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Sample records for acl tunnel placement

  1. A Simple Radiographic Sign of Vertical Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tunnel Placement.

    PubMed

    Farrow, Lutul Dashaun; Morris, Parisa M; Huston, Kellen L; Hall, Evan Tyler; Kaar, Scott

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe a novel radiographic sign indicative of vertical tunnel placement following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. We reviewed 190 consecutive ACL reconstructions. Operative records, patient charts, arthroscopic images, and preoperative and postoperative orthogonal plain radiographic images were reviewed. We made special note of the operative technique. Note was made of tunnel position and whether the posterior (proximal) aspect of Blumensaat line was violated on standard lateral knee radiographic images. Of 190 patients, 17 patients did not have postoperative imaging and were excluded. Of the 173 remaining knees, 163 were primary ACL reconstructions and 10 were revision ACL reconstructions. We found that no anatomically placed ACL femoral tunnel violated Blumensaat line. In all revision cases exhibiting violation of Blumensaat line, a new femoral tunnel was able to be drilled while completely avoiding the previously placed, nonanatomic ACL femoral tunnel. The principal findings of our study demonstrate that violation of Blumensaat line following ACL reconstruction is an indicator of vertical, nonanatomic femoral tunnel placement. Furthermore, presence of this radiographic sign indicates that an anatomically placed femoral tunnel may be drilled while completely avoiding the existing femoral tunnel during cases of revision ACL reconstruction.

  2. Principles of tunneled cuffed catheter placement.

    PubMed

    Heberlein, Wolf

    2011-12-01

    Tunneled cuffed catheters provide reliable and instant long-term intravenous access for a large variety of therapeutic purposes, including chemotherapy, parenteral nutrition, and apheresis. The most frequent application is for patients with renal failure as an access device for hemodialysis. In this capacity, the rate of catheter use has remained stable in the United States, despite the promotion of arteriovenous fistulas and arteriovenous grafts. The latter 2 procedures achieve superior longevity and much higher cost-efficiency. Tunneled catheters, however, serve as bridging devices during maturation of newly placed arteriovenous fistulas or as the final option in patients in whom fistulas and grafts have failed. High-quality vascular access is a hallmark of interventional radiology, and its significance for patient care and for our specialty cannot be overestimated. Familiarity with basic concepts of the device and procedural techniques are crucial to achieve successful long-term venous access. The following article demonstrates key concepts of tunneled venous catheter placement by means of dialysis, inasmuch as dialysis catheters represent the most commonly placed tunneled central venous catheters. The principles of placement and techniques utilized, however, are applicable to devices that are used for chemotherapy or parenteral nutrition, such as the Hickman, Broviac, Groshong, or tunneled peripherally inserted central catheters.

  3. Correlation between fixation systems elasticity and bone tunnel widening after ACL reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Giorgio, Nicola; Moretti, Lorenzo; Pignataro, Paolo; Carrozzo, Massimiliano; Vicenti, Giovanni; Moretti, Biagio

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Femoral and tibial tunnel widening (TW) after ACL reconstruction is a phenomenon increasing talk in the literature. It is underlying biological and mechanical causes. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between bone tunnel enlargement and two different ACL fixation systems. Patients and Methods 40 patient underwent ACL reconstruction with hamstring; randomly divided into group A with 20 patients treated with stiff systems (femoral Rigidfix and tibial interference screw), and into group B, with 20 patients treated with morel elastic system (femoral and tibial Tight-rope). Evaluated postoperatively with knee MRI at 40 days, 3 months, 6 months to measure bone tunnel diameters widening. Results At 40 days tunnel widening between two groups shows no statistically difference. At 3 months postoperatively, femoral bone tunnel widening amounted on average to 1.84 mm in middle of tunnel and 1 mm at the mouth in joint in group A, and respectively 3.2 mm and 2.5 mm in group B (p<0.05). Tibial tunnel widening was 1.24 mm at the mouth in joint and 1.3 mm in middle in group A and respectively 2.26 mm and 2.43 mm in group B (p<0.05). At 6 months femoral tunnel widening amounted on average to 2.45 mm in middle and 1.35 mm at the mouth in joint in group A and respectively 3.5 mm and 2.7 mm in group B (p<0.01). Tibial tunnel widening amounted on average to 1.27 at mouth in joint and 1 mm in middle of tunnel in group A and respectively 2.6 mm and 2.3 mm in group B (p<0.01). Conclusions This study results suggest elastic fixation system increases bone tunnel enlargement after ACL reconstruction with hamstring without correlation with worse clinical performance. Level of evidence IV. PMID:28217568

  4. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF ACL RECONSTRUCTION WITH ANATOMICAL POSITIONING OF THE TUNNELS USING THE PATELLAR TENDON VERSUS HAMSTRING TENDON

    PubMed Central

    de Pádua, Vitor Barion Castro; Maldonado, Hilário; Vilela, Júlio César Rodrigues; Provenza, Alexandre Ribeira; Monteiro, Cleverson; de Oliveira Neto, Heleno Cavalcante

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare ACL reconstruction with anatomical positioning of the tunnels using the hamstring or patellar tendons. Methods: We prospectively evaluated 52 patients who underwent ACL reconstruction using the Chambat's technique, with anatomical positioning of the tunnels drilled outside in. They were divided into group A, with 27 patients, using the patellar tendon as a graft, and group B, with 25 patients, using the hamstring. Results: In group A 26 patients were very satisfied or satisfied and 1 unhappy, in group B. 25 patients were very satisfied or satisfied with the procedure (p = 0.990). According to the Lysholm scale, group A had a mean score of 96.11 and group B, 95.32 (p=0.594). In relation to preoperative IKDC, 100% of the patients in group A and 92% of those in group B were IKDC C or D (p = 0.221); in the assessment with a minimum of two-year follow-up, 96% of group A and 92% of group B were IKDC A or B (p = 0.256). The Lachman test, pivot shift, return to sports activities, and the comparative difference in anterior translation (RolimeterTM) also showed no statistically significant difference. In group A, 5 patients (18.5%) were unable to kneel on a hard surface, whereas no patient in group B had this complaint. Conclusion: The anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction presents similar results using the hamstring or patellar tendon with anatomical positioning of the tunnels. Drilling the femoral tunnel outside in is a reproducible and accurate option in the correct placement the femoral tunnel. PMID:27027082

  5. In vivo bone tunnel evaluation of nanoparticle-grafts using an ACL reconstruction rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Grant, Sheila A; Smith, Sarah E; Schmidt, Hilary; Pfeiffer, Ferris; Kuroki, Kei; Sherman, Seth; White, Richard; Grant, David A

    2017-04-01

    Acellular human gracilis tendons conjugated with gold nanoparticles (AuNP) and hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (nano-HAp) were used as a graft in an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction rabbit model. The ACLs of 11 New Zealand rabbits were reconstructed using grafts conjugated without nanoparticles, with AuNP only, and with both AuNP and nano-HAp. Semi-quantitative histological scoring of bone tunnel portion of grafts was performed after 14 weeks. Bone tunnels were scored for graft degeneration, graft remodeling, percentage of new host fibrous connective, collateral connection, head-to-head connection, graft collagen fiber organization, new host fibrous connective tissue organization, and graft and interface vascularity. All grafts were intact at 14 weeks. Results of bone tunnel scoring indicate remodeling in all graft types with new organized host fibrous connective tissue, head-to-head connection to bone and mild inflammation associated with remodeling. Components of the 20 nm AuNP grafts have significantly more graft degeneration, more new host fibrous connective tissue, and more vascularity compared to crosslinked grafts. Comparison between femoral and tibial tunnel scores indicate more degeneration in femoral tunnels compared to tibial tunnels. Overall results indicated potentially enhanced remodeling from the use of 20 nm AuNP grafts. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 1071-1082, 2017.

  6. A three-dimensional finite element stress analysis for tunnel placement and buttons in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Au, Anthony G; Raso, V James; Liggins, Adrian B; Otto, David D; Amirfazli, A

    2005-04-01

    This communication reports the results of a three-dimensional finite element (FE) model of stresses in a surgically altered femur and tibia. The model incorporated a novel approach in implementing orthotropic and inhomogeneous bone properties and non-uniform distributed loading. Cortical, cancellous, and subchondral bone of the femur and the tibia were modeled. Mechanical properties for the cortical and cancellous bone were mapped from published data characterizing the anisotropy and inhomogeneity of the bone properties. Mesh adequacy was determined using stress convergence and strain energy error convergence. Qualitatively, the results of the study compare well with experimental principal compressive strains from the literature. With respect to tunnel placement in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, the model predicted stress-shielding at the postero-lateral region of the tunnel wall, and increased stress at the postero-medial region of the tunnel wall. The stresses in the cancellous bone beneath the tunnel were, in general, lower than those above the tunnel. Prolonged stress shielding leads to bone resorption of the posterior tunnel wall leading to tunnel enlargement, and possible compromise of the ACL reconstruction. The stresses on the femoral cortex produced from a button-type fixation were noticeable for low levels of loading; the stress levels were very similar in models incorporating bone properties of patients aged 45 and 65. Repeated compression of the femoral cortex at these stress levels may cause microdamage to the cortex eventually resulting in fatigue failure.

  7. Assessing 3D tunnel position in ACL reconstruction using a novel single image 3D-2D registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, X.; Yau, W. P.; Otake, Y.; Cheung, P. Y. S.; Hu, Y.; Taylor, R. H.

    2012-02-01

    The routinely used procedure for evaluating tunnel positions following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions based on standard X-ray images is known to pose difficulties in terms of obtaining accurate measures, especially in providing three-dimensional tunnel positions. This is largely due to the variability in individual knee joint pose relative to X-ray plates. Accurate results were reported using postoperative CT. However, its extensive usage in clinical routine is hampered by its major requirement of having CT scans of individual patients, which is not available for most ACL reconstructions. These difficulties are addressed through the proposed method, which aligns a knee model to X-ray images using our novel single-image 3D-2D registration method and then estimates the 3D tunnel position. In the proposed method, the alignment is achieved by using a novel contour-based 3D-2D registration method wherein image contours are treated as a set of oriented points. However, instead of using some form of orientation weighting function and multiplying it with a distance function, we formulate the 3D-2D registration as a probability density estimation using a mixture of von Mises-Fisher-Gaussian (vMFG) distributions and solve it through an expectation maximization (EM) algorithm. Compared with the ground-truth established from postoperative CT, our registration method in an experiment using a plastic phantom showed accurate results with errors of (-0.43°+/-1.19°, 0.45°+/-2.17°, 0.23°+/-1.05°) and (0.03+/-0.55, -0.03+/-0.54, -2.73+/-1.64) mm. As for the entry point of the ACL tunnel, one of the key measurements, it was obtained with high accuracy of 0.53+/-0.30 mm distance errors.

  8. In vivo bone tunnel remodeling in symptomatic patients after ACL reconstruction: a retrospective comparison of articular and extra-articular fixation

    PubMed Central

    Mathis, Dominic T.; Rasch, Helmut; Hirschmann, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background there is only a paucity of studies dealing with bone remodeling within the tunnels after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of tendon graft type and surgical fixation technique on bone tunnel remodeling in patients with symptomatic knees after ACL reconstruction. Methods in a retrospective study 99mTc-HDP bone tracer uptake (BTU) in SPECT/CT of 57 knees with symptoms of pain and/or instability after ACL reconstruction was investigated. All 57 knees were subdivided according their anatomy (femur and tibia), fixation (articular versus extra-articular fixation) and graft types into eight groups: femoral-articular versus extra-articular fixation using bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) and hamstring autografts; tibial-articular versus extra-articular fixation using patellar tendon and hamstring autografts; BTU grading for each area of the localisation scheme were recorded. Tunnel diameter and length was measured in the CT scans. Results BTU was higher for the articular fixation in the femur and for the extra-articular fixation in the tibial tunnel. Patellar tendon graft fixation showed a significantly higher BTU in the superior-lateral and posterior-central area of the tibia, meaning the areas of the tibial tunnel near the entrance into the joint. Tunnel enlargement correlated significantly with increased BTU (p<0.05). Conclusion assessment of in vivo bone tunnel remodelling in symptomatic patients after ACL reconstruction revealed different patterns of BTU with regards to graft and fixation method. PMID:26958543

  9. ACL Revision

    PubMed Central

    Costa-Paz, Matias; Dubois, Julieta Puig; Zicaro, Juan Pablo; Rasumoff, Alejandro; Yacuzzi, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate a series of patients one year after an ACL revision with clinical evaluation and MRI, to consider their condition before returning to sports activities. Methods: A descriptive, prospective and longitudinal study was performed. A series of patients who underwent an ACL revision between March 2014 and March 2015 were evaluated after one year post surgery. They were evaluated using the Lysholm score, IKDC, Tegner, artrometry and MRI (3.0 t). A signal pattern and osteointegration was determined in the MRI. Graft signal intensity of the ACL graft using the signal/noise quotient value (SNQ) was also determined to evaluate the ligamentatization process state. Results: A total of 18 male patients were evaluated with a mean age of 31 years old.Average scores were: Lysholm 88 points, IKDC 80 points, Pre-surgical Tegner 9 points and postoperative 4 points. Artrhometry (KT1000) at 20 newtons showed a side to side difference of less than 3 mm in 88%. Only 44% of patients returned to their previous sport activity one year after revision.The MRI showed a heterogeneous signal in neoligaments in 34% of patients. SNQ showed graft integration in only 28%. Synovial fluid was found in bone-graft interphase in 44% of tunnels, inferring partial osteointegration. The heterogeneous signal was present in 50% of patients who did not return to the previous sport level activity. (Fisher statistics: p = 0.043) There were no meaningful differences in patients with auto or allografts. Conclusion: Although the clinical evaluation was satisfactory, only 44% of patients returned to the previous level of sport activity one year after the ACL surgery. The ligamentatization process was found in 28% of knees evaluated with MRI one year later. Partial osteointegration is inferred in 44%. Results showed a meaningful relation between the signal of neoligaments in the MRI and the return to sport activity in said series of patients. MRI is a useful tool

  10. Accuracy and Learning Curve of Femoral Tunnel Placement in Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hiemstra, Laurie Anne; Kerslake, Sarah; O'Brien, Catherine L; Lafave, Mark R

    2017-02-13

    The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of femoral tunnel placement in a medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction (MPFL-R) cohort. The secondary purpose was to establish the evidence of a learning curve to achieve acceptable femoral tunnel placement during MPFL-R. Two surgeons, using lateral radiographs, assessed 73 subjects post-MPFL-R. Femoral tunnel accuracy and direction of tunnel error were measured in relation to Schöttle's point (A-T distance). Interrater reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient 2,k) of these measures was calculated. Learning curve of accurate femoral tunnel placement was examined by dividing the patient cohort into quartiles. A one-way analysis of variance was used to assess the quartiles for accuracy of femoral tunnel position and surgical time. In relation to Schöttle's point, 66/73 (90.4%) femoral tunnels were categorized as being in a "good" or "excellent" position and 7/73 (9.6%) were categorized as being in a "poor" position. Evidence of an MPFL-R learning curve was established via a statistically significant difference in the mean A to T distance for the four quartiles (F [3, 69] = 6.41, p = 0.001). There was also a statistically significant difference in the surgical time for the four quartiles (F [3, 69] = 8.71, p = 0.001). In this series, accurate femoral tunnels were placed more than 90% of the time during MPFL-R. A clear learning curve for accurate femoral tunnel placement was demonstrated both with respect to distance of the tunnel from Schöttle point and with regard to surgical time. Level of evidence was IV.

  11. ACL Reconstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the major ligaments in your knee. ACL injuries most commonly occur during sports that involve sudden stops and changes in direction — such as basketball, soccer, football, tennis, downhill skiing, volleyball and gymnastics. In ...

  12. ACL reconstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... This increases the chance you may have a meniscus tear. ACL reconstruction may be used for these ... When other ligaments are also injured When your meniscus is torn Before surgery, talk to your health ...

  13. ACL Revision in Synthetic ACL graft failure

    PubMed Central

    Etcheto, H. Rivarola; Zordán, J.; Escobar, G.; Collazo, C.; Palanconi, M.; Autorino, C.; Salinas, E. Alvarez

    2017-01-01

    The development of synthetic grafts as an alternative to biological grafts for reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament dates from 1980. The interest is awakened due to the potential advantages of: The absence of morbidity associated with donor site, and early return to sport. However, this surgical technique has had multiple complications associated with graft: mechanical failures (synthetic graft failure, loss of fixation), synovial foreign body reaction, recurrent stroke, recurrent instability and ultimately, early osteoarthritis. Objectives: We describe the synthetic graft failure LCA, intraoperative findings and details of surgical technique. Methods: Patient 35 years old, with a history of ACL reconstruction four years of evolution in another health center, consultation with the Service knee arthroscopy for acute knee pain left knee during secondary sporting event to a rotation mechanism with fixed foot. On physical examination, presents and positive Lachman maneuver Pivot. Radiografia in a widening of the tibial tunnel is observed. NMR shows a discontinuity of fibers of synthetic graft. Results: First time arthroscopic revision where synthetic plastic LCA identifies with Disruption fiber pattern. Intraoperatively, hypertrophic chronic synovitis localized predominantly in intercóndilo is observed. debridement thereof is performed, and proceeds to the extraction of the synthetic ligament. Then he was made prior cruentado and revival of the edges of the tunnel, filling them with non-irradiated structural bone allograft. At four months as planned and after confirmation by studies incorporating bone graft was performed the second time with the new plastic ACL. It was planned like a primary graft surgery with autologous hamstring prepared in fourfold form, and fixation with modified transtibial technique Biotransfix system proximal and distal screw Biocomposite (arthrex®). A quadruple graft 9 mm was obtained, making good positioning of tunnels and stable

  14. The anatomy of the proximal tibia in pediatric and adolescent patients: implications for ACL reconstruction and prevention of physeal arrest.

    PubMed

    Shea, Kevin G; Apel, Peter J; Pfeiffer, Ronald P; Traughber, Paul D

    2007-04-01

    shallow angle of inclination. The proximal tibial physis and apophysis is vulnerable to injury by drill hole placement during ACL reconstruction in skeletally immature patients. This paper defines the anatomic relationship of the apophyseal and epiphyseal regions of the physis in the proximal tibia. The volume of injury to the physis can be reduced by avoiding tunnel placement that is too lateral or too proximal on the tibia. A better understanding of these relationships may guide the placement of tibial drill holes, which have a lower risk of producing significant physeal damage.

  15. ACL reconstruction - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction - discharge; ACL reconstruction - discharge ... had surgery to reconstruct your anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The surgeon drilled holes in the bones of ...

  16. Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries KidsHealth > For Teens > Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) ... and Recovery Coping With an ACL Injury About ACL Injuries A torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is ...

  17. Modified Transtibial versus Anteromedial Portal Technique in Single Bundle ACL Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Emiliano Alvarez; Etcheto, Horacio Rivarola; Blanchod, Cristian Collazo; Escobar, Gonzalo; Zordan, Jesuan; Autorino, Carlos María

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study is to determine whether it is possible to achieves a similar anatomical placement of the femoral tunnel with a modified transtibial ACL single bundle reconstruction tecnique compared to anteromedial transportal technique. Results were evaluated by tomographic comparisons between patients from both groups. Methods: 36 patients (36 knees) who were candidates for an ACL single bundle reconstruction with patellar bone graft were included in the study. Patients were randomly allocated using a computerized sequence into two groups. 18 patients were assigned each group (modified transtibial vs AM transportal technique). Surgery was performed by the same surgical team in both groups. Femoral tunnel quadrant placement, oblicuity in the coronal and sagittal planes and diameter of the femoral tunnel were assesed tomographically blinded by two observers and statistical comparison between groups was realized. Results: Average distance measured from posterior edge of the condyle to the femoral tunnel ( measured as a proportion respect to the T line) was similar in both groups ( Group I : 32.7 % +- 5.1% ; Group 2: 32.4 % +-4.4% , p = 0.85). Average distance measured from the Blumensaat line to the femoral tunnel (measured as a proportion respect to the H line) was similar in both groups ( Group I: 28.5% 4.49 % Group II , 31.5% of 4.83% p = 0.06). Average angulation values of the femoral tunnel in the coronal plane were lower in Group I than in Group II (Group I = 34.8 ° range 32.7 ° - 38.6 ° and 41.2 ° range Group II 36.7 ° - 43.1 ° P = 0.0016 ). Average angulation values of the femoral tunnel in the sagittal plane were similar in both groups (Group I 40.2 ° range 38.4 ° - 43.4 ° ; Group II 38 1 ° range 36.6 ° - 40.2 ° p = 0.17).. The average diameter of the femoral tunnel was significantly higher in group I than in Group II (Group I 11 mm 0.84 mm and 10.2 mm Group II 0.65mm p = 0.007) . Conclusion: The modified transtibial technique

  18. Continuous ACL graft, results

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Jorge Luis; Vega, Marcelo; Matesevach, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: describe our technique using hamstring graft that respects the proximal continuity of Semitendinosus and uses the superior biological potential of the distal periosteum., preserving and stressing the ST reinforce the retropulsión and dynamic control of external rotation of the knee. Here the technique, results, difficulties and foundations. Methods: The sample of this research was composed of 229 cases operated between 01/03/97 and 01/03/13 in Arthroscopy Private Center., 166 male and 63 female, the postop follow-up was 86 months. Evaluated with IKDC, Lysholm, Hamstring EMG. Comparative histology study in rabbits. Results: IKDC and Lysholm score showed 93% of very good results. Conclusion: Dynamic ACL reconstruction achieves a static-dynamic stabilization of the knee. Grafts have a plus in their biological potential (proximal continuity - osteo-periosteal insertion of the tendons in the femoral tunnel). The hamstring maintains its functionality (EMG). 93% satisfactory results (IKDC, Lysholm). It is a valid surgical option in ACL injuries.

  19. Femoral and Tibial Tunnel Diameter and Bioabsorbable Screw Findings After Double-Bundle ACL Reconstruction in 5-Year Clinical and MRI Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Kiekara, Tommi; Paakkala, Antti; Suomalainen, Piia; Huhtala, Heini; Järvelä, Timo

    2017-01-01

    Background: Tunnel enlargement is frequently seen in short-term follow-up after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). According to new evidence, tunnel enlargement may be followed by tunnel narrowing, but the long-term evolution of the tunnels is currently unknown. Hypothesis/Purpose: The hypothesis was that tunnel enlargement is followed by tunnel narrowing caused by ossification as seen in follow-up using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ossification pattern of the tunnels, the communication of the 2 femoral and 2 tibial tunnels, and screw absorption findings in MRI. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Thirty-one patients underwent anatomic double-bundle ACLR with hamstring grafts and bioabsorbable interference screw fixation and were followed with MRI and clinical evaluation at 2 and 5 years postoperatively. Results: The mean tunnel enlargement at 2 years was 58% and reduced to 46% at 5 years. Tunnel ossification resulted in evenly narrowed tunnels in 44%, in conical tunnels in 48%, and fully ossified tunnels in 8%. Tunnel communication increased from 13% to 23% in the femur and from 19% to 23% in the tibia between 2 and 5 years and was not associated with knee laxity. At 5 years, 54% of the screws were not visible, with 35% of the screws replaced by a cyst and 19% fully ossified. Tunnel cysts were not associated with worse patient-reported outcomes or knee laxity. Patients with a tibial anteromedial tunnel cyst had higher Lysholm scores than patients without a cyst (93 and 84, P = .03). Conclusion: Tunnel enlargement was followed by tunnel narrowing in 5-year follow-up after double-bundle ACLR. Tunnel communication and tunnel cysts were frequent MRI findings and not associated with adverse clinical evaluation results. PMID:28203605

  20. Transphyseal ACL Reconstruction in Skeletally Immature Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Aristides I.; Lakomkin, Nikita; Fabricant, Peter D.; Lawrence, J. Todd R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Most studies examining the safety and efficacy of transphyseal anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction for skeletally immature patients utilize transtibial drilling. Independent femoral tunnel drilling may impart a different pattern of distal femoral physeal involvement. Purpose: To radiographically assess differences in distal femoral physeal disruption between transtibial and independent femoral tunnel drilling. We hypothesized that more oblique tunnels associated with independent drilling involve a significantly larger area of physeal disruption compared with vertically oriented tunnels. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: We analyzed skeletally immature patients aged between 10 and 15 years who underwent transphyseal ACL reconstruction utilizing an independent femoral tunnel drilling technique between January 1, 2008, and March 31, 2011. These patients were matched with a transtibial technique cohort based on age and sex. Radiographic measurements were recorded from preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and postoperative radiographs. Results: Ten patients in each group were analyzed. There were significant differences between independent drilling and transtibial drilling cohorts in the estimated area of physeal disruption (1.64 vs 0.74 cm2; P < .001), femoral tunnel angles (32.1° vs 72.8°; P < .001), and medial/lateral location of the femoral tunnel (24.2 vs 36.1 mm from lateral cortex; P = .001), respectively. There was a significant inverse correlation between femoral tunnel angle and estimated area of distal femoral physeal disruption (r = –0.8255, P = .003). Conclusion: Femoral tunnels created with an independent tunnel drilling technique disrupt a larger area of the distal femoral physis and create more eccentric tunnels compared with a transtibial technique. Clinical Relevance: As most studies noting the safety of transphyseal ACL reconstruction have utilized a central, vertical femoral tunnel

  1. A new technique for femoral and tibial tunnel bone grafting using the OATS harvesters in revision anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Said, Hatem G; Baloch, Khalid; Green, Marcus

    2006-07-01

    Revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is becoming more frequent, especially in specialized centers, because of the large numbers of primary ACL procedures performed. In 2-stage revisions, bone grafting of the tunnels may be undertaken if the primary position was inaccurate or if osteolysis has caused widening of the tunnels. This will allow the desired placement of the new tunnels without the risk of loss of structural integrity. It is technically difficult to deliver and impact bone graft into the femoral tunnel with the standard surgical and arthroscopic instruments. We describe a new technique for femoral and tibial tunnel impaction grafting in 2-stage ACL revisions, using the OATS grafting instruments (Osteochondral Autologous Transfer System; Arthrex, Naples, FL). The appropriately sized OATS harvester is chosen 1 mm larger than the tunnel size and is used to harvest bone graft from the iliac crest through a percutaneous approach. This provides a cylindrical graft, which is delivered to the femoral tunnel through the arthroscopic portal. The inside punch of the harvester is tapped and this allows delivery of the graft in a controlled manner and its impaction into the tunnel. The same is repeated for the tibial tunnel while providing support for the proximal end of the tunnel.

  2. Ultrasound-guided tunneled lower extremity peripherally inserted central catheter placement in infants.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Subramanian; Moe, David C; Vo, Jack N

    2013-12-01

    Tunneled lower extremity peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are placed in infants under combined ultrasound and fluoroscopic guidance in the interventional radiology suite. In infants requiring a bedside procedure, image guidance is limited, often using portable radiographs during the procedure. This report demonstrates feasibility of placing tunneled lower extremity PICCs using ultrasound as the sole imaging modality for vascular access, intravascular length measurement, and final confirmation of catheter tip position in a case series of 15 critically ill infants. The technique negates the need for added imaging confirmation methods that use ionizing radiation and can be performed at the bedside.

  3. The influence of graft placement on clinical outcome in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    PADUA, ROBERTO; ALVITI, FEDERICA; VENOSA, MICHELE; MAZZOLA, CARLO; PADUA, LUCA

    2016-01-01

    Purpose the aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of graft tunnel position on both clinical outcome and instrumental knee stability in patients submitted to arthroscopic ACL reconstruction using a bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) graft. Methods thirty patients (24 men and 6 women) who underwent ACL reconstruction performed using an autologous bone-patellar tendon-bone graft were studied at a mean follow-up of 18 months. Clinical outcome was assessed on the basis of the Lysholm score, Tegner activity level, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective form and the Short Form-36. Clinical outcomes were correlated with both femoral and tibial tunnel placement measured on standard anteroposterior and lateral knee radiographs, in accordance with established guidelines. Results tibial tunnel position on the lateral view correlated significantly with both the IKDC subjective form (r = −0.72; p<0.05) and the Lysholm score (r=−0.73; p<0.05). Tibial tunnel position on the lateral view also correlated with stability measured using a KT-1000 arthrometer at 30N of force (r=0.57; p<0.05). No correlation was found between α angle and anteroposterior (AP) laxity measured by KT-1000 arthrometer. No significant correlation was found between femoral tunnel position (on either view) and Lysholm score, IKDC score and Tegner activity level. Similarly, no correlation was found between AP laxity measured by KT-1000 arthrometer and femoral tunnel position. Conclusions these results suggest that the more anterior the placement of the tibial tunnel, the better the clinical outcome will be. On the basis of literature data and our findings, we discuss the hypothesis that there exists a “correct area” for tunnel placement, making it possible to obtain the best results. Level of evidence Level IV, case series. PMID:27386442

  4. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction tunnel size: causes of tunnel enlargement and implications for single versus two-stage revision reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Rizer, Magda; Foremny, Gregory Brian; Rush, Augustus; Singer, Adam D; Baraga, Michael; Kaplan, Lee D; Jose, Jean

    2017-02-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions have increased over the past 25 years. The increased incidence of ACL reconstructions has translated into a larger number of graft failures and revision ACL procedures. It is important to understand the causes of graft failure when evaluating for a revision ACL reconstruction and to appreciate changes in tunnel anatomy over time prior to planning revision surgery. In this manuscript, tunnel size for ACL reconstruction and implications for single-stage versus two-stage revision ACL reconstruction will be discussed, as well as causes of tunnel enlargement, including mechanical and biological factors.

  5. Biological enhancement of graft-tunnel healing in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    SACCOMANNO, MARISTELLA F.; CAPASSO, LUIGI; FRESTA, LUCA; MILANO, GIUSEPPE

    2016-01-01

    The sites where graft healing occurs within the bone tunnel and where the intra-articular ligamentization process takes place are the two most important sites of biological incorporation after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, since they help to determine the mechanical behavior of the femur-ACL graft-tibia complex. Graft-tunnel healing is a complex process influenced by several factors, such as type of graft, preservation of remnants, bone quality, tunnel length and placement, fixation techniques and mechanical stress. In recent years, numerous experimental and clinical studies have been carried out to evaluate potential strategies designed to enhance and optimize the biological environment of the graft-tunnel interface. Modulation of inflammation, tissue engineering and gene transfer techniques have been applied in order to obtain a direct-type fibrocartilaginous insertion of the ACL graft, similar to that of native ligament, and to accelerate the healing process of tendon grafts within the bone tunnel. Although animal studies have given encouraging results, clinical studies are lacking and their results do not really support the use of the various strategies in clinical practice. Further investigations are therefore needed to optimize delivery techniques, therapeutic concentrations, maintenance of therapeutic effects over time, and to reduce the risk of undesirable effects in clinical practice. PMID:27900311

  6. Laser-guided placement of the tibial guide in the transtibial technique for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Toshiaki; Takeda, Haruhiko; Watanabe, Seiji; Yamamoto, Haruyasu

    2009-02-01

    In anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, it is important to determine the location and direction of the femoral bone tunnel when using the transtibial technique. Accurately identifying the anatomic location at which to make the femoral bone tunnel for double-bundle ACL reconstruction is not a straightforward procedure. We describe a new method in which the centrum of the femoral tunnel is marked with an awl and a laser beam-guided technique is used to place the tibial pin. This procedure allows us to mark the desired location of the femoral tunnel before drilling the tibial bone tunnel when using the transtibial technique. This is the first report of a laser-guided technique used in arthroscopic surgery. We used a laser beam to determine the location of the femoral tunnel--the anatomic site needed to perform the intra-articular drilling in the tibia. In this technique, a laser pointer is set at the tibial guide, which reflects the laser beam and illuminates the point where the femoral bone tunnel should be made. Our method offers an easy and accurate way to reconfirm the tibial placement before drilling.

  7. Wind Tunnel Investigation of the Effects of Surface Porosity and Vertical Tail Placement on Slender Wing Vortex Flow Aerodynamics at Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary E.

    2007-01-01

    A wind tunnel experiment was conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) to determine the effects of passive surface porosity and vertical tail placement on vortex flow development and interactions about a general research fighter configuration at supersonic speeds. Optical flow measurement and flow visualization techniques were used that featured pressure sensitive paint (PSP), laser vapor screen (LVS), and schlieren, These techniques were combined with conventional electronically-scanned pressure (ESP) and six-component force and moment measurements to quantify and to visualize the effects of flow-through porosity applied to a wing leading edge extension (LEX) and the placement of centerline and twin vertical tails on the vortex-dominated flow field of a 65 cropped delta wing model. Test results were obtained at free-stream Mach numbers of 1.6, 1.8, and 2.1 and a Reynolds number per foot of 2.0 million. LEX porosity promoted a wing vortex-dominated flow field as a result of a diffusion and weakening of the LEX vortex. The redistribution of the vortex-induced suction pressures contributed to large nose-down pitching moment increments but did not significantly affect the vortex-induced lift. The trends associated with LEX porosity were unaffected by vertical tail placement. The centerline tail configuration generally provided more stable rolling moments and yawing moments compared to the twin wing-mounted vertical tails. The strength of a complex system of shock waves between the twin tails was reduced by LEX porosity.

  8. Physeal Disruption During ACL Reconstruction in Skeletally Immature Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Aristides Ignacio; Lakomkin, Nikita; Fabricant, Peter D.; Lawrence, John Todd R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to radiographically assess differences in distal femoral physeal disruption between transtibial and independent femoral tunnel drilling techniques following ACL reconstruction in skeletally immature patients. Methods: A retrospective, matched comparative cohort study was performed of skeletally immature patients who underwent transphyseal ACL reconstruction between January 1, 2008 and March 31, 2011. All skeletally immature patients between ten and fifteen years old who underwent independent femoral tunnel drilling and had adequate baseline and post-operative radiographs were analyzed. These patients were matched with a transtibial technique cohort based on age and sex. Demographic characteristics and peri-operative metrics were collected. Radiographic measurements were recorded from pre-operative MRI and post-operative plain radiographs. Results: Twenty patients were analyzed. Between groups, there were significant differences between independent tunnel drilling and transtibial tunnel drilling in the estimated area of physeal disruption (1.64 cm2 vs. 0.74 cm2, P<0.001), femoral (32.1º vs. 72.8º, P<0.001) and tibial (50.1º vs. 60.5º, P=0.003) tunnel angles, medial/lateral location of the femoral tunnel (24.2 mm vs. 36.1 mm from lateral cortex, P=0.001), and distance from the lateral aspect of the distal femoral physis and the femoral tunnel exit (4.7 mm vs. 26.7 mm from the perichondrial ring, P<0.001), respectively. All patients who underwent femoral tunnel drilling at an angle of less than 25º from the transverse axis experienced a greater than 6% disruption of physeal area. There was a significant inverse correlation between femoral tunnel angle and estimated area of femoral physeal involvement (r=-0.8255, P=0.003). Conclusion: With femoral tunnel drilling techniques that create more oblique tunnels, the area of distal femoral physeal damage is larger, more eccentric and closer to the perichondrial ring. Since most

  9. Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... what the surgeon advises. previous continue Rehab and Recovery Recovery from ACL surgery can take from 6 months ... frequent therapy, but they won't necessarily speed recovery. In the early stages of recovery, a doctor ...

  10. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... proper techniques when playing sports or exercising. Some college sports programs teach athletes how to reduce stress placed on the ACL. The use of knee braces during vigorous athletic activity ( ...

  11. Vascular Access for Placement of Tunneled Dialysis Catheters for Hemodialysis: A Systematic Approach and Clinical Practice Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Keith; Osiason, Adam; Salsamendi, Jason

    2015-01-01

    The role of interventional radiology in the overall management of patients on dialysis continues to expand. In patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), the use of tunneled dialysis catheters (TDCs) for hemodialysis has become an integral component of treatment plans. Unfortunately, long-term use of TDCs often leads to infections, acute occlusions, and chronic venous stenosis, depletion of the patient's conventional access routes, and prevention of their recanalization. In such situations, the progressive loss of venous access sites prompts a systematic approach to alternative sites to maximize patient survival and minimize complications. In this review, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each vascular access option. We illustrate the procedures with case histories and images from our own experience at a highly active dialysis and transplant center. We rank each vascular access option and classify them into tiers based on their relative degrees of effectiveness. The conventional approaches are the most preferred, followed by alternative approaches and finally the salvage approaches. It is our intent to have this review serve as a concise and informative reference for physicians managing patients who need vascular access for hemodialysis. PMID:26167389

  12. Partial ACL tears: anatomic reconstruction versus nonanatomic augmentation surgery.

    PubMed

    Buda, Roberto; Ruffilli, Alberto; Parma, Alessandro; Pagliazzi, Gherardo; Luciani, Deianira; Ramponi, Laura; Castagnini, Francesco; Giannini, Sandro

    2013-09-01

    Treatment of partial anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears requires ACL remnant preservation. The goal of this study was to compare the outcome of anatomic reconstruction of the torn bundle with nonanatomic augmentation using the over-the-top femoral route. Fifty-two athletes (mean age, 23.3 years) with partial ACL lesions underwent anatomic reconstruction (n=26) or nonanatomic augmentation (n=26). Intraoperative damage of the healthy bundle that required a standard ACL reconstruction occurred in 2 patients in the anatomic reconstruction group. International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score, Tegner score, and arthrometer evaluation were used pre-operatively and at follow-up for up to 5 years postoperatively. One failure occurred in the anatomic reconstruction group. Mean IKDC subjective score at follow-up was 88.2 ± 5.7 in the anatomic reconstruction group and 90.2 ± 4.7 in the nonanatomic augmentation group. According to the IKDC objective score at final follow-up, 96% of knees in the nonanatomic augmentation group were normal vs 87.5% in the anatomic reconstruction group. No significative differences were observed between the 2 groups at final follow-up. Anteromedial bundle reconstruction showed significantly lower IKDC subjective and objective scores and higher residual instability values as evaluated with the arthrometer compared with posterolateral bundle reconstruction (P=.017). The surgical treatment of ACL partial tears is demanding. Adapted portals, perfect control of the tunnel drilling process, and intercondylar space management are required in anatomic reconstruction. The nonanatomic augmentation technique is simpler, providing excellent durable results over time with a lower complication rate. Anteromedial bundle reconstruction is associated with a poorer outcome, especially when performed with anatomic reconstruction.

  13. The ACL Message Passing Library

    SciTech Connect

    Painter, J.; McCormick, P.; Krogh, M.; Hansen, C.; Colin de Verdiere, G.

    1995-09-01

    This paper presents the ACL (Advanced Computing Lab) Message Passing Library. It is a high throughput, low latency communications library, based on Thinking Machines Corp.`s CMMD, upon which message passing applications can be built. The library has been implemented on the Cray T3D, Thinking Machines CM-5, SGI workstations, and on top of PVM.

  14. Mycotic Infection post ACL Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Costa-Paz, Matias; Ayerza, Miguel; Carbo, Lisandro; Sanchez, Marisa; Yacuzzi, Carlos; Muscolo, Luis

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: There are several studies in literature of septic arthritis after the ACL arthroscopic reconstruction related to bacterial germs. However, fungi infection is likely infrequent generating a massive bone loss with a catastrophic result. The purpose of this study was to describe preventive measures to decrease the mycotic infection after ACL reconstruction. Methods: Since 2005, we have diagnosed and treated 22 immunocompetent patients who underwent a surgery of an ACL lesion in other institutions in the country. Form these cases, we analyzed 19 which developed mycotic infection and an oncologic debridement was performed to control the pathology. In this series, we considered the initial surgery, the number of toilettes performed until their referral, magnitude of bone loss and final outcome. There were 5 other patients who consulted for mucormycosis, who finally were treated in other hospitals. Results: Epidemiology of mucormycosis is not clear. The exact cause is unknown due to heterogeneous data, different places and surgeons, facilities and type of surgical instruments in this series. In spite of not knowing the cause of the infection, several alternatives were evaluated in a non systematic way. Most of them related to the surgery room, sterilization place of the surgical tools, use of sterilizing liquids, cleanliness of lumen and cannulated bits. Instruments used during surgery were also evaluated: fields, shaver blades, drill types, ACL reconstruction fixation method. It is doubtful if the type of graft to reconstruct the ACL had any relation with infections. Among ideal preventive measures, the following are described: Surgery room with temperature and humidity control. Not using sterilizing liquids. Optimal preparation of surgical tools with adequate cleanliness of lumen and cannulated bits performed by adequate personnel. Sterilize in the same place where the surgery will be performed. Use of adequate instruments. The use of the central third of

  15. Review of NASA ACLS research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daugherty, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to evaluate a method of maintaining stability of an air cushion vehicle and also to evaluate several concepts to brake and steer an ACLS-equipped vehicle. The investigation used a modified airboat equipped with an air cushion landing system. The pressure relief door stability concept was characterized by the ACLS pressure time histories. The pressure relief doors vented excess cavity and lobe pressures and consistently maintained vehicle heave and pitch stability. Braking concepts were characterized by the average deceleration of the vehicle. Reduced lobe flow and cavity venting braking concepts were evaluated in this program. The cavity venting concept demonstrated the best performance, producing decelerations on the test vehicle on the same order as moderate braking with conventional wheel brakes. Steering concepts were evaluated by recording the path taken while attempting to follow a prescribed maneuver. The steering concepts evaluated included using rudders only, using differential lobe flow, and using rudders combined with a lightly loaded, nonsteering center wheel. The latter concept proved to be the most accurate means of steering the vehicle on the ACLS, producing translational deviations which, while two to three times higher than those from conventional nose gear steering, were still felt to provide reasonably precise steering control for this type vehicle.

  16. ACL reconstruction in children: a transphyseal technique.

    PubMed

    Lemaitre, G; Salle de Chou, E; Pineau, V; Rochcongar, G; Delforge, S; Bronfen, C; Haumont, T; Hulet, C

    2014-06-01

    The annual incidence of ACL tears is increasing steadily in pediatric patients. Chronic anterior instability causes meniscal lesions at a frequency that increases significantly with the injury-to-surgery interval. Conservative therapy, simple suturing, and isolated extra-articular tendon reconstruction are associated with high failure rates. Intra-articular arthroscopy-assisted tendon reconstruction is a good treatment method, although several different techniques have been described. We used a transphyseal technique with a hamstring tendon graft to treat 14 knees in 13 patients with a mean age of 13 years and 7 months. Mean injury-to-surgery interval was 6 months. Strict compliance with technical rules is required when using this technique. Bone tunnel diameter must not exceed 8 mm. Bone tunnels must be as vertical and central as possible. The fixation material must not bridge the physis (at the femur, cortical fixation; and at the tibia, fixation using a resorbable screw no longer than 25 mm combined with a staple). Meniscal lesions were present in half the knees and meniscal preservation considered mandatory. Conservative treatment of concomitant lesions was performed routinely. After a mean follow-up of 15 months, no recurrent tears or revision procedures for meniscectomy had been recorded. The IKDC grade was A or B in 93% of knees. The mean subjective IKDC score was 83.3 and the Lysholm score was in the excellent or good range in 93% of knees. Of the 14 knees, 2 exhibited signs suggesting femoral epiphysiodesis, with 4° of valgus deformity compared to the contra-lateral knee and no clinical consequences. Transphyseal reconstruction with open physes conducted in strict compliance with technical rules can be performed to control the instability and preserve the menisci. Nevertheless, this technique carries a risk of epiphysiodesis, chiefly at the femur.

  17. ACLS.

    PubMed

    Handley, A J

    2001-09-01

    It must be emphasised that the published International Guidelines 2000 contain an in-depth presentation of the scientific evidence behind advanced life support. The exact interpretation of this evidence, and the algorithms adopted by a national resuscitation council will depend upon various factors such as local interpretation of the evidence, local practice and availability of drugs. The ERC is publishing its own summaries of the guideline changes and the sequences of action for both BLS and ALS and these papers are recommended for further reading.

  18. Keyword: Placement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassuto, Leonard

    2012-01-01

    The practical goal of graduate education is placement of graduates. But what does "placement" mean? Academics use the word without thinking much about it. "Placement" is a great keyword for the graduate-school enterprise. For one thing, its meaning certainly gives a purpose to graduate education. Furthermore, the word is a portal into the way of…

  19. 50 CFR 648.290 - Tilefish Annual Catch Limit (ACL).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... detailed review of fishery performance relative to the sector ACLs at least every 5 years. (1) If the ACL... recommendations to the MAFMC for changes in measures intended to ensure ACLs are not as frequently exceeded. (2...) Performance reviews shall not substitute for annual reviews that occur to ascertain if prior year ACLs...

  20. 50 CFR 648.290 - Tilefish Annual Catch Limit (ACL).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... detailed review of fishery performance relative to the sector ACLs at least every 5 years. (1) If the ACL... recommendations to the MAFMC for changes in measures intended to ensure ACLs are not as frequently exceeded. (2...) Performance reviews shall not substitute for annual reviews that occur to ascertain if prior year ACLs...

  1. 50 CFR 648.290 - Tilefish Annual Catch Limit (ACL).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... detailed review of fishery performance relative to the sector ACLs at least every 5 years. (1) If the ACL... recommendations to the MAFMC for changes in measures intended to ensure ACLs are not as frequently exceeded. (2...) Performance reviews shall not substitute for annual reviews that occur to ascertain if prior year ACLs...

  2. An Athlete's Nightmare: Tearing the ACL

    MedlinePlus

    ... women's knees tends to bend inward when women land." Some researchers believe that this inward bend may ... any athlete suffers ACL damage is because they land in a flat-footed position, as opposed to ...

  3. Physeal-Sparing Technique for Femoral Tunnel Drilling in Pediatric Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using a Posteromedial Portal

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, Stephen E.; Keating, Patrick M.; Scott, Timothy P.; Siwiec, Ryan M.

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears present a technical dilemma for orthopaedic surgeons. Multiple surgical techniques have been described to protect the distal femoral and proximal tibial physes. We present an ACL reconstruction technique performed on a 12-year-old girl with open physes who sustained an ACL tear after a noncontact twisting injury while playing soccer. A hamstring autograft reconstruction was performed by use of a posteromedial portal to drill the femoral tunnel in an all-epiphyseal fashion at the anatomic footprint of the native ACL. This case provides a new surgical technique to achieve anatomic fixation for ACL reconstruction in a skeletally immature individual using a posteromedial portal to drill a physeal-sparing lateral femoral tunnel for anatomic ACL reconstruction. This advancement may make drilling the femoral tunnel less technically challenging compared with other proposed methods while maintaining the lateral wall of the distal femur. PMID:24892013

  4. ACL Tears on The Rise Among Kids, Especially Girls

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163730.html ACL Tears on the Rise Among Kids, Especially Girls ... A common knee injury -- an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear -- has steadily increased among 6- to 18- ...

  5. Reducing the Risk of ACL Injury in Female Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Larry W.; Rasche, Adrienna; Gaudet, Laura; Jackson, Allen

    2010-01-01

    The Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) is located behind the kneecap (patella) and connects the thigh bone (femur) to the shin bone (tibia). Stabilizing the knee joint is the primary responsibility of the ACL. Injuries that affect the ACL are three to five times more common in females than males. This is a result of anatomical, biomechanical,…

  6. 50 CFR 648.120 - Scup Annual Catch Limit (ACL).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... shall recommend to the MAFMC separate ACLs for the commercial and recreational scup fisheries, the sum... and recreational fishing sector ACLs will be established consistent with the allocation guidelines... recreational sector ACLs may be established on an annual basis for up to 3 years at a time, dependent...

  7. 50 CFR 648.120 - Scup Annual Catch Limit (ACL).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... shall recommend to the MAFMC separate ACLs for the commercial and recreational scup fisheries, the sum... and recreational fishing sector ACLs will be established consistent with the allocation guidelines... recreational sector ACLs may be established on an annual basis for up to 3 years at a time, dependent...

  8. 50 CFR 648.120 - Scup Annual Catch Limit (ACL).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... shall recommend to the MAFMC separate ACLs for the commercial and recreational scup fisheries, the sum... and recreational fishing sector ACLs will be established consistent with the allocation guidelines... recreational sector ACLs may be established on an annual basis for up to 3 years at a time, dependent...

  9. Pretibial Cyst Formation after ACL Reconstruction. A series of 14 cases with different etiologies

    PubMed Central

    Zicaro, Juan Pablo; Ranalletta, Maximiliano; Avila, Christian Garcia; Yacuzzi, Carlos; Costa-Paz, Matias

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Among complications following an ACL reconstruction, the formation of a pre-tibial cyst in the site of the tibial tunnel is rare and might happen even years after surgery. The purpose of this study was to analyze 14 patients with pretibial cyst after ACL reconstruction. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated patients between 2008 and 2016. The inclusion criteria were patients who underwent an ACL reconstruction, and developed an extra-articular cyst at the tibial tunnel level. For recurrence evaluation, patients with less than one-year follow-up were excluded. A pre and postoperative clinical and radiological evaluation was performed. We analyzed the graft selection and surgical technique for ACL reconstruction, the time between primary surgery and onset of symptoms, and the clinical presentation. A pre and postoperative radiological evaluation was performed for every patient. Surgical technique for cyst excision, histological analysis and culture results were also analyzed. The recurrence rate was evaluated at final follow-up. Results: Nine patients were male, with an average age of 38 years. The average follow-up was of 35 months. All ACL reconstructions were performed using hamstrings graft and a trans-tibial technique. Tibial fixation was performed with a biodegradable screw in 9 patients, three of them associated with the use of a staple. In four patients hamstrings tibial insertion was left in situ with an open stripper and fixed in the tibia using non-absorbable Ethibond 2 sutures. The average time between primary ACL surgery and onset of the cyst was 29 months. All patients presented a palpable tumor at proximal tibia and a stable knee. The cyst size varied between 1 and 3 cm. In all cases, Rx and MRI showed a widening of the tibial tunnel, though no articular communication could be confirmed. The arthroscopic evaluation revealed no graft loosening. All cysts were approached through the previous tibial incision and staples or screws where removed

  10. Tibial plateau fracture following gracilis-semitendinosus anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: The tibial tunnel stress-riser.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, R O; Cohen, D; Barton-Hanson, N

    2006-06-01

    Tibial plateau fractures following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction are extremely rare. This is the first reported case of a tibial plateau fracture following four-strand gracilis-semitendinosus autograft ACL reconstruction. The tibial tunnel alone may behave as a stress riser which can significantly reduce bone strength.

  11. Prehospital ACLS--does it work?

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Alok; Mehrotra, Avanti; Gupta, Anoop K; Thakur, Ranjan K

    2002-11-01

    Cardiac disease is the most common cause of death in the United States, and sudden cardiac arrest frequently claims the lives of men and women during their most productive years. It is believed that much better survival rates can be achieved for victims of cardiac arrest through optimizing the "chain of survival" as described by the American Heart Association. The relative and incremental benefit of full prehospital ACLS over basic life support and defibrillation is unproven, however. This is an important issue in this era of cost containment. Some of the ongoing studies including the OPALS study may clarify the cost effectiveness and relative efficacy of rapid defibrillation and full ACLS programs for victims of prehospital cardiac arrest [6].

  12. ACLED Country Report: Central African Republic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    violence between January 1997 and September 2014. Almost 8,000 fatalities have occurred during this time, making it the fourteenth most fatal country in...the dataset in this regard. However, violence has escalated sharply in recent years: the majority of these events occurred since the outbreak of the...CAR) is the fifteenth most violent country in the ACLED dataset, with over 2,000 recorded events of political violence between January 1997 and

  13. Frontal plane knee mechanics and medial cartilage MR relaxation times in individuals with ACL reconstruction : A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Deepak; Kothari, Abbas; Souza, Richard B.; Wu, Samuel; Ma, C. Benjamin; Li, Xiaojuan

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate cartilage T1ρ and T2 relaxation times and knee mechanics during walking and drop-landing for individuals with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R). Methods Nine patients (6 men and 3 women, Age 35.8±5.4 years, BMI 23.5±2.5 kg/m2) participated 1.5±0.8 years after single-bundle two-tunnel ACL reconstruction. Peak knee adduction moment (KAM), flexion moment (KFM), extension moment (KEM), and peak varus were calculated from kinematic and kinetic data obtained during walking and drop-landing tasks. T1ρ and T2 times were calculated for medial femur (MF), and medial tibia (MT) cartilage and compared between subjects with low KAM and high KAM. Biomechanical variables were compared between limbs. Results The high KAM group had higher T1ρ for MT (p = 0.01), central MT (p = 0.05), posterior MF (p = 0.04), posterior MT (p = 0.01); and higher T2 for MT (p = 0.02), MF (p = 0.05) posterior MF (p = 0.002) and posterior MT (p = 0.01). During walking, ACL-R knees had greater flexion at initial contact (p =0.04), and lower KEM (p = 0.02). During drop-landing, the ACL-R knees had lower KAM (p = 0.03) and KFM (p = 0.002). Conclusion Patients with ACL-R who have higher KAM during walking had elevated MR relaxation times in the medial knee compartments. These data suggest that those individuals who have undergone ACL-R and have higher frontal plane loading, may be at a greater risk of knee osteoarthritis. PMID:24993277

  14. All-Epiphyseal Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Skeletally Immature Patients: A Surgical Technique Using a Split Tibial Tunnel

    PubMed Central

    Lykissas, Marios G.; Nathan, Senthil T.; Wall, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    Many techniques have been described for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in skeletally immature patients, including extra-articular, complete or partial transphyseal, and physeal-sparing techniques. An all-epiphyseal technique places the tendon and its tunnels and fixation all within the child's epiphysis, leaving the growth plates untouched. We describe an all-epiphyseal quadruple-hamstring ACL reconstruction using a split tibial tunnel. The split tibial tunnels drop the tunnel size down to 4.5 to 5.5 mm from 7 to 8 mm because only half the total graft diameter passes through each of the split tunnels. This increases the safety margin for keeping the tunnel within the tibial epiphysis, in addition to avoiding damage into the growth plate. The bone bridge between the 2 tunnels serves as a solid low-profile fixation post. Femoral graft fixation is achieved with an interference screw, which allows precise tensioning and low-profile fixation entirely within the femoral tunnel. By placing the graft at the native ACL's anatomic attachment points without spanning or violating the growth plates at any step of the procedure, an all-epiphyseal ACL reconstruction with a split tibial tunnel theoretically minimizes the risk of growth disturbance in an ACL-deficient child. PMID:23766968

  15. Should critical care nurses be ACLS-trained?

    PubMed

    Hagyard-Wiebe, Tammy

    2007-01-01

    The aim of resuscitation is to sustain life with intact neurological functioning and the same quality of life previously experienced by the patient. Advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) was designed to achieve this aim. However the requirement for ACLS training for critical care nurses working in Canadian critical care units is inconsistent across the country. The purposes of this article are to explore the evidence surrounding ACLS training for critical care nurses and its impact on resuscitation outcomes, and to review the evidence surrounding ACLS knowledge and skill degradation with strategies to support code blue team efficiency for an effective resuscitation. Using the search terms ACLS training, resuscitation, critical care, and nursing, two databases, CINAHL and MEDLINE, were used. The evidence supports the need for ACLS training for critical care nurses. The evidence also supports organized ongoing refresher courses, multidisciplinary mock code blue practice using technologically advanced simulator mannequins, and videotaped reviews to prevent knowledge and skill degradation for effective resuscitation efforts.

  16. The characteristics of EEG power spectra changes after ACL rupture

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Xin; Huang, Hongshi; Hu, Xiaoqing; Li, Dai; Yu, Yuanyuan; Ao, Yingfang

    2017-01-01

    Background Reestablishing knee stability is the core of the treatment of ACL (Anterior Cruciate Ligament) injury. Some patients still have a feeling of instability of the knee after ACL injury treatment. This unstable feeling may be caused by central nervous system changes after ACL rupture. Methods To identify the central changes after ACL rupture, EEG spectra were recorded to compare ACL patients and healthy controls when they were walking, jogging, and landing. Results There was a significant increase in delta, theta, alpha and beta band power during walking, jogging and landing in ACL patients. We also found an asymmetry phenomenon of EEG only in the ACL patients, mainly in the frontal area and central-parietal area. The asymmetry of beta band power extended to the frontal and the central area during jogging and landing task. Conclusions There were significant differences in EEG power spectra between the ACL patients and healthy people. ACL patients showed high EEG band power activities and an asymmetry phenomenon. EEG power changes were affected by movements, the asymmetry extended when performing more complicated movements. PMID:28182627

  17. New perspectives on ACL injury: On the role of repetitive sub-maximal knee loading in causing ACL fatigue failure.

    PubMed

    Wojtys, Edward M; Beaulieu, Mélanie L; Ashton-Miller, James A

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we review a series of studies that we initiated to examine mechanisms of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in the hope that these injuries, and their sequelae, can be better prevented. First, using the earliest in vitro model of a simulated single-leg jump landing or pivot cut with realistic knee loading rates and trans-knee muscle forces, we identified the worst-case dynamic knee loading that causes the greatest peak ACL strain: Combined knee compression, flexion, and internal tibial rotation. We also identified morphologic factors that help explain individual susceptibility to ACL injury. Second, using the above knee loading, we introduced a possible paradigm shift in ACL research by demonstrating that the human ACL can fail by a sudden rupture in response to repeated sub-maximal knee loading. If that load is repeated often enough over a short time interval, the failure tended to occur proximally, as observed clinically. Third, we emphasize the value of a physical exam of the hip by demonstrating how limited internal axial rotation at the hip both increases the susceptibility to ACL injury in professional athletes, and also increases peak ACL strain during simulated pivot landings, thereby further increasing the risk of ACL fatigue failure. When training at-risk athletes, particularly females with their smaller ACL cross-sections, rationing the number and intensity of worst-case knee loading cycles, such that ligament degradation is within the ACL's ability to remodel, should decrease the risk for ACL rupture due to ligament fatigue failure.© 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:2059-2068, 2016.

  18. Does the lateral intercondylar ridge disappear in ACL deficient patients?

    PubMed

    van Eck, Carola F; Morse, Kenneth R; Lesniak, Bryson P; Kropf, Eric J; Tranovich, Michael J; van Dijk, C Niek; Fu, Freddie H

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether there is a difference in the presence of the lateral intercondylar ridge and the lateral bifurcate ridge between patients with sub-acute and chronic ACL injuries. We hypothesized that the ridges would be present less often with chronic ACL deficiency. Twenty-five patients with a chronic ACL injury were matched for age and gender to 25 patients with a sub-acute ACL injury. The lateral intercondylar ridge and lateral bifurcate ridge were scored as either present, absent, or indeterminate due to insufficient visualization by three blinded observers. The kappa for the three observers was .61 for the lateral intercondylar ridge and .58 for the lateral bifurcate ridge. The lateral intercondylar ridge was present in 88% of the sub-acute patients and 88% of the chronic patients. The lateral bifurcate ridge was present in 48% of the sub-acute and 48% of the chronic patients. This matched-pairs case-control study was unable to show a difference in the presence of the femoral bony ridges between patients with acute and chronic ACL injuries. The authors would suggest looking for the ridges as a landmark of the native ACL insertion site during ACL reconstruction in both acute and chronic ACL injuries.

  19. The effects of femoral graft placement on cartilage thickness after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Okafor, Eziamaka C; Utturkar, Gangadhar M; Widmyer, Margaret R; Abebe, Ermias S; Collins, Amber T; Taylor, Dean C; Spritzer, Charles E; Moorman, C T; Garrett, William E; DeFrate, Louis E

    2014-01-03

    Altered joint motion has been thought to be a contributing factor in the long-term development of osteoarthritis after ACL reconstruction. While many studies have quantified knee kinematics after ACL injury and reconstruction, there is limited in vivo data characterizing the effects of altered knee motion on cartilage thickness distributions. Thus, the objective of this study was to compare cartilage thickness distributions in two groups of patients with ACL reconstruction: one group in which subjects received a non-anatomic reconstruction that resulted in abnormal joint motion and another group in which subjects received an anatomically placed graft that more closely restored normal knee motion. Ten patients with anatomic graft placement (mean follow-up: 20 months) and 12 patients with non-anatomic graft placement (mean follow-up: 18 months) were scanned using high-resolution MR imaging. These images were used to generate 3D mesh models of both knees of each patient. The operative and contralateral knee models were registered to each other and a grid sampling system was used to make site-specific comparisons of cartilage thickness. Patients in the non-anatomic graft placement group demonstrated a significant decrease in cartilage thickness along the medial intercondylar notch in the operative knee relative to the intact knee (8%). In the anatomic graft placement group, no significant changes were observed. These findings suggest that restoring normal knee motion after ACL injury may help to slow the progression of degeneration. Therefore, graft placement may have important implications on the development of osteoarthritis after ACL reconstruction.

  20. The potential for primary repair of the ACL

    PubMed Central

    Vavken, Patrick; Murray, Martha M

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work is to assess the feasibility of successfully repairing the torn ACL. Two major motivators for developing a new treatment for ACL injuries are the recently reported high rates of osteoarthritis after conventional ACL reconstruction as well as the problem of how to safely treat skeletally immature patients. A key factor in developing such a technique was the identification of the main inhibitor of intrinsic ACL healing – the lack of clot formation between the two torn ends of the ligament. A bioactive and biocompatible scaffold which could be placed in the wound site to enhance cellular proliferation and biosynthesis was developed. This biomaterial has shown promising functional outcomes in several large animal models of primary repair of partial and complete ACL transection over 4 to 14 weeks, suggesting potential for a successful, future clinical application. PMID:21293237

  1. Knee extension torque variability after exercise in ACL reconstructed knees.

    PubMed

    Goetschius, John; Kuenze, Christopher M; Hart, Joseph M

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare knee extension torque variability in patients with ACL reconstructed knees before and after exercise. Thirty two patients with an ACL reconstructed knee (ACL-R group) and 32 healthy controls (control group) completed measures of maximal isometric knee extension torque (90° flexion) at baseline and following a 30-min exercise protocol (post-exercise). Exercise included 30-min of repeated cycles of inclined treadmill walking and hopping tasks. Dependent variables were the coefficient of variation (CV) and raw-change in CV (ΔCV): CV = (torque standard deviation/torque mean x 100), ΔCV = (post-exercise - baseline). There was a group-by-time interaction (p = 0.03) on CV. The ACL-R group demonstrated greater CV than the control group at baseline (ACL-R = 1.07 ± 0.55, control = 0.79 ± 0.42, p = 0.03) and post-exercise (ACL-R = 1.60 ± 0.91, control = 0.94 ± 0.41, p = 0.001). ΔCV was greater (p = 0.03) in the ACL-R group (0.52 ± 0.82) than control group (0.15 ± 0.46). CV significantly increased from baseline to post-exercise (p = 0.001) in the ACL-R group, while the control group did not (p = 0.06). The ACL-R group demonstrated greater knee extension torque variability than the control group. Exercise increased torque variability more in the ACL-R group than control group.

  2. Is bone tunnel osseointegration in hamstring tendon autograft anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction important?

    PubMed

    Logan, Martin; Williams, Andy; Myers, Peter

    2003-10-01

    A 27-year-old man underwent anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using 4-strand hamstring autograft with femoral and tibial interference screw fixation. Four weeks after surgery, he developed a discharging hematoma through the graft harvest-tibial tunnel incision, which persisted. The patient required further surgical intervention 7 weeks after the initial surgery. The wound was debrided, the tibial interference screw was removed, and the tibial tunnel was completely cleared of graft remnants. Arthroscopy of the knee was performed, in which the ACL graft appeared healthy and viable. No evidence of intra-articular sepsis was found. Postoperatively, the rehabilitation program was uneventful and, at 36 months, the patient has unrestricted activity and no clinical evidence of excessive ACL laxity. This case supports the importance of marginal articular surface healing of the ACL graft, suggesting that tibial intratunnel healing becomes redundant.

  3. The effect of platelet concentrates on graft maturation and graft-bone interface healing in ACL reconstruction in human patients

    PubMed Central

    Vavken, Patrick; Sadoghi, Patrick; Murray, Martha M

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To systematically review the current evidence for effects of platelet concentrates on (1) graft maturation and (2) graft-bone interface healing in ACL reconstruction in human, controlled trials, and for ensuing differences in clinical outcomes. Methods A systematic search of PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, CCTR and CDSR was performed for controlled trials of human ACL reconstruction with and without platelet concentrates. Data validity was assessed and data were collected on graft maturation, graft-bone interface healing and clinical outcome. Results Eight studies met the inclusion criteria. Seven studies reported on graft maturation with significantly better outcomes in the platelet groups in four, and large differences in means in two (underpowered) studies. Five studies report on tunnel healing, but four found no difference between groups. Three studies assessed clinical outcome but found no differences, regardless whether they had shown a benefical (1/3) or no effect (2/3) of platelets on graft and tunnel healing. Conclusion The current best evidence suggests that the addition of platelet concentrates to ACL reconstruction may have a beneficial effect on graft maturation and could improve it by 20–30% on average, but with substantial variability. The most likely mode of action is that treatment with platelets accelerates graft repopulation and remodeling, and this interpretation is supported by the existing data and biologically plausible. However, the current evidence also shows only a very limited influence of platelet concentrates on graft-bone interface healing and no significant difference in clinical outcomes. Clinical Relevance This systematic review collected evidence that the use of platelet concentrates may be a safe and inexpensive way to optimize graft maturation after ACL reconstruction, but there is no evidence for improved graft-bone interface healing or a significant difference in clinical outcomes. Level of Evidence Level IV, systematic

  4. Effect of Calcium Phosphate–Hybridized Tendon Graft in Anatomic Single-Bundle ACL Reconstruction in Goats

    PubMed Central

    Mutsuzaki, Hirotaka; Fujie, Hiromichi; Nakajima, Hiromi; Fukagawa, Makoto; Nomura, Shunsuke; Sakane, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    Background: We previously developed a novel technique using an alternate soaking process that improves tendon-bone healing by hybridizing the tendon graft with calcium phosphate (CaP). However, the effects of the CaP-hybridized tendon graft on anatomic single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction remain unclear. Purpose: To determine the effects of CaP-hybridized tendon grafts compared with untreated tendon grafts 6 months after anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction using a goat model. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Animals were divided into a CaP group (n = 5 goats) and a control group (n = 5 goats), and we analyzed (1) knee kinematics and in situ forces under applied anterior tibial loads of 50 N and internal tibial torque of 2.0 N·m in the grafts at full extension and at 60° and 90° of knee flexion, (2) the mean percentage of bone tunnel enlargement using computed tomography (CT), and (3) the histology of the tendon-bone interface. Results: The in situ forces under applied anterior tibial loads of 50 N at 60° and 90° of knee flexion in the CaP group were greater than those in the control group (P < .05). The red safranin-O–stained area, indicating glycosaminoglycans in the cartilage layers at the joint aperture sites of the anterior femoral and posterior tibial bone tunnel, was greater in the CaP group than that in the control group (P < .05). The lengths of the nonbonding gap area between the anterior femoral and posterior tibial bone tunnels in the control group were greater than those in the CaP group (P < .05). No significant difference could be detected in the mean percentage of bone tunnel enlargement between the 2 groups. Conclusion: The CaP-hybridized tendon graft enhanced tendon-bone healing at the joint aperture site in both anterior femoral and posterior tibial tunnels 6 months after anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction in goats. The in situ forces under applied anterior tibial loads at greater

  5. Risk Factors and Predictors of Subsequent ACL Injury in either Knee after ACL Reconstruction: Prospective Analysis of 2488 Primary ACL Reconstructions from the MOON Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Kaeding, Christopher C.; Pedroza, Angela D.; Reinke, Emily K.; Huston, Laura J.; Spindler, Kurt P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) re-injury results in worse outcomes and increases risk of post-traumatic osteoarthritis. Objectives To identify the risk factors for both ipsilateral and contralateral ACL tears after primary ACL reconstruction (ACLR). Study Design Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods Data from the Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network (MOON), a prospective longitudinal cohort, were used to identify risk factors for ACL retear. Subjects with primary ACLR, no history of contralateral knee surgery, and a minimum of 2-year follow-up data were included. Age, sex, Marx activity score, graft type, lateral meniscus tear, medial meniscus tear, sport played at index injury, and surgical facility were evaluated to determine their contribution to both ipsilateral retear and contralateral ACL tear. Results A total of 2683 subjects with average age of 27 ± 11 years (1498 men; 56%) met all study inclusion/exclusion criteria. Overall there were 4.4% ipsilateral graft tears and 3.5% contralateral ACL tears. The odds of ipsilateral retear were 5.2 times greater for an allograft (p<0.01) compared with a bone-patellar tendon-bone (BTB) autograft; the odds of retear were not significantly different between BTB autograft and hamstring autograft (p=0.12). The odds of an ipsilateral ACL retear decreased by 0.09 for every yearly increase in age (p<0.01) and increased by 0.11 for every increased point on the Marx score (p< 0.01). The odds were not significantly influenced by sex, smoking status, sport played, medial or lateral meniscus tear, or consortium site (p>0.05). The odds of a contralateral ACL tear decreased by 0.04 for every yearly increase in age (p=0.04) and increased by 0.12 for every increased point on the Marx score (p<0.01); these odds were not significantly different between sex, smoking status, sport played, graft type, medial meniscal tear, and lateral meniscal tear (p>0.05). Conclusions Younger age, higher activity level, and

  6. ACL reconstruction in a teenage athlete with fibular hemimelia.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, Randy; Simon, David; Forsythe, Brian; Harner, Christopher D

    2014-03-01

    Fibular hemimelia exists as a rare cause of ACL insufficiency. This case report concerns the diagnosis and treatment of anterior cruciate ligament insufficiency in a teenage football player with fibular hemimelia. While ACL reconstruction has been described to allow activities of daily living in this patient population, this is the first report in the literature of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in an athlete with fibular hemimelia. We believe that ACL reconstruction is a viable and beneficial treatment option in the care of a symptomatic patient with congenital absence of the ACL and can allow athletes with this condition to return not only to their previous functional level, but also to their previous level of play.

  7. Automatic Carrier Landing System (ACLS) Category 3 Certification Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-01

    INSTRUMENT LANDING SYSTEM .... ......... J-1 APPENDIX K: FRESNEL LENS OPTICAL LANDING SYSTEM .. ......... K-I APPENDIX L: PILOT ACLS RATINGS...surface elements of the ACLS consist of the AN/SPN-42A Landing Control Central with the AN/SPN-41 Instrument Landing System and Fresnel Lens Optical...radar antennas. c. The Fresnel lens calibration pole and three hand held radios be provided. d. Instrumentation seivicing and recording playback

  8. PROPRIOCEPTION, BODY BALANCE AND FUNCTIONALITY IN INDIVIDUALS WITH ACL RECONSTRUCTION

    PubMed Central

    Furlanetto, Tássia Silveira; Peyré-Tartaruga, Leonardo Alexandre; do Pinho, Alexandre Severo; Bernardes, Emanuele da Silva; Zaro, Milton Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Objective : To evaluate and compare proprioception, body balance and knee functionality of individuals with or without unilateral anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Methods : Forty individuals were divided in two groups: Experimental group, 20 individuals with ACL reconstruction at six months postoperative, and control group, 20 individuals with no history of lower limb pathologies. In the experimental group, we assessed lower limbs with reconstructed ACL and contralateral limb; in the control group the dominant and the non-dominant lower limbs were assessed. All subjects were submitted to joint position sense test to evaluate proprioception, postural control measure in single-limb, and step up and down (SUD) test for functional assessment. Results : There were no deficits in proprioception and postural control. In the SUD test, a 5% decrease in lift up force was found in reconstructed ACL lower limbs, however, a statistically not significant difference. The impact and step down force during the course of test were 30% greater in anatomic ACL than in control lower limbs. Conclusion : The individuals with ACL reconstruction at six months postoperative did not show changes in proprioception and postural control, but showed motor control changes, influencing knee functionality. Level of Evidence IV, Prognostic Studies. PMID:26981038

  9. Do Newer-Generation Bioabsorbable Screws Become Incorporated into Bone at Two Years After ACL Reconstruction with Patellar Tendon Graft?

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Charles L.; Spindler, Kurt P.; Leonard, James P.; Morris, Brent J.; Dunn, Warren R.; Reinke, Emily K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Bioabsorbable interference screws are used frequently for graft fixation in ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) reconstruction. The resorption properties of many available screws that are marketed as bioabsorbable are not well defined. The CALAXO (Smith & Nephew Endoscopy) and MILAGRO (DePuy Synthes) bioabsorbable screws contain polymers of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) plus additives to encourage osseointegration over time. The purpose of this study was to evaluate radiographic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) properties and compare patient-reported outcomes at a minimum of two years of follow-up after ACL reconstruction using CALAXO or MILAGRO bioabsorbable interference screws. Methods: A cohort of patients who underwent ACL reconstruction in which the fixation used was either CALAXO or MILAGRO screws returned for repeat radiographs for evaluation of tunnel widening, repeat MRI for evaluation of graft integrity and screw breakdown, and completion of the pain and symptom items of the KOOS (Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score) questionnaire. Results: At a mean of three years (range, 2.5 to 4.0 years) after surgery, thirty-one patients with sixty-two CALAXO screws and thirty-six patients with seventy-two MILAGRO screws returned for repeat evaluation. Two blinded, independent reviewers found no significant differences between the two screw types when comparing radiographs for tibial or femoral tunnel widening or MRIs for graft integrity, tibial and femoral foreign body reactions, or femoral screw degradation. Both reviewers found a significant difference between the two screw types when comparing tibial screw degradation properties (p < 0.01). All analyzed CALAXO screws were rated as partially intact or degraded; the MILAGRO screws were more likely to be rated as intact. No significant differences were noted between the two screw types when comparing the two KOOS subscales. Conclusions: CALAXO screws in the tibial tunnel were more likely

  10. Gender Dimorphic ACL Strain In Response to Combined Dynamic 3D Knee Joint Loading: Implications for ACL Injury Risk

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Kiyonori; Andrish, Jack T.; van den Bogert, Antonie J.; McLean, Scott G.

    2009-01-01

    While gender-based differences in knee joint anatomies/laxities are well documented, the potential for them to precipitate gender-dimorphic ACL loading and resultant injury risk has not been considered. To this end, we generated gender-specific models of ACL strain as a function of any six degrees of freedom (6DOF) knee joint load state via a combined cadaveric and analytical approach. Continuously varying joint forces and torques were applied to five male and five female cadaveric specimens and recorded along with synchronous knee flexion and ACL strain data. All data (~10,000 samples) were submitted to specimen-specific regression analyses, affording ACL strain predictions as a function of the combined 6 DOF knee loads. Following individual model verifications, generalized gender-specific models were generated and subjected to 6 DOF external load scenarios consistent with both a clinical examination and a dynamic sports maneuver. The ensuing model-based strain predictions were subsequently examined for gender-based discrepancies. Male and female specimen specific models predicted ACL strain within 0.51% ± 0.10% and 0.52% ± 0.07% of the measured data respectively, and explained more than 75% of the associated variance in each case. Predicted female ACL strains were also significantly larger than respective male values for both of simulated 6 DOF load scenarios. Outcomes suggest that the female ACL will rupture in response to comparatively smaller external load applications. Future work must address the underlying anatomical/laxity contributions to knee joint mechanical and resultant ACL loading, ultimately affording prevention strategies that may cater to individual joint vulnerabilities. PMID:19464897

  11. Amiodarone for ACLS: a critical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Stewart, C E

    2001-09-01

    Years ago, William Osler taught physicians, "Be not the first nor the last to adopt a therapy." This continues to be sage advice. Clinicians should be cautious in considering the use of amiodarone in a field setting for cardiac arrest until studies clearly show a benefit over drugs currently in use. The endpoint of the only cardiac arrest study available shows improved survival when amiodarone is combined with other drugs over placebo until the patient gets to the emergency department, but is not a comparison with other current drugs nor had any effect on long-term survival or functioning neurologic status. As previously cited, amiodarone was comparable with bretylium in treating recurrent VT/VF in one controlled study. Further study of this and other ACLS drugs is imperative. In summary, amiodarone should be reclassified as either a class indeterminate agent when used alone ("no harm but no benefit ... evidence insufficient to support final class decision") or a class IIb agent ("acceptable and useful ... supported by fair to good evidence") when used in addition to other therapies in the treatment of ventricular fibrillation and pulseless ventricular tachycardia. There is not sufficient evidence to move amiodarone to first-line therapy in the "out-of-hospital" cardiac arrest. This evidence may be available in the future and would then change this recommendation.

  12. Calcium phosphate-hybridized tendon graft to enhance tendon-bone healing two years after ACL reconstruction in goats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We developed a novel technique to improve tendon-bone attachment by hybridizing calcium phosphate (CaP) with a tendon graft using an alternate soaking process. However, the long-term result with regard to the interface between the tendon graft and the bone is unclear. Methods We analyzed bone tunnel enlargement by computed tomography and histological observation of the interface and the tendon graft with and without the CaP hybridization 2 years after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in goats using EndoButton and the postscrew technique (CaP, n = 4; control, n = 4). Results The tibial bone tunnel enlargement rates in the CaP group were lower than those in the control group (p < 0.05). In the CaP group, in the femoral and tibial bone tunnels at the anterior and posterior of the joint aperture site, direct insertion-like formation that contained a cartilage layer without tidemarks was more observed at the tendon-bone interface than in the control group (p < 0.05). Moreover, the gap area between the tendon graft and the bone was more observed at the femoral bone tunnel of the joint aperture site in the control group than in the CaP group (p < 0.05). The maturation of the tendon grafts determined using the ligament tissue maturation index was similar in both groups. Conclusions The CaP-hybridized tendon graft enhanced the tendon-bone healing 2 years after ACL reconstruction in goats. The use of CaP-hybridized tendon grafts can reduce the bone tunnel enlargement and gap area associated with the direct insertion-like formation in the interface near the joint. PMID:22166674

  13. A Placement Advisory Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Chris

    2010-01-01

    The primary method of placement at Portland CC (PCC) is the Compass Placement test. For the most part, students are placed correctly, but there are cases when students feel that they have been placed too low. In such cases we use our newly created Placement Advisory Test (PAT) to help us place them appropriately. (Contains 2 figures.)

  14. Isokinetic Testing in Evaluation Rehabilitation Outcome After ACL Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Cvjetkovic, Dragana Dragicevic; Bijeljac, Sinisa; Palija, Stanislav; Talic, Goran; Radulovic, Tatjana Nozica; Kosanovic, Milkica Glogovac; Manojlovic, Slavko

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Numerous rehab protocols have been used in rehabilitation after ACL reconstruction. Isokinetic testing is an objective way to evaluate dynamic stability of the knee joint that estimates the quality of rehabilitation outcome after ACL reconstruction. Our investigation goal was to show importance of isokinetic testing in evaluation thigh muscle strength in patients which underwent ACL reconstruction and rehabilitation protocol. Subjects and methods: In prospective study, we evaluated 40 subjects which were divided into two groups. Experimental group consisted of 20 recreational males which underwent ACL reconstruction with hamstring tendon and rehabilitation protocol 6 months before isokinetic testing. Control group (20 subjects) consisted of healthy recreational males. In all subjects knee muscle testing was performed on a Biodex System 4 Pro isokinetic dynamo-meter et velocities of 60°/s and 180°/s. We followed average peak torque to body weight (PT/BW) and classic H/Q ratio. In statistical analysis Student’s T test was used. Results: There were statistically significant differences between groups in all evaluated parameters except of the mean value of PT/BW of the quadriceps et velocity of 60°/s (p>0.05). Conclusion: Isokinetic testing of dynamic stabilizers of the knee is need in diagnostic and treatment thigh muscle imbalance. We believe that isokinetic testing is an objective parameter for return to sport activities after ACL reconstruction. PMID:25870471

  15. Effect of Timing of Surgery in Partially Injured ACLs.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Bai, Lunhao; Fu, Yonghui; Wang, Guangbin; He, Ming; Wang, Jiashi

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the optimal timing for surgical intervention of partially injured anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL). Thirty-eight patients were divided into early (n=17) or delayed (n=21) surgery groups based on the interval between injury and surgery. Minimum follow-up was 2 years. The outcome measures used were the International Knee Documentation Committee score, Lysholm knee score, Tegner activity rating, range of motion, and arthrometer measurements. The findings of this study indicate that early surgical reconstruction of partially ruptured ACLs did not result in arthrofibrosis but may prevent secondary loosening of the intact bundles and further meniscal and chondral injury.

  16. FUNCTIONAL HOP TESTS AND TUCK JUMP ASSESSMENT SCORES BETWEEN FEMALE DIVISION I COLLEGIATE ATHLETES PARTICIPATING IN HIGH VERSUS LOW ACL INJURY PRONE SPORTS: A CROSS SECTIONAL ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Hoog, Philipp; Warren, Meghan; Smith, Craig A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although functional tests including the single leg hop (SLH), triple hop (TH), cross over hop (COH) for distance, and the tuck jump assessment (TJA) are used for return to play (RTP) criteria for post anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, sport-specific baseline measurements are limited. Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine differences in SLH, TH, and COH distance and limb symmetry index (LSI), as well as total scores, number of jumps, and individual flaws of the TJA in 97 injury-free Division I (DI) collegiate female student athletes participating in ACL injury prone vs. non ACL injury prone sports. The hypothesis was that significant mean differences and asymmetries (LSI) would exist between the two groups in SLH, TH, COH and TJA. Study Design Cross sectional. Methods Due to research suggesting inherent ACL injury risk associated with specific sport involvement, participants were grouped into high (HR, n=57) and low (LR, n=40) ACL injury risk based on participating in a sport with high or low ACL injury rates. The HR group was composed of athletes participating in soccer, basketball, and volleyball, while the LR group athletes participated in diving, cross country, and track and field. Participants performed all standard functional tests (SFT) and side-to-side differences for each participant as well as between group differences were assessed for the hop tests. The LSI, a ratio frequently used to gauge athletes’ readiness for RTP post injury, was also assessed for between group differences. The TJA was compared between the groups on individual flaws, overall scores, and number of jumps performed. Results No between group differences for hop distances were found, with medium to large effect sizes for SLH, TH, and COH. The HR group had a higher TJA score, number of jumps, and higher proportion of the flaw of ‘foot placement not shoulder width apart’. Conclusion Although most SFT's showed no significant differences between athlete

  17. 50 CFR 648.100 - Summer flounder Annual Catch Limit (ACL).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) The Summer Flounder Monitoring Committee shall recommend to the MAFMC separate ACLs for the commercial... recommended by the SSC. (1) Sector allocations. The commercial and recreational fishing sector ACLs will be... sector ACLs may be established on an annual basis for up to 3 years at a time, dependent on whether...

  18. 50 CFR 648.64 - Yellowtail flounder sub-ACLs and AMs for the scallop fishery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Yellowtail flounder sub-ACLs and AMs for...-ACLs and AMs for the scallop fishery. (a) As specified in § 648.55(d), and pursuant to the biennial... Georges Bank and Southern New England/Mid-Atlantic stocks of yellowtail flounder. The sub-ACLs for...

  19. 50 CFR 648.100 - Summer flounder Annual Catch Limit (ACL).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) The Summer Flounder Monitoring Committee shall recommend to the MAFMC separate ACLs for the commercial... recommended by the SSC. (1) Sector allocations. The commercial and recreational fishing sector ACLs will be... sector ACLs may be established on an annual basis for up to 3 years at a time, dependent on whether...

  20. 50 CFR 648.230 - Spiny dogfish Annual Catch Limits (ACLs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Spiny dogfish Annual Catch Limits (ACLs... Management Measures for the Spiny Dogfish Fishery § 648.230 Spiny dogfish Annual Catch Limits (ACLs). (a) The... make recommendations to the Councils for changes in measures intended to ensure ACLs are not...

  1. Preventing ACL Injuries in Females: What Physical Educators Need to Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toscano, Lisa; Carroll, Brianne

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries happen at a frequent rate, especially in girls and women. While there are many factors that contribute to ACL tears, teaching proper landing techniques and strengthening certain muscles can decrease the incidence of ACL tears, especially in women. This article reviews some of the high-risk factors that…

  2. 50 CFR 648.140 - Black sea bass Annual Catch Limit (ACL).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Black Sea Bass Monitoring Committee shall recommend to the MAFMC separate ACLs for the commercial and...) Sector allocations. The commercial and recreational fishing sector ACLs will be established consistent... Management Plan. (2) Periodicity. The black sea bass commercial and recreational sector ACLs may...

  3. 50 CFR 648.100 - Summer flounder Annual Catch Limit (ACL).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) The Summer Flounder Monitoring Committee shall recommend to the MAFMC separate ACLs for the commercial... recommended by the SSC. (1) Sector allocations. The commercial and recreational fishing sector ACLs will be... sector ACLs may be established on an annual basis for up to 3 years at a time, dependent on whether...

  4. 50 CFR 648.64 - Yellowtail flounder sub-ACLs and AMs for the scallop fishery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Yellowtail flounder sub-ACLs and AMs for...-ACLs and AMs for the scallop fishery. (a) As specified in § 648.55(d), and pursuant to the biennial... Georges Bank and Southern New England/Mid-Atlantic stocks of yellowtail flounder. The sub-ACLs for...

  5. 50 CFR 648.140 - Black sea bass Annual Catch Limit (ACL).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Black Sea Bass Monitoring Committee shall recommend to the MAFMC separate ACLs for the commercial and...) Sector allocations. The commercial and recreational fishing sector ACLs will be established consistent... Management Plan. (2) Periodicity. The black sea bass commercial and recreational sector ACLs may...

  6. 50 CFR 648.230 - Spiny dogfish Annual Catch Limits (ACLs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Spiny dogfish Annual Catch Limits (ACLs... Management Measures for the Spiny Dogfish Fishery § 648.230 Spiny dogfish Annual Catch Limits (ACLs). (a) The... make recommendations to the Councils for changes in measures intended to ensure ACLs are not...

  7. 50 CFR 648.140 - Black sea bass Annual Catch Limit (ACL).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Black Sea Bass Monitoring Committee shall recommend to the MAFMC separate ACLs for the commercial and...) Sector allocations. The commercial and recreational fishing sector ACLs will be established consistent... Management Plan. (2) Periodicity. The black sea bass commercial and recreational sector ACLs may...

  8. 50 CFR 648.230 - Spiny dogfish Annual Catch Limits (ACLs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Spiny dogfish Annual Catch Limits (ACLs... Management Measures for the Spiny Dogfish Fishery § 648.230 Spiny dogfish Annual Catch Limits (ACLs). (a) The... make recommendations to the Councils for changes in measures intended to ensure ACLs are not...

  9. All-inside ACL: retroconstruction controversies.

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H

    2010-03-01

    All-inside anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is controversial because the technique is new; as a result, evidence-based clinical outcome studies have yet to be published. The purpose of this article is to consider the following controversies (considered alphabetically): anatomy, biomechanics, biology, bioabsorbables, divergence of the femoral interference screw, expansion or widening of tunnels, fixation, future considerations, graft choice, the learning curve, technique, tensioning, and tibia blow-out fracture. The technique should be learned in stages. In the opinion of the author, the history of sports medicine and arthroscopy has been a progression toward less invasive techniques. In the future, all-inside anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction techniques should become more simple and reproducible, and clinical outcomes must be analyzed with long-term follow-up.

  10. Outcome of ACL Reconstruction for Chronic ACL Injury in Knees without the Posterior Horn of the Medial Meniscus: Comparison with ACL Reconstructed Knees with An Intact Medial Meniscus

    PubMed Central

    Syam, Kevin; Chouhan, Devendra K.; Dhillon, Mandeep Singh

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Cadaveric studies have shown that deficiency of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus (PHMM) increases strain on the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft. However, its influence on the clinical and radiological outcome after ACL reconstruction is less discussed and hence evaluated in this study. Materials and Methods This study included 77 cases of ACL reconstruction with a minimum 18-month follow-up. Of the 77 cases, 41 patients with intact menisci were compared clinically and radiologically with 36 patients with an injury to the PHMM that required various grades of meniscectomy. The knees were evaluated using subjective International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score and Orthopadische Arbeitsgruppe Knie (OAK) score. Results Cases with intact menisci showed better stability (p=0.004) at an average of 44.51 months after surgery. No significant differences were noted in the overall OAK score, subjective IKDC score, and functional OAK score (p=0.082, p=0.526, and p=0.363, respectively). The incidence of radiological osteoarthrosis was significantly higher in the posterior horn deficient knees (p=0.022). Conclusions The tendency toward relatively higher objective instability and increased incidence of osteoarthrosis in the group with absent posterior horn reinforces its importance as a secondary stabiliser of the knee. PMID:28231647

  11. The ACLS Survey of Scholars: Views on Publications, Computers, Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, Herbert C.; Price, Anne Jamieson

    1986-01-01

    Reviews results of a survey by the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) of 3,835 scholars in the humanities and social sciences who are working both in colleges and universities and outside the academic community. Areas highlighted include professional reading, authorship patterns, computer use, and library use. (LRW)

  12. The Humanities in the Schools. ACLS Occasion Paper, No. 20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Council of Learned Societies, New York, NY.

    Designed to serve as a record of the initial public activity of the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) Program in Humanities Curriculum Development, this collection of three articles offers different perspectives on the humanities in the schools. In the first article, "The Humanities and Public Education," Stanley N. Katz discusses the…

  13. Individuality of Item Interpretation in Interchangeable ACL Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiske, Donald W.; Barack, Leonard I.

    1976-01-01

    The diversity among interpretations of single items in personality questionnaires has been noted previously. Using adjectives from the Adjective Check List (ACL), the study sought evidence bearing on these questions: Does such diversity make the responses to an item not comparable across subjects? If so, what are the implications for scores based…

  14. The Effects of a Valgus Collapse Knee Position on In Vivo ACL Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Utturkar, G. M.; Irribarra, L. A.; Taylor, K. A.; Spritzer, C. E.; Taylor, D. C.; Garrett, W. E.; DeFrate, Louis E.

    2013-01-01

    There are conflicting data regarding what motions increase ACL injury risk. More specifically, the mechanical role of valgus collapse positions during ACL injury remains controversial. Our objective was to evaluate ACL elongation in a model that mimics knee movements thought to occur during ACL injury. Eight healthy male subjects were imaged using MR and biplanar fluoroscopy to measure the in vivo elongation of the ACL and its functional bundles during three static knee positions: full extension, 30° of flexion, and a position intended to mimic a valgus collapse position described in the literature. For this study, the valgus collapse position consisted of 30° of knee flexion, internal rotation of the hip, and 10° of external tibial rotation. ACL length decreased significantly from full extension (30.2 ± 2.6 mm) to 30° of flexion (27.1 ± 2.2 mm). ACL length further decreased in the valgus collapse position (25.6 ± 2.4 mm). Both functional bundles of the ACL followed similar trends with regards to decreases in length in each of the three positions. Since strain would follow patterns of ACL length, landing on an extended knee may be a more relevant risk factor for ACL injuries than the valgus collapse position in males. Future studies should evaluate the effects of dynamic motion patterns on in vivo ACL strains. PMID:22855117

  15. The effects of a valgus collapse knee position on in vivo ACL elongation.

    PubMed

    Utturkar, G M; Irribarra, L A; Taylor, K A; Spritzer, C E; Taylor, D C; Garrett, W E; Defrate, Louis E

    2013-01-01

    There are conflicting data regarding what motions increase ACL injury risk. More specifically, the mechanical role of valgus collapse positions during ACL injury remains controversial. Our objective was to evaluate ACL elongation in a model that mimics knee movements thought to occur during ACL injury. Eight healthy male subjects were imaged using MR and biplanar fluoroscopy to measure the in vivo elongation of the ACL and its functional bundles during three static knee positions: full extension, 30° of flexion, and a position intended to mimic a valgus collapse position described in the literature. For this study, the valgus collapse position consisted of 30° of knee flexion, internal rotation of the hip, and 10° of external tibial rotation. ACL length decreased significantly from full extension (30.2 ± 2.6 mm) to 30° of flexion (27.1 ± 2.2 mm). ACL length further decreased in the valgus collapse position (25.6 ± 2.4 mm). Both functional bundles of the ACL followed similar trends with regards to decreases in length in each of the three positions. Since strain would follow patterns of ACL length, landing on an extended knee may be a more relevant risk factor for ACL injuries than the valgus collapse position in males. Future studies should evaluate the effects of dynamic motion patterns on in vivo ACL strains.

  16. Relationship Between Posterior-Inferior Tibial Slope and Bilateral Noncontact ACL Injury.

    PubMed

    Hendrix, Steven T; Barrett, Austin M; Chrea, Bopha; Replogle, William H; Hydrick, Josie M; Barrett, Gene R

    2016-10-18

    Is there a correlation between increased posterior-inferior tibial slope angle and noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury? Does increasing the posterior-inferior tibial slope angle increase the risk of bilateral ACL injury? A computerized relational database (Access 2007; Microsoft Inc, Redmond, Washington) was used to conduct a retrospective review of patients undergoing bilateral or unilateral ACL reconstruction surgery or treatment by a single surgeon between 1995 and 2013. Included in the study were patients with bilateral and unilateral ACL injuries and patellofemoral pain syndrome with no associated ACL deficiency. Exclusion criteria included concomitant ligament injury, previous ACL reconstruction, and previous knee surgery. Also excluded were patients who did not have plain lateral radiographs. Fifty patients were randomly selected from each group. After controlling for age and Tegner activity level, the authors found that the posterior-inferior tibial slope angle was a significant predictor (P=.002) of noncontact ACL injury. Mean posterior-inferior tibial slope angle for the bilateral, unilateral, and control groups was 11.8°±2.3°, 9.3°±2.4°, and 7.5°±2.3°, respectively. In the group with unilateral ACL injury vs the group without ACL deficiency, a 1° increase in posterior-inferior tibial slope angle (P=.03) was associated with a 20% increase in unilateral ACL injury. In those with bilateral ACL injury vs those without ACL deficiency, a 1° increase in posterior-inferior tibial slope angle (P=.001) increased bilateral knee injury by 34%. The difference between the mean angles of the control group without ACL deficiency and both the bilateral injury and unilateral injury cohorts was statistically significant (P=.003). Increased posterior-inferior tibial slope angle is associated with an increased risk of noncontact bilateral and unilateral ACL injury. [Orthopedics. 201x; xx(x):xx-xx.].

  17. Electrospinning polymer blends for biomimetic scaffolds for ACL tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Vanessa Lizeth

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is one of the most common knee injuries. Current ACL reconstructive strategies consist of using an autograft or an allograft to replace the ligament. However, limitations have led researchers to create tissue engineered grafts, known as scaffolds, through electrospinning. Scaffolds made of natural and synthetic polymer blends have the potential to promote cell adhesion while having strong mechanical properties. However, enzymes found in the knee are known to degrade tissues and affect the healing of intra-articular injuries. Results suggest that the natural polymers used in this study modify the thermal properties and tensile strength of the synthetic polymers when blended. Scanning electron microscopy display bead-free and enzyme biodegradability of the fibers. Raman spectroscopy confirms the presence of the natural and synthetic polymers in the scaffolds while, amino acid analysis present the types of amino acids and their concentrations found in the natural polymers.

  18. Evaluation of the Microsoft Kinect for screening ACL injury.

    PubMed

    Stone, Erik E; Butler, Michael; McRuer, Aaron; Gray, Aaron; Marks, Jeffrey; Skubic, Marjorie

    2013-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the use of the skeletal model generated by the Microsoft Kinect SDK in capturing four biomechanical measures during the Drop Vertical Jump test. These measures, which include: knee valgus motion from initial contact to peak flexion, frontal plane knee angle at initial contact, frontal plane knee angle at peak flexion, and knee-to-ankle separation ratio at peak flexion, have proven to be useful in screening for future knee anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries among female athletes. A marker-based Vicon motion capture system was used for ground truth. Results indicate that the Kinect skeletal model likely has acceptable accuracy for use as part of a screening tool to identify elevated risk for ACL injury.

  19. Unilateral Stance Strategies of Athletes With ACL Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Di Stasi, Stephanie L.; Hartigan, Erin H.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant movement strategies are characteristic of ACL-deficient athletes with recurrent knee instability (non-copers), and may instigate premature or accelerate joint degradation. Biomechanical evaluation of kinematic changes over time may elucidate noncopers’ responses to neuromuscular intervention and ACL reconstruction (ACLR). Forty noncopers were randomized into a perturbation group or a strength training only group. We evaluated the effects of perturbation training, and then gender on knee angle and tibial position during a unilateral standing task before and after ACLR. No statistically significant interactions were found. Before surgery, the strength training only group demonstrated knee angle asymmetry, but 6 months after ACLR, both groups presented with similar knee flexion between limbs. Aberrant and asymmetrical tibial position was found only in females following injury and ACLR. Neither treatment group showed distinct unilateral standing strategies following intervention; however, males and female noncopers appear to respond uniquely to physical therapy and surgery. PMID:22983931

  20. Femoral and Tibial Tunnel Widening following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction using Various Modalities of Fixation: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Kanthila, Mahesha; Saya, Rama Prakasha; Vidyasagar, JVS

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bone tunnel enlargement after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction (ACL-R) is a well-accepted phenomenon but there are very few published data comparing the extent of tunnel widening by various methods of fixation after ACL-R. Aim To compare the femoral and tibial tunnel widening following ACL-R with different methods of fixation using CT scan. Materials and Methods This one year prospective study included all patients with chronic Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) injury who underwent primary arthroscopic ACL-R using tripled hamstring tendon autograft. The graft was fixed to the tibial tunnel by Interference Screw (IFS) or Suture Disc (SD) and to the femoral tunnel by IFS, SD, Cross-Pin (CP) or Endo-button CL (Smith & Nephew). The widening of the tibial and femoral tunnels in different methods of fixation was assessed by Computed Tomography (CT) at 12 months follow-up; and was compared using paired sample test. Results A total of 63 patients were included in the study of which 58 (92%) were males and 5 (8%) were females, with a mean age of 29.1 ± 5.9 years. The tibial tunnel widening at one year follow-up was 1.680 ± 1.08794 (19.37%) and 1.517 ± 0.94834 mm (17.39%) by IFS and SD methods respectively. Femoral tunnel widening at one year follow-up was 1.294 ± 0.231, 1.809 ± 0.912, 1.320 ± 0.238, 1.779 ± 0.889 mm by IFS, SD, EB, and CP methods respectively. Femoral tunnel widening following suture disc method of fixation was very highly significant (p<0.001) in comparison with other methods. Conclusion Femoral tunnel and tibial tunnel widening varies with different methods of fixation and was maximum with suture disc method compared to others at one year follow-up after ACL-R. PMID:28050456

  1. Growth disturbances without growth arrest after ACL reconstruction in children.

    PubMed

    Chotel, Franck; Henry, Julien; Seil, Romain; Chouteau, Julien; Moyen, Bernard; Bérard, Jérôme

    2010-11-01

    Growth arrest is a major concern after ACL reconstruction in children. It usually occurs in patients near to closure of the growth plates. Growth disturbances without growth arrest are also possible and more vicious; the authors analyse the mechanism of two patients with growth disturbance due to overgrowth following ACL reconstruction. One was a symmetrical overgrowth process with 15 mm limb length discrepancy treated with percutaneous epiphysiodesis. Full correction at the time of skeletal maturity was achieved. The second patient developed an asymmetrical overgrowth with progressive tibial valgus deformity. This mechanism was similar to a posttraumatic tibial valgus deformity. After nonoperative treatment, a spontaneous correction of the deformity was noticed. Both children were young (7 and 10 years old) at the time of ACL reconstruction with an autologous iliotibial band graft. The clinical relevance of overgrowth disturbance is usually limited when compared to growth arrest but could require a second surgical procedure as reported in this study. Parents must be informed that even in experienced hands, and despite the use of a physeal sparing technique, this specific risk of growth disturbance is still present.

  2. ESL Placement and Schools

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Rebecca; Wilkinson, Lindsey; Muller, Chandra; Frisco, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the authors explore English as a Second Language (ESL) placement as a measure of how schools label and process immigrant students. Using propensity score matching and data from the Adolescent Health and Academic Achievement Study and the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, the authors estimate the effect of ESL placement on immigrant achievement. In schools with more immigrant students, the authors find that ESL placement results in higher levels of academic performance; in schools with few immigrant students, the effect reverses. This is not to suggest a one-size-fits-all policy; many immigrant students, regardless of school composition, generational status, or ESL placement, struggle to achieve at levels sufficient for acceptance to a 4-year university. This study offers several factors to be taken into consideration as schools develop policies and practices to provide immigrant students opportunities to learn. PMID:20617111

  3. Fiducial Marker Placement

    MedlinePlus

    ... Media Computed Tomography (CT) - Body General Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Introduction to Cancer Therapy (Radiation Oncology) Proton Therapy Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) Images related to Fiducial Marker Placement Sponsored by ...

  4. Gastrostomy tube placement - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... presentations/100125.htm Gastrostomy tube placement - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  5. Tunnel widening prevention with the allo-Achilles tendon graft in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: Surgical tips and short term followup

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Dong Won; Han, Seung Beom; Yeo, Woo Jin; Lee, Won Hee; Kwon, Jae Ho; Kyung, Bong Soo

    2017-01-01

    Background: Tunnel widening (TW) after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction can be a serious complication, and there is controversy over how to prevent it. This study aimed to suggest surgical approaches to prevent TW using an allo-Achilles tendon graft, and then to evaluate TW after these surgical tips were applied. Materials and Methods: Sixty two patients underwent ACL reconstruction with an allo-Achilles tendon graft. Four surgical approaches were used: Making a tibial tunnel by bone impaction, intraarticular reamer application, bone portion application for the femoral tunnel, and an additional bone plug application for the tibial tunnel. After more than 1-year, followup radiographs including anteroposterior and lateral views were taken in 29 patients encompassing thirty knees. The diameter of the tunnels at postoperation day 1 (POD1) and at followup was measured and compared. Results: In 18 knees (60%), there were no visible femoral tunnel margins on the radiographs at POD1 or followup. In the other 12 cases, which had visible femoral tunnel margins on followup radiographs, the mean femoral tunnel diameter was 8.6 mm. In the tibial tunnel, the mean diameters did not increase on all three levels (proximal, middle, and distal), and there was no statistically significant difference between the diameters at POD1 and followup. Conclusion: The suggested tips for surgery involving an allo-Achilles tendon graft can effectively prevent TW after ACL reconstruction according to this case series. These surgical tips can prevent TW.

  6. ACL reconstruction with BPTB autograft and irradiated fresh frozen allograft*

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Kang; Tian, Shao-qi; Zhang, Ji-hua; Xia, Chang-suo; Zhang, Cai-long; Yu, Teng-bo

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the clinical outcomes of arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with irradiated bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) allograft compared with non-irradiated allograft and autograft. Methods: All BPTB allografts were obtained from a single tissue bank and the irradiated allografts were sterilized with 2.5 mrad of irradiation prior to distribution. A total of 68 patients undergoing arthroscopic ACL reconstruction were prospectively randomized consecutively into one of the two groups (autograft and irradiated allograft groups). The same surgical technique was used in all operations done by the same senior surgeon. Before surgery and at the average of 31 months of follow-up (ranging from 24 to 47 months), patients were evaluated by the same observer according to objective and subjective clinical evaluations. Results: Of these patients, 65 (autograft 33, irradiated allograft 32) were available for full evaluation. When the irradiated allograft group was compared to the autograft group at the 31-month follow-up by the Lachman test, the anterior drawer test (ADT), the pivot shift test, and KT-2000 arthrometer test, statistically significant differences were found. Most importantly, 87.8% of patients in the autograft group and just only 31.3% in the irradiated allograft group had a side-to-side difference of less than 3 mm according to KT-2000. The failure rate of the ACL reconstruction with irradiated allograft (34.4%) was higher than that with autograft (6.1%). The anterior and rotational stabilities decreased significantly in the irradiated allograft group. According to the overall International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), functional and subjective evaluations, and activity level testing, no statistically significant differences were found between the two groups. Besides, patients in the irradiated allograft group had a shorter operation time and a longer duration of postoperative fever. When the patients had a fever, the

  7. Panoramic Measurement and Analysis of Strain Distribution in the Human ACL Using a Photoelastic Coating Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirokawa, Shunji; Yamamoto, Kouji; Kawada, Takashi

    Large and highly variable deformations of the ACL cannot be adequately quantified by one-dimensional and/or localized measurements. Since the complex anatomy of the ACL makes uniform loading of all fiber bundles almost impossible, strains on specific portions being tested are considerably altered during knee movement. To observe the ACL's entire surface, we propose a photoelastic coating method. A simulator jig was used to allow a natural motion of the knee whose medial and lateral femoral bone parts were removed in order to expose the ACL for observation. The simulator jig with the knee was mounted on a universal stand which allows tilt and swivel rotations, so that the exposed ACL might be viewed from any direction. Measurements were performed on the strain distributions over the ACL at various knee angles. The panoramic images of the photoelastic fringe patterns yielded significant results. Special attention was paid for insight into the relation between strain distribution and the directions of fiber run.

  8. Understanding and preventing acl injuries: current biomechanical and epidemiologic considerations - update 2010.

    PubMed

    Hewett, Timothy E; Ford, Kevin R; Hoogenboom, Barbara J; Myer, Gregory D

    2010-12-01

    This invited clinical commentary summarizes the current state of knowledge in the area of prevention of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. ACL injuries occur with a four to six fold greater incidence in female compared to male athletes playing the same high risk sports. The combination of increased risk of ACL injury and a 10-fold increase in sports participation since the enactment of Title IX in 1972 has led to an almost epidemic rise in ACL injuries in female athletes. Examination of the mechanisms responsible for this sex disparity in ACL rupture accelerated in the last two decades. A summary of these findings and a synthesis and framework for understanding the results of the intense investigation of this research are detailed herein. This clinical commentary focuses on the current understanding, identification and interventional targeting of the primary neuromuscular and biomechanical risk factors associated with the ACL injury mechanism in high-risk individuals.

  9. 50 CFR 648.64 - Yellowtail flounder sub-ACLs and AMs for the scallop fishery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Yellowtail flounder sub-ACLs and AMs for...-ACLs and AMs for the scallop fishery. (a) As specified in § 648.55(d), and pursuant to the biennial... specified in § 648.90(a)(4)(iii)(C) of the NE multispecies regulations, the sub-ACLs for the 2011...

  10. 50 CFR 640.28 - Annual catch limits (ACLs) and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE SPINY LOBSTER FISHERY OF THE GULF... accountability measures (AMs). For recreational and commercial spiny lobster landings combined, the ACL is...

  11. From open to arthroscopic anatomical ACL-reconstructions: the long way round. A statement paper.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Markus P; Friederich, Niklaus F; Müller, Werner; Hirschmann, Michael T

    2013-07-01

    The single-incision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction evidently has its shortcomings. In an attempt to improve the biomechanical but also the biological state of the knees after an ACL-reconstruction, double, even triple-bundle reconstructions have been popularised recently. As a positive side effect, details concerning ACL-insertion anatomy were brought back into the focus. In our opinion it would be more straight forward and logical to replace the non-anatomical single-incision technique with a more anatomic single-bundle ACL-reconstruction technique.

  12. Subselenean tunneler melting head design: A preliminary study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engblom, Bill; Graham, Eric; Perera, Jeevan; Strahan, Alan; Ro, Ted

    1988-01-01

    The placement of base facilities in subsurface tunnels created as a result of subsurface mining is described as an alternative to the establishing of a base on the lunar surface. Placement of the base facilities and operations in subselenean tunnels will allow personnel to live and work free from the problem of radiation and temperature variations. A conceptual design for a tunneling device applicable to such a lunar base application was performed to assess the feasibility of the concept. A tunneler was designed which would melt through the lunar material leaving behind glass lined tunnels for later development. The tunneler uses a nuclear generator which supplies the energy to thermally melt the regolith about the cone shaped head. Melted regolith is exacavated through intakes in the head and transferred to a truck which hauls it to the surface. The tunnel walls are solidified to provide support lining by using an active cooling system about the mid section of the tunneler. Also addressed is the rationale for a subselenean tunneler and the tunneler configuration and subsystems, as well as the reasoning behind the resulting design.

  13. Recognition Tunneling

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Stuart; He, Jin; Sankey, Otto; Hapala, Prokop; Jelinek, Pavel; Zhang, Peiming; Chang, Shuai; Huang, Shuo

    2010-01-01

    Single molecules in a tunnel junction can now be interrogated reliably using chemically-functionalized electrodes. Monitoring stochastic bonding fluctuations between a ligand bound to one electrode and its target bound to a second electrode (“tethered molecule-pair” configuration) gives insight into the nature of the intermolecular bonding at a single molecule-pair level, and defines the requirements for reproducible tunneling data. Simulations show that there is an instability in the tunnel gap at large currents, and this results in a multiplicity of contacts with a corresponding spread in the measured currents. At small currents (i.e. large gaps) the gap is stable, and functionalizing a pair of electrodes with recognition reagents (the “free analyte” configuration) can generate a distinct tunneling signal when an analyte molecule is trapped in the gap. This opens up a new interface between chemistry and electronics with immediate implications for rapid sequencing of single DNA molecules. PMID:20522930

  14. Amiodarone supplants lidocaine in ACLS and CPR protocols.

    PubMed

    Mizzi, Anna; Tran, Thanh; Mangar, Devanand; Camporesi, Enrico M

    2011-09-01

    Amiodarone is an antiarrhythmic medication used to treat and prevent certain types of serious, life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. Amiodarone gained slow acceptance outside the specialized field of cardiac antiarrhythmic surgery because the side-effects are significant. Recent adoption of amiodarone in the ACLS (Advanced Cardiac Life Support) protocol has somewhat popularized this class of antiarrhythmics. Its use is slowly expanding in the acute medicine setting of anesthetics. This article summarizes the use of Amiodarone by anesthesiologists in the operating room and during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  15. ACLS 2000: overview of changes to the guidelines.

    PubMed

    Cleland, Michelle A; Hynes-Gay, Patricia

    2002-01-01

    Emergency treatment measures in the setting of a cardiopulmonary arrest have recently been reclassified according to the strength of evidence in support of their use. As a result, there are new recommendations that must be incorporated, both in the management of patients in cardiac arrest and those with clinical findings that have the potential to deteriorate and become life-threatening. This article provides an overview of the 2000 ACLS guidelines, with particular emphasis on new developments in the management of patients with acute coronary syndromes, changes in the tachycardia algorithms, and recommendations pertaining to endotracheal intubation.

  16. Dual ACL Ganglion Cysts: Significance of Detailed Arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Samarth; Singla, Amit; Nag, H L; Meena, Sanjay; Lohiya, Ramprakash; Agarwal, Abhinav

    2014-01-01

    Intra-articular ganglion cysts of the knee joint are rare and most frequently are an incidental finding on MRI and arthroscopy. Most of the previous studies have reported a single ganglion cyst in the knee. There have been previous reports of more than one cyst in the same knee but not in the same structure within the knee. We are reporting a case of dual ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) ganglion cysts one of which was missed on radiological examination but later detected during arthroscopy. To the best of our knowledge, no such case has been reported in the indexed English literature till date.

  17. Association Between Lateral Posterior Tibial Slope, Body Mass Index, and ACL Injury Risk

    PubMed Central

    Bojicic, Katherine M.; Beaulieu, Mélanie L.; Imaizumi Krieger, Daniel Y.; Ashton-Miller, James A.; Wojtys, Edward M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: While body mass index (BMI), a modifiable parameter, and knee morphology, a nonmodifiable parameter, have been identified as risk factors for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture, the interaction between them remains unknown. An understanding of this interaction is important because greater compressive axial force (perhaps due to greater BMI) applied to a knee that is already at an increased risk because of its geometry, such as a steep lateral posterior tibial slope, could further increase the probability of ACL injury. Purpose: To quantify the relationship between BMI and select knee morphological parameters as potential risk factors for ACL injury. Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Sagittal knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) files from 76 ACL-injured and 42 uninjured subjects were gathered from the University of Michigan Health System’s archive. The posterior tibial slope (PTS), middle cartilage slope (MCS), posterior meniscus height (PMH), and posterior meniscus bone angle (MBA) in the lateral compartment were measured using MRI. BMI was calculated from demographic data. The association between the knee structural factors, BMI, and ACL injury risk was explored using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Results: PTS (P = .043) and MCS (P = .037) significantly predicted ACL injury risk. As PTS and MCS increased by 1°, odds of sustaining an ACL injury increased by 12% and 13%, respectively. The multivariate logistic regression analysis, which included PTS, BMI centered around the mean (cBMI), and their interaction, showed that this interaction predicted the odds of ACL rupture (P = .050; odds ratio, 1.03). For every 1-unit increase in BMI from the average that is combined with a 1° increase in PTS, the odds of an ACL tear increased by 15%. Conclusion: An increase in BMI was associated with increased risk of ACL tear in the presence of increased lateral posterior tibial slope. Larger values of PTS or

  18. The effects of ACL injury on quadriceps and hamstring torque, work and power.

    PubMed

    Pincivero, Danny M; Heller, Brandan M; Hou, Su-I

    2002-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess isokinetic torque, work and power between non-injured, ACL (anterior cruciate ligament)-deficient and ACL-reconstructed individuals. Ten healthy, non-injured individuals, seven unilateral ACL-deficient individuals and six unilateral ACL-reconstructed individuals were assessed for isokinetic quadriceps and hamstring strength at 1.05 and 3.14 rad.s-1. Peak torque, total work, average power and the ratio of peak torque to body mass were computed for both velocities. Peak torque was also corrected for body mass, using allometric modelling. The non-injured individuals showed significantly greater quadriceps peak torque to body mass ratios than the ACL-deficient and ACL-reconstructed individuals at both velocities, and greater hamstring peak torque to body mass ratios than the ACL-deficient group at 3.14 rad.s-1 (P < 0.05). The ACL-deficient individuals displayed greater quadriceps and hamstring peak torque, total work and average power than the non-injured individuals at 1.05 rad.s-1 (P < 0.05). The ACL-deficient individuals also displayed significantly greater peak torque, total work and average power than the ACL-reconstructed individuals for the quadriceps at both velocities (P < 0.05). The ACL-deficient individuals demonstrated greater hamstring peak torque and total work than the non-injured individuals at both velocities (P < 0.05). The allometrically modelled peak torques at both isokinetic velocities demonstrated that the quadriceps muscle values were significantly higher in the non-involved than the involved limb. The hamstring peak torques corrected for body mass were significantly higher in the non-involved than the involved limb only at 1.05 rad.s-1. The main finding from the present study is that isokinetic measures in ratio-scaled or absolute units yield a different outcome and, hence, interpretation compared with the allometric approach.

  19. Anteromedial portal versus transtibial drilling techniques in ACL reconstruction: a blinded cross-sectional study at two- to five-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Samitier, Gonzalo; Álvarez, Pedro; Steinbacher, Gilbert

    2010-01-01

    Drilling of the femoral tunnel with the transtibial (TT) technique is widely used in bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Recent studies suggest higher knee stability with the use of the anteromedial portal (AMP). The purpose of this study was to compare functional and clinical outcomes of BPTB ACL reconstruction using the TT or the AMP technique for drilling the femoral tunnel. All ACL reconstructions between January 2003 and April 2006 were approached for eligibility. Forty-seven patients met inclusion criteria (21 TT group and 26 AMP group). Blinded assessments of IKDC score, knee stability and range of motion, one-leg hop test, mid-quadriceps circumference, VAS for satisfaction with surgery, Lysholm and Tegner scores, and SF-12 questionnaire were obtained for both groups. Data on preoperative and postoperative surgical timing were retrospectively reviewed through the charts. The AMP group demonstrated a significantly lower recovery time from surgery to walking without crutches (p < 0.01), to return to normal life (p < 0.03), to return jogging (p < 0.03), to return training (p < 0.03), and to return to play (p < 0.03). Knee stability values measured with KT-1000, Lachman test, pivot-shift sign, and objective IKDC score assessments were significantly better for the AMP compared to TT group (p < 0.002, p < 0.03, p < 0.02, p < 0.015, respectively). No differences were found for VAS for satisfaction with surgery, Lysholm, Tegner, and SF-12 between both groups. The use of the AMP technique significantly improved the anterior-posterior and rotational knee stability, IKDC scores, and recovery time from surgery compared to the TT technique. PMID:20401753

  20. Role of the ACL2 locus in flower stalk elongation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hiroaki; Komeda, Yoshibumi; Saito, Tamao; Ito, Hidetaka; Kato, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    The acaulis2 (acl2) mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana shows a defect in flower stalk elongation. We identified the mutation point of acl2 by map-based cloning. The ACL2 locus is located within an approximately 320-kb region at around 100 map units on chromosome 1. One nucleotide substitution was detected in this region in the acl2 mutant, but no significant open reading frames were found around this mutation point. When wild-type DNA fragments containing the mutation point were introduced into acl2 mutant plants, some transgenic plants partially or almost completely recovered from the defect in flower stalk elongation. 3'-RACE experiments showed that bidirectional transcripts containing the acl2 mutation point were expressed, and the Plant MPSS database revealed that several small RNAs were produced from this region. Microarray analysis showed that transcription of many genes is activated in flower stalks of acl2 mutant plants. Overexpression of some of these genes caused a dwarf phenotype in wild-type plants. These results suggest the following novel mechanism for control of the elongation of flower stalks. Bidirectional non-coding RNAs are transcribed from the ACL2 locus, and small RNAs are generated from them in flower stalks. These small RNAs repress the transcription of a set of genes whose expression represses flower stalk elongation, and flower stalks are therefore fully elongated.

  1. ACL injury mechanisms and related factors in male and female carving skiers: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Ruedl, G; Webhofer, M; Linortner, I; Schranz, A; Fink, C; Patterson, C; Nachbauer, W; Burtscher, M

    2011-10-01

    In recreational alpine skiing, ACL injury risk is 3 times greater in females. However, since the introduction of carving skis ACL injury risk seems to have decreased. No study has yet investigated the distribution of ACL injury mechanisms in male and female carving skiers. Therefore, the aim of the study was to investigate potential gender specific differences of ACL injury mechanisms and related factors among carving skiers. In total, 220 recreational carving skiers (59 males and 161 females) suffering from an ACL injury volunteered for this study. Demographic data, skiing ability, equipment related and environmental factors, circumstances and causes for the fall, and type of fall (injury mechanisms) were collected by questionnaire. The forward twisting fall is the most reported ACL injury mechanism in both gender (p=0.672) accounting for 54% of all injuries, although male and female skiers differed significantly with regard to circumstances of fall (p=0.001) and actions when ACL injury occurred (p=0.04). Bindings not releasing at the time point of accident occurred 2.6 times more with females than with males (p=0.005). The forward twisting fall seems to have become the dominant ACL injury mechanism both in male and female recreational skiers since the introduction of carving skis.

  2. Role of gastrocnemius activation in knee joint biomechanics: gastrocnemius acts as an ACL antagonist.

    PubMed

    Adouni, M; Shirazi-Adl, A; Marouane, H

    2016-01-01

    Gastrocnemius is a premier muscle crossing the knee, but its role in knee biomechanics and on the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) remains less clear when compared to hamstrings and quadriceps. The effect of changes in gastrocnemius force at late stance when it peaks on the knee joint response and ACL force was initially investigated using a lower extremity musculoskeletal model driven by gait kinematics-kinetics. The tibiofemoral joint under isolated isometric contraction of gastrocnemius was subsequently analyzed at different force levels and flexion angles (0°-90°). Changes in gastrocnemius force at late stance markedly influenced hamstrings forces. Gastrocnemius acted as ACL antagonist by substantially increasing its force. Simulations under isolated contraction of gastrocnemius confirmed this role at all flexion angles, in particular, at extreme knee flexion angles (0° and 90°). Constraint on varus/valgus rotations substantially decreased this effect. Although hamstrings and gastrocnemius are both knee joint flexors, they play opposite roles in respectively protecting or loading ACL. Although the quadriceps is also recognized as antagonist of ACL, at larger joint flexion and in contrast to quadriceps, activity in gastrocnemius substantially increased ACL forces (anteromedial bundle). The fact that gastrocnemius is an antagonist of ACL should help in effective prevention and management of ACL injuries.

  3. Perspectives on the Humanities and School-Based Curriculum Development. ACLS Occasional Paper No. 24.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackman, Sandra; Chodorow, Stanley; Ohmann, Richard; Okura, Sandra; Purrington, Sandra Sanchez; Stein, Robert

    This paper records three plenary sessions held at the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) National Education Conference, August 27-29, 1993. The conference built on what was learned in the first year of the project and reported in ACLS Occasional Paper 20. Sessions allowed participants to talk with colleagues who had been project…

  4. 50 CFR 648.64 - Yellowtail flounder sub-ACLs and AMs for the scallop fishery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Yellowtail flounder sub-ACLs and AMs for the scallop fishery. 648.64 Section 648.64 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT...-ACLs and AMs for the scallop fishery. (a) As specified in § 648.55(d), and pursuant to the...

  5. Liberal Arts Colleges in American Higher Education: Challenges and Opportunities. ACLS Occasional Paper, No. 59

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Council of Learned Societies, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) Occasional Paper presents the proceedings of a conference on "Liberal Arts Colleges in American Higher Education: Challenges and Opportunities" convened by ACLS in November 2003 in Williamstown, Massachusetts with the support of the Oakley Center for the Humanities and Social Sciences at…

  6. 50 CFR 660.410 - Conservation objectives, ACLs, and de minimis control rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Conservation objectives, ACLs, and de... COAST STATES West Coast Salmon Fisheries § 660.410 Conservation objectives, ACLs, and de minimis control... Limits. Annual management measures will be designed to ensure escapement levels at or higher than...

  7. 50 CFR 660.410 - Conservation objectives, ACLs, and de minimis control rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Conservation objectives, ACLs, and de... COAST STATES West Coast Salmon Fisheries § 660.410 Conservation objectives, ACLs, and de minimis control... Limits. Annual management measures will be designed to ensure escapement levels at or higher than...

  8. Enhancing proliferation and ECM expression of human ACL fibroblasts by sonic vibration.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuan-Yuan; Park, Jung-Keug; Yoon, Hee-Hoon; Choi, Hynjin; Kim, Chan-Wha; Seo, Young-Kwon

    2015-01-01

    Effects of mechanical vibration on cell activity and behavior remain controversial: There has been evidence on both positive and negative effects. Furthermore, research on the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has as yet been limited and the frequency-related effects remain unknown, even though ACL injury is common and an injured ACL hardly spontaneously recovers. The object of this work was to address the influence of mechanical vibration on ACL fibroblasts, to determine the effects of frequencies, and to further study this effect at the cellular level. We found that sonic vibration affected ACL fibroblasts' proliferation and metabolism in a frequency-dependent manner, and 20 Hz gave rise to the most ACL cell activity and comprehensively increased extracellular matrix (ECM) contents, including collagen type I, collagen type III, fibronectin, elastin, tenascin, glycosaminoglycan (GAG), and the cytoskeleton protein vimentin. Thus, our results indicate that sonic vibration possesses frequency-dependent effects on proliferation and productivity of ACL fibroblast with an optimal frequency of 20 Hz under the present stimulation conditions, providing further information for future research in how vibrational stimulation manipulates ACL cellular behavior.

  9. Evaluating ACLS Algorithms for the International Space Station (ISS) - A Paradigm Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Dave; Brandt, Keith; Locke, James; Hurst, Victor, IV; Mack, Michael D.; Pettys, Marianne; Smart, Kieran

    2007-01-01

    The ISS may have communication gaps of up to 45 minutes during each orbit and therefore it is imperative to have medical protocols, including an effective ACLS algorithm, that can be reliably autonomously executed during flight. The aim of this project was to compare the effectiveness of the current ACLS algorithm with an improved algorithm having a new navigation format.

  10. College Placement in Today's Economy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galloway, James L.

    1982-01-01

    Analyzed the effects of reduced financing on college placement items such as services, staffing, fees, conference attendance, travel, recruitment, and salaries. Placement personnel (N=224) responded to a questionnaire. Results indicated that budgets have generally remained the same. (RC)

  11. 50 CFR 622.12 - Annual catch limits (ACLs) and accountability measures (AMs) for Caribbean island management...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... lb (26,524 kg). (R) Spiny lobster—327,920 lb (148,742 kg). (ii) Recreational ACLs. The following ACLs... (15,242 kg). (N) Triggerfish and filefish, combined—24,980 lb (11,331 kg). (O) Spiny lobster—107,307...). (O) Spiny lobster—104,199 lb (47,264 kg). (ii) (4) Caribbean EEZ— (i) ACLs. The following ACLs...

  12. 50 CFR 622.12 - Annual catch limits (ACLs) and accountability measures (AMs) for Caribbean island management...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... lb (26,524 kg). (R) Spiny lobster—327,920 lb (148,742 kg). (ii) Recreational ACLs. The following ACLs... (15,242 kg). (N) Triggerfish and filefish, combined—24,980 lb (11,331 kg). (O) Spiny lobster—107,307...). (O) Spiny lobster—104,199 lb (47,264 kg). (ii) (4) Caribbean EEZ— (i) ACLs. The following ACLs...

  13. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tear in an Athlete: Does Increased Heel Loading Contribute to ACL Rupture?

    PubMed Central

    Burkhart, Bradd; Ford, Kevin R.; Heidt, Robert S.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2008-01-01

    Rupture to the anterior cruciate ligament is a common athletic injury in American football. The lower extremity biomechanics related to increased ACL injury risk are not completely understood. However, foot landing has been purported to be a significant contributing factor to the ACL injury mechanism. In this case report, information is presented on an athlete previously tested for in-shoe loading patterns on artificial turf and subsequently went on to non-contact ACL rupture on the same surface. This case report describes the specific findings in a study participant who suffered an ACL rupture after testing and suggests that flatfoot tendency in running and cutting maneuvers might lead to an increased risk of ACL injury. PMID:20333261

  14. 77 FR 10668 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-23

    ... Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch Limit) Harvested for Management... harvest and processing, U.S. at-sea processing, border transfer, and sub-ACLs for each management area. The 2012 Domestic Annual Harvest is 91,200 metric tons (mt); the 2012 sub-ACL allocated to Area 2...

  15. 76 FR 61059 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-03

    ... Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch Limit) Harvested for Management... calendar day until January 1, 2012, when the 2012 sub-ACL for Area 1B becomes available, except when... Atlantic herring sub-ACL allocated to Area 1B for 2011 is projected to be harvested by October 1,...

  16. 78 FR 21071 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-09

    ... Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch Limit) Harvested for Management.... at-sea processing, border transfer, and sub-ACLs for each management area. The 2013 Domestic Annual Harvest is 91,200 metric tons (mt); the 2013 sub-ACL allocated to Area 2 is 22,146 mt, and 0 mt of the...

  17. 76 FR 61061 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-03

    ... Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch Limit) Harvested for Management... day until January 1, 2012, when the 2012 sub-ACL (annual catch limit) for Area 3 becomes available... percent of the herring sub-ACL allocated to Area 3 for 2011 is projected to be harvested by October...

  18. 77 FR 61299 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-09

    ... Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch Limit) Harvested for Management..., domestic harvest and processing, U.S. at-sea processing, border transfer, and the sub-ACL for each management area. The 2012 Domestic Annual Harvest was set as 91,200 metric tons (mt); the sub-ACL...

  19. 77 FR 66746 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-07

    ... Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch Limit) Harvested for Management..., domestic harvest and processing, U.S. at-sea processing, border transfer, and the sub-ACL for each management area. The 2012 Domestic Annual Harvest was set as 91,200 metric tons (mt); the sub-ACL...

  20. 76 FR 66654 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-27

    ... Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch Limit) Harvested for Management..., domestic harvest and processing, U.S. at-sea processing, border transfer, and sub-ACLs for each management area. The 2011 Domestic Annual Harvest is 91,200 metric tons (mt); the 2011 sub-ACL allocated to...

  1. 50 CFR 648.53 - Acceptable biological catch (ABC), annual catch limits (ACL), annual catch targets (ACT), DAS...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... catch limits (ACL), annual catch targets (ACT), DAS allocations, and individual fishing quotas (IFQ... limits (ACL), annual catch targets (ACT), DAS allocations, and individual fishing quotas (IFQ). (a... limited access scallop fishery shall be allocated 94.5 percent of the ACL specified in paragraph (a)(1)...

  2. 50 CFR 622.496 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch.... Virgin Islands § 622.496 Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs). See § 622.12 for applicable ACLs and AMs....

  3. 50 CFR 622.457 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch.... Virgin Islands § 622.457 Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs). See § 622.12 for applicable ACLs and AMs....

  4. 50 CFR 648.53 - Acceptable biological catch (ABC), annual catch limits (ACL), annual catch targets (ACT), DAS...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... divided as sub-ACLs between limited access vessels, limited access vessels that are fishing under a... limited access fishery sub-ACLs for fishing years 2011 through 2013 are: (A) 2011: 24,954 mt. (B) 2012: 26... catch, observer set-aside, and research set-aside, as specified in this paragraph (a). The LAGC ACLs...

  5. 50 CFR 622.439 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch.... Virgin Islands § 622.439 Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs). See § 622.12 for applicable ACLs and AMs....

  6. 50 CFR 622.439 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch.... Virgin Islands § 622.439 Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs). See § 622.12 for applicable ACLs and AMs....

  7. 50 CFR 622.193 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch... Region § 622.193 Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures... commercial ACLs, in round weight, are 284,680 lb (129,129 kg) for 2012, 315,920 lb (143,299 kg) for 2013,...

  8. 50 CFR 622.457 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch.... Virgin Islands § 622.457 Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs). See § 622.12 for applicable ACLs and AMs....

  9. 50 CFR 622.41 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch....41 Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs). (a... sector for the remainder of that fishing year. (3) The stock complex ACLs for Other SWG, in gutted...

  10. 50 CFR 648.53 - Acceptable biological catch (ABC), annual catch limits (ACL), annual catch targets (ACT), DAS...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... divided as sub-ACLs between limited access vessels, limited access vessels that are fishing under a LAGC... adjustment. (i) The limited access fishery sub-ACLs for fishing years 2014 and 2015 are: (A) 2014: 18,885 mt...). (i) The ACLs for fishing years 2014 and 2015 for LAGC IFQ vessels without a limited access...

  11. 50 CFR 648.53 - Acceptable biological catch (ABC), annual catch limits (ACL), annual catch targets (ACT), DAS...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... divided as sub-ACLs between limited access vessels, limited access vessels that are fishing under a LAGC... adjustment. (i) The limited access fishery sub-ACLs for fishing years 2013 and 2014 are: (A) 2013: 19,093 mt... paragraph (a). (i) The ACLs for fishing years 2013 and 2014 for LAGC IFQ vessels without a limited...

  12. 50 CFR 622.496 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch.... Virgin Islands § 622.496 Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs). See § 622.12 for applicable ACLs and AMs....

  13. Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction Femoral Tunnel Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Hiemstra, Laurie A.; Kerslake, Sarah; Lafave, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Background: Medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction is a procedure aimed to reestablish the checkrein to lateral patellar translation in patients with symptomatic patellofemoral instability. Correct femoral tunnel position is thought to be crucial to successful MPFL reconstruction, but the accuracy of this statement in terms of patient outcomes has not been tested. Purpose: To assess the accuracy of femoral tunnel placement in an MPFL reconstruction cohort and to determine the correlation between tunnel accuracy and a validated disease-specific, patient-reported quality-of-life outcome measure. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Between June 2008 and February 2014, a total of 206 subjects underwent an MPFL reconstruction. Lateral radiographs were measured to determine the accuracy of the femoral tunnel by measuring the distance from the center of the femoral tunnel to the Schöttle point. Banff Patella Instability Instrument (BPII) scores were collected a mean 24 months postoperatively. Results: A total of 155 (79.5%) subjects had adequate postoperative lateral radiographs and complete BPII scores. The mean duration of follow-up (±SD) was 24.4 ± 8.2 months (range, 12-74 months). Measurement from the center of the femoral tunnel to the Schöttle point resulted in 143 (92.3%) tunnels being categorized as “good” or “ideal.” There were 8 failures in the cohort, none of which occurred in malpositioned tunnels. The mean distance from the center of the MPFL tunnel to the center of the Schöttle point was 5.9 ± 4.2 mm (range, 0.5-25.9 mm). The mean postoperative BPII score was 65.2 ± 22.5 (range, 9.2-100). Pearson r correlation demonstrated no statistically significant relationship between accuracy of femoral tunnel position and BPII score (r = –0.08; 95% CI, –0.24 to 0.08). Conclusion: There was no evidence of a correlation between the accuracy of MPFL reconstruction femoral tunnel in relation to the Schöttle point and

  14. Impacted material placement plans

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, M.J.

    1997-01-29

    Impacted material placement plans (IMPP) are documents identifying the essential elements in placing remediation wastes into disposal facilities. Remediation wastes or impacted material(s) are those components used in the construction of the disposal facility exclusive of the liners and caps. The components might include soils, concrete, rubble, debris, and other regulatory approved materials. The IMPP provides the details necessary for interested parties to understand the management and construction practices at the disposal facility. The IMPP should identify the regulatory requirements from applicable DOE Orders, the ROD(s) (where a part of a CERCLA remedy), closure plans, or any other relevant agreements or regulations. Also, how the impacted material will be tracked should be described. Finally, detailed descriptions of what will be placed and how it will be placed should be included. The placement of impacted material into approved on-site disposal facilities (OSDF) is an integral part of gaining regulatory approval. To obtain this approval, a detailed plan (Impacted Material Placement Plan [IMPP]) was developed for the Fernald OSDF. The IMPP provides detailed information for the DOE, site generators, the stakeholders, regulatory community, and the construction subcontractor placing various types of impacted material within the disposal facility.

  15. Knee functional recovery and limb-to-limb symmetry restoration after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture and ACL reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawasreh, Zakariya Hussein

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is a common sport injury of young athletes who participate in jumping, cutting, and pivoting activities. Although ACL reconstruction (ACLR) surgery has the goal of enabling athletes to return to preinjury activity levels, treatment results often fall short of this goal. The outcomes after ACLR are variable and less than optimal with low rate of return to preinjury activity level and high risk for second ACL injury. Factors related to the knee functional limitations, strength deficits, and limb-to-limb movement asymmetry may be associated with poor outcomes after ACLR. Additionally, the criteria that are used to determine a patient's readiness to return to the preinjury activity level are undefined which may also be associated with poor outcomes after ACLR. The clinical decision-making to clear patients' for safe and successful return to high physical activities should be based on a universal comprehensive set of objective criteria that ensure normal knee function and limb-to-limb symmetry. A battery of return to activity criteria (RTAC) that emphases normal knee function and limb-to-limb movement symmetry has been constituted to better ensure safe and successful return to preinjury activity level. Yet, only variables related to patients' demographics, concomitant injuries, and treatment measures have been used to predict return to preinjury activity levels after ACLR. However, the ability of RTAC variables that ensure normal knee function and limb movement symmetry to predict the return to participate in the same preinjury activity level after ACLR has not been investigated. In light of this background, the first aim of the present study was to compare functional knee performance-based and patient-reported measures of those who PASS and who FAIL on RTAC at 6 months (6-M) following ACLR with those at 12 months (12-M) and 24 months (24-M) following ACLR and to determine how performance-based and patient-reported measures

  16. The use of platelets to affect functional healing of an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) autograft in a caprine ACL reconstruction model.

    PubMed

    Spindler, Kurt P; Murray, Martha M; Carey, James L; Zurakowski, David; Fleming, Braden C

    2009-05-01

    Many anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions have increased laxity postoperatively. We hypothesized that enhancing an ACL graft with a collagen-platelet composite (CPC) would improve knee laxity and graft structural properties. We also hypothesized the platelet concentration in the CPC would affect these parameters. Twelve goats underwent ACL reconstruction with autologous patellar tendon graft. In six goats, a collagen-platelet composite was placed around the graft (CPC group). In the remaining six goats, the collagen scaffold only was used (COLL group). Three goats were excluded due to complications. After 6 weeks in vivo, anterior-posterior (AP) laxity and tensile properties of the ACL reconstructed knees were measured and normalized against the contralateral intact knee. At a knee flexion angle of 30 degrees, the average increase in AP laxity was 40% less in the CPC group than the COLL group (p = 0.045). At 60 degrees, the AP laxity was 30% less in the CPC group, a difference that was close to statistical significance (p = 0.080). No differences were found between treatment groups with respect to the structural properties (p > 0.30). However, there were significant correlations between serum platelet concentration and AP laxity (R2 = 0.643; p = 0.009), maximum load (R2 = 0.691; p = 0.006), and graft stiffness (R2 = 0.840; p < 0.001). In conclusion, use of a CPC to enhance healing of an allograft ACL reconstruction inversely correlated with early sagittal plane laxity and the systemic platelet count was highly predictive of ACL reconstruction graft strength and stiffness at 6 weeks. These findings emphasize the importance of further research on delineating the effect of platelets in treating of ACL injuries.

  17. Kinematic and kinetic interactions during normal and ACL-deficient gait: a longitudinal in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Atarod, Mohammad; Frank, Cyril B; Shrive, Nigel G

    2014-03-01

    The interactions between different tissues within the knee joint and between different kinematic DOF and joint flexion during normal gait were investigated. These interactions change following ACL transection, in both short (4 weeks) and long (20 weeks) term. Ten skeletally mature sheep were used in control (N = 5) and experimental (N = 5) groups. The 6-DOF stifle joint motion was first measured during normal gait. The control group were then euthanized and mounted on a unique robotic testing platform for kinetic measurements. The experimental group underwent ACL transection surgery, and kinematics measurements were repeated 4 and 20 weeks post-operatively. The experimental group were then euthanized and underwent kinetic assessment using the robotic system. Results indicated significant couplings between joint flexion vs. abduction and internal tibial rotation, as well as medial, anterior, and superior tibial translations during both normal and ACL-deficient gait. Distinct kinetic interactions were also observed between different tissues within the knee joint. Direct relationships were found between ACL vs. LM/MM, and PCL vs. MCL loads during normal gait; inverse relationships were detected between ACL vs. PCL and PCL vs. LM/MM loads. These kinetic interaction patterns were considerably altered by ACL injury. Significant inter-subject variability in joint kinematics and tissue loading patterns during gait was also observed. This study provides further understanding of the in vivo function of different tissues within the knee joint and their couplings with joint kinematics during normal gait and over time following ACL transection.

  18. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using cryopreserved irradiated bone-ACL-bone-allograft transplants.

    PubMed

    Goertzen, M J; Clahsen, H; Schulitz, K P

    1994-01-01

    Bone-ACL-bone allograft transplantation has been investigated as a potential solution to reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). To minimize disease transmission (e.g. the acquired immuno deficiency syndrome), bony and collagenous tissues should be sterilized. Recent animal studies indicate that gamma irradiation and ethylene oxide sterilization result in diminished histological and biomechanical properties. The purpose of the present study was biomechanical and histological determination of the fate of deep-frozen gamma-irradiated (2.5 Mrad) canine bone-ACL-bone allografts with argon gas protection. Particular attention was paid to collagenous and neuroanatomical morphology 3, 6 and 12 months after implantation, by comparison to a non-irradiated control group. Sixty skeletally mature foxhounds were operated on in this study, divided up in two groups of 30 dogs each. In group A animals the ACL was replaced by a deep-frozen (-80 degrees C) bone-ACL-bone LAD-augmented allograft subjected to 2.5 Mrad gamma irradiation with argon gas protection. The animals in group B received an LAD-augmented ACL-allograft transplant without gamma irradiation. All knees from both groups were evaluated 3, 6 and 12 months after implantation in regard to biomechanical properties, collagen morphology and routine histology (haematoxylin and eosin stain, polarization microscopy), neuroanatomical morphology (silver and gold chloride stain) and microvasculature (modified Spalteholz technique). The irradiated ACL allografts withstood a maximum load that was 63.8% (718.3 N) of the maximum load of normal ACLs after 12 months. By contrast, the non-irradiated allografts failed at 69.1% (780.1 N) of the maximum load of normal control ACLs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Comparison of ACL strain estimated via a data-driven model with in vitro measurements.

    PubMed

    Weinhandl, Joshua T; Hoch, Matthew C; Bawab, Sebastian Y; Ringleb, Stacie I

    2016-11-01

    Computer modeling and simulation techniques have been increasingly used to investigate anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) loading during dynamic activities in an attempt to improve our understanding of injury mechanisms and development of injury prevention programs. However, the accuracy of many of these models remains unknown and thus the purpose of this study was to compare estimates of ACL strain from a previously developed three-dimensional, data-driven model with those obtained via in vitro measurements. ACL strain was measured as the knee was cycled from approximately 10° to 120° of flexion at 20 deg s(-1) with static loads of 100, 50, and 50 N applied to the quadriceps, biceps femoris and medial hamstrings (semimembranosus and semitendinosus) tendons, respectively. A two segment, five-degree-of-freedom musculoskeletal knee model was then scaled to match the cadaver's anthropometry and in silico ACL strains were then determined based on the knee joint kinematics and moments of force. Maximum and minimum ACL strains estimated in silico were within 0.2 and 0.42% of that measured in vitro, respectively. Additionally, the model estimated ACL strain with a bias (mean difference) of -0.03% and dynamic accuracy (rms error) of 0.36% across the flexion-extension cycle. These preliminary results suggest that the proposed model was capable of estimating ACL strains during a simple flexion-extension cycle. Future studies should validate the model under more dynamic conditions with variable muscle loading. This model could then be used to estimate ACL strains during dynamic sporting activities where ACL injuries are more common.

  20. Developing a 6-DOF robot to investigate multi-axis ACL injuries under valgus loading coupled with tibia internal rotation.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yupeng; Jacobs, Benjamin J; Nuber, Gordon W; Koh, Jason L; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2010-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries have become more common in recent years as more young people participate in risky sporting activities [1]. Most ACL injuries occur as a result of noncontact mechanisms. Previous in vitro studies of ACL strain have found significant increases in ACL strain primarily with anterior directed force on the tibia relative to the femur and with internal rotation and often with valgus torque [2,3]. However, there remains significant controversy over the mechanisms of ACL failure and the forces on the knee that lead to injury. Some studies have also shown that isolated valgus loading may not load the ACL strongly. The goal of this study was to investigate the mechanism underlying valgus-related ACL injuries. An improved understanding of ACL failure may lead to improved ACL injury prevention programs. A novel 6 degrees of freedom (DOF) knee driving robot was developed in this study with a unique multi-axis simultaneous torque/position control. It was found that pure valgus torque caused a torque that internally rotated the tibia and thus increased ACL strain markedly, which may be an important mechanism underlying the rather common seemingly valgus-related ACL injuries.

  1. Bridge-Enhanced ACL Repair: A Review of the Science and the Pathway through FDA Investigational Device Approval

    PubMed Central

    Proffen, Benedikt L.; Perrone, Gabriel S.; Roberts, Gordon; Murray, Martha M.

    2016-01-01

    Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are currently treated with replacement of the torn ligament with a graft of tendon harvested from elsewhere in the knee. This procedure, called "ACL reconstruction," is excellent for restoring gross stability to the knee; however, there are relatively high graft failure rates in adolescent patients,4, 12, 60 and the ACL reconstruction procedure does not prevent the premature osteoarthritis seen in patients after an ACL injury.1, 46, 52 Thus, new solutions are needed for ACL injuries. Researchers have been investigating the use of scaffolds, growth factors and cells to supplement a suture repair of the ACL (bio-enhanced repair). In this paper, we will review the varied approaches, which have been investigated for stimulating ACL healing and repair in preclinical models and how one of these technologies was able to move from promising preclinical results to FDA acceptance of an Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) application for a first-in-human study. PMID:25631206

  2. Preferential Loading of the ACL Compared With the MCL During Landing

    PubMed Central

    Quatman, Carmen E.; Kiapour, Ata M.; Demetropoulos, Constantine K.; Kiapour, Ali; Wordeman, Samuel C.; Levine, Jason W.; Goel, Vijay K.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Strong biomechanical and epidemiological evidence associates knee valgus collapse with isolated, noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. However, a concomitant injury to the medial collateral ligament (MCL) would be expected under valgus collapse, based on the MCL’s anatomic orientation and biomechanical role in knee stability. Purpose/Hypothesis The purpose of this study was to investigate the relative ACL to MCL strain patterns during physiological simulations of a wide range of high-risk dynamic landing scenarios. We hypothesized that both knee abduction and internal tibial rotation moments would generate a disproportionate increase in the ACL strain relative to the MCL strain. However, the physiological range of knee abduction and internal tibial rotation moments that produce ACL injuries are not of sufficient magnitude to compromise the MCL’s integrity consistently. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Methods A novel in sim approach was used to test our hypothesis. Seventeen cadaveric lower extremities (mean age, 45 ± 7 years; 9 female and 8 male) were tested to simulate a broad range of landings after a jump under anterior tibial shear force, knee abduction, and internal tibial rotation at 25° of knee flexion. The ACL and MCL strains were quantified using differential variable reluctance transducers. An extensively validated, detailed finite element model of the lower extremity was used to help better interpret experimental findings. Results Anterior cruciate ligament failure occurred in 15 of 17 specimens (88%). Increased anterior tibial shear force and knee abduction and internal tibial rotation moments resulted in significantly higher ACL:MCL strain ratios (P < .05). Under all modes of single-planar and multiplanar loading, the ACL:MCL strain ratio remained greater than 1.7, while the relative ACL strain was significantly higher than the relative MCL strain (P < .01). Relative change in the ACL strain was demonstrated

  3. Phosphor-in-glass for high-powered remote-type white AC-LED.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hang; Wang, Bo; Xu, Ju; Zhang, Rui; Chen, Hui; Yu, Yunlong; Wang, Yuansheng

    2014-12-10

    The high-powered alternating current (AC) light-emitting diode (LED) (AC-LED), featuring low cost, high energy utilization efficiency, and long service life, will become a new economic growth point in the field of semiconductor lighting. However, flicker of AC-LED in the AC cycles is not healthy for human eyes, and therefore need to be restrained. Herein we report an innovation of persistent "phosphor-in-glass" (PiG) for the remote-type AC-LED, whose afterglow can be efficiently activated by the blue light. It is experimentally demonstrated that the afterglow decay of PiG in the microsecond range can partly compensate the AC time gap. Moreover, the substitution of inorganic glass for organic resins or silicones as the encapsulants would bring out several technological benefits to AC-LED, such as good heat-dissipation, low glare, and excellent physical/chemical stability.

  4. Evaluation of pediatric CPR course on knowledge of pediatric residents--before and after ACLS course.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Alireza Ebrahim; Khan, Zahid Hussain; Arbabi, Shahriar; Hossini, Babak; Nahvi, Hedaiatollah; Agamohammadi, Asghar

    2009-02-01

    An evaluation was conducted on the knowledge gained by pediatric residents on CPR, before and after a PALS (Pediatric Advanced Cardiac Life Support) course. Following an examination of all pediatric residents at Tehran University of Medical Sciences, they were divided into two groups: non-trained (Group 1) and a group scheduled to undergone training (Group 2). A course on ACLS was conducted. Examination were performed before and after the ACLS course. The mean of the examination prior to the course in Group 1 and 2 was low, reflecting no significant differences between the Groups. Examination after the ACLS course showed a statistically significant improvement in Group 2 (P < or = 0.05). It is concluded that knowledge of pediatric residents was low before ACLS course and enhanced after the course.

  5. Regaining Native Knee Kinematics Following Joint Arthroplasty: A Novel Biomimetic Design with ACL and PCL Preservation.

    PubMed

    Zumbrunn, Thomas; Varadarajan, Kartik Mangudi; Rubash, Harry E; Malchau, Henrik; Li, Guoan; Muratoglu, Orhun K

    2015-12-01

    Lack of ACL and non-anatomic articular surfaces in contemporary total knee implants result in kinematic abnormalities. We hypothesized that such abnormalities may be addressed with a biomimetic bi-cruciate retaining (BCR) design having anatomical articular surfaces. We used dynamic computer simulations to compare kinematics among the biomimetic BCR, a contemporary BCR and cruciate-retaining implant for activities of daily living. During simulated deep knee bend, chair-sit and walking, the biomimetic BCR implant showed activity dependent kinematics similar to healthy knees in vivo. Restoring native knee geometry together with ACL preservation provided these kinematic improvements over contemporary ACL-preserving and ACL-sacrificing implants. Further clinical studies are required to determine if such biomimetic implants can result in more normal feeling knees and improve quality of life for active patients.

  6. Computer-assisted anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Four generations of development and usage.

    PubMed

    Klos, Tiburtius V S

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the literature about the contribution of navigation in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The evolution of computer-assisted surgery (CAS) for ACL reconstruction has undergone several steps. These steps were divided into 4 subsequent developments: (1) positioning of ACL graft placement; (2) laxity measurement of ACL reconstruction (quality control); (3) kinematic evaluation during ACL reconstruction (navigated pivot shift); (4) case-specific individual ACL reconstruction with adjustments and additional reconstruction options. CAS has shown to improve femoral tunnel positioning, even if clinical outcomes do not improve results of manual techniques. CAS technology has helped researchers better understand the effects of different ACL reconstruction techniques and bundles replacements on joint laxity and to describe tunnel positioning in relation to native ACL insertion. CAS in ACL surgery can improve results at time zero and can improve knowledge in this field.

  7. 7. View showing placement of timber deck placement on chord ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. View showing placement of timber deck placement on chord and built up construction of top chord and continuous construction through top panel points, eye bar construction on bottom chord - Bridge No. 2.4, Spanning Boiling Fork Creek at Railroad Milepost JC-2.4, Decherd, Franklin County, TN

  8. Non-contact ACL injuries in female athletes: an International Olympic Committee current concepts statement.

    PubMed

    Renstrom, P; Ljungqvist, A; Arendt, E; Beynnon, B; Fukubayashi, T; Garrett, W; Georgoulis, T; Hewett, T E; Johnson, R; Krosshaug, T; Mandelbaum, B; Micheli, L; Myklebust, G; Roos, E; Roos, H; Schamasch, P; Shultz, S; Werner, S; Wojtys, E; Engebretsen, L

    2008-06-01

    The incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury remains high in young athletes. Because female athletes have a much higher incidence of ACL injuries in sports such as basketball and team handball than male athletes, the IOC Medical Commission invited a multidisciplinary group of ACL expert clinicians and scientists to (1) review current evidence including data from the new Scandinavian ACL registries; (2) critically evaluate high-quality studies of injury mechanics; (3) consider the key elements of successful prevention programmes; (4) summarise clinical management including surgery and conservative management; and (5) identify areas for further research. Risk factors for female athletes suffering ACL injury include: (1) being in the preovulatory phase of the menstrual cycle compared with the postovulatory phase; (2) having decreased intercondylar notch width on plain radiography; and (3) developing increased knee abduction moment (a valgus intersegmental torque) during impact on landing. Well-designed injury prevention programmes reduce the risk of ACL for athletes, particularly women. These programmes attempt to alter dynamic loading of the tibiofemoral joint through neuromuscular and proprioceptive training. They emphasise proper landing and cutting techniques. This includes landing softly on the forefoot and rolling back to the rearfoot, engaging knee and hip flexion and, where possible, landing on two feet. Players are trained to avoid excessive dynamic valgus of the knee and to focus on the "knee over toe position" when cutting.

  9. TRITON-X is most effective among three decellularization agents for ACL tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Vavken, Patrick; Joshi, Shilpa; Murray, Martha M

    2009-12-01

    Ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are still associated with high rates of long-term complications, even in patients undergoing modern, state-of-the-art replacement. Tissue-engineering approaches have been shown to be of value in improving treatment of ACL ruptures. However, the success of tissue-engineering procedures depends on the choice of an appropriate biomaterial. Decellularized ACL tissue potentially combines the structural composition of the targeted tissue with a reduced risk of graft rejection or disease transmission. In this study, we tested the effectiveness of currently available decellularization methods based on TRITON-X, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and trypsin. After identifying the most effective decellularization method, the capacity for reseeding with ACL fibroblasts was studied. All decellularization protocols reduced DNA content, with TRITON-X treatment having the greatest effect. Concurrently, decellularization did not affect tissue collagen or total protein content, but did decrease glycosaminoglycan content. TRITON-X also resulted the least glycosaminoglycan depletion. Porcine ACL tissue after decellularization with TRITON-X could be successfully reseeded with human ACL fibroblasts as demonstrated by steady DNA content and increasing pro-collagen expression.

  10. Biomechanical analysis of knee hyperextension and of the impingement of the anterior cruciate ligament: a cinematographic MRI study with impact on tibial tunnel positioning in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Jagodzinski, M; Richter, G M; Pässler, H H

    2000-01-01

    This study analyzed the interaction between the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and the intercondylar notch roof (INR) in hyperextension of the knee using magnetic resonance cinematography. Cinematographic image series of 15 knees were investigated. Two independent observers identified the image that displayed the beginning of contact between the ACL and the INR. They determined knee extension on this image and on the image that displayed maximum hyperextension of the knee. Correlations between a variable representing impingement and the inclination angle of the INR, the anterior laxity of the knee, and full hyperextension were examined. Theoretical, impingement-free tibial tunnel positions for the knees were calculated as a percentage of the anteroposterior tibial width. All ACLs of the knees in this study made contact with the INR. The average extension angle at the beginning of impingement was -6.3 +/- 3.8 degrees. There were significant correlations between impingement and maximum manual displacement as measured with the arthrometer (r = 0.77; P < 0.001), maximum hyperextension (r = 0. 67; P = 0.007), and notch roof angle (r = -0.73; P = 0.002). There were biomechanically acceptable tunnel positions for all knees but one. Hyperextension is physiologically associated with impingement of the ACL. In uninjured knees there was a correlation between ACL impingement and hyperextension, inclination of the INR, and maximum manual displacement of the tibia. Impingement free tibial tunnel positioning is possible in most knees without notchplasty.

  11. Tunnel-to-tunnel correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinle, F. W., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Flow quality is discussed. Incremental comparisons of: (1) the angle of attack, (2) the axial force coefficient, and (3) the base cavity axial force coefficient against the normal force coefficient are presented. Relative blockage determination, relative buoyancy corrections, and boundary layer transition length are discussed. Blockage buoyancy caused by tunnel model wall dynamic interaction is discussed in terms of adaptive walls. The effect of 'transonic turbulence factor' is considered.

  12. Planning Image-Based Measurements in Wind Tunnels by Virtual Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kushner, Laura Kathryn; Schairer, Edward T.

    2011-01-01

    Virtual imaging is routinely used at NASA Ames Research Center to plan the placement of cameras and light sources for image-based measurements in production wind tunnel tests. Virtual imaging allows users to quickly and comprehensively model a given test situation, well before the test occurs, in order to verify that all optical testing requirements will be met. It allows optimization of the placement of cameras and light sources and leads to faster set-up times, thereby decreasing tunnel occupancy costs. This paper describes how virtual imaging was used to plan optical measurements for three tests in production wind tunnels at NASA Ames.

  13. ACL reconstruction: in vivo measurement of patellar tendon graft elongation.

    PubMed

    Berruto, M; Howe, J G; Beynnon, B D; Johnson, R J; Nichols, C E; Pope, M H

    1991-06-01

    The implantation of a free autogenous patellar tendon graft is the surgical technique that currently offers the best results in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. However, numerous aspects regarding both technique and postoperative rehabilitation can still be improved. The aim of this study was to measure the elongation of the patellar tendon in vivo in the operating room after reconstructive surgery, subjecting the knee to normal strain such as passive mobilization or anterior displacement of the tibia. Three volunteers were studied. Our results were different from those reported in a previous study conducted in vivo on a normal anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). In spite of the isometric position of the tendon, passive mobilization provoked a progressive increase in the elongation of the graft within each cycle of flexion-extension and between one cycle and the next. This also occurred during the Lachman test. These findings suggest that the graft undergoes a process of tensile adjustment when it is first put under strain. Continued elongation once this process appears stabilized raises doubts as to the reliability of isometric measuring devices.

  14. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Just a passing cramp? It could be carpal tunnel syndrome. The carpal tunnel is a narrow passageway of ligament and bones ... from irritated tendons or other swelling narrows the tunnel and causes the nerve to be compressed. Symptoms ...

  15. Looking into Tunnel Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinshaw, Craig

    1999-01-01

    Describes how to make tunnel books, which are viewed by looking into a "tunnel" created by accordion-folded expanding sides. Suggests possible themes. Describes how to create a walk-through tunnel book for first grade students. (CMK)

  16. MAPP: A Mathematics Placement Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doblin, Stephen A.

    1978-01-01

    MAPP (A Mathematics Placement Program) uses two COBOL programs to place entering freshmen in mathematics courses which are commensurate with their backgrounds and abilities. Having been used for three years, the program is considered to be a viable alternative to the traditional mathematics placement process. (Author/JKS)

  17. [Developmental Placement.] Collected Research References.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjorklund, Gail

    Drawing on information and references in the ERIC system, this literature review describes research related to a child's developmental placement. The issues examined include school entrance age; predictive validity, reliability, and features of Gesell School Readiness Assessment; retention; and the effectiveness of developmental placement. A…

  18. Improvement of Job Placement Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mount San Antonio Community Coll. District, Walnut, CA.

    The Improvement of Job Placement Services Project was undertaken to examine and strengthen job placement services and programs in the California community colleges. Specific objectives of the project were to: (1) select and convene a 12-member representative advisory committee to oversee project operations working with the California Placement…

  19. Placement and Follow-up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shippen, Samuel Joseph, Ed.; Wasil, Raymond A., Ed.

    This document contains a compilation of original manuscripts written by competent authorities in the field of job placement services for students. Viewing placement as both a product and an integral part of a developmental process, these papers are divided into the following six topical areas: (1) information, (2) exploration, (3) counseling, (4)…

  20. College Student Personnel Graduate Placement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greer, Richard M.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    This study reports results of ACPA Commission XII's survey of 101 college student personnel training institutions regarding their graduate placement. Graduates were identified according to degree, race, and sex. Percentages of graduates placed, specialty areas, types of institutions, areas of the country, and time and method of placement were…

  1. Relationship of ACL Injury and Posterior Tibial Slope With Patient Age, Sex, and Race

    PubMed Central

    Waiwaiole, Alana; Gurbani, Ajay; Motamedi, Kambiz; Seeger, Leanne; Sim, Myung Shin; Nwajuaku, Patricia; Hame, Sharon L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Posterior tibial slope (PTS) has been proposed as a potential risk factor for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury; however, studies that have examined this relationship have provided inconclusive and sometimes contradictory results. Further characterization of this relationship may enable the medical community to identify individuals at greater risk for ACL injury and possibly characterize an anatomic target during surgical reconstruction. Purpose: The primary goal was to investigate the relationship between PTS and ACL injury. The secondary goal was to determine whether there are any patient factors, such as age, race, or sex, that correlate with ACL injury and PTS. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Medical records of 221 patients who underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee between January 2003 and December 2009 were reviewed. Patients were separated into 2 groups: a study group of those subjects who had undergone surgery for ACL injury (n = 107) and a control group of patients diagnosed with patellofemoral syndrome (n = 114). Demographic data were collected, and MRI images from both groups were analyzed using imaging software to obtain medial and lateral tibial slope measurements. Data were then analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) comparison and a multivariable regression model to determine which, if any, patient factors were related to probability of having an ACL injury. Results: ANOVA comparison demonstrated that the study group had significantly greater values for lateral PTS (6° ± 4°; P < .001) and medial PTS (7° ± 4°; P = .002) compared with controls (5° ± 3° and 5° ± 4°, respectively). After stepwise elimination of nonsignificant variables, the final multivariable logistic regression model determined that age (odds ratio [OR], 0.94; P < .001) and lateral PTS (OR, 1.12; P = .002) had statistically significant relationships with ACL injury. Medial PTS, race, and sex were not

  2. Healing of the Acutely Injured Anterior Cruciate Ligament: Functional Treatment with the ACL-Jack, a Dynamic Posterior Drawer Brace

    PubMed Central

    Reischl, Nikolaus; Rönn, Karolin; Magnusson, Robert A.; Gautier, Emanuel; Jakob, Roland P.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The injured anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has a limited healing capacity leading to persisting instability. Hypothesis/Purpose. To study if the application of a brace, producing a dynamic posterior drawer force, after acute ACL injury reduces initial instability. Study Design. Cohort study. Methods. Patients treated with the ACL-Jack brace were compared to controls treated with primary ACL reconstruction und controls treated nonsurgically with functional rehabilitation. Measurements included anterior laxity (Rolimeter), clinical scores (Lysholm, Tegner, and IKDC), and MRI evaluation. Patients were followed up to 24 months. Results. Patients treated with the ACL-Jack brace showed a significant improvement of anterior knee laxity comparable to patients treated with ACL reconstruction, whereas laxity persisted after nonsurgical functional rehabilitation. The failure risk (secondary reconstruction necessary) of the ACL-Jack group was however 21% (18 of 86) within 24 months. Clinical scores were similar in all treatment groups. Conclusion. Treatment of acute ACL tears with the ACL-Jack brace leads to improved anterior knee laxity compared to nonsurgical treatment with functional rehabilitation. PMID:28053787

  3. Bioresorbable scaffolds for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: do we need an off-the-shelf ACL substitute?

    PubMed

    Richmond, John C; Weitzel, Paul P

    2010-03-01

    Currently available anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft sources, autograft and allograft, present potential problems that a natural biomaterial ACL graft might be able to solve. Earlier efforts in the development of synthetic ACL grafts were less than optimal, and those devices have largely been abandoned. We can learn from these past failures, and potentially develop a bioresorbable scaffold for ACL reconstruction, which will provide immediate stability, promote and direct tissue in growth, and degrade at an appropriate rate, without harmful wear debris. We have developed a modified silk scaffold, which is currently being evaluated in humans in a pilot study.

  4. Healing of the Acutely Injured Anterior Cruciate Ligament: Functional Treatment with the ACL-Jack, a Dynamic Posterior Drawer Brace.

    PubMed

    Jacobi, Matthias; Reischl, Nikolaus; Rönn, Karolin; Magnusson, Robert A; Gautier, Emanuel; Jakob, Roland P

    2016-01-01

    Background. The injured anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has a limited healing capacity leading to persisting instability. Hypothesis/Purpose. To study if the application of a brace, producing a dynamic posterior drawer force, after acute ACL injury reduces initial instability. Study Design. Cohort study. Methods. Patients treated with the ACL-Jack brace were compared to controls treated with primary ACL reconstruction und controls treated nonsurgically with functional rehabilitation. Measurements included anterior laxity (Rolimeter), clinical scores (Lysholm, Tegner, and IKDC), and MRI evaluation. Patients were followed up to 24 months. Results. Patients treated with the ACL-Jack brace showed a significant improvement of anterior knee laxity comparable to patients treated with ACL reconstruction, whereas laxity persisted after nonsurgical functional rehabilitation. The failure risk (secondary reconstruction necessary) of the ACL-Jack group was however 21% (18 of 86) within 24 months. Clinical scores were similar in all treatment groups. Conclusion. Treatment of acute ACL tears with the ACL-Jack brace leads to improved anterior knee laxity compared to nonsurgical treatment with functional rehabilitation.

  5. ACL injury in football: a literature overview of the prevention programs

    PubMed Central

    Bisciotti, Gian Nicola; Chamari, Karim; Cena, Emanuele; Carimati, Giulia; Volpi, Piero

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background The ACL prevention programs are addressed to the control and/or modification of the so-called “modifiable risk factors”. All these programs focus on different intervention strategies aimed to decrease the ACL injury risk, particularly in female athletes population. Purpose To furnish an overview of the most used ACL injury prevention program through a narrative review. Conclusion In literature there are many reports on prevention programs whose common denominator is the proper alignment of the lower limb joints and proper motor control during movements that are considered at risk for ACL integrity, as the landing phase after a jump. Nevertheless, some programs would appear more effective than others. In any cases a major problem remains the lack of sufficient compliance in respect of prevention programs. Finally, it is important to remember that the ethiology of ACL injuries is multifactorial. For this reason a prevention program able to prevent all the risk situations is utopian. Study design Narrative review. PMID:28217569

  6. Biomechanical regulation of type I collagen gene expression in ACLs in organ culture.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Adam H; Sah, Robert L; Paul Sung, K L

    2002-03-01

    In this study, an ex vivo organ culture system that allows the application of controlled loads to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) was designed and used to characterize the influence of a step input in mechanical load on gene expression. A procedure for isolating bone-ACL-bone (B-ACL-B) complexes from rat knees was developed. After harvest and 24 hour culture, B-ACL-B complexes exhibited percentages of viability similar to that in intact ACLs (approximately 90%). Application of a physiologically relevant load of 5 N (superimposed on a I N tare load) resulted in changes in levels of mRNA encoding type I collagen. While levels of type I collagen mRNA significantly increased 32+/-13% (mean +/- standard errors of the mean (SEM)) over controls within the first hour of loading, levels decreased significantly to 44+/-9% of control after 2 h. Displacements induced by the 5 N load were measured by video dimensional analysis. Calculated axial strains of 0.141+/-0.034 were achieved rapidly during the first hour and remained essentially unchanged thereafter. These results demonstrate the feasibility of maintaining ligaments in organ culture and illustrate the time course expression of type I collagen following the application of a mechanical load.

  7. KNEE SYNERGISM DURING GAIT REMAIN ALTERED ONE YEAR AFTER ACL RECONSTRUCTION

    PubMed Central

    LEPORACE, GUSTAVO; METSAVAHT, LEONARDO; PEREIRA, GLAUBER RIBEIRO; OLIVEIRA, LISZT PALMEIRA DE; CRESPO, BERNARDO; BATISTA, LUIZ ALBERTO

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To compare the activation of the vastus lateralis (VL) and biceps femoris (BF) muscles during gait, as well VL/BF muscular co-contraction (MCC) between healthy (CG) and anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed (ACL-R) subjects. Methods: Nineteen subjects, ten controls and nine ACL-R patients had a VL and BF electromyogram (EMG) captured to calculate the MCC ratio. A Principal Component (PC) Analysis was applied to reduce the dimensionality effect of each of the MCC, VL and BF curves for both healthy and ACL reconstructed groups. The PC scores were used to calculate the standard distance (SD). SD values were employed in order to compare each dependent variable (MCC, VL and BF) between the two groups using unpaired t-test. Results: ACL-R group presented a lower VL activation at the beginning and at the end of the gait cycle, as compared to the control group. However, no difference was found for BF or VL/BF MCC. Conclusion: The gait analysis of ACL reconstructed patients demonstrated a persistent deficit in VL activation when compared to the control group, even one year after surgery. Level of Evidence III. Case Control Study PMID:27217814

  8. Negative feedback regulation of auxin signaling by ATHB8/ACL5-BUD2 transcription module.

    PubMed

    Baima, Simona; Forte, Valentina; Possenti, Marco; Peñalosa, Andrés; Leoni, Guido; Salvi, Sergio; Felici, Barbara; Ruberti, Ida; Morelli, Giorgio

    2014-06-01

    The role of auxin as main regulator of vascular differentiation is well established, and a direct correlation between the rate of xylem differentiation and the amount of auxin reaching the (pro)cambial cells has been proposed. It has been suggested that thermospermine produced by ACAULIS5 (ACL5) and bushy and dwarf2 (BUD2) is one of the factors downstream to auxin contributing to the regulation of this process in Arabidopsis. Here, we provide an in-depth characterization of the mechanism through which ACL5 modulates xylem differentiation. We show that an increased level of ACL5 slows down xylem differentiation by negatively affecting the expression of homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-ZIP) III and key auxin signaling genes. This mechanism involves the positive regulation of thermospermine biosynthesis by the HD-ZIP III protein Arabidopsis thaliana homeobox8 tightly controlling the expression of ACL5 and BUD2. In addition, we show that the HD-ZIP III protein REVOLUTA contributes to the increased leaf vascularization and long hypocotyl phenotype of acl5 likely by a direct regulation of auxin signaling genes such as like auxin resistant2 (LAX2) and LAX3. We propose that proper formation and differentiation of xylem depend on a balance between positive and negative feedback loops operating through HD-ZIP III genes.

  9. 34 CFR 300.327 - Educational placements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Educational placements. 300.327 Section 300.327... Educational Placements Development of Iep § 300.327 Educational placements. Consistent with § 300.501(c), each... makes decisions on the educational placement of their child. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1414(e))...

  10. 34 CFR 300.327 - Educational placements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Educational placements. 300.327 Section 300.327... Educational Placements Development of Iep § 300.327 Educational placements. Consistent with § 300.501(c), each... makes decisions on the educational placement of their child. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1414(e))...

  11. Asymmetrical lower extremity loading after ACL reconstruction: more than meets the eye.

    PubMed

    Chmielewski, Terese L

    2011-06-01

    Sports fans know that movement patterns are important for athletic performance. Similarly, clinicians know that addressing abnormal movement patterns after an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is important for a successful return to sport. The kinematic (motion) component of movement patterns is more easily observed than the kinetic (forces) component, thus more commonly addressed in ACL reconstruction rehabilitation. Ignoring the kinetic component, though, could impede a successful return to sport. Asymmetrical lower extremity loading has been reported in a variety of activities following ACL reconstruction, and may contribute to both short- and long-term consequences. It is important that clinicians become aware of the potential for asymmetrical lower extremity loading to affect patient outcomes and for researchers to enlarge the body of knowledge.

  12. Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) utilizing Man-Tended Capability (MTC) hardware onboard Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M.; Barratt, M.; Lloyd, C.

    1992-01-01

    Because of the time and distance involved in returning a patient from space to a definitive medical care facility, the capability for Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) exists onboard Space Station Freedom. Methods: In order to evaluate the effectiveness of terrestrial ACLS protocols in microgravity, a medical team conducted simulations during parabolic flights onboard the KC-135 aircraft. The hardware planned for use during the MTC phase of the space station was utilized to increase the fidelity of the scenario and to evaluate the prototype equipment. Based on initial KC-135 testing of CPR and ACLS, changes were made to the ventricular fibrillation algorithm in order to accommodate the space environment. Other constraints to delivery of ACLS onboard the space station include crew size, minimum training, crew deconditioning, and limited supplies and equipment. Results: The delivery of ACLS in microgravity is hindered by the environment, but should be adequate. Factors specific to microgravity were identified for inclusion in the protocol including immediate restraint of the patient and early intubation to insure airway. External cardiac compressions of adequate force and frequency were administered using various methods. The more significant limiting factors appear to be crew training, crew size, and limited supplies. Conclusions: Although ACLS is possible in the microgravity environment, future evaluations are necessary to further refine the protocols. Proper patient and medical officer restraint is crucial prior to advanced procedures. Also emphasis should be placed on early intubation for airway management and drug administration. Preliminary results and further testing will be utilized in the design of medical hardware, determination of crew training, and medical operations for space station and beyond.

  13. Sagittal Plane Knee Biomechanics and Vertical Ground Reaction Forces Are Modified Following ACL Injury Prevention Programs

    PubMed Central

    Padua, Darin A.; DiStefano, Lindsay J.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) occur because of excessive loading on the knee. ACL injury prevention programs can influence sagittal plane ACL loading factors and vertical ground reaction force (VGRF). Objective: To determine the influence of ACL injury prevention programs on sagittal plane knee biomechanics (anterior tibial shear force, knee flexion angle/moments) and VGRF. Data Sources: The PubMed database was searched for studies published between January 1988 and June 2008. Reference lists of selected articles were also reviewed. Study Selection: Studies were included that evaluated healthy participants for knee flexion angle, sagittal plane knee kinetics, or VGRF after performing a multisession training program. Two individuals reviewed all articles and determined which articles met the selection criteria. Approximately 4% of the articles fulfilled the selection criteria. Data Extraction: Data were extracted regarding each program’s duration, frequency, exercise type, population, supervision, and testing procedures. Means and variability measures were recorded to calculate effect sizes. One reviewer extracted all data and assessed study quality using PEDro (Physiotherapy Evidence Database). A second reviewer (blinded) verified all information. Results: There is moderate evidence to indicate that knee flexion angle, external knee flexion moment, and VGRF can be successfully modified by an ACL injury prevention program. Programs utilizing multiple exercises (ie, integrated training) appear to produce the most improvement, in comparison to that of single-exercise programs. Knee flexion angle was improved following integrated training (combined balance and strength exercises or combined plyometric and strength exercises). Similarly, external knee flexion moment was improved following integrated training consisting of balance, plyometric, and strength exercises. VGRF was improved when incorporating supervision with instruction and

  14. 50 CFR 622.58 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs). 622.58 Section 622.58 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY... Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs). (a) Royal...

  15. 50 CFR 622.251 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs). 622.251 Section 622.251 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY... § 622.251 Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs)....

  16. 50 CFR 622.251 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs). 622.251 Section 622.251 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY... § 622.251 Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs)....

  17. 50 CFR 622.388 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs). 622.388 Section 622.388 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY... Mexico and South Atlantic) § 622.388 Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs),...

  18. 50 CFR 622.388 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs). 622.388 Section 622.388 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY... Mexico and South Atlantic) § 622.388 Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs),...

  19. 50 CFR 622.58 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs). 622.58 Section 622.58 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY... Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs). (a) Royal...

  20. Comparison of hamstring muscle behavior for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) patient and normal subject during local marching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amineldin@Aminudin, Nurul Izzaty Bt.; Rambely, A. S.

    2014-09-01

    This study aims to investigate the hamstring muscle activity after the surgery by carrying out an electromyography experiment on the hamstring and to compare the behavior of the ACL muscle activity between ACL patient and control subject. Electromyography (EMG) is used to study the behavior of muscles during walking activity. Two hamstring muscles involved which are semitendinosus and bicep femoris. The EMG data for both muscles were recorded while the subject did maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and marching. The study concluded that there were similarities between bicep femoris of the ACL and control subjects. The analysis showed that the biceps femoris muscle of the ACL subject had no abnormality and the pattern is as normal as the control subject. However, ACL patient has poor semitendinosus muscle strength compared to that of control subject because the differences of the forces produced. The force of semitendinosus value for control subject was two times greater than that of the ACL subject as the right semitendinosus muscle of ACL subject was used to replace the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) that was injured.

  1. 50 CFR 622.41 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ACL based on a moving multi-year average of landings, as described in the FMP. (c) Other shallow-water....775 million kg) for 2015 and subsequent fishing years. (e) Red grouper—(1) Commercial sector. The IFQ... commercial red grouper. The applicable commercial ACL for red grouper, in gutted weight, for 2012...

  2. 50 CFR 622.193 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Snapper-Grouper Fishery of the South Atlantic... increase in the respective sector ACLs will be applied. (ii) (e) Black sea bass—(1) Commercial sector. (i... landings for black sea bass, as estimated by the SRD, are projected to reach the recreational ACL...

  3. Effect of ACL Transection on Internal Tibial Rotation in an in Vitro Simulated Pivot Landing

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Youkeun K.; Kreinbrink, Jennifer L.; Ashton-Miller, James A.; Wojtys, Edward M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The amount of resistance provided by the ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) to axial tibial rotation remains controversial. The goal of this study was to test the primary hypotheses that ACL transection would not significantly affect tibial rotation under the large impulsive loads associated with a simulated pivot landing but would increase anterior tibial translation. Methods: Twelve cadaveric knees (mean age of donors [and standard deviation] at the time of death, 65.0 ± 10.5 years) were mounted in a custom testing apparatus to simulate a single-leg pivot landing. A compound impulsive load was applied to the distal part of the tibia with compression (∼800 N), flexion moment (∼40 N-m), and axial tibial torque (∼17 N-m) in the presence of five trans-knee muscle forces. A differential variable reluctance transducer mounted on the anteromedial aspect of the ACL measured relative strain. With the knee initially in 15° of flexion, and after five combined compression and flexion moment (baseline) loading trials, six trials were conducted with the addition of either internal or external tibial torque (internal or external loading), and then six baseline trials were performed. The ACL was then sectioned, six baseline trials were repeated, and then six trials of either the internal or the external loading condition, whichever had initially resulted in the larger relative ACL strain, were carried out. Tibiofemoral kinematics were measured optoelectronically. The results were analyzed with a nonparametric Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: Following ACL transection, the increase in the normalized internal tibial rotation was significant but small (0.7°/N-m ± 0.3°/N-m to 0.8°/N-m ± 0.3°/N-m, p = 0.012), while anterior tibial translation increased significantly (3.8 ± 2.9 to 7.0 ± 2.9 mm, p = 0.017). Conclusions: ACL transection leads to a small increase in internal tibial rotation, equivalent to a 13% decrease in the dynamic rotational resistance

  4. Cryogenic wind tunnels. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    The application of the cryogenic concept to various types of tunnels including Ludwieg tube tunnel, Evans clean tunnel, blowdown, induced-flow, and continuous-flow fan-driven tunnels is discussed. Benefits related to construction and operating costs are covered, along with benefits related to new testing capabilities. It is noted that cooling the test gas to very low temperatures increases Reynolds number by more than a factor of seven. From the energy standpoint, ambient-temperature fan-driven closed-return tunnels are considered to be the most efficient type of tunnel, while a large reduction in the required tunnel stagnation pressure can be achieved through cryogenic operation. Operating envelopes for three modes of operation for a cryogenic transonic pressure tunnel with a 2.5 by 2.5 test section are outlined. A computer program for calculating flow parameters and power requirements for wind tunnels with operating temperatures from saturation to above ambient is highlighted.

  5. 4. 'Ring Stones & Tunnel Sections, Tunnel #33,' Southern Pacific ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. 'Ring Stones & Tunnel Sections, Tunnel #33,' Southern Pacific Standard Double-Track Tunnel, ca. 1913. Compare to photos in documentation sets for Tunnel 18 (HAER No. CA-197), Tunnel 34 (HAER No. CA-206), and Tunnel 1 (HAER No. CA-207). - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Sacramento to Nevada state line, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  6. Sensor placement optimization in buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, Simone; Tisato, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    In this work we address the problem of optimal sensor placement for a given region and task. An important issue in designing sensor arrays is the appropriate placement of the sensors such that they achieve a predefined goal. There are many problems that could be considered in the placement of multiple sensors. In this work we focus on the four problems identified by Hörster and Lienhart. To solve these problems, we propose an algorithm based on Direct Search, which is able to approach the global optimal solution within reasonable time and memory consumption. The algorithm is experimentally evaluated and the results are presented on two real floorplans. The experimental results show that our DS algorithm is able to improve the results given by the most performing heuristic introduced in. The algorithm is then extended to work also on continuous solution spaces, and 3D problems.

  7. Crises and Opportunities: The Futures of Scholarly Publishing. ACLS Occasional Paper, No. 57

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonso, Carlos J.; Davidson, Cathy N.; Unsworth, John M.; Withey, Lynne

    2003-01-01

    Presented herein are papers presented at a session entitled "Crises and Opportunities: The Future of Scholarly Publishing," from the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) Annual Meeting, May 10, 2003. Four speakers approached this topic from different standpoints: as leaders of learned societies, as senior university officials, from the…

  8. 50 CFR 622.280 - Annual catch limits (ACLs) and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Dolphin and Wahoo Fishery Off the Atlantic States § 622.280 Annual catch limits (ACLs) and accountability measures (AMs). (a) Atlantic dolphin—(1) Commercial sector. If commercial landings for Atlantic dolphin, as estimated by the SRD, reach or are projected to reach...

  9. 50 CFR 622.49 - Annual catch limits (ACLs) and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Annual catch limits (ACLs) and accountability measures (AMs). 622.49 Section 622.49 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Management Measures...

  10. Thermography based diagnosis of ruptured anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in canines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lama, Norsang; Umbaugh, Scott E.; Mishra, Deependra; Dahal, Rohini; Marino, Dominic J.; Sackman, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture in canines is a common orthopedic injury in veterinary medicine. Veterinarians use both imaging and non-imaging methods to diagnose the disease. Common imaging methods such as radiography, computed tomography (CT scan) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have some disadvantages: expensive setup, high dose of radiation, and time-consuming. In this paper, we present an alternative diagnostic method based on feature extraction and pattern classification (FEPC) to diagnose abnormal patterns in ACL thermograms. The proposed method was experimented with a total of 30 thermograms for each camera view (anterior, lateral and posterior) including 14 disease and 16 non-disease cases provided from Long Island Veterinary Specialists. The normal and abnormal patterns in thermograms are analyzed in two steps: feature extraction and pattern classification. Texture features based on gray level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM), histogram features and spectral features are extracted from the color normalized thermograms and the computed feature vectors are applied to Nearest Neighbor (NN) classifier, K-Nearest Neighbor (KNN) classifier and Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier with leave-one-out validation method. The algorithm gives the best classification success rate of 86.67% with a sensitivity of 85.71% and a specificity of 87.5% in ACL rupture detection using NN classifier for the lateral view and Norm-RGB-Lum color normalization method. Our results show that the proposed method has the potential to detect ACL rupture in canines.

  11. 50 CFR 622.280 - Annual catch limits (ACLs) and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Dolphin and Wahoo Fishery Off the Atlantic States § 622.280 Annual catch limits (ACLs) and accountability measures (AMs). (a) Atlantic dolphin—(1) Commercial sector. (i) If commercial landings for Atlantic dolphin, as estimated by the SRD, reach or are projected to reach...

  12. Interaction of potential intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors in ACL injured recreational female skiers.

    PubMed

    Ruedl, G; Ploner, P; Linortner, I; Schranz, A; Fink, C; Patterson, C; Nachbauer, W; Burtscher, M

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction of potential intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors in ACL injured recreational female skiers. 93 female recreational skiers who had suffered a non-contact ACL injury and 93 age-matched controls completed a self-reported questionnaire relating to intrinsic risk factors (menstrual history, BMI, previous knee injuries, self reported weekly sports participation) and extrinsic risk factors (type of ski used, time of last binding adjustment, snow condition, weather and slope difficulty). A logistic regression model revealed the following independent ACL injury risk factors for female recreational skiers: icy snow conditions (odds ratio, 24.33; 95% confidence interval, 6.8-86.5, P<0.001), skiing during snowfall (odds ratio, 16.63; 95% confidence interval, 1.8-152.1, P=0.013), use of traditional skis (odds ratio, 10.49; 95% confidence interval, 2.0-54.5, P=0.005), and preovulatory phase of menstrual cycle (odds ratio, 2.59; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-5.5, P=0.013). In conclusion, ACL injuries in female recreational skiers are the result of a complex interaction of intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors.

  13. ACL Report. A Report of the Activities of the American Classical League 1977-1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawall, Gilbert

    Five topics of interest to persons involved in classical studies are discussed in this report: (1) "A Survey of the Classical Scene" focusses on the future of classical studies in elementary and secondary schools with some mention of the situation in colleges and universities. (2) "ACL: The State of the League" includes…

  14. Quantitative topographic anatomy of the femoral ACL footprint: a micro-CT analysis.

    PubMed

    Norman, Daniel G; Getgood, Alan; Thornby, John; Bird, Jonathan; Turley, Glen A; Spalding, Tim; Williams, Mark A

    2014-11-01

    The femoral footprint of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a much-studied anatomic structure, predominantly due to its importance during ACL reconstruction surgery. A new technique utilising high-resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is described, allowing detailed three-dimensional (3D) quantitative analysis of this structure. Seven cadaveric knees were scanned using micro-CT, yielding 3D data with a reconstructed voxel size of 60 μm. A novel method of 3D surface extraction was developed and validated, facilitating both qualitative observation of surface details and quantitative topographic assessment using colour-coded relief maps. Images were displayed on an immersive 3D visualisation wall, and ten experienced ACL clinicians were surveyed as to the presence and morphology of osseous landmarks, providing qualitative assessment of whether such features can be reliably identified for navigation during surgery. Both quantitative analysis and qualitative assessment of the footprints in this study showed significant variability in the presence and morphology of osseous landmarks, with the lateral intercondylar ridge being objectively present in four out of seven relief maps, although reportedly seen in six out of seven cases in the qualitative study, suggesting an element of subjectivity and interpretation. This is the first study to utilise micro-CT in the study of ACL anatomy.

  15. 50 CFR 660.410 - Conservation objectives, ACLs, and de minimis control rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Conservation objectives, ACLs, and de minimis control rules. 660.410 Section 660.410 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OFF...

  16. Carpal tunnel repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100078.htm Carpal tunnel repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... in the wrist and the wrist bones (carpal tunnel). Review Date 5/9/2015 Updated by: C. ...

  17. In vivo analysis of the pivot shift phenomenon during computer navigated ACL reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Lane, Clayton G; Warren, Russell F; Stanford, Fatima C; Kendoff, Daniel; Pearle, Andrew D

    2008-05-01

    ACL insufficiency can be documented clinically with the pivot shift maneuver, but the specific pathologic kinematics of the pivot shift is difficult to quantify. Navigation provides an opportunity to analyze in vivo the motions that comprise the pivot shift and the kinematic changes that are inherent after ACL reconstruction. We hypothesized that tibial rotation, anterior tibial translation (ATT), acceleration of posterior translation (APT) and the newly described angle of P, quantified during navigated pivot shift examination, correlate with clinical grading of the pivot shift phenomena. Navigation data from 12 patients who underwent navigated ACL surgery were retrospectively reviewed. A characteristic P-shaped track of motion is recorded by the navigation software during the pivot-shift examination. The "angle of P" was developed as a means characterizing this track of motion and was measured in all cases. The tibial rotation, maximum anterior tibial translation and acceleration of posterior translation during the pivot shift were also measured. The charts of these patients were reviewed to obtain information on the clinical grading of the pivot-shift before and after ACL reconstruction. Spearman correlation analysis was then used to identify significant correlations between clinical grade of the pivot shift and the angle of p measured with computer navigation. After reconstruction, the clinical grade of the pivot shift was zero in all patients. The tibial rotation, maximum ATT, APT and the angle of p also decreased. On analysis of 24 EUAs, 12 before reconstruction and 12 after, there was excellent and significant correlation between the clinical grade of pivot shift examination and the angle of P (R2 = 0.97, p < 0.001). Only good correlation was noted between the clinical pivot shift and the rotation (R2 = 0.77, p < 0.0001), maximum ATT (R2 = 0.87, p < 0.0001) and APT (R2 = 0.81, p < 0.0001). There was a stepwise increase of 6-7 mm of translation and 5-6 degrees

  18. THE EFFECT OF CONSERVATIVELY TREATED ACL INJURY ON KNEE JOINT POSITION Sense

    PubMed Central

    Herrington, Lee

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Proprioception is critical for effective movement patterns. However, methods of proprioceptive measurement in previous research have been inconsistent and lacking in reliability statistics making it applications to clinical practice difficult. Researchers have suggested that damage to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) can alter proprioceptive ability due to a loss of functioning mechanoreceptors. The majority of patients opt for reconstructive surgery following this injury. However, some patients chose conservative rehabilitation options rather than surgical intervention. Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of ACL deficiency on knee joint position sense following conservative, non-operative treatment and return to physical activity. A secondary purpose was to report the reliability and measurement error of the technique used to measure joint position sense, (JPS) and comment on the clinical utility of this measurement. Study Design Observational study design using a cross-section of ACL deficient patients and matched uninjured controls. Methods Twenty active conservatively treated ACL deficient patients who had returned to physical activity and twenty active matched controls were included in the study. Knee joint position sense was measured using a seated passive-active reproductive angle technique. The average absolute angle of error score, between 10 °-30 ° of knee flexion was determined. This error score was derived from the difference between the target and repositioning angle. Results The ACL deficient patients had a greater error score (7.9 °±3.6) and hence poorer static proprioception ability that both the contra-lateral leg (2.0 °±1.6; p = 0.0001) and the control group (2.6 °±0.9; p = 0.0001). The standard error of the mean (SEM) of this JPS technique was 0.5 ° and 0.2 ° and the minimum detectable change (MDC) was 1.3 ° and 0.4 ° on asymptomatic and symptomatic subjects

  19. A Wearable Neuromuscular Device Reduces ACL Injury Risk in Female Soccer Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Michael John; Shaw, Matthew; Maddan, Casey; Campbell, Julie; Davidson, Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Female soccer athletes have a three-fold greater risk of sustaining an ACL injury compared with their male counterparts yet only 1 in 5 teams engage in ACL risk reduction programs due to several participation barriers. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a wearable neuromuscular (WNM) device on postural control, performance and ACL injury risk in female soccer athletes. Methods: Seventy-nine elite youth and collegiate female soccer athletes (age range: 12-25 y) trained with a WNM device that applied bi-lateral, topical pressure to the medial quadriceps and hamstrings muscles (Topical Gear, Austin, TX). The athletes performed 7-9 weeks of pre-season training with the WNM device consisting of strength and conditioning exercises and on-field team practices (46-64 total hours of exposure). Postural control was measured in 15 athletes with and without the WNM device before and after the training program; and performance was measured in 25 athletes without the WNM device before and after the training program. Postural control was determined from a single-leg landing on a force plate from a horizontal distance normalized to leg length. The athletes were instructed to gain their balance as fast as possible upon landing and remain balanced for 5 seconds. The peak ground reaction forces (GRF) and the medial-lateral, anterior-posterior and net center of pressure (COP) velocities and displacement ranges were calculated during 2 seconds of single-leg stance. Performance measures including speed, power and endurance were measured from the 40 yard dash, vertical jump for height and the Beep test, respectively. A two-way repeated measures ANOVA and post-hoc comparisons were used to compare the postural variables; and t-tests were used to compare the performance tests (p=.05). ACL injury rates, the absolute risk reduction (ARR) and the number needed to treat (NNT) to prevent one ACL injury were calculated between the WNM intervention group and 11

  20. Variable Density Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Variable Density Tunnel in operation. Man at far right is probably Harold J. 'Cannonball' Tuner, longtime safety officer, who started with Curtiss in the teens. This view of the Variable Density Tunnel clearly shows the layout of the Tunnel's surroundings, as well as the plumbing and power needs of the this innovative research tool.

  1. Matrix metalloproteinase genes on chromosome 11q22 and the risk of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture.

    PubMed

    Posthumus, M; Collins, M; van der Merwe, L; O'Cuinneagain, D; van der Merwe, W; Ribbans, W J; Schwellnus, M P; Raleigh, S M

    2012-08-01

    As matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are critical to ligament homeostasis and integrity, the aim of this study was to investigate whether four functional polymorphisms within four MMP genes, which cluster on chromosome 11q22 associate with risk of ACL ruptures. Three hundred and forty-five [129 with ACL ruptures (ACL group) and 216 asymptomatic controls (CON group)] unrelated Caucasians were recruited for this case-control study. Fifty-four participants reported non-contact mechanisms of ACL rupture (NON subgroup). All participants were genotyped for the MMP10 C/T rs486055, MMP1 1G/2G rs1799750, MMP3 G/A rs679620 and MMP12 A/G rs2276109 variants. After adjusting for sex, age and weight, the AG and GG genotypes of the MMP12 rs2276109 variant were significantly (P=0.030) under-represented among the NON subgroup (14%), when compared with the CON group (26%). No other variants were significantly different between groups. Adjusted for the same confounders, the two four-variant haplotypes T-1G-A-A (CON 14%, ACL 9%, P=0.033) and C-2G-G-G (CON 14%, NON 5%, P=0.021) were significantly different between the CON and the ACL groups, and the CON group and the NON subgroup, respectively. This is the first report that indicates an association between the chromosomal region 11q22 and the risk of ACL rupture.

  2. Anterior cruciate ligament- and hamstring tendon-derived cells: in vitro differential properties of cells involved in ACL reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ghebes, Corina Adriana; Kelder, Cindy; Schot, Thomas; Renard, Auke J; Pakvis, Dean F M; Fernandes, Hugo; Saris, Daniel B

    2015-03-11

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction involves the replacement of the torn ligament with a new graft, often a hamstring tendon (HT). Described as similar, the ACL and HT have intrinsic differences related to their distinct anatomical locations. From a cellular perspective, identifying these differences represents a step forward in the search for new cues that enhance recovery after the reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to characterize the phenotype and multilineage potential of ACL- and HT-derived cells. ACL- and HT-derived cells were isolated from tissue harvest from patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) or ACL reconstruction. In total, three ACL and three HT donors were investigated. Cell morphology, self-renewal potential (CFU-F), surface marker profiling, expression of tendon/ligament-related markers (PCR) and multilineage potential were analysed for both cell types; both had fibroblast-like morphology and low self-renewal potential. No differences in the expression of tendon/ligament-related genes or a selected set of surface markers were observed between the two cell types. However, differences in their multilineage potential were observed: while ACL-derived cells showed a high potential to differentiate into chondrocytes and adipocytes, but not osteoblasts, HT-derived cells showed poor potential to form adipocytes, chondrocytes and osteoblasts. Our results demonstrated that HT-derived cells have low multilineage potential compared to ACL-derived cells, further highlighting the need for extrinsic signals to fully restore the function of the ACL upon reconstruction. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Age, sex, body anthropometry, and ACL size predict the structural properties of the human anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Javad; Mansouri, Hossein; Chandrashekar, Naveen; Slauterbeck, James R; Hardy, Daniel M; Beynnon, Bruce D

    2011-07-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury continues to be at the forefront of sports injury concerns because of its impact on quality of life and joint health prognosis. One strategy is to reduce the occurrence of this injury by identifying at-risk subjects based on key putative risk factors. The purpose of our study was to develop models that predict the structural properties of a subject's ACL based on the combination of known risk factors. We hypothesized that the structural properties of the ACL can be predicted using a multi-linear regression model based on significant covariates that are associated with increased risk of injury, including age, sex, body size, and ACL size. We also hypothesized that ACL size is a significant contributor to the model. The developed models had predictive capabilities for the structural properties of the ACL: load at failure (R2 = 0.914), elongation at failure (R2 = 0.872), energy at failure (R2 = 0.913), and linear stiffness (R2 = 0.756). Furthermore, sex, age, body mass, BMI, and height were contributors (p < 0.05) to all predicted structural properties. ACL minimal area was a contributor to elongation, energy at failure, and linear stiffness (p < 0.05), but not to load at failure. ACL volume was also a contributor to elongation and energy at failure (p < 0.05), but not to linear stiffness and load at failure models. ACL length was not a significant contributor to any structural property. The clinical significance of this research is its potential, after continued development and refinement of the model, for application to prognostic studies that are designed to identify individuals at increased risk for injury to the ligament.

  4. Rehabilitation of Patients Following Autogenic Bone-Patellar Tendon-Bone ACL Reconstruction: A 20-Year Perspective

    PubMed Central

    De Carlo, Mark S.; McDivitt, Ryan

    2006-01-01

    Rehabilitation of patients following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has undergone remarkable improvements over the past two decades. During this time, ACL research has been at the forefront of many orthopaedic and sports physical therapy clinics. With over 20 years of ACL rehabilitation experience (senior author) and prior collaboration with accelerated ACL rehabilitation pioneer K. Donald Shelbourne, the authors wish to present a unique perspective on the evolution of ACL rehabilitation. Prior to the classic article by Paulos et al in 1981,1 literature on ACL rehabilitation was quite sparse. The basis for ACL rehabilitation at this time was founded in basic science studies conducted with animal models. In an effort to protect the graft, emphasis was placed on immobilization, extension limitation, restricted weight bearing, and delayed return to activity. Despite achieving good ligamentous stability, patients often experienced a spectrum of complications. In 1990, Shelbourne and Nitz2 proposed an accelerated rehabilitation protocol following ACL reconstruction based on clinical experience. Their program emphasized delayed surgery, earlier range of motion and weight bearing, and full extension. As a result, patients experienced better clinical outcomes while maintaining knee stability. The rehabilitation program presented in this paper is still largely based on the principles of the accelerated protocol. As evidence-based practice and the call for prospective, randomized clinical research continues, the continued progress in treating patients with this injury will be enhanced. Furthermore, clinicians are urged not to lose sight of the clinical reasoning that helped evolve the ACL rehabilitation process where it is today. PMID:21522223

  5. Practical anatomy of the carpal tunnel.

    PubMed

    Rotman, Mitchell B; Donovan, James P

    2002-05-01

    The carpal tunnel is most narrow at the level of the hook of the hamate. The median nerve is the most superficial structure. It has specific relationships to surrounding structures within the carpal tunnel to the ulnar bursa, flexor tendons, and endoscopic devices placed inside the canal. The importance of the ring finger axis is stressed. Knowledge of topographical landmarks that mark the borders of the carpal tunnel, the hook of the hamate, superficial arch, and thenar branch of the median nerve ensure appropriate incision placement for endoscopic as well as open carpal tunnel release surgery. Anatomy of the transverse carpal ligament, its layers and relationships to adjacent structures including the fad pad, Guyon's canal, palmar fascia, and thenar muscles has been discussed. Fibers derived primarily from thenar muscle fascia with connections to the hypothenar muscle fascia and dorsal fascia of the palmaris brevis form a separate fascial layer directly palmar to the TCL and can be retained. This helps to preserve postoperative pinch strength. The fat pad in line with the ring finger axis overlaps the deep surface of the distal edge of the TCL and must be retracted in order to visualize the distal end of the ligament. Whereas the ulnar artery within Guyon's canal is frequently located radial to the hook of the hamate, injury to this structure has not been a problem during ECTR surgery. Variations of the median nerve and its branches, as well as the palmar cutaneous nerve distribution, have been reviewed. A rare ulnar-sided thenar branch from the median nerve, interconnecting branches between the ulnar and median nerves located just distal to the end of the TCL, and transverse ulnar-based cutaneous nerves can be injured during open or ECTR surgery. Anomalous muscles, tendons or interconnections, and the lumbricals during finger flexion may be seen within the carpal tunnel. These structures can be the cause of compression of the median nerve. The anatomy of the

  6. The Placement Professional as Marketeer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walz, Garry R.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses resistance of helping professions to marketing. Defines human services marketing. Describes forces that are placing human services in an increasingly competitive position. Makes recommendations to enhance the image of career planning and placement services and increase their usage. Concludes that by adopting a marketeer orientation,…

  7. Placement Services: A Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Advisory Council on Vocational Education, Washington, DC.

    This self-contained instructional package defines a comprehensive job placement program as a coordinated series of activities involving school-community interaction, staff training and curriculum development resulting in youth being able to obtain and retain satisfying employment. The author and contributors focus their efforts on presenting case…

  8. A Consideration of Placement Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilpatrick, Gordon

    This report consists of three sections, the first of which is a discussion of placement testing. It is maintained that the strengths and weaknesses of a tested population cannot be determined by a single composite test--yet, many institutions place students in beginning courses on the basis of such limited information. To assess basic capabilities…

  9. The Ironies of Mandatory Placement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadden, Craig

    2000-01-01

    Suggests that mandatory placement of underprepared students in developmental courses may actually provide the key to opening the door to true academic, vocational, or community success, despite criticism by some that it excludes students and restricts their freedoms. Discusses ethical balances between access, student success and academic…

  10. College Student Personnel Graduate Placement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Packwood, William

    1976-01-01

    ACPA's Commission XII surveyed 103 college student personnel training institutions regarding their graduate placement. Graduates were identified according to degree, sex, and race. Percentages of graduates placed, areas within the college student personnel field, types of institutions, and areas of the country were computed. The discussion…

  11. Abduction of Arm Facilitates Correction of Kinked Peel-Away Sheath During Subclavian Central Line Placement.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunghoon

    2015-12-01

    A tunneled central line catheter placement using a subclavian vein approach can be complicated by an occurrence of peel-away sheath kink which prevents the advancement of the catheter through the sheath. The kink is created due to the angular junction of subclavian and brachiocephalic veins which meet at 90 degree angle. A technique is described which corrects the peel-away sheath kink by extending the subclavian/brachiocephalic vein angle to greater than 90 degrees by abducting the patient's arm.

  12. Mathematics Placement at the University of Illinois

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahlgren Reddy, Alison; Harper, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Data from the ALEKS-based placement program at the University of Illinois is presented visually in several ways. The placement exam (an ALEKS assessment) contains precise item-specific information and the data show many interesting properties of the student populations of the placement courses, which include Precalculus, Calculus, and Business…

  13. Can Placement Tests Inform Instructional Decisions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Anthony B.; Weir, Cyril J.

    2004-01-01

    Studies of placement tests are typically narrowly concerned with their validation as instruments for the efficient grouping of students. They rarely explore the assumption that placement test content can be related to classroom tasks and so inform instructional decisions. This study focuses on a trial version of the Global Placement Test (GPT), a…

  14. 28 CFR 551.24 - Child placement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Child placement. 551.24 Section 551.24 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Birth Control, Pregnancy, Child Placement, and Abortion § 551.24 Child placement. (a) The Warden may...

  15. 28 CFR 551.24 - Child placement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Child placement. 551.24 Section 551.24 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Birth Control, Pregnancy, Child Placement, and Abortion § 551.24 Child placement. (a) The Warden may...

  16. 28 CFR 551.24 - Child placement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Child placement. 551.24 Section 551.24 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Birth Control, Pregnancy, Child Placement, and Abortion § 551.24 Child placement. (a) The Warden may...

  17. 28 CFR 551.24 - Child placement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Child placement. 551.24 Section 551.24 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Birth Control, Pregnancy, Child Placement, and Abortion § 551.24 Child placement. (a) The Warden may...

  18. 28 CFR 551.24 - Child placement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Child placement. 551.24 Section 551.24 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Birth Control, Pregnancy, Child Placement, and Abortion § 551.24 Child placement. (a) The Warden may...

  19. 5 CFR 359.702 - Placement rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Placement rights. 359.702 Section 359.702 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS REMOVAL FROM THE SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE; GUARANTEED PLACEMENT IN OTHER PERSONNEL SYSTEMS Guaranteed Placement § 359.702...

  20. 5 CFR 359.702 - Placement rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Placement rights. 359.702 Section 359.702 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS REMOVAL FROM THE SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE; GUARANTEED PLACEMENT IN OTHER PERSONNEL SYSTEMS Guaranteed Placement § 359.702...

  1. Knee Kinematics During Non-contact ACL Injury as Determined from Bone Bruise Location

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sophia Y.; Spritzer, Charles E.; Utturkar, Gangadhar M.; Toth, Alison P.; Garrett, William E.; DeFrate, Louis E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The motions causing non-contact ACL injury remain unclear. Tibiofemoral bone bruises are believed to be the result of joint impact near the time of ACL rupture. The locations and frequencies of these bone bruises have been reported, but there is limited data quantifying knee position and orientation near the time of injury based on these contusions. Hypothesis Knee position and orientation near the time of non-contact ACL injury include extension and anterior tibial translation. Study Design Descriptive Laboratory Study Methods Magnetic resonance (MR) images of eight subjects with non-contact ACL injuries were acquired within one month of injury and subsequently analyzed. All subjects exhibited bruises on both the femur and tibia in both medial and lateral compartments. The outer margins of bone and the bone bruise surfaces were outlined on each image to create a 3D model of each subject’s knee in its position during MR imaging (MRI position). Numerical optimization was used to maximize overlap of the bone bruises on the femur and tibia and predict the position of injury. Flexion angle, valgus orientation, internal tibial rotation, and anterior tibial translation were measured in both the MRI position and the predicted position of injury. Differences in kinematics between the MRI position, which served as an unloaded reference, and the predicted position of injury were compared using paired t-tests. Results Flexion angle was near full extension in both the MRI position and the predicted position of injury (8° versus 12°, p=0.2). Statistically significant increases in valgus orientation (5°, p=0.003), internal tibial rotation (15°, p=0.003), and anterior tibial translation (22mm, p<0.001) were observed in the predicted position of injury relative to the MRI position. Conclusions These results suggest that for the bone bruise pattern studied, landing on an extended knee is high risk for ACL injury. Extension was accompanied by increased anterior

  2. The anatomy of the anterior cruciate ligament and its relevance to the technique of reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Śmigielski, R; Zdanowicz, U; Drwięga, M; Ciszek, B; Williams, A

    2016-08-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is commonly performed and has been for many years. Despite this, the technical details related to ACL anatomy, such as tunnel placement, are still a topic for debate. In this paper, we introduce the flat ribbon concept of the anatomy of the ACL, and its relevance to clinical practice. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B:1020-6.

  3. 50 CFR 622.411 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Spiny Lobster Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico and... measures (AMs). For recreational and commercial spiny lobster landings combined, the ACL is 7.32 million...

  4. 50 CFR 622.411 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Spiny Lobster Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico and... measures (AMs). For recreational and commercial spiny lobster landings combined, the ACL is 7.32 million...

  5. An Integrated Approach to Change the Outcome Part II: Targeted Neuromuscular Training Techniques to Reduce Identified ACL Injury Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Myer, Gregory D.; Ford, Kevin R.; Brent, Jensen L.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    Prior reports indicate that female athletes who demonstrate high knee abduction moments (KAMs) during landing are more responsive to neuromuscular training designed to reduce KAM. Identification of female athletes who demonstrate high KAM, which accurately identifies those at risk for noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, may be ideal for targeted neuromuscular training. Specific neuromuscular training targeted to the underlying biomechanical components that increase KAM may provide the most efficient and effective training strategy to reduce noncontact ACL injury risk. The purpose of the current commentary is to provide an integrative approach to identify and target mechanistic underpinnings to increased ACL injury in female athletes. Specific neuromuscular training techniques will be presented that address individual algorithm components related to high knee load landing patterns. If these integrated techniques are employed on a widespread basis, prevention strategies for noncontact ACL injury among young female athletes may prove both more effective and efficient. PMID:22580980

  6. THE ROLE AND IMPLEMENTATION OF ECCENTRIC TRAINING IN ATHLETIC REHABILITATION: TENDINOPATHY, HAMSTRING STRAINS, AND ACL RECONSTRUCTION

    PubMed Central

    Reiman, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The benefits and proposed physiological mechanisms of eccentric exercise have previously been elucidated and eccentric exercise has been used for well over seventy years. Traditionally, eccentric exercise has been used as a regular component of strength training. However, in recent years, eccentric exercise has been used in rehabilitation to manage a host of conditions. Of note, there is evidence in the literature supporting eccentric exercise for the rehabilitation of tendinopathies, muscle strains, and in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rehabilitation. The purpose of this Clinical Commentary is to discuss the physiologic mechanism of eccentric exercise as well as to review the literature regarding the utilization of eccentric training during rehabilitation. A secondary purpose of this commentary is to provide the reader with a framework for the implementation of eccentric training during rehabilitation of tendinopathies, muscle strains, and after ACL reconstruction. PMID:21655455

  7. Return to sports after ACL reconstruction: a new functional test protocol

    PubMed Central

    Bisciotti, Gian Nicola; Quaglia, Alessandro; Belli, Andrea; Carimati, Giulia; Volpi, Piero

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background In literature, there are lack of studies proposing clear and rationally designed test battery to be performed after an ACL reconstruction. Methods From 2006 to 2015, 80 football players were subjected, after ACL reconstruction, to a newly conceived test battery analyzing: Isometric and isokinetic force production The different phases during the jump The correct control of the landing phase after jump The control of valgus during landing after jump and cutting movements. Results The isokinetic and isometric test do not show any significant relationship with the another test. The laboratory test as well the field test showed them a significant correlation. Conclusions The results showed that a normal force production during the laboratory does not guarantee an equally satisfactory production of force during the field test. Study design Case series (Level III). PMID:28217573

  8. Humanitarian engineering placements in our own communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanderSteen, J. D. J.; Hall, K. R.; Baillie, C. A.

    2010-05-01

    There is an increasing interest in the humanitarian engineering curriculum, and a service-learning placement could be an important component of such a curriculum. International placements offer some important pedagogical advantages, but also have some practical and ethical limitations. Local community-based placements have the potential to be transformative for both the student and the community, although this potential is not always seen. In order to investigate the role of local placements, qualitative research interviews were conducted. Thirty-two semi-structured research interviews were conducted and analysed, resulting in a distinct outcome space. It is concluded that local humanitarian engineering placements greatly complement international placements and are strongly recommended if international placements are conducted. More importantly it is seen that we are better suited to address the marginalised in our own community, although it is often easier to see the needs of an outside populace.

  9. Muscle function is associated with future patient-reported outcomes in young adults with ACL injury

    PubMed Central

    Flosadottir, Vala; Roos, Ewa M; Ageberg, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Background/aim Consequences of an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury include worse patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and a decrease in activity level. Muscle function can be improved by targeted exercise. Our aims were to investigate cross-sectional and longitudinal associations among lower extremity muscle function and PROs after ACL injury. Methods Fifty-four participants (15 women, mean 30 years) with ACL injury or reconstruction, from the Knee Anterior Cruciate Ligament, Nonsurgical versus Surgical Treatment (KANON) trial (ISRCTN84752559), were assessed with hop performance, muscle power and postural orientation 3 years (SD 0.85) after ACL injury. PROs at 3 and 5 years after injury included Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) subscales Function in sport and recreation (KOOS Sport/rec) and Knee-related Quality of life (KOOS QoL), KOOS item Q3 (KOOS Q3), Tegner Activity Scale and Activity Rating Scale (ARS). Partial Spearman's rank-order correlation was used to analyse correlations between muscle function and PROs, controlling for gender and treatment. Results Numerous cross-sectional correlations were observed between muscle function and PROs (rsp≈0.3–0.5, p≤0.045). Worse hop performance and worse postural orientation were associated with worse KOOS scores 2 years later (rsp≥0.280, p≤0.045). Worse muscle power was associated with lower future ARS scores (rsp=0.281, p=0.044). Conclusions The moderate associations suggest that improving muscle function during rehabilitation could improve present and future PROs. PMID:27900196

  10. Can course format influence the performance of students in an advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) program?

    PubMed

    Garrido, F D; Romano, M M D; Schmidt, A; Pazin-Filho, A

    2011-01-01

    Advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) is a problem-based course that employs simulation techniques to teach the standard management techniques of cardiovascular emergencies. Its structure is periodically revised according to new versions of the American Heart Association guidelines. Since it was introduced in Brazil in 1996, the ACLS has been through two conceptual and structural changes. Detailed documented reports on the effect of these changes on student performance are limited. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of conceptual and structural changes of the course on student ACLS performance at a Brazilian training center. This was a retrospective study of 3266 students divided into two groups according to the teaching model: Model 1 (N = 1181; 1999-2003) and Model 2 (N = 2085; 2003-2007). Model 2 increased practical skill activities to 75% of the total versus 60% in Model 1. Furthermore, the teaching material provided to the students before the course was more objective than that used for Model 1. Scores greater than 85% in the theoretical evaluation and approval in the evaluation of practice by the instructor were considered to be a positive outcome. Multiple logistic regression was used to adjust for potential confounders (specialty, residency, study time, opportunity to enhance practical skills during the course and location where the course was given). Compared to Model 1, Model 2 presented odds ratios (OR) indicating better performance in the theoretical (OR = 1.34; 95%CI = 1.10-1.64), practical (OR = 1.19; 95%CI = 0.90-1.57), and combined (OR = 1.38; 95%CI = 1.13-1.68) outcomes. Increasing the time devoted to practical skills did not improve the performance of ACLS students.

  11. The cryogenic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Based on theoretical studies and experience with a low speed cryogenic tunnel and with a 1/3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel, the cryogenic wind tunnel concept was shown to offer many advantages with respect to the attainment of full scale Reynolds number at reasonable levels of dynamic pressure in a ground based facility. The unique modes of operation available in a pressurized cryogenic tunnel make possible for the first time the separation of Mach number, Reynolds number, and aeroelastic effects. By reducing the drive-power requirements to a level where a conventional fan drive system may be used, the cryogenic concept makes possible a tunnel with high productivity and run times sufficiently long to allow for all types of tests at reduced capital costs and, for equal amounts of testing, reduced total energy consumption in comparison with other tunnel concepts.

  12. Simulator of Road Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danišovič, Peter; Schlosser, František; Šrámek, Juraj; Rázga, Martin

    2015-05-01

    A Tunnel Traffic & Operation Simulator is a device of the Centre of Transport Research at the University of Žilina. The Simulator allows managing technological equipment of virtual two-tube highway tunnel, which is interconnected with simulation of vehicle traffic in tunnel. Changes of the traffic-operation states and other equipment are reflecting at the simulated traffic, as well as simulations of various emergency events in traffic initiate changes in tunnel detecting and measuring devices. It is thus possible to simulate emergency states, which can be affected by various faults of technology as well as by climatic conditions. The solutions can be found in irreplaceable experiences of Slovak road tunnel operators, changes of trafficoperation states, visualizations of operator technological display screens, technological devices labelling in order to increase operational safety of road tunnels.

  13. Analytical performances of Hemoclot Protein C Reagent on ACL TOP analyzer.

    PubMed

    Calmette, Leyla; Charpentier, Nicole; Tircot, Caroline; Bigot, Delphine; Dunois, Claire; Amiral, Jean; Tetegan, Marcelle; Sep Hieng, Sonnthida; Peltier, Jean-Yves

    2016-12-01

    Our study aimed to evaluate and validate according to standard NF EN ISO 15189 the original protocol ajustement of Hemoclot Protein C (PC) (Hyphen BioMed), clotting-based assay of PC on ACL TOP analyzer (Werfen/Instrumentation Laboratory). We evaluated the performance in terms of imprecision and we validate additional parameters in range B required by the SH GTA 04 (COFRAC): repeatability, reproducibility, detection and quantification limits, limits of linearity, stability, inter-samples and inter-reagents contamination, inaccuracy, evaluation of interferences (hemolysis, bilirubinemia and chyles). A comparison with Hemoclot PC on STA Compact analyzer (Stago) was performed. Coefficients of variation were lower than 5 %. Detection and quantification limits were respectively 8.3 % and 9.3 %. Superior limit of linearity was 140 %. The test didn't diplay any inter-samples and inter-reagents contamination. Reagent after reconstitution was stable 6 hours on ACL TOP. No interferences were observed for hemoglobin lower than 500 mg/dL, for bilirubin lower than and for chyles lower than 300 mg/dL. Comparison with Hemoclot PC on STA analyzer (Stago) was satisfactory. Hemoclot PC adjusted on ACL TOP analyzer showed satisfactory analytical performances with criteria chosen in our study. These data allow a better knowledge of the performances of this test and were useful to make a validation file in range B as recommended by SH GTA 04.

  14. Pipetron Tunnel Construction Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Friant, James E.; Bauer, Robert A.; Gross, David L.; May, Michael; Lach, Joseph

    1997-01-01

    This report examines issues involved in the civil construction aspects of the tunneling that could be done in the region of Fermilab to support the Pipetron along, moderately deep, tunnel loop. Cost, technical and political aspects of tunneling are addressed in this preliminary guide for further study. At Snowmass 96, in a series of informal, but comprehensive discussions, several guidelines were developed to frame this report.

  15. Charge Islands Through Tunneling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Daryl C.

    2002-01-01

    It has been recently reported that the electrical charge in a semiconductive carbon nanotube is not evenly distributed, but rather it is divided into charge "islands." This paper links the aforementioned phenomenon to tunneling and provides further insight into the higher rate of tunneling processes, which makes tunneling devices attractive. This paper also provides a basis for calculating the charge profile over the length of the tube so that nanoscale devices' conductive properties may be fully exploited.

  16. [Intra-articular reinforcement of a partially torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using newly developed UHMWPE biomaterial in combination with Hexalon ACL/PCL screws: ex-vivo mechanical testing of an animal knee model].

    PubMed

    Fedorová, P; Srnec, R; Pěnčík, J; Dvořák, M; Krbec, M; Nečas, A

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY Recent trends in the experimental surgical management of a partial anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture in animals show repair of an ACL lesion using novel biomaterials both for biomechanical reinforcement of a partially unstable knee and as suitable scaffolds for bone marrow stem cell therapy in a partial ACL tear. The study deals with mechanical testing of the newly developed ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) biomaterial anchored to bone with Hexalon biodegradable ACL/PCL screws, as a new possibility of intra-articular reinforcement of a partial ACL tear. MATERIAL AND METHODS Two groups of ex vivo pig knee models were prepared and tested as follows: the model of an ACL tear stabilised with UHMWPE biomaterial using a Hexalon ACL/PCL screw (group 1; n = 10) and the model of an ACL tear stabilised with the traditional, and in veterinary medicine used, extracapsular technique involving a monofilament nylon fibre, a clamp and a Securos bone anchor (group 2; n = 11). The models were loaded at a standing angle of 100° and the maximum load (N) and shift (mm) values were recorded. RESULTS In group 1 the average maximal peak force was 167.6 ± 21.7 N and the shift was on average 19.0 ± 4.0 mm. In all 10 specimens, the maximum load made the UHMWPE implant break close to its fixation to the femur but the construct/fixation never failed at the site where the material was anchored to the bone. In group 2, the average maximal peak force was 207.3 ± 49.2 N and the shift was on average 24.1 ± 9.5 mm. The Securos stabilisation failed by pullout of the anchor from the femoral bone in nine out of 11 cases; the monofilament fibre ruptured in two cases. CONCLUSIONS It can be concluded that a UHMWPE substitute used in ex-vivo pig knee models has mechanical properties comparable with clinically used extracapsular Securos stabilisation and, because of its potential to carry stem cells and bioactive substances, it can meet the requirements for

  17. Tunnel closure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, B.; Attia, A.

    1995-07-01

    When a deeply penetrating munition explodes above the roof of a tunnel, the amount of rubble that falls inside the tunnel is primarily a function of three parameters: first the cube-root scaled distance from the center of the explosive to the roof of the tunnel. Second the material properties of the rock around the tunnel, and in particular the shear strength of that rock, its RQD (Rock Quality Designator), and the extent and orientation of joints. And third the ratio of the tunnel diameter to the standoff distance (distance between the center of explosive and the tunnel roof). The authors have used CALE, a well-established 2-D hydrodynamic computer code, to calculate the amount of rubble that falls inside a tunnel as a function of standoff distance for two different tunnel diameters. In particular they calculated three of the tunnel collapse experiments conducted in an iron ore mine near Kirkeness, Norway in the summer of 1994. The failure model that they used in their calculations combines an equivalent plastic strain criterion with a maximum tensile strength criterion and can be calibrated for different rocks using cratering data as well as laboratory experiments. These calculations are intended to test and improve the understanding of both the Norway Experiments and the ACE (Array of conventional Explosive) phenomenology.

  18. Conversion of tunneled hemodialysis catheter into HeRO device can provide immediate access for hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, Julio C; DeLaRosa, Jacob; Rahim, Fahim; Rahim, Naeem

    2010-11-01

    Patients with central venous occlusion who are ''tunneled catheter dependent'' are a challenge for hemodialysis access. A relatively new option for them is the hemodialysis reliable outflow (HeRO) device that can be totally implanted subcutaneously. However, patients still require a tunneled hemodialysis catheter that is used until the HeRO device is mature, 4 to 6 weeks later. Here, we describe a conversion of an existing tunneled hemodialysis catheter into a HeRO device, which was combined with a ''self-sealing'' Flixene graft. This allowed almost immediate use of the HeRO device without the need for placement of a catheter.

  19. Quantifying Quadriceps Muscle Strength in Patients With ACL Injury, Focal Cartilage Lesions, and Degenerative Meniscus Tears

    PubMed Central

    Eitzen, Ingrid; Grindem, Hege; Nilstad, Agnethe; Moksnes, Håvard; Risberg, May Arna

    2016-01-01

    Background: Reduced quadriceps strength influences knee function and increases the risk of knee osteoarthritis. Thus, it is of significant clinical relevance to precisely quantify strength deficits in patients with knee injuries. Purpose: To evaluate isokinetic concentric quadriceps muscle strength torque values, assessed both from peak torque and at specific knee flexion joint angles, in patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, focal cartilage lesions, and degenerative meniscus tears. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Data were synthesized from patients included in 3 previously conducted research projects: 2 prospective cohort studies and 1 randomized controlled trial. At the time of inclusion, all patients were candidates for surgery. Isokinetic concentric quadriceps muscle strength measurements (60 deg/s) were performed at baseline (preoperative status) and after a period of progressive supervised exercise therapy (length of rehabilitation period: 5 weeks for ACL injury, 12 weeks for cartilage lesions and degenerative meniscus). Outcome measures were peak torque and torque at specific knee flexion joint angles from 20° to 70°. All patients had unilateral injuries, and side-to-side deficits were calculated. For comparisons between and within groups, we utilized 1-way analysis of variance and paired t tests, respectively. Results: In total, 250 patients were included. At baseline, cartilage patients had the most severe deficit (39.7% ± 24.3%; P < .001). Corresponding numbers for ACL and degenerative meniscus subjects were 21.7% (±13.2%) and 20.7% (±16.3%), respectively. At retest, there was significant improvement in all groups (P < .001), with remaining deficits of 24.7% (±18.5%) for cartilage, 16.8% (±13.9%) for ACL, and 3.3% (±17.8%) for degenerative meniscus. Peak torque was consistently measured at 60° of knee flexion, whereas the largest mean deficits were measured at 30° at baseline and 70° at retest for the

  20. Utilization of Modified NFL Combine Testing to Identify Functional Deficits in Athletes Following ACL Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    MYER, GREGORY D.; SCHMITT, LAURA C.; BRENT, JENSEN L.; FORD, KEVIN R.; BARBER FOSS, KIM D.; SCHERER, BRADLEY J.; HEIDT, ROBERT S.; DIVINE, JON G.; HEWETT, TIMOTHY E.

    2012-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN Case control. OBJECTIVES To use modified NFL Combine testing methodology to test for functional deficits in athletes following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction following return to sport. BACKGROUND There is a need to develop objective, performance-based, on-field assessment methods designed to identify potential lower extremity performance deficits and related impairments in this population. METHODS Eighteen patients (mean ± SD age, 16.9 ± 2.1 years; height, 170.0 ± 8.7 cm; body mass, 71.9 ± 21.8 kg) who returned to their sport within a year following ACL reconstruction (95% CI: 7.8 to 11.9 months from surgery) participated (ACLR group). These individuals were asked to bring 1 or 2 teammates to serve as control participants, who were matched for sex, sport, and age (n = 20; mean ± SD age, 16.9 ± 1.1 years; height, 169.7 ± 8.4 cm; body mass, 70.1 ± 20.7 kg). Functional performance was tested using the broad jump, vertical jump, modified long shuttle, modified pro shuttle, modified agility T-test, timed hop, triple hop, single hop, and crossover hop tests. A 1-way multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) was used to evaluate group differences for dependent performance variables. RESULTS The functional performance measurements of skills requiring bilateral involvement of both lower extremities showed no group differences between the ACLR and control groups (P>.05). An overall group difference (P = .006) was observed for the combined limb symmetry index (LSI) measures. However, the modified double-limb performance tasks (long shuttle, modified agility T-test, and pro shuttle) were not, independently, sufficiently sensitive to detect limb deficits in individuals with ACL reconstruction. Conversely, the LSI on the distance measures of the single-limb performance tasks all provided moderate to large effect sizes to differentiate between the ACLR and control groups, as the individuals who had ACL reconstruction demonstrated involved

  1. PATIENT-SPECIFIC AND SURGERY-SPECIFIC FACTORS THAT AFFECT RETURN TO SPORT AFTER ACL RECONSTRUCTION

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Andrew; Rabuck, Stephen; Lynch, Brittany; Davin, Sarah; Irrgang, James

    2016-01-01

    Context Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is frequently performed to allow individuals to return to their pre-injury levels of sports participation, however, return to pre-injury level of sport is poor and re-injury rates are unacceptably high. Re-injury is likely associated with the timeframe and guidelines for return to sport (RTS). It is imperative for clinicians to recognize risk factors for re-injury and to ensure that modifiable risk factors are addressed prior to RTS. The purpose of this commentary is to summarize the current literature on the outcomes following return to sport after ACL reconstruction and to outline the biologic and patient-specific factors that should be considered when counseling an athlete on their progression through rehabilitation. Evidence Acquisition A comprehensive literature search was performed to identify RTS criteria and RTS rates after ACL reconstruction with consideration paid to graft healing, anatomic reconstruction, and risk factors for re-injury and revision. Results were screened for relevant original research articles and review articles, from which results were summarized. Study Design Clinical Review of the Literature Results Variable RTS rates are presented in the literature due to variable definitions of RTS ranging from a high threshold (return to competition) to low threshold (physician clearance for return to play). Re-injury and contralateral injury rates are greater than the risk for primary ACL injury, which may be related to insufficient RTS guidelines based on time from surgery, which do not allow for proper healing or resolution of post-operative impairments and elimination of risk factors associated with both primary and secondary ACL injuries. Conclusions RTS rates to pre-injury level of activity after ACLR are poor and the risk for graft injury or contralateral injury requiring an additional surgery is substantial. Resolving impairments while eliminating movement patterns associated with

  2. Deficits in Quadriceps Strength and Patient-Oriented Outcomes at Return to Activity After ACL Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lepley, Lindsey K.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Side-to-side quadriceps strength deficits are linked to hazardous lower extremity mechanics and reduced function at a time when individuals are returned to activity after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. As a result, generalized criteria have emerged in the literature, wherein researchers are recommending that patients be cleared for participation once side-to-side differences in strength are ≤10% of the noninjured limb. Similar recommendations exist for patient-oriented outcomes (ie, self-reported function and hop tests), where deficits of ≤10% are considered ideal at return to activity. It is unclear how many studies actually achieve these clinically recommended results. Evidence Acquisition: Articles that reported quadriceps strength deficits as compared to the contralateral limb were collected from peer-reviewed sources available on Medline and Web of Science databases (1990 through August 2014). Search terms included the following: anterior cruciate ligament OR ACL AND muscle weakness, anterior cruciate ligament OR ACL AND strength; return-to-activity AND strength; anterior cruciate ligament OR ACL AND quadriceps. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: Average side-to-side strength deficits at 6 months postreconstruction were 23% ± 8% (range, 3%-40%), while the average at 12 months postsurgery was found to be 14% ± 6% (range, 3%-28%). The average deficits in self-reported function at 6 months (mean, 14% ± 5%) and 12 months postsurgery (mean, 13% ± 6%) were also found to be >10%. Performance on hop tests was found to be less than optimal at 6 months postsurgery (mean, 11% ± 7%), but improved at 12 months postsurgery (mean, 1.3% ± 2%). Conclusion: This review provides an up-to-date account of the typical deficits in strength and patient-oriented outcomes that exist when formalized physical therapy concludes after ACL reconstruction. Based on the studies included, it seems pertinent that researchers

  3. Acadian flycatcher nest placement: Does placement influence reproductive success?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, R.R.; Cooper, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    We located 511 Acadian Flycatcher (Empidonax virescens) nests in bottomland hardwood forest of eastern Arkansas. Microhabitat characteristics were measured and their relationship with nest success evaluated. Fifty-two percent of all nesting attempts resulted in predation. Attributes of nest placement were similar between successful and unsuccessful nests, although successful nests were placed higher. Similarly, nonparasitized nests were typically higher than parasitized nests. Nests initiated late in the breeding season were placed in larger trees with higher canopy bases resulting in increased vegetation around the nest. Fifteen different tree species were used for nesting. Acadian Flycatchers chose nest trees in a nonrandom fashion, selecting Nuttall oak (Quercus nuttallii) and possumhaw (Ilex decidua) in greater proportions than their availability. However, there was no relationship between tree species used for nesting and nest success. Nest height was positively correlated with concealment at the nest site, supporting the predator-avoidance theory. No other attribute of nest placement differentiated successful nest sites, suggesting that nest predation is likely a function of random events in space and time.

  4. The carpal tunnel.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Harold

    2009-12-01

    The carpal bones are deeply convex anteriorly. This bony gutter is converted by the flexor retinaculum into a tube - the carpal tunnel, which conveys the median nerve, together with the long flexor tendons of the fingers and thumb, into the hand. It is of special interest to the surgeon because it is the site of a common nerve entrapment, the carpal tunnel syndrome.

  5. Shotcrete in tunnel design

    SciTech Connect

    Golser, J.; Galler, R.; Schubert, P.; Rabensteiner, K.

    1995-12-31

    Shotcrete is an important structural element for tunnel support. Green shotcrete is exposed to compression strain rates and tunnel design requires a realistic material law for shotcrete. A modified rate of flow method simulates shotcrete behavior very well and can be incorporated in Finite Element calculations.

  6. Two-dimensional optimal sensor placement

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.

    1995-05-01

    A method for determining the optimal two-dimensional spatial placement of multiple sensors participating in a robot perception task is introduced in this paper. This work is motivated by the fact that sensor data fusion is an effective means of reducing uncertainties in sensor observations, and that the combined uncertainty varies with the relative placement of the sensors with respect to each other. The problem of optimal sensor placement is formulated and a solution is presented in the two dimensional space. The algebraic structure of the combined sensor uncertainty with respect to the placement of sensor is studied. A necessary condition for optimal placement is derived and this necessary condition is used to obtain an efficient closed-form solution for the global optimal placement. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the solution. 11 refs.

  7. Assessment of the Impacts of ACLS on the ISS Life Support System Using Dynamic Simulations in V-HAB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putz, Daniel; Olthoff, Claas; Ewert, Michael; Anderson, Molly

    2016-01-01

    The Advanced Closed Loop System (ACLS) is currently under development by Airbus Defense and Space and is slated for launch to the International Space Station (ISS) in 2017. The addition of new hardware into an already complex system such as the ISS life support system (LSS) always poses operational risks. It is therefore important to understand the impacts ACLS will have on the existing systems to ensure smooth operations for the ISS. This analysis can be done by using dynamic computer simulations and one possible tool for such a simulation is the Virtual Habitat (V-HAB). Based on MATLAB, V-HAB has been under development at the Institute of Astronautics of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) since 2004 and in the past has been successfully used to simulate the ISS life support systems. The existing V-HAB ISS simulation model treated the interior volume of the space station as one large, ideally-stirred container. This model was improved to allow the calculation of the atmospheric composition inside individual modules of the ISS by splitting it into twelve distinct volumes. The virtual volumes are connected by a simulation of the inter-module ventilation flows. This allows for a combined simulation of the LSS hardware and the atmospheric composition aboard the ISS. A dynamic model of ACLS is added to the ISS Simulation and several different operating modes for both ACLS and the existing ISS life support systems are studied and the impacts of ACLS on the rest of the system are determined. The results suggest that the US, Russian and ACLS CO2 systems can operate at the same time without impeding each other. Furthermore, based on the results of this analysis, the US and ACLS Sabatier systems can be operated in parallel as well to a achieve a very low CO2 concentration in the cabin atmosphere.

  8. Assessment of the Impacts of ACLS on the ISS Life Support System using Dynamic Simulations in V-HAB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puetz, Daniel; Olthoff, Claas; Ewert, Michael K.; Anderson, Molly S.

    2016-01-01

    The Advanced Closed Loop System (ACLS) is currently under development by Airbus Defense and Space and is slated for launch to the International Space Station (ISS) in 2017. The addition of new hardware into an already complex system such as the ISS life support system (LSS) always poses operational risks. It is therefore important to understand the impacts ACLS will have on the existing systems to ensure smooth operations for the ISS. This analysis can be done by using dynamic computer simulations and one possible tool for such a simulation is Virtual Habitat (V-HAB). Based on Matlab (Registered Trademark) V-HAB has been under development at the Institute of Astronautics of the Technical University Munich (TUM) since 2006 and in the past has been successfully used to simulate the ISS life support systems. The existing V-HAB ISS simulation model treated the interior volume of the space station as one large ideally-stirred container. This model was improved to allow the calculation of the atmospheric composition inside the individual modules of the ISS by splitting it into ten distinct volumes. The virtual volumes are connected by a simulation of the inter-module ventilation flows. This allows for a combined simulation of the LSS hardware and the atmospheric composition aboard the ISS. A dynamic model of ACLS is added to the ISS simulation and different operating modes for both ACLS and the existing ISS life support systems are studied to determine the impacts of ACLS on the rest of the system. The results suggest that the US, Russian and ACLS CO2 systems can operate at the same time without impeding each other. Furthermore, based on the results of this analysis, the US and ACLS Sabatier systems can be operated in parallel as well to achieve the highest possible CO2 recycling together with a low CO2 concentration.

  9. Quantification of the role of tibial posterior slope in knee joint mechanics and ACL force in simulated gait.

    PubMed

    Marouane, H; Shirazi-Adl, A; Hashemi, J

    2015-07-16

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is a common knee joint injury with higher prevalence in female athletes. In search of contributing mechanisms, clinical imaging studies of ACL-injured individuals versus controls have found greater medial-lateral posterior tibial slope (PTS) in injured population irrespective of the sex and in females compared to males, with stronger evidence on the lateral plateau slope. To quantify these effects, we use a lower extremity musculoskeletal model including a detailed finite element (FE) model of the knee joint to compute the role of changes in medial and/or lateral PTS by ±5° and ±10° on knee joint biomechanics, in general, and ACL force, in particular, throughout the stance phase of gait. The model is driven by reported kinematics/kinetics of gait in asymptomatic subjects. Our predictions showed, at all stance periods, a substantial increase in the anterior tibial translation (ATT) and ACL force as PTS increased with reverse trends as PTS decreased. At mid-stance, for example, ACL force increased from 181 N to 317 N and 460 N as PTS increased by 5° and 10°, respectively, while dropped to 102 N and 0 N as PTS changed by -5° and -10°, respectively. These effects are caused primarily by change in PTS at the tibial plateau that carries a larger portion of joint contact force. Steeper PTS is a major risk factor, especially under activities with large compression, in markedly increasing ACL force and its vulnerability to injury. Rehabilitation and ACL injury prevention programs could benefit from these findings.

  10. Peripheral Stent Placement in Hemodialysis Grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Kariya, Shuji Tanigawa, Noboru; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Komemushi, Atsushi; Shomura, Yuzo; Shiraishi, Tomokuni; Kawanaka, Toshiaki; Sawada, Satoshi

    2009-09-15

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of peripheral stent placement after failed balloon angioplasty in patients with grafts who are on hemodialysis. We examined 30 Wallstents that were placed in 26 patients because balloon angioplasty failed or early restenosis (<3 months) occurred within 3 months. We retrospectively reviewed 267 consecutive balloon angioplasties performed in 71 patients with graft access between August 2000 and March 2007. Stent placements accounted for 30 (11.2%) of the 267 balloon angioplasties. The clinical success rate of stent placement was 93.3% (28 of 30 stent placements). The 3-, 6-, and 12-month primary patency rates were 73.3%, 39.3%, and 17.7%, respectively. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year secondary patency rates were 90.2%, 83.8%, and 83.8%, respectively. Primary patency was significantly prolonged by stent placement after early restenosis compared with previous balloon angioplasty alone (P = 0.0059). Primary patency after stent placement was significantly lower than after successful balloon angioplasty without indications for stent placement (P = 0.0279). Secondary patency rates did not significantly differ between stent placement and balloon angioplasty alone. The mean number of reinterventions required to maintain secondary patency after stent placement was significantly larger than that after balloon angioplasty alone (Mann-Whitney U test, P = 0.0419). We concluded that peripheral stent placement for graft access is effective for salvaging vascular access after failed balloon angioplasty and for prolonging patency in early restenosis after balloon angioplasty. However, reinterventions are required to maintain secondary patency after stent placement. Furthermore, peripheral stent placement for graft access cannot achieve the same primary patency as balloon angioplasty alone.

  11. Effect of ski boot rear stiffness (SBRS) on maximal ACL force during injury prone landing movements in alpine ski racing: A study with a musculoskeletal simulation model.

    PubMed

    Eberle, Robert; Heinrich, Dieter; Kaps, Peter; Oberguggenberger, Michael; Nachbauer, Werner

    2017-06-01

    A common anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury situation in alpine ski racing is landing back-weighted after a jump. Simulated back-weighted landing situations showed higher ACL-injury risk for increasing ski boot rear stiffness (SBRS) without considering muscles. It is well known that muscle forces affect ACL tensile forces during landing. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of different SBRS on the maximal ACL tensile forces during injury prone landings considering muscle forces by a two-dimensional musculoskeletal simulation model. Injury prone situations for ACL-injuries were generated by the musculoskeletal simulation model using measured kinematics of a non-injury situation and the method of Monte Carlo simulation. Subsequently, the SBRS was varied for injury prone landings. The maximal ACL tensile forces and contributing factors to the ACL forces were compared for the different SBRS. In the injury prone landings the maximal ACL tensile forces increased with increasing SBRS. It was found that the higher maximal ACL force was caused by higher forces acting on the tibia by the boot and by higher quadriceps muscle forces both due to the higher SBRS. Practical experience suggested that the reduction of SBRS is not accepted by ski racers due to performance reasons. Thus, preventive measures may concentrate on the reduction of the quadriceps muscle force during impact.

  12. Degeneration in ACL Injured Knees with and without Reconstruction in Relation to Muscle Size and Fat Content—Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Thomas; Nevitt, Michael C.; Nardo, Lorenzo; Gersing, Alexandra S.; Lane, Nancy E.; McCulloch, Charles E.; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Link, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL) injuries represent a major risk factor for early osteoarthritis (OA). Purpose To evaluate the prevalence and 4-year progression of knee OA measured with 3T MR-imaging in individuals with ruptured, reconstructed or normal ACL and to assess the impact of thigh muscle characteristics. Methods A total of 54 knees (23/54 male, 31/54 female) were recruited from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI). At baseline, 15/54 subjects had prevalent ACL ruptures and 15/54 subjects had prevalent ACL reconstruction (24/54 normal ACL). Western Ontario and McMasters Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) scores, Physical Activity Scores of the Elderly (PASE) and thigh muscle characteristics including strength, fat infiltration (Goutallier score) and thigh muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) MR measurements were obtained at baseline. Whole-organ MR-imaging Scores (WORMS) were obtained at baseline and at a 4-year follow-up time-point. Multivariate regression models, adjusting for covariates (age, gender, body mass index), were used for statistical analysis. Results At baseline, subjects with prevalent ACL ruptures had worse WORMS total scores (mean±SEM, 44.1±3.5) than subjects with ACL reconstruction (30.8±4.0; P = 0.015) and worse than subjects with normal ACL (21.3±3.0; P<0.001). Cartilage scores were worse in both femorotibial compartments in ACL injured knees than in knees with normal ACL (P<0.05). Knees with ACL reconstruction showed an increased degeneration of the medial meniscus (P = 0.036), cartilage degeneration at the medial femoral condyle (P = 0.011). In a multivariate regression model, including both ACL groups and total muscle characteristics as influence parameters, high thigh muscle CSA, high muscle/ fat ratio and low Goutallier scores were associated with less degenerative changes at the knee, independent of ACL status. Knees with ACL reconstruction showed an increased progression of cartilage degeneration at the medial tibia

  13. The Stability Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1943-01-01

    Engineers operate the controls of the Stability Tunnel: Plans for a new tunnel to study stability problems began in the late thirties. The Stability Tunnel was authorized in 1939 and began operations in June 1941. The installation was completed in December that year with the completion of a new 10,000 Horsepower Diesel-electric generating plant. It was a single return, closed jet tunnel with a 6-foot square test section. The tunnel was disassembled and shipped to Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in 1958. The tunnel had two separate test sections: one for curved flow, the other for rolling flow. 'The facility...simulates the motion of the aircraft in curved or rolling flight. This is done by actually curving or rolling the airstream as it passes over the model and at the same time providing the proper velocity distribution.' (From AIAA-80-0309) >From Alan Pope, Wind-Tunnel Testing: 'The only tunnel directly designed for dynamic stability work is located at the Langley Field branch of the NACA. Its most vital feature is its ability to subject the models to curving air streams that simulate those actually encountered when an airplane rolls, pitches, or yaws. the rotating airstream for simulating roll is produced by a motor-driven paddle just ahead of the test section. Curved air of properly varying velocity for simulating pitch and yaw is produced by a combination of a curved test section and velocity screens. The proper use of this apparatus makes possible the determination of the stability derivatives.' Published in F.H. Lutze, 'Experimental Determination of Pure Rotary Stability Derivatives using a Curved and Rolling Flow Wind Tunnel,' AIAA-80-0309, AIAA 18th Aerospace Sciences Meeting, Pasadena, CA, January 14-16, 1980; Alan Pope, Wind-Tunnel Testing (New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1947).

  14. Product placement of computer games in cyberspace.

    PubMed

    Yang, Heng-Li; Wang, Cheng-Shu

    2008-08-01

    Computer games are considered an emerging media and are even regarded as an advertising channel. By a three-phase experiment, this study investigated the advertising effectiveness of computer games for different product placement forms, product types, and their combinations. As the statistical results revealed, computer games are appropriate for placement advertising. Additionally, different product types and placement forms produced different advertising effectiveness. Optimum combinations of product types and placement forms existed. An advertisement design model is proposed for use in game design environments. Some suggestions are given for advertisers and game companies respectively.

  15. Adaptable Deployable Entry and Placement Technology (ADEPT)

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Adaptable, Deployable Entry Placement Technology (ADEPT) Project will test and demonstrate a deployable aeroshell concept as a viable thermal protection system for entry, descent, and landing o...

  16. Automated fiber placement: Evolution and current demonstrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Carroll G.; Benson, Vernon M.

    1993-01-01

    The automated fiber placement process has been in development at Hercules since 1980. Fiber placement is being developed specifically for aircraft and other high performance structural applications. Several major milestones have been achieved during process development. These milestones are discussed in this paper. The automated fiber placement process is currently being demonstrated on the NASA ACT program. All demonstration projects to date have focused on fiber placement of transport aircraft fuselage structures. Hercules has worked closely with Boeing and Douglas on these demonstration projects. This paper gives a description of demonstration projects and results achieved.

  17. A comparison of the outcome of CPR according to AHA 2005 ACLS and AHA 2010 ACLS guidelines in cardiac arrest: multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Ocal, Oktay; Ozucelik, Dogac Niyazi; Avci, Akkan; Yazicioglu, Mustafa; Aydin, Yilmaz; Ayvaci, Baris Murat; Dogan, Halil; Aciksari, Kurtulus; Cukurova, Zafer

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether there is a difference in the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and survival with sequel-free recovery rates between the patients who underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) according to 2005 and 2010 guidelines. This study was conducted in the Bakırköy Dr. Sadi Konuk and Kartal Lütfi Kırdar Training and Research Hospital between dates of October 2010 and 28 February 2011 after approval of Ethics Committee. In the first months of the study, CPR was performed according to AHA 2005 ACLS guidelines (Group-1), while CPR was performed according to AHA 2010 ACLS guidelines after November 2010 (Group-2). Patients were assessed for neurological deficit with Cerebral Performance Categories Scale. Mean age was found as 69.01±13.05 (minimum: 21, maximum: 92) in 86 patients included. Of the 33 patients underwent CPR in the Group 1, ROSC was achieved in 51.5%; and 6.1% of these patients were discharged. Of the 53 patients underwent CPR in the Group 2, ROSC was achieved in 37.7%; and 9.4% of these patients were discharged. Although the number of living patients in Group 2 was higher than Group 1, the difference was not found statistically significant (5 versus 2), (P>0.05). But, neurological outcomes were found better with 2010 compared to 2005 guidelines (3/7 versus 0/2 good cerebral performance). It was found that the 2005 CPR guidelines practices in ED were more successful than the 2010 CPR guidelines practices in ROSC, but less successful in the rate of discharge from hospital and neurological sequel-free discharge rate.

  18. Nanowire Tunnel Field Effect Transistors: Prospects and Pitfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvia, Somaia Sarwat

    The tunnel field effect transistor (TFET) has the potential to operate at lower voltages and lower power than the field effect transistor (FET). The TFET can circumvent the fundamental thermal limit of the inverse subthreshold slope (S) by exploiting interband tunneling of non-equilibrium "cold" carriers. The conduction mechanism in the TFET is governed by band-to-band tunneling which limits the drive current. TFETs built with III-V materials like InAs and InSb can produce enough tunneling current because of their small direct bandgap. Our simulation results show that although they require highly degenerate source doping to support the high electric fields in the tunnel region, the devices achieve minimum inverse subthreshold slopes of 30 mV/dec. In subthreshold, these devices experience both regimes of voltage-controlled tunneling and cold-carrier injection. Numerical results based on a discretized 8-band k.p model are compared to analytical WKB theory. For both regular FETs and TFETs, direct channel tunneling dominates the leakage current when the physical gate length is reduced to 5 nm. Therefore, a survey of materials is performed to determine their ability to suppress the direct tunnel current through a 5 nm barrier. The tunneling effective mass gives the best indication of the relative size of the tunnel currents. Si gives the lowest overall tunnel current for both the conduction and valence band and, therefore, it is the optimum choice for suppressing tunnel current at the 5 nm scale. Our numerical simulation shows that the finite number, random placement, and discrete nature of the dopants in the source of an InAs nanowire (NW) TFET affect both the mean value and the variance of the drive current and the inverse subthreshold slope. The discrete doping model gives an average drive current and an inverse subthreshold slope that are less than those predicted from the homogeneous doping model. The doping density required to achieve a target drive current is

  19. Dynamics of Placement...How to Develop a Successful Career Planning & Placement Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shingleton, John D.; Fitzpatrick, Edwin B.

    This document presents college practitioners with a practical guide for establishing, maintaining, expanding, or revitalizing a contemporary career planning and placement center. The introduction to this guide contains a brief history of career planning and placement. Chapter 1, Career Planning and Placement in the Academic Setting, addresses the…

  20. Three-Dimensional Reconstruction Computed Tomography Evaluation of the Tunnel Location and Angle in Anatomic Single-Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Comparison of the Anteromedial Portal and Outside-in Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kang-Il; Lee, Sang Hak; Bae, Chanil; Bae, Sung Hae

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare the geometry and position of the femoral tunnel between the anteromedial portal (AMP) and outside-in (OI) techniques after anatomic single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Materials and Methods We evaluated 82 patients undergoing single-bundle ACL reconstruction with hamstring autografts using either the AMP (n=40) or OI (n=42) technique. The locations of the tunnel apertures were assessed by postoperative 3-dimensional computed tomography imaging. The femoral graft bending angle, femoral tunnel aperture shape, femoral tunnel length, and posterior wall breakage were also measured. Results The mean femoral tunnel position parallel to the Blumensaat line was more caudally positioned in the AMP group than in the OI group (p=0.025) The mean femoral graft angle in the OI group (99.6°±7.1°) was significantly more acute than that of the AMP group (108.9°±10.2°, p<0.001). The mean height/width ratio of the AMP group (1.21±0.20) was significantly more ellipsoidal than that of the OI group (1.07±0.09, p<0.001). Conclusions The mean femoral tunnel position was significantly shallower in the AMP technique than in the OI technique. The OI technique might be more disadvantageous than the AMP technique in terms of the more acute bending angle. PMID:28231643

  1. Efficacy of ACL injury risk screening methods in identifying high-risk landing patterns during a sport-specific task.

    PubMed

    Fox, A S; Bonacci, J; McLean, S G; Saunders, N

    2016-06-12

    Screening methods sensitive to movement strategies that increase anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) loads are likely to be effective in identifying athletes at-risk of ACL injury. Current ACL injury risk screening methods are yet to be evaluated for their ability to identify athletes' who exhibit high-risk lower limb mechanics during sport-specific maneuvers associated with ACL injury occurrences. The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of two ACL injury risk screening methods in identifying high-risk lower limb mechanics during a sport-specific landing task. Thirty-two female athletes were screened using the Landing Error Scoring System (LESS) and Tuck Jump Assessment. Participants' also completed a sport-specific landing task, during which three-dimensional kinematic and kinetic data were collected. One-dimensional statistical parametric mapping was used to examine the relationships between screening method scores, and the three-dimensional hip and knee joint rotation and moment data from the sport-specific landing. Higher LESS scores were associated with reduced knee flexion from 30 to 57 ms after initial contact (P = 0.003) during the sport-specific landing; however, no additional relationships were found. These findings suggest the LESS and Tuck Jump Assessment may have minimal applicability in identifying athletes' who exhibit high-risk landing postures in the sport-specific task examined.

  2. Relationship between jump landing kinematics and peak ACL force during a jump in downhill skiing: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, D; van den Bogert, A J; Nachbauer, W

    2014-06-01

    Recent data highlight that competitive skiers face a high risk of injuries especially during off-balance jump landing maneuvers in downhill skiing. The purpose of the present study was to develop a musculo-skeletal modeling and simulation approach to investigate the cause-and-effect relationship between a perturbed landing position, i.e., joint angles and trunk orientation, and the peak force in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) during jump landing. A two-dimensional musculo-skeletal model was developed and a baseline simulation was obtained reproducing measurement data of a reference landing movement. Based on the baseline simulation, a series of perturbed landing simulations (n = 1000) was generated. Multiple linear regression was performed to determine a relationship between peak ACL force and the perturbed landing posture. Increased backward lean, hip flexion, knee extension, and ankle dorsiflexion as well as an asymmetric position were related to higher peak ACL forces during jump landing. The orientation of the trunk of the skier was identified as the most important predictor accounting for 60% of the variance of the peak ACL force in the simulations. Teaching of tactical decisions and the inclusion of exercise regimens in ACL injury prevention programs to improve trunk control during landing motions in downhill skiing was concluded.

  3. Ultrafast scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Botkin, D.A. |

    1995-09-01

    I have developed an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope (USTM) based on uniting stroboscopic methods of ultrafast optics and scanned probe microscopy to obtain nanometer spatial resolution and sub-picosecond temporal resolution. USTM increases the achievable time resolution of a STM by more than 6 orders of magnitude; this should enable exploration of mesoscopic and nanometer size systems on time scales corresponding to the period or decay of fundamental excitations. USTM consists of a photoconductive switch with subpicosecond response time in series with the tip of a STM. An optical pulse from a modelocked laser activates the switch to create a gate for the tunneling current, while a second laser pulse on the sample initiates a dynamic process which affects the tunneling current. By sending a large sequence of identical pulse pairs and measuring the average tunnel current as a function of the relative time delay between the pulses in each pair, one can map the time evolution of the surface process. USTM was used to measure the broadband response of the STM`s atomic size tunnel barrier in frequencies from tens to hundreds of GHz. The USTM signal amplitude decays linearly with the tunnel junction conductance, so the spatial resolution of the time-resolved signal is comparable to that of a conventional STM. Geometrical capacitance of the junction does not appear to play an important role in the measurement, but a capacitive effect intimately related to tunneling contributes to the measured signals and may limit the ultimate resolution of the USTM.

  4. Genome-wide association screens for Achilles tendon and ACL tears and tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Roos, Thomas R.; Roos, Andrew K.; Kleimeyer, John P.; Ahmed, Marwa A.; Goodlin, Gabrielle T.; Fredericson, Michael; Ioannidis, John P. A.; Avins, Andrew L.; Dragoo, Jason L.

    2017-01-01

    Achilles tendinopathy or rupture and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture are substantial injuries affecting athletes, associated with delayed recovery or inability to return to competition. To identify genetic markers that might be used to predict risk for these injuries, we performed genome-wide association screens for these injuries using data from the Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA) cohort consisting of 102,979 individuals. We did not find any single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with either of these injuries with a p-value that was genome-wide significant (p<5x10-8). We found, however, four and three polymorphisms with p-values that were borderline significant (p<10−6) for Achilles tendon injury and ACL rupture, respectively. We then tested SNPs previously reported to be associated with either Achilles tendon injury or ACL rupture. None showed an association in our cohort with a false discovery rate of less than 5%. We obtained, however, moderate to weak evidence for replication in one case; specifically, rs4919510 in MIR608 had a p-value of 5.1x10-3 for association with Achilles tendon injury, corresponding to a 7% chance of false replication. Finally, we tested 2855 SNPs in 90 candidate genes for musculoskeletal injury, but did not find any that showed a significant association below a false discovery rate of 5%. We provide data containing summary statistics for the entire genome, which will be useful for future genetic studies on these injuries. PMID:28358823

  5. Knee biomechanics during a jump-cut maneuver: Effects of gender & ACL surgery

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Daniel L.; Fadale, Paul D.; Hulstyn, Michael J.; Shalvoy, Robert M.; Machan, Jason T.; Fleming, Braden C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare kinetic and knee kinematic measurements from male and female ACL-intact (ACLINT) and ACL-reconstructed (ACLREC) subjects during a jump-cut maneuver using biplanar videoradiography. Methods Twenty subjects were recruited; 10 ACLINT (5 males, 5 females) and 10 ACLREC (4 males, 6 females; five years post surgery). Each subject performed a jump-cut maneuver by landing on a single leg and performing a 45° side-step cut. Ground reaction force was measured by a force plate and expressed relative to body weight. Six-degree-of-freedom knee kinematics were determined from a biplanar videoradiography system and an optical motion capture system. Results ACLINT female subjects landed with a larger peak vertical GRF (p<0.001) compared to ACLINT male subjects. ACLINT subjects landed with a larger peak vertical GRF (p≤0.036) compared to ACLREC subjects. Regardless of ACL reconstruction status, female subjects underwent less knee flexion angle excursion (p=0.002) and had an increased average rate of anterior tibial translation (0.05±0.01%/millisecond; p=0.037) after contact compared to male subjects. Furthermore, ACLREC subjects had a lower rate of anterior tibial translation compared to ACLINT subjects (0.05±0.01%/millisecond; p=0.035). Finally, no striking differences were observed in other knee motion parameters. Conclusion Women permit a smaller amount of knee flexion angle excursion during a jump-cut maneuver, resulting in a larger peak vertical GRF and increased rate of anterior tibial translation. Notably, ACLREC subjects also perform the jump cut maneuver with lower GRF than ACLINT subjects five years post surgery. This study proposes a causal sequence whereby increased landing stiffness (larger peak vertical GRF combined with less knee flexion angle excursion) leads to an increased rate of anterior tibial translation while performing a jump-cut maneuver. PMID:23190595

  6. Hypoxic culture conditions induce increased metabolic rate and collagen gene expression in ACL-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Tomasz J; Leong, Natalie L; Dar, Ayelet; Wu, Ling; Kabir, Nima; Khan, Adam Z; Eliasberg, Claire D; Pedron, Andrew; Karayan, Ashant; Lee, Siyoung; Di Pauli von Treuheim, Theodor; Jiacheng, Jin; Wu, Ben M; Evseenko, Denis; McAllister, David R; Petrigliano, Frank A

    2016-06-01

    There has been substantial effort directed toward the application of bone marrow and adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in the regeneration of musculoskeletal tissue. Recently, resident tissue-specific stem cells have been described in a variety of mesenchymal structures including ligament, tendon, muscle, cartilage, and bone. In the current study, we systematically characterize three novel anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-derived cell populations with the potential for ligament regeneration: ligament-forming fibroblasts (LFF: CD146(neg) , CD34(neg) CD44(pos) , CD31(neg) , CD45(neg) ), ligament perivascular cells (LPC: CD146(pos) CD34(neg) CD44(pos) , CD31(neg) , CD45(neg) ) and ligament interstitial cells (LIC: CD34(pos) CD146(neg) , CD44(pos) , CD31(neg) , CD45(neg) )-and describe their proliferative and differentiation potential, collagen gene expression and metabolism in both normoxic and hypoxic environments, and their trophic potential in vitro. All three groups of cells (LIC, LPC, and LFF) isolated from adult human ACL exhibited progenitor cell characteristics with regard to proliferation and differentiation potential in vitro. Culture in low oxygen tension enhanced the collagen I and III gene expression in LICs (by 2.8- and 3.3-fold, respectively) and LFFs (by 3- and 3.5-fold, respectively) and increased oxygen consumption rate and extracellular acidification rate in LICs (by 4- and 3.5-fold, respectively), LFFs (by 5.5- and 3-fold, respectively), LPCs (by 10- and 4.5-fold, respectively) as compared to normal oxygen concentration. In summary, this study demonstrates for the first time the presence of three novel progenitor cell populations in the adult ACL that demonstrate robust proliferative and matrix synthetic capacity; these cells may play a role in local ligament regeneration, and consequently represent a potential cell source for ligament engineering applications. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  7. [Anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Miliam, Palle B; Basse, Peter N

    2009-03-30

    Anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome is a rare entrapment neuropathy of the deep peroneal nerve beneath the extensor retinaculum of the ankle. It may be rare because it is underrecognized clinically.We present a case regarding a 29-year-old man, drummer, who for one and a half year experienced clinical symptoms of anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome. A surgical decompression of the anterior tarsal tunnel was performed, and at the check three months later the symptoms where gone. One year after, there were still no symptoms.

  8. Multivariable robust controller design of ACLS using loop-shaping approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Chaoyang; Cui, Haihua; Wang, Qing

    2008-10-01

    In this paper a multivariable robust controller design approach of the ACLS is accomplished by using robust loop-shaping techniques. In order to avoid the inefficient way of choosing the weight functions by trial-and-error method, the structured genetic algorithm (SGA) approach is introduced, which is capable of simultaneously searching the orders and coefficients of the pre- and post-compensator for weight matrices. According to this approach, engineers can achieve an ideal loop-shape which lies in an appropriate region relating to the desired performance specifications. The effectiveness of this approach is illustrated by the longitudinal equations of a carrier-based aircraft's motion design example.

  9. ACL Injury, Return To Play And Reinjury In The Elite, Collegiate Athlete: An Analysis Of A Single, Division I NCAA Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, Ganesh V.; Murphy, Timothy; Creighton, Robert A.; Taft, Timothy N.; Spang, Jeffrey T.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Graft survivorship, reinjury rates, and career length are poorly understood after ACL reconstruction in the elite, NCAA Division-I athlete. The purpose of this study was to examine the outcomes of ACL reconstruction in a Division-I athlete cohort. Methods: Retrospective chart review was performed of all Division-I athletes at a single, public university from 2000 to 2009 until completion of eligibility. Athletes with a Pre-collegiate (PC) and Intra-collegiate (IC) ACL reconstruction were separated into two cohorts. Graft survivorship, reoperation rates, and career length information was collected. Results: 35 athletes were identified with a pre-collegiate (PC) ACL reconstruction; 60 with an intra-collegiate (IC) reconstruction. The PC group had a 17.1% injury rate to the original graft, with a 20.0% rate of contralateral ACL injury. For the IC group, the reinjury rates were 1.9% to the ACL graft, with a 9.2% rate of contralateral ACL injury after an IntraCollegiate ACL reconstruction. The PC group used 78% of their total eligibility (avg 3.11 yrs). Athletes in the IC group used an average of 77% of their remaining NCAA eligibility. 88.3% of the IC group played an additional non-redshirt year after their injury. Reoperation rate for the PC group was 51.4% and 20.3% for the IC group. Conclusion: Reoperation and reinjury rates are high after ACL reconstruction in the Division-I athlete. Pre-collegiate ACL reconstruction is associated with a very high rate of repeat ACL reinjury to the graft or opposite knee (37.1%). The majority of athletes are able to return to play after successful reconstruction.

  10. Exploring Continuous Clinical Placement for Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenna, Lisa G.; Wray, Natalie; McCall, Louise

    2009-01-01

    Clinical placements are integral to health professional preparatory courses. These placements allow for the application of classroom-based learning into real patient care situations. In doing so, they provide opportunities for applying theoretical knowledge into practice contexts, skills development and socialisation into the chosen profession.…

  11. 32 CFR 1656.10 - Job placement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Job placement. 1656.10 Section 1656.10 National....10 Job placement. (a) Selective Service will maintain a job bank for the exclusive purpose of placing ASWs in alternative service jobs. (b) An ASW who has identified his own job in accordance with §...

  12. 32 CFR 1656.10 - Job placement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Job placement. 1656.10 Section 1656.10 National....10 Job placement. (a) Selective Service will maintain a job bank for the exclusive purpose of placing ASWs in alternative service jobs. (b) An ASW who has identified his own job in accordance with §...

  13. 32 CFR 1656.10 - Job placement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Job placement. 1656.10 Section 1656.10 National....10 Job placement. (a) Selective Service will maintain a job bank for the exclusive purpose of placing ASWs in alternative service jobs. (b) An ASW who has identified his own job in accordance with §...

  14. 32 CFR 1656.10 - Job placement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Job placement. 1656.10 Section 1656.10 National....10 Job placement. (a) Selective Service will maintain a job bank for the exclusive purpose of placing ASWs in alternative service jobs. (b) An ASW who has identified his own job in accordance with §...

  15. 32 CFR 1656.10 - Job placement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Job placement. 1656.10 Section 1656.10 National....10 Job placement. (a) Selective Service will maintain a job bank for the exclusive purpose of placing ASWs in alternative service jobs. (b) An ASW who has identified his own job in accordance with §...

  16. Private Placement Debt Financing for Public Entities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holman, Lance S.

    2010-01-01

    Private placement financing is a debt or capital lease obligation arranged between a municipality or a 501(c) (3) not-for-profit organization and a single sophisticated institutional investor. The investor can be a bank, insurance company, finance company, hedge fund, or high-net worth individual. Private placement financing is similar to…

  17. Developing Career Planning and Placement Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolvitz, Marcia, Ed.

    These three conference papers from the Biennial Conference on Postsecondary Education for Persons who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing focus on career planning and placement strategies for students with deafness or hard of hearing. The first paper, "Successful Job Development and Placement Strategies with Deaf and Hard of Hearing College…

  18. Preparing ESP Learners for Workplace Placement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, David

    2009-01-01

    Engineering students in North American universities often participate in cooperative education placements in workplaces as part of the requirements for their degrees and professional certification. Students for whom English is an L2 often experience difficulties in these placements due to the fact that while their academic language ability may be…

  19. Advanced Placement Courses and American Indian Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, George; Slate, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Enrollment in Advanced Placement (AP) courses and performance on Advanced Placement examinations for American Indians in the U.S. for 2007 was analyzed. Scores on AP examinations, overall and then for five AP courses, were compared to the AP examination scores of White students. In every case, American Indians had AP examination scores that were…

  20. Implementation of Job Placement Services Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGillicuddy (Shirley) & Associates, Sierra Madre, CA.

    The Implementation of Job Placement Services Guidelines Project was designed to strengthen placement programs and services for California community college vocational students, and for all students needing part-time employment to realize their educational goals. The project was designed to test the validity and relevance of quality indicators…

  1. New pole placement algorithm - Polynomial matrix approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafai, B.; Keel, L. H.

    1990-01-01

    A simple and direct pole-placement algorithm is introduced for dynamical systems having a block companion matrix A. The algorithm utilizes well-established properties of matrix polynomials. Pole placement is achieved by appropriately assigning coefficient matrices of the corresponding matrix polynomial. This involves only matrix additions and multiplications without requiring matrix inversion. A numerical example is given for the purpose of illustration.

  2. Understanding Successful Sandwich Placements: A Bourdieusian Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Martyn; Zukas, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    Sandwich placements and other integrated work and study schemes are increasingly advocated as a key means by which universities can promote students' employability. However, there is little understanding of how successful placements work in terms of facilitating learning and development. Drawing on three longitudinal case studies of students who…

  3. Math Placement in California's Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Niu; Adan, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Last year, the California Legislature passed a new law--the California Mathematics Placement Act--to address widespread concern over equity in the math placement process. The law is aimed at improving the measurement of student performance in order to move more students successfully through the high school curriculum. In this context, researchers…

  4. Characteristics of Work Placements Valued by Employers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chivers, Barbara; Flatten, Kay

    1996-01-01

    Group Feedback Strategy was used to evaluate data from 73 employers, 18 tutors, 156 students, and 45 graduates involved in work placements in a library and information science program. Respondents showed reasonably high satisfaction for the following characteristics of placements: teamwork experience, assessment of capabilities, training…

  5. Genetic Algorithm Approaches for Actuator Placement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crossley, William A.

    2000-01-01

    This research investigated genetic algorithm approaches for smart actuator placement to provide aircraft maneuverability without requiring hinged flaps or other control surfaces. The effort supported goals of the Multidisciplinary Design Optimization focus efforts in NASA's Aircraft au program. This work helped to properly identify various aspects of the genetic algorithm operators and parameters that allow for placement of discrete control actuators/effectors. An improved problem definition, including better definition of the objective function and constraints, resulted from this research effort. The work conducted for this research used a geometrically simple wing model; however, an increasing number of potential actuator placement locations were incorporated to illustrate the ability of the GA to determine promising actuator placement arrangements. This effort's major result is a useful genetic algorithm-based approach to assist in the discrete actuator/effector placement problem.

  6. Carpal tunnel release

    MedlinePlus

    ... you are taking. This includes medicines, supplements, or herbs you bought without a prescription. You may be ... gov/pubmed/23026458 . Zhao M, Burke DT. Median neuropathy (carpal tunnel syndrome). In: Frontera WR, Silver JK, ...

  7. Endoscopic cubital tunnel release.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Tyson K

    2010-10-01

    A minimally invasive endoscopic approach has been successfully applied to surgical treatment of cubital tunnel syndrome. This procedure allows for smaller incisions with faster recovery time. This article details relevant surgical anatomy, indications, contraindications, surgical technique, complications, and postoperative management.

  8. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khanna, S. K.; Lambe, J.

    1983-01-01

    Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy is a useful technique for the study of vibrational modes of molecules adsorbed on the surface of oxide layers in a metal-insulator-metal tunnel junction. The technique involves studying the effects of adsorbed molecules on the tunneling spectrum of such junctions. The data give useful information about the structure, bonding, and orientation of adsorbed molecules. One of the major advantages of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy is its sensitivity. It is capable of detecting on the order of 10 to the 10th molecules (a fraction of a monolayer) on a 1 sq mm junction. It has been successfully used in studies of catalysis, biology, trace impurity detection, and electronic excitations. Because of its high sensitivity, this technique shows great promise in the area of solid-state electronic chemical sensing.

  9. World's Largest Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    NASA's National Full Scale Aerodynamics Complex, which houses two of the world's largest wind tunnels and has been used for testing experimental aircraft since 1944, is presented. This video highlights the structure and instrumentation of the 40 x 80 foot and 80 x 120 foot wind tunnels and documents their use in testing full scale aircraft, NASA's Space Shuttle and the XV-15 Tiltrotor aircraft.

  10. Electron tunnel sensor technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, T. W.; Waltman, S. B.; Reynolds, J. K.; Kaiser, W. J.

    1991-01-01

    Researchers designed and constructed a novel electron tunnel sensor which takes advantage of the mechanical properties of micro-machined silicon. For the first time, electrostatic forces are used to control the tunnel electrode separation, thereby avoiding the thermal drift and noise problems associated with piezoelectric actuators. The entire structure is composed of micro-machined silicon single crystals, including a folded cantilever spring and a tip. The application of this sensor to the development of a sensitive accelerometer is described.

  11. Full Scale Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Construction of motor fairing for the fan motors of the Full-Scale Tunnel (FST). The motors and their supporting structures were enclosed in aerodynamically smooth fairings to minimize resistance to the air flow. Close examination of this photograph reveals the complicated nature of constructing a wind tunnel. This motor fairing, like almost every other structure in the FST, represents a one-of-a-kind installation.

  12. The Effect of Different Sagittal Angles of the Tibial Guide on Aperture Widening of the Tibial Tunnel during Modified Transtibial Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Randomized In Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Chan; Tawonsawatruk, Tulyapruek; Woon, Hyeong Hwa; Yum, Ji Woong; Shin, Myung Jin; Bravo, Rodolfo S.; Nha, Kyung Wook

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The effect of sagittal plane angle of the tibial tunnel on the severity of tibial intra-articular aperture expansion caused by iatrogenic re-reaming in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using a modified transtibial technique is unknown. The purpose of this study was to compare the severity of intra-articular aperture widening at different angles (40°, 45°, and 50°) of the tibial guide (TG). Materials and Methods Ninety-seven patients who underwent modified transtibial ACL reconstruction were randomly allocated to TG 40°, 45°, and 50° groups. Intra-articular tibial aperture width (TW) and tibial tunnel length (TTL) were measured intraoperatively using an arthroscopic ruler and a depth gauge. Results The TG 50° group had significantly greater tibial aperture widening than the TG 40° group. There was a significant difference among TG 40°, 45°, and 50° groups and the percentage of knees with TTL <35 mm was 8%, 9% and 3%, respectively. There were 2 females with TTL <35 mm in TG 40° and 45° groups each. The average mediolateral length of the tibial plateau was 75 mm. Conclusions This study shows that the TG angle of 40° would reduce the severity of intra-articular aperture widening of the tibial tunnel compared to 45° or 50° in modified transtibial ACL reconstruction. PMID:28231645

  13. Novel tunnelling barriers for spin tunnelling junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Manish

    A tunnel junction consists of two metal electrodes separated by an insulating barrier thin enough for electrons to tunnel across. With ferromagnetic electrodes, a spin-dependent tunnelling (SDT) effect, electrons of one spin tunnelling preferentially over those of the other, is observed. When the electrodes are switched from a parallel to an anti-parallel alignment, the tunnelling current changes and gives rise to tunnelling magnetoresistance (TMR). Since 1995, interest in SDT junctions has increased as TMR in excess of 15% has been achieved, making viable their use in non-volatile memory and magnetic sensors applications. In this work, two key issues of SDT junctions are addressed: spin polarization of the electrode and the tunnel barrier. Spin polarization, a measure of electron states of up and down spins, is widely believed to be an intrinsic property of the electrode. In junctions with barriers formed by plasma oxidation of composite Ta/Al films, the surprising effect of the resistance being lower with the electrodes aligned antiparallel was observed. Junctions with Ta/Al barriers and those with Al/Ta barriers behave opposite to each other and exhibit an inversion only when the Ta side of the barrier is biased positive. This demonstrates the spin polarization is also influenced by the barrier material. Half-metallic materials such as magnetite (Fe3O4) have a gap in one of the spins' states at the fermi level, thus having a theoretical spin polarization of 100%. In this work, an ultrathin Fe3O 4 layer was added between the Al2O3 barrier and the NiFe electrode. The TMR increased sharply from 4% to 16% for thicknesses less than 0.5nm. As the tunnel barrier must be thinner than 2nm, choice of the barrier material becomes critical. Presently, Al2O3 is the best known barrier. In looking for alternative materials, AlN and AlON were formed by plasma nitridation and oxy-nitridation of deposited Al films. TMR results of up to 18% and resistance-area products down to 3

  14. The Beginner's Guide to Wind Tunnels with TunnelSim and TunnelSys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Thomas J.; Galica, Carol A.; Vila, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    The Beginner's Guide to Wind Tunnels is a Web-based, on-line textbook that explains and demonstrates the history, physics, and mathematics involved with wind tunnels and wind tunnel testing. The Web site contains several interactive computer programs to demonstrate scientific principles. TunnelSim is an interactive, educational computer program that demonstrates basic wind tunnel design and operation. TunnelSim is a Java (Sun Microsystems Inc.) applet that solves the continuity and Bernoulli equations to determine the velocity and pressure throughout a tunnel design. TunnelSys is a group of Java applications that mimic wind tunnel testing techniques. Using TunnelSys, a team of students designs, tests, and post-processes the data for a virtual, low speed, and aircraft wing.

  15. Comparison of grafts for anatomical reconstruction of the ACL: patellar versus semitendinosus/gracilis☆

    PubMed Central

    Bitun, Patrícia Barros; Miranda, Carlos Roberto; Escudero, Ricardo Boso; Araf, Marcelo; de Souza, Daphnis Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the functional results from surgical treatment for anatomical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) with a single band, using two types of autologous grafts. Methods Twenty-seven patients who underwent anatomical reconstruction of the ACL by means of the Chambat technique were evaluated prospectively. They were divided into two groups: A, with 14 patients, using grafts from flexor tendons; and B, with 13 patients, using grafts from the patellar tendon. In both groups, fixation was performed using an absorbable interference screw. Results Based on the Lysholm score, group A presented a mean score of 71.6 in the first month, while B presented 75. At the end of the sixth month, both groups presented 96.6. Evaluation of the total IKDC showed that in the first month, the majority of the patients, both in group A (85.7%) and in group B (76.9%), presented a knee assessment that was close to normal. In the sixth month, 92.9% of group A had normal presentations, and 100% of group B. Conclusion According to the Lysholm functional evaluation and the IKDC subjective assessment, there was no statistically significant difference in the results between the groups, and the results were better in the sixth month. PMID:26229896

  16. Development of spin-on carbon hardmasks with comparable etch resistance to Amorphous Carbon Layer (ACL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheon, Hwan-Sung; Yoon, Kyong-Ho; Kim, Min-Soo; Oh, Seung Bae; Song, Jee-Yun; Tokareva, Nataliya; Kim, Jong-Seob; Chang, Tuwon

    2008-11-01

    In recent microlithography of semiconductor fabrication, spin-on hardmask (SOH) process continue to gain popularity as it replaces the traditional SiON/ACL hardmask scheme which suffers from high CoO, low productivity, particle contamination, and layer alignment issues. In the SOH process, organic polymer with high carbon content is spin-cast to form a carbon hardmask film. In the previous papers, we reported the development of organic SOH materials and their application in sub-70 nm lithography. In this paper, we describe the synthesis of organic polymers with very high carbon contents (>92 wt.%) and the evaluation of the spin-coated films for the hardmask application. The high carbon content of the polymer ensures improved etch resistance which amounts to >90% of ACL's resistance. However, as the carbon content of the polymers increases, the solubility in common organic solvents becomes lower. Here we report the strategies to improve the solubility of the high carbon content resins and optimization of the film properties for the SOH application.

  17. Global molecular changes in a tibial compression induced ACL rupture model of post‐traumatic osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jiun C.; Sebastian, Aimy; Murugesh, Deepa K.; Hatsell, Sarah; Economides, Aris N.; Christiansen, Blaine A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Joint injury causes post‐traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA). About ∼50% of patients rupturing their anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) will develop PTOA within 1–2 decades of the injury, yet the mechanisms responsible for the development of PTOA after joint injury are not well understood. In this study, we examined whole joint gene expression by RNA sequencing (RNAseq) at 1 day, 1‐, 6‐, and 12 weeks post injury, in a non‐invasive tibial compression (TC) overload mouse model of PTOA that mimics ACL rupture in humans. We identified 1446 genes differentially regulated between injured and contralateral joints. This includes known regulators of osteoarthritis such as MMP3, FN1, and COMP, and several new genes including Suco, Sorcs2, and Medag. We also identified 18 long noncoding RNAs that are differentially expressed in the injured joints. By comparing our data to gene expression data generated using the surgical destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) PTOA model, we identified several common genes and shared mechanisms. Our study highlights several differences between these two models and suggests that the TC model may be a more rapidly progressing model of PTOA. This study provides the first account of gene expression changes associated with PTOA development and progression in a TC model. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:474–485, 2017. PMID:27088242

  18. The Utility of a High-intensity Exercise Protocol to Prospectively Assess ACL Injury Risk.

    PubMed

    Bossuyt, F M; García-Pinillos, F; Raja Azidin, R M F; Vanrenterghem, J; Robinson, M A

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the utility of a 5-min high-intensity exercise protocol (SAFT(5)) to include in prospective cohort studies investigating ACL injury risk. 15 active females were tested on 2 occasions during which their non-dominant leg was analysed before SAFT(5) (PRE), immediately after (POST0), 15 min after (POST15), and 30 min after (POST30). On the first occasion, testing included 5 maximum isokinetic contractions for eccentric and concentric hamstring and concentric quadriceps and on the second occasion, 3 trials of 2 landing tasks (i. e., single-leg hop and drop vertical jump) were conducted. Results showed a reduced eccentric hamstring peak torque at POST0, POST15 and POST30 (p<0.05) and a reduced functional HQ ratio (Hecc/Qcon) at POST15 and POST30 (p<0.05). Additionally, a more extended knee angle at POST30 (p<0.05) and increased knee internal rotation angle at POST0 and POST15 (p<0.05) were found in a single-leg hop. SAFT(5) altered landing strategies associated with increased ACL injury risk and similar to observations from match simulations. Our findings therefore support the utility of a high-intensity exercise protocol such as SAFT(5) to strengthen injury screening tests and to include in prospective cohort studies where time constraints apply.

  19. Hop tests correlate with IKDC and KOOS at minimum of 2 years after primary ACL reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Reinke, Emily K.; Lorring, Dawn; Jones, Morgan H.; Schmitz, Leah; Flanigan, David C.; An, Angel Qi; Quiram, Amanda R.; Preston, Emily; Martin, Michael; Schroeder, Bettina; Parker, Richard D.; Kaeding, Christopher C.; Borzi, Lynn; Pedroza, Angela; Huston, Laura J.; Harrell, Frank E.; Dunn, Warren R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The hypothesis of this study was that single-legged horizontal hop test ratios would correlate with IKDC, KOOS, and Marx activity level scores in patients 2 years after primary ACL reconstruction. Methods Individual patient-reported outcome tools and hop test ratios on 69 ACL reconstructed patients were compared using correlations and multivariable modeling. Correlations between specific questions on the IKDC and KOOS concerning the ability to jump and hop ratios were also performed. Results The triple-hop ratio was moderately but significantly correlated with the IKDC, KOOS Sports and Recreation subscale, and the KOOS Knee Related Quality of Life subscale, as well as with the specific questions related to jumping. Similar but weaker relationship patterns were found for the single-hop ratio and timed hop. No significant correlations were found for the Marx activity level or crossover-hop ratio. Multivariable modeling showed almost no significant additional contribution to predictability of the IKDC or KOOS subscores by gender, BMI, or the number of faults on either leg. Conclusions The triple-hop test is most significantly correlated with patient-reported outcome scores. Multivariable modeling indicates that less than a quarter of the variability in outcome scores can be explained by hop test results. This indicates that neither test can serve as a direct proxy for the other; however, assessment of patient physical function by either direct report using validated outcome tools or by the hop test will provide relatively comparable data. Level of evidence II. PMID:21445595

  20. Differential expression of fatty acid synthase genes, Acl, Fat and Kas, in Capsicum fruit.

    PubMed

    Aluru, Maneesha R; Mazourek, Michael; Landry, Laurie G; Curry, Jeanne; Jahn, Molly; O'Connell, Mary A

    2003-07-01

    The biosynthesis of capsaicinoids in the placenta of chilli fruit is modelled to require components of the fatty acid synthase (FAS) complex. Three candidate genes for subunits in this complex, Kas, Acl, and Fat, isolated based on differential expression, were characterized. Transcription of these three genes was placental-specific and RNA abundance was positively correlated with degree of pungency. Kas and Acl were mapped to linkage group 1 and Fat to linkage group 6. None of the genes is linked to the pungency locus, C, on linkage group 2. KAS accumulation was positively correlated with pungency. Western blots of placental extracts and histological sections both demonstrated that the accumulation of this enzyme was correlated with fruit pungency and KAS was immunolocalized to the expected cell layer, the placental epidermis. Enzyme activity of the recombinant form of the placental-specific KAS was confirmed using crude cell extracts. These FAS components are fruit-specific members of their respective gene families. These genes are predicted to be associated with Capsicum fruit traits, for example, capsaicinoid biosynthesis or fatty acid biosynthesis necessary for placental development.

  1. Correlation between body mass index and quadrupled hamstring tendon autograft size in ACL reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    ATBAŞI, ZAFER; ERÇIN, ERSIN; ERDEM, YUSUF; EMRE, TULUHAN YUNUS; ATILLA, HALIS ATIL; PARLAK, ADEM

    2016-01-01

    Purpose the aim of this study was to assess the relationship of patient weight, height and body mass index (BMI) with the size of the quadrupled hamstring tendon used in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Methods from patient records, we retrospectively assessed the weight, height, BMI and graft sizes of 126 patients who underwent ACL reconstruction using a quadrupled hamstring tendon autograft between January 2010 and January 2013 at our institution. The data obtained from perioperative measurements were studied using correlation analysis. Results statistically significant relationships were found between patient height and graft diameter (p = 0.033, r = 0.19) and between patient weight and graft diameter (p < 0.0001, r = 0.33). No statistically significant relationships were found between graft diameter and BMI or between graft length and patient height, weight and BMI (p > 0.05). Conclusions patient height and weight were found to be related to quadrupled hamstring graft diameter in our patient population. BMI was not related to the quadrupled hamstring graft size. The exact size of the graft cannot be predicted preoperatively on the basis of these variables. Level of evidence Level IV, retrospective case series. PMID:28217655

  2. Management of Acute Combined ACL-Medial and Posteromedial Instability of the Knee.

    PubMed

    Medvecky, Michael J; Tomaszewski, Paul

    2015-06-01

    Medial collateral ligament (MCL) injuries are the most common ligamentous injury of the knee. The extent of injury can range from a minor first-degree (1-degree) sprain to an extensive third-degree (3-degree) sprain that can propagate across the knee, rupturing one or both cruciate ligaments, and result in a knee subluxation or dislocation. A common pattern involves the combined anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and MCL injury that is the focus of this chapter. The vast majority of these combined medial-sided injuries are treated nonoperatively with delayed reconstruction of the ACL injury in athletically active individuals. The MCL and associated medial structures are carefully assessed on physical examination, and classification of injury is based upon abnormal limits of joint motion. In vitro cadaveric biomechanical testing has given us a better understanding of ligament deficiency and altered joint motion. Consistency in terminology is necessary for proper classification of injury and reproducible categorization of injury patterns to be able to compare both nonoperative and operative treatment of various injury patterns.

  3. Identification of types of landings after blocking in volleyball associated with risk of ACL injury.

    PubMed

    Zahradnik, David; Jandacka, Daniel; Farana, Roman; Uchytil, Jaroslav; Hamill, Joseph

    2017-03-01

    Landing with a low knee flexion angle after volleyball block jumps may be associated with an increased risk of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. The aim of the present study was to identify the types of volleyball landings after blocks where the knee flexion angle is found to be under a critical knee flexion angle value of 30° at the instant of the first peak of the ground reaction force (GRF). Synchronized kinematic and kinetic data were collected for each trial. T-tests were used to determine if each knee flexion angle at the instant of the peak GRF was significantly different from the critical value of 30°. A repeated measures ANOVA was used to compare knee flexion angle, time to first peak and the magnitude of the first peak of the resultant GRF and knee stiffness. Significantly lower knee flexion angles were found in the "go" landing (p = .01, ES = 0.6) and the "reverse" landing (p = .02, ES = 0.6) only. The results for knee flexion angle and GRF parameters indicated a significant difference between a "reverse" and "go" and other types of landings, except the "side stick" landing for GRF. The "reverse" and "go" landings may present a risk for ACL injury due to the single-leg landing of these activities that have an associated mediolateral movement.

  4. Quantitative comparison of the microscopic anatomy of the human ACL femoral and tibial entheses.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Mélanie L; Carey, Grace E; Schlecht, Stephen H; Wojtys, Edward M; Ashton-Miller, James A

    2015-12-01

    The femoral enthesis of the human anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is known to be more susceptible to injury than the tibial enthesis. To determine whether anatomic differences might help explain this difference, we quantified the microscopic appearance of both entheses in 15 unembalmed knee specimens using light microscopy, toluidine blue stain and image analysis. The amount of calcified fibrocartilage and uncalcified fibrocartilage, and the ligament entheseal attachment angle were then compared between the femoral and tibial entheses via linear mixed-effects models. The results showed marked differences in anatomy between the two entheses. The femoral enthesis exhibited a 3.9-fold more acute ligament attachment angle than the tibial enthesis (p<0.001), a 43% greater calcified fibrocartilage tissue area (p<0.001), and a 226% greater uncalcified fibrocartilage depth (p<0.001), with the latter differences being particularly pronounced in the central region. We conclude that the ACL femoral enthesis has more fibrocartilage and a more acute ligament attachment angle than the tibial enthesis, which provides insight into why it is more vulnerable to failure.

  5. Persons with reconstructed ACL exhibit altered knee mechanics during high-speed maneuvers.

    PubMed

    Lee, S-P; Chow, J W; Tillman, M D

    2014-06-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is a sports trauma that causes long-term disability. The function of the knee during dynamic activities can be severely limited even after successful surgical reconstruction. This study examined the effects of approach velocity during side-step cutting on knee joint mechanics in persons with reconstructed ACL (ACLR). 22 participants (11 with unilateral ACLR, 11 matched-controls) participated. Knee joint mechanics were tested in 3 approach conditions: counter-movement, one-step, and running. Dependent variables, including peak knee flexion, extension, valgus, varus, internal rotation, external rotation angles and corresponding peak joint moments, were assessed during the stance phase of cutting. Two 2×3 ("group" by "approach condition") mixed MANOVA tests were used to examine the effects of ACLR and approach velocity on knee mechanics. ACLR participants exhibited higher knee internal rotator moment (0.22 vs. 0.13 Nm/kg, p=0.003). Inter-group comparisons revealed that the ACLR participants exhibited significantly higher abductor and internal rotator moments only in the running condition (1.86 vs. 1.16 Nm/kg, p=0.018; 0.28 vs. 0.17 Nm/kg, p=0.010, respectively). Our findings suggested that patients with ACLR may be at increased risk of re-injury when participating in high-demand physical activities. Task demand should be considered when prescribing progressive therapeutic interventions to ACLR patients.

  6. ACL Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional Info Sugar and Sugar Substitutes Exercise and Fitness Exercise Basics Sports Safety Injury ... Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional Info Sugar and Sugar Substitutes Exercise and Fitness Exercise Basics Sports Safety Injury ...

  7. Nursing students' experience of practice placements.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Kathleen; Paterson, Kirstie; Wallar, Jessica

    2016-11-02

    Clinical practice placements are an essential component of pre-registration nursing programmes. Integration into a new team in an unfamiliar setting, which has its own values, practices, culture and language, can be stressful for nursing students. This article presents and discusses students' reflections on preparing for, entering and leaving practice placements. Ten students who participated in fortnightly group reflective sessions, discussed and analysed their learning experiences while on practice placements in an acute hospital. The challenges the students encountered were deconstructed using a group narrative approach. The students experienced ethical dilemmas around patient dignity, consent and advocacy as well as factors external to the practice setting, such as navigating systems and processes to access information before starting practice placements, managing household duties and academic workloads while working long shifts, and managing fatigue and loneliness. The students devised recommendations for other students to enable them to navigate their practice placements effectively and enhance their learning experience. Raising awareness among academic and practice placement staff of the challenges students encounter before and during their practice placement is essential to assist students to succeed and maximise their learning potential.

  8. Value of anatomic landmarks in carpal tunnel surgery.

    PubMed

    Yavuz, O Y; Uras, I; Tasbas, B; Kaya, M; Ozay, R; Komurcu, M

    2013-07-01

    This study investigated which anatomic landmarks were most useful for correct and safe incision placement in carpal tunnel surgery. Kirschner wires were attached to the hands to mark previously defined landmarks. The bony attachments of the transverse carpal ligament, which were identified previously, were drawn on an anteroposterior digital x-ray of the hand, with the thumb in full abduction. The relationship between anatomic landmarks and these bony attachments were examined. In all hands, either the line along the third web space or the crease between the thenar and the hypothenar regions, or both, were on the ulnar half of the transverse carpal ligament. During incision placement, we recommend selecting the most ulnar choice between the line drawn along the third web space and the crease between the thenar and hypothenar regions in order to be at safe distance from the recurrent motor branch of the median nerve.

  9. Single Electron Tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, Steven T.

    2005-07-25

    Financial support for this project has led to advances in the science of single-electron phenomena. Our group reported the first observation of the so-called ''Coulomb Staircase'', which was produced by tunneling into ultra-small metal particles. This work showed well-defined tunneling voltage steps of width e/C and height e/RC, demonstrating tunneling quantized on the single-electron level. This work was published in a now well-cited Physical Review Letter. Single-electron physics is now a major sub-field of condensed-matter physics, and fundamental work in the area continues to be conducted by tunneling in ultra-small metal particles. In addition, there are now single-electron transistors that add a controlling gate to modulate the charge on ultra-small photolithographically defined capacitive elements. Single-electron transistors are now at the heart of at least one experimental quantum-computer element, and single-electron transistor pumps may soon be used to define fundamental quantities such as the farad (capacitance) and the ampere (current). Novel computer technology based on single-electron quantum dots is also being developed. In related work, our group played the leading role in the explanation of experimental results observed during the initial phases of tunneling experiments with the high-temperature superconductors. When so-called ''multiple-gap'' tunneling was reported, the phenomenon was correctly identified by our group as single-electron tunneling in small grains in the material. The main focus throughout this project has been to explore single electron phenomena both in traditional tunneling formats of the type metal/insulator/particles/insulator/metal and using scanning tunneling microscopy to probe few-particle systems. This has been done under varying conditions of temperature, applied magnetic field, and with different materials systems. These have included metals, semi-metals, and superconductors. Amongst a number of results, we have

  10. Suppression of tunneling rate fluctuations in tunnel field-effect transistors by enhancing tunneling probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Takahiro; Migita, Shinji; Fukuda, Koichi; Asai, Hidehiro; Morita, Yukinori; Mizubayashi, Wataru; Liu, Yongxun; O’uchi, Shin-ichi; Fuketa, Hiroshi; Otsuka, Shintaro; Yasuda, Tetsuji; Masahara, Meishoku; Ota, Hiroyuki; Matsukawa, Takashi

    2017-04-01

    This paper discusses the impact of the tunneling probability on the variability of tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs). Isoelectronic trap (IET) technology, which enhances the tunneling current in TFETs, is used to suppress the variability of the ON current and threshold voltage. The simulation results show that suppressing the tunneling rate fluctuations results in suppression of the variability. In addition, a formula describing the relationship between the tunneling rate fluctuations and the electric field strength is derived based on Kane’s band-to-band tunneling model. This formula indicates that the magnitude of the tunneling rate fluctuations is proportional to the magnitude of the fluctuations in the electric field strength and a higher tunneling probability results in a lower variability. The derived relationship is universally valid for any technologies that exploit enhancement of the tunneling probability, including IET technology, channel material engineering, heterojunctions, strain engineering, etc.

  11. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Gregory R.

    1994-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is a neuropathy resulting from compression of the median nerve as it passes through a narrow tunnel in the wrist on its way to the hand. The lack of precise objective and clinical tests, along with symptoms that are synonymous with other syndromes in the upper extremity, cause carpal tunnel syndrome to appear to be a rare entity in athletics. However, it should not be ruled out as a possible etiology of upper extremity paralysis in the athlete. More typically, carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common peripheral entrapment neuropathy encountered in industry. Treatment may include rest and/or splinting of the involved wrist, ice application, galvanic stimulation, or iontophoresis to reduce inflammation, and then transition to heat modalities and therapeutic exercises for developing flexibility, strength, and endurance. In addition, an ergonomic assessment should be conducted, resulting in modifications to accommodate the carpal tunnel syndrome patient. ImagesFig 3.Fig 4.Fig 5.Fig 6.Fig 7. PMID:16558255

  12. Condensate Mixtures and Tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Timmermans, E.

    1998-09-14

    The experimental study of condensate mixtures is a particularly exciting application of the recently developed atomic-trap Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) technology: such multiple condensates represent the first laboratory systems of distinguishable boson superfluid mixtures. In addition, as the authors point out in this paper, the possibility of inter-condensate tunneling greatly enhances the richness of the condensate mixture physics. Not only does tunneling give rise to the oscillating particle currents between condensates of different chemical potentials, such as those studied extensively in the condensed matter Josephson junction experiments, it also affects the near-equilibrium dynamics and stability of the condensate mixtures. In particular, the stabilizing influence of tunneling with respect to spatial separation (phase separation) could be of considerable practical importance to the atomic trap systems. Furthermore, the creation of mixtures of atomic and molecular condensates could introduce a novel type of tunneling process, involving the conversion of a pair of atomic condensate bosons into a single molecular condensate boson. The static description of condensate mixtures with such type of pair tunneling suggests the possibility of observing dilute condensates with the liquid-like property of a self-determined density.

  13. A Validation Study of a Novel 3-Dimensional MRI Modeling Technique to Identify the Anatomic Insertions of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Catherine; Pi, Yeli; Swami, Vimarsha; Mabee, Myles; Jaremko, Jacob L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anatomic single bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is the current gold standard in ACL reconstructive surgery. However, placement of femoral and tibial tunnels at the anatomic center of the ACL insertion sites can be difficult intraoperatively. We developed a “virtual arthroscopy” program that allows users to identify ACL insertions on preoperative knee magnetic resonance images (MRIs) and generates a 3-dimensional (3D) bone model that matches the arthroscopic view to help guide intraoperative tunnel placement. Purpose: To test the validity of the ACL insertion sites identified using our 3D modeling program and to determine the accuracy of arthroscopic ACL reconstruction guided by our “virtual arthroscopic” model. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Sixteen cadaveric knees were prescanned using routine MRI sequences. A trained, blinded observer then identified the center of the ACL insertions using our program. Eight knees were dissected, and the centers of the ACL footprints were marked with a screw. In the remaining 8 knees, arthroscopic ACL tunnels were drilled into the center of the ACL footprints based on landmarks identified using our virtual arthroscopic model. Postprocedural MRI was performed on all 16 knees. The 3D distance between pre- and postoperative 3D centers of the ACL were calculated by 2 trained, blinded observers and a musculoskeletal radiologist. Results: With 2 outliers removed, the postoperative femoral and tibial tunnel placements in the open specimens differed by 2.5 ± 0.9 mm and 2.9 ± 0.7 mm from preoperative centers identified on MRI. Postoperative femoral and tibial tunnel centers in the arthroscopic specimens differed by 3.2 ± 0.9 mm and 2.9 ± 0.7 mm, respectively. Conclusion: Our results show that MRI-based 3D localization of the ACL and our virtual arthroscopic modeling program is feasible and does not show a statistically significant difference to an open arthrotomy approach

  14. Development of a distributed-parameter mathematical model for simulation of cryogenic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripp, J. S.

    1983-01-01

    A one-dimensional distributed-parameter dynamic model of a cryogenic wind tunnel was developed which accounts for internal and external heat transfer, viscous momentum losses, and slotted-test-section dynamics. Boundary conditions imposed by liquid-nitrogen injection, gas venting, and the tunnel fan were included. A time-dependent numerical solution to the resultant set of partial differential equations was obtained on a CDC CYBER 203 vector-processing digital computer at a usable computational rate. Preliminary computational studies were performed by using parameters of the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel. Studies were performed by using parameters from the National Transonic Facility (NTF). The NTF wind-tunnel model was used in the design of control loops for Mach number, total temperature, and total pressure and for determining interactions between the control loops. It was employed in the application of optimal linear-regulator theory and eigenvalue-placement techniques to develop Mach number control laws.

  15. Nano-ADEPT Aeroloads Wind Tunnel Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Brandon; Yount, Bryan; Kruger, Carl; Brivkalns, Chad; Makino, Alberto; Cassell, Alan; Zarchi, Kerry; McDaniel, Ryan; Ross, James; Wercinski, Paul; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Swanson, Gregory; Gold, Nili

    2016-01-01

    A wind tunnel test of the Adaptable Deployable Entry and Placement Technology (ADEPT) was conducted in April 2015 at the US Army's 7 by10 Foot Wind Tunnel located at NASA Ames Research Center. Key geometric features of the fabric test article were a 0.7 meter deployed base diameter, a 70 degree half-angle forebody cone angle, eight ribs, and a nose-to-base radius ratio of 0.7. The primary objective of this wind tunnel test was to obtain static deflected shape and pressure distributions while varying pretension at dynamic pressures and angles of attack relevant to entry conditions at Earth, Mars, and Venus. Other objectives included obtaining aerodynamic force and moment data and determining the presence and magnitude of any dynamic aeroelastic behavior (buzz/flutter) in the fabric trailing edge. All instrumentation systems worked as planned and a rich data set was obtained. This paper describes the test articles, instrumentation systems, data products, and test results. Four notable conclusions are drawn. First, test data support adopting a pre-tension lower bound of 10 foot pounds per inch for Nano-ADEPT mission applications in order to minimize the impact of static deflection. Second, test results indicate that the fabric conditioning process needs to be reevaluated. Third, no flutter/buzz of the fabric was observed for any test condition and should also not occur at hypersonic speeds. Fourth, translating one of the gores caused ADEPT to generate lift without the need for a center of gravity offset. At hypersonic speeds, the lift generated by actuating ADEPT gores could be used for vehicle control.

  16. An intelligent recovery progress evaluation system for ACL reconstructed subjects using integrated 3-D kinematics and EMG features.

    PubMed

    Malik, Owais A; Senanayake, S M N Arosha; Zaheer, Dansih

    2015-03-01

    An intelligent recovery evaluation system is presented for objective assessment and performance monitoring of anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed (ACL-R) subjects. The system acquires 3-D kinematics of tibiofemoral joint and electromyography (EMG) data from surrounding muscles during various ambulatory and balance testing activities through wireless body-mounted inertial and EMG sensors, respectively. An integrated feature set is generated based on different features extracted from data collected for each activity. The fuzzy clustering and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference techniques are applied to these integrated feature sets in order to provide different recovery progress assessment indicators (e.g., current stage of recovery, percentage of recovery progress as compared to healthy group, etc.) for ACL-R subjects. The system was trained and tested on data collected from a group of healthy and ACL-R subjects. For recovery stage identification, the average testing accuracy of the system was found above 95% (95-99%) for ambulatory activities and above 80% (80-84%) for balance testing activities. The overall recovery evaluation performed by the proposed system was found consistent with the assessment made by the physiotherapists using standard subjective/objective scores. The validated system can potentially be used as a decision supporting tool by physiatrists, physiotherapists, and clinicians for quantitative rehabilitation analysis of ACL-R subjects in conjunction with the existing recovery monitoring systems.

  17. Handheld E-Book Readers and Scholarship Report and Reader Survey: ACLS Humanities E-Book. White Paper No. 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gielen, Nina

    2010-01-01

    This report describes a conversion experiment and subsequent reader survey conducted by the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) Humanities E-Book (HEB) in late 2009 and early 2010 to assess the viability of using scholarly monographs with handheld e-readers. As sample content, HEB selected six titles from its own online collection, three…

  18. A Life of Learning: Nancy Siraisi. Charles Homer Haskins Prize Lecture for 2010. ACLS Occasional Paper, No. 67

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Council of Learned Societies, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Nancy Siraisi has been a prolific and leading scholar in the history of medicine and science of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. This lecture of hers is the twenty-eighth of series of lectures named for Charles Homer Haskins, first chairman of the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) and himself a famed medievalist who brought…

  19. Combined lipid emulsion and ACLS resuscitation following bupivacaine- and hypoxia-induced cardiovascular collapse in unanesthetized swine.

    PubMed

    Bushey, Brent A; Auld, Victor H; Volk, John E; Vacchiano, Charles A

    2011-04-01

    This study examined whether combining lipid emulsion and advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) improves survival in an unanesthetized swine model of bupivacaine- and hypoxia-induced cardiovascular collapse. Arterial and venous catheters and a tracheostomy were surgically placed in 26 swine receiving inhalation anesthesia. After a 1-hour recovery period, bupivacaine (5 mg/kg) was administered intravenously over 15 seconds. Following 1 minute of observation and 3 minutes of mechanical airway obstruction, during which all animals exhibited complete cardiovascular collapse, ACLS was initiated. Animals were randomized to receive either intravenous saline or 20% lipid emulsion commencing with the initiation ofACLS. Survival was defined as a return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) with unsupported blood pressure greater than 60 mm Hg for 10 minutes after 25 minutes of resuscitation effort. Data collection included electrocardiogram, arterial blood pressure, and arterial and mixed venous oxygen saturations. There was no significant difference in survival between the saline group (4/12, 33%) and lipid emulsion group (6/12, 50%; P > .05). Additionally, there was no significant difference between groups of surviving animals in the time to ROSC (P > .05). The combination of lipid emulsion and ACLS did not improve survival from bupivacaine- and hypoxia-induced cardiovascular collapse in unanesthetized swine.

  20. Frontal plane comparison between drop jump and vertical jump: implications for the assessment of ACL risk of injury.

    PubMed

    Cesar, Guilherme M; Tomasevicz, Curtis L; Burnfield, Judith M

    2016-11-01

    The potential to use the vertical jump (VJ) to assess both athletic performance and risk of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury could have widespread clinical implications since VJ is broadly used in high school, university, and professional sport settings. Although drop jump (DJ) and VJ observationally exhibit similar lower extremity mechanics, the extent to which VJ can also be used as screening tool for ACL injury risk has not been assessed. This study evaluated whether individuals exhibit similar knee joint frontal plane kinematic and kinetic patterns when performing VJs compared with DJs. Twenty-eight female collegiate athletes performed DJs and VJs. Paired t-tests indicated that peak knee valgus angles did not differ significantly between tasks (p = 0.419); however, peak knee internal adductor moments were significantly larger during the DJ vs. VJ (p < 0.001). Pearson correlations between the DJ and VJ revealed strong correlations for knee valgus angles (r = 0.93, p < 0.001) and for internal knee adductor moments (r = 0.82, p < 0.001). Our results provide grounds for investigating whether frontal plane knee mechanics during VJ can predict ACL injuries and thus can be used as an effective tool for the assessment of risk of ACL injury in female athletes.

  1. Educational Placement of Children with Spina Bifida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauder, Calvin E.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Procedures of school placement for 38 children (ages 5 to 18 years) with spina bifida in 23 school districts in western New York State were studied 5 years after a mandated process was enacted. (Author)

  2. Femtosecond scanning tunneling microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, A.J.; Donati, G.P.; Rodriguez, G.; Gosnell, T.R.; Trugman, S.A.; Some, D.I.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). By combining scanning tunneling microscopy with ultrafast optical techniques we have developed a novel tool to probe phenomena on atomic time and length scales. We have built and characterized an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope in terms of temporal resolution, sensitivity and dynamic range. Using a novel photoconductive low-temperature-grown GaAs tip, we have achieved a temporal resolution of 1.5 picoseconds and a spatial resolution of 10 nanometers. This scanning tunneling microscope has both cryogenic and ultra-high vacuum capabilities, enabling the study of a wide range of important scientific problems.

  3. Uncooled tunneling infrared sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Thomas W. (Inventor); Kaiser, William J. (Inventor); Podosek, Judith A. (Inventor); Vote, Erika C. (Inventor); Muller, Richard E. (Inventor); Maker, Paul D. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An uncooled infrared tunneling sensor in which the only moving part is a diaphragm which is deflected into contact with a micromachined silicon tip electrode prepared by a novel lithographic process. Similarly prepared deflection electrodes employ electrostatic force to control the deflection of a silicon nitride, flat diaphragm membrane. The diaphragm exhibits a high resonant frequency which reduces the sensor's sensitivity to vibration. A high bandwidth feedback circuit controls the tunneling current by adjusting the deflection voltage to maintain a constant deflection of the membrane. The resulting infrared sensor can be miniaturized to pixel dimensions smaller than 100 .mu.m. An alternative embodiment is implemented using a corrugated membrane to permit large deflection without complicated clamping and high deflection voltages. The alternative embodiment also employs a pinhole aperture in a membrane to accommodate environmental temperature variation and a sealed chamber to eliminate environmental contamination of the tunneling electrodes and undesireable accoustic coupling to the sensor.

  4. View down tank tunnel (tunnel no. 2) showing pipes and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View down tank tunnel (tunnel no. 2) showing pipes and walkway of metal grating, side tunnel to tank 3 is on the left - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Diesel Purification Plant, North Road near Pierce Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  5. PEG feeding tube placement and aftercare.

    PubMed

    Haywood, Sharlene

    Some adults and children are unable to swallow or eat and drink enough. Insertion of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube may enable long-term feeding, fluid and/or medication administration. The procedure involves gastroscopy under sedation to identify tube placement site, place the tube and check it has been placed correctly. Serious complications include peritonitis and perforation of the colon. Frequent observations immediately after placement are essential. With good nursing care, complications can be avoided or dealt with promptly.

  6. Aorto-ventricular tunnel

    PubMed Central

    McKay, Roxane

    2007-01-01

    Aorto-ventricular tunnel is a congenital, extracardiac channel which connects the ascending aorta above the sinutubular junction to the cavity of the left, or (less commonly) right ventricle. The exact incidence is unknown, estimates ranging from 0.5% of fetal cardiac malformations to less than 0.1% of congenitally malformed hearts in clinico-pathological series. Approximately 130 cases have been reported in the literature, about twice as many cases in males as in females. Associated defects, usually involving the proximal coronary arteries, or the aortic or pulmonary valves, are present in nearly half the cases. Occasional patients present with an asymptomatic heart murmur and cardiac enlargement, but most suffer heart failure in the first year of life. The etiology of aorto-ventricular tunnel is uncertain. It appears to result from a combination of maldevelopment of the cushions which give rise to the pulmonary and aortic roots, and abnormal separation of these structures. Echocardiography is the diagnostic investigation of choice. Antenatal diagnosis by fetal echocardiography is reliable after 18 weeks gestation. Aorto-ventricular tunnel must be distinguished from other lesions which cause rapid run-off of blood from the aorta and produce cardiac failure. Optimal management of symptomatic aorto-ventricular tunnel consists of diagnosis by echocardiography, complimented with cardiac catheterization as needed to elucidate coronary arterial origins or associated defects, and prompt surgical repair. Observation of the exceedingly rare, asymptomatic patient with a small tunnel may be justified by occasional spontaneous closure. All patients require life-long follow-up for recurrence of the tunnel, aortic valve incompetence, left ventricular function, and aneurysmal enlargement of the ascending aorta. PMID:17922908

  7. Aorto-ventricular tunnel.

    PubMed

    McKay, Roxane

    2007-10-08

    Aorto-ventricular tunnel is a congenital, extracardiac channel which connects the ascending aorta above the sinutubular junction to the cavity of the left, or (less commonly) right ventricle. The exact incidence is unknown, estimates ranging from 0.5% of fetal cardiac malformations to less than 0.1% of congenitally malformed hearts in clinico-pathological series. Approximately 130 cases have been reported in the literature, about twice as many cases in males as in females. Associated defects, usually involving the proximal coronary arteries, or the aortic or pulmonary valves, are present in nearly half the cases. Occasional patients present with an asymptomatic heart murmur and cardiac enlargement, but most suffer heart failure in the first year of life. The etiology of aorto-ventricular tunnel is uncertain. It appears to result from a combination of maldevelopment of the cushions which give rise to the pulmonary and aortic roots, and abnormal separation of these structures. Echocardiography is the diagnostic investigation of choice. Antenatal diagnosis by fetal echocardiography is reliable after 18 weeks gestation. Aorto-ventricular tunnel must be distinguished from other lesions which cause rapid run-off of blood from the aorta and produce cardiac failure. Optimal management of symptomatic aorto-ventricular tunnel consists of diagnosis by echocardiography, complimented with cardiac catheterization as needed to elucidate coronary arterial origins or associated defects, and prompt surgical repair. Observation of the exceedingly rare, asymptomatic patient with a small tunnel may be justified by occasional spontaneous closure. All patients require life-long follow-up for recurrence of the tunnel, aortic valve incompetence, left ventricular function, and aneurysmal enlargement of the ascending aorta.

  8. Future tunnelling projects in Iceland

    SciTech Connect

    Jonsson, B. )

    1992-04-01

    More than 300 km of hydro tunnels and 80-90 km of road tunnels could be excavated in Iceland before the year 2050. In order to complete this task, an average of 6-7 km of tunnel per year would have to be driven. This volume of tunnelling is estimated to cost more than $US1 billion, which could be divided as follows: (a) about 100 km of 3.5-m-wide diversion hydro tunnels (unsupported), for a total of $90 million; (b) approx. 100 km of 5-m-wide hydro tunnels (supported), for a total of $210 million; (c) about 100 km of 7.6-m-wide hydro tunnels (supported), for a total of $380 million; and (d) approx. 85 km of road tunnels with 25 m[sup 2] cross-section, for a total of $435 million. 5 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading Taking Care of Your Ears Taking ... an X-ray Carpal Tunnel Syndrome KidsHealth > For Kids > Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Print A A A What's ...

  10. High-speed Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackeret, J

    1936-01-01

    Wind tunnel construction and design is discussed especially in relation to subsonic and supersonic speeds. Reynolds Numbers and the theory of compressible flows are also taken into consideration in designing new tunnels.

  11. Instrumentation in wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takashima, K.

    1986-01-01

    Requirements in designing instrumentation systems and measurements of various physical quantities in wind tunnels are surveyed. Emphasis is given to sensors used for measuring pressure, temperature, and angle, and the measurements of air turbulence and boundary layers. Instrumentation in wind tunnels require accuracy, fast response, diversity and operational simplicity. Measurements of force, pressure, attitude angle, free flow, pressure distribution, and temperature are illustrated by a table, and a block diagram. The LDV (laser Doppler velocimeter) method for measuring air turbulence and flow velocity and measurement of skin friction and flow fields using laser holograms are discussed. The future potential of these techniques is studied.

  12. Tunneling in axion monodromy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Jon; Cottrell, William; Shiu, Gary; Soler, Pablo

    2016-10-01

    The Coleman formula for vacuum decay and bubble nucleation has been used to estimate the tunneling rate in models of axion monodromy in recent literature. However, several of Coleman's original assumptions do not hold for such models. Here we derive a new estimate with this in mind using a similar Euclidean procedure. We find that there are significant regions of parameter space for which the tunneling rate in axion monodromy is not well approximated by the Coleman formula. However, there is also a regime relevant to large field inflation in which both estimates parametrically agree. We also briefly comment on the applications of our results to the relaxion scenario.

  13. 41 CFR 60-2.16 - Placement goals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... good faith effort to make all aspects of the entire affirmative action program work. Placement goals... placement goal for a particular job group, the contractor must establish a percentage annual placement goal... job group. (d) The placement goal-setting process described above contemplates that contractors...

  14. Loss of neuromuscular control related to motion in the acutely ACL-injured knee: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Bonsfills, N; Gómez-Barrena, E; Raygoza, J J; Núñez, A

    2008-10-01

    Ligamentomuscular and muscular stretch reflexes are known to contribute to knee joint stability. After anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, a more intense and adjusted muscular response is required to maintain joint stability, but this neuromuscular control of the knee has not been clearly proved. The aim of the study is to record electromyography (EMG) signal and muscular fibre length variations in quadriceps and hamstrings of the knee with and without ACL, and to analyze and integrate the ligament strain and the muscular reaction to forced anterior tibial translation (ATT). In 17 knees from 12 cats, EMG electrodes and ultrasonomicrometry crystals were inserted into four main periarticular muscles, with strain gauges on periarticular ligament insertions. Their output signal was compared before and after ACL surgical section in series of ATT (at 90 degrees and 30 degrees knee flexion), and also during knee flexion and extension. Linear regression analysis was performed between the EMG signal and muscular fibre length variations, and between the EMG signal and the strain on ligament insertions, in the search of this reflex neuromuscular response. In the ACL deficient knees, the studied muscles showed a poor adjustment to motion of EMG firing, inversely to controls. The muscle stretch reflexes showed poorer correlation with post-peak EMG activity than the ligaments. ATT control depended mainly on hamstrings activity in control knees, whereas in unstable knees, quadriceps activity was associated with more tibial translation. Acute ACL-deficient knees showed poor neuromuscular control with weak ligamentomuscular reflexes and no muscular stretch reflexes, suggesting the ineffectiveness of acute muscular reaction to provide early mechanical knee stabilization after injury.

  15. Lower limb asymmetry in mechanical muscle function: A comparison between ski racers with and without ACL reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Jordan, M J; Aagaard, P; Herzog, W

    2015-06-01

    Due to a high incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) re-injury in alpine ski racers, this study aims to assess functional asymmetry in the countermovement jump (CMJ), squat jump (SJ), and leg muscle mass in elite ski racers with and without anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R). Elite alpine skiers with ACL-R (n = 9; 26.2 ± 11.8 months post-op) and uninjured skiers (n = 9) participated in neuromuscular screening. Vertical ground reaction force during the CMJ and SJ was assessed using dual force plate methodology to obtain phase-specific bilateral asymmetry indices (AIs) for kinetic impulse (CMJ and SJ phase-specific kinetic impulse AI). Dual x-ray absorptiometry scanning was used to assess asymmetry in lower body muscle mass. Compared with controls, ACL-R skiers had increased AI in muscle mass (P < 0.001), kinetic impulse AI in the CMJ concentric phase (P < 0.05), and the final phase of the SJ (P < 0.05). Positive associations were observed between muscle mass and AI in the CMJ concentric phase (r = 0.57, P < 0.01) as well as in the late SJ phase (r = 0.66, P < 0.01). Future research is required to assess the role of the CMJ and SJ phase-specific kinetic impulse AI as a part of a multifaceted approach for improving outcome following ACL-R in elite ski racers.

  16. Attraction of the cutaneous leishmaniasis vector Nyssomyia neivai (Diptera: Psychodidae) to host odour components in a wind tunnel

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Laboratory studies of host-seeking olfactory behaviour in sandflies have largely been restricted to the American visceral leishmaniasis vector Lutzomyia longipalpis. In comparison, almost nothing is known about the chemical ecology of related species, which transmit American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL), due in part to difficulties in raising these insects in the laboratory. Understanding how ACL vectors locate their hosts will be essential to developing new vector control strategies to combat this debilitating disease. Methods This study examined host-odour seeking behaviour of the ACL vector Nyssomyia neivai (Pinto) (=Lutzomyia neivai) using a wind tunnel olfactometer. The primary aim was to determine whether field-collected female N. neivai would respond to host odours in the laboratory, thereby eliminating the need to maintain colonies of these insects for behavioural experiments. Responses to two key host odour components, 1-octen-3-ol and lactic acid, and a commercially-available mosquito lure (BG-Lure™) were assessed and compared relative to an air control. We also tested whether trials could be conducted outside of the normal evening activity period of N. neivai without impacting on fly behaviour, and whether the same flies could be used to assess baseline responses to air without affecting responses to octenol, thereby reducing the number of flies required for experiments. Results Octenol was found to both activate host-seeking behaviour and attract female N. neivai in the wind tunnel, while lactic acid elicited weaker responses of activation and attractiveness under identical conditions. The BG-Lure did not activate or attract N. neivai under test conditions. Further experiments showed that sandfly behaviour in the wind tunnel was not affected by time of day, such that experiments need not be restricted to nocturnal hours. Moreover, using the same flies to measure both baseline responses to air and attraction to test compounds did not affect

  17. Effect of ACL graft material on joint forces during a simulated in vivo motion in the porcine knee: examining force during the initial cycles.

    PubMed

    Boguszewski, Daniel V; Wagner, Christopher T; Butler, David L; Shearn, Jason T

    2014-11-01

    This study compared three-dimensional forces in knees containing anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft materials versus the native porcine ACL. A six-degree-of-freedom (DOF) robot simulated gait while recording the joint forces and moments. Knees were subjected to 10 cycles of simulated gait in intact, ACL-deficient, and ACL-reconstructed knee states to examine time zero biomechanical performance. Reconstruction was performed using bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft (BPTB), reconstructive porcine tissue matrix (RTM), and an RTM-polymer hybrid (Hybrid). Forces and moments were examined about anatomic DOFs throughout the gait cycle and at three key points during gait: heel strike (HS), mid stance (MS), toe off (TO). Compared to native ACL, each graft restored antero-posterior (A-P) forces throughout gait. However, all failed to mimic normal joint forces in other DOFs. For example, each reconstructed knee showed greater compressive forces at HS and TO compared to the native ACL knee. Overall, the Hybrid graft restored more of the native ACL forces following reconstruction than did BPTB, while RTM grafts were the least successful. If early onset osteoarthritis is in part caused by altered knee kinematics, then understanding how reconstruction materials restore critical force generation during gait is an essential step in improving a patient's long-term prognosis.

  18. Combination of Eccentric Exercise and Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation to Improve Quadriceps Function Post-ACL Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lepley, Lindsey K.; Wojtys, Edward M.; Palmieri-Smith, Riann M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) has been shown to reduce quadriceps activation failure (QAF), and eccentric exercise has been shown lessen muscle atrophy post-ACL reconstruction. Given that these are two critical components of quadriceps strength, intervention combining these therapies may be effective at reinstituting quadriceps function post-anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness of a combined NMES and eccentric exercise intervention to improve the recovery of quadriceps activation and strength post-reconstruction. Design Parallel longitudinal design. Setting Laboratory. Participants Thirty-six individuals post-injury were placed into four treatment groups (N&E, NMES and eccentrics; E-only, eccentrics only; N-only, NMES-only; STND, standard of care) and ten healthy controls participated. Intervention N&E and N-only received the NMES protocol 2x per week for the first six weeks post-reconstruction. N&E and E-only received the eccentric exercise protocol 2x per week beginning six weeks post-reconstruction. Main outcome measure Quadriceps activation was assessed via the superimposed burst technique and quantified via the central activation ratio. Quadriceps strength was assessed via maximal voluntary isomeric contractions (Nm/kg). Data was gathered on three occasions: pre-operative, 12-weeks-post-surgery and at return-to-play. Results No differences in pre-operative measures existed (P>0.05). E-only recovered quadriceps activation better than N-only or STND (P<0.05). N&E and E-only recovered strength better than N-only or the STND (P<0.05) and had strength values that were similar to healthy individuals at return-to-play (P>0.05). Conclusion Eccentric exercise was capable of restoring levels of quadriceps activation and strength that were similar to those of healthy adults and better than NMES alone. PMID:25819154

  19. Sex-specific gait adaptations prior to and up to six months after ACL reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Stasi, Stephanie L. Di; Hartigan, Erin H.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN Controlled longitudinal laboratory study. OBJECTIVES Compare sagittal plane gait mechanics of men and women before and up to 6 months after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). BACKGROUND Aberrant gait patterns are ubiquitous after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture and persist after ACLR despite skilled physical therapy. Sex influences post-operative function and second ACL injury risk, but its influence on gait adaptations after injury have not been investigated. METHODS Sagittal plane knee and hip joint excursions during midstance and internal knee and hip extension moments at peak knee flexion were collected on 12 women and 27 men using 3-dimensional gait analysis before (Screen) and after pre-operative physical therapy (Pre-sx), and 6 months after ACLR (6mo). Repeated measures analysis of variance models were used to determine whether limb asymmetries changed differently over time in men and women. RESULTS Significant time x limb x sex interactions were identified for hip and knee excursions and internal knee extension moments (P≤.007). Both sexes demonstrated smaller knee excursions on the involved compared to the uninvolved knee at each time point (P≤.007), but only women demonstrated a decrease in the involved knee excursion from pre-sx to 6mo (P=.03). Women also demonstrated smaller hip excursions (P<.001) and internal knee extension moments (P=.005) on the involved limb compared to the uninvolved limb at 6mo. Men demonstrated smaller hip excursions and knee moments on the involved limb compared to the uninvolved limb (main effects, P<.001). CONCLUSION The persistence of limb asymmetries in men and women 6 months after ACLR indicates that current rehabilitation efforts are inadequate for some individuals following ACLR. PMID:25627155

  20. Biomechanical Deficit Profiles Associated with ACL Injury Risk in Female Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Pappas, Evangelos; Shiyko, Mariya P.; Ford, Kevin R.; Myer, Gregory D.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To quantify the prevalence of biomechanical deficit patterns associated with ACL injury risk and their inter-connections in a large cohort of female athletes during an unanticipated cutting task. Methods High school female athletes (N=721) performed an unanticipated cutting task in the biomechanics laboratory. Trunk and lower extremity 3D kinetics and kinematics were measured and entered into a latent profile analysis model. Results Approximately 40% of female athletes demonstrated no biomechanical deficits and were categorized into the low risk group. The second most prevalent profile (24%) demonstrated a combination of high quadriceps and leg dominance deficits and was labeled as quadriceps-leg. The third most prevalent profile (22%) demonstrated a combination of trunk and leg dominance deficits and to lesser extent ligament dominance deficits, and was labeled as trunk-leg-ligament. Finally, the fourth profile (14%) demonstrated very high ligament dominance deficits only and it was labeled as ligament dominance profile. Conclusions This is the first study to identify the most common biomechanical profiles associated with ACL injury during a cutting task in a large cohort of female athletes. Approximately 60% of female athletes belong to one of the high-risk profiles. With the exception of the ligament dominance profile, the current analysis indicates that risk profiles consist of a combination of biomechanical deficits. The findings provide important insight into the prevalence of biomechanical deficits and future directions for the development of injury prevention programs. The findings can be used to guide the development of quick and easy tests that accurately categorize athletes into one of the profiles and subsequently prescribe tailored injury prevention programs that will be more effective and efficient than the current generic ones. PMID:26258858

  1. Scanning tunneling microscope nanoetching method

    DOEpatents

    Li, Yun-Zhong; Reifenberger, Ronald G.; Andres, Ronald P.

    1990-01-01

    A method is described for forming uniform nanometer sized depressions on the surface of a conducting substrate. A tunneling tip is used to apply tunneling current density sufficient to vaporize a localized area of the substrate surface. The resulting depressions or craters in the substrate surface can be formed in information encoding patterns readable with a scanning tunneling microscope.

  2. Joint loads resulting in ACL rupture: Effects of age, sex, and body mass on injury load and mode of failure in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Blaker, Carina L; Little, Christopher B; Clarke, Elizabeth C

    2016-09-07

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears are a common knee injury with a known but poorly understood association with secondary joint injuries and post-traumatic osteoarthritis (OA). Female sex and age are known risk factors for ACL injury but these variables are rarely explored in mouse models of injury. This study aimed to further characterize a non-surgical ACL injury model to determine its clinical relevance across a wider range of mouse specifications. Cadaveric and anesthetized C57BL/6 mice (9-52 weeks of age) underwent joint loading to investigate the effects of age, sex, and body mass on ACL injury mechanisms. The ACL injury load (whole joint load required to rupture the ACL) was measured from force-displacement data, and mode of failure was assessed using micro-dissection and histology. ACL injury load was found to increase with body mass and age (p < 0.001) but age was not significant when controlling for mass. Sex had no effect. In contrast, the mode of ACL failure varied with both age and sex groups. Avulsion fractures (complete or mixed with mid-substance tears) were common in all age groups but the proportion of mixed and mid-substance failures increased with age. Females were more likely than males to have a major avulsion relative to a mid-substance tear (p < 0.01). This data compliments studies in human cadaveric knees, and provides a basis for determining the severity of joint injury relative to a major ACL tear in mice, and for selecting joint loading conditions in future experiments using this model. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res.

  3. Root Causes of Field Emitters in SRF Cavities Placed in CEBAF Tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Rongli

    2016-05-01

    It has been suspected that appearance of new field emitters can occur in SRF cavities after their placement in accelerator tunnel for long term beam operation. This apparently has been the case for CEBAF. However, no physical evidence has been shown in the past. In this contribution, we will report on the recent results concerning the root cause of field emitters in SRF cavities placed in CEBAF tunnel. We will discuss these results in the context of high-reliability and low-cryogenic-loss operation of CEBAF.

  4. Carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Carpal tunnel syndrome is a collection of clinical symptoms and signs caused by compression of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel. However, the severity of symptoms and signs does not often correlate well with the extent of nerve compression. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of drug treatments, non-drug treatments, and surgical treatments for carpal tunnel syndrome? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to October 2013 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 33 studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: carpal tunnel release surgery (open and endoscopic), diuretics, local corticosteroids injection, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), therapeutic ultrasound, and wrist splints.

  5. Carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Carpal tunnel syndrome is a neuropathy caused by compression of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel. However, the severity of symptoms and signs does not often correlate well with the extent of nerve damage. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of drug treatments, non-drug treatments, surgical treatments, and postoperative treatments for carpal tunnel syndrome? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to March 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 53 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, carpal tunnel release surgery (open and endoscopic), diuretics, internal neurolysis, local and systemic corticosteroids, massage therapy, nerve and tendon gliding exercises, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), pyridoxine, therapeutic ultrasound, and wrist splints. PMID:21718565

  6. Wind Tunnel Balances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Edward P; Norton, F H

    1920-01-01

    Report embodies a description of the balance designed and constructed for the use of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics at Langley Field, and also deals with the theory of sensitivity of balances and with the errors to which wind tunnel balances of various types are subject.

  7. Tunneling path toward spintronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Guo-Xing; Münzenberg, Markus; Moodera, Jagadeesh S.

    2011-03-01

    The phenomenon of quantum tunneling, which was discovered almost a century ago, has led to many subsequent discoveries. One such discovery, spin polarized tunneling, was made 40 years ago by Robert Meservey and Paul Tedrow (Tedrow and Meservey 1971 Phys. Rev. Lett. 26 192), and it has resulted in many fundamental observations and opened up an entirely new field of study. Until the mid-1990s, this field developed at a steady, low rate, after which a huge increase in activity suddenly occurred as a result of the unraveling of successful spin tunneling between two ferromagnets. In the past 15 years, several thousands of papers related to spin polarized tunneling and transport have been published, making this topic one of the hottest areas in condensed matter physics from both fundamental science and applications viewpoints. Many review papers and book chapters have been written in the past decade on this subject. This paper is not exhaustive by any means; rather, the emphases are on recent progress, technological developments and informing the reader about the current direction in which this topic is moving.

  8. Tunnelling with wormhole creation

    SciTech Connect

    Ansoldi, S.; Tanaka, T.

    2015-03-15

    The description of quantum tunnelling in the presence of gravity shows subtleties in some cases. We discuss wormhole production in the context of the spherically symmetric thin-shell approximation. By presenting a fully consistent treatment based on canonical quantization, we solve a controversy present in the literature.

  9. Full Scale Tunnel model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1929-01-01

    Interior view of Full-Scale Tunnel (FST) model. (Small human figures have been added for scale.) On June 26, 1929, Elton W. Miller wrote to George W. Lewis proposing the construction of a model of the full-scale tunnel . 'The excellent energy ratio obtained in the new wind tunnel of the California Institute of Technology suggests that before proceeding with our full scale tunnel design, we ought to investigate the effect on energy ratio of such factors as: 1. small included angle for the exit cone; 2. carefully designed return passages of circular section as far as possible, without sudden changes in cross sections; 3. tightness of walls. It is believed that much useful information can be obtained by building a model of about 1/16 scale, that is, having a closed throat of 2 ft. by 4 ft. The outside dimensions would be about 12 ft. by 25 ft. in plan and the height 4 ft. Two propellers will be required about 28 in. in diameter, each to be driven by direct current motor at a maximum speed of 4500 R.P.M. Provision can be made for altering the length of certain portions, particularly the exit cone, and possibly for the application of boundary layer control in order to effect satisfactory air flow.

  10. Dry wind tunnel system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Ping-Chih (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    This invention is a ground flutter testing system without a wind tunnel, called Dry Wind Tunnel (DWT) System. The DWT system consists of a Ground Vibration Test (GVT) hardware system, a multiple input multiple output (MIMO) force controller software, and a real-time unsteady aerodynamic force generation software, that is developed from an aerodynamic reduced order model (ROM). The ground flutter test using the DWT System operates on a real structural model, therefore no scaled-down structural model, which is required by the conventional wind tunnel flutter test, is involved. Furthermore, the impact of the structural nonlinearities on the aeroelastic stability can be included automatically. Moreover, the aeroservoelastic characteristics of the aircraft can be easily measured by simply including the flight control system in-the-loop. In addition, the unsteady aerodynamics generated computationally is interference-free from the wind tunnel walls. Finally, the DWT System can be conveniently and inexpensively carried out as a post GVT test with the same hardware, only with some possible rearrangement of the shakers and the inclusion of additional sensors.

  11. The Mystery Tunnel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormack, Alan J.

    1974-01-01

    Describes a mystery tunnel, constructed by teachers, which provides a variety of non-visual, sensory experiences for children as they crawl through it. It is designed to help primary children develop basic abilities to use their own senses to better observe, discriminate among observations, and describe their own perceptions accurately. (JR)

  12. Management of ventricular fibrillation or unstable ventricular tachycardia in patients with congenital long-QT syndrome: a suggested modification to ACLS guidelines.

    PubMed

    Homme, Jason H; White, Roger D; Ackerman, Michael J

    2003-10-01

    Prolongation of the QT interval is a known risk factor for syncope, seizures and sudden cardiac death. Most patients with QT prolongation have an acquired cause, but congenital forms of QT prolongation are being increasingly recognized. However, existing advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) treatment algorithms for prolonged QT mediated ventricular fibrillation pertains to acquired long-QT syndrome (LQTS). Here, a young patient with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest secondary to congenital LQTS illustrates critical exceptions to the current ACLS treatment algorithms for ventricular fibrillation and unstable ventricular tachycardia when QT prolongation is congenital in origin. A clarified ACLS algorithm is proposed.

  13. The effect of the variation in ACL constitutive model on joint kinematics and biomechanics under different loads: a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Wan, Chao; Hao, Zhixiu; Wen, Shizhu

    2013-04-01

    The biomechanics and function of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) have been widely studied using both experimental and simulation methods. It is known that a constitutive model of joint tissue is a critical factor in the numerical simulation. Some different ligament constitutive models have been presented to describe the ACL material behavior. However, the effect of the variation in the ligament constitutive model on joint kinematics and biomechanics has still not been studied. In this paper, a three-dimensional finite element model of an intact tibiofemoral joint was reconstructed. Three ACL constitutive models were compared under different joint loads (such as anterior tibial force, varus tibial torque, and valgus tibial torque) to investigate the effect of the change of the ACL constitutive model. The three constitutive models corresponded to an isotropic hyperelasticity model, a transversely isotropic hyperelasticity model with neo-Hookean ground substance description, and a transversely isotropic hyperelastic model with nonlinear ground substance description. Although the material properties of these constitutive equations were fitted on the same uniaxial tension stress-strain curve, the change of the ACL material constitutive model was found to induce altered joint kinematics and biomechanics. The effect of different ACL constitutive equations on joint kinematics depended on both deformation direction and load type. The variation in the ACL constitutive models would influence the joint kinematic results greatly in both the anterior and internal directions under anterior tibial force as well as some other deformations such as the anterior and medial tibial translations under valgus tibial torque, and the medial tibial translation and internal rotation under varus torque. It was revealed that the transversely isotropic hyperelastic model with nonlinear ground substance description (FE model III) was the best representation of the realistic ACL property by a

  14. Addition of Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Whole Blood for Bio-Enhanced ACL Repair has No Benefit in the Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Proffen, Benedikt L.; Vavken, Patrick; Haslauer, Carla M.; Fleming, Braden C.; Harris, Chad E.; Machan, Jason T.; Murray, Martha M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Co-culture of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from the retropatellar fat pad and peripheral blood has been shown to stimulate anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) fibroblast proliferation and collagen production in vitro. Current techniques of bio-enhanced ACL repair in animal studies involve adding a biologic scaffold, in this case an extracellular matrix based scaffold saturated with autologous whole blood, to a simple suture repair of the ligament. Whether the enrichment of whole blood with MSCs would further improve the in vivo results of bio-enhanced ACL repair was investigated. Hypothesis/Purpose The hypothesis was that the addition of MSCs derived from adipose tissue or peripheral blood to the blood-extracellular matrix composite, which is used in bio-enhanced ACL repair to stimulate healing, would improve the biomechanical properties of a bio-enhanced ACL repair after 15 weeks of healing. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Methods Twenty-four adolescent Yucatan mini-pigs underwent ACL transection followed by: 1) bio-enhanced ACL repair, 2) bio-enhanced ACL repair with the addition of autologous adipose-derived MSCs and 3) bio-enhanced ACL repair with the addition of autologous peripheral blood derived MSCs. After fifteen weeks of healing, structural properties of the ACL (yield & failure load, linear stiffness) were measured. Cell and vascular density were measured in the repaired ACL via histology, and its tissue structure was qualitatively evaluated using the Advanced Ligament Maturity Index. Results After fifteen weeks of healing, there were no significant improvements in the biomechanical or histological properties with the addition of adipose-derived MSCs. The only significant change with the addition of peripheral blood MSCs was an increase in knee anteroposterior (AP) laxity when measured at 30 degrees of flexion. Conclusions These findings suggest that the addition of adipose or peripheral blood MSCs to whole blood prior to saturation of

  15. The Channel Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The Channel Tunnel is a 50.5 km-long rail tunnel beneath the English Channel at the Straits of Dover. It connects Dover, Kent in England with Calais, northern France. The undersea section of the tunnel is unsurpassed in length in the world. A proposal for a Channel tunnel was first put forward by a French engineer in 1802. In 1881, a first attempt was made at boring a tunnel from the English side; the work was halted after 800 m. Again in 1922, English workers started boring a tunnel, and advanced 120 m before it too was halted for political reasons. The most recent attempt was begun in 1987, and the tunnel was officially opened in 1994. At completion it was estimated that the project cost around $18 billion. It has been operating at a significant loss since its opening, despite trips by over 7 million passengers per year on the Eurostar train, and over 3 million vehicles per year.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring

  16. Organization, Operation, and Evaluation of Community College Placement Programs. Proceedings: Career Placement Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen, Howard B., Ed.; Karr, Susan, Ed.

    This publication seeks to examine the problems and practical concerns related to the organization and operation of an effective community college placement program. Using presentations given in workshops, basic information in four critical areas of placement activities in the community college is provided. First, a presentation by B. Keith Duffin…

  17. The Placement Process at Colorado Mountain College: Placement Testing and the Advising Matrix.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadden, Craig

    At Colorado Mountain College (CMC), academic advising is based upon a comparison of students' basic skills with the skill requirements of individual courses. Students who enter CMC to obtain a degree must take placement tests in writing, reading, math, and study skills before they can enroll in classes. The placement test battery includes a…

  18. College Mathematics Placement Tests: Student Perceptions of Preparation and Appropriateness of Placement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magee, Pamela Ann

    2010-01-01

    An increasing number of recent high school graduates' college math placement test results indicate that they are not ready for college level math. This study examined the perceptions of recent high school graduates enrolled in developmental math classes to determine their level of satisfaction with their math placement, the relationship of…

  19. Primary TEP placement in patients with laryngopharyngeal free tissue reconstruction and salivary bypass tube placement.

    PubMed

    Divi, Vasu; Lin, Derrick T; Emerick, Kevin; Rocco, James; Deschler, Daniel G

    2011-03-01

    The authors examined the feasibility and advantages of primary tracheoesophageal puncture (TEP) with intraoperative placement of the voice prosthesis for patients undergoing laryngopharyngectomy requiring free tissue reconstruction and salivary bypass tube placement. Six patients were identified; 4 underwent total laryngopharyngectomy, and 2 underwent total laryngectomy with partial pharyngectomy. All 6 required free tissue reconstruction, and a salivary bypass tube was placed in all cases. All patients had a 20F Indwelling Blom-Singer prosthesis (InHealth Technologies, Carpinteria, California) placed. No complications were noted with intraoperative prosthesis placement. No prostheses were dislodged in the postoperative period. At 6 months, 4 patients available for evaluation had successful voice outcomes, and 3 were disease free. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of voice prosthesis placement at the time of primary TEP associated with free tissue reconstruction of a laryngopharyngeal defect with salivary bypass tube placement.

  20. Gait Patterns Differ Between ACL-Reconstructed Athletes Who Pass Return-to-Sport Criteria and Those Who Fail

    PubMed Central

    Di Stasi, Stephanie L.; Logerstedt, David; Gardinier, Emily S.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Background The current standard of practice for an athlete to return to sport after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is varied. Attempt to return to activity is typically advised 6 months after surgery, but functional performance deficits and gait abnormalities are often still evident and may have important implications on future function. Hypothesis When comparing the involved and uninvolved limbs, patients who failed return-to-sport (RTS) criteria would demonstrate (1) smaller peak knee angles, extensor moments, and peak power absorption at the knee of the involved limb and (2) larger peak hip angles, extensor moments, and peak power generation of the involved limb. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Methods A total of 42 patients completed functional and biomechanical gait assessment 6 months after ACL reconstruction. Functional testing involved an isometric quadriceps strength test, 4 single-legged hop tests, and 2 self-report questionnaires. Three-dimensional motion analysis was used to measure sagittal plane kinematics and kinetics of the hip and knee. A mixed-model analysis of variance and post hoc t tests were used to compare the limb symmetry of those who passed and those who did not pass RTS criteria. Minimal clinically important differences were calculated from healthy gait data and used to further define meaningful limb asymmetries. Results Twenty of the 42 (48%) patients passed RTS criteria 6 months after ACL reconstruction. Patients who did not pass the criteria demonstrated statistically significant differences between limbs on all kinematic and kinetic variables at the knee (P ≤ .027). Clinically meaningful asymmetries at the hip were also identified in this group. Only kinetic asymmetries at the knee were identified in the patients who passed RTS criteria. Conclusion Athletes who demonstrate superior functional performance 6 months after ACL reconstruction may have fewer abnormal and asymmetrical gait behaviors than their

  1. Functional clinical placements: a driver for change.

    PubMed

    Goddard, L; Mackey, S; Davidson, P M

    2010-07-01

    The aim of the project was to create a supervised professional experience placement model involving undergraduate nursing students, families of children with intellectual disabilities and nursing lecturers. Action research provided the methodological framework for developing a new placement model. Five families with children with disabilities, nine nursing students and two nurse academics worked together through the cycles of the action research process to develop a family health promotion intervention to improve the health and wellness of the family members and reduce risk for illness. Awareness, valuing and understanding were key themes derived from the qualitative data. Findings of this project indicate that this model of university-initiated, community-focused professional experience placement is effective in achieving the competency-based learning outcomes required of undergraduate nursing students and is worthy of ongoing exploration.

  2. Macro cell placement with neural net algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storti-Gajani, Giancarlo

    Placement of VLSI (Very Large Scale Integration) macro cells is one of the hard problems encountered in the process of integrated circuits design. Since the problem is essentially NP-complete a solution must be searched for with the aid of heuristics using, maybe, non deterministic strategies. A new algorithm for cell preplacement based on neural nets that may be very well extended to find solution of the final placement problem is presented. Simulations for the part of the algorithm concerning preplacement are carried out on several different examples giving always a sharply decreasing cost function (where cost is evaluated essentially on total length of wires given a rectangular boundary). The direct mapping between neural units and VLSI blocks that is adopted in the algorithm makes the extension to the final placement problem quite simple. Simulation programs are implemented in a interpreted mathematical simulation language and a C language implementation is currently under way.

  3. Tools and Techniques for Placement Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Vegt, Wim; Kalz, Marco; Giesbers, Bas; Wild, Fridolin; van Bruggen, Jan

    In Chap. 11 we presented placement in the context of Accreditation of Prior Learning and showed that in the scenario we address we do not assume the availability of controlled vocabulary with which the contents of the learner portfolio or the learning material in the learning network is described. Our placement service is based on the assumption that similarity between material produced or studied by the learner on the one hand and the learning material of the learning network on the other, can be used as a proxy to similarity in learning outcomes. The first task of any such placement service is therefore to establish whether these similarities are present for a given learner. The technology with which this is done, latent semantic analysis, is presented here. The emphasis here is on the technical and computational aspects of data preparation and analysis.

  4. Tunnel boring machine

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, L. L.

    1985-07-09

    A tunnel boring machine for controlled boring of a curvilinear tunnel including a rotating cutter wheel mounted on the forward end of a thrust cylinder assembly having a central longitudinal axis aligned with the cutter wheel axis of rotation; the thrust cylinder assembly comprising a cylinder barrel and an extendable and retractable thrust arm received therein. An anchoring assembly is pivotally attached to the rear end of the cylinder barrel for anchoring the machine during a cutting stroke and providing a rear end pivot axis during curved cutting strokes. A pair of laterally extending, extendable and retractable arms are fixedly mounted at a forward portion of the cylinder barrel for providing lateral displacement in a laterally curved cutting mode and for anchoring the machine between cutting strokes and during straight line boring. Forward and rear transverse displacement and support assemblies are provided to facilitate cutting in a transversely curved cutting mode and to facilitate machine movement between cutting strokes.

  5. Uncooled tunneling infrared sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Thomas W. (Inventor); Kaiser, William J. (Inventor); Podosek, Judith A. (Inventor); Vote, Erika C. (Inventor); Rockstad, Howard K. (Inventor); Reynolds, Joseph K. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An uncooled infrared tunneling sensor in which the only moving part is a diaphragm which is deflected into contact with a micromachined silicon tip electrode prepared by a novel lithographic process. Similarly prepared deflection electrodes employ electrostatic force to control the deflection of a silicon nitride, flat diaphragm membrane. The diaphragm exhibits a high resonant frequency which reduces the sensor's sensitivity to vibration. A high bandwidth feedback circuit controls the tunneling current by adjusting the deflection voltage to maintain a constant deflection of the membrane which would otherwise change deflection depending upon incident infrared radiation. The resulting infrared sensor will meet or exceed the performance of all other broadband, uncooled, infrared sensors and can be miniaturized to pixel dimensions smaller than 100 .mu.m. The technology is readily implemented as a small-format linear array suitable for commercial and spacecraft applications.

  6. Possibility of hyperbolic tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo, Francisco S. N.; Mimoso, Jose P.

    2010-08-15

    Traversable wormholes are primarily useful as 'gedanken experiments' and as a theoretician's probe of the foundations of general relativity. In this work, we analyze the possibility of having tunnels in a hyperbolic spacetime. We obtain exact solutions of static and pseudo-spherically symmetric spacetime tunnels by adding exotic matter to a vacuum solution referred to as a degenerate solution of class A. The physical properties and characteristics of these intriguing solutions are explored, and through the mathematics of embedding it is shown that particular constraints are placed on the shape function, that differ significantly from the Morris-Thorne wormhole. In particular, it is shown that the energy density is always negative, and the radial pressure is positive, at the throat, contrary to the Morris-Thorne counterpart. Specific solutions are also presented by considering several equations of state, and by imposing restricted choices for the shape function or the redshift function.

  7. Tunnel magnetoresistance of diamondoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Yukihito

    2016-10-01

    Tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) of diamondoids has been predicted by first principles density functional theory. Diamantane was used as a basic molecular proxy for diamondoids because hydrogen atoms in the apical position are easily substituted for a thiol group. The pristine diamantane exhibited a low TMR ratio of 7%, and boron-substitution considerably decreased the TMR ratio. Conversely, nitrogen-substitution enhanced the TMR ratio by up to 20%. Heteroatom-substitution changes the tunneling probabilities by varying the molecular bond lengths. Furthermore, when the spins of the electrodes are parallel, the heteroatoms resulted in transmittance probabilities at an energy range near the Fermi level. Consequently, heteroatom-substitution can control the TMR ratios of diamondoids very well.

  8. Optimization Strategies for Sensor and Actuator Placement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Sharon L.; Kincaid, Rex K.

    1999-01-01

    This paper provides a survey of actuator and sensor placement problems from a wide range of engineering disciplines and a variety of applications. Combinatorial optimization methods are recommended as a means for identifying sets of actuators and sensors that maximize performance. Several sample applications from NASA Langley Research Center, such as active structural acoustic control, are covered in detail. Laboratory and flight tests of these applications indicate that actuator and sensor placement methods are effective and important. Lessons learned in solving these optimization problems can guide future research.

  9. Trajectory surgical guide stent for implant placement.

    PubMed

    Adrian, E D; Ivanhoe, J R; Krantz, W A

    1992-05-01

    This article describes a new implant placement surgical guide that gives both implant location and trajectory to the surgeon. Radiopaque markers are placed on diagnostic dentures and a lateral cephalometric radiograph is made that shows the osseous anatomy at the symphysis and the anterior tooth location. The ideal implant location and trajectory data are transferred to a surgical stent that programs the angle and location of the fixtures at time of surgery. The stent has the additional benefit of acting as an occlusion rim, a mouth prop, and tongue retractor. Use of this stent has resulted in consistently programming the placement of implant fixtures that are prosthodontically ideal.

  10. Performance consequences of parity placement in disk arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Edward K.; Katz, Randy H.

    1991-01-01

    The performance of a variety of parity placement schemes are defined and investigated to demonstrate that, at relatively large request sizes of hundreds of kilobytes, the choice of parity placement significantly affects performance (20 to 30 percent for the disk array configurations that are common today). It is shown that the left-symmetric, extended-left-symmetric and flat-left-symmetric are the best RAID level 5 parity placements. The placement with the highest read performance, flat-left-symmetric, has the lowest write performance, while the placement with the lowest read performance, left-symmetric, has the highest write performance. Suggestions for optimizing parity placements are included.

  11. Tarsal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gould, John S

    2011-06-01

    Tarsal tunnel syndrome, unlike its similar sounding counterpart in the hand, is a significantly misunderstood clinical entity. Confusion concerning the anatomy involved, the presenting symptomatology, the appropriateness and significance of various diagnostic tests, conservative and surgical management, and, finally, the variability of reported results of surgical intervention attests to the lack of consensus surrounding this condition. The terminology involved in various diagnoses for chronic heel pain is also a hodgepodge of poorly understood entities.

  12. Full Scale Tunnel (FST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Installation of Full Scale Tunnel (FST) power plant. Virginia Public Service Company could not supply adequate electricity to run the wind tunnels being built at Langley. (The Propeller Research Tunnel was powered by two submarine diesel engines.) This led to the consideration of a number of different ideas for generating electric power to drive the fan motors in the FST. The main proposition involved two 3000 hp and two 1000 hp diesel engines with directly connected generators. Another, proposition suggested 30 Liberty motors driving 600 hp DC generators in pairs. For a month, engineers at Langley were hopeful they could secure additional diesel engines from decommissioned Navy T-boats but the Navy could not offer a firm commitment regarding the future status of the submarines. By mid-December 1929, Virginia Public Service Company had agreed to supply service to the field at the north end of the King Street Bridge connecting Hampton and Langley Field. Thus, new plans for FST powerplant and motors were made. Smith DeFrance described the motors in NACA TR No. 459: 'The most commonly used power plant for operating a wind tunnel is a direct-current motor and motor-generator set with Ward Leonard control system. For the FST it was found that alternating current slip-ring induction motors, together with satisfactory control equipment, could be purchased for approximately 30 percent less than the direct-current equipment. Two 4000-horsepower slip-ring induction motors with 24 steps of speed between 75 and 300 r.p.m. were therefore installed.'

  13. Diffraction as tunneling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nussenzveig, H. M.; Wiscombe, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    A new approximation to the short-wavelength scattering amplitude from an impenetrable sphere is presented. It is uniform in the scattering angle and it is more accurate than previously known approximations (including Fock's theory of diffraction) by up to several orders of magnitude. It remains valid in the transition to long-wavelength scattering. It leads to a new physical picture of diffraction, as tunneling through an inertial barrier.

  14. Comparison of traditional advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) course instruction vs. a scenario-based, performance oriented team instruction (SPOTI) method for Korean paramedic students.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christopher C; Im, Mark; Kim, Tae Min; Stapleton, Edward R; Kim, Kyuseok; Suh, Gil Joon; Singer, Adam J; Henry, Mark C

    2010-01-01

    Current Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) course instruction involves a 2-day course with traditional lectures and limited team interaction. We wish to explore the advantages of a scenario-based performance-oriented team instruction (SPOTI) method to implement core ACLS skills for non-English-speaking international paramedic students. The objective of this study was to determine if scenario-based, performance-oriented team instruction (SPOTI) improves educational outcomes for the ACLS instruction of Korean paramedic students. Thirty Korean paramedic students were randomly selected into two groups. One group of 15 students was taught the traditional ACLS course. The other 15 students were instructed using a SPOTI method. Each group was tested using ACLS megacode examinations endorsed by the American Heart Association. All 30 students passed the ACLS megacode examination. In the traditional ACLS study group an average of 85% of the core skills were met. In the SPOTI study group an average of 93% of the core skills were met. In particular, the SPOTI study group excelled at physical examination skills such as airway opening, assessment of breathing, signs of circulation, and compression rates. In addition, the SPOTI group performed with higher marks on rhythm recognition compared to the traditional group. The traditional group performed with higher marks at providing proper drug dosages compared to the SPOTI students. However, the students enrolled in the SPOTI method resulted in higher megacode core compliance scores compared to students trained in traditional ACLS course instruction. These differences did not achieve statistical significance due to the small sample size.

  15. Resonant Tunneling Spin Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.

    2007-01-01

    The resonant tunneling spin pump is a proposed semiconductor device that would generate spin-polarized electron currents. The resonant tunneling spin pump would be a purely electrical device in the sense that it would not contain any magnetic material and would not rely on an applied magnetic field. Also, unlike prior sources of spin-polarized electron currents, the proposed device would not depend on a source of circularly polarized light. The proposed semiconductor electron-spin filters would exploit the Rashba effect, which can induce energy splitting in what would otherwise be degenerate quantum states, caused by a spin-orbit interaction in conjunction with a structural-inversion asymmetry in the presence of interfacial electric fields in a semiconductor heterostructure. The magnitude of the energy split is proportional to the electron wave number. Theoretical studies have suggested the possibility of devices in which electron energy states would be split by the Rashba effect and spin-polarized currents would be extracted by resonant quantum-mechanical tunneling.

  16. Evaluating tunnel kiln performance

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connor, K.R.; Carty, W.M.; Ninos, N.J.

    1997-08-01

    Process improvements in the production of whitewares provide the potential for substantial savings for manufacturers. A typical whiteware manufacturer incurs an annual defective product loss of {approximately}$20 million when accounting for raw materials, energy, labor and waste disposal. Reduction in defective product loss of 1% could result in a savings in excess of $1 million annually. This study was designed to establish benchmarks for two conventional tunnel kilns used to bisque-fire dinnerware at Buffalo China Inc. (Buffalo, NY). The benchmark was established by assessing the current conditions and variability of the two tunnel kilns as a function of the fracture strength of sample bars that were made from production body. Sample bars were fired in multiple locations in both kilns to assess the conditions and variability of firing within each kiln. Comparison of strength results between the two kilns also was assessed. These comparisons were accomplished through applied statistical analysis, wherein significant statistical variations were identified and isolated for both tunnel kilns. The statistical methods and tools used in this analysis are readily accessible to manufacturers, thus allowing implementation of similar analysis, or benchmarking, in-house.

  17. Smart tunnel: Docking mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schliesing, John A. (Inventor); Edenborough, Kevin L. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A docking mechanism is presented for the docking of a space vehicle to a space station comprising a flexible tunnel frame structure which is deployable from the space station. The tunnel structure comprises a plurality of series connected frame sections, one end section of which is attached to the space station and the other end attached to a docking module of a configuration adapted for docking in the payload bay of the space vehicle. The docking module is provided with trunnions, adapted for latching engagement with latches installed in the vehicle payload bay and with hatch means connectable to a hatch of the crew cabin of the space vehicle. Each frame section comprises a pair of spaced ring members, interconnected by actuator-attenuator devices which are individually controllable by an automatic control means to impart relative movement of one ring member to the other in six degrees of freedom of motion. The control means includes computer logic responsive to sensor signals of range and attitude information, capture latch condition, structural loads, and actuator stroke for generating commands to the onboard flight control system and the individual actuator-attenuators to deploy the tunnel to effect a coupling with the space vehicle and space station after coupling. A tubular fluid-impervious liner, preferably fabric, is disposed through the frame sections of a size sufficient to accommodate the passage of personnel and cargo.

  18. Evaluation of an intact, an ACL-deficient, and a reconstructed human knee joint finite element model.

    PubMed

    Vairis, Achilles; Stefanoudakis, George; Petousis, Markos; Vidakis, Nectarios; Tsainis, Andreas-Marios; Kandyla, Betina

    2016-02-01

    The human knee joint has a three-dimensional geometry with multiple body articulations that produce complex mechanical responses under loads that occur in everyday life and sports activities. Understanding the complex mechanical interactions of these load-bearing structures is of use when the treatment of relevant diseases is evaluated and assisting devices are designed. The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in the knee is one of four main ligaments that connects the femur to the tibia and is often torn during sudden twisting motions, resulting in knee instability. The objective of this work is to study the mechanical behavior of the human knee joint and evaluate the differences in its response for three different states, i.e., intact, ACL-deficient, and surgically treated (reconstructed) knee. The finite element models corresponding to these states were developed. For the reconstructed model, a novel repair device was developed and patented by the author in previous work. Static load cases were applied, as have already been presented in a previous work, in order to compare the calculated results produced by the two models the ACL-deficient and the surgically reconstructed knee joint, under the exact same loading conditions. Displacements were calculated in different directions for the load cases studied and were found to be very close to those from previous modeling work and were in good agreement with experimental data presented in literature. The developed finite element model for both the intact and the ACL-deficient human knee joint is a reliable tool to study the kinematics of the human knee, as results of this study show. In addition, the reconstructed human knee joint model had kinematic behavior similar to the intact knee joint, showing that such reconstruction devices can restore human knee stability to an adequate extent.

  19. Reduced platelet concentration does not harm PRP effectiveness for ACL repair in a porcine in vivo model

    PubMed Central

    Mastrangelo, AN; Vavken, P; Fleming, BC; Harrison, SL; Murray, MM

    2011-01-01

    Enhanced primary repair of the ACL using a collagen scaffold loaded with platelets has been shown to improve the functional healing of suture repair in animal models. In this study, our objectives were to determine if lowering the platelet concentration would reduce the structural properties of the repaired ACL and increase postoperative knee laxity. Eight Yucatan minipigs underwent bilateral suture repair. In one knee, the repair was augmented with a collagen scaffold saturated with platelet-rich plasma containing five times the systemic baseline of platelets (5X) while the contralateral knee had a collagen scaffold saturated with platelet-rich plasma containing three times the systemic baseline of platelets (3X). After thirteen weeks of healing, knee joint laxity and the structural properties of the ACL were measured. The 3X platelet concentration resulted in a 24.1% decrease in cellular density of the repair tissue (p<0.05), but did not significantly decrease the structural properties [3Xvs 5X: 314 vs 298 N (p=0.596) and 65 vs 64 N/mm (p=0.532) for the yield load and linear stiffness, respectively]. The 3x platelet concentration also did not significantly change the mean anteroposterior knee laxity at 30° and 90° of flexion [5X vs. 3X: 3.5 vs. 5.1 mm (p=0.140), and 6.1 vs. 6.3 mm (p=0.764)] but did result in a lower AP laxity at 60° [5X vs. 3X: 8.6 vs. 7.3 mm (p=0.012)]. The decrease in platelet concentration from 5X to 3X to enhance suture repair of the ACL did not significantly harm the mechanical outcomes in this animal model. PMID:21337615

  20. Anterior cruciate ligament- specialized post-operative return-to-sports (ACL-SPORTS) training: a randomized control trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) is standard practice for athletes that wish to return to high-level activities; however functional outcomes after ACLR are poor. Quadriceps strength weakness, abnormal movement patterns and below normal knee function is reported in the months and years after ACLR. Second ACL injuries are common with even worse outcomes than primary ACLR. Modifiable limb-to-limb asymmetries have been identified in individuals who re-injure after primary ACLR, suggesting a neuromuscular training program is needed to improve post-operative outcomes. Pre-operative perturbation training, a neuromuscular training program, has been successful at improving limb symmetry prior to surgery, though benefits are not lasting after surgery. Implementing perturbation training after surgery may be successful in addressing post-operative deficits that contribute to poor functional outcomes and second ACL injury risk. Methods/Design 80 athletes that have undergone a unilateral ACLR and wish to return to level 1 or 2 activities will be recruited for this study and randomized to one of two treatment groups. A standard care group will receive prevention exercises, quadriceps strengthening and agility exercises, while the perturbation group will receive the same exercise program with the addition of perturbation training. The primary outcomes measures will include gait biomechanics, clinical and functional measures, and knee joint loading. Return to sport rates, return to pre-injury level of activity rates, and second injury rates will be secondary measures. Discussion The results of this ACL-Specialized Post-Operative Return To Sports (ACL-SPORTS) Training program will help clinicians to better determine an effective post-operative treatment program that will improve modifiable impairments that influence outcomes after ACLR. Trial registration Randomized Control Trial NIH 5R01AR048212-07. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01773317 PMID:23522373

  1. Aspergillus Collagen-Like Genes (acl): Identification, Sequence Polymorphism, and Assessment for PCR-Based Pathogen Detection

    PubMed Central

    Tuntevski, Kiril; Durney, Brandon C.; Snyder, Anna K.; LaSala, P. Rocco; Nayak, Ajay P.; Green, Brett J.; Beezhold, Donald H.; Rio, Rita V. M.; Holland, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    The genus Aspergillus is a burden to public health due to its ubiquitous presence in the environment, its production of allergens, and wide demographic susceptibility among cystic fibrosis, asthmatic, and immunosuppressed patients. Current methods of detection of Aspergillus colonization and infection rely on lengthy morphological characterization or nonstandardized serological assays that are restricted to identifying a fungal etiology. Collagen-like genes have been shown to exhibit species-specific conservation across the noncollagenous regions as well as strain-specific polymorphism in the collagen-like regions. Here we assess the conserved region of the Aspergillus collagen-like (acl) genes and explore the application of PCR amplicon size-based discrimination among the five most common etiologic species of the Aspergillus genus, including Aspergillus fumigatus, A. flavus, A. nidulans, A. niger, and A. terreus. Genetic polymorphism and phylogenetic analysis of the aclF1 gene were additionally examined among the available strains. Furthermore, the applicability of the PCR-based assay to identification of these five species in cultures derived from sputum and bronchoalveolar fluid from 19 clinical samples was explored. Application of capillary electrophoresis on nanogels was additionally demonstrated to improve the discrimination between Aspergillus species. Overall, this study demonstrated that Aspergillus acl genes could be used as PCR targets to discriminate between clinically relevant Aspergillus species. Future studies aim to utilize the detection of Aspergillus acl genes in PCR and microfluidic applications to determine the sensitivity and specificity for the identification of Aspergillus colonization and invasive aspergillosis in immunocompromised subjects. PMID:24123732

  2. Proprioception in the ACL-ruptured knee: the contribution of the medial collateral ligament and patellar ligament. An in vivo experimental study in the cat.

    PubMed

    Bonsfills, N; Raygoza, J J; Boemo, E; Garrido, J; Núñez, A; Gómez-Barrena, E

    2007-01-01

    In the absence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), secondary restraints such as menisci, ligaments, and tendons restrict anterior knee laxity. Strain detection at these sites could define the contribution of this alternative signalling system to knee proprioception after ACL injury. The hypothesis in this study questions if measurements of anterior tibial translation (ATT) from surface strain gauges on the insertions of the medial collateral ligament (MCL) and the patellar tendon (PT) are sufficiently sensitive and specific to differentiate normal, stable knees from acutely unstable knees due to ACL section. Twelve cats received miniaturized strain gauges on the surface of MCL and PT distal insertions. A purpose-made receiver transformed into measurements any voltage variation obtained during passive knee flexion-extension and anterior tibial translation manoeuvres. Variables under evaluation included first peak latency, normalized amplitude, and slope of voltage along time. Femorotibial displacements were video recorded, digitized, and used as the ATT reference. The proposed system detected significant changes in the slope of the voltage/time signal, with higher specificity and sensitivity during ATT after experimental ACL section. Changes were not significant during flexion or extension. It was found that a pattern of earlier and more intense strain in MCL and PT distal insertions was found during ATT in the ACL deficient knee. Enhanced pattern recognition learning from these structures could be a future target for proprioceptive training after ACL injury.

  3. Neuromuscular Coordination Deficit Persists 12 Months after ACL Reconstruction But Can Be Modulated by 6 Weeks of Kettlebell Training: A Case Study in Women's Elite Soccer

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Christoffer H.; Bencke, Jesper; Ørntoft, Christina; Linnebjerg, Connie; Hölmich, Per

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present single-case study was to investigate the effect of 6 weeks' kettlebell training on the neuromuscular risk profile for ACL injury in a high-risk athlete returning to sport after ACL reconstruction. A female elite soccer player (age 21 years) with no previous history of ACL injury went through neuromuscular screening as measured by EMG preactivity of vastus lateralis and semitendinosus during a standardized sidecutting maneuver. Subsequently, the player experienced a noncontact ACL injury. The player was screened again following postreconstruction rehabilitation, then underwent 6-week kettlebell training, and was subsequently screened again at 6-week follow-up. Prior to and after postreconstruction rehabilitation the player demonstrated a neuromuscular profile during sidecutting known to increase the risk for noncontact ACL injury, that is, reduced EMG preactivity for semitendinosus and elevated EMG preactivity for vastus lateralis. Subsequently, the 6-week kettlebell training increased semitendinosus muscle preactivity during sidecutting by 38 percentage points to a level equivalent to a neuromuscular low-risk profile. An ACL rehabilitated female athlete with a high-risk neuromuscular profile changed to low-risk in response to 6 weeks of kettlebell training. Thus, short-term kettlebell exercise with documented high levels of medial hamstring activation was found to transfer into high medial hamstring preactivation during a sidecutting maneuver. PMID:28197354

  4. Neuromuscular Coordination Deficit Persists 12 Months after ACL Reconstruction But Can Be Modulated by 6 Weeks of Kettlebell Training: A Case Study in Women's Elite Soccer.

    PubMed

    Zebis, Mette K; Andersen, Christoffer H; Bencke, Jesper; Ørntoft, Christina; Linnebjerg, Connie; Hölmich, Per; Thorborg, Kristian; Aagaard, Per; Andersen, Lars L

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present single-case study was to investigate the effect of 6 weeks' kettlebell training on the neuromuscular risk profile for ACL injury in a high-risk athlete returning to sport after ACL reconstruction. A female elite soccer player (age 21 years) with no previous history of ACL injury went through neuromuscular screening as measured by EMG preactivity of vastus lateralis and semitendinosus during a standardized sidecutting maneuver. Subsequently, the player experienced a noncontact ACL injury. The player was screened again following postreconstruction rehabilitation, then underwent 6-week kettlebell training, and was subsequently screened again at 6-week follow-up. Prior to and after postreconstruction rehabilitation the player demonstrated a neuromuscular profile during sidecutting known to increase the risk for noncontact ACL injury, that is, reduced EMG preactivity for semitendinosus and elevated EMG preactivity for vastus lateralis. Subsequently, the 6-week kettlebell training increased semitendinosus muscle preactivity during sidecutting by 38 percentage points to a level equivalent to a neuromuscular low-risk profile. An ACL rehabilitated female athlete with a high-risk neuromuscular profile changed to low-risk in response to 6 weeks of kettlebell training. Thus, short-term kettlebell exercise with documented high levels of medial hamstring activation was found to transfer into high medial hamstring preactivation during a sidecutting maneuver.

  5. Predicting success on the Advanced Placement Biology Examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Lesa Hanlin

    Four hundred sixty students in four public high schools were used as subjects to determine which of eleven academic and demographic factors studied were significant predictors of success for the Advanced Placement Biology Examination. Factors studied were attendance, class rank, gender, grade level at the time of the examination, grade point average, level of prerequisite biology course, number of Advanced Placement Examinations taken in the year prior to the Advanced Placement Biology Examination, number of Advanced Placement Examinations taken in the same year as the Advanced Placement Biology Examination, proposed major in college, race, and SAT mathematics, verbal, and combined score. Significant relationships were found to exist between the Advanced Placement Biology Examination score and attendance, class rank, gender, grade level at the time of the Advanced Placement Biology Examination, grade point average, number of Advanced Placement Examinations taken in the year prior to the Advanced Placement Biology Examination, number of Advanced Placement Examinations taken in the same year as the Advanced Placement Biology Examination, race, and SAT scores. Significant relationships were not found to exist between Advanced Placement Biology Examination score and level prerequisite biology course and Advanced Placement Biology Examination score and proposed major in college. A multiple regression showed the best combination of predictors to be attendance, SAT verbal score, and SAT mathematics score. Discriminant analysis showed the variables in this study to be good predictors of whether the student would pass the Advanced Placement Biology Examination (score a 3, 4, or 5) or fail the Advanced Placement Biology Examination (score a 1 or 2). These results demonstrated that significant predictors for the Advanced Placement Biology Examination do exist and can be used to assist in the prediction of scores, prediction of passing or failing, the identification of

  6. Hydrogel fibers for ACL prosthesis: design and mechanical evaluation of PVA and PVA/UHMWPE fiber constructs.

    PubMed

    Bach, Jason S; Detrez, Fabrice; Cherkaoui, Mohammed; Cantournet, Sabine; Ku, David N; Corté, Laurent

    2013-05-31

    Prosthetic devices for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction have been unsuccessful due to mechanical failure or chronic inflammation. Polymer hydrogels combine biocompatibility and unique low friction properties; however, their prior use for ligament reconstruction has been restricted to coatings due to insufficient tensile mechanics. Here, we investigate new constructs of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) hydrogel fibers. In water, these fibers swell to an equilibrium water content of 50% by weight, retaining a tensile modulus greater than 40 MPa along the fiber axis at low strain. Rope constructs were assembled for ACL replacement and mechanical properties were compared with data from the literature. Pure PVA hydrogel constructs closely reproduce the non-linear tensile stiffness of the native ACL with an ultimate strength of about 2000 N. An additional safety factor in tensile strength was achieved with composite braids by adding ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fibers around a core of PVA cords. Composition and braiding angle are adjusted to produce a non-linear tensile behavior within the range of the native ligament that can be predicted by a simple rope model. This design was found to sustain over one million cycles between 50 and 450 N with limited damage and less than 20% creep. The promising mechanical performances of these systems provide justification for more extensive in vivo evaluation.

  7. Linking Services to Increased Productivity in Placement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bostaph, Charles P.; Martoni, Charles J.

    1984-01-01

    Looks at the way Pennsylvania Job Search was brought to the Boyce Campus of Community College of Allegheny County. Discusses student and community participants in the job placement program, its unique services, benefits to the campus, and use of the model by other schools. (AYC)

  8. Placement of Engineering and Technology Graduates, 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilmore, Arthur W.

    Information on the placement status of 1980 engineering and technology graduates is presented. At the doctoral degree level, the percentage without job offers or other firm plans was lower than in 1979. The bachelor's degree level experienced a one percentage point reduction in the number of graduates employed as of graduation compared to 1979,…

  9. CAPS: Career Assistance & Placement Services. Resource Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrow, Connye M.; And Others

    This resource manual describes a model for planning and developing comprehensive career placement services integrated into the total career development efforts of secondary and postsecondary schools in Illinois. The manual is designed to be used by educational administrators at the local and regional level in developing specific program goals,…

  10. Modern Agriculture in Advanced Placement Human Geography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanegran, David A.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the four sections of the Advanced Placement (AP) human geography course focusing on agriculture: (1) development and diffusion of agriculture; (2) major agricultural production regions; (3) rural land use and change; and (4) impacts of modern agricultural change. Includes references and a resource list. (CMK)

  11. Health risks for students on overseas placements.

    PubMed

    Driver, Carolyn

    Health profession students are encouraged to take an elective during training and many do this overseas in tropical, low-income countries. Higher education institutions should offer advice and support on organising these placements but this varies and students may present for pre-travel health advice at their general practice or travel clinic. This article discusses how they should be advised.

  12. Advanced Placement Economics. Macroeconomics: Student Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, John S.

    This book is designed to help advanced placement students better understand macroeconomic concepts through various activities. The book contains 6 units with 64 activities, sample multiple-choice questions, sample short essay questions, and sample long essay questions. The units are entitled: (1) "Basic Economic Concepts"; (2) "Measuring Economic…

  13. Advanced Placement Economics. Teacher Resource Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, John S.

    This book, in conjunction with the student activities books for macroeconomics and microeconomics, is designed for teaching the Advanced Placement Economics course. The book contains five units for the microeconomic portion and six units for the macroeconomic portion of the text. Along with the many activities are sample multiple-choice questions,…

  14. Online Placement in First-Year Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peckham, Irvin

    2009-01-01

    This essay describes Louisiana State University's search for an alternative to available placement protocols. Under the leadership of Les Perelman at MIT, LSU collaborated with four universities to develop iMOAT, a program for administering online assessments of student writing. This essay focuses on LSU's On-line Challenge, which developed from…

  15. Academic Placement after Traumatic Brain Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donders, Jacques

    The acadmic placement of 87 children (ages 6 to 16 years) who had sustained brain injuries was determined within 1 year after initial psychological assessment. Forty-five children had returned full time to regular academic programs, 21 children received special education support for less than half of their classes, and 21 children were enrolled in…

  16. BIBLIOGRAPHIC GUIDE FOR ADVANCED PLACEMENT, LATIN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BARRON, ROBERT; ROSELLE, LEONE

    LITERARY AND CRITICAL WORKS, REFERENCE BOOKS, PERIODICALS, RECORDS, FILMS, AND FILMSTRIPS DEALING WITH ROMAN LITERATURE, HISTORY, CIVILIZATION, MYTHOLOGY, AND LANGUAGE ARE INCLUDED IN THIS BIBLIOGRAPHY OF RECOMMENDED READING IN ENGLISH FOR ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAMS IN LATIN. THE LIST IS DIVIDED INTO TWO $500 GROUPS, SO THAT FOR CONVENIENCE IN…

  17. Clitoral Pain Following Retropubic Midurethral Sling Placement

    PubMed Central

    Christofferson, Melanie; Barnard, Jami

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Although uncommon, postprocedural pain with associated sexual dysfunction may be seen in patients after retropubic midurethral sling placement for treatment of stress urinary incontinence. Aims To describe a report of a woman who developed localized severe, persistent periclitoral pain after placement of a retropubic midurethral sling. Methods A healthy 41‐year‐old underwent an uncomplicated retropubic midurethral sling procedure. She developed persistent postoperative clitoral pain with worsening associated with arousal, impairing sexual function. Symptoms resolved with time and a course of steroid medication. Main Outcome Measures To report a case of clitoral pain following midurethral sling surgery, and to provide a discussion about clitoral innervation, possible pain etiologies, and management options. Results We report a case of clitoral pain associated with sexual dysfunction and provide a review of clitoral innervation as well as potential mechanisms of nerve injury associated with a retropubic sling procedure. Conclusion Clitoral pain symptoms following placement of a retropubic midurethral sling should be evaluated and promptly addressed, given the potential negative impact on the patient's sexual function. Christofferson M, Barnard J, and Montoya TI. Clitoral pain following retropubic midurethral sling placement. Sex Med 2015;3:346–348. PMID:26797072

  18. Institutional Placement: Phases of the Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zarit, Steven H.; Whitlatch, Carol J.

    1992-01-01

    Examined consequences of institutionalization for 555 caregivers of dementia patients. Consistent with stress process model, institutionalization was hypothesized to have large impact on primary effects of caregiving and lesser influence on secondary effects and well-being. Following placement, caregivers experienced relief from primary effects of…

  19. Expanding the Scope of Advanced Placement Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Victoria

    2008-01-01

    Dr. Paul Dosal of the University of South Florida is not impressed with the way most high school students learn about Latin American history. Dosal believes an advanced placement course in the subject will change that. He's the executive director of ENLACE Florida, a statewide network funded by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, designed to increase the…

  20. Introduction. Teaching Advanced Placement Human Geography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Alexander B.

    2000-01-01

    Introduces this special issue of "Journal of Geography" focusing on the teaching of Advanced Placement (AP) human geography. States that essays were developed by members of the AP Human Geography Development Committee focusing on areas in the human geography course outline which are included in the appendix. (CMK)

  1. Paired Field Placements: A Means for Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardiner, Wendy; Robinson, Karen Shipley

    2009-01-01

    In this qualitative study, pairs of preservice teachers were placed with single cooperating teachers in a 100-hour urban field placement. The question guiding this research was would preservice teachers collaborate in ways that contributed to their professional development and if so why, how, and to what end? Results from field notes, multiple…

  2. In Job-Placement Rates, Fuzzy Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandoval, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    As colleges and lawmakers seek better data about the employment success of graduates, a lack of standardized tracking makes much of the information unreliable. Many colleges release placement rates based on scant information: More than a third of colleges' reported rates in 2010 were based on responses from half of their graduates or fewer,…

  3. Writing Strategies for Advanced Placement European History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jacqueline

    This guide to effective writing strategies is based on three ideas that provide motivation for writing skills development in an advanced placement history class: students learn to write by writing; problem essays are more effective in developing writing skills than topic essays; and writing is a learning tool. Stressing that writing practice is…

  4. Polytechnic Graduate Placement in Finnish Manufacturing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bockerman, Petri

    2007-01-01

    This paper analyses polytechnic graduate placement in Finnish manufacturing. The paper uses a register-based data source covering white-collar manufacturing workers over the period 1995-2004. Taken together, the results show that wages and job classification are higher for polytechnic graduates, once other covariates are controlled for. Despite…

  5. Literary Archetypes. Advanced Placement English Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anne Arundel County Public Schools, Annapolis, MD.

    Providing students with the opportunity to earn college credit while still in high school, the Advanced Placement English course described in this guide is designed to help students (1) want to choose from a wide range of literature for independent reading; (2) develop a critical awareness about literature; (3) recognize connections among works of…

  6. Advanced Placement: Model Policy Components. Policy Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zinth, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Advanced Placement (AP), launched in 1955 by the College Board as a program to offer gifted high school students the opportunity to complete entry-level college coursework, has since expanded to encourage a broader array of students to tackle challenging content. This Education Commission of the State's Policy Analysis identifies key components of…

  7. A Collaborative Assessment of Students' Placement Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Susan

    2017-01-01

    The research informing this paper set out to investigate the qualitative experiences of students, supervisors and tutors involved in a summative collaborative assessment of placement learning on an undergraduate professional qualifying programme in the UK. Analysis of data gathered through semi-structured interviews provides valuable insights into…

  8. 34 CFR 300.116 - Placements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Placements. 300.116 Section 300.116 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN...

  9. 34 CFR 300.116 - Placements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Placements. 300.116 Section 300.116 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN...

  10. 34 CFR 300.116 - Placements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Placements. 300.116 Section 300.116 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN...

  11. 34 CFR 300.116 - Placements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Placements. 300.116 Section 300.116 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN...

  12. Osseointegrated fixture placement with simultaneous tooth extraction.

    PubMed

    Schabes, G A; Sacks, H G; Kaufman, P S

    1992-03-01

    Three cases are presented that illustrate the potential for accelerating the healing phase with fixture-based treatment. Depending on the clinical circumstances, techniques may include radical alveolectomy, the use of fresh extraction sockets, and fixture placement in inter-radicular bone.

  13. 34 CFR 300.104 - Residential placement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Residential placement 300.104 Section 300.104 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN...

  14. 34 CFR 300.116 - Placements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Placements. 300.116 Section 300.116 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN...

  15. Confessions of a Community Placement Optimist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Provencal, Gerald

    This paper offers reflections from the author's experience with community placement for developmentally disabled persons, specifically addressing practical and philosophical issues. Drawn from the author's personal involvement with the Macomb-Oakland Regional Center (MORE) in Michigan, this document notes nine illustrations of progress from…

  16. Layout Decision Making: The Placement of Illustrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnsey, Ava L.; And Others

    This study investigated the position of illustrations and how they affect the sequential organization of text. The primary purpose was to describe learners' reading sequence and preference for page designs with variations of illustration placement. The 70 subjects were undergraduate and graduate students enrolled in education courses at Memphis…

  17. 21 CFR 1230.10 - Placement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Placement. 1230.10 Section 1230.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL...

  18. 21 CFR 1230.10 - Placement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Placement. 1230.10 Section 1230.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL...

  19. 42 CFR 483.126 - Appropriate placement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Appropriate placement. 483.126 Section 483.126 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Screening and Annual Review of Mentally Ill and Mentally Retarded Individuals § 483.126...

  20. 42 CFR 483.126 - Appropriate placement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Appropriate placement. 483.126 Section 483.126 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Screening and Annual Review of Mentally Ill and Mentally Retarded Individuals § 483.126...

  1. Advanced Placement Courses Are Not for Everyone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blagaich, Pete

    1999-01-01

    Demonstrates that Advanced Placement (AP) courses may not be appropriate for every student. Discusses the process of selecting students for AP U.S. history. Criteria include an application, summer sessions, and evidence of motivation to excel in the program. Considers the effects of this policy. (CMK)

  2. Grow Your Own: Online Placement Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sokolik, Maggie; Duber, Jim

    2002-01-01

    Details the advantages and process of creating an online English-as-a-Second-Language placement test. Outlines the steps for constructing a good test and describes the piloting of an online exam over a 2-year period. (Author/VWL)

  3. How visual perceptual grouping influences foot placement

    PubMed Central

    Fennell, John; Goodwin, Charlotte; Burn, Jeremy F.; Leonards, Ute

    2015-01-01

    Everybody would agree that vision guides locomotion; but how does vision influence choice when there are different solutions for possible foot placement? We addressed this question by investigating the impact of perceptual grouping on foot placement in humans. Participants performed a stepping stone task in which pathways consisted of target stones in a spatially regular path of foot falls and visual distractor stones in their proximity. Target and distractor stones differed in shape and colour so that each subset of stones could be easily grouped perceptually. In half of the trials, one target stone swapped shape and colour with a distractor in its close proximity. We show that in these ‘swapped’ conditions, participants chose the perceptually groupable, instead of the spatially regular, stepping location in over 40% of trials, even if the distance between perceptually groupable steps was substantially larger than normal step width/length. This reveals that the existence of a pathway that could be traversed without spatial disruption to periodic stepping is not sufficient to guarantee participants will select it and suggests competition between different types of visual input when choosing foot placement. We propose that a bias in foot placement choice in favour of visual grouping exists as, in nature, sudden changes in visual characteristics of the ground increase the uncertainty for stability. PMID:26587273

  4. Photoelectron Spectroscopy in Advanced Placement Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benigna, James

    2014-01-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) is a new addition to the Advanced Placement (AP) Chemistry curriculum. This article explains the rationale for its inclusion, an overview of how the PES instrument records data, how the data can be analyzed, and how to include PES data in the course. Sample assessment items and analysis are included, as well as…

  5. Honors and Advanced Placement Chemistry Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Summarizes papers and minipapers on honors and advanced placement (AP) chemistry courses presented at the Seventh Biennial Conference on Chemical Education (Stillwater, Oklahoma 1982). Advantages/disadvantages of AP chemistry, high school/college courses, and grouping all chemistry students in one class were among the topics discussed. (JN)

  6. Preoperative Predictors for Noncopers to Pass Return to Sports Criteria After ACL Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Zeni, Joseph; Di Stasi, Stephanie; Axe, Michael J.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Less than 50% of athletes pass criteria to return to sports (RTS) 6 months after ACL reconstruction (ACLR). Using data on 38 noncopers, we hypothesized that preoperative age, quadriceps strength index (QI), and knee flexion moments (KFM) during gait would predict the ability to pass/fail RTS criteria and that preoperative quadriceps strength gains would be predictive of passing RTS criteria. Gait analysis and strength data were collected before and after a preoperative intervention and 6 months after ACLR. Age, QI, and KFM each contributed to the predictability to pass or fail RTS criteria 6 months after ACLR. Collectively, the variables predict 69% who would pass and 82% who would fail RTS criteria 6 months after ACLR. Younger athletes who have symmetrical quadriceps strength and greater KFM were more likely to pass RTS criteria. Further, 63% of those who increased preoperative quadriceps strength passed RTS criteria, whereas 73% who did not failed. Increasing quadriceps strength in noncopers before ACLR seems warranted. PMID:22983930

  7. Microbubble tunneling in gel phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Caskey, Charles F.; Qin, Shengping; Dayton, Paul A.; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2009-01-01

    Insonified microbubbles were observed in vessels within a gel with a Young’s modulus similar to that of tissue, demonstrating shape instabilities, liquid jets, and the formation of small tunnels. In this study, tunnel formulation occurred in the direction of the propagating ultrasound wave, where radiation pressure directed the contact of the bubble and gel, facilitating the activity of the liquid jets. Combinations of ultrasonic parameters and microbubble concentrations that are relevant for diagnostic imaging and drug delivery and that lead to tunnel formation were applied and the resulting tunnel formation was quantified. PMID:19425620

  8. Magnetic tunnel junction pattern technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Eugene; Schwarz, Benjamin; Choi, Chang Ju; Kula, Witold; Wolfman, Jerome; Ounadjela, Kamel; Geha, Sam

    2003-05-01

    We have developed a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) pattern technique that involves transforming the magnetic layer above the tunnel barrier in unwanted areas into an insulator, thus providing insulation between different MTJ devices without suffering common tunnel barrier shorting problems. With this technique, 90%-100% yielding MTJ devices have been observed. MTJ results using this process are superior to an etching based process. Switching distribution of patterned magnetic bits is also narrower using this novel technique. Process control and the ability to stop on the tunnel barrier have been demonstrated.

  9. Tunneling above the crossover temperature.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Barcia, Sonia; Flores, Jesús R; Kästner, Johannes

    2014-01-09

    Quantum mechanical tunneling of atoms plays a significant role in many chemical reactions. The crossover temperature between classical and quantum movement is a convenient preliminary indication of the importance of tunneling for a particular reaction. Here we show, using instanton theory, that quantum tunneling is possible significantly above this crossover temperature for specific forms of the potential energy surface. We demonstrate the effect on an analytic potential as well as a chemical system. While protons move asynchronously along a Grotthuss chain in the classical high-temperature range, the onset of tunneling results in a synchronization of their movement.

  10. Ferroelectric tunneling under bias voltages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Z. J.; Chen, G.; Zhou, P.; Mei, Z. H.; Zhang, T. J.

    2017-01-01

    Theoretical investigations of ferroelectric tunneling in a SrRuO3/BaTiO3/Pt junction were conducted, and critical expressions for the surface charge density in the electrodes and the potential distribution across the tunnel junction were derived. It was found that the screening charges associated with the ferroelectric polarization and the charging effect of the capacitor jointly contribute to the charges in the electrodes. A current-voltage study simulating the ‘read’ operation indicated that the tunneling electroresistance effect increases with the ferroelectric thickness, and the tunneling electroresistance values agree well with experimental results.

  11. Rehabilitation Manpower Specialist--A Job Description of Placement Personnel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchison, Jack; Cogan, Floyd

    1974-01-01

    The article responds to a national survey of State rehabilitation job placement personnel and synthesizes the materials received from 42 states pertaining to placement efforts, personnel, and duties. (EA)

  12. Persistent Biomechanical Alterations After ACL Reconstruction Are Associated With Early Cartilage Matrix Changes Detected by Quantitative MR

    PubMed Central

    Amano, Keiko; Pedoia, Valentina; Su, Favian; Souza, Richard B.; Li, Xiaojuan; Ma, C. Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Background: The effectiveness of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in preventing early osteoarthritis is debated. Restoring the original biomechanics may potentially prevent degeneration, but apparent pathomechanisms have yet to be described. Newer quantitative magnetic resonance (qMR) imaging techniques, specifically T1ρ and T2, offer novel, noninvasive methods of visualizing and quantifying early cartilage degeneration. Purpose: To determine the tibiofemoral biomechanical alterations before and after ACL reconstruction using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to evaluate the association between biomechanics and cartilage degeneration using T1ρ and T2. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Methods: Knee MRIs of 51 individuals (mean age, 29.5 ± 8.4 years) with unilateral ACL injuries were obtained prior to surgery; 19 control subjects (mean age, 30.7 ± 5.3 years) were also scanned. Follow-up MRIs were obtained at 6 months and 1 year. Tibial position (TP), internal tibial rotation (ITR), and T1ρ and T2 were calculated using an in-house Matlab program. Student t tests, repeated measures, and regression models were used to compare differences between injured and uninjured sides, observe longitudinal changes, and evaluate correlations between TP, ITR, and T1ρ and T2. Results: TP was significantly more anterior on the injured side at all time points (P < .001). ITR was significantly increased on the injured side prior to surgery (P = .033). At 1 year, a more anterior TP was associated with elevated T1ρ (P = .002) and T2 (P = .026) in the posterolateral tibia and with decreased T2 in the central lateral femur (P = .048); ITR was associated with increased T1ρ in the posteromedial femur (P = .009). ITR at 6 months was associated with increased T1ρ at 1 year in the posteromedial tibia (P = .029). Conclusion: Persistent biomechanical alterations after ACL reconstruction are related to significant changes in cartilage T1ρ and T2 at 1 year

  13. The Dedicated Chaperone Acl4 Escorts Ribosomal Protein Rpl4 to Its Nuclear Pre-60S Assembly Site

    PubMed Central

    Pillet, Benjamin; García-Gómez, Juan J.; Pausch, Patrick; Falquet, Laurent; Bange, Gert; de la Cruz, Jesús; Kressler, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomes are the highly complex macromolecular assemblies dedicated to the synthesis of all cellular proteins from mRNA templates. The main principles underlying the making of ribosomes are conserved across eukaryotic organisms and this process has been studied in most detail in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast ribosomes are composed of four ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) and 79 ribosomal proteins (r-proteins). Most r-proteins need to be transported from the cytoplasm to the nucleus where they get incorporated into the evolving pre-ribosomal particles. Due to the high abundance and difficult physicochemical properties of r-proteins, their correct folding and fail-safe targeting to the assembly site depends largely on general, as well as highly specialized, chaperone and transport systems. Many r-proteins contain universally conserved or eukaryote-specific internal loops and/or terminal extensions, which were shown to mediate their nuclear targeting and association with dedicated chaperones in a growing number of cases. The 60S r-protein Rpl4 is particularly interesting since it harbours a conserved long internal loop and a prominent C-terminal eukaryote-specific extension. Here we show that both the long internal loop and the C-terminal eukaryote-specific extension are strictly required for the functionality of Rpl4. While Rpl4 contains at least five distinct nuclear localization signals (NLS), the C-terminal part of the long internal loop associates with a specific binding partner, termed Acl4. Absence of Acl4 confers a severe slow-growth phenotype and a deficiency in the production of 60S subunits. Genetic and biochemical evidence indicates that Acl4 can be considered as a dedicated chaperone of Rpl4. Notably, Acl4 localizes to both the cytoplasm and nucleus and it has the capacity to capture nascent Rpl4 in a co-translational manner. Taken together, our findings indicate that the dedicated chaperone Acl4 accompanies Rpl4 from the cytoplasm to its pre-60S

  14. The Dedicated Chaperone Acl4 Escorts Ribosomal Protein Rpl4 to Its Nuclear Pre-60S Assembly Site.

    PubMed

    Pillet, Benjamin; García-Gómez, Juan J; Pausch, Patrick; Falquet, Laurent; Bange, Gert; de la Cruz, Jesús; Kressler, Dieter

    2015-10-01

    Ribosomes are the highly complex macromolecular assemblies dedicated to the synthesis of all cellular proteins from mRNA templates. The main principles underlying the making of ribosomes are conserved across eukaryotic organisms and this process has been studied in most detail in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast ribosomes are composed of four ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) and 79 ribosomal proteins (r-proteins). Most r-proteins need to be transported from the cytoplasm to the nucleus where they get incorporated into the evolving pre-ribosomal particles. Due to the high abundance and difficult physicochemical properties of r-proteins, their correct folding and fail-safe targeting to the assembly site depends largely on general, as well as highly specialized, chaperone and transport systems. Many r-proteins contain universally conserved or eukaryote-specific internal loops and/or terminal extensions, which were shown to mediate their nuclear targeting and association with dedicated chaperones in a growing number of cases. The 60S r-protein Rpl4 is particularly interesting since it harbours a conserved long internal loop and a prominent C-terminal eukaryote-specific extension. Here we show that both the long internal loop and the C-terminal eukaryote-specific extension are strictly required for the functionality of Rpl4. While Rpl4 contains at least five distinct nuclear localization signals (NLS), the C-terminal part of the long internal loop associates with a specific binding partner, termed Acl4. Absence of Acl4 confers a severe slow-growth phenotype and a deficiency in the production of 60S subunits. Genetic and biochemical evidence indicates that Acl4 can be considered as a dedicated chaperone of Rpl4. Notably, Acl4 localizes to both the cytoplasm and nucleus and it has the capacity to capture nascent Rpl4 in a co-translational manner. Taken together, our findings indicate that the dedicated chaperone Acl4 accompanies Rpl4 from the cytoplasm to its pre-60S

  15. SPOT-A SENSOR PLACEMENT OPTIMIZATION TOOL FOR ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    journal article This paper presents SPOT, a Sensor Placement Optimization Tool. SPOT provides a toolkit that facilitates research in sensor placement optimization and enables the practical application of sensor placement solvers to real-world CWS design applications. This paper provides an overview of SPOT’s key features, and then illustrates how this tool can be flexibly applied to solve a variety of different types of sensor placement problems.

  16. Placement techniques for the standard transistor array (Star)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, G. W.; Carroll, B. D.

    1978-01-01

    Techniques for the placement of digital logic cells on STAR's (Standard Transistor Arrays) were developed. These techniques are designed to provide placement automation capabilities to low volume users with limited available processing power. A series of programs implementing the placement techniques was written and a number of test cases executed. Results of these test cases indicate that the methods achieve near optimum placements with respect to network routability.

  17. Target Tracking, Approach, and Camera Handoff for Automated Instrument Placement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bajracharya, Max; Diaz-Calderon, Antonio; Robinson, Matthew; Powell, Mark

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the target designation, tracking, approach, and camera handoff technologies required to achieve accurate, single-command autonomous instrument placement for a planetary rover. It focuses on robust tracking integrated with obstacle avoidance during the approach phase, and image-based camera handoff to allow vision-based instrument placement. It also provides initial results from a complete system combining these technologies with rover base placement to maximize arm manipulability and image-based instrument placement.

  18. Abnormal Mechanical Loading Induces Cartilage Degeneration by Accelerating Meniscus Hypertrophy and Mineralization After ACL Injuries In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Du, Guoqing; Zhan, Hongsheng; Ding, Daofang; Wang, Shaowei; Wei, Xiaochun; Wei, Fangyuan; Zhang, Jianzhong; Bilgen, Bahar; Reginato, Anthony M.; Fleming, Braden C.; Deng, Jin; Wei, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Background Although patients with an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury have a high risk of developing posttraumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA), the role of meniscus hypertrophy and mineralization in PTOA after an ACL injury remains unknown. Purpose/Hypothesis The purpose of this study was to determine if menisci respond to abnormal loading and if an ACL injury results in meniscus hypertrophy and calcification. The hypotheses were that (1) abnormal mechanical loading after an ACL injury induces meniscus hypertrophy and mineralization, which correlates to articular cartilage damage in vivo, and (2) abnormal mechanical loading on bovine meniscus explants induces the overexpression of hypertrophic and mineralization markers in vitro. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Methods In vivo guinea pig study (hypothesis 1): Three-month-old male Hartley guinea pigs (n = 9) underwent ACL transection (ACLT) on the right knee; the left knee served as the control. Calcification in the menisci was evaluated by calcein labeling 1 and 5 days before knee harvesting at 5.5 months. Cartilage and meniscus damage and mineralization were quantified by the Osteoarthritis Research Society International score and meniscus grade, respectively. Indian hedgehog (Ihh), matrix metalloproteinase–13 (MMP-13), collagen type X (Col X), progressive ankylosis homolog (ANKH), ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase–1 (ENPP1), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi), and inorganic phosphate (Pi) concentrations were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In vitro bovine meniscus explant study (hypothesis 2): Bovine meniscus explants were subjected to 25% strain at 0.3 Hz for 1, 2, and 3 hours. Cell viability was determined using live/dead staining. The levels of mRNA expression and protein levels were measured using real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot after 24, 48, and 72 hours in

  19. Carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Aroori, Somaiah; Spence, Roy AJ

    2008-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is one of the most common peripheral neuropathies. It affects mainly middle aged women. In the majority of patients the exact cause and pathogenesis of CTS is unclear. Although several occupations have been linked to increased incidence and prevalence of CTS the evidence is not clear. Occupational CTS is uncommon and it is essential to exclude all other causes particularly the intrinsic factors such as obesity before attributing it to occupation. The risk of CTS is high in occupations involving exposure to high pressure, high force, repetitive work, and vibrating tools. The classic symptoms of CTS include nocturnal pain associated with tingling and numbness in the distribution of median nerve in the hand. There are several physical examination tests that will help in the diagnosis of CTS but none of these tests are diagnostic on their own. The gold standard test is nerve conduction studies. However, they are also associated with false positive and false negative results. The diagnosis of CTS should be based on history, physical examination and results of electrophysiological studies. The patient with mild symptoms of CTS can be managed with conservative treatment, particularly local injection of steroids. However, in moderate to severe cases, surgery is the only treatment that provides cure. The basic principle of surgery is to increase the volume of the carpal tunnel by dividing transverse carpal ligament to release the pressure on the median nerve. Apart from early recovery and return to work there is no significant difference in terms of early and late complications and long-term pain relief between endoscopic and open carpal tunnel surgery. PMID:18269111

  20. Full Scale Tunnel (FST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Construction of Full Scale Tunnel (FST). In November 1929, Smith DeFrance submitted his recommendations for the general design of the Full Scale Wind Tunnel. The last on his list concerned the division of labor required to build this unusual facility. He believed the job had five parts and described them as follows: 'It is proposed that invitations be sent out for bids on five groups of items. The first would be for one contract on the complete structure; second the same as first, including the erection of the cones but not the fabrication, since this would be more of a shipyard job; third would cover structural steel, cover, sash and doors, but not cones or foundation; fourth, foundations; an fifth, fabrication of cones.' DeFrance's memorandum prompted the NACA to solicit estimates from a large number of companies. Preliminary designs and estimates were prepared and submitted to the Bureau of the Budget and Congress appropriated funds on February 20, 1929. The main construction contract with the J.A. Jones Company of Charlotte, North Carolina was signed one year later on February 12, 1930. It was a peculiar structure as the building's steel framework is visible on the outside of the building. DeFrance described this in NACA TR No. 459: 'The entire equipment is housed in a structure, the outside walls of which serve as the outer walls of the return passages. The over-all length of the tunnel is 434 feet 6 inches, the width 222 feet, and the maximum height 97 feet. The framework is of structural steel....' (pp. 292-293)

  1. Full Scale Tunnel (FST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Construction of Full-Scale Tunnel (FST). In November 1929, Smith DeFrance submitted his recommendations for the general design of the Full Scale Wind Tunnel. The last on his list concerned the division of labor required to build this unusual facility. He believed the job had five parts and described them as follows: 'It is proposed that invitations be sent out for bids on five groups of items. The first would be for one contract on the complete structure; second the same as first, including the erection of the cones but not the fabrication, since this would be more of a shipyard job; third would cover structural steel, cover, sash and doors, but not cones or foundation; fourth, foundations; and fifth, fabrication of cones.' DeFrance's memorandum prompted the NACA to solicit estimates from a large number of companies. Preliminary designs and estimates were prepared and submitted to the Bureau of the Budget and Congress appropriated funds on February 20, 1929. The main construction contract with the J.A. Jones Company of Charlotte, North Carolina was signed one year later on February 12, 1930. It was a peculiar structure as the building's steel framework is visible on the outside of the building. DeFrance described this in NACA TR No. 459: 'The entire equipment is housed in a structure, the outside walls of which serve as the outer walls of the return passages. The over-all length of the tunnel is 434 feet 6 inches, the width 222 feet, and the maximum height 97 feet. The framework is of structural steel....' (pp. 292-293).

  2. Prediction of Supported Employment Placements by Job Developers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culver, Jill Blair; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The study attempted to identify activities performed by 47 job developers that positively or negatively influenced job placement. Variance in job placement was influenced by marketing activities, available job development time, use of specific client assessment procedures, frequency of use of trial job placements, and gender of the job developers.…

  3. 38 CFR 21.252 - Job development and placement services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Job development and... 38 U.S.C. Chapter 31 Employment Services § 21.252 Job development and placement services. (a) General. Job development and placement services may include: (1) Direct placement assistance by VA;...

  4. 38 CFR 21.252 - Job development and placement services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Job development and... 38 U.S.C. Chapter 31 Employment Services § 21.252 Job development and placement services. (a) General. Job development and placement services may include: (1) Direct placement assistance by VA;...

  5. 38 CFR 21.252 - Job development and placement services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Job development and... 38 U.S.C. Chapter 31 Employment Services § 21.252 Job development and placement services. (a) General. Job development and placement services may include: (1) Direct placement assistance by VA;...

  6. 38 CFR 21.252 - Job development and placement services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Job development and... 38 U.S.C. Chapter 31 Employment Services § 21.252 Job development and placement services. (a) General. Job development and placement services may include: (1) Direct placement assistance by VA;...

  7. Brand Placement and Consumer Choice: An in-Store Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigurdsson, Valdimar; Saevarsson, Hugi; Foxall, Gordon

    2009-01-01

    An in-store experiment was performed to investigate the effects of shelf placement (high, middle, low) on consumers' purchases of potato chips. Placement of potato chips on the middle shelf was associated with the highest percentage of purchases. The results confirm the importance of item placement as a factor in consumers' buying behavior.…

  8. BRAND PLACEMENT AND CONSUMER CHOICE: AN IN-STORE EXPERIMENT

    PubMed Central

    Sigurdsson, Valdimar; Saevarsson, Hugi; Foxall, Gordon

    2009-01-01

    An in-store experiment was performed to investigate the effects of shelf placement (high, middle, low) on consumers' purchases of potato chips. Placement of potato chips on the middle shelf was associated with the highest percentage of purchases. The results confirm the importance of item placement as a factor in consumers' buying behavior. PMID:20190939

  9. West Virginia Guidebook: Job Placement Services: What's Your Need?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Thomas R., Jr.; And Others

    Opening with a discussion of the rationale of a school-based job placement program, the school's responsibilities, and student needs, the paper focuses on the organization of a placement service, the major functions of the job placement coordinator, and testing services. Organizational considerations include: labor laws, scope of service, the…

  10. Brand placement and consumer choice: an in-store experiment.

    PubMed

    Sigurdsson, Valdimar; Saevarsson, Hugi; Foxall, Gordon

    2009-01-01

    An in-store experiment was performed to investigate the effects of shelf placement (high, middle, low) on consumers' purchases of potato chips. Placement of potato chips on the middle shelf was associated with the highest percentage of purchases. The results confirm the importance of item placement as a factor in consumers' buying behavior.

  11. Parental Status Characteristics and Self-Placement of Young Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBroom, William H.; Hammer, Gail

    1983-01-01

    Examines status self-placement literature. Tests Talcott Parsons's inferences that, in predicting young adults' self-placement, (1) father's occupation is more important than other status variables of the father, (2) mother's employment makes the process of self-placement less predictable, and (3) "emancipation" from family of…

  12. 41 CFR 60-2.16 - Placement goals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... of discrimination. (c) Where, pursuant to § 60-2.15, a contractor is required to establish a placement goal for a particular job group, the contractor must establish a percentage annual placement goal... job group. (d) The placement goal-setting process described above contemplates that contractors...

  13. 41 CFR 60-2.16 - Placement goals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of discrimination. (c) Where, pursuant to § 60-2.15, a contractor is required to establish a placement goal for a particular job group, the contractor must establish a percentage annual placement goal... job group. (d) The placement goal-setting process described above contemplates that contractors...

  14. 41 CFR 60-2.16 - Placement goals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of discrimination. (c) Where, pursuant to § 60-2.15, a contractor is required to establish a placement goal for a particular job group, the contractor must establish a percentage annual placement goal... job group. (d) The placement goal-setting process described above contemplates that contractors...

  15. 41 CFR 60-2.16 - Placement goals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of discrimination. (c) Where, pursuant to § 60-2.15, a contractor is required to establish a placement goal for a particular job group, the contractor must establish a percentage annual placement goal... job group. (d) The placement goal-setting process described above contemplates that contractors...

  16. The Placement Director of the '80s: A Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crouch, Larry R.; Tolle, Donald J.

    1982-01-01

    Conducted a national survey of career planning and placement directors (N=1,032) at colleges and universities to determine, describe, and analyze selected factors concerning the careers of placement directors. Results indicated the typical placement director in a four-year college is male, holds a masters degree, and reports to student affairs.…

  17. Better Prepared, Better Placement: An Online Resource for Health Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grace, Sandra; O'Neil, Ross

    2014-01-01

    Despite calls for better preparation of students and supervisors for clinical placement, few dedicated pre-placement resources have been developed. The aim of this project was to design, pilot, and evaluate an online resource to prepare health students and supervisors for clinical placements. Development of an online resource was informed by the…

  18. Recurrent tarsal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gould, John S

    2014-09-01

    Recurrence of tarsal tunnel syndrome after surgery may be due to inadequate release, lack of understanding or appreciation of the actual anatomy involved, variations in the anatomy of the nerve(s), failure to execute the release properly, bleeding with subsequent scarring, damage to the nerve and branches, persistent hypersensitivity of the nerves, and preexisting intrinsic damage to the nerve. Approaches include more thorough release, use of barrier materials to decrease adherence of the nerve to surrounding tissues to avoid traction neuritis, excisions of neuromas using conduits, and consideration of nerve stimulators and systemic medications to deal with persistent neural pain.

  19. Icing Research Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chennault, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    The Icing Research Tunnel in Building 11 at the NASA Glenn Research Center is committed to researching the effects of in flight icing on aircraft and testing ways to stop the formation of hazardous icing conditions on planes. During this summer, I worked here with Richard DelRosa, the lead engineer for this area. address one of the major concerns of aviation: icing conditions. During the war, many planes crashed (especially supply planes going over the.Himalayas) because ice built up in their wings and clogged the engines. To this day, it remains the largest ice tunnel in the world, with a test section that measures 6 feet high, 9 feet long, and 20 feet wide. It can simulate airspeeds from 50 to 300 miles per hour at temperatures as low as -50 Fahrenheit. Using these capabilities, IRT can simulate actual conditions at high altitudes. The first thing I did was creating a cross reference in Microsoft Excel. It lists commands for the DPU units that control the pressure and temperature variations in the tunnel, as well as the type of command (keyboard, multiplier, divide, etc). The cross reference also contains the algorithm for every command, and which page it is listed in on the control sheet (visual Auto-CAD graphs, which I helped to make). I actually spent most of the time on the computer using Auto-CAD. I drew a diagram of the entire icing tunnel and then drew diagrams of its various parts. Between my mentor and me, we have drawings of every part of it, from the spray bars to the thermocouples, power cabinets, input-output connectors for power systems, and layouts of various other machines. I was also responsible for drawing schematics for the Escort system (which controls the spray bars), the power system, DPUs, and other electrical systems. In my spare time, I am attempting to build and program the "toddler". Toddler is a walking robot that I have to program in PBASIC language. When complete, it should be able to walk on level terrain while avoiding obstacles in

  20. RISKS AND CONSEQUENCES OF USING THE TRANSPORTAL TECHNIQUE IN RECONSTRUCTING THE ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT: RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN THE FEMORAL TUNNEL, LATERAL SUPERIOR GENICULAR ARTERY AND LATERAL EPICONDYLE OF THE FEMORAL CONDYLE

    PubMed Central

    Astur, Diego Costa; Aleluia, Vinicius; Santos, Ciro Veronese; Arliani, Gustavo Gonçalves; Badra, Ricardo; Oliveira, Saulo Gomes; Kaleka, Camila Cohen; Cohen, Moisés

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Define a security zone to avoid possibles vascular and ligamentar complications during anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Methods: Arthroscopic reconstruction using the transtibial and transportal technique in cadaver knees was performed followed by dissection and measurement of the distance between the femoral tunnel and the proximal attachment of the lateral collateral ligament and the femoral tunnel and the lateral superior genicular artery. Results: The measure of the analysed distances show us an aproximation between the major branch of the lateral superior genicular artery and the femoral insertion of the colateral lateral ligament and the femoral tunnel during the transportal technique. Conclusion: We realize that the use of technical ship it to arthroscopic ACL reconstruction has a higher probability of injury to the lateral geniculate artery and insertion of the lateral collateral ligament, promoting post-surgical complications such as instability of the knee, osteonecrosis of the femoral condyle and ligamentização graft. PMID:27047873

  1. Laparoscopic-assisted catheter insertion for continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis: A case report of simple technique for optimal placement

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Tomohide; Nakauchi, Masaya; Nagao, Kazuhiro; Oike, Fumitaka; Tanaka, Takahiro; Gunji, Daigo; Okada, Noriyuki

    2013-01-01

    A 40-year-old male underwent tube placement surgery for continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). A 2-cm skin incision was made, and the peritoneum was reflected enough to perform secure fixation. A swan-necked, double-felted silicone CAPD catheter was inserted, and the felt cuff was sutured to the peritoneum to avoid postoperative leakage. An adequate gradient for tube fixation to the abdominal wall was confirmed. The CAPD tube was passed through a subcutaneous tunnel. Aeroperitoneum was induced to confirm that there was no air leakage from the sites of CAPD insertion. Two trocars were placed, and we confirmed that the CAPD tube led to the rectovesical pouch. Tip position was reliably observed laparoscopically. Optimal patency of the CAPD tube was confirmed during surgery. Placement of CAPD catheters by laparoscopic-assisted surgery has clear advantages in simplicity, safety, flexibility, and certainty. Laparoscopic technique should be considered the first choice for CAPD tube insertion. PMID:24179625

  2. EXERCISES THAT FACILITATE OPTIMAL HAMSTRING AND QUADRICEPS CO-ACTIVATION TO HELP DECREASE ACL INJURY RISK IN HEALTHY FEMALES: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE.

    PubMed Central

    Dedinsky, Rachel; Baker, Lindsey; Imbus, Samuel; Bowman, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    Background Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is common among females due to many anatomic, hormonal, and neuromuscular risk factors. One modifiable risk factor that places females at increased risk of ACL injury is a poor hamstrings: quadriceps (H:Q) co-activation ratio, which should be 0.6 or greater in order to decrease the stress placed on the ACL. Exercises that produce more quadriceps dominant muscle activation can add to the tension placed upon the ACL, potentially increasing the risk of ACL injury. Hypothesis/Purpose The purpose of this systematic review was to compare quadriceps and hamstring muscle activation during common closed kinetic chain therapeutic exercises in healthy female knees to determine what exercises are able to produce adequate H:Q co-activation ratios. Study Design Systematic Review Methods Multiple online databases were systematically searched and screened for inclusion. Eight articles were identified for inclusion. Data on mean electromyography (EMG) activation of both quadriceps and hamstring muscles, % maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC), and H:Q co-activation ratios were extracted from the studies. Quality assessment was performed on all included studies. Results Exercises analyzed in the studies included variations of the double leg squat, variations of the single leg squat, lateral step-up, Fitter, Stairmaster® (Core Health and Fitness, Vancouver, WA), and slide board. All exercises, except the squat machine with posterior support at the level of the scapula and feet placed 50 cm in front of the hips, produced higher quadriceps muscle activation compared to hamstring muscle activation. Conclusion Overall, two leg squats demonstrate poor H:Q co-activation ratios. Single leg exercises, when performed between 30 and 90 degrees of knee flexion, produce adequate H:Q ratios, thereby potentially reducing the risk of tensile stress on the ACL and ACL injury. Level of Evidence 2a- Systematic Review of Cohort Studies PMID

  3. Biliary Duct-to-Duct Reconstruction with a Tunneled Retroperitoneal T-Tube During Liver Transplantation: a Novel Approach to Decrease Biliary Leaks After T-Tube Removal.

    PubMed

    Navez, Julie; Mohkam, Kayvan; Darnis, Benjamin; Cazauran, Jean-Baptiste; Ducerf, Christian; Mabrut, Jean-Yves

    2017-04-01

    The benefit of placing a T-tube for duct-to-duct biliary reconstruction during orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) remains controversial because it could be associated with specific complications, especially at the time of T-tube removal. While the utility of T-tube during OLT represents an eternal debate, only a few technical refinements of T-tube placement have been described since the report of the original technique by Starzl and colleagues. Herein, we present a novel technique of T-tube placement for duct-to-duct biliary reconstruction during OLT, using a tunneled retroperitoneal route. On the basis of our experience of 305 patients who benefitted from the reported technique, the placement of a tunneled retroperitoneal biliary T-tube appears to be safe and results in a low rate of biliary complications, especially at the time of T-tube removal.

  4. The Langley Wind Tunnel Enterprise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulson, John W., Jr.; Kumar, Ajay; Kegelman, Jerome T.

    1998-01-01

    After 4 years of existence, the Langley WTE is alive and growing. Significant improvements in the operation of wind tunnels have been demonstrated and substantial further improvements are expected when we are able to truly address and integrate all the processes affecting the wind tunnel testing cycle.

  5. Supersonic Wind Tunnel Test Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1957-01-01

    8ft x 6ft Supersonic Wind Tunnel Test-Section showing changes made in Stainless Steel walls with 17 inch inlet model installation. The model is the ACN Nozzle model used for aircraft engines. The Supersonic Wind Tunnel is located in the Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory, now John H. Glenn Research Center

  6. Early Childhood: Funnels and Tunnels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowlkes, Mary Anne

    1985-01-01

    Suggests using funnels and tunnels in combination with water, blocks, transportation toys, and other materials to help teach preschoolers to make predictions. Many examples are included for using funnels to understand properties of liquids and for using tunnels to predict order. (DH)

  7. Two tunnels to inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Aguirre, Anthony; Johnson, Matthew C.

    2006-06-15

    We investigate the formation via tunneling of inflating (false-vacuum) bubbles in a true-vacuum background, and the reverse process. Using effective potentials from the junction condition formalism, all true- and false-vacuum bubble solutions with positive interior and exterior cosmological constant, and arbitrary mass are catalogued. We find that tunneling through the same effective potential appears to describe two distinct processes: one in which the initial and final states are separated by a wormhole (the Farhi-Guth-Guven mechanism), and one in which they are either in the same hubble volume or separated by a cosmological horizon. In the zero-mass limit, the first process corresponds to the creation of an inhomogenous universe from nothing, while the second mechanism is equivalent to the nucleation of true- or false-vacuum Coleman-De Luccia bubbles. We compute the probabilities of both mechanisms in the WKB approximation using semiclassical Hamiltonian methods, and find that--assuming both process are allowed--neither mechanism dominates in all regimes.

  8. Carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chammas, M

    2014-04-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is the commonest entrapment neuropathy and is due to combined compression and traction on the median nerve at the wrist. It is often idiopathic. Although spontaneous resolution is possible, the usual natural evolution is slow progression. Diagnosis is mainly clinical depending on symptoms and provocative tests. An electromyogram is recommended preoperatively and in cases of work-related disease. Medical treatment is indicated early on or in cases with no deficit and consists of steroid injection in the canal or a night splint in neutral wrist position. Surgical treatment is by section of the flexor retinaculum and is indicated in resistance to medical treatment, in deficit or acute cases. Mini-invasive techniques such as endoscopic and mini-open approaches to carpal tunnel release with higher learning curves are justified by the shorter functional recovery time compared to classical surgery, but with identical long-term results. The choice depends on the surgeon's preference, patient information, stage of severity, etiology and availability of material. Results are satisfactory in 90% of cases. Nerve recovery depends on the stage of severity as well as general patient factors. Recovery of force takes about 2-3 months after the disappearance of 'pillar pain'. This operation has a benign reputation with a 0.2-0.5% reported neurovascular complication rate.

  9. Tunneling magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Edward R.; Gomez, Romel D.; Adly, Amr A.; Mayergoyz, Isaak D.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a powerful new tool for studying the magnetic patterns on magnetic recording media. This was accomplished by modifying a conventional scanning tunneling microscope. The fine-wire probe that is used to image surface topography was replaced with a flexible magnetic probe. Images obtained with these probes reveal both the surface topography and the magnetic structure. We have made a thorough theoretical analysis of the interaction between the probe and the magnetic fields emanating from a typical recorded surface. Quantitative data about the constituent magnetic fields can then be obtained. We have employed these techniques in studies of two of the most important issues of magnetic record: data overwrite and maximizing data-density. These studies have shown: (1) overwritten data can be retrieved under certain conditions; and (2) improvements in data-density will require new magnetic materials. In the course of these studies we have developed new techniques to analyze magnetic fields of recorded media. These studies are both theoretical and experimental and combined with the use of our magnetic force scanning tunneling microscope should lead to further breakthroughs in the field of magnetic recording.

  10. Tunneling in Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giaever, Ivar

    2002-03-01

    It has been said that Thomas Edison's greatest invention was that of the "Research Laboratory" as a social institution. My greatest discovery was when I learned at 29 years of age that it was possible to work in such an institution and get paid for doing research. I had become interested in physics, gotten a job at General Electric Research Laboratory and found a great mentor in John C. Fischer, who besides instructing me in physics told me that sooner or later we all would become historians of science. I guess for me that time is now, because I have been asked to tell you about my second greatest discovery: Tunneling in superconductors. My great fortune was to be at the right place at the right time, where I had access to outstanding and helpful (not necessary an oxymoron) physicists. Hopefully I will be able to convey to you some of the fun and excitement of that area in this recollection. If you become real interested you may find a written version in my Nobel Prize talk: "Electron Tunneling and Superconductivity" Les Prix Nobel en 1973 or Science 183, 1253-1258 1974 or Reviews of Modern Physics 46 (2), 245-250 1974

  11. 15-Foot Spin Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1935-01-01

    A researcher is launching a model into the tunnel airstream of the 15-Foot Spin Tunnel. Charles Zimmerman wrote in NASA TR No. 557: 'After the observations have been made, the model is lowered into a net held in the air stream by one of the operators or into a large bowl-shaped net at the bottom of the test section. When lowered into the large net, the model is retrieved with a long- handled clamp.' (p. 267) 'The models used are generally 1/10 to 1/16 scale. The size of the models is limited by the wing span and the wing loading. The maximum allowable span is about 36 inches; the maximum wing loading is about 1.3 pounds per square foot.' (p. 266) 'Balsa wood is the usual structural material because of its low density. It is necessary to hollow out the after portion of the fuselage and to cut out a large portion of the wood in the wings to permit proper mass distribution. The wing cut-outs are covered with silk tissue paper. The leading and trailing edges and tips of the wings are fitted with strips of spruce, pattern pine, or bamboo inset into the edge of the balsa to prevent disfigurement from accidental blows or from striking the safety netting. Lead is used for ballast.' (p. 266)

  12. Tunneling in thin MOS structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maserjian, J.

    1974-01-01

    Recent results on tunneling in thin MOS structures are described. Thermally grown SiO2 films in the thickness range of 22-40 A have been shown to be effectively uniform on an atomic scale and exhibit an extremely abrupt oxide-silicon interface. Resonant reflections are observed at this interface for Fowler-Nordheim tunneling and are shown to agree with the exact theory for a trapezoidal barrier. Tunneling at lower fields is consistent with elastic tunneling into the silicon direct conduction band and, at still lower fields, inelastic tunneling into the indirect conduction band. Approximate dispersion relations are obtained over portions of the silicon-dioxide energy gap and conduction band.

  13. Technological advances for PICC placement and management.

    PubMed

    Pettit, Janet

    2007-06-01

    Placement of a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) is often complicated by the infant's small size and previous use of the peripheral veins, making the traditional means of insertion inadequate. New techniques and technologies, previously reserved for pediatric and adult patients, are now available for use in neonates and can enhance the practice of neonatal PICC teams. The modified Seldinger technique allows insertion of the PICC via smaller peripheral veins while decreasing venous trauma and enhancing the rate of successful placement. A second useful technique, the catheter exchange procedure, allows insertion of a new catheter within the same vein when complications such as occlusion, breakage, or inappropriate position occur and require removal of the currently dwelling PICC. Clinicians caring for neonates and infants must continually update their knowledge and skill by incorporating new techniques into their practice.

  14. Customized ATP towpreg. [Automated Tow Placement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandusky, Donald A.; Marchello, Joseph M.; Baucom, Robert M.; Johnston, Norman J.

    1992-01-01

    Automated tow placement (ATP) utilizes robotic technology to lay down adjacent polymer-matrix-impregnated carbon fiber tows on a tool surface. Consolidation and cure during ATP requires that void elimination and polymer matrix adhesion be accomplished in the short period of heating and pressure rolling that follows towpreg ribbon placement from the robot head to the tool. This study examined the key towpreg ribbon properties and dimensions which play a significant role in ATP. Analysis of the heat transfer process window indicates that adequate heating can be achieved at lay down rates as high as 1 m/sec. While heat transfer did not appear to be the limiting factor, resin flow and fiber movement into tow lap gaps could be. Accordingly, consideration was given to towpreg ribbon having uniform yet non-rectangular cross sections. Dimensional integrity of the towpreg ribbon combined with customized ribbon architecture offer great promise for processing advances in ATP of high performance composites.

  15. Examining Waiting Placement in Hospital: Utilization and the Lived Experience

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Donna M.; Vihos, Jill; Hewitt, Jessica A.; Barnes, Nancy; Peterson, Karen; Magnus, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    This mixed-methods study addressed the problem that although waiting placement is considered a major hospital utilization issue, minimal evidence exists to highlight the extent of it and the personal impact of waiting placement. An analysis of two years of complete hospital data for the Canadian province of Alberta was undertaken to examine waiting placement rates and describe waiting placement patients. Qualitative interviews and observations of elderly patients waiting in hospital for nursing home placement were also undertaken to gain an understanding of the lived experience of waiting for placement in hospital. Only 1.8% of all inpatients were waiting placement with an ALC (Alternative Level of Care) designation, 80% of ALC waits were less than 41 days (mean=29.85, median=14), and 2.2% of total hospital bed days in these two years were used by ALC patients. Three qualitative themes emerged: (a) coming to a realization of this significant move, (b) waiting is boring and distressing, and (c) hospitals are not designed for waiting placement. The findings of this study should raise awareness that although relatively few people wait placement in hospital, there are some major possible negative effects of waiting for placement in hospital for those who wait; with remedies to address waiting placement care deficits needed. PMID:24576361

  16. Quantifying the factors influencing gravel placement and productivity of an internally gravel packed completion based on field data analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Welling, R.W.F.; Jonathan, P.; Reijnen, P.H.F.; Samuel, A.J.

    1995-12-31

    A detailed analysis of 341 internally gravel-packed zones in wells from three oil fields was carried out to determine which parameters significantly influence the placement of the gravel in such a completion and the well`s resulting productivity. The database analysis demonstrates that, in addition to the well-known impairing factors, such as dirty completion fluids and viscous fluid-loss control pills, the performance of gravel packs can be improved by increasing the number of perforations--especially in 7 inch completions. This suggests that the perforation tunnel is the most critical area in an internally gravel-packed completion.

  17. Multi-Target Single Cycle Instrument Placement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedersen, Liam; Smith, David E.; Deans, Matthew; Sargent, Randy; Kunz, Clay; Lees, David; Rajagopalan, Srikanth; Bualat, Maria

    2005-01-01

    This presentation is about the robotic exploration of Mars using multiple targets command cycle, safe instrument placements, safe operation, and K9 Rover which has a 6 wheel steer rocket-bogey chassis (FIDO, MER), 70% MER size, 1.2 GHz Pentium M laptop running Linux OS, Odometry and compass/inclinometer, CLARAty architecture, 5 DOF manipulator w/CHAMP microscopic camera, SciCams, NavCams and HazCams.

  18. Optimization of Passive Coherent Receiver System Placement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    the transmitter location. The difference between mono and bistatic radars is depicted in Figure 1. This change in antenna placement can help negate...requirements of traditional mono -static radar systems. Although there are benefits associated with the use of these NMR systems, additional challenges arise...applications of mono -static radar systems since the received signal is expected to return to the receiver from the same direction the originating signal

  19. VLSI Cells Placement Using the Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Azizi, Hacene; Zouaoui, Lamri; Mokhnache, Salah

    2008-06-12

    The artificial neural networks have been studied for several years. Their effectiveness makes it possible to expect high performances. The privileged fields of these techniques remain the recognition and classification. Various applications of optimization are also studied under the angle of the artificial neural networks. They make it possible to apply distributed heuristic algorithms. In this article, a solution to placement problem of the various cells at the time of the realization of an integrated circuit is proposed by using the KOHONEN network.

  20. Search Path Evaluation Incorporating Object Placement Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-20

    discussed. The application of this theoretical foundation and the numerical methods to other search paradigms Is also discussed. 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15... paradigms , object detection is said to occur with probability PD if it occurs anywhere within a predefined temporal interval or spatial region...distinctive the pattern is, the more interdependent the object placements become. Continue with the paradigm of placing the set M of NM known objects in the