. All clinical isolates examined contain a conserved gene cluster, the K locus, which determines the production of complex polysaccharides, including an exopolysaccharide capsule known to protect against killing by host serum and to increase virulence in animal models of infection. Whether the polysaccharides determined by the K locus contribute to intrinsic defenses against antibiotics is unknown. We demonstrate here that mutants deficient in the exopolysaccharide capsule have lowered intrinsic resistance to peptide antibiotics, while a mutation affecting sugar precursors involved in both capsule and lipopolysaccharide synthesis sensitizes the bacterium to multiple antibiotic classes. We observed that, when grown in the presence of certain antibiotics below their MIC, including the translation inhibitors chloramphenicol and erythromycin, A. baumannii increases production of the K locus exopolysaccharide. Hyperproduction of capsular exopolysaccharide is reversible and non-mutational, and occurs concomitantly with increased resistance to the inducing antibiotic that is independent of the presence of the K locus. Strikingly, antibiotic-enhanced capsular exopolysaccharide production confers increased resistance to killing by host complement and increases virulence in a mouse model of systemic infection. Finally, we show that augmented capsule production upon antibiotic exposure is facilitated by transcriptional increases in K locus gene expression that are dependent on a two-component regulatory system, bfmRS. These studies reveal that the synthesis of capsule, a major pathogenicity determinant, is regulated in response to antibiotic stress. Our data are consistent with a model in which gene expression changes triggered by ineffectual antibiotic treatment cause A. baumannii to transition between states of low

  3. Antibiotic Modulation of Capsular Exopolysaccharide and Virulence in Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Geisinger, Edward; Isberg, Ralph R.

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic pathogen of increasing importance due to its propensity for intractable multidrug-resistant infections in hospitals. All clinical isolates examined contain a conserved gene cluster, the K locus, which determines the production of complex polysaccharides, including an exopolysaccharide capsule known to protect against killing by host serum and to increase virulence in animal models of infection. Whether the polysaccharides determined by the K locus contribute to intrinsic defenses against antibiotics is unknown. We demonstrate here that mutants deficient in the exopolysaccharide capsule have lowered intrinsic resistance to peptide antibiotics, while a mutation affecting sugar precursors involved in both capsule and lipopolysaccharide synthesis sensitizes the bacterium to multiple antibiotic classes. We observed that, when grown in the presence of certain antibiotics below their MIC, including the translation inhibitors chloramphenicol and erythromycin, A. baumannii increases production of the K locus exopolysaccharide. Hyperproduction of capsular exopolysaccharide is reversible and non-mutational, and occurs concomitantly with increased resistance to the inducing antibiotic that is independent of the presence of the K locus. Strikingly, antibiotic-enhanced capsular exopolysaccharide production confers increased resistance to killing by host complement and increases virulence in a mouse model of systemic infection. Finally, we show that augmented capsule production upon antibiotic exposure is facilitated by transcriptional increases in K locus gene expression that are dependent on a two-component regulatory system, bfmRS. These studies reveal that the synthesis of capsule, a major pathogenicity determinant, is regulated in response to antibiotic stress. Our data are consistent with a model in which gene expression changes triggered by ineffectual antibiotic treatment cause A. baumannii to transition between states of low

  4. Epidemiologic and Clinical Impact of Acinetobacter baumannii Colonization and Infection

    PubMed Central

    Villar, Macarena; Cano, María E.; Gato, Eva; Garnacho-Montero, José; Miguel Cisneros, José; Ruíz de Alegría, Carlos; Fernández-Cuenca, Felipe; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Vila, Jordi; Pascual, Alvaro; Tomás, María; Bou, Germán; Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the most important antibiotic-resistant nosocomial bacteria. We investigated changes in the clinical and molecular epidemiology of A. baumannii over a 10-year period. We compared the data from 2 prospective multicenter cohort studies in Spain, one performed in 2000 (183 patients) and one in 2010 (246 patients), which included consecutive patients infected or colonized by A. baumannii. Molecular typing was performed by repetitive extragenic palindromic polymerase chain reaction (REP-PCR), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The incidence density of A. baumannii colonization or infection increased significantly from 0.14 in 2000 to 0.52 in 2010 in medical services (p < 0.001). The number of non-nosocomial health care-associated cases increased from 1.2% to 14.2%, respectively (p < 0.001). Previous exposure to carbapenems increased in 2010 (16.9% in 2000 vs 27.3% in 2010, p = 0.03). The drugs most frequently used for definitive treatment of patients with infections were carbapenems in 2000 (45%) and colistin in 2010 (50.3%). There was molecular-typing evidence of an increase in the frequency of A. baumannii acquisition in non-intensive care unit wards in 2010 (7.6% in 2000 vs 19.2% in 2010, p = 0.01). By MSLT, the ST2 clonal group predominated and increased in 2010. This epidemic clonal group was more frequently resistant to imipenem and was associated with an increased risk of sepsis, although not with severe sepsis or mortality. Some significant changes were noted in the epidemiology of A. baumannii, which is increasingly affecting patients admitted to conventional wards and is also the cause of non-nosocomial health care-associated infections. Epidemic clones seem to combine antimicrobial resistance and the ability to spread, while maintaining their clinical virulence. PMID:25181313

  5. Prevalence of OXA-type carbapenemase genes and genetic heterogeneity in clinical isolates of Acinetobacter spp. from Mangalore, India.

    PubMed

    Karunasagar, Anusha; Maiti, Biswajit; Shekar, Malathi; Shenoy M, Shalini; Karunasagar, Indrani

    2011-04-01

    The prevalence of OXA-type carbapenemase genes, ISAba1 insertion sequence, carbapenem resistance, biofilm forming ability and genetic heterogeneity in clinical isolates of Acinetobacter spp. from hospitals in Mangalore, South India was studied. Based on the presence of the bla(OXA-51) -like gene, the 62 isolates of Acinetobacter spp. were identified as 48 A. baumannii and 14 other Acinetobacter spp. The prevalence of bla(OXA-23) -like, bla(OXA-24) -like and bla(OXA-58) -like genes in A. baumannii was 47.9%, 22.9% and 4.2%, while in other Acinetobacter spp. it was 28.5%, 64.3% and 35.7% respectively. Several A. baumannii isolates (16/48) harbored the insertion sequence ISAba1 in the upstream region of the bla(OXA-23) -like gene. Resistance to meropenem was seen in 39.6% and 14.2% of A. baumannii and other Acinetobacter spp. isolates, respectively. The ability to form biofilm was observed to be higher among A. baumannii in comparison to other Acinetobacter spp. The present study shows that bla(OXA-23) -like genes are more common in A. baumannii,whereas bla(OXA-24) -like genes are common to other Acinetobacter spp. The study revealed genetic heterogeneity among the isolates, indicating multiple sources in the hospitals.

  6. The changing epidemiology of Acinetobacter spp. producing OXA carbapenemases causing bloodstream infections in Brazil: a BrasNet report.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza R; Barth, Afonso L; Zavascki, Alexandre P; Gales, Ana C; Levin, Anna S; Lucarevschi, Bianca R; Cabral, Blenda G; Brasiliense, Danielle M; Rossi, Flavia; Furtado, Guilherme H C; Carneiro, Irna Carla R S; da Silva, Juliana O; Ribeiro, Julival; Lima, Karla V B; Correa, Luci; Britto, Maria H; Silva, Mariama T; da Conceição, Marília L; Moreira, Marina; Martino, Marinês D V; de Freitas, Marise R; Oliveira, Maura S; Dalben, Mirian F; Guzman, Ricardo D; Cayô, Rodrigo; Morais, Rosângela; Santos, Sânia A; Martins, Willames M B S

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the epidemiology of Acinetobacter spp. recovered from patients diagnosed with bloodstream infections in 9 tertiary hospitals located in all Brazilian geographic regions between April and August 2014. Although OXA-23-producing Acinetobacter baumannii clones were disseminated in most hospitals, it was observed for the first time the spread of OXA-72 among clonally related A. baumannii isolated from distinct hospitals. Interestingly, Acinetobacter pittii was the most frequent species found in a Northern region hospital. Contrasting with the multisusceptible profile displayed by A. pittii isolates, the tetracyclines and polymyxins were the only antimicrobials active against all A. baumannii isolates.

  7. Global transcriptome and physiological responses of Acinetobacter oleivorans DR1 exposed to distinct classes of antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Heo, Aram; Jang, Hyun-Jin; Sung, Jung-Suk; Park, Woojun

    2014-01-01

    The effects of antibiotics on environment-originated nonpathogenic Acinetobacter species have been poorly explored. To understand the antibiotic-resistance mechanisms that function in nonpathogenic Acinetobacter species, we used an RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) technique to perform global gene-expression profiling of soil-borne Acinetobacter oleivorans DR1 after exposing the bacteria to 4 classes of antibiotics (ampicillin, Amp; kanamycin, Km; tetracycline, Tc; norfloxacin, Nor). Interestingly, the well-known two global regulators, the soxR and the rpoE genes are present among 41 commonly upregulated genes under all 4 antibiotic-treatment conditions. We speculate that these common genes are essential for antibiotic resistance in DR1. Treatment with the 4 antibiotics produced diverse physiological and phenotypic changes. Km treatment induced the most dramatic phenotypic changes. Examination of mutation frequency and DNA-repair capability demonstrated the induction of the SOS response in Acinetobacter especially under Nor treatment. Based on the RNA-seq analysis, the glyoxylate-bypass genes of the citrate cycle were specifically upregulated under Amp treatment. We also identified newly recognized non-coding small RNAs of the DR1 strain, which were also confirmed by Northern blot analysis. These results reveal that treatment with antibiotics of distinct classes differentially affected the gene expression and physiology of DR1 cells. This study expands our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of antibiotic-stress response of environment-originated bacteria and provides a basis for future investigations.

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of a Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Strain from Chile.

    PubMed

    Opazo, Andrés; Lopes, Bruno S; García, Patricia; Domínguez Yévenes, Mariana; Lima, Celia; Bello-Toledo, Helia; González-Rocha, Gerardo; Amyes, Sebastian G B

    2015-07-02

    Acinetobacter baumannii strain Ab5 was isolated in the year 2007 in Chile, being one of the first multidrug-resistant (MDR) cases reported in the country. Here, we present the very first draft genome sequence of an MDR Chilean strain, which shows the presence of diverse resistance and acquired virulence genes.

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of a Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Strain from Chile

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Bruno S.; García, Patricia; Domínguez Yévenes, Mariana; Lima, Celia; Bello-Toledo, Helia; González-Rocha, Gerardo; Amyes, Sebastian G. B.

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii strain Ab5 was isolated in the year 2007 in Chile, being one of the first multidrug-resistant (MDR) cases reported in the country. Here, we present the very first draft genome sequence of an MDR Chilean strain, which shows the presence of diverse resistance and acquired virulence genes. PMID:26139713

  10. First Genome Sequence of a Mexican Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Graña-Miraglia, Lucía; Lozano, Luis; Castro-Jaimes, Semiramis; Cevallos, Miguel A.; Volkow, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as an important nosocomial pathogen worldwide. Here, we present the draft genome of the first multidrug-resistant A. baumannii isolate, sampled from a tertiary hospital in Mexico City. This genome will provide a starting point for studying the genomic diversity of this species in Mexico. PMID:27013043

  11. Draft Genome Sequences of Clinical Isolates of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Keesha E.; Madinger, Nancy E.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report here the draft genome sequences of two clinically isolated Acinetobacter baumannii strains. These samples were obtained from patients at the University of Colorado Hospital in 2007 and 2013 and encode an estimated 20 and 13 resistance genes, respectively. PMID:28153899

  12. Occurrence of an Environmental Acinetobacter baumannii Strain Similar to a Clinical Isolate in Paleosol from Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Durn, Goran; Goic-Barisic, Ivana; Kovacic, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, bacteria of the genus Acinetobacter have emerged as a leading cause of hospital-acquired infections. Outbreaks of Acinetobacter infections are considered to be caused exclusively by contamination and transmission in hospital environments. The natural habitats of clinically important multiresistant Acinetobacter spp. remain to be defined. In this paper, we report an incidental finding of a viable multidrug-resistant strain of Acinetobacter baumannii, related to clinical isolates, in acid paleosol from Croatia. The environmental isolate of A. baumannii showed 87% similarity to a clinical isolate originating from a hospital in this geographic area and was resistant to gentamicin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, ciprofloxacin, and levofloxacin. In paleosol, the isolate was able to survive a low pH (3.37), desiccation, and a high temperature (50°C). The probable source of A. baumannii in paleosol is illegally disposed waste of external origin situated in the abandoned quarry near the sampling site. The bacteria could have been leached from waste by storm water and thus infiltrated the paleosol. PMID:24584245

  13. The Impact of Antibiotic Consumption on Development of Acinetobacter Baumannii Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Granov, Djana; Ljubovic, Amela Dedeic; Zec, Svjetlana Loga; Granov, Nermir; Hukic, Mirsada

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to examine the impact of antibiotic consumption on development of antimicrobial resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii. Material and Methods: The study was conducted in University Clinical Center of Sarajevo. In our retrospective study Acinetobacter baumannii isolated in period from July 1st 2009 to December 31st 2012. Isolates were detected from different clinical samples including urine, wound swab, blood, bronchial aspirate and other samples which were collected from patients situated on various hospital wards. Clinical isolates belonged to one per patient in a given period of time. Results: Antimicrobial resistance was interpreted according to CLSI breakpoints. Consumption of antibiotics was analyzed according to recommendations of the ESAC-Net and current Acinetobacter baumannii classification. Pearson’s correlation showed a positive correlation between gentamicin consumption and emerging of resistance (p = 0.023). Conclusion: Increase in the antimicrobial use was followed with an increase in resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii isolates. Monitoring of antibiotic resistance and consumption is of a great importance in order to reduce the emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistant organisms in the health care settings. PMID:28144198

  14. Colistin methanesulfonate against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in an in vitro pharmacodynamic model.

    PubMed

    Kroeger, Lisa A; Hovde, Laurie B; Mitropoulos, Isaac F; Schafer, Jeremy; Rotschafer, John C

    2007-09-01

    Using an in vitro pharmacodynamic model, a multidrug-resistant strain of Acinetobacter baumannii was exposed to colistin methanesulfonate alone and in combination with ceftazidime. Pre- and postexposure colistin sulfate MICs were determined. A single daily dose of colistin methanesulfonate combined with continuous-infusion ceftazidime prevented regrowth and postexposure MIC increases.

  15. Whole-Genome Sequencing Elucidates Epidemiology of Nosocomial Clusters of Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Willems, Stefanie; Kampmeier, Stefanie; Bletz, Stefan; Kossow, Annelene; Köck, Robin; Kipp, Frank

    2016-01-01

    We characterized two epidemiologically similar Acinetobacter baumannii clusters from two separate intensive care units (ICU) using core genome multilocus sequence typing. Clonal spread was confirmed in ICU-1 (12 of 14 isolates shared genotypes); in ICU-2, all genotypes (13 isolates) were diverse, thus excluding transmissions and enabling adequate infection control measures. PMID:27358465

  16. First Identification of OXA-72 Carbapenemase from Acinetobacter pittii in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Montealegre, Maria Camila; Maya, Juan José; Correa, Adriana; Espinal, Paula; Mojica, Maria F.; Ruiz, Sory J.; Rosso, Fernando; Vila, Jordi; Quinn, John P.

    2012-01-01

    OXA-72 has been reported in few countries around the world. We report the first case in Colombia in an Acinetobacter pittii clinical isolate. The arrival of a new OXA, into a country with high endemic resistance, poses a significant threat, especially because the potential for widespread dissemination is considerable. PMID:22508295

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of Lytic Bacteriophage LZ35 Infecting Acinetobacter baumannii Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhonghe; Huang, Honglan; Wu, Xiaolin; Hao, Yuchong

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen that is frequently associated with nosocomial infections. Bacteriophages infecting A. baumannii can be used as effective agents to control these infections. Here, we announce the complete genome sequence of the lytic bacteriophage LZ35 infecting A. baumannii isolates. PMID:27856573

  18. Meta-analysis of colistin for the treatment of Acinetobacter baumannii infection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhijin; Chen, Yu; Fang, Yaogao; Wang, Xiaotian; Chen, Yanqing; Qi, Qingsong; Huang, Fang; Xiao, Xungang

    2015-11-24

    Multidrug resistant among Acinetobacter baumannii infection is associated with a high mortality rate and limits the therapeutic options. The aim of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of colistin monotherapy vs. other single antibiotic therapy AND colistin-based combination therapy (with other antibiotics) vs. colistin alone for the treatment of Acinetobacter baumannii infection. Online electronic database were searched for studies evaluating colistin with or without other antibiotics in treatment of patients with drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infection. Totally, twelve studies met the inclusion criteria. For colistin-based combination therapy, six articles including 668 patients were included. Our results showed that the overall clinical response did not differ significantly between colistin-based combination therapy and monotherapy (OR = 1.37, 95% CI = 0.86-2.19, P = 0.18). This insignificance was also detected in ICU mortality, length of stay and nephrotoxicity (P > 0.05). However, the colistin-based combination therapy was shown increasing the microbiological response (OR = 2.14, 95% CI = 1.48-3.07, P < 0.0001). For colistin monotherapy, six studies involving 491 patients were analyzed. The results were in concordance with the findings of the colistin-based combination therapy group. Our results suggest that colistin may be a promising therapy as safe and efficacious as standard antibiotics for the treatment of drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infection.

  19. Multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii reaches a new frontier: prosthetic hip joint infection.

    PubMed

    Hischebeth, G T R; Wimmer, M D; Molitor, E; Seifert, H; Gravius, S; Bekeredjian-Ding, I

    2015-02-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging nosocomial pathogen primarily in countries with a high prevalence of multidrug resistance. Here we report the detection of a bla OXA23 carbapenemase-producing A. baumannii strain in a German patient with prosthetic hip joint infection following several hip joint surgeries but no history of foreign travel.

  20. Severe Community-Acquired Bloodstream Infection with Acinetobacter ursingii in Person who Injects Drugs.

    PubMed

    Salzer, Helmut J F; Rolling, Thierry; Schmiedel, Stefan; Klupp, Eva-Maria; Lange, Christoph; Seifert, Harald

    2016-01-01

    We report a community-acquired bloodstream infection with Acinteobacter ursingii in an HIV-negative woman who injected drugs. The infection was successfully treated with meropenem. Species identification was performed by using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Improved identification of Acinetobacter spp. by using this method will help identify clinical effects of this underdiagnosed pathogen.

  1. Antimicrobial Susceptibility and Mechanisms of Resistance to Quinolones and β-Lactams in Acinetobacter Genospecies 3

    PubMed Central

    Ribera, A.; Fernández-Cuenca, F.; Beceiro, A.; Bou, G.; Martínez-Martínez, L.; Pascual, A.; Cisneros, J. M.; Rodríguez-Baño, J.; Pachón, J.; Vila, J.

    2004-01-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined in 15 epidemiologically unrelated clinical isolates of Acinetobacter genospecies 3. Moreover, the mechanisms of resistance to some β-lactam antibiotics may be associated with the presence of a chromosomal cephalosporinase, AmpC, and the resistance to quinolones related to mutations in the gyrA and parC genes. PMID:15047561

  2. Monitoring Precursor 16S rRNAs of Acinetobacter spp. in Activated Sludge Wastewater Treatment Systems

    PubMed Central

    Oerther, Daniel B.; Pernthaler, Jakob; Schramm, Andreas; Amann, Rudolf; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2000-01-01

    Recently, Cangelosi and Brabant used oligonucleotide probes targeting the precursor 16S rRNA of Escherichia coli to demonstrate that the levels of precursor rRNA were more sensitive to changes in growth phase than the levels of total rRNA (G. A. Cangelosi and W. H. Brabant, J. Bacteriol. 179:4457–4463, 1997). In order to measure changes in the levels of precursor rRNA in activated sludge systems, we designed oligonucleotide probes targeting the 3′ region of the precursor 16S rRNA of Acinetobacter spp. We used these probes to monitor changes in the level of precursor 16S rRNA during batch growth of Acinetobacter spp. in Luria-Bertani (LB) medium, filtered wastewater, and in lab- and full-scale wastewater treatment systems. Consistent with the previous reports for E. coli, results obtained with membrane hybridizations and fluorescence in situ hybridizations with Acinetobacter calcoaceticus grown in LB medium showed a more substantial and faster increase in precursor 16S rRNA levels compared to the increase in total 16S rRNA levels during exponential growth. Diluting an overnight culture of A. calcoaceticus grown in LB medium with filtered wastewater resulted in a pattern of precursor 16S rRNA levels that appeared to follow diauxic growth. In addition, fluorescence in situ hybridizations with oligonucleotide probes targeting total 16S rRNA and precursor 16S rRNA showed that individual cells of A. calcoaceticus expressed highly variable levels of precursor 16S rRNA when adapting from LB medium to filtered sewage. Precursor 16S rRNA levels of Acinetobacter spp. transiently increased when activated sludge was mixed with influent wastewater in lab- and full-scale wastewater treatment systems. These results suggest that Acinetobacter spp. experience a change in growth activity within wastewater treatment systems. PMID:10788395

  3. Molecular Epidemiology of Aminoglycosides Resistance in Acinetobacter Spp. with Emergence of Multidrug-Resistant Strains

    PubMed Central

    Moniri, R; Farahani, R Kheltabadi; Shajari, Gh; Shirazi, MH. Nazem; Ghasemi, A

    2010-01-01

    Background: Acinetobacter spp. is characterized as an important nosocomial pathogen and increasing antimicrobial resistance. Our aim was to evaluate antimicrobial susceptibility and aminoglycosides resistance genes of Acinetobacter spp. isolated from hospitalized patients. Methods: Sixty isolates were identified as Acinetobacter species. The isolates were tested for antibiotic resistance by disc diffusion method for 12 antimicrobials. The presence of aphA6, aacC1 aadA1, and aadB genes were detected using PCR. Results: From the isolated Acinetobacter spp. the highest resistance rate showed against amikacin, tobramycin, and ceftazidim, respectively; while isolated bacteria were more sensitive to ampicillic/subactam. More than 66% of the isolates were resistant to at least three classes of antibiotics, and 27.5% of MDR strains were resistant to all seven tested classes of antimicrobials. The higher MDR rate presented in bacteria isolated from the ICU and blood samples. More than 60% of the MDR bacteria were resistance to amikacin, ceftazidim, ciprofloxacin, piperacillin/tazobactam, doxycycline, tobramycin and levofloxacin. Also, more than 60% of the isolates contained phosphotransferase aphA6, and acetyltransferase genes aacC1, but adenylyltransferase genes aadA1 (41.7%), and aadB (3.3%) were less prominent. 21.7% of the strains contain three aminoglycoside resistance genes (aphA6, aacC1 and aadA1). Conclusion: The rising trend of resistance to aminoglycosides poses an alarming threat to treatment of such infections. The findings showed that clinical isolates of Acinetobacter spp. in our hospital carrying various kinds of aminoglycoside resistance genes. PMID:23113008

  4. Acinetobacter seifertii Isolated from China: Genomic Sequence and Molecular Epidemiology Analyses.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yunxing; Wang, Jianfeng; Fu, Ying; Ruan, Zhi; Yu, Yunsong

    2016-03-01

    Clinical infections caused by Acinetobacter spp. have increasing public health concerns because of their global occurrence and ability to acquire multidrug resistance. Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii (ACB) complex encompasses A. calcoaceticus, A. baumannii, A. pittii (formerly genomic species 3), and A nosocomial (formerly genomic species 13TU), which are predominantly responsible for clinical pathogenesis in the Acinetobacter genus. In our previous study, a putative novel species isolated from 385 non-A. baumannii spp. strains based on the rpoB gene phylogenetic tree was reported. Here, the putative novel species was identified as A. seifertii based on the whole-genome phylogenetic tree. A. seifertii was recognized as a novel member of the ACB complex and close to A. baumannii and A. nosocomials. Furthermore, we studied the characteristics of 10 A. seifertii isolates, which were distributed widely in 6 provinces in China and mainly caused infections in the elderly or children. To define the taxonomic status and characteristics, the biochemical reactions, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and whole-genome sequence analysis were performed. The phenotypic characteristics failed to distinguish A. serfertii from other species in the ACB complex. Most of the A. seifertii isolates were susceptible to antibiotics commonly used for nosocomial Acinetobacter spp. infections, but one isolate (strain A362) was resistant to ampicillin/sulbactam, ceftazidime and amikacin. The different patterns of MLST and PFGE suggested that the 10 isolates were not identical and lacked clonal relatedness. Our study reported for the first time the molecular epidemiological and genomic features of widely disseminated A. seifertii in China. These observations could enrich the knowledge of infections caused by non-A. baumannii and may provide a scientific basis for future clinical treatment.

  5. Prevalence of digestive tract colonization of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in hospitals in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Aljindan, Reem; Bukharie, Huda; Alomar, Amer; Abdalhamid, Baha

    2015-04-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii is a major health problem worldwide, especially in intensive care units (ICUs). This study aimed to detect the prevalence of A. baumannii colonization of the gastrointestinal tract of patients admitted to the ICU in two hospitals in Saudi Arabia. In addition, it aimed to characterize the molecular mechanisms of carbapenem resistance in these isolates. From January to June 2014, 565 rectal swab specimens were screened for Acinetobacer strains and carbapenem resistance using CHROMagar Acinetobacter and CHROMagar KPC agar plates, respectively. Organism identification and susceptibility were detected using the Vitek 2 system. A total of 47 Acinetobacter spp. were detected, and 35 were resistant to carbapenem, making the prevalence of Acinetobacter spp. 8.3% (47/565) and carbapenem resistance (6.2%, 35/565). The 47 strains showed remarkable clonal diversity as revealed by PFGE. Using PCR, OXA-51, a chromosomal marker for A. baumannii, was detected in 46 strains. OXA-23 β-lactamase was detected in all 35 carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii. No IMP, VIM, SPM, SIM, GIM, KPC or NDM β-lactamases were detected in these isolates. Thus, OXA-23 was the main mechanism of carbapenem resistance in these isolates. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to detect the prevalence of Acinetobacter colonization in the digestive tract of ICU patients in Saudi Arabia. This study revealed the importance of having well-established protocols for early identification of these multidrug-resistant organisms, optimizing infection-control strategies and having active surveillance studies to reduce morbidity, mortality and cost.

  6. Acinetobacter baumannii Genes Required for Bacterial Survival during Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Subashchandrabose, Sargurunathan; Smith, Sara; DeOrnellas, Valerie; Crepin, Sebastien; Kole, Monica; Zahdeh, Carina

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acinetobacter baumannii is emerging as a leading global multiple-antibiotic-resistant nosocomial pathogen. The identity of genes essential for pathogenesis in a mammalian host remains largely unknown. Using transposon-directed insertion-site sequencing (TraDIS), we identified A. baumannii genes involved in bacterial survival in a leukopenic mouse model of bloodstream infection. Mice were inoculated with a pooled transposon mutant library derived from 109,000 mutants, and TraDIS was used to map transposon insertion sites in the genomes of bacteria in the inoculum and of bacteria recovered from mouse spleens. Unique transposon insertion sites were mapped and used to calculate a fitness factor for every insertion site based on its relative abundance in the inoculum and postinfection libraries. Eighty-nine transposon insertion mutants that were underrepresented after experimental infection in mice compared to their presence in the inocula were delineated as candidates for further evaluation. Genetically defined mutants lacking feoB (ferrous iron import), ddc (d-ala-d-ala-carboxypeptidase), and pntB (pyridine nucleotide transhydrogenase subunit) exhibited a fitness defect during systemic infection resulting from bacteremia. In vitro, these mutants, as well as a fepA (ferric enterobactin receptor) mutant, are defective in survival in human serum and within macrophages and are hypersensitive to killing by antimicrobial peptides compared to the survival of the parental strain under these conditions. Our data demonstrate that FepA is involved in the uptake of exogenous enterobactin in A. baumannii. Genetic complementation rescues the phenotypes of mutants in assays that emulate conditions encountered during infection. In summary, we have determined novel A. baumannii fitness genes involved in the pathogenesis of mammalian infection. IMPORTANCE A. baumannii is a significant cause of bacterial bloodstream infection in humans. Since multiple antibiotic resistance

  7. Post Neurosurgical Meningitis due to Colistin Heteroresistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Moosavian, Mojtaba; Shoja, Saeed; Nashibi, Roohangiz; Ebrahimi, Nasim; Tabatabaiefar, Mohammad Amin; Rostami, Soodabeh; Peymani, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Recently Acinetobacter baumannii isolates have emerged as a problematic infectious agent that causes meningitis in neurosurgical patients. Colistin has been used successfully for the treatment of A. baumannii meningitis but colistin resistant isolates have been reported worldwide. Case Presentation: Two isolates of A. baumannii were cultured during a five-day period from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples of a 20-year-old man with a gunshot trauma in the abdomen, which had exited from his back. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests of isolates were performed. Multiplex PCR was performed for detection of blaOXA-23-like, blaOXA-24-like and blaOXA-58-like genes. Metallo-β-lactamase genes such as: blaVIM, blaIMP, blaSPM and blaNDM were sought by singleplex PCR. In order to evaluate the genetic relationship, two isolates were examined by the repetitive extragenic palindromic-polymerase chain reaction (REP_PCR) method. Conclusions: E-test results showed that the isolates were sensitive to colistin and tigecycline with minimum inhibitory concentration of (MIC) 0.25 µg/mL and 1.5 µg/mL, respectively. Secondly the isolates were resistant to colistin with MIC > 256 µg/mL but remained sensitive to tigecycline with MIC 1.5 µg/mL. On the basis of the multiplex PCR, both of the isolates were positive for blaOXA-23-like. Other investigated genes such as blaOXA-24-like, blaOXA-58-like, blaVIM, blaIMP, blaSPM and blaNDM were negative. REP-PCR results showed that two isolates were derived from a single strain and both were the same. The results of our study revealed that the firs isolate of A. baumannii was colistin heteroresistant and was changed to completely resistant during therapy. Diagnosis and treatment of A. baumannii meningitis is very important and to avoid treatment failure we suggest that all A. baumannii isolates obtained from CSF should be evaluated properly for colistin heteroresistance. PMID:25632326

  8. Pseudomonas kuykendallii sp. nov.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is a submission to the list of microorganisms with standing in nomenclature maintained by the International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. We wish to have Pseudomonas kuykendallii sp. nov. added to the list as a valid species belonging to the genus Pseudomonas. Three str...

  9. Identification and Antibacterial Activity of Bacteria Isolated from Marine Sponge Haliclona (Reniera) sp. against Multi-Drug Resistant Human Pathogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardhanu Asagabaldan, Meezan; Ayuningrum, D.; Kristiana, R.; Sabdono, A.; Radjasa, O. K.; Trianto, A.

    2017-02-01

    The marine sponge Haliclona (Reniera) sp. was a potential source of natural bioactive compounds. This sponge widely distributed along the coast of Panjang Island, Jepara, Indonesia. The aims of this research were to isolate the associated bacteria with Haliclona (Reniera) sp. and to screen the antibacterial activity against Multi-Drug Resistant (MDR) bacteria. Amount five bacteria were isolated using media selective for bacteria. The antibacterial activities of bacteria were performed by overlay methods. The bacteria strain PSP. 39-04 had the best activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Enterobacter cloaceae. Based on colony morphology and phylogenetic characterization using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, PSP 39-04 was closely related with Chromohalobacter salixigens strain DSM3043.

  10. Colistin and tigecycline for management of external ventricular device-related ventriculitis due to multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Gentle Sunder; Tamang, Sushil; Paneru, Hem Raj; Shrestha, Pramesh Sunder; Keyal, Niraj; Acharya, Subhash Prasad; Marhatta, Moda Nath; Shilpakar, Sushil

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important cause of nosocomial ventriculitis associated with external ventricular device (EVD). It is frequently multidrug resistant (MDR), carries a poor outcome, and is difficult to treat. We report a case of MDR Acinetobacter ventriculitis treated with intravenous and intraventricular colistin together with intravenous tigecycline. The patient developed nephrotoxicity and poor neurological outcome despite microbiological cure. Careful implementation of bundle of measures to minimize EVD-associated ventriculitis is valuable. PMID:27365967

  11. Prevalence, genomic and metabolic profiles of Acinetobacter and Asaia associated with field-caught Aedes albopictus from Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Minard, Guillaume; Tran, Florence Hélène; Raharimalala, Fara Nantenaina; Hellard, Eléonore; Ravelonandro, Pierre; Mavingui, Patrick; Valiente Moro, Claire

    2013-01-01

    The presence of cultivable bacteria Acinetobacter and Asaia was recently demonstrated in the mosquito vector Aedes albopictus. However, it is not known how prevalent these bacteria are in field populations. Here, the presence of these bacteria in Ae. albopictus populations from Madagascar was diagnosed by amplification of 16S rRNA gene fragments. Both genera were detected at relatively high frequencies, 46% for Asaia and 74% for Acinetobacter. The prevalence of Acinetobacter correlated significantly with mosquito gender, and the prevalence of Asaia with the interaction between mosquito gender and the sampling site. For each bacterial genus, more male than female mosquitoes were infected. Using pulse field gel electrophoresis, no significant difference in genome size was found between Acinetobacter isolates from mosquitoes compared with free-living Acinetobacter. However, a great diversity was observed in plasmid numbers (from 1 to 12) and sizes (from < 8 to 690 kb). Mosquito isolates utilized fewer substrates than free-living isolates, but some substrates known as blood or plant components were specifically utilized by mosquito isolates. Therefore it is likely that a specific subpopulation of Acinetobacter is selected by Ae. albopictus. Overall, this study emphasizes the need to gain a global view on the bacterial partners in mosquito vectors.

  12. Prevalence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. in subgingival biofilm and saliva of subjects with chronic periodontal infection.

    PubMed

    Souto, Renata; Silva-Boghossian, Carina M; Colombo, Ana Paula Vieira

    2014-01-01

    P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. are important pathogens associated with late nosocomial pneumonia in hospitalized and institutionalized individuals. The oral cavity may be a major source of these respiratory pathogens, particularly in the presence of poor oral hygiene and periodontal infection. This study investigated the prevalence of P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. in subgingival biofilm and saliva of subjects with periodontal disease or health. Samples were obtained from 55 periodontally healthy (PH) and 169 chronic periodontitis (CP) patients. DNA was obtained from the samples and detection of P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. was carried out by multiplex and nested PCR. P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. were detected in 40% and 45% of all samples, respectively. No significant differences in the distribution of these microorganisms between men and women, subgingival biofilm and saliva samples, patients ≤ 35 and > 35 years of age, and smokers and non-smokers were observed regardless periodontal status (p > 0.05). In contrast, the frequencies of P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. in saliva and biofilm samples were significantly greater in CP than PH patients (p < 0.01). Smokers presenting P. aeruginosa and high frequencies of supragingival plaque were more likely to present CP than PH. P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. are frequently detected in the oral microbiota of CP. Poor oral hygiene, smoking and the presence of P. aeruginosa are strongly associated with periodontitis.

  13. Prevalence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. in subgingival biofilm and saliva of subjects with chronic periodontal infection

    PubMed Central

    Souto, Renata; Silva-Boghossian, Carina M.; Colombo, Ana Paula Vieira

    2014-01-01

    P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. are important pathogens associated with late nosocomial pneumonia in hospitalized and institutionalized individuals. The oral cavity may be a major source of these respiratory pathogens, particularly in the presence of poor oral hygiene and periodontal infection. This study investigated the prevalence of P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. in subgingival biofilm and saliva of subjects with periodontal disease or health. Samples were obtained from 55 periodontally healthy (PH) and 169 chronic periodontitis (CP) patients. DNA was obtained from the samples and detection of P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. was carried out by multiplex and nested PCR. P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. were detected in 40% and 45% of all samples, respectively. No significant differences in the distribution of these microorganisms between men and women, subgingival biofilm and saliva samples, patients ≤ 35 and > 35 years of age, and smokers and non-smokers were observed regardless periodontal status (p > 0.05). In contrast, the frequencies of P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. in saliva and biofilm samples were significantly greater in CP than PH patients (p < 0.01). Smokers presenting P. aeruginosa and high frequencies of supragingival plaque were more likely to present CP than PH. P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. are frequently detected in the oral microbiota of CP. Poor oral hygiene, smoking and the presence of P. aeruginosa are strongly associated with periodontitis. PMID:25242933

  14. Iron acquisition functions expressed by the human pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Zimbler, Daniel L; Penwell, William F; Gaddy, Jennifer A; Menke, Sharon M; Tomaras, Andrew P; Connerly, Pamela L; Actis, Luis A

    2009-02-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a gram-negative bacterium that causes serious infections in compromised patients. More recently, it has emerged as the causative agent of severe infections in military personnel wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan. This pathogen grows under a wide range of conditions including iron-limiting conditions imposed by natural and synthetic iron chelators. Initial studies using the type strain 19606 showed that the iron proficiency of this pathogen depends on the expression of the acinetobactin-mediated iron acquisition system. More recently, we have observed that hemin but not human hemoglobin serves as an iron source when 19606 isogenic derivatives affected in acinetobactin transport and biosynthesis were cultured under iron-limiting conditions. This finding is in agreement with the observation that the genome of the strain 17978 has a gene cluster coding for putative hemin-acquisition functions, which include genes coding for putative hemin utilization functions and a TonBExbBD energy transducing system. This system restored enterobactin biosynthesis in an E. coli ExbBD deficient strain but not when introduced into a TonB mutant. PCR and Southern blot analyses showed that this hemin-utilization gene cluster is also present in the 19606 strain. Analysis of the 17978 genome also showed that this strain harbors genes required for acinetobactin synthesis and transport as well as a gene cluster that could code for additional iron acquisition functions. This hypothesis is in agreement with the fact that the inactivation of the basD acinetobactin biosynthetic gene did not affect the growth of A. baumannii 17978 cells under iron-chelated conditions. Interestingly, this second iron uptake gene cluster is flanked by perfect inverted repeats and includes transposase genes that are expressed transcriptionally. Also interesting is the observation that this additional cluster could not be detected in the type strain 19606, an observation that suggests some

  15. Carbapenem Resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii and Other Acinetobacter spp. Causing Neonatal Sepsis: Focus on NDM-1 and Its Linkage to ISAba125.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Somdatta; Datta, Saswati; Roy, Subhasree; Ramanan, Lavanya; Saha, Anindya; Viswanathan, Rajlakshmi; Som, Tapas; Basu, Sulagna

    2016-01-01

    Carbapenem-resistant determinants and their surrounding genetic structure were studied in Acinetobacter spp. from neonatal sepsis cases collected over 7 years at a tertiary care hospital. Acinetobacter spp. (n = 68) were identified by ARDRA followed by susceptibility tests. Oxacillinases, metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs), extended-spectrum β-lactamases and AmpCs, were detected phenotypically and/or by PCR followed by DNA sequencing. Transconjugants possessing the bla NDM-1(New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase) underwent further analysis for plasmids, integrons and associated genes. Genetic environment of the carbapenemases were studied by PCR mapping and DNA sequencing. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify risk factors for sepsis caused by NDM-1-harboring organisms. A. baumannii (72%) was the predominant species followed by A. calcoaceticus (10%), A. lwoffii (6%), A. nosocomialis (3%), A. junni (3%), A. variabilis (3%), A. haemolyticus (2%), and 14TU (2%). Fifty six percent of the isolates were meropenem-resistant. Oxacillinases present were OXA-23-like, OXA-58-like and OXA-51-like, predominately in A. baumannii. NDM-1 was the dominant MBL (22%) across different Acinetobacter spp. Isolates harboring NDM-1 also possessed bla (VIM-2, PER-1, VEB-2, CTX-M-15), armA, aac(6')Ib, aac(6')Ib-cr genes. bla NDM-1was organized in a composite transposon between two copies of ISAba125 in the isolates irrespective of the species. Further, OXA-23-like gene and OXA-58-like genes were linked with ISAba1 and ISAba3 respectively. Isolates were clonally diverse. Integrons were variable in sequence but not associated with carbapenem resistance. Most commonly found genes in the 5' and 3'conserved segment were aminoglycoside resistance genes (aadB, aadA2, aac4'), non-enzymatic chloramphenicol resistance gene (cmlA1g) and ADP-ribosylation genes (arr2, arr3). Outborn neonates had a significantly higher incidence of sepsis due to NDM-1 harboring isolates than their inborn

  16. Carbapenem Resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii and Other Acinetobacter spp. Causing Neonatal Sepsis: Focus on NDM-1 and Its Linkage to ISAba125

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Somdatta; Datta, Saswati; Roy, Subhasree; Ramanan, Lavanya; Saha, Anindya; Viswanathan, Rajlakshmi; Som, Tapas; Basu, Sulagna

    2016-01-01

    Carbapenem-resistant determinants and their surrounding genetic structure were studied in Acinetobacter spp. from neonatal sepsis cases collected over 7 years at a tertiary care hospital. Acinetobacter spp. (n = 68) were identified by ARDRA followed by susceptibility tests. Oxacillinases, metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs), extended-spectrum β-lactamases and AmpCs, were detected phenotypically and/or by PCR followed by DNA sequencing. Transconjugants possessing the blaNDM−1(New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase) underwent further analysis for plasmids, integrons and associated genes. Genetic environment of the carbapenemases were studied by PCR mapping and DNA sequencing. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify risk factors for sepsis caused by NDM-1-harboring organisms. A. baumannii (72%) was the predominant species followed by A. calcoaceticus (10%), A. lwoffii (6%), A. nosocomialis (3%), A. junni (3%), A. variabilis (3%), A. haemolyticus (2%), and 14TU (2%). Fifty six percent of the isolates were meropenem-resistant. Oxacillinases present were OXA-23-like, OXA-58-like and OXA-51-like, predominately in A. baumannii. NDM-1 was the dominant MBL (22%) across different Acinetobacter spp. Isolates harboring NDM-1 also possessed bla(VIM−2, PER−1, VEB−2, CTX−M−15), armA, aac(6′)Ib, aac(6′)Ib-cr genes. blaNDM−1was organized in a composite transposon between two copies of ISAba125 in the isolates irrespective of the species. Further, OXA-23-like gene and OXA-58-like genes were linked with ISAba1 and ISAba3 respectively. Isolates were clonally diverse. Integrons were variable in sequence but not associated with carbapenem resistance. Most commonly found genes in the 5′ and 3′conserved segment were aminoglycoside resistance genes (aadB, aadA2, aac4′), non-enzymatic chloramphenicol resistance gene (cmlA1g) and ADP-ribosylation genes (arr2, arr3). Outborn neonates had a significantly higher incidence of sepsis due to NDM-1 harboring isolates than

  17. Toll-Like Receptor 9 Contributes to Defense against Acinetobacter baumannii Infection

    PubMed Central

    Noto, Michael J.; Boyd, Kelli L.; Burns, William J.; Varga, Matthew G.; Peek, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a common nosocomial pathogen capable of causing severe diseases associated with significant morbidity and mortality in impaired hosts. Pattern recognition receptors, such as the Toll-like receptors (TLRs), play a key role in pathogen detection and function to alert the immune system to infection. Here, we examine the role for TLR9 signaling in response to A. baumannii infection. In a murine model of A. baumannii pneumonia, TLR9−/− mice exhibit significantly increased bacterial burdens in the lungs, increased extrapulmonary bacterial dissemination, and more severe lung pathology compared with those in wild-type mice. Following systemic A. baumannii infection, TLR9−/− mice have significantly increased bacterial burdens in the lungs, as well as decreased proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine production. These results demonstrate that TLR9-mediated pathogen detection is important for host defense against the opportunistic pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii. PMID:26238713

  18. Toll-Like Receptor 9 Contributes to Defense against Acinetobacter baumannii Infection.

    PubMed

    Noto, Michael J; Boyd, Kelli L; Burns, William J; Varga, Matthew G; Peek, Richard M; Skaar, Eric P

    2015-10-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a common nosocomial pathogen capable of causing severe diseases associated with significant morbidity and mortality in impaired hosts. Pattern recognition receptors, such as the Toll-like receptors (TLRs), play a key role in pathogen detection and function to alert the immune system to infection. Here, we examine the role for TLR9 signaling in response to A. baumannii infection. In a murine model of A. baumannii pneumonia, TLR9(-/-) mice exhibit significantly increased bacterial burdens in the lungs, increased extrapulmonary bacterial dissemination, and more severe lung pathology compared with those in wild-type mice. Following systemic A. baumannii infection, TLR9(-/-) mice have significantly increased bacterial burdens in the lungs, as well as decreased proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine production. These results demonstrate that TLR9-mediated pathogen detection is important for host defense against the opportunistic pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii.

  19. Bacteremia due to Acinetobacter ursingii in infants: Reports of two cases.

    PubMed

    Yakut, Nurhayat; Kepenekli, Eda Kadayifci; Karaaslan, Ayse; Atici, Serkan; Akkoc, Gulsen; Demir, Sevliya Ocal; Soysal, Ahmet; Bakir, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter ursingii is an aerobic, gram-negative, opportunistic microorganism which is rarely isolated among Acinetobacter species. We present two immunocompetent infants who developed bacteremia due to A. ursingii. The first patient is a two -month- old boy who had been hospitalized in pediatric surgery unit for suspected tracheo-esophageal fistula because of recurrent aspiration pneumonia unresponsive to antibiotic therapy. The second patient is a fourteen -month- old boy with prolonged vomiting and diarrhea. A. ursingii was isolated from their blood cultures. They were successfully treated with ampicillin-sulbactam. Although A. ursingii has recently been isolated from a clinical specimen; reports of infection with A. ursingii in children are rare. A. ursingii should be kept in mind as an opportunistic microorganism in children.

  20. Novobiocin Inhibits the Antimicrobial Resistance Acquired through DNA Damage-Induced Mutagenesis in Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Jara, Luis M.; Pérez-Varela, María; Corral, Jordi; Arch, Marta; Cortés, Pilar; Bou, Germán; Barbé, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii, a worldwide emerging nosocomial pathogen, acquires antimicrobial resistances in response to DNA-damaging agents, which increase the expression of multiple error-prone DNA polymerase components. Here we show that the aminocoumarin novobiocin, which inhibits the DNA damage response in Gram-positive bacteria, also inhibits the expression of error-prone DNA polymerases in this Gram-negative multidrug-resistant pathogen and, consequently, its potential acquisition of antimicrobial resistance through DNA damage-induced mutagenesis. PMID:26503651

  1. Genomic and functional analysis of the type VI secretion system in Acinetobacter.

    PubMed

    Weber, Brent S; Miyata, Sarah T; Iwashkiw, Jeremy A; Mortensen, Brittany L; Skaar, Eric P; Pukatzki, Stefan; Feldman, Mario F

    2013-01-01

    The genus Acinetobacter is comprised of a diverse group of species, several of which have raised interest due to potential applications in bioremediation and agricultural purposes. In this work, we show that many species within the genus Acinetobacter possess the genetic requirements to assemble a functional type VI secretion system (T6SS). This secretion system is widespread among Gram negative bacteria, and can be used for toxicity against other bacteria and eukaryotic cells. The most studied species within this genus is A. baumannii, an emerging nosocomial pathogen that has become a significant threat to healthcare systems worldwide. The ability of A. baumannii to develop multidrug resistance has severely reduced treatment options, and strains resistant to most clinically useful antibiotics are frequently being isolated. Despite the widespread dissemination of A. baumannii, little is known about the virulence factors this bacterium utilizes to cause infection. We determined that the T6SS is conserved and syntenic among A. baumannii strains, although expression and secretion of the hallmark protein Hcp varies between strains, and is dependent on TssM, a known structural protein required for T6SS function. Unlike other bacteria, A. baumannii ATCC 17978 does not appear to use its T6SS to kill Escherichia coli or other Acinetobacter species. Deletion of tssM does not affect virulence in several infection models, including mice, and did not alter biofilm formation. These results suggest that the T6SS fulfils an important but as-yet-unidentified role in the various lifestyles of the Acinetobacter spp.

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of the Biofilm-Hyperproducing Acinetobacter baumannii Clinical Strain MAR002

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Fraga, Laura; López, María; Merino, María; Rumbo-Feal, Soraya; Tomás, María

    2015-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Acinetobacter baumannii strain MAR002, a biofilm-hyperproducing clinical strain isolated during the study CP/09/0033 (GEIH/REIPI-Ab2010, Spain). The genome of A. baumannii MAR002 has an approximate length of 3,717,929 bp and 3,300 protein-coding sequences, with a C+G content of 39.09%. PMID:26205868

  3. Role of OmpA in the Multidrug Resistance Phenotype of Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Fàbrega, Anna; Roca, Ignasi; Sánchez-Encinales, Viviana; Vila, Jordi; Pachón, Jerónimo

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a nosocomial pathogen with an increased prevalence of multidrug-resistant strains. The role of the outer membrane protein A (OmpA) in antimicrobial resistance remains poorly understood. In this report, disruption of the ompA gene led to decreased MICs of chloramphenicol, aztreonam, and nalidixic acid. We have characterized, for the first time, the contribution of OmpA in the antimicrobial resistance phenotype of A. baumannii. PMID:24379205

  4. First report of NDM-1-producing Acinetobacter baumannii sequence type 25 in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pillonetto, Marcelo; Arend, Lavinia; Vespero, Eliana Carolina; Pelisson, Marsileni; Chagas, Thiago Pavoni Gomes; Carvalho-Assef, Ana Paula D'Alincourt; Asensi, Marise Dutra

    2014-12-01

    New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase 1 (NDM-1) was first identified in Brazil in Enterobacter hormaechei and Providencia rettgeri in 2013. Here, we describe the first case of NDM-1-producing Acinetobacter baumannii sequence type 25 isolated from the urinary tract of a 71-year-old man who died of multiple complications, including A. baumannii infection. The NDM-1 gene was detected by quantitative PCR, and its sequence confirmed its presence in an ∼ 100-kb plasmid.

  5. Diversity and Clinical Impact of Acinetobacter baumannii Colonization and Infection at a Military Medical Center ▿

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Kyle; Cannegieter, Suzanne C.; van der Reijden, Tanny J.; van Strijen, Beppie; You, David M.; Babel, Britta S.; Philip, Andrew I.; Dijkshoorn, Lenie

    2011-01-01

    The epidemiology of Acinetobacter baumannii emerging in combat casualties is poorly understood. We analyzed 65 (54 nonreplicate) Acinetobacter isolates from 48 patients (46 hospitalized and 2 outpatient trainees entering the military) from October 2004 to October 2005 for genotypic similarities, time-space relatedness, and antibiotic susceptibility. Clinical and surveillance cultures were compared by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) genomic fingerprinting to each other and to strains of a reference database. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined, and multiplex PCR was performed for OXA-23-like, -24-like, -51-like, and -58-like carbapenemases. Records were reviewed for overlapping hospital stays of the most frequent genotypes, and risk ratios were calculated for any association of genotype with severity of Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score or injury severity score (ISS) and previous antibiotic use. Nineteen genotypes were identified; two predominated, one consistent with an emerging novel international clone and the other unique to our database. Both predominant genotypes were carbapenem resistant, were present at another hospital before patients' admission to our facility, and were associated with higher APACHE II scores, higher ISSs, and previous carbapenem antibiotics in comparison with other genotypes. One predominated in wound and respiratory isolates, and the other predominated in wound and skin surveillance samples. Several other genotypes were identified as European clones I to III. Acinetobacter genotypes from recruits upon entry to the military, unlike those in hospitalized patients, did not include carbapenem-resistant genotypes. Acinetobacter species isolated from battlefield casualties are diverse, including genotypes belonging to European clones I to III. Two carbapenem-resistant genotypes were epidemic, one of which appeared to belong to a novel international clone. PMID:21084513

  6. The genomic diversification of the whole Acinetobacter genus: origins, mechanisms, and consequences.

    PubMed

    Touchon, Marie; Cury, Jean; Yoon, Eun-Jeong; Krizova, Lenka; Cerqueira, Gustavo C; Murphy, Cheryl; Feldgarden, Michael; Wortman, Jennifer; Clermont, Dominique; Lambert, Thierry; Grillot-Courvalin, Catherine; Nemec, Alexandr; Courvalin, Patrice; Rocha, Eduardo P C

    2014-10-13

    Bacterial genomics has greatly expanded our understanding of microdiversification patterns within a species, but analyses at higher taxonomical levels are necessary to understand and predict the independent rise of pathogens in a genus. We have sampled, sequenced, and assessed the diversity of genomes of validly named and tentative species of the Acinetobacter genus, a clade including major nosocomial pathogens and biotechnologically important species. We inferred a robust global phylogeny and delimited several new putative species. The genus is very ancient and extremely diverse: Genomes of highly divergent species share more orthologs than certain strains within a species. We systematically characterized elements and mechanisms driving genome diversification, such as conjugative elements, insertion sequences, and natural transformation. We found many error-prone polymerases that may play a role in resistance to toxins, antibiotics, and in the generation of genetic variation. Surprisingly, temperate phages, poorly studied in Acinetobacter, were found to account for a significant fraction of most genomes. Accordingly, many genomes encode clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas systems with some of the largest CRISPR-arrays found so far in bacteria. Integrons are strongly overrepresented in Acinetobacter baumannii, which correlates with its frequent resistance to antibiotics. Our data suggest that A. baumannii arose from an ancient population bottleneck followed by population expansion under strong purifying selection. The outstanding diversification of the species occurred largely by horizontal transfer, including some allelic recombination, at specific hotspots preferentially located close to the replication terminus. Our work sets a quantitative basis to understand the diversification of Acinetobacter into emerging resistant and versatile pathogens.

  7. In vitro and in vivo biological activities of iron chelators and gallium nitrate against Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    de Léséleuc, Louis; Harris, Greg; KuoLee, Rhonda; Chen, Wangxue

    2012-10-01

    We investigated the ability of compounds interfering with iron metabolism to inhibit the growth of Acinetobacter baumannii. Iron restriction with transferrin or 2,2-bipyridyl significantly inhibited A. baumannii growth in vitro. Gallium nitrate alone was moderately effective at reducing A. baumannii growth but became bacteriostatic in the presence of serum or transferrin. More importantly, gallium nitrate treatment reduced lung bacterial burdens in mice. The use of gallium-based therapies shows promise for the control of multidrug-resistant A. baumannii.

  8. Prevalence of antibiotic resistance among Acinetobacter baumannii isolates from Aleppo, Syria.

    PubMed

    Hamzeh, Abdul Rezzak; Al Najjar, Mona; Mahfoud, Maysa

    2012-10-01

    This study describes and analyzes Acinetobacter baumannii antibiotic susceptibly profile in Aleppo, Syria, thus providing vital information for guiding treatment of A baumannii infections. Two hundred sixty nonrepetitive A baumannii isolates were studied over 3.5 years. Resistance rates are at the higher end of globally reported levels. Newer cephalosporins and β-lactamase-resistant agents are becoming practically ineffective. Better activity is limited to carbapenems and colistin, which elicited the highest susceptibility levels.

  9. Factors associated with recovery of Acinetobacter baumannii in a combat support hospital.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Matthew E; Gonzalez, Russell S; Holcomb, John B; Hospenthal, Duane R; Wortmann, Glenn W; Murray, Clinton K

    2008-07-01

    A retrospective review of hospital records for Acinetobacter baumannii infection at a US Army combat support hospital revealed a monthly infection rate ranging from 20.5 to 0 cases per 1,000 patients admitted. The rate correlated with the mean census of host-nation patients in the intensive care unit, the mean census of host-nation patients on the wards, and length of stay in the intensive care unit.

  10. Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter pittii strain harboring blaOXA-72 from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Chagas, Thiago Pavoni Gomes; Tavares E Oliveira, Thamirys Rachel; D'Alincourt Carvalho-Assef, Ana Paula; Albano, Rodolpho M; Asensi, Marise Dutra

    2017-02-06

    In this study, we report the isolation of OXA-72-producing Acinetobacter pittii in Brazil. A carbapenem-resistant A. pittii strain was recovered from a hospitalized female patient from Espírito Santo, Southeastern Brazil. PCR screening and DNA sequencing allowed us to identify the presence of blaOXA-72. We observed blaOXA-72 in a ~11kb plasmid and flanked by XerC/XerD-binding sites.

  11. Phylogenetic signal in phenotypic traits related to carbon source assimilation and chemical sensitivity in Acinetobacter species.

    PubMed

    Van Assche, Ado; Álvarez-Pérez, Sergio; de Breij, Anna; De Brabanter, Joseph; Willems, Kris A; Dijkshoorn, Lenie; Lievens, Bart

    2017-01-01

    A common belief is that the phylogeny of bacteria may reflect molecular functions and phenotypic characteristics, pointing towards phylogenetic conservatism of traits. Here, we tested this hypothesis for a large set of Acinetobacter strains. Members of the genus Acinetobacter are widespread in nature, demonstrate a high metabolic diversity and are resistant to several environmental stressors. Notably, some species are known to cause opportunistic human infections. A total of 133 strains belonging to 33 species with validly published names, two genomic species and species of an as-yet unknown taxonomic status were analyzed using the GENIII technology of Biolog, which allows high-throughput phenotyping. We estimated the strength and significance of the phylogenetic signal of each trait across phylogenetic reconstructions based on partial RNA polymerase subunit B (rpoB) and core genome sequences. Secondly, we tested whether phylogenetic distance was a good predictor of trait differentiation by Mantel test analysis. And finally, evolutionary model fitting was used to determine if the data for each phenotypic character was consistent with a phylogenetic or an essentially random model of trait distribution. Our data revealed that some key phenotypic traits related to substrate assimilation and chemical sensitivity are linked to the phylogenetic placement of Acinetobacter species. The strongest phylogenetic signals found were for utilization of different carbon sources such as some organic acids, amino acids and sugars, thus suggesting that in the diversification of Acinetobacter carbon source assimilation has had a relevant role. Future work should be aimed to clarify how such traits have shaped the remarkable ability of this bacterial group to dominate in a wide variety of habitats.

  12. Utility of Whole-Genome Sequencing in Characterizing Acinetobacter Epidemiology and Analyzing Hospital Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Margaret A.; Hauser, Alan R.

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii frequently causes nosocomial infections and outbreaks. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) is a promising technique for strain typing and outbreak investigations. We compared the performance of conventional methods with WGS for strain typing clinical Acinetobacter isolates and analyzing a carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii (CRAB) outbreak. We performed two band-based typing techniques (pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and repetitive extragenic palindromic-PCR), multilocus sequence type (MLST) analysis, and WGS on 148 Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex bloodstream isolates collected from a single hospital from 2005 to 2012. Phylogenetic trees inferred from core-genome single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) confirmed three Acinetobacter species within this collection. Four major A. baumannii clonal lineages (as defined by MLST) circulated during the study, three of which are globally distributed and one of which is novel. WGS indicated that a threshold of 2,500 core SNPs accurately distinguished A. baumannii isolates from different clonal lineages. The band-based techniques performed poorly in assigning isolates to clonal lineages and exhibited little agreement with sequence-based techniques. After applying WGS to a CRAB outbreak that occurred during the study, we identified a threshold of 2.5 core SNPs that distinguished nonoutbreak from outbreak strains. WGS was more discriminatory than the band-based techniques and was used to construct a more accurate transmission map that resolved many of the plausible transmission routes suggested by epidemiologic links. Our study demonstrates that WGS is superior to conventional techniques for A. baumannii strain typing and outbreak analysis. These findings support the incorporation of WGS into health care infection prevention efforts. PMID:26699703

  13. The Genomic Diversification of the Whole Acinetobacter Genus: Origins, Mechanisms, and Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Touchon, Marie; Cury, Jean; Yoon, Eun-Jeong; Krizova, Lenka; Cerqueira, Gustavo C.; Murphy, Cheryl; Feldgarden, Michael; Wortman, Jennifer; Clermont, Dominique; Lambert, Thierry; Grillot-Courvalin, Catherine; Nemec, Alexandr; Courvalin, Patrice; Rocha, Eduardo P.C.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial genomics has greatly expanded our understanding of microdiversification patterns within a species, but analyses at higher taxonomical levels are necessary to understand and predict the independent rise of pathogens in a genus. We have sampled, sequenced, and assessed the diversity of genomes of validly named and tentative species of the Acinetobacter genus, a clade including major nosocomial pathogens and biotechnologically important species. We inferred a robust global phylogeny and delimited several new putative species. The genus is very ancient and extremely diverse: Genomes of highly divergent species share more orthologs than certain strains within a species. We systematically characterized elements and mechanisms driving genome diversification, such as conjugative elements, insertion sequences, and natural transformation. We found many error-prone polymerases that may play a role in resistance to toxins, antibiotics, and in the generation of genetic variation. Surprisingly, temperate phages, poorly studied in Acinetobacter, were found to account for a significant fraction of most genomes. Accordingly, many genomes encode clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas systems with some of the largest CRISPR-arrays found so far in bacteria. Integrons are strongly overrepresented in Acinetobacter baumannii, which correlates with its frequent resistance to antibiotics. Our data suggest that A. baumannii arose from an ancient population bottleneck followed by population expansion under strong purifying selection. The outstanding diversification of the species occurred largely by horizontal transfer, including some allelic recombination, at specific hotspots preferentially located close to the replication terminus. Our work sets a quantitative basis to understand the diversification of Acinetobacter into emerging resistant and versatile pathogens. PMID:25313016

  14. Diversity and clinical impact of Acinetobacter baumannii colonization and infection at a military medical center.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Kyle; Cannegieter, Suzanne C; van der Reijden, Tanny J; van Strijen, Beppie; You, David M; Babel, Britta S; Philip, Andrew I; Dijkshoorn, Lenie

    2011-01-01

    The epidemiology of Acinetobacter baumannii emerging in combat casualties is poorly understood. We analyzed 65 (54 nonreplicate) Acinetobacter isolates from 48 patients (46 hospitalized and 2 outpatient trainees entering the military) from October 2004 to October 2005 for genotypic similarities, time-space relatedness, and antibiotic susceptibility. Clinical and surveillance cultures were compared by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) genomic fingerprinting to each other and to strains of a reference database. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined, and multiplex PCR was performed for OXA-23-like, -24-like, -51-like, and -58-like carbapenemases. Records were reviewed for overlapping hospital stays of the most frequent genotypes, and risk ratios were calculated for any association of genotype with severity of Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score or injury severity score (ISS) and previous antibiotic use. Nineteen genotypes were identified; two predominated, one consistent with an emerging novel international clone and the other unique to our database. Both predominant genotypes were carbapenem resistant, were present at another hospital before patients' admission to our facility, and were associated with higher APACHE II scores, higher ISSs, and previous carbapenem antibiotics in comparison with other genotypes. One predominated in wound and respiratory isolates, and the other predominated in wound and skin surveillance samples. Several other genotypes were identified as European clones I to III. Acinetobacter genotypes from recruits upon entry to the military, unlike those in hospitalized patients, did not include carbapenem-resistant genotypes. Acinetobacter species isolated from battlefield casualties are diverse, including genotypes belonging to European clones I to III. Two carbapenem-resistant genotypes were epidemic, one of which appeared to belong to a novel international clone.

  15. CraA, a Major Facilitator Superfamily Efflux Pump Associated with Chloramphenicol Resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii▿

    PubMed Central

    Roca, I.; Marti, S.; Espinal, P.; Martínez, P.; Gibert, I.; Vila, J.

    2009-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has been increasingly associated with hospital-acquired infections, and the presence of multidrug resistance strains is of great concern to clinicians. A. baumannii is thought to possess a great deal of intrinsic resistance to several antimicrobial agents, including chloramphenicol, although the mechanisms involved in such resistance are not well understood. In this work, we have identified a major facilitator superfamily efflux pump present in most A. baumannii strains, displaying strong substrate specificity toward chloramphenicol. PMID:19581458

  16. Evaluation of the effect of appropriate antimicrobial therapy on mortality associated with Acinetobacter nosocomialis bacteraemia.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Shu-Chen; Lee, Yi-Tzu; Yang, Su-Pen; Chiang, Mei-Chun; Lin, Yi-Tsung; Tseng, Fan-Chen; Chen, Te-Li; Fung, Chang-Phone

    2013-07-01

    Appropriate antimicrobial therapy is effective for severe infections caused by Acinetobacter baumannii, but efficacy for other Acinetobacter species remains to be established. The current study was designed to determine whether appropriate antimicrobial therapy reduces the mortality of patients with Acinetobacter nosocomialis bacteraemia. A 9-year retrospective study of 266 patients with monomicrobial A. nosocomialis bacteraemia was conducted at a large teaching hospital in Taiwan. Multivariable analysis was performed to evaluate the impact on 14-day mortality according to clinical characteristics, severity of disease and use of appropriate antimicrobial therapy. The influence of APACHE II score on the impact of appropriate antimicrobial therapy was analysed by including an interaction term. The overall 14-day mortality was 9.4%. Multivariable analysis revealed that APACHE II score was the only factor significantly associated with mortality (odds ratio, 1.18; 95% confidence interval, 1.11-1.25; p <0.001). Appropriate antimicrobial therapy was not associated with reduced mortality regardless of disease severity. In the subgroup analyses in patients with different clinical conditions, APACHE II score was consistently an independent factor for 14-day mortality, and appropriate antimicrobial therapy did not affect the mortality in any group. In conclusion, severity of disease, based on the APACHE II score, was the independent risk factor for 14-day mortality for patients with monomicrobial A. nosocomialis bacteraemia, even in different clinical conditions. In contrast, appropriate antimicrobial therapy did not reduce the 14-day mortality. The result highlighted a different effect of appropriate antimicrobial therapy on infections caused by two phenotypically undifferentiated Acinetobacter.

  17. Utility of Whole-Genome Sequencing in Characterizing Acinetobacter Epidemiology and Analyzing Hospital Outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Margaret A; Ozer, Egon A; Hauser, Alan R

    2016-03-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii frequently causes nosocomial infections and outbreaks. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) is a promising technique for strain typing and outbreak investigations. We compared the performance of conventional methods with WGS for strain typing clinical Acinetobacter isolates and analyzing a carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii (CRAB) outbreak. We performed two band-based typing techniques (pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and repetitive extragenic palindromic-PCR), multilocus sequence type (MLST) analysis, and WGS on 148 Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex bloodstream isolates collected from a single hospital from 2005 to 2012. Phylogenetic trees inferred from core-genome single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) confirmed three Acinetobacter species within this collection. Four major A. baumannii clonal lineages (as defined by MLST) circulated during the study, three of which are globally distributed and one of which is novel. WGS indicated that a threshold of 2,500 core SNPs accurately distinguished A. baumannii isolates from different clonal lineages. The band-based techniques performed poorly in assigning isolates to clonal lineages and exhibited little agreement with sequence-based techniques. After applying WGS to a CRAB outbreak that occurred during the study, we identified a threshold of 2.5 core SNPs that distinguished nonoutbreak from outbreak strains. WGS was more discriminatory than the band-based techniques and was used to construct a more accurate transmission map that resolved many of the plausible transmission routes suggested by epidemiologic links. Our study demonstrates that WGS is superior to conventional techniques for A. baumannii strain typing and outbreak analysis. These findings support the incorporation of WGS into health care infection prevention efforts.

  18. Metabolism of spacecraft cleaning reagents by Mars Odyssey and Phoenix-associated Acinetobacter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogul, Rakesh; Barding, Gregory; Baki, Ryan; Perkins, Nicole; Lee, Sooji; Lalla, Sid; Campos, Alexa; Sripong, Kimberly; Madrid, Steve

    2016-07-01

    The metabolomic and proteomic properties that promote microbial survival in spacecraft assembly facilities are important aspects to planetary protection and astrobiology. In this presentation, we will provide molecular and biological evidence that the spacecraft-associated Acinetobacter metabolize/degrade spacecraft cleaning reagents such as ethanol, 2-propanol, and Kleenol-30. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) studies on A. radioresistens 50v1 (Mars Odyssey) show that the metabolome is dependent upon growth conditions and that ^{13}C-labeled ethanol is incorporated into metabolites such as TCA/glyoxylate cycle intermediates, amino acids, monosaccharides, and disaccharides (e.g., trehalose). In fact, plate count assays show that ethanol is a sole carbon source under minimal conditions for several Mars Phoenix and Odyssey-associated Acinetobacter strains, which may explain why the Acinetobacter are among the most abundant genera found in spacecraft assembly facilities. Biochemical analyses support the enzymatic oxidation of ethanol and 2-propanol by a membrane-bound and NAD+/PQQ-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase, with current kinetic data providing similar apparent K _{M} and maximum growth rate values of ˜5 and 8 mM ethanol, respectively. Preliminary GC-MS analysis also suggests that Kleenol-30 is degraded by A. radioresistens 50v1 when grown in ethanol mixtures. Under minimal conditions, A. radioresistens 50v1 (˜10 ^{8} cfu/mL) also displays a remarkable oxidative extremotolerance (˜2-log reduction in 10 mM hydrogen peroxide), which suggests crucial roles for metabolites associated with oxidative stress (e.g., trehalose) and the observed appreciable catalase specific activities. In conclusion, these results provide key insights into the survival strategies of spacecraft-associated Acinetobacter and emphasize the importance of characterizing the carbon metabolism of forward contaminants.

  19. Dienelactone hydrolase from Pseudomonas sp. strain B13.

    PubMed Central

    Ngai, K L; Schlömann, M; Knackmuss, H J; Ornston, L N

    1987-01-01

    Dienelactone hydrolase (EC 3.1.1.45) catalyzes the conversion of cis- or trans-4-carboxymethylenebut-2-en-4-olide (dienelactone) to maleylacetate. An approximately 24-fold purification from extracts of 3-chlorobenzoate-grown Pseudomonas sp. strain B13 yielded a homogeneous preparation of the enzyme. The purified enzyme crystallized readily and proved to be a monomer with a molecular weight of about 30,000. Each dienelactone hydrolase molecule contains two cysteinyl side chains. One of these was readily titrated by stoichiometric amounts of p-chloromercuribenzoate, resulting in inactivation of the enzyme; the inactivation could be reversed by the addition of dithiothreitol. The other cysteinyl side chain appeared to be protected in the native protein against chemical reaction with p-chloromercuribenzoate. The properties of sulfhydryl side chains in dienelactone hydrolase resembled those that have been characterized for bacterial 4-carboxymethylbut-3-en-4-olide (enol-lactone) hydrolases (EC 3.1.1.24), which also are monomers with molecular weights of about 30,000. The amino acid composition of the dienelactone hydrolase resembled the amino acid composition of enol-lactone hydrolase from Pseudomonas putida, and alignment of the NH2-terminal amino acid sequence of the dienelactone hydrolase with the corresponding sequence of an Acinetobacter calcoaceticus enol-lactone hydrolase revealed sequence identity at 8 of the 28 positions. These observations foster the hypothesis that the lactone hydrolases share a common ancestor. The lactone hydrolases differed in one significant property: the kcat of dienelactone hydrolase was 1,800 min-1, an order of magnitude below the kcat observed with enol-lactone hydrolases. The relatively low catalytic activity of dienelactone hydrolase may demand its production at the high levels observed for induced cultures of Pseudomonas sp. strain B13. PMID:3804973

  20. The Population Structure of Acinetobacter baumannii: Expanding Multiresistant Clones from an Ancestral Susceptible Genetic Pool

    PubMed Central

    Diancourt, Laure; Passet, Virginie; Nemec, Alexandr; Dijkshoorn, Lenie; Brisse, Sylvain

    2010-01-01

    Outbreaks of hospital infections caused by multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strains are of increasing concern worldwide. Although it has been reported that particular outbreak strains are geographically widespread, little is known about the diversity and phylogenetic relatedness of A. baumannii clonal groups. Sequencing of internal portions of seven housekeeping genes (total 2,976 nt) was performed in 154 A. baumannii strains covering the breadth of known diversity and including representatives of previously recognized international clones, and in 19 representatives of other Acinetobacter species. Restricted amounts of diversity and a star-like phylogeny reveal that A. baumannii is a genetically compact species that suffered a severe bottleneck in the recent past, possibly linked to a restricted ecological niche. A. baumannii is neatly demarcated from its closest relative (genomic species 13TU) and other Acinetobacter species. Multilocus sequence typing analysis demonstrated that the previously recognized international clones I to III correspond to three clonal complexes, each made of a central, predominant genotype and few single locus variants, a hallmark of recent clonal expansion. Whereas antimicrobial resistance was almost universal among isolates of these and a novel international clone (ST15), isolates of the other genotypes were mostly susceptible. This dichotomy indicates that antimicrobial resistance is a major selective advantage that drives the ongoing rapid clonal expansion of these highly problematic agents of nosocomial infections. PMID:20383326

  1. Galleria mellonella as a model system to study Acinetobacter baumannii pathogenesis and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Peleg, Anton Y; Jara, Sebastian; Monga, Divya; Eliopoulos, George M; Moellering, Robert C; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2009-06-01

    Nonmammalian model systems of infection such as Galleria mellonella (caterpillars of the greater wax moth) have significant logistical and ethical advantages over mammalian models. In this study, we utilize G. mellonella caterpillars to study host-pathogen interactions with the gram-negative organism Acinetobacter baumannii and determine the utility of this infection model to study antibacterial efficacy. After infecting G. mellonella caterpillars with a reference A. baumannii strain, we observed that the rate of G. mellonella killing was dependent on the infection inoculum and the incubation temperature postinfection, with greater killing at 37 degrees C than at 30 degrees C (P = 0.01). A. baumannii strains caused greater killing than the less-pathogenic species Acinetobacter baylyi and Acinetobacter lwoffii (P < 0.001). Community-acquired A. baumannii caused greater killing than a reference hospital-acquired strain (P < 0.01). Reduced levels of production of the quorum-sensing molecule 3-hydroxy-C(12)-homoserine lactone caused no change in A. baumannii virulence against G. mellonella. Treatment of a lethal A. baumannii infection with antibiotics that had in vitro activity against the infecting A. baumannii strain significantly prolonged the survival of G. mellonella caterpillars compared with treatment with antibiotics to which the bacteria were resistant. G. mellonella is a relatively simple, nonmammalian model system that can be used to facilitate the in vivo study of host-pathogen interactions in A. baumannii and the efficacy of antibacterial agents.

  2. Salt adaptation in Acinetobacter baylyi: identification and characterization of a secondary glycine betaine transporter.

    PubMed

    Sand, Miriam; de Berardinis, Veronique; Mingote, Ana; Santos, Helena; Göttig, Stephan; Müller, Volker; Averhoff, Beate

    2011-10-01

    Members of the genus Acinetobacter are well known for their metabolic versatility that allows them to adapt to different ecological niches. Here, we have addressed how the model strain Acinetobacter baylyi copes with different salinities and low water activities. A. baylyi tolerates up to 900 mM sodium salts and even higher concentrations of potassium chloride. Growth at high salinities was better in complex than in mineral medium and addition of glycine betaine stimulated growth at high salinities in mineral medium. Cells grown at high salinities took up glycine betaine from the medium. Uptake of glycine betaine was energy dependent and dependent on a salinity gradient across the membrane. Inspection of the genome sequence revealed two potential candidates for glycine betaine transport, both encoding potential secondary transporters, one of the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) class (ACIAD2280) and one of the betaine/choline/carnitine transporter (BCCT) family (ACIAD3460). The latter is essential for glycine betaine transport in A. baylyi. The broad distribution of ACIAD3460 homologues indicates the essential role of secondary transporters in the adaptation of Acinetobacter species to osmotic stress.

  3. Signature motifs identify an Acinetobacter Cif virulence factor with epoxide hydrolase activity.

    PubMed

    Bahl, Christopher D; Hvorecny, Kelli L; Bridges, Andrew A; Ballok, Alicia E; Bomberger, Jennifer M; Cady, Kyle C; O'Toole, George A; Madden, Dean R

    2014-03-14

    Endocytic recycling of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is blocked by the CFTR inhibitory factor (Cif). Originally discovered in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Cif is a secreted epoxide hydrolase that is transcriptionally regulated by CifR, an epoxide-sensitive repressor. In this report, we investigate a homologous protein found in strains of the emerging nosocomial pathogens Acinetobacter nosocomialis and Acinetobacter baumannii ("aCif"). Like Cif, aCif is an epoxide hydrolase that carries an N-terminal secretion signal and can be purified from culture supernatants. When applied directly to polarized airway epithelial cells, mature aCif triggers a reduction in CFTR abundance at the apical membrane. Biochemical and crystallographic studies reveal a dimeric assembly with a stereochemically conserved active site, confirming our motif-based identification of candidate Cif-like pathogenic EH sequences. Furthermore, cif expression is transcriptionally repressed by a CifR homolog ("aCifR") and is induced in the presence of epoxides. Overall, this Acinetobacter protein recapitulates the essential attributes of the Pseudomonas Cif system and thus may facilitate airway colonization in nosocomial lung infections.

  4. Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern in nosocomial infections caused by Acinetobacter species in Asir Region, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Nazar M; Osman, Amani A; Haimour, Waleed O; Sarhan, Mohammed A A; Mohammed, Mohammed N; Zyad, Eyhab M; Al-Ghtani, Abdalla M

    2013-03-15

    This study aimed at evaluating the sensitivity of antibiotics towards nosocomial infections caused by Acinetobacter species. The study took place during the period Dec. 2011- Dec. 2012 at Assir Central Hospital in collaboration with the department of microbiology, college of medicine, King Khalid University, Abha. A prospective study involving 150 patients presented with nosocomial infections due to Acinetobacter species detected by bacteriological tests; direct microscopy, culture in blood agar media, fermentation test in MacConkey media and MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration) for antibiotics sensitivity using Muller Hinton media and Chemical test using API 20. A 150 nosocomial infections in this study showed gram-negative coccobacilli, non motile, glucose-negative fermentor and oxidase negative. All isolates showed 100% sensitivity to: Imipramine, Meropenem, Colistin. From the rest of tested antibiotics the higher resistant ones were; Nitrofurantoin 87% and Cefoxitin 85%. The least resistant antibiotics; Imipenem 3% and Ticarcillin 7%. While variable resistance in the rest of tested antimicrobials. A 47 patients (31.3%) have used antibiotics prior to this study. The high rate of usage occurred in elder patients. The frequency of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus baumannii complex multi-drugs resistance ABCMDR is rising including almost all commonly used antibiotics. Only few antibiotics exert 100% sensitivity towards these bacteria.

  5. Molecular detection of Acinetobacter species in lice and keds of domestic animals in Oromia Regional State, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Kumsa, Bersissa; Socolovschi, Cristina; Parola, Philippe; Rolain, Jean-Marc; Raoult, Didier

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the presence of Acinetobacter and Rickettsia species DNA in lice and Melophagus ovinus (sheep ked) of animals from Oromia Regional State in Ethiopia. From September through November 2011, a total of 207 cattle, 85 sheep, 47 dogs and 16 cats were examined for ectoparasites. Results of morphological identification revealed several species of ectoparasites: Linognathus vituli (L. vituli), Bovicola bovis (B. bovis) and Solenopotes capillatus (S. capillatus) on cattle; B. ovis and Melophagus ovinus (M. ovinus) on sheep; and Heterodoxus spiniger (H. spiniger) on dogs. There was a significantly (p≤0.0001) higher prevalence of L. vituli observed in cattle than both S. capillatus and B. bovis. Molecular identification of lice using an 18S rRNA gene analysis confirms the identified lice species by morphological methods. We detected different Acinetobacter species among lice (11.1%) and keds (86.4%) including A. soli in L. vituli of cattle, A. lowffii in M. ovinus of sheep, A. pittii in H. spiniger of dogs, 1 new Acinetobacter spp. in M. ovinus and 2 new Acinetobacter spp. in H. spiniger of dogs using partial rpoB gene sequence analysis. There was a significantly higher prevalence of Acinetobacter spp. in keds than in lice (p≤0.00001). Higher percentage of Acinetobacter spp. DNA was detected in H. spiniger than in both B. ovis and L. vituli (p≤0.00001). Carbapenemase resistance encoding genes for blaOXA-23, blaOXA-24, blaOXA-58, blaNDM-1 and blaOXA-51 were not found in any lice and keds. These findings suggest that synanthropic animals and their ectoparasites might increase the risk of human exposure to zoonotic pathogens and could be a source for Acinetobacter spp. infections in humans. However, additional epidemiological data are required to determine whether ectoparasites of animals can act as environmental reservoirs and play a role in spreading these bacteria to both animal and human hosts.

  6. Molecular Detection of Acinetobacter Species in Lice and Keds of Domestic Animals in Oromia Regional State, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Kumsa, Bersissa; Socolovschi, Cristina; Parola, Philippe; Rolain, Jean-Marc; Raoult, Didier

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the presence of Acinetobacter and Rickettsia species DNA in lice and Melophagus ovinus (sheep ked) of animals from Oromia Regional State in Ethiopia. From September through November 2011, a total of 207 cattle, 85 sheep, 47 dogs and 16 cats were examined for ectoparasites. Results of morphological identification revealed several species of ectoparasites: Linognathus vituli (L. vituli), Bovicola bovis (B. bovis) and Solenopotes capillatus (S. capillatus) on cattle; B. ovis and Melophagus ovinus (M. ovinus) on sheep; and Heterodoxus spiniger (H. spiniger) on dogs. There was a significantly (p≤0.0001) higher prevalence of L. vituli observed in cattle than both S. capillatus and B. bovis. Molecular identification of lice using an 18S rRNA gene analysis confirms the identified lice species by morphological methods. We detected different Acinetobacter species among lice (11.1%) and keds (86.4%) including A. soli in L. vituli of cattle, A. lowffii in M. ovinus of sheep, A. pittii in H. spiniger of dogs, 1 new Acinetobacter spp. in M. ovinus and 2 new Acinetobacter spp. in H. spiniger of dogs using partial rpoB gene sequence analysis. There was a significantly higher prevalence of Acinetobacter spp. in keds than in lice (p≤0.00001). Higher percentage of Acinetobacter spp. DNA was detected in H. spiniger than in both B. ovis and L. vituli (p≤0.00001). Carbapenemase resistance encoding genes for blaOXA-23, blaOXA-24, blaOXA-58, blaNDM-1 and blaOXA-51 were not found in any lice and keds. These findings suggest that synanthropic animals and their ectoparasites might increase the risk of human exposure to zoonotic pathogens and could be a source for Acinetobacter spp. infections in humans. However, additional epidemiological data are required to determine whether ectoparasites of animals can act as environmental reservoirs and play a role in spreading these bacteria to both animal and human hosts. PMID:23285015

  7. Isolation and application of Gordonia sp. JC11 for removal of boat lubricants.

    PubMed

    Chanthamalee, Jirapat; Luepromchai, Ekawan

    2012-01-01

    Boat lubricants are continuously released into the marine environment and thereby cause chronic oil pollution. This study aims to isolate lubricant-degrading microorganisms from Thai coastal areas as well as to apply a selected strain for removal of boat lubricants. Ten microorganisms in the genera of Gordonia, Microbacterium, Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, Brucella, Enterococcus and Candida were initially isolated by crude oil enrichment culture techniques. The lubricant-removal activity of these isolates was investigated with mineral-based lubricants that had been manufactured for the 4-stroke diesel engines of fishing boats. Gordonia sp. JC11, the most effective strain was able to degrade 25-55% of 1,000 mg L(-1) total hydrocarbons in six tested lubricants, while only 0-15% of the lubricants was abiotically removed. The bacterium had many characteristics that promoted lubricant degradation such as hydrocarbon utilization ability, emulsification activity and cell surface hydrophobicity. For bioaugmentation treatment of lubricant contaminated seawater, the inoculum of Gordonia sp. JC11 was prepared by immobilizing the bacterium on polyurethane foam (PUF). PUF-immobilized Gordonia sp. JC11 was able to remove 42-56% of 100-1,000 mg L(-1) waste lubricant No. 2 within 5 days. This lubricant removal efficiency was higher than those of free cells and PUF without bacterial cells. The bioaugmentation treatment significantly increased the number of lubricant-degrading microorganisms in the fishery port seawater microcosm and resulted in rapid removal of waste lubricant No. 2.

  8. Identification, Genotypic Relation, and Clinical Features of Colistin-Resistant Isolates of Acinetobacter Genomic Species 13BJ/14TU from Bloodstreams of Patients in a University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Yeob; Shin, Jong Hee; Park, Kyung Hwa; Kim, Ju Hee; Shin, Myung Geun; Suh, Soon Pal; Ryang, Dong Wook

    2014-01-01

    Colistin resistance remains rare among clinical isolates of Acinetobacter species. We noted the emergence of colistin-resistant bloodstream isolates of the Acinetobacter genomic species (GS) 13BJ/14TU from patients at a university hospital between 2003 and 2011. We report here, for the first time, the microbiological and molecular characteristics of these isolates, with clinical features of Acinetobacter GS 13BJ/14TU bacteremia. All 11 available patient isolates were correctly identified as Acinetobacter GS 13BJ/14TU using partial rpoB gene sequencing but were misidentified using the phenotypic methods Vitek 2 (mostly as Acinetobacter baumannii), MicroScan (mostly as A. baumannii/Acinetobacter haemolyticus), and the API 20 NE system (all as A. haemolyticus). Most isolates were susceptible to commonly used antibiotics, including carbapenems, but all were resistant to colistin, for which it is unknown whether the resistance is acquired or intrinsic. However, the fact that none of the patients had a history of colistin therapy strongly suggests that Acinetobacter GS 13BJ/14TU is innately resistant to colistin. The phylogenetic tree of multilocus sequence typing (MLST) showed that all 11 isolates formed a separate cluster from other Acinetobacter species and yielded five sequence types. However, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) revealed 11 distinct patterns, suggesting that the bacteremia had occurred sporadically. Four patients showed persistent bacteremia (6 to 17 days), and all 11 patients had excellent outcomes with cleared bacteremia, suggesting that patients with Acinetobacter GS 13BJ/14TU-associated bacteremia show a favorable outcome. These results emphasize the importance of precise species identification, especially regarding colistin resistance in Acinetobacter species. In addition, MLST offers another approach to the identification of Acinetobacter GS 13BJ/14TU, whereas PFGE is useful for genotyping for this species. PMID:24403305

  9. Identification, genotypic relation, and clinical features of colistin-resistant isolates of Acinetobacter genomic species 13BJ/14TU from bloodstreams of patients in a university hospital.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Yeob; Shin, Jong Hee; Park, Kyung Hwa; Kim, Ju Hee; Shin, Myung Geun; Suh, Soon Pal; Ryang, Dong Wook; Kim, Soo Hyun

    2014-03-01

    Colistin resistance remains rare among clinical isolates of Acinetobacter species. We noted the emergence of colistin-resistant bloodstream isolates of the Acinetobacter genomic species (GS) 13BJ/14TU from patients at a university hospital between 2003 and 2011. We report here, for the first time, the microbiological and molecular characteristics of these isolates, with clinical features of Acinetobacter GS 13BJ/14TU bacteremia. All 11 available patient isolates were correctly identified as Acinetobacter GS 13BJ/14TU using partial rpoB gene sequencing but were misidentified using the phenotypic methods Vitek 2 (mostly as Acinetobacter baumannii), MicroScan (mostly as A. baumannii/Acinetobacter haemolyticus), and the API 20 NE system (all as A. haemolyticus). Most isolates were susceptible to commonly used antibiotics, including carbapenems, but all were resistant to colistin, for which it is unknown whether the resistance is acquired or intrinsic. However, the fact that none of the patients had a history of colistin therapy strongly suggests that Acinetobacter GS 13BJ/14TU is innately resistant to colistin. The phylogenetic tree of multilocus sequence typing (MLST) showed that all 11 isolates formed a separate cluster from other Acinetobacter species and yielded five sequence types. However, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) revealed 11 distinct patterns, suggesting that the bacteremia had occurred sporadically. Four patients showed persistent bacteremia (6 to 17 days), and all 11 patients had excellent outcomes with cleared bacteremia, suggesting that patients with Acinetobacter GS 13BJ/14TU-associated bacteremia show a favorable outcome. These results emphasize the importance of precise species identification, especially regarding colistin resistance in Acinetobacter species. In addition, MLST offers another approach to the identification of Acinetobacter GS 13BJ/14TU, whereas PFGE is useful for genotyping for this species.

  10. SP-100 program developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnyer, A. D.; Sholtis, J. A., Jr.; Wahlquist, E. J.; Verga, R. L.; Wiley, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    An update is provided on the status of the Sp-100 Space Reactor Power Program. The historical background that led to the program is reviewed and the overall program objectives and development approach are discussed. The results of the mission studies identify applications for which space nuclear power is desirable and even essential. Results of a series of technology feasibility experiments are expected to significantly improve the earlier technology data base for engineering development. The conclusion is reached that a nuclear reactor space power system can be developed by the early 1990s to meet emerging mission performance requirements.

  11. SP mountain data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawson, R. F.; Hamilton, R. E.; Liskow, C. L.; Dias, A. R.; Jackson, P. L.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis of synthetic aperture radar data of SP Mountain was undertaken to demonstrate the use of digital image processing techniques to aid in geologic interpretation of SAR data. These data were collected with the ERIM X- and L-band airborne SAR using like- and cross-polarizations. The resulting signal films were used to produce computer compatible tapes, from which four-channel imagery was generated. Slant range-to-ground range and range-azimuth-scale corrections were made in order to facilitate image registration; intensity corrections were also made. Manual interpretation of the imagery showed that L-band represented the geology of the area better than X-band. Several differences between the various images were also noted. Further digital analysis of the corrected data was done for enhancement purposes. This analysis included application of an MSS differencing routine and development of a routine for removal of relief displacement. It was found that accurate registration of the SAR channels is critical to the effectiveness of the differencing routine. Use of the relief displacement algorithm on the SP Mountain data demonstrated the feasibility of the technique.

  12. Origin in Acinetobacter guillouiae and dissemination of the aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme Aph(3')-VI.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Eun-Jeong; Goussard, Sylvie; Touchon, Marie; Krizova, Lenka; Cerqueira, Gustavo; Murphy, Cheryl; Lambert, Thierry; Grillot-Courvalin, Catherine; Nemec, Alexandr; Courvalin, Patrice

    2014-10-21

    The amikacin resistance gene aphA6 was first detected in the nosocomial pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii and subsequently in other genera. Analysis of 133 whole-genome sequences covering the taxonomic diversity of Acinetobacter spp. detected aphA6 in the chromosome of 2 isolates of A. guillouiae, which is an environmental species, 1 of 8 A. parvus isolates, and 5 of 34 A. baumannii isolates. The gene was also present in 29 out of 36 A. guillouiae isolates screened by PCR, indicating that it is ancestral to this species. The Pnative promoter for aphA6 in A. guillouiae and A. parvus was replaced in A. baumannii by PaphA6, which was generated by use of the insertion sequence ISAba125, which brought a -35 sequence. Study of promoter strength in Escherichia coli and A. baumannii indicated that PaphA6 was four times more potent than Pnative. There was a good correlation between aminoglycoside MICs and aphA6 transcription in A. guillouiae isolates that remained susceptible to amikacin. The marked topology differences of the phylogenetic trees of aphA6 and of the hosts strongly support its recent direct transfer within Acinetobacter spp. and also to evolutionarily remote bacterial genera. Concomitant expression of aphA6 must have occurred because, contrary to the donors, it can confer resistance to the new hosts. Mobilization and expression of aphA6 via composite transposons and the upstream IS-generating hybrid PaphA6, followed by conjugation, seems the most plausible mechanism. This is in agreement with the observation that, in the recipients, aphA6 is carried by conjugative plasmids and flanked by IS that are common in Acinetobacter spp. Our data indicate that resistance genes can also be found in susceptible environmental bacteria. Importance: We speculated that the aphA6 gene for an enzyme that confers resistance to amikacin, the most active aminoglycoside for the treatment of nosocomial infections due to Acinetobacter spp., originated in this genus before

  13. NDM-1 encoded by a pNDM-BJ01-like plasmid p3SP-NDM in clinical Enterobacter aerogenes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhenhong; Li, Hongxia; Feng, Jiao; Li, Yuxue; Chen, Xin; Guo, Xuemin; Chen, Weijun; Wang, Li; Lin, Lei; Yang, Huiying; Yang, Wenhui; Wang, Jie; Zhou, Dongsheng; Liu, Changting; Yin, Zhe

    2015-01-01

    A carbapenem-nonsusceptible Enterobacter aerogenes strain named 3-SP was isolated from a human case of pneumonia in a Chinese teaching hospital. NDM-1 carbapenemase is produced by a pNDM-BJ01-like conjugative plasmid designated p3SP-NDM to account for carbapenem resistance of 3-SP. p3SP-NDM was fully sequenced and compared with all publically available pNDM-BJ01-like plasmids. The genetic differences between p3SP-NDM and pNDM-BJ01 include only 18 single nucleotide polymorphisms, a 1 bp deletion and a 706 bp deletion. p3SP-NDM and pNDM-BJ01 harbor an identical Tn125 element organized as ISAba125, blaNDM−1, bleMBL, ΔtrpF, dsbC, cutA, ΔgroES, groEL, ISCR27, and ISAba125. The blaNDM−1 surrounding regions in these pNDM-BJ01-like plasmids have a conserved linear organization ISAba14-aphA6-Tn125-unknown IS, with considerable genetic differences identified within or immediately downstream of Tn125. All reported pNDM-BJ01-like plasmids are exclusively found in Acinetobacter, whereas this is the first report of identification of a pNDM-BJ01-like plasmid in Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:25926823

  14. NDM-1 encoded by a pNDM-BJ01-like plasmid p3SP-NDM in clinical Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenhong; Li, Hongxia; Feng, Jiao; Li, Yuxue; Chen, Xin; Guo, Xuemin; Chen, Weijun; Wang, Li; Lin, Lei; Yang, Huiying; Yang, Wenhui; Wang, Jie; Zhou, Dongsheng; Liu, Changting; Yin, Zhe

    2015-01-01

    A carbapenem-nonsusceptible Enterobacter aerogenes strain named 3-SP was isolated from a human case of pneumonia in a Chinese teaching hospital. NDM-1 carbapenemase is produced by a pNDM-BJ01-like conjugative plasmid designated p3SP-NDM to account for carbapenem resistance of 3-SP. p3SP-NDM was fully sequenced and compared with all publically available pNDM-BJ01-like plasmids. The genetic differences between p3SP-NDM and pNDM-BJ01 include only 18 single nucleotide polymorphisms, a 1 bp deletion and a 706 bp deletion. p3SP-NDM and pNDM-BJ01 harbor an identical Tn125 element organized as ISAba125, bla NDM-1, ble MBL, ΔtrpF, dsbC, cutA, ΔgroES, groEL, ISCR27, and ISAba125. The bla NDM-1 surrounding regions in these pNDM-BJ01-like plasmids have a conserved linear organization ISAba14-aphA6-Tn125-unknown IS, with considerable genetic differences identified within or immediately downstream of Tn125. All reported pNDM-BJ01-like plasmids are exclusively found in Acinetobacter, whereas this is the first report of identification of a pNDM-BJ01-like plasmid in Enterobacteriaceae.

  15. Acetobacter intermedius, sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Boesch, C; Trcek, J; Sievers, M; Teuber, M

    1998-03-01

    Strains of a new species in the genus Acetobacter, for which we propose the name A. intermedius sp. nov., were isolated and characterized in pure culture from different sources (Kombucha beverage, cider vinegar, spirit vinegar) and different countries (Switzerland, Slovenia). The isolated strains grow in media with 3% acetic acid and 3% ethanol as does A. europaeus, do, however, not require acetic acid for growth. These characteristics phenotypically position A. intermedius between A. europaeus and A. xylinus, DNA-DNA hybridizations of A. intermedius-DNA with DNA of the type strains of Acetobacter europaeus, A. xylinus, A. aceti, A. hansenii, A. liquefaciens, A. methanolicus, A. pasteurianus, A. diazotrophicus, Gluconobacter oxydans and Escherichia coli HB 101 indicated less than 60% DNA similarity. The important features of the new species are described. Acetobacter intermedius strain TF2 (DSM11804) isolated from the liquid phase of a tea fungus beverage (Kombucha) is the type strain.

  16. Evaluation of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry for species identification of Acinetobacter strains isolated from blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Kishii, K; Kikuchi, K; Matsuda, N; Yoshida, A; Okuzumi, K; Uetera, Y; Yasuhara, H; Moriya, K

    2014-05-01

    The clinical relevance of Acinetobacter species, other than A. baumannii, as human pathogens has not been sufficiently assessed owing to the insufficiency of simple phenotypic clinical diagnostic laboratory tests. Infections caused by these organisms have different impacts on clinical outcome and require different treatment and management approaches. It is therefore important to correctly identify Acinetobacter species. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has been introduced to identify a wide range of microorganisms in clinical laboratories, but only a few studies have examined its utility for identifying Acinetobacter species, particularly those of the non-Acinetobacter baumannii complex. We therefore evaluated MALDI-TOF MS for identification of Acinetobacter species by comparing it with sequence analysis of rpoB using 123 isolates of Acinetobacter species from blood. Of the isolates examined, we identified 106/123 (86.2%) to species, and 16/123 (13.0%) could only be identified as acinetobacters. The identity of one isolate could not be established. Of the 106 species identified, 89/106 (84.0%) were confirmed by rpoB sequence analysis, and 17/106 (16.0%) were discordant. These data indicate correct identification of 89/123 (72.4%) isolates. Surprisingly, all blood culture isolates were identified as 13 species of Acinetobacter, and the incidence of Acinetobacter pittii was unexpectedly high (42/123; 34.1%) and exceeded that of A. baumannii (22/123; 17.9%). Although the present identification rate using MALDI-TOF MS is not acceptable for species-level identification of Acinetobacter, further expansion of the database should remedy this situation.

  17. Antimicrobial effects of Ferula gummosa Boiss gum against extended-spectrum β-lactamase producing Acinetobacter clinical isolates

    PubMed Central

    Afshar, Fatemeh Farid; Saffarian, Parvaneh; Hosseini, Hamideh Mahmoodzadeh; Sattarian, Fereshteh; Amin, Mohsen; Fooladi, Abbas Ali Imani

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Acinetobacter spp. are important causes of nosocomial infections. They possess various antibiotic resistance mechanisms including extended spectrum beta lactamases (ESBLs). The aim of this study was to determine antibiotic resistance profile of Acinetobacter clinical isolates especially among ESBL-producing strains and to investigate the antimicrobial effects of oleo-gum-resin extract and essential oil of Ferula gummosa Boiss. Materials and Methods: 120 Acinetobacter strains were isolated from various clinical samples of hospitalized patients in Baqiyatallah hospital, Tehran during 2011–2012. Antibiotic susceptibility test was performed on the isolates using disk diffusion method. To detect and confirm the ESBL-positive isolates, phenotypic and genotypic tests were performed. Three types of F. gummosa oleo-gum-resin extracts and essential oils were prepared and the bioactive components of F. gummosa Boiss extracts were determined by GC-Mass chromatography. F. gummosa antimicrobial activity was evaluated against standard strain of Acinetobacter baumannii (ATCC19606) as well as Acinetobacter clinical isolates using well and disk diffusion methods. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) were determined by broth microdilution method. Results: 46 isolates were resistant to all tested antibiotics. All clinical isolates were resistant to cefotaxime. 12.94% of the isolates were phenotypically ESBL-producing among which 94.2% carried ESBL genes ( bla PER-1 , bla OXA-4 and bla CTX-M ) detected by PCR. Oleo-gum-resin of F. gummosa had significant antibacterial activity and alcoholic essential oil had higher inhibitory effect on Acinetobacter strains (MIC of 18.75 mg/ml). Conclusion: Ferula gummosa extract contained components with well-known antimicrobial effects. PMID:28210466

  18. Distribution of carbapenem resistance determinants among epidemic and non-epidemic types of Acinetobacter species in Japan.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Mari; Suzuki, Satowa; Yamane, Kunikazu; Suzuki, Masato; Konda, Toshifumi; Arakawa, Yoshichika; Shibayama, Keigo

    2014-06-01

    We performed a comparative molecular analysis on three types of clinically isolated Acinetobacter spp.: epidemic sequence types (STs) of Acinetobacter baumannii (epidemic ST-AB), non-epidemic sequence types of A. baumannii (non-epidemic ST-AB) and non-baumannii Acinetobacter spp. A total of 87 isolates - 46 A. baumannii, 25 A. pittii and 16 A. nosocomialis - from 43 hospitals were analysed. Of these, 31 A. baumannii isolates were ST1 or ST2 according to the Pasteur Institute multilocus sequence typing scheme and were defined as epidemic ST-AB. The other 15 A. baumannii isolates were defined as non-epidemic ST-AB. The epidemic ST-AB isolates harboured the blaOXA-23-like gene or had an ISAba1 element upstream of blaOXA-51-like, or both, whereas non-epidemic ST-AB and non-baumannii Acinetobacter spp. isolates harboured blaOXA-58-like or metallo-β-lactamase genes, or both. The proportion of multidrug-resistant isolates was significantly higher in the epidemic ST-AB isolates (48 %) than that in the other types of Acinetobacter isolates (5 %) (P<0.05). In addition, epidemic ST-AB isolates exhibited a relatively higher proportion of fluoroquinolone resistance. We demonstrated that, in terms of genotypes and phenotypes of antimicrobial resistance, non-epidemic ST-AB isolates shared more similarity with non-baumannii Acinetobacter spp. isolates than with epidemic ST-AB isolates, regardless of bacterial species. In addition, this study revealed that, even in Japan, where IMP-type metallo-β-lactamase producers are endemic, epidemic ST-AB harbouring blaIMP have not yet emerged.

  19. Whole-Genome Sequence of a Colombian Acinetobacter baumannii Strain, a Coproducer of OXA-72 and OXA-255-Like Carbapenemases

    PubMed Central

    Saavedra, Sandra Yamile; Prada-Cardozo, Diego; Pérez-Cardona, Hermes; Hidalgo, Andrea Melissa; González, María Nilse; Reguero, María T.; Valenzuela de Silva, Emilia M.; Mantilla, José R.; Falquet, Laurent; Barreto-Hernández, Emiliano; Duarte, Carolina

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Colombian Acinetobacter baumannii strain ST920 was isolated from the sputum of a 68-year-old male patient. This isolate possessed blaOXA-72 and blaOXA-255-like genes. The assembled genome contained 4,104,098 pb and 38.79% G+C content. This is the first case reported of the coproduction (blaOXA-72 and blaOXA-255-like) of carbapenem-hydrolyzing class D β-lactamases (CHDLs) in Acinetobacter baumannii. PMID:28209815

  20. Characterizing in vivo pharmacodynamics of carbapenems against Acinetobacter baumannii in a murine thigh infection model to support breakpoint determinations.

    PubMed

    Macvane, Shawn H; Crandon, Jared L; Nicolau, David P

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacodynamic profiling data of carbapenems for Acinetobacter spp. are sparse. This study aimed to determine the pharmacodynamic targets of carbapenems for Acinetobacter baumannii based on a range of percentages of the dosing interval in which free drug concentrations remained above the MIC (fT>MIC) in the neutropenic murine thigh infection model. fT>MIC values of 23.7%, 32.8%, and 47.5% resulted in stasis, 1-log reductions, and 2-log reductions in bacterial density after 24 h, respectively. The pharmacodynamic targets of carbapenems for A. baumannii demonstrated in vivo are similar to those of other Gram-negative bacteria.

  1. Evaluation of a Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification-Based Methodology To Detect Carbapenemase Carriage in Acinetobacter Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Vergara, Andrea; Zboromyrska, Yuliya; Mosqueda, Noraida; Morosini, María Isabel; García-Fernández, Sergio; Roca, Ignasi; Cantón, Rafael; Marco, Francesc

    2014-01-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii is a major source of nosocomial infections worldwide and is mainly associated with the acquisition of OXA-type carbapenemases and, to a lesser extent, metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs). In this study, 82 nonepidemiologically related Acinetobacter strains carrying different types of OXA or MBL enzymes were tested using the Eazyplex system, a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP)-based method to rapidly detect carbapenemase carriage. The presence/absence of carbapenem-hydrolyzing enzymes was correctly determined for all isolates in <30 min. PMID:25224010

  2. AdeIJK, a Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division Pump Effluxing Multiple Antibiotics in Acinetobacter baumannii▿

    PubMed Central

    Damier-Piolle, Laurence; Magnet, Sophie; Brémont, Sylvie; Lambert, Thierry; Courvalin, Patrice

    2008-01-01

    We have identified a second resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND)-type efflux pump, AdeIJK, in clinical isolate Acinetobacter baumannii BM4454. The adeI, adeJ, and adeK genes encode, respectively, the membrane fusion, RND, and outer membrane components of the pump. AdeJ belongs to the AcrB protein family (57% identity with AcrB from Escherichia coli). mRNA analysis by Northern blotting and reverse transcription-PCR indicated that the genes were cotranscribed. Overexpression of the cloned adeIJK operon was toxic in both E. coli and Acinetobacter. The adeIJK genes were detected in all of the 60 strains of A. baumannii tested. The two latter observations suggest that the AdeIJK complex might contribute to intrinsic but not to acquired antibiotic resistance in Acinetobacter. To characterize the substrate specificity of the pump, we have constructed derivatives of BM4454 in which adeIJK (strain BM4579), adeABC (strain BM4561), or both groups of genes (strain BM4652) were inactivated by deletion-insertion. Determination of the antibiotic susceptibility of these strains and of BM4652 and BM4579, in which the adeIJK operon was provided in trans, indicated that the AdeIJK pump contributes to resistance to β-lactams, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, erythromycin, lincosamides, fluoroquinolones, fusidic acid, novobiocin, rifampin, trimethoprim, acridine, safranin, pyronine, and sodium dodecyl sulfate. The chemical structure of these molecules suggests that amphiphilic compounds are the preferred substrates. The AdeABC and AdeIJK efflux systems contributed in a more than additive fashion to tigecycline resistance. PMID:18086852

  3. Escherichia coli Overexpressing a Baeyer-Villiger Monooxygenase from Acinetobacter radioresistens Becomes Resistant to Imipenem

    PubMed Central

    Minerdi, Daniela; Zgrablic, Ivan; Castrignanò, Silvia; Catucci, Gianluca; Medana, Claudio; Terlizzi, Maria Elena; Gribaudo, Giorgio; Gilardi, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a global issue currently resulting in the deaths of hundreds of thousands of people a year worldwide. Data present in the literature illustrate the emergence of many bacterial species that display resistance to known antibiotics; Acinetobacter spp. are a good example of this. We report here that Acinetobacter radioresistens has a Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase (Ar-BVMO) with 100% amino acid sequence identity to the ethionamide monooxygenase of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii. Both enzymes are only distantly phylogenetically related to other canonical bacterial BVMO proteins. Ar-BVMO not only is capable of oxidizing two anticancer drugs metabolized by human FMO3, danusertib and tozasertib, but also can oxidize other synthetic drugs, such as imipenem. The latter is a member of the carbapenems, a clinically important antibiotic family used in the treatment of MDR bacterial infections. Susceptibility tests performed by the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method demonstrate that imipenem-sensitive Escherichia coli BL21 cells overexpressing Ar-BVMO become resistant to this antibiotic. An agar disk diffusion assay proved that when imipenem reacts with Ar-BVMO, it loses its antibiotic property. Moreover, an NADPH consumption assay with the purified Ar-BVMO demonstrates that this antibiotic is indeed a substrate, and its product is identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to be a Baeyer-Villiger (BV) oxidation product of the carbonyl moiety of the β-lactam ring. This is the first report of an antibiotic-inactivating BVMO enzyme that, while mediating its usual BV oxidation, also operates by an unprecedented mechanism of carbapenem resistance. PMID:26459905

  4. Characterization of hydrogen peroxide-resistant Acinetobacter species isolated during the Mars Phoenix spacecraft assembly.

    PubMed

    Derecho, I; McCoy, K B; Vaishampayan, P; Venkateswaran, K; Mogul, R

    2014-10-01

    The microbiological inventory of spacecraft and the associated assembly facility surfaces represent the primary pool of forward contaminants that may impact the integrity of life-detection missions. Herein, we report on the characterization of several strains of hydrogen peroxide-resistant Acinetobacter, which were isolated during the Mars Phoenix lander assembly. All Phoenix-associated Acinetobacter strains possessed very high catalase specific activities, and the specific strain, A. gyllenbergii 2P01AA, displayed a survival against hydrogen peroxide (no loss in 100 mM H2O2 for 1 h) that is perhaps the highest known among Gram-negative and non-spore-forming bacteria. Proteomic characterizations reveal a survival mechanism inclusive of proteins coupled to peroxide degradation (catalase and alkyl hydroperoxide reductase), energy/redox management (dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase), protein synthesis/folding (EF-G, EF-Ts, peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase, DnaK), membrane functions (OmpA-like protein and ABC transporter-related protein), and nucleotide metabolism (HIT family hydrolase). Together, these survivability and biochemical parameters support the hypothesis that oxidative tolerance and the related biochemical features are the measurable phenotypes or outcomes for microbial survival in the spacecraft assembly facilities, where the low-humidity (desiccation) and clean (low-nutrient) conditions may serve as selective pressures. Hence, the spacecraft-associated Acinetobacter, due to the conferred oxidative tolerances, may ultimately hinder efforts to reduce spacecraft bioburden when using chemical sterilants, thus suggesting that non-spore-forming bacteria may need to be included in the bioburden accounting for future life-detection missions.

  5. Acinetobacter Prosthetic Joint Infection Treated with Debridement and High-Dose Tigecycline.

    PubMed

    Vila, Andrea; Pagella, Hugo; Amadio, Claudio; Leiva, Alejandro

    2016-12-01

    Prosthesis retention is not recommended for multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter prosthetic joint infection due to its high failure rate. Nevertheless, replacing the prosthesis implies high morbidity and prolonged hospitalization. Although tigecycline is not approved for the treatment of prosthetic joint infection due to multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii, its appropriate use may preclude prosthesis exchange. Since the area under the curve divided by the minimum inhibitory concentration is the best pharmacodynamic predictor of its efficacy, we used tigecycline at high dose, in order to optimize its efficacy and achieve implant retention in 3 patients who refused prosthesis exchange. All patients with prosthetic joint infections treated at our Institution are prospectively registered in a database. Three patients with early prosthetic joint infection of total hip arthroplasty due to multidrug resistant A. baumannii were treated with debridement, antibiotics and implant retention, using a high maintenance dose of tigecycline (100 mg every 12 hours). The cases were retrospectively reviewed. All patients signed informed consent for receiving off-label use of tigecycline. Tigecycline was well tolerated, allowing its administration at high maintenance dose for a median of 40 days (range 30-60). Two patients were then switched to minocycline at standard doses for a median of 3.3 months in order to complete treatment. Currently, none of the patients showed relapse. Increasing the dose of tigecycline could be considered as a means to better attain pharmacodynamic targets in patients with severe or difficult-to-treat infections. Tigecycline at high maintenance dose might be useful when retention of the implant is attempted for treatment for prosthetic joint infections due to multidrug resistant Acinetobacter. Although this approach might be promising, off-label use of tigecycline should be interpreted cautiously until prospective data are available. Tigecycline is

  6. Acinetobacter, Aeromonas, and Trichococcus populations dominate the microbial community within urban sewer infrastructure

    PubMed Central

    VandeWalle, J. L.; Goetz, G.W.; Huse, S.M.; Morrison, H. G.; Sogin, M.L.; Hoffmann, R.G.; Yan, K.; McLellan, S.L.

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the population structure and temporal dynamics of the dominant community members within sewage influent from two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Milwaukee, WI. We generated >1.1M bacterial pyrotag sequences from the V6 hypervariable region of 16S rRNA genes from 38 influent samples and two samples taken upstream in the sanitary sewer system. Only a small fraction of pyrotags from influent samples (~15%) matched sequences from human fecal samples. The fecal components of the sewage samples included enriched pyrotag populations from Lactococcus and Enterobacteriaceae relative to their fractional representation in human fecal samples. In contrast to the large number of distinct pyrotags that represent fecal bacteria such as Lachnospiraceae and Bacteroides, only one or two unique V6 sequences represented Acinetobacter, Trichococcus and Aeromonas, which collectively account for nearly 35% of the total sewage community. Two dominant Acinetobacter V6 pyrotags (designated Acineto tag 1 and Acineto tag 2) fluctuated inversely with a seasonal pattern over a 3-year period, suggesting two distinct Acinetobacter populations respond differently to ecological forcings in the system. A single nucleotide change in the V6 pyrotags accounted for the difference in these populations and corresponded to two phylogenically distinct clades based on full-length sequences. Analysis of wavelet functions, derived from a mathematical model of temporal fluctuations, demonstrated that other abundant sewer associated populations including Trichococcus and Aeromonas had temporal patterns similar to either Acineto tag 1 or Acineto tag 2. Populations with related temporal fluctuations were found to significantly correlate with the same WWTP variables (5-day BOD, flow, ammonia, total phosphorous, and suspended solids). These findings illustrate that small differences in V6 sequences can represent phylogenetically and ecologically distinct taxa. This work provides insight into

  7. Acinetobacter Prosthetic Joint Infection Treated with Debridement and High-Dose Tigecycline

    PubMed Central

    Pagella, Hugo; Leiva, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Prosthesis retention is not recommended for multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter prosthetic joint infection due to its high failure rate. Nevertheless, replacing the prosthesis implies high morbidity and prolonged hospitalization. Although tigecycline is not approved for the treatment of prosthetic joint infection due to multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii, its appropriate use may preclude prosthesis exchange. Since the area under the curve divided by the minimum inhibitory concentration is the best pharmacodynamic predictor of its efficacy, we used tigecycline at high dose, in order to optimize its efficacy and achieve implant retention in 3 patients who refused prosthesis exchange. All patients with prosthetic joint infections treated at our Institution are prospectively registered in a database. Three patients with early prosthetic joint infection of total hip arthroplasty due to multidrug resistant A. baumannii were treated with debridement, antibiotics and implant retention, using a high maintenance dose of tigecycline (100 mg every 12 hours). The cases were retrospectively reviewed. All patients signed informed consent for receiving off-label use of tigecycline. Tigecycline was well tolerated, allowing its administration at high maintenance dose for a median of 40 days (range 30–60). Two patients were then switched to minocycline at standard doses for a median of 3.3 months in order to complete treatment. Currently, none of the patients showed relapse. Increasing the dose of tigecycline could be considered as a means to better attain pharmacodynamic targets in patients with severe or difficult-to-treat infections. Tigecycline at high maintenance dose might be useful when retention of the implant is attempted for treatment for prosthetic joint infections due to multidrug resistant Acinetobacter. Although this approach might be promising, off-label use of tigecycline should be interpreted cautiously until prospective data are available. Tigecycline is

  8. Escherichia coli Overexpressing a Baeyer-Villiger Monooxygenase from Acinetobacter radioresistens Becomes Resistant to Imipenem.

    PubMed

    Minerdi, Daniela; Zgrablic, Ivan; Castrignanò, Silvia; Catucci, Gianluca; Medana, Claudio; Terlizzi, Maria Elena; Gribaudo, Giorgio; Gilardi, Gianfranco; Sadeghi, Sheila J

    2015-10-12

    Antimicrobial resistance is a global issue currently resulting in the deaths of hundreds of thousands of people a year worldwide. Data present in the literature illustrate the emergence of many bacterial species that display resistance to known antibiotics; Acinetobacter spp. are a good example of this. We report here that Acinetobacter radioresistens has a Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase (Ar-BVMO) with 100% amino acid sequence identity to the ethionamide monooxygenase of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii. Both enzymes are only distantly phylogenetically related to other canonical bacterial BVMO proteins. Ar-BVMO not only is capable of oxidizing two anticancer drugs metabolized by human FMO3, danusertib and tozasertib, but also can oxidize other synthetic drugs, such as imipenem. The latter is a member of the carbapenems, a clinically important antibiotic family used in the treatment of MDR bacterial infections. Susceptibility tests performed by the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method demonstrate that imipenem-sensitive Escherichia coli BL21 cells overexpressing Ar-BVMO become resistant to this antibiotic. An agar disk diffusion assay proved that when imipenem reacts with Ar-BVMO, it loses its antibiotic property. Moreover, an NADPH consumption assay with the purified Ar-BVMO demonstrates that this antibiotic is indeed a substrate, and its product is identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to be a Baeyer-Villiger (BV) oxidation product of the carbonyl moiety of the β-lactam ring. This is the first report of an antibiotic-inactivating BVMO enzyme that, while mediating its usual BV oxidation, also operates by an unprecedented mechanism of carbapenem resistance.

  9. Wastewater treatment contributes to selective increase of antibiotic resistance among Acinetobacter spp.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongli; Marrs, Carl F; Simon, Carl; Xi, Chuanwu

    2009-06-01

    The occurrence and spread of multi-drug resistant bacteria is a pressing public health problem. The emergence of bacterial resistance to antibiotics is common in areas where antibiotics are heavily used, and antibiotic-resistant bacteria also increasingly occur in aquatic environments. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the impact of the wastewater treatment process on the prevalence of antibiotic resistance in Acinetobacter spp. in the wastewater and its receiving water. During two different events (high-temperature, high-flow, 31 degrees C; and low-temperature, low-flow, 8 degrees C), 366 strains of Acinetobacter spp. were isolated from five different sites, three in a wastewater treatment plant (raw influent, second effluent, and final effluent) and two in the receiving body (upstream and downstream of the treated wastewater discharge point). The antibiotic susceptibility phenotypes were determined by the disc-diffusion method for 8 antibiotics, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (AMC), chloramphenicol (CHL), ciprofloxacin (CIP), colistin (CL), gentamicin (GM), rifampin (RA), sulfisoxazole (SU), and trimethoprim (TMP). The prevalence of antibiotic resistance in Acinetobacter isolates to AMC, CHL, RA, and multi-drug (three antibiotics or more) significantly increased (p<0.01) from the raw influent samples (AMC, 8.7%; CHL, 25.2%; RA, 63.1%; multi-drug, 33.0%) to the final effluent samples (AMC, 37.9%; CHL, 69.0%; RA, 84.5%; multi-drug, 72.4%), and was significantly higher (p<0.05) in the downstream samples (AMC, 25.8%; CHL, 48.4%; RA, 85.5%; multi-drug, 56.5%) than in the upstream samples (AMC, 9.5%; CHL, 27.0%; RA, 65.1%; multi-drug, 28.6%). These results suggest that wastewater treatment process contributes to the selective increase of antibiotic resistant bacteria and the occurrence of multi-drug resistant bacteria in aquatic environments.

  10. Carbapenem-resistance and pathogenicity of bovine Acinetobacter indicus-like isolates.

    PubMed

    Klotz, Peter; Göttig, Stephan; Leidner, Ursula; Semmler, Torsten; Scheufen, Sandra; Ewers, Christa

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize blaOXA-23 harbouring Acinetobacter indicus-like strains from cattle including genomic and phylogenetic analyses, antimicrobial susceptibility testing and evaluation of pathogenicity in vitro and in vivo. Nasal and rectal swabs (n = 45) from cattle in Germany were screened for carbapenem-non-susceptible Acinetobacter spp. Thereby, two carbapenem resistant Acinetobacter spp. from the nasal cavities of two calves could be isolated. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and 16S rDNA sequencing identified these isolates as A. indicus-like. A phylogenetic tree based on partial rpoB sequences indicated closest relation of the two bovine isolates to the A. indicus type strain A648T and human clinical A. indicus isolates, while whole genome comparison revealed considerable intraspecies diversity. High mimimum inhibitory concentrations were observed for carbapenems and other antibiotics including fluoroquinolones and gentamicin. Whole genome sequencing and PCR mapping revealed that both isolates harboured blaOXA-23 localized on the chromosome and surrounded by interrupted Tn2008 transposon structures. Since the pathogenic potential of A. indicus is unknown, pathogenicity was assessed employing the Galleria (G.) mellonella infection model and an in vitro cytotoxicity assay using A549 human lung epithelial cells. Pathogenicity in vivo (G. mellonella killing assay) and in vitro (cytotoxicity assay) of the two A. indicus-like isolates was lower compared to A. baumannii ATCC 17978 and similar to A. lwoffii ATCC 15309. The reduced pathogenicity of A. indicus compared to A. baumannii correlated with the absence of important virulence genes encoding like phospholipase C1+C2, acinetobactin outer membrane protein BauA, RND-type efflux system proteins AdeRS and AdeAB or the trimeric autotransporter adhesin Ata. The emergence of carbapenem-resistant A. indicus-like strains from cattle carrying blaOXA-23 on transposable elements and revealing genetic

  11. Clonal spread of blaOXA-72-carrying Acinetobacter baumannii sequence type 512 in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Han-Yueh; Hsu, Po-Jui; Chen, Jiann-Yuan; Liao, Po-Cheng; Lu, Chia-Wei; Chen, Chang-Hua; Liou, Ming-Li

    2016-07-01

    This is the first report to show an insidious outbreak of armA- and blaOXA-72-carrying Acinetobacter baumannii sequence type 512 (ST512) at a study hospital in northern Taiwan. Multilocus sequence typing revealed that this was a ST512 clone. All of the isolates with ST512 carried a novel 12,056-bp repGR2 in combination with a repGR12-type plasmid. This plasmid, designated pAB-ML, had one copy of the blaOXA-72 gene that was flanked by XerC/XerD-like sites and conferred resistance to carbapenems.

  12. Azide-resistant mutants in Acinetobacter calcoaceticus A2 are defective in protein secretion.

    PubMed

    Elkeles, A; Rosenberg, E; Ron, E Z

    1994-02-15

    Azide, an inhibitor of ATPase, and a specific inhibitor of protein export was used in order to select for protein secretion mutants in Acinetobacter calcoaceticus A2. Two such mutants were isolated that were azide-resistant and defective in the general protein transport system. The mutation also conferred additional phenotypic changes, including an inability to grow on minimal media or at 40 degrees C. The existence of protein secretion mutants with a selectable phenotype may be useful for the genetic study of protein export.

  13. In Vitro Activity of Eravacycline against Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae and Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Mushtaq, Shazad; Warner, Marina; Woodford, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Eravacycline and comparators were tested against carbapenem- and tigecycline-resistant Enterobacteriaceae and Acinetobacter isolates received at the United Kingdom's national reference laboratory. Eravacycline MICs correlated closely with those of tigecycline but mostly were around 2-fold lower; both molecules retained full activity against isolates with high-level tetracycline and minocycline resistance. MIC90s of eravacycline and tigecycline were raised ca. 2-fold for carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae compared with carbapenem-susceptible controls, probably reflecting subsets of isolates with increased efflux. PMID:27044556

  14. [Respiratory activity of bacteria Acinetobacter calcoaceticus TM-31 during assimilation of alkane hydrocarbons].

    PubMed

    Ignatov, O V; Grechkina, E V; Muratova, A Iu; Turkovskaia, O V; Ignatov, V V

    2000-01-01

    The respiratory activity of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus TM-31 with resect to alkane hydrocarbons was studied. The dynamics of oxygen consumption by the cells while assimilating n-hexadecane was assayed by a modified technique using an oxygen electrode. The dependence of cell respiratory activity on the amount of n-hexadecane within the concentration range of 0.03-0.66% was determined. It was demonstrated that the cells also displayed respiratory activity towards other medium-chain n-alkanes: hexane, octane, decane, tridecane, and heptadecane. Thus, we demonstrated the possibility of determining alkanes by measuring the respiratory activities of microorganisms.

  15. The effect of terminal cleaning on environmental contamination rates of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Strassle, Paula; Thom, Kerri A; Johnson, J Kristie; Johnsonm, J Kristie; Leekha, Surbhi; Lissauer, Matthew; Zhu, Jingkun; Harris, Anthony D

    2012-12-01

    We evaluated the prevalence of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii environmental contamination before and after discharge cleaning in rooms of infected/colonized patients. 46.9% of rooms and 15.3% of sites were found contaminated precleaning, and 25% of rooms and 5.5% of sites were found contaminated postcleaning. Cleaning significantly decreased environmental contamination of A baumannii; however, persistent contamination represents a significant risk factor for transmission. Further studies on this and more effective cleaning methods are needed.

  16. Carbapenem-resistance and pathogenicity of bovine Acinetobacter indicus-like isolates

    PubMed Central

    Leidner, Ursula; Semmler, Torsten; Scheufen, Sandra; Ewers, Christa

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize blaOXA-23 harbouring Acinetobacter indicus-like strains from cattle including genomic and phylogenetic analyses, antimicrobial susceptibility testing and evaluation of pathogenicity in vitro and in vivo. Nasal and rectal swabs (n = 45) from cattle in Germany were screened for carbapenem-non-susceptible Acinetobacter spp. Thereby, two carbapenem resistant Acinetobacter spp. from the nasal cavities of two calves could be isolated. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and 16S rDNA sequencing identified these isolates as A. indicus-like. A phylogenetic tree based on partial rpoB sequences indicated closest relation of the two bovine isolates to the A. indicus type strain A648T and human clinical A. indicus isolates, while whole genome comparison revealed considerable intraspecies diversity. High mimimum inhibitory concentrations were observed for carbapenems and other antibiotics including fluoroquinolones and gentamicin. Whole genome sequencing and PCR mapping revealed that both isolates harboured blaOXA-23 localized on the chromosome and surrounded by interrupted Tn2008 transposon structures. Since the pathogenic potential of A. indicus is unknown, pathogenicity was assessed employing the Galleria (G.) mellonella infection model and an in vitro cytotoxicity assay using A549 human lung epithelial cells. Pathogenicity in vivo (G. mellonella killing assay) and in vitro (cytotoxicity assay) of the two A. indicus-like isolates was lower compared to A. baumannii ATCC 17978 and similar to A. lwoffii ATCC 15309. The reduced pathogenicity of A. indicus compared to A. baumannii correlated with the absence of important virulence genes encoding like phospholipase C1+C2, acinetobactin outer membrane protein BauA, RND-type efflux system proteins AdeRS and AdeAB or the trimeric autotransporter adhesin Ata. The emergence of carbapenem-resistant A. indicus-like strains from cattle carrying blaOXA-23 on transposable elements and revealing genetic

  17. High Frequency of OXA-253-Producing Acinetobacter baumannii in Different Hospitals in Recife, Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Sá Cavalcanti, Felipe Lira; Mendes-Marques, Carina Lucena; Vasconcelos, Crhisllane Rafaele Dos Santos; de Lima Campos, Túlio; Rezende, Antonio Mauro; Xavier, Danilo Elias; Leal, Nilma Cintra; de-Melo-Neto, Osvaldo Pompilio; de Morais, Marcia Maria Camargo; Leal-Balbino, Tereza Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Here, we report the isolation of 31 Acinetobacter baumannii strains producing OXA-253 in a single large Brazilian city. These strains belonged to five different sequence types (STs), including 4 STs not previously associated with blaOXA-253 In all strains, the blaOXA-253 gene was located in a plasmid within a genetic environment similar to what was found previously in Brazil and Italy. The reported data emphasize the successful transmission of the blaOXA-253 gene through a large area and the tendency for this resistance determinant to remain in the A. baumannii population.

  18. In Vivo Fitness Adaptations of Colistin-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Isolates to Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shweta S.; Alamneh, Yonas; Casella, Leila G.; Ernst, Robert K.; Lesho, Emil P.; Waterman, Paige E.; Zurawski, Daniel V.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The loss of fitness in colistin-resistant (CR) Acinetobacter baumannii was investigated using longitudinal isolates from the same patient. Early CR isolates were outcompeted by late CR isolates for growth in broth and survival in the lungs of mice. Fitness loss was associated with an increased susceptibility to oxidative stress since early CR strains had reduced in vitro survival in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and decreased catalase activity compared to that of late CR and colistin-susceptible (CS) strains. PMID:27993849

  19. Colistin-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Clinical Strains with Deficient Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Dafopoulou, Konstantina; Xavier, Basil Britto; Hotterbeekx, An; Janssens, Lore; Lammens, Christine; Dé, Emmanuelle; Goossens, Herman; Tsakris, Athanasios; Malhotra-Kumar, Surbhi

    2015-01-01

    In two pairs of clinical colistin-susceptible/colistin-resistant (Csts/Cstr) Acinetobacter baumannii strains, the Cstr strains showed significantly decreased biofilm formation in static and dynamic assays (P < 0.001) and lower relative fitness (P < 0.05) compared with those of the Csts counterparts. The whole-genome sequencing comparison of strain pairs identified a mutation converting a stop codon to lysine (*241K) in LpsB (involved in lipopolysaccharide [LPS] synthesis) in one Cstr strain and a frameshift mutation in CarO and the loss of a 47,969-bp element containing multiple genes associated with biofilm production in the other. PMID:26666921

  20. Efficacy of the small molecule inhibitor of Lipid II BAS00127538 against Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    de Leeuw, Erik PH

    2014-01-01

    Objective To test the activity of a small molecule compound that targets Lipid II against Acinetobacter baumannii. Methods Susceptibility to small molecule Lipid II inhibitor BAS00127538 was assessed using carbapenem- and colistin-resistant clinical isolates of A. baumannii. In addition, synergy between colisitin and this compound was assessed. Results Small molecule Lipid II inhibitor BAS00127538 potently acts against A. baumannii and acts synergistically with colistin. Conclusion For the first time, a compound that targets Lipid II is described that acts against multi-drug resistant isolates of A. baumannii. The synergy with colistin warrants further lead development of BAS00127538. PMID:25143710

  1. Inhibition of LpxC Increases Antibiotic Susceptibility in Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    García-Quintanilla, Meritxell; Caro-Vega, José M.; Pulido, Marina R.; Moreno-Martínez, Patricia; Pachón, Jerónimo

    2016-01-01

    LpxC inhibitors have generally shown poor in vitro activity against Acinetobacter baumannii. We show that the LpxC inhibitor PF-5081090 inhibits lipid A biosynthesis, as determined by silver staining and measurements of endotoxin levels, and significantly increases cell permeability. The presence of PF-5081090 at 32 mg/liter increased susceptibility to rifampin, vancomycin, azithromycin, imipenem, and amikacin but had no effect on susceptibility to ciprofloxacin and tigecycline. Potentiating existing antibiotics with LpxC inhibitors may represent an alternative treatment strategy for multidrug-resistant A. baumannii. PMID:27270288

  2. SP-100 space reactor safety

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-05-01

    The SP-100 space reactor power system is being developed to meet the large electrical power requirements of civilian and military missions planned for the 1990's and beyond. It will remove the restrictions on electrical power generation that have tended to limit missions and will enable the fuller exploration and utilization of space. This booklet describes the SP-100 space reactor power system and its development. Particular emphasis is given to safety. The design aand operational features as well as the design and safety review process that will assure that the SP-100 can be launched nd operated safely are described.

  3. Yersinia nurmii sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Murros-Kontiainen, Anna; Fredriksson-Ahomaa, Maria; Korkeala, Hannu; Johansson, Per; Rahkila, Riitta; Björkroth, Johanna

    2011-10-01

    This study was set up to identify three Gram-negative, rod-shaped strains originating from broiler meat packaged under a modified atmosphere. A polyphasic taxonomic approach, including multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) of five genes (16S rRNA, glnA, gyrB, recA and HSP60), DNA-DNA reassociation between the closest phylogenetic neighbours and determination of relevant phenotypic properties, was applied. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences grouped these strains together and within the genus Yersinia. MLSA of the 16S rRNA gene and four housekeeping genes showed that the strains formed a monophyletic group separate from other Yersinia species in all phylogenetic trees constructed. The strains had a phenotypic profile different from those of other representatives of the genus Yersinia, but most similar to that of Yersinia ruckeri. Typical virulence markers for pathogenic Yersinia were not detected. Based on phylogenetic, phenotypic and DNA-DNA reassociation data, a novel species, Yersinia nurmii sp. nov., is proposed for the isolated strains. The type strain is APN3a-c(T) ( = DSM 22296(T)  = LMG 25213(T)).

  4. Actinoplanes couchii sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Kämpfer, Peter; Huber, Birgit; Thummes, Kathrin; Grün-Wollny, Iris; Busse, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-04-01

    A Gram-positive bacterium, strain GW8-1761(T), was isolated from soil close to the Marmore waterfalls, Terni, Italy. 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity studies showed that strain GW8-1761(T) belonged to the genus Actinoplanes, being most closely related to Actinoplanes italicus JCM 3165(T) (98.9 %), A. rectilineatus IFO 13941(T) (98.5 %), A. palleronii JCM 7626(T) (97.8 %), A. utahensis IFO 13244(T) (97.6 %) and A. cyaneus DSM 46137(T) (97.6 %). Strain GW8-1761(T) could be distinguished from any other Actinoplanes species with validly published names by 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity values of less than 97.5 %. Chemotaxonomic data [major menaquinone MK-9(H(4)); major polar lipids diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylinositol, with phosphatidylcholine and aminoglycolipids absent; major fatty acids C(15 : 0), C(16 : 0), C(16 : 0) iso, C(17 : 1)omega8c and summed feature 3 (C(16 : 1)omega7c and/or C(15 : 0) iso 2-OH)] supported the affiliation of strain GW8-1761(T) to the genus Actinoplanes. The results of DNA-DNA hybridizations and physiological and biochemical tests allowed genotypic and phenotypic differentiation of strain GW8-1761(T) from the most closely related species. Strain GW8-1761(T) therefore merits species status, and we propose the name Actinoplanes couchii sp. nov., with the type strain GW8-1761(T) (=DSM 45050(T)=CIP 109316(T)).

  5. Code blue: Acinetobacter baumannii, a nosocomial pathogen with a role in the oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Richards, A.M.; Kwaik, Y. Abu; Lamont, R.J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Actinetobacter baumannii is an important nosocomial pathogen that can cause a wide range of serious conditions including pneumonia, meningitis, necrotizing fasciitis and sepsis. It is also a major cause of wound infections in military personnel injured during the conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq, leading to its popular nickname of ‘Iraqibacter’. Contributing to its success in clinical settings is resistance to environmental stresses such as desiccation and disinfectants. Moreover, in recent years there has been a dramatic increase in the number of A. baumannii strains with resistance to multiple antibiotic classes. Acinetobacter baumannii is an inhabitant of oral biofilms, which can act as a reservoir for pneumonia and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Subgingival colonization by A. baumannii increases the risk of refractory periodontitis. Pathogenesis of the organism involves adherence, biofilm formation and iron acquisition. In addition, A. baumannii can induce apoptotic cell death in epithelial cells and kill hyphal forms of Candida albicans. Virulence factors that have been identified include pili, the outer membrane protein OmpA, phospholipases and extracellular polysaccharide. Acinetobacter baumannii can sense blue light through a blue-light sensing using flavin (BLUF) domain protein, BlsA. The resulting conformational change in BlsA leads to changes in gene expression, including virulence genes. PMID:25052812

  6. CpaA a novel protease from Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates deregulates blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Tilley, Derek; Law, Robert; Warren, Sarah; Samis, John A; Kumar, Ayush

    2014-07-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important nosocomial pathogen that displays high antibiotic resistance. It causes a variety of infections including pneumonias and sepsis which may result in disseminated intravascular coagulation. In this work, we identify and characterize a novel secreted, zinc-dependent, metallo-endopeptidase CpaA (coagulation targeting metallo-endopeptidase of Acinetobacter baumannii) which deregulates human blood coagulation in vitro and thus is likely to contribute to A. baumannii virulence. Three quarters of the clinical isolates tested (n = 16) had the cpaA gene; however, it was absent from two type strains, A. baumannii ATCC 17978 and A. baumannii ATCC 19606. The CpaA protein was purified from one clinical isolate and was able to cleave purified factor (F) V and fibrinogen and reduce the coagulation activity of FV in human plasma. CpaA-treated plasma showed reduced clotting activity in contact pathway-activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) assays, but increased clotting activity in tissue factor pathway prothrombin time (PT) assays. A significant portion of clinically relevant A. baumannii isolates secrete a protease which targets and deregulates the coagulation system.

  7. The opportunistic human pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii senses and responds to light.

    PubMed

    Mussi, María A; Gaddy, Jennifer A; Cabruja, Matías; Arivett, Brock A; Viale, Alejandro M; Rasia, Rodolfo; Actis, Luis A

    2010-12-01

    Light is a ubiquitous environmental signal that many organisms sense and respond to by modulating their physiological responses accordingly. While this is an expected response among phototrophic microorganisms, the ability of chemotrophic prokaryotes to sense and react to light has become a puzzling and novel issue in bacterial physiology, particularly among bacterial pathogens. In this work, we show that the opportunistic pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii senses and responds to blue light. Motility and formation of biofilms and pellicles were observed only when bacterial cells were incubated in darkness. In contrast, the killing of Candida albicans filaments was enhanced when they were cocultured with bacteria under light. These bacterial responses depend on the expression of the A. baumannii ATCC 17978 A1S_2225 gene, which codes for an 18.6-kDa protein that contains an N-terminal blue-light-sensing-using flavin (BLUF) domain and lacks a detectable output domain(s). Spectral analyses of the purified recombinant protein showed its ability to sense light by a red shift upon illumination. Therefore, the A1S_2225 gene, which is present in several members of the Acinetobacter genus, was named blue-light-sensing A (blsA). Interestingly, temperature plays a role in the ability of A. baumannii to sense and respond to light via the BlsA photoreceptor protein.

  8. Resources for Genetic and Genomic Analysis of Emerging Pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Ramage, Elizabeth; Weiss, Eli J.; Radey, Matthew; Hayden, Hillary S.; Held, Kiara G.; Huse, Holly K.; Zurawski, Daniel V.; Brittnacher, Mitchell J.; Manoil, Colin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen notorious for causing serious nosocomial infections that resist antibiotic therapy. Research to identify factors responsible for the pathogen's success has been limited by the resources available for genome-scale experimental studies. This report describes the development of several such resources for A. baumannii strain AB5075, a recently characterized wound isolate that is multidrug resistant and displays robust virulence in animal models. We report the completion and annotation of the genome sequence, the construction of a comprehensive ordered transposon mutant library, the extension of high-coverage transposon mutant pool sequencing (Tn-seq) to the strain, and the identification of the genes essential for growth on nutrient-rich agar. These resources should facilitate large-scale genetic analysis of virulence, resistance, and other clinically relevant traits that make A. baumannii a formidable public health threat. IMPORTANCE Acinetobacter baumannii is one of six bacterial pathogens primarily responsible for antibiotic-resistant infections that have become the scourge of health care facilities worldwide. Eliminating such infections requires a deeper understanding of the factors that enable the pathogen to persist in hospital environments, establish infections, and resist antibiotics. We present a set of resources that should accelerate genome-scale genetic characterization of these traits for a reference isolate of A. baumannii that is highly virulent and representative of current outbreak strains. PMID:25845845

  9. CipA of Acinetobacter baumannii Is a Novel Plasminogen Binding and Complement Inhibitory Protein.

    PubMed

    Koenigs, Arno; Stahl, Julia; Averhoff, Beate; Göttig, Stephan; Wichelhaus, Thomas A; Wallich, Reinhard; Zipfel, Peter F; Kraiczy, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging opportunistic pathogen, responsible for up to 10% of gram-negative, nosocomial infections. The global increase of multidrug-resistant and pan-resistant Acinetobacter isolates presents clinicians with formidable challenges. To establish a persistent infection,A. baumannii must overcome the detrimental effects of complement as the first line of defense against invading microorganisms. However, the immune evasion principles underlying serum resistance inA. baumannii remain elusive. Here, we identified a novel plasminogen-binding protein, termed CipA. Bound plasminogen, upon conversion to active plasmin, degraded fibrinogen and complement C3b and contributed to serum resistance. Furthermore, CipA directly inhibited the alternative pathway of complement in vitro, irrespective of its ability to bind plasminogen. A CipA-deficient mutant was efficiently killed by human serum and showed a defect in the penetration of endothelial monolayers, demonstrating that CipA is a novel multifunctional protein that contributes to the pathogenesis ofA. baumannii.

  10. Characterization of Affinity-Purified Isoforms of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus Y1 Glutathione Transferases

    PubMed Central

    Chee, Chin-Soon; Tan, Irene Kit-Ping; Alias, Zazali

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GST) were purified from locally isolated bacteria, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus Y1, by glutathione-affinity chromatography and anion exchange, and their substrate specificities were investigated. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that the purified GST resolved into a single band with a molecular weight (MW) of 23 kDa. 2-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis showed the presence of two isoforms, GST1 (pI 4.5) and GST2 (pI 6.2) with identical MW. GST1 was reactive towards ethacrynic acid, hydrogen peroxide, 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, and trans,trans-hepta-2,4-dienal while GST2 was active towards all substrates except hydrogen peroxide. This demonstrated that GST1 possessed peroxidase activity which was absent in GST2. This study also showed that only GST2 was able to conjugate GSH to isoproturon, a herbicide. GST1 and GST2 were suggested to be similar to F0KLY9 (putative glutathione S-transferase) and F0KKB0 (glutathione S-transferase III) of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus strain PHEA-2, respectively. PMID:24892084

  11. Characterisation of pellicles formed by Acinetobacter baumannii at the air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Nait Chabane, Yassine; Marti, Sara; Rihouey, Christophe; Alexandre, Stéphane; Hardouin, Julie; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Vila, Jordi; Kaplan, Jeffrey B; Jouenne, Thierry; Dé, Emmanuelle

    2014-01-01

    The clinical importance of Acinetobacter baumannii is partly due to its natural ability to survive in the hospital environment. This persistence may be explained by its capacity to form biofilms and, interestingly, A. baumannii can form pellicles at the air-liquid interface more readily than other less pathogenic Acinetobacter species. Pellicles from twenty-six strains were morphologically classified into three groups: I) egg-shaped (27%); II) ball-shaped (50%); and III) irregular pellicles (23%). One strain representative of each group was further analysed by Brewster's Angle Microscopy to follow pellicle development, demonstrating that their formation did not require anchoring to a solid surface. Total carbohydrate analysis of the matrix showed three main components: Glucose, GlcNAc and Kdo. Dispersin B, an enzyme that hydrolyzes poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PNAG) polysaccharide, inhibited A. baumannii pellicle formation, suggesting that this exopolysaccharide contributes to pellicle formation. Also associated with the pellicle matrix were three subunits of pili assembled by chaperon-usher systems: the major CsuA/B, A1S_1510 (presented 45% of identity with the main pilin F17-A from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli pili) and A1S_2091. The presence of both PNAG polysaccharide and pili systems in matrix of pellicles might contribute to the virulence of this emerging pathogen.

  12. Characterisation of Pellicles Formed by Acinetobacter baumannii at the Air-Liquid Interface

    PubMed Central

    Nait Chabane, Yassine; Marti, Sara; Rihouey, Christophe; Alexandre, Stéphane; Hardouin, Julie; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Vila, Jordi; Kaplan, Jeffrey B.; Jouenne, Thierry; Dé, Emmanuelle

    2014-01-01

    The clinical importance of Acinetobacter baumannii is partly due to its natural ability to survive in the hospital environment. This persistence may be explained by its capacity to form biofilms and, interestingly, A. baumannii can form pellicles at the air-liquid interface more readily than other less pathogenic Acinetobacter species. Pellicles from twenty-six strains were morphologically classified into three groups: I) egg-shaped (27%); II) ball-shaped (50%); and III) irregular pellicles (23%). One strain representative of each group was further analysed by Brewster’s Angle Microscopy to follow pellicle development, demonstrating that their formation did not require anchoring to a solid surface. Total carbohydrate analysis of the matrix showed three main components: Glucose, GlcNAc and Kdo. Dispersin B, an enzyme that hydrolyzes poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PNAG) polysaccharide, inhibited A. baumannii pellicle formation, suggesting that this exopolysaccharide contributes to pellicle formation. Also associated with the pellicle matrix were three subunits of pili assembled by chaperon-usher systems: the major CsuA/B, A1S_1510 (presented 45% of identity with the main pilin F17-A from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli pili) and A1S_2091. The presence of both PNAG polysaccharide and pili systems in matrix of pellicles might contribute to the virulence of this emerging pathogen. PMID:25360550

  13. Bioinformatic analysis of phage AB3, a phiKMV-like virus infecting Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Liu, X; Li, X-J

    2015-01-16

    The phages of Acinetobacter baumannii has drawn increasing attention because of the multi-drug resistance of A. baumanni. The aim of this study was to sequence Acinetobacter baumannii phage AB3 and conduct bioinformatic analysis to lay a foundation for genome remodeling and phage therapy. We isolated and sequenced A. baumannii phage AB3 and attempted to annotate and analyze its genome. The results showed that the genome is a double-stranded DNA with a total length of 31,185 base pairs (bp) and 97 open reading frames greater than 100 bp. The genome includes 28 predicted genes, of which 24 are homologous to phage AB1. The entire coding sequence is located on the negative strand, representing 90.8% of the total length. The G+C mol% was 39.18%, without areas of high G+C content over 200 bp in length. No GC island, tRNA gene, or repeated sequence was identified. Gene lengths were 120-3099 bp, with an average of 1011 bp. Six genes were found to be greater than 2000 bp in length. Genomic alignment and phylogenetic analysis of the RNA polymerase gene showed that similar to phage AB1, phage AB3 is a phiKMV-like virus in the T7 phage family.

  14. Community-acquired necrotizing fasciitis caused by Acinetobacter calcoaceticus: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Yuko; Nagae, Masaaki; Omae, Takahito; Yamamoto, Shuhei; Horitani, Ryosuke; Maeda, Daigen; Yoshinaga, Takayuki

    2014-05-01

    A 61-year-old man presented with pain in the abdomen and right lower limb. He had a history of hepatitis B virus-induced liver cirrhosis, but had not been visiting the outpatient clinic and did not receive any medication. Cutaneous necrosis and bulla were observed on his abdomen and right lower limb. The necrotic skin was incised, and he was diagnosed with necrotizing fasciitis. A nonfermentative Gram-negative bacillus infection was confirmed from aspirated fluid and blood cultures. Therefore, meropenem and immunoglobulins were administered. Because necrosis was widespread, surgical debridement was performed. Thereafter, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus infection was confirmed by semi-quantitative PCR using the bullous fluid and blood cultures. Meropenem was administered for 3 weeks, followed by levofloxacin alone for 1 week. The patient's condition improved; therefore, skin grafting was performed as planned and yielded a favorable response. After rehabilitation, the patient could walk without support and infection did not recur. However, he had severe liver cirrhosis and large esophageal varices, and he eventually died from sudden varix rupture. Necrotizing fasciitis is an uncommon soft tissue infection, associated with high morbidity and mortality, and early recognition and treatment are crucial for survival. Acinetobacter is rarely associated with necrotizing fasciitis. Although this is a very rare case of the occurrence of necrotizing fasciitis due to A. calcoaceticus infection, we believe that this organism can be pathogenic in immunocompromised patients such as those with liver cirrhosis by reporting this case.

  15. Critical role of bacterial isochorismatase in the autophagic process induced by Acinetobacter baumannii in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Zhang, Kaiyu; Shi, Xiaochen; Wang, Chao; Wang, Feng; Fan, Junwen; Shen, Fengge; Xu, Jiancheng; Bao, Wanguo; Liu, Mingyuan; Yu, Lu

    2016-01-01

    A recent study reported that Acinetobacter baumannii could induce autophagy, but the recognition and clearance mechanism of intracytosolic A. baumannii in the autophagic process and the molecular mechanism of autophagy induced by the pathogen remains unknown. In this study, we first demonstrated that invading A. baumannii induced a complete, ubiquitin-mediated autophagic response that is dependent upon septins SEPT2 and SEPT9 in mammalian cells. We also demonstrated that autophagy induced by A. baumannii was Beclin-1 dependent via the AMPK/ERK/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway. Of interest, we found that the isochorismatase mutant strain had significantly decreased siderophore-mediated ferric iron acquisition ability and had a reduced the ability to induce autophagy. We verified that isochorismatase was required for the recognition of intracytosolic A. baumannii mediated by septin cages, ubiquitinated proteins, and ubiquitin-binding adaptor proteins p62 and NDP52 in autophagic response. We also confirmed that isochorismatase was required for the clearance of invading A. baumannii by autophagy in vitro and in the mouse model of infection. Together, these findings provide insight into the distinctive recognition and clearance of intracytosolic A. baumannii by autophagy in host cells, and that isochorismatase plays a critical role in the A. baumannii–induced autophagic process.—Wang, Y., Zhang, K., Shi, X., Wang, C., Wang, F., Fan, J., Shen, F., Xu, J., Bao, W., Liu, M., Yu, L. Critical role of bacterial isochorismatase in the autophagic process induced by Acinetobacter baumannii in mammalian cells. PMID:27432399

  16. Antibiotic-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Increasing Success Remains a Challenge as a Nosocomial Pathogen.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Villoria, Ana Maria; Valverde-Garduno, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant infectious bacteria currently imply a high risk and therefore constitute a strong challenge when treating patients in hospital settings. Characterization of these species and of particular strains is a priority for the establishment of diagnostic tests and preventive procedures. The relevance of Acinetobacter baumannii as a problematic microorganism in inpatient facilities, particularly intensive care units, has increased over time. This review aims to draw attention to (i) the historical emergence of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii, (ii) the current status of surveillance needs in Latin America, and (iii) recent data suggesting that A. baumannii continues to spread and evolve in hospital settings. First, we present synopsis of the series of events leading to the discovery and precise identification of this microorganism in hospital settings. Then key events in the acquisition of antibiotic-resistant genes by this microorganism are summarized, highlighting the race between new antibiotic generation and emergence of A. baumannii resistant strains. Here we review the historical development of this species as an infectious threat, the current state of its distribution, and antibiotic resistance characteristics, and we discuss future prospects for its control.

  17. Characterization and application of a novel bioemulsifier in crude oil degradation by Acinetobacter beijerinckii ZRS.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yi-He; Chen, Li-Yuan; Tian, Zi-Jing; Sun, Yue; Liu, Jin-Biao; Huang, Lei

    2016-02-01

    Bioemulsifiers can be applicated in a variety of areas such as bioremediation and microbial-enhanced oil recovery. The present study was aimed at bioemulsifier production, optimization, stability studies, and applications of the bioemulsifier produced by one of these strains, Acinetobacter beijerinckii ZRS. When Acinetobacter beijerinckii ZRS is cultured with hexadecane as a carbon source, it produces a novel extracellular emulsifying agent that does not cause remarkable reductions in surface tension. In order to enhance bioemulsifier production, response surface methodology was applied to optimize the culture medium. The bioemulsifier was subjected to thin-layer chromatography, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), gel filtration chromatography, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), which allowed for the identification of a novel polymeric bioemulsifier. The bioemulsifier retained its properties at a wide range of pH values, high temperatures and high salinities (up to 5% [w⁄v] Na(+) and 24% Ca(2+)). To deduce the role of this bioemulsifier in a coastal zone oil spill, the propagation of oil-degrading bacteria on oil-coated grains of gravel immersed in seawater was investigated in beach-simulating tanks. The bioemulsifier played a positive role in the degradation of these hydrocarbons and increasing the light crude oil degradation rate of the bacterial strain from 37.5 to 58.3% within 56 days. Therefore, this bioemulsifier shows strong potential to be used for bioremediation of oil pollution in marine environments.

  18. Growth inhibition and microcystin degradation effects of Acinetobacter guillouiae A2 on Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Yi, Yang-Lei; Yu, Xiao-Bo; Zhang, Chao; Wang, Gao-Xue

    2015-01-01

    Strain A2 with algicidal activity against Microcystis aeruginosa was isolated and identified with the genus Acinetobacter on the basis of phenotypic tests and 16S rRNA gene analysis. It was identified with the species Acinetobactor guillouiae by partial rpoB sequence analysis. When 10% (v/v) of the bacterial culture was co-incubated with M. aeruginosa culture, algicidal efficiency reached 91.6% after 7 days. Supernatant of A2 culture showed similar algicidal activity, while the cell pellet had little activity, suggesting that Acinetobacter guillouiae A2 indirectly attacked M. aeruginosa cells by secreting an extracellular algicidal compound, which was characterized as heat-stable. A significant decrease in the microcystin (microcystin-LR) concentration was observed after 10% (v/v) addition of A2 culture. Transcription of three microcystin-related genes (mcyA, mcyD and mcyH) was also found to be inhibited. The algicidal compound 4-hydroxyphenethylamine was obtained by further isolation and purification using various chromatographic techniques. The EC50, 3d and EC50, 7d values of 4-hydroxyphenethylamine against M. aeruginosa were 22.5 and 10.3 mgL(-1), respectively. These results indicate that A. guillouiae strain A2 inhibits growth of M. aeruginosa and degrades microcystin production. The identified compound, 4-hydroxyphenethylamine, has potential for development as a new algicidal formulation or product.

  19. Emergence of Acinetobacter pittii harboring New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase genes in Daejeon, Korea.

    PubMed

    Sung, Ji Youn; Koo, Sun Hoe; Kim, Semi; Kwon, Gye Cheol

    2015-09-01

    Carbapenemase production has been reported worldwide in gram-negative bacteria, including Acinetobacter species. We detected carbapenemase-producing Acinetobacter pittii in clinical isolates in Daejeon, Korea. Twenty-one ertapenem-resistant A. pittii isolates screened with a disk diffusion method were characterized by using the Epsilon test, four multiplex PCR assays, and a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme. A total of 21 A. pittii isolates harbored the metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) gene bla(IMP-1) or bla(NDM-1). Nineteen isolates containing bla(IMP-1) were resistant to imipenem and meropenem, but two isolates harboring bla(NDM-1) were susceptible to them. The sequence types (STs) of the two New Delhi MBL (NDM-1)-producing A. pittii isolates were ST70 and ST207, which differed from the STs (ST63, ST119, ST396, and a novel ST) of the IMP-1-producing A. pittii. This is the first report on NDM-1-producing A. pittii isolates in Korea. Our results emphasize that the study of NDM-1-producing gram-negative bacteria should involve carbapenem-susceptible as well as carbapenem-resistant isolates.

  20. Presence of OXA-23-producing isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii in wastewater from hospitals in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Alessandra E; Marchetti, Desirée P; De Oliveira, Lyvia M; Gusatti, Carolina S; Fuentefria, Daiane B; Corção, Gertrudes

    2011-06-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the dissemination of multiresistant isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii carrying resistance genes, by samples of wastewater from hospitals in Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. We obtained 303 bacterial isolates from the wastewater of three hospitals in Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul. For each isolate, we determined the profile of susceptibility to antimicrobials and the presence of the genes bla(OXA-23), bla(OXA-24), bla(OXA-51), bla(OXA-58), bla(SPM-1), bla(IMP), and bla(VIM.) The bla(OXA-51) gene was found in 56% of the isolates, indicating the presence of A. baumannii in this environment. Of these, three multiresistant isolates were positive for the bla(OXA-23) gene, in wastewater from two of the hospitals. The results obtained in this study indicate that isolates of A. baumannii which are multiresistant and carry resistance genes such as bla(OXA-51) and bla(OXA-23) are being released into the environment in the wastewater from the hospitals analyzed. Multiresistant Acinetobacter junii, the newly emerging pathogen, were also found among the multiresistant isolates. Hospital wastewater may be crucial to the development and dispersal of multiresistant bacteria, making waterbodies reservoirs of bacterial resistance.

  1. Antibiotic-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Increasing Success Remains a Challenge as a Nosocomial Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Villoria, Ana Maria; Valverde-Garduno, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant infectious bacteria currently imply a high risk and therefore constitute a strong challenge when treating patients in hospital settings. Characterization of these species and of particular strains is a priority for the establishment of diagnostic tests and preventive procedures. The relevance of Acinetobacter baumannii as a problematic microorganism in inpatient facilities, particularly intensive care units, has increased over time. This review aims to draw attention to (i) the historical emergence of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii, (ii) the current status of surveillance needs in Latin America, and (iii) recent data suggesting that A. baumannii continues to spread and evolve in hospital settings. First, we present synopsis of the series of events leading to the discovery and precise identification of this microorganism in hospital settings. Then key events in the acquisition of antibiotic-resistant genes by this microorganism are summarized, highlighting the race between new antibiotic generation and emergence of A. baumannii resistant strains. Here we review the historical development of this species as an infectious threat, the current state of its distribution, and antibiotic resistance characteristics, and we discuss future prospects for its control. PMID:26966582

  2. Genome Sequence of Acinetobacter baumannii Strain D36, an Antibiotic-Resistant Isolate from Lineage 2 of Global Clone 1

    PubMed Central

    Hamidian, Mohammad; Hawkey, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Multiply antibiotic-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolate D36 was recovered in Australia in 2008 and belongs to a distinct lineage of global clone 1 (GC1). Here, we present the complete 4.13 Mbp genome sequence (chromosome plus 4 plasmids), generated via long read sequencing (PacBio). PMID:26679588

  3. Draft Genome Sequences of Seven Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Strains, Isolated from Respiratory Samples in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Labrador-Herrera, Gema; Álvarez, Rocío; López-Rojas, Rafael; Smani, Younes; Cebrero-Cangueiro, Tania; Rueda, Antonio; Pérez Florido, Javier; Pachón-Ibáñez, María Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    The draft genome sequences of seven multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii clinical strains belonging to sequence types ST-208 and ST-218 are reported in this study. They were isolated from tracheobronchial aspirate of mechanically ventilated adult patients admitted to the intensive care unit of a Spanish tertiary hospital during 2010 to 2011. PMID:27034482

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of a Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Isolate Obtained from a Mexican Hospital (Sequence Type 422)

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Jaimes, Semiramis; Salgado-Camargo, Abraham David; Graña-Miraglia, Lucía; Lozano, Luis; Bocanegra-Ibarias, Paola; Volkow-Fernández, Patricia; Silva-Sanchez, Jesus; Castillo-Ramírez, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a dangerous nosocomial pathogen, particularly for severely ill patients in intensive care units and patients with hematologic malignancies. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of a multidrug-resistant A. baumannii isolate, recovered from a Mexican hospital and classified as sequence type 422 according to the multilocus sequence typing Pasteur scheme. PMID:27340065

  5. A distinct alleles and genetic recombination of pmrCAB operon in species of Acinetobacter baumannii complex isolates.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Hun; Ko, Kwan Soo

    2015-07-01

    To investigate pmrCAB sequence divergence in 5 species of Acinetobacter baumannii complex, a total of 80 isolates from a Korean hospital were explored. We evaluated nucleotide and amino acid polymorphisms of pmrCAB operon, and phylogenetic trees were constructed for each gene of prmCAB operon. Colistin and polymyxin B susceptibility was determined for all isolates, and multilocus sequence typing was also performed for A. baumannii isolates. Our results showed that each species of A. baumannii complex has divergent pmrCAB operon sequences. We identified a distinct pmrCAB allele allied with Acinetobacter nosocomialis in gene trees. Different grouping in each gene tree suggests sporadic recombination or emergence of pmrCAB genes among Acinetobacter species. Sequence polymorphisms among Acinetobacter species might not be associated with colistin resistance. We revealed that a distinct pmrCAB allele may be widespread across the continents such as North America and Asia and that sporadic genetic recombination or emergence of pmrCAB genes might occur.

  6. Rapid discrimination of Acinetobacter baumannii international clone II lineage by pyrosequencing SNP analyses of bla(OXA-51-like) genes.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Mari; Suzuki, Satowa; Suzuki, Masato; Arakawa, Yoshichika; Shibayama, Keigo

    2013-08-01

    We found that Acinetobacter baumannii international clone II generally possesses unique GTA sequence at nucleotide positions 106-108 in the bla(OXA-51-like) genes. We exploited this to develop an easy and rapid method for discrimination of international clone II from other A. baumannii by employing pyrosequencing analyses of single nucleotide polymorphisms.

  7. Genome Sequence of vB_AbaS_TRS1, a Viable Prophage Isolated from Acinetobacter baumannii Strain A118

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Dann; Wand, Matthew E.; Sutton, J. Mark; Centron, Daniela; Kropinski, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    A novel temperate phage, vB_AbaS_TRS1, was isolated from cultures of Acinetobacter baumannii strain A118 that had been exposed to mitomycin C. Phage TRS1 belongs to the Siphoviridae family of bacteriophages and encapsulates a 40,749-bp genome encoding 70 coding sequences and a single tRNA. PMID:27738026

  8. Emergence of extensively drug-resistant OXA-72-producing Acinetobacter baumannii in Recife, Brazil: risk of clonal dissemination?

    PubMed

    de Sá Cavalcanti, Felipe Lira; Almeida, Anna Carolina Soares; Vilela, Marinalda Anselmo; de Morais Junior, Marcos Antonio; de Morais, Marcia Maria Camargo; Leal-Balbino, Tereza Cristina

    2013-11-01

    Two new examples of OXA-72-producing Acinetobacter baumannii isolate resistant to a broad spectrum of antimicrobials, but not polymyxin B, have been identified in Recife, Brazil. Molecular typing indicated a close genetic link with the OXA-72-producing A. baumannii previously isolated in São Paulo, suggesting the possibility of clonal dissemination within the country.

  9. Genome Sequence of vB_AbaS_TRS1, a Viable Prophage Isolated from Acinetobacter baumannii Strain A118.

    PubMed

    Turner, Dann; Wand, Matthew E; Sutton, J Mark; Centron, Daniela; Kropinski, Andrew M; Reynolds, Darren M

    2016-10-13

    A novel temperate phage, vB_AbaS_TRS1, was isolated from cultures of Acinetobacter baumannii strain A118 that had been exposed to mitomycin C. Phage TRS1 belongs to the Siphoviridae family of bacteriophages and encapsulates a 40,749-bp genome encoding 70 coding sequences and a single tRNA.

  10. Draft genome sequence of an Acinetobacter genomic species 3 strain harboring a bla(NDM-1) gene.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Cui, Yujun; Pu, Fei; Jiang, Guoqin; Zhao, Xiangna; Yuan, Yanting; Zhao, Wei; Li, Dongfang; Liu, Hui; Li, Yin; Liang, Ting; Xu, Li; Wang, Yan; Song, Qing; Yang, Jiyong; Liang, Long; Yang, Ruifu; Han, Li; Song, Yajun

    2012-01-01

    Here we report the draft genome sequence of one Acinetobacter genomic species 3 strain, D499, which harbors the bla(NDM-1) gene. The total length of the assembled genome is 4,103,824 bp, and 3,896 coding sequences (CDSs) were predicted within the genome. A previously unreported bla(NDM-1)-bearing plasmid was identified in this strain.

  11. Urban riverine environment is a source of multidrug-resistant and ESBL-producing clinically important Acinetobacter spp.

    PubMed

    Maravić, Ana; Skočibušić, Mirjana; Fredotović, Željana; Šamanić, Ivica; Cvjetan, Svjetlana; Knezović, Mia; Puizina, Jasna

    2016-02-01

    Some Acinetobacter species have emerged as very important opportunistic pathogens in humans. We investigated Acinetobacter spp. from the polluted urban riverine environment in Croatia in regard to species affiliation, antibiotic resistance pattern, and resistance mechanisms. Considerable number of isolates produced acquired extended-spectrum β-lactamase(s) (ESBLs), CTX-M-15 solely or with TEM-116. By Southern blot hybridization, bla TEM-116 was identified on plasmids ca. 10, 3, and 1.2 kb in Acinetobacter junii, A. gandensis, and A. johnsonii. The bla TEM-116-carrying plasmid in A. gandensis was successfully transferred by conjugation to azide-resistant Escherichia coli J53. A. radioresistens isolate also carried an intrinsic carbapenemase gene bla OXA-133 with ISAba1 insertion sequence present upstream to promote its expression. Majority of ESBL-producing isolates harbored integrases intI1 and/or intI2 and the sulfamethoxazole resistance gene sul1. Almost all isolates had overexpressed resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) efflux system, indicating that this mechanism may have contributed to multidrug resistance phenotypes. This is the first report of environmental CTX-M-15-producing Acinetobacter spp. and the first identification of CTX-M-15 in A. johnsonii, A. junii, A. calcoaceticus, A. gandensis, A. haemolyticus, and A. radioresistens worldwide. We identified, also for the first time, the environmental Acinetobacter-producing TEM ESBLs, highlighting the potential risk for human health, and the role of these bacteria in maintenance and dissemination of clinically important antibiotic resistance genes in community through riverine environments.

  12. Epidemiological Characteristics of blaNDM-1 in Enterobacteriaceae and the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii Complex in China from 2011 to 2012

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Weimei; Cui, Lanqing; Li, Yun; Zheng, Bo; Lv, Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The study aimed to investigate the prevalence and epidemiological characteristics of blaNDM-1 (encoding New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase 1) in Enterobacteriaceae and the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex (ABC) in China from July 2011 to June 2012. Methods PCR was used to screen for the presence of blaNDM-1 in all organisms studied. For blaNDM-1-positive strains, 16S rRNA analysis and Analytical Profile Index (API) strips were used to identify the bacterial genus and species. The ABCs were reconfirmed by PCR detection of blaOXA-51-like. Antibiotic susceptibilities of the bacteria were assessed by determining minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of them using two-fold agar dilution test, as recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Molecular typing was performed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). S1 nuclease-pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (S1-PFGE) and Southern blot hybridization were conducted to ascertain the gene location of blaNDM-1. Conjugation experiments were conducted to determine the transmission of blaNDM-1-positive strains. Results Among 2,170 Enterobacteriaceae and 600 ABCs, seven Enterobacteriaceae strains and two A. calcoaceticus isolates from five different cities carried the blaNDM-1 gene. The seven Enterobacteriaceae strains comprised four Klebsiella pneumoniae, one Enterobacter cloacae, one Enterobacter aerogen and one Citrobacter freundii. All seven were non-susceptible to imipenem, meropenem or ertapenem. Two A. calcoaceticus species were resistant to imipenem and meropenem. Three K. pneumoniae showed the same PFGE profiles. The blaNDM-1 genes of eight strains were localized on plasmids, while one was chromosomal. Conclusions Compared with previous reports, the numbers and species containing the blaNDM-1 in Enterobacteriaceae have significantly increased in China. Most of them are able to disseminate the gene, which is cause for concern. Consecutive surveillance should

  13. Evaluation of the Bruker Biotyper Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry System for Identification of Blood Isolates of Acinetobacter Species

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, Po-Ren; Kuo, Lu-Cheng; Chang, Tsung-Chain; Lee, Tai-Fen; Teng, Shih-Hua; Chuang, Yu-Chung; Teng, Lee-Jene

    2014-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) (Bruker Biotyper) was able to accurately identify 98.6% (142/144) of Acinetobacter baumannii isolates, 72.4% (63/87) of A. nosocomialis isolates, and 97.6% (41/42) of A. pittii isolates. All Acinetobacter junii, A. ursingii, A. johnsonii, and A. radioresistens isolates (n = 28) could also be identified correctly by Bruker Biotyper. PMID:24899038

  14. Identification of a new allelic variant of the Acinetobacter baumannii cephalosporinase, ADC-7 beta-lactamase: defining a unique family of class C enzymes.

    PubMed

    Hujer, Kristine M; Hamza, Nashaat S; Hujer, Andrea M; Perez, Federico; Helfand, Marion S; Bethel, Christopher R; Thomson, Jodi M; Anderson, Vernon E; Barlow, Miriam; Rice, Louis B; Tenover, Fred C; Bonomo, Robert A

    2005-07-01

    Acinetobacter spp. are emerging as opportunistic hospital pathogens that demonstrate resistance to many classes of antibiotics. In a metropolitan hospital in Cleveland, a clinical isolate of Acinetobacter baumannii that tested resistant to cefepime and ceftazidime (MIC = 32 microg/ml) was identified. Herein, we sought to determine the molecular basis for the extended-spectrum-cephalosporin resistance. Using analytical isoelectric focusing, a beta-lactamase with a pI of > or = 9.2 was detected. PCR amplification with specific A. baumannii cephalosporinase primers yielded a 1,152-bp product which, when sequenced, identified a novel 383-amino-acid class C enzyme. Expressed in Escherichia coli DH10B, this beta-lactamase demonstrated greater resistance against ceftazidime and cefotaxime than cefepime (4.0 microg/ml versus 0.06 microg/ml). The kinetic characteristics of this beta-lactamase were similar to other cephalosporinases found in Acinetobacter spp. In addition, this cephalosporinase was inhibited by meropenem, imipenem, ertapenem, and sulopenem (K(i) < 40 microM). The amino acid compositions of this novel enzyme and other class C beta-lactamases thus far described for A. baumannii, Acinetobacter genomic species 3, and Oligella urethralis in Europe and South Africa suggest that this cephalosporinase defines a unique family of class C enzymes. We propose a uniform designation for this family of cephalosporinases (Acinetobacter-derived cephalosporinases [ADC]) found in Acinetobacter spp. and identify this enzyme as ADC-7 beta-lactamase. The coalescence of Acinetobacter ampC beta-lactamases into a single common ancestor and the substantial phylogenetic distance separating them from other ampC genes support the logical value of developing a system of nomenclature for these Acinetobacter cephalosporinase genes.

  15. Identification of a New Allelic Variant of the Acinetobacter baumannii Cephalosporinase, ADC-7 β-Lactamase: Defining a Unique Family of Class C Enzymes‡

    PubMed Central

    Hujer, Kristine M.; Hamza, Nashaat S.; Hujer, Andrea M.; Perez, Federico; Helfand, Marion S.; Bethel, Christopher R.; Thomson, Jodi M.; Anderson, Vernon E.; Barlow, Miriam; Rice, Louis B.; Tenover, Fred C.; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    Acinetobacter spp. are emerging as opportunistic hospital pathogens that demonstrate resistance to many classes of antibiotics. In a metropolitan hospital in Cleveland, a clinical isolate of Acinetobacter baumannii that tested resistant to cefepime and ceftazidime (MIC = 32 μg/ml) was identified. Herein, we sought to determine the molecular basis for the extended-spectrum-cephalosporin resistance. Using analytical isoelectric focusing, a β-lactamase with a pI of ≥9.2 was detected. PCR amplification with specific A. baumannii cephalosporinase primers yielded a 1,152-bp product which, when sequenced, identified a novel 383-amino-acid class C enzyme. Expressed in Escherichia coli DH10B, this β-lactamase demonstrated greater resistance against ceftazidime and cefotaxime than cefepime (4.0 μg/ml versus 0.06 μg/ml). The kinetic characteristics of this β-lactamase were similar to other cephalosporinases found in Acinetobacter spp. In addition, this cephalosporinase was inhibited by meropenem, imipenem, ertapenem, and sulopenem (Ki < 40 μM). The amino acid compositions of this novel enzyme and other class C β-lactamases thus far described for A. baumannii, Acinetobacter genomic species 3, and Oligella urethralis in Europe and South Africa suggest that this cephalosporinase defines a unique family of class C enzymes. We propose a uniform designation for this family of cephalosporinases (Acinetobacter-derived cephalosporinases [ADC]) found in Acinetobacter spp. and identify this enzyme as ADC-7 β-lactamase. The coalescence of Acinetobacter ampC β-lactamases into a single common ancestor and the substantial phylogenetic distance separating them from other ampC genes support the logical value of developing a system of nomenclature for these Acinetobacter cephalosporinase genes. PMID:15980372

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of the Multiresistant Acinetobacter baumannii Strain AbH12O-A2, Isolated during a Large Outbreak in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Merino, M.; Alvarez-Fraga, L.; Gómez, M. J.; Aransay, A. M.; Lavín, J. L.; Chaves, F.

    2014-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of Acinetobacter baumannii strain AbH12O-A2, isolated during a large outbreak in Spain. The genome has 3,875,775 bp and 3,526 coding sequences, with 39.4% G+C content. The availability of this genome will facilitate the study of the pathogenicity of the Acinetobacter species. PMID:25395646

  17. Biology of Acinetobacter baumannii: Pathogenesis, Antibiotic Resistance Mechanisms, and Prospective Treatment Options.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Ro; Lee, Jung Hun; Park, Moonhee; Park, Kwang Seung; Bae, Il Kwon; Kim, Young Bae; Cha, Chang-Jun; Jeong, Byeong Chul; Lee, Sang Hee

    2017-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is undoubtedly one of the most successful pathogens responsible for hospital-acquired nosocomial infections in the modern healthcare system. Due to the prevalence of infections and outbreaks caused by multi-drug resistant A. baumannii, few antibiotics are effective for treating infections caused by this pathogen. To overcome this problem, knowledge of the pathogenesis and antibiotic resistance mechanisms of A. baumannii is important. In this review, we summarize current studies on the virulence factors that contribute to A. baumannii pathogenesis, including porins, capsular polysaccharides, lipopolysaccharides, phospholipases, outer membrane vesicles, metal acquisition systems, and protein secretion systems. Mechanisms of antibiotic resistance of this organism, including acquirement of β-lactamases, up-regulation of multidrug efflux pumps, modification of aminoglycosides, permeability defects, and alteration of target sites, are also discussed. Lastly, novel prospective treatment options for infections caused by multi-drug resistant A. baumannii are summarized.

  18. Synergistic activity of coriander oil and conventional antibiotics against Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Duarte, A; Ferreira, S; Silva, F; Domingues, F C

    2012-02-15

    In this study we investigated the existence of synergistic antibacterial effect between coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) essential oil and six different antibacterial drugs (cefoperazone, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, tetracycline and piperacillin). The antibacterial activity of coriander oil was assessed using microdilution susceptibility testing and synergistic interaction by checkerboard assays. The association of coriander essential oil with chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin and tetracycline against Acinetobacter baumannii showed in vitro effectiveness, which is an indicator of a possible synergistic interaction against two reference strains of A. baumannii (LMG 1025 and LMG 1041) (FIC index from 0.047 to 0.375). However, when tested the involvement between coriander essential oil and piperacillin or cefoperazone, the isobolograms and FIC index showed an additive interaction. The in vitro interaction could improve the antimicrobial effectiveness of ciprofloxacin, gentamicin and tetracycline and may contribute to resensitize A. baumannii to the action of chloramphenicol.

  19. Variable number tandem repeat loci providing discrimination within widespread genotypes of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Turton, J F; Matos, J; Kaufmann, M E; Pitt, T L

    2009-05-01

    Some genotypes of Acinetobacter baumannii, defined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), have been found in many hospitals. Our aim was to find variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) loci capable of providing discrimination among isolates with highly similar or identical PFGE profiles, to gain insights into the epidemiology. Thirteen loci identified in A. baumannii ATCC 17978 were tested using a panel of isolates that included multiple representatives of genotypes belonging to the three European clonal lineages. Two loci, with repeat units of 9 and 6 bp respectively were selected. Repeat numbers varied between 3 and 29, and 9 and 26 respectively at the two loci. The repeat numbers of representatives of each genotype often differed between hospitals, providing a means of tracking patient transfers and possible transmissions between patients. The results suggest that this analysis accurately reflects the known epidemiological information, and provides a valuable tool for cross-infection studies.

  20. Platelet-activating Factor Receptor Initiates Contact of Acinetobacter baumannii Expressing Phosphorylcholine with Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Smani, Younes; Docobo-Pérez, Fernando; López-Rojas, Rafael; Domínguez-Herrera, Juan; Ibáñez-Martínez, José; Pachón, Jerónimo

    2012-01-01

    Adhesion is an initial and important step in Acinetobacter baumannii causing infections. However, the exact molecular mechanism of such a step between A. baumannii and the host cells remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated that the phosphorylcholine (ChoP)-containing outer membrane protein of A. baumannii binds to A549 cells through platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR), resulting in activation of G protein and intracellular calcium. Upon A. baumannii expressing ChoP binding to PAFR, clathrin and β-arrestins, proteins involved in the direction of the vacuolar movement, are activated during invasion of A. baumannii. PAFR antagonism restricts the dissemination of A. baumannii in the pneumonia model. These results define a role for PAFR in A. baumannii interaction with host cells and suggest a mechanism for the entry of A. baumannii into the cytoplasm of host cells. PMID:22689572

  1. Effect of Acinetobacter glutaminase-asparaginase treatment on free amino acids in mouse tissues.

    PubMed

    Holcenberg, J S; Tang, E; Dolowy, W C

    1975-05-01

    Acinetobacter glutaminase-asparaginase (AGA) and Escherichia coli asparaginase were compared for their effects on plasma and tissue levels of amino acids, ammonia, and glutamyl transferase activity in the mouse. Free asparagine was depleted similarly in plasma and tissues by both enzymes. AGA treatment produced partial depletion of glutamine concentrations in muscle, spleen, small intestine, and liver. Brain and kidney glutamine concentrations actually rose with treatment. Despite over 100-fold increase in plasma glutamate, only the kidney showed a substantial increase in free glutamate levels during AGA treatment. Glutamine biosynthesis measured by glutamyl transferase activity showed an appreciable increase only in the kidney. Ammonia levels in tissues and plasma rose 1.3- to 4.3-fold. In general, E. coli asparaginase treatment had much less effect on these measurements than did AGA. The changes in these levels are discussed in relation to sites of possible toxicity and antitumor effects.

  2. A milk pump as a source for spreading Acinetobacter baumannii in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Engür, Defne; Çakmak, Bilin Çetinkaya; Türkmen, Münevver Kaynak; Telli, Murat; Eyigör, Mete; Güzünler, Melike

    2014-12-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative coccobacillus that has emerged as a troublesome pathogen causing institutional outbreaks. Environmental contamination is a distinctive characteristic of this microorganism, which brings a further difficulty in infection control. During A. baumannii outbreaks in intensive care units, a common contaminated object can be found as a reservoir. Finding out this source by epidemiological investigations is of particular importance in order to develop effective interventions. We describe an outbreak of A. baumannii and the results of epidemiological investigations in a neonatal intensive care unit. The outbreak strain was isolated from the outer surface of a breastmilk pump. We have successfully controlled the outbreak by careful reviewing of our milk collection process.

  3. Molecular Mechanisms of Sulbactam Antibacterial Activity and Resistance Determinants in Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Penwell, William F.; Shapiro, Adam B.; Giacobbe, Robert A.; Gu, Rong-Fang; Gao, Ning; Thresher, Jason; McLaughlin, Robert E.; Huband, Michael D.; DeJonge, Boudewijn L. M.; Ehmann, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Sulbactam is a class A β-lactamase inhibitor with intrinsic whole-cell activity against certain bacterial species, including Acinetobacter baumannii. The clinical use of sulbactam for A. baumannii infections is of interest due to increasing multidrug resistance in this pathogen. However, the molecular drivers of its antibacterial activity and resistance determinants have yet to be precisely defined. Here we show that the antibacterial activities of sulbactam vary widely across contemporary A. baumannii clinical isolates and are mediated through inhibition of the penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) PBP1 and PBP3, with very low frequency of resistance; the rare pbp3 mutants with high levels of resistance to sulbactam are attenuated in fitness. These results support further investigation of the potential clinical utility of sulbactam. PMID:25561334

  4. Molecular mechanisms of sulbactam antibacterial activity and resistance determinants in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Penwell, William F; Shapiro, Adam B; Giacobbe, Robert A; Gu, Rong-Fang; Gao, Ning; Thresher, Jason; McLaughlin, Robert E; Huband, Michael D; DeJonge, Boudewijn L M; Ehmann, David E; Miller, Alita A

    2015-03-01

    Sulbactam is a class A β-lactamase inhibitor with intrinsic whole-cell activity against certain bacterial species, including Acinetobacter baumannii. The clinical use of sulbactam for A. baumannii infections is of interest due to increasing multidrug resistance in this pathogen. However, the molecular drivers of its antibacterial activity and resistance determinants have yet to be precisely defined. Here we show that the antibacterial activities of sulbactam vary widely across contemporary A. baumannii clinical isolates and are mediated through inhibition of the penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) PBP1 and PBP3, with very low frequency of resistance; the rare pbp3 mutants with high levels of resistance to sulbactam are attenuated in fitness. These results support further investigation of the potential clinical utility of sulbactam.

  5. Screening and deciphering antibiotic resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii: a state of the art.

    PubMed

    Bonnin, Rémy A; Nordmann, Patrice; Poirel, Laurent

    2013-06-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii, recognized as a serious threat in healthcare facilities, has the ability to develop resistance to antibiotics quite easily. This resistance is related to either gene acquisition (horizontal gene transfer) or mutations in the genome, leading to gene disruption, over- or down-expression of genes. The clinically relevant antibiotic resistances in A. baumannii include resistance to aminoglycosides, broad-spectrum cephalosporins, carbapenems, tigecycline and colistin, which are the last resort antibiotics. The intrinsic and acquired resistance mechanisms of A. baumannii are presented here, with special focus on β-lactam resistance. The most up-to-date techniques for identification, including phenotypical and molecular tests, and screening of those emerging resistance traits are also highlighted. The implementation of early detection and identification of multidrug-resistant A. baumannii is crucial to control their spread.

  6. Antibiotic resistance determinants of a group of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in China.

    PubMed

    Xiao-Min, Xu; You-Fen, Fan; Wei-Yun, Feng; Zu-Huang, Mi; Xing-Bei, Weng

    2014-06-01

    A group of Acinetobacter baumannii confers multidrug resistance, but the molecular epidemiology and multidrug resistance mechanisms are poorly understood. Nineteen isolates were identified, and the antimicrobial susceptibility profile was determined using the disc diffusion method. Then, PCR of 78 kinds of resistance-associated genes were performed. A novel variant of blaADC gene: blaADC-67 gene (Genbank accession No. JX169789) was prevalent in all 19 isolates. Moreover, ISAba1 could also provide strong promoter to upregulate the expression of blaADC67 to confer resistance to beta-lactam. This is the first report of emergence of blaADC-67 in A. baumannii worldwide, which might confer resistance to beta-lactam.

  7. Alcohol impairs J774.16 macrophage-like cell antimicrobial functions in Acinetobacter baumannii infection

    PubMed Central

    Asplund, Melissa B; Coelho, Carolina; Cordero, Radames JB; Martinez, Luis R

    2013-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii (Ab) is a common cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in chronic alcoholics in tropical and sub-tropical climates and associated with a >50% mortality rate. We demonstrated that exposure of J774.16 macrophage-like cells to physiological alcohol (EtOH) concentrations decreased phagocytosis and killing of Ab. EtOH-mediated macrophage phagocytosis dysfunction may be associated with reduced expression of GTPase-RhoA, a key regulator of the actin polymerization signaling cascade. EtOH inhibited nitric oxide (NO) generation via inducible NO-synthase inactivation, which enhanced Ab survival within macrophages. Additionally, EtOH alters cytokine production resulting in a dysregulated immune response. This study is a proof of principle which establishes that EtOH might exacerbate Ab infection and be an important factor enhancing CAP in individuals at risk. PMID:23863607

  8. Discovery and Characterization of New Hydroxamate Siderophores, Baumannoferrin A and B, produced by Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Penwell, William F; DeGrace, Nancy; Tentarelli, Sharon; Gauthier, Lise; Gilbert, Catherine M; Arivett, Brock A; Miller, Alita A; Durand-Reville, Thomas F; Joubran, Camil; Actis, Luis A

    2015-07-27

    Acinetobacter baumannii AYE does not produce acinetobactin but grows under iron limitation. Accordingly, analyses of AYE iron-restricted culture supernatants resulted in the isolation of two fractions, which contained only hydroxamates and showed siderophore activity. Structural analyses identified baumannoferrin A and baumannoferrin B, which differ only by a double bond. These siderophores are composed of citrate, 1,3-diaminopropane, 2,4-diaminobutyrate, decenoic acid, and α-ketoglutarate. Analysis of the AYE genome showed the presence of a 12-gene cluster coding for proteins similar to those involved in the production and utilization of the hydroxamate siderophores acinetoferrin and achromobactin. As A. baumannii AYE does not produce acinetobactin and harbors only one gene cluster encoding the production and utilization of a siderophore, this strain's growth under iron limitation depends on baumannoferrin, a novel hydroxamate that could play a role in its virulence.

  9. Biodegradation of Phenol by Bacteria Strain Acinetobacter Calcoaceticus PA Isolated from Phenolic Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenghui; Xie, Wenyu; Li, Dehao; Peng, Yang; Li, Zesheng; Liu, Shusi

    2016-01-01

    A phenol-degrading bacterium strain PA was successfully isolated from the effluent of petrochemical wastewater. Based on its morphological, physiological and biochemical characteristics, the strain PA was characterized as a Gram-negative, strictly aerobic, nonmotile and short rod-shaped bacterium that utilizes phenol as a sole carbon and energy source. 16S rDNA sequence analysis revealed that this strain is affiliated to Acinetobacter calcoaceticus in the group of Gammaproteobacteria. The strain was efficient in removing 91.6% of the initial 800 mg∙L−1 phenol within 48 h, and had a tolerance of phenol concentration as high as 1700 mg∙L−1. These results indicated that A. calcoaceticus possesses a promising potential in treating phenolic wastewater. PMID:27005648

  10. Diketone cleaving enzyme Dke1 production by Acinetobacter johnsonii--optimization of fermentation conditions.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Hannes; Mandl, Thomas; Steiner, Walter

    2004-01-08

    The main objective of this work was the optimization of the production of the novel dioxygenase diketone cleaving enzyme (Dke1) from Acinetobacter johnsonii. Acetylacetone was used as an inducer for enzyme production. In the first step, the growth medium was optimized by using screening designs for finding the optimal carbon and nitrogen source. In the second step, a genetic algorithm was used to optimize the concentrations of all medium components. After six generations the stopping criterion was reached and a growth medium was obtained which produced sixteen times more enzyme than the starting medium. In the next step, an addition profile for the inducer acetylacetone was developed to further increase enzyme production by using a genetic algorithm. In this case, after four generations the stopping criterion was fulfilled. By using the obtained optimal addition profile Dke1 activity was enhanced from 826 to 2584Ul(-1). In comparison to the starting conditions activity could even be increased by a factor of 50.

  11. Biotypes, serovars and antimicrobial resistance patterns of Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, M G; Irino, K; Vaz, T M; Gonçalves, C R; Levy, C E

    1996-08-01

    255 Acinetobacter strains, from clinical specimens of inpatients and outpatients, were identified phenotypically according to the new taxonomy proposed by Bouvet and Grimont. A. baumannii was the most frequent species (80.8%). This species underwent biotyping and serotyping according to the scheme of Bouvet and Grimont, and that of Traub, respectively, 81.2% of samples belonged to biotypes 2, 6 and 9 with a predominance of biotype 2. 86.6% of the strains could be serotyped; 2 new serotypes were encountered. The new serotype 29, being the most frequently isolated, was related to biotype 2 (86.6%), whereas serotype 13 was related to biotype 6 (84.8%). These clones presented marked multiple resistance patterns and were widespread in different wards. No outbreak was reported during the period studied. These phenotypical methods proved to be useful in differentiating strains of A. baumannii and, if used together, they showed a high discriminatory power.

  12. Distribution of AdeABC efflux system genes in genotypically diverse strains of clinical Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Piotr; Sacha, Paweł; Czaban, Sławomir; Hauschild, Tomasz; Ojdana, Dominika; Kowalczuk, Oksana; Milewski, Robert; Poniatowski, Bogusław; Nikliński, Jacek; Tryniszewska, Elżbieta

    2013-10-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a highly problematic hospital-associated pathogen. Different mechanisms contribute to the formation of multidrug resistance in A. baumannii, including the AdeABC efflux system. Distribution of the structural and regulatory genes encoding the AdeABC efflux system among genetically diverse clinical A. baumannii strains was achieved by using PCR and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis techniques. The distribution of adeABRS genes is extremely high among our A. baumannii strains, except the adeC gene. We have observed a large proportion of strains presenting multidrug-resistance phenotype for several years. The efflux pump could be an important mechanism in these strains in resistance to antibiotics.

  13. Effects of silver nanoparticles in combination with antibiotics on the resistant bacteria Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Wan, Guoqing; Ruan, Lingao; Yin, Yu; Yang, Tian; Ge, Mei; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii resistance to carbapenem antibiotics is a serious clinical challenge. As a newly developed technology, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) show some excellent characteristics compared to older treatments, and are a candidate for combating A. baumannii infection. However, its mechanism of action remains unclear. In this study, we combined AgNPs with antibiotics to treat carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii (aba1604). Our results showed that single AgNPs completely inhibited A. baumannii growth at 2.5 μg/mL. AgNP treatment also showed synergistic effects with the antibiotics polymixin B and rifampicin, and an additive effect with tigecyline. In vivo, we found that AgNPs-antibiotic combinations led to better survival ratios in A. baumannii-infected mouse peritonitis models than that by single drug treatment. Finally, we employed different antisense RNA-targeted Escherichia coli strains to elucidate the synergistic mechanism involved in bacterial responses to AgNPs and antibiotics.

  14. Alcohol impairs J774.16 macrophage-like cell antimicrobial functions in Acinetobacter baumannii infection.

    PubMed

    Asplund, Melissa B; Coelho, Carolina; Cordero, Radames J B; Martinez, Luis R

    2013-08-15

    Acinetobacter baumannii (Ab) is a common cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in chronic alcoholics in tropical and sub-tropical climates and associated with a > 50% mortality rate. We demonstrated that exposure of J774.16 macrophage-like cells to physiological alcohol (EtOH) concentrations decreased phagocytosis and killing of Ab. EtOH-mediated macrophage phagocytosis dysfunction may be associated with reduced expression of GTPase-RhoA, a key regulator of the actin polymerization signaling cascade. EtOH inhibited nitric oxide (NO) generation via inducible NO-synthase inactivation, which enhanced Ab survival within macrophages. Additionally, EtOH alters cytokine production resulting in a dysregulated immune response. This study is a proof of principle which establishes that EtOH might exacerbate Ab infection and be an important factor enhancing CAP in individuals at risk.

  15. Biofilm Formation and Colistin Susceptibility of Acinetobacter baumannii Isolated from Korean Nosocomial Samples.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Ah; Ryu, Seong Yeol; Seo, Incheol; Suh, Seong-Il; Suh, Min-Ho; Baek, Won-Ki

    2015-08-01

    Biofilm formation, a virulence factor of Acinetobacter baumannii, is associated with long-term survival in hospital environments and provides resistance to antibiotics. Standard tests for antibiotic susceptibility involve analyzing bacteria in the planktonic state. However, the biofilm formation ability can influence antibiotic susceptibility. Therefore, here, the biofilm formation ability of A. baumannii clinical isolates from Korea was investigated and the susceptibility of biofilm and planktonic bacteria to colistin was compared. Of the 100 clinical isolates examined, 77% exhibited enhanced biofilm formation capacity relative to a standard A. baumannii strain (ATCC 19606). Differences between the minimal inhibitory concentrations and minimal biofilm-inhibitory concentrations of colistin were significantly greater in the group of A. baumannii that exhibited enhanced biofilm formation than the group that exhibited less ability for biofilm formation. Thus, the ability to form a biofilm may affect antibiotic susceptibility and clinical failure, even when the dose administered is in the susceptible range.

  16. Laboratory investigation of hospital outbreak caused by two different multiresistant Acinetobacter calcoaceticus subsp. anitratus strains.

    PubMed Central

    Vila, J; Almela, M; Jimenez de Anta, M T

    1989-01-01

    During a 7-month period, from December 1986 to June 1987, multiresistant strains of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus subsp. anitratus were isolated from 25 patients in a respiratory intensive care unit. The biochemical characteristics defined two groups of strains, group 1 (14 strains) and group 2 (11 strains). Both groups had the same biochemical characteristics, but group 2 strains could assimilate adipate and phenyl acetate. Moreover, of 16 antibiotics tested only netilmicin and imipenem had some inhibitory activity for group 1 strains; group 2 strains were susceptible to mezlocillin, piperacillin, and ticarcillin. Plasmid profiles of the groups were also different. The results of a laboratory investigation (biochemical characteristics, antibiotic susceptibility, and plasmid isolation) identified two different A. calcoaceticus subsp. anitratus strains as the causes of the outbreak. Images PMID:2745682

  17. Ultrafast Structural Dynamics of BlsA, a Photoreceptor from the Pathogenic Bacterium Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important human pathogen that can form biofilms and persist under harsh environmental conditions. Biofilm formation and virulence are modulated by blue light, which is thought to be regulated by a BLUF protein, BlsA. To understand the molecular mechanism of light sensing, we have used steady-state and ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy to compare the photoactivation mechanism of BlsA to the BLUF photosensor AppA from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Although similar photocycles are observed, vibrational data together with homology modeling identify significant differences in the β5 strand in BlsA caused by photoactivation, which are proposed to be directly linked to downstream signaling. PMID:24723998

  18. Outbreak of Extensively Drug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Indigo-Pigmented Strains

    PubMed Central

    Vilacoba, Elisabet; Almuzara, Marisa; Gulone, Lucia; Rodriguez, Rocio; Pallone, Elida; Bakai, Romina; Centrón, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii pigmented strains are not common in clinical settings. Here, we report an outbreak caused by indigo-pigmented A. baumannii strains isolated in an acute care hospital in Argentina from March to September 2012. Pan-PCR assays exposed a unique pattern belonging to the recently described regional CC113B/CC79P clonal complex that confirms the relevant relationships among the indigo-pigmented A. baumannii strains. All of them were extensively drug resistant and harbored different genetic elements associated with horizontal genetic transfer, such as the transposon Tn2006, class 2 integrons, AbaR-type islands, IS125, IS26, strA, strB, florR, and the small recombinase ISCR2 associated with the sul2 gene preceded by ISAba1. PMID:23985923

  19. Quorum sensing in metal tolerance of Acinetobacter junii BB1A is associated with biofilm production.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Suchitra; Chakraborty, Ranadhir

    2008-05-01

    Acinetobacter junii strain BB1A, a novel metal-tolerant bacterium, produced biofilm in the presence of added ions such as Ni(2+), AsO(2)(-), Cd(2+) and Hg(2+) on surfaces such as glass and polystyrene. Generation of a metal-sensitive and adhesion-deficient mutant by transposition of Tn5-mob in the A. junii genome has putatively confirmed the association of metal tolerance with the production of biofilm. The requirement of a critical cell density for biofilm formation and presence of acyl-homoserine lactone-like autoinducer molecules in the cell-free supernatant indicated the phenomenon of quorum sensing. Addition of a natural quorum-sensing inhibitor (garlic extract) or synthetic quorum-sensing inhibitor (4-nitro-pyridine oxide) significantly inhibited cell growth and biofilm formation in the presence of metal/metalloid ions.

  20. VEB-1 Extended-Spectrum β-lactamase–producing Acinetobacter baumannii, France1

    PubMed Central

    Coignard, Bruno; Carbonne, Anne; Blanckaert, Karine; Bajolet, Odile; Bernet, Claude; Verdeil, Xavier; Astagneau, Pascal; Desenclos, Jean-Claude; Nordmann, Patrice

    2006-01-01

    VEB-1 extended-spectrum β-lactamase–producing Acinetobacter baumannii was responsible for an outbreak in hospitals in France. A national alert was triggered in September 2003 when 4 hospitals reported clusters of A. baumannii infection with similar susceptibility profiles. Case definitions and laboratory guidelines were disseminated, and prospective surveillance was implemented; strains were sent to a single laboratory for characterization and typing. From April 2003 through June 2004, 53 hospitals reported 290 cases of A. baumannii infection or colonization; 275 isolates were blaVEB-1-positive and clonally related. Cases were first reported in 5 districts of northern France, then in 10 other districts in 4 regions. Within a region, interhospital spread was associated with patient transfer. In northern France, investigation and control measures led to a reduction of reported cases after January 2004. The national alert enabled early control of new clusters, demonstrating the usefulness of early warning about antimicrobial drug resistance. PMID:16965700

  1. Genes Involved in the Biosynthesis and Transport of Acinetobactin in Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Tarik; Choi, Chul Hee

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria survive in iron-limited host environments by using several iron acquisition mechanisms. Acinetobacter baumannii, causing serious infections in compromised patients, produces an iron-chelating molecule, called acinetobactin, which is composed of equimolar quantities of 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA), L-threonine, and N-hydroxyhistamine, to compete with host cells for iron. Genes that are involved in the production and transport of acinetobactin are clustered within the genome of A. baumannii. A recent study showed that entA, located outside of the acinetobactin gene cluster, plays important roles in the biosynthesis of the acinetobactin precursor DHBA and in bacterial pathogenesis. Therefore, understanding the genes that are associated with the biosynthesis and transport of acinetobactin in the bacterial genome is required. This review is intended to provide a general overview of the genes in the genome of A. baumannii that are required for acinetobactin biosynthesis and transport. PMID:25873846

  2. Biology of Acinetobacter baumannii: Pathogenesis, Antibiotic Resistance Mechanisms, and Prospective Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Ro; Lee, Jung Hun; Park, Moonhee; Park, Kwang Seung; Bae, Il Kwon; Kim, Young Bae; Cha, Chang-Jun; Jeong, Byeong Chul; Lee, Sang Hee

    2017-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is undoubtedly one of the most successful pathogens responsible for hospital-acquired nosocomial infections in the modern healthcare system. Due to the prevalence of infections and outbreaks caused by multi-drug resistant A. baumannii, few antibiotics are effective for treating infections caused by this pathogen. To overcome this problem, knowledge of the pathogenesis and antibiotic resistance mechanisms of A. baumannii is important. In this review, we summarize current studies on the virulence factors that contribute to A. baumannii pathogenesis, including porins, capsular polysaccharides, lipopolysaccharides, phospholipases, outer membrane vesicles, metal acquisition systems, and protein secretion systems. Mechanisms of antibiotic resistance of this organism, including acquirement of β-lactamases, up-regulation of multidrug efflux pumps, modification of aminoglycosides, permeability defects, and alteration of target sites, are also discussed. Lastly, novel prospective treatment options for infections caused by multi-drug resistant A. baumannii are summarized. PMID:28348979

  3. First detection of OXA-24 carbapenemase-producing Acinetobacter baumannii isolates in Bulgaria.

    PubMed

    Todorova, Bozhana; Velinov, Tzvetan; Ivanov, Ivan; Dobreva, Elina; Kantardjiev, Todor

    2014-04-01

    This report describes the first identification of OXA-24 carbapenemase-producing Acinetobacter baumannii isolates from Bulgaria. According to national surveillance data A. baumannii along with Pseudomonas aeruginosa are the most troublesome microorganisms in hospital environment with high rates of acquired carbapenem resistance. In the present study real-time multiplex PCR was performed to identify the most common carbapenemase genes in 15 non-duplicate carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii isolates collected in 2012. The results showed lack of KPC, GES, VIM, IMP-type enzymes. Four A. baumannii isolates tested positive by PCR for the acquired OXA-24 together with the intrinsic OXA-51 carbapenemase. OXA-24 and OXA-23 were determined as co-existent in one isolate. Two isolates were identified with OXA-23 in addition to the OXA-51 carbapenemase.

  4. Phosphoproteomics as an emerging weapon to develop new antibiotics against carbapenem resistant strain of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Vishvanath; Tiwari, Monalisa

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii causes pneumonia, bloodstream infections, urinary tract infections, respiratory infections and meningitis. A. baumannii has developed resistance against most of the antibiotics including carbapenem. Therefore, to battle carbapenem resistance, there is a need to develop antimicrobial drugs with new modes of action. Phosphoproteomics will help identify the differentially phosphorylated protein and its crucial phosphosites which facilitate the elucidation of molecular mechanism of signaling and regulation of carbapenem resistant strain of A. baumannii as compared to carbapenem sensitive strain. This understanding might be useful for the development of new antibiotics against kinases involved in the phosphorylation of identified phosphosites in carbapenem resistant strain of A. baumannii. The proposed antibiotics selectively inhibit carbapenem resistant strain which further avoids its excessive use against carbapenem sensitive strain and thereafter reduces emergence of resistance.

  5. New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase-1-producing Acinetobacter spp. infection: report of a survivor.

    PubMed

    Schuelter-Trevisol, Fabiana; Schmitt, Graciane Jacinta; Araújo, Jane Martins de; Souza, Liliane Braga de; Nazário, Juliana Gomes; Januário, Raquel Landuchi; Mello, Rogério Sobroza de; Trevisol, Daisson José

    2016-02-01

    New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase-1 (NDM-1) is a bacterial enzyme that renders the bacteria resistant to a variety of beta-lactam antibiotics. A 20-year-old man was hospitalized several times for surgical treatment and complications caused by a right-sided vestibular schwannoma. Although the patient acquired several multidrug-resistant infections, this study focuses on the NDM-1-producing Acinetobacter spp. infection. As it was resistant to all antimicrobials tested, the medical team developed a 20-day regimen of 750mg/day metronidazole, 2,000,000IU/day polymyxin B, and 100mg/day tigecycline. The treatment was effective, and the patient recovered and was discharged from the hospital.

  6. Clinical and Epidemiological Significance of Carbapenem Resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii Infections

    PubMed Central

    Tal-Jasper, Ruthy; Katz, David E.; Amrami, Nadav; Ravid, Dor; Avivi, Dori; Zaidenstein, Ronit; Lazarovitch, Tsilia; Dadon, Mor; Kaye, Keith S.

    2016-01-01

    Carbapenems are considered the treatment of choice for Acinetobacter baumannii infections. Many facilities implement preventive measures toward only carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii (CRAB). However, the independent role of the carbapenem resistance determinant on patient outcomes remains controversial. In a 6-year analysis of adults with A. baumannii bloodstream infection (BSI), the outcomes of 149 CRAB isolates were compared to those of 91 patients with carbapenem-susceptible A. baumannii. In bivariable analyses, CRAB BSIs were significantly associated with worse outcomes and with a delay in the initiation of appropriate antimicrobial therapy (DAAT). However, in multivariable analyses, carbapenem resistance status was no longer associated with poor outcomes, while DAAT remained an independent predictor. The epidemiological significance of A. baumannii should not be determined by its resistance to carbapenems. PMID:26883694

  7. Characterization of Acinetobacter baumannii from intensive care units and home care patients in Palermo, Italy.

    PubMed

    Mammina, C; Bonura, C; Aleo, A; Calà, C; Caputo, G; Cataldo, M C; Di Benedetto, A; Distefano, S; Fasciana, T; Labisi, M; Sodano, C; Palma, D M; Giammanco, A

    2011-11-01

    In this study 45 isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii identified from patients in intensive care units of three different hospitals and from pressure ulcers in home care patients in Palermo, Italy, during a 3-month period in 2010, were characterized. All isolates were resistant to at least three classes of antibiotics, but susceptible to colistin and tygecycline. Forty isolates were non-susceptible to carbapenems. Eighteen and two isolates, respectively, carried the bla(OXA-23-like) and the bla(OXA-58-like) genes. One strain carried the VIM-4 gene. Six major rep-PCR subtype clusters were defined, including isolates from different hospitals or home care patients. The sequence type/pulsed field gel electrophoresis group ST2/A included 33 isolates, and ST78/B the remaining 12. ST2 clone proved to be predominant, but a frequent involvement of the ST78 clone was evident.

  8. Phase-Variable Control of Multiple Phenotypes in Acinetobacter baumannii Strain AB5075

    PubMed Central

    Tipton, Kyle A.; Dimitrova, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acinetobacter baumannii strain AB5075 produces colonies with two opacity phenotypes, designated opaque and translucent. These phenotypes were unstable and opaque and translucent colony variants were observed to interconvert at high frequency, suggesting that a phase-variable mechanism was responsible. The frequency of phase variation both within colonies and in broth cultures increased in a cell density-dependent manner and was mediated by the accumulation of an extracellular factor. This factor was distinct from the known A. baumannii signaling molecule 3-OH C12-homoserine lactone. Opaque and translucent colony variants exhibited a number of phenotypic differences, including cell morphology, surface motility, biofilm formation, antibiotic resistance, and virulence in a Galleria mellonella model. Additional clinical isolates exhibited a similar phase-variable control of colony opacity, suggesting that this may be a common feature of A. baumannii. IMPORTANCE A novel phase-variable mechanism has been identified in Acinetobacter baumannii that results in an interconversion between opaque and translucent colony phenotypes. This phase variation also coordinately regulates motility, cell shape, biofilm formation, antibiotic resistance, and virulence. The frequency of phase variation is increased at high cell density via a diffusible extracellular signal. To our knowledge, this report presents the first example of phase variation in A. baumannii and also the first example of quorum sensing-mediated control of phase variation in a bacterium. The findings are important, as this phase-variable mechanism can be identified only via changes in colony opacity using oblique light; therefore, many researchers studying A. baumannii may unknowingly be working with different colony variants. PMID:26013481

  9. Characterization and plasmid elimination of NDM-1-producing Acinetobacter calcoaceticus from China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yang; Liu, Qi; Chen, Shuo; Song, Yang; Liu, Jun; Guo, Xuejun; Zhu, Lingwei; Ji, Xue; Xu, Lizhi; Zhou, Wei; Qian, Jun; Feng, Shuzhang

    2014-01-01

    The presence of multidrug-resistant bacterial pathogens in the environment poses a serious threat to public health. The opportunistic Acinetobacter spp. are among the most prevalent causes of nosocomial infections. Here, we performed complete genome sequencing of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus strain XM1570, which was originally cultivated from the sputum of a patient diagnosed with pneumonia in Xiamen in 2010. We identified carbapenem resistance associated gene bla(NDM-1) located on a 47.3-kb plasmid. Three methods--natural reproduction, sodium dodecyl sulfate treatment and nalidixic acid treatment--were used to eliminate the bla(NDM-1)-encoding plasmid, which achieved elimination rates of 3.32% (10/301), 83.78% (278/332), and 84.17% (298/354), respectively. Plasmid elimination dramatically increased antibiotic sensitivity, reducing the minimum bacteriostatic concentration of meropenem from 256 µg/ml in the clinical strain to 0.125 µg/ml in the plasmid-eliminated strain. Conjugation transfer assays showed that the bla(NDM-1)-containing plasmid could be transferred into Escherichia coli DH5α:pBR322 in vitro as well as in vivo in mice. The bla(NDM-1) genetic environment was in accordance with that of other bla(NDM-1) genes identified from India, Japan, and Hong-Kong. The multilocus sequence type of the isolate was identified as ST-70. Two novel genes encoding intrinsic OXA and ADC were identified and named as OXA-417 and ADC-72. The finding of bla(NDM-1) in species like A. calcoaceticus demonstrates the wide spread of this gene in gram-negative bacteria which is possible by conjugative plasmid transfer. The results of this study may help in the development of a treatment strategy for controlling NDM-1 bacterial infection and transmission.

  10. Computational gene network study on antibiotic resistance genes of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Anitha, P; Anbarasu, Anand; Ramaiah, Sudha

    2014-05-01

    Multi Drug Resistance (MDR) in Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the major threats for emerging nosocomial infections in hospital environment. Multidrug-resistance in A. baumannii may be due to the implementation of multi-combination resistance mechanisms such as β-lactamase synthesis, Penicillin-Binding Proteins (PBPs) changes, alteration in porin proteins and in efflux pumps against various existing classes of antibiotics. Multiple antibiotic resistance genes are involved in MDR. These resistance genes are transferred through plasmids, which are responsible for the dissemination of antibiotic resistance among Acinetobacter spp. In addition, these resistance genes may also have a tendency to interact with each other or with their gene products. Therefore, it becomes necessary to understand the impact of these interactions in antibiotic resistance mechanism. Hence, our study focuses on protein and gene network analysis on various resistance genes, to elucidate the role of the interacting proteins and to study their functional contribution towards antibiotic resistance. From the search tool for the retrieval of interacting gene/protein (STRING), a total of 168 functional partners for 15 resistance genes were extracted based on the confidence scoring system. The network study was then followed up with functional clustering of associated partners using molecular complex detection (MCODE). Later, we selected eight efficient clusters based on score. Interestingly, the associated protein we identified from the network possessed greater functional similarity with known resistance genes. This network-based approach on resistance genes of A. baumannii could help in identifying new genes/proteins and provide clues on their association in antibiotic resistance.

  11. Identification of Acinetobacter baumannii serum-associated antibiotic efflux pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Catlyn; Barnett, Pamela; Perlmutter, Jessamyn; Dunman, Paul M

    2014-11-01

    Adaptive antibiotic resistance is a newly described phenomenon by which Acinetobacter baumannii induces efflux pump activity in response to host-associated environmental cues that may, in part, account for antibiotic treatment failures against clinically defined susceptible strains. To that end, during adaptation to growth in human serum, the organism induces approximately 22 putative efflux-associated genes and displays efflux-mediated minocycline tolerance at antibiotic concentrations corresponding to patient serum levels. Here, we show that in addition to minocycline, growth in human serum elicits A. baumannii efflux-mediated tolerance to the antibiotics ciprofloxacin, meropenem, tetracycline, and tigecycline. Moreover, using a whole-cell high-throughput screen and secondary assays, we identified novel serum-associated antibiotic efflux inhibitors that potentiated the activities of antibiotics toward serum-grown A. baumannii. Two compounds, Acinetobacter baumannii efflux pump inhibitor 1 (ABEPI1) [(E)-4-((4-chlorobenzylidene)amino)benezenesulfonamide] and ABEPI2 [N-tert-butyl-2-(1-tert-butyltetrazol-5-yl)sulfanylacetamide], were shown to lead to minocycline accumulation within A. baumannii during serum growth and inhibit the efflux potential of the organism. While both compounds also inhibited the antibiotic efflux properties of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, they did not display significant cytotoxicity toward human cells or mammalian Ca(2+) channel inhibitory effects, suggesting that ABEPI1 and ABEPI2 represent promising structural scaffolds for the development of new classes of bacterial antibiotic efflux pump inhibitors that can be used to potentiate the activities of current and future antibiotics for the therapeutic intervention of Gram-negative bacterial infections.

  12. [In vitro tigecycline and carbapenem susceptibilities of clinical Acinetobacter baumannii isolates].

    PubMed

    Nayman Alpat, Saygın; Aybey, Aşkın Derya; Akşit, Filiz; Ozgüneş, Ilhan; Kiremitçi, Abdurrahman; Usluer, Gaye

    2010-10-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a frequent cause of nosocomial infections in most hospitals. Management of infections caused by these strains is difficult, as the strains often display multiple drug resistance, including carbapenem. Tigecycline which is a glycylcycline derivative has antimicrobial activity against many gram-positive and gram-negative organisms. In this study, in vitro activity of tigecycline and carbapenems against clinical isolates of A.baumannii strains were investigated. A total of 100 A.baumannii isolates were collected from hospitalized patients with documented nosocomial infections [pneumonia (n = 39), surgical wound infection (n = 32), bacteremia (n = 16), catheter infection (n = 6), urinary tract infection (n = 5), peritonitis (n = 1), eye infection (n = 1)] between October 2006 and June 2007. Only one isolate per patient was included to the study. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of tigecycline were determined by E-test (AB Biodisk, Sweden). Carbapenem resistance of A.baumannii strains were determined by disk diffusion method. All of the 100 A.baumannii isolates (100%) were found susceptible to tigecycline (MIC values ≤ 2 µg/ml; MIC ranges: 0.032-1.5 µg/ml). Imipenem susceptibility test was performed for 95 strains, and 36 (37.9%) were found sensitive, 18 (18.9%) were intermediate sensitive, and 41 (43.2%) were resistant. Meropenem susceptibility test was performed for 87 strains, and 22 (25.3%) were found sensitive, 9 (10.3%) were intermediate sensitive, and 56 (64.4%) were resistant. Since tigecycline is found quite effective on nosocomial A.baumannii isolates, it may be considered as a treatment alternative in infections caused by carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter spp.

  13. Clinically Relevant Growth Conditions Alter Acinetobacter baumannii Antibiotic Susceptibility and Promote Identification of Novel Antibacterial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Colquhoun, Jennifer M.; Wozniak, Rachel A. F.; Dunman, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Biological processes that govern bacterial proliferation and survival in the host-environment(s) are likely to be vastly different from those that are required for viability in nutrient-rich laboratory media. Consequently, growth-based antimicrobial screens performed in conditions modeling aspects of bacterial disease states have the potential to identify new classes of antimicrobials that would be missed by screens performed in conventional laboratory media. Accordingly, we performed screens of the Selleck library of 853 FDA approved drugs for agents that exhibit antimicrobial activity toward the Gram-negative bacterial pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii during growth in human serum, lung surfactant, and/or the organism in the biofilm state and compared those results to that of conventional laboratory medium. Results revealed that a total of 90 compounds representing 73 antibiotics and 17 agents that were developed for alternative therapeutic indications displayed antimicrobial properties toward the test strain in at least one screening condition. Of the active library antibiotics only four agents, rifampin, rifaximin, ciprofloxacin and tetracycline, exhibited antimicrobial activity toward the organism during all screening conditions, whereas the remainder were inactive in ≥ 1 condition; 56 antibiotics were inactive during serum growth, 25 and 38 were inactive toward lung surfactant grown and biofilm-associated cells, respectively, suggesting that subsets of antibiotics may outperform others in differing infection settings. Moreover, 9 antibiotics that are predominantly used for the treatment Gram-positive pathogens and 10 non-antibiotics lacked detectable antimicrobial activity toward A. baumannii grown in conventional medium but were active during ≥ 1 alternative growth condition(s). Such agents may represent promising anti-Acinetobacter agents that would have likely been overlooked by antimicrobial whole cell screening assays performed in traditional

  14. Structural and bioinformatic characterization of an Acinetobacter baumannii type II carrier protein

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, C. Leigh; Gulick, Andrew M.

    2014-06-01

    The high-resolution crystal structure of a free-standing carrier protein from Acinetobacter baumannii that belongs to a larger NRPS-containing operon, encoded by the ABBFA-003406–ABBFA-003399 genes of A. baumannii strain AB307-0294, that has been implicated in A. baumannii motility, quorum sensing and biofilm formation, is presented. Microorganisms produce a variety of natural products via secondary metabolic biosynthetic pathways. Two of these types of synthetic systems, the nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs), use large modular enzymes containing multiple catalytic domains in a single protein. These multidomain enzymes use an integrated carrier protein domain to transport the growing, covalently bound natural product to the neighboring catalytic domains for each step in the synthesis. Interestingly, some PKS and NRPS clusters contain free-standing domains that interact intermolecularly with other proteins. Being expressed outside the architecture of a multi-domain protein, these so-called type II proteins present challenges to understand the precise role they play. Additional structures of individual and multi-domain components of the NRPS enzymes will therefore provide a better understanding of the features that govern the domain interactions in these interesting enzyme systems. The high-resolution crystal structure of a free-standing carrier protein from Acinetobacter baumannii that belongs to a larger NRPS-containing operon, encoded by the ABBFA-003406–ABBFA-003399 genes of A. baumannii strain AB307-0294, that has been implicated in A. baumannii motility, quorum sensing and biofilm formation, is presented here. Comparison with the closest structural homologs of other carrier proteins identifies the requirements for a conserved glycine residue and additional important sequence and structural requirements within the regions that interact with partner proteins.

  15. Light modulates metabolic pathways and other novel physiological traits in the human pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Müller, Gabriela L; Tuttobene, Marisel; Altilio, Matías; Martinez Amezaga, Maitena; Nguyen, Meaghan; Pamela Cribb, P; Cybulski, Larisa E; Ramírez, María Soledad; Altabe, Silvia; Mussi, María Alejandra

    2017-03-13

    Light sensing in chemotrophic bacteria has been relatively recently ascertained. In the human pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii, light modulates motility, biofilm formation and virulence through the BLUF photoreceptor BlsA. In addition, light can induce reduction in susceptibility to certain antibiotics such as minocycline and tigecycline in a photoreceptor-independent manner. In this work we identified new traits whose expression are modulated by light in this pathogen, which comprise not only important determinants related to pathogenicity and antibiotic resistance, but also metabolic pathways, which represents a novel concept for chemotrophic bacteria. Indeed, the phenylacetic acid catabolic pathway as well as trehalose biosynthesis were modulated by light, responses that completely depend on BlsA. We further show that tolerance to some antibiotics as well as modulation of antioxidant enzyme levels are also influenced by light, likely contributing to bacterial persistence in adverse environments. Also, we present evidence indicating that surfactant production is modulated by light. Finally, the expression of whole pathways and gene clusters such as genes involved in lipid metabolism and genes encoding components of the type VI secretion system, as well as efflux pumps related to antibiotic resistance, were differentially induced by light. Overall, our results indicate that light modulates global features of A. baumannii lifestyle.Importance The discovery that non-phototrophic bacteria respond to light constituted a novel concept in microbiology. In this context, we demonstrated that light could modulate aspects related to bacterial virulence, persistence and resistance to antibiotics in the human pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii In this work, we present the novel finding that light directly regulates metabolism in this chemotrophic bacterium. Insights into the mechanism show the involvement of the photoreceptor BlsA. In addition, tolerance to antibiotics and

  16. Effects of Psychrotrophic Bacteria, Serratia liquefaciens and Acinetobacter genomospecies 10 on Yogurt Quality.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yong Kook; Oh, Nam Su; Lee, Hyun Ah; Choi, Jong-Woo; Nam, Myoung Soo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of proteolytic (Serratia liquefaciens, match %: 99.39) or lipolytic (Acinetobacter genomospecies 10, match %: 99.90) psychrotrophic bacteria (bacterial counts, analysis of free fatty acids (FFA) and analysis of free amino acids) on the microbial and chemical properties (yogurt composition), and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of yogurt during storage. Yogurts were prepared with raw milk preinoculated with each psychrotrophic bacteria. The total solid, fat, and protein content were not affected by preinoculation, but the pH of yogurt preinoculated with psychrotrophic bacteria was higher than in control. There was a dramatic increase in short chain free fatty acids among FFA in yogurt with Acinetobacter genomospecies 10. For 14 d of cold storage condition, SCFFA was 25.3 mg/kg to 34.4 mg/kg (1.36 times increased), MCFFA was 20.4 mg/kg to 25.7 mg/kg (1.26 times increased), and LCFFA was 240.2 mg/kg to 322.8 mg/kg (1.34 times increased). Serratia liquefaciens (match %: 99.39) in yogurt caused a greater accumulation of free amino acids (FAA), especially bitter peptides such as leucine, valine, arginine, and tyrosine, but SDS-PAGE showed that the inoculation of Serratia liquefaciens did not affect the degree of casein degradation during storage. Taken together, the excessive peptides and FFA in yogurt generated from psychrotrophic bacteria could develop off-flavors that degrade the quality of commercial yogurt products.

  17. Identification of Acinetobacter baumannii Serum-Associated Antibiotic Efflux Pump Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, Catlyn; Barnett, Pamela; Perlmutter, Jessamyn

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive antibiotic resistance is a newly described phenomenon by which Acinetobacter baumannii induces efflux pump activity in response to host-associated environmental cues that may, in part, account for antibiotic treatment failures against clinically defined susceptible strains. To that end, during adaptation to growth in human serum, the organism induces approximately 22 putative efflux-associated genes and displays efflux-mediated minocycline tolerance at antibiotic concentrations corresponding to patient serum levels. Here, we show that in addition to minocycline, growth in human serum elicits A. baumannii efflux-mediated tolerance to the antibiotics ciprofloxacin, meropenem, tetracycline, and tigecycline. Moreover, using a whole-cell high-throughput screen and secondary assays, we identified novel serum-associated antibiotic efflux inhibitors that potentiated the activities of antibiotics toward serum-grown A. baumannii. Two compounds, Acinetobacter baumannii efflux pump inhibitor 1 (ABEPI1) [(E)-4-((4-chlorobenzylidene)amino)benezenesulfonamide] and ABEPI2 [N-tert-butyl-2-(1-tert-butyltetrazol-5-yl)sulfanylacetamide], were shown to lead to minocycline accumulation within A. baumannii during serum growth and inhibit the efflux potential of the organism. While both compounds also inhibited the antibiotic efflux properties of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, they did not display significant cytotoxicity toward human cells or mammalian Ca2+ channel inhibitory effects, suggesting that ABEPI1 and ABEPI2 represent promising structural scaffolds for the development of new classes of bacterial antibiotic efflux pump inhibitors that can be used to potentiate the activities of current and future antibiotics for the therapeutic intervention of Gram-negative bacterial infections. PMID:25114126

  18. Evaluation of carriage and environmental contamination by carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Nutman, A; Lerner, A; Schwartz, D; Carmeli, Y

    2016-11-01

    We evaluated the sensitivity of surveillance cultures for carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAB) in patients and in their environment. Patients with a CRAB-positive clinical culture were sampled within 7 days; the buccal mucosa and rectum were sampled using swabs, and skin was sampled using pre-moistened sterile sponges. Sponges were also used to sample the surrounding environment. Specimens were inoculated onto CHROMagar MDR Acinetobacter plates both directly and after overnight enrichment. CRAB load was scored semi-quantitatively and composite scores for patient colonization and environmental contamination were calculated. Thirty-four patients were included. Screening sensitivity was 28/34 (82%) for buccal mucosa, 30/34 (88%) for skin, and 25/34 (74%) for rectum. Combined sensitivity was 32/34 (94%). Among patients with CRAB-positive respiratory cultures, sensitivity for buccal mucosa was 20/20 (100%). Direct inoculation had excellent sensitivity: 25/28 (89%) for all three sites combined. In the subgroup of patients who did not have a respiratory source for CRAB, direct inoculation sensitivity was lower than among patients with CRAB-positive respiratory cultures: 5/8 (63%) versus 20/20 (100%). The environment of all patients was contaminated with CRAB. There was a positive correlation between the patient colonization score and the environmental contamination score (r = 0.63, p <0.001; r = 0.4, p 0.04 for buccal mucosa, r = 0.7, p <0.001 for skin, and r = 0.46, p 0.14 for rectum). In conclusion, screening for CRAB carriers can be performed by direct plating of skin and buccal mucosa samples. Environmental contamination is common and can be monitored. Implementing screening may facilitate infection control efforts to limit the spread of CRAB.

  19. Risk factors and outcomes for patients with bloodstream infection due to Acinetobacter baumannii-calcoaceticus complex.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Teena; Marchaim, Dror; Johnson, Paul C; Awali, Reda A; Doshi, Hardik; Chalana, Indu; Davis, Naomi; Zhao, Jing J; Pogue, Jason M; Parmar, Sapna; Kaye, Keith S

    2014-08-01

    Identifying patients at risk for bloodstream infection (BSI) due to Acinetobacter baumannii-Acinetobacter calcoaceticus complex (ABC) and providing early appropriate therapy are critical for improving patient outcomes. A retrospective matched case-control study was conducted to investigate the risk factors for BSI due to ABC in patients admitted to the Detroit Medical Center (DMC) between January 2006 and April 2009. The cases were patients with BSI due to ABC; the controls were patients not infected with ABC. Potential risk factors were collected 30 days prior to the ABC-positive culture date for the cases and 30 days prior to admission for the controls. A total of 245 case patients were matched with 245 control patients. Independent risk factors associated with BSI due to ABC included a Charlson's comorbidity score of ≥ 3 (odds ratio [OR], 2.34; P = 0.001), a direct admission from another health care facility (OR, 4.63; P < 0.0001), a prior hospitalization (OR, 3.11; P < 0.0001), the presence of an indwelling central venous line (OR, 2.75; P = 0.011), the receipt of total parenteral nutrition (OR, 21.2; P < 0.0001), the prior receipt of β-lactams (OR, 3.58; P < 0.0001), the prior receipt of carbapenems (OR, 3.18; P = 0.006), and the prior receipt of chemotherapy (OR, 15.42; P < 0.0001). The median time from the ABC-positive culture date to the initiation of the appropriate antimicrobial therapy was 2 days (interquartile range [IQR], 1 to 3 days). The in-hospital mortality rate was significantly higher among case patients than among control patients (OR, 3.40; P < 0.0001). BSIs due to ABC are more common among critically ill and debilitated institutionalized patients, who are heavily exposed to health care settings and invasive devices.

  20. Prevalence and analysis of microbiological factors associated with phenotypic heterogeneous resistance to carbapenems in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Fernández Cuenca, Felipe; Sánchez, M del Carmen Gómez; Caballero-Moyano, Francisco Javier; Vila, Jordi; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Bou, Germán; Baño, Jesús Rodríguez; Pascual, Alvaro

    2012-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of Acinetobacter baumannii with phenotypic heterogeneous resistance (PHR) to carbapenems (colonies inside the halo of inhibition) and to analyse its association with several microbiological variables. Acinetobacter baumannii isolates collected in Spain were used to analyse: (i) minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of carbapenems; (ii) heteroresistance to carbapenems; (iii) genes encoding β-lactamases (bla genes); (iv) insertion sequences; and (v) inactivation of genes encoding porins (CarO, OprD and Omp33-36) and genes associated with the AdeABC efflux system (adeB, adeR and adeS). Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification was used for gene detection. The rate of PHR was 20% to imipenem and 24% to meropenem. Susceptibility to imipenem was observed in 39% of PHR isolates. MICs of carbapenems for colonies were similar (± 1 log(2) dilution) to those of their parental isolates. These colonies growing inside the inhibition halo also reproduced the PHR to carbapenems. Differences observed between PHR isolates and non-PHR isolates were: bla(OXA-58-like), 57% vs. 0%; oprD-like, 96% vs. 56%; adeB, 89% vs. 94%; adeR, 82% vs. 94%; adeS, 82% vs. 94%; ISAba2, 61% vs. 31%; and ISAba3, 57% vs. 0%. No interruption of genes encoding porins or the efflux-related genes (adeB, adeR and adeS) was observed. In conclusion, A. baumannii strains with PHR to carbapenems are widespread in Spain. This phenotype is present in carbapenem-susceptible isolates as well as those that are not susceptible to carbapenems. Heteroresistance cannot explain the PHR to carbapenems, which appears to relate more to persistence or tolerance to carbapenems. bla(OXA-58-like), bla(OXA-51-like), ISAba2 and ISAba3 are associated with PHR to carbapenems. Inactivation of genes encoding porins or genes related to AdeABC is infrequent.

  1. Lactobacillus apinorum sp. nov., Lactobacillus mellifer sp. nov., Lactobacillus mellis sp. nov., Lactobacillus melliventris sp. nov., Lactobacillus kimbladii sp. nov., Lactobacillus helsingborgensis sp. nov. and Lactobacillus kullabergensis sp. nov., isolated from the honey stomach of the honeybee Apis mellifera

    PubMed Central

    Alsterfjord, Magnus; Nilson, Bo; Butler, Èile; Vásquez, Alejandra

    2014-01-01

    We previously discovered a symbiotic lactic acid bacterial (LAB) microbiota in the honey stomach of the honeybee Apis mellifera. The microbiota was composed of several phylotypes of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus. 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses and phenotypic and genetic characteristics revealed that the phylotypes isolated represent seven novel species. One grouped with Lactobacillus kunkeei and the others belong to the Lactobacillus buchneri and Lactobacillus delbrueckiisubgroups of Lactobacillus. We propose the names Lactobacillus apinorum sp. nov., Lactobacillus mellifer sp. nov., Lactobacillus mellis sp. nov., Lactobacillus melliventris sp. nov., Lactobacillus kimbladii sp. nov., Lactobacillus helsingborgensis sp. nov. and Lactobacillus kullabergensis sp. nov. for these novel species, with the respective type strains being Fhon13NT ( = DSM 26257T = CCUG 63287T), Bin4NT ( = DSM 26254T = CCUG 63291T), Hon2NT ( = DSM 26255T = CCUG 63289T), Hma8NT ( = DSM 26256T = CCUG 63629T), Hma2NT ( = DSM 26263T = CCUG 63633T), Bma5NT ( = DSM 26265T = CCUG 63301T) and Biut2NT ( = DSM 26262T = CCUG 63631T). PMID:24944337

  2. SP-100 control system modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, R. A.; Halfen, F. J.; Alley, A. D.

    1987-01-01

    SP-100 Control Systems modeling was done using a thermal hydraulic transient analysis model called ARIES-S. The ARIES-S Computer Simulation provides a basis for design, integration and analysis of the reactor including the control and protection systems. It is a modular digital computer simulation written in FORTRAN that operates interactively in real time on a VAX minicomputer.

  3. Argonne's SpEC Module

    ScienceCinema

    Harper, Jason

    2016-07-12

    Jason Harper, an electrical engineer in Argonne National Laboratory's EV-Smart Grid Interoperability Center, discusses his SpEC Module invention that will enable fast charging of electric vehicles in under 15 minutes. The module has been licensed to BTCPower.

  4. Pantoea vagans sp. nov., Pantoea eucalypti sp. nov., Pantoea deleyi sp. nov. and Pantoea anthophila sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Brady, Carrie L; Venter, Stephanus N; Cleenwerck, Ilse; Engelbeen, Katrien; Vancanneyt, Marc; Swings, Jean; Coutinho, Teresa A

    2009-09-01

    Bacteria isolated from eucalyptus leaves and shoots showing symptoms of blight and die-back collected in Uganda, Uruguay and Argentina and from maize displaying brown stalk rot symptoms in South Africa were tentatively placed in the genus Pantoea on the basis of phenotypic and biochemical tests. These isolates, together with two strains (LMG 2558 and LMG 2560) previously assigned to Pantoea agglomerans based on protein electrophoregrams but later excluded from this species, were further investigated using molecular techniques. 16S rRNA gene sequencing and multilocus sequence analyses (MLSA) revealed that the strains were phylogenetically closely related to Pantoea agglomerans, Pantoea stewartii and Pantoea ananatis. MLSA and amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis placed the strains into four separate clusters, not containing any of the type strains of species of the genus Pantoea. DNA-DNA hybridization confirmed the classification of the isolates into four novel species, for which the names Pantoea vagans sp. nov. (type strain R-21566T=LMG 24199T=BCC 105T=BD 765T), Pantoea eucalypti sp. nov. (type strain R-25678T=LMG 24197T=BCC 076T=BD 769T), Pantoea deleyi sp. nov. (type strain R-31523T=LMG 24200T=BCC 109T=BD 767T) and Pantoea anthophila sp. nov. (type strain LMG 2558T=BD 871T=NCPPB 1682T) are proposed.

  5. Argonne's SpEC Module

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, Jason

    2014-05-05

    Jason Harper, an electrical engineer in Argonne National Laboratory's EV-Smart Grid Interoperability Center, discusses his SpEC Module invention that will enable fast charging of electric vehicles in under 15 minutes. The module has been licensed to BTCPower.

  6. The role of Sp1 and Sp3 in the constitutive DPYD gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue; Li, Lin; Fourie, Jeanne; Davie, James R; Guarcello, Vincenzo; Diasio, Robert B

    2006-05-01

    Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD), the initial and rate-limiting enzyme in the 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) catabolic pathway, has been implicated as one of the factors determining the efficacy and toxicity of the anticancer agent 5-FU. Studies have attributed variation in DPD activity partially to alterations at the transcriptional level of DPYD gene. We investigated the transcription factors implicated in the constitutive expression of DPYD by utilizing a 174-bp fragment of the DPYD promoter region in which three consensus Sp protein binding sites (SpA, SpB and SpC) were predicted. The binding of Sp1 and Sp3 transcription factors to this region was detected by electrophoretic mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. By ectopically expressing human Sp1 and Sp3 in Sp-deficient Drosophila S2 cells, we demonstrated that Sp1 is a strong activator, while Sp3 by its own is a weak activator of the DPYD promoter. Moreover, Sp3 may serve as a competitor of Sp1, thus decreasing the Sp1 induced promoter activity. SpA, SpB and SpC sites are all Sp1 inducible. In the full activation of the DPYD promoter in human cell lines, the SpB site is essential; the SpC site works cooperatively with SpB, while SpA has minor promoter activity. These studies provide further insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the heterogeneity of DPD activity, and may facilitate the efficacy and safety of 5-FU-based chemotherapy.

  7. Development of a real-time PCR assay for the rapid detection of Acinetobacter baumannii from whole blood samples.

    PubMed

    De Gregorio, Eliana; Roscetto, Emanuela; Iula, Vita Dora; Martinucci, Marianna; Zarrilli, Raffaele; Di Nocera, Pier Paolo; Catania, Maria Rosaria

    2015-04-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a multidrug-resistant pathogen associated with severe infections in hospitalized patients, including pneumonia, urinary and bloodstream infections. Rapid detection of A. baumannii infection is crucial for timely treatment of septicemic patients. The aim of the present study was to develop a specific marker for a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the detection of A. baumannii. The target gene chosen is the biofilm-associated protein (bap) gene, encoding a cell surface protein involved in biofilm formation. The assay is specific for A. baumannii, allowing its discrimination from different species of Acinetobacter and other clinically relevant bacterial pathogens. The assay is able to detect one genomic copy of A. baumannii, corresponding to 4 fg of purified DNA, and 20 colony-forming units/ml using DNA extracted from spiked whole blood samples.

  8. Phenotypic characterization of Acinetobacter baumannii isolates from intensive care units at a tertiary-care hospital in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Nageeb, W; Kamel, M; Zakaria, S; Metwally, L

    2014-04-03

    Multi-drug resistant (MDR) strains of Acinetobacter baumannii are responsible for an increasing number of opportunistic infections in hospitals. This study determined the prevalence of MDR A. baumannii isolates from intensive care units in a large tertiary-care hospital in Ismailia, Egypt, and the occurrence of different beta-lactamases in these isolates. Biotyping and antimicrobial susceptibility profile was done for isolated strains. Respiratory, urine, burn wound and blood specimens were collected from 350 patients admitted to different units; 10 strains (2.9%) of A. baumannii were isolated. All isolates showed resistance to more than 3 classes of antibiotics. Among the isolates, 6 isolates were carbapenemase producers, 2 were AmpC beta-lactamase producers and no isolates were metallo-beta-lactamase producers. Despite the low prevalence of A. baumannii infection in this hospital, the antibiotic resistance profile suggests that prevention of health-care-associated transmission of MDR Acinetobacter spp. infection is essential.

  9. Sustainable biodegradation of phenol by Acinetobacter calcoaceticus P23 isolated from the rhizosphere of duckweed Lemna aoukikusa.

    PubMed

    Yamaga, Fumiko; Washio, Kenji; Morikawa, Masaaki

    2010-08-15

    Phenol-degrading bacteria were isolated from the rhizosphere of duckweed (Lemna aoukikusa) using an enrichment culture method. One of the isolates, P23, exhibited an excellent ability to degrade phenol and attach to a solid surface under laboratory conditions. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that P23 belongs to the genera Acinetobacter and has the highest similarity to Acinetobacter calcoaceticus. P23 rapidly colonized on the surface of sterilized duckweed roots and formed biofilms, indicating that the conditions provided by the root system of duckweed are favorable to P23. A long-term performance test (160 h) showed that continuous removal of phenol can be attributed to the beneficial symbiotic interaction between duckweed and P23. P23 is the first growth-promoting bacterium identified from Lemna aoukikusa. The results in this study suggest the potential usefulness of dominating a particular bacterium in the rhizosphere of duckweeds to achieve efficient and sustainable bioremediation of polluted water.

  10. Biodegradation of Medium Chain Hydrocarbons by Acinetobacter venetianus 2AW Immobilized to Hair-Based Adsorbent Mats (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    Difco Lab- oratories, Detroit, MI) was used as a complete medium for bacterial cultivation . Bushnell-Haas (BH) (Becton Dickinson 3 Laboratories, Sparks...Bacterial cultivation and characterization Acinetobacter venetianus 2AW was cultured aerobically in BH broth (Becton Dickinson Laboratories...over a period of 40 min using a Synergy 4 hybrid plate reader (Biotek, Winooski, VT). The same cell dilutions were cultivated overnight at room

  11. [The influence of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus K-4 surface-active substances on the efficiency of microbial destruction of oil pollutants].

    PubMed

    Pyroh, T P; Antoniuk, S I; Sorokina, A I

    2009-01-01

    The possibility of the use of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus K-4 surface-active substances (SAS) for water purification from oil was shown. The efficiency of oil degradation (2.6 g/l) in the presence of SAS preparations (5-15 %) in the form of postfermentation of cultural liquid or its supernatant was established to be 81-95 %. Intensification of oil destruction was determined by SAS affecting the activity of oil-oxidizing microbial population.

  12. In vitro and in vivo activities of E-101 solution against Acinetobacter baumannii isolates from U.S. military personnel.

    PubMed

    Denys, G A; Davis, J C; O'Hanley, P D; Stephens, J T

    2011-07-01

    We evaluated the in vitro and in vivo activity of a novel topical myeloperoxidase-mediated antimicrobial, E-101 solution, against 5 multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolates recovered from wounded American soldiers. Time-kill studies demonstrated rapid bactericidal activity against all A. baumannii strains tested in the presence of 3% blood. The in vitro bactericidal activity of E-101 solution against A. baumannii strains was confirmed in a full-thickness excision rat model. Additional in vivo studies appear warranted.

  13. First report of an OXA-23 carbapenemase-producing Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolate related to Tn2006 in Spain.

    PubMed

    Espinal, P; Macià, M D; Roca, I; Gato, E; Ruíz, E; Fernández-Cuenca, F; Oliver, A; Rodríguez-Baño, J; Bou, G; Tomás, M; Vila, J

    2013-01-01

    A carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolate belonging to European clone II and sequence type 2 was recovered from a patient in the Son Espases hospital in Mallorca, Spain. Genetic analysis showed the presence of the bla(OXA-23) gene in association with the widely disseminated transposon Tn2006. This is the first reported identification of A. baumannii carrying bla(OXA-23) in Spain.

  14. Update on Acinetobacter species: mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance and contemporary in vitro activity of minocycline and other treatment options.

    PubMed

    Castanheira, Mariana; Mendes, Rodrigo E; Jones, Ronald N

    2014-12-01

    Among Acinetobacter species, A. baumannii and other closely related species are commonly implicated in nosocomial infections. These organisms are usually multidrug resistant (MDR), and therapeutic options to treat A. baumannii infections are very limited. Clinicians have been resorting to older antimicrobial agents to treat infections caused by MDR A. baumannii, and some of these agents have documented toxicity and/or are not optimized for the infection type to be treated. Recent clinical experience supported by antimicrobial susceptibility data suggests that minocycline has greater activity than other tetracyclines and glycylcyclines against various MDR pathogens that have limited therapeutic options available, including Acinetobacter species. An intravenous formulation of minocycline has recently become available for clinical use, and in contrast to most older tetracyclines, minocycline has high activity against Acinetobacter species. In this report, we summarized some of the characteristics of the tetracycline class, and quantified the minocycline activity against contemporary (2007-2011) isolates and its potential therapeutic role against a collection of 5477 A. baumannii and other relevant gram-negative organisms when compared directly with tetracycline, doxycycline, and other broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents. Acinetobacter baumannii strains were highly resistant to all agents tested, with the exception of minocycline (79.1% susceptible) and colistin (98.8% susceptible). Minocycline (minimum inhibitory concentration that inhibits 50% and 90% of the isolates [MIC(50/90)]: 1/8 µg/mL) displayed greater activity than doxycycline (MIC(50/90): 2/>8 µg/mL) and tetracycline hydrochloride (HCL) (only 30.2% susceptible) against A. baumannii isolates, and was significantly more active than other tetracyclines against Burkholderia cepacia, Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia isolates. In vitro susceptibility testing using

  15. Rapid detection of blaOXA in carbapenem-susceptible Acinetobacter radioresistens bacteremia leading to unnecessary antimicrobial administration.

    PubMed

    Brady, Adam C; Lewis, James S; Pfeiffer, Christopher D

    2016-08-01

    Rapid molecular techniques to identify resistant pathogens are revolutionizing antibiotic stewardship; however, it is important to recognize the limitations of these techniques. Herein we describe two cases of bacteremia that were both initially identified by genotypic testing as carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter spp. and subsequently identified phenotypically as carbapenem-susceptible A. radioresistens. The genotypic results prompted unnecessary broad-spectrum antibiotic use and infection control concerns.

  16. Innate immune responses to systemic Acinetobacter baumannii infection in mice: neutrophils, but not interleukin-17, mediate host resistance.

    PubMed

    Breslow, Jessica M; Meissler, Joseph J; Hartzell, Rebecca R; Spence, Phillip B; Truant, Allan; Gaughan, John; Eisenstein, Toby K

    2011-08-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a nosocomial pathogen with a high prevalence of multiple-drug-resistant strains, causing pneumonia and sepsis. The current studies further develop a systemic mouse model of this infection and characterize selected innate immune responses to the organism. Five clinical isolates, with various degrees of antibiotic resistance, were assessed for virulence in two mouse strains, and between male and female mice, using intraperitoneal infection. A nearly 1,000-fold difference in virulence was found between bacterial strains, but no significant differences between sexes or mouse strains were observed. It was found that microbes disseminated rapidly from the peritoneal cavity to the lung and spleen, where they replicated. A persistent septic state was observed. The infection progressed rapidly, with mortality between 36 and 48 h. Depletion of neutrophils with antibody to Ly-6G decreased mean time to death and increased mortality. Interleukin-17 (IL-17) promotes the response of neutrophils by inducing production of the chemokine keratinocyte-derived chemoattractant (KC/CXCL1), the mouse homolog of human IL-8. Acinetobacter infection resulted in biphasic increases in both IL-17 and KC/CXCL1. Depletion of neither IL-17 nor KC/CXCL1, using specific antibodies, resulted in a difference in bacterial burdens in organs of infected mice at 10 h postinfection. Comparison of bacterial burdens between IL-17a(-/-) and wild-type mice confirmed that the absence of this cytokine did not sensitize mice to Acinetobacter infection. These studies definitely demonstrate the importance of neutrophils in resistance to systemic Acinetobacter infection. However, neither IL-17 nor KC/CXCL1 alone is required for effective host defense to systemic infection with this organism.

  17. Emergence and Spread of Plasmid-Borne tet(B)::ISCR2 in Minocycline-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Vilacoba, Elisabet; Almuzara, Marisa; Gulone, Lucia; Traglia, German Matías; Figueroa, Silvia A.; Sly, Gabriela; Fernández, Analia; Centrón, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to minocycline has emerged in multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolates from Buenos Aires hospitals. Few reports about the description and dispersion of tet genes in this species have been published. We observed the presence of tet(B) in all minocycline-resistant isolates. This gene was found to be associated with the ISCR2 mobile element, which may, in part, explain its dispersion. PMID:23147737

  18. OXA-207, a novel OXA-24 variant with reduced catalytic efficiency against carbapenems in Acinetobacter pittii from Spain.

    PubMed

    Cayô, Rodrigo; Merino, María; Ruiz Del Castillo, Belén; Cano, María Eliecer; Calvo, Jorge; Bou, Germán; Martínez-Martínez, Luis

    2014-08-01

    A carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter pittii strain carrying an OXA-24-like enzyme was isolated in northern Spain in 2008. Sequence analysis confirmed the presence of the novel bla(OXA-207) gene flanked by the site-specific XerC/XerD-like recombination binding sites and showing a unique Gly222Val substitution compared to OXA-24. Cloning and kinetic analysis showed that OXA-207 presents a reduction in the catalytic efficiency against carbapenems and a noticeable increase for oxacillin.

  19. Surface-associated motility, a common trait of clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii, depends on 1,3-diaminopropane.

    PubMed

    Skiebe, Evelyn; de Berardinis, Véronique; Morczinek, Peter; Kerrinnes, Tobias; Faber, Franziska; Lepka, Daniela; Hammer, Bettina; Zimmermann, Ortrud; Ziesing, Stefan; Wichelhaus, Thomas A; Hunfeld, Klaus-Peter; Borgmann, Stefan; Gröbner, Sabine; Higgins, Paul G; Seifert, Harald; Busse, Hans-Jürgen; Witte, Wolfgang; Pfeifer, Yvonne; Wilharm, Gottfried

    2012-07-01

    While flagella-independent motility has long been described in representatives of the genus Acinetobacter, the mechanism of motility remains ambiguous. Acinetobacter baumannii, a nosocomial pathogen appearing increasingly multidrug-resistant, may profit from motility during infection or while persisting in the hospital environment. However, data on the frequency of motility skills among clinical A. baumannii isolates is scarce. We have screened a collection of 83 clinical A. baumannii isolates of different origin and found that, with the exception of one isolate, all were motile on wet surfaces albeit to varying degrees and exhibiting differing morphologies. Screening a collection of transposon mutants of strain ATCC 17978 for motility defects, we identified 2 akinetic mutants carrying transposon insertions in the dat and ddc gene, respectively. These neighbouring genes contribute to synthesis of 1,3-diaminopropane (DAP), a polyamine ubiquitously produced in Acinetobacter. Supplementing semi-solid media with DAP cured the motility defect of both mutants. HPLC analyses confirmed that DAP synthesis was abolished in ddc and dat mutants of different A. baumannii isolates and was re-established after genetic complementation. Both, the dat and ddc mutant of ATCC 17978 were attenuated in the Galleria mellonella caterpillar infection model. Taken together, surface-associated motility is a common trait of clinical A. baumannii isolates that requires DAP and may play a role in its virulence.

  20. Identification and characterisation of the putative phage-related endolysins through full genome sequence analysis in Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 17978.

    PubMed

    Lai, Meng-Jiun; Soo, Po-Chi; Lin, Nien-Tsung; Hu, Anren; Chen, You-Jie; Chen, Li-Kuang; Chang, Kai-Chih

    2013-08-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has recently emerged as a major cause of healthcare-associated infections owing to an increase in its antimicrobial resistance to virtually all available drugs. The ability of endolysins (lysozymes) to digest cell walls when applied exogenously to bacterial cells has enabled their use as novel antibacterials. In order to utilise endolysins as a therapeutic alternative to antibiotics, we surveyed the genome sequence of A. baumannii ATCC 17978 and successfully identified two phage-related endolysin genes, A1S_1600 and A1S_2016 (termed lysAB3 and lysAB4, respectively). Following cloning and expression/purification, various antibacterial activities of these two phage-related endolysins were determined in vitro. Zymographic assays showed that only purified LysAB3 could lyse the peptidoglycan of the A. baumannii cell wall. When applied exogenously, both LysAB3 and LysAB4 were active against most Acinetobacter spp. tested but had virtually no activity against other non-Acinetobacter spp. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that exposure to 100μg/mL LysAB3 and LysAB4 for up to 60min caused a remarkable modification of the cell shape of A. baumannii. These results indicate that the genes encoding phage-related endolysins can be readily isolated from the bacterial genome and have potential for the development of novel antimicrobial agents.

  1. Use of Comparative Genomics To Characterize the Diversity of Acinetobacter baumannii Surveillance Isolates in a Health Care Institution.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Lalena; Daugherty, Sean C; Nagaraj, Sushma; Johnson, J Kristie; Harris, Anthony D; Rasko, David A

    2016-10-01

    Despite the increasing prevalence of the nosocomial pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii, little is known about which genomic components contribute to clinical presentation of this important pathogen. Most whole-genome comparisons of A. baumannii have focused on specific genomic regions associated with phenotypes in a limited number of genomes. In this work, we describe the results of a whole-genome comparative analysis of 254 surveillance isolates of Acinetobacter species, 203 of which were A. baumannii, isolated from perianal swabs and sputum samples collected as part of an infection control active surveillance program at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The collection of surveillance isolates includes both carbapenem-susceptible and -resistant isolates. Based on the whole-genome phylogeny, the A. baumannii isolates collected belong to two major phylogenomic lineages. Results from multilocus sequence typing indicated that one of the major phylogenetic groups of A. baumannii was comprised solely of strains from the international clonal lineage 2. The genomic content of the A. baumannii isolates was examined using large-scale BLAST score ratio analysis to identify genes that are associated with carbapenem-susceptible and -resistant isolates, as well as genes potentially associated with the source of isolation. This analysis revealed a number of genes that were exclusive or at greater frequency in each of these classifications. This study is the most comprehensive genomic comparison of Acinetobacter isolates from a surveillance study to date and provides important information that will contribute to our understanding of the success of A. baumannii as a human pathogen.

  2. Medically Relevant Acinetobacter Species Require a Type II Secretion System and Specific Membrane-Associated Chaperones for the Export of Multiple Substrates and Full Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Christian M.; Kinsella, Rachel L.; Palmer, Lauren D.; Skaar, Eric P.; Feldman, Mario F.

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii, A. nosocomialis, and A. pittii have recently emerged as opportunistic human pathogens capable of causing severe human disease; however, the molecular mechanisms employed by Acinetobacter to cause disease remain poorly understood. Many pathogenic members of the genus Acinetobacter contain genes predicted to encode proteins required for the biogenesis of a type II secretion system (T2SS), which have been shown to mediate virulence in many Gram-negative organisms. Here we demonstrate that Acinetobacter nosocomialis strain M2 produces a functional T2SS, which is required for full virulence in both the Galleria mellonella and murine pulmonary infection models. Importantly, this is the first bona fide secretion system shown to be required for virulence in Acinetobacter. Using bioinformatics, proteomics, and mutational analyses, we show that Acinetobacter employs its T2SS to export multiple substrates, including the lipases LipA and LipH as well as the protease CpaA. Furthermore, the Acinetobacter T2SS, which is found scattered amongst five distinct loci, does not contain a dedicated pseudopilin peptidase, but instead relies on the type IV prepilin peptidase, reinforcing the common ancestry of these two systems. Lastly, two of the three secreted proteins characterized in this study require specific chaperones for secretion. These chaperones contain an N-terminal transmembrane domain, are encoded adjacently to their cognate effector, and their disruption abolishes type II secretion of their cognate effector. Bioinformatic analysis identified putative chaperones located adjacent to multiple previously known type II effectors from several Gram-negative bacteria, which suggests that T2SS chaperones constitute a separate class of membrane-associated chaperones mediating type II secretion. PMID:26764912

  3. Medically Relevant Acinetobacter Species Require a Type II Secretion System and Specific Membrane-Associated Chaperones for the Export of Multiple Substrates and Full Virulence.

    PubMed

    Harding, Christian M; Kinsella, Rachel L; Palmer, Lauren D; Skaar, Eric P; Feldman, Mario F

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii, A. nosocomialis, and A. pittii have recently emerged as opportunistic human pathogens capable of causing severe human disease; however, the molecular mechanisms employed by Acinetobacter to cause disease remain poorly understood. Many pathogenic members of the genus Acinetobacter contain genes predicted to encode proteins required for the biogenesis of a type II secretion system (T2SS), which have been shown to mediate virulence in many Gram-negative organisms. Here we demonstrate that Acinetobacter nosocomialis strain M2 produces a functional T2SS, which is required for full virulence in both the Galleria mellonella and murine pulmonary infection models. Importantly, this is the first bona fide secretion system shown to be required for virulence in Acinetobacter. Using bioinformatics, proteomics, and mutational analyses, we show that Acinetobacter employs its T2SS to export multiple substrates, including the lipases LipA and LipH as well as the protease CpaA. Furthermore, the Acinetobacter T2SS, which is found scattered amongst five distinct loci, does not contain a dedicated pseudopilin peptidase, but instead relies on the type IV prepilin peptidase, reinforcing the common ancestry of these two systems. Lastly, two of the three secreted proteins characterized in this study require specific chaperones for secretion. These chaperones contain an N-terminal transmembrane domain, are encoded adjacently to their cognate effector, and their disruption abolishes type II secretion of their cognate effector. Bioinformatic analysis identified putative chaperones located adjacent to multiple previously known type II effectors from several Gram-negative bacteria, which suggests that T2SS chaperones constitute a separate class of membrane-associated chaperones mediating type II secretion.

  4. Antioxidant capacity, polyphenol content and iron bioavailability from algae (Ulva sp., Sargassum sp. and Porphyra sp.) in human subjects.

    PubMed

    García-Casal, Maria N; Ramírez, José; Leets, Irene; Pereira, Ana C; Quiroga, Maria F

    2009-01-01

    Marine algae are easily produced and are good sources of Fe. If this Fe is bioavailable, algae consumption could help to combat Fe deficiency and anaemia worldwide. The objective of the present study was to evaluate Fe bioavailability, polyphenol content and antioxidant capacity from three species of marine algae distributed worldwide. A total of eighty-three subjects received maize- or wheat-based meals containing marine algae (Ulva sp., Sargassum sp. and Porphyra sp.) in different proportions (2.5, 5.0 and 7.5 g) added to the water to prepare the dough. All meals administered contained radioactive Fe. Absorption was evaluated calculating radioactive Fe incorporation in subjects' blood. The three species of marine algae were analysed for polyphenol content and reducing power. Algae significantly increased Fe absorption in maize- or wheat-based meals, especially Sargassum sp., due to its high Fe content. Increases in absorption were dose-dependent and higher in wheat- than in maize-based meals. Total polyphenol content was 10.84, 18.43 and 80.39 gallic acid equivalents/g for Ulva sp., Porphyra sp. and Sargassum sp., respectively. The antioxidant capacity was also significantly higher in Sargassum sp. compared with the other two species analysed. Ulva sp., Sargassum sp. and Porphyra sp. are good sources of bioavailable Fe. Sargassum sp. resulted in the highest Fe intake due to its high Fe content, and a bread containing 7.5 g Sargassum sp. covers daily Fe needs. The high polyphenol content found in Sargassum sp. could be partly responsible for the antioxidant power reported here, and apparently did not affect Fe absorption.

  5. Bacillus novalis sp. nov., Bacillus vireti sp. nov., Bacillus soli sp. nov., Bacillus bataviensis sp. nov. and Bacillus drentensis sp. nov., from the Drentse A grasslands.

    PubMed

    Heyrman, Jeroen; Vanparys, Bram; Logan, Niall A; Balcaen, An; Rodríguez-Díaz, Marina; Felske, Andreas; De Vos, Paul

    2004-01-01

    A group of 42 isolates were isolated from the soil of several disused hay fields, in the Drentse A agricultural research area (The Netherlands), that were taken out of production at different times. The group represents hitherto-uncultured Bacillus lineages that have previously been found, by a non-cultural method, to be predominant in soil. The strains were subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study, including (GTG)5-PCR, 16S rDNA sequence analysis, DNA-DNA hybridizations, DNA base-ratio determination, fatty acid analysis and morphological and biochemical characterization. By comparing the groupings obtained by (GTG)5-PCR and 16S rDNA sequence analysis, six clusters of similar strains could be recognized. A DNA-DNA relatedness study showed that these clusters represented five novel genospecies. Further analysis supported the proposal of five novel species in the genus Bacillus, namely Bacillus novalis sp. nov. (type strain IDA3307T=R-15439T=LMG 21837T=DSM 15603T), Bacillus vireti sp. nov. (type strain IDA3632T=R-15447T=LMG 21834T=DSM 15602T), Bacillus soli sp. nov. (type strain IDA0086T=R-16300T=LMG 21838T=DSM 15604T), Bacillus bataviensis sp. nov. (type strain IDA1115T=R-16315T=LMG 21833T=DSM 15601T) and Bacillus drentensis sp. nov. (type strain IDA1967T=R-16337T=LMG 21831T=DSM 15600T).

  6. Sp1 and the 'hallmarks of cancer'.

    PubMed

    Beishline, Kate; Azizkhan-Clifford, Jane

    2015-01-01

    For many years, transcription factor Sp1 was viewed as a basal transcription factor and relegated to a role in the regulation of so-called housekeeping genes. Identification of Sp1's role in recruiting the general transcription machinery in the absence of a TATA box increased its importance in gene regulation, particularly in light of recent estimates that the majority of mammalian genes lack a TATA box. In this review, we briefly consider the history of Sp1, the founding member of the Sp family of transcription factors. We review the evidence suggesting that Sp1 is highly regulated by post-translational modifications that positively and negatively affect the activity of Sp1 on a wide array of genes. Sp1 is over-expressed in many cancers and is associated with poor prognosis. Targeting Sp1 in cancer treatment has been suggested; however, our review of the literature on the role of Sp1 in the regulation of genes that contribute to the 'hallmarks of cancer' illustrates the extreme complexity of Sp1 functions. Sp1 both activates and suppresses the expression of a number of essential oncogenes and tumor suppressors, as well as genes involved in essential cellular functions, including proliferation, differentiation, the DNA damage response, apoptosis, senescence and angiogenesis. Sp1 is also implicated in inflammation and genomic instability, as well as epigenetic silencing. Given the apparently opposing effects of Sp1, a more complete understanding of the function of Sp1 in cancer is required to validate its potential as a therapeutic target.

  7. Whole-genome sequence analysis of the naturally competent Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolate A118.

    PubMed

    Traglia, German M; Chua, Katherina; Centrón, Daniela; Tolmasky, Marcelo E; Ramírez, María Soledad

    2014-08-26

    Recent studies have demonstrated a high genomic plasticity in Acinetobacter baumannii, which may explain its high capacity to acquire multiple antibiotic resistance determinants and to survive in the hospital environment. Acinetobacter baumannii strain A118 (Ab A118) was isolated in the year 1995 from a blood culture of an intensive care unit patient. As this particular strain showed some peculiar characteristic such as being naturally competent and susceptible to numerous antibiotics, we performed whole-genome comparison (WGC) studies to gain insights into the nature and extent of the genomic differences. The Ab A118 genome is approximately 3,824 kb long with a 38.4% GC content and contains 3,520 coding sequences. WGC studies showed that the Ab A118 genome has 98% average nucleotide identity with that of A. baumannii ATCC 17978, and 96% average nucleotide identity with that of strains AYE and ACICU. At least 12 inversions, 275 insertions, and 626 deletions were identified when the Ab A118 genome was compared with those of strains ATCC 17978, AYE, and ACICU using MAUVE WGC. Multiple gene order arrangements were observed among the analyzed strains. MAUVE WGC analysis identified 19 conserved segments, known as locally colinear blocks. The number of single nucleotide polymorphisms found when comparing the Ab A118 genome with that of strains ATCC 17978, AYE, and ACICU was 43,784 (1.1496%), 44,130 (1.158%), and 43,914 (1.153%), respectively. Genes comEA, pilQ, pilD, pilF, comL, pilA, comEC, pilI, pilH, pilO, pilN, pilY1(comC), pilE, pilR, and comM, potentially involved in natural competence were found in the Ab A118 genome. In particular, unlike in most strains where comM is interrupted by an insertion of a resistance island (AbaR), in strain Ab A118 it is uninterrupted.

  8. Whole-Genome Sequence Analysis of the Naturally Competent Acinetobacter baumannii Clinical Isolate A118

    PubMed Central

    Traglia, German M.; Chua, Katherina; Centrón, Daniela; Tolmasky, Marcelo E.; Ramírez, María Soledad

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated a high genomic plasticity in Acinetobacter baumannii, which may explain its high capacity to acquire multiple antibiotic resistance determinants and to survive in the hospital environment. Acinetobacter baumannii strain A118 (Ab A118) was isolated in the year 1995 from a blood culture of an intensive care unit patient. As this particular strain showed some peculiar characteristic such as being naturally competent and susceptible to numerous antibiotics, we performed whole-genome comparison (WGC) studies to gain insights into the nature and extent of the genomic differences. The Ab A118 genome is approximately 3,824 kb long with a 38.4% GC content and contains 3,520 coding sequences. WGC studies showed that the Ab A118 genome has 98% average nucleotide identity with that of A. baumannii ATCC 17978, and 96% average nucleotide identity with that of strains AYE and ACICU. At least 12 inversions, 275 insertions, and 626 deletions were identified when the Ab A118 genome was compared with those of strains ATCC 17978, AYE, and ACICU using MAUVE WGC. Multiple gene order arrangements were observed among the analyzed strains. MAUVE WGC analysis identified 19 conserved segments, known as locally colinear blocks. The number of single nucleotide polymorphisms found when comparing the Ab A118 genome with that of strains ATCC 17978, AYE, and ACICU was 43,784 (1.1496%), 44,130 (1.158%), and 43,914 (1.153%), respectively. Genes comEA, pilQ, pilD, pilF, comL, pilA, comEC, pilI, pilH, pilO, pilN, pilY1(comC), pilE, pilR, and comM, potentially involved in natural competence were found in the Ab A118 genome. In particular, unlike in most strains where comM is interrupted by an insertion of a resistance island (AbaR), in strain Ab A118 it is uninterrupted. PMID:25164683

  9. In Vitro Activity of RX-P873 against Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Rhomberg, Paul R.; Jones, Ronald N.; Farrell, David J.

    2015-01-01

    RX-P873 is a novel antibiotic from the pyrrolocytosine series which exhibits high binding affinity for the bacterial ribosome and broad-spectrum antibiotic properties. The pyrrolocytosines have shown in vitro activity against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains of bacteria known to cause complicated urinary tract, skin, and lung infections, as well as sepsis. Enterobacteriaceae (657), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (200), and Acinetobacter baumannii (202) isolates from North America and Europe collected in 2012 as part of a worldwide surveillance program were tested in vitro by broth microdilution using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) methodology. RX-P873 (MIC90, 0.5 μg/ml) was >32-fold more active than ceftazidime and inhibited 97.1% and 99.5% of Enterobacteriaceae isolates at MIC values of ≤1 and ≤4 μg/ml, respectively. There were only three isolates with an MIC value of >4 μg/ml (all were indole-positive Protea). RX-P873 (MIC50/90, 2/4 μg/ml) was highly active against Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates, including isolates which were nonsusceptible to ceftazidime or meropenem. RX-P873 was 2-fold less active against P. aeruginosa than tobramycin (MIC90, 2 μg/ml; 91.0% susceptible) and colistin (MIC90, 2 μg/ml; 99.5% susceptible) and 2-fold more potent than amikacin (MIC90, 8 μg/ml; 93.5% susceptible) and meropenem (MIC90, 8 μg/ml; 76.0% susceptible). RX-P873, the most active agent against Acinetobacter baumannii (MIC90, 1 μg/ml), was 2-fold more active than colistin (MIC90, 2 μg/ml; 97.0% susceptible) and 4-fold more active than tigecycline (MIC90, 4 μg/ml). This novel agent merits further exploration of its potential against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:25645834

  10. Inhibition of the Class C β-Lactamase from Acinetobacter spp: Insights into Effective Inhibitor Design†

    PubMed Central

    Drawz, Sarah M.; Babic, Maja; Bethel, Christopher R.; Taracila, Magda; Distler, Anne M.; Ori, Claudia; Caselli, Emilia; Prati, Fabio; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    The need to develop β-lactamase inhibitors against class C cephalosporinases of Gram-negative pathogens represents an urgent clinical priority. To respond to this challenge, five boronic acid derivatives including a new cefoperazone analog were synthesized and tested against the class C cephalosporinase of Acinetobacter baumannii (Acinetobacter-Derived Cephalosporinase, ADC). The commercially available carbapenems antibiotics were also assayed. In the boronic acid series, a chiral cephalothin analog with a meta-carboxyphenyl moiety corresponding to the C3/C4 carboxylate of β-lactams showed the lowest Ki (11 ± 1 nM). In antimicrobial susceptibility tests, this cephalothin analog lowered the ceftazidime and cefotaxime minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of Escherichia coli DH10B cells carrying blaADC from 16 → 4 μg/ml, and 8 → 1 μg/ml, respectively. On the other hand, each carbapenem exhibited a Ki < 20 μM, and timed electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) demonstrated the formation of adducts corresponding to acyl-enzyme intermediates with both intact carbapenem and carbapenem lacking the C6 hydroxyethyl group. To better understand the interactions between the β-lactamase and the inhibitors, we constructed models of ADC as an acyl-enzyme with: i) the meta-carboxyphenyl cephalothin analog; and ii) the carbapenems imipenem and meropenem. Our first model suggests that this chiral cephalothin analog adopts a novel conformation in the β-lactamase active site. Further, the addition of the substituent mimicking the cephalosporin dihydrothiazine ring may significantly improve affinity for the ADC β-lactamase. In contrast, the ADC: carbapenem models offer a novel role for the R2 side group, and also suggest that elimination of the C6 hydroxyethyl group by retroaldolic reaction leads to a significant conformational change of the acyl-enzyme. Lessons from the diverse mechanisms and structures of the boronic acid derivatives and carbapenems provide

  11. Paradoxical Effect of Polymyxin B: High Drug Exposure Amplifies Resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Landersdorfer, Cornelia B.; Lenhard, Justin R.; Cheah, Soon-Ee; Thamlikitkul, Visanu; Rao, Gauri G.; Holden, Patricia N.; Forrest, Alan; Bulitta, Jürgen B.; Nation, Roger L.; Li, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Administering polymyxin antibiotics in a traditional fashion may be ineffective against Gram-negative ESKAPE (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species) pathogens. Here, we explored increasing the dose intensity of polymyxin B against two strains of Acinetobacter baumannii in the hollow-fiber infection model. The following dosage regimens were simulated for polymyxin B (t1/2 = 8 h): non-loading dose (1.43 mg/kg of body weight every 12 h [q12h]), loading dose (2.22 mg/kg q12h for 1 dose and then 1.43 mg/kg q12h), front-loading dose (3.33 mg/kg q12h for 1 dose followed by 1.43 mg/kg q12h), burst (5.53 mg/kg for 1 dose), and supraburst (18.4 mg/kg for 1 dose). Against both A. baumannii isolates, a rapid initial decline in the total population was observed within the first 6 h of polymyxin exposure, whereby greater polymyxin B exposure resulted in greater maximal killing of −1.25, −1.43, −2.84, −2.84, and −3.40 log10 CFU/ml within the first 6 h. Unexpectedly, we observed a paradoxical effect whereby higher polymyxin B exposures dramatically increased resistant subpopulations that grew on agar containing up to 10 mg/liter of polymyxin B over 336 h. High drug exposure also proliferated polymyxin-dependent growth. A cost-benefit pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationship between 24-h killing and 336-h resistance was explored. The intersecting point, where the benefit of bacterial killing was equal to the cost of resistance, was an fAUC0–24 (area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h for the free, unbound fraction of drug) of 38.5 mg · h/liter for polymyxin B. Increasing the dose intensity of polymyxin B resulted in amplification of resistance, highlighting the need to utilize polymyxins as part of a combination against high-bacterial-density A. baumannii infections. PMID:27067330

  12. Antimicrobial susceptibility profiling and genomic diversity of Acinetobacter baumannii isolates: A study in western Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mohajeri, Parviz; Farahani, Abbas; Feizabadi, Mohammad Mehdi; Ketabi, Hosnieh; Abiri, Ramin; Najafi, Farid

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objective Acinetobacter baumannii is an aerobic non-motile Gram-negative bacterial pathogen that is resistant to most antibiotics. Carbapenems are the most common antibiotics for the treatment of infections caused by this pathogen. Mechanisms of antibiotic-resistance in A. baumannii are mainly mediated by efflux pumps-lactamases. The aim of this study was to determine antibiotic susceptibility, the possibility of existence of OXAs genes and fingerprinting by Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) among clinical isolates of Acinetobacter collected from Kermanshah hospitals. Materials and Methods One hundred and four isolates were collected from patients attending Imam Reza, Taleghani and Imam Khomeini hospitals of Kermanshah (Iran). Isolates were identified by biochemical tests and API 20NE kit. The susceptibility to different antibiotics was assessed with Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. PCR was performed for detection of bla OXA-23, bla OXA-24, bla OXA-51 and bla OXA-58 beta-lactamase genes. Clonal relatedness was estimated by PFGE (with the restriction enzyme Apa I) and DNA patterns were analyzed by Gel compare II 6.5 software. Results All isolates showed high-level of resistance to imipenem, meropenem as well as to other antimicrobial agents, while no resistance to polymyxin B, colistin, tigecylcine and minocycline was observed. The bla OXA-23like and bla OXA-24 like were found among 77.9% and 19.2% of the isolates, respectively. All isolates were positive for bla OXA-51, but none produced any amplicon for bla OXA-58. PFGE genotype analysis suggested the existence of eight clones among the 104 strains [A (n = 35), B (n = 29), C (n = 19), D (n = 10), E (n = 4), F (n = 3), G (n = 3), H (n = 1)]. Clone A was the dominant clone in hospital settings particularly infection wards so that the isolates in this group, compared to the other clones, showed higher levels of resistance to antibiotics. Conclusion The bla OXA-51-like and bla OXA-23like were

  13. RNA-mediated cis-regulation in Acinetobacter baumannii modulates stress-induced phenotypic variation.

    PubMed

    Ching, Carly; Gozzi, Kevin; Heinemann, Björn; Chai, Yunrong; Godoy, Veronica G

    2017-03-20

    In the nosocomial opportunistic pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii, RecA-dependent mutagenesis, which causes antibiotic resistance acquisition, is linked to the DNA damage response (DDR). Notably, unlike the Escherichia coli paradigm, recA and DDR gene expression in A. baumannii are bimodal. Namely, there is phenotypic variation upon DNA damage, which may provide a bet-hedging strategy for survival. Thus, understanding recA gene regulation is key to elucidate the yet unknown DDR regulation in A. baumannii Here, we identify a structured 5' Untranslated Region (5' UTR) in the recA transcript which serves as a cis-regulatory element. We show that a predicted stem-loop structure in this 5' UTR affects mRNA half-life and underlies bimodal gene expression and thus phenotypic variation in response to ciprofloxacin treatment. We furthermore show that the stem-loop structure of the recA 5' UTR influences intracellular RecA protein levels and, in vivo, impairing the formation of the stem-loop structure of the recA 5' UTR lowers cell survival to UV treatment and decreases rifampicin resistance acquisition from DNA damage-induced mutagenesis. We hypothesize that the 5' UTR allows for stable recA transcripts during stress, including antibiotic treatment, enabling cells to maintain suitable RecA levels for survival. This innovative strategy to regulate the DDR in A. baumannii may contribute to its success as a pathogen.ImportanceAcinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic pathogen quickly gaining antibiotic resistances. Mutagenesis and antibiotic resistance acquisition are linked to the DNA damage response (DDR). However, how the DDR is regulated in A. baumannii remains unknown, since unlike most bacteria, A. baumannii does not follow the regulation of the Escherichia coli paradigm. Here, we have started to uncover the mechanisms regulating the novel A. baumannii DDR. We have found that a cis-acting 5' UTR regulates recA transcript stability, RecA protein levels, and DNA damage

  14. Penialidins A-C with strong antibacterial activities from Penicillium sp., an endophytic fungus harboring leaves of Garcinia nobilis.

    PubMed

    Jouda, Jean-Bosco; Kusari, Souvik; Lamshöft, Marc; Mouafo Talontsi, Ferdinand; Douala Meli, Clovis; Wandji, Jean; Spiteller, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Three new polyketides named penialidins A-C (1-3), along with one known compound, citromycetin (4), were isolated from an endophytic fungus, Penicillium sp., harbored in the leaves of the Cameroonian medicinal plant Garcinia nobilis. Their structures were elucidated by means of spectroscopic and spectrometric methods (NMR and HRMS(n)). The antibacterial efficacies of the new compounds (1-3) were tested against the clinically-important risk group 2 (RG2) bacterial strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. The ecologically imposing strains of E. coli (RG1), Bacillus subtilis and Acinetobacter sp. BD4 were also included in the assay. Compound 3 exhibited pronounced activity against the clinically-relevant S. aureus as well as against B. subtilis comparable to that of the reference standard (streptomycin). Compound 2 was also highly-active against S. aureus. By comparing the structures of the three new compounds (1-3), it was revealed that altering the substitutions at C-10 and C-2 can significantly increase the antibacterial activity of 1.

  15. Proteogenomic Characterization of Monocyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Degradation Pathways in the Aniline-Degrading Bacterium Burkholderia sp. K24

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Sung Ho; Choi, Chi-Won; Yi, Yoon-Sun; Kim, Jonghyun; Chung, Young-Ho; Park, Edmond Changkyun; Kim, Seung Il

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia sp. K24, formerly known as Acinetobacter lwoffii K24, is a soil bacterium capable of utilizing aniline as its sole carbon and nitrogen source. Genomic sequence analysis revealed that this bacterium possesses putative gene clusters for biodegradation of various monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs), including benzene, toluene, and xylene (BTX), as well as aniline. We verified the proposed MAH biodegradation pathways by dioxygenase activity assays, RT-PCR, and LC/MS-based quantitative proteomic analyses. This proteogenomic approach revealed four independent degradation pathways, all converging into the citric acid cycle. Aniline and p-hydroxybenzoate degradation pathways converged into the β-ketoadipate pathway. Benzoate and toluene were degraded through the benzoyl-CoA degradation pathway. The xylene isomers, i.e., o-, m-, and p-xylene, were degraded via the extradiol cleavage pathways. Salicylate was degraded through the gentisate degradation pathway. Our results show that Burkholderia sp. K24 possesses versatile biodegradation pathways, which may be employed for efficient bioremediation of aniline and BTX. PMID:27124467

  16. Proteogenomic Characterization of Monocyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Degradation Pathways in the Aniline-Degrading Bacterium Burkholderia sp. K24.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Yeop; Kim, Gun-Hwa; Yun, Sung Ho; Choi, Chi-Won; Yi, Yoon-Sun; Kim, Jonghyun; Chung, Young-Ho; Park, Edmond Changkyun; Kim, Seung Il

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia sp. K24, formerly known as Acinetobacter lwoffii K24, is a soil bacterium capable of utilizing aniline as its sole carbon and nitrogen source. Genomic sequence analysis revealed that this bacterium possesses putative gene clusters for biodegradation of various monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs), including benzene, toluene, and xylene (BTX), as well as aniline. We verified the proposed MAH biodegradation pathways by dioxygenase activity assays, RT-PCR, and LC/MS-based quantitative proteomic analyses. This proteogenomic approach revealed four independent degradation pathways, all converging into the citric acid cycle. Aniline and p-hydroxybenzoate degradation pathways converged into the β-ketoadipate pathway. Benzoate and toluene were degraded through the benzoyl-CoA degradation pathway. The xylene isomers, i.e., o-, m-, and p-xylene, were degraded via the extradiol cleavage pathways. Salicylate was degraded through the gentisate degradation pathway. Our results show that Burkholderia sp. K24 possesses versatile biodegradation pathways, which may be employed for efficient bioremediation of aniline and BTX.

  17. Phenotypic and genomic characterization of the antimicrobial producer Rheinheimera sp. EpRS3 isolated from the medicinal plant Echinacea purpurea: insights into its biotechnological relevance.

    PubMed

    Presta, Luana; Bosi, Emanuele; Fondi, Marco; Maida, Isabel; Perrin, Elena; Miceli, Elisangela; Maggini, Valentina; Bogani, Patrizia; Firenzuoli, Fabio; Di Pilato, Vincenzo; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Mengoni, Alessio; Fani, Renato

    2017-04-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing interest in plant microbiota; however, despite medicinal plant relevance, very little is known about their highly complex endophytic communities. In this work, we report on the genomic and phenotypic characterization of the antimicrobial compound producer Rheinheimera sp. EpRS3, a bacterial strain isolated from the rhizospheric soil of the medicinal plant Echinacea purpurea. In particular, EpRS3 is able to inhibit growth of different bacterial pathogens (Bcc, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Klebsiella pneumoniae) which might be related to the presence of gene clusters involved in the biosynthesis of different types of secondary metabolites. The outcomes presented in this work highlight the fact that the strain possesses huge biotechnological potential; indeed, it also shows antimicrobial effects upon well-described multidrug-resistant (MDR) human pathogens, and it affects plant root elongation and morphology, mimicking indole acetic acid (IAA) action.

  18. Pantoea rodasii sp. nov., Pantoea rwandensis sp. nov. and Pantoea wallisii sp. nov., isolated from Eucalyptus.

    PubMed

    Brady, Carrie L; Cleenwerck, Ilse; van der Westhuizen, Lorinda; Venter, Stephanus N; Coutinho, Teresa A; De Vos, Paul

    2012-07-01

    Several Gram-negative-staining, facultatively anaerobic bacterial isolates were obtained from Eucalyptus seedlings showing symptoms of bacterial blight and dieback in Colombia, Rwanda and South Africa. Partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing, together with partial gyrB sequencing, placed the isolates in the genus Pantoea and indicated that they constituted three novel species. Multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) based on partial sequences of gyrB, rpoB, infB and atpD revealed Pantoea dispersa, Pantoea eucrina and Pantoea cypripedii as their closest phylogenetic relatives. DNA-DNA hybridization studies confirmed the classification of the new isolates as three novel species and phenotypic tests allowed them to be differentiated from their closest phylogenetic neighbours. The names Pantoea rodasii sp. nov. [type strain LMG 26273(T)=BD 943(T) (deposited with the Plant Pathogenic and Plant Protecting Bacteria Collection, South Africa)=BCC 581(T) (deposited with the Bacterial Culture Collection, Forestry and Agricultural Institute, South Africa)], Pantoea rwandensis sp. nov. (type strain LMG 26275(T)=BD 944(T)=BCC 571(T)) and Pantoea wallisii sp. nov. (type strain LMG 26277(T)=BD 946(T)=BCC 682(T)) are proposed.

  19. Cultivation of Monoraphidium sp., Chlorella sp. and Scenedesmus sp. algae in Batch culture using Nile tilapia effluent.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Cabrera, Luis; Rueda, José A; García-Lozano, Hiram; Navarro, A Karin

    2014-06-01

    Monoraphidium sp., Chlorella sp. and Scenedesmus sp. algae were cultured in three volumes of Tilapia Effluent Medium (TEM) in comparison with the Bold Basal Medium (BBM) (Nichols and Bold, 1965). Specific growth rate (μ'), biomass dry productivity (Q), volumetric productivity (Qv) as well as lipid and protein content were measured. Then, volumetric productivities for both lipids and proteins were calculated (QVL and QVP). In Scenedesmus sp., BBM produced higher μ' and Qv than TEM in 1.5L volume. Chlorella sp. showed a higher QVL for BBM than TEM. Any observed difference in protein or lipid productivities among volumes was in favor of a greater productivity for 1.5L volume. Even when TEM had a larger protein content in Chlorella sp. than BBM, QVP was not different. Current results imply that TEM can be used as an alternative growth medium for algae when using Batch cultures, yet productivity is reduced.

  20. An ultrastructural study of the spermatozoa of Eulalia sp. (Phyllodocidae), Lepidonotus sp. (Polynoidae), Lumbrineris sp. (Lumbrineridae) and Owenia fusiformis (Oweniidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouse, G. W.

    1988-03-01

    The ultrastructure of the mature spermatozoa of four polychaetes is described: Eulalia sp. (Phyllodocidae), Lepidonotus sp. (Polynoidae), Lumbrineris sp. (Lumbrineridae) and Owenia fusiformis (Oweniidae). All the sperm show features typical of externally fertilizing sperm in having a rounded nucleus, a short unmodified midpiece, and a simple flagellum with a 9+2 axoneme. Owenia fusiformis and Lepidonotus sp. have a nuclear cone extending into the subacrosomal space that may act to present the inner acrosomal membrane to the egg during fertilization. The acrosome of Lumbrineris sp. is flattened and crenulated. The sperm of Eulalia sp. is unusual in having the four mitochondria of the midpiece ensheathed by a membrane. Comparisons are made with other polychaete sperm, and the use of sperm ultrastructure as a taxonomic tool within the Polychaeta is discussed.

  1. Multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in veterinary medicine--emergence of an underestimated pathogen?

    PubMed

    Müller, Stefanie; Janssen, Traute; Wieler, Lothar H

    2014-01-01

    The proportion of multidrug resistant bacteria causing infections in animals has continuously been increasing. While the relevance of ESBL (extended spectrum beta-lactamase)-producing Enterobacteriaceae spp. and MRSA (methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus) is unquestionable, knowledge about multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in veterinary medicine is scarce. This is a worrisome situation, as A. baumannii are isolated from veterinary clinical specimens with rising frequency. The remarkable ability of A. baumannii to develop multidrug resistance and the high risk of transmission are known in human medicine for years. Despite this, data regarding A. baumannii isolates of animal origin are missing. Due to the changing role of companion animals with closer contact between animal and owner, veterinary intensive care medicine is steadily developing. It can be assumed that the number of "high risk" patients with an enhanced risk for hospital acquired infections will be rising simultaneously. Thus, development and spread of multidrug resistant pathogens is envisioned to rise. It is possible, that A. baumannii will evolve into a veterinary nosocomial pathogen similar to ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae and MRSA. The lack of attention paid to A. baumannii in veterinary medicine is even more worrying, as first reports indicate a transmission between humans and animals. Essential questions regarding the role of livestock, especially as a potential source of multidrug resistant isolates, remain unanswered. This review summarizes the current knowledge on A. baumannii in veterinary medicine for the first time. It underlines the utmost significance of further investigations of A. baumannii animal isolates, particularly concerning epidemiology and resistance mechanisms.

  2. Invitro Apramycin Activity against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kang, Anthony D; Smith, Kenneth P; Eliopoulos, George M; Berg, Anders H; McCoy, Christopher; Kirby, James E

    2017-03-16

    The in vitro activity of apramycin was compared to that of amikacin, gentamicin, and tobramycin against multidrug-resistant, extensively drug-resistant, and pandrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Apramycin demonstrated an MIC50/MIC90 of 8/32μg/ml for A. baumannii and 16/32μg/ml for P. aeruginosa. Only 2% of A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa had an MIC greater than an epidemiological cutoff value of 64μg/ml. In contrast, the MIC50/MIC90 for amikacin, gentamicin, and tobramycin were ≥64/>256μg/ml for A. baumannii with 57%, 95%, and 74% of isolates demonstrating resistance, respectively, and the MIC50/MIC90 were ≥8/256μg/ml for P. aeruginosa with 27%, 50%, and 57% of strains demonstrating resistance, respectively. Apramycin appears to offer promising in vitro activity against highly resistant pathogens. It therefore may warrant further pre-clinical study to assess potential for repurposing as a human therapeutic and relevance as a scaffold for further medicinal chemistry exploration.

  3. Rhamnolipids Produced by Indigenous Acinetobacter junii from Petroleum Reservoir and its Potential in Enhanced Oil Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hao; Xia, Wenjie; Dong, Honghong; She, Yuehui; Zhu, Panfeng; Liang, Kang; Zhang, Zhongzhi; Liang, Chuanfu; Song, Zhaozheng; Sun, Shanshan; Zhang, Guangqing

    2016-01-01

    Biosurfactant producers are crucial for incremental oil production in microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) processes. The isolation of biosurfactant-producing bacteria from oil reservoirs is important because they are considered suitable for the extreme conditions of the reservoir. In this work, a novel biosurfactant-producing strain Acinetobacter junii BD was isolated from a reservoir to reduce surface tension and emulsify crude oil. The biosurfactants produced by the strain were purified and then identified via electrospray ionization-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR-MS). The biosurfactants generated by the strain were concluded to be rhamnolipids, the dominant rhamnolipids were C26H48O9, C28H52O9, and C32H58O13. The optimal carbon source and nitrogen source for biomass and biosurfactant production were NaNO3 and soybean oil. The results showed that the content of acid components increased with the progress of crude oil biodegradation. A glass micromodel test demonstrated that the strain significantly increased oil recovery through interfacial tension reduction, wettability alteration and the mobility of microorganisms. In summary, the findings of this study indicate that the newly developed BD strain and its metabolites have great potential in MEOR. PMID:27872613

  4. Catechol 1,2-dioxygenase from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus: purification and properties.

    PubMed Central

    Patel, R N; Hou, C T; Felix, A; Lillard, M O

    1976-01-01

    Procedures for the purification of catechol 1,2-dioxygenase from extracts of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus strain ADP-96 are described. The purified enzyme was homogeneous as judged by ultracentrifugation and acrylamide gel electrophoresis. The enzyme contained 2 g-atoms of iron per mol of protein. The enzyme had a broad substrate specificity and catalyzed the oxidation of catechol, 4-methylcatechol, 3-methylcatechol, and 3-isopropyl catechol. The activity of the enzyme was inhibited by heavy metals, sulfhydryl inhibitors, and substrate analogues. The molecular weight of the enzyme was 85,000 as estimated by filtration on Bio-Gel agarose and 81,000 as estimated by sedimentation equilibrium analysis. The subunit size determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis was 40,000. The amino terminal amino acid was methionine. The amino acid composition and spectral properties of 1,2-dioxygenase are also presented. Antisera prepared against the purified enzyme cross-reacted and inhibited enzyme activity in crude extracts from the other strain of A. calcoaceticus, but failed to cross-react and inhibit isofunctional enzyme from organisms of the genera Pseudomonas, Alcaligenes, and Nocardia. Images PMID:58860

  5. Differential Role of the T6SS in Acinetobacter baumannii Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Foucault-Grunenwald, Marie-Laure; Borges, Vitor; Charpentier, Xavier; Limansky, Adriana S.; Gomes, João Paulo; Viale, Alejandro M.; Salcedo, Suzana P.

    2015-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria, such as Acinetobacter baumannii, are an increasing burden in hospitals worldwide with an alarming spread of multi-drug resistant (MDR) strains. Herein, we compared a type strain (ATCC17978), a non-clinical isolate (DSM30011) and MDR strains of A. baumannii implicated in hospital outbreaks (Ab242, Ab244 and Ab825), revealing distinct patterns of type VI secretion system (T6SS) functionality. The T6SS genomic locus is present and was actively transcribed in all of the above strains. However, only the A. baumannii DSM30011 strain was capable of killing Escherichia coli in a T6SS-dependent manner, unlike the clinical isolates, which failed to display an active T6SS in vitro. In addition, DSM30011 was able to outcompete ATCC17978 as well as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae, bacterial pathogens relevant in mixed nosocomial infections. Finally, we found that the T6SS of DSM30011 is required for host colonization of the model organism Galleria mellonella suggesting that this system could play an important role in A. baumannii virulence in a strain-specific manner. PMID:26401654

  6. Novel Engineered Peptides of a Phage Lysin as Effective Antimicrobials against Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Thandar, Mya; Lood, Rolf; Winer, Benjamin Y.; Deutsch, Douglas R.; Euler, Chad W.

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen responsible for a range of nosocomial infections. The recent rise and spread of multidrug-resistant A. baumannii clones has fueled a search for alternative therapies, including bacteriophage endolysins with potent antibacterial activities. A common feature of these lysins is the presence of a highly positively charged C-terminal domain with a likely role in promoting outer membrane penetration. In the present study, we show that the C-terminal amino acids 108 to 138 of phage lysin PlyF307, named P307, alone were sufficient to kill A. baumannii (>3 logs). Furthermore, P307 could be engineered for improved activity, the most active derivative being P307SQ-8C (>5-log kill). Both P307 and P307SQ-8C showed high in vitro activity against A. baumannii in biofilms. Moreover, P307SQ-8C exhibited MICs comparable to those of levofloxacin and ceftazidime and acted synergistically with polymyxin B. Although the peptides were shown to kill by disrupting the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane, they did not lyse human red blood cells or B cells; however, serum was found to be inhibitory to lytic activity. In a murine model of A. baumannii skin infection, P307SQ-8C reduced the bacterial burden by ∼2 logs in 2 h. This study demonstrates the prospect of using peptide derivatives from bacteriophage lysins to treat topical infections and remove biofilms caused by Gram-negative pathogens. PMID:26856847

  7. Association of the outer membrane protein Omp33 with fitness and virulence of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Smani, Younes; Dominguez-Herrera, Juan; Pachón, Jerónimo

    2013-11-15

    Outer membrane protein 33 (Omp33) is an outer membrane porin of Acinetobacter baumannii associated with carbapenem resistance. However, the role of Omp33 in the fitness and virulence of A. baumannii remains unknown. In the present study, we investigated the role of Omp33 in fitness and virulence of A. baumannii by using an isogenic knockout strain deficient in the omp33 gene (JPAB02), derived from the ATCC 17978 wild-type (wt). Both in vitro and in vivo defect in the growth rate was found in the JPAB02 strain in competition with the ATCC 17978 wt, highlighting the effect of Omp33 on the metabolic fitness. A significant reduction was observed both in adherence and invasion of human lung epithelial cells and in cytotoxicity of these cells and macrophages with JPAB02. In a murine peritoneal sepsis model, the JPAB02 strain exhibited lower lethal dose 0 (LD0), LD50, and LD100, and dissemination in mice, with reduced bacterial concentration in spleen and lungs. From these data, we concluded that Omp33 plays an important role for fitness and virulence of A. baumannii.

  8. Impact of Acinetobacter baumannii superoxide dismutase on motility, virulence, oxidative stress resistance and susceptibility to antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Heindorf, Magdalena; Kadari, Mahendar; Heider, Christine; Skiebe, Evelyn; Wilharm, Gottfried

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative bacterium appearing as an opportunistic pathogen in hospital settings. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) contributes to virulence in several pathogenic bacteria by detoxifying reactive oxygen species released in the course of host defense reactions. However, the biological role of SODs in A. baumannii has not yet been elucidated. Here, we inactivated in A. baumannii ATCC 17978 gene A1S_2343, encoding a putative SOD of the Fe-Mn type by transposon insertion, resulting in mutant ATCC 17978 sod2343::Km. The mutation was also introduced in two naturally competent A. baumannii isolates by transformation with chromosomal DNA derived from mutant ATCC 17978 sod2343::Km. We demonstrate that inactivation of sod2343 leads to significant motility defects in all three A. baumannii strains. The mutant strains were more susceptible to oxidative stress compared to their parental strains. Susceptibility to colistin and tetracycline was increased in all mutant strains while susceptibility of the mutants to gentamicin, levofloxacin and imipenem was strain-dependent. In the Galleria mellonella infection model the mutant strains were significantly attenuated. In conclusion, sod2343 plays an important role in motility, resistance to oxidative stress, susceptibility to antibiotics and virulence in A. baumannii.

  9. Therapeutic efficacy of lysophosphatidylcholine in severe infections caused by Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Smani, Younes; Domínguez-Herrera, Juan; Ibáñez-Martínez, José; Pachón, Jerónimo

    2015-07-01

    Due to the significant increase in antimicrobial resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii, immune system stimulation to block infection progression may be a therapeutic adjuvant to antimicrobial treatment. Lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), a major component of phospholipids in eukaryotic cells, is involved in immune cell recruitment and modulation. The aim of this study was to show if LPC could be useful for treating infections caused by A. baumannii. A. baumannii ATCC 17978 was used in this study. Levels of serum LPC and levels of the inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-1β, and IL-10 were determined by spectrophotometric assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively, using a murine peritoneal sepsis model in which mice were inoculated with 5.3 log CFU/ml of A. baumannii. The therapeutic efficacy of LPC against A. baumannii in murine peritoneal sepsis and pneumonia models was assessed for 48 h after bacterial infection. At early time points in the murine model of peritoneal sepsis caused by A. baumannii, LPC was depleted and was associated with an increase of inflammatory cytokine release. Preemptive therapy with LPC in murine peritoneal sepsis and pneumonia models markedly enhanced spleen and lung bacterial clearance and reduced the numbers of positive blood cultures and the mouse mortality rates. Moreover, treatment with LPC reduced proinflammatory cytokine production. These data demonstrate that LPC is efficacious as a preemptive treatment in experimental models of peritoneal sepsis and pneumonia caused by A. baumannii.

  10. Evaluation of the trimeric autotransporter Ata as a vaccine candidate against Acinetobacter baumannii infections.

    PubMed

    Bentancor, Leticia V; Routray, Abhisek; Bozkurt-Guzel, Cagla; Camacho-Peiro, Ana; Pier, Gerald B; Maira-Litrán, Tomás

    2012-10-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a multidrug-resistant (MDR) nosocomial pathogen for which immunotherapeutic alternatives are needed. We previously identified a surface autotransporter of A. baumannii, Ata, that bound to various extracellular matrix/basal membrane proteins and was required for full virulence, biofilm formation, and the adhesion of A. baumannii to collagen type IV. We show here that Ata binding to collagen type IV was inhibited by antibodies to Ata. In addition, in the presence of complement and polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs), antibodies to Ata were highly opsonic against A. baumannii ATCC 17978 and showed low to moderate killing activity against four heterologous A. baumannii strains, whereas in the absence of PMNs, antibody to Ata efficiently promoted complement-dependent bactericidal killing of all of the tested A. baumannii isolates. Using a pneumonia model of infection in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised mice, we found that, compared to normal rabbit sera, antisera to Ata significantly reduced the levels of A. baumannii ATCC 17978 and two MDR strains in the lungs of infected mice. The ability of Ata to engender anti-adhesive, bactericidal, opsonophagocytic, and protective antibodies validates its potential use as an antigenic target against MDR A. baumannii infections.

  11. H-NS plays a role in expression of Acinetobacter baumannii virulence features.

    PubMed

    Eijkelkamp, Bart A; Stroeher, Uwe H; Hassan, Karl A; Elbourne, Liam D H; Paulsen, Ian T; Brown, Melissa H

    2013-07-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has become a major problem in the clinical setting with the prevalence of infections caused by multidrug-resistant strains on the increase. Nevertheless, only a limited number of molecular mechanisms involved in the success of A. baumannii as a human pathogen have been described. In this study, we examined the virulence features of a hypermotile derivative of A. baumannii strain ATCC 17978, which was found to display enhanced adherence to human pneumocytes and elevated levels of lethality toward Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes. Analysis of cellular lipids revealed modifications to the fatty acid composition, providing a possible explanation for the observed changes in hydrophobicity and subsequent alteration in adherence and motility. Comparison of the genome sequences of the hypermotile variant and parental strain revealed that an insertion sequence had disrupted an hns-like gene in the variant. This gene encodes a homologue of the histone-like nucleoid structuring (H-NS) protein, a known global transcriptional repressor. Transcriptome analysis identified the global effects of this mutation on gene expression, with major changes seen in the autotransporter Ata, a type VI secretion system, and a type I pilus cluster. Interestingly, isolation and analysis of a second independent hypermotile ATCC 17978 variant revealed a mutation to a residue within the DNA binding region of H-NS. Taken together, these mutants indicate that the phenotypic and transcriptomic differences seen are due to loss of regulatory control effected by H-NS.

  12. Acinetobacter baumannii Virulence Is Mediated by the Concerted Action of Three Phospholipases D

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, Julia; Bergmann, Holger; Göttig, Stephan; Ebersberger, Ingo; Averhoff, Beate

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii causes a broad range of opportunistic infections in humans. Its success as an emerging pathogen is due to a combination of increasing antibiotic resistance, environmental persistence and adaptation to the human host. To date very little is known about the molecular basis of the latter. Here we demonstrate that A. baumannii can use phosphatidylcholine, an integral part of human cell membranes, as sole carbon and energy source. We report on the identification of three phospholipases belonging to the PLD superfamily. PLD1 and PLD2 appear restricted to the bacteria and display the general features of bacterial phospholipases D. They possess two PLDc_2 PFAM domains each encompassing the HxKx4Dx6GS/GGxN (HKD) motif necessary for forming the catalytic core. The third candidate, PLD3, is found in bacteria as well as in eukaryotes and harbours only one PLDc_2 PFAM domain and one conserved HKD motif, which however do not overlap. Employing a markerless mutagenesis system for A. baumannii ATCC 19606T, we generated a full set of PLD knock-out mutants. Galleria mellonella infection studies as well as invasion experiments using A549 human lung epithelial cells revealed that the three PLDs act in a concerted manner as virulence factors and are playing an important role in host cell invasion. PMID:26379240

  13. Molecular Epidemiology and Characterization of Multiple-Drug Resistant (MDR) Clinical Isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    El-Shazly, Sherief; Dashti, Ali; Vali, Leila; Bolaris, Michael; Ibrahim, Ashraf S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to identify the genetic relatedness of multiple-drug resistance (MDR) in Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates recovered from a hospital in Los Angeles. Methods Twenty one MDR A. baumannii isolates were collected and their antibiotic susceptibility were determined according to the CLSI guidelines. Genes coding for antibiotic resistance were identified by PCR and their identities were confirmed by DNA sequencing. Clonal relationships were studied by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). Results MDR consistently correlated with the presence of oxacillinases, mostly in the form of plasmid-mediated OXA-23 enzyme which were detected in 12 (57.1%) isolates. GES-type carbapenemases were found in 20 (95.2%) strains, AAC in all 21 (100%) strains, PER in 7 (33.3%) strains and ISAba1 has been detected in 16 (76.2%) isolates. The association between ISAba1 and resistant genes confirms insertion elements as a source of β-lactamase production. Of the 21 clinical isolates, 5 were found to be related to sequence type-1 (ST1) and 16 to ST2 as analyzed by MLST. PFGE demonstrated that the majority of clinical isolates are highly related (>85%). Conclusions This study supports a more complete understanding of genotyping of antibiotic resistance for better assessment of MDR strains transmission. PMID:26518066

  14. Screening of nuclear targeting proteins in Acinetobacter baumannii based on nuclear localization signals.

    PubMed

    Moon, Dong Chan; Gurung, Mamata; Lee, Jung Hwa; Lee, Yong Seok; Choi, Chi Won; Kim, Seung Il; Lee, Je Chul

    2012-05-01

    Nuclear targeting of bacterial proteins is an emerging pathogenic mechanism in bacteria. However, due to the absence of an appropriate screening system for nuclear targeting proteins, systematic approaches to nuclear targeting of bacterial proteins and subsequent host cell pathology are limited. In this study, we developed a screening system for nuclear targeting proteins in Acinetobacter baumannii using a combination of bioinformatic analysis based on nuclear localization signal (NLS) and the Gateway(®) recombinational cloning system. Among 3367 open reading frames of A. baumannii ATCC 17978, 34 functional or hypothetical proteins were predicted to carry the putative NLS sequences. Of the 29 clones generated by the Gateway(®) recombinational cloning system, 14 proteins tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) were targeted to nuclei of host cells. Among the 14 nuclear targeting proteins, S21, L20, and L32 ribosomal proteins and transposase carried putative nuclear export signal (NES) sequences, but only transposase harbored the functional NES. After translocation to nuclei of host cells, four A. baumannii proteins induced cytotoxicity. In conclusion, we have developed a screening system for nuclear targeting proteins in A. baumannii. This system may open the way to a new field of bacterial pathogenesis.

  15. Characterization of the Acinetobacter baumannii growth phase-dependent and serum responsive transcriptomes.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Anna C; Sayood, Khalid; Olmsted, Stephen B; Blanchard, Catlyn E; Hinrichs, Steven; Russell, David; Dunman, Paul M

    2012-04-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a bacterial pathogen of considerable healthcare concern. Yet, little is known about the organism's basic biological processes and the regulatory networks that modulate expression of its virulence factors and antibiotic resistance. Using Affymetrix GeneChips , we comprehensively defined and compared the transcriptomes of two A. baumannii strains, ATCC 17978 and 98-37-09, during exponential and stationary phase growth in Luria-Bertani (LB) medium. Results revealed that in addition to expected growth phase-associated metabolic changes, several putative virulence factors were dramatically regulated in a growth phase-dependent manner. Because a common feature between the two most severe types of A. baumannii infection, pneumonia and septicemia, includes the organism's dissemination to visceral organs via the circulatory system, microarray studies were expanded to define the expression properties of A. baumannii during growth in human serum. Growth in serum significantly upregulated iron acquisition systems, genes associated with epithelial cell adherence and DNA uptake, as well as numerous putative drug efflux pumps. Antibiotic susceptibility testing verified that the organism exhibits increased antibiotic tolerance when cultured in human serum, as compared to LB medium. Collectively, these studies provide researchers with a comprehensive database of A. baumannii's expression properties in LB medium and serum and identify biological processes that may contribute to the organism's virulence and antibiotic resistance.

  16. The Effect of Colistin Resistance-Associated Mutations on the Fitness of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xinli; Wang, Nanfei; Li, Xi; Shi, Keren; Zhou, Zhihui; Yu, Yunsong; Hua