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Sample records for acl injury prevention

  1. Understanding and preventing acl injuries: current biomechanical and epidemiologic considerations - update 2010.

    PubMed

    Hewett, Timothy E; Ford, Kevin R; Hoogenboom, Barbara J; Myer, Gregory D

    2010-12-01

    This invited clinical commentary summarizes the current state of knowledge in the area of prevention of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. ACL injuries occur with a four to six fold greater incidence in female compared to male athletes playing the same high risk sports. The combination of increased risk of ACL injury and a 10-fold increase in sports participation since the enactment of Title IX in 1972 has led to an almost epidemic rise in ACL injuries in female athletes. Examination of the mechanisms responsible for this sex disparity in ACL rupture accelerated in the last two decades. A summary of these findings and a synthesis and framework for understanding the results of the intense investigation of this research are detailed herein. This clinical commentary focuses on the current understanding, identification and interventional targeting of the primary neuromuscular and biomechanical risk factors associated with the ACL injury mechanism in high-risk individuals.

  2. Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries KidsHealth > For Teens > Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) ... and Recovery Coping With an ACL Injury About ACL Injuries A torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is ...

  3. ACL Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional Info Sugar and Sugar Substitutes Exercise and Fitness Exercise Basics Sports Safety Injury ... Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional Info Sugar and Sugar Substitutes Exercise and Fitness Exercise Basics Sports Safety Injury ...

  4. ACL injury in football: a literature overview of the prevention programs

    PubMed Central

    Bisciotti, Gian Nicola; Chamari, Karim; Cena, Emanuele; Carimati, Giulia; Volpi, Piero

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background The ACL prevention programs are addressed to the control and/or modification of the so-called “modifiable risk factors”. All these programs focus on different intervention strategies aimed to decrease the ACL injury risk, particularly in female athletes population. Purpose To furnish an overview of the most used ACL injury prevention program through a narrative review. Conclusion In literature there are many reports on prevention programs whose common denominator is the proper alignment of the lower limb joints and proper motor control during movements that are considered at risk for ACL integrity, as the landing phase after a jump. Nevertheless, some programs would appear more effective than others. In any cases a major problem remains the lack of sufficient compliance in respect of prevention programs. Finally, it is important to remember that the ethiology of ACL injuries is multifactorial. For this reason a prevention program able to prevent all the risk situations is utopian. Study design Narrative review. PMID:28217569

  5. Sagittal Plane Knee Biomechanics and Vertical Ground Reaction Forces Are Modified Following ACL Injury Prevention Programs

    PubMed Central

    Padua, Darin A.; DiStefano, Lindsay J.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) occur because of excessive loading on the knee. ACL injury prevention programs can influence sagittal plane ACL loading factors and vertical ground reaction force (VGRF). Objective: To determine the influence of ACL injury prevention programs on sagittal plane knee biomechanics (anterior tibial shear force, knee flexion angle/moments) and VGRF. Data Sources: The PubMed database was searched for studies published between January 1988 and June 2008. Reference lists of selected articles were also reviewed. Study Selection: Studies were included that evaluated healthy participants for knee flexion angle, sagittal plane knee kinetics, or VGRF after performing a multisession training program. Two individuals reviewed all articles and determined which articles met the selection criteria. Approximately 4% of the articles fulfilled the selection criteria. Data Extraction: Data were extracted regarding each program’s duration, frequency, exercise type, population, supervision, and testing procedures. Means and variability measures were recorded to calculate effect sizes. One reviewer extracted all data and assessed study quality using PEDro (Physiotherapy Evidence Database). A second reviewer (blinded) verified all information. Results: There is moderate evidence to indicate that knee flexion angle, external knee flexion moment, and VGRF can be successfully modified by an ACL injury prevention program. Programs utilizing multiple exercises (ie, integrated training) appear to produce the most improvement, in comparison to that of single-exercise programs. Knee flexion angle was improved following integrated training (combined balance and strength exercises or combined plyometric and strength exercises). Similarly, external knee flexion moment was improved following integrated training consisting of balance, plyometric, and strength exercises. VGRF was improved when incorporating supervision with instruction and

  6. Preventing ACL Injuries in Females: What Physical Educators Need to Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toscano, Lisa; Carroll, Brianne

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries happen at a frequent rate, especially in girls and women. While there are many factors that contribute to ACL tears, teaching proper landing techniques and strengthening certain muscles can decrease the incidence of ACL tears, especially in women. This article reviews some of the high-risk factors that…

  7. Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... what the surgeon advises. previous continue Rehab and Recovery Recovery from ACL surgery can take from 6 months ... frequent therapy, but they won't necessarily speed recovery. In the early stages of recovery, a doctor ...

  8. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... proper techniques when playing sports or exercising. Some college sports programs teach athletes how to reduce stress placed on the ACL. The use of knee braces during vigorous athletic activity ( ...

  9. New perspectives on ACL injury: On the role of repetitive sub-maximal knee loading in causing ACL fatigue failure.

    PubMed

    Wojtys, Edward M; Beaulieu, Mélanie L; Ashton-Miller, James A

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we review a series of studies that we initiated to examine mechanisms of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in the hope that these injuries, and their sequelae, can be better prevented. First, using the earliest in vitro model of a simulated single-leg jump landing or pivot cut with realistic knee loading rates and trans-knee muscle forces, we identified the worst-case dynamic knee loading that causes the greatest peak ACL strain: Combined knee compression, flexion, and internal tibial rotation. We also identified morphologic factors that help explain individual susceptibility to ACL injury. Second, using the above knee loading, we introduced a possible paradigm shift in ACL research by demonstrating that the human ACL can fail by a sudden rupture in response to repeated sub-maximal knee loading. If that load is repeated often enough over a short time interval, the failure tended to occur proximally, as observed clinically. Third, we emphasize the value of a physical exam of the hip by demonstrating how limited internal axial rotation at the hip both increases the susceptibility to ACL injury in professional athletes, and also increases peak ACL strain during simulated pivot landings, thereby further increasing the risk of ACL fatigue failure. When training at-risk athletes, particularly females with their smaller ACL cross-sections, rationing the number and intensity of worst-case knee loading cycles, such that ligament degradation is within the ACL's ability to remodel, should decrease the risk for ACL rupture due to ligament fatigue failure.© 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:2059-2068, 2016.

  10. A prospective investigation of biomechanical risk factors for patellofemoral pain syndrome. The joint undertaking to monitor and prevent ACL injury (JUMP-ACL) cohort

    PubMed Central

    Boling, Michelle C.; Padua, Darin A; Marshall, Stephen W.; Guskiewicz, Kevin; Pyne, Scott; Beutler, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Background Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is one of the most common chronic knee injuries; however, little research has been done to determine the risk factors for this injury. Hypothesis Altered lower extremity kinematics and kinetics, decreased strength, and altered postural measurements will be risk factors. Study Design Prospective cohort. Methods 1597 participants were enrolled in this investigation and prospectively followed from the date of their enrollment (July 2005, July 2006, or July 2007) through January 2008. Each participant underwent baseline data collection during their pre-freshman summer at the United States Naval Academy. Baseline data collection included three-dimensional motion analysis during a jump-landing task, six lower extremity isometric strength tests, and postural alignment measurements (navicular drop and Q-angle). Participants were prospectively followed from their date of enrollment to January 2008 (maximum of 2.5 years of follow up). Results Risk factors for the development of PFPS included decreased knee flexion angle, decreased vertical ground reaction force, and increased hip internal rotation angle during the jump-landing task. Additionally, decreased quadriceps and hamstring strength, increased hip external rotator strength, and increased navicular drop were risk factors for the development of PFPS. Conclusions Multiple modifiable risk factors for PFPS pain have been identified in this investigation. In order to decrease the incidence of this chronic injury, the risk factors for PFPS need to be targeted in injury prevention programs. Clinical Relevance Prevention programs should focus on increasing strength of the lower extremity musculature along with instructing proper mechanics during dynamic movements in order to decrease the incidence of PFPS. PMID:19797162

  11. Reducing the Risk of ACL Injury in Female Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Larry W.; Rasche, Adrienna; Gaudet, Laura; Jackson, Allen

    2010-01-01

    The Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) is located behind the kneecap (patella) and connects the thigh bone (femur) to the shin bone (tibia). Stabilizing the knee joint is the primary responsibility of the ACL. Injuries that affect the ACL are three to five times more common in females than males. This is a result of anatomical, biomechanical,…

  12. Developing a 6-DOF robot to investigate multi-axis ACL injuries under valgus loading coupled with tibia internal rotation.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yupeng; Jacobs, Benjamin J; Nuber, Gordon W; Koh, Jason L; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2010-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries have become more common in recent years as more young people participate in risky sporting activities [1]. Most ACL injuries occur as a result of noncontact mechanisms. Previous in vitro studies of ACL strain have found significant increases in ACL strain primarily with anterior directed force on the tibia relative to the femur and with internal rotation and often with valgus torque [2,3]. However, there remains significant controversy over the mechanisms of ACL failure and the forces on the knee that lead to injury. Some studies have also shown that isolated valgus loading may not load the ACL strongly. The goal of this study was to investigate the mechanism underlying valgus-related ACL injuries. An improved understanding of ACL failure may lead to improved ACL injury prevention programs. A novel 6 degrees of freedom (DOF) knee driving robot was developed in this study with a unique multi-axis simultaneous torque/position control. It was found that pure valgus torque caused a torque that internally rotated the tibia and thus increased ACL strain markedly, which may be an important mechanism underlying the rather common seemingly valgus-related ACL injuries.

  13. Gender Dimorphic ACL Strain In Response to Combined Dynamic 3D Knee Joint Loading: Implications for ACL Injury Risk

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Kiyonori; Andrish, Jack T.; van den Bogert, Antonie J.; McLean, Scott G.

    2009-01-01

    While gender-based differences in knee joint anatomies/laxities are well documented, the potential for them to precipitate gender-dimorphic ACL loading and resultant injury risk has not been considered. To this end, we generated gender-specific models of ACL strain as a function of any six degrees of freedom (6DOF) knee joint load state via a combined cadaveric and analytical approach. Continuously varying joint forces and torques were applied to five male and five female cadaveric specimens and recorded along with synchronous knee flexion and ACL strain data. All data (~10,000 samples) were submitted to specimen-specific regression analyses, affording ACL strain predictions as a function of the combined 6 DOF knee loads. Following individual model verifications, generalized gender-specific models were generated and subjected to 6 DOF external load scenarios consistent with both a clinical examination and a dynamic sports maneuver. The ensuing model-based strain predictions were subsequently examined for gender-based discrepancies. Male and female specimen specific models predicted ACL strain within 0.51% ± 0.10% and 0.52% ± 0.07% of the measured data respectively, and explained more than 75% of the associated variance in each case. Predicted female ACL strains were also significantly larger than respective male values for both of simulated 6 DOF load scenarios. Outcomes suggest that the female ACL will rupture in response to comparatively smaller external load applications. Future work must address the underlying anatomical/laxity contributions to knee joint mechanical and resultant ACL loading, ultimately affording prevention strategies that may cater to individual joint vulnerabilities. PMID:19464897

  14. Non-contact ACL injuries in female athletes: an International Olympic Committee current concepts statement.

    PubMed

    Renstrom, P; Ljungqvist, A; Arendt, E; Beynnon, B; Fukubayashi, T; Garrett, W; Georgoulis, T; Hewett, T E; Johnson, R; Krosshaug, T; Mandelbaum, B; Micheli, L; Myklebust, G; Roos, E; Roos, H; Schamasch, P; Shultz, S; Werner, S; Wojtys, E; Engebretsen, L

    2008-06-01

    The incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury remains high in young athletes. Because female athletes have a much higher incidence of ACL injuries in sports such as basketball and team handball than male athletes, the IOC Medical Commission invited a multidisciplinary group of ACL expert clinicians and scientists to (1) review current evidence including data from the new Scandinavian ACL registries; (2) critically evaluate high-quality studies of injury mechanics; (3) consider the key elements of successful prevention programmes; (4) summarise clinical management including surgery and conservative management; and (5) identify areas for further research. Risk factors for female athletes suffering ACL injury include: (1) being in the preovulatory phase of the menstrual cycle compared with the postovulatory phase; (2) having decreased intercondylar notch width on plain radiography; and (3) developing increased knee abduction moment (a valgus intersegmental torque) during impact on landing. Well-designed injury prevention programmes reduce the risk of ACL for athletes, particularly women. These programmes attempt to alter dynamic loading of the tibiofemoral joint through neuromuscular and proprioceptive training. They emphasise proper landing and cutting techniques. This includes landing softly on the forefoot and rolling back to the rearfoot, engaging knee and hip flexion and, where possible, landing on two feet. Players are trained to avoid excessive dynamic valgus of the knee and to focus on the "knee over toe position" when cutting.

  15. An Integrated Approach to Change the Outcome Part II: Targeted Neuromuscular Training Techniques to Reduce Identified ACL Injury Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Myer, Gregory D.; Ford, Kevin R.; Brent, Jensen L.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    Prior reports indicate that female athletes who demonstrate high knee abduction moments (KAMs) during landing are more responsive to neuromuscular training designed to reduce KAM. Identification of female athletes who demonstrate high KAM, which accurately identifies those at risk for noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, may be ideal for targeted neuromuscular training. Specific neuromuscular training targeted to the underlying biomechanical components that increase KAM may provide the most efficient and effective training strategy to reduce noncontact ACL injury risk. The purpose of the current commentary is to provide an integrative approach to identify and target mechanistic underpinnings to increased ACL injury in female athletes. Specific neuromuscular training techniques will be presented that address individual algorithm components related to high knee load landing patterns. If these integrated techniques are employed on a widespread basis, prevention strategies for noncontact ACL injury among young female athletes may prove both more effective and efficient. PMID:22580980

  16. Knee Kinematics During Non-contact ACL Injury as Determined from Bone Bruise Location

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sophia Y.; Spritzer, Charles E.; Utturkar, Gangadhar M.; Toth, Alison P.; Garrett, William E.; DeFrate, Louis E.

    2015-01-01

    tibial translation (22mm), internal tibial rotation (15°), and valgus rotation (5°) in the predicted position of injury relative to the MRI position. Clinical Relevance This study provides novel data characterizing the motions associated with ACL injury, information critical to improving strategies aimed at injury prevention. PMID:26264770

  17. Effect of ski boot rear stiffness (SBRS) on maximal ACL force during injury prone landing movements in alpine ski racing: A study with a musculoskeletal simulation model.

    PubMed

    Eberle, Robert; Heinrich, Dieter; Kaps, Peter; Oberguggenberger, Michael; Nachbauer, Werner

    2017-06-01

    A common anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury situation in alpine ski racing is landing back-weighted after a jump. Simulated back-weighted landing situations showed higher ACL-injury risk for increasing ski boot rear stiffness (SBRS) without considering muscles. It is well known that muscle forces affect ACL tensile forces during landing. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of different SBRS on the maximal ACL tensile forces during injury prone landings considering muscle forces by a two-dimensional musculoskeletal simulation model. Injury prone situations for ACL-injuries were generated by the musculoskeletal simulation model using measured kinematics of a non-injury situation and the method of Monte Carlo simulation. Subsequently, the SBRS was varied for injury prone landings. The maximal ACL tensile forces and contributing factors to the ACL forces were compared for the different SBRS. In the injury prone landings the maximal ACL tensile forces increased with increasing SBRS. It was found that the higher maximal ACL force was caused by higher forces acting on the tibia by the boot and by higher quadriceps muscle forces both due to the higher SBRS. Practical experience suggested that the reduction of SBRS is not accepted by ski racers due to performance reasons. Thus, preventive measures may concentrate on the reduction of the quadriceps muscle force during impact.

  18. Relationship Between Posterior-Inferior Tibial Slope and Bilateral Noncontact ACL Injury.

    PubMed

    Hendrix, Steven T; Barrett, Austin M; Chrea, Bopha; Replogle, William H; Hydrick, Josie M; Barrett, Gene R

    2016-10-18

    Is there a correlation between increased posterior-inferior tibial slope angle and noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury? Does increasing the posterior-inferior tibial slope angle increase the risk of bilateral ACL injury? A computerized relational database (Access 2007; Microsoft Inc, Redmond, Washington) was used to conduct a retrospective review of patients undergoing bilateral or unilateral ACL reconstruction surgery or treatment by a single surgeon between 1995 and 2013. Included in the study were patients with bilateral and unilateral ACL injuries and patellofemoral pain syndrome with no associated ACL deficiency. Exclusion criteria included concomitant ligament injury, previous ACL reconstruction, and previous knee surgery. Also excluded were patients who did not have plain lateral radiographs. Fifty patients were randomly selected from each group. After controlling for age and Tegner activity level, the authors found that the posterior-inferior tibial slope angle was a significant predictor (P=.002) of noncontact ACL injury. Mean posterior-inferior tibial slope angle for the bilateral, unilateral, and control groups was 11.8°±2.3°, 9.3°±2.4°, and 7.5°±2.3°, respectively. In the group with unilateral ACL injury vs the group without ACL deficiency, a 1° increase in posterior-inferior tibial slope angle (P=.03) was associated with a 20% increase in unilateral ACL injury. In those with bilateral ACL injury vs those without ACL deficiency, a 1° increase in posterior-inferior tibial slope angle (P=.001) increased bilateral knee injury by 34%. The difference between the mean angles of the control group without ACL deficiency and both the bilateral injury and unilateral injury cohorts was statistically significant (P=.003). Increased posterior-inferior tibial slope angle is associated with an increased risk of noncontact bilateral and unilateral ACL injury. [Orthopedics. 201x; xx(x):xx-xx.].

  19. Evaluation of the Microsoft Kinect for screening ACL injury.

    PubMed

    Stone, Erik E; Butler, Michael; McRuer, Aaron; Gray, Aaron; Marks, Jeffrey; Skubic, Marjorie

    2013-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the use of the skeletal model generated by the Microsoft Kinect SDK in capturing four biomechanical measures during the Drop Vertical Jump test. These measures, which include: knee valgus motion from initial contact to peak flexion, frontal plane knee angle at initial contact, frontal plane knee angle at peak flexion, and knee-to-ankle separation ratio at peak flexion, have proven to be useful in screening for future knee anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries among female athletes. A marker-based Vicon motion capture system was used for ground truth. Results indicate that the Kinect skeletal model likely has acceptable accuracy for use as part of a screening tool to identify elevated risk for ACL injury.

  20. A Wearable Neuromuscular Device Reduces ACL Injury Risk in Female Soccer Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Michael John; Shaw, Matthew; Maddan, Casey; Campbell, Julie; Davidson, Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Female soccer athletes have a three-fold greater risk of sustaining an ACL injury compared with their male counterparts yet only 1 in 5 teams engage in ACL risk reduction programs due to several participation barriers. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a wearable neuromuscular (WNM) device on postural control, performance and ACL injury risk in female soccer athletes. Methods: Seventy-nine elite youth and collegiate female soccer athletes (age range: 12-25 y) trained with a WNM device that applied bi-lateral, topical pressure to the medial quadriceps and hamstrings muscles (Topical Gear, Austin, TX). The athletes performed 7-9 weeks of pre-season training with the WNM device consisting of strength and conditioning exercises and on-field team practices (46-64 total hours of exposure). Postural control was measured in 15 athletes with and without the WNM device before and after the training program; and performance was measured in 25 athletes without the WNM device before and after the training program. Postural control was determined from a single-leg landing on a force plate from a horizontal distance normalized to leg length. The athletes were instructed to gain their balance as fast as possible upon landing and remain balanced for 5 seconds. The peak ground reaction forces (GRF) and the medial-lateral, anterior-posterior and net center of pressure (COP) velocities and displacement ranges were calculated during 2 seconds of single-leg stance. Performance measures including speed, power and endurance were measured from the 40 yard dash, vertical jump for height and the Beep test, respectively. A two-way repeated measures ANOVA and post-hoc comparisons were used to compare the postural variables; and t-tests were used to compare the performance tests (p=.05). ACL injury rates, the absolute risk reduction (ARR) and the number needed to treat (NNT) to prevent one ACL injury were calculated between the WNM intervention group and 11

  1. ACL injury mechanisms and related factors in male and female carving skiers: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Ruedl, G; Webhofer, M; Linortner, I; Schranz, A; Fink, C; Patterson, C; Nachbauer, W; Burtscher, M

    2011-10-01

    In recreational alpine skiing, ACL injury risk is 3 times greater in females. However, since the introduction of carving skis ACL injury risk seems to have decreased. No study has yet investigated the distribution of ACL injury mechanisms in male and female carving skiers. Therefore, the aim of the study was to investigate potential gender specific differences of ACL injury mechanisms and related factors among carving skiers. In total, 220 recreational carving skiers (59 males and 161 females) suffering from an ACL injury volunteered for this study. Demographic data, skiing ability, equipment related and environmental factors, circumstances and causes for the fall, and type of fall (injury mechanisms) were collected by questionnaire. The forward twisting fall is the most reported ACL injury mechanism in both gender (p=0.672) accounting for 54% of all injuries, although male and female skiers differed significantly with regard to circumstances of fall (p=0.001) and actions when ACL injury occurred (p=0.04). Bindings not releasing at the time point of accident occurred 2.6 times more with females than with males (p=0.005). The forward twisting fall seems to have become the dominant ACL injury mechanism both in male and female recreational skiers since the introduction of carving skis.

  2. The anatomy of the proximal tibia in pediatric and adolescent patients: implications for ACL reconstruction and prevention of physeal arrest.

    PubMed

    Shea, Kevin G; Apel, Peter J; Pfeiffer, Ronald P; Traughber, Paul D

    2007-04-01

    Although the treatment of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears in skeletally immature patients is still controversial, several studies have advocated ACL reconstruction in selected patients to prevent secondary injury. The proximal tibial physis is a structure at risk during ACL reconstruction in young patients, and physeal growth complications have been reported after surgery in this area. The relationship between the ACL and the proximal tibial physeal/apophyseal regions is poorly understood. This study examined the MRI anatomy of the ACL and the proximal tibia apophysis and epiphysis. MRIs of 59 skeletally immature knees were reviewed (Average age = 12.75 years, range 6-15) to define the anatomy of the epiphyseal and apophyseal regions. Measurements were recorded in three parasagittal planes: (1) at the lateral border of the patellar tendon, (2) the lateral edge of the ACL insertion, and (3) the medial edge of the ACL insertion. A single three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) scan was used to evaluate the position of standard drill holes used in ACL reconstruction to assess for potential degree of injury to the epiphyseal and apophyseal growth plates. In the parasagittal planes, the average height of the epiphysis was 19.6, 20.7, and 21.5 mm at the lateral border of the patellar tendon, the lateral border of the ACL, and the medial border of the ACL, respectively. At the level of the same landmarks, the apophysis extended below the physis at an average of 20.2, 16.8, and 7.0 mm, respectively. Expressed as a percentage of epiphysis height this was an average of 104, 82, and 33%, respectively. Examination of 3D CT images revealed that variations in drill hole placement had effects on the volume of injury to the proximal tibial physis and apophysis. Drill holes that started more medial, distal, and with a steeper angle of inclination reduced the amount of physis and apophysis violated when compared with holes placed more lateral, proximal, and with a

  3. Risk Factors and Predictors of Subsequent ACL Injury in either Knee after ACL Reconstruction: Prospective Analysis of 2488 Primary ACL Reconstructions from the MOON Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Kaeding, Christopher C.; Pedroza, Angela D.; Reinke, Emily K.; Huston, Laura J.; Spindler, Kurt P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) re-injury results in worse outcomes and increases risk of post-traumatic osteoarthritis. Objectives To identify the risk factors for both ipsilateral and contralateral ACL tears after primary ACL reconstruction (ACLR). Study Design Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods Data from the Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network (MOON), a prospective longitudinal cohort, were used to identify risk factors for ACL retear. Subjects with primary ACLR, no history of contralateral knee surgery, and a minimum of 2-year follow-up data were included. Age, sex, Marx activity score, graft type, lateral meniscus tear, medial meniscus tear, sport played at index injury, and surgical facility were evaluated to determine their contribution to both ipsilateral retear and contralateral ACL tear. Results A total of 2683 subjects with average age of 27 ± 11 years (1498 men; 56%) met all study inclusion/exclusion criteria. Overall there were 4.4% ipsilateral graft tears and 3.5% contralateral ACL tears. The odds of ipsilateral retear were 5.2 times greater for an allograft (p<0.01) compared with a bone-patellar tendon-bone (BTB) autograft; the odds of retear were not significantly different between BTB autograft and hamstring autograft (p=0.12). The odds of an ipsilateral ACL retear decreased by 0.09 for every yearly increase in age (p<0.01) and increased by 0.11 for every increased point on the Marx score (p< 0.01). The odds were not significantly influenced by sex, smoking status, sport played, medial or lateral meniscus tear, or consortium site (p>0.05). The odds of a contralateral ACL tear decreased by 0.04 for every yearly increase in age (p=0.04) and increased by 0.12 for every increased point on the Marx score (p<0.01); these odds were not significantly different between sex, smoking status, sport played, graft type, medial meniscal tear, and lateral meniscal tear (p>0.05). Conclusions Younger age, higher activity level, and

  4. Reliability of 3-Dimensional Measures of Single-Leg Drop Landing Across 3 Institutions: Implications for Multicenter Research for Secondary ACL-Injury Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Myer, Gregory D.; Bates, Nathaniel A.; DiCesare, Christopher A.; Barber Foss, Kim D.; Thomas, Staci M.; Wordeman, Samuel C.; Sugimoto, Dai; Roewer, Benjamin D.; Medina McKeon, Jennifer M.; Di Stasi, Stephanie L.; Noehren, Brian W.; McNally, Michael; Ford, Kevin R.; Kiefer, Adam W.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2016-01-01

    Context Due to the limitations of single-center studies in achieving appropriate sampling with relatively rare disorders, multicenter collaborations have been proposed to achieve desired sampling levels. However, documented reliability of biomechanical data is necessary for multicenter injury-prevention studies and is currently unavailable. Objective To measure the reliability of 3-dimensional (3D) biomechanical waveforms from kinetic and kinematic variables during a single-leg landing (SLL) performed at 3 separate testing facilities. Design Multicenter reliability study. Setting 3 laboratories. Patients 25 female junior varsity and varsity high school volleyball players who visited each facility over a 1-mo period. Intervention Subjects were instrumented with 43 reflective markers to record 3D motion as they performed SLLs. During the SLL the athlete balanced on 1 leg, dropped down off of a 31-cm-high box, and landed on the same leg. Kinematic and kinetic data from both legs were processed from 2 trials across the 3 laboratories. Main Outcome Measures Coefficients of multiple correlations (CMC) were used to statistically compare each joint angle and moment waveform for the first 500 ms of landing. Results Average CMC for lower-extremity sagittal-plane motion was excellent between laboratories (hip .98, knee .95, ankle .99). Average CMC for lower-extremity frontal-plane motion was also excellent between laboratories (hip .98, knee .80, ankle .93). Kinetic waveforms were repeatable in each plane of rotation (3-center mean CMC ≥.71), while knee sagittal-plane moments were the most consistent measure across sites (3-center mean CMC ≥.94). Conclusions CMC waveform comparisons were similar relative to the joint measured to previously published reports of between-sessions reliability of sagittal- and frontal-plane biomechanics performed at a single institution. Continued research is needed to further standardize technology and methods to help ensure that highly

  5. Association Between Lateral Posterior Tibial Slope, Body Mass Index, and ACL Injury Risk

    PubMed Central

    Bojicic, Katherine M.; Beaulieu, Mélanie L.; Imaizumi Krieger, Daniel Y.; Ashton-Miller, James A.; Wojtys, Edward M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: While body mass index (BMI), a modifiable parameter, and knee morphology, a nonmodifiable parameter, have been identified as risk factors for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture, the interaction between them remains unknown. An understanding of this interaction is important because greater compressive axial force (perhaps due to greater BMI) applied to a knee that is already at an increased risk because of its geometry, such as a steep lateral posterior tibial slope, could further increase the probability of ACL injury. Purpose: To quantify the relationship between BMI and select knee morphological parameters as potential risk factors for ACL injury. Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Sagittal knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) files from 76 ACL-injured and 42 uninjured subjects were gathered from the University of Michigan Health System’s archive. The posterior tibial slope (PTS), middle cartilage slope (MCS), posterior meniscus height (PMH), and posterior meniscus bone angle (MBA) in the lateral compartment were measured using MRI. BMI was calculated from demographic data. The association between the knee structural factors, BMI, and ACL injury risk was explored using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Results: PTS (P = .043) and MCS (P = .037) significantly predicted ACL injury risk. As PTS and MCS increased by 1°, odds of sustaining an ACL injury increased by 12% and 13%, respectively. The multivariate logistic regression analysis, which included PTS, BMI centered around the mean (cBMI), and their interaction, showed that this interaction predicted the odds of ACL rupture (P = .050; odds ratio, 1.03). For every 1-unit increase in BMI from the average that is combined with a 1° increase in PTS, the odds of an ACL tear increased by 15%. Conclusion: An increase in BMI was associated with increased risk of ACL tear in the presence of increased lateral posterior tibial slope. Larger values of PTS or

  6. Biomechanical Deficit Profiles Associated with ACL Injury Risk in Female Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Pappas, Evangelos; Shiyko, Mariya P.; Ford, Kevin R.; Myer, Gregory D.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To quantify the prevalence of biomechanical deficit patterns associated with ACL injury risk and their inter-connections in a large cohort of female athletes during an unanticipated cutting task. Methods High school female athletes (N=721) performed an unanticipated cutting task in the biomechanics laboratory. Trunk and lower extremity 3D kinetics and kinematics were measured and entered into a latent profile analysis model. Results Approximately 40% of female athletes demonstrated no biomechanical deficits and were categorized into the low risk group. The second most prevalent profile (24%) demonstrated a combination of high quadriceps and leg dominance deficits and was labeled as quadriceps-leg. The third most prevalent profile (22%) demonstrated a combination of trunk and leg dominance deficits and to lesser extent ligament dominance deficits, and was labeled as trunk-leg-ligament. Finally, the fourth profile (14%) demonstrated very high ligament dominance deficits only and it was labeled as ligament dominance profile. Conclusions This is the first study to identify the most common biomechanical profiles associated with ACL injury during a cutting task in a large cohort of female athletes. Approximately 60% of female athletes belong to one of the high-risk profiles. With the exception of the ligament dominance profile, the current analysis indicates that risk profiles consist of a combination of biomechanical deficits. The findings provide important insight into the prevalence of biomechanical deficits and future directions for the development of injury prevention programs. The findings can be used to guide the development of quick and easy tests that accurately categorize athletes into one of the profiles and subsequently prescribe tailored injury prevention programs that will be more effective and efficient than the current generic ones. PMID:26258858

  7. Outcome of ACL Reconstruction for Chronic ACL Injury in Knees without the Posterior Horn of the Medial Meniscus: Comparison with ACL Reconstructed Knees with An Intact Medial Meniscus

    PubMed Central

    Syam, Kevin; Chouhan, Devendra K.; Dhillon, Mandeep Singh

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Cadaveric studies have shown that deficiency of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus (PHMM) increases strain on the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft. However, its influence on the clinical and radiological outcome after ACL reconstruction is less discussed and hence evaluated in this study. Materials and Methods This study included 77 cases of ACL reconstruction with a minimum 18-month follow-up. Of the 77 cases, 41 patients with intact menisci were compared clinically and radiologically with 36 patients with an injury to the PHMM that required various grades of meniscectomy. The knees were evaluated using subjective International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score and Orthopadische Arbeitsgruppe Knie (OAK) score. Results Cases with intact menisci showed better stability (p=0.004) at an average of 44.51 months after surgery. No significant differences were noted in the overall OAK score, subjective IKDC score, and functional OAK score (p=0.082, p=0.526, and p=0.363, respectively). The incidence of radiological osteoarthrosis was significantly higher in the posterior horn deficient knees (p=0.022). Conclusions The tendency toward relatively higher objective instability and increased incidence of osteoarthrosis in the group with absent posterior horn reinforces its importance as a secondary stabiliser of the knee. PMID:28231647

  8. Relationship of ACL Injury and Posterior Tibial Slope With Patient Age, Sex, and Race

    PubMed Central

    Waiwaiole, Alana; Gurbani, Ajay; Motamedi, Kambiz; Seeger, Leanne; Sim, Myung Shin; Nwajuaku, Patricia; Hame, Sharon L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Posterior tibial slope (PTS) has been proposed as a potential risk factor for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury; however, studies that have examined this relationship have provided inconclusive and sometimes contradictory results. Further characterization of this relationship may enable the medical community to identify individuals at greater risk for ACL injury and possibly characterize an anatomic target during surgical reconstruction. Purpose: The primary goal was to investigate the relationship between PTS and ACL injury. The secondary goal was to determine whether there are any patient factors, such as age, race, or sex, that correlate with ACL injury and PTS. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Medical records of 221 patients who underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee between January 2003 and December 2009 were reviewed. Patients were separated into 2 groups: a study group of those subjects who had undergone surgery for ACL injury (n = 107) and a control group of patients diagnosed with patellofemoral syndrome (n = 114). Demographic data were collected, and MRI images from both groups were analyzed using imaging software to obtain medial and lateral tibial slope measurements. Data were then analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) comparison and a multivariable regression model to determine which, if any, patient factors were related to probability of having an ACL injury. Results: ANOVA comparison demonstrated that the study group had significantly greater values for lateral PTS (6° ± 4°; P < .001) and medial PTS (7° ± 4°; P = .002) compared with controls (5° ± 3° and 5° ± 4°, respectively). After stepwise elimination of nonsignificant variables, the final multivariable logistic regression model determined that age (odds ratio [OR], 0.94; P < .001) and lateral PTS (OR, 1.12; P = .002) had statistically significant relationships with ACL injury. Medial PTS, race, and sex were not

  9. Preventing Eye Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Eye Injuries Sections Preventing Eye Injuries Recognizing and Treating ... Infographic Five Steps to Safer Champagne Celebrations Preventing Eye Injuries Reviewed by: Brenda Pagan-Duran MD Mar. ...

  10. ACL Reconstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the major ligaments in your knee. ACL injuries most commonly occur during sports that involve sudden stops and changes in direction — such as basketball, soccer, football, tennis, downhill skiing, volleyball and gymnastics. In ...

  11. Neuroscience Application to Noncontact Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Grooms, Dustin R.; Onate, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Many factors, including anatomy, neuromuscular control, hormonal regulation, and genetics, are known to contribute to the noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury risk profile. The neurocognitive and neurophysiological influences on the noncontact ACL injury mechanism have received less attention despite their implications to maintain neuromuscular control. Sex-specific differences in neurocognition may also play a critical role in the elevated female ACL injury risk. This report serves to frame existing literature in a new light to consider neurocognition and its implications for movement control, visual-motor function, and injury susceptibility. Evidence Acquisition: Sources were obtained from PubMed, MEDLINE, Web of Science, and LISTA (EBSCO) databases from 1990 onward and ranged from diverse fields including psychological and neuroscience reviews to injury epidemiology and biomechanical reports. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 5. Results: Neurological factors may contribute to the multifactorial ACL injury risk paradigm and the increased female injury susceptibility. Conclusion: When developing ACL injury prevention programs, considering neurocognition and its role in movement, neuromuscular control, and injury risk may help improve intervention effectiveness. PMID:26608453

  12. Muscle function is associated with future patient-reported outcomes in young adults with ACL injury

    PubMed Central

    Flosadottir, Vala; Roos, Ewa M; Ageberg, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Background/aim Consequences of an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury include worse patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and a decrease in activity level. Muscle function can be improved by targeted exercise. Our aims were to investigate cross-sectional and longitudinal associations among lower extremity muscle function and PROs after ACL injury. Methods Fifty-four participants (15 women, mean 30 years) with ACL injury or reconstruction, from the Knee Anterior Cruciate Ligament, Nonsurgical versus Surgical Treatment (KANON) trial (ISRCTN84752559), were assessed with hop performance, muscle power and postural orientation 3 years (SD 0.85) after ACL injury. PROs at 3 and 5 years after injury included Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) subscales Function in sport and recreation (KOOS Sport/rec) and Knee-related Quality of life (KOOS QoL), KOOS item Q3 (KOOS Q3), Tegner Activity Scale and Activity Rating Scale (ARS). Partial Spearman's rank-order correlation was used to analyse correlations between muscle function and PROs, controlling for gender and treatment. Results Numerous cross-sectional correlations were observed between muscle function and PROs (rsp≈0.3–0.5, p≤0.045). Worse hop performance and worse postural orientation were associated with worse KOOS scores 2 years later (rsp≥0.280, p≤0.045). Worse muscle power was associated with lower future ARS scores (rsp=0.281, p=0.044). Conclusions The moderate associations suggest that improving muscle function during rehabilitation could improve present and future PROs. PMID:27900196

  13. THE EFFECT OF CONSERVATIVELY TREATED ACL INJURY ON KNEE JOINT POSITION Sense

    PubMed Central

    Herrington, Lee

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Proprioception is critical for effective movement patterns. However, methods of proprioceptive measurement in previous research have been inconsistent and lacking in reliability statistics making it applications to clinical practice difficult. Researchers have suggested that damage to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) can alter proprioceptive ability due to a loss of functioning mechanoreceptors. The majority of patients opt for reconstructive surgery following this injury. However, some patients chose conservative rehabilitation options rather than surgical intervention. Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of ACL deficiency on knee joint position sense following conservative, non-operative treatment and return to physical activity. A secondary purpose was to report the reliability and measurement error of the technique used to measure joint position sense, (JPS) and comment on the clinical utility of this measurement. Study Design Observational study design using a cross-section of ACL deficient patients and matched uninjured controls. Methods Twenty active conservatively treated ACL deficient patients who had returned to physical activity and twenty active matched controls were included in the study. Knee joint position sense was measured using a seated passive-active reproductive angle technique. The average absolute angle of error score, between 10 °-30 ° of knee flexion was determined. This error score was derived from the difference between the target and repositioning angle. Results The ACL deficient patients had a greater error score (7.9 °±3.6) and hence poorer static proprioception ability that both the contra-lateral leg (2.0 °±1.6; p = 0.0001) and the control group (2.6 °±0.9; p = 0.0001). The standard error of the mean (SEM) of this JPS technique was 0.5 ° and 0.2 ° and the minimum detectable change (MDC) was 1.3 ° and 0.4 ° on asymptomatic and symptomatic subjects

  14. The Natural History and Tailored Treatment of ACL Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Nick A.; Chew, Hall F.; Stanish, William D.

    2001-01-01

    Bodily responses to an anterior cruciate ligament injury can range from minor to very significant. Understanding factors influencing the course can help physicians determine effective treatment strategies. Certain patterns, such as complete disruption and participation in high-demand sports, highlight the need for an aggressive approach.…

  15. Quantifying Quadriceps Muscle Strength in Patients With ACL Injury, Focal Cartilage Lesions, and Degenerative Meniscus Tears

    PubMed Central

    Eitzen, Ingrid; Grindem, Hege; Nilstad, Agnethe; Moksnes, Håvard; Risberg, May Arna

    2016-01-01

    Background: Reduced quadriceps strength influences knee function and increases the risk of knee osteoarthritis. Thus, it is of significant clinical relevance to precisely quantify strength deficits in patients with knee injuries. Purpose: To evaluate isokinetic concentric quadriceps muscle strength torque values, assessed both from peak torque and at specific knee flexion joint angles, in patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, focal cartilage lesions, and degenerative meniscus tears. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Data were synthesized from patients included in 3 previously conducted research projects: 2 prospective cohort studies and 1 randomized controlled trial. At the time of inclusion, all patients were candidates for surgery. Isokinetic concentric quadriceps muscle strength measurements (60 deg/s) were performed at baseline (preoperative status) and after a period of progressive supervised exercise therapy (length of rehabilitation period: 5 weeks for ACL injury, 12 weeks for cartilage lesions and degenerative meniscus). Outcome measures were peak torque and torque at specific knee flexion joint angles from 20° to 70°. All patients had unilateral injuries, and side-to-side deficits were calculated. For comparisons between and within groups, we utilized 1-way analysis of variance and paired t tests, respectively. Results: In total, 250 patients were included. At baseline, cartilage patients had the most severe deficit (39.7% ± 24.3%; P < .001). Corresponding numbers for ACL and degenerative meniscus subjects were 21.7% (±13.2%) and 20.7% (±16.3%), respectively. At retest, there was significant improvement in all groups (P < .001), with remaining deficits of 24.7% (±18.5%) for cartilage, 16.8% (±13.9%) for ACL, and 3.3% (±17.8%) for degenerative meniscus. Peak torque was consistently measured at 60° of knee flexion, whereas the largest mean deficits were measured at 30° at baseline and 70° at retest for the

  16. Factors influencing the implementation of anterior cruciate ligament injury prevention strategies by girls soccer coaches.

    PubMed

    Joy, Elizabeth A; Taylor, John R; Novak, Melissa A; Chen, Michael; Fink, Barbara P; Porucznik, Christina A

    2013-08-01

    Women are 3 times more likely to injure their anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) while playing soccer than men. ACL injury prevention programs (IPPs) involving stretching and strengthening drills can reduce the incidence of ACL injury when incorporated into routine training. The rate of implementation among coaches is largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the rate of implementation of ACL IPP, to identify factors that influence implementation, and to acquire information to assist in design dissemination and implementation strategies. Study subjects were coaches of woman soccer players aged 11-22 years in Utah (n = 756). Data were gathered using a Web-based survey followed by a qualitative study in which "best practice coaches"-coaches who met criteria for successful implementation of ACL IPP-were interviewed via telephone. A minority of survey respondents, 19.8% (27/136), have implemented ACL IPP. Factors associated with successful implementation include length of coaching experience and presence of additional support staff such as a strength and conditioning coach or athletic trainer. Best practice coaches (14/136) unanimously agreed on the following: (a) there are performance-enhancing benefits of ACL IPP, (b) education on ACL injury prevention should be required for licensure, and (c) dissemination and implementation will require soccer associations to enact policies that require IPPs. In conclusion, a minority of girls soccer coaches have implemented ACL IPP and those that have do so because they believe that prevention improves performance and that soccer organizations should enact policies requiring ACL injury prevention education and implementation. Efforts to implement ACL IPP should be driven by soccer organizations, emphasize performance-enhancing benefits, and engage additional coaching staff.

  17. Prevention of Football Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Kirkendall, Donald T; Junge, Astrid; Dvorak, Jiri

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Every sport has a unique profile of injury and risk of injury. In recent years, there have been numerous attempts at conducting injury prevention trials for specific injuries or for injuries within specific sports to provide evidence useful to the sports medicine and sport community. Football has been a focus of a number of randomized injury prevention trials. Methods MEDLINE was searched with the first order keywords of “injury prevention” and “sport”. This list was restricted to “clinical trial” or “randomized controlled trial” which had been conducted on children and adults whose goal was preventing common football injuries. Our objective was to find studies with an exercise-based training program, thus projects that used mechanical interventions were excluded. Results A structured, generalized warm-up has been shown to be effective at preventing common injuries in football, reducing injuries by about one-third. Conclusion The huge participation numbers in the worldwide family of football would suggest that any reduction in injury should have a public health impact. Professionals in sports medicine need to promote injury prevention programs that have been shown to be effective. PMID:22375195

  18. Prevention of non-contact anterior cruciate ligament injuries in soccer players. Part 2: a review of prevention programs aimed to modify risk factors and to reduce injury rates.

    PubMed

    Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Myer, Gregory D; Silvers, Holly J; Samitier, Gonzalo; Romero, Daniel; Lázaro-Haro, Cristina; Cugat, Ramón

    2009-08-01

    Soccer is the most commonly played sport in the world, with an estimated 265 million active soccer players participating in the game as on 2006. Inherent to this sport is the higher risk of injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) relative to other sports. ACL injury causes a significant loss of time from competition in soccer, which has served as the strong impetus to conduct research that focuses to determine the risk factors for injury, and more importantly, to identify and teach techniques to reduce this injury in the sport. This research emphasis has afforded a rapid influx of literature aimed to report the effects of neuromuscular training on the risk factors and the incidence of non-contact ACL injury in high-risk soccer populations. The purpose of the current review is to sequence the most recent literature relating the effects of prevention programs that were developed to alter risk factors associated with non-contact ACL injuries and to reduce the rate of non-contact ACL injuries in soccer players. To date there is no standardized intervention program established for soccer to prevent non-contact ACL injuries. Multi-component programs show better results than single-component preventive programs to reduce the risk and incidence of non-contact ACL injuries in soccer players. Lower extremity plyometrics, dynamic balance and strength, stretching, body awareness and decision-making, and targeted core and trunk control appear to be successful training components to reduce non-contact ACL injury risk factors (decrease landing forces, decrease varus/valgus moments, and increase effective muscle activation) and prevent non-contact ACL injuries in soccer players, especially in female athletes. Pre-season injury prevention combined with an in-season maintenance program may be advocated to prevent injury. Compliance may in fact be the limiting factor to the overall success of ACL injury interventions targeted to soccer players regardless of gender. Thus

  19. ABCs of Evidence-based Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Prevention Strategies in Female Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Dai; Myer, Gregory D.; Micheli, Lyle J.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2015-01-01

    Context Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is a major concern in physically active females. Although ACL reconstruction techniques have seen significant advances in recent years, risk associated with re-injury and future osteoarthritis remains a major concern. Thus, prevention of ACL injury is a logical step to protect and preserve healthy knee joints in young athletes. The current report aims to summarize a list of evidence-based prevention strategies to reduce ACL injury in female athletes. A list of six critical principles, which come from documented, large scale clinical trial studies and further analyses, were presented with ABC format including age, biomechanics, compliance, dosage, exercise, and feedback. Also, a grade for evidence and implications of future research is noted. Finally, in the conclusion section, importance of collaborative efforts from healthcare practitioners, researchers, and personnel associated with athletics is addressed. PMID:26042191

  20. The Utility of a High-intensity Exercise Protocol to Prospectively Assess ACL Injury Risk.

    PubMed

    Bossuyt, F M; García-Pinillos, F; Raja Azidin, R M F; Vanrenterghem, J; Robinson, M A

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the utility of a 5-min high-intensity exercise protocol (SAFT(5)) to include in prospective cohort studies investigating ACL injury risk. 15 active females were tested on 2 occasions during which their non-dominant leg was analysed before SAFT(5) (PRE), immediately after (POST0), 15 min after (POST15), and 30 min after (POST30). On the first occasion, testing included 5 maximum isokinetic contractions for eccentric and concentric hamstring and concentric quadriceps and on the second occasion, 3 trials of 2 landing tasks (i. e., single-leg hop and drop vertical jump) were conducted. Results showed a reduced eccentric hamstring peak torque at POST0, POST15 and POST30 (p<0.05) and a reduced functional HQ ratio (Hecc/Qcon) at POST15 and POST30 (p<0.05). Additionally, a more extended knee angle at POST30 (p<0.05) and increased knee internal rotation angle at POST0 and POST15 (p<0.05) were found in a single-leg hop. SAFT(5) altered landing strategies associated with increased ACL injury risk and similar to observations from match simulations. Our findings therefore support the utility of a high-intensity exercise protocol such as SAFT(5) to strengthen injury screening tests and to include in prospective cohort studies where time constraints apply.

  1. Risk factors and prevention strategies of non-contact anterior cruciate ligament injuries.

    PubMed

    Laible, Catherine; Sherman, Orrin H

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the number of women playing sports has increased significantly. The passage of Title IX in 1972 had a significant effect in encouraging female participation in sports. This increase in women's sports participation also led to a rise in noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. As ACL injuries in young female athletes have be- come a public health issue, much research has been done on risk factors and prevention strategies.

  2. Efficacy of ACL injury risk screening methods in identifying high-risk landing patterns during a sport-specific task.

    PubMed

    Fox, A S; Bonacci, J; McLean, S G; Saunders, N

    2016-06-12

    Screening methods sensitive to movement strategies that increase anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) loads are likely to be effective in identifying athletes at-risk of ACL injury. Current ACL injury risk screening methods are yet to be evaluated for their ability to identify athletes' who exhibit high-risk lower limb mechanics during sport-specific maneuvers associated with ACL injury occurrences. The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of two ACL injury risk screening methods in identifying high-risk lower limb mechanics during a sport-specific landing task. Thirty-two female athletes were screened using the Landing Error Scoring System (LESS) and Tuck Jump Assessment. Participants' also completed a sport-specific landing task, during which three-dimensional kinematic and kinetic data were collected. One-dimensional statistical parametric mapping was used to examine the relationships between screening method scores, and the three-dimensional hip and knee joint rotation and moment data from the sport-specific landing. Higher LESS scores were associated with reduced knee flexion from 30 to 57 ms after initial contact (P = 0.003) during the sport-specific landing; however, no additional relationships were found. These findings suggest the LESS and Tuck Jump Assessment may have minimal applicability in identifying athletes' who exhibit high-risk landing postures in the sport-specific task examined.

  3. Preventing head injuries in children

    MedlinePlus

    Concussion - preventing in children; Traumatic brain injury - preventing in children; TBI - children; Safety - preventing head injury ... not ride on these vehicles. After having a concussion or mild head injury , your child may need ...

  4. Identification of types of landings after blocking in volleyball associated with risk of ACL injury.

    PubMed

    Zahradnik, David; Jandacka, Daniel; Farana, Roman; Uchytil, Jaroslav; Hamill, Joseph

    2017-03-01

    Landing with a low knee flexion angle after volleyball block jumps may be associated with an increased risk of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. The aim of the present study was to identify the types of volleyball landings after blocks where the knee flexion angle is found to be under a critical knee flexion angle value of 30° at the instant of the first peak of the ground reaction force (GRF). Synchronized kinematic and kinetic data were collected for each trial. T-tests were used to determine if each knee flexion angle at the instant of the peak GRF was significantly different from the critical value of 30°. A repeated measures ANOVA was used to compare knee flexion angle, time to first peak and the magnitude of the first peak of the resultant GRF and knee stiffness. Significantly lower knee flexion angles were found in the "go" landing (p = .01, ES = 0.6) and the "reverse" landing (p = .02, ES = 0.6) only. The results for knee flexion angle and GRF parameters indicated a significant difference between a "reverse" and "go" and other types of landings, except the "side stick" landing for GRF. The "reverse" and "go" landings may present a risk for ACL injury due to the single-leg landing of these activities that have an associated mediolateral movement.

  5. Prevention of running injuries.

    PubMed

    Fields, Karl B; Sykes, Jeannie C; Walker, Katherine M; Jackson, Jonathan C

    2010-01-01

    Evidence for preventive strategies to lessen running injuries is needed as these occur in 40%-50% of runners on an annual basis. Many factors influence running injuries, but strong evidence for prevention only exists for training modification primarily by reducing weekly mileage. Two anatomical factors - cavus feet and leg length inequality - demonstrate a link to injury. Weak evidence suggests that orthotics may lessen risk of stress fracture, but no clear evidence proves they will reduce the risk of those athletes with leg length inequality or cavus feet. This article reviews other potential injury variables, including strength, biomechanics, stretching, warm-up, nutrition, psychological factors, and shoes. Additional research is needed to determine whether interventions to address any of these will help prevent running injury.

  6. Frontal plane comparison between drop jump and vertical jump: implications for the assessment of ACL risk of injury.

    PubMed

    Cesar, Guilherme M; Tomasevicz, Curtis L; Burnfield, Judith M

    2016-11-01

    The potential to use the vertical jump (VJ) to assess both athletic performance and risk of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury could have widespread clinical implications since VJ is broadly used in high school, university, and professional sport settings. Although drop jump (DJ) and VJ observationally exhibit similar lower extremity mechanics, the extent to which VJ can also be used as screening tool for ACL injury risk has not been assessed. This study evaluated whether individuals exhibit similar knee joint frontal plane kinematic and kinetic patterns when performing VJs compared with DJs. Twenty-eight female collegiate athletes performed DJs and VJs. Paired t-tests indicated that peak knee valgus angles did not differ significantly between tasks (p = 0.419); however, peak knee internal adductor moments were significantly larger during the DJ vs. VJ (p < 0.001). Pearson correlations between the DJ and VJ revealed strong correlations for knee valgus angles (r = 0.93, p < 0.001) and for internal knee adductor moments (r = 0.82, p < 0.001). Our results provide grounds for investigating whether frontal plane knee mechanics during VJ can predict ACL injuries and thus can be used as an effective tool for the assessment of risk of ACL injury in female athletes.

  7. Rationale and implementation of anterior cruciate ligament injury prevention warm-up programs in female athletes.

    PubMed

    Bien, Daniel P

    2011-01-01

    The sex disparity in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury risk and the subsequent adverse effects on knee joint health, psychosocial well-being, and financial costs incurred have produced a surge in research on risk factors and interventions designed to decrease this disparity and overall incidence. Biomechanical and neuromuscular differences have been identified throughout the trunk and lower extremity that may increase noncontact ACL injury risk in female athletes. Evidence demonstrates that many risk factors are modifiable with intervention programs and that athletic performance measures can be enhanced. No universally accepted ACL injury prevention program currently exists, and injury prevention programs are diverse. Anterior cruciate ligament injury prevention programs introduced in a warm-up format offer multiple benefits, primarily, improved compliance based on improved practicality of implementation. However, drawbacks of warm-up style formats also exist, most notably that a lack of equipment and resources may preclude measurable improvements in athletic performance that foster improved compliance among participants. The purpose of this review is to analyze the current literature researching possible biomechanical and neuromuscular risk factors in noncontact ACL injury in female athletes and the most effective means of implementing critical elements of a program to decrease ACL injury risk in female athletes while improving athletic performance. Hip and hamstring training, core stabilization, plyometrics, balance, agility, neuromuscular training with video and verbal feedback to modify technique, and stretching appear to be essential components of these programs. Further research is critical to determine ideal training program volume, intensity, duration, and frequency.

  8. Joint loads resulting in ACL rupture: Effects of age, sex, and body mass on injury load and mode of failure in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Blaker, Carina L; Little, Christopher B; Clarke, Elizabeth C

    2016-09-07

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears are a common knee injury with a known but poorly understood association with secondary joint injuries and post-traumatic osteoarthritis (OA). Female sex and age are known risk factors for ACL injury but these variables are rarely explored in mouse models of injury. This study aimed to further characterize a non-surgical ACL injury model to determine its clinical relevance across a wider range of mouse specifications. Cadaveric and anesthetized C57BL/6 mice (9-52 weeks of age) underwent joint loading to investigate the effects of age, sex, and body mass on ACL injury mechanisms. The ACL injury load (whole joint load required to rupture the ACL) was measured from force-displacement data, and mode of failure was assessed using micro-dissection and histology. ACL injury load was found to increase with body mass and age (p < 0.001) but age was not significant when controlling for mass. Sex had no effect. In contrast, the mode of ACL failure varied with both age and sex groups. Avulsion fractures (complete or mixed with mid-substance tears) were common in all age groups but the proportion of mixed and mid-substance failures increased with age. Females were more likely than males to have a major avulsion relative to a mid-substance tear (p < 0.01). This data compliments studies in human cadaveric knees, and provides a basis for determining the severity of joint injury relative to a major ACL tear in mice, and for selecting joint loading conditions in future experiments using this model. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res.

  9. ACL Injury, Return To Play And Reinjury In The Elite, Collegiate Athlete: An Analysis Of A Single, Division I NCAA Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, Ganesh V.; Murphy, Timothy; Creighton, Robert A.; Taft, Timothy N.; Spang, Jeffrey T.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Graft survivorship, reinjury rates, and career length are poorly understood after ACL reconstruction in the elite, NCAA Division-I athlete. The purpose of this study was to examine the outcomes of ACL reconstruction in a Division-I athlete cohort. Methods: Retrospective chart review was performed of all Division-I athletes at a single, public university from 2000 to 2009 until completion of eligibility. Athletes with a Pre-collegiate (PC) and Intra-collegiate (IC) ACL reconstruction were separated into two cohorts. Graft survivorship, reoperation rates, and career length information was collected. Results: 35 athletes were identified with a pre-collegiate (PC) ACL reconstruction; 60 with an intra-collegiate (IC) reconstruction. The PC group had a 17.1% injury rate to the original graft, with a 20.0% rate of contralateral ACL injury. For the IC group, the reinjury rates were 1.9% to the ACL graft, with a 9.2% rate of contralateral ACL injury after an IntraCollegiate ACL reconstruction. The PC group used 78% of their total eligibility (avg 3.11 yrs). Athletes in the IC group used an average of 77% of their remaining NCAA eligibility. 88.3% of the IC group played an additional non-redshirt year after their injury. Reoperation rate for the PC group was 51.4% and 20.3% for the IC group. Conclusion: Reoperation and reinjury rates are high after ACL reconstruction in the Division-I athlete. Pre-collegiate ACL reconstruction is associated with a very high rate of repeat ACL reinjury to the graft or opposite knee (37.1%). The majority of athletes are able to return to play after successful reconstruction.

  10. Prevention of childhood injuries.

    PubMed

    Greensher, J

    1984-11-01

    Accidents account for more deaths among children aged 1 to 14 years than the next five most common causes. Thinking about accidents as injuries that happen in a context comprising a host, an agent, and an environment may help prevent them. Until a profile of the family and child at risk of injuries is developed, causal factors must be identified and removed, and parents and children educated about injury prevention. Different problems occur at different stages of a child's development. The agents most commonly associated with injuries are automobiles, bicycles, swimming, and animals. The special vulnerability of infants was addressed by the American Academy of Pediatrics' "First Ride/A Safe Ride" program, which encouraged the use of safety seats. Design changes have reduced the number of bicycle injuries, but human factors continue to contribute significantly. Most drownings occur in fresh water, with many children within a few feet of safety; continuing education is essential. Inculcating respect for animals, learning safety rules for interaction, and advice on pet ownership help to reduce animal bite injuries.

  11. The effects of ACL injury on quadriceps and hamstring torque, work and power.

    PubMed

    Pincivero, Danny M; Heller, Brandan M; Hou, Su-I

    2002-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess isokinetic torque, work and power between non-injured, ACL (anterior cruciate ligament)-deficient and ACL-reconstructed individuals. Ten healthy, non-injured individuals, seven unilateral ACL-deficient individuals and six unilateral ACL-reconstructed individuals were assessed for isokinetic quadriceps and hamstring strength at 1.05 and 3.14 rad.s-1. Peak torque, total work, average power and the ratio of peak torque to body mass were computed for both velocities. Peak torque was also corrected for body mass, using allometric modelling. The non-injured individuals showed significantly greater quadriceps peak torque to body mass ratios than the ACL-deficient and ACL-reconstructed individuals at both velocities, and greater hamstring peak torque to body mass ratios than the ACL-deficient group at 3.14 rad.s-1 (P < 0.05). The ACL-deficient individuals displayed greater quadriceps and hamstring peak torque, total work and average power than the non-injured individuals at 1.05 rad.s-1 (P < 0.05). The ACL-deficient individuals also displayed significantly greater peak torque, total work and average power than the ACL-reconstructed individuals for the quadriceps at both velocities (P < 0.05). The ACL-deficient individuals demonstrated greater hamstring peak torque and total work than the non-injured individuals at both velocities (P < 0.05). The allometrically modelled peak torques at both isokinetic velocities demonstrated that the quadriceps muscle values were significantly higher in the non-involved than the involved limb. The hamstring peak torques corrected for body mass were significantly higher in the non-involved than the involved limb only at 1.05 rad.s-1. The main finding from the present study is that isokinetic measures in ratio-scaled or absolute units yield a different outcome and, hence, interpretation compared with the allometric approach.

  12. Effect of knee flexion angle on ground reaction forces, knee moments and muscle co-contraction during an impact-like deceleration landing: implications for the non-contact mechanism of ACL injury.

    PubMed

    Podraza, Jeffery T; White, Scott C

    2010-08-01

    Investigating landing kinetics and neuromuscular control strategies during rapid deceleration movements is a prerequisite to understanding the non-contact mechanism of ACL injury. The purpose of this study was to quantify the effect of knee flexion angle on ground reaction forces, net knee joint moments, muscle co-contraction and lower extremity muscles during an impact-like, deceleration task. Ground reaction forces and knee joint moments were determined from video and force plate records of 10 healthy male subjects performing rapid deceleration single leg landings from a 10.5 cm height with different degrees of knee flexion at landing. Muscle co-contraction was based on muscle moments calculated from an EMG-to-moment processing model. Ground reaction forces and co-contraction indices decreased while knee extensor moments increased significantly with increased degrees of knee flexion at landing (all p<0.005). Higher ground reaction forces when landing in an extended knee position suggests they are a contributing factor in non-contact ACL injuries. Increased knee extensor moments and less co-contraction with flexed knee landings suggest that quadriceps overload may not be the primary cause of non-contact ACL injuries. The results bring into question the counterbalancing role of the hamstrings during dynamic movements. The soleus may be a valuable synergist stabilizing the tibia against anterior translation at landing. Movement strategies that lessen the propagation of reaction forces up the kinetic chain may help prevent non-contact ACL injuries. The relative interaction of all involved thigh and lower leg muscles, not just the quadriceps and hamstrings should be considered when interpreting non-contact ACL injury mechanisms.

  13. Bridge-Enhanced ACL Repair: A Review of the Science and the Pathway through FDA Investigational Device Approval

    PubMed Central

    Proffen, Benedikt L.; Perrone, Gabriel S.; Roberts, Gordon; Murray, Martha M.

    2016-01-01

    Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are currently treated with replacement of the torn ligament with a graft of tendon harvested from elsewhere in the knee. This procedure, called "ACL reconstruction," is excellent for restoring gross stability to the knee; however, there are relatively high graft failure rates in adolescent patients,4, 12, 60 and the ACL reconstruction procedure does not prevent the premature osteoarthritis seen in patients after an ACL injury.1, 46, 52 Thus, new solutions are needed for ACL injuries. Researchers have been investigating the use of scaffolds, growth factors and cells to supplement a suture repair of the ACL (bio-enhanced repair). In this paper, we will review the varied approaches, which have been investigated for stimulating ACL healing and repair in preclinical models and how one of these technologies was able to move from promising preclinical results to FDA acceptance of an Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) application for a first-in-human study. PMID:25631206

  14. Biomechanical and neuromuscular characteristics of male athletes: implications for the development of anterior cruciate ligament injury prevention programs.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Dai; Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Mendiguchía, Jurdan; Samuelsson, Kristian; Karlsson, Jon; Myer, Gregory D

    2015-06-01

    Prevention of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is likely the most effective strategy to reduce undesired health consequences including reconstruction surgery, long-term rehabilitation, and pre-mature osteoarthritis occurrence. A thorough understanding of mechanisms and risk factors of ACL injury is crucial to develop effective prevention programs, especially for biomechanical and neuromuscular modifiable risk factors. Historically, the available evidence regarding ACL risk factors has mainly involved female athletes or has compared male and female athletes without an intra-group comparison for male athletes. Therefore, the principal purpose of this article was to review existing evidence regarding the investigation of biomechanical and neuromuscular characteristics that may imply aberrant knee kinematics and kinetics that would place the male athlete at risk of ACL injury. Biomechanical evidence related to knee kinematics and kinetics was reviewed by different planes (sagittal and frontal/coronal), tasks (single-leg landing and cutting), situation (anticipated and unanticipated), foot positioning, playing surface, and fatigued status. Neuromuscular evidence potentially related to ACL injury was reviewed. Recommendations for prevention programs for ACL injuries in male athletes were developed based on the synthesis of the biomechanical and neuromuscular characteristics. The recommendations suggest performing exercises with multi-plane biomechanical components including single-leg maneuvers in dynamic movements, reaction to and decision making in unexpected situations, appropriate foot positioning, and consideration of playing surface condition, as well as enhancing neuromuscular aspects such as fatigue, proprioception, muscle activation, and inter-joint coordination.

  15. Prevention and Control of Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuchfarber, Barbara S.; Zins, Joseph E.; Jason, Leonard A.

    Childhood injury continues to be a major public health crisis in the United States, with a large percentage of injuries being preventable and controllable. This chapter provides information related to understanding child and youth injury. Studies have shown that injuries affect identifiable high-risk groups. Such host factors that put children at…

  16. Characterization of thigh and shank segment angular velocity during jump landing tasks commonly used to evaluate risk for ACL injury.

    PubMed

    Dowling, Ariel V; Favre, Julien; Andriacchi, Thomas P

    2012-09-01

    The dynamic movements associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury during jump landing suggest that limb segment angular velocity can provide important information for understanding the conditions that lead to an injury. Angular velocity measures could provide a quick and simple method of assessing injury risk without the constraints of a laboratory. The objective of this study was to assess the inter-subject variations and the sensitivity of the thigh and shank segment angular velocity in order to determine if these measures could be used to characterize jump landing mechanisms. Additionally, this study tested the correlation between angular velocity and the knee abduction moment. Thirty-six healthy participants (18 male) performed drop jumps with bilateral and unilateral landing. Thigh and shank angular velocities were measured by a wearable inertial-based system, and external knee moments were measured using a marker-based system. Discrete parameters were extracted from the data and compared between systems. For both jumping tasks, the angular velocity curves were well defined movement patterns with high inter-subject similarity in the sagittal plane and moderate to good similarity in the coronal and transverse planes. The angular velocity parameters were also able to detect differences between the two jumping tasks that were consistent across subjects. Furthermore, the coronal angular velocities were significantly correlated with the knee abduction moment (R of 0.28-0.51), which is a strong indicator of ACL injury risk. This study suggested that the thigh and shank angular velocities, which describe the angular dynamics of the movement, should be considered in future studies about ACL injury mechanisms.

  17. Abnormal Mechanical Loading Induces Cartilage Degeneration by Accelerating Meniscus Hypertrophy and Mineralization After ACL Injuries In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Du, Guoqing; Zhan, Hongsheng; Ding, Daofang; Wang, Shaowei; Wei, Xiaochun; Wei, Fangyuan; Zhang, Jianzhong; Bilgen, Bahar; Reginato, Anthony M.; Fleming, Braden C.; Deng, Jin; Wei, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Background Although patients with an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury have a high risk of developing posttraumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA), the role of meniscus hypertrophy and mineralization in PTOA after an ACL injury remains unknown. Purpose/Hypothesis The purpose of this study was to determine if menisci respond to abnormal loading and if an ACL injury results in meniscus hypertrophy and calcification. The hypotheses were that (1) abnormal mechanical loading after an ACL injury induces meniscus hypertrophy and mineralization, which correlates to articular cartilage damage in vivo, and (2) abnormal mechanical loading on bovine meniscus explants induces the overexpression of hypertrophic and mineralization markers in vitro. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Methods In vivo guinea pig study (hypothesis 1): Three-month-old male Hartley guinea pigs (n = 9) underwent ACL transection (ACLT) on the right knee; the left knee served as the control. Calcification in the menisci was evaluated by calcein labeling 1 and 5 days before knee harvesting at 5.5 months. Cartilage and meniscus damage and mineralization were quantified by the Osteoarthritis Research Society International score and meniscus grade, respectively. Indian hedgehog (Ihh), matrix metalloproteinase–13 (MMP-13), collagen type X (Col X), progressive ankylosis homolog (ANKH), ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase–1 (ENPP1), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi), and inorganic phosphate (Pi) concentrations were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In vitro bovine meniscus explant study (hypothesis 2): Bovine meniscus explants were subjected to 25% strain at 0.3 Hz for 1, 2, and 3 hours. Cell viability was determined using live/dead staining. The levels of mRNA expression and protein levels were measured using real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot after 24, 48, and 72 hours in

  18. Single-leg balance and core motor control in children: when does the risk for ACL injury occurs?

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Allison B; Yao, Paul; Hutchinson, Mark R

    2016-01-01

    Introduction While numerous publications have demonstrated the correlation of poor single-leg balance and core motor control with an increased risk of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in skeletally mature female athletes, few have analysed the preadolescent population regarding when indeed comparative deficits in balance and core control actually occur. The purpose of this study was to assess whether the neuromotor factors that place mature females at increased risk of ACL injury actually are present in preadolescents and if so when. Methods This study used simplified modifications of classic drop-jump testing as well as single-leg balance tests performed on stable and unstable surfaces to assess balance and core motor control. 84 children (males and females) ranging in age from 6 to 13 years were divided into 4 equally sized groups based on their academic classes. Each group was compared with each other, and compared with a cohort of 205 collegiate athletes. The latter served as a comparative norm of mature athletes who had performed the same or similar testing. Results Outcomes revealed that the preadolescent population performed poorly on the tests when compared with the collegiate population but the children matured with age until the eldest subgroups compared more favourably with the college-aged athletes. Girls appear to mature at a slightly earlier pace than boys. This study focusing on preadolescent children concluded that the neuromuscular changes that place females at greater risk of injury do not appear to occur prior to adolescence. Conclusions Based on the outcomes of this study, it is suggested that sex differences regarding balance and core control deficits that can increase risk of ACL injuries likely occur after grade school (age 12–13). PMID:27900188

  19. Prevention and Screening Programs for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in Young Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Swart, Eric; Redler, Lauren; Fabricant, Peter D.; Mandelbaum, Bert R.; Ahmad, Christopher S.; Wang, Y. Claire

    2014-01-01

    Background: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are common among young athletes. Biomechanical studies have led to the development of training programs to improve neuromuscular control and reduce ACL injury rates as well as screening tools to identify athletes at higher risk for ACL injury. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of these training methods and screening strategies for preventing ACL injuries. Methods: A decision-analysis model was created to evaluate three strategies for a population of young athletes participating in organized sports: (1) no training or screening, (2) universal neuromuscular training, and (3) universal screening, with neuromuscular training for identified high-risk athletes only. Risk of injury, risk reduction from training, and sensitivity and specificity of screening were based on published data from clinical trials. Costs of training and screening programs were estimated on the basis of the literature. Sensitivity analyses were performed on key model parameters to evaluate their effect on base case conclusions. Results: Universal neuromuscular training of all athletes was the dominant strategy, with better outcomes and lower costs compared with screening. On average, the implementation of a universal training program would save $100 per player per season, and would reduce the incidence of ACL injury from 3% to 1.1% per season. Screening was not cost-effective within the range of reported sensitivity and specificity values. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance: Given its low cost and ease of implementation, neuromuscular training of all young athletes represents a cost-effective strategy for reducing costs and morbidity from ACL injuries. While continued innovations on inexpensive and accurate screening methods to identify high-risk athletes remain of interest, improving existing training protocols and implementing neuromuscular training into routine training for all young athletes is warranted. PMID

  20. EXERCISES THAT FACILITATE OPTIMAL HAMSTRING AND QUADRICEPS CO-ACTIVATION TO HELP DECREASE ACL INJURY RISK IN HEALTHY FEMALES: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE.

    PubMed Central

    Dedinsky, Rachel; Baker, Lindsey; Imbus, Samuel; Bowman, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    Background Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is common among females due to many anatomic, hormonal, and neuromuscular risk factors. One modifiable risk factor that places females at increased risk of ACL injury is a poor hamstrings: quadriceps (H:Q) co-activation ratio, which should be 0.6 or greater in order to decrease the stress placed on the ACL. Exercises that produce more quadriceps dominant muscle activation can add to the tension placed upon the ACL, potentially increasing the risk of ACL injury. Hypothesis/Purpose The purpose of this systematic review was to compare quadriceps and hamstring muscle activation during common closed kinetic chain therapeutic exercises in healthy female knees to determine what exercises are able to produce adequate H:Q co-activation ratios. Study Design Systematic Review Methods Multiple online databases were systematically searched and screened for inclusion. Eight articles were identified for inclusion. Data on mean electromyography (EMG) activation of both quadriceps and hamstring muscles, % maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC), and H:Q co-activation ratios were extracted from the studies. Quality assessment was performed on all included studies. Results Exercises analyzed in the studies included variations of the double leg squat, variations of the single leg squat, lateral step-up, Fitter, Stairmaster® (Core Health and Fitness, Vancouver, WA), and slide board. All exercises, except the squat machine with posterior support at the level of the scapula and feet placed 50 cm in front of the hips, produced higher quadriceps muscle activation compared to hamstring muscle activation. Conclusion Overall, two leg squats demonstrate poor H:Q co-activation ratios. Single leg exercises, when performed between 30 and 90 degrees of knee flexion, produce adequate H:Q ratios, thereby potentially reducing the risk of tensile stress on the ACL and ACL injury. Level of Evidence 2a- Systematic Review of Cohort Studies PMID

  1. Preventing Knee Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... as a result of a twisting or pivoting motion. This injury may cause susceptibility to repeat injuries and knee instability, and therefore often requires surgery. Occasionally, a twisting or hyperextension force to the knee may result in a tibial ...

  2. Potential for Non-Contact ACL Injury Between Step-Close-Jump and Hop-Jump Tasks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-I; Gu, Chin-Yi; Chen, Wei-Ling; Chang, Mu-San

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the kinematics and kinetics during the landing of hop-jump and step-close-jump movements in order to provide further inferring that the potential risk of ACL injuries. Eleven elite male volleyball players were recruited to perform hop-jump and step-close-jump tasks. Lower extremity kinematics and ground reaction forces during landing in stop-jump tasks were recorded. Lower extremity kinetics was calculated by using an inverse dynamic process. Step-close-jump tasks demonstrated smaller peak proximal tibia anterior shear forces during the landing phase. In step-close-jump tasks, increasing hip joint angular velocity during initial foot-ground contact decreased peak posterior ground reaction force during the landing phase, which theoretically could reduce the risk of ACL injury. Key pointsThe different landing techniques required for these two stop-jump tasks do not necessarily affect the jump height.Hop-jump decreased the hip joint angular velocity at initial foot contact with ground, which could lead to an increasing peak posterior GRF during the landing phase.Hop-jump decreased hip and knee joint angular flexion displacement during the landing, which could increase the peak vertical loading rate during the landing phase.

  3. Editorial. Bicycle injuries and injury prevention.

    PubMed

    Pless, I B

    2014-07-01

    In 1989, long before this journal added injuries to its title, it published two papers on childhood injuries and I was asked to write an editorial for this occasion. I chose the title "Challenges for Injury Prevention: Two Neglected Aspects" because I thought the papers neglected to mention the inadequacy of injury statistics (at the time there were no emergency department data) and also failed to emphasize the public health importance of childhood injuries. It is instructive, therefore, to compare this issue's offerings with how matters stood nearly 25 years ago and see what progress we've made. Papers in this and the previous issue of this journal discuss bicycle safety in general and helmet use in particular. Although this is a somewhat narrow focus, it serves as one indicator of how the field has evolved and what remains to be done to improve both the science and policy in this domain.

  4. Empirically derived injury prevention rules.

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, L; Schick, B

    1993-01-01

    This study describes a set of empirically derived safety rules that if followed, would have prevented the occurrence of minor injuries. Epidemiologists have criticized behavioral interventions as increasing "safe" behavior but failing to demonstrate a decrease in injury. The present study documents retrospectively the link between safe behavior and injury. It demonstrates that these empirically derived rules are very similar to rules for the prevention of serious injury. The study also shows that these rules are not widely accepted and implemented by parents. Suggestions for future research in this area are advanced. PMID:8307829

  5. Preventing head and neck injury.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, A S; McCrory, P

    2005-06-01

    A wide range of head and neck injury risks are present in sport, including catastrophic injury. The literature since 1980 on prevention of head and neck injury in sport was reviewed, focusing on catastrophic and brain injury and identifying the range of injury prevention methods in use. There have been few formal evaluations of injury prevention methods. Approaches that are considered, or have been proven, to be successful in preventing injury include: modification of the baseball; implementation of helmet standards in ice hockey and American football and increased wearing rates; use of full faceguards in ice hockey; changes in rules associated with body contact; implementation of rules to reduce the impact forces in rugby scrums. Helmets and other devices have been shown to reduce the risk of severe head and facial injury, but current designs appear to make little difference to rates of concussion. Research methods involving epidemiological, medical, and human factors are required in combination with biomechanical and technological approaches to reduce further injury risks in sport.

  6. Head Injury Prevention Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fax: 847-378-0600 www.NeurosurgeryToday.org A traumatic brain injury (TBI) is defined as a blow or jolt to the head or a penetrating head injury that disrupts the normal function of the brain. TBI can result when the head suddenly and ...

  7. Preventing Children's Sports Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... caused by the repeated stress of the overhead motions used with swimming or throwing a ball. The ... Doing so places stress upon the injury and forces the body to compensate for the weakness, which ...

  8. Anterior cruciate ligament injury: identification of risk factors and prevention strategies.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Rafael J; Rivera-Vega, Alexandra; Miranda, Gerardo; Micheo, William

    2014-01-01

    Injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is common and affects young individuals, particularly girls, who are active in sports that involve jumping, pivoting, as well as change of direction. ACL injury is associated with potential long-term complications including reduction in activity levels and osteoarthritis. Multiple intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors have been identified, which include anatomic variations, neuromuscular deficits, biomechanical abnormalities, playing environment, and hormonal status. Multicomponent prevention programs have been shown to be effective in reducing the incidence of this injury in both girls and boys. Programs should include a combination of strengthening, stretching, aerobic conditioning, plyometrics, proprioceptive and balance training, as well as education and feedback regarding body mechanics and proper landing pattern. Preventive programs should be implemented at least 6 wk prior to competition, followed by a maintenance program during the season.

  9. Prevent Children's Sports Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Micheli, Lyle J.

    1983-01-01

    Children who actively take part in sports are susceptible to special injury risks because their bodies are still growing. Parents should keep both the child's individual physical and emotional makeup and the demands of the sport in mind when selecting an activity. Proper training methods and equipment are discussed. (PP)

  10. Seven Steps for Developing and Implementing a Preventive Training Program: Lessons Learned from JUMP ACL and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Barnett; Donaldson, Alex; de la Motte, Sarah; Cameron, Kenneth L.; Beutler, Anthony I.; DiStefano, Lindsay J.; Marshall, Stephen W.

    2014-01-01

    Musculoskeletal injuries during military and sport-related training are common, costly and potentially debilitating. Thus, there is a great need to develop and implement evidence-based injury prevention strategies to reduce the burden of musculoskeletal injury. The lack of attention to implementation issues is a major factor limiting the ability to successfully reduce musculoskeletal injury rates using evidence-based injury prevention programs. We propose 7 steps that can be used to facilitate successful design and implementation of evidence-based injury prevention programs within the logical constraints of a real-world setting by identifying implementation barriers and associated solutions. Incorporating these 7 steps along with other models for behavioral health interventions may improve the overall efficacy of military and sport-related injury prevention programs. PMID:25280612

  11. Effect of Timing of Surgery in Partially Injured ACLs.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Bai, Lunhao; Fu, Yonghui; Wang, Guangbin; He, Ming; Wang, Jiashi

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the optimal timing for surgical intervention of partially injured anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL). Thirty-eight patients were divided into early (n=17) or delayed (n=21) surgery groups based on the interval between injury and surgery. Minimum follow-up was 2 years. The outcome measures used were the International Knee Documentation Committee score, Lysholm knee score, Tegner activity rating, range of motion, and arthrometer measurements. The findings of this study indicate that early surgical reconstruction of partially ruptured ACLs did not result in arthrofibrosis but may prevent secondary loosening of the intact bundles and further meniscal and chondral injury.

  12. FUNCTIONAL HOP TESTS AND TUCK JUMP ASSESSMENT SCORES BETWEEN FEMALE DIVISION I COLLEGIATE ATHLETES PARTICIPATING IN HIGH VERSUS LOW ACL INJURY PRONE SPORTS: A CROSS SECTIONAL ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Hoog, Philipp; Warren, Meghan; Smith, Craig A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although functional tests including the single leg hop (SLH), triple hop (TH), cross over hop (COH) for distance, and the tuck jump assessment (TJA) are used for return to play (RTP) criteria for post anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, sport-specific baseline measurements are limited. Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine differences in SLH, TH, and COH distance and limb symmetry index (LSI), as well as total scores, number of jumps, and individual flaws of the TJA in 97 injury-free Division I (DI) collegiate female student athletes participating in ACL injury prone vs. non ACL injury prone sports. The hypothesis was that significant mean differences and asymmetries (LSI) would exist between the two groups in SLH, TH, COH and TJA. Study Design Cross sectional. Methods Due to research suggesting inherent ACL injury risk associated with specific sport involvement, participants were grouped into high (HR, n=57) and low (LR, n=40) ACL injury risk based on participating in a sport with high or low ACL injury rates. The HR group was composed of athletes participating in soccer, basketball, and volleyball, while the LR group athletes participated in diving, cross country, and track and field. Participants performed all standard functional tests (SFT) and side-to-side differences for each participant as well as between group differences were assessed for the hop tests. The LSI, a ratio frequently used to gauge athletes’ readiness for RTP post injury, was also assessed for between group differences. The TJA was compared between the groups on individual flaws, overall scores, and number of jumps performed. Results No between group differences for hop distances were found, with medium to large effect sizes for SLH, TH, and COH. The HR group had a higher TJA score, number of jumps, and higher proportion of the flaw of ‘foot placement not shoulder width apart’. Conclusion Although most SFT's showed no significant differences between athlete

  13. Prevention of unintentional childhood injury.

    PubMed

    Theurer, Wesley M; Bhavsar, Amit K

    2013-04-01

    Unintentional injury accounts for 40 percent of childhood deaths annually, most commonly from motor vehicle crashes. The proper use of child restraints is the most effective strategy to prevent injury or death. Motor vehicle restraint guidelines have recently been revised to an age-based system that delays the progression in type of restraint for most children. Strategies to prevent suffocation in children include using appropriate bedding, positioning babies on their backs to sleep, and removing items from the sleep and play environment that could potentially entrap or entangle the child. Fencing that isolates a swimming pool from the yard and surrounding area and "touch" adult supervision (i.e., an adult is in the water and able to reach and grab a child) have been shown to be most effective in preventing drownings. Swimming lessons are recommended for children older than four years. Poison prevention programs have been shown to improve prevention behavior among caregivers, but may not decrease poisoning incidence. Syrup of ipecac is not recommended. Smoke detector maintenance, a home escape plan, and educating children about how to respond during a fire emergency are effective strategies for preventing fire injuries or death. Fall injuries may be reduced by not using walkers for infants and toddlers or bunk beds for children six years and younger. Consistent helmet use while bicycling reduces head and brain injuries. Although direct counseling by physicians appears to improve some parental safety behaviors, its effect on reducing childhood injuries is uncertain. Community-based interventions can be effective in high-risk populations.

  14. Evaluation, management, rehabilitation, and prevention of anterior cruciate ligament injury: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Micheo, William; Hernández, Liza; Seda, Carlos

    2010-10-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is essential for both static and dynamic stability of the knee. It is commonly injured during sports activities by noncontact mechanisms that include landing with the knee in valgus and extension, sudden deceleration, change of direction, and rotation. Several modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors predispose athletes to this injury, especially women. Early diagnosis, treatment directed to protect secondary knee structures, and rehabilitation play an important role in the management of ACL injury. Despite a lack of scientifically validated and published guidelines to help clinicians decide between conservative or surgical treatment, criteria such as pain, recurrent instability, injury to secondary structures, and desired level of activity should be considered. Accelerated rehabilitation protocols for patients who have and have not undergone an operation are available and recommended with goals of reducing complications such as recurrent injury, loss of motion, residual weakness, and associated osteoarthritis. However, injury prevention protocols could be the next big step in management of ACL injury with emphasis on reducing modifiable risk factors in susceptible individuals who participate in sports.

  15. ACL reconstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... This increases the chance you may have a meniscus tear. ACL reconstruction may be used for these ... When other ligaments are also injured When your meniscus is torn Before surgery, talk to your health ...

  16. Musculoskeletal Health and Injury Prevention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    Avoid tobacco products. Anti-Inflammatory Foods • Green vegetables • Carrots • Avocados • Pecans • Seeds – Sesame – Flax – Pumpkin ... benefits , from maintaining low back health to preventing knee injury; • Pilates is an alternative approach for treating non-specific low back pain

  17. Brain Injury Safety Tips and Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Address What's this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Brain Injury Safety Tips and Prevention Recommend on Facebook ... not grass or dirt. More HEADS UP Video: Brain Injury Safety and Prevention frame support disabled and/ ...

  18. Treatment of PCL, ACL, and lateral-side knee injuries: acute and chronic.

    PubMed

    Levy, Bruce A; Stuart, Michael J

    2012-09-01

    Combined posterior cruciate ligament, anterior cruciate ligament, and lateral-side disruption is one of the more common patterns of multiligament knee injury. This is a devastating injury with significant long-term functional sequelae, making accurate diagnosis and management extremely important. While surgical intervention is necessary to restore function, the specific management strategies remain controversial. This article will review the current literature and the authors' preferred approach including physical examination, imaging, timing of surgery, surgical technique, and postoperative rehabilitation.

  19. Needlestick and sharps injury prevention.

    PubMed

    Wilburn, Susan Q

    2004-09-30

    Every day while caring for patients, nurses are at risk to exposure to bloodborne pathogens potentially resulting in infections such as HIV or hepatitis B and C. These exposures, while preventable, are often accepted as being a part of the job. In the United States, needlestick injuries have begun to decrease from an estimated one million exposures per year in 1996 to 385,000 per year in 2000. This decline has resulted from the protections afforded by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Bloodborne Pathogens Standard. Reasons for the success in decreasing needlestick and sharps injuries may be attributed to the elimination of needle recapping and the use of safer needle devices, sharps collection boxes, gloves and personal protective gear, and universal precautions. The prevention of needlestick injuries has made slow progress over the past 20 years since the HIV epidemic drew attention to the deadly nature of health care work and to protection of health care worker health and safety. In Africa, where the AIDS virus originated and where the prevalence of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among hospitalized patients is highest in the world, attention has been directed only recently at protecting health care workers. Nurses, especially those infected from a preventable exposure, have been at the forefront of advocacy for prevention. This article includes a review about the hazard of exposure to bloodborne pathogens and epidemiology of occupational infection. The author discusses how to apply standard methods of occupational health and industry hygiene using the hierarchy of controls framework to prevent exposure to blood, and discusses evidence-based prevention and efficacy of particular control measures. Legislative progress and implementation of enforceable policy to protect health care workers is outlined.

  20. Case study: Muscle atrophy and hypertrophy in a premier league soccer player during rehabilitation from ACL injury.

    PubMed

    Milsom, Jordan; Barreira, Paulo; Burgess, Darren J; Iqbal, Zafar; Morton, James P

    2014-10-01

    The onset of injury and subsequent period of immobilization and disuse present major challenges to maintenance of skeletal muscle mass and function. Although the characteristics of immobilization-induced muscle atrophy are well documented in laboratory studies, comparable data from elite athletes in free-living conditions are not readily available. We present a 6-month case-study account from a professional soccer player of the English Premier League characterizing rates of muscle atrophy and hypertrophy (as assessed by DXA) during immobilization and rehabilitation after ACL injury. During 8 weeks of inactivity and immobilization, where the athlete adhered to a low carbohydrate-high protein diet, total body mass decreased by 5 kg attributable to 5.8 kg loss and 0.8 kg gain in lean and fat mass, respectively. Changes in whole-body lean mass was attributable to comparable relative decreases in the trunk (12%, 3.8 kg) and immobilized limb (13%, 1.4 kg) whereas the nonimmobilized limb exhibited smaller declines (7%, 0.8 kg). In Weeks 8 to 24, the athlete adhered to a moderate carbohydrate-high protein diet combined with structured resistance and field based training for both the lower and upper-body that resulted in whole-body muscle hypertrophy (varying from 0.5 to 1 kg per week). Regional hypertrophy was particularly pronounced in the trunk and nonimmobilized limb during weeks 8 to 12 (2.6 kg) and 13 to 16 (1.3 kg), respectively, whereas the previously immobilized limb exhibited slower but progressive increases in lean mass from Week 12 to 24 (1.2 kg). The athlete presented after the totality of the injured period with an improved anthropometrical and physical profile.

  1. Childhood injury: significance and prevention strategies.

    PubMed

    Crawley, T

    1996-08-01

    Unintentional preventable injury is the number one killer of our children. Each year more children die of injuries than of all childhood diseases combined. It is important for nurses to understand the epidemiology and significance of childhood injury. This article discusses developmental and environmental factors that influence the child's probability of sustaining an unintentional injury and offers suggestions for client, family, and community injury prevention efforts for nurses.

  2. Preferential Loading of the ACL Compared With the MCL During Landing

    PubMed Central

    Quatman, Carmen E.; Kiapour, Ata M.; Demetropoulos, Constantine K.; Kiapour, Ali; Wordeman, Samuel C.; Levine, Jason W.; Goel, Vijay K.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    to be significantly greater under combined multiplanar loading compared with anterior tibial shear force (P = .016), knee abduction (P = .018), and internal tibial rotation (P < .0005) moments alone. Conclusion While both the ACL and the MCL resist knee valgus during landing, physiological magnitudes of the applied loads leading to high ACL strain levels and injuries were not sufficient to compromise the MCL’s integrity. Clinical Relevance A better understanding of injury mechanisms may provide insight that improves current risk screening and injury prevention strategies. Current findings support multiplanar knee valgus collapse as a primary factor contributing to a non-contact ACL injury. PMID:24124198

  3. Triathlon related musculoskeletal injuries: the status of injury prevention knowledge.

    PubMed

    Gosling, Cameron McR; Gabbe, Belinda J; Forbes, Andrew B

    2008-07-01

    Triathlon is a popular participation sport that combines swimming, cycling and running into a single event. A number of studies have investigated the incidence of injury, profile of injuries sustained and factors contributing to triathlon injury. This paper summarises the published literature in the context of the evidence base for the prevention of triathlon related injuries. Relevant articles on triathlon injuries were sourced from peer-reviewed English language journals and assessed using the Translating Research into Injury Prevention Practice (TRIPP) framework. This review highlights the significant knowledge gap that exists in the published literature describing the incidence of injury, the profile of injuries sustained and evidence for the prevention of injury in triathlon. Despite the number of studies undertaken to address TRIPP Stages 1 and 2 (injury surveillance, aetiology and mechanism of injury), most triathlon studies have been limited by retrospective designs with substantial, and unvalidated, recall periods, inconsistency in the definitions used for a reportable injury and exposure to injury, or a failure to capture exposure data at all. Overall, the paucity of quality, prospective studies investigating the incidence of injury in triathlon and factors contributing to their occurrence has led to an inability to adequately inform the development of injury prevention strategies (TRIPP Stages 3-6) for this sport, a situation that must be rectified if gains are to be made in reducing the burden of triathlon related injury.

  4. Prevention of injuries to children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Rivara, F P; Aitken, M

    1998-01-01

    Injury prevention is one of the most important preventive health challenges for pediatricians worldwide. A science of injury control has developed. Matching a child's skill and development age is needed for anticipatory guidance. Poor children living in rural areas are at greatest risk and require continuous reinforcement. Family function relates closely to injuries and recovery from injury. Prevention involves education, legislation, environmental modification, and engineering techniques.

  5. Predisposing Risk Factors for Non-Contact ACL Injuries in Military Subjects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    316 10. Griffin LY, Agel J, Albohm MJ, Arendt EA, Dick RW, Garrett WE, Garrick JG, Hewett TE, Huston L , Ireland ML, Johnson RJ, Kibler WB, Lephart S...J. F. Dickens J. Giuliani D . Gwinn Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, MD, USA e-mail: ehenze1@jhmi.edu J.-P. Rue Naval...Harris JM, Vaughan L (1991) Preseason strength and flexibility imbalances associated with athletic injuries in female collegiate athletes. Am J Sports

  6. Preventing dance injuries: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Russell, Jeffrey A

    2013-09-30

    Dancers are clearly athletes in the degree to which sophisticated physical capacities are required to perform at a high level. The standard complement of athletic attributes - muscular strength and endurance, anaerobic and aerobic energy utilization, speed, agility, coordination, motor control, and psychological readiness - all are essential to dance performance. In dance, as in any athletic activity, injuries are prevalent. This paper presents the research background of dance injuries, characteristics that distinguish dance and dancers from traditional sports and athletes, and research-based perspectives into how dance injuries can be reduced or prevented, including the factors of physical training, nutrition and rest, flooring, dancing en pointe, and specialized health care access for dancers. The review concludes by offering five essential components for those involved with caring for dancers that, when properly applied, will assist them in decreasing the likelihood of dance-related injury and ensuring that dancers receive optimum attention from the health care profession: (1) screening; (2) physical training; (3) nutrition and rest; (4) specialized dance health care; and (5) becoming acquainted with the nature of dance and dancers.

  7. Preventing dance injuries: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Jeffrey A

    2013-01-01

    Dancers are clearly athletes in the degree to which sophisticated physical capacities are required to perform at a high level. The standard complement of athletic attributes – muscular strength and endurance, anaerobic and aerobic energy utilization, speed, agility, coordination, motor control, and psychological readiness – all are essential to dance performance. In dance, as in any athletic activity, injuries are prevalent. This paper presents the research background of dance injuries, characteristics that distinguish dance and dancers from traditional sports and athletes, and research-based perspectives into how dance injuries can be reduced or prevented, including the factors of physical training, nutrition and rest, flooring, dancing en pointe, and specialized health care access for dancers. The review concludes by offering five essential components for those involved with caring for dancers that, when properly applied, will assist them in decreasing the likelihood of dance-related injury and ensuring that dancers receive optimum attention from the health care profession: (1) screening; (2) physical training; (3) nutrition and rest; (4) specialized dance health care; and (5) becoming acquainted with the nature of dance and dancers. PMID:24379726

  8. Skiing and snowboarding injury prevention.

    PubMed

    Warda, Lynne J; Yanchar, Natalie L

    2012-01-01

    Skiing and snowboarding are popular recreational and competitive sport activities for children and youth. Injuries associated with both activities are frequent and can be serious. There is new evidence documenting the benefit of wearing helmets while skiing and snowboarding, as well as data refuting suggestions that helmet use may increase the risk of neck injury. There is also evidence to support using wrist guards while snowboarding. There is poor uptake of effective preventive measures such as protective equipment use and related policy. Physicians should have the information required to counsel children, youth and families regarding safer snow sport participation, including helmet use, wearing wrist guards for snowboarding, training and supervision, the importance of proper equipment fitting and binding adjustment, sun safety and avoiding substance use while on the slopes.

  9. Role of gastrocnemius activation in knee joint biomechanics: gastrocnemius acts as an ACL antagonist.

    PubMed

    Adouni, M; Shirazi-Adl, A; Marouane, H

    2016-01-01

    Gastrocnemius is a premier muscle crossing the knee, but its role in knee biomechanics and on the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) remains less clear when compared to hamstrings and quadriceps. The effect of changes in gastrocnemius force at late stance when it peaks on the knee joint response and ACL force was initially investigated using a lower extremity musculoskeletal model driven by gait kinematics-kinetics. The tibiofemoral joint under isolated isometric contraction of gastrocnemius was subsequently analyzed at different force levels and flexion angles (0°-90°). Changes in gastrocnemius force at late stance markedly influenced hamstrings forces. Gastrocnemius acted as ACL antagonist by substantially increasing its force. Simulations under isolated contraction of gastrocnemius confirmed this role at all flexion angles, in particular, at extreme knee flexion angles (0° and 90°). Constraint on varus/valgus rotations substantially decreased this effect. Although hamstrings and gastrocnemius are both knee joint flexors, they play opposite roles in respectively protecting or loading ACL. Although the quadriceps is also recognized as antagonist of ACL, at larger joint flexion and in contrast to quadriceps, activity in gastrocnemius substantially increased ACL forces (anteromedial bundle). The fact that gastrocnemius is an antagonist of ACL should help in effective prevention and management of ACL injuries.

  10. ACL Tears on The Rise Among Kids, Especially Girls

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163730.html ACL Tears on the Rise Among Kids, Especially Girls ... A common knee injury -- an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear -- has steadily increased among 6- to 18- ...

  11. Changes of early post-traumatic osteoarthritis in an ovine model of simulated ACL reconstruction are associated with transient acute post-injury synovial inflammation and tissue catabolism.

    PubMed

    Heard, B J; Solbak, N M; Achari, Y; Chung, M; Hart, D A; Shrive, N G; Frank, C B

    2013-12-01

    The study described here tested the hypothesis that early intra-articular inflammation is associated with the development of post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) in a sheep model. We extended previously published work in which we investigated joint gross morphology and synovial mRNA expression of inflammatory and catabolic molecules 2 weeks after anatomic Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) autograft reconstructive surgery (ACL-R). The same variables have been analyzed at 20 weeks post surgery together with new experimental variables at both time points. Animals were sacrificed at 20 weeks post ACL-R surgery and their joints graded for signs of PTOA. Synovial samples were harvested for histological grading plus mRNA and protein analysis for a panel of inflammatory and catabolic molecules. The mRNA expression levels for this panel plus connective tissue matrix turnover molecules were also investigated in cartilage samples. Results of gross morphological assessments at 20 weeks post surgery showed some changes consistent with early OA, but indicated little progression of damage from the 2 week time point. While significant alterations in mRNA levels for synovial inflammatory and catabolic molecules were detected at 2 weeks, values had normalized by 20 weeks. Similarly, all mRNA expression levels for inflammatory and catabolic molecules in articular cartilage had returned to normal levels by 20 weeks post ACL-R surgery. We conclude that synovial inflammatory processes are initiated very early after ACL-R surgery and may instigate events that lead to the gross cartilage and joint abnormalities observed as early as 2 weeks. However, the absence of sustained inflammation and joint instability may prevent OA progression.

  12. Youth Sport Injury Prevention is KEY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shimon, Jane M.

    2002-01-01

    Describes how providing a well-designed injury prevention program that includes attention to growth and development, training and conditioning, protective equipment, and emergency care can minimize youth sport injuries. (SM)

  13. Comparison of ACL strain estimated via a data-driven model with in vitro measurements.

    PubMed

    Weinhandl, Joshua T; Hoch, Matthew C; Bawab, Sebastian Y; Ringleb, Stacie I

    2016-11-01

    Computer modeling and simulation techniques have been increasingly used to investigate anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) loading during dynamic activities in an attempt to improve our understanding of injury mechanisms and development of injury prevention programs. However, the accuracy of many of these models remains unknown and thus the purpose of this study was to compare estimates of ACL strain from a previously developed three-dimensional, data-driven model with those obtained via in vitro measurements. ACL strain was measured as the knee was cycled from approximately 10° to 120° of flexion at 20 deg s(-1) with static loads of 100, 50, and 50 N applied to the quadriceps, biceps femoris and medial hamstrings (semimembranosus and semitendinosus) tendons, respectively. A two segment, five-degree-of-freedom musculoskeletal knee model was then scaled to match the cadaver's anthropometry and in silico ACL strains were then determined based on the knee joint kinematics and moments of force. Maximum and minimum ACL strains estimated in silico were within 0.2 and 0.42% of that measured in vitro, respectively. Additionally, the model estimated ACL strain with a bias (mean difference) of -0.03% and dynamic accuracy (rms error) of 0.36% across the flexion-extension cycle. These preliminary results suggest that the proposed model was capable of estimating ACL strains during a simple flexion-extension cycle. Future studies should validate the model under more dynamic conditions with variable muscle loading. This model could then be used to estimate ACL strains during dynamic sporting activities where ACL injuries are more common.

  14. Injury Risk Estimation Expertise

    PubMed Central

    Petushek, Erich J.; Ward, Paul; Cokely, Edward T.; Myer, Gregory D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Simple observational assessment of movement is a potentially low-cost method for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury screening and prevention. Although many individuals utilize some form of observational assessment of movement, there are currently no substantial data on group skill differences in observational screening of ACL injury risk. Purpose/Hypothesis: The purpose of this study was to compare various groups’ abilities to visually assess ACL injury risk as well as the associated strategies and ACL knowledge levels. The hypothesis was that sports medicine professionals would perform better than coaches and exercise science academics/students and that these subgroups would all perform better than parents and other general population members. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A total of 428 individuals, including physicians, physical therapists, athletic trainers, strength and conditioning coaches, exercise science researchers/students, athletes, parents, and members of the general public participated in the study. Participants completed the ACL Injury Risk Estimation Quiz (ACL-IQ) and answered questions related to assessment strategy and ACL knowledge. Results: Strength and conditioning coaches, athletic trainers, physical therapists, and exercise science students exhibited consistently superior ACL injury risk estimation ability (+2 SD) as compared with sport coaches, parents of athletes, and members of the general public. The performance of a substantial number of individuals in the exercise sciences/sports medicines (approximately 40%) was similar to or exceeded clinical instrument-based biomechanical assessment methods (eg, ACL nomogram). Parents, sport coaches, and the general public had lower ACL-IQ, likely due to their lower ACL knowledge and to rating the importance of knee/thigh motion lower and weight and jump height higher. Conclusion: Substantial cross-professional/group differences in visual ACL

  15. ACL Revision

    PubMed Central

    Costa-Paz, Matias; Dubois, Julieta Puig; Zicaro, Juan Pablo; Rasumoff, Alejandro; Yacuzzi, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate a series of patients one year after an ACL revision with clinical evaluation and MRI, to consider their condition before returning to sports activities. Methods: A descriptive, prospective and longitudinal study was performed. A series of patients who underwent an ACL revision between March 2014 and March 2015 were evaluated after one year post surgery. They were evaluated using the Lysholm score, IKDC, Tegner, artrometry and MRI (3.0 t). A signal pattern and osteointegration was determined in the MRI. Graft signal intensity of the ACL graft using the signal/noise quotient value (SNQ) was also determined to evaluate the ligamentatization process state. Results: A total of 18 male patients were evaluated with a mean age of 31 years old.Average scores were: Lysholm 88 points, IKDC 80 points, Pre-surgical Tegner 9 points and postoperative 4 points. Artrhometry (KT1000) at 20 newtons showed a side to side difference of less than 3 mm in 88%. Only 44% of patients returned to their previous sport activity one year after revision.The MRI showed a heterogeneous signal in neoligaments in 34% of patients. SNQ showed graft integration in only 28%. Synovial fluid was found in bone-graft interphase in 44% of tunnels, inferring partial osteointegration. The heterogeneous signal was present in 50% of patients who did not return to the previous sport level activity. (Fisher statistics: p = 0.043) There were no meaningful differences in patients with auto or allografts. Conclusion: Although the clinical evaluation was satisfactory, only 44% of patients returned to the previous level of sport activity one year after the ACL surgery. The ligamentatization process was found in 28% of knees evaluated with MRI one year later. Partial osteointegration is inferred in 44%. Results showed a meaningful relation between the signal of neoligaments in the MRI and the return to sport activity in said series of patients. MRI is a useful tool

  16. Effects of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury on muscle activity of head, neck and trunk muscles: a cross-sectional evaluation.

    PubMed

    Tecco, Simona; Salini, Vincenzo; Teté, Stefano; Festa, Felice

    2007-07-01

    This study evaluated the that effects a pathology of the knee, due to an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, has on muscular activity of neck, head, and trunk muscles. Twenty-five (25) subjects (mean age 28+/-9 years) with ACL injury of the left knee were compared with a control no-pathology group. Surface electromyography (sEMG) at mandibular rest position and maximal voluntary clenching (MVC) wasused to evaluate muscular activity of the areas: masseter, anterior temporalis, posterior cervicals, sternocleidomastoid (SCM), and upper and lower trapezius. The sEMG activity of each muscle, as well as the asymmetry index between the right and the left sides, were compared between the two groups. Subjects in the study group showed a significant increase in the asymmetry index of the sEMG activity of the anterior temporalis at mandibular rest position (p<0.05). At rest, the areas of anterior temporalis and masseter in the control group showed a significantly lower sEMG activity compared with subjects in the study group, both in the right and the left sides (p<0.05). The same was found for the sEMG activity of the areas of SCM and lower trapezius. At MVC, the right areas of anterior temporalis and masseter in the study subjects showed a significantly lower sEMG activity compared with the control group. The same was observed for the lower trapezius area, both in the right and the left sides. In general, ACL injury appears to provide a change in the sEMG activity of head, neck and trunk muscles.

  17. Injury prevention. Where are the resources?

    PubMed

    Feury, Karen Jean

    2003-01-01

    According to the Centers for Disease Control (2002), each year nearly 150,000 Americans die from injuries, making injury the leading cause of death among children and young adults and a significant problem for Americans of all ages. Nonfatal injuries account for approximately 114 million physician office visits and 25% of all emergency department examinations. It is estimated that one in four Americans will suffer a potentially preventable injury serious enough to require medical attention (Shienfield Gorin & Arnold, 1998). As injury-prevention advocates, we must address this public health problem with a multidimensional approach that includes the three Es: education, engineering, and enforcement. Professionals from many disciplines, including nurses, physicians, health educators, school teachers, social workers, police officers, firefighters, emergency medical technicians, and coaches, must have accurate information to educate. Education in injury prevention must be a collaborative approach. These injury-prevention leaders must stay informed and knowledgeable of this ever-changing science. This article highlights common injuries, preventive strategies, and resources for injury-prevention information. This information will assist the healthcare provider in finding accurate sources of information concerning injury prevention (Shienfield Gorin & Arnold, 1998).

  18. Overuse Injury: How to Prevent Training Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... type of muscle or joint injury, such as tendinitis or a stress fracture, that's caused by repetitive ... Khan K, et al. Overview of chronic (overuse) tendinopathies. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Dec. 21, ...

  19. Cheerleading Injuries. Patterns, Prevention, Case Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchinson, Mark R.

    1997-01-01

    Although cheerleading carries a relatively low injury risk, injuries that do occur can be severe, commonly affecting the ankle, head, and neck. Two case reports are presented that illustrate acute injuries typical of cheerleading. Prevention recommendations are offered related to supervising, screening, limiting stunts, optimizing the environment…

  20. Alpine ski injuries and their prevention.

    PubMed

    Koehle, Michael S; Lloyd-Smith, Rob; Taunton, Jack E

    2002-01-01

    Alpine skiing is a popular sport with significant risk of injury. Since the 1970s, injury rates have dropped from approximately 5 to 8 per 1000 skier-days to about 2 to 3 per 1000 skier-days. The nature of the injuries has also been transformed over the same period. Lower leg injuries are becoming less common while the incidence of knee sprains and upper extremity injuries is becoming more common. Much of this change can be attributed to advancements in binding technology, which effectively reduces lower leg injury, but does not adequately address the issue of knee sprains. Along with design, binding adjustment and maintenance are important preventative factors. Poorly adjusted bindings have been correlated with increased injury rates. Upper extremity injuries constitute approximately one-third of skiing injuries, with ulnar collateral ligament sprains and shoulder injuries being the most common. Strategies to prevent these include proper poling technique and avoidance of non-detachable ski pole retention devices. Spinal injuries in skiers have been traditionally much less common than in snowboarders, but this disparity is likely to diminish with the recent trend of incorporating snowboarding moves into skiing. Strategies to help reduce these injuries include promoting the development of terrain parks and focussing on proper technique during such moves. Head injuries have been increasing in incidence over recent decades and account for more than half of skiing-related deaths. The issue of ski helmets remains controversial while evidence for their efficacy remains under debate. There is no evidence to demonstrate that traditional ski instruction reduces injury frequency. More specific programmes focussed on injury prevention techniques are effective. The question of pre-season conditioning to prevent injuries needs further research to demonstrate efficacy.

  1. ACL reconstruction - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction - discharge; ACL reconstruction - discharge ... had surgery to reconstruct your anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The surgeon drilled holes in the bones of ...

  2. Common injuries and ailments of the female athlete; pathophysiology, treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Hilibrand, Miryl J; Hammoud, Sommer; Bishop, Meghan; Woods, Daniel; Fredrick, Robert W; Dodson, Christopher C

    2015-11-01

    With increasing numbers of women competing in high school and collegiate athletics, it is important that physicians become familiar with injury patterns and medical conditions unique to the female athlete. Observations and clinical data have elucidated unique biomechanical, anatomic and hormonal factors that predispose skeletally mature female athletes to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries, patellofemoral disorders and lower extremity stress fractures. Additionally, younger female athletes are particularly at risk of developing components of the "Female Athlete Triad" (more recently included under the syndrome of "Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport" [RED-S]): disordered eating, amenorrhea and osteoporosis. An understanding of the pathophysiology of these conditions has led to the development of programs that can treat their underlying causes, decrease susceptibility to injury, and improve the long-term health of the female athlete. This paper is intended to provide physicians with a review of the sex-specific etiology, prevention and treatment of injuries common to the female athlete.

  3. Cheerleading injuries: epidemiology and recommendations for prevention.

    PubMed

    LaBella, Cynthia R; Mjaanes, Jeffrey

    2012-11-01

    Over the last 30 years, cheerleading has increased dramatically in popularity and has evolved from leading the crowd in cheers at sporting events into a competitive, year-round sport involving complex acrobatic stunts and tumbling. Consequently, cheerleading injuries have steadily increased over the years in both number and severity. Sprains and strains to the lower extremities are the most common injuries. Although the overall injury rate remains relatively low, cheerleading has accounted for approximately 66% of all catastrophic injuries in high school girl athletes over the past 25 years. Risk factors for injuries in cheerleading include higher BMI, previous injury, cheering on harder surfaces, performing stunts, and supervision by a coach with low level of training and experience. This policy statement describes the epidemiology of cheerleading injuries and provides recommendations for injury prevention.

  4. The incidence of knee and anterior cruciate ligament injuries over one decade in the Belgian Soccer League.

    PubMed

    Quisquater, Laurent; Bollars, Peter; Vanlommel, Luc; Claes, Steven; Corten, Kristoff; Bellemans, Johan

    2013-10-01

    In an epidemiological study we assessed the evolution in the incidence and possible risk factors of knee injuries, especially anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries, in Belgian soccer over one decade. Two soccer seasons (1999-2000 and 2009-2010) were compared and 56,364 injury reports registered by the KBVB-URBSFA were retrieved. Knee injuries totaled 9.971 cases, 5.495 in the first season (1999-2000) and 4.476 in the second (2009-2010): a significant decrease in incidence from 1.5 per 100 players in 2000 to 1.2 knee injuries in 2010. Six percent of all knee injuries were ACL injuries. The reported incidence of ACL tears slightly increased from 0.081 to 0.084 per 100 players. Female gender, competition and age over 18 years were prognosticators for ACL injuries. Enhanced prevention programs for ACL injuries, especially in those sports groups are warranted.

  5. Prediction and prevention of musculoskeletal injury: a paradigm shift in methodology

    PubMed Central

    Quatman, C E; Quatman, C C; Hewett, T E

    2014-01-01

    Traditional methods employed to study musculoskeletal injury mechanisms and joint biomechanics utilise in vivo or in vitro techniques. The advent of new technology and improved methods has also given rise to in silico (computer modelling) techniques. Under the current research paradigm, in vivo, in vitro and in silico methods independently provide information regarding the mechanisms and prevention of musculoskeletal injury. However, individually, each of these methods has multiple, inherent limitations and is likely to provide incomplete answers about multifactorial, complex injury conditions. The purpose of this treatise is to review current methods used to study, understand, and prevent musculoskeletal injury and to develop new conceptual-methodological frameworks that may help create a paradigm shift in musculoskeletal injury prevention research. We term the fusion of these three techniques in simulacra amalgama, or simply in sim, meaning a “union of models done on the likeness of phenomena.” Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury will be employed as a model example for the utility and applicability of the proposed, synthesised approach. Shifting the current experimental paradigm to incorporate a multifaceted, multidisciplinary, integration of in vivo, in vitro and in silico methods into the proposed in sim approaches may provide a platform for a more comprehensive understanding of the relationships between complex joint biomechanics and observed injury mechanisms. PMID:19884108

  6. Prediction and prevention of musculoskeletal injury: a paradigm shift in methodology.

    PubMed

    Quatman, C E; Quatman, C C; Hewett, T E

    2009-12-01

    Traditional methods employed to study musculoskeletal injury mechanisms and joint biomechanics utilise in vivo or in vitro techniques. The advent of new technology and improved methods has also given rise to in silico (computer modelling) techniques. Under the current research paradigm, in vivo, in vitro and in silico methods independently provide information regarding the mechanisms and prevention of musculoskeletal injury. However, individually, each of these methods has multiple, inherent limitations and is likely to provide incomplete answers about multifactorial, complex injury conditions. The purpose of this treatise is to review current methods used to study, understand, and prevent musculoskeletal injury and to develop new conceptual-methodological frameworks that may help create a paradigm shift in musculoskeletal injury prevention research. We term the fusion of these three techniques in simulacra amalgama, or simply in sim, meaning a "union of models done on the likeness of phenomena." Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury will be employed as a model example for the utility and applicability of the proposed, synthesised approach. Shifting the current experimental paradigm to incorporate a multifaceted, multidisciplinary, integration of in vivo, in vitro and in silico methods into the proposed in sim approaches may provide a platform for a more comprehensive understanding of the relationships between complex joint biomechanics and observed injury mechanisms.

  7. Injury prevention: the time has come.

    PubMed Central

    Cushman, R

    1995-01-01

    Although cancer, heart disease and stroke occupy much of society's attention to health matters, injuries account for more potential years of life lost before age 65 than all these diseases combined. The time has come to set the record straight and to give injury its rightful place on the health policy agenda. Contrary to popular belief, most injuries are no accident. More than 90% of injuries are both predictable and preventable. Injury prevention, a multidisciplinary effort, is coming of age in Canada. Education alone is not enough. New technology, innovative approaches to safety education and the mobilization of community resources can help to change behaviour and legislation to decrease the risk of injury. Physicians have an important role to play in this process. PMID:7804918

  8. Tennis injuries: occurrence, aetiology, and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Pluim, B M; Staal, J B; Windler, G E; Jayanthi, N

    2006-01-01

    A systematic search of published reports was carried out in three electronic databases from 1966 on to identify relevant articles relating to tennis injuries. There were 39 case reports, 49 laboratory studies, 28 descriptive epidemiological studies, and three analytical epidemiological studies. The principal findings of the review were: first, there is a great variation in the reported incidence of tennis injuries; second, most injuries occur in the lower extremities, followed by the upper extremities and then the trunk; third, there have been very few longitudinal cohort studies that investigated the association between risk factors and the occurrence of tennis injuries (odds ratios, risk ratios, hazard ratios); and fourth, there were no randomised controlled trials investigating injury prevention measures in tennis. More methodologically sound studies are needed for a better understanding of risk factors, in order to design useful strategies to prevent tennis injuries. PMID:16632572

  9. Prevention of Hamstring Injuries in Collegiate Sprinters

    PubMed Central

    Sugiura, Yusaku; Sakuma, Kazuhiko; Sakuraba, Keishoku; Sato, Yamato

    2017-01-01

    Background: No studies have been reported on how strength, agility, and flexibility training reduce the occurrence of hamstring injuries in sprinters. Therefore, a program for preventing hamstring injury in these athletes has not been established. Purpose: To document the incidence of hamstring injuries during times when different prevention strategies were employed to see whether a particular prevention program reduced their occurrence. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: The study subjects were a total of 613 collegiate male sprinters trained by the same coach over 24 seasons. Tow training was used throughout the research period as a normal sprint training method. The hamstring injury prevention program evolved over time. From 1988 to 1991 (period 1), prevention focused on strength training alone; from 1992 to 1999 (period 2), a combination of strength and agility training was used; and from 2000 to 2011 (period 3), the program incorporated strength, agility, and flexibility training. The incidence of hamstring injuries was compared for each of the 3 prevention strategies. Results: The incidence of hamstring injuries per athlete-seasons was 137.9 for period 1, 60.6 for period 2, and 6.7 for period 3. A significant difference was observed in the incidence of hamstring injury according to the different prevention programs (χ2(2) = 31.78, P < .001, effect size: Cramer V = 0.23, 1 − β = 0.999). Residual analysis showed that the number of hamstring injuries for period 1 was significantly greater than the expected value (P < .01), whereas that for period 3 was significantly lower than the expected value (P < .01). Conclusion: The incidence of hamstring injuries in sprinters decreased as agility and flexibility were added to strength training. PMID:28210652

  10. Core Competencies for Injury and Violence Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Stephens-Stidham, Shelli; Peek-Asa, Corinne; Bou-Saada, Ingrid; Hunter, Wanda; Lindemer, Kristen; Runyan, Carol

    2009-01-01

    Efforts to reduce the burden of injury and violence require a workforce that is knowledgeable and skilled in prevention. However, there has been no systematic process to ensure that professionals possess the necessary competencies. To address this deficiency, we developed a set of core competencies for public health practitioners in injury and violence prevention programs. The core competencies address domains including public health significance, data, the design and implementation of prevention activities, evaluation, program management, communication, stimulating change, and continuing education. Specific learning objectives establish goals for training in each domain. The competencies assist in efforts to reduce the burden of injury and violence and can provide benchmarks against which to assess progress in professional capacity for injury and violence prevention. PMID:19197083

  11. Ways to Prevent Percussion Overuse Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fidyk, Steve

    2009-01-01

    It is a proven fact that the repetitive nature of percussion playing can cause carpal tunnel syndrome, bursitis, and tendinitis. This paper offers ways to prevent percussion overuse injuries, particularly by developing a healthy warmup routine.

  12. Community-based Injury Prevention Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klassen, Terry P.; MacKay, J. Morag; Moher, David; Walker, Annie; Jones, Alison L.

    2000-01-01

    Reviewed 32 studies that evaluated the impact of community-based injury prevention efforts on childhood injuries, safety behaviors, and adoption of safety devices. Interventions targeted schools, municipalities, and cities. This approach effectively increased some safety practices (e.g, bicycle helmet and car seat use) but not others. Common…

  13. Knee Braces to Prevent Injuries in Football.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physician and Sportsmedicine, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Five physicians discuss the use of knee braces to prevent injuries in football players. Questions are raised regarding the strength and design of the braces, whether they prestress the knee in some cases, and whether they actually reduce injuries. More clinical and biomechanical research is called for. (MT)

  14. Barefoot running: does it prevent injuries?

    PubMed

    Murphy, Kelly; Curry, Emily J; Matzkin, Elizabeth G

    2013-11-01

    Endurance running has evolved over the course of millions of years and it is now one of the most popular sports today. However, the risk of stress injury in distance runners is high because of the repetitive ground impact forces exerted. These injuries are not only detrimental to the runner, but also place a burden on the medical community. Preventative measures are essential to decrease the risk of injury within the sport. Common running injuries include patellofemoral pain syndrome, tibial stress fractures, plantar fasciitis, and Achilles tendonitis. Barefoot running, as opposed to shod running (with shoes), has recently received significant attention in both the media and the market place for the potential to promote the healing process, increase performance, and decrease injury rates. However, there is controversy over the use of barefoot running to decrease the overall risk of injury secondary to individual differences in lower extremity alignment, gait patterns, and running biomechanics. While barefoot running may benefit certain types of individuals, differences in running stance and individual biomechanics may actually increase injury risk when transitioning to barefoot running. The purpose of this article is to review the currently available clinical evidence on barefoot running and its effectiveness for preventing injury in the runner. Based on a review of current literature, barefoot running is not a substantiated preventative running measure to reduce injury rates in runners. However, barefoot running utility should be assessed on an athlete-specific basis to determine whether barefoot running will be beneficial.

  15. Dynamic neuromuscular analysis training for preventing anterior cruciate ligament injury in female athletes.

    PubMed

    Hewett, Timothy E; Myer, Gregory D; Ford, Kevin R; Slauterbeck, James R

    2007-01-01

    Female athletes are four to six times more likely to sustain an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury than male athletes. Since the enactment of Title IX, male athletic participation at the high school level has remained steady (3.8 million), whereas female athletic participation has increased tenfold (from 0.3 to 3.0 million). Geometric growth in athletic participation and the higher injury rate in female athletes have led to gender inequity in ACL injury rates. Most ACL injuries occur as a result of noncontact mechanisms such as during landing from a jump or while making a lateral pivot. Dynamic knee instability, caused by ligament dominance (decreased dynamic neuromuscular control of the joint), quadriceps dominance (decreased hamstring strength and recruitment), and leg dominance (side-to-side differences in strength and coordination) may be responsible for gender inequity in ACL injury rates.

  16. Risk Factors for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Helen C.; Vacek, Pamela; Johnson, Robert J.; Slauterbeck, James R.; Hashemi, Javad; Shultz, Sandra; Beynnon, Bruce D.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are immediately disabling and are associated with long-term consequences, such as posttraumatic osteoarthritis. It is important to have a comprehensive understanding of all possible risk factors for ACL injury to identify individuals who are at risk for future injuries and to provide an appropriate level of counseling and programs for prevention. Objective: This review, part 2 of a 2-part series, highlights what is known and still unknown regarding hormonal, genetic, cognitive function, previous injury, and extrinsic risk factors for ACL injury. Data Sources: Studies were identified from MEDLINE (1951–March 2011) using the MeSH terms anterior cruciate ligament, knee injury, and risk factors. The bibliographies of relevant articles and reviews were cross-referenced to complete the search. Study Selection: Prognostic case-control and prospective cohort study designs to evaluate risk factors for ACL injury were included in this review. Results: A total of 50 case-control and prospective cohort articles were included in parts 1 and 2. Twenty-one focused on hormonal, genetic, cognitive function, previous injury, and extrinsic risk factors. Conclusions: Several risk factors are associated with increased risk of suffering ACL injury—such as female sex, prior reconstruction of the ACL, and familial predisposition. These risk factors most likely act in combination with the anatomic factors reviewed in part 1 of this series to influence the risk of suffering ACL injury. PMID:23016083

  17. Pressure injuries: causes and prevention.

    PubMed

    Bliss, M R

    1998-11-01

    Pressure injuries are caused by peripheral circulatory failure in acutely ill or traumatized patients, which is exacerbated by increased tissue deformability over bony prominences as a result of hypotension, dehydration or poor muscle tone.

  18. [Causes and prevention of typical volleyball injuries].

    PubMed

    Hell, H; Schönle, C

    1985-01-01

    A survey conducted among 224 volleyball players in the German Federal League revealed a high number of serious injuries. The upper ankle joint (55.1% of all serious injuries) and the fingers (22.4%) were most commonly affected. The principal cause of the accidents was a collision with an opponent at the net. There is a close relationship between the player's position, the part he plays in the game and the frequency of injury. Aside from other measures a change of one of the international volleyball rules would represent a suitable method of preventing such injuries.

  19. Firearm injury prevention training in Preventive Medicine Residency programs.

    PubMed

    Khubchandani, Jagdish; Price, James H; Dake, Joseph A

    2009-08-01

    Preventive medicine plays a central role in the reducing the number of deaths due to preventable causes of premature deaths. General Preventive Medicine Residency programs have not been studied in relation to training in this area. A three-wave mail survey was conducted with email and telephone follow-ups. The outcome measures were the portion of program directors involved in training residents on firearm injury prevention issues and their perceived benefits and barriers of training residents on firearm injury prevention issues. Only 25% of the programs provided formal training on firearm injury prevention. Program directors who provided formal training perceived significantly higher number of benefits to offering such training than did directors who did not provide such training but no significant difference was found between the two for number of perceived barriers. If preventive medicine residency graduates are to play a role in reducing premature morbidity and mortality from firearms it will require more residencies to offer formal training in this area. The Association for Prevention Teaching and Research needs to develop guidelines on specific curriculum topics regarding firearm injury prevention.

  20. Hamstring Strain Injuries: Recommendations for Diagnosis, Rehabilitation and Injury Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Heiderscheit, Bryan C.; Sherry, Marc A.; Silder, Amy; Chumanov, Elizabeth S.; Thelen, Darryl G.

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Hamstring strain injuries remain a challenge for both athletes and clinicians given the high incidence rate, slow healing, and persistent symptoms. Moreover, nearly one-third of these injuries recur within the first year following a return to sport, with subsequent injuries often being more severe than the original. This high reinjury rate suggests that commonly utilized rehabilitation programs may be inadequate at resolving possible muscular weakness, reduced tissue extensibility, and/or altered movement patterns associated with the injury. Further, the traditional criteria used to determine the readiness of the athlete to return to sport may be insensitive to these persistent deficits, resulting in a premature return. There is mounting evidence that the risk of reinjury can be minimized by utilizing rehabilitation strategies that incorporate neuromuscular control exercises and eccentric strength training, combined with objective measures to assess musculotendon recovery and readiness to return to sport. In this paper, we first describe the diagnostic examination of an acute hamstring strain injury, including discussion of the value of determining injury location in estimating the duration of the convalescent period. Based on the current available evidence, we then propose a clinical guide for the rehabilitation of acute hamstring injuries including specific criteria for treatment progression and return to sport. Finally, we describe directions for future research including injury-specific rehabilitation programs, objective measures to assess reinjury risk, and strategies to prevent injury occurrence. Level of evidence: Diagnosis/therapy, level 5. PMID:20118524

  1. Preventing gun injuries in children.

    PubMed

    Crossen, Eric J; Lewis, Brenna; Hoffman, Benjamin D

    2015-02-01

    Firearms are involved in the injury and death of a large number of children each year from both intentional and unintentional causes. Gun ownership in homes with children is common, and pediatricians should incorporate evidence-based means to discuss firearms and protect children from gun-related injuries and violence. Safe storage of guns, including unloaded guns locked and stored separately from ammunition, can decrease risks to children, and effective tools are available that pediatricians can use in clinical settings to help decrease children's access to firearms. Furthermore, several community-based interventions led by pediatricians have effectively reduced firearm-related injury risks to children. Educational programs that focus on children's behavior around guns have not proven effective.

  2. Injuries and injury prevention among indigenous children and young people.

    PubMed

    Berger, Lawrence R; Wallace, L J David; Bill, Nancy M

    2009-12-01

    Throughout the world, injuries and violence are a leading cause of mortality and suffering among Indigenous communities. Among American Indian and Alaska Native children aged 1 to 19 years, 71% of deaths are from injuries. Motor-vehicle accidents, attempted suicide, and interpersonal violence are the most common causes of injuries in highly industrialized countries. For Indigenous populations in middle- and low-income countries, trauma caused by motor-vehicle accidents, agricultural injuries, interpersonal violence, child labor, and the ravages of war are priorities for intervention. To be effective, injury-prevention efforts should be based on scientific evidence, be developmentally and culturally appropriate, and draw on the inherent strengths of Indigenous communities.

  3. Continuous ACL graft, results

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Jorge Luis; Vega, Marcelo; Matesevach, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: describe our technique using hamstring graft that respects the proximal continuity of Semitendinosus and uses the superior biological potential of the distal periosteum., preserving and stressing the ST reinforce the retropulsión and dynamic control of external rotation of the knee. Here the technique, results, difficulties and foundations. Methods: The sample of this research was composed of 229 cases operated between 01/03/97 and 01/03/13 in Arthroscopy Private Center., 166 male and 63 female, the postop follow-up was 86 months. Evaluated with IKDC, Lysholm, Hamstring EMG. Comparative histology study in rabbits. Results: IKDC and Lysholm score showed 93% of very good results. Conclusion: Dynamic ACL reconstruction achieves a static-dynamic stabilization of the knee. Grafts have a plus in their biological potential (proximal continuity - osteo-periosteal insertion of the tendons in the femoral tunnel). The hamstring maintains its functionality (EMG). 93% satisfactory results (IKDC, Lysholm). It is a valid surgical option in ACL injuries.

  4. Prevention of sports-related eye injury.

    PubMed

    Stock, J G; Cornell, F M

    1991-08-01

    Sports-related eye injury is an important cause of vision loss. Many eye injuries can be prevented through the supervision of play, the enforcement of game rules and the use of eye protective devices. State-of-the-art eye protective devices incorporate highly impact-resistant optical material, usually polycarbonate lenses, in a sturdy frame. Protective devices are available for use in racquet sports, baseball, basketball, football, ice hockey and other sports.

  5. Recognition and Prevention of Rugby Injuries.

    PubMed

    Tomasin, J D; Martin, D F; Curl, W W

    1989-06-01

    In brief: Rugby is a popular, strenuous contact sport that demands almost continuous action by the players. Players, coaches, and physicians must be aware of the potential for and types of injuries that occur during matches and of ways to avoid, or at least reduce, this number and severity. Minor and moderate injuries are more frequent than severe injuries, but all must be regarded seriously. Concussions, although relatively rare, can have serious consequences, and cervical spine injuries can be catastrophic. Player fitness and conditioning and a pregame warm-up are all essential for preventing injuries. Equally important are coaching, adherence to the rules of the game, and avoidance of dangerous play. If these measures are practiced consistently, rugby will be safer.

  6. Preventing injuries and illnesses in the wilderness.

    PubMed

    Angert, David; Schaff, Eric A

    2010-06-01

    Wilderness trips have become increasingly popular, especially in the adolescent population. The wilderness can be a source of rejuvenation while being mentally and physically challenging; however, it is also fraught with the potential for injury, illness, and even death. Epidemiologic studies of injuries and illnesses from hikers are not extensive, but there are sufficient data to identify the most common risk factors to offer some strategies for prevention. Many youth will have a medical visit or preparticipation physical assessment before an organized wilderness experience. This article highlights commonly seen wilderness injuries and illnesses and provides guidance for proper planning and problem solving.

  7. Spinal Cord Injury Prevention Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... knee and elbow pads, wrist braces, and gloves. Swimming/diving prevention tips • Do not dive in water ... all rules and warning signs at water parks, swimming pools, and public beaches. • The first time you ...

  8. Childhood injury prevention: time for tougher measures.

    PubMed Central

    Pless, I B

    1996-01-01

    The publication in this issue of an article describing the fatal strangulation of two children on clothing drawstrings (see pages 1417 to 1419) coincides with National Child Day. This juxtaposition prompts the author to examine Canadian child health policy and practices in relation to injury prevention and product safety. The absence of a central body in Canada responsible for injury prevention may reflect the absence of advocacy groups concerned exclusively with the prevention of childhood injuries and stands in sharp contrast to the attention given to various "high-profile" but comparatively rare childhood diseases. In Canada, taking a firm regulatory or legislative approach to product safety appears to be the exception rather than the rule. Instead, we rely on product safety bulletins, the effectiveness of which has never been evaluated. The adoption of tougher measures would be facilitated by the establishment of a national centre for injury prevention and control. Such centres in the United States and Sweden have been successful and demonstrate that the creation of a Canadian body responsible for addressing the epidemic of accidental injury is long overdue. PMID:8943931

  9. A meta-analysis of the effect of neuromuscular training on the prevention of the anterior cruciate ligament injury in female athletes.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jae Ho; Lim, Bee Oh; Ha, Mina; Lee, Soo Won; Oh, Soo Jin; Lee, Yong Seuk; Kim, Jin Goo

    2010-06-01

    Female athletes are more prone to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury than their male counterparts, presumably because of anatomical, hormonal, and neuromuscular differences. Of these three, only the neuromuscular component can be modified by preventive exercise. We aimed to evaluate the effect of a neuromuscular protocol on the prevention of ACL injury by performing meta-analysis, and to identify essential factors by subgroup analysis. An extensive literature review was conducted to identify relevant studies, and eventually, only seven randomized controlled trials or prospective cohort studies were included in the analysis. The odds ratios (OR) and the confidence interval (CI) for the overall effects of training and of potentially contributory factors were estimated. The OR and the 95% CI for the overall effect of the preventive training were 0.40 and [0.27, 0.60], respectively. Subgroup analysis revealed that an age under 18, soccer rather than handball, pre- and in-season training rather than either pre- or in-season training, and the plyometrics and strengthening components rather than balancing were significant. Meta-analysis showed that pre- and in-season neuromuscular training with an emphasis on plyometrics and strengthening exercises was effective at preventing ACL injury in female athletes, especially in those under 18 years of age. Further study is required to develop a relevant training program protocol of appropriate intensity.

  10. Degeneration in ACL Injured Knees with and without Reconstruction in Relation to Muscle Size and Fat Content—Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Thomas; Nevitt, Michael C.; Nardo, Lorenzo; Gersing, Alexandra S.; Lane, Nancy E.; McCulloch, Charles E.; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Link, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL) injuries represent a major risk factor for early osteoarthritis (OA). Purpose To evaluate the prevalence and 4-year progression of knee OA measured with 3T MR-imaging in individuals with ruptured, reconstructed or normal ACL and to assess the impact of thigh muscle characteristics. Methods A total of 54 knees (23/54 male, 31/54 female) were recruited from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI). At baseline, 15/54 subjects had prevalent ACL ruptures and 15/54 subjects had prevalent ACL reconstruction (24/54 normal ACL). Western Ontario and McMasters Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) scores, Physical Activity Scores of the Elderly (PASE) and thigh muscle characteristics including strength, fat infiltration (Goutallier score) and thigh muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) MR measurements were obtained at baseline. Whole-organ MR-imaging Scores (WORMS) were obtained at baseline and at a 4-year follow-up time-point. Multivariate regression models, adjusting for covariates (age, gender, body mass index), were used for statistical analysis. Results At baseline, subjects with prevalent ACL ruptures had worse WORMS total scores (mean±SEM, 44.1±3.5) than subjects with ACL reconstruction (30.8±4.0; P = 0.015) and worse than subjects with normal ACL (21.3±3.0; P<0.001). Cartilage scores were worse in both femorotibial compartments in ACL injured knees than in knees with normal ACL (P<0.05). Knees with ACL reconstruction showed an increased degeneration of the medial meniscus (P = 0.036), cartilage degeneration at the medial femoral condyle (P = 0.011). In a multivariate regression model, including both ACL groups and total muscle characteristics as influence parameters, high thigh muscle CSA, high muscle/ fat ratio and low Goutallier scores were associated with less degenerative changes at the knee, independent of ACL status. Knees with ACL reconstruction showed an increased progression of cartilage degeneration at the medial tibia

  11. Gastrointestinal radiation injury: Prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Shadad, Abobakr K; Sullivan, Frank J; Martin, Joseph D; Egan, Laurence J

    2013-01-01

    With the recent advances in detection and treatment of cancer, there is an increasing emphasis on the efficacy and safety aspects of cancer therapy. Radiation therapy is a common treatment for a wide variety of cancers, either alone or in combination with other treatments. Ionising radiation injury to the gastrointestinal tract is a frequent side effect of radiation therapy and a considerable proportion of patients suffer acute or chronic gastrointestinal symptoms as a result. These side effects often cause morbidity and may in some cases lower the efficacy of radiotherapy treatment. Radiation injury to the gastrointestinal tract can be minimised by either of two strategies: technical strategies which aim to physically shift radiation dose away from the normal intestinal tissues, and biological strategies which aim to modulate the normal tissue response to ionising radiation or to increase its resistance to it. Although considerable improvement in the safety of radiotherapy treatment has been achieved through the use of modern optimised planning and delivery techniques, biological techniques may offer additional further promise. Different agents have been used to prevent or minimize the severity of gastrointestinal injury induced by ionising radiation exposure, including biological, chemical and pharmacological agents. In this review we aim to discuss various technical strategies to prevent gastrointestinal injury during cancer radiotherapy, examine the different therapeutic options for acute and chronic gastrointestinal radiation injury and outline some examples of research directions and considerations for prevention at a pre-clinical level. PMID:23345942

  12. Stretching and injury prevention: an obscure relationship.

    PubMed

    Witvrouw, Erik; Mahieu, Nele; Danneels, Lieven; McNair, Peter

    2004-01-01

    It is generally accepted that increasing the flexibility of a muscle-tendon unit promotes better performances and decreases the number of injuries. Stretching exercises are regularly included in warm-up and cooling-down exercises; however, contradictory findings have been reported in the literature. Several authors have suggested that stretching has a beneficial effect on injury prevention. In contrast, clinical evidence suggesting that stretching before exercise does not prevent injuries has also been reported. Apparently, no scientifically based prescription for stretching exercises exists and no conclusive statements can be made about the relationship of stretching and athletic injuries. Stretching recommendations are clouded by misconceptions and conflicting research reports. We believe that part of these contradictions can be explained by considering the type of sports activity in which an individual is participating. Sports involving bouncing and jumping activities with a high intensity of stretch-shortening cycles (SSCs) [e.g. soccer and football] require a muscle-tendon unit that is compliant enough to store and release the high amount of elastic energy that benefits performance in such sports. If the participants of these sports have an insufficient compliant muscle-tendon unit, the demands in energy absorption and release may rapidly exceed the capacity of the muscle-tendon unit. This may lead to an increased risk for injury of this structure. Consequently, the rationale for injury prevention in these sports is to increase the compliance of the muscle-tendon unit. Recent studies have shown that stretching programmes can significantly influence the viscosity of the tendon and make it significantly more compliant, and when a sport demands SSCs of high intensity, stretching may be important for injury prevention. This conjecture is in agreement with the available scientific clinical evidence from these types of sports activities. In contrast, when the type

  13. Noise Injury: Etiology and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Lees, R. E. M.

    1982-01-01

    Exposure to noise might be responsible for a wide and varied spectrum of physical and mental morbidity, although many of the claims of cause and effect relationship are controversial and unproven. The etiological relationship between noise and high frequency hearing loss is, however, well documented. While noise-induced hearing loss is considered to be primarily an occupational problem, current leisure time activities have created the potential for it to become more common in the community at large. Once developed, this hearing loss is permanent and cannot be influenced by therapy. Noise-induced hearing loss is almost completely preventable and the family physician has an important responsibility for primary and secondary prevention, whether the noise source is in the workplace or in some other location. PMID:21286519

  14. [Typical injuries in snowboarding. Possible prevention strategies].

    PubMed

    Ehrnthaller, C; Gebhard, F; Kusche, H

    2014-01-01

    Due to the specific position on a snowboard, crashes often result in snowboard-specific injuries. As snowboarding nowadays represents a mass sport, treatment of injured snowboarders is becoming common clinical practice. Optimal treatment makes knowledge about snowboard-specific injuries and their underlying mechanisms mandatory. The upper extremities are most frequently affected, with the most frequent injury being the distal radius fracture. Because especially beginners are more often injured, prevention strategies seem to be promising. It was demonstrated that wrist-protection guards are able to decrease the risk of suffering a distal radius fracture. Moreover, use of a helmet was also shown to be protective. Against this background, wearing protective gear such as wrist guards and helmets is strongly recommended to decrease injury severity and frequency.

  15. Mycotic Infection post ACL Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Costa-Paz, Matias; Ayerza, Miguel; Carbo, Lisandro; Sanchez, Marisa; Yacuzzi, Carlos; Muscolo, Luis

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: There are several studies in literature of septic arthritis after the ACL arthroscopic reconstruction related to bacterial germs. However, fungi infection is likely infrequent generating a massive bone loss with a catastrophic result. The purpose of this study was to describe preventive measures to decrease the mycotic infection after ACL reconstruction. Methods: Since 2005, we have diagnosed and treated 22 immunocompetent patients who underwent a surgery of an ACL lesion in other institutions in the country. Form these cases, we analyzed 19 which developed mycotic infection and an oncologic debridement was performed to control the pathology. In this series, we considered the initial surgery, the number of toilettes performed until their referral, magnitude of bone loss and final outcome. There were 5 other patients who consulted for mucormycosis, who finally were treated in other hospitals. Results: Epidemiology of mucormycosis is not clear. The exact cause is unknown due to heterogeneous data, different places and surgeons, facilities and type of surgical instruments in this series. In spite of not knowing the cause of the infection, several alternatives were evaluated in a non systematic way. Most of them related to the surgery room, sterilization place of the surgical tools, use of sterilizing liquids, cleanliness of lumen and cannulated bits. Instruments used during surgery were also evaluated: fields, shaver blades, drill types, ACL reconstruction fixation method. It is doubtful if the type of graft to reconstruct the ACL had any relation with infections. Among ideal preventive measures, the following are described: Surgery room with temperature and humidity control. Not using sterilizing liquids. Optimal preparation of surgical tools with adequate cleanliness of lumen and cannulated bits performed by adequate personnel. Sterilize in the same place where the surgery will be performed. Use of adequate instruments. The use of the central third of

  16. Acute effects of static stretching of hamstring on performance and ACL injury risk during stop-jump and cutting tasks in female athletes.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Mianfang; Zhang, Qiang; Wu, Xie

    2017-01-11

    There is limited research investigating antagonist stretch. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of SSH on performance and ACL injury risk during stop-jump and 180° cutting tasks. Twelve female college athletes (age 20.8 ± 0.7 years; height 1.61 ± 0.05 m; mass 54.25 ± 4.22 kg) participated in this study. Subjects performed stop-jump and 180° cutting tasks under two conditions: after warm-up with 4×30 s SSH or after warm-up without SSH. Three-dimensional kinematic and kinetic data as well as EMG of biceps femoris (BF), rectus femoris (RF), vastus medialis (VM), and gastrocnemius medialis (GM) were collected during testing. SSH significantly enhanced jump height by 5.1% (P = 0.009), but did not change the takeoff speed of cutting. No significant changes in peak knee adduction moment or peak anterior tibia shear force were observed with SSH regardless of the task. The peak lateral tibia shear force during cutting was significantly (P = 0.036) reduced with SSH. The co-contraction of hamstring and quadriceps during the preactivation (stop-jump: P = 0.04; cutting: P = 0.05) and downward phases (stop-jump: P = 0.04; cutting: P = 0.05) was significantly reduced after SSH regardless of the task. The results suggest that SSH enhanced the performance of stop-jump due to decreased co-contraction of hamstring and quadriceps, but did not change the performance of cutting. In addition, SSH did not increase ACL injury risk during stop-jump and cutting tasks and even reduced medial-lateral knee loading during cutting.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND) , where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.

  17. Pediatricians Offer Heads-Up for Preventing Soccer Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163060.html Pediatricians Offer Heads-Up for Preventing Soccer Injuries Sprains and strains ... benefit from wearing heel cups or arch supports. Head injuries: Concussions are a common soccer-related injury. ...

  18. Accidental injury: risk and preventative interventions

    PubMed Central

    van Weeghel, I.; Kendrick, D.; Marsh, P.

    1997-01-01

    Accepted 16 April 1997
 OBJECTIVE—To evaluate the relation between risk factors for childhood unintentional injury and requests for injury prevention interventions as part of the Nottingham Safe at Home project, a primary care based controlled intervention study assessing the effectiveness of a package of injury prevention interventions.
SETTING—17 practices in Nottingham randomly selected from 55 practices volunteering to take part in the study.
METHODS—Postal questionnaire to all parents of children aged 3 to 12 months registered with the intervention practices (n = 1124) to assess risk factors for injury and to elicit requests for three injury prevention interventions: free home safety checks, low cost safety equipment, and free first aid training.
RESULTS—73% of parents responded to the questionnaire. The distribution of sociodemographic variables among responders was similar to that for the population of Nottingham. One third of parents (34%) requested one intervention, 21% requested two interventions, and 10% requested three. Receipt of means tested benefits, ethnicity, and residence in a deprived area were independently associated with requesting home safety checks. Non-owner occupation, lack of access to a car, receipt of means tested benefits, ethnicity, and unemployment were independently associated with requesting low cost safety equipment. Non-owner occupiers were less likely to request first aid training.
CONCLUSIONS—Families with risk factors for childhood unintentional injury do request home safety checks and low cost safety equipment, but they are less likely to request first aid training. Other methods for providing first aid advice may be needed to reach such families.

 PMID:9279147

  19. CDC Vital Signs: Motor Vehicle Crash Injuries: Costly but Preventable

    MedlinePlus

    ... Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Motor Vehicle Crash Injuries Costly but Preventable Language: English Español ( ... and how to prevent future crashes. Problem Motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of injury in ...

  20. Does the lateral intercondylar ridge disappear in ACL deficient patients?

    PubMed

    van Eck, Carola F; Morse, Kenneth R; Lesniak, Bryson P; Kropf, Eric J; Tranovich, Michael J; van Dijk, C Niek; Fu, Freddie H

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether there is a difference in the presence of the lateral intercondylar ridge and the lateral bifurcate ridge between patients with sub-acute and chronic ACL injuries. We hypothesized that the ridges would be present less often with chronic ACL deficiency. Twenty-five patients with a chronic ACL injury were matched for age and gender to 25 patients with a sub-acute ACL injury. The lateral intercondylar ridge and lateral bifurcate ridge were scored as either present, absent, or indeterminate due to insufficient visualization by three blinded observers. The kappa for the three observers was .61 for the lateral intercondylar ridge and .58 for the lateral bifurcate ridge. The lateral intercondylar ridge was present in 88% of the sub-acute patients and 88% of the chronic patients. The lateral bifurcate ridge was present in 48% of the sub-acute and 48% of the chronic patients. This matched-pairs case-control study was unable to show a difference in the presence of the femoral bony ridges between patients with acute and chronic ACL injuries. The authors would suggest looking for the ridges as a landmark of the native ACL insertion site during ACL reconstruction in both acute and chronic ACL injuries.

  1. Contributions of the anterolateral complex and the anterolateral ligament to rotatory knee stability in the setting of ACL Injury: a roundtable discussion.

    PubMed

    Musahl, Volker; Getgood, Alan; Neyret, Philippe; Claes, Steven; Burnham, Jeremy M; Batailler, Cecile; Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand; Williams, Andy; Amis, Andrew; Zaffagnini, Stefano; Karlsson, Jón

    2017-03-12

    Persistent rotatory knee laxity is increasingly recognized as a common finding after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. While the reasons behind rotator knee laxity are multifactorial, the impact of the anterolateral knee structures is significant. As such, substantial focus has been directed toward better understanding these structures, including their anatomy, biomechanics, in vivo function, injury patterns, and the ideal procedures with which to address any rotatory knee laxity that results from damage to these structures. However, the complexity of lateral knee anatomy, varying dissection techniques, differing specimen preparation methods, inconsistent sectioning techniques in biomechanical studies, and confusing terminology have led to discrepancies in published studies on the topic. Furthermore, anatomical and functional descriptions have varied widely. As such, we have assembled a panel of expert surgeons and scientists to discuss the roles of the anterolateral structures in rotatory knee laxity, the healing potential of these structures, the most appropriate procedures to address rotatory knee laxity, and the indications for these procedures. In this round table discussion, KSSTA Editor-in-Chief Professor Jón Karlsson poses a variety of relevant and timely questions, and experts from around the world provide answers based on their personal experiences, scientific study, and interpretations of the literature. Level of evidence V.

  2. Implementing Injury Prevention Counseling in a Clinic Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeBailly, Susan A.; And Others

    While physicians should provide injury prevention counseling to parents of young children, they do not always feel they are adequately prepared to provide such counseling. An injury prevention training project was developed to train physicians in injury prevention counseling and to examine factors related to parental compliance with injury…

  3. Global collaboration on road traffic injury prevention.

    PubMed

    Peden, Margie

    2005-06-01

    Worldwide, nearly 1.2 million people are killed in road traffic crashes every year and 20 million to 50 million more are injured or disabled. These injuries account for 2.1% of global mortality and 2.6% of all disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) lost. Low- and middle-income countries account for about 85% of the deaths and 90% of the DALYs lost annually. Without appropriate action, by 2020, road traffic injuries are predicted to be the third leading contributor to the global burden of disease. The economic cost of road traffic crashes is enormous. Globally it is estimated that US$518 billion is spent on road traffic crashes with low- and middle-income countries accounting for US$65 billion--more than these countries receive in development assistance. But these costs are just the tip of the iceberg. For everyone killed, injured or disabled by a road traffic crash there are countless others deeply affected. Many families are driven into poverty by the expenses of prolonged medical care, loss of a family breadwinner or the added burden of caring for the disabled. There is an urgent need for global collaboration on road traffic injury prevention. Since 2000, WHO has stepped up its response to the road safety crisis by firstly developing a 5-year strategy for road traffic injury prevention and following this by dedicating World Health Day 2004 to road safety and launching the WHO/World Bank World Report on Road Traffic Injury Prevention at the global World Health Day event in Paris, France. This short article highlights the main messages from the World Report and the six recommendations for action on road safety at a national and international level. It goes on to briefly discuss other international achievements since World Health Day and calls for countries to take up the challenge of implementing the recommendations of the World Report.

  4. Repetitive strain injury: causes, treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Shuttleworth, Ann

    Repetitive strain injury (RSI) has become increasingly prevalent with the growth of computer-based and automated occupations. While environmental factors such as work stations and repetitive tasks are primary causes, a number of secondary causes can increase a person's risk of RSI. Various treatments provide relief but the rate of recovery varies widely. Prevention involves adopting a range of measures that will also promote recovery in those with RSI.

  5. Injury prevention for children with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Gaebler-Spira, Deborah; Thornton, Lisa S

    2002-11-01

    Little injury data exists for children who have disabilities. There is an urgent need to address injury prevention and to improve safety standards for this group. Understanding the epidemiology of injuries will allow clinicians to accurately advise patients and their families on individual risks and counsel them in steps to take to reduce those risks. Safety information must be tailored to consider each child's functional impairments. All children who have disabilities are at risk for maltreatment. Open discussion of this problem is warranted given the immensity of the problem. Identifying parental concerns and supporting parents in the use of respite resources are appropriate. For children who have problems in mobility, falls are the number one concern. Collaboration with reliable vendors and therapists that adhere to standards for safe seating is essential for reducing the risk of wheelchair tips and falls. In addition, therapists should be directed to provide mobility training for activities from safe transfers to street crossing in a community setting. Parents should be counseled to approach their child's injury risk based on the child's cognitive and behavioral level rather than their chronological level. Knowledge of the child's developmental quotient or intelligence quotient will also allow the clinician to accurately formulate an injury prevention plan. Many children will always need supervision for tasks that put them in situations of injury risk (i.e., swimming, street crossing, bathing). Sensorineural deficits such as blindness or deafness create significant alterations in negotiating the environment and an increased risk of injury. Awareness of the special needs for fire risk reduction and street safety are critical in this population. The collection of injury data is critical to define the scope of the problem and to influence changes in policy and the development of technical standards. Educational efforts focused on safety should include

  6. Quantification of the role of tibial posterior slope in knee joint mechanics and ACL force in simulated gait.

    PubMed

    Marouane, H; Shirazi-Adl, A; Hashemi, J

    2015-07-16

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is a common knee joint injury with higher prevalence in female athletes. In search of contributing mechanisms, clinical imaging studies of ACL-injured individuals versus controls have found greater medial-lateral posterior tibial slope (PTS) in injured population irrespective of the sex and in females compared to males, with stronger evidence on the lateral plateau slope. To quantify these effects, we use a lower extremity musculoskeletal model including a detailed finite element (FE) model of the knee joint to compute the role of changes in medial and/or lateral PTS by ±5° and ±10° on knee joint biomechanics, in general, and ACL force, in particular, throughout the stance phase of gait. The model is driven by reported kinematics/kinetics of gait in asymptomatic subjects. Our predictions showed, at all stance periods, a substantial increase in the anterior tibial translation (ATT) and ACL force as PTS increased with reverse trends as PTS decreased. At mid-stance, for example, ACL force increased from 181 N to 317 N and 460 N as PTS increased by 5° and 10°, respectively, while dropped to 102 N and 0 N as PTS changed by -5° and -10°, respectively. These effects are caused primarily by change in PTS at the tibial plateau that carries a larger portion of joint contact force. Steeper PTS is a major risk factor, especially under activities with large compression, in markedly increasing ACL force and its vulnerability to injury. Rehabilitation and ACL injury prevention programs could benefit from these findings.

  7. Timing Sequence of Multi-Planar Knee Kinematics Revealed by Physiologic Cadaveric Simulation of Landing: Implications for ACL Injury Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Kiapour, Ata M.; Quatman, Carmen E.; Goel, Vijay K.; Wordeman, Samuel C.; Hewett, Timothy E.; Demetropoulos, Constantine K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Challenges in accurate, in vivo quantification of multi-planar knee kinematics and relevant timing sequence during high-risk injurious tasks pose challenges in understanding the relative contributions of joint loads in non-contact injury mechanisms. Biomechanical testing on human cadaveric tissue, if properly designed, offers a practical means to evaluate joint biomechanics and injury mechanisms. This study seeks to investigate detailed interactions between tibiofemoral joint multi-planar kinematics and anterior cruciate ligament strain in a cadaveric model of landing using a validated physiologic drop-stand apparatus. Methods Sixteen instrumented cadaveric legs, 45(SD 7) years (8 female and 8 male) were tested. Event timing sequence, change in tibiofemoral kinematics (position, angular velocity and linear acceleration) and change in anterior cruciate ligament strain were quantified. Findings The proposed cadaveric model demonstrated similar tibiofemoral kinematics/kinetics as reported measurements obtained from in vivo studies. While knee flexion, anterior tibial translation, knee abduction and increased anterior cruciate ligament strain initiated and reached maximum values almost simultaneously, internal tibial rotation initiated and peaked (p<0.015 for all comparisons) significantly later. Further, internal tibial rotation reached 1.8(SD 2.5)°, almost 63% of its maximum value, at the time that peak anterior cruciate ligament strain occurred, while both anterior tibial translation and knee abduction had already reached their peaks. Interpretation Together, these findings indicate that although internal tibial rotation contributes to increased anterior cruciate ligament strain, it is secondary to knee abduction and anterior tibial translation in its effect on anterior cruciate ligament strain and potential risk of injury. PMID:24238957

  8. The characteristics of EEG power spectra changes after ACL rupture

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Xin; Huang, Hongshi; Hu, Xiaoqing; Li, Dai; Yu, Yuanyuan; Ao, Yingfang

    2017-01-01

    Background Reestablishing knee stability is the core of the treatment of ACL (Anterior Cruciate Ligament) injury. Some patients still have a feeling of instability of the knee after ACL injury treatment. This unstable feeling may be caused by central nervous system changes after ACL rupture. Methods To identify the central changes after ACL rupture, EEG spectra were recorded to compare ACL patients and healthy controls when they were walking, jogging, and landing. Results There was a significant increase in delta, theta, alpha and beta band power during walking, jogging and landing in ACL patients. We also found an asymmetry phenomenon of EEG only in the ACL patients, mainly in the frontal area and central-parietal area. The asymmetry of beta band power extended to the frontal and the central area during jogging and landing task. Conclusions There were significant differences in EEG power spectra between the ACL patients and healthy people. ACL patients showed high EEG band power activities and an asymmetry phenomenon. EEG power changes were affected by movements, the asymmetry extended when performing more complicated movements. PMID:28182627

  9. Cycling safety: injury prevention in Oxford cyclists

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, L; Smith, N

    2000-01-01

    Objective—To assess injury prevention measures used by cyclists in Oxford and to detect any differences between wearers and non-wearers of cycling helmets. Method—A prospective observational survey of a series of cyclists passing a single point on a busy city road in reduced lighting. Two observers jointly recorded four measures of injury prevention: use of front or rear light, high visibility (reflective or fluorescent) clothing, and cycling helmet. The use of the first three interventions was analysed in relation to helmet use/non-use. Results—A total of 392 cyclists were observed over one hour. Fourteen (3.6%) were observed to use all four studied measures, while 137 (34.9%) used none of them. The frequency of measures observed was: lit front light 190 (48.5%), lit rear light 197 (50.2%), both lights on 163 (41.6%), helmet on 104 (26.5%), and high visibility clothing 39 (9.9%). Despite the helmet using group's smaller size, it contained a significantly higher proportion of cyclists with lit front light (60.6% v 44.1%), lit rear light (61.5% v 46.2%), and high visibility clothing (27.9% v 3.5%), than the non-helmet group (p≤0.01). Whereas only 22% of the helmet users had no other observed measures, 47.2% of non-users did so. Conclusion—Cycling helmet users were significantly more likely to use collision prevention measures in conditions of reduced visibility. Explanations may include higher levels of risk awareness and greater knowledge of safe cycling practices in the smaller, helmet using group. However, current measures by cyclists in a major cycling centre may be insufficient to prevent collisions and consequent serious injury or death. PMID:11144629

  10. The Relationship between Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury and Osteoarthritis of the Knee.

    PubMed

    Simon, David; Mascarenhas, Randy; Saltzman, Bryan M; Rollins, Meaghan; Bach, Bernard R; MacDonald, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears are a common injury, particularly in the athletic and youth populations. The known association between ACL injury and subsequent osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee merits a more in-depth understanding of the relationship between the ACL-injured knee and osteoarthritis. ACL injury, especially with concomitant meniscal or other ligamentous pathology, predisposes the knee to an increased risk of osteoarthritis. ACL insufficiency results in deterioration of the normal physiologic knee bending culminating in increased anterior tibial translation and increased internal tibial rotation. This leads to increased mean contact stresses in the posterior medial and lateral compartments under anterior and rotational loading. However, surgical reconstruction of the ACL has not been shown to reduce the risk of future OA development back to baseline and has variability based on operative factors of graft choice, timing of surgery, presence of meniscal and chondral abnormalities, and surgical technique. Known strategies to prevent OA development are applicable to patients with ACL deficiency or after ACL reconstruction and include weight management, avoidance of excessive musculoskeletal loading, and strength training. Reconstruction of the ACL does not necessarily prevent osteoarthritis in many of these patients and may depend on several external variables.

  11. Prevention of Overuse Sports Injuries in the Young Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Paterno, Mark V.; Taylor-Haas, Jeffery A.; Myer, Gregory D.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis The purpose of this article is to review current theories regarding prevalence, mechanism and prevention strategies for overuse injuries in a young, athletic population. This information will provide valuable insight into the state of current evidence regarding overuse injuries in young athletes as well as potential future directions in the development of overuse injury prevention interventions. PMID:24095071

  12. Injuries in Female Gymnasts: Trends Suggest Prevention Tactics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackie, Susan J.; Taunton, Jack E.

    1994-01-01

    Survey of 100 young female gymnasts examined injuries over a 40-month period. Injury rates were similar to those found in other studies of female competitive gymnasts, but there were several notable findings regarding injury patterns. Prevention methods to reduce injury include modifying mat design and prescribing strengthening and stretching…

  13. A wearable airbag to prevent fall injuries.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Toshiyo; Yoshimura, Takumi; Sekine, Masaki; Uchida, Mitsuo; Tanaka, Osamu

    2009-11-01

    We have developed a wearable airbag that incorporates a fall-detection system that uses both acceleration and angular velocity signals to trigger inflation of the airbag. The fall-detection algorithm was devised using a thresholding technique with an accelerometer and gyro sensor. Sixteen subjects mimicked falls, and their acceleration waveforms were monitored. Then, we developed a fall-detection algorithm that could detect signals 300 ms before the fall. This signal was used as a trigger to inflate the airbag to a capacity of 2.4 L. Although the proposed system can help to prevent fall-related injuries, further development is needed to miniaturize the inflation system.

  14. Relationship between jump landing kinematics and peak ACL force during a jump in downhill skiing: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, D; van den Bogert, A J; Nachbauer, W

    2014-06-01

    Recent data highlight that competitive skiers face a high risk of injuries especially during off-balance jump landing maneuvers in downhill skiing. The purpose of the present study was to develop a musculo-skeletal modeling and simulation approach to investigate the cause-and-effect relationship between a perturbed landing position, i.e., joint angles and trunk orientation, and the peak force in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) during jump landing. A two-dimensional musculo-skeletal model was developed and a baseline simulation was obtained reproducing measurement data of a reference landing movement. Based on the baseline simulation, a series of perturbed landing simulations (n = 1000) was generated. Multiple linear regression was performed to determine a relationship between peak ACL force and the perturbed landing posture. Increased backward lean, hip flexion, knee extension, and ankle dorsiflexion as well as an asymmetric position were related to higher peak ACL forces during jump landing. The orientation of the trunk of the skier was identified as the most important predictor accounting for 60% of the variance of the peak ACL force in the simulations. Teaching of tactical decisions and the inclusion of exercise regimens in ACL injury prevention programs to improve trunk control during landing motions in downhill skiing was concluded.

  15. Need for injury-prevention education in medical school curriculum.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Isaac; Sayegh, Rockan; Lotfipour, Shahram; Vaca, Federico E

    2010-02-01

    Injury is the leading cause of death and disability among the U.S. population aged 1 to 44 years. In 2006 more than 179,000 fatalities were attributed to injury. Despite increasing awareness of the global epidemic of injury and violence, a considerable gap remains between advances in injury-prevention research and prevention knowledge that is taught to medical students. This article discusses the growing need for U.S medical schools to train future physicians in the fundamentals of injury prevention and control. Teaching medical students to implement injury prevention in their future practice should help reduce injury morbidity and mortality. Deliberate efforts should be made to integrate injury-prevention education into existing curriculum. Key resources are available to do this. Emergency physicians can be essential advocates in establishing injury prevention training because of their clinical expertise in treating injury. Increasing the number of physicians with injury- and violence- prevention knowledge and skills is ultimately an important strategy to reduce the national and global burden of injury.

  16. ACL injury risk in elite female youth soccer: Changes in neuromuscular control of the knee following soccer-specific fatigue.

    PubMed

    De Ste Croix, M B A; Priestley, A M; Lloyd, R S; Oliver, J L

    2015-10-01

    Fatigue is known to influence dynamic knee joint stability from a neuromuscular perspective, and electromechanical delay (EMD) plays an important role as the feedback activation mechanism that stabilizes the joint. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of soccer-specific fatigue on EMD in U13-, U15-, and U17-year-old female soccer players. Thirty-six youth soccer players performed eccentric actions of the hamstrings in a prone position at 60, 120, and 180°/s before and after a soccer-specific fatigue trial. Surface electromyography was used to determine EMD from the semitendinosus, biceps femoris and gastrocnemius. A time × age × muscle × velocity repeated measures analysis of variance was used to explore the influence of fatigue on EMD. A significant main effect for time (P = 0.001) indicated that EMD was significantly longer post- compared with pre-fatigue (58.4% increase). A significant time × group interaction effect (P = 0.046) indicated EMD was significantly longer in the U13 age group compared with the U15 (P = 0.011) and U17 (P = 0.021) groups and greater post-fatigue. Soccer-specific fatigue compromised neuromuscular feedback mechanisms and the age-related effects may represent a more compliant muscle-tendon system in younger compared with older girls, increasing risk of injury.

  17. Preventing Musculoskeletal Sports Injuries in Youth: A Guide for Parents

    MedlinePlus

    ... of heart and lungs), warm-up exercises, proper coaching, use of safety equipment. Track and Field Common ... males, sunscreen, water. Injury prevention: Proper conditioning and coaching. Football Common injuries and locations: Bruises, sprains, strains, ...

  18. Decreasing mitochondrial fission prevents cholestatic liver injury.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tianzheng; Wang, Li; Lee, Hakjoo; O'Brien, Dawn K; Bronk, Steven F; Gores, Gregory J; Yoon, Yisang

    2014-12-05

    Mitochondria frequently change their shape through fission and fusion in response to physiological stimuli as well as pathological insults. Disrupted mitochondrial morphology has been observed in cholestatic liver disease. However, the role of mitochondrial shape change in cholestasis is not defined. In this study, using in vitro and in vivo models of bile acid-induced liver injury, we investigated the contribution of mitochondrial morphology to the pathogenesis of cholestatic liver disease. We found that the toxic bile salt glycochenodeoxycholate (GCDC) rapidly fragmented mitochondria, both in primary mouse hepatocytes and in the bile transporter-expressing hepatic cell line McNtcp.24, leading to a significant increase in cell death. GCDC-induced mitochondrial fragmentation was associated with an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. We found that preventing mitochondrial fragmentation in GCDC by inhibiting mitochondrial fission significantly decreased not only ROS levels but also cell death. We also induced cholestasis in mouse livers via common bile duct ligation. Using a transgenic mouse model inducibly expressing a dominant-negative fission mutant specifically in the liver, we demonstrated that decreasing mitochondrial fission substantially diminished ROS levels, liver injury, and fibrosis under cholestatic conditions. Taken together, our results provide new evidence that controlling mitochondrial fission is an effective strategy for ameliorating cholestatic liver injury.

  19. Should critical care nurses be ACLS-trained?

    PubMed

    Hagyard-Wiebe, Tammy

    2007-01-01

    The aim of resuscitation is to sustain life with intact neurological functioning and the same quality of life previously experienced by the patient. Advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) was designed to achieve this aim. However the requirement for ACLS training for critical care nurses working in Canadian critical care units is inconsistent across the country. The purposes of this article are to explore the evidence surrounding ACLS training for critical care nurses and its impact on resuscitation outcomes, and to review the evidence surrounding ACLS knowledge and skill degradation with strategies to support code blue team efficiency for an effective resuscitation. Using the search terms ACLS training, resuscitation, critical care, and nursing, two databases, CINAHL and MEDLINE, were used. The evidence supports the need for ACLS training for critical care nurses. The evidence also supports organized ongoing refresher courses, multidisciplinary mock code blue practice using technologically advanced simulator mannequins, and videotaped reviews to prevent knowledge and skill degradation for effective resuscitation efforts.

  20. Incidence and Characterization of Injury to the Infrapatellar Branch of the Saphenous Nerve after ACL Reconstruction: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Steven B.; Ciccotti, Michael C.; Dodson, Christopher C.; Tjoumakaris, Fotios P.; Salvo, John P.; Marchetto, Paul A.; Watson, Ryan A.; Salminen, Matthew Robert; Flato, Russell R.; O'Brien, Daniel Francis

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The infrapatellar branch of the saphenous nerve is commonly injured in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) causing sensory deficits around the knee. The primary purpose of this prospective study was to determine the incidence of patient reported sensory deficits around the knee following ACLR. The secondary purpose was to determine if sensory deficits caused by intraoperative injury present at 6 weeks changed in severity and total area after 6 months and 1 year postoperatively. Methods: Two-hundred and fifty patients that underwent ACLR with or without meniscal repair were prospectively enrolled. Variables for each patient included: type of graft, direction of tibial incision, number of portals, and length of surgical incision. The grafts used were categorized into three types: Allograft (allo), hamstring autograft (HS), or patella tendon autograft (BTB). At 6 weeks, patients completed a questionnaire to ascertain any sensory deficits over their knee. Patients rated their sensory deficit on a scale from 0-10 (“0” = (no deficit) to “10” (complete lack of sensation) and shaded areas on a picture of a knee split into nine rectangular segments (3 by 3 grid) to determine the location of any numbness. Patients completed the same questionnaire at 6 months and 1 year. Any patient that was noted to have no stated numbness at 6 weeks or 6 months was noted to have completed the study. A mixed effects linear regression model was used to identify variables which were predictors for the patient-reported severity of numbness. Results: Overall, 67/221 (30.3%) patients who underwent ACLR stated that they had no numbness at 6 weeks. Of those patients who reported numbness at 6 weeks, 16.6% (25/151) considered their numbness completely resolved by six months. At 1 year, 73.2% (90/123) reported their numbness had gotten better and 14.2% (18/123) considered their numbness resolved. The most common location of numbness was along the inferolateral aspect

  1. The Effects of a Valgus Collapse Knee Position on In Vivo ACL Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Utturkar, G. M.; Irribarra, L. A.; Taylor, K. A.; Spritzer, C. E.; Taylor, D. C.; Garrett, W. E.; DeFrate, Louis E.

    2013-01-01

    There are conflicting data regarding what motions increase ACL injury risk. More specifically, the mechanical role of valgus collapse positions during ACL injury remains controversial. Our objective was to evaluate ACL elongation in a model that mimics knee movements thought to occur during ACL injury. Eight healthy male subjects were imaged using MR and biplanar fluoroscopy to measure the in vivo elongation of the ACL and its functional bundles during three static knee positions: full extension, 30° of flexion, and a position intended to mimic a valgus collapse position described in the literature. For this study, the valgus collapse position consisted of 30° of knee flexion, internal rotation of the hip, and 10° of external tibial rotation. ACL length decreased significantly from full extension (30.2 ± 2.6 mm) to 30° of flexion (27.1 ± 2.2 mm). ACL length further decreased in the valgus collapse position (25.6 ± 2.4 mm). Both functional bundles of the ACL followed similar trends with regards to decreases in length in each of the three positions. Since strain would follow patterns of ACL length, landing on an extended knee may be a more relevant risk factor for ACL injuries than the valgus collapse position in males. Future studies should evaluate the effects of dynamic motion patterns on in vivo ACL strains. PMID:22855117

  2. The effects of a valgus collapse knee position on in vivo ACL elongation.

    PubMed

    Utturkar, G M; Irribarra, L A; Taylor, K A; Spritzer, C E; Taylor, D C; Garrett, W E; Defrate, Louis E

    2013-01-01

    There are conflicting data regarding what motions increase ACL injury risk. More specifically, the mechanical role of valgus collapse positions during ACL injury remains controversial. Our objective was to evaluate ACL elongation in a model that mimics knee movements thought to occur during ACL injury. Eight healthy male subjects were imaged using MR and biplanar fluoroscopy to measure the in vivo elongation of the ACL and its functional bundles during three static knee positions: full extension, 30° of flexion, and a position intended to mimic a valgus collapse position described in the literature. For this study, the valgus collapse position consisted of 30° of knee flexion, internal rotation of the hip, and 10° of external tibial rotation. ACL length decreased significantly from full extension (30.2 ± 2.6 mm) to 30° of flexion (27.1 ± 2.2 mm). ACL length further decreased in the valgus collapse position (25.6 ± 2.4 mm). Both functional bundles of the ACL followed similar trends with regards to decreases in length in each of the three positions. Since strain would follow patterns of ACL length, landing on an extended knee may be a more relevant risk factor for ACL injuries than the valgus collapse position in males. Future studies should evaluate the effects of dynamic motion patterns on in vivo ACL strains.

  3. Preventing unintentional injuries in Indigenous children and youth in Canada.

    PubMed

    Banerji, Anna

    2012-08-01

    Unintentional injuries are the leading cause of death in Canadian Indigenous children and youth, occurring at rates three to four times the national average. Death and disabling injuries not only devastate families and communities but take a heavy toll on health care resources. The lack of statistics, ongoing surveillance or injury prevention programs for Indigenous children and adolescents further compound human and health care costs. Indigenous communities are heterogeneous culturally, in terms of access to resources, and even as to risks and patterns of injury. Yet in general, they are far more likely to be poor, to have substandard housing and to have difficulty accessing health care, factors which increase the risk and impact of injury. There are urgent needs for injury surveillance, research, capacity-building, knowledge dissemination, as well as for injury prevention programs that focus on Indigenous populations. Effective injury prevention would involve multidisciplinary, collaborative and sustainable approaches based on best practices while being culturally and linguistically specific and sensitive.

  4. Effects of a knee ligament injury prevention exercise program on impact forces in women.

    PubMed

    Irmischer, Bobbie S; Harris, Chad; Pfeiffer, Ronald P; DeBeliso, Mark A; Adams, Kent J; Shea, Kevin G

    2004-11-01

    Previous research suggests high impact forces generated during landings contribute to noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. In women, neuromuscular differences appear to modify the ability to dissipate landing forces when compared to men. This study examined peak vertical impact forces (F(p)) and rate of force development (RFD) following a 9-week, low-intensity (simple jump-landing-jump tasks) and volume (number of foot contacts per workout) plyometric-based knee ligament injury prevention (KLIP) program. Female subjects were randomly assigned into control (n = 14) and treatment (n = 14) groups. Treatment subjects attended KLIP sessions twice a week for 9 weeks, and control subjects received no intervention. Ground reaction forces (F(p) and RFD) generated during a step-land protocol were assessed at study onset and termination. Significant reductions in F(p) (p = 0.0004) and RFD (p = 0.0205) were observed in the treatment group. Our results indicate that 9 weeks of KLIP training altered landing strategies in women to lower F(p) and RFD. These changes are considered conducive to a reduced risk of knee injury while landing.

  5. Injuries to dancers. Prevalence, treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Sohl, P; Bowling, A

    1990-05-01

    Studies from the USA and UK indicate that the back, neck and shoulder and the lower limb (particularly the hip, knee, ankle and foot) are the most frequent sites of injury among dancers. Most injuries are soft tissue injuries. Most dancers experience injuries at some time and about half have chronic injuries. Shoulder injuries appear to be caused by frequent or unaccustomed lifting, and are treated by rest and oral anti-inflammatory medication. Back injuries include sprains, prolapsed or herniated intervertebral discs, and spondylolytic stress fractures. Several risk factors, especially training error, have been identified for overuse injuries. Hip injuries include degenerative changes and osteoarthritis, stress fractures, bursitis and damage to the sciatic nerve. The most common foot injury is an anterior lateral ligament sprain, which may lead to permanent instability in the ankle. More soundly based research into the prevalence, diagnosis and treatment of injuries is needed.

  6. Injury Prevention and Control for Children and Youth. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widome, Mark D., Ed.

    This book was compiled for pediatricians and others who are interested in the control of pediatric injuries. The manual's three sections are: (1) "The Field of Pediatric Injury Prevention and Control," which provides a broad overview of the field and highlights the roles of the pediatrician in the control of injuries and a developmental approach…

  7. CDC School Health Guidelines to Prevent Unintentional Injuries and Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrios, Lisa C.; Sleet, David A.; Mercy, James A.

    2003-01-01

    Approximately two-thirds of all deaths among children and adolescents aged five to 19 years results from injury-related causes: motor-vehicle crashes, all other unintentional injuries, homicide, and suicide. Schools have a responsibility to prevent injuries from occurring on school property and at school-sponsored events. In addition, schools can…

  8. The potential for primary repair of the ACL

    PubMed Central

    Vavken, Patrick; Murray, Martha M

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work is to assess the feasibility of successfully repairing the torn ACL. Two major motivators for developing a new treatment for ACL injuries are the recently reported high rates of osteoarthritis after conventional ACL reconstruction as well as the problem of how to safely treat skeletally immature patients. A key factor in developing such a technique was the identification of the main inhibitor of intrinsic ACL healing – the lack of clot formation between the two torn ends of the ligament. A bioactive and biocompatible scaffold which could be placed in the wound site to enhance cellular proliferation and biosynthesis was developed. This biomaterial has shown promising functional outcomes in several large animal models of primary repair of partial and complete ACL transection over 4 to 14 weeks, suggesting potential for a successful, future clinical application. PMID:21293237

  9. Physician-directed injury prevention for young skiers and snowboarders

    PubMed Central

    Macnab, Andrew J; Cadman, Robert E; Greenlaw, Julia V

    1998-01-01

    Based on earlier studies of ski injury, which indicated that youths were at increased risk of injury, that males were most likely to injure the head or face and that females were most likely to injure the knee, a study to identify factors relevant for physicians to use in injury prevention initiatives was undertaken. The authors then conducted a search for effective injury prevention strategies using MEDLINE. The results of both undertakings were the basis for proposed guidelines for prevention strategies that physicians can use when counselling skiers and snowboarders. PMID:20401274

  10. Prevention of Injury and Violence in the USA

    PubMed Central

    Haegerich, Tamara M; Dahlberg, Linda L; Simon, Thomas R; Baldwin, Grant T; Sleet, David A; Greenspan, Arlene I

    2015-01-01

    In the first three decades of life, more individuals in the USA die from injuries and violence than from any other cause. Millions more people survive and are left with physical, emotional, and financial problems. Injuries and violence are not accidents; they are preventable. Prevention has a strong scientific foundation, yet efforts are not fully implemented or integrated into clinical and community settings. In this Series paper, we review the burden of injuries and violence in the USA, note effective interventions, and discuss methods to bring interventions into practice. Alliances between the public health community and medical care organisations, health-care providers, states, and communities can reduce injuries and violence. We encourage partnerships between medical and public health communities to consistently frame injuries and violence as preventable, identify evidence-based interventions, provide scientific information to decision makers, and strengthen the capacity of an integrated health system to prevent injuries and violence. PMID:24996591

  11. Solar Injury and Heat Illness. Treatment and Prevention in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutierrez, Greg

    1995-01-01

    Children are especially vulnerable to solar injury and heat illness. Physicians can lower children's risk through education about short-term and long-term sequelae and through various prevention efforts. The paper discusses how to screen for risk factors and how to prevent and treat heat illness and solar injury. (SM)

  12. Wisconsin EMT Association: A Statewide Injury Prevention Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Ralph; Evans, Diane

    This report provides a detailed description of a statewide injury prevention program of the Wisconsin Emergency Medical Technician Association. A project introduction is followed by brief descriptions of the components of the injury prevention program: occupant protection seminars; mock crash seminars; Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Buckle Bear,…

  13. A Prospective Investigation of Biomechanical Risk Factors for Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome. The Joint Undertaking to Monitor and Prevent ACL Injury (JUMP-ACL) Cohort

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-24

    angle during the jump-landing task. Additionally, decreased quadriceps and hamstring strength, increased hip external rotator strength, and increased...quadriceps and hamstring strength, increased hip external rotator strength, and increased navicular drop were risk factors for the development of...Problems, ninth edition [ICD-9]): 726.69 (unspecified knee enthesopathy ), 726.64 (patellar tendonitis), 717.7 (patella chondromalacia), and 719.46

  14. Strategies for the prevention of volleyball related injuries

    PubMed Central

    Reeser, J C; Verhagen, E; Briner, W W; Askeland, T I; Bahr, R

    2006-01-01

    Although the overall injury rate in volleyball and beach volleyball is relatively low compared with other team sports, injuries do occur in a discipline specific pattern. Epidemiological research has revealed that volleyball athletes are, in general, at greatest risk of acute ankle injuries and overuse conditions of the knee and shoulder. This structured review discusses both the known and suspected risk factors and potential strategies for preventing the most common volleyball related injuries: ankle sprains, patellar tendinopathy, and shoulder overuse. PMID:16799111

  15. Strategies for the prevention of volleyball related injuries.

    PubMed

    Reeser, J C; Verhagen, E; Briner, W W; Askeland, T I; Bahr, R

    2006-07-01

    Although the overall injury rate in volleyball and beach volleyball is relatively low compared with other team sports, injuries do occur in a discipline specific pattern. Epidemiological research has revealed that volleyball athletes are, in general, at greatest risk of acute ankle injuries and overuse conditions of the knee and shoulder. This structured review discusses both the known and suspected risk factors and potential strategies for preventing the most common volleyball related injuries: ankle sprains, patellar tendinopathy, and shoulder overuse.

  16. 76 FR 10371 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and... Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the... and Prevention and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Dated: February 14,...

  17. 75 FR 30040 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the aforementioned meeting: Time and Date: 1:30... Disease Control and Prevention. BILLING CODE 4163-18-P...

  18. 75 FR 39544 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and... Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC... Analysis and Services Office, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. BILLING CODE 4163-18-P...

  19. 75 FR 7606 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and... Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the... for Disease Control and Prevention. BILLING CODE 4163-18-P...

  20. Sports-related workload and injury risk: simply knowing the risks will not prevent injuries.

    PubMed

    Drew, Michael K; Cook, Jill; Finch, Caroline F

    2016-05-10

    Training loads contribute to sports injury risk but their mitigation has rarely been considered in a sports injury prevention framework. A key concept behind monitoring training loads for injury prevention is to screen for those at increased risk of injury so that workloads can be adjusted to minimise these risks. This review describes how advances in management of workload can be applied as a preventive measure. Primary prevention involves screening for preparticipation load risk factors, such as low training loads, prior to a training period or competition. Secondary prevention involves screening for workloads that are known to precede an injury developing so that modification can be undertaken to mitigate this risk. Tertiary prevention involves rehabilitation practices that include a graded return to training programme to reduce the risk of sustaining a subsequent injury. The association of training loads with injury incidence is now established. Prevention measures such as rule changes that affect the workload of an athlete are universal whereas those that address risk factors of an asymptomatic subgroup are more selective. Prevention measures, when implemented for asymptomatic individuals exhibiting possible injury risk factors, are indicated for an athlete at risk of developing a sports injury. Seven key indicated risks and associated prevention measures are proposed.

  1. ACL Revision in Synthetic ACL graft failure

    PubMed Central

    Etcheto, H. Rivarola; Zordán, J.; Escobar, G.; Collazo, C.; Palanconi, M.; Autorino, C.; Salinas, E. Alvarez

    2017-01-01

    The development of synthetic grafts as an alternative to biological grafts for reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament dates from 1980. The interest is awakened due to the potential advantages of: The absence of morbidity associated with donor site, and early return to sport. However, this surgical technique has had multiple complications associated with graft: mechanical failures (synthetic graft failure, loss of fixation), synovial foreign body reaction, recurrent stroke, recurrent instability and ultimately, early osteoarthritis. Objectives: We describe the synthetic graft failure LCA, intraoperative findings and details of surgical technique. Methods: Patient 35 years old, with a history of ACL reconstruction four years of evolution in another health center, consultation with the Service knee arthroscopy for acute knee pain left knee during secondary sporting event to a rotation mechanism with fixed foot. On physical examination, presents and positive Lachman maneuver Pivot. Radiografia in a widening of the tibial tunnel is observed. NMR shows a discontinuity of fibers of synthetic graft. Results: First time arthroscopic revision where synthetic plastic LCA identifies with Disruption fiber pattern. Intraoperatively, hypertrophic chronic synovitis localized predominantly in intercóndilo is observed. debridement thereof is performed, and proceeds to the extraction of the synthetic ligament. Then he was made prior cruentado and revival of the edges of the tunnel, filling them with non-irradiated structural bone allograft. At four months as planned and after confirmation by studies incorporating bone graft was performed the second time with the new plastic ACL. It was planned like a primary graft surgery with autologous hamstring prepared in fourfold form, and fixation with modified transtibial technique Biotransfix system proximal and distal screw Biocomposite (arthrex®). A quadruple graft 9 mm was obtained, making good positioning of tunnels and stable

  2. Sport Injuries for Females: Incidence and Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kindig, Louise E.

    Comparisons between sport-related injuries for male and female athletes are discussed in relation to statistics gathered by the National Athletic Injury/Illness Reporting System (NAIRS) and other sources. Tables display data on: (1) athletic injuries and fatalities in colleges and universities by sport, l975-76; (2) average annual frequency of…

  3. Preventing Running Injuries through Barefoot Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Priscilla M.; Smith, Darla R.

    2008-01-01

    Running has become a very popular lifetime physical activity even though there are numerous reports of running injuries. Although common theories have pointed to impact forces and overpronation as the main contributors to chronic running injuries, the increased use of cushioning and orthotics has done little to decrease running injuries. A new…

  4. Prevention of Neurologic Injuries in Equestrian Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, William H.; Bixby-Hammett, Doris M.

    1988-01-01

    Risk of neurological injuries accompanies horseback riding, especially for children and adolescents. This article describes the mechanisms of craniospinal injuries and suggests measures to lessen risks. Measures include: identifying individuals who should not ride, developing criteria for resumption of riding after injury, developing protective…

  5. Injuries are not accidents: towards a culture of prevention.

    PubMed

    Bonilla-Escobar, Francisco Javier; Gutiérrez, María Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Injuries are the result of an acute exposure to exhort of energy or a consequence of a deficiency in a vital element that exceeds physiological thresholds resulting threatens life. They are classified as intentional or unintentional. Injuries are considered a global health issue because they cause more than 5 million deaths per year worldwide and they are an important contributor to the burden of disease, especially affecting people of low socioeconomic status in low- and middle-income countries. A common misconception exists where injuries are thought to be the same as accidents; however, accidents are largely used as chance events, without taken in consideration that all these are preventable. This review discusses injuries and accidents in the context of road traffic and emphasizes injuries as preventable events. An understanding of the essence of injuries enables the standardization of terminology in public use and facilitates the development of a culture of prevention among all of us.

  6. Epidemiology of Injuries and Prevention Strategies in Competitive Swimmers

    PubMed Central

    Wanivenhaus, Florian; Fox, Alice J. S.; Chaudhury, Salma; Rodeo, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Competitive swimmers are predisposed to musculoskeletal injuries of the upper limb, knee, and spine. This review discusses the epidemiology of these injuries, in addition to prevention strategies that may assist the physician in formulating rehabilitation programs for the swimmer following an injury. Evidence Acquisition: A literature search was performed by a review of Google Scholar, OVID, and PubMed articles published from 1972 to 2011. Results: This study highlights the epidemiology of injuries common to competitive swimmers and provides prevention strategies for the sports health professional. Conclusions: An understanding of swimming biomechanics and typical injuries in swimming aids in early recognition of injury, initiation of treatment, and design of optimal prevention and rehabilitation strategies. PMID:23016094

  7. Injury prevention in an urban setting: challenges and successes.

    PubMed

    Laraque, D; Barlow, B; Durkin, M; Heagarty, M

    1995-01-01

    The Harlem Hospital Injury Prevention Program (HHIPP) was established in 1988 with the goal of reducing injuries to children in central Harlem by providing safe play areas, supervised activities, and injury prevention education. To achieve this goal, a broad-based coalition was formed with state and local governmental agencies interested in injury prevention and with community groups, schools, parents, and hospital staff. An evaluation of the program in terms of both process and outcome formed a critical element of this effort. Since 1988 the HHIPP, as the lead agency for the Healthy Neighborhoods/Safe Kids Coalition, developed or participated in two types of programs: injury-prevention education programs and programs that provide safe activities and/or environments for children. The educational programs included Window Guards campaign; Safety City Program; Kids, Injuries and Street Smarts Program (KISS); Burn Prevention Curriculum and Smoke Detector Distribution; Harlem Alternative to Violence Program; Adolescent Outreach Program; and Critical Incident Stress Management Teams. The safe activities and environmental programs included the Bicycle Safety Program/Urban Youth Bike Corps; Playground Injury Prevention Program; the Greening of Harlem Program; the Harlem Horizon Art Studio; Harlem Hospital Dance Clinic; Unity through Murals project; baseball at the Harlem Little League; winter baseball clinic; and the soccer league. Each program was conceived using injury data, coupled with parental concern and activism, which acted as catalysts to create a community coalition to respond to a specific problem. Data systems developed over time, which monitored the prevalence and incidence of childhood injuries in northern Manhattan, including central Harlem, became essential not only to identify specific types of childhood injuries in this community but also to evaluate these programs for the prevention of injuries in children.

  8. A multifactorial injury prevention intervention reduces injury incidence in Physical Education Teacher Education students.

    PubMed

    Goossens, L; Cardon, G; Witvrouw, E; Steyaert, A; De Clercq, D

    2016-01-01

    Physical Education Teacher Education (PETE) students are at considerable risk for non-contact sports injuries of the lower extremities. Multifactorial injury prevention interventions including exercises have been successful in sports populations, but no such study has ever been performed in PETE students. This study investigated the efficacy of a multifactorial injury prevention intervention on injury incidence reduction in PETE students. PETE students in the intervention group (n = 154) and in the control group (n = 189) registered sports injuries prospectively. The intervention lasted one academic year and consisted of an injury awareness programme and preventive strategies, implemented by the PETE sports lecturers. Differences in injury incidence between the intervention and control group were tested by Poisson regression Wald tests. There was a trend towards significantly lower incidence rate (2.18 vs. 2.73; p = 0.061) in the intervention group compared with the control group. Students in the intervention group had significantly less acute, first-time and extracurricular injuries. The largest reduction was observed for injuries during unsupervised practice sessions. A multifactorial injury prevention intervention embedded into a regular PETE programme is a promising and feasible strategy to prevent injuries in PETE students. Further research is needed to investigate whether the results may be generalised to other PETE programmes.

  9. An injury prevention program to prevent gymnastic injuries in children and teenagers.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Swainston, Erin M; Dahlstrom, Jill J; Gubler, K; Long, William B; Beaton, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    There are more than 5 million participants in 1 of 6 gymnastic disciplines that are prone to spinal cord injuries. Working with the gifted scholar and attorney, Jeffrey Beaton, the authors have participated in developing an injury prevention program for children and teenagers who participate in gymnastics. This program includes the following components: (1) a gymnastics center that complies with the e-Book design of gymnasticszone.com; (2) all teachers and students in gymnastics should be members of USA Gymnastics (USAG) and purchase a copy of the USA Gymnastics Safety Manual, the official manual of the United States Gymnastics Safety Association; (3) trampolines should be sunk in the ground with the bed level with the floor; and finally, (4) immediate emergency access of the injured gymnast to either a skilled orthopedic or neurosurgeon.

  10. Coach-led prevention programs are effective in reducing anterior cruciate ligament injury risk in female athletes: A number-needed-to-treat analysis.

    PubMed

    Pfile, K R; Curioz, B

    2017-03-08

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the effectiveness of an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) prevention program is impacted by the individual(s) directing the program. A number-needed-to-treat analysis compared the effectiveness of injury prevention measures when either directed by a coach or a mixed leadership group consisting of coach and healthcare providers. Eleven studies were included for analysis. Number-needed-to-treat and relative risk reduction (RRR) were calculated for each study and data sets were pooled based on the intervention leader. Quality of evidence was determined by assessing individual studies (PEDro score x¯=4.55±1.97, range=2-7), applying the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine Levels of Evidence (CEBM=2a), and the Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy (SORT=Level B). The mixed leadership group studies' RRR=48.2% (95% confidence interval (CI)=22-65) and a number-needed-to-benefit of 120 (CI=73-303) while the coach-led group's RRR=58.4% (CI=40-71) and a number-needed-to-benefit=133 (CI=96-217). These results demonstrate that a coach-led ACL injury prevention program approach is as effective as a mixed group leadership approach. Coach-led prevention programs can be more widely implemented; however, it is imperative to ensure adequate training is in place prior to implementation of such intervention.

  11. Safe Kids Worldwide: preventing unintentional childhood injuries across the globe.

    PubMed

    Mickalide, Angela; Carr, Kate

    2012-12-01

    Unintentional injuries are predictable and preventable. Yet every hour, a child in the United States dies from an unintentional injury. Globally, the number is even more staggering, with nearly 1 million children dying from unintentional injuries each year. Motor vehicle-related injuries, burns, drowning, falls, suffocation or choking, and poisoning are just a few of the unintentional injury risks threatening children. Patient safety requires a three-pronged strategy of behavior change, use of safety devices, and improvement of laws and regulations to ensure that all children lead healthy and productive lives.

  12. Child injury prevention in Vietnam: achievements and challenges.

    PubMed

    Boufous, Soufiane; Ali, Maria; Nguyen, Ha T; Stevenson, Mark; Vu, Thien C; Nguyen, Duyen T Y; Ivers, Rebecca; Pham, Cuong V; Nguyen, An T T

    2012-01-01

    As with other South Asian countries, injury is becoming a leading cause of death and morbidity among children in Vietnam. In response to the increasing burden of child injury, government and non-government agencies in Vietnam have combined efforts during the last decade to develop and implement various child injury prevention strategies and programmes. This article provides, through a review of relevant documents and interviews with major stakeholders, an overview of these efforts and highlights major challenges to child injury prevention in the country. The findings point to notable achievements in terms of increasing awareness of injury facing children at all levels in the community and developing a sound injury prevention policy framework in a relatively short period of time. However, much needs to be done to implement necessary environmental and legislative changes, strengthen child injury surveillance and injury prevention research; and to improve access to health services. The insight into the experience of Vietnam could benefit other low- and middle-income countries with a high burden of child injury.

  13. 76 FR 9018 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and...), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the aforementioned meeting: Time and... meetings and other committee management activities, for both the Centers for Disease Control and...

  14. Evaluation of the effectiveness of neuromuscular training to reduce anterior cruciate ligament injury in female athletes: a critical review of relative risk reduction and numbers-needed-to-treat analyses.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Dai; Myer, Gregory D; McKeon, Jennifer M; Hewett, Timothy E

    2012-11-01

    Since previous numbers-needed-to-treat (NNT) and relative risk reduction (RRR) report, a few studies were published to evaluate prophylactic effectiveness of neuromuscular training for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in female athletes. The purpose of the current analyses was to determine the effectiveness of neuromuscular training interventions in reducing both non-contact and overall ACL injury risk in female athletes through RRR and NNT. The keywords 'knee', 'anterior cruciate ligament', 'ACL', 'prospective', 'neuromuscular', 'training', 'female' and 'prevention' were searched to find studies published from 1995 to 2011 in PubMed and EBSCO (CINAHL, Health source, MEDLINE and SPORT Discus). Inclusion criteria required that relevant studies: recruited physically active young girls as subjects, documented the number of ACL injuries, employed a neuromuscular training intervention, and used a prospective controlled study design. The numbers of non-contact and overall ACL injuries, subjects and observation time period were used to calculate RRR and NNT for each study. A total of 12 studies met the inclusion criteria. There was a 73.4% (95% CI 62.5% to 81.1%) and 43.8% (95% CI 28.9% to 55.5%) of RRR for non-contact and overall ACL injuries. From the NNT analysis, it was determined that, respectively, 108 (95% CI 86 to 150) and 120 (95% CI 74 to 316) individuals would need to be trained to prevent one non-contact or one overall ACL injury over the course of one competitive season. Although the RRR analysis indicated prophylactic benefits of neuromuscular training, the relatively large NNT indicated that many athletes are needed to prevent one ACL injury. A future direction to reduce NNT and improve the efficiency of ACL injury-prevention strategies is to develop a screening system for identifying at-risk athletes.

  15. Injury prevention and the attainment of child and adolescent health

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Alison; Peden, Margie; Soori, Hamid; Bartolomeos, Kidist

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Urgent attention is required to tackle the problem of child and adolescent injury across the world. There have been considerable shifts in the epidemiological patterns of child deaths; while great progress has been made in preventing infectious diseases, the exposure of children and adolescents to the risks of injury appear to be increasing and will continue to do so in the future. The issue of injuries is too often absent from child and adolescent health agendas. In December 2008, WHO and the United Nations Children’s Fund published the World report on child injury prevention, calling global attention to the problem of child injuries. This article expands on the report’s arguments that child injuries must be integrated into child health initiatives and proposes initial steps for achieving this integration. PMID:19551258

  16. Studying injury prevention: practices, problems, and pitfalls in implementation.

    PubMed

    Sangvai, Shilpa; Cipriani, Lynne; Colborn, D Kathleen; Wald, Ellen R

    2007-04-01

    This prospective, randomized, controlled trial was conducted to determine feasibility and effectiveness of a chronic care model approach to injury prevention compared with standard anticipatory guidance. Enrolled caregivers of children aged 0 to 5 years received focused counseling from a physician and health assistant, educational handouts, phone follow-up, and access to free safety devices and automobile restraint evaluations. Only 35.1% of eligible parents participated. Home visits were completed at 6 months to observe safety practices. Injuries were gleaned from parent report and medical record review. Safety practices were evaluated in 27 households. Chart review showed no significant difference in the number of medically attended injuries between groups (P = 0.6). The impact of the chronic care model on injury prevention in primary care could not be determined with certainty. Evaluating effectiveness of injury prevention strategies on actual safety practices with direct observation is challenging.

  17. Injury Prevention: What Music Teachers Can Do

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guptill, Christine; Zaza, Christine

    2010-01-01

    The risk of injury in musicians has been well established over the past twenty-five years. Concerns about the risk of becoming injured have been increasingly present in the music world. Research in performing arts medicine has demonstrated that approximately 25 percent of music students experience a playing-related injury. Since musicians'…

  18. Preventing Dance Injuries: An Interdisciplinary Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Ruth, Ed.; And Others

    This book on the interdisciplinary nature of dance medicine as an emerging field of inquiry contains the following chapters: (1) "A Comparison of Patterns of Injury in Ballet, Modern, and Aerobic Dance" (Marie Schafle, And Others); (2) "Pronation as a Predisposing Factor in Overuse Injuries" (Steven R. Kravitz); (3) "Some…

  19. Preventing Injury: A Safety Curriculum. Preschool-Kindergarten.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, J. Scott; And Others

    The focus of this curriculum is on prevention of spinal cord injury (SCI) and traumatic brain injury (TBI). The program is aimed at young children because it is during the early years that behavioral patterns are formed which become increasingly more difficult to modify as the child enters adolescence. The curriculum is based on principles of…

  20. Preventing Injury: A Safety Curriculum. Grades 3 and 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, J. Scott; And Others

    The focus of this curriculum is on prevention of spinal cord injury (SCI) and traumatic brain injury (TBI). The program is aimed at young children because it is during the early years that behavioral patterns are formed which become increasingly more difficult to modify as the child enters adolescence. The curriculum is based on principles of…

  1. Preventing Injury: A Safety Curriculum. Grades 1 and 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, J. Scott; And Others

    The focus of this curriculum is on prevention of spinal cord injury (SCI) and traumatic brain injury (TBI). The program is aimed at young children because it is during the early years that behavioral patterns are formed which become increasingly more difficult to modify as the child enters adolescence. The curriculum is based on principles of…

  2. Preventing Injury: A Safety Curriculum. Grades 5 and 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, J. Scott; And Others

    The focus of this curriculum is on prevention of spinal cord injury (SCI) and traumatic brain injury (TBI). The program is aimed at children because it is early in life that behavioral patterns are formed which become increasingly more difficult to modify as the child enters adolescence. The curriculum is based on principles of child development,…

  3. Injury Prevention in Physical Education: Scenarios and Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrie, Michael D.; Shewmake, Cole; Calleja, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide physical educators with practical strategies that can assist in preventing injuries in the classroom. The dynamic nature of physical education and the numerous tasks physical educators must complete daily can be challenging. Embedded in these challenges is the constant risk of student injury. Fortunately,…

  4. National Action Plan for the Prevention of Playground Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Donna; Hudson, Susan

    Recognizing the need for a nationally coordinated effort to reduce playground injuries, the National Program for Playground Safety was created in 1995. This booklet describes the national action plan for prevention of playground injuries. Designed for use by parents, teachers, recreation and park personnel, and caregivers involved in providing…

  5. Preventing Burns and Scalds. Injury Prevention for Young Children from the National Safety Certification System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Sheryl L.; Walker, April L.

    This booklet outlines a comprehensive fire and burn injury prevention program which includes an instructor's manual, a videotape, and a test: the video provides additional information and examples of injury prevention techniques, and the test measures the amount of knowledge acquired. Following an introduction, the prevalence and extent of burn…

  6. Effect of an injury prevention program on muscle injuries in elite professional soccer.

    PubMed

    Owen, Adam L; Wong, Del P; Dellal, Alexandre; Paul, Darren J; Orhant, Emmanuel; Collie, Stuart

    2013-12-01

    Due to the continual physical, physiological, and psychological demands of elite level soccer increasing the incidence and risk of injuries, preventative training programs have become a common feature of soccer players training schedule. The aim of the current investigation was to examine the effectiveness of a structured injury prevention program on the number of muscle injuries and the total number of injuries within elite professional soccer. The present study was conducted over 2 consecutive seasons, of which the first (2008-2009) being the intervention season and the second the control season (2009-2010). In total, 26 and 23 elite male professional soccer players competing within the Scottish Premier League and European competition participated. The training program was performed twice weekly for the entirety of the season (58 prevention sessions). The results revealed an increase in the total number of injuries within the intervention season (88 vs. 72); however, this was largely due to the greater number of contusion injuries sustained within the intervention season (n = 44) when compared with control season (n = 23). Significantly less muscle injuries were observed during the intervention season (moderate effect), and this occurred concomitant with a bigger squad size (large effect, p < 0.001). The findings from this study identify that a multicomponent injury prevention-training program may be appropriate for reducing the number of muscle injuries during a season but may not be adequate to reduce all other injuries.

  7. [Snowboard sports technique, injury pattern, prevention].

    PubMed

    Dingerkus, M L; Imhoff, A; Hipp, E

    1997-02-20

    Although, in Europe, snowboarding is a young sport, it has already established itself and, in common with Alpine skiing, is represented in the Olympics. Its biomechanical aspects (technique, shoeboard connection), lead not only to a typical pattern of movements, but also to a snowboard-specific pattern of injuries, which differs from that seen with Alpine skiing. In the case of snowboarding, the upper limbs are appreciably more often involved in injuries than are the lower extremities. The most common injuries are fractures of or close to the wrist. Since many children and adolescents are to be found among snowboarding fans, the percentage of epiphyseal injuries is high. Depending on the style employed-Alpine or freestyle-the risk of lower limb injuries differ in terms of ankles and knee injuries. Through the use of special protective equipment, such as gloves provided with extra protection for wrist and fingers, (possibly also helmets, knee and elbow protectors for beginners), together with improvements in technique in a snowboard school, and the optimisation of the materials used by the industry, the risk of injury can be reduced.

  8. 75 FR 18848 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Prevention...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and... Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the..., PhD, Scientific Review Officer, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health...

  9. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tear in an Athlete: Does Increased Heel Loading Contribute to ACL Rupture?

    PubMed Central

    Burkhart, Bradd; Ford, Kevin R.; Heidt, Robert S.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2008-01-01

    Rupture to the anterior cruciate ligament is a common athletic injury in American football. The lower extremity biomechanics related to increased ACL injury risk are not completely understood. However, foot landing has been purported to be a significant contributing factor to the ACL injury mechanism. In this case report, information is presented on an athlete previously tested for in-shoe loading patterns on artificial turf and subsequently went on to non-contact ACL rupture on the same surface. This case report describes the specific findings in a study participant who suffered an ACL rupture after testing and suggests that flatfoot tendency in running and cutting maneuvers might lead to an increased risk of ACL injury. PMID:20333261

  10. ThinkFirst National Injury Prevention Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Join Team ThinkFirst! Order Products Contact Us National Conferences Read more Promoting Safety Continued Messaging Read more Education Search form Product Catalog Order ThinkFirst Products Injury is ...

  11. GIS and Injury Prevention and Control: History, Challenges, and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Nathaniel; Schuurman, Nadine

    2010-01-01

    Intentional and unintentional injury is the leading cause of death and potential years of life lost in the first four decades of life in industrialized countries around the world. Despite surgical innovations and improved access to emergency care, research has shown that certain populations remain particularly vulnerable to the risks and consequences of injury. Recent evidence has shown that the analytical, data linkage, and mapping tools of geographic information systems (GIS) technology provide can further address these determinants and identify populations in need. This paper traces the history of injury prevention and discusses current and future challenges in furthering our understanding of the determinants of injury through the use of GIS. PMID:20617015

  12. Prevention and Management of Nerve Injuries in Thoracic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Auchincloss, Hugh G; Donahue, Dean M

    2015-11-01

    Nerve injuries can cause substantial morbidity after thoracic surgical procedures. These injuries are preventable, provided that the surgeon has a thorough understanding of the anatomy and follows important surgical principles. When nerve injuries occur, it is important to recognize the options available in the immediate and postoperative settings, including expectant management, immediate nerve reconstruction, or auxiliary procedures. This article covers the basic anatomy and physiology of nerves and nerve injuries, an overview of techniques in nerve reconstruction, and a guide to the nerves most commonly involved in thoracic operative procedures.

  13. Outdoor pedestrian fall-related injuries among Swedish senior citizens--injuries and preventive strategies.

    PubMed

    Gyllencreutz, Lina; Björnstig, Johanna; Rolfsman, Ewa; Saveman, Britt-Inger

    2015-06-01

    Senior citizens get around, to a large extent, as pedestrians, and safe walking is desirable for senior citizens allowing them to stay mobile, independent and healthy in old age. Senior citizens are over-represented in injury statistics, and fall-related injuries are common. The aim of this study was to investigate fall-related injuries including healthcare costs among senior citizen pedestrians injured when walking in public outdoor environments and to describe their self-reported causes and suggested preventive strategies. The data were based on a combination of information from injury data and a questionnaire. Three hundred senior citizens attended one emergency department after sustaining injuries from pedestrian falls; 60% suffered nonminor injuries, mostly fractures. One-fifth of the pedestrians were hospitalised for an average of 8 days with an indirect hospital cost of 6.2 million EUR (55 million SEK). Environmental factors such as ice were the most commonly described cause of the injury incident. Forty per cent of the respondents indicated that the municipality was responsible for the cause of the injury incident. Fewer respondents mentioned their own responsibility as a preventive strategy. Thirty per cent described a combination of improvements such as better road maintenance, changes in human behaviour and use of safety products as preventive strategies. It is of great importance to highlight general safety, products and preventive strategies to minimise injury risks, so that pedestrians can safely realise the known health benefits of walking and thereby limit healthcare costs.

  14. Lateral Knee Braces in Football: Do They Prevent Injury?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulos, Lonnie E.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The results of three recently presented clinical studies and a biomechanical study of the use of lateral knee braces to prevent knee injuries are reviewed. The results raise serious doubts about the efficacy of the preventive knee braces which are currently available. (Author/MT)

  15. Injury Prevention Awareness in an Urban Native American Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, James S. J.; Williams, Scott D.

    1991-01-01

    A survey of 50 Native American and 100 other families assessed injury prevention awareness and practices among urban Native Americans in Salt Lake City (Utah). Native American families were less aware of and less likely to practice prevention than others. These characteristics are more likely caused by low-income status than culture. (SLD)

  16. Preventing Workplace Injuries Among Perinatal Nurses.

    PubMed

    Harolds, Laura; Hurst, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Many aspects of perinatal nursing put nurses at risk for injuries, including frequent repetitive bending, lifting of clients, and exposure to potentially large amounts of body fluids such as blood and amniotic fluid. Violence is also a potential risk with stressful family situations that may arise around childbirth. Workplace injuries put a health care facility at risk for staff turnover, decreases in the number of skilled nurses, client dissatisfaction, workers' compensation payouts, and employee lawsuits. Through the use of safety equipment, improved safety and violence training programs, "no manual lift" policies, reinforcement of personal protective equipment usage, and diligent staff training to improve awareness, these risks can be minimized.

  17. Strategies to prevent injury in adolescent sport: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Abernethy, Liz; Bleakley, Chris

    2007-01-01

    This systematic review set out to identify randomised controlled trials and controlled intervention studies that evaluated the effectiveness of preventive strategies in adolescent sport and to draw conclusions on the strength of the evidence. A literature search in seven databases (Medline, SportDiscus, EMBASE, CINAHL, PEDro, Cochrane Review and DARE) was carried out using four keywords: adolescent, sport, injury and prevention (expanded to capture any relevant literature). Assessment of 154 papers found 12 studies eligible for inclusion. It can be concluded that injury prevention strategies that focus on preseason conditioning, functional training, education, balance and sport‐specific skills, which should be continued throughout the sporting season, are effective. The evidence for the effectiveness of protective equipment in injury prevention is inconclusive and requires further assessment. PMID:17496070

  18. Are pre-hospital deaths from accidental injury preventable?

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, L. M.; Redmond, A. D.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine what proportion of pre-hospital deaths from accidental injury--deaths at the scene of the accident and those that occur before the person has reached hospital--are preventable. DESIGN--Retrospective study of all deaths from accidental injury that occurred between 1 January 1987 and 31 December 1990 and were reported to the coroner. SETTING--North Staffordshire. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Injury severity score, probability of survival (probit analysis), and airway obstruction. RESULTS--There were 152 pre-hospital deaths from accidental injury (110 males and 42 females). In the same period there were 257 deaths in hospital from accidental injury (136 males and 121 females). The average age at death was 41.9 years for those who died before reaching hospital, and their average injury severity score was 29.3. In contrast, those who died in hospital were older and equally likely to be males or females. Important neurological injury occurred in 113 pre-hospital deaths, and evidence of airway obstruction in 59. Eighty six pre-hospital deaths were due to road traffic accidents, and 37 of these were occupants in cars. On the basis of the injury severity score and age, death was found to have been inevitable or highly likely in 92 cases. In the remaining 60 cases death had not been inevitable and airway obstruction was present in up to 51 patients with injuries that they might have survived. CONCLUSION--Death was potentially preventable in at least 39% of those who died from accidental injury before they reached hospital. Training in first aid should be available more widely, and particularly to motorists as many pre-hospital deaths that could be prevented are due to road accidents. PMID:8173428

  19. Preventing Non-Suicidal Self-Injury in Adolescents: The Signs of Self-Injury Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muehlenkamp, Jennifer J.; Walsh, Barent W.; McDade, Moira

    2010-01-01

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) continues to be a problem among youth and there is a great need for programming aimed at reducing NSSI in adolescents. The signs of self-injury program is the first known NSSI school-based prevention program for adolescents that attempts to increase knowledge, improve help-seeking attitudes and behaviors, and…

  20. Parental Compliance with Childhood Injury Prevention Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeBailly, Susan A.; And Others

    Preliminary data from a study documenting parental perceptions of injuries and steps taken by inner-city and suburban parents to make their homes safe are reported. Participants were 407 families with children under 5 years old. Families were provided one of the following interventions: (1) a well child visit; (2) safety equipment (3) physician…

  1. Music and Medicine: Preventing Performance Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Carol Anne

    2001-01-01

    Describes medical conditions that musicians may contract. Addresses what experts believe may help avoid some conditions and what to do if injury is possible. Provides a bibliography of resources on performing arts medicine, including books and periodicals, and a list of associations for performing arts medicine. (CMK)

  2. Prevention of back injuries and pain

    SciTech Connect

    Baptiste, B.

    1982-10-11

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in conjunction with Hansen and Associates (San Mateo, CA), developed an employee education and training class in back care. In three years about 1500 LLNL employees have attended this class. According to accident statistics and employee questionnaires, the class has been effective in reducing back injury and pain.

  3. Youth sports and concussions: preventing preventable brain injuries. One client, one cause, and a new law.

    PubMed

    Adler, Richard H

    2011-11-01

    Effective concussion prevention and management for youth athletes requires both education and legislation. Education alone effectively begins the awareness of an issue, but does not change behavior. Education and legislation are required to prevent preventable concussion and brain injuries in youth athletes.

  4. Health promotion policy and politics: lessons from childhood injury prevention.

    PubMed

    Sleet, David A; Schieber, Richard A; Gilchrist, Julie

    2003-04-01

    Health promotion policies--including laws that regulate safe products, environments, and behaviors--are among the most effective mechanisms for reducing childhood injuries for large segments of the population. In this article, five examples of safety legislation and regulation to reduce childhood injury are described. Two such efforts are aimed at preventing injury-producing events from occurring: child-resistant packaging for medications and hazardous substances, and graduated licensing for teen drivers. Three other examples illustrate the value and complexities of policies designed to prevent an injury once a hazardous event has occurred: bicycle helmet legislation, children's sleepwear standards, and child safety seat laws. One important role of health promotion is to tackle not only how health promotion policies and politics can improve child health, but also how to educate legislators and policy makers in the process.

  5. Common rugby league injuries. Recommendations for treatment and preventative measures.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, N

    1994-12-01

    Rugby league is the main professional team sport played in Eastern Australia. It is also very popular at a junior and amateur level. However, injuries are common because of the amount of body contact that occurs and the amount of running that is required to participate in the game. Injuries to the lower limbs account for over 50% of all injuries. The most common specific injuries are ankle lateral ligament tears, knee medial collateral and anterior cruciate ligament tears, groin musculotendinous tears, hamstring and calf muscle tears, and quadriceps muscle contusions. Head injuries are common and consist of varying degrees of concussion as well as lacerations and facial fractures. Serious head injury is rare. Some of the more common upper limb injuries are to the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joints. Accurate diagnosis of these common injuries using appropriate history, examination and investigations is critical in organising a treatment and rehabilitation plan that will return the player to competition as soon as possible. An understanding of the mechanism of injury is also important in order to develop preventative strategies.

  6. Risk Factors for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Helen C.; Vacek, Pamela; Johnson, Robert J.; Slauterbeck, James R.; Hashemi, Javad; Shultz, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Context: Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of the knee are immediately debilitating and can cause long-term consequences, including the early onset of osteoarthritis. It is important to have a comprehensive understanding of all possible risk factors for ACL injury to identify individuals who are at risk for future injuries and to provide an appropriate level of counseling and programs for prevention. Objective: This review, part 1 of a 2-part series, highlights what is known and still unknown regarding anatomic and neuromuscular risk factors for injury to the ACL from the current peer-reviewed literature. Data Sources: Studies were identified from MEDLINE (1951–March 2011) using the MeSH terms anterior cruciate ligament, knee injury, and risk factors. The bibliographies of relevant articles and reviews were cross-referenced to complete the search. Study Selection: Prognostic studies that utilized the case-control and prospective cohort study designs to evaluate risk factors for ACL injury were included in this review. Results: A total of 50 case-control and prospective cohort articles were included in the review, and 30 of these studies focused on neuromuscular and anatomic risk factors. Conclusions: Several anatomic and neuromuscular risk factors are associated with increased risk of suffering ACL injury—such as female sex and specific measures of bony geometry of the knee joint, including decreased intercondylar femoral notch size, decreased depth of concavity of the medial tibial plateau, increased slope of the tibial plateaus, and increased anterior-posterior knee laxity. These risk factors most likely act in combination to influence the risk of ACL injury; however, multivariate risk models that consider all the aforementioned risk factors in combination have not been established to explore this interaction. PMID:23016072

  7. Prevention of injury from x-radiation.

    PubMed

    HOLDEN, F R; TOCHILIN, E; HINE, C H; LEWIS, L

    1951-03-01

    Despite continued advances in x-ray technology, evidence indicates that x-radiation injuries occur today to an excessive degree. These injuries have led to a progressive stiffening of standards of permissible exposure, especially in the past 15 years. Protection from radiation damage is logically based on dosimetry, preferably administered by a centralized service laboratory. The experience of two large hospitals in the control of x-radiation exposure is cited. Personnel exposed to x-radiation may be monitored by either pocket dosimeters of the ion chamber or electroscope type or by standardized film badge dosimeters. A recently developed film badge dosimeter that measures effective x-ray energy and radiation exposure in a quantitative manner is described.

  8. PREVENTION OF INJURY FROM X-RADIATION

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Francis R.; Tochilin, Eugene; Hine, Charles H.; Lewis, Leon

    1951-01-01

    Despite continued advances in x-ray technology, evidence indicates that x-radiation injuries occur today to an excessive degree. These injuries have led to a progressive stiffening of standards of permissible exposure, especially in the past 15 years. Protection from radiation damage is logically based on dosimetry, preferably administered by a centralized service laboratory. The experience of two large hospitals in the control of x-radiation exposure is cited. Personnel exposed to x-radiation may be monitored by either pocket dosimeters of the ion chamber or electroscope type or by standardized film badge dosimeters. A recently developed film badge dosimeter that measures effective x-ray energy and radiation exposure in a quantitative manner is described. PMID:14812354

  9. Prevention of Blast-Related Injuries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-14

    intervention. Electroencephalography (EEG) is a commonly used method to study cerebral function. EEG is particularly attractive for field use because the...trauma. Electroencephalography and clinical neurophysiology. Aug 1989;73(2):94-106. 14. Cernak I, Savic J, Ignjatovic D, Jevtic M. Blast injury from...Quantitative electroencephalography in a swine model of cerebral arterial gas embolism. Clinical neurophysiology : official journal of the International

  10. Anterior cruciate ligament- specialized post-operative return-to-sports (ACL-SPORTS) training: a randomized control trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) is standard practice for athletes that wish to return to high-level activities; however functional outcomes after ACLR are poor. Quadriceps strength weakness, abnormal movement patterns and below normal knee function is reported in the months and years after ACLR. Second ACL injuries are common with even worse outcomes than primary ACLR. Modifiable limb-to-limb asymmetries have been identified in individuals who re-injure after primary ACLR, suggesting a neuromuscular training program is needed to improve post-operative outcomes. Pre-operative perturbation training, a neuromuscular training program, has been successful at improving limb symmetry prior to surgery, though benefits are not lasting after surgery. Implementing perturbation training after surgery may be successful in addressing post-operative deficits that contribute to poor functional outcomes and second ACL injury risk. Methods/Design 80 athletes that have undergone a unilateral ACLR and wish to return to level 1 or 2 activities will be recruited for this study and randomized to one of two treatment groups. A standard care group will receive prevention exercises, quadriceps strengthening and agility exercises, while the perturbation group will receive the same exercise program with the addition of perturbation training. The primary outcomes measures will include gait biomechanics, clinical and functional measures, and knee joint loading. Return to sport rates, return to pre-injury level of activity rates, and second injury rates will be secondary measures. Discussion The results of this ACL-Specialized Post-Operative Return To Sports (ACL-SPORTS) Training program will help clinicians to better determine an effective post-operative treatment program that will improve modifiable impairments that influence outcomes after ACLR. Trial registration Randomized Control Trial NIH 5R01AR048212-07. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01773317 PMID:23522373

  11. [Prevention of hand injuries - current situation in Europe].

    PubMed

    Leixnering, M; Quadlbauer, S; Szolarcz, C; Schenk, C; Leixnering, S; Körpert, K

    2013-12-01

    Hand injuries are a frequent occurrence and account for 41% of all occupational injuries. In general such accidents are the result of stress, inattention, tiredness, use of defective or poorly maintained machinery. However, artention must equally be directed at the large number of accidents occurring in leisure time activities since the inability to work due to a leisure time accident is similarly cost-intensive. Throughout Europe attempts have been made in the past 10 years to improve prevention. At the initiative of the Hand Trauma Committee (HTC) of FESSH prevention conferences were stated in 2009. These have in part reduced the number of hand injuries in -Europe. In Austria a special controlling committee was founded by the Austrian Workers' Compensation Board (AUVA) with the specific objective of reducing the number of hand injuries. Similarly the "Circle for Leisure Time Hand Injury Prevention" was created to specifically deal with hand injuries occurring during leisure time activities. Through the cooperation of these 2 committees and implementation of the thus decided measures, a reduction in the number of accidents involving the hand is to be expected with a concomitant reduction in the associated costs.

  12. Injury prevention: a strategic priority for environmental health?

    PubMed

    Stone, D H; Morris, G P

    2010-10-01

    Injury results from the acute transfer of energy (or the acute lack of a vital element) from the environment to human tissue. It is thus, ipso facto, an 'environmental health' issue par excellence. This paper argues that injury consequently deserves consideration as a major strategic priority by environmental health professionals. Two international agreements concerning children's health and the environment have major implications for safety. The Children's Environmental Health Action Plan for Europe (CEHAPE) and the European Environmental Health Strategy make reference to the need for improved evidence and greater co-operation between the environmental and health sectors. CEHAPE is particularly relevant to safety as it focuses on four regional priority goals, the second of which refers to the prevention and reduction of health consequences from injuries by promoting safe, secure and supportive human settlements for all children. The natural strategic 'home' for injury prevention may therefore lie within environmental health, a domain from which it has generally been excluded. In support of this assertion, Scotland's recent policy initiative on the environment and human health 'Good Places, Better Health' is cited, where injury in children up to 8 years of age is one of four child health priorities being tackled during its initial implementation. An important test of the initiative may be its capacity to inform policy, practice and research in the field of injury prevention and safety promotion. If successful, it will help to validate the environmental health approach to a field that remains relatively neglected by public agencies, policy makers, practitioners and researchers.

  13. Injury prevention among friends: the benefits of school connectedness.

    PubMed

    Chapman, R L; Buckley, L; Reveruzzi, B; Sheehan, M

    2014-08-01

    Unsafe road behaviors, violence and alcohol use, are primary contributors to adolescent injury. Research suggests that adolescents look out for their friends and engage in protective behavior to reduce others' risk-taking and that school connectedness is associated with reduced injury-risks. This study examined the role of school connectedness in willingness to protect and prevent friends from involvement in alcohol use, fights and unlicensed driving. Surveys were completed at two time points, six months apart, by 545 13-14 year olds from seven Australian high schools. Females were significantly more likely than males to report willingness to protect their friends. School connectedness significantly and positively predicted willingness to protect across all three injury-risk behaviors, after accounting for sex and own involvement in injury-risk behaviors. School connectedness may therefore be an important factor to target in school-based prevention programs, both to reduce adolescents' own injury-risk behavior and to increase injury prevention among friends.

  14. Hamstring injuries. Current trends in treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Kujala, U M; Orava, S; Järvinen, M

    1997-06-01

    Pre-exercise stretching and adequate warm-up are important in the prevention of hamstring injuries. A previous mild injury or fatigue may increase the risk of injury. Hamstring muscle tear is typically partial and takes place during eccentric exercise when the muscle develops tension while lengthening, but variation in injury mechanisms is possible. Diagnosis of typical hamstring muscle injury is usually based on typical injury mechanism and clinical findings of local pain and loss of function. Diagnosis of avulsion in the ischial tuberosity, with the need for longer immobilisation, and a complete rupture of the hamstring origin, in which immediate operative treatment is necessary, poses a challenge to the treating physician. X-rays, ultrasonography or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be helpful in differential diagnostics. After first aid with rest, compression, cold and elevation, the treatment of hamstring muscle injury must be tailored to the grade of injury. Conservative treatment is based on a knowledge of the biological background of the healing process of the muscle. Experimental studies have shown that a short period of immobilisation is needed to accelerate formation of the granulation tissue matrix following injury. The length of the immobilisation is, however, dependent on the grade of injury and should be optimised so that the scar can bear the pulling forces operating on it without re-rupture. Mobilisation, on the other hand, is required in order to regain the original strength of the muscle and to achieve good final results in resorption of the connective tissue scar and re-capillarisation of the damaged area. Another important aim of mobilisation--especially in sports medical practice--is to avoid muscle atrophy and loss of strength and extensibility, which rapidly result from prolonged immobilisation. Complete ruptures with loss of function should be operated on, as should cases resistant to conservative therapy in which, in the late phase of

  15. Shoulder injuries in the skeletally immature baseball pitcher and recommendations for the prevention of injury.

    PubMed

    Zaremski, Jason L; Krabak, Brian J

    2012-07-01

    Since 1996, when the first article on pitch restriction recommendations was published, the number of research articles involving skeletally immature pitchers has increased. Potential shoulder injuries in this age group are proximal humeral epiphysiolysis, glenohumeral instability, rotator cuff dysfunction, and superior labrum anteroposterior lesions. Fatigue, improper biomechanics, and overuse are the most common reasons for these injuries. In the hopes of preventing injury to young pitchers, numerous organizations, including the USA Baseball Medical & Safety Advisory Committee, The American Sports Medicine Institute, Little League Baseball & Softball, and the Long Term Athlete Development Program for Baseball Canada, have developed recommendations on pitching restrictions that include limits on pitch count, pitches per week, pitches per season, and rest between pitching. Awareness by sports medicine providers, coaches, and parents/guardians of the most up-to-date recommendations on injury prevention and return to play guidelines should reduce the incidence of acute and chronic injuries in adolescent baseball pitchers.

  16. Modern concepts of treatment and prevention of lightning injuries.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Farinholt, Heidi-Marie A; Winters, Kathryne L; Britt, L D; Long, William B

    2005-01-01

    Lightning is the second most common cause of weather-related death in the United States. Lightning is a natural atmospheric discharge that occurs between regions of net positive and net negative electric charges. There are several types of lightning, including streak lightning, sheet lightning, ribbon lightning, bead lightning, and ball lightning. Lightning causes injury through five basic mechanisms: direct strike, flash discharge (splash), contact, ground current (step voltage), and blunt trauma. While persons struck by lightning show evidence of multisystem derangement, the most dramatic effects involve the cardiovascular and central nervous systems. Cardiopulmonary arrest is the most common cause of death in lightning victims. Immediate resuscitation of people struck by lightning greatly affects the prognosis. Electrocardiographic changes observed following lightning accidents are probably from primary electric injury or burns of the myocardium without coronary artery occlusion. Lightning induces vasomotor spasm from direct sympathetic stimulation resulting in severe loss of pulses in the extremities. This vasoconstriction may be associated with transient paralysis. Damage to the central nervous system accounts for the second most debilitating group of injuries. Central nervous system injuries from lightning include amnesia and confusion, immediate loss of consciousness, weakness, intracranial injuries, and even brief aphasia. Other organ systems injured by lightning include the eye, ear, gastrointestinal system, skin, and musculoskeletal system. The best treatment of lightning injuries is prevention. The Lightning Safety Guidelines devised by the Lightning Safety Group should be instituted in the United States and other nations to prevent these devastating injuries.

  17. Buckled-up children: understanding the mechanism, injuries, management, and prevention of seat belt related injuries.

    PubMed

    Davies, Kimberly L

    2004-01-01

    In the United States motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death in children. Although laws and public awareness campaigns have increased the use of passive restraints, many children continue to be unrestrained or improperly restrained. Age-appropriate child restraint systems are a vital means to prevent injury and death. The young school-aged child presents unique challenges to standardized vehicle restraint systems. As these children outgrow child safety seats, they frequently are placed in lap/shoulder belt systems designed for the adult. When prematurely graduated to the vehicle's restraint systems they are predisposed to injuries to the abdomen and lumbar spine known as the "seat belt syndrome" or "lap belt complex." These injuries often present subtly, and are not as obvious as the often life-threatening injuries found in the unrestrained pediatric trauma patient. However if undetected or missed these injuries can significantly impact the child's recovery and functional outcome. This article will provide a comprehensive overview of pediatric seat belt injuries. Content will explore the mechanisms responsible for producing the typical patterns of injury, recognition of these potential injuries during the trauma assessment, diagnostic evaluation and management of children with suspected or actual seat belt injuries. Prevention strategies will be discussed that will enable trauma nurses to effectively advocate the use of booster seats for the young school-aged child.

  18. Community based prevention programs targeting all injuries for children

    PubMed Central

    Spinks, A; Turner, C; McClure, R; Nixon, J

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Community based models for injury prevention have become an accepted part of the overall injury control strategy. This systematic review of the scientific literature examines the evidence for their effectiveness in reducing all-cause injury in children 0–14 years of age. Methods: A comprehensive search of the literature was performed using the following study selection criteria: community based intervention study; children under 14 years; outcome measure was injury rates; and either a community control or an historical control was used in the design. Quality assessment and data abstraction were guided by a standardized procedure and performed independently by two authors. Data synthesis was in tabular and text form with meta-analysis not being possible due to the discrepancy in methods and measures between the studies. Results: Thorough electronic and library search techniques yielded only nine formally evaluated community based all-cause child injury prevention programs that have reported actual injury outcomes. Of these nine studies, seven provided high level evidence where contemporary control communities were used for comparison; the remaining two used a pre and post-design or time trend analysis where historical data from the community were used as the comparison. Only three of the seven studies with contemporary control communities found significant effect of the intervention; the two studies without controls noted significant reductions in injury rates after the intervention period. Conclusion: There is a paucity of research from which evidence regarding the effectiveness of community based childhood injury prevention programs can be obtained and hence a clear need to increase the effort on developing this evidence base. PMID:15178676

  19. Prevention of Elbow Injuries in Youth Baseball Pitchers

    PubMed Central

    Fleisig, Glenn S.; Andrews, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Although baseball is a relatively safe sport, numerous reports suggest a rapid rise in elbow injury rate among youth baseball pitchers. Evidence Acquisition: PubMed was searched for epidemiologic, biomechanical, and clinical studies of elbow injuries in baseball (keywords: “youth OR adolescent” AND baseball AND pitching AND “ulnar collateral ligament OR elbow”; published January 2000 – April 2012). Studies with relevance to youth baseball pitchers were reviewed. Relevant references from these articles were also retrieved and reviewed. Original data, insight, and recommendations were added. Results: The majority of baseball elbow injuries are noncontact injuries to the dominant arm resulting from repetitive pitching. Five percent of youth pitchers suffer a serious elbow or shoulder injury (requiring surgery or retirement from baseball) within 10 years. The risk factor with the strongest correlation to injury is amount of pitching. Specifically, increased pitches per game, innings pitched per season, and months pitched per year are all associated with increased risk of elbow injury. Pitching while fatigued and pitching for concurrent teams are also associated with increased risk. Pitchers who also play catcher have an increased injury risk, perhaps due to the quantity of throws playing catcher adds to the athlete’s arm. Another risk factor is poor pitching biomechanics. Improper biomechanics may increase the torque and force produced about the elbow during each pitch. Although throwing breaking pitches at a young age has been suggested as a risk factor, existing clinical, epidemiologic, and biomechanical data do not support this claim. Conclusions: Some elbow injuries to youth baseball pitchers can be prevented with safety rules, recommendations, education, and common sense. Scientific and medical organizations have published safety rules and recommendations, with emphasis on prevention of overuse and pitching while fatigued. Strength

  20. The biomechanics of cervical spine injury and implications for injury prevention.

    PubMed

    Winkelstein, B A; Myers, B S

    1997-07-01

    Most catastrophic cervical spinal injuries occur as a result of head impacts in which the head stops and the neck is forced to stop the moving torso. In these situations the neck is sufficiently fragile that injuries have been reported at velocities as low as 3.1 m/s with only a fraction of the mass of the torso loading the cervical spine. Cervical spinal injury occurs in less than 20 ms following head impact, explaining the absence of a relationship between clinically reported head motions and the cervical spinal injury mechanism. In contrast, the forces acting on the spine at the time of injury are able to explain the injury mechanism and form a rational basis for classification of vertebral fractures and dislocations. Fortunately, most head impacts do not result in cervical spine injuries. Analysis of the biomechanical and clinical literature shows that the flexibility of the cervical spine frequently allows the head and neck to flex or extend out of the path of the torso and escape injury. Accordingly, constraints which restrict the motion of the neck can increase the risk for cervical spine injury. These observations serve as a foundation on which injury prevention strategies, including coaching, helmets, and padding, may be evaluated.

  1. Youth baseball injuries: recognition, treatment, and prevention.

    PubMed

    Ray, Tracy R

    2010-01-01

    Baseball is a very popular and safe sport for children and adolescents. Understanding bone maturation and risk factors for overuse will guide the practitioner to manage these athletes properly. Overuse injury risk can be minimized by limiting pitch counts, ensuring adequate recovery, developing proper mechanics, and allowing for early evaluation and intervention. Rest, albeit difficult for the athlete, is the mainstay of treatment for many of the maladies affecting this age group of throwers. Individualized approaches to treatment for this population are advised. Structural damage that may lead to surgery is rare but may need consideration if there is no response to conservative measures. Several resources are available to educate players, coaches, and parents regarding safe play.

  2. Youth Sports: A Pediatrician's Perspective on Coaching and Injury Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Koester, Michael C.

    2000-01-01

    Objective: My objective is to review the factors that influence youth participation in sports, to discuss the role coaches may play in youth sports injuries, and to call on athletic trainers and other health professionals to become involved in youth sports in an effort to limit injury risk. Background: Millions of American youths participate in team sports. Their primary motivation to participate is to have fun. Unfortunately, large numbers of participants have sustained correspondingly large numbers of injuries. Many injuries can be attributed to improper technique and conditioning methods taught by volunteer coaches. Although not the only contributors to injuries, these may be the most amenable to preventive measures, such as formal instruction for coaches in the areas of proper biomechanics and player-coach communication. Description: I provide an overview of the reasons why children participate in sports, discuss participation motivation, and review the literature on coaches' communication methods that have been proved effective in maximizing learning and enjoyment for young athletes. Clinical Advantages: This article provides certified athletic trainers with the background knowledge needed to take an active role in youth sports injury prevention at the community level. PMID:16558664

  3. The effectiveness of the nationwide BokSmart rugby injury prevention program on catastrophic injury rates.

    PubMed

    Brown, J C; Verhagen, E; Knol, D; Van Mechelen, W; Lambert, M I

    2016-02-01

    Rugby Union ("rugby") participants have a higher than average risk of injury compared with participants of other popular team sports. BokSmart, a nationwide injury prevention program was launched in South Africa in mid-2009, with the goal of reducing catastrophic head/neck (serious) injuries in players. The program provides injury prevention information to coaches and referees. This study investigated if BokSmart has been associated with a reduction in these injuries. The BokSmart program collected data on all South African rugby-related serious injuries since 2008. Using a Poisson regression, injury numbers were compared pre-BokSmart (2008-2009) to the years post-implementation (2010-2013). Player numbers were assumed to be constant throughout this evaluation: junior = 529,483; senior = 121,663. In junior players, the "post-BokSmart" period had 2.5 less annual serious injuries than "pre-BokSmart" (incidence rate ratio: 0.6, 95% confidence interval: 0.5-0.7, P < 0.000). In contrast, there was no significant difference in these periods in seniors. The absence of effect in seniors may be a result of fewer players or of differences in effectiveness of BokSmart in this group--future studies should investigate these questions.

  4. Stretching and injury prevention in football: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Stojanovic, Marko D; Ostojic, Sergej M

    2011-04-01

    Stretching exercises are regularly recommended as a part of football-training sessions and in preparation for competition. There is little sound empirical evidence, however, to substantiate the role of stretching exercises and consequently increased flexibility on injury prevention in football. Furthermore, in the last decade or so, fundamental research has shed some light on the biomechanical adaptation of the muscle-tendon unit following different stretching protocols, improving knowledge about the topic and enabling better understanding of the stretching-injury relationship. The purpose of this review is to examine the literature on the role of stretching and/or increased flexibility on injury prevention in football, with presented results analyzed in the context of the up-to-date basic science research evidence.

  5. [Hand injuries management of care and hand prevention networks].

    PubMed

    Couturier, Christian

    2013-11-01

    Injuries of the hand are common and sometimes more serious than it appears on a non-specialist initial examination. They are a public health issue with some major impact on the continued activity of patients who have been victims of those injuries. The European Federation of Hand Emergency Services (FESUM) accredits SOS Hand centers, dedicated hand trauma organizations in which the specialized medical cares is optima, avoiding the loss of chance to inadequate primary orientation. If nevertheless a serious injury leaves a debilitating sequela Hand Prevention networks, organized by practitioners of SOS Hand centers, help patients establish a process of socio-professional rehabilitation as soon as possible. These networks organize primary, secondary and tertiary prevention of hand trauma and disabilities that can accompany them. Innovative organizations, they resemble a national association that supports the development of new structures. They are open to all professionals of health and their patients, members or not of the network.

  6. A systematic review to evaluate exercise for anterior cruciate ligament injuries: does this approach reduce the incidence of knee osteoarthritis?

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Koji J; Chopp-Hurley, Jaclyn N; Maly, Monica R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Among a variety of conservative and surgical options to treat anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries, we do not understand which options could potentially prevent knee osteoarthritis (OA). The aim of this systematic review was to examine the evidence pertaining to exercise treatment of ACL injuries in the context of knee OA. Methods Medline, Embase, CINAHL, PubMed, and PEDro (Physiotherapy Evidence Database) databases were systematically searched using keywords encompassed within four primary key terms: knee, osteoarthritis, anterior cruciate ligament, and exercise. Clinical studies evaluating the effect of an exercise treatment for ACL injuries on the development of knee OA in adult humans were included. The PEDro scale was used to critically assess the studies included in the review. Results Eighteen studies were included in this review, with a median PEDro score of 6/11 (range, 2/11–9/11). Three studies provided statistical evidence that exercise following ACL injury lowered the risk for knee OA development. Nine studies demonstrated no benefit of exercise in preventing knee OA incidence relative to either operative treatment or the contralateral, unaffected knee. However, exercise resulted in higher knee instability. Nonetheless, there were no significant differences in subjective or objective knee outcomes for early versus late ACL reconstruction. Limitations This review was not registered through PROSPERO. Conclusion The relationship between a rehabilitative exercise for ACL injuries and long-term knee OA prevalence is inconclusive. However, research suggests initial conservative treatment with optional late ACL reconstruction because this treatment strategy may reduce the risk of knee OA. More research, ideally randomized controlled trials or comparable designs, is required prior to establishing clinical guidelines for ACL injury management. PMID:27843365

  7. Prevention of arm injury in youth baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    Kerut, Edmund Kenneth; Kerut, Denise Goodfellow; Fleisig, Glenn S; Andrews, James R

    2008-01-01

    The advent of youth year-round baseball has come with an increased incidence of pitching related injury and surgery, most notably involving the shoulder and elbow (ulnar collateral ligament). These injuries become evident in high school and college, but begin at the youth level. Several studies have identified baseball pitching risk factors during youth that increase likelihood for injury and surgery in subsequent years. Based on these studies, the USA Baseball Medical & Safety Advisory Committee has published guidelines for pitching that include limits on pitch count and pitches per week and season as well as recommendations for number of rest days between pitching. Also, recommendations include the restriction of breaking balls prior to puberty, the importance of instruction for proper pitching mechanics as early as possible in development, and at least three months of rest after a season. This review is intended to help guide primary care physicians and pediatricians when discussing youth pitching and injury prevention with parents and coaches.

  8. Childhood injury prevention practices by parents in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Mock, C; Arreola, R; Trevino, P; Almazan, S; Enrique, Z; Gonzalez, S; Simpson, K; Hernandez, T

    2002-01-01

    Objective: Scientifically based injury prevention efforts have not been widely implemented in Latin America. This study was undertaken to evaluate the baseline knowledge and practices of childhood safety on the part of parents in Monterrey, Mexico and in so doing provide information on which to base subsequent injury prevention efforts. Methods: Interviews were carried out with parents from three socioeconomic strata (upper, middle, lower). Questionnaires were based on Spanish language materials developed by The Injury Prevention Program (TIPP) of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Results: Data were obtained from parents of 1123 children. Overall safety scores (percent safe responses) increased with increasing socioeconomic status. The differences among the socioeconomic groups were most pronounced for transportation and less pronounced for household and recreational safety. The differences were most notable for activities that required a safety related device such as a car seat, seat belt, helmet, or smoke detector. Appropriate use of such devices declined from 47% (upper socioeconomic group) to 25% (middle) to 15% (lower). Conclusions: Considerable differences in the knowledge and especially the practice of childhood safety exist among parents in different socioeconomic levels in Mexico. Future injury prevention efforts need to address these and especially the availability, cost, and utilization of specific highly effective safety devices. PMID:12460967

  9. 75 FR 35360 - Injury and Illness Prevention Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-22

    ... discussion. To ] facilitate as much group interaction as possible, formal presentations will not be permitted... Group, Inc., 110 Hartwell Avenue, Lexington, MA 02421; Attention: OSHA Injury and Illness Prevention... Series (OHSAS) Project Group, which is an international association of government agencies,...

  10. Research on injury prevention: topics for systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Rivara, F; Johansen, J; Thompson, D

    2002-01-01

    Background: Duplication should be avoided in research and only effective intervention programs should be implemented. Objective: To arrive at a consensus among injury control investigators and practitioners on the most important research questions for systematic review in the area of injury prevention. Design: Delphi survey. Methods: A total of 34 injury prevention experts were asked to submit questions for systematic review. These were then collated; experts then ranked these on importance and availability of research. Results: Twenty one experts generated 79 questions. The prevention areas with the most number of questions generated were fires and burns, motor vehicle, and violence (other than intimate partner), and the least were other interventions (which included Safe Communities), and risk compensation. These were ranked by mean score. There was good agreement between the mean score and the proportion of experts rating questions as important or very important. Nine of the top 24 questions were rated as having some to a substantial amount of research available, and 15 as having little research available. Conclusions: The Delphi technique provided a useful means to develop consensus on injury prevention research needs and questions for systematic review. PMID:12120838

  11. Injury Prevention for the Elderly. Field Test Instructor Coursebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Bonnie

    This coursebook is intended for use by the instructors presenting a workshop on preventing injuries in the elderly that was developed as a field test of a larger 10-module training program for staff of long-term health care facilities, senior center and adult day care staff, and home health aides. The curriculum guide served as a blueprint for the…

  12. Preventing Death and Serious Injury from Falling Trees and Branches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookes, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    Of 128 outdoor education related deaths examined since 1960, 14 have been due to falling trees or branches. This article examines the grounds on which death or serious injury due to falling trees or branches can be regarded as an inherent risk in outdoor education, and the extent to which such incidents can be regarded as preventable. It compares…

  13. Prevention of growth arrest by fibrin interposition into physeal injury.

    PubMed

    Jie, Qiang; Hu, Yunyu; Yang, Liu; Lei, Wei; Zhao, Li; Lv, Rong; Wang, Jun

    2010-03-01

    This study investigated the repair effects of fat and fibrin graft interposition through a proximal tibia transphyseal injury model and assessed the effectiveness of treatment to physeal injury with the fibrin. In this study, a unilateral growth plate injury was created in the right proximal tibia of 28 rats without any graft interposition; all left tibias were left untouched. In the other group of 28 rats, a bilateral physeal injury was made with the left tibia filled with autogenously adipose tissue and the right tibia filled with fibrin. To compare the malformed extents induced by different interventions, the length and the metaphyseal-diaphyseal angle of the tibia of three injured groups were examined. Further studies on bone density analysis and histological change were used to compare the bony bridge formation under different interventions. Results showed that the deformity angle and medial length of the tibia were significantly different between the grafted groups and nongrafted group at 4, 16, and 24 weeks postoperative (P<0.01). Results also showed no significant difference between fibrin-graft and fat-graft groups (P>0.05). Furthermore, the bone mineralization density of bony bridge induced by injury was significantly different between the grafted group and nongrafted group at 4, 16, and 24 weeks postoperative (P<0.01). Histological findings showed that bony repair after physeal injury was inhibited by both fibrin and fat interventions. We concluded that fibrin could be a substitute of adipose tissue in preventing the deformities induced by epiphyseal injury. Similar to autogenous fat, fibrin was found to alleviate limb shortness and prevent angular malformation by forming a scar instead of a bony bridge. The use of fibrin can help us to develop effective and compound intervention grafts to prevent skeletal deformity and regenerate normal cartilage tissue in the future.

  14. Prevention of infections associated with combat-related extremity injuries.

    PubMed

    Murray, Clinton K; Obremskey, William T; Hsu, Joseph R; Andersen, Romney C; Calhoun, Jason H; Clasper, Jon C; Whitman, Timothy J; Curry, Thomas K; Fleming, Mark E; Wenke, Joseph C; Ficke, James R

    2011-08-01

    During combat operations, extremities continue to be the most common sites of injury with associated high rates of infectious complications. Overall, ∼ 15% of patients with extremity injuries develop osteomyelitis, and ∼ 17% of those infections relapse or recur. The bacteria infecting these wounds have included multidrug-resistant bacteria such as Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Klebsiella species and Escherichia coli, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The goals of extremity injury care are to prevent infection, promote fracture healing, and restore function. In this review, we use a systematic assessment of military and civilian extremity trauma data to provide evidence-based recommendations for the varying management strategies to care for combat-related extremity injuries to decrease infection rates. We emphasize postinjury antimicrobial therapy, debridement and irrigation, and surgical wound management including addressing ongoing areas of controversy and needed research. In addition, we address adjuvants that are increasingly being examined, including local antimicrobial therapy, flap closure, oxygen therapy, negative pressure wound therapy, and wound effluent characterization. This evidence-based medicine review was produced to support the Guidelines for the Prevention of Infections Associated With Combat-Related Injuries: 2011 Update contained in this supplement of Journal of Trauma.

  15. Preventing injuries in workers: the role of management practices in decreasing injuries reporting

    PubMed Central

    Kiani, Fariba; Khodabakhsh, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Researchers have found that management safety practices may predict occupational injuries and psychological distresses in the workplace. The present study examined the perception of management safety practices related to injuries reporting and its dimensions among workers of Isfahan Steel Company (ESCO). Methods: A self-administered anonymous survey was distributed to 189 workers. The survey included demographic factors, management safety perception, injuries reporting and its components (physical symptoms, psychological symptoms, and injuries). The data were analyzed by Multivariate and correlation techniques. Results: The results showed that: 1) there were significant correlations between management safety perception with injuries reporting and its two dimensions namely physical and psychological symptoms; 2) there was no significant relationship between management safety perception and injury; 3) in Multivariate analysis, management safety perception significantly predicted about 26%, 19%, and 28% of the variances of variables of injuries reporting, physical symptoms, and psychological symptoms respectively (P< 0.01). Conclusion: Improving employees’ perception of management safety practices can be important to prevent the development of job injuries and to promote workers’ safety and well-being. PMID:25279379

  16. Partners in health: Injury prevention and the coal mining industry

    SciTech Connect

    Hoerner, E.F.

    1996-12-31

    It is necessary to solve many of the work-related problems and areas of concern that are present in the mining industry. An overview of concerns and how to attack the problems is discussed. Some of the worker`s injury problems, such as back pain syndromes, are by no means unique to the industry. However, other problems such as bolter shoulder syndrome problems, are job specific and need biomechanical investigation to determine specific causal relation of job task to injury. The goal would be defined as twofold. The primary goal is to identify the specific job contribution to high risk occupations, and secondly, to implement a total work force injury prevention program. These goals are discussed.

  17. The physician's role in preventing small arms injury.

    PubMed

    Hargarten, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    The first step in defining a public health problem is to describe its scope and nature. For most diseases, this involves details on the victims, morbidity and mortality, and the agent of the disease. In the case of the small-arms 'disease', apart from data on the injuries caused, most other information resides with criminal justice agencies that are primarily concerned with criminal activity. In the United States, beginning in the state of Wisconsin, an approach based on the nation-wide data system of car crash deaths has been developed, linking medical examiners, coroners, police data and other information to provide a comprehensive picture of firearm-related deaths. The next step should be to develop standardized firearm-markings that would aid in controlling the illicit trade in small arms and more detailed information on the relationship between type of firearm and injury. Physicians can do much to aid prevention of small arms injury by advocating this public health approach.

  18. Incidence, aetiology and prevention of musculoskeletal injuries in volleyball: A systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kilic, O; Maas, M; Verhagen, E; Zwerver, J; Gouttebarge, V

    2017-04-09

    Currently, there is no overview of the incidence and (volleyball-specific) risk factors of musculoskeletal injuries among volleyball players, nor any insight into the effect of preventive measures on the incidence of injuries in volleyball. This study aimed to review systematically the scientific evidence on the incidence, prevalence, aetiology and preventive measures of volleyball injuries. To this end, a highly sensitive search strategy was built based on two groups of keywords (and their synonyms). Two electronic databases were searched, namely Medline (biomedical literature) via Pubmed, and SPORTDiscus (sports and sports medicine literature) via EBSCOhost. The results showed that ankle, knee and shoulder injuries are the most common injuries sustained while playing volleyball. Results are presented separately for acute and overuse injuries, as well as for contact and non-contact injuries. Measures to prevent musculoskeletal injuries, anterior knee injuries and ankle injuries were identified in the scientific literature. These preventive measures were found to have a significant effect on decreasing the occurrence of volleyball injuries (for instance on ankle injuries with a reduction from 0.9 to 0.5 injuries per 1000 player hours). Our systematic review showed that musculoskeletal injuries are common among volleyball players, while effective preventive measures remain scarce. Further epidemiological studies should focus on other specific injuries besides knee and ankle injuries, and should also report their prevalence and not only the incidence. Additionally, high-quality studies on the aetiology and prevention of shoulder injuries are lacking and should be a focus of future studies.

  19. Shoulder injuries in soccer goalkeepers: review and development of a FIFA 11+ shoulder injury prevention program

    PubMed Central

    Ejnisman, Benno; Barbosa, Gisele; Andreoli, Carlos V; de Castro Pochini, A; Lobo, Thiago; Zogaib, Rodrigo; Cohen, Moises; Bizzini, Mario; Dvorak, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    In the last years, shoulder injuries have represented an increasing health problem in soccer players. The goalkeepers are more exposed to shoulder disorders than other field players. Injury prevention exercises for upper limbs were cited in few studies involving throwing athletes, but we know that goalkeepers need a specific program. The purpose of this study is to describe the development of an adapted Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) 11+ program, namely the FIFA 11+ shoulder, which targets the prevention of shoulder injuries in soccer goalkeepers. The FIFA 11+ shoulder program is structured into three parts: general warming-up exercises, exercises to improve strength and balance of the shoulder, elbow, wrist, and finger muscles, and advanced exercises for core stability and muscle control. The exercises were selected based on recommendations from studies demonstrating high electromyographic activity. PMID:27563262

  20. Wearable IMU for Shoulder Injury Prevention in Overhead Sports.

    PubMed

    Rawashdeh, Samir A; Rafeldt, Derek A; Uhl, Timothy L

    2016-11-03

    Body-worn inertial sensors have enabled motion capture outside of the laboratory setting. In this work, an inertial measurement unit was attached to the upper arm to track and discriminate between shoulder motion gestures in order to help prevent shoulder over-use injuries in athletics through real-time preventative feedback. We present a detection and classification approach that can be used to count the number of times certain motion gestures occur. The application presented involves tracking baseball throws and volleyball serves, which are common overhead movements that can lead to shoulder and elbow overuse injuries. Eleven subjects are recruited to collect training, testing, and randomized validation data, which include throws, serves, and seven other exercises that serve as a large null class of similar movements, which is analogous to a realistic usage scenario and requires a robust estimator.

  1. Wearable IMU for Shoulder Injury Prevention in Overhead Sports

    PubMed Central

    Rawashdeh, Samir A.; Rafeldt, Derek A.; Uhl, Timothy L.

    2016-01-01

    Body-worn inertial sensors have enabled motion capture outside of the laboratory setting. In this work, an inertial measurement unit was attached to the upper arm to track and discriminate between shoulder motion gestures in order to help prevent shoulder over-use injuries in athletics through real-time preventative feedback. We present a detection and classification approach that can be used to count the number of times certain motion gestures occur. The application presented involves tracking baseball throws and volleyball serves, which are common overhead movements that can lead to shoulder and elbow overuse injuries. Eleven subjects are recruited to collect training, testing, and randomized validation data, which include throws, serves, and seven other exercises that serve as a large null class of similar movements, which is analogous to a realistic usage scenario and requires a robust estimator. PMID:27827880

  2. Legislation coverage for child injury prevention in China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Scherpbier, Robert; Wu, Jing; Zhu, Xu; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Lin; Gao, Xin; Luo, Jiesi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine the extent to which effective interventions to prevent unintentional child injury are reflected in the laws and regulations of China. Methods We focused on the six common causes of fatal child injuries – drowning, road traffic injury, falls, poisoning, burns and suffocation. We investigated 27 interventions recommended by the United Nations Children’s Fund, the World Health Organization or the European Child Safety Alliance. We searched China National Knowledge Infrastructure and Lawyee for Chinese legislations using keywords and synonyms for the 27 interventions. We reviewed the identified legislations for statements specifying the responsible implementation department. Findings Seven national laws, nine regulations of the State Council and 46 departmental regulations were found to relate to at least one of the interventions. Although seven of the 27 internationally recommended interventions were covered by Chinese laws, 10 were not covered by any current Chinese law or regulation. None of the interventions against drowning and falls that we investigated was covered by national laws. The implementation responsibilities for effective interventions were either not specified or were assigned to multiple governmental departments in 11 or 20 legislative documents, respectively. Conclusion In Chinese laws and regulations, interventions proven to prevent major causes of unintentional child injuries are underrepresented and the associated implementation responsibilities are often poorly defined. China should include all such interventions in laws and regulations, and assign implementation responsibility for each to a single department of the national government. PMID:25838612

  3. Current Concepts for Injury Prevention in Athletes After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Hewett, Timothy E.; Di Stasi, Stephanie L.; Myer, Gregory D.

    2013-01-01

    Ligament reconstruction is the current standard of care for active patients with an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. Although the majority of ACL reconstruction (ACLR) surgeries successfully restore the mechanical stability of the injured knee, postsurgical outcomes remain widely varied. Less than half of athletes who undergo ACLR return to sport within the first year after surgery, and it is estimated that approximately 1 in 4 to 1 in 5 young, active athletes who undergo ACLR will go on to a second knee injury. The outcomes after a second knee injury and surgery are significantly less favorable than outcomes after primary injuries. As advances in graft reconstruction and fixation techniques have improved to consistently restore passive joint stability to the preinjury level, successful return to sport after ACLR appears to be predicated on numerous postsurgical factors. Importantly, a secondary ACL injury is most strongly related to modifiable postsurgical risk factors. Biomechanical abnormalities and movement asymmetries, which are more prevalent in this cohort than previously hypothesized, can persist despite high levels of functional performance, and also represent biomechanical and neuromuscular control deficits and imbalances that are strongly associated with secondary injury incidence. Decreased neuromuscular control and high-risk movement biomechanics, which appear to be heavily influenced by abnormal trunk and lower extremity movement patterns, not only predict first knee injury risk but also reinjury risk. These seminal findings indicate that abnormal movement biomechanics and neuromuscular control profiles are likely both residual to, and exacerbated by, the initial injury. Evidence-based medicine (EBM) strategies should be used to develop effective, efficacious interventions targeted to these impairments to optimize the safe return to high-risk activity. In this Current Concepts article, the authors present the latest evidence related to risk

  4. Peripheral Vasodilation Responses to Prevent Local Cold Injuries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    Arteritis • Raynaud Syndrome • Vasospastic disorders • Anaemia • Sickle cell disease • Diabetes • Shock • Vasoconstrictors Another...SUBTITLE Peripheral Vasodilation Responses to Prevent Local Cold Injuries 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ...5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) Thermal and Mountain Medicine Division

  5. Needlestick Injuries in Agriculture Workers and Prevention Programs.

    PubMed

    Buswell, Minden L; Hourigan, Mary; Nault, André J; Bender, Jeffrey B

    2016-01-01

    There are a variety of biologics, vaccines, antibiotics, and hormones used in animal agriculture. Depending upon the procedure or pharmaceutical used, accidental injections or product exposures can result in mild to severe injuries. Needlestick injury (NSI) prevention, research, and education for veterinarians and agriculture workers is limited. The objective of this study was to collect and review published case reports and case series/surveys on human needlestick exposure to veterinary biologics and to summarize needlestick prevention strategies for agricultural workers/veterinarians. A search was conducted of PubMed and Centre for Agriculture Bioscience International (CABI) databases. References were reviewed to identify additional articles. NSI among agricultural workers were primarily included in this review. Thirty articles were applicable to exposures in agricultural settings. Relevant literature consisted of case reports, survey/case series articles, prevention documents, and background articles. Fifty-nine case patients were identified. Most of these cases were associated with exposures to specific vaccines or veterinary products. Injury location was identified from 36 individuals: 24 (67%) NSI to the hands, 10 (28%) injuries to the legs, and 2 to other body locations. Of the 59 cases, 20 (34%) involved oil-adjuvant vaccines. Evidence of hospitalization was recorded for 30 case patients. The length of hospitalization was available from 11 case patients. Median length of hospitalization was 3 days (range: 1-4). Surgical intervention was reported in 25 case patients. Outcome information was available on 30 case patients. Fifteen made a complete recovery within 2 weeks of treatment, 14 had residual sequelae attributed to the injury, and there was 1 reported death. Of the 13 survey/case series articles: 2 focused on oil-adjuvant products, 1 on Brucellosis RB-51 vaccine, 3 on tilmicosin, 1 on Salmonella enteritidis vaccine, 1 on high-pressure injection, and 5

  6. Peripheral nerve injuries in athletes. Treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Lorei, M P; Hershman, E B

    1993-08-01

    Peripheral nerve lesions are uncommon but serious injuries which may delay or preclude an athlete's safe return to sports. Early, accurate anatomical diagnosis is essential. Nerve lesions may be due to acute injury (e.g. from a direct blow) or chronic injury secondary to repetitive microtrauma (entrapment). Accurate diagnosis is based upon physical examination and a knowledge of the relative anatomy. Palpation, neurological testing and provocative manoeuvres are mainstays of physical diagnosis. Diagnostic suspicion can be confirmed by electrophysiological testing, including electromyography and nerve conduction studies. Proper equipment, technique and conditioning are the keys to prevention. Rest, anti-inflammatories, physical therapy and appropriate splinting are the mainstays of treatment. In the shoulder, spinal accessory nerve injury is caused by a blow to the neck and results in trapezius paralysis with sparing of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. Scapular winging results from paralysis of the serratus anterior because of long thoracic nerve palsy. A lesion of the suprascapular nerve may mimic a rotator cuff tear with pain a weakness of the rotator cuff. Axillary nerve injury often follows anterior shoulder dislocation. In the elbow region, musculocutaneous nerve palsy is seen in weightlifters with weakness of the elbow flexors and dysesthesias of the lateral forearm. Pronator syndrome is a median nerve lesion occurring in the proximal forearm which is diagnosed by several provocative manoeuvres. Posterior interosseous nerve entrapment is common among tennis players and occurs at the Arcade of Froshe--it results in weakness of the wrist and metacarpophalangeal extensors. Ulnar neuritis at the elbow is common amongst baseball pitchers. Carpal tunnel syndrome is a common neuropathy seen in sport and is caused by median nerve compression in the carpal tunnel. Paralysis of the ulnar nerve at the wrist is seen among bicyclists resulting in weakness of grip and

  7. Assessment of caregiver responsibility in unintentional child injury deaths: challenges for injury prevention.

    PubMed

    Schnitzer, Patricia G; Covington, Theresa M; Kruse, Robin L

    2011-02-01

    Most unintentional injury deaths among young children result from inadequate supervision or failure by caregivers to protect the child from potential hazards. Determining whether inadequate supervision or failure to protect could be classified as child neglect is a component of child death review (CDR) in most states. However, establishing that an unintentional injury death was neglect related can be challenging as differing definitions, lack of standards regarding supervision, and changing norms make consensus difficult. The purpose of this study was to assess CDR team members' categorisation of the extent to which unintentional injury deaths were neglect related. CDR team members were surveyed and asked to classify 20 vignettes-presented in 10 pairs-that described the circumstances of unintentional injury deaths among children. Vignette pairs differed by an attribute that might affect classification, such as poverty or intent. Categories for classifying vignettes were: (1) caregiver not responsible/not neglect related; (2) some caregiver responsibility/somewhat neglect related; (3) caregiver responsible /definitely neglect related. CDR team members from five states (287) completed surveys. Respondents assigned the child's caregiver at least some responsibility for the death in 18 vignettes (90%). A majority of respondents classified the caregiver as definitely responsible for the child's death in eight vignettes (40%). This study documents attributes that influence CDR team members' decisions when assessing caregiver responsibility in unintentional injury deaths, including supervision, intent, failure to use safety devices, and a pattern of previous neglectful behaviour. The findings offer insight for incorporating injury prevention into CDR more effectively.

  8. Persistent Biomechanical Alterations After ACL Reconstruction Are Associated With Early Cartilage Matrix Changes Detected by Quantitative MR

    PubMed Central

    Amano, Keiko; Pedoia, Valentina; Su, Favian; Souza, Richard B.; Li, Xiaojuan; Ma, C. Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Background: The effectiveness of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in preventing early osteoarthritis is debated. Restoring the original biomechanics may potentially prevent degeneration, but apparent pathomechanisms have yet to be described. Newer quantitative magnetic resonance (qMR) imaging techniques, specifically T1ρ and T2, offer novel, noninvasive methods of visualizing and quantifying early cartilage degeneration. Purpose: To determine the tibiofemoral biomechanical alterations before and after ACL reconstruction using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to evaluate the association between biomechanics and cartilage degeneration using T1ρ and T2. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Methods: Knee MRIs of 51 individuals (mean age, 29.5 ± 8.4 years) with unilateral ACL injuries were obtained prior to surgery; 19 control subjects (mean age, 30.7 ± 5.3 years) were also scanned. Follow-up MRIs were obtained at 6 months and 1 year. Tibial position (TP), internal tibial rotation (ITR), and T1ρ and T2 were calculated using an in-house Matlab program. Student t tests, repeated measures, and regression models were used to compare differences between injured and uninjured sides, observe longitudinal changes, and evaluate correlations between TP, ITR, and T1ρ and T2. Results: TP was significantly more anterior on the injured side at all time points (P < .001). ITR was significantly increased on the injured side prior to surgery (P = .033). At 1 year, a more anterior TP was associated with elevated T1ρ (P = .002) and T2 (P = .026) in the posterolateral tibia and with decreased T2 in the central lateral femur (P = .048); ITR was associated with increased T1ρ in the posteromedial femur (P = .009). ITR at 6 months was associated with increased T1ρ at 1 year in the posteromedial tibia (P = .029). Conclusion: Persistent biomechanical alterations after ACL reconstruction are related to significant changes in cartilage T1ρ and T2 at 1 year

  9. 76 FR 77537 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control: Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control: Notice of Charter Renewal This gives notice under the Federal..., National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention...

  10. 76 FR 13621 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel; Teleconference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel; Teleconference Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the aforementioned meeting: Time and Date: 11...

  11. Evaluation of a ski and snowboard injury prevention program.

    PubMed

    Cusimano, Michael; Luong, Wilson P; Faress, Ahmed; Leroux, Timothy; Russell, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    The objective was to study the effectiveness of a brochure and video at improving skiing and snowboarding knowledge. Sixty-nine Grade 7 students were randomised to an educational intervention (n = 35) or control (n = 34) group. The intervention group viewed an injury prevention video aimed at improving skiers and snowboarder's knowledge, attitudes and behaviours about ski and snowboard safety and received a brochure. The control group participated in a teaching session and had a simple question and answer session about snow sports. Pre- and post-tests were administered and injuries during four trips were documented. Pre-test scores were similar between the two groups. Compared with the control group, there was a significantly greater improvement in post-test scores among the intervention group (WMD: 2.1; 95% CI: 0.19-4.01). There was no significant difference in injury rates (RR: 0.49; 95% CI: 0.04, 3.39). All injuries were minor and did not require medical attention. The intervention aimed at youth skiers and snowboarders appears to be effective at improving knowledge, attitudes and behaviours of skiing and snowboarding safety.

  12. All-terrain vehicle injury in children: strategies for prevention

    PubMed Central

    Aitken, M; Graham, C; Killingsworth, J; Mullins, S; Parnell, D; Dick, R

    2004-01-01

    Objective: A variety of educational efforts, policies, and regulations have been adopted to reduce all-terrain vehicle (ATV) injury in children. Despite this, ATV use by children continues and serious injuries are common. The purpose of this study was to investigate the knowledge, practices, and beliefs of ATV users to help develop effective educational strategies to promote safer ATV use. Design: Focus groups were conducted to characterize participant ATV use and safety awareness as well as to explore avenues for prevention. Feedback on draft ATV safety public service announcements was elicited. Themes of transcribed focus group data were summarized. Setting: Rural state with high ATV use and injury rates. Subjects: Adult and adolescent ATV users. Interventions: None. Main outcome measures: Summaries of focus group discussions. Results: ATV riders frankly discussed current use and safety behaviors and were aware of some ATV risks. Youths felt that age specific regulation was unlikely to be a helpful strategy. Participants endorsed messages demonstrating graphic consequences as likely to get the attention of young riders regarding risks. Educational settings were suggested, including hunter and driver safety classes. Conclusions: Efforts to improve ATV safety awareness should clearly show pediatric ATV injury risk and safety practices. Campaigns must also show realistic understanding of current use practices to be credible for users. Messages emphasizing the consequences of ATV use were endorsed as most likely to have impact. Approaches based on age based restrictions were considered unrealistic and alternative strategies were suggested. PMID:15470012

  13. Preventive Effects of Carnosine on Lipopolysaccharide-induced Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Ken-Ichiro; Sugizaki, Toshifumi; Kanda, Yuki; Tamura, Fumiya; Niino, Tomomi; Kawahara, Masahiro

    2017-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a potentially devastating form of acute lung injury, which involves neutrophilic inflammation and pulmonary cell death. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play important roles in ARDS development. New compounds for inhibiting the onset and progression of ARDS are required. Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is a small di-peptide with numerous activities, including antioxidant effects, metal chelation, proton buffering capacity and the inhibition of protein carbonylation and glycoxidation. We have examined the preventive effects of carnosine on tissue injury, oedema and inflammation in a murine model for ARDS. Oral administration of carnosine suppressed lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced vascular permeability, tissue injury and inflammation in the lung. In vivo imaging analysis revealed that LPS administration increased the level of ROS and that this increase was inhibited by carnosine administration. Carnosine also suppressed LPS-induced neutrophilic inflammation (evaluated by activation of myeloperoxidase in the lung and increased extracellular DNA in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid). Furthermore, carnosine administration suppressed the LPS-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress response in vivo. These results suggest that the oral administration of carnosine suppresses LPS-induced lung injury via carnosine’s ROS-reducing activity. Therefore, carnosine may be beneficial for suppressing the onset and progression of ARDS. PMID:28205623

  14. Enhancing proliferation and ECM expression of human ACL fibroblasts by sonic vibration.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuan-Yuan; Park, Jung-Keug; Yoon, Hee-Hoon; Choi, Hynjin; Kim, Chan-Wha; Seo, Young-Kwon

    2015-01-01

    Effects of mechanical vibration on cell activity and behavior remain controversial: There has been evidence on both positive and negative effects. Furthermore, research on the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has as yet been limited and the frequency-related effects remain unknown, even though ACL injury is common and an injured ACL hardly spontaneously recovers. The object of this work was to address the influence of mechanical vibration on ACL fibroblasts, to determine the effects of frequencies, and to further study this effect at the cellular level. We found that sonic vibration affected ACL fibroblasts' proliferation and metabolism in a frequency-dependent manner, and 20 Hz gave rise to the most ACL cell activity and comprehensively increased extracellular matrix (ECM) contents, including collagen type I, collagen type III, fibronectin, elastin, tenascin, glycosaminoglycan (GAG), and the cytoskeleton protein vimentin. Thus, our results indicate that sonic vibration possesses frequency-dependent effects on proliferation and productivity of ACL fibroblast with an optimal frequency of 20 Hz under the present stimulation conditions, providing further information for future research in how vibrational stimulation manipulates ACL cellular behavior.

  15. The Hormone Ghrelin Prevents Traumatic Brain Injury Induced Intestinal Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Vishal; Ryu, Seok Yong; Blow, Chelsea; Costantini, Todd; Loomis, William; Eliceiri, Brian; Baird, Andrew; Wolf, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Intestinal barrier breakdown following traumatic brain injury (TBI) is characterized by increased intestinal permeability, leading to bacterial translocation, and inflammation. The hormone ghrelin may prevent intestinal injury and have anti-inflammatory properties. We hypothesized that exogenous ghrelin prevents intestinal injury following TBI. A weight-drop model created severe TBI in three groups of anesthetized Balb/c mice. Group TBI: animals underwent TBI only; Group TBI/ghrelin: animals were given 10 μg of ghrelin intraperitoneally prior and 1 h following TBI; Group sham: no TBI or ghrelin injection. Intestinal permeability was measured 6 h following TBI by detecting serum levels of FITC-Dextran after injection into the intact ileum. The terminal ileum was harvested for histology, expression of the tight junction protein MLCK and inflammatory cytokine TNF-α. Permeability increased in the TBI group compared to the sham group (109.7 ± 21.8 μg/mL vs. 32.2 ± 10.1 μg/mL; p < 0.002). Ghrelin prevented TBI-induced permeability (28.3 ± 4.2 μg/mL vs. 109.7 ± 21.8 μg/mL; p < 0.001). The intestines of the TBI group showed blunting and necrosis of villi compared to the sham group, while ghrelin injection preserved intestinal architecture. Intestinal MLCK increased 73% compared to the sham group (p < 0.03). Ghrelin prevented TBI-induced MLCK expression to sham levels. Intestinal TNF-α increased following TBI compared to the sham group (46.2 ± 7.1 pg/mL vs. 24.4 ± 2.2 pg/mL p < 0.001). Ghrelin reduced TNF-α to sham levels (29.2 ± 5.0 pg/mL; p = NS). We therefore conclude that ghrelin prevents TBI-induced injury, as determined by intestinal permeability, histology, and intestinal levels of TNF-α. The mechanism for ghrelin mediating intestinal protection is likely multifactorial, and further studies are needed to delineate these possibilities. PMID:20858122

  16. 75 FR 6675 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Human...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Prevention Projects for...

  17. Rectus femoris muscle injuries in football: a clinically relevant review of mechanisms of injury, risk factors and preventive strategies.

    PubMed

    Mendiguchia, Jurdan; Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Idoate, Fernando; Myer, Gregory D

    2013-04-01

    Quadriceps muscle strains frequently occur in sports that require repetitive kicking and sprinting, and are common in football in its different forms around the world. This paper is a review of aetiology, mechanism of injury and the natural history of rectus femoris injury. Investigating the mechanism and risk factors for rectus femoris muscle injury aims to allow the development of a framework for future initiatives to prevent quadriceps injury in football players.

  18. Update: soccer injury and prevention, concussion, and chronic groin pain.

    PubMed

    Jones, Nathaniel S

    2014-01-01

    Soccer, or football, as it is known in much of the world, is one of the most popular sports in the world. The purpose of this article was to provide a concise update on select soccer-specific medical issues published in the last year as they relate to soccer injury and prevention, concussions, and chronic groin pain. Both the Fédération Internationale de Football Association and the Union of European Football Associations published data from their longstanding injury tracking systems, providing foundation for further research. Concussion research continues to drive much interest, especially as it relates to heading and the controversy of subconcussive trauma. Lastly, our understanding of chronic groin pain continues to be refined as we try to understand the complexity of its pathophysiology and attempt to standardize a multispecialty approach of diagnosis and treatment.

  19. The Landing Error Scoring System as a Screening Tool for an Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury–Prevention Program in Elite-Youth Soccer Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Padua, Darin A.; DiStefano, Lindsay J.; Beutler, Anthony I.; de la Motte, Sarah J.; DiStefano, Michael J.; Marshall, Steven W.

    2015-01-01

    Context Identifying neuromuscular screening factors for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is a critical step toward large-scale deployment of effective ACL injury-prevention programs. The Landing Error Scoring System (LESS) is a valid and reliable clinical assessment of jump-landing biomechanics. Objective To investigate the ability of the LESS to identify individuals at risk for ACL injury in an elite-youth soccer population. Design Cohort study. Setting Field-based functional movement screening performed at soccer practice facilities. Patients or Other Participants A total of 829 elite-youth soccer athletes (348 boys, 481 girls; age = 13.9 ± 1.8 years, age range = 11 to 18 years), of whom 25% (n = 207) were less than 13 years of age. Intervention(s) Baseline preseason testing for all participants consisted of a jump-landing task (3 trials). Participants were followed prospectively throughout their soccer seasons for diagnosis of ACL injuries (1217 athlete-seasons of follow-up). Main Outcome Measure(s) Landings were scored for “errors” in technique using the LESS. We used receiver operator characteristic curves to determine a cutpoint on the LESS. Sensitivity and specificity of the LESS in predicting ACL injury were assessed. Results Seven participants sustained ACL injuries during the follow-up period; the mechanism of injury was noncontact or indirect contact for all injuries. Uninjured participants had lower LESS scores (4.43 ± 1.71) than injured participants (6.24 ± 1.75; t1215 = −2.784, P = .005). The receiver operator characteristic curve analyses suggested that 5 was the optimal cutpoint for the LESS, generating a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 64%. Conclusions Despite sample-size limitations, the LESS showed potential as a screening tool to determine ACL injury risk in elite-youth soccer athletes. PMID:25811846

  20. Electrospinning polymer blends for biomimetic scaffolds for ACL tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Vanessa Lizeth

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is one of the most common knee injuries. Current ACL reconstructive strategies consist of using an autograft or an allograft to replace the ligament. However, limitations have led researchers to create tissue engineered grafts, known as scaffolds, through electrospinning. Scaffolds made of natural and synthetic polymer blends have the potential to promote cell adhesion while having strong mechanical properties. However, enzymes found in the knee are known to degrade tissues and affect the healing of intra-articular injuries. Results suggest that the natural polymers used in this study modify the thermal properties and tensile strength of the synthetic polymers when blended. Scanning electron microscopy display bead-free and enzyme biodegradability of the fibers. Raman spectroscopy confirms the presence of the natural and synthetic polymers in the scaffolds while, amino acid analysis present the types of amino acids and their concentrations found in the natural polymers.

  1. The ACL Message Passing Library

    SciTech Connect

    Painter, J.; McCormick, P.; Krogh, M.; Hansen, C.; Colin de Verdiere, G.

    1995-09-01

    This paper presents the ACL (Advanced Computing Lab) Message Passing Library. It is a high throughput, low latency communications library, based on Thinking Machines Corp.`s CMMD, upon which message passing applications can be built. The library has been implemented on the Cray T3D, Thinking Machines CM-5, SGI workstations, and on top of PVM.

  2. Neuromuscular Control Training Programs and Noncontact Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Rates in Female Athletes: A Numbers-Needed-to-Treat Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Grindstaff, Terry L; Hammill, Robert R; Tuzson, Ann E; Hertel, Jay

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To determine the numbers needed to treat (NNT) and relative risk reduction (RRR) associated with neuromuscular training programs aimed at preventing noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in female athletes. Data Sources: We searched PubMed, MEDLINE, SPORT Discus, CINAHL, and Web of Science from 1966 through 2005 using the terms knee, injury, anterior cruciate ligament, ACL, prevention, plyometric, and neuromuscular training. Study Selection: Selected articles were from peer-reviewed journals written in English that described original research studies comparing neuromuscular training programs with control programs to determine the number of noncontact ACL injuries per event exposure or hours of playing time. Five studies met the inclusion criteria and were independently rated by 3 reviewers using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale. Consensus PEDro scores ranged from 4 to 7 out of 10. Data Extraction: We used numbers of subjects, ACL injuries, and injury exposure rates to calculate NNT and RRR for each study. The NNT calculations from all studies were based on the number of players across 1 competitive season and were described as NNT benefit or NNT harm. Data Synthesis: All 5 studies demonstrated a prophylactic effect due to the neuromuscular training programs. The pooled NNT estimates showed that 89 individuals (95% confidence interval: 66 to 136) would need to participate in the prophylactic training program to prevent 1 ACL injury over the course of 1 competitive season. Pooled RRR was 70% (95% confidence interval: 54% to 80%) among individuals who participated in the intervention program. One high-quality randomized control trial and 4 medium-quality prospective cohort studies showed mostly consistent findings. Thus, a Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy level of evidence of 1 with a grade B recommendation supports the use of neuromuscular training programs in the prevention of noncontact ACL injuries in female athletes

  3. Self-reported worst injuries in women's Australian football identify lower limb injuries as a prevention priority

    PubMed Central

    Fortington, Lauren V; Donaldson, Alex; Finch, Caroline F

    2016-01-01

    Background Increasing participation by women in Australian football (AF) has made understanding their specific injury prevention needs a priority. In other sports, men and women have different injury profiles. This study aims to provide the first overview of self-reported injuries in women's AF. Methods Nationwide survey of women aged 17+ years who played in an AF competition was conducted following the 2014 playing season. The players' self-reported worst injury from the 2014 season is presented according to injury type, body part injured, treatment sought and games/training missed. Results Three-quarters of 553 respondents (n=431, 78%) reported at least 1 injury. Over half (n=235, 55%) of injuries were to the lower limb. Ankle ligament tears/sprains (n=50, 12% of all injuries) and knee ligament tears/sprains (n=45, 10%) were most frequent lower limb injuries reported. Two-thirds (65%) of all lower limb injuries led to at least 1 missed game. Of 111 (26% of all injuries) upper limb injuries reported, over half (n=57, 62%) were to the hand/fingers/thumb, including fractures (n=28, 6% of all injuries), ligament tears/sprains (n=18, 4%) and dislocations (n=11, 3%). Half of the upper limb injuries (51%) resulted in players missing matches/training. Conclusions The most frequent self-reported worst injuries for women playing AF were joint damage to the ankle and knee. A prospective injury study is needed to confirm the causes and rate of these lower limb injuries to identify the most suitable prevention interventions. PMID:27900178

  4. Injury prevention education in medical schools: an international survey of medical students

    PubMed Central

    Villaveces, A; Kammeyer, J; Bencevic, H

    2005-01-01

    Background: Injuries account for an estimated 9% of global mortality. Health professionals worldwide receive little formal injury prevention training, especially in developing countries. Objective: To identify injury prevention training topics taught in a sample of medical schools throughout the world. Design and setting: Cross sectional survey of 82 medical schools from 31 countries. Based on a convenience sample, respondents recalled the injury prevention concepts they were taught, estimated the time dedicated to these topics, specified the courses and rotations where these concepts were taught, and noted whether they were compulsory or elective sessions. Participants: Medical students in their last year of medical training. Main exposure measures: Student recall of classes and rotations where topics of injury prevention and control were discussed. Results: Basic injury prevention concepts including risk factors for injuries and injury classification systems were not covered in 60% of medical schools. Concepts related to child abuse and neglect and emergency care were more commonly taught than others such as traffic injury prevention and youth violence prevention. In general, injury prevention and control concepts were less frequently taught in Middle Eastern and African universities compared with other regions and some topics such as violence prevention were more frequently taught in medical schools in the Americas. Injury prevention concepts were taught most frequently in preventive medicine, forensic medicine, emergency medicine, surgery and pediatrics courses, and rotations. Conclusions: Injury prevention and control education is infrequent and fragmented in medical schools around the world. Inclusion or further development of curricula on this subject could benefit prevention and control efforts. PMID:16326768

  5. Prevention of occupational musculo-skeletal injuries. Labour Inspectorate investigation.

    PubMed

    Kemmlert, K

    1996-01-01

    psychological symptoms in the study group compared to data from population groups. Activities in daily life were more restricted in the study group. 109 persons were in active employment. The association between the two effect measures improved ergonomic conditions and active employment, and both individual and work-related characteristics was analysed. The odds for improved working conditions were increased where the employer had given an informative injury description in the injury report, probably indicating that an understanding of the mechanisms of injury is a prerequisite for effective prevention. Sick-leaves for more than 6 months during the year following the report had a significant negative association with active employment, whereas male sex and higher education, respectively, had a positive association. The studied musculo-skeletal injuries were associated with a high prevalence of physical and psychological symptoms. Identification and investigation of ergonomic hazards, as appearing in informative reports on the origin of injuries and in inspection notices, seemed to have a positive influence on the process of prevention.

  6. The new trend in back injury prevention programs

    SciTech Connect

    Rummerfield, P.D.

    1996-12-31

    The reduction in Worker`s Compensation costs through lumbar strengthening programs is now a proven approach. This is the beginning of a new era in injury prevention. Imagine a test for muscle imbalance along with the strength of all the major muscle groups of every person on the mine site. Occupations, such as roof bolters, and operators of haul trucks, dozers, scrapers, continuous miners and shuttle cars could be tested for musculoskeletal strength of the spine and extremities. With this test data you could then compare your findings to the strength norms necessary for that person to perform his/her job task safely. Armed with this information, you could drastically reduce Workers` Compensation costs due to strains and sprains. Earl Hoerner, M.D. and Robert Wainwright, P.T. have consolidated these cutting-edge technologies that will produce the benchmark for industrial injury prevention for the next century. These technologies are available today, waiting to be used in an industrial setting by a management team with vision.

  7. Preventing Scars after Injury with Partial Irreversible Electroporation.

    PubMed

    Golberg, Alexander; Villiger, Martin; Khan, Saiqa; Quinn, Kyle P; Lo, William C Y; Bouma, Brett E; Mihm, Martin C; Austen, William G; Yarmush, Martin L

    2016-11-01

    Preventing the formation of hypertrophic scars, especially those that are a result of major trauma or burns, would have enormous impact in the fields of regenerative and trauma medicine. In this report, we introduce a noninvasive method to prevent scarring based on nonthermal partial irreversible electroporation. Contact burn injuries in rats were treated with varying treatment parameters to optimize the treatment protocol. Scar surface area and structural properties of the scar were assessed with histology and non-invasive, longitudinal imaging with polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography. We found that partial irreversible electroporation using 200 pulses of 250 V and 70 μs duration, delivered at 3 Hz every 20 days during a total of five therapy sessions after the initial burn injury, resulted in a 57.9% reduction of the scar area compared with untreated scars and structural features approaching those of normal skin. Unlike humans, rats do not develop hypertrophic scars. Therefore, the use of a rat animal model is the limiting factor of this work.

  8. Acute kidney injury by radiographic contrast media: pathogenesis and prevention.

    PubMed

    Andreucci, Michele; Faga, Teresa; Pisani, Antonio; Sabbatini, Massimo; Michael, Ashour

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that iodinated radiographic contrast media may cause kidney dysfunction, particularly in patients with preexisting renal impairment associated with diabetes. This dysfunction, when severe, will cause acute renal failure (ARF). We may define contrast-induced Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) as ARF occurring within 24-72 hrs after the intravascular injection of iodinated radiographic contrast media that cannot be attributed to other causes. The mechanisms underlying contrast media nephrotoxicity have not been fully elucidated and may be due to several factors, including renal ischaemia, particularly in the renal medulla, the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), reduction of nitric oxide (NO) production, and tubular epithelial and vascular endothelial injury. However, contrast-induced AKI can be prevented, but in order to do so, we need to know the risk factors. We have reviewed the risk factors for contrast-induced AKI and measures for its prevention, providing a long list of references enabling readers to deeply evaluate them both.

  9. Childhood injury prevention: intervention in the Bedouin city of Rahat.

    PubMed

    Hemmo-Lotem, Michal; Merrick, Efrat; Endy-Findling, Liri; Freh, Aziza Abu; Jinich-Aronowitz, Claudia; Korn, Liat; Merrick, Joav

    2005-08-08

    For several years, the National Center for Children's Health and Safety (Beterem) has worked on many levels to promote safety and prevent injury of the children in Israel. As part of intervention programs in 20 communities around Israel, this paper describes a 1-year, multidisciplinary, multistrategic childhood safety promotion and injury prevention project. The project took place in the Bedouin city of Rahat in the Southern part of Israel, the Negev, conducted by a local safety coordinator. This specific intervention study took place from March 2003 to March 2004. The main goal was to identify hazards and dangerous obstacles in public places in Rahat, then remove or repair the obstacles found, in order to secure a safe public environment for children. "Obstacle" was defined as any barrier that could endanger the safety of a child. Ten examples are used to illustrate this applied research project, and 80% of the problems were solved within the project period (time to solve between 1 week to 3 months, depending on various factors). We recommend the involvement of a safety coordinator from the community to focus on safety hazards for children, the use of a documentation diary to log the time frame, and also the use of pictures to illustrate the hazards and the changes, or to use as arguments in the lobbying process.

  10. Ebselen prevents early alcohol-induced liver injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Kono, H; Arteel, G E; Rusyn, I; Sies, H; Thurman, R G

    2001-02-15

    Oxidants have been shown to be involved in alcohol-induced liver injury. Moreover, 2-phenyl-1,2-benzisoselenazole-3(2H)-one (ebselen), an organoselenium compound and glutathione peroxidase mimic, decreases oxidative stress and protects against stroke clinically. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that ebselen protects against early alcohol-induced liver injury in rats. Male Wistar rats were fed high-fat liquid diets with or without ethanol (10-16 g/kg/d) continuously for up to 4 weeks using the intragastric enteral feeding protocol developed by Tsukamoto and French. Ebselen (50 mg/kg twice daily, intragastrically) or vehicle (1% tylose) was administered throughout the experiment. Mean urine ethanol concentrations were not significantly different between treatment groups, and ebselen did not affect body weight gains or cyclic patterns of ethanol concentrations in urine. After 4 weeks, serum ALT levels were increased significantly about 4-fold over control values (37 +/- 5 IU/l) by enteral ethanol (112 +/- 7 IU/l); ebselen blunted this increase significantly (61 +/- 8 IU/l). Enteral ethanol also caused severe fatty accumulation, mild inflammation, and necrosis in the liver (pathology score: 4.3 +/- 0.3). In contrast, these pathological changes were blunted significantly by ebselen (pathology score: 2.5 +/- 0.4). While there were no significant effects of either ethanol or ebselen on glutathione peroxidase activity in serum or liver tissue, ebselen blocked the increase in serum nitrate/nitrite caused by ethanol. Furthermore, ethanol increased the activity of NF-kappaB over 5-fold, the number of infiltrating neutrophils 4-fold, and the accumulation of 4-hydroxynonenal over 5-fold. Ebselen blunted all of these effects significantly. These results indicate that ebselen prevents early alcohol-induced liver injury, most likely by preventing oxidative stress, which decreases inflammation.

  11. The science of softball: implications for performance and injury prevention.

    PubMed

    Flyger, Nicholas; Button, Chris; Rishiraj, Neetu

    2006-01-01

    Whilst the sport of softball has achieved worldwide popularity over the last 100 years, a consideration of the scientific principles underpinning softball is in its infancy. It is clear that the various motor skills associated with softball, such as pitching, batting and fielding, place considerable perceptual and physical demands upon players. Each of these skill categories are examined in more detail by reviewing the biomechanical principles associated with skilled performance. For pitching, a certain amount of information can be gleaned from baseball research; however, the underarm technique required by softball places the highest loads on the arm and shoulder during the accelerative, downward phase of the swing. Kinematic analyses of the bat swing suggest that elite batters have approximately 200 ms to decide whether to swing, and approximately the same duration to complete the swing (resulting in reported bat speeds of up to 40 m/sec). The research conducted on fielding has been limited to a consideration of throwing styles adopted in games. A variety of throwing techniques are adopted in the course of a typical game but elite players commonly adopt a sidearm technique when returning to base as quickly as possible. Data obtained from the National Athletic Training Association indicate a similar level of injury incidence in softball as in baseball. Approximately 17% of injuries are experienced by the pitcher and approximately 25% of all injuries are located in the forearm/wrist/hand joint segments. Sports science and sports medicine research have the potential to contribute significantly to performance enhancement and injury prevention in the future.

  12. Are we having fun yet? Fostering adherence to injury preventive exercise recommendations in young athletes.

    PubMed

    Keats, Melanie R; Emery, Carolyn A; Finch, Caroline F

    2012-03-01

    Sport and recreational activities are the leading cause of injury in youth, yet there is increasing evidence that many sport-related injuries are preventable. For injury prevention strategies to be effective, individuals must understand, adopt and adhere to the recommended prevention strategy or programme. Despite the recognized importance of a behavioural approach, the inclusion of behavioural change strategies in sport injury prevention has been historically neglected. The purpose of this commentary is to outline the rationale for the inclusion and application of behavioural science in reducing the burden of injury by increasing adherence to proven prevention strategies. In an effort to provide an illustrative example of a behavioural change approach, the authors suggest a specific plan for the implementation of a neuromuscular training strategy to reduce the risk of lower limb injury in youth sport. Given the paucity of evidence in the sport injury prevention setting, and the lack of application of theoretical frameworks to predicting adoption and adherence to injury preventive exercise recommendations in youth sport, data from the related physical activity promotion domain is utilized to describe how sound, theory-based injury prevention exercise interventions in youth may be developed. While the question of how to facilitate behavioural change and optimize adherence to preventive exercise recommendations remains an ongoing challenge, the authors detail several strategies based on two prominent behavioural theories to aid the reader in conceptualizing, designing and implementing effective interventions. Despite the minimal application of behavioural theory within the field of sport injury prevention in youth, behavioural science has the potential to make a significant impact on the understanding and prevention of youth sport injury. Appropriate evaluation of adherence and maintenance components based on models of behavioural change should be a critical

  13. Preventing Workplace Injuries and Illnesses through Ergonomics. Listening to Our Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosskam, Ellen; Baichoo, Pavan

    1997-01-01

    Ergonomics focuses on the prevention of injuries through proper design of equipment, workstations, and products. The adoption of an ergonomic philosophy in the workplace has demonstrable benefits. (JOW)

  14. Preventing non-suicidal self-injury in adolescents: the signs of self-injury program.

    PubMed

    Muehlenkamp, Jennifer J; Walsh, Barent W; McDade, Moira

    2010-03-01

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) continues to be a problem among youth and there is a great need for programming aimed at reducing NSSI in adolescents. The signs of self-injury program is the first known NSSI school-based prevention program for adolescents that attempts to increase knowledge, improve help-seeking attitudes and behaviors, and decrease acts of NSSI. A total of five schools implemented the program in selected classrooms (n = 274 adolescents; 51.5% female, mean age = 16.07 years) that consisted of predominantly Caucasian (73%) adolescents. Researchers collected pre-post evaluation surveys of the program and feasibility interviews were conducted with the school guidance personnel who ran the program. Results indicated the prevention program did not produce iatrogenic effects, increased accurate knowledge and improved help-seeking attitudes and intentions among students. No significant changes were found in regards to self-reported formal help-seeking actions. Feasibility responses indicate the program is user-friendly and well received by school personnel. The data offer preliminary evidence that the program may be an effective prevention program for schools.

  15. Healing of the Acutely Injured Anterior Cruciate Ligament: Functional Treatment with the ACL-Jack, a Dynamic Posterior Drawer Brace

    PubMed Central

    Reischl, Nikolaus; Rönn, Karolin; Magnusson, Robert A.; Gautier, Emanuel; Jakob, Roland P.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The injured anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has a limited healing capacity leading to persisting instability. Hypothesis/Purpose. To study if the application of a brace, producing a dynamic posterior drawer force, after acute ACL injury reduces initial instability. Study Design. Cohort study. Methods. Patients treated with the ACL-Jack brace were compared to controls treated with primary ACL reconstruction und controls treated nonsurgically with functional rehabilitation. Measurements included anterior laxity (Rolimeter), clinical scores (Lysholm, Tegner, and IKDC), and MRI evaluation. Patients were followed up to 24 months. Results. Patients treated with the ACL-Jack brace showed a significant improvement of anterior knee laxity comparable to patients treated with ACL reconstruction, whereas laxity persisted after nonsurgical functional rehabilitation. The failure risk (secondary reconstruction necessary) of the ACL-Jack group was however 21% (18 of 86) within 24 months. Clinical scores were similar in all treatment groups. Conclusion. Treatment of acute ACL tears with the ACL-Jack brace leads to improved anterior knee laxity compared to nonsurgical treatment with functional rehabilitation. PMID:28053787

  16. Healing of the Acutely Injured Anterior Cruciate Ligament: Functional Treatment with the ACL-Jack, a Dynamic Posterior Drawer Brace.

    PubMed

    Jacobi, Matthias; Reischl, Nikolaus; Rönn, Karolin; Magnusson, Robert A; Gautier, Emanuel; Jakob, Roland P

    2016-01-01

    Background. The injured anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has a limited healing capacity leading to persisting instability. Hypothesis/Purpose. To study if the application of a brace, producing a dynamic posterior drawer force, after acute ACL injury reduces initial instability. Study Design. Cohort study. Methods. Patients treated with the ACL-Jack brace were compared to controls treated with primary ACL reconstruction und controls treated nonsurgically with functional rehabilitation. Measurements included anterior laxity (Rolimeter), clinical scores (Lysholm, Tegner, and IKDC), and MRI evaluation. Patients were followed up to 24 months. Results. Patients treated with the ACL-Jack brace showed a significant improvement of anterior knee laxity comparable to patients treated with ACL reconstruction, whereas laxity persisted after nonsurgical functional rehabilitation. The failure risk (secondary reconstruction necessary) of the ACL-Jack group was however 21% (18 of 86) within 24 months. Clinical scores were similar in all treatment groups. Conclusion. Treatment of acute ACL tears with the ACL-Jack brace leads to improved anterior knee laxity compared to nonsurgical treatment with functional rehabilitation.

  17. Injury risk in female floorball: a prospective one-season follow-up.

    PubMed

    Pasanen, K; Parkkari, J; Kannus, P; Rossi, L; Palvanen, M; Natri, A; Järvinen, M

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to examine the incidence, nature, causes, and severity of injuries in female floorball. Three hundred and seventy-four licensed female floorball players from Finnish top leagues were observed prospectively for one season (6 months). The practice and game hours of floorball were recorded on an exercise diary. All injuries were registered with a structured questionnaire and verified by a physician. During the study period, 133 out of the 374 (35%) players sustained 172 injuries. The injury incidence was 1.8 per 1000 practice hours and 40.3 per 1000 game hours. Of all injuries, 70% were traumatic and 30% were from overuse. The most common injury type was joint sprain (27%). The most commonly injured sites were the knee (27%) and ankle (22%). Twenty-one of the knee injuries (46%) were serious including 10 anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures. Eight of ACL ruptures occurred during floorball games, giving an ACL rupture incidence of 3.6 per 1000 game hours. Eleven injuries (6%) needed hospital admission. The study attested that injury rate in floorball game is very high. Injury prevention strategies in female floorball should be targeted at injuries occurring at the knee and ankle.

  18. Tribal motor vehicle injury prevention programs for reducing disparities in motor vehicle-related injuries.

    PubMed

    West, Bethany A; Naumann, Rebecca B

    2014-04-18

    A previous analysis of National Vital Statistics System data for 2003-2007 that examined disparities in rates of motor vehicle-related death by race/ethnicity and sex found that death rates for American Indians/Alaska Natives were two to four times the rates of other races/ethnicities. To address the disparity in motor vehicle-related injuries and deaths among American Indians/Alaska Natives, CDC funded four American Indian tribes during 2004-2009 to tailor, implement, and evaluate evidence-based road safety interventions. During the implementation of these four motor vehicle-related injury prevention pilot programs, seat belt and child safety seat use increased and alcohol-impaired driving decreased. Four American Indian/Alaska Native tribal communities-the Tohono O'odham Nation, the Ho-Chunk Nation, the White Mountain Apache Tribe, and the San Carlos Apache Tribe-implemented evidence-based road safety interventions to reduce motor vehicle-related injuries and deaths. Each community selected interventions from the Guide to Community Preventive Services and implemented them during 2004-2009. Furthermore, each community took a multifaceted approach by incorporating several strategies, such as school and community education programs, media campaigns, and collaborations with law enforcement officers into their programs. Police data and direct observational surveys were the main data sources used to assess results of the programs. Results included increased use of seat belts and child safety seats, increased enforcement of alcohol-impaired driving laws, and decreased motor vehicle crashes involving injuries or deaths. CDC's Office of Minority Health and Health Equity selected the intervention analysis and discussion as an example of a program that might be effective for reducing motor vehicle-related injury disparities in the United States. The Guide to Community Preventive Services recognizes these selected interventions as effective; this report examines the

  19. Kinematic and kinetic interactions during normal and ACL-deficient gait: a longitudinal in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Atarod, Mohammad; Frank, Cyril B; Shrive, Nigel G

    2014-03-01

    The interactions between different tissues within the knee joint and between different kinematic DOF and joint flexion during normal gait were investigated. These interactions change following ACL transection, in both short (4 weeks) and long (20 weeks) term. Ten skeletally mature sheep were used in control (N = 5) and experimental (N = 5) groups. The 6-DOF stifle joint motion was first measured during normal gait. The control group were then euthanized and mounted on a unique robotic testing platform for kinetic measurements. The experimental group underwent ACL transection surgery, and kinematics measurements were repeated 4 and 20 weeks post-operatively. The experimental group were then euthanized and underwent kinetic assessment using the robotic system. Results indicated significant couplings between joint flexion vs. abduction and internal tibial rotation, as well as medial, anterior, and superior tibial translations during both normal and ACL-deficient gait. Distinct kinetic interactions were also observed between different tissues within the knee joint. Direct relationships were found between ACL vs. LM/MM, and PCL vs. MCL loads during normal gait; inverse relationships were detected between ACL vs. PCL and PCL vs. LM/MM loads. These kinetic interaction patterns were considerably altered by ACL injury. Significant inter-subject variability in joint kinematics and tissue loading patterns during gait was also observed. This study provides further understanding of the in vivo function of different tissues within the knee joint and their couplings with joint kinematics during normal gait and over time following ACL transection.

  20. Age, sex, body anthropometry, and ACL size predict the structural properties of the human anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Javad; Mansouri, Hossein; Chandrashekar, Naveen; Slauterbeck, James R; Hardy, Daniel M; Beynnon, Bruce D

    2011-07-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury continues to be at the forefront of sports injury concerns because of its impact on quality of life and joint health prognosis. One strategy is to reduce the occurrence of this injury by identifying at-risk subjects based on key putative risk factors. The purpose of our study was to develop models that predict the structural properties of a subject's ACL based on the combination of known risk factors. We hypothesized that the structural properties of the ACL can be predicted using a multi-linear regression model based on significant covariates that are associated with increased risk of injury, including age, sex, body size, and ACL size. We also hypothesized that ACL size is a significant contributor to the model. The developed models had predictive capabilities for the structural properties of the ACL: load at failure (R2 = 0.914), elongation at failure (R2 = 0.872), energy at failure (R2 = 0.913), and linear stiffness (R2 = 0.756). Furthermore, sex, age, body mass, BMI, and height were contributors (p < 0.05) to all predicted structural properties. ACL minimal area was a contributor to elongation, energy at failure, and linear stiffness (p < 0.05), but not to load at failure. ACL volume was also a contributor to elongation and energy at failure (p < 0.05), but not to linear stiffness and load at failure models. ACL length was not a significant contributor to any structural property. The clinical significance of this research is its potential, after continued development and refinement of the model, for application to prognostic studies that are designed to identify individuals at increased risk for injury to the ligament.

  1. 77 FR 3269 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Data...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-23

    ... Prevention (CDC) Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Data... Review Officer, CDC, 4770 Buford Highway NE., Mailstop F-46, Atlanta, Georgia 30341, Telephone: (770)...

  2. 75 FR 46952 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): National Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Behavioral...

  3. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... knee Quickly stop moving and change direction while running, landing from a jump, or turning Skiers and ... by wrapping it with an elastic bandage or compression wrap. Elevate your leg by raising it above ...

  4. Firearms injury prevention and gun control in Canada.

    PubMed Central

    Chapdelaine, A; Maurice, P

    1996-01-01

    Firearms cause more than three deaths daily in Canada. The rate of mortality from gunshot wounds varies among provinces and territories, ranging from 5.7 to 21.2 per 100,000 people. Most deaths from gunshot wounds occur in the home, with more occurring in rural areas than in cities, and are inflicted with legally acquired hunting guns. The cost of the consequences of the improper use of firearms in Canada has been estimated at $6.6 billion per year. There is a correlation between access to guns and risk of death. The mere presence of a firearm in a home increases the risk of suicide, homicide and "accidental" death. It is estimated that, in one third of all households in Quebec that have a firearm, it is not safely, or even legally, stored. To prevent deaths and injuries from firearms, education is not enough. Environmental, technological and legislative measures are also needed. In this spirit, the Quebec Public Health Network has taken a position supporting better controls on access to firearms, including the licensing and registration of all firearms and their ownership, to prevent deaths and injuries. The network believes that licensing and registration will reduce the problems related to firearms by making owners accountable for the use of their firearms, improving public safety, helping to control the import and circulation of firearms, reinforcing research and education, and reducing access to firearms in homes. Licensing and registration do not interfere with legitimate firearm use, their cost is acceptable in light of the advantages they provide, and they are desired by most Canadians. PMID:8911295

  5. Review of NASA ACLS research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daugherty, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to evaluate a method of maintaining stability of an air cushion vehicle and also to evaluate several concepts to brake and steer an ACLS-equipped vehicle. The investigation used a modified airboat equipped with an air cushion landing system. The pressure relief door stability concept was characterized by the ACLS pressure time histories. The pressure relief doors vented excess cavity and lobe pressures and consistently maintained vehicle heave and pitch stability. Braking concepts were characterized by the average deceleration of the vehicle. Reduced lobe flow and cavity venting braking concepts were evaluated in this program. The cavity venting concept demonstrated the best performance, producing decelerations on the test vehicle on the same order as moderate braking with conventional wheel brakes. Steering concepts were evaluated by recording the path taken while attempting to follow a prescribed maneuver. The steering concepts evaluated included using rudders only, using differential lobe flow, and using rudders combined with a lightly loaded, nonsteering center wheel. The latter concept proved to be the most accurate means of steering the vehicle on the ACLS, producing translational deviations which, while two to three times higher than those from conventional nose gear steering, were still felt to provide reasonably precise steering control for this type vehicle.

  6. Preventing Unintentional Injuries in the Home Using the Health Impact Pyramid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mack, Karin A.; Liller, Karen D.; Baldwin, Grant; Sleet, David

    2015-01-01

    Injuries continue to be the leading cause of death for the first four decades of life. These injuries result from a confluence of behavioral, physical, structural, environmental, and social factors. Taken together, these illustrate the importance of taking a broad and multileveled approach to injury prevention. Using examples from fall, fire,…

  7. Strategies for Playground Injury Prevention: An Overview of a Playground Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Heather; Hudson, Susan D.; Thompson, Donna

    2010-01-01

    Preventing injuries to children, especially debilitating and life threatening, requires an awareness of where these types of injuries occur during the school days. This review examines falls from playground equipment, events that have been identified as the leading causes of nonfatal unintentional injuries for children. Thus, the issue of…

  8. Shoulder injuries from alpine skiing and snowboarding. Aetiology, treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Kocher, M S; Dupré, M M; Feagin, J A

    1998-03-01

    There has been a decrease in the overall injury rate and the rate of lower extremity injuries for alpine skiing, with a resultant increase in the ratio of upper extremity to lower extremity injuries. Upper extremity injuries account for 20 to 35% of all injuries during alpine skiing and nearly 50% of all injuries during snowboarding. The most common upper extremity injuries during skiing are sprain of the thumb metacarpal-phalangeal joint ulnar collateral ligament, and the most common in snowboarding is wrist fracture. Shoulder injuries from skiing and snowboarding have been less well characterised. With the increased ratio of upper to lower extremity injuries during alpine skiing and the boom in popularity of snowboarding, shoulder injuries will be seen with increasing frequency by those who care for alpine sport injuries. Shoulder injuries account for 4 to 11% of all alpine skiing injuries and 22 to 41% of upper extremity injuries. The rate of shoulder injuries during alpine skiing is 0.2 to 0.5 injuries per thousand skier-days. During snowboarding, shoulder injuries account for 8 to 16% of all injuries and 20 to 34% of upper extremity injuries. Falls are the most common mechanism of shoulder injury, in addition to pole planting during skiing and aerial manoeuvres during snowboarding. Common shoulder injuries during skiing and snowboarding are glenohumeral instability, rotator cuff strains, acromioclavicular separations and clavicle fractures. Less common shoulder injuries include greater tuberosity fractures, trapezius strains, proximal humerus fractures, biceps strains, glenoid fractures, scapula fractures, humeral head fractures, sterno-clavicular separations, acromion fractures and biceps tendon dislocation. Prevention of shoulder injuries during skiing and snowboarding may be possible through interventions in education and technique, conditioning and equipment and environment.

  9. A systematic literature review of the relationship between stretching and athletic injury prevention.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Athletic-related injuries are a major cause for healthcare visits and financial burden for an otherwise healthy population of adults. The purpose of this article was to investigate the effects of stretching on injury prevention and to determine whether current stretching guidelines are beneficial for athletes. A systematic review of the literature was conducted through searching MEDLINE and CINAHL on topics related to stretching and injury prevention. Current belief is that stretching reduces injury incidence and that it should be performed prior to athletic activities. An examination of 11 articles provided inconclusive outcomes regarding the positive effect of stretching on injury prevention. A sport or activity-specific tailored stretch and warm-up program yielded the best outcomes in relation to preventing injuries. Direct negative effects of stretching were not identified; therefore, the application of stretching should be performed on an individual basis.

  10. Injury and violence prevention policy: celebrating our successes, protecting our future.

    PubMed

    Koné, Rebecca Greco; Zurick, Elizabeth; Patterson, Sara; Peeples, Amy

    2012-09-01

    Policy strategies for injury and violence prevention influence systems development, organizational change, social norms, and individual behavior to improve the health and safety of a population. Injury and violence prevention professionals should consider how their issues resonate with various audiences, including policy makers, the public, and other decision makers. As the cost of healthcare continues to rise and greater demands are placed on the healthcare system, the use of public health policy becomes increasingly critical to protect the public's health and prevent injury and violence and its related morbidities and disabilities (Degutis, 2011). This article highlights some impactful policy successes from the field, allows us to reflect on the Injury Center's 20th anniversary, and describes steps to address injuries and violence into the future. The purpose of this paper is to discuss policy as a public health strategy and the critical role it plays in injury and violence prevention.

  11. Aging and Spinal Cord Injury: External Causes of Injury and Implications for Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ying; Allen, Victoria; DeVivo, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite a consistent trend toward older age at time of spinal cord injury (SCI), little is known about the external causes of SCI in the elderly. Objective: To examine environmental circumstances, documented by International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, Clinical Modification codes, at time of SCI among older adults. Method: Data on individuals injured in 2005 or later were retrieved from the National SCI Database. Demographics, injury profiles, and external causes of injury were compared between the study group (age >60 years, n = 1,079) and reference group (age 16–45 years, n = 3,579) using chi-square and Student t tests. Results: Among the elderly, falls were the most common etiology of SCI (60%), followed by transport accidents (24%) and complications of medical and surgical care (12%). In the younger group, transport accidents were the most common etiology of SCI (49%), followed by falls (22%) and assault (21%). Falls on the same level (30%), from stairs and steps (22%), and other slipping, tripping, and stumbling (11%) were the most common mechanisms of falls in the elderly group. Among motor vehicle accidents, car occupant injured in a collision with another car was the most common mechanism of injury among the elderly (28%). Conclusion: There is an urgent need for effective fall prevention programs among the elderly to reduce SCI in this expanding population. Details on the mechanisms of falls and other major causes of SCI among the elderly provided in this study should inform the development of future interventions for high-risk persons, activities, and environments. PMID:26363588

  12. Development and Optimization of an Injury Prevention Intervention for Physical Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vercruysse, Sien; De Clercq, Dirk; Goossens, Lennert; Aelterman, Nathalie; Haerens, Leen

    2017-01-01

    Background: Injury prevention is highly needed in physically active populations, such as pre-service and in-service physical education teachers (PETs). As a lack of adherence to preventive strategies is problematic in injury, it seems crucial to develop and optimize interventions that correspond to the specific needs and wishes of PETs. Aim: The…

  13. Promoting Health and Preventing Injury in Preschool Children: The Role of Parenting Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alemagno, Sonia A.; Niles, Sheila A.; Shaffer-King, Peggy; Miller, William J.

    2008-01-01

    There is concern that parents under stress may not be effective in promoting health and preventing injury in young children, but research in this area has been limited. To explore this issue, a study was conducted to look at the relationship between self-reported parenting stress and actions taken to promote health and to prevent injury in…

  14. Toppled television sets and head injuries in the pediatric population: a framework for prevention.

    PubMed

    Cusimano, Michael D; Parker, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    Injuries to children caused by falling televisions have become more frequent during the last decade. These injuries can be severe and even fatal and are likely to become even more common in the future as TVs increase in size and become more affordable. To formulate guidelines for the prevention of these injuries, the authors systematically reviewed the literature on injuries related to toppling televisions. The authors searched MEDLINE, PubMed, Embase, Scopus, CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar according to the Cochrane guidelines for all studies involving children 0-18 years of age who were injured by toppled TVs. Factors contributing to injury were categorized using Haddon's Matrix, and the public health approach was used as a framework for developing strategies to prevent these injuries. The vast majority (84%) of the injuries occurred in homes and more than three-fourths were unwitnessed by adult caregivers. The TVs were most commonly large and elevated off the ground. Dressers and other furniture not designed to support TVs were commonly involved in the TV-toppling incident. The case fatality rate varies widely, but almost all deaths reported (96%) were due to brain injuries. Toddlers between the ages of 1 and 3 years most frequently suffer injuries to the head and neck, and they are most likely to suffer severe injuries. Many of these injuries require brain imaging and neurosurgical intervention. Prevention of these injuries will require changes in TV design and legislation as well as increases in public education and awareness. Television-toppling injuries can be easily prevented; however, the rates of injury do not reflect a sufficient level of awareness, nor do they reflect an acceptable effort from an injury prevention perspective.

  15. Unilateral Stance Strategies of Athletes With ACL Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Di Stasi, Stephanie L.; Hartigan, Erin H.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant movement strategies are characteristic of ACL-deficient athletes with recurrent knee instability (non-copers), and may instigate premature or accelerate joint degradation. Biomechanical evaluation of kinematic changes over time may elucidate noncopers’ responses to neuromuscular intervention and ACL reconstruction (ACLR). Forty noncopers were randomized into a perturbation group or a strength training only group. We evaluated the effects of perturbation training, and then gender on knee angle and tibial position during a unilateral standing task before and after ACLR. No statistically significant interactions were found. Before surgery, the strength training only group demonstrated knee angle asymmetry, but 6 months after ACLR, both groups presented with similar knee flexion between limbs. Aberrant and asymmetrical tibial position was found only in females following injury and ACLR. Neither treatment group showed distinct unilateral standing strategies following intervention; however, males and female noncopers appear to respond uniquely to physical therapy and surgery. PMID:22983931

  16. A three-phase analysis of the prevention of recreational softball injuries.

    PubMed

    Janda, D H; Wojtys, E M; Hankin, F M; Benedict, M E; Hensinger, R N

    1990-01-01

    Recreational sports injuries are expensive to society. Prevention of such injuries must be a major public health goal. In a previous retrospective study, base sliding was found to be responsible for 71% of recreational softball injuries. Because most injuries occurred during rapid deceleration against stationary bases, quick-release (break-away) bases were evaluated as a means to modify this mechanism of injury. In a prospective study, 633 softball games were played on a break-away base fields and 627 games were played on stationary base fields. Forty-five sliding injuries occurred on the stationary base diamonds (1 injury for every 13.9 games) and only two sliding injuries occurred on the break-away fields (1 injury for every 316.5 games). The medical costs for injuries on the stationary base fields was 79 times greater than that on the break-away fields. In a 1035 game follow-up study performed on all fields equipped with break-away bases, two sliding injuries occurred (1 injury for every 517.5 games). Installing break-away bases in fields used by recreational leagues would achieve a significant reduction of serious softball injuries (98%) and, therefore, should be mandatory. Based on our findings, the Centers for Disease Control has estimated 1.7 million injuries would be prevented nationally per year, saving $2.0 billion per year nationally in acute medical care costs.

  17. 76 FR 7217 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Enhanced...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Enhanced Surveillance for New Vaccine Preventable Disease, Funding... for New Vaccine Preventable Disease, FOA IP11-010, initial review.'' CONTACT PERSON FOR...

  18. 76 FR 3908 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): The...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-21

    ... Officer, CDC, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office of the Director... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and.... L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the...

  19. 75 FR 13560 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Knowledge...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-22

    ...: Donald Blackman, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and... Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces...

  20. 75 FR 77645 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Pregnancy...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-13

    ... for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office of the Director, Extramural Research... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and.... 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the aforementioned...

  1. 75 FR 77645 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Pregnancy...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-13

    ... Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office of the Director, Extramural Research... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and.... 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the aforementioned...

  2. 76 FR 4703 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Pregnancy...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and..., Scientific Review Officer, CDC, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office... and Prevention and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Dated: January 20,...

  3. 76 FR 12122 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): The...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and...., Scientific Review Officer, CDC, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office... and Prevention and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Dated: February 25,...

  4. 75 FR 78997 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Pilot...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and... Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the..., Scientific Review Officer, CDC, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion,...

  5. 76 FR 20355 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Funding...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and... Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Developmental Disabilities, CDC, 1600 Clifton Road, NE... and Prevention and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. ] Dated: March 31,...

  6. 76 FR 19995 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Funding...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and... (Pub. L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the aforementioned... Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC, 1600 Clifton Road, NE., Mailstop...

  7. 78 FR 19490 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panels (SEP): Initial Review

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    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and... activities, for both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Agency for Toxic Substances and... Disease Control and Prevention. BILLING CODE 4163-18-P...

  8. 78 FR 19489 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and... the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention... management activities, for both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Agency for...

  9. 76 FR 28437 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Interest Project (SIP): Initial...

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    2011-05-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and... for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC, 4770 Buford Highway, NE., Mailstop K-92... management activities, for both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Agency for...

  10. 76 FR 20355 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Funding...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and... Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the... Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC, 4770 Buford Highway, NE., Mailstop K-92,...

  11. 76 FR 45575 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

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    2011-07-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and..., Extramural Programs, National Center for HIV, Hepatitis and Sexually Transmitted Diseases Prevention, CDC... management activities, for both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Agency for...

  12. 78 FR 19489 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

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    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and.... L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the aforementioned... committee management activities, for both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Agency...

  13. 78 FR 19490 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

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    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and... and Prevention and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Dana Redford, Acting Director, Management Analysis and Services Office, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. BILLING CODE 4163-18-P...

  14. 78 FR 60878 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and... and Disease Prevention Research Centers, Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) DP14-001, initial... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the aforementioned meeting: Times And Dates 8...

  15. 76 FR 32213 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP); Initial Review

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    2011-06-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and..., Hepatitis and Sexually Transmitted Diseases Prevention, CDC, 1600 Clifton Road, NE., Mailstop E-60, Atlanta... and Prevention and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Dated: May 25, 2011. Elaine...

  16. 78 FR 56236 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

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    2013-09-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and... Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the... Disease Control and Prevention and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Elaine L....

  17. 78 FR 25743 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

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    2013-05-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and... Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC... both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Agency for Toxic Substances and...

  18. 78 FR 60878 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and... and Disease Prevention Research Centers, Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) DP14-001, initial... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the aforementioned meeting: Times and Dates 8...

  19. 76 FR 19996 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Funding...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and.... 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the aforementioned meeting... management activities, for both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Agency for...

  20. 78 FR 19490 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

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    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and... Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the aforementioned meeting: Time and Date: 11:00 a.m.-6:00... and Prevention and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Dana Redford, Acting...

  1. 76 FR 28437 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Interest Project (SIP): Initial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and... Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC..., Director, Extramural Research Program Office, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and...

  2. 76 FR 49771 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

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    2011-08-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and... Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the..., National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC, 4770 Buford Highway,...

  3. 76 FR 13414 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Pilot...

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    2011-03-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and... Blackman, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, CDC, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health... Disease Control and Prevention and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Dated: March...

  4. 78 FR 19490 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

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    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and.... L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the aforementioned... committee management activities, for both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Agency...

  5. 76 FR 18555 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

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    2011-04-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and... (Pub. L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the aforementioned... committee management activities, for both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Agency...

  6. 76 FR 78263 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

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    2011-12-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and... Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the aforementioned meeting: Time and Date: 8 a.m.-5 p.m., January... Disease Control and Prevention and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Dated: December...

  7. 77 FR 29351 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control; Special Interest Projects (SIPs): Initial...

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    2012-05-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and... Adults to Inform Future Public Health Policy Efforts to Prevent Skin Cancer, SIP12-054, Pilot Study to... Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the aforementioned meeting: Time and Date 11:00 a.m.-5:30...

  8. The role of warmup in muscular injury prevention.

    PubMed

    Safran, M R; Garrett, W E; Seaber, A V; Glisson, R R; Ribbeck, B M

    1988-01-01

    This study is an attempt to provide biomechanical support for the athletic practice of warming up prior to an exercise task to reduce the incidence of injury. Tears in isometrically preconditioned (stimulated before stretching) muscle were compared to tears in control (nonstimulated) muscle by examining four parameters: 1) force and 2) change of length required to tear the muscle, 3) site of failure, and 4) length-tension deformation. The tibialis anterior (TA), the extensor digitorum longus (EDL), and flexor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles from both hindlimbs of rabbits comprised our experimental model. Isometrically preconditioned TA (P less than 0.001), EDL (P less than 0.005), and FDL (P less than 0.01) muscles required more force to fail than their contralateral controls. Preconditioned TA (P less than 0.05), EDL (P less than 0.001), and FDL (P less than 0.01) muscles also stretched to a greater length from rest before failing than their nonpreconditioned controls. The site of failure in all of the muscles was the musculotendinous junction; thus, the site of failure was not altered by condition. The length-tension deformation curves for all three muscle types showed that in every case the preconditioned muscles attained a lesser force at each given increase in length before failure, showing a relative increase in elasticity, although only the EDL showed a statistically significant difference. From our data, it may be inferred that physiologic warming (isometric preconditioning) is of benefit in preventing muscular injury by increasing the and length to failure and elasticity of the muscle-tendon unit.

  9. Nrf2 activation prevents cadmium-induced acute liver injury

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Kai C.; Liu, Jie J.; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2012-08-15

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in cadmium-induced liver injury. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that up-regulates cytoprotective genes in response to oxidative stress. To investigate the role of Nrf2 in cadmium-induced hepatotoxicity, Nrf2-null mice, wild-type mice, kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1-knockdown (Keap1-KD) mice with enhanced Nrf2, and Keap1-hepatocyte knockout (Keap1-HKO) mice with maximum Nrf2 activation were treated with cadmium chloride (3.5 mg Cd/kg, i.p.). Blood and liver samples were collected 8 h thereafter. Cadmium increased serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities, and caused extensive hepatic hemorrhage and necrosis in the Nrf2-null mice. In contrast, Nrf2-enhanced mice had lower serum ALT and LDH activities and less morphological alternations in the livers than wild-type mice. H{sub 2}DCFDA (2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluoresein diacetate) staining of primary hepatocytes isolated from the four genotypes of mice indicated that oxidative stress was higher in Nrf2-null cells, and lower in Nrf2-enhanced cells than in wild-type cells. To further investigate the mechanism of the protective effect of Nrf2, mRNA of metallothionein (MT) and other cytoprotective genes were determined. Cadmium markedly induced MT-1 and MT-2 in livers of all four genotypes of mice. In contrast, genes involved in glutathione synthesis and reducing reactive oxygen species, including glutamate-cysteine ligase (Gclc), glutathione peroxidase-2 (Gpx2), and sulfiredoxin-1 (Srxn-1) were only induced in Nrf2-enhanced mice, but not in Nrf2-null mice. In conclusion, the present study shows that Nrf2 activation prevents cadmium-induced oxidative stress and liver injury through induction of genes involved in antioxidant defense rather than genes that scavenge Cd. -- Highlights: ► Cadmium caused extensive hepatic hemorrhage and necrosis in Nrf2-null mice. ► Keap1-KD and Keap1-HKO mice

  10. Priorities for injury prevention in women's Australian football: a compilation of national data from different sources

    PubMed Central

    Fortington, Lauren V; Finch, Caroline F

    2016-01-01

    Background/aim Participation in Australian football (AF) has traditionally been male dominated and current understanding of injury and priorities for prevention are based solely on reports of injuries in male players. There is evidence in other sports that indicates that injury types differ between males and females. With increasing participation in AF by females, it is important to consider their specific injury and prevention needs. This study aimed to provide a first injury profile from existing sources for female AF. Methods Compilation of injury data from four prospectively recorded data sets relating to female AF: (1) hospital admissions in Victoria, 2008/09–13/14, n=500 injuries; (2) emergency department (ED) presentations in Victoria, 2008/09–2012/13, n=1,879 injuries; (3) insurance claims across Australia 2004–2013, n=522 injuries; (4) West Australian Women's Football League (WAWFL), 2014 season club data, n=49 injuries. Descriptive results are presented as injury frequencies, injury types and injury to body parts. Results Hospital admissions and ED presentations were dominated by upper limb injuries, representing 47% and 51% of all injuries, respectively, primarily to the wrist/hand at 32% and 40%. Most (65%) insurance claim injuries involved the lower limb, 27% of which were for knee ligament damage. A high proportion of concussions (33%) were reported in the club-collected data. Conclusions The results provide the first compilation of existing data sets of women's AF injuries and highlight the need for a rigorous and systematic injury surveillance system to be instituted. PMID:27900171

  11. What Can I Do to Help Prevent Traumatic Brain Injury?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancel Submit Search The CDC Traumatic Brain Injury & Concussion Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... this page: About CDC.gov . Traumatic Brain Injury & Concussion Basic Information Get the Facts Signs and Symptoms ...

  12. Cause and Prevention of Playground Injuries and Litigation; Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frost, Joe L.; Sweeney, Theodora B.

    This study examined 187 playground injuries and 13 fatalities that resulted in lawsuits between 1981 and 1995, taken from the files of two expert witnesses on playground safety who testified in the cases. The data are presented by geographic location, nature of injuries, cause of injuries/fatalities, playground equipment implicated, location of…

  13. Windsurfing Injuries: Added Awareness for Diagnosis, Treatment, and Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenbaum, Daryl A.; Dietz, Thomas E.

    2002-01-01

    With proper training and safety precautions, windsurfing is relatively safe, but its unique equipment and unpredictable environmental conditions can produce serious injuries. Clinicians may see fall-related ankle injuries, tarsometatarsal injuries, or anterior shoulder dislocations; chronic low-back pain from torso stress; skin lacerations; and…

  14. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Prevention of Pediatric Overuse Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Valovich McLeod, Tamara C.; Decoster, Laura C.; Loud, Keith J.; Micheli, Lyle J.; Parker, J. Terry; Sandrey, Michelle A.; White, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To provide certified athletic trainers, physicians, and other health care professionals with recommendations on best practices for the prevention of overuse sports injuries in pediatric athletes (aged 6–18 years). Background: Participation in sports by the pediatric population has grown tremendously over the years. Although the health benefits of participation in competitive and recreational athletic events are numerous, one adverse consequence is sport-related injury. Overuse or repetitive trauma injuries represent approximately 50% of all pediatric sport-related injuries. It is speculated that more than half of these injuries may be preventable with simple approaches. Recommendations: Recommendations are provided based on current evidence regarding pediatric injury surveillance, identification of risk factors for injury, preparticipation physical examinations, proper supervision and education (coaching and medical), sport alterations, training and conditioning programs, and delayed specialization. PMID:21391806

  15. [Skiing and snowboarding trauma in children: epidemiology, physiopathology, prevention and main injuries].

    PubMed

    Dohin, B; Kohler, R

    2008-11-01

    Skiing and snowboarding are leading to a risk of injuries in children. Beginners and experienced have higher risk of injuries, however, the first have less severe injuries than the latest. Risk factors of injury are: ability and experience, binding adjustment, slope characteristics, speed, collisions with objects or jumping and risky behavior of the young skiers and snowboarders. Lower limb injuries are most common in skier, especially knee sprains, conversely snowboarders present more upper limb injuries, especially wrist fractures. The frequency of head injuries does not decrease while helmet use increases but severity decreases. Despite prevention and wearing protections, the frequency of trauma does not decrease significantly, which could be in relation with higher speed and increased risky behavior. Main prevention factors are safety knowledge and safety behavior, correct binding adjustment, and use of protections.

  16. Evaluation of RugbySmart: a rugby union community injury prevention programme.

    PubMed

    Gianotti, Simon M; Quarrie, Ken L; Hume, Patria A

    2009-05-01

    RugbySmart, a rugby union injury prevention programme, was launched in New Zealand in 2001. It was compulsory for all coaches and referees to complete RugbySmart requirements annually in order to continue coaching or refereeing. After 5 years of implementation the programme partners, Accident Compensation Corporation and New Zealand Rugby Union, evaluated RugbySmart to determine its effectiveness in reducing injuries. The purpose was to evaluate the effect of RugbySmart on reducing injury rates per 100,000 players and resulting injury prevention behaviours. The RugbySmart programme was associated with a decrease in injury claims per 100,000 players in most areas the programme targeted; the programme had negligible impact on non-targeted injury sites. The decrease in injury claims numbers was supported by results from the player behaviour surveys pre- and post-RugbySmart. There was an increase in safe behaviour in the contact situations of tackle, scrum and ruck technique.

  17. Effect of static stretching on prevention of injuries for military recruits.

    PubMed

    Amako, Masatoshi; Oda, Takaaki; Masuoka, Kazunori; Yokoi, Hiromichi; Campisi, Paolo

    2003-06-01

    This prospective study was designed to evaluate whether static stretching can prevent training-related injuries in Japan Ground Self-Defense Force military recruits. A total of 901 recruits between 1996 and 1998 were divided into two groups. Of which, 518 recruits were assigned to the stretching group and practiced static stretching before and after each physical training session. The control subjects (383 recruits in the nonstretching group) did not stretch statically prior to exercise. The static stretching consisted of 18 exercises. We collected injury data from medical records and assessed the incidence and the location of injury. The total injury rate was almost the same between two groups; however, the incidences of muscle/tendon injury and low back pain were significantly lower in the stretching group (p < 0.05). Static stretching decreased the incidence of muscle-related injuries but did not prevent bone or joint injuries.

  18. [Repetitive strain injury (RSI): occurrence, etiology, therapy and prevention].

    PubMed

    Bongers, P M; de Vet, H C W; Blatter, B M

    2002-10-19

    In the Netherlands, work related upper-limb disorders are called Repetitive Strain Injuries (RSI). RSI is not a diagnosis but a catch-all term for symptoms and signs located in the neck, upper back, shoulder, arm, elbow, hand, wrist and fingers. These symptoms may include pain, stiffness, tingling, clumsiness, loss of co-ordination, loss of strength, skin discoloration and temperature differences. Each year, 8% of working Dutch citizens take time off work due to RSI symptoms. Although the number of people claiming disability benefit due to RSI is limited, this figure has risen consecutively over the last three years. There is consensus that repetitive work at a high frequency and possibly accompanied by exertion of force is accompanied by RSI symptoms. There are indications of a relation between visual display unit use and these symptoms. However, these relations have not been established in a longitudinal study of adequate quality. High perceived job stress and a high workload are thought to be related to RSI, and women report more symptoms than men. There is insufficient information available on the role of different coping styles, perfectionism and dealing with symptoms. There is little information on the underlying mechanisms in the development of RSI, the diagnostics, therapy and prevention. In view of the lack of clear diagnostic criteria, suggestions have been made for a standardised description of the symptoms involved in the syndrome. A multidisciplinary treatment is likely to have the most effect. In terms of prevention, an integrated approach aimed at improving the working posture, reduction of static load and job stress and at individual factors is assumed to be the most effective.

  19. The status of legal authority for injury prevention practice in state health departments.

    PubMed

    Stier, Daniel D; Thombley, Melisa L; Kohn, Melvin A; Jesada, Rebecca A

    2012-06-01

    Despite the potential for public health strategies to decrease the substantial burden of injuries, injury prevention infrastructure in state health departments is underdeveloped. We sought to describe the legal support for injury prevention activities at state health departments. We searched the Lexis database for state laws providing authority for those activities, and categorized the scope of those laws. Only 10 states have authority that covers the full scope of injury prevention practice; in the others, legal authority is piecemeal, nonspecific, or nonexistent. More comprehensive legal authority could help health departments access data for surveillance, work with partners, address sensitive issues, and garner funding. Efforts should be undertaken to enhance legal support for injury prevention activities across the country.

  20. Child safety seats for the prevention of traffic injuries.

    PubMed

    Collar, M

    2001-05-01

    It's an old joke among new parents in Labor and Delivery: How many people did it take to install your car seat? Although the remark elicits chuckles from new moms and dads, using a child safety seat--and using it correctly--is no laughing matter. More children between the ages of one and ten die in automobile crashes than from any other type of injury or disease. In the under-one-year age group, this health risk is second only to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). Some physicians, knowing how complicated child safety seats can be to use, may be reluctant to give advice to parents on their use. In addition, the potential liability of dispensing incorrect information may be enough to make some doctors reluctant to do so. However, there are some basic tips that physicians can and should be passing on to parents. Most parents place great trust in their child's physician; asking about the child's transportation and advocating proper child safety seat use is an effective prevention technique.

  1. Youth injury data in the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program: do they represent the Canadian experience?

    PubMed Central

    Pickett, W.; Brison, R.; Mackenzie, S.; Garner, M.; King, M.; Greenberg, T; Boyce, W.

    2000-01-01

    Objective—Injuries to Canadian youth (11–15 years) identified from a population based health survey (World Health Organization—Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children Survey, or WHO-HBSC) were compared with youth injuries from a national, emergency department based surveillance system. Comparisons focused on external causes of injury, and examined whether similar rankings of injury patterns and hence priorities for intervention were identified by the different systems. Setting—The Canadian version of the WHO-HBSC was conducted in 1998. The Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program (CHIRPP) is the national, emergency room based, surveillance program. Two hospitals involved in CHIRPP collectively provide population based data for Kingston, Ontario. Method—Numbers of injuries selected for study varied by data source: WHO-HBSC (n=3673); CHIRPP (n=20 133); Kingston CHIRPP (n=1944). WHO-HBSC and Kingston CHIRPP records were coded according to four variables in the draft International Classification of External Causes of Injury. Existing CHIRPP codes were available to compare Kingston and other CHIRPP data by five variables. Males and females in the three datasets were ranked according to the external causes. Data classified by source and sex were compared using Spearman's rank correlation statistic. Results—Rank orders of four variables describing external causes were remarkably similar between the WHO-HBSC and Kingston CHIRPP (ρ>0.78 p<0.004) for mechanism, object, location, and activity). The Kingston and other CHIRPP data were also similar (ρ>0.87; p<0.001) for the variables available to describe external causes of injury (including intent). Conclusion—The two subsets of the CHIRPP data and the WHO-HBSC data identified similar priorities for injury prevention among young people. These findings indicate that CHIRPP may be representative of general youth injury patterns in Canada. Our study provides a novel and practical model for the

  2. Policy Analysis of Road Traffic Injury Prevention in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Azami-Aghdash, Saber; Gorji, Hassan Abolghasem; Shabaninejad, Hosein; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Due to the large number of Road Traffic Injuries (RTIs) in Iran, authorities have implemented a number of policies for the prevention of RTIs. However, a scientific analysis of these policies has thus far been neglected. Therefore, this study was conducted for policy analysis of RTIs prevention in Iran. Methods This qualitative study with a case study approach was conducted in Iran during 2016 in two phases: First, by reviewing literature and documents of the past ten years, policies that have been executed to prevent RTIs in Iran were identified. In the second phase of the study, the identified policies were ranked by prioritization matrices. The two policies with the highest scores were selected. ‘Policy triangle framework’ was used for Policy analyzing. Stakeholders of these policies (42 people) were interviewed. Data were analyzed manually by implementing Content-Analysis methods. Results The policies of “pupil liaisons” and “safety belt” were selected for analysis from thirteen potential identified polices. The results of some studies revealed that safety belts had not been properly used in Iran (less than 80%). There was an eight-year hiatus between the approval of the safety belts policy and implementation of this policy. Eight actors were identified for safety belts policy. Lack of diligence in implementation of the policy, failing to pay adequate attention to education and the culture of driving, and failing to select an organization for the implementation of the policy, were identified as the main weaknesses of this policy. For ‘pupil liaisons’ policy, five actors were identified. Following the implementation of this policy, the number of penalties was reduced (17.9%). Neglecting scientific findings and individual-based nature of the policy were identified as the primary weaknesses of this policy. Conclusions Taking serious measures to properly execute the policy, educating people, selecting an efficient organization that is

  3. The science of fencing: implications for performance and injury prevention.

    PubMed

    Roi, Giulio S; Bianchedi, Diana

    2008-01-01

    In this review we analyse the data from the literature on fencing with the aim of creating a psychobiological and multi-factorial model of fencing performance. Fencing is an open-skilled combat sport that was admitted to the first modern Olympic Games in Athens (1896). It is mainly practised indoors, with three different weapons: the foil, the sabre and the épée, each contested with different rules. A fencing international tournament may last between 9 and 11 hours. Bouts represent only 18% of total competition time, with an effective fight time of between 17 and 48 minutes. The physical demands of fencing competitions are high, involving the aerobic and anaerobic alactic and lactic metabolisms, and are also affected by age, sex, level of training and technical and tactical models utilized in relation to the adversary. The anthropometrical characteristics of fencers show a typical asymmetry of the limbs as a result of the practice of an asymmetrical sport activity. Fencing produces typical functional asymmetries that emphasize the very high level of specific function, strength and control required in this sport. Moreover, the physical demands of fencing are closely linked to the perceptual and psychological ones, and all are subjected to a continuous succession of changes during the bouts based on the behaviour of the opponent. For this reason it is difficult to identify a significant relationship between any one physiological characteristic and performance, and performance is more likely to be influenced by perceptual and neuro-physiological characteristics. Fencers need to anticipate the opponent and to mask their true intentions with a game of feints and counter-feints, which must be supported by an adequate psycho-physical condition to prevent central and peripheral fatigue. Fencing is not particularly dangerous; however, there is a fine line between a fatal lesion and a simple wound from a broken blade. The suggestions for injury prevention fall into three

  4. ACLS.

    PubMed

    Handley, A J

    2001-09-01

    It must be emphasised that the published International Guidelines 2000 contain an in-depth presentation of the scientific evidence behind advanced life support. The exact interpretation of this evidence, and the algorithms adopted by a national resuscitation council will depend upon various factors such as local interpretation of the evidence, local practice and availability of drugs. The ERC is publishing its own summaries of the guideline changes and the sequences of action for both BLS and ALS and these papers are recommended for further reading.

  5. The use of platelets to affect functional healing of an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) autograft in a caprine ACL reconstruction model.

    PubMed

    Spindler, Kurt P; Murray, Martha M; Carey, James L; Zurakowski, David; Fleming, Braden C

    2009-05-01

    Many anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions have increased laxity postoperatively. We hypothesized that enhancing an ACL graft with a collagen-platelet composite (CPC) would improve knee laxity and graft structural properties. We also hypothesized the platelet concentration in the CPC would affect these parameters. Twelve goats underwent ACL reconstruction with autologous patellar tendon graft. In six goats, a collagen-platelet composite was placed around the graft (CPC group). In the remaining six goats, the collagen scaffold only was used (COLL group). Three goats were excluded due to complications. After 6 weeks in vivo, anterior-posterior (AP) laxity and tensile properties of the ACL reconstructed knees were measured and normalized against the contralateral intact knee. At a knee flexion angle of 30 degrees, the average increase in AP laxity was 40% less in the CPC group than the COLL group (p = 0.045). At 60 degrees, the AP laxity was 30% less in the CPC group, a difference that was close to statistical significance (p = 0.080). No differences were found between treatment groups with respect to the structural properties (p > 0.30). However, there were significant correlations between serum platelet concentration and AP laxity (R2 = 0.643; p = 0.009), maximum load (R2 = 0.691; p = 0.006), and graft stiffness (R2 = 0.840; p < 0.001). In conclusion, use of a CPC to enhance healing of an allograft ACL reconstruction inversely correlated with early sagittal plane laxity and the systemic platelet count was highly predictive of ACL reconstruction graft strength and stiffness at 6 weeks. These findings emphasize the importance of further research on delineating the effect of platelets in treating of ACL injuries.

  6. Current Practices in Injury Prevention and Safety Helmet Use Among Head Injury Patients in an Army Outpatient Care Setting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-05-01

    for which safety helmets or other protective head gear would also be appropriate. Biking 58% Wrestling 7% Karate 7% Rockclimbing 7% Kickboxing 7...activities: biking, rollerblading, baseball, kickboxing , rockclimbing, wrestling and karate. These Head Injury Prevention 36 activities all increase... Kickboxing , wrestling and karate were grouped into a contact collision group. This group was at the highest risk of head injury with any type of

  7. Stretching for prevention of Achilles tendon injuries: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Park, Don Young; Chou, Loretta

    2006-12-01

    Professional and recreational athletes commonly perform pre-exercise stretching to prevent musculoskeletal injuries. Little definitive evidence exists that clearly demonstrates the efficacy of stretching in reducing injury. Achilles tendon injuries are among the most common injuries affecting active individuals in the United States today. Clinicians commonly recommend stretching the Achilles tendon without concrete scientific evidence to support such a claim. Few studies have addressed the effect of stretching in Achilles tendon injuries, and it is unclear if the conclusions made for musculoskeletal injuries can be applied to the Achilles tendon. Biomechanical studies of the Achilles tendon and measurements of the tendon's reflex activity have demonstrated possible mechanisms for the potential benefit of stretching, including load-induced hypertrophy and increased tendon tensile strength. Recent prospective studies have contended that reductions in plantarflexor strength and increases in ankle dorsiflexion range of motion from stretching the Achilles tendon may increase the risk of injury. Studies examining stretching in injury prevention, the biomechanical properties of injuries to the Achilles tendon were compiled and reviewed. Although many theories have been published regarding the potential benefits and limitations of stretching, few studies have been able to definitively demonstrate its utility in injury prevention.

  8. Effectiveness of foot orthoses for treatment and prevention of lower limb injuries : a review.

    PubMed

    Hume, Patria; Hopkins, Will; Rome, Keith; Maulder, Peter; Coyle, Greg; Nigg, Benno

    2008-01-01

    Healthcare professionals prescribe foot orthoses (FOs) for treatment and prevention of lower limb injuries, but previous reviews of the effectiveness of FOs have been inconclusive. We have therefore performed a review emphasizing the magnitude of treatment effects to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of FOs in the treatment and prevention of lower limb injuries.Qualifying studies were mainly controlled trials, but some uncontrolled clinical trials of patients with chronic injuries were analysed separately. Injuries included plantar fasciitis, tibial stress fractures and patellofemoral pain syndrome; these were included because of the large treatment costs for these frequent injuries in New Zealand. Outcomes were pain, comfort, function and injury status. Continuous measures were expressed as standardized differences using baseline between-subject standard deviations, and magnitudes were inferred from the intersection of 90% confidence intervals with thresholds of a modified Cohen scale. Effects based on frequencies were expressed as hazard ratios and their magnitudes were inferred from intersection of confidence intervals with a novel scale of thresholds.The effects of FOs for treatment of pain or injury prevention were mostly trivial. FOs were not effective in treating or preventing patellofemoral pain syndrome. Some studies showed moderate effects for treatment of plantar fasciitis. Only a few studies showed moderate or large beneficial effects of FOs in preventing injuries.Customized semi-rigid FOs have moderate to large beneficial effects in treating and preventing plantar fasciitis and posterior tibial stress fractures, and small to moderate effects in treating patellofemoral pain syndrome. Given the limited randomized controlled trials or clinical controlled trials available for the injuries of interest, it may be that more or less benefit can be derived from the use of FOs, but many studies did not provide enough information for the standardized effect

  9. Stretching to prevent musculoskeletal injuries. An approach to workplace wellness.

    PubMed

    Gartley, Rosanna M; Prosser, J Lynn

    2011-06-01

    A pre-shift stretching protocol to reduce employee injuries was initiated at a beverage company and a tin mill in the northeastern United States. The primary goal of this study was to determine the effects of a pre-shift stretching program on work-related musculoskeletal injuries. A secondary goal was to evaluate daily participation compliance during the 90-day program. Data on employee injuries during the stretching program were collected and compared to injury events during the same time period 1 year earlier. Comparison to injury events of the total eligible population during the study time frame was also included. Results of this pilot program in terms of injury rate reduction and participant compliance are promising. Study results may be useful for employers considering implementing similar programs and also suggest the need for further study in this area.

  10. 78 FR 66938 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review Notice of Cancellation: This notice concerns.... Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, from October 1-16,...

  11. 78 FR 66937 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Capacity...), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the aforementioned SEP: Times and...

  12. 78 FR 66937 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review Notice of Cancellation: This notice concerns.... Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, from October 1-16,...

  13. 75 FR 28261 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Improved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Improved Diagnostics for Lyme Borreliosis, Funding Opportunity... Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces...

  14. 76 FR 9785 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Human...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Prevention Projects for Young...

  15. 75 FR 29561 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Surveillance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-26

    ... No: 2010-12627] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Surveillance, Natural... Officer, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office of the...

  16. 75 FR 78998 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Addressing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Addressing Global TB Prevention and Control in all Populations and Strengthening Health...

  17. Inpatient hospital outcomes following injury in Suriname: lessons for prevention.

    PubMed

    Pracht, Etienne

    2014-03-01

    Traumatic injury is an important and indiscriminant contributor to mortality. Hypothesizing that outcomes from severe injuries do not vary by demographic factors or socioeconomic status, this research analyzed the relationship between race, ethnicity, injury characteristics, and fatality following hospitalization in Suriname. Data were obtained for all hospital episodes in 2008 from the only hospital within the greater Paramaribo area that provides emergency department services. A logistic regression was used to analyze the subset of 544 non-elderly adult trauma victims to assess the contribution of patient demographics and anatomic injury severity to outcome, which was defined as mortality during acute hospitalization. The specific demographics included were patient age, gender, race, and insurance status. Injury severity was measured using the International Classification Injury Severity Score. The results indicate that age, insurance status, injury type, and injury severity were significant predictors for survival. While the uninsured experienced a higher rate of mortality, the model suggests this result is not due to physiologic reasons but behavioral and socioeconomic. The higher mortality is driven by greater injury severity, which increases not only the mortality rate but also the cost of care. Injury severity itself, independent of all other factors, is the most important contributor. The results suggest that a reduction of 10% in injury severity, around the mean, would reduce the probability of mortality by 70%. This suggests that targeting risk-taking behavior, perhaps relating to compliance with safety practices (e.g. seat belt and helmet laws), driver education, and road safety measures can play important roles in reducing mortality and morbidity from injury in Suriname.

  18. RESIDENTIAL BUILDING STAKEHOLDERS’ ATTITUDES AND BELIEFS REGARDING NAIL GUN INJURY RISKS AND PREVENTION

    PubMed Central

    ALBERS, JAMES T.; HUDOCK, STEPHEN D.; LOWE, BRIAN D.

    2015-01-01

    Pneumatic nail guns are ubiquitous at residential construction sites across the United States. These tools are noted for the traumatic injuries that can occur from their operation. Different trigger mechanisms on these tools are associated with different levels of risk. Residential building subcontractors and workers, both native-born and immigrant, were brought together in focus groups to discuss their attitudes and beliefs regarding risk factors for nail gun injury as well as barriers to the adoption of safer technology. Participants’ comments are organized first by influences on traumatic injury occurrence or prevention and later by sociotechnical system category. Participants attributed influences on injury risk to personal and external causation factors in all sociotechnical system categories; however, participants more frequently described influences on injury prevention as related to workers’ behaviors, rather than to external factors. A discussion of these influences with respect to attribution theory and sociotechnical models of injury causation is presented. PMID:24704813

  19. Prevention of iatrogenic inferior alveolar nerve injuries in relation to dental procedures.

    PubMed

    Renton, T

    2010-09-01

    This article aims to review current hypotheses on the aetiology and prevention of inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injuries in relation to dental procedures. The inferior alveolar nerve can be damaged during many dental procedures, including administration of local anaesthetic, implant bed preparation and placement, endodontics, third molar surgery and other surgical interventions. Damage to sensory nerves can result in anaesthesia, paraesthesia, pain, or a combination of the three. Pain is common in inferior alveolar nerve injuries, resulting in significant functional problems. The significant disability associated with these nerve injuries may also result in increasing numbers of medico-legal claims. Many of these iatrogenic nerve injuries can be avoided with careful patient assessment and planning. Furthermore, if the injury occurs there are emerging strategies that may facilitate recovery. The emphasis of this review is on how we may prevent these injuries and facilitate resolution in the early post surgical phase.

  20. Residential building stakeholders' attitudes and beliefs regarding nail gun injury risks and prevention.

    PubMed

    Albers, James T; Hudock, Stephen D; Lowe, Brian D

    2013-01-01

    Pneumatic nail guns are ubiquitous at residential construction sites across the United States. These tools are noted for the traumatic injuries that can occur from their operation. Different trigger mechanisms on these tools are associated with different levels of risk. Residential building subcontractors and workers, both native-born and immigrant, were brought together in focus groups to discuss their attitudes and beliefs regarding risk factors for nail gun injury as well as barriers to the adoption of safer technology. Participants' comments are organized first by influences on traumatic injury occurrence or prevention and later by sociotechnical system category. Participants attributed influences on injury risk to personal and external causation factors in all sociotechnical system categories; however, participants more frequently described influences on injury prevention as related to workers' behaviors, rather than to external factors. A discussion of these influences with respect to attribution theory and sociotechnical models of injury causation is presented.

  1. Distracted driving and implications for injury prevention in adults.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Jane; Grell, Jennifer; Lohrman, Nicole; Stehly, Christy; Stoltzfus, Jill; Wainwright, Gail; Hoff, William S

    2013-01-01

    Distracted driving, a significant public safety issue, is typically categorized as cell phone use and texting. The increase of distracted driving behavior (DDB) has resulted in an increase in injury and death. The purpose of this study was to identify the frequency and perception of DDB in adults. A 7-question SurveyMonkey questionnaire was distributed to a convenience sample of adults. Standard demographics included age, gender, and highest levels of education. Primary outcome questions were related to frequency of DDB, and overall perceptions specific to distracted driving. Results were compared on the basis of demographics. Chi-square testing and the Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance were applied, with statistical significance defined as P ≤ .05. There were 1857 respondents to the survey: 1721 were aged 23-64 years (93%); 1511 were women (81%); 1461 had high school education or greater (79%). A total of 168 respondents (9%) reported being involved in a car accident while distracted. The highest reported frequency of DDB included cell phone use (69%), eating/drinking (67%), and reaching for an object in the care (49%). Younger age (18-34 years) and higher level of education (bachelor's degree or greater) were statistically associated with these DDB; gender demonstrated no statistical significance. Text messaging was reported by 538 respondents (29%), with a statistically significant association with age (18-34 years), higher education (bachelor's degree or greater), and gender (males). A total of 1143 respondents (63%) believed that they could drive safely while distracted. This study demonstrates that DDB in adults is not restricted to reading and sending text messages. Moreover, these results indicated that people fail to perceive the dangers inherent in distracted driving. Prevention and outreach education should not be limited to texting and cell phone use but should target all forms of DDB. The age group 18-34 years should be the primary target in the

  2. Football injuries in children and adolescent players: are there clues for prevention?

    PubMed

    Faude, Oliver; Rößler, Roland; Junge, Astrid

    2013-09-01

    Football (soccer) is the world's most popular sport with most players being younger than 18 years. Playing football can induce beneficial health effects, but there is also a high risk of injury. Therefore, it is necessary to implement measures for preventing injuries. The present review analyzes and summarizes published scientific information on the incidence and characteristics of football injuries in children and adolescent players to arrive at sound conclusions and valid considerations for the development of injury-prevention programs. A literature search was conducted up to November 2012. Fifty-three relevant scientific publications were detected. Thirty-two studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria for pooled analysis. Additional information from the remaining 21 studies was considered where appropriate to obtain a broader perspective on the injury problem in children and youth football. Training injury incidence was nearly constant for players aged 13-19 years, ranging from 1 to 5 injuries per 1,000 h training. Match injury incidence tended to increase with age through all age groups, with an average incidence of about 15 to 20 injuries per 1,000 match hours in players older than 15 years. Between 60 and 90 % of all football injuries were classified as traumatic and about 10-40 % were overuse injuries. Most injuries (60-90 %) were located at the lower extremities with the ankle, knee, and thigh being mostly affected. The frequency of upper-extremity and head/face injuries was higher in those studies that analyzed match injuries only. The most common injury types were strains, sprains, and contusions (10 up to 40 % each). There is some evidence that the risk of traumatic injuries and, in particular, of sustaining a fracture, contusion, or concussion was higher during match play than in practice sessions. Fractures were more frequent in children younger than 15 years than in older players. About half of all time-loss injuries led to an absence from sport of less

  3. THE CLINICAL UTILITY OF FUNCTIONAL PERFORMANCE TESTS WITHIN ONE-YEAR POST-ACL RECONSTRUCTION: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Narducci, Elizabeth; Waltz, Amanda; Gorski, Katheryn; Leppla, Lucas

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: A tear of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) represents a significant injury for an athlete that requires substantial time away from sport, and significant rehabilitation after reconstruction. The physical therapist is responsible to determine when a patient is capable of tolerating the physical demands of daily activities and to attempt to prevent re-injury. Physical or functional performance tests (FPTs) are one mechanism used to evaluate the athlete's physical skills and capabilities prior to returning to sports participation. The purpose of this systematic review is to critically examine the clinical utility of functional performance tests used with patients less than or equal to one year post ACL reconstruction. Methods: A systematic review of the relevant literature was performed using PRISMA guidelines. A total of twelve studies were included for analysis. Results: Two independent blinded reviewers then analyzed and rated the final included articles (n=12) utilizing the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS). Percent overall agreement between raters for the NOS was 88% with a fixed-marginal kappa (κ) of 0.80. Of the 12 included articles, the FPTs were utilized as an outcome measure within the study design (41.7%) or studied as a measure of function (58.3%). Among those studies that used FPTs as a “measure of function” 71.4% studied a battery of FPTs, while 28.6% studied a single test. None of the studies utilized FPTs as a measure to determine readiness to return to sport. Discussion: FPTs are being utilized with patients, less than or equal to one year post ACL reconstruction, either as an assessment of functional performance or as an outcome measure. No studies identified a FPT or test battery that has construct or predictive validity for “return to sport” in athletic population one-year post-ACL reconstruction. The identification of the critical elements within the return to sport construct may allow lower extremity performance tests to be

  4. Examination of Interventions to Prevent Common Lower-Limb Injuries in the New Zealand Defense Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Davidson, PhD*; Suzanne J. Wilson, MSc*; David J. Chalmers, PhD*; Barry D. Wilson, PhDf; Lt Col David McBnde, RNZAMCf ABSTRACT The biomechanical ...force. Stability training is low cost and has the ability to address the biomechanical mechanisms of several lower-limb injuries. However, it requires... biomechanical mechanism of the injury, an effective injury prevention strategy must take into account the particular requirements of the user group.’ In

  5. The child and adolescent athlete: a review of three potentially serious injuries.

    PubMed

    Caine, Dennis; Purcell, Laura; Maffulli, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    The increased participation of children and adolescents in organized sports worldwide is a welcome trend given evidence of lower physical fitness and increased prevalence of overweight in this population. However, the increased sports activity of children from an early age and continued through the years of growth, against a background of their unique vulnerability to injury, gives rise to concern about the risk and severity of injury. Three types of injury-anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, concussion, and physeal injury - are considered potentially serious given their frequency, potential for adverse long-term health outcomes, and escalating healthcare costs. Concussion is probably the hottest topic in sports injury currently with voracious media coverage and exploding research interest. Given the negative cognitive effects of concussion, it has the potential to have a great impact on children and adolescents during their formative years and potentially impair school achievement and, if concussion management is not managed appropriately, there can be long term negative impact on cognitive development and ability to resume sports participation. Sudden and gradual onset physeal injury is a unique injury to the pediatric population which can adversely affect growth if not managed correctly. Although data are lacking, the frequency of stress-related physeal injury appears to be increasing. If mismanaged, physeal injuries can also lead to long-term complications which could negatively affect ability to participate in sports. Management of ACL injuries is an area of controversy and if not managed appropriately, can affect long-term growth and recovery as well as the ability to participate in sports. This article considers the young athlete's vulnerability to injury, with special reference to ACL injury, concussion, and physeal injury, and reviews current research on epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of these injury types. This article is intended

  6. Emergency presentations by vulnerable road users: implications for injury prevention

    PubMed Central

    Meuleners, L B; Lee, A H; Haworth, C

    2006-01-01

    Most emergency presentations by vulnerable road users were the result of collisions that did not involve a motor vehicle. Many injuries occurred off‐road without police attendance. Hence, reliance on official police records would underestimate the magnitude and scope of these injuries. Suggestions to provide a safer road environment are given. PMID:16461413

  7. Preventing Vision Loss from Blast Injuries with Regenerative Biomaterial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    Cornea , Blast Injury, Silk, Biomaterial dbarbut@gmail.com 12 Table of Contents...Americans sustain traumatic injuries to the cornea each year, and over 4 million Americans undergo surgery that leaves the cornea wounded annually. Such...few pennies. This will result in a less expensive procedure for treating cornea trauma resulting in millions in savings to the American health care

  8. Hazard Patterns and Injury Prevention with Infant Walkers and Strollers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wishon, Phillip M.; And Others

    Mindful of the potential hazards associated with products intended for young children, this article examines pediatric accidents involving strollers and walkers. According to the latest figures available from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System of the United States (NEISS), more than 11,800 stroller injuries in 1987 were serious…

  9. PATIENT-SPECIFIC AND SURGERY-SPECIFIC FACTORS THAT AFFECT RETURN TO SPORT AFTER ACL RECONSTRUCTION

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Andrew; Rabuck, Stephen; Lynch, Brittany; Davin, Sarah; Irrgang, James

    2016-01-01

    Context Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is frequently performed to allow individuals to return to their pre-injury levels of sports participation, however, return to pre-injury level of sport is poor and re-injury rates are unacceptably high. Re-injury is likely associated with the timeframe and guidelines for return to sport (RTS). It is imperative for clinicians to recognize risk factors for re-injury and to ensure that modifiable risk factors are addressed prior to RTS. The purpose of this commentary is to summarize the current literature on the outcomes following return to sport after ACL reconstruction and to outline the biologic and patient-specific factors that should be considered when counseling an athlete on their progression through rehabilitation. Evidence Acquisition A comprehensive literature search was performed to identify RTS criteria and RTS rates after ACL reconstruction with consideration paid to graft healing, anatomic reconstruction, and risk factors for re-injury and revision. Results were screened for relevant original research articles and review articles, from which results were summarized. Study Design Clinical Review of the Literature Results Variable RTS rates are presented in the literature due to variable definitions of RTS ranging from a high threshold (return to competition) to low threshold (physician clearance for return to play). Re-injury and contralateral injury rates are greater than the risk for primary ACL injury, which may be related to insufficient RTS guidelines based on time from surgery, which do not allow for proper healing or resolution of post-operative impairments and elimination of risk factors associated with both primary and secondary ACL injuries. Conclusions RTS rates to pre-injury level of activity after ACLR are poor and the risk for graft injury or contralateral injury requiring an additional surgery is substantial. Resolving impairments while eliminating movement patterns associated with

  10. Prevention of lung injury in cardiac surgery: a review.

    PubMed

    Young, Robert W

    2014-06-01

    Inflammatory lung injury is an inevitable consequence of cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. The lungs are particularly susceptible to the effects of the systemic inflammatory response to cardiopulmonary bypass. This insult is further exacerbated by a pulmonary ischemia-reperfusion injury after termination of bypass. Older patients and those with pre-existing lung disease will clearly be less tolerant of any lung injury and more likely to develop respiratory failure in the postoperative period. A requirement for prolonged ventilation has implications for morbidity, mortality, and cost of treatment. This review contains a summary of recent interventions and changes of practice that may reduce inflammatory lung injury after cardiac surgery. The review also focuses on a number of general aspects of perioperative management, which may exacerbate such injury, if performed poorly.

  11. 77 FR 18973 - Reinforced Concrete in Construction, and Preventing Backover Injuries and Fatalities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-29

    ... Reinforced Concrete in Construction, and Preventing Backover Injuries and Fatalities AGENCY: Occupational... aware of employee safety risks in two areas, reinforcing operations in concrete work (construction only... following methods (submissions relating to Reinforced Concrete in Construction to Docket No....

  12. Preventing Unintentional Firearm Injury in Children: The Need for Behavioral Skills Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Himle, Michael B.; Miltenberger, Raymond G.

    2004-01-01

    Unintentional firearm injury in children is a problem in the United States that warrants attention. Recent research has identified several risk factors for such injuries and has developed prevention strategies for reducing their occurrence. Many of these programs, however, have not been evaluated or have been shown to be ineffective. Research on…

  13. Primary Care Opportunities to Prevent Unintentional Home Injuries: A Focus on Children and Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Eileen M.; Mack, Karin; Shields, Wendy C.; Lee, Robin P.; Gielen, Andrea C.

    2016-01-01

    Unintentional injuries are a persistent public health problem in the United States. A new health care landscape has the potential to create a clinical environment that fosters greater involvement by health care providers in injury prevention. The aim of this article is to provide evidence supporting the need for engagement by primary care providers in unintentional home injury prevention along with examples of how this could be accomplished. We know a great deal about what population groups are at risk for certain types of injuries. We also know that many injuries can be prevented through policies, programs, and resources that ensure safe environments and promote safe behaviors. For example, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s STEADI (Stopping Elderly Accidents, Deaths, and Injuries) initiative comprises clinical decision support tools and educational materials for health care providers. Two effective interventions that have demonstrated a reduction in falls among children are the redesign of baby walkers (engineering) and the mandated use of window guards (enforcement). Primary care clinicians can play a key role in promoting their patient’s safety. Taken collectively, a focused attention on preventing unintentional home injuries by primary care providers can contribute to the reduction of injuries and result in optimal health for all. PMID:27141210

  14. Traumatic Brain Injury: A Look at Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VSA Educational Services, Washington, DC. Resource Center on Substance Abuse Prevention and Disability.

    This leaflet examines alcohol and other drug abuse prevention for individuals with traumatic brain injury. The characteristics and incidence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) are noted. The implications of alcohol and other drug use are discussed, emphasizing that TBI is often related to lifestyles where alcohol and other drug abuse and risk taking…

  15. ACL reconstruction in children: a transphyseal technique.

    PubMed

    Lemaitre, G; Salle de Chou, E; Pineau, V; Rochcongar, G; Delforge, S; Bronfen, C; Haumont, T; Hulet, C

    2014-06-01

    The annual incidence of ACL tears is increasing steadily in pediatric patients. Chronic anterior instability causes meniscal lesions at a frequency that increases significantly with the injury-to-surgery interval. Conservative therapy, simple suturing, and isolated extra-articular tendon reconstruction are associated with high failure rates. Intra-articular arthroscopy-assisted tendon reconstruction is a good treatment method, although several different techniques have been described. We used a transphyseal technique with a hamstring tendon graft to treat 14 knees in 13 patients with a mean age of 13 years and 7 months. Mean injury-to-surgery interval was 6 months. Strict compliance with technical rules is required when using this technique. Bone tunnel diameter must not exceed 8 mm. Bone tunnels must be as vertical and central as possible. The fixation material must not bridge the physis (at the femur, cortical fixation; and at the tibia, fixation using a resorbable screw no longer than 25 mm combined with a staple). Meniscal lesions were present in half the knees and meniscal preservation considered mandatory. Conservative treatment of concomitant lesions was performed routinely. After a mean follow-up of 15 months, no recurrent tears or revision procedures for meniscectomy had been recorded. The IKDC grade was A or B in 93% of knees. The mean subjective IKDC score was 83.3 and the Lysholm score was in the excellent or good range in 93% of knees. Of the 14 knees, 2 exhibited signs suggesting femoral epiphysiodesis, with 4° of valgus deformity compared to the contra-lateral knee and no clinical consequences. Transphyseal reconstruction with open physes conducted in strict compliance with technical rules can be performed to control the instability and preserve the menisci. Nevertheless, this technique carries a risk of epiphysiodesis, chiefly at the femur.

  16. Child unintentional injury prevention in Eastern Mediterranean Region

    PubMed Central

    Soori, Hamid; Khodakarim, Soheila

    2016-01-01

    Background: Unintentional injuries are one of the leading causes of death and disability among children in Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR). The issue of child injuries in the EMR is a major public health concern. Objectives: This study aimed to present the epidemiological pattern of children's unintentional injuries in this region and compare the results for the EMR member states and the global status based on the findings of the World Report. Materials and Methods: This is a secondary analysis and focuses on unintentional injuries specifically road traffic injuries, drowning, burns, falls and poisoning, and adjusted for countries from EMR. Results: About 12% of all deaths due to unintentional injuries taking place globally under the age of 20 years took place in EMR with 113 327 deaths which is about 19% higher than the world rate (45.5 Vs. 38.8 per 100 000). In EMR the top five leading causes of death due to childhood unintentional injuries are reported to be from road traffic injuries (17.4 per 100 000), drowning (6.8 per 100 000), burns (4.5 per 100 000), falls (2.9 per 100 000) and poisoning (1.6 per 100 000). Estimated mortality showed that boys were more likely to be killed than girls. However, there was no significant difference for by age group. Conclusions: Injuries are the leading cause of death and disability among children in the EMR and that injury programmes focusing on major risk factors need to be integrated into other child health strategies, with ministries of health playing a pivotal role. PMID:27051620

  17. Paralympic athletes' perceptions of their experiences of sports-related injuries, risk factors and preventive possibilities.

    PubMed

    Fagher, Kristina; Forsberg, Anna; Jacobsson, Jenny; Timpka, Toomas; Dahlström, Örjan; Lexell, Jan

    2016-11-01

    Our knowledge of sports-related injuries in para-sport is limited and there are no data on how Paralympic athletes themselves perceive an injury. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore Paralympic athletes' perceptions of their experiences of sports-related injuries, risk factors and preventive possibilities. Eighteen Swedish Paralympic athletes with vision impairment, intellectual impairment, spinal cord injury, cerebral palsy, myelomeningocele, dysplasia and neuromuscular disorder, representing 10 different para-sports, were interviewed. The qualitative phenomenographic method was used to interpret the data. The analysis revealed nine categories of perceptions of experiences. The athletes perceived that their impairments were involved in the cause and consequential chains associated with a sports-related injury. Other categories that denoted and described these injuries were: sport overuse, risk behaviour, functional limitations, psychological stressors, the normalised pain, health hazards, individual possibilities to prevent sports-related injuries and unequal prerequisites. This qualitative study revealed that Paralympic athletes' perceptions of their experiences of sports-related injuries are complex and multifactorial, and in several ways differ from able-bodied athletes. This needs to be considered in the sports health and safety work within the Paralympic Movement as well as in the design of future injury surveillance systems and preventive programmes.

  18. Interaction of potential intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors in ACL injured recreational female skiers.

    PubMed

    Ruedl, G; Ploner, P; Linortner, I; Schranz, A; Fink, C; Patterson, C; Nachbauer, W; Burtscher, M

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction of potential intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors in ACL injured recreational female skiers. 93 female recreational skiers who had suffered a non-contact ACL injury and 93 age-matched controls completed a self-reported questionnaire relating to intrinsic risk factors (menstrual history, BMI, previous knee injuries, self reported weekly sports participation) and extrinsic risk factors (type of ski used, time of last binding adjustment, snow condition, weather and slope difficulty). A logistic regression model revealed the following independent ACL injury risk factors for female recreational skiers: icy snow conditions (odds ratio, 24.33; 95% confidence interval, 6.8-86.5, P<0.001), skiing during snowfall (odds ratio, 16.63; 95% confidence interval, 1.8-152.1, P=0.013), use of traditional skis (odds ratio, 10.49; 95% confidence interval, 2.0-54.5, P=0.005), and preovulatory phase of menstrual cycle (odds ratio, 2.59; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-5.5, P=0.013). In conclusion, ACL injuries in female recreational skiers are the result of a complex interaction of intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors.

  19. Epidemiology, Treatment, and Prevention of Lumbar Spine Injuries in Major League Baseball Players.

    PubMed

    Camp, Christopher L; Conti, Matthew S; Sgroi, Terrance; Cammisa, Frank P; Dines, Joshua S

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, increased attention has been paid to injuries occurring in Major League Baseball (MLB) players. Although most of the current orthopedic literature regarding baseball injuries pertains to the shoulder and elbow, lumbar spine injuries are another common reason for time out of play. Back and core injuries may represent as many as 12% of all injuries that result in time out of play from MLB. This high rate of injury is likely related to the critical role that the spine plays in every major baseball-related movement. Linking the upper extremities to the hips and lower extremities, a healthy, strong, and stable spine and core is a prerequisite for performance in all levels of baseball. It has been well documented that baseball players with poor spinal control and stabilization are at increased risk for future injury. Common etiologies of lumbar injuries include stress fractures, muscle injury, annular tears with or without disc herniation, facet joint pain, sacroiliac joint pain, and stenosis. This review discusses the epidemiology of spinal injuries in baseball. Special attention is paid to the role of the spine in baseball-related activities, common injuries, tips for making the correct diagnosis, treatment options, outcomes, rehabilitation, and injury prevention.

  20. Barriers and Enablers to Enacting Child and Youth Related Injury Prevention Legislation in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Rothman, Linda; Pike, Ian; Belton, Kathy; Olsen, Lise; Fuselli, Pam; Macpherson, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Injury prevention policy is crucial for the safety of Canada’s children; however legislation is not adopted uniformly across the country. This study aimed to identify key barriers and enablers to enacting injury prevention legislation. Purposive snowball sampling identified individuals involved in injury prevention throughout Canada. An online survey asked respondents to identify policies that were relevant to them, and whether legislation existed in their province. Respondents rated the importance of barriers or enablers using a 5-point Likert type scale and included open-ended comments. Fifty-seven respondents identified the most common injury topics: bicycle helmets (44, 77%), cell phone-distracted driving (36, 63%), booster seats (28, 49%), ski helmets (24, 42%), and graduated driver’s licensing (21, 37%). The top enablers were research/surveillance, managerial/political support and professional group consultation, with much variability between injury topics. Open-ended comments emphasized the importance of a united opinion as an enabler and barriers included costs of protective equipment and inadequate enforcement of legislation. The results highlighted the importance of strategies that include research, management and community collaboration and that injury prevention topics should be addressed individually as information may be lost if topics are considered together. Findings can inform the process of turning injury prevention evidence into action. PMID:27399745

  1. The Importance of Physical Fitness for Injury Prevention: Part 2.

    PubMed

    Knapik, Joseph J

    2015-01-01

    This report examines associations between injuries and flexibility, stretching, warm-up, and body composition. Military studies show that either too much or too little flexibility increases injury risk. Static stretching prior to exercise does not appear to reduce the overall injury incidence, although further research is needed on some types of injuries. Static stretching also appears to reduce strength and power (explosive strength). Warm-up (low intensity activity prior to exercise or sports) appears to reduce injury risk. Body mass index (BMI; weight in kg/ height in m²) is a surrogate measure of body fat because it is highly related to laboratory measures of body fat. However, Soldiers can also have a high BMI because of higher muscle mass. If high BMI reflects a larger percentage of body fat relative to height, injury risk might be increased because the additional fat would increase the intensity of physical activity, leading to more rapid fatigue and repetitive stress on the musculoskeletal system. Low BMI could reflect a paucity of fat or muscle/ bone, or both. Low BMI may make Soldiers more susceptible to injury if they lack the muscle mass or strength in the supportive structures (ligaments, bones) required to perform certain physical tasks, and if they overexert or overuse the available muscle mass or supportive structures. Studies in basic combat training show that both high and low BMI increases injury risk. However, studies among active duty Soldiers only show that injury risk increases as BMI increases, possibly because very few active duty Soldiers have very low BMI (i.e., less than 18 kg/m²).

  2. 50 CFR 648.290 - Tilefish Annual Catch Limit (ACL).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... detailed review of fishery performance relative to the sector ACLs at least every 5 years. (1) If the ACL... recommendations to the MAFMC for changes in measures intended to ensure ACLs are not as frequently exceeded. (2...) Performance reviews shall not substitute for annual reviews that occur to ascertain if prior year ACLs...

  3. 50 CFR 648.290 - Tilefish Annual Catch Limit (ACL).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... detailed review of fishery performance relative to the sector ACLs at least every 5 years. (1) If the ACL... recommendations to the MAFMC for changes in measures intended to ensure ACLs are not as frequently exceeded. (2...) Performance reviews shall not substitute for annual reviews that occur to ascertain if prior year ACLs...

  4. 50 CFR 648.290 - Tilefish Annual Catch Limit (ACL).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... detailed review of fishery performance relative to the sector ACLs at least every 5 years. (1) If the ACL... recommendations to the MAFMC for changes in measures intended to ensure ACLs are not as frequently exceeded. (2...) Performance reviews shall not substitute for annual reviews that occur to ascertain if prior year ACLs...

  5. What makes community based injury prevention work? In search of evidence of effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Nilsen, P

    2004-01-01

    Community based injury prevention work has become a widely accepted strategy among safety promotion specialists. Hundreds of community based injury prevention programs have been implemented since the mid-1970s, but relatively few have been evaluated rigorously, resulting in a lack of consensus regarding the effectiveness of this approach. This study sought to identify key components that contribute to the effectiveness of these programs. The objective was to gain a better understanding of the community based model for injury prevention. The study was performed as a structured review of existing evaluations of injury prevention programs that employed multiple strategies to target different age groups, environments, and situations. The results of this study suggested that there are complex relationships between the outcome and the context, structure, and process of community-wide injury prevention programs. The interconnectedness of these variables made it difficult to provide solid evidence to prioritise in terms of program effectiveness. The evaluations of multifaceted community oriented injury prevention programs were found to have many shortcomings. Meagre descriptions of community characteristics and conditions, insufficient assessment of structural program components, and failure to establish process-outcome relationships contributed to the difficulty of identifying key success factors of the programs. PMID:15470005

  6. Inferior epigastric artery: Surface anatomy, prevention and management of injury.

    PubMed

    Wong, Clare; Merkur, Harry

    2016-04-01

    The anatomical position of the inferior epigastric artery (IEA) subjects it to risk of injury during abdominal procedures that are close to the artery, such as laparoscopic trocar insertion, insertion of intra-abdominal drains, Tenckhoff(®) catheter (peritoneal dialysis catheter) and paracentesis. This article aims to raise the awareness of the anatomical variations of the course of the IEA in relation to abdominal landmarks in order to define a safer zone for laparoscopic ancillary trocar placement. Methods of managing the IEA injury as well as techniques to minimise the risk of injury to the IEA are reviewed and discussed.

  7. The child and adolescent athlete: a review of three potentially serious injuries

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The increased participation of children and adolescents in organized sports worldwide is a welcome trend given evidence of lower physical fitness and increased prevalence of overweight in this population. However, the increased sports activity of children from an early age and continued through the years of growth, against a background of their unique vulnerability to injury, gives rise to concern about the risk and severity of injury. Three types of injury–anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, concussion, and physeal injury – are considered potentially serious given their frequency, potential for adverse long-term health outcomes, and escalating healthcare costs. Concussion is probably the hottest topic in sports injury currently with voracious media coverage and exploding research interest. Given the negative cognitive effects of concussion, it has the potential to have a great impact on children and adolescents during their formative years and potentially impair school achievement and, if concussion management is not managed appropriately, there can be long term negative impact on cognitive development and ability to resume sports participation. Sudden and gradual onset physeal injury is a unique injury to the pediatric population which can adversely affect growth if not managed correctly. Although data are lacking, the frequency of stress-related physeal injury appears to be increasing. If mismanaged, physeal injuries can also lead to long-term complications which could negatively affect ability to participate in sports. Management of ACL injuries is an area of controversy and if not managed appropriately, can affect long-term growth and recovery as well as the ability to participate in sports. This article considers the young athlete’s vulnerability to injury, with special reference to ACL injury, concussion, and physeal injury, and reviews current research on epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of these injury types. This article is

  8. Back injury prevention: a lift team success story.

    PubMed

    Hefti, Kelly S; Farnham, Richard J; Docken, Lisa; Bentaas, Ruth; Bossman, Sharon; Schaefer, Jill

    2003-06-01

    Work related back injuries among hospital personnel account for high volume, high cost workers' compensation claims. These injuries can be life altering experiences, affecting both the personal and professional lives of injured workers. Lifting must be viewed as a skill involving specialized training and mandated use of mechanical equipment, rather than as a random task performed by numerous health care providers. The use of a lift team specially trained in body mechanics, lifting techniques, and the use of mandated mechanical equipment can significantly affect injury data, financial outcomes, and employee satisfaction. The benefits of a lift team extend beyond the effect on injury and financial outcomes--they can be used for recruitment and retention strategies, and team members serve as mentors to others by demonstrating safe lifting techniques. Ultimately, a lift team helps protect a valuable resource--the health care worker.

  9. Prevention of Overuse Injuries in Young Baseball Pitchers

    PubMed Central

    Parks, Eric D.; Ray, Tracy R.

    2009-01-01

    With millions of athletes participating in baseball in the United States annually, overuse injuries are common occurrences. Epidemiological studies, including surveys of orthopaedic surgeons, coaches, and athletes, indicate that injuries such as those to the ulnar collateral ligament are increasing in incidence. Many risk factors for throwing injuries have been proposed—including the immature skeleton, throwing mechanics, glenohumeral internal rotation deficit, pitch type, velocity, and counts—but little evidence is available to support the majority of these factors. Recent studies have shown that pitch volume and overuse are central factors that lead to shoulder and elbow injuries in the young throwing athlete. Pitching while fatigued and in spite of arm pain has also been implicated. PMID:23015915

  10. Proposed national strategies for the prevention of leading work-related diseases and injuries. Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Preliminary strategies developed at the National Symposium on the Prevention of Leading Work Related Diseases and Injuries, held in Atlanta, Georgia on May 1 to 3, 1985 were revised, elaborated, and further developed. Strategies were developed for the prevention of occupational lung diseases, musculoskeletal injuries, occupational cancers, severe occupational traumatic injuries, and occupational cardiovascular diseases. Lung diseases considered included silicosis, asbestosis, lung cancer mesothelioma, coal workers' pneumoconiosis, byssinosis, occupational asthma, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, asphyxiation, irritation, pulmonary edema, brucellosis, psitticosis, anthrax, mycobacterioses, histoplasmosis, aspergillosis, and coccidioidomycosis. Occupational cancers were discussed as they occur in the lung, pleura, peritoneum, bladder, kidneys, blood, nasal cavity, skin, nasal sinuses, and liver.

  11. Prevention of Football Injuries: A Review of the Literature

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    prophylactic double upright knee orthosis by Division I collegiate football players from the Iowa State University during the period of 1979 to...Jt Dis 59(4):201-210. 36. Brodersen, M.P., Symanowski, J.T. 1993. “Use of a double upright knee orthosis prophylactically to decrease...Prophylactic double upright knee orthosis Brace=503 Non brace=273 - Overall knee injury: nonbraced: 44% braced: 26% - Knee injury severity (time

  12. Preventing Vision Loss from Blast Injuries with Regenerative Biomaterial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    addition, eye injury is the number one cause of field evacuation in the military. Corneal wounds cause intense pain and may lead to blindness...depending on the severity of injury. Seryx’s regenerative biomaterial accelerates corneal healing and soothes the damaged surface by providing a coating...immortalized human corneal -limbal epithelial (HCLE) cell line. HCLE cells were grown to confluence in culture, and the media was then supplemented

  13. Prevention of Infections Associated with Combat-Related Burn Injuries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    microbial flora.19–22 Gram-positive skin flora such as Streptococcus pyogenes and Staphylococcus aureus reside deep within skin appendages and colonize...such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae , and Escherichia coli, colonize the wound within the first 48 hours to 72 hours after injury.19,20...bacterial microorganisms that colonize the burn wound surface after injury, S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, and K. pneumoniae are the most likely to result

  14. Injury prevention target groups in soccer: injury characteristics and incidence rates in male junior and senior players.

    PubMed

    Schmikli, Sandor L; de Vries, Wouter R; Inklaar, Han; Backx, Frank J G

    2011-05-01

    To identify target groups for injury prevention in male amateur soccer players under 35 years of age. A computer-assisted telephone survey with a 12-month recall period for injuries in a representative sample of Dutch citizens from the Injuries and Physical Activity Netherlands (IPAN)-database. A comparison of the volume of soccer injuries, the incidence and the need for medical attention per level of exposure and age category. The incidence in seniors was twice that of juniors (17.5% versus 8.1%; odds ratio (OR=2.4). In juniors the overall incidence was lowest in the category with the least amount of soccer exposure time (0-3 h: 2.9%; 3-5 h: 13.0%; 5+ h: 12.3%). A comparable result was found in seniors: (0-3 h: 12.0%; 3-5 h: 21.6%; 5+ h: 21.5%). Within each level of soccer exposure, a different incidence was found in juniors and seniors (0-3 h: OR=4.6; 3-5 h: OR=1.8; 5+ h: OR=1.9). Ankle, knee and upper leg injuries were most common (59.9%). Contusions, strains and sprains dominated (78.1%). Body region and type of injuries were similar in both age categories. Medical treatment for injuries was equally necessary in both age groups. Senior male amateur soccer players and particularly the more skilled seniors (involved in soccer at least 3 h per week), should be primarily targeted for studies on injury risk factors and prevention programs.

  15. Training on a knife's edge: how to balance triathlon training to prevent overuse injuries.

    PubMed

    Bales, James; Bales, Karrn

    2012-12-01

    The sport of triathlon offers athletes the chance to build and/or maintain cardiovascular fitness across 3 endurance disciplines. Swimming, biking, and running each have a host of overuse injuries that can occur as a result of overtraining. High running mileage, a history of previous injury, inadequate warm up or cool down, and an increase in the years of triathlon experience are a few of the factors that have been linked to triathlon overuse injuries. Early identification of overtraining symptoms and a corresponding reallocation of balance between each discipline, perhaps with an emphasis on increasing swimming, may help prevent many overuse injuries.

  16. Hamstring exercises for track and field athletes: injury and exercise biomechanics, and possible implications for exercise selection and primary prevention.

    PubMed

    Malliaropoulos, Nikos; Mendiguchia, Jurdan; Pehlivanidis, Hercules; Papadopoulou, Sofia; Valle, Xavier; Malliaras, Peter; Maffulli, Nicola

    2012-09-01

    Hamstring strain injuries are the most prevalent muscle injuries in track and field (TF). These injuries often cause prolonged symptoms and a high risk of re-injury. Strengthening of the hamstring muscles has been recommended for injury prevention. The authors review the possible role of eccentric training in TF hamstring injury prevention and introduce exercise classification criteria to guide clinicians in designing strengthening programmes adapted to TF. The principles exposed may serve as a foundation for future development and application of new eccentric programmes to decrease the high incidence of this type of injury in other sports.

  17. [Injuries, accidents and mortality in epilepsy: a review of its prevalence risk factors and prevention].

    PubMed

    Téllez-Zenteno, José Francisco; Nguyen, Rita; Hernádez-Ronquillo, Lizbeth

    2010-01-01

    Currently, there is intense clinical research into various aspects of the medical risks relating to epilepsy, including total and cause-specific mortality, accidents and injuries in patients with epilepsy and mortality related with seizures. Submersion injuries, motor vehicle accidents, burns, and head injuries are among the most feared epilepsy-related injuries. Published risk factors for injuries include the number of antiepileptic drugs, history of generalized seizures, and seizure frequency. In general, studies focusing on populations with more severe forms of epilepsy tend to report substantially higher risks of injuries than those involving less selected populations. On the other hand, studies based in non selected populations of people with epilepsy have not shown an increase frequency of injuries in people with epilepsy compared with the general population. Some studies have shown that patients with epilepsy are more frequently admitted to the hospital following an injury. Possible explanations include are more cautious attitude of clinicians toward injuries occurring in the setting of seizures; hospitalization required because of seizures and not to the injuries themselves; and hospitalization driven by other issues, such as comorbidities, which are highly prevalent in patients with epilepsy. This article reviews information about specific type of injuries such as fractures, burns, concussions, dislocations, etc. Finally this article review in a comprehensive way information of mortality in patients with epilepsy. Aspects of mortality discussed in this review are: epidemiology, causes of mortality, sudden death in epilepsy and prevention measures.

  18. Equestrian injury is costly, disabling, and frequently preventable: the imperative for improved safety awareness.

    PubMed

    Guyton, Kristina; Houchen-Wise, Emily; Peck, Ellen; Mayberry, John

    2013-01-01

    Horse-related injury can be severe and disabling. We investigated the causes, severity, and costs of equestrian injury with the goal of injury prevention. A retrospective review of horse-related injuries from 2001 to 2008 identified 231 patients with a mean age of 38 years and a mean Injury Severity Score of 11 (range, 1 to 45). Mean length of stay was 5.5 days. Fifty-nine patients (25%) required 84 surgeries. Helmet use was 20 per cent and of the 172 patients not wearing a helmet while mounted, 38 per cent received potentially preventable head injuries. There were three deaths of which two were the result of intracranial hemorrhage in riders not wearing a helmet. Mean hospital charge was $29,800 for a total of $6.9 million. Ninety-one patients completed a survey regarding causation and disability. Thirty-four per cent reported wearing a helmet at the time of injury. Forty per cent reported that poor environmental factors contributed, 30 per cent reported poor horse and rider pairing, and 9 per cent reported equipment failure. Fifty-nine per cent reported long-term disabilities. Compared with the general population, respondents had diminution in their ability to perform usual daily activities associated with physical problems, diminution in social function, and higher bodily pain. We conclude that equestrian injury is costly, disabling, and frequently preventable.

  19. Prevention of shoulder injuries in overhead athletes: a science-based approach

    PubMed Central

    Cools, Ann M.; Johansson, Fredrik R.; Borms, Dorien; Maenhout, Annelies

    2015-01-01

    The shoulder is at high risk for injury during overhead sports, in particular in throwing or hitting activities, such as baseball, tennis, handball, and volleyball. In order to create a scientific basis for the prevention of recurrent injuries in overhead athletes, four steps need to be undertaken: (1) risk factors for injury and re-injury need to be defined; (2) established risk factors may be used as return-to-play criteria, with cut-off values based on normative databases; (3) these variables need to be measured using reliable, valid assessment tools and procedures; and (4) preventative training programs need to be designed and implemented into the training program of the athlete in order to prevent re-injury. In general, three risk factors have been defined that may form the basis for recommendations for the prevention of recurrent injury and return to play after injury: glenohumeral internal-rotation deficit (GIRD); rotator cuff strength, in particular the strength of the external rotators; and scapular dyskinesis, in particular scapular position and strength. PMID:26537804

  20. Modeling the Injury Prevention Impact of Mandatory Alcohol Ignition Interlock Installation in All New US Vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Flannagan, Carol A. C.; Bingham, C. Raymond; Cunningham, Rebecca M.; Rupp, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We estimated the injury prevention impact and cost savings associated with alcohol interlock installation in all new US vehicles. Methods. We identified fatal and nonfatal injuries associated with drinking driver vehicle crashes from the Fatality Analysis Reporting System and National Automotive Sampling System’s General Estimates System data sets (2006–2010). We derived the estimated impact of universal interlock installation using an estimate of the proportion of alcohol-related crashes that were preventable in vehicles < 1 year-old. We repeated this analysis for each subsequent year, assuming a 15-year implementation. We applied existing crash-induced injury cost metrics to approximate economic savings, and we used a sensitivity analysis to examine results with varying device effectiveness. Results. Over 15 years, 85% of crash fatalities (> 59 000) and 84% to 88% of nonfatal injuries (> 1.25 million) attributed to drinking drivers would be prevented, saving an estimated $342 billion in injury-related costs, with the greatest injury and cost benefit realized among recently legal drinking drivers. Cost savings outweighed installation costs after 3 years, with the policy remaining cost effective provided device effectiveness remained above approximately 25%. Conclusions. Alcohol interlock installation in all new vehicles is likely a cost-effective primary prevention policy that will substantially reduce alcohol-involved crash fatalities and injuries, especially among young vulnerable drivers. PMID:25790385

  1. An Athlete's Nightmare: Tearing the ACL

    MedlinePlus

    ... women's knees tends to bend inward when women land." Some researchers believe that this inward bend may ... any athlete suffers ACL damage is because they land in a flat-footed position, as opposed to ...

  2. Preventive mechanisms of agmatine against ischemic acute kidney injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Takahiro; Kobuchi, Shuhei; Tsutsui, Hidenobu; Takaoka, Masanori; Fujii, Toshihide; Hayashi, Kentaro; Matsumura, Yasuo

    2009-01-28

    The excitation of renal sympathetic nervous system plays an important role in the development of ischemic acute kidney injury in rats. Recently, we found that agmatine, an adrenaline alpha(2)/imidazoline I(1)-receptor agonist, has preventive effects on ischemic acute kidney injury by suppressing the enhanced renal sympathetic nerve activity during renal ischemia and by decreasing the renal venous norepinephrine overflow after reperfusion. In the present study, we investigated preventive mechanisms of agmatine against ischemic acute kidney injury in rats. Ischemic acute kidney injury was induced by clamping the left renal artery and vein for 45 min followed by reperfusion, 2 weeks after the contralateral nephrectomy. Pretreatment with efaroxan (30 mumol/kg, i.v.), an alpha(2)/I(1)-receptor antagonist, abolished the suppressive effects of agmatine on the enhanced renal sympathetic nerve activity during renal ischemia and on the elevated norepinephrine overflow after reperfusion, and eliminated the preventing effects of agmatine on the ischemia/reperfusion-induced renal dysfunction and histological damage. On the other hand, pretreatment with yohimbine (6 mumol/kg, i.v.), an alpha(2)-receptor antagonist, eliminated the preventing effects of agmatine on the ischemia/reperfusion-induced renal injury and norepinephrine overflow, without affecting the lowering effect of agmatine on renal sympathetic nerve activity. These results indicate that agmatine prevents the ischemic renal injury by sympathoinhibitory effect probably via I(1) receptors in central nervous system and by suppressing the norepinephrine overflow through alpha(2) or I(1) receptors on sympathetic nerve endings.

  3. Overcoming the organization-practice barrier in sports injury prevention: A nonhierarchical organizational model.

    PubMed

    Dahlström, Ö; Jacobsson, J; Timpka, T

    2015-08-01

    The organization of sports at the national level has seldom been included in scientific discussions of sports injury prevention. The aim of this study was to develop a model for organization of sports that supports prevention of overuse injuries. The quality function deployment technique was applied in seminars over a two-season period to develop a national organizational structure for athletics in Sweden that facilitates prevention of overuse injuries. Three central features of the resulting model for organization of sports at the national level are (a) diminishment of the organizational hierarchy: participatory safety policy design is introduced through annual meetings where actors from different sectors of the sporting community discuss training, injury prevention, and sports safety policy; (b) introduction of a safety surveillance system: a ubiquitous system for routine collection of injury and illness data; and (c) an open forum for discussion of safety issues: maintenance of a safety forum for participants from different sectors of the sport. A nonhierarchical model for organization of sports at the national level - facilitated by modern information technology - adapted for the prevention of overuse injuries has been developed. Further research is warranted to evaluate the new organizational model in prospective effectiveness studies.

  4. Effects of a multifactorial injury prevention intervention in physical education teachers: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Vercruysse, Sien; Haerens, Leen; Verhagen, Evert; Goossens, Lennert; De Clercq, Dirk

    2016-10-01

    Physical education (PE) teachers are at a high risk of musculoskeletal sports or work-related injuries because of the physical activity as inherent part of their profession. Such injuries have a negative impact on work and leisure time activities, and effective injury prevention interventions are needed. The present study aimed at testing the effectiveness of an injury prevention intervention that was developed and optimized according to PE teachers' wishes and values. Fifty-five PE teachers were randomly assigned to intervention or control group. Intervention group teachers engaged in two days of training during which they familiarized with eight injury prevention strategies (seven intrinsic and one extrinsic). A special feature of the intervention was that the way of delivery was based on the self-determination theory in order to stimulate participants' motivation to adhere to the proposed strategies. Prospective registrations during one school year were conducted concerning injuries and preventive behaviours. Results showed that the intervention group teachers had a lower number of injuries per 1000 h time of exposure (TOE) than the controls (INT: 0.49, CON: 1.14 injuries/1000 h TOE, OR: 2.32, 95% CI: 1.06-5.07), and applied a broader variety of strategies including dynamic and static stretching, core stability, balance and strength training, when compared to the controls who mainly engaged in warming-up. In conclusion, with the same amount of time, an injury reduction was found in PE teachers through a more balanced use of provided preventive strategies.

  5. Preventive Effects of Safety Helmets on Traumatic Brain Injury after Work-Related Falls

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Chul; Ro, Young Sun; Shin, Sang Do; Kim, Joo Yeong

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Work-related traumatic brain injury (TBI) caused by falls is a catastrophic event that leads to disabilities and high socio-medical costs. This study aimed to measure the magnitude of the preventive effect of safety helmets on clinical outcomes and to compare the effect across different heights of fall. Methods: We collected a nationwide, prospective database of work-related injury patients who visited the 10 emergency departments between July 2010 and October 2012. All of the adult patients who experienced work-related fall injuries were eligible, excluding cases with unknown safety helmet use and height of fall. Primary and secondary endpoints were intracranial injury and in-hospital mortality. We calculated adjusted odds ratios (AORs) of safety helmet use and height of fall for study outcomes, and adjusted for any potential confounders. Results: A total of 1298 patients who suffered from work-related fall injuries were enrolled. The industrial or construction area was the most common place of fall injury occurrence, and 45.0% were wearing safety helmets at the time of fall injuries. The safety helmet group was less likely to have intracranial injury comparing with the no safety helmet group (the adjusted odds ratios (ORs) (95% confidence interval (CI)): 0.42 (0.24–0.73)), however, there was no statistical difference of in-hospital mortality between two groups (the adjusted ORs (95% CI): 0.83 (0.34–2.03). In the interaction analysis, preventive effects of safety helmet on intracranial injury were significant within 4 m height of fall. Conclusions: A safety helmet is associated with prevention of intracranial injury resulting from work-related fall and the effect is preserved within 4 m height of fall. Therefore, wearing a safety helmet can be an intervention for protecting fall-related intracranial injury in the workplace. PMID:27801877

  6. Injury prevention and care: an important public health agenda for health, survival and safety of children.

    PubMed

    Gururaj, Gopalkrishna

    2013-03-01

    Injuries affect the lives of thousands of young people and their families each year in India. With the gradual decline of communicable and nutritional diseases, injuries will be a leading cause of mortality, morbidity and disabilities and the success achieved so far in child health and survival is in jeopardy. Available data indicate that among children less than 18 y, 10-15 % of deaths, 20-30 % of hospital registrations and 20 % of disabilities are due to injuries. Based on available data, it is estimated that injuries result in death of nearly 1, 00,000 children every year in India and hospitalisations among 2 million children. Road Traffic Injuries (RTI's), drowning, falls, burns and poisoning are leading injury causes in India. Drowning and burns are major causes of mortality in less than 5 y, while RTIs, falls and poisoning are leading causes in 5-18 y. A shift in the occurrence of suicides to younger age groups of 15-20 y is a matter of serious concern in recent years. More number of males, those in rural areas, and majority of poor income households are affected due to injuries.Child injuries are predictable and preventable. Children have limitations of size, development, vision, hearing and risk perceptions as compared to adults and hence are more susceptible and vulnerable to injuries. Thus, it is important to make products and home - road and school environments safer along with greater supervision by parents and care givers. The key approaches include vehicle and product safety, environmental modification, legislation and enforcement, education and skills development along with availability of quality trauma care. Child injury prevention and care requires good quality data, building human and financial resources, strengthening policies and programmes based on evidence and integrated implementation of countermeasures along with monitoring and evaluation. Child injury prevention and control is crucial and should be an integral part of child health and

  7. Evidence based prevention of acute injuries during physical exercise in a WHO safe community

    PubMed Central

    Timpka, T; Lindqvist, K

    2001-01-01

    Objective—To evaluate a community based programme for evidence based prevention of injuries during physical exercise. Design—Quasi-experimental evaluation using an intervention population and a non-random control population. Participants—Study municipality (population 41 000) and control municipality (population 26 000) in Sweden. Main outcome measures—Morbidity rate for sports related injuries treated in the health care system; severity classification according to the abbreviated injury scale (AIS). Results—The total morbidity rate for sports related injuries in the study area decreased by 14% from 21 to 18 injuries per 1000 population years (odds ratio 0.87; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.79 to 0.96). No tendency towards a decrease was observed in people over 40. The rate of moderately severe injury (AIS 2) decreased to almost half (odds ratio 0.58; 95% CI 0.50 to 0.68), whereas the rate of minor injuries (AIS 1) increased (odds ratio 1.22; 95% CI 1.06 to 1.40). The risk of severe injuries (AIS 3–6) remained constant. The rate of total sports injury in the control area did not change (odds ratio 0.93; 95% CI 0.81 to 1.07), and the trends in the study and control areas were not statistically significantly different. Conclusion—An evidence based prevention programme based on local safety rules and educational programmes can reduce the burden of injuries related to physical exercise in a community. Future studies need to look at adjusting the programme to benefit all age groups. Key Words: injuries; prevention; evaluation; community; intervention; safety promotion PMID:11157457

  8. [Snowboarding. History--injuries--risks--new materials--tournament on-site services--prevention].

    PubMed

    Dann, K; Kristen, K H; Knoeringer, M; Boldrino, C; Nehrer, S

    2005-05-01

    Since the 1998 Olympic Winter Games in Nagano, snowboarding has been established as a popular winter sport for youth and adults. The most frequently affected body region reported in many studies on snowboarding injuries are the wrists accounting for more than 50% of severe injuries, especially in beginners. Wrist braces are effective in protecting snowboarding beginners against wrist injuries. Male snowboarders up to the age of 16 and female snowboarders over the age of 25 have a higher risk of injury. Snowboarders should not use ski boots and should be careful with rented equipment. Systems providing body and limb protection and also snowboard-specific helmets can reduce the injury risk for alpine racers, freestylers, and also freeriders. Snowboard training is important to prevent injuries especially for beginners, and icy slopes should be avoided.

  9. 75 FR 28626 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Interest Projects (SIPs): SIP 10...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Interest Projects (SIPs): SIP 10-029, Pilot Study--Cancer Survivorship Care Planning & SIP 10-030, Evaluating Special Events as...

  10. 78 FR 66937 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Occupational... 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control...

  11. Missed Opportunities to Keep Children Safe? National Survey of Injury Prevention Activities of Children's Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Michael Craig; Mulvaney, Caroline; Timblin, Clare; Stewart, Jane; Coupland, Carol A.; Deave, Toity; Hayes, Mike; Kendrick, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain the activities undertaken by children's centres to prevent unintentional injuries in the under-fives and, in particular, the prevention of falls, poisoning and scalds. Design: A questionnaire was posted to managers of 851 children's centres, using stratified cluster sampling. The questionnaire included questions on injury…

  12. 77 FR 2548 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Grants for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Disease, Disability, and Injury... Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC..., Management Analysis and Services Office, CDC, pursuant to Public Law 92-463. Matters To Be Discussed:...

  13. 75 FR 32190 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Interest Projects (SIPs...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-07

    ...: Michelle Mathieson, Public Health Analyst, National Center for Chronic Disease and Health Promotion, Office... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and... Chronic Conditions SIP 10-037 and Epidemiologic Follow- Up Study of Newly Diagnosed Epilepsy SIP...

  14. 75 FR 7281 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Translating...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-18

    ..., Scientific Review Officer, National Center for Chronic Disease and Health Promotion, Office of the Director... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and... the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control and...

  15. 77 FR 12844 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Reducing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and... Disabilities, FOA DD12-003, Initial Review In accordance with Section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory... among People with Intellectual Disabilities, FOA DD12-003, initial review.'' Contact Person for...

  16. 75 FR 1062 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, (BSC, NCIPC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-08

    ... [Federal Register Volume 75, Number 5 (Friday, January 8, 2010)] [Notices] [Pages 1062-1063] [FR Doc No: 2010-22] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, (BSC, NCIPC)...

  17. 76 FR 13621 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Family...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Family History and Diamond Blackfan Anemia, DD11- 010,...

  18. 75 FR 28625 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Assessment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Assessment of Post-Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome, Funding...-Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome,'' FOA CK10-004. Contact Person for More Information: Maurine Goodman,...

  19. 76 FR 9020 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control; Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Ability of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-16

    ...) Technologies To Reduce the Entomological Risk of Lyme Disease, Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) CK11-005... (ITM) Technologies To Reduce the Entomological Risk of Lyme Disease, FOA CK11-005.'' Contact Person for... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention...

  20. 77 FR 31358 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Interest Projects (SIPs): Initial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Interest Projects (SIPs): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Research...

  1. 76 FR 27327 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Virologic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Virologic Evaluation of the Modes of Influenza Virus...

  2. 78 FR 78966 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Capacity Building Assistance for High Impact...

  3. 77 FR 12844 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Development...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and... Intervention for Changing Behaviors Related to Cytomegalovirus Transmission in Pregnant Women, FOA DD12-005... and Brief Intervention for Changing Behaviors Related to Cytomegalovirus Transmission in...

  4. 76 FR 10908 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Maternal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Maternal Vitamin D Status and Preterm Birth, DP11-002,...

  5. 75 FR 27561 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control; Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): A...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-17

    ... dictate. Contact Person For More Information: Jane Suen, Dr.P.H., M.S., National Center for Injury... Control and Prevention (CDC), announces the aforementioned meeting: Times and Date: 1 p.m.-4 p.m., July 8... Services Office Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. BILLING CODE 4163-18-P...

  6. 75 FR 13769 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Natural...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Natural Experiments and Effectiveness Studies To Identify the Best..., discussion, and evaluation of ``Natural Experiments and Effectiveness Studies to Identify the Best Policy...

  7. Preventing Injuries in the U.S. Military: The Process, Priorities, and Epidemiologic Evidence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    prevention. (2) METHODS. Active Duty military personnel, who sought inpatient or outpatient treatment for one or more oral-maxillofacial...just mortality measures but also morbidity measures such as disabilities, hospital discharges, and visits for emergency and other outpatient treatment ...RJ, Fulco CD, and Liverman, CT, editors. 1999. Reducing the burden of injury: advancing prevention and treatment . Washington, DC: National

  8. Controlled evaluation of a community based injury prevention program in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Ozanne-Smith, J; Day, L; Stathakis, V; Sherrard, J

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of a community based, all age, all injury prevention program, the Safe Living Program, on injury risk and injury rates. Design: A quasiexperimental population based evaluation using an intervention and comparison community design. Setting: The intervention community (Shire of Bulla, n=37 257) is an outer metropolitan area of Melbourne, Australia. The demographically matched comparison community (Shire of Melton, n=33 592) is located nearby. Subjects and methods: The Safe Living Program in the Shire of Bulla targeted injury reduction in all settings with a focus on high risk groups. Strategies included program publicity, education and training, injury hazard reduction, and environmental change. Baseline and follow up measures of program reach, risk factors, and injury rates in both communities were used to evaluate program process, impact, and outcome. Results: Increase in program awareness was moderate and similar to other community based programs. The program achieved injury hazard reduction on the road, in schools, and, to a more limited extent, in the home. Other changes in injury risk factors could not necessarily be attributed to the program as similar changes were observed in the comparison community. No significant changes were found in rates of injury deaths, hospitalisations, or emergency department presentations in the Shire of Bulla after six years. Self reported household injuries, mostly minor, were reduced in the intervention community, but had been higher at program launch than in the comparison community. Conclusions: The Safe Living Program was unable to replicate the significant reductions in injuries reported in other community based interventions. Replication of apparently successful community based injury prevention programs in different settings and populations requires evidence based interventions, sustained and effective program penetration, reliable data systems to measure change, at least one control

  9. Prevention of elbow injuries in youth baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    Fleisig, Glenn S; Weber, Adam; Hassell, Nina; Andrews, James R

    2009-01-01

    There is concern among sports medicine practitioners that the number of youth baseball pitchers with elbow injuries appears to be increasing. Research points to overuse as the principle risk factor. The risk of elbow pain in youth pitchers is correlated with the number of pitches thrown in a game and in a season. Adolescents who competitively pitch more than 85 pitches per game, more than 8 months out of a year, or with arm fatigue are several times more likely to require elbow surgery. Poor pitching mechanics also appear to contribute to injury risk. Existing research does not show a significant correlation between curveballs and injury. Adults should help youth pitchers avoid fatigue, overuse, and improper mechanics. If elbow pain develops, the youth pitcher should be evaluated by a sports medicine physician.

  10. Surgical brain injury: prevention is better than cure.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Vikram; Zhang, John H

    2008-05-01

    Neurosurgical procedures can cause inevitable brain damage resulting from the procedure itself. Unavoidable cortical and parenchymal incisions, intraoperative hemorrhage, brain lobe retraction and thermal injuries from electrocautery can cause brain injuries attributable exclusively to the neurosurgical operations and collectively referred to as surgical brain injury (SBI). This particular brain damage cannot be demarcated from the underlying brain pathology and has not been studied previously. Recently, we developed rat and mouse models to study SBI and the underlying cellular mechanisms. The animal modeling mimics a neurosurgical operation and causes commonly encountered postoperative complications such as brain edema following blood brain barrier (BBB) disruption, and neuronal cell death. Furthermore, the SBI animal model allows screening of known experimental neuroprotective agents and therapeutic agents being tried in clinical trials as possible pretreatments before neurosurgical procedures. In the present review, we elaborate on SBI and its clinical impact, the SBI animal models and their clinical relevance, and the importance of blanket neuroprotection before neurosurgical procedures.

  11. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for the prevention and treatment of lightning injuries: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Davis, Chris; Engeln, Anna; Johnson, Eric L; McIntosh, Scott E; Zafren, Ken; Islas, Arthur A; McStay, Christopher; Smith, William R; Cushing, Tracy

    2014-12-01

    To provide guidance to clinicians about best practices, the Wilderness Medical Society (WMS) convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based guidelines for the treatment and prevention of lightning injuries. These guidelines include a review of the epidemiology of lightning and recommendations for the prevention of lightning strikes, along with treatment recommendations organized by organ system. Recommendations are graded on the basis of the quality of supporting evidence according to criteria put forth by the American College of Chest Physicians. This is an updated version of the original WMS Practice Guidelines for Prevention and Treatment of Lightning Injuries published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2012;23(3):260-269.

  12. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in Growing Skeleton

    PubMed Central

    AlHarby, Saleh W.

    2010-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in the adult patients are thoroughly studied and published in orthopedic literature. Until recently, little was known about similar injuries in skeletally growing patients. The more frequent involvement of this age group in various athletic activities and the improved diagnostic modalities have increased the awareness and interest of ACL injuries in skeletally immature patients. ACL reconstruction in growing skeleton is controversial and carries some risks to the tibial and femoral growth plate. A guarded approach to ACL reconstruction is recommended in skeletally immature patients. Modification of activity of ACL injured young patient, proper rehabilitation and prudent planning of adolescent age ACL reconstruction carries the least risks of growth plate violation. PMID:21475528

  13. The use of mapping to identify priority areas for the prevention of home injuries.

    PubMed

    Chong, Shanley; Mitchell, Rebecca

    2009-03-01

    Geographical information system (GIS) technology is a potentially useful tool for policy makers to identify priority areas for the prevention of injuries in the home environment. An analysis of hospitalised injuries in New South Wales (NSW), Australia, that occurred in the home environment was conducted using Bayesian methods to calculate the expected relative home injury risk for common injury mechanisms. The results show geographic differences in the mechanism of home injuries. The risk of hospitalised fall-related injuries for people aged 75 years and over and poisoning of children four years of age or less was spread over NSW, while cut/pierce and struck by/struck against injuries showed less extensive areas of risk. This study shows that the use of geographic mapping and spatial statistics can provide a useful means of estimating home injury risk, eliminating the instability of estimates, while showing overall geographic patterns. In the future, geographical mapping of injury locations, coupled with satellite imagery, are likely to provide an additional level of detail for injury surveillance within a defined area.

  14. The Purley train crash mechanism: injuries and prevention.

    PubMed Central

    Fothergill, N J; Ebbs, S R; Reese, A; Partridge, R J; Mowbray, M; Southcott, R D; Hashemi, K

    1992-01-01

    On the afternoon of Saturday 4th March 1989 two trains, both bound for London Victoria Station, collided. Part of the rear train rolled down a steep railway embankment and jack-knifed against a tree. The mechanism of the crash and the injuries sustained by the 55 victims who were seen in the A&E Department of the Mayday University Hospital are described. Improvements in signalling technology and design of rolling stock which may reduce both the risk of collision and severity of injury in future accidents are discussed. Images Fig. 1 PMID:1388485

  15. The role of flexibility in injury prevention and athletic performance: have we stretched the truth?

    PubMed

    Ingraham, Stacy J

    2003-05-01

    The use of stretching to prevent injury, off-set muscle soreness, and improve performance has been widely accepted and promoted in sports. However, little or no scientific evidence supports the practice, and recent research suggests that stretching, which increases flexibility beyond that needed for sport-specific movements, may cause injury. This article presents studies that have looked at the effects of stretching on injury and performance. Many earlier studies that showed benefits of stretching did not look at the effects of stretching alone; they also involved general cardiovascular workouts in the experimental but not control groups. More recent research shows that general fitness, rather than stretching, is a more important risk factor in injury prevention. This article also discusses studies of the relationship between joint laxity and injury and the role that stiffness may play in enhancing performance and preventing injury. Overall, the evidence suggests that increasing range of motion beyond function through stretching is not beneficial and can actually cause injury and decrease performance. These findings should be used to challenge common warm-up practices in athletics.

  16. Rehabilitation of Patients Following Autogenic Bone-Patellar Tendon-Bone ACL Reconstruction: A 20-Year Perspective

    PubMed Central

    De Carlo, Mark S.; McDivitt, Ryan

    2006-01-01

    Rehabilitation of patients following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has undergone remarkable improvements over the past two decades. During this time, ACL research has been at the forefront of many orthopaedic and sports physical therapy clinics. With over 20 years of ACL rehabilitation experience (senior author) and prior collaboration with accelerated ACL rehabilitation pioneer K. Donald Shelbourne, the authors wish to present a unique perspective on the evolution of ACL rehabilitation. Prior to the classic article by Paulos et al in 1981,1 literature on ACL rehabilitation was quite sparse. The basis for ACL rehabilitation at this time was founded in basic science studies conducted with animal models. In an effort to protect the graft, emphasis was placed on immobilization, extension limitation, restricted weight bearing, and delayed return to activity. Despite achieving good ligamentous stability, patients often experienced a spectrum of complications. In 1990, Shelbourne and Nitz2 proposed an accelerated rehabilitation protocol following ACL reconstruction based on clinical experience. Their program emphasized delayed surgery, earlier range of motion and weight bearing, and full extension. As a result, patients experienced better clinical outcomes while maintaining knee stability. The rehabilitation program presented in this paper is still largely based on the principles of the accelerated protocol. As evidence-based practice and the call for prospective, randomized clinical research continues, the continued progress in treating patients with this injury will be enhanced. Furthermore, clinicians are urged not to lose sight of the clinical reasoning that helped evolve the ACL rehabilitation process where it is today. PMID:21522223

  17. Spinal Injuries in the Aquatics Environment, Part I: Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dworkin, Gerald M.

    1987-01-01

    Water-related activities are the number one cause of spinal cord injuries resulting from sports and recreation activities. This article discusses principles of safe diving; principles of safe water sliding; ways to reduce springboard diving accidents; factors contributing to springboard diving accidents; and safety recommendations for open water…

  18. Household Safety: Preventing Injuries from Firearms (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... A What's in this article? Be Prepared Maintaining a Safe, Kid-Friendly Environment en español Seguridad en casa: cómo prevenir las heridas por arma de fuego The best way to protect your kids from injury and ... guns are kept. If you do own a firearm, be sure that these rules are followed ...

  19. Attempts to Prevent Falls and Injury: A Prospective Community Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinsch, Sibylle; And Others

    1992-01-01

    At 16 senior centers, studied effectiveness of exercise and cognitive-behavioral programs, compared to discussion control program, in reducing falls and injuries among 230 older adults. After one year of programs, observed no significant difference in time to first fall among groups. Secondary outcome measures such as strength, balance, fear of…

  20. Nylon shock absorber prevents injury to parachute jumpers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandel, J. A.

    1966-01-01

    Nylon shock absorbers reduce the canopy-opening shock of a parachute to a level that protects the wearer from injury. A shock absorber is mounted on each of the four risers between the shroud lines and the harness. Because of their size and location, they pose no problem in repacking the chute and harness after a jump.

  1. 75 FR 27797 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-18

    ... priorities dictate. Contact Person for More Information: Jane Suen, Dr.P.H., M.S., National Center for Injury...:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m., June 17, 2010 (Closed). Place: Teleconference. Status: The meeting will be closed...] BILLING CODE 4163-18-P...

  2. Lifting Safety: Tips To Help Prevent Back Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... surfaces while you’re carrying something.The best way to pick up a load is to use handles or straps, ... back. This includes bending your knees to pick up something, instead of bending ... arch your back. This is one way to cause an injury by using the wrong ...

  3. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in National Football League Athletes From 2010 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Dodson, Christopher C.; Secrist, Eric S.; Bhat, Suneel B.; Woods, Daniel P.; Deluca, Peter F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a high incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries among National Football League (NFL) athletes; however, the incidence of reinjury in this population is unknown. Purpose: This retrospective epidemiological study analyzed all publicly disclosed ACL tears occurring in NFL players between 2010 and 2013 to characterize injury trends and determine the incidence of reinjury. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiological study. Methods: A comprehensive online search identified any NFL player who had suffered an ACL injury from 2010 to 2013. Position, playing surface, activity, and date were recorded. Each player was researched for any history of previous ACL injury. The NFL games database from USA Today was used to determine the incidence of ACL injuries on artificial turf and grass fields. Databases from Pro Football Focus and Pro Football Reference were used to determine the injury rate for each position. Results: NFL players suffered 219 ACL injuries between 2010 and 2013. Forty players (18.3%) had a history of previous ACL injury, with 27 (12.3%) retears and 16 (7.3%) tears contralateral to a previous ACL injury. Five players (2.28%) suffered their third ACL tear. Receivers (wide receivers and tight ends) and backs (linebackers, fullbacks, and halfbacks) had significantly greater injury risk than the rest of the NFL players, while perimeter linemen (defensive ends and offensive tackles) had significantly lower injury risk than the rest of the players. Interior linemen (offensive guards, centers, and defensive tackles) had significantly greater injury risk compared with perimeter linemen. ACL injury rates per team games played were 0.050 for grass and 0.053 for turf fields (P > .05). Conclusion: In this retrospective epidemiological study of ACL tears in NFL players, retears and ACL tears contralateral to a previously torn ACL constituted a substantial portion (18.3%) of total ACL injuries. The significant majority of ACL injuries in

  4. A dynamic analysis of knee ligament injuries in alpine skiing.

    PubMed

    Fischer, J F; Leyvraz, P F; Bally, A

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this study is to understand better the dynamic mechanisms of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture in alpine skiing. As a result of these findings, improvements in the boot-binding release systems are proposed. Six patients who sustained ACL rupture, aged 19 to 43 years, were studied. A step by step reconstruction of the accident was made using a questionnaire followed by an interview. The skiing equipment was tested in a specialized laboratory and the release levels of the boot-binding systems were measured in twist and in forward lean. ACL injury was confirmed by arthroscopy or surgery. Most patients had recent skiing equipment; their binding systems were correctly mounted and in perfect working order. Release levels of the bindings were equal to or slightly above those suggested by the ISO standards. The mechanisms of injury were valgus-external rotation in knee flexion of more than 90 degrees, internal rotation in knee flexion of more than 120 degrees with anterior drawer loads, internal rotation-valgus in knee flexion of less than 30 degrees with anterior drawer loads, external rotation-valgus in knee flexion of more than 120 degrees with anterior drawer loads, external rotation in knee flexion of about 100 degrees with anterior drawer loads and internal rotation-valgus. Even with a modern boot-binding system, properly adjusted, ACL injury remains possible. The improvements in the current equipment should be concerned with the behavior when confronted with combined loads producing friction in the system. We concluded that for lateral release at the toe, there should be a better compensation of the vertical parasite forces and an improvement of the antifriction devices. In order to prevent excessive anterior drawer loads on the ACL an additional release direction of the binding system, especially backwards, could, if properly adjusted, enhance the opportunities of early release in a dangerous backward lean "out of control" position.

  5. Treatment of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury in Skeletally Immature Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hudgens, Joshua L.; Dahm, Diane L.

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of ACL tears is rising in the pediatric and adolescent populations as these individuals succumb to traumatic and nontraumatic athletic injuries. Management of this condition in the skeletally immature patient poses a challenge and is controversial. Operative reconstruction carries the concern for damage to the physis with resultant limb length inequality and angular joint deformity but provides stability to the knee and allows return of function in most patients. On the other hand, nonoperative treatment has been shown to carry an increased risk of meniscal and articular cartilage damage and is difficult from a compliance standpoint in this demographic. For the majority of skeletally immature patients, operative treatment is recommended as it has shown good clinical and functional results with minimal risk of growth disturbance. This paper aims to address the natural course of ACL injuries in the skeletally immature patient, treatment options with associated complications, and current preventative strategies. PMID:22315624

  6. Management of Acute Combined ACL-Medial and Posteromedial Instability of the Knee.

    PubMed

    Medvecky, Michael J; Tomaszewski, Paul

    2015-06-01

    Medial collateral ligament (MCL) injuries are the most common ligamentous injury of the knee. The extent of injury can range from a minor first-degree (1-degree) sprain to an extensive third-degree (3-degree) sprain that can propagate across the knee, rupturing one or both cruciate ligaments, and result in a knee subluxation or dislocation. A common pattern involves the combined anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and MCL injury that is the focus of this chapter. The vast majority of these combined medial-sided injuries are treated nonoperatively with delayed reconstruction of the ACL injury in athletically active individuals. The MCL and associated medial structures are carefully assessed on physical examination, and classification of injury is based upon abnormal limits of joint motion. In vitro cadaveric biomechanical testing has given us a better understanding of ligament deficiency and altered joint motion. Consistency in terminology is necessary for proper classification of injury and reproducible categorization of injury patterns to be able to compare both nonoperative and operative treatment of various injury patterns.

  7. Amiodarone supplants lidocaine in ACLS and CPR protocols.

    PubMed

    Mizzi, Anna; Tran, Thanh; Mangar, Devanand; Camporesi, Enrico M

    2011-09-01

    Amiodarone is an antiarrhythmic medication used to treat and prevent certain types of serious, life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. Amiodarone gained slow acceptance outside the specialized field of cardiac antiarrhythmic surgery because the side-effects are significant. Recent adoption of amiodarone in the ACLS (Advanced Cardiac Life Support) protocol has somewhat popularized this class of antiarrhythmics. Its use is slowly expanding in the acute medicine setting of anesthetics. This article summarizes the use of Amiodarone by anesthesiologists in the operating room and during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  8. An injury prevention strategy for teen restaurant workers. Washington State's ProSafety project.

    PubMed

    Ward, Julie A; de Castro, A B; Tsai, Jenny Hsin-Chun; Linker, Darren; Hildahl, Lyle; Miller, Mary E

    2010-02-01

    High levels of youth employment, workplace hazards, and characteristics unique to adolescents contribute to a relatively high incidence of injuries among teens in the restaurant industry. This article discusses the ProSafety model of injury prevention among teen restaurant workers. Through integration with an existing career and technical education program, the ProSafety project seeks to prevent occupational injuries among the teen worker population through classroom safety education and internship skills reinforcement. ProSafety is the product of an innovative collaboration with occupational health nurses, business professionals, educators, and government. Its approach is derived from Social Cognitive Theory, is consistent with key values and strategies of occupational health nurses, and provides lessons for practitioners seeking to reduce occupational injuries in food service or among other populations of adolescent workers.

  9. Guarding the Precious Smile: Incidence and Prevention of Injury in Sports: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Dhillon, Bikramjit Singh; Sood, Nikhil; Sood, Niti; Sah, Nupur; Arora, Dhruv; Mahendra, Ashish

    2014-01-01

    The paper provides a review about the orofacial injuries sustained during sports and the options available to the athletes for their prevention. It was done with a purpose to determine three different aspects incidence of dental injury during sporting activities, role of mouthguards in preventing sports injury, types of mouthguards and their properties. From this review, it is clear that sports carry a considerable risk of injury, this is not only true for the contact sports such as rugby or kickboxing, but also for seemingly less dangerous sports such as football. Amongst the different types of mouthguards, the most acceptable and safe ones are the custom-fabricated mouthguards, in particular the pressure-laminated ones. In general, mouthguard usage is less than the dental profession would recommend. As much of progress has been made in this area, need for the use of mouthguard needs to be emphasized and promoted by the dental profession. PMID:25214744

  10. Guarding the precious smile: incidence and prevention of injury in sports: a review.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Bikramjit Singh; Sood, Nikhil; Sood, Niti; Sah, Nupur; Arora, Dhruv; Mahendra, Ashish

    2014-07-01

    The paper provides a review about the orofacial injuries sustained during sports and the options available to the athletes for their prevention. It was done with a purpose to determine three different aspects incidence of dental injury during sporting activities, role of mouthguards in preventing sports injury, types of mouthguards and their properties. From this review, it is clear that sports carry a considerable risk of injury, this is not only true for the contact sports such as rugby or kickboxing, but also for seemingly less dangerous sports such as football. Amongst the different types of mouthguards, the most acceptable and safe ones are the custom-fabricated mouthguards, in particular the pressure-laminated ones. In general, mouthguard usage is less than the dental profession would recommend. As much of progress has been made in this area, need for the use of mouthguard needs to be emphasized and promoted by the dental profession.

  11. Strategies for prevention of road traffic injuries (RTIs) in Pakistan: situational analysis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Adeel Ahmed; Fatmi, Zafar

    2014-05-01

    Road traffic injuries (RTIs) are one of the leading causes of death among productive age group. Using systems approach framework (SAF), current preventive strategies for RTI control were reviewed in Pakistan. A review of the literature was done using four international search engines. Only ten studies on preventive strategies for RTI stemming from Pakistan were found. The first Road Traffic Injuries Research Network (RTIRN) surveillance system for road traffic injuries was established in urban city (Karachi) in Pakistan has shown promise for injury control and should be scaled up to other cities. Enforcement of traffic laws on seat-belt and helmet wearing is poor. National Highway and Motorway Police Ordinance (2000) was one of the few legislative measure so far taken in Pakistan. Using SAF, efforts are required to implement interventions targeting human, vehicle design and also making environment safer for road users.

  12. Obesity and the aging adult: ideas for promoting patient safety and preventing caregiver injury.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Susan

    2005-11-01

    Some experts contend that the increasing prevalence of obesity among patients and caregivers leads to more frequent and serious musculoskeletal injuries among caregivers. Others believe that failure to ensure safe, appropriate equipment and supporting policies leads to the increasing prevalence of caregiver injuries. Health facilities best serve residents, caregivers, and institutions when there is preplanning for extra care and resources; size-appropriate equipment; larger, heavier furniture; and adequate space to accomplish tasks. The challenge to stakeholders is to find ways to prevent injuries that pose direct and indirect cost liabilities to caregivers, institutions, policy makers, and others. Several strategies are available to reduce or prevent caregiver injury and to promote patient safety. Physical environment, equipment, lift team, and necessary policy changes are discussed as possible strategies.

  13. New PPE Policy Will Help Prevent Injuries | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Ashley Shoemaker, Guest Writer In January 2013, a revised policy on personal protective equipment (PPE) was approved for all government and contractor employees at NCI at Frederick. This new policy was driven by a high number of eye injuries at NCI at Frederick (56 between 2007 and 2012) that were directly related to inadequate PPE. The Occupational Safety and Health Act states that each employer is responsible for identifying hazards in the workplace and determining what kind of PPE is necessary.

  14. Prevention of deep tissue injury through muscle contractions induced by intermittent electrical stimulation after spinal cord injury in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Solis, Leandro R.; Twist, Elizabeth; Seres, Peter; Thompson, Richard B.

    2013-01-01

    Deep tissue injury (DTI) is a severe medical complication that commonly affects those with spinal cord injury. It is caused by prolonged external loading of the muscles, entrapping them between a bony prominence and the support surface. The entrapment causes excessive mechanical deformation and increases in interstitial pressure, leading to muscle breakdown deep around the bony prominences. We proposed the use of intermittent electrical stimulation (IES) as a novel prophylactic method for the prevention of DTI. In this study, we assessed the long-term effectiveness of this technique in pigs that had received a partial spinal cord injury that paralyzed one hindlimb. The pigs recovered for 2 wk postsurgery, and subsequently, their paralyzed limbs were loaded to 25% of their body weights 4 h/day for 4 consecutive days each week for 1 mo. One group of pigs (n = 3) received IES during the loading, whereas another group (n = 3) did not. DTI was quantified using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and postmortem histology. In the group that did not receive IES, MRI assessments revealed signs of tissue damage in 48% of the volume of the loaded muscle. In the group that did receive IES, only 8% of the loaded muscle volume showed signs of tissue damage. Similar findings were found through postmortem histology. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that IES may be an effective technique for preventing the formation of DTI in loaded muscles after spinal cord injury. PMID:23172030

  15. Child restraint misuse: a case example and strategies for injury prevention.

    PubMed

    Beringer-Brown, Carol; Pearce, Jeanette; Rush, Carole

    2005-04-01

    Motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of death and serious injury for children. Emergency nurses can play a key role in encouraging parents and caregivers to use child restraints consistently and correctly. This article will discuss a case scenario where a young child is seriously injured in a motor vehicle crash where his child car seat was not used correctly. Injury prevention strategies for emergency nurses will be reviewed.

  16. Injury Prevention Survey: Army Awareness Assessment and Needs Analysis, 9 July - 26 August 2014

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    intervention for injuries due to being seen as weak/bad Soldier combatives Sleep deprivation association. Conditioning. Truth about supplements...Schuh 5d. PROJECT NUMBER S.0023151 5e. TASK NUMBER S.0023151 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER S.0023151 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES...Army Public Health Center (APHC), Injury Prevention Program, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010-5403 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER S

  17. The importance of physical fitness for injury prevention: part 1.

    PubMed

    Knapik, Joseph J

    2015-01-01

    Physical fitness can be defined as a set of attributes that allows the ability to perform physical activity. The attributes or components of fitness were identified by testing large numbers of individuals on physical performance tests (e.g., sit-ups, push-ups, runs, pull-ups, rope climbs, vertical jump, long jumps), and using statistical techniques to find tests that seem to share common performance requirements. These studies identified strength, muscular endurance, cardiorespiratory endurance, coordination, balance, flexibility, and body composition as important fitness components. Military studies have clearly shown that individuals with lower levels of cardiorespiratory endurance or muscular endurance are more likely to be injured and that improving fitness lowers injury risk. Those who are more fit perform activity at a lower percentage of their maximal capability and so can perform the task for a longer period of time, fatigue less rapidly, recover faster, and have greater reserve capacity for subsequent tasks. Fatigue alters movement patterns, putting stress on parts of the body unaccustomed to it, possibly increasing the likelihood of injury. Soldiers should develop and maintain high levels of physical fitness, not only for optimal performance of occupational tasks but also to reduce injury risk.

  18. Feedback Techniques to Target Functional Deficits Following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Implications for Motor Control and Reduction of Second Injury Risk

    PubMed Central

    Benjaminse, Anne; Hewett, Timothy E.; Paterno, Mark V.; Ford, Kevin R.; Otten, Egbert; Myer, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    Primary anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention training has been shown to reduce the risk of injury. Less is known about the effect of prevention on second injury after ACL reconstruction (ACLR). Given recent findings that second injury rates exceed 20 % in only the first year following the return to sport, it is imperative that rehabilitation after ACLR is scrutinized so that second injury preventative strategies can be optimized. A potential limitation of current rehabilitative processes following ACLR could be a deficiency in the transition from conscious awareness achieved during rehabilitation sessions to unexpected and automatic movements required for athletic activities on the field. Learning strategies with an internally directed focus have traditionally been utilized but may be less suitable for acquisition of control of complex motor skills required for sport reintegration. Conversely, an externally focused rehabilitation strategy may enhance skill acquisition more efficiently and increase the potential to transfer to competitive sport. This article presents new insights gained from the motor learning domain that may improve neuromuscular training programmes via increased retention from improved techniques and may ultimately reduce the incidence of second ACL injuries. PMID:24062274

  19. Patient positioning and prevention of injuries in patients undergoing laparoscopic and robot-assisted urologic procedures.

    PubMed

    Sukhu, Troy; Krupski, Tracey L

    2014-04-01

    Positioning injuries in the perioperative period are one of the inherent risks of surgery, but particularly in robot-assisted urologic surgery, and can result in often unrecognized morbidity. Injuries such as upper or lower extremity peripheral neuropathies occur via neural mechanisms and injuries such as compartment syndrome, rhabdomyolysis, ischemic optic neuropathy, and acute arterial occlusion occur via vascular mechanisms. The risk of injury may be exacerbated by operative and patient-related risk factors. Patient-related risk factors include ASA class and BMI, while surgery-related risk factors include physical orientation of the patient and operative length. These injuries can be prevented or reduced by joint effort of the surgeon, anesthesiologist, and operating room staff.

  20. Prevention of infections associated with combat-related thoracic and abdominal cavity injuries.

    PubMed

    Martin, Gregory J; Dunne, James R; Cho, John M; Solomkin, Joseph S

    2011-08-01

    Trauma-associated injuries of the thorax and abdomen account for the majority of combat trauma-associated deaths, and infectious complications are common in those who survive the initial injury. This review focuses on the initial surgical and medical management of torso injuries intended to diminish the occurrence of infection. The evidence for recommendations is drawn from published military and civilian data in case reports, clinical trials, meta-analyses, and previously published guidelines, in the interval since publication of the 2008 guidelines. The emphasis of these recommendations is on actions that can be taken in the forward-deployed setting within hours to days of injury. This evidence-based medicine review was produced to support the Guidelines for the Prevention of Infections Associated With Combat-Related Injuries: 2011 Update contained in this supplement of Journal of Trauma.

  1. Assessing injury severity in bicyclists involved in traffic accidents to more effectively prevent fatal bicycle injuries in Japan.

    PubMed

    Gomei, Sayaka; Hitosugi, Masahito; Ikegami, Keiichi; Tokudome, Shogo

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this study was to clarify the relationship between injury severity in bicyclists involved in traffic accidents and patient outcome or type of vehicle involved in order to propose effective measures to prevent fatal bicycle injuries. Hospital records were reviewed for all patients from 2007 to 2010 who had been involved in a traffic accident while riding a bicycle and were subsequently transferred to the Shock Trauma Center of Dokkyo Medical University Koshigaya Hospital. Patient outcomes and type of vehicle that caused the injury were examined. The mechanism of injury, Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) score, and Injury Severity Score (ISS) of the patient were determined. A total of 115 patients' records were reviewed. The mean patient age was 47.1 ± 27.4 years. The average ISS was 23.9, with an average maximum AIS (MAIS) score of 3.7. The ISS, MAIS score, head AIS score, and chest AIS score were well correlated with patient outcome. The head AIS score was significantly higher in patients who had died (mean of 4.4); however, the ISS, MAIS score, and head AIS score did not differ significantly according to the type of vehicle involved in the accident. The mean head AIS scores were as high as 2.4 or more for accidents involving any type of vehicle. This study provides useful information for forensic pathologists who suspect head injuries in bicyclists involved in traffic accidents. To effectively reduce bicyclist fatalities from traffic accidents, helmet use should be required for all bicyclists.

  2. Preventing Unintentional Injuries in the Home Using the Health Impact Pyramid

    PubMed Central

    Mack, Karin A.; Liller, Karen D.; Baldwin, Grant; Sleet, David

    2015-01-01

    Injuries continue to be the leading cause of death for the first four decades of life. These injuries result from a confluence of behavioral, physical, structural, environmental, and social factors. Taken together, these illustrate the importance of taking a broad and multileveled approach to injury prevention. Using examples from fall, fire, scald, and poisoning-related injuries, this article illustrates the utility of an approach that incorporates a social–environmental perspective in identifying and selecting interventions to improve the health and safety of individuals. Injury prevention efforts to prevent home injuries benefit from multilevel modifications of behavior, public policy, laws and enforcement, the environment, consumer products and engineering standards, as demonstrated with Frieden’s Health Impact Pyramid. A greater understanding, however, is needed to explain the associations between tiers. While interventions that include modifications of the social environment are being field-tested, much more work needs to be done in measuring social–environmental change and in evaluating these programs to disentangle what works best. PMID:25829110

  3. Data visualisation in surveillance for injury prevention and control: conceptual bases and case studies

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Ramon; Ordunez, Pedro; Soliz, Patricia N; Ballesteros, Michael F

    2016-01-01

    Background The complexity of current injury-related health issues demands the usage of diverse and massive data sets for comprehensive analyses, and application of novel methods to communicate data effectively to the public health community, decision-makers and the public. Recent advances in information visualisation, availability of new visual analytic methods and tools, and progress on information technology provide an opportunity for shaping the next generation of injury surveillance. Objective To introduce data visualisation conceptual bases, and propose a visual analytic and visualisation platform in public health surveillance for injury prevention and control. Methods The paper introduces data visualisation conceptual bases, describes a visual analytic and visualisation platform, and presents two real-world case studies illustrating their application in public health surveillance for injury prevention and control. Results Application of visual analytic and visualisation platform is presented as solution for improved access to heterogeneous data sources, enhance data exploration and analysis, communicate data effectively, and support decision-making. Conclusions Applications of data visualisation concepts and visual analytic platform could play a key role to shape the next generation of injury surveillance. Visual analytic and visualisation platform could improve data use, the analytic capacity, and ability to effectively communicate findings and key messages. The public health surveillance community is encouraged to identify opportunities to develop and expand its use in injury prevention and control. PMID:26728006

  4. Preventing unintentional injuries in the home using the Health Impact Pyramid.

    PubMed

    Mack, Karin A; Liller, Karen D; Baldwin, Grant; Sleet, David

    2015-04-01

    Injuries continue to be the leading cause of death for the first four decades of life. These injuries result from a confluence of behavioral, physical, structural, environmental, and social factors. Taken together, these illustrate the importance of taking a broad and multileveled approach to injury prevention. Using examples from fall, fire, scald, and poisoning-related injuries, this article illustrates the utility of an approach that incorporates a social-environmental perspective in identifying and selecting interventions to improve the health and safety of individuals. Injury prevention efforts to prevent home injuries benefit from multilevel modifications of behavior, public policy, laws and enforcement, the environment, consumer products and engineering standards, as demonstrated with Frieden's Health Impact Pyramid. A greater understanding, however, is needed to explain the associations between tiers. While interventions that include modifications of the social environment are being field-tested, much more work needs to be done in measuring social-environmental change and in evaluating these programs to disentangle what works best.

  5. Preventing and Treating Acute Kidney Injury Among Hospitalized Patients with Cirrhosis and Ascites: A Narrative Review.

    PubMed

    Tapper, Elliot B; Bonder, Alan; Cardenas, Andres

    2016-05-01

    Acute kidney injury in the setting of ascites and cirrhosis is a medical emergency characterized by significant morbidity and mortality. Clinicians other than gastroenterologists are often the front line against acute kidney injury for patients with ascites. Owing to the specifics of cirrhotic physiology, the treatment and prevention of acute kidney injury in the setting of ascites has unique features, widespread knowledge of which will benefit our patients with cirrhosis. Early detection and treatment of infection, maximization of cardiac output, and avoidance of medications that limit cardiorenal adaptations to arterial underfilling are part of a multipronged strategy to protect the renal function of our patients with cirrhosis and ascites.

  6. The training—injury prevention paradox: should athletes be training smarter and harder?

    PubMed Central

    Gabbett, Tim J

    2016-01-01

    Background There is dogma that higher training load causes higher injury rates. However, there is also evidence that training has a protective effect against injury. For example, team sport athletes who performed more than 18 weeks of training before sustaining their initial injuries were at reduced risk of sustaining a subsequent injury, while high chronic workloads have been shown to decrease the risk of injury. Second, across a wide range of sports, well-developed physical qualities are associated with a reduced risk of injury. Clearly, for athletes to develop the physical capacities required to provide a protective effect against injury, they must be prepared to train hard. Finally, there is also evidence that under-training may increase injury risk. Collectively, these results emphasise that reductions in workloads may not always be the best approach to protect against injury. Main thesis This paper describes the ‘Training-Injury Prevention Paradox’ model; a phenomenon whereby athletes accustomed to high training loads have fewer injuries than athletes training at lower workloads. The Model is based on evidence that non-contact injuries are not caused by training per se, but more likely by an inappropriate training programme. Excessive and rapid increases in training loads are likely responsible for a large proportion of non-contact, soft-tissue injuries. If training load is an important determinant of injury, it must be accurately measured up to twice daily and over periods of weeks and months (a season). This paper outlines ways of monitoring training load (‘internal’ and ‘external’ loads) and suggests capturing both recent (‘acute’) training loads and more medium-term (‘chronic’) training loads to best capture the player's training burden. I describe the critical variable—acute:chronic workload ratio—as a best practice predictor of training-related injuries. This provides the foundation for interventions to reduce players risk, and

  7. Household Safety: Preventing Injuries from Firearms (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... room a child shouldn't enter to prevent wandering into places that haven't been properly childproofed. ... the activities that develop your child's body and mind. Reviewed by: Mary L. Gavin, MD Date reviewed: ...

  8. Kinetic energy management in road traffic injury prevention: a call for action

    PubMed Central

    Khorasani-Zavareh, Davoud; Bigdeli, Maryam; Saadat, Soheil; Mohammadi, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: By virtue of their variability, mass and speed have important roles in transferring energies during a crash incidence (kinetic energy). The sum of kinetic energy is important in determining an injury severity and that is equal to one half of the vehicle mass multiplied by the square of the vehicle speed. To meet the Vision Zero policy (a traffic safety policy) prevention activities should be focused on vehicle speed management. Understanding the role of kinetic energy will help to develop measures to reduce the generation, distribution, and effects of this energy during a road traffic crash. Road traffic injury preventive activities necessitate Kinetic energy management to improve road user safety. PMID:24284810

  9. Fagonia olivieri prevented hepatorenal injuries induced with gentamicin in rat.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Umbreen; Khan, Muhammad Rashid

    2017-04-01

    Gentamicin is used clinically against Gram negative bacteria because of its efficacy. However, it causes renal injuries and failure at clinical dosages on account of induced oxidative stress. Fagonia olivieri is used in kidneys, liver, alimentary canal and cardiovascular disorders in local system of medicine in Pakistan. This study evaluates the protective abilities of methanol extract of F. olivieri (FOM) against the liver and renal injuries induced with gentamicin in rat. Sprague-Dawley male rats were treated with gentamicin (80mg/kg) alone or with silymarin (50mg/kg) as standard antioxidant drug. The other groups of rats were treated with gentamicin along with FOM (200mg/kg, 400mg/kg) or FOM (400mg/kg) alone. Effect of FOM was investigated on body weight, urine and serum biochemical markers, enzymatic antioxidants of renal and liver along with histopathological alterations. FOM was investigated by GC-MS for the presence of bioactive constituents. Treatment of FOM to rats ameliorated the gentamicin induced toxicity and increased the percent increase in body weight while decreased the absolute and relative weight of hepatic and kidneys. Gentamicin increased the level of specific gravity, count of RBCs and WBCs, and urobilinogen in urine; and AST, ALT, ALP, LDH, total bilirubin, total cholesterol, triglycerides and LDL in serum. Level of lipid peroxides in terms of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and DNA damages increased while the GSH contents and activity level of CAT, SOD, GSH-Px and GR decreased with gentamicin in liver and kidney samples. Co-treatment of FOM, dose dependently, alleviated the injuries induced with gentamicin. Histopathological studies of liver and kidneys supported the protective abilities of FOM. GC-MS analysis indicated the presence of various compounds including hexadecanoic acid, 2-methoxy-4-vinylphenol, benzoic acid and thalicpureine in the FOM. Results of the present investigation suggested the protective potential of FOM

  10. History of Injury and Violence as public health problems and emergence of the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control at CDC.

    PubMed

    Sleet, David A; Baldwin, Grant; Marr, Angela; Spivak, Howard; Patterson, Sara; Morrison, Christine; Holmes, Wendy; Peeples, Amy B; Degutis, Linda C

    2012-09-01

    Injuries and violence are among the oldest health problems facing humans. Only within the past 50 years, however, has the problem been addressed with scientific rigor using public health methods. The field of injury control began as early as 1913, but wasn't approached systematically or epidemiologically until the 1940s and 1950s. It accelerated rapidly between 1960 and 1985. Coupled with active federal and state interest in reducing injuries and violence, this period was marked by important medical, scientific, and public health advances. The National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC) was an outgrowth of this progress and in 2012 celebrated its 20th anniversary. NCIPC was created in 1992 after a series of government reports identified injury as one of the most important public health problems facing the nation. Congressional action provided the impetus for the creation of NCIPC as the lead federal agency for non-occupational injury and violence prevention. In subsequent years, NCIPC and its partners fostered many advances and built strong capacity. Because of the tragically high burden and cost of injuries and violence in the United States and around the globe, researchers, practitioners, and decision makers will need to redouble prevention efforts in the next 20 years. This article traces the history of injury and violence prevention as a public health priority-- including the evolution and current structure of the CDC's National Center for Injury Prevention and Control.

  11. Sports injuries in floorball: a prospective one-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Snellman, K; Parkkari, J; Kannus, P; Leppälä, J; Vuori, I; Järvinen, M

    2001-10-01

    Two hundred and ninety-five licensed floorball players from Finnish premier to fifth division were observed prospectively for one season to study the incidence, nature, causes and severity of floorball injuries. During the study period, 100 out of the 295 (34 %) players sustained 120 injuries. Thirty-seven percent (73/199) of the male players and 28 % (27/96) of the females suffered from an injury. The injury rate was 1.0 per 1000 practice hours for both sexes. The injury rates per 1000 game hours were 23.7 for men and 15.9 for women. One hundred injuries (83 %) were acute and the remaining 20 (17 %) were overuse injuries. Sprain was the most common type of injury in men while overuse injuries were the most frequent injury type in women. The lower extremity was involved in 62 %, spine or trunk in 19 % and upper extremity in 10 % of the injuries. The most commonly injured sites were the knee and ankle (22 % and 20 % of all injuries), followed by head and neck (8 %). In both sexes the majority of injuries were minor, level II, injuries. Ten of the knee injuries (38 %) were serious, level IV injuries, of which seven were ACL ruptures. In conclusion, the individual risk of injury in floorball is relatively low in game practice while rather high during the game itself. Before initiation of clinical trials on prevention of floorball injuries, an exact knowledge of the risk factors and mechanisms of floorball injuries are needed.

  12. Injury Prevention Practices as Depicted in G- and PG-Rated Movies, 2008-2012.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Andrew R; Tongren, J Eric; Gilchrist, Julie

    2015-08-01

    Unintentional injuries are the leading cause of death among children in the United States. The use of recommended safety practices can reduce injuries. Children often learn behaviors from media exposure. Children's movies released in 1995-2007 infrequently depicted appropriate injury prevention practices. The aim of this study was to determine if injury prevention practices in children's movies have improved. The top grossing 25 G- and PG-rated movies in the United States per year for 2008-2012 were eligible for inclusion in the study. Movies or scenes were excluded if they were animated, not set in the present day, fantasy, documentary, or not in English. Injury prevention practices involving riding in a motor vehicle, walking, boating, bicycling, and four other activities were recorded for characters with speaking roles. Fifty-six (45%) of the 125 movies met the inclusion criteria. A total of 603 person-scenes were examined involving 175 (29%) children and 428 (71%) adults. Thirty-eight person-scenes involved crashes or falls, resulting in four injuries and no deaths. Overall, 59% (353/603) of person-scenes showed appropriate injury prevention practices. This included 313 (70%) of 445 motor-vehicle passengers who were belted; 15 (30%) of 50 pedestrians who used a crosswalk, 2 (7%) of 30 boaters who wore personal flotation devices, and 8 (29%) of 28 bicyclists who wore helmets. In comparison with previous studies, there were significant increases in usage of seat belts, crosswalks, personal flotation devices, and bicycle helmets. However, 41% of person-scenes still showed unsafe practices and the consequences of those behaviors were infrequently depicted.

  13. Prevention of Sports Injuries by Marine Omega-3 Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    Bryhn, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Sport injuries are common and costly for the professional athlete, the "weekend warrior," and the community. Acute injuries are treated according to current guidelines with the aim of bringing the athlete back into the arena. These guidelines have not taken into account new scientific results of the inflammatory process following a trauma. The 4 hallmarks of inflammation, namely, pain, swelling, redness, and heat, are results of an adequate inflammatory response with the aim of bringing the affected tissue back to restitution (Latin: restitutio ad integrum). Cooling of the affected limb and anti-inflammatory drugs are widely used but may deter healing. The healing process is governed by fatty acids of the omega-3 and omega-6 series. In order to facilitate healing, these fatty acids have to be present in significant amounts in the affected tissues before the trauma occurs. This is particularly relevant for marine omega-3 fatty acids, which are often running low due to insignificant intake of seafood, common in individuals practicing sports. High-energy sports often lead to head and brain trauma. Continuous head traumata may even result in later mental defects. Saturation of brain cells with omega-3 fatty acids, in particular docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), may facilitate healing after brain trauma, thereby counteracting negative long-term results. The present understanding of a normal inflammatory process leading to restitution will be discussed along with data from recent scientific trials.

  14. Neuromuscular Coordination Deficit Persists 12 Months after ACL Reconstruction But Can Be Modulated by 6 Weeks of Kettlebell Training: A Case Study in Women's Elite Soccer

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Christoffer H.; Bencke, Jesper; Ørntoft, Christina; Linnebjerg, Connie; Hölmich, Per

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present single-case study was to investigate the effect of 6 weeks' kettlebell training on the neuromuscular risk profile for ACL injury in a high-risk athlete returning to sport after ACL reconstruction. A female elite soccer player (age 21 years) with no previous history of ACL injury went through neuromuscular screening as measured by EMG preactivity of vastus lateralis and semitendinosus during a standardized sidecutting maneuver. Subsequently, the player experienced a noncontact ACL injury. The player was screened again following postreconstruction rehabilitation, then underwent 6-week kettlebell training, and was subsequently screened again at 6-week follow-up. Prior to and after postreconstruction rehabilitation the player demonstrated a neuromuscular profile during sidecutting known to increase the risk for noncontact ACL injury, that is, reduced EMG preactivity for semitendinosus and elevated EMG preactivity for vastus lateralis. Subsequently, the 6-week kettlebell training increased semitendinosus muscle preactivity during sidecutting by 38 percentage points to a level equivalent to a neuromuscular low-risk profile. An ACL rehabilitated female athlete with a high-risk neuromuscular profile changed to low-risk in response to 6 weeks of kettlebell training. Thus, short-term kettlebell exercise with documented high levels of medial hamstring activation was found to transfer into high medial hamstring preactivation during a sidecutting maneuver. PMID:28197354

  15. Neuromuscular Coordination Deficit Persists 12 Months after ACL Reconstruction But Can Be Modulated by 6 Weeks of Kettlebell Training: A Case Study in Women's Elite Soccer.

    PubMed

    Zebis, Mette K; Andersen, Christoffer H; Bencke, Jesper; Ørntoft, Christina; Linnebjerg, Connie; Hölmich, Per; Thorborg, Kristian; Aagaard, Per; Andersen, Lars L

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present single-case study was to investigate the effect of 6 weeks' kettlebell training on the neuromuscular risk profile for ACL injury in a high-risk athlete returning to sport after ACL reconstruction. A female elite soccer player (age 21 years) with no previous history of ACL injury went through neuromuscular screening as measured by EMG preactivity of vastus lateralis and semitendinosus during a standardized sidecutting maneuver. Subsequently, the player experienced a noncontact ACL injury. The player was screened again following postreconstruction rehabilitation, then underwent 6-week kettlebell training, and was subsequently screened again at 6-week follow-up. Prior to and after postreconstruction rehabilitation the player demonstrated a neuromuscular profile during sidecutting known to increase the risk for noncontact ACL injury, that is, reduced EMG preactivity for semitendinosus and elevated EMG preactivity for vastus lateralis. Subsequently, the 6-week kettlebell training increased semitendinosus muscle preactivity during sidecutting by 38 percentage points to a level equivalent to a neuromuscular low-risk profile. An ACL rehabilitated female athlete with a high-risk neuromuscular profile changed to low-risk in response to 6 weeks of kettlebell training. Thus, short-term kettlebell exercise with documented high levels of medial hamstring activation was found to transfer into high medial hamstring preactivation during a sidecutting maneuver.

  16. Genome-wide association screens for Achilles tendon and ACL tears and tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Roos, Thomas R.; Roos, Andrew K.; Kleimeyer, John P.; Ahmed, Marwa A.; Goodlin, Gabrielle T.; Fredericson, Michael; Ioannidis, John P. A.; Avins, Andrew L.; Dragoo, Jason L.

    2017-01-01

    Achilles tendinopathy or rupture and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture are substantial injuries affecting athletes, associated with delayed recovery or inability to return to competition. To identify genetic markers that might be used to predict risk for these injuries, we performed genome-wide association screens for these injuries using data from the Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA) cohort consisting of 102,979 individuals. We did not find any single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with either of these injuries with a p-value that was genome-wide significant (p<5x10-8). We found, however, four and three polymorphisms with p-values that were borderline significant (p<10−6) for Achilles tendon injury and ACL rupture, respectively. We then tested SNPs previously reported to be associated with either Achilles tendon injury or ACL rupture. None showed an association in our cohort with a false discovery rate of less than 5%. We obtained, however, moderate to weak evidence for replication in one case; specifically, rs4919510 in MIR608 had a p-value of 5.1x10-3 for association with Achilles tendon injury, corresponding to a 7% chance of false replication. Finally, we tested 2855 SNPs in 90 candidate genes for musculoskeletal injury, but did not find any that showed a significant association below a false discovery rate of 5%. We provide data containing summary statistics for the entire genome, which will be useful for future genetic studies on these injuries. PMID:28358823

  17. 75 FR 34750 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-18

    ... Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Cooperative Agreement Program for the National Academic Centers of... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the aforementioned meeting: Times and Dates: 8...), Title 5, U.S.C., and the Determination of the Director, Management Analysis and Services Office,...

  18. 75 FR 21307 - Injury Prevention Program; Announcement Type: Cooperative Agreement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-23

    ... Promotion/Disease Prevention, Public Health Nurses, Community Health Representative, etc); and (3) home... advocacy to key stakeholders, i.e., Tribal leadership, health board and community. Present final report for...) in which regular or routine education, library, day care, health care of early childhood...

  19. Preventing Injuries among Watercraft Paddlers: Steady as You Go!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gauthier, Michele M.

    1989-01-01

    Recreational watercraft paddlers are susceptible to problems ranging from simple contusions and blisters to drowning. Most of these problems can be prevented by simple precautions, such as proper technique, good warmup, carrying first-aid kits, wearing personal flotation devices, and respecting the environment. (Author/SM)

  20. 75 FR 30041 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-28

    ... Information: Gregory Anderson, M.S., M.P.H., Scientific Review Officer, CDC, 1600 Clifton Road, NE., Mailstop... Date: 12 p.m.-2 p.m., June 15, 2010 (Closed). Place: Teleconference. Status: The meeting will be closed..., Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. BILLING CODE 4163-18-P...