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Sample records for acorus tatarinowii schott

  1. A novel sesquiterpene and three new phenolic compounds from the rhizomes of Acorus tatarinowii Schott.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shuang; Ying, Shu-Song; Wu, Hong-Hua; Liu, Yan-Ting; Dong, Peng-Zhi; Zhu, Yan; Xu, Yan-Tong

    2015-10-01

    A novel sesquiterpene with an unprecedented epoxy lactone skeleton, named tatarinolactone, together with two new amides, a new biphenylpropanoid and two known lignans were isolated from the rhizomes of Acorus tatarinowii Schott. Their structures were identified as 6,7,8-trihydroxy-4α-isobutyl-4,7-dimethylhexahydro-6,8α-epoxychromen-2(3H)-one (1), (E)-methyl 4-[3-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)acrylamido]butanoate (2), (Z)-methyl 4-[3-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)acrylamido]butanoate enol isomer (3), (R)-4-hydroxy-3-[1-hydroxy-3-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)propan-2-yl]-5-methoxybenzoic acid (4), (2S,3R)-ceplignan (5), and (2R,3S)-ceplignan (6), respectively, based on extensive spectroscopic analysis and by comparison to the known compounds. To test their effects on serotonin transporters, a high content assay using hSERT-HEK293 cell line was adopted. Results indicated that compounds 1 and 4 significantly inhibited SERT activity, while compounds 2, 3, 5, and 6 significantly enhanced SERT activity, which partly explain the traditional uses of the rhizomes of Acorus tatarinowii Schott in treatments of neuropsychiatric and digestive disorders. PMID:26296476

  2. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the major constituents in Acorus tatarinowii Schott by HPLC/ESI-QTOF-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Qi, Peng; Xue, Rui; Li, Zhixiong; Zhu, Kaicheng; Wan, Ping; Huang, Chenggang

    2015-06-01

    Acorus tatarinowii Schott (ATS) is a well-known traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for the treatment of epilepsy, amnesia and insomnia. In this study, a methodology utilizing high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-QTOF-MS/MS) was established for the separation and structural identification of the major chemical constituents in ATS for the first time. Overall, 46 major constituents including flavonoid glycosides, phenylpropane derivatives, amides and lignans were identified or tentatively characterized. Seven major constituents, including four phenylpropane derivatives and three lignans, were further quantified as marker substances, which showed good linearity within the test ranges. These results indicated that the developed quantitative method was linear, sensitive, and precise for quality control of ATS. PMID:25354491

  3. Tatarinan O, a lignin-like compound from the roots of Acorus tatarinowii Schott inhibits osteoclast differentiation through suppressing the expression of c-Fos and NFATc1.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaohan; Liu, Ning; Wang, Yingjian; Pan, Lei-Chang; Wu, Donglin; Peng, Qisheng; Zhang, Maolin; Wang, Hong-Bing; Sun, Wan-Chun

    2016-05-01

    Osteoclasts (OC) are large multinucleated cells derived from monocyte/macrophage precursors. Suppressing osteoclastogenesis is considered as an effective therapeutic approach to erosive bone disease. The root of Acorus tatarinowii Schott, a well-known traditional Chinese medicine was used to treat rheumatosis and other inflammatory disease. However, the effects of tatarinan O (TO), one of the lignin-like compounds isolated from the roots of Acorus tatarinowii Schott during bone development are still unclear. In the present study, we explored the effect of TO on RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro. TO was found to suppress osteoclast differentiation from RANKL-stimulated mouse bone marrow macrophages (BMMs) without significant cytotoxicity. TO also dose-dependently suppressed bone resorption activity of mature osteoclasts. Additionally, TO apparently inhibited the expression of osteoclastic marker genes, such as MMP-9, Cts K and TRAP. Furthermore, our results showed that TO decreased RANKL-induced expression of c-Fos and NFATc1 without influencing NF-κB activation and MAPK phosphorylation. Hence, for the first time we revealed that TO dose-dependently inhibited osteoclastogenesis from RANKL-stimulated mouse BMMs via decreasing the expression of NFATc1 and c-Fos. PMID:26971224

  4. Antioxidant Lignans and Neolignans from Acorus tatarinowii.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuanyuan; Xue, Yongbo; Chen, Shenjie; Zhu, Hucheng; Zhang, Jinwen; Li, Xiao-Nian; Wang, Jianping; Liu, JunJun; Qi, Changxing; Du, Guang; Zhang, Yonghui

    2016-01-01

    Eleven new lignans and neolignans, named acortatarinowins G-N (1-8), including three pairs of enantiomers (1a/1b-3a/3b) and five optically pure lignans and neolignans (4-8), along with five known analogs (9-14), were isolated from the rhizomes of Acorus tatarinowii Schott. Compounds 1-3 were successfully separated by chiral HPLC to afford 1a/1b-3a/3b. The planar structures of 1-8 were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic analyses including HRESIMS and NMR. Their absolute configurations were determined by analyses of single-crystal X-ray diffraction and a modified Mosher's method, assisted by experimental and calculated electronic circular dichroism (ECD) data. Compounds 1a and 1b were rare 7,8'-epoxy-8,7'-oxyneolignane. Compounds 1-8 were evaluated for their antioxidant activities using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) reducing antioxidant power assay. Compound 6, exhibiting strong DPPH radical scavenging capacity with IC50 value of 16.4 ± 0.22 μg/mL, could interpret the herbal traditional usage. PMID:26961724

  5. Antioxidant Lignans and Neolignans from Acorus tatarinowii

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuanyuan; Xue, Yongbo; Chen, Shenjie; Zhu, Hucheng; Zhang, Jinwen; Li, Xiao-Nian; Wang, Jianping; Liu, JunJun; Qi, Changxing; Du, Guang; Zhang, Yonghui

    2016-01-01

    Eleven new lignans and neolignans, named acortatarinowins G–N (1−8), including three pairs of enantiomers (1a/1b−3a/3b) and five optically pure lignans and neolignans (4−8), along with five known analogs (9−14), were isolated from the rhizomes of Acorus tatarinowii Schott. Compounds 1−3 were successfully separated by chiral HPLC to afford 1a/1b−3a/3b. The planar structures of 1−8 were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic analyses including HRESIMS and NMR. Their absolute configurations were determined by analyses of single-crystal X-ray diffraction and a modified Mosher’s method, assisted by experimental and calculated electronic circular dichroism (ECD) data. Compounds 1a and 1b were rare 7,8′-epoxy-8,7′-oxyneolignane. Compounds 1−8 were evaluated for their antioxidant activities using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) reducing antioxidant power assay. Compound 6, exhibiting strong DPPH radical scavenging capacity with IC50 value of 16.4 ± 0.22 μg/mL, could interpret the herbal traditional usage. PMID:26961724

  6. Simultaneous determination of α-, β- and γ-asarone in Acorus tatarinowii by microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography with [BMIM]PF6 as oil phase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Li, Feng; Yang, Feng-Qing; Zuo, Hua-Li; Xia, Zhi-Ning

    2012-11-15

    In the present study, a rapid and repeatable microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography (MEEKC) method was developed for the simultaneous determination of three isomers (α-, β- and γ-asarone) in Acorus tatarinowii by using ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BMIM]PF(6)) as oil phase. Experimental parameters including the microemulsion compositions (concentrations of surfactant, co-surfactant and oil phase), pH, concentration of borate buffer, capillary temperature and voltage were intensively investigated. Finally, the main compounds in the methanol extract of A. tatarinowii were well separated within 11 min using a running buffer composed of 40 mmol/L sodium dodecyl sulfonate (SDS), 2.0 mol/L n-propanol, 8 mmol/L [BMIM]PF(6) in 10 mmol/L borate buffer of pH 9.5. The developed method was applied to determine the contents of α-, β- and γ-asarone in A. tatarinowii from five different producing areas in China (Anhui, Hebei, Sichuan, Zhejiang and Chongqing). The results indicated that the contents of three asarones are quite different in the investigated A. tatarinowii samples. On the other hand, the MEEKC with ionic liquid as oil phase should be a promising method for the analysis of volatile components especially isomers in medicinal herbs. PMID:23158356

  7. Advanced astronomical interference filters from SCHOTT technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Anthony B.; Reichel, Steffen; Brauneck, Ulf; Bourquin, Sebastien; Marin-Franch, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Developing precision interference filters for astronomical radiometry often requires simultaneous solutions to very difficult requirements. SCHOTT's 80-year legacy methods with interference filters and 9,200-m2 facility dedicated to filters and optical fabrication bring multiple disciplines together to simultaneously solve requirements that include: narrow-band high-transmission, steep-edge bandpasses, extremely high out-of-band rejection across Si response, sizes accommodating large fields-of-view, precision mechanical filter assemblies and both spectral uniformity and excellent transmitted wavefront across the field. We discuss solutions as satisfied for Spain's state-of-the-art new fast LOCAL UNIVERSE 3° wide-field survey telescope.

  8. Acorus calamus Linn.: phytoconstituents and bactericidal property.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Rajesh K

    2016-10-01

    Acorus calamus Linn. of the family Araceae (Acoraceae), commonly known as Sweet Flag and Vacha. The rhizome of this plant has medicinal properties against bugs, moths, lice and emetic stomach in dyspepsia. Chemical composition of the hydro-distilled essential oil obtained from the rhizomes of A. calamus was analyzed by gas chromatography equipped with flame ionization detector and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. The essential oil of A. calamus and its major compound β-asarone were tested against five Gram-positive, eight Gram-negative bacteria, and three fungi by the tube-dilution method at a concentration rang of 5.0-0.009 mg/mL. Forty constituents were identified which comprised 98.3 % of the total oil. The major compound β-asarone (80.6 %) was identified and confirm by NMR ((1)H- & (13)C-) in rhizome oil of A. calamus. The organism Micrococcus luteus was found to be more susceptible to the oil with minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) value of 0.032 ± 0.004 mg/mL, followed by Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus niger and Micrococcus flavus with MBC values of 0.104 ± 0.016, 0.117 ± 0.017 and 0.143 ± 0.013 mg/mL, respectively. The compound β-asarone was susceptible to the microorganism A. niger with MBC value 0.416 ± 0.065 mg/mL. The present study revealed that tetraploid variety of A. calamus is growing in this region with substantial amount of β-asarone. The oil showed bactericidal property against tested bacteria and fungi. The β-asarone exhibited poorer bactericidal activity against test microorganisms. PMID:27562598

  9. Manufacturing of lightweighted ZERODUR components at SCHOTT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döhring, Thorsten; Thomas, Armin; Jedamzik, Ralf; Kohlmann, Heiko; Hartmann, Peter

    2007-09-01

    There is a broad range of applications for lightweighted components made from ZERODUR (R) glass ceramic. The main markets are secondary and tertiary mirrors for astronomical telescopes, mirrors and structural components for satellites, and mechanical structures for industrial applications, mainly in microlithography. Prominent examples from astronomy are VLT-M3, GEMINI-M2, SOFIA-M1, MAGELLAN-M2, MMT-M2, and METEOSAT-SEVIRI. At SCHOTT components with blind or undercut semiclosed holes are manufactured, typically with circular, hexagonal, rectangular or triangular shapes. The classical grinding process results in weight reduction factors of about 70 %. By additional acid etching technologies even higher lightweighting factors and rib thicknesses below 1 mm have been achieved.

  10. Performance comparison of SCHOTT laser glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Mark J.; Hayden, Joseph S.

    2011-06-01

    Laser performance measurements (quasi-CW) were made of various Nd-doped SCHOTT catalog laser glasses: LG-680, LG-750, LG-760, LG-770, APG-1, and APG-2; all but the first, a silicate, are phosphate glasses. Nominal Nd3+ doping was approximately 3 × 1020 ions/cm3. An end-pumped, laser diode geometry was used and input powers, pump pulse length, and pump rep-rates were kept low to avoid thermal lensing (4 W, 1 msec, and 0.1 Hz, respectively). As expected, the phosphate glasses performed better than the silicate glass. Slope efficiencies ranged from 25% for LG-680 up to nearly 33% for LG-760. APG-1, designed for high rep-rate, high-power systems, performed nearly the same in this particular configuration as glasses designed for high-energy applications (e.g., LG-770).

  11. Wolfgang Schott (1905-1989): the founder of quantitative paleoceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dullo, Wolf-Christian; Pfaffl, Fritz A.

    2016-06-01

    Wolfgang Schott is the pioneer in paleoceanography and has established this research field within marine geology. His papers from the first half of the twentieth century are all published in German; therefore, the most inspiring results are given here as original quotes in English, since they paved the ground for all scientific discussions on climate stratigraphy, past ocean currents, and glacial interglacial cycles.

  12. Characterization of polysaccharides with antioxidant and immunological activities from Rhizoma Acori Tatarinowii.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wuxia; Song, Dan; Xu, Dan; Wang, Tingting; Chen, Lu; Duan, Jinyou

    2015-11-20

    Rhizoma Acori Tatarinowii is widely used in traditional Chinese medicine. In this study, three novel polysaccharides designated RATPW, RATPS1 and RATPS2 were isolated from Rhizoma Acori Tatarinowii by DEAE-52 cellulose chromatography. Their structures were characterized using physicochemical and spectral methods. Chemical analysis indicated that RATPW (6.5×10(3)Da) mainly composed of glucose and fructose. RATPS1 (1.5×10(5)Da) contained galactose and arabinose, while RATPS2 (5.3×10(4)Da) contained ∼49.5% galacturonic acid along with rhamnose, fructose, galactose, and arabinose. In vitro, RATPS2 showed the most significant scavenging activity on DPPH and hydroxyl radical. Three polysaccharides could protect the PC12 cells from H2O2-induced damage. Immunological tests indicated that both RATPW and RATPS2 significantly stimulated NO production and phagocytic activity in RAW264.7, and promoted splenocyte proliferation. These data suggested that polysaccharides RATPW and RATPS2 had the potential as novel natural sources of antioxidative and immunopotentiating agents. PMID:26344267

  13. Results of a polishing study for SCHOTT XLD glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedamzik, Ralf; Yadwad, Harshwadhan; Dietrich, Volker

    2015-09-01

    Extremely low dispersion glasses (e.g. SCHOTT XLD glasses) play an essential role in the color correction of optical systems. Together with short flint glasses (KZFS Types) they can be used for apochromatic color correction in the visible spectrum or even for broadband color correction in combination with lanthanum crown glasses (LAK Types). Unfortunately the chemical composition of those glasses leads to a high coefficient of thermal expansion, low hardness and low resistance against chemical attacks. As a consequence these glasses tend to be difficult in processing. Therefore the glass engineer's task is to improve processing characteristics while keeping their special optical properties. N-FK58 XLD is an example of a new generation of XLD glasses from SCHOTT with improved workability. In 2014 a processing study has been conducted to optimize the polishing of XLD glasses. This presentation will show the results of this study for N-FK58 XLD and the application to other fluorophosphates glasses.

  14. An overview on traditional uses and pharmacological profile of Acorus calamus Linn. (Sweet flag) and other Acorus species.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Sandeep B; Tonge, Madan B; Karuppayil, S Mohan

    2014-02-15

    Acorus calamus (Sweet flag) has a long history of use and has numerous traditional and ethnomedicinal applications. Since ancient times, it has been used in various systems of medicines such as Ayurveda, Unani, Siddha, Chinese medicine, etc. for the treatment of various aliments like nervous disorders, appetite loss, bronchitis, chest pain, colic, cramps, diarrhea, digestive disorders, flatulence, gas, indigestion, rheumatism, sedative, cough, fever, bronchitis, inflammation, depression, tumors, hemorrhoids, skin diseases, numbness, general debility and vascular disorders. Various therapeutic potentials of this plant have been attributed to its rhizome. A number of active constituents from leaves, rhizomes and essential oils of A. calamus have been isolated and characterized. Of the constituents, alpha and beta-asarone are the predominant bioactive components. Various pharmacological activities of A. calamus rhizome such as sedative, CNS depressant, anticonvulsant, antispasmodic, cardiovascular, hypolipidemic, immunosuppressive, anti-inflammatory, cryoprotective, antioxidant, antidiarrheal, antimicrobial, anticancer and antidiabetic has been reported. Genotoxicity and mutagenecity of beta and alpha-asarone is reported, which limits their use at high dosage. Though A. calamus has been used since ancient times, many of its uses are yet to be scientifically validated. In the present review an attempt has been made to explore traditional uses and pharmacological properties of A. calamus. PMID:24200497

  15. Phylogenetic analysis of rbcL sequences identifies Acorus calamus as the primal extant monocotyledon.

    PubMed Central

    Duvall, M R; Learn, G H; Eguiarte, L E; Clegg, M T

    1993-01-01

    The identity of the oldest lineage of monocotyledons is a subject of debate. Alternative interpretations of morphological homologies are variously consistent with proposals that species of Alismatanae, Dioscoreales, or Melanthiales were the earliest descendants of the first monocotyledons. We present phylogenetic analyses based on DNA sequences of the plastid locus rbcL in which Acorus calamus, an herb with unspecialized floral features and of uncertain affinities, is supported as a member of the oldest extant lineage of monocotyledons. This conclusion is consistent with a substantial body of morphological, anatomical, and embryological evidence and offers an explanation for the failure to identify any close relationship between Acorus and other genera. PMID:8506310

  16. Antifungal Properties of Haem Peroxidase from Acorus calamus

    PubMed Central

    GHOSH, MODHUMITA

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims Plants have evolved a number of inducible defence mechanisms against pathogen attack, including synthesis of pathogenesis-related proteins. The aim of the study was to purify and characterize antifungal protein from leaves of Acorus calamus. • Methods Leaf proteins from A. calamus were fractionated by cation exchange chromatography and gel filtration and the fraction inhibiting the hyphal extension of phytopathogens was characterized. The temperature stability and pH optima of the protein were determined and its presence was localized in the leaf tissues. • Key Results The purified protein was identified as a class III haem peroxidase with a molecular weight of approx. 32 kDa and pI of 7·93. The temperature stability of the enzyme was observed from 5 °C to 60 °C with a temperature optimum of 36 °C. Maximum enzyme activity was registered at pH 5·5. The pH and temperature optima were corroborated with the antifungal activity of the enzyme. The enzyme was localized in the leaf epidermal cells and lumen tissues of xylem, characteristic of class III peroxidases. The toxic nature of the enzyme which inhibited hyphal growth was demonstrated against phytopathogens such as Macrophomina phaseolina, Fusarium moniliforme and Trichosporium vesiculosum. Microscopic observations revealed distortion in the hyphal structure with stunted growth, increased volume and extensive hyphal branching. • Conclusions This study indicates that peroxidases may have a role to play in host defence by inhibiting the hyphal extension of invading pathogens. PMID:17056613

  17. Final test results for the Schott HCE on a LS-2 collector.

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, Timothy A.; Brosseau, Douglas A.

    2005-07-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has completed thermal performance testing on the Schott parabolic trough receiver using the LS-2 collector on the Sandia rotating platform at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility in Albuquerque, NM. This testing was funded as part of the US DOE Sun-Lab USA-Trough program. The receiver tested was a new Schott receiver, known as Heat Collector Elements (HCEs). Schott is a new manufacturer of trough HCEs. The Schott HCEs are 4m long; therefore, two were joined and mounted on the LS-2 collector module for the test. The Schott HCE design consists of a 70mm diameter high solar absorptance coated stainless steel (SS) tube encapsulated within a 125mm diameter Pyrex{reg_sign} glass tube with vacuum in the annulus formed between the SS and glass tube to minimize convection heat losses. The Schott HCE design is unique in two regards. First, the bellows used to compensate for the difference in thermal expansion between the metal and glass tube are inside the glass envelope rather than outside. Second, the composition of materials at the glass-to-metal seal has very similar thermal expansion coefficients making the joint less prone to breakage from thermal shock. Sandia National Laboratories provided both the azimuth and elevation collector module tracking systems used during the tests. The test results showed the efficiency of the Schott HCE to be very similar to current HCEs being manufactured by Solel. This testing provided performance verification for the use of Schott tubes with Solargenix trough collector assemblies at currently planned trough power plant projects in Arizona and Nevada.

  18. Genetic Diversification and Dispersal of Taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott)

    PubMed Central

    Chaïr, H.; Traore, R. E.; Duval, M. F.; Rivallan, R.; Mukherjee, A.; Aboagye, L. M.; Van Rensburg, W. J.; Andrianavalona, V.; Pinheiro de Carvalho, M. A. A.; Saborio, F.; Sri Prana, M.; Komolong, B.; Lawac, F.; Lebot, V.

    2016-01-01

    Taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott) is widely distributed in tropical and sub-tropical areas. However, its origin, diversification and dispersal remain unclear. While taro genetic diversity has been documented at the country and regional levels in Asia and the Pacific, few reports are available from Americas and Africa where it has been introduced through human migrations. We used eleven microsatellite markers to investigate the diversity and diversification of taro accessions from nineteen countries in Asia, the Pacific, Africa and America. The highest genetic diversity and number of private alleles were observed in Asian accessions, mainly from India. While taro has been diversified in Asia and the Pacific mostly via sexual reproduction, clonal reproduction with mutation appeared predominant in African and American countries investigated. Bayesian clustering revealed a first genetic group of diploids from the Asia-Pacific region and to a second diploid-triploid group mainly from India. Admixed cultivars between the two genetic pools were also found. In West Africa, most cultivars were found to have originated from India. Only one multi-locus lineage was assigned to the Asian pool, while cultivars in Madagascar originated from India and Indonesia. The South African cultivars shared lineages with Japan. The Caribbean Islands cultivars were found to have originated from the Pacific, while in Costa Rica they were from India or admixed between Indian and Asian groups. Taro dispersal in the different areas of Africa and America is thus discussed in the light of available records of voyages and settlements. PMID:27314588

  19. Genetic Diversification and Dispersal of Taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott).

    PubMed

    Chaïr, H; Traore, R E; Duval, M F; Rivallan, R; Mukherjee, A; Aboagye, L M; Van Rensburg, W J; Andrianavalona, V; Pinheiro de Carvalho, M A A; Saborio, F; Sri Prana, M; Komolong, B; Lawac, F; Lebot, V

    2016-01-01

    Taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott) is widely distributed in tropical and sub-tropical areas. However, its origin, diversification and dispersal remain unclear. While taro genetic diversity has been documented at the country and regional levels in Asia and the Pacific, few reports are available from Americas and Africa where it has been introduced through human migrations. We used eleven microsatellite markers to investigate the diversity and diversification of taro accessions from nineteen countries in Asia, the Pacific, Africa and America. The highest genetic diversity and number of private alleles were observed in Asian accessions, mainly from India. While taro has been diversified in Asia and the Pacific mostly via sexual reproduction, clonal reproduction with mutation appeared predominant in African and American countries investigated. Bayesian clustering revealed a first genetic group of diploids from the Asia-Pacific region and to a second diploid-triploid group mainly from India. Admixed cultivars between the two genetic pools were also found. In West Africa, most cultivars were found to have originated from India. Only one multi-locus lineage was assigned to the Asian pool, while cultivars in Madagascar originated from India and Indonesia. The South African cultivars shared lineages with Japan. The Caribbean Islands cultivars were found to have originated from the Pacific, while in Costa Rica they were from India or admixed between Indian and Asian groups. Taro dispersal in the different areas of Africa and America is thus discussed in the light of available records of voyages and settlements. PMID:27314588

  20. Antioxidant and anticancer evaluation of Scindapsus officinalis (Roxb.) Schott fruits

    PubMed Central

    Shivhare, Shaktikumar C.; Patidar, Arjun O.; Malviya, K. G.; Shivhare-Malviya, K. K.

    2011-01-01

    Several methods exist for the treatment of cancer in modern medicine. These include chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and surgery; most cancer chemotherapeutants severely affect the host normal cells. Hence the use of natural products now has been contemplated of exceptional value in the control of cancer. Plant-derived natural products such as flavonoids, terpenes, alkaloids, etc., have received considerable attention in recent years due to their diverse pharmacological properties including cytotoxic and cancer chemopreventive effects. Looking into this, the antioxidant and anticancer evaluation of Scindapsus officinalis (Roxb.) Schott fruits has been attempted to investigate its antitumor activity. The collection and authentication of the plant material mainly fruits and their various extractions was done. Identification of plant's active constituents by preliminary phytochemical screening was carried out. An in-vitro cytotoxic assay using the brine shrimp lethality assay with brine shrimp eggs (Artemia salina) at a dose of 1–10 μg/ml with the fruit extract was performed by the method described by Mayer et al. Cell viability using the Trypan blue dye exclusion test at a dose of 20, 40, 80, 120, and 160 μg/ml dissolved in DMSO (final concentration 0.1%), and cytotoxicity using the MTT assay where viable cells convert MTT into a formazan salt were performed. All pharmacological screening for acute toxicity and anti tumour studies using EAC 1 × 106 cells/mouse treated Swiss albino mice at a dose of 100 and 200 mg/kg/day orally was carried out. Biochemical and antioxidants predictions from various parameters like hematological, RBC, WBC count, PVC, total protein, Tissue Lipid Peroxidation, SOD, CATALASE, GPx, GST levels and anti tumour activity of Scindapsus officinalis were observed. The data was statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA followed by Dunnett's and Tukey's multiple comparison test. The antitumor effect of the extract is evident from the increase in mean

  1. Comparative studies on growth and physiological responses of unicellular and colonial Microcystis aeruginosa to Acorus calamus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S-H; Chang, J-J; Cao, J-Y; Yang, C-L

    2015-02-01

    In order to explore the growth inhibition and physiological responses of unicellular and colonial Microcystis aeruginosa during coexistence with Acorus calamus, algal densities, chlorophyll a contents, exopolysaccharide (EPS) concentrations, malondialdehyde (MDA) contents, catalase (CAT) activities, and peroxidase (POD) activities of the two algae strains were analyzed. Although the unicellular and colonial strains of M. aeruginosa were both inhibited by A. calamus, unicellular algae were more sensitive than the colonial algae. The measurement results for EPS, MDA, CAT, and POD showed that unicellular M. aeruginosa had higher levels of stress related damage than colonial strains when they were exposed to the same density of A. calamus, and the cellular defense system of colonial M. aeruginosa was stronger than that of unicellular M. aeruginosa. Natural blooms of Microcystis are typically composed of colonial forms of M. aeruginosa, therefore future efforts to control such blooms, possibly through the development of new algicides, should focus on the unique characteristics of colonial M. aeruginosa strains. PMID:25416545

  2. Phytochemical and antimicrobial studies of four species of Cola Schott & Endl. (Sterculiaceae).

    PubMed

    Sonibare, Mubo Adeola; Soladoye, Micheal O; Esan, Oyedokun O; Sonibare, Oluwadayo O

    2009-01-01

    The in-vitro antimicrobial evaluation of ethanol extracts of four species of Cola Schott & Endl. was done using human isolated strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus albus, Bacillus subtilis, Klebsiella pneumonia, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans, Aspergillus niger as test organisms. The assays were carried out by agar well diffusion, erythromycin and ketoconazole served as the control drugs. The leaf ethanol extracts of the plants were found to be more effective against the tested fungi than the bacteria at high concentrations. None of the extracts was active against Staphylococcus aureus. Plant extract of C. acuminata (P. Beauv.) Schott & Endl. and C. nitida (Vent) Schott & Endl. showed activity on S. albus at concentrations ranging from 10-150 mgml(-) having comparable diameters of zone of inhibition of 7.3+/-0.03-16.0+/-0.0 for C. acuminata and 10.0+/-0.0-19.0+/-0.0 for C. nitida. Also, these two species of Cola demonstrated activities on C. albicans and A. niger at concentrations ranging from 90-150mgml(-1) with relatively close diameters of zone of inhibition. Only C. acuminata inhibited the growth of K. pneumoniae at the MIC of 90mgml(-1) whereas, C. albicans was inhibited by C. acuminata, C. millenii K. Schum and C. gigantea A.Chev. at the MIC of 120mgml(-1). Phytochemical screening of the four species of Cola showed the presence of alkaloids, saponins, tannins and cardenolides in all the plants which apart from showing the probable closeness of the species could also be responsible for the observed activities. The antimicrobial property shown by the plant extracts is an evidence of the ethnomedicinal uses of the plants. The similarity observed in the phytochemical constituents and antimicrobial activities demonstrated by C nitida (Vent.) Schott & Endl., C. millenii and C.gigantea A. Chev. and C. acuminata suggest a probable closeness among these species. The results obtained in this study provide preliminary evidence of the chemotaxonomic

  3. Antifungal activity of beta-asarone from rhizomes of Acorus gramineus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jee Yeon; Lee, Jung Yeop; Yun, Bong-Sik; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2004-02-25

    An antifungal substance was isolated from the extract of Acorus gramineus using various chromatographic procedures. The antibiotic was identified as beta-asarone, cis-2,4,5-trimethoxy-1-propenylbenzene, on the basis of the high-resolution EI-mass, NMR, and UV spectral data. Beta-asarone completely inhibited mycelial growth of some plant pathogenic fungi, Cladosporium cucumerinum,Colletotrichum orbiculare, Magnaporthe grisea, and Pythium ultimum, in a range of 0.5-30 microg/mL. The growth of Bacillus subtilis, Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora, Ralstonia solanacearum, and Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria was slightly suppressed by beta-asarone. As the concentration of beta-asarone increased, M. grisea infection was drastically inhibited on rice leaves. Treatment with 500 microg/mL of beta-asarone also greatly suppressed lesion formation of Co. orbiculare on cucumber leaves. This is the first study to demonstrate in vitro and in vivo antifungal activity of beta-asarone against plant fungal pathogens M. grisea and C. orbiculare. PMID:14969530

  4. Experimental evaluation of antidepressant effect of Vacha (Acorus calamus) in animal models of depression.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, A K; Singh, R H

    2010-04-01

    Depression is a common diagnosis throughout India. It is one of the major sequelae of modern lifestyle which is full of stress. Several drugs and therapies have been tried but a safe and effective treatment of depressive illness is yet not fully established. The main objective of this experimental study on animal models is to evaluate the antidepressant action of plant drug Vacha (Acorus calamus). The behavioral study was conducted and at the same time 5-HT receptor involvement was evaluated. The experimental study was done in rats to evaluate their Open Field Behavior (OFB), High Plus Maze (HPM) activity and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor syndrome, before and after feeding Vacha. Concurrent Vacha administration in the depression model prevented the development of behavioral deficit in ambulation and rearing due to stress. Similarly, in High Plus Maze Test (HPMT), exploratory activity of rat was restored with Vacha administration. In adopted model of depression, when the animal was subjected to Vacha administration, the behavioural deficit was prevented very well as compared to stressed group. While eliciting the 5-HT syndrome, only two components out of five were influenced by Vacha, indicating that Vacha does not sensitize postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptors, which explains the behavioral deficit prevention in stressed rat group. Vacha definitely has antidepressant effects in animal model of depression. PMID:22131703

  5. Phytoremediation of chlorpyrifos in aqueous system by riverine macrophyte, Acorus calamus: toxicity and removal rate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qinghai; Li, Cui; Zheng, Ruilun; Que, Xiaoe

    2016-08-01

    The potential of Acorus calamus to remove chlorpyrifos from water was assessed under laboratory conditions. Toxic effects of the insecticide in A. calamus were evaluated using pulse-amplitude modulated chlorophyll fluorescence techniques as well. At exposure concentrations above 8 mg L(-1), A. calamus showed obvious phytotoxic symptom with significant reduction in quantum efficiency of PSII (ΦPSII) and photochemical quenching coefficient (qP) in 20-day test; the inhibition of maximal quantum efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm) was accompanied by a significant rise in initial chlorophyll fluorescence (Fo) within 15-day exposures. Fv/Fm and Fo recover to the normal level after 20-day exposure. The reduced removal rate to chlorpyrifos was observed with increase of initial chlorpyrifos concentrations. At application levels of 1, 2, and 4 mg L(-1), the disappearance rate of chlorpyrifos in the hydroponic system with plants was significantly greater than that without plants during the 20-day test periods. Chlorpyrifos was taken up from medium and transferred to above ground tissues by the plant and significant amounts of chlorpyrifos accumulated in plant tissues. The result indicated that A. calamus can promote the disappearance of chlorpyrifos from water and may be used for phytoremediation of water contaminated with a relatively low concentration of chlorpyrifos insecticide (<4 mg L(-1)). PMID:27154841

  6. First report of taro vein chlorosis virus infecting taro [Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott] in the United States of America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In March 2013, taro plants [Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott cv. ‘iliuaua’] with leaves displaying veinal chlorosis and necrosis were observed at a germplasm collection on the island of Molokai. These symptoms were similar to those of taro vein chlorosis, an important disease of taro found in severa...

  7. Spatio-Temporal Patterns in Rhizosphere Oxygen Profiles in the Emergent Plant Species Acorus calamus

    PubMed Central

    Wenlin, Wang; Ruiming, Han; Yinjing, Wan; Bo, Liu; Xiaoyan, Tang; Bin, Liang; Guoxiang, Wang

    2014-01-01

    Rhizosphere oxygen profiles are the key to understanding the role of wetland plants in ecological remediation. Though in situ determination of the rhizosphere oxygen profiles has been performed occasionally at certain growing stages within days, comprehensive study on individual roots during weeks is still missing. Seedlings of Acorus calamus, a wetland monocot, were cultivated in silty sediment and the rhizosphere oxygen profiles were characterized at regular intervals, using micro-optodes to examine the same root at four positions along the root axis. The rhizosphere oxygen saturation culminated at 42.9% around the middle part of the root and was at its lowest level, 3.3%, at the basal part of the root near the aboveground portion. As the plant grew, the oxygen saturation at the four positions remained nearly constant until shoot height reached 15 cm. When shoot height reached 60 cm, oxygen saturation was greatest at the point halfway along the root, followed by the point three-quarters of the way down the root, the tip of the root, and the point one-quarter of the way down. Both the internal and rhizosphere oxygen saturation steadily increased, as did the thickness of stably oxidized microzones, which ranged from 20 µm in younger seedlings to a maximum of 320 µm in older seedlings. The spatial patterns of rhizosphere oxygen profiles in sediment contrast with those from previous studies on radial oxygen loss in A. calamus that used conventional approaches. Rhizosphere oxygen saturation peaked around the middle part of roots and the thickness of stably oxidized zones increased as the roots grew. PMID:24866504

  8. The Rhizomes of Acorus gramineus and the Constituents Inhibit Allergic Response In vitro and In vivo.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyun; Lee, Seung Young; Lee, Kang Ro; Kim, Yeong Shik; Kim, Hyun Pyo

    2012-09-01

    The rhizomes of Acorus gramineus have frequently been used in traditional medicine mainly for sedation as well as enhancing brain function. In this study, the anti-allergic activity of A. gramineus was investigated. The 70% ethanol extract of the rhizomes of A. gramineus was found to inhibit the allergic response against 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX)-catalyzed leukotriene (LT) production from rat basophilic leukemia (RBL)-1 cells and β-hexosaminidase release from RBL-2H3 cells with IC50's of 48.9 and >200 μg/ml, respectively. Among the 9 major constituents isolated, β-asarone, (2R,3R,4S,5S)-2,4-dimethyl-1,3-bis (2',4',5'-trimethoxyphenyl)tetrahydrofuran (AF) and 2,3-dihydro-4,5,7-trimethoxy-1-ethyl-2-methyl-3-(2,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)indene (AI) strongly inhibited 5-LOX-catalyzed LT production in A23187-treated RBL-1 cells, AI being the most potent (IC50=6.7 μM). Against β-hexosaminidase release by antigen-stimulated RBL-2H3 cells, only AI exhibited strong inhibition (IC50=7.3 μM) while β-asarone and AF showed 26.0% and 39.9% inhibition at 50 μM, respectively. In addition, the ethanol extract of A. gramineus showed significant inhibitory action against the hapten-induced delayed hypersensitivity reaction in mice by oral administration at 200 mg/kg. Therefore, it is suggested that A. gramineus possesses anti-allergic activity and the constituents including β-asarone and AI certainly contribute to the anti-allergic activity of the rhizomes of A. gramineus. PMID:24009837

  9. Efficacy of Acorus calamus on collagen maturation on full thickness cutaneous wounds in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ponrasu, Thangavel; Madhukumar, Karuppanan Natarajan; Ganeshkumar, Moorthy; Iyappan, Kuttalam; Sangeethapriya, Vilvanathan; Gayathri, Vinaya Subramani; Suguna, Lonchin

    2014-01-01

    Background: The rhizomes of Acorus calamus and their essential oil are widely used in the flavoring industry and production of alcoholic beverages in Europe. Recent reports have confirmed the presence of several pharmacological components in the rhizomes of A. calamus. Objective: The objective of this study was to find out the efficacy of topical administration of ethanolic extract of A. calamus on dermal wound healing in rats. Wound healing is a natural process occurring in living organisms, which results in a complete or partial remodeling of injured tissue and ultimately progresses to the formation of a fibrous scar. Several natural products have been reported to augment the wound healing process. Materials and Methods: An ethanolic extract of A. calamus was prepared and its wound-healing efficacy was studied. An excision wound was made on the back of the rat and 200 μL (40 mg/kg body weight) of the A. calamus extract was applied topically once daily for the treated wounds. The control wounds were treated with 200 μL of phosphate buffered saline. Results: The granulation tissues formed were removed at 4, 8 and 12 days and biochemical parameters such as deoxyribonucleic acid, total protein, total collagen, hexosamine and uronic acids were measured. The amount of type I/III collagen formed in control and treated wound tissues was evaluated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The epithelialization time, tensile strength and histological examination of the wounds were also studied. Biochemical analyses of the granulation tissues revealed a significant increase in collagen, hexosamine and uronic acid when compared with the control. The tensile strength of extract treated wounds was found to increase by 112%. A significant reduction in lipid peroxide levels suggested that A. calamus possesses antioxidant components. Conclusions: The results strongly confirm the beneficial effects of A. calamus in augmenting the wound healing process. PMID

  10. Transient radiation effects in D.O.I. optical materials: Schott filter glass

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons-Potter, K.

    1998-07-01

    Department of Energy and Defense Programs systems are becoming increasingly reliant on the use of optical technologies that must perform under a range of ionizing radiation environments. In particular, the radiation response of materials under consideration for applications in direct optical initiation (D.O.I.) schemes must be well characterized. In this report, transient radiation effects observed in Schott filter glass S-7010 are characterized. Under gamma exposure with 2 MeV photons in a 20--30 nsec pulse, the authors observe strong initial induced fluorescence in the red region of the spectrum followed by significant induced absorption over the same spectral region. Peak induced absorption coefficients of 0.113 cm{sup {minus}1} and 0.088 cm{sup {minus}1} were calculated at 800 nm and 660 nm respectively.

  11. β-Asarone, an active principle of Acorus calamus rhizome, inhibits morphogenesis, biofilm formation and ergosterol biosynthesis in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Sandeep B; Karuppayil, S Mohan

    2013-01-15

    Anti-Candida potential of Acorus calamus rhizome and its active principle, β-asarone, was evaluated against the human fungal pathogen, Candida albicans. β-Asarone exhibited promising growth inhibitory activity at 0.5mg/ml and it was fungicidal at 8 mg/ml. Time dependant kill curve assay showed that MFC of β-asarone was highly toxic to C. albicans, killing 99.9% inoculum within 120 min of exposure. β-Asarone caused significant inhibition of C. albicans morphogenesis and biofilm development at sub-inhibitory concentrations. Our data indicate that the growth inhibitory activity of β-asarone might be through inhibition of ergosterol biosynthesis. Hemolytic assay showed that β-asarone is non-toxic, even at concentrations approaching MIC value. Our results suggest that β-asarone may be safe as a topical antifungal agent. PMID:23123225

  12. Supplemental ultraviolet-B induced changes in essential oil composition and total phenolics of Acorus calamus L. (sweet flag).

    PubMed

    Kumari, Rima; Agrawal, S B; Singh, Suruchi; Dubey, N K

    2009-10-01

    The effect of supplemental UV-B radiation (sUV-B) was evaluated on the essential oil contents of sweet flag (Acorus calamus L.), a medicinal plant grown under natural field conditions. After the emergence of two leaves, plants were exposed to sUV-B radiation of 1.8 kJ m(-2) above the ambient level of UV-B. The level of essential oil and phenol contents increased with exposure to sUV-B. Exposure of sUV-B resulted in significant increase in p-cymene and carvacrol contents of essential oil. Decrease in the level of major component beta-asarone due to sUV-B treatment is of prime importance, because of its toxicological concern to human health. PMID:19321203

  13. Optical materials for astronomy from SCHOTT: the quality of large components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedamzik, Ralf; Hengst, Joachim; Elsmann, Frank; Lemke, Christian; Döhring, Thorsten; Hartmann, Peter

    2008-07-01

    The new generation of survey telescopes and future giant observatories such as E-ELT or TMT do not only require very fast or very large mirrors, but also high sophisticated instruments with the need of large optical materials in outstanding quality. The huge variety of modern optical materials from SCHOTT covers almost all areas of specification needs of optical designers. Even if many interesting optical materials are restricted in size and/or quality, there is a variety of optical materials that can be produced in large sizes, with excellent optical homogeneity, and a low level of stress birefringence. Some actual examples are high homogeneous N-BK7 blanks with a diameter of up to 1000 mm, CaF2 blanks as large as 300 mm which are useable for IR applications, Fused Silica (LITHOSIL®) with dimensions up to 700 mm which are used for visible applications, and other optical glasses like FK5, LLF1 and F2 in large formats. In this presentation the latest inspection results of large optical materials will be presented, showing the advances in production and measurement technology.

  14. Inhibitory effects of Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott constituents on aldose reductase.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong Mei; Hwang, Seung Hwan; Kang, Beom Goo; Hong, Jae Seung; Lim, Soon Sung

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the rat lens aldose reductase-inhibitory effects of 95% ethanol extracts from the leaves of C. esculenta and, its organic solvent soluble fractions, including the dichloromethane (CH2Cl2), ethyl acetate (EtOAc), n-butanol (BuOH) and water (H2O) layers, using dl-glyceraldehyde as a substrate. Ten compounds, namely tryptophan (1), orientin (2), isoorientin (3), vitexin (4), isovitexin (5), luteolin-7-O-glucoside (6), luteolin-7-O-rutinoside (7), rosmarinic acid (8), 1-O-feruloyl-d-glucoside (9) and 1-O-caffeoyl-d-glucoside (10) were isolated from the EtOAc and BuOH fractions of C. esculenta. The structures of compounds 1-10 were elucidated by spectroscopic methods and comparison with previous reports. All the isolates were subjected to an in vitro bioassay to evaluate their inhibitory activity against rat lens aldose reductase. Among tested compounds, compounds 2 and 3 significantly inhibited rat lens aldose reductase, with IC50 values of 1.65 and 1.92 μM, respectively. Notably, the inhibitory activity of orientin was 3.9 times greater than that of the positive control, quercetin (4.12 μM). However, the isolated compounds showed only moderate ABTS+ [2,29-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)] activity. These results suggest that flavonoid derivatives from Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott represent potential compounds for the prevention and/or treatment of diabetic complications. PMID:25255750

  15. Ability of eugenol to reduce tongue edema induced by Dieffenbachia picta Schott in mice.

    PubMed

    Dip, Etyene Castro; Pereira, Nuno Alvarez; Fernandes, Patricia Dias

    2004-05-01

    Dieffenbachia picta Schott (Araceae), known in Brazil as "comigo-ninguém-pode" is an ornamental plant with toxic properties. Its juice, when chewed, causes a painful edema of the oral mucous membranes, buccal ulcerations and tongue hypertrophy. This acute inflammation sometimes becomes severe enough to produce glottis obstruction, respiratory compromise and death. Eugenol (4-alil-2-metoxiphenol), the essential oil extracted from Caryophyllus aromaticus (Myrtaceae) is widely used in odontology. In this study, our objective was to standardize, in mice, a measurable methodology for the tongue edema induced by the topical application of the D. picta stem juice; evaluate the effects of eugenol in this model and compare the results with emergency treatment used in hospitals. Our results show that in spite of a small increase in edema a few minutes after administration, emergency treatment reduced by 70% the overall edema. When compared with the combination of the above drugs, eugenol, even at the smallest dose of 5 microg/kg, regardless of the chosen administration route, or the moment the treatment began, presents better results in the reduction and inhibition of the tongue edema induced by the D. picta juice. PMID:15109894

  16. AFLP analysis of nephthytis (Syngonium podophyllum Schott) selected from somaclonal variants.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Henny, R J; Devanand, P S; Chao, C T

    2006-01-01

    This study analyzed genetic differences of 19 cultivars selected from somaclonal variants of Syngonium podophyllum Schott along with their parents as well as seven additional Syngonium species and six other aroids using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers generated by 12 primer sets. Among the 19 somaclonal cultivars, 'Pink Allusion' was selected from 'White Butterfly'. Tissue culture of 'Pink Allusion' through organogenesis resulted in the development of 13 additional cultivars. Self-pollination of 'Pink Allusion' obtained a cultivar, 'Regina Red Allusion', and tissue culture propagation of 'Regina Red Allusion' led to the release of five other cultivars. The 12 primer sets generated a total of 1,583 scorable fragments from all accessions, of which 1,284 were polymorphic (81.9%). The percentages of polymorphic fragments within 'White Butterfly' and 'Regina Red Allusion' groups, however, were only 1.2% and 0.4%, respectively. Jaccard's similarity coefficients among somaclonal cultivars derived from 'White Butterfly' and 'Regina Red Allusion', on average, were 0.98 and 0.99, respectively. Seven out of the 15 cultivars from the 'White Butterfly' group and three out of six from the 'Regina Red Allusion' group were clearly distinguished by AFLP analysis as unique fragments were associated with respective cultivars. The unsuccessful attempt to distinguish the remaining eight cultivars from the 'White Butterfly' group and three from the 'Regina Red Allusion' group was not attributed to experimental errors or the number of primer sets used; rather it is hypothesized to be caused by DNA methylation and/or some rare mutations. This study also calls for increased genetic diversity of cultivated Syngonium as they are largely derived from somaclonal variants. PMID:16133347

  17. Evaluation of the wound-healing activity and anti-inflammatory activity of aqueous extracts from Acorus calamus L.

    PubMed

    Shi, Guo-bing; Wang, Bing; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Tong-chao; Wang, Chang-li; Sun, Xue-hui; Zong, Wen-tao; Yan, Ming; Zhao, Qing-chun; Chen, Yu-feng; Zhang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    In folklore medicine, Acorus calamus has been used as a wound-healing agent for thousands of years; however, there have been few scientific reports on this activity so far. Now, we explored deeply the wound-healing effect of aqueous extracts from the fresh roots and rhizomes of A. calamus in vivo, as well as anti-inflammatory activity in vitro, so as to provide scientific evidence for the traditional application. The wound-healing effect was determined by the image analysis techniques and the histological analysis in the excisional wounding test, and the anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by the real-time RT-PCR techniques in the lipopolysaccharide-induced RAW 264.7 cells test. Aqueous extracts, administered topically at the dose range from twice to thrice in a day, could enhance significantly the rate of skin wound-healing. Moreover, the extracts could effectively inhibit the mRNA expressions of inflammatory mediators induced by lipopolysaccharide in RAW 264.7 cells. These results showed significantly the wound-healing activity of aqueous extracts in the animal model of excise wound healing, and anti-inflammatory activity in vitro. PMID:24374458

  18. Asarones fromAcorus calamus L. Oil : Their effect on feeding behavior and dietary utilization inPeridroma saucia.

    PubMed

    Koul, O; Smirle, M J; Isman, M B

    1990-06-01

    Asarones (2, 4, 5-trimethoxypropenylbenzenes) isolated from the essential oil ofAcorus calamus L. rhizomes, are potent growth inhibitors and antifeedants to the variegated cutworm,Peridroma saucia Hubner.cis-Asarone added to artificial diet significantly inhibited growth and feeding by first-, third-, and fourth-instar larvae, whereas thetrans isomer produced an antifeedant effect alone. Gross dietary utilization (efficiency of conversion of ingested food, ECI) was decreased when the diet was supplemented withcis-asarone or when this compound was topically applied to fourth-instar larvae. Inhibition of growth occurred even at a moderate topical dose (5 μg/larva) primarily as a result of decreased efficiency of conversion of digested food (ECD), even though the approximate digestibility (AD) of the food was unchanged. Oral or topical treatment withtrans-asarone also significantly inhibited larval growth, but in this case the effect can be strictly attributed to decreased consumption, as dietary utilization (ECI) was not affected. Both isomers displayed a direct antifeedant effect based on leaf disk choice tests. Thecis isomer was 7.0 and 5.5 times more potent thant thetrans isomer against fourth- and fifth-instar larvae, respectively. Our data suggest that the two asarone isomers have different modes of action.cis-Asarone is toxic in addition to having strong antifeedant activity, whereas thetrans isomer acts only as an antifeedant with no appreciable toxicity. PMID:24263994

  19. Compositional variations and anthelmentic activity of essential oils from rhizomes of different wild populations of Acorus calamus L. and its major component, beta-Asarone.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ravendra; Prakash, Om; Pan, Anil K; Hore, Subrata K; Chanotiya, Chandan S; Mathela, Chandra S

    2009-02-01

    Hydro-distilled essential oils from Acorus calamus rhizomes collected from six different geographical zones in the northwest Himalayan region of Uttarakhand have been analyzed by GC and GC/MS. All the oils differed in their qualitative and quantitative make up, although beta-asarone was the major constituent of all of them. The essential oils and the isolated beta-asarone were screened for anthelmintic activity using contractility of Ascaridia galli. beta-Asarone, in particular, showed potent activity with IC50 values of 75.4 +/- 61.8 ng/mL. PMID:19370938

  20. Repellant and insecticidal activities of shyobunone and isoshyobunone derived from the essential oil of Acorus calamus rhizomes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hai-Ping; Yang, Kai; Zheng, Li-Shi; You, Chun-Xue; Cai, Qian; Wang, Cheng-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Context: It was found that the essential oil of Acorus calamus rhizomes showed insecticidal activity. Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the chemical composition of the essential oil from A. calamus rhizomes, evaluate insecticidal and repellant activity against Lasioderma serricorne (LS) and Tribolium castaneum (TC), and to isolate any insecticidal constituents from the essential oil. Materials and Methods: Essential oil from A. calamus was obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) flame ionization detector and GC-mass spectrometry. The insecticidal and repellant activity of the essential oil and isolated compounds was tested using a variety of methods. Results: The main components of the essential oil were identified to be isoshyobunone (15.56%), β-asarone (10.03%), bicyclo[6.1.0]non-1-ene (9.67%), shyobunone (9.60%) and methylisoeugenol (6.69%). Among them, the two active constituents were isolated and identified as shyobunone and isoshyobunone. The essential oil showed contact toxicity against LS and TC with LD50 values of 14.40 and 32.55 μg/adult, respectively. The isolated compounds, shyobunone and isoshyobunone also exhibited strong contact toxicity against LS adults with LD50 values of 20.24 and 24.19 μg/adult, respectively, while the LD50 value of isoshyobunone was 61.90 μg/adult for TC adults. The essential oil, shyobunone and isoshyobunone were strongly repellent (98%, 90% and 94%, respectively, at 78.63 nL/cm2, after 2 h treatment) against TC. Conclusion: The essential oil, shyobunone and isoshyobunone possessed insecticidal and repellant activity against LS and TC. PMID:26600710

  1. Midtemperature Solar Systems Test Facility predictions for thermal performance based on test data. Alpha Solarco Model 104 solar collector with 0. 125-inch Schott low-iron glass reflector surface

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, T.D.

    1981-04-01

    Thermal performance predictions based on test data are presented for the Alpha Solarco Model 104 solar collector, with 0.125-inch Schott low-iron glass reflector surface, for three output temperatures at five cities in the United States.

  2. Effects of Water-Soluble Polysaccharides with Different Chemical Structure, Isolated from Acorus calamus L. and Trifolium pratense L., on Nitric Oxide Production: A Screening Study.

    PubMed

    Ligacheva, A A; Danilets, M G; Trofimova, E S; Sherstoboev, E Yu; Zhdanov, V V; Guriev, A M; Belousov, M V; Yusubov, M S; Korzh, A P; Krivoshchekov, S V; Dygai, A M

    2016-01-01

    Screening study of the effects of sweet flag (Acorus calamus L.) rhizome and clover (Trifolium pratense L.) aerial part on the production of NO by mouse macrophages was carried out. The polysaccharides were separated by ion exchange chromatography into fractions differing by monomeric composition and ramification type and were used in concentrations of 20, 40, and 100 μg/ml. Four fractions of Acorus calamus L. (PSF-101, PSF-102, PSF-103, and PSF-105), used in different concentrations, moderately stimulated nitrite production by macrophages. Three of five Trifolium pratense L. polysaccharides (PS62-3, PS62-4, and PS62-5) exhibited a significant specific effect on NO production. Rhamnogalactouronans from clover PS63-3 in all concentrations and from PS62-5 in a concentration of 100 μg/ml exhibited the highest activity, comparable to the NO-stimulatory activity of the reference LPS, while polysaccharide PS62-3 in a concentration of 40 μg/ml exhibited even higher activity. PMID:26742749

  3. Analgesic and cytotoxic activity of Acorus calamus L., Kigelia pinnata L., Mangifera indica L. and Tabernaemontana divaricata L.

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mohammad Ahad Ali; Islam, Mohammad Torequl

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to evaluate analgesic and cytotoxic activity of Acorus calamus L., Kigelia pinnata L., Mangifera indica L., Tabernaemontana divaricata L. extracts by using acetic acid–induced writhing method in mice and brine shrimp lethality assay. Materials and Methods: The ethanolic extracts of the plants were obtained by simple maceration method and were subjected to standardization by using pharmacognostical and phytochemical screening methods, which were followed by acetic acid writhing and brine shrimp lethality test methods. Dose selection was made on the basis of acute oral toxicity study (10–1000 mg/kg body weight). Results and Conclusion: In analgesic test, M. indica L. extract produced 28.16% and 22.02% writhing protection at the doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg body weight in mice, respectively. While the T. divaricata L. extract produced 22.02% and 33.93%, K. pinnata L. extract produced 11.55% and 47.29% and A. calamus L. extract produced 15.16% and 54.51% of writhing protection at the same doses. The percent mortality (mean ± SD) was found to be 58.7 ± 25.22, 56.25 ± 22.88, 52.50 ± 24.37, and 61.25 ± 26.66 with M. indica L., T. divaricata L., K. pinnata L., and A. calamus L., respectively. And the LC50 and LC90 values were found to be 100 and 300 μg/mL for M. indica L. and that were (200 and 350 μg/mL), (100 and 350 μg/mL) and (50 and 300 μg/mL) for T. divaricata L., K. pinnata L., and A. calamus L., respectively. Thus it can be concluded that bark of M. indica L., leaves of T. divaricata L., bark of K. pinnata L., and roots of A. calamus L. have significant analgesic and cytotoxic activity and can be preferred in the treatment of pain and tumor. PMID:22557926

  4. Analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-diarrheal activities of ethanolic leaf extract of Typhonium trilobatum L. Schott

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Khadem; Ashraf, Ayesha; Nath Biswas, Nripendra

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the efficacy of ethanolic leaf extract of Typhonium trilobatum L. Schott in treating diarrhea, pain and inflammation using experimental models. Methods In the present study, acetic acid-induced writhing, xylene-induced ear edema and castor oil-induced diarrheal model were used to evaluate the analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-diarrheal activities, respectively. Acute toxicity test was carried out to fix the safe doses of the plant extract. Results The plant extract demonstrated a significant inhibition of writhing (P<0.01) compared with the control group in acetic acid-induced writhing test in mice. The extract also significantly inhibited the xylene induced ear edema formation (P<0.05). In anti-diarrheal test, the extract significantly decreased the frequency of defecation and increased the mean latent period (P<0.01) in castor oil-induced diarrheal model mice at the doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg body weight. Conclusions These results suggest that the extract possesses significant analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-diarrheal activities that support to the ethnopharmacological uses of this plant. PMID:23570002

  5. In vitro starch digestibility, estimated glycemic index and antioxidant potential of taro (Colocasia esculenta L. Schott) corm.

    PubMed

    Simsek, Sebnem; Nehir El, Sedef

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine some functional properties of taro (Colocasia esculenta L. Schott) corm, which can be a good alternative to the other dietary carbohydrate sources with its high starch content. The total phenolic and flavonoid content of taro corm was found as 205±53mgCAE/100g and 61±9mgCAE/100g, respectively. The antioxidant capacity of corm was determined as 452±72mMTEAC/100g and 244±73mMTEAC/100g, by the scavenging activity against ABTS and DPPH radicals, respectively. The free glucose content of corms was less than 1%, whereas the 60% of dry matter was composed of starch. According to the results, the taro corms' starch was highly digestible and higher than the 50% of the starch was composed of rapidly digestible starch (RDS) fractions. The estimated glycemic index (eGI) of taro corm was 63.1±2.5, indicating taro corm as a medium GI food and a good dietary carbohydrate alternative especially for diabetic people. PMID:25172708

  6. Calcium oxalate is the main toxic component in clinical presentations of alocasis macrorrhiza (L) Schott and Endl poisonings.

    PubMed

    Lin, T J; Hung, D Z; Hu, W H; Yang, D Y; Wu, T C; Deng, J F

    1998-04-01

    Alocasia macrorrhiza (L) Schott and Endl is called Hai Yu, Tien Ho, Shan Yu, Kuan Yin Lien, Tu Chiao lien, Lao Hu Yu and Lang Du in Chinese. Its common English name is Giant Elephant's Ear. The toxic effects of A macrorrhiza arise from sapotoxin and include gastroenteritis and paralysis of the nerve centers. From 1985 to 1993 all individuals who called the Poison Control Center asking for information regarding macrorrhiza were included in this retrospective study. A questionnaire filled out by the Poison Control Center staff collected the demographic data of the victim, the reason for consumption, the prescribed part, clinical symptoms and signs of the victim, and medical outcome of poisonings. Among 27 cases of A macrorrhiza poisoning, the age was 1.5 to 68 y with 12 females and 15 males. One had skin contact and 1 had eye contact. In the 25 cases that consumed the plant leaf or tuber either raw or cooked, the primary symptom was in injected sore throat and the secondary symptom was numbness of the oral cavity. Some patients had salivation, dysphonia, abdominal pain, ulcers of the oral cavity, difficulty in swallowing, thoracodynia, chest tightness and swollen lips. We believe the presence of sapotoxin alone is not sufficient to explain the injected swollen and ulcerative lesions. Calcium oxalate is reported distributed in the entire plant and results in inflammation of the oral cavity and mucous membranes just as our patients had. PMID:9554063

  7. Attenuating effect of Acorus calamus extract in chronic constriction injury induced neuropathic pain in rats: an evidence of anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective and calcium inhibitory effects

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Acorus calamus (family: Araceae), is an indigenous plant, traditionally it is used as an ingredient of various cocktail preparations and for the management of severe inflammatory disorders in Indian system of medicine. Present study investigated the attenuating role of Acorus calamus plant extract in chronic constriction injury (CCI) of sciatic nerve induced peripheral neuropathy in rats. Methods Hot plate, plantar, Randall Selitto, Von Frey Hair, pin prick, acetone drop, photoactometer and rota-rod tests were performed to assess degree of thermal, radiant, mechanical, chemical sensation, spontaneous motor activity and motor co-ordination changes respectively, at different time intervals i.e., day 0, 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18 and 21. Tissue myeloperoxidase, superoxide anion and total calcium levels were determined after 21st day to assess biochemical alterations. Histopathological evaluations were also performed. Hydroalcoholic extract of Acorus calamus (HAE-AC, 100 and 200 mg/kg, p.o.) and pregabalin (10 mg/kg, p.o.) were administered from the day of surgery for 14 days. Results CCI of sciatic nerve significantly induced thermal, radiant, mechanical hyperalgesia and thermal, chemical, tactile allodynia, along with increase in the levels of superoxide anion, total calcium and myeloperoxidase activity. Moreover significant histological changes were also observed. HAE-AC attenuated CCI induced development of painful behavioural, biochemical and histological changes in a dose dependent manner similar to that of pregabalin serving as positive control. Conclusions Acorus calamus prevented CCI induced neuropathy which may be attributed to its multiple actions including anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective and calcium inhibitory actions. PMID:21426568

  8. Kai-Xin-San, a Chinese Herbal Decoction Containing Ginseng Radix et Rhizoma, Polygalae Radix, Acori Tatarinowii Rhizoma, and Poria, Stimulates the Expression and Secretion of Neurotrophic Factors in Cultured Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Kevin Yue; Xu, Sherry Li; Choi, Roy Chi-Yan; Yan, Artemis Lu; Dong, Tina Ting-Xia; Tsim, Karl Wah-Keung

    2013-01-01

    Kai-xin-san (KXS), a Chinese herbal decoction prescribed by Sun Simiao in Beiji Qianjin Yaofang about 1400 years ago, contains Ginseng Radix et Rhizoma, Polygalae Radix, Acori Tatarinowii Rhizoma, and Poria. In China, KXS has been used to treat stress-related psychiatric diseases with the symptoms of depression and forgetfulness. Although animal study has supported the antidepression function of KXS, the mechanism in cellular level is still unknown. Here, a chemically standardized water extract of KXS was applied onto cultured astrocytes in exploring the action mechanisms of KXS treatment, which significantly stimulated the expression and secretion of neurotrophic factors, including NGF, BDNF, and GDNF, in a dose-dependent manner: the stimulation was both in mRNA and protein levels. In addition, the water extracts of four individual herbs did not significantly stimulate the expression of neurotrophic factors, which could explain the optimized effect of KXS in a herbal decoction. The KXS-induced expression of neurotrophic factors did not depend on signaling mediated by estrogen receptor or protein kinase. The results suggested that the antidepressant-like action of KXS might be mediated by an increase of expression of neurotrophic factors in astrocytes, which fully supported the clinical usage of this decoction. PMID:24222781

  9. Kai-xin-san, a chinese herbal decoction containing ginseng radix et rhizoma, polygalae radix, acori tatarinowii rhizoma, and poria, stimulates the expression and secretion of neurotrophic factors in cultured astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Kevin Yue; Xu, Sherry Li; Choi, Roy Chi-Yan; Yan, Artemis Lu; Dong, Tina Ting-Xia; Tsim, Karl Wah-Keung

    2013-01-01

    Kai-xin-san (KXS), a Chinese herbal decoction prescribed by Sun Simiao in Beiji Qianjin Yaofang about 1400 years ago, contains Ginseng Radix et Rhizoma, Polygalae Radix, Acori Tatarinowii Rhizoma, and Poria. In China, KXS has been used to treat stress-related psychiatric diseases with the symptoms of depression and forgetfulness. Although animal study has supported the antidepression function of KXS, the mechanism in cellular level is still unknown. Here, a chemically standardized water extract of KXS was applied onto cultured astrocytes in exploring the action mechanisms of KXS treatment, which significantly stimulated the expression and secretion of neurotrophic factors, including NGF, BDNF, and GDNF, in a dose-dependent manner: the stimulation was both in mRNA and protein levels. In addition, the water extracts of four individual herbs did not significantly stimulate the expression of neurotrophic factors, which could explain the optimized effect of KXS in a herbal decoction. The KXS-induced expression of neurotrophic factors did not depend on signaling mediated by estrogen receptor or protein kinase. The results suggested that the antidepressant-like action of KXS might be mediated by an increase of expression of neurotrophic factors in astrocytes, which fully supported the clinical usage of this decoction. PMID:24222781

  10. Colonization and Diversity of AM Fungi by Morphological Analysis on Medicinal Plants in Southeast China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingyuan; Jiang, Pan

    2015-01-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal distributions in the rhizosphere of 20 medicinal plants species in Zhangzhou, southeast China, were studied. The results showed 66 species of 8 genera of AM fungi were identified, of which 38 belonged to Glomus, 12 to Acaulospora, 9 to Scutellospora, 2 to Gigaspora, 2 to Funneliformis, 1 to Septoglomus, 1 to Rhizophagus, and 1 to Archaeospora. Glomus was the dominant genera and G. melanosporum, Acaulospora scrobiculata, G. etunicatum, Funneliformis mosseae, and G. rubiforme were the prevalent species. The highest colonization (100%) was recorded in Desmodium pulchellum (L.) Benth. while the lowest (8.0%) was in Acorus tatarinowii Schott. The AM fungi spore density ranged from 270 to 2860 per 100 g soil (average 1005), and the species richness ranged from 3 to 14 (average 9.7) per soil sample. Shannon-Wiener index ranged from 0.52 to 2 (average 1.45). In the present study, the colonization had a highly negative correlation with available K and electrical conductivity. Species richness correlated positively with electrical conductivity and organic matter. Shannon-Wiener index had a highly significant negative correlation with pH. This study provides a valuable germplasm and theoretical basis for AM fungal biotechnology on medicinal standardization planting. PMID:25688376

  11. Colonization and diversity of AM fungi by morphological analysis on medicinal plants in southeast China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingyuan; Jiang, Pan

    2015-01-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal distributions in the rhizosphere of 20 medicinal plants species in Zhangzhou, southeast China, were studied. The results showed 66 species of 8 genera of AM fungi were identified, of which 38 belonged to Glomus, 12 to Acaulospora, 9 to Scutellospora, 2 to Gigaspora, 2 to Funneliformis, 1 to Septoglomus, 1 to Rhizophagus, and 1 to Archaeospora. Glomus was the dominant genera and G. melanosporum, Acaulospora scrobiculata, G. etunicatum, Funneliformis mosseae, and G. rubiforme were the prevalent species. The highest colonization (100%) was recorded in Desmodium pulchellum (L.) Benth. while the lowest (8.0%) was in Acorus tatarinowii Schott. The AM fungi spore density ranged from 270 to 2860 per 100 g soil (average 1005), and the species richness ranged from 3 to 14 (average 9.7) per soil sample. Shannon-Wiener index ranged from 0.52 to 2 (average 1.45). In the present study, the colonization had a highly negative correlation with available K and electrical conductivity. Species richness correlated positively with electrical conductivity and organic matter. Shannon-Wiener index had a highly significant negative correlation with pH. This study provides a valuable germplasm and theoretical basis for AM fungal biotechnology on medicinal standardization planting. PMID:25688376

  12. Complex Interactions Between the Macrophyte Acorus Calamus and Microbial Fuel Cells During Pyrene and Benzo[a]Pyrene Degradation in Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Zaisheng; Jiang, Helong; Cai, Haiyuan; Zhou, Yanli; Krumholz, Lee R.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the interaction of the macrophyte Acorus calamus and sediment microbial fuel cells (SMFC) during the degradation of high molecular weight-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (HMW-PAHs) in sediments. Over 367-days, the combination of macrophyte and SMFC led to an increase in pyrene and benzo[a]pyrene degradation rates by at least 70% compared to SMFC or macrophyte alone. While either the macrophyte or SMFC increased redox potential in sediments, redox potentials near the anode (approximately 6 cm depth) in the macrophyte-SMFC combination were markedly lower than that in the only macrophyte treatment. Moreover, rhizospheric bacterial communities in macrophyte-SMFC and macrophyte treatments were distinctly different. Aerobic genera (Vogesella, Pseudomonas, Flavobacterium and Rhizobium) and anaerobic genera (Longilinea, Bellilinea, Desulfobacca and Anaeromyxobacter) became dominant in the rhizosphere in macrophyte and macrophyte-SMFC treatments, respectively. In addition, the macrophyte-SMFC combination improved the numbers of not only aerobic but anaerobic PAHs degraders in sediments. So, the SMFC employment facilitated the formation of anoxic zones in sediments with oxygen loss and exudates from the roots. As a result, cooperation of anaerobic/aerobic microbial metabolism for accelerating HMW-PAHs removal occurred within sediments after combining macrophytes with SMFC. PMID:26023748

  13. The Dual Antimelanogenic and Antioxidant Activities of the Essential Oil Extracted from the Leaves of Acorus macrospadiceus (Yamamoto) F. N. Wei et Y. K. Li

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Huey-Chun; Wang, Hsiao-Fen; Yih, Kuang-Hway; Chang, Long-Zen; Chang, Tsong-Min

    2012-01-01

    The antimelanogenic and antioxidant activities of the essential oil extracted from the leaves of Acorus macrospadiceus (Yamamoto) F. N. Wei et Y. K. Li have never been explored. The essential oil effectively inhibited mushroom tyrosinase activity (EC50 = 1.57 mg/mL) and B16F10 tyrosinase activity (IC50 = 1.01 mg/mL), decreased the melanin content (EC50 = 1.04 mg/mL), and depleted the cellular level of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) (EC50 = 1.87 mg/mL). The essential oil effectively scavenged 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) (EC50 = 0.121 mg/mL) and 2,2′-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) ABTS+ radicals (EC50 = 0.122 mg/mL). It also exhibited an apparent reducing power (EC50 = 0.021 mg/mL) and metal-ion chelating activity (EC50 = 0.029 mg/mL). The chemical constituents of the essential oil are ethers (55.73%), ketones (19.57%), monoterpenes (7.82%), alcohols (3.85%), esters (3.77%), sesquiterpenes (3.72%), and aromatic compounds (2.85%). The results confirm that A. macrospadiceus essential oil is a natural antioxidant and inhibitor of melanogenesis. PMID:23304214

  14. Complex Interactions Between the Macrophyte Acorus Calamus and Microbial Fuel Cells During Pyrene and Benzo[a]Pyrene Degradation in Sediments.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zaisheng; Jiang, Helong; Cai, Haiyuan; Zhou, Yanli; Krumholz, Lee R

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the interaction of the macrophyte Acorus calamus and sediment microbial fuel cells (SMFC) during the degradation of high molecular weight-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (HMW-PAHs) in sediments. Over 367-days, the combination of macrophyte and SMFC led to an increase in pyrene and benzo[a]pyrene degradation rates by at least 70% compared to SMFC or macrophyte alone. While either the macrophyte or SMFC increased redox potential in sediments, redox potentials near the anode (approximately 6 cm depth) in the macrophyte-SMFC combination were markedly lower than that in the only macrophyte treatment. Moreover, rhizospheric bacterial communities in macrophyte-SMFC and macrophyte treatments were distinctly different. Aerobic genera (Vogesella, Pseudomonas, Flavobacterium and Rhizobium) and anaerobic genera (Longilinea, Bellilinea, Desulfobacca and Anaeromyxobacter) became dominant in the rhizosphere in macrophyte and macrophyte-SMFC treatments, respectively. In addition, the macrophyte-SMFC combination improved the numbers of not only aerobic but anaerobic PAHs degraders in sediments. So, the SMFC employment facilitated the formation of anoxic zones in sediments with oxygen loss and exudates from the roots. As a result, cooperation of anaerobic/aerobic microbial metabolism for accelerating HMW-PAHs removal occurred within sediments after combining macrophytes with SMFC. PMID:26023748

  15. Alpha-Asarone, a Major Component of Acorus gramineus, Attenuates Corticosterone-Induced Anxiety-Like Behaviours via Modulating TrkB Signaling Process

    PubMed Central

    Sur, Bongjun; Yeom, Mijung; Shim, Insop; Lee, Hyejung

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the anxiolytic-like activity of α-asarone (AAS) from Acorus gramineus in an experimental rat model of anxiety induced by repeated administration of the exogenous stress hormone corticosterone (CORT). The putative anxiolytic effect of AAS was studied in behavioral tests of anxiety, such as the elevated plus maze (EPM) test and the hole-board test (HBT) in rats. For 21 consecutive days, male rats received 50, 100, or 200 mg/kg AAS (i.p.) 30 min prior to a daily injection of CORT. Dysregulation of the HPA axis in response to the repeated CORT injections was confirmed by measuring serum levels of CORT and the expression of corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) in the hypothalamus. Daily AAS (200 mg/kg) administration increased open-arm exploration significantly in the EPM test, and it increased the duration of head dipping activity in the HBT. It also blocked the increase in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression in the locus coeruleus (LC) and decreased mRNA expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor, TrkB, in the hippocampus. These results indicated that the administration of AAS prior to high-dose exogenous CORT significantly improved anxiety-like behaviors, which are associated with modification of the central noradrenergic system and with BDNF function in rats. The current finding may improve understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms responsible for changes in emotions induced by repeated administration of high doses of CORT or by elevated levels of hormones associated with chronic stress. Thus, AAS did exhibit an anxiolytic-like effects in animal models of anxiety. PMID:24976758

  16. Identification of an EcoRI restriction site for a rapid and precise determination of beta-asarone-free Acorus calamus cytotypes.

    PubMed

    Bertea, Cinzia M; Azzolin, Chiara M M; Bossi, Simone; Doglia, Giovanni; Maffei, Massimo E

    2005-03-01

    Calamus (Acorus calamus L., Araceae) is an aromatic herb, indigenous to Central Asia and Eastern Europe. The fragrant oils obtained by alcoholic extraction of the rhizome are mainly used in the pharmaceutical and oenological industries. Nevertheless, the occurrence of beta-asarone [(Z)-1,2,4-trimethoxy-5-prop-1-enyl-benzene] limits the possibility of its use due to the carcinogenic properties of this compound. The aim of this work was to identify a diploid beta-asarone-free A. calamus by using chemical and molecular approaches. For these purposes alcoholic extracts of both diploid and triploid A. calamus were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and comparison of the 700 bp sequence of the non-transcribed spacer (NTS) in the 5S-rRNA gene was also performed. Alcoholic extracts of the triploid A. calamus were characterized by a higher percentage of beta-asarone (11%), which was the main compound, followed by higher percentages of camphene (2.27%), E-beta-ocimene (3.28%), camphor (1.54%), calarene (1.42%), alpha-selinene (5.02%) and tau-cadinol (2.00%), when compared to the diploid A. calamus. The latter had higher percentages of iso-shyobunone (8.62%), beta-sesquiphellandrene (3.28%), preiso calamendiol (22.81%) and acorone (26.33%), and completely lacked of beta-asarone. The 5S-rRNA spacer region of both diploid and triploid A. calamus were amplified by PCR using a pair of primers located at the 3' and 5' ends of the coding sequence of 5S-rRNA gene. The resulting PCR products (about 700 bp) were gel purified, subcloned into pGEM-T Easy vector and sequenced. By aligning the isolated nucleotide sequences of the two varieties and the sequences from different A. calamus chemotypes present in Genbank, sequence diversities were found in the spacer region. Furthermore, the PCR products were digested by using EcoRI. The restriction profile of the spacer domain resulted different for the two cytotypes. Along with chemical analysis of alcoholic extracts

  17. Content of polyphenolic compounds in the Nigerian stimulants Cola nitida ssp. alba, Cola nitida ssp. rubra A. Chev, and Cola acuminata Schott & Endl and their antioxidant capacity.

    PubMed

    Atawodi, Sunday Ene-Ojo; Pfundstein, Beate; Haubner, Roswitha; Spiegelhalder, Bertold; Bartsch, Helmut; Owen, Robert Wyn

    2007-11-28

    Varieties of kola nuts (Cola nitida alba, Cola nitida rubra A. Chev, and Cola acuminata Schott & Endl), a group of popular Nigerian and West African stimulants, were analyzed for their content of secondary plant metabolites. The three varieties of the kola nuts contained appreciable levels of (+)-catechin (27-37 g/kg), caffeine (18-24 g/kg), (-)-epicatechin (20-21 g/kg), procyanidin B 1 [epicatechin-(4beta-->8)-catechin] (15-19 g/kg), and procyanidin B2 [epicatechin-(4beta-->8)-epicatechin] (7-10 g/kg). Antioxidant capacity of the extracts and purified metabolites was assessed by two HPLC-based and two colorimetric in vitro assays. Extracts of all varieties exhibited antioxidant capacity with IC 50 values in the range 1.70-2.83 and 2.74-4.08 mg/mL in the hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase and 2-deoxyguanosine HPLC-based assays, respectively. Utilization of HPLC-based assays designed to reflect in situ generation of free radicals (e.g., HO(*)), as opposed to general assays (DPPH, FRAP) in common use which do not, indicate that, of the major secondary plant metabolites present in kola nut extracts, caffeine is potentially the more effective cancer chemopreventive metabolite in terms of its antioxidant capacity. PMID:17979235

  18. Optical waveguides formed by silver ion exchange in Schott SG11 glass for waveguide evanescent field fluorescence microscopy: evanescent images of HEK293 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanzadeh, Abdollah; Nitsche, Michael; Armstrong, Souzan; Nabavi, Noushin; Harrison, Rene; Dixon, S. Jeffrey; Langbein, Uwe; Mittler, Silvia

    2010-05-01

    Planar glass waveguides with a specific number of modes were fabricated by Ag+-Na+ exchange in Schott SG11 glass. The effective refractive indices were determined using m-line spectroscopy in both s- and p-polarization. By using the reversed Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation, the index profiles were described by a nonlinear diffusion equation. The diffusion coefficients for Ag+ were established, as well as the penetration depth of the evanescent field in an aqueous environment for the different modes. The integrals of |E|2 fields for the evanescent-guided fields were investigated. These are important when evanescent fields are used for illumination in interface microscopy, an alternative method to total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy. The photoluminescent behavior of the waveguides was investigated as a function of ion exchange time and excitation wavelengths. Comparable images were obtained of fluorescently labeled HEK293 cells using TIRF microscopy and waveguide evanescent field fluorescence microscopy. Imaging was performed using HEK293 cells, delivering similar images and information.

  19. Growth indices and cost implications of hybro broiler chicks fed with graded levels of fermented wild cocoyam Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott corm meal as a replacement for maize.

    PubMed

    Olajide, R

    2014-05-01

    Corms such as wild cocoyam [Colocasia esculenta] have potential to replace maize as a cheaper energy source in poultry rations. A feeding trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of graded levels of fermented wild cocoyam [Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott] corm (FWCC), as substitutes for maize in the diets of broilers at the starter phase. One hundred and twenty unsexed day-old Hybro broiler chicks were randomly distributed to four dietary treatments in a Completely Randomized Design (CRD). There were 3 replicates per dietary treatment with 10 birds per replicate. Diet 1 without FWCC served as the control. Diets 2, 3 and 4 contained 10, 20 and 30% FWCC. Each of the diets represented a treatment. The experimental diets and clean drinking water were supplied ad libitum for 4 weeks (28 days) representing the starter phase of the broiler production. Result of the performance revealed significant (p<0.05) differences in feed intake, weight gain and feed conversion ratio. The economic analysis also showed that cost (Naira58.52) of a kilogram feed was highest (p<0.05) for the control and least (Naira53.10) for 30% FWCC. The least cost (Naira101.24) of feed per kilogram weight gain (p<0.05) was obtained for birds fed 30% FWCC compared to (Naira105.53) for the control. It was concluded that maize can economically be substituted with 30% FWCC in broiler starter diets. PMID:26031004

  20. Production of resistant starch from taro (Colocasia esculenta L. Schott) corm and determination of its effects on health by in vitro methods.

    PubMed

    Simsek, Sebnem; El, Sedef Nehir

    2012-10-15

    The aim of the study was the production of resistant starch from taro (Colocasia esculenta L. Schott) corm and determination of its effects on health by in vitro methods. Starch was isolated from taro corms with 98% purity, and 10.4±0.5% amylose content. By application of heating, autoclaving, enzymatic debranching, retrogradation, and drying processes to taro starch for two times, resistant starch (RS) content was increased 16 fold (35.1±1.9%, dry basis). The expected glycemic index (eGI) of taro starch and taro resistant starch was determined as 60.6±0.5 and 51.9±0.9, respectively and the decrease in the glycemic index of taro resistant starch was found as statistically significant (P<0.05). The in vitro binding of bile acids by taro starch and taro resistant starch relative to cholesterol decreasing drug cholestyramine were 5.2±0.2% and 7.6±1.7%, respectively. PMID:22939332

  1. [Influence of perennial flooding and drought on growth restoration of Acorus calamus in water-level-fluctuation zone of the Three Gorges Reservoir].

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Gao, Xiang; Ding, Wu-quan; Zhu, Qi-hong; Ou, Yuan; Liu, Yu

    2012-08-01

    Acorus calamus L. is a common kind of wetland plant species in the Three Gorges Reservoir. In this study, we investigated the influence of perennial flooding on growth restoration of A. calamus in the lightless conditions and the drought stress on this plant species' growth after flooding. Our research provided the scientific basis for the selection of candidate species for vegetations restoration in water-level-fluctuation zone of the Three Gorges Reservoir. A. calamus plants were exposed to waters in the lightless conditions in September 2009 and September 2010 respectively and taken away from the waters and grew in natural conditions in the following March, April and May (named as S1, S2, S3). All plants in the control, S1 and S2 groups were challenged with drought stress in May for 20 days. During the experiment, the plant number and leaf number were recorded regularly, as well as leaf length and leaf width. The results showed that flooding restrained the germination of the plants with much less plant in flooding groups than the control, and the plant germination rate had inverse relation to the flooding time. Flooding promoted formation and elongation of the leaves in S1 and S2 groups, which showed higher leaf growth parameters, such as leaf length, leaf number, total leaf length of one plant and total leaf length of all plants than the control. However, all of these growth parameters in S3 group had significantly lower values compared to the control. The survival rate of the plants after flooding decreased significantly with longer flooding time. Besides, the leaf length and leaf width in S1 and S2 groups increased significantly but with decreased leaf number. Additionally, all growth parameters (leaf length, leaf width, leaf number, total leaf number, total leaf length of one plant, total leaf length of all plants) in S3 group decreased remarkably. Furthermore, drought decreased the values of all growth parameters and the plant number in the control, S1 and

  2. Pro-neurogenic effect of β-asarone on RSC96 Schwann cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fuben; Wu, Huayu; Zhang, Kun; Lv, Peizhen; Zheng, Li; Zhao, Jinmin

    2016-03-01

    Nerve regeneration is a challenge for the therapy of peripheral nerve injury. β-Asarone, a major compound extracted from Acorus tatarinowii Schott rhizome, has been traditionally used in China and other parts of Asia for the treatment of common psychiatric diseases. It has been reported to have significant pharmacological effects on the central nervous system. This suggested that β-asarone may be a promising anti-neuroinflammatory and neuroprotective agent to relieve destruction and accelerate proliferation of Schwann cells after peripheral nerve injury. In this study, we investigated the effects of β-asarone on RSC96 Schwann cells, a spontaneously immortalized rat Schwann cell line in vitro. RSC96 cells were treated with a range of β-asarone concentrations (0-90 μM) for 2, 4, and 6 days. Results showed that β-asarone at concentrations down to 22.5 μM were not cytotoxic to RSC96 cells (p < 0.05). Concentrations of 5-20 μM β-asarone induced a net increase in cell proliferation (reflected in total DNA) compared to basal medium controls (p < 0.05). β-Asarone could promote expression of GDNF, BDNF, and CNTF genes (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the viability assay, hematoxylin-eosin, and immunohistochemical staining also showed better performances in β-asarone groups. As to the doses, 10 μM β-asarone showed the best performance. The results indicate that β-asarone can accelerate proliferation of RSC96 cells in vitro and meanwhile maintain the phenotype, which may provide valuable references for further exploration on peripheral nerve diseases. PMID:26659394

  3. β-Asarone Inhibits IRE1/XBP1 Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Pathway in 6-OHDA-Induced Parkinsonian Rats.

    PubMed

    Ning, Baile; Deng, Minzhen; Zhang, Qinxin; Wang, Nanbu; Fang, Yongqi

    2016-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease, with genetics and environment contributing to the disease onset. The limited pathological cognize of the disease restrained the approaches to improve the clinical treatment. Recently, studies showed that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress played an important role in the pathogenesis of PD. There was a neuroprotective effect partly mediated by modulating ER stress. β-Asarone is the essential constituent of Acorus tatarinowii Schott volatile oil. Our team observed that β-asarone could improve the behavior of parkinsonian rats; increase the HVA, Dopacl, and 5-HIAA levels; and reduce α-synuclein levels. Here we assumed that the protective role of β-asarone on parkinsonian rats was mediated via ER stress pathway. To prove the hypothesis we investigated the mRNA levels of glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78) and C/EBP homologous binding protein (CHOP) in 6-hydroxy dopamine (6-OHDA) induced parkinsonian rats after β-asarone treatment. Furthermore, the inositol-requiring enzyme 1/X-Box Binding Protein 1 (IRE1/XBP1) ER stress pathway was also studied. The results showed that β-asarone inhibited the mRNA levels of GRP78 and CHOP, accompanied with the delined expressions of phosphorylated IER1 (p-IRE1) and XBP1. We deduced that β-asarone might have a protective effect on the 6-OHDA induced parkinsonian rats via IRE1/XBP1 Pathway. Collectively, all data indicated that β-asarone might be a potential candidate of medicine for clinical therapy of PD. PMID:27097550

  4. Taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott).

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoling; Miyasaka, Susan C; Fitch, Maureen M M; Zhu, Yun J

    2015-01-01

    Genetic engineering of taro is an effective method to improve taro quality and the resistance to various diseases of taro. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of taro is more efficient than the particle bombardment transformation method based on current research. The development of a regeneration system starting from taro shoot tip explants could produce dasheen mosaic virus (DsMV)-free plantlets. Highly regenerative calluses could be developed from DsMV-free, in vitro plantlets on the Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium with 2 mg/L BA and 1 mg/L NAA (M5 medium). The Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation method is reported in this chapter. The highly regenerative calluses were selected and cocultivated with the Agrobacterium strain EHA105 harboring the binary vector PBI121 with either a rice chitinase gene chi11 or a wheat oxalate oxidase gene gf2.8. After cocultivation for 3-4 days, these calluses were transferred to selection medium (M5 medium) containing 50 mg/L Geneticin G418 and grown for 3 months in the dark. Transgenic shoot lines could be induced and selected on the MS medium containing 4 mg/L BA (M15 medium) and 50 mg/L Geneticin G418 for 3 months further in the light. Molecular analyses are used to confirm the stable transformation and expression of the disease resistance gene chi11 or gf2.8. Pathologic bioassays could be used to demonstrate whether the transgenic plants had increased disease resistance to taro pathogens Sclerotium rolfsii or Phytophthora colocasiae. PMID:25416252

  5. Alternative respiratory path capacity in plant mitochondria: effect of growth temperature, the electrochemical gradient, and assay pH. [Zea mays L. , Vigna radiata L. , Symplocarpus foetidus L. , Sauromatum guttatum Schott

    SciTech Connect

    Elthon, T.E.; Stewart, C.R.; McCoy, C.A.; Bonner, W.D. Jr.

    1986-02-01

    Influence of growth temperature on the capacity of the mitochondrial alternative pathway of electron transport was investigated using etiolated corn (Zea mays L.) seedlings. These seedlings were grown to comparable size in either a warm (30/sup 0/C) or a cold (13/sup 0/C) temperature regime, and then their respiration rates were measured as O/sub 2/ uptake at 25/sup 0/C. The capacity of the alternative pathway (KCN-insensitive O/sub 2/ uptake) was found essentially to double in shoots of cold-grown seedlings. When mitochondria were isolated from the shoots a greater potential for flow through the alternative path was observed in mitochondria from the cold-grown seedlings with all substrates used (an average increase of 84%). Using exogenous NADH as the substrate, the effect of the electrochemical gradient on measurable capacities of the cytochrome and alternative pathways was investigated in mitochondria from both etiolated seedlings and thermogenic spadices. In corn shoot and mung bean (Vigna radiata L.) hypocotyl mitochondria increased flow through the cytochrome chain in the absence of the electrochemical gradient was found not to influence the potential for flow through the alternative path. However, in mitochondria from skunk cabbage (Symplocarpus foetidus L.) and voodoo lily (Sauromatum gutatum Schott) spadices increased flow through the cytochrome chain in the absence of the gradient occurred at the expense of flow through the alternative pathway. This experiment also revealed that the potential for respiratory control is largely dependent upon the assay pH.

  6. Adsorption studies of Cu(II) on Boston fern (Nephrolepis exaltata Schott cv. Bostoniensis) leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Rifaqat Ali Khan; Khan, Umra

    2016-02-01

    Adsorption studies were done on Boston fern leaves for the effective removal of Cu(II) ions from aqueous solution. It has been tested for the first time for heavy metal adsorption from aqueous solution. This promising material has shown remarkable adsorption capacity towards Cu(II) ions which confirm its novelty, ease of availability, non-toxic nature, cheapness, etc., and give the main innovation to the present study. The adsorbent was analyzed by FT-IR, SEM and EDS. The effect of pH, contact time, initial metal ion concentration and temperature on the adsorption was investigated using batch process to optimize conditions for maximum adsorption. The adsorption of Cu(II) was maximum (96 %) at pH 4. The experimental data were analyzed by Langmuir, Freundlich and Tempkin isotherms. The kinetic studies of Cu(II)were carried out at room temperature (30 °C) in the concentration range 10-100 mg L-1. The data obtained fitted well with the Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second-order kinetics model. The maximum adsorption capacity (q m) obtained from Langmuir adsorption isotherm was found to be 27.027 mg g-1 at 30 °C. The process was found to be exothermic and spontaneous in nature. The breakthrough and exhaustive capacities were found to be 12.5 and 37.5 mg g-1, respectively. Desorption studies showed that 93.3 % Cu(II) could be desorbed with 0.1 M HCl by continuous mode.

  7. Compositional, spectroscopic and rheological analyses of mucilage isolated from taro (Colocasia esculenta L. Schott) corms.

    PubMed

    Njintang, Nicolas Yanou; Boudjeko, Thaddee; Tatsadjieu, Leopold Ngoune; Nguema-Ona, Eric; Scher, Joel; Mbofung, Carl M F

    2014-05-01

    Tropical roots and tubers generally contain mucilage. These mucilages exhibit unique rheological properties with considerable potential as a food thickener and stabilizer. A one-step extraction procedure was used to isolate starch free mucilage and associated proteins from a number of taro (Colocasia esculenta) varieties. The monosaccharide and amino acid composition, the structural and flow properties were investigated. The results showed that yield of mucilage fraction varied from 30 to 190 g.kg(-1). A negative correlation (r = -0.87; p < 0.05) was observed between the crude protein level and the yield. The monosaccharide profiles revealed that galactose, mannose and arabinose were the main monosaccharides in the hydrolysate of the mucilage. From the 17 amino acids analyzed, aspartic acid/asparagine (14.4-17.2%) and glutamic acid/glutamine (10.3-13.6%) were prominent in the mucilage as well as the flour. No significant differences were observed in the FT-IR spectra and in the viscosity behavior of the mucilage dispersions. The greatest difference in the mucilage is based on its monosaccharide profile while the protein composition, which reflects that of the flour, is relatively stable. PMID:24803696

  8. Evaluation of hepatoprotective activity of Colocasia esculenta (L. Schott) leaves on thioacetamide-induced hepatotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Chinonyelum, Azubike Nkiruka; Uwadiegwu, Achukwu Peter; Nwachukwu, Okwuosa Chukwugozie; Emmanuel, Oduah

    2015-11-01

    The hepatoprotective effect of orally administered leaf aqueous extract of Colocasia esculenta (CCLE) in thioacetamide-induced liver toxicity in rats was investigated in this study. Adult male Wistar rats (weight range: 120-150g) were divided into 5 groups (n=5) and received no treatment (normal control), distilled water (negative control), 50mg/kg silymarin (positive control) and CCLE (250 and 500mg/kg) respectively once daily for 3 consecutive days. Thioacetamide (TAA) (150mg/kg b.w.) was administered intraperitoneally on the 4th day to rats in all groups except the normal control. Evaluations were made for serum levels of alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), alkaline phosphate (ALP) and serum albumin. Histopathological examination was performed on the excised liver tissues. TAA-induced hepatotoxicity increased ALT, AST, ALP and decreased serum albumin. Histopathological results revealed extensive disruption of the liver histoarchitecture when compared to the normal control liver sections. Pre-treatment with CCLE showed protective effects by normalizing the liver enzymes markers. These results were supported by the histopathological observations. The activity of the CCLE was comparable to that of the standard hepatoprotective drug, silymarin (50mg/kg). Overall findings suggest that CCLE possesses in vivo hepatoprotective activity against thioacetamide in rats. PMID:26687753

  9. In vitro and in vivo leishmanicidal activity of Astronium fraxinifolium (Schott) and Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour.) Spreng against Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis.

    PubMed

    de Lima, Silvio César Gomes; Teixeira, Maria Jania; Lopes, José Evaldo Gonçalves; de Morais, Selene Maia; Torres, Alba Fabiola; Braga, Milena Aguiar; Rodrigues, Raphael Oliveira; Santiago, Gilvandete Maria Pinheiro; Martins, Alice Costa; Nagao-Dias, Aparecida Tiemi

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to evaluate antileishmanial activity of Astronium fraxinifolium and Plectranthus amboinicus. For the in vitro tests, essential oil of P. amboinicus (OEPA) and ethanolic extracts from A. fraxinifolium (EEAF) were incubated with 10(6) promastigotes of L. (Viannia) braziliensis. The OEPA was able to reduce the parasite growth after 48 h; nonetheless, all the EEAFs could totally abolish the parasite growth. For the in vivo studies, BALB/c mice were infected subcutaneously (s.c.) with 10(7) L. braziliensis promastigotes. Treatment was done by administering OEPA intralesionally (i.l.) for 14 days. No difference was found in lesion thickness when those animals were compared with the untreated animals. Further, golden hamsters were infected s.c. with 10(6) L. braziliensis promastigotes. The first protocol of treatment consisted of ethanolic leaf extract from A. fraxinifolium (ELEAF) administered i.l. for 4 days and a booster dose at the 7th day. The animals showed a significant reduction of lesion thickness in the 6th week, but it was not comparable to the animals treated with Glucantime. The second protocol consisted of 15 daily intralesional injections. The profiles of lesion thickness were similar to the standard treatment. In conclusion, in vivo studies showed a high efficacy when the infected animals were intralesionally treated with leaf ethanolic extract from A. fraxinifolium. PMID:24829921

  10. In Vitro and In Vivo Leishmanicidal Activity of Astronium fraxinifolium (Schott) and Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour.) Spreng against Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis

    PubMed Central

    de Lima, Silvio César Gomes; Teixeira, Maria Jania; Lopes Júnior, José Evaldo Gonçalves; de Morais, Selene Maia; Torres, Alba Fabiola; Braga, Milena Aguiar; Rodrigues, Raphael Oliveira; Santiago, Gilvandete Maria Pinheiro; Martins, Alice Costa; Nagao-Dias, Aparecida Tiemi

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to evaluate antileishmanial activity of Astronium fraxinifolium and Plectranthus amboinicus. For the in vitro tests, essential oil of P. amboinicus (OEPA) and ethanolic extracts from A. fraxinifolium (EEAF) were incubated with 106  promastigotes of L. (Viannia) braziliensis. The OEPA was able to reduce the parasite growth after 48 h; nonetheless, all the EEAFs could totally abolish the parasite growth. For the in vivo studies, BALB/c mice were infected subcutaneously (s.c.) with 107  L. braziliensis promastigotes. Treatment was done by administering OEPA intralesionally (i.l.) for 14 days. No difference was found in lesion thickness when those animals were compared with the untreated animals. Further, golden hamsters were infected s.c. with 106  L. braziliensis promastigotes. The first protocol of treatment consisted of ethanolic leaf extract from A. fraxinifolium (ELEAF) administered i.l. for 4 days and a booster dose at the 7th day. The animals showed a significant reduction of lesion thickness in the 6th week, but it was not comparable to the animals treated with Glucantime. The second protocol consisted of 15 daily intralesional injections. The profiles of lesion thickness were similar to the standard treatment. In conclusion, in vivo studies showed a high efficacy when the infected animals were intralesionally treated with leaf ethanolic extract from A. fraxinifolium. PMID:24829921

  11. Cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of six herbal plants against the human hepatocarcinoma (HepG2) cell line

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Six plants from Thailand were evaluated for their cytotoxicity and apoptosis induction in human hepatocarcinoma (HepG2) as compared to normal African green monkey kidney epithelial cell lines. Methods Ethanol-water crude extracts of the six plants were tested with neutral red assay for their cytotoxicity after 24 hours of exposure to the cells. Apoptotic induction was tested in the HepG2 cells with diamidino-2-phenylindole staining. DNA fragmentation, indicative of apoptosis, was analyzed with agarose gel electrophoresis. Alkylation, indicative of DNA damage, was also evaluated in vitro by 4-(4'-nitrobenzyl) pyridine assay. Results The extract of Pinus kesiya showed the highest selectivity (selectivity index = 9.6) and potent cytotoxicity in the HepG2 cell line, with an IC50 value of 52.0 ± 5.8 μg/ml (mean ± standard deviation). Extract of Catimbium speciosum exerted cytotoxicity with an IC50 value of 55.7 ± 8.1 μg/ml. Crude extracts from Glochidion daltonii, Cladogynos orientalis, Acorus tatarinowii and Amomum villosum exhibited cytotoxicity with IC50 values ranging 100-500 μg/ml. All crude extracts showed different alkylating abilities in vitro. Extracts of P. kesiya, C. speciosum and C. orientalis caused nuclei morphological changes and DNA laddering. Conclusion The extracts of C. speciosum, C. orientalis and P. kesiya induced apoptosis. Among the three plants, P. kesiya possessed the most robust anticancer activity, with specific selectivity against HepG2 cells. PMID:22041055

  12. Identification of both GABAA receptors and voltage-activated Na+ channels as molecular targets of anticonvulsant α-asarone

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ze-Jun; Levinson, Simon R.; Sun, Liqin; Heinbockel, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Alpha (α)-asarone, a major effective component isolated from the Chinese medicinal herb Acorus tatarinowii, is clinically used as medication for treating epilepsy, cough, bronchitis, and asthma. In the present study, we demonstrated that α-asarone targets central nervous system GABAA receptor as well as voltage-gated Na+ channels. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recording, α-asarone inhibited spontaneous firing of output neurons, mitral cells (MCs), in mouse olfactory bulb brain slice preparation and hyperpolarized the membrane potential of MCs. The inhibitory effect of α-asarone persisted in the presence of ionotropic glutamate receptor blockers but was eliminated after adding a GABAA receptor blocker, suggesting that GABAA receptors mediated the inhibition of MCs by α-asarone. This hypothesis was supported by the finding that α-asarone evoked an outward current, but did not influence inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs). In addition to inhibiting spontaneous firing, α-asarone also inhibited the Nav1.2 channel, a dominant rat brain Na+ channel subtype. The effects of α-asarone on a defined Nav1.2 were characterized using transfected cells that stably expressed the Nav1.2 channel isoform. α-Asarone displayed strong tonic inhibition of Nav1.2 currents in a concentration- and membrane potential-dependent fashion. α-Asarone reduced channel availability in steady-state inactivation protocols by enhancing or stabilizing Na+ channel inactivation. Both Na+ channel blockade and activation of GABAA receptors provide a possible mechanism for the known anti-epileptic effects of α-asarone. It also suggests that α-asarone could benefit patients with cough possibly through inhibiting a Na+ channel subtype to inhibit peripheral and/or central sensitization of cough reflexes. PMID:24653701

  13. Phytoremediation potential of Cd and Zn by wetland plants, Colocasia esculenta L. Schott., Cyperus malaccensis Lam. and Typha angustifolia L. grown in hydroponics.

    PubMed

    Chayapan, P; Kruatrachue, M; Meetam, M; Pokethitiyook, P

    2015-09-01

    Cadmium and zinc phytoremediation potential of wetland plants, Colocasia esculenta, Cyperus malaccensis, and Typha angustifolia, was investigated. Plants were grown for 15 days in nutrient solutions containing various concentrations of Cd (0, 5, 10, 20, 50 mg l(-1)) and Zn (0, 10, 20, 50, 100 mg l(-1)). T angustifolia was tolerant to both metals as indicated by high RGR when grown in 50 mg I(-1) Cd and 100 mg I(-1) Zn solutions. All these plants accumulated more metals in their underground parts and > 100 mg kg(-1) in their aboveground with TF values < 1. Only C. esculenta could be considered a Zn hyperaccumulator because it could concentrate > 10,000 mg kg(-1) in its aboveground parts with TF > 1. T angustifolia exhibited highest biomass production and highest Cd and Zn uptake, confirming that this plant is a suitable candidate for treating of Cd contaminated soil/sediments. PMID:26521563

  14. Effect of replacing soybean protein by taro leaf (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott) protein on growth performance of exotic (Landrace × Yorkshire) and native (Moo Lath) Lao pigs.

    PubMed

    Kaensombath, Lampheuy; Lindberg, Jan Erik

    2013-01-01

    The impact of replacing soybean crude protein (CP) with CP from ensiled taro leaves (ET) on growth performance, carcass traits, and organ weights in Landrace × Yorkshire (LY) and Moo Lath (ML) Lao pigs was studied. Twenty-four castrated male pigs, 12 of each breed, were allocated to the treatments according to a completely randomized 3 × 2 factorial (three levels of ET × two breeds) arrangement with four pigs per treatment. The pigs were kept in individual pens and were fed at 4 % dry matter of body weight for 105 days. The control diet (ET0) was formulated with soybean meal as the main CP source, and in the other two diets, soybean CP was replaced to 25 % (ET25) and 50 % (ET50), respectively, with CP from ensiled taro leaves. Calculated metabolizable energy intake decreased with increasing replacement of soybean CP in the diet, while dry matter intake (DMI), CP intake (CPI), average daily gain (ADG), and feed conversion ratio (FCR) were unaffected. Carcass weight, back fat thickness, and dressing percentage were unaffected by soybean CP replacement, while organ weights (except for spleen) increased (P < 0.001) when soybean CP was replaced by CP from ensiled taro leaves in the diet. LY pigs had higher (P < 0.001) DMI, CPI, and ADG and better (P < 0.001) FCR than ML pigs. LY pigs had higher carcass weight (P < 0.001), lower back fat thickness (P < 0.001), and higher organ weights (P < 0.05-0.001) than the ML pigs. In conclusion, taro leaf silage can replace up to 50 % of soybean CP in the diet of growing Lao LY and ML pigs without negative effects on performance and carcass traits. PMID:22610600

  15. Identification of chloroplast genome loci suitable for high-resolution phylogeographic studies of Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott (Araceae) and closely related taxa.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Ibrar; Matthews, Peter J; Biggs, Patrick J; Naeem, Muhammad; McLenachan, Patricia A; Lockhart, Peter J

    2013-09-01

    Recently, we reported the chloroplast genome-wide association of oligonucleotide repeats, indels and nucleotide substitutions in aroid chloroplast genomes. We hypothesized that the distribution of oligonucleotide repeat sequences in a single representative genome can be used to identify mutational hotspots and loci suitable for population genetic, phylogenetic and phylogeographic studies. Using information on the location of oligonucleotide repeats in the chloroplast genome of taro (Colocasia esculenta), we designed 30 primer pairs to amplify and sequence polymorphic loci. The primers have been tested in a range of intra-specific to intergeneric comparisons, including ten taro samples (Colocasia esculenta) from diverse geographical locations, four other Colocasia species (C. affinis, C. fallax, C. formosana, C. gigantea) and three other aroid genera (represented by Remusatia vivipara, Alocasia brisbanensis and Amorphophallus konjac). Multiple sequence alignments for the intra-specific comparison revealed nucleotide substitutions (point mutations) at all 30 loci and microsatellite polymorphisms at 14 loci. The primer pairs reported here reveal levels of genetic variation suitable for high-resolution phylogeographic and evolutionary studies of taro and other closely related aroids. Our results confirm that information on repeat distribution can be used to identify loci suitable for such studies, and we expect that this approach can be used in other plant groups. PMID:23718317

  16. 2, 3-Dimethylmaleic anhydride (3, 4-Dimethyl-2, 5-furandione): A plant derived insecticidal molecule from Colocasia esculenta var. esculenta (L.) Schott.

    PubMed

    Rajashekar, Yallappa; Tonsing, Ngaihlun; Shantibala, Tourangbam; Manjunath, Javagal R

    2016-01-01

    The phasing out of methyl bromide as a fumigant, resistance problems with phosphine and other fumigants in stored product beetles, and serious concern with human health and environmental safety have triggered the search for alternative biofumigants of plant origin. Despite the identification of a large number of plants that show insecticidal activity, and the diversity of natural products with inherent eco-friendly nature, newer biofumigants of plant origin have eluded discovery. Using a bioassay driven protocol, we have now isolated a bioactive molecule from the root stock of Colocasia esculenta (L.) and characterized it as 2, 3-dimethylmaleic anhydride (3, 4-dimethyl-2, 5-furandione) based on various physico-chemical and spectroscopic techniques (IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and Mass). The molecule proved to be an efficient biofumigant which is highly toxic to insect pests for stored grains even at very low concentration, but has no adverse effect on seed germination. We finally address the potential for this molecule to become a, effective biofumigant. PMID:26837840

  17. 2, 3-Dimethylmaleic anhydride (3, 4-Dimethyl-2, 5-furandione): A plant derived insecticidal molecule from Colocasia esculenta var. esculenta (L.) Schott

    PubMed Central

    Rajashekar, Yallappa; Tonsing, Ngaihlun; Shantibala, Tourangbam; Manjunath, Javagal R.

    2016-01-01

    The phasing out of methyl bromide as a fumigant, resistance problems with phosphine and other fumigants in stored product beetles, and serious concern with human health and environmental safety have triggered the search for alternative biofumigants of plant origin. Despite the identification of a large number of plants that show insecticidal activity, and the diversity of natural products with inherent eco-friendly nature, newer biofumigants of plant origin have eluded discovery. Using a bioassay driven protocol, we have now isolated a bioactive molecule from the root stock of Colocasia esculenta (L.) and characterized it as 2, 3-dimethylmaleic anhydride (3, 4-dimethyl-2, 5-furandione) based on various physico-chemical and spectroscopic techniques (IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and Mass). The molecule proved to be an efficient biofumigant which is highly toxic to insect pests for stored grains even at very low concentration, but has no adverse effect on seed germination. We finally address the potential for this molecule to become a, effective biofumigant. PMID:26837840

  18. Physical Interpretation of the Schott Energy of An Accelerating Point Charge and the Question of Whether a Uniformly Accelerating Charge Radiates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, David R.

    2010-01-01

    A core topic in graduate courses in electrodynamics is the description of radiation from an accelerated charge and the associated radiation reaction. However, contemporary papers still express a diversity of views on the question of whether or not a uniformly accelerating charge radiates suggesting that a complete "physical" understanding of the…

  19. Comment on “Hydromagnesite solubility product and growth kinetics in aqueous solution from 25 to 75 °C” by Gautier, Q., Benezeth, P., Mavromatis, V., and Schott, J

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xiong, Yongliang

    2016-04-16

    Here, Gautier et al. (2014) recently published their determination of hydromagnesite solubility constant and hydromagnesite growth kinetics. Although their raw data appear to be of high quality, there is an oversight in their calculations of the hydromagnesite solubility constants given the solution compositions in their experiments. The oversight lies in the fact that they did not consider the constraint of simultaneous equilibrium with brucite. This oversight causes their newly calculated equilibrium constant for hydromagnesite to be discordant with the literature values (Königsberger et al., 1992 and Xiong, 2011).

  20. Mercado/Robb/Buchdahl coefficients: an update of 243 common glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolser, Michael

    2002-12-01

    The 1983 Mercado/Robb listing of Buchdahl chromatic coordinate coefficients is supplemented with glasses from the Schott and O'Hara catalogues. The coefficients were calculated by using Buchdahl's cubic model. Appropriately selected materials yield a superachromat.

  1. Antioxidant capacities of ten edible North American plants.

    PubMed

    Acuña, Ulyana Muñoz; Atha, Daniel E; Ma, Jun; Nee, Michael H; Kennelly, Edward J

    2002-02-01

    The EtOAc extract obtained from ten edible North American plants, Acorus calamus, Clintonia borealis, Gaultheria shallon, Juniperus osteosperma, Opuntia polyacantha, Prunus americana, Prunus virginiana, Sambucus cerulea, Sorbus americana and Vaccinium parvifolium, were tested in the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical assay. High antioxidant activity was obtained from the extracts of three fruits, Gaultheria shallon, Sambucus cerulea and Prunus americana and one extracted rhizome, Acorus calamus. Catechin and epicatechin, potent polyphenolic antioxidants, were identified in the EtOAc extracts of Gaultheria shallon and Sambucus cerulea by reversed-phase thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). PMID:11807968

  2. Measurement of dimensional stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, S. F.; Berthold, J. W., III; Norton, M.

    1975-01-01

    A technique was developed for measuring, with a precision of one part 10 to the 9th power, changes in physical dimensions delta L/L. Measurements have commenced on five materials: Heraeus-Schott Homosil (vitreous silica), Corning 7940 (vitreous silica), Corning ULE 7971 (titanium silicate), Schott Zero-Dur, and Owens-Illinois Cer-Vit C-101. The study was extended to include Universal Cyclops Invar LR-35 and Simonds-Saw Superinvar.

  3. 21 CFR 189.110 - Calamus and its derivatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ....110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES PROHIBITED FROM USE IN HUMAN FOOD Substances Generally Prohibited From Direct Addition or Use as Human Food § 189.110 Calamus and its derivatives. (a) Calamus is the dried rhizome of Acorus calamus...

  4. New glass developments for fiber optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higby, Paige L.; Holst, Karen; Tabor, Kevin; James, William; Chase, Elizabeth; Pucilowski, Sally; Gober-Mangan, Elizabeth; Klimek, Ronald; Karetta, Frank; Schreder, Bianca

    2014-02-01

    Fiber optic components for lighting and imaging applications have been in use for decades. Recent requirements such as a need for RoHS compliance, attractive market pricing, or particular optical properties, such as numerical aperture (NA) or transmission, have required SCHOTT to develop and implement new glasses for these applications. From Puravis™ lead-free fibers for lighting applications, to new glasses for digital X-ray imaging and sensor applications, the challenges for SCHOTT scientists are considerable. Pertinent properties of these glasses and methods of determination for suitability will be discussed.

  5. Proton radiation damage in optical filter glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grillot, Patrick N.; Rosenberg, William J.

    1989-01-01

    Samples of Schott BG-39 and Hoya CM-500 blue-green filter glass were subjected to proton radiation to determine their acceptability for spaceflight. Initial testing done with 2.7 MeV protons showed negligible change in optical transmittance with doses as high as 5.2 x 10 to the 14th protons per sq cm. Irradiation with protons of energy up to 63 MeV caused a significant reduction in transmittance in the Schott samples at doses of 5.3 x 10 to the 12th protons per sq cm, while negligible change occurred in the Hoya samples.

  6. Recovering effects of aqueous extracts of some selected medical plants on the teratogenic effects during the development of D. melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Uysal, Handan; Kara, Ayşe Aydan; Algur, Omer Faruk; Dumlupinar, Rahmi; Aydogan, Mehmet Nuri

    2007-05-15

    In this study the effects of some selected medical plants (Pimpinella anisum L., Rosmarinus officinalis L., Achillea millefolium L., Acorus calamus L., Hypericum perforatum L.) on the development of Drosophila melanogaster have been investigated. When the different concentration of plant extracts were applied to the cultures of Drosophila melanogaster, they did not caused an elongation of metamorphosis of F1 progeny. Furthermore, depending on an increase of plant extract on the application groups, the number of offsprings increased. But this increasing (for application groups no. I, II and IV) was not statistically significant (p > 0.05) according to control group. The highest increase in the total number of offspring of F1 progeny obtained from applications of Acorus calamus extracts and the 10 mL/100 mL medium concentration of the extract of Hypericum perforatum. PMID:19086522

  7. Quality assessment of a formulated Chinese herbal decoction, Kaixinsan, by using rapid resolution liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry: A chemical evaluation of different historical formulae.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Kevin Y; Fu, Q; Xie, Heidi Q; Xu, Sherry L; Cheung, Anna W H; Zheng, Ken Y Z; Luk, Wilson K W; Choi, Roy C Y; Lau, David T W; Dong, Tina T X; Jiang, Zhi Y; Chen, Ji J; Tsim, Karl W K

    2010-12-01

    Kaixinsan is an ancient Chinese herbal decoction mainly prescribed for patients suffering from mental depression. This decoction was created by Sun Si-miao of Tang Dynasty (A.D. 600) in ancient China, and was composed of four herbs: Radix and Rhizome Ginseng, Radix Polygalae, Rhizoma Acori Tatarinowii and Poria. Historically, this decoction has three different formulations, each recorded at a different point in time. In this study, the chemical compositions of all three Kaixinsan formulae were analyzed. By using rapid resolution LC coupled with a diode-array detector and an ESI triple quadrupole tandem MS (QQQ-MS/MS), the Radix and Rhizome Ginseng-derived ginsenosides including Rb(1), Rd, Re, Rg(1), the Radix Polygalae-derived 3,6'-disinapoyl sucrose, the Rhizoma Acori Tatarinowii-derived α- and β-asarone and the Poria-derived pachymic acid were compared among the three different formulations. The results showed variations in the solubility of different chemicals between one formula and the others. This systematic method developed could be used for the quality assessment of this herbal decoction. PMID:21077129

  8. On the Energy and Momentum of an Accelerated Charged Particle and the Sources of Radiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eriksen, Erik; Gron, Oyvind

    2007-01-01

    We give a systematic development of the theory of the radiation field of an accelerated charged particle with reference to an inertial reference frame in flat spacetime. Special emphasis is given to the role of the Schott energy and momentum in the energy-momentum balance of the charge and its field. It is shown that the energy of the radiation…

  9. Graduation and Dropout Rates by Ethnicity and Gender. Research Note. Volume 1001

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froman, Terry

    2010-01-01

    The Shott Foundation for Public Education recently published "Yes We Can: The Schott 50 State Report on Public Education and Black Males." This report focused on the exceedingly low graduation rate for Black males enrolled in schools around the nation. According to the report, the graduation rate for Black males in Miami-Dade County (M-DCPS) was…

  10. Mapping Wild Taro with Color-infrared Aerial Photography and Image Processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wild taro [Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott.] is an exotic ornamental plant that has escaped cultivation and invaded many freshwater wetlands in the southeastern United States. Remote sensing techniques were evaluated for distinguishing wild taro along the Rio Grande in southwest Texas. Field refle...

  11. First record of Sinoxylon conigerum Gerstäcker (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Filho, Otávio Peres; Teixeira, Edson P; Bezerra, Márcio L M; Dorval, Alberto; Filho, Evoneo Berti

    2006-01-01

    This is the first register of Sinoxylon conigerum attacking timber of teak (Tectona grandis L.f.), mango tree (Mangifera indica L.) and (Astronium fraxinifolium Schott) in the municipalities of Cuiabá and Várzea Grande, State of Mato Grosso, Brazil. PMID:17144148

  12. Transitioning from Elementary School to Middle School: The Ecology of Black Males' Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mundy, Alma Christienne

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed method study is to explain the ecology Black males experience as they transition from elementary school to middle school in terms of behavior. The Black male graduation rate is well below 50% nationally (Orfield, Losen, Wald, & Swanson, 2004; Schott Foundation for Public Education, 2010). Graduating from high school…

  13. Plug and Play Components for Building Integrated PV Systems, Phase II Final Report, 20 February 2003 - 31 May 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Rowell, D.

    2008-04-01

    Progress by Schott Solar, Inc. under NREL's PV Manufacturing R&D Project. Details progress on meter-interconnect device; free-standing mounting system; dark I-V curves to unearth problems with PV module strings; new 34-V version of ASE-300 PV module; and updated source-circuit protectors.

  14. Chronology and astronomy in Athanasius Kircher's Organum Mathematicum. (German Title: Die Zeitberechnung und die Astronomie in Athanasius Kirchers Organum Mathematicum)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daxecker, Franz

    The Organum Mathematicum was developed by Athanasius Kircher in 1661m and was described by Caspar Schott in 1668. With the aid of marked sticks, the Organum Mathematicum permits calculations in the fields of arithmetic, geometry, fortification, chronology, horography (the science of sundials), astronomy, astrology, steganography (encryption), and music. This essay focusses on two applications: chronology and astronomy.

  15. Comments on Research: Student Use of Unscheduled Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, Everett W.

    1973-01-01

    Author reviews Student Use of Unscheduled Time,'' by Walter J. Foley, Gordon C. Harr, and Larry Smiley (Iowa Educational Information Center), and Comparing Block Scheduling and Traditional Scheduling on Student Achievement and Attitudes,'' by Adrian P. Van Mondrans, James L. Schott, and Denny G. French (paper presented at the convention of the…

  16. On the construction of a 2-metre mirror blank for the universal reflecting telescope in Tautenburg (German Title: Über die Fertigung eines 2-Meter-Spiegelträgers für das Universal-Spiegelteleskop in Tautenburg )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lödel, Wolfgang

    The astronomers' desire to penetrate deeper into space transforms into a demand for larger telescopes. The primary mirror constitutes the main part of a reflecting telescope, and it determines all subsequent activities. Already in the 1930s activities existed in the Schott company to manufacture mirror blanks up to diameters of 2 metres, which could not be pursued because of political constraints. This ambitious goal was again picked up a few years after the war. At a time when the procurement of raw materials was extremely difficult, the glass workers of Schott in Jena attacked this large project. After some failures, a good mirror blank could be delivered to the Carl Zeiss Company in 1951 for further processing and for the construction of the first 2-metre reflecting telescope. From 1960 to 1986, this mirror made from optical glass ZK7 served its purpose at the Karl Schwarzschild Observatory in Tautenburg. lt was then replaced by a zero expansion glass ceramics mirror.

  17. Radiation effects on the transmission of various optical glasses and epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shetter, M. T.; Abreu, V. J.

    1979-01-01

    A recent study for the Dynamics Explorer satellite project involved the determination of the effects of gamma radiation (at 1.33 and 1.17 MeV) on the transmission of several optical glasses and epoxies to be used in the construction of interference filters. The samples studied included a control sample of pure fused silica, a cerium-stabilized radiation-resistant glass (Schott BK-7G), two pieces of quartz cemented with EPO-TEK 305 optical epoxy, two pieces of quartz cemented with APCO 5313 epoxy, a sample of Schott OG-590 glass, and a sample of Corning Corion glass. The transmission of different optical components was measured as a function of wavelength for several radiation doses.

  18. Phenology of two Ficus species in seasonal semi-deciduous forest in Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bianchini, E; Emmerick, J M; Messetti, A V L; Pimenta, J A

    2015-11-01

    We analyzed the phenology of Ficus adhatodifolia Schott ex Spreng. (23 fig tree) and F. eximia Schott (12 fig tree) for 74 months in a remnant of seasonal semi-deciduous forest (23° 27'S and 51° 15'W), Southern Brazil and discussed their importance to frugivorous. Leaf drop, leaf flush, syconia production and dispersal were recorded. These phenophases occurred year-round, but seasonal peaks were recorded in both leaf phenophases for F. eximia and leaf flushing for F. adhatodifolia. Climatic variables analyzed were positively correlated with reproductive phenophases of F. adhatodifolia and negatively correlated with the vegetative phenophases of F. eximia. In despite of environmental seasonality, little seasonality in the phenology of two species was observed, especially in the reproductive phenology. Both species were important to frugivorous, but F. adhatodifolia can play a relevant role in the remnant. PMID:26602353

  19. Invasive vascular plant species of limnocrenic karst springs in Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spałek, Krzysztof

    2015-04-01

    Natural water reservoirs are very valuable floristic sites in Poland. Among them, the most important for preservation of biodiversity of flora are limnocrenic karst springs. The long-term process of human pressure on habitats of this type caused disturbance of their biological balance. Changes in the water regime, industrial development and chemisation of agriculture, especially in the period of last two hundred years, led to systematic disappearance of localities of many plant species connected with rare habitats and also to appear numerous invasive plant species. They are: Acorus calamus, Echinocystis lobata, Elodea canadensis, Erechtites hieraciifolia, Impatiens glandulifera, Solidago canadensis, S. gigantea and S. graminifolia. Fielworks were conducted in 2010-2014.

  20. NREL Produces Highly Efficient, Wide-Bandgap, Thin-Film Solar Cells (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-09-01

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are finding new ways to manufacture thin-film solar cells made from copper, indium, gallium, and selenium - called CIGS cells - that are different than conventional CIGS solar cells. Their use of high-temperature glass, designed by SCHOTT AG, allows higher fabrication temperatures, opening the door to new CIGS solar cells employing light-absorbing materials with wide 'bandgaps.'

  1. Next generation dilatometer for highest accuracy thermal expansion measurement of ZERODUR®

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedamzik, Ralf; Engel, Axel; Kunisch, Clemens; Westenberger, Gerhard; Fischer, Peter; Westerhoff, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    In the recent years, the ever tighter tolerance for the Coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of IC Lithography component materials is requesting significant progress in the metrology accuracy to determine this property as requested. ZERODUR® is known for its extremely low CTE between 0°C to 50°C. The current measurement of the thermal expansion coefficient is done using push rod dilatometer measurement systems developed at SCHOTT. In recent years measurements have been published showing the excellent CTE homogeneity of ZERODUR® in the one-digit ppb/K range using these systems. The verifiable homogeneity was limited by the CTE(0°C, 50°C) measurement repeatability in the range of ± 1.2 ppb/K of the current improved push rod dilatometer setup using an optical interferometer as detector instead of an inductive coil. With ZERODUR® TAILORED, SCHOTT introduced a low thermal expansion material grade that can be adapted to individual customer application temperature profiles. The basis for this product is a model that has been developed in 2010 for better understanding of the thermal expansion behavior under given temperature versus time conditions. The CTE behavior predicted by the model has proven to be in very good alignment with the data determined in the thermal expansions measurements. The measurements to determine the data feeding the model require a dilatometer setup with excellent stability and accuracy for long measurement times of several days. In the past few years SCHOTT spent a lot of effort to drive a dilatometer measurement technology based on the push rod setup to its limit, to fulfill the continuously demand for higher CTE accuracy and deeper material knowledge of ZERODUR®. This paper reports on the status of the dilatometer technology development at SCHOTT.

  2. Components Makeover Gives Concentrating Solar Power a Boost (Fact Sheet), The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-12-01

    Parabolic trough technology is the most mature of the various concentrating solar power (CSP) options. But scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) continue to make advances on trough systems through innovative research on various components in industrial partnerships with Acciona Solar Power, SkyFuel, Schott Solar, and others. The results are leading to improved system efficiencies and lower costs for CSP plants.

  3. Ultraprecise thermal expansion measurements of seven low expansion materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berthold, J. W., III; Jacobs, S. F.

    1976-01-01

    We summarize a large number of ultraprecise thermal expansion measurements made on seven different low expansivity materials. Expansion coefficients in the -150-300 C temperature range are shown for Owens-Illinois Cer-Vit C-101, Corning ULE 7971 (titanium silicate) and fused silica 7940, Heraeus-Schott Zerodur low-expansion material and Homosil fused silica, Universal Cyclops Invar LR-35, and Simonds Saw and Steel Super Invar.

  4. Lightweighted ZERODUR for telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerhoff, T.; Davis, M.; Hartmann, P.; Hull, T.; Jedamzik, R.

    2014-07-01

    The glass ceramic ZERODUR® from SCHOTT has an excellent reputation as mirror blank material for earthbound and space telescope applications. It is known for its extremely low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) at room temperature and its excellent CTE homogeneity. Recent improvements in CNC machining at SCHOTT allow achieving extremely light weighted substrates up to 90% incorporating very thin ribs and face sheets. In 2012 new ZERODUR® grades EXPANSION CLASS 0 SPECIAL and EXTREME have been released that offer the tightest CTE grades ever. With ZERODUR® TAILORED it is even possible to offer ZERODUR® optimized for customer application temperature profiles. In 2013 SCHOTT started the development of a new dilatometer setup with the target to drive the industrial standard of high accuracy thermal expansion metrology to its limit. In recent years SCHOTT published several paper on improved bending strength of ZERODUR® and lifetime evaluation based on threshold values derived from 3 parameter Weibull distribution fitted to a multitude of stress data. ZERODUR® has been and is still being successfully used as mirror substrates for a large number of space missions. ZERODUR® was used for the secondary mirror in HST and for the Wolter mirrors in CHANDRA without any reported degradation of the optical image quality during the lifetime of the missions. Some years ago early studies on the compaction effects of electron radiation on ZERODUR® were re analyzed. Using a more relevant physical model based on a simplified bimetallic equation the expected deformation of samples exposed in laboratory and space could be predicted in a much more accurate way. The relevant ingredients for light weighted mirror substrates are discussed in this paper: substrate material with excellent homogeneity in its properties, sufficient bending strengths, space radiation hardness and CNC machining capabilities.

  5. Neodymium-doped glasses for waveguide lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, Kenneth H.; Zanoni, Raymond; Sapak, David L.; Hayden, Joseph S.

    1994-10-01

    We report recent results from our work on the fabrication of neodymium waveguide lasers. Several neodymium doped glasses. APG-1, LG-680, BK 7 and S 3 made by Schott Glass Technologies, Inc. were studied as candidates for use as waveguide lasers. It was found that S 3, a standard ophthalmic glass, had the best ion-exchange properties of any of the glasses studied. A waveguide laser was successfully made using the neodymium doped S 3 glass.

  6. Equation of state data of shock compressed liquid CO sub 2 and synthetic Uranus

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, A.C.; Nellis, W.J.; Holmes, N.C.; Erskine, D.J.; McCandless, P.C.; Ravizza, D.L.; Cassidy, L.D.

    1989-09-01

    New Hugoniot equation-of-state data for liquid CO{sub 2}and synthetic Uranus are discussed. These CO{sub 2} data and the previous data of Schott indicate that CO{sub 2} begins to dissociate at about 33 GPa on the Hugoniot. Four double-shock points were obtained for synthetic Uranus up to 220 GPa and 3 g/cm{sup 3}. These data are coincident with the adiabat of Uranus calculated by Hubbard and Marley. 3 refs.

  7. Design and fabrication of a 3m class light weighted mirror blank for the E-ELT M5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedamzik, Ralf; Seibert, Volker; Thomas, Armin; Westerhoff, Thomas; Müller, Michael; Cayrel, Marc

    2011-09-01

    In the recent past, SCHOTT has demonstrated its ability to manufacture large light weighted ZERODUR® mirror blanks for telescope projects like the GREGOR solar-telescope, for example. In 2010, SCHOTT was commissioned with a study aimed at developing a design for the M5 mirror blank of the ESO E-ELT. The tip and tilt M5 mirror of the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) requires a demanding approach in light weighting. The approximately 3.1 m x 2.5 m elliptical plano mirror is specified to a weight of less than 500 kg with high Eigenfrequencies and low deformation under different inclination angles. The study was divided into two parts. The first part focused on coming up with an optimized light weighted design with respect to performance and processability with finite element modeling. In the second part of the study, a concept for the processing sequence including melting, cold-processing, acid etching and handling of the M5 blank was developed. By producing a prototype section, SCHOTT demonstrated its ability to manufacture the demanding features, including pockets 350 mm in depth, thin walls and sloped pocket bottoms. This paper outlines the results of the design work, processing concept and demonstrator fabrication.

  8. Effects of Medicinal herb Extracts and their Components on Steatogenic Hepatotoxicity in Sk-hep1 Cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, You-Jin; Yoon, Yujin; Choi, Ho-Sung; Park, Sora; Oh, Sehee; Jeong, Se-Mi; Suh, Hyo-Ryung; Lee, Byung-Hoon

    2011-12-01

    Herbal medicines are widely used in many countries for the treatment of many diseases. Although the use of herb extracts as alternative medicine is growing, their toxicological properties have not been thoroughly investigated. In this study, we have investigated the effects of water and ethanol extracts of 18 herbs on the hepatic lipid metabolism and steatogenic hepatotoxicity. Ethanol extracts of Cirsium japonicum, Carthamus tinctorius, Rehmanniae glutinosa (preparata), Polygala tenuifolia, Foeniculum vulgare, Polygonum multiflorum, and Acorus gramineus and water extracts of Polygonum multiflorum and Rehmanniae glutinosa induced lipid accumulation in Sk-hep1 human hepatoma cells as determined by Nile red staining. These extracts increased the luciferase activity of sterol regulatory element (SRE) and decreased that of peroxisome proliferator response element (PPRE), indicating the possibilities of enhanced fatty acid synthesis and decreased fatty acid oxidation. To identify the components responsible for the fat accumulation, we tested 50 chemicals isolated from the nine herbs. Apigenin, luteolin, pectolinarin and lupeol from Cirsium japonicum, 8-methoxypsoralen and umbelliferone from Foeniculum vulgare and pomonic acid and jiocerebroside from Rehmanniae glutinosa significantly increased the accumulation of lipid droplets. These results suggest that ethanol extracts of Cirsium japonicum, Carthamus tinctorius, Rehmanniae glutinosa (preparata), Polygala tenuifolia, Foeniculum vulgare, Polygonum multiflorum, and Acorus gramineus and water extracts of Polygonum multiflorum and Rehmanniae glutinosa can cause fatty liver disease by decreasing β-oxidation of fatty acid and increasing lipogenesis. PMID:24278574

  9. Comparative genomic analyses in Asparagus.

    PubMed

    Kuhl, Joseph C; Havey, Michael J; Martin, William J; Cheung, Foo; Yuan, Qiaoping; Landherr, Lena; Hu, Yi; Leebens-Mack, James; Town, Christopher D; Sink, Kenneth C

    2005-12-01

    Garden asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.) belongs to the monocot family Asparagaceae in the order Asparagales. Onion (Allium cepa L.) and Asparagus officinalis are 2 of the most economically important plants of the core Asparagales, a well supported monophyletic group within the Asparagales. Coding regions in onion have lower GC contents than the grasses. We compared the GC content of 3374 unique expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from A. officinalis with Lycoris longituba and onion (both members of the core Asparagales), Acorus americanus (sister to all other monocots), the grasses, and Arabidopsis. Although ESTs in A. officinalis and Acorus had a higher average GC content than Arabidopsis, Lycoris, and onion, all were clearly lower than the grasses. The Asparagaceae have the smallest nuclear genomes among all plants in the core Asparagales, which typically have huge genomes. Within the Asparagaceae, European Asparagus species have approximately twice the nuclear DNA of that of southern African Asparagus species. We cloned and sequenced 20 genomic amplicons from European A. officinalis and the southern African species Asparagus plumosus and observed no clear evidence for a recent genome doubling in A. officinalis relative to A. plumosus. These results indicate that members of the genus Asparagus with smaller genomes may be useful genomic models for plants in the core Asparagales. PMID:16391674

  10. Implementation of bio-fungicides and seed treatment in organic rice cv. KDML 105 farming.

    PubMed

    Thobunluepop, Pitipong

    2009-08-15

    This study was aimed to evaluate the several chemical compounds of relatively composite structure with antifungal activity from Thai local medical plants. The antifungal activity of Stemona curtisii HK. f., Stemona tuberose L., Acorus calamus L., Eugenia caryophyllus, Memmea siamensis Kost. and an eugenol active compound were studied in vitro. Four pathogenic seed borne fungi, Alternaria solani, Colletotrichum sp., Fusarium moniliforme and Rhizoctonia solani were used as target organisms. The agar overlay technique and spore inhibition techniques were applied for the determination of their essential oil and active compound antifungal activity at various concentration; 0.10, 0.25, 0.50 and 1.00% (v/v) and untreated as control (0% v/v). Eugenol active compound showed the strongest antifungal activity on all species of tested fungal species. On the other hand, the antifungal activity of those bio-fungicides was lined up into a series from strong to low, as follows: Eugenia caryophyllus > Acorus calamus Linn. > Stemona tuberosa L. > Stemona curtisii Hk.f, while Mammea siamensis Kost. could not control any fungal species. Moreover, after eugenol application, lysis of spore and inhibition of mycelium growth were detected. Microscopic analysis exhibited complete lysis of spores after 24 h at a concentration of 1.00% v/v. Moreover, at the same concentration and 96 h incubation the mycelia growth was completely inhibited. PMID:19899322

  11. Zero expansion glass ceramic ZERODUR® roadmap for advanced lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerhoff, Thomas; Jedamzik, Ralf; Hartmann, Peter

    2013-04-01

    The zero expansion glass ceramic ZERODUR® is a well-established material in microlithography in critical components as wafer- and reticle-stages, mirrors and frames in the stepper positioning and alignment system. The very low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and its extremely high CTE homogeneity are key properties to achieve the tight overlay requirements of advanced lithography processes. SCHOTT is continuously improving critical material properties of ZERODUR® essential for microlithography applications according to a roadmap driven by the ever tighter material specifications broken down from the customer roadmaps. This paper will present the SCHOTT Roadmap for ZERODUR® material property development. In the recent years SCHOTT established a physical model based on structural relaxation to describe the coefficient of thermal expansion's temperature dependence. The model is successfully applied for the new expansion grade ZERODUR® TAILORED introduced to the market in 2012. ZERODUR® TAILORED delivers the lowest thermal expansion of ZERODUR® products at microlithography tool application temperature allowing for higher thermal stability for tighter overlay control in IC production. Data will be reported demonstrating the unique CTE homogeneity of ZERODUR® and its very high reproducibility, a necessary precondition for serial production for microlithography equipment components. New data on the bending strength of ZERODUR® proves its capability to withstand much higher mechanical loads than previously reported. Utilizing a three parameter Weibull distribution it is possible to derive minimum strength values for a given ZERODUR® surface treatment. Consequently the statistical uncertainties of the earlier approach based on a two parameter Weibull distribution have been eliminated. Mechanical fatigue due to stress corrosion was included in a straightforward way. The derived formulae allows calculating life time of ZERODUR® components for a given stress

  12. Final inspection of photomask blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Fredi; Sauerbrei, Hartmut; Aschke, Lutz; Knapp, Konrad

    2001-04-01

    In order to increase the quality in manufacturing of future photon mask generations Schott Lithotec is brought in a brand new, much increased automatic laser inspection system into a new manufacturing line of photo mask blanks. It is in a position to detect additionally to the standard defect types further defect types like dim- and bright-chrome defects. The resolution of the system is less than 100 nm. With a quickly inspecting time per blank of less than three minutes and for the first time in the world used automatic SMIF-pod-handling this is a tool for the 100 percent final inspection in the manufacturing of photo mask blanks.

  13. Prediction of long-term radiation kinetics of transmission spectra of commerical optical glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusarov, Andrei I.; Doyle, Dominic B.; Fruit, Michel; Kinet, Damien P.

    2002-09-01

    We analyze the applicability of a number of exponent-type phenomenological kinetics for transmission degradation prediction in commercial optical glasses during and after irradiation. The analysis is based on post-radiation transmission measurements over a 5 years time interval of a commercial boro-silicate glass (BK7, Schott). A conclusion is drawn that the choice should be made between the stretched-exponential and the multi-exponential functions. We apply those kinetics to simulate kinetics of BK7 glass transmission spectra subject to Co60 gamma-radiation in the framework of the previously developed phenomenological model. Calculated transmission spectra agree well with our experimental data.

  14. Electrodynamics of Radiating Charges in a Gravitational Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grøn, Øyvind

    The electrodynamics of a radiating charge and its electromagnetic field based upon the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac (LAD) equation are discussed both with reference to an inertial reference frame and a uniformly accelerated reference frame. It is demonstrated that energy and momentum are conserved during runaway motion of a radiating charge and during free fall of a charge in a field of gravity. This does not mean that runaway motion is really happening. It may be an unphysical solution of the LAD equation of motion of a radiating charge due to the unrealistic point particle model of the charge upon which it is based. However it demonstrates the consistency of classical electrodynamics, including the LAD equation which is deduced from Maxwell's equations and the principle of energy-momentum conservation applied to a radiating charge and its electromagnetic field. The decisive role of the Schott energy in this connection is made clear and an answer is given to the question: What sort of energy is the Schott energy and where is it found? It is the part of the electromagnetic field energy which is proportional to (minus) the scalar product of the velocity and acceleration of a moving accelerated charged particle. In the case of the electromagnetic field of a point charge it is localized at the particle. This energy is negative if the acceleration is in the same direction as the velocity and positive if it is in the opposite direction. During runaway motion the Schott energy becomes more and more negative and in the case of a charged particle with finite extension, it is localized in a region with increasing extension surrounding the particle. The Schott energy provides the radiated energy of a freely falling charge. Also it is pointed out that a proton and a neutron fall with the same acceleration in a uniform gravitational field, although the proton radiates and the neutron does not. It is made clear that the question as to whether or not a charge radiates has a reference

  15. Transient radiation-induced absorption in the materials for a GSGG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brannon, P. J.

    1993-11-01

    Materials used in the optical elements of a 1,061 m GSGG (gadolinium scandium gallium garnet) laser have been tested for transient radiation-induced absorption. The transient radiation-induced absorption in KK1, Schott S7005 and S7010, and M382 glasses have been determined for discrete wavelengths in the range 440-750 nm. Also, the transient radiation-induced absorption in 'pure' and MgO doped LiNbO3 has been measured at 1,061 nm. Mathematical expressions composed of exponentials are fitted to the data.

  16. Characterization & Modeling of Materials in Glass-To-Metal Seals: Part I

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, Robert S.; Emery, John M.; Tandon, Rajan; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Stavig, Mark E.; Newton, Clay S.

    2014-01-01

    To support higher fidelity modeling of residual stresses in glass-to-metal (GTM) seals and to demonstrate the accuracy of finite element analysis predictions, characterization and validation data have been collected for Sandia’s commonly used compression seal materials. The temperature dependence of the storage moduli, the shear relaxation modulus master curve and structural relaxation of the Schott 8061 glass were measured and stress-strain curves were generated for SS304L VAR in small strain regimes typical of GTM seal applications spanning temperatures from 20 to 500 C. Material models were calibrated and finite element predictions are being compared to measured data to assess the accuracy of predictions.

  17. Determining the sulfuric acid fog concentration in coke oven gas

    SciTech Connect

    Zin'kovskaya, S.I.; Okhrimenko, E.L.; Sobko, L.V.

    1982-11-06

    A volumetric method for the analysis of sulfuric acid aerosols at levels of acid greater (25-40 g/m/sup 3/) than those (1 g/m/sup 3/) analyzable by current methods is described. Coke oven gas after acid scrubbing and electrofiltration is passed through a Schott filter (pressure drop 100 mm Hg), the sulfuric acid aerosol being condensed on the filter which is washed with water and the washings filtered with NaOH (0.01 N after electrofilter, 1.0 N after the acid towers) to methyl orange end point. The error is +/- 2%.

  18. High-sensitivity and high-Q-factor glass photonic crystal cavity and its applications as sensors.

    PubMed

    Siraji, Ashfaqul Anwar; Zhao, Yang

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the properties of a planar photonic crystal cavity on glass and its applications as sensors. An airbridged twofold defect cavity on Schott glass background and Gorilla glass substrate has been designed for high Q-factor up to 4459. The average sensitivity of the cavity resonance to background refractive index is 388 nm/Refractive Index Unit. The resonant wavelength is sensitive to background temperature by 18.5 pm/°C. The designed sensors show much higher sensitivity than those based on waveguide interferometers or photonic bandgap structures without cavity resonance. The results are also useful for experimental studies of glass photonic devices. PMID:25831371

  19. The research on conformal acid etching process of glass ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kepeng; Guo, Peiji

    2014-08-01

    A series of experiments have been done to explore the effect of different conditions on the hydrofluoric acid etching. The hydrofluoric acid was used to etch the glass ceramic called "ZERODUR", which is invented by SCHOTT in Germany. The glass ceramic was processed into cylindrical samples. The hydrofluoric acid etching was done in a plastic beaker. The concentration of hydrofluoric acid and the etching time were changed to measure the changes of geometric tolerance and I observed the surface using a microscope in order to find an appropriate condition of hydrofluoric acid etching.

  20. Observing and Predicting the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (Fridtjof Nansen Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marotzke, J.

    2009-04-01

    I will review the history of ideas that led to the establishment of the monitoring system for the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) at 26.5 °N. The results show a magnitude of AMOC variability that surprised most people. I will discuss a number of applications of the AMOC observations, including: Can models simulate the observed AMOC variability? When might a secular change in the AMOC be detectable against its natural variability? What is the potential for decadal prediction of the AMOC and North Atlantic temperatures? I will end on discussing the indirect yet profound role that Fritz Schott played in establishing the AMOC monitoring system.

  1. Laser properties of an improved average-power Nd-doped phosphate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Stephen A.; Marshall, Christopher D.; Bayramian, Andy J.; Wilke, Gary D.; Hayden, Joseph S.

    1994-10-01

    The Nd-doped phosphate laser glass described herein can withstand 2.3 times greater thermal loading without fracture, compared to APG-1 (commercially available average-power glass from Schott Glass Technologies). The enhanced thermal loading capability is established on the basis of the intrinsic thermomechanical properties (expansion, conduction, fracture toughness, and Young's modulus), and by direct thermally induced fracture experiments using Ar-ion laser heating of the samples. This Nd-doped phosphate glass (referred to as APG-t) is found to be characterized by a 29% gain cross section and a 25% longer low-concentration emission lifetime.

  2. Random Variables and Positive Definite Kernels Associated with the Schroedinger Algebra

    SciTech Connect

    Accardi, Luigi; Boukas, Andreas

    2010-06-17

    We show that the Feinsilver-Kocik-Schott (FKS) kernel for the Schroedinger algebra is not positive definite. We show how the FKS Schroedinger kernel can be reduced to a positive definite one through a restriction of the defining parameters of the exponential vectors. We define the Fock space associated with the reduced FKS Schroedinger kernel. We compute the characteristic functions of quantum random variables naturally associated with the FKS Schroedinger kernel and expressed in terms of the renormalized higher powers of white noise (or RHPWN) Lie algebra generators.

  3. Proposed Testing to Assess the Accuracy of Glass-To-Metal Seal Stress Analyses.

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, Robert S.; Emery, John M; Tandon, Rajan; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Stavig, Mark E.; Newton, Clay S.; Gibson, Cory S; Bencoe, Denise N.

    2014-09-01

    The material characterization tests conducted on 304L VAR stainless steel and Schott 8061 glass have provided higher fidelity data for calibration of material models used in Glass - T o - Metal (GTM) seal analyses. Specifically, a Thermo - Multi - Linear Elastic Plastic ( thermo - MLEP) material model has be en defined for S S304L and the Simplified Potential Energy Clock nonlinear visc oelastic model has been calibrated for the S8061 glass. To assess the accuracy of finite element stress analyses of GTM seals, a suite of tests are proposed to provide data for comparison to mo del predictions.

  4. Identification, characterization, and palynology of high-valued medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Fazal, Hina; Ahmad, Nisar; Haider Abbasi, Bilal

    2013-01-01

    High-valued medicinal plants Achillea millefolium, Acorus calamus, Arnebia nobilis, Fumaria indica, Gymnema sylvestre, Origanum vulgare, Paeonia emodi, Peganum harmala, Psoralea corylifolia, Rauwolfia serpentina, and Vetiveria zizanioides were identified with the help of taxonomical markers and investigated for characterization and palynological studies. These parameters are used to analyze their quality, safety, and standardization for their safe use. Botanical description and crude drug description is intended for their quality assurance at the time of collection, commerce stages, manufacturing, and production. For this purpose the detailed morphology was studied and compared with the Flora of Pakistan and other available literatures. Here we reported the pollen grain morphology of Origanum vulgare, Paeonia emodi, Psoralea corylifolia, and Rauwolfia serpentina for the first time. Similarly the crude drug study of Gymnema sylvestre (leaf), Origanum vulgare (aerial parts), Paeonia emodi (tubers), and Peganum harmala (seeds) was also carried out for the first time. PMID:23844389

  5. Identification, Characterization, and Palynology of High-Valued Medicinal Plants

    PubMed Central

    Fazal, Hina; Ahmad, Nisar; Haider Abbasi, Bilal

    2013-01-01

    High-valued medicinal plants Achillea millefolium, Acorus calamus, Arnebia nobilis, Fumaria indica, Gymnema sylvestre, Origanum vulgare, Paeonia emodi, Peganum harmala, Psoralea corylifolia, Rauwolfia serpentina, and Vetiveria zizanioides were identified with the help of taxonomical markers and investigated for characterization and palynological studies. These parameters are used to analyze their quality, safety, and standardization for their safe use. Botanical description and crude drug description is intended for their quality assurance at the time of collection, commerce stages, manufacturing, and production. For this purpose the detailed morphology was studied and compared with the Flora of Pakistan and other available literatures. Here we reported the pollen grain morphology of Origanum vulgare, Paeonia emodi, Psoralea corylifolia, and Rauwolfia serpentina for the first time. Similarly the crude drug study of Gymnema sylvestre (leaf), Origanum vulgare (aerial parts), Paeonia emodi (tubers), and Peganum harmala (seeds) was also carried out for the first time. PMID:23844389

  6. Nitrogen and phosphorus removal of locally adapted plant species used in constructed wetlands in China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xia; König, Thomas; Qi, Zhang; Yongsheng, Gao

    2012-01-01

    This paper assesses the nitrogen and phosphorus removal efficiency of seven plant species (Schoenoplectus lacustris, Vetiveria zizanioides, Acorus calamus, Canna indica, Zizania latifolia, Phragmites communis, and Iris pseudacorus) commonly used in constructed wetland systems in southern China. The investigation considers two aspects that are relevant to determine nutrient removal efficiency: plants' biomass production and nutrient content in water effluent. Both assessments are correlated with each other. Three different hydraulic retention times with different nutrient loads have been applied in this ex-situ trial. The plants' biomass production correlates positively with the effluent's nutrient removal efficiency. Six out of seven species reviewed produce more biomass above ground than below ground (average: 67% of dried biomass in aerial part); only I. pseudacorus produces more biomass below ground. S. lacustris, V. zizanioides, I. pseudacorus, and C. indica have performed best in terms of nutrient removal efficiency (65.6-90.2% for nitrogen; 67.7-84.6% for phosphorus). PMID:22766855

  7. In vitro evaluation of inhibitory nature of extracts of 18-plant species of Chhindwara against 3-keratinophilic fungi.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, S; Rai, M K; Agrawal, S C

    1997-01-01

    Effect of extract of 18 plant species, viz., Acorus calamus, Adhatoda vasica, Amomum subulatum, Andrographis paniculata, Boerhaavia diffusa, Cassia occidentalis, Centella asiatica, Cymbopogon citratus, Hemidesmus indicus, Hyptis suaveolens, Malvestrum sp., Passiflora edulis, Pergularia daemia, Peristrophe bicalyculata, Shuteria hirsuta, Solanum nigrum, Tecoma stans, and Verbascum chinense on the growth of Microsporum gypseum, Chrysosporium tropicum and Trichophyton terrestre was evaluated and discussed. The sensitivity of the keratinophilic fungi was evaluated by dry-weight method. The maximum inhibition of mycelial growth was shown by M. gypseum (86.62%) followed by T. terrestre (81.86%) and C. tropicum (74.06%) when treated with S. hirsuta whereas the minimum inhibition was exhibited by M. gypseum (0.29%), C. tropicum (0.16%) and T. terrestre (1.76%) when tested with the extract of P. edulis, A. vasica and B. diffusa respectively. PMID:10386016

  8. Embryological Features of Tofieldia glutinosa and Their Bearing on the Early Diversification of Monocotyledonous Plants

    PubMed Central

    Holloway, Samuel J.; Friedman, William E.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims Although much is known about the vegetative traits associated with early monocot evolution, less is known about the reproductive features of early monocotyledonous lineages. A study was made of the embryology of Tofieldia glutinosa, a member of an early divergent monocot clade (Tofieldiaceae), and aspects of its development were compared with the development of other early divergent monocots in order to gain insight into defining reproductive features of early monocots. Methods Field-collected developing gynoecial tissues of Tofieldia glutinosa were prepared for histological examination. Over 600 ovules were sectioned and studied using brightfield, differential interference contrast, and fluorescence microscopy. High-resolution digital imaging was used to document important stages of megasporogenesis, megagametogenesis and early endosperm development. Key Results Development of the female gametophyte in T. glutinosa is of a modified Polygonum-type. At maturity the female gametophyte is seven-celled and 11-nucleate with a standard three-celled egg apparatus, a binucleate central cell (where ultimately, the two polar nuclei will fuse into a diploid secondary nucleus) and three binucleate antipodal cells. The antipodal nuclei persist past fertilization, and the process of double fertilization appears to yield a diploid zygote and triploid primary endosperm cell, as is characteristic of plants with Polygonum-type female gametophytes. Endosperm development is helobial, and free-nuclear growth initially proceeds at equal rates in both the micropylar and chalazal endosperm chambers. Conclusions The analysis suggests that the shared common ancestor of monocots possessed persistent and proliferating antipodals similar to those found in T. glutinosa and other early-divergent monocots (e.g. Acorus and members of the Araceae). Helobial endosperm among monocots evolved once in the common ancestor of all monocots excluding Acorus. Thus, the analysis further

  9. A Standardized Chinese Herbal Decoction, Kai-Xin-San, Restores Decreased Levels of Neurotransmitters and Neurotrophic Factors in the Brain of Chronic Stress-Induced Depressive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Kevin Yue; Mao, Qing-Qiu; Ip, Siu-Po; Choi, Roy Chi-Yan; Dong, Tina Ting-Xia; Lau, David Tai-Wai; Tsim, Karl Wah-Keung

    2012-01-01

    Kai-xin-san (KXS), a Chinese herbal decoction being prescribed by Sun Simiao in Beiji Qianjin Yaofang about 1400 years ago, contains Ginseng Radix et Rhizoma, Polygalae Radix, Acori tatarinowii Rhizoma, and Poria. KXS has been used to treat stress-related psychiatric disease with the symptoms of depression and forgetfulness in ancient China until today. However, the mechanism of its antidepression action is still unknown. Here, the chronic mild-stress-(CMS-) induced depressive rats were applied in exploring the action mechanisms of KXS treatment. Daily intragastric administration of KXS for four weeks significantly alleviated the CMS-induced depressive symptoms displayed by enhanced sucrose consumption. In addition, the expressions of those molecular bio-markers relating to depression in rat brains were altered by the treatment of KXS. These KXS-regulated brain biomarkers included: (i) the levels of dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin (ii) the transcript levels of proteins relating to neurotransmitter metabolism; (iii) the transcript levels of neurotrophic factors and their receptors. The results suggested that the anti-depressant-like action of KXS might be mediated by an increase of neurotransmitters and expression of neurotrophic factors and its corresponding receptors in the brain. Thus, KXS could serve as alternative medicine, or health food supplement, for patients suffering from depression. PMID:22973399

  10. A Chinese herbal decoction, reformulated from Kai-Xin-San, relieves the depression-like symptoms in stressed rats and induces neurogenesis in cultured neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Lu; Hu, Qinghua; Mak, Marvin S. H.; Lou, Jianshu; Xu, Sherry L.; Bi, Cathy W. C.; Zhu, Yue; Wang, Huaiyou; Dong, Tina T. X.; Tsim, Karl W. K.

    2016-01-01

    Kai-Xin-San (KXS), a Chinese herbal decoction for anti-depression, is a combination of paired-herbs, i.e. Ginseng Radix et Rhizoma (GR)-Polygalae Radix (PR) and Acori Tatarinowii Rhizoma (ATR)-Poria (PO). The make-up of the paired-herbs has been commonly revised according to syndrome differentiation and treatment variation of individual. Currently, an optimized KXS (KXS2012) was prepared by functional screening different combination of GR-PR and ATR-PO. The aim of this study was to verify the effect and underlying mechanism of KXS2012 against depression in chronic mild stress (CMS)-induced depressive rats and in primary cultures of neurons and astrocytes. In rat model, the CMS-induced depressive symptoms were markedly alleviated by the treatment with KXS2012. The CMS-suppressed neurotransmitter amounts were restored in the presence of KXS2012. And the expressions of neurotropic factors and its corresponding receptors were increased under KXS2012 administration. In cultured neurons, application of KXS2012 could promote neurogenesis by inducing the expression of synaptotagmin and dendritic spine density. Moreover, application of KXS2012 in cultured astrocytes, or in H2O2-stressed astrocytes, induced the expressions of neurotrophic factors: the increase might be associated with the modification of Erk1/2 and CREB phosphorylation. Our current results fully support the therapeutic efficacy of KXS2012 against depression in cell and animal models. PMID:27444820

  11. A Chinese herbal decoction, reformulated from Kai-Xin-San, relieves the depression-like symptoms in stressed rats and induces neurogenesis in cultured neurons.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lu; Hu, Qinghua; Mak, Marvin S H; Lou, Jianshu; Xu, Sherry L; Bi, Cathy W C; Zhu, Yue; Wang, Huaiyou; Dong, Tina T X; Tsim, Karl W K

    2016-01-01

    Kai-Xin-San (KXS), a Chinese herbal decoction for anti-depression, is a combination of paired-herbs, i.e. Ginseng Radix et Rhizoma (GR)-Polygalae Radix (PR) and Acori Tatarinowii Rhizoma (ATR)-Poria (PO). The make-up of the paired-herbs has been commonly revised according to syndrome differentiation and treatment variation of individual. Currently, an optimized KXS (KXS2012) was prepared by functional screening different combination of GR-PR and ATR-PO. The aim of this study was to verify the effect and underlying mechanism of KXS2012 against depression in chronic mild stress (CMS)-induced depressive rats and in primary cultures of neurons and astrocytes. In rat model, the CMS-induced depressive symptoms were markedly alleviated by the treatment with KXS2012. The CMS-suppressed neurotransmitter amounts were restored in the presence of KXS2012. And the expressions of neurotropic factors and its corresponding receptors were increased under KXS2012 administration. In cultured neurons, application of KXS2012 could promote neurogenesis by inducing the expression of synaptotagmin and dendritic spine density. Moreover, application of KXS2012 in cultured astrocytes, or in H2O2-stressed astrocytes, induced the expressions of neurotrophic factors: the increase might be associated with the modification of Erk1/2 and CREB phosphorylation. Our current results fully support the therapeutic efficacy of KXS2012 against depression in cell and animal models. PMID:27444820

  12. An authenticity survey of herbal medicines from markets in China using DNA barcoding

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jianping; Pang, Xiaohui; Liao, Baosheng; Yao, Hui; Song, Jingyuan; Chen, Shilin

    2016-01-01

    Adulterant herbal materials are a threat to consumer safety. In this study, we used DNA barcoding to investigate the proportions and varieties of adulterant species in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) markets. We used a DNA barcode database of TCM (TCMD) that was established by our group to investigate 1436 samples representing 295 medicinal species from 7 primary TCM markets in China. The results indicate that ITS2 barcodes could be generated for most of the samples (87.7%) using a standard protocol. Of the 1260 samples, approximately 4.2% were identified as adulterants. The adulterant focused on medicinal species such as Ginseng Radix et Rhizoma (Renshen), Radix Rubi Parvifolii (Maomeigen), Dalbergiae odoriferae Lignum (Jiangxiang), Acori Tatarinowii Rhizoma (Shichangpu), Inulae Flos (Xuanfuhua), Lonicerae Japonicae Flos (Jinyinhua), Acanthopanacis Cortex (Wujiapi) and Bupleuri Radix (Chaihu). The survey revealed that adulterant species are present in the Chinese market, and these adulterants pose a risk to consumer health. Thus, regulatory measures should be adopted immediately. We suggest that a traceable platform based on DNA barcode sequences be established for TCM market supervision. PMID:26740340

  13. Smart Soup, a Traditional Chinese Medicine Formula, Ameliorates Amyloid Pathology and Related Cognitive Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaohang; Cui, Jin; Ding, Jianqing; Wang, Ying; Zeng, Xianglu; Ling, Yun; Shen, Xiaoheng; Chen, Shengdi; Huang, Chenggang; Pei, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that causes substantial public health care burdens. Intensive efforts have been made to find effective and safe disease-modifying treatment and symptomatic intervention alternatives against AD. Smart Soup (SS), a Chinese medicine formula composed of Rhizoma Acori Tatarinowii (AT), Poria cum Radix Pini (PRP) and Radix Polygalae (RP), is a typical prescription against memory deficits. Here, we assessed the efficacy of SS against AD. Oral administration of SS ameliorated the cognitive impairment of AD transgenic mice, with reduced Aβ levels, retarded Aβ amyloidosis and reduced Aβ-induced gliosis and neuronal loss in the brains of AD mice. Consistently, SS treatment reduced amyloid-related locomotor dysfunctions and premature death of AD transgenic Drosophila. Mechanistic studies showed that RP reduced Aβ generation, whereas AT and PRP exerted neuroprotective effects against Aβ. Taken together, our study indicates that SS could be effective against AD, providing a practical therapeutic strategy against the disease. PMID:25386946

  14. Infrared thermography ofArum lily inflorescences.

    PubMed

    Skubatz, H; Nelson, T A; Dong, A M; Meeuse, B J; Bendich, A J

    1990-10-01

    The infrared radiation emitted from the surface of inflorescences of 12 aroid species was monitored with an infrared camera, capable of 0.1°C resolution, and the data were converted to temperature values by means of temperature reference standards. Images representing surface temperatures were obtained forAmorphophallus bulbifer Blume,A. campanulatus Blume,A. forbesii Engl. et Gehrm.,A. rivieri Dur.,Philodendron selloum Koch,Monstera deliciosa Liebm.,Dracunculus vulgaris Schott,Arum italicum Mill.,A. dioscoridis Sibth.,A. creticum Boiss et Heldr.,Caladium sp., andRemusatia vivipara Schott. These images were different among species with respect to temperature, duration of detectable heat development, and organ type (male and female flowers, spathe and appendix) found to be thermogenic. All these species, however, exhibited three common characteristics: 1) production of heat by the male flowers; 2) pollen-shedding immediately after heat production had ceased; and 3) when male flowers were some distance away from female flowers along the spadix, heat was not detected in female flowers. Heat emission was associated with the alternative, cyanide-insensitive pathway that was fully operative. PMID:24197195

  15. Monsoon-modulated ring generation in the eastern Gulf of Aden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratantoni, D. M.

    2009-04-01

    The Somali Current is unique among major western boundary currents in its propensity to reverse direction in response to semi-annual monsoon wind forcing. As a consequence, the western tropical Indian Ocean is rife with eddy variability spanning a range of temporal and spatial scales, much of it carefully documented by Fritz Schott and colleagues. We report here on in-situ and remote observations of westward-translating anticyclonic rings generated as a portion of the Somali Current accelerates northward through the Socotra Passage following the October and April monsoon transitions. The observed rings exhibit strong azimuthal velocities exceeding 50 cm/s, are comparable in overall diameter to the width of the Gulf of Aden (250 km), and translate westward at 5-8 cm/s. We combine unique transport measurements obtained by Schott and colleagues during 1995-1996 with recent satellite altimetry and ocean color imagery to demonstrate that Socotra Passage transport extrema associated with the monsoon transitions are strongly correlated with ring generation events. This distinct and predictable formation process distinguishes these rings from the spectrum of eddies which propagate into the Gulf of Aden from the Arabian Sea and the interior Indian Ocean.

  16. An automated protocol for performance benchmarking a widefield fluorescence microscope.

    PubMed

    Halter, Michael; Bier, Elianna; DeRose, Paul C; Cooksey, Gregory A; Choquette, Steven J; Plant, Anne L; Elliott, John T

    2014-11-01

    Widefield fluorescence microscopy is a highly used tool for visually assessing biological samples and for quantifying cell responses. Despite its widespread use in high content analysis and other imaging applications, few published methods exist for evaluating and benchmarking the analytical performance of a microscope. Easy-to-use benchmarking methods would facilitate the use of fluorescence imaging as a quantitative analytical tool in research applications, and would aid the determination of instrumental method validation for commercial product development applications. We describe and evaluate an automated method to characterize a fluorescence imaging system's performance by benchmarking the detection threshold, saturation, and linear dynamic range to a reference material. The benchmarking procedure is demonstrated using two different materials as the reference material, uranyl-ion-doped glass and Schott 475 GG filter glass. Both are suitable candidate reference materials that are homogeneously fluorescent and highly photostable, and the Schott 475 GG filter glass is currently commercially available. In addition to benchmarking the analytical performance, we also demonstrate that the reference materials provide for accurate day to day intensity calibration. Published 2014 Wiley Periodicals Inc. PMID:25132217

  17. Widespread tannin intake via stimulants and masticatories, especially guarana, kola nut, betel vine, and accessories.

    PubMed

    Morton, J F

    1992-01-01

    Tannins are increasingly recognized as dietary carcinogens and as antinutrients interfering with the system's full use of protein. Nevertheless, certain tannin-rich beverages, masticatories, and folk remedies, long utilized in African, Asiatic, Pacific, and Latin American countries, are now appearing in North American sundry shops and grocery stores. These include guarana (Paullinia cupana HBK.) from Brazil, kola nut (Cola nitida Schott & Endl. and C. acuminata Schott & Endl.) from West Africa, and betel nut (Areca catechu L.) from Malaya. The betel nut, or arecanut, has long been associated with oral and esophageal cancer because of its tannin content and the tannin contributed by the highly astringent cutch from Acacia catechu L. and Uncaria gambir Roxb. and the aromatic, astringent 'pan' (leaves of Piper betel L.) chewed with it. In addition to the constant recreational/social ingestion of these plant materials, they are much consumed as aphrodisiacs and medications. Guarana and kola nut enjoy great popularity in their native lands because they are also rich in caffeine, which serves as a stimulant. Research and popular education on the deleterious effects of excessive tannin intake could do much to reduce the heavy burden of early mortality and health care, especially in developing countries. PMID:1417698

  18. CTE characterization of ZERODUR® for the ELT century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedamzik, Ralf; Döhring, Thorsten; Johansson, Thoralf; Hartmann, Peter; Westerhoff, Thomas

    2009-08-01

    This review paper summarizes the extensive investigations that have been performed at SCHOTT to achieve a deeper understanding of the CTE homogeneity of ZERODUR® within single blanks and the casted formats (boules). Especially for the upcoming Extremely Large Telescope (ELT) projects like E-ELT or TMT with at least several hundreds of mirror segments the reproducibility of the mean CTE, CTE homogeneity and axial gradient is very important while keeping the CTE quality assurance process economic at the same time. Statistics of CTE homogeneity measurements on a ZERODUR® boule suitable for an economical production of ELT mirror substrates using the improved dilatometer will be presented. It will be shown, that it is possible to achieve tight CTE specifications by utilisation of processes existing at SCHOTT, while at the same time guaranteeing a long term reproducibility. The CTE measurement is optimized for a temperature interval from 0°C to 50°C. We developed a model to extrapolate the CTE behaviour to specific temperature conditions at the telescope site.

  19. Plug and Play Components for Building-Integrated PV Systems: Phase I--Final Report, 20 February 2002--19 February 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, M. C.

    2004-07-01

    This report describes the development by RWE Schott Solar, Inc., of innovative new products to facilitate the broad use of its PV systems in the current markets. RWE manufactures and sells the 300-watt ASE-300 PV module and also provides complete photovoltaic system engineering, design, and turnkey PV system installation services. RWE Schott Solar has many years of experience designing PV arrays and installing them on flat roofs and pitched roofs, and had plans to improve these designs. Specifically, wind-tunnel testing and analyses were needed for the new flat-roof PV array mounting system that avoids roof penetrations. In addition, to simplify large grid-tied PV systems for flat-roof applications, the company's line of wiring junction boxes needed to be updated with new components and higher-power multi-circuit configurations. For pitched-roof residential applications, testing was planned to determine the holding power of three different fasteners in a wide range of wood-sheathing types found in residential construction to help optimize fastening methods. A device for connecting PV to the grid at a meter socket was innovated and is also being developed.

  20. Mechanical and electrochemical performance of composite cathode contact materials for solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Michael C.; Dejonghe, Lutgard C.; Garcia-Negron, Valerie; Trejo, Rosa M; Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    2013-01-01

    The feasibility of adding glass or inorganic binder to conventional SOFC cathode contact materials (CCM) in order to improve bonding to adjacent materials in the cell stack is assessed. Two glasses (SEM-COM SCZ-8 and Schott GM31107) and one inorganic binder (Aremco 644A) are mixed with LSM particles to produce composite CCM pastes. These are used to bond Mn1.5Co1.5O4-coated stainless steel mesh current collectors to anode-supported button cells. The cells are operated at 800 C for about 1000 h. The cell with SCZ-8 addition to the CCM displays quite stable operation (3.9%/1000 h degradation), whereas the other additives lead to somewhat higher degradation rate. Bonding of the CCM to coated stainless steel coupons is also assessed. Interfacial fracture toughness is determined using a four-point bend test. The fracture toughness for LSM Schott glass (12.3 N mm 1), LSM SCZ-8 glass (6.8 N mm 1) and LSM 644A binder (5.4 N mm 1) are significantly improved relative to pure LSM (1.7 N mm 1). Indeed, addition of binder or glass is found to improve bonding of the CCM layer without sacrificing cell performance.

  1. Structural modification of boron-doped ZnO layers caused by hydrogen outgassing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovics, R.; Csik, A.; Takáts, V.; Hakl, J.; Vad, K.

    2015-07-01

    Results of annealing experiments of boron-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:B) layers prepared by low pressure chemical vapor deposition method on polished Si, soda-lime glass for windows, and AF45 Schott alkali free thin glass substrates are presented. It is shown that short annealing of samples at 150 °C and 300 °C in air causes serious surface degradation of samples prepared on Si and soda-lime glass substrate. The characteristic feature of degradation is the creation of bubbles and craters on the sample surface which fully destroy the continuity of zinc oxide layers. The results of depth distribution mapping of elements indicate that the formation of bubbles is linked to increase in hydrogen concentration in the layer. The surface degradation was not noticed on samples deposited on AF45 Schott alkali free thin glass which has a SiO2 diffusion barrier layer on the surface, only much fewer and smaller bubbles were visible. The results indicate the important role of hydrogen outgassing from the substrate induced by a thermal shock.

  2. Laser glass process development for the next generation of ICF lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorne, Alfred J.; Hayden, Joseph S.

    1997-12-01

    The next generation of high energy laser systems for ICF research demands an unprecedented volume of laser glass to be produced over a limited manufacturing period while still meeting ambitious targets of internal quality and overall cost. To meet this challenge, Schott has conceived a continuous manufacturing unit capable of producing 5,000 meter class PH 4 slabs of platinum particle-free phosphate laser glass within a three-year time period. This manufacturing unit concept draws on years of prior production experience with phosphate laser glass and other high quality optical materials but still represents a significant departure from the proven discontinuous manufacturing technology successfully employed over the last ten years for platinum-free phosphate laser glass. In addition, Schott has developed a new phosphate laser glass that simultaneously offers improvements in properties that relate to both laser performance and to characteristics related to forming the glass into large, high quality slabs. In this paper we will describe the key technology issues addressed in the manufacturing development and present a brief description of the planned manufacturing method to be employed. Lastly, the status of the development will be reviewed including characterization of pilot production melts of the new laser glass and the schedule for completion of the development program.

  3. 650 nm Laser stimulated dating from Side Antique Theatre, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doğan, M.; Meriç, N.

    2014-03-01

    Samples were taken from the archeological excavation site, which was at the backs of the Side Antique Theatre. Samples were taken from under the base rock in this area. Polymineral fine grains were examined to determine the ages of the sediments. Samples gathered from the Side Antique Theatre were investigated through using the SAR method. Firstly, one part of the samples were evaluated by using conventional IRSL reading head model of (ELSEC-9010) which is infrared (880±80 nm) stimulation source with Schott BG39 filter. The IRSL age dating with feldspar minerals, gives a number of overestimated or underestimated age values as a result. A new reading head was proposed with the following configuration attachments for overestimation of equivalent dose rates. Measurements were done with this newly designed red laser stimulating reading head which works with Elsec 9010 OSL age dating system. SAR measurements were performed by (650±10 nm) red laser light source with two Schott BG3 filters. With usage of the new designed reading head; closer results were obtained in comparision with the Antique Theatre's expected age range. Fading rates were taken into consideration and these corrections were also handled for true age results.

  4. The ESA RADGLASS activity: a radiation study of non rad-hard glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manolis, Ilias; Bézy, Jean-Loup; Costantino, Alessandra; Vink, Ramon; Deep, Atul; Ahmad, Munadi; Amorim, Emmanuel; Miranda, Micael D.; Meynart, Roland

    2015-10-01

    Only a small set of radiation hardened optical glasses are currently offered in the market, thus drastically limiting the optical design choices available to the engineers at the early phases of an instrument development. Furthermore, availability of those glasses cannot be easily guaranteed for the long term horizon of future space instrument developments. Radiation tests on conventional glasses on the other hand have shown significant sensitivity to high radiation levels but such levels are not necessarily representative of typical low Earth (LEO) orbits. We have conducted irradiation campaigns on several different types of conventional, non-radiation hard glasses, selected from the wider pool of the Schott "new" arsenic and lead free series (N-*) and characterized their spectral transmission properties before and after ionizing dose deposition. We report our first findings here.

  5. Advances in CO2-Laser Drilling of Glass Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brusberg, Lars; Queisser, Marco; Gentsch, Clemens; Schröder, Henning; Lang, Klaus-Dieter

    The CO2 -laser drilling in Schott D263Teco thin glass having a thickness of 500 μm is intensively studied. The nearly cylindrical holes having diameters smaller 100 μm could be drilled in 0.25 seconds per hole. Reliability investigations by performing temperature cycling show cracks in 51% of the drilled holes in the glass substrate. The reason is thermally induced stress during thermal CO2 -laser ablation. Different thermal pre- and post-treatments have been successfully studied avoiding such cracks (98.4% crack-free holes) and show the high potential of CO2 -laser drilling for through glass via (TGV) processing in glass substrates for micro-system applications.

  6. Antioxidant Activity in the Extracts of Two Edible Aroids

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, P.; Misra, T. K.; Singh, I. D.

    2010-01-01

    Two neglected species of Araceae, Alocasia macrorhiza (Linn.) G. Don and Alocasia fornicata (Roxb.) Schott are important as food and ethno medicine in Asia and Africa. Their bioefficacy is documented in the Ayurveda. The solvent extracts of different edible parts of these two species like rhizomes, leaves, roots and stolons were screened for in vitro antioxidant properties using standard procedures. The successive extracts in hexane, benzene, toluene, chloroform, diethyl ether, ethyl acetate and water fraction exhibited IC50 values in the following order, roots>rhizome>leaves for Alocasia macrorhiza and leaves>stolon for Alocasia fornicate, respectively in 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl antioxidant inhibition assay. Maximum antioxidant activity was observed in diethyl ether extracts for both species. The IC50 values were comparable with those of quercetine and ascorbic acid as standards. These results suggest that the two aroid species have antioxidant activity in their edible parts and should be extracted using diethyl ether solvent. PMID:20582198

  7. Antioxidant activity in the extracts of two edible aroids.

    PubMed

    Mandal, P; Misra, T K; Singh, I D

    2010-01-01

    Two neglected species of Araceae, Alocasia macrorhiza (Linn.) G. Don and Alocasia fornicata (Roxb.) Schott are important as food and ethno medicine in Asia and Africa. Their bioefficacy is documented in the Ayurveda. The solvent extracts of different edible parts of these two species like rhizomes, leaves, roots and stolons were screened for in vitro antioxidant properties using standard procedures. The successive extracts in hexane, benzene, toluene, chloroform, diethyl ether, ethyl acetate and water fraction exhibited IC(50) values in the following order, roots>rhizome>leaves for Alocasia macrorhiza and leaves>stolon for Alocasia fornicate, respectively in 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl antioxidant inhibition assay. Maximum antioxidant activity was observed in diethyl ether extracts for both species. The IC(50) values were comparable with those of quercetine and ascorbic acid as standards. These results suggest that the two aroid species have antioxidant activity in their edible parts and should be extracted using diethyl ether solvent. PMID:20582198

  8. Laser confocal radius measurement method for unpolished spheres.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Zhao, Weiqian; Qiu, Lirong; Yang, Shuai; Wang, Zhongyu

    2016-06-10

    A laser confocal radius measurement method for unpolished spheres (CRMUS) is proposed for measuring the radius of an unpolished sphere during optical sphere processing. CRMUS uses the laser confocal focusing technique to accurately identify the cat's eye and confocal positions of the unpolished sphere, and then uses the distance between the cat's eye and confocal positions measured by a distance measurement interferometer to derive the radius. The partially coherent optical theoretical model of the CRMUS derived indicates that the CRMUS is able to measure the radius of the unpolished sphere with a roughness of less than 0.15 μm. Using an unpolished sphere made of Schott BK7 as the test sphere, experimental results indicate that the CRMUS has a relative expanded uncertainty of less than 20 ppm. The CRMUS could greatly increase processing efficiency. PMID:27409012

  9. Femtosecond laser ablation properties of transparent materials: impact of the laser process parameters on the machining throughput

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matylitsky, V. V.; Hendricks, F.; Aus der Au, J.

    2013-03-01

    High average power, high repetition rate femtosecond lasers with μJ pulse energies are increasingly used for bio-medical and material processing applications. With the introduction of femtosecond laser systems such as the SpiritTM platform developed by High Q Lasers and Spectra-Physics, micro-processing of solid targets with femtosecond laser pulses have obtained new perspectives for industrial applications [1]. The unique advantage of material processing with subpicosecond lasers is efficient, fast and localized energy deposition, which leads to high ablation efficiency and accuracy in nearly all kinds of solid materials. The study on the impact of the laser processing parameters on the removal rate for transparent substrate using femtosecond laser pulses will be presented. In particular, examples of micro-processing of poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) - bio-degradable polyester and XensationTM glass (Schott) machined with SpiritTM ultrafast laser will be shown.

  10. Complete genome sequence of Colocasia bobone disease-associated virus, a putative cytorhabdovirus infecting taro.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Colleen M; Bejerman, Nicolas; Li, Ming; James, Anthony P; Dietzgen, Ralf G; Pearson, Michael N; Revill, Peter A; Harding, Robert M

    2016-03-01

    We report the first genome sequence of a Colocasia bobone disease-associated virus (CBDaV) derived from bobone-affected taro [Colocasia esculenta L. Schott] from Solomon Islands. The negative-strand RNA genome is 12,193 nt long, with six major open reading frames (ORFs) with the arrangement 3'-N-P-P3-M-G-L-5'. Typical of all rhabdoviruses, the 3' leader and 5' trailer sequences show complementarity to each other. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that CBDaV is a member of the genus Cytorhabdovirus, supporting previous reports of virus particles within the cytoplasm of bobone-infected taro cells. The availability of the CBDaV genome sequence now makes it possible to assess the role of this virus in bobone, and possibly alomae disease of taro and confirm that this sequence is that of Colocasia bobone disease virus (CBDV). PMID:26687584

  11. Design and construction of an astrometric astrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukobratovich, Daniel; Valente, Tina M.; Shannon, Robert R.; Hooker, Roger A.; Sumner, Richard E.

    1992-12-01

    The Optical Sciences Center, University of Arizona, has designed and constructed a unique 'red corrected' astrometric astrograph objective lens for the United States Naval Observatory. A five element design, with an integral Schott OG550 filter, was developed to meet the requirement for a 2060 mm focal length, f/10 system. The lens provides a nearly zero distortion flat field of 5 by 5 degrees in the sky. A weight limit of 55 kg led to the use of a titanium lens barrel. Assembly tolerances are satisfied through the use of elastomeric subcell mounting of the individual elements, and an adjustable final element. The lens is hermetically sealed and uses a filter/dessicator system to insure the long term cleanliness of the optics.

  12. Evaluation of optical glass composition by optimization methods.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rama Krishna, K. S.; Sharma, A.

    1995-09-01

    Optical glass comprises SiO2 and various other oxides that create the basic glass structure network. The Huggins-Sun-Davis (HSD) model, later modified by several authors, explains the influence of glass composition on glass properties, such as refractive index and density. A new technique for calculating the composition of a given glass whose Buchdahl or Schott dispersion coefficients and density are known is described. The well-known damped-least-squares method implementing Lagrange multipliers for boundary constraints on the composition parameters is used to provide a powerful iteration scheme with a high rate of convergence. The method based on the modified HSD model has been tested on several commercial glasses and is found to converge to very realistic composition values. The method can be easily programmed and provides a good tool in graded-index profile computations and in forming new optical glasses.

  13. Patterning of Ta/SiO2 high transmission EAPSM material for 193nm technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koepernik, Corinna; Becker, H. W.; Butschke, J.; Buttgereit, U.; Irmscher, M.; Nedelmann, L.; Schmidt, F.; Teuber, S.

    2005-06-01

    For the new Schott EAPSM Material, comprising a Ta/SiO2/Cr stack, a patterning process has been developed. The material offers the advantage of an independent adjustment of phase shift and transmission and is applicable for different wavelengths. Because of very homogenous Ta and SiO2 films and perfect etch selectivities it has been achieved a phase shift uniformity of 1.1° and a tight transmission deviation of 0.34% (absolute) across the entire mask. First dry etch process development has been focused on profiles and selectivities. The influence of process parameters on sidewall angle, profile bow, resist loss and Cr loss of the three patterning steps are shown. We have achieved excellent selectivities and a final sidewall angle of > 88°. The aerial image contrast of the first test plate is comparable to known attenuated phase shift material.

  14. Using small glass catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesar, John C.

    2000-07-01

    Changes in glass catalogs from the major manufacturers, Schott, Ohara, Hoya, Corning, and Summita, are a future certainty. The ongoing efforts of these companies to eliminate arsenic, lead, and other environmentally unfriendly materials may well have an additional effect on the size of their catalogs also. We should not assume a zero-sum game, however. Environmental concerns may not lead to permanently smaller catalogs, though many have speculated that in the near term this might be so. However, from the designer's perspective, very small, abbreviated class catalogs, constructed for special purposes, can speed the glass selection process. Several examples will be discussed, based on derivative libraries suggested by Zhang, Shannon, and Walker. Streamlined libraries tailored for special purposes can be used effectively in the latest lens design software. Future software tools may speed this selection process by the use of algorithms that treat the problem as a `black box' using logic tools derived from probability studies of the patent literature.

  15. Direct writing of birefringent elements by ultrafast laser nanostructuring in multicomponent glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedotov, S. S.; Drevinskas, R.; Lotarev, S. V.; Lipatiev, A. S.; Beresna, M.; ČerkauskaitÄ--, A.; Sigaev, V. N.; Kazansky, P. G.

    2016-02-01

    Self-assembled nanostructures created by femtosecond laser irradiation are demonstrated in alkali-free aluminoborosilicate glass. The growth of the induced retardance associated with the nanograting formation is three orders of magnitude slower than in silica glass and is observed only within a narrow range of pulse energies. However, the strength of retardance asymptotically approaches the value typically measured in pure silica glass, which is attractive for practical applications. A similar intensity threshold for nanograting formation of about 1 TW/cm2 is observed for all glasses studied. The radially polarized vortex beam micro-converter designed as a space-variant quarter-wave retarder for the near-infrared spectral range is imprinted in commercial Schott AF32 glass.

  16. Initial Examination of Low Velocity Sphere Impact of Glass Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Morrissey, Timothy G; Fox, Ethan E; Wereszczak, Andrew A; Ferber, Mattison K

    2012-06-01

    This report summarizes US Army TARDEC sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) involving low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) sphere impact testing of two materials from the lithium aluminosilicate family reinforced with different amounts of ceramic particulate, i.e., glass-ceramic materials, SCHOTT Resistan{trademark}-G1 and SCHOTT Resistan{trademark}-L. Both materials are provided by SCHOTT Glass (Duryea, PA). This work is a follow-up to similar sphere impact studies completed by the authors on PPG's Starphire{reg_sign} soda-lime silicate glass and SCHOTT BOROFLOAT{reg_sign} borosilicate glass. A gas gun or a sphere-drop test setup was used to produce controlled velocity delivery of silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) spheres against the glass ceramic tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the glass-ceramics were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between sphere and target material. Quasistatic spherical indentation was also performed on both glass ceramics and their contact damage responses were compared to those of soda-lime silicate and borosilicate glasses. Lastly, variability of contact damage response was assessed by performing spherical indentation testing across the area of an entire glass ceramic tile. The primary observations from this low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) testing were: (1) Resistan{trademark}-L glass ceramic required the highest velocity of sphere impact for damage to initiate. Starphire{reg_sign} soda-lime silicate glass was second best, then Resistan{trademark}-G1 glass ceramic, and then BOROFLOAT{reg_sign} borosilicate glass. (2) Glass-ceramic Resistan{trademark}-L also required the largest force to initiate ring crack from quasi-static indentation. That ranking was followed, in descending order, by Starphire{reg_sign} soda-lime silicate glass, Resistan{trademark}-G1 glass ceramic, and BOROFLOAT{reg_sign} borosilicate glass. (3

  17. High-throughput allogeneic antibody detection using protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Paul, Jed; Sahaf, Bita; Perloff, Spenser; Schoenrock, Kelsi; Wu, Fang; Nakasone, Hideki; Coller, John; Miklos, David

    2016-05-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) have traditionally been used to detect alloantibodies in patient plasma samples post hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT); however, protein microarrays have the potential to be multiplexed, more sensitive, and higher throughput than ELISAs. Here, we describe the development of a novel and sensitive microarray method for detection of allogeneic antibodies against minor histocompatibility antigens encoded on the Y chromosome, called HY antigens. Six microarray surfaces were tested for their ability to bind recombinant protein and peptide HY antigens. Significant allogeneic immune responses were determined in male patients with female donors by considering normal male donor responses as baseline. HY microarray results were also compared with our previous ELISA results. Our overall goal was to maximize antibody detection for both recombinant protein and peptide epitopes. For detection of HY antigens, the Epoxy (Schott) protein microarray surface was both most sensitive and reliable and has become the standard surface in our microarray platform. PMID:26902899

  18. Investigation of the neutral-solution etch process for refractive SOE antireflective surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Maish, A.B.

    1991-01-01

    Antireflection of optically clear glass used in photovoltaic concentrator refractive secondary optical elements (SOE's) was investigated using the neutral-solution etch process developed by Schott Glass. Test coupons and SOE's made from barium zinc glass, which does not solarize under ultraviolet exposure, were successfully etched at the center point process variable conditions of 87{degrees}C and 24 hours. Reflectance of the plano-plano dropped from 7.7% to 0.8%, with a corresponding increase in transmission from 91.7% to 98.5%. The etching process uses non-hydrofluoric, relatively non-toxic chemicals in a low-cost process well suited for use by photovoltaic system manufacturers during production. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Single-mode hollow-core photonic crystal fiber made from soft glass.

    PubMed

    Jiang, X; Euser, T G; Abdolvand, A; Babic, F; Tani, F; Joly, N Y; Travers, J C; Russell, P St J

    2011-08-01

    We demonstrate the first soft-glass hollow core photonic crystal fiber. The fiber is made from a high-index lead-silicate glass (Schott SF6, refractive index 1.82 at 500 nm). Fabricated by the stack-and-draw technique, the fiber incorporates a 7-cell hollow core embedded in a highly uniform 6-layer cladding structure that resembles a kagomé-like lattice. Effective single mode guidance of light is observed from 750 to 1050 nm in a large mode area (core diameter ~30 µm) with a low loss of 0.74 dB/m. The underlying guidance mechanism of the fiber is investigated using finite element modeling. The fiber is promising for applications requiring single mode guidance in a large mode area, such as particle guidance, fluid and gas filled devices. PMID:21934907

  20. Antiviral properties from plants of the Mediterranean flora.

    PubMed

    Sanna, G; Farci, P; Busonera, B; Murgia, G; La Colla, P; Giliberti, G

    2015-01-01

    Natural products are a successful source in drug discovery, playing a significant role in maintaining human health. We investigated the in vitro cytotoxicity and antiviral activity of extracts from 18 traditionally used Mediterranean plants. Noteworthy antiviral activity was found in the extract obtained from the branches of Daphne gnidium L. against human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (EC50 = 0.08 μg/mL) and coxsackievirus B5 (EC50 = 0.10 μg/mL). Other relevant activities were found against BVDV, YFV, Sb-1, RSV and HSV-1. Interestingly, extracts from Artemisia arborescens L. and Rubus ulmifolius Schott, as well as those from D. gnidium L., showed activities against two different viruses. This extensive antiviral screening allowed us to identify attractive activities, offering opportunities to develop lead compounds with a great pharmaceutical potential. PMID:25613403

  1. Silicon EFG process development by multiscale modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, M.; Birkmann, B.; Mosel, F.; Westram, I.; Seidl, A.

    2010-04-01

    An overview of simulation models in use for optimizing the edge-defined film-fed growth (EFG) process of thin-walled hollow silicon tubes at WACKER SCHOTT Solar is presented. The simulations span the length scales from complete furnace models over growth simulations with a mesoscopic description of the crystalline character of silicon down to solidification simulations with atomic resolution. Results gained from one model are used as input parameters or boundary conditions on other levels. Examples for the application of these models and their impact on process design are given. These include the reduction of tube thickness variations, the control of tube deformations, residual stresses and dislocation densities and the identification of twin formation processes typical for EFG silicon.

  2. Slumping technique for the manufacturing of a representative x-ray grazing incidence mirror module for future space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghigo, Mauro; Proserpio, Laura; Basso, Stefano; Citterio, Oberto; Civitani, Marta M.; Pareschi, Giovanni; Salmaso, Bianca; Sironi, Giorgia; Spiga, Daniele; Tagliaferri, Giampiero; Vecchi, Gabriele; Zambra, Alberto; Parodi, Giancarlo; Martelli, Francesco; Gallieni, Daniele; Tintori, Matteo; Bavdaz, Marcos; Wille, Eric; Ferrario, Ivan; Burwitz, Vadim

    2013-09-01

    The Astronomical Observatory of Brera (INAF-OAB, Italy), with the financing support of the European Space Agency (ESA), has concluded a study regarding a glass shaping technology for the production of grazing incidence segmented x-ray optics. This technique uses a hot slumping phase, in which pressure is actively applied on thin glass foils being shaped, to form a cylindrical approximation of Wolter I x-ray segments, and a subsequent cold slumping phase, in which the final Wolter I profile is then freeze into the glass segments during their integration in elemental X-ray Optical Units. The final goal of this study was the manufacturing of a prototype containing a number of slumped pair plates (meaning parabola and hyperbola couples) having representative dimensions to be tested both in UV light and in x-rays at the Panter facility (Germany). In this paper, the INAF-OAB slumping technique, comprising a shaping step and an integration step is described, together with the results obtained on the manufactured prototype modules: the first prototype was aimed to test the ad-hoc designed and built semi-automatic Integration MAchine (IMA) and debug its control software. The most complete module comprises 40 slumped segments of Schott D263 glass type of dimension 200 mm x 200 mm and thickness of 0.4 mm, slumped on Zerodur K20 mould and stacked together through glued BK7 glass structural ribs to form the first entire x-ray optical module ever built totally composed by glass. A last prototype was aimed at demonstrate the use of Schott glass AF32 type instead of D263. In particular, a new hot slumping experimental set-up is described whose advantage is to permit a better contact between mould and glass during the shaping process. The integration procedure of the slumped segments into the elemental module is also reviewed.

  3. Characterization of Poliovirus Neutralization Escape Mutants of Single-Domain Antibody Fragments (VHHs)

    PubMed Central

    Schotte, Lise; Thys, Bert; Strauss, Mike; Filman, David J.; Rombaut, Bart

    2015-01-01

    To complete the eradication of poliovirus and to protect unvaccinated people subsequently, the development of one or more antiviral drugs will be necessary. A set of five single-domain antibody fragments (variable parts of the heavy chain of a heavy-chain antibody [VHHs]) with an in vitro neutralizing activity against poliovirus type 1 was developed previously (B. Thys, L. Schotte, S. Muyldermans, U. Wernery, G. Hassanzadeh-Ghassabeh, and B. Rombaut, Antiviral Res 87:257–264, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.antiviral.2010.05.012), and their mechanisms of action have been studied (L. Schotte, M. Strauss, B. Thys, H. Halewyck, D. J. Filman, M. Bostina, J. M. Hogle, and B. Rombaut, J Virol 88:4403–4413, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.03402-13). In this study, neutralization escape mutants were selected for each VHH. Sequencing of the P1 region of the genome showed that amino acid substitutions are found in the four viral proteins of the capsid and that they are located both in proximity to the binding sites of the VHHs and in regions further away from the canyon and hidden beneath the surface. Characterization of the mutants demonstrated that they have single-cycle replication kinetics that are similar to those of their parental strain and that they are all drug (VHH) independent. Their resistant phenotypes are stable, as they do not regain full susceptibility to the VHH after passage over HeLa cells in the absence of VHH. They are all at least as stable as the parental strain against heat inactivation at 44°C, and three of them are even significantly (P < 0.05) more resistant to heat inactivation. The resistant variants all still can be neutralized by at least two other VHHs and retain full susceptibility to pirodavir and 35-1F4. PMID:26014941

  4. Transpiration as landfill leachate phytotoxicity indicator.

    PubMed

    Białowiec, Andrzej

    2015-05-01

    An important aspect of constructed wetlands design for landfill leachate treatment is the assessment of landfill leachate phytotoxicity. Intravital methods of plants response observation are required both for lab scale toxicity testing and field examination of plants state. The study examined the toxic influence of two types of landfill leachate from landfill in Zakurzewo (L1) and landfill in Wola Pawłowska (L2) on five plant species: reed Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steud, manna grass Glyceria maxima (Hartm.) Holmb., bulrush Schoenoplectus lacustris (L.) Palla, sweet flag Acorus calamus L., and miscanthus Miscanthus floridulus (Labill) Warb. Transpiration measurement was used as indicator of plants response. The lowest effective concentration causing the toxic effect (LOEC) for each leachate type and plant species was estimated. Plants with the highest resistance to toxic factors found in landfill leachate were: sweet flag, bulrush, and reed. The LOEC values for these plants were, respectively, 17%, 16%, 9% in case of leachate L1 and 21%, 18%, 14% in case of L2. Leachate L1 was more toxic than L2 due to a higher pH value under similar ammonia nitrogen content, i.e. pH 8.74 vs. pH 8.00. PMID:25708408

  5. Sequence analysis and genetic diversity of five new Indian isolates of cucumber mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S; Gautam, K K; Raj, S K

    2015-12-01

    Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) is an important virus since it causes severe losses to many economically important crops worldwide. Five new isolates of CMV were isolated from naturally infected Hippeastrum hybridum, Dahlia pinnata, Hemerocallis fulva, Acorus calamus and Typhonium trilobatum plants, all exhibiting severe leaf mosaic symptoms. For molecular identification and sequence analyses, the complete coat protein (CP) gene of these isolates was amplified by RT-PCR. The resulting amplicons were cloned and sequenced and isolates were designated as HH (KP698590), DP (JF682239), HF (KP698589), AC (KP698588) and TT (JX570732). For study of genetic diversity among these isolates, the sequence data were analysed by BLASTn, multiple alignment and generating phylogenetic trees along with the respective sequences of other CMV isolates available in GenBank Database were done. The isolates under study showed 82-99% sequence diversity among them at nucleotide and amino acid levels; however they showed close relationships with CMV isolates of subgroup IB. In alignment analysis of amino acid sequences of HH and AC isolates, we have found fifteen and twelve unique substitutions, compared to HF, DP and TT isolates, suggesting the cause of high genetic diversity. PMID:26666188

  6. The efficacy of essential oils as natural preservatives in vegetable oil.

    PubMed

    Mahboubi, Mohaddese; Kazempour, Nastaran; Mahboubi, Atefeh

    2014-12-01

    The efforts for finding the natural preservatives with nontoxicity and nonirritancy have encouraged the scientists to research among the medicinal plants. The preservative efficacy of Daucus carota, Ferula gummosa, Eugenium caryophyllata, Oliveria decumbens, Pelargonium graveolens, Ziziphora tenuir, Acorus calamus, and Trachyspermum ammi essential oils on challenge test's pathogens and on pathogen's inoculated vegetable oil was evaluated by antimicrobial effectiveness test. Carotol (46%), β-pinene (62.7%), eugenol (78.4%), thymol (50.6%), cis-asarone (27.5%), thymol (50.1%), and α-terpineol (19.5%) were the primary main components of D. carota, F. gummosa, E. caryophyllata, T. ammi, A. calamus, O. decumbens, and Z. tenuir essential oils, respectively. A. niger was more sensitive microorganism to oils. The antimicrobial activity of O. decumbens oil was the highest. Different concentrations of essential oils were added to the vegetable oil. The results of test on the vegetable oil showed that the combination of O. decumbens and P. graveolens oils (0.5:0.5%) had enough efficacies as natural preservative in vegetable oil. PMID:24552253

  7. Screening of 20 Commonly Used Iranian Traditional Medicinal Plants Against Urease

    PubMed Central

    Biglar, Mahmood; Sufi, Hessameddin; Bagherzadeh, Kowsar; Amanlou, Massoud; Mojab, Faraz

    2014-01-01

    Infection with Helicobacter pyloriis the most common cause of stomach and duodenal ulcers. About more than 80 % of people are infected with H. pylori in developing countries. H. pylori uses urease enzyme product “ammonia” in order to neutralize and protect itself from the stomach acidic condition and urease enzyme activity has been shown to be essential to the colonization of H. pylori. Inhibitory activity of 20 traditional medicinal plants were examined and evaluated against Jack bean urease activity by Berthelot reaction to obtains natural sources of urease inhibitors. Each herb was extracted using 80% aqueous methanol, then tested its IC50 value was determined. Eight of the whole 20 studied plants crude extracts were found the most effective with IC50 values of less than 100 μg/mL including Laurus nobilis, Zingiber officinale, Nigella sativa, Angelica archangelica, Acorus calamus, Allium sativum,Curcuma longa, and Citrus aurantium extracts, from which most potent urease inhibitory was observed for Zingiber officinale, Laurus nobilis, and Nigella sativa with IC50 values of 48.54, 48.69 and 59.10 μg/mL, respectively. PMID:24711846

  8. Clinical study of the Immunoglobululin Enhancing effect of "Bala compound" on Infants.

    PubMed

    Appaji, Rao R; Sharma, R D; Katiyar, G P; Sai, Prasad A J V

    2009-01-01

    Kaumarbhritya a branch of Asthanga Ayurveda deals with neonatal, infant and child health care. Multicentric studies conducted in various developed and developing countries have indicated that Infant Mortality Rate (I.M.R.) is very high in developing countries, and infection has been observed as the major cause. Immune system in neonates is not yet fully functional. Bala compound having the ingredients ofAtibala (Abutilon indicum Linn), Amalaki (Emblica officinalis Linn), Vidanga (Emblica ribes burn), Guduchi (Tinospora cordifolia Welld Miers), Pippali (Piperlongum linn), Yashtimadhu (Glycyrrhiza glabra Linn), Shankhapuspi (Convolvulus pluricaulis Chois ), Vacha (Acorus calamus Linn), Musta (Cyperus rotundus Linn) and Ativisha (Aconitum heterophyllum wall) are Medhya as well as Rasayana drugs mention in Ayurvedic classics. 'Bala compound" was tried in infants in the form of oral drops for a period of six months and result was assessed for serum immuoglobulins IgG, IgM, IgA for three months of interval of two follow ups (i.e., third and six month of infant). There is significant increase of immunoglobulins observed after six months administration of 'Bala compoumd" PMID:22557316

  9. Chinese herbs for memory disorders: a review and systematic analysis of classical herbal literature.

    PubMed

    May, Brian H; Lu, Chuanjian; Lu, Yubo; Zhang, Anthony L; Xue, Charlie C L

    2013-02-01

    Text mining and other literature-based investigations can assist in identifying natural products for experimental and clinical research. This article details a method for systematically analyzing data derived from the classical Chinese medical literature. We present the results of electronic searches of Zhong Hua Yi Dian ("Encyclopaedia of Traditional Chinese Medicine"), a CD of 1000 premodern (before 1950) medical books, for single herbs, and other natural products used for dementia, memory disorders, and memory improvement. This review explores how the terminology for these disorders has changed over time and which herbs have been used more or less frequently, and compares the results from the premodern literature with the herbs indexed for memory disorders in a modern pharmacopoeia. The searches located 731 citations deriving from 127 different books written between ca. 188 ad and ca. 1920. Of the 110 different natural products identified, those most frequently cited for forgetfulness were yuan zhi (Polygala tenuifolia), fu shen (Poria cocos), and chang pu (Acorus spp.), all of which have been cited repeatedly over the past 1800 years and appear among the 31 herbs indexed in a modern pharmacopoeia. By providing a complete, hierarchically organized list of herbs for a specific disorder, this approach can assist researchers in selecting herbs for research. PMID:23433049

  10. PMC-12, a Prescription of Traditional Korean Medicine, Improves Amyloid β-Induced Cognitive Deficits through Modulation of Neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Young; Jung, Yeon Suk; Park, Jung Hwa; Choi, Young Whan; Lee, Jaewon; Kim, Cheol Min; Baek, Jin Ung; Choi, Byung Tae; Shin, Hwa Kyoung

    2015-01-01

    PMC-12 is a prescription used in traditional Korean medicine that consists of a mixture of four herbal medicines, Polygonum multiflorum, Rehmannia glutinosa, Polygala tenuifolia, and Acorus gramineus, which have been reported to have various pharmacological effects on age-related neurological diseases. In the present study, we investigated whether PMC-12 improves cognitive deficits associated with decreased neuroinflammation in an amyloid-β-(Aβ-) induced mouse model and exerts the antineuroinflammatory effects in lipopolysaccharide-(LPS-) stimulated murine BV2 microglia. Intracerebroventricular injection of Aβ 25-35 in mice resulted in impairment in learning and spatial memory, whereas this was reversed by oral administration of PMC-12 (100 and 500 mg/kg/day) in dose-dependent manners. Moreover, PMC-12 reduced the increase of Aβ expression and activation of microglia and astrocytes in the Aβ 25-35-injected brain. Furthermore, quantitative PCR data showed that inflammatory mediators were significantly decreased by administration of PMC-12 in Aβ-injected brains. Consistent with the in vivo data, PMC-12 significantly reduced the inflammatory mediators in LPS-stimulated BV2 cells without cell toxicity. Moreover, PMC-12 exhibited anti-inflammatory properties via downregulation of ERK, JNK, and p38 MAPK pathways. These findings suggest that the protective effects of PMC-12 may be mediated by its antineuroinflammatory activities, resulting in the attenuation of memory impairment; accordingly, PMC-12 may be useful in the prevention and treatment of AD. PMID:25945111

  11. PMC-12, a Prescription of Traditional Korean Medicine, Improves Amyloid β-Induced Cognitive Deficits through Modulation of Neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Min Young; Jung, Yeon Suk; Park, Jung Hwa; Lee, Jaewon; Kim, Cheol Min; Baek, Jin Ung; Shin, Hwa Kyoung

    2015-01-01

    PMC-12 is a prescription used in traditional Korean medicine that consists of a mixture of four herbal medicines, Polygonum multiflorum, Rehmannia glutinosa, Polygala tenuifolia, and Acorus gramineus, which have been reported to have various pharmacological effects on age-related neurological diseases. In the present study, we investigated whether PMC-12 improves cognitive deficits associated with decreased neuroinflammation in an amyloid-β-(Aβ-) induced mouse model and exerts the antineuroinflammatory effects in lipopolysaccharide-(LPS-) stimulated murine BV2 microglia. Intracerebroventricular injection of Aβ25−35 in mice resulted in impairment in learning and spatial memory, whereas this was reversed by oral administration of PMC-12 (100 and 500 mg/kg/day) in dose-dependent manners. Moreover, PMC-12 reduced the increase of Aβ expression and activation of microglia and astrocytes in the Aβ25−35-injected brain. Furthermore, quantitative PCR data showed that inflammatory mediators were significantly decreased by administration of PMC-12 in Aβ-injected brains. Consistent with the in vivo data, PMC-12 significantly reduced the inflammatory mediators in LPS-stimulated BV2 cells without cell toxicity. Moreover, PMC-12 exhibited anti-inflammatory properties via downregulation of ERK, JNK, and p38 MAPK pathways. These findings suggest that the protective effects of PMC-12 may be mediated by its antineuroinflammatory activities, resulting in the attenuation of memory impairment; accordingly, PMC-12 may be useful in the prevention and treatment of AD. PMID:25945111

  12. Are herbal compounds the next frontier for alleviating learning and memory impairments? An integrative look at memory, dementia and the promising therapeutics of traditional chinese medicines.

    PubMed

    Jesky, Robert; Hailong, Chen

    2011-08-01

    Recent advances in neuroscience have revealed a greater, in-depth understanding of the complexities associated with memory. Contemporary theories hold that an integral relationship between memory formation, stabilization and consolidation revolve around plasticity of neuronal networks. The associated requisite receptors α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) and N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and cellular mechanisms surrounding plasticity (posed to incite molecular functionality), also display strong correlations in the pathogenesis of dementias. When the brain is in a diseased state as a result of malignant neurotransmission (i.e. in Alzheimer's disease; AD), the homeostatic balance required for normal neuronal processes is disrupted, which leads to degeneration of neural circuitry. Present efforts to find new treatments aimed at reversing or halting neurodegeneration are immense, with increasing attention being placed on investigating various herbal medicines. A wide variety of herbal plants (i.e. Panax ginseng, Polygala tenuifolia, Acorus gramineus and Huperzia serrata, examined here within), extracts and compounds have, to date, already presented advantageous results when tested against known pathogenic markers related to AD-associated dementia. The efficaciousness of herbal medicines appears to be a modulatory effect on neurotrophins, kinases and their substrates that, in turn, initiate or take part in intracellular cascades related to memory processes. PMID:21305632

  13. Can medical herbs stimulate regeneration or neuroprotection and treat neuropathic pain in chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy?

    PubMed

    Schröder, Sven; Beckmann, Kathrin; Franconi, Giovanna; Meyer-Hamme, Gesa; Friedemann, Thomas; Greten, Henry Johannes; Rostock, Matthias; Efferth, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced neuropathy (CIPN) has a relevant impact on the quality of life of cancer patients. There are no curative conventional treatments, so further options have to be investigated. We conducted a systematic review in English and Chinese language databases to illuminate the role of medical herbs. 26 relevant studies on 5 single herbs, one extract, one receptor-agonist, and 8 combinations of herbs were identified focusing on the single herbs Acorus calamus rhizoma, Cannabis sativa fructus, Chamomilla matricaria, Ginkgo biloba, Salvia officinalis, Sweet bee venom, Fritillaria cirrhosae bulbus, and the herbal combinations Bu Yang Huan Wu, modified Bu Yang Huan Wu plus Liuwei Di Huang, modified Chai Hu Long Gu Mu Li Wan, Geranii herba plus Aconiti lateralis praeparata radix , Niu Che Sen Qi Wan (Goshajinkigan), Gui Zhi Jia Shu Fu Tang (Keishikajutsubuto), Huang Qi Wu Wu Tang (Ogikeishigomotsuto), and Shao Yao Gan Cao Tang (Shakuyakukanzoto). The knowledge of mechanism of action is still limited, the quality of clinical trials needs further improvement, and studies have not yielded enough evidence to establish a standard practice, but a lot of promising substances have been identified. While CIPN has multiple mechanisms of neuronal degeneration, a combination of herbs or substances might deal with multiple targets for the aim of neuroprotection or neuroregeneration in CIPN. PMID:23983777

  14. Chemical composition and insecticidal activities of essential oils against diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Yponomeutidae).

    PubMed

    Reddy, S G Eswara; Kirti Dolma, Shudh; Koundal, Rajkesh; Singh, Bikram

    2016-08-01

    Five Himalayan plants namely, Acorus calamus, Cedrus deodara, Aegle marmelos, Tagetes minuta and Murraya koenigii were used for the extraction of essential oils through hydrodistillation and the major volatile constituents as identified by GC and GC-MS techniques were β-asarone (91.1%), β-himachalene (45.8%), limonene (59.5%), Z-ocimene (37.9%) and α-pinene (54.2%), respectively. Essential oils were tested for their insecticidal properties against larvae of diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Yponomeutidae). Results showed that A. calamus was most toxic (LC50 = 0.29 mg mL(-1)) to P. xylostella followed by C. deodara (LC50 = 1.08 mg mL(-1)) and M. koenigii (LC50 = 1.93 mg mL(-1)) via residual toxicity bioassay. Per cent feeding deterrence index and growth inhibition was significantly higher in A. calamus (42.20 and 68.55, respectively) followed by C. deodara (35.41 and 52.47). In repellent activity studies, C. deodara showed high repellence (64.76%) followed by A. calamus (55.05%). PMID:26264423

  15. Importance of Macrophyte Quality in Determining Life-History Traits of the Apple Snails Pomacea canaliculata: Implications for Bottom-Up Management of an Invasive Herbivorous Pest in Constructed Wetlands

    PubMed Central

    Yam, Rita S. W.; Fan, Yen-Tzu; Wang, Tzu-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Pomacea canaliculata (Ampullariidae) has extensively invaded most Asian constructed wetlands and its massive herbivory of macrophytes has become a major cause of ecosystem dysfunctioning of these restored habitats. We conducted non-choice laboratory feeding experiments of P. canaliculata using five common macrophyte species in constructed wetlands including Ipomoea aquatica, Commelina communis, Nymphoides coreana, Acorus calamus and Phragmites australis. Effects of macrophytes on snail feeding, growth and fecundity responses were evaluated. Results indicated that P. canaliculata reared on Ipomoea had the highest feeding and growth rates with highest reproductive output, but all individuals fed with Phragmites showed lowest feeding rates and little growth with poorest reproductive output. Plant N and P contents were important for enhancing palatability, supporting growth and offspring quantity of P. canaliculata, whilst toughness, cellulose and phenolics had critically deterrent effects on various life-history traits. Although snail offspring quality was generally consistent regardless of maternal feeding conditions, the reduced growth and offspring quantity of the poorly-fed snails in constructed wetlands dominated by the less-palatable macrophytes could limit the invasive success of P. canaliculata. Effective bottom-up control of P. canaliculata in constructed wetlands should involve selective planting strategy using macrophytes with low nutrient and high toughness, cellulose and phenolic contents. PMID:26927135

  16. Essential oils analysis. I. Evaluation of essential oils composition using both GC and MS fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Oprean, R; Tamas, M; Sandulescu, R; Roman, L

    1998-12-01

    The chemical nature of essential oils makes them suitable for analysis using a gas chromatography-mass selective detector (GC-MSD). Mass spectra (MS) libraries can not be used as unique and absolute criteria for the identification of chromatogram peaks. The wide variety of MS of the libraries, recorded in different conditions, can lead us to erroneous results. In order to increase the reliability of the analytical results, we used as identity criteria, both GC fingerprints resulted from the relative retention indices (RRI) and the recorded MS of the separated compounds. The two criteria have been quantified by their correlation with the standards. A new parameter called global composition evaluation index (I(GCMS)), which resulted from a well-balanced average of the two criteria, has been defined. Because the comparison of the results of the MS with databases is more accurate than the RRI, we considered that the ratio of the two criteria must be at least GC:MS 1:2. A database containing RRI of about 600 components, widely found in essential oils composition and separated on HP-5 column, was created. Two macros based on the Microsoft Excel spreadsheet were also created. The program offers the best 20 matches of each compound with the combined MS and RRI library. The composition of Romanian Acorus calamus L. essential oil was established and the results were compared with those obtained by 'classical' methods. PMID:9919966

  17. PMC-12, a traditional herbal medicine, enhances learning memory and hippocampal neurogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Hee Ra; Kim, Ju Yeon; Lee, Yujeong; Chun, Hye Jeong; Choi, Young Whan; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Choi, Byung Tae; Kim, Cheol Min; Lee, Jaewon

    2016-03-23

    The beneficial effects of traditional Korean medicine are recognized during the treatment of neurodegenerative conditions, such as, Alzheimer's disease and neurocognitive dysfunction, and recently, hippocampal neurogenesis has been reported to be associated with memory function. In this study, the authors investigated the beneficial effects of polygonum multiflorum Thunberg complex composition-12 (PMC-12), which is a mixture of four medicinal herbs, that is, Polygonum multiflorum, Polygala tenuifolia, Rehmannia glutinosa, and Acorus gramineus, on hippocampal neurogenesis, learning, and memory in mice. PMC-12 was orally administered to male C57BL/6 mice (5 weeks old) at 100 or 500 mg/kg daily for 2 weeks. PMC-12 administration significantly was found to increase the proliferation of neural progenitor cells and the survival of newly-generated cells in the dentate gyrus. In the Morris water maze test, the latency times of PMC-12 treated mice (100 or 500 mg/kg) were shorter than those of vehicle-control mice. In addition, PMC-12 increased the levels of BDNF, p-CREB, and synaptophysin, which are known to be associated with neural plasticity and hippocampal neurogenesis. These findings suggest PMC-12 enhances hippocampal neurogenesis and neurocognitive function and imply that PMC-12 ameliorates memory impairment and cognitive deficits. PMID:26917101

  18. Widespread genome duplications throughout the history of flowering plants

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Liying; Wall, P. Kerr; Leebens-Mack, James H.; Lindsay, Bruce G.; Soltis, Douglas E.; Doyle, Jeff J.; Soltis, Pamela S.; Carlson, John E.; Arumuganathan, Kathiravetpilla; Barakat, Abdelali; Albert, Victor A.; Ma, Hong; dePamphilis, Claude W.

    2006-01-01

    Genomic comparisons provide evidence for ancient genome-wide duplications in a diverse array of animals and plants. We developed a birth–death model to identify evidence for genome duplication in EST data, and applied a mixture model to estimate the age distribution of paralogous pairs identified in EST sets for species representing the basal-most extant flowering plant lineages. We found evidence for episodes of ancient genome-wide duplications in the basal angiosperm lineages including Nuphar advena (yellow water lily: Nymphaeaceae) and the magnoliids Persea americana (avocado: Lauraceae), Liriodendron tulipifera (tulip poplar: Magnoliaceae), and Saruma henryi (Aristolochiaceae). In addition, we detected independent genome duplications in the basal eudicot Eschscholzia californica (California poppy: Papaveraceae) and the basal monocot Acorus americanus (Acoraceae), both of which were distinct from duplications documented for ancestral grass (Poaceae) and core eudicot lineages. Among gymnosperms, we found equivocal evidence for ancient polyploidy in Welwitschia mirabilis (Gnetales) and no evidence for polyploidy in pine, although gymnosperms generally have much larger genomes than the angiosperms investigated. Cross-species sequence divergence estimates suggest that synonymous substitution rates in the basal angiosperms are less than half those previously reported for core eudicots and members of Poaceae. These lower substitution rates permit inference of older duplication events. We hypothesize that evidence of an ancient duplication observed in the Nuphar data may represent a genome duplication in the common ancestor of all or most extant angiosperms, except Amborella. PMID:16702410

  19. Consumer and farmer safety evaluation of application of botanical pesticides in black pepper crop protection.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Moreno, David; Soffers, Ans E M F; Wiratno; Falke, Hein E; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Murk, Albertinka J

    2013-06-01

    This study presents a consumer and farmer safety evaluation on the use of four botanical pesticides in pepper berry crop protection. The pesticides evaluated include preparations from clove, tuba root, sweet flag and pyrethrum. Their safety evaluation was based on their active ingredients being eugenol, rotenone, β-asarone and pyrethrins, respectively. Botanical pesticides from Acorus calamus are of possible concern because of the genotoxic and carcinogenic ingredient β-asarone although estimated margins of exposure (MOE) for consumers indicate a low priority for risk management. For the other three botanical pesticides the margin of safety (MOS) between established acute reference doses and/or acceptable daily intake values and intake estimates for the consumer, resulting from their use as a botanical pesticide are not of safety concern, with the exception for levels of rotenone upon use of tuba root extracts on stored berries. Used levels of clove and pyrethrum as botanical pesticides in pepper berry crop production is not of safety concern for consumers or farmers, whereas for use of tuba root and sweet flag some risk factors were defined requiring further evaluation and/or risk management. It seems prudent to look for alternatives for use of sweet flag extracts containing β-asarone. PMID:23376780

  20. Activity of Medicinal Plant Extracts on Multiplication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis under Reduced Oxygen Conditions Using Intracellular and Axenic Assays

    PubMed Central

    Bhatter, Purva D.; Gupta, Pooja D.; Birdi, Tannaz J.

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Test the activity of selected medicinal plant extracts on multiplication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis under reduced oxygen concentration which represents nonreplicating conditions. Material and Methods. Acetone, ethanol and aqueous extracts of the plants Acorus calamus L. (rhizome), Ocimum sanctum L. (leaf), Piper nigrum L. (seed), and Pueraria tuberosa DC. (tuber) were tested on Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv intracellularly using an epithelial cell (A549) infection model. The extracts found to be active intracellularly were further studied axenically under reducing oxygen concentrations. Results and Conclusions. Intracellular multiplication was inhibited ≥60% by five of the twelve extracts. Amongst these 5 extracts, in axenic culture, P. nigrum (acetone) was active under aerobic, microaerophilic, and anaerobic conditions indicating presence of multiple components acting at different levels and P. tuberosa (aqueous) showed bactericidal activity under microaerophilic and anaerobic conditions implying the influence of anaerobiosis on its efficacy. P. nigrum (aqueous) and A. calamus (aqueous and ethanol) extracts were not active under axenic conditions but only inhibited intracellular growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, suggesting activation of host defense mechanisms to mediate bacterial killing rather than direct bactericidal activity. PMID:26941797

  1. Activity of Medicinal Plant Extracts on Multiplication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis under Reduced Oxygen Conditions Using Intracellular and Axenic Assays.

    PubMed

    Bhatter, Purva D; Gupta, Pooja D; Birdi, Tannaz J

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Test the activity of selected medicinal plant extracts on multiplication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis under reduced oxygen concentration which represents nonreplicating conditions. Material and Methods. Acetone, ethanol and aqueous extracts of the plants Acorus calamus L. (rhizome), Ocimum sanctum L. (leaf), Piper nigrum L. (seed), and Pueraria tuberosa DC. (tuber) were tested on Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv intracellularly using an epithelial cell (A549) infection model. The extracts found to be active intracellularly were further studied axenically under reducing oxygen concentrations. Results and Conclusions. Intracellular multiplication was inhibited ≥60% by five of the twelve extracts. Amongst these 5 extracts, in axenic culture, P. nigrum (acetone) was active under aerobic, microaerophilic, and anaerobic conditions indicating presence of multiple components acting at different levels and P. tuberosa (aqueous) showed bactericidal activity under microaerophilic and anaerobic conditions implying the influence of anaerobiosis on its efficacy. P. nigrum (aqueous) and A. calamus (aqueous and ethanol) extracts were not active under axenic conditions but only inhibited intracellular growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, suggesting activation of host defense mechanisms to mediate bacterial killing rather than direct bactericidal activity. PMID:26941797

  2. Can Medical Herbs Stimulate Regeneration or Neuroprotection and Treat Neuropathic Pain in Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy?

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Sven; Beckmann, Kathrin; Franconi, Giovanna; Greten, Henry Johannes; Rostock, Matthias; Efferth, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced neuropathy (CIPN) has a relevant impact on the quality of life of cancer patients. There are no curative conventional treatments, so further options have to be investigated. We conducted a systematic review in English and Chinese language databases to illuminate the role of medical herbs. 26 relevant studies on 5 single herbs, one extract, one receptor-agonist, and 8 combinations of herbs were identified focusing on the single herbs Acorus calamus rhizoma, Cannabis sativa fructus, Chamomilla matricaria, Ginkgo biloba, Salvia officinalis, Sweet bee venom, Fritillaria cirrhosae bulbus, and the herbal combinations Bu Yang Huan Wu, modified Bu Yang Huan Wu plus Liuwei Di Huang, modified Chai Hu Long Gu Mu Li Wan, Geranii herba plus Aconiti lateralis praeparata radix , Niu Che Sen Qi Wan (Goshajinkigan), Gui Zhi Jia Shu Fu Tang (Keishikajutsubuto), Huang Qi Wu Wu Tang (Ogikeishigomotsuto), and Shao Yao Gan Cao Tang (Shakuyakukanzoto). The knowledge of mechanism of action is still limited, the quality of clinical trials needs further improvement, and studies have not yielded enough evidence to establish a standard practice, but a lot of promising substances have been identified. While CIPN has multiple mechanisms of neuronal degeneration, a combination of herbs or substances might deal with multiple targets for the aim of neuroprotection or neuroregeneration in CIPN. PMID:23983777

  3. Importance of Macrophyte Quality in Determining Life-History Traits of the Apple Snails Pomacea canaliculata: Implications for Bottom-Up Management of an Invasive Herbivorous Pest in Constructed Wetlands.

    PubMed

    Yam, Rita S W; Fan, Yen-Tzu; Wang, Tzu-Ting

    2016-03-01

    Pomacea canaliculata (Ampullariidae) has extensively invaded most Asian constructed wetlands and its massive herbivory of macrophytes has become a major cause of ecosystem dysfunctioning of these restored habitats. We conducted non-choice laboratory feeding experiments of P. canaliculata using five common macrophyte species in constructed wetlands including Ipomoea aquatica, Commelina communis, Nymphoides coreana, Acorus calamus and Phragmites australis. Effects of macrophytes on snail feeding, growth and fecundity responses were evaluated. Results indicated that P. canaliculata reared on Ipomoea had the highest feeding and growth rates with highest reproductive output, but all individuals fed with Phragmites showed lowest feeding rates and little growth with poorest reproductive output. Plant N and P contents were important for enhancing palatability, supporting growth and offspring quantity of P. canaliculata, whilst toughness, cellulose and phenolics had critically deterrent effects on various life-history traits. Although snail offspring quality was generally consistent regardless of maternal feeding conditions, the reduced growth and offspring quantity of the poorly-fed snails in constructed wetlands dominated by the less-palatable macrophytes could limit the invasive success of P. canaliculata. Effective bottom-up control of P. canaliculata in constructed wetlands should involve selective planting strategy using macrophytes with low nutrient and high toughness, cellulose and phenolic contents. PMID:26927135

  4. Minor and trace elemental determination in the Indian herbal and other medicinal preparations.

    PubMed

    Samudralwar, D L; Garg, A N

    1996-08-01

    Medicinal plants described in the Indian "Ayurvedic" literature viz. Tulsi (Ocimum sanctum), Gulvel (Tinospora cardifolia), bitter Neem (Azadirachta indica), Kanher (Nerium Andicum), Vekhand (Acorus calamus), and Peacock's feather (ash) were analyzed for minor and trace elements by instrumental neutron activation analysis. The samples and the standards from the National Institute of Standards and Technology, USA and IAEA, Vienna were irradiated for 5 min, 1 h, 5 h, and 10 h with thermal neutrons at a flux of 10(12)-10(13) n cm-2 s-1 in APSARA and CIRUS reactor at BARC, Bombay. High resolution gamma ray spectrometry was performed using a 45 cm3 HPGe detector and a 4096 MCA system. Concentrations of 13 elements were determined. Zinc, manganese, and sodium were significantly higher in Tulsi leaves while zinc is higher in Neem leaves. Peacock's feathers were found to be rich in manganese, iron, copper, and zinc. A high concentration of mercury was also found in the peacock's feather ash. The therapeutic significance in restoring ionic balance is discussed. PMID:8886311

  5. Screening of 20 commonly used Iranian traditional medicinal plants against urease.

    PubMed

    Biglar, Mahmood; Sufi, Hessameddin; Bagherzadeh, Kowsar; Amanlou, Massoud; Mojab, Faraz

    2014-01-01

    Infection with Helicobacter pyloriis the most common cause of stomach and duodenal ulcers. About more than 80 % of people are infected with H. pylori in developing countries. H. pylori uses urease enzyme product "ammonia" in order to neutralize and protect itself from the stomach acidic condition and urease enzyme activity has been shown to be essential to the colonization of H. pylori. Inhibitory activity of 20 traditional medicinal plants were examined and evaluated against Jack bean urease activity by Berthelot reaction to obtains natural sources of urease inhibitors. Each herb was extracted using 80% aqueous methanol, then tested its IC50 value was determined. Eight of the whole 20 studied plants crude extracts were found the most effective with IC50 values of less than 100 μg/mL including Laurus nobilis, Zingiber officinale, Nigella sativa, Angelica archangelica, Acorus calamus, Allium sativum,Curcuma longa, and Citrus aurantium extracts, from which most potent urease inhibitory was observed for Zingiber officinale, Laurus nobilis, and Nigella sativa with IC50 values of 48.54, 48.69 and 59.10 μg/mL, respectively. PMID:24711846

  6. Metabolism of the carcinogen alpha-asarone in liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Cartus, Alexander T; Schrenk, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Alpha-asarone (1) is a naturally occurring phenylpropene found in several plants, e.g. Acorus calamus. 1-containing plant materials and essential oils thereof are used for flavoring foods and in many phytopharmaceuticals. 1 has been claimed to have positive pharmacological effects, however, it is carcinogenic in male mice (liver) and probably genotoxic. Since the metabolic pathways of 1 have not been investigated and its carcinogenic mode of action is unknown, we investigated the metabolism of 1 in liver microsomes of rat, bovine, porcine, and human origin using HPLC-DAD and LC-ESI-MS/MS and derived kinetic data on the metabolite formation. The main metabolic pathway was the side-chain hydroxylation leading to (E)-3'-hydroxyasarone (2). Epoxidation of 1 presumably led to (E)-asarone-1',2'-epoxide (4) which instantly hydrolyzed to form erythro- and threo-configured diols (5b+5a). As a minor reaction O-demethylation of 1 was observed. The metabolite formation showed little species-specific differences with the exception of porcine liver microsomes for which the formation of diols 5b+5a exceeded the formation of alcohol 2. The kinetic parameters imply a dependence of the pattern of metabolite formation from substrate concentration. On the basis of our results and earlier findings we hypothesize the genotoxic epoxide 4 being the ultimate carcinogen metabolically formed from 1. PMID:26678343

  7. In vitro conservation of twenty-three overexploited medicinal plants belonging to the Indian sub continent.

    PubMed

    Verma, Priyanka; Mathur, Ajay Kumar; Jain, Sheetal Prasad; Mathur, Archana

    2012-01-01

    Twenty-three pharmaceutically important plants, namely, Elaeocarpus spharicus, Rheum emodi, Indigofera tinctoria, Picrorrhiza kurroa, Bergenia ciliata, Lavandula officinalis, Valeriana wallichii, Coleus forskohlii, Gentiana kurroo, Saussurea lappa, Stevia rebaudiana, Acorus calamus, Pyrethrum cinerariaefolium, Aloe vera, Bacopa monnieri, Salvia sclarea, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Swertia cordata, Psoralea corylifolia, Jurinea mollis, Ocimum sanctum, Paris polyphylla, and Papaver somniferum, which are at the verge of being endangered due to their overexploitation and collection from the wild, were successfully established in vitro. Collections were made from the different biodiversity zones of India including Western Himalaya, Northeast Himalaya, Gangetic plain, Western Ghats, Semiarid Zone, and Central Highlands. Aseptic cultures were raised at the morphogenic level of callus, suspension, axillary shoot, multiple shoot, and rooted plants. Synseeds were also produced from highly proliferating shoot cultures of Bacopa monnieri, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Stevia rebaudiana, Valeriana wallichii, Gentiana kurroo, Lavandula officinalis, and Papaver somniferum. In vitro flowering was observed in Papaver somniferum, Psoralea corylifolia, and Ocimum sanctum shoots cultures. Out of 23 plants, 18 plants were successfully hardened under glasshouse conditions. PMID:22593711

  8. Mineral content of culinary and medicinal plants cultivated by Hmong refugees living in Sacramento, California.

    PubMed

    Corlett, Jan L; Clegg, Michael S; Keen, Carl L; Grivetti, Louis E

    2002-03-01

    Since the end of the American-Vietnamese War in 1975, more than 1.5 million refugees from Southeast Asia have resettled in the United States. Included among these displaced persons were the Hmong from Laos, a subsistence-based, shifting-cultivation, agricultural society. Hmong who resettled in urban areas have viewed vacant lots adjacent to urban dwellings as potential garden sites for production of familiar herbs and vegetables. In the present study exotic culinary and medicinal herbs grown by Hmong refugees in Sacramento, California were identified and analyzed for mineral composition. The herbs grown in these urban gardens were significant ingredients of Hmong recipes, and herb leaves, or infusions of steamed herb leaves were widely consumed as a component of pregnancy and post-partum diets. Six common species, Acorus gramineus, aff. Angelica, Dendranthema indicum, Eupatorium lindleyana, Sedum aff. sarmentosum, and Sedum aff. spectabile, were used in combination to season chicken. Polygonum odoratum, also widely cultivated, was used to season fish. Exotic culinary-medicinal species with highest mineral profiles included: Basella alba (Ca, Mg, Mn, Zn); Houttuynia cordata (Fe, Mg, Mn); Justica gendarussa (Ca, Mg, Zn); and Polygonum odoratum (Ca, Mg, Mn). While vacant lots sometimes are heavy metal contamination sites, we found no detectable levels of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, or lead in the samples analyzed. PMID:11939106

  9. Śodhana: An Ayurvedic process for detoxification and modification of therapeutic activities of poisonous medicinal plants

    PubMed Central

    Maurya, Santosh Kumar; Seth, Ankit; Laloo, Damiki; Singh, Narendra Kumar; Gautam, Dev Nath Singh; Singh, Anil Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Ayurveda involves the use of drugs obtained from plants, animals, and mineral origin. All the three sources of drugs can be divided under poisonous and nonpoisonous category. There are various crude drugs, which generally possess unwanted impurities and toxic substances, which can lead to harmful health problems. Many authors have reported that not all medicinal plants are safe to use since they can bear many toxic and harmful phytoconstituents in them. Śodhana (detoxification/purification) is the process, which involves the conversion of any poisonous drug into beneficial, nonpoisonous/nontoxic ones. Vatsanābha (Aconitum species), Semecarpus anacardium, Strychnos nux-vomica, Acorus calamus, Abrus precatorius etc., are some of the interesting examples of toxic plants, which are still used in the Indian system of medicine. Aconite, bhilawanols, strychnine, β–asarone, abrin are some of the toxic components present in these plants and are relatively toxic in nature. Śodhana process involves the purification as well as reduction in the levels of toxic principles which sometimes results in an enhanced therapeutic efficacy. The present review is designed to extensively discuss and understand the scientific basis of the alternative use of toxic plants as a medicine after their purification process. PMID:26283803

  10. Clinical study of the Immunoglobululin Enhancing effect of “Bala compound” on Infants

    PubMed Central

    Appaji, Rao R.; Sharma, R.D.; Katiyar, G. P.; Sai, Prasad A.J.V.

    2009-01-01

    Kaumarbhritya a branch of Asthanga Ayurveda deals with neonatal, infant and child health care. Multicentric studies conducted in various developed and developing countries have indicated that Infant Mortality Rate (I.M.R.) is very high in developing countries, and infection has been observed as the major cause. Immune system in neonates is not yet fully functional. Bala compound having the ingredients of Atibala (Abutilon indicum Linn), Amalaki (Emblica officinalis Linn), Vidanga (Emblica ribes burn), Guduchi (Tinospora cordifolia Welld Miers), Pippali (Piperlongum linn), Yashtimadhu (Glycyrrhiza glabra Linn), Shankhapuspi (Convolvulus pluricaulis Chois ), Vacha (Acorus calamus Linn), Musta (Cyperus rotundus Linn) and Ativisha (Aconitum heterophyllum wall) are Medhya as well as Rasayana drugs mention in Ayurvedic classics. ‘Bala compound” was tried in infants in the form of oral drops for a period of six months and result was assessed for serum immuoglobulins IgG, IgM, IgA for three months of interval of two follow ups (i.e., third and six month of infant). There is significant increase of immunoglobulins observed after six months administration of ‘Bala compoumd” PMID:22557316

  11. Study of Brāhmī Ghṛta and piracetam in amnesia

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Kapil Deo; Reddy, K. R. C.; Kumar, Vikas

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effect of Brāhmī Ghṛta with piracetam (a reference standard chemical) in amnesia. Materials and Methods: Brāhmī Ghṛta contained Brāhmī (Bacopa monneri), Vacā (Acorus calamus), Kuṣṭha (Sassurea lappa), Śaṅkhapuṣpī (Convolvulos pluricalis), and Purāṇa Ghṛta, prepared as per snehapāka process. Antiamnesic activity of Brāhmī Ghṛta (400 and 800 mg/kg, p.o.) was evaluated in scopolamine (1 mg/kg, s.c.) induced amnesia in Charles Foster rats using elevated plus maze, passive avoidance, and active avoidance tests. Piracetam (500 mg/kg, p.o.) was used as standard drug. This effect was compared with standard chemical used in experimental study. Results: Brāhmī Ghṛta - (in both doses) and piracetam-treated rats significantly reversed the effect of scopolamine in modified elevated plus maze, passive avoidance, and active avoidance tests. But there were no significant differences observed in antiamnesic activity of Brāhmī Ghṛta and standard drug. Conclusion: Brāhmī Ghṛta and piracetam produced significant beneficial effect on scopolamine-induced amnesic effect, but no significant difference was observed in between them. PMID:23929987

  12. Adaptive strategies against drought stress of six plant species with different growth forms from karst habitats of southwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Guo, K.; Liu, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Frequent temporary drought in the rain season, as well as long-term drought in the dry season, is one of the most important factors limiting the survival and growth of plants in the harsh karst habitats of southwestern China. The morphological and physiological responses to drought stress of six native woody plant species were investigated under both temporary and prolonged drought stress. The six plant species included Pyracantha fortuneana (evergreen shrub), Rosa cymosa (deciduous shrub), Cinnamomum bodinieri (evergreen tree), and other three deciduous trees, Broussonetia papyrifera, Platycarya longipes and Pteroceltis tatarinowii. Under severe drought stress, the two shrubs with low leaf area ratio (LAR) maintained higher water status, higher photosynthetic capacity and larger percent biomass increase than the most of the trees, owing to their lower specific leaf area, higher intrinsic water use efficiency and thermal dissipation, and higher capacities of osmotic adjustment and antioxidant protection. The evergreen tree, C. bodinieri, exhibited small decrease of water potential and maintained higher leaf mass ratio (LMR) and LAR than the deciduous species under moderate drought stress, due to the high proline accumulation and high activities of antioxidant enzymes. However, it showed high levels of cellular damages, very low photosynthetic capacity, and sharp decreases of water potential and biomass under severe drought stress. After rewatering, C. bodinieri showed a lower ability to recover from severe drought with the successive repeats of severe drought event. The three deciduous trees developed high root mass ratio for maximizing water uptake, and showed higher LAR and biomass than the two shrubs under well-watered condition. However, drought stress resulted in sharp decreases of biomass in the three deciduous trees, which were attributed to the large drought-induced decreases of LMR, LAR and gas exchange. Under drought conditions, the deciduous trees

  13. Composite Laminate With Coefficient of Thermal Expansion Matching D263 Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, David; Rodini, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    The International X-ray Observatory project seeks to make an X-ray telescope assembly with 14,000 flexible glass segments. The glass used is commercially available SCHOTT D263 glass. Thermal expansion causes the mirror to distort out of alignment. A housing material is needed that has a matching coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) so that when temperatures change in the X-ray mirror assembly, the glass and housing pieces expand equally, thus reducing or eliminating distortion. Desirable characteristics of this material include a high stiffness/weight ratio, and low density. Some metal alloys show promise in matching the CTE of D263 glass, but their density is high compared to aluminum, and their stiffness/weight ratio is not favorable. A laminate made from carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) should provide more favorable characteristics, but there has not been any made with the CTE matching D263 Glass. It is common to create CFRP laminates of various CTEs by stacking layers of prepreg material at various angles. However, the CTE of D263 glass is 6.3 ppm/ C at 20 C, which is quite high, and actually unachievable solely with carbon fiber and resin. A composite laminate has been developed that has a coefficient of thermal expansion identical to that of SCHOTT D263 glass. The laminate is made of a combination of T300 carbon fiber, Eglass, and RS3C resin. The laminate has 50% uni-T300 plies and 50% uni-E-glass plies, with each fiber-layer type laid up in a quasi-isotropic laminate for a total of 16 plies. The fiber volume (percent of fiber compared to the resin) controls the CTE to a great extent. Tests have confirmed that a fiber volume around 48% gives a CTE of 6.3 ppm/ C. This is a fairly simple composite laminate, following well established industry procedures. The unique feature of this laminate is a somewhat unusual combination of carbon fiber with E-glass (fiberglass). The advantage is that the resulting CTE comes out to 6.3 ppm/ C at 20 C, which matches D

  14. Convective Available Potential Energy of World Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Z.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Thompson, A. F.

    2012-12-01

    Here, for the first time, we propose the concept of Ocean Convective Available Potential Energy (OCAPE), which is the maximum kinetic energy (KE) per unit seawater mass achievable by ocean convection. OCAPE occurs through a different mechanism from atmospheric CAPE, and involves the interplay of temperature and salinity on the equation of state of seawater. The thermobaric effect, which arises because the thermal coefficient of expansion increases with depth, is an important ingredient of OCAPE. We develop an accurate algorithm to calculate the OCAPE for a given temperature and salinity profile. We then validate our calculation of OCAPE by comparing it with the conversion of OCAPE to KE in a 2-D numerical model. We propose that OCAPE is an important energy source of ocean deep convection and contributes to deep water formation. OCAPE, like Atmospheric CAPE, can help predict deep convection and may also provide a useful constraint for modelling deep convection in ocean GCMs. We plot the global distribution of OCAPE using data from the World Ocean Atlas 2009 (WOA09) and see many important features. These include large values of OCAPE in the Labrador, Greenland, Weddell and Mediterranean Seas, which are consistent with our present observations and understanding, but also identify some new features like the OCAPE pattern in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). We propose that the diagnosis of OCAPE can improve our understanding of global patterns of ocean convection and deep water formation as well as ocean stratification, the meridional overturning circulation and mixed layer processes. The background of this work is briefly introduced as below. Open-ocean deep convection can significantly modify water properties both at the ocean surface and throughout the water column (Gordon 1982). Open-ocean convection is also an important mechanism for Ocean Deep Water formation and the transport of heat, freshwater and nutrient (Marshall and Schott 1999). Open

  15. A multidisciplinary overview of intoxicating snuff rituals in the western hemisphere.

    PubMed

    de Smet, P A

    1985-03-01

    Part one of the paper discusses ethnobotanical, chemical and general pharmacological aspects of intoxicating snuff rituals in the western hemisphere. Four categories of ritual snuff ingredients arise from this multidisciplinary approach: It is well established that the plant contains one or more psychoactive principles and the Indian use of the plant as a ritual snuff ingredient is confirmed or quite probable: Anadenanthera, Erythroxylum, Nicotiana, Virola; It is well established that the plant contains one or more psychoactive principles, but the Indian use of the plant as a ritual snuff ingredient is not well recorded or even unlikely: Banisteriopsis, Cannabis, Datura, Ilex guayusa; The Indian use of the plant as a ritual snuff ingredient is confirmed or quite probable, but it is not well established that the plant contains one or more psychoactive principles: Justicia pectoralis, Pagamea macrophylla, Tanaecium nocturnum; The Indian use of the plant as a ritual snuff ingredient is not well recorded, and it is not well established that the plant contains one or more psychoactive principles: Acorus calamus, Capsicum, Macquira sclerophylla, Piper interitum. Part two of the paper discusses the nasal pharmacokinetics and efficacy of possible ritual snuff constituents. The literature yields convincing clinical evidence that atropine, cocaine, nicotine and scopolamine are effective following nasal application, but experimental confirmation of the efficacy of nasal tryptamine alkaloids is still awaited. In self-experiments, 6.4 mg/kg of caffeine produced substantial plasma levels via the nasal route, but 0.5 mg/kg of harmine did not produce measurable plasma levels, when taken as a nasal powder. Without additional experiments, it is difficult to give a definite explanation for this negative result. PMID:3887041

  16. [Effects of saltwater incursion on the microbiological characteristics and denitrification in a riparian rhizosphere soil in Chongming Island of Shanghai, East China].

    PubMed

    Yang, Chang-Ming; Cai, Wen-Juan; Li, Jian-Hua

    2012-04-01

    A simulation test was conducted to study the effects of saltwater incursion on the microbiological characteristics and denitrification in the riparian rhizosphere soils vegetated with different plants in Chongming Island of Shanghai. Saltwater incursion changed the microflora in the rhizospheric soils. Except for actinomycete whose quantity had slight increase, the quantities of bacteria, fungi, nitrifiers, and denitrifiers all decreased to some extent by saltwater incursion, with the denitrifiers decreased by 51.8%, suggesting that the riparian soil microflora responded differentially to saltwater incursion. The activities of soil nitrogen-transforming enzymes were significantly inhibited by saltwater incursion, and the inhibitory effects differed with the enzymes. Nitrite reductase activity was most sensitive to saltwater incursion, with an inhibition rate of 43.5%, followed by urease activity, with 37.4% inhibition, and by dehydrogenase (29.5% inhibition). Saltwater incursion inhibited the denitrification, with the average denitrification rate decreased by 34.9%. There existed significant differences in the eco-physiological responses of the microbes in the rhizosphere soils vegetated with different plants to the saltwater incursion. The microbial quantities and enzyme activities showed the highest inhibition percentages in the rhizosphere soil of Zizania aquatica, followed by in the rhizosphere soils of Acorus calamus and Phragmites australis. Under saltwater incursion, the inhibition percentages of microbial quantities, enzyme activities, and denitrification rate in the rhizosphere soil of A. calamus-P. australis were significantly lower, as compared with those in the rhizosphere soils vegetated with Z. aquatica, A. calamus, and P. australis, respectively, suggesting that mixed vegetation showed a better buffer effect on the responses of riparian rhizosphere soil microbiological processes and denitrification to saltwater incursion. PMID:22803478

  17. Effect of α-asarone on angiogenesis and matrix metalloproteinase.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye-Jung; Lee, Soo-Jin; Kim, Moon-Moo

    2015-05-01

    α-Asarone is a main component of Acorus gramineus widely known as an oriental traditional medicinal stuff. A. gramineus has been known to have a variety of medicinal efficacies such as anti-gastric ulcer and anti-allergic activities, inhibition of histamine release and antioxidant effect. However, its effect on angiogenesis remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of α-asarone on induction of angiogenesis through modulation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP). First of all, MTT assay was performed to evaluate the effect of α-asarone on cell viability using MTT assay, and then tube formation assay with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) in vitro and rat aorta ring assay ex vivo were carried out to elucidate its effect on angiogenesis. Treatment with α-asarone below 6μM showed no cytotoxicity in human fibrosarcoma cells (HT1080) and HUVEC. It was observed that α-asarone not only promotes tube formation of HUVEC but also induces angiogenesis of rat aorta. In addition, the effects of α-asarone on the expressions of protein and gene were evaluated using western blot analysis and RT-PCR assay. α-Asarone increased the expression levels of MMP-2 and MMP-9 stimulated by phenazine methosulfate (PMS) and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) in HT1080. Especially, the expression level of antioxidant enzyme such as glutathione reductase was increased in the presence of α-asarone. Therefore, above findings suggest that α-asarone may play an important role in pathological diseases related to MMP and angiogenesis. PMID:25912851

  18. Identifying the Basal Angiosperm Node in Chloroplast GenomePhylogenies: Sampling One's Way Out of the Felsenstein Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Leebens-Mack, Jim; Raubeson, Linda A.; Cui, Liying; Kuehl,Jennifer V.; Fourcade, Matthew H.; Chumley, Timothy W.; Boore, JeffreyL.; Jansen, Robert K.; dePamphilis, Claude W.

    2005-05-27

    While there has been strong support for Amborella and Nymphaeales (water lilies) as branching from basal-most nodes in the angiosperm phylogeny, this hypothesis has recently been challenged by phylogenetic analyses of 61 protein-coding genes extracted from the chloroplast genome sequences of Amborella, Nymphaea and 12 other available land plant chloroplast genomes. These character-rich analyses placed the monocots, represented by three grasses (Poaceae), as sister to all other extant angiosperm lineages. We have extracted protein-coding regions from draft sequences for six additional chloroplast genomes to test whether this surprising result could be an artifact of long-branch attraction due to limited taxon sampling. The added taxa include three monocots (Acorus, Yucca and Typha), a water lily (Nuphar), a ranunculid(Ranunculus), and a gymnosperm (Ginkgo). Phylogenetic analyses of the expanded DNA and protein datasets together with microstructural characters (indels) provided unambiguous support for Amborella and the Nymphaeales as branching from the basal-most nodes in the angiospermphylogeny. However, their relative positions proved to be dependent on method of analysis, with parsimony favoring Amborella as sister to all other angiosperms, and maximum likelihood and neighbor-joining methods favoring an Amborella + Nympheales clade as sister. The maximum likelihood phylogeny supported the later hypothesis, but the likelihood for the former hypothesis was not significantly different. Parametric bootstrap analysis, single gene phylogenies, estimated divergence dates and conflicting in del characters all help to illuminate the nature of the conflict in resolution of the most basal nodes in the angiospermphylogeny. Molecular dating analyses provided median age estimates of 161 mya for the most recent common ancestor of all extant angiosperms and 145 mya for the most recent common ancestor of monocots, magnoliids andeudicots. Whereas long sequences reduce variance in

  19. Assessment of litter degradation in medicinal plants subjected to ultraviolet-B radiation.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, S B; Kumari, Rima

    2013-07-01

    Litter decomposition is an important component of global carbon budget. Elevated influx of ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B) as a consequence of depletion of stratospheric ozone (O3) layer may affect litter decomposition directly or/modifying the plant tissue quality. Chemical composition of plant can affect litter decomposition. In the present study, three important medicinal plant species i.e. Acorus calamus, Ocimum sanctum and Cymbopogon citratus were exposed to two levels of supplemental UV-B (sUV and sUV,) during the growth period and examined the changes in leaf quality and degradation of leaf litters. The sUV, treatment (+3.6 kJ m(-2) d(-1)) increased the rate of decomposition by 45% and 31% respectively; in leaf litters from O. sanctum and C. citratus, while no significant effect was noticed in A. calamus leaf litter. Higher accumulation of sclerenchymatous tissue around vascular bundles and increased concentrations of total phenols by 39 mg g(-1) probably lowered the decomposition rate; finding k value: 0.0049 g g(-1) d(-1) in leaf litters of A. calamus. The C/N ratio was increased by 14% at sUV2 in C. citratus, whereas in O. sanctum it decreased by 13.6% after treatment. Results of the present experiment illustrates that firstly UV-B can modify the decomposition rate of leaf litter of test plant species, secondly it can alter the tissue chemistry particularly leaf phenolics, N and P concentrations strongly and thus affecting the decay rate and thirdly UV-B effects on decay rate and leaf chemistry is species specific. PMID:24640251

  20. Uptake, translocation and metabolism of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) in seven aquatic plants.

    PubMed

    Deng, Daiyong; Liu, Jin; Xu, Meiying; Zheng, Guolu; Guo, Jun; Sun, Guoping

    2016-06-01

    Terrestrial plant uptake of PBDEs from contaminated soils has been widely reported recently. In this study the fate of deca-BDE within a plant/PBDEs/aquatic environment system was investigated through simulated pot experiments. Accumulations of the total PBDEs and deca-BDE were observed in tissues of seven test aquatic plant species, namely Phragmites australis, Cyperus papyrus, Alternanthera philoxeroides, Colocasia esculenta, Scirpus validus, Acorus calamus and Oryza sativa. In all seven plants, O. sativa leads the uptake and accumulation both in the total PBDEs (444.8 ng g(-1)) and deca-BDE (368.0 ng g(-1)) in roots. Among the six common phytoremediation aquatic plants, A. calamus leads the uptake (236.2 ng g(-1)), and P. australis leads the translocation (Cshoot/Croot = 0.35), while A. philoxeroides (43.4%) and P. australis (80.0%) lead in the metabolism efficiencies in the root and shoot, respectively. The detection of seventeen lesser brominated PBDE congeners provided the debromination evidence, and the specific PBDEs profiles in test plant species indicated there is no common metabolic pattern. Furthermore, a relative high proportion of lesser brominated PBDE congeners in shoots suggested the possible metabolic difference between roots and shoots. Finally, a noticeable percentage of penta- and octa-BDE derived from deca-BDE also hint the ecological risk in deca-BDE use. This comparative research on the aquatic plants provide a broad vision on the understanding of plant/PBDEs/aquatic environment interaction system, and may be applied to remediate PBDEs in contaminated waters and sediments. PMID:26994429

  1. Ammonia- and methane-oxidizing microorganisms in high-altitude wetland sediments and adjacent agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuyin; Shan, Jingwen; Zhang, Jingxu; Zhang, Xiaoling; Xie, Shuguang; Liu, Yong

    2014-12-01

    Ammonia oxidation is known to be carried out by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA), while methanotrophs (methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB)) play an important role in mitigating methane emissions from the environment. However, the difference of AOA, AOB, and MOB distribution in wetland sediment and adjacent upland soil remains unclear. The present study investigated the abundances and community structures of AOA, AOB, and MOB in sediments of a high-altitude freshwater wetland in Yunnan Province (China) and adjacent agricultural soils. Variations of AOA, AOB, and MOB community sizes and structures were found in water lily-vegetated and Acorus calamus-vegetated sediments and agricultural soils (unflooded rice soil, cabbage soil, and garlic soil and flooded rice soil). AOB community size was higher than AOA in agricultural soils and lily-vegetated sediment, but lower in A. calamus-vegetated sediment. MOB showed a much higher abundance than AOA and AOB. Flooded rice soil had the largest AOA, AOB, and MOB community sizes. Principal coordinate analyses and Jackknife Environment Clusters analyses suggested that unflooded and flooded rice soils had relatively similar AOA, AOB, and MOB structures. Cabbage soil and A. calamus-vegetated sediment had relatively similar AOA and AOB structures, but their MOB structures showed a large difference. Nitrososphaera-like microorganisms were the predominant AOA species in garlic soil but were present with a low abundance in unflooded rice soil and cabbage soil. Nitrosospira-like AOB were dominant in wetland sediments and agricultural soils. Type I MOB Methylocaldum and type II MOB Methylocystis were dominant in wetland sediments and agricultural soils. Moreover, Pearson's correlation analysis indicated that AOA Shannon diversity was positively correlated with the ratio of organic carbon to nitrogen (p < 0.05). This work could provide some new insights toward ammonia and methane oxidation in soil and wetland sediment

  2. Influence of rhizosphere microbial ecophysiological parameters from different plant species on butachlor degradation in a riparian soil.

    PubMed

    Yang, Changming; Wang, Mengmeng; Li, Jianhua

    2012-01-01

    Biogeochemical processes in riparian zones regulate contaminant movement to receiving waters and often mitigate the impact of upland sources of contaminants on water quality. However, little research has been reported on the microbial process and degradation potential of herbicide in a riparian soil. Field sampling and incubation experiments were conducted to investigate differences in microbial parameters and butachlor degradation in the riparian soil from four plant communities in Chongming Island, China. The results suggested that the rhizosphere soil had significantly higher total organic C and water-soluble organic C relative to the nonrhizosphere soil. Differences in rhizosphere microbial community size and physiological parameters among vegetation types were significant. The rhizosphere soil from the mixed community of Phragmites australis and Acorus calamus had the highest microbial biomass and biochemical activity, followed by A. calamus, P. australis and Zizania aquatica. Microbial ATP, dehydrogenase activity (DHA), and basal soil respiration (BSR) in the rhizosphere of the mixed community of P. australis and A. calamus were 58, 72, and 62% higher, respectively, than in the pure P. australis community. Compared with the rhizosphere soil of the pure plant communities, the mixed community of P. australis and A. calamus displayed a significantly greater degradation rate of butachlor in the rhizosphere soil. Residual butachlor concentrations in rhizosphere soil of the mixed community of P. australis and A. calamus and were 48, 63, and 68% lower than three pure plant communities, respectively. Butachlor degradation rates were positively correlated to microbial ATP, DHA, and BSR, indicating that these microbial parameters may be useful in assessing butachlor degradation potential in the riparian soil. PMID:22565253

  3. Effects of perchlorate on growth of four wetland plants and its accumulation in plant tissues.

    PubMed

    He, Hongzhi; Gao, Haishuo; Chen, Guikui; Li, Huashou; Lin, Hai; Shu, Zhenzhen

    2013-10-01

    Perchlorate contamination in water is of concern because of uncertainties about toxicity and health effects, impact on ecosystems, and possible indirect exposure pathways to humans. Therefore, it is very important to investigate the ecotoxicology of perchlorate and to screen plant species for phytoremediation. Effects of perchlorate (20, 200, and 500 mg/L) on the growth of four wetland plants (Eichhornia crassipes, Acorus calamus L., Thalia dealbata, and Canna indica) as well as its accumulation in different plant tissues were investigated through water culture experiments. Twenty milligrams per liter of perchlorate had no significant effects on height, root length, aboveground part weight, root weight, and oxidizing power of roots of four plants, except A. calamus, and increasing concentrations of perchlorate showed that out of the four wetland plants, only A. calamus had a significant (p<0.05) dose-dependent decrease in these parameters. When treated with 500 mg/L perchlorate, these parameters and chlorophyll content in the leaf of plants showed significant decline contrasted to control groups, except the root length of E. crassipes and C. indica. The order of inhibition rates of perchlorate on root length, aboveground part weight and root weight, and oxidizing power of roots was: A. calamus > C. indica > T. dealbata > E. crassipes and on chlorophyll content in the leaf it was: A. calamus > T. dealbata > C. indica > E. crassipes. The higher the concentration of perchlorate used, the higher the amount of perchlorate accumulation in plants. Perchlorate accumulation in aboveground tissues was much higher than that in underground tissues and leaf was the main tissue for perchlorate accumulation. The order of perchlorate accumulation content and the bioconcentration factor in leaf of four plants was: E. crassipes > C. indica > T. dealbata > A. calamus. Therefore, E. crassipes might be an ideal plant with high tolerance ability and accumulation ability for constructing

  4. Efficacy of natural products against Callosobruchus chinensis (Coleoptera: Bruchidae) in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Regmi, Homan; Kafle, Lekhnath; Gc, Yubak Dhoj; Shih, Cheng Jen

    2012-06-01

    This study was conducted to determine the efficacy of local natural products against the beetle, Callosobruchus chinensis L. (Coleoptera: Bruchidae), in stored chickpea Cicer arietinum L. (Fabaceae) in Chitwan, Nepal. Five natural products and one synthetic pesticide (Malathion) and two storage regimes (aluminum sheet bin vs. jute bags with plastic lining) were tested for their effect on stored pulse with respect to damage by C. chinensis. The five natural products included Xanthoylum armatum DC (Rutaceae) fruit powder, Acorus calamus L. (Araceae) rhizome powder, Cinnamom camphora L. (Lauraceae) balls, oil of Sesamum indicum L. (Pedaliaceae), and leaf powder of Azadirachta indica A. Juss. (Meliaceae). Treatments of stored pulses with natural products or with Malathion all caused significantly higher mortality of C. chinensis at 15 d after treatment (DAT) than stored pulses receiving no treatments. The balls of C. camphora, rhizome powder of A. calamus and sesame oil outperformed all other treatments, including the Malathion at 45 and 75 DAT and resulted in significantly reduced damage or deterioration of stored pulses compared with other treatments. Storage regimes performed similarly, although the jute bags did protect seed integrity for some treatments. Our results indicate that incorporating these natural products into stored pulses can protect the seeds from C. chinensis for up to two generations, something that Malathion cannot do. These products are readily available to most farmers in the region and their use will lead to 1) reduction of losses to significant stored product pests, and 2) a reduction of contamination of foodstuffs and the environment by synthetic pesticides like Malathion. PMID:22812152

  5. Alpha-asarone improves striatal cholinergic function and locomotor hyperactivity in Fmr1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Guozhen; Chen, Shengqiang; Guo, Jialing; Wu, Jie; Yi, Yong-Hong

    2016-10-01

    Hyperactivity is a symptom found in several neurological and psychiatric disorders, including Fragile X syndrome (FXS). The animal model of FXS, fragile X mental retardation gene (Fmr1) knockout (KO) mouse, exhibits robust locomotor hyperactivity. Alpha (α)-asarone, a major bioactive component isolated from Acorus gramineus, has been shown in previous studies to improve various disease conditions including central nervous system disorders. In this study, we show that treatment with α-asarone alleviates locomotor hyperactivity in Fmr1 KO mice. To elucidate the mechanism underlying this improvement, we evaluated the expressions of various cholinergic markers, as well as acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and acetylcholine (ACh) levels, in the striatum of Fmr1 KO mice. We also analyzed the AChE-inhibitory activity of α-asarone. Striatal samples from Fmr1 KO mice showed decreased m1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (m1 mAChR) expression, increased AChE activity, and reduced ACh levels. Treatment with α-asarone improved m1 mAChR expression and ACh levels, and attenuated the increased AChE activity. In addition, α-asarone dose-dependently inhibited AChE activity in vitro. These results indicate that direct inhibition of AChE activity and up-regulation of m1 mAChR expression in the striatum might contribute to the beneficial effects of α-asarone on locomotor hyperactivity in Fmr1 KO mice. These findings might improve understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms responsible for locomotor hyperactivity. PMID:27316341

  6. Development of a safe ultraviolet camera system to enhance awareness by showing effects of UV radiation and UV protection of the skin (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.; Wedzinga, Rosaline; van Montfrans, Bibi; Stok, Mirte; Klaessens, John; van der Veen, Albert

    2016-03-01

    The significant increase of skin cancer occurring in the western world is attributed to longer sun expose during leisure time. For prevention, people should become aware of the risks of UV light exposure by showing skin damage and the protective effect of sunscreen with an UV camera. An UV awareness imaging system optimized for 365 nm (UV-A) was develop using consumer components being interactive, safe and mobile. A Sony NEX5t camera was adapted to full spectral range. In addition, UV transparent lenses and filters were selected based on spectral characteristics measured (Schott S8612 and Hoya U-340 filters) to obtain the highest contrast for e.g. melanin spots and wrinkles on the skin. For uniform UV illumination, 2 facial tanner units were adapted with UV 365 nm black light fluorescent tubes. Safety of the UV illumination was determined relative to the sun and with absolute irradiance measurements at the working distance. A maximum exposure time over 15 minutes was calculate according the international safety standards. The UV camera was successfully demonstrated during the Dutch National Skin Cancer day and was well received by dermatologists and participating public. Especially, the 'black paint' effect putting sun screen on the face was dramatic and contributed to the awareness of regions on the face what are likely to be missed applying sunscreen. The UV imaging system shows to be promising for diagnostics and clinical studies in dermatology and potentially in other areas (dentistry and ophthalmology)

  7. Optimized molten salt receivers for ultimate trough solar fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riffelmann, Klaus-J.; Richert, Timo; Kuckelkorn, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Today parabolic trough collectors are the most successful concentrating solar power (CSP) technology. For the next development step new systems with increased operation temperature and new heat transfer fluids (HTF) are currently developed. Although the first power tower projects have successfully been realized, up to now there is no evidence of an all-dominant economic or technical advantage of power tower or parabolic trough. The development of parabolic trough technology towards higher performance and significant cost reduction have led to significant improvements in competitiveness. The use of molten salt instead of synthetic oil as heat transfer fluid will bring down the levelized costs of electricity (LCOE) even further while providing dispatchable energy with high capacity factors. FLABEG has developed the Ultimate TroughTM (UT) collector, jointly with sbp Sonne GmbH and supported by public funds. Due to its validated high optical accuracy, the collector is very suitable to operate efficiently at elevated temperatures up to 550 °C. SCHOTT will drive the key-innovations by introducing the 4th generation solar receiver that addresses the most significant performance and cost improvement measures. The new receivers have been completely redesigned to provide a product platform that is ready for high temperature operation up to 550 °C. Moreover distinct product features have been introduced to reduce costs and risks in solar field assembly and installation. The increased material and design challenges incurred with the high temperature operation have been reflected in sophisticated qualification and validation procedures.

  8. Effects of the first heat up procedure on mechanical properties of solid oxide fuel cell sealing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rautanen, Markus; Pulkkinen, Valtteri; Tallgren, Johan; Himanen, Olli; Kiviaho, Jari

    2015-06-01

    SOFC stack seals need to be correctly dimensioned to achieve a gas tight stack with low electrical contact resistances. Mechanical properties of SOFC stack sealing materials are presented for three assembly and first heat up procedures: applying full compressive stress at room temperature before first heat up (1), applying no compressive stress before first heat up and applying the full compressive stress at operating temperature (2), applying partial compressive stress at room temperature and full compressive stress at operating temperature after first heat up (3). The behaviour of the glass seal (Schott GM31107) is not affected significantly by compressive force during heat up. Compressibility of both compressible sealing material (Thermiculite CL87) and hybrid sealing material (Thermiculite CL87LS) was found to be about 40% (between 0.1 and 0.9 MPa) at room temperature but only about 4% (between 0.1 and 0.9 MPa) at 700 °C. Therefore it is beneficial to carry out as much of the compression as possible at room temperature before first heat up. This allows for maximum amount of deformability in the sealing materials resulting in the highest ability to compensate for stack manufacturing and assembly tolerances, which is needed to realize a gas tight stack with low electrical contact resistances.

  9. Report on EUVL Mask Substrate Development: Low-Expansion Substrate Finishing II

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, W.M.; Taylor, J.S.; Hector, S.D.; Shell, M.

    1999-12-08

    This report is a continuation of our assessment of the finishing of low thermal expansion material wafers obtained through three different commercial pathways. This quarter we have patterned and printed a ULE{reg_sign} wafer (Rodel 1) and saw no difference between its images and those from silicon wafer substrates. This further demonstrated that ULE{reg_sign} can be used as the EUVL mask substrate material. We have also evaluated substrates produced by three vendors: Hoya, General Optics, and Rodel. Consistent with our results reported last quarter, surface roughness of the bare substrates from all three companies does not depend on the position. For Hoya, the wafers it produced had a low roughness than those from last quarter. However, the cleanliness of the wafers needs to be improved. For General Optics, the wafer roughness has increased, and it was only able to deliver one wafer this quarter. General Optics will be replaced by Schott ML next quarter. For Rodel, one of its wafers (Rodel 1) that had been cleaned in-house showed excellent finishing and was selected to be patterned. We also observed that the sleeks on the substrates were smoothed by the ML coating. The other two Rodel wafers (Rodel 2 and Rodel 4) had too many defects and the roughness values derived from AFM are not reliable.

  10. Five simultaneously Q-switch mode-locked passive laser modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Junewen

    2007-02-01

    Five types of passive Q-switched as well as simultaneously Q-switch mode-locked modulators: plastic dye sheets ( Kodak 9850 cellulose acetate dye sheets), lithium fluoride crystals containing F II - color centers ( LiF: F II -), chromium doped yttrium aluminum garnet crystals ( Cr 4+:YAG), ionic color filter glass ( Schott RG1000 color filter glass) and the single crystal semiconductor wafers ( GaAs, Fe doped InP, Zn doped InP, S doped InP, etc.) used for the modulation of the Nd:hosted(Nd:YAG, Nd:YVO 4, and Nd:LSB) lasers have been investigated in detail in our researches. We have also investigated into the applications of the Q-switch mode-locked pulses train for the development of higher resolution solid state laser range finder. We will also present the high accuracy laser ranging results, the micro-motor that driven mechanical parts from the stepping digital ranging readout, to precisely control the best focus of a miniature zoom lens modular. The core simultaneously Q-switch mode-locked modulators microchip laser is the key part of our automatic optical inspection system.

  11. Modeling of the thermal expansion behaviour of ZERODUR at arbitrary temperature profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedamzik, Ralf; Johansson, Thoralf; Westerhoff, Thomas

    2010-07-01

    Modeling of the thermal expansion behavior of ZERODUR® for the site conditions of the upcoming Extremely Large Telescope's (ELT's) allows an optimized material selection to yield the best performing ZERODUR® for the mirror substrates. The thermal expansion of glass ceramics is a function of temperature and a function of time, due to the structural relaxation behavior of the materials. The application temperature range of the upcoming ELT projects varies depending on the possible construction site between -13°C and +27°C. Typical temperature change rates during the night are in the range between 0.1°C/h and 0.3°C/h. Such temperature change rates are much smaller than the typical economic laboratory measurement rate, therefore the material behavior under these conditions can not be measured directly. SCHOTT developed a model approach to describe the structural relaxation behavior of ZERODUR®. With this model it is possible to precisely predict the thermal expansion behavior of the individual ZERODUR® material batches at any application temperature profile T(t). This paper presents results of the modeling and shows ZERODUR® material behavior at typical temperature profiles of different applications.

  12. In Vitro Antileukemic Activity of Xanthosoma sagittifolium (Taioba) Leaf Extract

    PubMed Central

    Caxito, Marina L. C.; Correia, Rachell R.; Gomes, Anne Caroline C.; Justo, Graça; Coelho, Marsen G. P.; Sakuragui, Cássia M.; Kuster, Ricardo M.; Sabino, Katia C. C.

    2015-01-01

    Xanthosoma sagittifolium Schott is a herb of the Araceae family, popularly known as taioba, which is consumed as food in some regions of Brazil, Africa, and Asia. This species has already been evaluated for the antifungal activities. However, based on its potential antitumor activity, the present study further aimed to examine the antitumor, as well as chelation, activity of X. sagittifolium leaf extract. Results showed that hydroethanolic extract of X. sagittifolium leaves (HEXs-L) exhibits cytotoxic effects against the immortalized line of human T-lymphocytic (Jurkat) and myelogenous (K562) leukemia cells, but not nontumor RAW 264.7 macrophages or NIH/3T3 fibroblasts. HEXs-L inhibited 50.3% of Jurkat cell proliferation, reducing by 20% cells in G2/M phase, but increasing cells in sub-G1 phase, thereby inducing apoptosis by 54%. In addition, HEXs-L inhibited NO production by 59%, as determined by Griess reaction, and chelated 93.8% of free Fe(II), as demonstrated by ferrozine assay. Phytochemical studies were carried out by ESI-MS, identifying apigenin di-C-glycosides as major compounds. Overall, this work revealed that leaf extract of Xanthosoma sagittifolium presented chelating activity and in vitro antitumor activity, arresting cell cycle and inducing apoptosis of leukemia cells, thus providing evidence that taioba leaves may have practical application in cancer therapy. PMID:26180533

  13. Characterization and calibration of a viscoelastic simplified potential energy clock model for inorganic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, Robert S.; Tandon, Rajan; Stavig, Mark E.

    2015-07-07

    In this study, to analyze the stresses and strains generated during the solidification of glass-forming materials, stress and volume relaxation must be predicted accurately. Although the modeling attributes required to depict physical aging in organic glassy thermosets strongly resemble the structural relaxation in inorganic glasses, the historical modeling approaches have been distinctly different. To determine whether a common constitutive framework can be applied to both classes of materials, the nonlinear viscoelastic simplified potential energy clock (SPEC) model, developed originally for glassy thermosets, was calibrated for the Schott 8061 inorganic glass and used to analyze a number of tests. A practical methodology for material characterization and model calibration is discussed, and the structural relaxation mechanism is interpreted in the context of SPEC model constitutive equations. SPEC predictions compared to inorganic glass data collected from thermal strain measurements and creep tests demonstrate the ability to achieve engineering accuracy and make the SPEC model feasible for engineering applications involving a much broader class of glassy materials.

  14. Total internal reflection without change of polarization using a right-angle prism with half-wavelength-thick optical interference coating.

    PubMed

    Azzam, R M A

    2009-02-01

    Monochromatic light, which is polarized in an arbitrary state, is totally internally reflected at angle of incidence phi=45 degrees without change of polarization by a right-angle prism of refractive index n0=1+1/Square root of 2=1.70711 (e.g., N-LAK8 Schott glass at wavelength lambda=706 nm), which is coated with a transparent thin film of refractive index n1=(1+1/2)1/2=1.30656 (e.g., vacuum-deposited fluoride material) and of metric thickness equal to half of the vacuum wavelength of incident light, d=lambda/2. The ambient medium of evanescent refraction is assumed to be vacuum, air, or an inert gas. Wavelength shifts of +/-50 nm, or changes of the internal angle of incidence of +/-1 degrees around 45 degrees, cause phase errors of only a few degrees. The reflected and incident polarization states are nearly identical in the presence of such small phase errors. PMID:19183662

  15. Optical glass: refractive index change with wavelength and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englert, Marion; Hartmann, Peter; Reichel, Steffen

    2014-05-01

    With the catalog of 1992 SCHOTT introduced two formulae each with six parameters for a better representation of the refractive index of optical glasses. The Sellmeier-equation improved the characterization of dispersion at room temperature and the Hoffmann equation that of its temperature dependence. Better representation had been expected because both formulae were derived from general dispersion theory. The original publication of Hoffmann et al. from 1992 contains first results on the accuracy of the fits. The extended use of the formulae has led to a collection of data allowing reviewing the adequacy of the Sellmeier-equation approach on a much broader basis. We compare fitted refractive index values with measured values for all wavelengths used at our precision refractive index goniometer. Data sets are available for specific melts of the four representative glass types N-BK7, N-FK5, LF5 and IRG2. For some materials, the optical glass N-LAF21, the IR glass IRG2 and the crystal CaF2, several sets of data for the temperature dependence of the refractive index are available thus giving evidence for the variation of these properties among melts of the same material.

  16. Design examples of diffraction-limited catadioptric objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallert, Frank

    1996-08-01

    The paper relates to different inventions, comprising three diffraction-limited catadioptric designs. All the systems use only spherical shaped surfaces and are designed from one kind of optical material only. In the examples the glass BK7 from the Schott-catalogue was used. The first example gives a three element design reaching equal performance as a Schmidt camera but with only 25 percent of its length. Additionally the field is flat and conveniently located behind the system. The second example is designed to reduce the central obstruction. It's somewhat based on the principle of the Houghton-camera. For a f-number 4 system with 1000 millimeters focal length it gives outstanding image quality at a 5 degree's field--even capable for diffraction-limited visual use. For reduced f-number 5,6 the image is diffraction-limited at the whole field. In terms of color correction it outperforms every Schmidt-Cassegrain or apochromatic triplet of even arbitrarily more reduced light gathering power. The third example is the equivalent for the so-called Wynne corrector triplet that corrects the aberrations of a parabolical mirror. But the invented corrector corrects additionally the spherical aberration of a spherical mirror. The corrector is able to correct all third order aberrations without introducing longitudinal and lateral color.

  17. The 2014 IODC lens design problem: the Cinderella lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juergens, Richard C.

    2014-12-01

    The lens design problem for the 2014 IODC is to design a 100 mm focal length lens in which all the components of the lens can be manufactured from ten Schott N-BK7 lens blanks 100 mm in diameter x 30 mm thick. The lens is used monochromatically at 587.56 nm. The goal of the problem is to maximize the product of the entrance pupil diameter and the semi-field of view while holding the RMS wavefront error to <= 0.070 wave within the field of view. There were 45 entries from 13 different countries. Four different commercial lens design programs were used, along with six custom, in-house programs. The number of lens elements in the entries ranged from 10 to 52. The winning entry from Jon Ehrmann had 25 lens elements, and had an entrance pupil diameter of 33.9 mm and a semi-field of view of 62.5° for a merit function product of 2,119.

  18. Measuring space radiation impact on the characteristics of optical glasses; measurement results and recommendations from testing a selected set of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruit, Michel; Gusarov, Andrei I.; Doyle, Dominic B.

    2002-09-01

    Radiation sensitivity of glass is a general concern for the designer of Space optical instruments. ASTRIUM, in cooperation with SCK-CEN, has conducted a study (under ESA sponsorship) to define the approach for the gathering of a comprehensive database to quantify these effects through the use of linear sensitivity coefficients (called "Dose Coefficients"). These "Dose coefficients" cover not only transmittance but also other characteristics such as refractive index. After having recalled the basics of the proposed approach, results of the first irradiation tests which have been run on a selected set of classical glasses nd their Radiation hardened Cerium doped analogs (including BK7, K5, LaK9 and other Schott glasses) will be discussed. PRotons and gamma radiation have been performed with the aim to demonstrate equivalence, thus allowing to further considering only gamma radiation for an extensive testing of available glasses. Relaxation impacts on some months period have been tentatively analyzed. All these measurements have been processed and the modeling approach of the radiations impacts has been derived, as shown in the publication from A. Gusarov at this conference. This will constitute the grounds for the building of a comprehensive "Dose Coefficients" data base, as expressed in the publication from D. Doyle also at this conference. From this, recommendations for a sound characterization of radiation impacts on refractive optical materials have been established and are the subject of this publication.

  19. Comparison of radiation-induced transmission degradation of borosilicate crown optical glass from four different manufacturers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusarov, Andrei; Doyle, Dominic; Glebov, Leonid; Berghmans, Francis

    2005-09-01

    Space-born optical systems must be tolerant to radiation to guarantee that the required system performance is maintained during prolonged mission times. The radiation-induced absorption in optical glasses is often related with the presence of impurities, which are, intentionally or not, introduced during the manufacturing process. Glass manufacturers use proprietary fabrication processes and one can expect that the radiation sensitivity of nominally identical optical glasses from different manufacturers is different. We studied the gamma-radiation induced absorption of several crown glasses with nd ≈ 1.516 and vd ≈ 64, i.e. NBK7 (Schott), S-BSL7 (Ohara), BSC 517642 (Pilkington) and K8 (Russia). NBK7 recently replaced the well-known BK7. We therefore also compared the radiation response of NBK7 and BK7 glass. Our results show that whereas the glasses are optically similar before irradiation, they show a different induced absorption after irradiation and also different post-radiation recovery kinetics. Taking these differences into account can help to improve the radiation tolerance of optical systems for space applications.

  20. In vivo evaluation of iron bioavailability in some Nigerian peasant meals by haemoglobin regeneration technique.

    PubMed

    Udo, U F; Ifon, E T; Umoh, I B; Eka, O U

    1993-07-01

    The bioavailability of iron in three different rural Nigerian peasant meals was studied. The meals were: pounded yam (Discorea spp) with 'afia efere'--(plain soup); 'ekpang nkukwo'--grated cocoyam (Xanthosoma maffafa Schott) and cocoyam leaves with pepper and plantain porridge (Musa paradisiaca) with water leaf (Talinum triangulare). Analyses of the meals showed the protein content to range from 8.58 +/- 0.01 mg/100 g DM to 11.38 +/- 0.08/100g DM. Iron content ranged from 17.50 +/- 2.50 mg/100 DM to 23.94 +/- 3.56 mg/100g DM. The rehabilitation of mildly anaemic rats with test meals showed the percentage of the ingested iron utilised for haemoglobin synthesis as: 48.08 +/- 0.51 pc; 18.09 +/- 0.41 pc; 19.09 +/- 0.36 pc for the test diets respectively and 60.80 +/- 0.22 pc for the control group. A comparison of the utilization of iron between the test and the control groups showed that there was a significant difference (p < 0.01) between the test and the control groups. The low level of iron enhancers in the meals has been suggested as the possible cause of the marginal level of iron availability from the meals to the test animals. PMID:8205607

  1. Biodiversity of volatile organic compounds from five French ferns.

    PubMed

    Fons, Françoise; Froissard, Didier; Bessière, Jean-Marie; Buatois, Bruno; Rapior, Sylvie

    2010-10-01

    Five French ferns belonging to different families were investigated for volatile organic compounds (VOC) by GC-MS using organic solvent extraction. Fifty-five VOC biosynthesized from the shikimic, lipidic and terpenic pathways including monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes and carotenoid-type compounds were identified. The main volatile compound of Adiantum capillus-veneris L. (Pteridaceae) was (E)-2-decenal with a plastic or "stink bug" odor. The volatile profiles of Athyrium filix-femina (L.) Roth (Woodsiaceae) and Blechnum spicant (L.) Roth (Blechnaceae) showed similarities, with small amounts of isoprenoids and the same main volatile compounds, i.e., 2-phenylethanal (odor of lilac and hyacinth) and 1-octen-3-ol (mushroom-like odor). The main volatile compound of Dryopteris filix-mas (L.) Schott (Dryopteridaceae) was (E)-nerolidol with a woody or fresh bark note. Polyketides, as acylfilicinic acids, were mainly identified in this fern. Oreopteris limbosperma (Bellardi ex. All.) J. Holub (Thelypteridaceae), well-known for its lemon smell, contained the highest biodiversity of VOC. Eighty percent of the volatiles was issued from the terpenic pathway. The main volatiles were (E)-nerolidol, alpha-terpineol, beta-caryophyllene and other minor monoterpenes (for example, linalool, pinenes, limonene, and gamma-terpinen-7-al). It was also the fern with the highest number of carotenoid-type derivatives, which were identified in large amounts. Our results were of great interest underlying new industrial valorisation for ferns based on their broad spectrum of volatiles. PMID:21121267

  2. The validity of Cloninger's psychobiological model versus the five-factor model to predict DSM-IV personality disorders in a heterogeneous psychiatric sample: domain facet and residualized facet descriptions.

    PubMed

    De Fruyt, Filip; De Clercq, Barbara J; van de Wiele, Lieve; Van Heeringen, Kees

    2006-04-01

    The validity of Cloninger's psychobiological model and the Five-Factor Model of personality to predict DSM-IV personality disorders was examined in a psychiatric in-patient sample of 130 individuals. Patients completed Dutch authorized versions of the TCI (Cloninger, Svrakic, & Przybeck, 1993) and the NEO PI-R (Costa & McCrae, 1992) and were also administered the ADP-IV (Schotte & De Doncker, 1994), a Dutch self-report questionnaire to assess Axis-II disorders. No personality-descriptive model proved to be superior in explaining personality disorder symptoms at the higher-order level: the TCI dimensions better explained the Obsessive-Compulsive and the Narcissistic disorders, whereas the FFM accounted for more variance of the Avoidant disorder. However, differences were apparent at the lower-order level with the NEO facets out performing the TCI subscales for six to four personality disorders. FFM facet-level predictions of Widiger, Trull, Clarkin, Sanderson, and Costa (2002) were partially confirmed, with substantially better results using residualized facet scores. A set of TCI subscale personality disorder relationships is suggested. PMID:16529584

  3. Cost-Benefit Analysis of Managing the Papuana uninodis (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) Taro Beetle in Fiji.

    PubMed

    Brown, P; Daigneault, A

    2014-10-01

    Taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott) plays a prominent role in the economies and cultures of Pacific Island countries such as Fiji. Unfortunately, taro is highly susceptible to invasion from taro beetles, which burrow into the corms and weaken the plants, rendering them unmarkable and prone to rot. Papuana uninodis Prell, an invasive alien species that is native to the Solomon Islands and Vanuatu, was first reported on Viti Levu (Fiji's largest island) in 1984. Since that time, taro production on Viti Levu has fallen substantially. In this paper, we employ data from surveys of households and communities to document the impacts of P. uninodis on Viti Levu. We then identify three management approaches-chemical controls, cultural controls, and switching from taro to another staple crop-and conduct a cost-benefit analysis of each. We find strong arguments for pursuing chemical control, which derives a net present value of monetised benefits of about FJ$139,500 per hectare over 50 yr, or >FJ$21 for each FJ$1 spent. Still, any of the three management options is more efficient than no management, even without any attempt to quantify the benefits to biodiversity or forest protection, underscoring the value of actively managing this invasive alien species. PMID:26309277

  4. Optical glass: deviation of relative partial dispersion from the normal line-need for a common definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Peter

    2015-10-01

    The design of high-quality imaging lenses continues to strive for the best color trueness over wider and wider wavelength ranges such as for multiwavelength fluorescence microscopy or hyperspectral imaging. Glasses suitable for sharp images at more than two wavelengths must differ in their dispersion from the classical crown and flint glass types, which gather along a straight line in a plot of the relative partial dispersion against the Abbe number. Glasses suitable for multicolor correction can be recognized by a considerable deviation of their relative partial dispersion from this normal line. Originally, the normal lines for different relative partial dispersions were defined by using the SCHOTT glass types K7 and F2. Today's data sheets of all glass manufacturers contain numerical values for deviations of relative partial dispersions from the normal lines. A comparison of almost identical glasses shows differences between these deviations being too large, obviously coming from different versions of K7 and F2 dispersion curves used. For preselection in designs and for direct comparison of glass types, it is necessary to agree on common dispersion curves each for K7 and for F2 in order to obtain really comparable values for deviations of the relative partial dispersion from the normal line.

  5. Purification of Colocasia esculenta lectin and determination of its anti-insect potential towards Bactrocera cucurbitae.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Kshema; Kaur, Manpreet; Kaur, Satwinder; Kaur, Amritpal; Kamboj, Sukhdev Singh; Singh, Jatinder

    2013-01-01

    The present study reports the purification of a lectin from Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott corms and evaluation of its anti-insect potential towards Bactrocera cucurbitae (Coquilett). The lectin was found to be specific towards N-acetyl-D-lactosamine (LacNac), a disaccharide and asialofetuin, a desialylated serum glycoprotein in hemagglutination inhibition assay. Asialofetuin was used as a ligand to purify Colocasia esculenta agglutinin (CEA) by affinity chromatography. The purity of CEA was ascertained by the presence of a single band in reducing SDS-PAGE at pH 8.3. The affinity purified CEA was employed in artificial diet bioassay of second instar larvae (64-72 hr old) of the B. cucurbitae at concentrations ranging between 10-160 microg ml(-1). The lectin significantly (p < 0.01) decreased the percent pupation and emergence with respect to control. Effect on various enzymes was studied by employing LC50 (51.6 microg ml(-1)) CEA in the artificial diet bioassay of second instar larvae. All the enzymes tested namely esterases, phosphatases (acid and alkaline), superoxide dismutases, catalase and glutathione-S-transferase showed a significant (p < 0.01, p < 0.05) increase in their enzyme and specific activities. These results showed that CEA affected normal growth and development and presented stress to the larvae, activating their detoxification and anti-oxidant systems. Thus, the lectin seems to be a useful candidate for the control measures of B. cucurbitae under the integrated pest management (IPM) system. PMID:24006804

  6. Host races of the cotton aphid, Aphis gossypii, in asexual populations from wild plants of taro and brinjal.

    PubMed

    Agarwala, B K; Choudhury, Parichita Ray

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide, several studies have shown that adaptation to different host plants in phytophagous insects can promote speciation. The cotton aphid, Aphis gossypii Glover (Homoptera: Aphididae: Aphidini), is a highly polyphagous species, but its populations increase by parthenogenetic reproduction alone in Indian subcontinent. This study showed that genotypes living in wild plants of taro, Colocasia esculenta var. esculenta (L.) Schott (Alismatales: Araceae), and brinjal, Solanum torvum Swartz (Solanales: Solanaceae), behave as distinct host races. Success rates of colonization after reciprocal host transfers were very poor. Clones of A. gossypii from wild taro partly survived in the first generation when transferred to wild brinjal, but nymph mortality was 100% in the second generation. In contrast, brinjal clones, when transferred to taro, could not survive even in the first generation. Significant differences between the clones from two host species were also recorded in development time, generation time, fecundity, intrinsic rate of increase, net reproductive rate, and mean relative growth rate. Morphologically, aphids of wild taro clones possessed longer proboscis and fore-femora than the aphids of the brinjal clones. The results showed that A. gossypii exists as distinct host races with different abilities of colonizing host plants, and its populations appear to have more potential of sympatic evolution than previously regarded. PMID:23895554

  7. Analysis of the mineral composition of taro for determination of geographic origin.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Natsuko I; Tanoi, Keitaro; Hirose, Atsushi; Saito, Takayuki; Noda, Akihiko; Iwata, Naoko; Nakano, Akimasa; Nakamura, Satoru; Nakanishi, Tomoko M

    2011-05-11

    The mineral composition of taro ( Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott) was analyzed to develop a method to distinguish taro produced in Japan and China. The concentrations of 15 elements (Al, Ca, Cl, Mg, Mn, Br, Co, Cr, Cs, Fe, K, Na, Rb, Sc, Zn) were assayed using instrumental neutron activation analysis. The concentrations of NO(3)(-), SO(4)(2-), H(2)PO(4)(-), Cl(-), malate, and oxalate were measured by ion chromatography. The mean concentrations of H(2)PO(4)(-), Co, Cr, and Na significantly differed (P < 0.01) between taro grown in Japan and that grown in China. Discriminant analysis was performed to identify the most efficient combination of elements and compounds to discriminate the taro geographic origin. The highest percentage of correct classification was achieved with a two-variable model including H(2)PO(4)(-) and Co (100% for Japanese, 93.75% for Chinese). Principal component analysis and cluster analysis using all of the assayed elements and compounds were also conducted to determine which elements significantly accounted for the variation of the taro mineral composition. We report on the potential of H(2)PO(4)(-) and Co concentrations to differentiate taro grown in China and Japan and discuss the sources of variability in the taro mineral composition of our samples. PMID:21425858

  8. Repellent Activity of Some Essential Oils Against Simulium Species in India

    PubMed Central

    Hazarika, S; Dhiman, Sunil; Rabha, Bipul; Bhola, RK; Singh, Lokendera

    2012-01-01

    Use of repellents seems to be most reliable method of personal protection against annoyance and infections associated with haematophagous insects. We have investigated the biting activity of Simulium and tested the repellency of five essential oils extracted from Homalomena aromatica Schott (Alismatales: Araceae), Pogostemon heyneanus Bentham (Lamiales: Lamiaceae), Citrus aurantifolia Swingle (Sapindales: Rutaceae), Vitex negundo L. (Lamiales: Lamiaceae), and Ageratum conzoides L. (Asterales: Asteraceae) on the human volunteers against Simulium (blackflies) in three locations of Arunachal Pradesh, India. Blackflies preferred biting legs (> 79%) as compared to hand and face with profound biting activity during 1000–1100 h (> 23%) and 1500 – 1600 h (> 28%). The essential oil extracted from Homalomena aromatica, Vitex negundo and Ageratum conizoides provided > 2 h protection at 5% concentration and > 5 h protection at 10% concentration in all the three testing locations. The repellency of Homalomena aromatica, Vitex negundo and Ageratum conizoides essential oils after 6 h application was > 50% at 5% concentration and > 90% at 10% concentration. The study provides evidence for the potential of these essential oils in developing new repellents against blackflies. PMID:22943569

  9. Characterization and swelling-deswelling properties of wheat straw cellulose based semi-IPNs hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Li, Qian; Su, Yuan; Yue, Qinyan; Gao, Baoyu

    2014-07-17

    A novel wheat straw cellulose-g-poly(potassium acrylate)/polyvinyl alcohol (WSC-g-PKA/PVA) semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (semi-IPNs) hydrogel was prepared by polymerizing wheat straw and an aqueous solution of acrylic acid (AA), and further semi-interpenetrating with PVA occurred during the chemosynthesis. The swelling and deswelling properties of WSC-g-PKA/PVA semi-IPNs hydrogel and WSC-g-PKA hydrogel were studied and compared in various pH solutions, salt solutions, temperatures, particle sizes and ionic strength. The results indicated that both hydrogels had the largest swelling capacity at pH=6, and the effect of ions on the swelling of hydrogels was in the order: Na(+)>K(+)>Mg(2+)>Ca(2+). The Schott's pseudo second order model can be effectively used to evaluate swelling kinetics of hydrogels. Moreover, the semi-IPNs hydrogel had improved swelling-deswelling properties compared with that of WSC-g-PKA hydrogel. PMID:24702940

  10. Glass ceramic ZERODUR enabling nanometer precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedamzik, Ralf; Kunisch, Clemens; Nieder, Johannes; Westerhoff, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    The IC Lithography roadmap foresees manufacturing of devices with critical dimension of < 20 nm. Overlay specification of single digit nanometer asking for nanometer positioning accuracy requiring sub nanometer position measurement accuracy. The glass ceramic ZERODUR® is a well-established material in critical components of microlithography wafer stepper and offered with an extremely low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), the tightest tolerance available on market. SCHOTT is continuously improving manufacturing processes and it's method to measure and characterize the CTE behavior of ZERODUR® to full fill the ever tighter CTE specification for wafer stepper components. In this paper we present the ZERODUR® Lithography Roadmap on the CTE metrology and tolerance. Additionally, simulation calculations based on a physical model are presented predicting the long term CTE behavior of ZERODUR® components to optimize dimensional stability of precision positioning devices. CTE data of several low thermal expansion materials are compared regarding their temperature dependence between - 50°C and + 100°C. ZERODUR® TAILORED 22°C is full filling the tight CTE tolerance of +/- 10 ppb / K within the broadest temperature interval compared to all other materials of this investigation. The data presented in this paper explicitly demonstrates the capability of ZERODUR® to enable the nanometer precision required for future generation of lithography equipment and processes.

  11. ZERODUR® glass ceramics for high stress applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Peter; Nattermann, Kurt; Döhring, Thorsten; Jedamzik, Ralf; Kuhr, Markus; Thomas, Peter; Kling, Guenther; Lucarelli, Stefano

    2009-08-01

    Recently SCHOTT has shown in a series of investigations the suitability of the zero expansion glass ceramic material ZERODUR® for applications like mirrors and support structures of complicated design used at high mechanical loads. Examples are vibrations during rocket launches, bonded elements to support single mirrors or mirrors of a large array, or controlled deformations for optical image correction, i.e. adaptive mirrors. Additional measurements have been performed on the behavior of ZERODUR® with respect to the etching process, which is capable of increasing strength significantly. It has been determined, which minimum layer thickness has to be removed in order to achieve the strength increase reliably. New data for the strength of the material variant ZERODUR K20® prepared with a diamond grain tool D151 are available and compared with the data of ZERODUR® specimens prepared in the same way. Data for the stress corrosion coefficient n of ZERODUR® for dry and normal humid environment have been measured already in the 1980s. It has been remeasured with the alternative double cleavage drilled compression (DCDC) method.

  12. Production of the 4.26 m ZERODUR mirror blank for the Advanced Technology Solar telescope (ATST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedamzik, Ralf; Werner, Thomas; Westerhoff, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    The Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST, formerly the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope, ATST) will be the most powerful solar telescope in the world. It is currently being built by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) in a height of 3000 m above sea level on the mountain Haleakala of Maui, Hawaii. The primary mirror blank of diameter 4.26 m is made of the extremely low thermal expansion glass ceramic ZERODUR® of SCHOTT AG Advanced Optics. The DKIST primary mirror design is extremely challenging. With a mirror thickness of only 78 to 85 mm it is the smallest thickness ever machined on a mirror of 4.26 m in diameter. Additionally the glassy ZERODUR® casting is one of the largest in size ever produced for a 4 m class ZERODUR® mirror blank. The off axis aspherical mirror surface required sophisticated grinding procedures to achieve the specified geometrical tolerance. The small thickness of about 80 mm required special measures during processing, lifting and transport. Additionally acid etch treatment was applied to the convex back-surface and the conical shaped outer diameter surface to improve the strength of the blank. This paper reports on the challenging tasks and the achievements on the material property and dimensional specification parameter during the production of the 4.26 m ZERODUR® primary mirror blank for AURA.

  13. ZERODUR: bending strength data for etched surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Peter; Leys, Antoine; Carré, Antoine; Kerz, Franca; Westerhoff, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    In a continuous effort since 2007 a considerable amount of new data and information has been gathered on the bending strength of the extremely low thermal expansion glass ceramic ZERODUR®. By fitting a three parameter Weibull distribution to the data it could be shown that for homogenously ground surfaces minimum breakage stresses exist lying much higher than the previously applied design limits. In order to achieve even higher allowable stress values diamond grain ground surfaces have been acid etched, a procedure widely accepted as strength increasing measure. If surfaces are etched taking off layers with thickness which are comparable to the maximum micro crack depth of the preceding grinding process they also show statistical distributions compatible with a three parameter Weibull distribution. SCHOTT has performed additional measurement series with etch solutions with variable composition testing the applicability of this distribution and the possibility to achieve further increase of the minimum breakage stress. For long term loading applications strength change with time and environmental media are important. The parameter needed for prediction calculations which is combining these influences is the stress corrosion constant. Results from the past differ significantly from each other. On the basis of new investigations better information will be provided for choosing the best value for the given application conditions.

  14. Testing of the Gemini secondary mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Wolfgang

    1999-09-01

    The first 1-m secondary mirror for the Gemini 8-m telescopes project was delivered by Zeiss in 1998, and 2nd mirror will be delivered in the summer of 1999. For first use during commissioning we produced an extreme lightweight Zerodur solution prefabricated at Schott. To reach the 85 percent weight reduction a novel etching technique was used. INterferometric testing was done performing full aperture measurements using a concave matrix. In progress with the fabrication process of the matrix we applied 3D-mechanical measurements, IR-interferometry, and VIS-interferometry using null lenses to reach the final intrinsic quality of 6 nm rms. For interferometric testing of the secondaries phase shifting interferometry with a tunable laser diode was applied. The optical test results of the secondaries show, that the mirrors are well within specification. The finally achieved intrinsic surface quality is 17 nm rms for Unit 1 and 13 nm rms for Unit 2, dominated by cutting effects which were introduced by removing the oversize at the inner and outer edge of the mirror after the final polishing step.

  15. Glass-containing composite cathode contact materials for solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Michael C.; Cheng, Lei; DeJonghe, Lutgard C.

    2011-10-01

    The feasibility of adding glass to conventional SOFC cathode contact materials in order to improve bonding to adjacent materials in the cell stack is assessed. A variety of candidate glass compositions are added to LSM and SSC. The important properties of the resulting composites, including conductivity, sintering behavior, coefficient of thermal expansion, and adhesion to LSCF and Mn1.5Co1.5O4-coated 441 stainless steel are used as screening parameters. Adhesion of LSM to LSCF improved from 3.9 to 5.3 MPa upon addition of SCZ-8 glass. Adhesion of LSM to coated stainless steel improved from 1.8 to 3.9 MPa upon addition of Schott GM31107 glass. The most promising cathode contact material/glass composites are coated onto Mn1.5Co1.5O4-coated 441 stainless steel substrates and subjected to area-specific resistance testing at 800 °C. In all cases, area-specific resistance is found to be in the range 2.5-7.5 mOhm cm2 and therefore acceptable. Indeed, addition of glass is found to improve bonding of the cathode contact material layer without sacrificing acceptable conductivity.

  16. Bending strength measurements at different materials used for IR-cut filters in mobile camera devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Volker; Hartmann, Peter; Kerz, Franca

    2015-03-01

    Digital cameras are present everywhere in our daily life. Science, business or private life cannot be imagined without digital images. The quality of an image is often rated by its color rendering. In order to obtain a correct color recognition, a near infrared cut (IRC-) filter must be used to alter the sensitivity of imaging sensor. Increasing requirements related to color balance and larger angle of incidence (AOI) enforced the use of new materials as the e.g. BG6X series which substitutes interference coated filters on D263 thin glass. Although the optical properties are the major design criteria, devices have to withstand numerous environmental conditions during use and manufacturing - as e.g. temperature change, humidity, and mechanical shock, as wells as mechanical stress. The new materials show different behavior with respect to all these aspects. They are usually more sensitive against these requirements to a larger or smaller extent. Mechanical strength is especially different. Reliable strength data are of major interest for mobile phone camera applications. As bending strength of a glass component depends not only upon the material itself, but mainly on the surface treatment and test conditions, a single number for the strength might be misleading if the conditions of the test and the samples are not described precisely,. Therefore, Schott started investigations upon the bending strength data of various IRC-filter materials. Different test methods were used to obtain statistical relevant data.

  17. Optimisation of an integrated optical evanescent wave absorbance sensor for the determination of chlorinated hydrocarbons in water.

    PubMed

    Mayer, J; Bürck, J; Ache, H J

    1996-03-01

    The suitability of an integrated optical chemical sensor for the determination of highly volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons in aqueous solutions has been proven. The analytes are detected by NIR absorption spectrometry in the evanescent field of an integrated optical strip waveguide generated in a BGG31 (Schott, Germany) glass substrate, which is coated with a hydrophobic polymer superstrate as sensing layer. It has been shown that the sensitivity increases when the refractive index of the superstrate is increased from 1.333 up to 1.46. Different UV-cured polysiloxanes with low cross sensitivity to water have been prepared. Due to the good light transmission properties of the IO-sensors prepared by this method, quantitative measurements have been performed with the model system trichloroethene (TCE) in water. A detection limit of 22 ppm has been found and the sensor response times (t(90)-value) are between five and fourteen minutes for a coating thickness of around 30 microm. The sensor response is totally reversible. The analyte desorbes in air within 2 min. The enrichment of trichloroethene in the polysiloxane coating can be described by film diffusion through the aqueous boundary layer as rate determining step. PMID:15048399

  18. Production of thin glass mirrors by hot slumping for x-ray telescopes: present process and ongoing development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmaso, B.; Basso, S.; Brizzolari, C.; Civitani, M.; Ghigo, M.; Pareschi, G.; Spiga, D.; Tagliaferri, G.; Vecchi, G.

    2014-07-01

    Thin glass foils are considered good candidates to build a segmented X-ray telescope with effective area as large as 2 m2 and angular resolution better than 5 arcsec. In order to produce thin glass mirror segments, we developed a direct hot slumping technique assisted by pressure, in which the shape of a mould is replicated onto the optical surface of the glass. In this paper we present the result obtained with AF32 (by Schott) and EAGLE XG (by Corning) glass types. The selected mould material is Zerodur K20, as it does not require any anti-sticking layer and has a good matching, in terms of Coefficient of Thermal Expansion, with both glass types. Our group already produced a few prototypes, reaching angular resolution near 20 arcsec. In this work, relevant steps forward aimed at attaining a 5 arcsec angular resolution are described, along with the tuning of few key parameters in the slumping process. The results obtained on a newly procured cylindrical Zerodur K20 mould are presented.

  19. NANOSECOND INTERFEROMETRIC STUDIES OF SURFACE DEFORMATIONS OF DIELECTRICS INDUCED BY LASER IRRADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    S. GREENFIELD; ET AL

    2000-05-01

    Transient surface deformations in dielectric materials induced by laser irradiation were investigated with time-resolved interferometry. Deformation images were acquired at various delay times after exposure to single pulses (100 ps at 1.064 {micro}m) on fresh sample regions. Above the ablation threshold, we observe prompt ejection of material and the formation of a single unipolar compressional surface acoustic wave propagating away from the ablation crater. For calcite, no deformation--either transient or permanent--is discernable at laser fluences below the threshold for material ejection. Above and below-threshold behavior was investigated using a phosphate glass sample with substantial near infrared absorption (Schott filter KG3). Below threshold, KG3 exhibits the formation of a small bulge roughly the size of the laser spot that reaches its maximum amplitude by {approx}5 ns. By tens of nanoseconds, the deformations become quite complex and very sensitive to laser fluence. The above-threshold behavior of KG3 combines the ablation-induced surface acoustic wave seen in calcite with the bulge seen below threshold in KG3. A velocity of 2.97 {+-} 0.03 km/s is measured for the KG3 surface acoustic wave, very close to the Rayleigh wave velocity calculated from material elastic parameters. Details of the transient interferometry system will also be given.

  20. A technique for production glass macro-shells for ICF targets. Final report, 1 November 1986--31 October 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Day, D.E.; Wang, S.C.P.

    1987-11-25

    A study of bubble formation, movement and distortion in viscous glass is described. A glass rod containing an irregularly shaped hole is heated to a temperature at where the glass viscosity is low enough to let the hole form a spherical bubble. Spheration occurs as the bubble moves upward in the glass rod. At the proper time, the rising bubble is decelerated and brought to a stop by increasing the glass viscosity by slowly reducing the temperature. The entrapped bubble is then cut from the glass rod and heated again, if necessary, to a lower temperature, to reduce distortion of the bubble. Conditions distorting the bubble and ways to reduce the distortion have been investigated. With the present technique, bubbles have been produced in Corning 7740 and Schott BK-7 glasses with a nominal diameter of 3 and 6 mm that have a distortion of 0.3%. Glass macro shells can be formed from the bubbles trapped in the glass by grinding the outside surface concentric with the perfectly spherical inside surface. These high quality glass shells, with a high degree of geometrical perfection, should be adequate for inertial confinement fusion targets.

  1. Lightweight ZERODUR: a cost-effective thermally stable approach to both large and small spaceborne telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Tony; Westerhoff, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    ZERODUR®, known as the "gold standard" material for systems which require dimensional stability in the presence of gradients and transients, is now available lightweighted to the 85% to 90% level for use in high performance spaceborne telescopes and sensor systems. This establishes a design option that may have cost, testability, performance and risk advantages for an entire sensor system payload. The technical approach to making these primary mirrors is the same, whether the aperture is <0.3m to <4.0m. Since each mirror blank is made from a single monolithic billet of near zero-expansion, isotropic and homogeneous ZERODUR® material, the resulting mirror is very stable over a wide range of scenes and orbits, with minimal to no need for ancillary thermal stability and wavefront sensing and control systems. Telescopes using ZERODUR® and low expansion metering structures can accommodate thermal design challenges of both non-thermal (UV, VIS, LLLTV, NIR, SWIR and mm) and thermal (MWIR, LWIR) imaging systems, and deliver optimal performance. This lightweight mirror technology is discussed, with actual examples by SCHOTT of 0.3m and 1.2m mirrors presented. Lightweight ZERODUR® mirrors offer superior optical performance, attractive cost and aggressive lead times, and are available to present and future spaceborne sensor trades.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Parallaxes for 1507 nearby mid-to-late M dwarfs (Dittmann+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmann, J. A.; Irwin, J. M.; Charbonneau, D.; Berta-Thompson, Z. K.

    2016-08-01

    The MEarth Observatory is an array consisting of eight identical f/9 40cm Ritchey-Chretien telescopes on German equatorial mounts at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory on Mount Hopkins, Arizona. The telescopes are controlled robotically and collect data every clear night from September through July. The facility is closed every August for the summer monsoons. Each telescope contains a 2048*2048 pixel CCD with a pixel scale of ~0.76/pixel and a Schott RG715 glass filter with anti-reflection coating. The cutoff is defined by the CCD response, and the effective bandpass is similar to the union of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey i and z filters. The MEarth target list consists of ~1800 nearby M dwarfs selected from Lepine 2005 (cat. J/AJ/130/1680), a subset of the LSPM-North catalog (Lepine & Shara 2005, cat. I/298) believed to be within 33pc of the Sun. The subset of the MEarth sample presented here includes 1507 mid-to-late M dwarfs (see Table2) for which we can obtain reliable results. Of the 1507 stars, 1267 had no previous trigonometric parallax measurement. The data presented here covers the time period from 2008 September through 2013 July. (1 data file).

  3. Phenazines and biosurfactants interact in the biological control of soil-borne diseases caused by Pythium spp.

    PubMed

    Perneel, Maaike; D'hondt, Liesbet; De Maeyer, Katrien; Adiobo, Amayana; Rabaey, Korneel; Höfte, Monica

    2008-03-01

    In this study, the putative role of phenazines and rhamnolipid-biosurfactants, antagonistic metabolites produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PNA1, was tested in the biological control of Pythium splendens on bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L) and Pythium myriotylum on cocoyam (Xanthosoma sagittifolium L Schott). A rhamnolipid-deficient and a phenazine-deficient mutant of PNA1 were used either separately or jointly in plant experiments. When the mutants were applied separately, no disease-suppressive effect was observed, although both mutants still produced one of the antagonistic compounds (phenazines or rhamnolipids). When the mutants were concurrently introduced in the soil, the biocontrol activity was restored to wild-type levels. Bean seeds developed significantly less pre-emergence damping-off caused by P. splendens when treated with a mixture of purified phenazine-1-carboxamide and rhamnolipids than with any of the chemicals alone. When phenazines and rhamnolipids were combined at concentrations that had no observable effects when the metabolites were applied separately, mycelial growth of P. myriotylum was significantly reduced. In addition, microscopic analysis revealed substantial vacuolization and disintegration of Pythium hyphae after incubation in liquid medium amended with both metabolites. Results of this study indicate that phenazines and biosurfactants are acting synergistically in the control of Pythium spp. PMID:18237310

  4. Evaluation of the surface strength of glass plates shaped by hot slumping process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proserpio, Laura; Basso, Stefano; Borsa, Francesco; Citterio, Oberto; Civitani, Marta; Ghigo, Mauro; Pareschi, Giovanni; Salmaso, Bianca; Sironi, Giorgia; Spiga, Daniele; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero; D'Este, Alberto; Dall'Igna, Roberto; Silvestri, Mirko; Parodi, Giancarlo; Martelli, Francesco; Bavdaz, Marcos; Wille, Eric

    2014-08-01

    Hot slumping technology is under development by several research groups in the world for the realization of grazing-incidence segmented mirrors for x-ray astronomy, based on thin glass plates shaped over a mold at temperatures above the transformation point. The performed thermal cycle and related operations might have effects on the strength of the glass, with consequences for the structural design of the elemental optical modules and, consequently, on the entire x-ray optic for large astronomical missions such as IXO and ATHENA. The mechanical strength of glass plates after they underwent the slumping process was tested through destructive double-ring tests in the context of a study performed by the Astronomical Observatory of Brera with the collaboration of Stazione Sperimentale del Vetro and BCV Progetti. The entire study was done on more than 200 D263 Schott borosilicate glass specimens of dimensions 100 mm×100 mm and a thickness 0.4 mm, either flat or bent at a radius of curvature of 1000 mm through the pressure-assisted hot slumping process developed by INAF-OAB. The collected experimental data have been compared with nonlinear finite element model analyses and treated with the Weibull statistic to assess the current IXO glass x-ray telescope design, in terms of survival probability, when subjected to static and acoustic loads characteristic of the launch phase. The paper describes the activities performed and presents the obtained results.

  5. Slope variation and population structure of tree species from different ecological groups in South Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bianchini, Edmilson; Garcia, Cristina C; Pimenta, José A; Torezan, José M D

    2010-09-01

    Size structure and spatial arrangement of 13 abundant tree species were determined in a riparian forest fragment in Paraná State, South Brazil (23°16'S and 51°01'W). The studied species were Aspidosperma polyneuron Müll. Arg., Astronium graveolens Jacq. and Gallesia integrifolia (Spreng) Harms (emergent species); Alseis floribunda Schott, Ruprechtia laxiflora Meisn. and Bougainvillea spectabilis Willd. (shade-intolerant canopy species); Machaerium paraguariense Hassl, Myroxylum peruiferum L. and Chrysophyllum gonocarpum (Mart. & Eichler ex Miq.) Engl. (shade-tolerant canopy species); Sorocea bonplandii (Baill.) Bürger, Trichilia casaretti C. Dc, Trichilia catigua A. Juss. and Actinostemon concolor (Spreng.) Müll. Arg. (understory small trees species). Height and diameter structures and basal area of species were analyzed. Spatial patterns and slope correlation were analyzed by Moran's / spatial autocorrelation coefficient and partial Mantel test, respectively. The emergent and small understory species showed the highest and the lowest variations in height, diameter and basal area. Size distribution differed among emergent species and also among canopy shade-intolerant species. The spatial pattern ranged among species in all groups, except in understory small tree species. The slope was correlated with spatial pattern for A. polyneuron, A. graveolens, A. floribunda, R. laxiflora, M. peruiferum and T. casaretti. The results indicated that most species occurred in specific places, suggesting that niche differentiation can be an important factor in structuring the tree community. PMID:21562693

  6. Characterization and calibration of a viscoelastic simplified potential energy clock model for inorganic glasses

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chambers, Robert S.; Tandon, Rajan; Stavig, Mark E.

    2015-07-07

    In this study, to analyze the stresses and strains generated during the solidification of glass-forming materials, stress and volume relaxation must be predicted accurately. Although the modeling attributes required to depict physical aging in organic glassy thermosets strongly resemble the structural relaxation in inorganic glasses, the historical modeling approaches have been distinctly different. To determine whether a common constitutive framework can be applied to both classes of materials, the nonlinear viscoelastic simplified potential energy clock (SPEC) model, developed originally for glassy thermosets, was calibrated for the Schott 8061 inorganic glass and used to analyze a number of tests. A practicalmore » methodology for material characterization and model calibration is discussed, and the structural relaxation mechanism is interpreted in the context of SPEC model constitutive equations. SPEC predictions compared to inorganic glass data collected from thermal strain measurements and creep tests demonstrate the ability to achieve engineering accuracy and make the SPEC model feasible for engineering applications involving a much broader class of glassy materials.« less

  7. Manufacturing laser glass by continuous melting

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J H; Suratwala, T; krenitsky, S; Takeuchi, K

    2000-07-01

    A novel, continuous melting process is being used to manufacture meter-sized plates of laser glass at a rate 20-times faster, 5-times cheaper, and with 2-3 times better optical quality than with previous one-at-a-time, ''discontinuous'' technology processes. This new technology for manufacturing laser glass, which is arguably the most difficult continuously-melted optical material ever produced, comes as a result of a $60 million, six-year joint R&D program between government and industry. The glasses manufactured by the new continuous melting process are Nd-doped phosphate-based glasses and are marketed under the product names LG-770 (Schott Glass Technologies) and LHG-8 (Hoya Corporation USA). With this advance in glass manufacturing technology, it is now possible to construct high-energy, high-peak-power lasers for use in fusion energy development, national defense, and basic physics research that would have been impractical to build using the old melting technology. The development of continuously melted laser glass required technological advances that have lead to improvements in the manufacture of other optical glass products as well. For example, advances in forming, annealing, and conditioning steps of the laser glass continuous melting process are now being used in manufacture of other large-size optical glasses.

  8. Investigations of the ultrafast laser induced melt dynamics by means of transient quantitative phase microscopy (TQPm)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mingareev, Ilya; Horn, Alexander

    2008-05-01

    Modifications of bulk aluminum irradiated well above ablation threshold (F < 300 J.cm-2) have been investigated in situ by means of shadowgraphy and transient quantitative phase microscopy (TQPm) using ultrafast laser radiation (tp=80 fs, λ=800 nm). This novel pump-probe technique enables quantitative time-resolved measurements of object's properties, e.g. dimensions of melt droplets and layer thickness or transient refractive index changes. A series of time-resolved phase images of vaporized material and/or melt, which are induced by n=1..8 pulses on an aluminum target, are obtained using TQPm. Dynamics and characteristics of melting, dependence of the ablated material volume on process parameters and thereby induced structural modifications have been studied. An increase of material ejection rate is observed at delay time of approximately τ=300 ns and τ>800 ns after the incident pulse. Transient refractive index modifications have been investigated in technical glass (Schott D263) by means of TQPm. By using high-repetition rate ultra-short pulsed laser radiation (tp=400 fs, λ=1045 nm, frep=1 MHz) focused by a microscope objective (w0 ~ 4 μm) heat accumulation and thereby glass melting as well as welding is enabled. Transient optical phase variation has been measured up to τ=2.1 μs after the incident pulse and can be attributed to the generation of free charge carriers and compression forces inside glass.

  9. Phosphorus removal from domestic wastewater by Echinodorus cordifolius L.

    PubMed

    Torit, Jirawan; Siangdung, Wipawan; Thiravetyan, Paitip

    2012-01-01

    This study was to use the plants to remove phosphorus from domestic wastewater which contained high phosphorus concentration. Six higher plant species such as Crinum asiaticum L., Echinodorus cordifolius L., Spathiphyllum clevelandii Schott, Rhizophora apiculata Blume, Thalia dealbata J.fraser., Heliconia psittacorum L.f. were screened for phosphorus removal. Plants were grown in the domestic wastewater and the remaining phosphorus-phosphate concentration in the systems was determined. The results indicated that among studied plants, Echinodorus cordifolius L. was the best for phosphorus removal. Using this plant will improve the quality of domestic wastewater which contained excess phosphorus concentration and induced eutrophication. The relationship between the plants, microorganisms, and soil in the system were also investigated. In this system, adsorption by soil was the major role for phosphorus removal (71%), followed by E. cordifolius (16%), microorganisms in domestic wastewater (7%), and microorganisms in soil (6%). These results indicated the ability of E. cordifolius to remove phosphorus which was superior to that of the microorganisms in the system. Moreover, the rapid phosphorus removal was concomitant to the growth, photosynthesis activity and biomass of E. cordifolius grown in domestic wastewater. The C:N:P ratio of E. cordifolius tissue in the system indicated that elements were taken up from the wastewater. From these results, the suitability of E. cordifolius for domestic wastewater treatment was confirmed. PMID:22416873

  10. Laser properties of a new average-power Nd-doped phosphate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, S. A.; Marshall, C. D.; Bayramian, A.; Wilke, G. D.; Hayden, J. S.

    1995-09-01

    The Nd-doped phosphate laser glass described herein can withstand 2.3 times greater thermal loading without fracture, compared to APG-1 (commercially available Average-Power Glass from Schott Glass Technologies). The enhanced thermal loading capability is established on the basis of the intrinsic thermomechanical properties (expansion, conduction, fracture toughness, and Young's modulus), and by direct thermally induced fracture experiments using Ar-ion laser heating of the samples. This Nd-doped phosphate glass (referred to as APG-t) is found to be characterized by a 29% lower gain cross section and a 25% longer low-concentration emission lifetime. Other measurements pertaining to the concentration quenching, thermal lensing, and saturation of the extraction are also described in this article. It is note-worthy that APG-t offers increased bandwidth near the peak of the 1054 nm gain spectrum, suggesting that this material may have special utility as a means of generating and amplifying ultrashort pulses of light.

  11. Karyotype analysis and visualization of 45S rRNA genes using fluorescence in situ hybridization in aroids (Araceae)

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmanan, Prabhu Shankar; Van Laere, Katrijn; Eeckhaut, Tom; Van Huylenbroeck, Johan; Van Bockstaele, Erik; Khrustaleva, Ludmila

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Karyotype analysis and FISH mapping using 45S rDNA sequences on 6 economically important plant species Anthurium andraeanum Linden ex André, 1877, Monstera deliciosa Liebmann, 1849, Philodendron scandens Koch & Sello, 1853, Spathiphyllum wallisii Regel, 1877, Syngonium auritum (Linnaeus, 1759) Schott, 1829 and Zantedeschia elliottiana (Knight, 1890) Engler, 1915 within the monocotyledonous family Araceae (aroids) were performed. Chromosome numbers varied between 2n=2x=24 and 2n=2x=60 and the chromosome length varied between 15.77 µm and 1.87 µm. No correlation between chromosome numbers and genome sizes was observed for the studied genera. The chromosome formulas contained only metacentric and submetacentric chromosomes, except for Philodendron scandens in which also telocentric and subtelocentric chromosomes were observed. The highest degree of compaction was calculated for Spathiphyllum wallisii (66.49Mbp/µm). B-chromosome-like structures were observed in Anthurium andraeanum. Their measured size was 1.87 times smaller than the length of the shortest chromosome. After FISH experiments, two 45S rDNA sites were observed in 5 genera. Only in Zantedeschia elliottiana, 4 sites were seen. Our results showed clear cytogenetic differences among genera within Araceae, and are the first molecular cytogenetics report for these genera. These chromosome data and molecular cytogenetic information are useful in aroid breeding programmes, systematics and evolutionary studies. PMID:26140158

  12. Cost-optimized methods extending the solution space of lightweight spaceborne monolithic ZERODUR® mirrors to larger sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leys, Antoine; Hull, Tony; Westerhoff, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    We address the problem that larger spaceborne mirrors require greater sectional thickness to achieve a sufficient first eigen frequency that is resilient to launch loads, and to be stable during optical telescope assembly integration and test, this added thickness results in unacceptable added mass if we simply scale up solutions for smaller mirrors. Special features, like cathedral ribs, arch, chamfers, and back-side following the contour of the mirror face have been considered for these studies. For computational efficiency, we have conducted detailed analysis on various configurations of a 800 mm hexagonal segment and of a 1.2-m mirror, in a manner that they can be constrained by manufacturing parameters as would be a 4-m mirror. Furthermore each model considered also has been constrained by cost-effective machining practice as defined in the SCHOTT Mainz factory. Analysis on variants of this 1.2-m mirror has shown a favorable configuration. We have then scaled this optimal configuration to 4-m aperture. We discuss resulting parameters of costoptimized 4-m mirrors. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages this analysis reveals of going to cathedral rib architecture on 1-m class mirror substrates.

  13. Laser textured substrates for light in-coupling in thin-film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakanga, Kambulakwao; Siepmann, Ortwin; Sergeev, Oleg; Geißendörfer, Stefan; von Maydell, Karsten; Agert, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the use of a picosecond (ps) laser used for monolithic connection to texture three commercially available and frequently used multicomponent glasses, Corning EAGLE XG, Schott BOROFLOAT 33 and Saint-Gobain SGG DIAMANT. The results show that the ablated crater profile and degree of texturing are glass composition dependent. This might be attributed to the different laser-induced electron collision times and recombination rates, and thus the critical electron density evolution leading to ablation. The surface texture is altered from periodic to random with decreasing scribing speed. The transmission of the textured substrates gradually decreases, whereas the multireflection on the surface increases as a consequence of the topological and morphological changes. The angular resolved measurements illustrate that the textured glass substrates scatter the light toward greater angles, which is necessary to increase the effective optical path in the absorber layer. Simulation results show that textured glass increases the absorption in the absorber material and the slightly modified refractive index region around the crater does not counteract the light in-coupling effect. The results suggest that these substrates can be used in various photovoltaic technologies and show potential for the application of alternative front contacts, such as carbon nanotubes.

  14. Laser textured substrates for light in-coupling in thin-film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakanga, Kambulakwao; Siepmann, Ortwin; Sergeev, Oleg; Geißendörfer, Stefan; von Maydell, Karsten; Agert, Carsten

    2014-03-01

    In this work we investigate the use of a picosecond (ps) laser used for monolithic connection to pattern glass substrates to achieve light in-coupling in silicon thin film solar cells. We present our results on the patterning of three commercially available and frequently used multi-component glasses Corning EAGLE XG®, Schott BOROFLOAT® 33 and Saint-Gobain SGG DIAMANT®. We find that the different glass structural components influence the degree of texturing obtained. This can be attributed to the different laser induced electron collision times and recombination rates, and thus the critical electron density evolution leading to ablation. Thus the ablated crater profile is glass composition dependent. The surface texture is altered from periodic to random with decreasing scribing speed. The transmission of the textured substrates gradually decreases while the reflection increases as a consequence of the topological and morphological changes. The angular resolved measurements illustrate that highly textured substrates scatter the light towards greater angles. This demonstrates potential for the application in substrate configuration (nip) thin film solar cells, as the scattering can increase the optical path, and hence the absorption in the absorber layer. Simulations of periodically textured glass substrates demonstrate a focused optical generation rate near the front contact and absorber layer interface. The influence of the modified refractive index region on the optical generation rate and reflection depends on the crater profile. The reflection is generally reduced when a periodic texture in the micrometre range is implemented.

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Carbon stars from Baldone telescope (Alksne+ 1987)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alksne, Z.; Alksnis, A.; Ozolina, V.; Platais, I.

    1997-04-01

    This catalogue contains data on 318 cool carbon stars discovered on objective prism photographs taken with the Schmidt Telescope (80/120/240 cm) of the Radioastrophysical Observatory at Baldone near Riga. Green-yellow survey (BC Nos 1-217) is made on the ortochromatic astronomical films A-600. Reciprocial dispersion of the spectra: 600 A/mm or 1130 A/mm at H-gamma. The region of the sky covered by the survey: 1) 4.5 degrees wide zones centered on the galactic latitudes +7 and -7 degrees between longitudes 68 and 200 degrees, 2) equatorial zone at longitudes 84-96 degrees and 172-180 degrees, 3) several other separate fields with five degrees diameter. Infrared survey (BC Nos 218-318) made on the infrared Kodak plates 1N with the filter Schott RG1. Reciprocial dispersion: 2500 A/mm at the atmospheric A-band. The region of the sky covered: 1) 4.5 degrees wide zone centered on the galactic latitude +7 degrees between longitudes 128 and 140 degrees, 2) region between latitudes +9.5 and -9.5 degrees and longitudes between 80 and 96 degrees. (1 data file).

  16. UV Thermoluminescence and Phosphorescence Properties of Mg2+ and Nd3+ Doped Nanostructured Al2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitencourt, J. F. S.; Gonçalves, K. A.; Tatumi, S. H.; Marcos, P. J. B.

    2010-11-01

    Mg2+ and Nd3+ doped aluminium oxide samples were produced by polymer calcination method. Mg2+ doped samples did not exhibited significant fluorescence emission, using IR (LED, emission centered at 862nm) or green (Xe-lamp plus optical filter, emission centered at 520 nm) sources. Nonetheless, high thermostimulated luminescence was detected, with high emission peak at 190°C. A nanoscopic layer (about 50 nm width) of magnesium spinel was observed by Transmission Electronic Microscopy (TEM) for 2.61mol% doped sample; this layer can be the responsible for TL enhancement. Nd3+ doped sample exhibited low phosphorescence emission in the UV (Schott U-340) using IR source. TL peaks were detected at 185 and 265°C the intermediary peak showed the highest emission. Occurrence of NdAl and NdAl2 structures were detected in 5 mol% doped sample and NdAl2 and NdAl4 structures in 10 mol% doped sample.

  17. New MADS-box gene in fern: cloning and expression analysis of DfMADS1 from Dryopteris fragrans.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qingyang; Li, Wenhua; Fan, Ruifeng; Chang, Ying

    2014-01-01

    MADS genes encode a family of transcription factors, some of which control the identities of floral organs in flowering plants. Most of the MADS-box genes in fern have been cloned and analyzed in model plants, such as Ceratopteris richardii and Ceratopteris pteridoides. In this study, a new MADS-box gene, DfMADS1(GU385475), was cloned from Dryopteris fragrans (L.) Schott to better understand the role of MADS genes in the evolution of floral organs. The full-length DfMADS1 cDNA was 973 bp in length with a 75 bp 5'-UTR and a 169 bp 3'-UTR. The DfMADS1 protein was predicted to contain a typical MIKC-type domain structure consisting of a MADS domain, a short I region, a K domain, and a C-terminal region. The DfMADS1 protein showed high homology with MADS box proteins from other ferns. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that DfMADS1 belongs to the CRM1-like subfamily. RT-PCR analysis indicated that DfMADS1 is expressed in both the gametophytes and the sporophytes of D. fragrans. PMID:24466046

  18. Proof Test Diagrams for a Lithia-Alumina-Silica Glass-Ceramic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S.

    2003-01-01

    The glass-ceramic (Zerodur, Schott Glaswerke, Mainz, Germany) contains 70% to 78% by weight crystalline phase of high-quartz structure with a mean crystal size of 50-55 nm. The vitreous phase has a positive thermal expansion coefficient which is practically balanced by the negative coefficient of the crystalline phase. This results in a material which can maintain longitudinal stability during thermal cycling. This was one of the reasons for its choice as the material for the grazing incidence mirrors for the Chandra X-Ray Facility. Brittle materials such as glass and glass-ceramics which exhibit slow crack growth and subsequent fast fracture to failure exhibit a time dependence in strength. The decrease in strength for a constant applied load is known as static fatigue. In many cases, environment plays a major role in the material lifetime. It has been shown for silicate glasses that crack velocity will increase as the amount of water vapor in the environment surface finish and rate of loading. A rough surface finish leads to a lower tensile strength than for an optically polished surface. The strength of glass is observed in general to increase with increasing load rate. This phenomena is known as dynamic fatigue. This was observed for Zerodur by Tucker and Gent and Tucker in previous dynamic fatigue studies, in which lifetimes were obtained. All of the above named factors need to be considered when glass is to be used in load bearing applications.

  19. EFG Ribbon Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwirtlich, I. A.

    Since the beginning of solar cell development based on crystalline silicon, there have been efforts to produce wafers directly from the melt instead of through crystallization of ingots. Ingots require slicing into the blocs and wafers which form the basis of solar cells. In the last 30 years, several dozen processes have been published that describe a variety of concepts. Only few of these processes could be developed to an acceptable degree of technical maturity. Among those successful technologies are the Dendritic Web process, the Edge Supported Pulling (ESP) process and the Edge-Defined-Film-Fed-Growth (EFG) process. The EFG Process was originally developed by Mobil Solar and, since the mid-1990s, belongs to SCHOTT Solar GmbH and its predecessors, respectively. The Ribbon Growth on Substrate (RGS) process was originally developed by Bayer AG and is now in a pilot project at the ECN, Petten. Considering the past 20 to 30 years, the EFG process has reached the most advanced state in terms of industrialization.

  20. Effect of smoke derivatives on in vitro pollen germination and pollen tube elongation of species from different plant families.

    PubMed

    Kumari, A; Papenfus, H B; Kulkarni, M G; Pošta, M; Van Staden, J

    2015-07-01

    Plant-derived smoke stimulates seed germination in numerous plant species. Smoke also has a positive stimulatory effect on pollen germination and pollen tube growth. The range of plant families affected my smoke still needs to be established since the initial study was restricted to only three species from the Amaryllidaceae. The effects of smoke-water (SW) and the smoke-derived compounds, karrikinolide (KAR1 ) and trimethylbutenolide (TMB) on pollen growth characteristics were evaluated in seven different plant families. Smoke-water (1:1000 and 1:2000 v:v) combined with either Brewbaker and Kwack's (BWK) medium or sucrose and boric acid (SB) medium significantly improved pollen germination and pollen tube growth in Aloe maculata All., Kniphofia uvaria Oken, Lachenalia aloides (L.f.) Engl. var. aloides and Tulbaghia simmleri P. Beauv. Karrikinolide (10(-6) and 10(-7) m) treatment significantly improved pollen tube growth in A. maculata, K. uvaria, L. aloides and Nematanthus crassifolius (Schott) Wiehle compared to the controls. BWK or SB medium containing TMB (10(-3) m) produced significantly longer pollen tubes in A. maculata, K. uvaria and N. crassifolius. These results indicate that plant-derived smoke and the smoke-isolated compounds may stimulate pollen growth in a wide range of plant species. PMID:25545791

  1. Dryofragin inhibits the migration and invasion of human osteosarcoma U2OS cells by suppressing MMP-2/9 and elevating TIMP-1/2 through PI3K/AKT and p38 MAPK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Su, Yan; Wan, Daqian; Song, Wenqi

    2016-08-01

    Dryofragin, a phloroglucinol derivative extracted from Dryopteris fragrans (L.) Schott, was found to inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of tumor cells. However, the mechanism involved in the suppression of cancer cell metastasis by dryofragin remains unclear. Our study investigated the mechanisms for the antitumor properties of dryofragin on the migration and invasion of human osteosarcoma U2OS cells. Dryofragin suppressed the migration and invasive ability of U2OS cells, and it decreased the expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 and elevated the expression of TIMP-1 and TIMP-2. Western blotting assays indicated that dryofragin was effective in suppressing the phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositide-3 kinase (PI3K), Akt, and p38 MAPK. These results suggest that dryofragin inhibited U2OS cell migration and invasion by reducing the expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 and elevating the expression of TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 through the PI3K/AKT and p38 MAPK signaling pathways. Above all, we conclude that dryofragin represents an anti-invasive agent and may potentially be applicable in osteosarcoma therapy. PMID:27243922

  2. Compact 2-J master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morelli, Gregg L.; Honig, John N.

    2000-04-01

    A compact, 2-J Master Oscillator, Power Amplifier (MOPA) laser system was designed and built to support a multiple- fiber injection experiment. The system was built in a breadboard configuration to support a risk-reduction/proof- of-concept effort. A common design approach for MOPA systems is to utilize a single-mode oscillator as the input source to the amplifier. However, to optimize this system for fiber injection, a multi-mode oscillator was chosen. A stable, multi-mode, 1053-nm, Nd:YLF laser oscillator was designed and built. A plano/concave resonator was utilized, with a 4.0-mm diameter Nd:YLF laser rod, pumped in a dual flashlamp, diffuse, close-coupled pump cavity. A lithium niobate (LiNbO3) Q-switch crystal was used in a quarter- wave scheme. This pump cavity design did not use any active cooling and was ideal for low duty cycle applications requiring no more than one shot every 60 seconds. The oscillator output was amplified using a neodymium-doped phosphate glass laser rod in a four-pass configuration. Two Joules of output energy with an output pulsewidth of 12 ns were obtained. The 9.53-mm diameter Nd:Glass amplifier rod was pumped in a dual flashlamp, diffuse, close-coupled pump cavity. Output energy, pulsewidth, far-field beam divergence and intensity profile results will be presented for a Schott LG750 amplifier rod.

  3. EFG Technology and Diagnostic R&D for Large-Scale PV Manufacturing; Final Subcontract Report, 1 March 2002 - 31 March 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Kalejs, J.; Aurora, P.; Bathey, B.; Cao, J.; Doedderlein, J.; Gonsiorawski, R.; Heath, B.; Kubasti, J.; Mackintosh, B.; Ouellette, M.; Rosenblum, M.; Southimath, S.; Xavier, G.

    2005-10-01

    The objective of this subcontract was to carry out R&D to advance the technology, processes, and performance of RWE Schott-Solar's wafer, cell, and module manufacturing lines, and help configure these lines for scaling up of edge-defined, film-fed growth (EFG) ribbon technology to the 50-100 MW PV factory level. EFG ribbon manufacturing continued to expand during this subcontract period and now has reached a capacity of 40 MW. EFG wafer products were diversified over this time period. In addition to 10 cm x 10 cm and 10 cm x 15 cm wafer areas, which were the standard products at the beginning of this program, R&D has focused on new EFG technology to extend production to 12.5 cm x 12.5 cm EFG wafers. Cell and module production also has continued to expand in Billerica. A new 12-MW cell line was installed and brought on line in 2003. R&D on this subcontract improved cell yield and throughput, and optimized the cell performance, with special emphasis on work to speed up wafer transfer, hence enhancing throughput. Improvements of wafer transfer processes during this program have raised cell line capacity from 12 MW to over 18 MW. Optimization of module manufacturing processes was carried out on new equipment installed during a manufacturing upgrade in Billerica to a 12-MW capacity to improve yield and reliability of products.

  4. Genetic Drift Linked to Heterogeneous Landscape and Ecological Specialization Drives Diversification in the Alpine Endemic Columbine Aquilegia thalictrifolia.

    PubMed

    Lega, Margherita; Fior, Simone; Li, Mingai; Leonardi, Stefano; Varotto, Claudio

    2014-05-26

    The European Alpine system is an extensive mountain range, whose heterogeneous landscape together with Quaternary climatic oscillations significantly affected organismal diversity and distribution in Europe. The model genus Aquilegia represents a textbook example of a rapid and recent radiation through the Northern hemisphere, with the majority of the European taxa occuring in the Alpine system. However, the processes governing genetic differentiation of the genus in this complex geographic area are still widely unexplored. In this work, we used 9 microsatellite loci to study the genetic structure and diversity of 11 populations of Aquilegia thalictrifolia Schott & Kotschy, an alpine taxon characterized by a marked ecological specificity. We found that, despite the endemic and fragmented distribution, A. thalictrifolia has overall high levels of heterozygosity, which is consistent to the substantial inbreeding depression that characterizes the genus. Strong spatial genetic structuring of populations suggests a historical prevalence of genetic drift over gene flow, with natural barriers and ecological niche hindering migration. An analytical comparison of fixation and population differentiation indexes allowed us to infer hypotheses of the postglacial history and more recent demographic events that have influenced the genetics of the species. Overall, our results indicate allopatry as a major force of differentiation in the European scenario, likely to underlie the development of taxonomic boundaries in a broader geographic context. This adds to previous notions on the primary evolutionary forces shaping the Aquilegia radiation in Europe. PMID:24864044

  5. REOSC Delivers the Best Astronomical Mirror in the World to ESO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-12-01

    employs about 15,500 people - more information is available at URL: www.sagem.com. Information about the ESO and the VLT project is available via the ESO website: www.eso.org. Some Key Dates The polishing at REOSC of the main mirrors for the four VLT Unit Telescopes has been a major industrial feat. Here are some of the main dates: July 1989 ESO and REOSC sign contract for the polishing of the four 8.2-m and various associated activities July 1989 - April 1992 Design activities, construction of REOSC production plant April 1992 Mirror Container and concrete dummy mirror blank completed - test transport May 1992 Inauguration of REOSC production plant July 1993 Delivery of first 8.2-m mirror blank to ESO at Schott Glaswerke AG (Mainz, Germany) October 1994 Delivery of second 8.2-m mirror blank to ESO at Schott Glaswerke AG September 1995 Delivery of third 8.2-m mirror blank to ESO at Schott Glaswerke AG May 1996 Acceptance by ESO of first polished mirror at REOSC September 1996 Delivery of fourth 8.2-m mirror blank to ESO at Schott Glaswerke AG October 1996 Acceptance by ESO of second polished mirror at REOSC June 1997 Acceptance by ESO of third polished mirror at REOSC October - December 1997 Transport and delivery of first mirror to Paranal by Gondrand (France) August - September 1998 Transport and delivery of second mirror to Paranal by Gondrand December 1998 - January 1999 Transport and delivery of third mirror to Paranal by Gondrand December 1999 Acceptance by ESO of fourth polished mirror at REOSC February 1999 - April 2000 Transport and delivery of fourth mirror to Paranal by Gondrand Note [1] A Press Release on the REOSC event and the delivery of the fourth VLT main mirror to ESO is also published by SAGEM (in French and English). How to obtain ESO Press Information ESO Press Information is made available on the World-Wide Web (URL: http://www.eso.org../ ). ESO PR Photo 44/99 may be reproduced, if credit is given to SAGEM and the European Southern Observatory.

  6. ZERODUR: progress in CTE characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedamzik, Ralf; Kunisch, Clemens; Westerhoff, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    In 2010, SCHOTT introduced a method for the modeling of the thermal expansion behavior of ZERODUR® under arbitrary temperature profiles for an optimized production of material for the upcoming Extremely Large Telescope (ELT) projects. In 2012 a new product was introduced based on this method called ZERODUR® TAILORED. ZERODUR® TAILORED provides an evolution in the specification of the absolute Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE) value by including the individual customer requirements in this process. This paper presents examples showing the benefit of an application oriented approach in the design of specifications using ZERODUR®. Additionally it will be shown how the modeling approach has advanced during the last years to improve the prediction accuracy on long time scales. ZERODUR® is known not only for its lowest CTE but also for its excellent CTE homogeneity as shown in the past for disc shaped blanks typical for telescope mirror substrates. Additionally this paper presents recent results of CTE homogeneity measurements in the single digit ppb/K range for a rectangular cast plate proving that the excellent CTE homogeneity is independent of the production format.

  7. Using Shrub Clearing, Draining, and Herbivory to Control Bramble Invasion in Mediterranean Dry Grasslands.

    PubMed

    Masson, Solène; Mesléard, François; Dutoit, Thierry

    2015-10-01

    For centuries, the dry grassland of the plain of La Crau (south-eastern France) has been subjected to numerous disturbances resulting in the destruction and the fragmentation of this emblematic rangeland ecosystem of the Mediterranean. Today, this ecosystem is facing a new threat from a proliferating native species, the bramble (Rubus ulmifolius Schott), which preferentially colonizes areas that were formerly cultivated and/or exposed to water infiltration. To identify a strategy for effective control of this colonization, in situ experiments testing disturbance regimes (shrub clearing and/or mixed grazing by sheep and goats) combined with the control of access to water resources (with or without drainage trenches) were undertaken between 2010 and 2013. Only clearing and grazing combined over 3 years led to significant changes in vegetation height and bramble cover as well as modifications in the floristic composition, diversity, similarity, and richness of the plant community. Neither a clearing operation carried out in 2010 alone, nor grazing alone, reduced bramble cover, and neither treatment increased the species richness of the plant community. Similarly, digging drainage trenches had no significant impact either on the plant community or on bramble cover. Our study suggests that only annual mechanical clearing coupled with sheep and goats grazing can significantly reduce bramble cover. This combined restoration treatment needs to be applied for at least 3 consecutive years to induce significant changes and enable this ecosystem to return to the dry grassland succession. PMID:26013075

  8. Using Shrub Clearing, Draining, and Herbivory to Control Bramble Invasion in Mediterranean Dry Grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Solène; Mesléard, François; Dutoit, Thierry

    2015-10-01

    For centuries, the dry grassland of the plain of La Crau (south-eastern France) has been subjected to numerous disturbances resulting in the destruction and the fragmentation of this emblematic rangeland ecosystem of the Mediterranean. Today, this ecosystem is facing a new threat from a proliferating native species, the bramble ( Rubus ulmifolius Schott), which preferentially colonizes areas that were formerly cultivated and/or exposed to water infiltration. To identify a strategy for effective control of this colonization, in situ experiments testing disturbance regimes (shrub clearing and/or mixed grazing by sheep and goats) combined with the control of access to water resources (with or without drainage trenches) were undertaken between 2010 and 2013. Only clearing and grazing combined over 3 years led to significant changes in vegetation height and bramble cover as well as modifications in the floristic composition, diversity, similarity, and richness of the plant community. Neither a clearing operation carried out in 2010 alone, nor grazing alone, reduced bramble cover, and neither treatment increased the species richness of the plant community. Similarly, digging drainage trenches had no significant impact either on the plant community or on bramble cover. Our study suggests that only annual mechanical clearing coupled with sheep and goats grazing can significantly reduce bramble cover. This combined restoration treatment needs to be applied for at least 3 consecutive years to induce significant changes and enable this ecosystem to return to the dry grassland succession.

  9. Sampled MTF of fused fiber optic components and bonded assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Thomas

    2013-05-01

    Fused fiber optic devices are bundles of glass optical fibers that have been successively bundled and drawn to smaller and smaller sizes, effectively creating a "zero optical path window". Due to the nature of fiber's clad and core design, pixelization or sampling of the resulting image occurs; this sampling fundamentally degrades the image. Degradation of a resulting image caused by an optical system can be quantified by way of its Modulation Transfer Function. However, since fused fiber optic devices first sample then effectively project the original image, they do not meet the Fourier transform's prerequisite conditions of being linear and isoplanatic. Current technologies at SCHOTT Lighting and Imaging have initiated a study to determine methodology for measuring the sampled modulation transfer function of bonded assemblies such as bonded Faceplate-to-OLED and Faceplate-tosensor assemblies. The use of randomly generated targets imaged through the bonded assemblies proved to be a useful tactic. This paper discusses the test methods developed and subsequent measurement of the sampled modulation transfer function of fused fiber optic bundles and bonded assemblies.

  10. Monoclonal antibodies to the alternative oxidase of higher plant mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Elthon, T.E.; Nickels, R.L.; McIntosh, L. )

    1989-04-01

    The higher plant mitochondrial electron transport chain contains, in addition to the cytochrome chain which terminates with cytochrome oxidase, an alternative pathway that terminates with an alternative oxidase. The alternative oxidase of Sauromatum guttatum Schott has recently been identified as a cluster of proteins with apparent M{sub r} of 37, 36, and 35 kilodaltons (kD). Monoclonal antibodies have now been prepared to these proteins and designated as AOA (binding all three proteins of the alternative oxidase cluster), AOU (binding the upper or 37 kD protein), and AOL (binding the lower or 36 and 35 kD proteins). All three antibodies bind to their respective alternative oxidase proteins whether the proteins are in their native or denatured states. AOA and AOU inhibit alternative oxidase activity around 49%, whereas AOL inhibits activity only 14%. When coupled individually to Sepharose 4B, all three monoclonal resins were capable of retaining the entire cluster of alternative oxidase proteins, suggesting that these proteins are physically associated in some manner. The monoclonals were capable of binding similar mitochondrial proteins in a number of thermogenic and nonthermogenic species, indicating that they will be useful in characterizing and purifying the alternative oxidase of different systems. The ability of the monoclonal-Sepharose 4B resins to retain the cluster of previously identified alternative oxidase proteins, along with the inhibition of alternative oxidase activity by these monoclonals, supports the role of these proteins in constituting the alternative oxidase.

  11. Manganese and the limits of high potential phototrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, W. W.; Hemp, J.; Johnson, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centers create high-energy electrons using light, harnessing the charge separation to simultaneously provide the cell with a strong oxidant and strong reductant. Many substrates can be used as electron donors for phototrophy, however there appears to be important energetic limits. In oxygenic photosynthesis photosystem II (PSII) provides a very strong oxidant that is capable of oxidizing water (ca. +830 mV) to molecular oxygen at the water-oxidizing complex, a redox-active tetra-manganese cluster. Anoxygenic photosystems however appear to only be able to oxidize lower potential electron donors (Fe2+, H2, S0, HS, S2O32-, NO2-, AsO33-).. Several transitional photosystems have been proposed as evolutionary intermediates between anoxygenic and oxygenic photosynthesis, with electron donors of higher redox potentials such as nitrite (ca. +431 mV) or Mn2+ (ca. +780 mV) bridging the redox gap to water. While a range of observations from the geological record support a Mn2+-based transitional photosystem (Johnson et al. 2013), this proposed photochemical scheme is distinct from that observed in anoxygenic photosynthetic organisms. Mechanistically all anoxygenic reaction centers receive their electrons indirectly via soluble electron carriers such as cytochrome c, high potential iron sulfur proteins or cupredoxins. Conversely Mn2+ oxidation is only known to occur today via direct oxidation, such as during photoassembly of the water-oxidizing complex of PSII, or by two distinct, non-energy-conserving mechanisms using molecular oxygen. No natural photosystem is known to solely perform Mn2+-oxidation. The highest redox-potential accessed by known anoxygenic phototrophs oxidizes nitrite (Schott et al. 2010), but it has been unclear until now whether the reaction center is specially adapted to produce high potential oxidants, similar to that of PSII to oxidize Mn2+ and water. To constrain this we sequenced the genome of the nitrite-oxidizing phototroph

  12. One Step Biomass Gas Reforming-Shift Separation Membrane Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Michael J.; Souleimanova, Razima

    2012-12-28

    GTI developed a plan where efforts were concentrated in 4 major areas: membrane material development, membrane module development, membrane process development, and membrane gasifier scale-up. GTI assembled a team of researchers to work in each area. Task 1.1 Ceramic Membrane Synthesis and Testing was conducted by Arizona State University (ASU), Task 1.2 Metallic Membrane Synthesis and Testing was conducted by the U.S. National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Task 1.3 was conducted by SCHOTT, and GTI was to test all membranes that showed potential. The initial focus of the project was concentrated on membrane material development. Metallic and glass-based membranes were identified as hydrogen selective membranes under the conditions of the biomass gasification, temperatures above 700C and pressures up to 30 atmospheres. Membranes were synthesized by arc-rolling for metallic type membranes and incorporating Pd into a glass matrix for glass membranes. Testing for hydrogen permeability properties were completed and the effects of hydrogen sulfide and carbon monoxide were investigated for perspective membranes. The initial candidate membrane of Pd80Cu20 chosen in 2008 was selected for preliminary reactor design and cost estimates. Although the H2A analysis results indicated a $1.96 cost per gge H2 based on a 5A (micron) thick PdCu membrane, there was not long-term operation at the required flux to satisfy the go/no go decision. Since the future PSA case yielded a $2.00/gge H2, DOE decided that there was insufficient savings compared with the already proven PSA technology to further pursue the membrane reactor design. All ceramic membranes synthesized by ASU during the project showed low hydrogen flux as compared with metallic membranes. The best ceramic membrane showed hydrogen permeation flux of 0.03 SCFH/ft2 at the required process conditions while the metallic membrane, Pd80Cu20 showed a flux of 47.2 SCFH/ft2 (3 orders of magnitude difference). Results from

  13. Hepatotoxic potential of asarones: in vitro evaluation of hepatotoxicity and quantitative determination in herbal products

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Dhavalkumar N.; Ho, Han K.; Tan, Liesbet L.; Tan, Mui-Mui B.; Zhang, Qian; Low, Min-Yong; Chan, Cheng-Leng; Koh, Hwee-Ling

    2015-01-01

    α and β asarones are natural constituents of some aromatic plants, especially species of the genus Acorus (Araceae). In addition to reports of beneficial properties of asarones, genotoxicity and carcinogenicity are also reported. Due to potential toxic effects of β-asarone, a limit of exposure from herbal products of ~2 μg/kg body weight/day has been set temporarily until a full benefit/risk assessment has been carried out by the European Medicines Agency. Therefore, it is important to monitor levels of β-asarone in herbal products. In this study, we developed a simple, rapid and validated GC-MS method for quantitative determination of asarones and applied it in 20 pediatric herbal products after detecting high concentrations of β-asarone in a product suspected to be implicated in hepatotoxicity in a 3 month old infant. Furthermore, targeted toxicological effects were further investigated in human hepatocytes (THLE-2 cells) by employing various in vitro assays, with the goal of elucidating possible mechanisms for the observed toxicity. Results showed that some of the products contained as much as 4–25 times greater amounts of β-asarone than the recommended levels. In 4 of 10 samples found to contain asarones, the presence of asarones could not be linked to the labeled ingredients, possibly due to poor quality control. Cell-based investigations in THLE-2 cells confirmed the cytotoxicity of β-asarone (IC50 = 40.0 ± 2.0 μg/mL) which was associated with significant lipid peroxidation and glutathione depletion. This observed cytotoxic effect is likely due to induction of oxidative stress by asarones. Overall, the results of this study ascertained the usability of this GC-MS method for the quantitative determination of asarones from herbal products, and shed light on the importance of controlling the concentration of potentially toxic asarones in herbal products to safeguard consumer safety, especially when the target consumers are young children. Further

  14. Biphasic Effects of α-Asarone on Immobility in the Tail Suspension Test: Evidence for the Involvement of the Noradrenergic and Serotonergic Systems in Its Antidepressant-Like Activity.

    PubMed

    Chellian, Ranjithkumar; Pandy, Vijayapandi; Mohamed, Zahurin

    2016-01-01

    Alpha (α)-asarone is one of the main psychoactive compounds, present in Acorus species. Evidence suggests that the α-asarone possess an antidepressant-like activity in mice. However, the exact dose-dependent effect of α-asarone and mechanism(s) involved in the antidepressant-like activity are not clear. The present study aimed to investigate the dose-dependent effect of α-asarone and the underlining mechanism(s) involved in the antidepressant-like activity of α-asarone in the mouse model of tail suspension test (TST). In this study, the acute effect of α-asarone per se at different doses (10-100 mg/kg, i.p.) on immobility in the TST was studied. Additionally, the possible mechanism(s) involved in the antidepressant-like effect of α-asarone was studied using its interaction with noradrenergic and serotonergic neuromodulators in the TST. The present results reveal that the acute treatment of α-asarone elicited biphasic responses on immobility such that the duration of the immobility time is significantly reduced at lower doses (15 and 20 mg/kg, i.p.) but increased at higher doses (50 and 100 mg/kg, i.p.) in the TST. Besides, α-asarone at higher doses (50 and 100 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly decreased the spontaneous locomotor activity. Moreover, pretreatment of mice with noradrenergic neuromodulators such as AMPT (100 mg/kg, i.p., a catecholamine synthesis inhibitor), prazosin (1 mg/kg, i.p., an α1-adrenoceptor antagonist), yohimbine (1 mg/kg, i.p., an α2-adrenoceptor antagonist) and with serotonergic neuromodulators such as PCPA (100 mg/kg, i.p., once daily for four consecutive days, a serotonin synthesis inhibitor,) and WAY100635 (0.1 mg/kg, s.c., a selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist) significantly reversed the anti-immobility effect of α-asarone (20 mg/kg, i.p.). Taken together, our results suggest that the acute treatment with α-asarone elicited biphasic actions in the TST in which antidepressant-like effect was seen at relatively lower doses (15 and

  15. Efficacy of herbal shampoo base on native plant against head lice (Pediculus humanus capitis De Geer, Pediculidae: Phthiraptera) in vitro and in vivo in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Soonwera, Mayura

    2014-09-01

    Head lice infestation (or pediculosis) is an important public health problem in Thailand, especially in children between the ages 5 and 11 years. Head lice resistance is increasing, chemical pediculicides have lost their efficacy, and, therefore, alternative pediculicides such as herbal shampoos have been proposed to treat head lice infestation. Thus, the present study investigated the efficacy of three herbal shampoos based on native plants in Thailand (Acorus calamus Linn., Phyllanthus emblica Linn., and Zanthoxylum limonella Alston) against head lice and compared them with carbaryl shampoo (Hafif shampoo, 0.6% w/v carbaryl), malathion shampoo (A-Lice shampoo, 1.0% w/v malathion), and commercial shampoos (Babi Mild Natural' N Mild and Johnson's baby shampoo) in order to assess their in vitro and in vivo efficacy. For in vitro study, doses of 0.12 and 0.25 ml/cm(2) of each herbal shampoo were applied to filter paper, then 10 head lice were place on the filter paper. The mortalities of head lice were recorded at 5, 15, 30, and 60 min. The results revealed that all herbal shampoo were more effective on pediculicidal activity than chemical and commercial shampoos with 100% mortality at 15 min; LT₅₀ values ranged from 0.25 to 1.90 min. Meanwhile, chemical shampoos caused 20-80% mortality, and LT₅₀ values ranged from 6.50 to 85.43 min. On the other side, commercial shampoos showed 4.0% mortality. The most effective pediculicide was Z. limonella shampoo, followed by A. calamus shampoo, P. emblica shampoo, carbaryl shampoo, malathion shampoo, and commercial shampoo, respectively. In vivo results showed that all herbal shampoos were also more effective for head lice treatment than chemical and commercial shampoos with 94.67-97.68% of cure rate after the first treatment; the second treatment, 7 days later, revealed that the cure rate was 100%. Meanwhile, chemical shampoo showed 71.67-93.0% of cure rate and, unfortunately, commercial shampoos were nontoxic to

  16. Biphasic Effects of α-Asarone on Immobility in the Tail Suspension Test: Evidence for the Involvement of the Noradrenergic and Serotonergic Systems in Its Antidepressant-Like Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chellian, Ranjithkumar; Pandy, Vijayapandi; Mohamed, Zahurin

    2016-01-01

    Alpha (α)-asarone is one of the main psychoactive compounds, present in Acorus species. Evidence suggests that the α-asarone possess an antidepressant-like activity in mice. However, the exact dose-dependent effect of α-asarone and mechanism(s) involved in the antidepressant-like activity are not clear. The present study aimed to investigate the dose-dependent effect of α-asarone and the underlining mechanism(s) involved in the antidepressant-like activity of α-asarone in the mouse model of tail suspension test (TST). In this study, the acute effect of α-asarone per se at different doses (10–100 mg/kg, i.p.) on immobility in the TST was studied. Additionally, the possible mechanism(s) involved in the antidepressant-like effect of α-asarone was studied using its interaction with noradrenergic and serotonergic neuromodulators in the TST. The present results reveal that the acute treatment of α-asarone elicited biphasic responses on immobility such that the duration of the immobility time is significantly reduced at lower doses (15 and 20 mg/kg, i.p.) but increased at higher doses (50 and 100 mg/kg, i.p.) in the TST. Besides, α-asarone at higher doses (50 and 100 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly decreased the spontaneous locomotor activity. Moreover, pretreatment of mice with noradrenergic neuromodulators such as AMPT (100 mg/kg, i.p., a catecholamine synthesis inhibitor), prazosin (1 mg/kg, i.p., an α1-adrenoceptor antagonist), yohimbine (1 mg/kg, i.p., an α2-adrenoceptor antagonist) and with serotonergic neuromodulators such as PCPA (100 mg/kg, i.p., once daily for four consecutive days, a serotonin synthesis inhibitor,) and WAY100635 (0.1 mg/kg, s.c., a selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist) significantly reversed the anti-immobility effect of α-asarone (20 mg/kg, i.p.). Taken together, our results suggest that the acute treatment with α-asarone elicited biphasic actions in the TST in which antidepressant-like effect was seen at relatively lower doses (15

  17. Comparative investigation of the mutagenicity of propenylic and allylic asarone isomers in the Ames fluctuation assay.

    PubMed

    Berg, Kerstin; Bischoff, Roland; Stegmüller, Simone; Cartus, Alexander; Schrenk, Dieter

    2016-07-01

    α-, β- and γ-asarone are naturally occurring phenylpropenes that occur in different plant families, mainly in Aristolochiaceae, Acoraceae and Lauraceae. Plants containing asarones are used as flavouring ingredients in alcoholic beverages (bitters), traditional phytomedicines and the rhizome of e.g. Acorus calamus is used to prepare tea. Although α- and β-asarone show a potential in the treatment of several diseases, previous studies have shown carcinogenicity in rodents (duodenum, liver). However, the mechanism of action remained unclear. Studies on the mutagenicity of propenylic α- and β-asarone are inconsistent and data on carcinogenicity and genotoxicity of allylic γ-asarone are lacking completely. Thus, the present study determined the mutagenicity of the three asarone isomers using the Ames fluctuation assay with and without exogenous metabolic activation (S9 mix) in the standard Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100. A concentration dependent increase in mutagenicity could be verified for α- and β-asarone in strain TA100 in the presence of rat liver homogenate. The side-chain epoxides of α- and β-asarone, major metabolites formed in liver microsomes, caused mutations in TA100, supporting the hypothesis that epoxidation of the side chain plays a key role in mutagenicity of the propenylic alkenylbenzenes. The allylic γ-asarone, not undergoing detectable side-chain epoxidation in liver microsomes, was supposed to be activated via side-chain hydroxylation and further sulphonation, a typical pathway for other allylic alkenylbenzenes like estragole or methyleugenol. However, neither y-asarone nor 1'-OH-γ-asarone showed any mutagenic effect even in the human SULT-expressing Salmonella strains (TA100-hSULT1A1 and TA100-hSULT1C2), while 1'-OH-methyleugenol used as a positive control was mutagenic under these conditions. These results indicate that the propenylic asarones are genotoxic via metabolic formation of side-chain epoxides while the side

  18. Oxisol decapitated recovery with green manure and sewage sludge: Effect on growth of Astronium fraxinifolium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souto Filho, S. N.; Marchini, D. C.; de Arruda, O. G.; Giácomo, R. G.; Alves, M. C.

    2012-04-01

    Incorrect use of land and large buildings in rural areas are causing changes to it, making them less productive and thus increasing the degraded areas. Techniques aimed at ecological restoration of degraded soils have been investigated. In recovery planning a degraded area, the great challenge to be achieved is the establishment of a A horizon, so that from then on, the process is catalyzed by the biosphere, and there may be other horizons, as the natural conditioning. In this sense the positive changes were investigated in an environment of decapitated Savannah Oxisol, which was removed a layer 8.5 m thick to build a hydroelectric power plant. For recovery, we used a native tree species, green manure, sewage sludge and grass. The studied soil is under human intervention techniques for recovery for seven years. The experimental design was randomized blocks with five treatments and five replications. The treatments were: 1-Control- bare soil (without management), 2-Astronium fraxinifolium Schott; 3-A. fraxinifolium + Canavalia ensiformis; 4- A. fraxinifolium + Raphanus sativus by 2005 was replaced in 2006 by Crotalaria juncea; 5- A. fraxinifolium + Brachiaria decumbens + sewage sludge (60 t ha-1, dry basis). We studied in 2010 and 2011 the development of tree species (stem diameter and plant height), the fresh and dry matter of green manures and B. decumbens. The results were analyzed by performing the variance analysis and Tukey test at 5% probability to compare averages. The rate of plant growth during the periods studied in the treatment with sewage sludge was higher than other treatments, so this is the most appropriate management for the recovery of degraded soil under study.

  19. Spatially controlled optogenetic light stimulation and recording platform via imaging fiber bundles (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez, Javier I.; Sengupta, Parijat; Mun, Jonathan; Iyer, Rajashekar; Rhodes, Justin; Gillette, Martha U.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-03-01

    Current methods for light delivery in in vivo optogenetic applications are typically accomplished via a single multimode fiber that diffuses light over a large area of the brain, and relies on the spatial distribution of transfected light-sensitive neurons for targeted control. In our investigations, an imaging fiber bundle (Schott) containing 4,500 individual fibers, each with a diameter of 7.5 µm, and an overall outer bundle diameter of 530 µm, served as a conduit for light delivery and optical recording/imaging. The use of this fiber bundle, in contrast to a single multimode fiber, allows for individually-addressable fibers, spatial selectivity at the stimulus site, more precise control of light delivery, and full field-of-view imaging and/or optical recordings of individual neurons in local neural circuits. An objective coupled the two continuous wave diode laser sources (561nm/488nm) (Coherent) for stimulation and imaging into the fiber bundle while a set of galvanometer-scanning mirrors was used to couple the light stimulus to distinct fibers within the proximal end of the imaging fiber bundle. In our study, C1V1(E122T/E162T)-TS-p2A-mCherry (Karl Deisseroth, Stanford) and GCaMP6s transgenic mice (Jackson Labs) were utilized for this all-optical approach. The results of our investigation demonstrate that imaging fiber bundles provide a new level of spatial selectivity and control of light delivery to specific neurons, as well as function as a conduit for optical imaging and recording at the in vivo site of stimulation, in contrast to the use of single multimode fibers that diffusely illuminate neural tissue and lack in vivo imaging capabilities.

  20. MEDEA+ project 2T302 MUSCLE: masks through user's supply chain: leadership by excellence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torsy, Andreas

    2008-04-01

    The rapid evolution of our information society depends on the continuous developments and innovations of semiconductor products. The cost per chip functionality keeps reducing by a factor of 2 every 18 month. However, this performance and success of the semiconductor industry critically depends on the quality of the lithographic photomasks. The need for the high quality of photomask drives lithography costs sensitively, which is a key factor in the manufacture of microelectronics devices. Therefore, the aim is to reduce production costs while overcoming challenges in terms of feature sizes, complexity and cycle times. Consequently, lithography processes must provide highest possible quality at reasonable prices. This way, the leadership in the lithographic area can be maintained and European chipmakers can stay competitive with manufacturers in the Far East and the USA. Under the umbrella of MEDEA+, a project called MUSCLE (<< Masks through User's Supply Chain: Leadership by Excellence >>) has been started among leading semiconductor companies in Europe: ALTIS Semiconductor (Project Leader), ALCATEL Vacuum, ATMEL, CEA/LETI, Entegris, NXP Semiconductors, TOPPAN Photomasks, AMTC, Carl ZEISS SMS, DMS, Infineon Technologies, VISTEC Semiconductor, NIKON Precision, SCHOTT Lithotec, ASML, PHOTRONICS, IMEC, DCE, DNP Photomask, STMicroelectronics, XYALIS and iCADA. MUSCLE focuses particularly on mask data flow, photomask carrier, photomask defect characterization and photomask data handling. In this paper, we will discuss potential solutions like standardization and automation of the photomask data flow based on SEMI P10, the performance and the impact of the supply chain parameter within the photomask process, the standardization of photomask defect characterization and a discussion of the impact of new Reticle Enhancement Technologies (RET) such as mask process correction and finally a generic model to describe the photomasks key performance indicators for prototype

  1. Continued advancement of laser damage resistant optically functional microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Douglas S.; MacLeod, Bruce D.; Sabatino, Ernest

    2012-11-01

    Micro- and nano-structured optically functional surface textures continue to exhibit higher performance and longer term survivability than thin-film coatings for an increasing number of materials used within high energy laser (HEL) systems. Anti-reflection (AR) microstructures (ARMs) produce a graded refractive index yielding high transmission over wide spectral ranges along with a chemical, mechanical and laser damage resistance inherited from the bulk optic material. In this study, ARMs were fabricated in the relevant HEL materials sapphire, neodymium-doped YAG, fused silica, BK7 glass, and the magnesium aluminate known as SPINEL. Standardized pulsed laser induced damage threshold (LiDT) measurements were made using commercial testing services to directly compare the damage resistance of ARMs-treated optics to uncoated and thin-film-AR-coated (TFARC) optics at wavelengths of 532nm, 694nm, 800nm, 1064nm, and 1538nm. As found with prior work, the LiDT of ARMs etched in fused silica was typically in the range of 35 J/cm2 at a wavelength of 1064nm and a pulse width of 10ns, a level that is comparable to uncoated samples and 3.5 times greater than the level specified by six prominent TFARC providers. The Army Research Laboratory measured the pulsed LiDT at 532nm (10ns) of ARMs in fused silica to be up to 5 times the level of the ion beam sputtered TFARC previously employed in their HEL system, and 2 times higher than a low performance single layer MgF2 TFARC. This result was repeated and expanded using a commercial LiDT testing service for ARMs in two types of fused silica and for Schott N-BK7 glass. An average damage threshold of 26.5 J/cm2 was recorded for the ARMs-treated glass materials, a level 4 times higher than the commercial IBS TFARCs tested.

  2. Electrodynamics of hyperbolically accelerated charges V. The field of a charge in the Rindler space and the Milne space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksen, E.; Grøn, Ø.

    2004-09-01

    We describe the electromagnetic field of a uniformly accelerated charge in its co-moving Rindler frame. It is shown that the electrical field lines coincide with the trajectories of photons. The self force of a charged particle at rest in Rindler space, and the increase of its weight due to its charge, is calculated. The general case of an accelerated charge in Rindler space is also considered. It is shown that the electrical field inside a uniformly charged spherical shell can be used as a measure of it 4-acceleration. A result that has earlier been deduced in a different way by Fugmann and Kretzschmar is confirmed, namely that the intensity of radiation from a point charge instantaneously at rest in an accelerated frame is proportional to the square of the relative acceleration of the charge and the observer. In particular it is shown that a freely falling charge in Rindler space radiates in accordance with Larmor's formula. In this case the radiation energy is taken from the Schott energy. The energy of the electromagnetic field is analysed from the point of view of the Hirayama-separation, which generalizes the Teitelboim-separation to non-inertial frames, of the field in a bound part and an unbound part. A detailed account, with reference to the Rindler frame, of the field energy and particle energy is given for the case of a charge entering and leaving a region with hyperbolic motion. We also consider the electromagnetic field of a uniformly accelerated charge with reference to the Milne frame, which covers a different part of spacetime than the Rindler frame. The radiating part of the electromagnetic field is found in the Milne sector of spacetime.

  3. Minocycline-loaded cellulose nano whiskers/poly(sodium acrylate) composite hydrogel films as wound dressing.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, S K; Pathak, V; Soni, Bhawna

    2015-08-01

    In this work, antibiotic drug Minocycline (Mic) loaded cellulose nano-whiskers (CNWs)/poly(sodium acrylate) hydrogel films were prepared and investigated for their drug releasing capacity in physiological buffer solution (PBS) at 37 °C. The (CNWs)/poly(sodium acrylate) film, containing 9.7% (w/w) of CNWs, demonstrated Mic release of 2500 μg/g while the plain poly(acrylate) film showed 3100 μg/g of drug release. In addition, with the increase in the concentration of cross-linker N,N'-methylene bisacrylamide (MB) from to, the drug release from the resulting films decreased from 507 to 191 μg/g. The release exponent 'n' for films with different compositions was found in the range of 0.45 to 0.89, thus indicating non-Fickian release mechanism. The Schott model was employed to interpret the kinetic drug release data successfully. The film samples poly(SA) and CNWs/poly(SA) (both not containing drug) showed thrombus formation of 0.010±0.001 g and 0.007±0.001 g, respectively, thus showing the non-thrombogenic behavior. In percent Hemolysis, both of the film samples of 1.136±0.012 and 0.5±0.020, respectively, thus indicating non-hemolytic behavior. In addition, both of the film samples demonstrated protein adsorption of 49.02±0.59μ g/μL and 51.20±0.51 μg/μL per cm(2), thus revealing a fair degree of protein adsorption. Finally, the Mic-loaded films showed fair anti-fungal and antibacterial properties. PMID:25940526

  4. Thermal poling of alkaline earth boroaluminosilicate glasses with intrinsically high dielectric breakdown strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Nicholas J.; Lanagan, Michael T.; Pantano, Carlo G.

    2012-04-01

    Per the rectification model of thermal poling, it has been proposed that intrinsic breakdown strength plays a strong limiting role in the internal DC fields supported by the glass from the poling process. One might therefore hypothesize proportionately larger second-order nonlinearity (SON) in glasses with intrinsically high dielectric breakdown strength. We test these ideas by thermal poling of two different commercial alkali-free alkaline-earth boroaluminosilicate display glasses—one with barium only (AF45 from Schott), and the other with a mixture of alkaline-earth ions (OA-10 G from NEG). Not only are such compositions relevant from a commercial standpoint, they are also interesting in that they have been recently shown to exhibit remarkably high intrinsic dielectric breakdown strengths of 11-14 MV/cm. Quantitative Maker fringe and stack Maker-fringe measurements provide an accurate evaluation of the poling-induced SON susceptibilities, and indicate maximum χ(2) values of 0.44 and 0.26 pm/V in these glasses. These values are comparable to those reported for silica and other multicomponent glasses. Thus, the hypothesis that higher χ(2) would be observed in high intrinsic breakdown strength glasses was not validated. Based on our application of the rectification model, internal fields of the order 2-4 MV/cm were calculated, which are well below the measured intrinsic breakdown strengths at room temperature. The most plausible explanation for these observations is nonlinear electronic conduction effects taking place within the depletion region at the poling temperature, limiting internal fields to a fraction of the breakdown field.

  5. Polar distribution of annexin-like proteins during phytochrome-mediated initiation and growth of rhizoids in the ferns Dryopteris and Anemia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G. B.; Turnwald, S.; Tirlapur, U. K.; Haas, C. J.; von der Mark, K.; Roux, S. J.; Scheuerlein, R.

    1995-01-01

    Although the calcium requirement of phytochrome-mediated fern spore germination and early rhizoid growth is well established, the calcium-binding proteins that serve as transducers for these responses are not known. Here we report the presence of annexin-like proteins in germinating spores of Dryopteris filix-mas (L.) Schott and Anemia phyllitidis (L.) Sw. and evidence that they may be important participants in early photomorphogenic changes in gametophytes. Immunolocalization and immunoblot assays of these proteins were carried out using polyclonal antibodies raised either against a 35-kDa annexin-like protein from pea or against anchorin CII from chicken. Western-blot analysis showed that crude protein extracts obtained from both species after red-light treatment contained two cross-reactive protein bands with molecular weights around 70 kDa. These proteins were annexin-like in that they bound to a phosphatidylserine affinity column in a calcium-dependent fashion. Using this column, two protein bands around 70 kDa, i.e. 67 and 73 kDa, were partially purified together with proteins at 36 kDa and a doublet at 54 kDa. Proteins of these latter molecular weights are suggested to be members of the annexin family, but no cross-reactivity could be found between these and the two antibodies used in our investigations. Immunodetectable levels of these proteins were observed only after light-mediated induction of spore germination. Imaging of the immuno-localization patterns observed with both antibodies showed that the annexin-like proteins are concentrated at the extreme tips of the rhizoids in D. filix-mas and A. phyllitidis during rhizoid initiation and all stages of elongation. We suggest that these proteins may play a major role in the tip-oriented exocytosis events that are critical for the initiation and growth of fern rhizoids.

  6. Evaluation of the surface strength of glass plates shaped by hot slumping process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proserpio, L.; Crimi, G.; Ghigo, M.; Pareschi, G.; Salmaso, B.; D'Este, A.; Dall'Igna, R.; Silvestri, M.; Parodi, G.; Martelli, F.

    2013-09-01

    The Hot Slumping Technology is under development by several research groups in the world for the realization of X-ray segmented mirrors, based on thin glass plates: during the process of slumping, a glass foil is shaped over a mould at temperatures above its transformation point. The performed thermal cycle and related operations might have effects on the strength characteristics of the glass, with consequences on the structural design of the elemental optical module and consecutively on the whole X-ray telescope. No reference technical literature exists for this particular aspect since the strength of glass depends on several parameters connected to any of the manufacturing and glass history stages, such as the distribution of surface flaws or the residual internal stresses. It is therefore extremely important to test the mechanical strength of the glass plates after they underwent the slumping process. The Astronomical Observatory of Brera (INAFOAB, Merate - Italy) started a deep analysis of this aspect, with the collaboration of Stazione Sperimentale del Vetro (SSV, Murano - Italy) and BCV Progetti (Milano - Italy). The entire study has been realized on borosilicate glass D263 by Schott, largely considered for the realization of next-generation IXO-like X-ray telescope. More than 200 slumped plates of dimension 100 mm x 100 mm and thickness 0.4 mm, both flat and curved, have been produced and tested; the collected experimental data have been compared to non-linear FEM analyses and treated with Weibull statistics, giving the strength data necessary to assess the current IXO glass X-ray telescope design, in terms of survival probability, when subject to static and acoustic load characteristic of the launch phase. The paper describes the activities performed and presents the obtained results.

  7. Chemogeography and antimicrobial activity of essential oils from Geijera parviflora and Geijera salicifolia (Rutaceae): two traditional Australian medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Sadgrove, Nicholas J; Gonçalves-Martins, Maximilien; Jones, Graham L

    2014-08-01

    Essential oils were hydrodistilled from 27 specimens of Geijera parviflora Lindl., (Rutaceae) and nine specimens of Geijera salicifolia Schott, collected over a wide geographic range in New South Wales, Queensland and South Australia. Essential oils were produced by traditional hydrodistillation and characterised using GC-MS. From one specimen a serendipitous discovery was made of bioactive coumarins dissolved in the hydrosol, which were the coumarins isopsoralen, xanthyletine and osthole. These coumarins were not present in the essential oil from that specimen. Using essential oil composition from all specimens, principal component analysis (PCA) demonstrated nine clusters for G. parviflora and three for G. salicifolia. Some clusters are representative of previously described chemotypes and some are reflective of possible chemotypes requiring more comprehensive sampling for confirmation. Thus, another three or four possible chemotypes of G. parviflora and one of G. salicifolia have been tentatively identified. Using micro-titre plate broth dilution assays, antibacterial and antifungal activity of all chemotypes was investigated. In this regard, the 'green oil' chemotype, restricted to G. parviflora, with major components linalool, geijerene/pregeijerene, 1,8-cineol and bicyclogermacrene, demonstrated the highest antimicrobial and free radical scavenging activity. Thus, in the light of traditional use reports of local analgaesia and bioactivity demonstrated in the current study, oils from select chemotypes of G. parviflora may be useful in suitably compounded lotions and creams designed for topical antimicrobial applications and local pain relief. In addition, because major components are known for insecticidal activities, such lotions may also be useful as topically applied insect repellents. PMID:24878365

  8. Ellagic Acid Derivatives from Rubus ulmifolius Inhibit Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Formation and Improve Response to Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Quave, Cassandra L.; Estévez-Carmona, Miriam; Compadre, Cesar M.; Hobby, Gerren; Hendrickson, Howard; Beenken, Karen E.; Smeltzer, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Biofilms contribute to the pathogenesis of many forms of Staphylococcus aureus infection. Treatment of these infections is complicated by intrinsic resistance to conventional antibiotics, thus creating an urgent need for strategies that can be used for the prevention and treatment of biofilm-associated infections. Methodology/Principal Findings This study demonstrates that a botanical natural product composition (220D-F2) rich in ellagic acid and its derivatives can limit S. aureus biofilm formation to a degree that can be correlated with increased antibiotic susceptibility. The source of this composition is Rubus ulmifolius Schott. (Rosaceae), a plant used in complementary and alternative medicine in southern Italy for the treatment of skin and soft tissue infections. All S. aureus clonal lineages tested exhibited a reduced capacity to form a biofilm at 220D-F2 concentrations ranging from 50–200 µg/mL, which were well below the concentrations required to limit bacterial growth (530–1040 µg/mL). This limitation was therapeutically relevant in that inclusion of 220D-F2 resulted in enhanced susceptibility to the functionally-distinct antibiotics daptomycin, clindamycin and oxacillin. Testing with kidney and liver cell lines also demonstrated a lack of host cell cytotoxicity at concentrations of 220D-F2 required to achieve these effects. Conclusions/Significance These results demonstrate that extract 220D-F2 from the root of Rubus ulmifolius can be used to inhibit S. aureus biofilm formation to a degree that can be correlated with increased antibiotic susceptibility without toxic effects on normal mammalian cells. Hence, 220D-F2 is a strong candidate for development as a botanical drug for use in the prevention and treatment of S. aureus biofilm-associated infections. PMID:22242149

  9. Inhibition of proliferation by agricultural plant extracts in seven human adult T-cell leukaemia (ATL)-related cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kai, Hisahiro; Akamatsu, Ena; Torii, Eri; Kodama, Hiroko; Yukizaki, Chizuko; Sakakibara, Yoichi; Suiko, Masahito; Morishita, Kazuhiro; Kataoka, Hiroaki; Matsuno, Koji

    2011-07-01

    Adult T-cell leukaemia (ATL) is caused by human T-cell leukaemia virus type I (HTLV-I) infection and is resistant to conventional chemotherapy. We evaluated the inhibitory effects of agricultural plants on the proliferation of seven ATL-related human leukaemia cells, using three ATL cell lines (ED, Su9T01 and S1T), two human T-cell lines transformed by HTLV-I infection (HUT-102 and MT-2) and two HTLV-I-negative human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cell lines (Jurkat and MOLT-4). A total of 52 samples of 80% ethanol extracts obtained from 30 types of agricultural plants were examined. On the basis of IC(50) values, we selected samples with greater activity than genistein, which was used as a positive control. The highest inhibitory effect was observed with extracts from leaves of Vaccinium virgatum Aiton (blueberry) on four cell lines (ED, Su9T01, HUT-102 and Jurkat); seeds of Momordica charantia L. (bitter gourd) exhibited the second highest activity. The bitter gourd seeds suppressed the proliferation of three cell lines (Su9T01, HUT-102 and Jurkat). The extracts from edible parts of Ipomea batatas LAM. (sweet potato), edible parts of Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott (taro), skin of taro and seeds of Prunus mume Sieb. et Zucc. (mume) showed markedly greater inhibitory effects on Su9T01 than genistein. These findings suggest that ATL-preventative bioactive compounds may exist in these agricultural plants, which are considered to be functional foods. PMID:21293936

  10. Electro-optical circuit board with single-mode glass waveguide optical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brusberg, Lars; Neitz, Marcel; Pernthaler, Dominik; Weber, Daniel; Sirbu, Bogdan; Herbst, Christian; Frey, Christopher; Queisser, Marco; Wöhrmann, Markus; Manessis, Dionysios; Schild, Beatrice; Oppermann, Hermann; Eichhammer, Yann; Schröder, Henning; Hâkansson, Andreas; Tekin, Tolga

    2016-03-01

    A glass optical waveguide process has been developed for fabrication of electro-optical circuit boards (EOCB). Very thin glass panels with planar integrated single-mode waveguides can be embedded as a core layer in printed circuit boards for high-speed board-level chip-to-chip and board-to-board optical interconnects over an optical backplane. Such singlemode EOCBs will be needed in upcoming high performance computers and data storage network environments in case single-mode operating silicon photonic ICs generate high-bandwidth signals [1]. The paper will describe some project results of the ongoing PhoxTroT project, in which a development of glass based single-mode on-board and board-to-board interconnection platform is successfully in progress. The optical design comprises a 500 μm thin glass panel (Schott D263Teco) with purely optical layers for single-mode glass waveguides. The board size is accommodated to the mask size limitations of the fabrication (200 mm wafer level process, being later transferred also to larger panel size). Our concept consists of directly assembling of silicon photonic ICs on cut-out areas in glass-based optical waveguide panels. A part of the electrical wiring is patterned by thin film technology directly on the glass wafer surface. A coupling element will be assembled on bottom side of the glass-based waveguide panel for 3D coupling between board-level glass waveguides and chip-level silicon waveguides. The laminate has a defined window for direct glass access for assembling of the photonic integrated circuit chip and optical coupling element. The paper describes the design, fabrication and characterization of glass-based electro-optical circuit board with format of (228 x 305) mm2.

  11. Investigation of polarization effects on new mask materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubke, Karsten; Teuber, Silvio; Hoellein, Ingo; Becker, Hans; Seitz, Holger; Buttgereit, Ute

    2005-05-01

    As microlithography moves to smaller critical dimensions, structures on reticles reach feature sizes comparable to the operating wavelength. Furthermore, with increasing NA the angle of incidence of light illuminating the mask steadily increases. In particular for immersion lithography this will have severe consequences on the printing behavior of reticles. Polarization effects arise which have an impact on, among other things, the contrast of the printed image. Angular effects have to be considered when aggressive off-axis illumination schemes are used. Whereas numerous articles have been published on those effects and the underlying theory seems to be understood, there is a strong need for experimental verification of properties of real masks at the actinic wavelength. This paper presents measurements of polarization effects on different mask blank types produced at Schott Lithotec including chrome and alternative absorber binary mask blanks, as well as phase shift mask blanks. Thickness and optical dispersion of all layers were determined using grazing incidence x-ray reflectometry (GIXR) and variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry (VASE). The set of mask blanks was patterned using a special design developed at the Advanced Mask Technology Center (AMTC) to allow measurements at different line width and pitch sizes. VUV Ellipsometry was then used to measure the properties of the structured materials, in particular the intensities in the 0th and 1st diffraction order for both polarization directions and varying angle of incidence. The degree of polarization of respective mask types is evaluated for dense lines with varying pitches and duty cycles. The results obtained experimentally are compared with simulations based on rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA).

  12. New ultra low permittivity composites for use in ceramic packaging of Ga:As integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, L. E.

    1985-09-01

    This report documents work performed to develop materials systems for use in the ceramic packaging of Ga:As integrated circuits. Topics under study at Penn State are: dielectrics produced from Macro-Defect-Free (MDF) cements. Both aluminate and silicate based cements have been studied. The objectives of the first year's work have been to show that suitable test tablets can be produced which exhibit dielectric losses less than 1% into the frequency range of 2.5 GHz. Current work is focused upon lowering the permittivity level using silica microballoons dispersed in the matrix. Sol-gel preparation of both thick (25 microns) and thin (0.5 microns) SiO2 and silica:alumina films has shown that in the diphasis system, it is possible to produce crack-free monoliths with permittivities in the range 1.6 to 2.0 and loss tangents below .003. In the thin films, capping of columnar sputtered etched films has been demonstrated. For etched Schott and Vycor glass structures, permittivities in the range 2.5 to 3.0 have been measured with excellent low loss properties. Sputtered silicon films have been sucessfully etched to yield highly planar columnar structures up to 25 microns meters thick. Experiments are in progress to convert the silicon to SiO2 by an oxidation step and capping of the columnar structure using sol-gel coatings has been achieved. In a parallel program at Interamics, new families of borosilicate glass bonded alumina ceramics are being developed.

  13. Viscosity properties of sodium borophosphate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Gaylord, S.; Tincher, B.; Petit, L. Richardson, K.

    2009-05-06

    The viscosity behavior of (1 - x)NaPO{sub 3}-xNa{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} glasses (x = 0.05-0.20) have been measured as a function of temperature using beam-bending and parallel-plate viscometry. The viscosity was found to shift to higher temperatures with increasing sodium borate content. The kinetic fragility parameter, m, estimated from the viscosity curve, decreases from 52 to 33 when x increases from 0.05 to 0.20 indicating that the glass network transforms from fragile to strong with the addition of Na{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}. The decrease in fragility with increasing x is due to the progressive depolymerization of the phosphate network by the preferred four-coordinated boron atoms present in the low alkali borate glasses. As confirmed by Raman spectroscopy increasing alkali borate leads to enhanced B-O-P linkages realized with the accompanying transition from solely four-coordinated boron (in BO{sub 4} units) to mixed BO{sub 4}/BO{sub 3} structures. The glass viscosity characteristics of the investigated glasses were compared to those of P-SF67 and N-FK5 commercial glasses from SCHOTT. We showed that the dependence of the viscosity of P-SF67 was similar to the investigated glasses due to similar phosphate network organization confirmed by Raman spectroscopy, whereas N-FK5 exhibited a very different viscosity curve and fragility parameter due to its highly coordinated silicate network.

  14. First light of the 1.6 meter off-axis New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wenda; Gorceix, Nicolas; Coulter, Roy; Coulter, Aaron; Goode, Philip R.

    2010-07-01

    New Jersey Institute of Technology, in collaboration with the University of Hawaii and the Korea Astronomy & Space Science Institute, has successfully developed and installed a 1.6 m clear aperture, off-axis New Solar Telescope (NST) at the Big Bear Solar Observatory. The NST will be the largest aperture solar telescope in the world until the 4 m Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) and 4 m European Solar Telescope (EST) begin operation in the next decade. Meanwhile, the NST will be the largest off-axis telescope before the 8.4 m segmented Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) comes on-line. The NST is configured as an off-axis Gregorian system consisting of a parabolic primary, prime focus field stop and heat reflector, elliptical secondary and diagonal flats. The primary mirror is made of Zerodur from Schott and figured to a final residual error of 16 nm rms by Steward Observatory Mirror Lab. The final focal ratio is f/52. The 180 circular opening in the field stop defines the maximal square field-of-view. The working wavelength range will cover 0.4 to 1.7 μm in the Coud´e Lab two floors beneath the telescope, and all wavelengths including far infrared at the Nasmyth focus on an optical bench attached to the side of the telescope structure. First-light scientific observations have been attained at the Nasmyth focus and in the Coud´e Lab. This paper presents a detailed description of installation and alignment of the NST. First-light observational results are also shown to demonstrate the validity of the NST optical alignment.

  15. Design Study of an 8 Meter Monolithic Mirror UV/Optical Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2008-01-01

    This paper will review a recent NASA MSFC preliminary study that demonstrated the feasibility of launching a 6 to 8 meter class monolithic primary mirror telescope to Sun-Earth L2 using an Ares V. The study started with the unique capabilities of the Ares V vehicle and examined the feasibility of launching a large aperture low cost low risk telescope based on a conventional ground based glass primary mirror. Specific technical areas studied included optical design; structural design/analysis including primary mirror support structure, sun shade and secondary mirror support structure; thermal analysis; launch vehicle performance and trajectory; spacecraft including structure, propulsion, GN & C, avionics, power systems and reaction wheels; operations & servicing, mass budget and system cost. The study telescope was an on-axis three-mirror anastigmatic design with a fine steering mirror. The observatory has a 100 arc-minute (8.4 X 12 arc-minutes) of diffraction limited field of view at a wavelength les than 500 nm. The study assumed that the primary mirror would be fabricated from an existing Schott Zerodur residual VLT blank edged to 6.2 meters, 175 mm thick at the edge with a mass of 11,000 kg. The entire mass budget for the observatory including primary mirror, structure, light baffle tube, instruments, space craft, avionics, etc. is less than 40,000 kg - a 33% mass margin on the Ares V's 60,000 kg Sun-Earth L2 capability. An 8 meter class observatory would have a total mass of less than 60,000 kg of which the primary mirror is the largest contributor.

  16. Thermal lensing of laser materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Mark J.; Hayden, Joseph S.

    2014-10-01

    This paper focuses on the three main effects that can induce wave-front distortion due to thermal lensing in laser gain media: 1) thermo-optic (dn/dT); 2) stress-optic; and 3) surface deformation (e.g., "end-bulging" of a laser rod). Considering the simple case of a side-pumped cylindrical rod which is air- or water-cooled along its length, the internal temperature distribution has long been known to assume a simple parabolic profile. Resulting from this are two induced refractive index variations due to thermo-optic and stress-optic effects that also assume a parabolic profile, but generally not of the same magnitude, nor even of the same sign. Finally, a small deformation on the rod ends can induce a small additional lensing contribution. We had two goals in this study: a) use finite-element simulations to verify the existing analytical expressions due to Koechner1 and Foster and Osterink; and b) apply them to glasses from the SCHOTT laser glass portfolio. The first goal was a reaction to more recent work by Chenais et al. who claimed Koechner made an error in his analysis with regard to thermal stress, throwing into doubt conclusions within studies since 1970 which made use of his equations. However, our re-analysis of their derivations, coupled with our FE modeling, confirmed that the Koechner and Foster and Osterink treatments are correct, and that Chenais et al. made mistakes in their derivation of the thermally-induced strain. Finally, for a nominal laser rod geometry, we compared the thermally-induced optical distortions in LG-680, LG-750, LG-760, LG-770, APG-1, and APG-2. While LG-750, -760, and -770 undergo considerable thermo-optic lensing, their stress-optic lensing is nearly of the same magnitude but of opposite sign, leading to a small total thermal lensing signature.

  17. Etching of fused silica and glass with excimer laser at 351 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, K.; Braun, A.; Böhme, R.

    2003-03-01

    The etching of solid surfaces at the interface to liquids is a new promising method for micro-machining of transparent materials. To extend the method to additional materials the pulsed radiation of a XeF-excimer laser (351 nm) was used for etching different types of glass (Corning Inc.: Pyrex, 7059 and Schott Group: D263, AF45) and fused silica for comparison. The etch rates of the investigated materials increase almost linear at low laser fluences. Threshold fluences for glass as low as 0.5 J/cm 2 and etch rates from 6 to 10 nm per pulse at 1 J/cm 2 have been determined. The etch rate and the threshold fluence depend also on the used liquid, consisting of a solvent (acetone, toluene) and a certain concentration of dissolved pyrene, but only little on the glass type. Due to the low etch rate typically very smooth surfaces are achieved. The surface roughness measured by AFM on Corning 7059-glass at an etch depth of 3.7 μm is as low as 4 nm. Contrary to the other glasses the surface roughness of Pyrex is much higher and dominated by typical arbitrary etch pits with micron dimensions. Comparing the etching of fused silica at a wavelength of 248 and 351 nm the used solution influences both the etch threshold and the etch rate. In accordance to earlier investigations at 248 nm also XeF-laser etching at the interface to an absorbing liquid results in a good surface quality, well defined patterns and almost no debris deposition. Thus, this technique is a good candidate for precise micro-machining applications.

  18. Thermoluminescence characteristics of Zn(BO2)2:Ce3+ under beta irradiation.

    PubMed

    Kucuk, Nil; Kucuk, Ilker; Yüksel, Mehmet; Topaksu, Mustafa

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the thermoluminescence (TL) characteristics of undoped and various Ce(3) (+)-doped Zn(BO2)2 powder samples excited by beta irradiation are reported for the first time. Zn(BO2)2:Ce(3+) powder samples were prepared by the nitric acid method (NAM) using the starting oxides [zinc oxide (ZnO), boric acid (H3BO3) and doped element oxide (CeO2)]. The formations of the obtained samples were confirmed by an X-ray diffraction study. Dose responses of Ce(3) (+)-doped Zn(BO2)2 samples were investigated after the beta irradiation in the dose range from 143 mGy to 60 Gy. All TL measurements were made on using an automated Risø TL/OSL DA-20 reader. TL emission was detected through a filter pack (Schott BG-39 and Corning 7-59) transmitting between 330 and 480 nm. TL glow curves were obtained using a constant heating rate of 5°C s(-1) from room temperature (RT) to 450°C in an N2 atmosphere. The dose response and minimum detectable dose (MDD) values of the samples were determined. The dose responses of all the samples tested exhibited a superlinear behaviour. MDD value of 4 % Ce(3) (+)-doped Zn(BO2)2 sample, which shows a high temperature peak at about 230°C, was determined as 96 mGy. MDD values for 1, 2, 3, 5 and 10 % Ce(3) (+)-doped Zn(BO2)2 samples were also determined as 682, 501, 635, 320 and 824 mGy, respectively. The trap parameters of undoped and 4 % Ce(3) (+)-doped Zn(BO2)2 samples were estimated by the computerised glow curve deconvolution method. PMID:26142459

  19. Advanced industrial fluorescence metrology used for qualification of high quality optical materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Axel; Becker, Hans-Juergen; Sohr, Oliver; Haspel, Rainer; Rupertus, Volker

    2003-11-01

    Schott Glas is developing and producing the optical material for various specialized applications in telecommunication, biomedical, optical, and micro lithography technology. The requirements on quality for optical materials are extremely high and still increasing. For example in micro lithography applications the impurities of the material are specified to be in the low ppb range. Usually the impurities in the lower ppb range are determined using analytical methods like LA ICP-MS and Neutron Activation Analysis. On the other hand absorption and laser resistivity of optical material is qualified with optical methods like precision spectral photometers and in-situ transmission measurements having UV lasers. Analytical methods have the drawback that they are time consuming and rather expensive, whereas the sensitivity for the absorption method will not be sufficient to characterize the future needs (coefficient much below 10-3 cm-1). In order to achieve the current and future quality requirements a Jobin Yvon FLUOROLOG 3.22 fluorescence spectrometer is employed to enable fast and precise qualification and analysis. The main advantage of this setup is the combination of highest sensitivity (more than one order of magnitude higher sensitivity that state of the art UV absorption spectroscopy) and fast measurement and evaluation cycles (several minutes compared to several hours necessary for chemical analytics). An overview is given for spectral characteristics and using specified standards. Moreover correlations to the material qualities are shown. In particular we have investigated the elementary fluorescence and absorption of rare earth element impurities as well as defects induced luminescence originated by impurities.

  20. Cortical GABA Levels in Primary Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Peter T.; Pace-Schott, Edward F.; Mason, Graeme F.; Forselius, Erica; Fasula, Madonna; Valentine, Gerald W.; Sanacora, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: GABA is increasingly recognized as an important neurotransmitter for the initiation and maintenance of sleep. We sought to measure cortical GABA content through proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in persons with and without primary insomnia, and relate brain GABA levels to polysomnographic sleep measures. Design: Two-group comparison study. Setting: Outpatient study at a university research clinic. Participants: Non-medicated persons with primary insomnia (N = 16) and no sleep complaints (N = 17). Interventions: Participants kept sleep diaries and a regular time-in-bed schedule for 9 days, culminating in 2 consecutive nights of ambulatory polysomnography and a single proton MRS session. The main outcome measure was occipital GABA/creatine ratios; secondary measures included sleep measurements and relationship between polysomnographically measured time awake after sleep onset and occipital GABA content. Measurements and Results: The primary insomnia group was distinguished from persons with no sleep complaints on self-reported and polysomnographically measured sleep. The two groups did not differ in age, sex, body mass index, habitual bed- and wake-times, napping, use of caffeine, or use of cigarettes. Mean occipital GABA level was 12% higher in persons with insomnia than in persons without sleep complaints (P < 0.05). In both groups, GABA levels correlated negatively with polysomnographically measured time awake after sleep onset (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Increased GABA levels in persons with insomnia may reflect an allostatic response to chronic hyperarousal. The preserved, negative relationship between GABA and time awake after sleep onset supports this notion, indicating that the possible allostatic response is adaptive. Citation: Morgan PT; Pace-Schott EF; Mason GF; Forselius E; Fasula M; Valentine GW; Sanacora G. Cortical GABA levels in primary insomnia. SLEEP 2012;35(6):807-814. PMID:22654200

  1. Picosecond laser cutting and drilling of thin flex glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wlodarczyk, Krystian L.; Brunton, Adam; Rumsby, Phil; Hand, Duncan P.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the feasibility of cutting and drilling thin flex glass (TFG) substrates using a picosecond laser operating at wavelengths of 1030 nm, 515 nm and 343 nm. 50 μm and 100 μm thick AF32®Eco Thin Glass (Schott AG) sheets are used. The laser processing parameters such as the wavelength, pulse energy, pulse repetition frequency, scan speed and the number of laser passes which are necessary to perform through a cut or to drill a borehole in the TFG substrate are studied in detail. Our results show that the highest effective cutting speeds (220 mm/s for a 50 μm thick TFG substrate and 74 mm/s for a 100 μm thick TFG substrate) are obtained with the 1030 nm wavelength, whereas the 343 nm wavelength provides the best quality cuts. The 515 nm wavelength, meanwhile, can be used to provide relatively good laser cut quality with heat affected zones (HAZ) of <25 μm for 50 μm TFG and <40 μm for 100 μm TFG with cutting speeds of 100 mm/s and 28.5 mm/s, respectively. The 343 nm and 515 nm wavelengths can also be used for drilling micro-holes (with inlet diameters of ⩽75 μm) in the 100 μm TFG substrate with speeds of up to 2 holes per second (using 343 nm) and 8 holes per second (using 515 nm). Optical microscope and SEM images of the cuts and micro-holes are presented.

  2. Electrolytic Conductivity of Four Imidazolium-Based Ionic Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calado, Marta S.; Diogo, João C. F.; Correia da Mata, José L.; Caetano, Fernando J. P.; Visak, Zoran P.; Fareleira, João M. N. A.

    2013-07-01

    In this article, electrolytic (ionic) conductivity measurements of four ionic liquids (ILs), namely, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl] imide ([Cmim][NTf]), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate ([Cmim][OTf]), 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide ([Cmim][NTf]), and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethyl sulfate ([Cmim][EtSO]) (ECOENG212), were performed in a temperature range of (288.15 to 333.15) K. [Cmim][NTf] was chosen to be a reference ionic liquid for several properties, including the electrolytic conductivity by the IUPAC Project 2002-005-1-100. For that reason, the measurements performed with that ionic liquid primarily serve the purpose to validate the instrumentation and the experimental procedure used in this work. The measurements were carried out using a complex impedance method, applying a novel electronic device designed and constructed for this purpose. The complete setup includes a Schott Instruments LF 913 T, used as a four-electrode conductivity cell, and a lock-in amplifier. The cell was calibrated using standard reference KCl aqueous solutions. The measurements of the impedance of the conductivity cell were carried out along a range of frequencies from (0.2 to 30) kHz, and the results were extrapolated to infinite frequency, in order to determine the electrolytic conductivity of the liquid samples. The results obtained for the ionic liquid [Cmim][NTf] were compared to reference data, and it was estimated that the overall uncertainty of the present results is better than 2 %. All the data obtained were compared with available literature data, and were analyzed and discussed in respect to the effect of temperature, cation alkyl chain length, and anion.

  3. New ultralow permittivity composites for use in ceramic packaging of ga:as integrated circuits. Annual report, 1 August 1984-31 July 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, L.E.

    1985-09-18

    This report documents work performed to develop materials systems for use in the ceramic packaging of Ga:As integrated circuits. Topics under study at Penn State are: dielectrics produced from Macro-Defect-Free (MDF) cements. Both aluminate- and silicate-based cements were studied. The objectives of the first year's work have been to show that suitable test tablets can be produced that exhibit dielectric losses less than 1% into the frequency range of 2.5 GHz. Current work is focused upon lowering the permittivity level using silica microballoons dispersed in the matrix. Sol-gel preparation of both thick (25 microns) and thin (0.5 microns) SiO2 and silica:alumina films has shown that in the diphasis system, it is possible to produce crack-free monoliths with permittivities in the range 1.6 to 2.0 and loss tangents below .003. In the thin films, capping of columnar sputtered etched films was demonstrated. For etched Schott and Vycor glass structures, permittivities in the range 2.5 to 3.0 was measured with excellent low-loss properties. Sputtered silicon films were sucessfully etched to yield highly planar columnar structures up to 25 microns thick. Experiments are in progress to convert the silicon to SiO/sub 2/ by an oxidation step, and capping of the columnar structure using sol-gel coatings was achieved. In a parallel program at Interamics, new families of borosilicate-glass-bonded alumina ceramics are being developed. Tapes using both lead and calcium boroslicate glasses were fabricated and densified at firing temperature below 1,000 C. Current studies are exploring suitable metallization techniques.

  4. Compatibility of Larmor's Formula with Radiation Reaction for an Accelerated Charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singal, Ashok K.

    2016-05-01

    It is shown that the well-known disparity in classical electrodynamics between the power losses calculated from the radiation reaction and that from Larmor's formula, is succinctly understood when a proper distinction is made between quantities expressed in terms of a "real time" and those expressed in terms of a retarded time. It is explicitly shown that an accelerated charge, taken to be a sphere of vanishingly small radius r_o , experiences at any time a self-force proportional to the acceleration it had at a time r_o /c earlier, while the rate of work done on the charge is obtained by a scalar product of the self-force with the instantaneous (present) value of its velocity. Now if the retarded value of acceleration is expressed in terms of the present values of acceleration, then we get the rate of work done according to the radiation reaction equation, however if we instead express the present value of velocity in terms of its time-retarded value, then we get back the familiar Larmor's radiation formula. From this simple relation between the two we show that they differ because Larmor's formula, in contrast with the radiation reaction, is written not in terms of the real-time values of quantities specifying the charge motion but is instead expressed in terms of the time-retarded values. Moreover, it is explicitly shown that the difference in the two formulas for radiative power loss exactly matches the difference in the temporal rate of the change of energy in the self-fields between the retarded and real times. From this it becomes obvious that the ad hoc introduction of an acceleration-dependent energy term, usually referred to in the prevalent literature as Schott-term, in order to make the two formulas comply with each other, is redundant.

  5. Sputter deposition of PZT piezoelectric films on thin glass substrates for adjustable x-ray optics.

    PubMed

    Wilke, Rudeger H T; Johnson-Wilke, Raegan L; Cotroneo, Vincenzo; Davis, William N; Reid, Paul B; Schwartz, Daniel A; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan

    2013-05-10

    Piezoelectric PbZr(0.52)Ti(0.48)O(3) (PZT) thin films deposited on thin glass substrates have been proposed for adjustable optics in future x-ray telescopes. The light weight of these x-ray optics enables large collecting areas, while the capability to correct mirror figure errors with the PZT thin film will allow much higher imaging resolution than possible with conventional lightweight optics. However, the low strain temperature and flexible nature of the thin glass complicate the use of chemical-solution deposition due to warping of the substrate at typical crystallization temperatures for the PZT. RF magnetron sputtering enabled preparation of PZT films with thicknesses up to 3 μm on Schott D263 glass substrates with much less deformation. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that the films crystallized with the perovskite phase and showed no indication of secondary phases. Films with 1 cm(2) electrodes exhibited relative permittivity values near 1100 and loss tangents below 0.05. In addition, the remanent polarization was 26 μC/cm(2) with coercive fields of 33 kV/cm. The transverse piezoelectric coefficient was as high as -6.1±0.6 C/m(2). To assess influence functions for the x-ray optics application, the piezoelectrically induced deflection of individual cells was measured and compared with finite-element-analysis calculations. The good agreement between the results suggests that actuation of PZT thin films can control mirror figure errors to a precision of about 5 nm, allowing sub-arcsecond imaging. PMID:23669858

  6. Cold shaping of thin glass foils: a fast and cost-effective solution for making light-weight astronomical x-ray optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civitani, M. M.; Basso, S.; Citterio, O.; Ghigo, M.; Salmaso, B.; Pareschi, G.; Vecchi, G.

    2015-09-01

    Recent advancements in thin glass materials allowed the development and the mass production of very thin glass foils, like e.g. the Willow glass (thickness of 0.1-0.2 mm) produced by Corning or AF32 produced by Schott (thickness down to 0.055 mm). The thickness, strength and flexibility of these glass foils allow bending them up to very small radius of curvature without breaks. This feature, together with the very low micro-roughness, makes this kind of materials ideal candidates for pursuing a cold replication approach for cost-effective and fast making of grazing incidence astronomical optics. Starting from the very thin flat glass sheets, the process under development foresees to bond them onto the supporting structure while they are wrapped around reference mandrels. The assembly concept, based on the use of Wolter-I counter-form moulds, is also based on the use of reinforcing ribs that connect pairs of consecutive foils in the final assembly. The ribs do not only play the role of mechanical connectors, they keep the shape and increase the structural stiffness. Indeed, the ribs constrain the foil profile to the correct shape during the bonding, damping the low-frequency residuals with respect to the Wolter I configuration. This approach is particularly interesting because of their low weight and cost. They could e.g be used for the production of high throughput optics as those needed for the Chines XTP mission, in which the requirements on the angular resolution are not too tight. In fact, a Half Energy Width in the range of 20-60 arcsec is compatible with the expected residual error due to the spring back of the glass sheets. In this paper we provide an overview of the project, the expected performances and present the first preliminary results.

  7. The Heterogeneity and Spatial Patterning of Structure and Physiology across the Leaf Surface in Giant Leaves of Alocasia macrorrhiza

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuai; Zhang, Yong-Jiang; Sack, Lawren; Scoffoni, Christine; Ishida, Atsushi; Chen, Ya-Jun; Cao, Kun-Fang

    2013-01-01

    Leaf physiology determines the carbon acquisition of the whole plant, but there can be considerable variation in physiology and carbon acquisition within individual leaves. Alocasia macrorrhiza (L.) Schott is an herbaceous species that can develop very large leaves of up to 1 m in length. However, little is known about the hydraulic and photosynthetic design of such giant leaves. Based on previous studies of smaller leaves, and on the greater surface area for trait variation in large leaves, we hypothesized that A. macrorrhiza leaves would exhibit significant heterogeneity in structure and function. We found evidence of reduced hydraulic supply and demand in the outer leaf regions; leaf mass per area, chlorophyll concentration, and guard cell length decreased, as did stomatal conductance, net photosynthetic rate and quantum efficiency of photosystem II. This heterogeneity in physiology was opposite to that expected from a thinner boundary layer at the leaf edge, which would have led to greater rates of gas exchange. Leaf temperature was 8.8°C higher in the outer than in the central region in the afternoon, consistent with reduced stomatal conductance and transpiration caused by a hydraulic limitation to the outer lamina. The reduced stomatal conductance in the outer regions would explain the observed homogeneous distribution of leaf water potential across the leaf surface. These findings indicate substantial heterogeneity in gas exchange across the leaf surface in large leaves, greater than that reported for smaller-leafed species, though the observed structural differences across the lamina were within the range reported for smaller-leafed species. Future work will determine whether the challenge of transporting water to the outer regions can limit leaf size for plants experiencing drought, and whether the heterogeneity of function across the leaf surface represents a particular disadvantage for large simple leaves that might explain their global rarity, even in

  8. Google Earth Grand Tour Themes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Paor, D. G.; Whitmeyer, S. J.; Bentley, C.; Dordevic, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    As part of an NSF TUES Type 3 project entitled "Google Earth for Onsite and Distance Education (GEODE)," we are assembling a "Grand Tour" of locations on Earth and other terrestrial bodies that every geoscience student should know about and visit at least in virtual reality. Based on feedback from colleagues at previous meetings, we have identified nine Grand Tour themes: "Plates and Plumes," "Rocks and Regions," "Geology Through Time," "The Mapping Challenge*," "U.S. National Parks*," "The Magical Mystery Tour*," "Resources and Hazards," "Planets and Moons," and "Top of the Pops." Themes marked with an asterisk are most developed at this stage and will be demonstrated in real time. The Mapping Challenge invites students to trace geological contacts, measure bedding strike and dip and the plunge, trend, and facing of a fold. There is an advanced tool for modeling periclinal folds. The challenge is presented in a game-like format with an emphasis on puzzle-solving that will appeal to students regardless of gender. For the tour of U.S. national parks, we divided the most geologically important parks into four groups—Western Pacific, West Coast, Rockies, and East Coast. We are combining our own team's GigaPan imagery with imagery already available on the Internet. There is a great deal of imagery just waiting to be annotated for geological education purposes. The Magical Mystery Tour takes students to Google Streetview locations selected by instructors. Students are presented with questions or tasks and are given automatic feedback. Other themes are under development. Within each theme, we are crowd-sourcing contributions from colleagues and inviting colleagues to vote for or against proposed locations and student interactions. The GEODE team includes the authors and: Heather Almquist, Stephen Burgin, Cinzia Cervato, Gene Cooper, Paul Karabinos, Terry Pavlis, Jen Piatek, Bill Richards, Jeff Ryan, Ron Schott, Kristen St. John, and Barb Tewksbury.

  9. Production of the IXO glass segmented mirrors by hot slumping with pressure assistance: tests and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proserpio, L.; Ghigo, M.; Basso, S.; Conconi, P.; Citterio, O.; Civitani, M.; Negri, R.; Pagano, G.; Pareschi, G.; Salmaso, B.; Spiga, D.; Tagliaferri, G.; Terzi, L.; Zambra, A.; Parodi, G.; Martelli, F.; Bavdaz, M.; Wille, E.

    2011-09-01

    The large dimensions of the future X-ray telescopes, with diameters ranging from 3.5 m and up to several meters, will require the adoption of segmented optics and hence the development of new technologies for their manufacturing. These technologies are based on lightweight materials and structures to comply with the mass constrains imposed by the launcher. The Astronomical Observatory of Brera (INAF-OAB) is involved in the development of a glass shaping technology for the production of grazing incidence segmented optics to be employed onboard the next generation of Xray Observatories. This technique, named "Hot slumping technology with pressure", is based on the viscosity change of the glass with the temperature: by applying a suitable thermal cycle the viscosity of the glass is decreased enough to allow its slumping on a mould so to replicate its shape without significantly degrade its surface finishing. Following this replication approach, it is possible to obtain, with the same mould, a number of equal mirror segments that will be integrated and aligned in the telescope aperture so to create a mirror shell in configuration Wolter I. The entire study has been financed by ESA in the context of the International X-ray Observatory (IXO) mission with the aim of developing a back-up technology for the IXO mirror manufacturing. The study started in 2009 and it is scheduled to finish in 2012 with the production of representative module prototypes, named POC and XOU_BB. After a brief review of past results, this paper reports the latest advancement in the slumping of Schott glass D263 foils on Fused Silica and Zerodur moulds and its status as for summer 2011.

  10. Flavonol tetraglycosides and other constituents from leaves of Styphnolobium japonicum (Leguminosae) and related taxa.

    PubMed

    Kite, Geoffrey C; Stoneham, Charlotte A; Veitch, Nigel C

    2007-05-01

    Two flavonol tetraglycosides comprising a trisaccharide at C-3 and a monosaccharide at C-7 were isolated from the leaves of Styphnolobium japonicum (L.) Schott and characterised as the 3-O-alpha-rhamnopyranosyl(1-->2)[alpha-rhamnopyranosyl(1-->6)]-beta-glucopyranoside-7-O-alpha-rhamnopyranosides of quercetin and kaempferol. The 3-O-alpha-rhamnopyranosyl(1-->2)[alpha-rhamnopyranosyl(1-->6)]-beta-galactopyranoside-7-O-alpha-rhamnopyranoside of kaempferol, the 3-O-alpha-rhamnopyranosyl(1-->2)[alpha-rhamnopyranosyl(1-->6)]-beta-glucopyranosides of kaempferol and quercetin and the 3-O-alpha-rhamnopyranosyl(1-->2)[alpha-rhamnopyranosyl(1-->6)]-beta-galactopyranoside of kaempferol were also obtained from this species for the first time. Some or all of these flavonol tetra- and triglycosides were detected in 17 of 18 specimens of S. japonicum examined from living and herbarium material, although the most abundant flavonoid in the leaves was generally quercetin 3-O-alpha-rhamnopyranosyl(1-->6)-beta-glucopyranoside (rutin). The triglycosides, but not the tetraglycosides, were detected in herbarium specimens of Styphnolobium burseroides M. Sousa, Rudd & Medrano and Styphnolobium monteviridis M. Sousa & Rudd, but specimens of Styphnolobium affine (Torrey & A. Gray) Walp. contained a different profile of flavonol glycosides. The flavonol tetra- and triglycosides of S. japonicum were also present in leaves of Cladrastis kentukea (Dum. Cours.) Rudd, a representative of a genus placed close to Styphnolobium in current molecular phylogenies. An additional constituent obtained from leaves of Styphnolobium japonicum was identified as the maltol derivative, 3-hydroxy-2-methyl-4H-pyran-4-one 3-O-(4'-O-p-coumaroyl-6'-O-(3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaroyl))-beta-glucopyranoside. PMID:17462679

  11. Heavy metal leaching from coal fly ash amended container substrates during Syngonium production

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Q.S.; Chen, J.J.; Li, Y.C.

    2008-02-15

    Coal fly ash has been proposed to be an alternative to lime amendment and a nutrient source of container substrates for ornamental plant production. A great concern over this proposed beneficial use, however, is the potential contamination of surface and ground water by heavy metals. In this study, three fly ashes collected from Florida, Michigan, and North Carolina and a commercial dolomite were amended in a basal substrate. The formulated substrates were used to produce Syngonium podophyllum Schott 'Berry Allusion' in 15-cm diameter containers in a shaded greenhouse. Leachates from the containers were collected during the entire six months of plant production and analyzed for heavy metal concentrations. There were no detectable As, Cr, Hg, Pb, and Se in the leachates; Cd and Mo were only detected in few leachate samples. The metals constantly detected were Cu, Mn, Ni, and Zn. The total amounts of Cu, Mn, Ni, and Zn leached during the six-month production period were 95, 210, 44, and 337 {mu} g per container, indicating that such amounts in leachates may contribute little to contamination of surface and ground water. In addition, plant growth indices and fresh and dry weights of S. podophyllum 'Berry Allusion' produced from fly ash and dolomite-amended substrates were comparable except for the plants produced from the substrate amended with fly ash collected from Michigan which had reduced growth indices and fresh and dry weights. Thus, selected fly ashes can be alternatives to commercial dolomites as amendments to container substrates for ornamental plant production. The use of fly ashes as container substrate amendments should represent a new market for the beneficial use of this coal combustion byproduct.

  12. Heavy metal leaching from coal fly ash amended container substrates during Syngonium production.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiansheng; Chen, Jianjun; Li, Yuncong

    2008-02-01

    Coal fly ash has been proposed to be an alternative to lime amendment and a nutrient source of container substrates for ornamental plant production. A great concern over this proposed beneficial use, however, is the potential contamination of surface and ground water by heavy metals. In this study, three fly ashes collected from Florida, Michigan, and North Carolina and a commercial dolomite were amended in a basal substrate. The formulated substrates were used to produce Syngonium podophyllum Schott 'Berry Allusion' in 15-cm diameter containers in a shaded greenhouse. Leachates from the containers were collected during the entire six months of plant production and analyzed for heavy metal concentrations. There were no detectable As, Cr, Hg, Pb, and Se in the leachates; Cd and Mo were only detected in few leachate samples. The metals constantly detected were Cu, Mn, Ni, and Zn. The total amounts of Cu, Mn, Ni, and Zn leached during the six-month production period were 95, 210, 44, and 337 microg per container, indicating that such amounts in leachates may contribute little to contamination of surface and ground water. In addition, plant growth indices and fresh and dry weights of S. podophyllum 'Berry Allusion' produced from fly ash and dolomite-amended substrates were comparable except for the plants produced from the substrate amended with fly ash collected from Michigan which had reduced growth indices and fresh and dry weights. Thus, selected fly ashes can be alternatives to commercial dolomites as amendments to container substrates for ornamental plant production. The use of fly ashes as container substrate amendments should represent a new market for the beneficial use of this coal combustion byproduct. PMID:18246510

  13. Sleep Promotes Generalization of Extinction of Conditioned Fear

    PubMed Central

    Pace-Schott, Edward F.; Milad, Mohammed R.; Orr, Scott P.; Rauch, Scott L.; Stickgold, Robert; Pitman, Roger K.

    2009-01-01

    Study Objective: To examine the effects of sleep on fear conditioning, extinction, extinction recall, and generalization of extinction recall in healthy humans. Design: During the Conditioning phase, a mild, 0.5-sec shock followed conditioned stimuli (CS+s), which consisted of 2 differently colored lamps. A third lamp color was interspersed but never reinforced (CS-). Immediately after Conditioning, one CS+ was extinguished (CS+E) by presentation without shocks (Extinction phase). The other CS+ went unextinguished (CS+U). Twelve hours later, following continuous normal daytime waking (Wake group, N = 27) or an equal interval containing a normal night's sleep (Sleep group, N = 26), conditioned responses (CRs) to all CSs were measured (Extinction Recall phase). It was hypothesized that the Sleep versus Wake group would show greater extinction recall and/or generalization of extinction recall from the CS+E to the CS+U. Setting: Academic medical center. Subjects: Paid normal volunteers. Measurements and Results: Square-root transformed skin conductance response (SCR) measured conditioned responding. During Extinction Recall, the Group (Wake or Sleep) × CS+ Type (CS+E or CS+U) interaction was significant (P = 0.04). SCRs to the CS+E did not differ between groups, whereas SCRs to the CS+U were significantly smaller in the Sleep group. Additionally, SCRs were significantly larger to the CS+U than CS+E in the Wake but not the Sleep group. Conclusions: After sleep, extinction memory generalized from an extinguished conditioned stimulus to a similarly conditioned but unextinguished stimulus. Clinically, adequate sleep may promote generalization of extinction memory from specific stimuli treated during exposure therapy to similar stimuli later encountered in vivo. Citation: Pace-Schott EF; Milad MR; Orr SP; Rauch SL; Stickgold R; Pitman RK. Sleep promotes generalization of extinction of conditioned fear. SLEEP 2009;32(1):19-26. PMID:19189775

  14. In vivo photoacoustic imaging of nude mice vasculature using a photoacoustic imaging system based on a commercial ultrasound scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankovic, Ladislav; Shahzad, Khalid; Wang, Yao; Burcher, Michael; Scholle, Frank-Detlef; Hauff, Peter; Mofina, Sabine; Skobe, Mihaela

    2008-02-01

    In-vivo photoacoustic/ultrasound (PA/US) imaging of nude mice was investigated using a photoacoustic imaging system based on a commercial ultrasound scanner HDI-5000. Raw per-channel data was captured and beamformed to generate each individual photoacoustic image with a single laser shot. An ultra-broadband CL15-7 linear array with a center frequency of 8 MHz, combined with a Schott Glass fiber bundle, was used as a compact high resolution imaging probe, with lateral and axial PA resolutions of about 300µm and 200µm, respectively. The imaging system worked in a dual PA-US mode, with the ultrasound outlining the tissue structure and the photoacoustic image showing the blood vessels. PA signals were generated by exposing mice to ultra-short optical pulses from a Nd:YAG-pumped OPO laser operating in a wavelength range of 700-950nm. The corresponding ultrasound images were generated in the regular B-mode with standard delay-and-sum beamforming algorithm. The system resolution was sufficiently high to identify and clearly distinguish the dorsal artery and the two lateral veins in the mouse tail. Both the saphena artery and the ischiatic vein on the cross-section of the mouse leg were clearly outlined in the PA images and correctly overlaid on the ultrasound image of the tissue structure. Similarly, cross-section PA images of the mouse abdomen revealed mesenteric vasculatures located below the abdominal wall. Finally, a successful PA imaging of the mouse thoracic cavity unveiled the ascending and descending aorta. These initial results demonstrate a great potential for a dual photoacoustic/ultrasound imaging modality implemented on a commercial ultrasound imaging scanner.

  15. Interaction of N-FK5 and L-BAL35 optical glass with various carbide and other precision glass mold tooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koontz, E.; Wachtel, P.; Musgraves, J. David; Richardson, K.; Mourad, S.; Huber, M.; Kunz, A.; Forrer, M.

    2013-09-01

    Precision glass molding (PGM) is an optical manufacturing process used to hot press optical glass into a specified lens shape. This is done by taking the glass to a temperature above Tg and exerting force using an upper and lower mold. These molds will, together, give the pressed lens its shape. This study focuses on the high temperature interactions between the mold tooling material and two optical oxide glasses, Ohara's L-BAL35 and Schott's N-FK5. Flat molds were used to press flat glass work pieces at high temperature and force; key post process parameters such as sample and mold surface contamination using EDS and visible degradation via SEM were catalogued and analyzed. The molds used were bare tungsten carbide (WC) and silicon carbide (SiC) with an amorphous SiC chemical vapor deposition (CVD) coating. The results showed that raw WC molds suffered the most degradation including physical damage as well as chemical adherence and reaction. The Ti binder used in the WC as well as some the tungsten itself transferred to both glasses and caused a white reflective layer to appear on the molded glass surface. Severe damage was evident after only 2 pressing cycles with potassium from N-FK5 being the most prominent chemical contaminant. N-FK5 proved to be the more corrosive of the two glasses in all occasions. The SiC coated molds fared better in terms of degradation than the WC, however sticking of glass to mold was a problem.

  16. Influence of cerium on the pulsed UV nanosecond laser processing of photostructurable glass ceramic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livingston, F. E.; Adams, P. M.; Helvajian, H.

    2005-07-01

    Photostructurable glass ceramic (PSGC) materials contain a sensitizer that is used to facilitate the optical exposure process. The primary role of the sensitizer is to absorb incident radiation and generate photoelectrons. With thermal treatment, these photoelectrons can then interact with nascent metal ions to induce the formation of metallic clusters and the precipitation of a soluble crystalline phase in the glass matrix. The photo-ionization efficiency of the sensitizer species is strongly dependent on its spectral absorption and oxidation state in the base glass. Stabilizing compounds are typically added to the glass matrix to maintain the photo-active oxidation state and promote efficient exposure. To investigate the effectiveness of the photo-initiator, we have conducted experiments in which sample coupons of a commercial PSGC material (Foturan™, Schott Corp., Germany) were carefully exposed to various photon doses by pulsed UV nanosecond lasers at λ = 266 nm and 355 nm. Foturan is a lithium aluminosilicate glass that contains trace amounts of cerium as the photosensitive agent (0.01-0.04 wt.% admixture Ce 2O 3). The photo-initiator efficiency was investigated by using samples with cerium and without cerium. The irradiation wavelengths were selected because they lie above and below the primary absorption band of the cerium photo-initiator. Optical transmission spectroscopy (OTS) was employed to identify and monitor the population density of the photo-induced trapped electron state as a function of incident laser irradiance. The irradiated samples were thermally processed and then analyzed again with OTS to measure the quenching of the trapped electron state and the concurrent growth of a spectral band associated with the formation of nanometer-scale metallic clusters. The growth of metallic clusters signifies the "fixing" of the exposure and permanent image formation in the glass. The OTS results reveal that for λ = 266 nm laser irradiation, at least two

  17. Variable UV laser exposure processing of photosensitive glass-ceramics: maskless micro- to meso-scale structure fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livingston, F. E.; Helvajian, H.

    2005-12-01

    A novel variable UV laser processing technique was developed that enables the concurrent fabrication of structures in photosensitive glass-ceramic (PSGC) materials that range from the micro-scale to the meso-scale domains. This technique combines the advantages of direct-write volumetric laser patterning and batch chemical processing. The merged non-thermal laser fabrication approach relies on the ability to precisely and selectively alter the chemical etch rate of the PSGC by varying the laser exposure during pattern formation. The present study determined that the chemical etch rate of a commercial photosensitive glass-ceramic (FoturanTM, Schott Corp., Germany) in dilute hydrofluoric (HF) acid is strongly dependent on the incident laser irradiance during patterning at λ=266 nm and λ=355 nm. For low laser irradiances, the etch rate ratio (Rexposed/Runexposed) increased nearly linearly with laser irradiance. The slopes of the linear ranges of the etch rate ratios were measured to be 435.9±46.7 μm2/mW and 46.2±2.3 μm2/mW for λ=266 nm and λ=355 nm, respectively. For high laser irradiances, the measured etch rate ratio saturated at ˜30:1 with a maximum absolute etch rate of 18.62±0.30 μm/min. The maximum absolute chemical etch rate was independent of the exposure wavelength. Consequently, variation of the laser exposure during direct-write patterning permits the formation of variegated and proximal high and low aspect ratio structures on a common substrate. The results show that adjacent microstructures with aspect ratios ranging from <1:1 to ˜30:1 can be fabricated in a single, simultaneous batch chemical etch step without the need for a complex masking sequence or post-process ablation step. This new technique facilitates rapid prototype processing with pattern and component uniformity, and achieves material processing over large areas without incurring high cost.

  18. Examination of the laser-induced variations in the chemical etch rate of a photosensitive glass ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voges, Melanie; Beversdorff, Manfred; Willert, Chris; Krain, Hartmut

    2007-10-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have reported that the chemical etch rate of a commercial photosensitive glass ceramic (FoturanTM, Schott Corp., Germany) in dilute hydrofluoric acid is strongly dependent on the incident laser irradiance during patterning at λ=266 nm and λ=355 nm. To help elucidate the underlying chemical and physical processes associated with the laser-induced variations in the chemical etch rate, several complimentary techniques were employed at various stages of the UV laser exposure and thermal treatment. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to identify the crystalline phases that are formed in Foturan following laser irradiation and annealing, and monitor the crystalline content as a function of laser irradiance at λ=266 nm and λ=355 nm. The XRD results indicate the nucleation of lithium metasilicate (Li2SiO3) crystals as the exclusive phase following laser irradiation and thermal treatment at temperatures not exceeding 605 °C. The XRD studies also show that the Li2SiO3 density increases with increasing laser irradiance and saturates at high laser irradiance. For our thermal treatment protocol, the average Li2SiO3 crystal diameters are 117.0±10.0 nm and 91.2±5.8 nm for λ=266 nm and λ=355 nm, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was utilized to examine the microscopic structural features of the lithium metasilicate crystals. The TEM results reveal that the growth of lithium metasilicate crystals proceeds dendritically, and produces Li2SiO3 crystals that are ˜700 1000 nm in length for saturation exposures. Optical transmission spectroscopy (OTS) was used to study the growth of metallic silver clusters that act as nucleation sites for the Li2SiO3 crystalline phase. The OTS results show that the (Ag0)x cluster concentration has a dependence on incident laser irradiance that is similar to the etch rate ratios and Li2SiO3 concentration. A comparison between the XRD and optical transmission results and our prior etch rate

  19. Modeling Karst Ecosystem-Atmosphere CO2 Exchange: The Importance of Ventilation for Carbonate Geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, M.; Serrano-Ortiz, P.; Godderis, Y.; Kowalski, A. S.; Janssens, I.

    2011-12-01

    Global carbonate weathering is considered a small carbon flux when compared with biogenic CO2 fluxes. This is, however, a question of time and space. In karst regions, it has been shown that biogenic fluxes are not always dominant. CO2 exchange patterns have been reported there that cannot be explained by biological processes: disproportionate outgassing during daytime or nighttime CO2 uptake during periods when all vegetation is senescent. These phenomena have previously been attributed to carbonate weathering reactions or biocrust activity, but their associated CO2 exchange rates are considered too small [Serrano-Ortiz et al., 2010]. Here, we report a novel mechanism through which carbonate weathering, exacerbated by subterranean ventilation, dominates the diel pattern of land-atmosphere CO2 exchange in karst areas. Ventilation is an efficient air mass transfer process (including pressure pumping, deep penetration of eddies and thermal expansion of air) that occurs in all porous media, when pores are connected and not blocked by water. Due to its high porosity and the presence of caves, fissures and cracks, karts systems are very prone to ventilation. When soil CO2 concentrations are rapidly brought into disequilibrium by ventilation, CO2 fluxes associated with carbonate weathering can exceed those associated with biological activity. The biology-based standardized partitioning schemes that are used by a large community of scientists, are then no longer applicable and gas exchange measurements fail to reveal any information on the biological activity. By incorporating ventilation processes into the mineral weathering model WITCH [Goddéris et al., 2006], we were able to quantify the contribution of carbonate geochemistry to the synoptic CO2 fluxes on karst ecosystems. [1] Goddéris, Y., L. M. Francois, A. Probst, J. Schott, D. Moncoulon, D. Labat, and D. Viville (2006), Modelling weathering processes at the catchment scale: The WITCH numerical model, Geochim

  20. Confocal microendoscopy: Characterization of imaging bundles, fluorescent contrast agents, and early clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udovich, Joshua Anthony

    Ovarian cancer is the fifth leading cause of cancer related deaths among women. Early detection improves the chances of survival following diagnosis, and new imaging modalities have the potential to reduce deaths due to this disease. The confocal microendoscope (CME) is a non-destructive in-vivo imaging device for visualization of the ovaries that operates in real-time. Two components of the CME system are evaluated in this paper, and initial results from an ongoing clinical trial are presented. Fiber-optic imaging bundles are used in the CME imaging catheter to relay images over distances of up to 20 feet. When detecting fluorescent signals from investigated tissue, any fluorescence in the system can potentially reduce contrast in images. The emission and transmission properties of three commercially available fiber optic imaging bundles were evaluated. Emission maps of fluorescence from bundles were generated at multiple excitation wavelengths to determine the profile and amount of fluorescence present in bundles manufactured by Sumitomo, Fujikura, and Schott. Results are also presented that show the variation of transmittance as a function of illumination angle in these bundles. Users of high-resolution fiber-optic imaging bundles should be aware of these properties and take them into account during system design. Contrast is improved in images obtained with the CME through the application of topical dyes. Acridine orange (AO) and SYTO 16 are two fluorescent stains that are used to show the size, shape, and distribution of cell nuclei. Unfortunately, little is known about the effects of these dyes on living tissues. This study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of dye treatment on peritoneal tissues in mice. Seventy-five Balb/c mice were split into five groups of fifteen and given peritoneal injections of dye or saline. The proportions of negative outcomes for the control and test groups were compared using confidence intervals and the Fisher's exact test

  1. A five-factor model perspective on psychopathy and comorbid Axis-II disorders in a forensic-psychiatric sample.

    PubMed

    Decuyper, Mieke; De Fruyt, Filip; Buschman, Jos

    2008-01-01

    The validity of DSM-IV predictions [Widiger, T. A., Trull, T. J., Clarkin, J. F., Sanderson, C. J., & Costa, P. T., (2002). A description of the DSM-IV personality disorders with the five-factor model of personality. In Costa, P. T. & Widiger, T. A. (Eds.), Personality disorders and the five-factor model of personality (2nd ed.). Washington DC: American Psychological Association] concerning Antisocial Personality Disorder and the validity of the hypothesized associations between the Five-Factor Model and psychopathy were examined in 48 male forensic-psychiatric patients. Prevalence of psychopathy and comorbid personality pathology was also investigated, as well as the convergent validity of two Dutch personality disorder inventories. Patients provided self-descriptions on the NEO-PI-R [Costa, P. T., & McCrae, R. R., (1992b). Professional Manual: Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R) and NEO Five-Factor-Inventory (NEO-FFI). Odessa, FL: Psychological Assessment Resources], and were administered the VKP [Duijsens, I. J., Haringsma, R., & EurelingsBontekoe, E. H. M., (1999). Handleiding VKP (Vragenlijst voor kenmerken van de persoonlijkheid). Gebaseerd op DSM-IV en ICD-10. Leiderdorp: Datec] and the ADP-IV [Schotte, C. K. W., & De Doncker, D. A. M., (1994). ADP-IV Questionnaire. Antwerp Belgium: University Hospital Antwerp] to assess personality pathology. Psychopathy was assessed using Hare's Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R; [Hare, R. D., (1990). The Hare Psychopathy Checklist Revised Manual. Toronto: Multi-Health Systems]) based on a semi-structured interview and file records of psychiatric and psychological evaluations and criminal history. Results underscored the validity of the FFM Antisocial PD associations, but the hypothesized correlations between the FFM and Psychopathy were less supported. Results supported the convergent validity of the ADP-IV and the VKP, both at the dimensional and categorical level. Around 55% met the diagnostic threshold of

  2. Reaching the Next Generation of College Students via Their Digital Devices.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmeyer, S. J.; De Paor, D. G.; Bentley, C.

    2015-12-01

    Cooper, Mladen Dordevic, Marissa Dudek, Brandon Fitzwater, Bridget Gomez, Tyler Hansen, Paul Karabinos, Terry Pavlis, Jen Piatek, Alan Pitts, Robin Rohrback, Bill Richards, Caroline Robinson, Jeff Rollins, Jeff Ryan, Ron Schott, Kristen St. John, and Barb Tewksbury. Supported by NSF DUE 1323419 and by Google Geo Curriculum Awards.

  3. TU-C-12A-07: Characterization of Longitudinal Reproducibility of Quantitative Diffusion Imaging Data Acquired with Four Different Protocols Using a Phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X; Buzzelli, M; Randazzo, W; Yanasak, N

    2014-06-15

    diffusion imaging sequences from different platforms. Schott Glass North America and The Phantom Laboratory have donated materials and personnel time to this project.

  4. Internal consistency in aqueous geochemical data revisited: Applications to the aluminum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutolo, Benjamin M.; Kong, Xiang-Zhao; Seyfried, William E.; Saar, Martin O.

    2014-05-01

    Internal consistency of thermodynamic data has long been considered vital for confident calculations of aqueous geochemical processes. However, an internally consistent mineral thermodynamic data set is not necessarily consistent with calculations of aqueous species thermodynamic properties due, potentially, to improper or inconsistent constraints used in the derivation process. In this study, we attempt to accommodate the need for a mineral thermodynamic data set that is internally consistent with respect to aqueous species thermodynamic properties by adapting the least squares optimization methods of Powell and Holland (1985). This adapted method allows for both the derivation of mineral thermodynamic properties from fluid chemistry measurements of solutions in equilibrium with mineral assemblages, as well as estimates of the uncertainty on the derived results. Using a large number of phase equilibria, solubility, and calorimetric measurements, we have developed a thermodynamic data set of 12 key aluminum-bearing mineral phases. These data are derived to be consistent with Na+ and K+ speciation data presented by Shock and Helgeson (1988), H4SiO4(aq) data presented by Stefánsson (2001), and the Al speciation data set presented by Tagirov and Schott (2001). Many of the constraining phase equilibrium measurements are exactly the same as those used to develop other thermodynamic data, yet our derived values tend to be quite different than some of the others' due to our choices of reference data. The differing values of mineral thermodynamic properties have implications for calculations of Al mineral solubilities; specifically, kaolinite solubilities calculated with the developed data set are as much as 6.75 times lower and 73% greater than those calculated with Helgeson et al. (1978) and Holland and Powell (2011) data, respectively. Where possible, calculations and experimental data are compared at low T, and the disagreement between the two sources reiterates the

  5. Stress manipulated coating for fabricating lightweight X-ray telescope mirrors.

    PubMed

    Yao, Youwei; Wang, Xiaoli; Cao, Jian; Ulmer, Melville

    2015-11-01

    In this paper wepresent a method to correct the surface profile of an X-ray mirror by using a stress manipulated coating on the back side of mirror shells. The ability to fabricate a thin walled mirror by some replication process is required if future affordable X-ray space missions are to have ~30 times the effective area of the current best X-ray observatory, i.e., the Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO). Thus, some process is necessary for using replicated X-ray optics to make the next generation X-ray observatory. However, although the surface roughness of sub-100 μm length scales can be replicated, no known replication technique can make 1 arc-second or better CXO-like optics. Yet, because the images produced by the CXO are so exquisite, many X-ray astronomers are not willing to settle for less in the future. Therefore, a post replication technique must be developed to make future major X-ray astronomy missions possible. In this paper, we describe a technique based on DC magnetron sputtering. For figure correction, we apply a controlled bias voltage on the surface during the sputtering. We show that we can produce, in 1-D, shape changes large enough (1 μm over 10 mm) to correct the typical figure errors in replicated optics. We demonstrate reproducibility on an order of 0.6%, and stability over weeks on a scale of less than 1 μm over 10 mm. For these tests, we used 200 μm thick pieces of D263 Schott glass, about 5 mm x 20 mm. In addition to the basic concept of controlling the stress with the coating, we describe a new optimization software design to calculate the stress distribution for a desired surface profile. We show that the combination of the stress optimization software coupled with the coating process, can reduce the slope error of a 5 mm x 20 mm glass sample by a factor of ten. PMID:26561130

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Optical observations of LS I +61 303 (Paredes-Fortuny+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes-Fortuny, X.; Ribo, M.; Bosch-Ramon, V.; Casares, J.; Fors, O.; Nunez, J.

    2015-01-01

    In Table 1 we present the already reduced differential optical photometry of the gamma-ray binary LS I +61 303 obtained with the robotic Telescope Fabra-ROA Montsec (TFRM; 0.5m aperture, 0.78m primary mirror) at the Observatori Astronomic del Montsec (Lleida, Spain; see Fors et al. 2013PASP..125..522F). The observations span from 2012 July 31 to 2014 March 7 with 71 nights of good data. The target was observed around 20 times per night with exposures of 5-10s. The passband filter is SCHOTT GG475 (lambda>475nm). We conducted the data reduction and analysis using a pipeline developed in Python following these steps: standard calibration of the images using IRAF (implemented through PyRAF), aperture photometry using the PHOT package from IRAF (PyRAF) with an aperture radius of 7.5-pixels, and correction of the lightcurves using a weighted average differential magnitude correction method based on Broeg et al. (2005AN....326..134B). The lightcurve of LS I +61 303 has been corrected using 145 weighted reference stars up to 4mag fainter than the target and as close as possible to it (<0.25deg). Finally, we averaged the corrected magnitudes of the target on a nightly basis, and we used and artificial offset to a mean magnitude of 10.7mag. The nightly photometric uncertainties are estimated as the standard deviation of the magnitudes of the target obtained from the individual images for each night. In Table 2 we present the already reduced H-alpha equivalent width (EW) data of LS I +61 303 obtained using FRODOspec on the robotic 2.0m Liverpool telescope at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (La Palma, Spain). The data span from 2012 July to 2014 January 15 with 104 measurements, with one 600s exposure per night. The data have been obtained with the same setup, and reduced in the same way as in Casares et al. (2012MNRAS.421.1103C). We assumed that the uncertainties of the EW are at the 10% level. The adopted convention is positive for emission. (2 data files).

  7. Using Google Streetview Panoramic Imagery for Geoscience Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Paor, D. G.; Dordevic, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    geoscience educators both to use existing Streetview imagery and to generate new imagery for specific locations of geological interest. The GEODE team includes the authors and: H. Almquist, C. Bentley, S. Burgin, C. Cervato, G. Cooper, P. Karabinos, T. Pavlis, J. Piatek, B. Richards, J. Ryan, R. Schott, K. St. John, B. Tewksbury, and S. Whitmeyer.

  8. Fluorescence metrology used for analytics of high-quality optical materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Axel; Haspel, Rainer; Rupertus, Volker

    2004-09-01

    Optical, glass ceramics and crystals are used for various specialized applications in telecommunication, biomedical, optical, and micro lithography technology. In order to qualify and control the material quality during the research and production processes several specialized ultra trace analytisis methods have to be appliedcs Schott Glas is applied. One focus of our the activities is the determination of impurities ranging in the sub ppb-regime, because such kind of impurity level is required e.g. for pure materials used for microlithography for example. Common analytical techniques for these impurity levels areSuch impurities are determined using analytical methods like LA ICP-MS and or Neutron Activation Analysis for example. On the other hand direct and non-destructive optical analysistic becomes is attractive because it visualizes the requirement of the optical applications additionally. Typical eExamples are absorption and laser resistivity measurements of optical material with optical methods like precision spectral photometers and or in-situ transmission measurements by means ofusing lamps and or UV lasers. Analytical methods have the drawback that they are time consuming and rather expensive, whereas the sensitivity for the absorption method will not be sufficient to characterize the future needs (coefficient much below 10-3 cm-1). For a non-destructive qualification for the current and future quality requirements a Jobin Yvon FLUOROLOG 3.22 fluorescence spectrometery is employed to enable fast and precise qualification and analysis. The main advantage of this setup is the combination of highest sensitivity (more than one order of magnitude higher sensitivity than state of the art UV absorption spectroscopy), fast measurement and evaluation cycles (several minutes compared to several hours necessary for chemical analystics). An overview is given for spectral characteristics using specified standards, which are necessary to establish the analytical system

  9. Integration of Mirror Design with Suspension System using NASA's New Mirror Modeling Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, William; Bevan Ryan M.; Stahl, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Advances in mirror fabrication is making very large space based telescopes possible. In the many applications, only monolithic mirrors meet the performance requirements. The existing and near-term planned heavy launch vehicles place a premium on lowest possible mass. Again, available and planned payload shroud size limits near term designs to 4 meter class mirror. Practical 8 meter and beyond designs could encourage planners to include larger shrouds if it can be proven that such mirrors can be manufactured. These two factors lower mass and larger mirrors, presents the classic optimization problem. There is a practical upper limit to how large a mirror can be supported by a purely kinematic mount system and be launched. This paper shows how the design of the suspension system and mirror blank needs to be designed simultaneously. We will also explore the concepts of auxiliary support systems, which act only during launch and disengage on orbit. We will define required characteristics of these systems and show how they can substantially reduce the mirror mass. The AMTD project is developing and maturing the processes for future replacements for HUBBLE, creating the design tools, validating the methods and techniques necessary to manufacture, test and launch extremely large optical missions. This paper will use the AMTD 4 meter "design point" as an illustration of the typical use of the modeler in generating the multiple models of mirror and suspension systems used during the conceptual design phase of most projects. The influence of Hexapod geometry, mirror depth, cell size and construction techniques (Exelsis Deep Core Low Temperature Fusion (c) versus Corning Frit Bonded (c) versus Schott Pocket Milled Zerodur (c) in this particular study) are being evaluated. Due to space and time consideration we will only be able to present snippets of the study in this paper. The advances in manufacturing techniques for lightweight mirrors, such as EXELSIS deep core low

  10. Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility Delivery Delayed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-12-01

    create and disperse many of the elements necessary for new stars, planets and life. The Marshall Space Flight Center manages development of the observatory for the Office of Space Science at NASA Headquarters. Made of glass purchased from Schott Glaswerke, Mainz, Germany, the telescope's mirrors were built by Hughes Danbury Optical Systems, Danbury, CT, and assembled by Eastman-Kodak Company, Rochester, NY. The science instruments are being integrated into the science instrument module at Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation, Boulder, CO, before being tested and shipped to TRW.

  11. Optical lead flint glasses: key material in optics since centuries and in future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Peter

    2015-09-01

    fluorescence light bands simultaneously. These outstanding properties of the lead flint glass types caused SCHOTT to keep them in the glass program and not to replace them completely as other glass companies have done. The improvements of the last two decades with respect to homogeneity and transmittance underline their suitability for future extreme quality optics with applications in medical and general research and in astronomy for large beam shaping and atmospheric dispersion correction.

  12. Silicate all-solid photonic crystal fibers with a glass high index contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buczynski, Ryszard; Pysz, Dariusz; Kujawa, Ireneusz; Fita, Piotr; Pawlowska, Monika; Nowosielski, J.; Radzewicz, Czeslaw; Stepien, Ryszard

    2007-05-01

    An all-solid photonic crystal fiber can be developed using two thermally matched glasses with one glass forming the background, and the other the lattice of inclusions. Optical properties of all-solid holey fibers (SOHO) are sensitive to the photonic cladding configuration, much the same as PCFs with air holes, and strongly depend on dispersion properties of the materials used. When a high index contrast between the glasses is assured photonic crystal fiber can effectively guide light with photonic band gap mechanism. This can be easily achieved when multicomponent soft glass is used for fiber fabrication. We report on new developments of F2/NC-21 silicate all-glass PCFs. F2 is a commercially available glass (Schott Inc.) with a high concentration of lead-oxide (PbO=45.5%) and the refractive index n D=1.619. It can be used both as the background material and as a material for micro-rods (inclusions). A borosilicate glass (B IIO 3=26.0%) NC-21 glass has been synthesized in-house at IEMT. NC21 has the index n D=1.533 and was used as the material for micro-rods (inclusions) or as a background glass in the structures. The two selected glasses have a high index contrast equal to 0,084 at 1,55μm wavelength. In this report we present new results on optimization of the filling factor d/Λ and reduction of the lattice pitch Λ necessary to obtain efficient guidance at 1.55 μm. The numerical analysis of SOHO F2/NC21 fibers has been carried out using a full-vector mode solver based on the plane-wave expansion method. In our paper we report on photonic crystal fibers with two guiding mechanisms: an effective index with a high index core (low index inclusions made of NC21 glass and F2 used as a background glass) and a photonic band gap with a low index core (high index inclusions made of F2 glass and NC21 used as a background glass).

  13. Comment on the reported fiber attenuations in the visible regime in 'Fabrication of glass photonic crystal fibers with a die-cast process'

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Xian; Loh, Wei H.; Richardson, David J

    2008-10-01

    We comment on the recent paper by Zhou et al. [Appl. Opt.45, 4433 (2006)APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.45.004433], in which transmission losses of 0.2-0.3 dB/m were claimed across the wavelength range 420-900 nm in a high-index (nd=1.80518 at 587.6 nm) SF6 glass-based photonic crystal fiber fabricated by novel die-cast technique. If confirmed, these losses are at least 1 order of magnitude lower than previous reported losses of SF6 photonic crystal fibers from other fabrication approaches. Here we present a statistic survey on the relationship between the refractive index and the bulk material attenuation, based on a large number of commercial Schott optical glasses with the nd ranging between 1.40 and 2.05. It shows that the loss of a high-index (nd=1.80) glass optical fiber should be at the levels of 10-50 dB/m at 420 nm and 1-10 dB/m at 500 nm, respectively. Moreover, the material attenuation of such a high-index glass fiber should intrinsically show a large decay, from 10-50 dB/m at 420 nm to the level of 1 dB/m at 700 nm, which arises from the tail on the UV absorption edge of the high-index glass extending to the visible region. Therefore, we conclude that: (1) the low loss of 0.2-0.3 dB/m reported in the cited paper is abnormally one or two magnitudes lower than the material attenuation that a high-index (nd=1.80) glass optical fiber should have in the range between 420 and 500 nm and that (2) the flat loss curve between 420 and 700 nm in the cited paper deviates greatly from the intrinsic behavior of a high-index (nd=1.80) glass fiber.

  14. Coal fly ash as an amendment to container substrate for Spathiphyllum production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianjun; Li, Yuncong

    2006-10-01

    Coal fly ash, possessing alkalinity and containing some essential mineral elements, could be an alternative to lime amendment and a nutrient source of container substrates for ornamental plant growth. This study examined physiochemical properties of three fly ashes collected from Florida, Michigan, and North Carolina and container substrates formulated by incorporating commercial dolomite and the three fly ashes, respectively into a soilless basal substrate. The basal, dolomite- and fly ash-amended substrates were used to grow peace lily (Spathiphyllum Schott 'Ty's Pride'), a popular ornamental foliage plant, in 15-cm diameter containers in a shaded greenhouse. Electrical conductivities and pH of the substrates were monitored monthly. Plant canopy heights and widths, shoot fresh and dry weights were recorded five months after transplanting, and tissue nutrient contents were measured. Three fly ashes and the commercial dolomite were able to raise pH of the basal substrate from 3.8 to about 6.8. Canopy heights and widths as well as shoot fresh and dry weights of plants produced from fly ash-amended substrates were comparable to those produced from dolomite-amended substrate but significantly different from those produced from the basal substrate. On an average, five necrotic leaves appeared from plants produced in the basal substrate; however, less than one necrotic leaf occurred on plants produced in either dolomite- or fly ash-amended substrates. As a result, the quality grade of plants grown in the basal substrate was low, and plants were not marketable. Additionally, electrical conductivities of fly ash-amended substrates were consistently higher during the course of plant growth, suggesting that, in addition to neutralizing pH, the amended fly ashes provide nutrients for peace lily growth, which was confirmed by high nutrient contents in plant shoots. This study demonstrates that the three fly ashes can be alternatives to commercial dolomites used as amendments

  15. Marker based standardization of polyherbal formulation (SJT-DI-02) by high performance thin layer chromatography method

    PubMed Central

    Ladva, Bhakti J.; Mahida, Vijay M.; Kantaria, Urmi D.; Gokani, Rina H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Preparation of highly standardized herbal products with respect to chemical composition and biological activity is considered to be a valuable approach in this field. SJT-DI-02 polyherbal formulation was successfully developed at our institute and filed for patent at Mumbai patent office. Objective: The present work was marker based standardization of patented, novel and efficacious polyherbal formulation namely SJT-DI-02 for the treatment of diabetes. The SJT-DI-02 was comprised of dried extracts of rhizomes of Acorus calamus, leaves of Aegle marmelose, fruits of Benincasa hispida, roots of Chlorophytum arendinaceum, seeds of Eugenia jambolana, leaves of Ocimum sanctum, pericarp of Punica granatum, seeds of Tamarindus indica. Selected plants were collected, dried and extracted with suitable solvents. The formulation was prepared by mixing different fractions of extracts. Materials and Methods: For successful and best standardization, first of all selection and procurement was carried out. Selection is done on the basis of therapeutic efficacy and amount of the marker present in the particular plant part. At the time of procurement side by side phytochemical screening and estimation of phytoconstituents was carried out. After completion of preliminary screening using characterized markers, we tried to develop best TLC systems using selected solvent composition. Finally well-developed TLC systems were applied in HPTLC. In the present study polyherbal formulation was standardized by using different four markers. TLC Densitometric methods were developed using HPTLC for the quantification of these marker compounds. Solvent systems were optimized to achieve best resolution of the marker compounds from other components of the sample extract. The identity of the bands in the sample extracts were confirmed by comparing the Rf and the absorption spectra by overlaying their UV absorption spectra with those of their respective standards. The purity of the bands

  16. Hepatic metabolism of carcinogenic β-asarone.

    PubMed

    Cartus, Alexander T; Stegmüller, Simone; Simson, Nadine; Wahl, Andrea; Neef, Sylvia; Kelm, Harald; Schrenk, Dieter

    2015-09-21

    β-Asarone (1) belongs to the group of naturally occurring phenylpropenes like eugenol or anethole. Compound 1 is found in several plants, e.g., Acorus calamus or Asarum europaeum. Compound 1-containing plant materials and essential oils thereof are used to flavor foods and alcoholic beverages and as ingredients of many drugs in traditional phytomedicines. Although 1 has been claimed to have several positive pharmacological effects, it was found to be genotoxic and carcinogenic in rodents (liver and small intestine). The mechanism of action of carcinogenic allylic phenylpropenes consists of the metabolic activation via cytochrome P450 enzymes and sulfotransferases. In vivo experiments suggested that this pathway does not play a major role in the carcinogenicity of the propenylic compound 1 as is the case for other propenylic compounds, e.g., anethole. Since the metabolic pathways of 1 have not been investigated and its carcinogenic mode of action is unknown, we investigated the metabolism of 1 in liver microsomes of rats, bovines, porcines, and humans using (1)H NMR, HPLC-DAD, and LC-ESI-MS/MS techniques. We synthesized the majority of identified metabolites which were used as reference compounds for the quantification and final verification of metabolites. Microsomal epoxidation of the side chain of 1 presumably yielded (Z)-asarone-1',2'-epoxide (8a) which instantly was hydrolyzed to the corresponding erythro- and threo-configurated diols (9b, 9a) and the ketone 2,4,5-trimethoxyphenylacetone (13). This was the main metabolic pathway in the metabolism of 1 in all investigated liver microsomes. Hydroxylation of the side chain of 1 led to the formation of three alcohols at total yields of less than 30%: 1'-hydroxyasarone (2), (E)- and (Z)-3'-hydroxyasarone (4 and 6), with 6 being the mainly formed alcohol and 2 being detectable only in liver microsomes of Aroclor 1254-pretreated rats. Small amounts of 4 and 6 were further oxidized to the corresponding carbonyl

  17. Topical AC-11 abates actinic keratoses and early squamous cell cancers in hairless mice exposed to Ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation.

    PubMed

    Mentor, Julian M; Etemadi, Amir; Patta, Abrienne M; Scheinfeld, Noah

    2015-04-01

    AC-11 is an aqueous extract of the botanical, Uncaria tomentosa, which has a variety of effects that enhance DNA repair and down regulate inflammation. AC-11 is essentially free of oxindole alkaloids (< 0.05%, w/w) but contains more than 8% carboxy alkyl esters (CAEs) as their active ingredients. Three groups of 10 outbred SK-1 hairless or SK-II hairless strains of mice each were treated with AC-11 at 0.5%, 1.5%, and 3.0% in a non-irritating, dye-free, perfume-free, and fragrance-free vanishing cream vehicle. Ten mice used vehicle only and 10 were untreated. Each concentration of AC-11 and was applied daily to the backs of the mice prior to exposure to a 1,600-watt solar simulator used in this work (Solar Light Co. Philadelphia, PA) emitting (mainly Ultraviolet A (UVA) and B (UVB) radiation) duration of the experimental period with UVB wavelengths was filtered out with a 1.0 cm Schott WG 345 filter. AC-11 with a peak absorption at 200nm does act as a sun block. We tested for and focused on clinical appearance of mice and histological appearance of tumors in mice rather than metrics of radiation generated inflammation. Tumor progression scores were assigned as follows: 4+ = extensive tumor development; 3+ = early malignancies (raised palpable plaques)(early squamous cell cancers) 2+ = firm scaling, palpable keratosis (actinic keratoses); 1+ = light scaling with erythema. Following a total cumulative dose of 738 J/cm2, 85.7% all of the irradiated control animals, which did not receive AC-11 had precancerous actinic keratosis (AK)-type lesions (2+) (64.3% versus 42.9%) or early squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) (3+) (21.4% vs. 4.8%), in comparison with 47.7 % of AC-11-treated animals. There were no significant differences between the AC-11 groups. Three months after cessation of exposure to UVA radiation, the lesions in all but three of the 14 animals which were treated with AC-11 that were still evaluable irradiated with UVA radiation progressed to papillomas and frank

  18. Diverging longitudinal changes in astrocytosis and amyloid PET in autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Vieitez, Elena; Saint-Aubert, Laure; Carter, Stephen F; Almkvist, Ove; Farid, Karim; Schöll, Michael; Chiotis, Konstantinos; Thordardottir, Steinunn; Graff, Caroline; Wall, Anders; Långström, Bengt; Nordberg, Agneta

    2016-03-01

    See Schott and Fox (doi:10.1093/brain/awv405) for a scientific commentary on this article.Alzheimer's disease is a multifactorial dementia disorder characterized by early amyloid-β, tau deposition, glial activation and neurodegeneration, where the interrelationships between the different pathophysiological events are not yet well characterized. In this study, longitudinal multitracer positron emission tomography imaging of individuals with autosomal dominant or sporadic Alzheimer's disease was used to quantify the changes in regional distribution of brain astrocytosis (tracer (11)C-deuterium-L-deprenyl), fibrillar amyloid-β plaque deposition ((11)C-Pittsburgh compound B), and glucose metabolism ((18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose) from early presymptomatic stages over an extended period to clinical symptoms. The 52 baseline participants comprised autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease mutation carriers (n = 11; 49.6 ± 10.3 years old) and non-carriers (n = 16; 51.1 ± 14.2 years old; 10 male), and patients with sporadic mild cognitive impairment (n = 17; 61.9 ± 6.4 years old; nine male) and sporadic Alzheimer's disease (n = 8; 63.0 ± 6.5 years old; five male); for confidentiality reasons, the gender of mutation carriers is not revealed. The autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease participants belonged to families with known mutations in either presenilin 1 (PSEN1) or amyloid precursor protein (APPswe or APParc) genes. Sporadic mild cognitive impairment patients were further divided into (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B-positive (n = 13; 62.0 ± 6.4; seven male) and (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B-negative (n = 4; 61.8 ± 7.5 years old; two male) groups using a neocortical standardized uptake value ratio cut-off value of 1.41, which was calculated with respect to the cerebellar grey matter. All baseline participants underwent multitracer positron emission tomography scans, cerebrospinal fluid biomarker analysis and neuropsychological assessment. Twenty-six of the participants

  19. Characterization of structural relaxation in inorganic glasses using length dilatometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koontz, Erick

    characterization technique is comprised of three main components: experimental measurements, fitting of configurational length change, and description of glass behavior by analysis of fitting parameters. N-BK7 optical glass from Schott was used as the proof of concept glass but the main scientific interest was in three chalcogenide glasses: As40Se 60, As20Se80, and Ge17.9As19.7 Se62.4. The dilatometric experiments were carried out using a thermomechanical analyzer (TMA) on glass sample that were synthesized by the author, in all cases except N-BK7. Isothermal structural relaxation measurements were done on (12 mm tall x 3 mm x 3 mm) beams placed vertically in the TMA. The samples were equilibrated at a starting temperature (T 0) until structural equilibrium was reached then a temperature down step was initiated to the final temperature (T 1) and held isothermally until relaxation concluded. The configurational aspect of length relaxation, and therefore volume relaxation was extracted and fit with a Prony series. The Prony series parameters indicated a number of relaxation events occurring within the glass on timescales typically an order of magnitude apart in time. The data analysis showed as many as 4 discrete relaxation times at lower temperatures. The number of discrete relaxation decreased as the temperature increased until just one single relaxation was left in the temperature range just at or above Tg. In the case of N-BK7 these trends were utilized to construct a simple model that could be applied to glass manufacturing in the areas of annealing or PGM. A future development of a rather simple finite element model (FEM) would easily be able to use this model to predict the exponential-like, temperature and time dependent relaxation behaviors of the glass. The predictive model was not extended to the chalcogenide glass studied here, but could easily be applied to them in the future. The relaxation time trends versus temperature showed a definite region of transition between a

  20. The role of reaction affinity and secondary minerals in regulating chemical weathering rates at the Santa Cruz Soil Chronosequence, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, Kate; Steefel, Carl I.; White, Art F.; Stonestrom, Dave A.

    2009-05-01

    In order to explore the reasons for the apparent discrepancy between laboratory and field weathering rates and to determine the extent to which weathering rates are controlled by the approach to thermodynamic equilibrium, secondary mineral precipitation, and flow rates, a multicomponent reactive transport model (CrunchFlow) was used to interpret soil profile development and mineral precipitation and dissolution rates at the 226 ka Marine Terrace Chronosequence near Santa Cruz, CA. Aqueous compositions, fluid chemistry, transport, and mineral abundances are well characterized [White A. F., Schulz M. S., Vivit D. V., Blum A., Stonestrom D. A. and Anderson S. P. (2008) Chemical weathering of a Marine Terrace Chronosequence, Santa Cruz, California. I: interpreting the long-term controls on chemical weathering based on spatial and temporal element and mineral distributions. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta72 (1), 36-68] and were used to constrain the reaction rates for the weathering and precipitating minerals in the reactive transport modeling. When primary mineral weathering rates are calculated with either of two experimentally determined rate constants, the nonlinear, parallel rate law formulation of Hellmann and Tisserand [Hellmann R. and Tisserand D. (2006) Dissolution kinetics as a function of the Gibbs free energy of reaction: An experimental study based on albite feldspar. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta70 (2), 364-383] or the aluminum inhibition model proposed by Oelkers et al. [Oelkers E. H., Schott J. and Devidal J. L. (1994) The effect of aluminum, pH, and chemical affinity on the rates of aluminosilicate dissolution reactions. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta58 (9), 2011-2024], modeling results are consistent with field-scale observations when independently constrained clay precipitation rates are accounted for. Experimental and field rates, therefore, can be reconciled at the Santa Cruz site. Additionally, observed maximum clay abundances in the argillic horizons occur at the

  1. Computational materials science aided design of glass ceramics and crystal properties (abstract only)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannstadt, Wolfgang

    2008-02-01

    Today's high tech materials have in many cases highly specialized properties and designed functionalities. Materials parameters like high temperature stability, high stiffness and certain optical properties have to be optimized and in many cases an adaptation to given processes is necessary. Many materials are compounds or layered structures. Thus, surface and interface properties need to be considered as well. At the same time to some extent just a few atomic layers sometimes determine the properties of the material, as is well known in semiconductor and other thin film technologies. Therefore, a detailed understanding of the materials properties at the atomic scale becomes more and more important. In addition many high tech materials have to be of high purity or selective dopant concentrations have to be adjusted to fulfill the desired functionality. Modern materials developments successfully use computational materials science to achieve that goal. Improved software tools and continuously growing computational power allow us to predict macroscopic properties of materials on the basis of microscopic/atomic ab initio simulation approaches. At Schott, special materials, in particular glasses and glass ceramics, are produced for a variety of applications. For a glass ceramic all the above mentioned difficulties for materials development arise. The properties of a glass ceramic are determined by the interplay of crystalline phases embedded in an amorphous glass matrix. For materials development the understanding of crystal structures and their properties, surfaces and interface phenomena, and amorphous systems are necessary, likewise. Each by itself is already a challenging problem. Many crystal phases that are grown within the glass matrix do not exist as single crystals or are difficult to grow in reasonable amounts for experimental investigations. The only way to obtain the properties of these crystalline phases is through 'ab initio' simulations in the computer

  2. A Novel Method For Predicting Carbon Monoxide Apparent Quantum Yield Spectra in Coastal Water Using Remote Sensing Reflectance Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reader, H. E.; Miller, W. L.

    2010-12-01

    irradiating samples in a Suntest Solar Simulator, under duplicate Schott glass long-pass cutoff filters. CO photoproduction was determined using an SRI Gas Chromatograph fitted with a reduced gas detector. The mathematical equation for CO spectral AQY was determined by fitting the production data to the equation AQY(λ) = exp(-(m1 +m2(λ-m3))) using the MATLAB routine nlinfit. AQY(350) ranged from 8.2E-5 to 2.5E-4 mol CO/mol photon absorbed. It was determined that the absorption coefficient of the CDOM at 320nm (ag320) in the original sample (prior to irradiation) accurately predicted the 3 coefficients in the AQY equation and the accuracy of this relationship is presented. The SeaUV algorithm for determining in situ attenuation and CDOM absorption coefficients at 320nm (Fichot and Miller 2008) was modified for application to AISA hyperspectral remote sensing data obtained from flyovers of the Duplin River and Doboy Sound (Georgia, USA) in the summer of 2006. Photoproduction estimates of CO photoproduction from optical data are determined for this area using our new methods to estimate AQY variability in dark waters.

  3. The influence of Cl, F and Mg ions on the experimental replacement of Carrara marble by apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trindade Pedrosa, Elisabete; Putnis, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    : whether the reaction front is more effective through the grain boundaries towards the centre of the grains, or through the developing porous structures towards the centre of the rock. Moreover, the micro-porosity of the replaced product also shows significant dependence on the solution composition, varying from being very heterogeneous as reported by Jonas et al., (2013), to a more uniform micro-porosity distribution as observed in this study. References: Jonas, L., John, T., King, H. E., Geisler, T., & Putnis, A. (2014). The role of grain boundaries and transient porosity in rocks as fluid pathways for reaction front propagation. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 386, 64-74. doi:10.1016/j.epsl.2013.10.050 Putnis A. (2009) Mineral Replacement Reactions. In: Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Water-Rock Interaction. Oelkers E. H & Schott J (eds). Reviews in Mineralogy & Geochemistry 30, 87-124 (2009)

  4. Ge and Ga behaviour during subduction-related metamorphism of basic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Korh, Afifé; Luais, Béatrice; Boiron, Marie-Christine; Deloule, Etienne

    2014-05-01

    garnet increases from blueschists to eclogites (prograde metamorphism), i.e. with increasing temperature from 500 to 550°C [5], in line with the Ge/Si increase in garnet rims. Ga/Al values remain relatively constant. By contrast, Ge/Si in garnet in greenschists (retrograde path) is similar to garnet in blueschists. In epidote, the Ga/Al ratios increase during the prograde path, while the Ge/Si decrease. At peak conditions (500-550°C [5]), Ge seems to be preferentially incorporated in garnet than in epidote. These results allow evaluating the Ga and Ge exchange behaviour during the various P-T conditions. REFERENCES [1] Pokrovski and Schott (1998). GCA 62, 1631-1642. [2] Wood, S.A., Samson, I.M. (2006). Ore Geol. Rev. 28, 57-102. [3] Luais, B. (2012). Chem. Geol. 334, 295-311. [4] Malvin, D.J., Drake, M.J. (1976). GCA 51, 2117-2128. [5] El Korh, A., Schmidt, S. Th., Ulianov, A., Potel, S. (2009). J. Petrol. 50, 1107-1148. [6] De Argollo, R., Schilling, J. (1978). GCA 42, 623-630.

  5. Computational materials science aided design of glass ceramics and crystal properties (abstract only).

    PubMed

    Mannstadt, Wolfgang

    2008-02-13

    Today's high tech materials have in many cases highly specialized properties and designed functionalities. Materials parameters like high temperature stability, high stiffness and certain optical properties have to be optimized and in many cases an adaptation to given processes is necessary. Many materials are compounds or layered structures. Thus, surface and interface properties need to be considered as well. At the same time to some extent just a few atomic layers sometimes determine the properties of the material, as is well known in semiconductor and other thin film technologies. Therefore, a detailed understanding of the materials properties at the atomic scale becomes more and more important. In addition many high tech materials have to be of high purity or selective dopant concentrations have to be adjusted to fulfill the desired functionality. Modern materials developments successfully use computational materials science to achieve that goal. Improved software tools and continuously growing computational power allow us to predict macroscopic properties of materials on the basis of microscopic/atomic ab initio simulation approaches. At Schott, special materials, in particular glasses and glass ceramics, are produced for a variety of applications. For a glass ceramic all the above mentioned difficulties for materials development arise. The properties of a glass ceramic are determined by the interplay of crystalline phases embedded in an amorphous glass matrix. For materials development the understanding of crystal structures and their properties, surfaces and interface phenomena, and amorphous systems are necessary, likewise. Each by itself is already a challenging problem. Many crystal phases that are grown within the glass matrix do not exist as single crystals or are difficult to grow in reasonable amounts for experimental investigations. The only way to obtain the properties of these crystalline phases is through 'ab initio' simulations in the computer

  6. Late-Holocene environmental and climatic changes in central part of the Western Sayan Mountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenaderova, Anna; Sharafutdinov, Ruslan

    2016-04-01

    with most stable hydrological conditions. During this period, the flood waters have supplied the least amount of allochthonous contaminants on the surface of the swamp. On the peatlands, sedge and sedge-moss plant communities were developed. Main plant species which grows in the peatlands are Carex altaica (Gorodk.) V.Krecz, Carex limosa L. Tomentypnum nitens Hedw., Aulacomnium palustre (Hedw.) Schwaegr., Warnstorfia exannulata (B.S.G.) Loeske., Thelypteris palustris Schott, Baeothryon caespitosum (L.) A.Dietr. During the last 500 years an increase of allochthonous contaminants inputs to marsh sediments is observed. In our opinion, the main causes of the increase were reduction the forest area, sharper contrast of summer and winter temperatures and more rapid melting of snow in early summer. The last cause lead to increased levels of floods. Eutrophic-mesotrophic sphagnum communities (Sphagnum warnstorfii Russ., Sph.subsecundum Nees,, Sphagnum angustifolium Jensen., Sph. fuscum (Schimp.) Klinggr.), which are growing at the moment, begin to develop in the peatlands since 500 years ago.

  7. The role of reaction affinity and secondary minerals in regulating chemical weathering rates at the Santa Cruz Soil Chronosequence, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maher, K.; Steefel, Carl; White, A.F.; Stonestrom, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    In order to explore the reasons for the apparent discrepancy between laboratory and field weathering rates and to determine the extent to which weathering rates are controlled by the approach to thermodynamic equilibrium, secondary mineral precipitation, and flow rates, a multicomponent reactive transport model (CrunchFlow) was used to interpret soil profile development and mineral precipitation and dissolution rates at the 226 ka Marine Terrace Chronosequence near Santa Cruz, CA. Aqueous compositions, fluid chemistry, transport, and mineral abundances are well characterized [White A. F., Schulz M. S., Vivit D. V., Blum A., Stonestrom D. A. and Anderson S. P. (2008) Chemical weathering of a Marine Terrace Chronosequence, Santa Cruz, California. I: interpreting the long-term controls on chemical weathering based on spatial and temporal element and mineral distributions. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 72 (1), 36-68] and were used to constrain the reaction rates for the weathering and precipitating minerals in the reactive transport modeling. When primary mineral weathering rates are calculated with either of two experimentally determined rate constants, the nonlinear, parallel rate law formulation of Hellmann and Tisserand [Hellmann R. and Tisserand D. (2006) Dissolution kinetics as a function of the Gibbs free energy of reaction: An experimental study based on albite feldspar. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 70 (2), 364-383] or the aluminum inhibition model proposed by Oelkers et al. [Oelkers E. H., Schott J. and Devidal J. L. (1994) The effect of aluminum, pH, and chemical affinity on the rates of aluminosilicate dissolution reactions. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 58 (9), 2011-2024], modeling results are consistent with field-scale observations when independently constrained clay precipitation rates are accounted for. Experimental and field rates, therefore, can be reconciled at the Santa Cruz site. Additionally, observed maximum clay abundances in the argillic horizons occur at

  8. Revisiting classical silicate dissolution rate laws under hydrothermal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollet-Villard, Marion; Daval, Damien; Saldi, Giuseppe; Knauss, Kevin; Wild, Bastien; Fritz, Bertrand

    2015-04-01

    apparent modification of silicate dissolution rate over time. In addition, we evidenced that the relation between K-spar dissolution rate and ΔG depends on the crystallographic orientation of the altered surface, and differs from the transition state theory currently implemented into geochemical codes. Importantly, this theoretical curve overestimates the dissolution rates measured in close-to-equilibrium conditions. Taken together, the new findings show promise as a means for improving the accuracy of geochemical simulations. [1] Schott, J., Pokrovsky, O. S., and Oelkers, E. H., 2009. The Link Between Mineral Dissolution/Precipitation Kinetics and Solution Chemistry. Rev Mineral Geochem 70, 207-258. [2] Daval, D., Hellmann, R., Saldi, G. D., Wirth, R., and Knauss, K. G., 2013. Linking nm-scale measurements of the anisotropy of silicate surface reactivity to macroscopic dissolution rate laws: New insights based on diopside. Geochim Cosmochim Acta 107, 121-134.

  9. Assembly of NASA's Most Powerful X-Ray Telescope Completed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-03-01

    holes, many of which are invisible to us now. We may even see the processes that create the elements found here on Earth." Assembly of the observatory began in 1997 with the arrival of the high resolution mirror assembly at TRW Space and Electronics Group. In August 1997, the telescope's optical bench was mated with the mirrors, followed by integration of the telescope with the spacecraft in October. In February 1998, the observatory's science instrument module was mated to the top of the telescope. The complete observatory is 45 feet long, has a solar array wing span 64 feet wide, and weighs more than 5 tons. Using glass purchased from Schott Glaswerke, Mainz, Germany, the telescope's mirrors were built by Raytheon Optical Systems Inc., Danbury, Conn. The mirrors were coated by Optical Coating Laboratory Inc., Santa Rosa, Calif.; and assembled by Eastman-Kodak Co., Rochester, N.Y. The observatory's charged coupled device imaging spectrometer was developed by Pennsylvania State University at University Park, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), at Cambridge. One diffraction grating was developed by MIT, the other by the Space Research Organization Netherlands, Utrecht, in collaboration with the Max Planck Institute, Garching, Germany. The high resolution camera instrument was built by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corporation of Boulder, Colo., developed the science instrument module. The Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility program is managed by the Marshall Center for the Office of Space Science, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Cambridge, Mass., will operate the observatory for NASA. NOTE TO EDITORS: A photo of the integrated telescope is available via the World Wide Web at URL: http://chandra.harvard.edu/press/images.html Prepared by John Bryk

  10. Book Review: Beitraege zur Astronomiegeschichte, Band 5 (Acta Historica Astronomiae Vol. 15)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerbeck, H. W.; Dick, W. R.; Hamel, J.

    2002-12-01

    The 15th volume of the Acta Historica Astronomiae is at the same time the fifth collection of essays on the history of astronomy (Beitraege zur Astronomiegeschichte, Band 5), edited by the historians of astronomy W.R. Dick (Potsdam) and J. Hamel (Berlin). Besides a few short notices and book reviews, the book contains 11 major articles, which deal with astronomical topics covering the time from the 16th to the 20th centuries. The first article, on the analysis and interpretation of historical horoscopes as a source of the history of science, is based on the inaugural lecture of its author, Guenther Oestmann. After a general introduction, which deals with the principles of horoscope making, the author discusses the horoscope of Count Heinrich Ranzau (1526-1598), the Danish governor of Schleswig-Holstein, who was a friend of Tycho Brahe. Oestmann shows that the astronomical-mathematical basis of such a horoscope can be reconstructed and interpreted. However, it is hardly possible to gain an insight in the process how the interpretation of a horoscope was done in detail. The second and third articles, by Franz Daxecker, deal with Athanasius Kircher and Christoph Scheiner, two catholic astronomers of the 17th century. Kircher's Organum Mathematicum is a calculating device that can be used in the fields of arithmetic, geometry, chronology, astronomy, astrology and others. The author provides extracts of the description of the Organum taken from a book by Caspar Schott, which deal with chronology and astronomy. A photograph of the Organum indicates that this tool consists of a set of tables glued on wooden or cardboard, but details of its contents and applications remain pretty obscure for the reader - a few elaborated examples would have been helpful. The second paper deals with the life of Christoph Scheiner SJ, the co-discoverer of sunspots (next to Galileo), after leaving Rome in 1633 - the year of the Galileo trial. Scheiner spent his later years in the Austrian and

  11. Diverging longitudinal changes in astrocytosis and amyloid PET in autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Saint-Aubert, Laure; Carter, Stephen F.; Almkvist, Ove; Farid, Karim; Schöll, Michael; Chiotis, Konstantinos; Thordardottir, Steinunn; Graff, Caroline; Wall, Anders; Långström, Bengt; Nordberg, Agneta

    2016-01-01

    See Schott and Fox (doi:10.1093/brain/awv405) for a scientific commentary on this article. Alzheimer’s disease is a multifactorial dementia disorder characterized by early amyloid-β, tau deposition, glial activation and neurodegeneration, where the interrelationships between the different pathophysiological events are not yet well characterized. In this study, longitudinal multitracer positron emission tomography imaging of individuals with autosomal dominant or sporadic Alzheimer’s disease was used to quantify the changes in regional distribution of brain astrocytosis (tracer 11C-deuterium-L-deprenyl), fibrillar amyloid-β plaque deposition (11C-Pittsburgh compound B), and glucose metabolism (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose) from early presymptomatic stages over an extended period to clinical symptoms. The 52 baseline participants comprised autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease mutation carriers (n = 11; 49.6 ± 10.3 years old) and non-carriers (n = 16; 51.1 ± 14.2 years old; 10 male), and patients with sporadic mild cognitive impairment (n = 17; 61.9 ± 6.4 years old; nine male) and sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (n = 8; 63.0 ± 6.5 years old; five male); for confidentiality reasons, the gender of mutation carriers is not revealed. The autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease participants belonged to families with known mutations in either presenilin 1 (PSEN1) or amyloid precursor protein (APPswe or APParc) genes. Sporadic mild cognitive impairment patients were further divided into 11C-Pittsburgh compound B-positive (n = 13; 62.0 ± 6.4; seven male) and 11C-Pittsburgh compound B-negative (n = 4; 61.8 ± 7.5 years old; two male) groups using a neocortical standardized uptake value ratio cut-off value of 1.41, which was calculated with respect to the cerebellar grey matter. All baseline participants underwent multitracer positron emission tomography scans, cerebrospinal fluid biomarker analysis and neuropsychological assessment. Twenty-six of the participants

  12. Astronomical Honeymoon Continues as X-Ray Observatory Marks First Anniversary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-08-01

    of the X-ray background, a glow throughout the universe whose source or sources are unknown. Astronomers are now pinpointing the various sources of the X-ray glow because Chandra has resolution eight times better than that of previous X-ray telescopes, and is able to detect sources more than 20 times fainter. "The Chandra team had to develop technologies and processes never tried before," said Tony Lavoie, Chandra program manager at Marshall. "One example is that we built and validated a measurement system to make sure the huge cylindrical mirrors of the telescope were ground correctly and polished to the right shape." The polishing effort resulted in an ultra-smooth surface for all eight of Chandra's mirrors. If the state of Colorado were as smooth as the surface of Chandra's mirrors, Pike's Peak would be less than an inch tall. "Chandra has experienced a great first year of discovery and we look forward to many more tantalizing science results as the mission continues," said Alan Bunner, program director, Structure and Evolution of the universe, NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC. Marshall manages the Chandra program for the Office of Space Science, NASA Headquarters. TRW Space and Electronics Group, Redondo Beach, CA, is the prime contractor. Using glass purchased from Schott Glaswerke, Mainz, Germany, the telescope's mirrors were built by Raytheon Optical Systems Inc., Danbury, CT, coated by Optical Coating Laboratory, Inc., Santa Rosa, CA, and assembled and inserted into the telescope portion of Chandra by Eastman Kodak Co., Rochester, NY. The scientific instruments were supplied by collaborations led by Pennsylvania State University, University Park; Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Cambridge, MA; Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge; and the Space Research Organization Netherlands, Utrecht. The Smithsonian's Chandra X-ray Center controls science and operations from Cambridge, working with astronomers around the globe to record the activities

  13. NASA X-Ray Observatory Completes Tests Under Harsh Simulated Space Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-07-01

    the Operations Control Center after launch. "As is usually the case, we identified a few issues to be resolved before launch," said Wojtalik. "Overall, however, the observatory performed exceptionally well." The observatory test team discovered a mechanical problem with one of the primary science instruments, the Imaging Spectrometer. A door protecting the instrument did not function when commanded by test controllers. "We do these tests to check and double check every aspect of satellite operation that could affect the ultimate success of the science mission," said Craig Staresinich, TRW Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility program manager. "Discovering a problem now is a success. Discovering a problem later, after launch, would be a failure." A team of NASA and contractor engineers are studying the mechanical problem and developing a plan to correct it. The instrument will be sent back to its builder, Lockheed-Martin Astronautics in Denver, Colo., where it will be repaired while the rest of the observatory continues other testing. This should still allow an on-time delivery of the observatory to NASA's Kennedy Space Center, Fla., in August, where it will be readied for launch in January. With a resolving power 10 times greater than previous X-ray telescopes, the new X-ray observatory will provide scientists with views of previously invisible X-ray sources, including black holes, exploding stars and interstellar gasses. The third of NASA's Great Observatories, it will join the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory and the Hubble Space Telescope in orbit. The Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility program is managed by the Marshall Center for the Office of Space Science, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. TRW Space & Electronics Group is assembling the observatory and doing verification testing. The Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility Operations Control Center is operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. Using glass purchased from Schott Glaswerke, Mainz, Germany

  14. First Giant Mirror for the ESO VLT Ready at REOSC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-11-01

    The REOSC Contract In 1989, the European Southern Observatory (ESO), the European Organisation for Astronomy, awarded to REOSC, a subsidiary of the SFIM Group and located in Saint Pierre du Perray (France), a comprehensive contract for the polishing of four 8.2-metre diameter mirrors for the unit telescopes of the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) project. These mirrors are the largest ever manufactured and polished. This contract comprises not only the polishing and high-precision optical testing of each giant mirror, but also the safe condition of transportation of the blanks which were manufactured by Schott Glaswerke in Mainz (Germany). In order to fulfill the contract, REOSC conceived, built and equipped a novel, high-tech workshop which would allow to polish and test the mirrors, each of which has a surface area of more than 50 square metres. First 8.2-Metre Mirror is Ready and within Specifications The REOSC polishing facility for giant mirrors was built in Saint Pierre du Perray, just south of Paris. It is equipped with two machines: one for grinding and the other for polishing the mirrors, and both with 150-actuator systems that support the thin and flexible mirrors. All equipment is computer controlled. State-of-the-art interferometers probe the accuracy of the mirror surface as the polishing proceeds; they are installed at the top level of the facility in a 30-metre high tower, at the centre of the mirror's radius of curvature. The success of the work at REOSC is now evident by the fact that careful measurements of the first mirror earlier this month have shown that the final optical surface is correct to within 0.00005 millimetres. For illustration, this corresponds to an accuracy of only 1 millimetre deviation over a surface with a diameter of 165 kilometres (equivalent to the entire Paris area)! ESO Receives the First VLT Mirror After having been carefully placed in a special transport box designed by REOSC, the first mirror blank, weighing 23.5 tons and

  15. Characterization of structural relaxation in inorganic glasses using length dilatometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koontz, Erick

    characterization technique is comprised of three main components: experimental measurements, fitting of configurational length change, and description of glass behavior by analysis of fitting parameters. N-BK7 optical glass from Schott was used as the proof of concept glass but the main scientific interest was in three chalcogenide glasses: As40Se 60, As20Se80, and Ge17.9As19.7 Se62.4. The dilatometric experiments were carried out using a thermomechanical analyzer (TMA) on glass sample that were synthesized by the author, in all cases except N-BK7. Isothermal structural relaxation measurements were done on (12 mm tall x 3 mm x 3 mm) beams placed vertically in the TMA. The samples were equilibrated at a starting temperature (T 0) until structural equilibrium was reached then a temperature down step was initiated to the final temperature (T 1) and held isothermally until relaxation concluded. The configurational aspect of length relaxation, and therefore volume relaxation was extracted and fit with a Prony series. The Prony series parameters indicated a number of relaxation events occurring within the glass on timescales typically an order of magnitude apart in time. The data analysis showed as many as 4 discrete relaxation times at lower temperatures. The number of discrete relaxation decreased as the temperature increased until just one single relaxation was left in the temperature range just at or above Tg. In the case of N-BK7 these trends were utilized to construct a simple model that could be applied to glass manufacturing in the areas of annealing or PGM. A future development of a rather simple finite element model (FEM) would easily be able to use this model to predict the exponential-like, temperature and time dependent relaxation behaviors of the glass. The predictive model was not extended to the chalcogenide glass studied here, but could easily be applied to them in the future. The relaxation time trends versus temperature showed a definite region of transition between a

  16. Hohenpeissenberg temperatures are too high between 1781 and 1850

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, P.

    2009-04-01

    A detailed study of historical sources with relevance to the early instrumental observations at Hohenpeissenberg resulted in the Having been in use at Hohenpeissenberg from 1781 to 1841, the Palatina thermometer was found to suffer from a positive bias of 0.5°R (or 0.63°C) as discovered by Lamont following a re-calibration made in 1842. Although this fault had become known, no correction was ap-plied to the Hohenpeissenberg temperature series until now. The main reason was due to the composition of the glass used during the early instrumental period. Glass of this period shows a long-term rise of the freezing-point position that newer types of glass do not suffer from. These early glasses showed a thermal after effect extending over several years which mani-fested in a shrinking of the thermometer bulb with the consequence that the freezing-point rose. While originally this effect was interpreted to be a consequence of the external air pres-sure compressing the evacuated thermometer, it took many decades to find out that the mix-ture of certain glass ingredients were responsible and around 1886 Schott succeeded in find-ing a glass most suitable for manufacturing thermometers which were nearly free from ther-mal after effects. Hemmer calibrated his thermometers at an air pressure of 27 Paris inches instead of 28 inches (sea level pressure). This bias, however, seems to be small (<0.1°R) in comparison to other disturbances. In rare cases, the graduation at the lowest end of the scale of the Palatina-thermometer was insufficient to exactly observe the temperature. Since only 22 such occasions occurred, the overall trend will not be influenced by these missing data. Other stations of the Societas Meteorologica Palatina, which were also supplied with ther-mometers from Hemmers manufacturer Artari can be expected to suffer from a similar bias of the gradually rising zero-point and this bias may partly be responsible for the discrepancy between instrumental and proxy

  17. Hydrothermal mobilization of pegmatite-hosted REE and Zr at Strange Lake, Canada: A reaction path model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gysi, Alexander P.; Williams-Jones, Anthony E.

    2013-12-01

    , particularly at high temperature (400 °C). The LREE are more mobile than the HREE in saline HCl-bearing fluids due to the greater stability of LREE-chloride complexes. The simulated mineralogy is consistent with the zonation observed in the pegmatites and with fluid-rock interaction at conditions that were rock-buffered in the pegmatite borders (low fluid/rock ratio; and pH > 4) and fluid-buffered in the cores (high fluid/rock ratio; pH ⩽ 2). We propose a model in which saline HCl-HF-bearing fluids created pathways during acidic alteration from the pegmatite cores outward. This led to the mobilization of REE and Zr due to progressive alteration of primary silicate minerals and increased acidity upon cooling. The key requirement for REE and Zr mobilization in peralkaline igneous intrusions is the formation of an acidic subsystem with high fluid/rock ratios that increases the overall permeability of the rocks. In these zones, the extent of late stage hydrothermal redistribution and concentration of REE and Zr depends on the buffering capacity of the rocks and the availability of fluids that may produce autometasomatic rock alteration, interact with external rock units and/or mix with fluids from other sources. b The detection limits of Yb were 1043 ppm for zircon, 380 ppm for gadolinite-group minerals and 380 ppm for REE-F-(CO2)-minerals. bAja et al. (1995). cMigdisov et al. (2011). dTagirov et al. (1997). eTagirov and Schott (2001). fMigdisov et al. (2009) with REE (La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu). b Calculated using the methods of the Chermak and Rimstidt (1989), Berman and Brown (1985) and Holland (1989) with molar volume of arfvedsonite from Hawthorne (1976). cZotov et al. (1998). d GEM-Selektor v.3 database (http://gems.web.psi.ch). eMigdisov et al. (2009).

  18. Book Review: Beitraege zur Astronomiegeschichte, Band 5 (Acta Historica Astronomiae Vol. 15)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerbeck, H. W.; Dick, W. R.; Hamel, J.

    2002-12-01

    The 15th volume of the Acta Historica Astronomiae is at the same time the fifth collection of essays on the history of astronomy (Beitraege zur Astronomiegeschichte, Band 5), edited by the historians of astronomy W.R. Dick (Potsdam) and J. Hamel (Berlin). Besides a few short notices and book reviews, the book contains 11 major articles, which deal with astronomical topics covering the time from the 16th to the 20th centuries. The first article, on the analysis and interpretation of historical horoscopes as a source of the history of science, is based on the inaugural lecture of its author, Guenther Oestmann. After a general introduction, which deals with the principles of horoscope making, the author discusses the horoscope of Count Heinrich Ranzau (1526-1598), the Danish governor of Schleswig-Holstein, who was a friend of Tycho Brahe. Oestmann shows that the astronomical-mathematical basis of such a horoscope can be reconstructed and interpreted. However, it is hardly possible to gain an insight in the process how the interpretation of a horoscope was done in detail. The second and third articles, by Franz Daxecker, deal with Athanasius Kircher and Christoph Scheiner, two catholic astronomers of the 17th century. Kircher's Organum Mathematicum is a calculating device that can be used in the fields of arithmetic, geometry, chronology, astronomy, astrology and others. The author provides extracts of the description of the Organum taken from a book by Caspar Schott, which deal with chronology and astronomy. A photograph of the Organum indicates that this tool consists of a set of tables glued on wooden or cardboard, but details of its contents and applications remain pretty obscure for the reader - a few elaborated examples would have been helpful. The second paper deals with the life of Christoph Scheiner SJ, the co-discoverer of sunspots (next to Galileo), after leaving Rome in 1633 - the year of the Galileo trial. Scheiner spent his later years in the Austrian and

  19. ESO Council Visits First VLT Unit Telescope Structure in Milan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-12-01

    (UT4). Mirrors and Instruments As earlier announced, ESO officially received the first 8.2-metre VLT mirror from REOSC in Paris [3] on November 21. The polishing of the second mirror has already started and, based on the experience gained with the first, it is expected that this work will be accomplished in less time. The third blank is already at REOSC and the fourth will soon be ready at Schott Glaswerke in Mainz (Germany). Following extended studies, and as yet another move towards new technology within the VLT project, it has now been decided to make the 1.2-metre secondary VLT mirrors of beryllium, a very light, exotic metal. The contracting firm is Dornier of the DASA group (Germany). This saves much weight and allows these relatively large mirrors to be efficiently used in the `chopping and tilting' mode needed for observations in the infrared wavelength region as well as for the critical, image-sharpening adaptive optics system. Significant progress has also been achieved on the first astronomical instruments which will be installed at the VLT. The integration of the first two of these, ISAAC and CONICA which will be installed on UT1 in the course of 1997, has already started in the ESO laboratories at the Headquarters in Garching. Important advances have also taken place within the FORS (managed by a consortium of Landessternwarte Heidelberg, Universitaets-Sternwarte Goettingen and Institut fuer Astronomie und Astrophysik der Ludwig Maximilians Universitaet Muenchen) and FUEGOS (Paris Observatory, Meudon Observatory, Toulouse Observatory, Geneva Observatory and Bologna Observatory) projects. More details about these and other VLT instruments will be given in later communications. Notes: [1] The Council of ESO consists of two representatives from each of the eight member states. It is the highest legislative authority of the organisation and normally meets twice a year. This time, Council was invited to Milan by the Director of the Osservatorio di Brera (Milan