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Sample records for acinetobacter strains including

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Acinetobacter sp. Strain VT-511 Isolated from the Stomach of a Patient with Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tetz, Victor

    2015-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Acinetobacter sp. strain VT-511, which was obtained from the stomach of a patient with gastric cancer. The genome of Acinetobacter sp. VT-511 is composed of approximately 3,416,321 bp and includes 3,214 predicted protein-coding genes. PMID:26472843

  2. Antibacterial sensitivity of Acinetobacter strains isolated from nosocomial infections.

    PubMed

    Karsligil, T; Balci, I; Zer, Y

    2004-01-01

    Acinetobacter species can cause many types of hospital-acquired infection and play an important role in nosocomial pneumonia in intensive care units, skin and wound infections, and meningitis. They are of increasing importance because of their ability to rapidly develop resistance to the major groups of antibiotics. We aimed to determine the antibiotic sensitivity of Acinetobacter strains isolated from, and determined to be the cause of, hospital-acquired infections. A total of 156 cultures of Acinetobacter (strains of A. baumannii [136; 87.2%] and A. iwoffii [20; 12.8%]), were isolated from clinical samples taken from patients in different units of our hospital. Conventional bacterial identification methods and the Sceptor system were used. In the antibiotic sensitivity tests, A. baumannii was susceptible to imipenem (90.4%), norfloxacin (84.5%) and ciprofloxacin (65.4%), and A. iwoffii to amikacin (80.0%), ticarcillin/clavulanic acid (70.0%) and imipenem (60.0%). PMID:15303777

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of a Dimethyl Sulfide-Utilizing Bacterium, Acinetobacter guillouiae Strain 20B (NBRC 110550)

    PubMed Central

    Yee, LiiMien; Hosoyama, Akira; Ohji, Shoko; Tsuchikane, Keiko; Shimodaira, Jun; Yamazoe, Atsushi; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Suzuki-Minakuchi, Chiho

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter guillouiae strain 20B can utilize dimethyl sulfide (DMS) as the sole sulfur source and degrade chloroethylenes. We report here the complete 4,648,418-bp genome sequence for this strain, which contains 4,367 predicted coding sequences (CDSs), including a well-characterized DMS degradative operon. PMID:25323718

  4. Comparison of the Virulence Potential of Acinetobacter Strains from Clinical and Environmental Sources

    PubMed Central

    Tayabali, Azam F.; Nguyen, Kathy C.; Shwed, Philip S.; Crosthwait, Jennifer; Coleman, Gordon; Seligy, Verner L.

    2012-01-01

    Several Acinetobacter strains have utility for biotechnology applications, yet some are opportunistic pathogens. We compared strains of seven Acinetobacter species (baumannii, Ab; calcoaceticus, Ac; guillouiae, Ag; haemolyticus, Ah; lwoffii, Al; junii, Aj; and venetianus, Av-RAG-1) for their potential virulence attributes, including proliferation in mammalian cell conditions, haemolytic/cytolytic activity, ability to elicit inflammatory signals, and antibiotic susceptibility. Only Ah grew at 102 and 104 bacteria/well in mammalian cell culture medium at 37°C. However, co-culture with colonic epithelial cells (HT29) improved growth of all bacterial strains, except Av-RAG-1. Cytotoxicity of Ab and Ah toward HT29 was at least double that of other test bacteria. These effects included bacterial adherence, loss of metabolism, substrate detachment, and cytolysis. Only Ab and Ah exhibited resistance to killing by macrophage-like J774A.1 cells. Haemolytic activity of Ah and Av-RAG-1 was strong, but undetectable for other strains. When killed with an antibiotic, Ab, Ah, Aj and Av-RAG-1 induced 3 to 9-fold elevated HT29 interleukin (IL)-8 levels. However, none of the strains altered levels of J774A.1 pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α). Antibiotic susceptibility profiling showed that Ab, Ag and Aj were viable at low concentrations of some antibiotics. All strains were positive for virulence factor genes ompA and epsA, and negative for mutations in gyrA and parC genes that convey fluoroquinolone resistance. The data demonstrate that Av-RAG-1, Ag and Al lack some potentially harmful characteristics compared to other Acinetobacter strains tested, but the biotechnology candidate Av-RAG-1 should be scrutinized further prior to widespread use. PMID:22655033

  5. [Identification and determination of sensitivity to antibiotics of 31 clinical strains of Acinetobacter other than A. baumannii].

    PubMed

    Freney, J; Bouvet, P J; Tixier, C

    1989-01-01

    Precise identification and determination of MICs of clinical isolates of Acinetobacter identified to other species than the hospital species A. baumannii were carried out. On 260 Acinetobacter strains isolated in an hospital over a 6 months period, 31 strains (12 p. cent) were identified to species other than A. baumannii. Among these 31 strains, A. Iwoffii sensu stricto (16 strains) and A. haemolyticus (6 strains) were mostly recovered. Eight glucose oxidizing strains were identified to A. haemolyticus (6 strains), Acinetobacter genospecies 3 (2 strains), and A. Iwoffii sensu stricto (1 strain). Antibiotic susceptibilities of these strains were greater than those commonly observed with A. baumannii strains. PMID:2930020

  6. Distribution of AdeABC efflux system genes in genotypically diverse strains of clinical Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Piotr; Sacha, Paweł; Czaban, Sławomir; Hauschild, Tomasz; Ojdana, Dominika; Kowalczuk, Oksana; Milewski, Robert; Poniatowski, Bogusław; Nikliński, Jacek; Tryniszewska, Elżbieta

    2013-10-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a highly problematic hospital-associated pathogen. Different mechanisms contribute to the formation of multidrug resistance in A. baumannii, including the AdeABC efflux system. Distribution of the structural and regulatory genes encoding the AdeABC efflux system among genetically diverse clinical A. baumannii strains was achieved by using PCR and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis techniques. The distribution of adeABRS genes is extremely high among our A. baumannii strains, except the adeC gene. We have observed a large proportion of strains presenting multidrug-resistance phenotype for several years. The efflux pump could be an important mechanism in these strains in resistance to antibiotics. PMID:23886790

  7. [Susceptibility to antibiotics and biochemical activity of strains of Acinetobacter sp. isolated from various sources].

    PubMed

    Gospodarek, E

    1993-01-01

    The study was performed on 576 Acinetobacter strains isolated from clinical material, objects from hospital, environment, soil, water and from animals. Applying API 20NE system identification was following: A. baumanii (61.1%), A. junii (19.4%), A. haemolyticus (4.3%), A. lwoffii (3.3%), A. johnsonii (0.52%) and not belonging to above genus strains (11.3%). Over 47% strains of Acinetobacter were isolated from clinical material as the only bacteria (mainly from samples received from intensive care units and surgical and urological wards). Out of 23 antibiotics and antimicrobials used for investigation of 535 strains of Acinetobacter, most active were imipenem (99%) of susceptible strains, ofloxacin and ciprofloxacin (95%) and netilmicin (88%). Multiple resistant strains were isolated more frequently from hospital environment than from other sources--these were mostly A. baumanii and A. junii. PMID:8189806

  8. Characterization and identification of newly isolated Acinetobacter baumannii strain serdang 1 for phenol removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadzir, Z. H. M.; Shukor, M. Y.; Nazir, M. S.; Abdullah, M. A.

    2012-09-01

    A new indigenous bacterial strain from Malaysian soil contaminated with petroleum waste had been successfully isolated, characterized and identified for phenol removal. The gram negative bacteria showed 98% identity with Acinetobacter baumannii based on Biolog{trade mark, serif} Identification System and the determination of a partial 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequence. The isolate clustered with species belonging to Acinetobacter clade in a 16S rDNA-based neighbour-joining phylogenetic tree.

  9. Resistance mechanism of Acinetobacter spp. strains resistant to DW-116, a new quinolone.

    PubMed

    Choi, K H; Baek, M C; Kim, B K; Choi, E C

    1998-06-01

    DW-116 is a new fluoroquinolone antimicrobial agent with a broad spectrum. In order to elucidate the resistance mechanism to DW-116 in Acinetobacter spp. bacteria, total chromosomal DNA was isolated from 10 strains of Acinetobacter spp. resistant to DW-116. Quinolone resistance determinant region (QRDR) of DNA gyrase gene was amplified by PCR. The 345 bp nucleotide fragment yielded was inserted into pKF 3 which was used as the vector. Comparisons of the DNA sequences of 8 strains with that of the wild type strain revealed a Ser-83 to Leu mutation in mutants and all ten strains contained one silent mutation(T-->G) in QRDR. From Acinetobacter MB4-8 strain, DNA gyrase was isolated and purified, through no-vobiocin-sepharose, heparin-sepharose affinity column chromatography. The enzyme was composed of two subunits and the molecular mass of subunits A and B were 75.6 and 51.9 kDa, respectively. The supercoiling activity of the reconstituted DNA gyrase composed of subunit A from Acinetobacter MB4-8 and subunit B from E. coli was not inhibited by 128 micrograms/ml of ciprofloxacin. It might be said that one of the resistance mechanisms to DW-116 in A-cinetobacter MB4-8 was subunit A alteration of DNA gyrase. PMID:9875449

  10. Prevalence and in-vitro antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of Acinetobacter strains isolated from patients in intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Aktas, O; Ozbek, A

    2003-01-01

    Fifty-six Acinetobacter species strains (49 Acinetobacter baumanii, 5 Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, 2 Acinetobacter iwoffii) were detected using both conventional methods and gas chromatography of bacterial fatty acids with the MIDI Sherlock Microbial Identification System. The susceptibilities of these strains to 16 antimicrobial agents were investigated by the disc-diffusion method according to the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. The production of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) and inducible beta-lactamases (IBLs) by the strains were investigated by the double-disc-synergy and disc-approximation methods, respectively. Imipenem was the most effective agent for Acinetobacter baumanii strains (95.9% of strains were sensitive), while meropenem and netilmicin showed moderate activity (87.7% and 79.6% of strains, respectively, responded). Acinetobacter baumanii strains were less sensitive to cefoperazone-sulbactam (53.1%), ofloxacin (51.0%), ciprofloxacin (42.8%), and amikacin (36.7%). Acinetobacter calcoaceticus and Acinetobacter iwoffii strains were sensitive to imipenem, meropenem and netilmicin. IBLs and ESBLs were produced, respectively, by 8.9% and 7.1% of all bacterial strains. The strains isolated were sufficiently sensitive to imipenem, but not to ofloxacin or ciprofloxacin, and were very resistant to amikacin. PMID:12964502

  11. Analysis of drug resistance in 1,861 strains of Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    JIN, HAO; QIU, FAN; JI, HONG JIAN; LU, QIANG

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging human pathogen that causes hospital-acquired infections. The trend in increased antimicrobial resistance limits the choice of effective antimicrobial agents. The present study reports the resistance to Acinetobacter baumannii and analyzes the associations between antibiotic use and resistance rates at a general hospital between 2010 and 2014. A total of 1,861 isolates were obtained from clinical cultures, accounting for 10.33% of all detected bacteria (1,861/18,016). The strains were mainly from respiratory samples (1,628 isolates, 87.5%) and the intensive care unit (696 isolates, 37.4%). The resistance rates of Acinetobacter baumannii to the majority of antibiotics were >50%, particularly the resistance rate to cefoperazone/sulbactam increased from 47.37 in 2011 to 89.25% in 2014. However, the rates of imipenem and cilastatin sodium decreased from 81.03 to 69.44% due to the antibiotic policy. There were Pearson significant associations between the use of three antibiotics and resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii to this drug, piperacillin/tazobactam (r=0.976, P<0.01), gentamicin (r=0.870, P<0.01) and cefoxitin (r=0.741, P<0.05). Therefore, a combination of drugs should be adopted to treat Acinetobacter baumannii infections. Microbiology laboratory support and surveillance policies are essential to control the emergence of multidrug-resistance Acinetobacter baumannii. PMID:27073633

  12. Taxonomy of haemolytic and/or proteolytic strains of the genus Acinetobacter with the proposal of Acinetobacter courvalinii sp. nov. (genomic species 14 sensu Bouvet & Jeanjean), Acinetobacter dispersus sp. nov. (genomic species 17), Acinetobacter modestus sp. nov., Acinetobacter proteolyticus sp. nov. and Acinetobacter vivianii sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Nemec, Alexandr; Radolfova-Krizova, Lenka; Maixnerova, Martina; Vrestiakova, Eliska; Jezek, Petr; Sedo, Ondrej

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to define the taxonomic status of 40 haemolytic and/or proteolytic strains of the genus Acinetobacter which were previously classified into five putative species termed as genomic species 14BJ (n = 9), genomic species 17 (n = 9), taxon 18 (n = 7), taxon 19 (n = 6) and taxon 20 (n = 9). The strains were recovered mostly from human clinical specimens or soil and water ecosystems and were highly diverse in geographical origin and time of isolation. Comparative analysis of the rpoB and gyrB gene sequences of all strains, and the whole-genome sequences of selected strains, showed that these putative species formed five respective, well-supported clusters within a distinct clade of the genus Acinetobacter which typically, although not exclusively, encompasses strains with strong haemolytic activity. The whole-genome-based average nucleotide identity (ANIb) values supported the species status of each of these clusters. Moreover, the distinctness and coherence of the clusters were supported by whole-cell profiling based on MALDI-TOF MS. Congruent with these findings were the results of metabolic and physiological testing. We conclude that the five putative taxa represent respective novel species, for which the names Acinetobacter courvalinii sp. nov. (type strain ANC 3623T = CCUG 67960T = CIP 110480T = CCM 8635T), Acinetobacter dispersus sp. nov. (type strain ANC 4105T = CCUG 67961T = CIP 110500T = CCM 8636T), Acinetobacter modestus sp. nov. (type strain NIPH 236T = CCUG 67964T = CIP 110444T = CCM 8639T), Acinetobacter proteolyticus sp. nov. (type strain NIPH 809T = CCUG 67965T = CIP 110482T = CCM 8640T) and Acinetobacter vivianii sp. nov. (type strain NIPH 2168T = CCUG 67967T = CIP 110483T = CCM 8642T) are proposed. PMID:26822020

  13. Antimicrobial Activity of Gallium Protoporphyrin IX against Acinetobacter baumannii Strains Displaying Different Antibiotic Resistance Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Arivett, Brock A.; Fiester, Steven E.; Ohneck, Emily J.; Penwell, William F.; Kaufman, Cynthia M.; Relich, Ryan F.

    2015-01-01

    A paucity of effective, currently available antibiotics and a lull in antibiotic development pose significant challenges for treatment of patients with multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii infections. Thus, novel therapeutic strategies must be evaluated to meet the demands of treatment of these often life-threatening infections. Accordingly, we examined the antibiotic activity of gallium protoporphyrin IX (Ga-PPIX) against a collection of A. baumannii strains, including nonmilitary and military strains and strains representing different clonal lineages and isolates classified as susceptible or MDR. Susceptibility testing demonstrated that Ga-PPIX inhibits the growth of all tested strains when cultured in cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth, with a MIC of 20 μg/ml. This concentration significantly reduced bacterial viability, while 40 μg/ml killed all cells of the A. baumannii ATCC 19606T and ACICU MDR isolate after 24-h incubation. Recovery of ATCC 19606T and ACICU strains from infected A549 human alveolar epithelial monolayers was also decreased when the medium was supplemented with Ga-PPIX, particularly at a 40-μg/ml concentration. Similarly, the coinjection of bacteria with Ga-PPIX increased the survival of Galleria mellonella larvae infected with ATCC 19606T or ACICU. Ga-PPIX was cytotoxic only when monolayers or larvae were exposed to concentrations 16-fold and 1,250-fold higher than those showing antibacterial activity, respectively. These results indicate that Ga-PPIX could be a viable therapeutic option for treatment of recalcitrant A. baumannii infections regardless of the resistance phenotype, clone lineage, time and site of isolation of strains causing these infections and their iron uptake phenotypes or the iron content of the media. PMID:26416873

  14. Colistin-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Clinical Strains with Deficient Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Dafopoulou, Konstantina; Xavier, Basil Britto; Hotterbeekx, An; Janssens, Lore; Lammens, Christine; Dé, Emmanuelle; Goossens, Herman; Tsakris, Athanasios; Malhotra-Kumar, Surbhi

    2015-01-01

    In two pairs of clinical colistin-susceptible/colistin-resistant (Csts/Cstr) Acinetobacter baumannii strains, the Cstr strains showed significantly decreased biofilm formation in static and dynamic assays (P < 0.001) and lower relative fitness (P < 0.05) compared with those of the Csts counterparts. The whole-genome sequencing comparison of strain pairs identified a mutation converting a stop codon to lysine (*241K) in LpsB (involved in lipopolysaccharide [LPS] synthesis) in one Cstr strain and a frameshift mutation in CarO and the loss of a 47,969-bp element containing multiple genes associated with biofilm production in the other. PMID:26666921

  15. Occurrence of an Environmental Acinetobacter baumannii Strain Similar to a Clinical Isolate in Paleosol from Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Durn, Goran; Goic-Barisic, Ivana; Kovacic, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, bacteria of the genus Acinetobacter have emerged as a leading cause of hospital-acquired infections. Outbreaks of Acinetobacter infections are considered to be caused exclusively by contamination and transmission in hospital environments. The natural habitats of clinically important multiresistant Acinetobacter spp. remain to be defined. In this paper, we report an incidental finding of a viable multidrug-resistant strain of Acinetobacter baumannii, related to clinical isolates, in acid paleosol from Croatia. The environmental isolate of A. baumannii showed 87% similarity to a clinical isolate originating from a hospital in this geographic area and was resistant to gentamicin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, ciprofloxacin, and levofloxacin. In paleosol, the isolate was able to survive a low pH (3.37), desiccation, and a high temperature (50°C). The probable source of A. baumannii in paleosol is illegally disposed waste of external origin situated in the abandoned quarry near the sampling site. The bacteria could have been leached from waste by storm water and thus infiltrated the paleosol. PMID:24584245

  16. Investigation of Metallo Beta Lactamases and Oxacilinases in Carbapenem Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Strains Isolated from Inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, M. Duygu; Çavuşlu, Şaban; Tuğrul, H. Murat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics is widespread among Acinetobacter strains. Plasmid-mediated metallo beta lactamases (MBL) are responsible for carbapenem resistance, as are oxacillinases (OXA). In recent years, MBL producing carbapenem-resistant strains have been reported in the world and in Turkey in increasing rates. In our country, besides the OXA 51-like enzyme which is inherent in A. baumannii strains, OXA 58-like and OXA 23-like carbapenemases producing strains have also been widely detected. In addition, Verona Imipenemase (VIM) and (IMP)-type MBL have been reported in some centers. Aims: The aim of our study was to investigate the presence of carbapenemases in Acinetobacter strains isolated from hospitalized patients in Edirne. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: A total of 52 imipenem-resistant A. baumannii strains isolated between January and March 2013 were investigated. The presence of MBL was described phenotypically by the combined disk diffusion test (CDDT), double disk synergy test (DDST), MBL E-test (only performed in 28 strains) and modified Hodge test. blaIMP, blaVIM, blaGIM, blaSIM, blaSPM genes and blaOXA-23, blaOXA-51, blaOXA-40, blaOXA-58 genes were investigated by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The blaNDM-1 gene was determined by PCR. Results: By modified Hodge test, 50 strains (96%) were found to be MBL positive. Positivity of MBL was 21% by both CDDT (0.1 M EDTA) and DDST. Twenty-four of 28 strains (85.7%) were positive by MBL E-test. OXA 23-like and OXA 51-like carbapenemases were detected in all strains, but OXA 58-like and OXA 40-like carbapenemases-producing A. baumannii were not detected. Also, MBL genes were not detected by genotypic methods. Conclusion: Only OXA 23-like carbapenemase was responsible for carbapenem resistance in carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter strains in Edirne. The MBL-producing Acinetobacter strain is not yet a problem in our hospital. MBL resistance was found by

  17. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Extensively Drug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Strains Isolated from Pus Samples

    PubMed Central

    Mahalingam, Niranjana; Manivannan, Bhavani; Jadhao, Sudhir; Mishra, Gayathri; Nilawe, Pravin

    2016-01-01

    We report the draft genomes of two extensively drug-resistant (XDR) Acinetobacter baumannii strains isolated from pus samples of two patients with surgical site infections at Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Medical Sciences, Prasanthigram, India. The average genomic size and G+C content are 4 Mbp and 38.96% (AB28) and 4 Mbp and 38.94% (AB30), respectively. PMID:27013044

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Ammonia-Producing Acinetobacter sp. Strain MCC2139 from Dairy Effluent

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Debasmita; Thakur, Ashoke Ranjan

    2013-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of an ammonia-producing, esculin-hydrolyzing, catalase-positive, gram-negative bacterium, Acinetobacter sp. strain MCC2139. This bacterium, isolated from dairy sludge and with optimum growth at 37°C, has a genome size of 2,967,280 bp with a G+C content of 42.3%. PMID:23814111

  19. Fatty aldehyde dehydrogenases in Acinetobacter sp. strain HO1-N: role in hexadecane and hexadecanol metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, M.E.; Finnerty, W.R.

    1985-12-01

    The role of fatty aldehyde dehydrogenases (FALDHs) in hexadecane and hexadecanol metabolism was studied in Acinetobacter sp. strain HO1-N. Two distinct FALDHs were demonstrated in Acinetobacter sp. strain HO1-N: (i) a membrane-bound, NADP-dependent FALDH activity induced 5-, 15-, and 9 fold by growth on hexadecanol, dodecyl aldehyde, and hexadecane, respectively, and (ii) a constitutive, NAD-dependent, membrane-localized FALDH. Dodecyl aldehyde-negative mutants were isolated and grouped into two phenotypic classes based on growth: class 1 mutants were hexadecane and hexadecanol negative and class 2 mutants were hexadecane and hexadecanol positive. Specific activity of NADP-dependent FALDH in Ald21 (class 1 mutant) was 85% lower than that of wild-type FALDH, while the specific activity of Ald24 (class 2 mutant) was 55% greater than that of wild-type FALDH. Ald21R, a dodecyl aldehyde-positive revertant able to grow on hexadecane, hexadecanol, and dodecyl aldehyde, exhibited a 100% increase in the specific activity of the NADP-dependent FALDH. This study provides genetic and physiological evidence for the role of fatty aldehyde as an essential metabolic intermediate and NADP-dependent FALDH as a key enzyme in the dissimilation of hexadecane, hexadecanol, and dodecyl aldehyde in Acinetobacter sp. strain HO1-N.

  20. A Taxonomically Unique Acinetobacter Strain with Proteolytic and Hemolytic Activities Recovered from a Patient with a Soft Tissue Injury

    PubMed Central

    Almuzara, Marisa; Traglia, German Matías; Krizova, Lenka; Barberis, Claudia; Montaña, Sabrina; Bakai, Romina; Tuduri, Alicia; Vay, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    A taxonomically unique bacterial strain, Acinetobacter sp. A47, has been recovered from several soft tissue samples from a patient undergoing reconstructive surgery owing to a traumatic amputation. The results of 16S rRNA, rpoB, and gyrB gene comparative sequence analyses showed that A47 does not belong to any of the hitherto-known taxa and may represent an as-yet-unknown Acinetobacter species. The recognition of this novel organism contributes to our knowledge of the taxonomic complexity underlying infections caused by Acinetobacter. PMID:25392359

  1. Screening of Herbal-Based Bioactive Extract Against Carbapenem-Resistant Strain of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Monalisa; Roy, Ranita; Tiwari, Vishvanath

    2016-07-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is grouped in the ESKAPE pathogens by Infectious Disease Society of America, which is linked to high degree of morbidity, mortality, and increased costs. The high level of acquired and intrinsic resistance mechanisms of these bacteria makes it an urgent requirement to find a suitable alternative to carbapenem, a commonly prescribed drug for Acinetobacter infection. In this study, methanolic extracts of six medicinal plants were subjected to phytochemical screening and their antimicrobial activity was tested against two strains of A. baumannii (ATCC 19606, carbapenem-sensitive strain, and RS 307, carbapenem-resistant strain). Synergistic effect of the plant extracts and antibiotics was also tested. Bael or Aegle marmelos contains tannin, phenol, terpenoids, glycoside, alkaloids, coumarine, steroid, and quinones. Flowers of madar or Calotropis procera possess tannin, phenol, terpenoids, glycoside, quinone, anthraquinone, anthocyanin, coumarin, and steroid. An inhibitory growth curve was seen for both the bacterial strains when treated with A. marmelos, Curcuma longa, and leaves and flowers of C. procera. Antibiotics alone showed a small zone of inhibition, but when used with herbal extracts they exhibited larger zone of inhibition. Synergistic effect of A. marmelos and imipenem was the best against both the strains of A. baumannii. From this study, it can be concluded that extracts from A. marmelos and leaves and flowers of C. procera exhibited the most effective antibacterial activity. These herbal extracts may be used to screen the bioactive compound against the carbapenem-resistant strain of A. baumannii. PMID:26910023

  2. [Evaluation of the efficacy of colistin/sulbactam combination on carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strains].

    PubMed

    Çetinkol, Yeliz; Telli, Murat; Altunçekiç Yıldırım, Arzu; Çalgın, Mustafa Kerem

    2016-07-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii strains, are opportunistic pathogens that cause severe nosocomial infections that are difficult to treat due to development of resistance to multiple antibiotics. As the antibiotic choices to be used in treatment are limited, combinations of a variety of antibiotics are used. The aims of this study were to identify the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of colistin and sulbactam against A.baumannii isolates and to determine the in vitro activity of colistin-sulbactam combination. A total of 50 A.baumannii strains isolated from different clinical specimens (32 tracheal aspirates, 10 blood, 6 urine and 2 wound samples) were included in the study. The identification of bacteria was performed by traditional methods and Vitek-2 (BioMerieux, France) automated system. Antibiotic susceptibilities were detected by Mueller-Hinton agar disk diffusion method and Vitek-2 automated system and the results were interpreted according to the CLSI standards. MIC values of colistin and sulbactam against A.baumannii strains and in vitro interactions of colistin-sulbactam combinations were determined with the E-test (BioMerieux, France). Fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) index was used for the detection of efficacy of drug combinations. The presence of oxacillinase and metallo-beta-lactamase (MBL) genes that lead carbapenem resistance was investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was performed for the determination of clonal relationship. In our study, all strains (100%) were detected as susceptible to colistin, 48 (96%) to trimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole and 18 to (36%) tigecyclin; however all of them were resistant to the other studied antibiotics, including sulbactam and carbapenem. When the colistin-sulbactam combination was assessed according to FIC index, all strains were found to have antagonistic effect. All of the carbapenem-resistant strains were positive for OXA-51 and OXA-23, and 3

  3. Biodegradation of Phenol by Bacteria Strain Acinetobacter Calcoaceticus PA Isolated from Phenolic Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenghui; Xie, Wenyu; Li, Dehao; Peng, Yang; Li, Zesheng; Liu, Shusi

    2016-01-01

    A phenol-degrading bacterium strain PA was successfully isolated from the effluent of petrochemical wastewater. Based on its morphological, physiological and biochemical characteristics, the strain PA was characterized as a Gram-negative, strictly aerobic, nonmotile and short rod-shaped bacterium that utilizes phenol as a sole carbon and energy source. 16S rDNA sequence analysis revealed that this strain is affiliated to Acinetobacter calcoaceticus in the group of Gammaproteobacteria. The strain was efficient in removing 91.6% of the initial 800 mg∙L−1 phenol within 48 h, and had a tolerance of phenol concentration as high as 1700 mg∙L−1. These results indicated that A. calcoaceticus possesses a promising potential in treating phenolic wastewater. PMID:27005648

  4. Diversity and Evolution of AbaR Genomic Resistance Islands in Acinetobacter baumannii Strains of European Clone I▿†

    PubMed Central

    Krizova, Lenka; Dijkshoorn, Lenie; Nemec, Alexandr

    2011-01-01

    To assess the diversity of AbaR genomic resistance islands in Acinetobacter baumannii European clone I (MLST clonal complex 1), we investigated 26 multidrug-resistant strains of this major clone isolated from hospitals in 21 cities of 10 European countries between 1984 and 2005. Each strain harbored an AbaR structure integrated at the same position in the chromosomal ATPase gene. AbaR3, including four subtypes based on variations in class 1 integron cassettes, and AbaR10 were found in 15 and 2 strains, respectively, whereas a new, unique AbaR variant was discovered in each of the other 9 strains. These new variants, designated AbaR11 to AbaR19 (19.8 kb to 57.5 kb), seem to be truncated derivatives of AbaR3, likely resulting from the deletions of its internal parts mediated by either IS26 elements (AbaR12 to AbaR19) or homologous recombination (AbaR11). AbaR3 was detected in all 10 strains isolated in 1984 to 1991, while AbaR11 to AbaR19 were carried only by strains isolated since 1997. Our results and those from previous publications suggest that AbaR3 is the original form of AbaR in European clone I, which may have provided strains of the lineage with a selective advantage facilitating their spread in European hospitals in the 1980s or before. PMID:21537009

  5. Modified CHROMagar Acinetobacter Medium for Direct Detection of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter Strains in Nasal and Rectal Swab Samples

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jacob; Kim, Taek-Kyung; Park, Min-Jeong; Kim, Han-Sung; Kim, Jae-Seok

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether CHROMagar Acinetobacter medium (CHROMagar, France) in combination with an antimicrobial supplement (modified CHROMagar Acinetobacter; CHROMagar, France) can be used for detecting and isolating multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter species (MRA) in nasal and rectal surveillance cultures. Nasal and rectal swab samples were collected from patients in an intensive care unit at a teaching hospital. The samples were used to inoculate modified CHROMagar Acinetobacter plates, which were examined after 24 and 48 hr of incubation at 37℃. Their susceptibility against the antimicrobial agents meropenem, imipenem, ciprofloxacin, and amikacin was analyzed using the Etest (bioMerieux, France). A total of 406 paired samples (406 nasal swabs and 406 rectal swabs) were obtained from 226 patients, and 120 samples (28 nasal and 28 rectal cultures, 47 nasal cultures only, and 17 rectal cultures only) yielded MRA. Seventy-five MRA isolates (18.5%) were recovered from the 406 nasal samples, and 45 MRA isolates (11.1%) were recovered from the 406 rectal samples. Of the 120 MRA isolates, 3 (2.5%) were detected only after 48 hr of incubation. The use of modified CHROMagar Acinetobacter together with nasal and rectal swabs and 1-day incubation is an effective surveillance tool for detecting MRA colonization. PMID:23667846

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus Strain P23, a Plant Growth-Promoting Bacterium of Duckweed

    PubMed Central

    Hosoyama, Akira; Yamazoe, Atsushi; Morikawa, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter calcoaceticus strain P23 is a plant growth-promoting bacterium, which was isolated from the surface of duckweed. We report here the draft genome sequence of strain P23. The genome data will serve as a valuable reference for understanding the molecular mechanism of plant growth promotion in aquatic plants. PMID:25720680

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus Strain P23, a Plant Growth-Promoting Bacterium of Duckweed.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Masayuki; Hosoyama, Akira; Yamazoe, Atsushi; Morikawa, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter calcoaceticus strain P23 is a plant growth-promoting bacterium, which was isolated from the surface of duckweed. We report here the draft genome sequence of strain P23. The genome data will serve as a valuable reference for understanding the molecular mechanism of plant growth promotion in aquatic plants. PMID:25720680

  8. Genome sequence of Acinetobacter sp. strain HA, isolated from the gut of the polyphagous insect pest Helicoverpa armigera.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Jaya; Dua, Ankita; Saxena, Anjali; Sangwan, Naseer; Mukherjee, Udita; Pandey, Neeti; Rajagopal, Raman; Khurana, Paramjit; Khurana, Jitendra P; Lal, Rup

    2012-09-01

    In this study, Acinetobacter sp. strain HA was isolated from the midgut of a fifth-instar larva of Helicoverpa armigera. Here, we report the draft genome sequence (3,125,085 bp) of this strain that consists of 102 contigs, 2,911 predicted coding sequences, and a G+C content of 41%. PMID:22933775

  9. Genome Sequence of Acinetobacter sp. Strain HA, Isolated from the Gut of the Polyphagous Insect Pest Helicoverpa armigera

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Jaya; Dua, Ankita; Saxena, Anjali; Sangwan, Naseer; Mukherjee, Udita; Pandey, Neeti; Rajagopal, Raman; Khurana, Paramjit; Khurana, Jitendra P.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, Acinetobacter sp. strain HA was isolated from the midgut of a fifth-instar larva of Helicoverpa armigera. Here, we report the draft genome sequence (3,125,085 bp) of this strain that consists of 102 contigs, 2,911 predicted coding sequences, and a G+C content of 41%. PMID:22933775

  10. [Distribution of blaOXA genes in Acinetobacter baumannii strains: a multicenter study].

    PubMed

    Ciftci, Ihsan Hakkı; Aşık, Gülşah; Karakeçe, Engin; Oksüz, Lütfiye; Yağcı, Server; Sesli Çetin, Emel; Ozdemir, Mehmet; Atasoy, Ali Rıza; Koçoğlu, Esra; Gül, Mustafa; Kurtoğlu, Muhammet Güzel; Köksal Çakırlar, Fatma; Seyrek, Adnan; Berktaş, Mustafa; Gültepe, Bilge; Ayyildiz, Ahmet

    2013-10-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is the most important agent of nosocomial infections within the Acinetobacter genus. This gram-negative coccobacillus is intrinsically resistant to many antibiotics used in antimicrobial therapy, and capable of developing resistance including carbapenems. The objective of this study was to develop a multiplex real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) kit for OXA subgroups in A.baumannii, and to investigate the distribution of OXA subgroups in A.baumannii strains isolated from geographically different regions of Turkey. A total of 834 A.baumannii clinical isolates collected from different state and university medical centers in 13 provinces (Afyonkarahisar, Ankara, Bolu, Elazig, Erzurum, Isparta, Istanbul, Kahramanmaras, Konya, Sakarya, Van) between 2008-2011, were included in the study. The isolates were identified by conventional methods and automated systems [Vitek2 (bioMerieux, ABD) and Phoenix (BD Diagnostic, MD)]. The susceptibility profiles of the isolates were studied with automated systems and standard disc diffusion method. All samples were subjected to qPCR to detect blaOXA-51-like, blaOXA-23-like and blaOXA-58-like genes. A conventional PCR method was also used to detect blaOXA-24-like gene. The resistance rates observed during the study period were as follows: 96.8% for amoxicillin-clavulanate, 86.8% for ciprofloxacin, 74.7% for gentamicin, 71.7% for amikacin, 73.5% for cefaperozone-sulbactam, 72.1% for imipenem and 73% for meropenem. Six hundred and two (72.2 %) isolates were resistant to both imipenem and meropenem. Colistin was found to be the most effective antibiotic against A.baumannii isolates with 100% susceptibility rate. All isolates were positive for blaOXA-51-like, however blaOXA-24-like gene could not be demonstrated in any isolate. Total positivity rates of blaOXA-23-like and blaOXA-58-like genes were found as 53.7% and 12.5%, respectively, while these rates were 74.4% and 17.3% in carbapenem-resistant isolates

  11. Draft genome sequence of Acinetobacter baumannii strain NCTC 13423, a multidrug-resistant clinical isolate.

    PubMed

    Michiels, Joran E; Van den Bergh, Bram; Fauvart, Maarten; Michiels, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a pathogen that is becoming increasingly important and causes serious hospital-acquired infections. We sequenced the genome of A. baumannii NCTC 13423, a multidrug-resistant strain belonging to the international clone II group, isolated from a human infection in the United Kingdom in 2003. The 3,937,944 bp draft genome has a GC-content of 39.0 % and a total of 3672 predicted protein-coding sequences. The availability of genome sequences of multidrug-resistant A. baumannii isolates will fuel comparative genomic studies to help understand the worrying spread of multidrug resistance in this pathogen. PMID:27594976

  12. Outbreak of extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii indigo-pigmented strains.

    PubMed

    Vilacoba, Elisabet; Almuzara, Marisa; Gulone, Lucia; Rodriguez, Rocio; Pallone, Elida; Bakai, Romina; Centrón, Daniela; Ramírez, María Soledad

    2013-11-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii pigmented strains are not common in clinical settings. Here, we report an outbreak caused by indigo-pigmented A. baumannii strains isolated in an acute care hospital in Argentina from March to September 2012. Pan-PCR assays exposed a unique pattern belonging to the recently described regional CC113(B)/CC79(P) clonal complex that confirms the relevant relationships among the indigo-pigmented A. baumannii strains. All of them were extensively drug resistant and harbored different genetic elements associated with horizontal genetic transfer, such as the transposon Tn2006, class 2 integrons, AbaR-type islands, IS125, IS26, strA, strB, florR, and the small recombinase ISCR2 associated with the sul2 gene preceded by ISAba1. PMID:23985923

  13. Growth of Acinetobacter sp. strain HO1-N on n-hexadecanol: physiological and ultrastructural characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, M.E.; Tyler, S.M.; Finnerty, W.R.

    1985-04-01

    The growth of Acinetobacter sp. strain HO1-N on hexadecanol results in the formation of intracytoplasmic membranes and intracellular rectangular inclusions containing one of the end products of hexadecanol metabolism, hexadecyl palmitate. The intracellular inclusions were purified and characterized as wax ester inclusions consisting of 85.6% hexadecyl palmitate, 4.8% hexadecanol, and 9.6% phospholipid, with a phospholipid-to-protein ratio of 0.42 ..mu..mol of lipid phosphate per mg of inclusion protein. The cellular lipids consisted of 69.8% hexadecyl palmitate, 22.8% phospholipid, 1.9% triglyceride, 4.7% mono- and diglyceride, 0.1% free fatty acid, and 0.8% hexadecanol, as compared with 98% hexadecyl palmitate and 1.9% triglyceride, which comprised the extracellular lipids. Cell-associated hexadecanol represented 0.05% of the exogenously supplied hexadecanol, with hexadecyl palmitate accounting for 14.7% of the total cellular dry weight. Acinetobacter sp. strain HO1-N possesses a mechanism for the intracellular packaging of hexadecyl palmitate in wax ester inclusions, which differ in structure and chemical composition from hydrocarbon inclusions isolated from hexadecane-grown cells.

  14. NDM-1-producing Acinetobacter baumannii ST85 now in Turkey, including one isolate from a Syrian refugee.

    PubMed

    Heydari, Farzad; Mammina, Caterina; Koksal, Fatih

    2015-09-01

    New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase-1 (NDM-1), an acquired class B carbapenemase, is a significant clinical threat owing to the extended hydrolysis of β-lactams including carbapenems. Here, to the best of our knowledge we describe for the first time in Turkey two NDM-1-producing Acinetobacter baumannii isolates recovered from intensive care unit patients. The presence of blaNDM-1 was detected by PCR and confirmed by sequencing. The clonal relationship was assessed by PFGE and multilocus sequence typing. Both isolates were positive for blaNDM-1 and were attributed with the sequence type 85. One isolate was from a Syrian refugee, whereas the second was from a patient who had never travelled outside Turkey. Our findings confirmed that the rapid spread of NDM-1-producing Gram-negative organisms could become a major challenge for the treatment and control of healthcare-associated infections in our geographical area. They suggest also that NDM-1-producing strains and/or their genetic determinants are probably being imported from Syria to neighbouring countries. PMID:26296677

  15. Indigoids Biosynthesis from Indole by Two Phenol-Degrading Strains, Pseudomonas sp. PI1 and Acinetobacter sp. PI2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Zhang, Xuwang; Fan, Jiangli; Zhang, Zhaojing; Ma, Qiao; Peng, Xiaojun

    2015-07-01

    In this study, two phenol-degrading bacterial strains, designated as PI1 and PI2, were isolated from activated sludge for the production of indigoids from indole. According to the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequence analysis, strains PI1 and PI2 were identified as Pseudomonas sp. and Acinetobacter sp., respectively. Liquid chromatography/time-of-flight/mass spectrometry (LC/TOF/MS) was applied to analyze the metabolites during the biotransformation of indole by the phenol-degrading strains. The results indicated that both strains could catalyze the formation of four indigoids with the same prominent molecular ion (M-H)(-) peak at m/z 261.067 and molecular formula of C16H10N2O2, including indigo and a purple product, 2-(7-oxo-1H-indol-6(7H)-ylidene) indolin-3-one. Isatin and 7-hydroxyindole were detected as the intermediates. Thus, the possible pathways for the production of indigoids from indole were proposed. Subsequently, the optimal conditions for the production of indigo from indole were determined using response surface methodology, and 11.82 ± 0.30 and 17.19 ± 0.49 mg/L indigo were produced by strains PI1 and PI2, respectively. The present study should provide potential candidates for microbial production of indigoids. PMID:25926013

  16. Unravelling the genome of long chain N-acylhomoserine lactone-producing Acinetobacter sp. strain GG2 and identification of its quorum sensing synthase gene

    PubMed Central

    How, Kah Yan; Hong, Kar-Wai; Sam, Choon-Kook; Koh, Chong-Lek; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2015-01-01

    Myriad proteobacteria use N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) molecules as quorum sensing (QS) signals to regulate different physiological functions, including virulence, antibiotic production, and biofilm formation. Many of these proteobacteria possess LuxI/LuxR system as the QS mechanism. Recently, we reported the 3.89 Mb genome of Acinetobacter sp. strain GG2. In this work, the genome of this long chain AHL-producing bacterium was unravelled which led to the molecular characterization of luxI homologue, designated as aciI. This 552 bp gene was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The purified protein was ∼20.5 kDa and is highly similar to several autoinducer proteins of LuxI family among Acinetobacter species. To verify the AHL synthesis activity of this protein, high-resolution liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry analysis revealed the production of 3-oxo-dodecanoyl-homoserine lactone and 3-hydroxy-dodecanoyl-homoserine lactone from induced E. coli harboring the recombinant AciI. Our data show for the first time, the cloning and characterization of the luxI homologue from Acinetobacter sp. strain GG2, and confirmation of its AHLs production. These data are of great significance as the annotated genome of strain GG2 has provided a valuable insight in the study of autoinducer molecules and its roles in QS mechanism of the bacterium. PMID:25926817

  17. Draft Genome Sequences of Seven Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Strains, Isolated from Respiratory Samples in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Labrador-Herrera, Gema; Álvarez, Rocío; López-Rojas, Rafael; Smani, Younes; Cebrero-Cangueiro, Tania; Rueda, Antonio; Pérez Florido, Javier; Pachón-Ibáñez, María Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    The draft genome sequences of seven multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii clinical strains belonging to sequence types ST-208 and ST-218 are reported in this study. They were isolated from tracheobronchial aspirate of mechanically ventilated adult patients admitted to the intensive care unit of a Spanish tertiary hospital during 2010 to 2011. PMID:27034482

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Extensively Drug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Strain CUAB1 from a Patient in Hong Kong, China

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Alden King-Yung; Lau, Hiuus Hiu-Yu; Chan, Ting-Fung; Ip, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of an extensively drug-resistant strain of Acinetobacter baumannii, CUAB1, isolated from a patient in a local Hong Kong hospital. MIC testing was performed, and genes previously associated with drug resistance were located. PMID:25977429

  19. The Genetic Analysis of an Acinetobacter johnsonii Clinical Strain Evidenced the Presence of Horizontal Genetic Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Montaña, Sabrina; Schramm, Sareda T. J.; Traglia, German Matías; Chiem, Kevin; Parmeciano Di Noto, Gisela; Almuzara, Marisa; Barberis, Claudia; Vay, Carlos; Quiroga, Cecilia; Tolmasky, Marcelo E.; Iriarte, Andrés; Ramírez, María Soledad

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter johnsonii rarely causes human infections. While most A. johnsonii isolates are susceptible to virtually all antibiotics, strains harboring a variety of β-lactamases have recently been described. An A. johnsonii Aj2199 clinical strain recovered from a hospital in Buenos Aires produces PER-2 and OXA-58. We decided to delve into its genome by obtaining the whole genome sequence of the Aj2199 strain. Genome comparison studies on Aj2199 revealed 240 unique genes and a close relation to strain WJ10621, isolated from the urine of a patient in China. Genomic analysis showed evidence of horizontal genetic transfer (HGT) events. Forty-five insertion sequences and two intact prophages were found in addition to several resistance determinants such as blaPER-2, blaOXA-58, blaTEM-1, strA, strB, ereA, sul1, aacC2 and a new variant of blaOXA-211, called blaOXA-498. In particular, blaPER-2 and blaTEM-1 are present within the typical contexts previously described in the Enterobacteriaceae family. These results suggest that A. johnsonii actively acquires exogenous DNA from other bacterial species and concomitantly becomes a reservoir of resistance genes. PMID:27548264

  20. Synergistic Effects and Antibiofilm Properties of Chimeric Peptides against Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Strains

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Ramamourthy; Kim, Young Gwon; Lee, Jun Ho; Lee, Seog Ki; Chae, Jeong Don; Son, Byoung Kwan; Seo, Chang Ho

    2014-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of drug-resistant pathogens highlights the need to identify novel antibiotics. Here we investigated the efficacies of four new antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) for potential drug development. The antibacterial activities, synergistic effects, and antibiofilm properties of the four chimeric AMPs were tested against Acinetobacter baumannii, an emerging Gram-negative, nosocomial, drug-resistant pathogen. Nineteen A. baumannii strains resistant to ampicillin, cefotaxime, ciprofloxacin, tobramycin, and erythromycin were isolated at a hospital from patients with cholelithiasis. All four peptides exhibited significant antibacterial effects (MIC = 3.12 to 12.5 μM) against all 19 strains, whereas five commercial antibiotics showed little or no activity against the same pathogens. An exception was polymyxin, which was effective against all of the strains tested. Each of the peptides showed synergy against one or more strains when administered in combination with cefotaxime, ciprofloxacin, or erythromycin. The peptides also exhibited an ability to prevent biofilm formation, which was not seen with cefotaxime, ciprofloxacin, or erythromycin, though polymyxin also inhibited biofilm formation. Indeed, when administered in combination with ciprofloxacin, the AMP HPMA exerted a potent synergistic effect against A. baumannii biofilm formation. Collectively, our findings indicate that the AMPs tested have no cytotoxicity but possess potent antibacterial and antibiofilm activities and may act synergistically with commercial antibiotics. PMID:24366740

  1. The Genetic Analysis of an Acinetobacter johnsonii Clinical Strain Evidenced the Presence of Horizontal Genetic Transfer.

    PubMed

    Montaña, Sabrina; Schramm, Sareda T J; Traglia, German Matías; Chiem, Kevin; Parmeciano Di Noto, Gisela; Almuzara, Marisa; Barberis, Claudia; Vay, Carlos; Quiroga, Cecilia; Tolmasky, Marcelo E; Iriarte, Andrés; Ramírez, María Soledad

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter johnsonii rarely causes human infections. While most A. johnsonii isolates are susceptible to virtually all antibiotics, strains harboring a variety of β-lactamases have recently been described. An A. johnsonii Aj2199 clinical strain recovered from a hospital in Buenos Aires produces PER-2 and OXA-58. We decided to delve into its genome by obtaining the whole genome sequence of the Aj2199 strain. Genome comparison studies on Aj2199 revealed 240 unique genes and a close relation to strain WJ10621, isolated from the urine of a patient in China. Genomic analysis showed evidence of horizontal genetic transfer (HGT) events. Forty-five insertion sequences and two intact prophages were found in addition to several resistance determinants such as blaPER-2, blaOXA-58, blaTEM-1, strA, strB, ereA, sul1, aacC2 and a new variant of blaOXA-211, called blaOXA-498. In particular, blaPER-2 and blaTEM-1 are present within the typical contexts previously described in the Enterobacteriaceae family. These results suggest that A. johnsonii actively acquires exogenous DNA from other bacterial species and concomitantly becomes a reservoir of resistance genes. PMID:27548264

  2. Identification of Novel Genes Involved in Long-Chain n-Alkane Degradation by Acinetobacter sp. Strain DSM 17874▿

    PubMed Central

    Throne-Holst, Mimmi; Wentzel, Alexander; Ellingsen, Trond E.; Kotlar, Hans-Kristian; Zotchev, Sergey B.

    2007-01-01

    Acinetobacter sp. strain DSM 17874 is capable of utilizing n-alkanes with chain lengths ranging from that of decane (C10H22) to that of tetracontane (C40H82) as a sole carbon source. Two genes encoding AlkB-type alkane hydroxylase homologues, designated alkMa and alkMb, have been shown to be involved in the degradation of n-alkanes with chain lengths of from 10 to 20 C atoms in this strain. Here, we describe a novel high-throughput screening method and the screening of a transposon mutant library to identify genes involved in the degradation of n-alkanes with C chain lengths longer than 20, which are solid at 30°C, the optimal growth temperature for Acinetobacter sp. strain DSM 17874. A library consisting of approximately 6,800 Acinetobacter sp. strain DSM 17874 transposon mutants was constructed and screened for mutants unable to grow on dotriacontane (C32H66) while simultaneously showing wild-type growth characteristics on shorter-chain n-alkanes. For 23 such mutants isolated, the genes inactivated by transposon insertion were identified. Targeted inactivation and complementation studies of one of these genes, designated almA and encoding a putative flavin-binding monooxygenase, confirmed its involvement in the strain's metabolism of long-chain n-alkanes. To our knowledge, almA represents the first cloned gene shown to be involved in the bacterial degradation of long-chain n-alkanes of 32 C's and longer. Genes encoding AlmA homologues were also identified in other long-chain n-alkane-degrading Acinetobacter strains. PMID:17400787

  3. Resistance-nodulation-cell division-type efflux pump involved in aminoglycoside resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii strain BM4454.

    PubMed

    Magnet, S; Courvalin, P; Lambert, T

    2001-12-01

    Multidrug-resistant strain Acinetobacter baumannii BM4454 was isolated from a patient with a urinary tract infection. The adeB gene, which encodes a resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) protein, was detected in this strain by PCR with two degenerate oligodeoxynucleotides. Insertional inactivation of adeB in BM4454, which generated BM4454-1, showed that the corresponding protein was responsible for aminoglycoside resistance and was involved in the level of susceptibility to other drugs including fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, chloramphenicol, erythromycin, trimethoprim, and ethidium bromide. Study of ethidium bromide accumulation in BM4454 and BM4454-1, in the presence or in the absence of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, demonstrated that AdeB was responsible for the decrease in intracellular ethidium bromide levels in a proton motive force-dependent manner. The adeB gene was part of a cluster that included adeA and adeC which encodes proteins homologous to membrane fusion and outer membrane proteins of RND-type three-component efflux systems, respectively. The products of two upstream open reading frames encoding a putative two-component regulatory system might be involved in the regulation of expression of the adeABC gene cluster. PMID:11709311

  4. Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division-Type Efflux Pump Involved in Aminoglycoside Resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii Strain BM4454

    PubMed Central

    Magnet, Sophie; Courvalin, Patrice; Lambert, Thierry

    2001-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant strain Acinetobacter baumannii BM4454 was isolated from a patient with a urinary tract infection. The adeB gene, which encodes a resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) protein, was detected in this strain by PCR with two degenerate oligodeoxynucleotides. Insertional inactivation of adeB in BM4454, which generated BM4454-1, showed that the corresponding protein was responsible for aminoglycoside resistance and was involved in the level of susceptibility to other drugs including fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, chloramphenicol, erythromycin, trimethoprim, and ethidium bromide. Study of ethidium bromide accumulation in BM4454 and BM4454-1, in the presence or in the absence of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, demonstrated that AdeB was responsible for the decrease in intracellular ethidium bromide levels in a proton motive force-dependent manner. The adeB gene was part of a cluster that included adeA and adeC which encodes proteins homologous to membrane fusion and outer membrane proteins of RND-type three-component efflux systems, respectively. The products of two upstream open reading frames encoding a putative two-component regulatory system might be involved in the regulation of expression of the adeABC gene cluster. PMID:11709311

  5. Resistance Markers and Genetic Diversity in Acinetobacter baumannii Strains Recovered from Nosocomial Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Hanoch S. I.; Bomfim, Maria Rosa Q.; França, Rafaela O.; Farias, Luiz M.; Carvalho, Maria Auxiliadora R.; Serufo, José Carlos; Santos, Simone G.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, phenotypic and genotypic methods were used to detect metallo-β-lactamases, cephalosporinases and oxacillinases and to assess genetic diversity among 64 multiresistant Acinetobacter baumannii strains recovered from blood cultures in five different hospitals in Brazil from December 2008 to June 2009. High rates of resistance to imipenem (93.75%) and polymyxin B (39.06%) were observed using the disk diffusion (DD) method and by determining the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Using the disk approximation method, thirty-nine strains (60.9%) were phenotypically positive for class D enzymes, and 51 strains (79.6%) were positive for cephalosporinase (AmpC). Using the E-test, 60 strains (93.75%) were positive for metallo-β-lactamases (MβLs). All strains were positive for at least one of the 10 studied genes; 59 (92.1%) contained blaVIM-1, 79.6% contained blaAmpC, 93.7% contained blaOXA23 and 84.3% contained blaOXA51. Enterobacteria Repetitive Intergenic Consensus (ERIC)-PCR analysis revealed a predominance of certain clones that differed from each other. However, the same band pattern was observed in samples from the different hospitals studied, demonstrating correlation between the genotypic and phenotypic results. Thus, ERIC-PCR is an appropriate method for rapidly clustering genetically related isolates. These results suggest that defined clonal clusters are circulating within the studied hospitals. These results also show that the prevalence of MDR A. baumannii may vary among clones disseminated in specific hospitals, and they emphasize the importance of adhering to appropriate infection control measures. PMID:24477210

  6. Alcohol dehydrogenases in Acinetobacter sp. strain HO1-N: role in hexadecanse and hexadecanol metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, M.E.; Finnerty, W.R.

    1985-12-01

    Multiple alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH) were demonstrated in Acinetobacter sp. strain HO1-N. ADH-A and ADH-B were distinguished on the basis of electrophoretic mobility, pyridine nucleotide cofactor requirement, and substrate specificity. ADH-A is a soluble, NAD-linked, inducible ethanol dehydrogenase (EDH). An ethanol-negative mutant (Eth1) was isolated which contained 6.5% of wild-type EDH activity and was deficient in ADH-A. Eth1 exhibited normal growth on hexadecane and hexadecanol. A second ethanol-negative mutant (Eth3) was acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) deficient, having 12.5% of wild-type ALDH activity. Eth3 had threefold-higher EDH activity than the wild-type strain. ALDH is a soluble, NAD-linked, ethanol-inducible enzyme. Eth3 exhibited normal growth on hexadecane, hexadecanol, and fatty aldehyde. ADH-B is soluble, constitutive, NADP-linked ADH which was active with medium-chain-length alcohols. Hexadecanol dehydrogenase (HDH), a soluble and membrane-bound, NAD-linked ADH, was induced 5- to 11-fold by growth on hexadecane or hexadecanol. HDH was distinct from ADH-A and ADH-B. NAD-linked HDH appears to possess a functional role in hexadecane and hexadecanol dissimilation.

  7. Spreading of AbaR-type genomic islands in multidrug resistance Acinetobacter baumannii strains belonging to different clonal complexes.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, María Soledad; Vilacoba, Elisabet; Stietz, María Silvina; Merkier, Andrea Karina; Jeric, Paola; Limansky, Adriana S; Márquez, Carolina; Bello, Helia; Catalano, Mariana; Centrón, Daniela

    2013-07-01

    In order to determine the occurrence of AbaR-type genomic island in multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDRAb) strains circulating in Argentina, Uruguay, and Chile, we studied 51 MDRAb isolates recovered from several hospitals over 30 years. AbaR-type genomic resistance islands were found in 36 MDRAb isolates since 1986 till now. MLST technique allowed us to identify the presence of four different Clonal Complexes (109, 104, 119, 113) among the positive AbaR-type island positive strains. This is the first description of AbaR-type islands in the CC104 and CC113 that are the most widespread Clonal Complexes in Argentina. In addition, PCR mapping exposed different arrays to those previously described, evidencing the plasticity of this island. Our results evidence a widespread distribution of the AbaR-type genomic islands along the time in the MDRAb population, including the epidemic global clone 1 (GC1) as well as different clonal complexes to those already described in the literature. PMID:23397241

  8. Draft Genome Sequences of Acinetobacter baumannii Strains Harboring the blaNDM-1 Gene Isolated in Lebanon from Civilians Wounded during the Syrian Civil War

    PubMed Central

    Eisen, Jonathan A.; Jospin, Guillaume; Hamze, Monzer; Rafei, Rayane; Salloum, Tamara; Ibrahim, Joe; Coil, David A.

    2016-01-01

    We present here the draft genome sequences of multidrug-resistant blaNDM-1-positive Acinetobacter baumannii strains ACMH-6200 and ACMH-6201, isolated in north Lebanon from civilians wounded during the Syrian civil war. The draft genomes were contained in 217 contigs for ACMH-6200 and 83 contigs for ACMH-6201, including a combined 3,997,237 bases for ACMH-6200 and 3,983,110 bases for ACMH-6201, with 39% and 38.9% G+C content, respectively. PMID:26823599

  9. Draft Genome Sequences of Acinetobacter baumannii Strains Harboring the blaNDM-1 Gene Isolated in Lebanon from Civilians Wounded during the Syrian Civil War.

    PubMed

    Tokajian, Sima; Eisen, Jonathan A; Jospin, Guillaume; Hamze, Monzer; Rafei, Rayane; Salloum, Tamara; Ibrahim, Joe; Coil, David A

    2016-01-01

    We present here the draft genome sequences of multidrug-resistant blaNDM-1-positive Acinetobacter baumannii strains ACMH-6200 and ACMH-6201, isolated in north Lebanon from civilians wounded during the Syrian civil war. The draft genomes were contained in 217 contigs for ACMH-6200 and 83 contigs for ACMH-6201, including a combined 3,997,237 bases for ACMH-6200 and 3,983,110 bases for ACMH-6201, with 39% and 38.9% G+C content, respectively. PMID:26823599

  10. Isolation and genetic characterization of metallo-β-lactamase and carbapenamase producing strains of Acinetobacter baumannii from patients at Tehran hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Shahcheraghi, F; Abbasalipour, M; Feizabadi, MM; Ebrahimipour, GH; Akbari, N

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objective Carbapenems are therapeutic choice against infections caused by gram-negative bacilli including strains of Acinetobacter baumannii. Resistance to these antibiotics is mediated by efflux pumps, porins, PBPs and ß-lactamases. The aim of this study was to determine the possibility of existence of MBLs, OXAs and GES-1 betalactamase genes among clinical isolates of Acinetobacter collected from Tehran hospitals. Material and Methods Two hundred and three Acinetobacter isolates were collected from patient at Tehran hospitals. The isolates were identified using biochemical tests. The susceptibility to different antibiotics was evaluated by disk diffusion method and MICs of imipenem were determined using Micro broth dilution method (CLSI). PCR was performed for detection of bla VIM-2, bla SPM-1, bla IMP-2, bla GES-1, bla OXA-51, bla OXA-23 betalactamase genes. Clonal relatedness was estimated by PFGE with the restriction enzyme SmaI. Results and Conclusion Of 100 isolates of imipenem resistant Acinetobacter spp. collected from Tehran hospitals in 2009 and 2010, 6 isolates produced metallo-beta-lactamases and 94 isolates produced OXA-type carbapenemase. The bla SPM-1, bla GES-1, bla OXA-51, bla OXA-23 genes were detected by PCR among 6, 2, 94 and 84 isolates of A. baumannii, respectively. The MICs of isolates to imipenem were 8–128 µg/mL. PFGE analysis of 29 bla OXA-51 and bla OXA-23-positive A. baumannii isolates gave 6 different patterns. This is the first report of SPM-1 and GES-1 beta-lactamase producing A. baumannii. Production of the OXA-23, OXA-51, GES-1 and SPM-1 enzyme presents an emerging threat of carbapenem resistance among A. baumannii in Iran. PMID:22347585

  11. Acinetobacter strains IH9 and OCI1, two rhizospheric phosphate solubilizing isolates able to promote plant growth, constitute a new genomovar of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus.

    PubMed

    Peix, Alvaro; Lang, Elke; Verbarg, Susanne; Spröer, Cathrin; Rivas, Raúl; Santa-Regina, Ignacio; Mateos, Pedro F; Martínez-Molina, Eustoquio; Rodríguez-Barrueco, Claudino; Velázquez, Encarna

    2009-08-01

    During a screening of phosphate solubilizing bacteria (PSB) in agricultural soils, two strains, IH9 and OCI1, were isolated from the rhizosphere of grasses in Spain, and they showed a high ability to solubilize phosphate in vitro. Inoculation experiments in chickpea and barley were conducted with both strains and the results demonstrated their ability to promote plant growth. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of these strains were nearly identical to each other and to those of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus DSM 30006(T), as well as the strain CIP 70.29 representing genomospecies 3. Their phenotypic characteristics also coincided with those of strains forming the A. calcoaceticus-baumannii complex. They differed from A. calcoaceticus in the utilization of l-tartrate as a carbon source and from genomospecies 3 in the use of d-asparagine as a carbon source. The 16S-23S intergenic spacer (ITS) sequences of the two isolates showed nearly 98% identities to those of A. calcoaceticus, confirming that they belong to this phylogenetic group. However, the isolates appeared as a separate branch from the A. calcoaceticus sequences, indicating their molecular separation from other A. calcoaceticus strains. The analysis of three housekeeping genes, recA, rpoD and gyrB, confirmed that IH9 and OCI1 form a distinct lineage within A. calcoaceticus. These results were congruent with those from DNA-DNA hybridization, indicating that strains IH9 and OCI1 constitute a new genomovar for which we propose the name A. calcoaceticus genomovar rhizosphaerae. PMID:19467815

  12. Antibiotic resistance and phylogenetic characterization of Acinetobacter baumannii strains isolated from commercial raw meat in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Lupo, Agnese; Vogt, Debora; Seiffert, Salome N; Endimiani, Andrea; Perreten, Vincent

    2014-11-01

    The spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria through food has become a major public health concern because some important human pathogens may be transferred via the food chain. Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the most life-threatening gram-negative pathogens; multidrug-resistant (MDR) clones of A. baumannii are spreading worldwide, causing outbreaks in hospitals. However, the role of raw meat as a reservoir of A. baumannii remains unexplored. In this study, we describe for the first time the antibiotic susceptibility and fingerprint (repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR [rep-PCR] profile and sequence types [STs]) of A. baumannii strains found in raw meat retailed in Switzerland. Our results indicate that A. baumannii was present in 62 (25.0%) of 248 (CI 95%: 19.7 to 30.9%) meat samples analyzed between November 2012 and May 2013, with those derived from poultry being the most contaminated (48.0% [CI 95%: 37.8 to 58.3%]). Thirty-nine strains were further tested for antibiotic susceptibility and clonality. Strains were frequently not susceptible (intermediate and/or resistant) to third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins for human use (i.e., ceftriaxone [65%], cefotaxime [32%], ceftazidime [5%], and cefepime [2.5%]). Resistance to piperacillin-tazobactam, ciprofloxacin, colistin, and tetracycline was sporadically observed (2.5, 2.5, 5, and 5%, respectively), whereas resistance to carbapenems was not found. The strains were genetically very diverse from each other and belonged to 29 different STs, forming 12 singletons and 6 clonal complexes (CCs), of which 3 were new (CC277, CC360, and CC347). RepPCR analysis further distinguished some strains of the same ST. Moreover, some A. baumannii strains from meat belonged to the clonal complexes CC32 and CC79, similar to the MDR isolates responsible for human infections. In conclusion, our findings suggest that raw meat represents a reservoir of MDR A. baumannii and may serve as a vector for the spread of these pathogens

  13. A mouse model of Acinetobacter baumannii-associated pneumonia using a clinically isolated hypervirulent strain.

    PubMed

    Harris, Greg; Kuo Lee, Rhonda; Lam, Christopher K; Kanzaki, Gregory; Patel, Girishchandra B; Xu, H Howard; Chen, Wangxue

    2013-08-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important emerging pathogen in health care-acquired infections and is responsible for severe nosocomial and community-acquired pneumonia. Currently available mouse models of A. baumannii pneumonia show poor colonization with little to no extrapulmonary dissemination. Here, we describe a mouse model of A. baumannii pneumonia using a clinical isolate (LAC-4 strain) that reliably reproduces the most relevant features of human pulmonary A. baumannii infection and pathology. Using this model, we have shown that LAC-4 infection induced rapid bacterial replication in the lungs, significant extrapulmonary dissemination, and severe bacteremia by 24 h postintranasal inoculation. Infected mice showed severe bronchopneumonia and dilatation and inflammatory cell infiltration in the perivascular space. More significantly, 100% of C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice succumbed to 10(8) CFU of LAC-4 inoculation within 48 h. When this model was used to assess the efficacy of antimicrobials, all mice treated with imipenem and tigecycline survived a lethal intranasal challenge, with minimal clinical signs and body weight loss. Moreover, intranasal immunization of mice with formalin-fixed LAC-4 protected 40% of mice from a lethal (100× 100% lethal dose) intraperitoneal challenge. Thus, this model offers a reproducible acute course of A. baumannii pneumonia without requiring additional manipulation of host immune status, which will facilitate the development of therapeutic agents and vaccines against A. baumannii pneumonia in humans. PMID:23689726

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of the Multiresistant Acinetobacter baumannii Strain AbH12O-A2, Isolated during a Large Outbreak in Spain.

    PubMed

    Merino, M; Alvarez-Fraga, L; Gómez, M J; Aransay, A M; Lavín, J L; Chaves, F; Bou, G; Poza, M

    2014-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of Acinetobacter baumannii strain AbH12O-A2, isolated during a large outbreak in Spain. The genome has 3,875,775 bp and 3,526 coding sequences, with 39.4% G+C content. The availability of this genome will facilitate the study of the pathogenicity of the Acinetobacter species. PMID:25395646

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of the Multiresistant Acinetobacter baumannii Strain AbH12O-A2, Isolated during a Large Outbreak in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Merino, M.; Alvarez-Fraga, L.; Gómez, M. J.; Aransay, A. M.; Lavín, J. L.; Chaves, F.

    2014-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of Acinetobacter baumannii strain AbH12O-A2, isolated during a large outbreak in Spain. The genome has 3,875,775 bp and 3,526 coding sequences, with 39.4% G+C content. The availability of this genome will facilitate the study of the pathogenicity of the Acinetobacter species. PMID:25395646

  16. Molecular Analysis of Acinetobacter baumannii Strains Isolated in Lebanon Using Four Different Typing Methods

    PubMed Central

    Rafei, Rayane; Dabboussi, Fouad; Hamze, Monzer; Eveillard, Matthieu; Lemarié, Carole; Gaultier, Marie-Pierre; Mallat, Hassan; Moghnieh, Rima; Husni-Samaha, Rola; Joly-Guillou, Marie-Laure; Kempf, Marie

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzed 42 Acinetobacter baumannii strains collected between 2009–2012 from different hospitals in Beyrouth and North Lebanon to better understand the epidemiology and carbapenem resistance mechanisms in our collection and to compare the robustness of pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) and blaOXA-51 sequence-based typing (SBT). Among 31 carbapenem resistant strains, we have detected three carbapenem resistance genes: 28 carried the blaOXA-23 gene, 1 the blaOXA-24 gene and 2 strains the blaOXA-58 gene. This is the first detection of blaOXA-23 and blaOXA-24 in Lebanon. PFGE identified 11 types and was the most discriminating technique followed by rep-PCR (9 types), blaOXA-51 SBT (8 types) and MLST (7 types). The PFGE type A'/ST2 was the dominant genotype in our collection present in Beyrouth and North Lebanon. The clustering agreement between all techniques was measured by adjust Wallace coefficient. An overall agreement has been demonstrated. High values of adjust Wallace coefficient were found with followed combinations: PFGE to predict MLST types  = 100%, PFGE to predict blaOXA-51 SBT = 100%, blaOXA-51 SBT to predict MLST = 100%, MLST to predict blaOXA-51 SBT = 84.7%, rep-PCR to predict MLST = 81.5%, PFGE to predict rep-PCR = 69% and rep-PCR to predict blaOXA-51 SBT = 67.2%. PFGE and MLST are gold standard methods for outbreaks investigation and population structure studies respectively. Otherwise, these two techniques are technically, time and cost demanding. We recommend the use of blaOXA-51 SBT as first typing method to screen isolates and assign them to their corresponding clonal lineages. Repetitive sequence-based PCR is a rapid tool to access outbreaks but careful interpretation of results must be always performed. PMID:25541711

  17. Clonal Diversity of Nosocomial Epidemic Acinetobacter baumannii Strains Isolated in Spain▿

    PubMed Central

    Villalón, Pilar; Valdezate, Sylvia; Medina-Pascual, Maria J.; Rubio, Virginia; Vindel, Ana; Saez-Nieto, Juan A.

    2011-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the major pathogens involved in nosocomial outbreaks. The clonal diversity of 729 epidemic strains isolated from 19 Spanish hospitals (mainly from intensive care units) was analyzed over an 11-year period. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) identified 58 PFGE types that were subjected to susceptibility testing, rpoB gene sequencing, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). All PFGE types were multidrug resistant; colistin was the only agent to which all pathogens were susceptible. The 58 PFGE types were grouped into 16 clones based on their genetic similarity (cutoff of 80%). These clones were distributed into one major cluster (cluster D), three medium clusters (clusters A, B, and C), and three minor clusters (clusters E, F, and G). The rpoB gene sequencing and MLST results reflected a clonal distribution, in agreement with the PFGE results. The MLST sequence types (STs) (and their percent distributions) were as follows: ST-2 (47.5%), ST-3 (5.1%), ST-15 (1.7%), ST-32 (1.7%), ST-79 (13.6%), ST-80 (20.3%), and ST-81 (10.2%). ST-79, ST-80, and ST-81 and the alleles cpn60-26 and recA29 are described for the first time. International clones I, II, and III were represented by ST-81, ST-2, and ST-3, respectively. ST-79 and ST-80 could be novel emerging clones. This work confirms PFGE and MLST to be complementary tools in clonality studies. Here PFGE was able to demonstrate the monoclonal pattern of most outbreaks, the inter- and intrahospital transmission of bacteria, and their endemic persistence in some wards. MLST allowed the temporal evolution and spatial distribution of Spanish clones to be monitored and permitted international comparisons to be made. PMID:21177889

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of the Mercury-Resistant Bacterium Acinetobacter idrijaensis Strain MII, Isolated from a Mine-Impacted Area, Idrija, Slovenia

    PubMed Central

    Caballero Pérez, Juan; Cruz Medina, Julio Alfonso; Molina Vera, Carlos; Salas Rosas, Luz María; Limpens Gutiérrez, Citlalli; García Salinas, Isaac; Hernández Ramírez, Miriam Rebeca; Soto Alonso, Gerardo; Cruz Hernández, Andrés; Saldaña Gutiérrez, Carlos; Romero Gómez, Sergio; Pastrana Martínez, Xóchitl; Álvarez Hidalgo, Erika; Gosar, Mateja; Dizdarevič, Tatjana

    2014-01-01

    We report here the first draft assembly for the genome of Acinetobacter idrijaensis strain MII, isolated from the Idrija mercury mine area (Slovenia). This strain shows a strikingly high tolerance to mercury, and the genome sequence shows genes involved in the mechanisms for heavy metal tolerance pathways and multidrug efflux pumps. PMID:25395645

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Acinetobacter bereziniae HPC229, a Carbapenem-Resistant Clinical Strain from Argentina Harboring blaNDM-1.

    PubMed

    Brovedan, Marco; Marchiaro, Patricia M; Morán-Barrio, Jorgelina; Revale, Santiago; Cameranesi, Marcela; Brambilla, Luciano; Viale, Alejandro M; Limansky, Adriana S

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of an NDM-1-producing Acinetobacter bereziniae clinical strain, HPC229. This strain harbors both plasmid and chromosomal resistance determinants toward different β-lactams and aminoglycosides as well as several types of multidrug efflux pumps, most likely representing an adaptation strategy for survival under different environments. PMID:26966220

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Acinetobacter bereziniae HPC229, a Carbapenem-Resistant Clinical Strain from Argentina Harboring blaNDM-1

    PubMed Central

    Brovedan, Marco; Marchiaro, Patricia M.; Morán-Barrio, Jorgelina; Revale, Santiago; Cameranesi, Marcela; Brambilla, Luciano; Viale, Alejandro M.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of an NDM-1-producing Acinetobacter bereziniae clinical strain, HPC229. This strain harbors both plasmid and chromosomal resistance determinants toward different β-lactams and aminoglycosides as well as several types of multidrug efflux pumps, most likely representing an adaptation strategy for survival under different environments. PMID:26966220

  1. Activity of Eravacycline against Enterobacteriaceae and Acinetobacter baumannii, Including Multidrug-Resistant Isolates, from New York City

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Marie; Olafisoye, Olawole; Cortes, Christopher; Urban, Carl; Landman, David

    2014-01-01

    Eravacycline demonstrated in vitro activity against a contemporary collection of more than 4,000 Gram-negative pathogens from New York City hospitals, with MIC50/MIC90 values, respectively, for Escherichia coli of 0.12/0.5 μg/ml, Klebsiella pneumoniae of 0.25/1 μg/ml, Enterobacter aerogenes of 0.25/1 μg/ml, Enterobacter cloacae 0.5/1 μg/ml, and Acinetobacter baumannii of 0.5/1 μg/ml. Activity was retained against multidrug-resistant isolates, including those expressing KPC and OXA carbapenemases. For A. baumannii, eravacycline MICs correlated with increased expression of the adeB gene. PMID:25534744

  2. [Antibiotic resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii strains isolated from clinical specimens in the "Marius Nasta" Pneumology Institute, Bucharest].

    PubMed

    Moisoiu, Adriana; Ionită, Monica; Sârbu, Lăcrămioara; Stoica, Corina; Grigoriu, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in patients who are in critical condition in hospitals and especially in intensive care units (ICU). Long time considered a bacterium with low virulence, A. baumannii has more recently become a cause for major concern in clinical practice due to its high level of antimicrobial resistance. The extend of infections with Acinetobacter baumannii in ICU is caused by multiple factors, such as mechanical ventilation, invasive procedures, the use of a large number of broad spectrum antibiotics and transmission through the hands of medical staff In this study we evaluated the resistance to antibiotics of 213 non-duplicated strains of A. baumannii isolated in the bacteriology laboratory of the "Marius Nasta" lnstitute of Pneumophtisiology (IPMN) from January 2012 to December 2013. These strains originated from patients in medical wards (56), ICU (143) and surgery (14). Strains identification was performed by classical methods on multitest media and with API kits (Bio Merieux). The antibiotic sensitivity was performed on Mueller-Hinton media in accordance with CLSI2013. Analysis of the resistance to antibiotics was the following: carbenicilin (87.3%), ceftriaxone (87.3%), cefoperazone with sulbactam (84.9%), ceftazidime (79.3%), carbapenems (imipenem and/or meropenem--75.1%), fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin and/orlevofloxacin--73.7%), cefepime (66.6%), piperacilin with tazobactam (62.4%), amikacin (50.2%), netilmicin (45%), gentamicin (42.7%) and tobramycin (35.6%). In our study, we only found two strains of Acinetobacter baumannii with resistance to colistin and 70 (32.8%) strains sensitive only to colistin, but resistant to all other antibiotics tested. A. baumannii is a pathogen with rapid spread and extended resistance to even newer antimicrobial agents. Due to its ability to survive in the hospital environment, A. baumannii has the immense potential to cause nosocomial

  3. Plant growth-promoting and rhizosphere-competent Acinetobacter rhizosphaerae strain BIHB 723 from the cold deserts of the Himalayas.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Arvind; Vyas, Pratibha; Rahi, Praveen; Kasana, Ramesh Chand

    2009-04-01

    A phosphate-solubilizing bacterial strain BIHB 723 isolated from the rhizosphere of Hippophae rhamnoides was identified as Acinetobacter rhizosphaerae on the basis of phenotypic characteristics, carbon source utilization pattern, fatty acid methyl esters analysis, and 16S rRNA gene sequence. The strain exhibited the plant growth-promoting attributes of inorganic and organic phosphate solubilization, auxin production, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase activity, ammonia generation, and siderophore production. A significant increase in the growth of pea, chickpea, maize, and barley was recorded for inoculations under controlled conditions. Field testing with the pea also showed a significant increment in plant growth and yield. The rifampicin mutant of the bacterial strain effectively colonized the pea rhizosphere without adversely affecting the resident microbial populations. PMID:19137371

  4. Simultaneous enhancement of phenolic compound degradations by Acinetobacter strain V2 via a step-wise continuous acclimation process.

    PubMed

    Lin, Johnson; Sharma, Vikas; Milase, Ridwaan; Mbhense, Ntuthuko

    2016-06-01

    Phenol degradation enhancement of Acinetobacter strain V2 by a step-wise continuous acclimation process was investigated. At the end of 8 months, three stable adapted strains, designated as R, G, and Y, were developed with the sub-lethal concentration of phenol at 800, 1100, and 1400 mg/L, respectively, from 400 mg/L of V2 parent strain. All strains degraded phenol at their sub-lethal level within 24 h, their growth rate increased as the acclimation process continued and retained their degradation properties even after storing at -80 °C for more than 3 years. All adapted strains appeared coccoid with an ungranulated surface under electron microscope compared to typical rod-shaped parental strain V2 . The adapted Y strain also possessed superior degradation ability against aniline, benzoate, and toluene. This study demonstrated the use of long term acclimation process to develop efficient and better pollutant degrading bacterial strains with potentials in industrial and environmental bioremediation. PMID:26471472

  5. Biodegradation of type II pyrethroids and major degraded products by a newly isolated Acinetobacter sp. strain JN8.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhaoxia; Guo, Qiong; Zhang, Zongshen; Yan, Tongshuai

    2014-08-01

    A Gram-negative aerobic bacterium, designated as JN8, was isolated from activated sludge and soil in a pesticides factory in China. It was found that JN8 had a high capacity for degrading a broad range of type II pyrethroids and utilizing these pyrethroids as the sole carbon source for cell growth. The degradation rates of a 100 mg·L(-1) concentration of β-cypermethrin, cypermethrin, fenpropathrin, fenvalerate, and deltamethrin by JN8 in mineral salt medium were 74.1%, 64.9%, 57.9%, 48.1% and 34.9%, respectively. Strain JN8 was identified as a species of Acinetobacter based on its biochemical properties and 16S rRNA sequence analysis. β-Cypermethrin was degraded by JN8 through hydrolysis of the carboxylester linkage to form 3-phenoxybenzoic acid and 3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane carboxylic acid, both of which could be further degraded by JN8. JN8 is the first strain of an Acinetobacter species in which pyrethoid-degrading activity has been detected, and such a feature makes it a potential resource for disposal of waste and effluent from pyrethroid manufacturing facilities. PMID:25083550

  6. Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Aoife; O’Donoghue, Michael; Feeney, Audrey; Sleator, Roy D.

    2012-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic bacterial pathogen primarily associated with hospital-acquired infections. The recent increase in incidence, largely associated with infected combat troops returning from conflict zones, coupled with a dramatic increase in the incidence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains, has significantly raised the profile of this emerging opportunistic pathogen. Herein, we provide an overview of the pathogen, discuss some of the major factors that have led to its clinical prominence and outline some of the novel therapeutic strategies currently in development. PMID:22546906

  7. Complete genome of the multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strain KBN10P02143 isolated from Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong-Woon; Choe, Hanna; Lee, Sang-Heon; Kim, Kyung Mo; Kam, Sin; Kim, Byung Kwon; Lee, Won-Kil

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii, a strictly aerobic, non-fermentative, Gram-negative coccobacillary rod-shaped bacterium, is an opportunistic pathogen in humans. We recently isolated a multidrug-resistant A. baumannii strain KBN10P02143 from the pus sample drawn from a surgical patient in South Korea. We report the complete genome of this strain, which consists of 4,139,396 bp (G + C content, 39.08%) with 3,868 protein-coding genes, 73 tRNAs and six rRNA operons. Identification of the genes related to multidrug resistance from this genome and the discovery of a novel conjugative plasmid will increase our understanding of the pathogenicity associated with this species. PMID:27143492

  8. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Extensively Drug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Strains Isolated from Pus Samples.

    PubMed

    Mahalingam, Niranjana; Manivannan, Bhavani; Jadhao, Sudhir; Mishra, Gayathri; Nilawe, Pravin; Pradeep, Bulagonda Eswarappa

    2016-01-01

    We report the draft genomes of two extensively drug-resistant (XDR)Acinetobacter baumanniistrains isolated from pus samples of two patients with surgical site infections at Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Medical Sciences, Prasanthigram, India. The average genomic size and G+C content are 4 Mbp and 38.96% (AB28) and 4 Mbp and 38.94% (AB30), respectively. PMID:27013044

  9. Enrichment of Acinetobacter spp. from food samples.

    PubMed

    Carvalheira, Ana; Ferreira, Vânia; Silva, Joana; Teixeira, Paula

    2016-05-01

    Relatively little is known about the role of foods in the chain of transmission of acinetobacters and the occurrence of different Acinetobacter spp. in foods. Currently, there is no standard procedure to recover acinetobacters from food in order to gain insight into the food-related ecology and epidemiology of acinetobacters. This study aimed to assess whether enrichment in Dijkshoorn enrichment medium followed by plating in CHROMagar™ Acinetobacter medium is a useful method for the isolation of Acinetobacter spp. from foods. Recovery of six Acinetobacter species from food spiked with these organisms was compared for two selective enrichment media (Baumann's enrichment and Dijkshoorn's enrichment). Significantly (p < 0.01) higher cell counts were obtained in Dijkshoorn's enrichment. Next, the Dijkshoorn's enrichment followed by direct plating on CHROMagar™ Acinetobacter was applied to detect Acinetobacter spp. in different foods. Fourteen different presumptive acinetobacters were recovered and assumed to represent nine different strains on the basis of REP-PCR typing. Eight of these strains were identified by rpoB gene analysis as belonging to the species Acinetobacter johnsonii, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Acinetobacter guillouiae and Acinetobacter gandensis. It was not possible to identify the species level of one strain which may suggests that it represents a distinct species. PMID:26742623

  10. Genomic Analysis of the Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Strain MDR-ZJ06 Widely Spread in China▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hua; Zhang, Tongwu; Yu, Dongliang; Pi, Borui; Yang, Qing; Zhou, Jianying; Hu, Songnian; Yu, Yunsong

    2011-01-01

    We previously reported that the multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii strain MDR-ZJ06, belonging to European clone II, was widely spread in China. In this study, we report the whole-genome sequence of this clinically important strain. A 38.6-kb AbaR-type genomic resistance island (AbaR22) was identified in MDR-ZJ06. AbaR22 has a structure similar to those of the resistance islands found in A. baumannii strains AYE and AB0057, but it contained only a few antibiotic resistance genes. The region of resistant gene accumulation as previously described was not found in AbaR22. In the chromosome of the strain MDR-ZJ06, we identified the gene blaoxa-23 in a composite transposon (Tn2009). Tn2009 shared the backbone with other A. baumannii transponsons that harbor blaoxa-23, but it was bracketed by two ISAba1 elements which were transcribed in the same orientation. MDR-ZJ06 also expressed the armA gene on its plasmid pZJ06, and this gene has the same genetic environment as the armA gene of the Enterobacteriaceae. These results suggest variability of resistance acquisition even in closely related A. baumannii strains. PMID:21788470

  11. Similarities between the antABC-Encoded Anthranilate Dioxygenase and the benABC-Encoded Benzoate Dioxygenase of Acinetobacter sp. Strain ADP1

    PubMed Central

    Bundy, Becky M.; Campbell, Alan L.; Neidle, Ellen L.

    1998-01-01

    Acinetobacter sp. strain ADP1 can use benzoate or anthranilate as a sole carbon source. These structurally similar compounds are independently converted to catechol, allowing further degradation to proceed via the β-ketoadipate pathway. In this study, the first step in anthranilate catabolism was characterized. A mutant unable to grow on anthranilate, ACN26, was selected. The sequence of a wild-type DNA fragment that restored growth revealed the antABC genes, encoding 54-, 19-, and 39-kDa proteins, respectively. The deduced AntABC sequences were homologous to those of class IB multicomponent aromatic ring-dihydroxylating enzymes, including the dioxygenase that initiates benzoate catabolism. Expression of antABC in Escherichia coli, a bacterium that normally does not degrade anthranilate, enabled the conversion of anthranilate to catechol. Unlike benzoate dioxygenase (BenABC), anthranilate dioxygenase (AntABC) catalyzed catechol formation without requiring a dehydrogenase. In Acinetobacter mutants, benC substituted for antC during growth on anthranilate, suggesting relatively broad substrate specificity of the BenC reductase, which transfers electrons from NADH to the terminal oxygenase. In contrast, the benAB genes did not substitute for antAB. An antA point mutation in ACN26 prevented anthranilate degradation, and this mutation was independent of a mucK mutation in the same strain that prevented exogenous muconate degradation. Anthranilate induced expression of antA, although no associated transcriptional regulators were identified. Disruption of three open reading frames in the immediate vicinity of antABC did not prevent the use of anthranilate as a sole carbon source. The antABC genes were mapped on the ADP1 chromosome and were not linked to the two known supraoperonic gene clusters involved in aromatic compound degradation. PMID:9721284

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Colistin-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Strain VB22595 Isolated from a Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection.

    PubMed

    Veeraraghavan, Balaji; Anandan, Shalini; Ragupathi, Naveen Kumar Devanga; Vijayakumar, Saranya; Sethuvel, Dhiviya Prabaa Muthuirulandi; Biswas, Indranil

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important emerging pathogen that causes health care-associated infections. In this study, we determined the genome of a multidrug-resistant clinical strain, VB22595, isolated from a hospital in Southern India. The draft genome indicates that strain VB22595 encodes a genome of ~3.92 Mb in size and does not contain plasmid derived MCR-1 for colistin resistance. PMID:27516521

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Colistin-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Strain VB22595 Isolated from a Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Veeraraghavan, Balaji; Anandan, Shalini; Ragupathi, Naveen Kumar Devanga; Vijayakumar, Saranya; Sethuvel, Dhiviya Prabaa Muthuirulandi

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important emerging pathogen that causes health care-associated infections. In this study, we determined the genome of a multidrug-resistant clinical strain, VB22595, isolated from a hospital in Southern India. The draft genome indicates that strain VB22595 encodes a genome of ~3.92 Mb in size and does not contain plasmid derived MCR-1 for colistin resistance. PMID:27516521

  14. [Characterization and determination of antibiotic resistance profiles of a single clone Acinetobacter baumannii strains isolated from blood cultures].

    PubMed

    Karagöz, Alper; Baran, Irmak; Aksu, Neriman; Acar, Sümeyra; Durmaz, Rıza

    2014-10-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii which is a significant cause of nosocomial infections, increases the rate of morbidity and mortality in health care settings especially in intensive care units (ICUs). The aim of this study was to determine the antibiotic resistance profiles of A.baumannii strains isolated from blood cultures of inpatients from different ICUs, wards and hospital environment and evaluate their clonal relationships and epidemiologic features. A total of 54 A.baumannii strains (47 from the blood cultures and 7 from the hospital environment), identified between 01 January 2012-28 December 2012 at the Clinical Microbiology Laboratory of Ankara Numune Training and Research Hospital, Turkey, were included in the study. Identification of A.baumannii isolates and their antimicrobial [sulbactam-ampicillin (SAM), piperacillin (PIP), piperacillin-tazobactam (TZP), ceftazidime (CFZ), cefoperazone-sulbactam (SCF), cefepime (CEF), imipenem (IMP), meropenem (MER), amikacin (AMK), gentamicin (GEN), netilmicin (NT), ciprofloxacin (CIP), levofloxacin (LVF), tetracycline (TET), tigecycline (TG), colistin (COL), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SXT)] susceptibility testing were performed by Vitek 2 (bioMérieux, France) system. The clonal relationship between the A.baumannii isolates was analysed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). In our study colistin, tigecycline and netilmicin were found to be the most effective agents against A.baumannii isolates. All of the clinical isolates (n= 47) were found susceptible to COL, however all were resistant to SAM, PIP, TZP, CEF, IPM, CFZ, MER and CIP. While 1.85%, 14.8%, 14.8%, 16.6%, 59.2% and 22.2% of the isolates were susceptible to SCF, AMK, NT, GEN, TG and SXT, respectively; 1.85%, 1.85%, 9.2%, 16.6%, 38.8% and 27.7% of the isolates were intermediate to SCF, TET, AMK, NT, LVF and TG, respectively. Similarly, all of the environmental A.baumannii isolates (n= 7) were resistant to SAM, PIP, TZP, CFZ, CEF, IPM, MER and CIP, and all

  15. Genotypic and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii: Analysis of ISAba Elements and blaOXA-23-like Genes Including a New Variant

    PubMed Central

    Bahador, Abbas; Raoofian, Reza; Pourakbari, Babak; Taheri, Mohammad; Hashemizadeh, Zahra; Hashemi, Farhad B.

    2015-01-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CR-AB) causes serious nosocomial infections, especially in ICU wards of hospitals, worldwide. Expression of blaOXA genes is the chief mechanism of conferring carbapenem resistance among CR-AB. Although some blaOXA genes have been studied among CR-AB isolates from Iran, their blaOXA-23-like genes have not been investigated. We used a multiplex-PCR to detect Ambler class A, B, and D carbapenemases of 85 isolates, and determined that 34 harbored blaOXA-23-like genes. Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) genotyping, followed by DNA sequencing of blaOXA-23-like amplicons of CR-AB from each AFLP group was used to characterize their blaOXA-23-like genes. We also assessed the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of CR-AB isolates, and tested whether they harbored insertion sequences ISAba1 and ISAba4. Sequence comparison with reference strain A. baumannii (NCTC12156) revealed five types of mutations in blaOXA-23-like genes; including one novel variant and four mutants that were already reported from China and the USA. All of the blaOXA-23-like genes mutations were associated with increased minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) against imipenem. ISAba1 and ISAba4 sequences were detected upstream of blaOXA-23 genes in 19 and 7% of isolates, respectively. The isolation of CR-AB with new blaOXA-23 mutations including some that have been reported from the USA and China highlights CR-AB pervasive distribution, which underscores the importance of concerted national and global efforts to control the spread of CR-AB isolates worldwide. PMID:26617588

  16. Genome Sequence of a Clinical Strain of Acinetobacter baumannii Belonging to the ST79/PFGE-HUI-1 Clone Lacking the AdeABC (Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division-Type) Efflux Pump.

    PubMed

    López, M; Álvarez-Fraga, L; Gato, E; Blasco, L; Poza, M; Fernández-García, L; Bou, G; Tomás, M

    2016-01-01

    Increased expression of chromosomal genes for resistance-nodulation-cell division-type efflux systems plays a major role in the multidrug resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii Little is known about the genetic characteristics of clinical strains of Acinetobacter baumannii lacking the AdeABC pump. In this study, we sequenced the genome of clinical strain Ab421 GEIH-2010 (belonging to clone ST79/PFGE-HUI-1 from the GEIH-REIPI Ab. 2010 project) which lacks this efflux pump. PMID:27609928

  17. Validation of use of whole-cell repetitive extragenic palindromic sequence-based PCR (REP-PCR) for typing strains belonging to the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex and application of the method to the investigation of a hospital outbreak.

    PubMed Central

    Snelling, A M; Gerner-Smidt, P; Hawkey, P M; Heritage, J; Parnell, P; Porter, C; Bodenham, A R; Inglis, T

    1996-01-01

    Acinetobacter spp. are being reported with increasing frequency as causes of nosocomial infection. In order to identify reservoirs of infection as quickly as possible, a rapid typing method that can differentiate epidemic strains from environmental and nonepidemic strains is needed. In 1993, a cluster of Acinetobacter baumannii isolates from five patients in the adult intensive therapy unit of our tertiary-care teaching hospital led us to develop and optimize a rapid repetitive extragenic palindromic sequence-based PCR (REP-PCR) typing protocol for members of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex that uses boiled colonies and consensus primers aimed at repetitive extragenic palindromic sequences. Four of the five patient isolates gave the same REP-PCR typing pattern as isolates of A. baumannii obtained from the temperature probe of a Bennett humidifier; the fifth isolate had a unique profile. Disinfection of the probe with 70% ethanol, as recommended by the manufacturer, proved ineffective, as A. baumannii with the same REP-PCR pattern was isolated from it 10 days after cleaning, necessitating a change in our decontamination procedure. Results obtained with REP-PCR were subsequently confirmed by ribotyping. To evaluate the discriminatory power (D) of REP-PCR for typing members of the A. calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex, compared with that of ribotyping, we have applied both methods to a collection of 85 strains that included representatives of six DNA groups within the complex. Ribotyping using EcoRI digests yielded 53 patterns (D = 0.98), whereas 68 different REP-PCR patterns were observed (D = 0.99). By computer-assisted analysis of gel images, 74 patterns were observed with REP-PCR (D = 1.0). Overall, REP-PCR typing proved to be slightly more discriminatory than ribotyping. Our results indicate that REP-PCR typing used boiled colonies is a simple, rapid, and effective means of typing members of the A. calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex. PMID

  18. Characterization of a highly virulent and antimicrobial-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strain isolated from diseased chicks in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Liu, Zeng-Shan; Hu, Pan; Hui, Qi; Fu, Bao-Quan; Lu, Shi-Ying; Li, Yan-Song; Zou, De-Ying; Li, Zhao-Hui; Yan, Dong-Ming; Ding, Yan-Xia; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Zhou, Yu; Liu, Nan-Nan; Ren, Hong-Lin

    2016-08-01

    Poultry husbandry is a very important aspect of the agricultural economy in China. However, chicks are often susceptible to infectious disease microorganisms, such as bacteria, viruses and parasites, causing large economic losses in recent years. In the present study, we isolated an Acinetobacter baumannii strain, CCGGD201101, from diseased chicks in the Jilin Province of China. Regression analyses of virulence and LD50 tests conducted using healthy chicks confirmed that A. baumannii CCGGD201101, with an LD50 of 1.81 (±0.11) × 10(4) CFU, was more virulent than A. baumannii ATCC17978, with an LD50 of 1.73 (±0.13) × 10(7) CFU. Moreover, TEM examination showed that the pili of A. baumannii CCGGD201101 were different from those of ATCC17978. Antibiotic sensitivity analyses showed that A. baumannii CCGGD201101 was sensitive to rifampicin but resistant to most other antibiotics. These results imply that A. baumannii strain CCGGD201101 had both virulence enhancement and antibiotic resistance characteristics, which are beneficial for A. baumannii survival under adverse conditions and enhance fitness and invasiveness in the host. A. baumannii CCGGD20101, with its high virulence and antimicrobial resistance, may be one of the pathogens causing death of diseased chicks. PMID:27399903

  19. Complete genome sequence of Acinetobacter sp. TTH0-4, a cold-active crude oil degrading strain isolated from Qinghai-Tibet Plateau.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gaosen; Chen, Tuo; Chang, Sijing; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Xiukun; Wu, Minghui; Wang, Yilin; Long, Haozhi; Chen, Ximing; Wang, Yun; Liu, Guangxiu

    2016-05-20

    Acinetobacter sp. strain TTH0-4 was isolated from a permafrost region in Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. With its capability to degrade crude oil at low temperature, 10°C, the strain could be an excellent candidate for the bioremediation of crude oil pollution in cold areas or at cold seasons. We sequenced and annotated the whole genome to serve as a basis for further elucidation of the genetic background of this promising strain, and provide opportunities for investigating the metabolic and regulatory mechanisms and optimizing the biodegradative activity in cold environment. PMID:26988394

  20. Rapid Determination of Colistin Resistance in Clinical Strains of Acinetobacter baumannii by Use of the Micromax Assay

    PubMed Central

    Tamayo, Maria; Santiso, Rebeca; Otero, Fátima; Bou, Germán; Lepe, José Antonio; McConnell, Michael J.; Cisneros, José Miguel; Gosálvez, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    Colistin is an old antibiotic which has been used as a therapeutic option for carbapenem- and multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, like Acinetobacter baumannii. This pathogen produces life-threatening infections, mainly in patients admitted to intensive care units. Rapid detection of resistance to colistin may improve patient outcomes and prevent the spread of resistance. For this purpose, Micromax technology was evaluated in four isogenic A. baumannii strains with known mechanisms of resistance to colistin and in 66 isolates (50 susceptible and 16 resistant). Two parameters were determined, DNA fragmentation and cell wall damage. To assess DNA fragmentation, cells trapped in a microgel were incubated with a lysing solution to remove the cell wall, and the released nucleoids were visualized under fluorescence microscopy. Fragmented DNA was observed as spots that diffuse from the nucleoid. To assess cell wall integrity, cells were incubated with a lysis solution which removes only weakened cell walls, resulting in nucleoid release exclusively in affected cells. A dose-response relationship was demonstrated between colistin concentrations and the percentages of bacteria with DNA fragmentation and cell wall damage, antibiotic effects that were delayed and less frequent in resistant strains. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves demonstrated that both DNA fragmentation and cell wall damage were excellent parameters for identifying resistant strains. Obtaining ≤11% of bacteria with cell wall damage after incubation with 0.5 μg/ml colistin identified resistant strains of A. baumannii with 100% sensitivity and 96% specificity. Results were obtained in 3 h 30 min. This is a simple, rapid, and accurate assay for detecting colistin resistance in A. baumannii, with strong potential value in critical clinical situations. PMID:23985913

  1. Insertions or Deletions (Indels) in the rrn 16S-23S rRNA Gene Internal Transcribed Spacer Region (ITS) Compromise the Typing and Identification of Strains within the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii (Acb) Complex and Closely Related Members

    PubMed Central

    Maslunka, Christopher; Gifford, Bianca; Tucci, Joseph; Gürtler, Volker; Seviour, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether ITS sequences in the rrn operon are suitable for identifying individual Acinetobacter Acb complex members, we analysed length and sequence differences between multiple ITS copies within the genomes of individual strains. Length differences in ITS reported previously between A. nosocomialis BCRC15417T (615 bp) and other strains (607 bp) can be explained by presence of an insertion (indel 13i/1) in the longer ITS variant. The same Indel 13i/1 was also found in ITS sequences of ten strains of A. calcoaceticus, all 639 bp long, and the 628 bp ITS of Acinetobacter strain BENAB127. Four additional indels (13i/2–13i/5) were detected in Acinetobacter strain c/t13TU 10090 ITS length variants (608, 609, 620, 621 and 630 bp). These ITS variants appear to have resulted from horizontal gene transfer involving other Acinetobacter species or in some cases unrelated bacteria. Although some ITS copies in strain c/t13TU 10090 are of the same length (620 bp) as those in Acinetobacter strains b/n1&3, A. pittii (10 strains), A. calcoaceticus and A. oleivorans (not currently acknowledged as an Acb member), their individual ITS sequences differ. Thus ITS length by itself can not by itself be used to identify Acb complex strains. A shared indel in ITS copies in two separate Acinetobacter species compromises the specificity of ITS targeted probes, as shown with the Aun-3 probe designed to target the ITS in A. pitti. The presence of indel 13i/5 in the ITS of Acinetobacter strain c/t13TU means it too responded positively to this probe. Thus, neither ITS sequencing nor the currently available ITS targeted probes can distinguish reliably between Acb member species. PMID:25141005

  2. Acinetobacter Pneumonia: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Hartzell, Joshua D.; Kim, Andrew S.; Kortepeter, Mark G.; Moran, Kimberly A.

    2007-01-01

    Acinetobacter species are becoming a major cause of nosocomial infections, including hospital-acquired and ventilator-associated pneumonia. Acinetobacter species have become increasingly resistant to antibiotics over the past several years and currently present a significant challenge in treating these infections. Physicians now rely on older agents, such as polymyxins (colistin), for treatment. This paper reviews the epidemiology, treatment, and prevention of this emerging pathogen. PMID:18092011

  3. Extremophilic Acinetobacter Strains from High-Altitude Lakes in Argentinean Puna: Remarkable UV-B Resistance and Efficient DNA Damage Repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albarracín, Virginia Helena; Pathak, Gopal P.; Douki, Thierry; Cadet, Jean; Borsarelli, Claudio Darío; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Farias, María Eugenia

    2012-06-01

    High-Altitude Andean Lakes (HAAL) of the South American Andes are almost unexplored ecosystems of shallow lakes. The HAAL are recognized by a remarkably high UV exposure, strong changes in temperature and salinity, and a high content of toxic elements, especially arsenic. Being exposed to remarkably extreme conditions, they have been classified as model systems for the study of life on other planets. Particularly, Acinetobacter strains isolated from the HAAL were studied for their survival competence under strong UV-B irradiation. Clinical isolates, Acinetobacter baumannii and Acinetobacter johnsonii, served as reference material. Whereas the reference strains rapidly lost viability under UV-B irradiation, most HAAL-derived strains readily survived this exposure and showed less change in cell number after the treatment. Controls for DNA repair activity, comparing dark repair (DR) or photo repair (PR), gave evidence for the involvement of photolyases in the DNA repair. Comparative measurements by HPLC-mass spectrometry detected the number of photoproducts: bipyrimidine dimers under both PR and DR treatments were more efficiently repaired in the HAAL strains (up to 85 % PR and 38 % DR) than in the controls (31 % PR and zero DR ability). Analysis of cosmid-cloned total genomic DNA from the most effective DNA-photorepair strain (Ver3) yielded a gene (HQ443199) encoding a protein with clear photolyase signatures belonging to class I CPD-photolyases. Despite the relatively low sequence similarity of 41 % between the enzymes from Ver3 and from E. coli (PDB 1DNPA), a model-building approach revealed a high structural homology to the CPD-photolyase of E. coli.

  4. Extremophilic Acinetobacter strains from high-altitude lakes in Argentinean Puna: remarkable UV-B resistance and efficient DNA damage repair.

    PubMed

    Albarracín, Virginia Helena; Pathak, Gopal P; Douki, Thierry; Cadet, Jean; Borsarelli, Claudio Darío; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Farias, María Eugenia

    2012-06-01

    High-Altitude Andean Lakes (HAAL) of the South American Andes are almost unexplored ecosystems of shallow lakes. The HAAL are recognized by a remarkably high UV exposure, strong changes in temperature and salinity, and a high content of toxic elements, especially arsenic. Being exposed to remarkably extreme conditions, they have been classified as model systems for the study of life on other planets. Particularly, Acinetobacter strains isolated from the HAAL were studied for their survival competence under strong UV-B irradiation. Clinical isolates, Acinetobacter baumannii and Acinetobacter johnsonii, served as reference material. Whereas the reference strains rapidly lost viability under UV-B irradiation, most HAAL-derived strains readily survived this exposure and showed less change in cell number after the treatment. Controls for DNA repair activity, comparing dark repair (DR) or photo repair (PR), gave evidence for the involvement of photolyases in the DNA repair. Comparative measurements by HPLC-mass spectrometry detected the number of photoproducts: bipyrimidine dimers under both PR and DR treatments were more efficiently repaired in the HAAL strains (up to 85 % PR and 38 % DR) than in the controls (31 % PR and zero DR ability). Analysis of cosmid-cloned total genomic DNA from the most effective DNA-photorepair strain (Ver3) yielded a gene (HQ443199) encoding a protein with clear photolyase signatures belonging to class I CPD-photolyases. Despite the relatively low sequence similarity of 41 % between the enzymes from Ver3 and from E. coli (PDB 1DNPA), a model-building approach revealed a high structural homology to the CPD-photolyase of E. coli. PMID:22644565

  5. Novel Pathway for the Degradation of 2-Chloro-4-Nitrobenzoic Acid by Acinetobacter sp. Strain RKJ12▿†

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Dhan; Kumar, Ravi; Jain, R. K.; Tiwary, B. N.

    2011-01-01

    The organism Acinetobacter sp. RKJ12 is capable of utilizing 2-chloro-4-nitrobenzoic acid (2C4NBA) as a sole source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. In the degradation of 2C4NBA by strain RKJ12, various metabolites were isolated and identified by a combination of chromatographic, spectroscopic, and enzymatic activities, revealing a novel assimilation pathway involving both oxidative and reductive catabolic mechanisms. The metabolism of 2C4NBA was initiated by oxidative ortho dehalogenation, leading to the formation of 2-hydroxy-4-nitrobenzoic acid (2H4NBA), which subsequently was metabolized into 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,4-DHBA) by a mono-oxygenase with the concomitant release of chloride and nitrite ions. Stoichiometric analysis indicated the consumption of 1 mol O2 per conversion of 2C4NBA to 2,4-DHBA, ruling out the possibility of two oxidative reactions. Experiments with labeled H218O and 18O2 indicated the involvement of mono-oxygenase-catalyzed initial hydrolytic dechlorination and oxidative denitration mechanisms. The further degradation of 2,4-DHBA then proceeds via reductive dehydroxylation involving the formation of salicylic acid. In the lower pathway, the organism transformed salicylic acid into catechol, which was mineralized by the ortho ring cleavage catechol-1,2-dioxygenase to cis, cis-muconic acid, ultimately forming tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates. Furthermore, the studies carried out on a 2C4NBA− derivative and a 2C4NBA+ transconjugant demonstrated that the catabolic genes for the 2C4NBA degradation pathway possibly reside on the ∼55-kb transmissible plasmid present in RKJ12. PMID:21803909

  6. A comprehensive study on the behavior of a novel bacterial strain Acinetobacter guillouiae for bioremediation of divalent copper.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Subhajit; Gangadhar, Gayathri; Raghuvanshi, Smita; Gupta, Suresh

    2015-09-01

    Biological methods have been successfully used to mitigate heavy metal pollution problem in wastewater. The present study was aimed towards isolation of a novel indigenous bacterial strain, Acinetobacter guillouiae from activated sludge and its subsequent application in remediation of copper (Cu(2+)) from aqueous solution. Kinetic study of bioremediation was performed for initial Cu(2+) concentrations ranging from 40 to 150 mg L(-1). Optimum values of nutrient dosage, pH, macronutrients [Nitrogen (N)-Phosphorus (P)-Potassium (K)] dosage, aerobic and facultative anaerobic conditions, temperature, and inoculum volume were determined by conducting separate batch bioremediation studies at 80 mg L(-1) initial concentration of Cu(2+). Kinetic study showed that A. guillouiae removed 98.7 % Cu(2+) for 80 mg L(-1) initial concentration of Cu(2+) after 16 h at an optimum solution pH of 7.0. Results also revealed that A. guillouiae showed maximum growth at double the standard composition of N, P and standard composition of K in nutrient dosage. Experimental data obtained in present study were utilized to validate different growth kinetic models such as Monod, Powell, Haldane, Luong, and Edwards. Growth kinetics of A. guillouiae was better understood by Luong model (R (2) = 0.97). Higher values of coefficient of determination (R (2) = 0.97-0.99) confirmed the suitability of the three-half-order kinetic model for representing the Cu(2+) bioremediation. A. guillouiae showed a robust removal mechanism for the bioremediation of Cu(2+). PMID:26017755

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Acinetobacter oleivorans PF1, a Diesel-Degrading and Plant-Growth-Promoting Endophytic Strain Isolated from Poplar Trees Growing on a Diesel-Contaminated Plume

    PubMed Central

    Gkorezis, Panagiotis; Rineau, Francois; Van Hamme, Jonathan; Daghio, Matteo; Thijs, Sofie; Weyens, Nele

    2015-01-01

    We report the 3.7-Mb draft genome of Acinetobacter oleivorans strain PF1, a hydrocarbonoclastic Gram-negative bacterium in the class Gammaproteobacteria, isolated from poplar trees growing on a diesel-contaminated plume at the Ford Motor Company site in Genk, Belgium. Strain PF1 is a potent plant-growth promoter, useful for diesel fuel phytoremediation applications. PMID:25657268

  8. Thio Wax Ester Biosynthesis Utilizing the Unspecific Bifunctional Wax Ester Synthase/Acyl Coenzyme A:Diacylglycerol Acyltransferase of Acinetobacter sp. Strain ADP1

    PubMed Central

    Uthoff, Stefan; Stöveken, Tim; Weber, Nikolaus; Vosmann, Klaus; Klein, Erika; Kalscheuer, Rainer; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    The bifunctional wax ester synthase/acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA):diacylglycerol acyltransferase (WS/DGAT) from Acinetobacter sp. strain ADP1 (formerly Acinetobacter calcoaceticus ADP1) mediating the biosyntheses of wax esters and triacylglycerols was used for the in vivo and in vitro biosynthesis of thio wax esters and dithio wax esters. For in vitro biosynthesis, 5′His6WS/DGAT comprising an N-terminal His6 tag was purified from the soluble protein fraction of Escherichia coli Rosetta(DE3)pLysS (pET23a::5′His6atf). By employing SP-Sepharose high-pressure and Ni-nitrilotriacetic acid fast-protein liquid chromatographies, a 19-fold enrichment with a final specific activity of 165.2 nmol mg of protein−1 min−1 was achieved by using 1-hexadecanol and palmitoyl-CoA as substrates. Incubation of purified 5′His6WS/DGAT with 1-hexadecanethiol and palmitoyl-CoA as substrates resulted in the formation of palmitic acid hexadecyl thio ester (10.4% relative specific activity of a 1-hexadecanol control). Utilization of 1,8-octanedithiol and palmitoyl-CoA as substrates led to the formation of 1-S-monopalmitoyloctanedithiol and minor amounts of 1,8-S-dipalmitoyloctanedithiol (59.3% relative specific activity of a 1-hexadecanol control). The latter dithio wax ester was efficiently produced when 1-S-monopalmitoyloctanedithiol and palmitoyl-CoA were used as substrates (13.4% specific activity relative to that of a 1-hexadecanol control). For the in vivo biosynthesis of thio wax esters, the knockout mutant Acinetobacter sp. strain ADP1acr1ΩKm, which is unable to produce fatty alcohols, was used. Cultivation of Acinetobacter sp. strain ADP1acr1ΩKm in the presence of gluconate, 1-hexadecanethiol, and oleic acid in nitrogen-limited mineral salts medium resulted in the accumulation of unusual thio wax esters that accounted for around 1.19% (wt/wt) of the cellular dry weight and consisted mainly of oleic acid hexadecyl thioester as revealed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

  9. Multidrug Resistant Acinetobacter

    PubMed Central

    Manchanda, Vikas; Sanchaita, Sinha; Singh, NP

    2010-01-01

    Emergence and spread of Acinetobacter species, resistant to most of the available antimicrobial agents, is an area of great concern. It is now being frequently associated with healthcare associated infections. Literature was searched at PUBMED, Google Scholar, and Cochrane Library, using the terms ‘Acinetobacter Resistance, multidrug resistant (MDR), Antimicrobial Therapy, Outbreak, Colistin, Tigecycline, AmpC enzymes, and carbapenemases in various combinations. The terms such as MDR, Extensively Drug Resistant (XDR), and Pan Drug Resistant (PDR) have been used in published literature with varied definitions, leading to confusion in the correlation of data from various studies. In this review various mechanisms of resistance in the Acinetobacter species have been discussed. The review also probes upon the current therapeutic options, including combination therapies available to treat infections due to resistant Acinetobacter species in adults as well as children. There is an urgent need to enforce infection control measures and antimicrobial stewardship programs to prevent the further spread of these resistant Acinetobacter species and to delay the emergence of increased resistance in the bacteria. PMID:20927292

  10. Acinetobacter and similar organisms in ear infections.

    PubMed

    Dadswell, J V

    1976-08-01

    Fifty-seven strains of acinetobacter-like organisms were isolated over a period of 26 months from the ears of 55 patients with acute or chronic otitis media, or otitis externa, and one strain was isolated in a survey of 50 normal ears. After comparison with eight reference strains, 32 of the isolates were identified as Acinetobacter anitratus, 22 as Acinetobacter Iwoffii, three as Moraxella spp. and one as Achromobacter sp. Analysis of the clinical findings suggests that although most of these organisms played little part in the disease process, a few strains were probably pathogenic in this situation. PMID:957420

  11. Antibiotic susceptibility and molecular epidemiology of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus–baumannii complex strains isolated from a referral hospital in northern Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Van, Trang Dinh; Dinh, Quynh-Dao; Vu, Phu Dinh; Nguyen, Trung Vu; Pham, Ca Van; Dao, Trinh Tuyet; Phung, Cam Dac; Hoang, Ha Thu Thi; Tang, Nga Thi; Do, Nga Thuy; Nguyen, Kinh Van; Wertheim, Heiman

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter calcoaceticus–baumannii complex is a common cause of hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) globally, remarkable for its high rate of antibiotic resistance, including to carbapenems. There are few data on the resistance of A. baumannii in Vietnam, which are essential for developing evidence-based treatment guidelines for HAIs. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was conducted by VITEK®2, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was performed on 66 clinical A. baumannii complex isolates recovered during 2009 at the National Hospital of Tropical Diseases (NHTD), a referral hospital in Hanoi, Vietnam. Basic demographic and clinical data were collected and analysed using descriptive statistics. Most isolates came from lower respiratory tract specimens (59; 89.4%) from intensive care unit (ICU) patients [64/65 (98.5%) with available data] who had been admitted to NHTD for ≥2 days [42/46 (91.3%) with available data]. More than 90% of the isolates were resistant to the tested β-lactamase/β-lactamase inhibitors, cephalosporins, carbapenems, fluoroquinolones and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. Moreover, 25.4% (16/63) were resistant to all tested β-lactams, quinolones and aminoglycosides. All isolates remained sensitive to colistin and 58.7% were susceptible to tigecycline. Of the 66 isolates, 49 could be classified into eight PFGE types (A–H). Every PFGE type, except D, had cluster(s) of three or more isolates with a temporal relationship. In conclusion, these data suggest a significant rise in A. baumannii antibiotic resistance in Vietnam. Clustering within PFGE types supports cross-transmission of A. baumannii within the ICU at NHTD. Increased research and resources in optimising treatment, infection control and antibiotic stewardship are needed. PMID:25540720

  12. Characterization of an Acinetobacter baumannii lptD Deletion Strain: Permeability Defects and Response to Inhibition of Lipopolysaccharide and Fatty Acid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Bojkovic, Jade; Richie, Daryl L.; Six, David A.; Rath, Christopher M.; Sawyer, William S.; Hu, Qijun

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lipid A on the Gram-negative outer membrane (OM) is synthesized in the cytoplasm by the Lpx pathway and translocated to the OM by the Lpt pathway. Some Acinetobacter baumannii strains can tolerate the complete loss of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) resulting from the inactivation of early LPS pathway genes such as lpxC. Here, we characterized a mutant deleted for lptD, which encodes an OM protein that mediates the final translocation of fully synthesized LPS to the OM. Cells lacking lptD had a growth defect comparable to that of an lpxC deletion mutant under the growth conditions tested but were more sensitive to hydrophobic antibiotics, revealing a more significant impact on cell permeability from impaired LPS translocation than from the loss of LPS synthesis. Consistent with this, ATP leakage and N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine (NPN) fluorescence assays indicated a more severe impact of lptD deletion than of lpxC deletion on inner and outer membrane permeability, respectively. Targeted liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LCMS) analysis of LPS intermediates from UDP-3-O-R-3-hydroxylauroyl-N-acetyl-α-d-glucosamine through lipid IVA showed that the loss of LptD caused an accumulation of lipid IVA. This suggested that pathway intermediate accumulation or mislocalization caused by the blockage of later LPS pathway steps impacts envelope integrity. Supporting this notion, chemical inhibition of lipid A precursor enzymes, including LpxC and FabB/F, in the lptD deletion strain partially rescued growth and permeability defects. IMPORTANCE New antibiotics to treat Gram-negative bacterial infections are urgently needed. Inhibition of LPS biosynthesis is attractive because this would impact viability and cell permeability. Therefore, a better understanding of this pathway is important, especially in strains such as A. baumannii ATCC 19606, where LPS biosynthesis is not essential in vitro. We show that ATCC 19606 also survives the loss of the final translocation of LPS into

  13. Clinical impact and pathogenicity of Acinetobacter.

    PubMed

    Joly-Guillou, M-L

    2005-11-01

    Members of the genus Acinetobacter have been implicated in a wide spectrum of infectious diseases. Although this organism is associated primarily with nosocomial infections, it has also been involved in cases of community-acquired infection. Before the 1970s, Acinetobacter infections were mostly post-surgical urinary tract infections in patients hospitalised in surgical units. The significant improvement in resuscitation techniques during the last 30 years has changed the types of infection caused by Acinetobacter. Since the 1980s, Acinetobacter has spread rapidly among patients in intensive care units. Today, Acinetobacter accounts for c. 9% of nosocomial infections, with most Acinetobacter infections involving the respiratory tract. Transmission via the hands of hospital staff has become the most important contributory factor in patient colonisation. Acinetobacter baumannii is the species that is involved most frequently in infections of humans, but a natural reservoir for A. baumannii outside the hospital environment has not yet been identified. Community-acquired infection and infections acquired following war or natural disasters (e.g., earthquakes) have been described. Acinetobacter causes mild-to-severe illness, but can be fatal. The severity of Acinetobacter infection depends upon the site of infection and the patient's susceptibility to infection as a result of underlying disease. The circumstances that allow Acinetobacter to assume a pathogenic role are not really well-understood. As this organism is a low-grade pathogen, the pathogenesis of Acinetobacter infections probably involves numerous factors, including virulence determinants, which have yet to be investigated. PMID:16216100

  14. True stress-strain curve acquisition for irradiated stainless steel including the range exceeding necking strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamaya, Masayuki; Kitsunai, Yuji; Koshiishi, Masato

    2015-10-01

    True stress-strain curves were obtained for irradiated 316L stainless steel by a tensile test and by a curve estimation procedure. In the tensile test, the digital image correlation technique together with iterative finite element analysis was applied in order to identify curves for strain larger than the necking strain. The true stress-strain curves were successfully obtained for the strain of more than 0.4 whereas the necking strain was about 0.2 in the minimum case. The obtained true stress-strain curves were approximated well with the Swift-type equation including the post-necking strain even if the exponential constant n was fixed to 0.5. Then, the true stress-strain curves were estimated by a curve estimation procedure, which was referred to as the K-fit method. Material properties required for the K-fit method were the yield and ultimate strengths or only the yield strength. Some modifications were made for the K-fit method in order to improve estimation accuracy for irradiated stainless steels.

  15. [Extended spectrum beta lactamases (ESBL) production in Acinetobacter baumannii strains isolated from Chilean hospitals belonging to VIII Region].

    PubMed

    Pino I, Carolina; Domínguez Y, Mariana; González R, Gerardo; Bello T, Helia; Sepúlveda A, Marcela; Mella M, Sergio; Zemelman M, Claudia; Zemelman Z, Raúl

    2007-04-01

    The resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii to ss-lactam antibiotics is mainly due to the synthesis of ss-lactamases. From a clinical point of view, this bacteria and others, grouped under the acronym SPACE (S: Serratia, P: Pseudomonas, A: Acinetobacter, C: Citrobacter, E: Enterobacter) are essentially Amp-C ss-lactamases producers. There is no local information about ESBL presence in Acinetobacter. We studied ESBL production using the Ho and col. technique modified by adding cloxacillin as chromosomal ss-lactamases inhibitor. From 69 isolates, with resistance to at least one third generation cephalosporin, only 7 showed positive synergy test. Four of these amplified for TEM family gene, and one of these amplified also for the OXA family. Our study found a low ESBL production percentage, which agrees with the premise of Amp-C as the main mechanism of resistance to ss-lactam antibiotics in A. baumannii. However, the ESBL description in these bacteria emphasizes the capacity of expressing multiple resistance mechanisms. PMID:17453072

  16. Radiation resistance of acinetobacter spp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitby, James L.

    1995-02-01

    The radiation resistance of 78 different strains of Acinetobacter sp. 42 from clinical isolates and 36 from other sources were compared with 15 clinical isolates and 12 other strains from Denmark. None of the Canadian strains was as resistant as resistant-enhanced Danish strains. Four strains had D 10 values of 3.1-3.6 kGy. Irradiated and unirradiated cells from all strains grew well, when cultured in Trypticase-Soy Broth at 30°C. Most cultures grew after overnight incubation. It was concluded that there would be no difficulty in detecting these strains, using ISO methodology for establishing the radiation sterilization dose for devices.

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Acinetobacter sp. Strain BMW17, a Cellulolytic and Plant Growth-Promoting Bacterium Isolated from the Rhizospheric Region of Phragmites karka of Chilika Lake, India

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Samir R.; Ray, Lopamudra; Panda, Ananta Narayan; Sahu, Neha; Xess, Sonal S.; Jadhao, Sudhir; Suar, Mrutyunjay; Adhya, Tapan Kumar; Rastogi, Gurdeep; Pattnaik, Ajit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    We report the 3.16 Mb draft genome of Acinetobacter sp. strain BMW17, a Gram-negative bacterium in the class of Gammaproteobacteria, isolated from the rhizospheric region of Phragmites karka, an invasive weed in Chilika Lake, Odisha, India. The strain BMW17T is capable of degrading cellulose and is also an efficient plant growth promoter that can be useful for various phytoremedial and commercial applications. PMID:27365343

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Acinetobacter sp. Strain BMW17, a Cellulolytic and Plant Growth-Promoting Bacterium Isolated from the Rhizospheric Region of Phragmites karka of Chilika Lake, India.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Samir R; Ray, Lopamudra; Panda, Ananta Narayan; Sahu, Neha; Xess, Sonal S; Jadhao, Sudhir; Suar, Mrutyunjay; Adhya, Tapan Kumar; Rastogi, Gurdeep; Pattnaik, Ajit Kumar; Raina, Vishakha

    2016-01-01

    We report the 3.16 Mb draft genome of Acinetobacter sp. strain BMW17, a Gram-negative bacterium in the class of Gammaproteobacteria, isolated from the rhizospheric region of Phragmites karka, an invasive weed in Chilika Lake, Odisha, India. The strain BMW17(T) is capable of degrading cellulose and is also an efficient plant growth promoter that can be useful for various phytoremedial and commercial applications. PMID:27365343

  19. The Wax Ester Synthase/Acyl Coenzyme A:Diacylglycerol Acyltransferase from Acinetobacter sp. Strain ADP1: Characterization of a Novel Type of Acyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Stöveken, Tim; Kalscheuer, Rainer; Malkus, Ursula; Reichelt, Rudolf; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    The wax ester synthase/acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA):diacylglycerol acyltransferase (WS/DGAT) catalyzes the final steps in triacylglycerol (TAG) and wax ester (WE) biosynthesis in the gram-negative bacterium Acinetobacter sp. strain ADP1. It constitutes a novel class of acyltransferases which is fundamentally different from acyltransferases involved in TAG and WE synthesis in eukaryotes. The enzyme was purified by a three-step purification protocol to apparent homogeneity from the soluble fraction of recombinant Escherichia coli Rosetta (DE3)pLysS (pET23a::atfA). Purified WS/DGAT revealed a remarkably low substrate specificity, accepting a broad range of various substances as alternative acceptor molecules. Besides having DGAT and WS activity, the enzyme possesses acyl-CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferase (MGAT) activity. The sn-1 and sn-3 positions of acylglycerols are accepted with higher specificity than the sn-2 position. Linear alcohols ranging from ethanol to triacontanol are efficiently acylated by the enzyme, which exhibits highest specificities towards medium-chain-length alcohols. The acylation of cyclic and aromatic alcohols, such as cyclohexanol or phenylethanol, further underlines the unspecific character of this enzyme. The broad range of possible substrates may lead to biotechnological production of interesting wax ester derivatives. Determination of the native molecular weight revealed organization as a homodimer. The large number of WS/DGAT-homologous genes identified in pathogenic mycobacteria and their possible importance for the pathogenesis and latency of these bacteria makes the purified WS/DGAT from Acinetobacter sp. strain ADP1 a valuable model for studying this group of proteins in pathogenic mycobacteria. PMID:15687201

  20. Community-acquired Acinetobacter meningitis in adults.

    PubMed

    Chang, W N; Lu, C H; Huang, C R; Chuang, Y C

    2000-01-01

    Community-acquired Acinetobacter meningitis in adults is an extremely rare infection of the central nervous system (CNS). Here we report one adult case of this rare CNS infection and review the clinical data of another seven cases reported in the English language literature. In total, eight patients (six men and two women) aged between 19 and 63 years were studied. The causative pathogen in our patient was Acinetobacter baumannii; in the other reported cases they were most likely Acinetobacter Iwoffii, Acinetobacter johnsonii, Acinetobacter junii, a genomic species 3 or 6. No underlying disease was found in seven of the eight cases and six of the eight patients acquired the infections before the age of 30 years. Fever and consciousness disturbance were the most common clinical manifestations. Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome (WFS) was found in two cases. Unlike the Acinetobacter strains found in nosocomial infections, the strain of Acinetobacter meningitis in the community-acquired case did not show multiple antibiotic resistance. Most adult patients with community-acquired Acinetobacter meningitis can be saved by timely therapy with appropriate antibiotics before deterioration of the systemic condition and impairment of consciousness. PMID:11139162

  1. Reservoirs of Non-baumannii Acinetobacter Species.

    PubMed

    Al Atrouni, Ahmad; Joly-Guillou, Marie-Laure; Hamze, Monzer; Kempf, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter spp. are ubiquitous gram negative and non-fermenting coccobacilli that have the ability to occupy several ecological niches including environment, animals and human. Among the different species, Acinetobacter baumannii has evolved as global pathogen causing wide range of infection. Since the implementation of molecular techniques, the habitat and the role of non-baumannii Acinetobacter in human infection have been elucidated. In addition, several new species have been described. In the present review, we summarize the recent data about the natural reservoir of non-baumannii Acinetobacter including the novel species that have been described for the first time from environmental sources and reported during the last years. PMID:26870013

  2. Reservoirs of Non-baumannii Acinetobacter Species

    PubMed Central

    Al Atrouni, Ahmad; Joly-Guillou, Marie-Laure; Hamze, Monzer; Kempf, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter spp. are ubiquitous gram negative and non-fermenting coccobacilli that have the ability to occupy several ecological niches including environment, animals and human. Among the different species, Acinetobacter baumannii has evolved as global pathogen causing wide range of infection. Since the implementation of molecular techniques, the habitat and the role of non-baumannii Acinetobacter in human infection have been elucidated. In addition, several new species have been described. In the present review, we summarize the recent data about the natural reservoir of non-baumannii Acinetobacter including the novel species that have been described for the first time from environmental sources and reported during the last years. PMID:26870013

  3. Biodegradation of fenoxaprop-P-ethyl (FE) by Acinetobacter sp. strain DL-2 and cloning of FE hydrolase gene afeH.

    PubMed

    Dong, Weiliang; Jiang, Sheng; Shi, Kaiwen; Wang, Fei; Li, Shuhuan; Zhou, Jie; Huang, Fei; Wang, Yicheng; Zheng, Yuxiao; Hou, Ying; Huang, Yan; Cui, Zhongli

    2015-06-01

    Fenoxaprop-P-ethyl (FE) is widely used as a post-emergence aryloxyphenoxy propionate (AOPP) herbicide in agriculture. An efficient FE-degrading strain DL-2 was isolated from the enrichment culture and identified as Acinetobacter sp. and the metabolite fenoxaprop acid (FA) was identified by HPLC/MS analysis. The strain DL-2 could also degrade a wide range of other AOPP herbicides. A novel FE hydrolase esterase gene afeH was cloned from strain DL-2 and functionally expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The specific activities of recombinant AfeH was 216.39 U mg(-1) for FE with Km and Vmax values of 0.82 μM and 7.94 μmol min(-1) mg(-1). AfeH could also hydrolyze various AOPP herbicides, p-nitrophenyl esters and triglycerides. The optimal pH and temperature for recombinant AfeH were 9.0 and 50°C, respectively; the enzyme was activated by Co(2+) and inhibited by Ca(2+), Zn(2+), Ba(2+). AfeH was inhibited strongly by phenylmethylsulfonyl and SDS and weakly by dimethyl sulfoxide. PMID:25812814

  4. An Amphipathic Undecapeptide with All d-Amino Acids Shows Promising Activity against Colistin-Resistant Strains of Acinetobacter baumannii and a Dual Mode of Action.

    PubMed

    Oddo, Alberto; Thomsen, Thomas T; Kjelstrup, Susanne; Gorey, Ciara; Franzyk, Henrik; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Løbner-Olesen, Anders; Hansen, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    Multiple strains of Acinetobacter baumannii have developed multidrug resistance (MDR), leaving colistin as the only effective treatment. The cecropin-α-melittin hybrid BP100 (KKLFKKILKYL-NH2) and its analogs have previously shown activity against a wide array of plant and human pathogens. In this study, we investigated the in vitro antibacterial activities of 18 BP100 analogs (four known and 14 new) against the MDR A. baumannii strain ATCC BAA-1605, as well as against a number of other clinically relevant human pathogens. Selected peptides were further evaluated against strains of A. baumannii that acquired resistance to colistin due to mutations of the lpxC, lpxD, pmrA, and pmrB genes. The novel analogue BP214 showed antimicrobial activity at 1 to 2 μM and a hemolytic 50% effective concentration (EC50) of >150 μM. The lower activity of its enantiomer suggests a dual, specific and nonspecific mode of action. Interestingly, colistin behaved antagonistically to BP214 when pmrAB and lpxC mutants were challenged. PMID:26574005

  5. Purification and Characterization of Catechol 1,2-Dioxygenase from Acinetobacter sp. Y64 Strain and Escherichia coli Transformants.

    PubMed

    Lin, J; Milase, R N

    2015-12-01

    This study intends to purify and characterize catechol 1,2-dioxygenase (C1,2O) of phenol-degrading Acinetobacter sp. Y64 and of E. coli transformant. Acinetobacter sp. Y64 was capable of degrading 1000 mg/L of phenol within 14 ± 2 h at 30 °C, 160 rpm and pH of 7. One C1,2O of 36 kDa was purified using ammonium sulphate precipitation and Hitrap QFF column chromatograph with 49% recovery and a 10.6-fold increase in purity. Purified Y64 C1,2O had temperature and pH optimum at 37 °C and pH 7.7 respectively with the Michaelis constant of 17.53 µM and the maximal velocity of 1.95 U/mg, respectively. The presence of Fe(3+) or Fe(2+) enhanced the activity of Y64 C1,2O while other compounds such as Ca(2+), and EDTA had an inhibitory effect. 80% of C1,2O activity remained using 4-nitrocatechol as substrate while 2% remained using 3-methylcatechol compared with that using catechol. Y64 catA gene encoding C1,2O was amplified using PCR cloned into pET22b vector and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 DE3 (pLysS) after transformation. Purified and cloned Y64 C1,2O show no significant differences in the biochemical properties. The phylogenetic tree based on the protein sequences indicates that these C1,2Os possess a common ancestry. PMID:26563518

  6. Structure of a short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) within a genomic island from a clinical strain of Acinetobacter baumannii

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Bhumika S. Tetu, Sasha G.; Harrop, Stephen J.; Paulsen, Ian T.; Mabbutt, Bridget C.

    2014-09-25

    The structure of a short-chain dehydrogenase encoded within genomic islands of A. baumannii strains has been solved to 2.4 Å resolution. This classical SDR incorporates a flexible helical subdomain. The NADP-binding site and catalytic side chains are identified. Over 15% of the genome of an Australian clinical isolate of Acinetobacter baumannii occurs within genomic islands. An uncharacterized protein encoded within one island feature common to this and other International Clone II strains has been studied by X-ray crystallography. The 2.4 Å resolution structure of SDR-WM99c reveals it to be a new member of the classical short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily. The enzyme contains a nucleotide-binding domain and, like many other SDRs, is tetrameric in form. The active site contains a catalytic tetrad (Asn117, Ser146, Tyr159 and Lys163) and water molecules occupying the presumed NADP cofactor-binding pocket. An adjacent cleft is capped by a relatively mobile helical subdomain, which is well positioned to control substrate access.

  7. Isolation, identification and diesel-oil biodegradation capacities of indigenous hydrocarbon-degrading strains of Cellulosimicrobium cellulans and Acinetobacter baumannii from tarball at Terengganu beach, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Nkem, Bruno Martins; Halimoon, Normala; Yusoff, Fatimah Md; Johari, Wan Lufti Wan; Zakaria, Mohamad Pauzi; Medipally, Srikanth Reddy; Kannan, Narayanan

    2016-06-15

    In this study, we isolated two indigenous hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria from tarball found in Rhu Sepuluh beach, Terengganu, Malaysia. These bacteria were identified based on their physiological characteristic and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, and they showed 99% similarity with Cellulosimicrobium cellulans DSM 43879 and Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 19606 respectively. Their hydrocarbon-degrading capabilities were tested using diesel-oil as sole carbon source. Results analysed using GC-MS, showed diesel-oil alkanes were degraded an average 64.4% by C. cellulans and 58.1% by A. baumannii with medium optical density reaching 0.967 (C. cellulans) and 1.515 (A. baumannii) in minimal salt media at 32°C for 10days. Individual diesel-oil alkanes were degraded between 10%-95.4% by C. cellulans and 0.2%-95.9% by A. baumannii. Both strains utilized diesel-oil for growth. The study suggests both strains are part of indigenous hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in tarball with potential for bioremediation of oil-polluted marine environment. PMID:27085593

  8. The Acinetobacter baumannii Two-Component System AdeRS Regulates Genes Required for Multidrug Efflux, Biofilm Formation, and Virulence in a Strain-Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    Richmond, Grace E.; Evans, Laura P.; Anderson, Michele J.; Wand, Matthew E.; Bonney, Laura C.; Ivens, Alasdair; Chua, Kim Lee; Webber, Mark A.; Sutton, J. Mark; Peterson, Marnie L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The opportunistic pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii is able to persist in the environment and is often multidrug resistant (MDR), causing difficulties in the treatment of infections. Here, we show that the two-component system AdeRS, which regulates the production of the AdeABC multidrug resistance efflux pump, is required for the formation of a protective biofilm in an ex vivo porcine mucosal model, which mimics a natural infection of the human epithelium. Interestingly, deletion of adeB impacted only on the ability of strain AYE to form a biofilm on plastic and only on the virulence of strain Singapore 1 for Galleria mellonella. RNA-Seq revealed that loss of AdeRS or AdeB significantly altered the transcriptional landscape, resulting in the changed expression of many genes, notably those associated with antimicrobial resistance and virulence interactions. For example, A. baumannii lacking AdeRS displayed decreased expression of adeABC, pil genes, com genes, and a pgaC-like gene, whereas loss of AdeB resulted in increased expression of pil and com genes and decreased expression of ferric acinetobactin transport system genes. These data define the scope of AdeRS-mediated regulation, show that changes in the production of AdeABC mediate important phenotypes controlled by AdeRS, and suggest that AdeABC is a viable target for antimicrobial drug and antibiofilm discovery. PMID:27094331

  9. Potent Synergy and Sustained Bactericidal Activity of a Vancomycin-Colistin Combination versus Multidrug-Resistant Strains of Acinetobacter baumannii ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, N. C.; Png, K.; Wareham, D. W.

    2010-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDRAB) presents an increasing challenge to health care. Although colistin has been used as a treatment of last resort, there is concern regarding its potential for toxicity and the emergence of resistance. The mechanism of action of colistin, however, raises the possibility of synergy with compounds that are normally inactive against Gram-negative organisms by virtue of the impermeability of the bacterial outer membrane. This study evaluated the effect of colistin combined with vancomycin on 5 previously characterized epidemic strains and 34 MDRAB clinical isolates by using time-kill assay, microdilution, and Etest methods. For all the isolates, significant synergy was demonstrated by at least one method, with reductions in the MIC of vancomycin from >256 μg/ml to ≤48 μg/ml for all strains after exposure to 0.5 μg/ml colistin. This raises the possibility of the clinical use of this combination for infections due to MDRAB, with the potential for doses lower than those currently used. PMID:20876375

  10. Role of Acinetobactin-Mediated Iron Acquisition Functions in the Interaction of Acinetobacter baumannii Strain ATCC 19606T with Human Lung Epithelial Cells, Galleria mellonella Caterpillars, and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gaddy, Jennifer A.; Arivett, Brock A.; McConnell, Michael J.; López-Rojas, Rafael; Pachón, Jerónimo

    2012-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii, which causes serious infections in immunocompromised patients, expresses high-affinity iron acquisition functions needed for growth under iron-limiting laboratory conditions. In this study, we determined that the initial interaction of the ATCC 19606T type strain with A549 human alveolar epithelial cells is independent of the production of BasD and BauA, proteins needed for acinetobactin biosynthesis and transport, respectively. In contrast, these proteins are required for this strain to persist within epithelial cells and cause their apoptotic death. Infection assays using Galleria mellonella larvae showed that impairment of acinetobactin biosynthesis and transport functions significantly reduces the ability of ATCC 19606T cells to persist and kill this host, a defect that was corrected by adding inorganic iron to the inocula. The results obtained with these ex vivo and in vivo approaches were validated using a mouse sepsis model, which showed that expression of the acinetobactin-mediated iron acquisition system is critical for ATCC 19606T to establish an infection and kill this vertebrate host. These observations demonstrate that the virulence of the ATCC 19606T strain depends on the expression of a fully active acinetobactin-mediated system. Interestingly, the three models also showed that impairment of BasD production results in an intermediate virulence phenotype compared to those of the parental strain and the BauA mutant. This observation suggests that acinetobactin intermediates or precursors play a virulence role, although their contribution to iron acquisition is less relevant than that of mature acinetobactin. PMID:22232188

  11. Molecular Epidemiology and Drug Resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii Isolated from Hospitals in Southern Poland: ICU as a Risk Factor for XDR Strains.

    PubMed

    Chmielarczyk, Agnieszka; Pilarczyk-Żurek, Magdalena; Kamińska, Wanda; Pobiega, Monika; Romaniszyn, Dorota; Ziółkowski, Grzegorz; Wójkowska-Mach, Jadwiga; Bulanda, Małgorzata

    2016-06-01

    The objectives of the present study were to investigate the carbapenemase and metallo-beta-lactamase genes of Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real time PCR and to determine the molecular epidemiology of the strains using the DiversiLab tool. From these data, correlations between drug resistance, resistance genes, and epidemiological clones may be revealed. The study was conducted on 125 A. baumannii collected over the 2013 year. The majority of the isolates from both intensive care unit (ICU) and non-ICU cases originated from pneumonia infections (79.2%), isolates from blood infections accounted for 17.6% and 3.2% were from meningitis infections. In the ICU cases compared with the non-ICU cases, bloodstream infections were more frequently diagnosed (19.2% vs. 11.5%). Sixty percent of A. baumannii strains were resistant to all the antimicrobials tested with the exception of colistin. All strains were susceptible to colistin and polymyxin B. Extensively drug-resistant (XDR) strains accounted for 80.8% of the isolates tested and these XDR strains were more frequently isolated from ICU cases than from non-ICU cases (93.9% vs. 30.8%). Among the 101 isolates of A. baumannii exhibiting the XDR pattern of resistance, 80 possessed the blaOXA-24 gene and 29 had the blaOXA-23 gene. Only two isolates possessed the blaVIM gene. The presence of the ISAba1element was confirmed among 10 strains from patients hospitalized in the ICU. Using repetitive extragenic palindromic sequence PCR (DiversiLab typing), six clones and 12 unique strains were identified, of which two clones dominated. Most isolates belonging to clone 1 (66.7%) and clone 2 (85.5%) were susceptible only to colistin. In summary, it is clear from our findings and those of other studies that carbapenem resistance among A. baumannii strains presents a serious clinical problem worldwide. Furthermore, the presence of XDR international clone II in ICUs poses a potential risk

  12. Analysis of the role of the LH92_11085 gene of a biofilm hyper-producing Acinetobacter baumannii strain on biofilm formation and attachment to eukaryotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Fraga, Laura; Pérez, Astrid; Rumbo-Feal, Soraya; Merino, María; Vallejo, Juan Andrés; Ohneck, Emily J.; Edelmann, Richard E.; Beceiro, Alejandro; Vázquez-Ucha, Juan C.; Valle, Jaione; Actis, Luis A.; Bou, Germán; Poza, Margarita

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acinetobacter baumannii is a nosocomial pathogen that has a considerable ability to survive in the hospital environment partly due to its capacity to form biofilms. The first step in the process of establishing an infection is adherence of the bacteria to target cells. Chaperone-usher pili assembly systems are involved in pilus biogenesis pathways that play an important role in adhesion to host cells and tissues as well as medically relevant surfaces. After screening a collection of strains, a biofilm hyper-producing A. baumannii strain (MAR002) was selected to describe potential targets involved in pathogenicity. MAR002 showed a remarkable ability to form biofilm and attach to A549 human alveolar epithelial cells. Analysis of MAR002 using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed a significant presence of pili on the bacterial surface. Putative protein-coding genes involved in pili formation were identified based on the newly sequenced genome of MAR002 strain (JRHB01000001/2 or NZ_JRHB01000001/2). As assessed by qRT-PCR, the gene LH92_11085, belonging to the operon LH92_11070-11085, is overexpressed (ca. 25-fold more) in biofilm-associated cells compared to exponential planktonic cells. In the present work we investigate the role of this gene on the MAR002 biofilm phenotype. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and biofilm assays showed that inactivation of LH92_11085 gene significantly reduced bacterial attachment to A549 cells and biofilm formation on plastic, respectively. TEM analysis of the LH92_11085 mutant showed the absence of long pili formations normally present in the wild-type. These observations indicate the potential role this LH92_11085 gene could play in the pathobiology of A baumannii. PMID:26854744

  13. Analysis of the role of the LH92_11085 gene of a biofilm hyper-producing Acinetobacter baumannii strain on biofilm formation and attachment to eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Fraga, Laura; Pérez, Astrid; Rumbo-Feal, Soraya; Merino, María; Vallejo, Juan Andrés; Ohneck, Emily J; Edelmann, Richard E; Beceiro, Alejandro; Vázquez-Ucha, Juan C; Valle, Jaione; Actis, Luis A; Bou, Germán; Poza, Margarita

    2016-05-18

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a nosocomial pathogen that has a considerable ability to survive in the hospital environment partly due to its capacity to form biofilms. The first step in the process of establishing an infection is adherence of the bacteria to target cells. Chaperone-usher pili assembly systems are involved in pilus biogenesis pathways that play an important role in adhesion to host cells and tissues as well as medically relevant surfaces. After screening a collection of strains, a biofilm hyper-producing A. baumannii strain (MAR002) was selected to describe potential targets involved in pathogenicity. MAR002 showed a remarkable ability to form biofilm and attach to A549 human alveolar epithelial cells. Analysis of MAR002 using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed a significant presence of pili on the bacterial surface. Putative protein-coding genes involved in pili formation were identified based on the newly sequenced genome of MAR002 strain (JRHB01000001/2 or NZ_JRHB01000001/2). As assessed by qRT-PCR, the gene LH92_11085, belonging to the operon LH92_11070-11085, is overexpressed (ca. 25-fold more) in biofilm-associated cells compared to exponential planktonic cells. In the present work we investigate the role of this gene on the MAR002 biofilm phenotype. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and biofilm assays showed that inactivation of LH92_11085 gene significantly reduced bacterial attachment to A549 cells and biofilm formation on plastic, respectively. TEM analysis of the LH92_11085 mutant showed the absence of long pili formations normally present in the wild-type. These observations indicate the potential role this LH92_11085 gene could play in the pathobiology of A baumannii. PMID:26854744

  14. Acinetobacter variabilis sp. nov. (formerly DNA group 15 sensu Tjernberg & Ursing), isolated from humans and animals.

    PubMed

    Krizova, Lenka; McGinnis, Jana; Maixnerova, Martina; Nemec, Matej; Poirel, Laurent; Mingle, Lisa; Sedo, Ondrej; Wolfgang, William; Nemec, Alexandr

    2015-03-01

    We aimed to define the taxonomic status of 16 strains which were phenetically congruent with Acinetobacter DNA group 15 described by Tjernberg & Ursing in 1989. The strains were isolated from a variety of human and animal specimens in geographically distant places over the last three decades. Taxonomic analysis was based on an Acinetobacter-targeted, genus-wide approach that included the comparative sequence analysis of housekeeping, protein-coding genes, whole-cell profiling based on matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), an array of in-house physiological and metabolic tests, and whole-genome comparative analysis. Based on analyses of the rpoB and gyrB genes, the 16 strains formed respective, strongly supported clusters clearly separated from the other species of the genus Acinetobacter. The distinctness of the group at the species level was indicated by average nucleotide identity values of ≤82 % between the whole genome sequences of two of the 16 strains (NIPH 2171(T) and NIPH 899) and those of the known species. In addition, the coherence of the group was also supported by MALDI-TOF MS. All 16 strains were non-haemolytic and non-gelatinase-producing, grown at 41 °C and utilized a rather limited number of carbon sources. Virtually every strain displayed a unique combination of metabolic and physiological features. We conclude that the 16 strains represent a distinct species of the genus Acinetobacter, for which the name Acinetobacter variabilis sp. nov. is proposed to reflect its marked phenotypic heterogeneity. The type strain is NIPH 2171(T) ( = CIP 110486(T) = CCUG 26390(T) = CCM 8555(T)). PMID:25510976

  15. Acinetobacter variabilis sp. nov. (formerly DNA group 15 sensu Tjernberg & Ursing), isolated from humans and animals

    PubMed Central

    Krizova, Lenka; McGinnis, Jana; Maixnerova, Martina; Nemec, Matej; Poirel, Laurent; Mingle, Lisa; Sedo, Ondrej; Wolfgang, William

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to define the taxonomic status of 16 strains which were phenetically congruent with Acinetobacter DNA group 15 described by Tjernberg & Ursing in 1989. The strains were isolated from a variety of human and animal specimens in geographically distant places over the last three decades. Taxonomic analysis was based on an Acinetobacter-targeted, genus-wide approach that included the comparative sequence analysis of housekeeping, protein-coding genes, whole-cell profiling based on matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), an array of in-house physiological and metabolic tests, and whole-genome comparative analysis. Based on analyses of the rpoB and gyrB genes, the 16 strains formed respective, strongly supported clusters clearly separated from the other species of the genus Acinetobacter. The distinctness of the group at the species level was indicated by average nucleotide identity values of ≤82 % between the whole genome sequences of two of the 16 strains (NIPH 2171T and NIPH 899) and those of the known species. In addition, the coherence of the group was also supported by MALDI-TOF MS. All 16 strains were non-haemolytic and non-gelatinase-producing, grown at 41 °C and utilized a rather limited number of carbon sources. Virtually every strain displayed a unique combination of metabolic and physiological features. We conclude that the 16 strains represent a distinct species of the genus Acinetobacter, for which the name Acinetobacter variabilis sp. nov. is proposed to reflect its marked phenotypic heterogeneity. The type strain is NIPH 2171T ( = CIP 110486T = CCUG 26390T = CCM 8555T). PMID:25510976

  16. Role of OXA-23 and AdeABC efflux pump for acquiring carbapenem resistance in an Acinetobacter baumannii strain carrying the blaOXA-66 gene.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yangsoon; Yum, Jong Hwa; Kim, Chang-Ki; Yong, Dongeun; Jeon, Eun Hee; Jeong, Seok Hoon; Ahn, Jee Young; Lee, Kyungwon

    2010-01-01

    This study was performed to determine the mechanisms for acquiring carbapenem resistance in six clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii. All isolates showed similar SmaI-macrorestriction patterns with less than 3 band differences by PFGE. The isolates showed a high level resistance (>32 mg/L) to both imipenem and meropenem by Etest. Phe-Arg-beta-naphthylamide lowered the MICs of carbapenems. Real-time PCR experiments showed that expression levels of the adeB gene in the six A. baumannii isolates were 10- to 40-times higher than those of imipenem-susceptible strains. Direct sequencing of PCR products showed that all isolates carried the bla(OXA-23) gene, which was preceded by ISAba1. The bla(OXA-23) probe hybridized with approximately 500-kb I-CeuI chromosomal fragments, but not with a plasmid. These findings suggest that overexpression of the AdeABC efflux pump as well as chromosome-borne OXA-23 may play a role in acquiring carbapenem resistance in our A. baumannii isolates. PMID:20124329

  17. Complete genome sequence of hypervirulent and outbreak-associated Acinetobacter baumannii strain LAC-4: epidemiology, resistance genetic determinants and potential virulence factors

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Hong-Yu; Kuang, Shan N.; He, Xinyi; Molgora, Brenda M.; Ewing, Peter J.; Deng, Zixin; Osby, Melanie; Chen, Wangxue; Xu, H. Howard

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important human pathogen due to its multi-drug resistance. In this study, the genome of an ST10 outbreak A. baumannii isolate LAC-4 was completely sequenced to better understand its epidemiology, antibiotic resistance genetic determinants and potential virulence factors. Compared with 20 other complete genomes of A. baumannii, LAC-4 genome harbors at least 12 copies of five distinct insertion sequences. It contains 12 and 14 copies of two novel IS elements, ISAba25 and ISAba26, respectively. Additionally, three novel composite transposons were identified: Tn6250, Tn6251 and Tn6252, two of which contain resistance genes. The antibiotic resistance genetic determinants on the LAC-4 genome correlate well with observed antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. Moreover, twelve genomic islands (GI) were identified in LAC-4 genome. Among them, the 33.4-kb GI12 contains a large number of genes which constitute the K (capsule) locus. LAC-4 harbors several unique putative virulence factor loci. Furthermore, LAC-4 and all 19 other outbreak isolates were found to harbor a heme oxygenase gene (hemO)-containing gene cluster. The sequencing of the first complete genome of an ST10 A. baumannii clinical strain should accelerate our understanding of the epidemiology, mechanisms of resistance and virulence of A. baumannii. PMID:25728466

  18. Acinetobacter seifertii Isolated from China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yunxing; Wang, Jianfeng; Fu, Ying; Ruan, Zhi; Yu, Yunsong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Clinical infections caused by Acinetobacter spp. have increasing public health concerns because of their global occurrence and ability to acquire multidrug resistance. Acinetobacter calcoaceticus–Acinetobacter baumannii (ACB) complex encompasses A. calcoaceticus, A. baumannii, A. pittii (formerly genomic species 3), and A nosocomial (formerly genomic species 13TU), which are predominantly responsible for clinical pathogenesis in the Acinetobacter genus. In our previous study, a putative novel species isolated from 385 non-A. baumannii spp. strains based on the rpoB gene phylogenetic tree was reported. Here, the putative novel species was identified as A. seifertii based on the whole-genome phylogenetic tree. A. seifertii was recognized as a novel member of the ACB complex and close to A. baumannii and A. nosocomials. Furthermore, we studied the characteristics of 10 A. seifertii isolates, which were distributed widely in 6 provinces in China and mainly caused infections in the elderly or children. To define the taxonomic status and characteristics, the biochemical reactions, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and whole-genome sequence analysis were performed. The phenotypic characteristics failed to distinguish A. serfertii from other species in the ACB complex. Most of the A. seifertii isolates were susceptible to antibiotics commonly used for nosocomial Acinetobacter spp. infections, but one isolate (strain A362) was resistant to ampicillin/sulbactam, ceftazidime and amikacin. The different patterns of MLST and PFGE suggested that the 10 isolates were not identical and lacked clonal relatedness. Our study reported for the first time the molecular epidemiological and genomic features of widely disseminated A. seifertii in China. These observations could enrich the knowledge of infections caused by non-A. baumannii and may provide a scientific basis for future clinical

  19. Acinetobacter kookii sp. nov., isolated from soil.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji Young; Ko, Gwangpyo; Jheong, Weonghwa; Huys, Geert; Seifert, Harald; Dijkshoorn, Lenie; Ko, Kwan Soo

    2013-12-01

    Two Gram-stain-negative, non-fermentative bacterial strains, designated 11-0202(T) and 11-0607, were isolated from soil in South Korea, and four others, LUH 13522, LUH 8638, LUH 10268 and LUH 10288, were isolated from a beet field in Germany, soil in the Netherlands, and sediment of integrated fish farms in Malaysia and Thailand, respectively. Based on 16S rRNA, rpoB and gyrB gene sequences, they are considered to represent a novel species of the genus Acinetobacter. Their 16S rRNA gene sequences showed greatest pairwise similarity to Acinetobacter beijerinckii NIPH 838(T) (97.9-98.4 %). They shared highest rpoB and gyrB gene sequence similarity with Acinetobacter johnsonii DSM 6963(T) and Acinetobacter bouvetii 4B02(T) (85.4-87.6 and 78.1-82.7 %, respectively). Strain 11-0202(T) displayed low DNA-DNA reassociation values (<40 %) with the most closely related species of the genus Acinetobacter. The six strains utilized azelate, 2,3-butanediol, ethanol and dl-lactate as sole carbon sources. Cellular fatty acid analyses showed similarities to profiles of related species of the genus Acinetobacter: summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c, C16 : 1ω6c; 24.3-27.2 %), C18 : 1ω9c (19.9-22.1 %), C16 : 0 (15.2-22.0 %) and C12 : 0 (9.2-14.2 %). On the basis of the current findings, it is concluded that the six strains represent a novel species, for which the name Acinetobacter kookii sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is 11-0202(T) ( = KCTC 32033(T) = JCM 18512(T)). PMID:23950148

  20. The Success of Acinetobacter Species; Genetic, Metabolic and Virulence Attributes

    PubMed Central

    Peleg, Anton Y.; de Breij, Anna; Adams, Mark D.; Cerqueira, Gustavo M.; Mocali, Stefano; Galardini, Marco; Nibbering, Peter H.; Earl, Ashlee M.; Ward, Doyle V.; Paterson, David L.; Seifert, Harald; Dijkshoorn, Lenie

    2012-01-01

    An understanding of why certain Acinetobacter species are more successful in causing nosocomial infections, transmission and epidemic spread in healthcare institutions compared with other species is lacking. We used genomic, phenotypic and virulence studies to identify differences between Acinetobacter species. Fourteen strains representing nine species were examined. Genomic analysis of six strains showed that the A. baumannii core genome contains many genes important for diverse metabolism and survival in the host. Most of the A. baumannii core genes were also present in one or more of the less clinically successful species. In contrast, when the accessory genome of an individual A. baumannii strain was compared to a strain of a less successful species (A. calcoaceticus RUH2202), many operons with putative virulence function were found to be present only in the A. baumannii strain, including the csu operon, the acinetobactin chromosomal cluster, and bacterial defence mechanisms. Phenotype microarray analysis showed that compared to A. calcoaceticus (RUH2202), A. baumannii ATCC 19606T was able to utilise nitrogen sources more effectively and was more tolerant to pH, osmotic and antimicrobial stress. Virulence differences were also observed, with A. baumannii ATCC 19606T, A. pittii SH024, and A. nosocomialis RUH2624 persisting and forming larger biofilms on human skin than A. calcoaceticus. A. baumannii ATCC 19606T and A. pittii SH024 were also able to survive in a murine thigh infection model, whereas the other two species were eradicated. The current study provides important insights into the elucidation of differences in clinical relevance among Acinetobacter species. PMID:23144699

  1. Acinetobacter seifertii sp. nov., a member of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex isolated from human clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Nemec, Alexandr; Krizova, Lenka; Maixnerova, Martina; Sedo, Ondrej; Brisse, Sylvain; Higgins, Paul G

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to define the taxonomic status of a phenetically distinct group of 16 strains that corresponds to Acinetobacter genomic species 'close to 13TU', a provisional genomic species of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii (ACB) complex recognized by Gerner-Smidt and Tjernberg in 1993. These strains have been isolated in different countries since the early 1990s and were mostly recovered from human clinical specimens. They were compared with 45 reference strains representing the known taxa of the ACB complex using taxonomic methods relevant to the genus Acinetobacter. Based on sequence analysis of the concatenated partial sequences (2976 bp) of seven housekeeping genes, the 16 strains formed a tight and well-supported cluster (intracluster sequence identity of ≥98.4 %) that was clearly separated from the other members of the ACB complex (≤94.7 %). The species status of the group was supported by average nucleotide identity values of ≤91.7 % between the whole genome sequence of representative strain NIPH 973(T) (NCBI accession no. APOO00000000) and those of the other species. In addition, whole-cell matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) MS analyses indicated the distinctness of the group at the protein level. Metabolic and physiological tests revealed several typical features of the group, although they did not allow its reliable differentiation from the other members of the ACB complex. We conclude that the 16 strains represent a distinct novel species, for which we propose the name Acinetobacter seifertii sp. nov. The type strain is NIPH 973(T) ( = CIP 110471(T) = CCUG 34785(T) = CCM 8535(T)). PMID:25563912

  2. Prevalence of ESBL and MBL encoding genes in Acinetobacter baumannii strains isolated from patients of intensive care units (ICU).

    PubMed

    Safari, Marzieh; Mozaffari Nejad, Amir Sasan; Bahador, Abas; Jafari, Rasool; Alikhani, Mohammad Yousef

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of ESBL and MBL encoding genes among A. baumannii isolates. In this cross sectional study, 100 A. baumannii strains were isolated from ICU wards of 3 educational hospitals of Hamadan City, Iran in 2011. Phenotypic identification of the production of ESBLs and MBLs has been carried out by using E-test and DDST methods, respectively. PCR technique was used for amplification of the ESBL and MBL encoding genes, namely: CTX-M, SHV, TEM, OXA-51, VIM-Family, IMP-Family, SPM-1, SIM-1, and GIM-1. Eighty seven (87%), 95 (95%), 98 (98%) and 95 (95%) out of 100 A. baumannii isolates were resistant to imipenem, meropenem, ceftazidime and cefotaxime, respectively. Also, 99% and 7% of the isolates were MBLs and ESBLs produced phenotypically. Thirty (30%), 20 (20%) and 58 (58%) out of 100 A. baumannii isolates have been confirmed to harbor the bla VIM-family, TEM and SHV genes, respectively. Our results show no significant relationship between the detected gens with production of MBLs and ESBLs in spite of high prevalence of MBL encoding and drug resistant A. baumannii. Probably some other genes rather than what we studied are involved in phenotypic production of MBLs and ESBLs and subsequent drug resistance in Hamadan area, Iran. PMID:26150748

  3. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of Vagococcus fluvialis, including strains isolated from human sources.

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, L M; Carvalho, M G; Merquior, V L; Steigerwalt, A G; Brenner, D J; Facklam, R R

    1997-01-01

    This study presents phenotypic and genotypic data for seven isolates of Vagococcus fluvialis, including four strains recovered from human clinical sources, one strain isolated from an environmental source, and two strains isolated from pigs. On the basis of phenotypic characteristics, most isolates were initially classified as "unidentified enterococci," because they resembled atypical arginine-negative enterococcal species. All seven strains as well as the type strain of V. fluvialis reacted with the AccuProbe Enterococcus genetic probe. The seven isolates had virtually indistinguishable whole-cell protein profiles that were similar to that of the V. fluvialis type strain and distinct from those of Enterococcus and Lactococcus species. DNA-DNA reassociation experiments confirmed that the strains were V. fluvialis. They were 71% or more related to the V. fluvialis type strain under optimum and stringent conditions, with 2.5% or less divergence within related sequences. All strains were susceptible to ampicillin, cefotaxime, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and vancomycin and were resistant to clindamycin, lomefloxacin, and ofloxacin. Strain-to-strain variation was observed in relation to susceptibilities to 18 other antimicrobial agents. Chromosomal DNA was analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) after digestion with SmaI. Distinctive PFGE patterns were generated, suggesting the nonclonal nature of V. fluvialis strains. Although the number of strains was small, this report provides molecular characterization of V. fluvialis and the first evidence of a possible connection of this species with human infections. PMID:9350732

  4. Identification of 50 Class D β-Lactamases and 65 Acinetobacter-Derived Cephalosporinases in Acinetobacter spp.

    PubMed Central

    Périchon, Bruno; Goussard, Sylvie; Walewski, Violaine; Krizova, Lenka; Cerqueira, Gustavo; Murphy, Cheryl; Feldgarden, Michael; Wortman, Jennifer; Clermont, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Whole-genome sequencing of a collection of 103 Acinetobacter strains belonging to 22 validly named species and another 16 putative species allowed detection of genes for 50 new class D β-lactamases and 65 new Acinetobacter-derived cephalosporinases (ADC). All oxacillinases (OXA) contained the three typical motifs of class D β-lactamases, STFK, (F/Y)GN, and K(S/T)G. The phylogenetic tree drawn from the OXA sequences led to an increase in the number of OXA groups from 7 to 18. The topologies of the OXA and RpoB phylogenetic trees were similar, supporting the ancient acquisition of blaOXA genes by Acinetobacter species. The class D β-lactamase genes appeared to be intrinsic to several species, such as Acinetobacter baumannii, Acinetobacter pittii, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, and Acinetobacter lwoffii. Neither blaOXA-40/143- nor blaOXA-58-like genes were detected, and their origin remains therefore unknown. The phylogenetic tree analysis based on the alignment of the sequences deduced from blaADC revealed five main clusters, one containing ADC belonging to species closely related to A. baumannii and the others composed of cephalosporinases from the remaining species. No indication of blaOXA or blaADC transfer was observed between distantly related species, except for blaOXA-279, possibly transferred from Acinetobacter genomic species 6 to Acinetobacter parvus. Analysis of β-lactam susceptibility of seven strains harboring new oxacillinases and cloning of the corresponding genes in Escherichia coli and in a susceptible A. baumannii strain indicated very weak hydrolysis of carbapenems. Overall, this study reveals a large pool of β-lactamases in different Acinetobacter spp., potentially transferable to pathogenic strains of the genus. PMID:24277043

  5. The Effect of Ivermectin in Seven Strains of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) Including a Genetically Diverse Laboratory Strain and Three Permethrin Resistant Strains

    PubMed Central

    Deus, K. M.; Saavedra-rodriguez, K.; Butters, M. P.; Black, W. C.; Foy, B. D.

    2014-01-01

    Seven different strains of Aedes aegypti (L.), including a genetically diverse laboratory strain, three laboratory-selected permethrin-resistant strains, a standard reference strain, and two recently colonized strains were fed on human blood containing various concentrations of ivermectin. Ivermectin reduced adult survival, fecundity, and hatch rate of eggs laid by ivermectin-treated adults in all seven strains. The LC50 of ivermectin for adults and the concentration that prevented 50% of eggs from hatching was calculated for all strains. Considerable variation in adult survival after an ivermectin-bloodmeal occurred among strains, and all three permethrin-resistant strains were significantly less susceptible to ivermectin than the standard reference strain. The hatch rate after an ivermectin bloodmeal was less variable among strains, and only one of the permethrin-resistant strains differed significantly from the standard reference strain. Our studies suggest that ivermectin induces adult mortality and decreases the hatch rate of eggs through different mechanisms. A correlation analysis of log-transformed LC50 among strains suggests that permethrin and ivermectin cross-resistance may occur. PMID:22493855

  6. Genotypic and Phenotypic Correlations of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii-A. calcoaceticus Complex Strains Isolated from Patients at the National Naval Medical Center

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acinetobacter baumannii-calcoaceticus complex (ABC) infections have complicated the care of U.S. combat casualties. In this study, 102 ABC isolates from wounded soldiers treated at National Naval Medical Center (NNMC) were characterized by phenotype and genotype to identify clones in this population...

  7. Tigecycline Efflux as a Mechanism for Nonsusceptibility in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Peleg, Anton Y; Adams, Jennifer; Paterson, David L

    2007-06-01

    Tigecycline has an extended spectrum of in vitro antimicrobial activities, including that against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter. After identifying bloodstream isolates of Acinetobacter with reduced susceptibilities to tigecycline, we performed a study to assess tigecycline efflux mediated by the resistance-nodulation-division-type transporter AdeABC. After exposure of two tigecycline-nonsusceptible isolates to the efflux pump inhibitor phenyl-arginine-beta-naphthylamide (PABN), a fourfold reduction in the tigecycline MIC was observed. Both tigecycline-susceptible and -nonsusceptible isolates were found to carry the gene coding for the transmembrane component of the AdeABC pump, adeB, and the two-component regulatory system comprising adeS and adeR. Previously unreported point mutations were identified in the regulatory system in tigecycline-nonsusceptible isolates. Real-time PCR identified 40-fold and 54-fold increases in adeB expression in the two tigecycline-nonsusceptible isolates compared to that in a tigecycline-susceptible isolate. In vitro exposure of a tigecycline-susceptible clinical strain to tigecycline caused a rapid rise in the MIC of tigecycline from 2 microg/ml to 24 microg/ml, which was reversible with PABN. A 25-fold increase in adeB expression was observed in a comparison between this tigecycline-susceptible isolate and its isogenic tigecycline-nonsusceptible mutant. These results indicate that an efflux-based mechanism plays a role in reduced tigecycline susceptibility in Acinetobacter. PMID:17420217

  8. Tigecycline Efflux as a Mechanism for Nonsusceptibility in Acinetobacter baumannii▿

    PubMed Central

    Peleg, Anton Y.; Adams, Jennifer; Paterson, David L.

    2007-01-01

    Tigecycline has an extended spectrum of in vitro antimicrobial activities, including that against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter. After identifying bloodstream isolates of Acinetobacter with reduced susceptibilities to tigecycline, we performed a study to assess tigecycline efflux mediated by the resistance-nodulation-division-type transporter AdeABC. After exposure of two tigecycline-nonsusceptible isolates to the efflux pump inhibitor phenyl-arginine-β-naphthylamide (PABN), a fourfold reduction in the tigecycline MIC was observed. Both tigecycline-susceptible and -nonsusceptible isolates were found to carry the gene coding for the transmembrane component of the AdeABC pump, adeB, and the two-component regulatory system comprising adeS and adeR. Previously unreported point mutations were identified in the regulatory system in tigecycline-nonsusceptible isolates. Real-time PCR identified 40-fold and 54-fold increases in adeB expression in the two tigecycline-nonsusceptible isolates compared to that in a tigecycline-susceptible isolate. In vitro exposure of a tigecycline-susceptible clinical strain to tigecycline caused a rapid rise in the MIC of tigecycline from 2 μg/ml to 24 μg/ml, which was reversible with PABN. A 25-fold increase in adeB expression was observed in a comparison between this tigecycline-susceptible isolate and its isogenic tigecycline-nonsusceptible mutant. These results indicate that an efflux-based mechanism plays a role in reduced tigecycline susceptibility in Acinetobacter. PMID:17420217

  9. Reliability of phenotypic tests for identification of Acinetobacter species.

    PubMed Central

    Gerner-Smidt, P; Tjernberg, I; Ursing, J

    1991-01-01

    A numerical approach was used for identification of 198 Acinetobacter strains assigned to DNA groups according to the classification of Tjernberg and Ursing (I. Tjernberg and J. Ursing, APMIS 97:595-605, 1989). The matrix used was constructed from data published by Bouvet and Grimont (P.J.M. Bouvet and P.A.D. Grimont, Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 36:228-240, 1986) and Bouvet and Jeanjean (P.J.M. Bouvet and S. Jeanjean, Res. Microbiol. 140:291-299, 1989). The tests chosen were those of the simplified identification scheme for Acinetobacter species devised by Bouvet and Grimont (P.J.M. Bouvet and P.A.D. Grimont, Ann. Inst. Pasteur/Microbiol. 138:569-578, 1987), namely, growth at 37, 41, and 44 degrees C, oxidation of glucose, gelatin hydrolysis, and assimilation of 14 carbon sources. Of the strains tested, 181 represented 12 DNA groups in the matrix; at a probability level of greater than or equal to 0.95, 78% of them were correctly identified, 2.2% were misidentified, and 19.8% were not identified. Seventeen strains represented two DNA groups not included in the matrix; nine of them were incorrectly assigned to a DNA group by these phenotypic tests. Because of problems of separating strains belonging to DNA groups 1, 2, 3, and 13 by using the phenotypic tests proposed by Bouvet and Grimont (Ann. Inst. Pasteur/Microbiol.), we suggest that these groups should be referred to as the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex. PMID:2007635

  10. Staring at the Cold Sun: Blue Light Regulation Is Distributed within the Genus Acinetobacter

    PubMed Central

    Golic, Adrián; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Nemec, Alexandr; Viale, Alejandro M.; Actis, Luis A.; Mussi, María Alejandra

    2013-01-01

    We previously showed that the opportunistic nosocomial pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii is able to sense and respond to light via BlsA, a BLUF (Blue-Light-sensing Using FAD)-domain photoreceptor protein. Here, we extend our previous studies showing that light regulation is not restricted to A. baumannii, but rather widespread within the genus Acinetobacter. First, we found that blue light modulates motility and biofilm formation in many species of the genus, including members of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex. In many of these species blue light acts as a key factor guiding the decision between motility or sessility at 24°C, whereas in A. baumannii, light inhibits both motility and biofilm formation. We also show that light regulation of motility occurred not only at 24°C but also at 37°C in non-A. baumannii species, contrasting the situation of A. baumannii which only shows photoregulation at 24°C. Second, we show that Acinetobacter baylyi (strain ADP1) BLUF-photoreceptors can functionally replace in vivo the A. baumannii 17978 BlsA protein and that the pathways leading to biofilm formation are inversely regulated at 24°C between these two microorganisms. Finally, we found the presence of predicted genes coding BLUF-containing proteins in all Acinetobacter sequenced genomes, even though the copy number is variable among them. Phylogenetic analysis suggests a common origin for all BLUF domains present in members of this genus, and could distinguish well-differentiated clusters that group together BLUF homologs from different species, a situation particularly clear for members of the ACB complex. Despite a role played by these BLUF domain-containing proteins in the photoregulation observed in the members of the genus Acinetobacter is a likely scenario given our findings in A. baumannii and A. baylyi, further research will contribute to confirm this possibility. PMID:23358859

  11. Sensitive, resistant and multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumanii at Saudi Arabia hospital eastern region.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mughis Uddin; Farooq, Reshma; Al-Hawashim, Nadia; Ahmed, Motasim; Yiannakou, Nearchos; Sayeed, Fatima; Sayed, Ali Rifat; Lutfullah, Sualiha

    2015-05-01

    Multi-Drug Resistant Acinetobacter baumanii have been isolated from different sites. The other Gram negative isolates included Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus vulgaris, Klebsiella oxytoca, Serratia marcescens and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. A significant rise in R and MDR but there is rise in R and MDR Acinetobacter baumanii Strains has been interceded other isolates. It is important to adopt proper and sustainable policies and guideline regarding antibiotics prescription and used. We should also check our infection control practices in our hospital or healthcare settings. We should start antibiotics stewardship in our hospital in order to reducing or overcoming antibiotics Resistant (R) and Multi-Drug Resistant (MDR) strains prevalence. PMID:26004714

  12. Diversity of Group I and II Clostridium botulinum Strains from France Including Recently Identified Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Mazuet, Christelle; Legeay, Christine; Sautereau, Jean; Ma, Laurence; Bouchier, Christiane; Bouvet, Philippe; Popoff, Michel R.

    2016-01-01

    In France, human botulism is mainly food-borne intoxication, whereas infant botulism is rare. A total of 99 group I and II Clostridium botulinum strains including 59 type A (12 historical isolates [1947–1961], 43 from France [1986–2013], 3 from other countries, and 1 collection strain), 31 type B (3 historical, 23 recent isolates, 4 from other countries, and 1 collection strain), and 9 type E (5 historical, 3 isolates, and 1 collection strain) were investigated by botulinum locus gene sequencing and multilocus sequence typing analysis. Historical C. botulinum A strains mainly belonged to subtype A1 and sequence type (ST) 1, whereas recent strains exhibited a wide genetic diversity: subtype A1 in orfX or ha locus, A1(B), A1(F), A2, A2b2, A5(B2′) A5(B3′), as well as the recently identified A7 and A8 subtypes, and were distributed into 25 STs. Clostridium botulinum A1(B) was the most frequent subtype from food-borne botulism and food. Group I C. botulinum type B in France were mainly subtype B2 (14 out of 20 historical and recent strains) and were divided into 19 STs. Food-borne botulism resulting from ham consumption during the recent period was due to group II C. botulinum B4. Type E botulism is rare in France, 5 historical and 1 recent strains were subtype E3. A subtype E12 was recently identified from an unusual ham contamination. Clostridium botulinum strains from human botulism in France showed a wide genetic diversity and seems to result not from a single evolutionary lineage but from multiple and independent genetic rearrangements. PMID:27189984

  13. Diversity of Group I and II Clostridium botulinum Strains from France Including Recently Identified Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Mazuet, Christelle; Legeay, Christine; Sautereau, Jean; Ma, Laurence; Bouchier, Christiane; Bouvet, Philippe; Popoff, Michel R

    2016-01-01

    In France, human botulism is mainly food-borne intoxication, whereas infant botulism is rare. A total of 99 group I and II Clostridium botulinum strains including 59 type A (12 historical isolates [1947-1961], 43 from France [1986-2013], 3 from other countries, and 1 collection strain), 31 type B (3 historical, 23 recent isolates, 4 from other countries, and 1 collection strain), and 9 type E (5 historical, 3 isolates, and 1 collection strain) were investigated by botulinum locus gene sequencing and multilocus sequence typing analysis. Historical C. botulinum A strains mainly belonged to subtype A1 and sequence type (ST) 1, whereas recent strains exhibited a wide genetic diversity: subtype A1 in orfX or ha locus, A1(B), A1(F), A2, A2b2, A5(B2') A5(B3'), as well as the recently identified A7 and A8 subtypes, and were distributed into 25 STs. Clostridium botulinum A1(B) was the most frequent subtype from food-borne botulism and food. Group I C. botulinum type B in France were mainly subtype B2 (14 out of 20 historical and recent strains) and were divided into 19 STs. Food-borne botulism resulting from ham consumption during the recent period was due to group II C. botulinum B4. Type E botulism is rare in France, 5 historical and 1 recent strains were subtype E3. A subtype E12 was recently identified from an unusual ham contamination. Clostridium botulinum strains from human botulism in France showed a wide genetic diversity and seems to result not from a single evolutionary lineage but from multiple and independent genetic rearrangements. PMID:27189984

  14. The Population Structure of Acinetobacter baumannii: Expanding Multiresistant Clones from an Ancestral Susceptible Genetic Pool

    PubMed Central

    Diancourt, Laure; Passet, Virginie; Nemec, Alexandr; Dijkshoorn, Lenie; Brisse, Sylvain

    2010-01-01

    Outbreaks of hospital infections caused by multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strains are of increasing concern worldwide. Although it has been reported that particular outbreak strains are geographically widespread, little is known about the diversity and phylogenetic relatedness of A. baumannii clonal groups. Sequencing of internal portions of seven housekeeping genes (total 2,976 nt) was performed in 154 A. baumannii strains covering the breadth of known diversity and including representatives of previously recognized international clones, and in 19 representatives of other Acinetobacter species. Restricted amounts of diversity and a star-like phylogeny reveal that A. baumannii is a genetically compact species that suffered a severe bottleneck in the recent past, possibly linked to a restricted ecological niche. A. baumannii is neatly demarcated from its closest relative (genomic species 13TU) and other Acinetobacter species. Multilocus sequence typing analysis demonstrated that the previously recognized international clones I to III correspond to three clonal complexes, each made of a central, predominant genotype and few single locus variants, a hallmark of recent clonal expansion. Whereas antimicrobial resistance was almost universal among isolates of these and a novel international clone (ST15), isolates of the other genotypes were mostly susceptible. This dichotomy indicates that antimicrobial resistance is a major selective advantage that drives the ongoing rapid clonal expansion of these highly problematic agents of nosocomial infections. PMID:20383326

  15. Organic acid production and plant growth promotion as a function of phosphate solubilization by Acinetobacter rhizosphaerae strain BIHB 723 isolated from the cold deserts of the trans-Himalayas.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Arvind; Sharma, Natasha; Vyas, Pratibha; Sood, Swati; Rahi, Praveen; Pathania, Vijaylata; Prasad, Ramdeen

    2010-11-01

    An efficient phosphate-solubilizing plant growth-promoting Acinetobacter rhizosphaerae strain BIHB 723 exhibited significantly higher solubilization of tricalcium phosphate (TCP) than Udaipur rock phosphate (URP), Mussoorie rock phosphate (MRP) and North Carolina rock phosphate (NCRP). Qualitative and quantitative differences were discerned in the gluconic, oxalic, 2-keto gluconic, lactic, malic and formic acids during the solubilization of various inorganic phosphates by the strain. Gluconic acid was the main organic acid produced during phosphate solubilization. Formic acid production was restricted to TCP solubilization and oxalic acid production to the solubilization of MRP, URP and NCRP. A significant increase in plant height, shoot fresh weight, shoot dry weight, root length, root dry weight, and root, shoot and soil phosphorus (P) contents was recorded with the inoculated treatments over the uninoculated NP(0)K or NP(TCP)K treatments. Plant growth promotion as a function of phosphate solubilization suggested that the use of bacterial strain would be a beneficial addition to the agriculture practices in TCP-rich soils in reducing the application of phosphatic fertilizers. PMID:20821196

  16. Acinetobacter junii as an aetiological agent of corneal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Broniek, G; Langwińska-Wośko, E; Szaflik, J; Wróblewska, M

    2014-12-01

    Rods of the Acinetobacter genus are present mainly in the external environment (e.g. water, soil) and in animals, while in humans they may comprise physiological flora. The main pathogenic species is Acinetobacter baumannii complex, which constitutes a common cause of nosocomial infections, particularly in patients with underlying diseases and risk factors (e.g. prior broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy, malignancy, central venous catheter, mechanical ventilation); however, infections of the eye caused by strains of Acinetobacter spp. are very rare. We report a unique case of community-acquired corneal ulcer caused by Acinetobacter non-baumannii (possibly A. junii), in a patient with no risk factors identified. The case highlights the need for obtaining a sample from the cornea for bacteriological culture in the case of suspected ophthalmic infection as identification of the pathogen, and assessment of its susceptibility profile enables proper antibiotic therapy, improves the outcome and may constitute an eyesight-saving management. PMID:25056128

  17. Prevalence of Aminoglycoside Resistance Genes in Acinetobacter baumannii Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Aliakbarzade, Katayun; Farajnia, Safar; Karimi Nik, Ashraf; Zarei, Farzaneh; Tanomand, Asghar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the major causes of nosocomial infections and is resistant to most available antibiotics. Aminoglycosides remain as drugs of choice for treatment of Acinetobacter infections yet resistance to aminoglycosides has increased in the recent years. Objectives: The present study investigated the prevalence of genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes in A. baumannii strains isolated from patients of Tabriz city, northwest of Iran. Materials and Methods: A total of 103 Acinetobacter isolates were collected from Imam Reza Hospital of Tabriz University of medical sciences. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of the isolates to different antimicrobial agents including cephalosporins, gentamicin, amikacin, tobramycin, colistin and polymyxin, were evaluated by the disc diffusion method. The frequency of aminoglycoside modifying enzymes encoding genes aacC1, aphA6, aadA1 and aadB was analyzed by the PCR method. Results: Antimicrobial susceptibility analysis showed that the highest resistance was towards beta−lactam antibiotics including cephalosporins whereas the highest sensitivity was observed towards colistin (77%) and polymyxin (84%). The resistance rate to aminoglycosides was 81%, 86% and 63% for amikacin, gentamicin and tobramycin, respectively. The PCR results showed that among the 103 A. baumannii isolates, 56 (65.11 %) were positive for aacC1, 52 (60.46 %) for aphA6, 24 (27.9 %) for aadA1 and 16 (18.6 %) for aadB resistant genes. Conclusions: The results of this study indicated that the genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes are prevalent in A. baumannii isolates in the study region, which highlighted the necessity of considering preventive measures to control dissemination of these resistance genes. PMID:25632323

  18. Modifying enzymes related aminoglycoside: analyses of resistant Acinetobacter isolates

    PubMed Central

    Atasoy, Ali Riza; Ciftci, Ihsan Hakki; Petek, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides by nucleotidyltransferases, acetyltransferases and/or phosphotransferases accounts for the majority of aminoglycoside-resistant Acinetobacter isolates. In this study, we investigated the relationship between aminoglycoside resistance and the presence of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes in Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolate groups with different resistance profiles. Thirty-two clinical A. baumannii isolates were included in this study. Acinetobacter isolates were divided into 4 groups according to results of susceptibility testing. The presence of genes encoding the following aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes; aph (3’)-V1, aph (3’)-Ia, aac (3)-Ia, aac (3) IIa, aac (6’)-Ih, aac (6’)-Ib and ant (2’)-Ia responsible for resistance was investigated by PCR in all strains. The acetyltransferase (aac (6’)-Ib, aac (3)-Ia) and phosphotransferase (aph (3’)-Ia) gene regions were identified in the first group, which comprised nine imipenem, meropenem, and gentamicin-resistant isolates. The acetyltransferase (aac (6’)-Ib, aac (3)-Ia), phosphotransferase (aph (3’)-VI) and nucleotidyltransferase (ant2-Ia) gene regions were identified in the second group, which was composed of nine imipenem-resistant, meropenem-resistant and gentamicin-sensitive isolates. The acetyltransferase (aac (3)-Ia) and phosphotransferase (aph (3’)-Ia) regions were identified in the fourth group, which comprised eight imipenem-sensitive, meropenem-sensitive and gentamicin-resistant isolates. Modifying enzyme gene regions were not detected in the third group, which was composed of six imipenem, meropenem and gentamicin-sensitive isolates. Our data are consistent with previous reports, with the exception of four isolates. Both acetyltransferases and phosphotransferases were widespread in A. baumannii clinical isolates in our study. However, the presence of the enzyme alone is insufficient to explain the resistance rates. Therefore, the

  19. Medically Relevant Acinetobacter Species Require a Type II Secretion System and Specific Membrane-Associated Chaperones for the Export of Multiple Substrates and Full Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Christian M.; Kinsella, Rachel L.; Palmer, Lauren D.; Skaar, Eric P.; Feldman, Mario F.

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii, A. nosocomialis, and A. pittii have recently emerged as opportunistic human pathogens capable of causing severe human disease; however, the molecular mechanisms employed by Acinetobacter to cause disease remain poorly understood. Many pathogenic members of the genus Acinetobacter contain genes predicted to encode proteins required for the biogenesis of a type II secretion system (T2SS), which have been shown to mediate virulence in many Gram-negative organisms. Here we demonstrate that Acinetobacter nosocomialis strain M2 produces a functional T2SS, which is required for full virulence in both the Galleria mellonella and murine pulmonary infection models. Importantly, this is the first bona fide secretion system shown to be required for virulence in Acinetobacter. Using bioinformatics, proteomics, and mutational analyses, we show that Acinetobacter employs its T2SS to export multiple substrates, including the lipases LipA and LipH as well as the protease CpaA. Furthermore, the Acinetobacter T2SS, which is found scattered amongst five distinct loci, does not contain a dedicated pseudopilin peptidase, but instead relies on the type IV prepilin peptidase, reinforcing the common ancestry of these two systems. Lastly, two of the three secreted proteins characterized in this study require specific chaperones for secretion. These chaperones contain an N-terminal transmembrane domain, are encoded adjacently to their cognate effector, and their disruption abolishes type II secretion of their cognate effector. Bioinformatic analysis identified putative chaperones located adjacent to multiple previously known type II effectors from several Gram-negative bacteria, which suggests that T2SS chaperones constitute a separate class of membrane-associated chaperones mediating type II secretion. PMID:26764912

  20. Development of an rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probe specific for the genus Acinetobacter and its application for in situ monitoring in activated sludge.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, M; Erhart, R; Manz, W; Amann, R; Lemmer, H; Wedi, D; Schleifer, K H

    1994-01-01

    Enhanced biological phosphate removal in an anaerobic-aerobic activated sludge system has generally been ascribed to members of the genus Acinetobacter. A genus-specific 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probe was developed to investigate the role of Acinetobacter spp. in situ. Nonisotopic dot blot hybridization to 66 reference strains, including the seven described Acinetobacter spp., demonstrated the expected probe specificity. Fluorescent derivatives were used for in situ monitoring of Acinetobacter spp. in the anaerobic and aerobic compartments of a sewage treatment plant with enhanced biological phosphate removal. Microbial community structures were further analyzed with oligonucleotide probes specific for the alpha, beta, or gamma subclasses of the class Proteobacteria, for the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium cluster, for gram-positive bacteria with a high G + C DNA content, and for all bacteria. Total cell counts were determined by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining. In both the anaerobic and the aerobic basins, the activated sludge samples were dominated by members of the class Proteobacteria belonging to the beta subclass and by gram-positive bacteria with a high G + C DNA content. Acinetobacter spp. constituted less than 10% of all bacteria. For both basins, the microbial community structures determined with molecular techniques were compared with the compositions of the heterotrophic saprophytic microbiota determined with agar plating techniques. Isolates on nutrient-rich medium were classified by whole-cell hybridization with rRNA-targeted probes and fatty acid analysis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:7512807

  1. Plane strain finite element analysis of sheet forming operations including bending effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Uk Youn

    1993-01-01

    An improved finite element method suitable for the plane-strain analysis of sheet metal forming operations is presented. The method incorporates a computationally efficient shell model and a consistent frictional contact algorithm through an implicit updated Lagrangian formulation. The workpiece material model is rigid-viscoplastic with a choice of power law hardening and plastic normal anisotropy and is capable of modeling a wide variety of sheet metals. A simplified nonlinear incremental shell theory is employed along with an optional reduced integration through the thickness for computational efficiency, while retaining the advantages of the kinematic model containing the bending effects. Complex tool geometry can be handled by discrete data points, by primitives (lines and arcs), or by analytical functions. The capabilities of the method are demonstrated through verification problems and comparisons with experimental data, benchmark results, and published data for several practical problems of the sheet metal forming industry. The problems include stretching and/or deep drawing operations, simulation of automobile panel section, and brake bending operation. As an independent investigation from the first portion of the dissertation, measured data from a set of simple bending experiments of two types of aluminum are presented and analyzed. Generated data from the experiments include strain histories (loading and unloading), spring back information (spring back angle and strains), and friction coefficients. As a by-product, a simple way of estimating the friction coefficient (Coulomb's law) during a bending operation is proposed and demonstrated.

  2. Antimicrobial active herbal compounds against Acinetobacter baumannii and other pathogens.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Vishvanath; Roy, Ranita; Tiwari, Monalisa

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens cause a number of lethal diseases. Opportunistic bacterial pathogens grouped into ESKAPE pathogens that are linked to the high degree of morbidity, mortality and increased costs as described by Infectious Disease Society of America. Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the ESKAPE pathogens which cause respiratory infection, pneumonia and urinary tract infections. The prevalence of this pathogen increases gradually in the clinical setup where it can grow on artificial surfaces, utilize ethanol as a carbon source and resists desiccation. Carbapenems, a β-lactam, are the most commonly prescribed drugs against A. baumannii. The high level of acquired and intrinsic carbapenem resistance mechanisms acquired by these bacteria makes their eradication difficult. The pharmaceutical industry has no solution to this problem. Hence, it is an urgent requirement to find a suitable alternative to carbapenem, a commonly prescribed drug for Acinetobacter infection. In order to do this, here we have made an effort to review the active compounds of plants that have potent antibacterial activity against many bacteria including carbapenem resistant strain of A. baumannii. We have also briefly highlighted the separation and identification methods used for these active compounds. This review will help researchers involved in the screening of herbal active compounds that might act as a replacement for carbapenem. PMID:26150810

  3. Antimicrobial active herbal compounds against Acinetobacter baumannii and other pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Vishvanath; Roy, Ranita; Tiwari, Monalisa

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens cause a number of lethal diseases. Opportunistic bacterial pathogens grouped into ESKAPE pathogens that are linked to the high degree of morbidity, mortality and increased costs as described by Infectious Disease Society of America. Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the ESKAPE pathogens which cause respiratory infection, pneumonia and urinary tract infections. The prevalence of this pathogen increases gradually in the clinical setup where it can grow on artificial surfaces, utilize ethanol as a carbon source and resists desiccation. Carbapenems, a β-lactam, are the most commonly prescribed drugs against A. baumannii. The high level of acquired and intrinsic carbapenem resistance mechanisms acquired by these bacteria makes their eradication difficult. The pharmaceutical industry has no solution to this problem. Hence, it is an urgent requirement to find a suitable alternative to carbapenem, a commonly prescribed drug for Acinetobacter infection. In order to do this, here we have made an effort to review the active compounds of plants that have potent antibacterial activity against many bacteria including carbapenem resistant strain of A. baumannii. We have also briefly highlighted the separation and identification methods used for these active compounds. This review will help researchers involved in the screening of herbal active compounds that might act as a replacement for carbapenem. PMID:26150810

  4. Structural Relationship of the Lipid A Acyl Groups to Activation of Murine Toll-Like Receptor 4 by Lipopolysaccharides from Pathogenic Strains of Burkholderia mallei, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Korneev, Kirill V.; Arbatsky, Nikolay P.; Molinaro, Antonio; Palmigiano, Angelo; Shaikhutdinova, Rima Z.; Shneider, Mikhail M.; Pier, Gerald B.; Kondakova, Anna N.; Sviriaeva, Ekaterina N.; Sturiale, Luisa; Garozzo, Domenico; Kruglov, Andrey A.; Nedospasov, Sergei A.; Drutskaya, Marina S.; Knirel, Yuriy A.; Kuprash, Dmitry V.

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is required for activation of innate immunity upon recognition of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Gram-negative bacteria. The ability of TLR4 to respond to a particular LPS species is important since insufficient activation may not prevent bacterial growth while excessive immune reaction may lead to immunopathology associated with sepsis. Here, we investigated the biological activity of LPS from Burkholderia mallei that causes glanders, and from the two well-known opportunistic pathogens Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (causative agents of nosocomial infections). For each bacterial strain, R-form LPS preparations were purified by hydrophobic chromatography and the chemical structure of lipid A, an LPS structural component, was elucidated by HR-MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The biological activity of LPS samples was evaluated by their ability to induce production of proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6 and TNF, by bone marrow-derived macrophages. Our results demonstrate direct correlation between the biological activity of LPS from these pathogenic bacteria and the extent of their lipid A acylation. PMID:26635809

  5. [Problem of treatment for pyo-inflammatory complications caused by Acinetobacter].

    PubMed

    Bogomolova, N S; Bol'shakov, L V; Kuznetsova, S M

    2014-01-01

    The article deals with analysis of a detection frequency and antibacterial treatment resistance of Acinetobacter spp.of different species affiliation. Strains of bacteria detected in patients with pyo-inflammatory complications after surgeries (period from 2010 to 2012) were involved in the study 137 strains of Acinetobacter spp. were detected and studied Fraction of Acinetobacter spp. in 2010, 2011 and 2012 was 2.3, 3 and 3.4% respectively. Fraction of P. aeruginosain all non-fermentative Gram-negative bacteria (NFGNB) decreased by 120% and fraction of Acinetobacter spp. increased by 200-250%. Acinetobacter spp. detection frequency was not significantly changed in the period from 2006 to 2012. However the fraction of Acinetobacter spp. in NFGNB increased by 150% and was 29% in 2012. Detection frequency of A. baumanii sharply increased in 2012. A study of antibacterial treatment resistance of Acinetobacter spp. (10 antibacterial medicines) showed that Polymyxin B and E (Colistin) was the most effective medicine for A. baumanii and A. calcoaceticus infection. 85-95% of Acinetobacter spp.strains kept sensitivity to this antibacterial medicine. 66-88.9% of A. baumanii strains, 66.7-81.8% of A. alcoaceticus and 66.6% of other Acinetobacter spp. were sensitive to Tigecycline. Dioxidine effectiveness was close to Tigecycline in 66.7-80% of A. baumanii strains. 85-100% of A. calcoaceticus strains were sensitive to Dioxidine. There is a trend of decreasing of A. baumanii sensitivity to Carbapenems by 200%. Fraction of strains sensitive to Meropenem and Imipenem in 2012 was 21.4% and 16.7% respectively. All studied strains of A. lwoffi and A. haemolyticus kept sensitivity to Carbapenems. In 2012 23.8% of A. baumanii and 50% of A. calcoaceticus strains were sensitivity to Amikacin, meanwhile A. lwoffi and A. haemolyticus were not sensitive to this medicine. 31.3% of A. baumanii and 50% of A. calcoaceticus strains were sensitive to Ceftazidime/Sulbactam. 5.3% of A. baumanii

  6. Occurrence of High Catalase-containing Acinetobacter in Spacecraft Assembly Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, K. B.; Derecho, I.; La Duc, M. T.; Vaishampayan, P.; Venkateswaran, K. J.; Mogul, R.

    2010-04-01

    In summary, the measurement of high catalase specific activity values for spacecraft-associated Acinetobacter strains is potentially the result of adaptation towards the harsh conditions of the clean rooms and assembly process.

  7. Herellea (Acinetobacter) and Pseudomonas ovalis (P. putida) from Frozen Foods

    PubMed Central

    Eller, Charles

    1969-01-01

    Seventeen strains of Herellea vaginicola (Acinetobacter antitratus) and 8 of Pseudomonas ovalis (P. putida), isolated from 23 (6.3%) of 364 samples of frozen, foil-pack foods, were identified and characterized morphologically and biochemically. Herellea was isolated from 17 foods (4.7%), P. ovalis from 6 (1.6%). No Mima were found. The food samples included precooked frozen meats, precooked and uncooked frozen vegetables, and uncooked frozen desserts. The bacteria were detected in the food with a procedure used generally for the detection of salmonellae. The pseudomonad simulated the characteristics of Herellea on Sellers differential agar, except for the fact that it fluoresced. From consideration of the habitat and pathogenicity of Herellea and Mima, it is concluded that, although the presence of these bacteria may not be desirable, their significance in food remains unanswered. PMID:4886860

  8. Efflux Pump Inhibitor Phenylalanine-Arginine Β-Naphthylamide Effect on the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration of Imipenem in Acinetobacter baumannii Strains Isolated From Hospitalized Patients in Shahid Motahari Burn Hospital, Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Gholami, Mehrdad; Hashemi, Ali; Hakemi-Vala, Mojdeh; Goudarzi, Hossein; Hallajzadeh, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a highly troublesome pathogen and a leading cause of mortality and morbidity among hospitalized burn patients. Objectives: The aims of this study were to determine the frequency of the AdeABC genes and the role of the efflux pump (s) in the imipenem resistance of A. baumannii strains isolated from burn patients. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on 60 A. baumannii isolates collected from 240 wound samples of burn patients admitted to the Burn Unit of Shahid Motahari Burn hospital, Tehran, Iran. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion and broth microdilution according to the clinical and laboratory standards institute (CLSI) guidelines. The activity of the efflux pump was evaluated using the efflux pump inhibitor, the phenylalanine-arginine Β-naphthylamide (PAΒN). The AdeABC genes were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing. Results: In this study, 100% of the isolates were resistant to cefotaxime, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin, cefepime, piperacillin, meropenem, co-trimoxazole, and piperacillin/tazobactam; 56 (94%) to gentamicin; 50 (81%) to amikacin; 58 (97%) to imipenem; and 45 (76%) to tetracycline. Additionally,all the isolates were susceptible to colistin. The susceptibility of the strains to imipenem was highly increased in the presence of the efflux pump inhibitor such that for 58 (96.6%) of the isolates, the PAΒN reduced the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) by 4- to 64-fold. The adeA and adeB genes were detected in 60 (100%) of the isolates, and the adeC gene was present in 51 (85%). Conclusions: The efflux pump may play a role in antibiotic resistance in A. baumannii isolates. The ability of A. baumannii isolates to acquire drug resistance by the efflux pump mechanism is a concern. Thus, new strategies are required in order to eliminate the efflux transport activity from resistant A. baumannii isolates causing

  9. The Genomic Diversification of the Whole Acinetobacter Genus: Origins, Mechanisms, and Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Touchon, Marie; Cury, Jean; Yoon, Eun-Jeong; Krizova, Lenka; Cerqueira, Gustavo C.; Murphy, Cheryl; Feldgarden, Michael; Wortman, Jennifer; Clermont, Dominique; Lambert, Thierry; Grillot-Courvalin, Catherine; Nemec, Alexandr; Courvalin, Patrice; Rocha, Eduardo P.C.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial genomics has greatly expanded our understanding of microdiversification patterns within a species, but analyses at higher taxonomical levels are necessary to understand and predict the independent rise of pathogens in a genus. We have sampled, sequenced, and assessed the diversity of genomes of validly named and tentative species of the Acinetobacter genus, a clade including major nosocomial pathogens and biotechnologically important species. We inferred a robust global phylogeny and delimited several new putative species. The genus is very ancient and extremely diverse: Genomes of highly divergent species share more orthologs than certain strains within a species. We systematically characterized elements and mechanisms driving genome diversification, such as conjugative elements, insertion sequences, and natural transformation. We found many error-prone polymerases that may play a role in resistance to toxins, antibiotics, and in the generation of genetic variation. Surprisingly, temperate phages, poorly studied in Acinetobacter, were found to account for a significant fraction of most genomes. Accordingly, many genomes encode clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas systems with some of the largest CRISPR-arrays found so far in bacteria. Integrons are strongly overrepresented in Acinetobacter baumannii, which correlates with its frequent resistance to antibiotics. Our data suggest that A. baumannii arose from an ancient population bottleneck followed by population expansion under strong purifying selection. The outstanding diversification of the species occurred largely by horizontal transfer, including some allelic recombination, at specific hotspots preferentially located close to the replication terminus. Our work sets a quantitative basis to understand the diversification of Acinetobacter into emerging resistant and versatile pathogens. PMID:25313016

  10. Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in Veterinary Clinics, Germany

    PubMed Central

    Prenger-Berninghoff, Ellen; Weiss, Reinhard; van der Reijden, Tanny; van den Broek, Peterhans; Baljer, Georg; Dijkshoorn, Lenie

    2011-01-01

    An increase in prevalence of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter spp. in hospitalized animals was observed at the Justus-Liebig-University (Germany). Genotypic analysis of 56 isolates during 2000–2008 showed 3 clusters that corresponded to European clones I–III. Results indicate spread of genotypically related strains within and among veterinary clinics in Germany. PMID:21888812

  11. Acinetobacter plantarum sp. nov. isolated from wheat seedlings plant.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Singh, Hina; Yu, Hongshan; Jin, Feng-Xie; Yi, Tae-Hoo

    2016-07-01

    Strain THG-SQM11(T), a Gram-negative, aerobic, non-motile, coccus-shaped bacterium, was isolated from wheat seedlings plant in P. R. China. Strain THG-SQM11(T) was closely related to members of the genus Acinetobacter and showed the highest 16S rRNA sequence similarities with Acinetobacter junii (97.9 %) and Acinetobacter kookii (96.1 %). DNA-DNA hybridization showed 41.3 ± 2.4 % DNA reassociation with A. junii KCTC 12416(T). Chemotaxonomic data revealed that strain THG-SQM11(T) possesses ubiquinone-9 as the predominant respiratory quinone, C18:1 ω9c, summed feature 3 (C16:1 ω7c and/or C16:1 ω6c), and C16:0 as the major fatty acids. The major polar lipids were found to be diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, and phosphatidylcholine. The DNA G+C content was 41.7 mol %. These data, together with phenotypic characterization, suggest that the isolate represents a novel species, for which the name Acinetobacter plantarum sp. nov. is proposed, with THG-SQM11(T) as the type strain (=CCTCC AB 2015123(T) =KCTC 42611(T)). PMID:26869166

  12. Transferable amikacin resistance in Acinetobacter spp. due to a new type of 3'-aminoglycoside phosphotransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, T; Gerbaud, G; Courvalin, P

    1988-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii BM2580 resistant to kanamycin and structurally related antibiotics, including amikacin, was isolated from a clinical specimen. A phosphocellulose paper-binding assay and DNA annealing studies indicated that resistance to aminoglycosides in BM2580 was due to synthesis of a new type of 3'-aminoglycoside phosphotransferase. The gene conferring resistance to kanamycin-amikacin in this strain was carried by a 63-kilobase plasmid, pIP1841, self-transferable to A. baumannii, A. haemolyticus, and A. lwoffii but not to Escherichia coli. The aminoglycoside resistance gene of pIP1841 was cloned in E. coli, where it was expressed. Images PMID:2831812

  13. Investigation of the Distributions and Types of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in Different Departments in a General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Yaner; Dong, Xuejun; Wang, Zongxin; Yang, Guocan; Liu, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acinetobacter baumannii is the most prevalent strain in hospitals and different clinical departments. Objectives: The current study aimed to investigate the genetic characteristics and resistance mechanisms of A. baumannii isolated from clinical samples in Shaoxing people’s hospital affiliated to Zhejiang University, Shaoxing, China. Patients and Methods: Acinetobacter baumannii strains were isolated from blood, phlegm and skin of the patients hospitalized in different departments as respiratory medicine, plastic surgery and intensive care unit (ICU). Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was used to characterize the isolates. Kirby-Bauer test was used to evaluate antibiotic resistance of the bacteria. The expression of resistance inducing genes was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results were analyzed and compared. Results: Two bacterial types, ST208, and ST218, were identified in all 140 samples. The ST208 mainly came from ICU and department of respiratory medicine, while ST218 from department of plastic surgery; 70.21% of ST208 and 84.78% of ST218 were carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAB) and carbapenem-susceptible Acinetobacter baumannii (CSAB), respectively. Multidrug-resistance genes in CRAB isolated from the hospital mainly included, oxa-23, oxa-5, intl 1 and qaceΔ1-sul 1. Besides, the highest and lowest antibiotic resistance was observed in the strains isolated from blood samples and wounds, respectively. Conclusions: The distribution of AB varies in different clinical departments and samples. In the hospital under study, the main types of AB were ST208 and ST218. The genes which affect the ability of antibiotic-resistance were oxa-23, oxa-51, intl 1 and qaceΔ1-sul 1. PMID:26487921

  14. Antibiotic sensitivity of Haemophilus influenzae strains including three recent chloramphenicol-resistant isolates.

    PubMed

    Zackrisson, G; Brorson, J E

    1980-08-01

    The antibiotic sensitivity of 100 recent isolates of Haemophilus influenzae was determined. Three strains were resistant to chloramphenicol with minimal inhibitory concentrations of 16 microgram/ml. Of these three resistant strains, one produced betalactamase and one was resistant to sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim. The remaining strains were inhibited by 0.25-2.0 microgram/ml of chloramphenicol. Ampicillin and benzylpenicillin were found to inhibit all but the betalactamase-producing strains at low concentrations. Regarding sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim 96% had minimal inhibitory concentrations of 2.5-0.12 microgram/ml or less, while two strains were resistant. The invitro efficacy of erythromycin against H. influenzae was low. The majority of the strains was inhibited by low concentrations of doxycycline and cefuroxime while cefoxitin exhibited minimal inhibitory concentrations values usually exceeding 1 microgram/ml. The minimal inhibitory concentrations registered are compared to the concentrations of the different antibiotics attainable in certain body fluids. PMID:6968146

  15. First report of OXA-72 producing Acinetobacter baumannii in Romania.

    PubMed

    Georgescu, M; Gheorghe, I; Dudu, A; Czobor, I; Costache, M; Cristea, V-C; Lazăr, V; Chifiriuc, M C

    2016-09-01

    This is the first report of an OXA-72-producing Acinetobacter baumannii strain in Romania, isolated from chronic leg ulcer samples. Identification of the strain was performed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Presence of carbapenem resistance genes was investigated by PCR and sequencing. Our data support the spread of the bla OXA-72 gene in Eastern Europe. PMID:27547405

  16. Characterization of hydrogen peroxide-resistant Acinetobacter species isolated during the Mars Phoenix spacecraft assembly.

    PubMed

    Derecho, I; McCoy, K B; Vaishampayan, P; Venkateswaran, K; Mogul, R

    2014-10-01

    The microbiological inventory of spacecraft and the associated assembly facility surfaces represent the primary pool of forward contaminants that may impact the integrity of life-detection missions. Herein, we report on the characterization of several strains of hydrogen peroxide-resistant Acinetobacter, which were isolated during the Mars Phoenix lander assembly. All Phoenix-associated Acinetobacter strains possessed very high catalase specific activities, and the specific strain, A. gyllenbergii 2P01AA, displayed a survival against hydrogen peroxide (no loss in 100 mM H2O2 for 1 h) that is perhaps the highest known among Gram-negative and non-spore-forming bacteria. Proteomic characterizations reveal a survival mechanism inclusive of proteins coupled to peroxide degradation (catalase and alkyl hydroperoxide reductase), energy/redox management (dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase), protein synthesis/folding (EF-G, EF-Ts, peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase, DnaK), membrane functions (OmpA-like protein and ABC transporter-related protein), and nucleotide metabolism (HIT family hydrolase). Together, these survivability and biochemical parameters support the hypothesis that oxidative tolerance and the related biochemical features are the measurable phenotypes or outcomes for microbial survival in the spacecraft assembly facilities, where the low-humidity (desiccation) and clean (low-nutrient) conditions may serve as selective pressures. Hence, the spacecraft-associated Acinetobacter, due to the conferred oxidative tolerances, may ultimately hinder efforts to reduce spacecraft bioburden when using chemical sterilants, thus suggesting that non-spore-forming bacteria may need to be included in the bioburden accounting for future life-detection missions. PMID:25243569

  17. Screening of antibiotics resistance to Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii by an advanced expert system.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Hakuo

    2005-12-01

    The VITEK2 advanced expert system (AES) gives information about the antibiotics-resistance mechanisms based on the biological validation derived from the VITEK2 susceptibility result. In this study, we investigated whether or not this system correctly categorized the beta-lactamase resistance mechanism data derived from the VITEK2 susceptibility result using the testing card, AST-N025, with Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii. We used 131 strains, and their phenotypes were determined according to the biological and genetic screening. The AES analysis result matched the phenotype testing in 120 (91.6%) of the 131 strains. Incorrect findings were found in six strains, including three strains of Serratia marcescens. The resistance mechanism could not be determined in five strains, including three strains of Providencia rettgeri. The analysis of those phenotypes agreed in 34 (97.1%) among 35 strains with extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL), and in 27 (96.4%) among 28 strains with high-level cephalosporinase. The agreement ratio in the phenotype was very high as we expected. The incorrect and nondeterminable samples were strains with relatively high cephalosporinase that has variation of outer membrane protein. The AES was able to detect the phenotype for carbapenemase. The AES is a clinically useful system that allows taking prompt measures to treat patients because it can provide information about the resistance mechanism in less than half a day after starting the analysis. PMID:16369735

  18. Implementing Randomized Controlled Trials in Preschool Settings That Include Young Children with Disabilities: Considering the Context of Strain and Bovey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    In this commentary, developments related to conducting randomized controlled trials in authentic preschool settings that include young children with disabilities are discussed in relation to the Strain and Bovey study.

  19. The first cases of human bacteremia caused by Acinetobacter seifertii in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kishii, Kozue; Kikuchi, Ken; Tomida, Junko; Kawamura, Yoshiaki; Yoshida, Atsushi; Okuzumi, Katsuko; Moriya, Kyoji

    2016-05-01

    Acinetobacter seifertii, a novel species of Acinetobacter, was first reported in 2015. A. seifertii strains were isolated from human clinical specimens (blood, respiratory tract, and ulcer) and hospital environments. Here, we report the first cases of bacteremia caused by A. seifertii in patients with catheter-related bloodstream infection in Japan. The patients favorably recovered, without any complications, after removal of the peripheral intravenous catheters and administration of antibiotics. The pathogens were initially identified as Acinetobacter baumannii, using phenotypic methods and the MicroScan Walkaway System; however, rpoB gene sequence analysis indicated 99.54% similarity to A. seifertii. Moreover, antimicrobial susceptibility testing revealed that one of the strains was not susceptible to gentamicin and ceftazidime. Our report shows that Acinetobacter species other than A. baumannii can also cause nosocomial infections and that accurate methods for the identification of causative agents should be developed. PMID:26778251

  20. Activity of faropenem tested against Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates including fluoroquinolone-resistant strains.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ronald N; Critchley, Ian A; Whittington, William L H; Janjic, Nebojsa; Pottumarthy, Sudha

    2005-12-01

    We evaluated the anti-gonococcal potency of faropenem along with 7 comparator reference antimicrobials against a preselected collection of clinical isolates. The 265 isolates were inclusive of 2 subsets: 1) 76 well-characterized resistant phenotypes of gonococcal strains (53 quinolone-resistant strains--31 with documented quinolone resistance-determining region changes from Japan, 15 strains resistant to penicillin and tetracycline, and 8 strains with intermediate susceptibility to penicillin) and 2) 189 recent isolates from clinical specimens in 2004 from 6 states across the United States where quinolone resistance is prevalent. Activity of faropenem was adversely affected by l-cysteine hydrochloride in IsoVitaleX (4-fold increase in [minimal inhibitory concentration] MIC50; 0.06 versus 0.25 microg/mL). The rank order of potency of the antimicrobials for the entire collection was ceftriaxone (MIC90, 0.06 microg/mL) > faropenem (0.25 microg/mL) > azithromycin (0.5 microg/mL) > cefuroxime (1 microg/mL) > tetracycline (2 microg/mL) > penicillin = ciprofloxacin = levofloxacin (4 microg/mL). Using MIC90 for comparison, faropenem was 4-fold more potent than cefuroxime (0.25 versus 1 microg/mL), but was 4-fold less active than ceftriaxone (0.25 versus 0.06 microg/mL). Although the activity of faropenem was not affected by either penicillinase production (MIC90, 0.12 microg/mL, penicillinase-positive) or increasing ciprofloxacin MIC (0.25 microg/mL, ciprofloxacin-resistant), increasing penicillin MIC was associated with an increase in MIC90 values (0.016 microg/mL for penicillin-susceptible to 0.25 microg/mL for penicillin-resistant strains). Among the recent (2004) clinical gonococcal isolates tested, reduced susceptibility to penicillins, tetracycline, and fluoroquinolones was high (28.0-94.2%). Geographic distribution of the endemic resistance rates of gonococci varied considerably, with 16.7-66.7% of the gonococcal isolates being ciprofloxacin-resistant in Oregon

  1. Modeling of stress/strain behavior of fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites including stress redistribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mital, Subodh K.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1994-01-01

    A computational simulation procedure is presented for nonlinear analyses which incorporates microstress redistribution due to progressive fracture in ceramic matrix composites. This procedure facilitates an accurate simulation of the stress-strain behavior of ceramic matrix composites up to failure. The nonlinearity in the material behavior is accounted for at the constituent (fiber/matrix/interphase) level. This computational procedure is a part of recent upgrades to CEMCAN (Ceramic Matrix Composite Analyzer) computer code. The fiber substructuring technique in CEMCAN is used to monitor the damage initiation and progression as the load increases. The room-temperature tensile stress-strain curves for SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) matrix unidirectional and angle-ply laminates are simulated and compared with experimentally observed stress-strain behavior. Comparison between the predicted stress/strain behavior and experimental stress/strain curves is good. Collectively the results demonstrate that CEMCAN computer code provides the user with an effective computational tool to simulate the behavior of ceramic matrix composites.

  2. Detection of aac(6')-I genes in amikacin-resistant Acinetobacter spp. by PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Ploy, M C; Giamarellou, H; Bourlioux, P; Courvalin, P; Lambert, T

    1994-01-01

    The distribution of aac(6')-I genes in 62 strains of Acinetobacter spp. resistant to amikacin, netilmicin, and tobramycin and susceptible to gentamicin, a phenotype compatible with synthesis of an AAC(6')-I enzyme, was studied by PCR and by DNA hybridization. Both methods gave similar results. Among the 51 Acinetobacter baumannii strains, aac(6')-Ib was found in 19 isolates and aac(6')-Ih was found in the remaining strains. The aac(6')-Ig gene was present in all 10 A. haemolyticus strains studied and was detected only in this species. A pair of degenerate oligonucleotides complementary to conserved regions of aac(6')-Ic, -Id, -If, -Ig, and -Ih enabled detection of these genes and also of aac(6')-Ij, recently recognized in Acinetobacter sp. strain 13. Images PMID:7695286

  3. Draft Genome Sequences of Acinetobacter baumannii Isolates from Wounded Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Arivett, Brock A; Ream, Dave C; Fiester, Steven E; Kidane, Destaalem; Actis, Luis A

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative bacterium capable of causing hospital-acquired infections that has been grouped with Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species as ESKAPE pathogens because of their extensive drug resistance phenotypes and increasing risk to human health. Twenty-four multidrug-resistant A. baumannii strains isolated from wounded military personnel were sequenced and annotated. PMID:27563036

  4. Draft Genome Sequences of Acinetobacter baumannii Isolates from Wounded Military Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Arivett, Brock A.; Ream, Dave C.; Fiester, Steven E.; Kidane, Destaalem

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative bacterium capable of causing hospital-acquired infections that has been grouped with Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species as ESKAPE pathogens because of their extensive drug resistance phenotypes and increasing risk to human health. Twenty-four multidrug-resistant A. baumannii strains isolated from wounded military personnel were sequenced and annotated. PMID:27563036

  5. Comparative genomic analysis of novel Acinetobacter symbionts: A combined systems biology and genomics approach.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vipin; Haider, Shazia; Sood, Utkarsh; Gilbert, Jack A; Ramjee, Meenakshi; Forbes, Ken; Singh, Yogendra; Lopes, Bruno S; Lal, Rup

    2016-01-01

    The increasing trend of antibiotic resistance in Acinetobacter drastically limits the range of therapeutic agents required to treat multidrug resistant (MDR) infections. This study focused on analysis of novel Acinetobacter strains using a genomics and systems biology approach. Here we used a network theory method for pathogenic and non-pathogenic Acinetobacter spp. to identify the key regulatory proteins (hubs) in each strain. We identified nine key regulatory proteins, guaA, guaB, rpsB, rpsI, rpsL, rpsE, rpsC, rplM and trmD, which have functional roles as hubs in a hierarchical scale-free fractal protein-protein interaction network. Two key hubs (guaA and guaB) were important for insect-associated strains, and comparative analysis identified guaA as more important than guaB due to its role in effective module regulation. rpsI played a significant role in all the novel strains, while rplM was unique to sheep-associated strains. rpsM, rpsB and rpsI were involved in the regulation of overall network topology across all Acinetobacter strains analyzed in this study. Future analysis will investigate whether these hubs are useful as drug targets for treating Acinetobacter infections. PMID:27378055

  6. Comparative genomic analysis of novel Acinetobacter symbionts: A combined systems biology and genomics approach

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vipin; Haider, Shazia; Sood, Utkarsh; Gilbert, Jack A.; Ramjee, Meenakshi; Forbes, Ken; Singh, Yogendra; Lopes, Bruno S.; Lal, Rup

    2016-01-01

    The increasing trend of antibiotic resistance in Acinetobacter drastically limits the range of therapeutic agents required to treat multidrug resistant (MDR) infections. This study focused on analysis of novel Acinetobacter strains using a genomics and systems biology approach. Here we used a network theory method for pathogenic and non-pathogenic Acinetobacter spp. to identify the key regulatory proteins (hubs) in each strain. We identified nine key regulatory proteins, guaA, guaB, rpsB, rpsI, rpsL, rpsE, rpsC, rplM and trmD, which have functional roles as hubs in a hierarchical scale-free fractal protein-protein interaction network. Two key hubs (guaA and guaB) were important for insect-associated strains, and comparative analysis identified guaA as more important than guaB due to its role in effective module regulation. rpsI played a significant role in all the novel strains, while rplM was unique to sheep-associated strains. rpsM, rpsB and rpsI were involved in the regulation of overall network topology across all Acinetobacter strains analyzed in this study. Future analysis will investigate whether these hubs are useful as drug targets for treating Acinetobacter infections. PMID:27378055

  7. Acinetobacter baumannii: evolution of antimicrobial resistance-treatment options.

    PubMed

    Doi, Yohei; Murray, Gerald L; Peleg, Anton Y

    2015-02-01

    The first decade of the 20th century witnessed a surge in the incidence of infections due to several highly antimicrobial-resistant bacteria in hospitals worldwide. Acinetobacter baumannii is one such organism that turned from an occasional respiratory pathogen into a major nosocomial pathogen. An increasing number of A. baumannii genome sequences have broadened our understanding of the genetic makeup of these bacteria and highlighted the extent of horizontal transfer of DNA. Animal models of disease combined with bacterial mutagenesis have provided some valuable insights into mechanisms of A. baumannii pathogenesis. Bacterial factors known to be important for disease include outer membrane porins, surface structures including capsule and lipopolysaccharide, enzymes such as phospholipase D, iron acquisition systems, and regulatory proteins. A. baumannii has a propensity to accumulate resistance to various groups of antimicrobial agents. In particular, carbapenem resistance has become commonplace, accounting for the majority of A. baumannii strains in many hospitals today. Carbapenem-resistant strains are often resistant to all other routinely tested agents. Treatment of carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii infection therefore involves the use of combinations of last resort agents such as colistin and tigecycline, but the efficacy and safety of these approaches are yet to be defined. Antimicrobial-resistant A. baumannii has high potential to spread among ill patients in intensive care units. Early recognition and timely implementation of appropriate infection control measures is crucial in preventing outbreaks. PMID:25643273

  8. Acinetobacter baumannii: Evolution of Antimicrobial Resistance—Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Yohei; Murray, Gerald L.; Peleg, Anton Y.

    2015-01-01

    The first decade of the 20th century witnessed a surge in the incidence of infections due to several highly antimicrobial-resistant bacteria in hospitals worldwide. Acinetobacter baumannii is one such organism that turned from an occasional respiratory pathogen into a major nosocomial pathogen. An increasing number of A. baumannii genome sequences have broadened our understanding of the genetic makeup of these bacteria and highlighted the extent of horizontal transfer of DNA. Animal models of disease combined with bacterial mutagenesis have provided some valuable insights into mechanisms of A. baumannii pathogenesis. Bacterial factors known to be important for disease include outer membrane porins, surface structures including capsule and lipopolysaccharide, enzymes such as phospholipase D, iron acquisition systems, and regulatory proteins. A. baumannii has a propensity to accumulate resistance to various groups of antimicrobial agents. In particular, carbapenem resistance has become commonplace, accounting for the majority of A. baumannii strains in many hospitals today. Carbapenem-resistant strains are often resistant to all other routinely tested agents. Treatment of carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii infection therefore involves the use of combinations of last resort agents such as colistin and tigecycline, but the efficacy and safety of these approaches are yet to be defined. Antimicrobial-resistant A. baumannii has high potential to spread among ill patients in intensive care units. Early recognition and timely implementation of appropriate infection control measures is crucial in preventing outbreaks. PMID:25643273

  9. High levels of multiple metal resistance and its correlation to antibiotic resistance in environmental isolates of Acinetobacter.

    PubMed

    Dhakephalkar, P K; Chopade, B A

    1994-01-01

    Forty strains of Acinetobacter were isolated from different environmental sources. All the strains were classified into four genospecies, i.e., A. baumannii (33 isolates), A. calcoaceticus (three isolates), A. junii (three isolates) and A. genospecies3 (one isolate). Susceptibility of these 40 strains to salts of 20 heavy metals and 18 antibiotics was tested by the agar dilution method. All environmental isolates of Acinetobacter were resistant to multiple metal ions (minimum 13 metal ions) while all but one of the strains were resistant to multiple antibiotics (minimum four antibiotics). The maximum number of strains were found to be sensitive to mercury (60% strains) while all strains were resistant to copper, lead, boron and tungsten even at 10 mM concentration. Salts of these four metal ions may be added to the growth medium to facilitate selective isolation of Acinetobacter. Rifampicin and nalidixic acid were the most toxic antibiotics, inhibiting 94.5 and 89.5% of the acinetobacters, respectively. A. genospecies3 was found to be the most resistant species, tolerating high concentrations of all the 20 metal ions and also to a greater number of antibiotics than any other species of Acinetobacter tested. An inhibitory concentration (10 mM) of Ni(2+) and Zn(2+) was observed to inhibit the growth of all of the clinical isolates but allowed the growth of the environmental isolates, facilitating the differentiation between pathogenic and non-pathogenic acinetobacters. PMID:8118175

  10. Successful Eradication of Multidrug Resistant Acinetobacter in the Helsinki Burn Centre.

    PubMed

    Lindford, Andrew; Kiuru, Valtteri; Anttila, Veli-Jukka; Vuola, Jyrki

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter is an important pathogen implicated in nosocomial infections in healthcare environments. Virulence factors, resistance mechanisms, and limited therapeutic options make this pathogen a major problem currently facing burn intensive care units (ICUs) worldwide. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of infection control measures taken in Helsinki Burn Centre in 2001 on MDR Acinetobacter prevalence in ICU burn patients. Data were retrospectively collected from patient files from 1998 to 2012. ICU burn patients were defined as those with either over 30% of total body surface area burnt or requiring mechanical ventilation. Inclusion criteria consisted of patients who tested positive for Acinetobacter sp. in routine bacterial cultures or cultures taken because of a clinically suspected infection. Infection control interventions performed in 2001 consisted of various shower room renovations and changes in hospital hygiene and burn treatment regimes. Between 1998 and 2012, 75 patients were diagnosed with Acinetobacter sp. colonization. Following the infection control interventions the incidence of Acinetobacter sp. radically declined. Between 1998 and 2001, there were 31 cases of MDR Acinetobacter colonizations diagnosed, but from 2002 to 2012 no MDR strains were found. Changes to hospital hygiene and wound treatment protocols as well as structural changes to the hospital environment can have a major impact on preventing and treating Acinetobacter outbreaks in burn centers. PMID:25501783

  11. Zabofloxacin (DW-224a) activity against Neisseria gonorrhoeae including quinolone-resistant strains.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ronald N; Biedenbach, Douglas J; Ambrose, Paul G; Wikler, Matthew A

    2008-09-01

    Zabofloxacin, a new fluoroquinolone compound (DW-224a), was tested by reference agar dilution methods against 35 strains of multiresistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The potency of zabofloxacin (MIC(50), 0.016 microg/mL) was generally comparable with azithromycin but 8-fold superior to ciprofloxacin. This novel naphthyridine should be explored as an alternative therapy for quinolone-nonsusceptible gonorrhea and Chlamydia trachomatis infections. PMID:18620833

  12. Acinetobacter sp. isolates from emergency departments in two hospitals of South Korea.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji-Young; Ko, Eun Ah; Kwon, Ki Tae; Lee, Shinwon; Kang, Choel In; Chung, Doo-Ryeon; Peck, Kyong Ran; Song, Jae-Hoon; Ko, Kwan Soo

    2014-10-01

    A total of 114 Acinetobacter sp. isolates were collected from patients in the emergency departments (EDs) of two Korean hospitals. Most isolates belonged to the Acinetobacter baumannii complex (105 isolates, 92.1 %). Imipenem resistance was found in 39 isolates (34.2 %) of the Acinetobacter sp. isolates, and 6 colistin-resistant isolates were also identified. Species distribution and antimicrobial-resistance rates were different between the two hospitals. In addition, two main clones were identified in the imipenem-resistant A. baumannii isolates from hospital B, but very diverse and novel genotypes were found in those from hospital A. Many Acinetobacter sp. isolates, including the imipenem-resistant A. baumannii, are considered to be associated with the community. The evidence of high antimicrobial resistance and different features in these Acinetobacter sp. isolates between the two EDs suggests the need for continuous testing to monitor changes in epidemiology. PMID:25062943

  13. Genomic and phenotypic characterization of the species Acinetobacter venetianus.

    PubMed

    Fondi, Marco; Maida, Isabel; Perrin, Elena; Orlandini, Valerio; La Torre, Laura; Bosi, Emanuele; Negroni, Andrea; Zanaroli, Giulio; Fava, Fabio; Decorosi, Francesca; Giovannetti, Luciana; Viti, Carlo; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Dijkshoorn, Lenie; Fani, Renato

    2016-01-01

    Crude oil is a complex mixture of hydrocarbons and other organic compounds that can produce serious environmental problems and whose removal is highly demanding in terms of human and technological resources. The potential use of microbes as bioremediation agents is one of the most promising fields in this area. Members of the species Acinetobacter venetianus have been previously characterized for their capability to degrade n-alkanes and thus may represent interesting model systems to implement this process. Although a preliminary experimental characterization of the overall hydrocarbon degradation capability has been performed for five of them, to date, the genetic/genomic features underlying such molecular processes have not been identified. Here we have integrated genomic and phenotypic information for six A. venetianus strains, i.e. VE-C3, RAG-1(T), LUH 13518, LUH 7437, LUH 5627 and LUH 8758. Besides providing a thorough description of the A. venetianus species, these data were exploited to infer the genetic features (presence/absence patterns of genes) and the short-term evolutionary events possibly responsible for the variability in n-alkane degradation efficiency of these strains, including the mechanisms of interaction with the fuel droplet and the subsequent catabolism of this pollutant. PMID:26902269

  14. Genomic and phenotypic characterization of the species Acinetobacter venetianus

    PubMed Central

    Fondi, Marco; Maida, Isabel; Perrin, Elena; Orlandini, Valerio; La Torre, Laura; Bosi, Emanuele; Negroni, Andrea; Zanaroli, Giulio; Fava, Fabio; Decorosi, Francesca; Giovannetti, Luciana; Viti, Carlo; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Dijkshoorn, Lenie; Fani, Renato

    2016-01-01

    Crude oil is a complex mixture of hydrocarbons and other organic compounds that can produce serious environmental problems and whose removal is highly demanding in terms of human and technological resources. The potential use of microbes as bioremediation agents is one of the most promising fields in this area. Members of the species Acinetobacter venetianus have been previously characterized for their capability to degrade n-alkanes and thus may represent interesting model systems to implement this process. Although a preliminary experimental characterization of the overall hydrocarbon degradation capability has been performed for five of them, to date, the genetic/genomic features underlying such molecular processes have not been identified. Here we have integrated genomic and phenotypic information for six A. venetianus strains, i.e. VE-C3, RAG-1T, LUH 13518, LUH 7437, LUH 5627 and LUH 8758. Besides providing a thorough description of the A. venetianus species, these data were exploited to infer the genetic features (presence/absence patterns of genes) and the short-term evolutionary events possibly responsible for the variability in n-alkane degradation efficiency of these strains, including the mechanisms of interaction with the fuel droplet and the subsequent catabolism of this pollutant. PMID:26902269

  15. Donor platelet plasma components inactivate sensitive and multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolates.

    PubMed

    Edelblute, Chelsea M; Pakhomova, Olga N; Li, Fanying; Hargrave, Barbara Y; Heller, Loree C

    2015-12-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an environmentally resilient healthcare-associated opportunistic pathogen responsible for infections at many body sites. In the last 10 years, clinical strains resistant to many or all commonly used antibiotics have emerged globally. With few antimicrobial agents in the pharmaceutical pipeline, new and alternative agents are essential. Platelets secrete a large number of proteins, including proteins with antimicrobial activity. In a previous study, we demonstrated that donor platelet supernatants and plasma significantly inhibited the growth of a reference strain of A. baumannii in broth and on skin. This inhibition appeared to be unrelated to the platelet activation state. In this study, we demonstrate that this growth inhibition extends to clinical multidrug resistant isolates. We also demonstrate that there is no relationship between this activity and selected platelet-derived antimicrobial proteins. Instead, the donor plasma components complement and alpha-2 macroglobulin are implicated. PMID:26500225

  16. Antibiotic susceptibility of Acinetobacter species in intensive care unit in Montenegro.

    PubMed

    Mijovic, Gordana; Pejakov, Ljubica; Vujosevic, Danijela

    2016-08-01

    The global increase in multidrug resistance of Acinetobacter has created widespread problems in the treatment of patients in intensive care units (ICUs). The aim of this study was to assess the current level of antimicrobial susceptibility of Acinetobacter species in ICU of Clinical Centre of Montenegro and determine their epidemiology. Antibiotic susceptibility was tested in 70 isolates of Acinetobacter collected from non-repeating samples taken from 40 patients. The first nine isolates were genotyped by repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR). Tigecycline was found to be the most active antimicrobial agent with 80.6% of susceptibility. All the isolates were multidrug resistant with fully resistance to cefalosporinas, piperacillin and piperacillin/tazobactam. More than half of them (58.5%) were probably extensively resistant. Seven out of nine examined strains were clonally related by rep-PCR. Our results showed extremely high rate of multidrug resistance (MDR) of Acinetobacter isolates and high percentage of its clonally spreading. PMID:25979577

  17. Genome Sequencing of Four Strains of Rickettsia prowazekii, the Causative Agent of Epidemic Typhus, Including One Flying Squirrel Isolate.

    PubMed

    Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A; Ge, Hong; Butani, Amy; Osborne, Brian; Verratti, Kathleen; Mokashi, Vishwesh; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Pop, Mihai; Read, Timothy D; Richards, Allen L

    2013-01-01

    Rickettsia prowazekii is a notable intracellular pathogen, the agent of epidemic typhus, and a potential biothreat agent. We present here whole-genome sequence data for four strains of R. prowazekii, including one from a flying squirrel. PMID:23814035

  18. Code blue: Acinetobacter baumannii, a nosocomial pathogen with a role in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Richards, A M; Abu Kwaik, Y; Lamont, R J

    2015-02-01

    Actinetobacter baumannii is an important nosocomial pathogen that can cause a wide range of serious conditions including pneumonia, meningitis, necrotizing fasciitis and sepsis. It is also a major cause of wound infections in military personnel injured during the conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq, leading to its popular nickname of 'Iraqibacter'. Contributing to its success in clinical settings is resistance to environmental stresses such as desiccation and disinfectants. Moreover, in recent years there has been a dramatic increase in the number of A. baumannii strains with resistance to multiple antibiotic classes. Acinetobacter baumannii is an inhabitant of oral biofilms, which can act as a reservoir for pneumonia and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Subgingival colonization by A. baumannii increases the risk of refractory periodontitis. Pathogenesis of the organism involves adherence, biofilm formation and iron acquisition. In addition, A. baumannii can induce apoptotic cell death in epithelial cells and kill hyphal forms of Candida albicans. Virulence factors that have been identified include pili, the outer membrane protein OmpA, phospholipases and extracellular polysaccharide. Acinetobacter baumannii can sense blue light through a blue-light sensing using flavin (BLUF) domain protein, BlsA. The resulting conformational change in BlsA leads to changes in gene expression, including virulence genes. PMID:25052812

  19. Acinetobacter Peritoneal Dialysis Peritonitis: A Changing Landscape over Time

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Chia-Ter; Lee, Szu-Ying; Yang, Wei-Shun; Chen, Huei-Wen; Fang, Cheng-Chung; Yen, Chung-Jen; Chiang, Chih-Kang; Hung, Kuan-Yu; Huang, Jenq-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Background Acinetobacter species are assuming an increasingly important role in modern medicine, with their persistent presence in health-care settings and antibiotic resistance. However, clinical reports addressing this issue in patients with peritoneal dialysis (PD) peritonitis are rare. Methods All PD peritonitis episodes caused by Acinetobacter that occurred between 1985 and 2012 at a single centre were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical features, microbiological data, and outcomes were analysed, with stratifications based upon temporal periods (before and after 2000). Results Acinetobacter species were responsible for 26 PD peritonitis episodes (3.5% of all episodes) in 25 patients. A. baumannii was the most common pathogen (54%), followed by A. iwoffii (35%), with the former being predominant after 2000. Significantly more episodes resulted from breaks in exchange sterility after 2000, while those from exit site infections decreased (P = 0.01). The interval between the last and current peritonitis episodes lengthened significantly after 2000 (5 vs. 13.6 months; P = 0.05). All the isolates were susceptible to cefepime, fluoroquinolone, and aminoglycosides, with a low ceftazidime resistance rate (16%). Nearly half of the patients (46%) required hospitalisation for their Acinetobacter PD-associated peritonitis, and 27% required an antibiotic switch. The overall outcome was fair, with no mortality and a 12% technique failure rate, without obvious interval differences. Conclusions The temporal change in the microbiology and origin of Acinetobacter PD-associated peritonitis in our cohort suggested an important evolutional trend. Appropriate measures, including technique re-education and sterility maintenance, should be taken to decrease the Acinetobacter peritonitis incidence in PD patients. PMID:25314341

  20. Proliferation of spacecraft-associated Acinetobacter on alcohol solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogul, Rakesh; Cepeda, Ivonne; Brasali, Hania; Gornick, Trevor; Jain, Chirag; Kim, Eun Jin; Nguyen, Vinh Bao; Oei, Alex; Rodriguez, Joseph; Walker, Jillian; Savla, Gautam

    The Acinetobacter are the most abundant Gram-negative and non-spore forming bacteria found in the cleanroom facilities for Mars spacecraft. The spacecraft-associated Acinetobacter are extremotolerant towards hydrogen peroxide and have been shown to increase in abundance as a result of the spacecraft assembly process. To better understand the oligotrophic growth in the cleanroom environments, we have measured the growth of several Acinetobacter strains against ethanol and isopropanol, which are cleaning solvents used in the spacecraft assembly process. Our studies show that A. radioresistens 50v1, which was isolated from Mars Odyssey orbiter, optimally proliferates on 300 mM ethanol under minimal conditions at a growth rate that is 2-fold higher than that of the A. radioresistens type strain (strain 43998 (T) ). The impact of transition metals on the growth rates followed the trend of Fe (2+) > Mn (2+) > Zn (2+) , where Zn (2+) was inhibitory. In contrast, no growth on ethanol was observed for the novel species A. phoenicis 2P01AA, which was isolated from the facilities for the Mars Phoenix lander. Alcohol dehydrogenase activities measured in rich and minimal media paralleled these observations with the 50v1 strain possessing higher specific activities than the type strain, and the 2P01AA strain displaying no measurable activity in rich media. Preliminary studies indicate that isopropanol is insufficient as an energy source when in culture. The significance of these results as well as the observed differences between the Odyssey and Phoenix-associated strains will be discussed.

  1. Laboratory Maintenance of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Anna C; Zurawski, Daniel V

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has recently drawn great interest in the microbiology research community due to the increase in clinical antibiotic resistance of this organism, and persistence of this bacterial species in the hospital environment. This unit outlines protocols for the growth and maintenance of A. baumannii in the laboratory. PMID:25367273

  2. Biofilm-Related Genes: Analyses in Multi-Antibiotic Resistant Acinetobacter Baumannii Isolates From Mainland China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Wu, Yong-Quan; Chen, Li-Ping; Gao, Xiang; Huang, Hao-Nan; Qiu, Fu-Lan; Wu, Ding-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Background Acinetobacter baumannii is an important nosocomial pathogen which shows a high level of mortality risk. Several papers have reported biofilm formation as a well-known pathogenic mechanism in A. baumannii infections and exceptional antibiotic resistance. The study aims to explore the potential relationships between biofilm-related genes and antimicrobial resistance. Material/Methods Samples from 122 patients with lower respiratory tract infections of A. baumannii were collected at Fujian Longyan First Hospital from January 2013 to September 2014. A. baumannii was isolated from sputum specimens. Biofilm-related genes including abaI, csuE, ompA, and bla-PER1 were analyzed by PCR. The minimum inhibitory concentration method was used to determine the sensitivity of each strain to antibiotics. Results The clinical manifestations of A. baumannii-induced lower respiratory tract infections lacked specificity. Infected patients were most commonly admitted to intensive care units (54.9%) and frequently had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (27.0%). The detection rates of abaI and csuE were both 59.8%, and those of ompA and bla-PER1 were 100% and 0%, respectively. After genetic testing, antimicrobial resistance to amikacin, ampicillin/sulbactam, and 14 other types of antimicrobials was higher in abaI- and csuE-positive strains than in abaI- and csuE-negative strains (P<0.05). Conclusions The findings of our study suggest that abaI- and csuE-positive Acinetobacter baumannii strains are associated with a higher incidence of antibiotic resistance in 14 types of antimicrobials. PMID:27234982

  3. Biofilm-Related Genes: Analyses in Multi-Antibiotic Resistant Acinetobacter Baumannii Isolates From Mainland China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Wu, Yong-Quan; Chen, Li-Ping; Gao, Xiang; Huang, Hao-Nan; Qiu, Fu-Lan; Wu, Ding-Chang

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Acinetobacter baumannii is an important nosocomial pathogen which shows a high level of mortality risk. Several papers have reported biofilm formation as a well-known pathogenic mechanism in A. baumannii infections and exceptional antibiotic resistance. The study aims to explore the potential relationships between biofilm-related genes and antimicrobial resistance. MATERIAL AND METHODS Samples from 122 patients with lower respiratory tract infections of A. baumannii were collected at Fujian Longyan First Hospital from January 2013 to September 2014. A. baumannii was isolated from sputum specimens. Biofilm-related genes including abaI, csuE, ompA, and bla-PER1 were analyzed by PCR. The minimum inhibitory concentration method was used to determine the sensitivity of each strain to antibiotics. RESULTS The clinical manifestations of A. baumannii-induced lower respiratory tract infections lacked specificity. Infected patients were most commonly admitted to intensive care units (54.9%) and frequently had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (27.0%). The detection rates of abaI and csuE were both 59.8%, and those of ompA and bla-PER1 were 100% and 0%, respectively. After genetic testing, antimicrobial resistance to amikacin, ampicillin/sulbactam, and 14 other types of antimicrobials was higher in abaI- and csuE-positive strains than in abaI- and csuE-negative strains (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS The findings of our study suggest that abaI- and csuE-positive Acinetobacter baumannii strains are associated with a higher incidence of antibiotic resistance in 14 types of antimicrobials. PMID:27234982

  4. Coculture degradation of selected PCB congeners by two Acinetobacter sp

    SciTech Connect

    Adriaens, P.

    1989-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been introduced in the environment for nearly six decades and are considered to be refractile to microbial attack, since PCBs have to be degraded via cometabolic processes, which occur in the obligate presence of an alternative growth substrate. However, cometabolism of PCBs has been demonstrated to accumulate chlorobenzoates as the main intermediates. Therefore, the complete mineralization of PCBs can only be obtained by coculturing at least a PCB cometabolizing and a chlorobenzoate utilizing microorganism, or by constructing a recombinant strain harboring the complementary pathways of both strains. Therefore, coculture mineralization of PCBs in suspended culture was obtained by providing biphenyl or 4-chlorobiphenyl as the growth substrate for Acinetobacter sp. strain P6, a PCB cometabolizer, while the chlorobenzoates were used as growth substrates by Acinetobacter sp. strain 4-CB1, which was isolated on 4-chlorobenzoate. 4-Chlorobenzoate (4-CB) was metabolized after hydrolytic dehalogenation to 4-hydroxybenzoate (4-HB) via the protocatechuate pathway. Acinetobacter sp. strain 4-CB1 has the metabolic ability to carry out the degradation of 3,4-DCB. Although this strain does not grow on this compound, it cometabolizes 3,4-DCB to 3-chloro-4-hydroxybenzoate (3-C-4-OHB), which is used as a growth substrate and further metabolized via 4-carboxy-1,2-benzoquinone. This degradation process was termed cryptic cometabolism. 3,4-DCB has shown to be a substrate inhibitor (Ki = 1,840 {mu}M) and an uncompetitive inhibitor for 4-CB metabolism. Additionally, 3-C-4-OHB was a competitive inhibitor (Ki = 12 {mu}M) for the 4-HB monooxygenase, while the quinone uncompetitively inhibited 4-CB metabolism (Ki = 50 {mu}M).

  5. Extremotolerant survival and proteomics of Acinetobacter isolated from spacecraft assembly facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogul, Rakesh; Vaishampayan, Parag; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; McCoy, Kelly; Derecho, Ivy; Dallal, Freida

    2012-07-01

    Herein, we report on the extreme hydrogen peroxide resistance of Acinetobacter isolated from the assembly facilities for the Mars Odyssey orbiter and Phoenix lander. Specific activity experiments on 10 different spacecraft-associated Acinetobacter strains show that the catalase contents are 15-250-fold greater than that of E. coli. Among this group, the highest and lowest catalase-containing strains, which were Acinetobacter nov. sp. 2P01AA and Acinetobacter radioresistens 50v1, demonstrated no significant and 2-log reductions in survivability upon exposure to 100 mM hydrogen peroxide (1 hr), respectively. These survivals are among the highest reported for non-spore forming Gram-negative bacteria. Comparative proteomics on these strains reveals that alkyl hydroperoxide reductase, ATP synthase, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase, and peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase also contribute to the hydrogen peroxide extremotolerance. Together, the survival and metabolic features of the spacecraft-associated Acinetobacter indicate that survival in the dry and low-nutrient environments of clean rooms is supported by factors such as oxidant degradation, energy management, and protein biosynthesis.

  6. Diversity in the Major Polysaccharide Antigen of Acinetobacter Baumannii Assessed by DNA Sequencing, and Development of a Molecular Serotyping Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Dijkshoorn, Lenie; Wang, Lei; Reeves, Peter R.

    2013-01-01

    We have sequenced the gene clusters for type strains of the Acinetobacter baumannii serotyping scheme developed in the 1990s, and used the sequences to better understand diversity in surface polysaccharides of the genus. We obtained genome sequences for 27 available serovar type strains, and identified 25 polysaccharide gene cluster sequences. There are structures for 12 of these polysaccharides, and in general the genes present are appropriate to the structure where known. This greatly facilitates interpretation. We also find 53 different glycosyltransferase genes, and for 7 strains can provisionally allocate specific genes to all linkages. We identified primers that will distinguish the 25 sequence forms by PCR or microarray, or alternatively the genes can be used to determine serotype by “molecular serology”. We applied the latter to 190 Acinetobacter genome-derived gene-clusters, and found 76 that have one of the 25 gene-cluster forms. We also found novel gene clusters and added 52 new gene-cluster sequence forms with different wzy genes and different gene contents. Altogether, the strains that have one of the original 25 sequence forms include 98 A. baumannii (24 from our strains) and 5 A. nosocomialis (3 from our strains), whereas 32 genomes from 12 species other than A. baumannii or A. nosocomialis, all have new sequence forms. One of the 25 serovar type sequences is found to be in European clone I (EC I), 2 are in EC II but none in EC III. The public genome strains add an additional 52 new sequence forms, and also bring the number found in EC I to 5, in EC II to 9 and in EC III to 2. PMID:23922982

  7. Impact of empirical antimicrobial therapy on the outcome of critically ill patients with Acinetobacter bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dorzi, Hasan M.; Asiri, Abdulaziz M.; Shimemri, Abdullah; Tamim, Hani M.; Al Johani, Sameera M.; Al Dabbagh, Tarek; Arabi, Yaseen M.

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE: Empirical antimicrobial therapy (EAT) for Acinetobacter infections may not be appropriate as it tends to be multidrug-resistant. This study evaluated the relationship between appropriate EAT and the outcomes of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients with Acinetobacter bacteremia. METHODS: This is a retrospective study of patients admitted to a medical-surgical ICU (2005-2010) and developed Acinetobacter bacteremia during the stay. Patients were categorized according to EAT appropriateness, defined as administration of at least one antimicrobial agent to which the Acinetobacter was susceptible before susceptibility results were known. The relation between EAT appropriateness and outcomes was evaluated. RESULTS: Sixty patients developed Acinetobacter bacteremia in the 6-year period (age = 50 ± 19 years; 62% males; Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score = 28 ± 9; 98.3% with central lines; 67% in shock and 59% mechanically ventilated) on average on day 23 of ICU and day 38 of hospital stay. All isolates were resistant to at least three of the tested antimicrobials. Appropriate EAT was administered to 60% of patients, mostly as intravenous colistin. Appropriate EAT was associated with lower ICU mortality risk (odds ratio: 0.15; 95% confidence interval: 0.03-0.96) on multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: In this 6-year cohort, Acinetobacter bacteremia was related to multidrug-resistant strains. Appropriate EAT was associated with decreased ICU mortality risk. PMID:26664563

  8. Acinetobacter lipases: molecular biology, biochemical properties and biotechnological potential.

    PubMed

    Snellman, Erick A; Colwell, Rita R

    2004-10-01

    Lipases (EC 3.1.1.3) have received increased attention recently, evidenced by the increasing amount of information about lipases in the current literature. The renewed interest in this enzyme class is due primarily to investigations of their role in pathogenesis and their increasing use in biotechnological applications. Also, many microbial lipases are available as commercial products, the majority of which are used in detergents, cosmetic production, food flavoring, and organic synthesis. Lipases are valued biocatalysts because they act under mild conditions, are highly stable in organic solvents, show broad substrate specificity, and usually show high regio- and/or stereo-selectivity in catalysis. A number of lipolytic strains of Acinetobacter have been isolated from a variety of sources and their lipases possess many biochemical properties similar to those that have been developed for biotechnological applications. This review discusses the biology of lipase expression in Acinetobacter, with emphasis on those aspects relevant to potential biotechnology applications. PMID:15378387

  9. Antimicrobial susceptibilities of clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii from Singapore.

    PubMed

    Kuah, B G; Kumarasinghe, G; Doran, J; Chang, H R

    1994-10-01

    The in vitro activities of 17 antimicrobial agents alone or in combination against 70 clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii from Singapore were determined by broth microdilution. The MICs of amoxicillin, ampicillin, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, gentamicin, and piperacillin for 90% of the strains were > or = 128 micrograms/ml. Addition of sulbactam to ampicillin produced improved activity, whereas adding tazobactam to piperacillin did not. The MICs of amikacin, ciprofloxacin, and imipenem for 90% of the strains were 32, 32, and 16 micrograms/ml, respectively. PMID:7840598

  10. Isolation and Characterization of Fipronil Degrading Acinetobacter calcoaceticus and Acinetobacter oleivorans from Rhizospheric Zone of Zea mays.

    PubMed

    Uniyal, Shivani; Paliwal, Rashmi; Verma, Megha; Sharma, R K; Rai, J P N

    2016-06-01

    An enrichment culture technique was used for the isolation of bacteria capable of utilizing fipronil as a sole source of carbon and energy. Based on morphological, biochemical characteristics and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA sequence, the bacterial strains were identified as Acinetobacter calcoaceticus and Acinetobacter oleivorans. Biodegradation experiments were conducted in loamy sand soil samples fortified with fipronil (50 µg kg(-1)) and inoculated with Acinetobacter sp. cells (45 × 10(7) CFU mL(-1)) for 90 days. Soil samples were periodically analyzed by gas liquid chromatography equipped with electron capture detector. Biodegradation of fipronil fitted well with the pseudo first-order kinetics, with rate constant value between 0.041 and 0.051 days(-1). In pot experiments, fipronil and its metabolites fipronil sulfide, fipronil sulfone and fipronil amide were found below quantifiable limit in soil and root, shoot and leaves of Zea mays. These results demonstrated that A. calcoaceticus and A. oleivorans may serve as promising strains in the bioremediation of fipronil-contaminated soils. PMID:27084098

  11. Global evolution of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii clonal lineages.

    PubMed

    Zarrilli, Raffaele; Pournaras, Spyros; Giannouli, Maria; Tsakris, Athanassios

    2013-01-01

    The rapid expansion of Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates exhibiting resistance to carbapenems and most or all available antibiotics during the last decade is a worrying evolution. The apparent predominance of a few successful multidrug-resistant lineages worldwide underlines the importance of elucidating the mode of spread and the epidemiology of A. baumannii isolates in single hospitals, at a country-wide level and on a global scale. The evolutionary advantage of the dominant clonal lineages relies on the capability of the A. baumannii pangenome to incorporate resistance determinants. In particular, the simultaneous presence of divergent strains of the international clone II and their increasing prevalence in international hospitals further support the ongoing adaptation of this lineage to the hospital environment. Indeed, genomic and genetic studies have elucidated the role of mobile genetic elements in the transfer of antibiotic resistance genes and substantiate the rate of genetic alterations associated with acquisition in A. baumannii of various resistance genes, including OXA- and metallo-β-lactamase-type carbapenemase genes. The significance of single nucleotide polymorphisms and transposon mutagenesis in the evolution of A. baumannii has been also documented. Establishment of a network of reference laboratories in different countries would generate a more complete picture and a fuller understanding of the importance of high-risk A. baumannii clones in the international dissemination of antibiotic resistance. PMID:23127486

  12. Numerical classification and identification of Acinetobacter genomic species.

    PubMed

    Kämpfer, P; Tjernberg, I; Ursing, J

    1993-09-01

    A total of 211 Acinetobacter strains (representing all currently recognized genomic species) were tested for 329 biochemical characters. Overall similarities of all strains were determined for 145 characters by numerical taxonomic techniques, the UPGMA algorithm and the S(SM)) and the S(J) coefficients as measures of similarity. Seven clusters (two or more strains) and three unclustered strains were recovered at a similarity level of 80.0% (S(SM). At this level a complete correspondence between phenotypic cluster and genomic species was found only for genomic species 12 (Ac. radioresistens). At higher similarity levels (84.0% to 84.6% (S(SM)), however, several subclusters were found, each representing a single genomic species. An exception were the strains belonging to the genetically closely related species of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii complex. These were recovered scattered in several subclusters. The degree of genomic relatedness between some DNA groups correlated with phenotypic similarities, especially for DNA group 8 (Ac. Iwoffii) and 15 of Tjernberg and Ursing, and for DNA group 4 (Ac. haemolyticus) and 6. For the majority of genomic species, two identification matrices were constructed consisting of 22 and 10 diagnostic characters, respectively. The correct identification rates for the matrices were 98.0% (22 tests) and 90.8% (10 tests) taking a Willcox probability > 0.9. For unambiguous identification of some genomic species, however, additional methods (preferably DNA-DNA hybridization or ribotyping) should be used. PMID:8244904

  13. Dehalococcoides mccartyi strain JNA dechlorinates multiple chlorinated phenols including pentachlorophenol and harbors at least 19 reductive dehalogenase homologous genes.

    PubMed

    Fricker, Ashwana D; LaRoe, Sarah L; Shea, Michael E; Bedard, Donna L

    2014-12-16

    Pentachlorophenol and other chlorinated phenols are highly toxic ubiquitous environmental pollutants. Using gas chromatographic analysis we determined that Dehalococcoides mccartyi strain JNA in pure culture dechlorinated pentachlorophenol to 3,5-dichlorophenol (DCP) via removal of the ortho and para chlorines in all of the three possible pathways. In addition, JNA dechlorinated 2,3,4,6-tetrachlorophenol via 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP) and 2,4,5-TCP to 2,4-DCP and 3,4-DCP, respectively, and dechlorinated 2,3,6-TCP to 3-chlorophenol (CP) via 2,5-DCP. JNA converted 2,3,4-TCP to 3,4-DCP and 2,4-DCP by ortho and meta dechlorination, respectively. 2,3-DCP was dechlorinated to 3-CP, and, because cultures using it could be transferred with a low inoculum (0.5 to 1.5% vol/vol), it may act as an electron acceptor to support growth. Using PCR amplification with targeted and degenerate primers followed by cloning and sequencing, we determined that JNA harbors at least 19 reductive dehalogenase homologous (rdh) genes including orthologs of pcbA4 and pcbA5, pceA, and mbrA, but not tceA or vcrA. Many of these genes are shared with D. mccartyi strains CBDB1, DCMB5, GT, and CG5. Strain JNA has previously been shown to extensively dechlorinate the commercial polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) mixture Aroclor 1260. Collectively the data suggest that strain JNA may be well adapted to survive in sites contaminated with chlorinated aromatics and may be useful for in situ bioremediation. PMID:25377868

  14. Rapid identification of Acinetobacter spp. by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) from colony and blood culture material

    PubMed Central

    Essig, A.; Hagen, R. M.; Riecker, M.; Jerke, K.; Ellison, D.; Poppert, S.

    2011-01-01

    Multi-drug-resistant strains of the Acinetobacter baumannii complex cause nosocomial infections. Rapid identification of Acinetobacter spp. is desirable in order to facilitate therapeutic or hygiene decisions. We evaluated a newly designed DNA probe that can be used under standard conditions in both a microwave oven and a slide chamber for the rapid identification of Acinetobacter spp. by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Using FISH, the new probe correctly identified 81/81 Acinetobacter spp. isolates and excluded 109/109 tested non-target organisms from agar culture. Furthermore, the new probe correctly identified 7/7 Acinetobacter spp. in 214 blood cultures determined to contain Gram-negative bacteria by Gram staining. Using either the microwave oven or slide chamber technique, the new probe was able to identify Acinetobacter spp. in 100% of the samples tested. FISH used in conjunction with our newly designed probe provides an easy, cheap, precise, and rapid method for the preliminary identification of Acinetobacter spp., especially in laboratories where more sophisticated methods like matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) are not available. PMID:24516735

  15. Enrichment, isolation and characterization of pentachlorophenol degrading bacterium Acinetobacter sp. ISTPCP-3 from effluent discharge site.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashwani; Thakur, Indu Shekhar; Dureja, Prem

    2009-09-01

    Three pentachlorophenol (PCP) degrading bacterial strains were isolated from sediment core of pulp and paper mill effluent discharge site. The strains were continuously enriched in mineral salts medium supplemented with PCP as sole source of carbon and energy. One of the acclimated strains with relatively high PCP degradation capability was selected and characterized in this study. Based on morphology, biochemical tests, 16S rDNA sequence analysis and phylogenetic characteristics, the strains showed greatest similarity with Acinetobacter spp. The strain was identified as Acinetobacter sp. ISTPCP-3. The physiological characteristics and optimum growth conditions of the bacterial strain were investigated. The results of optimum growth temperature revealed that it was a mesophile. The optimum growth temperature for the strain was 30 degrees C. The preferential initial pH for the strain was ranging at 6.5-7.5, the optimum pH was 7. The bacterium was able to tolerate and degrade PCP up to a concentration of 200 mg/l. Increase in PCP concentration had a negative effect on biodegradation rate and PCP concentration above 250 mg/l was inhibitory to its growth. Acinetobacter sp. ISTPCP-3 was able to utilize PCP through an oxidative route with ortho ring-cleavage with the formation of 2,3,5,6-tetrachlorohydroquinone and 2-chloro-1,4-benzenediol, identified using gas chromatograph-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) analysis. The degradation pathway followed by isolated bacterium is different from previously characterized pathway. PMID:19214760

  16. Acinetobacter baumannii: Emergence of a Successful Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Peleg, Anton Y.; Seifert, Harald; Paterson, David L.

    2008-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a highly troublesome pathogen for many institutions globally. As a consequence of its immense ability to acquire or upregulate antibiotic drug resistance determinants, it has justifiably been propelled to the forefront of scientific attention. Apart from its predilection for the seriously ill within intensive care units, A. baumannii has more recently caused a range of infectious syndromes in military personnel injured in the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts. This review details the significant advances that have been made in our understanding of this remarkable organism over the last 10 years, including current taxonomy and species identification, issues with susceptibility testing, mechanisms of antibiotic resistance, global epidemiology, clinical impact of infection, host-pathogen interactions, and infection control and therapeutic considerations. PMID:18625687

  17. An Antimicrobial Metabolite from Bacillus sp.: Significant Activity Against Pathogenic Bacteria Including Multidrug-Resistant Clinical Strains

    PubMed Central

    Chalasani, Ajay G.; Dhanarajan, Gunaseelan; Nema, Sushma; Sen, Ramkrishna; Roy, Utpal

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the cell free modified tryptone soya broth (pH 7.4 ± 0.2) of Bacillus subtilis URID 12.1 showed significant antimicrobial activity against multidrug-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Streptococcus pyogenes and Enterococcus faecalis. The partially purified antimicrobial molecule was found to be resistant to extremes of pH and temperatures and also to higher concentrations of trypsin and proteinase K. The antimicrobial molecule was purified by a three-step method that included reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were determined for 14 species of bacteria using a microbroth dilution technique. The HPLC-purified fraction showed the MICs ranging from 0.5 to 16 μg/ml for methicillin and vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MVRSA) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE) strains. The molecular mass of the antimicrobial compound was determined to be 842.37 Da. The same antimicrobial fraction showed negligible haemolytic activity against human red blood cells even at a concentration as high as 100 μg/ml. Because of its significant antimicrobial activity at low MIC values coupled with its non-haemolytic property, it may prove to be a novel antimicrobial lead molecule. PMID:26696963

  18. Molecular Epidemiology and Characterization of Genotypes of Acinetobacter baumannii Isolates from Regions of South China.

    PubMed

    Ying, Jun; Lu, Junwan; Zong, Li; Li, Ailing; Pan, Ruowang; Cheng, Cong; Li, Kunpeng; Chen, Liqiang; Ying, Jianchao; Tou, Huifen; Zhu, Chuanxin; Xu, Teng; Yi, Huiguang; Li, Jinsong; Ni, Liyan; Xu, Zuyuan; Bao, Qiyu; Li, Peizhen

    2016-05-20

    The aim of this study was to analyze the molecular epidemiologic characteristics of Acinetobacter baumannii. A total of 398 isolates were collected in 7 regions of South China from January to June of 2012. Drug sensitivity was tested toward 15 commonly used antibiotics; thus, 146 multi-drug-resistant strains (resistant to more than 7 drugs) were identified, representing 36.7% of all isolates. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) were used for molecular subtyping. According to the PFGE results (with a cutoff of 70% similarity for the DNA electrophoretic bands), 146 strains were subdivided into 15 clusters, with cluster A being the largest (33.6%, distributed in all districts except Jiaxing). Cluster B was also widespread and included 14.4% of all strains. In addition, MLST results revealed 11 sequence types (ST), with ST208 being the most prevalent, followed by ST191 and ST729. Furthermore, 4 novel alleles and 6 novel STs were identified. Our results showed that multi-drug-resistant A. baumannii in South China shares the origin with other widespread strains in other countries. The nosocomial infections caused by A. baumannii have been severe in South China. Continuous monitoring and judicious antibiotic use are required. PMID:26166496

  19. Bacterial Peritonitis Due to Acinetobacter baumannii Sequence Type 25 with Plasmid-Borne New Delhi Metallo-β-Lactamase in Honduras

    PubMed Central

    Snesrud, Erik; Clifford, Robert J.; Kwak, Yoon I.; Munoz-Urbizo, Ivón P.; Tabora-Castellanos, Juana; Milillo, Michael; Preston, Lan; Aviles, Ricardo; Sutter, Deena E.; Lesho, Emil P.

    2013-01-01

    A carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strain was isolated from the peritoneal fluid of a patient with complicated intra-abdominal infection and evaluated at the Multidrug-resistant Organism Repository and Surveillance Network by whole-genome sequencing and real-time PCR. The isolate was sequence type 25 and susceptible to colistin and minocycline, with low MICs of tigecycline. blaNDM-1 was located on a plasmid with >99% homology to pNDM-BJ02. The isolate carried numerous other antibiotic resistance genes, including the 16S methylase gene, armA. PMID:23817381

  20. QUANTIFICATION OF SIDEROPHORE AND HEMOLYSIN FROM STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM STRAINS, INCLUDING A STRAIN ISOLATED FROM THE LUNG OF A CHILD WITH PULMONARY HEMORRHAGE AND HEMOSIDEROSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A strain of Stachybotrys chartarum was recently isolated from the lung of a pulmonary hemorrhage and hemosiderosis (PH) patient in Texas (designated the Houston strain). This is the first time that S. chartarum has been isolated from the lung of a PH patient. In this study, the ...

  1. Screening and Quantification of the Expression of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Acinetobacter baumannii with a Microarray▿

    PubMed Central

    Coyne, Sébastien; Guigon, Ghislaine; Courvalin, Patrice; Périchon, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    An oligonucleotide-based DNA microarray was developed to evaluate expression of genes for efflux pumps in Acinetobacter baumannii and to detect acquired antibiotic resistance determinants. The microarray contained probes for 205 genes, including those for 47 efflux systems, 55 resistance determinants, and 35 housekeeping genes. The microarray was validated by comparative analysis of mutants overexpressing or deficient in the pumps relative to the parental strain. The performance of the microarray was also evaluated using in vitro single-step mutants obtained on various antibiotics. Overexpression, confirmed by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR, of RND efflux pumps AdeABC, due to a G30D substitution in AdeS in a multidrug-resistant (MDR) strain obtained on gentamicin, and AdeIJK, in two mutants obtained on cefotaxime or tetracycline, was detected. A new efflux pump, AdeFGH, was found to be overexpressed in a mutant obtained on chloramphenicol. Study of MDR clinical isolates, including the AYE strain, whose entire sequence has been determined, indicated overexpression of AdeABC and of the chromosomally encoded cephalosporinase as well as the presence of several acquired resistance genes. The overexpressed and acquired determinants detected by the microarray could account for nearly the entire MDR phenotype of the isolates. The microarray is potentially useful for detection of resistance in A. baumannii and should allow detection of new efflux systems associated with antibiotic resistance. PMID:19884373

  2. The rise of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Evans, Benjamin A; Hamouda, Ahmed; Amyes, Sebastian G B

    2013-01-01

    Acinetobacter spp. are Gram-negative bacteria that have become one of the most difficult pathogens to treat. The species A. baumannii, largely unknown 30 years ago, has risen to prominence particularly because of its ability to cause infections in immunocompromised patients. It is now a predominant pathogen in many hospitals as it has acquired resistance genes to virtually all antibiotics capable of treating Gram-negative bacteria, including the fluoroquinolones and the cephalosporins. Some members of the species have accumulated these resistance genes in large resistance islands, located in a "hot-spot" within the bacterial chromosome. The only conventional remaining treatment options were the carbapenems. However, A. baumannii possesses an inherent class D β-lactamase gene (blaOXA-51-like) that can have the ability to confer carbapenem resistance. Additionally, mechanisms of carbapenem resistance have emerged that derive from the importation of the distantly related class D β-lactamase genes blaOXA-23 and blaOXA-58. Although not inducible, the expression of these genes is controlled by mobile promoters carried on ISAba elements. It has also been found that other resistance genes including the chromosomal class C β-lactamase genes conferring cephalosporin resistance are controlled in the same manner. Colistin is now considered to be the final drug capable of treating infections caused by carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii; however, strains are now being isolated that are resistant to this antibiotic as well. The increasing inability to treat infections caused by A. baumannii ensures that this pathogen more than ranks with MRSA or Clostridium difficile as a threat to modern medicine. PMID:22894617

  3. Acylation of SC4 dodecapeptide increases bactericidal potency against Gram-positive bacteria, including drug-resistant strains.

    PubMed Central

    Lockwood, Nathan A; Haseman, Judith R; Tirrell, Matthew V; Mayo, Kevin H

    2004-01-01

    We have conjugated dodecyl and octadecyl fatty acids to the N-terminus of SC4, a potently bactericidal, helix-forming peptide 12-mer (KLFKRHLKWKII), and examined the bactericidal activities of the resultant SC4 'peptide-amphiphile' molecules. SC4 peptide-amphiphiles showed up to a 30-fold increase in bactericidal activity against Gram-positive strains (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes and Bacillus anthracis), including S. aureus strains resistant to conventional antibiotics, but little or no increase in bactericidal activity against Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Fatty acid conjugation improved endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide) neutralization by 3- to 6-fold. Although acylation somewhat increased lysis of human erythrocytes, it did not increase lysis of endothelial cells, and the haemolytic effects occurred at concentrations 10- to 100-fold higher than those required for bacterial cell lysis. For insight into the mechanism of action of SC4 peptide-amphiphiles, CD, NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy studies were performed in micelle and liposome models of eukaryotic and bacterial cell membranes. CD indicated that SC4 peptide-amphiphiles had the strongest helical tendencies in liposomes mimicking bacterial membranes, and strong membrane integration of the SC4 peptide-amphiphiles was observed using tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy under these conditions; results that correlated with the increased bactericidal activities of SC4 peptide-amphiphiles. NMR structural analysis in micelles demonstrated that the two-thirds of the peptide closest to the fatty acid tail exhibited a helical conformation, with the positively-charged side of the amphipathic helix interacting more with the model membrane surface. These results indicate that conjugation of a fatty acid chain to the SC4 peptide enhances membrane interactions, stabilizes helical structure in the membrane-bound state and increases bactericidal potency. PMID:14609430

  4. Comparison of rpoB gene sequencing, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, gyrB multiplex PCR, and the VITEK2 system for identification of Acinetobacter clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Jung; Jang, Sook Jin; Li, Xue Min; Park, Geon; Kook, Joong-Ki; Kim, Min Jung; Chang, Young-Hyo; Shin, Jong Hee; Kim, Soo Hyun; Kim, Dong-Min; Kang, Seong-Ho; Moon, Dae-Soo

    2014-01-01

    Since accurate identification of species is necessary for proper treatment of Acinetobacter infections, we compared the performances of 4 bacterial identification methods using 167 Acinetobacter clinical isolates to identify the best identification method. To secure more non-baumannii Acinetobacter (NBA) strains as target strains, we first identified Acinetobacter baumannii in a total of 495 Acinetobacter clinical isolates identified using the VITEK 2 system. Because 371 of 495 strains were identified as A. baumannii using gyrB multiplex 1 PCR and blaOXA51-like PCR, we performed rpoB gene sequencing and 16S rRNA gene sequencing on remaining 124 strains belonging to NBA and 52 strains of A. baumannii. For identification of Acinetobacter at the species level, the accuracy rates of rpoB gene sequencing, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, gyrB multiplex PCR, and the VITEK 2 were 98.2%, 93.4%, 77.2%, and 35.9%, respectively. The gyrB multiplex PCR seems to be very useful for the detection of ACB complex because its concordance rates to the final identification of strains of ACB complex were 100%. Both the rpoB gene sequencing and the 16S rRNA gene sequencing may be useful in identifying Acinetobacter. PMID:24157058

  5. Recent Emergence of Clonal Group O25b:K1:H4-B2-ST131 ibeA Strains among Escherichia coli Poultry Isolates, Including CTX-M-9-Producing Strains, and Comparison with Clinical Human Isolates ▿

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Azucena; Herrera, Alexandra; Mamani, Rosalia; López, Cecilia; Alonso, María Pilar; Blanco, Jesús E.; Blanco, Miguel; Dahbi, Ghizlane; García-Garrote, Fernando; Pita, Julia María; Coira, Amparo; Bernárdez, María Isabel; Blanco, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    To discern the possible spread of the Escherichia coli O25b:H4-ST131 clonal group in poultry and the zoonotic potential of avian strains, we made a retrospective search of our strain collection and compared the findings for those strains with the findings for current strains. Thus, we have characterized a collection of 19 avian O25b:H4-ST131 E. coli strains isolated from 1995 to 2010 which, interestingly, harbored the ibeA gene. Using this virulence gene as a criterion for selection, we compared those 19 avian strains with 33 human O25b:H4-ST131 ibeA-positive E. coli strains obtained from patients with extraintestinal infections (1993 to 2009). All 52 O25b:H4-ST131 ibeA-positive E. coli strains shared the fimH, kpsMII, malX, and usp genes but showed statistically significant differences in nine virulence factors, namely, papGIII, cdtB, sat, and kpsMII K5, which were associated with human strains, and iroN, kpsMII K1, cvaC, iss, and tsh, which were associated with strains of avian origin. The XbaI macrorestriction profiles of the 52 E. coli O25b:H4-ST131 ibeA-positive strains revealed 11 clusters (clusters I to XI) of >85% similarity, with four clusters including strains of human and avian origin. Cluster VII (90.9% similarity) grouped 10 strains (7 avian and 3 human strains) that mostly produced CTX-M-9 and that also shared the same virulence profile. Finally, we compared the macrorestriction profiles of the 12 CTX-M-9-producing O25b:H4-ST131 ibeA strains (7 avian and 5 human strains) identified among the 52 strains with those of 15 human O25b:H4-ST131 CTX-M-14-, CTX-M-15-, and CTX-M-32-producing strains that proved to be negative for ibeA and showed that they clearly differed in the level of similarity from the CTX-M-9-producing strains. In conclusion, E. coli clonal group O25b:H4-ST131 ibeA has recently emerged among avian isolates with the new acquisition of the K1 capsule antigen and includes CTX-M-9-producing strains. This clonal group represents a real

  6. Recent emergence of clonal group O25b:K1:H4-B2-ST131 ibeA strains among Escherichia coli poultry isolates, including CTX-M-9-producing strains, and comparison with clinical human isolates.

    PubMed

    Mora, Azucena; Herrera, Alexandra; Mamani, Rosalia; López, Cecilia; Alonso, María Pilar; Blanco, Jesús E; Blanco, Miguel; Dahbi, Ghizlane; García-Garrote, Fernando; Pita, Julia María; Coira, Amparo; Bernárdez, María Isabel; Blanco, Jorge

    2010-11-01

    To discern the possible spread of the Escherichia coli O25b:H4-ST131 clonal group in poultry and the zoonotic potential of avian strains, we made a retrospective search of our strain collection and compared the findings for those strains with the findings for current strains. Thus, we have characterized a collection of 19 avian O25b:H4-ST131 E. coli strains isolated from 1995 to 2010 which, interestingly, harbored the ibeA gene. Using this virulence gene as a criterion for selection, we compared those 19 avian strains with 33 human O25b:H4-ST131 ibeA-positive E. coli strains obtained from patients with extraintestinal infections (1993 to 2009). All 52 O25b:H4-ST131 ibeA-positive E. coli strains shared the fimH, kpsMII, malX, and usp genes but showed statistically significant differences in nine virulence factors, namely, papGIII, cdtB, sat, and kpsMII K5, which were associated with human strains, and iroN, kpsMII K1, cvaC, iss, and tsh, which were associated with strains of avian origin. The XbaI macrorestriction profiles of the 52 E. coli O25b:H4-ST131 ibeA-positive strains revealed 11 clusters (clusters I to XI) of >85% similarity, with four clusters including strains of human and avian origin. Cluster VII (90.9% similarity) grouped 10 strains (7 avian and 3 human strains) that mostly produced CTX-M-9 and that also shared the same virulence profile. Finally, we compared the macrorestriction profiles of the 12 CTX-M-9-producing O25b:H4-ST131 ibeA strains (7 avian and 5 human strains) identified among the 52 strains with those of 15 human O25b:H4-ST131 CTX-M-14-, CTX-M-15-, and CTX-M-32-producing strains that proved to be negative for ibeA and showed that they clearly differed in the level of similarity from the CTX-M-9-producing strains. In conclusion, E. coli clonal group O25b:H4-ST131 ibeA has recently emerged among avian isolates with the new acquisition of the K1 capsule antigen and includes CTX-M-9-producing strains. This clonal group represents a real

  7. Genetic diversity of endophytic diazotrophs of the wild rice, Oryza alta and identification of the new diazotroph, Acinetobacter oryzae sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Hassan Javed; Peng, Guixiang; Hu, Mei; He, Yumei; Yang, Lijuan; Luo, Yan; Tan, Zhiyuan

    2012-05-01

    Thirty-three endophytic diazotrophs were isolated from surface-sterilized leaves, stem, and roots of wild rice Oryza alta. The SDS-PAGE profile of total protein and insertion sequence-based polymerase chain reaction (IS-PCR) fingerprinting grouped the isolates into four clusters (I-IV). The 16S rRNA gene sequence homology of the representative strains B21, B31, B1, and B23 of clusters I, II, III, and IV were assigned to Pseudomonas oleovorans (99.2% similarity), Burkholderia fungorum (99.4% similarity), Enterobacter cloacae (98.9% similarity), and Acinetobacter johnsonii (98.4% similarity), respectively. The results showed wide genetic diversity of the putative diazotrophic strains of the wild rice, O. alta, and the strains of cluster IV are the first report of nitrogen-fixing Acinetobacter species. The cell size, phenotypic characters, total protein profile, genomic DNA fingerprinting, DNA-DNA hybridization, and antibiotic resistance differentiated strain B23(T) from its closest relatives A. johnsonii LMG999(T) and Acinetobacter haemolyticus LMG996(T). The DNA-DNA hybridization also distinguished the strain B23(T) from the closely related Acinetobacter species. Based on these data, a novel species, Acinetobacter oryzae sp. nov., and strain B23(T) (=LMG25575(T) = CGMCC1.10689(T)) as the type strain were proposed. PMID:22105517

  8. Effect of Chlorine Exposure on the Survival and Antibiotic Gene Expression of Multidrug Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in Water

    PubMed Central

    Karumathil, Deepti Prasad; Yin, Hsin-Bai; Kollanoor-Johny, Anup; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a multidrug resistant pathogen capable of causing a wide spectrum of clinical conditions in humans. Acinetobacter spp. is ubiquitously found in different water sources. Chlorine being the most commonly used disinfectant in water, the study investigated the effect of chlorine on the survival of A. baumannii in water and transcription of genes conferring antibiotic resistance. Eight clinical isolates of A. baumannii, including a fatal meningitis isolate (ATCC 17978) (~108 CFU/mL) were separately exposed to free chlorine concentrations (0.2, 1, 2, 3 and 4 ppm) with a contact time of 30, 60, 90 and 120 second. The surviving pathogen counts at each specified contact time were determined using broth dilution assay. In addition, real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis of the antibiotic resistance genes (efflux pump genes and those encoding resistance to specific antibiotics) of three selected A. baumannii strains following exposure to chlorine was performed. Results revealed that all eight A. baumannii isolates survived the tested chlorine levels during all exposure times (p > 0.05). Additionally, there was an up-regulation of all or some of the antibiotic resistance genes in A. baumannii, indicating a chlorine-associated induction of antibiotic resistance in the pathogen. PMID:24514427

  9. Diversity and antibiotic resistance of Acinetobacter spp. in water from the source to the tap.

    PubMed

    Narciso-da-Rocha, Carlos; Vaz-Moreira, Ivone; Svensson-Stadler, Liselott; Moore, Edward R B; Manaia, Célia M

    2013-01-01

    Acinetobacter spp. are ubiquitous bacteria in the environment. Acinetobacter spp. isolated from a municipal drinking water treatment plant and from connected tap water were identified to the species level on the basis of rpoB gene partial sequence analysis. Intraspecies variation was assessed based on the analysis of partial sequences of housekeeping genes (rpoB, gyrB, and recA). Antibiotic resistance was characterized using the disk diffusion method and isolates were classified as wild or non-wild type (non-WT), according to the observed phenotype. The strains of Acinetobacter spp. were related to 11 different validly published species, although three groups of isolates, presenting low rpoB sequence similarities with previously described species, may represent new species. Most of the isolates were related to the species A. johnsonii and A. lwoffii. These two groups, as well as others related to the species A. parvus and A. tjernbergiae, were detected in the water treatment plant and in tap water. Other strains, related to the species A. pittii and A. beijerinckii, were isolated only from tap water. Most of the isolates (80 %) demonstrated wild type (WT) to all of the 12 antibiotics tested. Non-WT for tetracycline, meropenem, and ceftazidime, among others, were observed in water treatment plant or in tap water samples. Although, in general, this study suggests a low prevalence of acquired antibiotic resistance in water Acinetobacter spp., the potential of some species to acquire and disseminate resistance via drinking water is suggested. PMID:22669636

  10. Staphylococcus aureus strains associated with food poisoning outbreaks in France: comparison of different molecular typing methods, including MLVA

    PubMed Central

    Roussel, Sophie; Felix, Benjamin; Vingadassalon, Noémie; Grout, Joël; Hennekinne, Jacques-Antoine; Guillier, Laurent; Brisabois, Anne; Auvray, Fréderic

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcal food poisoning outbreaks (SFPOs) are frequently reported in France. However, most of them remain unconfirmed, highlighting a need for a better characterization of isolated strains. Here we analyzed the genetic diversity of 112 Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from 76 distinct SFPOs that occurred in France over the last 30 years. We used a recently developed multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) protocol and compared this method with pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), spa-typing and carriage of genes (se genes) coding for 11 staphylococcal enterotoxins (i.e., SEA, SEB, SEC, SED, SEE, SEG, SEH, SEI, SEJ, SEP, SER). The strains known to have an epidemiological association with one another had identical MLVA types, PFGE profiles, spa-types or se gene carriage. MLVA, PFGE and spa-typing divided 103 epidemiologically unrelated strains into 84, 80, and 50 types respectively demonstrating the high genetic diversity of S. aureus strains involved in SFPOs. Each MLVA type shared by more than one strain corresponded to a single spa-type except for one MLVA type represented by four strains that showed two different-but closely related-spa-types. The 87 enterotoxigenic strains were distributed across 68 distinct MLVA types that correlated all with se gene carriage except for four MLVA types. The most frequent se gene detected was sea, followed by seg and sei and the most frequently associated se genes were sea-seh and sea-sed-sej-ser. The discriminatory ability of MLVA was similar to that of PFGE and higher than that of spa-typing. This MLVA protocol was found to be compatible with high throughput analysis, and was also faster and less labor-intensive than PFGE. MLVA holds promise as a suitable method for investigating SFPOs and tracking the source of contamination in food processing facilities in real time. PMID:26441849

  11. Acinetobacter guangdongensis sp. nov., isolated from abandoned lead-zinc ore.

    PubMed

    Feng, Guang-Da; Yang, Song-Zhen; Wang, Yong-Hong; Deng, Ming-Rong; Zhu, Hong-Hui

    2014-10-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, non-motile bacterial strain designated 1NM-4(T) was isolated from an abandoned lead-zinc ore mine site in Mei County, Meizhou, Guangdong Province, southern China. The isolate was light yellow, strictly aerobic, oxidase-negative and catalase-positive. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA, rpoB and gyrB gene sequences, together with DNA-DNA hybridization values less than 70%, revealed that strain 1NM-4(T) belongs to the genus Acinetobacter and may represent a novel species. The major respiratory quinone was ubiquinone 9 (Q-9) and the major cellular fatty acids consisted of C18:1ω9c, summed feature 3 (C16:1ω7c and/or C16:1ω6c), C16:0 and C12:0. The major polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, an unidentified aminolipid and two unidentified phospholipids. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain 1NM-4(T) was 47.17 ± 0.02 mol%. Based on phenotypic, phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, strain 1NM-4(T) should be assigned to a novel species of the genus Acinetobacter, for which the name Acinetobacter guangdongensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is 1NM-4(T) ( = GIMCC 1.656(T) = CCTCC AB 2014199(T) = KCTC 42012(T)). PMID:25015678

  12. Update on Acinetobacter species: mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance and contemporary in vitro activity of minocycline and other treatment options.

    PubMed

    Castanheira, Mariana; Mendes, Rodrigo E; Jones, Ronald N

    2014-12-01

    Among Acinetobacter species, A. baumannii and other closely related species are commonly implicated in nosocomial infections. These organisms are usually multidrug resistant (MDR), and therapeutic options to treat A. baumannii infections are very limited. Clinicians have been resorting to older antimicrobial agents to treat infections caused by MDR A. baumannii, and some of these agents have documented toxicity and/or are not optimized for the infection type to be treated. Recent clinical experience supported by antimicrobial susceptibility data suggests that minocycline has greater activity than other tetracyclines and glycylcyclines against various MDR pathogens that have limited therapeutic options available, including Acinetobacter species. An intravenous formulation of minocycline has recently become available for clinical use, and in contrast to most older tetracyclines, minocycline has high activity against Acinetobacter species. In this report, we summarized some of the characteristics of the tetracycline class, and quantified the minocycline activity against contemporary (2007-2011) isolates and its potential therapeutic role against a collection of 5477 A. baumannii and other relevant gram-negative organisms when compared directly with tetracycline, doxycycline, and other broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents. Acinetobacter baumannii strains were highly resistant to all agents tested, with the exception of minocycline (79.1% susceptible) and colistin (98.8% susceptible). Minocycline (minimum inhibitory concentration that inhibits 50% and 90% of the isolates [MIC(50/90)]: 1/8 µg/mL) displayed greater activity than doxycycline (MIC(50/90): 2/>8 µg/mL) and tetracycline hydrochloride (HCL) (only 30.2% susceptible) against A. baumannii isolates, and was significantly more active than other tetracyclines against Burkholderia cepacia, Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia isolates. In vitro susceptibility testing using

  13. Comparative studies of the Acinetobacter genus and the species identification method based on the recA sequences.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, B; Lewandowski, K; Kur, J

    2002-02-01

    The recA gene is indispensable for a maintaining and diversification of the bacterial genetic material. Given its important role in ensuring cell viability, it is not surprising that the RecA protein is both ubiquitous and well conserved among a range of prokaryotes. Previously, we reported Acinetobacter genomic species identification method based on PCR amplification of an internal fragment of the recA gene with subsequent restriction analysis (RFLP) with HinfI and MboI enzymes. In present study, the PCR products containing the internal fragment of the recA gene, for 25 Acinetobacter strains belonging to all genomic species, were sequenced. Based on the nucleotide sequences the restriction maps and phylogenetic tree were prepared. The restriction maps revealed that Tsp509I restriction enzyme is the most discriminating for RFLP. To verify the computer analysis, the amplified DNAs from all reference genomic species available (43 strains) and 34 clinical strains were digested with each of the three restriction endonucleases mentioned. The results of digestion confirmed the computer analysis. The reconstructed phylogenetic tree showed linkages between genomic species 1 (Acinetobacter calcoaceticus), 2 (Acinetobacter baumannii), 3, 'between 1 and 3', TU13 and 'close to TU13'; genomic species 4, 6, BJ13, BJ14, BJ15, BJ16 and BJ17; genomic species 7 (Acinetobacter johnsonii) and TU14; genomic species 10 and 11; genomic species 8 (Acinetobacter Iwoffii), 9, 12 (Acinetobacter radioresistens) and TU15; and genomic species 5 (Acinetobacter junii). It is interesting that one branch in the phylogenetic tree contains haemolytic species-genomic species 4 (A. haemolyticus), BJ13, BJ14, BJ15, BJ16 and BJ17. The proposed genotypic method clearly revealed that the RFLP profiles obtained with Tsp509I enzyme might be useful for species identification of Acinetobacter strains. In this context, recA/RFLP genotypic method should be seen as an ideal preliminary screening method for large

  14. The heat-resistant agglutinin family includes a novel adhesin from enteroaggregative Escherichia coli strain 60A.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Justin; Weckselblatt, Brooke; Chung, Yoonjie K; Durante, Julia C; Andelman, Steven; Glaubman, Jessica; Dorff, Justin D; Bhargava, Samhita; Lijek, Rebeccah S; Unger, Katherine P; Okeke, Iruka N

    2011-09-01

    Heat-resistant agglutinin 1 (Hra1) is an accessory colonization factor of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) strain 042. Tia, a close homolog of Hra1, is an invasin and adhesin that has been described in enterotoxigenic E. coli. We devised a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism screen for the associated genes and found that they occur among 55 (36.7%) of the enteroaggregative E. coli isolates screened, as well as lower proportions of enterotoxigenic, enteropathogenic, enterohemorrhagic, and commensal E. coli isolates. Overall, 25%, 8%, and 3% of 150 EAEC strains harbored hra1 alone, tia alone, or both genes, respectively. One EAEC isolate, 60A, produced an amplicon with a unique restriction profile, distinct from those of hra1 and tia. We cloned and sequenced the full-length agglutinin gene from strain 60A and have designated it hra2. The hra2 gene was not detected in any of 257 diarrheagenic E. coli isolates in our collection but is present in the genome of Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg strain SL476. The cloned hra2 gene from strain 60A, which encodes a predicted amino acid sequence that is 64% identical to that of Hra1 and 68% identical to that of Tia, was sufficient to confer adherence on E. coli K-12. We constructed an hra2 deletion mutant of EAEC strain 60A. The mutant was deficient in adherence but not autoaggregation or invasion, pointing to a functional distinction from the autoagglutinin Hra1 and the Tia invasin. Hra1, Tia, and the novel accessory adhesin Hra2 are members of a family of integral outer membrane proteins that confer different colonization-associated phenotypes. PMID:21764925

  15. In vitro synergy of colistin combinations against extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii producing OXA-23 carbapenemase.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wenjuan; Yang, Haifei; Liu, Yanyan; Ye, Ying; Li, Jiabin

    2016-06-01

    Fifty extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (XDRAB) were isolated from patients. The chequerboard microdilution method was used to determine the in vitro activities of five colistin (COL)-based combinations including COL+fosfomycin (FOS), COL+rifampicin (RIF), COL+imipenem (IMP), COL+sulbactam (SUP) and COL+levofloxacin (LVX). The synergistic activity was evaluated by the fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI). According to our results, the combination of COL was synergistic with FOS, RIF, IMP, SUP and LVX with the ratios of 50, 72, 88, 92 and 64%, respectively. When combined with COL, the other five agents showed increased antimicrobial activities. In addition, two of the combinations, COL+RIF and COL+IMP, were more active than the combinations of COL+FOS, COL+SUP and COL+LVX. More importantly, these combination regimens could exert synergistic effects at the sub-minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) levels against XDRAB strains. PMID:25978105

  16. Pyogenic Liver Abscess Caused by Acinetobacter lwoffii: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Singh, N Pal; Sagar, Tanu; Nirmal, Kirti; Kaur, I Rajender

    2016-06-01

    Acinetobacter lwoffii is a gram negative aerobic non-fermenter bacilli. It is considered as an important emerging pathogen after Acinetobacter baumannii in patients with impaired immune system and in nosocomial infections. Here, we present a case of community acquired pyogenic liver Abscess caused by Acinetobacter lwoffii in a diabetic patient. PMID:27504286

  17. Pyogenic Liver Abscess Caused by Acinetobacter lwoffii: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Singh, N. Pal; Nirmal, Kirti; Kaur, I. Rajender

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter lwoffii is a gram negative aerobic non-fermenter bacilli. It is considered as an important emerging pathogen after Acinetobacter baumannii in patients with impaired immune system and in nosocomial infections. Here, we present a case of community acquired pyogenic liver Abscess caused by Acinetobacter lwoffii in a diabetic patient. PMID:27504286

  18. The Complete Genome and Phenome of a Community-Acquired Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Farrugia, Daniel N.; Elbourne, Liam D. H.; Hassan, Karl A.; Eijkelkamp, Bart A.; Tetu, Sasha G.; Brown, Melissa H.; Shah, Bhumika S.; Peleg, Anton Y.; Mabbutt, Bridget C.; Paulsen, Ian T.

    2013-01-01

    Many sequenced strains of Acinetobacter baumannii are established nosocomial pathogens capable of resistance to multiple antimicrobials. Community-acquired A. baumannii in contrast, comprise a minor proportion of all A. baumannii infections and are highly susceptible to antimicrobial treatment. However, these infections also present acute clinical manifestations associated with high reported rates of mortality. We report the complete 3.70 Mbp genome of A. baumannii D1279779, previously isolated from the bacteraemic infection of an Indigenous Australian; this strain represents the first community-acquired A. baumannii to be sequenced. Comparative analysis of currently published A. baumannii genomes identified twenty-four accessory gene clusters present in D1279779. These accessory elements were predicted to encode a range of functions including polysaccharide biosynthesis, type I DNA restriction-modification, and the metabolism of novel carbonaceous and nitrogenous compounds. Conversely, twenty genomic regions present in previously sequenced A. baumannii strains were absent in D1279779, including gene clusters involved in the catabolism of 4-hydroxybenzoate and glucarate, and the A. baumannii antibiotic resistance island, known to bestow resistance to multiple antimicrobials in nosocomial strains. Phenomic analysis utilising the Biolog Phenotype Microarray system indicated that A. baumannii D1279779 can utilise a broader range of carbon and nitrogen sources than international clone I and clone II nosocomial isolates. However, D1279779 was more sensitive to antimicrobial compounds, particularly beta-lactams, tetracyclines and sulphonamides. The combined genomic and phenomic analyses have provided insight into the features distinguishing A. baumannii isolated from community-acquired and nosocomial infections. PMID:23527001

  19. [Isolation and characterization of two strains of Streptomyces able to metabolize natural polysaccharides including mannan (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Charpentier, M; Percheron, F

    1976-10-01

    Two strains of aerobic and mesophilic microorganisms were isolated from palm-tree plantation sand. They grew on insoluble polysaccharides: mannan, cellulose, chitin as only source of carbon. This lytic activity was used for the purification of the two strains. The morphology of the organisms and the presence of LL-diaminopimetic acid in their cell-wall are characteristic of the genus Streptomyces. Investigations lead to: 1) the characterization of their specific polysaccharidase activity toward insoluble and natural beta-and alpha-glycans (mannan, cellulose, chitin, pectine and starch) and the formation of soluble saccharides (mannobiose, cellobiose, beta-D-N-acetylglucosamine, galacturonic acid, and maltose); 2) the research for antagonist, or synergic, effect on pathogenic bacteria and certain phytopathogenic microorganisms; only in the case of these latter was a weak lytic activity exerted by the two Streptomyces isolates, but one of them was shown to stimulate Colletotrichum lindemuthianum and Phialophora cinerescens; 3) a study of antibiotic sensitivity; the two strains were sensitive to tetracycline and streptomycin, but they had native resistance to other aminosides (gentamicin, kanamycin), to erythromycin and to the beta-lactam antibiotics (penicillin and cephalosporin); they possessed a beta-lactamase bound to the cell membrane. PMID:1020873

  20. Immunochemical identification of the major cell surface agglutinogen of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus RAG-92.

    PubMed

    Bayer, E A; Skutelsky, E; Goldman, S; Rosenberg, E; Gutnick, D L

    1983-04-01

    The immunochemical and immunocytochemical characteristics of three Acinetobacter calcoaceticus RAG strains were compared in order to clarify the relationship between antibody-induced agglutination and the production of polyanionic extracellular emulsifier (termed emulsan). In addition to the parent, RAG-92, two mutant strains were examined: (1) a non-agglutinating emulsan-producer (AB15), and (2) an agglutinating mutant (16TLU) defective in the production of emulsan. A combined genetic-immunochemical approach was employed. This included the comparison of crossed immunoelectrophoresis patterns of parent and mutant supernates and the effect of absorption of anti-whole cell antiserum with mutant cells. In addition, agglutinability and competition studies were performed as well as electron microscopic cytochemistry. The results demonstrated that three major antigenic components were associated with the cell surface and the supernate. Mutant cells were altered both in their cell surface properties and in their extracellular products. One antigenic component, termed component C3, was the major cell surface agglutinogen; this component was absent in non-agglutinating mutants. Component C3 may be identical with or attached to the 300 nm projections on the parent cell surface, but it is not directly related to the presence of emulsan. It appears that emulsan plays little or no role in the phenomenon of antibody-induced agglutination of this organism. PMID:6688443

  1. Outbreak of multiresistant OXA-24- and OXA-51-producing Acinetobacter baumannii in an internal medicine ward.

    PubMed

    Tena, Daniel; Martínez, Nora Mariela; Oteo, Jesús; Sáez, David; Vindel, Ana; Azañedo, María Luisa; Sánchez, Lorenzo; Espinosa, Alfredo; Cobos, Juan; Sánchez, Rosario; Otero, Ignacio; Bisquert, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Here we describe the clinical, microbiological, epidemiological, and molecular characterization of an outbreak of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MRAB) involving 5 patients admitted to the internal medicine ward of our hospital. Over a 6-week period, 5 MRAB isolates were recovered from 5 patients, including 1 with fatal meningitis, 3 with skin and soft tissue infections, and 1 with respiratory colonization. One sample obtained during environmental monitoring in the ward was A. baumannii-positive. According to the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing results, the strains isolated from all patients and the environmental sample belonged to a single clone, identified as ST79 by multilocus sequence typing. The blaOXA-24 and blaOXA-51 carbapenemases were detected in all isolates. Four patients died, but only the death of the meningitis patient was probably related to the A. baumannii infection. The infection source was probably the hands of the healthcare workers because the outbreak strain was isolated from the surface of a serum container. The results of the present study revealed the importance of strict adherence to control measures by all healthcare workers because the consequences of noncompliance can be very serious. PMID:23883845

  2. Resistance patterns of multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in an ICU of a tertiary care hospital, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Janahiraman, Sivakami; Aziz, Muhammad Nazri; Hoo, Fan Kee; P’ng, Hon Shen; Boo, Yang Liang; Ramachandran, Vasudevan; Shamsuddin, Ahmad Fuad

    2015-01-01

    Backgrounds & Objective: Antimicrobial resistance is a major health problem worldwide in hospitals. The main contributing factors are exposures to broad-spectrum antimicrobials and cross-infections. Understanding the extent and type of antimicrobial use in tertiary care hospitals will aid in developing national antimicrobial stewardship priorities. Methods: In this study, we have analyzed the antimicrobial agents’ usage for acquisition of multidrug resistant using retrospective, cross-sectional, single-centre study in a multidisciplinary ICU at tertiary care hospital. Results: Acinetobacter baumannii (ACB) was isolated in various specimens from 662 patients. From these, 136 patients who were diagnosed with Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) caused by ACB were included into the study. In our study, MDR strain accounts for 51% of all VAP cases caused by ACB. The development of ACB VAP were 10.5 + 6.4 days for MDR strains compared to susceptible organism (7.8 + 4.5 days) and had significantly longer ICU stay. Conclusion: The study concludes that prudent use of antimicrobial agents is important to reduce acquisition of MDR ACB. PMID:26870101

  3. Outbreak of septicaemic cases caused by Acinetobacter ursingii in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Máder, Krisztina; Terhes, Gabriella; Hajdú, Edit; Urbán, Edit; Sóki, József; Magyar, Tibor; Márialigeti, Károly; Katona, Márta; Nagy, Elisabeth; Túri, Sándor

    2010-06-01

    Neonatal infections may be caused by various microorganisms, but as far as we are aware, Acinetobacter ursingii has not yet been reported in connection with nosocomial infections of premature infants. During 2 months, 3 premature babies were treated with nosocomial infection caused by A. ursingii at the same ward, and on the basis of molecular typing results the same strain was responsible for all of these cases. Traditional biochemical methods and automatic identification systems failed to identify this bacterium on the species level, and only 16S rDNA sequencing gave acceptable species identifications. The isolated strains proved to be susceptible to all of the tested antimicrobials, including ampicillin/sulbactam, doxycyclin, netilmicin, ciprofloxacin, piperacillin/tazobactam, ceftazidime, imipenem, meropenem, trimethoprim/sulfametoxazole, gentamicin, tobramycin, amikacin, and levofloxacin according to the CLSI standard. In spite of the environmental screening, the source of the infection could not be clarified. One of 3 neonates died, the others recovered and were discharged home after several months of hospitalization. PMID:19931486

  4. Molecular epidemiology of Acinetobacter baumannii in central intensive care unit in Kosova Teaching Hospital.

    PubMed

    Raka, Lul; Kalenć, Smilja; Bosnjak, Zrinka; Budimir, Ana; Katić, Stjepan; Sijak, Dubravko; Mulliqi-Osmani, Gjyle; Zoutman, Dick; Jaka, Arbëresha

    2009-12-01

    Infections caused by bacteria of genus Acinetobacter pose a significant health care challenge worldwide. Information on molecular epidemiological investigation of outbreaks caused by Acinetobacter species in Kosova is lacking. The present investigation was carried out to enlight molecular epidemiology of Acinetobacter baumannii in the Central Intensive Care Unit (CICU) of a University hospital in Kosova using pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). During March - July 2006, A. baumannii was isolated from 30 patients, of whom 22 were infected and 8 were colonised. Twenty patients had ventilator-associated pneumonia, one patient had meningitis, and two had coinfection with bloodstream infection and surgical site infection. The most common diagnoses upon admission to the ICU were politrauma and cerebral hemorrhage. Bacterial isolates were most frequently recovered from endotracheal aspirate (86.7%). First isolation occurred, on average, on day 8 following admission (range 1-26 days). Genotype analysis of A. baumannii isolates identified nine distinct PFGE patterns, with predominance of PFGE clone E represented by isolates from 9 patients. Eight strains were resistant to carbapenems. The genetic relatedness of Acinetobacter baumannii was high, indicating cross-transmission within the ICU setting. These results emphasize the need for measures to prevent nosocomial transmission of A. baumannii in ICU. PMID:20464330

  5. Acinetobacter Infections and Outcomes at an Academic Medical Center: A Disease of Long-Term Care

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Jennifer; Park, An Na; Gander, Rita; Orr, Kathleen; Arocha, Doramarie; Zhang, Song; Greenberg, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Our study aims to describe the epidemiology, microbial resistance patterns, and clinical outcomes of Acinetobacter infections at an academic university hospital. This retrospective study analyzed all inpatient clinical isolates of Acinetobacter collected at an academic medical center over 4 years. The data were obtained from an Academic tertiary referral center between January 2008 and December 2011. All consecutive inpatients during the study period who had a clinical culture positive for Acinetobacter were included in the study. Patients without medical records available for review or less than 18 years of age were excluded. Methods. Records were reviewed to determine source of isolation, risk factors for acquisition, drug resistance patterns, and clinical outcomes. Repetitive sequence-based polymerase chain reaction of selected banked isolates was used to determine patterns of clonal spread in and among institutions during periods of higher infection rates. Results. Four hundred eighty-seven clinical isolates of Acinetobacter were found in 212 patients (in 252 admissions). Patients with Acinetobacter infections were frequently admitted from healthcare facilities (HCFs) (59%). One hundred eighty-three of 248 (76%) initial isolates tested were resistant to meropenem. One hundred ninety-eight of 249 (79.5%) initial isolates were multidrug resistant (MDR). Factors associated with mortality included bacteremia (odds ratio [OR] = 1.93, P = .024), concomitant steroid use (OR = 2.87, P < .001), admission from a HCF (OR = 6.34, P = .004), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (OR = 3.17, P < .001). Conclusions. Acinetobacter isolates at our institution are frequently MDR and are more common among those who reside in HCFs. Our findings underline the need for new strategies to prevent and treat this pathogen, including stewardship efforts in long-term care settings. PMID:26034772

  6. Utility of Whole-Genome Sequencing in Characterizing Acinetobacter Epidemiology and Analyzing Hospital Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Margaret A.; Hauser, Alan R.

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii frequently causes nosocomial infections and outbreaks. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) is a promising technique for strain typing and outbreak investigations. We compared the performance of conventional methods with WGS for strain typing clinical Acinetobacter isolates and analyzing a carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii (CRAB) outbreak. We performed two band-based typing techniques (pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and repetitive extragenic palindromic-PCR), multilocus sequence type (MLST) analysis, and WGS on 148 Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex bloodstream isolates collected from a single hospital from 2005 to 2012. Phylogenetic trees inferred from core-genome single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) confirmed three Acinetobacter species within this collection. Four major A. baumannii clonal lineages (as defined by MLST) circulated during the study, three of which are globally distributed and one of which is novel. WGS indicated that a threshold of 2,500 core SNPs accurately distinguished A. baumannii isolates from different clonal lineages. The band-based techniques performed poorly in assigning isolates to clonal lineages and exhibited little agreement with sequence-based techniques. After applying WGS to a CRAB outbreak that occurred during the study, we identified a threshold of 2.5 core SNPs that distinguished nonoutbreak from outbreak strains. WGS was more discriminatory than the band-based techniques and was used to construct a more accurate transmission map that resolved many of the plausible transmission routes suggested by epidemiologic links. Our study demonstrates that WGS is superior to conventional techniques for A. baumannii strain typing and outbreak analysis. These findings support the incorporation of WGS into health care infection prevention efforts. PMID:26699703

  7. Role of OmpA in the Multidrug Resistance Phenotype of Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Fàbrega, Anna; Roca, Ignasi; Sánchez-Encinales, Viviana; Vila, Jordi; Pachón, Jerónimo

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a nosocomial pathogen with an increased prevalence of multidrug-resistant strains. The role of the outer membrane protein A (OmpA) in antimicrobial resistance remains poorly understood. In this report, disruption of the ompA gene led to decreased MICs of chloramphenicol, aztreonam, and nalidixic acid. We have characterized, for the first time, the contribution of OmpA in the antimicrobial resistance phenotype of A. baumannii. PMID:24379205

  8. Unique features revealed by the genome sequence of Acinetobacter sp. ADP1, a versatile and naturally transformation competent bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Barbe, Valérie; Vallenet, David; Fonknechten, Nuria; Kreimeyer, Annett; Oztas, Sophie; Labarre, Laurent; Cruveiller, Stéphane; Robert, Catherine; Duprat, Simone; Wincker, Patrick; Ornston, L. Nicholas; Weissenbach, Jean; Marlière, Philippe; Cohen, Georges N.; Médigue, Claudine

    2004-01-01

    Acinetobacter sp. strain ADP1 is a nutritionally versatile soil bacterium closely related to representatives of the well-characterized Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida. Unlike these bacteria, the Acinetobacter ADP1 is highly competent for natural transformation which affords extraordinary convenience for genetic manipulation. The circular chromosome of the Acinetobacter ADP1, presented here, encodes 3325 predicted coding sequences, of which 60% have been classified based on sequence similarity to other documented proteins. The close evolutionary proximity of Acinetobacter and Pseudomonas species, as judged by the sequences of their 16S RNA genes and by the highest level of bidirectional best hits, contrasts with the extensive divergence in the GC content of their DNA (40 versus 62%). The chromosomes also differ significantly in size, with the Acinetobacter ADP1 chromosome <60% of the length of the Pseudomonas counterparts. Genome analysis of the Acinetobacter ADP1 revealed genes for metabolic pathways involved in utilization of a large variety of compounds. Almost all of these genes, with orthologs that are scattered in other species, are located in five major ‘islands of catabolic diversity’, now an apparent ‘archipelago of catabolic diversity’, within one-quarter of the overall genome. Acinetobacter ADP1 displays many features of other aerobic soil bacteria with metabolism oriented toward the degradation of organic compounds found in their natural habitat. A distinguishing feature of this genome is the absence of a gene corresponding to pyruvate kinase, the enzyme that generally catalyzes the terminal step in conversion of carbohydrates to pyruvate for respiration by the citric acid cycle. This finding supports the view that the cycle itself is centrally geared to the catabolic capabilities of this exceptionally versatile organism. PMID:15514110

  9. Detection of New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase (encoded by blaNDM-1) in Acinetobacter schindleri during routine surveillance.

    PubMed

    McGann, Patrick; Milillo, Michael; Clifford, Robert J; Snesrud, Erik; Stevenson, Lindsay; Backlund, Michael G; Viscount, Helen B; Quintero, Reyes; Kwak, Yoon I; Zapor, Michael J; Waterman, Paige E; Lesho, Emil P

    2013-06-01

    A carbapenem-resistant Alcaligenes faecalis strain was isolated from a surveillance swab of a service member injured in Afghanistan. The isolate was positive for bla(NDM) by real-time PCR. Species identification was reevaluated on three identification systems but was inconclusive. Genome sequencing indicated that the closest relative was Acinetobacter schindleri and that bla(NDM-1) was carried on a plasmid that shared >99% identity with one identified in an Acinetobacter lwoffii isolate. The isolate also carried a novel chromosomally encoded class D oxacillinase. PMID:23554204

  10. The Genomic Scrapheap Challenge; Extracting Relevant Data from Unmapped Whole Genome Sequencing Reads, Including Strain Specific Genomic Segments, in Rats

    PubMed Central

    van der Weide, Robin H.; Simonis, Marieke; Hermsen, Roel; Toonen, Pim; Cuppen, Edwin; de Ligt, Joep

    2016-01-01

    Unmapped next-generation sequencing reads are typically ignored while they contain biologically relevant information. We systematically analyzed unmapped reads from whole genome sequencing of 33 inbred rat strains. High quality reads were selected and enriched for biologically relevant sequences; similarity-based analysis revealed clustering similar to previously reported phylogenetic trees. Our results demonstrate that on average 20% of all unmapped reads harbor sequences that can be used to improve reference genomes and generate hypotheses on potential genotype-phenotype relationships. Analysis pipelines would benefit from incorporating the described methods and reference genomes would benefit from inclusion of the genomic segments obtained through these efforts. PMID:27501045

  11. Investigation and management of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii spread in a French medical intensive care unit: one outbreak may hide another.

    PubMed

    Bourigault, Céline; Corvec, Stéphane; Bretonnière, Cédric; Guillouzouic, Aurélie; Crémet, Lise; Marraillac, Julie; Juvin, Marie-Emmanuelle; Bemer, Pascale; Le Gallou, Florence; Reynaud, Alain; Boutoille, David; Villers, Daniel; Lepelletier, Didier

    2013-07-01

    An outbreak in a medical intensive care unit was due to an OXA-23-producing Acinetobacter baumannii strain imported from a repatriate hospitalized in Singapore. This outbreak revealed another multidrug resistant epidemic strain that had been present in the hospital for 2 years. Both outbreaks were controlled after 9 months of an extensive infection control program. PMID:23266385

  12. Modeling the Nonlinear, Strain Rate Dependent Deformation of Woven Ceramic Matrix Composites With Hydrostatic Stress Effects Included

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Carney, Kelly S.

    2004-01-01

    An analysis method based on a deformation (as opposed to damage) approach has been developed to model the strain rate dependent, nonlinear deformation of woven ceramic matrix composites with a plain weave fiber architecture. In the developed model, the differences in the tension and compression response have also been considered. State variable based viscoplastic equations originally developed for metals have been modified to analyze the ceramic matrix composites. To account for the tension/compression asymmetry in the material, the effective stress and effective inelastic strain definitions have been modified. The equations have also been modified to account for the fact that in an orthotropic composite the in-plane shear stiffness is independent of the stiffness in the normal directions. The developed equations have been implemented into a commercially available transient dynamic finite element code, LS-DYNA, through the use of user defined subroutines (UMATs). The tensile, compressive, and shear deformation of a representative plain weave woven ceramic matrix composite are computed and compared to experimental results. The computed values correlate well to the experimental data, demonstrating the ability of the model to accurately compute the deformation response of woven ceramic matrix composites.

  13. Modeling the Nonlinear, Strain Rate Dependent Deformation of Shuttle Leading Edge Materials with Hydrostatic Stress Effects Included

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Carney, Kelly S.

    2004-01-01

    An analysis method based on a deformation (as opposed to damage) approach has been developed to model the strain rate dependent, nonlinear deformation of woven ceramic matrix composites, such as the Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) material used on the leading edges of the Space Shuttle. In the developed model, the differences in the tension and compression deformation behaviors have also been accounted for. State variable viscoplastic equations originally developed for metals have been modified to analyze the ceramic matrix composites. To account for the tension/compression asymmetry in the material, the effective stress and effective inelastic strain definitions have been modified. The equations have also been modified to account for the fact that in an orthotropic composite the in-plane shear response is independent of the stiffness in the normal directions. The developed equations have been implemented into LS-DYNA through the use of user defined subroutines (UMATs). Several sample qualitative calculations have been conducted, which demonstrate the ability of the model to qualitatively capture the features of the deformation response present in woven ceramic matrix composites.

  14. Activity of Debio1452, a FabI Inhibitor with Potent Activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Coagulase-Negative Staphylococcus spp., Including Multidrug-Resistant Strains

    PubMed Central

    Rhomberg, Paul R.; Kaplan, Nachum; Jones, Ronald N.; Farrell, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are responsible for a wide variety of human infections. The investigational antibacterial Debio1450 (previously AFN-1720), a prodrug of Debio1452 (previously AFN-1252), specifically targets staphylococci without significant activity against other Gram-positive or Gram-negative species. Debio1452 inhibits FabI, an enzyme critical to fatty acid biosynthesis in staphylococci. The activity of Debio1452 against CoNS, methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), including significant clones, was determined. A globally diverse collection of 574 patient isolates from 35 countries was tested that included CoNS (6 species, 103 strains), MSSA (154 strains), MRSA (163 strains), and molecularly characterized strains (including spa-typed MRSA clones; 154 strains). The isolates were tested for susceptibility by CLSI broth microdilution methods against Debio1452 and 10 comparators. The susceptibility rates for the comparators were determined using CLSI and EUCAST breakpoint criteria. All S. aureus and CoNS strains were inhibited by Debio1452 concentrations of ≤0.12 and ≤0.5 μg/ml, respectively. The MIC50s for MSSA, MRSA, and molecularly characterized MRSA strains were 0.004 μg/ml, and the MIC90s ranged from 0.008 to 0.03 μg/ml. The MICs were higher for the CoNS isolates (MIC50/90, 0.015/0.12 μg/ml). Among S. aureus strains, resistance was common for erythromycin (61.6%), levofloxacin (49.0%), clindamycin (27.6%), tetracycline (15.7%), and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (7.0%). Debio1452 demonstrated potent activity against MSSA, MRSA, and CoNS. Debio1452 showed significantly greater activity overall (MIC50, 0.004 μg/ml) than the other agents tested against these staphylococcal species, which included dominant MRSA clones and strains resistant to currently utilized antimicrobial agents. PMID:25691627

  15. Study of the resistance of Acinetobacter sp. to mercuric chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Lomovskaya, O.L.; Mindlin, S.Z.; Khesin, R.B.

    1986-06-01

    In addition to large plasmids (approx 60 kb) a small plasmid (almost 7.5 kb), plasmid PKL1, has been found in HgCl/sub 2/-resistant strains of Acinetobacter sp. isolated from soil in the vicinity of the Khaidarkan mercury deposit. With the aid of conjugation and transformation studies it was established that plasmid pKL1 is a mobilized plasmid with a broad host range and that this plasmid carries the Hg/sup r/-determinant. A restriction map of plasmid pKL1 was constructed, and the site of the Hg/sup r/-determinant and the regions essential for replication were localized. By comparing the results of the present study and previously-obtained data it was proposed that in a given microbiocoenosis the Hg/sup r/-determinants may occur in plasmids which differ markedly in structure and properties.

  16. A cluster of Acinetobacter Pneumonia in foundry workers

    SciTech Connect

    Cordes, L.G.; Brink, E.W.; Checko, P.J.; Lentnek, A.; Lyons, R.W.; Hayes, P.S.; Wu, T.C.; Tharr, D.G.; Fraser, D.W.

    1981-12-01

    In a 3-month period, three men who had worked for 5 to 19 years as welders or grinders of steel castings in a foundry acquired pneumonia caused by Acinetobacter calcoaceticus variety anitratus serotype 7J. Two of the men died, and postmortem examination showed mixed-dust pneumoconiosis with iron particles in the lungs. A calcoaceticus variety anitratus serotype 7J was isolated from the air in the foundry but the source was not found. The prevalence of antibody titers of 64 or greater to the 7J strain was significantly higher among foundry workers (15%) than among community controls (2%) (p less than 0.01). Sampling showed that the concentrations of total and metallic particles (especially iron) and of free silica in air inhaled by welders and grinders at the foundry frequently exceeded acceptable levels. These findings suggest that chronic exposure to such particles may increase susceptibility to infection by this organism, which rarely affects healthy people.

  17. Acinetobacter cyclohexanone monooxygenase: gene cloning and sequence determination.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y C; Peoples, O P; Walsh, C T

    1988-01-01

    The gene coding for cyclohexanone monooxygenase from Acinetobacter sp. strain NCIB 9871 was isolated by immunological screening methods. We located and determined the nucleotide sequence of the gene. The structural gene is 1,626 nucleotides long and codes for a polypeptide of 542 amino acids; 389 nucleotides 5' and 108 nucleotides 3' of the coding region are also reported. The complete amino acid sequence of the enzyme was derived by translation of the nucleotide sequence. From a comparison of the amino acid sequence with consensus sequences of nucleotide-binding folds, we identified a potential flavin-binding site at the NH2 terminus of the enzyme (residues 6 to 18) and a potential nicotinamide-binding site extending from residue 176 to residue 208 of the protein. An overproduction system for the gene to facilitate genetic manipulations was also constructed by using the tac promoter vector pKK223-3 in Escherichia coli. Images PMID:3338974

  18. Optimization of protocols for derivation of mouse embryonic stem cell lines from refractory strains, including the non obese diabetic mouse.

    PubMed

    Davies, Timothy J; Fairchild, Paul J

    2012-07-01

    The derivation of pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) from a variety of genetic backgrounds remains a desirable objective in the generation of mice functionally deficient in genes of interest and the modeling of human disease. Nevertheless, disparity in the ease with which different strains of mice yield ESC lines has long been acknowledged. Indeed, the generation of bona fide ESCs from the non obese diabetic (NOD) mouse, a well-characterized model of human type I diabetes, has historically proved especially difficult to achieve. Here, we report the development of protocols for the derivation of novel ESC lines from C57Bl/6 mice based on the combined use of high concentrations of leukemia inhibitory factor and serum-replacement, which is equally applicable to fresh and cryo-preserved embryos. Further, we demonstrate the success of this approach using Balb/K and CBA/Ca mice, widely considered to be refractory strains. CBA/Ca ESCs contributed to the somatic germ layers of chimeras and displayed a very high competence at germline transmission. Importantly, we were able to use the same protocol for the derivation of ESC lines from nonpermissive NOD mice. These ESCs displayed a normal karyotype that was robustly stable during long-term culture, were capable of forming teratomas in vivo and germline competent chimeras after injection into recipient blastocysts. Further, these novel ESC lines efficiently formed embryoid bodies in vitro and could be directed in their differentiation along the dendritic cell lineage, thus illustrating their potential application to the generation of cell types of relevance to the pathogenesis of type I diabetes. PMID:21933027

  19. Heterotrophic nitrogen removal by Acinetobacter sp. Y1 isolated from coke plant wastewater.

    PubMed

    Liu, YuXiang; Hu, Tingting; Song, Yujie; Chen, Hongping; Lv, YongKang

    2015-11-01

    A strain of Acinetobacter sp. Y1, which exhibited an amazing ability to remove ammonium, nitrite and nitrate, was isolated from the activated sludge of a coking wastewater treatment plant. The aim of this work was to study the ability, influence factors and possible pathway of nitrogen removal by Acinetobacter sp. Y1. Results showed that maximum removal rate of NH4(+)-N by the strain was 10.28 mg-N/L/h. Carbon source had significant influence on the growth and ammonium removal efficiencies of strain Y1. Pyruvate, citrate and acetate were favourable carbon sources for the strain. Temperature, pH value and shaking speed could affect the growth and nitrogen removal ability. Nitrate or nitrite could be used as a sole nitrogen source for the growth and removed efficiently by the strain. N2 levels increased to 53.74%, 50.21% and 55.13% within 36 h when 100 mg/L NH4(+)-N, NO2(-)-N or NO3(-) -N was used as sole nitrogen source in the gas detection experiment. The activities of hydroxylamine oxidoreductase (HAO), nitrate reductase (NR) and nitrite reductase (NiR), which are key enzymes in heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification, were all detectable in the strain. Consequently, a possible pathway for ammonium removal by the strain was also suggested. PMID:25910961

  20. Efflux-Mediated Antibiotic Resistance in Acinetobacter spp. ▿

    PubMed Central

    Coyne, Sébastien; Courvalin, Patrice; Périchon, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    Among Acinetobacter spp., A. baumannii is the most frequently implicated in nosocomial infections, in particular in intensive care units. It was initially thought that multidrug resistance (MDR) in this species was due mainly to horizontal acquisition of resistance genes. However, it has recently become obvious that increased expression of chromosomal genes for efflux systems plays a major role in MDR. Among the five superfamilies of pumps, resistance-nodulation-division (RND) systems are the most prevalent in multiply resistant A. baumannii. RND pumps typically exhibit a wide substrate range that can include antibiotics, dyes, biocides, detergents, and antiseptics. Overexpression of AdeABC, secondary to mutations in the adeRS genes encoding a two-component regulatory system, constitutes a major mechanism of multiresistance in A. baumannii. AdeIJK, intrinsic to this species, is responsible for natural resistance, but since overexpression above a certain threshold is toxic for the host, its contribution to acquired resistance is minimal. The recently described AdeFGH, probably regulated by a LysR-type transcriptional regulator, also confers multidrug resistance when overexpressed. Non-RND efflux systems, such as CraA, AmvA, AbeM, and AbeS, have also been characterized for A. baumannii, as have AdeXYZ and AdeDE for other Acinetobacter spp. Finally, acquired narrow-spectrum efflux pumps, such as the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) members TetA, TetB, CmlA, and FloR and the small multidrug resistance (SMR) member QacE in Acinetobacter spp., have been detected and are mainly encoded by mobile genetic elements. PMID:21173183

  1. Whole genome sequence analysis of circulating Bluetongue virus serotype 11 strains from the United States including two domestic canine isolates.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Natasha N; Jasperson, Dane C; Dubovi, Edward J; Johnson, Donna J; Ostlund, Eileen N; Wilson, William C

    2015-07-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is a vector-transmitted pathogen that typically infects and causes disease in domestic and wild ruminants. BTV is also known to infect domestic canines as discovered when dogs were vaccinated with a BTV-contaminated vaccine. Canine BTV infections have been documented through serological surveys, and natural infection by the Culicoides vector has been suggested. The report of isolation of BTV serotype 11 (BTV-11) from 2 separate domestic canine abortion cases in the states of Texas in 2011 and Kansas in 2012, were apparently unrelated to BTV-contaminated vaccination or consumption of BTV-contaminated raw meat as had been previously speculated. To elucidate the origin and relationship of these 2 domestic canine BTV-11 isolates, whole genome sequencing was performed. Six additional BTV-11 field isolates from Texas, Florida, and Washington, submitted for diagnostic investigation during 2011 and 2013, were also fully sequenced and analyzed. The phylogenetic analysis indicates that the BTV-11 domestic canine isolates are virtually identical, and both share high identity with 2 BTV-11 isolates identified from white-tailed deer in Texas in 2011. The results of the current study further support the hypothesis that a BTV-11 strain circulating in the Midwestern states could have been transmitted to the dogs by the infected Culicoides vector. Our study also expands the short list of available BTV-11 sequences, which may aid BTV surveillance and epidemiology. PMID:26069226

  2. The pmrCAB Operon Mediates Polymyxin Resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 17978 and Clinical Isolates through Phosphoethanolamine Modification of Lipid A▿

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo, Luis A.; Herrera, Carmen M.; Fernandez, Lucia; Hankins, Jessica V.; Trent, M. Stephen; Hancock, Robert E. W.

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug resistance among Acinetobacter baumannii is leading to an increasing dependence on the use of polymyxins as last-hope antibiotics. Here, we utilized genetic and biochemical methods to define the involvement of the pmrCAB operon in polymyxin resistance in this organism. Sequence analysis of 16 polymyxin B-resistant strains, including 6 spontaneous mutants derived from strain ATCC 17978 and 10 clinical isolates from diverse sources, revealed that they had independent mutations in the pmrB gene, encoding a sensor kinase, or in the response regulator PmrA. Knockout of the pmrB gene in two mutants and two clinical isolates led to a decrease in the polymyxin B susceptibility of these strains, which could be restored with the cloned pmrAB genes from the mutants but not from the wild type. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis also showed a correlation between the expression of pmrC and polymyxin B resistance. Characterization of lipid A species from the mutant strains, by thin-layer chromatography and mass spectrometry, indicated that the addition of phosphoethanolamine to lipid A correlated with resistance. This addition is performed in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium by the product of the pmrC gene, which is a homolog of the pmrC gene from Acinetobacter. Knockout of this gene in the mutant R2 [pmrB(T235I)] reversed resistance as well as phosphoethanolamine modification of lipid A. These results demonstrate that specific alterations in the sequence of the pmrCAB operon are responsible for resistance to polymyxins in A. baumannii. PMID:21646482

  3. Continuous coculture degradation of selected polychlorinated biphenyl congeners by Acinetobacter spp. in an aerobic reactor system

    SciTech Connect

    Adriaens, P.; Focht, D.D. )

    1990-07-01

    A coculture of two Acinetobacter spp. was applied to degrade polychlorinated biphenyls during a 42-day incubation study in a continuous aerobic fixed-bed reactor system, filled with polyurethane foam boards as support for bacterial biofilm development. The reactor was supplied with mineral medium containing 500 ppm sodium benzoate as a growth (primary) substrate, while the incoming airstream was saturated with biphenyl vapors to induce for PCB cometabolism in Acinetobacter sp. strain P6. The chlorobenzoates thus generated from 4,4{prime}-dichlorobiphenyl (4,4{prime}-DCBP), 3,4-dichlorobiphenyl (3,4-DCBP), and 3,3{prime},4,4{prime}-tetrachlorobiphenyl were further metabolized by Acinetobacter sp. strain 4-CB1. The chlorobenzoate metabolites, as well as ring-fission product ({lambda}{sub max} = 442 nm) from the PCB congeners, accounted for the degradation of 63% (2.8 mM) of the 4,4{prime}-DCBP, 100% (0.5 mM) of the 3,4-DCBP, and 32% (0.12 mM) of the 3,3{prime},4,4{prime}-TCBP, the biofilm responded with a concurrent higher release of chlorobenzoates and chloride through cosubstrate utilization.

  4. Strains

    MedlinePlus

    Pulled muscle ... can include: Pain and difficulty moving the injured muscle Discolored and bruised skin Swelling ... if you still have pain. Rest the pulled muscle for at least a day. If possible, keep ...

  5. Culturable populations of Acinetobacter can promptly respond to contamination by alkanes in mangrove sediments.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Lidianne L; Colares, Geórgia B; Angelim, Alysson L; Grangeiro, Thalles B; Melo, Vânia M M

    2013-11-15

    This study evaluated the potential of bacterial isolates from mangrove sediments to degrade hexadecane, an paraffin hydrocarbon that is a large constituent of diesel and automobile lubricants. From a total of 18 oil-degrading isolates obtained by an enrichment technique, four isolates showed a great potential to degrade hexadecane. The strain MSIC01, which was identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing as Acinetobacter sp., showed the best performance in degrading this hydrocarbon, being capable of completely degrading 1% (v/v) hexadecane within 48 h without releasing biosurfactants. Its hydrophobic surface probably justifies its potential to degrade high concentrations of hexadecane. Thus, the sediments from the studied mangrove harbour bacterial communities that are able to use oil as a carbon source, which is a particularly interesting feature due to the risk of oil spills in coastal areas. Moreover, Acinetobacter sp. MSIC01 emerged as a promising candidate for applications in bioremediation of contaminated mangrove sediments. PMID:24050127

  6. Detection of Multi-drug Resistant Acinetobacter Lwoffii Isolated from Soil of Mink Farm.

    PubMed

    Sun, Na; Wen, Yong Jun; Zhang, Shu Qin; Zhu, Hong Wei; Guo, Li; Wang, Feng Xue; Chen, Qiang; Ma, Hong Xia; Cheng, Shi Peng

    2016-07-01

    There were 4 Acinetobacter lwoffii obtained from soil samples. The antimicrobial susceptibility of the strains to 16 antimicrobial agents was investigated using K-B method. Three isolates showed the multi-drug resistance. The presence of resistance genes and integrons was determined using PCR. The aadA1, aac(3')-IIc, aph(3')-VII, aac(6')-Ib, sul2, cat2, floR, and tet(K) genes were detected, respectively. Three class 1 integrons were obtained. The arr-3-aacA4 and blaPSE-1 gene cassette, which cause resistance to aminoglycoside and beta-lactamase antibiotics. Our results reported the detection of multi-drug resistant and carried resistant genes Acinetobacter lwoffii from soil. The findings suggested that we should pay close attention to the prevalence of multi-drug resistant bacterial species of environment. PMID:27554122

  7. Novel Approach To Optimize Synergistic Carbapenem-Aminoglycoside Combinations against Carbapenem-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Rajbharan; Landersdorfer, Cornelia B.; Nation, Roger L.; Boyce, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is among the most dangerous pathogens and emergence of resistance is highly problematic. Our objective was to identify and rationally optimize β-lactam-plus-aminoglycoside combinations via novel mechanism-based modeling that synergistically kill and prevent resistance of carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii. We studied combinations of 10 β-lactams and three aminoglycosides against four A. baumannii strains, including two imipenem-intermediate (MIC, 4 mg/liter) and one imipenem-resistant (MIC, 32 mg/liter) clinical isolate, using high-inoculum static-concentration time-kill studies. We present the first application of mechanism-based modeling for killing and resistance of A. baumannii using Monte Carlo simulations of human pharmacokinetics to rationally optimize combination dosage regimens for immunocompromised, critically ill patients. All monotherapies achieved limited killing (≤2.3 log10) of A. baumannii ATCC 19606 followed by extensive regrowth for aminoglycosides. Against this strain, imipenem-plus-aminoglycoside combinations yielded more rapid and extensive killing than other β-lactam-plus-aminoglycoside combinations. Imipenem at 8 mg/liter combined with an aminoglycoside yielded synergistic killing (>5 log10) and prevented regrowth of all four strains. Modeling demonstrated that imipenem likely killed the aminoglycoside-resistant population and vice versa and that aminoglycosides enhanced the target site penetration of imipenem. Against carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii (MIC, 32 mg/liter), optimized combination regimens (imipenem at 4 g/day as a continuous infusion plus tobramycin at 7 mg/kg of body weight every 24 h) were predicted to achieve >5 log10 killing without regrowth in 98.2% of patients. Bacterial killing and suppression of regrowth were best achieved for combination regimens with unbound imipenem steady-state concentrations of at least 8 mg/liter. Imipenem-plus-aminoglycoside combination regimens are highly promising and

  8. Comparative Genomics of Multidrug Resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a species of nonfermentative gram-negative bacteria commonly found in water and soil. This organism was susceptible to most antibiotics in the 1970s. It has now become a major cause of hospital-acquired infections worldwide due to its remarkable propensity to rapidly acquire resistance determinants to a wide range of antibacterial agents. Here we use a comparative genomic approach to identify the complete repertoire of resistance genes exhibited by the multidrug-resistant A. baumannii strain AYE, which is epidemic in France, as well as to investigate the mechanisms of their acquisition by comparison with the fully susceptible A. baumannii strain SDF, which is associated with human body lice. The assembly of the whole shotgun genome sequences of the strains AYE and SDF gave an estimated size of 3.9 and 3.2 Mb, respectively. A. baumannii strain AYE exhibits an 86-kb genomic region termed a resistance island—the largest identified to date—in which 45 resistance genes are clustered. At the homologous location, the SDF strain exhibits a 20 kb-genomic island flanked by transposases but devoid of resistance markers. Such a switching genomic structure might be a hotspot that could explain the rapid acquisition of resistance markers under antimicrobial pressure. Sequence similarity and phylogenetic analyses confirm that most of the resistance genes found in the A. baumannii strain AYE have been recently acquired from bacteria of the genera Pseudomonas, Salmonella, or Escherichia. This study also resulted in the discovery of 19 new putative resistance genes. Whole-genome sequencing appears to be a fast and efficient approach to the exhaustive identification of resistance genes in epidemic infectious agents of clinical significance. PMID:16415984

  9. Comparison between phenotypic and PCR for detection of OXA-23 type and metallo-beta-lactamases producer Acinetobacter spp.

    PubMed Central

    Azimi, Leila; Lari, Abdolaziz Rastegar; Talebi, Malihe; Namvar, Amirmorteza Ebrahimzadeh; Jabbari, Mosadegh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Resistance to carbapenems is developing around the world and can cause many problems for treatment of patients. Production of metallo-beta-lactamase (MBL) is one of the main mechanism for this type of resistance. So, detection of MBL-producer microorganisms can prevent the spread of this type of resistance. Materials and methods: In this study 94 Acinetobacter spp. were investigated. Resistance to imipenem was conducted after purification and identification. Combination disc (CD) and Double Disc Synergy Test (DDST) were performed for phenotypic detection of MBL and the molecular PCR method was done for vim-1, vim-2, imp-1 and OXA-23 genes. Results: According to TSI, SIM and oxidation-fermentation (OF) test and PCR assay 93 Acinetobacter baumannii and one strain Acinetobacter lwoffii were identified. 85% of them were resistant to imipenem. 34% of them have a positive combination disc test (CD) while Double Disc Synergy Test (DDST) was negative for all of them. The vim-1, vim-2 and imp-1 genes were not detected in PCR molecular method, however in 74% of strains with positive results in combination disc, were positive for the OXA-23 gene after PCR test. This study shows that the blaOXA-23 resistance determinant may become an emerging therapeutic problem. Discussion: According to the results, it seems that combination disc does not have enough specificity for detection of MBL-producer Acinetobacter and using Double Disc Synergy Test (DDST) can be more convenient. PMID:24327942

  10. Acinetobacter baumannii in Localised Cutaneous Mycobacteriosis in Falcons.

    PubMed

    Muller, Margit Gabriele; George, Ancy Rajeev; Walochnik, Julia

    2010-01-01

    Between May 2007 and April 2009, 29 falcons with identically localized, yellowish discolored cutaneous lesions in the thigh and lateral body wall region were presented at Abu Dhabi Falcon Hospital. Out of 18 falcons integrated in this study, 16 tested positive to Mycobacterium. avium complex. The 2 negative falcons tested positive in the Mycobacterium genus PCR. Moreover, 1 falcon tested positive to M. avium. paratuberculosis in tissue samples by PCR. In all cases, blood and fecal samples tested negative. In the acid-fast stain, all samples showed the for mycobacteriosis typical rods. Moreover, in 13 samples Acinetobacter baumannii was detected by PCR and proven by DNA sequencing. Clinical features included highly elevated WBCs, heterophilia, lymphocytopenia, monocytosis, severe anemia and weight loss. A. baumannii, a gram-negative bacillus with the ability to integrate foreign DNA, has emerged as one of the major multidrug resistant bacteria. In veterinary medicine, it has so far been detected in dogs, cats, horses and wild birds. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of an A. baumannii infection in falcons and of a veterinary Mycobacterium-Acinetobacter coinfection. PMID:20871867

  11. Higher Isolation of NDM-1 Producing Acinetobacter baumannii from the Sewage of the Hospitals in Beijing

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jiajun; Wang, Pan; Huang, Liuyu; Klena, John D.; Song, Hongbin

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistant microbes present in the environment are a potential public health risk. In this study, we investigate the presence of New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase 1 (NDM-1) producing bacteria in the 99 water samples in Beijing City, including river water, treated drinking water, raw water samples from the pools and sewage from 4 comprehensive hospitals. For the blaNDM-1 positive isolate, antimicrobial susceptibility testing was further analyzed, and Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) was performed to determine the genetic relationship among the NDM-1 producing isolates from sewage and human, as well as the clinical strains without NDM-1. The results indicate that there was a higher isolation of NDM-1 producing Acinetobacter baumannii from the sewage of the hospitals, while no NDM-1 producing isolates were recovered from samples obtained from the river, drinking, or fishpond water. Surprisingly, these isolates were markedly different from the clinical isolates in drug resistance and pulsed field gel electrophoresis profiles, suggesting different evolutionary relationships. Our results showed that the hospital sewage may be one of the diffusion reservoirs of NDM-1 producing bacteria. PMID:23755152

  12. Colistin Resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii Is Mediated by Complete Loss of Lipopolysaccharide Production ▿

    PubMed Central

    Moffatt, Jennifer H.; Harper, Marina; Harrison, Paul; Hale, John D. F.; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Seemann, Torsten; Henry, Rebekah; Crane, Bethany; St. Michael, Frank; Cox, Andrew D.; Adler, Ben; Nation, Roger L.; Li, Jian; Boyce, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Infections caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-negative bacteria represent a major global health problem. Polymyxin antibiotics such as colistin have resurfaced as effective last-resort antimicrobials for use against MDR Gram-negative pathogens, including Acinetobacter baumannii. Here we show that A. baumannii can rapidly develop resistance to polymyxin antibiotics by complete loss of the initial binding target, the lipid A component of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which has long been considered to be essential for the viability of Gram-negative bacteria. We characterized 13 independent colistin-resistant derivatives of A. baumannii type strain ATCC 19606 and showed that all contained mutations within one of the first three genes of the lipid A biosynthesis pathway: lpxA, lpxC, and lpxD. All of these mutations resulted in the complete loss of LPS production. Furthermore, we showed that loss of LPS occurs in a colistin-resistant clinical isolate of A. baumannii. This is the first report of a spontaneously occurring, lipopolysaccharide-deficient, Gram-negative bacterium. PMID:20855724

  13. Emergence and clonal dissemination of carbapenem-hydrolysing OXA-58-producing Acinetobacter baumannii isolates in Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Sevillano, Elena; Fernández, Elena; Bustamante, Zulema; Zabalaga, Silvia; Rosales, Ikerne; Umaran, Adelaida; Gallego, Lucía

    2012-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging multidrug-resistant pathogen and very little information is available regarding its imipenem resistance in Latin American countries such as Bolivia. This study investigated the antimicrobial resistance profile of 46 clinical strains from different hospitals in Cochabamba, Bolivia, from March 2008 to July 2009, and the presence of carbapenemases as a mechanism of resistance to imipenem. Isolates were obtained from 46 patients (one isolate per patient; 30 males,16 females) with an age range of 1 day to 84 years, and were collected from different sample types, the majority from respiratory tract infections (17) and wounds (13). Resistance to imipenem was detected in 15 isolates collected from different hospitals of the city. These isolates grouped into the same genotype, named A, and were resistant to all antibiotics tested including imipenem, with susceptibility only to colistin. Experiments to detect carbapenemases revealed the presence of the OXA-58 carbapenemase. Further analysis revealed the location of the bla(OXA-58) gene on a 40 kb plasmid. To our knowledge, this is the first report of carbapenem resistance in A. baumannii isolates from Bolivia that is conferred by the OXA-58 carbapenemase. The presence of this gene in a multidrug-resistant clone and its location within a plasmid is of great concern with regard to the spread of carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii in the hospital environment in Bolivia. PMID:21873380

  14. AdeIJK, a Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division Pump Effluxing Multiple Antibiotics in Acinetobacter baumannii▿

    PubMed Central

    Damier-Piolle, Laurence; Magnet, Sophie; Brémont, Sylvie; Lambert, Thierry; Courvalin, Patrice

    2008-01-01

    We have identified a second resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND)-type efflux pump, AdeIJK, in clinical isolate Acinetobacter baumannii BM4454. The adeI, adeJ, and adeK genes encode, respectively, the membrane fusion, RND, and outer membrane components of the pump. AdeJ belongs to the AcrB protein family (57% identity with AcrB from Escherichia coli). mRNA analysis by Northern blotting and reverse transcription-PCR indicated that the genes were cotranscribed. Overexpression of the cloned adeIJK operon was toxic in both E. coli and Acinetobacter. The adeIJK genes were detected in all of the 60 strains of A. baumannii tested. The two latter observations suggest that the AdeIJK complex might contribute to intrinsic but not to acquired antibiotic resistance in Acinetobacter. To characterize the substrate specificity of the pump, we have constructed derivatives of BM4454 in which adeIJK (strain BM4579), adeABC (strain BM4561), or both groups of genes (strain BM4652) were inactivated by deletion-insertion. Determination of the antibiotic susceptibility of these strains and of BM4652 and BM4579, in which the adeIJK operon was provided in trans, indicated that the AdeIJK pump contributes to resistance to β-lactams, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, erythromycin, lincosamides, fluoroquinolones, fusidic acid, novobiocin, rifampin, trimethoprim, acridine, safranin, pyronine, and sodium dodecyl sulfate. The chemical structure of these molecules suggests that amphiphilic compounds are the preferred substrates. The AdeABC and AdeIJK efflux systems contributed in a more than additive fashion to tigecycline resistance. PMID:18086852

  15. Phosphate uptake kinetics by Acinetobacter isolates.

    PubMed

    Pauli, A S; Kaitala, S

    1997-02-01

    Acinetobacter isolates from activated sludge treatment plants of forest industry were used as model organisms for polyphosphate accumulating bacteria to study excess phosphate uptake by the overplus phenomenon as well as luxury uptake of phosphate during growth. The initial, rapid phosphate uptake by the phosphorus-starved Acinetobacter isolates (the overplus phenomenon) followed the Michaelis-Menten model (maximum initial phosphate uptake rate 29 mg P g(-1) dry mass (DM) h(-1), half-saturation constant for excess phosphate uptake 17 mg P L(-1)). During the rapid uptake no growth was observed, but most cells contained polyphosphate granules. Also growth and luxury uptake of phosphate could be modeled with the Michaelis-Menten equation (maximum phosphate uptake rate 3.7-12 mg P g(-1) DM h(-1), half-saturation constant for growth 0.47-6.0 mg P L(-1), maximum specific growth rate 0.15-0.55 h(-1)). PMID:18633985

  16. Identification of NDM-1 in a Putatively Novel Acinetobacter Species (“NB14”) Closely Related to Acinetobacter pittii

    PubMed Central

    Espinal, Paula; Mosqueda, Noraida; Telli, Murat; van der Reijden, Tanny; Rolo, Dora; Fernández-Orth, Dietmar; Dijkshoorn, Lenie; Vila, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we describe the molecular characterization of a plasmid-located blaNDM-1 harbored by an Acinetobacter clinical isolate recovered from a patient in Turkey that putatively constitutes a novel Acinetobacter species, as shown by its distinct ARDRA (amplified 16S ribosomal DNA restriction analysis) profile and molecular sequencing techniques. blaNDM-1 was carried by a conjugative plasmid widespread among non-baumannii Acinetobacter isolates, suggesting its potential for dissemination before reaching more clinically relevant Acinetobacter species. PMID:26259796

  17. The Response Regulator BfmR Is a Potential Drug Target for Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Manohar, Akshay; Beanan, Janet M.; Olson, Ruth; MacDonald, Ulrike; Graham, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Identification and validation is the first phase of target-based antimicrobial development. BfmR (RstA), a response regulator in a two-component signal transduction system (TCS) in Acinetobacter baumannii, is an intriguing potential antimicrobial target. A unique characteristic of BfmR is that its inhibition would have the dual benefit of significantly decreasing in vivo survival and increasing sensitivity to selected antimicrobials. Studies on the clinically relevant strain AB307-0294 have shown BfmR to be essential in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that this phenotype in strains AB307-0294 and AB908 is mediated, in part, by enabling growth in human ascites fluid and serum. Further, BfmR conferred resistance to complement-mediated bactericidal activity that was independent of capsular polysaccharide. Importantly, BfmR also increased resistance to the clinically important antimicrobials meropenem and colistin. BfmR was highly conserved among A. baumannii strains. The crystal structure of the receiver domain of BfmR was determined, lending insight into putative ligand binding sites. This enabled an in silico ligand binding analysis and a blind docking strategy to assess use as a potential druggable target. Predicted binding hot spots exist at the homodimer interface and the phosphorylation site. These data support pursuing the next step in the development process, which includes determining the degree of inhibition needed to impact growth/survival and the development a BfmR activity assay amenable to high-throughput screening for the identification of inhibitors. Such agents would represent a new class of antimicrobials active against A. baumannii which could be active against other Gram-negative bacilli that possess a TCS with shared homology. IMPORTANCE Increasing antibiotic resistance in bacteria, particularly Gram-negative bacilli, has significantly affected the ability of physicians to treat infections, with resultant increased morbidity, mortality, and

  18. The Response Regulator BfmR Is a Potential Drug Target for Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Russo, Thomas A; Manohar, Akshay; Beanan, Janet M; Olson, Ruth; MacDonald, Ulrike; Graham, Jessica; Umland, Timothy C

    2016-01-01

    Identification and validation is the first phase of target-based antimicrobial development. BfmR (RstA), a response regulator in a two-component signal transduction system (TCS) in Acinetobacter baumannii, is an intriguing potential antimicrobial target. A unique characteristic of BfmR is that its inhibition would have the dual benefit of significantly decreasing in vivo survival and increasing sensitivity to selected antimicrobials. Studies on the clinically relevant strain AB307-0294 have shown BfmR to be essential in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that this phenotype in strains AB307-0294 and AB908 is mediated, in part, by enabling growth in human ascites fluid and serum. Further, BfmR conferred resistance to complement-mediated bactericidal activity that was independent of capsular polysaccharide. Importantly, BfmR also increased resistance to the clinically important antimicrobials meropenem and colistin. BfmR was highly conserved among A. baumannii strains. The crystal structure of the receiver domain of BfmR was determined, lending insight into putative ligand binding sites. This enabled an in silico ligand binding analysis and a blind docking strategy to assess use as a potential druggable target. Predicted binding hot spots exist at the homodimer interface and the phosphorylation site. These data support pursuing the next step in the development process, which includes determining the degree of inhibition needed to impact growth/survival and the development a BfmR activity assay amenable to high-throughput screening for the identification of inhibitors. Such agents would represent a new class of antimicrobials active against A. baumannii which could be active against other Gram-negative bacilli that possess a TCS with shared homology. IMPORTANCE Increasing antibiotic resistance in bacteria, particularly Gram-negative bacilli, has significantly affected the ability of physicians to treat infections, with resultant increased morbidity, mortality, and health

  19. Construction of a 3-chlorobiphenyl-utilizing recombinant from an intergeneric mating. [Pseudomonas; Acinetobacter

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, R.H.; Huang, C.M.; Higson, F.K.; Brenner, V.; Focht, D.D. )

    1992-02-01

    Recombinant Pseudomonas sp. strain CB15, which grows on 3-chlorobiphenyl (3CB), was constructed from Pseudomonas sp. strain HF1, which grows on 3-chlorobenzoate, and from Acinetobacter sp. strain P6, which grows on biphenyl, by using a continuous amalgamated culture apparatus. DNA from strains CB15 and HF1 hybridized very strongly to each other, while hybridization between both parental strains, HF1 and P6, was negligible. However, DNA from the recombinant CB15 hybridized moderately to strongly with three specific fragments of parental strain P6. Strains HF1 and P6 did not grow on 3CB, but recombinant strain CB15 mineralized this compound and released inorganic chloride. When growing on 3CB, strain CB15 accumulated brown products, one of which was identified as 3-chloro-5-(2{prime}-hydroxy-3{prime}-chlorophenyl)-1,2-benzoquinone by mass spectrometry. At least three methods of inhibition from catecholic intermediates may account for slow growth on 3CB. In resting-cell assays, recombinant strain CB15 and strain P6 both metabolized 3CB faster than 3,3{prime}-dichlorobiphenyl. However, 3,3{prime}-dichlorobiphenyl could not be utilized as a growth substrate by strain CB15, nor did its presence have any effect on the rate of 3CB mineralization.

  20. Blood stream infections caused by Acinetobacter ursingii in an obstetrics ward.

    PubMed

    Horii, Toshinobu; Tamai, Kiyoko; Mitsui, Mayumi; Notake, Shigeyuki; Yanagisawa, Hideji

    2011-01-01

    The genus Acinetobacter is an important causative pathogen of nosocomial infections in the healthcare setting. The objectives of this study were to determine the species of causative pathogens and the sources of Acinetobacter blood stream infections that occurred in 2 immunocompetent pregnant women admitted to an obstetrics ward within a 2-month period. Phenotypic identification of the two isolates from blood stream infections was inconsistent among the ID test, the MicroScan WalkAway and the Vitek2 systems. In addition to the growth profile and detailed biochemical analysis, genotypic identification and phylogenetic tree analysis based on the almost complete 16S rRNA sequence and the partial rpoB gene sequence confirmed the identification of these isolates as A. ursingii. Environmental investigation of the obstetrics ward revealed A. ursingii and different strains of Acinetobacter junii in specimens obtained from the ward shower bath, although the source and route of transmission for the A. ursingii infections were not clarified. Our findings show that A. ursingii can inhabit the hospital environment. PMID:20969979

  1. The structure of alanine racemase from Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Emily; Scaletti-Hutchinson, Emma; Opel-Reading, Helen; Nakatani, Yoshio; Krause, Kurt L.

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic Gram-negative bacterium which is a common cause of hospital-acquired infections. Numerous antibiotic-resistant strains exist, emphasizing the need for the development of new antimicrobials. Alanine racemase (Alr) is a pyridoxal 5′-phosphate dependent enzyme that is responsible for racemization between enantiomers of alanine. As d-alanine is an essential component of the bacterial cell wall, its inhibition is lethal to prokaryotes, making it an excellent antibiotic drug target. The crystal structure of A. baumannii alanine racemase (AlrAba) from the highly antibiotic-resistant NCTC13302 strain has been solved to 1.9 Å resolution. Comparison of AlrAba with alanine racemases from closely related bacteria demonstrates a conserved overall fold. The substrate entryway and active site of the enzymes were shown to be highly conserved. The structure of AlrAba will provide the template required for future structure-based drug-design studies. PMID:25195891

  2. Radiation resistance of clinical Acinetobacter spp. : A need for concern

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, E.A.; Gerner-Smidt, P.; Kristensen, H. )

    1991-06-01

    As part of an epidemiological investigation of hospital infections caused by Acinetobacter spp. the radiation resistance of 15 clinical isolates and four reference strains was assessed. The radiation resistance (in D-6 values, viz. the dose necessary for reducing the initial number of colony forming units by a factor of 10(6)) was, in general, higher in the isolates of A. radioresistens than in the isolates of the A. calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex and of A. lwoffi. However, the least resistant isolates of A. radioresistens had a D-6 value equal to or lower than the most resistant isolates of the other groups. The lowest D-6 values found were for two of the reference strains. The highest D-6 value was 35 kGy. Three isolates of A. johnsonii could not survive long enough in a dried preparation to make an assessment of the D-6 values possible. The radiation resistance of the 15 clinical isolates in the present study was higher than the resistance found in a study of similar isolates in 1970.

  3. Independent Predictors of Survival in Primary Systemic (AL) Amyloidosis, Including Cardiac Biomarkers and Left Ventricular Strain Imaging: An Observational Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Bellavia, Diego; Pellikka, Patricia A.; Al-Zahrani, Ghormallah B.; Abraham, Theodore P.; Dispenzieri, Angela; Miyazaki, Chinami; Lacy, Martha; Scott, Christopher G.; Oh, Jae K.; Miller, Fletcher A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The prognostic value of Doppler myocardial imaging, including myocardial velocity imaging, strain, and strain rate imaging, in patients with primary (AL) amyloidosis is uncertain. The aim of this longitudinal study was to identify independent predictors of survival, comparing clinical data, hematologic and cardiac biomarkers, and standard echocardiographic and Doppler myocardial imaging measures in a cohort of patients with AL amyloidosis. Methods A total of 249 consecutive patients with AL amyloidosis were prospectively enrolled. The primary end point was all-cause mortality, and during a median follow-up period of 18 months, 75 patients (30%) died. Clinical and electrocardiographic data, biomarkers (brain natriuretic peptide and cardiac troponin T) and standard echocardiographic and longitudinal systolic and diastolic Doppler myocardial imaging measurements for 16 left ventricular segments were tested as potential independent predictors of survival. Results Age (hazard ratio [HR], 1.03; P = .03), New York Heart Association class III or IV (HR, 2.47; P = .01), the presence of pleural effusion (HR, 1.79; P = .08), brain natriuretic peptide level (HR, 1.29; P = .01), ejection time (HR, 0.99; P = .13), and peak longitudinal systolic strain of the basal anteroseptal segment (HR, 1.05; P = .02) were independent predictors in the final model. Conclusions Multivariate survival analysis identified independent predictors of clinical outcome in patients with AL amyloidosis: New York Heart Association class III or IV, presence of pleural effusion, brain natriuretic peptide level > 493 pg/mL, ejection time < 273 ms, and peak longitudinal systolic basal anteroseptal strain less negative than or equal to −7.5% defined a high-risk group of patients. PMID:20434879

  4. Synergistic effects of sulbactam in multi-drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Temocin, Fatih; Erdinc, Fatma Sebnem; Tulek, Necla; Demirelli, Meryem; Ertem, Gunay; Kinikli, Sami; Koksal, Eda

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a frequently isolated etiologic agent of nosocomial infections, especially in intensive care units. With the increase in multi-drug resistance of A. baumannii isolates, finding appropriate treatment alternatives for infections caused by these bacteria has become more difficult, and available alternate treatments include the use of older antibiotics such as colistin or a combination of antibiotics. The current study aimed to evaluate the in vitro efficacy of various antibiotic combinations against multi-drug resistant A. baumannii strains. Thirty multi-drug and carbapenem resistant A. baumannii strains isolated at the Ankara Training and Research Hospital between June 2011 and June 2012 were used in the study. Antibiotic susceptibility tests and species-level identification were performed using conventional methods and the VITEK 2 system. The effects of meropenem, ciprofloxacin, amikacin, tigecycline, and colistin alone and in combination with sulbactam against the isolates were studied using Etest (bioMérieux) in Mueller-Hinton agar medium. Fractional inhibitory concentration index (FIC) was used to determine the efficacy of the various combinations. While all combinations showed a predominant indifferent effect, a synergistic effect was also observed in 4 of the 5 combinations. Synergy was demonstrated in 43% of the isolates with the meropenem-sulbactam combination, in 27% of the isolates with tigecycline-sulbactam, and in 17% of the isolates with colistin-sulbactam and amikacin-sulbactam. No synergy was detected with the sulbactam-ciprofloxacin combination and antagonism was detected only in the sulbactam-colistin combination (6.66% of the isolates). Antibiotic combinations can be used as an alternative treatment approach in multi-drug resistant A. baumannii infections. PMID:26691470

  5. OmpA Binding Mediates the Effect of Antimicrobial Peptide LL-37 on Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ming-Feng; Tsai, Pei-Wen; Chen, Jeng-Yi; Lin, Yun-You; Lan, Chung-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii has recently emerged as an important pathogen in nosocomial infection; thus, effective antimicrobial regimens are urgently needed. Human antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) exhibit multiple functions and antimicrobial activities against bacteria and fungi and are proposed to be potential adjuvant therapeutic agents. This study examined the effect of the human cathelicidin-derived AMP LL-37 on A. baumannii and revealed the underlying mode of action. We found that LL-37 killed A. baumannii efficiently and reduced cell motility and adhesion. The bacteria-killing effect of LL-37 on A. baumannii was more efficient compared to other AMPs, including human ß–defensin 3 (hBD3) and histatin 5 (Hst5). Both flow cytometric analysis and immunofluorescence staining showed that LL-37 bound to A. baumannii cells. Moreover, far-western analysis demonstrated that LL-37 could bind to the A. baumannii OmpA (AbOmpA) protein. An ELISA assay indicated that biotin-labelled LL-37 (BA-LL37) bound to the AbOmpA74-84 peptide in a dose-dependent manner. Using BA-LL37 as a probe, the ~38 kDa OmpA signal was detected in the wild type but the ompA deletion strain did not show the protein, thereby validating the interaction. Finally, we found that the ompA deletion mutant was more sensitive to LL-37 and decreased cell adhesion by 32% compared to the wild type. However, ompA deletion mutant showed a greatly reduced adhesion defect after LL-37 treatment compared to the wild strain. Taken together, this study provides evidence that LL-37 affects A. baumannii through OmpA binding. PMID:26484669

  6. Antimicrobial Resistance Determinants in Acinetobacter baumannii Isolates Taken from Military Treatment Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Leski, Tomasz A.; Stockelman, Michael G.; Craft, David W.; Zurawski, Daniel V.; Kirkup, Benjamin C.; Vora, Gary J.

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii infections are of particular concern within medical treatment facilities, yet the gene assemblages that give rise to this phenotype remain poorly characterized. In this study, we tested 97 clinical A. baumannii isolates collected from military treatment facilities (MTFs) from 2003 to 2009 by using a molecular epidemiological approach that enabled for the simultaneous screening of 236 antimicrobial resistance genes. Overall, 80% of the isolates were found to be MDR, each strain harbored between one and 17 resistant determinants, and a total of 52 unique resistance determinants or gene families were detected which are known to confer resistance to β-lactam (e.g., blaGES-11, blaTEM, blaOXA-58), aminoglycoside (e.g., aphA1, aacC1, armA), macrolide (msrA, msrB), tetracycline [e.g., tet(A), tet(B), tet(39)], phenicol (e.g., cmlA4, catA1, cat4), quaternary amine (qacE, qacEΔ1), streptothricin (sat2), sulfonamide (sul1, sul2), and diaminopyrimidine (dfrA1, dfrA7, dfrA19) antimicrobial compounds. Importantly, 91% of the isolates harbored blaOXA-51-like carbapenemase genes (including six new variants), 40% harbored the blaOXA-23 carbapenemase gene, and 89% contained a variety of aminoglycoside resistance determinants with up to six unique determinants identified per strain. Many of the resistance determinants were found in potentially mobile gene cassettes; 45% and 7% of the isolates contained class 1 and class 2 integrons, respectively. Combined, the results demonstrate a facile approach that supports a more complete understanding of the genetic underpinnings of antimicrobial resistance to better assess the load, transmission, and evolution of MDR in MTF-associated A. baumannii. PMID:24247131

  7. First report of Oxa-72-producing Acinetobacter calcoaceticus in Lebanon

    PubMed Central

    Al Atrouni, A.; Kempf, M.; Eveillard, M.; Rafei, R.; Hamze, M.; Joly-Guillou, M.-L.

    2015-01-01

    Emergence of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter spp. has been increasingly reported worldwide. We report here the first detection of an Acinetobacter calcoaceticus isolate from vegetables in Lebanon carrying the blaOxa-72 gene. These findings show that the Lebanese environment may constitute a potential reservoir for this antibiotic resistance gene. PMID:26858838

  8. Metabolism of spacecraft cleaning reagents by Mars Odyssey and Phoenix-associated Acinetobacter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogul, Rakesh; Barding, Gregory; Baki, Ryan; Perkins, Nicole; Lee, Sooji; Lalla, Sid; Campos, Alexa; Sripong, Kimberly; Madrid, Steve

    2016-07-01

    The metabolomic and proteomic properties that promote microbial survival in spacecraft assembly facilities are important aspects to planetary protection and astrobiology. In this presentation, we will provide molecular and biological evidence that the spacecraft-associated Acinetobacter metabolize/degrade spacecraft cleaning reagents such as ethanol, 2-propanol, and Kleenol-30. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) studies on A. radioresistens 50v1 (Mars Odyssey) show that the metabolome is dependent upon growth conditions and that ^{13}C-labeled ethanol is incorporated into metabolites such as TCA/glyoxylate cycle intermediates, amino acids, monosaccharides, and disaccharides (e.g., trehalose). In fact, plate count assays show that ethanol is a sole carbon source under minimal conditions for several Mars Phoenix and Odyssey-associated Acinetobacter strains, which may explain why the Acinetobacter are among the most abundant genera found in spacecraft assembly facilities. Biochemical analyses support the enzymatic oxidation of ethanol and 2-propanol by a membrane-bound and NAD+/PQQ-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase, with current kinetic data providing similar apparent K _{M} and maximum growth rate values of ˜5 and 8 mM ethanol, respectively. Preliminary GC-MS analysis also suggests that Kleenol-30 is degraded by A. radioresistens 50v1 when grown in ethanol mixtures. Under minimal conditions, A. radioresistens 50v1 (˜10 ^{8} cfu/mL) also displays a remarkable oxidative extremotolerance (˜2-log reduction in 10 mM hydrogen peroxide), which suggests crucial roles for metabolites associated with oxidative stress (e.g., trehalose) and the observed appreciable catalase specific activities. In conclusion, these results provide key insights into the survival strategies of spacecraft-associated Acinetobacter and emphasize the importance of characterizing the carbon metabolism of forward contaminants.

  9. Kinetic analysis of simultaneous denitrification and biomineralization of novel Acinetobacter sp. CN86.

    PubMed

    Su, Jun-Feng; Shi, Jing-Xin; Huang, Ting-Lin; Ma, Fang

    2016-08-15

    A novel aerobic denitrification and biomineralization strain CN86 was isolated from the Qu Jiang artificial lake. Based on phylogenetic characteristics, the isolated strain was identified as Acinetobacter species. Strain CN86 was confirmed to have the ability to perform simultaneous denitrification and biomineralization. Exponential decay equation was used for the matching of kinetic processes on denitrification and biomineralization. A highest nitrate removal rate was achieved at the pH7.0, organic concentration of 1.5g/L and temperature of 30°C. An optimal hardness removal rate was obtained at the pH9.0, organic concentration of 2.0g/L and temperature of 30°C. Strain CN86 is a suitable candidate for the simultaneous removal of nitrate and hardness in groundwater treatment. PMID:27287863

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of a Multidrug-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase-Producing Acinetobacter baumannii Sequence Type 2 Isolate from Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Teresa; Ropelewski, Alexander J; González-Mendez, Ricardo; Vázquez, Guillermo J; Robledo, Iraida E

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of Acinetobacter baumannii strain M3AC14-8, sequence type 2 (ST2), carrying a chromosomally carried blaKPC-2 gene. The draft genome consists of a total length of 4.11 Mbp and a G+C content of 39.25%. PMID:27540056

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of a Multidrug-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase-Producing Acinetobacter baumannii Sequence Type 2 Isolate from Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Teresa; Ropelewski, Alexander J.; González-Mendez, Ricardo; Vázquez, Guillermo J.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of Acinetobacter baumannii strain M3AC14-8, sequence type 2 (ST2), carrying a chromosomally carried blaKPC-2 gene. The draft genome consists of a total length of 4.11 Mbp and a G+C content of 39.25%. PMID:27540056

  12. Colistin and Fusidic Acid, a Novel Potent Synergistic Combination for Treatment of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Infections

    PubMed Central

    Betts, Jonathan W.; Bharathan, Binutha

    2015-01-01

    The spread of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDRAB) has led to the renaissance of colistin (COL), often the only agent to which MDRAB remains susceptible. Effective therapy with COL is beset with problems due to unpredictable pharmacokinetics, toxicity, and the rapid selection of resistance. Here, we describe a potent synergistic interaction when COL was combined with fusidic acid (FD) against A. baumannii. Synergy in vitro was assessed against 11 MDRAB isolates using disc diffusion, checkerboard methodology (fractional inhibitory concentration index [FICI] of ≤ 0.5, susceptibility breakpoint index [SBPI] of >2), and time-kill methodology (≥2 log10 CFU/ml reduction). The ability of FD to limit the emergence of COL resistance was assessed in the presence and absence of each drug alone and in combination. Synergy was demonstrated against all strains, with an average FICI and SBPI of 0.064 and 78.85, respectively. In time-kill assays, COL-FD was synergistic and rapidly bactericidal, including against COL-resistant strains. Fusidic acid prevented the emergence of COL resistance, which was readily selected with COL alone. This is the first description of a novel COL-FD regimen for the treatment of MDRAB. The combination was effective at low concentrations, which should be therapeutically achievable while limiting toxicity. Further studies are warranted to determine the mechanism underlying the interaction and the suitability of COL-FD as an unorthodox therapy for the treatment of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative infections. PMID:25987639

  13. Molecular Epidemiology of Carbapenem-Resistant Acinetobacter Baumannii Complex Isolates from Patients that were Injured During the Eastern Ukrainian Conflict.

    PubMed

    Granzer, Heike; Hagen, Ralf Matthias; Warnke, Philipp; Bock, Wolfgang; Baumann, Tobias; Schwarz, Norbert Georg; Podbielski, Andreas; Frickmann, Hagen; Koeller, Thomas

    2016-06-24

    This study addressed carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii complex (ABC) isolates from patients that were injured during the military conflict in the Eastern Ukraine and treated at German Armed Forces Hospitals in 2014 and 2015. Clonal diversity of the strains and potential ways of transmission were analyzed. Patients with one or several isolation events of carbapenem-resistant ABC were included. Isolates were characterized by VITEK II-based identification and resistance testing, molecular screening for frequent carbapenemase genes, and DiversiLab rep-PCR-based typing. Available clinical information of the patients was assessed. From 21 young male Ukrainian patients with battle injuries, 32 carbapenem- and fluoroquinolone-resistant ABC strains were isolated. Four major clonal clusters were detected. From four patients (19%), ABC isolates from more than one clonal cluster were isolated. The composition of the clusters suggested transmission events prior to the admission to the German hospitals. The infection and colonization pressure in the conflict regions of the Eastern Ukraine with ABC of low clonal diversity is considerable. Respective infection risks have to be considered in case of battle-related injuries in these regions. The low number of local clones makes any molecular exclusion of transmission events difficult. PMID:27429793

  14. Colistin and Fusidic Acid, a Novel Potent Synergistic Combination for Treatment of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Infections.

    PubMed

    Phee, Lynette M; Betts, Jonathan W; Bharathan, Binutha; Wareham, David W

    2015-08-01

    The spread of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDRAB) has led to the renaissance of colistin (COL), often the only agent to which MDRAB remains susceptible. Effective therapy with COL is beset with problems due to unpredictable pharmacokinetics, toxicity, and the rapid selection of resistance. Here, we describe a potent synergistic interaction when COL was combined with fusidic acid (FD) against A. baumannii. Synergy in vitro was assessed against 11 MDRAB isolates using disc diffusion, checkerboard methodology (fractional inhibitory concentration index [FICI] of ≤ 0.5, susceptibility breakpoint index [SBPI] of >2), and time-kill methodology (≥2 log10 CFU/ml reduction). The ability of FD to limit the emergence of COL resistance was assessed in the presence and absence of each drug alone and in combination. Synergy was demonstrated against all strains, with an average FICI and SBPI of 0.064 and 78.85, respectively. In time-kill assays, COL-FD was synergistic and rapidly bactericidal, including against COL-resistant strains. Fusidic acid prevented the emergence of COL resistance, which was readily selected with COL alone. This is the first description of a novel COL-FD regimen for the treatment of MDRAB. The combination was effective at low concentrations, which should be therapeutically achievable while limiting toxicity. Further studies are warranted to determine the mechanism underlying the interaction and the suitability of COL-FD as an unorthodox therapy for the treatment of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative infections. PMID:25987639

  15. Molecular Epidemiology of Carbapenem-Resistant Acinetobacter Baumannii Complex Isolates from Patients that were Injured During the Eastern Ukrainian Conflict

    PubMed Central

    Granzer, Heike; Hagen, Ralf Matthias; Warnke, Philipp; Bock, Wolfgang; Baumann, Tobias; Schwarz, Norbert Georg; Podbielski, Andreas; Frickmann, Hagen; Koeller, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This study addressed carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii complex (ABC) isolates from patients that were injured during the military conflict in the Eastern Ukraine and treated at German Armed Forces Hospitals in 2014 and 2015. Clonal diversity of the strains and potential ways of transmission were analyzed. Patients with one or several isolation events of carbapenem-resistant ABC were included. Isolates were characterized by VITEK II-based identification and resistance testing, molecular screening for frequent carbapenemase genes, and DiversiLab rep-PCR-based typing. Available clinical information of the patients was assessed. From 21 young male Ukrainian patients with battle injuries, 32 carbapenem- and fluoroquinolone-resistant ABC strains were isolated. Four major clonal clusters were detected. From four patients (19%), ABC isolates from more than one clonal cluster were isolated. The composition of the clusters suggested transmission events prior to the admission to the German hospitals. The infection and colonization pressure in the conflict regions of the Eastern Ukraine with ABC of low clonal diversity is considerable. Respective infection risks have to be considered in case of battle-related injuries in these regions. The low number of local clones makes any molecular exclusion of transmission events difficult. PMID:27429793

  16. Identification of Ata, a Multifunctional Trimeric Autotransporter of Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Bentancor, Leticia V.; Camacho-Peiro, Ana; Bozkurt-Guzel, Cagla; Pier, Gerald B.

    2012-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has recently emerged as a highly troublesome nosocomial pathogen, especially in patients in intensive care units and in those undergoing mechanical ventilation. We have identified a surface protein adhesin of A. baumannii, designated the Acinetobacter trimeric autotransporter (Ata), that contains all of the typical features of trimeric autotransporters (TA), including a long signal peptide followed by an N-terminal, surface-exposed passenger domain and a C-terminal domain encoding 4 β-strands. To demonstrate that Ata encoded a TA, we created a fusion protein in which we replaced the entire passenger domain of Ata with the epitope tag V5, which can be tracked with specific monoclonal antibodies, and demonstrated that the C-terminal 101 amino acids of Ata were capable of exporting the heterologous V5 tag to the surface of A. baumannii in a trimeric form. We found that Ata played a role in biofilm formation and bound to various extracellular matrix/basal membrane (ECM/BM) components, including collagen types I, III, IV, and V and laminin. Moreover, Ata mediated the adhesion of whole A. baumannii cells to immobilized collagen type IV and played a role in the survival of A. baumannii in a lethal model of systemic infection in immunocompetent mice. Taken together, these results reveal that Ata is a TA of A. baumannii involved in virulence, including biofilm formation, binding to ECM/BM proteins, mediating the adhesion of A. baumannii cells to collagen type IV, and contributing to the survival of A. baumannii in a mouse model of lethal infection. PMID:22609912

  17. Community-acquired Acinetobacter baumannii: clinical characteristics, epidemiology and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dexter, Carina; Murray, Gerald L; Paulsen, Ian T; Peleg, Anton Y

    2015-05-01

    Community-acquired Acinetobacter baumannii (CA-Ab) is a rare but serious cause of community-acquired pneumonia in tropical regions of the world. CA-Ab infections predominantly affect individuals with risk factors, which include excess alcohol consumption, diabetes mellitus, smoking and chronic lung disease. CA-Ab pneumonia presents as a surprisingly fulminant course and is characterized by a rapid onset of fever, severe respiratory symptoms and multi-organ dysfunction, with a mortality rate reported as high as 64%. It is unclear whether the distinct clinical syndrome caused by CA-Ab is because of host predisposing factors or unique bacterial characteristics, or a combination of both. Deepening our understanding of the drivers of overwhelming CA-Ab infection will provide important insights into preventative and therapeutic strategies. PMID:25850806

  18. Emerging therapies for multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    García-Quintanilla, Meritxell; Pulido, Marina R; López-Rojas, Rafael; Pachón, Jerónimo; McConnell, Michael J

    2013-03-01

    The global emergence of multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii has reduced the number of clinically available antibiotics that retain activity against this pathogen. For this reason, the development of novel prevention and treatment strategies for infections caused by A. baumannii is necessary. Several studies have begun to characterize nonantibiotic approaches that utilize novel mechanisms of action to achieve antibacterial activity. Recent advances in phage therapy, iron chelation therapy, antimicrobial peptides, prophylactic vaccination, photodynamic therapy, and nitric oxide (NO)-based therapies have all been shown to have activity against A. baumannii. However, before these approaches can be used clinically there are still limitations and remaining questions that must be addressed. PMID:23317680

  19. Role for emulsan in growth of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus RAG-1 on crude oil

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, O.; Gutnick, D.

    1986-03-01

    When Acinetobacter calcoaceticus RAG-1 was grown together with an emulsan-deficient mutant on crude oil, only the emulsan-producing RAG-1 was found to grow, regardless of whether the medium was supplemented with emulsan. The results suggested that the cell-associated form of the bioemulsifier is the biologically active species required for growth on crude oil. A revertant of an emulsan-deficient strain was isolated which simultaneously regained the ability to produce both cell-associated and cell-free emulsan as well as the ability to grow on crude oil.

  20. Resources for Genetic and Genomic Analysis of Emerging Pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Ramage, Elizabeth; Weiss, Eli J.; Radey, Matthew; Hayden, Hillary S.; Held, Kiara G.; Huse, Holly K.; Zurawski, Daniel V.; Brittnacher, Mitchell J.; Manoil, Colin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen notorious for causing serious nosocomial infections that resist antibiotic therapy. Research to identify factors responsible for the pathogen's success has been limited by the resources available for genome-scale experimental studies. This report describes the development of several such resources for A. baumannii strain AB5075, a recently characterized wound isolate that is multidrug resistant and displays robust virulence in animal models. We report the completion and annotation of the genome sequence, the construction of a comprehensive ordered transposon mutant library, the extension of high-coverage transposon mutant pool sequencing (Tn-seq) to the strain, and the identification of the genes essential for growth on nutrient-rich agar. These resources should facilitate large-scale genetic analysis of virulence, resistance, and other clinically relevant traits that make A. baumannii a formidable public health threat. IMPORTANCE Acinetobacter baumannii is one of six bacterial pathogens primarily responsible for antibiotic-resistant infections that have become the scourge of health care facilities worldwide. Eliminating such infections requires a deeper understanding of the factors that enable the pathogen to persist in hospital environments, establish infections, and resist antibiotics. We present a set of resources that should accelerate genome-scale genetic characterization of these traits for a reference isolate of A. baumannii that is highly virulent and representative of current outbreak strains. PMID:25845845

  1. Inverse PCR for subtyping of Acinetobacter baumannii carrying ISAba1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shukho; Park, Yun-Ju; Kim, Jungmin

    2016-05-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has been prevalent in nosocomial infections, often causing outbreaks in intensive care units. ISAba1 is an insertion sequence that has been identified only in A. baumannii and its copy number varies among strains. It has been reported that ISAba1 provides a promoter for bla OXA-51-like, bla OXA-23-like, and bla ampC, which are associated with the resistance of A. baumannii to carbapenems and cephalosporins. The main purpose of this study was to develop a novel inverse PCR method capable of typing A. baumannii strains. The method involves three major steps: cutting of genomic DNA with a restriction enzyme, ligation, and PCR. In the first step, bacterial genomic DNA was digested with DpnI. In the second step, the digested genomic DNAs were ligated to form intramolecular circular DNAs. In the last step, the ligated circular DNAs were amplified by PCR with primers specific for ISAba1 and the amplified PCR products were electrophoresed. Twenty-two clinical isolates of A. baumannii were used for the evaluation of the inverse PCR (iPCR) typing method. Dendrogram analysis revealed two major clusters, similar to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) results. Three ISAba1-associated genes - bla ampC, bla OXA-66-like, and csuD - were amplified and detected in the clinical isolates. This novel iPCR typing method is comparable to PFGE in its ability to discriminate A. baumannii strains, and is a promising molecular epidemiological tool for investigating A. baumannii carrying ISAba1. PMID:27095456

  2. Virstatin inhibits biofilm formation and motility of Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as an opportunistic nosocomial pathogen causing infections worldwide. One reason for this emergence is due to its natural ability to survive in the hospital environment, which may be explained by its capacity to form biofilms. Cell surface appendages are important determinants of the A. baumannii biofilm formation and as such constitute interesting targets to prevent the development of biofilm-related infections. A chemical agent called virstatin was recently described to impair the virulence of Vibrio cholerae by preventing the expression of its virulence factor, the toxin coregulated pilus (type IV pilus). The objective of this work was to investigate the potential effect of virstatin on A. baumannii biofilms. Results After a dose–response experiment, we determined that 100 μM virstatin led to an important decrease (38%) of biofilms formed by A. baumannii ATCC17978 grown under static mode. We demonstrated that the production of biofilms grown under dynamic mode was also delayed and reduced. The biofilm susceptibility to virstatin was then tested for 40 clinical and reference A. baumannii strains. 70% of the strains were susceptible to virstatin (with a decrease of 10 to 65%) when biofilms grew in static mode, whereas 60% of strains respond to the treatment when their biofilms grew in dynamic mode. As expected, motility and atomic force microscopy experiments showed that virstatin acts on the A. baumannii pili biogenesis. Conclusions By its action on pili biogenesis, virstatin demonstrated a very promising antibiofilm activity affecting more than 70% of the A. baumannii clinical isolates. PMID:24621315

  3. Assessment of Minocycline and Polymyxin B Combination against Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Dana R.; Cao, Henry; Zhou, Jian; Ledesma, Kimberly R.; Sun, Dongxu; Lomovskaya, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance among Acinetobacter baumannii is increasing worldwide, often necessitating combination therapy. The clinical utility of using minocycline with polymyxin B is not well established. In this study, we investigated the activity of minocycline and polymyxin B against 1 laboratory isolate and 3 clinical isolates of A. baumannii. Minocycline susceptibility testing was performed with and without an efflux pump inhibitor, phenylalanine-arginine β-naphthylamide (PAβN). The intracellular minocycline concentration was determined with and without polymyxin B (0.5 μg/ml). Time-kill studies were performed over 24 h using approximately 106 CFU/ml of each strain with clinically relevant minocycline concentrations (2 μg/ml and 8 μg/ml), with and without polymyxin B (0.5 μg/ml). The in vivo efficacy of the combination was assessed in a neutropenic murine pneumonia model. Infected animals were administered minocycline (50 mg/kg), polymyxin B (10 mg/kg), or both to achieve clinically equivalent exposures in humans. A reduction in the minocycline MIC (≥4×) was observed in the presence of PAβN. The intracellular concentration and in vitro bactericidal effect of minocycline were both enhanced by polymyxin B. With 2 minocycline-susceptible strains, the bacterial burden in lung tissue at 24 h was considerably reduced by the combination compared to monotherapy with minocycline or polymyxin B. In addition, the combination prolonged survival of animals infected with a minocycline-susceptible strain. Polymyxin B increased the intracellular concentration of minocycline in bacterial cells and enhanced the bactericidal activity of minocycline, presumably due to efflux pump disruption. The clinical utility of this combination should be further investigated. PMID:25712362

  4. Draft Genome Sequences of Three European Laboratory Derivatives from Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 Strain EDL933, Including Two Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Fellner, Lea; Huptas, Christopher; Simon, Svenja; Mühlig, Anna; Neuhaus, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 EDL933, isolated in 1982 in the United States, was the first enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) strain sequenced. Unfortunately, European labs can no longer receive the original strain. We checked three European EDL933 derivatives and found major genetic deviations (deletions, inversions) in two strains. All EDL933 strains contain the cryptic EHEC-plasmid, not reported before. PMID:27056239

  5. First report of NDM-1-producing Acinetobacter baumannii sequence type 25 in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pillonetto, Marcelo; Arend, Lavinia; Vespero, Eliana Carolina; Pelisson, Marsileni; Chagas, Thiago Pavoni Gomes; Carvalho-Assef, Ana Paula D'Alincourt; Asensi, Marise Dutra

    2014-12-01

    New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase 1 (NDM-1) was first identified in Brazil in Enterobacter hormaechei and Providencia rettgeri in 2013. Here, we describe the first case of NDM-1-producing Acinetobacter baumannii sequence type 25 isolated from the urinary tract of a 71-year-old man who died of multiple complications, including A. baumannii infection. The NDM-1 gene was detected by quantitative PCR, and its sequence confirmed its presence in an ∼ 100-kb plasmid. PMID:25288087

  6. Management of meningitis due to antibiotic-resistant Acinetobacter species

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Baek-Nam; Peleg, Anton Y; Lodise, Thomas P; Lipman, Jeffrey; Li, Jian; Nation, Roger; Paterson, David L

    2009-01-01

    Acinetobacter meningitis is becoming an increasingly common clinical entity, especially in the postneurosurgical setting, with mortality from this infection exceeding 15%. Infectious Diseases Society of America guidelines for therapy of postneurosurgical meningitis recommend either ceftazidime or cefepime as empirical coverage against Gram-negative pathogens. However, assessment of the pharmacodynamics of these cephalosporins in cerebrospinal fluid suggests that recommended doses will achieve pharmacodynamic targets against fewer than 10% of contemporary acinetobacter isolates. Thus, these antibiotics are poor options for suspected acinetobacter meningitis. From in vitro and pharmacodynamic perspectives, intravenous meropenem plus intraventricular administration of an aminoglycoside may represent a superior, albeit imperfect, regimen for suspected acinetobacter meningitis. For cases of meningitis due to carbapenem-resistant acinetobacter, use of tigecycline is not recommended on pharmacodynamic grounds. The greatest clinical experience rests with use of polymyxins, although an intravenous polymyxin alone is inadvisable. Combination with an intraventricularly administered antibiotic plus removal of infected neurosurgical hardware appears the therapeutic strategy most likely to succeed in this situation. Unfortunately, limited development of new antibiotics plus the growing threat of multidrug-resistant acinetobacter is likely to increase the problems posed by acinetobacter meningitis in the future. PMID:19324297

  7. Draft Genome Sequences of Acinetobacter parvus CM11, Acinetobacter radioresistens CM38, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia BR12, Isolated from Murine Proximal Colonic Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Saffarian, Azadeh; Mulet, Céline; Naito, Tomoaki; Bouchier, Christiane; Tichit, Magali; Ma, Laurence; Grompone, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report three genome sequences of bacteria isolated from murine proximal colonic tissue and identified as Acinetobacter parvus CM11, Acinetobacter radioresistens CM38, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia BR12. PMID:26472823

  8. Draft Genome Sequences of Acinetobacter parvus CM11, Acinetobacter radioresistens CM38, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia BR12, Isolated from Murine Proximal Colonic Tissue.

    PubMed

    Saffarian, Azadeh; Mulet, Céline; Naito, Tomoaki; Bouchier, Christiane; Tichit, Magali; Ma, Laurence; Grompone, Gianfranco; Sansonetti, Philippe J; Pédron, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report three genome sequences of bacteria isolated from murine proximal colonic tissue and identified as Acinetobacter parvus CM11, Acinetobacter radioresistens CM38, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia BR12. PMID:26472823

  9. [Emerging Acinetobacter baumannii infections and factors favouring their occurrence].

    PubMed

    Eveillard, M; Joly-Guillou, M-L

    2012-10-01

    During the last decade, Acinetobacter baumannii (AB) has been increasingly responsible for infections occurring in three particular contexts (in terms of patients and environment). Community AB pneumonia is severe infections, mainly described around the Indian Ocean, and which mainly concern patients with major co-morbidities. AB is also responsible for infections occurring among soldiers wounded in action during operations conducted in Iraq or Afghanistan. Lastly, this bacterium is responsible for infections occurring among casualties from natural disasters like earthquakes and tsunamis. Those infections are often due to multidrug-resistant strains, which can be implicated in nosocomial outbreaks when patients are hospitalized in a local casualty department or during their repatriation thereafter. The source of the contaminations which lead to AB infections following injuries (warfare or natural disasters) is still poorly known. Three hypotheses are usually considered: a contamination of wounds with environmental bacteria, a wound contamination from a previous cutaneous or oropharyngeal endogenous reservoir, or hospital acquisition. The implication of telluric or agricultural primary reservoirs in human AB infections is a common hypothesis which remains to be demonstrated by further specifically designed studies. PMID:21963271

  10. Host resistance to intranasal Acinetobacter baumannii reinfection in mice.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Hongyu; Li, Zack; KuoLee, Rhonda; Harris, Greg; Gao, Xiaoling; Yan, Hongbin; Xu, H Howard; Chen, Wangxue

    2016-07-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a major causative agent of healthcare-associated infection and develops multidrug resistance rapidly. However, little is known in the host defense mechanisms against this infection. In this study, we examined if mice recovered from a previous intranasal A. baumannii infection (recovered mice) are fully protected against a subsequent reinfection. We found that, despite the presence of specific serum IgG and mucosal IgA responses prior to the reinfection, the recovered mice were only marginally better protected against intranasal challenge with low doses of homologous or heterologous A. baumannii strains than the naïve mice. Post-challenge immune and inflammatory (cells and cytokines) responses were generally comparable between recovered and naïve mice although the recovered mice produced significantly higher amounts of IFN-γ and IL-17 and had higher percentages and numbers of resident lung CD44(hi)CD62L(-)CD4(+) and CD19(+) B lymphocytes. Taken together, our results suggest that mice recovered from a previous A. baumannii infection remain susceptible to reinfection, indicating the complexity of immune protection mechanism for this Gram-negative, multidrug-resistant emerging pathogen. PMID:27194730

  11. Evaluation of Parameters for High Efficiency Transformation of Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Suleyman; Thompson, Mitchell G.; Jacobs, Anna C.; Zurawski, Daniel V.; Kirkup, Benjamin C.

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging, nosocomial pathogen that is poorly characterized due to a paucity of genetic tools and methods. While whole genome sequence data from several epidemic and environmental strains have recently become available, the functional characterization of genes is significantly lagging. Efficient transformation is one of the first steps to develop molecular tools that can be used to address these shortcomings. Here we report parameters allowing high efficiency transformation of A. baumannii. Using a multi-factorial experimental design we found that growth phase, voltage, and resistance all significantly contribute to transformation efficiency. The highest efficiency (4.3 × 108 Transformants/μg DNA) was obtained at the stationary growth phase of the bacterium (OD 6.0) using 25 ng of plasmid DNA under 100 Ohms resistance and 1.7 kV/cm voltage. The optimized electroporation parameters reported here provide a useful tool for genetic manipulation of A. baumannii. PMID:26911658

  12. Evaluation of Acinetobacter sp. B9 for Cr (VI) resistance and detoxification with potential application in bioremediation of heavy-metals-rich industrial wastewater.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Amrik; Gupta, Anshu

    2013-09-01

    Present work demonstrates Cr (VI) detoxification and resistance mechanism of a newly isolated strain (B9) of Acinetobacter sp. Bioremediation potential of the strain B9 is shown by simultaneous removal of major heavy metals including chromium from heavy-metals-rich metal finishing industrial wastewater. Strain B9 tolerate up to 350 mg L(-1) of Cr (VI) and also shows level of tolerance to Ni (II), Zn (II), Pb (II), and Cd (II). The strain was capable of reducing 67 % of initial 7.0 mg L(-1) of Cr (VI) within 24 h of incubation, while in presence of Cu ions 100 % removal of initial 7.0 and 10 mg L(-1) of Cr (VI) was observed with in 24 h. pH in the range of 6.0-8.0 and inoculum size of 2 % (v/v) were determined to be optimum for dichromate reduction. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy studies suggested absorption or intracellular accumulation and that might be one of the major mechanisms behind the chromium resistance by strain B9. Scanning electron microscopy showed morphological changes in the strain due to chromium stress. Relevance of the strain for treatment of heavy-metals-rich industrial wastewater resulted in 93.7, 55.4, and 68.94 % removal of initial 30 mg L(-1) Cr (VI), 246 mg L(-1) total Cr, and 51 mg L(-1) Ni, respectively, after 144 h of treatment in a batch mode. PMID:23619927

  13. Post-neurosurgical meningitis caused by acinetobacter baumannii: case series and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Shunlan; Li, Shanshan; Yang, Naibin; Zhang, Sainan; Hu, Danping; Li, Qian; Lu, Mingqin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii), a gram-negative bacterium, has now become an important hospital pathogen, which causes various serious nosocomial infections worldwide. Bacterial meningitis is a common complication after neurosurgical operation, and the percentage of A. baumannii meningitis is growing, especially the one resisting multiple drugs. Method: We retrospectively reviewed the cases with postoperative A. baumannii meningitis (PABM) in the First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University from January 2013 to October 2014. And we retrieved the PubMed for cases with PABM and reviewed them. Result: Five cases were included in our retrospective study. Two cases with sensitive A. baumannii and one with multidrug-resistant acinetobacter baumannii (MRAB) were cured, and other two with MRAB died. Conclusion: Intraventricular or intrathecal colistin could be a treatment to the MRAB. PMID:26885152

  14. Genome-sequence analysis of Acinetobacter johnsonii MB44 reveals potential nematode-virulent factors.

    PubMed

    Tian, Shijing; Ali, Muhammad; Xie, Li; Li, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter johnsonii is generally recognized as a nonpathogenic bacterium although it is often found in hospital environments. However, a newly identified isolate of this species from a frost-plant-tissue sample, namely, A. johnsonii MB44, showed significant nematicidal activity against the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. To expand our understanding of this bacterial species, we generated a draft genome sequence of MB44 and analyzed its genomic features related to nematicidal attributes. The 3.36 Mb long genome contains 3636 predicted protein-coding genes and 95 RNA genes (including 14 rRNA genes), with a G + C content of 41.37 %. Genomic analysis of the prediction of nematicidal proteins using the software MP3 revealed a total of 108 potential virulence proteins. Some of these proteins were homologous to the known virulent proteins identified from Acinetobacter baumannii, a pathogenic species of the genus Acinetobacter. These virulent proteins included the outer membrane protein A, the phospholipase D, and penicillin-binding protein 7/8. Moreover, one siderophore biosynthesis gene cluster and one capsular polysaccharide gene cluster, which were predicted to be important virulence factors for C. elegans, were identified in the MB44 genome. The current study demonstrated that A. johnsonii MB44, with its nematicidal activity, could be an opportunistic pathogen to animals. PMID:27429894

  15. Types and Prevalence of Carbapenem-Resistant Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii Complex in Northern Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Wen-Shyang; Wang, Nai-Yu; Feng, Jou-An; Weng, Li-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    The frequency of the carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii (CRACB) complex increases annually in our hospitals. However, the types and prevalence of carbapenemases among isolates still remain unclear. In this study, we identified and collected 672 carbapenem-resistant isolates from a medical center in Northern Taiwan between April and December of 2010. There were 577 genospecies 2 (Acinetobacter baumannii), 79 genospecies 13TU, and 16 genospecies 3 isolates. The isolates had an acquired blaOXA-24-like gene, which was confirmed by sequencing for the encoded OXA-72 carbapenemase, and were often associated with high-level carbapenem resistance. These CRACB complex isolates remained susceptible to colistin (100%). The genotyping of isolates was conducted using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis with ApaI digestion. In most clonally related groups, patients were from both branch hospitals. The results indicate that interhospital dissemination of clones occurred. This study provides updated data on the types and prevalence of the CRACB complex. In addition, it presents a warning on the emergence and spread of CRACB complex harboring blaOXA-24-like genes in northern Taiwan. PMID:24145535

  16. Safety assessment of the Clostridium butyricum MIYAIRI 588® probiotic strain including evaluation of antimicrobial sensitivity and presence of Clostridium toxin genes in vitro and teratogenicity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Isa, K; Oka, K; Beauchamp, N; Sato, M; Wada, K; Ohtani, K; Nakanishi, S; McCartney, E; Tanaka, M; Shimizu, T; Kamiya, S; Kruger, C; Takahashi, M

    2016-08-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms ingested for the purpose of conferring a health benefit on the host. Development of new probiotics includes the need for safety evaluations that should consider factors such as pathogenicity, infectivity, virulence factors, toxicity, and metabolic activity. Clostridium butyricum MIYAIRI 588(®) (CBM 588(®)), an anaerobic spore-forming bacterium, has been developed as a probiotic for use by humans and food animals. Safety studies of this probiotic strain have been conducted and include assessment of antimicrobial sensitivity, documentation of the lack of Clostridium toxin genes, and evaluation of CBM 588(®) on reproductive and developmental toxicity in a rodent model. With the exception of aminoglycosides, to which anaerobes are intrinsically resistant, CBM 588(®) showed sensitivity to all antibiotic classes important in human and animal therapeutics. In addition, analysis of the CBM 588(®) genome established the absence of genes for encoding for α, β, or ε toxins and botulin neurotoxins types A, B, E, or F. There were no deleterious reproductive and developmental effects observed in mice associated with the administration of CBM 588(®) These data provide further support for the safety of CBM 588(®) for use as a probiotic in animals and humans. PMID:26437792

  17. Prevalence of hypermutators among clinical Acinetobacter baumannii isolates

    PubMed Central

    Komp Lindgren, Patricia; Higgins, Paul G.; Seifert, Harald; Cars, Otto

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were to study the presence of mutators in a set of Acinetobacter baumannii isolates and to explore whether there is a correlation between mutation rates and antibiotic resistance. Methods The variation in mutation rate was evaluated for 237 clinical A. baumannii isolates by determining the frequency of their mutation to rifampicin resistance. For each isolate, the antibiotic resistance profile was determined by disc diffusion and/or Etest. Isolates were divided into susceptible, resistant and MDR groups according to their resistance to five groups of different antibiotics. A comparison between differences in mutation frequency (f) and strain-specific factors was performed. Results Of the 237 isolates 32%, 18% and 50% were classified as susceptible, resistant and MDR, respectively. The f of rifampicin resistance varied between 2.2 × 10−10 and 1.2 × 10−6. Of the strains under investigation, 16% had an ≥2.5- to 166-fold higher f. The presence of mutators (definition ≥2.5-fold increase in f compared with ATCC 19606) in the MDR group (22%) was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than that in the susceptible and resistant groups (11% and 7%, respectively). Furthermore, f was significantly higher in the MDR group compared with that in the susceptible and resistant groups. Conclusions The facts that 26 of 37 mutator isolates (70%) in the population were MDR and that there was a significantly higher general f in isolates exhibiting an MDR profile suggest that hypermutability can be of advantage for the organism in a selective environment with extensive exposure to antimicrobials. PMID:26660878

  18. Efficacy of a combined oral formulation of derquantel-abamectin against the adult and larval stages of nematodes in sheep, including anthelmintic-resistant strains.

    PubMed

    Little, Peter R; Hodge, Andrew; Maeder, Steven J; Wirtherle, Nicole C; Nicholas, David R; Cox, George G; Conder, George A

    2011-09-27

    Derquantel (DQL), a semi-synthetic member of a novel anthelmintic class, the spiroindoles, in combination with abamectin (ABA) [as the combination product STARTECT(®)] is a new entry for the treatment and control of parasites in sheep. The 19 studies reported herein were conducted in Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and the United Kingdom to demonstrate the efficacy of derquantel-abamectin (DQL-ABA) against a broad spectrum of gastrointestinal and respiratory nematodes of sheep, and to support registration of the combination product. Eleven studies were conducted using natural or experimental parasite infections with unknown or unconfirmed resistance, while eight studies utilised isolates/strains with confirmed or well characterised resistance to one or more currently available anthelmintics, including macrocyclic lactones. All studies included DQL-ABA and negative control groups, and in selected studies one or more reference anthelmintic groups were included. In all studies the commercial formulation of DQL-ABA was administered orally at 2mg/kg DQL and 0.2mg/kg ABA; placebo was administered in the same volume as DQL-ABA; and reference anthelmintics were administered as per label recommendations, except in one instance where levamisole was administered at twice the label dose. Infection, necropsy, worm collection and worm counting procedures were performed using standard techniques. Efficacy was calculated based on the percentage reduction in geometric mean worm count relative to negative control for each nematode species and lifecycle stage targeted. Twenty-two isolates/strains used in the eight studies targeting resistant worms had proven resistance: three to one anthelmintic class, eleven to two classes and eight to three or more classes; of these resistant strains, 16 demonstrated resistance to a macrocyclic lactone anthelmintic. Regardless of resistance status in the 19 studies, DQL-ABA controlled a broad range of economically important gastrointestinal

  19. Characterization and application of a novel bioemulsifier in crude oil degradation by Acinetobacter beijerinckii ZRS.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yi-He; Chen, Li-Yuan; Tian, Zi-Jing; Sun, Yue; Liu, Jin-Biao; Huang, Lei

    2016-02-01

    Bioemulsifiers can be applicated in a variety of areas such as bioremediation and microbial-enhanced oil recovery. The present study was aimed at bioemulsifier production, optimization, stability studies, and applications of the bioemulsifier produced by one of these strains, Acinetobacter beijerinckii ZRS. When Acinetobacter beijerinckii ZRS is cultured with hexadecane as a carbon source, it produces a novel extracellular emulsifying agent that does not cause remarkable reductions in surface tension. In order to enhance bioemulsifier production, response surface methodology was applied to optimize the culture medium. The bioemulsifier was subjected to thin-layer chromatography, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), gel filtration chromatography, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), which allowed for the identification of a novel polymeric bioemulsifier. The bioemulsifier retained its properties at a wide range of pH values, high temperatures and high salinities (up to 5% [w⁄v] Na(+) and 24% Ca(2+)). To deduce the role of this bioemulsifier in a coastal zone oil spill, the propagation of oil-degrading bacteria on oil-coated grains of gravel immersed in seawater was investigated in beach-simulating tanks. The bioemulsifier played a positive role in the degradation of these hydrocarbons and increasing the light crude oil degradation rate of the bacterial strain from 37.5 to 58.3% within 56 days. Therefore, this bioemulsifier shows strong potential to be used for bioremediation of oil pollution in marine environments. PMID:26576943

  20. Antibiotic-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Increasing Success Remains a Challenge as a Nosocomial Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Villoria, Ana Maria; Valverde-Garduno, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant infectious bacteria currently imply a high risk and therefore constitute a strong challenge when treating patients in hospital settings. Characterization of these species and of particular strains is a priority for the establishment of diagnostic tests and preventive procedures. The relevance of Acinetobacter baumannii as a problematic microorganism in inpatient facilities, particularly intensive care units, has increased over time. This review aims to draw attention to (i) the historical emergence of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii, (ii) the current status of surveillance needs in Latin America, and (iii) recent data suggesting that A. baumannii continues to spread and evolve in hospital settings. First, we present synopsis of the series of events leading to the discovery and precise identification of this microorganism in hospital settings. Then key events in the acquisition of antibiotic-resistant genes by this microorganism are summarized, highlighting the race between new antibiotic generation and emergence of A. baumannii resistant strains. Here we review the historical development of this species as an infectious threat, the current state of its distribution, and antibiotic resistance characteristics, and we discuss future prospects for its control. PMID:26966582

  1. Characterisation of Pellicles Formed by Acinetobacter baumannii at the Air-Liquid Interface

    PubMed Central

    Nait Chabane, Yassine; Marti, Sara; Rihouey, Christophe; Alexandre, Stéphane; Hardouin, Julie; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Vila, Jordi; Kaplan, Jeffrey B.; Jouenne, Thierry; Dé, Emmanuelle

    2014-01-01

    The clinical importance of Acinetobacter baumannii is partly due to its natural ability to survive in the hospital environment. This persistence may be explained by its capacity to form biofilms and, interestingly, A. baumannii can form pellicles at the air-liquid interface more readily than other less pathogenic Acinetobacter species. Pellicles from twenty-six strains were morphologically classified into three groups: I) egg-shaped (27%); II) ball-shaped (50%); and III) irregular pellicles (23%). One strain representative of each group was further analysed by Brewster’s Angle Microscopy to follow pellicle development, demonstrating that their formation did not require anchoring to a solid surface. Total carbohydrate analysis of the matrix showed three main components: Glucose, GlcNAc and Kdo. Dispersin B, an enzyme that hydrolyzes poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PNAG) polysaccharide, inhibited A. baumannii pellicle formation, suggesting that this exopolysaccharide contributes to pellicle formation. Also associated with the pellicle matrix were three subunits of pili assembled by chaperon-usher systems: the major CsuA/B, A1S_1510 (presented 45% of identity with the main pilin F17-A from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli pili) and A1S_2091. The presence of both PNAG polysaccharide and pili systems in matrix of pellicles might contribute to the virulence of this emerging pathogen. PMID:25360550

  2. Characterisation of pellicles formed by Acinetobacter baumannii at the air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Nait Chabane, Yassine; Marti, Sara; Rihouey, Christophe; Alexandre, Stéphane; Hardouin, Julie; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Vila, Jordi; Kaplan, Jeffrey B; Jouenne, Thierry; Dé, Emmanuelle

    2014-01-01

    The clinical importance of Acinetobacter baumannii is partly due to its natural ability to survive in the hospital environment. This persistence may be explained by its capacity to form biofilms and, interestingly, A. baumannii can form pellicles at the air-liquid interface more readily than other less pathogenic Acinetobacter species. Pellicles from twenty-six strains were morphologically classified into three groups: I) egg-shaped (27%); II) ball-shaped (50%); and III) irregular pellicles (23%). One strain representative of each group was further analysed by Brewster's Angle Microscopy to follow pellicle development, demonstrating that their formation did not require anchoring to a solid surface. Total carbohydrate analysis of the matrix showed three main components: Glucose, GlcNAc and Kdo. Dispersin B, an enzyme that hydrolyzes poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PNAG) polysaccharide, inhibited A. baumannii pellicle formation, suggesting that this exopolysaccharide contributes to pellicle formation. Also associated with the pellicle matrix were three subunits of pili assembled by chaperon-usher systems: the major CsuA/B, A1S_1510 (presented 45% of identity with the main pilin F17-A from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli pili) and A1S_2091. The presence of both PNAG polysaccharide and pili systems in matrix of pellicles might contribute to the virulence of this emerging pathogen. PMID:25360550

  3. In vitro activity of curcumin in combination with epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) versus multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic human pathogen often associated with life-threatening infections in the immunocompromised and the critically ill. Strains are often multidrug-resistant (MDR) and due to the lack of new synthetic antimicrobials in development for treatment, attention is increasingly focused on natural compounds either as stand-alone or adjunctive agents. Curcumin (CCM) is a natural polyphenol found in turmeric and isolated from the plant, Curcuma longa. Curcumin has been found to possess many biological properties, including antibacterial activity. In this study the antimicrobial activity of CCM and synergistic effects with epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) against multidrug-resistant strains of A. baumannii were investigated and assessed via checkerboard and time-kill assays. Results The MIC of CCM was >256 μg/mL against all strains of A. baumannii whilst those for EGCG ranged from 128-1024 μg/mL. In checkerboard studies synergy was observed against 5/9 isolates, with an additive effect noted in the remaining 4. The addition of EGCG reduced the MIC of CCM by 3- to 7-fold, with the greatest interaction resulting in a CCM MIC of 4 μg/mL. Time-kill curves indicated that a CCM-EGCG (1:8 and 1:4) combination was bactericidal with a 4 to 5-log reduction in viable counts after 24 h compared to the most effective polyphenol alone. Conclusions This study demonstrates that despite little antibacterial activity alone, CCM activity is greatly enhanced in the presence of EGCG resulting in antibacterial activity against MDR A. baumannii. The combination may have a potential use in medicine as a topical agent to prevent or treat A. baumannii infections. PMID:24969489

  4. Characterization of Five Zoonotic Streptococcus suis Strains from Germany, Including One Isolate from a Recent Fatal Case of Streptococcal Toxic Shock-Like Syndrome in a Hunter.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Tobias; Hudemann, Christoph; Hossain, Hamid M; Hewer, Angela; Tello, Khodr; Bandorski, Dirk; Rohde, Manfred; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Baums, Christoph Georg

    2015-12-01

    A Streptococcus suis isolate from a German hunter with streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome (STSLS) and four additional zoonotic isolates were genotyped as mrp(+) epf* (variant 1890) sly(+) cps2(+). All five zoonotic German strains were characterized by high multiplication in human blood samples ex vivo, but induction of only low levels of proinflammatory cytokines compared to a Chinese STSLS strain. PMID:26424844

  5. Cold Tolerance of some Ralstonia solanacearum strains, including Race3 Biovar2, is conferred in part by variation in cold shock gene cspD3.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2 (R3B2) strains are one of only 10 USDA Select Agents, a category of quarantined pathogens reserved for the most serious threats to U.S. plant industry. The threat of R3B2 strains was not considered to be likely due to race (these are poorly defined) or biovar ...

  6. Integron, Plasmid and Host Strain Characteristics of Escherichia coli from Humans and Food Included in the Norwegian Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring Programs

    PubMed Central

    Sunde, Marianne; Simonsen, Gunnar Skov; Slettemeås, Jannice Schau; Böckerman, Inger; Norström, Madelaine

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistant Escherichia coli (n=331) isolates from humans with bloodstream infections were investigated for the presence of class 1 and class 2 integrons. The integron cassettes arrays were characterized and the findings were compared with data from similar investigations on resistant E. coli from meat and meat products (n=241) produced during the same time period. All isolates were obtained from the Norwegian monitoring programs for antimicrobial resistance in human pathogens and in the veterinary sector. Methods used included PCR, sequencing, conjugation experiments, plasmid replicon typing and subtyping, pulsed-field-gel-electrophoresis and serotyping. Integrons of class 1 and 2 occurred significantly more frequently among human isolates; 45.4% (95% CI: 39.9-50.9) than among isolates from meat; 18% (95% CI: 13.2 -23.3), (p<0.01, Chi-square test). Identical cassette arrays including dfrA1-aadA1, aadA1, dfrA12-orfF-aadA2, oxa-30-aadA1 (class 1 integrons) and dfrA1-sat1-aadA1 (class 2 integrons) were detected from both humans and meat. However, the most prevalent cassette array in human isolates, dfrA17-aadA5, did not occur in isolates from meat, suggesting a possible linkage between this class 1 integron and a subpopulation of E. coli adapted to a human host. The drfA1-aadA1 and aadA1 class 1 integrons were found frequently in both human and meat isolates. These isolates were subjected to further studies to investigate similarities with regard to transferability, plasmid and host strain characteristics. We detected incF plasmids with pMLST profile F24:A-:B1 carrying drfA1-aadA1 integrons in isolates from pork and in a more distantly related E. coli strain from a human with septicaemia. Furthermore, we showed that most of the class 1 integrons with aadA1 were located on incF plasmids with pMLST profile F51:A-:B10 in human isolates. The plasmid was present in unrelated as well as closely related host strains, demonstrating that dissemination of this

  7. Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter spp.: Increasingly Problematic Nosocomial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyungwon; Yong, Dongeun; Jeong, Seok Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria have increasingly been resisting to antimicrobial therapy. Recently, resistance problem has been relatively much worsened in Gram-negative bacilli. Acinetobacter spp. are typical nosocomial pathogens causing infections and high mortality, almost exclusively in compromised hospital patients. Acinetobacter spp. are intrinsically less susceptible to antibiotics than Enterobacteriaceae, and have propensity to acquire resistance. A surveillance study in Korea in 2009 showed that resistance rates of Acinetobacter spp. were very high: to fluoroquinolone 67%, to amikacin 48%, to ceftazidime 66% and to imipenem 51%. Carbapenem resistance was mostly due to OXA type carbapenemase production in A. baumannii isolates, whereas it was due to metallo-β-lactamase production in non-baumannii Acinetobacter isolates. Colistin-resistant isolates were rare but started to be isolated in Korea. Currently, the infection caused by multidrug-resistant A. baumannii is among the most difficult ones to treat. Analysis at tertiary care hospital in 2010 showed that among the 1,085 isolates of Acinetobacter spp., 14.9% and 41.8% were resistant to seven, and to all eight antimicrobial agents tested, respectively. It is known to be difficult to prevent Acinetobacter spp. infection in hospitalized patients, because the organisms are ubiquitous in hospital environment. Efforts to control resistant bacteria in Korea by hospitals, relevant scientific societies and government agencies have only partially been successful. We need concerted multidisciplinary efforts to preserve the efficacy of currently available antimicrobial agents, by following the principles of antimicrobial stewardship. PMID:22028150

  8. Extrahuman Epidemiology of Acinetobacter baumannii in Lebanon

    PubMed Central

    Rafei, Rayane; Hamze, Monzer; Pailhoriès, Hélène; Eveillard, Matthieu; Marsollier, Laurent; Joly-Guillou, Marie-Laure; Dabboussi, Fouad

    2015-01-01

    The presence of Acinetobacter baumannii outside hospitals is still a controversial issue. The objective of our study was to explore the extrahospital epidemiology of A. baumannii in Lebanon. From February 2012 to October 2013, a total of 73 water samples, 51 soil samples, 37 raw cow milk samples, 50 cow meat samples, 7 raw cheese samples, and 379 animal samples were analyzed by cultural methods for the presence of A. baumannii. Species identification was performed by rpoB gene sequencing. Antibiotic susceptibility was investigated, and the A. baumannii population was studied by two genotyping approaches: multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and blaOXA-51 sequence-based typing (SBT). A. baumannii was detected in 6.9% of water samples, 2.7% of milk samples, 8.0% of meat samples, 14.3% of cheese samples, and 7.7% of animal samples. All isolates showed a susceptible phenotype against most of the antibiotics tested and lacked carbapenemase-encoding genes, except one that harbored a blaOXA-143 gene. MLST analysis revealed the presence of 36 sequence types (STs), among which 24 were novel STs reported for the first time in this study. blaOXA-51 SBT showed the presence of 34 variants, among which 21 were novel and all were isolated from animal origins. Finally, 30 isolates had new partial rpoB sequences and were considered putative new Acinetobacter species. In conclusion, animals can be a potential reservoir for A. baumannii and the dissemination of new emerging carbapenemases. The roles of the novel animal clones identified in community-acquired infections should be investigated. PMID:25616788

  9. Biosynthesis of UDP-N,N′-Diacetylbacillosamine in Acinetobacter baumannii: Biochemical Characterization and Correlation to Existing Pathways†

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Michael J.; Imperiali, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The Gram-negative, opportunistic pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii has recently captured headlines due to its ability to circumvent current antibiotic therapies. Herein we show that the multi-drug resistant (MDR) AYE strain of A. baumannii contains a gene locus that encodes three enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of the highly-modified bacterial nucleotide sugar, UDP-N,N -diacetylbacillosamine (UDP-diNAcBac). Previously, this UDP-sugar has been implicated in the pgl pathway of Campylobacter jejuni. Here we report the overexpression, purification, and biochemical characterization of the A. baumannii enzymes WeeK, WeeJ, and WeeI that are responsible for the production of UDP-diNAcBac. We also demonstrate the function of the phosphoglycosyltransferase (WeeH), which transfers the diNAcBac moiety to undecaprenyl-phosphate. UDP-diNAcBac biosynthesis in A. baumannii is also directly compared to the homologous pathways in the pathogens C. jejuni and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. This work demonstrates for the first time the ability of A. baumannii to generate the highly-modified, UDP-diNAcBac nucleotide sugar found previously in other bacteria adding to the growing list of pathogens that assemble glycoconjugates including bacillosamine. Additionally, characterization of these pathway enzymes highlights the opportunity for investigating the significance of highly-modified sugars in bacterial pathogenesis. PMID:23747578

  10. Early detection of metallo-β-lactamase NDM-1- and OXA-23 carbapenemase-producing Acinetobacter baumannii in Libyan hospitals.

    PubMed

    Mathlouthi, Najla; El Salabi, Allaaeddin Ali; Ben Jomàa-Jemili, Mariem; Bakour, Sofiane; Al-Bayssari, Charbel; Zorgani, Abdulaziz A; Kraiema, Abdulmajeed; Elahmer, Omar; Okdah, Liliane; Rolain, Jean-Marc; Chouchani, Chedly

    2016-07-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic pathogen causing various nosocomial infections. The aim of this study was to characterise the molecular support of carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii clinical isolates recovered from two Libyan hospitals. Bacterial isolates were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS). Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed using disk diffusion and Etest methods, and carbapenem resistance determinants were studied by PCR amplification and sequencing. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was performed for typing of the isolates. All 36 imipenem-resistant isolates tested were identified as A. baumannii. The blaOXA-23 gene was detected in 29 strains (80.6%). The metallo-β-lactamase blaNDM-1 gene was detected in eight isolates (22.2%), showing dissemination of multidrug-resistant (MDR) A. baumannii in Tripoli Medical Center and Burn and Plastic Surgery Hospital in Libya, including one isolate that co-expressed the blaOXA-23 gene. MLST revealed several sequence types (STs). Imipenem-resistant A. baumannii ST2 was the predominant clone (16/36; 44.4%). This study shows that NDM-1 and OXA-23 contribute to antibiotic resistance in Libyan hospitals and represents the first incidence of the association of these two carbapenemases in an autochthonous MDR A. baumannii isolated from patients in Libya, indicating that there is a longstanding infection control problem in these hospitals. PMID:27216382

  11. Synergy between Colistin and the Signal Peptidase Inhibitor MD3 Is Dependent on the Mechanism of Colistin Resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Guitián, Marta; Vázquez-Ucha, Juan C; Odingo, Joshua; Parish, Tanya; Poza, Margarita; Waite, Richard D; Bou, German; Wareham, David W; Beceiro, Alejandro

    2016-07-01

    Synergy between colistin and the signal peptidase inhibitor MD3 was tested against isogenic mutants and clinical pairs of Acinetobacter baumannii isolates. Checkerboard assays and growth curves showed synergy against both colistin-susceptible strains (fractional inhibitory concentration index [FICindex] = 0.13 to 0.24) and colistin-resistant strains with mutations in pmrB and phosphoethanolamine modification of lipid A (FICindex = 0.14 to 0.25) but not against colistin-resistant Δlpx strains with loss of lipopolysaccharide (FICindex = 0.75 to 1). A colistin/MD3 combination would need to be targeted to strains with specific colistin resistance mechanisms. PMID:27139471

  12. Implementation of an Associative Flow Rule Including Hydrostatic Stress Effects Into the High Strain Rate Deformation Analysis of Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Roberts, Gary D.; Gilat, Amos

    2003-01-01

    A previously developed analytical formulation has been modified in order to more accurately account for the effects of hydrostatic stresses on the nonlinear, strain rate dependent deformation of polymer matrix composites. State variable constitutive equations originally developed for metals have been modified in order to model the nonlinear, strain rate dependent deformation of polymeric materials. To account for the effects of hydrostatic stresses, which are significant in polymers, the classical J2 plasticity theory definitions of effective stress and effective inelastic strain, along with the equations used to compute the components of the inelastic strain rate tensor, are appropriately modified. To verify the revised formulation, the shear and tensile deformation of two representative polymers are computed across a wide range of strain rates. Results computed using the developed constitutive equations correlate well with experimental data. The polymer constitutive equations are implemented within a strength of materials based micromechanics method to predict the nonlinear, strain rate dependent deformation of polymer matrix composites. The composite mechanics are verified by analyzing the deformation of a representative polymer matrix composite for several fiber orientation angles across a variety of strain rates. The computed values compare well to experimentally obtained results.

  13. Isolation of estrogen-degrading bacteria from an activated sludge bioreactor treating swine waste, including a strain that converts estrone to β-estradiol.

    PubMed

    Isabelle, Martine; Villemur, Richard; Juteau, Pierre; Lépine, François

    2011-07-01

    An estrogen-degrading bacterial consortium from a swine wastewater biotreatment was enriched in the presence of low concentrations (1 mg/L) of estrone (E1), 17β-estradiol (βE2), and equol (EQO) as sole carbon sources. The consortium removed 99% ± 1% of these three estrogens in 48 h. Estrogen removal occurred even in the presence of an ammonia monooxygenase inhibitor, suggesting that nitrifiers are not involved. Five strains showing estrogen-metabolizing activity were isolated from the consortium on mineral agar medium with estrogens as sole carbon source. They are related to four genera ( Methylobacterium (strain MI6.1R), Ochrobactrum (strains MI6.1B and MI9.3), Pseudomonas (strain MI14.1), and Mycobacterium (strain MI21.2)) distributed among three classes (Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Actinobacteria). Depending on the culture medium, strains MI6.1B, MI9.3, MI14.1, and MI21.2 partially transform βE2 into E1, whereas Methylobacterium sp. strain MI6.1R reduces E1 into βE2 under aerobic conditions, in contrast with the usually observed conversion of βE2 into E1. Since βE2 is a more potent endocrine disruptor than E1, it means that the presence of Methylobacterium sp. strain MI6.1R (or other bacteria with the same E1-reducing activity) in a treatment could transiently increase the estrogenicity of the effluent. MI6.1R can also reduce the ketone group of 16-ketoestradiol, a hydroxylated analog of E1. All βE2 and E1 transformation activities were constitutive, and many of them are favoured in a rich medium than a medium containing no other carbon source. None of the isolated strains could degrade EQO. PMID:21770814

  14. Efficacy of Acinetobacter sp. B9 for simultaneous removal of phenol and hexavalent chromium from co-contaminated system.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Amrik; Gupta, Anshu; Kaur, Amarjeet; Malik, Darshan

    2014-12-01

    The present study shows the feasibility of a newly isolated strain Acinetobacter sp. B9 for concurrent removal of phenol and Cr (VI) from wastewater. The experiments were conducted in a batch reactor under aerobic conditions. Initially, when mineral salt solution was used as the culture medium, the strain was found to utilize phenol as sole carbon and energy source while no Cr (VI) removal was observed. However, the addition of glucose as co-carbon source resulted in the removal of both toxicants. This co-removal efficiency of the strain was further improved with nutrient-rich media (NB). Optimum co-removal was determined at 188 mg L(-1) of phenol and 3.5 mg L(-1) of Cr (VI) concentrations at pH 7.0. Strain B9 followed the orthometabolic pathway for phenol degradation. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) studies showed sorption of chromium as one of the major mechanisms for Cr (VI) removal by B9 cells. Acinetobacter sp. B9 was later on checked for bioremediation of real tannery wastewater. After 96 h of batch treatment of tannery effluent containing an initial 47 mg L(-1) phenol and 16 mg L(-1) Cr (VI), complete removal of phenol and 87 % reduction of Cr (VI) were attained, showing high efficiency of the bacterial strain for potential application in industrial pollution control. PMID:25062955

  15. Distribution of Intrinsic Plasmid Replicase Genes and Their Association with Carbapenem-Hydrolyzing Class D β-Lactamase Genes in European Clinical Isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii▿

    PubMed Central

    Towner, Kevin J.; Evans, Benjamin; Villa, Laura; Levi, Katrina; Hamouda, Ahmed; Amyes, Sebastian G. B.; Carattoli, Alessandra

    2011-01-01

    Ninety-six genetically diverse multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii from 25 hospitals in 17 European countries were screened by PCR for specific carbapenemase-hydrolyzing class D β-lactamase (CHDL) genes and by PCR-based replicon typing for the presence of 19 different plasmid replicase (rep) gene homology groups (GRs). Results were confirmed by DNA sequencing where necessary. All 96 isolates contained at least 1 (with a maximum of 4) of the 19 groups of rep genes. Groups detected were GR6 (repAci6; 93 isolates), GR2 (including repAci1 [67 isolates] and repAci2 [3 isolates]), GR16 (repApAB49; 12 isolates), GR12 (p2ABSDF0001; 10 isolates), GR3 (repAci3; 4 isolates), GR4 (repAci4; 3 isolates), GR10 (repAciX; 1 isolate), and GR14 (repp4AYE; 1 isolate). Variations in rep gene content were observed even among epidemiologically related isolates. Genes encoding OXA-58-like CHDLs (22 isolates) were associated with carriage of the repAci1, repAci3, repAci4, and repAciX genes, genes encoding OXA-40-like CHDLs (6 isolates) were associated with repAci2 and p2ABSDF0001, and genes encoding OXA-23-like CHDLs (8 isolates) were associated with repAci1. Most intrinsic Acinetobacter plasmids are non-self-transferable, but the almost ubiquitous repAci6 gene was strongly associated with a potential tra locus that could serve as a general system for plasmid mobilization and consequent horizontal transmission of plasmids and their associated antibiotic resistance genes among strains of A. baumannii. PMID:21300832

  16. Biofilm Formation and Motility Depend on the Nature of the Acinetobacter baumannii Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Saranya; Rajenderan, Sangeetha; Laishram, Shakti; Anandan, Shalini; Balaji, Veeraraghavan; Biswas, Indranil

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a nosocomial pathogen involved in various infections ranging from minor soft-tissue infections to more severe infections such as ventilator-associated pneumonia and bacteremia. The severity and the type of infections depend on the genetic and phenotypic variations of the strains. In this study, we compared the extent of biofilm formation and motility displayed by 60 multidrug-resistant A. baumannii clinical strains isolated from blood and sputum samples from patients from Southern India. Our results showed that isolates from the sputum samples formed significantly more robust biofilm compared to the blood isolates. On the other hand, we observed that the blood isolates were more motile than the sputum isolates. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that systematically evaluated the correlation between these two phenotypic traits and the nature of the isolates. PMID:27252939

  17. Biofilm Formation and Motility Depend on the Nature of the Acinetobacter baumannii Clinical Isolates.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumar, Saranya; Rajenderan, Sangeetha; Laishram, Shakti; Anandan, Shalini; Balaji, Veeraraghavan; Biswas, Indranil

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a nosocomial pathogen involved in various infections ranging from minor soft-tissue infections to more severe infections such as ventilator-associated pneumonia and bacteremia. The severity and the type of infections depend on the genetic and phenotypic variations of the strains. In this study, we compared the extent of biofilm formation and motility displayed by 60 multidrug-resistant A. baumannii clinical strains isolated from blood and sputum samples from patients from Southern India. Our results showed that isolates from the sputum samples formed significantly more robust biofilm compared to the blood isolates. On the other hand, we observed that the blood isolates were more motile than the sputum isolates. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that systematically evaluated the correlation between these two phenotypic traits and the nature of the isolates. PMID:27252939

  18. Infections Caused by Acinetobacter baumannii in Recipients of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Al-Anazi, Khalid Ahmed; Al-Jasser, Asma M.

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) is a Gram-negative, strictly aerobic, non-fermentative coccobacillus, which is widely distributed in nature. Recently, it has emerged as a major cause of health care-associated infections (HCAIs) in addition to its capacity to cause community-acquired infections. Risk factors for A. baumannii infections and bacteremia in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation include: severe underlying illness such as hematological malignancy, prolonged use of broad-spectrum antibiotics, invasive instrumentation such as central venous catheters or endotracheal intubation, colonization of respiratory, gastrointestinal, or urinary tracts in addition to severe immunosuppression caused by using corticosteroids for treating graft versus host disease. The organism causes a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations, but serious complications such as bacteremia, septic shock, ventilator-associated pneumonia, extensive soft tissue necrosis, and rapidly progressive systemic infections that ultimately lead to multi-organ failure and death are prone to occur in severely immunocompromised hosts. The organism is usually resistant to many antimicrobials including penicillins, cephalosporins, trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole, almost all fluoroquinolones, and most of the aminoglycosides. The recently increasing resistance to carbapenems, colistin, and polymyxins is alarming. Additionally, there are geographic variations in the resistance patterns and several globally and regionally resistant strains have already been described. Successful management of A. baumannii infections depends upon appropriate utilization of antibiotics and strict application of preventive and infection control measures. In uncomplicated infections, the use of a single active beta-lactam may be justified, while definitive treatment of complicated infections in critically ill individuals may require drug combinations such as colistin and rifampicin or colistin and carbapenem

  19. Impact of Acinetobacter baumannii Superoxide Dismutase on Motility, Virulence, Oxidative Stress Resistance and Susceptibility to Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Heider, Christine; Skiebe, Evelyn; Wilharm, Gottfried

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative bacterium appearing as an opportunistic pathogen in hospital settings. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) contributes to virulence in several pathogenic bacteria by detoxifying reactive oxygen species released in the course of host defense reactions. However, the biological role of SODs in A. baumannii has not yet been elucidated. Here, we inactivated in A. baumannii ATCC 17978 gene A1S_2343, encoding a putative SOD of the Fe-Mn type by transposon insertion, resulting in mutant ATCC 17978 sod2343::Km. The mutation was also introduced in two naturally competent A. baumannii isolates by transformation with chromosomal DNA derived from mutant ATCC 17978 sod2343::Km. We demonstrate that inactivation of sod2343 leads to significant motility defects in all three A. baumannii strains. The mutant strains were more susceptible to oxidative stress compared to their parental strains. Susceptibility to colistin and tetracycline was increased in all mutant strains while susceptibility of the mutants to gentamicin, levofloxacin and imipenem was strain-dependent. In the Galleria mellonella infection model the mutant strains were significantly attenuated. In conclusion, sod2343 plays an important role in motility, resistance to oxidative stress, susceptibility to antibiotics and virulence in A. baumannii. PMID:25000585

  20. Differential Role of the T6SS in Acinetobacter baumannii Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Foucault-Grunenwald, Marie-Laure; Borges, Vitor; Charpentier, Xavier; Limansky, Adriana S.; Gomes, João Paulo; Viale, Alejandro M.; Salcedo, Suzana P.

    2015-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria, such as Acinetobacter baumannii, are an increasing burden in hospitals worldwide with an alarming spread of multi-drug resistant (MDR) strains. Herein, we compared a type strain (ATCC17978), a non-clinical isolate (DSM30011) and MDR strains of A. baumannii implicated in hospital outbreaks (Ab242, Ab244 and Ab825), revealing distinct patterns of type VI secretion system (T6SS) functionality. The T6SS genomic locus is present and was actively transcribed in all of the above strains. However, only the A. baumannii DSM30011 strain was capable of killing Escherichia coli in a T6SS-dependent manner, unlike the clinical isolates, which failed to display an active T6SS in vitro. In addition, DSM30011 was able to outcompete ATCC17978 as well as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae, bacterial pathogens relevant in mixed nosocomial infections. Finally, we found that the T6SS of DSM30011 is required for host colonization of the model organism Galleria mellonella suggesting that this system could play an important role in A. baumannii virulence in a strain-specific manner. PMID:26401654

  1. Resistance and integron characterization of Acinetobacter baumannii in a teaching hospital in Chongqing, China

    PubMed Central

    Huang, C.; Long, Q.; Qian, K.; Fu, T.; Zhang, Z.; Liao, P.; Xie, J.

    2015-01-01

    A total of 189 Acinetobacter baumannii isolates were collected in 2011 from a teaching hospital in Chongqing, China. Susceptibility data showed strains carrying integrons were significantly more resistant to all tested antibiotics that strains lacking integrons. Five types of gene cassettes belonging to class I integrons were identified in this study, and for the first time two types of gene cassettes belonging to class II integrons are reported. Most of the cassettes belong to a class I integron (136/144) encoding arr3, aacA4, dfrA17, aadA5, aadB, cat, blaOXA10, aadA1, aadA2, dfrA and aacC1. Isolates contained a class I gene cassette; AadA2-HP-dfrA was the prevalent strain in this hospital. A class II integron was detected in eight strains, which contained the type IV fimbriae expression regulatory gene pilR and sulfate adenylyltransferase, suggesting a possible role in multidrug resistance. The major epidemic strains from intensive care unit patients belong to international clone 2. In conclusion, the presence of integrons was significantly associated with multiple drug resistance of A. baumannii in this hospital, and class I integron isolates bearing AadA2-HP-dfrA were the prevalent strain in this hospital. PMID:26649184

  2. Characterization of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii complex isolates from nosocomial bloodstream infections in southern Iran.

    PubMed

    Pourabbas, Bahman; Firouzi, Roya; Pouladfar, Gholamreza

    2016-03-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important opportunistic bacterial pathogen responsible for serious infections in hospitalized patients. From a total of 78 consecutive non-repetitive Acinetobacter spp. isolates from patients with blood infections, 61 were carbapenem resistant, which were positive for blaOXA-51-like (96.7%), blaOXA-23-like (77 %), blaOXA-58-like (8.1%) and blaOXA-40-like genes (32.8%) by multiplex PCR. The isolates were identified as A. baumannii (n = 59) and Acinetobacter nosocomialis (n = 2). Also, we found a case of Acinetobacter junii, causing bacteraemia, that possessed the IMP gene. High levels of resistance were observed to fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, tigecycline and to the beta-lactam antibiotics, including piperacillin/tazobactam and ampicillin/sulbactam. ISAba1 was present in 96.7% of all Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii complex (Acb) isolates. Also, 33 (54.1%) and 23 (37.7%) isolates harboured ISAba1 upstream of blaOXA-23-like and blaOXA-51-like genes, respectively, though this was not observed in A. nosocomialis isolates. No relationship was observed between the presence of ISAba1 upstream of oxacillinase genes and the level of carbapenem resistance in all Acb isolates. Only two genes encoding metallo-beta-lactamase (VIM, SPM) were detected in all Acb isolates. This suggests that carbapenem resistance in blood-isolate Acb is mostly due to the presence of acquired carbapenemases. This is the first report from Iran on the identification of A. nosocomialis isolates that possess multiple oxacillinase genes and lack upstream ISAba1. PMID:26747061

  3. Rapid Detection of Carbapenem Resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii Using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Flaudrops, Christophe; Berrazeg, Meryem; Brunel, Jean-Michel; Drissi, Mourad; Mesli, Esma; Touati, Abdelaziz; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2012-01-01

    Rapid detection of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strains is critical and will benefit patient care by optimizing antibiotic therapies and preventing outbreaks. Herein we describe the development and successful application of a mass spectrometry profile generated by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) that utilized the imipenem antibiotic for the detection of carbapenem resistance in a large series of A. baumannii clinical isolates from France and Algeria. A total of 106 A. baumannii strains including 63 well-characterized carbapenemase-producing and 43 non-carbapenemase-producing strains, as well as 43 control strains (7 carbapenem-resistant and 36 carbapenem-sensitive strains) were studied. After an incubation of bacteria with imipenem for up to 4 h, the mixture was centrifuged and the supernatant analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS. The presence and absence of peaks representing imipenem and its natural metabolite was analyzed. The result was interpreted as positive for carbapenemase production if the specific peak for imipenem at 300.0 m/z disappeared during the incubation time and if the peak of the natural metabolite at 254.0 m/z increased as measured by the area under the curves leading to a ratio between the peak for imipenem and its metabolite being <0.5. This assay, which was applied to the large series of A. baumannii clinical isolates, showed a sensitivity of 100.0% and a specificity of 100.0%. Our study is the first to demonstrate that this quick and simple assay can be used as a routine tool as a point-of-care method for the identification of A. baumannii carbapenemase-producers in an effort to prevent outbreaks and the spread of uncontrollable superbugs. PMID:22359616

  4. Characterization of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates in a tertiary care hospital in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Abdalhamid, Baha; Hassan, Hoda; Itbaileh, Ahmad; Shorman, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    This study characterized the occurrence of carbapenem resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii isolates in a tertiary care hospital in Saudi Arabia. From January 2010 until February 2012, Acinetobacter spp. isolates were collected from different wards and were identified using Vitek 2 system and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Vitek 2 system and Etest were used for susceptibility testing. PCR and Pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were used for detecting and typing genes associated with carbapenem resistance. A total of 141 isolates were identified as A. baumannii. A total of 46 (32.6%) isolates were carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAB) isolates and had wild diversity by PFGE. Metallo ?-lactamase confirmatory test was positive for 43 isolates with negative PCR for blaIMP and blaVIM. Among the 46 CRAB strains, 37 isolates harbored blaOXA-23 which was encoded downstream of ISAba1 and 1 isolate had ISAba1 encoded upstream blaOXA-51. These data reveal that the interhospital transmission of CRAB isolates was apparently insignificant. BlaOXA-23 adjacent to ISAba1 was the main mechanism of carbapenem resistance in these isolates. To our knowledge, this is the first molecular study characterizing carbapenem resistance in A. baumannii in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia. PMID:24531172

  5. Prophage induction and differential RecA and UmuDAb transcriptome regulation in the DNA damage responses of Acinetobacter baumannii and Acinetobacter baylyi.

    PubMed

    Hare, Janelle M; Ferrell, Joshua C; Witkowski, Travis A; Grice, Alison N

    2014-01-01

    The SOS response to DNA damage that induces up to 10% of the prokaryotic genome requires RecA action to relieve LexA transcriptional repression. In Acinetobacter species, which lack LexA, the error-prone polymerase accessory UmuDAb is instead required for ddrR induction after DNA damage, suggesting it might be a LexA analog. RNA-Seq experiments defined the DNA damage transcriptome (mitomycin C-induced) of wild type, recA and umuDAb mutant strains of both A. baylyi ADP1 and A. baumannii ATCC 17978. Of the typical SOS response genes, few were differentially regulated in these species; many were repressed or absent. A striking 38.4% of all ADP1 genes, and 11.4% of all 17978 genes, were repressed under these conditions. In A. baylyi ADP1, 66 genes (2.0% of the genome), including a CRISPR/Cas system, were DNA damage-induced, and belonged to four regulons defined by differential use of recA and umuDAb. In A. baumannii ATCC 17978, however, induction of 99% of the 152 mitomycin C-induced genes depended on recA, and only 28 of these genes required umuDAb for their induction. 90% of the induced A. baumannii genes were clustered in three prophage regions, and bacteriophage particles were observed after mitomycin C treatment. These prophages encoded esvI, esvK1, and esvK2, ethanol-stimulated virulence genes previously identified in a Caenorhabditis elegans model, as well as error-prone polymerase alleles. The induction of all 17978 error-prone polymerase alleles, whether prophage-encoded or not, was recA dependent, but only these DNA polymerase V-related genes were de-repressed in the umuDAb mutant in the absence of DNA damage. These results suggest that both species possess a robust and complex DNA damage response involving both recA-dependent and recA-independent regulons, and further demonstrates that although umuDAb has a specialized role in repressing error-prone polymerases, additional regulators likely participate in these species' transcriptional response to DNA damage

  6. Prophage Induction and Differential RecA and UmuDAb Transcriptome Regulation in the DNA Damage Responses of Acinetobacter baumannii and Acinetobacter baylyi

    PubMed Central

    Hare, Janelle M.; Ferrell, Joshua C.; Witkowski, Travis A.; Grice, Alison N.

    2014-01-01

    The SOS response to DNA damage that induces up to 10% of the prokaryotic genome requires RecA action to relieve LexA transcriptional repression. In Acinetobacter species, which lack LexA, the error-prone polymerase accessory UmuDAb is instead required for ddrR induction after DNA damage, suggesting it might be a LexA analog. RNA-Seq experiments defined the DNA damage transcriptome (mitomycin C-induced) of wild type, recA and umuDAb mutant strains of both A. baylyi ADP1 and A. baumannii ATCC 17978. Of the typical SOS response genes, few were differentially regulated in these species; many were repressed or absent. A striking 38.4% of all ADP1 genes, and 11.4% of all 17978 genes, were repressed under these conditions. In A. baylyi ADP1, 66 genes (2.0% of the genome), including a CRISPR/Cas system, were DNA damage-induced, and belonged to four regulons defined by differential use of recA and umuDAb. In A. baumannii ATCC 17978, however, induction of 99% of the 152 mitomycin C-induced genes depended on recA, and only 28 of these genes required umuDAb for their induction. 90% of the induced A. baumannii genes were clustered in three prophage regions, and bacteriophage particles were observed after mitomycin C treatment. These prophages encoded esvI, esvK1, and esvK2, ethanol-stimulated virulence genes previously identified in a Caenorhabditis elegans model, as well as error-prone polymerase alleles. The induction of all 17978 error-prone polymerase alleles, whether prophage-encoded or not, was recA dependent, but only these DNA polymerase V-related genes were de-repressed in the umuDAb mutant in the absence of DNA damage. These results suggest that both species possess a robust and complex DNA damage response involving both recA-dependent and recA-independent regulons, and further demonstrates that although umuDAb has a specialized role in repressing error-prone polymerases, additional regulators likely participate in these species' transcriptional response to DNA damage

  7. Clinical and economic outcomes of Acinetobacter vis a vis non-Acinetobacter infections in an Indian teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Asim, Priyendu; Naik, Nagappa Anantha; Muralidhar, Varma; Vandana, K. Eshwara; Varsha, A. Prabhu

    2016-01-01

    Context: Acinetobacter infections are a major nosocomial infection causing epidemics of infection in the Intensive Care Units (ICU). Aims: This study estimates the clinical and economic outcomes of Acinetobacter infections and compares them with those of non-Acinetobacter bacterial infections. Settings and Design: Prospective cross-sectional observational study carried out for 6 months in the medicine ICU of a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: Patients were divided in two groups, one group with Acinetobacter infections and the other with non-Acinetobacter infections. The data was collected for infection, length of stay (LOS), mortality and cost along with patient demographics from the hospital records for analysis. Statistical Analysis Used: The data was analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences Version 15.0. The LOS and cost of treatment (COT) for the two groups were compared using the nonparametric Mann–Whitney U-test. Results: A total of 220 patients were studied out of which 91 had Acinetobacter infections. The median LOS was 20 days in Group-A and 12 days in Group-B (P < 0.0001). The median COT was INR 125,862 in Group-A and INR 68,228 in the Group-B (P < 0.0001). Mortality in Group-A and Group-B was 32.97 and 32.56 (P = 0.949) respectively. Conclusion: The burden of Acinetobacter infections in ICUs is increasing with the increase in LOS and COT for the patients. The infection control team has to play a major role in reducing the rate of nosocomial infections. PMID:26955573

  8. Epidemiological Characteristics of blaNDM-1 in Enterobacteriaceae and the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii Complex in China from 2011 to 2012

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Weimei; Cui, Lanqing; Li, Yun; Zheng, Bo; Lv, Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The study aimed to investigate the prevalence and epidemiological characteristics of blaNDM-1 (encoding New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase 1) in Enterobacteriaceae and the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex (ABC) in China from July 2011 to June 2012. Methods PCR was used to screen for the presence of blaNDM-1 in all organisms studied. For blaNDM-1-positive strains, 16S rRNA analysis and Analytical Profile Index (API) strips were used to identify the bacterial genus and species. The ABCs were reconfirmed by PCR detection of blaOXA-51-like. Antibiotic susceptibilities of the bacteria were assessed by determining minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of them using two-fold agar dilution test, as recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Molecular typing was performed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). S1 nuclease-pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (S1-PFGE) and Southern blot hybridization were conducted to ascertain the gene location of blaNDM-1. Conjugation experiments were conducted to determine the transmission of blaNDM-1-positive strains. Results Among 2,170 Enterobacteriaceae and 600 ABCs, seven Enterobacteriaceae strains and two A. calcoaceticus isolates from five different cities carried the blaNDM-1 gene. The seven Enterobacteriaceae strains comprised four Klebsiella pneumoniae, one Enterobacter cloacae, one Enterobacter aerogen and one Citrobacter freundii. All seven were non-susceptible to imipenem, meropenem or ertapenem. Two A. calcoaceticus species were resistant to imipenem and meropenem. Three K. pneumoniae showed the same PFGE profiles. The blaNDM-1 genes of eight strains were localized on plasmids, while one was chromosomal. Conclusions Compared with previous reports, the numbers and species containing the blaNDM-1 in Enterobacteriaceae have significantly increased in China. Most of them are able to disseminate the gene, which is cause for concern. Consecutive surveillance should

  9. Chemical Analysis of the Outer Membrane and Other Layers of the Cell Envelope of Acinetobacter sp

    PubMed Central

    Thorne, Kareen J. I.; Thornley, Margaret J.; Glauert, Audrey M.

    1973-01-01

    Chemical analysis of fractions of the cell envelope of Acinetobacter sp. strain MJT/F5/199A, prepared by breakage in the French press and removal of plasma membranes, followed by sequential treatment with lysozyme and with papain, confirmed the existence of layers previously identified by electron microscopy. Outside the plasma membrane and periplasmic space, the envelope is composed of (i) a peptidoglycan-containing dense layer, (ii) an intermediate layer, (iii) a lipopolysaccharide-containing outer membrane, and (iv) an ordered array of protein subunits. A small amount of carbohydrate (3%) is found associated with protein in the fraction containing both the surface subunits and the intermediate layer. The papain-treated outer membranes contain 67% protein, 24% lipid, together with 11% lipopolysaccharide, and about 6% of non-lipopolysaccharide hexosamine. Lipid is located only in the papain-treated outer-membrane and is mainly phospholipid: 29% phosphatidyl glycerol, 30% phosphatidyl ethanolamine, and 40% cardiolipin. The principal fatty acid is C18:1. Significant amounts of alcohols16:1 and alcohols18:1, which are found in Acinetobacter waxes, were recovered from the outer membrane. Images PMID:4745422

  10. Characterization of affinity-purified isoforms of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus Y1 glutathione transferases.

    PubMed

    Chee, Chin-Soon; Tan, Irene Kit-Ping; Alias, Zazali

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GST) were purified from locally isolated bacteria, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus Y1, by glutathione-affinity chromatography and anion exchange, and their substrate specificities were investigated. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that the purified GST resolved into a single band with a molecular weight (MW) of 23 kDa. 2-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis showed the presence of two isoforms, GST1 (pI 4.5) and GST2 (pI 6.2) with identical MW. GST1 was reactive towards ethacrynic acid, hydrogen peroxide, 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, and trans,trans-hepta-2,4-dienal while GST2 was active towards all substrates except hydrogen peroxide. This demonstrated that GST1 possessed peroxidase activity which was absent in GST2. This study also showed that only GST2 was able to conjugate GSH to isoproturon, a herbicide. GST1 and GST2 were suggested to be similar to F0KLY9 (putative glutathione S-transferase) and F0KKB0 (glutathione S-transferase III) of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus strain PHEA-2, respectively. PMID:24892084

  11. Characterization of Affinity-Purified Isoforms of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus Y1 Glutathione Transferases

    PubMed Central

    Chee, Chin-Soon; Tan, Irene Kit-Ping; Alias, Zazali

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GST) were purified from locally isolated bacteria, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus Y1, by glutathione-affinity chromatography and anion exchange, and their substrate specificities were investigated. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that the purified GST resolved into a single band with a molecular weight (MW) of 23 kDa. 2-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis showed the presence of two isoforms, GST1 (pI 4.5) and GST2 (pI 6.2) with identical MW. GST1 was reactive towards ethacrynic acid, hydrogen peroxide, 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, and trans,trans-hepta-2,4-dienal while GST2 was active towards all substrates except hydrogen peroxide. This demonstrated that GST1 possessed peroxidase activity which was absent in GST2. This study also showed that only GST2 was able to conjugate GSH to isoproturon, a herbicide. GST1 and GST2 were suggested to be similar to F0KLY9 (putative glutathione S-transferase) and F0KKB0 (glutathione S-transferase III) of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus strain PHEA-2, respectively. PMID:24892084

  12. Contribution of Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division Efflux Systems to Antibiotic Resistance and Biofilm Formation in Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Eun-Jeong; Nait Chabane, Yassine; Goussard, Sylvie; Snesrud, Erik; Courvalin, Patrice; Dé, Emmanuelle

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acinetobacter baumannii is a nosocomial pathogen of increasing importance due to its multiple resistance to antibiotics and ability to survive in the hospital environment linked to its capacity to form biofilms. To fully characterize the contribution of AdeABC, AdeFGH, and AdeIJK resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND)-type efflux systems to acquired and intrinsic resistance, we constructed, from an entirely sequenced susceptible A. baumannii strain, a set of isogenic mutants overexpressing each system following introduction of a point mutation in their cognate regulator or a deletion for the pump by allelic replacement. Pairwise comparison of every derivative with the parental strain indicated that AdeABC and AdeFGH are tightly regulated and contribute to acquisition of antibiotic resistance when overproduced. AdeABC had a broad substrate range, including β-lactams, fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines-tigecycline, macrolides-lincosamides, and chloramphenicol, and conferred clinical resistance to aminoglycosides. Importantly, when combined with enzymatic resistance to carbapenems and aminoglycosides, this pump contributed in a synergistic fashion to the level of resistance of the host. In contrast, AdeIJK was expressed constitutively and was responsible for intrinsic resistance to the same major drug classes as AdeABC as well as antifolates and fusidic acid. Surprisingly, overproduction of AdeABC and AdeIJK altered bacterial membrane composition, resulting in decreased biofilm formation but not motility. Natural transformation and plasmid transfer were diminished in recipients overproducing AdeABC. It thus appears that alteration in the expression of efflux systems leads to multiple changes in the relationship between the host and its environment, in addition to antibiotic resistance. PMID:25805730

  13. Pregnancy and Perinatal Outcomes Associated with Acinetobacter baumannii Infection.

    PubMed

    He, Mai; Kostadinov, Stefan; Gundogan, Fusun; Struminsky, Judith; Pinar, Halit; Sung, C James

    2013-05-01

    Objective To determine perinatal and pregnancy outcomes of Acinetobacter baumannii infection using clinicopathologic material from pregnant women, neonates, and perinatal postmortem examinations with positive cultures. Study Design This is a retrospective record review with placental and postmortem examination. Results During a 5-year period, 40 positive cultures were found. Three pregnancies with positive cultures close in the peripartum period were all associated with adverse outcomes including spontaneous abortion, preterm labor, and one full-term birth with histological chorioamnionitis. Two positive cultures were found in preterm neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit. Two of three cases of perinatal death grew pure cultures from blood and/or fetal tissue with placental or fetal examination demonstrating evidence of infection/inflammation with fetal inflammatory response. Conclusion This is the first case series report of A. baumannii-positive cultures in maternal, fetal, and neonatal specimen, with histopathologic evidence of infection. The results suggest a significant role of A. baumannii infection in adverse pregnancy and perinatal outcomes. PMID:23943711

  14. Pregnancy and Perinatal Outcomes Associated with Acinetobacter baumannii Infection

    PubMed Central

    He, Mai; Kostadinov, Stefan; Gundogan, Fusun; Struminsky, Judith; Pinar, Halit; Sung, C. James

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine perinatal and pregnancy outcomes of Acinetobacter baumannii infection using clinicopathologic material from pregnant women, neonates, and perinatal postmortem examinations with positive cultures. Study Design This is a retrospective record review with placental and postmortem examination. Results During a 5-year period, 40 positive cultures were found. Three pregnancies with positive cultures close in the peripartum period were all associated with adverse outcomes including spontaneous abortion, preterm labor, and one full-term birth with histological chorioamnionitis. Two positive cultures were found in preterm neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit. Two of three cases of perinatal death grew pure cultures from blood and/or fetal tissue with placental or fetal examination demonstrating evidence of infection/inflammation with fetal inflammatory response. Conclusion This is the first case series report of A. baumannii-positive cultures in maternal, fetal, and neonatal specimen, with histopathologic evidence of infection. The results suggest a significant role of A. baumannii infection in adverse pregnancy and perinatal outcomes. PMID:23943711

  15. [Destruction of oil in the presence of Cu2+ and surfactants of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus IMV B-7241, Rhodococcus erythropolis IMV Ac-5017 and Nocardia vaccinii IMV B-7405].

    PubMed

    Pirog, T P; Konon, A D; Sofilkanich, A P; Shevchuk, T A; Iutinska, G O

    2015-01-01

    The effect of copper cations (0.01-1.0 mM) and surface-active agents (surfactants) of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus IMV B-7241, Rhodococcus erythropolis IMV Alc-5017 and Nocardia vaccinii IMV B-7405 in the form of culture liquid on the destruction of oil in water (3.0-6.0 g/L) and soil (20 g/kg), including in the presence of Cd2+ and Pb2+ (0.01-0.5 mM), was investigated. It was shown that the degree of oil degradation in water and soil after 20 days in the presence of low concentrations of Cu2+ (0.01-0.05 mM) and culture liquid of strains IMV B-7241, IMV Ac-5017, and IMV B-7405 was 15 - 25% higher than without copper cations. The activating effect of Cu2+ on the decomposition of complex oil and Cd2+ and Pb2+ pollution was established: after treatment with surfactant of A. calcoacelicus IMV B-7241 and R. erythropolis IMV Ac-5017 destruction of oil in water and soil was 85-95%, and after removal of the copper cations decreased to 45-70%. Intensification of oil destruction in the presence of copper cations may be due to their stimulating effect on the activity of alkane hydroxylases as in surfactant-producing strains, and natural (autochthonous) oxidizing microbiota. PMID:26036026

  16. Acinetobacter baumannii Is Dependent on the Type II Secretion System and Its Substrate LipA for Lipid Utilization and In Vivo Fitness

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Tanya L.; Waack, Ursula; Smith, Sara; Mobley, Harry

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gram-negative bacteria express a number of sophisticated secretion systems to transport virulence factors across the cell envelope, including the type II secretion (T2S) system. Genes for the T2S components GspC through GspN and PilD are conserved among isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii, an increasingly common nosocomial pathogen that is developing multidrug resistance at an alarming rate. In contrast to most species, however, the T2S genes are dispersed throughout the genome rather than linked into one or two operons. Despite this unique genetic organization, we show here that the A. baumannii T2S system is functional. Deletion of gspD or gspE in A. baumannii ATCC 17978 results in loss of secretion of LipA, a lipase that breaks down long-chain fatty acids. Due to a lack of extracellular lipase, the gspD mutant, the gspE mutant, and a lipA deletion strain are incapable of growth on long-chain fatty acids as a sole source of carbon, while their growth characteristics are indistinguishable from those of the wild-type strain in nutrient-rich broth. Genetic inactivation of the T2S system and its substrate, LipA, also has a negative impact on in vivo fitness in a neutropenic murine model for bacteremia. Both the gspD and lipA mutants are outcompeted by the wild-type strain as judged by their reduced numbers in spleen and liver following intravenous coinoculation. Collectively, our findings suggest that the T2S system plays a hitherto-unrecognized role in in vivo survival of A. baumannii by transporting a lipase that may contribute to fatty acid metabolism. IMPORTANCE Infections by multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii are a growing health concern worldwide, underscoring the need for a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which this pathogen causes disease. In this study, we demonstrated that A. baumannii expresses a functional type II secretion (T2S) system that is responsible for secretion of LipA, an extracellular lipase required for

  17. Role of Thin Fimbriae in Adherence and Growth of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus RAG-1 on Hexadecane.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, M; Bayer, E A; Delarea, J; Rosenberg, E

    1982-10-01

    Acinetobacter calcoaceticus RAG-1, a hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium which adheres avidly to hydrocarbons and other hydrophobic surfaces, possesses numerous thin fimbriae (ca. 3.5-nm diameter) on the cell surface. MR-481, a nonadherent mutant of RAG-1 which is unable to grow on hexadecane under conditions of limited emulsification and low initial cell density, lacks these fimbriae. Prolonged incubation of MR-481 in hexadecane medium enriched for partial adherence revertants. The reappearance of thin fimbriae was observed in all such revertant strains. RAG-1 cells and partial revertant strains were agglutinated in the presence of antibody, whereas MR-481 cells were not. Another mutant, AB15, which was previously isolated on the basis of its nonagglutinability in the presence of antibody, also lacked thin fimbriae and was conditionally nonadherent. Furthermore, strain AB15 was unable to grow on hexadecane medium. Adherence of RAG-1 cells to hexadecane was considerably reduced after shearing treatment. The material removed from the cell surface by shearing of RAG-1 and the partial revertant strains yielded a single antigenic band in RAG-1 and partial revertant strains, as observed by crossed immunoelectrophoresis. This band was absent in both fimbriae-less mutants, MR-481 and AB15. The data demonstrate that the thin fimbriae of RAG-1 (i) are a major factor in adherence to polystyrene and hydrocarbon, (ii) may be crucial in enabling growth of cells on hexadecane, and (iii) constitute the major cell surface agglutinogen. PMID:16346118

  18. Role of Thin Fimbriae in Adherence and Growth of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus RAG-1 on Hexadecane

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Mel; Bayer, Edward A.; Delarea, Jacob; Rosenberg, Eugene

    1982-01-01

    Acinetobacter calcoaceticus RAG-1, a hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium which adheres avidly to hydrocarbons and other hydrophobic surfaces, possesses numerous thin fimbriae (ca. 3.5-nm diameter) on the cell surface. MR-481, a nonadherent mutant of RAG-1 which is unable to grow on hexadecane under conditions of limited emulsification and low initial cell density, lacks these fimbriae. Prolonged incubation of MR-481 in hexadecane medium enriched for partial adherence revertants. The reappearance of thin fimbriae was observed in all such revertant strains. RAG-1 cells and partial revertant strains were agglutinated in the presence of antibody, whereas MR-481 cells were not. Another mutant, AB15, which was previously isolated on the basis of its nonagglutinability in the presence of antibody, also lacked thin fimbriae and was conditionally nonadherent. Furthermore, strain AB15 was unable to grow on hexadecane medium. Adherence of RAG-1 cells to hexadecane was considerably reduced after shearing treatment. The material removed from the cell surface by shearing of RAG-1 and the partial revertant strains yielded a single antigenic band in RAG-1 and partial revertant strains, as observed by crossed immunoelectrophoresis. This band was absent in both fimbriae-less mutants, MR-481 and AB15. The data demonstrate that the thin fimbriae of RAG-1 (i) are a major factor in adherence to polystyrene and hydrocarbon, (ii) may be crucial in enabling growth of cells on hexadecane, and (iii) constitute the major cell surface agglutinogen. Images PMID:16346118

  19. Outer membrane Protein A plays a role in pathogenesis of Acinetobacter nosocomialis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Woo; Oh, Man Hwan; Jun, So Hyun; Jeon, Hyejin; Kim, Seung Il; Kim, Kwangho; Lee, Yoo Chul; Lee, Je Chul

    2016-05-18

    Acinetobacter nosocomialis is an important nosocomial pathogen that causes a variety of human infections. However, the specific virulence factors of this microorganism have not yet been determined. We investigated the role of outer membrane protein A (OmpA) in the pathogenesis of A. nosocomialis. A ΔompA mutant of the A. nosocomialis ATCC 17903(T) strain was constructed using markerless gene deletion. The ΔompA mutant displayed reduced biofilm formation in polystyrene tubes and reduced adherence to A549 cells in comparison to the wild-type strain. These virulence traits of the ΔompA mutant strain were restored when the ompA gene was complemented. Cytotoxicity was not significantly different between the wild-type strain and the ΔompA mutant when A549 cells were infected with bacteria or treated with outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). However, OMVs from the wild-type strain induced cytotoxicity in HEp-2 cells, whereas OMVs from the ΔompA mutant did not induce cytotoxicity. Proteomic analysis of OMVs revealed that OmpA influenced the distribution of envelope and periplasmic proteins. Overall, this study is the first report that links OmpA to A. nosocomialis pathogenesis, and highlights OmpA as a putative target to develop anti-virulence agents or vaccines against A. nosocomialis infection. PMID:26759990

  20. Acinetobacter baumannii Genes Required for Bacterial Survival during Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Subashchandrabose, Sargurunathan; Smith, Sara; DeOrnellas, Valerie; Crepin, Sebastien; Kole, Monica; Zahdeh, Carina

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acinetobacter baumannii is emerging as a leading global multiple-antibiotic-resistant nosocomial pathogen. The identity of genes essential for pathogenesis in a mammalian host remains largely unknown. Using transposon-directed insertion-site sequencing (TraDIS), we identified A. baumannii genes involved in bacterial survival in a leukopenic mouse model of bloodstream infection. Mice were inoculated with a pooled transposon mutant library derived from 109,000 mutants, and TraDIS was used to map transposon insertion sites in the genomes of bacteria in the inoculum and of bacteria recovered from mouse spleens. Unique transposon insertion sites were mapped and used to calculate a fitness factor for every insertion site based on its relative abundance in the inoculum and postinfection libraries. Eighty-nine transposon insertion mutants that were underrepresented after experimental infection in mice compared to their presence in the inocula were delineated as candidates for further evaluation. Genetically defined mutants lacking feoB (ferrous iron import), ddc (d-ala-d-ala-carboxypeptidase), and pntB (pyridine nucleotide transhydrogenase subunit) exhibited a fitness defect during systemic infection resulting from bacteremia. In vitro, these mutants, as well as a fepA (ferric enterobactin receptor) mutant, are defective in survival in human serum and within macrophages and are hypersensitive to killing by antimicrobial peptides compared to the survival of the parental strain under these conditions. Our data demonstrate that FepA is involved in the uptake of exogenous enterobactin in A. baumannii. Genetic complementation rescues the phenotypes of mutants in assays that emulate conditions encountered during infection. In summary, we have determined novel A. baumannii fitness genes involved in the pathogenesis of mammalian infection. IMPORTANCE A. baumannii is a significant cause of bacterial bloodstream infection in humans. Since multiple antibiotic resistance

  1. A case of community-acquired Acinetobacter junii-johnsonii cellulitis.

    PubMed

    Henao-Martínez, Andrés F; González-Fontal, Guido R; Johnson, Steven

    2012-06-01

    Acinetobacter skin and soft tissue infection outside of the traumatic wound setting are rare occurrences. The majority of cases occur in the presence of significant comorbilities and by Acinetobacter baumanii. Herein a case is reported of community-onset, health-care-associated, non-traumatic cellulitis caused by Acinetobacter, species junii-johnsonii with bacteremia. This is the first reported case of Acinetobacter junii-johnsonii skin and soft tissue infection. Hemorrhagic bullae might be one of the clinical features of Acinetobacter cellulitis. PMID:23242290

  2. Infections with verotoxin-producing escherichia coli O157:H7 and other serotypes, including the outbreak strain O104:H4.

    PubMed

    Buvens, G; Piérard, D

    2012-01-01

    Through the acquisition of mobile genetic elements, the normally harmless commensal Escherichia coli evolved into a highly adapted human pathogen. Pathogenic strains of E. coli are associated with urinary tract infections, sepsis/meningitis, and diarrhoea. At least six different diarrhoeagenic E. coli pathotypes have emerged during the past three decades as human pathogens of public health importance worldwide. In this review, we focus on the clinical features, pathogenic mechanisms, and diagnostic strategies of verotoxin-producing E. coli (VTEC) that are associated with sporadic cases and epidemics of gastrointestinal disease throughout the world. Recently, an E. coli strain of serotype O104:H4 combining verotoxin production with virulence factors of another pathotype, the enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), emerged as the cause of a severe outbreak in Europe. PMID:22480032

  3. Molecular Epidemiology and Clinical Impact of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii Complex in a Belgian Burn Wound Center.

    PubMed

    De Vos, Daniel; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Bilocq, Florence; Jennes, Serge; Verbeken, Gilbert; Rose, Thomas; Keersebilck, Elkana; Bosmans, Petra; Pieters, Thierry; Hing, Mony; Heuninckx, Walter; De Pauw, Frank; Soentjens, Patrick; Merabishvili, Maia; Deschaght, Pieter; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Bogaerts, Pierre; Glupczynski, Youri; Pot, Bruno; van der Reijden, Tanny J; Dijkshoorn, Lenie

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii and its closely related species A. pittii and A. nosocomialis, all members of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii (Acb) complex, are a major cause of hospital acquired infection. In the burn wound center of the Queen Astrid military hospital in Brussels, 48 patients were colonized or infected with Acb complex over a 52-month period. We report the molecular epidemiology of these organisms, their clinical impact and infection control measures taken. A representative set of 157 Acb complex isolates was analyzed using repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) (DiversiLab) and a multiplex PCR targeting OXA-51-like and OXA-23-like genes. We identified 31 rep-PCR genotypes (strains). Representatives of each rep-type were identified to species by rpoB sequence analysis: 13 types to A. baumannii, 10 to A. pittii, and 3 to A. nosocomialis. It was assumed that isolates that belonged to the same rep-type also belonged to the same species. Thus, 83.4% of all isolates were identified to A. baumannii, 9.6% to A. pittii and 4.5% to A. nosocomialis. We observed 12 extensively drug resistant Acb strains (10 A. baumannii and 2 A. nosocomialis), all carbapenem-non-susceptible/colistin-susceptible and imported into the burn wound center through patients injured in North Africa. The two most prevalent rep-types 12 and 13 harbored an OXA-23-like gene. Multilocus sequence typing allocated them to clonal complex 1 corresponding to EU (international) clone I. Both strains caused consecutive outbreaks, interspersed with periods of apparent eradication. Patients infected with carbapenem resistant A. baumannii were successfully treated with colistin/rifampicin. Extensive infection control measures were required to eradicate the organisms. Acinetobacter infection and colonization was not associated with increased attributable mortality. PMID:27223476

  4. Genomic and proteomic evidences unravel the UV-resistome of the poly-extremophile Acinetobacter sp. Ver3

    PubMed Central

    Kurth, Daniel; Belfiore, Carolina; Gorriti, Marta F.; Cortez, Néstor; Farias, María E.; Albarracín, Virginia H.

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation can damage biomolecules, with detrimental or even lethal effects for life. Even though lower wavelengths are filtered by the ozone layer, a significant amount of harmful UV-B and UV-A radiation reach Earth’s surface, particularly in high altitude environments. high-altitude Andean lakes (HAALs) are a group of disperse shallow lakes and salterns, located at the Dry Central Andes region in South America at altitudes above 3,000 m. As it is considered one of the highest UV-exposed environments, HAAL microbes constitute model systems to study UV-resistance mechanisms in environmental bacteria at various complexity levels. Herein, we present the genome sequence of Acinetobacter sp. Ver3, a gammaproteobacterium isolated from Lake Verde (4,400 m), together with further experimental evidence supporting the phenomenological observations regarding this bacterium ability to cope with increased UV-induced DNA damage. Comparison with the genomes of other Acinetobacter strains highlighted a number of unique genes, such as a novel cryptochrome. Proteomic profiling of UV-exposed cells identified up-regulated proteins such as a specific cytoplasmic catalase, a putative regulator, and proteins associated to amino acid and protein synthesis. Down-regulated proteins were related to several energy-generating pathways such as glycolysis, beta-oxidation of fatty acids, and electronic respiratory chain. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on a genome from a polyextremophilic Acinetobacter strain. From the genomic and proteomic data, an “UV-resistome” was defined, encompassing the genes that would support the outstanding UV-resistance of this strain. PMID:25954258

  5. Genomic and proteomic evidences unravel the UV-resistome of the poly-extremophile Acinetobacter sp. Ver3.

    PubMed

    Kurth, Daniel; Belfiore, Carolina; Gorriti, Marta F; Cortez, Néstor; Farias, María E; Albarracín, Virginia H

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation can damage biomolecules, with detrimental or even lethal effects for life. Even though lower wavelengths are filtered by the ozone layer, a significant amount of harmful UV-B and UV-A radiation reach Earth's surface, particularly in high altitude environments. high-altitude Andean lakes (HAALs) are a group of disperse shallow lakes and salterns, located at the Dry Central Andes region in South America at altitudes above 3,000 m. As it is considered one of the highest UV-exposed environments, HAAL microbes constitute model systems to study UV-resistance mechanisms in environmental bacteria at various complexity levels. Herein, we present the genome sequence of Acinetobacter sp. Ver3, a gammaproteobacterium isolated from Lake Verde (4,400 m), together with further experimental evidence supporting the phenomenological observations regarding this bacterium ability to cope with increased UV-induced DNA damage. Comparison with the genomes of other Acinetobacter strains highlighted a number of unique genes, such as a novel cryptochrome. Proteomic profiling of UV-exposed cells identified up-regulated proteins such as a specific cytoplasmic catalase, a putative regulator, and proteins associated to amino acid and protein synthesis. Down-regulated proteins were related to several energy-generating pathways such as glycolysis, beta-oxidation of fatty acids, and electronic respiratory chain. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on a genome from a polyextremophilic Acinetobacter strain. From the genomic and proteomic data, an "UV-resistome" was defined, encompassing the genes that would support the outstanding UV-resistance of this strain. PMID:25954258

  6. Molecular Epidemiology and Clinical Impact of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii Complex in a Belgian Burn Wound Center

    PubMed Central

    Bilocq, Florence; Jennes, Serge; Verbeken, Gilbert; Rose, Thomas; Keersebilck, Elkana; Bosmans, Petra; Pieters, Thierry; Hing, Mony; Heuninckx, Walter; De Pauw, Frank; Soentjens, Patrick; Merabishvili, Maia; Deschaght, Pieter; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Bogaerts, Pierre; Glupczynski, Youri; Pot, Bruno; van der Reijden, Tanny J.; Dijkshoorn, Lenie

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii and its closely related species A. pittii and A. nosocomialis, all members of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii (Acb) complex, are a major cause of hospital acquired infection. In the burn wound center of the Queen Astrid military hospital in Brussels, 48 patients were colonized or infected with Acb complex over a 52-month period. We report the molecular epidemiology of these organisms, their clinical impact and infection control measures taken. A representative set of 157 Acb complex isolates was analyzed using repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) (DiversiLab) and a multiplex PCR targeting OXA-51-like and OXA-23-like genes. We identified 31 rep-PCR genotypes (strains). Representatives of each rep-type were identified to species by rpoB sequence analysis: 13 types to A. baumannii, 10 to A. pittii, and 3 to A. nosocomialis. It was assumed that isolates that belonged to the same rep-type also belonged to the same species. Thus, 83.4% of all isolates were identified to A. baumannii, 9.6% to A. pittii and 4.5% to A. nosocomialis. We observed 12 extensively drug resistant Acb strains (10 A. baumannii and 2 A. nosocomialis), all carbapenem-non-susceptible/colistin-susceptible and imported into the burn wound center through patients injured in North Africa. The two most prevalent rep-types 12 and 13 harbored an OXA-23-like gene. Multilocus sequence typing allocated them to clonal complex 1 corresponding to EU (international) clone I. Both strains caused consecutive outbreaks, interspersed with periods of apparent eradication. Patients infected with carbapenem resistant A. baumannii were successfully treated with colistin/rifampicin. Extensive infection control measures were required to eradicate the organisms. Acinetobacter infection and colonization was not associated with increased attributable mortality. PMID:27223476

  7. Associative Flow Rule Used to Include Hydrostatic Stress Effects in Analysis of Strain-Rate-Dependent Deformation of Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Roberts, Gary D.

    2004-01-01

    designing reliable composite engine cases that are lighter than the metal cases in current use. The types of polymer matrix composites that are likely to be used in such an application have a deformation response that is nonlinear and that varies with strain rate. The nonlinearity and the strain-rate dependence of the composite response are due primarily to the matrix constituent. Therefore, in developing material models to be used in the design of impact-resistant composite engine cases, the deformation of the polymer matrix must be correctly analyzed. However, unlike in metals, the nonlinear response of polymers depends on the hydrostatic stresses, which must be accounted for within an analytical model. By applying micromechanics techniques along with given fiber properties, one can also determine the effects of the hydrostatic stresses in the polymer on the overall composite deformation response. First efforts to account for the hydrostatic stress effects in the composite deformation applied purely empirical methods that relied on composite-level data. In later efforts, to allow polymer properties to be characterized solely on the basis of polymer data, researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center developed equations to model the polymers that were based on a non-associative flow rule, and efforts to use these equations to simulate the deformation of representative polymer materials were reasonably successful. However, these equations were found to have difficulty in correctly analyzing the multiaxial stress states found in the polymer matrix constituent of a composite material. To correct these difficulties, and to allow for the accurate simulation of the nonlinear strain-rate-dependent deformation analysis of polymer matrix composites, in the efforts reported here Glenn researchers reformulated the polymer constitutive equations from basic principles using the concept of an associative flow rule. These revised equations were characterized and validated in an

  8. Acinetobacter, Aeromonas, and Trichococcus populations dominate the microbial community within urban sewer infrastructure

    PubMed Central

    VandeWalle, J. L.; Goetz, G.W.; Huse, S.M.; Morrison, H. G.; Sogin, M.L.; Hoffmann, R.G.; Yan, K.; McLellan, S.L.

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the population structure and temporal dynamics of the dominant community members within sewage influent from two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Milwaukee, WI. We generated >1.1M bacterial pyrotag sequences from the V6 hypervariable region of 16S rRNA genes from 38 influent samples and two samples taken upstream in the sanitary sewer system. Only a small fraction of pyrotags from influent samples (~15%) matched sequences from human fecal samples. The fecal components of the sewage samples included enriched pyrotag populations from Lactococcus and Enterobacteriaceae relative to their fractional representation in human fecal samples. In contrast to the large number of distinct pyrotags that represent fecal bacteria such as Lachnospiraceae and Bacteroides, only one or two unique V6 sequences represented Acinetobacter, Trichococcus and Aeromonas, which collectively account for nearly 35% of the total sewage community. Two dominant Acinetobacter V6 pyrotags (designated Acineto tag 1 and Acineto tag 2) fluctuated inversely with a seasonal pattern over a 3-year period, suggesting two distinct Acinetobacter populations respond differently to ecological forcings in the system. A single nucleotide change in the V6 pyrotags accounted for the difference in these populations and corresponded to two phylogenically distinct clades based on full-length sequences. Analysis of wavelet functions, derived from a mathematical model of temporal fluctuations, demonstrated that other abundant sewer associated populations including Trichococcus and Aeromonas had temporal patterns similar to either Acineto tag 1 or Acineto tag 2. Populations with related temporal fluctuations were found to significantly correlate with the same WWTP variables (5-day BOD, flow, ammonia, total phosphorous, and suspended solids). These findings illustrate that small differences in V6 sequences can represent phylogenetically and ecologically distinct taxa. This work provides insight into

  9. Resistant mechanisms and molecular epidemiology of imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shu-Zhen; Chu, Hai-Qing; Han, Li-Zhong; Zhang, Zhe-Min; Li, Bing; Zhao, Lan; Xu, Liyun

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the resistant mechanisms and homology of imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii). A total of 46 non-duplicate imipenem‑resistant A. baumannii clinical isolates were collected from three tertiary hospitals between July, 2011 and June, 2012. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of antimicrobial agents were determined using the agar dilution method. Phenylalanine‑arginine β-naphthylamide was used to detect the presence of the efflux pump-mediated resistant mechanism. Polymerase chain reaction was employed to amplify genes associated with drug resistance, including β‑lactamase genes, efflux pump genes and outer membrane protein gene CarO. A few amplicons were randomly selected and sequenced. Multilocus sequence analysis (MLST) was employed in typing A. baumanni. A. baumannii was resistant to imipenem, simultaneously showing resistance to several other antimicrobials. In addtition, 13 A. baumannii were found to mediate drug resistance through operation of the efflux pump. Of the various drug resistance genes tested, blaOXA‑51 was present in 46 isolates, blaOXA‑23 gene was present in 44 isolates and blaNDM gene was found in only one strain. Other drug resistant‑associated genes, including blaKPC, blaIMP, blaOXA-24, blaOXA‑58, blaSHV, blaGIM and blaVIM were not detected. Mutation of adeS and outer membrane protein gene CarO were found in a few of the imipenem‑resistant isolates. The MLST analysis revealed that all 46 clinical isolates were clustered into 11 genotypes and the most frequent genotype was ST208. In conclusion, β‑lactamase genes, genes involved in efflux pump and mutation of outer membrane protein encoding gene may be important in mediating imipenem resistance in A. baumannii. Of the 11 different genotypes, ST11 was shared by the majority of A. baumannii, which may be due to horizontal transfer of patients from hospitals. PMID:27485638

  10. VEB-1 Extended-Spectrum β-lactamase–producing Acinetobacter baumannii, France1

    PubMed Central

    Coignard, Bruno; Carbonne, Anne; Blanckaert, Karine; Bajolet, Odile; Bernet, Claude; Verdeil, Xavier; Astagneau, Pascal; Desenclos, Jean-Claude; Nordmann, Patrice

    2006-01-01

    VEB-1 extended-spectrum β-lactamase–producing Acinetobacter baumannii was responsible for an outbreak in hospitals in France. A national alert was triggered in September 2003 when 4 hospitals reported clusters of A. baumannii infection with similar susceptibility profiles. Case definitions and laboratory guidelines were disseminated, and prospective surveillance was implemented; strains were sent to a single laboratory for characterization and typing. From April 2003 through June 2004, 53 hospitals reported 290 cases of A. baumannii infection or colonization; 275 isolates were blaVEB-1-positive and clonally related. Cases were first reported in 5 districts of northern France, then in 10 other districts in 4 regions. Within a region, interhospital spread was associated with patient transfer. In northern France, investigation and control measures led to a reduction of reported cases after January 2004. The national alert enabled early control of new clusters, demonstrating the usefulness of early warning about antimicrobial drug resistance. PMID:16965700

  11. Genome shuffling improves production of the low-temperature alkalophilic lipase by Acinetobacter johnsonii.

    PubMed

    Wang, HaiKuan; Zhang, Jie; Wang, XiaoJie; Qi, Wei; Dai, YuJie

    2012-01-01

    The production of a low-temperature alkalophilic lipase from Acinetobacter johnsonii was improved using genome shuffling. The starting populations, obtained by UV irradiation and diethyl sulfate mutagenesis, were subjected to recursive protoplast fusion. The optimal conditions for protoplast formation and regeneration were 0.15 mg lysozyme/ml for 45 min at 37°C. The protoplasts were inactivated under UV for 20 min or heated at 60°C for 60 min and a fusant probability of ~98% was observed. The positive colonies were created by fusing the inactivated protoplasts. After two rounds of genome shuffling, one strain, F22, with a lipase activity of 7 U/ml was obtained. PMID:21972140

  12. Acinetobactin Isomerization Enables Adaptive Iron Acquisition in Acinetobacter baumannii through pH-Triggered Siderophore Swapping.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Justin A; Wencewicz, Timothy A

    2016-02-12

    Pathogenic strains of Acinetobacter baumannii excrete multiple siderophores that enhance iron scavenging from host sources. The oxazoline siderophore pre-acinetobactin undergoes an unusual non-enzymatic isomerization, producing the isoxazolidinone acinetobactin. In this study, we explored the kinetics, mechanism, and biological consequence of this siderophore swapping. Pre-acinetobactin is excreted to the extracellular space where the isomerization to acinetobactin occurs with a pH-rate profile consistent with 5-exo-tet cyclization at C5' with clean stereochemical inversion. Pre-acinetobactin persists at pH <6, and acinetobactin is rapidly formed at pH >7, matching each siderophore's pH preference for iron(III) chelation and A. baumannii growth promotion. Acinetobactin isomerization provides two siderophores for the price of one, enabling A. baumannii to sequester iron over a broad pH range likely to be encountered during the course of an infection. PMID:27624967

  13. Structural and bioinformatic characterization of an Acinetobacter baumannii type II carrier protein

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, C. Leigh; Gulick, Andrew M.

    2014-06-01

    The high-resolution crystal structure of a free-standing carrier protein from Acinetobacter baumannii that belongs to a larger NRPS-containing operon, encoded by the ABBFA-003406–ABBFA-003399 genes of A. baumannii strain AB307-0294, that has been implicated in A. baumannii motility, quorum sensing and biofilm formation, is presented. Microorganisms produce a variety of natural products via secondary metabolic biosynthetic pathways. Two of these types of synthetic systems, the nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs), use large modular enzymes containing multiple catalytic domains in a single protein. These multidomain enzymes use an integrated carrier protein domain to transport the growing, covalently bound natural product to the neighboring catalytic domains for each step in the synthesis. Interestingly, some PKS and NRPS clusters contain free-standing domains that interact intermolecularly with other proteins. Being expressed outside the architecture of a multi-domain protein, these so-called type II proteins present challenges to understand the precise role they play. Additional structures of individual and multi-domain components of the NRPS enzymes will therefore provide a better understanding of the features that govern the domain interactions in these interesting enzyme systems. The high-resolution crystal structure of a free-standing carrier protein from Acinetobacter baumannii that belongs to a larger NRPS-containing operon, encoded by the ABBFA-003406–ABBFA-003399 genes of A. baumannii strain AB307-0294, that has been implicated in A. baumannii motility, quorum sensing and biofilm formation, is presented here. Comparison with the closest structural homologs of other carrier proteins identifies the requirements for a conserved glycine residue and additional important sequence and structural requirements within the regions that interact with partner proteins.

  14. Bacterial O-methylation of halogen-substituted phenols. [Rhodococcus; Acinetobacter

    SciTech Connect

    Allard, A.S.; Remberger, M.; Neilson, A.H.

    1987-04-01

    Two strains of bacteria capable of carrying out the O-methylation of phenolic compounds, one from the gram-positive genus Rhodococcus and one from the gram-negative genus Acinetobacter, were used to examine the O-methylation of phenols carrying fluoro-, chloro-, and bromo-substituents. Zero-order rates of O-methylation were calculated from data for the chloro- and bromophenols; there was no simple relationship between the rate of reaction and the structure of the substrates, and significant differences were observed in the responses of the two test organisms. For the gram-negative strain, the pattern of substitution was as important as the number of substituents. Hexachlorophene was resistant to O-methylation by both strains, and tetrabromobisphenol-A was O-methylated only by the gram-positive strain. It is suggested that in the natural environment, bacterial O-methylation of phenols carrying electron-attracting substituents might be a significant alternative to biodegradation.

  15. Effect of carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) on killing Acinetobacter baumannii by colistin.

    PubMed

    Park, Young Kyoung; Ko, Kwan Soo

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) and other efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) on the colistin susceptibility in Acinetobacter baumannii. While minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of colistin in all colistin-resistant strains decreased significantly with 25 μM of CCCP and 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), phenyl-arginine-β-naphthylamide (PAβN), and reserpine did not decrease the colistin MICs. However, CCCP and DNP as well as PAβN and reserpine did not have a significant effect on the MICs of the other agents. Efflux pump gene expressions in colistin-resistant strains were not increased compared with those in colistin-susceptible strains. When only 5X MIC of colistin (5 mg/L) was provided to a colistin-susceptible A. baumannii strain, the bacterial cell number was reduced by 9 h after exposure to colistin, but regrowth was observed. When CCCP was added to colistin, bacterial cells were completely killed after 24 to 48 h of incubation, which was not due to the toxicity of CCCP itself. Colistin resistance in A. baumannii may not be due to efflux pumps. Our present study suggests that bacterial cells with reduced metabolic activity by CCCP are more susceptible to colistin in A. baumannii. It may show the possibility that combined therapy with colistin and other antimicrobial agents could effective against A. baumannii infections. PMID:25557480

  16. [A urinary outbreak of Acinetobacter baumanii in a spinal cord injury unit].

    PubMed

    Pedraza, F; Andreu, A; Saune, M; Moreno, A; Ramírez, L; García, L

    1993-02-01

    From January 1990 to April 1992, 114 urinary strains of Acinetobacter baumanii were isolated in 57 patients with traumatic spinal cord [correction of medular] injury. The strains were characterized by having all of them the same biochemical identification, except for citrate, maltose and tryptophan-desaminase. Until December 1990, (5 strains) were resistant to all antibiotics, except to tobramicine, amikacine, cotrimoxazol and imipenem (6.3%, 33.9%, 26.7% and 0% of resistances, respectively); since January 1991, (99 strains) became resistant to all of them, except to imipenem. 39.5% of AB were isolated in pure cultures, 46% of them with pyuria. Between February 1991 and January 1992, we observed the highest number of affected patients, although without seasonal predominance. We observed as well a higher incidence among males (46 males, 11 females). 80% of them carried a permanent probe. Only 6 patients presented clinical signs directly related to AB. The environmental study could not demonstrate any source of contagion or transmission mechanism. PMID:8452972

  17. Colistin-resistant, lipopolysaccharide-deficient Acinetobacter baumannii responds to lipopolysaccharide loss through increased expression of genes involved in the synthesis and transport of lipoproteins, phospholipids, and poly-β-1,6-N-acetylglucosamine.

    PubMed

    Henry, Rebekah; Vithanage, Nuwan; Harrison, Paul; Seemann, Torsten; Coutts, Scott; Moffatt, Jennifer H; Nation, Roger L; Li, Jian; Harper, Marina; Adler, Ben; Boyce, John D

    2012-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that colistin resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii can result from mutational inactivation of genes essential for lipid A biosynthesis (Moffatt JH, et al., Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 54:4971-4977). Consequently, strains harboring these mutations are unable to produce the major Gram-negative bacterial surface component, lipopolysaccharide (LPS). To understand how A. baumannii compensates for the lack of LPS, we compared the transcriptional profile of the A. baumannii type strain ATCC 19606 to that of an isogenic, LPS-deficient, lpxA mutant strain. The analysis of the expression profiles indicated that the LPS-deficient strain showed increased expression of many genes involved in cell envelope and membrane biogenesis. In particular, upregulated genes included those involved in the Lol lipoprotein transport system and the Mla-retrograde phospholipid transport system. In addition, genes involved in the synthesis and transport of poly-β-1,6-N-acetylglucosamine (PNAG) also were upregulated, and a corresponding increase in PNAG production was observed. The LPS-deficient strain also exhibited the reduced expression of genes predicted to encode the fimbrial subunit FimA and a type VI secretion system (T6SS). The reduced expression of genes involved in T6SS correlated with the detection of the T6SS-effector protein AssC in culture supernatants of the A. baumannii wild-type strain but not in the LPS-deficient strain. Taken together, these data show that, in response to total LPS loss, A. baumannii alters the expression of critical transport and biosynthesis systems associated with modulating the composition and structure of the bacterial surface. PMID:22024825

  18. Geographical Patterns in Antimicrobial Resistance of Acinetobacter in Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Sonal; Prakash, S. Krishna

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Acinetobacter spp. has emerged as a threat to the healthcare workers throughout the globe, owing to its property of multidrug resistance. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antimicrobial resistance patterns of Acinetobacter spp. among indoor and out patients in our hospital and compare the resistance patterns in India and abroad. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, which was carried out between Over a period of one year, a total of 5593 clinical specimens of pus and purulent fluids were examined and antimicrobial resistance pattern for Acinetobacter spp. using Modified Stoke’s were evaluated. Also a comparison was done with the other similar studies. Statistical Analysis: Using the proportions of sensitive and resistant, the statistical analysis was done. The total, mean and percentage were calculated by using SPSS. Results: A high level of antimicrobial multidrug-resistance was found in almost all the clinical isolate. Our study was also found to be concordant with the results of other studies. Conclusion: There is an emerging need for identification of the genes and mechanisms for multidrug resistance among Acinetobacter spp. PMID:24959441

  19. 21 CFR 866.3010 - Acinetobacter calcoaceticus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Acinetobacter calcoaceticus serological reagents. 866.3010 Section 866.3010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3010 - Acinetobacter calcoaceticus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acinetobacter calcoaceticus serological reagents. 866.3010 Section 866.3010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  1. 21 CFR 866.3010 - Acinetobacter calcoaceticus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acinetobacter calcoaceticus serological reagents. 866.3010 Section 866.3010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  2. 21 CFR 866.3010 - Acinetobacter calcoaceticus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acinetobacter calcoaceticus serological reagents. 866.3010 Section 866.3010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  3. 21 CFR 866.3010 - Acinetobacter calcoaceticus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acinetobacter calcoaceticus serological reagents. 866.3010 Section 866.3010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  4. Characterization of Acinetobacter baumannii biofilm associated components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brossard, Kari A.

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative aerobic coccobaccillus that is a major cause of nosocomial infections worldwide. Infected individuals may develop pneumonia, urinary tract, wound, and other infections that are associated with the use of indwelling medical devices such as catheters and mechanical ventilation. Treatment is difficult because many A. baumannii isolates have developed multi-drug resistance and the bacterium can persist on abiotic surfaces. Persistence and resistance may be due to formation of biofilms, which leads to long-term colonization, evasion of the host immune system and resistance to treatment with antibiotics and disinfectants. While biofilms are complex multifaceted structures, two bacterial components that have been shown to be important in formation and stability are exopolysaccharides (EPS) and the biofilm-associated protein (Bap). An EPS, poly-beta-1,6-N-acetylglucosamine, PNAG, has been described for E. coli and S. epidermidis. PNAG acts as an intercellular adhesin. Production of this adhesin is dependent on the pga/icaABCD locus. We have identified a homologous locus in A. baumannii 307-0294 that is involved in production of an exopolysaccharide, recognized by an anti-PNAG antibody. We hypothesized that the A. baumannii pgaABCD locus plays a role in biofilm formation, and protection against host innate defenses and disinfectants suggesting that PNAG is a possible virulence factor for the organism. The first aim of this thesis will define the pgaABCD locus. We have previously identified Bap, a protein with similarity to those described for S. aureus and we have demonstrated that this protein is involved in maintaining the stability of biofilms on glass. We hypothesized that A. baumannii Bap plays a role in persistence and pathogenesis and is regulated by quorum sensing. In our second aim we will examine the role of Bap in attachment and biofilm formation on medically relevant surfaces and also determine if Bap is involved in

  5. Intraspecies Transfer of the Chromosomal Acinetobacter baumannii blaNDM-1 Carbapenemase Gene.

    PubMed

    Krahn, Thomas; Wibberg, Daniel; Maus, Irena; Winkler, Anika; Bontron, Séverine; Sczyrba, Alexander; Nordmann, Patrice; Pühler, Alfred; Poirel, Laurent; Schlüter, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    The species Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the most important multidrug-resistant human pathogens. To determine its virulence and antibiotic resistance determinants, the genome of the nosocomial blaNDM-1-positive A. baumannii strain R2090 originating from Egypt was completely sequenced. Genome analysis revealed that strain R2090 is highly related to the community-acquired Australian A. baumannii strain D1279779. The two strains belong to sequence type 267 (ST267). Isolate R2090 harbored the chromosomally integrated transposon Tn125 carrying the carbapenemase gene blaNDM-1 that is not present in the D1279779 genome. To test the transferability of the metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) gene region, the clinical isolate R2090 was mated with the susceptible A. baumannii recipient CIP 70.10, and the carbapenem-resistant derivative R2091 was obtained. Genome sequencing of the R2091 derivative revealed that it had received an approximately 66-kb region comprising the transposon Tn125 embedding the blaNDM-1 gene. This region had integrated into the chromosome of the recipient strain CIP 70.10. From the four known mechanisms for horizontal gene transfer (conjugation, outer membrane vesicle-mediated transfer, transformation, and transduction), conjugation could be ruled out, since strain R2090 lacks any plasmid, and a type IV secretion system is not encoded in its chromosome. However, strain R2090 possesses three putative prophages, two of which were predicted to be complete and therefore functional. Accordingly, it was supposed that the transfer of the resistance gene region from the clinical isolate R2090 to the recipient occurred by general transduction facilitated by one of the prophages present in the R2090 genome. Hence, phage-mediated transduction has to be taken into account for the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes within the species A. baumannii. PMID:26953198

  6. Epidemiologic and Clinical Impact of Acinetobacter baumannii Colonization and Infection

    PubMed Central

    Villar, Macarena; Cano, María E.; Gato, Eva; Garnacho-Montero, José; Miguel Cisneros, José; Ruíz de Alegría, Carlos; Fernández-Cuenca, Felipe; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Vila, Jordi; Pascual, Alvaro; Tomás, María; Bou, Germán; Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the most important antibiotic-resistant nosocomial bacteria. We investigated changes in the clinical and molecular epidemiology of A. baumannii over a 10-year period. We compared the data from 2 prospective multicenter cohort studies in Spain, one performed in 2000 (183 patients) and one in 2010 (246 patients), which included consecutive patients infected or colonized by A. baumannii. Molecular typing was performed by repetitive extragenic palindromic polymerase chain reaction (REP-PCR), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The incidence density of A. baumannii colonization or infection increased significantly from 0.14 in 2000 to 0.52 in 2010 in medical services (p < 0.001). The number of non-nosocomial health care-associated cases increased from 1.2% to 14.2%, respectively (p < 0.001). Previous exposure to carbapenems increased in 2010 (16.9% in 2000 vs 27.3% in 2010, p = 0.03). The drugs most frequently used for definitive treatment of patients with infections were carbapenems in 2000 (45%) and colistin in 2010 (50.3%). There was molecular-typing evidence of an increase in the frequency of A. baumannii acquisition in non-intensive care unit wards in 2010 (7.6% in 2000 vs 19.2% in 2010, p = 0.01). By MSLT, the ST2 clonal group predominated and increased in 2010. This epidemic clonal group was more frequently resistant to imipenem and was associated with an increased risk of sepsis, although not with severe sepsis or mortality. Some significant changes were noted in the epidemiology of A. baumannii, which is increasingly affecting patients admitted to conventional wards and is also the cause of non-nosocomial health care-associated infections. Epidemic clones seem to combine antimicrobial resistance and the ability to spread, while maintaining their clinical virulence. PMID:25181313

  7. Evaluation of CHROMagar Acinetobacter for Detection of Enteric Carriage of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in Samples from Critically Ill Patients▿

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, N. C.; Wareham, D. W.

    2009-01-01

    CHROMagar Acinetobacter was used to screen stool and perineal swabs for enteric carriage of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in samples from critically ill patients. Results were compared with a molecular assay resulting in sensitivity and specificity of culture compared to PCR of 91.7% and 89.6%, respectively. PMID:19439546

  8. Genetic classification of Listeria monocytogenes serotype 4b strains, including epidemic clones, isolated from retail meat in the Tokyo metropolitan area.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Yoshitsugu; Mochizuki, Mariko; Yamada, Fumiya; Takano, Takashi; Hondo, Ryo; Ueda, Fukiko

    2014-01-01

    A food-borne pathogen, Listeria monocytogenes serotype 4b, has been frequently isolated from patients with listeriosis, and numerous outbreaks of listeriosis are associated with this serotype. In the present study, we performed subtyping of L. monocytogenes serotype 4b strains on the basis of genetic analyses. Thirty-four isolates of serotype 4b were classified into 8 genotypes, namely genotypes 12, 15, 16, 17, 18, 23, 24, and 25, on the basis of the sequence for the partial iap gene. Genetic analyses revealed that genotype 16 and genotypes 24 and 25 belong to epidemic clone I (ECI) and ECII, respectively, which have been frequently associated with listeriosis outbreaks in the United States and Europe. The genotype isolated most frequently from retail meats in the Tokyo metropolitan area was genotype 12 (52%), followed by genotype 16 (29%), which belongs to ECI. We suggest that ECI is a common subtype of L. monocytogenes in retail meat in the area under investigation. On the other hand, ECII isolates were confirmed to be present in retail meat in Japan but were rare. PMID:25056070

  9. Isolation and Characterization of Rhamnolipid-Producing Bacterial Strains from a Biodiesel Facility

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel strains of rhamnolipid-producing bacteria were isolated from soils at a biodiesel facility on the basis of their ability to grow on glycerol as a sole carbon source. Strains were identified as Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Enterobacter asburiae, E. hormaecheii, Pantoea stewartii and Pseudomona...

  10. Acinetobacter baumannii Extracellular OXA-58 Is Primarily and Selectively Released via Outer Membrane Vesicles after Sec-Dependent Periplasmic Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yu-Ting; Kuo, Shu-Chen; Chiang, Ming-Hsien; Lee, Yi-Tzu; Sung, Wang-Chou; Chen, You-Hsuan; Fung, Chang-Phone

    2015-01-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAb) shelter cohabiting carbapenem-susceptible bacteria from carbapenem killing via extracellular release of carbapenem-hydrolyzing class D β-lactamases, including OXA-58. However, the mechanism of the extracellular release of OXA-58 has not been elucidated. In silico analysis predicted OXA-58 to be translocated to the periplasm via the Sec system. Using cell fractionation and Western blotting, OXA-58 with the signal peptide and C terminus deleted was not detected in the periplasmic and extracellular fractions. Overexpression of enhanced green fluorescent protein fused to the OXA-58 signal peptide led to its periplasmic translocation but not extracellular release, suggesting that OXA-58 is selectively released. The majority of the extracellular OXA-58 was associated with outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). The OMV-associated OXA-58 was detected only in a strain overexpressing OXA-58. The presence of OXA-58 in OMVs was confirmed by a carbapenem inactivation bioassay, proteomic analysis, and transmission electron microscopy. Imipenem treatment increased OMV formation and caused cell lysis, resulting in an increase in the OMV-associated and OMV-independent release of extracellular OXA-58. OMV-independent OXA-58 hydrolyzed nitrocefin more rapidly than OMV-associated OXA-58 but was more susceptible to proteinase K degradation. Rose bengal, an SecA inhibitor, inhibited the periplasmic translocation and OMV-associated release of OXA-58 and abolished the sheltering effect of CRAb. This study demonstrated that the majority of the extracellular OXA-58 is selectively released via OMVs after Sec-dependent periplasmic translocation. Addition of imipenem increased both OMV-associated and OMV-independent OXA-58, which may have different biological roles. SecA inhibitor could abolish the carbapenem-sheltering effect of CRAb. PMID:26369971

  11. Emergence of Carbapenem-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii Clinical Isolates Collected from Some Libyan Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Mathlouthi, Najla; Areig, Zaynab; Al Bayssari, Charbel; Bakour, Sofiane; Ali El Salabi, Allaaeddin; Ben Gwierif, Salha; Zorgani, Abdulaziz A; Ben Slama, Karim; Chouchani, Chedly; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the molecular mechanism of carbapenem resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates recovered from Libyan hospitals between April 2013 and April 2014. In total, 49 strains (24 P. aeruginosa and 25 A. baumannii) were isolated, including 21 P. aeruginosa and 22 A. baumannii isolates (87.75%) resistant to imipenem (minimum inhibitory concentrations ≥16 μg/ml). The blaVIM-2 gene was detected in 19 P. aeruginosa isolates. All imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates showed the presence of OprD mutations. Acquired OXA-carbapenemase-encoding genes were present in all A. baumannii isolates: blaOXA-23 (n=19) and blaOXA-24 (n=3). Finally, a total of 13 and 17 different sequence types were assigned to the 21 P. aeruginosa and the 22 A. baumannii carbapenem-resistant isolates, respectively. This study is the first report describing imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii isolated from patients in Libya. We report the first case of co-occurrence of blaVIM-2 with oprD porin loss in identical isolates of P. aeruginosa in Libya and demonstrate that these oprD mutations can be used as a tool to study the clonality in P. aeruginosa isolates. We also report the first identification of multidrug-resistant A. baumannii isolates harboring blaOXA-23-like, blaOXA-24-like, and blaOXA-48-like genes in Libya. PMID:25587875

  12. Polyvinyl alcohol nanofiber formulation of the designer antimicrobial peptide APO sterilizes Acinetobacter baumannii-infected skin wounds in mice.

    PubMed

    Sebe, Istvan; Ostorhazi, Eszter; Fekete, Aron; Kovacs, Krisztian N; Zelko, Romana; Kovalszky, Ilona; Li, Wenyi; Wade, John D; Szabo, Dora; Otvos, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    Native and designer cationic antimicrobial peptides are increasingly acknowledged as host defense molecules rather than true antimicrobials. Due to their ability to activate the innate immune system, these structures are used to treat uninfected and bacterially-infected wounds, including those harboring Acinetobacter baumannii. Previously we documented that when administered intramuscularly or topically in liquid formulations, the proline-rich host defense peptide dimer A3-APO accelerates uninfected wound re-epithelization and eliminates systemic and local A. baumannii, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and other pathogen load from infected lesions better than conventional antibiotics. In the current study we sought to produce and characterize a novel delivery system, suitable for immediate and convenient application in non-hospital environments. The APO monomer was incorporated into polyvinyl alcohol nanofibers and the complex was polymerized into a solid patch dressing. Mice were subjected to skin abrasion where the wounds were either left uninfected or were inoculated with a near lethal dose of multidrug resistant A. baumannii strain. Analyzed after 3 days, APO monomer-containing patches improved wound appearance significantly better than polymer patches without antibiotics. When compared to colistin, the APO patches accelerated wound healing, and statistically significantly reduced wound size and wound bacterial load. The in vivo antimicrobial effect was more extensive than after intramuscular administration of the peptide drug, by using only one tenth of the active pharmaceutical ingredient. These data suggest that the APO monomer-impregnated nanofiber dressing can be developed as an economical first-line treatment option to skin injuries in general and battlefield burn and blast injuries in particular. PMID:26319645

  13. Evaluation of five susceptibility test methods for detection of tobramycin resistance in a cluster of epidemiologically related Acinetobacter baumannii isolates.

    PubMed

    Moodley, V Mischka; Oliver, Stephen P; Shankland, Iva; Elisha, B Gay

    2013-08-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a major nosocomial pathogen causing infections in critically ill patients. This organism has acquired the propensity to rapidly develop resistance to most antibiotics. At several hospitals within Cape Town, South Africa, tobramycin and colistin are frequently the only therapeutic options. Vitek2 automated susceptibility testing (AST) is used in the clinical laboratory to determine selected susceptibility profiles. The suspicion of a possible AST-related technical error when testing for susceptibility to tobramycin in A. baumannii precipitated this study. Thirty-nine A. baumannii strains isolated from clinical specimens (June to December 2006) were included in this prospective study. Tobramycin susceptibility testing results obtained by AST, disc diffusion, the epsilometer test (Etest), and agar dilution were compared to those for broth microdilution (BMD), the reference method. The tobramycin susceptibility results revealed errors in 25/39 (64%) isolates (10 very major and 15 minor errors) when AST was compared to BMD, 12/39 (31%) (2 very major and 10 minor errors) when Etest was compared to BMD, 16/39 (41%) (3 very major and 13 minor errors) when disc diffusion was compared to BMD, and 21/39 (54%) (10 very major and 11 minor errors) when agar dilution was compared to BMD. Using PCR, we detected aac(3)-IIa, which is associated with tobramycin resistance, in 21/25 of the discrepant isolates. Molecular typing (using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and repetitive sequence-based PCR [rep-PCR]) showed that these isolates were genetically related. Clinical laboratories that routinely use the Vitek2 system should consider an alternative testing method for determining susceptibility to tobramycin. PMID:23698528

  14. Molecular Detection of Class-D OXA Carbapenemase Genes in Biofilm and Non-Biofilm Forming Clinical Isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Azizi, Omid; Shakibaie, Mohammad Reza; Modarresi, Farzan; Shahcheraghi, Fereshteh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Emergence and spread of carbapenemase (blaOXA) genes in multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDR-AB) forming biofilm complicated treatment of the patients infected with this microorganism particularly in intensive care units (ICUs). Objectives: The current study aimed to determine the prevalence of molecular class-D OXA carbapenemase in biofilm and non-biofilm forming strains of MDR-AB. Materials and Methods: A total of 65 strains of MDR-AB were isolated from the patients hospitalized in the ICU of two hospitals in Kerman, Iran. The isolates were identified by conventional microbiological tests as well as API 20NE assay. Antibiotic susceptibility was carried out by disk diffusion method; minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of carbapenems was measured by E-test. The presence of blaOXA genes among the isolates were studied by duplex-polymerase chain reaction and application of appropriate primers. Biofilm formation was detected by microtiter plate method. Results: The isolates were highly resistant to ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, piperacillin, nalidixic acid and third generation cephalosporins such as tigecycline (7%; n = 5) and colistin (13%; n = 8). Among the isolates, 77% (n = 50) exhibited high MIC (265μg/mL) for imipenem. Both the blaOXA-51 and blaOXA-23 like genes coexisted in all the isolates; while, blaOXA-24/40 like gene was only detected in 29 imipenem-resistant strains (P ≤ 0.05). The blaOXA-58 like gene was not detected among the isolated strains. Quantification of biofilm introduced 23 isolates (including blaOXA-24/40 strains) with efficient attachment to microtiter plate; while, those isolates without blaOXA-24/40, or imipenem-sensitive strains formed weak or no biofilm. Conclusions: Coexistence of the blaOXA-51, blaOXA-23 and blaOXA-24/40 like genes, along with formation of strong biofilm, in MDR-AB strains particularly with indiscriminate use of imipenem, complicated treatment of the patients infected with these bacteria in

  15. Characterization of a fluoride-resistant bacterium Acinetobacter sp. RH5 towards assessment of its water defluoridation capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Shraboni; Yadav, Vaibhav; Mondal, Madhumanti; Banerjee, Soumya; Halder, Gopinath

    2015-12-01

    The present study investigates the defluoridation capability of fluoride-resistant bacteria from contaminated groundwater collected from Asanjola and Madhabpur, West Bengal, India. Seven strains of fluoride-resistant bacteria were isolated employing culture media containing 10-250 mg/L of fluoride to evaluate their ability in reducing fluoride concentration in water. Five isolates exhibited significant amount of reduction in fluoride. Isolate RH5 achieved a maximum fluoride removal of 25.7 % from the media at 30 °C and pH 7 after 8 days of incubation. Based on morphological, physiological characteristics and analysis of 16S rDNA gene sequence, isolate RH5 was identified as Acinetobacter sp. RH5. Growth of RH5 was analysed at a diverse pH range, and it could thrive at pH 5-10. The present investigation revealed that the selective pressure of fluoride results in growth of fluoride-resistant bacteria capable of secreting high-affinity anion-binding compounds. This bacterium played a dominant bioremediative role by concentrating the anions so that they become less available. Hence, the fluoride-resistant bacteria, Acinetobacter sp. RH5, could be used as a promising strain for application in water defluoridation from contaminated sites.

  16. Identification of Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat (VNTR) Sequences in Acinetobacter baumannii and Interlaboratory Validation of an Optimized Multiple-Locus VNTR Analysis Typing Scheme▿†

    PubMed Central

    Pourcel, Christine; Minandri, Fabrizia; Hauck, Yolande; D'Arezzo, Silvia; Imperi, Francesco; Vergnaud, Gilles; Visca, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important opportunistic pathogen responsible for nosocomial outbreaks, mostly occurring in intensive care units. Due to the multiplicity of infection sources, reliable molecular fingerprinting techniques are needed to establish epidemiological correlations among A. baumannii isolates. Multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) has proven to be a fast, reliable, and cost-effective typing method for several bacterial species. In this study, an MLVA assay compatible with simple PCR- and agarose gel-based electrophoresis steps as well as with high-throughput automated methods was developed for A. baumannii typing. Preliminarily, 10 potential polymorphic variable-number tandem repeats (VNTRs) were identified upon bioinformatic screening of six annotated genome sequences of A. baumannii. A collection of 7 reference strains plus 18 well-characterized isolates, including unique types and representatives of the three international A. baumannii lineages, was then evaluated in a two-center study aimed at validating the MLVA assay and comparing it with other genotyping assays, namely, macrorestriction analysis with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and PCR-based sequence group (SG) profiling. The results showed that MLVA can discriminate between isolates with identical PFGE types and SG profiles. A panel of eight VNTR markers was selected, all showing the ability to be amplified and good amounts of polymorphism in the majority of strains. Independently generated MLVA profiles, composed of an ordered string of allele numbers corresponding to the number of repeats at each VNTR locus, were concordant between centers. Typeability, reproducibility, stability, discriminatory power, and epidemiological concordance were excellent. A database containing information and MLVA profiles for several A. baumannii strains is available from http://mlva.u-psud.fr/. PMID:21147956

  17. Naturally Occurring Antibodies in Humans Can Neutralize a Variety of Influenza Virus Strains, Including H3, H1, H2, and H5 ▿ §

    PubMed Central

    Ohshima, Nobuko; Iba, Yoshitaka; Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko; Asano, Yoshizo; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Kurosawa, Yoshikazu

    2011-01-01

    Influenza A viruses are classified into 16 subtypes according to the serotypes of hemagglutinin (HA). It is generally thought that neutralizing antibodies (Abs) are not broadly cross-reactive among HA subtypes. We examined the repertoire of neutralizing Abs against influenza viruses in humans. B lymphocytes were collected from donors by apheresis, and Ab libraries were constructed by using phage-display technology. Anti-HA clones were isolated by screening with H3N2 viruses. Their binding activity was examined, and four kinds of Abs showing broad strain specificity were identified from one donor. Two of the Abs, F045-092 and F026-427, were extensively analyzed. They neutralized not only H3N2 but also H1N1, H2N2, and H5N1 viruses, although the activities were largely varied. Flow cytometry suggested that they have the ability to bind to HA and HA1 artificially expressed on the cell surface. They show hemagglutination inhibition activity and do not compete with C179, an Ab thought to bind to the stalk region. F045-092 competes with Abs that recognize sites A and B for binding to HA. Furthermore, the serine at residue 136 in site A could be a part of the epitope. Thus, it is likely that F045-092 and F026-427 bind to a conserved epitope in the head region formed by HA1. Interestingly, while the VH1-69 gene can encode MAbs against the HA stem that are group 1 specific, F045-092 and its relatives that recognize the head region also use VH1-69. The possible epitope recognized by these clones is discussed. PMID:21865387

  18. Seawater is a reservoir of multi-resistant Escherichia coli, including strains hosting plasmid-mediated quinolones resistance and extended-spectrum beta-lactamases genes

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Marta S.; Pereira, Anabela; Araújo, Susana M.; Castro, Bruno B.; Correia, António C. M.; Henriques, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine antibiotic resistance (AR) dissemination in coastal water, considering the contribution of different sources of fecal contamination. Samples were collected in Berlenga, an uninhabited island classified as Natural Reserve and visited by tourists for aquatic recreational activities. To achieve our aim, AR in Escherichia coli isolates from coastal water was compared to AR in isolates from two sources of fecal contamination: human-derived sewage and seagull feces. Isolation of E. coli was done on Chromocult agar. Based on genetic typing 414 strains were established. Distribution of E. coli phylogenetic groups was similar among isolates of all sources. Resistances to streptomycin, tetracycline, cephalothin, and amoxicillin were the most frequent. Higher rates of AR were found among seawater and feces isolates, except for last-line antibiotics used in human medicine. Multi-resistance rates in isolates from sewage and seagull feces (29 and 32%) were lower than in isolates from seawater (39%). Seawater AR profiles were similar to those from seagull feces and differed significantly from sewage AR profiles. Nucleotide sequences matching resistance genes blaTEM, sul1, sul2, tet(A), and tet(B), were present in isolates of all sources. Genes conferring resistance to 3rd generation cephalosporins were detected in seawater (blaCTX-M-1 and blaSHV-12) and seagull feces (blaCMY-2). Plasmid-mediated determinants of resistance to quinolones were found: qnrS1 in all sources and qnrB19 in seawater and seagull feces. Our results show that seawater is a relevant reservoir of AR and that seagulls are an efficient vehicle to spread human-associated bacteria and resistance genes. The E. coli resistome recaptured from Berlenga coastal water was mainly modulated by seagulls-derived fecal pollution. The repertoire of resistance genes covers antibiotics critically important for humans, a potential risk for human health. PMID:25191308

  19. Molecular characterization of HIV type 1 strains from newly diagnosed patients in Cyprus (2007-2009) recovers multiple clades including unique recombinant strains and lack of transmitted drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Kousiappa, Ioanna; Achilleos, Charis; Hezka, Johana; Lazarou, Yiota; Othonos, Katerina; Demetriades, Ioannis; Kostrikis, Leondios G

    2011-11-01

    HIV-1 evolution generates substantial genetic diversity among isolates, the majority of which are represented in areas where multiple strains cocirculate. A heterogeneous genetic HIV-1 pool has been found in Cyprus, directing us to determine the dynamics of the local HIV-1 infection by characterizing strains isolated from 74 subjects during 2007-2009, representing 88% of the known-living HIV-1-infected population, of whom 53 are newly diagnosed therapy-naive patients and 21 are chronic patients, according to the European HIV Resistance guidelines. Near full-length genome sequences were amplified by RT-nested PCR using diluted RNA from all HIV-1 seropositives and sequenced using a newly designed assay. Resistant mutations were not found among the population of the newly diagnosed therapy-naive patients either to protease, reverse transcriptase, or integrase inhibitors. Phylogenetic analyses indicated subtype B as the main subtype (48.6%), followed by subtype A (18.9%), subtype C (10.8%), CRF02_AG (8.1%), CRF11_cpx (2.7%), and (sub)subtype F1 and CRF37_cpx (1.4% each). Six HIV-1 isolates (8.1%) were not classified in any pure (sub)subtype or circulating recombinant form (CRF). Complete phylogenetic and bootscanning analyses revealed that each isolate had a new, unique recombinant pattern and is distinct from all other CRFs or unique recombinant forms (URFs) reported so far. Two of the six isolates have the same mosaic pattern. Analogous to results of the earlier epidemiological studies, this study expands on the HIV-1 sequence database and reveals the high degree of diversity of HIV-1 infection in Cyprus. PMID:21453134

  20. Isolation and characterization of antimicrobial compounds in plant extracts against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Miyasaki, Yoko; Rabenstein, John D; Rhea, Joshua; Crouch, Marie-Laure; Mocek, Ulla M; Kittell, Patricia Emmett; Morgan, Margie A; Nichols, Wesley Stephen; Van Benschoten, M M; Hardy, William David; Liu, George Y

    2013-01-01

    The number of fully active antibiotic options that treat nosocomial infections due to multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) is extremely limited. Magnolia officinalis, Mahonia bealei, Rabdosia rubescens, Rosa rugosa, Rubus chingii, Scutellaria baicalensis, and Terminalia chebula plant extracts were previously shown to have growth inhibitory activity against a multidrug-resistant clinical strain of A. baumannii. In this study, the compounds responsible for their antimicrobial activity were identified by fractionating each plant extract using high performance liquid chromatography, and determining the antimicrobial activity of each fraction against A. baumannii. The chemical structures of the fractions inhibiting >40% of the bacterial growth were elucidated by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The six most active compounds were identified as: ellagic acid in Rosa rugosa; norwogonin in Scutellaria baicalensis; and chebulagic acid, chebulinic acid, corilagin, and terchebulin in Terminalia chebula. The most potent compound was identified as norwogonin with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 128 µg/mL, and minimum bactericidal concentration of 256 µg/mL against clinically relevant strains of A. baumannii. Combination studies of norwogonin with ten anti-Gram negative bacterial agents demonstrated that norwogonin did not enhance the antimicrobial activity of the synthetic antibiotics chosen for this study. In conclusion, of all identified antimicrobial compounds, norwogonin was the most potent against multidrug-resistant A. baumannii strains. Further studies are warranted to ascertain the prophylactic and therapeutic potential of norwogonin for infections due to multidrug-resistant A. baumannii. PMID:23630600

  1. CspE is Overproduced by Temperature Downshift in the Acinetobacter johnsonii DBP-3.

    PubMed

    Su, Dan; Hao, Linlin; Chen, Fuwang; Li, Siming; Abdelrahman, Ahmed Mohamed; Zhang, Yu; Yu, Hao; Liu, Songcai; Li, Mingtang

    2016-05-01

    The denitrifying bacterium Acinetobacter johnsonii strain DBP-3 which was capable of removing phosphate, nitrate, and ammoniacal salt is psychrotolerant, whereas, the cold shock response mechanisms or the cold shock proteins (Csps) was unclear. In this article, the optimal growth temperature (25 °C) and cold shock temperature (7.5 °C) were determined firstly by an Arrhenius plot of the growth of the strain DBP-3. Then, among the seven cold shock-like protein genes which were cloned and identified referenced by A. johnsonii SH046 genome, qRT-PCR and shotgun-LTQ mass spectrometry showed that Csp3 and Csp4 were overexpressed under cold shock condition. Furthermore, Western blotting confirmed the result with the antibodies against Csp3 and Csp4 prepared by ourselves. Finally, the phylogenetic analysis showed that the similarity percent between Csp3 and Csp4 was 76.85 %, and Csp3 and Csp4 belonged to CspE family. The results indicated that CspE is overproduced by temperature downshift and may play an important role in the psychrotolerant process of strain DBP-3. PMID:26794214

  2. The First Outbreak Caused by Acinetobacter baumannii ST208 and ST195 in China

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Junyan; Du, Yu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the clinical characteristics of patients and molecular mechanisms of the first outbreak mainly caused by sequence types (STs) 208 multidrug resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii in China. A total of 10 clinical samples were collected from 5 patients who were involved in the outbreak. Bacterial identification and antibiotic sensitivity tests were performed by the VITEK-2 COMPACT automated system. MICs of tigecycline for clinical isolates were determined using broth microdilution. The clonal relatedness of A. baumannii clinical isolates in our local settings was determinated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). A total of 7 A. baumannii strains were isolated and all were MDR strains; two of them were carbapenem-nonsusceptible strains. blaOXA-23 was the only acquired carbapenemase gene in the isolates. The isolates belonged to a single clonal pulsotype determined by PFGE and two sequences types (STs) determined by MLST. The isolates belonged to the globally disseminated clonal complex 92, among which ST195 and ST208 were the most common sequence types (71.43% and 28.57%). The outbreak was successfully controlled by stringent infection control measures, especially improving the hand hygiene compliance and enhancing antimicrobial stewardship. In conclusion, this is the first description of an outbreak caused mainly by A. baumannii of ST208 in China. Infection control measures should be strengthened when infection outbreaks in hospital. PMID:27144176

  3. Clonal diversity of Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates revealed by a snapshot study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acinetobacter baumannii is a notorious opportunistic pathogen mainly associated with hospital-acquired infections. Studies on the clonal relatedness of isolates could lay the foundation for effective infection control. A snapshot study was performed to investigate the clonal relatedness of A. baumannii clinical isolates in our local settings. Results Among 82 non-repetitive Acinetobacter spp. clinical isolates that were recovered during a period of four days in 13 hospitals in Sichuan, Southwest China, 67 isolates were identified as A. baumannii. Half of the 67 A. baumannii isolates were non-susceptible to carbapenems. blaOXA-23 was the only acquired carbapenemase gene detected, present in 40 isolates including five carbapenem-susceptible ones. The isolates belonged to 62 pulsotypes determined by PFGE and 31 sequence types (ST) by multi-locus sequence typing. Forty-three isolates belonged to the globally-disseminated clonal complex 92, among which ST75, ST92 and ST208 were the most common sequence types. Conclusions Clinical isolates of A. baumannii were diverse in clonality in this snapshot study. However, most of the isolates belonged to the globally-distributed clonal complex CC92. ST75, ST92 and ST208 were the most common types in our region. In particular, ST208 might be an emerging lineage carrying blaOXA-23. PMID:24144168

  4. Fatal skin and soft tissue infection of multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Aqsa; Botha, John; Tiruvoipati, Ravindranath

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Acinetobacter baumannii is usually associated with respiratory tract, urinary tract and bloodstream infections. Recent reports suggest that it is increasingly causing skin and soft tissue infections. It is also evolving as a multidrug resistant organism that can be difficult to treat. We present a fatal case of multidrug resistant A. baumannii soft tissue infection and review of relevant literature. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 41 year old morbidly obese man, with history of alcoholic liver disease presented with left superficial pre-tibial abrasions and cellulitis caused by multidrug resistant (MDR) A. baumannii. In spite of early antibiotic administration he developed extensive myositis and fat necrosis requiring extensive and multiple surgical debridements. He deteriorated despite appropriate antibiotic therapy and multiple surgical interventions with development of multi-organ failure and died. DISCUSSION Managing Acinetobacter infections remains difficult due to the array of resistance and the pathogens ability to develop new and ongoing resistance. The early diagnosis of necrotizing soft tissue infection may be challenging, but the key to successful management of patients with necrotizing soft tissue infection are early recognition and complete surgical debridement. CONCLUSION A. baumannii is emerging as an important cause of severe, life-threatening soft tissue infections. Multidrug resistant A. baumannii soft tissue infections may carry a high mortality in spite of early and aggressive treatment. Clinicians need to consider appropriate early empirical antibiotic coverage or the use of combination therapy to include MDR A. baumannii as a cause of skin and soft tissue infections. PMID:25016080

  5. Correlation of Ciprofloxacin Resistance with the AdeABC Efflux System in Acinetobacter baumannii Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Ardebili, Abdollah; Talebi, Malihe

    2014-01-01

    Background Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the most important pathogens capable of colonization in burn patients, leading to drug-resistant wound infections. This study evaluated the distribution of the AdeABC efflux system genes and their relationship to ciprofloxacin resistance in A. baumannii isolates collected from burn patients. Methods A total of 68 A. baumannii clinical strains were isolated from patients hospitalized in Motahari Burns Center in Tehran, Iran. Ciprofloxacin susceptibility was tested by the disk diffusion and agar dilution methods. PCR amplification of the adeRS-adeB drug efflux genes was performed for all resistant and susceptible isolates. To assess the role of the drug efflux pump in ciprofloxacin susceptibility, carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) was used as an efflux pump inhibitor (EPI). Results Approximately 95.6% of the Acinetobacter isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin, with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranging from 4 to ≥128 µg/mL. The susceptibility of 86.1% of the resistant isolates increased by factors of 2 to 64 in the presence of CCCP. All resistant isolates were positive for the adeRS-adeB genes, and 73.2% of them had mutations in the AdeRS regulatory system. Conclusions The results showed that AdeABC genes are common in A. baumannii, which might be associated with ciprofloxacin non-susceptibility, as indicated by the observed linkage to the presence of the genes essential for the activity of the AdeABC, several single mutations occurring in the adeRS regulatory system, and an increase of ciprofloxacin susceptibility in the presence of a CCCP EPI. PMID:25368818

  6. Identification of Acinetobacter baumannii Serum-Associated Antibiotic Efflux Pump Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, Catlyn; Barnett, Pamela; Perlmutter, Jessamyn

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive antibiotic resistance is a newly described phenomenon by which Acinetobacter baumannii induces efflux pump activity in response to host-associated environmental cues that may, in part, account for antibiotic treatment failures against clinically defined susceptible strains. To that end, during adaptation to growth in human serum, the organism induces approximately 22 putative efflux-associated genes and displays efflux-mediated minocycline tolerance at antibiotic concentrations corresponding to patient serum levels. Here, we show that in addition to minocycline, growth in human serum elicits A. baumannii efflux-mediated tolerance to the antibiotics ciprofloxacin, meropenem, tetracycline, and tigecycline. Moreover, using a whole-cell high-throughput screen and secondary assays, we identified novel serum-associated antibiotic efflux inhibitors that potentiated the activities of antibiotics toward serum-grown A. baumannii. Two compounds, Acinetobacter baumannii efflux pump inhibitor 1 (ABEPI1) [(E)-4-((4-chlorobenzylidene)amino)benezenesulfonamide] and ABEPI2 [N-tert-butyl-2-(1-tert-butyltetrazol-5-yl)sulfanylacetamide], were shown to lead to minocycline accumulation within A. baumannii during serum growth and inhibit the efflux potential of the organism. While both compounds also inhibited the antibiotic efflux properties of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, they did not display significant cytotoxicity toward human cells or mammalian Ca2+ channel inhibitory effects, suggesting that ABEPI1 and ABEPI2 represent promising structural scaffolds for the development of new classes of bacterial antibiotic efflux pump inhibitors that can be used to potentiate the activities of current and future antibiotics for the therapeutic intervention of Gram-negative bacterial infections. PMID:25114126

  7. Clinically Relevant Growth Conditions Alter Acinetobacter baumannii Antibiotic Susceptibility and Promote Identification of Novel Antibacterial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Colquhoun, Jennifer M.; Wozniak, Rachel A. F.; Dunman, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Biological processes that govern bacterial proliferation and survival in the host-environment(s) are likely to be vastly different from those that are required for viability in nutrient-rich laboratory media. Consequently, growth-based antimicrobial screens performed in conditions modeling aspects of bacterial disease states have the potential to identify new classes of antimicrobials that would be missed by screens performed in conventional laboratory media. Accordingly, we performed screens of the Selleck library of 853 FDA approved drugs for agents that exhibit antimicrobial activity toward the Gram-negative bacterial pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii during growth in human serum, lung surfactant, and/or the organism in the biofilm state and compared those results to that of conventional laboratory medium. Results revealed that a total of 90 compounds representing 73 antibiotics and 17 agents that were developed for alternative therapeutic indications displayed antimicrobial properties toward the test strain in at least one screening condition. Of the active library antibiotics only four agents, rifampin, rifaximin, ciprofloxacin and tetracycline, exhibited antimicrobial activity toward the organism during all screening conditions, whereas the remainder were inactive in ≥ 1 condition; 56 antibiotics were inactive during serum growth, 25 and 38 were inactive toward lung surfactant grown and biofilm-associated cells, respectively, suggesting that subsets of antibiotics may outperform others in differing infection settings. Moreover, 9 antibiotics that are predominantly used for the treatment Gram-positive pathogens and 10 non-antibiotics lacked detectable antimicrobial activity toward A. baumannii grown in conventional medium but were active during ≥ 1 alternative growth condition(s). Such agents may represent promising anti-Acinetobacter agents that would have likely been overlooked by antimicrobial whole cell screening assays performed in traditional

  8. Detection of blaSPM-1, blaKPC, blaTEM and blaCTX-M genes in isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter spp. and Klebsiella spp. from cancer patients with healthcare-associated infections.

    PubMed

    Jácome, Paula Regina Luna de Araújo; Alves, Lílian Rodrigues; Jácome-Júnior, Agenor Tavares; Silva, Maria Jesuíta Bezerra da; Lima, Jailton Lobo da Costa; Araújo, Paulo Sérgio Ramos; Lopes, Ana Catarina S; Maciel, Maria Amélia Vieira

    2016-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter spp. and Klebsiella spp. are three of the pathogens most frequently involved in infections of cancer patients, and the production of β -lactamases is a major mechanism of resistance due to its wide diversity of existing enzymes. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the microbiological profile and data related to patients and infections, and to search for β -lactamase genes in bacterial isolates from hospitalized cancer patients in a hospital in Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil. A total of 169 isolates were recovered between 2012 and 2014, of which 58 were P. aeruginosa, 36 were Acinetobacter spp. and 75 were Klebsiella spp. A high percentage of carbapenem resistance was observed in P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. Among the carbapenem-resistant bacteria, the blaSPM-1 gene was detected in P. aeruginosa (35.5 %) and Acinetobacter spp. (3.8 %), while blaKPC was detected in P. aeruginosa (25.8 %) only. Among the third- and fourth-generation cephalosporin-resistant strains, in Klebsiella spp. we detected the genes blaTEM (30.6 %), blaCTX-M (58.3 %) and blaKPC (5.6 %), and in Acinetobacter spp. only blaTEM (25.9 %). This the first report of an Acinetobacter baumannii blaSPM-1 gene carrier that has been isolated in Brazil. The most frequent cancer types were bowel tumour [14.8 %; 95 % confidence interval (CI95 %) 9.8-21.1 %], breast cancer (13.6 %; CI95 % 8.8-19.7 %) and prostate cancer (11.2%; CI95 % 6.9-17.0 %). These results therefore provide knowledge of susceptibility profile and resistance mechanisms and thus can contribute to the strategic formulation of hospital infection control plans and the rational use of antimicrobials, reducing mortality from infection levels in cancer patients. PMID:27217349

  9. Suspected nosocomial infections with multi-drug resistant E. coli, including extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing strains, in an equine clinic.

    PubMed

    Walther, Birgit; Lübke-Becker, Antina; Stamm, Ivonne; Gehlen, Heidrun; Barton, Ann Kristin; Janssen, Traute; Wieler, Lothar H; Guenther, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Enterobacteriaceae such as Escherichia coli are common commensals as well as opportunistic and obligate pathogens. They cause a broad spectrum of infectious diseases in various hosts, including hospital-associated infections. In recent years, the rise of extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing E. coli in companion animals (dogs, cats and horses) has been striking. However, reports on nosocomial infections are mostly anecdotic. Here we report on the suspected nosocomial spread of both ESBL-producing and non-ESBL-producing multi-drug resistant E. coli isolates in three equine patients within an equine clinic. Unlike easy-to-clean hospitalization opportunities available for small animal settings like boxes and cages made of ceramic floor tiles or stainless steel, clinical settings for horses are challenging environments for infection control programs due to unavoidable extraneous material including at least hay and materials used for horse bedding. The development of practice-orientated recommendations is needed to improve the possibilities for infection control to prevent nosocomial infections with multi-drug resistant and other transmissible pathogens in equine clinical settings. PMID:25872251

  10. Membrane proteomes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Dé, E; Cosette, P; Coquet, L; Siroy, A; Alexandre, S; Duncan, A; Naudin, B; Rihouey, C; Schaumann, A; Junter, G A; Jouenne, T

    2011-12-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are known for their intrinsic resistance to antibiotics. Between mechanisms involved in this resistance, diminished expression of outer membrane proteins and up-regulation of efflux pumps play an important role. The characterization of membrane proteins is consequently necessary because of their importance in the antibiotic resistance but also in virulence. This review presents proteomic investigations aiming to describe the protein content of the membranes of these two bacterial species. PMID:19942379

  11. Use of adherence monitors as part of a team approach to control clonal spread of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in a research hospital

    PubMed Central

    Palmore, Tara N.; Michelin, Angela V.; Bordner, MaryAnn; Odom, Robin T.; Stock, Frida; Sinaii, Ninet; Fedorko, Daniel; Murray, Patrick R.; Henderson, David K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDRAB) is difficult to treat and eradicate. Several reports describe isolation and environmental cleaning strategies that controlled hospital MDRAB outbreaks. Such interventions were insufficient to interrupt MDRAB transmission in two intensive care unit-based outbreaks in our hospital. We describe strategies that were associated with termination of MDRAB outbreaks at the NIH Clinical Center. Methods In response to MDRAB outbreaks in 2007 and 2009, we implemented multiple interventions, including stakeholder meetings, enhanced isolation precautions, active microbial surveillance, cohorting, and extensive environmental cleaning. We conducted a case-control study to analyze risk factors for acquiring MDRAB. In each outbreak, infection control adherence monitors were placed in MDRAB cohort areas to observe and correct staff infection control behavior. Results Between May 2007 and December 2009, 63 patients acquired nosocomial MDRAB; 57 (90%) acquired one or more of four outbreak strains. Of 347 environmental cultures, only 2 grew outbreak strains of MDRAB from areas other than MDRAB patient rooms. Adherence monitors recorded 1330 isolation room entries in 2007, of which 8% required interventions. In 2009, around-the-clock monitors recorded 4892 staff observations, including 127 (2.6%) instances of nonadherence with precautions requiring 68 interventions (1.4%). Physicians were responsible for more violations than other staff (58% of hand hygiene violations and 37% of violations relating to gown and glove use). Each outbreak terminated in temporal association with initiation of adherence monitoring. Conclusions Although labor-intensive, adherence monitoring may be useful as part of a multifaceted strategy to limit nosocomial transmission of MDRAB. PMID:22080654

  12. Acinetobacter community-acquired pneumonia in a healthy child.

    PubMed

    Moreira Silva, G; Morais, L; Marques, L; Senra, V

    2012-01-01

    Acinetobacter is involved in a variety of infectious diseases primarily associated with healthcare. Recently there has been increasing evidence of the important role these pathogens play in community acquired infections. We report on the case of a previously healthy child, aged 28 months, admitted for fever, cough and pain on the left side of the chest, which on radiographic examination corresponded to a lower lobe necrotizing pneumonia. After detailed diagnostic work-up, community acquired Acinetobacter lwoffii pneumonia was diagnosed. The child had frequently shared respiratory equipment with elderly relatives with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. As there were no other apparent risk factors, it could be assumed that the sharing of the equipment was the source of infection. The authors wish to draw attention to this possibility, that a necrotising community-acquired pneumonia due to Acinetobacter lwoffii can occur in a previously healthy child and to the dangers of inappropriate use and poor sterilisation of nebulisers. This case is a warning of the dangers that these bacteria may pose in the future in a community setting. PMID:21963110

  13. In Vitro Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activities of Chlorogenic Acid against Clinical Isolates of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia including the Trimethoprim/Sulfamethoxazole Resistant Strain

    PubMed Central

    Karunanidhi, Arunkumar; Thomas, Renjan; van Belkum, Alex; Neela, Vasanthakumari

    2013-01-01

    The in vitro antibacterial and antibiofilm activity of chlorogenic acid against clinical isolates of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia was investigated through disk diffusion, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC), time-kill and biofilm assays. A total of 9 clinical S. maltophilia isolates including one isolate resistant to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX) were tested. The inhibition zone sizes for the isolates ranged from 17 to 29 mm, while the MIC and MBC values ranged from 8 to 16 μg mL−1 and 16 to 32 μg mL−1. Chlorogenic acid appeared to be strongly bactericidal at 4x MIC, with a 2-log reduction in viable bacteria at 10 h. In vitro antibiofilm testing showed a 4-fold reduction in biofilm viability at 4x MIC compared to 1x MIC values (0.085 < 0.397 A 490 nm) of chlorogenic acid. The data from this study support the notion that the chlorogenic acid has promising in vitro antibacterial and antibiofilm activities against S. maltophilia. PMID:23509719

  14. AtaA, a New Member of the Trimeric Autotransporter Adhesins from Acinetobacter sp. Tol 5 Mediating High Adhesiveness to Various Abiotic Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Masahito; Nakatani, Hajime; Hori, Katsutoshi

    2012-01-01

    Acinetobacter sp. Tol 5 exhibits an autoagglutinating nature and noteworthy adhesiveness to various abiotic surfaces from hydrophobic plastics to hydrophilic glass and stainless steel. Although previous studies have suggested that bacterionanofibers on Tol 5 cells are involved in the adhesive phenotype of Tol 5, the fiber that directly mediates Tol 5 adhesion has remained unknown. Here, we present a new member of trimeric autotransporter adhesins designated AtaA, which we discovered by analyzing a less adhesive mutant of Tol 5, T1, obtained by transposon mutagenesis. AtaA forms thinner and shorter nanofibers than fimbriae on Tol 5 cells. We performed target disruption of ataA by allelic marker exchange, and the resulting ΔataA strain was complemented with ataA on the Escherichia coli-Acinetobacter shuttle vector, which was newly constructed. These results proved that AtaA is essential for Tol 5’s autoagglutinating nature and high adhesiveness to surfaces of various materials. In addition, the adhesiveness to solid surfaces mediated by AtaA is notably higher than that mediated by YadA of Yersinia enterocolitica WA-314. Moreover, and importantly, these characteristics can be conferred to the non-adhesive, non-agglutinating bacterium Acinetobacter sp. ADP1 in trans by transformation with ataA, with expected applications to microbial immobilization. PMID:23155410

  15. Treatment Options for Carbapenem-Resistant and Extensively Drug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Infections

    PubMed Central

    Viehman, J. Alexander; Nguyen, Minh-Hong; Doi, Yohei

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a leading cause of healthcare-associated infections worldwide. Due to various intrinsic and acquired mechanisms of resistance, most β-lactam agents are not effective against many strains, and carbapenems have played an important role in therapy. Recent trends show many infections are caused by carbapenem-resistant, or even extensively drug-resistant (XDR) strains, for which effective therapy is not well established. Evidence to date suggests that colistin constitutes the backbone of therapy, but the unique pharmacokinetic properties of colistin have led many to suggest the use of combination antimicrobial therapy. However, the combination of agents and dosing regimens that delivers the best clinical efficacy while minimizing toxicity is yet to be defined. Carbapenems, sulbactam, rifampin and tigecycline have been the most studied in the context of combination therapy. Most data regarding therapy for invasive, resistant A. baumannii infections come from uncontrolled case series and retrospective analyses, though some clinical trials have been completed and others are underway. Early institution of appropriate antimicrobial therapy is shown to consistently improve survival of patients with carbapenem-resistant and XDR A. baumannii infection, but the choice of empiric therapy in these infections remains an open question. This review summarizes the most current knowledge regarding the epidemiology, mechanisms of resistance, and treatment considerations of carbapenem-resistant and XDR A. baumannii. PMID:25091170

  16. Production and Secretion of the Polysaccharide Biodispersan of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus A2 in Protein Secretion Mutants.

    PubMed

    Elkeles, A; Rosenberg, E; Ron, E Z

    1994-12-01

    Biodispersan is an extracellular anionic polysaccharide produced by Acinetobacter calcoaceticus A2 that changes the surface properties of limestone and acts both as a dispersant and as a grinding aid (E. Rosenberg, C. Rubinovitz, A. Gottlieb, S. Rosenhak, and E. Z. Ron, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 54:317-322, 1988; E. Rosenberg, C. Rubinovitz, R. Legmann, and E. Z. Ron, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 54:323-326, 1988; E. Rosenberg, Z. Schwartz, A. Tenenbaum, C. Rubinovitz, R. Legmann, and E. Z. Ron, J. Dispersion Sci. Technol. 10:241-250, 1989). Extracellular fluid also contains a high concentration of secreted proteins that create problems in the purification and application of biodispersan. In order to obtain preparations of biodispersan that contained smaller amounts of protein, we selected mutants of strain A2 that were defective in protein secretion. These mutants produced equal, or even higher, levels of total biodispersan compared with those of the parental strain. Moreover, although there was a significant drop in the concentration of extracellular proteins in the medium, the secretion of biodispersan was unaffected. These results suggest that secretion mutants are potentially useful for the production of extracellular polysaccharides. PMID:16349473

  17. Clinical Use of Colistin Induces Cross-Resistance to Host Antimicrobials in Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Napier, Brooke A.; Burd, Eileen M.; Satola, Sarah W.; Cagle, Stephanie M.; Ray, Susan M.; McGann, Patrick; Pohl, Jan; Lesho, Emil P.; Weiss, David S.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The alarming rise in antibiotic resistance has led to an increase in patient mortality and health care costs. This problem is compounded by the absence of new antibiotics close to regulatory approval. Acinetobacter baumannii is a human pathogen that causes infections primarily in patients in intensive care units (ICUs) and is highly antibiotic resistant. Colistin is one of the last-line antibiotics for treating A. baumannii infections; however, colistin-resistant strains are becoming increasingly common. This cationic antibiotic attacks negatively charged bacterial membranes in a manner similar to that seen with cationic antimicrobials of the innate immune system. We therefore set out to determine if the increasing use of colistin, and emergence of colistin-resistant strains, is concomitant with the generation of cross-resistance to host cationic antimicrobials. We found that there is indeed a positive correlation between resistance to colistin and resistance to the host antimicrobials LL-37 and lysozyme among clinical isolates. Importantly, isolates obtained before and after treatment of individual patients demonstrated that colistin use correlated with increased resistance to cationic host antimicrobials. These data reveal the overlooked risk of inducing cross-resistance to host antimicrobials when treating patients with colistin as a last-line antibiotic. PMID:23695834

  18. Biotechnological tools to improve bioremediation of phenol by Acinetobacter sp. RTE1.4.

    PubMed

    Paisio, Cintia E; Talano, Melina A; González, Paola S; Magallanes-Noguera, Cynthia; Kurina-Sanz, Marcela; Agostini, Elizabeth

    2016-09-01

    The use of native bacteria is a useful strategy to decontaminate industrial effluents as well as the environment. Acinetobacter sp. RTE1.4 was previously isolated from polluted environments and constitutes a promising alternative for this purpose due to its capability to remove phenol from synthetic solutions and industrial effluents. In this work, this strain was identified at species level as A. tandoii RTE1.4. Phenol degradation pathway was studied and some reaction intermediates were detected, confirming that this strain degraded phenol through ortho-cleavage of the aromatic ring. Phenol removal assays were carried out in a stirred tank bioreactor and a complete degradation of the contaminant was achieved after only 7 h, at an aeration rate of 3 vvm and at agitation of 600 rpm. Moreover, this bacterium was immobilized into calcium alginate beads and an increase in phenol biodegradation with respect to free cells was observed. The immobilized cells were reused for four consecutive cycles and stored at 4°C for 9 months, during which phenol removal efficiency was maintained. Post-removal solutions were evaluated by Microtox® test, showing a toxicity reduction after bacterial treatment. These findings demonstrated that A. tandoii RTE1.4 might be considered as a useful biotechnological tool for an efficient treatment of different solutions contaminated with phenol in bioreactors, using either free or immobilized cells. PMID:26853946

  19. Joint Transcriptional Control of Virulence and Resistance to Antibiotic and Environmental Stress in Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Larry A.; Jacobson, Rachael K.; Usacheva, Elena A.; Peterson, Lance R.; Zurawski, Daniel V.; Shuman, Howard A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The increasing emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial pathogens represents a serious risk to human health and the entire health care system. Many currently circulating strains of Acinetobacter baumannii exhibit resistance to multiple antibiotics. A key limitation in combating A. baumannii is that our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of A. baumannii is lacking. To identify potential virulence determinants of a contemporary multidrug-resistant isolate of A. baumannii, we used transposon insertion sequencing (TnSeq) of strain AB5075. A collection of 250,000 A. baumannii transposon mutants was analyzed for growth within Galleria mellonella larvae, an insect-based infection model. The screen identified 300 genes that were specifically required for survival and/or growth of A. baumannii inside G. mellonella larvae. These genes encompass both known, established virulence factors and several novel genes. Among these were more than 30 transcription factors required for growth in G. mellonella. A subset of the transcription factors was also found to be required for resistance to antibiotics and environmental stress. This work thus establishes a novel connection between virulence and resistance to both antibiotics and environmental stress in A. baumannii. PMID:26556274

  20. Enhanced Efficacy of Combinations of Pexiganan with Colistin Versus Acinetobacter Baumannii in Experimental Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Cirioni, Oscar; Simonetti, Oriana; Pierpaoli, Elisa; Barucca, Alessandra; Ghiselli, Roberto; Orlando, Fiorenza; Pelloni, Maria; Minardi, Daniele; Trombettoni, Maria Michela Cappelletti; Guerrieri, Mario; Offidani, Annamaria; Giacometti, Andrea; Provinciali, Mauro

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the efficacy of colistin combined with pexiganan in experimental mouse models of Acinetobacter baumannii infection.Adult male BALB/c mice received intraperitoneally 1 mL saline containing 2 × 10 CFU of susceptible and multiresistant A. baumannii. Two hours after bacterial challenge, animals received 1 mg/kg of colistin, 1 mg/kg of pexiganan, or 1 mg/kg of colistin plus 1 mg/kg of pexiganan.Blood culture positivity, the quantities of bacteria in the intra-abdominal fluid, the rate of lethality and immunological studies, such as immunophenotyping and NK cytotoxicity, were evaluated.In the in vitro study, A. baumannii showed susceptibility to colistin and pexiganan and a strong synergy was observed by testing colistin combined with pexiganan with fractionary inhibitory concentration index of 0.312 for both strains.In the in vivo study colistin or pexiganan alone showed a good antimicrobial efficacy. When colistin was combined with pexiganan, the positive interaction produced low bacterial counts that were statistically significant versus singly treated groups. For both strains the highest rate of survival was observed in combined-treated groups (90%).Pexiganan increased NK cytotoxic activity over the levels of infected and colistin-treated animals.In conclusion, pexiganan combined with colistin was found to be efficacious against A. baumannii infection. PMID:26849630

  1. Extracellular Polymeric Substance Architecture Influences Natural Genetic Transformation of Acinetobacter baylyi in Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Merod, Robin T.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic exchange by natural transformation is an important mechanism of horizontal gene transfer in biofilms. Thirty-two biofilm metrics were quantified in a heavily encapsulated Acinetobacter baylyi strain and a miniencapsulated mutant strain, accounting for cellular architecture, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) architecture, and their combined biofilm architecture. In general, transformation location, abundance, and frequency were more closely correlated to EPS architecture than to cellular or combined architecture. Transformation frequency and transformant location had the greatest correlation with the EPS metric surface area-to-biovolume ratio. Transformation frequency peaked when EPS surface area-to-biovolume ratio was greater than 3 μm2/μm3 and less than 5 μm2/μm3. Transformant location shifted toward the biofilm-bulk fluid interface as the EPS surface area-to-biovolume ratio increased. Transformant biovolume was most closely correlated with EPS biovolume and peaked when transformation occurred in close proximity to the substratum. This study demonstrates that biofilm architecture influences A. baylyi transformation frequency and transformant location and abundance. The major role of EPS may be to facilitate the binding and stabilization of plasmid DNA for cellular uptake. PMID:25304505

  2. Comparative Genomics of Two ST 195 Carbapenem-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii with Different Susceptibility to Polymyxin Revealed Underlying Resistance Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Lean, Soo-Sum; Yeo, Chew Chieng; Suhaili, Zarizal; Thong, Kwai-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative nosocomial pathogen of importance due to its uncanny ability to acquire resistance to most antimicrobials. These include carbapenems, which are the drugs of choice for treating A. baumannii infections, and polymyxins, the drugs of last resort. Whole genome sequencing was performed on two clinical carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii AC29 and AC30 strains which had an indistinguishable ApaI pulsotype but different susceptibilities to polymyxin. Both genomes consisted of an approximately 3.8 Mbp circular chromosome each and several plasmids. AC29 (susceptible to polymyxin) and AC30 (resistant to polymyxin) belonged to the ST195 lineage and are phylogenetically clustered under the International Clone II (IC-II) group. An AbaR4-type resistance island (RI) interrupted the comM gene in the chromosomes of both strains and contained the blaOXA−23 carbapenemase gene and determinants for tetracycline and streptomycin resistance. AC29 harbored another copy of blaOXA−23 in a large (~74 kb) conjugative plasmid, pAC29b, but this gene was absent in a similar plasmid (pAC30c) found in AC30. A 7 kb Tn1548::armA RI which encodes determinants for aminoglycoside and macrolide resistance, is chromosomally-located in AC29 but found in a 16 kb plasmid in AC30, pAC30b. Analysis of known determinants for polymyxin resistance in AC30 showed mutations in the pmrA gene encoding the response regulator of the two-component pmrAB signal transduction system as well as in the lpxD, lpxC, and lpsB genes that encode enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Experimental evidence indicated that impairment of LPS along with overexpression of pmrAB may have contributed to the development of polymyxin resistance in AC30. Cloning of a novel variant of the blaAmpC gene from AC29 and AC30, and its subsequent expression in E. coli also indicated its likely function as an extended-spectrum cephalosporinase. PMID:26779129

  3. High prevalence of blaOXA-23 in Acinetobacter spp. and detection of blaNDM-1 in A. soli in Cuba: report from National Surveillance Program (2010–2012)

    PubMed Central

    Quiñones, D.; Carvajal, I.; Perez, Y.; Hart, M.; Perez, J.; Garcia, S.; Salazar, D.; Ghosh, S.; Kawaguchiya, M.; Aung, M.S.; Kobayashi, N.

    2015-01-01

    As a first national surveillance of Acinetobacter in Cuba, a total of 500 Acinetobacter spp. isolates recovered from 30 hospitals between 2010 and 2012 were studied. Acinetobacter baumannii–calcoaceticus complex accounted for 96.4% of all the Acinetobacter isolates, while other species were detected at low frequency (A. junii 1.6%, A. lwoffii 1%, A. haemolyticus 0.8%, A. soli 0.2%). Resistance rates of isolates were 34–61% to third-generation cephalosporins, 49–50% to β-lactams/inhibitor combinations, 42–47% to aminoglycosides, 42–44% to carbapenems and 55% to ciprofloxacin. However, resistance rates to colistin, doxycycline, tetracycline and rifampin were less than 5%. Among carbapenem-resistant isolates, 75% harboured different blaOXA genes (OXA-23, 73%; OXA-24, 18%; OXA-58, 3%). The blaNDM-1 gene was identified in an A. soli strain, of which the species was confirmed by sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene, rpoB, rpoB–rpoC and rpoL–rpoB intergenic spacer regions and gyrB. The sequences of blaNDM-1 and its surrounding genes were identical to those reported for plasmids of A. baumannii and A. lwoffi strains. This is the first report of blaNDM-1 in A. soli, together with a high prevalence of OXA-23 carbapenemase for carbapenem resistance in Acinetobacter spp. in Cuba. PMID:26236494

  4. Variation in the Complex Carbohydrate Biosynthesis Loci of Acinetobacter baumannii Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Kenyon, Johanna J.; Hall, Ruth M.

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular polysaccharides are major immunogenic components of the bacterial cell envelope. However, little is known about their biosynthesis in the genus Acinetobacter, which includes A. baumannii, an important nosocomial pathogen. Whether Acinetobacter sp. produce a capsule or a lipopolysaccharide carrying an O antigen or both is not resolved. To explore these issues, genes involved in the synthesis of complex polysaccharides were located in 10 complete A. baumannii genome sequences, and the function of each of their products was predicted via comparison to enzymes with a known function. The absence of a gene encoding a WaaL ligase, required to link the carbohydrate polymer to the lipid A-core oligosaccharide (lipooligosaccharide) forming lipopolysaccharide, suggests that only a capsule is produced. Nine distinct arrangements of a large capsule biosynthesis locus, designated KL1 to KL9, were found in the genomes. Three forms of a second, smaller variable locus, likely to be required for synthesis of the outer core of the lipid A-core moiety, were designated OCL1 to OCL3 and also annotated. Each K locus includes genes for capsule export as well as genes for synthesis of activated sugar precursors, and for glycosyltransfer, glycan modification and oligosaccharide repeat-unit processing. The K loci all include the export genes at one end and genes for synthesis of common sugar precursors at the other, with a highly variable region that includes the remaining genes in between. Five different capsule loci, KL2, KL6, KL7, KL8 and KL9 were detected in multiply antibiotic resistant isolates belonging to global clone 2, and two other loci, KL1 and KL4, in global clone 1. This indicates that this region is being substituted repeatedly in multiply antibiotic resistant isolates from these clones. PMID:23614028

  5. Algicidal and denitrification characterization of Acinetobacter sp. J25 against Microcystis aeruginosa and microbial community in eutrophic landscape water.

    PubMed

    Su, Jun Feng; Ma, Min; Wei, Li; Ma, Fang; Lu, Jin Suo; Shao, Si Cheng

    2016-06-15

    Acinetobacter sp. J25 exhibited good denitrification and high algicidal activity against toxic Microcystis aeruginosa. Response surface methodology (RSM) experiments showed that the maximum algicidal ratio occurred under the following conditions: temperature, 30.46°C; M. aeruginosa density, 960,000cellsmL(-1); and inoculum, 23.75% (v/v). Of these, inoculum produced the maximum effect. In the eutrophic landscape water experiment, 10% bacterial culture was infected with M. aeruginosa cells in the landscape water. After 24days, the removal ratios of nitrate and chlorophyll-a were high, 100% and 87.86%, respectively. The denitrification rate was approximately 0.118mgNO3(-)-N·L(-1)·h(-1). Moreover, the high-throughput sequencing result showed that Acinetobacter sp. J25 was obviously beneficial for chlorophyll-a and nitrate removal performance in the eutrophic landscape water treatment. Therefore, strain J25 is promising for the simultaneous removal of chlorophyll-a and nitrate in the eutrophic landscape water treatment. PMID:27126181

  6. The transcriptomic response of Acinetobacter baumannii to colistin and doripenem alone and in combination in an in vitro pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics model

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Rebekah; Crane, Bethany; Powell, David; Deveson Lucas, Deanna; Li, Zhifeng; Aranda, Jesús; Harrison, Paul; Nation, Roger L.; Adler, Ben; Harper, Marina; Boyce, John D.; Li, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Colistin remains a last-line treatment for MDR Acinetobacter baumannii and combined use of colistin and carbapenems has shown synergistic effects against MDR strains. In order to understand the bacterial responses to these antibiotics, we analysed the transcriptome of A. baumannii following exposure to each. Methods RNA sequencing was employed to determine changes in the transcriptome following treatment with colistin and doripenem, both alone and in combination, using an in vitro pharmacokinetics (PK)/pharmacodynamics model to mimic the PK of both antibiotics in patients. Results After treatment with colistin (continuous infusion at 2 mg/L), >400 differentially regulated genes were identified, including many associated with outer membrane biogenesis, fatty acid metabolism and phospholipid trafficking. No genes were differentially expressed following treatment with doripenem (Cmax 25 mg/L, t1/2 1.5 h) for 15 min, but 45 genes were identified as differentially expressed after 1 h of growth under this condition. Treatment of A. baumannii with both colistin and doripenem together for 1 h resulted in >450 genes being identified as differentially expressed. More than 70% of these gene expression changes were also observed following colistin treatment alone. Conclusions These data suggest that colistin causes gross damage to the outer membrane, facilitates lipid exchange between the inner and outer membrane and alters the normal asymmetric outer membrane composition. The transcriptional response to colistin was highly similar to that observed for an LPS-deficient strain, indicating that many of the observed changes are responses to outer membrane instability resulting from LPS loss. PMID:25587995

  7. Iterative reconstruction of a global metabolic model of Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1 using high-throughput growth phenotype and gene essentiality data

    PubMed Central

    Durot, Maxime; Le Fèvre, François; de Berardinis, Véronique; Kreimeyer, Annett; Vallenet, David; Combe, Cyril; Smidtas, Serge; Salanoubat, Marcel; Weissenbach, Jean; Schachter, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    Background Genome-scale metabolic models are powerful tools to study global properties of metabolic networks. They provide a way to integrate various types of biological information in a single framework, providing a structured representation of available knowledge on the metabolism of the respective species. Results We reconstructed a constraint-based metabolic model of Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1, a soil bacterium of interest for environmental and biotechnological applications with large-spectrum biodegradation capabilities. Following initial reconstruction from genome annotation and the literature, we iteratively refined the model by comparing its predictions with the results of large-scale experiments: (1) high-throughput growth phenotypes of the wild-type strain on 190 distinct environments, (2) genome-wide gene essentialities from a knockout mutant library, and (3) large-scale growth phenotypes of all mutant strains on 8 minimal media. Out of 1412 predictions, 1262 were initially consistent with our experimental observations. Inconsistencies were systematically examined, leading in 65 cases to model corrections. The predictions of the final version of the model, which included three rounds of refinements, are consistent with the experimental results for (1) 91% of the wild-type growth phenotypes, (2) 94% of the gene essentiality results, and (3) 94% of the mutant growth phenotypes. To facilitate the exploitation of the metabolic model, we provide a web interface allowing online predictions and visualization of results on metabolic maps. Conclusion The iterative reconstruction procedure led to significant model improvements, showing that genome-wide mutant phenotypes on several media can significantly facilitate the transition from genome annotation to a high-quality model. PMID:18840283

  8. Genome Sequence of Jumbo Phage vB_AbaM_ME3 of Acinetobacter baumanni

    PubMed Central

    Buttimer, Colin; O’Sullivan, Lisa; Elbreki, Mohamed; Neve, Horst; McAuliffe, Olivia; Ross, R. Paul; Hill, Colin; O’Mahony, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophage (phage) vB_AbaM_ME3 was previously isolated from wastewater effluent using the propagating host Acinetobacter baumannii DSM 30007. The full genome was sequenced, revealing it to be the largest Acinetobacter bacteriophage sequenced to date with a size of 234,900 bp and containing 326 open reading frames (ORFs). PMID:27563033

  9. Genome Sequence of Jumbo Phage vB_AbaM_ME3 of Acinetobacter baumanni.

    PubMed

    Buttimer, Colin; O'Sullivan, Lisa; Elbreki, Mohamed; Neve, Horst; McAuliffe, Olivia; Ross, R Paul; Hill, Colin; O'Mahony, Jim; Coffey, Aidan

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophage (phage) vB_AbaM_ME3 was previously isolated from wastewater effluent using the propagating host Acinetobacter baumannii DSM 30007. The full genome was sequenced, revealing it to be the largest Acinetobacter bacteriophage sequenced to date with a size of 234,900 bp and containing 326 open reading frames (ORFs). PMID:27563033

  10. Emergence of NDM-1 and OXA-72 producing Acinetobacter pittii clinical isolates in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Al Atrouni, A; Joly-Guillou, M-L; Hamze, M; Kempf, M

    2016-07-01

    Acinetobacter spp. have emerged as global opportunistic pathogen causing a wide range of infections. Emergence of carbapenem resistance in these organisms is a matter of great concern. We report here the first detection of Acinetobacter pittii clinical isolates in Lebanon carrying either the bla NDM-1 or the bla OXA-72 gene. PMID:27222717

  11. A highly acid-resistant novel strain of Lactobacillus johnsonii No. 1088 has antibacterial activity, including that against Helicobacter pylori, and inhibits gastrin-mediated acid production in mice

    PubMed Central

    Aiba, Yuji; Nakano, Yasuhiro; Koga, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Kenji; Komatsu, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    A novel strain of Lactobacillus johnsonii No. 1088 was isolated from the gastric juice of a healthy Japanese male volunteer, and characterized for its effectiveness in the stomach environment. Lactobacillus johnsonii No. 1088 was found to have the strongest acid resistance among several lactobacilli examined (>10% of cells survived at pH 1.0 after 2 h), and such a high acid resistance property was a specific characteristic of this strain of L. johnsonii. When cultured with various virulent bacteria, L. johnsonii No. 1088 inhibited the growth of Helicobacter pylori,Escherichia coli O-157, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Clostridium difficile, in which case its effectiveness was more potent than that of a type strain of L. johnsonii,JCM2012. In addition to its effect in vitro, L. johnsonii No. 1088 inhibited the growth of H. pylori in human intestinal microbiota-associated mice in both its live and lyophilized forms. Moreover, L. johnsonii No. 1088 suppressed gastric acid secretion in mice via decreasing the number of gastrin-positive cells in the stomach. These results taken together suggest that L. johnsonii No. 1088 is a unique lactobacillus having properties beneficial for supporting H. pylori eradication by triple therapy including the use of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) and also for prophylaxis of gastroesophageal reflux disease possibly caused after H. pylori eradication as a side effect of PPI. PMID:25771812

  12. Involvement of a plasmid in growth on and dispersion of crude oil by Acinetobacter calcoaceticus RA57

    SciTech Connect

    Rusansky, S.; Avigad, R.; Michaeli, S.; Gutnick, D.L.

    1987-08-01

    A crude-oil-degrading Acinetobacter species, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus RA57, was isolated by standard enrichment culture techniques on the basis of its ability to utilize the oily sludge found in the vicinity of a local gas station. Strain RA57 was found to contain four plasmids: pSR1, pSR2, pSR3, and pSR4. Both supercoiled and open circular forms of the first three plasmids were identified by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Restriction endonuclease analysis of pSR4 demonstrated that the plasmid contained a circular map. Colonies were isolated at random after growth in the presence of acridine orange and found to fall into two categories: (i) those which had lost the ability to grow on and disperse crude oil in liquid culture and concurrently were cured of pSR4 and (ii) those which retained the ability to both grow on and disperse crude oil and which contained pSR4. Strains from the first class continued to grow on hydrocarbon vapors, indicating that the defect associated with the curing of pSR4 was related to the physical interaction of the cells with the hydrocarbon substrate, rather than to its metabolism. No differences in either adherence to hydrocarbons or production of extracellular emulsifying activity were found between the two classes of mutants. In growth experiments on crude oil in mixed culture with strains which either contained or lacked pSR4, no sparing of the growth defect was observed. The results are consistent with the possibility that pSR4 encodes a factor(s) which is tightly associated with the cell surface.

  13. Muscle strain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A muscle strain is the stretching or tearing of muscle fibers. A muscle strain can be caused by sports, exercise, a ... something that is too heavy. Symptoms of a muscle strain include pain, tightness, swelling, tenderness, and the ...

  14. Antibacterial effect of imipenem in vitro against important aerobic and anaerobic strains isolated from clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Klietmann, W; Focht, J; Nösner, K

    1987-08-01

    Imipenem is a thienamycin antibiotic of the first generation with broad antibacterial activity. It covers all gram-positive organisms (including Streptococcus faecalis) and gram-negative bacteria (including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia spp.) as well as Bacteroides fragilis and other Bacteroides species. In this comparative study the antimicrobic effect against 1020 gram-negative, 927 gram-positive and 352 anaerobic strains from fresh clinical isolates was tested and compared with that of other frequently used antibiotics. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined by means of a serial dilution test with micro standard plates. Within the group of gram-negative strains, imipenem was the most active antibiotic with a MIC90 of less than or equal to 0.25 mg/l for most isolates. Imipenem shows a broad spectrum of activity against gram-negative pathogenic bacteria including Escherichia coli, Klebsiella spp., Proteus spp, Enterobacter spp., Citrobacter spp. and Serratia spp., and also covers resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter spp. and Alcaligenes faecalis. Imipenem also shows high inhibiting activity against gram-positive strains and anaerobic pathogens. PMID:3477332

  15. Emerging broad-spectrum resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii: Mechanisms and epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Potron, Anaïs; Poirel, Laurent; Nordmann, Patrice

    2015-06-01

    Multidrug resistance is quite common among non-fermenting Gram-negative rods, in particular among clinically relevant species including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii. These bacterial species, which are mainly nosocomial pathogens, possess a diversity of resistance mechanisms that may lead to multidrug or even pandrug resistance. Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) conferring resistance to broad-spectrum cephalosporins, carbapenemases conferring resistance to carbapenems, and 16S rRNA methylases conferring resistance to all clinically relevant aminoglycosides are the most important causes of concern. Concomitant resistance to fluoroquinolones, polymyxins (colistin) and tigecycline may lead to pandrug resistance. The most important mechanisms of resistance in P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii and their most recent dissemination worldwide are detailed here. PMID:25857949

  16. Growth of Acinetobacter baumannii in Pellicle Enhanced the Expression of Potential Virulence Factors

    PubMed Central

    Alexandre, Stéphane; Coquet, Laurent; Vila, Jordi; Jouenne, Thierry; Dé, Emmanuelle

    2011-01-01

    Background Interestingly, Acinetobacter baumannii presents an enhanced capacity to form biofilms (also named pellicles) at the air-liquid interface as compared to the other Acinetobacter species. This characteristic questions the contribution of this phenotype to an increased risk of clinical infections by this pathogen. Methodology/Principal Findings By a proteomic approach using 2-D gel electrophoresis-LC-MS/MS mass spectrometry, we compared the membrane protein patterns of A. baumannii 77, a pellicle-forming clinical isolate, grown in planktonic and in sessile modes. We identified 52 proteins with a differential expression, including 32 up-regulated and 20 down-regulated in the pellicle state. Several proteins, differentially expressed during pellicle development, were of particular interest. We determined the over-expression of four siderophore iron uptake systems including the acinetobactin and enterobactin receptors and confirmed that the development of this type of biofilm is promoted by ferric ions. Two over-expressed proteins, CarO and an OprD-homologue, putative carbapenem-resistance associated porins, would be involved in the transport of specific compounds, like ornithine, a biosynthesis precursor of a siderophore from the hydroxamate family. We evidenced the overexpression of a lipase and a transporter of LCFA that may be involved in the recycling of lipids inside the pellicle matrix. Finally, we demonstrated both by proteomic and by AFM studies that this particular type of biofilm required multiple pili systems to maintain this cohesive structure at the air-liquid interface; two of these systems have never been described in A. baumannii. Conclusions/Significance Our study demonstrated that several proteins, overexpressed at a late state of pellicle development, could be potentially involved in virulence processes. Therefore, regarding the number of potential virulence factors that are over-expressed in this growth mode, the pellicle-forming clinical

  17. Chlorine Dioxide is a Better Disinfectant than Sodium Hypochlorite against Multi-Drug Resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Hinenoya, Atsushi; Awasthi, Sharda Prasad; Yasuda, Noritomo; Shima, Ayaka; Morino, Hirofumi; Koizumi, Tomoko; Fukuda, Toshiaki; Miura, Takanori; Shibata, Takashi; Yamasaki, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated and compared the antibacterial activity of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) and sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) on various multidrug-resistant strains in the presence of bovine serum albumin and sheep erythrocytes to mimic the blood contamination that frequently occurs in the clinical setting. The 3 most important species that cause nosocomial infections, i.e., methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDRP), and multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDRA), were evaluated, with three representative strains of each. At a 10-ppm concentration, ClO2 drastically reduced the number of bacteria of all MDRP and MDRA strains, and 2 out of 3 MRSA strains. However, 10 ppm of NaClO did not significantly kill any of the 9 strains tested in 60 seconds (s). In addition, 100 ppm of ClO2 completely killed all MRSA strains, whereas 100 ppm of NaClO failed to significantly lower the number of 2 MRSA strains and 1 MDRA strain. A time-course experiment demonstrated that, within 15 s, 100 ppm of ClO2, but not 100 ppm of NaClO, completely killed all tested strains. Taken together, these data suggest that ClO2 is more effective than NaClO against MRSA, MDRP, and MDRA, and 100 ppm is an effective concentration against these multidrug-resistant strains, which cause fatal nosocomial infections. PMID:25672403

  18. First occurrence of blaOXA-58 in Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from a clinical sample in Southern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Souza Gusatti, Carolina; Bertholdo, Lauren Martins; Otton, Letícia Muner; Marchetti, Desirée Padilha; Ferreira, Alessandra Einsfeld; Corção, Gertrudes

    2012-01-01

    This is the first report of an Acinetobacter baumannii from clinical origin carrying the blaOXA-58 gene in Brazil. The isolate included in this study was from a patient during an outbreak in Porto Alegre, RS, Southern Brazil, in 2007. It was resistant to most of the beta-lactams tested, it has also the blaOXA-65 gene and the ISAbal sequence located upstream to both blaOXA genes detected and it has a MIC of imipenem of 64 μg/mL. PMID:24031824

  19. Outbreak of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in the intensive care unit: a multi-level strategic management approach.

    PubMed

    Molter, G; Seifert, H; Mandraka, F; Kasper, G; Weidmann, B; Hornei, B; Öhler, M; Schwimmbeck, P; Kröschel, P; Higgins, P G; Reuter, S

    2016-02-01

    An outbreak of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAb) occurred in an interdisciplinary intensive care unit, affecting 10 patients. Within hours of recognition of the spread of CRAb an intervention team was instituted for collection of available data, decision-making, communication and monitoring of all interventions performed, including cohorting, temporary stop of admissions, staff education, and enforcement of infection control measures. An area was defined for cohortation of patients colonized with CRAb, with a separate nursing team and a second set of mobile equipment. New transmissions were no longer observed after only four days into the institution of enhanced infection control measures. PMID:26778130

  20. Dissemination of 16S rRNA Methylase ArmA-Producing Acinetobacter baumannii and Emergence of OXA-72 Carbapenemase Coproducers in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Tada, Tatsuya; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Shimada, Kayo; Shimojima, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Forty-nine clinical isolates of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii were obtained from 12 hospitals in 7 prefectures throughout Japan. Molecular phylogenetic analysis revealed the clonal spread of A. baumannii sequence type 208 (ST208) and ST455 isolates harboring the armA gene and ST512 harboring the armA and blaOXA-72 genes. These findings show that A. baumannii isolates harboring armA are disseminated throughout Japan, and this is the first report to show that A. baumannii strains harboring blaOXA-72 and armA are emerging in hospitals in Japan. PMID:24550340

  1. Risk factors and outcomes of hospitalized patients with blood infections caused by multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii complex in a hospital of Northern China.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ninghui; Xue, Wencheng; Tang, Dahai; Ding, Jinya; Zhao, Bin

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the risk factors and outcomes of bloodstream infections caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii complex in a hospital of Northern China. Risk factors associated with MDR A baumannii complex included older age, pneumonia, using drainage catheters, and intensive care unit stay. Multivariate analysis showed that multidrug resistance and mechanical ventilation were identified as independent risk factors for 30-day mortality in patients with A baumannii complex bacteremia. PMID:26804303

  2. The outer membrane porin OmpW of Acinetobacter baumannii is involved in iron uptake and colistin binding.

    PubMed

    Catel-Ferreira, Manuella; Marti, Sara; Guillon, Laurent; Jara, Luis; Coadou, Gaël; Molle, Virginie; Bouffartigues, Emeline; Bou, German; Shalk, Isabelle; Jouenne, Thierry; Vila-Farrés, Xavier; Dé, Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    This study was undertaken to characterize functions of the outer membrane protein OmpW, which potentially contributes to the development of colistin- and imipenem-resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii. Reconstitution of OmpW in artificial lipid bilayers showed that it forms small channels (23 pS in 1 m KCl) and markedly interacts with iron and colistin, but not with imipenem. In vivo, (55) Fe uptake assays comparing the behaviours of ΔompW mutant and wild-type strains confirmed a role for OmpW in A. baumannii iron homeostasis. However, the loss of OmpW expression did not have an impact on A. baumannii susceptibilities to colistin or imipenem. PMID:26823169

  3. Common components of industrial metal-working fluids as sources of carbon for bacterial growth. [Acinetobacter; Pseudomonas

    SciTech Connect

    Foxall-vanAken, S.; Brown, J.A. Jr.; Young, W.; Salmeen, I.; McClure, T.; Napier, S. Jr.; Olsen, R.H.

    1986-06-01

    Water-based metal-working fluids in large-scale industrial operations consist of many components, but in the most commonly used formulations only three classes of components are present in high enough concentrations that they could, in principle, provide enough carbon to support the high bacterial densities (10/sup 9/ CFU/ml) often observed in contaminated factory fluids. These components are petroleum oil (1 to 5%), petroleum sulfonates (0.1 to 0.5%), and fatty acids (less than 0.1%, mainly linoleic and oleic acids supplied as tall oils). Pure strains of predominating bacteria were isolated from contaminated reservoirs of two metal-working systems and randomly selected 12 strains which were tested in liquid culture for growth with each of the metal-working fluid components as the sole source of carbon. Of the 12 strains, 7 reached high density (10/sup 9/ CFU/ml from an initial inoculum of less than 2 x 10/sup 3/) in 24 h, and 1 strain did the same in 48 h with 0.05% oleic or linoleic acid as the carbon source. These same strains also grew on 1% naphthenic petroleum oil but required up to 72 h to reach densities near 10/sup 8/ CFU/ml. One strain grew slightly and the others not at all on the petroleum sulfonates. The four remaining strains did not grow on any of the components, even though they were among the predominating bacteria in the contaminated system. Of the seven strains that grew best on the fatty acids and on the naphthenic petroleum oil, five were tentatively identified as Acinetobacter species and two were identified as Pseudomonas species. Four of the bacteria that did not grow were tentatively identified as species of Pseudomonas, and one could not be identified.

  4. Acinetobacter infection is associated with acquired glucose intolerance in burn patients.

    PubMed

    Furniss, Dominic; Gore, Sinclair; Azadian, Berge; Myers, Simon R

    2005-01-01

    Infection with antibiotic-resistant Acinetobacter spp. is an increasing problem in critical care environments worldwide. Acinetobacter spp. are known to produce an insulin-cleaving protease. We hypothesized that infection with Acinetobacter spp. was associated with the acquisition of glucose intolerance in burn patients. Data were collected prospectively on all 473 patients admitted to the Burns Centre between January 2002 and March 2003. A total of 3.4% of patients acquired glucose intolerance during admission. Patients with Acinetobacter spp. infection were 9.8 times more likely to develop glucose intolerance than those without the infection (P < .0001). The association persisted after controlling for TBSA (P < .001). In patients with deep Acinetobacter spp. infection, 47% had glucose intolerance, compared with 12% in those with infection of the burn only (P = .03). In patients with pre-existing diabetes mellitus, 27% developed Acinetobacter spp. infection compared with only 8.5% of patients without diabetes (P = .04). This study demonstrates a clear association between Acinetobacter spp. infection and glucose intolerance in burns patients. PMID:16151285

  5. Blood stream infections caused by Acinetobacter baumannii group in Japan - Epidemiological and clinical investigation.

    PubMed

    Fujikura, Yuji; Yuki, Atsushi; Hamamoto, Takaaki; Kawana, Akihiko; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Matsumoto, Tetsuya

    2016-06-01

    Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex, especially A. baumannii, Acinetobacter pittii and Acinetobacter nosocomialis, constitutes an important group of nosocomial pathogens; however, epidemiological or clinical characteristics and prognosis is limited in Japan. From 2009 to 2013, 47 blood stream infection cases resulting from A. baumannii group were reviewed at the National Defense Medical College, an 800-bed tertiary hospital. To determine the genospecies, further comparative nucleotide sequence analyses of the RNA polymerase b-subunit (rpoB) gene were performed. Sequence analysis of rpoB gene showed that 25 (49.0%), 17 (33.3%) and 5 (9.8%) cases were caused by A. baumannii, A. pittii and A. nosocomialis, respectively. The 30-day and in-hospital mortality rates of A. baumannii were 8.5% and 25.5%, respectively, and there were no significant differences between Acinetobacter species. Clinical characteristics were statistically insignificant. Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter species were detected in 3 cases (5.9%) with same pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) pattern and A. baumannii was less susceptible to amikacin and levofloxacin. In this study, the mortality and clinical characteristics were similar among A. baumannii group isolate cases despite some showing drug resistance. However, identification of Acinetobacter species helps to initiate appropriate antibiotic therapy in earlier treatment phase, because A. baumannii shows some drug resistance. PMID:26993173

  6. High prevalence of extensively drug-resistant and metallo beta-lactamase-producing clinical Acinetobacter baumannii in Iran.

    PubMed

    Maspi, Hossein; Mahmoodzadeh Hosseini, Hamideh; Amin, Mohsen; Imani Fooladi, Abbas Ali

    2016-09-01

    Acinetobacter species particularly Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) have been widely reported as broad-spectrum antibiotic resistant pathogens. Expression of various types of metallo beta-lactamases (MBL), classified as Ambler class B, has been associated with carbapenem resistance. Here, we attempted to assess the frequency of extensively drug-resistant (XDR) and MBL-producing A. baumannii among clinical isolates. 86 clinical A. baumannii strains were collected from 2014 to 2015 and their susceptibility to meropenem (10 μg), imipenem (10 μg), azteronem (30 μg), pipracillin (100 μg) tazobactam (110 μg), tobramycin (10 μg), fosfomycin (200 μg), rifampicin (5 μg), colistin (10 μg), tigecycline (15 μg), sulbactam/ampicillin (10 μg + 10 μg) and polymixin B (300 U) was evaluated using disk diffusion method. The MBL-producing isolates were screened using combined disc diffusion method. Furthermore, the presence of blaVIM, blaIMP, blaSPM, blaGIM, blaSIM and blaNDM was detected by PCR. 34.9% of isolates were recovered from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). 81 (94.2%) and 62 (71.2%) isolates were multidrug resistance (MDR) and XDR, respectively. 44 (51.2%) and 65 (75.6%) isolates were MBL-producing strains with resistance to imipenem and meropenem, respectively. 2 (2.3%), 13 (15.1%), 2 (2.3%), 4 (4.7%) and 2 (2.3%) isolates carried blaVIM, blaIMP, blaSPM, blaGIM and blaSIM genes, respectively. Our data showed that the rate of XDR and MBL A. baumannii is on the rise. PMID:27448835

  7. Treatment for patients with multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii pulmonary infection

    PubMed Central

    PAN, TAO; LIU, XIAOYUN; XIANG, SHOUGUI; JI, WENLI

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infections are common but have become increasingly resistant to drugs. The aim of the present study was to examine the combined treatment of traditional Chinese and Western medicine in 30 cases of pulmonary infection with multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. Patients were divided into groups A and B according to drug treatments. Cefoperazone or sulbactam and tanreqing were administered in group A, and cefoperazone or sulbactam in group B. The curative effect and prognosis of the two groups were recorded and the remaining treatments were performed routinely in the clinic. For the combined therapy group, which was administered sulperazone and tanreqing, 8 patients were recovered, 6 patients had significant effects, 3 patients exhibited some improvement and 1 patient had no response. One of the patients did not survive after 28 days. By contrast, there were 4 patients that were successfully treated, 3 patients with significant effects, 2 patients with some improvement and 2 patients had no response in the sulperazone group, and 4 patients did not survive after 28 days. In conclusion, the combined therapy of cefoperazone or sulbactam supplemented with tanreqing was identified to be more effective than cefoperazone or sulbactam as monotherapy, for treating multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. PMID:27073447

  8. Surface activity of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus sp. 2CA2

    SciTech Connect

    Neufeld, R.J.; Zajic, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    The hydrocarbon metabolizing Acinetobacter calcoaceticus sp. 2CA2 reduces the surface tension of the culture broth during growth on liquid hydrocarbons. This activity, which is not evident during growth on soluble substrates, is associated with the whole cells. Removing the cells from the culture broth increases the surface tension of the liquid phase. The cells when resuspended in water result in a dramatic lowering of the surface tension. Acinetobacter sp. 2CA2 tends to partition between the two liquid phases during growth on hydrocarbons. Both the hydrocarbon bound and nonadhering cells are equally surface active. The whole cells are also able to form and stabilize kerosene-water emulsions. This ability is not related to the lowering of the liquid surface or interfacial tension, since both surface active and nonsurface active cells demonstrated the same emulsifying properties. An extracellular lipopeptide produced during growth on hydrocarbons is not surface active but effectively forms and stabilizes kerosene-water emulsions. The cells and extracellular lipopeptide are also effective in de-emulsifying surfactant stabilized test emulsions. The cells and extracellular lipopeptide are also effective in de-emulsifying surfactant stabilized test emulsions. The lipopeptide product reduced the half-life of a Tween-Span (TS) stabilized kerosene-water emulsion from 650 to 0.4 h at product concentrations of less than 1% (w/v).

  9. Global metabolic analyses identify key differences in metabolite levels between polymyxin-susceptible and polymyxin-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Mahamad Maifiah, Mohd Hafidz; Cheah, Soon-Ee; Johnson, Matthew D; Han, Mei-Ling; Boyce, John D; Thamlikitkul, Visanu; Forrest, Alan; Kaye, Keith S; Hertzog, Paul; Purcell, Anthony W; Song, Jiangning; Velkov, Tony; Creek, Darren J; Li, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii presents a global medical crisis and polymyxins are used as the last-line therapy. This study aimed to identify metabolic differences between polymyxin-susceptible and polymyxin-resistant A. baumannii using untargeted metabolomics. The metabolome of each A. baumannii strain was measured using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Multivariate and univariate statistics and pathway analyses were employed to elucidate metabolic differences between the polymyxin-susceptible and -resistant A. baumannii strains. Significant differences were identified between the metabolic profiles of the polymyxin-susceptible and -resistant A. baumannii strains. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) deficient, polymyxin-resistant 19606R showed perturbation in specific amino acid and carbohydrate metabolites, particularly pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates. Levels of nucleotides were lower in the LPS-deficient 19606R. Furthermore, 19606R exhibited a shift in its glycerophospholipid profile towards increased abundance of short-chain lipids compared to the parent polymyxin-susceptible ATCC 19606. In contrast, in a pair of clinical isolates 03-149.1 (polymyxin-susceptible) and 03-149.2 (polymyxin-resistant, due to modification of lipid A), minor metabolic differences were identified. Notably, peptidoglycan biosynthesis metabolites were significantly depleted in both of the aforementioned polymyxin-resistant strains. This is the first comparative untargeted metabolomics study to show substantial differences in the metabolic profiles of the polymyxin-susceptible and -resistant A. baumannii. PMID:26924392

  10. Global metabolic analyses identify key differences in metabolite levels between polymyxin-susceptible and polymyxin-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Mahamad Maifiah, Mohd Hafidz; Cheah, Soon-Ee; Johnson, Matthew D.; Han, Mei-Ling; Boyce, John D.; Thamlikitkul, Visanu; Forrest, Alan; Kaye, Keith S.; Hertzog, Paul; Purcell, Anthony W.; Song, Jiangning; Velkov, Tony; Creek, Darren J.; Li, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii presents a global medical crisis and polymyxins are used as the last-line therapy. This study aimed to identify metabolic differences between polymyxin-susceptible and polymyxin-resistant A. baumannii using untargeted metabolomics. The metabolome of each A. baumannii strain was measured using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Multivariate and univariate statistics and pathway analyses were employed to elucidate metabolic differences between the polymyxin-susceptible and -resistant A. baumannii strains. Significant differences were identified between the metabolic profiles of the polymyxin-susceptible and -resistant A. baumannii strains. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) deficient, polymyxin-resistant 19606R showed perturbation in specific amino acid and carbohydrate metabolites, particularly pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates. Levels of nucleotides were lower in the LPS-deficient 19606R. Furthermore, 19606R exhibited a shift in its glycerophospholipid profile towards increased abundance of short-chain lipids compared to the parent polymyxin-susceptible ATCC 19606. In contrast, in a pair of clinical isolates 03–149.1 (polymyxin-susceptible) and 03–149.2 (polymyxin-resistant, due to modification of lipid A), minor metabolic differences were identified. Notably, peptidoglycan biosynthesis metabolites were significantly depleted in both of the aforementioned polymyxin-resistant strains. This is the first comparative untargeted metabolomics study to show substantial differences in the metabolic profiles of the polymyxin-susceptible and -resistant A. baumannii. PMID:26924392

  11. A glimpse into evolution and dissemination of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolates in East Asia: a comparative genomics study

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ye; Ruan, Zhi; Shu, Jianfeng; Chen, Chyi-Liang; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun

    2016-01-01

    Clonal dissemination is characteristic of the important nosocomial pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii, as revealed by previous multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) studies. However, the disseminated phyletic unit is actually MLST sequence type instead of real bacterial clone. Here we sequenced the genomes of 13 multidrug-resistant (MDR) A. baumannii strains from Taiwan, and compared them with that of A. baumannii from other East Asian countries. Core-genome phylogenetic tree divided the analyzed strains into three major clades. Among them, one ST455 clade was a hybrid between the ST208 clade and the other ST455 clade. Several strains showed nearly identical genome sequence, but their isolation sources differed by over 2,500 km and 10 years apart, suggesting a wide dissemination of the phyletic units, which were much smaller than the sequence type. Frequent structural variation was detected even between the closely related strains in antimicrobial resistance elements such as AbaRI, class I integron, indicating strong selection pressure brought by antimicrobial use. In conclusion, wide clonal dissemination and frequent genomic variation simultaneously characterize the clinical MDR A. baumannii in East Asia. PMID:27072398

  12. A glimpse into evolution and dissemination of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolates in East Asia: a comparative genomics study.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ye; Ruan, Zhi; Shu, Jianfeng; Chen, Chyi-Liang; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun

    2016-01-01

    Clonal dissemination is characteristic of the important nosocomial pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii, as revealed by previous multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) studies. However, the disseminated phyletic unit is actually MLST sequence type instead of real bacterial clone. Here we sequenced the genomes of 13 multidrug-resistant (MDR) A. baumannii strains from Taiwan, and compared them with that of A. baumannii from other East Asian countries. Core-genome phylogenetic tree divided the analyzed strains into three major clades. Among them, one ST455 clade was a hybrid between the ST208 clade and the other ST455 clade. Several strains showed nearly identical genome sequence, but their isolation sources differed by over 2,500 km and 10 years apart, suggesting a wide dissemination of the phyletic units, which were much smaller than the sequence type. Frequent structural variation was detected even between the closely related strains in antimicrobial resistance elements such as AbaRI, class I integron, indicating strong selection pressure brought by antimicrobial use. In conclusion, wide clonal dissemination and frequent genomic variation simultaneously characterize the clinical MDR A. baumannii in East Asia. PMID:27072398

  13. Identification and Characterization of a Glycosyltransferase Involved in Acinetobacter baumannii Lipopolysaccharide Core Biosynthesis▿

    PubMed Central

    Luke, Nicole R.; Sauberan, Shauna L.; Russo, Thomas A.; Beanan, Janet M.; Olson, Ruth; Loehfelm, Thomas W.; Cox, Andrew D.; St. Michael, Frank; Vinogradov, Evgeny V.; Campagnari, Anthony A.

    2010-01-01

    Although Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a significant cause of nosocomial infections worldwide, there have been few investigations describing the factors important for A. baumannii persistence and pathogenesis. This paper describes the first reported identification of a glycosyltransferase, LpsB, involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis in A. baumannii. Mutational, structural, and complementation analyses indicated that LpsB is a core oligosaccharide glycosyl transferase. Using a genetic approach, lpsB was compared with the lpsB homologues of several A. baumannii strains. These analyses indicated that LpsB is highly conserved among A. baumannii isolates. Furthermore, we developed a monoclonal antibody, monoclonal antibody 13C11, which reacts to an LPS core epitope expressed by approximately one-third of the A. baumannii clinical isolates evaluated to date. Previous studies describing the heterogeneity of A. baumannii LPS were limited primarily to structural analyses; therefore, studies evaluating the correlation between these surface glycolipids and pathogenesis were warranted. Our data from an evaluation of LpsB mutant 307::TN17, which expresses a deeply truncated LPS glycoform consisting of only two 3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acid residues and lipid A, suggest that A. baumannii LPS is important for resistance to normal human serum and confers a competitive advantage for survival in vivo. These results have important implications for the role of LPS in A. baumannii infections. PMID:20194587

  14. Characterization of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolates in a Chinese teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yaowen; Luan, Guangxin; Xu, Ying; Wang, Yanhong; Shen, Min; Zhang, Chi; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Jinwei; Yang, Jingni; Jia, Xu; Ling, Baodong

    2015-01-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAB) presents a serious therapeutic and infection control challenge. In this study, we investigated the epidemiological and molecular differences of CRAB and the threatening factors for contributing to increased CRAB infections at a hospital in western China. A total of 110 clinical isolates of A. baumannii, collected in a recent 2-year period, were tested for carbapenem antibiotic susceptibility, followed by a molecular analysis of carbapenemase genes. Genetic relatedness of the isolates was characterized by multilocus sequence typing. Sixty-seven of the 110 isolates (60.9%) were resistant to carbapenems, 80.60% (54/67) of which carried the blaOXA-23 gene. Most of these CRAB isolates (77.62%) were classified as clone complex 92 (CC92), and sequence type (ST) 92 was the most prevalent STs, followed by ST195, ST136, ST843, and ST75. One CRAB isolate of ST195 harbored plasmid pAB52 from a Chinese patient without travel history. This plasmid contains toxin–antitoxin elements related to adaptation for growth, which might have emerged as a common vehicle indirectly mediating the spread of OXA-23 in CRAB. Thus, CC92 A. baumannii carrying OXA-23 is a major drug-resistant strain spreading in China. Our findings indicate that rational application of antibiotics is indispensable for minimizing widespread of drug resistance. PMID:26388854

  15. The induction and identification of novel Colistin resistance mutations in Acinetobacter baumannii and their implications

    PubMed Central

    Thi Khanh Nhu, Nguyen; Riordan, David W.; Do Hoang Nhu, Tran; Thanh, Duy Pham; Thwaites, Guy; Huong Lan, Nguyen Phu; Wren, Brendan W.; Baker, Stephen; Stabler, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a significant cause of opportunistic hospital acquired infection and has been identified as an important emerging infection due to its high levels of antimicrobial resistance. Multidrug resistant A. baumannii has risen rapidly in Vietnam, where colistin is becoming the drug of last resort for many infections. In this study we generated spontaneous colistin resistant progeny (up to >256 μg/μl) from four colistin susceptible Vietnamese isolates and one susceptible reference strain (MIC <1.5 μg/μl). Whole genome sequencing was used to identify single nucleotide mutations that could be attributed to the reduced colistin susceptibility. We identified six lpxACD and three pmrB mutations, the majority of which were novel. In addition, we identified further mutations in six A. baumannii genes (vacJ, pldA, ttg2C, pheS and conserved hypothetical protein) that we hypothesise have a role in reduced colistin susceptibility. This study has identified additional mutations that may be associated with colistin resistance through novel resistance mechanisms. Our work further demonstrates how rapidly A. baumannii can generate resistance to a last resort antimicrobial and highlights the need for improved surveillance to identified A. baumannii with an extensive drug resistance profile. PMID:27329501

  16. Antimicrobial Resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii to Imipenem in Iran: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pourhajibagher, Maryam; Hashemi, Farhad B.; Pourakbari, Babak; Aziemzadeh, Masoud; Bahador, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Imipenem-resistant multi-drug resistant (IR-MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii has been emerged as a morbidity successful nosocomial pathogen throughout the world.To address imipenem being yet the most effective antimicrobial agent against A. baumannii to control outbreaks and treat patients, a systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the prevalence of IR-MDR A. baumannii. We systematically searched Web of Science, PubMed, MEDLINE, Science Direct, EMBASE, Scopus, Cochrane Library, Google Scholar, and Iranian databases to identify studies addressing the antibiotic resistance of A. baumannii to imipenem and the frequency of MDR strains in Iran. Out of 58 articles and after a secondary screening using inclusion and exclusion criteria and on the basis of title and abstract evaluation, 51 studies were selected for analysis. The meta-analysis revealed that 55% [95% confidence interval (CI), 53.0–56.5] of A. baumannii were resistant to imipenem and 74% (95% CI, 61.3–83.9) were MDR. The MDR A. baumannii population in Iran is rapidly changing toward a growing resistance to imipenem. Our findings highlight the critical need for a comprehensive monitoring and infection control policy as well as a national susceptibility review program that evaluates IR-MDR A. baumannii isolates from various parts of Iran. PMID:27099638

  17. Identification and Characterization of Type II Toxin-Antitoxin Systems in the Opportunistic Pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Jurėnaitė, Milda; Markuckas, Arvydas

    2013-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic pathogen that causes nosocomial infections. Due to the ability to persist in the clinical environment and rapidly acquire antibiotic resistance, multidrug-resistant A. baumannii clones have spread in medical units in many countries in the last decade. The molecular basis of the emergence and spread of the successful multidrug-resistant A. baumannii clones is not understood. Bacterial toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are abundant genetic loci harbored in low-copy-number plasmids and chromosomes and have been proposed to fulfill numerous functions, from plasmid stabilization to regulation of growth and death under stress conditions. In this study, we have performed a thorough bioinformatic search for type II TA systems in genomes of A. baumannii strains and estimated at least 15 possible TA gene pairs, 5 of which have been shown to be functional TA systems. Three of them were orthologs of bacterial and archaeal RelB/RelE, HicA/HicB, and HigB/HigA systems, and others were the unique SplT/SplA and CheT/CheA TA modules. The toxins of all five TA systems, when expressed in Escherichia coli, inhibited translation, causing RNA degradation. The HigB/HigA and SplT/SplA TA pairs of plasmid origin were highly prevalent in clinical multidrug-resistant A. baumannii isolates from Lithuanian hospitals belonging to the international clonal lineages known as European clone I (ECI) and ECII. PMID:23667234

  18. Effects of silver nanoparticles in combination with antibiotics on the resistant bacteria Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Wan, Guoqing; Ruan, Lingao; Yin, Yu; Yang, Tian; Ge, Mei; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii resistance to carbapenem antibiotics is a serious clinical challenge. As a newly developed technology, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) show some excellent characteristics compared to older treatments, and are a candidate for combating A. baumannii infection. However, its mechanism of action remains unclear. In this study, we combined AgNPs with antibiotics to treat carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii (aba1604). Our results showed that single AgNPs completely inhibited A. baumannii growth at 2.5 μg/mL. AgNP treatment also showed synergistic effects with the antibiotics polymixin B and rifampicin, and an additive effect with tigecyline. In vivo, we found that AgNPs-antibiotic combinations led to better survival ratios in A. baumannii-infected mouse peritonitis models than that by single drug treatment. Finally, we employed different antisense RNA-targeted Escherichia coli strains to elucidate the synergistic mechanism involved in bacterial responses to AgNPs and antibiotics. PMID:27574420

  19. Identification and characterization of a glycosyltransferase involved in Acinetobacter baumannii lipopolysaccharide core biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Luke, Nicole R; Sauberan, Shauna L; Russo, Thomas A; Beanan, Janet M; Olson, Ruth; Loehfelm, Thomas W; Cox, Andrew D; St Michael, Frank; Vinogradov, Evgeny V; Campagnari, Anthony A

    2010-05-01

    Although Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a significant cause of nosocomial infections worldwide, there have been few investigations describing the factors important for A. baumannii persistence and pathogenesis. This paper describes the first reported identification of a glycosyltransferase, LpsB, involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis in A. baumannii. Mutational, structural, and complementation analyses indicated that LpsB is a core oligosaccharide glycosyl transferase. Using a genetic approach, lpsB was compared with the lpsB homologues of several A. baumannii strains. These analyses indicated that LpsB is highly conserved among A. baumannii isolates. Furthermore, we developed a monoclonal antibody, monoclonal antibody 13C11, which reacts to an LPS core epitope expressed by approximately one-third of the A. baumannii clinical isolates evaluated to date. Previous studies describing the heterogeneity of A. baumannii LPS were limited primarily to structural analyses; therefore, studies evaluating the correlation between these surface glycolipids and pathogenesis were warranted. Our data from an evaluation of LpsB mutant 307::TN17, which expresses a deeply truncated LPS glycoform consisting of only two 3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acid residues and lipid A, suggest that A. baumannii LPS is important for resistance to normal human serum and confers a competitive advantage for survival in vivo. These results have important implications for the role of LPS in A. baumannii infections. PMID:20194587

  20. Effects of silver nanoparticles in combination with antibiotics on the resistant bacteria Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Guoqing; Ruan, Lingao; Yin, Yu; Yang, Tian; Ge, Mei; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii resistance to carbapenem antibiotics is a serious clinical challenge. As a newly developed technology, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) show some excellent characteristics compared to older treatments, and are a candidate for combating A. baumannii infection. However, its mechanism of action remains unclear. In this study, we combined AgNPs with antibiotics to treat carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii (aba1604). Our results showed that single AgNPs completely inhibited A. baumannii growth at 2.5 μg/mL. AgNP treatment also showed synergistic effects with the antibiotics polymixin B and rifampicin, and an additive effect with tigecyline. In vivo, we found that AgNPs–antibiotic combinations led to better survival ratios in A. baumannii-infected mouse peritonitis models than that by single drug treatment. Finally, we employed different antisense RNA-targeted Escherichia coli strains to elucidate the synergistic mechanism involved in bacterial responses to AgNPs and antibiotics. PMID:27574420

  1. The induction and identification of novel Colistin resistance mutations in Acinetobacter baumannii and their implications.

    PubMed

    Thi Khanh Nhu, Nguyen; Riordan, David W; Do Hoang Nhu, Tran; Thanh, Duy Pham; Thwaites, Guy; Huong Lan, Nguyen Phu; Wren, Brendan W; Baker, Stephen; Stabler, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a significant cause of opportunistic hospital acquired infection and has been identified as an important emerging infection due to its high levels of antimicrobial resistance. Multidrug resistant A. baumannii has risen rapidly in Vietnam, where colistin is becoming the drug of last resort for many infections. In this study we generated spontaneous colistin resistant progeny (up to >256 μg/μl) from four colistin susceptible Vietnamese isolates and one susceptible reference strain (MIC <1.5 μg/μl). Whole genome sequencing was used to identify single nucleotide mutations that could be attributed to the reduced colistin susceptibility. We identified six lpxACD and three pmrB mutations, the majority of which were novel. In addition, we identified further mutations in six A. baumannii genes (vacJ, pldA, ttg2C, pheS and conserved hypothetical protein) that we hypothesise have a role in reduced colistin susceptibility. This study has identified additional mutations that may be associated with colistin resistance through novel resistance mechanisms. Our work further demonstrates how rapidly A. baumannii can generate resistance to a last resort antimicrobial and highlights the need for improved surveillance to identified A. baumannii with an extensive drug resistance profile. PMID:27329501

  2. Characterization of the anaerobic denitrification bacterium Acinetobacter sp. SZ28 and its application for groundwater treatment.

    PubMed

    Su, Jun feng; Zheng, Sheng Chen; Huang, Ting lin; Ma, Fang; Shao, Si Cheng; Yang, Shao Fei; Zhang, Li na

    2015-09-01

    Acinetobacter sp. SZ28 exhibited efficient autotrophic denitrification ability using Mn(2+) as an electron donor. Sequence amplification identified the presence of the nirS gene. Meteorological chromatography analysis showed that N2 was produced as an end product. Response surface methodology experiments showed that the maximum removal of nitrate occurred under the following conditions: Mn(2+) concentration of 143.56 mg/L, C/N ratio of 6.82, initial pH of 5.17, and temperature of 34.26 °C, where the initial Mn(2+) concentration produced the largest effect. In the groundwater experiment, nitrate levels decreased from 1.63 mg/L to 0 mg/L. Three-dimensional fluorescence analysis showed a decrease in the peak intensity of the original humus. Humus and the small-molecule amino acid tryptophan were detected. These results demonstrated that strain SZ28 is a suitable candidate for the simultaneous removal of nitrogen and Mn(2+) in groundwater treatment. PMID:26094190

  3. DNA microarray for genotyping antibiotic resistance determinants in Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Dally, Simon; Lemuth, Karin; Kaase, Martin; Rupp, Steffen; Knabbe, Cornelius; Weile, Jan

    2013-10-01

    In recent decades, Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as an organism of great concern due to its ability to accumulate antibiotic resistance. In order to improve the diagnosis of resistance determinants in A. baumannii in terms of lead time and accuracy, we developed a microarray that can be used to detect 91 target sequences associated with antibiotic resistance within 4 h from bacterial culture to result. The array was validated with 60 multidrug-resistant strains of A. baumannii in a blinded, prospective study. The results were compared to phenotype results determined by the automated susceptibility testing system VITEK2. Antibiotics considered were piperacillin-tazobactam, ceftazidime, imipenem, meropenem, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, amikacin, gentamicin, tobramycin, ciprofloxacin, and tigecycline. The average positive predictive value, negative predictive value, sensitivity, and specificity were 98, 98, 99, and 94%, respectively. For carbapenemase genes, the array results were compared to singleplex PCR results provided by the German National Reference Center for Gram-Negative Pathogens, and results were in complete concordance. The presented array is able to detect all relevant resistance determinants of A. baumannii in parallel. The short handling time of 4 h from culture to result helps to provide fast results in order to initiate adequate anti-infective therapy for critically ill patients. Another application would be data acquisition for epidemiologic surveillance. PMID:23856783

  4. [In vitro activity of tigecycline against multiple resistant Acinetobacter baumannii and carbapenem resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates].

    PubMed

    Arikan Akan, Ozay; Uysal, Sevil

    2008-04-01

    In order to detect the in vitro activity of tigecycline against multiple resistant gram-negative bacilli isolated in our hospital, tigecycline susceptibilities of clinical isolates of multiple and/or panresistant 100 Acinetobacter baumannii isolates, and 38 carbapenem resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (17 of which were panresistant), obtained between January 2005 and August 2007, were evaluated by using E-test (AB Biodisc, Sweden). Carbapenem resistance rate was found to be 59% for A.baumannii, using Vitek2 Compact System (Bio-Merieux, France) which is present in our laboratory for routine use. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) levels for tigecycline were < or =2 mcg/ml in 93% of the isolates while the MIC level was 3 mcg/ml for 7% of the isolates. Tigecycline MIC50 and MIC 90 values were 1.5 and 2 mcg/ml, respectively. Among K. pneumoniae the least resistance was detected against amikacin (52.6% resistant) while tigecycline MIC levels were between 0.13 mcg/ml and 2 mcg/ml. All of the K.pneumoniae strains were susceptible to tigecycline, and the MIC50 ve MIC90 values of these isolates were 1 mcg/ml and 1.5 mcg/ml, respectively. The in vitro susceptibility rates of tigecycline against multiple and/or panresistant A. baumannii and K. pneumoniae isolates are found to be promising for use in therapy. PMID:18697418

  5. Molecular Methods for Identification of Acinetobacter Species by Partial Sequencing of the rpoB and 16S rRNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi, Azar Dokht; Shahraki, Abdolrazagh Hashemi; Heidarieh, Parvin; Sheikhi, Nasrin

    2015-01-01

    Background Acinetobacter spp. is a diverse group of Gram-negative bacteria which are ubiquitous in soil and water, and an important cause of nosocomial infections. The purpose of this study was to identify a collection of Acinetobacter spp. clinical isolates accurately and to investigate their antibiotic susceptibility patterns. Materials and Methods A total of 197 non-duplicate clinical isolates of Acinetobacter spp. isolates identified using conventional biochemical tests. The molecular technique of PCR-RFLP and sequence analysis of rpoB and 16S rRNA genes was applied for species identification. Antimicrobial susceptibility test was performed with a disk diffusion assay. Results Based on 16S rRNA and rpoB genes analysis separately, most of clinical isolates can be identified with high bootstrap values. However, the identity of the isolate 555T was uncertain due to high similarity of A. grimontii and A. junii. Identification by concatenation of 16S rRNA and rpoB confirmed the identity of clinical isolates of Acenitobacer to species level confidently. Accordingly, the isolate 555T assigned as A. grimontii due to 100% similarity to A. grimontii. Moreover, this isolate showed 98.64% to A. junii. Besides, the identity of the isolates 218T and 364T was confirmed as Genomic species 3 and A. calcoaceticus respectively. So, the majority of Acinetobacter spp. isolates, were identified as: A. baumannii (131 isolates, 66%), A. calcoaceticus (9 isolates, 4.5%), and A. genomosp 16 (8 isolates, 4%). The rest of identified species showed the lower frequencies. In susceptibility test, 105 isolates (53%), presented high antibiotic resistance of 90% to ceftriaxone, piperacillin, piperacillin tazobactam, amikacin, and 81% to ciprofloxacin. Conclusion Sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA and rpoB spacer simultaneously was able to do identification of Acinetobacter spp. to species level. A.baumannii was identified as the most prevalent species with high antibiotic resistance. Other

  6. Antimicrobial susceptibility profiling and genomic diversity of Acinetobacter baumannii isolates: A study in western Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mohajeri, Parviz; Farahani, Abbas; Feizabadi, Mohammad Mehdi; Ketabi, Hosnieh; Abiri, Ramin; Najafi, Farid

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objective Acinetobacter baumannii is an aerobic non-motile Gram-negative bacterial pathogen that is resistant to most antibiotics. Carbapenems are the most common antibiotics for the treatment of infections caused by this pathogen. Mechanisms of antibiotic-resistance in A. baumannii are mainly mediated by efflux pumps-lactamases. The aim of this study was to determine antibiotic susceptibility, the possibility of existence of OXAs genes and fingerprinting by Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) among clinical isolates of Acinetobacter collected from Kermanshah hospitals. Materials and Methods One hundred and four isolates were collected from patients attending Imam Reza, Taleghani and Imam Khomeini hospitals of Kermanshah (Iran). Isolates were identified by biochemical tests and API 20NE kit. The susceptibility to different antibiotics was assessed with Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. PCR was performed for detection of bla OXA-23, bla OXA-24, bla OXA-51 and bla OXA-58 beta-lactamase genes. Clonal relatedness was estimated by PFGE (with the restriction enzyme Apa I) and DNA patterns were analyzed by Gel compare II 6.5 software. Results All isolates showed high-level of resistance to imipenem, meropenem as well as to other antimicrobial agents, while no resistance to polymyxin B, colistin, tigecylcine and minocycline was observed. The bla OXA-23like and bla OXA-24 like were found among 77.9% and 19.2% of the isolates, respectively. All isolates were positive for bla OXA-51, but none produced any amplicon for bla OXA-58. PFGE genotype analysis suggested the existence of eight clones among the 104 strains [A (n = 35), B (n = 29), C (n = 19), D (n = 10), E (n = 4), F (n = 3), G (n = 3), H (n = 1)]. Clone A was the dominant clone in hospital settings particularly infection wards so that the isolates in this group, compared to the other clones, showed higher levels of resistance to antibiotics. Conclusion The bla OXA-51-like and bla OXA-23like were

  7. Paradoxical Effect of Polymyxin B: High Drug Exposure Amplifies Resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Brian T; Landersdorfer, Cornelia B; Lenhard, Justin R; Cheah, Soon-Ee; Thamlikitkul, Visanu; Rao, Gauri G; Holden, Patricia N; Forrest, Alan; Bulitta, Jürgen B; Nation, Roger L; Li, Jian

    2016-07-01

    Administering polymyxin antibiotics in a traditional fashion may be ineffective against Gram-negative ESKAPE (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species) pathogens. Here, we explored increasing the dose intensity of polymyxin B against two strains of Acinetobacter baumannii in the hollow-fiber infection model. The following dosage regimens were simulated for polymyxin B (t1/2 = 8 h): non-loading dose (1.43 mg/kg of body weight every 12 h [q12h]), loading dose (2.22 mg/kg q12h for 1 dose and then 1.43 mg/kg q12h), front-loading dose (3.33 mg/kg q12h for 1 dose followed by 1.43 mg/kg q12h), burst (5.53 mg/kg for 1 dose), and supraburst (18.4 mg/kg for 1 dose). Against both A. baumannii isolates, a rapid initial decline in the total population was observed within the first 6 h of polymyxin exposure, whereby greater polymyxin B exposure resulted in greater maximal killing of -1.25, -1.43, -2.84, -2.84, and -3.40 log10 CFU/ml within the first 6 h. Unexpectedly, we observed a paradoxical effect whereby higher polymyxin B exposures dramatically increased resistant subpopulations that grew on agar containing up to 10 mg/liter of polymyxin B over 336 h. High drug exposure also proliferated polymyxin-dependent growth. A cost-benefit pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationship between 24-h killing and 336-h resistance was explored. The intersecting point, where the benefit of bacterial killing was equal to the cost of resistance, was an fAUC0-24 (area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h for the free, unbound fraction of drug) of 38.5 mg · h/liter for polymyxin B. Increasing the dose intensity of polymyxin B resulted in amplification of resistance, highlighting the need to utilize polymyxins as part of a combination against high-bacterial-density A. baumannii infections. PMID:27067330

  8. Breath analysis for noninvasively differentiating Acinetobacter baumannii ventilator-associated pneumonia from its respiratory tract colonization of ventilated patients.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jianping; Zou, Yingchang; Wang, Yonggang; Wang, Feng; Lang, Lang; Wang, Ping; Zhou, Yong; Ying, Kejing

    2016-01-01

    A number of multiresistant pathogens including Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) place a heavy burden on ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) patients in intensive care units (ICU). It is critically important to differentiate between bacterial infection and colonization to avoid prescribing unnecessary antibiotics. Quantitative culture of lower respiratory tract (LRT) specimens, however, requires invasive procedures. Nowadays, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have been studied in vitro and in vivo to identify pathogen-derived biomarkers. Therefore, an exploratory pilot study was conceived for a proof of concept that the appearance and level of A. baumannii-derived metabolites might be correlated with the presence of the pathogen and its ecological niche (i.e. the infection and colonization states) in ICU ventilated patients. Twenty patients with A. baumannii VAP (infection group), 20 ventilated patients with LRT A. baumannii colonization (colonization group) and 20 ventilated patients with neurological disorders, but without pneumonia or A. baumannii colonization (control group) were enrolled in the in vivo pilot study. A clinical isolate of A. baumannii strains was used for the in vitro culture experiment. The adsorptive preconcentration (solid-phase microextraction fiber and Tenax(®) TA) and analysis technique of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were applied in the studies. Breath profiles could be visually differentiated between A. baumannii cultivation in vitro and culture medium, and among in vivo groups. In the in vitro experiment, nine compounds of interest (2,5-dimethyl-pyrazine, 1-undecene, isopentyl 3-methylbutanoate, decanal, 1,3-naphthalenediol, longifolene, tetradecane, iminodibenzyl and 3-methyl-indene) in the headspace were found to be possible A. baumannii derivations. While there were eight target VOCs (1-undecene, nonanal, decanal, 2,6,10-trimethyl-dodecane, 5-methyl-5-propyl-nonane, longifolene, tetradecane and 2-butyl-1-octanol

  9. Homologs of the Acinetobacter baumannii AceI Transporter Represent a New Family of Bacterial Multidrug Efflux Systems

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qi; Henderson, Peter J. F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Multidrug efflux systems are a major cause of resistance to antimicrobials in bacteria, including those pathogenic to humans, animals, and plants. These proteins are ubiquitous in these pathogens, and five families of bacterial multidrug efflux systems have been identified to date. By using transcriptomic and biochemical analyses, we recently identified the novel AceI (Acinetobacter chlorhexidine efflux) protein from Acinetobacter baumannii that conferred resistance to the biocide chlorhexidine, via an active efflux mechanism. Proteins homologous to AceI are encoded in the genomes of many other bacterial species and are particularly prominent within proteobacterial lineages. In this study, we expressed 23 homologs of AceI and examined their resistance and/or transport profiles. MIC analyses demonstrated that, like AceI, many of the homologs conferred resistance to chlorhexidine. Many of the AceI homologs conferred resistance to additional biocides, including benzalkonium, dequalinium, proflavine, and acriflavine. We conducted fluorimetric transport assays using the AceI homolog from Vibrio parahaemolyticus and confirmed that resistance to both proflavine and acriflavine was mediated by an active efflux mechanism. These results show that this group of AceI homologs represent a new family of bacterial multidrug efflux pumps, which we have designated the proteobacterial antimicrobial compound efflux (PACE) family of transport proteins. PMID:25670776

  10. Investigation of the molecular epidemiology of Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from patients and environmental contamination.

    PubMed

    Ying, Chunmei; Li, Yongli; Wang, Yaping; Zheng, Bing; Yang, Chengde

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate correlations between Acinetobacter baumannii isolates from neurosurgical intensive care unit patients and its environment. This is a prospective, observational study. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of antimicrobial agents against 27 clinical and 28 environmental isolates were determined by the agar dilution method. Molecular genotyping was performed by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR (ERIC-PCR), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). The presence of carbapenemase and metallo-β-lactamase genes were analyzed by specific PCRs and DNA sequencing. From the clinical A. baumannii isolates, 25.9% were found resistant to minocycline, 51.9% to cefoperazone-sulbactam, 59.3% to imipenem and 70% resistant to other antimicrobial agents. Environmental isolates were more sensitive compared with clinical isolates (P<0.05). Twenty-seven clinical isolates comprised three ERIC-PCR genotypes, four major PFGE pulsotypes and five distinct MLST sequence types (STs) (ST208, ST368, ST191, ST195, ST540), all belonging to CC92 with only one locus (gpi) difference among them. Twenty-eight environmental isolates showed more diverse genetic types than clinical isolates and comprised six ERIC-PCR groups, nine PFGE groups and two main STs (ST208, ST229). Four clinical and 15 environmental isolates could not be identified by MLST and were assigned to non-clonal STs. We identified the presence of the blaOXA-23 carbapenemase encoding gene in most of the clinical (21/27) but fewer in the environmental isolates (3/28). The A. baumannii strains isolated from patients were genetically similar to the environmental strains, with CC92 members as the major fraction but with different antibiotic susceptibilities. PMID:25873322

  11. Immunization against Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Effectively Protects Mice in both Pneumonia and Sepsis Models

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weiwei; Yao, Yufeng; Long, Qiong; Yang, Xu; Sun, Wenjia; Liu, Cunbao; Jin, Xiaomei; li, Yang; Chu, Xiaojie; Chen, Bin; Ma, Yanbing

    2014-01-01

    Objective Acinetobacter baumannii is considered the prototypical example of a multi- or pan- drug-resistant bacterium. It has been increasingly implicated as a major cause of nosocomial and community-associated infections. This study proposed to evaluate the efficacy of immunological approaches to prevent and treat A. baumannii infections. Methods Mice were immunized with outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) prepared from a clinically isolated multidrug-resistant strain of A. baumannii. Pneumonia and sepsis models were used to evaluate the efficacy of active and passive immunization with OMVs. The probable effective mechanisms and the protective potential of clonally distinct clinical isolates were investigated in vitro using an opsonophagocytic assay. Results Intramuscular immunization with OMVs rapidly produced high levels of OMV-specific IgG antibodies, and subsequent intranasal challenge with A. baumannii elicited mucosal IgA and IgG responses. Both active and passive immunization protected the mice from challenges with homologue bacteria in a sepsis model. Bacterial burden in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF), lung, and spleen, inflammatory cell infiltration in BALF and lung, and inflammatory cytokine accumulation in BALF was significantly suppressed in the pneumonia model by both active and passive immunization strategies. The antisera from immunized mice presented with significant opsonophagocytic activities in a dose-dependent manner against not only homologous strains but also five of the other six clonally distinct clinical isolates. Conclusions Utilizing immunological characteristics of outer membrane proteins to elevate protective immunity and circumvent complex multidrug-resistance mechanisms might be a viable approach to effectively control A. baumannii infections. PMID:24956279

  12. Deciphering the Function of the Outer Membrane Protein OprD Homologue of Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Catel-Ferreira, Manuella; Nehmé, Rony; Molle, Virginie; Aranda, Jesús; Bouffartigues, Emeline; Chevalier, Sylvie; Bou, Germán; Jouenne, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    The increasing number of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolates is a major cause for concern which restricts therapeutic options to treat severe infections caused by this emerging pathogen. To identify the molecular mechanisms involved in carbapenem resistance, we studied the contribution of an outer membrane protein homologue of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa OprD porin. Suspected to be the preferred pathway of carbapenems in A. baumannii, the oprD homologue gene was inactivated in strain ATCC 17978. Comparison of wild-type and mutant strains did not confirm the expected increased resistance to any antibiotic tested. OprD homologue sequence analysis revealed that this protein actually belongs to an OprD subgroup but is closer to the P. aeruginosa OprQ protein, with which it could share some functions, e.g., allowing bacterial survival under low-iron or -magnesium growth conditions or under poor oxygenation. We thus overexpressed and purified a recombinant OprD homologue protein to further examine its functional properties. As a specific channel, this porin presented rather low single-channel conductance, i.e., 28 pS in 1 M KCl, and was partially closed by micro- and millimolar concentrations of Fe3+ and Mg2+, respectively, but not by imipenem and meropenem or basic amino acids. The A. baumannii OprD homologue is likely not involved in the carbapenem resistance mechanism, but as an OprQ-like protein, it could contribute to the adaptation of this bacterium to magnesium- and/or iron-depleted environments. PMID:22564848

  13. Clinical epidemiology and resistance mechanisms of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii, French Guiana, 2008-2014.

    PubMed

    Mahamat, Aba; Bertrand, Xavier; Moreau, Brigitte; Hommel, Didier; Couppie, Pierre; Simonnet, Christine; Kallel, Hatem; Demar, Magalie; Djossou, Felix; Nacher, Mathieu

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated the clinical epidemiology and resistance mechanisms of Acinetobacter baumannii and characterised the clonal diversity of carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii (CRAB) during an ICU-associated outbreak at Cayenne Hospital, French Guiana. All non-duplicate A. baumannii isolates from 2008 to 2014 were tested for antibiotic susceptibility by disk diffusion. Multilocus sequence typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and characterisation of carbapenemase-encoding genes were performed on CRAB. Of the 441 A. baumannii isolates, most were from males (54.0%) and were detected mainly from the ICU (30.8%) and medicine wards (21.8%). In the ICU, strains were mainly isolated from the respiratory tract (44.1%) and bloodstream (14.0%), whereas in medicine wards they mainly were from wound/drainage (36.5%) and bloodstream (25.0%). A. baumannii showed the greatest susceptibility to piperacillin/tazobactam (92.7%), imipenem (92.5%), colistin (95.6%) and amikacin (97.2%), being lower in the ICU and medicine wards compared with other wards. An outbreak of OXA-23-producing CRAB occurred in the 13-bed ICU in 2010. CRAB strains were more co-resistant to other antimicrobials compared with non-CRAB. Molecular genetics analysis revealed five sequence types [ST78, ST107 and ST642 and two new STs (ST830 and ST831)]. Analysis of PFGE profiles indicated cross-transmissions of CRAB within the ICU, between the ICU and one medicine ward during transfer of patients, and within that medicine ward. This study provides the first clinical and molecular data of A. baumannii from French Guiana and the Amazon basin. The ICU was the highest risk unit of this nosocomial outbreak of OXA-23-producing CRAB, which could subsequently disseminate within the hospital. PMID:27236843

  14. In Vivo Selection of Pan-Drug Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii during Antibiotic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoonjung; Bae, Il Kwon; Yong, Dongeun; Lee, Kyungwon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Colistin resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) is mediated by a complete loss of lipopolysaccharide production via mutations in lpxA, lpxC, and lpxD gene or lipid A modifications via mutations in the pmrA and pmrB genes. However, the exact mechanism of therapy-induced colistin resistance in A. baumannii is not well understood. Materials and Methods We investigated the genotypic and phenotypic changes that underlie pan-drug resistance mechanisms by determining differences between the alterations in extensively drug-resistant (XDR) A. baumannii (AB001 and AB002) isolates and a pan-drug resistant (PDR) counterpart (AB003) recovered from one patient before and after antibiotic treatment, respectively. Results All three clinical isolates shared an identical sequence type (ST138), belonging to the global epidemic clone, clonal complex 92, and all produced OXA-23 carbapenemase. The PDR AB003 showed two genetic differences, acquisition of armA gene and an amino acid substitution (Glu229Asp) in pmrB gene, relative to XDR isolates. No mutations were detected in the pmrA, pmrC, lpxA, lpxC, or lpxD genes in all three isolates. In matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight analysis, the three isolates commonly showed two major peaks at 1728 m/z and 1912 m/z, but peaks at 2034 m/z, 2157 m/z, 2261 m/z, and 2384 m/z were detected only in the PDR A. baumannii AB003 isolate. Conclusion Our results show that changes in lipid A structure via a mutation in the pmrB gene and acquisition of armA gene might confer resistance to colistin and aminoglycosides to XDR A. baumannii strains, resulting in appearance of a PDR A. baumannii strain of ST138. PMID:26069113

  15. Characteristics of antibiotic resistance and sequence type of Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates in Japan and the antibacterial activity of DS-8587.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Saito; Shikata, Mototsugu; Chiba, Megumi; Hoshino, Kazuki; Gotoh, Naomasa

    2014-04-01

    DS-8587 is a novel broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone with extended antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens. In this study, we evaluated the antibacterial activity and mechanism of DS-8587 in 31 quinolone-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates. Efflux pump and qnr genes, mutations in quinolone resistance-determining regions of target enzymes, and sequence types determined by multilocus sequence typing were analyzed. Forty-two quinolone-susceptible clinical isolates were analyzed for comparison. For susceptibility testing, DS-8587 exhibited more effective antibacterial activity when compared with ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin. When combined with the efflux pump inhibitor 1-(1-napthylmethyl)-piperazine, the MIC of DS-8587 was less affected when compared with the MIC exhibited by combined ciprofloxacin and 1-(1-napthylmethyl)-piperazine. The efflux pump genes adeA/adeB/adeC and regulatory elements adeR/adeS were detected in 23 of 31 quinolone-resistant isolates. The qnrA/qnrB/qnrS genes were not detected in any A. baumannii isolates analyzed. Mutations in quinolone resistance-determining regions were observed in all 31 quinolone-resistant isolates. Multilocus sequence typing analyses revealed that 22 of 31 quinolone-resistant isolates belonged to ST-2, corresponding to international clonal lineage II. In conclusion, DS-8587 exhibits potent antibacterial activity against quinolone-resistant A. baumannii isolates that harbor mutations in quinolone resistance-determining regions. In the presence of the efflux pump inhibitor 1-(1-napthylmethyl)-piperazine, no significant changes were observed in the MIC for DS-8587. DS-8587 should be considered as a treatment option for A. baumannii including ST-2 strains that are predominant among the quinolone-resistant A. baumannii isolates found in Japan. PMID:24709045

  16. Prevalence of PER and VEB Type Extended Spectrum Betalactamases among Multidrug Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Isolates in North-West of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Farajnia, Safar; Azhari, Fatemeh; Alikhani, Mohammad Yousef; Hosseini, Mohammad Kazem; Peymani, Amir; Sohrabi, Nasrolah

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): Drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii have emerged as a major problem in many hospitals and intensive care units. Various types of extended spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) are responsible for resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics in different parts of the world. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of integron class1 (INT 1) and ESBL types PER-1, PER-2 and VEB-1 among A. baumannii strains isolated from Tabriz, North-West of Iran. Material and Methods: A total of 100 A. baumannii isolates collected from different clinical samples were included in the study. Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles were determined using the Kirby Bauer disk diffusion method. Production of ESBL was investigated by testing resistance against ceftazidime, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone and verified by Double Disk Synergy Test. DNA was extracted from the isolates and the frequency of INT 1 and ESBL types PER-1, PER-2 and VEB-1 were determined by PCR using specific primers. Results: Among 100 A. baumannii isolates screened, 80 isolates were multidrug-resistant and 70 isolates were positive for ESBL production. PCR screening revealed that 74 % of the isolates contained class 1 integron, 51% were positive for PER-1 gene, 10% positive for VEB1 whereas none of the isolates were positive for PER2 type gene. Conclusion: This is the first report of ESBL types VEB and PER in A. baumannii from North West of Iran. The results of this study demonstrated high prevalence of PER-1 and VEB-1 type ESBLs among A. baumannii isolates in the study region and reminded the necessity of appropriate infection control strategy to prevent further spread of infection by these organisms. PMID:23997900

  17. Lytic Myophage Abp53 Encodes Several Proteins Similar to Those Encoded by Host Acinetobacter baumannii and Phage phiKO2 ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chia-Ni; Tseng, Tsai-Tien; Lin, Juey-Wen; Fu, Yung-Chieh; Weng, Shu-Fen; Tseng, Yi-Hsiung

    2011-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen causing nosocomial infections. The emergence of multiple-drug-resistant A. baumannii isolates has increased in recent years. Directed toward phage therapy, a lytic phage of A. baumannii, designated Abp53, was isolated from a sputum sample in this study. Abp53 has an isometric head and a contractile tail with tail fibers (belonging to Myoviridae), a latent period of about 10 min, and a burst size of approximately 150 PFU per infected cell. Abp53 could completely lyse 27% of the A. baumannii isolates tested, which were all multiple drug resistant, but not other bacteria. Mg2+ enhanced the adsorption and productivity of, and host lysis by, Abp53. Twenty Abp53 virion proteins were visualized in SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, with a 47-kDa protein being the predicted major capsid protein. Abp53 has a double-stranded DNA genome of 95 kb. Sequence analyses of a 10-kb region revealed 8 open reading frames. Five of the encoded proteins, including 3 tail components and 2 hypothetical proteins, were similar to proteins encoded by A. baumannii strain ACICU. ORF1176 (one of the tail components, 1,176 amino acids [aa]), which is also similar to tail protein gp21 of Klebsiella phage phiKO2, contained repeated domains similar to those within the ACICU_02717 protein of A. baumannii ACICU and gp21. These findings suggest a common ancestry and horizontal gene transfer during evolution. As phages can expand the host range by domain duplication in tail fiber proteins, repeated domains in ORF1176 might have a similar significance in Abp53. PMID:21821767

  18. Antibiotic-Resistant Escherichia coli Bacteria, Including Strains with Genes Encoding the Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase and QnrS, in Waterbirds on the Baltic Sea Coast of Poland▿

    PubMed Central

    Literak, Ivan; Dolejska, Monika; Janoszowska, Dagmar; Hrusakova, Jolana; Meissner, Wlodzimierz; Rzyska, Hanna; Bzoma, Szymon; Cizek, Alois

    2010-01-01

    Individual cloacal swabs of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) and of herring gulls (Larus argentatus), as well as samples of waterbird feces obtained in 2008 and 2009, were cultivated for Escherichia coli. Isolates of E. coli were tested for susceptibilities to 12 antimicrobial agents by the disk diffusion method. Moreover, the samples were subcultivated on MacConkey agar (MCA) containing cefotaxime (2 mg liter−1) to detect E. coli with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) and subsequently on MCA supplemented with ciprofloxacin (0.05 mg liter−1) and MCA with nalidixic acid (20 mg liter−1) to isolate fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli. PCR was used to detect specific antibiotic resistance genes. We found 9 E. coli isolates producing ESBL with bla genes: blaCTX-M-1 (6 isolates), blaCTX-M-9 plus blaTEM-1b (1 isolate), blaCTX-M-15 plus blaOXA-1 (1 isolate), and blaSHV-12 (1 isolate). In the isolate with blaCTX-M-15, the gene aac(6)-Ib-cr was also detected. The bla genes were harbored by transferable plasmids of the IncN and IncI1 groups. Nine quinolone-resistant E. coli isolates with qnrS genes were found and characterized. The gene qnrS was associated with a Tn3-like transposon on the IncX1 plasmid together with blaTEM-1 in two isolates. The gene qnrS was also harbored by conjugative plasmids of the IncN and IncX2 groups. Even if populations of wild birds are not directly influenced by antibiotic practice, we have demonstrated that antibiotic-resistant E. coli strains, including strains with various ESBL and qnrS genes, are found in the feces of wild birds on the coast of the Baltic Sea in Poland. PMID:20952638

  19. Antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli bacteria, including strains with genes encoding the extended-spectrum beta-lactamase and QnrS, in waterbirds on the Baltic Sea Coast of Poland.

    PubMed

    Literak, Ivan; Dolejska, Monika; Janoszowska, Dagmar; Hrusakova, Jolana; Meissner, Wlodzimierz; Rzyska, Hanna; Bzoma, Szymon; Cizek, Alois

    2010-12-01

    Individual cloacal swabs of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) and of herring gulls (Larus argentatus), as well as samples of waterbird feces obtained in 2008 and 2009, were cultivated for Escherichia coli. Isolates of E. coli were tested for susceptibilities to 12 antimicrobial agents by the disk diffusion method. Moreover, the samples were subcultivated on MacConkey agar (MCA) containing cefotaxime (2 mg liter(-1)) to detect E. coli with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) and subsequently on MCA supplemented with ciprofloxacin (0.05 mg liter(-1)) and MCA with nalidixic acid (20 mg liter(-1)) to isolate fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli. PCR was used to detect specific antibiotic resistance genes. We found 9 E. coli isolates producing ESBL with bla genes: bla(CTX-M-1) (6 isolates), bla(CTX-M-9) plus bla(TEM-1b) (1 isolate), bla(CTX-M-15) plus bla(OXA-1) (1 isolate), and bla(SHV-12) (1 isolate). In the isolate with bla(CTX-M-15), the gene aac(6)-Ib-cr was also detected. The bla genes were harbored by transferable plasmids of the IncN and IncI1 groups. Nine quinolone-resistant E. coli isolates with qnrS genes were found and characterized. The gene qnrS was associated with a Tn3-like transposon on the IncX1 plasmid together with bla(TEM-1) in two isolates. The gene qnrS was also harbored by conjugative plasmids of the IncN and IncX2 groups. Even if populations of wild birds are not directly influenced by antibiotic practice, we have demonstrated that antibiotic-resistant E. coli strains, including strains with various ESBL and qnrS genes, are found in the feces of wild birds on the coast of the Baltic Sea in Poland. PMID:20952638

  20. The influence of carbon sources on the expression of the recA gene and genotoxicity detection by an Acinetobacter bioreporter.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Song, Yizhi; Zhang, Dayi; Huang, Wei E; Zhang, Xu; Li, Guanghe

    2015-04-01

    Bacterial whole-cell bioreporters are practical and reliable analytical tools to assess the toxicity and bioavailability of environmental contaminants, yet evidence has shown that their performance could be affected by different carbon sources. This paper evaluated the influence of carbon sources on the recA gene (ACIAD1385) in a DNA damage-inducible recA::luxCDABE Acinetobacter bioreporter and optimized the induction conditions for its practical application in environmental monitoring. Different carbon sources, including LB, potassium acetate (MMA), sodium citrate (MMC), sodium pyruvate (MMP), and sodium succinate (MMS), significantly influenced (p < 0.05) the bioluminescence intensity of the genotoxicity bioreporter. A reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) showed the different expression levels of the DNA damage-inducible gene recA (p < 0.05), suggesting that carbon sources influenced the DNA damage response in the Acinetobacter bioreporter at the transcriptional level. Additionally, proteomic analysis identified 122 proteins that were differentially expressed after exposure to mitomycin C in defined media and LB, and 5 of them were related to the DNA damage response, indicating the effects of carbon sources on the DNA damage response in Acinetobacter at the translational level. The repression effect caused by the rich medium, LB, was possibly related to the mechanism of carbon catabolite repression. Our results suggest that the practical application of Acinetobacter bioreporters to the genotoxicity assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soils could be significantly improved by using a standard medium of defined composition, as this could increase their sensitivity. PMID:25764502

  1. Contamination of Ambient Air with Acinetobacter baumannii on Consecutive Inpatient Days.

    PubMed

    Shimose, Luis A; Doi, Yohei; Bonomo, Robert A; De Pascale, Dennise; Viau, Roberto A; Cleary, Timothy; Namias, Nicholas; Kett, Daniel H; Munoz-Price, L Silvia

    2015-07-01

    Acinetobacter-positive patients had their ambient air tested for up to 10 consecutive days. The air was Acinetobacter positive for an average of 21% of the days; the rate of contamination was higher among patients colonized in the rectum than in the airways (relative risk [RR], 2.35; P = 0.006). Of the 6 air/clinical isolate pairs available, 4 pairs were closely related according to rep-PCR results. PMID:25926496

  2. Update on the Epidemiology, Treatment, and Outcomes of Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter infections

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Uh Jin; Kim, Hee Kyung; An, Joon Hwan; Cho, Soo Kyung; Park, Kyung-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter species are increasingly recognized as major nosocomial pathogens, especially in patients with critical illnesses or in intensive care. The ability of these organisms to accumulate diverse mechanisms of resistance limits the available therapeutic agents, makes the infection difficult to treat, and is associated with a greater risk of death. In this review, we provide an update on the epidemiology, resistance mechanisms, infection control measures, treatment, and outcomes of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter infections. PMID:25229014

  3. Acinetobacter baumannii Infection in Prior ICU Bed Occupants Is an Independent Risk Factor for Subsequent Cases of Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Tsakiridou, Eirini; Makris, Demosthenes; Daniil, Zoe; Manoulakas, Efstratios; Chatzipantazi, Vasiliki; Vlachos, Odysseas; Xidopoulos, Grigorios; Charalampidou, Olympia; Zakynthinos, Epaminondas

    2014-01-01

    Objective. We aimed to evaluate risk factors for ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) due to Acinetobacter baumannii (AbVAP) in critically ill patients. Methods. This was a prospective observational study conducted in an intensive care unit (ICU) of a district hospital (6 beds). Consecutive patients were eligible for enrolment if they required mechanical ventilation for >48 hours and hospitalization for >72 hours. Clinical, microbiological, and laboratory parameters were assessed as risk factors for AbVAP by univariate and multivariate analysis. Results. 193 patients were included in the study. Overall, VAP incidence was 23.8% and AbVAP, 11.4%. Previous hospitalization of another patient with Acinetobacter baumannii infection was the only independent risk factor for AbVAP (OR (95% CI) 12.016 (2.282–19.521) P < 0.001). ICU stay (25 ± 17 versus 12 ± 9  P < 0.001), the incidence of other infections (OR (95% CI) 9.485 (1.640–10.466) P = 0.002) (urinary tract infection, catheter related infection, and bacteremia), or sepsis (OR (95% CI) 10.400 (3.749–10.466) P < 0.001) were significantly increased in patients with AbVAP compared to patients without VAP; no difference was found with respect to ICU mortality. Conclusion. ICU admission or the hospitalization of patients infected by Acinetobacter baumannii increases the risk of AbVAP by subsequent patients. PMID:25101265

  4. Stress responses in the opportunistic pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Fiester, Steven E; Actis, Luis A

    2013-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii causes a wide range of severe infections among compromised and injured patients worldwide. The relevance of these infections are, in part, due to the ability of this pathogen to sense and react to environmental and host stress signals, allowing it to persist and disseminate in medical settings and the human host. This review summarizes current knowledge on the roles that environmental and cellular stressors play in the ability of A. baumannii to resist nutrient deprivation, oxidative and nitrosative injury, and even the presence of the commonly used antiseptic ethanol, which could serve as a nutrient- and virulence-enhancing signal rather than just being a convenient disinfectant. Emerging experimental evidence supports the role of some of these responses in the pathogenesis of the infections A. baumannii causes in humans and its capacity to resist antibiotics and host response effectors. PMID:23464372

  5. Acinetobacter baumannii Infection and IL-17 Mediated Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Zihe; Yang, Junjun; Hu, Renjing; Hu, Xichi; Chen, Kong

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a significant cause of severe hospital-acquired infections with a recent rise in multidrug-resistant infections involving traumatic wounds of military personnel. The interleukin-17 (IL-17) pathway is essential for neutrophil recruitment in response to a variety of pathogens, while the control of A. baumannii infection is known to be dependent on neutrophils. This suggests that IL-17 may play an important role in A. baumannii infection; however, this has yet to be studied. Here, we summarize the recent advances in understanding the host-pathogen interaction of A. baumannii and propose a potential role of the IL-17 pathway in generating a protective immune response. PMID:26977122

  6. Genetic Determinants of Intrinsic Colistin Tolerance in Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Hood, M. Indriati; Becker, Kyle W.; Roux, Christelle M.; Dunman, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a leading cause of multidrug-resistant infections worldwide. This organism poses a particular challenge due to its ability to acquire resistance to new antibiotics through adaptation or mutation. This study was undertaken to determine the mechanisms governing the adaptability of A. baumannii to the antibiotic colistin. Screening of a transposon mutant library identified over 30 genes involved in inducible colistin resistance in A. baumannii. One of the genes identified was lpsB, which encodes a glycosyltransferase involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) synthesis. We demonstrate that loss of LpsB function results in increased sensitivity to both colistin and cationic antimicrobial peptides of the innate immune system. Moreover, LpsB is critical for pathogenesis in a pulmonary model of infection. Taken together, these data define bacterial processes required for intrinsic colistin tolerance in A. baumannii and underscore the importance of outer membrane structure in both antibiotic resistance and the pathogenesis of A. baumannii. PMID:23230287

  7. Antimicrobial susceptibility of clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Shi, Z Y; Liu, P Y; Lau, Y; Lin, Y; Hu, B S; Shir J-M

    1996-02-01

    The in-vitro activity of 18 antimicrobial agents alone or in combination against 248 clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii from Taiwan were tested by agar dilution. The MIC90S of ampicillin, amoxicillin, piperacillin, cefuroxime, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, gentamicin, and amikacin were at least 128 mu g/ml. Ceftazidime, cefepime, sulbactam, clavulanic acid, and tazobactam presented moderate activity with MIC90S of 32, 16, 16, 32, and 32 mu g/ml, respectively. The increased activity of ampicillin/sulbactam, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, and piperacillin/tazobactam was due to the intrinsic effect of sulbactam, clavulanic acid, and tazobactam, respectively. Imipenem, meropenem, and ciprofloxacin were the most active antimicrobial agents with MIC90S of 1, 1, and 0.5 mu g/ml, respectively. Nineteen isolates (7.7%) were resistant to all aminoglycosides and beta-lactam antibiotics, except carbapenems and ciprofloxacin. We are concerned about the multidrug resistance of A. baumannii in this study. PMID:9147913

  8. A Case of Acinetobacter Septic Pulmonary Embolism in an Infant

    PubMed Central

    Ananthan, Anitha; David, Jane; Ghildiyal, Radha

    2016-01-01

    Case Characteristics. An 11-month-old girl presented with fever and breathlessness for 5 days. Patient had respiratory distress with bilateral coarse crepitations. Chest radiograph revealed diffuse infiltrations in the right lung with thick walled cavities in mid and lower zone. Computed tomography showed multiple cystic spaces and emboli. Blood culture grew Acinetobacter species. Intervention. Patient was treated with Meropenem and Vancomycin. Outcome. Complete clinical and radiological recovery was seen in child. Message. Blood cultures and CT of the chest are invaluable in the evaluation of a patient with suspected septic pulmonary embolism. With early diagnosis and appropriate antimicrobial therapy, complete recovery can be expected in patients with septic pulmonary embolism. PMID:27529040

  9. The Response of Acinetobacter baumannii to Zinc Starvation.

    PubMed

    Nairn, Brittany L; Lonergan, Zachery R; Wang, Jiefei; Braymer, Joseph J; Zhang, Yaofang; Calcutt, M Wade; Lisher, John P; Gilston, Benjamin A; Chazin, Walter J; de Crécy-Lagard, Valerie; Giedroc, David P; Skaar, Eric P

    2016-06-01

    Zinc (Zn) is an essential metal that vertebrates sequester from pathogens to protect against infection. Investigating the opportunistic pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii's response to Zn starvation, we identified a putative Zn metallochaperone, ZigA, which binds Zn and is required for bacterial growth under Zn-limiting conditions and for disseminated infection in mice. ZigA is encoded adjacent to the histidine (His) utilization (Hut) system. The His ammonia-lyase HutH binds Zn very tightly only in the presence of high His and makes Zn bioavailable through His catabolism. The released Zn enables A. baumannii to combat host-imposed Zn starvation. These results demonstrate that A. baumannii employs several mechanisms to ensure bioavailability of Zn during infection, with ZigA functioning predominately during Zn starvation, but HutH operating in both Zn-deplete and -replete conditions to mobilize a labile His-Zn pool. PMID:27281572

  10. Contribution of Efflux Pumps, Porins, and β-Lactamases to Multidrug Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Rumbo, C.; Gato, E.; López, M.; Ruiz de Alegría, C.; Fernández-Cuenca, F.; Martínez-Martínez, L.; Vila, J.; Pachón, J.; Cisneros, J. M.; Rodríguez-Baño, J.; Pascual, A.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the mechanisms of resistance to carbapenems, aminoglycosides, glycylcyclines, tetracyclines, and quinolones in 90 multiresistant clinical strains of Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from two genetically unrelated A. baumannii clones: clone PFGE-ROC-1 (53 strains producing the OXA-58 β-lactamase enzyme and 18 strains with the OXA-24 β-lactamase) and clone PFGE-HUI-1 (19 strains susceptible to carbapenems). We used real-time reverse transcriptase PCR to correlate antimicrobial resistance (MICs) with expression of genes encoding chromosomal β-lactamases (AmpC and OXA-51), porins (OmpA, CarO, Omp33, Dcap-like, OprB, Omp25, OprC, OprD, and OmpW), and proteins integral to six efflux systems (AdeABC, AdeIJK, AdeFGH, CraA, AbeM, and AmvA). Overexpression of the AdeABC system (level of expression relative to that by A. baumannii ATCC 17978, 30- to 45-fold) was significantly associated with resistance to tigecycline, minocycline, and gentamicin and other biological functions. However, hyperexpression of the AdeIJK efflux pump (level of expression relative to that by A. baumannii ATCC 17978, 8- to 10-fold) was significantly associated only with resistance to tigecycline and minocycline (to which the TetB efflux system also contributed). TetB and TetA(39) efflux pumps were detected in clinical strains and were associated with resistance to tetracyclines and doxycycline. The absence of the AdeABC system and the lack of expression of other mechanisms suggest that tigecycline-resistant strains of the PFGE-HUI-1 clone may be associated with a novel resistance-nodulation-cell efflux pump (decreased MICs in the presence of the inhibitor Phe-Arg β-naphthylamide dihydrochloride) and the TetA(39) system. PMID:23939894

  11. In vitro Comparison of Anti-Biofilm Effects against Carbapenem-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii: Imipenem, Colistin, Tigecycline, Rifampicin and Combinations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Multi-drug resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as one of the most important nosocomial pathogens. In addition to the diverse resistance mechanisms, some A. baumannii strains are known to have biofilm-producing capacity, thereby decreasing antibiotic effectiveness. Materials and Methods This study was designed to assess biofilm-producing capacity of three different MDR A. baumannii strains with diverse resistance mechanisms (OXA-51, IMP-1 and VIM-2 type β-lactamases), and intended to compare the effect of each antibiotic regimen (rifampicin, colistin, imipenem, tigecycline, rifampicin-imipenem and rifampicin-colistin) on mature A. baumannii biofilms using in vitro polystyrene plate biofilm assay. Results Among three MDR A. baumannii strains, only VIM-2 strain produced strong biofilm compared to the controls (optical density, 8.04 ± 2.16 vs. 0.49 ± 0.26). Regarding VIM-2 strains, none of imipenem, colistin and rifampicin reduced biofilm formation alone at MIC of each antibiotic agent (inhibition of biofilm synthesis, less than 30%). In comparison, tigecyclin (0.76 ± 0.23), imipenem-rifampicin (1.07 ± 0.31) and colistin-rifampicin (1.47 ± 0.54) showed a significant inhibition of biofilm synthesis compared to the positive controls at 48 hours after incubation (P<0.01). Tigecycline inhibited biofilm formation even at the one fourth level of MIC (1.17 ± 0.21). Likewise, both imipenem and colistin were also effective even with the reduced concentrations when those were combined with rifampicin. Such biofilm-inhibiting effects with those antibiotic regimens sustained up to 96 hours after incubation. Conclusion Tigecycline, imipenem-rifampicin and colistin-rifampicin would be effective for the prevention or reduction of biofilm formation caused by A. baumannii strains. PMID:25844260

  12. Contribution of efflux pumps, porins, and β-lactamases to multidrug resistance in clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Rumbo, C; Gato, E; López, M; Ruiz de Alegría, C; Fernández-Cuenca, F; Martínez-Martínez, L; Vila, J; Pachón, J; Cisneros, J M; Rodríguez-Baño, J; Pascual, A; Bou, G; Tomás, M

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the mechanisms of resistance to carbapenems, aminoglycosides, glycylcyclines, tetracyclines, and quinolones in 90 multiresistant clinical strains of Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from two genetically unrelated A. baumannii clones: clone PFGE-ROC-1 (53 strains producing the OXA-58 β-lactamase enzyme and 18 strains with the OXA-24 β-lactamase) and clone PFGE-HUI-1 (19 strains susceptible to carbapenems). We used real-time reverse transcriptase PCR to correlate antimicrobial resistance (MICs) with expression of genes encoding chromosomal β-lactamases (AmpC and OXA-51), porins (OmpA, CarO, Omp33, Dcap-like, OprB, Omp25, OprC, OprD, and OmpW), and proteins integral to six efflux systems (AdeABC, AdeIJK, AdeFGH, CraA, AbeM, and AmvA). Overexpression of the AdeABC system (level of expression relative to that by A. baumannii ATCC 17978, 30- to 45-fold) was significantly associated with resistance to tigecycline, minocycline, and gentamicin and other biological functions. However, hyperexpression of the AdeIJK efflux pump (level of expression relative to that by A. baumannii ATCC 17978, 8- to 10-fold) was significantly associated only with resistance to tigecycline and minocycline (to which the TetB efflux system also contributed). TetB and TetA(39) efflux pumps were detected in clinical strains and were associated with resistance to tetracyclines and doxycycline. The absence of the AdeABC system and the lack of expression of other mechanisms suggest that tigecycline-resistant strains of the PFGE-HUI-1 clone may be associated with a novel resistance-nodulation-cell efflux pump (decreased MICs in the presence of the inhibitor Phe-Arg β-naphthylamide dihydrochloride) and the TetA(39) system. PMID:23939894

  13. Biodegradation of medium chain hydrocarbons by Acinetobacter venetianus 2AW immobilized to hair-based adsorbent mats.

    PubMed

    Luckarift, Heather R; Sizemore, Susan R; Farrington, Karen E; Fulmer, Preston A; Biffinger, Justin C; Nadeau, Lloyd J; Johnson, Glenn R

    2011-01-01

    The natural attenuation of hydrocarbons can be hindered by their rapid dispersion in the environment and limited contact with bacteria capable of oxidizing hydrocarbons. A functionalized composite material is described herein, that combines in situ immobilized alkane-degrading bacteria with an adsorbent material that collects hydrocarbon substrates, and facilitates biodegradation by the immobilized bacterial population. Acinetobacter venetianus 2AW was isolated for its ability to utilize hydrophobic n-alkanes (C10-C18) as the sole carbon and energy source. Growth of strain 2AW also resulted in the production of a biosurfactant that aided in the dispersion of complex mixtures of hydrophobic compounds. Effective immobilization of strain 2AW to the surface of Ottimat™ adsorbent hair mats via vapor phase deposition of silica provided a stable and reproducible biocatalyst population that facilitates in situ biodegradation of n-alkanes. Silica-immobilized strain 2AW demonstrated ca. 85% removal of 1% (v/v) tetradecane and hexadecane within 24 h, under continuous flow conditions. The methodology for immobilizing whole bacterial cells at the surface of an adsorbent, for in situ degradation of hydrocarbons, has practical application in the bioremediation of oil in water emulsions. Published 2011 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol Prog., 2011. PMID:21948333

  14. Evaluation of Virulence Gene Expression Patterns in Acinetobacter baumannii Using Quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction Array.

    PubMed

    Lannan, Ford M; O'conor, Daniel K; Broderick, Joseph C; Tate, Jamison F; Scoggin, Jacob T; Moran, Nicholas A; Husson, Christopher M; Hegeman, Erik M; Ogrydziak, Cole E; Singh, Sneha A; Vafides, Andrew G; Brinkley, Carl C; Goodin, Jeremy L

    2016-09-01

    According to the Centers for Disease Control's recently devised National Strategy for Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria, Acinetobacter baumannii is a "serious" threat level pathogen. A. baumannii's notoriety stems from the fact that a large number of modern strains are multidrug resistant and persist in the hospital setting, thus causing numerous deaths per year. It is imperative that research focus on a more fundamental understanding of the factors responsible for the success of A. baumannii. Toward this end, our group investigated virulence gene expression patterns in a recently characterized wound isolate, AB5075, using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction array. Notably, several genes showed statistically significant upregulation at 37°C compared to 25°C; MviM, Wbbj, CarO, and certain genes of the Bas, Bar, and Csu operons. Additionally, we found that in vitro biofilm formation by Csu transposon insertion mutant strains is attenuated. These findings validate previous reports that suggest a link between the Csu operon and biofilm formation. More importantly, our results demonstrate a successful method for evaluating the significance of previously identified virulence factors in a modern and clinically relevant strain of A. baumannii, thereby providing a path toward a more fundamental understanding of the pathogenicity of A. baumannii. PMID:27612361

  15. Decolorization and biodegradation of the Congo red by Acinetobacter baumannii YNWH 226 and its polymer production's flocculation and dewatering potential.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruijing; Ning, Xun-an; Sun, Jian; Wang, Yujie; Liang, Jieying; Lin, Meiqing; Zhang, Yaping

    2015-10-01

    The strain Acinetobacter baumannii YNWH 226 was utilized to degrade Congo red (CR) under aerobic conditions. CR was employed as the sole carbon source to produce extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) used as potent bioflocculants in this strain. A total of 98.62% CR was removed during the 48-h decoloration experiments using CR (100 mg/L). A total of 83% bioadsorption and 65% biodegradation were responsible for the decoloration and degradation of CR through the strain. The bioflocculant showed high flocculation activity and dewaterability on textile dyeing sludge. A maximum flocculation of 78.62% with a minimum SBF of 3.07×10(9) s(2)/g and a CST of 58.4 s were achieved. We investigated the internal relationship between the decolorization efficiency of YNWH 226 and the flocculation activity and dewatering capacity of its EPS. The components and structure of the EPS highly influenced the decolorization efficiency of CR and the flocculation activity and dewatering capacity on sludge. PMID:26207869

  16. Epidemiological Monitoring of Nosocomial Infections Caused by Acinetobacter Baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Custovic, Amer; Smajlovic, Jasmina; Tihic, Nijaz; Hadzic, Sadeta; Ahmetagic, Sead; Hadzagic, Haris

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Acinetobacter baumannii is a frequent cause of infections in hospitals around the world, which is very difficult to control and treat. It is particularly prevalent in intensive care wards. Aim: The main objective of the research was to establish the application of epidemiological monitoring of nosocomial infections (NIs) caused by A. baumannii in order to determine: the type and distribution of NIs, and to investigate antimicrobial drug resistance of A. baumannii. Material and Methods: 855 patients treated at the Clinic of Anesthesiology and Reanimation, University Clinical Center Tuzla during 2013 were followed prospectively for the development of NIs. Infections caused by A. baumannii were characterized by the anatomical site and antibiotics resistance profile. Results: NIs were registered in 105 patients (12.3%; 855/105). The predominant cause of infection was A. baumannii with an incidence of 51.4% (54/105), followed by ESBL-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae with 15.2% (16/105) of cases, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus with 8.6% (9/105), and ESBL-producing Proteus mirabilis with 7.6% (8/105). According to the anatomical site, and type of NIs caused by A. baumannii, the most frequent were respiratory infections (74.1%; 40/54). Infections of surgical sites were registered in 11.1% (6/54) of cases, while bloodstream infections in 9.2% (5/54). A. baumannii isolates tested resistant against most antibiotics examined, but showed a high degree of susceptibility to tobramycin (87%; 47/54) and colistin (100%; 54/54). Conclusion: The increasing incidence of multi- and extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter spp. emphasizes the importance of administration of an adequate antibiotic strategy and the implementation of strict monitoring of the measures for controlling nosocomial infections. PMID:25648217

  17. RT-PCR and statistical analyses of adeABC expression in clinical isolates of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex.

    PubMed

    Ruzin, Alexey; Immermann, Frederick W; Bradford, Patricia A

    2010-06-01

    The relationship between expression of adeABC and minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of tigecycline was investigated by RT-PCR and statistical analyses in a population of 106 clinical isolates (MIC range, 0.0313-16 microg/ml) of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex. There was a statistically significant linear relationship (p < 0.0001) between log-transformed expression values and log-transformed MIC values, indicating that overexpression of AdeABC efflux pump is a prevalent mechanism for decreased susceptibility to tigecycline in A. calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex. PMID:20438348

  18. Mutations Decreasing Intrinsic β-Lactam Resistance Are Linked to Cell Division in the Nosocomial Pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Knight, Daniel; Dimitrova, Daniela D; Rudin, Susan D; Bonomo, Robert A; Rather, Philip N

    2016-06-01

    Transposon mutagenesis was used to identify novel determinants of intrinsic β-lactam resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii An EZ-Tn5 transposon insertion in a gene corresponding to the A1S_0225 sequence resulted in a 4-fold decrease in resistance to ampicillin, cefotaxime, imipenem, and ceftriaxone but did not alter resistance to other classes of antibiotics. Based on this phenotype, the gene was designated blhA (β-lactam hypersusceptibility). The blhA::EZ-Tn5 mutation conferred a similar phenotype in A. baumannii strain ATCC 17978. The wild-type blhA gene complemented the blhA::EZTn5 insertion and restored β-lactam resistance levels back to wild-type le