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Sample records for aconitum heterophyllum wall

  1. Transcriptome-wide mining suggests conglomerate of genes associated with tuberous root growth and development in Aconitum heterophyllum Wall.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Nikhil; Sood, Hemant; Chauhan, Rajinder Singh

    2016-12-01

    Tuberous roots of Aconitum heterophyllum constitute storage organ for secondary metabolites, however, molecular components contributing to their formation are not known. The transcriptomes of A. heterophyllum were analyzed to identify possible genes associated with tuberous root development by taking clues from genes implicated in other plant species. Out of 18 genes, eight genes encoding GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase (GMPase), SHAGGY, Expansin, RING-box protein 1 (RBX1), SRF receptor kinase (SRF), β-amylase, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) and Auxin responsive factor 2 (ARF2) showed higher transcript abundance in roots (13-171 folds) compared to shoots. Comparative expression analysis of those genes between tuberous root developmental stages showed 11-97 folds increase in transcripts in fully developed roots compared to young rootlets, thereby implying their association in biosynthesis, accumulation and storage of primary metabolites towards root biomass. Cluster analysis revealed a positive correlation with the gene expression data for different stages of tuberous root formation in A. heterophyllum. The outcome of this study can be useful in genetic improvement of A. heterophyllum for root biomass yield.

  2. Hypolipidemic effect of methanol fraction of Aconitum heterophyllum wall ex Royle and the mechanism of action in diet-induced obese rats

    PubMed Central

    Subash, Arun Koorappally; Augustine, Anu

    2012-01-01

    Aconitum heterophyllum is an endangered Himalayan plant included in “lekhaneyagana,” a pharmacological classification mentioned by Charaka in “Charakasamhita” which means reduce excess fat. The subterranean part of the plant is used for the treatment of diseases like nervous system disorders, fever, diarrhea, obesity, etc. In the present study, we are reporting the hypolipidemic effect of methanol fraction of A. heterophyllum. The methanol extract of A. heterophyllum was orally administered in diet-induced obese rats. After four weeks treatment, blood samples were collected for the estimation of serum lipids and lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT). Liver was collected for the assay of HMG-CoA reductase (HMGR). The fecal samples were also collected to estimate the fecal fat content. The A. heterophyllum treatment markedly lowered total cholesterol, triglycerides and apolipoprotein B concentrations in blood serum. It also showed positive effects (increase) on serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) and apolipoprotein A1 concentrations. On the other hand, A. heterophyllum treatment lowered HMGR activity, which helps to reduce endogenous cholesterol synthesis and also activated LCAT, helping increase in HDL-c. An increase in fecal fat content is also an indication of the hypolipidemic effect of A. heterophyllum. The significant hypolipidemic effect of A. heterophyllum may be linked to its ability to inhibit HMGR activity and block intestinal fat absorption. The increase in HDL-c may be linked to its ability to activate LCAT enzyme. PMID:23378943

  3. Protein changes during ethanol induced seed germination in Aconitum heterophyllum.

    PubMed

    Rana, Bindu; Sreenivasulu, Yelam

    2013-01-01

    Aconitum heterophyllum is a high altitude medicinal plant that has become endangered due to overexploitation for their aconitins. The most effective, conventional propagation method for any plant species is by seed. However, in Aconitum seed germination is erratic, and seedling survival is low. In the present study results have been discussed on the possible implication of ethanol treatment on removal of barriers on radical emergence in terms of protein changes. Eighty seven percent of seed germination was achieved in Aconitum with ethanol treatment. Comparative 2-DE analysis of ethanol treated and untreated seed protein profiles in Phase II of germination revealed 40 differentially expressed proteins. Twenty-seven out of 40 proteins were induced, 5 were increased and 8 were repressed. Mass spectrometry and subsequent identification confirmed that these proteins were involved in metabolism, DNA regulation, stress tolerance and plasmamembrane/cell wall biosynthesis/extension processes. These protein changes might be responsible for physiological and physical changes, respectively, resulted in increase in germination percentage. Further, characterization of these proteins will be of great help in understanding the molecular mechanism lying behind enhanced germination in response to ethanol treatment.

  4. Antioxidant and Nephroprotective Activities of Aconitum heterophyllum Root in Glycerol Induced Acute Renal Failure in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Eerike, Madhavi; Raghuraman, Lakshmipathy Prabhu; Rajamanickam, Maignana Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Aim The present study was to evaluate the antioxidant and nephroprotective activities of ethanolic extract of Aconitum heterophyllum root (EEAHR) in glycerol induced acute renal failure (ARF) in Wistar albino rats. Materials and Methods In vitro antioxidant activity of EEAHR was assessed using the 2, 2-diphenyl-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH assay), nitric oxide radical scavenging (NO assay), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 assay) and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) scavenging activity assays. In vivo study, rats were divided into four groups of six each for assessing the nephroprotective activity. Group-1 received normal saline, group-2 received 50% glycerol (10 ml/kg) alone, group-3 received glycerol and 250 mg/kg of EEAHR and group-4 received glycerol and 500 mg/kg of EEAHR. The renal injury and recovery was measured by serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), total proteins, albumin, urine output and histopathological changes. Results In vitro antioxidant activity of root extract was found to be equal to Vitamin C and in an in vivo study root extract treated animals showed significant attenuation of biochemical parameters and histopathological changes of the kidney compared to glycerol treated group and it was found to be more significant with the extract at 500 mg/kg than 250mg/kg. Conclusion The present study revealed that Aconitum heterophyllum root has shown antioxidant and nephroprotective activities. PMID:27134892

  5. nrDNA ITS sequence based SCAR marker to authenticate Aconitum heterophyllum and Cyperus rotundus in Ayurvedic raw drug source and prepared herbal products.

    PubMed

    Seethapathy, Gopalakrishnan Saroja; Balasubramani, Subramani Paranthaman; Venkatasubramanian, Padma

    2014-02-15

    To authenticate Ayurvedic medicinal plants Ativisha (Aconitum heterophyllum) and Musta (Cyperus rotundus) at the raw drug source and in prepared herbal products, nrDNA ITS sequence based SCAR markers were designed and validated spp.-specific SCAR primers gave amplicon of 415 bp and 134 bp, respectively, in authentic species. The SCAR primers (Cyr-FP and Cyr-RP) could identify tissue sample containing 750 μg to 4.76 mg/100mg of Musta in complex mixtures of DNA extracted from commercial herbal drugs. Ativisha could not be identified through SCAR markers suggesting that authentic species may not been used to prepare herbal drugs despite its being labelled as one of the ingredients in formulations. Analysis of individual tubers of Ativisha and Musta assures the presence of admixtures in raw drug trade of Ativisha, indicates the need to monitor the basic raw material supply and concludes, supplying plant materials through cultivation to manufacturing industries can minimize the risks of adulteration.

  6. Typification of Zapałowicz’s names in Aconitum section Aconitum

    PubMed Central

    Wacławska-Ćwiertnia, Klaudia; Mitka, Józef

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hugo Zapałowicz described and named 27 taxa in Aconitum sect. Aconitum. Their names are typified here. Two of them (Aconitum berdaui, Aconitum bucovinense) are deemed correct for currently accepted species of the Carpathians, 24 are reduced to synonymy under five taxa, and for one no original material has been located. The correct place and exact date of their publication, which differs from those usually assumed, have been ascertained by bibliographic verification and the study of archival documents. PMID:26884711

  7. [Fatal exposure to Aconitum napellus].

    PubMed

    German Jørgensen, Jørgen Rahr; Andersen, Anne Elsborg

    2013-06-10

    Fatal exposure to poisonous plants in northern Europe is a rare condition. In this case report we describe an intended poisoning with Aconitum napellus (monkshood), which contains the toxin aconitine. The lethal dose in adults is 3-6 mg. The toxin affects excitable cells such as neurons and myocytes causing degrees of unconsciousness, hypotension and cardiac arrhythmias. There is no antidote and treatment is symptomatic. We describe a patient who had eaten monkshood. She was treated with infusion of lidocaine and survived. After 24 hours of treatment and monitoring she was discharged from the intensive care unit.

  8. [Intoxication with Monkshood (Aconitum napellus)].

    PubMed

    Tuinema, Rinske M; Uijlings, Ruben; Dijkman, Marieke A; van den Broek, Marcel P H; de Lange, Dylan W

    2009-01-01

    Three patients presented with an intoxication caused by Aconitum napellus, commonly known as Aconite, Monkshood or Wolfsbane. The first patient, a woman aged 24, was resuscitated after accidental ingestion of plant material 'from nature'. She experienced severe ventricular tachyarrhythmias. After discharge she returned with identical symptoms, which were now interpreted as intentional intoxication in a suicide attempt. She was referred to the Psychiatry department. The second patient was a 2-year-old boy who had cutaneous exposure to Aconite. Except for some red spots around his mouth there were no other symptoms. The third patient was a 34-year-old woman who ate Monkshood, which she mistook for parsley. Alarmed by the bitter taste she contacted the hospital. She was treated with stomach lavage which removed most of the ingested plant material, and with activated charcoal. She had no symptoms during observation in the hospital. Aconite alkaloids are known to cause ventricular arrhythmia by a prolonged activation of sodium channels. Because there is no antidote, treatment is largely supportive but serious arrhythmias and respiratory arrest need to be anticipated.

  9. Chemical composition and biological activity of essential oils of Dracocephalum heterophyllum and Hyssopus officinalis from Western Himalaya.

    PubMed

    Stappen, Iris; Wanner, Jürgen; Tabanca, Nurhayat; Wedge, David E; Ali, Abbas; Kaul, Vijay K; Lal, Brij; Jaitak, Vikas; Gochev, Velizar K; Schmidt, Erich; Jirovetz, Leopold

    2015-01-01

    The essential oils of two representatives of the Lamiaceae, Dracocephalum heterophyllum Benth. and Hyssopus officinalis L., are described for their antifungal, antibacterial, larvicidal and inect biting deterrent activities. Additionally, the chemical compositions of the essential oils, analyzed by simultaneous GC-MS and GC-FID, and odor descriptions are given. The main components of H. officinalis oil were pinocarvone, cis-pinocamphone, and β-pinene. Citronellol was found as the main compound of D. heterophyllum essential oil. Antibacterial testing by agar dilution assay revealed greater activity of D. heterophyllum against Staphylococcus aureus compared with H. officinalis. D. heterophyllum essential oil also showed promising antifungal activity against Colletotrichum species and was more toxic to Aedes aegypti larvae in a larvicial bioassay. Both essential oils showed high activity in the biting deterrent bioassay.

  10. Chemical composition and biological activity of essential oils of Dracocephalum heterophyllum and Hyssopus officinalis from Western Himalaya

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The essential oils of two representatives of the Lamiaceae-family, Dracocephalum heterophyllum Benth. and Hyssopus officinalis L., are described for their antifungal, antibacterial and larvicidal as well as biting deterrent activities. Additionally, the essential oils’ chemical compositions, analyze...

  11. Flavonoids from Aconitum napellus subsp. neomontanum.

    PubMed

    Fico, G; Braca, A; De Tommasi, N; Tomè, F; Morelli, I

    2001-06-01

    Three flavonol glycosides quercetin 7-O-(6-trans-caffeoyl)-beta-glucopyranosyl-(1-->3)-alpha-rhamnopyranoside-3-O-beta-glucopyranoside (1), kaempferol 7-O-(6-trans-caffeoyl)-beta-glucopyranosyl-(1-->3)-alpha-rhamnopyranoside-3-O-beta-glucopyranoside (2), and kaempferol 7-O-(6-trans-p-coumaroyl)-beta-glucopyranosyl-(1-->3)-alpha-rhamnopyranoside-3-O-beta-glucopyranoside (3), together with the known beta-3,4-dihydroxyphenethyl beta-glucopyranoside, were isolated from the flowers of Aconitum napellus subsp. neomontanum. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods, including 2D NMR spectral techniques.

  12. Alkaloids with antioxidant activities from Aconitum handelianum.

    PubMed

    Yin, Tian-Peng; Cai, Le; Xing, Yun; Yu, Jing; Li, Xue-Jiao; Mei, Rui-Feng; Ding, Zhong-Tao

    2016-06-01

    A new C20-diterpenoid alkaloid handelidine (1) and twenty-seven known alkaloids (2-28) were isolated from the roots of Aconitum handelianum. Their structures were established on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analyses. The study indicated that denudatine-type C20-diterpenoid alkaloids with vicinal-triol system and benzyltetrahydroisoquinoline alkaloids exhibited significant antioxidant activities measured by three antioxidant test systems. The aconitine-type C19-diterpenoid alkaloids could serve as potential secondary antioxidants for their strong binding effects to metal ions.

  13. [Long QRS tachycardia secondary to Aconitum napellus alkaloid ingestion].

    PubMed

    Gaibazzi, Nicola; Gelmini, Gian Paolo; Montresor, Graziano; Canel, Daniela; Comini, Teresa; Fracalossi, Claudio; Martinetti, Claudio; Poeta, Maria Luisa; Ziacchi, Vigilio

    2002-08-01

    The roots and seeds of the aconite (Aconitum napellus) contain alkaloids with modulatory activity on the sodium voltage-dependent channels; most fatal cases have been determined by ventricular tachycardia and respiratory paralysis. The only established treatment is supportive. We report a case of poisoning from Aconitum napellus, ingested by a husband and wife who thought the plant was "mountain chicory". They both had tachyarrhythmias, but the husband had more malignant episodes of hemodynamically unstable wide QRS tachycardia and respiratory paralysis requiring mechanical ventilation.

  14. Evidence for Mass Flow in Flowering Individuals of the Submersed Vascular Plant Myriophyllum heterophyllum.

    PubMed Central

    Schuette, J. L.; Klug, M. J.

    1995-01-01

    Myriophyllum heterophyllum Michx. is a rhizomatous submersed aquatic plant that produces a short, emergent floral spike. We hypothesized that lacunar pressures in emergent spikes should be at or near atmospheric pressure and that a mass flow of gases from submersed stems through the rhizome to emergent stems may occur as lacunar O2 concentrations and pressures in submersed stems increase during photosynthesis. We examined the potential for a pressure gradient ([delta]P) to develop along this pathway by measuring diurnal changes in lacunar gas composition and pressure in submersed stems of nonflowering plants and emergent stems of flowering individuals. Methane release from emergent spikes was also monitored during three diurnal cycles to evaluate the hypothesis that the [delta]P is maintained by the release of lacunar gases to the atmosphere. Lacunar O2 concentrations and pressures in submersed stems increased at sunrise and reached maximum levels by midday. Although O2 fluctuated similarly in emergent stems, lacunar pressures remained at or near atmospheric pressure, indicating that a [delta]P is generated between submersed and emergent stems during photosynthesis. Methane release from emergent spikes increased as lacunar pressures increased, indicating that rhizome gases are transported through emergent stems by mass flow and the [delta]P is maintained by venting lacunar gases from emergent spikes. The potential for mass flow in both flowering and nonflowering individuals is discussed. PMID:12228542

  15. Establishment of a bioassay for the toxicity evaluation and quality control of Aconitum herbs.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yi; Wang, Jia-bo; Zhao, Yan-ling; Shan, Li-mei; Li, Bao-cai; Fang, Fang; Jin, Cheng; Xiao, Xiao-he

    2012-01-15

    Currently, no bioassay is available for evaluating the toxicity of Aconitum herbs, which are well known for their lethal cardiotoxicity and neurotoxicity. In this study, we established a bioassay to evaluate the toxicity of Aconitum herbs. Test sample and standard solutions were administered to rats by intravenous infusion to determine their minimum lethal doses (MLD). Toxic potency was calculated by comparing the MLD. The experimental conditions of the method were optimized and standardized to ensure the precision and reliability of the bioassay. The application of the standardized bioassay was then tested by analyzing 18 samples of Aconitum herbs. Additionally, three major toxic alkaloids (aconitine, mesaconitine, and hypaconitine) in Aconitum herbs were analyzed using a liquid chromatographic method, which is the current method of choice for evaluating the toxicity of Aconitum herbs. We found that for all Aconitum herbs, the total toxicity of the extract was greater than the toxicity of the three alkaloids. Therefore, these three alkaloids failed to account for the total toxicity of Aconitum herbs. Compared with individual chemical analysis methods, the chief advantage of the bioassay is that it characterizes the total toxicity of Aconitum herbs. An incorrect toxicity evaluation caused by quantitative analysis of the three alkaloids might be effectively avoided by performing this bioassay. This study revealed that the bioassay is a powerful method for the safety assessment of Aconitum herbs.

  16. Microcalorimetry studies of the antimicrobial actions of Aconitum alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yan-bin; Liu, Lian; Shao, Wei; Wei, Ting; Lin, Gui-mei

    2015-08-01

    The metabolic activity of organisms can be measured by recording the heat output using microcalorimetry. In this paper, the total alkaloids in the traditional Chinese medicine Radix Aconiti Lateralis were extracted and applied to Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The effect of alkaloids on bacteria growth was studied by microcalorimetry. The power-time curves were plotted with a thermal activity monitor (TAM) air isothermal microcalorimeter and parameters such as growth rate constant (μ), peak-time (Tm), inhibitory ratio (I), and enhancement ratio (E) were calculated. The relationships between the concentration of Aconitum alkaloids and μ of E. coli or S. aureus were discussed. The results showed that Aconitum alkaloids had little effect on E. coli and had a potentially inhibitory effect on the growth of S. aureus.

  17. Evaluation of Aconitum diterpenoid alkaloids as antiproliferative agents.

    PubMed

    Wada, Koji; Ohkoshi, Emika; Zhao, Yu; Goto, Masuo; Morris-Natschke, Susan L; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2015-04-01

    Little information has been reported on the antitumor effects of the diterpenoid alkaloid constituents of Aconitum plants, used in the herbal drug 'bushi'. This study was aimed at determining the antitumor activities of Aconitum C19-and C20-diterpenoid alkaloids and synthetic derivatives against lung (A549), prostate (DU145), nasopharyngeal (KB), and vincristine-resistant nasopharyngeal (KB-VIN) cancer cell lines. Newly synthesized C20-diterpenoid alkaloid derivatives showed substantial suppressive effects against all human tumor cell lines tested. In contrast, natural and derivatized C19-diterpenoid alkaloids showed only a slight or no effect. Most of the active compounds were hetisine-type C20-diterpenoid alkaloids, specifically kobusine and pseudokobusine analogs with two different substitution patterns, C-11 and C-11,15. Notably, several C20-diterpenoid alkaloids were more potent against multidrug-resistant KB subline KB-VIN cells. Pseudokobusine 11-3'-trifluoromethylbenzoate (94) is a possible promising new lead meriting additional evaluation against multidrug-resistant tumors.

  18. [Aconitine analogues in wild Aconitum plants: contents toxicity to mice and decrease by boiling].

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Yoshimasa; Itou, Takeshi; Numazawa, Toshiaki; Wada, Akinobu

    2013-01-01

    Simultaneous determination of four aconitine analogues (ACs) (AC; aconitine, HA; hypaconitine, JA; jesaconitine, MA; mesaconitine) in leaves and roots of wild Aconitum plants (Aconitum japonicum THUNBERG, Aconitum okuyamae Nakai) was carried out to elucidate the relation between toxicity to mice and ACs content determind by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. The total amounts of ACs in leaves, roots, petals and nectaries of Aconitum japonicum collected at Sagae-shi Tashiro were 5.9 μg/g, 928.1 μg/g, 46.1 μg/g, and 69.8 μg/g, respectively. Despite the high contents in nectary, commercial honey contained no ACs. Extract of wild Aconitum japonicum roots which contained ACs (2.69 mg/g) was administered to 5 mice orally at 1.0 g/kg (fresh root equivalent), and 2 mice died. On the other hand, 3 of 5 mice died after being given the standard AC (3.0 mg/kg, p.o.). These findings confirmed good coincidence between toxicity and quantitative values. Mice given extract of Aconitum okuyamae root (100 g/kg, p.o.) without ACs showed no toxic symptoms. Residual ACs in Aconitum leaves were examined after boiling. The remaining percentage of ACs in leaves after 0.5 minutes boiling was 31.6%, and the amount in the boiling water was 54.5%. MA is converted into benzoylmesaconine by hydrolysis (by boiling). Therefore food poisoning caused by Aconitum plants is explained by detection of benzoylmesaconine formed during food preparation.

  19. Identification of diterpene alkaloids from Aconitum napellus subsp. firmum and GIRK channel activities of some Aconitum alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Tivadar; Orvos, Péter; Bánsághi, Száva; Forgo, Peter; Jedlinszki, Nikoletta; Tálosi, László; Hohmann, Judit; Csupor, Dezső

    2013-10-01

    Diterpene alkaloids neoline (1), napelline (2), isotalatizidine (3), karakoline (4), senbusine A (5), senbusine C (6), aconitine (7) and taurenine (8) were identified from Aconitum napellus L. subsp. firmum, four (2-4, 6) of which are reported for the first time from this plant. The structures were determined by means of LC-MS, 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy, including (1)H-(1)H COSY, NOESY, HSQC and HMBC experiments. Electrophysiological effects of the isolated compounds, together with nine diterpene alkaloids previously obtained from Aconitum toxicum and Consolida orientalis were investigated on stable transfected HEK-hERG (Kv11.1) and HEK-GIRK1/4 (Kir3.1 and Kir3.4) cell lines using automated patch clamp equipment. Significant blocking activity on GIRK channel was exerted by aconitine (7) (45% at 10 μM), but no blocking activities of the other investigated compounds were detected. The tested compounds were inactive on hERG channel in the tested concentration. The comparison of the previously reported metabolites of A. napellus subsp. firmum and compounds identified in our experiment reveals substantial variability of the alkaloid profile of this taxon.

  20. Ultrasound-assisted extraction of total flavonoids from Aconitum gymnandrum

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ling-Li; Wang, Dan; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Peng, Hong-Yan; Yuan, Ming-Yong; Gao, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Background: Aconitum gymnandrum is a Chinese traditional herb used as carminative and analgesic. In this study, A. gymnandrum was used as an experimental matrix. Materials and Methods: Optimized ultrasonic extraction technology of total flavonoids from the A. gymnandrum Maxim was studied by using the methodology of single factor and orthogonal design to study the effects of operation conditions, such as ethanol content, ultrasonic wave power, temperature, ultrasonic wave radiation time, and the ratio of sample weight to solvent volume. Result: Through the orthogonal experiment, the optimal extraction conditions were determined as follows: Ultrasonic power 100 W, ultrasonic temperature 45°C, 60% ethyl alcohol, extraction time 30 min, and solid–liquid ratio 1:20. Conclusion: Under the optimum parameters, the extraction ratio of total flavonoids from the A. gymnandrum Maxim is about 1.278%. PMID:24914295

  1. Phylogeny and reclassification of Aconitum subgenus Lycoctonum (Ranunculaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yu; Luo, Yan; Gao, Qi; Ren, Chen; Yuan, Qiong; Yang, Qin-Er

    2017-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses were performed using multiple nuclear (ITS and ETS) and chloroplast regions (ndhF-trnL, psbA-trnH, psbD-trnT, and trnT-trnL) to test the monophyly of Aconitum subgen. Lycoctonum (Ranunculaceae) and reconstruct the phylogenetic relationships within the subgenus. The subgenus as currently circumscribed is revealed to be polyphyletic. To achieve its monophyly, sect. Galeata and sect. Fletcherum, both being unispecific and each having a unique array of characters (the latter even having the aberrant base chromosome number of x = 6), must be removed from the subgenus. The subgenus Lycoctonum should thus be redefined to include only two sections, the unispecific sect. Alatospermum and the relatively species-rich sect. Lycoctonum. The section Alatospermum, which is both morphologically and karyologically in the primitive condition, is resolved as the first diverging lineage of the subgenus Lycoctonum clade. The monophyly of sect. Lycoctonum is strongly supported, but all the ten series currently recognized within the section are revealed to be para- or poly-phyletic. Five major clades are recovered within the section. We propose to treat them as five series: ser. Crassiflora, ser. Scaposa, ser. Volubilia, ser. Longicassidata, and ser. Lycoctonia. Thus, a formal reclassification of subgen. Lycoctonum is presented, which involves segregating both sect. Galeata and sect. Fletcherum from the subgenus as two independent subgenera within the genus Aconitum, reinstating one series (ser. Crassiflora) and abolishing six series (ser. Laevia, ser. Longibracteolata, ser. Micrantha, ser. Ranunculoidea, ser. Reclinata, and ser. Umbrosa) within sect. Lycoctonum. The series affiliation of some species within the section is adjusted accordingly. PMID:28141851

  2. Quantification of Aconitum alkaloids in aconite roots by a modified RP-HPLC method.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhi-Hong; Xie, Ying; Zhou, Hua; Wang, Jing-Rong; Liu, Zhong-Qiu; Wong, Yuen-Fan; Cai, Xiong; Xu, Hong-Xi; Liu, Liang

    2005-01-01

    The three Aconitum alkaloids, aconitine (1), mesaconitine (2) and hypaconitine (3), are pharmacologically active but also highly toxic. A standardised method is needed for assessing the levels of these alkaloids in aconite roots in order to ensure the safe use of these plant materials as medicinal herbs. By optimising extraction, separation and measurement conditions, a reliable, reproducible and accurate method for the quantitative determination of all three Aconitum alkaloids in unprocessed and processed aconite roots has been developed. This method should be appropriate for use in the quality control of Aconitum products. The three Aconitum alkaloids were separated by a modified HPLC method employing a C18 column gradient eluted with acetonitrile and ammonium bicarbonate buffer. Quantification of Aconitum alkaloids, detected at 240 nm, in different batches of samples showed that the content of 1, 2 and 3 varied significantly. In general, the alkaloid content of unprocessed roots was higher than that of processed roots. These variations were considered to be the result of differences in species, processing methods and places of origin of the samples.

  3. Enrichment and purification of six Aconitum alkaloids from Aconiti kusnezoffii radix by macroporous resins and quantification by HPLC-MS.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingjing; Li, Qing; Liu, Ran; Yin, Yidi; Chen, Xiaohui; Bi, Kaishun

    2014-06-01

    Aconitine, mesaconitine, hypaconitine, benzoylaconine, benzoylmesaconine and benzoylhypaconine are six main Aconitum alkaloids from traditional Chinese medicine, Aconiti kusnezoffii radix, which possess highly bioactive as well as highly toxic character for medicinal use. In the present study, for the purpose of better utilizing the toxic herbal material, the performance characteristics of NKA-II, D101, X-5, AB-8, S-8, HPD722 and HPD750 macroporous resins for the enrichment and purification of these six Aconitum alkaloids were critically evaluated. Results showed that NKA-II offered the best adsorption and desorption capacities for six Aconitum alkaloids among the seven macroporous resins tested, which were affected significantly by the pH value. Subsequently, dynamic adsorption and desorption experiments had been carried out with the column packed by NKA-II resin to optimize the separation process of six Aconitum alkaloids. After one run treatment with NKA-II resin, the content of total six Aconitum alkaloids were increased from 5.87% to 60.3%, the recovery was 75.8%. Meanwhile, a validated HPLC-MS method had been developed to qualitative and quantitative these six Aconitum alkaloids. This method would provide scientific references to the large-scale production of six Aconitum alkaloids from Aconiti kusnezoffii radix or other plants and might also expand the secure application of these highly toxic components for pharmacy.

  4. A study of the diterpene alkaloids of Aconitum napellus ssp. neomontanum during its onthogenetic cycle.

    PubMed

    Colombo, M L; Bravin, M; Tome, F

    1988-12-01

    Qualitative and quantitative variations in the diterpene alkaloids content in the neomontanum subspecies of Aconitum napellus, growing near lake of Como, were studied throughout its complete onthogenetic cycle. Aconitine, N-deethylaconitine and two compounds with m.w. = 688 and m.w. = 629 have been detected in the various organs of plant almost at any time during the vegetative cycle.

  5. Circadian aspects of hyperthermia in mice induced by Aconitum napellus

    PubMed Central

    de la Peña, Salvador Sánchez; Sothern, Robert B.; López, Fernando Santillán; Lujambio, Irene Mendoza; Waizel-Bucay, José; Sánchez, Carolina Olarte; Monroy, Claudia Pérez; Betancourt, Eduardo Tena

    2011-01-01

    Background: Aconitum napellus (Acn) is used topically to relieve pain, itching and inflammation, and internally to reduce febrile states, among others. Any circadian time-related consequences of Acn administration are unknown. The objective of this study was to explore the effects of two doses of Acn on body temperature (BT) of mice treated at six different times over 24 hours. Materials and Methods: BALB/c female mice were housed in six chambers (six mice each) with air temperature 24 ± 3°C, humidity 60 ± 4%, and a 12-hours light (L)/12-hours dark cycle, but with L-onset staggered by 4 hours between chambers so that study at one external test time resulted in six test times (02, 06, 10, 14, 18 and 22 hours [h] after light onset). Rectal temperature (RT; in °C) was measured at baseline (B) and 1 hour after oral treatment with placebo (P) or two doses of Acn (6C and 30C, two studies each) in six studies over an 8 day span. The difference in RT for each mouse from the respective B + P timepoint mean RT was computed following each Acn treatment, and data from each of the six studies (original RT and difference from B + P) were analyzed for time-effect by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and for circadian rhythm by 24-hour cosine fitting. Results: A circadian rhythm in RT was found at B and after P (mean: 35.58°C vs. 35.69°C; peak: 15:31 h vs. 15:40 h) and after each Acn dose (30C or 6C). Acn induced hyperthermia and the overall change in BT was rhythmically significant for each dose (mean = +1.95°C vs. +1.70°C), with greatest hyperthermia observed during the L-span for each dose (peak = 08:56 h vs. 05:17 h). Conclusion: Acn administered around the clock induced hyperthermia overall and in a time-dependent manner, with greatest effects during the resting (L) span. Thus, time of day may significantly impact the outcome of Acn and other homeopathic treatments and should be considered in determining optimal dosing and treatment time(s) in order to increase the desired

  6. Aconitum Alkaloid Poisoning Related to the Culinary Uses of Aconite Roots

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Thomas Y. K.

    2014-01-01

    Aconite roots (roots or root tubers of the Aconitum species) are eaten as root vegetables and used to prepare herbal soups and meals, mainly for their purported health benefits. Aconite roots contain aconitine and other Aconitum alkaloids, which are well known cardiotoxins and neurotoxins. To better understand why Aconitum alkaloid poisoning related to the culinary uses of aconite roots can occur and characterize the risks posed by these “food supplements”, relevant published reports were reviewed. From 1995 to 2013, there were eight reports of aconite poisoning after consumption of these herbal soups and meals, including two reports of large clusters of cases (n = 19–45) and two reports of cases (n = 15–156) managed by two hospitals over a period of 4.5 to 5 years. The herbal formulae used did not adhere to the suggested guidelines, with regarding to the doses (50–500 g instead of 3–30 g per person) and types (raw instead of processed) of aconite roots used. The quantities of Aconitum alkaloids involved were huge, taking into consideration the doses of aconite roots used to prepare herbal soups/meals and the amounts of aconite roots and herbal soups/meals consumed. In a large cluster of cases, despite simmering raw “caowu” (the root tuber of A. kusnezoffii) in pork broth for 24 h, all 19 family members who consumed this soup and boiled “caowu” developed poisoning. Severe or even fatal aconite poisoning can occur after consumption of herbal soups and foods prepared from aconite roots. Even prolonged boiling may not be protective if raw preparations and large quantities of aconite roots are used. The public should be warned of the risk of severe poisoning related to the culinary and traditional medicinal uses of aconite roots. PMID:25184557

  7. [Verification of a new processing technology for pilot production of Aconitum coreanum (Lévl.) Raipaics].

    PubMed

    Mao, S; Cheng, L; Wu, L; Lu, Z; Ye, Z; Zhu, D; Wang, J

    1998-03-01

    The stability and feasibility of a new technology for processing Aconitum coreanum have been tested for pilot production by determining the components, toxicity(LD50) and traditional identification standard. The result shows that the contents of guanfu A and total alkaloid between the small trial and pilot production are slightly different and LD50 are nearly similar. Hypaconitine was not found in all kinds of processed products. The new technology has thus been proved stable and feasible.

  8. Aconitum alkaloid poisoning related to the culinary uses of aconite roots.

    PubMed

    Chan, Thomas Y K

    2014-09-02

    Aconite roots (roots or root tubers of the Aconitum species) are eaten as root vegetables and used to prepare herbal soups and meals, mainly for their purported health benefits. Aconite roots contain aconitine and other Aconitum alkaloids, which are well known cardiotoxins and neurotoxins. To better understand why Aconitum alkaloid poisoning related to the culinary uses of aconite roots can occur and characterize the risks posed by these "food supplements", relevant published reports were reviewed. From 1995 to 2013, there were eight reports of aconite poisoning after consumption of these herbal soups and meals, including two reports of large clusters of cases (n = 19-45) and two reports of cases (n = 15-156) managed by two hospitals over a period of 4.5 to 5 years. The herbal formulae used did not adhere to the suggested guidelines, with regarding to the doses (50-500 g instead of 3-30 g per person) and types (raw instead of processed) of aconite roots used. The quantities of Aconitum alkaloids involved were huge, taking into consideration the doses of aconite roots used to prepare herbal soups/meals and the amounts of aconite roots and herbal soups/meals consumed. In a large cluster of cases, despite simmering raw "caowu" (the root tuber of A. kusnezoffii) in pork broth for 24 h, all 19 family members who consumed this soup and boiled "caowu" developed poisoning. Severe or even fatal aconite poisoning can occur after consumption of herbal soups and foods prepared from aconite roots. Even prolonged boiling may not be protective if raw preparations and large quantities of aconite roots are used. The public should be warned of the risk of severe poisoning related to the culinary and traditional medicinal uses of aconite roots.

  9. Severe acute poisoning with homemade Aconitum napellus capsules: toxicokinetic and clinical data.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Fabienne; Compagnon, Patricia; Kaliszczak, Isabelle Guery; Kaliszczak, Yann; Caliskan, Valérie; Girault, Christophe

    2005-01-01

    Aconitum napellus is an extremely dangerous plant that contains various toxic diterpenoid alkaloids, mainly aconitine primarily concentrated in the roots. We report a case of acute intoxication of a 21-year-old man admitted to our Emergency Department after the ingestion, in order to sleep, of three homemade Aconitum napellus capsules. Capsules were measured to contain 237 mg of root and 19 microg of aconitine. The patient experienced the first symptoms on wakening 5 hours later with generalized paresthesia, nausea, diarrhea, vertigo, thoracic pain dyspnea, and dyschromatopsia. At admission, 7 hours after intake electrocardiographic analysis showed a sinusal bradycardia with polymorphic and bigeminal ventricular extrasystolia. Cardiovascular and neurological symptoms disappeared, respectively within 11 and 13 hours of ingestion. The patient was discharged from the ICU on day 2. Plasmatic concentrations at H7, H9, H14 H19, and after ingestion were, respectively, of 1.75, 0.75, 0.35, and 0.02 ng/mL. The calculated half-life of aconitine was 3 hours. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case with an aconitine toxicokinetic-effect relationship. The authors stress that clinicians must be aware of possible occurrence of acute poisoning with Aconitum napellus in European countries and in the United States as herbal medicine is becoming increasingly popular.

  10. Separation and purification of five alkaloids from Aconitum duclouxii by counter-current chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yarong; Cai, Shining; Chen, Yang; Deng, Liang; Zhou, Xumei; Liu, Jia; Xu, Xin; Xia, Qiang; Lin, Mao; Zhang, Jili; Huang, Weili; Wang, Wenjun; Xiang, Canhui; Cui, Guozhen; Du, Lianfeng; He, Huan; Qi, Baohui

    2015-07-01

    C19 -diterpenoid alkaloids are the main components of Aconitum duclouxii Levl. The process of separation and purification of these compounds in previous studies was tedious and time consuming, requiring multiple chromatographic steps, thus resulted in low recovery and high cost. In the present work, five C19 -diterpenoid alkaloids, namely, benzoylaconine (1), N-deethylaconitine (2), aconitine (3), deoxyaconitine (4), and ducloudine A (5), were efficiently prepared from A. duclouxii Levl (Aconitum L.) by ethyl acetate extraction followed with counter-current chromatography. In the process of separation, the critical conditions of counter-current chromatography were optimized. The two-phase solvent system composed of n-hexane/ethyl acetate/methanol/water/NH3 ·H2 O (25%) (1:1:1:1:0.1, v/v) was selected and 148.2 mg of 1, 24.1 mg of 2, 250.6 mg of 3, 73.9 mg of 4, and 31.4 mg of 5 were obtained from 1 g total Aconitum alkaloids extract, respectively, in a single run within 4 h. Their purities were found to be 98.4, 97.2, 98.2, 96.8, and 96.6%, respectively, by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography analysis. The presented separation and purification method was simple, fast, and efficient, and the obtained highly pure alkaloids are suitable for biochemical and toxicological investigation.

  11. DPPH radical scavenging activity of two flavonol glycosides from Aconitum napellus sp. lusitanicum.

    PubMed

    Luis, J C; Valdés, F; Martín, R; Carmona, A J; Díaz, Jesús G

    2006-09-01

    The DPPH radical scavenging activity of two flavonol glycosides obtained from ethanolic extracts of Aconitum napellus sp. lusitanicum was studied. The results showed a high DPPH antiradical activity of compound 1 (quercetin 3-O-(6-trans-caffeoyl)-beta-glucopyranosyl-(1-->2)-beta-glucopyranosyl-7-O-alpha-rhamnopyranoside) when compared with compound 2 (quercetin-3-sophoroside-7-rhamnopyranoside), rutin and ascorbic acid. The relationship between the caffeoyl and rhamnopyranoside groups in the flavonol glycosides structures and the DPPH antiradical activity was also discussed.

  12. Salade malade: malignant ventricular arrhythmias due to an accidental intoxication with Aconitum napellus

    PubMed Central

    Weijters, B.J.; Verbunt, R.J.A.M.; Hoogsteen, J.; Visser, R.F.

    2008-01-01

    Intoxication with Aconitum napellus is rare in our regions. Aconite alkaloids can cause ventricular arrhythmia by a prolonged activation of sodium channels. Because the margin of safety is low between the analgesic and toxic dose, intoxication is not rare when Aconite is used in herbal medicine. We present a case in which a 39-year-old male was accidentally intoxicated with Aconite. Even though no antidote or adequate therapy is available he was successfully resuscitated. (Neth Heart J 2008;16:96-9.) PMID:18345331

  13. Salade malade: malignant ventricular arrhythmias due to an accidental intoxication with Aconitum napellus.

    PubMed

    Weijters, B J; Verbunt, R J A M; Hoogsteen, J; Visser, R F

    2008-01-01

    Intoxication with Aconitum napellus is rare in our regions. Aconite alkaloids can cause ventricular arrhythmia by a prolonged activation of sodium channels. Because the margin of safety is low between the analgesic and toxic dose, intoxication is not rare when Aconite is used in herbal medicine. We present a case in which a 39-year-old male was accidentally intoxicated with Aconite. Even though no antidote or adequate therapy is available he was successfully resuscitated. (Neth Heart J 2008;16:96-9.).

  14. The letter: private text or public place? The Mattioli-Gesner controversy about the aconitum primum.

    PubMed

    Delisle, Candice

    2004-01-01

    From 1555 to 1565, Pietro Andrea Mattioli and Conrad Gesner were locked in controversy over the veracity of Mattioli's picture of aconitum primum. This dispute led to numerous vehement publications and to intensive exchanges of letters, not only between the protagonists but also within their own and sometimes inter-connected networks of correspondence. This dispute illustrates how 16th-century scholars played upon the ambiguous place of these letters between private and public space to deal with controversy in the Republic of Letters.

  15. [Optimization of the processing technology of Aconitum kusnezoffii Reichb. by orthogonal test].

    PubMed

    Liu, B; Li, F; Zhong, Z C

    1994-04-01

    A study on the processing technology of Aconitum kusnezoffii by orthogonal test was carried out by assaying as criteria the changes in contents of the total alkaloids and ester type alkaloids before and after processing. The optimum experimental conditions were obtained after treating the experimental data with a formula for the multiple criteria, and the optimal processing results were achieved by having the material macerated with water, cut into thick pieces and then steamed under high pressure (127 degrees C, 0.15MPa) for 3 hours.

  16. Four new C18-diterpenoid alkaloids with analgesic activity from Aconitum weixiense.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Da-Ke; Ai, Hong-Lian; Zi, Shu-Hui; Zhang, Li-Mei; Yang, Sheng-Chao; Guo, Hua-Chun; Shen, Yong; Chen, Yan-Ping; Chen, Ji-Jun

    2013-12-01

    Four new C18-diterpenoid alkaloids, weisaconitines A-D (1-4), were isolated from Aconitum weixiense. Based on extensive UV, IR, MS, 1D and 2D NMR analyses, their structures were elucidated as 8-O-ethyldolaconine (1), 4-demethylgenicunine B (2), 14-oxoaconosine (3), and 8-O-ethylaconosine (4). The analgesic activity of compound 4 was studied with CH3COOH-induced writhing model in mice. Compound 4 showed writhing inhibitions of 24% (50 mg/kg), 26% (100 mg/kg) and 34% (200 mg/kg), respectively, as compared to the reference drug aspirin (63%) at a dose of 200 mg/kg.

  17. Biological and Molecular Characterization of a New Carlavirus Isolated from an Aconitum sp.

    PubMed

    Cohen, J; Zeidan, M; Rosner, A; Gera, A

    2000-04-01

    ABSTRACT A new virus was isolated from symptomless Aconitum napellus plants. The virus, for which the name Aconitum latent virus (AcLV) is proposed, has flexuous particles 640 nm in length. The experimental host range was limited to Nicotiana clevelandii. Electron microscopy studies of ultrathin sections of infected A. napellus tissues revealed the presence of elongated virus particles. No inclusion bodies characteristic of potyvirus infection were observed. AcLV was purified from naturally infected A. napellus by cesium chloride step gradient centrifugation. In sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of dissociated purified virus preparations, a major protein component with a molecular mass of 35 kDa was observed. Diagnostic antibodies that could specifically bind to virus particles were produced. The 5' terminus (620 nucleotides) of the viral RNA was cloned and sequenced. It comprised 71 nucleotides from the untranslated 5' terminus and 549 nucleotides of an open reading frame encoding 183 amino acids. Comparison of the predicted amino acid sequence with those of other plant viruses revealed 40 to 60% identity with several carlaviruses. Based on particle morphology, absence of inclusion bodies in ultrathin sections, the relative molecular weight of the coat protein, the nucleotide sequence, and predicted amino acid homology, it is suggested that this virus belongs to the carlavirus group.

  18. Incidence and Causes of Aconitum Alkaloid Poisoning in Hong Kong from 1989 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Chan, Thomas Y K

    2015-08-01

    Aconite roots contain Aconitum alkaloids, which are highly toxic cardiotoxins and neurotoxins. In this review, the main objective was to determine the incidence and causes of Aconitum alkaloid poisoning in Hong Kong between 1989 and 2010, based on six published reports from the territory-wide poison control units. In the New Territories East of Hong Kong, the incidence of aconite poisoning showed a sudden and sustained decrease from 0.60 (1989-1991) to 0.16 (1992-1993) and 0.17 (1996-1998) per 100 000 population, after publicity measures in late 1991 to promote awareness of the toxicity of aconite roots. In the whole of Hong Kong, the incidence of aconite poisoning was even lower in January 2000-June 2004 (0.03 per 100 000 population). However, aconite poisoning became more common again in April 2004-July 2009 and 2008-2010 (0.15 and 0.28 per 100 000 population). Overdoses and use of inadequately processed aconite roots were important causes. As from 2004 to 2009, 'hidden' aconite poisoning (toxicity caused by contaminants in other dispensed herbs) emerged as an important cause. It is important to continue the safety monitoring of potent herbs and the networking of poison control units. Further systematic studies would be required to identify the likely sources of contamination of herbs.

  19. [Isolation and preparation of an imidazole alkaloid from radix radix of Aconitum pendulum Busch by semi-preparative high-speed counter-current chromatography].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongling; Chen, Tao; Chen, Chen; Zou, Denglang; Li, Yulin

    2014-05-01

    Aconitum pendulum Busch is rich C19 diterpenoid alkaloids, but there is no report of imidazole alkaloid in Aconitum pendulum Busch. In this study, an imidazole alkaloid named 1H-imidazole-2-carboxylic acid, butyl ester (ICABE) was successfully separated from Aconitum pendulum Busch with semi-preparative high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC). The partition coefficient was measured by HPLC to select the solvent systems for ICABE separation by HSCCC. The separation was performed with a two-phase solvent system composed of n-hexane-chloroform-ethanol-water (10:1 : 13:2, v/v/v/v). The upper phase was used as the stationary phase and the lower phase as the mobile phase. It was operated at a flow rate of 1.8 mL/min. The apparatus was rotated at 850 r/min, and the detection wavelength was set at 230 nm. Under the selected conditions, a high efficiency separation of HSCCC was achieved, and 7.5 mg of ICABE was obtained from 100 mg of the crude sample of Aconitum pendulum in one-step separation within 350 min. The HPLC analysis showed that the purity of the compound was over 98%. The chemical structure was confirmed by UV, 1H-NMR and 13C-NMR. The established method is simple, highly efficient and suitable for large scale separation of ICABE from radix of Aconitum pendulum Busch.

  20. Allee effects within small populations of Aconitum napellus ssp. lusitanicum, a protected subspecies in northern France.

    PubMed

    Le Cadre, Solenn; Tully, Thomas; Mazer, Susan J; Ferdy, Jean-Baptiste; Moret, Jacques; Machon, Nathalie

    2008-01-01

    Plants growing at low density can suffer from Allee effects as a result of pollen limitation. Previous studies of Allee effects have focused on the effects of variation among populations in size or density on reproduction. Here, the effects of plant distribution within populations on fitness components are explored in a rare plant, Aconitum napellus ssp. lusitanicum, and ecological and genetic mechanisms underlying these effects are identified. To detect pollen limitation, seed production was compared under natural versus hand-supplemented pollinations on inflorescences of different sizes in natural patches differing both in flower density and in isolation from other patches. Germination rate and juvenile survival of seeds produced in low- and high-density patches were also compared. Pollen-supplemented flowers always produced more seeds than open-pollinated flowers, especially among small plants and plants growing at low density. Offspring produced in low-density patches exhibited lower fitness that those produced in high-density patches. This could have been caused by post-fertilization mechanisms, including inbreeding depression or differential maternal resource allocation. These results show that Allee effects on fitness components (ecological and genetic Allee effects) occur within A. napellus populations at different spatial scales. The spatial distribution of plants seems to be a crucial factor affecting reproductive output and fitness.

  1. Improvement of Aconitum napellus micropropagation by liquid culture on floating membrane rafts.

    PubMed

    Watad, A A; Kochba, M; Nissim, A; Gaba, V

    1995-03-01

    An efficient method was developed using floating membrane rafts (Liferaft(™)) for the micropropagation of Aconitum napellus (Ranunculaceae), a cut flower crop with a low natural propagation rate. This was achieved by introducing shoot tips into culture on Murashige and Skoog's (1962) solid medium, or liquid medium-supported rafts, supplemented by different levels of benzyl adenine (BA). Optimum shoot proliferation on solid medium required 4mg/l BA, whereas for expiants supported on rafts optimal proliferation was achieved at 0.25mg/l BA. Maximum shoot proliferation was found using the floating rafts (propagation ratio of 4.2 per month), 45% higher than the maximum value on solid medium. A similar value could be obtained on solid medium after a period of 2 months. The optimal response to BA was similar for fresh weight gain and shoot length. Growth in a shallow layer of liquid in shake flasks gives a similar shoot multiplication rate to that on floating rafts; however, submerged leaves brown and die.

  2. Isolation of diterpenoid alkaloids from herb and flowers of aconitum napellus ssp. vulgare and electrospray ion trap multiple MS study of these alkaloids

    PubMed

    Chen; Koelliker; Oehme; Katz

    1999-05-01

    Chemical investigation of herb and flowers of Aconitum napellus L. ssp. vulgare led to the isolation of 12 diterpenoid alkaloids. Their chemical structures were identified on the basis of NMR and MS and of their complete ion trap multiple fragmentation mass spectrometry study.

  3. Nonomuraea flavida sp. nov., a novel species of soil actinomycete isolated from Aconitum napellus rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaofeng; Shi, Jindi; Li, Dan; Wu, Yingying; Huang, Yaojian

    2015-11-01

    A novel actinomycete strain, YN-5-1T, isolated from the rhizosphere soil of a medicinal plant, Aconitum napellus, was characterized by a polyphasic approach to determine its taxonomic position. The strain showed highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities of 97.3, 97.2 and 97.1 % to Nonomuraea turkmeniaca DSM 43926T, Nonomuraea ferruginea DSM 43553T and Nonomuraea candida DSM 45086T, respectively. A wide range of genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, as well as levels of DNA-DNA relatedness between strain YN-5-1T and N. turkmeniaca DSM 43926T (57.46 %), N. ferruginea DSM 43553T (53.50 %) and N. candida DSM 45086T (48.80 %), distinguished the novel isolate from its closest phylogenetic neighbours. The morphological characteristics of strain YN-5-1T were typical of the genus Nonomuraea. Chemotaxonomic characteristics, such as diagnostic diamino acid of the peptidoglycan, whole-cell sugars, phospholipid type, major menaquinone and major fatty acids, further supported the assignment of strain YN-5-1T to the genus Nonomuraea. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 72.1 mol%. Based on the above data, strain YN-5-1T is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Nonomuraea, for which the name Nonomuraea flavida sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is YN-5-1T ( = CCTCC AB 2012909T = KCTC 29143T).

  4. [Allelopathic effects of extracts from tuberous roots of Aconitum carmichaeli on three pasture grasses].

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yu-jie; Wang, Ya-qi; Yuan, Ling

    2015-11-01

    The tuberous roots of Aconitum carmichaeli are largely used in traditional Chinese medicine and widely grown in Jiangyou, Sichuan, China. During the growth process, this medicinal plant releases a large amount of allelochemicals into soil, which retard the growth and development of near and late crops. Therefore, a pure culture experiment was thus carried out by seed soaking to study the allelopathic effects of extracts from tuberous roots of A. carmichaeli (ETR) on the seed germination and young seedling growth of Lolium perenne, Trifolium repens, and Medicago sativa, the late pasture grasses after cultivation of A. carmichaeli. The results showed that three pasture grasses varied significantly in seed germination and young seedling growth in response to ETR concentrations. Seed germination of M. sativa was stimulated by low ERT concentration (0.01 x g(-1)), while all of pasture grass seeds germinated poorly in solution with 1.00 g x L(-1). Seed soaking with 1.00 g x L(-1) also inhibited significantly the growth of pasture young seedlings, with M. sativa showing the highest seedling height reduction of 42.05% in seeding height, followed by T. repens (40.21%) and L. perenne with about 11%. Cultivation of L. perenne could thus be beneficial to increase whole land productivity in A. carmichaeli-pasture grass cropping systems. In addition, hydrolysis of protein, starch, and inositol phosphates was blocked and free amino acids, soluble sugars and phosphorus were decreased in seeds by seed soaking with ETR, which could be one of the reason for the inhibition of seed germination. There was a significant reduction in root vigor, nitrate reductase, and chlorophyll after the seed treatment with ETR, indicating the suppression of nutrient uptake, nitrate assimilation, and photosynthesis by allelopathic chemicals in ETR, which could lead to the slow growth rate of pasture grass seedlings.

  5. Antioxidant and free radical scavenging activity of flavonol glycosides from different Aconitum species.

    PubMed

    Braca, Alessandra; Fico, Gelsomina; Morelli, Ivano; De Simone, Francesco; Tomè, Franca; De Tommasi, Nunziatina

    2003-05-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation by 1,1-diphenyl-2-dipicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging test of polar extracts of some Italian Aconitum species (A. napellus subsp. tauricum, A. napellus subsp. neomontanum, A. paniculatum, A. vulparia) led to the isolation of 13 flavonol glycosides: quercetin 3-O-(6-trans-caffeoyl)-beta-glucopyranosyl-(1-->2)-beta-glucopyranoside-7-O-alpha-rhamnopyranoside (1), kaempferol 3-O-(6-trans-caffeoyl)-beta-glucopyranosyl-(1-->2)-beta-glucopyranoside-7-O-alpha-rhamnopyranoside (2), quercetin 3-O-(6-trans-p-coumaroyl)-beta-glucopyranosyl-(1-->2)-beta-glucopyranoside-7-O-alpha-rhamnopyranoside (3), kaempferol 3-O-(6-trans-p-coumaroyl)-beta-glucopyranosyl-(1-->2)-beta-glucopyranoside-7-O-alpha-rhamnopyranoside (4), quercetin 7-O-(6-trans-caffeoyl)-beta-glucopyranosyl-(1-->3)-alpha-rhamnopyranoside-3-O-beta-glucopyranoside (5), kaempferol 7-O-(6-trans-caffeoyl)-beta-glucopyranosyl-(1-->3)-alpha-rhamnopyranoside-3-O-beta-glucopyranoside (6), kaempferol 7-O-(6-trans-p-coumaroyl)-beta-glucopyranosyl-(1-->3)-alpha-rhamnopyranoside-3-O-beta-glucopyranoside (7), kaempferol 3-O-beta-(2"-acetyl)galactopyranoside (8), kaempferol 3-O-beta-(2"-acetyl)galactopyranoside-7-O-alpha-arabinopyranoside (9), quercetin 3-O-beta-(2"-acetyl)galactopyranoside-7-O-alpha-arabinopyranoside (10), quercetin 3,7-di-O-alpha-rhamnopyranoside (11), kaempferol 3,7-di-O-alpha-rhamnopyranoside (12) and quercetin 3-O-beta-glucopyranoside-7-O-alpha-rhamnopyranoside (13). Their antioxidant activity (AA) was determined by measuring free radical scavenging activity by DPPH test and the coupled oxidation of beta-carotene and linoleic acid assay. The results showed that 5 is the most active compound in the DPPH free-radical scavenging test (IC(50) 1.9 microM) while in the coupled oxidation of beta-carotene and linoleic acid assay compound 1 has the highest inhibitory ratio after 1h (58.9%). Some structure-activity relationships on the AA were obtained.

  6. Study on the Alkaloids in Tibetan Medicine Aconitum pendulum Busch by HPLC-MSn Combined with Column Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Beibei; Dong, Jie; Ji, Jiaojiao; Yuan, Jiang; Wang, Jiali; Wu, Jiarui; Tan, Peng; Liu, Yonggang

    2016-01-01

    A rapid, convenient and effective identification method of alkaloids was established and an attempt on isolating and analyzing the alkaloids in Aconitum pendulum Busch was conducted successfully. In this article, four high-content components including deoxyaconitine, benzoylaconine, aconine and neoline were isolated by using column chromatography. HPLC-MS(n)was employed to deduce the regulations of fragmentation of diterpenoid alkaloids which displayed a characteristic behavior of loss of CO(28u), CH3COOH(60u), CH3OH(32u), H2O(18u) and C6H5COOH(122u). Then, according to fragmentation regulation of mass spectrometry, 42 alkaloids were found inA. pendulum Among them, 38 compounds were identified and 29 alkaloids were reported for the first time for this herb. Therefore, this means that HPLC-MS(n)combined with column chromatography could work as an effective and reliable tool for rapid identification of the chemical components of herbal medicine.

  7. Coadministration of Pinellia ternata Can Significantly Reduce Aconitum carmichaelii to Inhibit CYP3A Activity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jinjun; Cheng, Zaixing; Zhu, Lijun; Lu, Linlin; Zhang, Guiyu; Wang, Ying; Xu, Ying; Lin, Na; Liu, Zhongqiu

    2014-01-01

    Chuanwu (CW), the mother root of Aconitum carmichaelii Debx., is a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for treating traumatic injuries, rheumatoid arthritis, and tumors. CW coadministered with banxia (BX), the root of Pinellia ternata, is also widely prescribed in clinical practice. However, the mechanism of this combination is yet deciphered. Current study aimed to investigate the effects of CW, including raw chuanwu (RCW) and processed chuanwu (PCW) alone, as well as CW coadministered with BX on CYP3A activity. Buspirone (BP) and testosterone (Tes) were used as specific probe substrates in vivo and ex vivo, respectively. CYP3A activity was determined by the metabolites formation ratios from the substrates. Compared with those in the control group, the metabolites formation ratios significantly decreased in the RCW and PCW alone groups, accompanied by a marked decrease in CYP3A protein and mRNA levels. However, there was a significant increase in those ratios in the RCW-BX and PCW-BX groups compared to the RCW and PCW alone groups. The results indicated that both RCW and PCW can inhibit CYP3A activity in rats because of downregulation of CYP3A protein and mRNA levels. Decreases in CYP3A activity can be reversed by coadministration with BX. PMID:25371696

  8. Ester Hydrolysis Differentially Reduces Aconitine-Induced Anti-hypersensitivity and Acute Neurotoxicity: Involvement of Spinal Microglial Dynorphin Expression and Implications for Aconitum Processing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Teng-Fei; Gong, Nian; Wang, Yong-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Aconitines, including bulleyaconitine A, probably the most bioactive and abundant alkaloids in Aconitum plant, are a group of diester C19-diterpenoid alkaloids with one acetylester group attached to C8 of the diterpenoid skeleton and one benzoylester group to C14. Hydrolysis of both groups is involved in the processing of Aconitum, a traditional Chinese medicinal approach. We recently demonstrated that bulleyaconitine A produced anti-hypersensitivity, which was mediated by stimulation of spinal microglial dynorphin A expression. This study aimed to elucidate whether the acetylester and benzoylester groups are involved in aconitine-induced dynorphin A expression, anti-hypersensitivity, neurotoxicity in neuropathic rats. Intrathecal administration of aconitine and benzoylaconine (but not aconine) attenuated mechanical allodynia and heat hyperalgesia, with normalized ED50 values of 35 pmol and 3.6 nmol, respectively. Aconitine and benzoylaconine anti-allodynia was completely blocked by the microglial inhibitor, dynorphin A antiserum, and κ-opioid receptor antagonist. Aconitine and benzoylaconine, but not aconine, stimulated dynorphin A expression in cultured primary spinal microglia, with EC50 values of 32 nM and 3 μM, respectively. Intrathecal aconitine, benzoylaconine and aconine induced flaccid paralysis and death, with normalized TD50 values of 0.5 nmol, 0.2 μmol, and 1.6 μmol, respectively. The TD50/ED50 ratios of aconitine and benzolyaconine were 14:1 and 56:1. Our results suggest that both the C8-acetyl and C14-benzoyl groups are essential for aconitine to stimulate spinal microglial dynorphin A expression and subsequent anti-hypersensitivity, which can be separated from neurotoxicity, because both benzoylaconine and aconine differentially produced anti-hypersensitivity and neurotoxicity due to their different stimulatory ability on dynorphin A expression. Our results support the scientific rationale for Aconitum processing, but caution should be taken to

  9. Ultra-fast LC-ESI-MS/MS method for the simultaneous determination of six highly toxic Aconitum alkaloids from Aconiti kusnezoffii radix in rat plasma and its application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingjing; Li, Qing; Yin, Yidi; Liu, Ran; Xu, Huarong; Bi, Kaishun

    2014-01-01

    A fast, sensitive, and efficient ultra-fast LC-ESI-MS/MS method was developed for the simultaneous quantitation of six highly toxic Aconitum alkaloids, that is, aconitine, mesaconitine, hypaconitine, benzoylaconine, benzoylmesaconine, and benzoylhypaconine, in rat plasma after oral administration of crude ethanol extracts from Aconiti kusnezoffii radix by ultrasonic extraction, reflux extraction for 1 h, and reflux extraction for 3 h, respectively. The separation of six Aconitum alkaloids and aminopyrine (internal standard) was performed on an InertSustain® C18 column, and the quantification of the analytes was performed on a 4000Q ultra-fast LC-MS/MS system with turbo ion spray source in the positive ion and multiple-reaction monitoring mode. Absolute recoveries ranged within 65.06-85.1% for plasma samples. The intra- and interday precision and accuracy of analytes were satisfactory. The methods were validated with sensitivity reaching the lower LOQ for aconitine, mesaconitine, hypaconitine, benzoylaconine, benzoylmesaconine, and benzoylhypaconine, which were 0.025, 0.025, 0.050, 0.025, 0.025, and 0.100 ng/mL, respectively. The method was successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study of six Aconitum alkaloids in rat plasma after oral administration of crude ethanol extracts from the raw root of Aconitum kusnezoffii Reichb. by three different extraction processes.

  10. Bulleyaconitine A isolated from Aconitum plant displays long-acting local anesthetic properties in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chi-Fei; Gerner, Peter; Wang, Sho-Ya; Wang, Ging Kuo

    2007-01-01

    Background Bulleyaconitine A (BLA) is an active ingredient of Aconitum bulleyanum plants. BLA has been approved for the treatment of chronic pain and rheumatoid arthritis in China, but its underlying mechanism remains unclear. Methods The authors examined (a) the effects of BLA on neuronal voltage-gated Na+ channels in vitro under the whole-cell patch-clamp configuration and (b) the sensory and motor functions of rat sciatic nerve after single BLA injections in vivo. Results BLA at 10 μM did not affect neuronal Na+ currents in clonal GH3 cells when stimulated infrequently to +50 mV. When stimulated at 2 Hz for 1,000 pulses (+50 mV for 4 ms), BLA reduced the peak Na+ currents by >90%. This use-dependent reduction of Na+ currents by BLA reversed little after washing. Single injections of BLA (0.2 ml at 0.375 mM) into the rat sciatic notch not only blocked sensory and motor functions of the sciatic nerve but also induced hyperexcitability, followed by sedation, arrhythmia, and respiratory distress. When BLA at 0.375 mM was co-injected with 2% lidocaine (~80 mM) or epinephrine (1:100,000) to reduce drug absorption by the blood-stream, the sensory and motor functions of the sciatic nerve remained fully blocked for ~4 hrs and regressed completely after ~7 hrs with minimal systemic effects. Conclusions BLA reduces neuronal Na+ currents strongly at +50 mV in a use-dependent manner. When co-injected with lidocaine or epinephrine, BLA elicits prolonged block of both motor and sensory functions in rats with minimal adverse effects. PMID:17585219

  11. Identification of Oxygenated Fatty Acid as a Side Chain of Lipo-Alkaloids in Aconitum carmichaelii by UHPLC-Q-TOF-MS and a Database.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ying; Wu, Jian-Lin; Leung, Elaine Lai-Han; Zhou, Hua; Liu, Zhongqiu; Yan, Guanyu; Liu, Ying; Liu, Liang; Li, Na

    2016-03-31

    Lipo-alkaloid is a kind of C19-norditerpenoid alkaloid usually found in Aconitum species. Structurally, they contain an aconitane skeleton and one or two fatty acid moieties of 3-25 carbon chains with 1-6 unsaturated degrees. Analysis of the lipo-alkaloids in roots of Aconitum carmichaelii resulted in the isolation of six known pure lipo-alkaloids (A1-A6) and a lipo-alkaloid mixture (A7). The mixture shared the same aconitane skeleton of 14-benzoylmesaconine, but their side chains were determined to be 9-hydroxy-octadecadienoic acid, 13-hydroxy-octadecadienoic acid and 10-hydroxy-octadecadienoic acid, respectively, by MS/MS analysis after alkaline hydrolysis. To our knowledge, this is the first time of the reporting of the oxygenated fatty acids as the side chains in naturally-occurring lipo-alkaloids. In order to identify more lipo-alkaloids, a compound database was established based on various combinations between the aconitane skeleton and the fatty acid chain, and then, the identification of lipo-alkaloids was conducted using the database, UHPLC-Q-TOF-MS and MS/MS. Finally, 148 lipo-alkaloids were identified from A. carmichaelii after intensive MS/MS analysis, including 93 potential new compounds and 38 compounds with oxygenated fatty acid moieties.

  12. Next-generation sequencing identification and characterization of microsatellite markers in Aconitum austrokoreense Koidz., an endemic and endangered medicinal plant of Korea.

    PubMed

    Yun, Y-E; Yu, J-N; Nam, G H; Ryu, S-A; Kim, S; Oh, K; Lim, C E

    2015-05-11

    We used next-generation sequencing to develop 9 novel microsatellite markers in Aconitum austrokoreense, an endemic and endangered medicinal plant in Korea. Owing to its very limited distribution, over-harvesting for traditional medicinal purposes, and habitat loss, the natural populations are dramatically declining in Korea. All novel microsatellite markers were successfully genotyped using 64 samples from two populations (Mt. Choejeong, Gyeongsangbuk-do and Ungseokbong, Gyeongsangnam-do) of Gyeongsang Province. The number of alleles ranged from 2 to 7 per locus in each population. Observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.031 to 0.938 and from 0.031 to 0.697, respectively. The novel markers will be valuable tools for assessing the genetic diversity of A. austrokoreense and for germplasm conservation of this endangered species.

  13. An Efficient High-performance Liquid Chromatography Combined with Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry Method to Elaborate the Changes of Components Between the Raw and Processed Radix Aconitum kusnezoffii

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Beibei; Ji, Jiaojiao; Zhao, Shuang; Dong, Jie; Tan, Peng; Na, Shengsang; Liu, Yonggang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Crude radix Aconitum kusnezoffii (RAK) has great toxicity. Traditional Chinese medicine practice proved that processing may decrease its toxicity. In our previous study, we had established a new method of RAK processing (Paozhi). However, the mechanism is yet not perfect. Objective: To explore the related mechanism of processing through comparing the chemical contents. Materials and Methods: A new processing method of RAK named stoving (Hong Zhi) was used. In particular, RAK was stored at 110°C for 8 h, and then high performance liquid chromatography combined with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MSn) was developed for the detection of the alkaloids of the crude and processed RAK decoction pieces. Results: Thirty components of the crude RAK were discovered, among which, 23 alkaloids were identified. Meanwhile, 23 ingredients were detected in the processed RAK decoction pieces, among which, 20 alkaloids were determined yet. By comparison, eight alkaloids were found in both crude and processed RAK decoction pieces, 15 alkaloids were not found in the crude RAK, however, 10 new constituents yield after processing, which are 10-OH-hypaconine, 10-OH-mesaconine, isomer of bullatine A, 14-benzoyl-10-OH-mesaconine, 14-benzoyl-10-OH-aconine, 14-benzoyl-10-OH-hypaconine, dehydrated aconitine, 14-benzoylaconine, chuanfumine, dehydrated mesaconitine. Conclusion: The present study showed that significant change of alkaloids was detected in RAK before and after processing. Among them, the highly toxic diester alkaloids decreased and the less toxic monoester alkaloids increased. Moreover, the concentration changes significantly. HPLC-ESI-MSn are Efficient to elaborate the mechanism of reduction of toxicity and enhancement efficacy after processing. SUMMARY Stoving is a simple and effective method for the processing of radix Aconitum kusnezoffii.In the positive mode, the characteristic fragmentations of Aconitum alkaloids were obtained

  14. Sensitive determination of three aconitum alkaloids and their metabolites in human plasma by matrix solid-phase dispersion with vortex-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and HPLC with diode array detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaozhong; Li, Xuwen; Li, Lanjie; Li, Min; Liu, Ying; Wu, Qian; Li, Peng; Jin, Yongri

    2016-05-01

    A simple and sensitive method for determination of three aconitum alkaloids and their metabolites in human plasma was developed using matrix solid-phase dispersion combined with vortex-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection. The plasma sample was directly purified by matrix solid-phase dispersion and the eluate obtained was concentrated and further clarified by vortex-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction. Some important parameters affecting the extraction efficiency, such as type and amount of dispersing sorbent, type and volume of elution solvent, type and volume of extraction solvent, salt concentration as well as sample solution pH, were investigated in detail. Under optimal conditions, the proposed method has good repeatability and reproducibility with intraday and interday relative standard deviations lower than 5.44 and 5.75%, respectively. The recoveries of the aconitum alkaloids ranged from 73.81 to 101.82%, and the detection limits were achieved within the range of 1.6-2.1 ng/mL. The proposed method offered the advantages of good applicability, sensitivity, simplicity, and feasibility, which makes it suitable for the determination of trace amounts of aconitum alkaloids in human plasma samples.

  15. Rapid separation and characterization of diterpenoid alkaloids in processed roots of Aconitum carmichaeli using ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with hybrid linear ion trap-Orbitrap tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen; Zhang, Jing; Zhu, Dayuan; Huang, Juan; Huang, Zhihai; Bai, Junqi; Qiu, Xiaohui

    2014-10-01

    The lateral root of Aconitum carmichaeli, a popular traditional Chinese medicine, has been widely used to treat rheumatic diseases. For decades, diterpenoid alkaloids have dominated the phytochemical and biomedical research on this plant. In this study, a rapid and sensitive method based on ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with linear ion trap-Orbitrap tandem mass spectrometry was developed to characterize the diterpenoid alkaloids in Aconitum carmichaeli. Based on an optimized chromatographic condition, more than 120 diterpenoid alkaloids were separated with good resolution. Using a systematic strategy that combines high resolution separation, highly accurate mass measurements and a good understanding of the diagnostic fragment-based fragmentation patterns, these diterpenoid alkaloids were identified or tentatively identified. The identification of these chemicals provided essential data for further phytochemical studies and toxicity research of Aconitum carmichaeli. Moreover, the ultra high performance liquid chromatography with linear ion trap-Orbitrap mass spectrometry platform was an effective and accurate tool for rapid qualitative analysis of secondary metabolite productions from natural resources.

  16. Wall Turbulence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanratty, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper gives an account of research on the structure of turbulence close to a solid boundary. Included is a method to study the flow close to the wall of a pipe without interferring with it. (Author/JN)

  17. 'Stucco' Walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This projected mosaic image, taken by the microscopic imager, an instrument located on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity 's instrument deployment device, or 'arm,' shows the partial clotting or cement-like properties of the sand-sized grains within the trench wall. The area in this image measures approximately 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) wide and 5 centimeters (2 inches) tall.(This image also appears as an inset on a separate image from the rover's navigation camera, showing the location of this particular spot within the trench wall.)

  18. Wall Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinley, Connie Q.

    2004-01-01

    The author of this article, an art teacher at Monarch High School in Louisville, Colorado, describes how her experience teaching in a new school presented an exciting visual challenge for an art teacher--monotonous brick walls just waiting for decoration. This school experienced only minimal instances of graffiti, but as an art teacher, she did…

  19. Diterpenoid alkaloids of Aconitum laciniatum and mitigation of inflammation by 14-O-acetylneoline in a murine model of ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Wangchuk, Phurpa; Navarro, Severine; Shepherd, Catherine; Keller, Paul A.; Pyne, Stephen G.; Loukas, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Aconitum laciniatum is used in Bhutanese traditional medicine for treating various chronic infections and inflammatory conditions. We carried out in-depth isolation and characterization of the phytochemicals from the root component and determined the anti-inflammatory effects of the isolated compounds against chemically-induced colitis in mice. Five diterpenoid alkaloids - pseudaconitine, 14-veratroylpseudaconine, 14-O-acetylneoline, neoline, and senbusine A - were isolated from A. laciniatum for the first time. Two of the alkaloids were tested for anti-inflammatory properties in the TNBS-induced colitis model in mice. Various parameters were measured to assess pathology including weight loss, clinical and macroscopic scores, histological structure and IFN-γ production in the gut. Of the two alkaloids tested, 14-O-acetylneoline showed significant protection against different parameters of colitic inflammation. Compared to control mice that received TNBS alone, mice treated with 14-O-acetylneoline experienced significantly less weight loss and had significantly lower clinical scores, macroscopic pathology and grades of histological inflammation. Moreover, colonic IFN-γ mRNA levels were significantly reduced in mice that received 14-O-acetylneoline compared to control mice that received TNBS alone. This alkaloid is now considered a novel anti-colitis drug lead compound. PMID:26240038

  20. Simultaneous determination of thirteen aminoalcohol-diterpenoid alkaloids in the lateral roots of Aconitum carmichaeli by solid-phase extraction-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jia-Yu; Liu, Xiu-Xiu; Xiong, Dong-Mei; Ye, Li-Ming; Chao, Ruo-Bing

    2014-06-01

    Aminoalcohol-diterpenoid alkaloids have been reported as the cardioactive components in the lateral roots of Aconitum carmichaeli (Fuzi) according to recent studies. Determination of these effective components is of great significance for quality control purposes for Fuzi. Here we report, for the first, the development and validation of a new method to determine the 13 aminoalcohol-diterpenoid alkaloids in Fuzi by using a simple and accurate solid-phase extraction-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The chromatographic analysis was performed on an ODS column with methanol-0.1 % formic acid (80 : 20, v/v) as the mobile phase. The quantification was performed using MS/MS detection in the positive ion mode with multiple reaction monitoring. Linearity was observed within a range of concentrations of 20-2,000 ng/mL. For all the analytes, the r value was greater than 0.9990. The limit of detection and the limit of quantitation were less than 0.5 ng/mL and 2.0 ng/mL, respectively. The intraday and interday precisions were less than 5% and 10%, respectively. The accuracy was within the range of 90 to 105%. This method was successfully applied to determine the 13 aminoalcohol-diterpenoid alkaloids in Fuzi from different origins and with different processing methods.

  1. Cooling wall

    SciTech Connect

    Nosenko, V.I.

    1995-07-01

    Protecting the shells of blast furnaces is being resolved by installing cast iron cooling plates. The cooling plates become non-operational in three to five years. The problem is that defects occur in manufacturing the cooling plates. With increased volume and intensity of work placed on blast furnaces, heat on the cast iron cooling plates reduces their reliability that limits the interim repair period of blast furnaces. Scientists and engineers from the Ukraine studied this problem for several years, developing a new method of cooling the blast furnace shaft called the cooling wall. Traditional cast iron plates were replaced by a screen of steel tubes, with the area between the tubes filled with fireproof concrete. Before placing the newly developed furnace shaft into operation, considerable work was completed such as theoretical calculations, design, research of temperature fields and tension. Continual testing over many years confirms the value of this research in operating blast furnaces. The cooling wall works with water cooling as well as vapor cooling and is operating in 14 blast furnaces in the Ukraine and two in Russia, and has operated for as long as 14 years.

  2. Wall to Wall Optimal Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chini, Gregory P.; Hassanzadeh, Pedram; Doering, Charles R.

    2013-11-01

    How much heat can be transported between impermeable fixed-temperature walls by incompressible flows with a given amount of kinetic energy or enstrophy? What do the optimal velocity fields look like? We employ variational calculus to address these questions in the context of steady 2D flows. The resulting nonlinear Euler-Lagrange equations are solved numerically, and in some cases analytically, to find the maximum possible Nusselt number Nu as a function of the Péclect number Pe , a measure of the flow's energy or enstrophy. We find that in the fixed-energy problem Nu ~ Pe , while in the fixed-enstrophy problem Nu ~ Pe 10 / 17 . In both cases, the optimal flow consists of an array of convection cells with aspect ratio Γ (Pe) . Interpreting our results in terms of the Rayleigh number Ra for relevant buoyancy-driven problems, we find Nu <= 1 + 0 . 035 Ra and Γ ~ Ra - 1 / 2 for porous medium convection (which occurs with fixed energy), and Nu <= 1 + 0 . 115 Ra 5 / 12 and Γ ~ Ra - 1 / 4 for Rayleigh-Bénard convection (which occurs with fixed enstrophy and for free-slip walls). This work was supported by NSF awards PHY-0855335, DMS-0927587, and PHY-1205219 (CRD) and DMS-0928098 (GPC). Much of this work was completed at the 2012 Geophysical Fluid Dynamics (GFD) Program at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

  3. Guanfu base A, an antiarrhythmic alkaloid of Aconitum coreanum, Is a CYP2D6 inhibitor of human, monkey, and dog isoforms.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianguo; Peng, Ying; Wu, Hui; Zhang, Xueyuan; Zhong, Yunxi; Xiao, Yanan; Zhang, Fengyi; Qi, Huanhuan; Shang, Lili; Zhu, Jianping; Sun, Yue; Liu, Ke; Liu, Jinghan; A, Jiye; Ho, Rodney J Y; Wang, Guangji

    2015-05-01

    Guanfu base A (GFA) is a novel heterocyclic antiarrhythmic drug isolated from Aconitum coreanum (Lèvl.) rapaics and is currently in a phase IV clinical trial in China. However, no study has investigated the influence of GFA on cytochrome P450 (P450) drug metabolism. We characterized the potency and specificity of GFA CYP2D inhibition based on dextromethorphan O-demethylation, a CYP2D6 probe substrate of activity in human, mouse, rat, dog, and monkey liver microsomes. In addition, (+)-bufuralol 1'-hydroxylation was used as a CYP2D6 probe for the recombinant form (rCYP2D6), 2D1 (rCYP2D1), and 2D2 (rCYP2D2) activities. Results show that GFA is a potent noncompetitive inhibitor of CYP2D6, with inhibition constant Ki = 1.20 ± 0.33 μM in human liver microsomes (HLMs) and Ki = 0.37 ± 0.16 μM for the human recombinant form (rCYP2D6). GFA is also a potent competitive inhibitor of CYP2D in monkey (Ki = 0.38 ± 0.12 μM) and dog (Ki = 2.4 ± 1.3 μM) microsomes. However, GFA has no inhibitory activity on mouse or rat CYP2Ds. GFA did not exhibit any inhibition activity on human recombinant CYP1A2, 2A6, 2C8, 2C19, 3A4, or 3A5, but showed slight inhibition of 2B6 and 2E1. Preincubation of HLMs and rCYP2D6 resulted in the inactivation of the enzyme, which was attenuated by GFA or quinidine. Beagle dogs treated intravenously with dextromethorphan (2 mg/ml) after pretreatment with GFA injection showed reduced CYP2D metabolic activity, with the Cmax of dextrorphan being one-third that of the saline-treated group and area under the plasma concentration-time curve half that of the saline-treated group. This study suggests that GFA is a specific CYP2D6 inhibitor that might play a role in CYP2D6 medicated drug-drug interaction.

  4. A RG-II Type Polysaccharide Purified from Aconitum coreanum Alleviates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation by Inhibiting the NF-κB Signal Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaojun; Jiang, Jiaye; Shi, Songshan; Bligh, S. W. Annie; Li, Yuan; Jiang, Yongbo; Huang, Dan; Ke, Yan; Wang, Shunchun

    2014-01-01

    Korean mondshood root polysaccharides (KMPS) isolated from the root of Aconitum coreanum (Lévl.) Rapaics have shown anti-inflammatory activity, which is strongly influenced by their chemical structures and chain conformations. However, the mechanisms of the anti-inflammatory effect by these polysaccharides have yet to be elucidated. A RG-II polysaccharide (KMPS-2E, Mw 84.8 kDa) was isolated from KMPS and its chemical structure was characterized by FT-IR and NMR spectroscopy, gas chromatography–mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography. The backbone of KMPS-2E consisted of units of [→6) -β-D-Galp (1→3)-β-L-Rhap-(1→4)-β-D-GalpA-(1→3)-β-D-Galp-(1→] with the side chain →5)-β-D-Arap (1→3, 5)-β-D-Arap (1→ attached to the backbone through O-4 of (1→3,4)-L-Rhap. T-β-D-Galp is attached to the backbone through O-6 of (1→3,6)-β-D-Galp residues and T-β-D-Ara is connected to the end group of each chain. The anti-inflammatory effects of KMPS-2E and the underlying mechanisms using lipopolysaccharide (LPS) - stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages and carrageenan-induced hind paw edema were investigated. KMPS-2E (50, 100 and 200 µg/mL) inhibits iNOS, TLR4, phospho-NF-κB–p65 expression, phosphor-IKK, phosphor-IκB-α expression as well as the degradation of IκB-α and the gene expression of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, iNOS and IL-6) mediated by the NF-κB signal pathways in macrophages. KMPS-2E also inhibited LPS-induced activation of NF-κB as assayed by electrophorectic mobility shift assay (EMSA) in a dose-dependent manner and it reduced NF-κB DNA binding affinity by 62.1% at 200µg/mL. In rats, KMPS-2E (200 mg/kg) can significantly inhibit carrageenan-induced paw edema as ibuprofen (200 mg/kg) within 3 h after a single oral dose. The results indicate that KMPS-2E is a promising herb-derived drug against acute inflammation. PMID:24927178

  5. Wall surveyor project report

    SciTech Connect

    Mullenhoff, D.J.; Johnston, B.C.; Azevedo, S.G.

    1996-02-22

    A report is made on the demonstration of a first-generation Wall Surveyor that is capable of surveying the interior and thickness of a stone, brick, or cement wall. LLNL`s Micropower Impulse Radar is used, based on emitting and detecting very low amplitude and short microwave impulses (MIR rangefinder). Six test walls were used. While the demonstrator MIR Wall Surveyor is not fieldable yet, it has successfully scanned the test walls and produced real-time images identifying the walls. It is planned to optimize and package the evaluation wall surveyor into a hand held unit.

  6. If walls could talk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braam, J.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The plant cell wall is very complex, both in structure and function. The wall components and the mechanical properties of the wall have been implicated in conveying information that is important for morphogenesis. Proteoglycans, fragments of polysaccharides and the structural integrity of the wall may relay signals that influence cellular differentiation and growth control. Furthering our knowledge of cell wall structure and function is likely to have a profound impact on our understanding of how plant cells communicate with the extracellular environment.

  7. Simultaneous determination of ten Aconitum alkaloids in rat tissues by UHPLC-MS/MS and its application to a tissue distribution study on the compatibility of Heishunpian and Fritillariae thunbergii Bulbus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Xu, Yanyan; Wu, Yuanyuan; Wu, Huanyu; Wang, Yuan; Yuan, Lei; Xie, Jiabin; Li, Yubo; Zhang, Yanjun

    2016-10-15

    A rapid, sensitive and selective ultra-high performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for simultaneous determination of ten Aconitum alkaloids in rat tissues. The tissue samples were prepared by a simple procedure protein precipitation with acetonitrile containing 0.1% acetic acid and separated on an Agilent XDB C18 column (4.6 mm×50mm, 1.8μm) using gradient elution with a mobile phase consisting of water and acetonitrile (both containing 0.1% formic acid) at a flow rate of 0.3mL/min. The quantitive determination was performed on an electrospray ionization (ESI) triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometer using selective reaction monitoring (SRM) under positive ionization mode. The established method was fully validated according to the USA Food and Drug Administration (FDA) bioanalytical method validation guidance and the results demonstrated that the method was sensitive and selective with the lowest limits of quantification (LLOQ) at 0.025ng/mL in rat tissue homogenates. Meanwhile, the linearity, precision, accuracy, extraction recovery, matrix effect and stability were all within the required limits of biological sample analysis. After method validation, the validated method was successfully applied to the tissue distribution study on the compatibility of Heishunpian (HSP, the processed product of Aconitum carmichaelii Debx) and Fritillariae thunbergii Bulbus (Zhebeimu, ZBM). The results indicated that the distribution feature of monoester diterpenoid aconitines (MDAs), diester diterpenoid aconitines (DDAs) and non-ester alkaloids (NEAs) were inconsistency, and the compatibility of HSP and ZBM resulted in the distribution amount of DDAs increased in tissues. What's more, the results could provide the reliable basis for systematic research on the substance foundation of the compatibility of the herbal pair.

  8. The Lamportian cell wall

    SciTech Connect

    Keiliszewski, M.; Lamport, D. )

    1991-05-01

    The Lamportian Warp-Weft hypothesis suggests a cellulose-extensin interpenetrating network where extensin mechanically couples the load-bearing cellulose microfibrils in a wall matrix that is best described as a microcomposite. This model is based on data gathered from the extensin-rich walls of tomato and sycamore cell suspension culture, wherein extensin precursors are insolubilized into the wall by undefined crosslinks. The authors recent work with cell walls isolated from intact tissue as well as walls from suspension cultured cells of the graminaceous monocots maize and rice, the non-graminaceous monocot asparagus, the primitive herbaceous dicot sugar beet, and the gymnosperm Douglas Fir indicate that although extensins are ubiquitous to all plant species examined, they are not the major structural protein component of most walls examined. Amino acid analyses of intact and HF-treated walls shows a major component neither an HRGP, nor directly comparable to the glycine-rich wall proteins such as those associated with seed coat walls or the 67 mole% glycine-rich proteins cloned from petunia and soybean. Clearly, structural wall protein alternatives to extensin exist and any cell wall model must take that into account. If we assume that extracellular matrices are a priori network structures, then new Hypless' structural proteins in the maize cell wall raise questions about the sort of network these proteins create: the kinds of crosslinks involved; how they are formed; and the roles played by the small amounts of HRGPs.

  9. Halogenation of microcapsule walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, T. R.; Schaab, C. K.; Scott, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Procedure for halogenation of confining walls of both gelatin and gelatin-phenolic resin capsules is similar to that used for microencapsulation. Ten percent halogen content renders capsule wall nonburning; any higher content enhances flame-retardant properties of selected internal phase material. Halogenation decreases permeability of wall material to encapsulated materials.

  10. Fluidized wall for protecting fusion chamber walls

    DOEpatents

    Maniscalco, James A.; Meier, Wayne R.

    1982-01-01

    Apparatus for protecting the inner wall of a fusion chamber from microexplosion debris, x-rays, neutrons, etc. produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) targets imploded within the fusion chamber. The apparatus utilizes a fluidized wall similar to a waterfall comprising liquid lithium or solid pellets of lithium-ceramic, the waterfall forming a blanket to prevent damage of the structural materials of the chamber.

  11. Wall contraction in Bloch wall films.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartran, D. S.; Bourne, H. C., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The phenomenon of wall contraction characterized by a peak in the velocity-field relationship and a region of negative differential mobility is observed in uniaxial magnetic thin films of various magnetic properties by careful interrupted-pulse experiments. The observed results agree quite well with the theory for bulk samples when the extensive flux closure of thin film walls is accounted for by a suitable empirical scaling factor.

  12. Wall of fundamental constants

    SciTech Connect

    Olive, Keith A.; Peloso, Marco; Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2011-02-15

    We consider the signatures of a domain wall produced in the spontaneous symmetry breaking involving a dilatonlike scalar field coupled to electromagnetism. Domains on either side of the wall exhibit slight differences in their respective values of the fine-structure constant, {alpha}. If such a wall is present within our Hubble volume, absorption spectra at large redshifts may or may not provide a variation in {alpha} relative to the terrestrial value, depending on our relative position with respect to the wall. This wall could resolve the contradiction between claims of a variation of {alpha} based on Keck/Hires data and of the constancy of {alpha} based on Very Large Telescope data. We derive the properties of the wall and the parameters of the underlying microscopic model required to reproduce the possible spatial variation of {alpha}. We discuss the constraints on the existence of the low-energy domain wall and describe its observational implications concerning the variation of the fundamental constants.

  13. Liquid Wall Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  14. Metallic Wall Hall Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan Michael (Inventor); Hofer, Richard Robert (Inventor); Mikellides, Ioannis G. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A Hall thruster apparatus having walls constructed from a conductive material, such as graphite, and having magnetic shielding of the walls from the ionized plasma has been demonstrated to operate with nearly the same efficiency as a conventional non-magnetically shielded design using insulators as wall components. The new design is believed to provide the potential of higher power and uniform operation over the operating life of a thruster device.

  15. Domain wall filters

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Oliver; Narayanan, Rajamani; Neuberger, Herbert; Witzel, Oliver

    2007-03-15

    We propose using the extra dimension separating the domain walls carrying lattice quarks of opposite handedness to gradually filter out the ultraviolet fluctuations of the gauge fields that are felt by the fermionic excitations living in the bulk. This generalization of the homogeneous domain wall construction has some theoretical features that seem nontrivial.

  16. Wall Finishes; Carpentry: 901895.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The course outline is designed to provide instruction in selecting, preparing, and installing wall finishing materials. Prerequisites for the course include mastery of building construction plans, foundations and walls, and basic mathematics. Intended for use in grades 11 and 12, the course contains five blocks of study totaling 135 hours of…

  17. Thin Wall Iron Castings

    SciTech Connect

    J.F. Cuttino; D.M. Stefanescu; T.S. Piwonka

    2001-10-31

    Results of an investigation made to develop methods of making iron castings having wall thicknesses as small as 2.5 mm in green sand molds are presented. It was found that thin wall ductile and compacted graphite iron castings can be made and have properties consistent with heavier castings. Green sand molding variables that affect casting dimensions were also identified.

  18. Interactive Word Walls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Julie; Narvaez, Rose

    2013-01-01

    It is common to see word walls displaying the vocabulary that students have learned in class. Word walls serve as visual scaffolds and are a classroom strategy used to reinforce reading and language arts instruction. Research shows a strong relationship between student word knowledge and academic achievement (Stahl and Fairbanks 1986). As a…

  19. 'Stucco' Walls-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image, taken by the microscopic imager, an instrument located on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity 's instrument deployment device, or 'arm,' shows the partial 'clodding' or cementation of the sand-sized grains within the trench wall. The area in this image measures approximately 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across and makes up half of the projected 'Stucco Walls' image.

  20. 22. SIDE WALL CONSTRUCTION, NORTH TRAINING WALL, LOOKING WEST FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. SIDE WALL CONSTRUCTION, NORTH TRAINING WALL, LOOKING WEST FROM THE SAME POINT AS VIEW NO. 21. - Oakland Harbor Training Walls, Mouth of Federal Channel to Inner Harbor, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  1. MIR wall surveyor

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, S K

    1998-08-01

    This report addresses the problem of determining the layer thickness of a wall probed with a monostatic, hand-held implementation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Micropower Impulse Radar (MIR). Our goal is to locate the layers of the wall, and measure its overall thickness. The physical constraints require the device to be held fixed or swept rapidly over the wall. Thus an insufficient amount of backscattered data are collected to use diffraction tomographic [3] techniques to form images. The problem is therefore one of determining the wall layers from a set of time series reflection data. We develop two channel signal processing algorithms to determine the location of the layers of a wall, using as inputs the time series returned from the wall and the incident pulse. We study the problem using a finite difference time domain (FDTD) computer code to simulate the electromagnetic propagation within and scattering from a wall probed with five pulses. We use the results to develop and test signal processing procedures for locating the individual layers. We study two classes of algorithms: a deconvolution approach to determine a layered impulse response, and a correlation approach. After testing the algorithms on the FDTD results, we down-select to a suitable method.

  2. [Nursing care wall planning].

    PubMed

    Moreau, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    Nursing care wall planners are not a tool for assessing workload, but a means of providing coherence and individualised monitoring of care. Its application is focused not only on team organisation, but also on the patient's needs.

  3. Conducting Wall Hall Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan M.; Hofer, Richard R.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Polk, James E.; Dotson, Brandon

    2013-01-01

    A unique configuration of the magnetic field near the wall of Hall thrusters, called Magnetic Shielding, has recently demonstrated the ability to significantly reduce the erosion of the boron nitride (BN) walls and extend the life of Hall thrusters by orders of magnitude. The ability of magnetic shielding to minimize interactions between the plasma and the discharge chamber walls has for the first time enabled the replacement of insulating walls with conducting materials without loss in thruster performance. The boron nitride rings in the 6 kW H6 Hall thruster were replaced with graphite that self-biased to near the anode potential. The thruster efficiency remained over 60% (within two percent of the baseline BN configuration) with a small decrease in thrust and increase in Isp typical of magnetically shielded Hall thrusters. The graphite wall temperatures decreased significantly compared to both shielded and unshielded BN configurations, leading to the potential for higher power operation. Eliminating ceramic walls makes it simpler and less expensive to fabricate a thruster to survive launch loads, and the graphite discharge chamber radiates more efficiently which increases the power capability of the thruster compared to conventional Hall thruster designs.

  4. Ultimate Cost of Building Walls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimm, Clayford T.; Gross, James G.

    The need for economic analysis of building walls is discussed, and the factors influencing the ultimate cost of exterior walls are studied. The present worth method is used to analyze three types of exterior non-loadbearing panel or curtain walls. Anticipated costs are expressed in terms of their present value per square foot of wall area. The…

  5. Abhava pratinidhi dravya: A comparative phytochemistry of Ativisha, Musta and related species

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, M.; Kuruvilla, Gina R.; Kumar, K. Subrahmanya; Venkatasubramanian, Padma

    2015-01-01

    Authentic Ativisha (Aconitum heterophyllum) is a rare, endangered Himalayan species. Ayurveda classical texts of c. 15th–16th century, introduced “abhava-pratinidhi dravya” concept, wherein Ativisha was categorized as an abhava dravya (unavailable drug) and Musta (Cyperus rotundus) was suggested as a pratinidhi dravya (substitute) for it. C. rotundus is a weed, abundantly available pan-India. Cryptocoryne spiralis (Naattu Athividayam) and Cyperus scariosus (Nagarmotha) are also traded as Ativisha and Musta, respectively. Yet, there are no scientific studies to validate the use of substitutes. A. heterophyllum bears no similarity in terms of botanical classification with the other candidates. This article reviews published literature with an emphasis to look for similar phytochemicals or groups of phytochemicals in the species that could contribute to similar pharmacological activities, thereby supporting the drug substitution from a bio-medical perspective. Alkaloids like atisine were found to be the main focus of studies on A. heterophyllum, whereas for the Cyperus spp., it was terpenoids like cyperene. Although alkaloids and terpenoids were reported from both species, alkaloids in C. rotundus and terpenoids in A. heterophyllum were minor constituents. Reports on phytochemicals on Cryptocoryne spiralis and C. scariosus were very limited. Despite no significant similarities in chemical profiles reported, the dravyaguna (Ayurvedic drug classification) of Ativisha and Musta was quite similar warranting further exploration into the bio-functional aspects of the drug materials. PMID:25878466

  6. Musculoskeletal chest wall pain

    PubMed Central

    Fam, Adel G.; Smythe, Hugh A.

    1985-01-01

    The musculoskeletal structures of the thoracic wall and the neck are a relatively common source of chest pain. Pain arising from these structures is often mistaken for angina pectoris, pleurisy or other serious disorders. In this article the clinical features, pathogenesis and management of the various musculoskeletal chest wall disorders are discussed. The more common causes are costochondritis, traumatic muscle pain, trauma to the chest wall, “fibrositis” syndrome, referred pain, psychogenic regional pain syndrome, and arthritis involving articulations of the sternum, ribs and thoracic spine. Careful analysis of the history, physical findings and results of investigation is essential for precise diagnosis and effective treatment. ImagesFig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:4027804

  7. Mouse bladder wall injection.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chi-Ling; Apelo, Charity A; Torres, Baldemar; Thai, Kim H; Hsieh, Michael H

    2011-07-12

    Mouse bladder wall injection is a useful technique to orthotopically study bladder phenomena, including stem cell, smooth muscle, and cancer biology. Before starting injections, the surgical area must be cleaned with soap and water and antiseptic solution. Surgical equipment must be sterilized before use and between each animal. Each mouse is placed under inhaled isoflurane anesthesia (2-5% for induction, 1-3% for maintenance) and its bladder exposed by making a midline abdominal incision with scissors. If the bladder is full, it is partially decompressed by gentle squeezing between two fingers. The cell suspension of interest is intramurally injected into the wall of the bladder dome using a 29 or 30 gauge needle and 1 cc or smaller syringe. The wound is then closed using wound clips and the mouse allowed to recover on a warming pad. Bladder wall injection is a delicate microsurgical technique that can be mastered with practice.

  8. Thermal treatment wall

    DOEpatents

    Aines, Roger D.; Newmark, Robin L.; Knauss, Kevin G.

    2000-01-01

    A thermal treatment wall emplaced to perform in-situ destruction of contaminants in groundwater. Thermal destruction of specific contaminants occurs by hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation at temperatures achievable by existing thermal remediation techniques (electrical heating or steam injection) in the presence of oxygen or soil mineral oxidants, such as MnO.sub.2. The thermal treatment wall can be installed in a variety of configurations depending on the specific objectives, and can be used for groundwater cleanup, wherein in-situ destruction of contaminants is carried out rather than extracting contaminated fluids to the surface, where they are to be cleaned. In addition, the thermal treatment wall can be used for both plume interdiction and near-wellhead in-situ groundwater treatment. Thus, this technique can be utilized for a variety of groundwater contamination problems.

  9. Axion domain wall baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Daido, Ryuji; Kitajima, Naoya; Takahashi, Fuminobu

    2015-07-28

    We propose a new scenario of baryogenesis, in which annihilation of axion domain walls generates a sizable baryon asymmetry. Successful baryogenesis is possible for a wide range of the axion mass and decay constant, m≃10{sup 8}–10{sup 13} GeV and f≃10{sup 13}–10{sup 16} GeV. Baryonic isocurvature perturbations are significantly suppressed in our model, in contrast to various spontaneous baryogenesis scenarios in the slow-roll regime. In particular, the axion domain wall baryogenesis is consistent with high-scale inflation which generates a large tensor-to-scalar ratio within the reach of future CMB B-mode experiments. We also discuss the gravitational waves produced by the domain wall annihilation and its implications for the future gravitational wave experiments.

  10. Gullies in Crater Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-388, 11 June 2003

    Many craters and troughs at polar and middle latitudes on Mars have gullies carved in their walls. These gullies may have formed by running water; others have suggested alternative, exotic fluids such as liquid or gaseous carbon dioxide. This view of martian gullies was acquired by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC). The image shows gullies in the wall of an old meteor impact crater near 39.0oS, 200.7oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  11. Gullied Crater Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-371, 25 May 2003

    Gullies are common in some regions on middle- and polar-latitude slopes, such as crater walls. This March 2003 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows gullies on the north wall of a crater in the Atlantis Chaos region near 34.3oS, 178.0oW. The gullies might have formed by flow of a fluid--perhaps liquid water--sometime in the geologically recent martian past. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  12. Fly on the Wall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Dave; Korpan, Cynthia

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a peer observation program at the University of Victoria called the Lecture Club. The observers are not interactive during the class--they are the proverbial flies on the wall. The paper identifies the program as self-developmental, discussing the attributes of this learning-to-teach and peer-sharing…

  13. A Wall of Faces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Lori

    2008-01-01

    Visitors to the campus of Orland High School (OHS) will never question that they have stepped into a world of the masses: kids, activity, personalities, busyness, and playfulness--a veritable cloud of mild bedlam. The wall of ceramic faces that greets a visitor in the school office is another reminder of the organized chaos that the teachers…

  14. A School without Walls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venuti, Len Tai

    1994-01-01

    During the summer, selected students of Hawaiian ancestry who have completed seventh or eighth grade participate in a boarding program with outdoor activities such as pulling taro, star gazing, and camping. The activities eliminate walls of doubt and fear and nurture self-confidence, creativity, personal growth, leadership, and cultural awareness.…

  15. The Wall Coverings Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    Students love nothing better than personalizing their space--desk, bedroom, or even their cars. This article describes a classroom challenge that gives students a chance to let their spirits soar with the invention of a new form of wall treatment. A trip to a big box store might prove to be most helpful for students to visualize their new product…

  16. Wall turbulence control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, Stephen P.; Lindemann, A. Margrethe; Beeler, George B.; Mcginley, Catherine B.; Goodman, Wesley L.; Balasubramanian, R.

    1986-01-01

    A variety of wall turbulence control devices which were experimentally investigated are discussed; these include devices for burst control, alteration of outer flow structures, large eddy substitution, increased heat transfer efficiency, and reduction of wall pressure fluctuations. Control of pre-burst flow was demonstrated with a single, traveling surface depression which is phase-locked to elements of the burst production process. Another approach to wall turbulence control is to interfere with the outer layer coherent structures. A device in the outer part of a boundary layer was shown to suppress turbulence and reduce drag by opposing both the mean and unsteady vorticity in the boundary layer. Large eddy substitution is a method in which streamline curvature is introduced into the boundary layer in the form of streamwise vortices. Riblets, which were already shown to reduce turbulent drag, were also shown to exhibit superior heat transfer characteristics. Heat transfer efficiency as measured by the Reynolds Analogy Factor was shown to be as much as 36 percent greater than a smooth flat plate in a turbulent boundary layer. Large Eddy Break-Up (LEBU) which are also known to reduce turbulent drag were shown to reduce turbulent wall pressure fluctuation.

  17. Lateral Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Donald P.; Butler, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Lateral abdominal wall (LAW) defects can manifest as a flank hernias, myofascial laxity/bulges, or full-thickness defects. These defects are quite different from those in the anterior abdominal wall defects and the complexity and limited surgical options make repairing the LAW a challenge for the reconstructive surgeon. LAW reconstruction requires an understanding of the anatomy, physiologic forces, and the impact of deinnervation injury to design and perform successful reconstructions of hernia, bulge, and full-thickness defects. Reconstructive strategies must be tailored to address the inguinal ligament, retroperitoneum, chest wall, and diaphragm. Operative technique must focus on stabilization of the LAW to nonyielding points of fixation at the anatomic borders of the LAW far beyond the musculofascial borders of the defect itself. Thus, hernias, bulges, and full-thickness defects are approached in a similar fashion. Mesh reinforcement is uniformly required in lateral abdominal wall reconstruction. Inlay mesh placement with overlying myofascial coverage is preferred as a first-line option as is the case in anterior abdominal wall reconstruction. However, interposition bridging repairs are often performed as the surrounding myofascial tissue precludes a dual layered closure. The decision to place bioprosthetic or prosthetic mesh depends on surgeon preference, patient comorbidities, and clinical factors of the repair. Regardless of mesh type, the overlying soft tissue must provide stable cutaneous coverage and obliteration of dead space. In cases where the fasciocutaneous flaps surrounding the defect are inadequate for closure, regional pedicled flaps or free flaps are recruited to achieve stable soft tissue coverage. PMID:23372458

  18. Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Arena, Lois; Mantha, Pallavi

    2013-05-01

    In this project, the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) team evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls. Wall assemblies evaluated included code minimum walls using spray foam insulation and fiberglass batts, high R-value walls at least 12 in. thick (R-40 and R-60 assemblies), and brick walls with interior insulation.

  19. 1. SOUTHEAST REAR WALL AND NORTHEAST SIDE WALL OF CABINS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. SOUTHEAST REAR WALL AND NORTHEAST SIDE WALL OF CABINS FORGEMAN'S HOUSE NO. 1 AT RIGHT - Mount Etna Iron Works, Forgeman's House No. 1, Legislative Route 07020 between junctions of T.R. 461 & 463, Williamsburg, Blair County, PA

  20. Typical Window, Interior Wall Paint Sequence, Wall Section, and Foundation ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Typical Window, Interior Wall Paint Sequence, Wall Section, and Foundation Sections - Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) Camp NP-5-C, Barracks No. 5, CCC Camp Historic District at Chapin Mesa, Cortez, Montezuma County, CO

  1. 4. CONSTRUCTION DETAIL, SW CORNER, SHOWING RETAINING WALL, BRIDGE WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. CONSTRUCTION DETAIL, SW CORNER, SHOWING RETAINING WALL, BRIDGE WALL AND EROSION ON ROAD SURFACE. - Bridalveil Fall Bridge No. 3, Spanning Bridalveil Creek on carriage road, Yosemite Village, Mariposa County, CA

  2. DETAIL OF CROCKETT BARN WALL CONSTRUCTION, UPPER LEVEL. The wall ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF CROCKETT BARN WALL CONSTRUCTION, UPPER LEVEL. The wall construction of the Crockett barn includes a layer of diagonal sheathing that is exposed on the interior. - Crockett Farm, Barn, 1056 Fort Casey Road, Coupeville, Island County, WA

  3. Interior view of wall detail of southeast wall, view towards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of wall detail of southeast wall, view towards the southeast, without scale - Fort McClellan Ammunition Storage Area, Building No. 4408, Second Avenue (Magazine Road), Anniston, Calhoun County, AL

  4. EAST WALL OF CRYSTALLIZER WING TO THE LEFT, END WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EAST WALL OF CRYSTALLIZER WING TO THE LEFT, END WALL OF CRUSHING MILL IN CENTER. GABLE END OF BOILING HOUSE IN LEFT BACKGROUND. VIEW FROM THE SOUTH - Kekaha Sugar Company, Sugar Mill Building, 8315 Kekaha Road, Kekaha, Kauai County, HI

  5. 40. RETAINING WALL CONSTRUCTION SHOWING PORTION OF COMPLETED WALL. BACKFILLING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. RETAINING WALL CONSTRUCTION SHOWING PORTION OF COMPLETED WALL. BACKFILLING BY POWER SHOVEL IN PROGRESS. ZION NP NEGATIVE NO. 1490. PHOTOGRAPHER: PARKER, NO DATE - Zion-Mount Carmel Highway, Springdale, Washington County, UT

  6. Wind tunnels with adapted walls for reducing wall interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganzer, U.

    1979-01-01

    The basic principle of adaptable wind tunnel walls is explained. First results of an investigation carried out at the Aero-Space Institute of Berlin Technical University are presented for two dimensional flexible walls and a NACA 0012 airfoil. With five examples exhibiting very different flow conditions it is demonstrated that it is possible to reduce wall interference and to avoid blockage at transonic speeds by wall adaptation.

  7. 25. NORTH TRAINING WALL, EAST SECTION, SIDE WALL CONSTRUCTION, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. NORTH TRAINING WALL, EAST SECTION, SIDE WALL CONSTRUCTION, LOOKING WEST FROM A POINT ABOUT 500 FEET FROM THE MIDDLE HARBOR PARK FISHING PIER. (Panoramic view 1 of 2). - Oakland Harbor Training Walls, Mouth of Federal Channel to Inner Harbor, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  8. High-R Walls for Remodeling. Wall Cavity Moisture Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Wiehagen, J.; Kochkin, V.

    2012-12-01

    The focus of the study is on the performance of wall systems, and in particular, the moisture characteristics inside the wall cavity and in the wood sheathing. Furthermore, while this research will initially address new home construction, the goal is to address potential moisture issues in wall cavities of existing homes when insulation and air sealing improvements are made.

  9. High-R Walls for Remodeling: Wall Cavity Moisture Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Wiehagen, J.; Kochkin, V.

    2012-12-01

    The focus of the study is on the performance of wall systems, and in particular, the moisture characteristics inside the wall cavity and in the wood sheathing. Furthermore, while this research will initially address new home construction, the goal is to address potential moisture issues in wall cavities of existing homes when insulation and air sealing improvements are made.

  10. DIELECTRIC WALL ACCELERATOR TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S; Caporaso, G; Chen, Y; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Nelson, S; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2007-10-18

    The dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) is a compact pulsed power device where the pulse forming lines, switching, and vacuum wall are integrated into a single compact geometry. For this effort, we initiated a extensive compact pulsed power development program and have pursued the study of switching (gas, oil, laser induced surface flashover and photoconductive), dielectrics (ceramics and nanoparticle composites), pulse forming line topologies (asymmetric and symmetric Blumleins and zero integral pulse forming lines), and multilayered vacuum insulator (HGI) technology. Finally, we fabricated an accelerator cell for test on ETAII (a 5.5 MeV, 2 kA, 70 ns pulsewidth electron beam accelerator). We review our past results and report on the progress of accelerator cell testing.

  11. The Dielectric Wall Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, George J.; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Sampayan, Stephen E.

    2009-01-01

    The Dielectric Wall Accelerator (DWA), a class of induction accelerators, employs a novel insulating beam tube to impress a longitudinal electric field on a bunch of charged particles. The surface flashover characteristics of this tube may permit the attainment of accelerating gradients on the order of 100 MV/m for accelerating pulses on the order of a nanosecond in duration. A virtual traveling wave of excitation along the tube is produced at any desired speed by controlling the timing of pulse generating modules that supply a tangential electric field to the tube wall. Because of the ability to control the speed of this virtual wave, the accelerator is capable of handling any charge to mass ratio particle; hence it can be used for electrons, protons and any ion. The accelerator architectures, key technologies and development challenges will be described.

  12. Curtain Wall Creates Ventilation Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, E. V.

    1985-01-01

    Curtain-wall structure proposed for removing methane and airborne coal dust from hydrojet-jaw mining machines. Channel between curtain wall and mine wall forms closed exhaust passage. Through it, gas and dust continuously removed so high concentrations of these explosive materials not build up.

  13. Molded Concrete Center Mine Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, E. V.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed semiautomatic system forms concrete-foam wall along middle of coal-mine passage. Wall helps support roof and divides passage into two conduits needed for ventilation of coal face. Mobile mold and concrete-foam generator form sections of wall in place.

  14. Left ventricular wall stress compendium.

    PubMed

    Zhong, L; Ghista, D N; Tan, R S

    2012-01-01

    Left ventricular (LV) wall stress has intrigued scientists and cardiologists since the time of Lame and Laplace in 1800s. The left ventricle is an intriguing organ structure, whose intrinsic design enables it to fill and contract. The development of wall stress is intriguing to cardiologists and biomedical engineers. The role of left ventricle wall stress in cardiac perfusion and pumping as well as in cardiac pathophysiology is a relatively unexplored phenomenon. But even for us to assess this role, we first need accurate determination of in vivo wall stress. However, at this point, 150 years after Lame estimated left ventricle wall stress using the elasticity theory, we are still in the exploratory stage of (i) developing left ventricle models that properly represent left ventricle anatomy and physiology and (ii) obtaining data on left ventricle dynamics. In this paper, we are responding to the need for a comprehensive survey of left ventricle wall stress models, their mechanics, stress computation and results. We have provided herein a compendium of major type of wall stress models: thin-wall models based on the Laplace law, thick-wall shell models, elasticity theory model, thick-wall large deformation models and finite element models. We have compared the mean stress values of these models as well as the variation of stress across the wall. All of the thin-wall and thick-wall shell models are based on idealised ellipsoidal and spherical geometries. However, the elasticity model's shape can vary through the cycle, to simulate the more ellipsoidal shape of the left ventricle in the systolic phase. The finite element models have more representative geometries, but are generally based on animal data, which limits their medical relevance. This paper can enable readers to obtain a comprehensive perspective of left ventricle wall stress models, of how to employ them to determine wall stresses, and be cognizant of the assumptions involved in the use of specific models.

  15. Gullies in Crater Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    6 April 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows gullies in the wall of a large impact crater in Newton Basin near 41.9oS, 158.1oW. Such gullies may have formed by downslope movement of wet debris--i.e., water. Unfortunately, because the responsible fluid (if there was one) is no longer present today, only the geomorphology of the channels and debris aprons can be used to deduce that water might have been involved. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  16. Structure of axionic domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, M. C.; Sikivie, P.

    1985-09-01

    The structure of axionic domain walls is investigated using the low-energy effective theory of axions and pions. We derive the spatial dependence of the phases of the Peccei-Quinn scalar field and the QCD quark-antiquark condensates inside an axionic domain wall. Thence an accurate estimate of the wall surface energy density is obtained. The equations of motion for axions, photons, leptons, and baryons in the neighborhood of axionic domain walls are written down and estimates are given for the wall reflection and transmission coefficients of these particles. Finally, we discuss the energy dissipation by axionic domain walls oscillating in the early universe due to the reflection of particles in the primordial soup.

  17. Asymptotic dynamics of monopole walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, R.

    2015-08-01

    We determine the asymptotic dynamics of the U(N) doubly periodic BPS monopole in Yang-Mills-Higgs theory, called a monopole wall, by exploring its Higgs curve using the Newton polytope and amoeba. In particular, we show that the monopole wall splits into subwalls when any of its moduli become large. The long-distance gauge and Higgs field interactions of these subwalls are Abelian, allowing us to derive an asymptotic metric for the monopole wall moduli space.

  18. Oven wall panel construction

    DOEpatents

    Ellison, Kenneth; Whike, Alan S.

    1980-04-22

    An oven roof or wall is formed from modular panels, each of which comprises an inner fabric and an outer fabric. Each such fabric is formed with an angle iron framework and somewhat resilient tie-bars or welded at their ends to flanges of the angle irons to maintain the inner and outer frameworks in spaced disposition while minimizing heat transfer by conduction and permitting some degree of relative movement on expansion and contraction of the module components. Suitable thermal insulation is provided within the module. Panels or skins are secured to the fabric frameworks and each such skin is secured to a framework and projects laterally so as slidingly to overlie the adjacent frame member of an adjacent panel in turn to permit relative movement during expansion and contraction.

  19. Crater Wall With Gullies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    8 June 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) picture shows gullies formed in the terraced wall of an impact crater on the floor of a larger crater near 39.1oS, 200.7oW. Gullies such as these are fairly common in craters and depressions at southern middle latitudes. They also occur in some areas at northern middle latitudes and in both polar regions. They may have formed by liquid water, or not--the Mars science community is still debating and discussing the issue. This picture covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  20. 13. LONG WEST WALL (LEFT) AND SHORT SOUTH WALL (RIGHT) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. LONG WEST WALL (LEFT) AND SHORT SOUTH WALL (RIGHT) OF AR-9, ALSO SHOWING MORE RECENT CONTROL ROOM BUILDING AT RIGHT. VIEW IS TO THE NORTHEAST. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base, Rammed Earth Aircraft Dispersal Revetments, Western Shore of Rogers Dry Lake, Boron, Kern County, CA

  1. 10. VIEW OF LAMINARFLOW FILTER WALL NEAR SOUTH WALL OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. VIEW OF LAMINAR-FLOW FILTER WALL NEAR SOUTH WALL OF CLEAN ROOM (102). NOTE GROUNDING CABLES NEAR BASEBOARD IN LOWER RIGHT BACKGROUND. WHITE SQUARE IN FOREGROUND IS A FLOOR DRAIN COVERED WITH TAPE. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Vehicle Support Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  2. North wall, central part, showing partial partition wall at left. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North wall, central part, showing partial partition wall at left. This area is labeled “Pioneering Research” on drawing copy NV-35-B-5 (submitted with HABS No. NV-35-B) (series 2 of 4) - Bureau of Mines Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Original Building, Date Street north of U.S. Highway 93, Boulder City, Clark County, NV

  3. 7. INTERIOR, MAIN GARAGE, SOUTHERN WALL, FROM CLOSE TO WALL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. INTERIOR, MAIN GARAGE, SOUTHERN WALL, FROM CLOSE TO WALL, LOOKING SOUTH, SHOWING 'GAMEWELL' FIRE ALARM TAPE CONTROL SYSTEM (TECHNOLOGY CIRCA 1910) AT CENTER, AND ENTRY TO OFFICE AT FAR RIGHT. - Oakland Naval Supply Center, Firehouse, East of Fourth Street, between A & B Streets, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  4. Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Arena, L.; Mantha, P.

    2013-05-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls.

  5. The Wonders of Word Walls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houle, Amy; Krogness, Allison

    2001-01-01

    Describes using a word wall, a visible display categorizing words alphabetically, enabling children in early childhood classrooms to discover new words and to practice and expand their language skills. Suggests that a word wall helps to create a secure learning environment, builds student confidence, and contributes to independent reading and…

  6. The "Brick Wall" Graphic Organizer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matteson, Shirley M.

    2016-01-01

    A brick wall provides a fitting description of what happens when teachers try to teach a concept for which students are unprepared. When students are unsuccessful academically, their foundational knowledge may be missing, incomplete, or incorrect. As a result, students "hit a brick wall," and their academic progress stops because they do…

  7. Great Wall of China

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This ASTER sub-image covers a 12 x 12 km area in northern Shanxi Province, China, and was acquired January 9, 2001. The low sun angle, and light snow cover highlight a section of the Great Wall, visible as a black line running diagonally through the image from lower left to upper right. The Great Wall is over 2000 years old and was built over a period of 1000 years. Stretching 4500 miles from Korea to the Gobi Desert it was first built to protect China from marauders from the north.

    This image is located at 40.2 degrees north latitude and 112.8 degrees east longitude.

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. Science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats, monitoring potentially active volcanoes, identifying crop stress, determining cloud morphology and physical properties, wetlands Evaluation, thermal pollution monitoring, coral reef degradation, surface temperature mapping of soils and geology, and

  8. Channel Wall Landslides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The multiple landslides in this VIS image occur along a steep channel wall. Note the large impact crater in the context image. The formation of the crater may have initially weakened that area of the surface prior to channel formation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -2.7, Longitude 324.8 East (35.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  9. Wall Shear Stress, Wall Pressure and Near Wall Velocity Field Relationships in a Whirling Annular Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Winslow, Robert B.; Thames, H. Davis, III

    1996-01-01

    The mean and phase averaged pressure and wall shear stress distributions were measured on the stator wall of a 50% eccentric annular seal which was whirling in a circular orbit at the same speed as the shaft rotation. The shear stresses were measured using flush mounted hot-film probes. Four different operating conditions were considered consisting of Reynolds numbers of 12,000 and 24,000 and Taylor numbers of 3,300 and 6,600. At each of the operating conditions the axial distribution (from Z/L = -0.2 to 1.2) of the mean pressure, shear stress magnitude, and shear stress direction on the stator wall were measured. Also measured were the phase averaged pressure and shear stress. These data were combined to calculate the force distributions along the seal length. Integration of the force distributions result in the net forces and moments generated by the pressure and shear stresses. The flow field inside the seal operating at a Reynolds number of 24,000 and a Taylor number of 6,600 has been measured using a 3-D laser Doppler anemometer system. Phase averaged wall pressure and wall shear stress are presented along with phase averaged mean velocity and turbulence kinetic energy distributions located 0.16c from the stator wall where c is the seal clearance. The relationships between the velocity, turbulence, wall pressure and wall shear stress are very complex and do not follow simple bulk flow predictions.

  10. Denitrification Walls: Successes and Limitations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schipper, L. A.; Barkle, G. F.; Burgess, C. P.; Vojvodic-Vukovic, M.

    2001-05-01

    There is a need to develop practical and inexpensive approaches for removing nitrate from ground water because of its potential adverse effect on receiving aquatic environments. Denitrification walls may be one such approach for removing nitrate from shallow groundwater. In January 1996, we constructed a denitrification wall by digging a trench that intercepted groundwater and mixed the excavated soil with sawdust before the mix was returned to the trench. Sawdust provides a source of energy for denitrifying bacteria, which convert nitrate in groundwater entering the wall to nitrogen gas. For the past 5 years, nitrate concentrations in groundwater entering this wall have ranged from 5 to 16 mg N L-1 but have always been reduced to less than 2 mg N L-1 in the wall indicating nearly complete removal of nitrate from the groundwater. We showed that this nitrate removal could be accounted for by denitrification rates which ranged from 0.6 to 18.1 mg N m-3 h-1. More recently we have encountered problems with denitrification walls constructed into coarsely textured soils (such as sands) where the addition of sawdust decreased hydraulic conductivity. As a consequence groundwater flowed under rather than through the wall. We are attempting to circumvent this problem using coarser grades of carbon amendments. Particulate carbon (such as sawdust) is likely to support lower rates of nitrate removal, but for longer, than soluble carbon sources because solid carbon sources degrade more slowly.

  11. 27. "TEST STAND; STRUCTURAL; SIDEWALL, NORTH WALL AND SOUTH WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. "TEST STAND; STRUCTURAL; SIDEWALL, NORTH WALL AND SOUTH WALL FRAMING ELEVATIONS." Specifications No. ENG-04353-55-72; Drawing No. 60-09-12; sheet 27 of 148; file no. 1320/78. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 4338, Rev. B; date: 15 April 1957. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  12. Economics of abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bower, Curtis; Roth, J Scott

    2013-10-01

    The economic aspects of abdominal wall reconstruction are frequently overlooked, although understandings of the financial implications are essential in providing cost-efficient health care. Ventral hernia repairs are frequently performed surgical procedures with significant economic ramifications for employers, insurers, providers, and patients because of the volume of procedures, complication rates, the significant rate of recurrence, and escalating costs. Because biological mesh materials add significant expense to the costs of treating complex abdominal wall hernias, the role of such costly materials needs to be better defined to ensure the most cost-efficient and effective treatments for ventral abdominal wall hernias.

  13. OTVE combustor wall condition monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szemenyei, Brian; Nelson, Robert S.; Barkhoudarian, S.

    1989-01-01

    Conventional ultrasonics, eddy current, and electromagnetic acoustic transduction (EMAT) technologies were evaluated to determine their capability of measuring wall thickness/wear of individual cooling channels in test specimens simulating conditions in the throat region of an OTVE combustion chamber liner. Quantitative results are presented for the eddy current technology, which was shown to measure up to the optimum 20-mil wall thickness with near single channel resolution. Additional results demonstrate the capability of the conventional ultrasonics and EMAT technologies to detect a thinning or cracked wall. Recommendations for additional eddy current and EMAT development tests are presented.

  14. Domain walls riding the wave.

    SciTech Connect

    Karapetrov, G.; Novosad, V.; Materials Science Division

    2010-11-01

    Recent years have witnessed a rapid proliferation of electronic gadgets around the world. These devices are used for both communication and entertainment, and it is a fact that they account for a growing portion of household energy consumption and overall world consumption of electricity. Increasing the energy efficiency of these devices could have a far greater and immediate impact than a gradual switch to renewable energy sources. The advances in the area of spintronics are therefore very important, as gadgets are mostly comprised of memory and logic elements. Recent developments in controlled manipulation of magnetic domains in ferromagnet nanostructures have opened opportunities for novel device architectures. This new class of memories and logic gates could soon power millions of consumer electronic devices. The attractiveness of using domain-wall motion in electronics is due to its inherent reliability (no mechanical moving parts), scalability (3D scalable architectures such as in racetrack memory), and nonvolatility (retains information in the absence of power). The remaining obstacles in widespread use of 'racetrack-type' elements are the speed and the energy dissipation during the manipulation of domain walls. In their recent contribution to Physical Review Letters, Oleg Tretiakov, Yang Liu, and Artem Abanov from Texas A&M University in College Station, provide a theoretical description of domain-wall motion in nanoscale ferromagnets due to the spin-polarized currents. They find exact conditions for time-dependent resonant domain-wall movement, which could speed up the motion of domain walls while minimizing Ohmic losses. Movement of domain walls in ferromagnetic nanowires can be achieved by application of external magnetic fields or by passing a spin-polarized current through the nanowire itself. On the other hand, the readout of the domain state is done by measuring the resistance of the wire. Therefore, passing current through the ferromagnetic wire is

  15. A comparative study on the traditional Indian Shodhana and Chinese processing methods for aconite roots by characterization and determination of the major components

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Aconitum is an indispensable entity of the traditional medicine therapy in Ayurveda and Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), in spite of its known fatal toxicity characteristics. The prolonged use of this drug, irrespective of its known lethal effects, is governed by the practice of effective detoxification processes that have been used for decades. However, the processing methods of Ayurveda and TCM are different, and no comparative study has been carried out to evaluate their differences. The objective of the present study was to carry out comparative chemical profiling of the roots of Aconitum heterophyllum Wall, A. carmichaelii Debx., and A. kusnezoffii Reichb. after application of two detoxification methods used in Ayurveda and one method used in TCM . Results Analysis of the processed samples was carried out by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography combined with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QTOF/MS). The results obtained in the study demonstrate that all three processing methods used in Ayurveda and TCM effectively extract the diester diterpenoid alkaloids and led to their conversion into monoester diterpenoid alkaloids. The efficiency of the processes in reduction of toxic alkaloid contents can be stated as: Processing with water > Shodhana with cow milk > Shodhana with cow urine. The analysis method was validated as per ICH-Q2R1 guidelines and all the parameters were found to comply with the recommendations stated in the guidelines. Conclusions There have been no reports till date, to compare the processing methods used in Ayurveda with the methods used in TCM for detoxification of aconite roots. Our study demonstrates that, these methods used in both the traditional systems of medicine, efficiently detoxify the aconite roots. Amongst the three selected procedures, the TCM method of decoction with water is the most efficient. Through experimental evidences, we prove the conversion of toxic diester diterpenoid

  16. Fly on the Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulenburg, Gerald

    2003-01-01

    The email was addressed not only to me, but also to all the Project Knowledge Sharing Community at Ames Research Center. We were invited to sit in on a major project review as a new experiment in knowledge sharing. This first-of-its-kind opportunity had been conceived by Claire Smith, who leads the knowledge sharing program, as well as heading up the Center's Project Leadership Development Program and serving as coordinator of the APPL-West program at Ames. The objective was to offer Ames project practitioners the opportunity to observe project-review processes as they happen. Not that I haven't participated in my share of project reviews, but this seemed like a great way for me to get up-to-date about a new project, the Kepler mission, and to experience a review from a new perspective. Typically, when you're being reviewed, it's difficult to see what's happening objectively-the same way it is on a project. Presenters are always thinking, 'Okay, what's on my slides? How much time do I have left? What are they going to ask me?' So when Claire's email pinged on my computer, I quickly responded by asking her to save a place for me. It was to be an informational review about progress on the project: what the team had done, where they were going, and what they needed to do to get there. There were people on the project team from all over the United States, and it was the first time for them to get together from all aspects of the project. For our part, as observers, we were asked to abide by a couple of rules: Don't ask any questions. and don't talk about the specifics of what we saw or heard. The idea was that we weren't supposed to be noticed. We weren't to buzz around and bother people. Hence the name for this experinient: Fly on the Wall.

  17. My Big Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espinosa, Paul S.

    2002-01-01

    It was June and I was in Yosemite National Park in California, 2,000-feet off the ground. I was climbing El Capitan, a majestic 3,000-foot high, mile-wide granite monolith--one of the most sought after and spectacular rock climbs in the world. After three days of climbing on its sheer face, and having completed the most difficult part of the route, my partner and I were heading down. A thunderstorm lasting all night and into the morning had soaked our tiny perch and all our worldly possessions. We began rappelling down the vertical wall by sliding to the ends of two 50meter ropes tied together and looped through a set of fixed rings bolted into the rock. At the end of the ropes was another rappel station consisting of a set of rings, placed by previous climbers for retreating parties, which we used to anchor ourselves to the rock face. We then pulled the ropes down from the rings above, threaded the ones in front of our noses and started down another rope length. Everything we brought up for our five-day climb to the summit we had to bring back down with us: ropes, climbing gear of every sort, sleeping bags, extra clothes, food, water, and other essentials. All this we either stuffed into a haul bag (an oversized reinforced duffel bag) or slung over our shoulders. The retreat was slow and methodical, akin to a train backing down a mountain, giving me ample time to think. My situation made me think about my work, mostly, about all the projects I have managed, or been involved in managing. As a NASA project manager, I have worked on a number of successful projects. I have also been involved in a number of projects I never saw the end of. I thought about all the projects I transferred off of for other opportunities, projects that were in full stride and ran out of funding, and ones put on the shelf because they would not meet a flight date. Oh yes, I have had many success, to be sure, or I would have burned out years ago. Lessons from both the successful and not

  18. Simulation of turbulent wall pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    A computer program has been developed to simulate the transient wall pressure field produced by a low speed fully turbulent boundary layer. The theoretical basis for the simulation has been discussed and preliminary results from a pressure simulation are presented.

  19. Plant cell walls to ethanol.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conversion of plant cell walls to ethanol constitutes generation 2 bioethanol production. The process consists of several steps: biomass selection/genetic modification, physiochemical pretreatment, enzymatic saccharification, fermentation, and separation. Ultimately, it is desired to combine as man...

  20. Wall effects in wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chevallier, J. P.; Vaucheret, X.

    1986-01-01

    A synthesis of current trends in the reduction and computation of wall effects is presented. Some of the points discussed include: (1) for the two-dimensional, transonic tests, various control techniques of boundary conditions are used with adaptive walls offering high precision in determining reference conditions and residual corrections. A reduction in the boundary layer effects of the lateral walls is obtained at T2; (2) for the three-dimensional tests, the methods for the reduction of wall effects are still seldom applied due to a lesser need and to their complexity; (3) the supports holding the model of the probes have to be taken into account in the estimation of perturbatory effects.

  1. Hall thruster with grooved walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hong; Ning, Zhongxi; Yu, Daren

    2013-02-01

    Axial-oriented and azimuthal-distributed grooves are formed on channel walls of a Hall thruster after the engine undergoes a long-term operation. Existing studies have demonstrated the relation between the grooves and the near-wall physics, such as sheath and electron near-wall transport. The idea to optimize the thruster performance with such grooves was also proposed. Therefore, this paper is devoted to explore the effects of wall grooves on the discharge characteristics of a Hall thruster. With experimental measurements, the variations on electron conductivity, ionization distribution, and integrated performance are obtained. The involved physical mechanisms are then analyzed and discussed. The findings help to not only better understand the working principle of Hall thruster discharge but also establish a physical fundamental for the subsequent optimization with artificial grooves.

  2. Pharmacology of Ativisha, Musta and their substitutes

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, M.; Kuruvilla, Gina R.; Kumar, K. Subrahmanya; Venkatasubramanian, Padma

    2015-01-01

    The Ayurvedic literature during the medieval period suggests the use of Musta (Cyperus rotundus), a common weed, as a pratinidhi dravya (substitute) for Ativisha (Aconitum heterophyllum), an endangered species. Contemporary Ayurvedic practice also uses Cryptocoryne spiralis, (known as Naattu Atividayam in South India) and Nagaramusta (Cyperus scariosus) as substitutes for Ativisha and Musta, respectively. This article reviews published literature on the pharmacology of the above four species. Both A. heterophyllum and C. rotundus are reported to possess antiinflammatory, antipyretic, antibacterial and antidiarrhoeal properties, while antiinflammatory and antibacterial activities are attributed to C. scariosus. No reports exist on the bioactivity of Cryptocoryne spiralis. It is interesting to note that other than the veerya which is different, the biological properties of Ativisha and Musta are similar according to Ayurvedic classification of dravyaguna. This is also supported by modern pharmacological studies, which show that, both A. heterophyllum and C. rotundus have antidiarrheal, antipyretic, antiinflammatory, antihyperlipidemic and hypoglycemic activities. However, the similarities between the discussed species cannot be attributed to their phytochemical composition or taxonomical classification as these are quite distinct. The dravyaguna method of classifying materials, which we are calling as “pharmaco-taxonomy”, offers a unique way of classifying those plant materials which lack similarity at the botanical or chemical level, but are similar at the level of biological functions. PMID:26167002

  3. Innovative Composite Wall System for Sheathing Masonry Walls

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, Robert L.; Cavallo, James

    1997-09-25

    Existing Housing - Much of the older multifamily housing stock in the United States includes units in structures with uninsulated masonry walls. Included in this stock are two- and three-story walk-up apartments, larger apartment complexes, and public housing (both high- rise and townhouse). This older multifamily housing has seen years of heavy use that may have left the plaster wall marred or damaged. Long- term building settlement or movement may have cracked the plaster, sometimes severely. Moisture from invented kitchens and baths may have caused condensation on uninsulated exterior walls. At best this condensation has left stains on the paint or wallpaper. At worst it has supported mold and mildew growth, fouling the air and creating unhealthy living conditions. Deteriorating plaster and flaking paint also result from wet walls. The presence of flaking, lead-based paint in older (pre-1978) housing is a major public health concern. Children can suffer permanent mental handicaps and psychological disorders if they are subjected to elevated levels of lead, while adults can suffer hypertension and other maladies. Studies have found that, in some urban communities with older housing stocks, over 35% of children tested have elevated blood lead levels (Hastings, et al.: 1997). Nationally, nearly 22% of black, non-hispanic children living in pre-1946 housing were found to have elevated levels of lead in their blood (MWWR Article: February 21,1997). The deterioration of many of these walls is to the point that lead can freely enter the living space.

  4. Wall thickness effect on the resistive wall mode stability in toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, L.-J.; Kotschenreuther, M.T.

    2005-07-15

    The effect of finite wall thickness on the stability of n=1 resistive wall modes in toroidal plasmas is investigated. A fusion reactor-relevant configuration is examined. The investigation employs a novel ideal-magnetohydrodynamics adaptive shooting code for axisymmetric plasmas, extended to take into account the wall thickness. Although finite wall thickness generally reduces the growth rate of the resistive wall modes, no contribution to stabilization is found to be made by the portion of the wall that is located beyond the critical position for perfectly conducting wall stabilization. Thus, when the inner side of the wall lies near the critical wall position, the scaling of the growth rate versus wall thickness in the realistic thick-wall calculation is significantly different from that of the usual thin-wall theory. The thin-wall estimate is relevant only when the wall is brought very close to the plasma and is not too thick.

  5. Effects of the flexibility of the arterial wall on the wall shear stresses and wall tension in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salsac, Anne-Virginie; Fernandez, Miguel; Chomaz, Jean-Marc

    2005-11-01

    As an abdominal aortic aneurysm develops, large changes occur in the composition and structure of the arterial wall, which result in its stiffening. So far, most studies, whether experimental or numerical, have been conducted assuming the walls to be rigid. A numerical simulation of the fluid structure interactions is performed in different models of aneurysms in order to analyze the effects that the wall compliance might have on the flow topology. Both symmetric and non-symmetric models of aneurysms are considered, all idealistic in shape. The wall mechanical properties are varied in order to simulate the progressive stiffening of the walls. The spatial and temporal distributions of wall tension are calculated for the different values of the wall elasticity and compared to the results for the rigid walls. In the case of rigid walls, the calculation of the wall shear stresses and pressure compare very well with experimental results.

  6. Isolation of the Cell Wall.

    PubMed

    Canut, Hervé; Albenne, Cécile; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    This chapter describes a method allowing the purification of the cell wall for studying both polysaccharides and proteins. The plant primary cell wall is mainly composed of polysaccharides (90-95 % in mass) and of proteins (5-10 %). At the end of growth, specialized cells may synthesize a lignified secondary wall composed of polysaccharides (about 65 %) and lignin (about 35 %). Due to its composition, the cell wall is the cellular compartment having the highest density and this property is used for its purification. It plays critical roles during plant development and in response to environmental constraints. It is largely used in the food and textile industries as well as for the production of bioenergy. All these characteristics and uses explain why its study as a true cell compartment is of high interest. The proposed method of purification can be used for large amount of material but can also be downscaled to 500 mg of fresh material. Tools for checking the quality of the cell wall preparation, such as protein analysis and microscopy observation, are also provided.

  7. MHD Electrode and wall constructions

    DOEpatents

    Way, Stewart; Lempert, Joseph

    1984-01-01

    Electrode and wall constructions for the walls of a channel transmitting the hot plasma in a magnetohydrodynamic generator. The electrodes and walls are made of a plurality of similar modules which are spaced from one another along the channel. The electrodes can be metallic or ceramic, and each module includes one or more electrodes which are exposed to the plasma and a metallic cooling bar which is spaced from the plasma and which has passages through which a cooling fluid flows to remove heat transmitted from the electrode to the cooling bar. Each electrode module is spaced from and electrically insulated from each adjacent module while interconnected by the cooling fluid which serially flows among selected modules. A wall module includes an electrically insulating ceramic body exposed to the plasma and affixed, preferably by mechanical clips or by brazing, to a metallic cooling bar spaced from the plasma and having cooling fluid passages. Each wall module is, similar to the electrode modules, electrically insulated from the adjacent modules and serially interconnected to other modules by the cooling fluid.

  8. Functional domain walls in multiferroics.

    PubMed

    Meier, Dennis

    2015-11-25

    During the last decade a wide variety of novel and fascinating correlation phenomena has been discovered at domain walls in multiferroic bulk systems, ranging from unusual electronic conductance to inseparably entangled spin and charge degrees of freedom. The domain walls represent quasi-2D functional objects that can be induced, positioned, and erased on demand, bearing considerable technological potential for future nanoelectronics. Most of the challenges that remain to be solved before turning related device paradigms into reality, however, still fall in the field of fundamental condensed matter physics and materials science. In this topical review seminal experimental findings gained on electric and magnetic domain walls in multiferroic bulk materials are addressed. A special focus is put on the physical properties that emerge at so-called charged domain walls and the added functionality that arises from coexisting magnetic order. The research presented in this review highlights that we are just entering a whole new world of intriguing nanoscale physics that is yet to be explored in all its details. The goal is to draw attention to the persistent challenges and identify future key directions for the research on functional domain walls in multiferroics.

  9. Turbine airfoil with outer wall thickness indicators

    DOEpatents

    Marra, John J; James, Allister W; Merrill, Gary B

    2013-08-06

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and including a depth indicator for determining outer wall blade thickness. The airfoil may include an outer wall having a plurality of grooves in the outer surface of the outer wall. The grooves may have a depth that represents a desired outer surface and wall thickness of the outer wall. The material forming an outer surface of the outer wall may be removed to be flush with an innermost point in each groove, thereby reducing the wall thickness and increasing efficiency. The plurality of grooves may be positioned in a radially outer region of the airfoil proximate to the tip.

  10. The DEMO wall load challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenninger, R.; Albanese, R.; Ambrosino, R.; Arbeiter, F.; Aubert, J.; Bachmann, C.; Barbato, L.; Barrett, T.; Beckers, M.; Biel, W.; Boccaccini, L.; Carralero, D.; Coster, D.; Eich, T.; Fasoli, A.; Federici, G.; Firdaouss, M.; Graves, J.; Horacek, J.; Kovari, M.; Lanthaler, S.; Loschiavo, V.; Lowry, C.; Lux, H.; Maddaluno, G.; Maviglia, F.; Mitteau, R.; Neu, R.; Pfefferle, D.; Schmid, K.; Siccinio, M.; Sieglin, B.; Silva, C.; Snicker, A.; Subba, F.; Varje, J.; Zohm, H.

    2017-04-01

    For several reasons the challenge to keep the loads to the first wall within engineering limits is substantially higher in DEMO compared to ITER. Therefore the pre-conceptual design development for DEMO that is currently ongoing in Europe needs to be based on load estimates that are derived employing the most recent plasma edge physics knowledge. An initial assessment of the static wall heat load limit in DEMO infers that the steady state peak heat flux limit on the majority of the DEMO first wall should not be assumed to be higher than 1.0 MW m‑2. This compares to an average wall heat load of 0.29 MW m‑2 for the design {\\tt {EU}}{\\tt {~}}{\\tt {DEMO1}}{\\tt {~2015}} assuming a perfect homogeneous distribution. The main part of this publication concentrates on the development of first DEMO estimates for charged particle, radiation, fast particle (all static) and disruption heat loads. Employing an initial engineering wall design with clear optimization potential in combination with parameters for the flat-top phase (x-point configuration), loads up to 7 MW m‑2 (penalty factor for tolerances etc not applied) have been calculated. Assuming a fraction of power radiated from the x-point region between 1/5 and 1/3, peaks of the total power flux density due to radiation of 0.6–0.8 MW m‑2 are found in the outer baffle region. This first review of wall loads, and the associated limits in DEMO clearly underlines a significant challenge that necessitates substantial engineering efforts as well as a considerable consolidation of the associated physics basis.

  11. Sporothrix schenckii Cell Wall Peptidorhamnomannans

    PubMed Central

    Lopes-Bezerra, Leila M.

    2011-01-01

    This mini-review article is dedicated to clarifying certain important biochemical aspects of Sporothrix schenckii cell wall peptidorhamnomannans. Cell wall components involved in the host interaction such as antigens as well as a gp70 adhesin are important molecules present on the surface of the yeast parasitic phase. Other structural glycoconjugates present on the fungus cell surface are also described here. Knowledge of the fine structure of carbohydrate epitopes expressed on the surface in both morphological phases of S. schenckii permitted the development of non-invasive immunochemical methods to diagnose human and feline sporotrichosis. PMID:22203817

  12. Gullies in Terraced Crater Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-375, 29 May 2003

    Gullies--possibly formed by a liquid such as water in the recent martian past--formed at two different levels in the walls of a meteor impact crater near 36.2oS, 185.5oW. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows gullies in the upper crater wall (top of the image) and emergent from the slope of a lower terrace (bottom of the image). Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  13. Wall Interference in Wind Tunnels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    d’un d £ faut d’ßtendue des signatures. Sp^cialeinent dans le cas de la correction d’incidence, la pondäration des ecarts de Kp entre les deux parois, de...für Stromungsmechanik der Tech. Univers. Bienroder Weg 3 D -3300 Braunschweig — Germany MrL.H.Ohman Head, High Speed Aerodynamics Lab. National...CORRECTIONS IM ’. • SOLID-WALL TUNNELS FROM MEASUREMENTS OF STATIC PRESSURE AT THE WALLS j t by t P. R. Ashill and D . J. Weeks Aerodynamics

  14. Recovery after abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kristian Kiim

    2017-03-01

    Incisional hernia is a common long-term complication to abdominal surgery, occurring in more than 20% of all patients. Some of these hernias become giant and affect patients in several ways. This patient group often experiences pain, decreased perceived body image, and loss of physical function, which results in a need for surgical repair of the giant hernia, known as abdominal wall reconstruction. In the current thesis, patients with a giant hernia were examined to achieve a better understanding of their physical and psychological function before and after abdominal wall reconstruction. Study I was a systematic review of the existing standardized methods for assessing quality of life after incisional hernia repair. After a systematic search in the electronic databases Embase and PubMed, a total of 26 studies using standardized measures for assessment of quality of life after incisional hernia repair were found. The most commonly used questionnaire was the generic Short-Form 36, which assesses overall health-related quality of life, addressing both physical and mental health. The second-most common questionnaire was the Carolinas Comfort Scale, which is a disease specific questionnaire addressing pain, movement limitation and mesh sensation in relation to a current or previous hernia. In total, eight different questionnaires were used at varying time points in the 26 studies. In conclusion, standardization of timing and method of quality of life assessment after incisional hernia repair was lacking. Study II was a case-control study of the effects of an enhanced recovery after surgery pathway for patients undergoing abdominal wall reconstruction for a giant hernia. Sixteen consecutive patients were included prospectively after the implementation of a new enhanced recovery after surgery pathway at the Digestive Disease Center, Bispebjerg Hospital, and compared to a control group of 16 patients included retrospectively in the period immediately prior to the

  15. Thermal breaking systems for metal stud walls -- Can metal stud walls perform as well as wood stud walls

    SciTech Connect

    Kosny, J.; Christian, J.E.; Desjarlais, A.O.

    1997-12-31

    Metal stud wall systems for residential buildings are gaining in popularity. Strong thermal bridges caused by highly conductive metal studs degrade the thermal performance of such walls. Several wall configurations have been developed to improve their thermal performance. The authors tried to evaluate some of these wall systems. The thermal performance of metal stud walls is frequently compared with that of wood stud walls. A reduction of the in-cavity R-value caused by the wood studs is about 10% in wood stud walls. In metal stud walls, thermal bridges generated by the metal components reduce their thermal performance by up to 55%. Today, metal stud walls are believed to be considerably less thermally effective than similar systems made of wood because steel has much higher thermal conductivity than wood. Relatively high R-values may be achieved by installing insulating sheathing, which is now widely recommended as the remedy for weak thermal performance of metal stud walls. A series of promising metal stud wall configurations was analyzed. Some of these walls were designed and tested by the authors, some were tested in other laboratories, and some were developed and forgotten a long time ago. Several types of thermal breaking systems were used in these walls. Two- and three-dimensional finite-difference computer simulations were used to analyze 20 metal stud wall configurations. Also, a series of hot-box tests were conducted on several of these walls. Test results for 22 additional metal stud walls were analyzed. Most of these walls contained conventional metal studs. Commonly used fiberglass and EPS were used as insulation materials. The most promising metal stud wall configurations have reductions in the center-of-cavity R-values of less than 20%.

  16. Reconstruction of chest wall defects.

    PubMed

    Hasse, J

    1991-12-01

    A series of 61 consecutive procedures of chest wall resection and reconstruction in 58 patients during the period between August, 1986 and December, 1990 is reported. The ages ranged between 6-77 years. The chest wall resection was indicated for malignant affections in 54 cases. Among these, there were 24 patients with bronchial carcinoma invading the chest wall, 17 patients with primary or metastatic sarcoma, 11 patients with recurrent breast cancer and 3 with cancer metastases of varying origin. Pulmonary resection included pneumonectomy in 8 cases, lobectomy in 19, segmental and wedge resections in 26. In the majority of resections, the reconstruction was accomplished without implants. In cases with full thickness removal of the chest wall, the plane of the rib cage and/or the sternum was reconstructed using Vicryl mesh (n = 7), PTFE soft tissue patch (n = 11), marlex-mesh (n = 1), or methyl-methacrylate (n = 3). There was one case of hospital mortality, 6 weeks postoperatively, due to neurological failure from an independent preoperatively undiagnosed brain tumor. There were 4 reoperations: one early and one late (4 months) infection, one case of limited superficial necrosis of a flap and one with chronic lymphous drainage from a large myocutaneous flap. In no instance was primary postoperative ventilation therapy necessary. Mechanical ventilation was instituted only on day 8 in the patient who accounts for the mortality in this series. In the presence of primary infection, the greater omentum was used for the restoration of the integument.

  17. Shear wall ultimate drift limits

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, T.A.; Goldman, A.; Farrar, C.R.

    1994-04-01

    Drift limits for reinforced-concrete shear walls are investigated by reviewing the open literature for appropriate experimental data. Drift values at ultimate are determined for walls with aspect ratios ranging up to a maximum of 3.53 and undergoing different types of lateral loading (cyclic static, monotonic static, and dynamic). Based on the geometry of actual nuclear power plant structures exclusive of containments and concerns regarding their response during seismic (i.e.,cyclic) loading, data are obtained from pertinent references for which the wall aspect ratio is less than or equal to approximately 1, and for which testing is cyclic in nature (typically displacement controlled). In particular, lateral deflections at ultimate load, and at points in the softening region beyond ultimate for which the load has dropped to 90, 80, 70, 60, and 50 percent of its ultimate value, are obtained and converted to drift information. The statistical nature of the data is also investigated. These data are shown to be lognormally distributed, and an analysis of variance is performed. The use of statistics to estimate Probability of Failure for a shear wall structure is illustrated.

  18. Tube-Wall Thickness Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleint, R. E.; Baily, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    Eddy-current measurements detect wear of thin walls (0.01 in) (0.25 mm) in small diameter (0.19 in) (5 mm) heat exchanger tubing. Flexible durable thin rod inserts eddy-current coil into the heatexchanger tube.

  19. Statistical characteristics of simulated walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demiański, M.; Doroshkevich, A. G.; Müller, V.; Turchaninov, V.

    2000-11-01

    The large-scale matter distribution in three different simulations of CDM models is investigated and compared with corresponding results of the Zel'dovich theory of non-linear gravitational instability. We show that the basic characteristics of wall-like structure elements are well described by this theory, and that they can be expressed by the cosmological parameters and a few spectral moments of the perturbation spectrum. Therefore the characteristics of such elements provide reasonable estimates of these parameters. We show that the compressed matter is relaxed and gravitationally confined and manifests itself in the existence of walls as (quasi-)stationary structure elements with a lifetime restricted by their disruption into high-density clouds. The matter distribution is investigated in both real and redshift spaces. In both cases almost the same particles form the walls, and we estimate differences in corresponding wall characteristics. The same methods are applied to several mock catalogues of `galaxies', which allows us to characterize a large-scale bias between the spatial distribution of dark matter and of simulated `galaxies'.

  20. Designing a Sound Reducing Wall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erk, Kendra; Lumkes, John; Shambach, Jill; Braile, Larry; Brickler, Anne; Matthys, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Acoustical engineers use their knowledge of sound to design quiet environments (e.g., classrooms and libraries) as well as to design environments that are supposed to be loud (e.g., concert halls and football stadiums). They also design sound barriers, such as the walls along busy roadways that decrease the traffic noise heard by people in…

  1. Mirror, Mirror, on the Wall.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Jim; Rose, M. Annette

    1998-01-01

    Students use tables of anthropometric data, their own measurements, underlying principles of physics, and math to solve a problem. The problem is to determine the height of a wall mirror, and where to mount it, so that 90% of the clientele can view their entire length without stretching or bending. (Author)

  2. Wary Eyes Monitoring Wall Street

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Linda

    2008-01-01

    School business officials kept a close watch on the financial markets this week--and on district investment portfolios and teacher-retirement funds--as stock prices gyrated and once-sound institutions got government bailouts or crumbled into bankruptcy. While financial observers said it was too soon to predict how Wall Street's upheaval might…

  3. Cell wall construction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Klis, Frans M; Boorsma, Andre; De Groot, Piet W J

    2006-02-01

    In this review, we discuss new insights in cell wall architecture and cell wall construction in the ascomycetous yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Transcriptional profiling studies combined with biochemical work have provided ample evidence that the cell wall is a highly adaptable organelle. In particular, the protein population that is anchored to the stress-bearing polysaccharides of the cell wall, and forms the interface with the outside world, is highly diverse. This diversity is believed to play an important role in adaptation of the cell to environmental conditions, in growth mode and in survival. Cell wall construction is tightly controlled and strictly coordinated with progression of the cell cycle. This is reflected in the usage of specific cell wall proteins during consecutive phases of the cell cycle and in the recent discovery of a cell wall integrity checkpoint. When the cell is challenged with stress conditions that affect the cell wall, a specific transcriptional response is observed that includes the general stress response, the cell wall integrity pathway and the calcineurin pathway. This salvage mechanism includes increased expression of putative cell wall assemblases and some potential cross-linking cell wall proteins, and crucial changes in cell wall architecture. We discuss some more enzymes involved in cell wall construction and also potential inhibitors of these enzymes. Finally, we use both biochemical and genomic data to infer that the architectural principles used by S. cerevisiae to build its cell wall are also used by many other ascomycetous yeasts and also by some mycelial ascomycetous fungi.

  4. Catalysts of plant cell wall loosening

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    The growing cell wall in plants has conflicting requirements to be strong enough to withstand the high tensile forces generated by cell turgor pressure while selectively yielding to those forces to induce wall stress relaxation, leading to water uptake and polymer movements underlying cell wall expansion. In this article, I review emerging concepts of plant primary cell wall structure, the nature of wall extensibility and the action of expansins, family-9 and -12 endoglucanases, family-16 xyloglucan endotransglycosylase/hydrolase (XTH), and pectin methylesterases, and offer a critical assessment of their wall-loosening activity PMID:26918182

  5. Direct calculation of wall interferences and wall adaptation for two-dimensional flow in wind tunnels with closed walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amecke, Juergen

    1986-01-01

    A method for the direct calculation of the wall induced interference velocity in two dimensional flow based on Cauchy's integral formula was derived. This one-step method allows the calculation of the residual corrections and the required wall adaptation for interference-free flow starting from the wall pressure distribution without any model representation. Demonstrated applications are given.

  6. A Near-Wall Reynolds-Stress Closure Without Wall Normals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, S. P.; So, R. M. C.

    1997-01-01

    Turbulent wall-bounded complex flows are commonly encountered in engineering practice and are of considerable interest in a variety of industrial applications. The presence of a wall significantly affects turbulence characteristics. In addition to the wall effects, turbulent wall-bounded flows become more complicated by the presence of additional body forces (e.g. centrifugal force and Coriolis force) and complex geometry. Most near-wall Reynolds stress models are developed from a high-Reynolds-number model which assumes turbulence is homogenous (or quasi-homogenous). Near-wall modifications are proposed to include wall effects in near-wall regions. In this process, wall normals are introduced. Good predictions could be obtained by Reynolds stress models with wall normals. However, ambiguity arises when the models are applied in flows with multiple walls. Many models have been proposed to model turbulent flows. Among them, Reynolds stress models, in which turbulent stresses are obtained by solving the Reynolds stress transport equations, have been proved to be the most successful ones. To apply the Reynolds stress models to wall-bounded flows, near-wall corrections accounting for the wall effects are needed, and the resulting models are called near-wall Reynolds stress models. In most of the existing near-wall models, the near-wall corrections invoke wall normals. These wall-dependent near-wall models are difficult to implement for turbulent flows with complex geometry and may give inaccurate predictions due to the ambiguity of wall normals at corners connecting multiple walls. The objective of this study is to develop a more general and flexible near-wall Reynolds stress model without using any wall-dependent variable for wall-bounded turbulent flows. With the aid of near-wall asymptotic analysis and results of direct numerical simulation, a new near-wall Reynolds stress model (NNWRS) is formulated based on Speziale et al.'s high-Reynolds-stress model with wall

  7. Microwave background distortions from domain walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, Guenter; Noetzold, Dirk

    1990-01-01

    Domain walls arising in a cosmic phase transition after decoupling were recently proposed as seeds for the formation of large scale structure. The distortion induced in the microwave background radiation is calculated in dependence of the wall thickness, surface density, scalar field potential, cosmic redshift and the velocity of the wall. It was found that the maximal redshift distortion for both spherical and planar walls is of the order pi G sigma H(sup -1)(sub 0), where sigma is the surface energy density and H(sup -1)(sub 0) the Hubble parameter. It was also found that, for a wall thickness smaller than the horizon, walls can be treated as infinitely thin, i.e., the redshift distortion is independent of the wall thickness and the specific form of the scalar potential. For planar walls moving with a Lorentz-factor gamma the redshift distortion is enhanced by gamma cubed.

  8. Microwave background distortions from domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, Guenter; Noetzold, Dirk

    1990-08-01

    Domain walls arising in a cosmic phase transition after decoupling were recently proposed as seeds for the formation of large scale structure. The distortion induced in the microwave background radiation is calculated in dependence of the wall thickness, surface density, scalar field potential, cosmic redshift and the velocity of the wall. It was found that the maximal redshift distortion for both spherical and planar walls is of the order pi G sigma H(sup -1)(sub 0), where sigma is the surface energy density and H(sup -1)(sub 0) the Hubble parameter. It was also found that, for a wall thickness smaller than the horizon, walls can be treated as infinitely thin, i.e., the redshift distortion is independent of the wall thickness and the specific form of the scalar potential. For planar walls moving with a Lorentz-factor gamma the redshift distortion is enhanced by gamma cubed.

  9. Microwave background distortions from domain walls.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, G.; Nötzold, D.

    1991-03-01

    Domain walls arising in a cosmic phase transition after decoupling were recently proposed as seeds for the formation of large-scale structure. The distortion induced in the microwave background radiation is calculated in dependence of the wall thickness, surface density, scalar field potential, cosmic redshift and the velocity of the wall. The authors find that the maximal redshift distortion for both spherical and planar walls is of the order πGσH0-1, where σ is the surface energy density and H0 the Hubble parameter. They also find that, for a wall thickness smaller than the horizon, walls can be treated as infinitely thin, i.e. the redshift distortion is independent of the wall thickness and the specific form of the scalar potential. For planar walls moving with a Lorentz-factor γ the redshift distortion is enhanced by γ3.

  10. Simulation of turbulent wall pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    A Monte Carlo procedure was developed to simulate turbulent boundary layer wall pressure fluctuations. The approach utilizes much of the newly available conditional sampling information to construct the required distribution functions. Various disturbance wave forms were examined, as well as the effect of frequency-dependent decay. Good agreement between the simulation and experimental data was achieved for root mean square pressure level, power spectrum, and space time correlation.

  11. How do plant cell walls extend?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    This article briefly summarizes recent work that identifies the biophysical and biochemical processes that give rise to the extension of plant cell walls. I begin with the biophysical notion of stress relaxation of the wall and follow with recent studies of wall enzymes thought to catalyze wall extension and relaxation. Readers should refer to detailed reviews for more comprehensive discussion of earlier literature (Taiz, 1984; Carpita and Gibeaut, 1993; Cosgrove, 1993).

  12. Tube wall thickness measurement apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Lagasse, P.R.

    1985-06-21

    An apparatus for measuring the thickness of a tube's wall for the tube's entire length and radius by determining the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the known thickness of a selected standard item. The apparatus comprises a base and a first support member having first and second ends. The first end is connected to the base and the second end is connected to a spherical element. A second support member is connected to the base and spaced apart from the first support member. A positioning element is connected to and movable relative to the second support member. An indicator is connected to the positioning element and is movable to a location proximate the spherical element. The indicator includes a contact ball for first contacting the selected standard item and holding it against the spherical element. The contact ball then contacts the tube when the tube is disposed about the spherical element. The indicator includes a dial having a rotatable needle for indicating the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the thickness of the selected standard item.

  13. Tube wall thickness measurement apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Lagasse, Paul R.

    1987-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the thickness of a tube's wall for the tube's entire length and circumference by determining the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the known thickness of a selected standard item. The apparatus comprises a base and a first support member having first and second ends. The first end is connected to the base and the second end is connected to a spherical element. A second support member is connected to the base and spaced apart from the first support member. A positioning element is connected to and movable relative to the second support member. An indicator is connected to the positioning element and is movable to a location proximate the spherical element. The indicator includes a contact ball for first contacting the selected standard item and holding it against the spherical element. The contact ball then contacts the tube when the tube is disposed about the spherical element. The indicator includes a dial having a rotatable needle for indicating the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the thickness of the selected standard item.

  14. Making Your Music Word Wall Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonhardt, Angela

    2011-01-01

    This article looks at what a word wall is and its use in the music classroom. The author outlines steps for creation of a word wall within the music classroom as well as the importance of such a resource. The author encourages the creation and consistent use of the word wall as leading to the development of stronger musicians and also independent,…

  15. Methods & Strategies: Put Your Walls to Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Julie; Durham, Annie

    2016-01-01

    This column provides ideas and techniques to enhance your science teaching. This month's issue discusses planning and using interactive word walls to support science and reading instruction. Many classrooms have word walls displaying vocabulary that students have learned in class. Word walls serve as visual scaffolds to support instruction. To…

  16. 19. INTERIOR OF UTILITY ROOM SHOWING STUCCO WALL/DRYWALL WALL TRANSITION, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. INTERIOR OF UTILITY ROOM SHOWING STUCCO WALL/DRYWALL WALL TRANSITION, ELECTRICAL JUNCTION BOXES, BUILT-IN WALL CABINETRY, AND ELECTRICAL WALL HEATER. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 4, Worker Cottage, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  17. Asymmetric counter propagation of domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade-Silva, I.; Clerc, M. G.; Odent, V.

    2016-07-01

    Far from equilibrium systems show different states and domain walls between them. These walls, depending on the type of connected equilibria, exhibit a rich spatiotemporal dynamics. Here, we investigate the asymmetrical counter propagation of domain walls in an in-plane-switching cell filled with a nematic liquid crystal. Experimentally, we characterize the shape and speed of the domain walls. Based on the molecular orientation, we infer that the counter propagative walls have different elastic deformations. These deformations are responsible of the asymmetric counter propagating fronts. Theoretically, based on symmetry arguments, we propose a simple bistable model under the influence of a nonlinear gradient, which qualitatively describes the observed dynamics.

  18. Experimental investigation of wall shock cancellation and reduction of wall interference in transonic testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferri, A.; Roffe, G.

    1975-01-01

    A series of experiments were performed to evaluate the effectiveness of a three-dimensional land and groove wall geometry and a variable permeability distribution to reduce the interference produced by the porous walls of a supercritical transonic test section. The three-dimensional wall geometry was found to diffuse the pressure perturbations caused by small local mismatches in wall porosity permitting the use of a relatively coarse wall porosity control to reduce or eliminate wall interference effects. The wall porosity distribution required was found to be a sensitive function of Mach number requiring that the Mach number repeatability characteristics of the test apparatus be quite good. The effectiveness of a variable porosity wall is greatest in the upstream region of the test section where the pressure differences across the wall are largest. An effective variable porosity wall in the down stream region of the test section requires the use of a slightly convergent test section geometry.

  19. Chest wall reconstruction after extended resection

    PubMed Central

    Seder, Christopher W.

    2016-01-01

    Extensive chest wall resection and reconstruction is a challenging procedure that requires a multidisciplinary approach, including input from thoracic surgeons, plastic surgeons, neurosurgeons, and radiation oncologists. The primary goals of any chest wall reconstruction is to obliterate dead space, restore chest wall rigidity, preserve pulmonary mechanics, protect intrathoracic organs, provide soft tissue coverage, minimize deformity, and allow patients to receive adjuvant radiotherapy. Successful chest wall reconstruction requires the re-establishment of skeletal stability to prevent chest wall hernias, avoids thoracoplasty-like contraction of the operated side, protects underlying viscera, and maintain a cosmetically-acceptable appearance. After skeletal stability is established, full tissue coverage can be achieved using direct closure, skin grafts, local advancement flaps, pedicled myocutaneous flaps, or free flaps. This review examines the indications for chest wall reconstruction and describes techniques for establishment of chest wall rigidity and soft tissue coverage. PMID:27942408

  20. Generalized Wall Function for Complex Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Povinelli, Louis A.; Liu, Nan-Suey; Chen, Kuo-Huey

    2000-01-01

    A generalized wall function was proposed by Shih et al., (1999). It accounts the effect of pressure gradients on the flow near the wall. Theory shows that the effect of pressure gradients on the flow in the inertial sublayer is very significant and the standard wall function should be replaced by a generalized wall function. Since the theory is also valid for boundary layer flows toward separation, the generalized wall function may be applied to complex turbulent flows with acceleration, deceleration, separation and recirculation. This paper is to verify the generalized wall function with numerical simulations for boundary layer flows with various adverse and favorable pressure gradients, including flows about to separate. Furthermore, a general procedure of implementation of the generalized wall function for National Combustion Code (NCC) is described, it can be applied to both structured and unstructured CFD codes.

  1. Pulmonary complications of abdominal wall defects.

    PubMed

    Panitch, Howard B

    2015-01-01

    The abdominal wall is an integral component of the chest wall. Defects in the ventral abdominal wall alter respiratory mechanics and can impair diaphragm function. Congenital abdominal wall defects also are associated with abnormalities in lung growth and development that lead to pulmonary hypoplasia, pulmonary hypertension, and alterations in thoracic cage formation. Although infants with ventral abdominal wall defects can experience life-threatening pulmonary complications, older children typically experience a more benign respiratory course. Studies of lung and chest wall function in older children and adolescents with congenital abdominal wall defects are few; such investigations could provide strategies for improved respiratory performance, avoidance of respiratory morbidity, and enhanced exercise ability for these children.

  2. Near-wall serpentine cooled turbine airfoil

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ching-Pang

    2013-09-17

    A serpentine coolant flow path (54A-54G) formed by inner walls (50, 52) in a cavity (49) between pressure and suction side walls (22, 24) of a turbine airfoil (20A). A coolant flow (58) enters (56) an end of the airfoil, flows into a span-wise channel (54A), then flows forward (54B) over the inner surface of the pressure side wall, then turns behind the leading edge (26), and flows back along a forward part of the suction side wall, then follows a loop (54E) forward and back around an inner wall (52), then flows along an intermediate part of the suction side wall, then flows into an aft channel (54G) between the pressure and suction side walls, then exits the trailing edge (28). This provides cooling matched to the heating topography of the airfoil, minimizes differential thermal expansion, revives the coolant, and minimizes the flow volume needed.

  3. POROUS WALL, HOLLOW GLASS MICROSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, W.

    2012-06-30

    Hollow Glass Microspheres (HGM) is not a new technology. All one has to do is go to the internet and Google{trademark} HGM. Anyone can buy HGM and they have a wide variety of uses. HGM are usually between 1 to 100 microns in diameter, although their size can range from 100 nanometers to 5 millimeters in diameter. HGM are used as lightweight filler in composite materials such as syntactic foam and lightweight concrete. In 1968 a patent was issued to W. Beck of the 3M{trademark} Company for 'Glass Bubbles Prepared by Reheating Solid Glass Particles'. In 1983 P. Howell was issued a patent for 'Glass Bubbles of Increased Collapse Strength' and in 1988 H. Marshall was issued a patent for 'Glass Microbubbles'. Now Google{trademark}, Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs), the key words here are Porous Wall. Almost every article has its beginning with the research done at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The Savannah River Site (SRS) where SRNL is located has a long and successful history of working with hydrogen and its isotopes for national security, energy, waste management and environmental remediation applications. This includes more than 30 years of experience developing, processing, and implementing special ceramics, including glasses for a variety of Department of Energy (DOE) missions. In the case of glasses, SRS and SRNL have been involved in both the science and engineering of vitreous or glass based systems. As a part of this glass experience and expertise, SRNL has developed a number of niches in the glass arena, one of which is the development of porous glass systems for a variety of applications. These porous glass systems include sol gel glasses, which include both xerogels and aerogels, as well as phase separated glass compositions, that can be subsequently treated to produce another unique type of porosity within the glass forms. The porous glasses can increase the surface area compared to 'normal glasses of a 1 to 2 order of

  4. Through-Wall Imaging Radar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    receiver dynamic range to be applied to the target scene behind the wall. A time-division multiplexed ( TDM ), multiple-input, multiple-output (MIMO...by the data-acquisition computer. The TDM MIMO radar system sequences through each of the 44 bistatic combinations, acquiring one range profile at...96 5. 75 5. 75 2 FiGurE 5. In this cartoon of the time-division multiplexed ( TDM ), multiple-input, multiple-output (MIMO) array lay- out [compare to

  5. An improved resistive wall monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Fellenz, Brian; Crisp, Jim

    1998-12-10

    Resistive wall monitors were designed and built for the Fermilab Main Injector project. These devices measure longitudinal beam current from 3 KHz to 4 GHz with a 1 ohm gap impedance. The new design provides a larger aperture and a calibration port to improve the accuracy of single-bunch intensity measurements. Microwave absorber material is used to reduce interference from spurious electromagnetic waves traveling inside the beam pipe. Several types of ferrite materials were evaluated for the absorber. Inexpensive ferrite rods were selected and assembled in an array forming the desired geometry without machining.

  6. Wall interference assessment and corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, P. A.; Kemp, W. B., Jr.; Garriz, J. A.

    1989-01-01

    Wind tunnel wall interference assessment and correction (WIAC) concepts, applications, and typical results are discussed in terms of several nonlinear transonic codes and one panel method code developed for and being implemented at NASA-Langley. Contrasts between 2-D and 3-D transonic testing factors which affect WIAC procedures are illustrated using airfoil data from the 0.3 m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel and Pathfinder 1 data from the National Transonic Facility. Initial results from the 3-D WIAC codes are encouraging; research on and implementation of WIAC concepts continue.

  7. Workshop on First Wall Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamada, K.; Fukutomi, M.

    1982-03-01

    Impurity control and first wall design in the JT 60 long pulse Tokamak is discussed. The present state of coating technology in Japan is reviewed with emphasis on fabrication methods and the characterization of thin coated films available by plasma spraying and chemical and physical vapor deposition. Surface preparation, radiation damage, internal stress, crystal structure and bonding are considered as well as the application of silicon carbide, titanium nitride, titanium carbide, titanium boride, and chromium nitride coatings by magnetron sputtering, long plating, electron beam evaporation, and gas absorption and reactive r.f. sputtering.

  8. First Wall and Operational Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Lasnier, C; Allen, S; Boedo, J; Groth, M; Brooks, N; McLean, A; LaBombard, B; Sharpe, J; Skinner, C; Whyte, D; Rudakov, D; West, W; Wong, C

    2006-06-19

    In this chapter we review numerous diagnostics capable of measurements at or near the first wall, many of which contribute information useful for safe operation of a tokamak. There are sections discussing infrared cameras, visible and VUV cameras, pressure gauges and RGAs, Langmuir probes, thermocouples, and erosion and deposition measurements by insertable probes and quartz microbalance. Also discussed are dust measurements by electrostatic detectors, laser scattering, visible and IR cameras, and manual collection of samples after machine opening. In each case the diagnostic is discussed with a view toward application to a burning plasma machine such as ITER.

  9. Moving walls and geometric phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facchi, Paolo; Garnero, Giancarlo; Marmo, Giuseppe; Samuel, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    We unveil the existence of a non-trivial Berry phase associated to the dynamics of a quantum particle in a one dimensional box with moving walls. It is shown that a suitable choice of boundary conditions has to be made in order to preserve unitarity. For these boundary conditions we compute explicitly the geometric phase two-form on the parameter space. The unboundedness of the Hamiltonian describing the system leads to a natural prescription of renormalization for divergent contributions arising from the boundary.

  10. Spontaneous Behaviors and Wall-Curvature Lead to Apparent Wall Preference in Planarian.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Yoshitaro; Agata, Kiyokazu; Inoue, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    The planarian Dugesia japonica tends to stay near the walls of its breeding containers and experimental dishes in the laboratory, a phenomenon called "wall preference". This behavior is thought to be important for environmental adaptation, such as hiding by planarians in nature. However, the mechanisms regulating wall-preference behavior are not well understood, since this behavior occurs in the absence of any particular stimulation. Here we show the mechanisms of wall-preference behavior. Surprisingly, planarian wall-preference behavior was also shown even by the head alone and by headless planarians. These results indicate that planarian "wall-preference" behavior only appears to be a "preference" behavior, and is actually an outcome of spontaneous behaviors, rather than of brain function. We found that in the absence of environmental cues planarians moved basically straight ahead until they reached a wall, and that after reaching a wall, they changed their direction of movement to one tangential to the wall, suggesting that this spontaneous behavior may play a critical role in the wall preference. When we tested another spontaneous behavior, the wigwag movement of the planarian head, using computer simulation with various wigwag angles and wigwag intervals, large wigwag angle and short wigwag interval reduced wall-preference behavior. This indicated that wigwag movement may determine the probability of staying near the wall or leaving the wall. Furthermore, in accord with this simulation, when we tested planarian wall-preference behavior using several assay fields with different curvature of the wall, we found that concavity and sharp curvature of walls negatively impacted wall preference by affecting the permissible angle of the wigwag movement. Together, these results indicate that planarian wall preference may be involuntarily caused by the combination of two spontaneous planarian behaviors: moving straight ahead until reaching a wall and then moving along it

  11. Spontaneous Behaviors and Wall-Curvature Lead to Apparent Wall Preference in Planarian

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Yoshitaro; Agata, Kiyokazu; Inoue, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    The planarian Dugesia japonica tends to stay near the walls of its breeding containers and experimental dishes in the laboratory, a phenomenon called “wall preference”. This behavior is thought to be important for environmental adaptation, such as hiding by planarians in nature. However, the mechanisms regulating wall-preference behavior are not well understood, since this behavior occurs in the absence of any particular stimulation. Here we show the mechanisms of wall-preference behavior. Surprisingly, planarian wall-preference behavior was also shown even by the head alone and by headless planarians. These results indicate that planarian “wall-preference” behavior only appears to be a “preference” behavior, and is actually an outcome of spontaneous behaviors, rather than of brain function. We found that in the absence of environmental cues planarians moved basically straight ahead until they reached a wall, and that after reaching a wall, they changed their direction of movement to one tangential to the wall, suggesting that this spontaneous behavior may play a critical role in the wall preference. When we tested another spontaneous behavior, the wigwag movement of the planarian head, using computer simulation with various wigwag angles and wigwag intervals, large wigwag angle and short wigwag interval reduced wall-preference behavior. This indicated that wigwag movement may determine the probability of staying near the wall or leaving the wall. Furthermore, in accord with this simulation, when we tested planarian wall-preference behavior using several assay fields with different curvature of the wall, we found that concavity and sharp curvature of walls negatively impacted wall preference by affecting the permissible angle of the wigwag movement. Together, these results indicate that planarian wall preference may be involuntarily caused by the combination of two spontaneous planarian behaviors: moving straight ahead until reaching a wall and then

  12. Speech About the Great Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chen Ning

    2013-05-01

    Of all the sights that I saw during that trip, the one that provoked the most thought on my part was the Great Wall. The Great Wall defies imagination. It is simple and strong. It winds gracefully up and down. It scales slowly but steadily the distant hill, to disappear down into the valley beyond, only to climb again, inexorably, to surmount the next mountain in its path. As one examines the individual stones with which it was built, one realizes how much sweat and blood there must have been in its complex history. As one looks at the overall structure, at its strength and elegance, its real significance begins to emerge. It is long. It is tenacious. It is flexible in every turn, but is persistent and persisting in the long range development. Its overall unity of purpose is what gives it strength and character. And its overall unity of purpose is what makes it one of the man-made structures on the surface of the earth to become first visible to a visitor approaching our planet from outer space...

  13. [Ageing of the arterial wall].

    PubMed

    Hanon, O

    2006-11-01

    Several mechanisms are implicated in the arterial wall changes due to ageing: ageing, hypertension and atherosclerosis. Although the changes related to ageing (arteriosclerosis) have many factors in common with those induced by hypertension, they differ from those caused by atherosclerosis although commonly associated. Arteriosclerosis causes a diffuse increase of the rigidity of the large arteries by disease of the media, the main clinical manifestation of which is the increase in pulsed pressure. This arterial "hyperpulsability" contributes to a defect in coupling between the heart and the blood vessels which results in an increase in the pulsatile load of the left ventricle and to left ventricular hypertrophy and decreased coronary perfusion. Atherosclerosis seems more of a localised scarring phenomenon of the arterial wall which is exposed to a series of chronic aggressions characterised by deposits of lipids in the intima and whose main complication is thrombosis. Although these two processes may be associated, or interact one with the other, they are clearly different in nature. Therefore, atherosclerosis is a localised disease resulting in a decrease in arterial lumen, quite different from arteriosclerosis which is a diffuse, physiological condition which leads to an increase in the arterial lumen.

  14. Moss cell walls: structure and biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Alison W.; Roberts, Eric M.; Haigler, Candace H.

    2012-01-01

    The genome sequence of the moss Physcomitrella patens has stimulated new research examining the cell wall polysaccharides of mosses and the glycosyl transferases that synthesize them as a means to understand fundamental processes of cell wall biosynthesis and plant cell wall evolution. The cell walls of mosses and vascular plants are composed of the same classes of polysaccharides, but with differences in side chain composition and structure. Similarly, the genomes of P. patens and angiosperms encode the same families of cell wall glycosyl transferases, yet, in many cases these families have diversified independently in each lineage. Our understanding of land plant evolution could be enhanced by more complete knowledge of the relationships among glycosyl transferase functional diversification, cell wall structural and biochemical specialization, and the roles of cell walls in plant adaptation. As a foundation for these studies, we review the features of P. patens as an experimental system, analyses of cell wall composition in various moss species, recent studies that elucidate the structure and biosynthesis of cell wall polysaccharides in P. patens, and phylogenetic analysis of P. patens genes potentially involved in cell wall biosynthesis. PMID:22833752

  15. The State of the GeoWall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, P. J.; Leigh, J.; van Keken, P.; Johnson, A.

    2003-12-01

    The GeoWall stereo projection technology has been widely adopted within Earth Science. Over 20,000 undergraduate students per year use a GeoWall in classroom and lab settings at over 80 institutions around the world using over 200 GeoWalls. We believe that critical mass for this technology has been reached in the Earth Science. Many collaborations have been initiated. With Iris, GeoWall is exploring new ways to monitor seismic networks in real-time and to visualize extremely large, whole Earth seismic simulations. We are also working with a number of drilling organizations including JOI, DOSECC and LacCore to bring modern visualization technology to core interpretation and drill site selection. Also, over 15 museums now have or are building GeoWalls for informal education. Much of the science that is being performed on the GeoWall is finding its way directly into the classroom and science museum. One of the success stories has been the GeoWall Consortium's interaction with industry. The basic hardware for the GeoWall has been spun off to companies that now sell variations of the hardware. In addition, many software companies including ESRI and Dynamic Graphics have added support for the GeoWall in their products. The future of GeoWall is four fold. Curriculum development will bring more material to all GeoWall users. Assessment of the curriculum and educational psychology will give us GeoWall best practices. In technology development, the GeoWall 2 is a 20+ million pixel, tiled display which brings more resolution to the Earth Sciences than ever. To support research the consortium is developing a volume rendering application to visualize extremely large datasets.

  16. Architecture of dermatophyte cell Walls: Electron microscopic and biochemical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nozawa, Y.; Kitajima, Y.

    1984-01-01

    A review with 83 references on the cell wall structure of dermatophytes is presented. Topics discussed include separation and preparation of cell walls; microstructure of cell walls by electron microscopy; chemical composition of cell walls; structural model of cell walls; and morphological structure of cell walls.

  17. Near wall flow parameters in the blade end-wall corner region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhargava, R. K.; Raj, R.

    The effects of secondary end-wall corner flows on near wall flow parameters in turbomachinary are studied. Important near wall flow parameters such as the wall shear stress vector, the mean wall pressure, the wall pressure fluctuations, and the correlation of the wall pressure fluctuation with the velocity fluctuation in three-dimensional turbulent flows are first experimentally investigated. The blade end-wall corner region is simulated by mounting airfoil section of symmetric blades on both sides of the flat plate with semicircular leading edge. Observed changes in the maximum values of the wall shear stress and its location from the corner line could be associated with the streching and attenuation of the horseshoe vortex. The values of wall pressure fluctuation intensity in the blade end-wall corner region are found to be influenced by the changes of the strength of the horseshoe vortex. The correlation of the wall pressure fluctuation with the velocity fluctuation indicated higher values of correlation coefficient in the inner region as compared to the outer region of the shear layer. The values of wall pressure-velocity correlation coefficient in the blade end-wall corner region also decrease in the streamwise direction while increasing in the presence of favorable and adverse pressure gradients.

  18. Near wall flow parameters in the blade end-wall corner region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhargava, R. K.; Raj, R.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of secondary end-wall corner flows on near wall flow parameters in turbomachinary are studied. Important near wall flow parameters such as the wall shear stress vector, the mean wall pressure, the wall pressure fluctuations, and the correlation of the wall pressure fluctuation with the velocity fluctuation in three-dimensional turbulent flows are first experimentally investigated. The blade end-wall corner region is simulated by mounting airfoil section of symmetric blades on both sides of the flat plate with semicircular leading edge. Observed changes in the maximum values of the wall shear stress and its location from the corner line could be associated with the streching and attenuation of the horseshoe vortex. The values of wall pressure fluctuation intensity in the blade end-wall corner region are found to be influenced by the changes of the strength of the horseshoe vortex. The correlation of the wall pressure fluctuation with the velocity fluctuation indicated higher values of correlation coefficient in the inner region as compared to the outer region of the shear layer. The values of wall pressure-velocity correlation coefficient in the blade end-wall corner region also decrease in the streamwise direction while increasing in the presence of favorable and adverse pressure gradients.

  19. Cell Wall Assembly in Fucus Zygotes

    PubMed Central

    Quatrano, Ralph S.; Stevens, Patricia T.

    1976-01-01

    Fertilization triggers the assembly of a cell wall around the egg cell of three brown algae, Fucus vesiculosus, F. distichus, and F. inflatus. New polysaccharide polymers are continually being added to the cell wall during the first 24 hours of synchronous embryo development. This wall assembly involves the extracellular deposition of fibrillar material by cytoplasmic vesicles fusing with the plasma membrane. One hour after fertilization a fragmented wall can be isolated free of cytoplasm and contains equal amounts of cellulose and alginic acid with no fucose-containing polymers (fucans) present. Birefringence of the wall caused by oriented cellulose microfibrils is not detected in all zygotes until 4 hours, at which time intact cell walls can be isolated that retain the shape of the zygote. These walls have a relatively low ratio of fucose to xylose and little sulfate when compared to walls from older embryos. When extracts of walls from 4-hour zygotes are subjected to cellulose acetate electrophoresis at pH 7, a single fucan (F1) can be detected. By 12 hours, purified cell walls are composed of fucans containing a relatively high ratio of fucose to xylose and high levels of sulfate, and contain a second fucan (F2) which is electrophoretically distinct from F1. F2 appears to be deposited in only a localized region of the wall, that which elongates to form the rhizoid cell. Throughout wall assembly, the polyuronide block co-polymer alginic acid did not significantly vary its mannuronic (M) to guluronic (G) acid ratio (0.33-0.55) or its block distribution (MG, 54%; GG, 30%; MM, 16%). From 6 to 24 hours of embryo development, the proportion of the major polysaccharide components found in purified walls is stable. Alginic acid is the major polymer and comprises about 60% of the total wall, while cellulose and the fucans each make-up about 20% of the remainder. During the extracellular assembly of this wall, the intracellular levels of the storage glucan laminaran

  20. Wall Interference Study of the NTF Slotted Tunnel Using Bodies of Revolution Wall Signature Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyer, Venkit; Kuhl, David D.; Walker, Eric L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper is a description of the analysis of blockage corrections for bodies of revolution for the slotted-wall configuration of the National Transonic Facility (NTF) at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). A wall correction method based on the measured wall signature is used. Test data from three different-sized blockage bodies and four wall ventilation settings were analyzed at various Mach numbers and unit Reynolds numbers. The results indicate that with the proper selection of the boundary condition parameters, the wall correction method can predict blockage corrections consistent with the wall measurements for Mach numbers as high as 0.95.

  1. Secondary cell walls: biosynthesis and manipulation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Campbell, Liam; Turner, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Secondary cell walls (SCWs) are produced by specialized plant cell types, and are particularly important in those cells providing mechanical support or involved in water transport. As the main constituent of plant biomass, secondary cell walls are central to attempts to generate second-generation biofuels. Partly as a consequence of this renewed economic importance, excellent progress has been made in understanding how cell wall components are synthesized. SCWs are largely composed of three main polymers: cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. In this review, we will attempt to highlight the most recent progress in understanding the biosynthetic pathways for secondary cell wall components, how these pathways are regulated, and how this knowledge may be exploited to improve cell wall properties that facilitate breakdown without compromising plant growth and productivity. While knowledge of individual components in the pathway has improved dramatically, how they function together to make the final polymers and how these individual polymers are incorporated into the wall remain less well understood.

  2. Seismic behavior of geogrid reinforced slag wall

    SciTech Connect

    Edincliler, Ayse; Baykal, Gokhan; Saygili, Altug

    2008-07-08

    Flexible retaining structures are known with their high performance under earthquake loads. In geogrid reinforced walls the performance of the fill material and the interface of the fill and geogrid controls the performance. Geosynthetic reinforced walls in seismic regions must be safe against not only static forces but also seismic forces. The objective of this study is to determine the behavior of a geogrid reinforced slag wall during earthquake by using shaking table experiments. This study is composed of three stages. In the first stage the physical properties of the material to be used were determined. In the second part, a case history involving the use of slag from steel industry in the construction of geogrid reinforced wall is presented. In the third stage, the results of shaking table tests conducted using model geogrid wall with slag are given. From the results, it is seen that slag can be used as fill material for geogrid reinforced walls subjected to earthquake loads.

  3. Collective magnetism at multiferroic vortex domain walls.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yanan; Lee, N; Choi, Y J; Cheong, S-W; Wu, Weida

    2012-12-12

    Cross-coupled phenomena of multiferroic domains and domain walls are of fundamental scientific and technological interest. Using cryogenic magnetic force microscopy, we find alternating net magnetic moments at ferroelectric domain walls around vortex cores in multiferroic hexagonal ErMnO(3), which correlate with each other throughout the entire vortex network. This collective nature of domain wall magnetism originates from the uncompensated Er(3+) moments at domain walls and the self-organization of the vortex network. Our results demonstrate that the collective domain wall magnetism can be controlled by external magnetic fields and represent a major advancement in the manipulation of local magnetic moments by harnessing cross-coupled domain walls.

  4. Textural break foundation wall construction modules

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Steven J.

    1990-01-01

    Below-grade, textural-break foundation wall structures are provided for inhibiting diffusion and advection of liquids and gases into and out from a surrounding hydrogeologic environment. The foundation wall structure includes a foundation wall having an interior and exterior surface and a porous medium disposed around a portion of the exterior surface. The structure further includes a modular barrier disposed around a portion of the porous medium. The modular barrier is substantially removable from the hydrogeologic environment.

  5. Panelized wall system with foam core insulation

    DOEpatents

    Kosny, Jan; Gaskin, Sally

    2009-10-20

    A wall system includes a plurality of wall members, the wall members having a first metal panel, a second metal panel, and an insulating core between the first panel and the second panel. At least one of the first panel and the second panel include ridge portions. The insulating core can be a foam, such as a polyurethane foam. The foam can include at least one opacifier to improve the k-factor of the foam.

  6. Blunt traumatic abdominal wall disruption with evisceration

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, Ellen; Stawicki, Stanislaw PA; Bahner, David P

    2011-01-01

    Blunt traumatic abdominal wall disruptions associated with evisceration are very rare. The authors describe a case of traumatic abdominal wall disruption with bowel evisceration that occurred after a middle-aged woman sustained direct focal blunt force impact to the lower abdomen. Abdominal exploration and surgical repair of the abdominal wall defect were performed, with good clinical outcome. A brief overview of literature pertinent to this rare trauma scenario is presented. PMID:22229144

  7. Electron-wall Interaction in Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Raitses; D. Staack; M. Keidar; N.J. Fisch

    2005-02-11

    Electron-wall interaction effects in Hall thrusters are studied through measurements of the plasma response to variations of the thruster channel width and the discharge voltage. The discharge voltage threshold is shown to separate two thruster regimes. Below this threshold, the electron energy gain is constant in the acceleration region and therefore, secondary electron emission (SEE) from the channel walls is insufficient to enhance electron energy losses at the channel walls. Above this voltage threshold, the maximum electron temperature saturates.

  8. First wall for polarized fusion reactors

    DOEpatents

    Greenside, Henry S.; Budny, Robert V.; Post, Jr., Douglass E.

    1988-01-01

    Depolarization mechanisms arising from the recycling of the polarized fuel at the limiter and the first-wall of a fusion reactor are greater than those mechanisms in the plasma. Rapid depolarization of the plasma is prevented by providing a first-wall or first-wall coating formed of a low-Z, non-metallic material having a depolarization rate greater than 1 sec.sup.-1.

  9. Explosive Fragmentation of Dividing Walls

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    their assistance in conducting the experiments and to Mlles. Donna K. Watiters and Norma Sandoval for their assistance in reducing the data. A1...SUPPORTED 102 10 -64 3.51 10 11 SIDE SU~PPORTED Rs 5.03 +TO swSYMBOL RS T - 3.51 kg/rn 1 2 A 2 2 r a0.60 2. 3 13.143. ISO . 158. 16.5. 173. 180, 188, 195...T Test Spac ing Thickness W R ISO . (ms o (g i) uwr 20 25.4 80.96 0.454 0.146 Wall is cracked at the base and at both side restraints but did not shear

  10. Plant cell walls to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Douglas B; Bowman, Michael J; Braker, Jay D; Dien, Bruce S; Hector, Ronald E; Lee, Charles C; Mertens, Jeffrey A; Wagschal, Kurt

    2012-03-01

    Conversion of plant cell walls to ethanol constitutes second generation bioethanol production. The process consists of several steps: biomass selection/genetic modification, physiochemical pretreatment, enzymatic saccharification, fermentation and separation. Ultimately, it is desirable to combine as many of the biochemical steps as possible in a single organism to achieve CBP (consolidated bioprocessing). A commercially ready CBP organism is currently unreported. Production of second generation bioethanol is hindered by economics, particularly in the cost of pretreatment (including waste management and solvent recovery), the cost of saccharification enzymes (particularly exocellulases and endocellulases displaying kcat ~1 s-1 on crystalline cellulose), and the inefficiency of co-fermentation of 5- and 6-carbon monosaccharides (owing in part to redox cofactor imbalances in Saccharomyces cerevisiae).

  11. Beetle Kill Wall at NREL

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    When it comes to designing an interior decorative feature for one of the most energy efficient office buildings in the world, very few would consider bringing in a beetle to do the job. But thats what happened at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Research Support Facility (RSF) located on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) campus.In June, the RSF will become home to more than 800 workers from DOE and NREL and building visitors will be greeted with a soaring, two-story high wall entirely covered with wood harvested from the bark beetle infestation that has killed millions of pine trees in the Western U.S. But, the use of beetle kill wood is just one example of the resources being leveraged to make the RSF a model for sustainability and one more step toward NRELs goal to be a net zero energy campus.

  12. Beetle Kill Wall at NREL

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    When it comes to designing an interior decorative feature for one of the most energy efficient office buildings in the world, very few would consider bringing in a beetle to do the job. But thats what happened at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Research Support Facility (RSF) located on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) campus.In June, the RSF will become home to more than 800 workers from DOE and NREL and building visitors will be greeted with a soaring, two-story high wall entirely covered with wood harvested from the bark beetle infestation that has killed millions of pine trees in the Western U.S. But, the use of beetle kill wood is just one example of the resources being leveraged to make the RSF a model for sustainability and one more step toward NRELs goal to be a net zero energy campus.

  13. Virtual gap dielectric wall accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George James; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Nelson, Scott; Sullivan, Jim; Hawkins, Steven A

    2013-11-05

    A virtual, moving accelerating gap is formed along an insulating tube in a dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) by locally controlling the conductivity of the tube. Localized voltage concentration is thus achieved by sequential activation of a variable resistive tube or stalk down the axis of an inductive voltage adder, producing a "virtual" traveling wave along the tube. The tube conductivity can be controlled at a desired location, which can be moved at a desired rate, by light illumination, or by photoconductive switches, or by other means. As a result, an impressed voltage along the tube appears predominantly over a local region, the virtual gap. By making the length of the tube large in comparison to the virtual gap length, the effective gain of the accelerator can be made very large.

  14. A Near-Wall Reynolds-Stress Closure without Wall Normals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, S. P.; So, R. M. C.

    1997-01-01

    With the aid of near-wall asymptotic analysis and results of direct numerical simulation, a new near-wall Reynolds stress model (NNWRS) is formulated based on the SSG high-Reynolds-stress model with wall-independent near-wall corrections. Only one damping function is used for flows with a wide range of Reynolds numbers to ensure that the near-wall modifications diminish away from the walls. The model is able to reproduce complicated flow phenomena induced by complex geometry, such as flow recirculation, reattachment and boundary-layer redevelopment in backward-facing step flow and secondary flow in three-dimensional square duct flow. In simple flows, including fully developed channel/pipe flow, Couette flow and boundary-layer flow, the wall effects are dominant, and the NNWRS model predicts less degree of turbulent anisotropy in the near-wall region compared with a wall-dependent near-wall Reynolds Stress model (NWRS) developed by So and colleagues. The comparison of the predictions given by the two models rectifies the misconception that the overshooting of skin friction coefficient in backward-facing step flow prevalent in those near-wall, models with wall normal is caused by he use of wall normal.

  15. Domain walls in antiferromagnetically coupled multilayer films.

    PubMed

    Hellwig, Olav; Berger, Andreas; Fullerton, Eric E

    2003-11-07

    We report experimentally observed magnetic domain-wall structures in antiferromagnetically coupled multilayer films with perpendicular anisotropy. Our studies reveal a first-order phase transition from domain walls with no net moment to domain walls with ferromagnetic cores. The transition originates from the competition between dipolar and exchange energies, which we tune by means of layer thickness. Although observed in a synthetic antiferromagnetic system, such domain-wall structures may be expected to occur in A-type antiferromagnets with anisotropic exchange coupling.

  16. Fillability of Thin-Wall Steel Castings

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Voigt; Joseph Bertoletti; Andrew Kaley; Sandi Ricotta; Travis Sunday

    2002-07-30

    The use of steel components is being challenged by lighter nonferrous or cast iron components. The development of techniques for enhancing and ensuring the filability of thin-wall mold cavities is most critical for thinner wall cast steel production. The purpose of this research was to develop thin-wall casting techniques that can be used to reliably produce thin-wall castings from traditional gravity poured sand casting processes. The focus of the research was to enhance the filling behavior to prevent misrunds. Experiments were conducted to investigate the influence of various foundry variables on the filling of thin section steel castings. These variables include casting design, heat transfer, gating design, and metal fluidity. Wall thickness and pouring temperature have the greatest effect on casting fill. As wall thickness increases the volume to surface area of the casting increases, which increases the solidification time, allowing the metal to flow further in thicker sect ions. Pouring time is another significant variable affecting casting fill. Increases or decreases of 20% in the pouring time were found to have a significant effect on the filling of thin-wall production castings. Gating variables, including venting, pouring head height, and mold tilting also significantly affected thin-wall casting fill. Filters offer less turbulent, steadier flow, which is appropriate for thicker castings, but they do not enhance thin-wall casting fill.

  17. First wall for polarized fusion reactors

    DOEpatents

    Greenside, H.S.; Budny, R.V.; Post, D.E. Jr.

    1985-01-29

    A first-wall or first-wall coating for use in a fusion reactor having polarized fuel may be formed of a low-Z non-metallic material having slow spin relaxation, i.e., a depolarization rate greater than 1 sec/sup -1/. Materials having these properties include hydrogenated and deuterated amorphous semiconductors. A method for preventing the rapid depolarization of a polarized plasma in a fusion device may comprise the step of providing a first-wall or first-wall coating formed of a low-Z, non-metallic material having a depolarization rate greater than 1 sec/sup -1/.

  18. Pollen wall development in flowering plants.

    PubMed

    Blackmore, Stephen; Wortley, Alexandra H; Skvarla, John J; Rowley, John R

    2007-01-01

    The outer pollen wall, or exine, is more structurally complex than any other plant cell wall, comprising several distinct layers, each with its own organizational pattern. Since elucidation of the basic events of pollen wall ontogeny using electron microscopy in the 1970s, knowledge of their developmental genetics has increased enormously. However, self-assembly processes that are not under direct genetic control also play an important role in pollen wall patterning. This review integrates ultrastructural and developmental findings with recent models for self-assembly in an attempt to understand the origins of the morphological complexity and diversity that underpin the science of palynology.

  19. Large-eddy simulations with wall models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabot, W.

    1995-01-01

    The near-wall viscous and buffer regions of wall-bounded flows generally require a large expenditure of computational resources to be resolved adequately, even in large-eddy simulation (LES). Often as much as 50% of the grid points in a computational domain are devoted to these regions. The dense grids that this implies also generally require small time steps for numerical stability and/or accuracy. It is commonly assumed that the inner wall layers are near equilibrium, so that the standard logarithmic law can be applied as the boundary condition for the wall stress well away from the wall, for example, in the logarithmic region, obviating the need to expend large amounts of grid points and computational time in this region. This approach is commonly employed in LES of planetary boundary layers, and it has also been used for some simple engineering flows. In order to calculate accurately a wall-bounded flow with coarse wall resolution, one requires the wall stress as a boundary condition. The goal of this work is to determine the extent to which equilibrium and boundary layer assumptions are valid in the near-wall regions, to develop models for the inner layer based on such assumptions, and to test these modeling ideas in some relatively simple flows with different pressure gradients, such as channel flow and flow over a backward-facing step. Ultimately, models that perform adequately in these situations will be applied to more complex flow configurations, such as an airfoil.

  20. The Structure of Plant Cell Walls

    PubMed Central

    Burke, David; Kaufman, Peter; McNeil, Michael; Albersheim, Peter

    1974-01-01

    The primary cell walls of six suspension-cultured monocots and of a single suspension-cultured gymnosperm have been investigated with the following results: (a) the compositions of all six monocot cell walls are remarkably similar, despite the fact that the cell cultures were derived from diverse tissues; (b) the cell walls of suspension-cultured monocots differ substantially from those of suspension-cultured dicots and from the suspension-cultured gymnosperm; (c) an arabinoxylan is a major component (40% or more by weight) of monocot primary cell walls; (d) mixed β-1,3; β-1,4-glucans were found only in the cell wall preparations of rye grass endosperm cells, and not in the cell walls of any of the other five monocot cell cultures nor in the walls of suspension-cultured Douglas fir cells; (e) the monocot primary cell walls studied contain from 9 to 14% cellulose, 7 to 18% uronic acids, and 7 to 17% protein; (f) hydroxyproline accounts for less than 0.2% of the cell walls of monocots. Similar data on the soluble extracellular polysaccharides secreted by these cells are included. PMID:16658824

  1. Mechanics of the Toxoplasma gondii oocyst wall

    PubMed Central

    Dumètre, Aurélien; Dubey, Jitender P.; Ferguson, David J. P.; Bongrand, Pierre; Azas, Nadine; Puech, Pierre-Henri

    2013-01-01

    The ability of microorganisms to survive under extreme conditions is closely related to the physicochemical properties of their wall. In the ubiquitous protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii, the oocyst stage possesses a bilayered wall that protects the dormant but potentially infective parasites from harsh environmental conditions until their ingestion by the host. None of the common disinfectants are effective in killing the parasite because the oocyst wall acts as a primary barrier to physical and chemical attacks. Here, we address the structure and chemistry of the wall of the T. gondii oocyst by combining wall surface treatments, fluorescence imaging, EM, and measurements of its mechanical characteristics by using atomic force microscopy. Elasticity and indentation measurements indicated that the oocyst wall resembles common plastic materials, based on the Young moduli, E, evaluated by atomic force microscopy. Our study demonstrates that the inner layer is as robust as the bilayered wall itself. Besides wall mechanics, our results suggest important differences regarding the nonspecific adhesive properties of each layer. All together, these findings suggest a key biological role for the oocyst wall mechanics in maintaining the integrity of the T. gondii oocysts in the environment or after exposure to disinfectants, and therefore their potential infectivity to humans and animals. PMID:23798399

  2. Molecular regulation of plant cell wall extensibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    Gravity responses in plants often involve spatial and temporal changes in cell growth, which is regulated primarily by controlling the ability of the cell wall to extend. The wall is thought to be a cellulose-hemicellulose network embedded in a hydrated matrix of complex polysaccharides and a small amount of structural protein. The wall extends by a form of polymer creep, which is mediated by expansins, a novel group of wall-loosening proteins. Expansins were discovered during a molecular dissection of the "acid growth" behavior of cell walls. Expansin alters the rheology of plant walls in profound ways, yet its molecular mechanism of action is still uncertain. It lacks detectable hydrolytic activity against the major components of the wall, but it is able to disrupt noncovalent adhesion between wall polysaccharides. The discovery of a second family of expansins (beta-expansins) sheds light on the biological role of a major group of pollen allergens and implies that expansins have evolved for diverse developmental functions. Finally, the contribution of other processes to wall extensibility is briefly summarized.

  3. Relevant surgical anatomy of the chest wall.

    PubMed

    Naidu, Babu V; Rajesh, Pala B

    2010-11-01

    The chest wall, like other regional anatomy, is a remarkable fusion of form and function. Principal functions are the protection of internal viscera and an expandable cylinder facilitating variable gas flow into the lungs. Knowledge of the anatomy of the whole cylinder (ribs, sternum, vertebra, diaphragm, intercostal spaces, and extrathoracic muscles) is therefore not only important in the local environment of a specific chest wall resection but also in its relation to overall function. An understanding of chest wall kinematics might help define the loss of function after resection and the effects of various chest wall substitutes. Therefore, this article is not an exhaustive anatomic description but a focused summary and discussion.

  4. Corrections to the thin wall approximation in general relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garfinkle, David; Gregory, Ruth

    1989-01-01

    The question is considered whether the thin wall formalism of Israel applies to the gravitating domain walls of a lambda phi(exp 4) theory. The coupled Einstein-scalar equations that describe the thick gravitating wall are expanded in powers of the thickness of the wall. The solutions of the zeroth order equations reproduce the results of the usual Israel thin wall approximation for domain walls. The solutions of the first order equations provide corrections to the expressions for the stress-energy of the wall and to the Israel thin wall equations. The modified thin wall equations are then used to treat the motion of spherical and planar domain walls.

  5. Electromagnetic approaches to wall characterization, wall mitigation, and antenna design for through-the-wall radar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thajudeen, Christopher

    Through-the-wall imaging (TWI) is a topic of current interest due to its wide range of public safety, law enforcement, and defense applications. Among the various available technologies such as, acoustic, thermal, and optical imaging, which can be employed to sense and image targets of interest, electromagnetic (EM) imaging, in the microwave frequency bands, is the most widely utilized technology and has been at the forefront of research in recent years. The primary objectives for any Through-the-Wall Radar Imaging (TWRI) system are to obtain a layout of the building and/or inner rooms, detect if there are targets of interest including humans or weapons, determine if there are countermeasures being employed to further obscure the contents of a building or room of interest, and finally to classify the detected targets. Unlike conventional radar scenarios, the presence of walls, made of common construction materials such as brick, drywall, plywood, cinder block, and solid concrete, adversely affects the ability of any conventional imaging technique to properly image targets enclosed within building structures as the propagation through the wall can induce shadowing effects on targets of interest which may result in image degradation, errors in target localization, and even complete target masking. For many applications of TWR systems, the wall ringing signals are strong enough to mask the returns from targets not located a sufficient distance behind the wall, beyond the distance of the wall ringing, and thus without proper wall mitigation, target detection becomes extremely difficult. The results presented in this thesis focus on the development of wall parameter estimation, and intra-wall and wall-type characterization techniques for use in both the time and frequency domains as well as analysis of these techniques under various real world scenarios such as reduced system bandwidth scenarios, various wall backing scenarios, the case of inhomogeneous walls, presence

  6. Phase-averaged wall shear stress, wall pressure, and near-wall velocity field measurements in a whirling annular seal

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, G.L.; Winslow, R.B.; Thames, H.D. III

    1996-07-01

    The flow field inside a 50 percent eccentric whirling annular seal operating at a Reynolds number of 24,000 and a Taylor number of 6600 has been measured using a three-dimensional laser-Doppler anemometer system. Flush mount pressure and wall shear stress probes have been used to measure the stresses (normal and shear) along the length of the stator. The rotor was mounted eccentrically on the shaft so that the rotor orbit was circular and rotated at the same speed as the shaft (a whirl ratio of 1.0). This paper presents mean pressure, mean wall shear stress magnitude, and mean wall shear stress direction distributions along the length of the seal. Phase-averaged wall pressure and wall shear stress are presented along with phase-averaged mean velocity and turbulence kinetic energy distributions located 0.16c from the stator wall, where c is the seal clearance. The relationships between the velocity, turbulence, wall pressure, and wall shear stress are very complex and do not follow simple bulk flow predictions.

  7. 8. NORTHWEST WALL OF AR8, ALSO SHOWING THE SOUTHWEST WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. NORTHWEST WALL OF AR-8, ALSO SHOWING THE SOUTHWEST WALL AND THE CREW SHELTER AT FAR RIGHT. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base, Rammed Earth Aircraft Dispersal Revetments, Western Shore of Rogers Dry Lake, Boron, Kern County, CA

  8. Analysis of dynamic diffuse wall based on two-dimensional twist wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, T.; Kumosaki, K.; Inoue, M.

    1981-03-01

    The mechanism and the dynamic properties of the dynamic diffuse wall observed in Garnet bubbles have been analyzed based on two dimensional twist wall with a finite film thickness. The analysis reveals that during wall motion, 360 °-spin twist nucleates inside the wall and propagates along the film thickness. The wall distortion takes place where the 360 °-twist appears. Annihilation and/or accumulation of the 360 °-twist occurs at the film surface. The number of the 360 °-twists contained in a wall increases with increasing drive and in-plane fields, which leads to an increase of the apparent wall width obtained by domain walls observed by transmitted light (Faraday effect). Most of the experimental results may be well interpreted by the present analysis.

  9. A wall interference assessment/correction system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Ching F.

    1993-01-01

    A Wall Signature method originally developed by Hackett was selected to be adapted for the Ames 12-ft Wind Tunnel Wall Interference Assessment/Correction (WIAC) System in the project. This method uses limited measurements of the static pressure at the wall, in conjunction with the solid wall boundary condition, to determine the strength and distribution of singularities representing the test article. The singularities are used in turn for estimating wall interference at the model location. The lifting interference will be treated separately by representing in a horseshoe vortex system for the model's lifting effects. The development and implementation of a working prototype will be completed, delivered, and documented with a software manual. The WIAC code will be validated by conducting numerically simulated experiments rather than actual wind tunnel experiments. The simulations will be used to generate both free-air and confined wind-tunnel flow fields for each of the test articles over a range of test configurations. Specifically, the pressure signature at the test section wall will be computed for the tunnel case to provide the simulated 'measured' data. These data will serve as the input for the WIAC method - Wall Signature method. The performance of the WIAC method then may be evaluated by comparing the corrected parameters with those for the free-air simulation. The following two additional tasks are included in the supplement No. 1 to the basic Grant. On-line wall interference calculation: The developed wall signature method (modified Hackett's method) for Ames 12-ft Tunnel will be the pre-computed coefficients which facilitate the on-line calculation of wall interference; and support system effects estimation: The effects on the wall pressure measurements due to the presence of the model support systems will be evaluated.

  10. External Insulation of Masonry Walls and Wood Framed Walls

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, P.

    2013-01-01

    The use of exterior insulation on a building is an accepted and effective means to increase the overall thermal resistance of the assembly that also has other advantages of improved water management and often increased air tightness of building assemblies. For thin layers of insulation (1" to 1 1/2"), the cladding can typically be attached directly through the insulation back to the structure. For thicker insulation layers, furring strips have been added as a cladding attachment location. This approach has been used in the past on numerous Building America test homes and communities (both new and retrofit applications), and has been proven to be an effective and durable means to provide cladding attachment. However, the lack of engineering data has been a problem for many designers, contractors, and code officials. This research project developed baseline engineering analysis to support the installation of thick layers of exterior insulation on existing masonry and frame walls. Furthermore, water management details necessary to integrate windows, doors, decks, balconies and roofs were created to provide guidance on the integration of exterior insulation strategies with other enclosure elements.

  11. External Insulation of Masonry Walls and Wood Framed Walls

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, P.

    2013-01-01

    The use of exterior insulation on a building is an accepted and effective means to increase the overall thermal resistance of the assembly that also has other advantages of improved water management and often increased air tightness of building assemblies. For thin layers of insulation (1” to 1 ½”), the cladding can typically be attached directly through the insulation back to the structure. For thicker insulation layers, furring strips have been added as a cladding attachment location. This approach has been used in the past on numerous Building America test homes and communities (both new and retrofit applications), and has been proven to be an effective and durable means to provide cladding attachment. However, the lack of engineering data has been a problem for many designers, contractors, and code officials. This research project developed baseline engineering analysis to support the installation of thick layers of exterior insulation on existing masonry and frame walls. Furthermore, water management details necessary to integrate windows, doors, decks, balconies and roofs were created to provide guidance on the integration of exterior insulation strategies with other enclosure elements.

  12. 7. NORTH WALL AND NORTHWEST WALL OF AR8, ALSO SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. NORTH WALL AND NORTHWEST WALL OF AR-8, ALSO SHOWING THE EAST END OF THE SOUTH WALL IN THE DISTANCE. VIEW TO SOUTH. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base, Rammed Earth Aircraft Dispersal Revetments, Western Shore of Rogers Dry Lake, Boron, Kern County, CA

  13. Indirect localization of a magnetic domain wall mediated by quasi walls.

    PubMed

    Lacour, D; Montaigne, F; Rougemaille, N; Belkhou, R; Raabe, J; Hehn, M

    2015-05-26

    The manipulation of magnetic domain walls in thin films and nanostructures opens new opportunities for fundamental and applied research. But controlling reliably the position of a moving domain wall still remains challenging. So far, most of the studies aimed at understanding the physics of pinning and depinning processes in the magnetic layer in which the wall moves (active layer). In these studies, the role of other magnetic layers in the stack has been often ignored. Here, we report an indirect localization process of 180° domain walls that occurs in magnetic tunnel junctions, commonly used in spintronics. Combining Scanning Transmission X-Ray Microscopy and micromagnetic simulations, magnetic configurations in both layers are resolved. When nucleating a 180° domain wall in the active layer, a quasi wall is created in the reference layer, atop the wall. The wall and its quasi wall must then be moved or positioned together, as a unique object. As a mutual effect, a localized change of the magnetic properties in the reference layer induces a localized quasi wall in the active layer. The two types of quasi walls are shown to be responsible for an indirect localization process of the 180° domain wall in the active layer.

  14. Differential scanning calorimetry of plant cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Liangshiou; Varner, J.E. ); Yuen, H.K. )

    1991-03-15

    High-sensitivity differential scanning calorimetry has been used to study the phase transition of cell wall preparations of the elongating and mature regions of soybean hypocotyls and of celery epidermis and collenchyma strands. A step-like transition believed to be glass transition was observed in walls isolated from the elongating region of soybean hypocotyls at 52.9C. Addition of 1 mM CaCl{sub 2} to the cell wall preparation increased the transition temperature to 60.8C and greatly reduced the transition magnitude. In walls from the mature region, the transition was small and occurred at a higher temperature (60.1C). Addition of calcium to the mature region cell wall had little effect on the transition. Based on the known interactions between calcium and pectin, the authors propose that calcium affects the glass transition by binding to the polygalacturonate backbone of wall pectin, resulting in a more rigid wall with a smaller transition at a higher temperature. The mature region either has more calcium in the wall or has more methyl-esterified pectin, making it less responsive to added calcium.

  15. Revisiting the Ladder on a Wall Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salu, Yehuda

    2011-01-01

    The problem of a ladder leaning on a wall has been a staple of introductory physics for years. It is discussed in numerous physics textbooks and in journals. Now, it even has an Internet presence. Postings from students seek help for "ladder on a wall" problems. A quick review of those postings would show that they all deal with frictionless…

  16. 14 CFR 121.245 - Fire walls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fire walls. 121.245 Section 121.245 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Special Airworthiness Requirements § 121.245 Fire walls. Each...

  17. 14 CFR 121.245 - Fire walls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fire walls. 121.245 Section 121.245 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Special Airworthiness Requirements § 121.245 Fire walls. Each...

  18. 14 CFR 121.245 - Fire walls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fire walls. 121.245 Section 121.245 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Special Airworthiness Requirements § 121.245 Fire walls. Each...

  19. 14 CFR 121.245 - Fire walls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fire walls. 121.245 Section 121.245 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Special Airworthiness Requirements § 121.245 Fire walls. Each...

  20. 14 CFR 121.245 - Fire walls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fire walls. 121.245 Section 121.245 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Special Airworthiness Requirements § 121.245 Fire walls. Each...

  1. Artificial Climbing Wall Design and Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cinnamon, Jerry

    Climbing walls can be designed to satisfy the needs of both untrained and experienced climbers offering these people a place to learn their craft as well as a place for them to keep their skills honed during off seasons. Users of the artificial wall can be classified into special groups, such as "Youth at Risk," who are engaged in…

  2. Do plant cell walls have a code?

    PubMed

    Tavares, Eveline Q P; Buckeridge, Marcos S

    2015-12-01

    A code is a set of rules that establish correspondence between two worlds, signs (consisting of encrypted information) and meaning (of the decrypted message). A third element, the adaptor, connects both worlds, assigning meaning to a code. We propose that a Glycomic Code exists in plant cell walls where signs are represented by monosaccharides and phenylpropanoids and meaning is cell wall architecture with its highly complex association of polymers. Cell wall biosynthetic mechanisms, structure, architecture and properties are addressed according to Code Biology perspective, focusing on how they oppose to cell wall deconstruction. Cell wall hydrolysis is mainly focused as a mechanism of decryption of the Glycomic Code. Evidence for encoded information in cell wall polymers fine structure is highlighted and the implications of the existence of the Glycomic Code are discussed. Aspects related to fine structure are responsible for polysaccharide packing and polymer-polymer interactions, affecting the final cell wall architecture. The question whether polymers assembly within a wall display similar properties as other biological macromolecules (i.e. proteins, DNA, histones) is addressed, i.e. do they display a code?

  3. [The cell wall of Coelastrum (Chlorophycees)].

    PubMed

    Reymond, O

    1975-01-01

    The cell wall of Coelastrum is usually composed of three layers. The outermost layer was studied most extensively. It consists of erect tubules which often bear long bristles whose function may be to stabilize the algae in its enviroment. The cell wall can modify its morphology according to the enviroment.

  4. Mechanics of the Toxoplasma gondii oocyst wall

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability of microorganisms to survive under extreme conditions is closely related to the physicochemical properties of their wall. In the ubiquitous protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii, the oocyst stage possesses a bilayered wall that protects the dormant but potentially infective parasites from...

  5. Biosynthesis: Imaging cell-wall biosynthesis live

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugg, Timothy D. H.

    2013-01-01

    The biosynthesis of peptidoglycan is an important step in bacterial cell division and cell-wall maturation. Now it has been shown that fluorescent D-amino acids can be used to label the peptidoglycan cell wall of living bacteria, providing a new tool to study this important process.

  6. Turbulence measurements in curved wall jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodman, L. C.; Wood, N. J.; Roberts, L.

    1987-01-01

    Accurate turbulence measurements taken in wall jet flows are difficult to obtain, due to high intensity turbulence and problems in achieving two-dimensionality. The problem is compounded when streamwise curvature of the flow is introduced, since the jet entrainment and turbulence levels are greatly increased over the equivalent planar values. In this experiment, two-dimensional plane and curved wall jet flows are simulated by having a jet blow axially over a cylinder. In the plane case the cylinder has constant transverse radius, and in the curved cases the cylinder has a varying transverse radius. Although the wall jet in these cases is axisymmetric, adequate 'two-dimensional' flow can be obtained as long as the ratio of the jet width to the cylinder radius is small. The annular wall jet has several advantages over wall jets issuing from finite rectangular slots. Since the slot has no ends, three-dimensional effects caused by the finite length of the slot and side wall interference are eliminated. Also, the transverse curvature of the wall allows close optical access to the surface using a Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) system. Hot wire measurements and some LDV measurements are presented for plane and curved wall jet flows. An integral analysis is used to assess the effects of transverse curvature on the turbulent shear stress. The analysis and the data show that the effects of transverse curvature on both the mean flow and the shear stress are small enough for two-dimensional flow to be approximately satisfactorily.

  7. Risk Assessment of Energy-Efficient Walls

    SciTech Connect

    Pallin, Simon B.; Hun, Diana E.; Jackson, Roderick K.; Kehrer, Manfred

    2014-12-01

    This multi-year project aims to provide the residential construction industry with energy-efficient wall designs that are moisture durable. The present work focused on the initial step of this project, which is to develop a moisture durability protocol that identifies energy efficient wall designs that have a low probability of experiencing moisture problems.

  8. Safranine fluorescent staining of wood cell walls.

    PubMed

    Bond, J; Donaldson, L; Hill, S; Hitchcock, K

    2008-06-01

    Safranine is an azo dye commonly used for plant microscopy, especially as a stain for lignified tissues such as xylem. Safranine fluorescently labels the wood cell wall, producing green/yellow fluorescence in the secondary cell wall and red/orange fluorescence in the middle lamella (ML) region. We examined the fluorescence behavior of safranine under blue light excitation using a variety of wood- and fiber-based samples of known composition to interpret the observed color differentiation of different cell wall types. We also examined the basis for the differences in fluorescence emission using spectral confocal microscopy to examine lignin-rich and cellulose-rich cell walls including reaction wood and decayed wood compared to normal wood. Our results indicate that lignin-rich cell walls, such as the ML of tracheids, the secondary wall of compression wood tracheids, and wood decayed by brown rot, tend to fluoresce red or orange, while cellulose-rich cell walls such as resin canals, wood decayed by white rot, cotton fibers and the G-layer of tension wood fibers, tend to fluoresce green/yellow. This variation in fluorescence emission seems to be due to factors including an emission shift toward red wavelengths combined with dye quenching at shorter wavelengths in regions with high lignin content. Safranine fluorescence provides a useful way to differentiate lignin-rich and cellulose-rich cell walls without counterstaining as required for bright field microscopy.

  9. Ballistic Limit Equation for Single Wall Titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratliff, J. M.; Christiansen, Eric L.; Bryant, C.

    2009-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact tests and hydrocode simulations were used to determine the ballistic limit equation (BLE) for perforation of a titanium wall, as a function of wall thickness. Two titanium alloys were considered, and separate BLEs were derived for each. Tested wall thicknesses ranged from 0.5mm to 2.0mm. The single-wall damage equation of Cour-Palais [ref. 1] was used to analyze the Ti wall's shielding effectiveness. It was concluded that the Cour-Palais single-wall equation produced a non-conservative prediction of the ballistic limit for the Ti shield. The inaccurate prediction was not a particularly surprising result; the Cour-Palais single-wall BLE contains shield material properties as parameters, but it was formulated only from tests of different aluminum alloys. Single-wall Ti shield tests were run (thicknesses of 2.0 mm, 1.5 mm, 1.0 mm, and 0.5 mm) on Ti 15-3-3-3 material custom cut from rod stock. Hypervelocity impact (HVI) tests were used to establish the failure threshold empirically, using the additional constraint that the damage scales with impact energy, as was indicated by hydrocode simulations. The criterion for shield failure was defined as no detached spall from the shield back surface during HVI. Based on the test results, which confirmed an approximately energy-dependent shield effectiveness, the Cour-Palais equation was modified.

  10. Near-wall serpentine cooled turbine airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ching-Pang

    2014-10-28

    A serpentine coolant flow path is formed by inner walls in a cavity between pressure and suction side walls of a turbine airfoil, the cavity partitioned by one or more transverse partitions into a plurality of continuous serpentine cooling flow streams each having a respective coolant inlet.

  11. Steel shear walls, behavior, modeling and design

    SciTech Connect

    Astaneh-Asl, Abolhassan

    2008-07-08

    In recent years steel shear walls have become one of the more efficient lateral load resisting systems in tall buildings. The basic steel shear wall system consists of a steel plate welded to boundary steel columns and boundary steel beams. In some cases the boundary columns have been concrete-filled steel tubes. Seismic behavior of steel shear wall systems during actual earthquakes and based on laboratory cyclic tests indicates that the systems are quite ductile and can be designed in an economical way to have sufficient stiffness, strength, ductility and energy dissipation capacity to resist seismic effects of strong earthquakes. This paper, after summarizing the past research, presents the results of two tests of an innovative steel shear wall system where the boundary elements are concrete-filled tubes. Then, a review of currently available analytical models of steel shear walls is provided with a discussion of capabilities and limitations of each model. We have observed that the tension only 'strip model', forming the basis of the current AISC seismic design provisions for steel shear walls, is not capable of predicting the behavior of steel shear walls with length-to-thickness ratio less than about 600 which is the range most common in buildings. The main reasons for such shortcomings of the AISC seismic design provisions for steel shear walls is that it ignores the compression field in the shear walls, which can be significant in typical shear walls. The AISC method also is not capable of incorporating stresses in the shear wall due to overturning moments. A more rational seismic design procedure for design of shear walls proposed in 2000 by the author is summarized in the paper. The design method, based on procedures used for design of steel plate girders, takes into account both tension and compression stress fields and is applicable to all values of length-to-thickness ratios of steel shear walls. The method is also capable of including the effect of

  12. Accelerating forward genetics for cell wall deconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Vidaurre, Danielle; Bonetta, Dario

    2012-01-01

    The elucidation of the genes involved in cell wall synthesis and assembly remains one of the biggest challenges of cell wall biology. Although traditional genetic approaches, using simple yet elegant screens, have identified components of the cell wall, many unknowns remain. Exhausting the genetic toolbox by performing sensitized screens, adopting chemical genetics or combining these with improved cell wall imaging, hold the promise of new gene discovery and function. With the recent introduction of next-generation sequencing technologies, it is now possible to quickly and efficiently map and clone genes of interest in record time. The combination of a classical genetics approach and cutting edge technology will propel cell wall biology in plants forward into the future. PMID:22685448

  13. The interaction of transverse domain walls.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Benjamin

    2012-01-18

    The interaction between transverse domain walls is calculated analytically using a multipole expansion up to third order. Starting from an analytical expression for the magnetization in the wall, the monopole, dipole, and quadrupole moments are derived and their impact on the interaction is investigated using the surface and volume charges. The surface charges are important for the dipole moment while the volume charges constitute the monopole and quadrupole moments. For domain walls that are situated in different wires it is found that there is a strong deviation from the interaction of two monopoles. This deviation is caused by the interaction of the monopole of the wall in the first wire with the dipole of the wall in the second wire and vice versa. The dipole-dipole and the quadrupole-monopole interactions are found to be also of considerable size and non-negligible. A comparison with micromagnetic simulations shows a good agreement.

  14. 2003 Plant Cell Walls Gordon Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel J. Cosgrove

    2004-09-21

    This conference will address recent progress in many aspects of cell wall biology. Molecular, genetic, and genomic approaches are yielding major advances in our understanding of the composition, synthesis, and architecture of plant cell walls and their dynamics during growth, and are identifying the genes that encode the machinery needed to make their biogenesis possible. This meeting will bring together international scientists from academia, industry and government labs to share the latest breakthroughs and perspectives on polysaccharide biosynthesis, wood formation, wall modification, expansion and interaction with other organisms, and genomic & evolutionary analyses of wall-related genes, as well as to discuss recent ''nanotechnological'' advances that take wall analysis to the level of a single cell.

  15. Through-the-wall polarimetric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Fauzia; Amin, Moeness G.

    2008-04-01

    Through-the-Wall Imaging is emerging as an affordable sensor technology supporting a variety of applications, such as surveillance and reconnaissance, emergency rescue, and firefighting. Motivated by the desire to understand the underlying phenomenology and performance bounds associated with imaging targets behind walls, several through-the-wall imaging experiments were conducted at the Center for Advanced Communications (CAC), Villanova University. These experiments aimed at supporting resolution, polarization, and localization of indoor targets and objects behind walls, and provided valuable dual-polarized synthetic aperture data measurements of indoor scenes of different complexity and population. In this paper, we present full-polarization imaging results, for a setting of calibrated reflectors behind a typical exterior grade wall. These imaging results provide polarimetric scene characterization and are shown to be in good agreement with the ground truth.

  16. Automotion of domain walls for spintronic interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Young, Ian A.

    2014-06-07

    We simulate “automotion,” the transport of a magnetic domain wall under the influence of demagnetization and magnetic anisotropy, in nanoscale spintronic interconnects. In contrast to spin transfer driven magnetic domain wall motion, the proposed interconnects operate without longitudinal charge current transfer, with only a transient current pulse at domain wall creation and have favorable scaling down to the 20 nm dimension. Cases of both in-plane and out-of-plane magnetization are considered. Analytical dependence of the velocity of domain walls on the angle of magnetization are compared with full micromagnetic simulations. Deceleration, attenuation and disappearance, and reflection of domain walls are demonstrated through simulation. Dependences of the magnetization angle on the current pulse parameters are studied. The energy and delay analysis suggests that automotion is an attractive option for spintronic logic interconnects.

  17. Metal stud wall systems -- Thermal disaster, or modern wall systems with highly efficient thermal insulation?

    SciTech Connect

    Kosny, J.; Christian, J.E.; Desjarlais, A.O.

    1997-11-01

    Because steel has higher thermal conductivity than wood and intense heat transfer occurs through the metal wall components, thermal performances of a metal stud wall are significantly lower than for similar wood stud walls. A reduction of the in-cavity R-value caused by the wood studs is about 10% in wood stud walls. That is why metal stud walls are believed to be considerably less thermally effective than similar made of wood. However, properly designed metal stud walls can be as thermally effective as wood stud walls. Relatively high R-values may be achieved by installing insulating sheathing, which is widely used as a remedy for a weak thermal performance of metal stud walls. A series of the promising metal stud wall configurations is analyzed using results of finite difference computer modeling and guarded hotbox tests. Some of these walls were designed and tested in the ORNL Building Technology Center, some were tested in other laboratories, and some walls were developed and forgotten long time ago. Also, a novel concept of combined foam-metal studs is considered. The main aim of the present paper is to prove that it is possible to build metal stud walls which perform as well as wood stud walls. The key lies in designing; metal stud wall systems have to be treated in a special way with particular consideration to the high thermal conduction of metal components. In the discussed collection of the efficient metal stud wall configurations, reductions of the in-cavity R-value caused by metal studs are between 10 and 20%.

  18. A wall interference assessment/correction system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, C. F.

    1994-01-01

    A Wall Signature method originally developed by Hackett has been selected to be adapted for the Ames 12-ft Wind Tunnel WIAC system in the project. This method uses limited measurements of the static pressure at the wall, in conjunction with the solid wall boundary condition, to determine the strength and distribution of singularities representing the test article. The singularities are used in turn for estimating wall interference at the model location. The development and implementation of a working prototype will be completed, delivered and documented with a software manual. The WIAC code will be validated by conducting numerically simulated experiments rather than actual wind tunnel experiments. The simulations will be used to generate both free-air and confined wind-tunnel flow fields for each of the test articles over a range of test configurations. Specifically, the pressure signature at the test section wall will be computed for the tunnel case to provide the simulated 'measured' data. These data will serve as the input for the WIAC method--Wall Signature method. The performance of the WIAC method then may be evaluated by comparing the corrected parameters with those for the free-air simulation. The following two additional tasks are included: (1) On-line wall interference calculation: The developed wall signature method (modified Hackett's method) for Ames 12-ft Tunnel will be the pre-computed coefficients which facilitate the on-line calculation of wall interference, and (2) Support system effects estimation: The effects on the wall pressure measurements due to the presence of the model support systems will be evaluated.

  19. Wall crossing, quivers and crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aganagic, Mina; Schaeffer, Kevin

    2012-10-01

    We study the spectrum of BPS D-branes on a Calabi-Yau manifold using the 0 + 1 dimensional quiver gauge theory that describes the dynamics of the branes at low energies. We argue that Seiberg dualities of the quiver correspond to crossing the "walls of the second kind" of Kontsevich and Soibelman. There is a large class of examples where the BPS degeneracies of quivers corresponding to one D6 brane bound to arbitrary numbers of D4, D2 and D0 branes are counted by melting crystal configurations. The shape of the crystal is determined by the Calabi-Yau geometry and the background B-field, and its microscopic structure by the quiver Q. We prove that the BPS degeneracies computed from Q and Q' are related by the Kontsevich-Soibelman formula. We also show that, in the limit of infinite B-field, the combinatorics of crystals becomes that of the topological vertex, thus re-deriving the Gromov-Witten/Donaldson-Thomas correspondence.

  20. Wall street comes to Washington.

    PubMed

    2004-08-01

    While health care cost trends likely will continue slowing through the end of 2004, the longer-term outlook for a sustained slowdown in underlying costs and private health insurance premiums largely depends on the strength of the economy, according to market and health policy experts at the Center for Studying Health System Change's (HSC) ninth annual Wall Street roundtable. Even as cost growth slows, insurers are practicing pricing discipline to keep premium trends ahead of cost trends to maintain profitability. Employers will continue to shift costs to workers through higher deductibles, copayments and coinsurance, but an improving economy could temper this trend as labor markets tighten. Employers remain skeptical of new health insurance products, including tiered-provider networks and consumer-driven health plans. Although growth in hospital use has slowed, the industry remains in the throes of a building boom. Increased payments to managed care plans could reinvigorate private plan participation in Medicare, but concerns about the federal budget deficit could prompt Congress to roll back rate increases.

  1. Final Report for "Stabilization of resistive wall modes using moving metal walls"

    SciTech Connect

    Forest, Cary B.

    2014-02-05

    The UW experiment used a linear pinch experiment to study the stabilization of MHD by moving metal walls. The methodology of the experiment had three steps. (1) Identify and understand the no-wall MHD instability limits and character, (2) identify and understand the thin-wall MHD instabilities (re- sistive wall mode), and then (3) add the spinning wall and understand its impact on stability properties. During the duration of the grant we accomplished all 3 of these goals, discovered new physics, and completed the experiment as proposed.

  2. Flow Characteristics of Plane Wall Jet with Side Walls on Both Sides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imao, Shigeki; Kikuchi, Satoshi; Kozato, Yasuaki; Hayashi, Takayasu

    Flow characteristics of a two-dimensional jet with side walls have been studied experimentally. Three kinds of cylindrical walls and a flat wall were provided as the side walls, and they were combined and attached to a nozzle. Nine types of side wall conditions were investigated. Velocity was measured by a hot-wire probe and the separation point was measured by a Pitot tube. Mean velocity profiles, the growth of the jet half-width, the decay of jet maximum velocity, and the attachment distance were clarified. When cylindrical walls with different radii are installed, the flow pattern changes markedly depending on the velocity of the jet. A striking increase in the jet half-width is related to the separation of flow from the smaller cylindrical wall just behind the nozzle.

  3. Wall shear stress measurement in blade end-wall corner region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhargava, R.; Raj, R.; Boldman, D. R.

    1987-01-01

    The magnitude and the direction of wall shear stress and surface pressure in the blade end-wall corner region were investigated. The measurements were obtained on a specially designed Preston tube, the tip of which could be concentrically rotated about its axis of rotation at the measurement location. The magnitude of wall shear stress in the vicinity of the corner was observed to increase significantly (170 percent) compared to its far-upstream value; the increase was consistently higher on the blade surface compared to the value on the plate surface of the blade end-wall corner. On both surfaces in the blade end-wall corner, the variation of the wall shear stress direction was found to be more predominant in the vicinity of the blade leading-edge location. The trend of the measured wall shear stress direction showed good agreement with the limiting streamline directions obtained from the flow visualization studies.

  4. Regeneration of near-wall turbulence structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, James M.; Kim, John J.; Waleffe, Fabian A.

    1993-01-01

    An examination of the regeneration mechanisms of near-wall turbulence and an attempt to investigate the critical Reynolds number conjecture of Waleffe & Kim is presented. The basis is an extension of the 'minimal channel' approach of Jimenez and Moin which emphasizes the near-wall region and further reduces the complexity of the turbulent flow. Reduction of the flow Reynolds number to the minimum value which will allow turbulence to be sustained has the effect of reducing the ratio of the largest scales to the smallest scales or, equivalently, of causing the near-wall region to fill more of the area between the channel walls. In addition, since each wall may have an active near-wall region, half of the channel is always somewhat redundant. If a plane Couette flow is instead chosen as the base flow, this redundancy is eliminated: the mean shear of a plane Couette flow has a single sign, and at low Reynolds numbers, the two wall regions share a single set of structures. A minimal flow with these modifications possesses, by construction, the strongest constraints which allow sustained turbulence, producing a greatly simplified flow in which the regeneration process can be examined.

  5. Chiral spin torque at magnetic domain walls.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Kwang-Su; Thomas, Luc; Yang, See-Hun; Parkin, Stuart

    2013-07-01

    Spin-polarized currents provide a powerful means of manipulating the magnetization of nanodevices, and give rise to spin transfer torques that can drive magnetic domain walls along nanowires. In ultrathin magnetic wires, domain walls are found to move in the opposite direction to that expected from bulk spin transfer torques, and also at much higher speeds. Here we show that this is due to two intertwined phenomena, both derived from spin-orbit interactions. By measuring the influence of magnetic fields on current-driven domain-wall motion in perpendicularly magnetized Co/Ni/Co trilayers, we find an internal effective magnetic field acting on each domain wall, the direction of which alternates between successive domain walls. This chiral effective field arises from a Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction at the Co/Pt interfaces and, in concert with spin Hall currents, drives the domain walls in lock-step along the nanowire. Elucidating the mechanism for the manipulation of domain walls in ultrathin magnetic films will enable the development of new families of spintronic devices.

  6. Isolation of plant cell wall proteins.

    PubMed

    Jamet, Elisabeth; Boudart, Georges; Borderies, Giséle; Charmont, Stephane; Lafitte, Claude; Rossignol, Michel; Canut, Herve; Pont-Lezica, Rafael

    2008-01-01

    The quality of a proteomic analysis of a cell compartment strongly depends on the reliability of the isolation procedure for the cell compartment of interest. Plant cell walls possess specific drawbacks: (1) the lack of a surrounding membrane may result in the loss of cell wall proteins (CWP) during the isolation procedure; (2) polysaccharide networks of cellulose, hemicelluloses, and pectins form potential traps for contaminants such as intracellular proteins; (3) the presence of proteins interacting in many different ways with the polysaccharide matrix require different procedures to elute them from the cell wall. Three categories of CWP are distinguished: labile proteins that have little or no interactions with cell wall components, weakly bound proteins extractable with salts, and strongly bound proteins. Two alternative protocols are decribed for cell wall proteomics: (1) nondestructive techniques allowing the extraction of labile or weakly bound CWP without damaging the plasma membrane; (2) destructive techniques to isolate cell walls from which weakly or strongly bound CWP can be extracted. These protocols give very low levels of contamination by intracellular proteins. Their application should lead to a realistic view of the cell wall proteome at least for labile and weakly bound CWP extractable by salts.

  7. Recent advances in plant cell wall proteomics.

    PubMed

    Jamet, Elisabeth; Albenne, Cécile; Boudart, Georges; Irshad, Muhammad; Canut, Hervé; Pont-Lezica, Rafael

    2008-02-01

    The plant extracellular matrix contains typical polysaccharides such as cellulose, hemicelluloses, and pectins that interact to form dense interwoven networks. Plant cell walls play crucial roles during development and constitute the first barrier of defense against invading pathogens. Cell wall proteomics has greatly contributed to the description of the protein content of a compartment specific to plants. Around 400 cell wall proteins (CWPs) of Arabidopsis, representing about one fourth of its estimated cell wall proteome, have been described. The main points to note are that: (i) the diversity of enzymes acting on polysaccharides suggests a great plasticity of cell walls; (ii) CWPs such as proteases, polysaccharide hydrolytic enzymes, and lipases may contribute to the generation of signals; (iii) proteins of unknown functions were identified, suggesting new roles for cell walls. Recently, the characterization of PTMs such as N- and O-glycosylations improved our knowledge of CWP structure. The presence of many glycoside hydrolases and proteases suggests a complex regulation of CWPs involving various types of post-translational events. The first 3-D structures to be resolved gave clues about the interactions between CWPs, or between CWPs and polysaccharides. Future work should include: extracting and identifying CWPs still recalcitrant to proteomics, describing the cell wall interactome, improving quantification, and unraveling the roles of each of the CWPs.

  8. Polyphosphorylated fungal cell wall glycopeptides

    SciTech Connect

    Bonetti, S.J.; Black, B.; Gander, J.E.

    1987-05-01

    Penicillium charlesii secretes a 65 kDa peptidophosphogalactomannan (pPGM) containing 10 phosphodiester residues and 10 galactofuranosyl-containing galactin chains attached to a linear mannan; the polysaccharides is attached to a 3 kDa seryl- and threonyl-rich peptide. The authors have now isolated and partially characterized a form of pPGM released from mycelia of P. charlesii treated at 50/sup 0/C for 15, 30, 60 or 120 min. Two- to 3-fold more pPGM was released by heat treatment than is secreted. Crude pPGM, released by heat, was fractionated on DE-52 and was fractionated into two major fractions on the basis of its difference in negative charge. /sup 1/H-decoupled /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy of these two fractions provided spectra very similar to that of secreted pPGM previously reported from this laboratory. /sup 1/H-decoupled /sup 31/P NMR showed major signals at 1.47, and 0.22 ppm and minor signals at 1.32, 1.15, 1.00, 0.91 and 0.76 ppm. These signals are upfield from phosphomonoesters and are in the region observed for (6-O-phosphorylcholine)- and (6-O-phosphorylethanolamine)-..cap alpha..-D-mannopyranosyl residues which are 0.22 and 0.90 ppm, respectively. These polymers contain 30 phosphodiester residues per molecule of 70 kDa mass compared with 10 phosphodiesters in secreted pPGM. Acid phosphatase and alkaline protease were the only lytic enzymes released by heat treatment. The evidence suggests that much of the pPGM is derived from cell walls; and that the polysaccharide is highly phosphorylated.

  9. A wall interference assessment/correction system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Ching F.; Ulbrich, N.; Sickles, W. L.; Qian, Cathy X.

    1992-01-01

    A Wall Signature method, the Hackett method, has been selected to be adapted for the 12-ft Wind Tunnel wall interference assessment/correction (WIAC) system in the present phase. This method uses limited measurements of the static pressure at the wall, in conjunction with the solid wall boundary condition, to determine the strength and distribution of singularities representing the test article. The singularities are used in turn for estimating wall interferences at the model location. The Wall Signature method will be formulated for application to the unique geometry of the 12-ft Tunnel. The development and implementation of a working prototype will be completed, delivered and documented with a software manual. The WIAC code will be validated by conducting numerically simulated experiments rather than actual wind tunnel experiments. The simulations will be used to generate both free-air and confined wind-tunnel flow fields for each of the test articles over a range of test configurations. Specifically, the pressure signature at the test section wall will be computed for the tunnel case to provide the simulated 'measured' data. These data will serve as the input for the WIAC method-Wall Signature method. The performance of the WIAC method then may be evaluated by comparing the corrected parameters with those for the free-air simulation. Each set of wind tunnel/test article numerical simulations provides data to validate the WIAC method. A numerical wind tunnel test simulation is initiated to validate the WIAC methods developed in the project. In the present reported period, the blockage correction has been developed and implemented for a rectangular tunnel as well as the 12-ft Pressure Tunnel. An improved wall interference assessment and correction method for three-dimensional wind tunnel testing is presented in the appendix.

  10. Low-cost sustainable wall construction system

    SciTech Connect

    Vohra, A.; Rosenfeld, A.H.

    1998-07-01

    Houses with no wall cavities, such as those made of adobe, stone, brick, or block, have poor thermal properties but are rarely insulated because of the cost and difficulty of providing wall insulation. A simple, low-cost technique using loose-fill indigenous materials has been demonstrated for the construction of highly insulated walls or the retrofit of existing walls in such buildings. Locally available pumice, in sandbags stacked along the exterior wall of an adobe house in New Mexico, added a thermal resistance (R) of 16 F{sm{underscore}bullet}ft{sup 2}{sm{underscore}bullet}h/Btu (2.8 m{sup 2}{sm{underscore}bullet}K/W). The total cost of the sandbag insulation wall retrofit was $3.76 per square foot ($40.50/m{sup 2}). Computer simulations of the adobe house using DOE 2.1E show savings of $275 per year, corresponding to 50% reduction in heating energy consumption. The savings-to-investment ratio ranges from 1.1 to 3.2, so the cost of conserved energy is lower than the price of propane, natural gas and electric heat, making the system cost-effective. Prototype stand-alone walls were also constructed using fly ash and sawdust blown into continuous polypropylene tubing, which was folded between corner posts as it was filled to form the shape of the wall. Other materials could also be used. The inexpensive technique solves the problem of insulating solid-wall hours and constructing new houses without specialized equipment and skills, thereby saving energy, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and improving comfort for people in many countries. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has filed patent applications on this technology, which is part of a DOE initiative on sustainable building envelope materials and systems.

  11. Soft tissue coverage in abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Donald P; Butler, Charles E

    2013-10-01

    Abdominal wall defects requiring soft tissue coverage can be either partial-thickness defects or full-thickness composite defects. Soft tissue flap reconstruction offers significant advantages in defects that cannot be closed primarily. Flap reconstruction is performed in a single-stage procedure obviating chronic wound management. If the defect size exceeds the availability of local soft tissue for coverage, regional pedicled flaps can be delivered into the abdominal wall while maintaining blood supply from their donor site. Microsurgical free tissue transfer increases the capacity to provide soft tissue coverage for abdominal wall defects that are not amenable to either local or regional flap coverage.

  12. Refractive index of plant cell walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gausman, H. W.; Allen, W. A.; Escobar, D. E.

    1974-01-01

    Air was replaced with media of higher refractive indices by vacuum infiltration in leaves of cucumber, blackeye pea, tomato, and string bean plants, and reflectance of noninfiltrated and infiltrated leaves was spectrophotometrically measured. Infiltrated leaves reflected less light than noninfiltrated leaves over the 500-2500-nm wavelength interval because cell wall-air interfaces were partly eliminated. Minimal reflectance should occur when the average refractive index of plant cell walls was matched by the infiltrating fluid. Although refractive indices that resulted in minimal reflectance differed among the four plant genera, an average value of 1.425 approximates the refractive index of plant cell walls for the four plant genera.

  13. Domain wall orientation in magnetic nanowires.

    PubMed

    Vedmedenko, E Y; Kubetzka, A; von Bergmann, K; Pietzsch, O; Bode, M; Kirschner, J; Oepen, H P; Wiesendanger, R

    2004-02-20

    Scanning tunneling microscopy reveals that domain walls in ultrathin Fe nanowires are oriented along a certain crystallographic direction, regardless of the orientation of the wires. Monte Carlo simulations on a discrete lattice are in accordance with the experiment if the film relaxation is taken into account. We demonstrate that the wall orientation is determined by the atomic lattice and the resulting strength of an effective exchange interaction. The magnetic anisotropy and the magnetostatic energy play a minor role for the wall orientation in that system.

  14. Chest wall hypoplasia--principles and treatment.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Oscar Henry

    2015-01-01

    The chest is a dynamic structure. For normal movement it relies on a coordinated movement of the multiple bones, joints and muscles of the respiratory system. While muscle weakness can have clear impact on respiration by decreasing respiratory motion, so can conditions that cause chest wall hypoplasia and produce an immobile chest wall. These conditions, such as Jarcho-Levin and Jeune syndrome, present significantly different challenges than those faced with early onset scoliosis in which chest wall mechanics and thoracic volume may be much closer to normal. Because of this difference more aggressive approaches to clinical and surgical management are necessary.

  15. Prefabricated brick wall panels: Economy or nightmare?

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, M.J.

    1999-07-01

    Prefabricated wall systems are becoming a popular element of building construction. Prefabricated systems lend themselves to streamlining construction schedules and reducing overall construction costs. They offer the potential for increased quality due to assembly in controlled factory environments. This paper reviews basic principles and concepts for the design of waterproofing systems for prefabricated brick wall panels. Using a project case study, the author will show that failure to adhere to certain proven conventional practices can have serious adverse consequences with respect to the performance of prefabricated brick wall panels.

  16. 15. MASONRY DETAIL NO. 1, NORTH TRAINING WALL, LOOKING DOWN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. MASONRY DETAIL NO. 1, NORTH TRAINING WALL, LOOKING DOWN UPON THE WALL SURFACE FROM THE ADJACENT RIPRAP. - Oakland Harbor Training Walls, Mouth of Federal Channel to Inner Harbor, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  17. 8. VIEW OF CROSS SECTION OF THE EASTERNMOST WALL SEGMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF CROSS SECTION OF THE EASTERNMOST WALL SEGMENT THAT SHOWS THE TRENCHING AND 1960 PIPELINE CORRIDOR BETWEEN THE WALL SEGMENTS, LOOKING WEST-NORTHWEST - Rock Wall, North side of Battle Creek Canyon, Shingletown, Shasta County, CA

  18. 14. INTERIOR VIEW OF FIREPLACE AND SURROUNDING WALL IN FIRST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. INTERIOR VIEW OF FIREPLACE AND SURROUNDING WALL IN FIRST FLOOR, NORTHWEST PARLOR, NORTH WALL, WITH SCALE (NOTE WALL STENCILING) - George W. Eckhart House, 810 Main Street, Wheeling, Ohio County, WV

  19. Artificial Rock Climbing Walls--Innovative Adventure Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attarian, Aram

    1989-01-01

    The history, advantages, and disadvantages of artificial rock climbing walls (used to instruct individuals in the sport of rock climbing) are discussed. Additional topics include designing an artificial wall, types of walls, various uses, and risk management. (IAH)

  20. 26. NORTH TRAINING WALL, CLOSE UP VIEW OF EAST SECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. NORTH TRAINING WALL, CLOSE UP VIEW OF EAST SECTION SIDE WALL, LOW TIDE. (Panoramic view 2 of 2). - Oakland Harbor Training Walls, Mouth of Federal Channel to Inner Harbor, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  1. Wall shear stress manifolds and near wall flow topology in aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzani, Amirhossein; Gambaruto, Alberto M.; Chen, Guoning; Shadden, Shawn C.

    2015-11-01

    Transport of atherogenic and thrombogenic chemicals near the vessel wall highly influences atherosclerosis and thrombosis. The high Schmidt number of these species leads to a thin concentration boundary layer near the wall. The wall shear stress (WSS) vector field can be scaled to obtain the near wall velocity in this region, thus providing first order approximation to near wall transport. In this study, the complex blood flow in patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysms was considered. Lagrangian tracking of surface-bound tracers representing near wall species was employed to identify Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) for the WSS surface vector field. The WSS LCS matched the stable and unstable manifolds of saddle type fixed points of the time-average WSS vector field, due to the quasi-steady nature of these near wall transport processes. A WSS exposure time measure is introduced to quantify the concentration of near wall species. The effect of diffusion and normal flow on these structures is investigated. The WSS LCS highly influence the concentration of near wall species, and provide a template for near-wall transport.

  2. Disruption of hydrogen bonding between plant cell wall polymers by proteins that induce wall extension.

    PubMed Central

    McQueen-Mason, S; Cosgrove, D J

    1994-01-01

    Plant cell enlargement is controlled by the ability of the constraining cell wall to expand. This ability has been postulated to be under the control of polysaccharide hydrolases or transferases that weaken or rearrange the loadbearing polymeric networks in the wall. We recently identified a family of wall proteins, called expansins, that catalyze the extension of isolated plant cell walls. Here we report that these proteins mechanically weaken pure cellulose paper in extension assays and stress relaxation assays, without detectable cellulase activity (exo- or endo- type). Because paper derives its mechanical strength from hydrogen bonding between cellulose microfibrils, we conclude that expansins can disrupt hydrogen bonding between cellulose fibers. This conclusion is further supported by experiments in which expansin-mediated wall extension (i) was increased by 2 M urea (which should weaken hydrogen bonding between wall polymers) and (ii) was decreased by replacement of water with deuterated water, which has a stronger hydrogen bond. The temperature sensitivity of expansin-mediated wall extension suggests that units of 3 or 4 hydrogen bonds are broken by the action of expansins. In the growing cell wall, expansin action is likely to catalyze slippage between cellulose microfibrils and the polysaccharide matrix, and thereby catalyze wall stress relaxation, followed by wall surface expansion and plant cell enlargement. Images PMID:11607483

  3. Combined Visualization of Wall Thickness and Wall Shear Stress for the Evaluation of Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Glaßer, Sylvia; Lawonn, Kai; Hoffmann, Thomas; Skalej, Martin; Preim, Bernhard

    2014-12-01

    For an individual rupture risk assessment of aneurysms, the aneurysm's wall morphology and hemodynamics provide valuable information. Hemodynamic information is usually extracted via computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulation on a previously extracted 3D aneurysm surface mesh or directly measured with 4D phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging. In contrast, a noninvasive imaging technique that depicts the aneurysm wall in vivo is still not available. Our approach comprises an experiment, where intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is employed to probe a dissected saccular aneurysm phantom, which we modeled from a porcine kidney artery. Then, we extracted a 3D surface mesh to gain the vessel wall thickness and hemodynamic information from a CFD simulation. Building on this, we developed a framework that depicts the inner and outer aneurysm wall with dedicated information about local thickness via distance ribbons. For both walls, a shading is adapted such that the inner wall as well as its distance to the outer wall is always perceivable. The exploration of the wall is further improved by combining it with hemodynamic information from the CFD simulation. Hence, the visual analysis comprises a brushing and linking concept for individual highlighting of pathologic areas. Also, a surface clustering is integrated to provide an automatic division of different aneurysm parts combined with a risk score depending on wall thickness and hemodynamic information. In general, our approach can be employed for vessel visualization purposes where an inner and outer wall has to be adequately represented.

  4. Development and pathologies of the arterial wall.

    PubMed

    Seidelmann, Sara B; Lighthouse, Janet K; Greif, Daniel M

    2014-06-01

    Arteries consist of an inner single layer of endothelial cells surrounded by layers of smooth muscle and an outer adventitia. The majority of vascular developmental studies focus on the construction of endothelial networks through the process of angiogenesis. Although many devastating vascular diseases involve abnormalities in components of the smooth muscle and adventitia (i.e., the vascular wall), the morphogenesis of these layers has received relatively less attention. Here, we briefly review key elements underlying endothelial layer formation and then focus on vascular wall development, specifically on smooth muscle cell origins and differentiation, patterning of the vascular wall, and the role of extracellular matrix and adventitial progenitor cells. Finally, we discuss select human diseases characterized by marked vascular wall abnormalities. We propose that continuing to apply approaches from developmental biology to the study of vascular disease will stimulate important advancements in elucidating disease mechanism and devising novel therapeutic strategies.

  5. Radial construction of an arterial wall.

    PubMed

    Greif, Daniel M; Kumar, Maya; Lighthouse, Janet K; Hum, Justine; An, Andrew; Ding, Ling; Red-Horse, Kristy; Espinoza, F Hernan; Olson, Lorin; Offermanns, Stefan; Krasnow, Mark A

    2012-09-11

    Some of the most serious diseases involve altered size and structure of the arterial wall. Elucidating how arterial walls are built could aid understanding of these diseases, but little is known about how concentric layers of muscle cells and the outer adventitial layer are assembled and patterned around endothelial tubes. Using histochemical, clonal, and genetic analysis in mice, here we show that the pulmonary artery wall is constructed radially, from the inside out, by two separate but coordinated processes. One is sequential induction of successive cell layers from surrounding mesenchyme. The other is controlled invasion of outer layers by inner layer cells through developmentally regulated cell reorientation and radial migration. We propose that a radial signal gradient controls these processes and provide evidence that PDGF-B and at least one other signal contribute. Modulation of such radial signaling pathways may underlie vessel-specific differences and pathological changes in arterial wall size and structure.

  6. Cell Wall Assembly in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Lesage, Guillaume; Bussey, Howard

    2006-01-01

    An extracellular matrix composed of a layered meshwork of β-glucans, chitin, and mannoproteins encapsulates cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This organelle determines cellular morphology and plays a critical role in maintaining cell integrity during cell growth and division, under stress conditions, upon cell fusion in mating, and in the durable ascospore cell wall. Here we assess recent progress in understanding the molecular biology and biochemistry of cell wall synthesis and its remodeling in S. cerevisiae. We then review the regulatory dynamics of cell wall assembly, an area where functional genomics offers new insights into the integration of cell wall growth and morphogenesis with a polarized secretory system that is under cell cycle and cell type program controls. PMID:16760306

  7. Cell wall remodeling under abiotic stress

    PubMed Central

    Tenhaken, Raimund

    2015-01-01

    Plants exposed to abiotic stress respond to unfavorable conditions on multiple levels. One challenge under drought stress is to reduce shoot growth while maintaining root growth, a process requiring differential cell wall synthesis and remodeling. Key players in this process are the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and peroxidases, which initially cross-link phenolic compounds and glycoproteins of the cell walls causing stiffening. The function of ROS shifts after having converted all the peroxidase substrates in the cell wall. If ROS-levels remain high during prolonged stress, OH°-radicals are formed which lead to polymer cleavage. In concert with xyloglucan modifying enzymes and expansins, the resulting cell wall loosening allows further growth of stressed organs. PMID:25709610

  8. Wall Paint Exposure Assessment Model (WPEM)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WPEM uses mathematical models developed from small chamber data to estimate the emissions of chemicals from oil-based (alkyd) and latex wall paint which is then combined with detailed use, workload and occupancy data to estimate user exposure.

  9. Axions from cosmic string and wall decay

    SciTech Connect

    Hagmann, C A

    2010-03-10

    If inflation occurred with a reheat temperature > T{sub PQ}, axions from the decay of global axion strings and domain walls would make an important contribution to the cosmological energy density, comparable to that from vacuum misalignment. Several groups have numerically studied the evolution of axion strings and walls in the past, however substantial uncertainties remain in their contribution to the present density {Omega}{sub a,string+wall} {approx} 1-100 (f{sub a}/10{sup 12} GeV){sup 7/6}, where f{sub a} is the axion decay constant. I will describe the numerical methods used in our simulations and show results for several string and wall configurations.

  10. Domain wall magneto-Seebeck effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzysteczko, Patryk; Hu, Xiukun; Liebing, Niklas; Sievers, Sibylle; Schumacher, Hans W.

    2015-10-01

    The interplay between charge, spin, and heat currents in magnetic nanostructures subjected to a temperature gradient has led to a variety of novel effects and promising applications studied in the fast-growing field of spin caloritronics. Here, we explore the magnetothermoelectrical properties of an individual magnetic domain wall in a permalloy nanowire. In thermal gradients of the order of few K /μ m along the long wire axis, we find a clear magneto-Seebeck signature due to the presence of a single domain wall. The observed domain wall magneto-Seebeck effect can be explained by the magnetization-dependent Seebeck coefficient of permalloy in combination with the local spin configuration of the domain wall.

  11. Wall System Saves Initial HVAC Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modern Schools, 1976

    1976-01-01

    The superior insulating characteristics of an exterior wall system has enabled a Massachusetts school district to realize a savings on electric heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems. (Author/MLF)

  12. On thick domain walls in general relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, Guenter; Noetzold, Dirk

    1989-01-01

    Planar scalar field configurations in general relativity differ considerably from those in flat space. It is shown that static domain walls of finite thickness in curved space-time do not possess a reflection symmetry. At infinity, the space-time tends to the Taub vacuum on one side of the wall and to the Minkowski vacuum (Rindler space-time) on the other. Massive test particles are always accelerated towards the Minkowski side, i.e., domain walls are attractive on the Taub side, but repulsive on the Minkowski side (Taub-vacuum cleaner). It is also proved that the pressure in all directions is always negative. Finally, a brief comment is made concerning the possibility of infinite, i.e., bigger than horizon size, domain walls in our universe. All of the results are independent of the form of the potential V(phi) greater than or equal to 0 of the scalar field phi.

  13. Applications of Green Walls in Urban Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virtudes, Ana; Manso, Maria

    2016-10-01

    Green walls are a choice towards achieving sustainable urban rehabilitation, due to the lack of free space in the consolidated urban fabric. Nowadays, green walls are considered to be an innovation in the fields of ecology, horticulture or buildings. Nevertheless, in the domain of urban design, they are still surprising and unexpected ideas. Thus, this research aims to reflect on green walls as a feature in urban design and rehabilitation, identifying the advantages of their utilization as an enhancement of the quality of city's image, especially in dense urban areas. It aims to demonstrate some practical applications of green walls in urban design proposals, showing model solutions and their real application in several architectural examples.

  14. Cell wall proteins: a new insight through proteomics.

    PubMed

    Jamet, Elisabeth; Canut, Hervé; Boudart, Georges; Pont-Lezica, Rafael F

    2006-01-01

    Cell wall proteins are essential constituents of plant cell walls; they are involved in modifications of cell wall components, wall structure, signaling and interactions with plasma membrane proteins at the cell surface. The application of proteomic approaches to the cell wall compartment raises important questions: are there technical problems specific to cell wall proteomics? What kinds of proteins can be found in Arabidopsis walls? Are some of them unexpected? What sort of post-translational modifications have been characterized in cell wall proteins to date? The purpose of this review is to discuss the experimental results obtained to date using proteomics, as well as some of the new questions challenging future research.

  15. Residual interference and wind tunnel wall adaption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mokry, Miroslav

    1989-01-01

    Measured flow variables near the test section boundaries, used to guide adjustments of the walls in adaptive wind tunnels, can also be used to quantify the residual interference. Because of a finite number of wall control devices (jacks, plenum compartments), the finite test section length, and the approximation character of adaptation algorithms, the unconfined flow conditions are not expected to be precisely attained even in the fully adapted stage. The procedures for the evaluation of residual wall interference are essentially the same as those used for assessing the correction in conventional, non-adaptive wind tunnels. Depending upon the number of flow variables utilized, one can speak of one- or two-variable methods; in two dimensions also of Schwarz- or Cauchy-type methods. The one-variable methods use the measured static pressure and normal velocity at the test section boundary, but do not require any model representation. This is clearly of an advantage for adaptive wall test section, which are often relatively small with respect to the test model, and for the variety of complex flows commonly encountered in wind tunnel testing. For test sections with flexible walls the normal component of velocity is given by the shape of the wall, adjusted for the displacement effect of its boundary layer. For ventilated test section walls it has to be measured by the Calspan pipes, laser Doppler velocimetry, or other appropriate techniques. The interface discontinuity method, also described, is a genuine residual interference assessment technique. It is specific to adaptive wall wind tunnels, where the computation results for the fictitious flow in the exterior of the test section are provided.

  16. Shear wall experiments and design in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y.J.; Hofmayer, C.

    1994-12-01

    This paper summarizes the results of recent survey studies on the available experimental data bases and design codes/standards for reinforced concrete (RC) shear wall structures in Japan. Information related to the seismic design of RC reactor buildings and containment structures was emphasized in the survey. The seismic requirements for concrete structures, particularly those related to shear strength design, are outlined. Detailed descriptions are presented on the development of Japanese shear wall equations, design requirements for containment structures, and ductility requirements.

  17. Cheaper Fabrication Of Tube-Wall Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bales, Daniel A.; Joyce, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Relatively inexpensive method of forming metal tubes into wall component devised. One initially selects ordinary, imprecisely dimensioned tubes having passed both pressure test and inspections for wall thickness and surface imperfections, and tubes bonded to each other in shorter, simpler procedure. Eliminates need for progressive die forming and attendant inspections after forming steps. Also applicable in fabrication of heat exchangers and other unitary assemblies of tubes.

  18. Thin Wall Cast Iron: Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Doru M. Stefanescu

    2005-07-21

    The development of thin-wall technology allows the designers of energy consuming equipment to select the most appropriate material based on cost/material properties considerations, and not solely on density. The technology developed in this research project will permit the designers working for the automotive industry to make a better informed choice between competing materials and thin wall cast iron, thus decreasing the overall cost of the automobile.

  19. Effect of shear on duct wall impedance.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M.; Rice, E.

    1973-01-01

    The solution to the equation governing the propagation of sound in a uniform shear layer is expressed in terms of parabolic cylinder functions. This result is used to develop a closed-form solution for acoustic wall impedance which accounts for both the duct liner and the presence of a boundary layer in the duct. The effective wall impedance can then be used as the boundary condition for the much simpler problem of sound propagation in uniform flow.

  20. Role of cell wall deconstructing enzymes in the proanthocyanidin-cell wall adsorption-desorption phenomena.

    PubMed

    Castro-López, Liliana del Rocío; Gómez-Plaza, Encarna; Ortega-Regules, Ana; Lozada, Daniel; Bautista-Ortín, Ana Belén

    2016-04-01

    The transference of proanthocyanidins from grapes to wine is quite low. This could be due, among other causes, to proanthocyanidins being bound to grape cell wall polysaccharides, which are present in high concentrations in the must. Therefore, the effective extraction of proanthocyanidins from grapes will depend on the ability to disrupt these associations, and, in this respect, enzymes that degrade these polysaccharides could play an important role. The main objective of this work was to test the behavior of proanthocyanidin-cell wall interactions when commercial maceration enzymes are present in the solution. The results showed that cell wall polysaccharides adsorbed a high amount of proanthocyanidins and only a limited quantity of proanthocyanidins could be desorbed from the cell walls after washing with a model solution. The presence of enzymes in the solution reduced the proanthocyanidin-cell wall interaction, probably through the elimination of pectins from the cell wall network.

  1. Changes in wall shear stresses in abdominal aortic aneurysms with increasing wall stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salsac, Anne-Virginie; Fernandez, Miguel

    2006-11-01

    During the growth of abdominal aortic aneurysms, local changes occur in the composition and structure of the diseased wall, resulting in its stiffening. A numerical simulation of the fluid structure interactions is performed in idealized models of aneurysms using a finite element method. A full coupling of the equations governing the pulsatile blood flow and the deformation of the compliant wall is undertaken. The effect of the progressive stiffening of the wall is analyzed at various stages in the growth of the aneurysm. Increasing the wall stiffness alters the distribution of wall shear stresses and leads to an increase in their magnitude. The wall compliance is shown to have a more pronounced effect on non-axisymmetric aneurysms, which sustain large displacements. The overall movement of the aneurysm models increases the three-dimensionality of the flow.

  2. Tunable inertia of chiral magnetic domain walls

    PubMed Central

    Torrejon, Jacob; Martinez, Eduardo; Hayashi, Masamitsu

    2016-01-01

    The time it takes to accelerate an object from zero to a given velocity depends on the applied force and the environment. If the force ceases, it takes exactly the same time to completely decelerate. A magnetic domain wall is a topological object that has been observed to follow this behaviour. Here we show that acceleration and deceleration times of chiral Neel walls driven by current are different in a system with low damping and moderate Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya exchange constant. The time needed to accelerate a domain wall with current via the spin Hall torque is much faster than the time it needs to decelerate once the current is turned off. The deceleration time is defined by the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya exchange constant whereas the acceleration time depends on the spin Hall torque, enabling tunable inertia of chiral domain walls. Such unique feature of chiral domain walls can be utilized to move and position domain walls with lower current, key to the development of storage class memory devices. PMID:27882932

  3. A wall interference assessment/correction system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Ching F.; Overby, Glenn; Qian, Cathy X.; Sickles, W. L.; Ulbrich, N.

    1992-01-01

    A Wall Signature method originally developed by Hackett has been selected to be adapted for the Ames 12-ft Wind Tunnel WIAC system in the project. This method uses limited measurements of the static pressure at the wall, in conjunction with the solid wall boundary condition, to determine the strength and distribution of singularities representing the test article. The singularities are used in turn for estimating blockage wall interference. The lifting interference will be treated separately by representing in a horseshoe vortex system for the model's lifting effects. The development and implementation of a working prototype will be completed, delivered and documented with a software manual. The WIAC code will be validated by conducting numerically simulated experiments rather than actual wind tunnel experiments. The simulations will be used to generate both free-air and confined wind-tunnel flow fields for each of the test articles over a range of test configurations. Specifically, the pressure signature at the test section wall will be computed for the tunnel case to provide the simulated 'measured' data. These data will serve as the input for the WIAC method--Wall Signature method. The performance of the WIAC method then may be evaluated by comparing the corrected data with those of the free-air simulation.

  4. Robust ferromagnetism carried by antiferromagnetic domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Hishiro T.; Yamaura, Jun-Ichi; Hiroi, Zenji

    2017-02-01

    Ferroic materials, such as ferromagnetic or ferroelectric materials, have been utilized as recording media for memory devices. A recent trend for downsizing, however, requires an alternative, because ferroic orders tend to become unstable for miniaturization. The domain wall nanoelectronics is a new developing direction for next-generation devices, in which atomic domain walls, rather than conventional, large domains themselves, are the active elements. Here we show that atomically thin magnetic domain walls generated in the antiferromagnetic insulator Cd2Os2O7 carry unusual ferromagnetic moments perpendicular to the wall as well as electron conductivity: the ferromagnetic moments are easily polarized even by a tiny field of 1 mT at high temperature, while, once cooled down, they are surprisingly robust even in an inverse magnetic field of 7 T. Thus, the magnetic domain walls could serve as a new-type of microscopic, switchable and electrically readable magnetic medium which is potentially important for future applications in the domain wall nanoelectronics.

  5. Tunable inertia of chiral magnetic domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrejon, Jacob; Martinez, Eduardo; Hayashi, Masamitsu

    2016-11-01

    The time it takes to accelerate an object from zero to a given velocity depends on the applied force and the environment. If the force ceases, it takes exactly the same time to completely decelerate. A magnetic domain wall is a topological object that has been observed to follow this behaviour. Here we show that acceleration and deceleration times of chiral Neel walls driven by current are different in a system with low damping and moderate Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya exchange constant. The time needed to accelerate a domain wall with current via the spin Hall torque is much faster than the time it needs to decelerate once the current is turned off. The deceleration time is defined by the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya exchange constant whereas the acceleration time depends on the spin Hall torque, enabling tunable inertia of chiral domain walls. Such unique feature of chiral domain walls can be utilized to move and position domain walls with lower current, key to the development of storage class memory devices.

  6. Tunable inertia of chiral magnetic domain walls.

    PubMed

    Torrejon, Jacob; Martinez, Eduardo; Hayashi, Masamitsu

    2016-11-24

    The time it takes to accelerate an object from zero to a given velocity depends on the applied force and the environment. If the force ceases, it takes exactly the same time to completely decelerate. A magnetic domain wall is a topological object that has been observed to follow this behaviour. Here we show that acceleration and deceleration times of chiral Neel walls driven by current are different in a system with low damping and moderate Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya exchange constant. The time needed to accelerate a domain wall with current via the spin Hall torque is much faster than the time it needs to decelerate once the current is turned off. The deceleration time is defined by the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya exchange constant whereas the acceleration time depends on the spin Hall torque, enabling tunable inertia of chiral domain walls. Such unique feature of chiral domain walls can be utilized to move and position domain walls with lower current, key to the development of storage class memory devices.

  7. From soft walls to infrared branes

    SciTech Connect

    Gersdorff, Gero von

    2010-10-15

    Five-dimensional warped spaces with soft walls are generalizations of the standard Randall-Sundrum compactifications, where instead of an infrared brane one has a curvature singularity (with vanishing warp factor) at finite proper distance in the bulk. We project the physics near the singularity onto a hypersurface located a small distance away from it in the bulk. This results in a completely equivalent description of the soft wall in terms of an effective infrared brane, hiding any singular point. We perform explicitly this calculation for two classes of soft wall backgrounds used in the literature. The procedure has several advantages. It separates in a clean way the physics of the soft wall from the physics of the five-dimensional bulk, facilitating a more direct comparison with standard two-brane warped compactifications. Moreover, consistent soft walls show a sort of universal behavior near the singularity which is reflected in the effective brane Lagrangian. Thirdly, for many purposes, a good approximation is obtained by assuming the bulk background away from the singularity to be the usual Randall-Sundrum metric, thus making the soft wall backgrounds better analytically tractable. We check the validity of this procedure by calculating the spectrum of bulk fields and comparing it to the exact result, finding very good agreement.

  8. Wall shear stress in collapsed tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naili, S.; Ribreau, C.

    1999-01-01

    A small flexural wall rigidity brings unique features to cross-sectional shapes and blood flow within veins, which are characterised by a non-uniform hemodynamical environment acting upon endothelial cells. Velocity fields and related wall shear stress were numerically determined for a large number of conditions, assuming a fully developed, steady, incompressible laminar flow through an uniform smooth pipe with a constant cross-section. It was shown that the flatness greatly influences the resulting distribution of the wall shear stresses along the lumen perimeter. For instance, under a steady longitudinal pressure gradient at about 500 Pascal per meter inside a constant oval-shaped tube, with a lumen perimeter of the order of 5 × 10^{-2} meter, the maximum wall shear stress is found at about 2 Pascal where the local curvature is minimal. On the other hand, the minimal wall shear stress of the order of 1 Pascal is found where the local curvature is maximal. Clear indications have been reported showing that the hemodynamical wall shear stress does alter endothelial cell morphology and orientation. These results are being used for developing an experimental set-up in order to locally map out the characteristic shear stresses looking for endothelial shape modifications whenever a viscous fluid flow is applied.

  9. Robust ferromagnetism carried by antiferromagnetic domain walls

    PubMed Central

    Hirose, Hishiro T.; Yamaura, Jun-ichi; Hiroi, Zenji

    2017-01-01

    Ferroic materials, such as ferromagnetic or ferroelectric materials, have been utilized as recording media for memory devices. A recent trend for downsizing, however, requires an alternative, because ferroic orders tend to become unstable for miniaturization. The domain wall nanoelectronics is a new developing direction for next-generation devices, in which atomic domain walls, rather than conventional, large domains themselves, are the active elements. Here we show that atomically thin magnetic domain walls generated in the antiferromagnetic insulator Cd2Os2O7 carry unusual ferromagnetic moments perpendicular to the wall as well as electron conductivity: the ferromagnetic moments are easily polarized even by a tiny field of 1 mT at high temperature, while, once cooled down, they are surprisingly robust even in an inverse magnetic field of 7 T. Thus, the magnetic domain walls could serve as a new-type of microscopic, switchable and electrically readable magnetic medium which is potentially important for future applications in the domain wall nanoelectronics. PMID:28195565

  10. Robust ferromagnetism carried by antiferromagnetic domain walls.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Hishiro T; Yamaura, Jun-Ichi; Hiroi, Zenji

    2017-02-14

    Ferroic materials, such as ferromagnetic or ferroelectric materials, have been utilized as recording media for memory devices. A recent trend for downsizing, however, requires an alternative, because ferroic orders tend to become unstable for miniaturization. The domain wall nanoelectronics is a new developing direction for next-generation devices, in which atomic domain walls, rather than conventional, large domains themselves, are the active elements. Here we show that atomically thin magnetic domain walls generated in the antiferromagnetic insulator Cd2Os2O7 carry unusual ferromagnetic moments perpendicular to the wall as well as electron conductivity: the ferromagnetic moments are easily polarized even by a tiny field of 1 mT at high temperature, while, once cooled down, they are surprisingly robust even in an inverse magnetic field of 7 T. Thus, the magnetic domain walls could serve as a new-type of microscopic, switchable and electrically readable magnetic medium which is potentially important for future applications in the domain wall nanoelectronics.

  11. Antipyretic studies on some indigenous Pakistani medicinal plants: II.

    PubMed

    Ikram, M; Khattak, S G; Gilani, S N

    1987-01-01

    Eight Pakistani medicinal plants were investigated for antipyretic activity in rabbits receiving subcutaneous yeast injections. Hexane- and chloroform-soluble extracts of Aconitum napellus stems, Corchorus depressus whole plant and Gmelina asiatica roots exhibited prominent oral antipyretic activity while insignificant antipyretic effects were found in the hexane- and chloroform-soluble portions of Melia azadirachta seeds, Tinospora cordifolia stems and Vitex trifolia seeds. No antipyretic actions whatsoever were produced by extracts of A. heterophyllum roots and Hedysarum alhagi aerial parts. Toxicity studies revealed no noteworthy toxic or adverse effects for any of the above plant extracts up to the highest oral doses of 1.6 g/kg except in the case of A. napellus.

  12. The experimental verification of wall movement influence coefficients for an adaptive walled test section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, G.

    1988-01-01

    Flexible walled wind tunnels have for some time been used to reduce wall interference effects at the model. A necessary part of the 3-D wall adjustment strategy being developed for the Transonic Self-Streamlining Wind Tunnel (TSWT) of Southampton University is the use of influence coefficients. The influence of a wall bump on the centerline flow in TSWT has been calculated theoretically using a streamline curvature program. This report details the experimental verification of these influence coefficients and concludes that it is valid to use the theoretically determined values in 3-D model testing.

  13. Adaptive wall technology for minimization of wall interferences in transonic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, Stephen W. D.

    1988-01-01

    Modern experimental techniques to improve free air simulations in transonic wind tunnels by use of adaptive wall technology are reviewed. Considered are the significant advantages of adaptive wall testing techniques with respect to wall interferences, Reynolds number, tunnel drive power, and flow quality. The application of these testing techniques relies on making the test section boundaries adjustable and using a rapid wall adjustment procedure. A historical overview shows how the disjointed development of these testing techniques, since 1938, is closely linked to available computer support. An overview of Adaptive Wall Test Section (AWTS) designs shows a preference for use of relatively simple designs with solid adaptive walls in 2- and 3-D testing. Operational aspects of AWTS's are discussed with regard to production type operation where adaptive wall adjustments need to be quick. Both 2- and 3-D data are presented to illustrate the quality of AWTS data over the transonic speed range. Adaptive wall technology is available for general use in 2-D testing, even in cryogenic wind tunnels. In 3-D testing, more refinement of the adaptive wall testing techniques is required before more widespread use can be planned.

  14. Noninvasive Stiffness Sensing of Ventricular Wall Based on a Thick-walled Cylinder Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashimori, Mitsuru; Ojio, Takeshi; Takeda, Yasuharu; Sakata, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Kaneko, Makoto

    This paper discusses a concept of a noninvasive sensing method that can estimate a left ventricular wall stiffness towards a medical diagnosis. Focusing on not only the strain of ventricular wall but also the displacements of epicardium during diastole of heart beat, we propose an index of ventricular wall stiffness based on a thick-walled cylinder model. Applying the proposed method to the echocardiography, we show statistical results where normal and HFpEF (Heart Failure with preserved Ejection Fraction) can be separated towards a medical diagnosis.

  15. Wall teichoic acids prevent antibody binding to epitopes within the cell wall of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Samir; Kim, Taehan; Lester, Evan; Deep, Deeksha; Spiegel, David A

    2016-01-15

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive bacterial pathogen that produces a range of infections including cellulitis, pneumonia, and septicemia. The principle mechanism in antistaphylococcal host defense is opsonization with antibodies and complement proteins, followed by phagocytic clearance. Here we use a previously developed technique for installing chemical epitopes in the peptidoglycan cell wall to show that surface glycopolymers known as wall teichoic acids conceal cell wall epitopes, preventing their recognition and opsonization by antibodies. Thus, our results reveal a previously unrecognized immunoevasive role for wall teichoic acids in S. aureus: repulsion of peptidoglycan-targeted antibodies.

  16. Structural domain walls in polar hexagonal manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, Yu

    2014-03-01

    The domain structure in the multiferroic hexagonal manganites is currently intensely investigated, motivated by the observation of intriguing sixfold topological defects at their meeting points [Choi, T. et al,. Nature Mater. 9, 253 (2010).] and nanoscale electrical conductivity at the domain walls [Wu, W. et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 077203 (2012).; Meier, D. et al., Nature Mater. 11, 284 (2012).], as well as reports of coupling between ferroelectricity, magnetism and structural antiphase domains [Geng, Y. et al., Nano Lett. 12, 6055 (2012).]. The detailed structure of the domain walls, as well as the origin of such couplings, however, was previously not fully understood. In the present study, we have used first-principles density functional theory to calculate the structure and properties of the low-energy structural domain walls in the hexagonal manganites [Kumagai, Y. and Spaldin, N. A., Nature Commun. 4, 1540 (2013).]. We find that the lowest energy domain walls are atomically sharp, with {210}orientation, explaining the orientation of recently observed stripe domains and suggesting their topological protection [Chae, S. C. et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 167603 (2012).]. We also explain why ferroelectric domain walls are always simultaneously antiphase walls, propose a mechanism for ferroelectric switching through domain-wall motion, and suggest an atomistic structure for the cores of the sixfold topological defects. This work was supported by ETH Zurich, the European Research Council FP7 Advanced Grants program me (grant number 291151), the JSPS Postdoctoral Fellowships for Research Abroad, and the MEXT Elements Strategy Initiative to Form Core Research Center TIES.

  17. Crystal Melting and Wall Crossing Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Masahito

    2010-02-01

    This paper summarizes recent developments in the theory of Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) state counting and the wall crossing phenomena, emphasizing in particular the role of the statistical mechanical model of crystal melting. This paper is divided into two parts, which are closely related to each other. In the first part, we discuss the statistical mechanical model of crystal melting counting BPS states. Each of the BPS state contributing to the BPS index is in one-to-one correspondence with a configuration of a molten crystal, and the statistical partition function of the melting crystal gives the BPS partition function. We also show that smooth geometry of the Calabi-Yau manifold emerges in the thermodynamic limit of the crystal. This suggests a remarkable interpretation that an atom in the crystal is a discretization of the classical geometry, giving an important clue as to the geometry at the Planck scale.In the second part we discuss the wall crossing phenomena. Wall crossing phenomena states that the BPS index depends on the value of the moduli of the Calabi-Yau manifold, and jumps along real codimension one subspaces in the moduli space. We show that by using type IIA/M-theory duality, we can provide a simple and an intuitive derivation of the wall crossing phenomena, furthermore clarifying the connection with the topological string theory. This derivation is consistent with another derivation from the wall crossing formula, motivated by multi-centered BPS extremal black holes. We also explain the representation of the wall crossing phenomena in terms of crystal melting, and the generalization of the counting problem and the wall crossing to the open BPS invariants.

  18. Crystal Melting and Wall Crossing Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Masahito

    This paper summarizes recent developments in the theory of Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) state counting and the wall crossing phenomena, emphasizing in particular the role of the statistical mechanical model of crystal melting. This paper is divided into two parts, which are closely related to each other. In the first part, we discuss the statistical mechanical model of crystal melting counting BPS states. Each of the BPS states contributing to the BPS index is in one-to-one correspondence with a configuration of a molten crystal, and the statistical partition function of the melting crystal gives the BPS partition function. We also show that smooth geometry of the Calabi-Yau manifold emerges in the thermodynamic limit of the crystal. This suggests a remarkable interpretation that an atom in the crystal is a discretization of the classical geometry, giving an important clue as such to the geometry at the Planck scale. In the second part, we discuss the wall crossing phenomena. Wall crossing phenomena states that the BPS index depends on the value of the moduli of the Calabi-Yau manifold, and jumps along real codimension one subspaces in the moduli space. We show that by using type IIA/M-theory duality, we can provide a simple and an intuitive derivation of the wall crossing phenomena, furthermore clarifying the connection with the topological string theory. This derivation is consistent with another derivation from the wall crossing formula, motivated by multicentered BPS extremal black holes. We also explain the representation of the wall crossing phenomena in terms of crystal melting, and the generalization of the counting problem and the wall crossing to the open BPS invariants.

  19. Moving Towards Domain Wall Devices in Ferroics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, Marty

    Domain walls in ferroelectric, ferroelastic and multiferroic oxides are distinct functional materials in their own right. They can be conducting, or even superconducting, when surrounding domains are insulating; they can demonstrate magnetism when the surrounding bulk is non-magnetic and they can contain ordered electrical dipoles when the matrix containing them is non-polar. Since domain walls can also be created, destroyed, and controllably moved from place to place, there is an amazing opportunity for us to design new forms of devices in which functionality is actively and dynamically deployed (now you see it; now you don't). This is the essence of the emerging field known as ``domain wall nanoelectronics''. In time, this arena of research could change the way we think of nanoscale functional devices, moving increasingly towards agile circuitry and neuromorphic device architectures. While the control of domain wall injection, movement and annihilation has been developed rather well in the nanomagnetics community (in race-track and domain wall logic research), similar research has not been widely performed in nanoscale ferroelectrics, ferroelastics and multiferroics. This talk will discuss progress that has been made to date and the way in which nanomagnetics research can be used as a source of inspiration. Site-specific domain wall injection and motion control in both proper and improper ferroelectrics using inhomogeneous electric and elastic fields, as well as dielectric patterning in uniaxial ferroelectrics, will be specifically considered. As will be shown, sufficient control has been developed to allow the creation of a diode for domain wall motion in ferroelectrics, for example. The author acknowledges support from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

  20. Further reduction of near-wall resolution for wall-modeled LES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Alexandre; Wang, Qiqi; Larsson, Johan; Laskowski, Gregory; Bose, Sanjeeb

    2016-11-01

    One of the greatest challenges to the use of Large Eddy Simulations (LES) in engineering applications is the large number of grid points required near walls. To mitigate this issue, LES is often coupled with a model of the flow close to the wall, known as wall model. One feature common to most wall models is that the first few (about 3) grid points must be located below the inviscid log-layer (y / δ <= 0 . 2), and the grid must have near isotropic resolution near the wall. Hence, wall-modeled LES may still require a large number of grid points, both in the wall-normal and span-wise directions. Because of these requirements, wall-modeled LES still is unfeasible in many applications. We present a new formulation of wall-modeled LES that is being developed to address this issue. In this formulation, LES is used to solve only for the features of the velocity field that can be adequately represented on the LES grid. The effects of the unresolved features are captured by imposing a balance of momentum integrated in the wall-normal direction. This integral momentum balance translates into a dynamic PDE defined on the walls, which is coupled to the LES equations. We discuss details of the new formulation and present results obtained in laminar and turbulent channel flows. This work was partially supported by the Center of Turbulence Research at Stanford University, and by the U.S. Department of Energy under Award Number DE-SC-0011089.

  1. 17. DETAIL OF INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR WALL CONSTRUCTION, VIEW TOWARD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. DETAIL OF INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR WALL CONSTRUCTION, VIEW TOWARD NORTHEAST CORNER, THIRD BAY Showing insulated exterior wall at right; asphalt felt on interior separation wall at left; sill beam, stud, and concrete foundation detailing of interior wall. - U.S. Military Academy, Ice House, Mills Road at Howze Place, West Point, Orange County, NY

  2. Enhancement of a Sunspot Light Wall with External Disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shuhong; Zhang, Jun; Erdélyi, Robert

    2016-12-01

    Based on the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph observations, we study the response of a solar sunspot light wall to external disturbances. A flare occurrence near the light wall caused material to erupt from the lower solar atmosphere into the corona. Some material falls back to the solar surface and hits the light bridge (i.e., the base of the light wall), then sudden brightenings appear at the wall base followed by the rise of wall top, leading to an increase of the wall height. Once the brightness of the wall base fades, the height of the light wall begins to decrease. Five hours later, another nearby flare takes place, and a bright channel is formed that extends from the flare toward the light bridge. Although no obvious material flow along the bright channel is found, some ejected material is conjectured to reach the light bridge. Subsequently, the wall base brightens and the wall height begins to increase again. Once more, when the brightness of the wall base decays, the wall top fluctuates to lower heights. We suggest, based on the observed cases, that the interaction of falling material and ejected flare material with the light wall results in the brightenings of wall base and causes the height of the light wall to increase. Our results reveal that the light wall can be not only powered by the linkage of p-mode from below the photosphere, but may also be enhanced by external disturbances, such as falling material.

  3. Modes of deformation of walled cells.

    PubMed

    Dumais, Jacques

    2013-11-01

    The bewildering morphological diversity found in cells is one of the starkest illustrations of life's ability to self-organize. Yet the morphogenetic mechanisms that produce the multifarious shapes of cells are still poorly understood. The shared similarities between the walled cells of prokaryotes, many protists, fungi, and plants make these groups particularly appealing to begin investigating how morphological diversity is generated at the cell level. In this review, I attempt a first classification of the different modes of surface deformation used by walled cells. Five modes of deformation were identified: inextensional bending, equi-area shear, elastic stretching, processive intussusception, and chemorheological growth. The two most restrictive modes-inextensional and equi-area deformations-are embodied in the exine of pollen grains and the wall-like pellicle of euglenoids, respectively. For these modes, it is possible to express the deformed geometry of the cell explicitly in terms of the undeformed geometry and other easily observable geometrical parameters. The greatest morphogenetic power is reached with the processive intussusception and chemorheological growth mechanisms that underlie the expansive growth of walled cells. A comparison of these two growth mechanisms suggests a possible way to tackle the complexity behind wall growth.

  4. Quantum properties of charged ferroelectric domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturman, B.; Podivilov, E.; Stepanov, M.; Tagantsev, A.; Setter, N.

    2015-12-01

    We consider the properties of charged domain walls in ferroelectrics as a quantum problem. This includes determination of self-consistent attracting 1D potential for compensating charge carriers, the number and positions of discrete energy levels in this potential, dependencies on the ferroelectric characteristics, as well as the spatial structure and formation energy of the wall. Our description is based on the Hartree and Thomas-Fermi methods and Landau theory for the ferroelectric transitions. Changeover from a few to many quantum levels (with the electron binding energies ˜1 eV) is controlled by a single characteristic parameter. The quantum models well describe the core of the wall, whose width is typically ˜10 nm. Additionally, the walls possess pronounced long-range tails which are due to trap recharging. For the trap concentration Nt=(1017-1018) cm-3 , the tail length ℓ is of the μ m scale. On the distances much larger than ℓ the walls are electrically uncoupled from each other and the crystal faces.

  5. Enhanced cold wall CVD reactor growth of horizontally aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Wei; Kwak, Eun-Hye; Chen, Bingan; Huang, Shirong; Edwards, Michael; Fu, Yifeng; Jeppson, Kjell; Teo, Kenneth; Jeong, Goo-Hwan; Liu, Johan

    2016-05-01

    HASynthesis of horizontally-aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (HA-SWCNTs) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) directly on quartz seems very promising for the fabrication of future nanoelectronic devices. In comparison to hot-wall CVD, synthesis of HA-SWCNTs in a cold-wall CVD chamber not only means shorter heating, cooling and growth periods, but also prevents contamination of the chamber. However, since most synthesis of HA-SWCNTs is performed in hot-wall reactors, adapting this well-established process to a cold-wall chamber becomes extremely crucial. Here, in order to transfer the CVD growth technology from a hot-wall to a cold-wall chamber, a systematic investigation has been conducted to determine the influence of process parameters on the HA-SWCNT's growth. For two reasons, the cold-wall CVD chamber was upgraded with a top heater to complement the bottom substrate heater; the first reason to maintain a more uniform temperature profile during HA-SWCNTs growth, and the second reason to preheat the precursor gas flow before projecting it onto the catalyst. Our results show that the addition of a top heater had a significant effect on the synthesis. Characterization of the CNTs shows that the average density of HA-SWCNTs is around 1 - 2 tubes/ μm with high growth quality as shown by Raman analysis. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. 32. DETAIL OF WALL SHOWN IN SD231. BEHIND WALL FRAMING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. DETAIL OF WALL SHOWN IN SD-2-31. BEHIND WALL FRAMING IS SAMPLING ROOM WITH WOOD SAMPLING ELEVATOR. CRUSHED OXIDIZED ORE BIN ON LEFT (SOUTH). - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  7. The role of wall calcium in the extension of cell walls of soybean hypocotyls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Virk, S. S.; Cleland, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    Calcium crosslinks are load-bearing bonds in soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) hypocotyl cell walls, but they are not the same load-bearing bonds that are broken during acid-mediated cell elongation. This conclusion is reached by studying the relationship between wall calcium, pH and the facilitated creep of frozen-thawed soybean hypocotyl sections. Supporting data include the following observations: 1) 2-[(2-bis-[carboxymethyl]amino-5-methylphenoxy)methyl]-6-methoxy-8-bis[car boxymethyl]aminoquinoline (Quin 2) and ethylene glycol-bis(2-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) caused only limited facilitated creep as compared with acid, despite removal of comparable or larger amounts of wall calcium; 2) the pH-response curves for calcium removal and acid-facilitated creep were different; 3) reversible acid-extension occurred even after removal of almost all wall calcium with Quin 2; and 4) growth of abraded sections did not involve a proportional loss of wall calcium. Removal of wall calcium, however, increased the capacity of the walls to undergo acid-facilitated creep. These data indicate that breakage of calcium crosslinks is not a major mechanism of cell-wall loosening in soybean hypocotyl tissues.

  8. Radial Corrugations of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Driven by Inter-Wall Nonbonding Interactions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xu; Liang, Wentao; Zhang, Sulin

    2011-12-01

    We perform large-scale quasi-continuum simulations to determine the stable cross-sectional configurations of free-standing multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). We show that at an inter-wall spacing larger than the equilibrium distance set by the inter-wall van der Waals (vdW) interactions, the initial circular cross-sections of the MWCNTs are transformed into symmetric polygonal shapes or asymmetric water-drop-like shapes. Our simulations also show that removing several innermost walls causes even more drastic cross-sectional polygonization of the MWCNTs. The predicted cross-sectional configurations agree with prior experimental observations. We attribute the radial corrugations to the compressive stresses induced by the excessive inter-wall vdW energy release of the MWCNTs. The stable cross-sectional configurations provide fundamental guidance to the design of single MWCNT-based devices and shed lights on the mechanical control of electrical properties.

  9. Stability of resistive wall modes with plasma rotation and thick wall in ITER scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L. J.; Kotschenreuther, M.; Chu, M.; Chance, M.; Turnbull, A.

    2004-11-01

    The rotation effect on resistive wall modes (RWMs) is examined for realistically shaped, high-beta tokamak equilibria, including reactor relevant cases with low mach number M and realistic thick walls. For low M, Stabilization of RWMs arises from unusually thin inertial layers. The investigation employs the newly developed adaptive eigenvalue code (AEGIS: Adaptive EiGenfunction Independent Solution), which describes both low and high n modes and is in good agreement with GATO in the benchmark studies. AEGIS is unique in using adaptive methods to resolve such inertial layers with low mach number rotation. This feature is even more desirable for transport barrier cases. Additionally, ITER and reactors have thick conducting walls ( ˜.5-1 m) which are not well modeled as a thin shell. Such thick walls are considered here, including semi-analytical approximations to account for the toroidally segmented nature of real walls.

  10. Comparison of a two-dimensional adaptive-wall technique with analytical wall interference correction techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, Raymond E.

    1992-01-01

    A two dimensional airfoil model was tested in the adaptive wall test section of the NASA Langley 0.3 meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (TCT) and in the ventilated test section of the National Aeronautical Establishment Two Dimensional High Reynold Number Facility (HRNF). The primary goal of the tests was to compare different techniques (adaptive test section walls and classical, analytical corrections) to account for wall interference. Tests were conducted over a Mach number range from 0.3 to 0.8 at chord Reynolds numbers of 10 x 10(exp 6), 15 x 10(exp 6), and 20 x 10(exp 6). The angle of attack was varied from about 12 degrees up to stall. Movement of the top and bottom test section walls was used to account for the wall interference in the HRNF tests. The test results are in good agreement.

  11. INTEGRATED ENERGY EFFICIENT WINDOW-WALL SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Arney, Ph.D.

    2002-12-31

    The building industry faces the challenge of reducing energy use while simultaneously improving construction methods and marketability. This paper describes the first phase of a project to address these concerns by designing an Integrated Window Wall System (IWWS) that can be commercialized. This work builds on previous research conducted during the 1990's by Lawrence Berkeley national Laboratories (LBNL). During this phase, the objective was to identify appropriate technologies, problems and issues and develop a number of design concepts. Four design concepts were developed into prototypes and preliminary energy analyses were conducted Three of these concepts (the foam wall, steel wall, and stiffened plate designs) showed particular potential for meeting the project objectives and will be continued into a second phase where one or two of the systems will be brought closer to commercialization.

  12. Anomalous feedback and negative domain wall resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ran; Zhu, Jian-Gang; Xiao, Di

    2016-11-01

    Magnetic induction can be regarded as a negative feedback effect, where the motive-force opposes the change of magnetic flux that generates the motive-force. In artificial electromagnetics emerging from spintronics, however, this is not necessarily the case. By studying the current-induced domain wall dynamics in a cylindrical nanowire, we show that the spin motive-force exerting on electrons can either oppose or support the applied current that drives the domain wall. The switching into the anomalous feedback regime occurs when the strength of the dissipative torque β is about twice the value of the Gilbert damping constant α. The anomalous feedback manifests as a negative domain wall resistance, which has an analogy with the water turbine.

  13. Tunable resistivity of individual magnetic domain walls.

    PubMed

    Franken, J H; Hoeijmakers, M; Swagten, H J M; Koopmans, B

    2012-01-20

    Despite the relevance of current-induced magnetic domain wall (DW) motion for new spintronics applications, the exact details of the current-domain wall interaction are not yet understood. A property intimately related to this interaction is the intrinsic DW resistivity. Here, we investigate experimentally how the resistivity inside a DW depends on the wall width Δ, which is tuned using focused ion beam irradiation of Pt/Co/Pt strips. We observe the nucleation of individual DWs with Kerr microscopy, and measure resistance changes in real time. A 1/Δ(2) dependence of DW resistivity is found, compatible with Levy-Zhang theory. Also quantitative agreement with theory is found by taking full account of the current flowing through each individual layer inside the multilayer stack.

  14. Sequential buckling of an elastic wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bico, Jose; Bense, Hadrien; Keiser, Ludovic; Roman, Benoit; Melo, Francisco; Abkarian, Manouk

    A beam under quasistatic compression classically buckles beyond a critical threshold. In the case of a free beam, the lowest buckling mode is selected. We investigate the case of a long ``wall'' grounded of a compliant base and compressed in the axial compression. In the case of a wall of slender rectangular cross section, the selected buckling mode adopts a nearly fixed wavelength proportional to the height of the wall. Higher compressive loads only increase the amplitude of the buckle. However if the cross section has a sharp shape (such as an Eiffel tower profile), we observe successive buckling modes of increasing wavelength. We interpret this unusual evolution in terms of scaling arguments. At small scales, this variable periodicity might be used to develop tunable optical devices. We thank ECOS C12E07, CNRS-CONICYT, and Fondecyt Grant No. N1130922 for partially funding this work.

  15. Analysis of a dusty wall jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Hock-Bin; Roberts, Leonard

    1991-01-01

    An analysis is given for the entrainment of dust into a turbulent radial wall jet. Equations are solved based on incompressible flow of a radial wall jet into which dust is entrained from the wall and transported by turbulent diffusion and convection throughout the flow. It is shown that the resulting concentration of dust particles in the flow depends on the difference between the applied shear stress at the surface and the maximum level of shear stress that the surface can withstand (varies as rho(sub d)a(sub g)D) i.e., the pressure due to the weight of a single layer of dust. The analysis is expected to have application to the downflow that results from helicopter and VTOL aircraft.

  16. Turbine airfoil with a compliant outer wall

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Christian X [Oviedo, FL; Morrison, Jay A [Oviedo, FL

    2012-04-03

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine with a cooling system and a compliant dual wall configuration configured to enable thermal expansion between inner and outer layers while eliminating stress formation in the outer layer is disclosed. The compliant dual wall configuration may be formed a dual wall formed from inner and outer layers separated by a support structure. The outer layer may be a compliant layer configured such that the outer layer may thermally expand and thereby reduce the stress within the outer layer. The outer layer may be formed from a nonplanar surface configured to thermally expand. In another embodiment, the outer layer may be planar and include a plurality of slots enabling unrestricted thermal expansion in a direction aligned with the outer layer.

  17. Wall thickness measuring method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Salzer, Leander J.; Bergren, Donald A.

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the wall thickness of a nonmagnetic article having a housing supporting a magnet and a contiguous supporting surface. The tubular article and the housing are releasably secured to the supporting surface and a support member of an optical comparator, respectively. To determine the wall thickness of the article at a selected point, a magnetically responsive ball is positioned within the tubular article over said point and retained therein by means of a magnetic field produced by the magnet. Thereafter, an optical comparator is employed to project a magnified image of the ball on a screen and the wall thickness at the selected point is calculated by using a ball surface measurement taken with the comparator in conjunction with a previously determined base line measurement.

  18. Bubble Impact with a Solid Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Vishrut; Thete, Sumeet; Basaran, Osman

    2016-11-01

    In diverse natural and industrial processes, and in particular in process equipment widely used in oil and gas production, bubbles and drops that are immersed in a continuous liquid phase frequently collide with solid walls. In this talk, the impact with a solid wall of a gas bubble that is surrounded by a liquid that is either a Newtonian or a non-Newtonian fluid is analyzed by numerical simulation. Special attention is paid to the thin film that forms between the approaching bubble and the solid wall. Flow regimes that arise as the film thickness decreases are scrutinized and rationalized by comparison of the computational predictions to well-known and new analytical results from lubrication theory based thin film literature. Finally, flow transitions that occur as the lubrication theory breaks down and inertia becomes significant are investigated.

  19. Prephonatory chest wall posturing in stutterers.

    PubMed

    Baken, R J; McManus, D A; Cavallo, S A

    1983-09-01

    The possibility that prephonatory chest wall posturing is abnormal in stutterers was explored by observing rib cage and abdominal hemicircumference changes during the interval between the presentation of a stimulus and the production of/alpha/by a group of stutterers (N = 5). It was found that the patterns of chest wall adjustment for phonation were qualitatively identical in the stutterers and in a comparable group of normal men studied previously. There was, however, a significant difference in the way in which lung volume changed during the execution of the chest wall adjustment. This was considered to be indicative of delayed glottal closure among the stutterers rather than representative of a primary ventilatory disturbance.

  20. Translational Response of Toe-Restrained Retaining Walls to Earthquake Ground Motions Using CorpsWallSlip (CWSlip)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    invert spillway slab (not shown). The translation of the structural wedge is assumed to occur during earthquake shaking. A drop down box entitled...e.g., navigation walls retaining earth, spillway chute walls, spill- way discharge channel walls, approach channel walls to outlet works structures...1.5 Axial load capacity of spillway invert slabs..................................................................... 27 1.6 Background and research

  1. Wood Pulp Digetster Wall Corrosion Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Giles, GE

    2003-09-18

    The modeling of the flow in a wood pulp digester is but one component of the investigation of the corrosion of digesters. This report describes the development of a Near-Wall-Model (NWM) that is intended to couple with a CFD model that determines the flow, heat, and chemical species transport and reaction within the bulk flow of a digester. Lubrication theory approximations were chosen from which to develop a model that could determine the flow conditions within a thin layer near the vessel wall using information from the interior conditions provided by a CFD calculation of the complete digester. The other conditions will be determined by coupled solutions of the wood chip, heat, and chemical species transport and chemical reactions. The NWM was to couple with a digester performance code in an iterative fashion to provide more detailed information about the conditions within the NW region. Process Simulations, Ltd (PSL) is developing the digester performance code. This more detailed (and perhaps more accurate) information from the NWM was to provide an estimate of the conditions that could aggravate the corrosion at the wall. It is intended that this combined tool (NWM-PSL) could be used to understand conditions at/near the wall in order to develop methods to reduce the corrosion. However, development and testing of the NWM flow model took longer than anticipated and the other developments (energy and species transport, chemical reactions and linking with the PSL code) were not completed. The development and testing of the NWM are described in this report. In addition, the investigation of the potential effects of a clear layer (layer reduced in concentration of wood chips) near the wall is reported in Appendix D. The existence of a clear layer was found to enhance the flow near the wall.

  2. Enhancement of wall jet transport properties

    DOEpatents

    Claunch, S.D.; Farrington, R.B.

    1997-02-04

    By enhancing the natural instabilities in the boundary layer and in the free shear layer of a wall jet, the boundary is minimized thereby increasing the transport of heat and mass. Enhancing the natural instabilities is accomplished by pulsing the flow of air that creates the wall jet. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct. 17 figs.

  3. Enhancement of wall jet transport properties

    DOEpatents

    Claunch, Scott D.; Farrington, Robert B.

    1997-01-01

    By enhancing the natural instabilities in the boundary layer and in the free shear layer of a wall jet, the boundary is minimized thereby increasing the transport of heat and mass. Enhancing the natural instabilities is accomplished by pulsing the flow of air that creates the wall jet. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct.

  4. Scaling properties of multitension domain wall networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, M. F.; Martins, C. J. A. P.

    2015-02-01

    We study the asymptotic scaling properties of domain wall networks with three different tensions in various cosmological epochs. We discuss the conditions under which a scale-invariant evolution of the network (which is well established for simpler walls) still applies and also consider the limiting case where defects are locally planar and the curvature is concentrated in the junctions. We present detailed quantitative predictions for scaling densities in various contexts, which should be testable by means of future high-resolution numerical simulations.

  5. Wall reflection of a viscous vortex ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sa, J. Y.; Chang, K. S.; Liu, C. H.

    1986-01-01

    The behavior of a viscous axisymmetric vortex ring being reflected from a wall is investigated. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations formulated in terms of the vorticity function and vector potential are numerically integrated by implicit finite difference methods. To specify the vector potential at a far boundary from the wall, the existing integral method used so far only for an unbounded domain is modified by a kind of image method. The trajectory of the vortex ring calcualted as a result closely resembles that observable from the experiment.

  6. Autolysis and extension of isolated walls from growing cucumber hypocotyls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.; Durachko, D. M.

    1994-01-01

    Walls isolated from cucumber hypocotyls retain autolytic activities and the ability to extend when placed under the appropriate conditions. To test whether autolysis and extension are related, we treated the walls in various ways to enhance or inhibit long-term wall extension ('creep') and measured autolysis as release of various saccharides from the wall. Except for some non-specific inhibitors of enzymatic activity, we found no correlation between wall extension and wall autolysis. Most notably, autolysis and extension differed strongly in their pH dependence. We also found that exogenous cellulases and pectinases enhanced extension in native walls, but when applied to walls previously inactivated with heat or protease these enzymes caused breakage without sustained extension. In contrast, pretreatment of walls with pectinase or cellulase, followed by boiling in methanol to inactivate the enzymes, resulted in walls with much stronger expansin-mediated extension responses. Crude protein preparations from the digestive tracts of snails enhanced extension of both native and inactivated walls, and these preparations contained expansin-like proteins (assessed by Western blotting). Our results indicate that the extension of isolated cucumber walls does not depend directly on the activity of endogenous wall-bound autolytic enzymes. The results with exogenous enzymes suggest that the hydrolysis of matrix polysaccharides may not induce wall creep by itself, but may act synergistically with expansins to enhance wall extension.

  7. Stabilization of the Resistive Wall Mode and Error Field Reduction by a Rotating Conducting Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz-Soldan, Carlos

    2011-10-01

    The hypothesis that the Resistive Wall Mode (RWM) can be stabilized by high-speed differentially-rotating conducting walls is tested in a linear device. This geometry allows the use of cylindrical solid metal walls, whereas a torus would require a flowing liquid metal. Experiments over the past year have for the first time explored RWM stability with a rotating copper wall capable of achieving speeds (rΩw) of up to 280 km/h, equivalent to a magnetic Reynolds number (Rm) of 5. The main results are: 1) Wall rotation increases the stability window of the RWM, allowing ~ 25% more plasma current (Ip) at Rm = 5 while maintaining MHD stability. 2) Error field reduction below a critical value allows the observation of initial mode rotation, followed by braking, wall-locking, and subsequent faster growth. 3) Locking is found to depend on the direction of wall rotation (Ω̂w) with respect to the intrinsic plasma rotation, with locking to both the static wall (vacuum vessel) and rotating wall observed. Additionally, indirect effects on RWM stability are observed via the effect of wall rotation on device error fields. Wall rotation shields locking error fields, which reduces the braking torque and inhibits mode-locking. The linear superposition of error fields from guide field (Bz) solenoid misalignments and current-carrying leads is also shown to break symmetry in Ω̂w , with one direction causing stronger error fields and earlier locking irrespective of plasma flow. Vacuum field measurements further show that rotation decreases the error field penetration time and advects the field to a different orientation, as predicted by theory. Experiments are conducted on the Rotating Wall Machine, a 1.2 m long and 16 cm diameter screw-pinch with Bz ~ 500 G, where hollow-cathode injectors are biased to source up to 7 kA of Ip, exciting current-driven RWMs. MHD activity is measured through 120 edge Br, Bθ, Bz probes as well as internal Bdot, Langmuir and Mach probes. RWM

  8. An experimental study of near wall flow parameters in the blade end-wall corner region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhargava, Rakesh K.; Raj, Rishi S.

    1989-01-01

    The near wall flow parameters in the blade end-wall corner region is investigated. The blade end-wall corner region was simulated by mounting an airfoil section (NACA 65-015 base profile) symmetric blades on both sides of the flat plate with semi-circular leading edge. The initial 7 cm from the leading edge of the flat plate was roughened by gluing No. 4 floor sanding paper to artificially increase the boundary layer thickness on the flat plate. The initial flow conditions of the boundary layer upstream of the corner region are expected to dictate the behavior of flow inside the corner region. Therefore, an experimental investigation was extended to study the combined effect of initial roughness and increased level of free stream turbulence on the development of a 2-D turbulent boundary layer in the absence of the blade. The measurement techniques employed in the present investigation included, the conventional pitot and pitot-static probes, wall taps, the Preston tube, piezoresistive transducer and the normal sensor hot-wire probe. The pitot and pitot-static probes were used to obtain mean velocity profile measurements within the boundary layer. The measurements of mean surface static pressure were obtained with the surface static tube and the conventional wall tap method. The wall shear vector measurements were made with a specially constructed Preston tube. The flush mounted piezoresistive type pressure transducer were employed to measure the wall pressure fluctuation field. The velocity fluctuation measurements, used in obtaining the wall pressure-velocity correlation data, were made with normal single sensor hot-wire probe. At different streamwise stations, in the blade end-wall corner region, the mean values of surface static pressure varied more on the end-wall surface in the corner region were mainly caused by the changes in the curvature of the streamlines. The magnitude of the wall shear stress in the blade end-wall corner region increased significantly

  9. Cell wall proteomic of Brachypodium distachyon grains: A focus on cell wall remodeling proteins.

    PubMed

    Francin-Allami, Mathilde; Merah, Kahina; Albenne, Cécile; Rogniaux, Hélène; Pavlovic, Marija; Lollier, Virginie; Sibout, Richard; Guillon, Fabienne; Jamet, Elisabeth; Larré, Colette

    2015-07-01

    Cell walls play key roles during plant development. Following their deposition into the cell wall, polysaccharides are continually remodeled according to the growth stage and stress environment to accommodate cell growth and differentiation. To date, little is known concerning the enzymes involved in cell wall remodeling, especially in gramineous and particularly in the grain during development. Here, we investigated the cell wall proteome of the grain of Brachypodium distachyon. This plant is a suitable model for temperate cereal crops. Among the 601 proteins identified, 299 were predicted to be secreted. These proteins were distributed into eight functional classes; the class of proteins that act on carbohydrates was the most highly represented. Among these proteins, numerous glycoside hydrolases were found. Expansins and peroxidases, which are assumed to be involved in cell wall polysaccharide remodeling, were also identified. Approximately half of the proteins identified in this study were newly discovered in grain and were not identified in the previous proteome analysis conducted using the culms and leaves of B. distachyon. Therefore, the data obtained from all organs of B. distachyon infer a global cell wall proteome consisting of 460 proteins. At present, this is the most extensive cell wall proteome of a monocot species.

  10. Stepped chute training wall height requirements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stepped chutes are commonly used for overtopping protection for embankment dams. Aerated flow is commonly associated with stepped chutes if the chute has sufficient length. The aeration and turbulence of the flow can create a significant amount of splash over the training wall if not appropriately...

  11. Reproducibility of airway wall thickness measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Michael; Kuhnigk, Jan-Martin; Krass, Stefan; Owsijewitsch, Michael; de Hoop, Bartjan; Peitgen, Heinz-Otto

    2010-03-01

    Airway remodeling and accompanying changes in wall thickness are known to be a major symptom of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), associated with reduced lung function in diseased individuals. Further investigation of this disease as well as monitoring of disease progression and treatment effect demand for accurate and reproducible assessment of airway wall thickness in CT datasets. With wall thicknesses in the sub-millimeter range, this task remains challenging even with today's high resolution CT datasets. To provide accurate measurements, taking partial volume effects into account is mandatory. The Full-Width-at-Half-Maximum (FWHM) method has been shown to be inappropriate for small airways1,2 and several improved algorithms for objective quantification of airway wall thickness have been proposed.1-8 In this paper, we describe an algorithm based on a closed form solution proposed by Weinheimer et al.7 We locally estimate the lung density parameter required for the closed form solution to account for possible variations of parenchyma density between different lung regions, inspiration states and contrast agent concentrations. The general accuracy of the algorithm is evaluated using basic tubular software and hardware phantoms. Furthermore, we present results on the reproducibility of the algorithm with respect to clinical CT scans, varying reconstruction kernels, and repeated acquisitions, which is crucial for longitudinal observations.

  12. Visualizing domain wall and reverse domain superconductivity.

    PubMed

    Iavarone, M; Moore, S A; Fedor, J; Ciocys, S T; Karapetrov, G; Pearson, J; Novosad, V; Bader, S D

    2014-08-28

    In magnetically coupled, planar ferromagnet-superconductor (F/S) hybrid structures, magnetic domain walls can be used to spatially confine the superconductivity. In contrast to a superconductor in a uniform applied magnetic field, the nucleation of the superconducting order parameter in F/S structures is governed by the inhomogeneous magnetic field distribution. The interplay between the superconductivity localized at the domain walls and far from the walls leads to effects such as re-entrant superconductivity and reverse domain superconductivity with the critical temperature depending upon the location. Here we use scanning tunnelling spectroscopy to directly image the nucleation of superconductivity at the domain wall in F/S structures realized with Co-Pd multilayers and Pb thin films. Our results demonstrate that such F/S structures are attractive model systems that offer the possibility to control the strength and the location of the superconducting nucleus by applying an external magnetic field, potentially useful to guide vortices for computing application.

  13. Salmonella typhimurium abscess of the chest wall

    PubMed Central

    Tonziello, Gilda; Valentinotti, Romina; Arbore, Enrico; Cassetti, Paolo; Luzzati, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Male, 73 Final Diagnosis: Salmonella typhimurium abscess of the chest wall Symptoms: — Medication: Ciprofloxacin Clinical Procedure:— Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Non-typhoid Salmonella extra-intestinal infections usually develop in infants and in adult patients with pre-existing predisposing conditions. Blood stream infections and urinary tract infections are the most common clinical presentations, but other sites of infection may be involved as well. Case Report: We describe a case of invasive salmonellosis caused by Salmonella typhimurium involving the chest wall in a 73-year-old man. The patient had suffered from gastroenteritis followed by left basal pneumonia with pleural effusion 7 weeks before. The CT scan of the chest wall showed a pericostal abscess with shirt-stud morphology near the left last cartilaginous arch. The abscess was surgically drained and patient was cured after a 40-day ciprofloxacin treatment. Conclusions: A review of the literature on extra-intestinal non-typhoid salmonellosis shows that pleuropulmonary and soft-tissue infections are uncommon. We argue that non-typhoid Salmonella might be considered as a possible cause of chest wall abscess in individuals with recent history of gastroenteritis complicated by pneumonia and pleural effusion. PMID:24298305

  14. Genetics Home Reference: abdominal wall defect

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aug;6(4):232-6. Citation on PubMed Islam S. Clinical care outcomes in abdominal wall defects. Curr ... Site Map Customer Support Selection Criteria for Links USA.gov Copyright Privacy Accessibility FOIA Viewers & Players U.S. ...

  15. Moving wall, continuous flow electronphoresis apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Percy H. (Inventor); Snyder, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    This invention relates generally to electrophoresis devices and more particularly to a moving wall, continuous flow device in which an electrophoresis chamber is angularly positionable with respect to the direction of moving belt walls. A frame with an electrophoresis chamber is rotatably supported between two synchronously driven belt walls. This allows the chamber to be angularly positionable with respect to the direction of belt travel, which compensates for electroosmotic flow within the electrophoresis chamber. Injection of a buffer solution via an opening and a homogenous sample stream via another opening is performed at the end of a chamber, and collection of buffer and the fractionated species particles is done by a conventional collection array at an opposite end of the chamber. Belts are driven at a rate which exactly matches the flow of buffer and sample through the chamber, which entrains the buffer to behave as a rigid electrophoretic medium, eliminating flow distortions (Poiseuille effect). Additionally, belt material for each belt is stored at one end of the device and is taken up by drive wheels at an opposite end. The novelty of this invention particularly lies in the electrophoresis chamber being angularly positionable between two moving belt walls in order to compensate for electroosmotic flow. Additionally, new belt material is continuously exposed within the chamber, minimizing flow distortion due to contamination of the belt material by the sample.

  16. Gravitation toward Walls among Human Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dabbs, James M., Jr.; Wheeler, Patricia A.

    1976-01-01

    In two studies, college students (N=34) in a classroom corridor who walked near the wall ("gravitators") were contrasted with those who walked near the center ("non-gravitators"). Gravitators were lower than non-gravitators on Autonomy and Defendence and appeared to be less responsive to other persons. (Author)

  17. Tearing Down the Wall: Literature and Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westcott, Warren B.; Spell, J. Everett

    1999-01-01

    Suggests English teachers might draw from authors such as Carl Sagan, Arthur C. Clarke, Mary Shelly and others: (1) to knock down the walls that separate science and literature; (2) to show their interrelationship; and (3) to instill enthusiasm for the study of both. (NH)

  18. The Discrete Site Sticky Wall Model.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-27

    TECHNICAL REPORT #23 THE DISCRETE SITE STICKY WALL tMDEL by J.P. Badiali Laboratoire Propre No 15 de CNRS Physique des Liquides et Electrochimie Tour 22, 5e...Liquides et Electrochimie NTIS CRA&I DTIC TAB 5 Tour 22, 5e Etage, 4 Place Jussieu U’annou;.ced . J ’ tificatlo rn

  19. Seismic Design of Gravity Retaining Walls

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    approx. 12.6 inches (320 mm) high with a base width of 8.7 inches (220 mm). The model walls were made of aluminum, and additional steel plates could...foundation soil. Re = Ratio of residual displacements of 2-block models using fixed e vs. variable 0 in analysis. -9 TBF =Natural period of backfill

  20. Terahertz Conductivity of Single Walled Nanotube Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jia-Guang; Zhu, Zhi-Yuan; He, Feng; Liao, Yi; Wang, Zhen-Xia; Zhang, Wei; Yu, Li-Ping; Sun, Li-Tao; Wang, Ting-Tai

    2003-09-01

    The conductivity of single walled nanotube films is investigated with a combination of the Maxwell-Garnett (MG) model and the Drude-Lorentzian (DL) model in the Terahertz region. A theoretical fit for Jeon's experiment is given and a decrease of the real conductivity with increasing frequency is predicted. Meanwhile, the MG and DL models are also discussed for different samples.

  1. Double-wall tubing for oil recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Back, L. H.; Carroll, W. F.; Jaffee, L. D.; Stimpson, L. D.

    1980-01-01

    Insulated double-wall tubing designed for steam injection oil recovery makes process more economical and allows deeper extension of wells. Higher quality wet steam is delivered through tubing to oil deposits with significant reductions in heat loss to surrounding rock allowing greater exploitation of previously unworkable reservoirs.

  2. Asbestos in Plaster and Wall Systems

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This collection of letters and clarification on final rules provides guidance on Asbestos National Emissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants for asbestos-containing join compounds, and asbestos-containing materials found in plaster and wall systems.

  3. Quantum processes in resonators with moving walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimov, A. B.; Dodonov, V. V.

    1993-01-01

    The behavior of an electromagnetic field in an ideal cavity with an oscillating boundary is considered in the resonance long-time limit. The rates of photon creation from the vacuum and thermal states are evaluated. The squeezing coefficients for the field modes are found, as well as the backward reaction of the field on the vibrating wall.

  4. Subcooled Boiling Near a Heated Wall

    SciTech Connect

    T.A. Trabold; C.C. Maneri; P.F. Vassallo; D.M. Considine

    2000-10-27

    Experimental measurements of void fraction, bubble frequency, and velocity are obtained in subcooled R-134a flowing over a heated flat plate near an unheated wall and compared to analytical predictions. The measurements were obtained for a fixed system pressure and mass flow rate (P = 2.4 MPa and w = 106 kg/hr) at various inlet liquid temperatures. During the experiments, electrical power was applied at a constant rate to one side of the test section. The local void fraction data, acquired with a hot-film anemometer probe, showed the existence of a significant peak near the heated wall and a smaller secondary peak near the unheated wall for the larger inlet subcoolings. Local vapor velocity data, taken with the hot-film probe and a laser Doppler velocimeter, showed broad maxima near the centerline between the heated and unheated plates. Significant temperature gradients near the heated wall were observed for large inlet subcooling. Bubble size data, inferred from measurements of void fraction, bubble frequency and vapor velocity, when combined with the measured bubble chord length distributions illustrate the transition from pure three dimensional spherical to two-dimensional planar bubble flow, the latter being initiated when the bubbles fill the gap between the plates. These various two-phase flow measurements were used for development of a multidimensional, four-field calculational method; comparisons of the data to the calculations show reasonable agreement.

  5. The dynamics of domain walls and strings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Ruth; Haws, David; Garfinkle, David

    1989-01-01

    The leading order finite-width corrections to the equation of motion describing the motion of a domain wall are derived. The regime in which this equation of motion is invalid is discussed. Spherically and cylindrically symmetric solutions to this equation of motion are found. A misconception that has arisen in recent years regarding the rigidity (or otherwise) of cosmic strings is also clarified.

  6. Factors Influencing Ultrasound Echoes From Arterial Walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Jim; Maciel, Mario; Zalesky, Paul

    1988-04-01

    Significant progress in methods for the treatment of arterial disease has been made during the past several years. The trend towards least invasive therapies has led to an increasing need for instruments which quantify arterial disease status before, during, and after an intervention or treatment. Such instruments should provide safer and more effective disease treatment by providing the physician with a procedure guidance tool. The use of miniature ultrasound transducers, mounted at the distal end of a vascular catheter or probe, offers a promising method for producing images and quantitative measure-ment of arterial lumen and wall thickness. Several approaches have been suggested for placing the transducers in a probe configuration which is then mounted in a catheter and advanced to the vascular site of interest for image generation. The "best" probe configuration is defined by the specific questions of interest to the physician. It also depends upon transducer characteristics and how the sound beam "interacts" with the arterial wall. Imaging the small diameter coronary arteries, in particular, requires careful consideration of various transducer-tissue parameters. Transducer signal-to-noise ratio will likely be a critical parameter for systems designed to image healthy and diseased coronary arteries. The reported study shows how arterial wall echo amplitude changes as the angle between sound beam and wall varies. Changes are measured under carefully defined laboratory conditions.

  7. Uniform-Temperature Walls for Cloud Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleischman, G.

    1985-01-01

    Flat heat pipes rapidly transfer heat to and from experimental volumes. Heat pipe vapor chamber carries heat to and from thermo electric modules. Critical surface acts as evaporator or condenser in cloud physics experiments. Used as walls of spaceborne atmospheric cloud chambers. On Earth, used as isothermal floors for environmental test chambers.

  8. Global Learning Communities: Science Classrooms without Walls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerlin, Steven C.

    2009-01-01

    The physical walls of a classroom have typically acted as the boundary of school science learning communities. The participants in these learning communities are the students and the teacher in individual classrooms. These participants contribute to scientific discourse about a specific content area under study. Scientific learning communities, on…

  9. Wall Climbing Micro Ground Vehicle (MGV)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    low pressures between the wall and itself while holding roughly 7 times its own weight, ~1.93 kg. Our research has indicated that the inverted wing...Flow Visualization ..........................................................................................................7 5.2 Effects Of Pressure ... Pressure sensor. ................................................................................................................6 Figure 9. Flow

  10. Where the Wall Will Fall First

    PubMed Central

    CARROLL, JOHN

    2007-01-01

    Most believe that ‘generic’ biologics are not a question of if, but when. Just when, though, and which therapies could face a threat in the marketplace, depend on the complexity of the product. Research is far along, indicating that some of today’s biggest markets could be exposed when the wall comes tumbling down. PMID:23319931

  11. Large eddy simulation of smooth-wall, transitional and fully rough-wall channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Namiko; Pullin, Dale I.; Inoue, Michio

    2012-07-01

    Large eddy simulation (LES) is reported for both smooth and rough-wall channel flows at resolutions for which the roughness is subgrid. The stretched vortex, subgrid-scale model is combined with an existing wall-model that calculates the local friction velocity dynamically while providing a Dirichlet-like slip velocity at a slightly raised wall. This wall model is presently extended to include the effects of subgrid wall roughness by the incorporation of the Hama's roughness function Δ U^+(k_{sinfty }^+) that depends on some geometric roughness height ks∞ scaled in inner variables. Presently Colebrook's empirical roughness function is used but the model can utilize any given function of an arbitrary number of inner-scaled, roughness length parameters. This approach requires no change to the interior LES and can handle both smooth and rough walls. The LES is applied to fully turbulent, smooth, and rough-wall channel flow in both the transitional and fully rough regimes. Both roughness and Reynolds number effects are captured for Reynolds numbers Reb based on the bulk flow speed in the range 104-1010 with the equivalent Reτ, based on the wall-drag velocity uτ varying from 650 to 108. Results include a Moody-like diagram for the friction factor f = f(Reb, ɛ), ɛ = ks∞/δ, mean velocity profiles, and turbulence statistics. In the fully rough regime, at sufficiently large Reb, the mean velocity profiles show collapse in outer variables onto a roughness modified, universal, velocity-deficit profile. Outer-flow stream-wise turbulence intensities scale well with uτ for both smooth and rough-wall flow, showing a log-like profile. The infinite Reynolds number limits of both smooth and rough-wall flows are explored. An assumption that, for smooth-wall flow, the turbulence intensities scaled on uτ are bounded above by the sum of a logarithmic profile plus a finite function across the whole channel suggests that the infinite Reb limit is inviscid slip flow without

  12. Hot wire production of single-wall and multi-wall carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Dillon, Anne C.; Mahan, Archie H.; Alleman, Jeffrey L.

    2010-10-26

    Apparatus (210) for producing a multi-wall carbon nanotube (213) may comprise a process chamber (216), a furnace (217) operatively associated with the process chamber (216), and at least one filament (218) positioned within the process chamber (216). At least one power supply (220) operatively associated with the at least one filament (218) heats the at least one filament (218) to a process temperature. A gaseous carbon precursor material (214) operatively associated with the process chamber (216) provides carbon for forming the multi-wall carbon nanotube (213). A metal catalyst material (224) operatively associated with the process (216) catalyzes the formation of the multi-wall carbon nanotube (213).

  13. Measuring in vitro extensibility of growing plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, Daniel J

    2011-01-01

    This article summarizes the theory and practical aspects of measuring cell wall properties by four different extensometer techniques and how the results of these methods relate to the concept and ideal measurement of cell wall extensibility in the context of cell growth. These in vivo techniques are particularly useful for studies of the molecular basis of cell wall extension. Measurements of breaking strength, elastic compliance, and plastic compliance may be informative about changes in cell wall structure, whereas measurements of wall stress relaxation and creep are sensitive to both changes in wall structure and wall-loosening processes, such as those mediated by expansins and some lytic enzymes. A combination of methods is needed to obtain a broader view of cell wall behavior and properties connected with the concept of cell wall extensibility.

  14. Wall relaxation and the driving forces for cell expansive growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    When water uptake by growing cells is prevented, the turgor pressure and the tensile stress in the cell wall are reduced by continued wall loosening. This process, termed in vivo stress relaxation, provides a new way to study the dynamics of wall loosening and to measure the wall yield threshold and the physiological wall extensibility. Stress relaxation experiments indicate that wall stress supplies the mechanical driving force for wall yielding. Cell expansion also requires water absorption. The driving force for water uptake during growth is created by wall relaxation, which lowers the water potential of the expanding cells. New techniques for measuring this driving force show that it is smaller than believed previously; in elongating stems it is only 0.3 to 0.5 bar. This means that the hydraulic resistance of the water transport pathway is small and that rate of cell expansion is controlled primarily by wall loosening and yielding.

  15. Hydrodynamic interaction of micro-swimmers near a wall

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gao-Jin

    2015-01-01

    The hydrodynamics of an archetypal low-Reynolds number swimmer, called “squirmer”, near a wall has been numerically studied. For a single squirmer, depending on the swimming mechanism, three different modes are distinguished: (a) the squirmer escaping from the wall, (b) the squirmer swimming along the wall at a constant distance and orientation angle, and (c) the squirmer swimming near the wall in a periodic trajectory. The role of inertial effects on the near-wall motion of the squirmer is quantified. The dynamics of multiple squirmers swimming between two walls is found to be very different from a single squirmer. Near-wall accumulation of squirmers are observed. At a relatively small concentration c = 0.1, around 60 – 80% of the squirmers are accumulated near the walls and attraction of pushers and pullers towards the wall is stronger than neutral squirmers. Near-wall squirmers orient normal to the wall, while in the bulk region, the squirmers are mostly oriented parallel to the wall. At a high concentration, c = 0.4, the percentage of the near-wall squirmers is around 40%. The orientation angle of squirmers in the bulk region is more uniformly distributed at high concentrations. In the near-wall region, pullers repel each other, while pushers are attracted to each other and form clusters. PMID:25122372

  16. Cell Wall Loosening in the Fungus, Phycomyces blakesleeanus

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Joseph K. E.; Truong, Jason T.; Munoz, Cindy M.; Ramirez, David G.

    2015-01-01

    A considerable amount of research has been conducted to determine how cell walls are loosened to produce irreversible wall deformation and expansive growth in plant and algal cells. The same cannot be said about fungal cells. Almost nothing is known about how fungal cells loosen their walls to produce irreversible wall deformation and expansive growth. In this study, anoxia is used to chemically isolate the wall from the protoplasm of the sporangiophores of Phycomyces blakesleeanus. The experimental results provide direct evidence of the existence of chemistry within the fungal wall that is responsible for wall loosening, irreversible wall deformation and elongation growth. In addition, constant-tension extension experiments are conducted on frozen-thawed sporangiophore walls to obtain insight into the wall chemistry and wall loosening mechanism. It is found that a decrease in pH to 4.6 produces creep extension in the frozen-thawed sporangiophore wall that is similar, but not identical, to that found in frozen-thawed higher plant cell walls. Experimental results from frozen-thawed and boiled sporangiophore walls suggest that protein activity may be involved in the creep extension. PMID:27135318

  17. Algorithm of chest wall keloid treatment

    PubMed Central

    Long, Xiao; Zhang, Mingzi; Wang, Yang; Zhao, Ru; Wang, Youbin; Wang, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Keloids are common in the Asian population. Multiple or huge keloids can appear on the chest wall because of its tendency to develop acne, sebaceous cyst, etc. It is difficult to find an ideal treatment for keloids in this area due to the limit of local soft tissues and higher recurrence rate. This study aims at establishing an individualized protocol that could be easily applied according to the size and number of chest wall keloids. A total of 445 patients received various methods (4 protocols) of treatment in our department from September 2006 to September 2012 according to the size and number of their chest wall keloids. All of the patients received adjuvant radiotherapy in our hospital. Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS) was used to assess the treatment effect by both doctors and patients. With mean follow-up time of 13 months (range: 6–18 months), 362 patients participated in the assessment of POSAS with doctors. Both the doctors and the patients themselves used POSAS to evaluate the treatment effect. The recurrence rate was 0.83%. There was an obvious significant difference (P < 0.001) between the before-surgery score and the after-surgery score from both doctors and patients, indicating that both doctors and patients were satisfied with the treatment effect. Our preliminary clinical result indicates that good clinical results could be achieved by choosing the proper method in this algorithm for Chinese patients with chest wall keloids. This algorithm could play a guiding role for surgeons when dealing with chest wall keloid treatment. PMID:27583896

  18. Assembly of the Yeast Cell Wall

    PubMed Central

    Cabib, Enrico; Farkas, Vladimir; Kosík, Ondrej; Blanco, Noelia; Arroyo, Javier; McPhie, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The cross-linking of polysaccharides to assemble new cell wall in fungi requires mechanisms by which a preexisting linkage is broken for each new one made, to allow for the absence of free energy sources outside the plasma membrane. Previous work showed that Crh1p and Crh2p, putative transglycosylases, are required for the linkage of chitin to β(1–3)glucose branches of β(1–6)glucan in the cell wall of budding yeast. To explore the linking reaction in vivo and in vitro, we used fluorescent sulforhodamine-linked laminari-oligosaccharides as artificial chitin acceptors. In vivo, fluorescence was detected in bud scars and at a lower level in the cell contour, both being dependent on the CRH genes. The linking reaction was also shown in digitonin-permeabilized cells, with UDP-N-acetylglucosamine as the substrate for nascent chitin production. Both the nucleotide and the Crh proteins were required here. A gas1 mutant that overexpresses Crh1p showed very high fluorescence both in intact and permeabilized cells. In the latter, fluorescence was still incorporated in patches in the absence of UDP-GlcNAc. Isolated cell walls of this strain, when incubated with sulforhodamine-oligosaccharide, also showed Crhp-dependent fluorescence in patches, which were identified as bud scars. In all three systems, binding of the fluorescent material to chitin was verified by chitinase digestion. Moreover, the cell wall reaction was inhibited by chitooligosaccharides. These results demonstrate that the Crh proteins act by transferring chitin chains to β(1–6)glucan, with a newly observed high activity in the bud scar. The importance of transglycosylation for cell wall assembly is thus firmly established. PMID:18694928

  19. Liquid Metal Walls and the Belt Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotschenreuther, Michael; Dorland, W.; Manickam, J.; Menard, J.; Miller, R.

    2000-10-01

    High flux reactor designs have placed the MHD stabilizing shell well away from the first wall due to breeding and reliability issues. Liquid metal shells containing Li may allow close shells, with much higher elongation (kappa), beta and power density. MHD stability of equilibria with kappa = 2 - 6 and high bootstrap fraction are examined using JSOLVER plus PEST and TOQ plus BALOO. Compared to kappa = 2, stable beta increases by 2.5 for kappa = 3 and 5 for kappa = 6 (with little change in normalized beta). External mode stability (n = 1-10 ) with a wall is similar for kappa = 2-6; a wall at b/a 1.2-1.3 give stability. Resistive wall mode evolution is examined using the new code WALLMODE; feedback power is evaluated using dynamic Monte Carlo simulations (similar to ARIES studies). N = 0 vertical modes are acceptable with a 2-4 cm Li shell at b/a 1.05 -1.1. Resistive wall kink modes for model current profiles are stabilizable by feedback and/or liquid flow as low as 20 m/s; interfacing with PEST is in progress to examinine realistic equilibria. Modest indendation gives bootstrap island stability. Comprehensive gyrokinetic simulations with GS2 find a strong improvement with kappa for 1) ExB shearing compared to ITG/drift mode growth rates and 2) transport in nonlinear ETG simulations. Also, low edge recycling (density) boundary conditions substantially improve H mode pedestal stabilty, for additional global confinement improvement. Even with H mode scaling law confinement, kappa =6 gives ignition in a .8 m major radius device with Cu coils (12T at the coil).

  20. Proportionality between chest wall resistance and elastance.

    PubMed

    Barnas, G M; Stamenović, D; Fredberg, J J

    1991-02-01

    Fredberg and Stamenovic (J. Appl. Physiol. 67: 2408-2419, 1989) demonstrated a relatively robust phenomenological relationship between resistance (R) and elastance (E) of lung tissue during external forcing. The relationship can be expressed as omega R = eta E, where omega = 2 pi times forcing frequency and eta is hysteresivity; they found eta to be remarkably invariant under a wide range of circumstances. From data gathered in previous experiments, we have tested the adequacy and utility of this phenomenological description for the chest wall (eta w) and its major compartments, the rib cage (eta rc), diaphragm-abdomen (eta d-a), and belly wall (eta bw+). For forcing frequencies and tidal volumes within the normal range of breathing, we found that eta w remained in a relatively narrow range (0.27-0.37) and that neither eta w nor the compartmental eta's changed much with frequency or tidal volume. Compared with eta w, eta rc tended to be slightly low, whereas eta d-a tended to be slightly higher than eta w. However, at higher frequencies (greater than 1 Hz) all eta's increased appreciably with frequency. During various static nonrespiratory maneuvers involving use of respiratory muscles, eta w increased up to twofold. We conclude that in the normal ranges of breathing frequency and tidal volume 1) elastic and dissipative processes within the chest wall appear to be coupled, 2) eta's of the various component parts of the chest wall are well matched, 3) respiratory muscle contraction increases the ratio of cyclic dissipative losses to energy storage, and 4) R of the relaxed chest wall can be estimated from E.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Complexity of the transcriptional network controlling secondary wall biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ruiqin; Ye, Zheng-Hua

    2014-12-01

    Secondary walls in the form of wood and fibers are the most abundant biomass produced by vascular plants, and are important raw materials for many industrial uses. Understanding how secondary walls are constructed is of significance in basic plant biology and also has far-reaching implications in genetic engineering of plant biomass better suited for various end uses, such as biofuel production. Secondary walls are composed of three major biopolymers, i.e., cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin, the biosynthesis of which requires the coordinated transcriptional regulation of all their biosynthesis genes. Genomic and molecular studies have identified a number of transcription factors, whose expression is associated with secondary wall biosynthesis. We comprehensively review how these secondary wall-associated transcription factors function together to turn on the secondary wall biosynthetic program, which leads to secondary wall deposition in vascular plants. The transcriptional network regulating secondary wall biosynthesis employs a multi-leveled feed-forward loop regulatory structure, in which the top-level secondary wall NAC (NAM, ATAF1/2 and CUC2) master switches activate the second-level MYB master switches and they together induce the expression of downstream transcription factors and secondary wall biosynthesis genes. Secondary wall NAC master switches and secondary wall MYB master switches bind to and activate the SNBE (secondary wall NAC binding element) and SMRE (secondary wall MYB-responsive element) sites, respectively, in their target gene promoters. Further investigation of what and how developmental signals trigger the transcriptional network to regulate secondary wall biosynthesis and how different secondary wall-associated transcription factors function cooperatively in activating secondary wall biosynthetic pathways will lead to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the transcriptional control of secondary wall biosynthesis.

  2. Enzymes and other agents that enhance cell wall extensibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    Polysaccharides and proteins are secreted to the inner surface of the growing cell wall, where they assemble into a network that is mechanically strong, yet remains extensible until the cells cease growth. This review focuses on the agents that directly or indirectly enhance the extensibility properties of growing walls. The properties of expansins, endoglucanases, and xyloglucan transglycosylases are reviewed and their postulated roles in modulating wall extensibility are evaluated. A summary model for wall extension is presented, in which expansin is a primary agent of wall extension, whereas endoglucanases, xyloglucan endotransglycosylase, and other enzymes that alter wall structure act secondarily to modulate expansin action.

  3. Antiferromagnetic domain wall motion driven by spin-orbit torques

    PubMed Central

    Shiino, Takayuki; Oh, Se-Hyeok; Haney, Paul M.; Lee, Seo-Won; Go, Gyungchoon; Park, Byong-Guk; Lee, Kyung-Jin

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically investigate dynamics of antiferromagnetic domain walls driven by spin-orbit torques in antiferromagnet/heavy metal bilayers. We show that spin-orbit torques drive antiferromagnetic domain walls much faster than ferromagnetic domain walls. As the domain wall velocity approaches the maximum spin-wave group velocity, the domain wall undergoes Lorentz contraction and emits spin-waves in the terahertz frequency range. The interplay between spin-orbit torques and the relativistic dynamics of antiferromagnetic domain walls leads to the efficient manipulation of antiferromagnetic spin textures and paves the way for the generation of high frequency signals from antiferromagnets. PMID:27588878

  4. OCT assessment of aortic wall degradation for surgical guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Real, E.; Val-Bernal, J. F.; Pontón, A.; Calvo Díez, M.; Mayorga, M.; Revuelta, J. M.; López-Higuera, J. M.; Conde, O. M.

    2014-05-01

    The degradation of the wall in large cardiovascular vessels, such as the aorta artery, induces weakness in the vessel that can lead to the formation of aneurysms and the rupture of the vessel. Characterization of the wall integrity is assessed by OCT for future intraoperative assistance in aneurysm graft surgery interventions. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) provides cross sectional images of the wall of the aortic media layer. Wall degradations appear as spatial anomalies in the reflectivity profile through the wall thickness. Wall degradation assessment is proposed by automatic identification and dimensioning of these anomalies within the homogeneous surrounding tissue.

  5. Polysaccharide-degrading Enzymes are Unable to Attack Plant Cell Walls without Prior Action by a "Wall-modifying Enzyme".

    PubMed

    Karr, A L; Albersheim, P

    1970-07-01

    A study of the degradation of plant cell walls by the mixture of enzymes present in Pectinol R-10 is described. A "wall-modifying enzyme" has been purified from this mixture by a combination of diethylaminoethyl cellulose, Bio Gel P-100, and carboxymethyl cellulose chromatography. Treatment of cell walls with the "wall-modifying enzyme" is shown to be a necessary prerequisite to wall degradation catalyzed by a mixture of polysaccharide-degrading enzymes prepared from Pectinol R-10 or by an alpha-galactosidase secreted by the pathogenic fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum. The action of the "wall-modifying enzyme" on cell walls is shown to result in both a release of water-soluble, 70% ethanol-insoluble polymers and an alteration of the residual cell wall. A purified preparation of the "wall-modifying enzyme" is unable to degrade a wide variety of polysaccharide, glycoside, and peptide substrates. However, the purified preparation of wall-modifying enzyme has a limited ability to degrade polygalacturonic acid. The fact that polygalacturonic acid inhibits the ability of the "wall-modifying enzyme" to affect cell walls suggests that the "wall-modifying enzyme" may be responsible for the limited polygalacturonic acid-degrading activity present in the purified preparation. The importance of a wall-modifying enzyme in developmental processes and in pathogenesis is discussed.

  6. Reconstitution of a Secondary Cell Wall in a Secondary Cell Wall-Deficient Arabidopsis Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Shingo; Mitsuda, Nobutaka

    2015-01-01

    The secondary cell wall constitutes a rigid frame of cells in plant tissues where rigidity is required. Deposition of the secondary cell wall in fiber cells contributes to the production of wood in woody plants. The secondary cell wall is assembled through co-operative activities of many enzymes, and their gene expression is precisely regulated by a pyramidal cascade of transcription factors. Deposition of a transmuted secondary cell wall in empty fiber cells by expressing selected gene(s) in this cascade has not been attempted previously. In this proof-of-concept study, we expressed chimeric activators of 24 transcription factors that are preferentially expressed in the stem, in empty fiber cells of the Arabidopsis nst1-1 nst3-1 double mutant, which lacks a secondary cell wall in fiber cells, under the control of the NST3 promoter. The chimeric activators of MYB46, SND2 and ANAC075, as well as NST3, reconstituted a secondary cell wall with different characteristics from those of the wild type in terms of its composition. The transgenic lines expressing the SND2 or ANAC075 chimeric activator showed increased glucose and xylose, and lower lignin content, whereas the transgenic line expressing the MYB46 chimeric activator showed increased mannose content. The expression profile of downstream genes in each transgenic line was also different from that of the wild type. This study proposed a new screening strategy to identify factors of secondary wall formation and also suggested the potential of the artificially reconstituted secondary cell walls as a novel raw material for production of bioethanol and other chemicals. PMID:25535195

  7. Rotational stabilization of the resistive wall modes in tokamaks with a ferritic wall

    SciTech Connect

    Pustovitov, V. D.; Yanovskiy, V. V.

    2015-03-15

    The dynamics of the rotating resistive wall modes (RWMs) is analyzed in the presence of a uniform ferromagnetic resistive wall with μ{sup ^}≡μ/μ{sub 0}≤4 (μ is the wall magnetic permeability, and μ{sub 0} is the vacuum one). This mimics a possible arrangement in ITER with ferromagnetic steel in test blanket modules or in future experiments in JT-60SA tokamak [Y. Kamada, P. Barabaschi, S. Ishida, the JT-60SA Team, and JT-60SA Research Plan Contributors, Nucl. Fusion 53, 104010 (2013)]. The earlier studies predict that such a wall must provide a destabilizing influence on the plasma by reducing the beta limit and increasing the growth rates, compared to the reference case with μ{sup ^}=1. This is true for the locked modes, but the presented results show that the mode rotation changes the tendency to the opposite. At μ{sup ^}>1, the rotational stabilization related to the energy sink in the wall becomes even stronger than at μ{sup ^}=1, and this “external” effect develops at lower rotation frequency, estimated as several kHz at realistic conditions. The study is based on the cylindrical dispersion relation valid for arbitrary growth rates and frequencies. This relation is solved numerically, and the solutions are compared with analytical dependences obtained for slow (s/d{sub w}≫1) and fast (s/d{sub w}≪1) “ferromagnetic” rotating RWMs, where s is the skin depth and d{sub w} is the wall thickness. It is found that the standard thin-wall modeling becomes progressively less reliable at larger μ{sup ^}, and the wall should be treated as magnetically thick. The analysis is performed assuming only a linear plasma response to external perturbations without constraints on the plasma current and pressure profiles.

  8. Virtual-Wall Model for Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Qian, Lijuan; Tu, Chengxu; Bao, Fubing; Zhang, Yonghao

    2016-12-09

    A large number of molecules are usually required to model atomic walls in molecular dynamics simulations. A virtual-wall model is proposed in this study to describe fluid-wall molecular interactions, for reducing the computational time. The infinite repetition of unit cell structures within the atomic wall causes the periodicity of the force acting on a fluid molecule from the wall molecules. This force is first calculated and then stored in the memory. A fluid molecule appearing in the wall force field is subjected to the force from the wall molecules. The force can then be determined by the position of the molecule relative to the wall. This model avoids excessive calculations of fluid-wall interactions and reduces the computational time drastically. The time reduction is significant for small fluid density and channel height. The virtual-wall model is applied to Poiseuille and Couette flows, and to a flow in a channel with a rough surface. Results of the virtual and atomic wall simulations agree well with each other, thereby indicating the usefulness of the virtual-wall model. The appropriate bin size and cut-off radius in the virtual-wall model are also discussed.

  9. Celery (Apium graveolens) parenchyma cell walls: cell walls with minimal xyloglucan.

    PubMed

    Thimm, Julian C.; Burritt, David J.; Sims, Ian M.; Newman, Roger H.; Ducker, William A.; Melton, Laurence D.

    2002-10-01

    The primary walls of celery (Apium graveolens L.) parenchyma cells were isolated and their polysaccharide components characterized by glycosyl linkage analysis, cross-polarization magic-angle spinning solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (CP/MAS 13C NMR) and X-ray diffraction. Glycosyl linkage analysis showed that the cell walls consisted of mainly cellulose (43 mol%) and pectic polysaccharides (51 mol%), comprising rhamnogalacturonan (28 mol%), arabinan (12 mol%) and galactan (11 mol%). The amounts of xyloglucan (2 mol%) and xylan (2 mol%) detected in the cell walls were strikingly low. The small amount of xyloglucan present means that it cannot coat the cellulose microfibrils. Solid-state 13C NMR signals were consistent with the constituents identified by glycosyl linkage analysis and allowed the walls to be divided into three domains, based on the rigidity of the polymers. Cellulose (rigid) and rhamnogalacturonan (semi-mobile) polymers responded to the CP/MAS 13C NMR pulse sequence and were distinguished by differences in proton spin relaxation time constants. The arabinans, the most mobile polymers, responded to single-pulse excitation (SPE), but not CP/MAS 13C NMR. From solid-state 13C NMR of the cell walls the diameter of the crystalline cellulose microfibrils was determined to be approximately 3 nm while X-ray diffraction of the cell walls gave a value for the diameter of approximately 2 nm.

  10. Scale resolving computation of submerged wall jets on flat wall with different roughness heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paik, Joongcheol; Bombardelli, Fabian

    2014-11-01

    Scale-adaptive simulation is used to investigate the response of velocity and turbulence in submerged wall jets to abrupt changes from smooth to rough beds. The submerged wall jets were experimentally investigated by Dey and Sarkar [JFM, 556, 337, 2006] at the Reynolds number of 17500 the Froude number of 4.09 and the submergence ratio of 1.12 on different rough beds that were generated by uniform sediments of different median diameters The SAS is carried out by means of a second-order-accurate finite volume method in space and time and the effect of bottom roughness is treated by the approach of Cebeci (2004). The evolution of free surface is captured by employing the two-phase volume of fluid (VOF) technique. The numerical results obtained by the SAS approach, incorporated with the VOF and the rough wall treatment, are in good agreement with the experimental measurements. The computed turbulent boundary layer grows more quickly and the depression of the free surface is more increased on the rough wall than those on smooth wall. The size of the fully developed zone shrinks and the decay rate of maximum streamwise velocity and Reynolds stress components are faster with increase in the wall roughness. Supported by NSF and NRF of Korea.

  11. Prediction of wall shear-stress fluctuations in wall-modeled large-eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, George; Howland, Michael; Lozano-Duran, Adrian; Moin, Parviz

    2016-11-01

    Wall-modeled large-eddy simulation (WMLES) is emerging as a viable and affordable tool for predicting mean flow statistics in high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layers. Recently, we examined the performance of two RANS-based wall models in prediction of wall pressure and shear stress fluctuations which are important in flow/structure interaction problems. Whereas the pressure statistics were predicted with reasonable accuracy, the magnitude of wall shear stress fluctuations was severely underestimated. The present study expands on this finding to characterize in more detail the capabilities of wall models for predicting τw'. Predictions of several wall models in high Reynolds number channel flows (Reτ = 2000) will be presented. Additionally, a recent empirical inner-outer model for τw' is reconstructed using channel flow DNS database , and it is coupled to WMLES to assess its performance as a predictive model in LES. The majority of this work was carried out during the 16th biannual Center for Turbulence Research (CTR) summer program, 2016. George Park was partially supported through NASA under the Subsonic Fixed-Wing Program (Grant No. NNX11AI60A).

  12. Skyrmion domain wall collision and domain wall-gated skyrmion logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Xiangjun; Pong, Philip W. T.; Zhou, Yan

    2016-08-01

    Skyrmions and domain walls are significant spin textures of great technological relevance to magnetic memory and logic applications, where they can be used as carriers of information. The unique topology of skyrmions makes them display emergent dynamical properties as compared with domain walls. Some studies have demonstrated that the two topologically inequivalent magnetic objects could be interconverted by using cleverly designed geometric structures. Here, we numerically address the skyrmion domain wall collision in a magnetic racetrack by introducing relative motion between the two objects based on a specially designed junction. An electric current serves as the driving force that moves a skyrmion toward a trapped domain wall pair. We see different types of collision dynamics depending on the driving parameters. Most importantly, the modulation of skyrmion transport using domain walls is realized in this system, allowing a set of domain wall-gated logical NOT, NAND, and NOR gates to be constructed. This work provides a skyrmion-based spin-logic architecture that is fully compatible with racetrack memories.

  13. The Structure of Plant Cell Walls

    PubMed Central

    Talmadge, Kenneth W.; Keegstra, Kenneth; Bauer, Wolfgang D.; Albersheim, Peter

    1973-01-01

    This is the first in a series of papers dealing with the structure of cell walls isolated from suspension-cultured sycamore cells (Acer pseudoplatanus). These studies have been made possible by the availability of purified hydrolytic enzymes and by recent improvements in the techniques of methylation analysis. These techniques have permitted us to identify and quantitate the macromolecular components of sycamore cell walls. These walls are composed of 10% arabinan, 2% 3,6-linked arabinogalactan, 23% cellulose, 9% oligo-arabinosides (attached to hydroxyproline), 8% 4-linked galactan, 10% hydroxyproline-rich protein, 16% rhamnogalacturonan, and 21% xyloglucan. The structures of the pectic polymers (the neutral arabinan, the neutral galactan, and the acidic rhamnogalacturonan) were obtained, in part, by methylation analysis of fragments of these polymers which were released from the sycamore walls by the action of a highly purified endopolygalacturonase. The data suggest a branched arabinan and a linear 4-linked galactan occurring as side chains on the rhamnogalacturonan. Small amounts or pieces of a xyloglucan, the wall hemicellulose, appear to be covalently linked to some of the galactan chains. Thus, the galactan appears to serve as a bridge between the xyloglucan and rhamnogalacturonan components of the wall. The rhamnogalacturonan consists of an α-(1 → 4)-linked galacturonan chain which is interspersed with 2-linked rhamnosyl residues. The rhamnosyl residues are not randomly distributed in the chain but probably occur in units of rhamnosyl- (1 → 4)-galacturonosyl- (1 → 2)-rhamnosyl. This sequence appears to alternate with a homogalacturonan sequence containing approximately 8 residues of 4-linked galacturonic acid. About half of the rhamnosyl residues are branched, having a substituent attached to carbon 4. This is likely to be the site of attachment of the 4-linked galactan. The hydroxyprolyl oligo-arabinosides of the hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein

  14. [Fatal poisoning caused by aconite monk's hood (Aconitum napellus)].

    PubMed

    Feldkamp, A; Köster, B; Weber, H P

    1991-06-01

    Severe intoxications after ingestion of monk's hood are rare in childhood. We report a case of fatal intoxication in a 20 months old child. There is no specific therapy available. A review of the literature is added.

  15. 42. VIEW OF WALL AT EAST ENTRANCE TO WALKWAY. 'FRANK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. VIEW OF WALL AT EAST ENTRANCE TO WALKWAY. 'FRANK AUZA, FLAGSTAFF SHEEP CO.' SCRATCHED INTO FRESH MORTAR CAP ON STONE WALL. February 1987 - Verde River Sheep Bridge, Spanning Verde River (Tonto National Forest), Cave Creek, Maricopa County, AZ

  16. 16. MASONRY DETAIL NO. 2, NORTH TRAINING WALL, SHOWING THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. MASONRY DETAIL NO. 2, NORTH TRAINING WALL, SHOWING THE RUBBLE CORE WHERE THE FACING STONES HAVE BEEN REMOVED. - Oakland Harbor Training Walls, Mouth of Federal Channel to Inner Harbor, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  17. 8. WEST END OF NORTH TRAINING WALL, LOOKING NORTHWEST, SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. WEST END OF NORTH TRAINING WALL, LOOKING NORTHWEST, SHOWING THE LIGHTHOUSE SITE OFFSHORE, AND THE UNIDENTIFIED STRUCTURE FOUNDATIONS ONSHORE AT FAR RIGHT. - Oakland Harbor Training Walls, Mouth of Federal Channel to Inner Harbor, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  18. 18. LOOKING EAST ALONG THIS PART OF THE NORTH WALL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. LOOKING EAST ALONG THIS PART OF THE NORTH WALL, FROM A POINT ABOUT 1,500 FEET EAST OF THE FEDERAL CHANNEL MOUTH. - Oakland Harbor Training Walls, Mouth of Federal Channel to Inner Harbor, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  19. 6. WEST END OF NORTH TRAINING WALL, LOOKING NORTH FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. WEST END OF NORTH TRAINING WALL, LOOKING NORTH FROM THE WATER, ALSO SHOWING FOUNDATIONS FOR AN UNIDENTIFIED STRUCTURE AT RIGHT. - Oakland Harbor Training Walls, Mouth of Federal Channel to Inner Harbor, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  20. 28. EAST END OF THE NORTH TRAINING WALL AT THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. EAST END OF THE NORTH TRAINING WALL AT THE FISHING PIER, FROM THE WATER, LOOKING NORTH-NORTHEAST. - Oakland Harbor Training Walls, Mouth of Federal Channel to Inner Harbor, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  1. 14. A CLOSER VIEW OF THE NORTH WALL TOP SURFACE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. A CLOSER VIEW OF THE NORTH WALL TOP SURFACE MASONRY, LOOKING EAST FROM A POINT NEAR THE PREVIOUS VIEW. - Oakland Harbor Training Walls, Mouth of Federal Channel to Inner Harbor, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  2. 19. MEDIUM DISTANCE VIEW OF NORTH TRAINING WALL FROM THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. MEDIUM DISTANCE VIEW OF NORTH TRAINING WALL FROM THE WATER, LOOKING NORTH AT THE BEST EXPOSED SECTION. - Oakland Harbor Training Walls, Mouth of Federal Channel to Inner Harbor, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  3. 20. ANOTHER WATER VIEW OF THIS NORTH TRAINING WALL SECTION, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. ANOTHER WATER VIEW OF THIS NORTH TRAINING WALL SECTION, FROM SEVERAL HUNDRED FEET TO THE EAST OF THE PREVIOUS VIEW. - Oakland Harbor Training Walls, Mouth of Federal Channel to Inner Harbor, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  4. Roles of membrane trafficking in plant cell wall dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ebine, Kazuo; Ueda, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The cell wall is one of the characteristic components of plant cells. The cell wall composition differs among cell types and is modified in response to various environmental conditions. To properly generate and modify the cell wall, many proteins are transported to the plasma membrane or extracellular space through membrane trafficking, which is one of the key protein transport mechanisms in eukaryotic cells. Given the diverse composition and functions of the cell wall in plants, the transport of the cell wall components and proteins that are involved in cell wall-related events could be specialized for each cell type, i.e., the machinery for cell wall biogenesis, modification, and maintenance could be transported via different trafficking pathways. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in the current understanding of the roles and mechanisms of membrane trafficking in plant cells and focus on the biogenesis and regulation of the cell wall. PMID:26539200

  5. Correlation between spin structure oscillations and domain wall velocities

    PubMed Central

    Bisig, André; Stärk, Martin; Mawass, Mohamad-Assaad; Moutafis, Christoforos; Rhensius, Jan; Heidler, Jakoba; Büttner, Felix; Noske, Matthias; Weigand, Markus; Eisebitt, Stefan; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Van Waeyenberge, Bartel; Stoll, Hermann; Schütz, Gisela; Kläui, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic sensing and logic devices based on the motion of magnetic domain walls rely on the precise and deterministic control of the position and the velocity of individual magnetic domain walls in curved nanowires. Varying domain wall velocities have been predicted to result from intrinsic effects such as oscillating domain wall spin structure transformations and extrinsic pinning due to imperfections. Here we use direct dynamic imaging of the nanoscale spin structure that allows us for the first time to directly check these predictions. We find a new regime of oscillating domain wall motion even below the Walker breakdown correlated with periodic spin structure changes. We show that the extrinsic pinning from imperfections in the nanowire only affects slow domain walls and we identify the magnetostatic energy, which scales with the domain wall velocity, as the energy reservoir for the domain wall to overcome the local pinning potential landscape. PMID:23978905

  6. Building D interior, looking south showing same stone wall as ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building D interior, looking south showing same stone wall as it attaches to the east wall of Building D - Hinckley Knitting Mills, Building D, 21-35 East Wister Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  7. 4. EAST VIEW OF HEAVILY DETERIORATED SECTION OF SEA WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. EAST VIEW OF HEAVILY DETERIORATED SECTION OF SEA WALL LOOKING ACROSS ERODED EASTERN CORNER OF PEA PATCH ISLAND. BUILDING FOUNDATION REMAINS IN FOREGROUND. - Fort Delaware, Sea Wall, Pea Patch Island, Delaware City, New Castle County, DE

  8. 11. VIEW, LOOKING WESTNORTHWEST, SHOWING STRUCTURAL BREACH IN WALL CAUSED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. VIEW, LOOKING WEST-NORTHWEST, SHOWING STRUCTURAL BREACH IN WALL CAUSED BY MARSHY CONDITIONS. SORTED AND ASSEMBLED NATIVE BASALT COBBLES USED FOR BUILDING MATERIAL APPEAR IN BACKGROUND - Rock Wall, North side of Battle Creek Canyon, Shingletown, Shasta County, CA

  9. View of intersection with west wall of north wing and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of intersection with west wall of north wing and north wall of west wing; camera facing southeast. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Marine Prison, Suisun Avenue, west side between Mesa Road & San Pablo, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  10. Lock 1 View north of wall west of lock ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Lock 1 - View north of wall west of lock 1. Note the wood pile and plank foundation (believed to be similar under lock 1 walls) - Savannah & Ogeechee Barge Canal, Between Ogeechee & Savannah Rivers, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  11. Lock 5 View west of wing walls and chamber ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Lock 5 - View west of wing walls and chamber with gate pockets visible. Note two small notches in brick at lower portion of wing walls - Savannah & Ogeechee Barge Canal, Between Ogeechee & Savannah Rivers, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  12. View of interior facade of gorge wall looking from southeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of interior facade of gorge wall looking from southeast to northwest at the northern half of the wall ( see also HABS No. GA-2158-56 & 57). - Fort Pulaski, Cockspur Island, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  13. 48. GENERAL VIEW OF SOUTHWEST, FIRST FLOOR ROOM, EAST WALL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. GENERAL VIEW OF SOUTHWEST, FIRST FLOOR ROOM, EAST WALL, WITH SECRET DOOR TO BOXED STAIRWAY TO ROOM ABOVE OPEN IN PANELLED WALL - Montpelier, Montpelier Drive & State Route 197, Laurel, Prince George's County, MD

  14. Lock 1 (Savannah River Lock), Elevation of North Wall, Detail ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Lock 1 (Savannah River Lock), Elevation of North Wall, Detail of Wall Foundation, Detail of Gate Pocket - Savannah & Ogeechee Barge Canal, Between Ogeechee & Savannah Rivers, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  15. 32. THIRD FLOOR: DETAIL OF STENCILED MASONIC EMBLEM ON WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. THIRD FLOOR: DETAIL OF STENCILED MASONIC EMBLEM ON WALL PAPER ON SOUTHWEST WALL OF ROOM IN NORTH CORNER OF BUILDING LOOKING SOUTHWEST - Masonic Temple, 1111-1119 Eleventh Street, Altoona, Blair County, PA

  16. 14. DETAIL OF TRANSITION FROM WING WALL TO CONCRETE RETAINING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. DETAIL OF TRANSITION FROM WING WALL TO CONCRETE RETAINING WALL AT SOUTHERN END OF DAM - Upper Doughty Dam, 200 feet west of Garden State Parkway, 1.7 miles west of Absecon, Egg Harbor City, Atlantic County, NJ

  17. 1. View southeast from Eldred Avenue toward stone wall at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View southeast from Eldred Avenue toward stone wall at corner of Benjamin Carr Farm. Wall moved to current location in 1941-1942. - Benjamin Carr Farm, Route 138 (Eldred Avenue) & Helm Street, Jamestown, Newport County, RI

  18. Arrangement of peptidoglycan in the cell wall of Staphylococcus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Amako, K; Umeda, A; Murata, K

    1982-01-01

    The arrangement of peptidoglycan in the cell wall of Staphylococcus was observed with the newly developed freeze-fracture technique, using n-octanol instead of water as the freezing medium. The replica of the trichloroacetic acid-extracted cell wall (TCA-wall) showed two areas. One of them has a concentric circular structure, a characteristic surface structure of the staphylococcal cell wall, and the other showed an irregular and rough surface. The chemical analysis of the wall revealed that the TCA-wall consisted of mostly peptidoglycan. By digesting the TCA-wall with lysozyme, the circular structures were greatly disturbed, and they disappeared after 60 min of treatment. From these observations it can be expected that the peptidoglycan is arranged in a concentric circular manner in the newly generated cell wall of Staphylococcus. Images PMID:7068534

  19. 30 CFR 56.3130 - Wall, bank, and slope stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Mining Methods § 56.3130 Wall, bank, and slope stability. Mining methods shall be used that will maintain wall, bank, and slope stability in places where persons work or travel in performing their...

  20. Correlation between spin structure oscillations and domain wall velocities.

    PubMed

    Bisig, André; Stärk, Martin; Mawass, Mohamad-Assaad; Moutafis, Christoforos; Rhensius, Jan; Heidler, Jakoba; Büttner, Felix; Noske, Matthias; Weigand, Markus; Eisebitt, Stefan; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Van Waeyenberge, Bartel; Stoll, Hermann; Schütz, Gisela; Kläui, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic sensing and logic devices based on the motion of magnetic domain walls rely on the precise and deterministic control of the position and the velocity of individual magnetic domain walls in curved nanowires. Varying domain wall velocities have been predicted to result from intrinsic effects such as oscillating domain wall spin structure transformations and extrinsic pinning due to imperfections. Here we use direct dynamic imaging of the nanoscale spin structure that allows us for the first time to directly check these predictions. We find a new regime of oscillating domain wall motion even below the Walker breakdown correlated with periodic spin structure changes. We show that the extrinsic pinning from imperfections in the nanowire only affects slow domain walls and we identify the magnetostatic energy, which scales with the domain wall velocity, as the energy reservoir for the domain wall to overcome the local pinning potential landscape.

  1. Dynamical evolution of domain walls in an expanding universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Press, William H.; Ryden, Barbara S.; Spergel, David N.

    1989-01-01

    Whenever the potential of a scalar field has two or more separated, degenerate minima, domain walls form as the universe cools. The evolution of the resulting network of domain walls is calculated for the case of two potential minima in two and three dimensions, including wall annihilation, crossing, and reconnection effects. The nature of the evolution is found to be largely independent of the rate at which the universe expands. Wall annihilation and reconnection occur almost as fast as causality allows, so that the horizon volume is 'swept clean' and contains, at any time, only about one, fairly smooth, wall. Quantitative statistics are given. The total area of wall per volume decreases as the first power of time. The relative slowness of the decrease and the smoothness of the wall on the horizon scale make it impossible for walls to both generate large-scale structure and be consistent with quadrupole microwave background anisotropy limits.

  2. Cemetery perimeter wall and plantings along Wortegemseweg, looking northwest from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cemetery perimeter wall and plantings along Wortegemseweg, looking northwest from south corner of site. Note climbing roses on wall and shaped black locust trees. - Flanders Field American Cemetery & Memorial, Wortegemseweg 117, Waregem, West Flanders (Belgium)

  3. 15. INTERIOR, FIRST FLOOR, NORTHWEST ROOM, SHOWING NORTH WALL WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. INTERIOR, FIRST FLOOR, NORTHWEST ROOM, SHOWING NORTH WALL WITH DOORWAY AND EAST WALL WITH UPPER STAIRWAY - Storm King Ranger Station, U.S. Highway 101 vicinity, near Barnes Point, Port Angeles, Clallam County, WA

  4. 24. DETAIL VIEW OF TILE GAUGE IN INTERMEDIATE LOCK WALL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. DETAIL VIEW OF TILE GAUGE IN INTERMEDIATE LOCK WALL, LOOKING NORTHEAST. NOTE STEEL WALL ARMOR EMBEDDED IN CONCRETE. - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam 26, Alton, Madison County, IL

  5. 6. INTERIOR, NORTH WING, VIEW THROUGH DOORWAY IN EAST WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. INTERIOR, NORTH WING, VIEW THROUGH DOORWAY IN EAST WALL OF SOUTHEAST ROOM, SHOWING RUINOUS FIRST AND SECOND FLOOR (EAST) WALL OF NORTHWEST ROOM IN CENTRAL BLOCK - Bulows Minde Estate House, Bulows Minde, Bulows Minde, St. Croix, VI

  6. 8. INTERIOR, NORTH WING, VIEW THROUGH DOORWAY IN NORTH WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. INTERIOR, NORTH WING, VIEW THROUGH DOORWAY IN NORTH WALL OF SOUTHEAST ROOM, SHOWING FENESTRATED NORTH WALL (BASEMENT THROUGH SECOND LEVELS) OF NORTH-CENTRAL ROOM - Bulows Minde Estate House, Bulows Minde, Bulows Minde, St. Croix, VI

  7. Dynamical properties of the soft-wall elliptical billiard.

    PubMed

    Kroetz, Tiago; Oliveira, Hércules A; Portela, Jefferson S E; Viana, Ricardo L

    2016-08-01

    Physical systems such as optical traps and microwave cavities are realistically modeled by billiards with soft walls. In order to investigate the influence of the wall softness on the billiard dynamics, we study numerically a smooth two-dimensional potential well that has the elliptical (hard-wall) billiard as a limiting case. Considering two parameters, the eccentricity of the elliptical equipotential curves and the wall hardness, which defines the steepness of the well, we show that (1) whereas the hard-wall limit is integrable and thus completely regular, the soft wall elliptical billiard exhibits chaos, (2) the chaotic fraction of the phase space depends nonmonotonically on the hardness of the wall, and (3) the effect of the hardness on the dynamics depends strongly on the eccentricity of the billiard. We further show that the limaçon billiard can exhibit enhanced chaos induced by wall softness, which suggests that our findings generalize to quasi-integrable systems.

  8. 2. FORMER QUARTERS OF THE SPANISH NAVY, BRICK WALL CONSTRUCTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. FORMER QUARTERS OF THE SPANISH NAVY, BRICK WALL CONSTRUCTION DETAIL SHOWING ARCHES OF SOUTH WALL OF WEST WING OF ENTRANCE PORTICO. - El Arsenal, Former Headquarters of the Spanish Navy, Calle Arsenal, San Juan, San Juan Municipio, PR

  9. 22. SOUTH WALL MAIN CANNERY BUILDING View from the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. SOUTH WALL - MAIN CANNERY BUILDING View from the south end of the main floor, showing the damaged roof and wall seen in Photo No. 21. - Hovden Cannery, 886 Cannery Row, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

  10. Polarization control at spin-driven ferroelectric domain walls.

    PubMed

    Leo, Naëmi; Bergman, Anders; Cano, Andres; Poudel, Narayan; Lorenz, Bernd; Fiebig, Manfred; Meier, Dennis

    2015-04-14

    Unusual electronic states arise at ferroelectric domain walls due to the local symmetry reduction, strain gradients and electrostatics. This particularly applies to improper ferroelectrics, where the polarization is induced by a structural or magnetic order parameter. Because of the subordinate nature of the polarization, the rigid mechanical and electrostatic boundary conditions that constrain domain walls in proper ferroics are lifted. Here we show that spin-driven ferroelectricity promotes the emergence of charged domain walls. This provides new degrees of flexibility for controlling domain-wall charges in a deterministic and reversible process. We create and position a domain wall by an electric field in Mn0.95Co0.05WO4. With a magnetic field we then rotate the polarization and convert neutral into charged domain walls, while its magnetic properties peg the wall to its location. Using atomistic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert simulations we quantify the polarization changes across the two wall types and highlight their general occurrence.

  11. 6. DETAIL OF MASONRY ON SOUTHWEST WING WALL. MASONRY ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. DETAIL OF MASONRY ON SOUTHWEST WING WALL. MASONRY ON WING WALLS IS LAID IN A RANDOM RUBBLE PATTERN. - Core Creek County Bridge, Spanning Core Creek, approximately 1 mile South of State Route 332 (Newtown Bypass), Newtown, Bucks County, PA

  12. Detail of northeast wing wall and guiderail. The section of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of northeast wing wall and guiderail. The section of the wing wall in the foreground is a historic extension of this element. - Chester County Bridge No. 225, Spanning Tweed Creek at Hopewell Road, Oxford, Chester County, PA

  13. Hydrogen scramjet with side wall injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, R. G.; Paull, A.; Morris, N.; Stalker, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented from an experimental evaluation of a hydrogen-burning wall-injection scramjet engine, performed in the free-piston shock tunnel at the Australian National University. The advantages of scramjet propulsion for high-Mach-number high-altitude flight are reviewed, and the need for an alternative to injection struts is indicated. Pressure profiles and heat-transfer measurements for constant-area and diverging ducts are presented graphically and characterized in detail. The ability of the injected flow to shield the chamber wall from the heat of the freestream flow is demonstrated. The extrapolation of the shock-tunnel results to flight conditions, however, is made difficult by the fact that a significant amount of fuel passes through a quenched zone without burning, seriously degrading overall performance.

  14. Turbulent wall jet in a coflowing stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    A theoretical investigation was undertaken to develop a relatively simple model of a two-dimensional, turbulent wall jet in a coflowing stream. The incompressible jet flow was modeled by using an integral method which includes turbulent shear stress, entrainment, and heat transfer. The method solves the conservation equations for the average jet flow properties and uses the velocity profile suggested by Escudier and Nicoll to obtain detailed characteristics of the jet on a flat plate. The analytical results compare favorably with experimental data for a range of injection velocities, which demonstrates the usefulness of the theory for estimating jet growth, velocity decay, and wall skin friction. The theory, which was applied to a Coanda jet on a circular cylinder, provided estimates of suction pressures aft of the jet exit that were in close agreement with experimental values.

  15. Magnetic domain-wall racetrack memory.

    PubMed

    Parkin, Stuart S P; Hayashi, Masamitsu; Thomas, Luc

    2008-04-11

    Recent developments in the controlled movement of domain walls in magnetic nanowires by short pulses of spin-polarized current give promise of a nonvolatile memory device with the high performance and reliability of conventional solid-state memory but at the low cost of conventional magnetic disk drive storage. The racetrack memory described in this review comprises an array of magnetic nanowires arranged horizontally or vertically on a silicon chip. Individual spintronic reading and writing nanodevices are used to modify or read a train of approximately 10 to 100 domain walls, which store a series of data bits in each nanowire. This racetrack memory is an example of the move toward innately three-dimensional microelectronic devices.

  16. Adding crumb rubber into exterior wall materials.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Han; Thong-On, Norasit; Zhang, Xiong

    2002-10-01

    In Arizona US, most houses are built with walls covered by stuccos/coatings/mortars. This paper presents an explorative investigation of adding crumb rubber into stuccos/coatings/mortars. A series of experiments are conducted to examine the thermal and mechanical performance of the crumb rubber mixes. The results show that, the mixes with crumb rubber do exhibit more desirable performances like being high in crack-resistance and thermal insulation, and low in thermal expansion/contraction. The drawback for the crumb rubber mixes is the reduction in compressive strength, but which can be compensated by other means. As a site experiment, an area of 100 square-feet of crumb rubber coatings for two mix designs is sprayed on a tire-adobe wall. After being sprayed more than 14 months, the coatings apparently are in good condition. Significance of this study is that this practice, if accepted, will yield improved products that consume large quantities of crumb rubber.

  17. Gullies and Streaks on Crater wall Kaiser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows gullies emergent from a specific layer in the wall of an ancient crater within a much larger crater, Kaiser. Located at 46.4oS, 341.4oW, this picture obtained in early southern summer also shows a plethora of dark, and in some places squiggly, streaks. The streaks are thought to have been formed by the passage of dust devils that removed or disrupted a thin coating of dust from the surface. Such streaks commonly form at martian middle latitudes in late spring and early summer. The gullies in the crater wall were likely eroded by a fluid, perhaps water. This picture was obtained in January 2002; it covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) across and is illuminated from the upper left.

  18. Chronic laminitis: strategic hoof wall resection.

    PubMed

    Rucker, Amy

    2010-04-01

    In the chronic-laminitic foot, severe soft-tissue compression and compromised circulation can result in osteitis and sepsis at the margin of the distal phalanx. Resultant inflammation and sepsis may cause the coronary corium to swell, drain, or separate from the hoof capsule, usually within 8 weeks of laminitis onset. Slow-onset cases of soft-tissue impingement can develop secondary to distal phalanx displacement due to lack of wall attachment. With either presentation, partial upper wall resection is required to reverse compression and vascular impingement by the hoof capsule. If the pathology is not overwhelming, the area reepithelializes and grows attached tubular horn. Firm bandaging and restricted exercise until tubular horn has regrown enhances recovery and the return of a strong hoof.

  19. Enhanced dielectric-wall linear accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Sampayan, S.E.; Caporaso, G.J.; Kirbie, H.C.

    1998-09-22

    A dielectric-wall linear accelerator is enhanced by a high-voltage, fast e-time switch that includes a pair of electrodes between which are laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators. A high voltage is placed between the electrodes sufficient to stress the voltage breakdown of the insulator on command. A light trigger, such as a laser, is focused along at least one line along the edge surface of the laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators extending between the electrodes. The laser is energized to initiate a surface breakdown by a fluence of photons, thus causing the electrical switch to close very promptly. Such insulators and lasers are incorporated in a dielectric wall linear accelerator with Blumlein modules, and phasing is controlled by adjusting the length of fiber optic cables that carry the laser light to the insulator surface. 6 figs.

  20. Near Wall Turbulence: an experimental view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanislas, Michel

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this presentation is to summarize the understanding of the near wall turbulence phenomena obtained at Laboratoire de Mécanique de Lille using both hot wire anemometry and PIV. A wind tunnel was built in 1993 specifically designed for these two measurement techniques and aimed at large Reynolds numbers. Several experiments were performed since then in the frame of different PhDs and European projects, all aimed at evidencing turbulence organization in this region. These have fully benefited of the extraordinary development of PIV in that time frame, which has allowed entering visually and quantitatively inside the complex spatial and temporal structure of near wall turbulence. The presentation will try to emphasize the benefit of this approach in terms of understanding and modelling, illustrated by some representative results obtained. M. Stanislas particularly acknowledges the financial support of Region Nord Pas de Calais, unmissing during 25 years.

  1. Manipulation of vortices by magnetic domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goa, P. E.; Hauglin, H.; Olsen, A.˚. A. F.; Shantsev, D.; Johansen, T. H.

    2003-01-01

    In a type-II superconductor, the magnetic field penetrates in the form of thin filaments called vortices. The controlled behavior of these vortices may provide the basis for a new generation of nanodevices. We present here a series of experiments showing simultaneous manipulation and imaging of individual vortices in a NbSe2 single crystal. The magnetic field from a Bloch wall in a ferrite garnet film (FGF) is used to manipulate the vortices. High-resolution magneto-optical imaging enables real-time observation of the vortex positions using the Faraday effect in the same FGF. Depending on the thickness of the sample, the vortices are either swept away or merely bent with the Bloch wall.

  2. Domain wall motion by localized temperature gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, Simone; Raposo, Victor; Martinez, Eduardo; Lopez-Diaz, Luis

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic domain wall (DW) motion induced by a localized Gaussian temperature profile is studied in a Permalloy nanostrip within the framework of the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Bloch equation. The different contributions to thermally induced DW motion, entropic torque and magnonic spin transfer torque, are isolated and compared. The analysis of magnonic spin transfer torque includes a description of thermally excited magnons in the sample. A third driving force due to a thermally induced dipolar field is found and described. Finally, thermally induced DW motion is studied under realistic conditions by taking into account the edge roughness. The results give quantitative insights into the different mechanisms responsible for domain wall motion in temperature gradients and allow for comparison with experimental results.

  3. Vascular MR segmentation: wall and plaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fuxing; Holzapfel, Gerhard; Schulze-Bauer, Christian; Stollberger, Rudolf; Thedens, Daniel; Bolinger, Lizann; Stolpen, Alan; Sonka, Milan

    2003-05-01

    Cardiovascular events frequently result from local rupture of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque. Non-invasive assessment of plaque vulnerability is needed to allow institution of preventive measures before heart attack or stroke occur. A computerized method for segmentation of arterial wall layers and plaque from high-resolution volumetric MR images is reported. The method uses dynamic programming to detect optimal borders in each MRI frame. The accuracy of the results was tested in 62 T1-weighted MR images from 6 vessel specimens in comparison to borders manually determined by an expert observer. The mean signed border positioning errors for the lumen, internal elastic lamina, and external elastic lamina borders were -0.12+/-0.14 mm, 0.04+/-0.12mm, and -0.15+/-0.13 mm, respectively. The presented wall layer segmentation approach is one of the first steps towards non-invasive assessment of plaque vulnerability in atherosclerotic subjects.

  4. The Kevlar-walled anechoic wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devenport, William J.; Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Borgoltz, Aurelien; Ravetta, Patricio A.; Barone, Matthew F.; Brown, Kenneth A.; Morton, Michael A.

    2013-08-01

    The aerodynamic and acoustic performance of an anechoic wind tunnel test section with walls made from thin Kevlar cloth have been measured and analyzed. The Kevlar test section offers some advantages over a conventional free-jet arrangement. The cloth contains the bulk of the flow but permits the transmission of sound with little loss. The containment results in smaller far-field aerodynamic corrections meaning that larger models can be tested at higher Reynolds numbers. The containment also eliminates the need for a jet catcher and allows for a much longer test section. Model-generated noise is thus more easily separated from facility background using beamforming. Measurements and analysis of acoustic and aerodynamic corrections for a Kevlar-walled test section are presented and discussed, along with benchmark trailing edge noise measurements.

  5. Enhanced dielectric-wall linear accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Sampayan, Stephen E.; Caporaso, George J.; Kirbie, Hugh C.

    1998-01-01

    A dielectric-wall linear accelerator is enhanced by a high-voltage, fast e-time switch that includes a pair of electrodes between which are laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators. A high voltage is placed between the electrodes sufficient to stress the voltage breakdown of the insulator on command. A light trigger, such as a laser, is focused along at least one line along the edge surface of the laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators extending between the electrodes. The laser is energized to initiate a surface breakdown by a fluence of photons, thus causing the electrical switch to close very promptly. Such insulators and lasers are incorporated in a dielectric wall linear accelerator with Blumlein modules, and phasing is controlled by adjusting the length of fiber optic cables that carry the laser light to the insulator surface.

  6. Stochastic behavior of nanoscale dielectric wall buckling

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Lawrence H.; Levin, Igor; Cook, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    The random buckling patterns of nanoscale dielectric walls are analyzed using a nonlinear multi-scale stochastic method that combines experimental measurements with simulations. The dielectric walls, approximately 200 nm tall and 20 nm wide, consist of compliant, low dielectric constant (low-k) fins capped with stiff, compressively stressed TiN lines that provide the driving force for buckling. The deflections of the buckled lines exhibit sinusoidal pseudoperiodicity with amplitude fluctuation and phase decorrelation arising from stochastic variations in wall geometry, properties, and stress state at length scales shorter than the characteristic deflection wavelength of about 1000 nm. The buckling patterns are analyzed and modeled at two length scales: a longer scale (up to 5000 nm) that treats randomness as a longer-scale measurable quantity, and a shorter-scale (down to 20 nm) that treats buckling as a deterministic phenomenon. Statistical simulation is used to join the two length scales. Through this approach, the buckling model is validated and material properties and stress states are inferred. In particular, the stress state of TiN lines in three different systems is determined, along with the elastic moduli of low-k fins and the amplitudes of the small-scale random fluctuations in wall properties—all in the as-processed state. The important case of stochastic effects giving rise to buckling in a deterministically sub-critical buckling state is demonstrated. The nonlinear multiscale stochastic analysis provides guidance for design of low-k structures with acceptable buckling behavior and serves as a template for how randomness that is common to nanoscale phenomena might be measured and analyzed in other contexts. PMID:27330220

  7. Machining Thin-Walled Cylindrical Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cimbak, Joe; Spagnolo, Jim; Kraus, Dan

    1988-01-01

    Cylindrical walls only few thousandths of inch thick machined accurately and without tears or punctures with aid of beryllium copper mandrel. Chilled so it contracts, then inserted in cylinder. As comes to room temperature, mandrel expands and fits snugly inside cylinder. Will not allow part to slide and provides solid backup to prevent deflection when part machined by grinding wheel. When machining finished, cylinder-and-mandrel assembly inserted in dry ice, mandrel contracts and removed from part.

  8. Effect of wall hardness on hemolysis.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, T; Shimokasa, K; Funakubo, A; Fukui, Y

    2000-08-01

    One of the major problems for artificial organs to develop and to improve is the reduction of hemolysis. The optimum designing of less hemolysis artificial organs is achieved through computational analysis and flow visualization techniques. However, it is impossible to know the quantitative relation between hemolysis and these analytic data. Thus, in vitro studies were performed to estimate these devices on hemolysis because there is no standard for designing these devices with less hemolysis. Therefore, it is essential to reveal the relation between blood flow behaviors and hemolysis. Previous studies reported that hemolysis was caused by a combination of physical factors. In particular, shear stress, pressure, and other fluid dynamical effects were shown to induce hemolysis. In another fluid dynamical experiment reported, the collision flow against the sanded wall was considered the most important factor that directly effected blood damage, which led to hemolysis. The blood flow impact of the collision against the wall effected serious damage to red blood cells. The objective of this study was to point out the relationship between physical force (pressure) in collision flow and hemolysis. In vitro tests using bovine blood and a circulation model that included a jet flow that collides against a wall were conducted. In these tests, we changed the material of the wall by replacing silicone rubber of various thicknesses. The thickness of the silicone rubber is inversely proportional to its hardness. The results show that the increasing rate of hemolysis was lower when the surface was coated by silicone rubber. In conclusion, we considered that it is possible to reduce hemolysis by adjusting the hardness of the material and contacted blood flow.

  9. From Cave Walls to Clay Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Julie

    2004-01-01

    About 15,000 BC, the bison and other animals roamed the land and cave people, in their spare time, found colorful, chalky rocks with which to play. Over the course of time, they found that the chalky rocks would rub off on the cave walls, thus cave paintings and the pursuit of art was born. This article describes one fourth-grade classroom's…

  10. Hydrogen uptake in vanadium first wall structures

    SciTech Connect

    Simonen, E.P.; Jones, R.H.

    1996-04-01

    Evaluation of hydrogen sources and transport are needed to assess the mechanical integrity of V structures. Two sources include implantation and transmutation. The proposed coatings for the DEMO and ITER first wall strongly influence retention of hydrogen isotopes. Upper limit calculations of hydrogen inventory were based on recycling to the plasma and an impermeable coolant-side coating. Hydrogen isotope concentrations in V approaching 1,000 appm may be activated.

  11. Reconstruction of complex abdominal wall defects.

    PubMed

    Leppäniemi, A; Tukiainen, E

    2013-01-01

    Complex abdominal wall defects refer to situations where simple ventral hernia repair is not feasible because the defect is very large, there is a concomitant infection or failed previous re-pair attempt, or if there is not enough original skin to cover the repair. Usually a complex abdominal wall repair is preceded by a period of temporary abdominal closure where the short-term aims include closure of the catabolic drain, protection of the viscera and preventing fistula formation, preventing bowel adherence to the abdominal wall, and enabling future fascial and skin closure. Currently the best way to achieve these goals is the vacuum- and mesh-mediated fascial traction method achieving close to 90% fascial closure rates. The long-term aims of an abdominal closure following a planned hernia strategy include intact skin cover, fascial closure at midline (if possible), good functional outcome with innervated abdominal musculature, no pain and good cosmetic result. The main methods of abdominal wall reconstruction include the use of prosthetic (mesh) or autologous material (tissue flaps). In patients with original skin cover over the fascial defect (simple ventral hernia), the most commonly used method is hernia repair with an artificial mesh. For more complex defects, our first choice of reconstruction is the component separation technique, sometimes combined with a mesh. In contaminated fields where component separation alone is not feasible, a combination with a biological mesh can be used. In large defects with grafted skin, a free TFL flap is the best option, sometimes reinforced with a mesh and enhanced with components separation.

  12. Hollow clay tile wall program summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, R.C.; Jones, W.D.

    1995-07-30

    Many of the Y-12 Plant buildings, constructed during the 1940s and 1950s, consist of steel ed concrete framing infilled with hollow clay tile (HCT). The infill was intended to provide for building enclosure and was not designed to have vertical or lateral load-carrying capacity. During the late 1970s and early 1980s, seismic and wind evaluations were performed on many of these buildings in conjunction with the preparation of a site-wide safety analysis report. This analytical work, based on the best available methodology, considered lateral load-carrying capacity of the HCT infill on the basis of building code allowable shear values. In parallel with the analysis effort, DOE initiated a program to develop natural phenomena capacity and performance criteria for existing buildings, but these criteria did not specify guidelines for determining the lateral force capacity of frames infilled with HCT. The evaluation of infills was, therefore, based on the provisions for the design of unreinforced masonry as outlined in standard masonry codes. When the results of the seismic and wind evaluations were compared with the new criteria, the projected building capacities fell short of the requirements. Apparently, if the buildings were to meet the new criteria, many millions of dollars would be required for building upgrades. Because the upgrade costs were significant, the assumptions and approaches used in the analyses were reevaluated. Four issues were identified: (1) Once the infilled walls cracked, what capacity (nonlinear response), if any, would the walls have to resist earthquake or wind loads applied in the plane of the infill (in-plane)? (2) Would the infilled walls remain within the steel or reinforced concrete framing when subjected to earthquake or high wind loads applied perpendicular to the infill (out-of-plane)? (3) What was the actual shear capacity of the HCT infill? (4) Was modeling the HCT infill as a shear wall the best approach?

  13. Stochastic behavior of nanoscale dielectric wall buckling.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Lawrence H; Levin, Igor; Cook, Robert F

    2016-03-01

    The random buckling patterns of nanoscale dielectric walls are analyzed using a nonlinear multi-scale stochastic method that combines experimental measurements with simulations. The dielectric walls, approximately 200 nm tall and 20 nm wide, consist of compliant, low dielectric constant (low-k) fins capped with stiff, compressively stressed TiN lines that provide the driving force for buckling. The deflections of the buckled lines exhibit sinusoidal pseudoperiodicity with amplitude fluctuation and phase decorrelation arising from stochastic variations in wall geometry, properties, and stress state at length scales shorter than the characteristic deflection wavelength of about 1000 nm. The buckling patterns are analyzed and modeled at two length scales: a longer scale (up to 5000 nm) that treats randomness as a longer-scale measurable quantity, and a shorter-scale (down to 20 nm) that treats buckling as a deterministic phenomenon. Statistical simulation is used to join the two length scales. Through this approach, the buckling model is validated and material properties and stress states are inferred. In particular, the stress state of TiN lines in three different systems is determined, along with the elastic moduli of low-k fins and the amplitudes of the small-scale random fluctuations in wall properties-all in the as-processed state. The important case of stochastic effects giving rise to buckling in a deterministically sub-critical buckling state is demonstrated. The nonlinear multiscale stochastic analysis provides guidance for design of low-k structures with acceptable buckling behavior and serves as a template for how randomness that is common to nanoscale phenomena might be measured and analyzed in other contexts.

  14. Stent implantation influence wall shear stress evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernad, S. I.; Totorean, A. F.; Bosioc, A. I.; Petre, I.; Bernad, E. S.

    2016-06-01

    Local hemodynamic factors are known affect the natural history of the restenosis critically after coronary stenting of atherosclerosis. Stent-induced flows disturbance magnitude dependent directly on the strut design. The impact of flow alterations around struts vary as the strut geometrical parameters change. Our results provide data regarding the hemodynamic parameters for the blood flow in both stenosed and stented coronary artery under physiological conditions, namely wall shear stress and pressure drop.

  15. Wall-layer eruptions in turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, J. D. A.

    1989-01-01

    The near-wall region of a turbulent flow is investigated in the limit of large Reynolds numbers. When low-speed streaks are present, the governing equations are shown to be of the boundary-layer type. Physical processes leading to local breakdown and a strong interaction with the outer region are considered. It is argued that convected vortices, predominantly of the hairpin type, will provoke eruptions and regenerative interactions with the outer region.

  16. Terraced Wall Crater on the Lunar Limb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    This oblique view featuring International Astronomical Union (IAU) Crater 302 on the Moon surface was photographed by the Apollo 10 astronauts in May of 1969. Note the terraced walls of the crater and central cone. Center point coordinates are located at 162 degrees, 2 minutes east longitude and 10 degrees, 1 minute south latitude. One of the Apollo 10 astronauts aimed a handheld 70mm camera at the surface from lunar orbit for a series of pictures in this area.

  17. Hot Wall Thickness Variation Measurement System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-01

    Subtltia) HOT WALL THICKNESS VARIATION MEASUREMENT SYSTEM 7. AUTHORfa; 3. J. KRUPSKI 9 . PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS PRODUCT...THE FORGING 3. ULTRASONICS ON A HOT TUBE 4. SYSTEt-l DESCRIPTION 5. TESTING RESULTS 6. CONCLUSIONS 7. HffLEMENTATION PAGE i ii 1 2 4 6 9 ...printed out. The grip procedure was repeated toward the breech end of the forging with good results. The third and 9 breech end prints were at about

  18. Special adhesion of natural honeycomb walls and their application.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tianqi; Li, Muchen; Heng, Liping; Jiang, Lei

    2015-03-07

    In this paper, we investigated the wettability and adhesive behavior of the natural honeycomb wall for water and honey droplets. The cell walls have hydrophobic and highly adhesive properties for both water and honey in air. This highly adhesive cell wall was used as a "mechanical hand" to transfer micro-droplets. These findings will help us to comprehensively understand the surface properties of honeycomb walls, and will provide a novel strategy for achieving functional biomimetics based on honeycombs.

  19. High Performance Walls in Hot-Dry Climates

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeschele, Marc; Springer, David; Dakin, Bill; German, Alea

    2015-01-01

    High performance walls represent a high priority measure for moving the next generation of new homes to the Zero Net Energy performance level. The primary goal in improving wall thermal performance revolves around increasing the wall framing from 2x4 to 2x6, adding more cavity and exterior rigid insulation, achieving insulation installation criteria meeting ENERGY STAR's thermal bypass checklist, and reducing the amount of wood penetrating the wall cavity.

  20. Mean flow generation in a rotating straight and sloping wall annulus with librating walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi V., Abouzar; Klein, Marten; Seelig, Torsten; Harlander, Uwe; Schaller, Eberhard; Will, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    The work presented is about the investigation of the mean flow generation mechanism in a rotating straight and sloping wall annulus with librating walls. Three mean flow generation mechanism may be identified: the mean flow driven by inertial wave-wave interaction, mean flow driven by the action of Reynolds stress and mean flow driven by friction. Direct numerical simulation together with a laboratory experiment is used to investigate it. An incompressible Navier-Stokes solver with the equations formulated for volume fluxes in generalized curvilinear coordinates has been used. In terms of geometry, the current investigation is divided into two parts: mean flow generation mechanism in (i) a sloping wall annulus and (ii) a straight wall annulus. For the sloping wall annulus we investigated mean flow induced by inertial wave-wave interaction and friction. Under consecutive reflections in a sloping wall annulus inertial waves may form wave attractors. It will be shown that when boundary layer over the sloping wall is centrifugally stable, a retrograde mean flow may be generated due to the focusing of inertial wave beam from the sloping wall via the inertial wave-wave interaction. In addition, we observed a prograde mean flow which is induced by the effect of friction and is scaled as a Stewartson layer. We studied the appearance of this mean flow by librating top/bottom lids and sloping wall either independently or together. A comparison with laboratory experiment (PIV) will be shown. In the second part, mean flow in a straight wall annulus induced by the effect of Reynolds stress and friction is investigated. To study mean flow generation mechanism, we allow top/bottom lids and inner and outer cylinder side walls librate either together or independently. It has been shown experimentally (Noir et al. 2010) that a retrograde mean flow in the bulk of the fluid is due to the nonlinearity of the Ekman boundary layer and instability of the Stokes boundary layer and inertial

  1. Cell wall proteome of pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Karkowska-Kuleta, Justyna; Kozik, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    A fast development of a wide variety of proteomic techniques supported by mass spectrometry coupled with high performance liquid chromatography has been observed in recent years. It significantly contributes to the progress in research on the cell wall, very important part of the cells of pathogenic fungi. This complicated structure composed of different polysaccharides, proteins, lipids and melanin, plays a key role in interactions with the host during infection. Changes in the set of the surface-exposed proteins under different environmental conditions provide an effective way for pathogens to respond, adapt and survive in the new niches of infection. This work summarizes the current state of knowledge on proteins, studied both qualitatively and quantitatively, and found within the cell wall of fungal pathogens for humans, including Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Aspergillus fumigatus, Cryptococcus neoformans and other medically important fungi. The described proteomic studies involved the isolation and fractionation of particular sets of proteins of interest with various techniques, often based on differences in their linkages to the polysaccharide scaffold. Furthermore, the proteinaceous contents of extracellular vesicles ("virulence bags") of C. albicans, C. neoformans, Histoplasma capsulatum and Paracoccidioides brasiliensis are compared, because their production can partially explain the problem of non-classical protein secretion by fungi. The role assigned to surface-exposed proteins in pathogenesis of fungal infections is enormously high, thus justifying the need for further investigation of cell wall proteomes.

  2. Domain wall motion in ferroelectrics: Barkhausen noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shur, V.; Rumyantsev, E.; Kozhevnikov, V.; Nikolaeva, E.; Shishkin, E.

    2002-03-01

    The switching current noise has been recorded during polarization reversal in single-crystalline gadolinium molybdate (GMO) and lithium tantalate (LT). Analysis of Barkhausen noise (BN) data allows to classify the noise types by determination of the critical indexes and fractal dimensions. BN is manifested as the short pulses during the polarization reversal. We have analyzed the BN data recorded in GMO and LT with various types of controlled domain structure. The data treatment in terms of probability distribution of duration, area and energy of individual pulses reveals the critical behavior typical for the fractal records in time. We used the Fourier transform and Hurst's rescaled range analysis for obtaining the Hurst factor, fractal dimension and classifying the noise types. We investigated by computer simulation the mechanism of sideways motion of 180O domain wall by nucleation at the wall taking into account the nuclei-nuclei interaction. It was shown that the moving domain walls display the fractal shape and their motion is accompanied by Flicker noise, which is in accord with experimental data. The research was made possible in part by Programs "Basic Research in Russian Universities" and "Priority Research in High School. Electronics", by Grant No. 01-02-17443 of RFBR, by Award No.REC-005 of CRDF.

  3. Mesh Sutured Repairs of Abdominal Wall Defects

    PubMed Central

    Lanier, Steven T.; Jordan, Sumanas W.; Miller, Kyle R.; Ali, Nada A.; Stock, Stuart R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: A new closure technique is introduced, which uses strips of macroporous polypropylene mesh as a suture for closure of abdominal wall defects due to failures of standard sutures and difficulties with planar meshes. Methods: Strips of macroporous polypropylene mesh of 2 cm width were passed through the abdominal wall and tied as simple interrupted sutures. The surgical technique and surgical outcomes are presented. Results: One hundred and seven patients underwent a mesh sutured abdominal wall closure. Seventy-six patients had preoperative hernias, and the mean hernia width by CT scan for those with scans was 9.1 cm. Forty-nine surgical fields were clean-contaminated, contaminated, or dirty. Five patients had infections within the first 30 days. Only one knot was removed as an office procedure. Mean follow-up at 234 days revealed 4 recurrent hernias. Conclusions: Mesh sutured repairs reliably appose tissue under tension using concepts of force distribution and resistance to suture pull-through. The technique reduces the amount of foreign material required in comparison to sheet meshes, and avoids the shortcomings of monofilament sutures. Mesh sutured closures seem to be tolerant of bacterial contamination with low hernia recurrence rates and have replaced our routine use of mesh sheets and bioprosthetic grafts. PMID:27757361

  4. Isotropy and anisotropy of the arterial wall.

    PubMed

    Weizsacker, H W; Pinto, J G

    1988-01-01

    The passive biomechanical response of intact cylindrical rat carotid arteries is studied in vitro and compared with the mechanical response of rubber tubes. Using true stress and natural strain in the definition of the incremental modulus of elasticity, the tissue wall properties are analyzed over wide ranges of simultaneous circumferential and longitudinal deformations. The type of loading chosen is 'physiological' i.e. symmetric: the cylindrical segments are subjected to internal pressure and axial prestretch without torsion or shear. Several aspects pertaining to the choice of parameters characterizing the material are discussed and the analysis pertaining to the deformational behavior of a hypothetical compliant tube with Hookean wall material is presented. The experimental results show that while rubber response can be adequately represented as linearly elastic and isotropic, the overall response of vascular tissue is highly non-linear and anisotropic. However, for states of deformation that occur in vivo, the elasticity of arteries is quite similar to that of rubber tubes and as such the arterial wall may be viewed as incrementally isotropic for the range of deformations that occur in vivo.

  5. Optical modulation of single walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strano, Michael S.

    2007-03-01

    Recent advances in the spectroscopy of single walled carbon nanotubes have significantly enhanced our ability to understand and control their surface chemistry, both covalently and non-covalently. Our work has focused on modulating the optical properties of semiconducting single walled carbon nanotubes as near infrared photoluminescent sensors for chemical analysis. Molecular detection using near-infrared light between 0.9 and 1.3 eV has important biomedical applications because of greater tissue penetration and reduced auto-fluorescent background in thick tissue or whole-blood media. In one system, the transition of DNA secondary structure modulates the dielectric environment of the single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) around which it is adsorbed. The SWNT band-gap fluorescence undergoes a red shift when an encapsulating 30-nucleotide oligomer is exposed to counter ions that screen the charged backbone. We demonstrate the detection of the mercuric ions in whole blood, tissue, and from within living mammalian cells using this technology. Similar results are obtained for DNA hybridization and the detection of single nucleotide polymorphism. We also report the synthesis and successful testing of near-infrared β-D-glucose sensors2 that utilize a different mechanism: a photoluminescence modulation via charge transfer. The results demonstrate new opportunities for nanoparticle optical sensors that operate in strongly absorbing media of relevance to medicine or biology.

  6. Wall Street's growing influence on plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Krieger, L M; Shaw, W W

    2000-04-01

    The advent of managed care has unleashed market forces on the health care system. One result of these new pressures is a shift from nonprofit to Wall Street-based financing. This report quantifies these trends by comparing health organizations' financial structures in the 1980s and now. The reasons behind this shift and the function of the stock market are examined. A review of Wall Street's key financial measures confirms that health care has shifted to the stock market as its principal means of financing. The stock market works by assigning a current price to a company's stock based on estimates for future earnings. Thus, companies desire predictability in their costs, revenues, and profits. Plastic surgeons can master this system by meeting the challenges imposed by Wall Street financing. Important steps include continuously measuring costs and outcomes of procedures, demanding cost data from hospitals and payers, using these data to improve costs and outcomes, and taking advantage of the system's openness to innovation and easier access to capital. As they seek to protect their role as medical decision makers under the new free-market system, plastic surgeons can benefit from understanding the mechanisms of the stock market.

  7. Domain walls in ω-phase transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanati, Mahdi; Saxena, Avadh

    1998-11-01

    The β-phase (body-centered cubic: b.c.c.) to ω-phase transformation in certain elements (e.g. Zr) and alloys (e.g. ZrNb) is induced either by quenching or application of pressure. The ω-phase is a metastable state and usually coexists with the β-matrix in the form of small particles. To study the formation of domain walls in these materials we have extended the Landau model of Cook for the ω-phase transition by including a spatial gradient (Ginzburg) term of the scalar order parameter. In general, the Landau free energy is an asymmetric double-well potential. From the variational derivative of the total free energy we obtain a static equilibrium condition. By solving this equation for different physical parameters and boundary conditions, we obtained different quasi-one-dimensional soliton-like solutions. These solutions correspond to three different types of domain walls between the ω-phase and the β-matrix. In addition, we obtained soliton lattice (domain wall array) solutions, calculated their formation energy and the asymptotic interaction between the solitons.

  8. ADVANCED HIGH PERFORMANCE SOLID WALL BLANKET CONCEPTS

    SciTech Connect

    WONG, CPC; MALANG, S; NISHIO, S; RAFFRAY, R; SAGARA, S

    2002-04-01

    OAK A271 ADVANCED HIGH PERFORMANCE SOLID WALL BLANKET CONCEPTS. First wall and blanket (FW/blanket) design is a crucial element in the performance and acceptance of a fusion power plant. High temperature structural and breeding materials are needed for high thermal performance. A suitable combination of structural design with the selected materials is necessary for D-T fuel sufficiency. Whenever possible, low afterheat, low chemical reactivity and low activation materials are desired to achieve passive safety and minimize the amount of high-level waste. Of course the selected fusion FW/blanket design will have to match the operational scenarios of high performance plasma. The key characteristics of eight advanced high performance FW/blanket concepts are presented in this paper. Design configurations, performance characteristics, unique advantages and issues are summarized. All reviewed designs can satisfy most of the necessary design goals. For further development, in concert with the advancement in plasma control and scrape off layer physics, additional emphasis will be needed in the areas of first wall coating material selection, design of plasma stabilization coils, consideration of reactor startup and transient events. To validate the projected performance of the advanced FW/blanket concepts the critical element is the need for 14 MeV neutron irradiation facilities for the generation of necessary engineering design data and the prediction of FW/blanket components lifetime and availability.

  9. Association Mapping of Cell Wall Synthesis Regulatory Genes and Cell Wall Quality in Switchgrass

    SciTech Connect

    Bartley, Laura; Wu, Y.; Zhu, L.; Brummer, E. C.; Saha, M.

    2016-05-31

    Inefficient conversion of biomass to biofuels is one of the main barriers for biofuel production from such materials. Approximately half of polysaccharides in biomass remain unused by typical biochemical conversion methods. Conversion efficiency is influenced by the composition and structure of cell walls of biomass. Grasses such as wheat, maize, and rice, as well as dedicated perennial bioenergy crops, like switchgrass, make up ~55% of biomass that can be produced in the United States. Grass cell walls have a different composition and patterning compared with dicotyledonous plants, including the well-studied model plant, Arabidopsis. This project identified genetic determinants of cell wall composition in grasses using both naturally occurring genetic variation of switchgrass and gene network reconstruction and functional assays in rice. In addition, the project linked functional data in rice and other species to switchgrass improvement efforts through curation of the most abundant class of regulators in the switchgrass genome. Characterizing natural diversity of switchgrass for variation in cell wall composition and properties, also known as quality, provides an unbiased avenue for identifying biologically viable diversity in switchgrass cell walls. To characterizing natural diversity, this project generated cell wall composition and enzymatic deconstruction data for ~450 genotypes of the Switchgrass Southern Association Collection (SSAC), a diverse collection composed of 36 switchgrass accessions from the southern U.S. distribution of switchgrass. Comparing these data with other measures of cell wall quality for the same samples demonstrated the complementary nature of the diverse characterization platforms now being used for biomass characterization. Association of the composition data with ~3.2K single nucleotide variant markers identified six significant single nucleotide variant markers co-associated with digestibility and another compositional trait. These

  10. 13. THE SAME NORTH TRAINING WALL TOP SURFACE, LOOKING EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. THE SAME NORTH TRAINING WALL TOP SURFACE, LOOKING EAST FROM ATOP ADJACENT RIPRAP. THE TRAINING WALL IS TO THE RIGHT OF THE JUMBLED, LIGHT TONED RIPRAP. - Oakland Harbor Training Walls, Mouth of Federal Channel to Inner Harbor, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  11. 7. South wall of blacksmith shop section of roundhouse at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. South wall of blacksmith shop section of roundhouse at left. West wall and south end wall of machine shop section of roundhouse at right. View to northeast. - Duluth & Iron Range Rail Road Company Shops, Roundhouse, Southwest of downtown Two Harbors, northwest of Agate Bay, Two Harbors, Lake County, MN

  12. CHARACTERIZATION OF TANK 18F WALL AND SCALE SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, Michael; Click, Damon; Diprete, c.; Diprete, David

    2010-03-01

    Samples from the wall of Tank 18F were obtained to determine the associated source term using a special wall sampling device. Two wall samples and a scale sample were obtained and characterized at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). All the analyses of the Tank 18F wall and scale samples met the targeted detection limits. The upper wall samples show {approx}2X to 6X higher concentrations for U, Pu, and Np on an activity per surface area basis than the lower wall samples. On an activity per mass basis, the upper and lower wall samples show similar compositions for U and Pu. The Np activity is still {approx}2.5X higher in the upper wall sample on a per mass basis. The scale sample contains 2-3X higher concentrations of U, Pu, and Sr-90 than the wall samples on an activity per mass basis. The plutonium isotopics differ for all three wall samples (upper, lower, and scale samples). The Pu-238 appears to increase as a proportion of total plutonium as you move up the tank wall from the lowest sample (scale sample) to the upper wall sample. The elemental composition of the scale sample appears similar to other F-Area PUREX sludge compositions. The composition of the scale sample is markedly different than the material on the floor of Tank 18F. However, the scale sample shows elevated Mg and Ca concentrations relative to typical PUREX sludge as do the floor samples.

  13. 30 CFR 56.3130 - Wall, bank, and slope stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Wall, bank, and slope stability. 56.3130... Mining Methods § 56.3130 Wall, bank, and slope stability. Mining methods shall be used that will maintain wall, bank, and slope stability in places where persons work or travel in performing their...

  14. 14 CFR 121.247 - Fire-wall construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fire-wall construction. 121.247 Section 121... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Special Airworthiness Requirements § 121.247 Fire-wall construction. Each fire wall and shroud must— (a) Be so made that no hazardous quantity of...

  15. HVI Ballistic Performance Characterization of Non-Parallel Walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohl, William; Miller, Joshua; Christiansen, Eric

    2012-01-01

    The Double-Wall, "Whipple" Shield [1] has been the subject of many hypervelocity impact studies and has proven to be an effective shield system for Micro-Meteoroid and Orbital Debris (MMOD) impacts for spacecraft. The US modules of the International Space Station (ISS), with their "bumper shields" offset from their pressure holding rear walls provide good examples of effective on-orbit use of the double wall shield. The concentric cylinder shield configuration with its large radius of curvature relative to separation distance is easily and effectively represented for testing and analysis as a system of two parallel plates. The parallel plate double wall configuration has been heavily tested and characterized for shield performance for normal and oblique impacts for the ISS and other programs. The double wall shield and principally similar Stuffed Whipple Shield are very common shield types for MMOD protection. However, in some locations with many spacecraft designs, the rear wall cannot be modeled as being parallel or concentric with the outer bumper wall. As represented in Figure 1, there is an included angle between the two walls. And, with a cylindrical outer wall, the effective included angle constantly changes. This complicates assessment of critical spacecraft components located within outer spacecraft walls when using software tools such as NASA's BumperII. In addition, the validity of the risk assessment comes into question when using the standard double wall shield equations, especially since verification testing of every set of double wall included angles is impossible.

  16. The Wall of Death: Newtons, Nerves, and Nausea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charoenkul, Niran; Wheeler, David; Dejasvanong, Chanwit

    1999-01-01

    Describes an experience as passengers in a car that traveled around the "Wall of Death" during a country fair show. Explains the physics behind riding vehicles around the Wall. Finds that cars don't need to lean, motorcycles must lean, and people should lean to avoid nausea while traveling around the Wall. (WRM)

  17. STREAMLINED METHOD FOR BIOMASS WHOLE-CELL-WALL STRUCTURAL PROFILING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In wide-ranging research aimed at altering plant cell wall characteristics by conventional breeding or modern genetic methods, one of the biggest problems is in delineating the effects on the cell wall. Plant cell walls are a complex conglomerate of a variety of polysaccharides and lignin. Each comp...

  18. Secondary cell walls: biosynthesis, patterned deposition and transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ruiqin; Ye, Zheng-Hua

    2015-02-01

    Secondary walls are mainly composed of cellulose, hemicelluloses (xylan and glucomannan) and lignin, and are deposited in some specialized cells, such as tracheary elements, fibers and other sclerenchymatous cells. Secondary walls provide strength to these cells, which lend mechanical support and protection to the plant body and, in the case of tracheary elements, enable them to function as conduits for transporting water. Formation of secondary walls is a complex process that requires the co-ordinated expression of secondary wall biosynthetic genes, biosynthesis and targeted secretion of secondary wall components, and patterned deposition and assembly of secondary walls. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of genes involved in secondary wall biosynthesis and deposition. Most of the genes involved in the biosynthesis of secondary wall components, including cellulose, xylan, glucomannan and lignin, have been identified and their co-ordinated activation has been shown to be mediated by a transcriptional network encompassing the secondary wall NAC and MYB master switches and their downstream transcription factors. It has been demonstrated that cortical microtubules and microtubule-associated proteins play important roles in the targeted secretion of cellulose synthase complexes, the oriented deposition of cellulose microfibrils and the patterned deposition of secondary walls. Further investigation of many secondary wall-associated genes with unknown functions will provide new insights into the mechanisms controlling the formation of secondary walls that constitute the bulk of plant biomass.

  19. STREAMLINED METHOD FOR BIOMASS WHOLE-CELL-WALL STRUCTURAL PROFILING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In wide-ranging research aimed at altering plant cell wall characteristics by conventional breeding or modern genetic methods, one of the biggest problems is in delineating the effects on the cell wall. Plant cell walls are a complex conglomerate of a variety of polysaccharides and lignin. Although ...

  20. The Berlin Wall: A Simulation for the Social Studies Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, William B., III

    2010-01-01

    November 9, 2009, marked the twentieth anniversary of the opening of the Berlin Wall. The Wall, a symbol of the Cold War, separated the German people for 28 years (1961-1989), keeping those on the East side isolated. Although the construction and dismantling of the Berlin Wall is a significant part of history, the topic is little covered in the…

  1. 106. Photocopied August 1978. EXTENSION OF TAIL PIT WALLS, APRIL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    106. Photocopied August 1978. EXTENSION OF TAIL PIT WALLS, APRIL 28, 1917. THE TIMBERWORK IN THE FOREGROUND WAS USED AS A COMBINATION COFFER DAM AND FORM FOR POURING THE CONCRETE TAIL RACE WALL EXTENSION. IN THE BACKGROUND ALONG THE POWER HOUSE SEVERAL COMPLETED WALL EXTENSIONS CAN BE SEEN DIMLY. (787) - Michigan Lake Superior Power Company, Portage Street, Sault Ste. Marie, Chippewa County, MI

  2. 6. Side (north) wall at the second story level, and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Side (north) wall at the second story level, and side (north) and rear (east) walls at the third and fourth floor levels. A complete view of the side (north) wall of 413-415 9th Street is not possible because of the adjacent and lower Ferree Building. - Edward Abner Building, 413-415 Ninth Street, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  3. Enhanced reactive metal wall for dehalogenation of hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Howson, P.E.; Mackenzie, P.D.; Horney, D.P.

    1996-08-06

    A method is provided for remediation of contaminated solutions using a tiered metal wall or column. The tiered metal wall or column has at least three zones with graduated sizes of reducing metal particles. Contaminated solutions pass through the tiered wall or column to dehalogenate contaminant halogenated hydrocarbons. 3 figs.

  4. Enhanced reactive metal wall for dehalogenation of hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Howson, Paul E.; Mackenzie, Patricia D.; Horney, David P.

    1996-01-01

    A method is provided for remediation of contaminated solutions using a tiered metal wall or column. The tiered metal wall or column has at least three zones with graduated sizes of reducing metal particles. Contaminated solutions pass through the tiered wall or column to dehalogenate contaminant halogenated hydrocarbons.

  5. Sound waves in two-dimensional ducts with sinusoidal walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayfeh, A. H.

    1974-01-01

    The method of multiple scales is used to analyze the wave propagation in two-dimensional hard-walled ducts with sinusoidal walls. For traveling waves, resonance occurs whenever the wall wavenumber is equal to the difference of the wavenumbers of any two duct acoustic modes. The results show that neither of these resonating modes could occur without strongly generating the other.

  6. Two endogenous proteins that induce cell wall extension in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQueen-Mason, S.; Durachko, D. M.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Plant cell enlargement is regulated by wall relaxation and yielding, which is thought to be catalyzed by elusive "wall-loosening" enzymes. By employing a reconstitution approach, we found that a crude protein extract from the cell walls of growing cucumber seedlings possessed the ability to induce the extension of isolated cell walls. This activity was restricted to the growing region of the stem and could induce the extension of isolated cell walls from various dicot stems and the leaves of amaryllidaceous monocots, but was less effective on grass coleoptile walls. Endogenous and reconstituted wall extension activities showed similar sensitivities to pH, metal ions, thiol reducing agents, proteases, and boiling in methanol or water. Sequential HPLC fractionation of the active wall extract revealed two proteins with molecular masses of 29 and 30 kD associated with the activity. Each protein, by itself, could induce wall extension without detectable hydrolytic breakdown of the wall. These proteins appear to mediate "acid growth" responses of isolated walls and may catalyze plant cell wall extension by a novel biochemical mechanism.

  7. 14. VIEW OF WEST WALL OF CLEAN ROOM (102) SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. VIEW OF WEST WALL OF CLEAN ROOM (102) SHOWING VIEWING WINDOWS IN WEST FALSE PARTION WALL, WEST WALL OF CLEAN ROOM (102), AND ROLLS OF PLASTIC WRAP FOR COVERING CLEANED FAIRING ASSEMBLY - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Vehicle Support Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  8. Prediction of compliant wall drag reduction, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orszag, S. A.

    1979-01-01

    A numerical model of turbulent boundary layer flows over compliant walls was investigated. The model is based on Burton's observation that outer flow structures in turbulent boundary layers produce large scale pressure fluctuations near the wall. The results of calculations indicate that certain small wavelength wall motions can have a significant effect upon the stability of turbulent boundary layers.

  9. Detail, north end wall, Burton Park Amphitheater, view to southwest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail, north end wall, Burton Park Amphitheater, view to southwest (90mm lens). Also visible are pilasters along back wall, east wing of stage area (within doorway), and east steps. Walls are adobe brick, with concrete coping. - Burton Park, Club House & Amphitheater, Adjacent ot south end of Chestnut Avenue, San Carlos, San Mateo County, CA

  10. Grass cell walls: A story of cross-linking

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cell wall matrices are complex composites mainly of polysaccharides, phenolics (monomers and polymers), and protein. We are beginning to understand the synthesis of these major wall components individually, but still have a poor understanding of how the cell wall components are assembled into comple...

  11. 21. A LOW TIDE VIEW OF THE NORTH TRAINING WALL'S ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. A LOW TIDE VIEW OF THE NORTH TRAINING WALL'S CHANNEL FACING STONEWORK, LOOKING EAST FROM THE POINT WHERE MODERN RIPRAP BEGINS TO COVER THE WALL, ABOUT 2,000 FEET FROM THE WEST END. - Oakland Harbor Training Walls, Mouth of Federal Channel to Inner Harbor, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  12. 12. VIEW OF SPACE BETWEEN EAST FALSE PARTITION WALL IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW OF SPACE BETWEEN EAST FALSE PARTITION WALL IN CLEAN ROOM (102) AND EAST WALL OF VEHICLE SUPPORT BUILDING SHOWING PREFILTER NEAR SOUTH WALL - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Vehicle Support Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  13. VIEW TO THE NORTH TOWARD THE WING WALL AND CONCRETESLAB ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW TO THE NORTH TOWARD THE WING WALL AND CONCRETE-SLAB CHANNEL WALL ON THE WEST SIDE OF THE NORTH END OF THE BRIDGE. NOTE THE SMALL CULVERT OPENING BEHIND SAGEBRUSH NEAR THE END OF THE WING WALL. 37 - Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad, Cajon Subdivision, Structure No. 61.5X, between Cajon Summit and Keenbrook, Devore, San Bernardino County, CA

  14. Rare backflow and extreme wall-normal velocity fluctuations in near-wall turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenaers, Peter; Li, Qiang; Brethouwer, Geert; Schlatter, Philipp; Örlü, Ramis

    2012-03-01

    Rare negative streamwise velocities and extreme wall-normal velocity fluctuations near the wall are investigated for turbulent channel flow at a series of Reynolds numbers based on friction velocity up to Reτ = 1000. Probability density functions of the wall-shear stress and velocity components are presented as well as joint probability density functions of the velocity components and the pressure. Backflow occurs more often (0.06% at the wall at Reτ = 1000) and further away (up to y+ = 8.5) from the wall for increasing Reynolds number. The regions of backflow are circular with an average diameter, based on ensemble averages, of approximately 20 viscous units independent of Reynolds number. A strong oblique vortex outside the viscous sublayer is found to cause this backflow. Extreme wall-normal velocity events occur also more often for increasing Reynolds number. These extreme fluctuations cause high flatness values near the wall (F(v) = 43 at Reτ = 1000). Positive and negative velocity spikes appear in pairs, located on the two edges of a strong streamwise vortex as documented by Xu et al. [Phys. Fluids 8, 1938 (1996)], 10.1063/1.868973 for Reτ = 180. The spikes are elliptical and orientated in streamwise direction with a typical length of 25 and a typical width of 7.5 viscous units at y+ ≈ 1. The negative spike occurs in a high-speed streak indicating a sweeping motion, while the positive spike is located in between a high and low-speed streak. The joint probability density functions of negative streamwise and extreme wall-normal velocity events show that these events are largely uncorrelated. The majority of both type of events can be found lying underneath a large-scale structure in the outer region with positive sign, which can be understood by considering the more intense velocity fluctuations due to amplitude modulation of the inner layer by the outer layer. Simulations performed at different resolutions give only minor differences. Results from

  15. Modeling of wall-induced force for wall-bounded bubbly flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongjoo; Kim, Jungwoo; Park, Hyungmin; Lee, Jun Ho

    2014-11-01

    The two-fluid model based on Eulerian-Eulerian approach has been widely used for simulating two-phase flow in industrial applications due to much less CPU time compared with interface tracking methods. However, the two-fluid approach requires accurate modeling of mass and momentum transfers between phases. The interfacial momentum exchange terms include drag, shear-induced lift, and wall-induced force. The last one is particularly important in order to correctly predict ``wall peaking'' and ``core peaking'' phenomena observed in bubbly pipe flows. However, the wall-induced force is not fully understood yet and the wall force coefficient used in previous studies has a wide range of values, probably tuned to match experiment. Therefore, we propose a new wall-induced force model in the present study. To verify the accuracy of present model, numerical simulations are performed for several laminar bubbly flows available in the literature. The spatial distributions of void fraction, liquid velocity, and bubble velocity are compared with those with previous models as well as experimental results. Supported by the NRF Programs (NRF-2012M2A8A4055647) of Korean government.

  16. Three measuring techniques for assessing the mean wall skin friction in wall-bounded flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanoun, E.-S.; Jehring, L.; Egbers, C.

    2014-04-01

    The present paper aims at evaluating the mean wall skin friction data in laminar and turbulent boundary layer flows obtained from two optical and one thermal measuring techniques, namely, laser-Doppler anemometry (LDA), oil-film interferometry (OFI), and surface hot-film anemometry (SHFA), respectively. A comparison among the three techniques is presented, indicating close agreement in the mean wall skin friction data obtained, directly, from both the OFI and the LDA near-wall mean velocity profiles. On the other hand, the SHFA, markedly, over estimates the mean wall skin friction by 3.5-11.7% when compared with both the LDA and the OFI data, depending on the thermal conductivity of the substrate and glue material, probe calibration, probe contamination, temperature drift and Reynolds number. Satisfactory agreement, however, is observed among all three measuring techniques at higher Reynolds numbers, Re x >106, and within ±5% with empirical relations extracted from the literature. In addition, accurate velocity data within the inertial sublayer obtained using the LDA supports the applicability of the Clauser method to evaluate the wall skin friction when appropriate values for the constants of the logarithmic line are utilized.

  17. Electromagnetic thin-wall model for simulations of plasma wall-touching kink and vertical modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Leonid E.; Atanasiu, Calin V.; Lackner, Karl; Hoelzl, Matthias; Strumberger, Erika

    2015-12-01

    > The understanding of plasma disruptions in tokamaks and predictions of their effects require realistic simulations of electric current excitation in three-dimensional vessel structures by the plasma touching the walls. As discovered at JET in 1996 (Litunovski JET Internal Report contract no. JQ5/11961, 1995; Noll et al., Proceedings of the 19th Symposium on Fusion Technology, Lisbon (ed. C. Varandas & F. Serra), vol. 1, 1996, p. 751. Elsevier) the wall-touching kink modes are frequently excited during vertical displacement events and cause large sideways forces on the vacuum vessel which are difficult to withstand in large tokamaks. In disruptions, the sharing of electric current between the plasma and the wall plays an important role in plasma dynamics and determines the amplitude and localization of the sideways force (Riccardo et al., Nucl. Fusion, vol. 40, 2000, p. 1805; Riccardo & Walker, Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion, vol. 42, 2000, p. 29; Zakharov, Phys. Plasmas, vol. 15, 2008, 062507; Riccardo et al., Nucl. Fusion, vol. 49, 2009, 055012; Bachmann et al., Fusion Engng Des., vol. 86, 2011, pp. 1915-1919). This paper describes a flat triangle representation of the electric circuits of a thin conducting wall of arbitrary three-dimensional geometry. Implemented into the shell simulation code (SHL) and the source sink current code (SSC), this model is suitable for modelling the electric currents excited in the wall inductively and through current sharing with the plasma.

  18. Grass Cell Walls: A Story of Cross-Linking

    PubMed Central

    Hatfield, Ronald D.; Rancour, David M.; Marita, Jane M.

    2017-01-01

    Cell wall matrices are complex composites mainly of polysaccharides, phenolics (monomers and polymers), and protein. We are beginning to understand the synthesis of these major wall components individually, but still have a poor understanding of how cell walls are assembled into complex matrices. Valuable insight has been gained by examining intact components to understand the individual elements that make up plant cell walls. Grasses are a prominent group within the plant kingdom, not only for their important roles in global agriculture, but also for the complexity of their cell walls. Ferulate incorporation into grass cell wall matrices (C3 and C4 types) leads to a cross-linked matrix that plays a prominent role in the structure and utilization of grass biomass compared to dicot species. Incorporation of p-coumarates as part of the lignin structure also adds to the complexity of grass cell walls. Feruoylation results in a wall with individual hemicellulosic polysaccharides (arabinoxylans) covalently linked to each other and to lignin. Evidence strongly suggests that ferulates not only cross-link arabinoxylans, but may be important factors in lignification of the cell wall. Therefore, the distribution of ferulates on arabinoxylans could provide a means of structuring regions of the matrix with the incorporation of lignin and have a significant impact upon localized cell wall organization. The role of other phenolics in cell wall formation such as p-coumarates (which can have concentrations higher than ferulates) remains unknown. It is possible that p-coumarates assist in the formation of lignin, especially syringyl rich lignin. The uniqueness of the grass cell wall compared to dicot sepcies may not be so much in the gross composition of the wall, but how the distinctive individual components are organized into a functional wall matrix. These features are discussed and working models are provided to illustrate how changing the organization of feruoylation and p

  19. Effect of elasticity of wall on diffusion in nano channel

    SciTech Connect

    Tankeshwar, K.; Srivastava, Sunita

    2014-04-24

    Confining walls of nano channel are taken to be elastic to study their effect on the diffusion coefficient of fluid flowing through the channel. The wall is elastic to the extent that it responses to molecular pressure exerted by fluid. The model to study diffusion is based on microscopic considerations. Results obtained for fluid confining to 20 atomic diameter width contrasted with results obtained by considering rigid and smooth wall. The effect of roughness of wall on diffusion can be compensated by the elastic property of wall.

  20. Wind Tunnel Wall Interference Assessment and Correction, 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, P. A. (Editor); Barnwell, R. W. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    Technical information focused upon emerging wall interference assessment/correction (WIAC) techniques applicable to transonic wind tunnels with conventional and passively or partially adapted walls is given. The possibility of improving the assessment and correction of data taken in conventional transonic wind tunnels by utilizing simultaneously obtained flow field data (generally taken near the walls) appears to offer a larger, nearer-term payoff than the fully adaptive wall concept. Development of WIAC procedures continues, and aspects related to validating the concept need to be addressed. Thus, the scope of wall interference topics discussed was somewhat limited.