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Sample records for acne drug products

  1. 21 CFR 333.350 - Labeling of acne drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... using this product avoid unnecessary sun exposure and use a sunscreen avoid contact with the eyes, lips... this section. (ii) The labeling states “ if going outside, apply sunscreen after using this product....

  2. 21 CFR 333.350 - Labeling of acne drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... using this product avoid unnecessary sun exposure and use a sunscreen avoid contact with the eyes, lips... this section. (ii) The labeling states “ if going outside, apply sunscreen after using this product....

  3. 21 CFR 333.350 - Labeling of acne drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... using this product avoid unnecessary sun exposure and use a sunscreen avoid contact with the eyes, lips... this section. (ii) The labeling states “ if going outside, apply sunscreen after using this product....

  4. 21 CFR 333.350 - Labeling of acne drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... using this product avoid unnecessary sun exposure and use a sunscreen avoid contact with the eyes, lips... this section. (ii) The labeling states “ if going outside, apply sunscreen after using this product....

  5. 21 CFR 333.350 - Labeling of acne drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... using this product avoid unnecessary sun exposure and use a sunscreen avoid contact with the eyes, lips... this section. (ii) The labeling states “ if going outside, apply sunscreen after using this product....

  6. FDA OKs Non-Prescription Use of Acne Drug

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159779.html FDA OKs Non-Prescription Use of Acne Drug Differin Gel 0.1% is first retinoid ... July 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Good news for acne sufferers: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has ...

  7. Acne

    MedlinePlus

    ... can try different ones to see which helps. Products with benzoyl peroxide (say: BEN-zoil peh - ROK - side) or salicylic (say: sal-uh-SIL - ick) acid in them are usually pretty helpful for treating acne. Benzoyl peroxide kills the bacteria that can lead to acne and it also ...

  8. Acne

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Body Looking and feeling your best Acne Acne Whether you call them pimples, zits, or acne, ... treatments? What doesn’t cause acne? What causes acne? top Acne happens when your pores get clogged ...

  9. 76 FR 36307 - Guidance for Industry on Topical Acne Drug Products for Over-the-Counter Human Use-Revision of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ..., including benzoyl peroxide, resorcinol, resorcinol monoacetate, salicylic acid, and/or sulfur) (21 CFR part... applicable to all OTC topical acne products marketed under the monograph (75 FR 9767, March 4, 2010)...

  10. Acne

    MedlinePlus

    Acne is a common skin disease that causes pimples. Pimples form when hair follicles under your skin ... neck, back, chest, and shoulders. Anyone can get acne, but it is common in teenagers and young ...

  11. Production of Superoxide Anions by Keratinocytes Initiates P. acnes-Induced Inflammation of the Skin

    PubMed Central

    Grange, Philippe A.; Chéreau, Christiane; Raingeaud, Joël; Nicco, Carole; Weill, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the sebaceous follicles. Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes), a gram-positive anareobic bacterium, plays a critical role in the development of these inflammatory lesions. This study aimed at determining whether reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced by keratinocytes upon P. acnes infection, dissecting the mechanism of this production, and investigating how this phenomenon integrates in the general inflammatory response induced by P. acnes. In our hands, ROS, and especially superoxide anions (O2•−), were rapidly produced by keratinocytes upon stimulation by P. acnes surface proteins. In P. acnes-stimulated keratinocytes, O2•− was produced by NAD(P)H oxidase through activation of the scavenger receptor CD36. O2•− was dismuted by superoxide dismutase to form hydrogen peroxide which was further detoxified into water by the GSH/GPx system. In addition, P. acnes-induced O2•− abrogated P. acnes growth and was involved in keratinocyte lysis through the combination of O2•− with nitric oxide to form peroxynitrites. Finally, retinoic acid derivates, the most efficient anti-acneic drugs, prevent O2•− production, IL-8 release and keratinocyte apoptosis, suggesting the relevance of this pathway in humans. PMID:19629174

  12. Carrier-Based Drug Delivery System for Treatment of Acne

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Amber; Kumar Sonker, Avinesh

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 95% of the population suffers at some point in their lifetime from acne vulgaris. Acne is a multifactorial disease of the pilosebaceous unit. This inflammatory skin disorder is most common in adolescents but also affects neonates, prepubescent children, and adults. Topical conventional systems are associated with various side effects. Novel drug delivery systems have been used to reduce the side effect of drugs commonly used in the topical treatment of acne. Topical treatment of acne with active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) makes direct contact with the target site before entering the systemic circulation which reduces the systemic side effect of the parenteral or oral administration of drug. The objective of the present review is to discuss the conventional delivery systems available for acne, their drawbacks, and limitations. The advantages, disadvantages, and outcome of using various carrier-based delivery systems like liposomes, niosomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, and so forth, are explained. This paper emphasizes approaches to overcome the drawbacks and limitations associated with the conventional system and the advances and application that are poised to further enhance the efficacy of topical acne formulations, offering the possibility of simplified dosing regimen that may improve treatment outcomes using novel delivery system. PMID:24688376

  13. Strain-Level Differences in Porphyrin Production and Regulation in Propionibacterium acnes Elucidate Disease Associations

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Tremylla; Kang, Dezhi; Barnard, Emma

    2016-01-01

    to play a causal role in several diseases including acne, a common skin disease affecting more than 80% of people worldwide. While specific strains of P. acnes have been associated with either disease or healthy skin, the mechanisms remain unclear. Recently, we showed that vitamin B12 supplementation increased porphyrin production in P. acnes, leading to acne development (D. Kang, B. Shi, M. C. Erfe, N. Craft, and H. Li, Sci. Transl. Med. 7:293ra103, 2015, doi:10.1126/scitranslmed.aab2009). Here, we reveal that the levels of porphyrin production and vitamin B12 regulation are different between acne- and health-associated strains, suggesting a potential molecular mechanism for disease-associated strains in acne pathogenesis and for health-associated strains in skin health. This study highlights the importance of understanding the strain-level differences of the human microbiota in disease pathogenesis. Our findings also suggest the porphyrin biosynthesis pathway as a candidate drug target and use of health-associated strains as potential probiotics in novel acne therapeutics. PMID:27303708

  14. Strain-Level Differences in Porphyrin Production and Regulation in Propionibacterium acnes Elucidate Disease Associations.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Tremylla; Kang, Dezhi; Barnard, Emma; Li, Huiying

    2016-01-01

    causal role in several diseases including acne, a common skin disease affecting more than 80% of people worldwide. While specific strains of P. acnes have been associated with either disease or healthy skin, the mechanisms remain unclear. Recently, we showed that vitamin B12 supplementation increased porphyrin production in P. acnes, leading to acne development (D. Kang, B. Shi, M. C. Erfe, N. Craft, and H. Li, Sci. Transl. Med. 7:293ra103, 2015, doi:10.1126/scitranslmed.aab2009). Here, we reveal that the levels of porphyrin production and vitamin B12 regulation are different between acne- and health-associated strains, suggesting a potential molecular mechanism for disease-associated strains in acne pathogenesis and for health-associated strains in skin health. This study highlights the importance of understanding the strain-level differences of the human microbiota in disease pathogenesis. Our findings also suggest the porphyrin biosynthesis pathway as a candidate drug target and use of health-associated strains as potential probiotics in novel acne therapeutics. PMID:27303708

  15. Acne

    MedlinePlus

    ... acne and scarring may try a medicine called isotretinoin (Accutane). You will be watched closely when taking this ... its side effects. Pregnant women should NOT take Accutane, because it causes severe birth defects. Women taking ...

  16. 21 CFR 333.310 - Acne active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acne active ingredients. 333.310 Section 333.310... FOR HUMAN USE TOPICAL ANTIMICROBIAL DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Topical Acne Drug Products § 333.310 Acne active ingredients. The active ingredient of the product consists of any of...

  17. 21 CFR 333.310 - Acne active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acne active ingredients. 333.310 Section 333.310... FOR HUMAN USE TOPICAL ANTIMICROBIAL DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Topical Acne Drug Products § 333.310 Acne active ingredients. The active ingredient of the product consists of any of...

  18. 21 CFR 333.310 - Acne active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acne active ingredients. 333.310 Section 333.310... FOR HUMAN USE TOPICAL ANTIMICROBIAL DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Topical Acne Drug Products § 333.310 Acne active ingredients. The active ingredient of the product consists of any of...

  19. 21 CFR 333.310 - Acne active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acne active ingredients. 333.310 Section 333.310... FOR HUMAN USE TOPICAL ANTIMICROBIAL DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Topical Acne Drug Products § 333.310 Acne active ingredients. The active ingredient of the product consists of any of...

  20. Hormone therapy in acne.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, Chembolli

    2013-01-01

    Underlying hormone imbalances may render acne unresponsive to conventional therapy. Relevant investigations followed by initiation of hormonal therapy in combination with regular anti-acne therapy may be necessary if signs of hyperandrogenism are present. In addition to other factors, androgen-stimulated sebum production plays an important role in the pathophysiology of acne in women. Sebum production is also regulated by other hormones, including estrogens, growth hormone, insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1, glucocorticoids, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and melanocortins. Hormonal therapy may also be beneficial in female acne patients with normal serum androgen levels. An understanding of the sebaceous gland and the hormonal influences in the pathogenesis of acne would be essential for optimizing hormonal therapy. Sebocytes form the sebaceous gland. Human sebocytes express a multitude of receptors, including receptors for peptide hormones, neurotransmitters and the receptors for steroid and thyroid hormones. Various hormones and mediators acting through the sebocyte receptors play a role in the orchestration of pathogenetic lesions of acne. Thus, the goal of hormonal treatment is a reduction in sebum production. This review shall focus on hormonal influences in the elicitation of acne via the sebocyte receptors, pathways of cutaneous androgen metabolism, various clinical scenarios and syndromes associated with acne, and the available therapeutic armamentarium of hormones and drugs having hormone-like actions in the treatment of acne.

  1. Management of severe acne.

    PubMed

    Zouboulis, C C; Bettoli, V

    2015-07-01

    Acne is the most common skin disease, affecting up to 95% of adolescents. Severe episodes of acne can cause considerable physical and psychological scarring, and overexpression of transforming growth factor-β can lead to formation of hypertrophic scars and keloids. The severity of acne in adolescence is associated with a positive history of severe acne in first-degree relatives, especially the mother. In most cases acne is a chronic disease, and it is often a component of systemic diseases or syndromes. All forms of severe acne require systemic treatment. The available options include oral antibiotics, hormonal antiandrogens for female patients and oral isotretinoin, as well as other combination treatments. Oral isotretinoin is the only drug available that affects all four pathogenic factors of acne. However, due to possible serious side-effects, a European directive states that oral isotretinoin should be used only as a second-line therapy in cases of severe, nodular and conglobate acne. The pharmaceutical quality of generic isotretinoin products and the obtainability of isotretinoin through e-pharmacies without prescription raise new therapeutic problems. New anti-inflammatory compounds, such as the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor zileuton, may replace systemic antibiotics in the future, especially under the scope of antibiotic resistance prevention. This review looks into the various options and latest approaches, and factors to consider, when combating severe acne.

  2. [Acne vulgaris].

    PubMed

    Zouboulis, C C

    2014-08-01

    Acne vulgaris is worldwide the most common skin disease. Acne is an inflammatory disorder in whose emergence androgens, PPAR ligands, the IGF-1 signaling pathway, regulating neuropeptides and environmental factors are probably involved. These factors interrupt the natural cycling process in the sebaceous gland follicle and support the transition of microcomedones to comedones and inflammatory lesions. Proinflammatory lipids and cytokines are mediators for the development of acne lesions. Bacterial antigens can potentate the inflammatory phenomena. Acne is predominantly treated with combination therapy. Selecting a treatment regimen depends on the exact classification of acne type and severity. The development of scars is the main criterion for the choice of systemic therapy. Retinoids for mild comedonal acne and the combination of retinoids with antibiotics and/or benzoyl peroxide for mild to moderate papulopustular acne are the drugs of first choice for topical treatment. The use of topical antibiotics is not recommended any more because of the development of resistant bacterial strains. Systemic antibiotics, in combination with topical retinoids and/or benzoyl peroxide, for moderate papular/nodular acne and isotretinoin for severe nodular/conglobate acne are the columns of systemic acne treatment. Systemic anti-androgens are used in women against moderate papulopustular acne. Due to advances in the understanding of the underlying inflammatory mechanisms in recent years the development of new therapeutic agents with good efficacy and better side effect profile should be expected in the future.

  3. The In vitro anti-acne activity of two unani drugs

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Shahid Shah; Tariq, Mohd.; Zaman, Roohi; Imtiyaz, Shaikh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Acne is the most common disorder treated by dermatologists. As many as 80-90% of all adolescents have some type of acne and 30% of them require medical treatment. It is an inflammatory disease of the pilosebaceous unit characterized by the formation of open and closed comedones, papules, pustules, nodules, and cysts. Aims: The present study was conducted to investigate the in vitro anti-acne activity of two Unani single drugs Darchini (Cinnamomum zeylanicum Bl.) and Tukhm Khashkhash (Papaver somniferum L. seeds). Materials and Methods: The antibacterial activity of aqueous, ethanolic and hydroalcoholic extracts of both drugs were investigated against two acne causing bacteria, i.e., Propionibacterium acne and Staphylococcus epidermidis using well diffusion method. Results: The result showed that both drugs were active against the two bacteria. Against P. acne aqueous and ethanolic extract of Darchini and Tukhm Khashkhash showed the zone of inhibition of 18 ± 1.02 mm and 18 ± 1.6 mm and 13 ± 1.04 mm and 14 ± 1.8 mm, respectively. Against S. epidermidis aqueous, hydroalcoholic and ethanolic extracts of Darchini showed 22 ± 1.7 mm, 22 ± 1.2 mm and 15 ± 1.8 mm zone of inhibition respectively. Hydroalcoholic and ethanolic extracts of Tukhm Khashkhash showed 15 ± 1.09 mm and 13 ± 1.6 mm zone of inhibition respectively. Conclusion: This suggests that C. zeylanicum and P. somniferum have potential against acne causing bacteria and hence they can be used in topical anti-acne preparations and may address the antibiotic resistance of the bacteria. PMID:25161328

  4. Contact dermatitis to topical acne drugs: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Foti, Caterina; Romita, Paolo; Borghi, Alessandro; Angelini, Gianni; Bonamonte, Domenico; Corazza, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a chronic dermatological disorder that affects the majority of teenagers in the Western world. Topical therapy is widely used to treat mild-moderate acne and is known as well-tolerated thanks to its low systemic toxicity, although associated to skin adverse effects. Acne seems to be associated also to an intrinsic alteration of the epidermal barrier, regarding both the upper and the follicular stratum corneum that promotes the onset of such local side effects. The commonest one is irritant contact dermatitis, an event of frequent observation occurring with erythema, burning, dryness, scaling, and itching, usually characterized by low severity and limited duration. Among topical acne drugs, retinoids are the most irritating ones. Another side effect is allergic contact dermatitis: it is rare and mainly associated to benzoyl peroxide.

  5. Current nanotechnological approaches for an effective delivery of bio-active drug molecules in the treatment of acne.

    PubMed

    Garg, Tarun

    2016-01-01

    Acne is a chronic inflammatory human skin disease, characterized by areas of skin with seborrhoea, comedones, papules, nodules, pimples, and possibly scarring with lesions occurring on face, neck, and back. Nanotechnological approaches such as particulate (solid lipid nanoparticles and microspheres), vesicular (liposomes and niosomes), colloidal drug delivery systems (micro-emulsion and nano-emulsion), and miscellaneous systems (aerosol foams and micro-sponges) have an important place in acne therapy. These approaches have an enormous opportunity for the designing of a novel, low-dose and effective treatment systems to control acne disease. In this review, we specially focus on the different nanotechnological approaches for an effective treatment of acne.

  6. Acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Moradi Tuchayi, Sara; Makrantonaki, Evgenia; Ganceviciene, Ruta; Dessinioti, Clio; Feldman, Steven R; Zouboulis, Christos C

    2015-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a chronic inflammatory disease - rather than a natural part of the life cycle as colloquially viewed - of the pilosebaceous unit (comprising the hair follicle, hair shaft and sebaceous gland) and is among the most common dermatological conditions worldwide. Some of the key mechanisms involved in the development of acne include disturbed sebaceous gland activity associated with hyperseborrhoea (that is, increased sebum production) and alterations in sebum fatty acid composition, dysregulation of the hormone microenvironment, interaction with neuropeptides, follicular hyperkeratinization, induction of inflammation and dysfunction of the innate and adaptive immunity. Grading of acne involves lesion counting and photographic methods. However, there is a lack of consensus on the exact grading criteria, which hampers the conduction and comparison of randomized controlled clinical trials evaluating treatments. Prevention of acne relies on the successful management of modifiable risk factors, such as underlying systemic diseases and lifestyle factors. Several treatments are available, but guidelines suffer from a lack of data to make evidence-based recommendations. In addition, the complex combination treatment regimens required to target different aspects of acne pathophysiology lead to poor adherence, which undermines treatment success. Acne commonly causes scarring and reduces the quality of life of patients. New treatment options with a shift towards targeting the early processes involved in acne development instead of suppressing the effects of end products will enhance our ability to improve the outcomes for patients with acne. PMID:27189872

  7. Acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Moradi Tuchayi, Sara; Makrantonaki, Evgenia; Ganceviciene, Ruta; Dessinioti, Clio; Feldman, Steven R; Zouboulis, Christos C

    2015-09-17

    Acne vulgaris is a chronic inflammatory disease - rather than a natural part of the life cycle as colloquially viewed - of the pilosebaceous unit (comprising the hair follicle, hair shaft and sebaceous gland) and is among the most common dermatological conditions worldwide. Some of the key mechanisms involved in the development of acne include disturbed sebaceous gland activity associated with hyperseborrhoea (that is, increased sebum production) and alterations in sebum fatty acid composition, dysregulation of the hormone microenvironment, interaction with neuropeptides, follicular hyperkeratinization, induction of inflammation and dysfunction of the innate and adaptive immunity. Grading of acne involves lesion counting and photographic methods. However, there is a lack of consensus on the exact grading criteria, which hampers the conduction and comparison of randomized controlled clinical trials evaluating treatments. Prevention of acne relies on the successful management of modifiable risk factors, such as underlying systemic diseases and lifestyle factors. Several treatments are available, but guidelines suffer from a lack of data to make evidence-based recommendations. In addition, the complex combination treatment regimens required to target different aspects of acne pathophysiology lead to poor adherence, which undermines treatment success. Acne commonly causes scarring and reduces the quality of life of patients. New treatment options with a shift towards targeting the early processes involved in acne development instead of suppressing the effects of end products will enhance our ability to improve the outcomes for patients with acne.

  8. Over-the-counter Acne Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Graber, Emmy M.

    2012-01-01

    Acne is a common dermatological disorder that most frequently affects adolescents; however, individuals may be affected at all ages. Many people who suffer from acne seek treatment from both prescription and over-the-counter acne medications. Due to convenience, lower cost, and difficulty getting an appointment with a dermatologist, the use of over-the-counter acne treatments is on the rise. As the plethora of over-the-counter acne treatment options can be overwhelming, it is important that dermatologists are well-versed on this subject to provide appropriate information about treatment regimens and potential drug interactions and that their patients see them as well-informed. This article reviews the efficacy of various over-the-counter acne treatments based on the current literature. A thorough literature review revealed there are many types of over-the-counter acne treatments and each are designed to target at least one of the pathogenic pathways that are reported to be involved in the development of acne lesions. Many of the key over-the-counter ingredients are incorporated in different formulations to broaden the spectrum and consumer appeal of available products. Unfortunately, many over-the-counter products are not well-supported by clinical studies, with a conspicuous absence of double-blind or investigator-blind, randomized, vehicle-controlled studies. Most studies that do exist on over-the-counter acne products are often funded by the manufacturer. Use of over-the-counter acne treatments is a mainstay in our society and it is important that dermatologists are knowledgeable about the different options, including potential benefits and limitations. Overall, over-the-counter acne therapies can be classified into the following five major groups: cleansers, leave-on products, mechanical treatments, essential oils, and vitamins. PMID:22808307

  9. Treatment of acne with tea tree oil (melaleuca) products: a review of efficacy, tolerability and potential modes of action.

    PubMed

    Hammer, K A

    2015-02-01

    Over-the-counter acne treatments containing tea tree oil from the plant Melaleuca alternifolia are widely available, and evidence indicates that they are a common choice amongst those self-treating their acne. The aims of this review were to collate and evaluate the clinical evidence on the use of tea tree oil products for treating acne, to review safety and tolerability and to discuss the underlying modes of therapeutic action. PMID:25465857

  10. Evidence for acne-promoting effects of milk and other insulinotropic dairy products.

    PubMed

    Melnik, Bodo C

    2011-01-01

    Acne vulgaris, the most common skin disease of western civilization, has evolved to an epidemic affecting more than 85% of adolescents. Acne can be regarded as an indicator disease of exaggerated insulinotropic western nutrition. Especially milk and whey protein-based products contribute to elevations of postprandial insulin and basal insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) plasma levels. It is the evolutional principle of mammalian milk to promote growth and support anabolic conditions for the neonate during the nursing period. Whey proteins are most potent inducers of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide secreted by enteroendocrine K cells which in concert with hydrolyzed whey protein-derived essential amino acids stimulate insulin secretion of pancreatic β-cells. Increased insulin/IGF-I signaling activates the phosphoinositide-3 kinase/Akt pathway, thereby reducing the nuclear content of the transcription factor FoxO1, the key nutrigenomic regulator of acne target genes. Nuclear FoxO1 deficiency has been linked to all major factors of acne pathogenesis, i.e. androgen receptor transactivation, comedogenesis, increased sebaceous lipogenesis, and follicular inflammation. The elimination of the whey protein-based insulinotropic mechanisms of milk will be the most important future challenge for nutrition research. Both, restriction of milk consumption or generation of less insulinotropic milk will have an enormous impact on the prevention of epidemic western diseases like obesity, diabetes mellitus, cancer, neurodegenerative diseases and acne.

  11. Multi-drugs resistant acne rosacea in a child affected by Ataxia-Telangiectasia: successful treatment with Isotretinoin.

    PubMed

    Cantarutti, Nicoletta; Claps, Alessia; Angelino, Giulia; Chessa, Luciana; Callea, Francesco; El Hachem, May; Diociaiuti, Andrea; Finocchi, Andrea

    2015-03-28

    Ataxia-Telangiectasia is a rare multisystem autosomal recessive disorder [OMIM 208900], caused by mutations in Ataxia-Telangiectasia Mutated gene. It is characterized by neurological, immunological and cutaneous involvement. Granulomas have been previously reported in Ataxia-Telangiectasia patients, even if acne rosacea has not been described.We report a case of a young Ataxia-Telangiectasia patient with a severe immunological and neurological involvement, who developed granulomatous skin lesions diagnosed by skin biopsy as acne rosacea. Considering the severe clinical picture and the lack of improvement to multiple topic and systemic therapies, treatment with Isotretinoin was started and the skin lesions disappeared after five months. However the therapy was stopped due to drug-hepatotoxicity.Systemic treatment with Isotretinoin should be carefully considered in patient with Ataxia-Telangiectasia for the treatment of multi-drug resistant acne rosacea, however its toxicity may limit long-term use and the risk/benefit ratio of the treatment should be evaluated.

  12. Epidemiology of acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Bhate, K; Williams, H C

    2013-03-01

    Despite acne being an almost universal condition in younger people, relatively little is known about its epidemiology. We sought to review what is known about the distribution and causes of acne by conducting a systematic review of relevant epidemiological studies. We searched Medline and Embase to the end of November 2011. The role of Propionibacterium acnes in pathogenesis is unclear: antibiotics have a direct antimicrobial as well as an anti-inflammatory effect. Moderate-to-severe acne affects around 20% of young people and severity correlates with pubertal maturity. Acne may be presenting at a younger age because of earlier puberty. It is unclear if ethnicity is truly associated with acne. Black individuals are more prone to postinflammatory hyperpigmentation and specific subtypes such as 'pomade acne'. Acne persists into the 20s and 30s in around 64% and 43% of individuals, respectively. The heritability of acne is almost 80% in first-degree relatives. Acne occurs earlier and is more severe in those with a positive family history. Suicidal ideation is more common in those with severe compared with mild acne. In the U.S.A., the cost of acne is over 3 billion dollars per year in terms of treatment and loss of productivity. A systematic review in 2005 found no clear evidence of dietary components increasing acne risk. One small randomized controlled trial showed that low glycaemic index (GI) diets can lower acne severity. A possible association between dairy food intake and acne requires closer scrutiny. Natural sunlight or poor hygiene are not associated. The association between smoking and acne is probably due to confounding. Validated core outcomes in future studies will help in combining future evidence.

  13. [DRUG-INDUCED LUPUS CAUSED BY LONG TERM MINOCYCLINE TREATMENT FOR ACNE VULGARIS].

    PubMed

    Hanai, Shunichiro; Sato, Takeo; Takeda, Koichi; Nagatani, Katsuya; Iwamoto, Masahiro; Minota, Seiji

    2015-09-01

    An 18-year-old Japanese girl had received oral minocycline 200mg daily for treatment of acne vulgaris since 16 years old. She had a fever three months before admission, followed by joint pains in her knees, elbows and several proximal interphalangeal joints one month before admission. She was referred to our hospital because of a high serum level of anti-DNA antibody. She had already discontinued oral minocycline five weeks before admission, because she missed her medication refilled. On admission, the arthralgia and fever spontaneously resolved, and there were no laboratory evidence of hypocomplementemia and cytopenia. She had neither erythema nor internal organ involvements. Because her symptoms subsided spontaneously after the cessation of minocycline, she was considered to have drug-induced lupus. Both the arthralgia and fever did not relapse, and anti-ds DNA antibody returned to normal during a follow-up period without treatment. There are few reports of drug-induced lupus caused by minocycline in Japan. This case highlights the importance of considering minocycline-induced lupus.

  14. Moisturizers for Acne

    PubMed Central

    Chularojanamontri, Leena; Tuchinda, Papapit; Kulthanan, Kanokvalai

    2014-01-01

    Acne is a chronic inflammatory disease of the pilosebaceous unit that affects almost all teenagers. Different treatments offer different modes of action, but aim to target acne pathology. Topical therapies, such as benzoyl peroxide, retinoids, antibiotics with alcohol-based preparations, and salicylic acid, can cause skin irritation resulting in a lack of patient adherence. Some physicians recommend patients use moisturizers as adjunctive treatment of acne, especially when either topical benzoyl peroxide or a retinoid is prescribed. Furthermore, some evidence shows that moisturizers can contribute independently to improve signs and symptoms of acne. Moisturizers contain three main properties, which are occlusive, humectant, and emollient effects. Currently, many moisturizers claim to be suitable for acne treatment. This article aims to provide a review of the active ingredients and properties of those moisturizers. Fifty-two moisturizers for acne were included for analysis. Most of the products (92%) have anti-inflammatory properties apart from occlusive, humectant, and emollient effects. Anti-acne medications, including salicylic acid, benzoyl peroxide, and retinol, were found respectively in 35, 10, and 8 percent of the moisturizer products containing anti-inflammatory properties. More than half of the products contain dimethicone and/or glycerin for its moisturizer property. Aloe vera and witch hazel are botanical anti-inflammatories that were commonly found in this study. Scientific data regarding some ingredients are discussed to provide a guide for physicians in selecting moisturizers for acne patients. PMID:24847408

  15. Inhibitory effects of wild bitter melon leaf extract on Propionibacterium acnes-induced skin inflammation in mice and cytokine production in vitro.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Cheng; Tsai, Tsung-Hsien; Huang, Ching-Jang; Li, You-Yi; Chyuan, Jong-Ho; Chuang, Lu-Te; Tsai, Po-Jung

    2015-08-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is a key pathogen involved in acne inflammation. Wild bitter melon (WBM, Momordica charantia L. var. abbreviate Seringe) is consumed as both a vegetable and as folk medicine in Taiwan. We examined the inhibitory activity of the total phenolic extract (TPE) of WBM leaf on P. acnes-induced inflammatory responses in vivo and in vitro. Our data showed that TPE significantly attenuated P. acnes-induced ear swelling in mice along with microabscess. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that TPE treatment significantly decreased the migration of neutrophils and interleukin (IL)-1β(+) populations in vivo. In P. acnes-stimulated human monocytic THP-1 cells, TPE suppressed the mRNA levels and production of IL-8, IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-αin vitro. In addition, TPE suppressed P. acnes-induced matrix metalloproteinase-9 levels. TPE blocked nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation and inactivated mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK); these actions may partially account for its inhibitory effect on cytokine production. The quantitative HPLC analysis revealed gallic, chlorogenic, caffeic, ferulic, and cinnamic acids, myricetin, quercetin, luteolin, apigenin, and thymol in TPE. All these phenolics significantly suppressed P. acnes-induced IL-8 production in vitro. Our results suggest that WBM leaf extract effectively inhibits P. acnes-induced inflammatory responses and may be useful to relieve the inflammation of acne. PMID:26098998

  16. Inhibitory effects of wild bitter melon leaf extract on Propionibacterium acnes-induced skin inflammation in mice and cytokine production in vitro.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Cheng; Tsai, Tsung-Hsien; Huang, Ching-Jang; Li, You-Yi; Chyuan, Jong-Ho; Chuang, Lu-Te; Tsai, Po-Jung

    2015-08-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is a key pathogen involved in acne inflammation. Wild bitter melon (WBM, Momordica charantia L. var. abbreviate Seringe) is consumed as both a vegetable and as folk medicine in Taiwan. We examined the inhibitory activity of the total phenolic extract (TPE) of WBM leaf on P. acnes-induced inflammatory responses in vivo and in vitro. Our data showed that TPE significantly attenuated P. acnes-induced ear swelling in mice along with microabscess. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that TPE treatment significantly decreased the migration of neutrophils and interleukin (IL)-1β(+) populations in vivo. In P. acnes-stimulated human monocytic THP-1 cells, TPE suppressed the mRNA levels and production of IL-8, IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-αin vitro. In addition, TPE suppressed P. acnes-induced matrix metalloproteinase-9 levels. TPE blocked nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation and inactivated mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK); these actions may partially account for its inhibitory effect on cytokine production. The quantitative HPLC analysis revealed gallic, chlorogenic, caffeic, ferulic, and cinnamic acids, myricetin, quercetin, luteolin, apigenin, and thymol in TPE. All these phenolics significantly suppressed P. acnes-induced IL-8 production in vitro. Our results suggest that WBM leaf extract effectively inhibits P. acnes-induced inflammatory responses and may be useful to relieve the inflammation of acne.

  17. Optical treatments for acne.

    PubMed

    Ross, E Victor

    2005-01-01

    Light-based treatments for acne are becoming increasingly commonplace in dermatology. This article reviews various light approaches in acne therapy. Methods are discussed from an anatomical and a functional perspective. The emphasis is on the practicality of treatment as well as the pros and cons of various devices. Also, a review of the recent literature is presented. The article is intended to give the reader a panoramic view of this still-young and developing area. Most likely, light-based acne treatment will receive more popularity as dermatologists learn how to integrate this type of therapy within the context of more established drug agents. PMID:16229726

  18. Successful treatment of mild to moderate acne vulgaris with Dr Michaels® (also branded as Zitinex®) topical products family: a clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Wollina, U; Tirant, M; Bayer, P; Coburn, M; Anderson, P; Donnelly, B; Kennedy, T; Gaibor, J; Arora, M; Clews, L; Walmsley, S; Hercogovấ, J; Fioranelli, M; Gianfaldoni, S; Chokoeva, A A; Tchernev, G; Novotny, F; Roccia, M G; Maximov, G K; França, K; Lotti, T

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is an epidemic inflammatory skin disease of multi-factorial origin, frequently seen in adolescents and often persisting or occurring through to adulthood. Acne vulgaris is a nearly universal skin disease afflicting 79-95% of the adolescent population in westernized societies and is a significant cause of psychological morbidity in affected patients. Despite the various treatment options available for acne, there is still a need for a safe and effective option. The aim of the study was to investigate the efficacy and tolerability of Dr Michaels® (Zitinex®) product family in the treatment of papulo-pustular acne. 25 patients (17 female/8 male), aged 15-22, with a mild to moderate papulo-pustular acne, localized on the face and on the trunk, were included in this study. None of the patients had used any other kind of treatment in the 3 months prior to commencing this study. All of the patients were treated with Dr Michaels® (Zitinex®) facial exfoliating cleanser, activator formula, a cream, PSC 200 and PSC 900 oral supplements. Application time of Dr Michaels® (Zitinex®) products was 12 weeks. The treatment was been evaluated clinically at 0, 4, 8 and 12 weeks. All of the patients showed an improvement in all parameters of their acne (comedones, papules, pustules, hyperpigmentation and scars). The acne lesions and erythema had mostly resolved. The hyperpigmentation and pitted scarring had significantly reduced also, with the skin appearing smoother. The treatment was well tolerated and no side effects have been described. Our study demonstrates that the Dr Michaels® (Zitinex®) facial exfoliating cleanser, activator formula, cream and oral supplements PSC 200 and PSC 900 are an effective therapeutic option for the treatment of moderately severe acne vulgaris. Moreover, it highlights the safety profile of the Dr Michaels® (Zitinex®) product family in a case of acne compared to traditional first-line treatments.

  19. Successful treatment of mild to moderate acne vulgaris with Dr Michaels® (also branded as Zitinex®) topical products family: a clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Wollina, U; Tirant, M; Bayer, P; Coburn, M; Anderson, P; Donnelly, B; Kennedy, T; Gaibor, J; Arora, M; Clews, L; Walmsley, S; Hercogovấ, J; Fioranelli, M; Gianfaldoni, S; Chokoeva, A A; Tchernev, G; Novotny, F; Roccia, M G; Maximov, G K; França, K; Lotti, T

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is an epidemic inflammatory skin disease of multi-factorial origin, frequently seen in adolescents and often persisting or occurring through to adulthood. Acne vulgaris is a nearly universal skin disease afflicting 79-95% of the adolescent population in westernized societies and is a significant cause of psychological morbidity in affected patients. Despite the various treatment options available for acne, there is still a need for a safe and effective option. The aim of the study was to investigate the efficacy and tolerability of Dr Michaels® (Zitinex®) product family in the treatment of papulo-pustular acne. 25 patients (17 female/8 male), aged 15-22, with a mild to moderate papulo-pustular acne, localized on the face and on the trunk, were included in this study. None of the patients had used any other kind of treatment in the 3 months prior to commencing this study. All of the patients were treated with Dr Michaels® (Zitinex®) facial exfoliating cleanser, activator formula, a cream, PSC 200 and PSC 900 oral supplements. Application time of Dr Michaels® (Zitinex®) products was 12 weeks. The treatment was been evaluated clinically at 0, 4, 8 and 12 weeks. All of the patients showed an improvement in all parameters of their acne (comedones, papules, pustules, hyperpigmentation and scars). The acne lesions and erythema had mostly resolved. The hyperpigmentation and pitted scarring had significantly reduced also, with the skin appearing smoother. The treatment was well tolerated and no side effects have been described. Our study demonstrates that the Dr Michaels® (Zitinex®) facial exfoliating cleanser, activator formula, cream and oral supplements PSC 200 and PSC 900 are an effective therapeutic option for the treatment of moderately severe acne vulgaris. Moreover, it highlights the safety profile of the Dr Michaels® (Zitinex®) product family in a case of acne compared to traditional first-line treatments. PMID:27498658

  20. [Acne vulgaris. Role of cosmetics].

    PubMed

    Korting, H C; Borelli, C; Schöllmann, C

    2010-02-01

    Appropriate cosmetics for skin cleansing are capable of contributing to a reduction of especially inflammatory lesions in acne-prone patients and to support pharmacological intervention in patients with manifest acne. Cleansing of acne-prone skin should employ acidified synthetic cleansers with a pH of 5.5 rather than soap. Furthermore, the ingredients of certain skin care products, i.e. nicotinamide, lactic acid, triethyl acetate/ethyllineolate, and prebiotic plant extracts, affect different mechanisms of acne pathogenesis and therefore may contribute to a decrease in acne lesions. At least some of these ingredients underscore the concept of evidence-based cosmetics. In contrast, the problem of acne lesions caused by comedogenic ingredients in cosmetics today is negligible. PMID:20107752

  1. Vaccination Targeting a Surface Sialidase of P. acnes: Implication for New Treatment of Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Nakatsuji, Teruaki; Liu, Yu-Tsueng; Huang, Cheng-Po; Gallo, Richard L.; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2008-01-01

    Background Acne vulgaris afflicts more than fifty million people in the United State and the severity of this disorder is associated with the immune response to Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes). Systemic therapies for acne target P. acnes using antibiotics, or target the follicle with retinoids such as isotretinoin. The latter systemic treatment is highly effective but also carries a risk of side effects including immune imbalance, hyperlipidemia, and teratogenicity. Despite substantial research into potential new therapies for this common disease, vaccines against acne vulgaris are not yet available. Methods and Findings Here we create an acne vaccine targeting a cell wall-anchored sialidase of P. acnes. The importance of sialidase to disease pathogenesis is shown by treatment of a human sebocyte cell line with recombinant sialidase that increased susceptibility to P. acnes cytotoxicity and adhesion. Mice immunized with sialidase elicit a detectable antibody; the anti-sialidase serum effectively neutralized the cytotoxicity of P. acnes in vitro and P. acnes-induced interleukin-8 (IL-8) production in human sebocytes. Furthermore, the sialidase-immunized mice provided protective immunity against P. acnes in vivo as this treatment blocked an increase in ear thickness and release of pro-inflammatory macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP-2) cytokine. Conclusions Results indicated that acne vaccines open novel therapeutic avenues for acne vulgaris and other P. acnes-associated diseases. PMID:18253498

  2. Acne Scars

    MedlinePlus

    ... scars. Cryosurgery : This treatment freezes the scar tissue. Freezing the tissue causes it to die and gradually ... et al . “Which Type of Atrophic Acne Scar (Ice-pick, Boxcar, or Rolling) Responds to Nonablative Fractional ...

  3. Acne: Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... the-counter medicines for acne. These medicines kill bacteria, dry up skin oil, and make your skin ... Antibiotics such as minocycline, doxycycline, and tetracycline reduce bacteria and inflammation, and can be used in combination ...

  4. The Role of Skin Care as an Integral Component in the Management of Acne Vulgaris: Part 1: The Importance of Cleanser and Moisturizer Ingredients, Design, and Product Selection

    PubMed Central

    Del Rosso, James Q.

    2013-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a very common facial skin disorder accounting for approximately 10 percent of all visits to ambulatory dermatology practices across the United States annually. Over time, greater attention has been directed to the roles of multiple epidermal barrier functions in various dermatological disorders, especially the stratum corneum permeability barrier and antimicrobial barrier. As a result, it has become readily apparent that professional direction of skin care is very important in the overall management of acne vulgaris. This article discusses several reasons that support the importance of incorporating specified skin care recommendations and instructions into the overall management plan for acne vulgaris. In addition, the article reviews formulation characteristics and some of the scientific data on two commercially available products that are recommended for use as a skin care regimen in patients with acne-prone and acne-affected skin, a foam wash and a moisturizer with a sun protection factor 30 broad spectrum photoprotection rating. The rationale for inclusion of specific ingredients are discussed along with an overview of research results including use in patients with acne vulgaris. PMID:24765221

  5. Inflammatory Acne Treatment: Review of Current and New Topical Therapeutic Options.

    PubMed

    Zeichner, Joshua A

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris (AV) is an inflammatory skin disease characterized by the presence of comedones, papules, pustules, and nodules. Consensus guidelines recommend the use of combination therapy using different drugs with complementary mechanisms of action to best address as many acne pathogenic factors as possible at the same time. Topical acne medications exist as individual agents that may be combined in physician-recommended regimens or as pre-formulated fixed-dose combination products. In addition, there are several new and promising topical therapies currently being developed that work by different mechanisms of action from traditionally used acne therapies. The following review will cover commonly used drugs, newcomers to the market, and what the future holds for the topical treatment of AV. PMID:26741391

  6. Inflammatory Acne Treatment: Review of Current and New Topical Therapeutic Options.

    PubMed

    Zeichner, Joshua A

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris (AV) is an inflammatory skin disease characterized by the presence of comedones, papules, pustules, and nodules. Consensus guidelines recommend the use of combination therapy using different drugs with complementary mechanisms of action to best address as many acne pathogenic factors as possible at the same time. Topical acne medications exist as individual agents that may be combined in physician-recommended regimens or as pre-formulated fixed-dose combination products. In addition, there are several new and promising topical therapies currently being developed that work by different mechanisms of action from traditionally used acne therapies. The following review will cover commonly used drugs, newcomers to the market, and what the future holds for the topical treatment of AV.

  7. Acne - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... It may help to use a wash with salicylic acid or benzoyl if your skin is oily and prone to acne. Remove all ... products may contain benzoyl peroxide, sulfur, resorcinol, or ... bacteria, drying up skin oils, or causing the top layer of your ...

  8. [Solar acne].

    PubMed

    Padilha-Gonçalves, A; Alvimar Ferreira, J

    1977-01-01

    Acne solaris a form of acne that appears and relapses after sun exposure, is almost always itchy and is preferably localized on the upper anterior chest, the deltoid regions and the shoulders. The use of greasy or oily sun protectors helps in the obstructions of the follicular openings, which is seen in the tissue sections, presumably initiated by sun irradiation causing initially hyperkeratosis. The essential lesion is a small hemispheric or conic erythematous papule which may show a yellow point in its top. True comedos are not seen and compression after punction provokes the appearance of a yellow mass-essentially keratinic and sebaceous. The usual treatment of acne vulgaris is useful specially if a topical corticosteroid is associated. The systemic use of corticosteroids usually worsens the disease.

  9. Can Acne Scars Be Removed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Can Acne Scars Be Removed? KidsHealth > For Teens > Can Acne ... eliminarse las marcas de acne? Different Types of Acne Scars from acne can seem like double punishment — ...

  10. Acne vulgaris related to androgens - a review.

    PubMed

    Khondker, L; Khan, S I

    2014-01-01

    Sebum production is stimulated by androgens and is the key in the development of acne vulgaris. Several investigators have looked for direct relationships between serum androgen levels, sebum secretion rate and the presence of acne. The presence of acne in prepubertal girls and sebum production in both sexes correlate with serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) levels. Although increased serum androgen levels correlate with the presence of severe nodular acne in men and women, these levels are often within the normal range in mild to moderate acne. This raises the question of whether there is an increased local production of androgens within the sebaceous gland of patients with acne vulgaris that leads to increased sebum secretion.

  11. Zapping Those Zits: Helping Teens Handle Acne.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Paul

    1992-01-01

    Describes five types of acne and stresses the importance of appropriate treatment. Some dermatologists believe diet is critical in improving acne. Other treatments include the use of drying lotions and soaps, astringents, abrasive cleansers, prescription drugs, face peels, and dermabrasion. (SM)

  12. Properties of herbal extracts against Propionibacterium acnes for biomedical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Youn-Mook; Kim, Sung Eun; Kim, Yong Soo; Shin, Young Min; Jeong, Sung In; Jo, Sun-Young; Gwon, Hui-Jeong; Park, Jong-seok; Nho, Young-Chang; Kim, Jong-Cheol; Kim, Seong-Jang; Shin, HeungSoo

    2012-10-01

    Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes), one of the anaerobic bacterium, causes inflammatory acne. To find a novel medication for treating the inflammation caused by P. acnes, we investigated the anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory activities of several herbal extracts against P. acnes. The aqueous extracts from five dried herbs, Phellodendron amurense Rupr., Paeonia lactiflora Pallas., Houttuynia cordata Thunb., Agrimonia pilosa Ledeb. and Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch., were prepared and mixed. In this experiment, 1 mg/ml of the herbal extract mixture caused a decrease in the growth of P. acnes and reduced the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α, IL-8, IL-1β and IL-6, in human monocytic THP-1 cells treated with heat-killed P. acnes. Therefore, this herbal extract mixture may possess both anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory activities against P. acnes and can be a novel therapeutic agent for treating inflammatory acne.

  13. Acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Aydemir, Ertuğrul H

    2014-03-01

    Acne vulgaris is a chronic inflammatory disease of the pilosebaceous unit and it is observed equally in both sexes and nearly all races. It generally begins at puberty, but the healing period is variable. There is no known etiological factor, except genetic tendency. Androgens play a very limited role in some female patients. The effects of cosmetics, foods and drinks are also discussible and too limited. There are four factors in acne pathogenesis: Increase of the sebum excretionKeratinization of infrainfundibulumBacterial colonization of the follicleInflammation It is mainly observed on the face and back, shoulders and chest. Initial lesions are comedons. Papules, pustules and cysts of severe types follow it. The most important factor in treatment is a very good patient-physician communication. Topical or systemic treatment or both can be used depending on the severity of acne. Benzoyl peroxyde, azelaic acid, AHA's antibiotics, retinoic acid and derivatives are the topical choices. For systemic treatment antibiotics are the most commonly used medicines, but isotretinoine has a very spesific place with the possibility of permanent healing. All kind of treatments need approximately six months for a good result.

  14. A Review of Acne in Ethnic Skin

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Erica C.

    2010-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is one of the most common conditions for which all patients, including those with skin of color (Fitzpatrick skin types IV–VI), seek dermatological care. The multifactorial pathogenesis of acne appears to be the same in ethnic patients as in Caucasians. However, there is controversy over whether certain skin biology characteristics, such as sebum production, differ in ethnic patients. Clinically, acne lesions can appear the same as those seen in Caucasians; however, histologically, all types of acne lesions in African Americans can be associated with intense inflammation including comedones, which can also have some degree of inflammation. It is the sequelae of the disease that are the distinguishing characteristics of acne in skin of color, namely postinflammatory hyperpigmentation and keloidal or hypertrophic scarring. Although the medical and surgical treatment options are the same, it is these features that should be kept in mind when designing a treatment regimen for acne in skin of color. PMID:20725545

  15. [Acne and diet].

    PubMed

    Melnik, B C

    2013-04-01

    In industrialized countries acne presents as an epidemic disease of civilization affecting sebaceous follicles of adolescents and young adults, associated with increased body mass index and insulin resistance. "Western style" diet, characterized by high glycaemic load and increased consumption of insulinotropic milk proteins, plays an important role in acne pathogenesis. On the cellular level, nutrient-derived metabolic signals are sensed by the metabolic transcription factor FoxO1 and integrated by the regulatory kinase mTORC1. mTORC1, the central hub of protein- and lipid biosynthesis, cell growth and proliferation, is activated by insulin, IGF-1 and branched-chain essential amino acids, especially leucine. The understanding of Western diet-mediated nutrient signalling with over-activated mTORC1 offers a reasonable approach for dietary intervention in acne by lowering glycaemic load and consumption of milk and milk products. A suitable diet attenuating increased mTORC1 activity is a Palaeolithic-like diet with reduced intake of sugar, hyperglycaemic grains, milk and milk products but enriched consumption of vegetables and fish.

  16. Effects of fish oil supplementation on inflammatory acne

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Given that acne is a rare condition in societies with higher consumption of omega-3 (n-3) relative to omega-6 (n-6) fatty acids, supplementation with n-3 may suppress inflammatory cytokine production and thereby reduce acne severity. Methods 13 individuals with inflammatory acne were given three grams of fish oil containing 930 mg of EPA to their unchanged diet and existing acne remedies for 12 weeks. Acne was assessed using an overall severity grading scale, total inflammatory lesion counts, and colorimetry. Findings There was no significant change in acne grading and inflammatory counts at week 12 compared to baseline. However, there was a broad range of response to the intervention on an individual basis. The results showed that acne severity improved in 8 individuals, worsened in 4, and remained unchanged in 1. Interestingly, among the individuals who showed improvement, 7 were classified as having moderate to severe acne at baseline, while 3 of the 4 whose acne deteriorated were classified as having mild acne. Conclusion There is some evidence that fish oil supplementation is associated with an improvement in overall acne severity, especially for individuals with moderate to severe acne. Divergent responses to fish oil in our pilot study indicates that dietary and supplemental lipids are worthy of further investigation in acne. PMID:23206895

  17. Bioengineering a humanized acne microenvironment model: Proteomics analysis of host responses to Propionibacterium acnes infection in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Nakatsuji, Teruaki; Shi, Yang; Zhu, Wenhong; Huang, Cheng-Po; Chen, Yun-Ru; Lee, Dong-Youn; Smith, Jeffery W.; Zouboulis, Christos C.; Gallo, Richard L.; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2009-01-01

    Acne is a human disease of the sebaceous hair follicle. Unlike humans, most animals produce little or no triglycerides in hair follicles to harbor Propionibacterium acnes a fact that has encumbered the development of novel treatments for acne lesions. Although genetic mutant mice with acne-like skins have been used for screening anti-acne drugs, the mice generally have deficits in immune system that turns out to be inappropriate to generate antibodies for developing acne vaccines. Here, we employed a bioengineering approach using a tissue chamber integrated with a dermis-based cell-trapped system (DBCTS) to mimic the in vivo microenvironment of acne lesions. Human sebocyte cell lines were grown in DBCTS as a scaffold and inserted into a perforated tissue chamber. After implantation of a tissue chamber bearing human sebocytes into ICR mice, P. acnes or PBS was injected into a tissue chamber to induce host immune response. Infiltrated cells such as neutrophils and macrophages were detectable in tissue chamber fluids. In addition, a proinflammatory cytokine macrophage-inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) was elevated after P. acnes injection. In tissue chamber fluids, 13 proteins including secreted proteins and cell matrix derived from mouse, human cells or P. acnes were identified by proteomics using isotope-coded protein label (ICPL) coupled to nano-LC-MS analysis. After P. acnes infection, four proteins including fibrinogen, α polypeptide, fibrinogen β chain, S100A9, and serine protease inhibitor A3K showed altered concentrations in the mimicked acne microenvironment. The bioengineered acne model thus provides an in vivo microenvironment to study the interaction of host with P. acnes and offers a unique set-up for screening novel anti-acne drugs and vaccines. PMID:18651708

  18. Canadian Drug Products Containing ASA

    PubMed Central

    Parker, William A.; Shearer, Cameron A.; Kirkpatrick, Susan L.

    1977-01-01

    A list of nearly 200 Canadian ASA-containing drug products is presented. Information was supplied by the major pharmaceutical companies and data were also obtained from various Canadian reference sources. This information should aid the physician and other health-related personnel in identifying ASA-containing products and counselling the salicylate-endangered patient. PMID:21304856

  19. Propionibacterium acnes in the pathogenesis and immunotherapy of acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pei-Feng; Hsieh, Yao-Dung; Lin, Ya-Ching; Two, Aimee; Shu, Chih-Wen; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Acne vulgaris, a multi-factorial disease, is one of the most common skin diseases, affecting an estimated 80% of Americans at some point during their lives. The gram-positive and anaerobic Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) bacterium has been implicated in acne inflammation and pathogenesis. Therapies for acne vulgaris using antibiotics generally lack bacterial specificity, promote the generation of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains, and cause adverse effects. Immunotherapy against P. acnes or its antigens (sialidase and CAMP factor) has been demonstrated to be effective in mice, attenuating P. acnes-induced inflammation; thus, this method may be applied to develop a potential vaccine targeting P. acnes for acne vulgaris treatment. This review summarizes reports describing the role of P. acnes in the pathogenesis of acne and various immunotherapy-based approaches targeting P. acnes, suggesting the potential effectiveness of immunotherapy for acne vulgaris as well as P. acnes-associated diseases.

  20. Propionibacterium acnes in the pathogenesis and immunotherapy of acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pei-Feng; Hsieh, Yao-Dung; Lin, Ya-Ching; Two, Aimee; Shu, Chih-Wen; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Acne vulgaris, a multi-factorial disease, is one of the most common skin diseases, affecting an estimated 80% of Americans at some point during their lives. The gram-positive and anaerobic Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) bacterium has been implicated in acne inflammation and pathogenesis. Therapies for acne vulgaris using antibiotics generally lack bacterial specificity, promote the generation of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains, and cause adverse effects. Immunotherapy against P. acnes or its antigens (sialidase and CAMP factor) has been demonstrated to be effective in mice, attenuating P. acnes-induced inflammation; thus, this method may be applied to develop a potential vaccine targeting P. acnes for acne vulgaris treatment. This review summarizes reports describing the role of P. acnes in the pathogenesis of acne and various immunotherapy-based approaches targeting P. acnes, suggesting the potential effectiveness of immunotherapy for acne vulgaris as well as P. acnes-associated diseases. PMID:26264195

  1. Can I Prevent Acne?

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Can I Prevent Acne? KidsHealth > For Teens > Can I Prevent Acne? Print A A A Text Size What's ... too. Although there is no surefire way to prevent acne, try these tips to help reduce the ...

  2. Heat-killed Propionibacterium acnes is capable of inducing inflammatory responses in skin.

    PubMed

    Lyte, Peter; Sur, Runa; Nigam, Anu; Southall, Michael D

    2009-12-01

    The etiology of acne is a complex process, and acne is one of the most common skin disorders affecting millions of people. The pathogenesis of acne is closely associated with the bacterium, Propionibacterium acnes which was previously known as Corynebacterium parvum. Both viable and non-viable P. acnes/C. parvum have been shown to induce an immunostimulatory effect in vivo, suggesting that even dead bacteria continue to activate an inflammatory response. Acne treatments with lasers or devices, induce a bactericidal effect through heat generation which may not address the immunogenic activity of P. acnes and the resulting acne inflammation. Therefore, we sought to determine whether killed P. acnes is capable of inducing an inflammatory response and therefore could be a contributing factor in acne. Direct heat treatment of P. acnes cultures with temperatures ranging from 50 degrees C to 80 degrees C reduced P. acnes viability. Both viable and heat-killed P. acnes activated the p38 MAP kinase and its downstream substrate Hsp27. Stimulating keratinocytes with normal and heat-inactivated P. acnes resulted in an induction of proinflammatory nitric oxide and IL-8 production. Thus killed P. acnes is capable of inducing inflammation in skin suggesting that therapies that have both bactericidal and anti-inflammatory effects may result in a more effective treatment of patients with acne than treatments that are bactericidal alone. PMID:19624731

  3. Acne in hirsute women

    PubMed Central

    Pupovci, Hatixhe Latifi; Berisha, Violeta Lokaj; Goçi, Aferdita Uka; Gerqari, Antigona

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Acne and hirsutism are common manifestations of hyperandrogenism. Aim To investigate whether or not acne is present in women with hirsutism, associated with different clinical, endocrine and ultrasonographic features. Material and methods The prospective study included 135 women with hirsutism, aged 14–46 years. We measured the levels of hormones with radioimmunoassay/immunoradiometric assay methods. Results Acne were present in 63 (47.6%) women with hirsutism. Sixty women had mild forms of acne, including: whiteheads, blackheads, papules and pustules. Only 3 women had moderate to severe acne, including nodules. In a group of women with hirsutism and acne, 6 (9.5%) were obese. In our study we found a high prevalence of androgen excess among hirsute women with acne: total testosterone was increased in 79%, free testosterone in 20.6%, androstenedione in 69.8%, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) in 30.1%, 17-OH-progesterone 68.2% and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) was decreased in 33.3% of women. Women with hirsutism and acne have received oral contraceptives for a year, without or in a combination with other medication. Thirty-four (53.9%) women have shown improvement in hirsutism and acne. Conclusions In this study we found a high prevalence of acne in hirsute women. The prevalence of acne was higher in polycystic ovarian syndrome. Since these women have associated endocrine changes it is important to correct them with hormonal therapy. PMID:25610349

  4. Acne in women.

    PubMed

    Ramos-e-Silva, M; Ramos-e-Silva, S; Carneiro, S

    2015-07-01

    This review focuses on the subject of acne in women, a disease that is increasingly common and that can also affect men. Adult acne differs from the type of acne that occurs in teenagers, and it may persist beyond adolescence or have its onset at an older age (adult-onset acne or late acne). Acne can have a negative impact on the quality of life of patients at any age, leading to a negative body image and decrease in self-esteem, and in older patients it can result in discrimination in the workplace and in other social environments. Acne in women must be understood as a specific problem, and here we discuss the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, psychology and treatment of this very prevalent problem. PMID:25597414

  5. Acne in women.

    PubMed

    Ramos-e-Silva, M; Ramos-e-Silva, S; Carneiro, S

    2015-07-01

    This review focuses on the subject of acne in women, a disease that is increasingly common and that can also affect men. Adult acne differs from the type of acne that occurs in teenagers, and it may persist beyond adolescence or have its onset at an older age (adult-onset acne or late acne). Acne can have a negative impact on the quality of life of patients at any age, leading to a negative body image and decrease in self-esteem, and in older patients it can result in discrimination in the workplace and in other social environments. Acne in women must be understood as a specific problem, and here we discuss the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, psychology and treatment of this very prevalent problem.

  6. Overview of drug product development.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Padma

    2011-12-01

    The process for developing drug delivery systems has evolved over the past two decades with more scientific rigor, involving a collaboration of various fields, i.e., biology, chemistry, engineering, and pharmaceutics. Drug products, also commonly known in the pharmaceutical industry as formulations or "dosage forms," are used for administering the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) for purposes of assessing safety in preclinical models, early- to late-phase human clinical trials, and for routine clinical/commercial use. This overview discusses approaches for creating small-molecule API dosage forms, from preformulation to commercial manufacturing.

  7. Propionibacterium acnes Induces an IL-17 Response in Acne Vulgaris that Is Regulated by Vitamin A and Vitamin D.

    PubMed

    Agak, George W; Qin, Min; Nobe, Jennifer; Kim, Myung-Hwa; Krutzik, Stephan R; Tristan, Grogan R; Elashoff, David; Garbán, Hermes J; Kim, Jenny

    2014-02-01

    Acne vulgaris is the most common skin disorder affecting millions of people worldwide and inflammation resulting from the immune response targeting Propionibacterium acnes has a significant role in its pathogenesis. In this study, we have demonstrated that P. acnes is a potent inducer of T helper 17 (Th17) and Th1, but not Th2 responses in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). P. acnes stimulated expression of key Th17-related genes, including IL-17A, RORα, RORc, IL-17RA, and IL-17RC, and triggered IL-17 secretion from CD4(+), but not from CD8(+) T cells. Supernatants from P. acnes-stimulated PBMCs were sufficient to promote the differentiation of naive CD4(+)CD45RA T cells into Th17 cells. Furthermore, we found that the combination of IL-1β, IL-6, and transforming growth factor-β-neutralizing antibodies completely inhibited P. acnes-induced IL-17 production. Importantly, we showed that IL-17-expressing cells were present in skin biopsies from acne patients but not from normal donors. Finally, vitamin A (all-trans retinoic acid) and vitamin D (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3) inhibited P. acnes-induced Th17 differentiation. Together, our data demonstrate that IL-17 is induced by P. acnes and expressed in acne lesions and that both vitamin A and D could be effective tools to modulate Th17-mediated diseases such as acne.

  8. Acne and whey protein supplementation among bodybuilders.

    PubMed

    Simonart, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    Accumulative evidence supports the role of nutritional factors in acne. I report here 5 healthy male adult patients developing acne after the consumption of whey protein, a favorite supplement of those engaged in bodybuilding. These observations are in line with biochemical and epidemiological data supporting the effects of milk and dairy products as enhancers of insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 signaling and acne aggravation. Further prospective studies are required to determine the possible role of dietary supplements in the fitness and bodybuilding environment.

  9. Acne: What's New.

    PubMed

    Stein Gold, Linda F

    2016-06-01

    Acne vulgaris is one of the most prevalent skin conditions. Antibiotics, when considered, are most effective in combination with other therapies, and limited evidence suggests that submicrobial doses of antibiotics may improve acne without increasing the risk for antibiotic resistance. A small but significant risk for inflammatory bowel disease has also been identified in children treated with multiple courses of antibiotics. New topical agents are expanding therapeutic options for acne. Semin Cutan Med Surg 35(supp6):S114-S116. PMID:27538054

  10. Minocycline in acne vulgaris: benefits and risks.

    PubMed

    Ochsendorf, Falk

    2010-01-01

    Minocycline is a semi-synthetic, second-generation tetracycline. It was introduced in 1972 and has both antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties. Minocycline is used for a variety of infectious diseases and in acne. Even today, new indications beyond the antibacterial indications are being investigated such as its use in neurologic diseases. Formerly, minocycline was thought to have a superior efficacy in the treatment of inflammatory acne, especially with respect to antibacterial-resistant Propionibacterium acnes. A thorough review of the literature, however, shows that minocycline is not more effective in acne than other tetracyclines. Compared with first-generation tetracyclines, minocycline has a better pharmacokinetic profile, and compared with doxycycline it is not phototoxic. However, minocycline has an increased risk of severe adverse effects compared with other tetracyclines. It may induce hypersensitivity reactions affecting the liver, lung, kidneys, or multiple organs (Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms [DRESS] syndrome) in the first weeks of treatment and, with long-term treatment, may cause autoimmune reactions (systemic lupus erythematosus, autoimmune hepatitis). In addition, CNS symptoms, such as dizziness, are more frequent compared with other tetracyclines. Long-term treatment may induce hyperpigmentation of the skin or other organs. Resistance of P. acnes to minocycline also occurs, dependent on the prescribing behavior. Considering the aspects of efficacy, its adverse effect profile, resistance, price, and alternatives, minocycline is no longer considered the first-line antibacterial in the treatment of acne.

  11. Oxidative Stress in Patients With Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Arican, Ozer; Belge Kurutas, Ergul; Sasmaz, Sezai

    2005-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is one of the common dermatological diseases and its pathogenesis is multifactorial. In this study, we aim to determine the effects of oxidative stress in acne vulgaris. Forty-three consecutive acne patients and 46 controls were enrolled. The parameters of oxidative stress such as catalase (CAT), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and malondialdehyde (MDA) in the venous blood of cases were measured spectrophotometrically. The values compared with control group, the relation between the severity and distribution of acne, and the correlation of each enzyme level were researched. CAT and G6PD levels in patients were found to be statistically decreased, and SOD and MDA levels were found to be statistically increased (P < .001). However, any statistical difference and correlation could not be found between the severity and distribution of lesions and the mean levels of enzymes. In addition, we found that each enzyme is correlated with one another. Our findings show that oxidative stress exists in the acne patients. It will be useful to apply at least one antioxidant featured drug along with the combined acne treatment. PMID:16489259

  12. Understanding innate immunity and inflammation in acne: implications for management.

    PubMed

    Dreno, B; Gollnick, H P M; Kang, S; Thiboutot, D; Bettoli, V; Torres, V; Leyden, J

    2015-06-01

    Acne has long been understood to have a complex physiological basis involving several main factors: hormonally-stimulated sebum production, abnormal keratinization of the pilosebaceous duct, and an inflammatory immune response to Propionibacterium acnes. Recent studies at the molecular and cellular level have begun clarifying how all of these factors interact, and the role of the innate immune system is better appreciated. Inflammation has been demonstrated in all acne lesions - the preclinical microcomedo, comedones, inflammatory lesions, 'post-inflammatory' erythema or hyperpigmentation, and scarring. Inflammation localized to the pilosebaceous unit can be considered the defining feature of acne and should be addressed via multiple therapeutic pathways. Clinicians tend to think oral antibiotics should be used to 'calm' inflammatory acne, but there is good evidence showing that topical retinoids also have anti-inflammatory properties as a class effect. For best therapeutic outcomes, most patients with acne should be treated first line with a topical retinoid plus an antimicrobial agent, as has been demonstrated in thousands of patients involved in clinical trials and recommended by the Global Alliance to Improve Outcomes in Acne for more than a decade. Moving away from reliance on antibiotic therapy for acne is particularly important in an era of worsening antimicrobial resistance and worldwide calls to reduce antibiotic use. Improved understanding about the role of P. acnes and the innate immune system in acne should help clinicians in designing efficacious treatment strategies.

  13. Understanding innate immunity and inflammation in acne: implications for management.

    PubMed

    Dreno, B; Gollnick, H P M; Kang, S; Thiboutot, D; Bettoli, V; Torres, V; Leyden, J

    2015-06-01

    Acne has long been understood to have a complex physiological basis involving several main factors: hormonally-stimulated sebum production, abnormal keratinization of the pilosebaceous duct, and an inflammatory immune response to Propionibacterium acnes. Recent studies at the molecular and cellular level have begun clarifying how all of these factors interact, and the role of the innate immune system is better appreciated. Inflammation has been demonstrated in all acne lesions - the preclinical microcomedo, comedones, inflammatory lesions, 'post-inflammatory' erythema or hyperpigmentation, and scarring. Inflammation localized to the pilosebaceous unit can be considered the defining feature of acne and should be addressed via multiple therapeutic pathways. Clinicians tend to think oral antibiotics should be used to 'calm' inflammatory acne, but there is good evidence showing that topical retinoids also have anti-inflammatory properties as a class effect. For best therapeutic outcomes, most patients with acne should be treated first line with a topical retinoid plus an antimicrobial agent, as has been demonstrated in thousands of patients involved in clinical trials and recommended by the Global Alliance to Improve Outcomes in Acne for more than a decade. Moving away from reliance on antibiotic therapy for acne is particularly important in an era of worsening antimicrobial resistance and worldwide calls to reduce antibiotic use. Improved understanding about the role of P. acnes and the innate immune system in acne should help clinicians in designing efficacious treatment strategies. PMID:26059728

  14. Treatment of acne vulgaris and prevention of acne scarring: canadian consensus guidelines.

    PubMed

    Madden, W S; Landells, I D; Poulin, Y; Searles, G E; Smith, K C; Tan, J K; Toole, J; Zip, C M; Degreef, H

    2000-06-01

    Acne affects approximately 95% of the population at some point during their lifetime.1 This common disorder can range from mild to severe forms, cause sometimes extensive scarring, and can last well into the fourth and fifth decades. Effective therapeutic agents are available to both treat acne and prevent ongoing disease. Despite this, dermatologists frequently see patients with significant acne scarring because many patients delay seeking medical attention for acne and many practitioners procrastinate over using effective antiscarring options. In patients who already demonstrate scarring, repeated courses of antibiotics only result in recurring acne and additional scarring. This, in turn, exacerbates the despair and other adverse psychosocial effects of the disease. There are a variety of agents and devices to help acne patients with scarring. However, successful treatment cannot be guaranteed, and in most cases residual scarring will be evident. Thus, the most effective way of managing acne scarring is to prevent its occurrence in the first place. Although we currently have a number of effective antiacne agents to control the disease, such as antibiotics and hormonal agents, isotretinoina is the only agent that has been shown to induce long-term drug-free remission and curative potential.

  15. What's new in the physiopathology of acne?

    PubMed

    Suh, D H; Kwon, H H

    2015-07-01

    There are four central factors that contribute to acne physiopathology: the inflammatory response, colonization with Propionibacterium acnes, increased sebum production and hypercornification of the pilosebaceous duct. In addition, research in the areas of diet and nutrition, genetics and oxidative stress is also yielding some interesting insights into the development of acne. In this paper we review some of the most recent research and novel concepts revealed in this work, which has been published by researchers from diverse academic disciplines including dermatology, immunology, microbiology and endocrinology. We discuss the implications of their findings (particularly in terms of opportunities to develop new therapies), highlight interrelationships between these novel factors that could contribute to the pathology of acne, and indicate where gaps in our understanding still exist.

  16. The antimicrobial activity of liposomal lauric acids against Propionibacterium acnes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Darren; Pornpattananangkul, Dissaya; Nakatsuji, Teruaki; Chan, Michael; Carson, Dennis; Huang, Chun-Ming; Zhang, Liangfang

    2009-10-01

    This study evaluated the antimicrobial activity of lauric acid (LA) and its liposomal derivatives against Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes), the bacterium that promotes inflammatory acne. First, the antimicrobial study of three free fatty acids (lauric acid, palmitic acid and oleic acid) demonstrated that LA gives the strongest bactericidal activity against P. acnes. However, a setback of using LA as a potential treatment for inflammatory acne is its poor water solubility. Then the LA was incorporated into a liposome formulation to aid its delivery to P. acnes. It was demonstrated that the antimicrobial activity of LA was not only well maintained in its liposomal derivatives but also enhanced at low LA concentration. In addition, the antimicrobial activity of LA-loaded liposomes (LipoLA) mainly depended on the LA loading concentration per single liposomes. Further study found that the LipoLA could fuse with the membranes of P. acnes and release the carried LA directly into the bacterial membranes, thereby killing the bacteria effectively. Since LA is a natural compound that is the main acid in coconut oil and also resides in human breast milk and liposomes have been successfully and widely applied as a drug delivery vehicle in the clinic, the LipoLA developed in this work holds great potential of becoming an innate, safe and effective therapeutic medication for acne vulgaris and other P. acnes associated diseases. PMID:19665786

  17. [Charles Bukowski's acne].

    PubMed

    Bahmer, F A; Bahmer, J A

    2012-04-01

    In his autobiography, Charles Bukowski (1920-1994) describes his severe acne conglobata, his experience with therapy, family conflicts and emotional tension. Despite the stigmatization by his acne scars, Bukowski became a philobatic writer and a true chronist of the American way of life in the second half of the 20th century, writing in a coarse and obscene language.

  18. [Charles Bukowski's acne].

    PubMed

    Bahmer, F A; Bahmer, J A

    2012-04-01

    In his autobiography, Charles Bukowski (1920-1994) describes his severe acne conglobata, his experience with therapy, family conflicts and emotional tension. Despite the stigmatization by his acne scars, Bukowski became a philobatic writer and a true chronist of the American way of life in the second half of the 20th century, writing in a coarse and obscene language. PMID:22406763

  19. Evaluation and Management of Acne.

    PubMed

    Botros, Paul A; Tsai, Gary; Pujalte, George G A

    2015-12-01

    Acne is a common complaint in the primary care clinics. It has not only physical implications but also psychological. This article discusses the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and criteria for making the diagnosis. It also discusses endocrine disorders that may be the cause of acne. Treatment and management are discussed by subtype. Acne mechanica or sports-related acne is also discussed. PMID:26612368

  20. Management strategies for acne vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, Kristen M; Ditre, Chérie M

    2011-01-01

    Clinical question: What are the most effective treatment(s) for mild, moderate, severe, and hormonally driven acne? Results: Mild acne responds favorably to topical treatments such as benzoyl peroxide, salicylic acid, and a low-dose retinoid. Moderate acne responds well to combination therapy comprising-topical benzoyl peroxide, antibiotics, and/or retinoids, as well as oral antibiotics in refractory cases and oral contraceptive pills for female acne patients. Severe nodulocystic acne vulgaris responds best to oral isotretinoin therapy. In female patients with moderate to severe acne, facial hair, loss of scalp hair and irregular periods, polycystic ovarian syndrome should be considered and appropriate treatment with hormonal modulation given. Adjunctive procedures can also be considered for all acne patients. Implementation: Pitfalls to avoid when treating acne: treatment of acne in women of child-bearing age; familiarization of all acne treatments in order to individualize management for patients; indications for specialist referral. PMID:21691566

  1. Are we underdosing acne patients with generic isotretinoin?

    PubMed

    Mutizwa, Misha M; Sheinbein, David M

    2013-01-15

    With Roche's withdrawl of Accutane from the U.S. market in 2009, isotretinoin has only been available in its generic form. Many clinicians fail to realize that for approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, a generic medication must have a bioequivalence between 80 percent and 125 percent of that of the innovator product. This potential variability in bioavailability between branded and generic medications is important to keep in mind with isotretinoin, given the implications for achieving a sustained remission in acne patients.

  2. Investigating the Stability of Benzoyl Peroxide in Over-the-Counter Acne Medications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kittredge, Marina Canepa; Kittredge, Kevin W.; Sokol, Melissa S.; Sarquis, Arlyne M.; Sennet, Laura M.

    2008-01-01

    One of the most commonly used ingredients in over-the-counter acne treatments in cream, gel, and wash form is benzoyl peroxide. It is an anti-bacterial agent that kills the bacterium ("Propionibacterium acne") involved in the formation of acne. The formulation of these products is extremely difficult owing to the instability of benzoyl peroxide.…

  3. Nanoparticle Stabilized Liposomes for Acne Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Victoria

    Acne vulgaris is a common skin disease that affects over 40 million people in the United States alone. The main cause of acne vulgaris is Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes), resides deep in the pores and follicles of the skin in order to feed on oil produced by the sebaceous glands. The liposome is a lipid based nanoparticle with numerous advantages over free drug molecules as an acne treatment alternative. Bare liposomes loaded with lauric acid (LipoLA) were found to show strong antimicrobial activity against P. acnes while generating minimal toxicity. However, the platform is limited by the spontaneous tendency of liposomes to fuse with each other. Attaching nanoparticles to the surface of liposomes can overcome this challenge by providing steric repulsion and reduce surface tension. Thus, carboxyl-functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuC) were attached to the surface of liposomes (AuC-liposomes) loaded with doxycycline, a general tetracycline antibiotic. These particles were found to have a diameter of 120 nm and a zeta potential of 20.0 mV. Both fluorescent and antimicrobial studies demonstrated that based on electrostatic interaction, negatively charged AuC attached to the liposome's positively charged surface and stabilized liposomes in a neutral pH environment (pH = 7.4). Upon entering the skin's acidic environment (pH = 4), AuC detached from the liposome's surface and liposomes could fuse with P. acnes residing in the pores. Furthermore, toxicity studies showed that AuC-liposomes did not induce any significant toxicity, while two of the leading over-the-counter therapies, benzoyl peroxide and salicylic acid, generated substantial skin irritation.

  4. Acne and smoking

    PubMed Central

    Capitanio, Bruno; Ottaviani, M; Bordignon, V; Amantea, A; Picardo, M

    2009-01-01

    Background. Post-adolescent acne is an inflammatory disorder, whose cause is unknown. Contrasting data are available on correlation between acne and smoking habit. Objectives. To verify the frequency of clinically non-inflammatory (atypical) post-adolescent acne (APAA) among women, a possible correlation with cigarette smoking, possible differences in sebum composition in a group of female smokers with acne compared to healthy smokers and non-smokers. Method and results. 1046 randomly selected women (25–50-years-old) participated at the study. In 60 selected female subjects we analyzed sebum composition for α-tocopherol, squalene and squalene monohydroperoxide. We found a high prevalence of APAA among women (74.6%), a strong correlation with smoking habit (p < 0.0001), as well as an increase in the grade of sebum peroxidation (p < 0.05) with a reduction in vitamin E (p = 0.02), in the subjects with acne compared to the controls. Conclusions. Clinical evidence and experimental data showed a straight correlation between smoking habit and post-pubertal acne in which the clinically non-inflammatory type—APAA—is the most frequent. In the more severe cases we could consider APAA as a new entity (smoker’s acne). PMID:20436880

  5. Efficacy and Tolerability of a Three-Step Acne System Containing a Solubilized Benzoyl Peroxide Lotion versus a Benzoyl Peroxide/Clindamycin Combination Product

    PubMed Central

    Del Rosso, James Q.

    2008-01-01

    A brand three-step acne treatment system containing a solubilized 5% benzoyl lotion and a designated cleanser and moisturizer was compared with a brand benzoyl peroxide 5%/clindamycin 1% gel in subjects with acne vulgaris. The single-center, four-week study was investigator-blinded and randomized. The three-step acne treatment system proved to be comparable in efficacy and tolerability. PMID:21203357

  6. Antibiotic-resistant acne: getting under the skin.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Mau; Sadhasivam, Suresh; Bhattacharyya, Anamika; Jain, Shilpi; Ghosh, Shamik; Arndt, Kenneth A; Dover, Jeffrey S; Sengupta, Shiladitya

    2016-06-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is a key pathogenic factor in the development of acne. Antibiotics are the first choice of treatment for mild-to-moderate, mixed, papular/pustular, and moderate nodular acne, and an alternative choice in severe, nodular/conglobate acne. The emergence of resistance to the currently available antibiotics poses a serious set-back to this algorithm, and the reduced arsenal can diminish efficacy of treatment. This emerging situation should catalyze innovations in dermatology; for example, newer drugs and technologies such as next-generation antibiotics with excellent potency and low propensity to develop resistance, rapid diagnostic platforms to select responders and nonresponders, and delivery technologies that target the bacteria. Such innovations can dramatically expand the arsenal for dermatologists in the management of acne. PMID:27416310

  7. Antibiotic-resistant acne: getting under the skin.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Mau; Sadhasivam, Suresh; Bhattacharyya, Anamika; Jain, Shilpi; Ghosh, Shamik; Arndt, Kenneth A; Dover, Jeffrey S; Sengupta, Shiladitya

    2016-06-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is a key pathogenic factor in the development of acne. Antibiotics are the first choice of treatment for mild-to-moderate, mixed, papular/pustular, and moderate nodular acne, and an alternative choice in severe, nodular/conglobate acne. The emergence of resistance to the currently available antibiotics poses a serious set-back to this algorithm, and the reduced arsenal can diminish efficacy of treatment. This emerging situation should catalyze innovations in dermatology; for example, newer drugs and technologies such as next-generation antibiotics with excellent potency and low propensity to develop resistance, rapid diagnostic platforms to select responders and nonresponders, and delivery technologies that target the bacteria. Such innovations can dramatically expand the arsenal for dermatologists in the management of acne.

  8. Treatment of acne scarring.

    PubMed

    Alam, M; Dover, J S

    Acne scarring is common but surprisingly difficult to treat. Scars can involve textural change in the superficial and deep dermis, and can also be associated with erythema, and less often, pigmentary change. In general, treatment of acne scarring is a multistep procedure. First, examination of the patient is necessary to classify the subtypes of scarring that are present. Then, the patient's primary concerns are elicited, and the patient is offered a menu of procedures that may address the various components of the scarring process. It is important to emphasize to the patient that acne scarring can be improved but never entirely reversed. PMID:17180246

  9. Raman Barcode for Counterfeit Drug Product Detection.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Latevi S; Rodriguez, Jason D

    2016-05-01

    Potential infiltration of counterfeit drug products-containing the wrong or no active pharmaceutical ingredient (API)-into the bona fide drug supply poses a significant threat to consumers worldwide. Raman spectroscopy offers a rapid, nondestructive avenue to screen a high throughput of samples. Traditional qualitative Raman identification is typically done with spectral correlation methods that compare the spectrum of a reference sample to an unknown. This is often effective for pure materials but is quite challenging when dealing with drug products that contain different formulations of active and inactive ingredients. Typically, reliable identification of drug products using common spectral correlation algorithms can only be made if the specific product under study is present in the library of reference spectra, thereby limiting the scope of products that can be screened. In this paper, we introduce the concept of the Raman barcode for identification of drug products by comparing the known peaks in the API reference spectrum to the peaks present in the finished drug product under study. This method requires the transformation of the Raman spectra of both API and finished drug products into a barcode representation by assigning zero intensity to every spectral frequency except the frequencies that correspond to Raman peaks. By comparing the percentage of nonzero overlap between the expected API barcode and finished drug product barcode, the identity of API present can be confirmed. In this study, 18 approved finished drug products and nine simulated counterfeits were successfully identified with 100% accuracy utilizing this method. PMID:27043140

  10. Antiandrogenic Therapy with Ciproterone Acetate in Female Patients Who Suffer from Both Androgenetic Alopecia and Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    CONEAC, ANDREI; MURESAN, ADRIANA; ORASAN, MEDA SANDRA

    2014-01-01

    Background. Androgenetic Alopecia in Women (AGA) occurs due to an underlying susceptibility of hair follicles to androgenic miniaturization, caused by androgens. Clinically, AGA is characterized by progressive hair loss, with a marked hair thinning in the fronto-parietal area so that the scalp can be easily seen. Acne vulgaris is androgen-dependent and often affects the skin that has an increased number of oil glands: face, back and chest. Although the sebaceous glands are present on the scalp too, it is very rare to get acne at this site, as the hair acts as a wig and allows the sebum to drain and does not block the pores. Both AGA and Acne Vulgaris are signs of hyperandrogenism. Cyproterone acetate/ethinyl estradiol (2mg/0.035mg) products are authorized for the treatment of androgenetic symptoms in women, such as acne, seborrhea, mild forms of hirsutism and androgenetic alopecia. Our study had a double purpose: - To evaluate the result of the study regimen Melleva 35 (one pill per day, for 3 consecutive months) in patients with moderate to severe acne, suffering also from Androgenetic Alopecia;- To establish the efficacy of the drug on acne and alopecia improvement, both from the doctor’s and patient’s point of view. Patients and methods. After being informed of the aims and procedures of the study, participants provided a written informed consent. A number of 35 female subjects with moderate to severe acne vulgaris remained in the study. The subjects had also been diagnosed as suffering from AGA, on the basis of clinical criteria, including the pattern of hair loss and trichoscopy assessment. Results 83% of study subjects reported that their hair did not continue to fall after 3 months of antiandrogen therapy. The females were evaluated using trichoscopy and the doctor noticed hair regrowth in 77% of the cases. Regarding the improvement of acne lesions after the treatment, 40% of study subjects recorded good improvement and 26% recorded excellent results

  11. Teens and Acne Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Types of treatments Benzoyl peroxide Benzoyl peroxide wash, lotion, or gel—the most effective acne treatment you ... and make it redder than the wash or lotion, so try the wash or lotion first. How ...

  12. Bacteriophages Infecting Propionibacterium acnes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Viruses specifically infecting bacteria, or bacteriophages, are the most common biological entity in the biosphere. As such, they greatly influence bacteria, both in terms of enhancing their virulence and in terms of killing them. Since the first identification of bacteriophages in the beginning of the 20th century, researchers have been fascinated by these microorganisms and their ability to eradicate bacteria. In this review, we will cover the history of the Propionibacterium acnes bacteriophage research and point out how bacteriophage research has been an important part of the research on P. acnes itself. We will further discuss recent findings from phage genome sequencing and the identification of phage sequence signatures in clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs). Finally, the potential to use P. acnes bacteriophages as a therapeutic strategy to combat P. acnes-associated diseases will be discussed. PMID:23691509

  13. Atrophic Acne Scarring

    PubMed Central

    Graber, Emmy M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Scarring is an unfortunate and frequent complication of acne, resulting in significant psychological distress for patients. Fortunately, numerous treatment options exist for acne scarring. Objectives: To extensively review the literature on treatment options for atrophic acne scarring. Materials and methods: A comprehensive literature search was conducted on the following topics: dermabrasion, subcision, punch techniques, chemical peels, tissue augmentation, and lasers. Results: The literature supports the use of various treatment modalities; superior results may be achieved when multiple modalities are combined for a multi-step approach to scarring. Conclusion: The safety and efficacy of various treatment devices for acne scarring is well established, but there is a paucity of split-face trials comparing modalities. PMID:25610524

  14. Bacteriophages infecting Propionibacterium acnes.

    PubMed

    Brüggemann, Holger; Lood, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    Viruses specifically infecting bacteria, or bacteriophages, are the most common biological entity in the biosphere. As such, they greatly influence bacteria, both in terms of enhancing their virulence and in terms of killing them. Since the first identification of bacteriophages in the beginning of the 20th century, researchers have been fascinated by these microorganisms and their ability to eradicate bacteria. In this review, we will cover the history of the Propionibacterium acnes bacteriophage research and point out how bacteriophage research has been an important part of the research on P. acnes itself. We will further discuss recent findings from phage genome sequencing and the identification of phage sequence signatures in clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs). Finally, the potential to use P. acnes bacteriophages as a therapeutic strategy to combat P. acnes-associated diseases will be discussed.

  15. Acne: Diet and acnegenesis

    PubMed Central

    Danby, F. William (Bill)

    2011-01-01

    Acne is a manifestation of hormonal overstimulation of the pilosebaceous units of genetically susceptible individuals. Endogenous reproductive and growth hormones, exogenous reproductive hormones, insulin and endogenous insulin-like growth hormone-1, sourced from and stimulated by dairy and high glycemic load foods, all appear to contribute to this overstimulation. A postulated molecular mechanism linking food and acne is reported and integrated into the clinical picture. PMID:23130204

  16. Acne and diet.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Ronni; Matz, Hagit; Orion, Edith

    2004-01-01

    Forbidden foods? "The first law of dietetics seems to be: If it tastes good, it's bad for you" (Isaac Asimov, Russian-born biochemist and science fiction writer). This was essentially the Magna Carta for dermatologists of the 1950s: anything coveted by the teenage palate was suspect for morning after acne. Today, half a century later, although the slant has shifted away for this line of thinking in our dermatologic textbooks, several articles on the beliefs and perceptions of acne patients showed that nothing much has changed and that they expect us to give them detailed instructions of what "acne-related" foods they should avoid. In one such study(1), diet was the third most frequently implicated factor (after hormones and genetics) as the cause of the disease, with 32% of the respondents selecting diet as the main cause, and 44% thinking that foods aggravate acne. In another study that analyzed knowledge about causes of acne among English teenagers, 11% of the responders blamed greasy food as the main cause of the disease(2), whereas in another study found that 41% of final-year medical students of the University of Melbourne chose diet as an important factor of acne exacerbation on a final examination.(3)

  17. Treatment Modalities for Acne.

    PubMed

    Fox, Lizelle; Csongradi, Candice; Aucamp, Marique; du Plessis, Jeanetta; Gerber, Minja

    2016-01-01

    Acne is a common inflammatory skin disease which affects the pilosebaceous units of the skin. It can have severe psychological effects and can leave the patient with severe skin scarring. There are four well-recognized pathological factors responsible for acne which is also the target for acne therapy. In this review, different treatment options are discussed, including topical (i.e., retinoids, and antibiotics) and systemic (i.e., retinoids, antibiotics, and hormonal) treatments. Since the general public has been showing an increasing interest in more natural and generally safer treatment options, the use of complementary and alternative medicines (CAM) for treating acne was also discussed. The use of physical therapies such as comedone extraction, cryoslush therapy, cryotherapy, electrocauterization, intralesional corticosteroids and optical treatments are also mentioned. Acne has been extensively researched with regards to the disease mechanism as well as treatment options. However, due to the increasing resistance of Propionibacterium acnes towards the available antibiotics, there is a need for new treatment methods. Additionally, the lack of necessary evidence on the efficacy of CAM therapies makes it necessary for researchers to investigate these treatment options further. PMID:27529209

  18. Isotretinoin, tetracycline and circulating hormones in acne.

    PubMed

    Palatsi, R; Ruokonen, A; Oikarinen, A

    1997-09-01

    Isotretinoin, used to treat severe acne, has been shown to induce hormonal changes, especially to reduce 5 alpha-reductase in the production of the tissue-derived dihydrotestosterone (DHT) metabolite 3 alpha-Adiol G. However, the effects of isotretinoin on other pituitary, adrenal or gonadal hormones have not been thoroughly elucidated. In the present study, isotretinoin administered at a dose of 0.5 mg/kg/day for 4 weeks caused no marked changes in the serum levels of pituitary, adrenal or gonadal hormones or 3 alpha-Adiol G in patients with severe papulopustulotic acne (n = 19). After 12 weeks of therapy, there was a decrease in the levels of the precursor androgens androstenedione, testosterone and 3 alpha-Adiol G in 6/9 patients. Acne improved after 4.5 months in all but 2 male patients, who had very low serum hormone binding globulins (SHBG) and a high free androgen index (FAI). Isotretinoin did not affect the elevated LH/FSH ratio in a patient with the polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS); nor did it change the high FAI or low SHBG in the male patients. For comparison, tetracycline had no effects on the serum hormonal levels of patients with mild acne (n = 19) after 7 days of treatment. This study confirms that the effects of isotretinoin on the serum hormone levels are small and unlikely to be of relevance for the resolution of acne or the suppression of sebum excretion. PMID:9298137

  19. Targeted delivery of salicylic acid from acne treatment products into and through skin: role of solution and ingredient properties and relationships to irritation.

    PubMed

    Rhein, Linda; Chaudhuri, Bhaskar; Jivani, Nur; Fares, Hani; Davis, Adrian

    2004-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a beta hydroxy acid and has multifunctional uses in the treatment of various diseases in skin such as acne, psoriasis, and photoaging. One problem often cited as associated with salicylic acid is that it can be quite irritating at pH 3-4, where it exhibits the highest activity in the treatment of skin diseases. We have identified strategies to control the irritation potential of salicylic acid formulations and have focused on hydroalcoholic solutions used in acne wipes. One strategy is to control the penetration of SA into the skin. Penetration of the drug into various layers of skin, i.e., epidermis, dermis, and receptor fluid, was measured using a modified Franz in vitro diffusion method after various exposure times up to 24 hours. A polyurethane polymer (polyolprepolymer-15) was found to be an effective agent in controlling delivery of SA. In a dose-dependent fashion it targeted delivery of more SA to the epidermis as compared to penetration through the skin into the receptor fluid. It also reduced the rapid rate of permeation of a large dose of SA through the skin in the first few hours of exposure. A second strategy that proved successful was incorporation of known mild nonionic surfactants like isoceteth-20. These surfactants cleanse the skin, yet due to their inherent mildness (because of their reduced critical micelle concentration and monomer concentration), keep the barrier intact. Also, they reduce the rate of salicylic acid penetration, presumably through micellar entrapment (either in solution or on the skin surface after the alcohol evaporates). Cumulative irritation studies showed that targeting delivery of SA to the epidermis and reducing the rapid early rate of penetration of large amounts of drug through the skin resulted in a reduced irritation potential. In vivo irritation studies also showed that the surfactant system is the most important factor controlling irritancy. SA delivery is secondary, as formulations with less

  20. Neonatal and infantile acne vulgaris: an update.

    PubMed

    Serna-Tamayo, Cristian; Janniger, Camila K; Micali, Giuseppe; Schwartz, Robert A

    2014-07-01

    Acne may present in neonates, infants, and small children. Neonatal and infantile acne vulgaris are not considered to be rare. The presentation of acne in this patient population sometimes represents virilization and may portend later development of severe adolescent acne. Neonatal and infantile acne vulgaris must be distinguished from other cutaneous disorders seen in newborns and infants. Infantile acne tends to be more pleomorphic and inflammatory, thus requiring more vigorous therapy than neonatal acne.

  1. Staphylococcus aureus in Acne Pathogenesis: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Khorvash, Farzin; Abdi, Fatemeh; Kashani, Hessam H.; Naeini, Farahnaz Fatemi; Narimani, Tahmineh

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is considerable evidence which suggests a possible pathogenetic role for Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) in acne vulgaris. Aim: The study was to determine S. aureus colonization and antibiotic susceptibility patterns in patients with acne and of healthy people. Materials and Methods: In the case-control study, a total of 324 people were screened for nasal carriage of S. aureus: 166 acne patients and 158 healthy persons. One control subject was individually matched to one case. Nasal swabs from anterior nares of individuals were cultured and identified as S. aureus. Antibiotic sensitivity was performed with recognized laboratory techniques. Results: S. aureus was detected in 21.7% of the subjects in acne, and in 26.6% of control groups. There was no statistical difference in colonization rates between two groups (P=0.3). In patient group, most of S. aureus isolates were resistant to doxicycline and tetracycline (P=0.001), and were more sensitive to rifampicin compared to other drugs. In control samples, the isolated demonstrated higher resistance to cotrimoxazole compared to patient samples (P=0.0001). There was no difference between groups regarding resistance to rifampicin, vancomycin, methicillin, and oxacillin. Conclusion: It is still unclear whether S. aureus is actually a causal agent in the pathogenesis of acne. Based on microbiological data of both healthy and acne-affected persons, we propose that contribution of S. aureus in acne pathogenesis is controversial. PMID:23181229

  2. Cosmeceuticals based on Rhealba(®) Oat plantlet extract for the treatment of acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Fabbrocini, G; Saint Aroman, M

    2014-12-01

    Recent evidence suggests that acne vulgaris begins as an inflammation in and around the sebaceous gland and alterations in the lipid content of sebum, which drive hyperproliferation and increased desquamation of keratinocytes within sebaceous follicles. This prevents sebum drainage, causing the formation of microcomedones, which spontaneously regress or become acne lesions when the pilosebaceous unit is further blocked by the accumulation of corneocytes. These conditions are favourable for the proliferation of Propionibacterium acnes, which further aggravates acne by enhancing abnormal desquamation, sebum production and inflammation. Also, skin fragility due to inflammation or irritation by anti-comedogenic agents can worsen the situation. Rhealba(®) Oat plantlet extract (Pierre Fabre Dermo Cosmetique) soothes and restores fragile skin in acne by reducing inflammation and inhibits bacterial adhesion of Propionibacterium acnes. Cosmeceuticals combining Rhealba(®) Oat plantlet extract and hydro-compensating actives, which are available with or without anti-comedogenic hydroxy acids, provide a balanced, multifaceted approach for acne patients.

  3. What is the role of antimicrobial peptides (AMP) in acne vulgaris?

    PubMed

    Harder, Jürgen; Tsuruta, Daisuke; Murakami, Masamoto; Kurokawa, Ichiro

    2013-06-01

    Acne vulgaris is the most common disorder of the pilosebaceous unit leading to inflamed skin characterized by the formation of comedones, papules, pustules and scarring. There is increasing evidence that the abundance of Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) in the inflamed acne lesions triggers inflammation. Therefore, in addition to treatment with retinoids, the use of antimicrobial agents has been established as a treatment option for acne. This indicates that antimicrobial mechanisms to control the growth of P. acnes may have an important influence on the severity of inflammatory acne. One import antimicrobial innate defense system comprises the production of antimicrobial peptides (AMP), small molecules with a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity as well as immunomodulatory properties. Although the role of AMP in acne is still emerging, there is increasing evidence that AMP may be of importance in acne. The aim of this viewpoint is to provide some hypotheses about the potential function of AMP in the pathogenesis of acne and to discuss potential AMP-based therapies for the treatment of acne.

  4. 21 CFR 211.134 - Drug product inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drug product inspection. 211.134 Section 211.134 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS... § 211.134 Drug product inspection. (a) Packaged and labeled products shall be examined during...

  5. 21 CFR 211.134 - Drug product inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Drug product inspection. 211.134 Section 211.134 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS... § 211.134 Drug product inspection. (a) Packaged and labeled products shall be examined during...

  6. Counting on natural products for drug design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Tiago; Reker, Daniel; Schneider, Petra; Schneider, Gisbert

    2016-06-01

    Natural products and their molecular frameworks have a long tradition as valuable starting points for medicinal chemistry and drug discovery. Recently, there has been a revitalization of interest in the inclusion of these chemotypes in compound collections for screening and achieving selective target modulation. Here we discuss natural-product-inspired drug discovery with a focus on recent advances in the design of synthetically tractable small molecules that mimic nature's chemistry. We highlight the potential of innovative computational tools in processing structurally complex natural products to predict their macromolecular targets and attempt to forecast the role that natural-product-derived fragments and fragment-like natural products will play in next-generation drug discovery.

  7. Effect of Garcinia mangostana on inflammation caused by Propionibacterium acnes.

    PubMed

    Chomnawang, Mullika Traidej; Surassmo, Suvimol; Nukoolkarn, Veena S; Gritsanapan, Wandee

    2007-09-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the activity of Thai medicinal plants on inflammation caused by Propionibacterium acnes in terms of free radical scavenging and cytokine reducing properties. P. acnes have been recognized as pus-forming bacteria triggering an inflammation in acne. Antioxidant activity was determined by DPPH scavenging and NBT reduction assay. The result showed that Garcinia mangostana possessed the most significant antioxidant activity and reduced reactive oxygen species production. Houttuynia cordata, Eupatorium odoratum, and Senna alata had a moderate antioxidant effect. In addition, Garcinia mangostana extracts could reduce the TNF-alpha production as determined by ELISA. Garcinia mangostana was highly effective in scavenging free radicals and was able to suppress the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. This study has identified the promising source of anti-inflammatory agent which could be useful in treatment of acne vulgaris.

  8. 21 CFR 352.52 - Labeling of sunscreen drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Labeling of sunscreen drug products. 352.52... (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE SUNSCREEN DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Labeling § 352.52 Labeling of sunscreen drug products. (a) Statement of identity. The labeling of the product contains...

  9. 21 CFR 352.52 - Labeling of sunscreen drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Labeling of sunscreen drug products. 352.52... (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE SUNSCREEN DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Labeling § 352.52 Labeling of sunscreen drug products. (a) Statement of identity. The labeling of the product contains...

  10. 21 CFR 352.52 - Labeling of sunscreen drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Labeling of sunscreen drug products. 352.52... (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE SUNSCREEN DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Labeling § 352.52 Labeling of sunscreen drug products. (a) Statement of identity. The labeling of the product contains...

  11. 21 CFR 352.52 - Labeling of sunscreen drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Labeling of sunscreen drug products. 352.52... (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE SUNSCREEN DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Labeling § 352.52 Labeling of sunscreen drug products. (a) Statement of identity. The labeling of the product contains...

  12. 21 CFR 352.52 - Labeling of sunscreen drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling of sunscreen drug products. 352.52... (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE SUNSCREEN DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Labeling § 352.52 Labeling of sunscreen drug products. (a) Statement of identity. The labeling of the product contains...

  13. From new findings in acne pathogenesis to new approaches in treatment.

    PubMed

    Gollnick, H P M

    2015-06-01

    Acne is a chronic disease of the pilosebaceous unit which is most common during adolescence. Four factors are believed to play a key role in the development of acne lesions: excess sebum production, disturbed keratinization within the follicle, colonization of the pilosebaceous duct by Propionibacterium acnes, and the release of inflammatory mediators into the skin. Consequently, in order to effectively and rapidly reduce acne lesions, treatments need to address as many of these underlying factors as possible. Currently, about half of patients have poor adherence to acne treatments. To overcome this limitation, treatments need to be developed which are well tolerated by patients, and easy for them to use, handle and apply. Topical monotherapies for acne such as retinoids and antimicrobials by themselves have a restricted range of actions against the pathogenic factors of acne. Instead, the Global Alliance to Improve Outcomes in Acne Group recommends combination therapy with a topical retinoid and an antimicrobial agent as the preferred approach for almost all acne patients. The principal advantage of such combinations is that they target more of the underlying pathogenic factors of acne than individual monotherapies and this results in faster and more complete clearing of acne lesions. Fixed-dose combinations are also more convenient than applying two medications separately, which leads to improved adherence with the regimen. By normalizing desquamation, the retinoid component of these combinations allows entry of the antimicrobial agent into the pilosebaceous unit resulting in faster clearance of P. acnes. In conclusion, topical retinoid/antimicrobial fixed-dose combinations represent a rational approach for the treatment of acne. They should be considered as the cornerstone of acne management and should be used much more in the future.

  14. Results of a Phase 2 Efficacy and Safety Study with SB204, an Investigational Topical Nitric Oxide-releasing Drug for the Treatment of Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Hilary; Blanco, Daisy; McKeever, Charles; Paz, Nelly; Vasquez, Ynca Nina; Quiring, John; De León, Emily; Stasko, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare efficacy, tolerability, and safety of two concentrations of topical SB204 and vehicle twice daily for 12 weeks in the treatment of acne vulgaris. Design: Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, three-arm, Phase 2 study. Setting: Dominican Republic, Panama, and Honduras. Participants: Subjects with acne, age 12 to 40, with 25 to 70 noninflammatory lesions, 20 to 40 inflammatory lesions, and a baseline Investigator’s Global Assessment score of mild, moderate, or severe. Measurements: The primary efficacy assessment was the absolute change in noninflammatory lesion counts. Other assessments included inflammatory lesion counts, success on dichotomized Investigator’s Global Assessment, reported adverse events, physical examinations, laboratory testing, and tolerability. Results: One hundred fifty-three subjects were randomized to vehicle (n=52), SB204 1% (n=51), or SB204 4% (n=50). When compared to vehicle, subjects treated with SB204 1% and SB204 4% had significantly greater mean percent reduction in noninflammatory lesions from baseline and subjects treated with SB204 4% had a significantly greater mean percent reduction in inflammatory lesion count from baseline at Week 12. There were no significant differences in the IGA success rates between groups. Both concentrations of SB204 were safe and well-tolerated. Conclusions: When compared to vehicle, both SB204 1% and SB204 4% significantly decreased the percentage of noninflammatory lesions and SB204 4% also significantly decreased the percentage of inflammatory lesions in subjects with acne vulgaris treated for 12 weeks. Treatment with SB204 1% and SB204 4% was safe and well-tolerated. Registry: clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01844752). PMID:27672413

  15. Results of a Phase 2 Efficacy and Safety Study with SB204, an Investigational Topical Nitric Oxide-releasing Drug for the Treatment of Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Hilary; Blanco, Daisy; McKeever, Charles; Paz, Nelly; Vasquez, Ynca Nina; Quiring, John; De León, Emily; Stasko, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare efficacy, tolerability, and safety of two concentrations of topical SB204 and vehicle twice daily for 12 weeks in the treatment of acne vulgaris. Design: Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, three-arm, Phase 2 study. Setting: Dominican Republic, Panama, and Honduras. Participants: Subjects with acne, age 12 to 40, with 25 to 70 noninflammatory lesions, 20 to 40 inflammatory lesions, and a baseline Investigator’s Global Assessment score of mild, moderate, or severe. Measurements: The primary efficacy assessment was the absolute change in noninflammatory lesion counts. Other assessments included inflammatory lesion counts, success on dichotomized Investigator’s Global Assessment, reported adverse events, physical examinations, laboratory testing, and tolerability. Results: One hundred fifty-three subjects were randomized to vehicle (n=52), SB204 1% (n=51), or SB204 4% (n=50). When compared to vehicle, subjects treated with SB204 1% and SB204 4% had significantly greater mean percent reduction in noninflammatory lesions from baseline and subjects treated with SB204 4% had a significantly greater mean percent reduction in inflammatory lesion count from baseline at Week 12. There were no significant differences in the IGA success rates between groups. Both concentrations of SB204 were safe and well-tolerated. Conclusions: When compared to vehicle, both SB204 1% and SB204 4% significantly decreased the percentage of noninflammatory lesions and SB204 4% also significantly decreased the percentage of inflammatory lesions in subjects with acne vulgaris treated for 12 weeks. Treatment with SB204 1% and SB204 4% was safe and well-tolerated. Registry: clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01844752).

  16. 21 CFR 341.72 - Labeling of antihistamine drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling of antihistamine drug products. 341.72 Section 341.72 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE COLD, COUGH, ALLERGY, BRONCHODILATOR, AND ANTIASTHMATIC DRUG PRODUCTS...

  17. 21 CFR 341.76 - Labeling of bronchodilator drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling of bronchodilator drug products. 341.76 Section 341.76 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE COLD, COUGH, ALLERGY, BRONCHODILATOR, AND ANTIASTHMATIC DRUG PRODUCTS...

  18. [Use of organic acids in acne and skin discolorations therapy].

    PubMed

    Kapuścińska, Alicja; Nowak, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    Acne is one of the most frequent skin disorders that occurs in puberty, but often adults also have acne. The most important factors responsible for acne are elevated production of sebum by hyperactive sebaceous glands and blockage of the follicle because of hyperkeratosis [14]. The third etiopathogenic factor of acne is excessive microflora reproduction [8]. The most significant bacterium that is responsible for formation of skin lesions is Propionibacterium acnes, a rod-shaped Gram-positive and aerotolerant anaerobic bacterium. It is estimated that P. acnes is responsible for acne in approximately 80% of people aged 11 to 30 [27,40]. Even healed skin lesions can often cause skin discolorations and scar formation [51]. Exfoliating chemical substances that are commonly used in dermatology and cosmetology are organic acids. Exfoliating treatment using organic acids is called "chemical peeling" and consists of controlled application of those substances on the skin [38]. The depth of exfoliation depends on organic acid concentration, type of substance and contact time with the skin [41]. Using exfoliating agents seems to be helpful in excessive keratinization - one of several factors responsible for acne. Moreover, epidermis exfoliation is a popular method of removing skin discoloration [22]. Considering chemical structure, exfoliating substances that are most often used in cosmetology contain alpha-hydroxyacids (glycolic acid, lactic acid, mandelic acid and citric acid), beta-hydroxyacids (salicylic acid) and other organic acids, such as trichloroacetic acid and pyruvic acid [47]. In this article, a literature review of use of organic acids in acne and skin discoloration therapy is presented. PMID:25811473

  19. [Use of organic acids in acne and skin discolorations therapy].

    PubMed

    Kapuścińska, Alicja; Nowak, Izabela

    2015-03-22

    Acne is one of the most frequent skin disorders that occurs in puberty, but often adults also have acne. The most important factors responsible for acne are elevated production of sebum by hyperactive sebaceous glands and blockage of the follicle because of hyperkeratosis [14]. The third etiopathogenic factor of acne is excessive microflora reproduction [8]. The most significant bacterium that is responsible for formation of skin lesions is Propionibacterium acnes, a rod-shaped Gram-positive and aerotolerant anaerobic bacterium. It is estimated that P. acnes is responsible for acne in approximately 80% of people aged 11 to 30 [27,40]. Even healed skin lesions can often cause skin discolorations and scar formation [51]. Exfoliating chemical substances that are commonly used in dermatology and cosmetology are organic acids. Exfoliating treatment using organic acids is called "chemical peeling" and consists of controlled application of those substances on the skin [38]. The depth of exfoliation depends on organic acid concentration, type of substance and contact time with the skin [41]. Using exfoliating agents seems to be helpful in excessive keratinization - one of several factors responsible for acne. Moreover, epidermis exfoliation is a popular method of removing skin discoloration [22]. Considering chemical structure, exfoliating substances that are most often used in cosmetology contain alpha-hydroxyacids (glycolic acid, lactic acid, mandelic acid and citric acid), beta-hydroxyacids (salicylic acid) and other organic acids, such as trichloroacetic acid and pyruvic acid [47]. In this article, a literature review of use of organic acids in acne and skin discoloration therapy is presented.

  20. Over-the-counter treatments for acne and rosacea.

    PubMed

    Rosamilia, Lorraine Larsen

    2016-06-01

    Acne and rosacea are common inflammatory processes historically classified in the same disease category, but evolving understanding of their disparate pathophysiology and exacerbating factors have generated an enormous armamentarium of therapeutic possibilities. Patients seek over-the-counter therapies first when managing cutaneous disease; therefore, this review defines ingredients considered to be effective over-the-counter acne and rosacea products, their mechanisms, and safe formulations, including botanical components, oral supplements, and other anecdotal options in this vast skin care domain. PMID:27416314

  1. Effects of bee venom against Propionibacterium acnes-induced inflammation in human keratinocytes and monocytes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Yeon; Lee, Woo-Ram; Kim, Kyung-Hyun; An, Hyun-Jin; Chang, Young-Chae; Han, Sang-Mi; Park, Yoon-Yub; Pak, Sok Cheon; Park, Kwan-Kyu

    2015-06-01

    Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) cause inflammatory acne and play an important role in the pathogenesis of acne by inducing inflammatory mediators. P. acnes contributes to the inflammatory responses of acne by activating inflammatory cells, keratinocytes and sebocytes to secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-8. Bee venom has traditionally been used in the treatment of certain immune-related diseases. However, there has not yet been a robust trial to prove the therapeutic effect of bee venom in skin inflammation. The aim of the present study was to investigate anti-inflammatory properties of bee venom in skin inflammation induced by P. acnes using keratinocytes (HaCaT) and monocytes (THP-1). P. acnes is known to stimulate the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1, IL-8, IL-12 and TNF-α. In the present study, the production of interferon-γ (IFN-γ), IL-1β, IL-8 and TNF-α was increased by P. acnes treatment in HaCaT and THP-1 cells. By contrast, bee venom effectively inhibited the secretion of IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-8 and TNF-α. Furthermore, P. acnes treatment activated the expression of IL-8 and toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) in HaCaT cells. However, bee venom inhibited the expression of IL-8 and TLR2 in heat-killed P. acnes. Based on these results, it is concluded that bee venom has an effective anti-inflammatory activity against P. acnes in HaCaT and THP-1 cells. Therefore, we suggest that bee venom is an alternative treatment to antibiotic therapy of acne. PMID:25872535

  2. Perimenstrual Flare of Adult Acne

    PubMed Central

    Geller, Lauren; Rosen, Jamie; Frankel, Amylynne; Goldenberg, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Background: Acne is typically regarded as an adolescent disease. A significant body of literature suggests a post-adolescent or adult form of acne. Female patients are known to experience perimenstrual acne flares, the exact prevalence of which is unknown. Objective: To establish a pattern of perimenstrual acne flare in adult women in order to better characterize the disorder. Methods: Subjects aged 18 and over were recruited during previously scheduled visits with their dermatologist at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York. An anonymous survey was distributed to women who reported their first menses at least six months earlier and had a complaint of acne within the last 30 days. Women <18 years of age and postmenopausal women were excluded from the study population. Results: Participants included women 18- to 29-years old (67%) and women 30- to 49-years old (33%). The ethnicity of respondents was Caucasian (50%), African American (20%), Latino (19%), Asian (5%), and Other (6%). The majority of participants with perimenstrual acne reported the onset of acne between the ages of 12 and 18 years. Sixty-five percent of participants reported that their acne symptoms were worse with their menses. Of those who reported perimenstrual acne symptoms, 56 percent reported worsening symptoms in the week preceding their menses, 17 percent reported worsening symptoms during their menses, three percent reported worsening symptoms after their menses, and 24 percent reported worsening symptoms throughout their cycle. Thirty-five percent of patients with perimenstrual acne reported oral contraceptive pill use. Conclusion: A significant number of adult women have perimenstrual acne symptoms. This study has proven to be useful in characterizing perimenstrual acne flare and is one of the first qualitative documentations of the presence and degree of this disorder. PMID:25161758

  3. The role of topical dermocosmetics in acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Araviiskaia, E; Dréno, B

    2016-06-01

    Acne is a common chronic inflammatory disease and treatment modalities based on acne severity are well established. The role of dermocosmetics in dermatology, and in particular acne, is becoming more important as more research elucidates the mechanisms of action of products in the pathogenesis of acne. Dermocosmetics have the potential to be used as monotherapy or in combination with medical treatment. Therefore, it has become important for dermatologists to understand dermocosmetics to effectively and appropriately advise patients on their use. The objective of this review was to provide new insights into the role of traditional and novel ingredients in dermocosmetics for the treatment of acne, based on the authors' objective assessment of the published literature. The type of products discussed include: those which have a sebostatic effect, such as topical antioxidants and niacinamide; agents targeting abnormal keratinization, such as salicylic acid, lipo-hydroxy acid, alpha-hydroxy acids, retinol-based products and linoleic acid; agents targeting Propionibacterium acnes, such as lauric acid; and anti-inflammatory agents such as nicotinamide, alpha-linolenic acid and zinc salts. Despite the scientific advances in understanding these cosmetic ingredients, there still remains a lack of rigorous controlled studies in this area. PMID:26916232

  4. Defining Patient Centric Pharmaceutical Drug Product Design.

    PubMed

    Stegemann, Sven; Ternik, Robert L; Onder, Graziano; Khan, Mansoor A; van Riet-Nales, Diana A

    2016-09-01

    The term "patient centered," "patient centric," or "patient centricity" is increasingly used in the scientific literature in a wide variety of contexts. Generally, patient centric medicines are recognized as an essential contributor to healthy aging and the overall patient's quality of life and life expectancy. Besides the selection of the appropriate type of drug substance and strength for a particular indication in a particular patient, due attention must be paid that the pharmaceutical drug product design is also adequately addressing the particular patient's needs, i.e., assuring adequate patient adherence and the anticipate drug safety and effectiveness. Relevant pharmaceutical design aspects may e.g., involve the selection of the route of administration, the tablet size and shape, the ease of opening the package, the ability to read the user instruction, or the ability to follow the recommended (in-use) storage conditions. Currently, a harmonized definition on patient centric drug development/design has not yet been established. To stimulate scientific research and discussions and the consistent interpretation of test results, it is essential that such a definition is established. We have developed a first draft definition through various rounds of discussions within an interdisciplinary AAPS focus group of experts. This publication summarizes the outcomes and is intended to stimulate further discussions with all stakeholders towards a common definition of patient centric pharmaceutical drug product design that is useable across all disciplines involved.

  5. Large-scale survey to describe acne management in Brazilian clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Seité, Sophie; Caixeta, Clarice; Towersey, Loan

    2015-01-01

    Background Acne is a chronic disease of the pilosebaceous unit that mainly affects adolescents. It is the most common dermatological problem, affecting approximately 80% of teenagers between 12 and 18 years of age. Diagnosis is clinical and is based on the patient’s age at the time the lesions first appear, and on its polymorphism, type of lesions, and their anatomical location. The right treatment for the right patient is key to treating acne safely. The aim of this investigational survey was to evaluate how Brazilian dermatologists in private practice currently manage acne. Materials and methods Dermatologists practicing in 12 states of Brazil were asked how they manage patients with grades I, II, III, and IV acne. Each dermatologist completed a written questionnaire about patient characteristics, acne severity, and the therapy they usually prescribe for each situation. Results In total, 596 dermatologists were interviewed. Adolescents presented as the most common acneic population received by dermatologists, and the most common acne grade was grade II. The doctors could choose more than one type of treatment for each patient, and treatment choices varied according to acne severity. A great majority of dermatologists considered treatment with drugs as the first alternative for all acne grades, choosing either topical or oral presentation depending on the pathology severity. Dermocosmetics were chosen mostly as adjunctive therapy, and their inclusion in the treatment regimen decreased as acne grades increased. Conclusion This survey illustrates that Brazilian dermatologists employ complex treatment regimens to manage acne, choosing systemic drugs, particularly isotretinoin, even in some cases of grade I acne, and heavily prescribe antibiotics. Because complex regimens are harder for patients to comply with, this result notably raises the question of adherence, which is a key factor in successful treatment. PMID:26609243

  6. Evaluation and Management of Refractory Acne Vulgaris in Adolescent and Adult Men.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Morgan

    2016-04-01

    Acne vulgaris alters the normal skin physiology, impairing stratum corneum and transepidermal water loss. A male's normal skin physiologic state is different than a female's and may have implications when choosing treatment when the skin is altered in a disease state. Transepidermal water loss, pH, and sebum production are different between the sexes. Several underlying conditions present in male acne patients at several ages that may require a more in-depth evaluation. As knowledge of the pathogenesis of acne expands, the differences in skin physiology between the sexes may alter the manner in which male patients with acne medications are approached. PMID:27015780

  7. Acne pathogenesis: history of concepts.

    PubMed

    Tilles, Gérard

    2014-01-01

    From the first reliable descriptions of acne in the early 19th century, dermatologists recognized it as a disease of the pilosebaceous follicle. Until the middle of the 20th century, they hypothesized that seborrhoea, follicular keratosis and microorganisms could be individually responsible for the acne lesions. Inflammation was only regarded as the final and inescapable step of the acne process. Although the importance of these factors has been reevaluated, recent works still regarded them as mandatory. In the 1970s, the onset of isotretinoin dramatically improved acne management. It also provided great opportunities for a better understanding of the pathogenic factors of acne. This study analyzes their genesis and development from the seminal contributions until recent advances.

  8. 78 FR 38053 - Determination That OPANA ER (Oxymorphone Hydrochloride) Drug Products Covered by New Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-25

    ... Products Covered by New Drug Application 21-610 Were Not Withdrawn From Sale for Reasons of Safety or... products approved under new drug application (NDA) 21-610 were not withdrawn from sale for reasons of... of abbreviated new drug applications (ANDAs) that refer to these drug products, and it will allow...

  9. Assessment technique for acne treatments based on statistical parameters of skin thermal images.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Medina, J Alfredo; León-Ordoñez, Francisco; Prado-Olivarez, Juan; Vela-Aguirre, Noe; Ramírez-Agundis, Agustin; Díaz-Carmona, Javier

    2014-04-01

    Acne vulgaris as an inflammatory disease, with an excessive production of subdermal fat, modifies the dynamics of the bloodstream, and consequently temperature, on the affected skin zone. A high percentage of this heat interchange is manifested as electromagnetic radiation with far-infrared wavelengths, which can be captured through a thermal imaging camera. A technique based on thermal image analysis for efficiency assessment in acne vulgaris is described. The procedure is based on computing statistical parameters of thermal images captured from the affected skin zone being attended by an acne treatment. The proposed technique was used to determine the skin thermal behavior according to acne severity levels in different acne treatment stages. Infrared images of acne skin zones on eight patients, diagnosed with acne vulgaris and attended by one specific acne treatment, were weekly registered during 11 weeks. The infrared images were captured until no more improvement in affected zones was detected. The obtained results suggest a direct relationship between the used statistical parameters, particularly first- and second-order statistics, and the acne vulgaris severity level on the affected zones.

  10. 21 CFR 335.50 - Labeling of antidiarrheal drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Labeling of antidiarrheal drug products. 335.50 Section 335.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... section 502 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act) relating to misbranding and...

  11. 21 CFR 335.50 - Labeling of antidiarrheal drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Labeling of antidiarrheal drug products. 335.50 Section 335.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... section 502 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act) relating to misbranding and...

  12. 21 CFR 335.50 - Labeling of antidiarrheal drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Labeling of antidiarrheal drug products. 335.50 Section 335.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... section 502 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act) relating to misbranding and...

  13. 21 CFR 335.50 - Labeling of antidiarrheal drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Labeling of antidiarrheal drug products. 335.50 Section 335.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... section 502 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act) relating to misbranding and...

  14. 21 CFR 211.208 - Drug product salvaging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Drug product salvaging. 211.208 Section 211.208 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Returned and Salvaged...

  15. 21 CFR 211.208 - Drug product salvaging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drug product salvaging. 211.208 Section 211.208 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Returned and Salvaged...

  16. 21 CFR 211.204 - Returned drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Returned drug products. 211.204 Section 211.204 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Returned and Salvaged...

  17. 21 CFR 211.204 - Returned drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Returned drug products. 211.204 Section 211.204 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Returned and Salvaged...

  18. 21 CFR 211.134 - Drug product inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drug product inspection. 211.134 Section 211.134 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Packaging and Labeling...

  19. 21 CFR 211.134 - Drug product inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Drug product inspection. 211.134 Section 211.134 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Packaging and Labeling...

  20. 21 CFR 211.208 - Drug product salvaging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Drug product salvaging. 211.208 Section 211.208 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Returned and Salvaged...

  1. 21 CFR 211.208 - Drug product salvaging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drug product salvaging. 211.208 Section 211.208 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Returned and Salvaged...

  2. 21 CFR 211.94 - Drug product containers and closures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drug product containers and closures. 211.94 Section 211.94 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Control...

  3. 21 CFR 211.208 - Drug product salvaging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Drug product salvaging. 211.208 Section 211.208 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Returned and Salvaged...

  4. 21 CFR 211.204 - Returned drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Returned drug products. 211.204 Section 211.204 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Returned and Salvaged...

  5. 21 CFR 211.204 - Returned drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Returned drug products. 211.204 Section 211.204 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Returned and Salvaged...

  6. 21 CFR 211.94 - Drug product containers and closures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Drug product containers and closures. 211.94 Section 211.94 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Control...

  7. 21 CFR 211.94 - Drug product containers and closures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Drug product containers and closures. 211.94 Section 211.94 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Control...

  8. 21 CFR 211.204 - Returned drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Returned drug products. 211.204 Section 211.204 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Returned and Salvaged...

  9. 21 CFR 211.94 - Drug product containers and closures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Drug product containers and closures. 211.94 Section 211.94 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Control...

  10. 21 CFR 211.94 - Drug product containers and closures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drug product containers and closures. 211.94 Section 211.94 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Control...

  11. 21 CFR 211.134 - Drug product inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Drug product inspection. 211.134 Section 211.134 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Packaging and Labeling...

  12. 21 CFR 341.78 - Labeling of expectorant drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Labeling of expectorant drug products. 341.78 Section 341.78 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... product for persistent or chronic cough such as occurs with smoking, asthma, chronic bronchitis,...

  13. 21 CFR 341.78 - Labeling of expectorant drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Labeling of expectorant drug products. 341.78 Section 341.78 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... product for persistent or chronic cough such as occurs with smoking, asthma, chronic bronchitis,...

  14. [Antibiotics, azelaic acid and benzoyl peroxide in topical acne therapy].

    PubMed

    Fluhr, Joachim W; Degitz, Klaus

    2010-03-01

    Benzoyl peroxide was introduced as a basic treatment already in acne therapy 1934. The mechanism of action is the reduction of anaerobe bacteria by strong oxidation processes. No resistancies have been ever reported. BPO is available in 2.5, 5 and 10 % formulations. Its efficacy is slightly related to the strength of concentrations, but the side effect profile with burning, erythema and desquamation is increasing with concentrations. BPO 5% mostly is efficient enough to control acne of grades I to II according to the Kligman & Plewig classification. BPO my bleach clothes and hair. It is the most costeffective topical drug in acne of grades I-II. Inflammatory acne of the papular-pustular type I-II can also be treated by topical antibiotics such as erythromycin, clindamycin, and, less frequent and today not anymore recommended tetracyclines. Mechanism of action is not alone an antibacterial but anti inflammatory effect. The efficacy and penetration of the topical antibiotics between the groups are similar. Randomized studies have shown that concentrations of 2-4% are equivalent to oral tetracycline and minocycline in mild to moderate acne. Combinatory formulations with BPO and with retinoids enhance the efficacy significantly. Topical antibiotics plus BPO show less bacterial resistancies as topical antibiotics alone. Antibiotics should therefore not be used as monotherapy. Moreover gram negative folliculitis may develop. Azelaic acid is acting as an antimicrobial and can also reduce comedones. It can also be used in pregnancy and during the lactation period.

  15. [Antibiotics, azelaic acid and benzoyl peroxide in topical acne therapy].

    PubMed

    Fluhr, Joachim W; Degitz, Klaus

    2010-03-01

    Benzoyl peroxide was introduced as a basic treatment already in acne therapy 1934. The mechanism of action is the reduction of anaerobe bacteria by strong oxidation processes. No resistancies have been ever reported. BPO is available in 2.5, 5 and 10 % formulations. Its efficacy is slightly related to the strength of concentrations, but the side effect profile with burning, erythema and desquamation is increasing with concentrations. BPO 5% mostly is efficient enough to control acne of grades I to II according to the Kligman & Plewig classification. BPO my bleach clothes and hair. It is the most costeffective topical drug in acne of grades I-II. Inflammatory acne of the papular-pustular type I-II can also be treated by topical antibiotics such as erythromycin, clindamycin, and, less frequent and today not anymore recommended tetracyclines. Mechanism of action is not alone an antibacterial but anti inflammatory effect. The efficacy and penetration of the topical antibiotics between the groups are similar. Randomized studies have shown that concentrations of 2-4% are equivalent to oral tetracycline and minocycline in mild to moderate acne. Combinatory formulations with BPO and with retinoids enhance the efficacy significantly. Topical antibiotics plus BPO show less bacterial resistancies as topical antibiotics alone. Antibiotics should therefore not be used as monotherapy. Moreover gram negative folliculitis may develop. Azelaic acid is acting as an antimicrobial and can also reduce comedones. It can also be used in pregnancy and during the lactation period. PMID:20482689

  16. Antimicrobial activities of ozenoxacin against isolates of propionibacteria and staphylococci from Japanese patients with acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Akiko; Ikeda, Fumiaki; Kanayama, Shoji; Okamoto, Kazuaki; Matsumoto, Tatsumi; Ishii, Ritsuko; Fujikawa, Akira; Takei, Katsuaki; Kawashima, Makoto

    2016-08-01

    Ozenoxacin, a novel non-fluorinated topical quinolone, was assessed for in vitro antimicrobial activity against clinical isolates of propionibacteria and staphylococci according to the broth microdilution method recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. The isolates used in this study were collected from Japanese patients with acne vulgaris during a period from 2012 to 2013. The MIC90s of ozenoxacin against Propionibacterium acnes (n=266), Propionibacterium granulosum (n=10), Staphylococcus aureus (n=23), Staphylococcus epidermidis (n=229) and other coagulase-negative staphylococci (n=82) were ≤0.06, ≤0.06, ≤0.06, 0.125 and ≤0.06 µg ml-1, respectively. The antimicrobial activity of ozenoxacin against the clinical isolates of propionibacteria and staphylococci was greater than that of five reference antimicrobial agents which have been used for the treatment of acne vulgaris. The MICs of ozenoxacin were correlated with those of nadifloxacin in P. acnes and S. epidermidis isolates. However, the MICs of ozenoxacin were 0.25-0.5 µg ml-1 and 0.5-8 µg ml-1 against nadifloxacin-resistant P. acnes (MIC: ≥8 µg ml-1; n=8) and S. epidermidis (MIC: ≥64 µg ml-1; n=10), respectively. These results indicated the potent antimicrobial activity against P. acnes and S. epidermidis isolates resistant to nadifloxacin. Topical ozenoxacin could represent an alternative therapeutic drug for acne vulgaris based on its potent antimicrobial activity against the isolates of propionibacteria and staphylococci from acne patients.

  17. Management of acne vulgaris with hormonal therapies in adult female patients.

    PubMed

    Husein-ElAhmed, Husein

    2015-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a very common condition affecting up of 93% of adolescents. Although rare, this disease may persist in adulthood. In adult women with acne (those older than 25 years old), this condition is particularly relevant because of the refractory to conventional therapies, which makes acne a challenge for dermatologists in this group of patients. In order to its potential risk for chronicity and the involvement of visible anatomical sites such as face and upper torso, acne has been associated with a wide spectrum of psychological and social dysfunction such as depression, anxiety, suicidal ideation, somatization, and social inhibition. In particular, adult women with acne have been shown to be adversely impacted by the effect of acne on their quality of life. For the last four decades, dermatologists have used hormonal therapies for the management of acne vulgaris in adult women, which are considered a rational choice given the severity and chronicity of this condition in this group of patients. The aim of this work is to review the hormonal drugs for management of acne.

  18. Antimicrobial activities of ozenoxacin against isolates of propionibacteria and staphylococci from Japanese patients with acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Akiko; Ikeda, Fumiaki; Kanayama, Shoji; Okamoto, Kazuaki; Matsumoto, Tatsumi; Ishii, Ritsuko; Fujikawa, Akira; Takei, Katsuaki; Kawashima, Makoto

    2016-08-01

    Ozenoxacin, a novel non-fluorinated topical quinolone, was assessed for in vitro antimicrobial activity against clinical isolates of propionibacteria and staphylococci according to the broth microdilution method recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. The isolates used in this study were collected from Japanese patients with acne vulgaris during a period from 2012 to 2013. The MIC90s of ozenoxacin against Propionibacterium acnes (n=266), Propionibacterium granulosum (n=10), Staphylococcus aureus (n=23), Staphylococcus epidermidis (n=229) and other coagulase-negative staphylococci (n=82) were ≤0.06, ≤0.06, ≤0.06, 0.125 and ≤0.06 µg ml-1, respectively. The antimicrobial activity of ozenoxacin against the clinical isolates of propionibacteria and staphylococci was greater than that of five reference antimicrobial agents which have been used for the treatment of acne vulgaris. The MICs of ozenoxacin were correlated with those of nadifloxacin in P. acnes and S. epidermidis isolates. However, the MICs of ozenoxacin were 0.25-0.5 µg ml-1 and 0.5-8 µg ml-1 against nadifloxacin-resistant P. acnes (MIC: ≥8 µg ml-1; n=8) and S. epidermidis (MIC: ≥64 µg ml-1; n=10), respectively. These results indicated the potent antimicrobial activity against P. acnes and S. epidermidis isolates resistant to nadifloxacin. Topical ozenoxacin could represent an alternative therapeutic drug for acne vulgaris based on its potent antimicrobial activity against the isolates of propionibacteria and staphylococci from acne patients. PMID:27305898

  19. [Dangerous drugs: products containing synthetic chemicals].

    PubMed

    Kamijo, Yoshito

    2016-02-01

    When the patients poisoned with "dangerous drugs", that is, products containing synthetic chemicals such as synthetic cannabinoids and cathinones, are transferred to the emergency facilities, the chemicals really consumed cannot be determined there. So, supportive care may be the most important strategy for treating them. For example, those with serious consciousness disturbance should be supported with ventilator after intubation. Those with remarkable excitatory CNS or sympathetic symptoms, benzodiazepines such as diazepam and midazolam, should be administered. Those with hallucination or delusion, antipsychotics such as haloperidol or risperidone should be administered. Those with rhabdomyolysis, hypermyoglobinemia and acute kidney injury, intravenous fluids and hemodialysis should be introduced. PMID:26915246

  20. Why Do I Get Acne?

    MedlinePlus

    ... you've been exercising. Many over-the-counter lotions and creams containing salicylic acid or benzoyl peroxide ... Sometimes even though they wash properly and try lotions and oil-free makeup, people get acne anyway — ...

  1. Acne: hormonal concepts and therapy.

    PubMed

    Thiboutot, Diane

    2004-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is the most common skin condition observed in the medical community. Although we know that hormones are important in the development of acne, many questions remain unanswered regarding the mechanisms by which hormones exert their effects. Androgens such as dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and testosterone, the adrenal precursor dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), estrogens such as estradiol, and other hormones, including growth hormone and insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), may be important in acne. It is not known whether these hormones are taken up from the serum by the sebaceous gland, whether they are produced locally within the gland, or whether a combination of these processes is involved. Finally, the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which these hormones exert their influence on the sebaceous gland have not been fully elucidated. Hormonal therapy is an option in women with acne not responding to conventional treatment or with signs of endocrine abnormalities. PMID:15556729

  2. The Psychosocial Impact of Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Hazarika, Neirita; Archana, M

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acne vulgaris causes erythematous papulopustular lesions in active stage and often leave behind residual scarring and pigmentation. Its onset in adolescence may add to the emotional and psychological challenges experienced during this period. Aims: To assess the impact of acne on the various psychosocial domains of daily life. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective, cross-sectional study done in the dermatology out-patient department of a tertiary care hospital from January to March 2015. A total of 100 consecutive, newly diagnosed patients of acne vulgaris, aged 15 years and above were included in this study. The relationship between acne vulgaris and its sequelae was analyzed with ten different domains of daily life by using dermatology life quality index (DLQI) questionnaire. Results: Females (56%), 15–20 year olds (61%), facial lesions (60%), and Grade II acne (70%) were most common. Acne scars were noted in 75% patients, whereas 79% cases had post-acne hyperpigmentation. Thirty-seven percent patients had DLQI scores of (6–10) interpreted as moderate effect on patient's life. Statistically significant correlation (P < 0.05) found were as follows: Physical symptoms with grade of acne; embarrassment with site and grade of acne; daily activities with grade of acne and post-acne pigmentation; choice of clothes with site of acne; social activities with gender, site and grade of acne; effect on work/study with grade of acne; interpersonal problems with site and post-acne pigmentation; sexual difficulties with grade of acne. Limitation: It was a hospital-based study with small sample size. Conclusion: Significant impact of acne and its sequelae was noted on emotions, daily activities, social activities, study/work, and interpersonal relationships. Assurance and counseling along with early treatment of acne vulgaris is important to reduce disease-related psychosocial sequelae and increase the efficacy of treatment. PMID:27688440

  3. The Psychosocial Impact of Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Hazarika, Neirita; Archana, M

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acne vulgaris causes erythematous papulopustular lesions in active stage and often leave behind residual scarring and pigmentation. Its onset in adolescence may add to the emotional and psychological challenges experienced during this period. Aims: To assess the impact of acne on the various psychosocial domains of daily life. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective, cross-sectional study done in the dermatology out-patient department of a tertiary care hospital from January to March 2015. A total of 100 consecutive, newly diagnosed patients of acne vulgaris, aged 15 years and above were included in this study. The relationship between acne vulgaris and its sequelae was analyzed with ten different domains of daily life by using dermatology life quality index (DLQI) questionnaire. Results: Females (56%), 15–20 year olds (61%), facial lesions (60%), and Grade II acne (70%) were most common. Acne scars were noted in 75% patients, whereas 79% cases had post-acne hyperpigmentation. Thirty-seven percent patients had DLQI scores of (6–10) interpreted as moderate effect on patient's life. Statistically significant correlation (P < 0.05) found were as follows: Physical symptoms with grade of acne; embarrassment with site and grade of acne; daily activities with grade of acne and post-acne pigmentation; choice of clothes with site of acne; social activities with gender, site and grade of acne; effect on work/study with grade of acne; interpersonal problems with site and post-acne pigmentation; sexual difficulties with grade of acne. Limitation: It was a hospital-based study with small sample size. Conclusion: Significant impact of acne and its sequelae was noted on emotions, daily activities, social activities, study/work, and interpersonal relationships. Assurance and counseling along with early treatment of acne vulgaris is important to reduce disease-related psychosocial sequelae and increase the efficacy of treatment.

  4. Photodynamic therapy of acne vulgaris.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ershova, Ekaterina Y.; Karimova, Lubov N.; Kharnas, Sergey S.; Kuzmin, Sergey G.; Loschenov, Victor B.

    2003-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with topical 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) was tested for the treatment of acne vulgaris. Patients with acne were treated with ALA plus red light. Ten percent water solution of ALA was applied with 1,5-2 h occlusion and then 18-45 J/cm2 630 nm light was given. Bacterial endogenous porphyrins fluorescence also was used for acne therapy. Treatment control and diagnostics was realized by fluorescence spectra and fluorescence image. Light sources and diagnostic systems were used: semiconductor laser (λ=630 nm, Pmax=1W), (LPhT-630-01-BIOSPEC); LED system for PDT and diagnostics with fluorescent imager (λ=635 nm, P=2W, p=50 mW/cm2), (UFPh-630-01-BIOSPEC); high sensitivity CCD video camera with narrow-band wavelength filter (central wavelength 630 nm); laser electronic spectrum analyzer for fluorescent diagnostics and photodynamic therapy monitoring (LESA-01-BIOSPEC). Protoporphyrin IX (PP IX) and endogenous porphyrins concentrations were measured by fluorescence at wavelength, correspondingly, 700 nm and 650 nm. It was shown that topical ALA is converted into PP IX in hair follicles, sebaceous glands and acne scars. The amount of resulting PP IX is sufficient for effective PDT. There was good clinical response and considerable clearance of acne lesion. ALA-PDT also had good cosmetic effect in treatment acne scars. PDT with ALA and red light assist in opening corked pores, destroying Propionibacterium acnes and decreasing sebum secretion. PDT treatment associated with several adverse effects: oedema and/or erytema for 3-5 days after PDT, epidermal exfoliation from 5th to 10th day and slight pigmentation during 1 month after PDT. ALA-PDT is effective for acne and can be used despite several side effects.

  5. Treatment of Acne in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Chien, Anna L; Qi, Ji; Rainer, Barbara; Sachs, Dana L; Helfrich, Yolanda R

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a common disease of the pilosebaceous unit and affects adolescents and adults. Because high-quality guidelines regarding treatment of acne in pregnancy are scarce, management of this condition can be challenging. We describe the safety profile of common therapies and outline approaches based on available evidence. Topical azelaic acid or benzoyl peroxide can be recommended as baseline therapy. A combination of topical erythromycin or clindamycin with benzoyl peroxide is recommended for inflammatory acne. Oral erythromycin or cephalexin is generally considered safe for moderate to severe inflammatory acne when used for a few weeks. A short course of oral prednisolone may be useful for treating fulminant nodular cystic acne after the first trimester. In general, topical and oral antibiotics should not be used as monotherapy, but combined with topical benzoyl peroxide to decrease bacterial resistance. Oral retinoids are teratogenic and absolutely contraindicated for women who are pregnant or considering pregnancy. Although some complementary therapies including micronutrients and nonpharmacologic treatments seem to be well tolerated, limited data exist regarding their safety and efficacy, and they are not currently recommended during pregnancy. The risk-to-benefit ratio, efficacy, acceptability, and costs are considerations when choosing a treatment for acne in pregnancy. PMID:26957383

  6. Vitamin B12 modulates the transcriptome of the skin microbiota in acne pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dezhi; Shi, Baochen; Erfe, Marie C; Craft, Noah; Li, Huiying

    2015-06-24

    Various diseases have been linked to the human microbiota, but the underlying molecular mechanisms of the microbiota in disease pathogenesis are often poorly understood. Using acne as a disease model, we aimed to understand the molecular response of the skin microbiota to host metabolite signaling in disease pathogenesis. Metatranscriptomic analysis revealed that the transcriptional profiles of the skin microbiota separated acne patients from healthy individuals. The vitamin B12 biosynthesis pathway in the skin bacterium Propionibacterium acnes was significantly down-regulated in acne patients. We hypothesized that host vitamin B12 modulates the activities of the skin microbiota and contributes to acne pathogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed the skin microbiota in healthy subjects supplemented with vitamin B12. We found that the supplementation repressed the expression of vitamin B12 biosynthesis genes in P. acnes and altered the transcriptome of the skin microbiota. One of the 10 subjects studied developed acne 1 week after vitamin B12 supplementation. To further understand the molecular mechanism, we revealed that vitamin B12 supplementation in P. acnes cultures promoted the production of porphyrins, which have been shown to induce inflammation in acne. Our findings suggest a new bacterial pathogenesis pathway in acne and provide one molecular explanation for the long-standing clinical observation that vitamin B12 supplementation leads to acne development in a subset of individuals. Our study discovered that vitamin B12, an essential nutrient in humans, modulates the transcriptional activities of skin bacteria, and provided evidence that metabolite-mediated interactions between the host and the skin microbiota play essential roles in disease development. PMID:26109103

  7. Vitamin B12 modulates the transcriptome of the skin microbiota in acne pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dezhi; Shi, Baochen; Erfe, Marie C; Craft, Noah; Li, Huiying

    2015-06-24

    Various diseases have been linked to the human microbiota, but the underlying molecular mechanisms of the microbiota in disease pathogenesis are often poorly understood. Using acne as a disease model, we aimed to understand the molecular response of the skin microbiota to host metabolite signaling in disease pathogenesis. Metatranscriptomic analysis revealed that the transcriptional profiles of the skin microbiota separated acne patients from healthy individuals. The vitamin B12 biosynthesis pathway in the skin bacterium Propionibacterium acnes was significantly down-regulated in acne patients. We hypothesized that host vitamin B12 modulates the activities of the skin microbiota and contributes to acne pathogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed the skin microbiota in healthy subjects supplemented with vitamin B12. We found that the supplementation repressed the expression of vitamin B12 biosynthesis genes in P. acnes and altered the transcriptome of the skin microbiota. One of the 10 subjects studied developed acne 1 week after vitamin B12 supplementation. To further understand the molecular mechanism, we revealed that vitamin B12 supplementation in P. acnes cultures promoted the production of porphyrins, which have been shown to induce inflammation in acne. Our findings suggest a new bacterial pathogenesis pathway in acne and provide one molecular explanation for the long-standing clinical observation that vitamin B12 supplementation leads to acne development in a subset of individuals. Our study discovered that vitamin B12, an essential nutrient in humans, modulates the transcriptional activities of skin bacteria, and provided evidence that metabolite-mediated interactions between the host and the skin microbiota play essential roles in disease development.

  8. Medicinal Plants for the Treatment of Acne Vulgaris: A Review of Recent Evidences

    PubMed Central

    Nasri, Hamid; Bahmani, Mahmoud; Shahinfard, Najmeh; Moradi Nafchi, Atefeh; Saberianpour, Shirin; Rafieian Kopaei, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Context: Acne vulgaris affects about 85% of teenagers and may continue to adulthood. There are about two million visits to physicians per year for teenagers and the direct cost of acne treatment in the US exceeds $1 billion per year. Evidence Acquisition: A wide variety of treatment regimens exist for acne vulgaris including benzoil peroxide, retinoids, isotretinoids, keratolytic soaps, alpha hydroxy acids, azelaic acid, salicilic acid as well as hormonal, anti-androgen or antiseborrheic treatments. However, none of these methods is free of side effects and their exact role in therapy is not clear. In this paper apart from presenting the possible causes of acne vulgaris and its available drugs, recently published papers about medicinal plants used in the treatment of acne vulgaris were reviewed. Results: Consumption of alternative and complementary medicine, including medicinal plants, is increasing and is common amongst patients affected by acne and infectious skin diseases. Medicinal plants have a long history of use and have been shown to possess low side effects. These plants are a reliable source for preparation of new drugs. Conclusions: Many plants seem to have inhibitory effects on the growth of bacteria, fungi and viruses in vitro. However, there are a few clinical evidences about the effectiveness and safety of these plants in the treatment of acne and other skin infections. PMID:26862380

  9. A combination of ellagic acid and tetracycline inhibits biofilm formation and the associated virulence of Propionibacterium acnes in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sivasankar, Chandran; Maruthupandiyan, Shanmugam; Balamurugan, Krishnaswamy; James, Prabhanand Bhaskar; Krishnan, Venkat; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha

    2016-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is an opportunistic pathogen which has become notorious owing to its ability to form a recalcitrant biofilm and to develop drug resistance. The current study aimed to develop anti-biofilm treatments against clinical isolates of P. acnes under in vitro and in vivo conditions. A combination of ellagic acid and tetracycline (ETC; 250 μg ml(-1) + 0.312 μg ml(-1)) was determined to effectively inhibit biofilm formation by P. acnes (80-91%) without affecting its growth, therefore potentially limiting the possibility of the bacterium attaining resistance. In addition, ETC reduced the production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) (20-26%), thereby making P. acnes more susceptible to the human immune system and antibiotics. The anti-biofilm potential of ETC was further substantiated under in vivo conditions using Caenorhabditis elegans. This study reports a novel anti-biofilm combination that could be developed as an ideal therapeutic agent with broad cosmeceutical and pharmaceutical applicability in the era of antibiotic resistance. PMID:26930280

  10. 21 CFR 357.150 - Labeling of anthelmintic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Section 357.150 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE MISCELLANEOUS INTERNAL DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE... be taken alone or with milk or fruit juice. Use of a laxative is not necessary prior to, during,...

  11. 21 CFR 357.150 - Labeling of anthelmintic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Section 357.150 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE MISCELLANEOUS INTERNAL DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE... be taken alone or with milk or fruit juice. Use of a laxative is not necessary prior to, during,...

  12. 21 CFR 357.150 - Labeling of anthelmintic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Section 357.150 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE MISCELLANEOUS INTERNAL DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE... be taken alone or with milk or fruit juice. Use of a laxative is not necessary prior to, during,...

  13. Photopneumatic Technology in Acne Treatment and Skin Rejuvenation: Histological Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Omi, Tokuya

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims: Recent reports indicate that a variety of light-based devices have been used for acne treatment and skin rejuvenation. A new technology combining intense pulsed light with negative pressure, photopneumatic technology, has recently attracted interest. The present study assessed acne treatment and skin rejuvenation with this novel approach Subjects and Methods: Acne, 450 nm tip. Five Japanese volunteers (1 male, 4 female; mean age 28.6 yr; skin type III) with mild to moderate/moderate active acne participated. The face was treated with 2 sessions, 2 weeks apart. Biopsies were obtained immediately after the first session and 1 week after the second session, and routinely processed for transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Rejuvenation, profusion tip with topical preparation. In 5 Japanese volunteers (3 male, 2 female; mean age 37.6 yr, skin type III), the volar aspect of both forearms was treated with the 530 nm head at P6 (around 12 J/cm2). The left arm was then treated with a pre-infused profusion tip and vacuum only. Four sessions were given, 14-day intervals. Biopsies were taken from both arms 2 weeks after the 2nd session and 3 weeks after the 4th session. One-half of each biopsy was assessed with histo-and immunohistochemistry, and the other with TEM. Results Acne trial: A combination of physical extraction of comedones, mild photothermal damage of the follicle and damage to identified bacilli was noted post-treatment, with macroscopic improvement of the skin. Rejuvenation with profusion: Significant morphological and immunohistochemical differences were seen between the control and profusion-treated arms at the first assessment. These differences became less significant at the 2nd assessment. Conclusions Macroscopically and histologically, photopneumatic technology improved acne lesions, suggesting a synergistic effect between the components of the technology. In skin rejuvenation, the profusion therapy accelerated the regenerative

  14. Dynamic enhancement of drug product labels to support drug safety, efficacy, and effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Out-of-date or incomplete drug product labeling information may increase the risk of otherwise preventable adverse drug events. In recognition of these concerns, the United States Federal Drug Administration (FDA) requires drug product labels to include specific information. Unfortunately, several studies have found that drug product labeling fails to keep current with the scientific literature. We present a novel approach to addressing this issue. The primary goal of this novel approach is to better meet the information needs of persons who consult the drug product label for information on a drug’s efficacy, effectiveness, and safety. Using FDA product label regulations as a guide, the approach links drug claims present in drug information sources available on the Semantic Web with specific product label sections. Here we report on pilot work that establishes the baseline performance characteristics of a proof-of-concept system implementing the novel approach. Claims from three drug information sources were linked to the Clinical Studies, Drug Interactions, and Clinical Pharmacology sections of the labels for drug products that contain one of 29 psychotropic drugs. The resulting Linked Data set maps 409 efficacy/effectiveness study results, 784 drug-drug interactions, and 112 metabolic pathway assertions derived from three clinically-oriented drug information sources (ClinicalTrials.gov, the National Drug File – Reference Terminology, and the Drug Interaction Knowledge Base) to the sections of 1,102 product labels. Proof-of-concept web pages were created for all 1,102 drug product labels that demonstrate one possible approach to presenting information that dynamically enhances drug product labeling. We found that approximately one in five efficacy/effectiveness claims were relevant to the Clinical Studies section of a psychotropic drug product, with most relevant claims providing new information. We also identified several cases where all of the drug-drug

  15. Acne, cystic on the face (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The face is the most common location of acne. Here, there are 4 to 6 millimeter red ( ... scars and fistulous tract formation (connecting passages). Severe acne may have a profound psychological impact and may ...

  16. Acne, vulgaris on the back (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Acne frequently occurs on the back. Here, there are 2 to 6 millimeter wide erythematous (red) pustules ... Permanent scarring may follow a severe case of acne. Men are more often affected on their shoulders ...

  17. 75 FR 73108 - Guidance for Industry on Abbreviated New Drug Applications: Impurities in Drug Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry on Abbreviated New Drug Applications...) guidance for industry ``Q3B(R) Impurities in New Drug Products,'' which was announced in August 2006. DATES... and Research, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New ] Hampshire Ave., Bldg. 51, rm. 2201,...

  18. Environmental pollution and acne: Chloracne

    PubMed Central

    Zouboulis, Christos C; Xia, Longqing

    2009-01-01

    Environmental pollutants can result in a variant of acne called ‘chloracne’. Chloracne is caused by systemic exposure to certain halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons ‘chloracnegens’, and is considered to be one of the most sensitive indicators of systemic poisoning by these compounds. Dioxin is the most potent environmental chloracnegen. Most cases of chloracne have resulted from occupational and non-occupational exposures, non-occupational chloracne mainly resulted from contaminated industrial wastes and contaminated food products. Non-inflammatory comedones and straw-colored cysts are the primary clinical manifestation of chloracne. Increasing of cysts in number is a signal of aggravation of chloracne. Generalized lesions can appear on the face, neck, trunk, exterimities, genitalia, axillary and other areas. Course of chloracne is chronic. Severity of chloracne is related to dosage of exposed chloracnegens, chloracnegenic potency and individual susceptibility. Histopathology of chloracne is characterized mainly by hyperplasia of epidermal cell, while follicular and sebaceous gland are taken placed by keratinized epidermal cell. The pathogenesis of chloracne maybe related to the imbalance of epidermal stem cell. Chloracne appears to be resistant to all tested forms of treatment. The only way to control chloracne is to prevent exposure to chloracnegens. PMID:20436879

  19. Efficacy and Tolerability of a Three-Step Acne System Containing a Solubilized Benzoyl Peroxide Lotion versus a Benzoyl Peroxide/Clindamycin Combination Product: An Investigator-Blind, Randomized, Parallel-Group Study.

    PubMed

    Green, Lawrence J; Del Rosso, James Q

    2008-09-01

    A brand three-step acne treatment system containing a solubilized 5% benzoyl lotion and a designated cleanser and moisturizer was compared with a brand benzoyl peroxide 5%/clindamycin 1% gel in subjects with acne vulgaris. The single-center, four-week study was investigator-blinded and randomized. The three-step acne treatment system proved to be comparable in efficacy and tolerability.

  20. Fillers for the improvement in acne scars

    PubMed Central

    Wollina, Uwe; Goldman, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Acne is a common inflammatory disease. Scarring is an unwanted end point of acne. Both atrophic and hypertrophic scar types occur. Soft-tissue augmentation aims to improve atrophic scars. In this review, we will focus on the use of dermal fillers for acne scar improvement. Therefore, various filler types are characterized, and available data on their use in acne scar improvement are analyzed. PMID:26491364

  1. Newer approaches to the treatment of acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Simonart, Thierry

    2012-12-01

    The multifactorial etiology of acne vulgaris makes it challenging to treat. Current treatments include topical retinoids, benzoyl peroxide, topical and systemic antibiotics, azelaic acid, and systemic isotretinoin. Adjunctive and/or emerging approaches include topical dapsone, taurine bromamine, resveratrol, chemical peels, optical treatments, as well as complementary and alternative medications. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the therapies available for acne and their latest developments, including new treatment strategies (i.e. re-evaluation of the use of oral antibiotics and avoidance of topical antibiotic monotherapy, use of subantimicrobial antibiotic dosing, use of low-dose isotretinoin, optical treatments), new formulations (microsponges, liposomes, nanoemulsions, aerosol foams), new combinations (fixed-combination products of topical retinoids and topical antibiotics [essentially clindamycin] or benzoyl peroxide), new agents (topical dapsone, taurine bromamine, resveratrol) and their rationale and likely place in treatment. Acne vaccines, topical natural antimicrobial peptides, and lauric acid represent other promising therapies. PMID:22920095

  2. 21 CFR 1310.11 - Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 1310.11 Section 1310.11 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT... Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. (a)...

  3. 21 CFR 1310.11 - Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 1310.11 Section 1310.11 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT... Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. (a)...

  4. Marinopyrroles: Unique Drug Discoveries Based on Marine Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Li, Rongshi

    2016-01-01

    Natural products provide a successful supply of new chemical entities (NCEs) for drug discovery to treat human diseases. Approximately half of the NCEs are based on natural products and their derivatives. Notably, marine natural products, a largely untapped resource, have contributed to drug discovery and development with eight drugs or cosmeceuticals approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency, and ten candidates undergoing clinical trials. Collaborative efforts from drug developers, biologists, organic, medicinal, and natural product chemists have elevated drug discoveries to new levels. These efforts are expected to continue to improve the efficiency of natural product-based drugs. Marinopyrroles are examined here as a case study for potential anticancer and antibiotic agents.

  5. Acne, dairy and cancer

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    A potent link to dairy seems to exist for three hormone-responsive glands. Acne, breast cancer and prostate cancer have all been linked epidemiologically to dairy intake. Although mechanisms postulated here remain to be accurately defined, the likely link involves Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 as a general stimulant, synergized by the steroid hormones present in milk. The IGF-1 may be either absorbed from milk, or stimulated by its ingestion, or both. The 5alpha-reduced compound 5alpha-pregnanedione (5α-P) present in milk is a direct precursor of dihydrotestosterone and may act through that pathway in prostate cancer, but 5α-P has also recently been shown to be capable of inducing estrogen receptors in breast cancer cells, upregulating cancer cells' sensitivity to estrogen. The introduction of exogenous hormones and growth factors into tissues that have not evolved defensive feedback inhibition of their corresponding endogenous sources is postulated as a direct stimulatory threat to these organ systems, whether for hyperplasia or neoplasia. PMID:20046583

  6. [Acne therapy with topical benzoyl peroxide, antibiotics and azelaic acid].

    PubMed

    Worret, Wolf-Ingo; Fluhr, Joachim W

    2006-04-01

    Benzoyl peroxide (BPO) was introduced in the treatment of acne in 1934. Despite the fact that only few randomized trials have been published, BPO is considered the standard in topical acne treatment. Anaerobic bacteria are reduced by oxidative mechanisms and the induction of resistant strains is reduced. Topical formulations are available at concentrations of 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 %. The effect is dose-dependent, but the irritation increases with higher concentrations. Usually 5 % BPO is sufficient to control acne grade I-II. Due to its strong oxidative potential, patients should be advised that BPO may bleach colored and dark clothing, bedding and even hair. BPO is safe for use in pregnant and lactating females because it is degraded to benzoic acid. It is a cost-effective treatment for acne grade I-II. Patients with papulopustular acne grade I-II, particularly with marked inflammation, show satisfactory improvement with topical antibiotic treatment. The following compounds are available and effective: erythromycin, clindamycin and tetracycline (the latter being less frequently used). A review in 1990 suggested that topical tetracycline was ineffective in the treatment of acne. Along with eliminating Propionibacterium acnes, the main mechanism of topical antibiotics is their antiinflammatory effect. All three penetrate the epidermal barrier well and are similarly efficacious. Randomized trials have shown that in concentrations of 2-4 %, their effects are comparable to oral tetracycline and minocycline. Combination therapy with retinoids or benzoyl peroxide (BPO) increases efficacy. Retinoids increase penetration and reduce comedones, while topical antibiotics primarily address inflammation. One side effect of topical antibacterial treatment is an increase in drug-resistant resident skin flora with gram-negative microorganisms prevailing, which can lead to gram-negative folliculitis. All three antibiotics fluoresce under black light which may produce interesting

  7. [Acne therapy with topical benzoyl peroxide, antibiotics and azelaic acid].

    PubMed

    Worret, Wolf-Ingo; Fluhr, Joachim W

    2006-04-01

    Benzoyl peroxide (BPO) was introduced in the treatment of acne in 1934. Despite the fact that only few randomized trials have been published, BPO is considered the standard in topical acne treatment. Anaerobic bacteria are reduced by oxidative mechanisms and the induction of resistant strains is reduced. Topical formulations are available at concentrations of 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 %. The effect is dose-dependent, but the irritation increases with higher concentrations. Usually 5 % BPO is sufficient to control acne grade I-II. Due to its strong oxidative potential, patients should be advised that BPO may bleach colored and dark clothing, bedding and even hair. BPO is safe for use in pregnant and lactating females because it is degraded to benzoic acid. It is a cost-effective treatment for acne grade I-II. Patients with papulopustular acne grade I-II, particularly with marked inflammation, show satisfactory improvement with topical antibiotic treatment. The following compounds are available and effective: erythromycin, clindamycin and tetracycline (the latter being less frequently used). A review in 1990 suggested that topical tetracycline was ineffective in the treatment of acne. Along with eliminating Propionibacterium acnes, the main mechanism of topical antibiotics is their antiinflammatory effect. All three penetrate the epidermal barrier well and are similarly efficacious. Randomized trials have shown that in concentrations of 2-4 %, their effects are comparable to oral tetracycline and minocycline. Combination therapy with retinoids or benzoyl peroxide (BPO) increases efficacy. Retinoids increase penetration and reduce comedones, while topical antibiotics primarily address inflammation. One side effect of topical antibacterial treatment is an increase in drug-resistant resident skin flora with gram-negative microorganisms prevailing, which can lead to gram-negative folliculitis. All three antibiotics fluoresce under black light which may produce interesting

  8. Antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties of nostocionone isolated from Nostoc commune Vauch and its derivatives against Propionibacterium acnes.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Tomohiro; Tsuchida, Akihiro; Muramatsu, Yuji; Ninomiya, Masayuki; Ando, Masashi; Tsukamasa, Yasuyuki; Koketsu, Mamoru

    2014-06-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is the primary pathogenic agent responsible for acne vulgaris on the skin and hair follicles. Overgrowth of this bacterium inhibits growth and promotes follicular inflammation, with an associated increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine production. P. acnes has therefore been considered the main target for the prevention and medical treatment of acne vulgaris. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro anti-P. acnes and anti-inflammatory properties of 6 compounds isolated from Nostoc commune. One of these compounds, nostocionone (Nost), and one of its derivatives, NostD3 [(1E,4E)-1-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-5-(2,6,6-trimethylcyclohex-1-enyl)penta-1,4-dien-3-one], significantly inhibited P. acnes growth. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of Nost and NostD3 on heat-killed (hk) P. acnes-induced inflammation in macrophages. Both Nost and NostD3 suppressed hk P. acnes-induced nitric oxide (NO) production through the suppression of inducible NO synthase expression, following inactivation of nuclear factor kappa B. Taken together, our findings suggested that both Nost and NostD3 were promising agents for the treatment of acne vulgaris, and that NostD3 showed higher efficacy than Nost. PMID:24699048

  9. [Topical cimetidine treatment of acne].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, J B; Spona, J

    1986-08-01

    We present first results of topically applied cimetidine in acne. Ten patients suffering from papulopustular and comedone acne administered 2% cimetidine in indifferent lotion on their face twice a day. Clinical controls were performed every two weeks; sebum was monthly determined. After treatment of 13 weeks on the average, the clinical success was generally good. Comedones responded best, followed by papules. Pustules were hardly reduced. There was no significant reduction of SER and the lipid fractions at the end of treatment. Low concentration or insufficient penetration might be possible explanations. The efficient reduction of comedones might be an antiandrogenic effect due to modulation of the keratinization in the follicle excretory duct. Immune-modulatory effects of cimetidine and effects on the skin vessels are other possible explanations for the clinical efficacy of topical application of cimetidine in acne.

  10. Acne tetrad in a family.

    PubMed

    Zisova, L; Sakakushev, B

    1994-01-01

    The authors report, for the first time in Bulgarian literature, a case of acne tetrad syndrome in a family. The patients were sisters who were found to have three of the four components of the syndrome: hidradenitis suppurativa, acne conglobata, and cysta pillaris. There was no evidence or anamnestic data for perifolliculitis capitis abscedens et suffodiens. In one of the sisters the syndrome showed a more precipitate clinical picture and was combined with other skin disorders (lichen ruber planus, neurodermitis circumscripta, hirsutismus). The patients had a familial predisposition to acne and pilar cycts. The complete blood analysis, all biochemical parameters, the cytogenetic analysis and hormonal status (testosterone and estrogens) showed no deviation from normal values. The patients did not report any disturbances during their menstrual cycles. The cellular immunity in one of the sisters was depressed. The patients and their children will be closely monitored. PMID:8698287

  11. Acne Vulgaris and the Epidermal Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Thiboutot, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a common dermatological disorder that predominantly affects teenagers, but can also affect preadolescents and post-teen individuals. Despite the fact that acne vulgaris is the most common skin disorder encountered in ambulatory dermatology practice in the United States, there has been limited research on the epidermal permeability barrier in untreated skin of people with acne vulgaris and also after use of acne therapies. This article reviews the research results and discusses the available literature on this subject area. The importance of proper skin care as a component of the management of acne vulgaris is supported by the information that is currently available. PMID:23441236

  12. Heredity of acne in Korean patients.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eun Byul; Ha, Ji Min; Park, Eun Joo; Kim, Kwang Ho; Kim, Kwang Joong

    2014-10-01

    Acne is a chronic inflammatory disease of the pilocebaceous unit that presents with various spectrum and severity. Genetic backgrounds and environmental factors are also considered to be relevant, but few studies have focused on Korean patients. A cross-sectional epidemiologic study on family history of Korean acne patients was performed to analyze family history of acne, and to compare the severity and characteristics of acne in association with family history. A total of 221 patients were enrolled, 98 male (44.3%) and 123 female (55.7%). Patients were grouped as patients with (A+) or without (A-) family history of acne. In a second analysis, patients with any experience of acne treatment were evaluated. Severity of acne was measured with Burton's grading system and Korean Acne Grading System (KAGS). Female patients had a higher tendency to have family history than males (P = 0.002). Group A+ had statistically significant earlier onset of acne (P = 0.002). In inexperienced patients, patients with family history showed a relatively earlier onset (P = 0.084). This study confirmed the role of heredity in acne. Family history of acne is associated with earlier onset of the disease, and more non-inflammatory lesions.

  13. South-East Asia study alliance guidelines on the management of acne vulgaris in South-East Asian patients.

    PubMed

    Goh, Chee Leok; Abad-Casintahan, Flordeliz; Aw, Derrick Chen Wee; Baba, Roshidah; Chan, Lee Chin; Hung, Nguyen Thanh; Kulthanan, Kanokvalai; Leong, Hoe Nam; Medina-Oblepias, Marie Socouer; Noppakun, Nopadon; Sitohang, Irma Bernadette; Sugito, Titi Lestari; Wong, Su-Ni

    2015-10-01

    The management of acne in South-East Asia is unique, as Asian skin and local variables require a clinical approach unlike that utilized in other parts of the world. There are different treatment guidelines per country in the region, and a group of leading dermatologists from these countries convened to review these guidelines, discuss current practices and recent advances, and formulate consensus guidelines to harmonize the management of acne vulgaris in the region. Emphasis has been placed on formulating recommendations to impede the development of antibiotic resistance in Propionibacterium acnes. The group adopted the Acne Consensus Conference system for grading acne severity. The group recommends that patients may be treated with topical medications including retinoids, benzoyl peroxide (BPO), salicylic acid, a combination of retinoid and BPO, or a combination of retinoids and BPO with or without antibiotics for mild acne; topical retinoid with topical BPO and a oral antibiotic for moderate acne; and oral isotretinoin if the patient fails first-line treatment (a 6- or 8-week trial of combined oral antibiotics and topical retinoids with BPO) for severe acne. Maintenance acne treatment using topical retinoids with or without BPO is recommended. To prevent the development of antibiotic resistance, topical antibiotics should not be used as monotherapy or used simultaneously with oral antibiotics. Skin care, comprised of cleansing, moisturizing and sun protection, is likewise recommended. Patient education and good communication is recommended to improve adherence, and advice should be given about the characteristics of the skin care products patients should use.

  14. Sensitivity of Propionibacterium acnes isolated from acne patients: comparative study of antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, S; Kurokawa, I; Kawabata, S

    1996-01-01

    The antimicrobial susceptibility of Propionibacterium acnes isolated before and after treatment of acne patients was measured. The four female and three male acne patients were treated with an oral acne medication, roxithromycin or minocycline, and/or a topical acne medication, nadifloxacin cream or clindamycin hydrochloride lotion for 1-8 weeks. The isolated strains were tested for their susceptibility to the antimicrobial action of: nadifloxacin, ofloxacin, erythromycin, clindamycin hydrochloride, tetracycline hydrochloride, minocycline, doxycycline, ampicillin, cephalexin and gentamycin. No resistant strains of P. acnes were observed.

  15. 21 CFR 332.30 - Labeling of antiflatulent drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Labeling of antiflatulent drug products. (a) Statement of identity. The labeling of the product contains... accidental overdose, seek professional assistance or contact a poison control center immediately.”...

  16. [New drugs for horses and production animals in 2012].

    PubMed

    Emmerich, I U

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, two newly developed active pharmaceutical ingredients for horses and food producing animals were released on the German market for veterinary drug products. Those are the parenterally applicable first generation cephalosporin Cefalonium (Cepravin®) and the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug Suxibuzone (Danilon®). Furthermore, one established veterinary active pharmaceutical ingredient is applicable to additional species: The anticoccidial Amprolium (Eimeryl®) has again been authorized for chicken and turkeys. Additionally, two veterinary drugs with a new formulation as well as three products with a new strength and one product with a new indication have recently been released to the veterinary drugs market for horses and food producing animals.

  17. 77 FR 71803 - Guidance on Food and Drug Administration Oversight of Positron Emission Tomography Drug Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-04

    ... guidance of the same title was announced in the Federal Register on February 27, 2012 (77 FR 11553), and... availability of a guidance entitled ``FDA Oversight of PET Drug Products--Questions and Answers.'' This... Oversight of PET Drug Products--Questions and Answers.'' In 1997, Congress passed the Food and...

  18. NdYag Laser for Acne Keloidalis Nuchae

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-27

    Acne Keloidalis Nuchae; NdYag Laser; AKN; Acne Keloidalis; AK; Dermatitis Papillaris Capillitii; Folliculitis Keloidalis Nuchae; Sycosis Nuchae; Acne Keloid; Keloidal Folliculitis; Lichen Keloidalis Nuchae; Folliculitis Nuchae Scleroticans; Sycosis Framboesiformis

  19. Drug-device combination products: regulatory landscape and market growth.

    PubMed

    Bayarri, L

    2015-08-01

    Combination products are therapeutic and diagnostic products that combine drugs, devices and/or biological products, leading to safer and more effective treatments thanks to careful and precise drug targeting, local administration and individualized therapy. These technologies can especially benefit patients suffering from serious diseases and conditions such as cancer, heart disease, multiple sclerosis and diabetes, among others. On the other hand, drug-device combination products have also introduced a new dynamic in medical product development, regulatory approval and corporate interaction. Due to the increasing integration of drugs and devices observed in the latest generation of combination products, regulatory agencies have developed specific competences and regulations over the last decade. Manufacturers are required to fully understand the specific requirements in each country in order to ensure timely and accurate market access of new combination products, and the development of combination products involves a very specific pattern of interactions between manufacturers and regulatory agencies. The increased sophistication of the products brought to market over the last couple of decades has accentuated the need to develop drugs and devices collaboratively using resources from both industries, fostering the need of business partnering and technology licensing. This review will provide a global overview of the market trends, as well as (in the last section) an analysis of the drug-device combination products approved by the FDA during the latest 5 years.

  20. Drug-device combination products: regulatory landscape and market growth.

    PubMed

    Bayarri, L

    2015-08-01

    Combination products are therapeutic and diagnostic products that combine drugs, devices and/or biological products, leading to safer and more effective treatments thanks to careful and precise drug targeting, local administration and individualized therapy. These technologies can especially benefit patients suffering from serious diseases and conditions such as cancer, heart disease, multiple sclerosis and diabetes, among others. On the other hand, drug-device combination products have also introduced a new dynamic in medical product development, regulatory approval and corporate interaction. Due to the increasing integration of drugs and devices observed in the latest generation of combination products, regulatory agencies have developed specific competences and regulations over the last decade. Manufacturers are required to fully understand the specific requirements in each country in order to ensure timely and accurate market access of new combination products, and the development of combination products involves a very specific pattern of interactions between manufacturers and regulatory agencies. The increased sophistication of the products brought to market over the last couple of decades has accentuated the need to develop drugs and devices collaboratively using resources from both industries, fostering the need of business partnering and technology licensing. This review will provide a global overview of the market trends, as well as (in the last section) an analysis of the drug-device combination products approved by the FDA during the latest 5 years. PMID:26380388

  1. Natural Products as a Foundation for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Beutler, John A.

    2009-01-01

    Natural products have contributed to the development of many drugs for diverse indications. While most U.S. pharmaceutical companies have reduced or eliminated their in-house natural product groups, new paradigms and new enterprises have evolved to carry on a role for natural products in the pharmaceutical industry. Many of the reasons for the decline in popularity of natural products are being addressed by the development of new techniques for screening and production. This overview aims to inform pharmacologists of current strategies and techniques that make natural products a viable strategic choice for inclusion in drug discovery programs. PMID:20161632

  2. Stressful Events and Serum Concentration of Substance P in Acne Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rokowska-Waluch, Anita; Cybulski, Marcin; Żurawski, Jakub; Kaczmarek, Mariusz; Michalak, Michał; Mojs, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Background Psychological stress is an important factor of acne pathogenesis. Stress related production of hormones, cytokines and neuropeptides may result in the chronic course and exacerbations of the disease. Objective The aim of the study was to evaluate the relationship between acne severity, intensity of emotional stress and serum concentration of substance P (scSP), to compare the intensity of adversities, psychological stress and scSP in acne patients with healthy controls and to compare coping techniques for stress. Methods The study consisted of 80 patients. Emotional stress was analyzed with the use of social readjustment rating scale, whereas the methods of coping with stress were assessed with the coping inventory for stressful situation questionnaire. The blood concentration of substance P was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method in a group of 40 patients with acne vulgaris and in control subjects. Results There was no statistically significant difference between the severity of acne and the intensity of stress. Acne patients presented a higher average scSP than the controls. No statistically significant correlation was observed between the severity of acne and scSP; however, the intensity of stress correlated with scSP in the control group. The evaluation of methods of coping with stress showed significantly higher rate for the avoidance-oriented coping among acne patients. Conclusion The number of stressful events is not a factor that determines the severity of acne. The course of the disease may depend on tolerance to stress and methods of coping with stress. PMID:27489429

  3. Acne-Related Quality of Life Among Female Adults of Different Races/Ethnicities

    PubMed Central

    Gorelick, Joe; Daniels, Selena R.; Kawata, Ariane K.; Degboe, Arnold; Wilcox, Teresa K.; Burk, Caroline T.; Douse-Dean, Tracee

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Background Acne impairs quality of life, but its effect on different races/ethnicities is unclear. This study evaluated racial/ethnic differences in acne-related quality of life and psychological symptoms among female adults. Methods A Web-based survey was conducted with U.S. female adults (25–45 years old) with facial acne (≥25 visible lesions). Outcomes included sociodemographics, clinical characteristics, acne-related quality of life (Acne-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire), psychological symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire), and work/school productivity. Racial/ethnic differences were evaluated using descriptive statistics and analysis of variance/chi-square analyses. Results Three-hundred twelve subjects (Black = 30.8%, Hispanic = 17.6%, Asian/other = 17.3%, White = 34.3%) completed the survey (mean age = 35.3 ± 5.9 years). Acne negatively impacted quality of life for all subjects. Black subjects reported significantly less negative impact on self-perception versus Asian/other (Black = 12.6 ± 9.9, Asian/other = 8.4 ± 8.6; p = .05). Social functioning was less negatively impacted in White and Black subjects versus Asian/other (White = 12.7 ± 7.5, Asian/other = 8.4 ± 7.8, p < .05; Black = 12.1 ± 9.2, Asian/other = 8.4 ± 7.8, p = .06). Over one third (total sample = 40.7%, Black = 31.3%, Hispanic = 36.4%, Asian/other = 50.0%, White = 46.7%) reported moderate/severe anxiety/depression symptoms. Acne also impacted ability to concentrate on work/school. Conclusion Racial/ethnic differences were observed in acne-related quality of life and psychological symptoms in female adults; acne negatively impacted self-perceptions and social/emotional functioning. PMID:26097643

  4. Isotretinoin therapy changes the expression of antimicrobial peptides in acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Borovaya, Alena; Dombrowski, Yvonne; Zwicker, Stephanie; Olisova, Olga; Ruzicka, Thomas; Wolf, Ronald; Schauber, Jürgen; Sárdy, Miklós

    2014-10-01

    In acne vulgaris, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) could play a dual role; i.e., protective by acting against Propionibacterium acnes, pro-inflammatory by acting as signalling molecules. The cutaneous expression of 15 different AMPs was investigated in acne patients; furthermore, the impact of isotretinoin therapy on AMP expression was analysed in skin biopsies from 13 patients with acne vulgaris taken before, during and after a 6-month treatment cycle with isotretinoin using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Cutaneous expression of the AMPs cathelicidin, human β-defensin-2 (HBD-2), lactoferrin, lysozyme, psoriasin (S100A7), koebnerisin (S100A15), and RNase 7 was upregulated in untreated acne vulgaris, whereas α-defensin-1 (HNP-1) was downregulated compared to controls. While relative expression levels of cathelicidin, HBD-2, lactoferrin, psoriasin (S100A7), and koebnerisin (S100A15) decreased during isotretinoin treatment, only those of cathelicidin and koebnerisin returned to normal after 6 months of isotretinoin therapy. The increased expression of lysozyme and RNase 7 remained unaffected by isotretinoin treatment. The levels of granulysin, RANTES (CCL5), perforin, CXCL9, substance P, chromogranin B, and dermcidin were not regulated in untreated acne patients and isotretinoin had no effect on these AMPs. In conclusion, the expression of various AMPs is altered in acne vulgaris. Isotretinoin therapy normalizes the cutaneous production of distinct AMPs while the expression of others is still increased in healing acne. Considering the antimicrobial and pro-inflammatory role of AMPs, these molecules could serve as specific targets for acne therapy and maintenance of clinical remission.

  5. Topically applied antibiotics in acne vulgaris: clinical response and suppression of Corynebacterium acnes in open comedones.

    PubMed

    Resh, W; Stoughton, R B

    1976-02-01

    Topical antibiotics were used on patients with acne vulgaris. Corynebacterium acnes organisms from open comedones were quantitated during treatment, and the progress of the disease was evaluated. Clindamycin lotion completely suppressed the growth of C acnes organisms, whereas erythromycin and tetracycline did not depress the C acnes counts. Taken as a group, these antibiotics gave a substantial improvement of the disease on the treated side as compared with paired untreated sides of the face and back.

  6. Linking diet to acne metabolomics, inflammation, and comedogenesis: an update.

    PubMed

    Melnik, Bodo C

    2015-01-01

    Acne vulgaris, an epidemic inflammatory skin disease of adolescence, is closely related to Western diet. Three major food classes that promote acne are: 1) hyperglycemic carbohydrates, 2) milk and dairy products, 3) saturated fats including trans-fats and deficient ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). Diet-induced insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1)-signaling is superimposed on elevated IGF-1 levels during puberty, thereby unmasking the impact of aberrant nutrigenomics on sebaceous gland homeostasis. Western diet provides abundant branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), glutamine, and palmitic acid. Insulin and IGF-1 suppress the activity of the metabolic transcription factor forkhead box O1 (FoxO1). Insulin, IGF-1, BCAAs, glutamine, and palmitate activate the nutrient-sensitive kinase mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), the key regulator of anabolism and lipogenesis. FoxO1 is a negative coregulator of androgen receptor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ), liver X receptor-α, and sterol response element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), crucial transcription factors of sebaceous lipogenesis. mTORC1 stimulates the expression of PPARγ and SREBP-1c, promoting sebum production. SREBP-1c upregulates stearoyl-CoA- and Δ6-desaturase, enhancing the proportion of monounsaturated fatty acids in sebum triglycerides. Diet-mediated aberrations in sebum quantity (hyperseborrhea) and composition (dysseborrhea) promote Propionibacterium acnes overgrowth and biofilm formation with overexpression of the virulence factor triglyceride lipase increasing follicular levels of free palmitate and oleate. Free palmitate functions as a "danger signal," stimulating toll-like receptor-2-mediated inflammasome activation with interleukin-1β release, Th17 differentiation, and interleukin-17-mediated keratinocyte proliferation. Oleate stimulates P. acnes adhesion, keratinocyte proliferation, and comedogenesis via interleukin-1α release. Thus, diet

  7. Linking diet to acne metabolomics, inflammation, and comedogenesis: an update

    PubMed Central

    Melnik, Bodo C

    2015-01-01

    Acne vulgaris, an epidemic inflammatory skin disease of adolescence, is closely related to Western diet. Three major food classes that promote acne are: 1) hyperglycemic carbohydrates, 2) milk and dairy products, 3) saturated fats including trans-fats and deficient ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). Diet-induced insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1)-signaling is superimposed on elevated IGF-1 levels during puberty, thereby unmasking the impact of aberrant nutrigenomics on sebaceous gland homeostasis. Western diet provides abundant branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), glutamine, and palmitic acid. Insulin and IGF-1 suppress the activity of the metabolic transcription factor forkhead box O1 (FoxO1). Insulin, IGF-1, BCAAs, glutamine, and palmitate activate the nutrient-sensitive kinase mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), the key regulator of anabolism and lipogenesis. FoxO1 is a negative coregulator of androgen receptor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ), liver X receptor-α, and sterol response element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), crucial transcription factors of sebaceous lipogenesis. mTORC1 stimulates the expression of PPARγ and SREBP-1c, promoting sebum production. SREBP-1c upregulates stearoyl-CoA- and Δ6-desaturase, enhancing the proportion of monounsaturated fatty acids in sebum triglycerides. Diet-mediated aberrations in sebum quantity (hyperseborrhea) and composition (dysseborrhea) promote Propionibacterium acnes overgrowth and biofilm formation with overexpression of the virulence factor triglyceride lipase increasing follicular levels of free palmitate and oleate. Free palmitate functions as a “danger signal,” stimulating toll-like receptor-2-mediated inflammasome activation with interleukin-1β release, Th17 differentiation, and interleukin-17-mediated keratinocyte proliferation. Oleate stimulates P. acnes adhesion, keratinocyte proliferation, and comedogenesis via interleukin-1α release. Thus, diet

  8. Acne Scars: Pathogenesis, Classification and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Fabbrocini, Gabriella; Annunziata, M. C.; D'Arco, V.; De Vita, V.; Lodi, G.; Mauriello, M. C.; Pastore, F.; Monfrecola, G.

    2010-01-01

    Acne has a prevalence of over 90% among adolescents and persists into adulthood in approximately 12%–14% of cases with psychological and social implications. Possible outcomes of the inflammatory acne lesions are acne scars which, although they can be treated in a number of ways, may have a negative psychological impact on social life and relationships. The main types of acne scars are atrophic and hypertrophic scars. The pathogenesis of acne scarring is still not fully understood, but several hypotheses have been proposed. There are numerous treatments: chemical peels, dermabrasion/microdermabrasion, laser treatment, punch techniques, dermal grafting, needling and combined therapies for atrophic scars: silicone gels, intralesional steroid therapy, cryotherapy, and surgery for hypertrophic and keloidal lesions. This paper summarizes acne scar pathogenesis, classification and treatment options. PMID:20981308

  9. Treatment of acne with topical antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Frank, S B

    1977-06-01

    The introduction of topical antibiotics for acne vulgaris has ushered in a new era in the treatment of this troublesome disorder. Tetracycline, erythromycin, and clindamycin can now be prepared in lotion form in vehicles that are capable of carrying the antibiotic into the follicular canal, where the primary lesion of acne occurs. Topical antibiotics are practically as effective as oral antibiotics in treating acne and are particularly useful for mild papular acne of puberty and early adolescence and papular-pustular acne of adult women. Use of topical antibiotics avoids the possibility of the adverse effects of systemic therapy; the side effects from the formulations reported here are negligible. Above all, antibiotic lotions do not produce the dryness and scaling that occur with most other topical acne preparations.

  10. Physical modalities for treating acne and rosacea.

    PubMed

    Jalian, H Ray; Levin, Yakir; Wanner, Molly

    2016-06-01

    Physical modalities provide an important adjunct to medical treatment of acne and rosacea. In patients who cannot tolerate or fail medical treatments, physical modalities offer an alternative approach. For cases of acne scarring, phymatous changes of rosacea, and rosacea-associated telangiectasia, physical modalities such as laser and light treatments represent the treatment of choice. We will review the use of laser and light treatments, photodynamic therapy, and other physical modalities such as targeted therapies for the treatment of acne and rosacea.

  11. Acne keloidalis nuchae and tufted hair folliculitis.

    PubMed

    Luz Ramos, M; Muñoz-Pérez, M A; Pons, A; Ortega, M; Camacho, F

    1997-01-01

    Acne keloidalis nuchae is a chronic, scarring folliculitis that affects mostly black patients and is located on the back of the neck of young adults. The course is progressive and leads to hypertrophic scarring, chronic abscesses and hair loss. We discuss the relationship between acne keloidalis and tufted hair folliculitis, pointing out the possibility that tufted hair folliculitis is not a specific disease but secondary to other progressive folliculitis like folliculitis decalvans, dissecting cellulitis or acne keloidalis. PMID:9031798

  12. [Using combined magnetotherapy in patients with acne].

    PubMed

    Kul'chitskaia, D B; Orekhova, E M; Vasil'eva, E S

    2004-01-01

    Laser Doppler flowmetry discovered microcirculatory disorders in acne patients. Affected are arterioles as well as capillaries and venules. Combination of magnetotherapy with medication improves microcirculation in acne patients. More marked positive changes occurred in the microcirculatory system due to combined treatment compared to medication therapy only. Thus, laser Doppler flowmetry is a new, noninvasive method of assessing microcirculation in acne patients and can serve an objective criterion of treatment efficacy. PMID:15449670

  13. 37 CFR 1.775 - Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. 1.775 Section 1.775 Patents... Review § 1.775 Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. (a) If a determination is made pursuant to § 1.750 that a patent for a human drug,...

  14. 37 CFR 1.775 - Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. 1.775 Section 1.775 Patents... Review § 1.775 Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. (a) If a determination is made pursuant to § 1.750 that a patent for a human drug,...

  15. 37 CFR 1.775 - Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. 1.775 Section 1.775 Patents... Review § 1.775 Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. (a) If a determination is made pursuant to § 1.750 that a patent for a human drug,...

  16. 37 CFR 1.775 - Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. 1.775 Section 1.775 Patents... Review § 1.775 Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. (a) If a determination is made pursuant to § 1.750 that a patent for a human drug,...

  17. 37 CFR 1.775 - Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. 1.775 Section 1.775 Patents... Review § 1.775 Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. (a) If a determination is made pursuant to § 1.750 that a patent for a human drug,...

  18. Important controversies associated with isotretinoin therapy for acne.

    PubMed

    Wolverton, Stephen E; Harper, Julie C

    2013-04-01

    Isotretinoin is a remarkably effective drug for severe, recalcitrant acne vulgaris. Soon after the drug's release in the early 1980s, a number of important adverse effects were reported subsequently leading to a variety of medical and medicolegal controversies. Three of these controversies will be highlighted concerning the putative role of isotretinoin in (1) depression and suicide, (2) inflammatory bowel disease, and (3) iPledge and pregnancy prevention programs. It appears that a very small subset of patients receiving isotretinoin for acne are at risk for depression, which is very manageable provided there is adequate patient awareness of the possibility, maximum communication between the patient and physician, and cessation of therapy if clinically important depression occurs (after which the depression rapidly resolves in a week or less). Multiple controlled studies actually suggest a very favorable effect of isotretinoin on depression and anxiety common in the population requiring isotretinoin. With regard to inflammatory bowel disease, in just one study, only ulcerative colitis association with isotretinoin reached statistical significance. The actual incidence of this association is strikingly low. Finally, it is clear that even the most recent pregnancy prevention program (iPledge) is no more successful than prior programs; there will likely always be a small number of female patients becoming pregnant while receiving isotretinoin for acne vulgaris.

  19. Pediatric Acne: Clinical Patterns and Pearls.

    PubMed

    Maroñas-Jiménez, Lidia; Krakowski, Andrew C

    2016-04-01

    Acne vulgaris presenting from birth to preadolescence can be confusing to diagnose and even more challenging to evaluate and manage. The differential diagnosis of acne varies by age and, in some cases (especially when it presents in midchildhood), deserves a thorough evaluation to rule out underlying systemic abnormalities. Acne management strategies, including factors affecting adherence to the treatment regimen, may be influenced by the patient's age. This article presents an overview of the clinical presentations of acne by age and our approach to evaluation and management of this common condition. PMID:27015779

  20. United States Food and Drug Administration Product Label Changes.

    PubMed

    Kircik, Leon; Sung, Julie C; Stein-Gold, Linda; Goldenberg, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Once a drug has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration and is on the market, the Food and Drug Administration communicates new safety information through product label changes. Most of these label changes occur after a spontaneous report to either the drug manufacturing companies or the Food and Drug Administration MedWatch program. As a result, 400 to 500 label changes occur every year. Actinic keratosis treatments exemplify the commonality of label changes throughout the postmarket course of a drug. Diclofenac gel, 5-fluorouracil cream, imiquimod, and ingenol mebutate are examples of actinic keratosis treatments that have all undergone at least one label revision. With the current system of spontaneous reports leading to numerous label changes, each occurrence does not necessarily signify a radical change in the safety of a drug. PMID:26962391

  1. United States Food and Drug Administration Product Label Changes

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Julie C.; Stein-Gold, Linda; Goldenberg, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Once a drug has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration and is on the market, the Food and Drug Administration communicates new safety information through product label changes. Most of these label changes occur after a spontaneous report to either the drug manufacturing companies or the Food and Drug Administration MedWatch program. As a result, 400 to 500 label changes occur every year. Actinic keratosis treatments exemplify the commonality of label changes throughout the postmarket course of a drug. Diclofenac gel, 5-fluorouracil cream, imiquimod, and ingenol mebutate are examples of actinic keratosis treatments that have all undergone at least one label revision. With the current system of spontaneous reports leading to numerous label changes, each occurrence does not necessarily signify a radical change in the safety of a drug. PMID:26962391

  2. Isotretinoin for acne and rosacea.

    PubMed

    Watson, Kendra D; Miest, Rachel Y; Tollefson, Megha M

    2016-06-01

    Isotretinoin is a revolutionary medicine for the treatment of acne vulgaris, with new studies showing evidence of excellent clinical outcomes in treating rosacea. After 30 years of clinical experience, new insights are being gained into dosing strategies, recurrence prevention, and dose-related side effects. Previous controversial associations with inflammatory bowel diseases and mood disorders have hampered the use of this medication in some clinical situations, with new evidence disproving these claims. The teratogenicity of this medication mandates iPLEDGE compliance with government regulations. Clinicians should be knowledgeable about this medication including its side effects, teratogenicity, and its controversies in order to adequately counsel patients, dissuade fears, and obtain the best clinical outcome when treating acne and rosacea. PMID:27416313

  3. Comparison effect of azithromycin gel 2% with clindamycin gel 1% in patients with acne

    PubMed Central

    Mokhtari, Fatemeh; Faghihi, Gita; Basiri, Akram; Farhadi, Sadaf; Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammadali; Behfar, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acne vulgaris is the most common skin disease. Local and systemic antimicrobial drugs are used for its treatment. But increasing resistance of Propionibacterium acnes to antibiotics has been reported. Materials and Methods: In a double-blind clinical trial, 40 patients with mild to moderate acne vulgaris were recruited. one side of the face was treated with Clindamycin Gel 1% and the other side with Azithromycin Topical Gel 2% BID for 8 weeks and then they were assessed. Results: Average age was 21. 8 ± 7 years. 82.5% of them were female. Average number of papules, pustules and comedones was similarly reduced in both groups and, no significant difference was observed between the two groups (P > 0.05, repeated measurs ANOVA). The mean indexes of ASI and TLC also significantly decreased during treatment in both groups, no significant difference was observed between the two groups. (P > 0.05, repeated measurs ANOVA). Also, impact of both drugs on papules and pustules was 2-3 times greater than the effect on comedones. Average satisfaction score was not significant between the two groups (P = 0.6, repeated measurs ANOVA). finally, frequency distribution of complications was not significant between the two groups (P > 0.05, Fisher Exact test). Conclusion: Azithromycin gel has medical impact at least similar to Clindamycin Gel in treatment of mild to moderate acne vulgaris, and it may be consider as suitable drug for resistant acne to conventional topical therapy. PMID:27169103

  4. 21 CFR 349.50 - Labeling of ophthalmic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., discard.” (3) For ophthalmic drug products containing mercury compounds used as a preservative. “This product contains (name and quantity of mercury-containing ingredient) as a preservative. Do not use this product if you are sensitive to” (select one of the following: “mercury” or “(insert name of...

  5. 21 CFR 349.50 - Labeling of ophthalmic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., discard.” (3) For ophthalmic drug products containing mercury compounds used as a preservative. “This product contains (name and quantity of mercury-containing ingredient) as a preservative. Do not use this product if you are sensitive to” (select one of the following: “mercury” or “(insert name of...

  6. 21 CFR 349.50 - Labeling of ophthalmic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., discard.” (3) For ophthalmic drug products containing mercury compounds used as a preservative. “This product contains (name and quantity of mercury-containing ingredient) as a preservative. Do not use this product if you are sensitive to” (select one of the following: “mercury” or “(insert name of...

  7. 21 CFR 349.50 - Labeling of ophthalmic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., discard.” (3) For ophthalmic drug products containing mercury compounds used as a preservative. “This product contains (name and quantity of mercury-containing ingredient) as a preservative. Do not use this product if you are sensitive to” (select one of the following: “mercury” or “(insert name of...

  8. 21 CFR 341.78 - Labeling of expectorant drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE COLD, COUGH, ALLERGY, BRONCHODILATOR, AND ANTIASTHMATIC DRUG PRODUCTS FOR...,” and “make coughs more productive”). Other truthful and nonmisleading statements, describing only the... persistent cough may be a sign of a serious condition. If cough persists for more than 1 week, tends to...

  9. 21 CFR 314.108 - New drug product exclusivity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... coordination bonds), or other noncovalent derivative (such as a complex, chelate, or clathrate) of the molecule... Administration. New chemical entity means a drug that contains no active moiety that has been approved by FDA in...) application. (1) (2) If a drug product that contains a new chemical entity was approved after September...

  10. 21 CFR 314.108 - New drug product exclusivity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... coordination bonds), or other noncovalent derivative (such as a complex, chelate, or clathrate) of the molecule... Administration. New chemical entity means a drug that contains no active moiety that has been approved by FDA in...) application. (1) (2) If a drug product that contains a new chemical entity was approved after September...

  11. 21 CFR 314.108 - New drug product exclusivity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... coordination bonds), or other noncovalent derivative (such as a complex, chelate, or clathrate) of the molecule... Administration. New chemical entity means a drug that contains no active moiety that has been approved by FDA in...) application. (1) (2) If a drug product that contains a new chemical entity was approved after September...

  12. 21 CFR 314.108 - New drug product exclusivity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... coordination bonds), or other noncovalent derivative (such as a complex, chelate, or clathrate) of the molecule... Administration. New chemical entity means a drug that contains no active moiety that has been approved by FDA in...) application. (1) (2) If a drug product that contains a new chemical entity was approved after September...

  13. 21 CFR 314.108 - New drug product exclusivity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... coordination bonds), or other noncovalent derivative (such as a complex, chelate, or clathrate) of the molecule... Administration. New chemical entity means a drug that contains no active moiety that has been approved by FDA in...) application. (1) (2) If a drug product that contains a new chemical entity was approved after September...

  14. 21 CFR 341.76 - Labeling of bronchodilator drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., psychiatric, or emotional conditions, or Parkinson's disease), or for 2 weeks after stopping the MAOI drug. If....” (2) “Do not use this product if you have heart disease, high blood pressure, thyroid...

  15. Dissecting the taxonomic heterogeneity within Propionibacterium acnes: proposal for Propionibacterium acnes subsp. acnes subsp. nov. and Propionibacterium acnes subsp. elongatum subsp. nov.

    PubMed

    Dekio, Itaru; Culak, Renata; Misra, Raju; Gaulton, Tom; Fang, Min; Sakamoto, Mitsuo; Ohkuma, Moriya; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Rajendram, Dunstan; Gharbia, Saheer E; Shah, Haroun N

    2015-12-01

    Propionibacterium acnes subsp. acnes subsp. nov. and Propionibacterium acnes subsp. elongatum subsp. nov. are described. These emanate from the three known phylotypes of P. acnes, designated types I, II and III. Electron microscopy confirmed the filamentous cell shape of type III, showing a striking difference from types I/II, which were short rods. Biochemical tests indicated that, in types I/II, either the pyruvate, l-pyrrolidonyl arylamidase or d-ribose 2 test was positive, whereas all of these were negative among type III strains. Matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) spectra, which profile mainly their ribosomal proteins, were different between these two groups. Surface-enhanced laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF MS) spectra of all phylotypes revealed a specific protein biomarker that was overexpressed in type III strains compared with types I/II only when grown aerobically. Reference strains had high whole-genome similarity between types I (>91 %) and II (>75 %), but a considerably lower level of 72 % similarity with type III. recA and gyrB sequence dendrograms confirmed the distant relatedness of type III, indicating the presence of two distinct centres of variation within the species P. acnes. On the other hand, cellular fatty acid profiles and 16S rRNA gene sequence relatedness (>99.3 %) circumscribed the species. Thus, we propose two subspecies, Propionibacterium acnes subsp. acnes subsp. nov. for types I/II and Propionibacterium acnes subsp. elongatum subsp. nov. for type III. The type strain of Propionibacterium acnes subsp. acnes is NCTC 737T ( = ATCC 6919T = JCM 6425T = DSM 1897T = CCUG 1794T), while the type strain of Propionibacterium acnes subsp. elongatum is K124T ( = NCTC 13655T = JCM 18919T). PMID:26432704

  16. 21 CFR 216.24 - Drug products withdrawn or removed from the market for reasons of safety or effectiveness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... Bromfenac sodium: All drug products containing bromfenac sodium. Butamben: All parenteral drug products containing butamben. Camphorated oil: All drug products containing camphorated oil. Carbetapentane citrate: All oral gel drug products containing carbetapentane citrate. Casein, iodinated: All drug...

  17. Downscaling drug nanosuspension production: processing aspects and physicochemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Van Eerdenbrugh, Bernard; Stuyven, Bernard; Froyen, Ludo; Van Humbeeck, Jan; Martens, Johan A; Augustijns, Patrick; Van den Mooter, Guy

    2009-01-01

    In this study, scaling down nanosuspension production to 10 mg of drug compound and evaluation of the nanosuspensions to 1 mg of drug compound per test were investigated. Media milling of seven model drug compounds (cinnarizine-indomethacin-itraconazole-loviride-mebendazole-naproxen-phenytoin) was evaluated in a 96-well plate setup (10, 20, and 30 mg) and a glass-vial-based system in a planetary mill (10, 100, and 1,000 mg). Physicochemical properties evaluated on 1 mg of drug compound were drug content (high-performance liquid chromatography), size [dynamic light scattering (DLS)], morphology (scanning electron microscopy), thermal characteristics (differential scanning calorimetry), and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). Scaling down nanosuspension production to 10 mg of drug compound was feasible for the seven model compounds using both designs, the planetary mill design being more robust. Similar results were obtained for both designs upon milling 10 mg of drug compound. Drug content determination was precise and accurate. DLS was the method of choice for size measurements. Morphology evaluation and thermal analysis were feasible, although sample preparation had a big influence on the results. XRPD in capillary mode was successfully performed, both in the suspended state and after freeze-drying in the capillary. Results obtained for the latter were superior. Both the production and the physicochemical evaluation of nanosuspensions can be successfully downscaled, enabling nanosuspension screening applications in preclinical development settings.

  18. 21 CFR 200.51 - Aqueous-based drug products for oral inhalation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aqueous-based drug products for oral inhalation. 200.51 Section 200.51 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...-based drug products for oral inhalation. (a) All aqueous-based drug products for oral inhalation must...

  19. 21 CFR 200.51 - Aqueous-based drug products for oral inhalation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aqueous-based drug products for oral inhalation. 200.51 Section 200.51 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...-based drug products for oral inhalation. (a) All aqueous-based drug products for oral inhalation must...

  20. 21 CFR 200.51 - Aqueous-based drug products for oral inhalation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aqueous-based drug products for oral inhalation. 200.51 Section 200.51 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...-based drug products for oral inhalation. (a) All aqueous-based drug products for oral inhalation must...

  1. 21 CFR 200.51 - Aqueous-based drug products for oral inhalation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aqueous-based drug products for oral inhalation. 200.51 Section 200.51 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...-based drug products for oral inhalation. (a) All aqueous-based drug products for oral inhalation must...

  2. 21 CFR 201.312 - Magnesium sulfate heptahydrate; label declaration on drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate heptahydrate; label declaration on drug products. 201.312 Section 201.312 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Drug Products § 201.312 Magnesium sulfate heptahydrate; label declaration on drug products....

  3. 21 CFR 201.312 - Magnesium sulfate heptahydrate; label declaration on drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate heptahydrate; label declaration on drug products. 201.312 Section 201.312 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Drug Products § 201.312 Magnesium sulfate heptahydrate; label declaration on drug products....

  4. 21 CFR 201.312 - Magnesium sulfate heptahydrate; label declaration on drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate heptahydrate; label declaration on drug products. 201.312 Section 201.312 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Drug Products § 201.312 Magnesium sulfate heptahydrate; label declaration on drug products....

  5. 21 CFR 201.312 - Magnesium sulfate heptahydrate; label declaration on drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate heptahydrate; label declaration on drug products. 201.312 Section 201.312 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Drug Products § 201.312 Magnesium sulfate heptahydrate; label declaration on drug products....

  6. 21 CFR 201.312 - Magnesium sulfate heptahydrate; label declaration on drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate heptahydrate; label declaration on drug products. 201.312 Section 201.312 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Drug Products § 201.312 Magnesium sulfate heptahydrate; label declaration on drug products....

  7. Using Nonexperts for Annotating Pharmacokinetic Drug-Drug Interaction Mentions in Product Labeling: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Yifan; Hernandez, Andres; Horn, John R; Jacobson, Rebecca; Boyce, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    Background Because vital details of potential pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions are often described in free-text structured product labels, manual curation is a necessary but expensive step in the development of electronic drug-drug interaction information resources. The use of nonexperts to annotate potential drug-drug interaction (PDDI) mentions in drug product label annotation may be a means of lessening the burden of manual curation. Objective Our goal was to explore the practicality of using nonexpert participants to annotate drug-drug interaction descriptions from structured product labels. By presenting annotation tasks to both pharmacy experts and relatively naïve participants, we hoped to demonstrate the feasibility of using nonexpert annotators for drug-drug information annotation. We were also interested in exploring whether and to what extent natural language processing (NLP) preannotation helped improve task completion time, accuracy, and subjective satisfaction. Methods Two experts and 4 nonexperts were asked to annotate 208 structured product label sections under 4 conditions completed sequentially: (1) no NLP assistance, (2) preannotation of drug mentions, (3) preannotation of drug mentions and PDDIs, and (4) a repeat of the no-annotation condition. Results were evaluated within the 2 groups and relative to an existing gold standard. Participants were asked to provide reports on the time required to complete tasks and their perceptions of task difficulty. Results One of the experts and 3 of the nonexperts completed all tasks. Annotation results from the nonexpert group were relatively strong in every scenario and better than the performance of the NLP pipeline. The expert and 2 of the nonexperts were able to complete most tasks in less than 3 hours. Usability perceptions were generally positive (3.67 for expert, mean of 3.33 for nonexperts). Conclusions The results suggest that nonexpert annotation might be a feasible option for comprehensive

  8. Nano-sized crystalline drug production by milling technology.

    PubMed

    Moribe, Kunikazu; Ueda, Keisuke; Limwikrant, Waree; Higashi, Kenjirou; Yamamoto, Keiji

    2013-01-01

    Nano-formulation of poorly water-soluble drugs has been developed to enhance drug dissolution. In this review, we introduce nano-milling technology described in recently published papers. Factors affecting the size of drug crystals are compared based on the preparation methods and drug and excipient types. A top-down approach using the comminution process is a method conventionally used to prepare crystalline drug nanoparticles. Wet milling using media is well studied and several wet-milled drug formulations are now on the market. Several trials on drug nanosuspension preparation using different apparatuses, materials, and conditions have been reported. Wet milling using a high-pressure homogenizer is another alternative to preparing production-scale drug nanosuspensions. Dry milling is a simple method of preparing a solid-state drug nano-formulation. The effect of size on the dissolution of a drug from nanoparticles is an area of fundamental research, but it is sometimes incorrectly evaluated. Here, we discuss evaluation procedures and the associated problems. Lastly, the importance of quality control, process optimization, and physicochemical characterization are briefly discussed.

  9. Benzoyl peroxide lotion (20 percent) in acne.

    PubMed

    Smith, E B; Padilla, R S; McCabe, J M; Becker, L E

    1980-01-01

    A double-blind, controlled study was performed to determine the effectiveness of 20 percent benzoyl peroxide lotion in the mangement of mild to moderate acne vulgaris. The results of our study have shown that this new, higher concentration formulation of benzoyl peroxide is effective in reducing the lesions of acne and is relatively nonirritating.

  10. [Hormonal factors in etiology of common acne].

    PubMed

    Bergler-Czop, Beata; Brzezińska-Wcisło, Ligia

    2004-05-01

    Common acne is steatorrhoeic chronic disease, to which specific is, among others, the presence of blackheads, papulopustular eruptions, purulent cysts and cicatrices. Such hormonal factors belong to elements inherent in etiology of the affection. Sebaceous glands have cell receptors on their surface for androgens. In etiopathogenesis of common/simple acne, a decisive role is played by a derivative of testosterone, i.e. 5-alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT). However, some experts are of opinion that there is no correlation between the increased intensity of common acne and other symptoms of hyperandrogenism. Numerous authors assume, however, that common acne-affected patients may be sometimes subjected to intense reactions caused by sebaceous glands against physiological androgens concentrations. Naturally, estrogens can inhibit release of such androgens. Under physiological conditions, natural progesterone does not conduct to intensification of the seborrhea, but the activity of sebum secretion may be triggered off by its synthetic counterparts. Hormonal etiology can be very distinctly visible in the steroid, androgenic, premenstrual, menopausal acne, as well as in juvenile acne and acne neonatorum. In case of females affected by acne, hormonal therapy should be persistently supported and consulted with dermatologists, endocrinologists and gynecologists. Antiandrogenic preparations are applied, such as: cyproterone acetate concurrently administered with estrogens and, as well as not so frequently with chlormadinone acetate (independently or during estrogenic therapy). PMID:15518435

  11. Stability profiles of drug products extended beyond labeled expiration dates.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Robbe C; Taylor, Jeb S; Porter, Donna A; Prasanna, Hullahalli R; Hussain, Ajaz S

    2006-07-01

    The American Medical Association has questioned whether expiration dating markedly underestimates the actual shelf life of drug products. Results from the shelf life extension program (SLEP) have been evaluated to provide extensive data to address this issue. The SLEP has been administered by the Food and Drug Administration for the United States Department of Defense (DOD) for 20 years. This program probably contains the most extensive source of pharmaceutical stability data extant. This report summarizes extended stability profiles for 122 different drug products (3,005 different lots). The drug products were categorized into five groups based on incidence of initial extension failures and termination failures (extended lot eventually failed upon re-testing). Based on testing and stability assessment, 88% of the lots were extended at least 1 year beyond their original expiration date for an average extension of 66 months, but the additional stability period was highly variable. The SLEP data supports the assertion that many drug products, if properly stored, can be extended past the expiration date. Due to the lot-to-lot variability, the stability and quality of extended drug products can only be assured by periodic testing and systematic evaluation of each lot. PMID:16721796

  12. Lessons from innovation in drug-device combination products.

    PubMed

    Couto, Daniela S; Perez-Breva, Luis; Saraiva, Pedro; Cooney, Charles L

    2012-01-01

    Drug-device combination products introduced a new dynamic on medical product development, regulatory approval, and corporate interaction that provide valuable lessons for the development of new generations of combination products. This paper examines the case studies of drug-eluting stents and transdermal patches to facilitate a detailed understanding of the challenges and opportunities introduced by combination products when compared to previous generations of traditional medical or drug delivery devices. Our analysis indicates that the largest barrier to introduce a new kind of combination products is the determination of the regulatory center that is to oversee its approval. The first product of a new class of combination products offers a learning opportunity for the regulator and the sponsor. Once that first product is approved, the leading regulatory center is determined, and the uncertainty about the entire class of combination products is drastically reduced. The sponsor pioneering a new class of combination products assumes a central role in reducing this uncertainty by advising the decision on the primary function of the combination product. Our analysis also suggests that this decision influences the nature (pharmaceutical, biotechnology, or medical devices) of the companies that will lead the introduction of these products into the market, and guide the structure of corporate interaction thereon.

  13. Lessons from innovation in drug-device combination products.

    PubMed

    Couto, Daniela S; Perez-Breva, Luis; Saraiva, Pedro; Cooney, Charles L

    2012-01-01

    Drug-device combination products introduced a new dynamic on medical product development, regulatory approval, and corporate interaction that provide valuable lessons for the development of new generations of combination products. This paper examines the case studies of drug-eluting stents and transdermal patches to facilitate a detailed understanding of the challenges and opportunities introduced by combination products when compared to previous generations of traditional medical or drug delivery devices. Our analysis indicates that the largest barrier to introduce a new kind of combination products is the determination of the regulatory center that is to oversee its approval. The first product of a new class of combination products offers a learning opportunity for the regulator and the sponsor. Once that first product is approved, the leading regulatory center is determined, and the uncertainty about the entire class of combination products is drastically reduced. The sponsor pioneering a new class of combination products assumes a central role in reducing this uncertainty by advising the decision on the primary function of the combination product. Our analysis also suggests that this decision influences the nature (pharmaceutical, biotechnology, or medical devices) of the companies that will lead the introduction of these products into the market, and guide the structure of corporate interaction thereon. PMID:22200650

  14. 21 CFR 310.509 - Parenteral drug products in plastic containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Parenteral drug products in plastic containers... Parenteral drug products in plastic containers. (a) Any parenteral drug product packaged in a plastic... parenteral drug product for intravenous use in humans that is packaged in a plastic immediate container on...

  15. 21 CFR 310.509 - Parenteral drug products in plastic containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Parenteral drug products in plastic containers... Parenteral drug products in plastic containers. (a) Any parenteral drug product packaged in a plastic... parenteral drug product for intravenous use in humans that is packaged in a plastic immediate container on...

  16. 21 CFR 310.509 - Parenteral drug products in plastic containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Parenteral drug products in plastic containers... Parenteral drug products in plastic containers. (a) Any parenteral drug product packaged in a plastic... parenteral drug product for intravenous use in humans that is packaged in a plastic immediate container on...

  17. 21 CFR 310.509 - Parenteral drug products in plastic containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Parenteral drug products in plastic containers... Parenteral drug products in plastic containers. (a) Any parenteral drug product packaged in a plastic... parenteral drug product for intravenous use in humans that is packaged in a plastic immediate container on...

  18. A Historical Overview of Natural Products in Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Daniel A.; Urban, Sylvia; Roessner, Ute

    2012-01-01

    Historically, natural products have been used since ancient times and in folklore for the treatment of many diseases and illnesses. Classical natural product chemistry methodologies enabled a vast array of bioactive secondary metabolites from terrestrial and marine sources to be discovered. Many of these natural products have gone on to become current drug candidates. This brief review aims to highlight historically significant bioactive marine and terrestrial natural products, their use in folklore and dereplication techniques to rapidly facilitate their discovery. Furthermore a discussion of how natural product chemistry has resulted in the identification of many drug candidates; the application of advanced hyphenated spectroscopic techniques to aid in their discovery, the future of natural product chemistry and finally adopting metabolomic profiling and dereplication approaches for the comprehensive study of natural product extracts will be discussed. PMID:24957513

  19. Hepatitis B, interferon, and acne fulminans in a young girl.

    PubMed

    Arora, Sandeep; Malik, Ajay; Kumar, Dharmendra; Sodhi, Neha

    2016-01-01

    Acne fulminans (AF) is a very rare severe form of acne seen in young males, characterized by a sudden and explosive onset of hemorrhagic pustules and ulceration on the trunk, systemic features in the form of fever, polyarthropathy, malaise, erythema nodosum and painful osteolytic bone involvement with leukocytosis, and an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Conventional treatment of AF includes corticosteroids or immunosuppressive agents for the initial phase followed by isotretinoin. Active hepatitis B infection with a high viral load precludes the administration of any immunosuppressive drugs. We present the case of an 18-year-old girl with a history of occasional acne who presented with AF of sudden onset following administration of interferon-alpha-2a for her recently detected hepatitis B infection. Management of hepatitis B was withheld in view of her general condition. The patient was managed with low dose isotretinoin with subsidence of lesions. AF in a young female precipitated by interferon and its management with isotretinoin in the presence of active hepatitis B infection make the case unique. PMID:27057488

  20. Minocycline in the treatment of acne: latest findings.

    PubMed

    Maffeis, L; Veraldi, S

    2010-06-01

    Minocycline is a semi-synthetic tetracycline antibiotic effective against a wide range of aerobic and anaerobic Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. It is highly active in the pilosebaceous complex, due to its great lipophilicity, and therefore it has been used in the treatment of moderate to severe papulo-pustular acne for a long time. It has an optimal therapeutic range and the percentage of P. acnes resistant strains are still inferior to 5%. Besides the antimicrobial activity, minocycline has an anti-inflammatory action, due to the reduction in neutrophilic chemotaxis, the inhibitory effect on pro-inflammatory cytokines, and the reduction in sebum free fatty acids and bacterial lipases. In 2006 the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a new extended-release formulation of minocycline. This formulation allowed the reduction of some dose-related adverse events, such as those affecting the vestibular system. Besides the dose-related events (nausea, vomiting, and dizziness), minocycline is also known to induce hyperpigmentation, even if less frequently than doxycycline, and is rarely responsible for autoimmune disorders, hypersensitivity reactions, and serum sickness-like reactions. The latest guidelines in the treatment of acne recommend a dose of 50-100 mg, once or twice a daily for the non-modified release minocycline, and 1 mg/kg daily for the new extended-release formulation. This agent is most appropriately used in combination with a topical regimen containing benzoyl peroxide and/or retinoid.

  1. Hepatitis B, interferon, and acne fulminans in a young girl.

    PubMed

    Arora, Sandeep; Malik, Ajay; Kumar, Dharmendra; Sodhi, Neha

    2016-01-01

    Acne fulminans (AF) is a very rare severe form of acne seen in young males, characterized by a sudden and explosive onset of hemorrhagic pustules and ulceration on the trunk, systemic features in the form of fever, polyarthropathy, malaise, erythema nodosum and painful osteolytic bone involvement with leukocytosis, and an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Conventional treatment of AF includes corticosteroids or immunosuppressive agents for the initial phase followed by isotretinoin. Active hepatitis B infection with a high viral load precludes the administration of any immunosuppressive drugs. We present the case of an 18-year-old girl with a history of occasional acne who presented with AF of sudden onset following administration of interferon-alpha-2a for her recently detected hepatitis B infection. Management of hepatitis B was withheld in view of her general condition. The patient was managed with low dose isotretinoin with subsidence of lesions. AF in a young female precipitated by interferon and its management with isotretinoin in the presence of active hepatitis B infection make the case unique.

  2. Hepatitis B, interferon, and acne fulminans in a young girl

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Sandeep; Malik, Ajay; Kumar, Dharmendra; Sodhi, Neha

    2016-01-01

    Acne fulminans (AF) is a very rare severe form of acne seen in young males, characterized by a sudden and explosive onset of hemorrhagic pustules and ulceration on the trunk, systemic features in the form of fever, polyarthropathy, malaise, erythema nodosum and painful osteolytic bone involvement with leukocytosis, and an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Conventional treatment of AF includes corticosteroids or immunosuppressive agents for the initial phase followed by isotretinoin. Active hepatitis B infection with a high viral load precludes the administration of any immunosuppressive drugs. We present the case of an 18-year-old girl with a history of occasional acne who presented with AF of sudden onset following administration of interferon-alpha-2a for her recently detected hepatitis B infection. Management of hepatitis B was withheld in view of her general condition. The patient was managed with low dose isotretinoin with subsidence of lesions. AF in a young female precipitated by interferon and its management with isotretinoin in the presence of active hepatitis B infection make the case unique. PMID:27057488

  3. Overpromotion of drugs in international product package inserts.

    PubMed

    Osifo, N G

    1983-01-01

    A study of the drug-labelling information contained in international product package inserts (PPIs) available in Nigeria in comparison with similar information in the United States Physicians' Desk Reference (PDR) was undertaken, against a background of recently-improved drug control regulations in Nigeria. The findings indicate that most multinational pharmaceutical firms, especially through their affiliates and subsidiaries, overpromote their drugs for extra indications and with mention of fewer hazards in the PPIs, than in the PDR. For some drugs with known, medically-stringent indications or low therapeutic indices, a few drug companies appeared to exert discretional restraint on overpromotion by providing the same content of information in the PPIs as in the PDR. The present study suggests that merely intending a better drug control with more sophisticated regulations which are not enforced may not cure the exploitative attitude of multinational drug companies and their subsidiaries or affiliates, in overpromoting pharmaceutical products through PPIs destined for countries with a literally free drug market.

  4. NATURAL PRODUCTS: A CONTINUING SOURCE OF NOVEL DRUG LEADS

    PubMed Central

    Cragg, Gordon M.; Newman, David J.

    2013-01-01

    1. Background Nature has been a source of medicinal products for millennia, with many useful drugs developed from plant sources. Following discovery of the penicillins, drug discovery from microbial sources occurred and diving techniques in the 1970s opened the seas. Combinatorial chemistry (late 1980s), shifted the focus of drug discovery efforts from Nature to the laboratory bench. 2. Scope of Review This review traces natural products drug discovery, outlining important drugs from natural sources that revolutionized treatment of serious diseases. It is clear Nature will continue to be a major source of new structural leads, and effective drug development depends on multidisciplinary collaborations. 3. Major Conclusions The explosion of genetic information led not only to novel screens, but the genetic techniques permitted the implementation of combinatorial biosynthetic technology and genome mining. The knowledge gained has allowed unknown molecules to be identified. These novel bioactive structures can be optimized by using combinatorial chemistry generating new drug candidates for many diseases. 4 General Significance: The advent of genetic techniques that permitted the isolation / expression of biosynthetic cassettes from microbes may well be the new frontier for natural products lead discovery. It is now apparent that biodiversity may be much greater in those organisms. The numbers of potential species involved in the microbial world are many orders of magnitude greater than those of plants and multi-celled animals. Coupling these numbers to the number of currently unexpressed biosynthetic clusters now identified (>10 per species) the potential of microbial diversity remains essentially untapped. PMID:23428572

  5. Curcumin attenuated acute Propionibacterium acnes-induced liver injury through inhibition of HMGB1 expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Gu, Qiaoli; Guan, Honggeng; Shi, Qin; Zhang, Yanyun; Yang, Huilin

    2015-02-01

    Curcumin is a phenolic product isolated from the rhizome of Curcuma longa and has protective effects on inflammatory diseases. Here we investigated the protective effect of curcumin in acute Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes)-induced inflammatory liver injury. C57BL/6 mice were primed with P. acnes followed by LPS challenge to induce fulminant hepatitis. Curcumin or vehicle control was administered perorally by gavage once daily starting 2days before P. acnes priming. We found that curcumin significantly improved mouse mortality. Then, to investigate the underlying mechanisms of curcumin in this acute inflammatory liver injury model, we primed C57BL/6 mice with P. acnes only. We found that curcumin treatment attenuated P. acnes-induced liver injury as evidenced by decreased production of ALT. In addition, curcumin treatment reduced the production of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IFN-γ, accompanied by reduced hepatocyte apoptosis. Furthermore, curcumin treatment significantly reduced HMGB1 cytoplasmic translocation and expression by down-regulating acetylation of lysine. Taken together, our results suggest that curcumin protects mice from P. acnes-induced liver injury through reduction of HMGB1 cytoplasmic translocation and expression.

  6. 21 CFR 1310.11 - Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 1310.11 Section 1310.11 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE RECORDS AND REPORTS OF LISTED CHEMICALS AND CERTAIN MACHINES §...

  7. 21 CFR 1310.11 - Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 1310.11 Section 1310.11 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE RECORDS AND REPORTS OF LISTED CHEMICALS AND CERTAIN MACHINES §...

  8. 21 CFR 1310.11 - Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 1310.11 Section 1310.11 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE RECORDS AND REPORTS OF LISTED CHEMICALS AND CERTAIN MACHINES §...

  9. 75 FR 65565 - Animal Drugs, Feeds, and Related Products; Withdrawal of Approval of New Animal Drug Applications...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts 520, 556, and 558 Animal Drugs, Feeds, and Related Products; Withdrawal of Approval of New Animal Drug Applications; Aklomide; Levamisole...: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending the animal drug regulations by removing...

  10. Insulin resistance in severe acne vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Cengiz, Fatma Pelin; Kemeriz, Funda

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Acne vulgaris is a pilosebaceous gland disease that usually affects people from puberty to young adulthood. It is seen especially on the face, neck, trunk and arms. Its severity differs from patient to patient and its pathogenesis is multifactorial. The main pathogenic factors of acne are high sebaceous gland secretion, follicular hyperproliferation, high androgen effects, propionibacterium acnes colonization and inflammation. Diet is always thought a probable reason for acne and many studies are done about acne and diet. Aim To determine the effect of insulin resistance in severe acne vulgaris. Material and methods Two hundred and forty-three acne vulgaris patients and 156 healthy controls were enrolled into the study. The blood levels of insulin and glucose were measured. Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA) Index was calculated. The values were compared with the control group. Results All of the patients were in the severe acne group according to their scores on the global acne scoring scale. While fasting blood glucose levels were not different between the groups (p > 0.05, 82.91 ±9.76 vs. 80.26 ±8.33), the fasting insulin levels were significantly higher in the patient group than in the control group (p < 0.001, 14.01 ±11.94 vs. 9.12 ±3.53). Additionally, there was a highly significant difference between the patient and control groups in terms of HOMA values (p < 0.001, 2.87 ±2.56 vs. 1.63 ±0.65). Conclusions These results suggest that insulin resistance may have a role in the pathogenesis of acne. PMID:26366152

  11. New natural products as new leads for antibacterial drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Brown, Dean G; Lister, Troy; May-Dracka, Tricia L

    2014-01-15

    Natural products have been a rich source of antibacterial drugs for many decades, but investments in this area have declined over the past two decades. The purpose of this review article is to provide a recent survey of new natural product classes and the mechanisms by which they work. PMID:24388805

  12. A look at emerging delivery systems for topical drug products.

    PubMed

    Fireman, Sharon; Toledano, Ofer; Neimann, Karine; Loboda, Natalia; Dayan, Nava

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of new topical drugs based on new chemical entities has become a rare event. Instead, pharmaceutical companies have been focused on reformulating existing drugs resulting in an ever-growing number of topical drug products for every approved drug substance. In light of this trend, soon reformulations may not be as rewarding to their sponsors as they are today unless they offer a substantial improvement over other formulations of the same drug substance and the same indication, namely improved efficacy over existing drugs, reduced side effects, unique drug combinations, or applicability for new indications. This article reviews and compares topical drug delivery systems currently under active research that are designed to offer such advantages in the coming years. The reviewed delivery systems are: liposomes, niosomes, transferosomes, ethosomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructured lipid carriers, cyclodextrin, and sol-gel microcapsules. Among all the topical drug delivery systems currently undergoing active research, only the sol-gel microencapsulation is at clinical stages. PMID:22353154

  13. 21 CFR 216.24 - Drug products withdrawn or removed from the market for reasons of safety or effectiveness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... fenfluramine hydrochloride. Flosequinan: All drug products containing flosequinan. Gelatin: All intravenous drug products containing gelatin. Glycerol, iodinated: All drug products containing iodinated...

  14. 21 CFR 216.24 - Drug products withdrawn or removed from the market for reasons of safety or effectiveness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... fenfluramine hydrochloride. Flosequinan: All drug products containing flosequinan. Gelatin: All intravenous drug products containing gelatin. Glycerol, iodinated: All drug products containing iodinated...

  15. The effect of globalization of drug manufacturing, production, and sourcing and challenges for American drug safety.

    PubMed

    Woo, J; Wolfgang, S; Batista, H

    2008-03-01

    Americans benefit from one of the safest drug supplies and one of the highest standards of consumer protection in the world. Over the past decade, though, a general trend toward globalization of the supply chains for finished pharmaceutical products and active pharmaceutical ingredients has created new challenges for the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in ensuring the safety and quality of the drug supply. Explosive growth in pharmaceutical manufacturing for the US market is particularly evident in the developing regions of Asia. Manufacturing sites in China and India now comprise approximately 40% of all FDA-registered foreign sites, having increased from 30% in 2002. (In 2001, when legislation first went into effect requiring registration of all foreign drug manufacturing sites, 140 registered sites in China listed 797 drug items for potential importation; as of 1 October 2007, that number had grown to 815 registered sites and well over 3,000 listed items.) In total in 2006, the United States received >145,000 line entries of imported drug products from >160 countries, up from only 1,300 line entries in 2000. FDA regulatory oversight resources (e.g., those allocated to inspection and testing of imports) are being challenged to keep up with the explosive growth of imported drugs. (In 2006, the FDA performed inspections at 212 foreign drug firms. This number has remained relatively consistent over the past 6 years, starting at 249 in 2001 and ranging from 190 to 260 on an annual basis.)

  16. Cell culture media impact on drug product solution stability.

    PubMed

    Purdie, Jennifer L; Kowle, Ronald L; Langland, Amie L; Patel, Chetan N; Ouyang, Anli; Olson, Donald J

    2016-07-01

    To enable subcutaneous administration of monoclonal antibodies, drug product solutions are often needed at high concentrations. A significant risk associated with high drug product concentrations is an increase in aggregate level over the shelf-life dating period. While much work has been done to understand the impact of drug product formulation on aggregation, there is limited understanding of the link between cell culture process conditions and soluble aggregate growth in drug product. During cell culture process development, soluble aggregates are often measured at harvest using cell-free material purified by Protein A chromatography. In the work reported here, cell culture media components were evaluated with respect to their impact on aggregate levels in high concentration solution drug product during accelerated stability studies. Two components, cysteine and ferric ammonium citrate, were found to impact aggregate growth rates in our current media (version 1) leading to the development of new chemically defined media and concentrated feed formulations. The new version of media and associated concentrated feeds (version 2) were evaluated across four cell lines producing recombinant IgG4 monoclonal antibodies and a bispecific antibody. In all four cell lines, the version 2 media reduced aggregate growth over the course of a 12 week accelerated stability study compared with the version 1 media, although the degree to which aggregate growth decreased was cell line dependent. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:998-1008, 2016.

  17. 21 CFR 333.150 - Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products... First Aid Antibiotic Drug Products § 333.150 Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products. (a... identifies the product as a “first aid antibiotic.” (b) Indications. The labeling of the product...

  18. 21 CFR 333.150 - Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products... First Aid Antibiotic Drug Products § 333.150 Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products. (a... identifies the product as a “first aid antibiotic.” (b) Indications. The labeling of the product...

  19. 21 CFR 333.150 - Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products... First Aid Antibiotic Drug Products § 333.150 Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products. (a... identifies the product as a “first aid antibiotic.” (b) Indications. The labeling of the product...

  20. 21 CFR 333.150 - Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products... First Aid Antibiotic Drug Products § 333.150 Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products. (a... identifies the product as a “first aid antibiotic.” (b) Indications. The labeling of the product...

  1. 21 CFR 333.150 - Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products... First Aid Antibiotic Drug Products § 333.150 Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products. (a... identifies the product as a “first aid antibiotic.” (b) Indications. The labeling of the product...

  2. Marine Natural Products: A Way to New Drugs

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The investigation of marine natural products (low molecular weight bioregulators) is a rapidly developing scientific field at the intersection of biology and chemistry. Investigations aimed at detecting, identifying, and understanding the structure of marine natural products have led to the discovery of 20,000 new substances, including those characterized by an extremely high physiological activity. Some results and prospects of works aimed at creating new drugs on the basis of marine natural products are discussed herein. PMID:22649599

  3. 21 CFR 333.250 - Labeling of antifungal drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE TOPICAL ANTIMICROBIAL DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Topical... labeled for the treatment of athlete's foot, jock itch, and ringworm. (i) (Select one of the following: “Treats,” “For the treatment of,” “For effective treatment of,” “Cures,” “For the cure of,” “Clears...

  4. Overcome Cancer Cell Drug Resistance Using Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pu; Yang, Hua Li; Yang, Ying Juan; Wang, Lan; Lee, Shao Chin

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy is one of the major treatment methods for cancer. However, failure in chemotherapy is not uncommon, mainly due to dose-limiting toxicity associated with drug resistance. Management of drug resistance is important towards successful chemotherapy. There are many reports in the Chinese literature that natural products can overcome cancer cell drug resistance, which deserve sharing with scientific and industrial communities. We summarized the reports into four categories: (1) in vitro studies using cell line models; (2) serum pharmacology; (3) in vivo studies using animal models; and (4) clinical studies. Fourteen single compounds were reported to have antidrug resistance activity for the first time. In vitro, compounds were able to overcome drug resistance at nontoxic or subtoxic concentrations, in a dose-dependent manner, by inhibiting drug transporters, cell detoxification capacity, or cell apoptosis sensitivity. Studies in vivo showed that single compounds, herbal extract, and formulas had potent antidrug resistance activities. Importantly, many single compounds, herbal extracts, and formulas have been used clinically to treat various diseases including cancer. The review provides comprehensive data on use of natural compounds to overcome cancer cell drug resistance in China, which may facilitate the therapeutic development of natural products for clinical management of cancer drug resistance. PMID:26421052

  5. 21 CFR 212.110 - How must I maintain records of my production of PET drugs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... PET drugs? 212.110 Section 212.110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY DRUGS Records § 212.110 How must I maintain records of my production of PET drugs? (a) Record availability. Records must be maintained at the PET drug production facility or another...

  6. 21 CFR 212.110 - How must I maintain records of my production of PET drugs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... PET drugs? 212.110 Section 212.110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... of PET drugs? (a) Record availability. Records must be maintained at the PET drug production facility... from the date of final release, including conditional final release, of a PET drug product....

  7. 21 CFR 355.70 - Testing procedures for fluoride dentifrice drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Testing procedures for fluoride dentifrice drug products. 355.70 Section 355.70 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE ANTICARIES DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE...

  8. 21 CFR 355.70 - Testing procedures for fluoride dentifrice drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Testing procedures for fluoride dentifrice drug products. 355.70 Section 355.70 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE ANTICARIES DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE...

  9. 21 CFR 350.60 - Guidelines for effectiveness testing of antiperspirant drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Guidelines for effectiveness testing of antiperspirant drug products. 350.60 Section 350.60 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE ANTIPERSPIRANT DRUG PRODUCTS FOR...

  10. 21 CFR 350.60 - Guidelines for effectiveness testing of antiperspirant drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Guidelines for effectiveness testing of antiperspirant drug products. 350.60 Section 350.60 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE ANTIPERSPIRANT DRUG PRODUCTS FOR...

  11. New Perspectives on Antiacne Plant Drugs: Contribution to Modern Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Narayan Prasad

    2014-01-01

    Acne is a common but serious skin disease, which affects approximately 80% adolescents and young adults in 11–30 age group. 42.5% of men and 50.9% of women continue to suffer from this disease into their twenties. Bacterial resistance is now at the alarming stage due to the irrational use of antibiotics. Hence, search for new lead molecule/bioactive and rational delivery of the existing drug (for better therapeutic effect) to the site of action is the need of the hour. Plants and plant-derived products have been an integral part of health care system since time immemorial. Therefore, plants that are currently used for the treatment of acne and those with a high potential are summarized in the present review. Most active plant extracts, namely, P. granatum, M. alba, A. anomala, and M. aquifolium exhibit minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) in the range of 4–50 µg/mL against P. acnes, while aromatic oils of C. obovoides, C. natsudaidai, C. japonica, and C. nardus possess MICs 0.005–0.6 μL/mL and phytomolecules such as rhodomyrtone, pulsaquinone, hydropulsaquinone, honokiol, magnolol, xanthohumol lupulones, chebulagic acid and rhinacanthin-C show MIC in the range of 0.5–12.5 μg/mL. Novel drug delivery strategies of important plant leads in the treatment of acne have also been discussed. PMID:25147793

  12. [Effective and safe pharmacotherapy of acne vulgaris and treatment of sun-damaged skin].

    PubMed

    Fendrich, Z; Jandová, E; Finsterlová, M

    2000-03-01

    An inevitable condition for the pharmacist is a basic knowledge of dermatological changes which are prominent in acne and solar impairment of the skin to be able to recommend in a qualified manner an effective and safe treatment to the patient. However, sufferers of the more serious forms of acne should always be referred to their general practitioner, or preferentially a dermatologist. Acne vulgaris is an androgen-induced disorder, but three major mechanisms for the development of the disease have been identified: hypertrophy of the sebaceous gland, hyperkatosis of the follicular epithelium, and proliferation of microbial flora, particularly Propionibacterium acnes. The basis of all lesions is the microcomedone which is developed into the ripe comedone. Inflammatory lesions are thought to be due to proliferation of P. acnes. In the selfmedication of common acne, benzoyl peroxide, which in a 5-10% lotion exerts antimicrobial and keratolytic properties, proved to be useful. Patients appreciate a lot its instant effect which is visible after just one day of treatment. Salicylic acid is another effective drug, which, when used on the long-term basis, has comedolytic properties; it reduces the number of microcomedones and counteracts plugging of the follicles. In addition, in healthy young women who take oral contraception, a triphasic combined oral preparations of contraceptives with newer progestins, notably with norgestimmate, which is practically free of androgenic effects, are recommended with advantage for the treatment of moderate acne vulgaris without any adverse effects. Solar impairment of the skin, the so-called solar ageing, is clinically indistinguishable from biological ageing. Changes connected with solar impairment appear mostly in the dermis, where solar elastosis develops, the skin gets drier and wrinkle formation appears. For the treatment, hydroxy acids are recommended, namely salicylic acid, which is very effective, because in combination with a

  13. Polyphenon-60 displays a therapeutic effect on acne by suppression of TLR2 and IL-8 expression via down-regulating the ERK1/2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Jung, Min Kyung; Ha, Soogyeong; Son, Ju-Ah; Song, Ji Hye; Houh, Younkyung; Cho, Eujin; Chun, Ji Hoon; Yoon, Suk Ran; Yang, Yoolhee; Bang, Sa Ik; Kim, Minjung; Park, Hyun Jeong; Cho, Daeho

    2012-10-01

    Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) is a well-known acne-inducing factor which causes inflammatory skin lesions by enhancing cytokine production through toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). Green tea extract catechin has been documented to possess anti-inflammatory effects. However, little is known about the mechanisms involved or any direct effect of green tea catechin on acne. The present study investigated the therapeutic effects and mechanism of polyphenon-60, also known as green tea catechin compound, on acne in vitro and in vivo. In a clinical study using topical polyphenon-60 treatment, acne patients showed symptomatic improvement with decrease in the number of comedos and pustules. To investigate the mechanism underlying the activity of polyphenon-60 in acne therapy, an in vitro study was performed. We found that polyphenon-60 reduced the levels of P. acnes-enhanced TLR2 and interleukin-8 (IL-8) in THP-1 cells, human monocyte cell line and human primary monocytes. Taken together, these data demonstrate that polyphenon-60 has a therapeutic effect on acne by suppressing inflammation, specifically by inhibiting TLR2 expression and IL-8 secretion via down-regulation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) pathway and activator protein-1 (AP-1) pathway.

  14. 21 CFR 338.50 - Labeling of nighttime sleep-aid drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Labeling of nighttime sleep-aid drug products. 338... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE NIGHTTIME SLEEP-AID DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Labeling § 338.50 Labeling of nighttime sleep-aid drug products. (a) Statement of identity. The labeling...

  15. 21 CFR 338.50 - Labeling of nighttime sleep-aid drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling of nighttime sleep-aid drug products. 338... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE NIGHTTIME SLEEP-AID DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Labeling § 338.50 Labeling of nighttime sleep-aid drug products. (a) Statement of identity. The labeling...

  16. 21 CFR 338.50 - Labeling of nighttime sleep-aid drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Labeling of nighttime sleep-aid drug products. 338... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE NIGHTTIME SLEEP-AID DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Labeling § 338.50 Labeling of nighttime sleep-aid drug products. (a) Statement of identity. The labeling...

  17. 21 CFR 338.50 - Labeling of nighttime sleep-aid drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Labeling of nighttime sleep-aid drug products. 338... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE NIGHTTIME SLEEP-AID DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Labeling § 338.50 Labeling of nighttime sleep-aid drug products. (a) Statement of identity. The labeling...

  18. 21 CFR 338.50 - Labeling of nighttime sleep-aid drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Labeling of nighttime sleep-aid drug products. 338... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE NIGHTTIME SLEEP-AID DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Labeling § 338.50 Labeling of nighttime sleep-aid drug products. (a) Statement of identity. The labeling...

  19. Transitional Forms of Corynebacterium acnes in Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zierdt, C. H.; Wertlake, P. T.

    1969-01-01

    A clear-cut triad of sequential Corynebacterium acnes transitional forms from disease has been discovered. This entity includes three major forms which are capable of stabilization in culture, the spherical, the intermediate, and the definitive C. acnes. During conversion or reversion among the three forms, a variety of forms with mixed characteristics was observed. The spherical form was gram-negative and osmotically fragile, but it possessed a vestigial cell wall and mesosomes which excluded it from the L forms. In lieu of the L-form designation, the term “transitional” was adopted for all forms leading up to the definitive C. acnes. Culture of the spherical form was successful only on Mycoplasma-type media. The intermediate form was gram-negative, had mixed spherical and filamentous morphology, and bore a striking resemblance to Streptobacillus moniliformis. Like the spherical form, it was nutritionally exacting. The definitive form of C. acnes was preceded by gram-positive transitional forms of C. acnes morphology. It lacked, however, the carbohydrases and proteinases of C. acnes and susceptibility to C. acnes bacteriophages. Reversion was often blocked at this stage. A series of blood cultures from a patient with endocarditis was studied. Postmortem stain sections of the heart-valve lesion included intracellular masses of gram-negative spherical organisms. Indirect fluorescent antibody staining of these masses was strongly positive with antiserum to the spherical form and weakly positive with antiserum to the intermediate form. Images PMID:4886295

  20. [Trade-offs in oral drug product development].

    PubMed

    Kondo, Hiromu; Sako, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Drug products are developed to meet multiple targets, thereby increasing their value. Pharmaceutical scientists encounter several trade-offs during the development of novel oral formulations. These trade-offs are generated by their desire to supply the highest possible quality products under the prevailing conditions of limited time and cost, and feasible options. When there are two incompatible factors, it is sometimes difficult to dismiss one element. This is because a quality target product profile (QTPP) is critical for each product being developed, and all elements should basically be satisfied with the criteria. Therefore, technological innovation becomes important to overcome the trade-offs. This article introduces examples of such innovations which have been successful in doing this, as well as some encountered in the oral formulation development and in the selection of proper dosage forms. Based on these examples, points to be considered in order to produce the drug product are thoroughly discussed. PMID:25747218

  1. Acne image analysis: lesion localization and classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abas, Fazly Salleh; Kaffenberger, Benjamin; Bikowski, Joseph; Gurcan, Metin N.

    2016-03-01

    Acne is a common skin condition present predominantly in the adolescent population, but may continue into adulthood. Scarring occurs commonly as a sequel to severe inflammatory acne. The presence of acne and resultant scars are more than cosmetic, with a significant potential to alter quality of life and even job prospects. The psychosocial effects of acne and scars can be disturbing and may be a risk factor for serious psychological concerns. Treatment efficacy is generally determined based on an invalidated gestalt by the physician and patient. However, the validated assessment of acne can be challenging and time consuming. Acne can be classified into several morphologies including closed comedones (whiteheads), open comedones (blackheads), papules, pustules, cysts (nodules) and scars. For a validated assessment, the different morphologies need to be counted independently, a method that is far too time consuming considering the limited time available for a consultation. However, it is practical to record and analyze images since dermatologists can validate the severity of acne within seconds after uploading an image. This paper covers the processes of region-ofinterest determination using entropy-based filtering and thresholding as well acne lesion feature extraction. Feature extraction methods using discrete wavelet frames and gray-level co-occurence matrix were presented and their effectiveness in separating the six major acne lesion classes were discussed. Several classifiers were used to test the extracted features. Correct classification accuracy as high as 85.5% was achieved using the binary classification tree with fourteen principle components used as descriptors. Further studies are underway to further improve the algorithm performance and validate it on a larger database.

  2. Meeting the Challenges of Acne Treatment in Asian Patients: A Review of the Role of Dermocosmetics as Adjunctive Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Chee Leok; Noppakun, Nopadon; Micali, Giuseppe; Azizan, Noor Zalmy; Boonchai, Waranya; Chan, Yung; Cheong, Wai Kwong; Chiu, Pin Chi; Etnawati, Kristiana; Gulmatico-Flores, Zharlah; Foong, Henry; Kubba, Raj; Paz-Lao, Purita; Lee, Yin Yin; Loo, Steven; Modi, Farida; Nguyen, Trong Hao; Pham, Thi Lan; Shih, Yi Hsien; Sitohang, Irma Bernadette; Wong, Su Ni

    2016-01-01

    Conventional acne treatment presents several challenges such as intolerable side effects and antibiotic resistance. Dermocosmetic products may be used to reduce these unwanted effects. Dermocosmetics include skin cleansers, topical sebum-controllers, skin antimicrobial/anti-inflammatory agents, moisturizers, sunscreens, and camouflage products. Appropriate use of these products may help augment the benefit of acne treatment, minimize side effects, and reduce the need for topical antibiotics. In Asia, there is currently limited scientific data on the application and recommendations for dermocosmetic use in acne vulgaris (AV). This article reviews the evidence on dermocosmetics for AV and provides practice recommendations as discussed during the 4th Asia-Pacific Acne Leaders' Summit held in Bangkok, Thailand, on 7 and 8 February 2015. Through a premeeting survey, a series of plenary lectures, a stepwise program of discussion sessions, and Medline article review, the Expert Panel set forth relevant recommendations on the role of dermocosmetics as adjunct for treating AV in Asian patients. PMID:27398008

  3. Meeting the Challenges of Acne Treatment in Asian Patients: A Review of the Role of Dermocosmetics as Adjunctive Therapy.

    PubMed

    Goh, Chee Leok; Noppakun, Nopadon; Micali, Giuseppe; Azizan, Noor Zalmy; Boonchai, Waranya; Chan, Yung; Cheong, Wai Kwong; Chiu, Pin Chi; Etnawati, Kristiana; Gulmatico-Flores, Zharlah; Foong, Henry; Kubba, Raj; Paz-Lao, Purita; Lee, Yin Yin; Loo, Steven; Modi, Farida; Nguyen, Trong Hao; Pham, Thi Lan; Shih, Yi Hsien; Sitohang, Irma Bernadette; Wong, Su Ni

    2016-01-01

    Conventional acne treatment presents several challenges such as intolerable side effects and antibiotic resistance. Dermocosmetic products may be used to reduce these unwanted effects. Dermocosmetics include skin cleansers, topical sebum-controllers, skin antimicrobial/anti-inflammatory agents, moisturizers, sunscreens, and camouflage products. Appropriate use of these products may help augment the benefit of acne treatment, minimize side effects, and reduce the need for topical antibiotics. In Asia, there is currently limited scientific data on the application and recommendations for dermocosmetic use in acne vulgaris (AV). This article reviews the evidence on dermocosmetics for AV and provides practice recommendations as discussed during the 4(th) Asia-Pacific Acne Leaders' Summit held in Bangkok, Thailand, on 7 and 8 February 2015. Through a premeeting survey, a series of plenary lectures, a stepwise program of discussion sessions, and Medline article review, the Expert Panel set forth relevant recommendations on the role of dermocosmetics as adjunct for treating AV in Asian patients. PMID:27398008

  4. Hormonal treatment of acne vulgaris: an update

    PubMed Central

    Elsaie, Mohamed L

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a common skin condition associated with multiple factors. Although mostly presenting alone, it can likewise present with features of hyperandrogenism and hormonal discrepancies. Of note, hormonal therapies are indicated in severe, resistant-to-treatment cases and in those with monthly flare-ups and when standard therapeutic options are inappropriate. This article serves as an update to hormonal pathogenesis of acne, discusses the basics of endocrinal evaluation for patients with suspected hormonal acne, and provides an overview of the current hormonal treatment options in women. PMID:27621661

  5. [How do I treat acne and rosacea?].

    PubMed

    Böcker, K H

    1986-04-01

    Regarding treatment of acne vulgaris and rosacea, there is not much difference between hospital and practice nor among practicing dermatologists. Most of the assistants performing the important physical-manual treatment have had the same training. After analytical conversation and etiologic as well as diagnostic classification, the patients undergo the following manual treatment: cleansing, astringing, removing of comedones, massage, face pack, and covering with tinted emulsion. At home, acne: cleansing, massage, skin lotion, vitamin A acid, benzoylperoxide, antibacterial therapy; in serious male cases of acne conglobata, Roaccutan. Rosacea: antiseptic (antibiotic) treatment (topically and systemically), metronidazole (Arilin); in serious male cases, Roaccutan.

  6. Hormonal treatment of acne vulgaris: an update

    PubMed Central

    Elsaie, Mohamed L

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a common skin condition associated with multiple factors. Although mostly presenting alone, it can likewise present with features of hyperandrogenism and hormonal discrepancies. Of note, hormonal therapies are indicated in severe, resistant-to-treatment cases and in those with monthly flare-ups and when standard therapeutic options are inappropriate. This article serves as an update to hormonal pathogenesis of acne, discusses the basics of endocrinal evaluation for patients with suspected hormonal acne, and provides an overview of the current hormonal treatment options in women.

  7. Hormonal treatment of acne vulgaris: an update.

    PubMed

    Elsaie, Mohamed L

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a common skin condition associated with multiple factors. Although mostly presenting alone, it can likewise present with features of hyperandrogenism and hormonal discrepancies. Of note, hormonal therapies are indicated in severe, resistant-to-treatment cases and in those with monthly flare-ups and when standard therapeutic options are inappropriate. This article serves as an update to hormonal pathogenesis of acne, discusses the basics of endocrinal evaluation for patients with suspected hormonal acne, and provides an overview of the current hormonal treatment options in women. PMID:27621661

  8. Physical modalities for treating acne and rosacea.

    PubMed

    Jalian, H Ray; Levin, Yakir; Wanner, Molly

    2016-06-01

    Physical modalities provide an important adjunct to medical treatment of acne and rosacea. In patients who cannot tolerate or fail medical treatments, physical modalities offer an alternative approach. For cases of acne scarring, phymatous changes of rosacea, and rosacea-associated telangiectasia, physical modalities such as laser and light treatments represent the treatment of choice. We will review the use of laser and light treatments, photodynamic therapy, and other physical modalities such as targeted therapies for the treatment of acne and rosacea. PMID:27416315

  9. Recreational drug discovery: natural products as lead structures for the synthesis of smart drugs.

    PubMed

    Appendino, Giovanni; Minassi, Alberto; Taglialatela-Scafati, Orazio

    2014-07-01

    Covering: up to December 2013. Over the past decade, there has been a growing transition in recreational drugs from natural materials (marijuana, hashish, opium), natural products (morphine, cocaine), or their simple derivatives (heroin), to synthetic agents more potent than their natural prototypes, which are sometimes less harmful in the short term, or that combine properties from different classes of recreational prototypes. These agents have been named smart drugs, and have become popular both for personal consumption and for collective intoxication at rave parties. The reasons for this transition are varied, but are mainly regulatory and commercial. New analogues of known illegal intoxicants are invisible to most forensic detection techniques, while the alleged natural status and the lack of avert acute toxicity make them appealing to a wide range of users. On the other hand, the advent of the internet has made possible the quick dispersal of information among users and the on-line purchase of these agents and/or the precursors for their synthesis. Unlike their natural products chemotypes (ephedrine, mescaline, cathinone, psilocybin, THC), most new drugs of abuse are largely unfamiliar to the organic chemistry community as well as to health care providers. To raise awareness of the growing plague of smart drugs we have surveyed, in a medicinal chemistry fashion, their development from natural products leads, their current methods of production, and the role that clandestine home laboratories and underground chemists have played in the surge of popularity of these drugs. PMID:24823967

  10. Recreational drug discovery: natural products as lead structures for the synthesis of smart drugs.

    PubMed

    Appendino, Giovanni; Minassi, Alberto; Taglialatela-Scafati, Orazio

    2014-07-01

    Covering: up to December 2013. Over the past decade, there has been a growing transition in recreational drugs from natural materials (marijuana, hashish, opium), natural products (morphine, cocaine), or their simple derivatives (heroin), to synthetic agents more potent than their natural prototypes, which are sometimes less harmful in the short term, or that combine properties from different classes of recreational prototypes. These agents have been named smart drugs, and have become popular both for personal consumption and for collective intoxication at rave parties. The reasons for this transition are varied, but are mainly regulatory and commercial. New analogues of known illegal intoxicants are invisible to most forensic detection techniques, while the alleged natural status and the lack of avert acute toxicity make them appealing to a wide range of users. On the other hand, the advent of the internet has made possible the quick dispersal of information among users and the on-line purchase of these agents and/or the precursors for their synthesis. Unlike their natural products chemotypes (ephedrine, mescaline, cathinone, psilocybin, THC), most new drugs of abuse are largely unfamiliar to the organic chemistry community as well as to health care providers. To raise awareness of the growing plague of smart drugs we have surveyed, in a medicinal chemistry fashion, their development from natural products leads, their current methods of production, and the role that clandestine home laboratories and underground chemists have played in the surge of popularity of these drugs.

  11. Clinical practice guidelines for treatment of acne vulgaris: a critical appraisal using the AGREE II instrument.

    PubMed

    Sanclemente, Gloria; Acosta, Jorge-Luis; Tamayo, Maria-Eulalia; Bonfill, Xavier; Alonso-Coello, Pablo

    2014-04-01

    A significant number of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) about the treatment of acne vulgaris in adolescents and adults have been published worldwide. However, little is known about the quality of CPGs in this field. The aim of this study was to appraise the methodological quality of published acne vulgaris CPGs. We performed a systematic review of published CPGs on acne vulgaris therapy from July 2002 to July 2012. Three reviewers independently assessed each CPG using the AGREE II instrument. A standardized score was calculated for each of the six domains. Our search strategy identified 103 citations but just six met our inclusion criteria. Agreement among reviewers was very good: 0.981. The domains that scored better were: "scope and purpose" and "clarity and presentation". Those that scored worse were "stakeholder involvement", "rigor of development", and "applicability". The European and the Malaysian CPGs were the only recommended with no further modifications. In addition, the Mexican, Colombian and the United States guidelines were recommended with provisos, with lower scores regarding stakeholder involvement, rigor of development and applicability. Only two guidelines clearly reported outcome measures for evaluating efficacy or included quality of life outcomes. CPGs varied regarding the consideration of light/laser therapy or consideration of complementary/alternative medicines. None of them included cost considerations of drugs such as systemic isotretinoin. In conclusion, published acne vulgaris CPGs for acne therapy vary in quality with a clear need to improve their methodological rigor. This could be achieved with the adherence to current CPGs development standards.

  12. 21 CFR 344.52 - Labeling of ear drying aid drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Labeling of ear drying aid drug products. 344.52... Labeling of ear drying aid drug products. (a) Statement of identity. The labeling of the product contains the established name of the drug, if any, and identifies the product as an “ear drying aid.”...

  13. 21 CFR 344.52 - Labeling of ear drying aid drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling of ear drying aid drug products. 344.52... Labeling of ear drying aid drug products. (a) Statement of identity. The labeling of the product contains the established name of the drug, if any, and identifies the product as an “ear drying aid.”...

  14. 21 CFR 357.810 - Active ingredients for deodorant drug products for internal use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Active ingredients for deodorant drug products for... HUMAN USE Deodorant Drug Products for Internal Use § 357.810 Active ingredients for deodorant drug products for internal use. The active ingredient of the product consists of either of the following...

  15. 21 CFR 357.810 - Active ingredients for deodorant drug products for internal use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Active ingredients for deodorant drug products for... HUMAN USE Deodorant Drug Products for Internal Use § 357.810 Active ingredients for deodorant drug products for internal use. The active ingredient of the product consists of either of the following...

  16. 21 CFR 357.810 - Active ingredients for deodorant drug products for internal use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Active ingredients for deodorant drug products for... HUMAN USE Deodorant Drug Products for Internal Use § 357.810 Active ingredients for deodorant drug products for internal use. The active ingredient of the product consists of either of the following...

  17. [Current situation and issues for analyzing illegal drug products].

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Takashi; Takahashi, Kazunaga; Saijo, Masaaki; Fukiwake, Tomohide; Motoki, Yuji

    2013-01-01

    Thirty-two psychotropic substances (31 compounds and one plant) have been controlled as designated substances (Shitei-yakubutsu) in Japan by the Pharmaceutical Affairs Law since April 2007. Although the trafficking of these drugs has decreased because of this regulation, new designer drugs (synthetic cannabinoids and cathinones) have appeared, one after the other. As of October 2011, 40 compounds had been newly added to this category. Analytical methods have become more complicated due to this increase in the number of designated substances. Moreover, many reference substances for such designated substances and other new designer drugs are not commercially available. For the reasons stated above, a lot of time and effort is required to analyze the illegal drug products available on the market. PMID:23292013

  18. Cultural characteristics and fatty acid composition of Corynebacterium acnes.

    PubMed

    Moss, C W; Dowell, V R; Lewis, V J; Schekter, M A

    1967-11-01

    A detailed study of the cultural characteristics and cellular fatty acid composition of 27 isolates of Corynebacterium acnes was performed to establish the properties by which this organism may be identified and characterized. The fatty acids were extracted directly from whole cells and examined as methyl esters by gas-liquid chromatography. Each strain possessed a similar fatty acid profile which was characterized by a large percentage of C15 branched-chain acid. Uniformity in certain biochemical reactions and cultural characteristics was also observed. All strains were catalase-positive, nonmotile, and urease-negative, reduced nitrate, liquefied gelatin, failed to hydrolyze esculin and starch, and gave a positive methyl red test. Glucose, fructose, and glycerol were fermented, but not lactose, salicin, sucrose, maltose, xylose, or arabinose. Production of hydrogen sulfide and indole, fermentation of mannitol, and hemolytic activity were variable characteristics. Two species of the genus Propionibacterium were also tested and found to be similar to C. acnes both in cultural characteristics and fatty acid composition. The results strengthen previous suggestions that C. acnes should be classified in the genus Propionibacterium.

  19. Complementary therapies for acne vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Huijuan; Yang, Guoyan; Wang, Yuyi; Liu, Jian Ping; Smith, Caroline A; Luo, Hui; Liu, Yueming

    2015-01-01

    Background Acne is a chronic skin disease characterised by inflamed spots and blackheads on the face, neck, back, and chest. Cysts and scarring can also occur, especially in more severe disease. People with acne often turn to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), such as herbal medicine, acupuncture, and dietary modifications, because of their concerns about the adverse effects of conventional medicines. However, evidence for CAM therapies has not been systematically assessed. Objectives To assess the effects and safety of any complementary therapies in people with acne vulgaris. Search methods We searched the following databases from inception up to 22 January 2014: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014, Issue 1), MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), PsycINFO (from 1806), AMED (from 1985), CINAHL (from 1981), Scopus (from 1966), and a number of other databases listed in the Methods section of the review. The Cochrane CAM Field Specialised Register was searched up to May 2014. We also searched five trials registers and checked the reference lists of articles for further references to relevant trials. Selection criteria We included parallel-group randomised controlled trials (or the first phase data of randomised cross-over trials) of any kind of CAM, compared with no treatment, placebo, or other active therapies, in people with a diagnosis of acne vulgaris. Data collection and analysis Three authors collected data from each included trial and evaluated the methodological quality independently. They resolved disagreements by discussion and, as needed, arbitration by another author. Main results We included 35 studies, with a total of 3227 participants. We evaluated the majority as having unclear risk of selection, attrition, reporting, detection, and other biases. Because of the clinical heterogeneity between trials and the incomplete data reporting, we could only include four

  20. Making the case for early treatment of acne.

    PubMed

    Zaenglein, Andrea L

    2010-01-01

    Early acne can be defined as the occurrence of acne at its onset, primarily in preteens, or as acne at its earliest severity (ie, mild to moderate). Although the majority of patients with acne are treated by dermatologists, most, particularly mild to moderate cases, could be successfully managed by primary care physicians. Therefore, it is important for physicians to understand the benefits of treating all types of acne, not just the most severe. Awareness of the emotional impact of acne, particularly in adolescence, as well as recognition of possible scarring are important considerations. To achieve optimal results, physicians should be familiar with classification and severity grading of acne. Also, in-depth knowledge of available acne medications will streamline and optimize treatment regimens. Recognizing, treating, and monitoring the progress of early acne may lead to quicker, better clinical outcomes and improved quality of life.

  1. Making the case for early treatment of acne.

    PubMed

    Zaenglein, Andrea L

    2010-01-01

    Early acne can be defined as the occurrence of acne at its onset, primarily in preteens, or as acne at its earliest severity (ie, mild to moderate). Although the majority of patients with acne are treated by dermatologists, most, particularly mild to moderate cases, could be successfully managed by primary care physicians. Therefore, it is important for physicians to understand the benefits of treating all types of acne, not just the most severe. Awareness of the emotional impact of acne, particularly in adolescence, as well as recognition of possible scarring are important considerations. To achieve optimal results, physicians should be familiar with classification and severity grading of acne. Also, in-depth knowledge of available acne medications will streamline and optimize treatment regimens. Recognizing, treating, and monitoring the progress of early acne may lead to quicker, better clinical outcomes and improved quality of life. PMID:19738184

  2. 21 CFR 216.24 - Drug products withdrawn or removed from the market for reasons of safety or effectiveness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... containing metabromsalan. Methamphetamine hydrochloride: All parenteral drug products containing methamphetamine hydrochloride. Methapyrilene: All drug products containing methapyrilene. Methopholine: All...

  3. 21 CFR 216.24 - Drug products withdrawn or removed from the market for reasons of safety or effectiveness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... containing metabromsalan. Methamphetamine hydrochloride: All parenteral drug products containing methamphetamine hydrochloride. Methapyrilene: All drug products containing methapyrilene. Methopholine: All...

  4. Marine natural products: a new wave of drugs?

    PubMed Central

    Montaser, Rana; Luesch, Hendrik

    2011-01-01

    The largely unexplored marine world that presumably harbors the most biodiversity may be the vastest resource to discover novel ‘validated’ structures with novel modes of action that cover biologically relevant chemical space. Several challenges, including the supply problem and target identification, need to be met for successful drug development of these often complex molecules; however, approaches are available to overcome the hurdles. Advances in technologies such as sampling strategies, nanoscale NMR for structure determination, total chemical synthesis, fermentation and biotechnology are all crucial to the success of marine natural products as drug leads. We illustrate the high degree of innovation in the field of marine natural products, which in our view will lead to a new wave of drugs that flow into the market and pharmacies in the future. PMID:21882941

  5. 76 FR 16533 - Animal Drugs, Feeds, and Related Products; Withdrawal of Approval of New Animal Drug Applications...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 558 Animal Drugs, Feeds, and Related Products..., 2010 (75 FR 65565) amending the animal drug regulations. The October 26, 2010, final rule amended the... medicated feed. This correction is being made to improve the accuracy of the animal drug regulations....

  6. 21 CFR 341.76 - Labeling of bronchodilator drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... pharmacist before use if you are” : (i) “ taking prescription drugs for asthma, obesity, weight control...) “ do not take more than directed” (ii) “ adults and children 12 years of age and over: oral dose is 12...) “ children under 12 years of age: ask a doctor”. (2) For products containing epinephrine,...

  7. 21 CFR 341.76 - Labeling of bronchodilator drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... pharmacist before use if you are” : (i) “ taking prescription drugs for asthma, obesity, weight control...) “ do not take more than directed” (ii) “ adults and children 12 years of age and over: oral dose is 12...) “ children under 12 years of age: ask a doctor”. (2) For products containing epinephrine,...

  8. 21 CFR 341.76 - Labeling of bronchodilator drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... pharmacist before use if you are” : (i) “ taking prescription drugs for asthma, obesity, weight control...) “ do not take more than directed” (ii) “ adults and children 12 years of age and over: oral dose is 12...) “ children under 12 years of age: ask a doctor”. (2) For products containing epinephrine,...

  9. 21 CFR 357.150 - Labeling of anthelmintic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... taking this drug. If any of these conditions persist consult a doctor.” (2) “If you are pregnant or have liver disease, do not take this product unless directed by a doctor.” (d) Directions. The labeling of... Do not use unless directed by a doctor. 25 to 37 pounds 125 milligrams. 38 to 62 pounds...

  10. 21 CFR 357.150 - Labeling of anthelmintic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... taking this drug. If any of these conditions persist consult a doctor.” (2) “If you are pregnant or have liver disease, do not take this product unless directed by a doctor.” (d) Directions. The labeling of... Do not use unless directed by a doctor. 25 to 37 pounds 125 milligrams. 38 to 62 pounds...

  11. The influence of sex hormones on acne.

    PubMed

    Förström, L

    1980-01-01

    The sebaceous glands are stimulated by androgens produced in the skin itself. This explains why elevated androgen levels are seldom found in blood and urine from patients with acne. The most potent androgen is dihydrotestosterone (DHT), which is formed in the target cells, i.e. in the sebaceous glands, by a 5 alpha-reduction of testosterone. DHT is then bound to a specific receptor protein and translocated into the cell nucleus. In young persons genetically predisposed to acne a temporarily increased local DHT-formation has been postulated. In women androstenedione appears to be the major pre-hormone for DHT-formation. Adrenal androgens may account for prepubertal acne. Estrogens and progesterone influence acne only in high, unphysiological doses. Therapeutically we are waiting for a safe effective anti-androgen for topical use. PMID:6258368

  12. What's new in acne and rosacea?

    PubMed

    Keri, Jonette

    2016-06-01

    Acne and rosacea are common conditions seen every day by dermatologists. This review will discuss the most recent therapeutic options for patients with these conditions. Specifically, for acne, there will be a discussion of the use of isotretinoin at higher cumulative doses as well as a new formulation of isotretinoin, isotretinoin-lidose. Adult women with acne represent a growing population of patients who present for treatment of acne; the use of hormonal therapies as well as topical dapsone gel will be reviewed for these patients. For rosacea patients, the new topical agents - brimonidine gel and ivermectin cream - will be reviewed, with a discussion on possible rebound phenomenon from brimonidine. Finally, future treatments in the pipeline will be discussed. PMID:27416316

  13. 77 FR 22327 - Draft Guidance for Industry on New Animal Drugs and New Animal Drug Combination Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-13

    ... Animal Drug Combination Products Administered in or on Medicated Feed or Drinking Water of Food-Producing... Drinking Water of Food- Producing Animals: Recommendations for Drug Sponsors for Voluntarily Aligning... and New Animal Drug Combination Products Administered in or on Medicated Feed or Drinking Water...

  14. Light-based therapies in acne treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Susan; Inamadar, Arun C.; Adya, Keshavmurthy A.; Tsoukas, Maria M.

    2015-01-01

    The use of light and laser in the treatment of acne is increasing as these modalities are safe, effective, and associated with no or minimal complications when used appropriately. These light and laser sources are also being used in combination with pharmacological and/or physical measures to synergize their effects and optimize the therapeutic outcome. This review focuses on optical devices used in treating acne and serves to delineate the current application of various methods, including their utility and efficacy. PMID:26009707

  15. [ACNE VULGARIS--AETIOLOGY, CLASSIFICATION, TREATMENT].

    PubMed

    Janda, Katarzyna; Chwilkowska, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    A spotless skin is a rarity. Both women and men have different problems related to the complexion. One of the most common problems is acne, which affects an increasing number of people of all ages. Seborrhea skin areas rich in sebaceous glands, the formation of comedones, inflammation, and scars are characteristic for this disease. The aim of the study was to discuss the causes of acne vulgaris, methods of treatment, and proper care of the skin affected by this problem.

  16. Hormonal Treatment of Acne in Women

    PubMed Central

    Ebede, Tobechi L.; Arch, Emily L.

    2009-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a common and chronic disorder of the pilosebaceous unit. Standard treatment protocols include topical retinoids, topical and oral antimicrobials, and isotretinoin. Hormonal therapies can be added to the regimen in some patients. This article will review the hormonal pathogenesis of acne, discuss the basics of an endocrine evaluation, and provide an overview of the current hormonal treatment options in women. PMID:20725580

  17. 21 CFR 355.70 - Testing procedures for fluoride dentifrice drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Testing procedures for fluoride dentifrice drug... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE ANTICARIES DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Testing Procedures § 355.70 Testing procedures for fluoride dentifrice drug products. (a) A fluoride dentifrice...

  18. 21 CFR 355.55 - Principal display panel of all fluoride rinse drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Principal display panel of all fluoride rinse drug products. 355.55 Section 355.55 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... § 355.55 Principal display panel of all fluoride rinse drug products. In addition to the statement...

  19. 21 CFR 355.55 - Principal display panel of all fluoride rinse drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Principal display panel of all fluoride rinse drug products. 355.55 Section 355.55 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... § 355.55 Principal display panel of all fluoride rinse drug products. In addition to the statement...

  20. 21 CFR 352.50 - Principal display panel of all sunscreen drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Principal display panel of all sunscreen drug... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE SUNSCREEN DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Labeling § 352.50 Principal display panel of all sunscreen drug products. In addition to the statement...

  1. 21 CFR 352.50 - Principal display panel of all sunscreen drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Principal display panel of all sunscreen drug... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE SUNSCREEN DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Labeling § 352.50 Principal display panel of all sunscreen drug products. In addition to the statement...

  2. 21 CFR 352.50 - Principal display panel of all sunscreen drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Principal display panel of all sunscreen drug... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE SUNSCREEN DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Labeling § 352.50 Principal display panel of all sunscreen drug products. In addition to the statement...

  3. 21 CFR 352.50 - Principal display panel of all sunscreen drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Principal display panel of all sunscreen drug... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE SUNSCREEN DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Labeling § 352.50 Principal display panel of all sunscreen drug products. In addition to the statement...

  4. 21 CFR 352.50 - Principal display panel of all sunscreen drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Principal display panel of all sunscreen drug... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE SUNSCREEN DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Labeling § 352.50 Principal display panel of all sunscreen drug products. In addition to the statement...

  5. 21 CFR 357.810 - Active ingredients for deodorant drug products for internal use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Active ingredients for deodorant drug products for internal use. 357.810 Section 357.810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... HUMAN USE Deodorant Drug Products for Internal Use § 357.810 Active ingredients for deodorant...

  6. 21 CFR 357.810 - Active ingredients for deodorant drug products for internal use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Active ingredients for deodorant drug products for internal use. 357.810 Section 357.810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... HUMAN USE Deodorant Drug Products for Internal Use § 357.810 Active ingredients for deodorant...

  7. 21 CFR 355.55 - Principal display panel of all fluoride rinse drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Principal display panel of all fluoride rinse drug products. 355.55 Section 355.55 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... § 355.55 Principal display panel of all fluoride rinse drug products. In addition to the statement...

  8. 21 CFR 355.55 - Principal display panel of all fluoride rinse drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Principal display panel of all fluoride rinse drug products. 355.55 Section 355.55 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... § 355.55 Principal display panel of all fluoride rinse drug products. In addition to the statement...

  9. 21 CFR 211.82 - Receipt and storage of untested components, drug product containers, and closures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Receipt and storage of untested components, drug product containers, and closures. 211.82 Section 211.82 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... and storage of untested components, drug product containers, and closures. (a) Upon receipt and...

  10. Complementary therapies for acne vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Huijuan; Yang, Guoyan; Wang, Yuyi; Liu, Jian Ping; Smith, Caroline A; Luo, Hui; Liu, Yueming

    2015-01-01

    Background Acne is a chronic skin disease characterised by inflamed spots and blackheads on the face, neck, back, and chest. Cysts and scarring can also occur, especially in more severe disease. People with acne often turn to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), such as herbal medicine, acupuncture, and dietary modifications, because of their concerns about the adverse effects of conventional medicines. However, evidence for CAM therapies has not been systematically assessed. Objectives To assess the effects and safety of any complementary therapies in people with acne vulgaris. Search methods We searched the following databases from inception up to 22 January 2014: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014, Issue 1), MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), PsycINFO (from 1806), AMED (from 1985), CINAHL (from 1981), Scopus (from 1966), and a number of other databases listed in the Methods section of the review. The Cochrane CAM Field Specialised Register was searched up to May 2014. We also searched five trials registers and checked the reference lists of articles for further references to relevant trials. Selection criteria We included parallel-group randomised controlled trials (or the first phase data of randomised cross-over trials) of any kind of CAM, compared with no treatment, placebo, or other active therapies, in people with a diagnosis of acne vulgaris. Data collection and analysis Three authors collected data from each included trial and evaluated the methodological quality independently. They resolved disagreements by discussion and, as needed, arbitration by another author. Main results We included 35 studies, with a total of 3227 participants. We evaluated the majority as having unclear risk of selection, attrition, reporting, detection, and other biases. Because of the clinical heterogeneity between trials and the incomplete data reporting, we could only include four

  11. Microneedling Therapy for Atrophic Acne Scars

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, Manal; Awad, Sherif; Medhat, Walid; El-Fakahany, Hasan; Farag, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Treatment of acne scarring is always a challenge. Microneedling therapy or percutaneous collagen induction is a new addition to the treatment modalities for such scars and has been reported to be simple and effective in atrophic acne scar treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical effect and objectively quantify the histological changes of acne scarring in response to skin microneedling. Design: A prospective clinical study. Participants: Ten patients with different types of atrophic acne scars were subjected to three months of skin microneedling treatment (six sessions at two-week intervals). Measurements: Patients were photographed, and skin biopsies were obtained at baseline as well as one and three months from the start of treatment. Histometry for epidermal thickness and quantitative evaluation of total elastin; newly synthesized tropoelastin; collagen types I, III, and VII; and newly synthesized collagen were performed for all biopsies. Results: Compared to the baseline, patients’ evaluations revealed noticeable clinical improvement in atrophic post-acne scars in response to skin microneedling. There was a statistically significant increase (p<0.05) in the mean of collagen types I, III, and VII and newly synthesized collagen, while total elastin was significantly decreased (p<0.05) after the end of treatment. Conclusions: Multiple minimally invasive sessions of skin microneedling are an effective treatment for post-acne atrophic scars as it stimulates the repair processes with the advantage of being a relatively risk-free, in-office procedure with minimal patient recovery time. PMID:26203319

  12. Imaging inflammatory acne: lesion detection and tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cula, Gabriela O.; Bargo, Paulo R.; Kollias, Nikiforos

    2010-02-01

    It is known that effectiveness of acne treatment increases when the lesions are detected earlier, before they could progress into mature wound-like lesions, which lead to scarring and discoloration. However, little is known about the evolution of acne from early signs until after the lesion heals. In this work we computationally characterize the evolution of inflammatory acne lesions, based on analyzing cross-polarized images that document acne-prone facial skin over time. Taking skin images over time, and being able to follow skin features in these images present serious challenges, due to change in the appearance of skin, difficulty in repositioning the subject, involuntary movement such as breathing. A computational technique for automatic detection of lesions by separating the background normal skin from the acne lesions, based on fitting Gaussian distributions to the intensity histograms, is presented. In order to track and quantify the evolution of lesions, in terms of the degree of progress or regress, we designed a study to capture facial skin images from an acne-prone young individual, followed over the course of 3 different time points. Based on the behavior of the lesions between two consecutive time points, the automatically detected lesions are classified in four categories: new lesions, resolved lesions (i.e. lesions that disappear completely), lesions that are progressing, and lesions that are regressing (i.e. lesions in the process of healing). The classification our methods achieve correlates well with visual inspection of a trained human grader.

  13. Effective Treatments of Atrophic Acne Scars

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bingrong

    2015-01-01

    Atrophic scarring is often an unfortunate and permanent complication of acne vulgaris. It has high prevalence, significant impact on quality of life, and therapeutic challenge for dermatologists. The treatment of atrophic acne scars varies depending on the types of acne scars and the limitations of the treatment modalities in their ability to improve scars. Therefore, many options are available for the treatment of acne scarring, including chemical peeling, dermabrasion, laser treatment, punch techniques, fat transplantation, other tissue augmenting agents, needling, subcision, and combined therapy. Various modalities have been used to treat scars, but limited efficacy and problematic side effects have restricted their application. In order to optimally treat a patient’s scar, we need to consider which treatment offers the most satisfactory result. There are also promising procedures in the future, such as stem cell therapy. In this article, the authors review the different treatment options of atrophic acne scars. This may be useful for selecting the best therapeutic strategy, whether it be single or combined therapy, in the treatment of atrophic acne scars while reducing or avoiding the side effects and complications. PMID:26029333

  14. Impaired water barrier function in acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, A; Takenouchi, K; Ito, M

    1995-01-01

    In acne vulgaris, abnormal follicular keratinization is important for comedo formation, yet the precise mechanisms of comedogenesis are not known. The present study examined the interrelationship between sebum secretion rate (SSR), lipid content and water barrier function (WBF) of the stratum corneum (SC) in 36 acne patients and 29 control subjects. All major SC lipid classes were separated and quantified by thin-layer chromatography/photodensitometry. WBF was evaluated by measuring transepidermal water loss (TEWL), and the hygroscopic properties and waterholding capacity of the SC. The SSR over a period of 3 h was significantly higher in patients with moderate acne than in control subjects, but no significant difference was noticed between patients with mild acne and control subjects. Significant differences between patients with both moderate and mild acne and control subjects were noted in the amount of sphingolipids (ceramides and free sphingosine), but not for any other lipid classes. Furthermore in acne patients, lower amounts of sphingolipids were observed corresponding with a diminished WBF. These results suggest that an impaired WBF caused by decreased amounts of ceramides may be responsible for comedo formation, since barrier dysfunction is accompanied by hyperkeratosis of the follicular epithelium.

  15. Topical liposomal gel of tretinoin for the treatment of acne: research and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Patel, V B; Misra, A; Marfatia, Y S

    2000-01-01

    An attempt was made to pharmaceutically develop a topical liposomal tretinoin (TRE) gel and clinically evaluate the developed formulation for the treatment of acne in patients. Liposomes of TRE were prepared using the lipid film hydration technique and the entrapment efficiency of TRE in liposomes was optimized to 79.96%. The drug retention in liposomes and in liposomal TRE gel (Carbopol 934 gel base) studied at three storage conditions indicated maximum drug retention at refrigeration temperature. For liposomal TRE gel, reduced drug leakage was observed as compared to that of liposomes at all three storage conditions. Diffusion studies of plain TRE gel and liposomal TRE gel suggested prolongation (3.4 times reduction in flux value) of drug diffusion and almost two-fold increase in skin drug retention after liposomal encapsulation of drug. A comparative double-blind clinical study of the developed liposomal TRE gel, carried out on 30 acne patients over a period of 3 months, demonstrated significant enhancement (about 1.5-fold) in drug efficacy. More remarkable improvement was observed in the treatment of comedones, where the mean percent reduction in lesions increased from 62.36% for plain TRE gel to 94.17% for liposomal TRE gel. Erythema and irritation associated with the use of plain TRE gel was reduced considerably with the use of liposomal TRE gel. The findings of this investigation therefore underscore potential utility of commercialization of liposomal TRE gel in the treatment of acne. PMID:11109245

  16. Propionibacterium acnes Recovered from Atherosclerotic Human Carotid Arteries Undergoes Biofilm Dispersion and Releases Lipolytic and Proteolytic Enzymes in Response to Norepinephrine Challenge In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lanter, Bernard B.

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, human atherosclerotic carotid arteries were examined following endarterectomy for the presence of the Gram-positive bacterium Propionibacterium acnes and its potential association with biofilm structures within the arterial wall. The P. acnes 16S rRNA gene was detectable in 4 of 15 carotid artery samples, and viable P. acnes was one among 10 different bacterial species recoverable in culture. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of 5 additional atherosclerotic carotid arteries demonstrated biofilm bacteria within all samples, with P. acnes detectable in 4 samples. We also demonstrated that laboratory-grown cultures of P. acnes biofilms were susceptible to induction of a biofilm dispersion response when challenged with physiologically relevant levels of norepinephrine in the presence of iron-bound transferrin or with free iron. The production and release of lipolytic and proteolytic extracellular enzymes by P. acnes were shown to increase in iron-induced dispersed biofilms, and these dispersion-induced P. acnes VP1 biofilms showed increased expression of mRNAs for the triacylglycerol lipases PPA2105 and PPA1796 and the hyaluronate lyase PPA380 compared to that in untreated biofilms. These results demonstrate that P. acnes can infect the carotid arteries of humans with atherosclerosis as a component of multispecies biofilms and that dispersion is inducible for this organism, at least in vitro, with physiologically relevant levels of norepinephrine resulting in the production and release of degradative enzymes. PMID:26216428

  17. Propionibacterium acnes Recovered from Atherosclerotic Human Carotid Arteries Undergoes Biofilm Dispersion and Releases Lipolytic and Proteolytic Enzymes in Response to Norepinephrine Challenge In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Lanter, Bernard B; Davies, David G

    2015-10-01

    In the present study, human atherosclerotic carotid arteries were examined following endarterectomy for the presence of the Gram-positive bacterium Propionibacterium acnes and its potential association with biofilm structures within the arterial wall. The P. acnes 16S rRNA gene was detectable in 4 of 15 carotid artery samples, and viable P. acnes was one among 10 different bacterial species recoverable in culture. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of 5 additional atherosclerotic carotid arteries demonstrated biofilm bacteria within all samples, with P. acnes detectable in 4 samples. We also demonstrated that laboratory-grown cultures of P. acnes biofilms were susceptible to induction of a biofilm dispersion response when challenged with physiologically relevant levels of norepinephrine in the presence of iron-bound transferrin or with free iron. The production and release of lipolytic and proteolytic extracellular enzymes by P. acnes were shown to increase in iron-induced dispersed biofilms, and these dispersion-induced P. acnes VP1 biofilms showed increased expression of mRNAs for the triacylglycerol lipases PPA2105 and PPA1796 and the hyaluronate lyase PPA380 compared to that in untreated biofilms. These results demonstrate that P. acnes can infect the carotid arteries of humans with atherosclerosis as a component of multispecies biofilms and that dispersion is inducible for this organism, at least in vitro, with physiologically relevant levels of norepinephrine resulting in the production and release of degradative enzymes. PMID:26216428

  18. 21 CFR 330.3 - Imprinting of solid oral dosage form drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Imprinting of solid oral dosage form drug products. 330.3 Section 330.3 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE OVER-THE-COUNTER (OTC) HUMAN DRUGS WHICH ARE GENERALLY...

  19. 21 CFR 200.51 - Aqueous-based drug products for oral inhalation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aqueous-based drug products for oral inhalation. 200.51 Section 200.51 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL GENERAL Requirements for Specific Classes of Drugs § 200.51 Aqueous-based drug products for oral inhalation. (a)...

  20. Acne

    MedlinePlus

    ... suggest you also try an over-the-counter lotion or cream. These medicines may make your skin ... work, your doctor may prescribe a cream or lotion with benzoyl peroxide, resorcinol, salicylic acid, or sulfur. ...

  1. Acne

    MedlinePlus

    ... are available in many forms, such as gels, lotions, creams, soaps, or pads. In some people, OTC ... topical medicines, prescription topical medicines come as creams, lotions, solutions, gels, or pads. Your doctor will consider ...

  2. Astringent drug products that produce aluminum acetate; skin protectant drug products for over-the-counter human use; technical amendment. Final rule; technical amendment.

    PubMed

    2009-03-01

    We (Food and Drug Administration (FDA)) are amending the final monograph (FM) for over-the-counter (OTC) skin protectant astringent drug products. This amendment clarifies that aluminum acetate solutions, produced by dissolving aluminum sulfate tetradecahydrate and calcium acetate monohydrate in powder or tablet form in water, are generally recognized as safe and effective (GRASE) and not misbranded as astringent drug products. The amendment also describes how manufacturers should relabel these products to comply with the FM. We are issuing this amendment in response to a citizen petition (CP) that we received from a manufacturer of OTC astringent drug products. This final rule is part of our ongoing review of OTC drug products.

  3. 21 CFR 310.518 - Drug products containing iron or iron salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drug products containing iron or iron salts. 310... Drug products containing iron or iron salts. Drug products containing elemental iron or iron salts as...) that contains iron or iron salts for use as an iron source shall bear the following statement:...

  4. 21 CFR 310.518 - Drug products containing iron or iron salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drug products containing iron or iron salts. 310... Drug products containing iron or iron salts. Drug products containing elemental iron or iron salts as...) that contains iron or iron salts for use as an iron source shall bear the following statement:...

  5. 21 CFR 310.519 - Drug products marketed as over-the-counter (OTC) daytime sedatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drug products marketed as over-the-counter (OTC... or Devices § 310.519 Drug products marketed as over-the-counter (OTC) daytime sedatives. (a... ingredients in over-the-counter (OTC) drug products for use as daytime sedatives. The following claims...

  6. 21 CFR 310.518 - Drug products containing iron or iron salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Drug products containing iron or iron salts. 310... Drug products containing iron or iron salts. Drug products containing elemental iron or iron salts as...) that contains iron or iron salts for use as an iron source shall bear the following statement:...

  7. 21 CFR 310.518 - Drug products containing iron or iron salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Drug products containing iron or iron salts. 310... Drug products containing iron or iron salts. Drug products containing elemental iron or iron salts as...) that contains iron or iron salts for use as an iron source shall bear the following statement:...

  8. Solid Lipid Nanoparticles Loaded with Retinoic Acid and Lauric Acid as an Alternative for Topical Treatment of Acne Vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Silva, Elton Luiz; Carneiro, Guilherme; De Araújo, Lidiane Advíncula; Trindade, Mariana de Jesus Vaz; Yoshida, Maria Irene; Oréfice, Rodrigo Lambert; Farias, Luis de Macêdo; De Carvalho, Maria Auxiliadora Roque; Dos Santos, Simone Gonçalves; Goulart, Gisele Assis Castro; Alves, Ricardo José; Ferreira, Lucas Antônio Miranda

    2015-01-01

    Topical therapy is the first choice for the treatment of mild to moderate acne and all-trans retinoic acid is one of the most used drugs. The combination of retinoids and antimicrobials is an innovative approach for acne therapy. Recently, lauric acid, a saturated fatty acid, has shown strong antimicrobial activity against Propionibacterium acnes. However, topical application of retinoic acid is followed by high incidence of side-effects, including erythema and irritation. Solid lipid nanoparticles represent an alternative to overcome these side-effects. This work aims to develop solid lipid nanoparticles loaded with retinoic acid and lauric acid and evaluate their antibacterial activity. The influence of lipophilic stearylamine on the characteristics of solid lipid nanoparticles was investigated. Solid lipid nanoparticles were characterized for size, zeta potential, encapsulation efficiency, differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction. The in vitro inhibitory activity of retinoic acid-lauric acid-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles was evaluated against Propionibacterium acnes, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. High encapsulation efficiency was obtained at initial time (94 ± 7% and 100 ± 4% for retinoic acid and lauric acid, respectively) and it was demonstrated that lauric acid-loaded-solid lipid nanoparticles provided the incorporation of retinoic acid. However, the presence of stearylamine is necessary to ensure stability of encapsulation. Moreover, retinoic acid-lauric acid-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles showed growth inhibitory activity against Staphylococcus epidermidis, Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus aureus, representing an interesting alternative for the topical therapy of acne vulgaris. PMID:26328443

  9. Randomised controlled trial of topical kanuka honey for the treatment of acne

    PubMed Central

    Semprini, Alex; Corin, Andrew; Sheahan, Davitt; Tofield, Christopher; Helm, Colin; Montgomery, Barney; Fingleton, James; Weatherall, Mark; Beasley, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the efficacy of Honevo, a topical 90% medical-grade kanuka honey, and 10% glycerine (honey product) as a treatment for facial acne. Design Randomised controlled trial with single blind assessment of primary outcome variable. Setting Outpatient primary care from 3 New Zealand localities. Participants Of 136 participants aged between 16 and 40 years with a diagnosis of acne and baseline Investigator's Global Assessment (IGA) for acne score of ≥2.68, participants were randomised to each treatment arm. Interventions All participants applied Protex, a triclocarban-based antibacterial soap twice daily for 12 weeks. Participants randomised to the honey product treatment arm applied this directly after washing off the antibacterial soap, twice daily for 12 weeks. Outcome measures The primary outcome was ≥2 point decrease in IGA score from baseline at 12 weeks. Secondary outcomes included mean lesion counts and changes in subject-rated acne improvement and severity at weeks 4 and 12, and withdrawals for worsening acne. Results 4/53 (7.6%) participants in the honey product group and 1/53 (1.9%) of participants in the control group had a ≥ 2 improvement in IGA score at week 12, compared with baseline, OR (95% CI) for improvement 4.2 (0.5 to 39.3), p=0.17. There were 15 and 14 participants who withdrew from the honey product group and control group, respectively. Conclusions This randomised controlled trial did not find evidence that addition of medical-grade kanuka honey in combination with 10% glycerine to standard antibacterial soap treatment is more effective than the use of antibacterial soap alone in the treatment of acne. Trial registration number ACTRN12614000003673; Results. PMID:26832428

  10. Acne Knowledge of Hispanic Parents of Teenagers with Mild to Moderate Acne.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Isha; Zapata, Lucio; Sosa, Juan Jesús; Rodgers, Clifford; Ruiz, Maria; Oh, Susan; Hynan, Linda S; Kimball, Alexa B; Pandya, Amit G

    2016-09-01

    We performed a cross-sectional study of Hispanic and non-Hispanic parents of children with acne using a survey designed to determine their level of awareness of acne and its treatment; 82% of Hispanic parents and 40% of non-Hispanic parents agreed that a health care provider should treat mild acne (p < 0.001). Hispanic parents of adolescents with acne agreed more frequently than non-Hispanic parents that children with mild and moderate acne should be taken to a health care provider for treatment, but they tended not to visit health care providers. Future studies should aim to determine the reasons for this discrepancy, after which culturally sensitive educational programs can be developed to address this disparity.

  11. Current perspectives in drug discovery against tuberculosis from natural products.

    PubMed

    Nguta, Joseph Mwanzia; Appiah-Opong, Regina; Nyarko, Alexander K; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Addo, Phyllis G A

    2015-09-01

    Currently, one third of the world's population is latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), while 8.9-9.9 million new and relapse cases of tuberculosis (TB) are reported yearly. The renewed research interests in natural products in the hope of discovering new and novel antitubercular leads have been driven partly by the increased incidence of multidrug-resistant strains of MTB and the adverse effects associated with the first- and second-line antitubercular drugs. Natural products have been, and will continue to be a rich source of new drugs against many diseases. The depth and breadth of therapeutic agents that have their origins in the secondary metabolites produced by living organisms cannot be compared with any other source of therapeutic agents. Discovery of new chemical molecules against active and latent TB from natural products requires an interdisciplinary approach, which is a major challenge facing scientists in this field. In order to overcome this challenge, cutting edge techniques in mycobacteriology and innovative natural product chemistry tools need to be developed and used in tandem. The present review provides a cross-linkage to the most recent literature in both fields and their potential to impact the early phase of drug discovery against TB if seamlessly combined. PMID:27649863

  12. The impact of natural products upon modern drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, A

    2008-06-01

    In the period 1970-2006, a total of 24 unique natural products were discovered that led to an approved drug. We analyze these successful leads in terms of drug-like properties, and show that they can be divided into two equal subsets. The first falls in the 'Lipinski universe' and complies with the Rule of Five. The second is a 'parallel universe' that violates the rules. Nevertheless, the latter compounds remain largely compliant in terms of logP and H-bond donors, highlighting the importance of these two metrics in predicting bioavailability. Natural products are often cited as an exception to Lipinski's rules. We believe this is because nature has learned to maintain low hydrophobicity and intermolecular H-bond donating potential when it needs to make biologically active compounds with high molecular weight and large numbers of rotatable bonds. In addition, natural products are more likely than purely synthetic compounds to resemble biosynthetic intermediates or endogenous metabolites, and hence take advantage of active transport mechanisms. Interestingly, the natural product leads in the Lipinski and parallel universe had an identical success rate (50%) in delivering an oral drug.

  13. 78 FR 68854 - Over-the-Counter Ophthalmic Drug Products-Emergency Use Eyewash Products; Rescheduling of Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Over-the-Counter Ophthalmic Drug Products--Emergency Use Eyewash Products; Rescheduling of Public Hearing AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice; rescheduling of public hearing. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is rescheduling a December...

  14. Liposomal Drug Products: A Quality by Design Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaoming

    Quality by Design (QbD) principles has been applied to the development of two liposomal formulations, containing a hydrophilic small molecule therapeutic (Tenofovir) and a protein therapeutic (superoxide dismutase). The goal of the research is to provide critical information on 1) how to reduce the preparation variability in liposome formulations, and 2) how to increase drug encapsulation inside liposomes to reduce manufacturing cost. Most notably, an improved liposome preparation method was developed which increased the encapsulation efficiency of hydrophilic molecules. In particular, this method allows for very high encapsulation efficiency. For example, encapsulation efficiencies of up to 50% have been achieved, whereas previously only 20% or less have been reported. Another significant outcome from this research is a first principle mathematical model to predict the encapsulation efficiency of hydrophilic drugs in unilamellar liposomes. This mathematical model will be useful in: formulation development to rapidly achieve optimized formulations; comparison of drug encapsulation efficiencies of liposomes prepared using different methods; and assisting in the development of suitable process analytical technologies to achieve real-time monitoring and control of drug encapsulation during manufacturing. A novel two-stage reverse dialysis in vitro release testing method has also been developed for passively targeted liposomes, which uses the first stage to mimic the circulation of liposomes in the body and the second stage to imitate the drug release process at the target. The developed in vitro release testing method can be used to distinguish formulations with varied compositions for quality control testing purposes. This developed method may pave the way to the development of more biorelevant quality control testing methods for liposomal drug products in the future. The QbD case studies performed in this research are examples of how this approach can be used to

  15. Comparison of clinical efficacies of sodium ascorbyl phosphate, retinol and their combination in acne treatment.

    PubMed

    Ruamrak, C; Lourith, N; Natakankitkul, S

    2009-02-01

    Acne vulgaris impairs the appearance of an individual and causes psychological irritation. Inflammatory acne lesion is caused by multifactor incorporates in each step of acne pathogenesis. In an attempt to archive inflammatory lesion treatment with the promise of prevention of acne vulgaris, randomized and double-blind studies on the comparison of the efficacies of topical formulations containing 5% sodium ascorbyl phosphate (SAP) and 0.2% retinol, separately as well as in combination application, were conducted. The resulting data showed that SAP reduced the inflammatory lesion by 20.14% and 48.82% within 4 and 8 weeks respectively. Application of the formulation containing retinol slightly improved the treatment efficacy as the lesion reduced by 21.79% and 49.50% after 4 and 8 weeks respectively. The combination treatment significantly reduced the inflammatory lesion by 29.28% after 4 weeks and 63.10% after 8 weeks of application. The most effective treatment was by using the combination of 5% SAP and 0.2% retinol, which incorporated the synergistic effects on lipid peroxidation and sebaceous gland function in addition to the enhancement of SAP permeability by the desquamation of stratum corneum influenced by retinol, keratin plug removal and anti-inflammatory effect of retinol. This study promises for the development of cosmetic products to overcome aesthetic and psychological problems caused by acne vulgaris. PMID:19134126

  16. New developments in acne treatment: role of combination adapalene–benzoylperoxide

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Youn; Ochsendorf, Falk R

    2016-01-01

    The fixed-dose combination adapalene 0.1%/benzoylperoxide 2.5% (A/BPO) was introduced as an acne vulgaris therapeutic in 2007. It combines anti-inflammatory, keratolytic, comedolytic, and antibacterial properties. Thus, it addresses several pathophysiological factors involved in the pathophysiology of acne. This review highlights the rationale for the use of this fixed-dose combination product, its therapeutic efficacy including effects on adherence and quality of life, its use for different forms of acne, and the side-effect profile. In summary, the fixed-dose combination of A/BPO gel can be regarded as a highly effective and safe formulation. It is not associated with antibiotic resistance. It reduces factors that cause nonadherence and has positive effects on the quality of life of affected patients. The tolerance is good. The initial mild irritation potential can be addressed by adequate counseling. A/BPO can be used for all forms of inflammatory acne, including severe forms, as part of a combination with systemic antibiotics. Finally, it can also be used for the long-term treatment of chronic acne. Thus, it is a very valuable therapeutic option in daily practice, which is reflected by its strong recommendation in the “European S3-guidelines”. PMID:27757036

  17. Correlation between the severity and type of acne lesions with serum zinc levels in patients with acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Rostami Mogaddam, Majid; Safavi Ardabili, Nastaran; Maleki, Nasrollah; Soflaee, Maedeh

    2014-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is the most common cutaneous disorder affecting adolescents and young adults. Some studies have reported an association between serum zinc levels and acne vulgaris. We aimed to evaluate the serum zinc level in patients with acne vulgaris and compare it with healthy controls. One hundred patients with acne vulgaris and 100 healthy controls were referred to our clinic. Acne severity was classified according to Global Acne Grading System (GAGS). Atomic absorption spectrophotometry was used to measure serum zinc levels. Mean serum level of zinc in acne patients and controls was 81.31 ± 17.63 μg/dl and 82.63 ± 17.49 μg/dl, respectively. Although the mean serum zinc level was lower in acne group, it was not statistically significant (P = 0.598). There was a correlation between serum zinc levels with severity and type of acne lesions. The results of our study suggest that zinc levels may be related to the severity and type of acne lesions in patients with acne vulgaris. Relative decrease of serum zinc level in acne patients suggests a role for zinc in the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris.

  18. Benzoyl peroxide, adapalene, and their combination in the treatment of acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Korkut, Caner; Piskin, Suleyman

    2005-03-01

    Benzoyl peroxide and adapalene are among the most effective topical agents used in the treatment of acne. We planned an open-labeled, prospective study to compare the effects and side effects of these two drugs alone and in combination in the treatment of acne vulgaris. One hundred and five consecutive patients (30 men and 75 women) with acne vulgaris were included in this study. The patients were randomly divided into three groups with 35 patients in each. The groups were randomly assigned to 0.1% adapalene gel, 5% benzoyl peroxide lotion, or combination of 0.1% adapalene gel +5% benzoyl peroxide treatment. Acne lesions were classified as noninflammatory (open and closed comedones) and inflammatory (papule, pustule, nodule, cyst), and the lesions on the face were counted before the therapy, during the control visits, and after the treatment. Erythema, dryness, burning, and other side effects were recorded during the treatment. The mean age of the patients was 18.44 +/- 3.75 years. Eight patients were excluded because of noncompliance with the treatment regimen or the follow-up schedule, and four patients were excluded due to allergic contact dermatitis. The study revealed that all three therapy protocols were effective in treating noninflammatory and inflammatory lesions in acne vulgaris (p<0.05) and that there was no significant difference between the groups in efficacy or side effects (p>0.05). Adapalene and benzoyl peroxide are effective and well tolerated agents for acne vulgaris; combination therapy has no superiority over adapalene or benzoyl peroxide alone.

  19. Acne Yields Up Secret That Points to New Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Acne Yields Up Secret That Points to New Treatments Bacteria on skin sometimes release fatty acids ... News) -- In a finding that could lead to new treatments for acne, scientists say they've discovered ...

  20. Consequences of psychological distress in adolescents with acne.

    PubMed

    Misery, Laurent

    2011-02-01

    Acne may cause psychological distress that is associated with many psychiatric disorders. In this issue, Halvorsen et al. report suicidal ideation, mental health problems, and affective isolation to be relatively frequent in adolescents with acne. This report suggests that adverse events that have been attributed to therapies for acne, including suicidal ideation and depression, may reflect the burden of substantial acne rather than the effect of medications.

  1. Photodynamic-induced inactivation of Propionibacterium acnes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Teschke, M.; Eick, Stephen G.; Pfister, W.; Meyer, Herbert; Halbhuber, Karl-Juergen

    1998-05-01

    We report on photodynamically induced inactivation of the skin bacterium Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) using endogenous as well as exogenous photosensitizers and red light sources. P. acnes is involved in the pathogenesis of the skin disease acne vulgaris. The skin bacterium is able to synthesize the metal-free fluorescent porphyrins protoporphyrin IX (PP) and coproporphyrin (CP) as shown by in situ spectrally-resolved detection of natural autofluorescence of human skin and bacteria colonies. These naturally occurring intracellular porphyrins act as efficient endogenous photosensitizers. Inactivation of P. acnes suspensions was achieved by irradiation with He-Ne laser light in the red spectral region (632.8 nm). We monitored the photodynamically-induced death of single bacteria using a fluorescent viability kit in combination with confocal laser scanning microscopy. In addition, the photo-induced inactivation was calculated by CFU (colony forming units) determination. We found 633 nm-induced inactivation (60 mW, 0.12 cm2 exposure area, 1 hour irradiation) of 72% in the case of non-incubated bacteria based on the destructive effect of singlet oxygen produced by red light excited endogenous porphyrins and subsequent energy transfer to molecular oxygen. In order to achieve a nearly complete inactivation within one exposure procedure, the exogenous photosensitizer Methylene Blue (Mb) was added. Far red exposure of Mb-labeled bacteria using a krypton ion laser at 647 nm and 676 nm resulted in 99% inactivation.

  2. Treatment of acne vulgaris in pregnant patients.

    PubMed

    Pugashetti, Rupa; Shinkai, Kanade

    2013-01-01

    The management of acne vulgaris in the setting of pregnancy raises important clinical considerations regarding the efficacy and safety of acne treatments in this special patient population. Particular challenges include the absence of safety data, discrepancy in safety data between different safety rating systems, and lack of evidence-based recommendations for the treatment of acne during pregnancy. Nonetheless, many therapeutic options exist, and the treatment of acne in pregnant women can be safely and often effectively accomplished. For mild or moderate disease, patients can be treated with topical antimicrobial agents, anti-inflammatory agents, as well as glycolic and salicylic acid. Several topical agents, notably benzoyl peroxide, previously viewed as potentially dangerous are cited by many sources as being considered safe. When necessary, systemic therapies that can be safely added include penicillins, amoxicillin, cephalosporins, erythromycin, clindamycin, and tetracyclines or sulfonamides, depending on the stage of fetal development. Adjunct therapy may include phototherapy or laser treatments. Physicians should work with this often highly motivated, safety-conscious patient population to tailor an individualized treatment regimen. This treatment regimen will likely shift throughout the different stages of fetal development, as distinct safety considerations are raised prior to conception as well as during each of the trimesters of pregnancy. Important considerations regarding acne management in breast-feeding mothers is also discussed.

  3. 78 FR 75570 - Guidance for Industry on New Animal Drugs and New Animal Drug Combination Products Administered...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-12

    ... Drug Combination Products Administered in or on Medicated Feed or Drinking Water of Food-Producing... or Drinking Water of Food-Producing Animals: Recommendations for Drug Sponsors for Voluntarily... Medicated Feed or Drinking Water of Food- Producing Animals: Recommendations for Drug Sponsors...

  4. A study on the characterization of Propionibacterium acnes isolated from ocular clinical specimens

    PubMed Central

    Sowmiya, Murali; Malathi, Jambulingam; Swarnali, Sen; Priya, Jeyavel Padma; Therese, Kulandai Lily; Madhavan, Hajib N.

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: There are only a few reports available on characterization of Propionibacterium acnes isolated from various ocular clinical specimens. We undertook this study to evaluate the role of P. acnes in ocular infections and biofilm production, and also do the phylogenetic analysis of the bacilli. Methods: One hundred isolates of P. acnes collected prospectively from ocular clinical specimens at a tertiary care eye hospital between January 2010 and December 2011, were studied for their association with various ocular disease conditions. The isolates were also subjected to genotyping and phylogenetic analysis, and were also tested for their ability to produce biofilms. Results: Among preoperative conjunctival swabs, P. acnes was a probably significant pathogen in one case; a possibly significant pathogen in two cases. In other clinical conditions, 13 per cent isolates were probably significant pathogens and 38 per cent as possibly significant pathogens. The analysis of 16S rRNA gene revealed four different phylogenies whereas analysis of recA gene showed two phylogenies confirming that recA gene was more reliable than 16S rRNA with less sequence variation. Results of polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) had 100 per cent concordance with phylogenetic results. No association was seen between P. acnes subtypes and biofilm production. Interpretation & conclusions: RecA gene phylogenetic studies revealed two different phylogenies. RFLP technique was found to be cost-effective with high sensitivity and specificity in phylogenetic analysis. No association between P. acnes subtypes and pathogenetic ability was observed. Biofilm producing isolates showed increased antibiotic resistance compared with non-biofilm producing isolates. PMID:26609036

  5. 21 CFR 341.80 - Labeling of nasal decongestant drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling of nasal decongestant drug products. 341.80 Section 341.80 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE COLD, COUGH, ALLERGY, BRONCHODILATOR, AND ANTIASTHMATIC...

  6. 21 CFR 310.518 - Drug products containing iron or iron salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) that contains iron or iron salts for use as an iron source shall bear the following statement: WARNING... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Drug products containing iron or iron salts. 310... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE NEW DRUGS Requirements for Specific New Drugs or Devices §...

  7. 21 CFR 211.89 - Rejected components, drug product containers, and closures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rejected components, drug product containers, and closures. 211.89 Section 211.89 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED...

  8. 21 CFR 211.89 - Rejected components, drug product containers, and closures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rejected components, drug product containers, and closures. 211.89 Section 211.89 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED...

  9. 21 CFR 211.89 - Rejected components, drug product containers, and closures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rejected components, drug product containers, and closures. 211.89 Section 211.89 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED...

  10. 21 CFR 211.89 - Rejected components, drug product containers, and closures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rejected components, drug product containers, and closures. 211.89 Section 211.89 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED...

  11. 21 CFR 211.89 - Rejected components, drug product containers, and closures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rejected components, drug product containers, and closures. 211.89 Section 211.89 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED...

  12. Computer-Aided Drug Design of Bioactive Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Prachayasittikul, Veda; Worachartcheewan, Apilak; Shoombuatong, Watshara; Songtawee, Napat; Simeon, Saw; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Nantasenamat, Chanin

    2015-01-01

    Natural products have been an integral part of sustaining civilizations because of their medicinal properties. Past discoveries of bioactive natural products have relied on serendipity, and these compounds serve as inspiration for the generation of analogs with desired physicochemical properties. Bioactive natural products with therapeutic potential are abundantly available in nature and some of them are beyond exploration by conventional methods. The effectiveness of computational approaches as versatile tools for facilitating drug discovery and development has been recognized for decades, without exception, in the case of natural products. In the post-genomic era, scientists are bombarded with data produced by advanced technologies. Thus, rendering these data into knowledge that is interpretable and meaningful becomes an essential issue. In this regard, computational approaches utilize the existing data to generate knowledge that provides valuable understanding for addressing current problems and guiding the further research and development of new natural-derived drugs. Furthermore, several medicinal plants have been continuously used in many traditional medicine systems since antiquity throughout the world, and their mechanisms have not yet been elucidated. Therefore, the utilization of computational approaches and advanced synthetic techniques would yield great benefit to improving the world's health population and well-being. PMID:25961523

  13. Computer-Aided Drug Design of Bioactive Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Prachayasittikul, Veda; Worachartcheewan, Apilak; Shoombuatong, Watshara; Songtawee, Napat; Simeon, Saw; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Nantasenamat, Chanin

    2015-01-01

    Natural products have been an integral part of sustaining civilizations because of their medicinal properties. Past discoveries of bioactive natural products have relied on serendipity, and these compounds serve as inspiration for the generation of analogs with desired physicochemical properties. Bioactive natural products with therapeutic potential are abundantly available in nature and some of them are beyond exploration by conventional methods. The effectiveness of computational approaches as versatile tools for facilitating drug discovery and development has been recognized for decades, without exception, in the case of natural products. In the post-genomic era, scientists are bombarded with data produced by advanced technologies. Thus, rendering these data into knowledge that is interpretable and meaningful becomes an essential issue. In this regard, computational approaches utilize the existing data to generate knowledge that provides valuable understanding for addressing current problems and guiding the further research and development of new natural-derived drugs. Furthermore, several medicinal plants have been continuously used in many traditional medicine systems since antiquity throughout the world, and their mechanisms have not yet been elucidated. Therefore, the utilization of computational approaches and advanced synthetic techniques would yield great benefit to improving the world's health population and well-being.

  14. 21 CFR 357.152 - Package inserts for anthelmintic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the pinworm. (c) A commentary on the life cycle of the pinworm. (d) A commentary on the ways in which... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Package inserts for anthelmintic drug products... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE MISCELLANEOUS INTERNAL DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER...

  15. Analysis of clinical efficacy, side effects, and laboratory changes among patients with acne vulgaris receiving single versus twice daily dose of oral isotretinoin.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Hesham M

    2015-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a debilitating disorder and requires proper treatment. This work evaluates the clinical efficacy, side effects, and laboratory changes of serum lipids and liver function during oral isotretinoin therapy for acne vulgaris, comparing single versus twice daily dose. Fifty-eight patients with acne vulgaris were included and randomized into group I (26 patients), who received once daily dose, and group II (32 patients), who received twice daily dose of oral isotretinoin. Global acne scoring system was used to evaluate acne severity and post-treatment improvement. Both regimens resulted in highly significant clinical improvement of acne with no significant difference. However, side effects were significantly more common among patients of group I. Both regimens caused mild rise of serum cholesterol, alanine transaminase (ALT), and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) with more prominent rise of triglycerides especially with twice daily dose. Oral isotretinoin is a very effective treatment for acne vulgaris with no statistically significant difference in clinical efficacy between once and twice daily doses. However, dividing dose to twice per day might cause fewer incidence of side effects without reducing clinical efficacy. The drug causes mild clinically insignificant rise of serum cholesterol, triglycerides, AST, and ALT.

  16. Scientific workflows as productivity tools for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Shon, John; Ohkawa, Hitomi; Hammer, Juergen

    2008-05-01

    Large pharmaceutical companies annually invest tens to hundreds of millions of US dollars in research informatics to support their early drug discovery processes. Traditionally, most of these investments are designed to increase the efficiency of drug discovery. The introduction of do-it-yourself scientific workflow platforms has enabled research informatics organizations to shift their efforts toward scientific innovation, ultimately resulting in a possible increase in return on their investments. Unlike the handling of most scientific data and application integration approaches, researchers apply scientific workflows to in silico experimentation and exploration, leading to scientific discoveries that lie beyond automation and integration. This review highlights some key requirements for scientific workflow environments in the pharmaceutical industry that are necessary for increasing research productivity. Examples of the application of scientific workflows in research and a summary of recent platform advances are also provided.

  17. Fraxelated radiofrequency device for acne scars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Babar K.; Khokher, Sairah

    2012-09-01

    Acne scars can be improved with various treatments such as topical creams, chemical peels, dermal fillers, microdermabrasion, laser, and radiofrequency devices. Some of these treatments especially lasers and deep chemical peels can have significant side effects such as post inflammatory hyperpigmentation in darker skin types. Fraxelated RF Laser devices have been reported to have lower incidence of side effects in all skin phototypes. Nine patients between ages 18 and 35 of various skin phototypes were selected from a private practice and treated with a RF fraxelated device (E-matrix) for acne scars. Outcomes were measured by physician observation, subjective feedback received by patients, and comparison of before and after photographs. In this small group of patients with various skin phototypes, fraxelated radiofrequency device improved acne scars with minimal side effects and downtime.

  18. Colloidal carriers of isotretinoin for topical acne treatment: skin uptake, ATR-FTIR and in vitro cytotoxicity studies.

    PubMed

    Gürbüz, Aslı; Özhan, Gül; Güngör, Sevgi; Erdal, M Sedef

    2015-09-01

    Acne vulgaris is the chronical, multifactorial and complex disease of the pilosebaceous unit in the skin. The main goal of the topical therapy in acne is to target the drug to epidermal and deep dermal regions by minimizing systemic absorption . Isotretinoin, a retinoic acid derivative, is the most effective drug in acne pathogenesis. Because systemic treatment may cause many side effects, topical isotretinoin treatment is an option in the management of acne. However, due to its high lipophilic character, isotretinoin tends to accumulate in the upper stratum corneum, thus its penetration into the lower layers is limited, which restricts the efficiency of topical treatment. Microemulsions are fluid, isotropic, colloidal drug carriers that have been widely studied as drug delivery systems. The percutaneous transport of active agents can be enhanced by microemulsions when compared with their conventional formulations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate microemulsions as alternative topical carriers for isotretinoin with an objective to improve its skin uptake. After in vitro permeation studies, the dermal penetration of isotretinoin from microemulsions was investigated by tape stripping procedure. Confocal laser scanning microscopy provided insight about the localization of the drug in the skin. The interaction between the microemulsion components and stratum corneum lipids is studied by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. The relative safety of the microemulsions was assessed in mouse embryonic fibroblasts using MTT viability test. The results indicate that microemulsion-based novel colloidal carriers have a potential for enhanced skin delivery and localization of isotretinoin.

  19. Addressing Free Radical Oxidation in Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Criscito, Maressa C.; Schlesinger, Todd E.; Verdicchio, Robert; Szoke, Ernest

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Comparatively little attention has been paid to the role of free radical oxidation in acne vulgaris. Here, using the traditional abnormalities cited for acne, the authors address the role of free radical oxidation throughout the pathogenesis by detailing the chemistry that may contribute to clinical changes. To probe the effects of free radical oxidation and test an antioxidant, they conducted a preliminary study of topically applied vitamin E. Methods: Seventeen patients with mild-to-moderate acne vulgaris were evaluated over an eight-week period in two private dermatology practices in this open-label study. All patients enrolled were on the same baseline regimen of salicylic acid and benzoyl peroxide. This regimen was then supplemented with topical vitamin E in sunflower seed oil. Results: At the end of the eight-week period, all patients demonstrated clinical improvement, as indicated by a reduction in the number of lesions and global mean difference. A statistically significant reduction was noted as early as Week 2. Enrolled patients also expressed a positive experience due to good tolerability and easy application. Conclusion: Although the exact pathogenesis of acne vulgaris remains unknown, the presence of excessive reactive oxygen species can be implicated in each of the major abnormalities involved. This presence, along with the positive results of the authors’ preliminary study, demonstrates the need for more exploration on the use of topical antioxidants in limiting free radical oxidation in the acne model. This paper is designed to stimulate academic discussion regarding a new way of thinking about the disease state of acne. PMID:26962389

  20. Acne Inversa: Evaluating Antimicrobial Peptides and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sand, Michael; Skrygan, Marina; Kreuter, Alexander; Altmeyer, Peter; Gambichler, Thilo

    2012-01-01

    Background Acne inversa is a chronic, suppurative relapsing inflammatory skin disease that primarily affects the axillae, perineum and inframammary regions. Evidence suggests that the innate immune system is involved in the pathogenesis of acne inversa. Objective To investigate the role of the innate immune system in acne inversa. Methods Skin biopsies were obtained from inflammatory skin lesions (n=17) and from non-lesional skin (intraindividual control, n=17) of patients with acne inversa. Additional skin lesions were taken from patients with chronic venous leg ulcers (interindividual control, n=5). Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the mRNA levels of antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs), including human β-defensin (hBD)-1, hBD-2 and hBD-3, LL-37 (cathelicidin) and Ribonuclease 7 (RNase 7). mRNA levels were also determined for inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP1), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10. Results The mRNA levels of hBD-2, LL-37, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and MMP1 were significantly higher in acne inversa lesions compared to non-lesional skin (p<0.05). A significant positive correlation expression was observed between hBD-2 mRNA expression and LL-37 (ρ=0.53, p=0.03), and between hBD-2 and RNAse 7 (ρ=0.68, p=0.006). When compared to the chronic venous leg ulcer lesions, acne inversa lesions showed a significantly higher expression of RNase 7 mRNA, while IL-1 β, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α and MMP1 mRNA expression was significantly higher in the chronic venous leg ulcer lesions (p<0.05). Conclusion The AMP, cytokine milieu and tissue proteases in acne inversa lesions differ significantly from non-lesional skin and chronic venous leg ulcers. The positively correlating up-regulation of AMPs in acne inversa indicates an important role of the innate immune system in the pathogenesis of this disorder

  1. Efficacy of local application of an Unani formulation in acne vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Sultana, Shabiya; Zulkifle, Mohd.; Ansari, Abdul Haseeb; Shahnawaz

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Buthūr-i-Labaniyya (Acne vulgaris) is affecting up to 80% of adolescents and many adults at different stages of life. It is one of the commonest skin disorders which appears on cheeks and nose as white eruptions that seems like solidified milk drops. These eruptions are treated by drugs having properties of tajfīf wa taḥlīl (desiccant and resolving), as mentioned by Ibne Sina. Daood Antaki in his book Tazkira Oolulalbab recommends the local application of a paste of Shonīz (nigella sativa), Naushādar (ammonium chloride) and Būra Armani mixed with Sirka (vinegar) for effective treatment of Acne vulgaris. Methods: The study was observational self comparison before and after treatment, conducted in the OPD of the hospital which is part of the National Institute of Unani Medicine, Bangalore. The duration of study was one year. 40 Female patients with combination of comedones, papules, pustules and nodules were recruited for this purpose. The test drug, Shonīz, Būra Armani, Naushadar powder, mixed with sirka were applied locally for one month with taqlīl-i-ghidhā tadābīr (low calorie index diet). All subjects were assessed on the basis of changes in subjective and objective parameters. Results: The response of test drugs was statistically highly significant (P < 0.01) by using ANOVA repeated measure test, there was also relief in subjective parameters. Subjects reported a reduction of 82.6%, 80.9%, 66.6% in tenderness, itching and irritation respectively. Interpretation and Conclusion: The present study reveals that the test drug formulation is safe and effective in treating Acne vulgaris if used along with low calorie index diet. No side effects of drugs were reported, therefore the trial formulation can be recommended to manage Acne vulgaris of mild to severe degree as a therapy. PMID:26865747

  2. Propionibacterium acnes as a cause of lung abscess in a cardiac transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Veitch, David; Abioye, Abu; Morris-Jones, Stephen; McGregor, Alastair

    2015-01-01

    A 29-year-old man was admitted with fevers, cough, left-sided chest pain and lethargy for 1 week. He had a cardiac transplant 10 years prior and was on immunosuppressive drugs. He was found to have a pulmonary lesion and went on to develop a lung abscess. Propionibacterium acnes was identified on matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation mass spectrometry-time of flight and 16s rRNA gene sequencing after drainage. He was curatively treated with co-trimoxazole and co-amoxiclav. He divulged a longstanding history of seborrhoeic dermatitis with frequent flares leading to large volumes of squames collecting on his bed sheets. We hypothesise this was a possible route of entry: inhalation of the Propionibacterium. This case highlights how a common commensal bacterium, P. acnes, was able to cause pathology in an immunosuppressed patient. This is the only case of a patient with transplantation developing a P. acnes pulmonary infection and the only case of P. acnes causing these clinical features to be reported in the literature. PMID:26677153

  3. Propionibacterium acnes as a cause of lung abscess in a cardiac transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Veitch, David; Abioye, Abu; Morris-Jones, Stephen; McGregor, Alastair

    2015-12-16

    A 29-year-old man was admitted with fevers, cough, left-sided chest pain and lethargy for 1 week. He had a cardiac transplant 10 years prior and was on immunosuppressive drugs. He was found to have a pulmonary lesion and went on to develop a lung abscess. Propionibacterium acnes was identified on matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation mass spectrometry-time of flight and 16s rRNA gene sequencing after drainage. He was curatively treated with co-trimoxazole and co-amoxiclav. He divulged a longstanding history of seborrhoeic dermatitis with frequent flares leading to large volumes of squames collecting on his bed sheets. We hypothesise this was a possible route of entry: inhalation of the Propionibacterium. This case highlights how a common commensal bacterium, P. acnes, was able to cause pathology in an immunosuppressed patient. This is the only case of a patient with transplantation developing a P. acnes pulmonary infection and the only case of P. acnes causing these clinical features to be reported in the literature.

  4. Fluorescence guided evaluation of photodynamic therapy as acne treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ericson, Marica B.; Horfelt, Camilla; Cheng, Elaine; Larsson, Frida; Larko, Olle; Wennberg, Ann-Marie

    2005-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an attractive alternative treatment for patients with acne because of its efficiency and few side effects. Propionibacterium acnes (P.acnes) are bacteria present in the skin, which produce endogenous porphyrins that act as photosensitisers. In addition, application of aminolaevulinic acid or its methyl ester (mALA) results in increased accumulation of porphyrins in the pilosebaceous units. This makes it possible to treat acne with PDT. This initial study investigates the possibility of fluorescence imaging as assessment tool in adjunct to PDT of patients with acne. Twenty-four patients with acne on the cheeks have been treated with PDT with and without mALA. Fluorescence images have been obtained before and after treatment. The clinical acne score was assessed as base line before PDT, and at every follow up visit. Additionally the amount of P.acnes was determined. The clinical evaluation showed a general improvement of acne, even though no difference between treatment with and without mALA was observed. By performing texture analysis and multivariate data analsysis on the fluorescence images, the extracted texture features were found to correlate with the corresponding clinical assessment (67%) and amount of P.acnes (72%). The analysis showed that features describing the highly fluorescent pores could be related to the clinical assessment. This result suggests that fluorescence imaging can be used as an objective assessment of acne, but further improvement of the technique is possible, for example by including colour images.

  5. Alexithymia and Acne Vulgaris: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Baykir, Murat; Ateş, Gülfem; Ekşioğlu, Meral

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess relationship between alexithymia and acne vulgaris in young people. Methods A hundred and eleven subjects between 15 and 25 years of age referred to out-patient clinic of dermatology with acne and 78 subjects applied to family physician for complaints other than acne were included in patient and control groups of the study, respectively. A questionnaire to determine demographic characteristics, an acne classification to determine severity of acne and Toronto Alexithymic Scale (TAS) to assess alexithymia were used. Results The mean scores of TAS were 52.7±10.8 and 51.7±10.7 in patient and control groups, respectively. Alexitymia was determined in 23.4% of the subjects in acne group and in 24.4% of control group. No significant differences were found between groups in terms of alexithymia, intermediate alexitymia and three-factors of TAS. Conclusion Alexithymia does not appear to be related to acne vulgaris. PMID:22216042

  6. Significance of diet in treated and untreated acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Kucharska, Alicja; Szmurło, Agnieszka; Sińska, Beata

    2016-04-01

    The relationship between diet and acne is highly controversial. Several studies during the last decade have led dermatologists to reflect on a potential link between diet and acne. This article presents the latest findings on a potential impact that diet can have on pathogenesis of acne vulgaris. The association between diet and acne can no longer be dismissed. Compelling evidence shows that high glycemic load diets may exacerbate acne. Dairy ingestion appears to be weakly associated with acne and the roles of omega-3 fatty acids, dietary fiber, antioxidants, vitamin A, zinc and iodine remain to be elucidated. The question of what the impact of diet is on the course of acne vulgaris still remains unclear.

  7. Significance of diet in treated and untreated acne vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Szmurło, Agnieszka; Sińska, Beata

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between diet and acne is highly controversial. Several studies during the last decade have led dermatologists to reflect on a potential link between diet and acne. This article presents the latest findings on a potential impact that diet can have on pathogenesis of acne vulgaris. The association between diet and acne can no longer be dismissed. Compelling evidence shows that high glycemic load diets may exacerbate acne. Dairy ingestion appears to be weakly associated with acne and the roles of omega-3 fatty acids, dietary fiber, antioxidants, vitamin A, zinc and iodine remain to be elucidated. The question of what the impact of diet is on the course of acne vulgaris still remains unclear. PMID:27279815

  8. 21 CFR 310.536 - Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for use as a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... FOR HUMAN USE NEW DRUGS Requirements for Specific New Drugs or Devices § 310.536 Drug products... thumbsucking deterrent is regarded as a new drug within the meaning of section 201(p) of the Federal Food, Drug... new drug application or abbreviated new drug application, such product is also misbranded...

  9. Excipients and additives: hidden hazards in drug products and in product substitution.

    PubMed Central

    Napke, E; Stevens, D G

    1984-01-01

    The excipients and additives in drug formulations have been described as inert because they do not have an active role in the prevention or treatment of particular ailments. This has led to the misconception among physicians, pharmacists, drug manufacturers and the public that excipients are harmless and unworthy of mention. In fact, pharmacists are allowed to substitute drug formulations, without regard to the excipients, as long as they ensure that the active ingredients in the substitute are the same as those in the formulation prescribed. The inappropriateness of the term inert is becoming increasingly apparent as evidence of adverse reactions--some fatal--to excipients mounts. The likelihood that some "active" constituents, particularly erythromycin, have been blamed for such reactions deserves to be investigated. The public deserves to be better protected. For example, the United States has legislation requiring complete labelling of all food, drugs and cosmetics that incorporate more than one ingredient, no matter how innocuous the constituents are believed to be. In Canada, drug manufacturers are not even required to share this information with physicians or pharmacists when they introduce a new drug or reformulate a product already being marketed, nor are pharmacists required to disclose the contents of formulations that they prepare in the absence of commercially available products. PMID:6498699

  10. 21 CFR 212.80 - What are the requirements associated with labeling and packaging PET drug products?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What are the requirements associated with labeling and packaging PET drug products? 212.80 Section 212.80 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... with labeling and packaging PET drug products? (a) A PET drug product must be suitably labeled...

  11. 21 CFR 212.80 - What are the requirements associated with labeling and packaging PET drug products?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are the requirements associated with labeling and packaging PET drug products? 212.80 Section 212.80 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... requirements associated with labeling and packaging PET drug products? (a) A PET drug product must be...

  12. Natural Products Towards the Discovery of Potential Future Antithrombotic Drugs.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Asiful; Alam, Fahmida; Khalil, Md Ibrahim; Sasongko, Teguh Haryo; Gan, Siew Hua

    2016-01-01

    Globally, thrombosis-associated disorders are one of the main contributors to fatalities. Besides genetic influences, there are some acquired and environmental risk factors dominating thrombotic diseases. Although standard regimens have been used for a long time, many side effects still occur which can be life threatening. Therefore, natural products are good alternatives. Although the quest for antithrombotic natural products came to light only since the end of last century, in the last two decades, a considerable number of natural products showing antithrombotic activities (antiplatelet, anticoagulant and fibrinolytic) with no or minimal side effects have been reported. In this review, several natural products used as antithrombotic agents including medicinal plants, vegetables, fruits, spices and edible mushrooms which have been discovered in the last 15 years and their target sites (thrombogenic components, factors and thrombotic pathways) are described. In addition, the side effects, limitations and interactions of standard regimens with natural products are also discussed. The active compounds could serve as potential sources for future research on antithrombotic drug development. As a future direction, more advanced researches (in quest of the target cofactor or component involved in antithrombotic pathways) are warranted for the development of potential natural antithrombotic medications (alone or combined with standard regimens) to ensure maximum safety and efficacy. PMID:26951101

  13. Potential strategies for increasing drug-discovery productivity.

    PubMed

    Cumming, John G; Finlay, M Raymond V; Giordanetto, Fabrizio; Hemmerling, Martin; Lister, Troy; Sanganee, Hitesh; Waring, Michael J

    2014-04-01

    The productivity challenge facing the pharmaceutical industry is well documented. Strategies to improve productivity have mainly focused on enhancing efficiency, such as the application of Lean Six Sigma process improvement methods and the introduction of modeling and simulation in place of 'wet' experiments. While these strategies have their benefits, the real challenge is to improve effectiveness by reducing clinical failure rates. We advocate redesigning the screening cascade to identify and optimize novel compounds with improved efficacy against disease, not just with improved potency against the target. There should be greater use of disease-relevant phenotypic screens in conjunction with target-based assays to drive medicinal chemistry optimization. An opportunistic approach to polypharmacology is recommended. There should also be more emphasis on optimization of the molecular mechanism of action incorporating understanding of binding kinetics, consideration of covalent drug strategies and targeting allosteric modulators.

  14. Make-up improves the quality of life of acne patients without aggravating acne eruptions during treatments.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Nobukazu; Imori, Mizuho; Yanagisawa, Midori; Seto, Yoko; Nagata, Osamu; Kawashima, Makoto

    2005-01-01

    Boehncke et al. suggested that decorative cosmetics can improve the quality of life (QOL) of skin diseases. But dermatologists sometimes discourage female acne patients from applying make-up since decorative cosmetics are considered one of the aggravating factors for acne eruptions. The purpose of this study is to assess whether make-up application interferes with acne treatments and how QOL changes when the make-up items are designed for acne patients and used in order to disguise acne eruptions. Eighteen female acne patients were trained by a make-up artist and advised to apply acne-designed basic and decorative cosmetics for 2 to 4 weeks while their acne was appropriately treated. The acne-severity and QOL of patients were assessed before and after the study. The results revealed that the number of acne eruptions decreased even though patients were applying make-up. The QOL scores of Skindex-16, GHQ30 and anxiety state index greatly improved. Our results suggest that dermatologists should encourage acne patients to utilize appropriate make-up to improve their QOL.

  15. The effect of Propionibacterium acnes on maturation of dendritic cells derived from acne patients' peripherial blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Michalak-Stoma, Anna; Tabarkiewicz, Jacek; Olender, Alina; Juszkiewicz-Borowiec, Maria; Stoma, Filip; Pietrzak, Aldona; Pozarowski, Piotr; Bartkowiak-Emeryk, Małgorzata

    2008-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris which is the most common cutaneous disorder. It has a proinflammatory activity and takes part in immune reactions modulating the Th1/Th2 cellular response. The exposure of dendritic cells (DCs) to whole bacteria, their components, cytokines or other inflammatory stimuli and infectious agents induces differentiation from immature DCs into antigen-presenting mature DCs. The aim of the study was to evaluate the capability of P. acnes to induce the maturation of DCs. We stimulated monocyte derived dendritic cells (Mo-DCs) from acne patients with various concetrations of heat-killed P. acnes (10(6)-10(8) bacteria/ml) cultured from acne lesions. The results showed an increase in CD80+/CD86+/DR+ and CD83+/CD1a+/DR+ cells percentage depending on the concetration of P. acnes. The expression of CD83 and CD80 (shown as the mean fluorescence intensity - MFI) increased with higher concetrations of P. acnes. There were also significant correlations between MFI of CD83, CD80, CD86 and concetration of P. acnes. The study showed that P. acnes in the concetration of 10(8) bacteria/ml is most effective in the induction of Mo-DCs maturation. Futher studies concerning the influence on the function of T cells are needed.

  16. Cheminformatic comparison of approved drugs from natural product versus synthetic origins.

    PubMed

    Stratton, Christopher F; Newman, David J; Tan, Derek S

    2015-11-01

    Despite the recent decline of natural product discovery programs in the pharmaceutical industry, approximately half of all new drug approvals still trace their structural origins to a natural product. Herein, we use principal component analysis to compare the structural and physicochemical features of drugs from natural product-based versus completely synthetic origins that were approved between 1981 and 2010. Drugs based on natural product structures display greater chemical diversity and occupy larger regions of chemical space than drugs from completely synthetic origins. Notably, synthetic drugs based on natural product pharmacophores also exhibit lower hydrophobicity and greater stereochemical content than drugs from completely synthetic origins. These results illustrate that structural features found in natural products can be successfully incorporated into synthetic drugs, thereby increasing the chemical diversity available for small-molecule drug discovery.

  17. Natural Product-Derived Drugs for the Treatment of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Natural products have been used as drugs for millennia, and the therapeutic potential of natural products has been studied for more than a century. Since the mid-1880s, approximately 60% of drugs have originated from natural products. Recently, the importance of using natural products has increased, as has interest in discovering efficient new drugs. Natural drugs are desirable for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases, such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. This review discusses the discovery and development of drugs derived from natural products for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:25349576

  18. Interventions to increase adherence to acne treatment

    PubMed Central

    Moradi Tuchayi, Sara; Alexander, Tiffany M; Nadkarni, Anish; Feldman, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    Background Adherence to acne medication is poor and is a major reason why treatment plans are ineffective. Recognizing solutions to nonadherence is critical. Objective The purpose of this study is to describe the hurdles associated with acne nonadherence and to provide mechanisms on how to ameliorate them. Methods PubMed database was searched. Of the 419 search results, 29 articles were reviewed to identify hurdles to adherence and corresponding solutions. Results Hurdles to primary nonadherence where the medication is not even started, include lack of knowledge, confusion about usage, weak physician–patient relationship, fear of adverse reactions, and cost. Secondary nonadherence hurdles where the medication is started but is not taken as directed include lack of results, complex regimens, side effects, busy lifestyle, forgetfulness, inconvenience, and psychiatric comorbidity. Solutions to these hurdles include treatment simplification, technology, and dynamic education. Limitations Adherence is affected by numerous factors, but available literature analyzing acne adherence and interventions to improve adherence to treatment is limited. Conclusion There are several hurdles in adhering to acne treatment. Recognition of these hurdles and finding appropriate solutions may be as important to treatment outcomes as choosing the right medication to prescribe. PMID:27784999

  19. Topical and oral antibiotics for acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Del Rosso, James Q

    2016-06-01

    Antibiotics, both oral and topical, have been an integral component of the management of acne vulgaris (AV) for approximately 6 decades. Originally thought to be effective for AV due to their ability to inhibit proliferation of Propionibacterium acnes, it is now believed that at least some antibiotics also exert anti-inflammatory effects that provide additional therapeutic benefit. To add, an increase in strains of P acnes and other exposed bacteria that are less sensitive to antibiotics used to treat AV have emerged, with resistance directly correlated geographically with the magnitude of antibiotic use. Although antibiotics still remain part of the therapeutic armamentarium for AV treatment, current recommendations support the following when used to treat AV: 1) monotherapy use should be avoided; 2) use benzoyl peroxide concomitantly to reduce emergence of resistant P acnes strains; 3) oral antibiotics should be used in combination with a topical regimen for moderate-to-severe inflammatory AV; and 4) use oral antibiotics over a limited duration to achieve control of inflammatory AV with an exit plan in place to discontinue their use as soon as possible. When selecting an oral antibiotic to treat AV, potential adverse effects are important to consider.

  20. ICG laser therapy of acne vulgaris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuchin, Valery V.; Altshuler, Gregory B.; Genina, Elina A.; Bashkatov, Alexey N.; Simonenko, Georgy V.; Odoevskaya, Olga D.; Yaroslavsky, Ilya V.

    2004-07-01

    The near-infrared (NIR) laser radiation due to its high penetration depth is widely used in phototherapy. In application to skin appendages a high selectivity of laser treatment is needed to prevent light action on surrounding tissues. Indocyanine Green (ICG) dye may provide a high selectivity of treatment due to effective ICG uploading by a target and its narrow band of considerable absorption just at the wavelength of the NIR diode laser. The goal of this study is to demonstrate the efficacy of the NIR diode laser phototherapy in combination with topical application of ICG suggested for soft and thermal treatment of acne vulgaris. 28 volunteers with facile or back-located acne were enrolled. Skin sites of subjects were stained by ICG and irradiated by NIR laser-diode light (803 or 809 nm). Untreated, only stained and only light irradiated skin areas served as controls. For soft acne treatment, the low-intensity (803 nm, 10 - 50 mW/cm2, 5-10 min) or the medium-intensity (809 nm, 150 - 190 mW/cm2, 15 min) protocols were used. The single and multiple (up to 8-9) treatments were provided. The individual acne lesions were photothermally treated at 18 W/cm2 (803 nm, 0.5 sec) without skin surface cooling or at 200 W/cm2 (809 nm, 0.5 sec) with cooling. The results of the observations during 1-2 months after the completion of the treatment have shown that only in the case of the multiple-wise treatment a combined action of ICG and NIR irradiation reduces inflammation and improves skin state during a month without any side effects. At high power densities (up to 200 W/cm2) ICG stained acne inflammatory elements were destructed for light exposures of 0.5 sec. Based on the concept that hair follicle, especially sebaceous gland, can be intensively and selectively stained by ICG due to dye diffusion through pilosebaceous canal and its fast uptake by living microorganisms, by vital keratinocytes of epithelium of the canal and sebaceous duct, and by rapidly proliferating

  1. A theoretical basis for a biopharmaceutic drug classification: the correlation of in vitro drug product dissolution and in vivo bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Amidon, G L; Lennernäs, H; Shah, V P; Crison, J R

    1995-03-01

    A biopharmaceutics drug classification scheme for correlating in vitro drug product dissolution and in vivo bioavailability is proposed based on recognizing that drug dissolution and gastrointestinal permeability are the fundamental parameters controlling rate and extent of drug absorption. This analysis uses a transport model and human permeability results for estimating in vivo drug absorption to illustrate the primary importance of solubility and permeability on drug absorption. The fundamental parameters which define oral drug absorption in humans resulting from this analysis are discussed and used as a basis for this classification scheme. These Biopharmaceutic Drug Classes are defined as: Case 1. High solubility-high permeability drugs, Case 2. Low solubility-high permeability drugs, Case 3. High solubility-low permeability drugs, and Case 4. Low solubility-low permeability drugs. Based on this classification scheme, suggestions are made for setting standards for in vitro drug dissolution testing methodology which will correlate with the in vivo process. This methodology must be based on the physiological and physical chemical properties controlling drug absorption. This analysis points out conditions under which no in vitro-in vivo correlation may be expected e.g. rapidly dissolving low permeability drugs. Furthermore, it is suggested for example that for very rapidly dissolving high solubility drugs, e.g. 85% dissolution in less than 15 minutes, a simple one point dissolution test, is all that may be needed to insure bioavailability. For slowly dissolving drugs a dissolution profile is required with multiple time points in systems which would include low pH, physiological pH, and surfactants and the in vitro conditions should mimic the in vivo processes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. 21 CFR 358.350 - Labeling of ingrown toenail relief drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling of ingrown toenail relief drug products. 358.350 Section 358.350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... provided in § 330.1(c)(2) of this chapter, subject to the provisions of section 502 of the Federal...

  3. 21 CFR 358.350 - Labeling of ingrown toenail relief drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Labeling of ingrown toenail relief drug products. 358.350 Section 358.350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... provided in § 330.1(c)(2) of this chapter, subject to the provisions of section 502 of the Federal...

  4. 21 CFR 358.350 - Labeling of ingrown toenail relief drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Labeling of ingrown toenail relief drug products. 358.350 Section 358.350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... provided in § 330.1(c)(2) of this chapter, subject to the provisions of section 502 of the Federal...

  5. 21 CFR 358.350 - Labeling of ingrown toenail relief drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Labeling of ingrown toenail relief drug products. 358.350 Section 358.350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... provided in § 330.1(c)(2) of this chapter, subject to the provisions of section 502 of the Federal...

  6. 21 CFR 358.350 - Labeling of ingrown toenail relief drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Labeling of ingrown toenail relief drug products. 358.350 Section 358.350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... provided in § 330.1(c)(2) of this chapter, subject to the provisions of section 502 of the Federal...

  7. 21 CFR 350.60 - Guidelines for effectiveness testing of antiperspirant drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Guidelines for effectiveness testing of antiperspirant drug products. 350.60 Section 350.60 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... because of minor variations in formulation. To assure the effectiveness of an antiperspirant, the Food...

  8. 21 CFR 350.60 - Guidelines for effectiveness testing of antiperspirant drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Guidelines for effectiveness testing of antiperspirant drug products. 350.60 Section 350.60 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... because of minor variations in formulation. To assure the effectiveness of an antiperspirant, the Food...

  9. 21 CFR 350.60 - Guidelines for effectiveness testing of antiperspirant drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Guidelines for effectiveness testing of antiperspirant drug products. 350.60 Section 350.60 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... because of minor variations in formulation. To assure the effectiveness of an antiperspirant, the Food...

  10. 75 FR 73109 - Guidance for Industry on Antibacterial Drug Products: Use of Noninferiority Trials to Support...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry on Antibacterial Drug Products: Use of Noninferiority Trials to Support Approval; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a guidance for...

  11. 75 FR 45641 - Guidance for Industry on Label Comprehension Studies for Nonprescription Drug Products; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry on Label Comprehension Studies for Nonprescription Drug Products; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a guidance for...

  12. 76 FR 58018 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Self-Selection Studies for Nonprescription Drug Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Self-Selection Studies for Nonprescription Drug Products; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a draft guidance for...

  13. 21 CFR 330.3 - Imprinting of solid oral dosage form drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Imprinting of solid oral dosage form drug products... AS SAFE AND EFFECTIVE AND NOT MISBRANDED General Provisions § 330.3 Imprinting of solid oral dosage form drug products. A requirement to imprint an identification code on solid oral dosage form...

  14. 78 FR 29142 - Anesthetic and Analgesic Drug Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Anesthetic and Analgesic Drug Products Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Anesthetic and Analgesic Drug Products Advisory...

  15. 77 FR 67380 - Anesthetic and Analgesic Drug Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Anesthetic and Analgesic Drug Products Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Anesthetic and Analgesic Drug Products Advisory...

  16. 78 FR 27405 - Anesthetic and Analgesic Drug Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Anesthetic and Analgesic Drug Products Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Anesthetic and Analgesic Drug Products Advisory...

  17. 21 CFR 330.3 - Imprinting of solid oral dosage form drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Imprinting of solid oral dosage form drug products... AS SAFE AND EFFECTIVE AND NOT MISBRANDED General Provisions § 330.3 Imprinting of solid oral dosage form drug products. A requirement to imprint an identification code on solid oral dosage form...

  18. 21 CFR 330.3 - Imprinting of solid oral dosage form drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Imprinting of solid oral dosage form drug products... AS SAFE AND EFFECTIVE AND NOT MISBRANDED General Provisions § 330.3 Imprinting of solid oral dosage form drug products. A requirement to imprint an identification code on solid oral dosage form...

  19. 21 CFR 330.3 - Imprinting of solid oral dosage form drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Imprinting of solid oral dosage form drug products... AS SAFE AND EFFECTIVE AND NOT MISBRANDED General Provisions § 330.3 Imprinting of solid oral dosage form drug products. A requirement to imprint an identification code on solid oral dosage form...

  20. 78 FR 58311 - Complex Issues in Developing Drug and Biological Products for Rare Diseases; Public Workshop...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Complex Issues in Developing Drug and Biological Products... announcing the following public workshop entitled ``Complex Issues in Developing Drug and Biological Products for Rare Diseases.'' The purpose of the public workshop is twofold: To discuss complex issues...

  1. Identification of antimycotic drugs transformation products upon UV exposure.

    PubMed

    Casado, Jorge; Rodríguez, Isaac; Ramil, María; Cela, Rafael

    2015-05-30

    The reactivity of three imidazolic, environmental persistent antimycotic drugs (clotrimazole, CTZ; ketoconazole, KTZ; and miconazole, MCZ) upon exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is discussed. First, precursor compounds were immobilized in a silicone support which was further exposed to UV light at two different wavelengths: 254 and 365 nm. After solvent desorption, degradation kinetics of the precursor pharmaceuticals, identification of the arising transformation products (TPs) and evaluation of their time-course were investigated by liquid chromatography (LC) with quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) mass spectrometry (MS) detection. The three antimycotics displayed similar stabilities when exposed to 254 nm light; however, CTZ was significantly more stable than MCZ and KTZ when irradiated with the 365 nm lamp. TPs identified in silicone supports resulted from de-chlorination, cleavage, intra-molecular cyclization and hydroxylation reactions. Many of these species were also detected when exposing other solid matrices, such as sand and agricultural soil, previously spiked with target compounds, to UV light. The 50% estimated lethal concentration, calculated using the 48-h Daphnia magna test, for the two main TPs of CTZ and MCZ, at both wavelengths, were lower than those corresponding to the precursor drugs.

  2. Identification of antimycotic drugs transformation products upon UV exposure.

    PubMed

    Casado, Jorge; Rodríguez, Isaac; Ramil, María; Cela, Rafael

    2015-05-30

    The reactivity of three imidazolic, environmental persistent antimycotic drugs (clotrimazole, CTZ; ketoconazole, KTZ; and miconazole, MCZ) upon exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is discussed. First, precursor compounds were immobilized in a silicone support which was further exposed to UV light at two different wavelengths: 254 and 365 nm. After solvent desorption, degradation kinetics of the precursor pharmaceuticals, identification of the arising transformation products (TPs) and evaluation of their time-course were investigated by liquid chromatography (LC) with quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) mass spectrometry (MS) detection. The three antimycotics displayed similar stabilities when exposed to 254 nm light; however, CTZ was significantly more stable than MCZ and KTZ when irradiated with the 365 nm lamp. TPs identified in silicone supports resulted from de-chlorination, cleavage, intra-molecular cyclization and hydroxylation reactions. Many of these species were also detected when exposing other solid matrices, such as sand and agricultural soil, previously spiked with target compounds, to UV light. The 50% estimated lethal concentration, calculated using the 48-h Daphnia magna test, for the two main TPs of CTZ and MCZ, at both wavelengths, were lower than those corresponding to the precursor drugs. PMID:25710817

  3. Perspective for the production of antimalarial drugs in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, B

    1992-01-01

    There appears to be no chemical manufacture of antimalarial drugs in Brazil. Technology at the laboratory process level has been developed for chloroquine, mefloquine, pyrimethamine and cycloguanil, but not perfected nor scaled-up, largely for economic reasons and market uncertainty. Development of primaquine has been contracted but it will run into the same difficulty. Manufacturing capacity for sulfadoxine was registered in the SDI by Roche. A project to produce artemisinine and its derivatives is under way at UNICAMP-CPQBA but is hampered by low content in the plant. Proguanil could be produced easily, but apparently no attempt has been made to do so. Quinine is imported on a large scale mostly for soft-drink production. Since malarial treatment falls largely within the responsibility of the Government health authorities, manufacture of drugs in Brazil will depend on an assured medium-term purchase order made to a potential local manufacturer, since competition in the world market is scarcely viable at the present moment.

  4. Analysis of Complete Genomes of Propionibacterium acnes Reveals a Novel Plasmid and Increased Pseudogenes in an Acne Associated Strain

    PubMed Central

    Fitz-Gibbon, Sorel; Tomida, Shuta; Li, Huiying

    2013-01-01

    The human skin harbors a diverse community of bacteria, including the Gram-positive, anaerobic bacterium Propionibacterium acnes. P. acnes has historically been linked to the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris, a common skin disease affecting over 80% of all adolescents in the US. To gain insight into potential P. acnes pathogenic mechanisms, we previously sequenced the complete genome of a P. acnes strain HL096PA1 that is highly associated with acne. In this study, we compared its genome to the first published complete genome KPA171202. HL096PA1 harbors a linear plasmid, pIMPLE-HL096PA1. This is the first described P. acnes plasmid. We also observed a five-fold increase of pseudogenes in HL096PA1, several of which encode proteins in carbohydrate transport and metabolism. In addition, our analysis revealed a few island-like genomic regions that are unique to HL096PA1 and a large genomic inversion spanning the ribosomal operons. Together, these findings offer a basis for understanding P. acnes virulent properties, host adaptation mechanisms, and its potential role in acne pathogenesis at the strain level. Furthermore, the plasmid identified in HL096PA1 may potentially provide a new opportunity for P. acnes genetic manipulation and targeted therapy against specific disease-associated strains. PMID:23762865

  5. Identifying acne treatment uncertainties via a James Lind Alliance Priority Setting Partnership

    PubMed Central

    Layton, Alison; Eady, E Anne; Peat, Maggie; Whitehouse, Heather; Levell, Nick; Ridd, Matthew; Cowdell, Fiona; Patel, Mahenda; Andrews, Stephen; Oxnard, Christine; Fenton, Mark; Firkins, Lester

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The Acne Priority Setting Partnership (PSP) was set up to identify and rank treatment uncertainties by bringing together people with acne, and professionals providing care within and beyond the National Health Service (NHS). Setting The UK with international participation. Participants Teenagers and adults with acne, parents, partners, nurses, clinicians, pharmacists, private practitioners. Methods Treatment uncertainties were collected via separate online harvesting surveys, embedded within the PSP website, for patients and professionals. A wide variety of approaches were used to promote the surveys to stakeholder groups with a particular emphasis on teenagers and young adults. Survey submissions were collated using keywords and verified as uncertainties by appraising existing evidence. The 30 most popular themes were ranked via weighted scores from an online vote. At a priority setting workshop, patients and professionals discussed the 18 highest-scoring questions from the vote, and reached consensus on the top 10. Results In the harvesting survey, 2310 people, including 652 professionals and 1456 patients (58% aged 24 y or younger), made submissions containing at least one research question. After checking for relevance and rephrasing, a total of 6255 questions were collated into themes. Valid votes ranking the 30 most common themes were obtained from 2807 participants. The top 10 uncertainties prioritised at the workshop were largely focused on management strategies, optimum use of common prescription medications and the role of non-drug based interventions. More female than male patients took part in the harvesting surveys and vote. A wider range of uncertainties were provided by patients compared to professionals. Conclusions Engaging teenagers and young adults in priority setting is achievable using a variety of promotional methods. The top 10 uncertainties reveal an extensive knowledge gap about widely used interventions and the relative merits

  6. Hand-Held Instrument Fights Acne, Tops Over-the-Counter Market

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Tyrell Inc., a Houston-based medical technologies company, was able to access engineering support in redesigning a heating element for a hand-held acne-fighting device through SATOP, NASA's Space Alliance Technology Outreach Program. SATOP put Tyrell in contact with The Boeing Company, which assessed the design and made several major contributions. The product, named Zeno, is now the highest selling over-the-counter medical device for the treatment of acne, and in 2006, Zeno was named the "SATOP Texas, Success Story of the Year." Zeno employs proprietary ClearPoint technology to provide relief of mild to moderate inflammatory acne by delivering a precisely controlled low-level dosage of heat to the blemish, causing the bacteria at the root of more than 90 percent of acne to self-destruct. Within its first year on the market, Zeno was cited by various publications for several awards, including Allure's 2005 "Best of Beauty," Marie Claire's "10 Best Gadgets for Girls," and Popular Science's 2005 "Best of What's New." A variation of the Zeno for use in treating herpetic lesions such as cold sores, by killing the virus that causes them, is currently undergoing FDA trials.

  7. 21 CFR 310.542 - Over-the-counter (OTC) drug products containing active ingredients offered for use in the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Over-the-counter (OTC) drug products containing... HUMAN USE NEW DRUGS Requirements for Specific New Drugs or Devices § 310.542 Over-the-counter (OTC) drug... safe and effective. (b) Any drug product that is labeled, represented, or promoted for OTC use in...

  8. 21 CFR 310.541 - Over-the-counter (OTC) drug products containing active ingredients offered for use in the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Over-the-counter (OTC) drug products containing... USE NEW DRUGS Requirements for Specific New Drugs or Devices § 310.541 Over-the-counter (OTC) drug... and effective. (b) Any drug product that is labeled, represented, or promoted for OTC use in...

  9. 78 FR 32667 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Rheumatoid Arthritis: Developing Drug Products for Treatment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Rheumatoid Arthritis... guidance for industry entitled ``Rheumatoid Arthritis: Developing Drug Products for Treatment.''...

  10. 21 CFR 250.250 - Hexachlorophene, as a component of drug and cosmetic products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... new drug regulations (21 CFR 314.50), including blood level data obtained from use of the drug as... ecology of the product, not merely on gram-positive bacteria. (1) Adequate safety data do not...

  11. 21 CFR 250.250 - Hexachlorophene, as a component of drug and cosmetic products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... new drug regulations (21 CFR 314.50), including blood level data obtained from use of the drug as... ecology of the product, not merely on gram-positive bacteria. (1) Adequate safety data do not...

  12. 21 CFR 250.250 - Hexachlorophene, as a component of drug and cosmetic products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... new drug regulations (21 CFR 314.50), including blood level data obtained from use of the drug as... ecology of the product, not merely on gram-positive bacteria. (1) Adequate safety data do not...

  13. 21 CFR 250.250 - Hexachlorophene, as a component of drug and cosmetic products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... new drug regulations (21 CFR 314.50), including blood level data obtained from use of the drug as... ecology of the product, not merely on gram-positive bacteria. (1) Adequate safety data do not...

  14. 21 CFR 250.250 - Hexachlorophene, as a component of drug and cosmetic products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... new drug regulations (21 CFR 314.50), including blood level data obtained from use of the drug as... ecology of the product, not merely on gram-positive bacteria. (1) Adequate safety data do not...

  15. Treating acne with oral contraceptives: use of lower doses.

    PubMed

    Huber, Johannes; Walch, Katharina

    2006-01-01

    Oral contraceptives (OCs) have been shown to effectively treat acne. Clinical trials of various doses of ethinyl estradiol (EE) combined with progestins such as levonorgestrel, desogestrel, norgestimate, gestodene, cyproterone acetate and drospirenone in monophasic, triphasic and combiphasic formulations used to treat acne in women are reviewed here. Open-label and comparative studies beginning in the 1980s were the first to demonstrate objective and subjective reductions in the incidence of acne, severity of existing acne and seborrhea. Placebo-controlled trials have corroborated these findings with a trend toward effective acne treatment with declining doses of EE. Significant reductions in total, inflammatory and noninflammatory lesions compared with placebo have been demonstrated with an OC containing the low dose of 20 microg of EE. Collectively, these findings support the use of low-dose OCs for the treatment of acne. PMID:16371290

  16. Immunotherapy for acne vulgaris: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Simonart, Thierry

    2013-12-01

    There is a high unmet clinical need for new and better treatments in acne vulgaris. Propionibacterium acnes has a strong proinflammatory activity and targets molecules involved in the innate cutaneous immunity, keratinocytes and sebaceous glands of the pilosebaceous follicle. The role of P. acnes in acne confers legitimacy on the possible benefits of immunization-based approaches, which may represent a solution for limiting the development of antibiotic-resistant P. acnes. Various immunization-based approaches have been developed over the last decades, including killed pathogen-based vaccines, vaccination against cell wall-anchored sialidase, monoclonal antibodies to the Christie, Atkins, Munch-Peterson factor of P. acnes, anti-Toll-like receptors vaccines and natural antimicrobial peptides. This review summarizes the current evidence and explores the challenges to making this a realistic treatment option for the future.

  17. A global perspective on the epidemiology of acne.

    PubMed

    Tan, J K L; Bhate, K

    2015-07-01

    Acne is estimated to affect 9.4% of the global population, making it the eighth most prevalent disease worldwide. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that acne is most common in postpubescent teens, with boys most frequently affected, particularly with more severe forms of the disease. This paper aims to provide an update on the epidemiology of acne worldwide. Recent general and institutional studies from around the world have shown that the prevalence of acne is broadly consistent globally (with the exception of specific populations, which are discussed). However, this review highlights that there is a wide range of disparate outcome measures being applied in epidemiology studies, and we emphasize the need to develop a widely accepted, credible, standard assessment scale to address this in the future. In addition we discuss special populations, such as those devoid of acne, as well as the impact of potential determinants of acne on disease epidemiology.

  18. Formulation and evaluation of herbal anti-acne moisturizer.

    PubMed

    Rasheed, Arun; Shama, Shaik Neelufar; Joy, Jyothi Mulanjananiyil; Reddy, Bobbu Sravya; Roja, Chirra

    2012-10-01

    The moisture content present in human skin makes it look young and the use of moisturizer results in fastening the moisture with a surface film of oil. Acne vulgaris is one of the most commonly seen diseases among the youth. The present study is focused on the use of herbs as moisturizer for acne treatment. The anti-acne moisturizer was formulated from herbal crude extracts and investigated the physico-chemical parameters as well as antibacterial activity of the formulation. The study revealed that ethanol extract of Andrographis paniculata, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Ocimum sanctum, Azadiracta indica and Green tea possessed the potential for inhibiting acne. It was observed that the optimal formula of anti-acne moisturizer was satisfactorily effective to control acne inducing bacteria i.e., Staphylococcus epidermis and Propionibacterium. The physico-chemical parameters of the formulation were also optimal with no signs of irritation. PMID:23010007

  19. 21 CFR 212.70 - What controls and acceptance criteria must I have for my finished PET drug products?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... for my finished PET drug products? 212.70 Section 212.70 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... acceptance criteria must I have for my finished PET drug products? (a) Specifications. You must establish specifications for each PET drug product, including criteria for determining identity, strength, quality,...

  20. 21 CFR 212.90 - What actions must I take to control the distribution of PET drug products?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... distribution of PET drug products? 212.90 Section 212.90 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... distribution of PET drug products? (a) Written distribution procedures. You must establish, maintain, and follow written procedures for the control of distribution of PET drug products shipped from the PET...

  1. 21 CFR 212.90 - What actions must I take to control the distribution of PET drug products?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... distribution of PET drug products? 212.90 Section 212.90 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... control the distribution of PET drug products? (a) Written distribution procedures. You must establish, maintain, and follow written procedures for the control of distribution of PET drug products shipped...

  2. 21 CFR 212.70 - What controls and acceptance criteria must I have for my finished PET drug products?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... for my finished PET drug products? 212.70 Section 212.70 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... What controls and acceptance criteria must I have for my finished PET drug products? (a) Specifications. You must establish specifications for each PET drug product, including criteria for...

  3. 21 CFR 333.303 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... follicles of the skin which is manifested by blackheads, whiteheads, acne pimples, and acne blemishes. (b) Acne blemish. A flaw in the skin resulting from acne. (c) Acne drug product. A drug product used to..., prominent, inflamed elevation of the skin resulting from acne. (e) Blackhead. A condition of the skin...

  4. 21 CFR 333.303 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... follicles of the skin which is manifested by blackheads, whiteheads, acne pimples, and acne blemishes. (b) Acne blemish. A flaw in the skin resulting from acne. (c) Acne drug product. A drug product used to..., prominent, inflamed elevation of the skin resulting from acne. (e) Blackhead. A condition of the skin...

  5. 21 CFR 333.303 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... follicles of the skin which is manifested by blackheads, whiteheads, acne pimples, and acne blemishes. (b) Acne blemish. A flaw in the skin resulting from acne. (c) Acne drug product. A drug product used to..., prominent, inflamed elevation of the skin resulting from acne. (e) Blackhead. A condition of the skin...

  6. 21 CFR 310.540 - Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for use as stomach...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE NEW DRUGS Requirements for Specific New Drugs or Devices § 310.540 Drug products containing active... regarded as a new drug within the meaning of section 201(p) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic...

  7. Etiopathogenesis and Therapeutic Approach to Adult Onset Acne

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Sarabjit; Verma, Poonam; Sangwan, Ankita; Dayal, Surabhi; Jain, Vijay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is usually considered as a skin disorder that primarily affects adolescents reaching a peak at the age of 14–17 years in females and 16–19 years in males. However, recent epidemiologic studies have shown that a significant number of female patients aged >25 years experience acne. As it is regarded as a disease of teenagers, adults are more apprehensive and experience social anxiety. Hence, adult onset acne has become a matter of concern. PMID:27512185

  8. In vitro LED and laser light photoinactivation of Propionibacterium acnes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuchina, Elena S.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2008-06-01

    Acne is a genetic, hormonal disease characterized by overproduction of oil by the sebaceous glands, plugging of the sebaceous glands to form micro- and macro- comedons and, finally, action of skin bacteria on oil trapped underneath the skin to red inflammatory cystic lesions. It was shown, that Propionibacterium acnes, the bacteria responsible for acne, was rather subjected to action of red and infrared radiation. The effect of the given radiation amplified at this bacteria by various solutions of photosensitizes.

  9. Etiopathogenesis and Therapeutic Approach to Adult Onset Acne.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Sarabjit; Verma, Poonam; Sangwan, Ankita; Dayal, Surabhi; Jain, Vijay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is usually considered as a skin disorder that primarily affects adolescents reaching a peak at the age of 14-17 years in females and 16-19 years in males. However, recent epidemiologic studies have shown that a significant number of female patients aged >25 years experience acne. As it is regarded as a disease of teenagers, adults are more apprehensive and experience social anxiety. Hence, adult onset acne has become a matter of concern. PMID:27512185

  10. A comparison of drug products available in Germany and the United States.

    PubMed

    Grabenstein, J D

    1990-03-01

    Health-care professionals practicing with the U.S. European Command frequently encounter drug products of their host nation. Confusion about the identity or use of these medications can slow emergency treatment or mislead the medical management of patients. This article compares drug products available in the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) with those of the United States of America. Differences in nomenclature used for generic drug names are described, as well as prescription practices unique to the FRG, such as unusual drug combinations, additional dosage forms, and divergent labeling practices. Military pharmacies are effective resources for translation of host nation drug products. PMID:2107469

  11. The use of hormonal agents in the treatment of acne.

    PubMed

    Hassoun, Lauren A; Chahal, Dev S; Sivamani, Raja K; Larsen, Larissa N

    2016-06-01

    Hormones and androgens play an important role in the pathogenesis of acne. Multiple hormonal modulators are now available for the treatment of acne. The efficacies and side effects of currently available hormonal agents are reviewed here including the use of oral contraceptives, spironolactone, flutamide, cyproterone acetate, finasteride, and cortexolone 17α-propionate. Hormonal therapies are an efficacious treatment option for acne among females. With the growing need to reduce antibiotic exposures, hormonal therapies should be more widely studied and incorporated into acne treatment strategies. PMID:27416311

  12. Physical Modalities (Devices) in the Management of Acne.

    PubMed

    Nestor, Mark S; Swenson, Nicole; Macri, Angela

    2016-04-01

    Treatment options for acne vulgaris are enhanced by laser and light therapy. Both visible and laser light are effective treatments for acne. Visible light and many lasers target Propionibacterium acnes porphyrins while others act as anti-inflammatory mediators or reduce sebaceous gland activity. Compared with topical and systemic therapies, laser and light therapies have few if any side effects and appear to be safe during pregnancy. If patients prefer at home light treatments, several devices are currently available and have been shown to have efficacy. Ultimately, combining laser and light with topical therapy may well become the mainstay of acne treatment. PMID:27015782

  13. Repair of acne scars with Dermicol-P35.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kevin C

    2009-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a prevalent skin condition that can cause disfiguring residual scarring. While the complete removal of acne scars is unlikely, several treatments exist that can improve the appearance of acne scars. Dermal fillers offer a simple, nonsurgical corrective procedure that can provide improved skin texture. Dermicol-P35 (Evolence [Ortho Dermatologics, Skillman, NJ]) is a new, highly purified, ribose cross-linked, porcine collagen-based dermal filler that has demonstrated low immunogenicity and results that persist for at least 12 months. This article presents the aesthetic results of a male patient treated with Dermicol-P35 for severe facial acne scars.

  14. Repair of acne scars with Dermicol-P35.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kevin C

    2009-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a prevalent skin condition that can cause disfiguring residual scarring. While the complete removal of acne scars is unlikely, several treatments exist that can improve the appearance of acne scars. Dermal fillers offer a simple, nonsurgical corrective procedure that can provide improved skin texture. Dermicol-P35 (Evolence [Ortho Dermatologics, Skillman, NJ]) is a new, highly purified, ribose cross-linked, porcine collagen-based dermal filler that has demonstrated low immunogenicity and results that persist for at least 12 months. This article presents the aesthetic results of a male patient treated with Dermicol-P35 for severe facial acne scars. PMID:19577176

  15. Acne is not associated with yet-uncultured bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bek-Thomsen, M; Lomholt, H B; Kilian, M

    2008-10-01

    Current clinical and microbiological information on acne fails to demonstrate a clear association between particular species, including Propionibacterium acnes, and disease, and the disease continues to be a considerable problem. To test if acne is associated with hitherto uncultured bacteria residing in diseased skin follicles, sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of approximately 5,700 amplified and cloned 16S rRNA genes were used to determine the microbial diversity in follicles from acne patients and healthy individuals and from the superficial skin of acne patients. Follicles from healthy skin were exclusively colonized by P. acnes, whereas the follicular microbiota of acne patients included, in addition, Staphylococcus epidermidis and minor proportions of other species. In comparison, samples from superficial skin showed a complex microbiota represented by 12 to 16 bacterial species. The findings of the study exclude the possibility that acne is associated with yet-uncultured bacteria and shows that healthy skin follicles constitute a remarkably exclusive habitat allowing colonization only by P. acnes. PMID:18716234

  16. Treatment of adult female acne: a new challenge.

    PubMed

    Dréno, B

    2015-06-01

    Acne is affecting an increasing number of adult females and so can no longer be considered as a disease of adolescence. The disease has a greater negative impact on the quality of life of adult females than their younger counterparts. Adult female acne may persist from adolescence or may have its first occurrence once adulthood has been reached. The clinical presentation and pathogenesis of adult female acne may be somewhat different to that of adolescent acne and this may require a different treatment approach. Genetic and hormonal factors are thought to play key roles in the pathogenesis of adult female acne and the disease is characterized by a chronic evolution with frequent relapses requiring long-term maintenance therapy. Fixed-dose retinoid/antimicrobial combinations may be of interest for the treatment of adult female acne given that subgroup analysis of clinical trials has indicated that they are effective against both inflammatory and non-inflammatory lesions in these patients. These treatments may also be of interest, given the chronic course of the disease in adult females, the high likelihood of the presence of antibiotic-resistant P. acnes and the poor adherence of patients to other long-term therapies. Oral hormonal treatment or isotretinoin may be required in patients with severe acne or disease that is refractory to other treatments. Additional clinical studies of acne treatments specifically conducted in adult female patients are required to increase the evidence base on which future treatment recommendations can be based.

  17. Pharmacognosy: Science of natural products in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Orhan, Ilkay Erdogan

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacognosy deals with the natural drugs obtained from organisms such as most plants, microbes, and animals. Up to date, many important drugs including morphine, atropine, galanthamine, etc. have originated from natural sources which continue to be good model molecules in drug discovery. Traditional medicine is also a part of pharmacognosy and most of the third world countries still depend on the use of herbal medicines. Consequently, pharmacognosy always keeps its popularity in pharmaceutical sciences and plays a critical role in drug discovery.

  18. Necrotizing vasculitis of the skin and uterine cervix associated with minocycline therapy for acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Schrodt, B J; Kulp-Shorten, C L; Callen, J P

    1999-05-01

    In recent years, minocycline has become a commonly used agent for the treatment of acne vulgaris and rosacea. With this increased use have come reports of severe and in some cases life-threatening toxicity, often occurring in otherwise healthy young women after prolonged courses of minocycline. These adverse reactions include hepatotoxicity, drug-induced lupus erythematosus, eosinophilic pneumonitis, and hypersensitivity syndrome. We describe a 35-year-old woman who had necrotizing vasculitis of the skin and uterine cervix after 2 years of minocycline therapy for acne vulgaris. Skin and cervical biopsies revealed acute inflammation involving through-and-through necrosis of vessel walls with thrombosis, focal fibrinoid change, and a perivascular lymphohistiocytic infiltrate. The disease fully resolved within 3 months of discontinuance of the minocycline therapy. Patients should be informed of these rare but potentially serious adverse effects before the initiation of minocycline therapy. Early recognition of these complications can result in complete resolution.

  19. Acne inversa: difficulties in diagnostics and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hadasik, Karolina; Brzezińska-Wcisło, Ligia

    2015-01-01

    Acne inversa (hidradenitis suppurativa) is a potentially severe and chronic inflammatory disease with a significant negative influence on the quality of life. Usually, lesions are located in the areas of skin folds and it is characterized by the presence of painful nodules and fistulas with a tendency to tissue fibrosis. Currently, it is suggested that follicular occlusion by infundibular hyperkeratosis plays a crucial role in pathogenesis and an occupation of apocrine sweat glands is a secondary phenomenon. Most often, it refers to men after puberty. This article tries to present the latest theory concerning the etiology of inverted acne and methods of its treatment. It also describes the most common errors in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, which are mainly connected with repeated and long antibiotic therapy and not radical surgical treatment. PMID:26366155

  20. A Family Physician's Approach to Acne

    PubMed Central

    Turgeon, Eugene

    1981-01-01

    Because of the potential for permanent physical and psychological sequelae, acne vulgaris should be regarded as a true disease—not the “normal” physiologic response one might infer from its near universal prevalence in adolescence. Effective therapy reduces pilosebaceous unit obstruction, minimizes secondary inflammation, and lessens the chance of significant scarring. This article reviews current therapeutic modalities, and suggests a sequence for implementation of specific agents. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:21289790

  1. Acne - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) Korean (한국어) Spanish (español) Vietnamese (Tiếng Việt) Chinese - Traditional ( ... Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Korean (한국어) What Is Acne? English 여드름이란 무엇인가? - 한국어 ( ...

  2. Clinical and sebumetric evaluation of topical emulsions in the treatment of acne vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Naveed

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Numerous plant products described in the scientific literature show distinct activities on the skin, such as moisturizing, antioxidant, sunscreen, anti-acne and depigmentation. Aim The main objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of emulsion formulations containing plant extracts (Hippophae rhamnoides and Cassia fistula) and placebo (without plant extracts) on acne patients. Material and methods A single-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, split-face study was designed. Two groups of 25 patients each (aged 18–37 years) with grade I and grade II acne vulgaris received active formulations on the left side of their cheeks and placebo on the right side of their cheeks twice daily for 12 weeks. Prior to the study, signed consent was obtained from each patient. The anti-bacterial activity of the extracts and formulations was tested in vitro. The skin sebum contents of patients were evaluated by the sebumeter® and subjectively using a clinical evaluation before and after treatment of 12 weeks. One way ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used in the statistical analysis. Results A significant (p ≤ 0.05) decrease in the level of sebum contents was observed in both groups who used formulations (F1 and F2) containing the plant extract. The difference between pre- and post-treatment levels of sebum contents was statistically significant (p ≤ 0.05). Formulations containing plant extracts were found effective in the reduction of skin sebum contents (anti-acne effects) sebumetrically as well as clinically when compared to placebo (F3). Conclusions Formulations with 5% plant extracts could be effective, safe, and well-tolerated topical medications for grade I and grade II acne vulgaris. PMID:25254008

  3. Child-resistant packaging for certain over-the-counter drug products. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2001-08-01

    Pursuant to its 3-0 vote to do so, the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC or Commission) is issuing a rule to require child-resistant (CR) packaging on drugs (OTC switched drugs) approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for over-the-counter (OTC) sale that contain active ingredients previously available only in prescription drugs. Current Commission regulations require CR packaging for most oral drug products containing prescription-only active ingredients.However, prior to issuance of this rule there was no general requirement to maintain CR packaging of such drug products in forms subsequently approved by the FDA for OTC sale. The Commission is also revoking the current prohibition on granting a petition for an exemption from a CR packaging requirement prior to FDA approval of the drug product in question. The Commission takes these actions under authority of the Poison Prevention Packaging Act of 1970, as amended.

  4. Reduced expression of dermcidin, a peptide active against propionibacterium acnes, in sweat of patients with acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Toshiaki; Yoshino, Takashi; Fujimura, Takao; Arai, Satoru; Mukuno, Akira; Sato, Naoya; Katsuoka, Kensei

    2015-09-01

    Dermcidin (DCD), an antimicrobial peptide with a broad spectrum of activity against bacteria such as Propionibacterum acnes, is expressed constitutively in sweat in the absence of stimulation due to injury or inflammation. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between DCD expression and acne vulgaris associated with P. acnes. The antimicrobial activity of recombinant full-length DCD (50 μg/ml) was 97% against Escherichia coli and 100% against Staphylococcus aureus. Antimicrobial activity against P. acnes ranged from 68% at 50 μg/ml DCD to 83% at 270 μg/ml DCD. DCD concentration in sweat from patients with acne vulgaris (median 9.8 μg/ml, range 6.9-95.3 μg/ml) was significantly lower than in healthy subjects (median 136.7 μg/ml, range 45.4-201.6 μg/ml) (p = 0.001). DCD demonstrated concentration-dependent, but partial, microbicidal activity against P. acnes. These results suggest that reduced DCD concentration in sweat in patients with inflammatory acne may permit proliferation of P. acnes in pilosebaceous units, resulting in progression of inflammatory acne.

  5. Diet and acne: an exploratory survey study of patient beliefs

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Quynh-Giao; Markus, Ramsey; Katta, Rajani

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the past, medical literature reflected that diet was not a proven cause of acne. However, studies in recent years have substantiated a link between certain dietary factors and acne. It is unclear whether patients are aware of recent research findings. Objectives: Acne patients were surveyed to explore beliefs regarding the link between diet and acne, to determine whether these beliefs translated into behavior change and to identify health information sources. Patients/Methods: Upon Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval, surveys were administered to 50 acne patients at an academic dermatology clinic in 2014, with 49 completed in full and included in this analysis. Results: Ninety-two percent of respondents believed that diet could affect acne. Seventy-one percent attempted to change their diet to improve acne. Seventy-one percent believed acne to be caused by fried or greasy foods, although chocolate (53%), dairy (47%), and soda drinks (35%) were highly implicated. Patients obtained information from Google searches (49%), dermatologists (43%), family members and TV (41% each), and medical websites (31%). Conclusions: In this exploratory study, patients reported utilizing a diversity of information sources, a majority from the Internet. In those surveyed, there was a persistence of long-held belief that fried/greasy foods and chocolate may serve as acne triggers, and less belief in trigger foods supported by recent research, including refined carbohydrates and sugar. Given the multiplicity of beliefs and utilized sources among acne patients in our survey, there is a need to establish up-to-date and reliable methods to educate patients on diet and acne. PMID:27222768

  6. 78 FR 42088 - Anesthetic and Analgesic Drug Products Advisory Committee; Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-15

    ... was announced in the Federal Register of May 17, 2013 (78 FR 29142 to 29143). This meeting has been... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Anesthetic and Analgesic Drug Products Advisory Committee; Cancellation AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The meeting of the...

  7. 78 FR 72897 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Interim Product Reporting for Human Drug Compounding Outsourcing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-04

    ... Human Drug Compounding Outsourcing Facilities Under Section 503B of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic... entitled ``Interim Product Reporting for Human Drug Compounding Outsourcing Facilities Under Section 503B... register as outsourcing facilities (outsourcing facilities). DATES: Although you can comment on...

  8. 77 FR 41415 - Single-Ingredient, Immediate-Release Drug Products Containing Oxycodone for Oral Administration...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Single-Ingredient, Immediate-Release Drug Products... AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice; correction. SUMMARY: The Food and...

  9. Protein Complex Production from the Drug Discovery Standpoint.

    PubMed

    Moarefi, Ismail

    2016-01-01

    Small molecule drug discovery critically depends on the availability of meaningful in vitro assays to guide medicinal chemistry programs that are aimed at optimizing drug potency and selectivity. As it becomes increasingly evident, most disease relevant drug targets do not act as a single protein. In the body, they are instead generally found in complex with protein cofactors that are highly relevant for their correct function and regulation. This review highlights selected examples of the increasing trend to use biologically relevant protein complexes for rational drug discovery to reduce costly late phase attritions due to lack of efficacy or toxicity.

  10. 21 CFR 310.538 - Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for use for ingrown...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... NEW DRUGS Requirements for Specific New Drugs or Devices § 310.538 Drug products containing active... product that is labeled, represented, or promoted for ingrown toenail relief is regarded as a new drug... is required for marketing. In the absence of an approved new drug application or abbreviated new...

  11. 21 CFR 212.61 - What must I do to ensure the stability of my PET drug products through expiry?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What must I do to ensure the stability of my PET drug products through expiry? 212.61 Section 212.61 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... the stability of my PET drug products through expiry? (a) Stability testing program. You...

  12. Assessing attributes of topical vehicles for the treatment of acne, atopic dermatitis, and plaque psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Eastman, William J; Malahias, Steven; Delconte, John; DiBenedetti, Dana

    2014-07-01

    There is limited information available regarding patient preferences and attributes of topical product formulations for specific dermatologic conditions. This study focused on product attributes that were most desirable for 3 dermatologic conditions: acne, atopic dermatitis (AD), and plaque psoriasis (PP). Six focus groups were conducted with participants self-reporting 1 of these conditions and use of 2 or more topical treatments. Discussion focused on symptoms, treatments tried, and vehicle attributes. Fifty-four subjects participated: acne, n=19; AD, n=18; and PP, n=17. The most commonly reported prescription medication vehicles were creams and ointments, followed by lotions, gels, and foams. Itching and redness were the only symptoms spontaneously reported across all 6 focus groups. The attributes considered most important across all conditions included: moisturizing, absorbs/disappears/dries quickly, available in various formulations, does not bleach or stain skin/hair/clothing, is not greasy or oily, is not sticky or tacky, is long lasting/long acting, is fragrance or odor free, is easy to apply/simple to use, and can use all the time. Preferences attributable to acne included: easy to dispense/dispenses right amount, nondrying, product goes on/spreads smoothly, container is not easily broken/does not leak, and creamy. Preferences attributable to AD included: not noticeable to others/conceals area, good consistency, and cooling. Patient preference for product vehicle is relevant to adherence as compliance is a major factor for high rates of failure for dermatologic treatments.

  13. Assessing attributes of topical vehicles for the treatment of acne, atopic dermatitis, and plaque psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Eastman, William J; Malahias, Steven; Delconte, John; DiBenedetti, Dana

    2014-07-01

    There is limited information available regarding patient preferences and attributes of topical product formulations for specific dermatologic conditions. This study focused on product attributes that were most desirable for 3 dermatologic conditions: acne, atopic dermatitis (AD), and plaque psoriasis (PP). Six focus groups were conducted with participants self-reporting 1 of these conditions and use of 2 or more topical treatments. Discussion focused on symptoms, treatments tried, and vehicle attributes. Fifty-four subjects participated: acne, n=19; AD, n=18; and PP, n=17. The most commonly reported prescription medication vehicles were creams and ointments, followed by lotions, gels, and foams. Itching and redness were the only symptoms spontaneously reported across all 6 focus groups. The attributes considered most important across all conditions included: moisturizing, absorbs/disappears/dries quickly, available in various formulations, does not bleach or stain skin/hair/clothing, is not greasy or oily, is not sticky or tacky, is long lasting/long acting, is fragrance or odor free, is easy to apply/simple to use, and can use all the time. Preferences attributable to acne included: easy to dispense/dispenses right amount, nondrying, product goes on/spreads smoothly, container is not easily broken/does not leak, and creamy. Preferences attributable to AD included: not noticeable to others/conceals area, good consistency, and cooling. Patient preference for product vehicle is relevant to adherence as compliance is a major factor for high rates of failure for dermatologic treatments. PMID:25101344

  14. 21 CFR 310.532 - Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) to relieve the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) to relieve the symptoms of benign prostatic hypertrophy. 310.532 Section 310.532 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE NEW DRUGS Requirements...

  15. 21 CFR 310.532 - Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) to relieve the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) to relieve the symptoms of benign prostatic hypertrophy. 310.532 Section 310.532 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE NEW DRUGS Requirements...

  16. 21 CFR 310.543 - Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for human use in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... FOR HUMAN USE NEW DRUGS Requirements for Specific New Drugs or Devices § 310.543 Drug products... new drug within the meaning of section 201(p) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act... the use of investigational new drugs set forth in part 312 of this chapter. (d) After May 7, 1991,...

  17. Fractional Carbon Dioxide Laser in Treatment of Acne Scars

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Andrej; Pljakovska, Vesna

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Scars appear as a result of skin damage during the process of the skin healing. There are two types of acne scars, depending on whether there is a loss or accumulation of collagen: atrophic and hypertrophic. In 80-90% it comes to scars with loss of collagen compared to smaller number of hypertrophic scars and keloids. AIM: The aim of the study was to determine efficiency and safety of fractional carbon dioxide laser in the treatment of acne scars. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was carried out in Acibadem Sistina Clinical Hospital, Skopje at the Department of Dermatovenerology, with a total of 40 patients treated with fractional carbon dioxide laser (Lutronic eCO2). The study included patients with residual acne scars of a different type. RESULTS: Comedogenic and papular acne in our material were proportionately presented in 50% of cases, while the other half were the more severe clinical forms of acne - pustular inflammatory acne and nodulocystic acne that leave residual lesions in the form of second, third and fourth grade of scars. CONCLUSION: The experiences of our work confirm the world experiences that the best result with this method is achieved in dotted ice pick or V-shaped acne scars. PMID:27275326

  18. Acne vulgaris: A review of causes and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Well, Danielle

    2013-10-10

    Acne vulgaris is a disorder of the sebaceous follicle. The cause is multifactorial, and both adolescents and adults can be affected. Acne is associated with a significant financial burden and considerable psychological distress. Treatment options are reviewed, including over-the-counter medications, prescription medications, and in-office procedures.

  19. Investigation of antibacterial activity of aspidin BB against Propionibacterium acnes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chang; Guo, Na; Li, Na; Peng, Xiao; Wang, Peng; Wang, Wei; Luo, Meng; Fu, Yu-Jie

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, antibacterial activity of four kinds of phloroglucinol derivatives extracted from Dryopteris fragrans (L.) Schott against S. aureus, S. epidermidis and P. acnes has been tested. Aspidin BB exerted the strongest antibacterial activity with minimal inhibition concentration (MIC) values ranging from 7.81 to 15.63 μg/mL. The time-kill assay indicated that aspidin BB could kill P. acnes completely at 2 MIC (MBC) within 4 h. By using AFM, we demonstrated extensive cell surface alterations of aspidin BB-treated P. acnes. SDS-PAGE of supernatant proteins and lipid peroxidation results showed that aspidin BB dose-dependently affected membrane permeability of P. acnes. DNA damage and protein degradation of P. acnes were also verified. SDS-PAGE of precipitated proteins revealed possible targets of aspidin BB, i.e., heat shock proteins (26 kDa) and lipase (33 kDa) which could all cause inflammation. Aspidin BB also seriously increased the inhibition rate of lipase activity from 10.20 to 65.20 % to possibly inhibit the inflammation. In conclusions, the effective constituents of D. fragrans (L.) Schott to treat acne might be phloroglucinol derivatives including aspidin BB, aspidin PB, aspidinol and dryofragin. Among this, aspidin BB inhibited the growth of P. acnes by disrupting their membrane, DNA and proteins and finally leaded to the cell death. The obtained data highlighted the potential of using aspidin BB as an alternative treatment for acne vulgaris. PMID:26596576

  20. Antiperspirant drug products for over-the-counter human use; final monograph. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2003-06-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule in the form of a final monograph establishing conditions under which over-the-counter (OTC) antiperspirant drug products are generally recognized as safe and effective and not misbranded as part of FDA's ongoing review of OTC drug products. FDA is issuing this final rule after considering public comments on its proposed regulation, issued as a tentative final monograph (TFM), and all new data and information on antiperspirant drug products that have come to the agency's attention.