Science.gov

Sample records for acoustic 4f imaging

  1. Acoustic Imaging in Helioseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Dean-Yi; Chang, Hsiang-Kuang; Sun, Ming-Tsung; LaBonte, Barry; Chen, Huei-Ru; Yeh, Sheng-Jen; Team, The TON

    1999-04-01

    The time-variant acoustic signal at a point in the solar interior can be constructed from observations at the surface, based on the knowledge of how acoustic waves travel in the Sun: the time-distance relation of the p-modes. The basic principle and properties of this imaging technique are discussed in detail. The helioseismic data used in this study were taken with the Taiwan Oscillation Network (TON). The time series of observed acoustic signals on the solar surface is treated as a phased array. The time-distance relation provides the phase information among the phased array elements. The signal at any location at any time can be reconstructed by summing the observed signal at array elements in phase and with a proper normalization. The time series of the constructed acoustic signal contains information on frequency, phase, and intensity. We use the constructed intensity to obtain three-dimensional acoustic absorption images. The features in the absorption images correlate with the magnetic field in the active region. The vertical extension of absorption features in the active region is smaller in images constructed with shorter wavelengths. This indicates that the vertical resolution of the three-dimensional images depends on the range of modes used in constructing the signal. The actual depths of the absorption features in the active region may be smaller than those shown in the three-dimensional images.

  2. Acoustic imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard W.

    1979-01-01

    An acoustic imaging system for displaying an object viewed by a moving array of transducers as the array is pivoted about a fixed point within a given plane. A plurality of transducers are fixedly positioned and equally spaced within a laterally extending array and operatively directed to transmit and receive acoustic signals along substantially parallel transmission paths. The transducers are sequentially activated along the array to transmit and receive acoustic signals according to a preestablished sequence. Means are provided for generating output voltages for each reception of an acoustic signal, corresponding to the coordinate position of the object viewed as the array is pivoted. Receptions from each of the transducers are presented on the same display at coordinates corresponding to the actual position of the object viewed to form a plane view of the object scanned.

  3. Acoustic subwavelength imaging of subsurface objects with acoustic resonant metalens

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Ying; Liu, XiaoJun; Zhou, Chen; Wei, Qi; Wu, DaJian

    2013-11-25

    Early research into acoustic metamaterials has shown the possibility of achieving subwavelength near-field acoustic imaging. However, a major restriction of acoustic metamaterials is that the imaging objects must be placed in close vicinity of the devices. Here, we present an approach for acoustic imaging of subsurface objects far below the diffraction limit. An acoustic metalens made of holey-structured metamaterials is used to magnify evanescent waves, which can rebuild an image at the central plane. Without changing the physical structure of the metalens, our proposed approach can image objects located at certain distances from the input surface, which provides subsurface signatures of the objects with subwavelength spatial resolution.

  4. Acoustical Imaging with Negative Refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, W. S.

    It is well known that the resolution limit of acoustical images is limited by diffraction to λ/2 where λ is the sound wavelength. Negative refraction proposed by Veselago in 1968 shows possibility of defeating the diffraction limit. His work is for electromagnetic waves. Recently it has been shown experimentally that negative refraction can be achieved for both electromagnetic waves and sound waves by using photonic crystals and phononic crystals respectively. John Pendry proposed the concept of `perfect lens' using negative refraction for electromagnetic waves. In this paper, we propose a `perfect lens' for sound waves and an acoustical imaging system incorporating the `perfect lens' is also outlined

  5. Acoustic image-processing software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Several algorithims that display, enhance and analyze side-scan sonar images of the seafloor, have been developed by the University of Washington, Seattle, as part of an Office of Naval Research funded program in acoustic image analysis. One of these programs, PORTAL, is a small (less than 100K) image display and enhancement program that can run on MS-DOS computers with VGA boards. This program is now available in the public domain for general use in acoustic image processing.PORTAL is designed to display side-scan sonar data that is stored in most standard formats, including SeaMARC I, II, 150 and GLORIA data. (See image.) In addition to the “standard” formats, PORTAL has a module “front end” that allows the user to modify the program to accept other image formats. In addition to side-scan sonar data, the program can also display digital optical images from scanners and “framegrabbers,” gridded bathymetry data from Sea Beam and other sources, and potential field (magnetics/gravity) data. While limited in image analysis capability, the program allows image enhancement by histogram manipulation, and basic filtering operations, including multistage filtering. PORTAL can print reasonably high-quality images on Postscript laser printers and lower-quality images on non-Postscript printers with HP Laserjet emulation. Images suitable only for index sheets are also possible on dot matrix printers.

  6. Image-guided acoustic therapy.

    PubMed

    Vaezy, S; Andrew, M; Kaczkowski, P; Crum, L

    2001-01-01

    The potential role of therapeutic ultrasound in medicine is promising. Currently, medical devices are being developed that utilize high-intensity focused ultrasound as a noninvasive method to treat tumors and to stop bleeding (hemostasis). The primary advantage of ultrasound that lends the technique so readily to use in noninvasive therapy is its ability to penetrate deep into the body and deliver to a specific site thermal or mechanical energy with submillimeter accuracy. Realizing the full potential of acoustic therapy, however, requires precise targeting and monitoring. Fortunately, several imaging modalities can be utilized for this purpose, thus leading to the concept of image-guided acoustic therapy. This article presents a review of high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy, including its mechanisms of action, the imaging modalities used for guidance and monitoring, some current applications, and the requirements and technology associated with this exciting and promising field.

  7. Acoustic Waves in Medical Imaging and Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Sarvazyan, Armen P.; Urban, Matthew W.; Greenleaf, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Up until about two decades ago acoustic imaging and ultrasound imaging were synonymous. The term “ultrasonography,” or its abbreviated version “sonography” meant an imaging modality based on the use of ultrasonic compressional bulk waves. Since the 1990s numerous acoustic imaging modalities started to emerge based on the use of a different mode of acoustic wave: shear waves. It was demonstrated that imaging with these waves can provide very useful and very different information about the biological tissue being examined. We will discuss physical basis for the differences between these two basic modes of acoustic waves used in medical imaging and analyze the advantages associated with shear acoustic imaging. A comprehensive analysis of the range of acoustic wavelengths, velocities, and frequencies that have been used in different imaging applications will be presented. We will discuss the potential for future shear wave imaging applications. PMID:23643056

  8. Acoustic waves in medical imaging and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Sarvazyan, Armen P; Urban, Matthew W; Greenleaf, James F

    2013-07-01

    Up until about two decades ago acoustic imaging and ultrasound imaging were synonymous. The term ultrasonography, or its abbreviated version sonography, meant an imaging modality based on the use of ultrasonic compressional bulk waves. Beginning in the 1990s, there started to emerge numerous acoustic imaging modalities based on the use of a different mode of acoustic wave: shear waves. Imaging with these waves was shown to provide very useful and very different information about the biological tissue being examined. We discuss the physical basis for the differences between these two basic modes of acoustic waves used in medical imaging and analyze the advantages associated with shear acoustic imaging. A comprehensive analysis of the range of acoustic wavelengths, velocities and frequencies that have been used in different imaging applications is presented. We discuss the potential for future shear wave imaging applications.

  9. Acoustic imaging microscope

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Telschow, Kenneth L.

    2006-10-17

    An imaging system includes: an object wavefront source and an optical microscope objective all positioned to direct an object wavefront onto an area of a vibrating subject surface encompassed by a field of view of the microscope objective, and to direct a modulated object wavefront reflected from the encompassed surface area through a photorefractive material; and a reference wavefront source and at least one phase modulator all positioned to direct a reference wavefront through the phase modulator and to direct a modulated reference wavefront from the phase modulator through the photorefractive material to interfere with the modulated object wavefront. The photorefractive material has a composition and a position such that interference of the modulated object wavefront and modulated reference wavefront occurs within the photorefractive material, providing a full-field, real-time image signal of the encompassed surface area.

  10. A novel reconfigurable optical interconnect architecture using an Opto-VLSI processor and a 4-f imaging system.

    PubMed

    Shen, Mingya; Xiao, Feng; Alameh, Kamal

    2009-12-01

    A novel reconfigurable optical interconnect architecture for on-board high-speed data transmission is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The interconnect architecture is based on the use of an Opto-VLSI processor in conjunction with a 4-f imaging system to achieve reconfigurable chip-to-chip or board-to-board data communications. By reconfiguring the phase hologram of an Opto-VLSI processor, optical data generated by a vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VCSEL) associated to a chip (or a board) is arbitrarily steered to the photodetector associated to another chip (or another board). Experimental results show that the optical interconnect losses range from 5.8dB to 9.6dB, and that the maximum crosstalk level is below -36dB. The proposed architecture is tested for high-speed data transmission, and measured eye diagrams display good eye opening for data rate of up to 10Gb/s.

  11. Reflective echo tomographic imaging using acoustic beams

    DOEpatents

    Kisner, Roger; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J

    2014-11-25

    An inspection system includes a plurality of acoustic beamformers, where each of the plurality of acoustic beamformers including a plurality of acoustic transmitter elements. The system also includes at least one controller configured for causing each of the plurality of acoustic beamformers to generate an acoustic beam directed to a point in a volume of interest during a first time. Based on a reflected wave intensity detected at a plurality of acoustic receiver elements, an image of the volume of interest can be generated.

  12. First images of thunder: Acoustic imaging of triggered lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayeh, M. A.; Evans, N. D.; Fuselier, S. A.; Trevino, J.; Ramaekers, J.; Dwyer, J. R.; Lucia, R.; Rassoul, H. K.; Kotovsky, D. A.; Jordan, D. M.; Uman, M. A.

    2015-07-01

    An acoustic camera comprising a linear microphone array is used to image the thunder signature of triggered lightning. Measurements were taken at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing in Camp Blanding, FL, during the summer of 2014. The array was positioned in an end-fire orientation thus enabling the peak acoustic reception pattern to be steered vertically with a frequency-dependent spatial resolution. On 14 July 2014, a lightning event with nine return strokes was successfully triggered. We present the first acoustic images of individual return strokes at high frequencies (>1 kHz) and compare the acoustically inferred profile with optical images. We find (i) a strong correlation between the return stroke peak current and the radiated acoustic pressure and (ii) an acoustic signature from an M component current pulse with an unusual fast rise time. These results show that acoustic imaging enables clear identification and quantification of thunder sources as a function of lightning channel altitude.

  13. Acoustic 3D imaging of dental structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, D.K.; Hume, W.R.; Douglass, G.D.

    1997-02-01

    Our goals for the first year of this three dimensional electodynamic imaging project was to determine how to combine flexible, individual addressable; preprocessing of array source signals; spectral extrapolation or received signals; acoustic tomography codes; and acoustic propagation modeling code. We investigated flexible, individually addressable acoustic array material to find the best match in power, sensitivity and cost and settled on PVDF sheet arrays and 3-1 composite material.

  14. Imaging of Acoustic Waves in Sand

    SciTech Connect

    Deason, Vance Albert; Telschow, Kenneth Louis; Watson, Scott Marshall

    2003-08-01

    There is considerable interest in detecting objects such as landmines shallowly buried in loose earth or sand. Various techniques involving microwave, acoustic, thermal and magnetic sensors have been used to detect such objects. Acoustic and microwave sensors have shown promise, especially if used together. In most cases, the sensor package is scanned over an area to eventually build up an image or map of anomalies. We are proposing an alternate, acoustic method that directly provides an image of acoustic waves in sand or soil, and their interaction with buried objects. The INEEL Laser Ultrasonic Camera utilizes dynamic holography within photorefractive recording materials. This permits one to image and demodulate acoustic waves on surfaces in real time, without scanning. A video image is produced where intensity is directly and linearly proportional to surface motion. Both specular and diffusely reflecting surfaces can be accomodated and surface motion as small as 0.1 nm can be quantitatively detected. This system was used to directly image acoustic surface waves in sand as well as in solid objects. Waves as frequencies of 16 kHz were generated using modified acoustic speakers. These waves were directed through sand toward partially buried objects. The sand container was not on a vibration isolation table, but sat on the lab floor. Interaction of wavefronts with buried objects showed reflection, diffraction and interference effects that could provide clues to location and characteristics of buried objects. Although results are preliminary, success in this effort suggests that this method could be applied to detection of buried landmines or other near-surface items such as pipes and tanks.

  15. Underwater imaging with a moving acoustic lens.

    PubMed

    Kamgar-Parsi, B; Rosenblum, L J; Belcher, E O

    1998-01-01

    The acoustic lens is a high-resolution, forward-looking sonar for three dimensional (3-D) underwater imaging. We discuss processing the lens data for recreating and visualizing the scene. Acoustical imaging, compared to optical imaging, is sparse and low resolution. To achieve higher resolution, we obtain a denser sample by mounting the lens on a moving platform and passing over the scene. This introduces the problem of data fusion from multiple overlapping views for scene formation, which we discuss. We also discuss the improvements in object reconstruction by combining data from several passes over an object. We present algorithms for pass registration and show that this process can be done with enough accuracy to improve the image and provide greater detail about the object. The results of in-water experiments show the degree to which size and shape can be obtained under (nearly) ideal conditions.

  16. Quantitative Ultrasound Imaging Using Acoustic Backscatter Coefficients.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boote, Evan Jeffery

    Current clinical ultrasound scanners render images which have brightness levels related to the degree of backscattered energy from the tissue being imaged. These images offer the interpreter a qualitative impression of the scattering characteristics of the tissue being examined, but due to the complex factors which affect the amplitude and character of the echoed acoustic energy, it is difficult to make quantitative assessments of scattering nature of the tissue, and thus, difficult to make precise diagnosis when subtle disease effects are present. In this dissertation, a method of data reduction for determining acoustic backscatter coefficients is adapted for use in forming quantitative ultrasound images of this parameter. In these images, the brightness level of an individual pixel corresponds to the backscatter coefficient determined for the spatial position represented by that pixel. The data reduction method utilized rigorously accounts for extraneous factors which affect the scattered echo waveform and has been demonstrated to accurately determine backscatter coefficients under a wide range of conditions. The algorithms and procedures used to form backscatter coefficient images are described. These were tested using tissue-mimicking phantoms which have regions of varying scattering levels. Another phantom has a fat-mimicking layer for testing these techniques under more clinically relevant conditions. Backscatter coefficient images were also formed of in vitro human liver tissue. A clinical ultrasound scanner has been adapted for use as a backscatter coefficient imaging platform. The digital interface between the scanner and the computer used for data reduction are described. Initial tests, using phantoms are presented. A study of backscatter coefficient imaging of in vivo liver was performed using several normal, healthy human subjects.

  17. Acoustic Imaging of Snowpack Physical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinar, N. J.; Pomeroy, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    Measurements of snowpack depth, density, structure and temperature have often been conducted by the use of snowpits and invasive measurement devices. Previous research has shown that acoustic waves passing through snow are capable of measuring these properties. An experimental observation device (SAS2, System for the Acoustic Sounding of Snow) was used to autonomously send audible sound waves into the top of the snowpack and to receive and process the waves reflected from the interior and bottom of the snowpack. A loudspeaker and microphone array separated by an offset distance was suspended in the air above the surface of the snowpack. Sound waves produced from a loudspeaker as frequency-swept sequences and maximum length sequences were used as source signals. Up to 24 microphones measured the audible signal from the snowpack. The signal-to-noise ratio was compared between sequences in the presence of environmental noise contributed by wind and reflections from vegetation. Beamforming algorithms were used to reject spurious reflections and to compensate for movement of the sensor assembly during the time of data collection. A custom-designed circuit with digital signal processing hardware implemented an inversion algorithm to relate the reflected sound wave data to snowpack physical properties and to create a two-dimensional image of snowpack stratigraphy. The low power consumption circuit was powered by batteries and through WiFi and Bluetooth interfaces enabled the display of processed data on a mobile device. Acoustic observations were logged to an SD card after each measurement. The SAS2 system was deployed at remote field locations in the Rocky Mountains of Alberta, Canada. Acoustic snow properties data was compared with data collected from gravimetric sampling, thermocouple arrays, radiometers and snowpit observations of density, stratigraphy and crystal structure. Aspects for further research and limitations of the acoustic sensing system are also discussed.

  18. Method and apparatus for acoustic imaging of objects in water

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Telschow, Kenneth L.

    2005-01-25

    A method, system and underwater camera for acoustic imaging of objects in water or other liquids includes an acoustic source for generating an acoustic wavefront for reflecting from a target object as a reflected wavefront. The reflected acoustic wavefront deforms a screen on an acoustic side and correspondingly deforms the opposing optical side of the screen. An optical processing system is optically coupled to the optical side of the screen and converts the deformations on the optical side of the screen into an optical intensity image of the target object.

  19. Acoustic noise during functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ravicz, M E; Melcher, J R; Kiang, N Y

    2000-10-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) enables sites of brain activation to be localized in human subjects. For studies of the auditory system, acoustic noise generated during fMRI can interfere with assessments of this activation by introducing uncontrolled extraneous sounds. As a first step toward reducing the noise during fMRI, this paper describes the temporal and spectral characteristics of the noise present under typical fMRI study conditions for two imagers with different static magnetic field strengths. Peak noise levels were 123 and 138 dB re 20 microPa in a 1.5-tesla (T) and a 3-T imager, respectively. The noise spectrum (calculated over a 10-ms window coinciding with the highest-amplitude noise) showed a prominent maximum at 1 kHz for the 1.5-T imager (115 dB SPL) and at 1.4 kHz for the 3-T imager (131 dB SPL). The frequency content and timing of the most intense noise components indicated that the noise was primarily attributable to the readout gradients in the imaging pulse sequence. The noise persisted above background levels for 300-500 ms after gradient activity ceased, indicating that resonating structures in the imager or noise reverberating in the imager room were also factors. The gradient noise waveform was highly repeatable. In addition, the coolant pump for the imager's permanent magnet and the room air-handling system were sources of ongoing noise lower in both level and frequency than gradient coil noise. Knowledge of the sources and characteristics of the noise enabled the examination of general approaches to noise control that could be applied to reduce the unwanted noise during fMRI sessions. PMID:11051496

  20. Interpreting Underwater Acoustic Images of the Upper Ocean Boundary Layer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ulloa, Marco J.

    2007-01-01

    A challenging task in physical studies of the upper ocean using underwater sound is the interpretation of high-resolution acoustic images. This paper covers a number of basic concepts necessary for undergraduate and postgraduate students to identify the most distinctive features of the images, providing a link with the acoustic signatures of…

  1. Transthoracic Cardiac Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradway, David Pierson

    This dissertation investigates the feasibility of a real-time transthoracic Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging system to measure myocardial function non-invasively in clinical setting. Heart failure is an important cardiovascular disease and contributes to the leading cause of death for developed countries. Patients exhibiting heart failure with a low left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) can often be identified by clinicians, but patients with preserved LVEF might be undetected if they do not exhibit other signs and symptoms of heart failure. These cases motivate development of transthoracic ARFI imaging to aid the early diagnosis of the structural and functional heart abnormalities leading to heart failure. M-Mode ARFI imaging utilizes ultrasonic radiation force to displace tissue several micrometers in the direction of wave propagation. Conventional ultrasound tracks the response of the tissue to the force. This measurement is repeated rapidly at a location through the cardiac cycle, measuring timing and relative changes in myocardial stiffness. ARFI imaging was previously shown capable of measuring myocardial properties and function via invasive open-chest and intracardiac approaches. The prototype imaging system described in this dissertation is capable of rapid acquisition, processing, and display of ARFI images and shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) movies. Also presented is a rigorous safety analysis, including finite element method (FEM) simulations of tissue heating, hydrophone intensity and mechanical index (MI) measurements, and thermocouple transducer face heating measurements. For the pulse sequences used in later animal and clinical studies, results from the safety analysis indicates that transthoracic ARFI imaging can be safely applied at rates and levels realizable on the prototype ARFI imaging system. Preliminary data are presented from in vivo trials studying changes in myocardial stiffness occurring under normal and abnormal

  2. Optimization of a Biometric System Based on Acoustic Images

    PubMed Central

    Izquierdo Fuente, Alberto; Del Val Puente, Lara; Villacorta Calvo, Juan J.; Raboso Mateos, Mariano

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of an acoustic biometric system that captures 16 acoustic images of a person for 4 frequencies and 4 positions, a study was carried out to improve the performance of the system. On a first stage, an analysis to determine which images provide more information to the system was carried out showing that a set of 12 images allows the system to obtain results that are equivalent to using all of the 16 images. Finally, optimization techniques were used to obtain the set of weights associated with each acoustic image that maximizes the performance of the biometric system. These results improve significantly the performance of the preliminary system, while reducing the time of acquisition and computational burden, since the number of acoustic images was reduced. PMID:24616643

  3. Optimization of a biometric system based on acoustic images.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo Fuente, Alberto; Del Val Puente, Lara; Villacorta Calvo, Juan J; Raboso Mateos, Mariano

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of an acoustic biometric system that captures 16 acoustic images of a person for 4 frequencies and 4 positions, a study was carried out to improve the performance of the system. On a first stage, an analysis to determine which images provide more information to the system was carried out showing that a set of 12 images allows the system to obtain results that are equivalent to using all of the 16 images. Finally, optimization techniques were used to obtain the set of weights associated with each acoustic image that maximizes the performance of the biometric system. These results improve significantly the performance of the preliminary system, while reducing the time of acquisition and computational burden, since the number of acoustic images was reduced.

  4. Acoustic radiation force-based elasticity imaging methods

    PubMed Central

    Palmeri, Mark L.; Nightingale, Kathryn R.

    2011-01-01

    Conventional diagnostic ultrasound images portray differences in the acoustic properties of soft tissues, whereas ultrasound-based elasticity images portray differences in the elastic properties of soft tissues (i.e. stiffness, viscosity). The benefit of elasticity imaging lies in the fact that many soft tissues can share similar ultrasonic echogenicities, but may have different mechanical properties that can be used to clearly visualize normal anatomy and delineate pathological lesions. Acoustic radiation force-based elasticity imaging methods use acoustic radiation force to transiently deform soft tissues, and the dynamic displacement response of those tissues is measured ultrasonically and is used to estimate the tissue's mechanical properties. Both qualitative images and quantitative elasticity metrics can be reconstructed from these measured data, providing complimentary information to both diagnose and longitudinally monitor disease progression. Recently, acoustic radiation force-based elasticity imaging techniques have moved from the laboratory to the clinical setting, where clinicians are beginning to characterize tissue stiffness as a diagnostic metric, and commercial implementations of radiation force-based ultrasonic elasticity imaging are beginning to appear on the commercial market. This article provides an overview of acoustic radiation force-based elasticity imaging, including a review of the relevant soft tissue material properties, a review of radiation force-based methods that have been proposed for elasticity imaging, and a discussion of current research and commercial realizations of radiation force based-elasticity imaging technologies. PMID:22419986

  5. Acoustic Radiation Force Elasticity Imaging in Diagnostic Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Joshua R.; Trahey, Gregg E.; Nightingale, Kathryn R.; Palmeri, Mark L.

    2013-01-01

    The development of ultrasound-based elasticity imaging methods has been the focus of intense research activity since the mid-1990s. In characterizing the mechanical properties of soft tissues, these techniques image an entirely new subset of tissue properties that cannot be derived with conventional ultrasound techniques. Clinically, tissue elasticity is known to be associated with pathological condition and with the ability to image these features in vivo, elasticity imaging methods may prove to be invaluable tools for the diagnosis and/or monitoring of disease. This review focuses on ultrasound-based elasticity imaging methods that generate an acoustic radiation force to induce tissue displacements. These methods can be performed non-invasively during routine exams to provide either qualitative or quantitative metrics of tissue elasticity. A brief overview of soft tissue mechanics relevant to elasticity imaging is provided, including a derivation of acoustic radiation force, and an overview of the various acoustic radiation force elasticity imaging methods. PMID:23549529

  6. Object classification and acoustic imaging with active sonar.

    PubMed

    Kelly, J G; Carpenter, R N; Tague, J A

    1992-04-01

    The theoretical underpinnings of underwater acoustic classification and imaging using high-frequency active sonar are studied. All essential components of practical classification systems are incorporated in a Bayesian theoretic framework. The optimum decision rules and array processing are presented and evaluated. A systematic performance evaluation methodology is derived. New results quantify the relationship between classifier performance and object geometry, acoustic imaging, and the accuracy of a priori knowledge infused into the processor.

  7. Nondestructive imaging of shallow buried objects using acoustic computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Younis, Waheed A; Stergiopoulos, Stergios; Havelock, David; Grodski, Julius

    2002-05-01

    The nondestructive three-dimensional acoustic tomography concept of the present investigation combines computerized tomography image reconstruction algorithms using acoustic diffracting waves together with depth information to produce a three-dimensional (3D) image of an underground section. The approach illuminates the underground area of interest with acoustic plane waves of frequencies 200-3000 Hz. For each transmitted pulse, the reflected-refracted signals are received by a line array of acoustic sensors located at a diametrically opposite point from the acoustic source line array. For a stratified underground medium and for a given depth, which is represented by a time delay in the received signal, a horizontal tomographic 2D image is reconstructed from the received projections. Integration of the depth dependent sequence of cross-sectional reconstructed images provides a complete three-dimensional overview of the inspected terrain. The method has been tested with an experimental system that consists of a line array of four-acoustic sources, providing plane waves, and a receiving line array of 32-acoustic sensors. The results indicate both the potential and the challenges facing the new methodology. Suggestions are made for improved performance, including an adaptive noise cancellation scheme and a numerical interpolation technique.

  8. Nondestructive imaging of shallow buried objects using acoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younis, Waheed A.; Stergiopoulos, Stergios; Havelock, David; Grodski, Julius

    2002-05-01

    The nondestructive three-dimensional acoustic tomography concept of the present investigation combines computerized tomography image reconstruction algorithms using acoustic diffracting waves together with depth information to produce a three-dimensional (3D) image of an underground section. The approach illuminates the underground area of interest with acoustic plane waves of frequencies 200-3000 Hz. For each transmitted pulse, the reflected-refracted signals are received by a line array of acoustic sensors located at a diametrically opposite point from the acoustic source line array. For a stratified underground medium and for a given depth, which is represented by a time delay in the received signal, a horizontal tomographic 2D image is reconstructed from the received projections. Integration of the depth dependent sequence of cross-sectional reconstructed images provides a complete three-dimensional overview of the inspected terrain. The method has been tested with an experimental system that consists of a line array of four-acoustic sources, providing plane waves, and a receiving line array of 32-acoustic sensors. The results indicate both the potential and the challenges facing the new methodology. Suggestions are made for improved performance, including an adaptive noise cancellation scheme and a numerical interpolation technique.

  9. Acoustic force mapping in a hybrid acoustic-optical micromanipulation device supporting high resolution optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Thalhammer, Gregor; McDougall, Craig; MacDonald, Michael Peter; Ritsch-Marte, Monika

    2016-04-21

    Many applications in the life-sciences demand non-contact manipulation tools for forceful but nevertheless delicate handling of various types of sample. Moreover, the system should support high-resolution optical imaging. Here we present a hybrid acoustic/optical manipulation system which utilizes a transparent transducer, making it compatible with high-NA imaging in a microfluidic environment. The powerful acoustic trapping within a layered resonator, which is suitable for highly parallel particle handling, is complemented by the flexibility and selectivity of holographic optical tweezers, with the specimens being under high quality optical monitoring at all times. The dual acoustic/optical nature of the system lends itself to optically measure the exact acoustic force map, by means of direct force measurements on an optically trapped particle. For applications with (ultra-)high demand on the precision of the force measurements, the position of the objective used for the high-NA imaging may have significant influence on the acoustic force map in the probe chamber. We have characterized this influence experimentally and the findings were confirmed by model simulations. We show that it is possible to design the chamber and to choose the operating point in such a way as to avoid perturbations due to the objective lens. Moreover, we found that measuring the electrical impedance of the transducer provides an easy indicator for the acoustic resonances. PMID:27025398

  10. Acoustic imaging in a water filled metallic pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Kolbe, W.F.; Turko, B.T.; Leskovar, B.

    1984-04-01

    A method is described for the imaging of the interior of a water filled metallic pipe using acoustical techniques. The apparatus consists of an array of 20 acoustic transducers mounted circumferentially around the pipe. Each transducer is pulsed in sequence, and the echos resulting from bubbles in the interior are digitized and processed by a computer to generate an image. The electronic control and digitizing system and the software processing of the echo signals are described. The performance of the apparatus is illustrated by the imaging of simulated bubbles consisting of thin walled glass spheres suspended in the pipe.

  11. Time-Reversal Acoustics and Maximum-Entropy Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J G

    2001-08-22

    Target location is a common problem in acoustical imaging using either passive or active data inversion. Time-reversal methods in acoustics have the important characteristic that they provide a means of determining the eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of the scattering operator for either of these problems. Each eigenfunction may often be approximately associated with an individual scatterer. The resulting decoupling of the scattered field from a collection of targets is a very useful aid to localizing the targets, and suggests a number of imaging and localization algorithms. Two of these are linear subspace methods and maximum-entropy imaging.

  12. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) Imaging: a Review

    PubMed Central

    Nightingale, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force based elasticity imaging methods are under investigation by many groups. These methods differ from traditional ultrasonic elasticity imaging methods in that they do not require compression of the transducer, and are thus expected to be less operator dependent. Methods have been developed that utilize impulsive (i.e. < 1 ms), harmonic (pulsed), and steady state radiation force excitations. The work discussed herein utilizes impulsive methods, for which two imaging approaches have been pursued: 1) monitoring the tissue response within the radiation force region of excitation (ROE) and generating images of relative differences in tissue stiffness (Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging); and 2) monitoring the speed of shear wave propagation away from the ROE to quantify tissue stiffness (Shear Wave Elasticity Imaging (SWEI)). For these methods, a single ultrasound transducer on a commercial ultrasound system can be used to both generate acoustic radiation force in tissue, and to monitor the tissue displacement response. The response of tissue to this transient excitation is complicated and depends upon tissue geometry, radiation force field geometry, and tissue mechanical and acoustic properties. Higher shear wave speeds and smaller displacements are associated with stiffer tissues, and slower shear wave speeds and larger displacements occur with more compliant tissues. ARFI images have spatial resolution comparable to that of B-mode, often with greater contrast, providing matched, adjunctive information. SWEI images provide quantitative information about the tissue stiffness, typically with lower spatial resolution. A review these methods and examples of clinical applications are presented herein. PMID:22545033

  13. Acoustic-optical imaging without immersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H.

    1979-01-01

    System using membraneous end wall of Bragg cell to separate test specimen from acoustic transmission medium, operates in real time and uses readily available optical components. System can be easily set up and maintained by people with little or no training in holography.

  14. Quantitative Determination of Lateral Mode Dispersion in Film Bulk Acoustic Resonators through Laser Acoustic Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Telschow; John D. Larson III

    2006-10-01

    Film Bulk Acoustic Resonators are useful for many signal processing applications. Detailed knowledge of their operation properties are needed to optimize their design for specific applications. The finite size of these resonators precludes their use in single acoustic modes; rather, multiple wave modes, such as, lateral wave modes are always excited concurrently. In order to determine the contributions of these modes, we have been using a newly developed full-field laser acoustic imaging approach to directly measure their amplitude and phase throughout the resonator. This paper describes new results comparing modeling of both elastic and piezoelectric effects in the active material with imaging measurement of all excited modes. Fourier transformation of the acoustic amplitude and phase displacement images provides a quantitative determination of excited mode amplitude and wavenumber at any frequency. Images combined at several frequencies form a direct visualization of lateral mode excitation and dispersion for the device under test allowing mode identification and comparison with predicted operational properties. Discussion and analysis are presented for modes near the first longitudinal thickness resonance (~900 MHz) in an AlN thin film resonator. Plate wave modeling, taking account of material crystalline orientation, elastic and piezoelectric properties and overlayer metallic films, will be discussed in relation to direct image measurements.

  15. Laser Imaging of Airborne Acoustic Emission by Nonlinear Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodov, Igor; Döring, Daniel; Busse, Gerd

    2008-06-01

    Strongly nonlinear vibrations of near-surface fractured defects driven by an elastic wave radiate acoustic energy into adjacent air in a wide frequency range. The variations of pressure in the emitted airborne waves change the refractive index of air thus providing an acoustooptic interaction with a collimated laser beam. Such an air-coupled vibrometry (ACV) is proposed for detecting and imaging of acoustic radiation of nonlinear spectral components by cracked defects. The photoelastic relation in air is used to derive induced phase modulation of laser light in the heterodyne interferometer setup. The sensitivity of the scanning ACV to different spatial components of the acoustic radiation is analyzed. The animated airborne emission patterns are visualized for the higher harmonic and frequency mixing fields radiated by planar defects. The results confirm a high localization of the nonlinear acoustic emission around the defects and complicated directivity patterns appreciably different from those observed for fundamental frequencies.

  16. Acoustic angiography: a new imaging modality for assessing microvasculature architecture.

    PubMed

    Gessner, Ryan C; Frederick, C Brandon; Foster, F Stuart; Dayton, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide the biomedical imaging community with details of a new high resolution contrast imaging approach referred to as "acoustic angiography." Through the use of dual-frequency ultrasound transducer technology, images acquired with this approach possess both high resolution and a high contrast-to-tissue ratio, which enables the visualization of microvascular architecture without significant contribution from background tissues. Additionally, volumetric vessel-tissue integration can be visualized by using b-mode overlays acquired with the same probe. We present a brief technical overview of how the images are acquired, followed by several examples of images of both healthy and diseased tissue volumes. 3D images from alternate modalities often used in preclinical imaging, contrast-enhanced micro-CT and photoacoustics, are also included to provide a perspective on how acoustic angiography has qualitatively similar capabilities to these other techniques. These preliminary images provide visually compelling evidence to suggest that acoustic angiography may serve as a powerful new tool in preclinical and future clinical imaging. PMID:23997762

  17. Optimal flushing agents for integrated optical and acoustic imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiawen; Minami, Hataka; Steward, Earl; Ma, Teng; Mohar, Dilbahar; Robertson, Claire; Shung, Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Patel, Pranav; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-05-01

    An increasing number of integrated optical and acoustic intravascular imaging systems have been developed and hold great promise for accurately diagnosing vulnerable plaques and guiding atherosclerosis treatment. However, in any intravascular environment, the vascular lumen is filled with blood, a high-scattering source for optical and high-frequency ultrasound signals. Blood must be flushed away to provide clearer images. To our knowledge, no research has been performed to find the ideal flushing agent for combined optical and acoustic imaging techniques. We selected three solutions as potential flushing agents for their image-enhancing effects: mannitol, dextran, and iohexol. Testing of these flushing agents was performed in a closed-loop circulation model and in vivo on rabbits. We found that a high concentration of dextran was the most useful for simultaneous intravascular ultrasound and optical coherence tomography imaging.

  18. Optimal flushing agents for integrated optical and acoustic imaging systems

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiawen; Minami, Hataka; Steward, Earl; Ma, Teng; Mohar, Dilbahar; Robertson, Claire; Shung, Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Patel, Pranav; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. An increasing number of integrated optical and acoustic intravascular imaging systems have been developed and hold great promise for accurately diagnosing vulnerable plaques and guiding atherosclerosis treatment. However, in any intravascular environment, the vascular lumen is filled with blood, a high-scattering source for optical and high-frequency ultrasound signals. Blood must be flushed away to provide clearer images. To our knowledge, no research has been performed to find the ideal flushing agent for combined optical and acoustic imaging techniques. We selected three solutions as potential flushing agents for their image-enhancing effects: mannitol, dextran, and iohexol. Testing of these flushing agents was performed in a closed-loop circulation model and in vivo on rabbits. We found that a high concentration of dextran was the most useful for simultaneous intravascular ultrasound and optical coherence tomography imaging. PMID:25985096

  19. Epipolar geometry of opti-acoustic stereo imaging.

    PubMed

    Negahdaripour, Shahriar

    2007-10-01

    Optical and acoustic cameras are suitable imaging systems to inspect underwater structures, both in regular maintenance and security operations. Despite high resolution, optical systems have limited visibility range when deployed in turbid waters. In contrast, the new generation of high-frequency (MHz) acoustic cameras can provide images with enhanced target details in highly turbid waters, though their range is reduced by one to two orders of magnitude compared to traditional low-/midfrequency (10s-100s KHz) sonar systems. It is conceivable that an effective inspection strategy is the deployment of both optical and acoustic cameras on a submersible platform, to enable target imaging in a range of turbidity conditions. Under this scenario and where visibility allows, registration of the images from both cameras arranged in binocular stereo configuration provides valuable scene information that cannot be readily recovered from each sensor alone. We explore and derive the constraint equations for the epipolar geometry and stereo triangulation in utilizing these two sensing modalities with different projection models. Theoretical results supported by computer simulations show that an opti-acoustic stereo imaging system outperforms a traditional binocular vision with optical cameras, particularly for increasing target distance and (or) turbidity.

  20. Application of acoustic reflection tomography to sonar imaging.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Brian G; Wyber, Ron J

    2005-05-01

    Computer-aided tomography is a technique for providing a two-dimensional cross-sectional view of a three-dimensional object through the digital processing of many one-dimensional views (or projections) taken at different look directions. In acoustic reflection tomography, insonifying the object and then recording the backscattered signal provides the projection information for a given look direction (or aspect angle). Processing the projection information for all possible aspect angles enables an image to be reconstructed that represents the two-dimensional spatial distribution of the object's acoustic reflectivity function when projected on the imaging plane. The shape of an idealized object, which is an elliptical cylinder, is reconstructed by applying standard backprojection, Radon transform inversion (using both convolution and filtered backprojections), and direct Fourier inversion to simulated projection data. The relative merits of the various reconstruction algorithms are assessed and the resulting shape estimates compared. For bandpass sonar data, however, the wave number components of the acoustic reflectivity function that are outside the passband are absent. This leads to the consideration of image reconstruction for bandpass data. Tomographic image reconstruction is applied to real data collected with an ultra-wideband sonar transducer to form high-resolution acoustic images of various underwater objects when the sonar and object are widely separated.

  1. Imaging and detection of mines from acoustic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witten, Alan J.; DiMarzio, Charles A.; Li, Wen; McKnight, Stephen W.

    1999-08-01

    A laboratory-scale acoustic experiment is described where a buried target, a hockey puck cut in half, is shallowly buried in a sand box. To avoid the need for source and receiver coupling to the host sand, an acoustic wave is generated in the subsurface by a pulsed laser suspended above the air-sand interface. Similarly, an airborne microphone is suspended above this interface and moved in unison with the laser. After some pre-processing of the data, reflections for the target, although weak, could clearly be identified. While the existence and location of the target can be determined by inspection of the data, its unique shape can not. Since target discrimination is important in mine detection, a 3D imaging algorithm was applied to the acquired acoustic data. This algorithm yielded a reconstructed image where the shape of the target was resolved.

  2. A hierarchical variational Bayesian approximation approach in acoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Ning; Mohammad-Djafari, Ali; Gac, Nicolas; Picheral, José

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic imaging is a powerful technique for acoustic source localization and power reconstruction from limited noisy measurements at microphone sensors. But it inevitably confronts a very ill-posed inverse problem which causes unexpected solution uncertainty. Recently, the Bayesian inference methods using sparse priors have been effectively investigated. In this paper, we propose to use a hierarchical variational Bayesian approximation for robust acoustic imaging. And we explore the Student-t priors with heavy tails to enforce source sparsity, and to model non-Gaussian noise respectively. Compared to conventional methods, the proposed approach can achieve the higher spatial resolution and wider dynamic range of source powers for real data from automobile wind tunnel.

  3. Ideal flushing agents for integrated optical acoustic imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiawen; Minami, Hataka; Steward, Earl; Ma, Teng; Mohar, Dilbahar; Robertson, Claire; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Patel, Pranav M.; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-02-01

    An increased number of integrated optical acoustic intravascular imaging systems have been researched and hold great hope for accurate diagnosing of vulnerable plaques and for guiding atherosclerosis treatment. However, in any intravascular environment, vascular lumen is filled with blood, which is a high-scattering source for optical and high frequency ultrasound signals. Blood must be flushed away to make images clear. To our knowledge, no research has been performed to find the ideal flushing agent that works for both optical and acoustic imaging techniques. We selected three solutions, mannitol, dextran and iohexol, as flushing agents because of their image-enhancing effects and low toxicities. Quantitative testing of these flushing agents was performed in a closed loop circulation model and in vivo on rabbits.

  4. Optical and opto-acoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Razansky, Daniel

    2013-01-01

     Since the inception of the microscope, optical imaging is serving the biological discovery for more than four centuries. With the recent emergence of methods appropriate for in vivo staining, such as bioluminescence, fluorescent molecular probes, and proteins, as well as nanoparticle-based targeted agents, significant attention has been shifted toward in vivo interrogations of different dynamic biological processes at the molecular level. This progress has been largely supported by the development of advanced optical tomographic imaging technologies suitable for obtaining volumetric visualization of biomarker distributions in small animals at a whole-body or whole-organ scale, an imaging frontier that is not accessible by the existing tissue-sectioning microscopic techniques due to intensive light scattering beyond the depth of a few hundred microns. Biomedical optoacoustics has also emerged in the recent decade as a powerful tool for high-resolution visualization of optical contrast, overcoming a variety of longstanding limitations imposed by light scattering in deep tissues. By detecting tiny sound vibrations, resulting from selective absorption of light at multiple wavelengths, multispectral optoacoustic tomography methods can now "hear color" in three dimensions, i.e., deliver volumetric spectrally enriched (color) images from deep living tissues at high spatial resolution and in real time. These new-found imaging abilities directly relate to preclinical screening applications in animal models and are foreseen to significantly impact clinical decision making as well.

  5. Opto-acoustic breast imaging with co-registered ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalev, Jason; Clingman, Bryan; Herzog, Don; Miller, Tom; Stavros, A. Thomas; Oraevsky, Alexander; Kist, Kenneth; Dornbluth, N. Carol; Otto, Pamela

    2014-03-01

    We present results from a recent study involving the ImagioTM breast imaging system, which produces fused real-time two-dimensional color-coded opto-acoustic (OA) images that are co-registered and temporally inter- leaved with real-time gray scale ultrasound using a specialized duplex handheld probe. The use of dual optical wavelengths provides functional blood map images of breast tissue and tumors displayed with high contrast based on total hemoglobin and oxygen saturation of the blood. This provides functional diagnostic information pertaining to tumor metabolism. OA also shows morphologic information about tumor neo-vascularity that is complementary to the morphological information obtained with conventional gray scale ultrasound. This fusion technology conveniently enables real-time analysis of the functional opto-acoustic features of lesions detected by readers familiar with anatomical gray scale ultrasound. We demonstrate co-registered opto-acoustic and ultrasonic images of malignant and benign tumors from a recent clinical study that provide new insight into the function of tumors in-vivo. Results from the Feasibility Study show preliminary evidence that the technology may have the capability to improve characterization of benign and malignant breast masses over conventional diagnostic breast ultrasound alone and to improve overall accuracy of breast mass diagnosis. In particular, OA improved speci city over that of conventional diagnostic ultrasound, which could potentially reduce the number of negative biopsies performed without missing cancers.

  6. Acoustic and photoacoustic microscopy imaging of single leukocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohm, Eric M.; Moore, Michael J.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    An acoustic/photoacoustic microscope was used to create micrometer resolution images of stained cells from a blood smear. Pulse echo ultrasound images were made using a 1000 MHz transducer with 1 μm resolution. Photoacoustic images were made using a fiber coupled 532 nm laser, where energy losses through stimulated Raman scattering enabled output wavelengths from 532 nm to 620 nm. The laser was focused onto the sample using a 20x objective, and the laser spot co-aligned with the 1000 MHz transducer opposite the laser. The blood smear was stained with Wright-Giemsa, a common metachromatic dye that differentially stains the cellular components for visual identification. A neutrophil, lymphocyte and a monocyte were imaged using acoustic and photoacoustic microscopy at two different wavelengths, 532 nm and 600 nm. Unique features in each imaging modality enabled identification of the different cell types. This imaging method provides a new way of imaging stained leukocytes, with applications towards identifying and differentiating cell types, and detecting disease at the single cell level.

  7. A combined parabolic-integral equation approach to the acoustic simulation of vibro-acoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, A E; Reitich, F; Yang, J; Greenleaf, J F; Fatemi, M

    2008-11-01

    This paper aims to model ultrasound vibro-acoustography to improve our understanding of the underlying physics of the technique thus facilitating the collection of better images. Ultrasound vibro-acoustography is a novel imaging technique combining the resolution of high-frequency imaging with the clean (speckle-free) images obtained with lower frequency techniques. The challenge in modeling such an experiment is in the variety of scales important to the final image. In contrast to other approaches for modeling such problems, we break the experiment into three parts: high-frequency propagation, non-linear interaction and the propagation of the low-frequency acoustic emission. We then apply different modeling strategies to each part. For the high-frequency propagation we choose a parabolic approximation as the field has a strong preferred direction and small propagation angles. The non-linear interaction is calculated directly with Fourier methods for computing derivatives. Because of the low-frequency omnidirectional nature of the acoustic emission field and the piecewise constant medium we model the low-frequency field with a surface integral approach. We use our model to compare with experimental data and to visualize the relevant fields at points in the experiment where laboratory data is difficult to collect, in particular the source of the low-frequency field. To simulate experimental conditions we perform the simulations with the two frequencies 3 and 3.05 MHz with an inclusion of varying velocity submerged in water.

  8. Near-Field Imaging with Sound: An Acoustic STM Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Euler, Manfred

    2012-10-01

    The invention of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) 30 years ago opened up a visual window to the nano-world and sparked off a bunch of new methods for investigating and controlling matter and its transformations at the atomic and molecular level. However, an adequate theoretical understanding of the method is demanding; STM images can be considered quantum theory condensed into a pictorial representation. A hands-on model is presented for demonstrating the imaging principles in introductory teaching. It uses sound waves and computer visualization to create mappings of acoustic resonators. The macroscopic simile is made possible by quantum-classical analogies between matter and sound waves. Grounding STM in acoustic experience may help to make the underlying quantum concepts such as tunneling less abstract to students.

  9. Ultra high frequency imaging acoustic microscope

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Telschow, Kenneth L.

    2006-05-23

    An imaging system includes: an object wavefront source and an optical microscope objective all positioned to direct an object wavefront onto an area of a vibrating subject surface encompassed by a field of view of the microscope objective, and to direct a modulated object wavefront reflected from the encompassed surface area through a photorefractive material; and a reference wavefront source and at least one phase modulator all positioned to direct a reference wavefront through the phase modulator and to direct a modulated reference wavefront from the phase modulator through the photorefractive material to interfere with the modulated object wavefront. The photorefractive material has a composition and a position such that interference of the modulated object wavefront and modulated reference wavefront occurs within the photorefractive material, providing a full-field, real-time image signal of the encompassed surface area.

  10. Application of time reversal acoustics focusing for nonlinear imaging ms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarvazyan, Armen; Sutin, Alexander

    2001-05-01

    Time reversal acoustic (TRA) focusing of ultrasound appears to be an effective tool for nonlinear imaging in industrial and medical applications because of its ability to efficiently concentrate ultrasonic energy (close to diffraction limit) in heterogeneous media. In this study, we used two TRA systems to focus ultrasonic beams with different frequencies in coinciding focal points, thus causing the generation of ultrasonic waves with combination frequencies. Measurements of the intensity of these combination frequency waves provide information on the nonlinear parameter of medium in the focal region. Synchronized stirring of two TRA focused beams enables obtaining 3-D acoustic nonlinearity images of the object. Each of the TRA systems employed an aluminum resonator with piezotransducers glued to its facet. One of the free facets of each resonator was submerged into a water tank and served as a virtual phased array capable of ultrasound focusing and beam steering. To mimic a medium with spatially varying acoustical nonlinearity a simplest model such as a microbubble column in water was used. Microbubbles were generated by electrolysis of water using a needle electrode. An order of magnitude increase of the sum frequency component was observed when the ultrasound beams were focused in the area with bubbles.

  11. Application Of Digital Image Processing To Acoustic Ambiguity Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkey, J. Brian

    1983-03-01

    The passive acoustic ambiguity function is a measure of the cross-spectrum in a Doppler-shift and time-delay space that arises when two or more passive receivers are used to monitor a moving acoustic source. Detection of a signal source in the presence of noise has been treated in the past from a communications-theory point of view, with considerable effort devoted to establishing a threshold to which the maximum value of the function is compared. That approach disregards ambiguity function topography information which in practice is manually used to interpret source characteristics and source kinematics. Because of the two-dimensional representation of the ambiguity function, digital image processing techniques can be easily applied for the purposes of topography enhancement and characterization. This work presents an overview of techniques previously reported as well as more current research being conducted to improve detection performance and automate topography characterization.

  12. Identifying Vulnerable Plaques with Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, Joshua Ryan

    The rupture of arterial plaques is the most common cause of ischemic complications including stroke, the fourth leading cause of death and number one cause of long term disability in the United States. Unfortunately, because conventional diagnostic tools fail to identify plaques that confer the highest risk, often a disabling stroke and/or sudden death is the first sign of disease. A diagnostic method capable of characterizing plaque vulnerability would likely enhance the predictive ability and ultimately the treatment of stroke before the onset of clinical events. This dissertation evaluates the hypothesis that Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging can noninvasively identify lipid regions, that have been shown to increase a plaque's propensity to rupture, within carotid artery plaques in vivo. The work detailed herein describes development efforts and results from simulations and experiments that were performed to evaluate this hypothesis. To first demonstrate feasibility and evaluate potential safety concerns, finite- element method simulations are used to model the response of carotid artery plaques to an acoustic radiation force excitation. Lipid pool visualization is shown to vary as a function of lipid pool geometry and stiffness. A comparison of the resulting Von Mises stresses indicates that stresses induced by an ARFI excitation are three orders of magnitude lower than those induced by blood pressure. This thesis also presents the development of a novel pulse inversion harmonic tracking method to reduce clutter-imposed errors in ultrasound-based tissue displacement estimates. This method is validated in phantoms and was found to reduce bias and jitter displacement errors for a marked improvement in image quality in vivo. Lastly, this dissertation presents results from a preliminary in vivo study that compares ARFI imaging derived plaque stiffness with spatially registered composition determined by a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) gold standard

  13. Nonlinear acoustic time reversal imaging using the scaling subtraction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalerandi, M.; Gliozzi, A. S.; Bruno, C. L. E.; Van Den Abeele, K.

    2008-11-01

    Lab experiments have shown that the imaging of nonlinear scatterers using time reversal acoustics can be a very promising tool for early stage damage detection. The potential applications are however limited by the need for an extremely accurate acquisition system. In order to let nonlinear features emerge from the background noise it is necessary to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio as much as possible. A comprehensive analysis to determine the nonlinear components in a recorded time signal, an alternative to those usually adopted (e.g. fast Fourier), is proposed here. The method is based on the nonlinear physical properties of the solution of the wave equation and takes advantage of the deficient system response scalability with the excitation amplitude. In this contribution, we outline the adopted procedure and apply it to a nonlinear time reversal imaging simulation to highlight the advantages with respect to traditional imaging based on a fast Fourier analysis of the recorded signals.

  14. A Dual Communication and Imaging Underwater Acoustic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Tricia C.

    A dual communication and imaging underwater acoustic system is proposed and developed throughout this dissertation. Due to the wide variation in underwater channel characteristics, the research here focuses more on robustness to multipath in the shallow underwater acoustic environment, rather than high bit-rate applications and signaling schemes. Lower bit-rate (in the hundreds of bits per second (bps) to low kbps), applications such as the transfer of ecological telemetry data, e.g. conductivity or temperature data, are the primary focus of this dissertation. The parallels between direct sequence spread spectrum in digital communication and pulse-echo with pulse compression in imaging, and channel estimation in communication and range profile estimation in imaging are drawn, leading to a unified communications and imaging platform. A digital communication algorithm for channel order and channel coefficient estimation and symbol demodulation using Matching Pursuit (MP) with Generalized Multiple Hypothesis Testing (GMHT) is implemented in programmable DSP in real time with field experiment results in varying underwater environments for the single receiver (Rx), single transmitter (Tx) case. The custom and off-the-shelf hardware used in the single receiver, single transmitter set of experiments are detailed as well. This work is then extended to the single-input multiple-output (SIMO) case, and then to the full multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) case. The results of channel estimation are used for simple range profile imaging reconstructions. Successful simulated and experimental results for both transducer array configurations are presented and analyzed. Non-real-time symbol demodulation and channel estimation is performed using experimental data from a scaled testing environment. New hardware based on cost-effective fish-finder transducers for a 6 Rx--1 Tx and 6 Rx--4 Tx transducer array is detailed. Lastly, in an application that is neither communication nor

  15. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) Imaging-Based Needle Visualization

    PubMed Central

    Rotemberg, Veronica; Palmeri, Mark; Rosenzweig, Stephen; Grant, Stuart; Macleod, David; Nightingale, Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided needle placement is widely used in the clinical setting, particularly for central venous catheter placement, tissue biopsy and regional anesthesia. Difficulties with ultrasound guidance in these areas often result from steep needle insertion angles and spatial offsets between the imaging plane and the needle. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging leads to improved needle visualization because it uses a standard diagnostic scanner to perform radiation force based elasticity imaging, creating a displacement map that displays tissue stiffness variations. The needle visualization in ARFI images is independent of needle-insertion angle and also extends needle visibility out of plane. Although ARFI images portray needles well, they often do not contain the usual B-mode landmarks. Therefore, a three-step segmentation algorithm has been developed to identify a needle in an ARFI image and overlay the needle prediction on a coregistered B-mode image. The steps are: (1) contrast enhancement by median filtration and Laplacian operator filtration, (2) noise suppression through displacement estimate correlation coefficient thresholding and (3) smoothing by removal of outliers and best-fit line prediction. The algorithm was applied to data sets from horizontal 18, 21 and 25 gauge needles between 0–4 mm offset in elevation from the transducer imaging plane and to 18G needles on the transducer axis (in plane) between 10° and 35° from the horizontal. Needle tips were visualized within 2 mm of their actual position for both horizontal needle orientations up to 1.5 mm off set in elevation from the transducer imaging plane and on-axis angled needles between 10°–35° above the horizontal orientation. We conclude that segmented ARFI images overlaid on matched B-mode images hold promise for improved needle visibility in many clinical applications. PMID:21608445

  16. Feasibility of High Frequency Acoustic Imaging for Inspection of Containments

    SciTech Connect

    C.N. Corrado; J.E. Bondaryk; V. Godino

    1998-08-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has a program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to provide assistance in their assessment of the effects of potential degradation on the structural integrity and Ieaktightness of metal containment vessels and steel liners of concrete containment in nuclear power plants. One of the program objectives is to identify a technique(s) for inspection of inaccessible portions of the containment pressure boundary. Acoustic imaging has been identified as one of these potential techniques. A numerical feasibility study investigated the use of high-frequency bistatic acoustic imaging techniques for inspection of inaccessible portions of the metallic pressure boundary of nuclear power plant containment. The range-dependent version of the OASES Code developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology was utilized to perform a series of numerical simulations. OASES is a well developed and extensively tested code for evaluation of the acoustic field in a system of stratified fluid and/or elastic layers. Using the code, an arbitrary number of fluid or solid elastic layers are interleaved, with the outer layers modeled as halfspaces. High frequency vibrational sources were modeled to simulate elastic waves in the steel. The received field due to an arbitrary source array can be calculated at arbitrary depth and range positions. In this numerical study, waves that reflect and scatter from surface roughness caused by modeled degradations (e.g., corrosion) are detected and used to identify and map the steel degradation. Variables in the numerical study included frequency, flaw size, interrogation distance, and sensor incident angle.Based on these analytical simulations, it is considered unlikely that acoustic imaging technology can be used to investigate embedded steel liners of reinforced concrete containment. The thin steel liner and high signal losses to the concrete make this application difficult. Results for portions of steel containment

  17. An acoustic charge transport imager for high definition television applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, W. D.; Brennan, Kevin F.

    1994-01-01

    The primary goal of this research is to develop a solid-state high definition television (HDTV) imager chip operating at a frame rate of about 170 frames/sec at 2 Megapixels per frame. This imager offers an order of magnitude improvement in speed over CCD designs and will allow for monolithic imagers operating from the IR to the UV. The technical approach of the project focuses on the development of the three basic components of the imager and their integration. The imager chip can be divided into three distinct components: (1) image capture via an array of avalanche photodiodes (APD's), (2) charge collection, storage and overflow control via a charge transfer transistor device (CTD), and (3) charge readout via an array of acoustic charge transport (ACT) channels. The use of APD's allows for front end gain at low noise and low operating voltages while the ACT readout enables concomitant high speed and high charge transfer efficiency. Currently work is progressing towards the development of manufacturable designs for each of these component devices. In addition to the development of each of the three distinct components, work towards their integration is also progressing. The component designs are considered not only to meet individual specifications but to provide overall system level performance suitable for HDTV operation upon integration. The ultimate manufacturability and reliability of the chip constrains the design as well. The progress made during this period is described in detail in Sections 2-4.

  18. From Acoustic Segmentation to Language Processing: Evidence from Optical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Obrig, Hellmuth; Rossi, Sonja; Telkemeyer, Silke; Wartenburger, Isabell

    2010-01-01

    During language acquisition in infancy and when learning a foreign language, the segmentation of the auditory stream into words and phrases is a complex process. Intuitively, learners use “anchors” to segment the acoustic speech stream into meaningful units like words and phrases. Regularities on a segmental (e.g., phonological) or suprasegmental (e.g., prosodic) level can provide such anchors. Regarding the neuronal processing of these two kinds of linguistic cues a left-hemispheric dominance for segmental and a right-hemispheric bias for suprasegmental information has been reported in adults. Though lateralization is common in a number of higher cognitive functions, its prominence in language may also be a key to understanding the rapid emergence of the language network in infants and the ease at which we master our language in adulthood. One question here is whether the hemispheric lateralization is driven by linguistic input per se or whether non-linguistic, especially acoustic factors, “guide” the lateralization process. Methodologically, functional magnetic resonance imaging provides unsurpassed anatomical detail for such an enquiry. However, instrumental noise, experimental constraints and interference with EEG assessment limit its applicability, pointedly in infants and also when investigating the link between auditory and linguistic processing. Optical methods have the potential to fill this gap. Here we review a number of recent studies using optical imaging to investigate hemispheric differences during segmentation and basic auditory feature analysis in language development. PMID:20725516

  19. From acoustic segmentation to language processing: evidence from optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Obrig, Hellmuth; Rossi, Sonja; Telkemeyer, Silke; Wartenburger, Isabell

    2010-01-01

    During language acquisition in infancy and when learning a foreign language, the segmentation of the auditory stream into words and phrases is a complex process. Intuitively, learners use "anchors" to segment the acoustic speech stream into meaningful units like words and phrases. Regularities on a segmental (e.g., phonological) or suprasegmental (e.g., prosodic) level can provide such anchors. Regarding the neuronal processing of these two kinds of linguistic cues a left-hemispheric dominance for segmental and a right-hemispheric bias for suprasegmental information has been reported in adults. Though lateralization is common in a number of higher cognitive functions, its prominence in language may also be a key to understanding the rapid emergence of the language network in infants and the ease at which we master our language in adulthood. One question here is whether the hemispheric lateralization is driven by linguistic input per se or whether non-linguistic, especially acoustic factors, "guide" the lateralization process. Methodologically, functional magnetic resonance imaging provides unsurpassed anatomical detail for such an enquiry. However, instrumental noise, experimental constraints and interference with EEG assessment limit its applicability, pointedly in infants and also when investigating the link between auditory and linguistic processing. Optical methods have the potential to fill this gap. Here we review a number of recent studies using optical imaging to investigate hemispheric differences during segmentation and basic auditory feature analysis in language development.

  20. Long range acoustic imaging of the continental shelf environment: the Acoustic Clutter Reconnaissance Experiment 2001.

    PubMed

    Ratilal, Purnima; Lai, Yisan; Symonds, Deanelle T; Ruhlmann, Lilimar A; Preston, John R; Scheer, Edward K; Garr, Michael T; Holland, Charles W; Goff, John A; Makris, Nicholas C

    2005-04-01

    An active sonar system is used to image wide areas of the continental shelf environment by long-range echo sounding at low frequency. The bistatic system, deployed in the STRATAFORM area south of Long Island in April-May of 2001, imaged a large number of prominent clutter events over ranges spanning tens of kilometers in near real time. Roughly 3000 waveforms were transmitted into the water column. Wide-area acoustic images of the ocean environment were generated in near real time for each transmission. Between roughly 10 to more than 100 discrete and localized scatterers were registered for each image. This amounts to a total of at least 30000 scattering events that could be confused with those from submerged vehicles over the period of the experiment. Bathymetric relief in the STRATAFORM area is extremely benign, with slopes typically less than 0.5 degrees according to high resolution (30 m sampled) bathymetric data. Most of the clutter occurs in regions where the bathymetry is locally level and does not coregister with seafloor features. No statistically significant difference is found in the frequency of occurrence per unit area of repeatable clutter inside versus outside of areas occupied by subsurface river channels.

  1. An acoustic charge transport imager for high definition television applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, W. D.; Brennan, K. F.; Summers, C. J.

    1994-01-01

    The primary goal of this research is to develop a solid-state television (HDTV) imager chip operating at a frame rate of about 170 frames/sec at 2 Megapixels/frame. This imager will offer an order of magnitude improvements in speed over CCD designs and will allow for monolithic imagers operating from the IR to UV. The technical approach of the project focuses on the development of the three basic components of the imager and their subsequent integration. The camera chip can be divided into three distinct functions: (1) image capture via an array of avalanche photodiodes (APD's); (2) charge collection, storage, and overflow control via a charge transfer transistor device (CTD); and (3) charge readout via an array of acoustic charge transport (ACT) channels. The use of APD's allows for front end gain at low noise and low operating voltages while the ACT readout enables concomitant high speed and high charge transfer efficiency. Currently work is progressing towards the optimization of each of these component devices. In addition to the development of each of the three distinct components, work towards their integration and manufacturability is also progressing. The component designs are considered not only to meet individual specifications but to provide overall system level performance suitable for HDTV operation upon integration. The ultimate manufacturability and reliability of the chip constrains the design as well. The progress made during this period is described in detail.

  2. Acoustical imaging of spheres above a reflecting surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, David; Berryman, James

    2003-04-01

    An analytical study using the MUSIC method of subspace imaging is presented for the case of spheres above a reflecting boundary. The field scattered from the spheres and the reflecting boundary is calculated analytically, neglecting interactions between spheres. The singular value decomposition of the response matrix is calculated and the singular vectors divided into signal and noise subspaces. Images showing the estimated sphere locations are obtained by backpropagating the noise vectors using either the free space Green's function or the Green's function that incorporates reflections from the boundary. We show that the latter Green's function improves imaging performance after applying a normalization that compensates for the interference between direct and reflected fields. We also show that the best images are attained in some cases when the number of singular vectors in the signal subspace exceeds the number of spheres. This is consistent with previous analysis showing multiple eigenvalues of the time reversal operator for spherical scatterers [Chambers and Gautesen, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 109 (2001)]. [Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  3. Standing tree decay detection by using acoustic tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa, Luis F.; Arciniegas, Andres F.; Prieto, Flavio A.; Cortes, Yolima; Brancheriau, Loïc.

    2015-04-01

    The acoustic tomographic technique is used in the diagnosis process of standing trees. This paper presents a segmentation methodology to separate defective regions in cross-section tomographic images obtained with Arbotom® device. A set of experiments was proposed using two trunk samples obtained from a eucalyptus tree, simulating defects by drilling holes with known geometry, size and position and using different number of sensors. Also, tomographic images from trees presenting real defects were studied, by testing two different species with significant internal decay. Tomographic images and photographs from the trunk cross-section were processed to align the propagation velocity data with a corresponding region, healthy or defective. The segmentation was performed by finding a velocity threshold value to separate the defective region; a logistic regression model was fitted to obtain the value that maximizes a performance criterion, being selected the geometric mean. Accuracy segmentation values increased as the number of sensors augmented; also the position influenced the result, obtaining improved results in the case of centric defects.

  4. Acoustic-integrated dynamic MR imaging for a patient with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunn-Jy; Shih, Tiffany Ting-Fang; Chang, Yi-Chung; Hsu, Ying-Chieh; Huon, Leh-Kiong; Lo, Men-Tzung; Pham, Van-Truong; Lin, Chen; Wang, Pa-Chun

    2015-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is caused by multi-level upper airway obstruction. Anatomic changes at the sites of obstruction may modify the physical or acoustic properties of snores. The surgical success of OSA depends upon precise localization of obstructed levels. We present a case of OSAS who received simultaneous dynamic MRI and snore acoustic recordings. The synchronized image and acoustic information successfully characterize the sites of temporal obstruction during sleep-disordered breathing events.

  5. Dual-frequency acoustic droplet vaporization detection for medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Arena, Christopher B; Novell, Anthony; Sheeran, Paul S; Puett, Connor; Moyer, Linsey C; Dayton, Paul A

    2015-09-01

    Liquid-filled perfluorocarbon droplets emit a unique acoustic signature when vaporized into gas-filled microbubbles using ultrasound. Here, we conducted a pilot study in a tissue-mimicking flow phantom to explore the spatial aspects of droplet vaporization and investigate the effects of applied pressure and droplet concentration on image contrast and axial and lateral resolution. Control microbubble contrast agents were used for comparison. A confocal dual-frequency transducer was used to transmit at 8 MHz and passively receive at 1 MHz. Droplet signals were of significantly higher energy than microbubble signals. This resulted in improved signal separation and high contrast-to-tissue ratios (CTR). Specifically, with a peak negative pressure (PNP) of 450 kPa applied at the focus, the CTR of B-mode images was 18.3 dB for droplets and -0.4 for microbubbles. The lateral resolution was dictated by the size of the droplet activation area, with lower pressures resulting in smaller activation areas and improved lateral resolution (0.67 mm at 450 kPa). The axial resolution in droplet images was dictated by the size of the initial droplet and was independent of the properties of the transmit pulse (3.86 mm at 450 kPa). In post-processing, time-domain averaging (TDA) improved droplet and microbubble signal separation at high pressures (640 kPa and 700 kPa). Taken together, these results indicate that it is possible to generate high-sensitivity, high-contrast images of vaporization events. In the future, this has the potential to be applied in combination with droplet-mediated therapy to track treatment outcomes or as a standalone diagnostic system to monitor the physical properties of the surrounding environment. PMID:26415125

  6. Acoustic and Elastodynamic Redatuming for VSP Salt Dome Flank Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, R.; Willis, M.; Toksoz, N.

    2007-12-01

    We apply an extension of the concept of Time Reversed Acoustics (TRA) for imaging salt dome flanks using Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP) data. We demonstrate its performance and capabilities on both synthetic acoustic and elastic seismic data from a Gulf of Mexico (GOM) model. This target-oriented strategy eliminates the need for the traditional complex process of velocity estimation, model building, and iterative depth migration to remove the effects of the salt canopy and surrounding overburden. In this study, we use data from surface shots recorded in a well from a walkaway VSP survey. The method, called redatuming, creates a geometry as if the source and receiver pairs had been located in the borehole at the positions of the receivers. This process generates effective downhole shot gathers without any knowledge of the overburden velocity structure. The resulting shot gathers are less complex since the VSP ray paths from the surface source are shortened and moved to be as if they started in the borehole, then reflected off the salt flank region and captured in the borehole. After redatuming, we apply multiple passes of prestack migration from the reference datum of the borehole. In our example, the first pass migration, using only simple vertical velocity gradient model, reveals the outline of the salt edge. A second pass of reverse-time prestack depth migration using the full, two-way wave equation, is performed with an updated velocity model that now consists of the velocity gradient and the salt dome. The second pass migration brings out the dipping sediments abutting the salt flank because these reflectors were illuminated by energy that bounced off the salt flank forming prismatic reflections.

  7. Full-Field Imaging of GHz Film Bulk Acoustic Resonator Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Telschow, Kenneth Louis; Deason, Vance Albert; Cottle, David Lynn; Larson III, J. D.

    2003-10-01

    A full-field view laser ultrasonic imaging method has been developed that measures acoustic motion at a surface without scanning. Images are recorded at normal video frame rates by using dynamic holography with photorefractive interferometric detection. By extending the approach to ultra high frequencies, an acoustic microscope has been developed that is capable of operation at gigahertz frequency and micron length scales. Both acoustic amplitude and phase are recorded, allowing full calibration and determination of phases to within a single arbitrary constant. Results are presented of measurements at frequencies of 800-900 MHz, illustrating a multitude of normal mode behavior in electrically driven thin film acoustic resonators. Coupled with microwave electrical impedance measurements, this imaging mode provides an exceptionally fast method for evaluation of electric-to-acoustic coupling of these devices and their performance. Images of 256 /spl times/ 240 pixels are recorded at 18 fps rates synchronized to obtain both in-phase and quadrature detection of the acoustic motion. Simple averaging provides sensitivity to the subnanometer level at each pixel calibrated over the image using interferometry. Identification of specific acoustic modes and their relationship to electrical impedance characteristics show the advantages and overall high speed of the technique.

  8. Full-Field Imaging of Acoustic Motion at Nanosecond Time and Micron Length Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Telschow, Kenneth Louis; Deason, Vance Albert; Cottle, David Lynn; Larson III, John D.

    2002-10-01

    A full-field view laser ultrasonic imaging method has been developed that measures acoustic motion at a surface without scanning. Images are recorded at normal video frame rates by employing dynamic holography using photorefractive interferometric detection. By extending the approach to ultra high frequencies, an acoustic microscope has been developed capable of operation on the nanosecond time and micron length scales. Both acoustic amplitude and phase are recorded allowing full calibration and determination of phases to within a single arbitrary constant. Results are presented of measurements at frequencies at 800-900 MHz illustrating a multitude of normal mode behavior in electrically driven thin film acoustic resonators. Coupled with microwave electrical impedance measurements, this imaging mode provides an exceptionally fast method for evaluation of electric to acoustic coupling and performance of these devices. Images of 256x240 pixels are recorded at 18Hz rates synchronized to obtain both in-phase and quadrature detection of the acoustic motion. Simple averaging provides sensitivity to the subnanometer level calibrated over the image using interferometry. Identification of specific acoustic modes and their relationship to electrical impedance characteristics show the advantages and overall high speed of the technique.

  9. Characterizing Response to Elemental Unit of Acoustic Imaging Noise: An fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Luh, Wen-Ming; Talavage, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    Acoustic imaging noise produced during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies can hinder auditory fMRI research analysis by altering the properties of the acquired time-series data. Acoustic imaging noise can be especially confounding when estimating the time course of the hemodynamic response (HDR) in auditory event-related fMRI (fMRI) experiments. This study is motivated by the desire to establish a baseline function that can serve not only as a comparison to other quantities of acoustic imaging noise for determining how detrimental is one's experimental noise, but also as a foundation for a model that compensates for the response to acoustic imaging noise. Therefore, the amplitude and spatial extent of the HDR to the elemental unit of acoustic imaging noise (i.e., a single ping) associated with echoplanar acquisition were characterized and modeled. Results from this fMRI study at 1.5 T indicate that the group-averaged HDR in left and right auditory cortex to acoustic imaging noise (duration of 46 ms) has an estimated peak magnitude of 0.29% (right) to 0.48% (left) signal change from baseline, peaks between 3 and 5 s after stimulus presentation, and returns to baseline and remains within the noise range approximately 8 s after stimulus presentation. PMID:19304477

  10. Negative refraction induced acoustic concentrator and the effects of scattering cancellation, imaging, and mirage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qi; Cheng, Ying; Liu, Xiao-jun

    2012-07-01

    We present a three-dimensional acoustic concentrator capable of significantly enhancing the sound intensity in the compressive region with scattering cancellation, imaging, and mirage effects. The concentrator shell is built by isotropic gradient negative-index materials, which together with an exterior host medium slab constructs a pair of complementary media. The enhancement factor, which can approach infinity by tuning the geometric parameters, is always much higher than that of a traditional concentrator made by positive-index materials with the same size. The acoustic scattering theory is applied to derive the pressure field distribution of the concentrator, which is consistent with the numerical full-wave simulations. The inherent acoustic impedance match at the interfaces of the shell as well as the inverse processes of “negative refraction—progressive curvature—negative refraction” for arbitrary sound rays can exactly cancel the scattering of the concentrator. In addition, the concentrator shell can also function as an acoustic spherical magnifying superlens, which produces a perfect image with the same shape, with bigger geometric and acoustic parameters located at a shifted position. Then some acoustic mirages are observed whereby the waves radiated from (scattered by) an object located in the center region may seem to be radiated from (scattered by) its image. Based on the mirage effect, we further propose an intriguing acoustic transformer which can transform the sound scattering pattern of one object into another object at will with arbitrary geometric, acoustic, and location parameters.

  11. Acoustic angiography: a new high frequency contrast ultrasound technique for biomedical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Sarah E.; Lindsey, Brooks D.; Gessner, Ryan; Lee, Yueh; Aylward, Stephen; Lee, Hyunggyun; Cherin, Emmanuel; Foster, F. Stuart; Dayton, Paul A.

    2016-05-01

    Acoustic Angiography is a new approach to high-resolution contrast enhanced ultrasound imaging enabled by ultra-broadband transducer designs. The high frequency imaging technique provides signal separation from tissue which does not produce significant harmonics in the same frequency range, as well as high resolution. This approach enables imaging of microvasculature in-vivo with high resolution and signal to noise, producing images that resemble x-ray angiography. Data shows that acoustic angiography can provide important information about the presence of disease based on vascular patterns, and may enable a new paradigm in medical imaging.

  12. Negative refraction imaging of acoustic metamaterial lens in the supersonic range

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jianning; Wen, Tingdun; Yang, Peng; Zhang, Lu

    2014-05-15

    Acoustic metamaterials with negative refraction index is the most promising method to overcome the diffraction limit of acoustic imaging to achieve ultrahigh resolution. In this paper, we use localized resonant phononic crystal as the unit cell to construct the acoustic negative refraction lens. Based on the vibration model of the phononic crystal, negative quality parameters of the lens are obtained while excited near the system resonance frequency. Simulation results show that negative refraction of the acoustic lens can be achieved when a sound wave transmiting through the phononic crystal plate. The patterns of the imaging field agree well with that of the incident wave, while the dispersion is very weak. The unit cell size in the simulation is 0.0005 m and the wavelength of the sound source is 0.02 m, from which we show that acoustic signal can be manipulated through structures with dimensions much smaller than the wavelength of incident wave.

  13. Tracking Energy Flow Using a Volumetric Acoustic Intensity Imager (VAIM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klos, Jacob; Williams, Earl G.; Valdivia, Nicolas P.

    2006-01-01

    A new measurement device has been invented at the Naval Research Laboratory which images instantaneously the intensity vector throughout a three-dimensional volume nearly a meter on a side. The measurement device consists of a nearly transparent spherical array of 50 inexpensive microphones optimally positioned on an imaginary spherical surface of radius 0.2m. Front-end signal processing uses coherence analysis to produce multiple, phase-coherent holograms in the frequency domain each related to references located on suspect sound sources in an aircraft cabin. The analysis uses either SVD or Cholesky decomposition methods using ensemble averages of the cross-spectral density with the fixed references. The holograms are mathematically processed using spherical NAH (nearfield acoustical holography) to convert the measured pressure field into a vector intensity field in the volume of maximum radius 0.4 m centered on the sphere origin. The utility of this probe is evaluated in a detailed analysis of a recent in-flight experiment in cooperation with Boeing and NASA on NASA s Aries 757 aircraft. In this experiment the trim panels and insulation were removed over a section of the aircraft and the bare panels and windows were instrumented with accelerometers to use as references for the VAIM. Results show excellent success at locating and identifying the sources of interior noise in-flight in the frequency range of 0 to 1400 Hz. This work was supported by NASA and the Office of Naval Research.

  14. Breaking the acoustic diffraction limit in photoacoustic imaging with multiple speckle illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaigne, Thomas; Gateau, Jérôme; Allain, Marc; Katz, Ori; Gigan, Sylvain; Sentenac, Anne; Bossy, Emmanuel

    2016-03-01

    In deep photoacoustic imaging, resolution is inherently limited by acoustic diffraction, and ultrasonic frequencies cannot be arbitrarily increased because of attenuation in tissue. Here we report on the use of multiple speckle illumination to perform super resolution photoacoustic imaging. We show that the analysis of speckle-induced second-order fluctuations of the photoacoustic signal combined with deconvolution enables to resolve optically absorbing structures below the acoustic diffraction limit.

  15. An Acoustic Charge Transport Imager for High Definition Television

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, William D.; Brennan, Kevin; May, Gary; Glenn, William E.; Richardson, Mike; Solomon, Richard

    1999-01-01

    This project, over its term, included funding to a variety of companies and organizations. In addition to Georgia Tech these included Florida Atlantic University with Dr. William E. Glenn as the P.I., Kodak with Mr. Mike Richardson as the P.I. and M.I.T./Polaroid with Dr. Richard Solomon as the P.I. The focus of the work conducted by these organizations was the development of camera hardware for High Definition Television (HDTV). The focus of the research at Georgia Tech was the development of new semiconductor technology to achieve a next generation solid state imager chip that would operate at a high frame rate (I 70 frames per second), operate at low light levels (via the use of avalanche photodiodes as the detector element) and contain 2 million pixels. The actual cost required to create this new semiconductor technology was probably at least 5 or 6 times the investment made under this program and hence we fell short of achieving this rather grand goal. We did, however, produce a number of spin-off technologies as a result of our efforts. These include, among others, improved avalanche photodiode structures, significant advancement of the state of understanding of ZnO/GaAs structures and significant contributions to the analysis of general GaAs semiconductor devices and the design of Surface Acoustic Wave resonator filters for wireless communication. More of these will be described in the report. The work conducted at the partner sites resulted in the development of 4 prototype HDTV cameras. The HDTV camera developed by Kodak uses the Kodak KAI-2091M high- definition monochrome image sensor. This progressively-scanned charge-coupled device (CCD) can operate at video frame rates and has 9 gm square pixels. The photosensitive area has a 16:9 aspect ratio and is consistent with the "Common Image Format" (CIF). It features an active image area of 1928 horizontal by 1084 vertical pixels and has a 55% fill factor. The camera is designed to operate in continuous mode

  16. Analysis of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) Data for Acoustic Velocity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackshire, James L.

    1997-01-01

    Acoustic velocity measurements were taken using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in a Normal Incidence Tube configuration at various frequency, phase, and amplitude levels. This report presents the results of the PIV analysis and data reduction portions of the test and details the processing that was done. Estimates of lower measurement sensitivity levels were determined based on PIV image quality, correlation, and noise level parameters used in the test. Comparison of measurements with linear acoustic theory are presented. The onset of nonlinear, harmonic frequency acoustic levels were also studied for various decibel and frequency levels ranging from 90 to 132 dB and 500 to 3000 Hz, respectively.

  17. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr.; Younane Abousleiman

    2004-04-01

    The research during this project has concentrated on developing a correlation between rock deformation mechanisms and their acoustic velocity signature. This has included investigating: (1) the acoustic signature of drained and undrained unconsolidated sands, (2) the acoustic emission signature of deforming high porosity rocks (in comparison to their low porosity high strength counterparts), (3) the effects of deformation on anisotropic elastic and poroelastic moduli, and (4) the acoustic tomographic imaging of damage development in rocks. Each of these four areas involve triaxial experimental testing of weak porous rocks or unconsolidated sand and involves measuring acoustic properties. The research is directed at determining the seismic velocity signature of damaged rocks so that 3-D or 4-D seismic imaging can be utilized to image rock damage. These four areas of study are described in the report: (1) Triaxial compression experiments have been conducted on unconsolidated Oil Creek sand at high confining pressures. (2) Initial experiments on measuring the acoustic emission activity from deforming high porosity Danian chalk were accomplished and these indicate that the AE activity was of a very low amplitude. (3) A series of triaxial compression experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of induced stress on the anisotropy developed in dynamic elastic and poroelastic parameters in rocks. (4) Tomographic acoustic imaging was utilized to image the internal damage in a deforming porous limestone sample. Results indicate that the deformation damage in rocks induced during laboratory experimentation can be imaged tomographically in the laboratory. By extension the results also indicate that 4-D seismic imaging of a reservoir may become a powerful tool for imaging reservoir deformation (including imaging compaction and subsidence) and for imaging zones where drilling operation may encounter hazardous shallow water flows.

  18. Temporal pattern of acoustic imaging noise asymmetrically modulates activation in the auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Ranaweera, Ruwan D; Kwon, Minseok; Hu, Shuowen; Tamer, Gregory G; Luh, Wen-Ming; Talavage, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the hemisphere-specific effects of the temporal pattern of imaging related acoustic noise on auditory cortex activation. Hemodynamic responses (HDRs) to five temporal patterns of imaging noise corresponding to noise generated by unique combinations of imaging volume and effective repetition time (TR), were obtained using a stroboscopic event-related paradigm with extra-long (≥27.5 s) TR to minimize inter-acquisition effects. In addition to confirmation that fMRI responses in auditory cortex do not behave in a linear manner, temporal patterns of imaging noise were found to modulate both the shape and spatial extent of hemodynamic responses, with classically non-auditory areas exhibiting responses to longer duration noise conditions. Hemispheric analysis revealed the right primary auditory cortex to be more sensitive than the left to the presence of imaging related acoustic noise. Right primary auditory cortex responses were significantly larger during all the conditions. This asymmetry of response to imaging related acoustic noise could lead to different baseline activation levels during acquisition schemes using short TR, inducing an observed asymmetry in the responses to an intended acoustic stimulus through limitations of dynamic range, rather than due to differences in neuronal processing of the stimulus. These results emphasize the importance of accounting for the temporal pattern of the acoustic noise when comparing findings across different fMRI studies, especially those involving acoustic stimulation.

  19. Temporal pattern of acoustic imaging noise asymmetrically modulates activation in the auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Ranaweera, Ruwan D; Kwon, Minseok; Hu, Shuowen; Tamer, Gregory G; Luh, Wen-Ming; Talavage, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the hemisphere-specific effects of the temporal pattern of imaging related acoustic noise on auditory cortex activation. Hemodynamic responses (HDRs) to five temporal patterns of imaging noise corresponding to noise generated by unique combinations of imaging volume and effective repetition time (TR), were obtained using a stroboscopic event-related paradigm with extra-long (≥27.5 s) TR to minimize inter-acquisition effects. In addition to confirmation that fMRI responses in auditory cortex do not behave in a linear manner, temporal patterns of imaging noise were found to modulate both the shape and spatial extent of hemodynamic responses, with classically non-auditory areas exhibiting responses to longer duration noise conditions. Hemispheric analysis revealed the right primary auditory cortex to be more sensitive than the left to the presence of imaging related acoustic noise. Right primary auditory cortex responses were significantly larger during all the conditions. This asymmetry of response to imaging related acoustic noise could lead to different baseline activation levels during acquisition schemes using short TR, inducing an observed asymmetry in the responses to an intended acoustic stimulus through limitations of dynamic range, rather than due to differences in neuronal processing of the stimulus. These results emphasize the importance of accounting for the temporal pattern of the acoustic noise when comparing findings across different fMRI studies, especially those involving acoustic stimulation. PMID:26519093

  20. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  1. Acoustic and optical borehole-wall imaging for fractured-rock aquifer studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, J.H.; Johnson, C.D.

    2004-01-01

    Imaging with acoustic and optical televiewers results in continuous and oriented 360?? views of the borehole wall from which the character, relation, and orientation of lithologic and structural planar features can be defined for studies of fractured-rock aquifers. Fractures are more clearly defined under a wider range of conditions on acoustic images than on optical images including dark-colored rocks, cloudy borehole water, and coated borehole walls. However, optical images allow for the direct viewing of the character of and relation between lithology, fractures, foliation, and bedding. The most powerful approach is the combined application of acoustic and optical imaging with integrated interpretation. Imaging of the borehole wall provides information useful for the collection and interpretation of flowmeter and other geophysical logs, core samples, and hydraulic and water-quality data from packer testing and monitoring. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. eIF4F: A Retrospective*

    PubMed Central

    Merrick, William C.

    2015-01-01

    The original purification of the heterotrimeric eIF4F was published over 30 years ago (Grifo, J. A., Tahara, S. M., Morgan, M. A., Shatkin, A. J., and Merrick, W. C. (1983) J. Biol. Chem. 258, 5804–5810). Since that time, numerous studies have been performed with the three proteins specifically required for the translation initiation of natural mRNAs, eIF4A, eIF4B, and eIF4F. These have involved enzymatic and structural studies of the proteins and a number of site-directed mutagenesis studies. The regulation of translation exhibited through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is predominately seen as the phosphorylation of 4E-BP, an inhibitor of protein synthesis that functions by binding to the cap binding subunit of eIF4F (eIF4E). A hypothesis that requires the disassembly of eIF4F during translation initiation to yield free subunits (eIF4A, eIF4E, and eIF4G) is presented. PMID:26324716

  3. The path to COVIS: A review of acoustic imaging of hydrothermal flow regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemis, Karen G.; Silver, Deborah; Xu, Guangyu; Light, Russ; Jackson, Darrell; Jones, Christopher; Ozer, Sedat; Liu, Li

    2015-11-01

    Acoustic imaging of hydrothermal flow regimes started with the incidental recognition of a plume on a routine sonar scan for obstacles in the path of the human-occupied submersible ALVIN. Developments in sonar engineering, acoustic data processing and scientific visualization have been combined to develop technology which can effectively capture the behavior of focused and diffuse hydrothermal discharge. This paper traces the development of these acoustic imaging techniques for hydrothermal flow regimes from their conception through to the development of the Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar (COVIS). COVIS has monitored such flow eight times a day for several years. Successful acoustic techniques for estimating plume entrainment, bending, vertical rise, volume flux, and heat flux are presented as is the state-of-the-art in diffuse flow detection.

  4. Acoustic micro-Doppler radar for human gait imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaonian; Pouliquen, Philippe O; Waxman, Allen; Andreou, Andreas G

    2007-03-01

    A portable acoustic micro-Doppler radar system for the acquisition of human gait signatures in indoor and outdoor environments is reported. Signals from an accelerometer attached to the leg support the identification of the components in the measured micro-Doppler signature. The acoustic micro-Doppler system described in this paper is simpler and offers advantages over the widely used electromagnetic wave micro-Doppler radars.

  5. Reconstructed imaging of acoustic cloak using time-lapse reversal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chen; Cheng, Ying; Xu, Jian-yi; Li, Bo; Liu, Xiao-jun

    2014-08-01

    We proposed and investigated a solution to the inverse acoustic cloak problem, an anti-stealth technology to make cloaks visible, using the time-lapse reversal (TLR) method. The TLR method reconstructs the image of an unknown acoustic cloak by utilizing scattered acoustic waves. Compared to previous anti-stealth methods, the TLR method can determine not only the existence of a cloak but also its exact geometric information like definite shape, size, and position. Here, we present the process for TLR reconstruction based on time reversal invariance. This technology may have potential applications in detecting various types of cloaks with different geometric parameters.

  6. Computer Evaluation Of Real-Time X-Ray And Acoustic Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacoby, M. H.; Loe, R. S.; Dondes, P. A.

    1983-03-01

    The weakest link in the inspection process is the subjective interpretation of data by inspectors. To overcome this troublesome fact computer based analysis systems have been developed. In the field of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) there is a large class of inspections that can benefit from computer analysis. X-ray images (both film and fluoroscopic) and acoustic images lend themselves to automatic analysis as do the one-dimensional signals associated with ultrasonic, eddy current and acoustic emission testing. Computer analysis can enhance and evaluate subtle details. Flaws can be located and measured, and accept-ance decisions made by computer in a consistent and objective manner. This paper describes the interactive, computer-based analysis of real-time x-ray images and acoustic images of graphite/epoxy adhesively bonded structures.

  7. Opti-acoustic stereo imaging: on system calibration and 3-D target reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Negahdaripour, Shahriar; Sekkati, Hicham; Pirsiavash, Hamed

    2009-06-01

    Utilization of an acoustic camera for range measurements is a key advantage for 3-D shape recovery of underwater targets by opti-acoustic stereo imaging, where the associated epipolar geometry of optical and acoustic image correspondences can be described in terms of conic sections. In this paper, we propose methods for system calibration and 3-D scene reconstruction by maximum likelihood estimation from noisy image measurements. The recursive 3-D reconstruction method utilized as initial condition a closed-form solution that integrates the advantages of two other closed-form solutions, referred to as the range and azimuth solutions. Synthetic data tests are given to provide insight into the merits of the new target imaging and 3-D reconstruction paradigm, while experiments with real data confirm the findings based on computer simulations, and demonstrate the merits of this novel 3-D reconstruction paradigm.

  8. Opti-acoustic stereo imaging: on system calibration and 3-D target reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Negahdaripour, Shahriar; Sekkati, Hicham; Pirsiavash, Hamed

    2009-06-01

    Utilization of an acoustic camera for range measurements is a key advantage for 3-D shape recovery of underwater targets by opti-acoustic stereo imaging, where the associated epipolar geometry of optical and acoustic image correspondences can be described in terms of conic sections. In this paper, we propose methods for system calibration and 3-D scene reconstruction by maximum likelihood estimation from noisy image measurements. The recursive 3-D reconstruction method utilized as initial condition a closed-form solution that integrates the advantages of two other closed-form solutions, referred to as the range and azimuth solutions. Synthetic data tests are given to provide insight into the merits of the new target imaging and 3-D reconstruction paradigm, while experiments with real data confirm the findings based on computer simulations, and demonstrate the merits of this novel 3-D reconstruction paradigm. PMID:19380272

  9. Modeling hemodynamic responses in auditory cortex at 1.5 T using variable duration imaging acoustic noise.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shuowen; Olulade, Olumide; Castillo, Javier Gonzalez; Santos, Joseph; Kim, Sungeun; Tamer, Gregory G; Luh, Wen-Ming; Talavage, Thomas M

    2010-02-15

    A confound for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), especially for auditory studies, is the presence of imaging acoustic noise generated mainly as a byproduct of rapid gradient switching during volume acquisition and, to a lesser extent, the radiofrequency transmit. This work utilized a novel pulse sequence to present actual imaging acoustic noise for characterization of the induced hemodynamic responses and assessment of linearity in the primary auditory cortex with respect to noise duration. Results show that responses to brief duration (46 ms) imaging acoustic noise is highly nonlinear while responses to longer duration (>1 s) imaging acoustic noise becomes approximately linear, with the right primary auditory cortex exhibiting a higher degree of nonlinearity than the left for the investigated noise durations. This study also assessed the spatial extent of activation induced by imaging acoustic noise, showing that the use of modeled responses (specific to imaging acoustic noise) as the reference waveform revealed additional activations in the auditory cortex not observed with a canonical gamma variate reference waveform, suggesting an improvement in detection sensitivity for imaging acoustic noise-induced activity. Longer duration (1.5 s) imaging acoustic noise was observed to induce activity that expanded outwards from Heschl's gyrus to cover the superior temporal gyrus as well as parts of the middle temporal gyrus and insula, potentially affecting higher level acoustic processing.

  10. Characterization of acoustic streaming and heating using synchronized infrared thermography and particle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Layman, Christopher N; Sou, In Mei; Bartak, Rico; Ray, Chittaranjan; Allen, John S

    2011-09-01

    Real-time measurements of acoustic streaming velocities and surface temperature fields using synchronized particle image velocimetry and infrared thermography are reported. Measurements were conducted using a 20 kHz Langevin type acoustic horn mounted vertically in a model sonochemical reactor of either degassed water or a glycerin-water mixture. These dissipative phenomena are found to be sensitive to small variations in the medium viscosity, and a correlation between the heat flux and vorticity was determined for unsteady convective heat transfer.

  11. Liver reserve function assessment by acoustic radiation force impulse imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiao-Lan; Liang, Li-Wei; Cao, Hui; Men, Qiong; Hou, Ke-Zhu; Chen, Zhen; Zhao, Ya-E

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the utility of liver reserve function by acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging in patients with liver tumors. METHODS: Seventy-six patients with liver tumors were enrolled in this study. Serum biochemical indexes, such as aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), serum albumin (ALB), total bilirubin (T-Bil), and other indicators were observed. Liver stiffness (LS) was measured by ARFI imaging, measurements were repeated 10 times, and the average value of the results was taken as the final LS value. Indocyanine green (ICG) retention was performed, and ICG-K and ICG-R15 were recorded. Child-Pugh (CP) scores were carried out based on patient’s preoperative biochemical tests and physical condition. Correlations among CP scores, ICG-R15, ICG-K and LS values were observed and analyzed using either the Pearson correlation coefficient or the Spearman rank correlation coefficient. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare LS values of CP scores, and the receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) curve was used to analyze liver reserve function assessment accuracy. RESULTS: LS in the ICG-R15 10%-20% group was significantly higher than in the ICG-R15 < 10% group; and the difference was statistically significant (2.19 ± 0.27 vs 1.59 ± 0.32, P < 0.01). LS in the ICG-R15 > 20% group was significantly higher than in the ICG-R15 < 10% group; and the difference was statistically significant (2.92 ± 0.29 vs 1.59 ± 0.32, P < 0.01). The LS value in patients with CP class A was lower than in patients with CP class B (1.57 ± 0.34 vs 1.86 ± 0.27, P < 0.05), while the LS value in patients with CP class B was lower than in patients with CP class C (1.86 ± 0.27 vs 2.47 ± 0.33, P < 0.01). LS was positively correlated with ICG-R15 (r = 0.617, P < 0.01) and CP score (r = 0.772, P < 0.01). Meanwhile, LS was negatively correlated with ICG-K (r = -0.673, P < 0.01). AST, ALT and T-Bil were positively correlated with LS, while ALB was negatively

  12. A surface acoustic wave /SAW/ charge transfer imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papanicolauo, N. A.; Lin, H. C.

    1981-01-01

    An 80 MHz, 2-microsecond surface acoustic wave charge transfer device (SAW-CTD) has been fabricated in which surface acoustic waves are used to create traveling longitudinal electric fields in the silicon substrate and to replace the multiphase clocks of charge coupled devices. The traveling electric fields create potential wells which will carry along charges that may be stored in the wells; the charges may be injected into the wells by light. An optical application is proposed where the SAW-CTD structure is used in place of a conventional interline transfer design.

  13. Segmentation of the spinous process and its acoustic shadow in vertebral ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Berton, Florian; Cheriet, Farida; Miron, Marie-Claude; Laporte, Catherine

    2016-05-01

    Spinal ultrasound imaging is emerging as a low-cost, radiation-free alternative to conventional X-ray imaging for the clinical follow-up of patients with scoliosis. Currently, deformity measurement relies almost entirely on manual identification of key vertebral landmarks. However, the interpretation of vertebral ultrasound images is challenging, primarily because acoustic waves are entirely reflected by bone. To alleviate this problem, we propose an algorithm to segment these images into three regions: the spinous process, its acoustic shadow and other tissues. This method consists, first, in the extraction of several image features and the selection of the most relevant ones for the discrimination of the three regions. Then, using this set of features and linear discriminant analysis, each pixel of the image is classified as belonging to one of the three regions. Finally, the image is segmented by regularizing the pixel-wise classification results to account for some geometrical properties of vertebrae. The feature set was first validated by analyzing the classification results across a learning database. The database contained 107 vertebral ultrasound images acquired with convex and linear probes. Classification rates of 84%, 92% and 91% were achieved for the spinous process, the acoustic shadow and other tissues, respectively. Dice similarity coefficients of 0.72 and 0.88 were obtained respectively for the spinous process and acoustic shadow, confirming that the proposed method accurately segments the spinous process and its acoustic shadow in vertebral ultrasound images. Furthermore, the centroid of the automatically segmented spinous process was located at an average distance of 0.38 mm from that of the manually labeled spinous process, which is on the order of image resolution. This suggests that the proposed method is a promising tool for the measurement of the Spinous Process Angle and, more generally, for assisting ultrasound-based assessment of scoliosis

  14. An acoustic charge transport imager for high definition television applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, William D.; Brennan, Kevin F.; Summers, Chris J.

    1992-01-01

    In this report we present the progress during the second six month period of the project. This includes both experimental and theoretical work on the acoustic charge transport (ACT) portion of the chip, the theoretical program modelling of both the avalanche photodiode (APD) and the charge transfer and overflow transistor and the materials growth and fabrication part of the program.

  15. Method and apparatus for detecting internal structures of bulk objects using acoustic imaging

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Telschow, Kenneth L.

    2002-01-01

    Apparatus for producing an acoustic image of an object according to the present invention may comprise an excitation source for vibrating the object to produce at least one acoustic wave therein. The acoustic wave results in the formation of at least one surface displacement on the surface of the object. A light source produces an optical object wavefront and an optical reference wavefront and directs the optical object wavefront toward the surface of the object to produce a modulated optical object wavefront. A modulator operatively associated with the optical reference wavefront modulates the optical reference wavefront in synchronization with the acoustic wave to produce a modulated optical reference wavefront. A sensing medium positioned to receive the modulated optical object wavefront and the modulated optical reference wavefront combines the modulated optical object and reference wavefronts to produce an image related to the surface displacement on the surface of the object. A detector detects the image related to the surface displacement produced by the sensing medium. A processing system operatively associated with the detector constructs an acoustic image of interior features of the object based on the phase and amplitude of the surface displacement on the surface of the object.

  16. NOTE: Acoustical properties of selected tissue phantom materials for ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zell, K.; Sperl, J. I.; Vogel, M. W.; Niessner, R.; Haisch, C.

    2007-10-01

    This note summarizes the characterization of the acoustic properties of four materials intended for the development of tissue, and especially breast tissue, phantoms for the use in photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging. The materials are agar, silicone, polyvinyl alcohol gel (PVA) and polyacrylamide gel (PAA). The acoustical properties, i.e., the speed of sound, impedance and acoustic attenuation, are determined by transmission measurements of sound waves at room temperature under controlled conditions. Although the materials are tested for application such as photoacoustic phantoms, we focus here on the acoustic properties, while the optical properties will be discussed elsewhere. To obtain the acoustic attenuation in a frequency range from 4 MHz to 14 MHz, two ultrasound sources of 5 MHz and 10 MHz core frequencies are used. For preparation, each sample is cast into blocks of three different thicknesses. Agar, PVA and PAA show similar acoustic properties as water. Within silicone polymer, a significantly lower speed of sound and higher acoustical attenuation than in water and human tissue were found. All materials can be cast into arbitrary shapes and are suitable for tissue-mimicking phantoms. Due to its lower speed of sound, silicone is generally less suitable than the other presented materials.

  17. Imaging Defects in Thin DLC Coatings Using High Frequency Scanning Acoustic Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Dong; Rebinsky, Douglas A.; Zinin, Pavel; Koehler, Bernd

    2004-02-01

    In this work high frequency scanning acoustic microscopy was employed to nondestructively characterize subsurface defects in chromium containing DLC (Cr-DLC) coatings. Subsurface defects as small as one micron were successfully detected in a flat Cr-DLC coated steel coupon. Depth of the imaged subsurface defects was estimated using a simple geometrical acoustics model. The nature of the subsurface defects was investigated by using FIB/SEM technique. Curved Cr-DLC coated components including a roller and gear tooth were also imaged, and the encountered challenges were addressed.

  18. Apparatus for real-time acoustic imaging of Rayleigh-Benard convection.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Kerry; Polfer, Jonathan; Furno, Joanna; Finke, Nathan

    2007-11-01

    We have designed and built an apparatus for real-time acoustic imaging of convective flow patterns in optically opaque fluids. This apparatus takes advantage of recent advances in two-dimensional ultrasound transducer array technology; it employs a modified version of a commercially available ultrasound camera, similar to those employed in nondestructive testing of solids. Images of convection patterns are generated by observing the lateral variation of the temperature dependent speed of sound via refraction of acoustic plane waves passing vertically through the fluid layer. The apparatus has been validated by observing convection rolls in both silicone oil and ferrofluid. PMID:18052477

  19. Unified imaging theory for x-ray and acoustic computerized tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Pingyu; Wang, Ge; Boyer, Arthur

    2004-10-01

    X-ray computerized tomography (CT) and acoustic CT are two main medical imaging modalities based on two intrinsically different physical phenomena. X-ray CT is based on x-ray"s attenuation when x-ray passes through medium. It has been well known that the Radon transform is the imaging theory for x-ray CT. Photoacoustic CT is a type of acoustic CT, which is based on differentiating electromagnetic energy absorption among media. In 1998 a new 3D reconstruction concept, the P-transform, was proposed to serve the imaging theory for photoacoustic CT. In this paper it was rigorously proved that both x-ray CT and photoacoustic CT are governed by a unified imaging theory. 3D data acquisition can be completed in 2p stereoangle. This new imaging theory realized, in part, the dream of all physicists, including Albert Einstein, who have long believed that our world is ultimately governed by few simple rules.

  20. Biologically relevant photoacoustic imaging phantoms with tunable optical and acoustic properties.

    PubMed

    Vogt, William C; Jia, Congxian; Wear, Keith A; Garra, Brian S; Joshua Pfefer, T

    2016-10-01

    Established medical imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography rely on well-validated tissue-simulating phantoms for standardized testing of device image quality. The availability of high-quality phantoms for optical-acoustic diagnostics such as photoacoustic tomography (PAT) will facilitate standardization and clinical translation of these emerging approaches. Materials used in prior PAT phantoms do not provide a suitable combination of long-term stability and realistic acoustic and optical properties. Therefore, we have investigated the use of custom polyvinyl chloride plastisol (PVCP) formulations for imaging phantoms and identified a dual-plasticizer approach that provides biologically relevant ranges of relevant properties. Speed of sound and acoustic attenuation were determined over a frequency range of 4 to 9 MHz and optical absorption and scattering over a wavelength range of 400 to 1100 nm. We present characterization of several PVCP formulations, including one designed to mimic breast tissue. This material is used to construct a phantom comprised of an array of cylindrical, hemoglobin-filled inclusions for evaluation of penetration depth. Measurements with a custom near-infrared PAT imager provide quantitative and qualitative comparisons of phantom and tissue images. Results indicate that our PVCP material is uniquely suitable for PAT system image quality evaluation and may provide a practical tool for device validation and intercomparison.

  1. Biologically relevant photoacoustic imaging phantoms with tunable optical and acoustic properties.

    PubMed

    Vogt, William C; Jia, Congxian; Wear, Keith A; Garra, Brian S; Joshua Pfefer, T

    2016-10-01

    Established medical imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography rely on well-validated tissue-simulating phantoms for standardized testing of device image quality. The availability of high-quality phantoms for optical-acoustic diagnostics such as photoacoustic tomography (PAT) will facilitate standardization and clinical translation of these emerging approaches. Materials used in prior PAT phantoms do not provide a suitable combination of long-term stability and realistic acoustic and optical properties. Therefore, we have investigated the use of custom polyvinyl chloride plastisol (PVCP) formulations for imaging phantoms and identified a dual-plasticizer approach that provides biologically relevant ranges of relevant properties. Speed of sound and acoustic attenuation were determined over a frequency range of 4 to 9 MHz and optical absorption and scattering over a wavelength range of 400 to 1100 nm. We present characterization of several PVCP formulations, including one designed to mimic breast tissue. This material is used to construct a phantom comprised of an array of cylindrical, hemoglobin-filled inclusions for evaluation of penetration depth. Measurements with a custom near-infrared PAT imager provide quantitative and qualitative comparisons of phantom and tissue images. Results indicate that our PVCP material is uniquely suitable for PAT system image quality evaluation and may provide a practical tool for device validation and intercomparison. PMID:26886681

  2. An echolocation model for the restoration of an acoustic image from a single-emission echo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Ikuo; Yano, Masafumi

    2004-12-01

    Bats can form a fine acoustic image of an object using frequency-modulated echolocation sound. The acoustic image is an impulse response, known as a reflected-intensity distribution, which is composed of amplitude and phase spectra over a range of frequencies. However, bats detect only the amplitude spectrum due to the low-time resolution of their peripheral auditory system, and the frequency range of emission is restricted. It is therefore necessary to restore the acoustic image from limited information. The amplitude spectrum varies with the changes in the configuration of the reflected-intensity distribution, while the phase spectrum varies with the changes in its configuration and location. Here, by introducing some reasonable constraints, a method is proposed for restoring an acoustic image from the echo. The configuration is extrapolated from the amplitude spectrum of the restricted frequency range by using the continuity condition of the amplitude spectrum at the minimum frequency of the emission and the minimum phase condition. The determination of the location requires extracting the amplitude spectra, which vary with its location. For this purpose, the Gaussian chirplets with a carrier frequency compatible with bat emission sweep rates were used. The location is estimated from the temporal changes of the amplitude spectra. .

  3. Selective magnetic resonance imaging of magnetic nanoparticles by Acoustically Induced Rotary Saturation (AIRS)

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bo; Witzel, Thomas; Jiang, Shan; Huang, Susie Y.; Rosen, Bruce R.; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We introduce a new method to selectively detect iron oxide contrast agents using an acoustic wave to perturb the spin-locked water signal in the vicinity of the magnetic particles. The acoustic drive can be externally modulated to turn the effect on and off, allowing sensitive and quantitative statistical comparison and removal of confounding image background variations. Methods We demonstrate the effect in spin-locking experiments using piezoelectric actuators to generate vibrational displacements of iron oxide samples. We observe a resonant behavior of the signal changes with respect to the acoustic frequency where iron oxide is present. We characterize the effect as a function of actuator displacement and contrast agent concentration. Results The resonant effect allows us to generate block-design “modulation response maps” indicating the contrast agent’s location, as well as positive contrast images with suppressed background signal. We show the AIRS effect stays approximately constant across acoustic frequency, and behaves monotonically over actuator displacement and contrast agent concentration. Conclusion AIRS is a promising method capable of using acoustic vibrations to modulate the contrast from iron oxide nanoparticles and thus perform selective detection of the contrast agents, potentially enabling more accurate visualization of contrast agents in clinical and research settings. PMID:25537578

  4. Method and system to synchronize acoustic therapy with ultrasound imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Neil (Inventor); Bailey, Michael R. (Inventor); Hossack, James (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Interference in ultrasound imaging when used in connection with high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is avoided by employing a synchronization signal to control the HIFU signal. Unless the timing of the HIFU transducer is controlled, its output will substantially overwhelm the signal produced by ultrasound imaging system and obscure the image it produces. The synchronization signal employed to control the HIFU transducer is obtained without requiring modification of the ultrasound imaging system. Signals corresponding to scattered ultrasound imaging waves are collected using either the HIFU transducer or a dedicated receiver. A synchronization processor manipulates the scattered ultrasound imaging signals to achieve the synchronization signal, which is then used to control the HIFU bursts so as to substantially reduce or eliminate HIFU interference in the ultrasound image. The synchronization processor can alternatively be implemented using a computing device or an application-specific circuit.

  5. A synchronized particle image velocimetry and infrared thermography technique applied to an acoustic streaming flow

    PubMed Central

    Sou, In Mei; Layman, Christopher N.; Ray, Chittaranjan

    2013-01-01

    Subsurface coherent structures and surface temperatures are investigated using simultaneous measurements of particle image velocimetry (PIV) and infrared (IR) thermography. Results for coherent structures from acoustic streaming and associated heating transfer in a rectangular tank with an acoustic horn mounted horizontally at the sidewall are presented. An observed vortex pair develops and propagates in the direction along the centerline of the horn. From the PIV velocity field data, distinct kinematic regions are found with the Lagrangian coherent structure (LCS) method. The implications of this analysis with respect to heat transfer and related sonochemical applications are discussed. PMID:24347810

  6. A synchronized particle image velocimetry and infrared thermography technique applied to an acoustic streaming flow.

    PubMed

    Sou, In Mei; Allen, John S; Layman, Christopher N; Ray, Chittaranjan

    2011-11-01

    Subsurface coherent structures and surface temperatures are investigated using simultaneous measurements of particle image velocimetry (PIV) and infrared (IR) thermography. Results for coherent structures from acoustic streaming and associated heating transfer in a rectangular tank with an acoustic horn mounted horizontally at the sidewall are presented. An observed vortex pair develops and propagates in the direction along the centerline of the horn. From the PIV velocity field data, distinct kinematic regions are found with the Lagrangian coherent structure (LCS) method. The implications of this analysis with respect to heat transfer and related sonochemical applications are discussed. PMID:24347810

  7. An acoustic charge transport imager for high definition television applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, William D.; Brennan, Kevin F.; Summers, Christopher J.

    1993-01-01

    This report covers: (1) invention of a new, ultra-low noise, low operating voltage APD which is expected to offer far better performance than the existing volume doped APD device; (2) performance of a comprehensive series of experiments on the acoustic and piezoelectric properties of ZnO films sputtered on GaAs which can possibly lead to a decrease in the required rf drive power for ACT devices by 15dB; (3) development of an advanced, hydrodynamic, macroscopic simulator used for evaluating the performance of ACT and CTD devices and aiding in the development of the next generation of devices; (4) experimental development of CTD devices which utilize a p-doped top barrier demonstrating charge storage capacity and low leakage currents; (5) refinements in materials growth techniques and in situ controls to lower surface defect densities to record levels as well as increase material uniformity and quality.

  8. An acoustic charge transport imager for high definition television applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, William D.; Brennan, Kevin F.; Summers, Christopher J.

    1993-09-01

    This report covers: (1) invention of a new, ultra-low noise, low operating voltage APD which is expected to offer far better performance than the existing volume doped APD device; (2) performance of a comprehensive series of experiments on the acoustic and piezoelectric properties of ZnO films sputtered on GaAs which can possibly lead to a decrease in the required rf drive power for ACT devices by 15dB; (3) development of an advanced, hydrodynamic, macroscopic simulator used for evaluating the performance of ACT and CTD devices and aiding in the development of the next generation of devices; (4) experimental development of CTD devices which utilize a p-doped top barrier demonstrating charge storage capacity and low leakage currents; (5) refinements in materials growth techniques and in situ controls to lower surface defect densities to record levels as well as increase material uniformity and quality.

  9. Modern Techniques in Acoustical Signal and Image Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J V

    2002-04-04

    Acoustical signal processing problems can lead to some complex and intricate techniques to extract the desired information from noisy, sometimes inadequate, measurements. The challenge is to formulate a meaningful strategy that is aimed at performing the processing required even in the face of uncertainties. This strategy can be as simple as a transformation of the measured data to another domain for analysis or as complex as embedding a full-scale propagation model into the processor. The aims of both approaches are the same--to extract the desired information and reject the extraneous, that is, develop a signal processing scheme to achieve this goal. In this paper, we briefly discuss this underlying philosophy from a ''bottom-up'' approach enabling the problem to dictate the solution rather than visa-versa.

  10. Investigation of an acoustical holography system for real-time imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fecht, Barbara A.; Andre, Michael P.; Garlick, George F.; Shelby, Ronald L.; Shelby, Jerod O.; Lehman, Constance D.

    1998-07-01

    A new prototype imaging system based on ultrasound transmission through the object of interest -- acoustical holography -- was developed which incorporates significant improvements in acoustical and optical design. This system is being evaluated for potential clinical application in the musculoskeletal system, interventional radiology, pediatrics, monitoring of tumor ablation, vascular imaging and breast imaging. System limiting resolution was estimated using a line-pair target with decreasing line thickness and equal separation. For a swept frequency beam from 2.6 - 3.0 MHz, the minimum resolution was 0.5 lp/mm. Apatite crystals were suspended in castor oil to approximate breast microcalcifications. Crystals from 0.425 - 1.18 mm in diameter were well resolved in the acoustic zoom mode. Needle visibility was examined with both a 14-gauge biopsy needle and a 0.6 mm needle. The needle tip was clearly visible throughout the dynamic imaging sequence as it was slowly inserted into a RMI tissue-equivalent breast biopsy phantom. A selection of human images was acquired in several volunteers: a 25 year-old female volunteer with normal breast tissue, a lateral view of the elbow joint showing muscle fascia and tendon insertions, and the superficial vessels in the forearm. Real-time video images of these studies will be presented. In all of these studies, conventional sonography was used for comparison. These preliminary investigations with the new prototype acoustical holography system showed favorable results in comparison to state-of-the-art pulse-echo ultrasound and demonstrate it to be suitable for further clinical study. The new patient interfaces will facilitate orthopedic soft tissue evaluation, study of superficial vascular structures and potentially breast imaging.

  11. Acoustic streaming in lithotripsy fields: preliminary observation using a particle image velocimetry method.

    PubMed

    Choi, Min Joo; Doh, Doeg Hee; Hwang, Tae Gyu; Cho, Chu Hyun; Paeng, Dong Guk; Rim, Gun Hee; Coleman, A J

    2006-02-01

    This study considers the acoustic streaming in water produced by a lithotripsy pulse. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) method was employed to visualize the acoustic streaming produced by an electromagnetic shock wave generator using video images of the light scattering particles suspended in water. Visualized streaming features including several local peaks and vortexes around or at the beam focus were easily seen with naked eyes over all settings of the lithotripter from 10 to 18 kV. Magnitudes of the peak streaming velocity measured vary in the range of 10-40 mm s(-1) with charging voltage settings. Since the streaming velocity was estimated on the basis of a series of the video images of particles averaged over 1/60s, the time resolution limited by the video frame rate which is 1-2 orders of magnitude larger than driving acoustic activities, measured velocities are expected to be underestimated and were shown a similar order of magnitude lower than those calculated from a simple theoretical consideration. Despite such an underestimation, it was shown that, as predicted by theory, the magnitude of the streaming velocity measured by the present PIV method was proportional to acoustic intensity. In particular it has almost a linear correlation with peak negative pressures (r=0.98683, p=0.0018). PMID:16376400

  12. 77 FR 321 - Section 4(f) Policy Paper

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-04

    ... Federal Highway Administration Section 4(f) Policy Paper AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA... draft Section 4(f) Policy Paper that will provide guidance on the procedures the FHWA will follow when... practicable. Background A copy of the proposed Section 4(f) Policy Paper is available for download and...

  13. 23 CFR 774.3 - Section 4(f) approvals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) property; (iv) The views of the official(s) with jurisdiction over each Section 4(f) property; (v) The... mitigation, the magnitude of any adverse impacts to resources not protected by Section 4(f); and (vii... Section 4(f) evaluations are developed by the Administration based on experience with a specific set...

  14. Numerical Simulation of Target Range Estimation Using Ambient Noise Imaging with Acoustic Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Kazuyoshi; Ogasawara, Hanako; Nakamura, Toshiaki; Tsuchiya, Takenobu; Endoh, Nobuyuki

    2010-07-01

    In ambient noise imaging (ANI), each pixel of a target image is mapped by either monochrome or pseudo color to represent its acoustic intensity in each direction. This intensity is obtained by measuring the target object's reflecting or scattering wave, with ocean background noise serving as the sound source. In the case of using an acoustic lens, the ANI system creates a C-mode-like image, where receivers are arranged on a focal plane and each pixel's color corresponds to the intensity of each receiver output. There is no consideration for estimating a target range by this method, because it is impossible to measure the traveling time between a transducer and a target by a method like an active imaging sonar. In this study, we tried to estimate a target range using the ANI system with an acoustic lens. Here, we conducted a numerical simulation of sound propagation based on the principle of the time reversal mirror. First, instead of actual ocean measurements in the forward propagation, we calculated the scattering wave from a rigid target object in an acoustic noise field generated by a large number of point sources using the two-dimensional (2D) finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. The time series of the scattering wave converged by the lens was then recorded on each receiver. The sound pressure distribution assuming that the time-reversed wave of the scattering wave was reradiated from each receiver position was also calculated using the 2D FDTD method in the backward propagation. It was possible to estimate a target range using the ANI system with an acoustic lens, because the maximum position of the reradiated sound pressure field was close to the target position.

  15. Numerical Simulation of Target Range Estimation Using Ambient Noise Imaging with Acoustic Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazuyoshi Mori,; Hanako Ogasawara,; Toshiaki Nakamura,; Takenobu Tsuchiya,; Nobuyuki Endoh,

    2010-07-01

    In ambient noise imaging (ANI), each pixel of a target image is mapped by either monochrome or pseudo color to represent its acoustic intensity in each direction. This intensity is obtained by measuring the target object’s reflecting or scattering wave, with ocean background noise serving as the sound source. In the case of using an acoustic lens, the ANI system creates a C-mode-like image, where receivers are arranged on a focal plane and each pixel’s color corresponds to the intensity of each receiver output. There is no consideration for estimating a target range by this method, because it is impossible to measure the traveling time between a transducer and a target by a method like an active imaging sonar. In this study, we tried to estimate a target range using the ANI system with an acoustic lens. Here, we conducted a numerical simulation of sound propagation based on the principle of the time reversal mirror. First, instead of actual ocean measurements in the forward propagation, we calculated the scattering wave from a rigid target object in an acoustic noise field generated by a large number of point sources using the two-dimensional (2D) finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. The time series of the scattering wave converged by the lens was then recorded on each receiver. The sound pressure distribution assuming that the time-reversed wave of the scattering wave was reradiated from each receiver position was also calculated using the 2D FDTD method in the backward propagation. It was possible to estimate a target range using the ANI system with an acoustic lens, because the maximum position of the reradiated sound pressure field was close to the target position.

  16. Phase Time and Envelope Time in Time-Distance Analysis and Acoustic Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Dean-Yi; Duvall, Thomas L.; Sun, Ming-Tsung; Chang, Hsiang-Kuang; Jimenez, Antonio; Rabello-Soares, Maria Cristina; Ai, Guoxiang; Wang, Gwo-Ping; Goode Philip; Marquette, William; Ehgamberdiev, Shuhrat; Landenkov, Oleg

    1999-01-01

    Time-distance analysis and acoustic imaging are two related techniques to probe the local properties of solar interior. In this study, we discuss the relation of phase time and envelope time between the two techniques. The location of the envelope peak of the cross correlation function in time-distance analysis is identified as the travel time of the wave packet formed by modes with the same w/l. The phase time of the cross correlation function provides information of the phase change accumulated along the wave path, including the phase change at the boundaries of the mode cavity. The acoustic signals constructed with the technique of acoustic imaging contain both phase and intensity information. The phase of constructed signals can be studied by computing the cross correlation function between time series constructed with ingoing and outgoing waves. In this study, we use the data taken with the Taiwan Oscillation Network (TON) instrument and the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) instrument. The analysis is carried out for the quiet Sun. We use the relation of envelope time versus distance measured in time-distance analyses to construct the acoustic signals in acoustic imaging analyses. The phase time of the cross correlation function of constructed ingoing and outgoing time series is twice the difference between the phase time and envelope time in time-distance analyses as predicted. The envelope peak of the cross correlation function between constructed ingoing and outgoing time series is located at zero time as predicted for results of one-bounce at 3 mHz for all four data sets and two-bounce at 3 mHz for two TON data sets. But it is different from zero for other cases. The cause of the deviation of the envelope peak from zero is not known.

  17. Schlieren imaging of the standing wave field in an ultrasonic acoustic levitator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendon, Pablo Luis; Boullosa, Ricardo R.; Echeverria, Carlos; Porta, David

    2015-11-01

    We consider a model of a single axis acoustic levitator consisting of two cylinders immersed in air and directed along the same axis. The first cylinder has a flat termination and functions as a sound emitter, and the second cylinder, which is simply a refector, has the side facing the first cylinder cut out by a spherical surface. By making the first cylinder vibrate at ultrasonic frequencies a standing wave is produced in the air between the cylinders which makes it possible, by means of the acoustic radiation pressure, to levitate one or several small objects of different shapes, such as spheres or disks. We use schlieren imaging to observe the acoustic field resulting from the levitation of one or several objects, and compare these results to previous numerical approximations of the field obtained using a finite element method. The authors acknowledge financial support from DGAPA-UNAM through project PAPIIT IN109214.

  18. Imaging of transient surface acoustic waves by full-field photorefractive interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Jichuan; Xu, Xiaodong E-mail: christ.glorieux@fys.kuleuven.be; Glorieux, Christ E-mail: christ.glorieux@fys.kuleuven.be; Matsuda, Osamu; Cheng, Liping

    2015-05-15

    A stroboscopic full-field imaging technique based on photorefractive interferometry for the visualization of rapidly changing surface displacement fields by using of a standard charge-coupled device (CCD) camera is presented. The photorefractive buildup of the space charge field during and after probe laser pulses is simulated numerically. The resulting anisotropic diffraction upon the refractive index grating and the interference between the polarization-rotated diffracted reference beam and the transmitted signal beam are modeled theoretically. The method is experimentally demonstrated by full-field imaging of the propagation of photoacoustically generated surface acoustic waves with a temporal resolution of nanoseconds. The surface acoustic wave propagation in a 23 mm × 17 mm area on an aluminum plate was visualized with 520 × 696 pixels of the CCD sensor, yielding a spatial resolution of 33 μm. The short pulse duration (8 ns) of the probe laser yields the capability of imaging SAWs with frequencies up to 60 MHz.

  19. Multi-acoustic lens design methodology for a low cost C-scan photoacoustic imaging camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinni, Bhargava; Han, Zichao; Brown, Nicholas; Vallejo, Pedro; Jacobs, Tess; Knox, Wayne; Dogra, Vikram; Rao, Navalgund

    2016-03-01

    We have designed and implemented a novel acoustic lens based focusing technology into a prototype photoacoustic imaging camera. All photoacoustically generated waves from laser exposed absorbers within a small volume get focused simultaneously by the lens onto an image plane. We use a multi-element ultrasound transducer array to capture the focused photoacoustic signals. Acoustic lens eliminates the need for expensive data acquisition hardware systems, is faster compared to electronic focusing and enables real-time image reconstruction. Using this photoacoustic imaging camera, we have imaged more than 150 several centimeter size ex-vivo human prostate, kidney and thyroid specimens with a millimeter resolution for cancer detection. In this paper, we share our lens design strategy and how we evaluate the resulting quality metrics (on and off axis point spread function, depth of field and modulation transfer function) through simulation. An advanced toolbox in MATLAB was adapted and used for simulating a two-dimensional gridded model that incorporates realistic photoacoustic signal generation and acoustic wave propagation through the lens with medium properties defined on each grid point. Two dimensional point spread functions have been generated and compared with experiments to demonstrate the utility of our design strategy. Finally we present results from work in progress on the use of two lens system aimed at further improving some of the quality metrics of our system.

  20. Acoustic imaging with time reversal methods: From medicine to NDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Mathias

    2015-03-01

    This talk will present an overview of the research conducted on ultrasonic time-reversal methods applied to biomedical imaging and to non-destructive testing. We will first describe iterative time-reversal techniques that allow both focusing ultrasonic waves on reflectors in tissues (kidney stones, micro-calcifications, contrast agents) or on flaws in solid materials. We will also show that time-reversal focusing does not need the presence of bright reflectors but it can be achieved only from the speckle noise generated by random distributions of non-resolved scatterers. We will describe the applications of this concept to correct distortions and aberrations in ultrasonic imaging and in NDT. In the second part of the talk we will describe the concept of time-reversal processors to get ultrafast ultrasonic images with typical frame rates of order of 10.000 F/s. It is the field of ultrafast ultrasonic imaging that has plenty medical applications and can be of great interest in NDT. We will describe some applications in the biomedical domain: Quantitative Elasticity imaging of tissues by following shear wave propagation to improve cancer detection and Ultrafast Doppler imaging that allows ultrasonic functional imaging.

  1. Structural changes and imaging signatures of acoustically sensitive microcapsules under ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Sridhar-Keralapura, Mallika; Thirumalai, Shruthi; Mobed-Miremadi, Maryam

    2013-07-01

    The ultrasound drug delivery field is actively designing new agents that would obviate the problems of just using microbubbles for drug delivery. Microbubbles have very short circulation time (minutes), low payload and large size (2-10μm), all of these aspects are not ideal for systemic drug delivery. However, microbubble carriers provide excellent image contrast and their use for image guidance can be exploited. In this paper, we suggest an alternative approach by developing acoustically sensitive microcapsule reservoirs that have future applications for treating large ischemic tumors through intratumoral therapy. We call these agents Acoustically Sensitized Microcapsules (ASMs) and these are not planned for the circulation. ASMs are very simple in their formulation, robust and reproducible. They have been designed to offer high payload (because of their large size), be acoustically sensitive and reactive (because of the Ultrasound Contrast Agents (UCAs) encapsulated) and mechanically robust for future injections/implantations within tumors. We describe three different aspects - (1) effect of therapeutic ultrasound; (2) mechanical properties and (3) imaging signatures of these agents. Under therapeutic ultrasound, the formation of a cavitational bubble was seen prior to rupture. The time to rupture was size dependent. Size dependency was also seen when measuring mechanical properties of these ASMs. % Alginate and permeability also affected the Young's modulus estimates. For study of imaging signatures of these agents, we show six schemes. For example, with harmonic imaging, tissue phantoms and controls did not generate higher harmonic components. Only ASM phantoms created a harmonic signal, whose sensitivity increased with applied acoustic pressure. Future work includes developing schemes combining both sonication and imaging to help detect ASMs before, during and after release of drug substance.

  2. Measurement of acoustic velocity in the stack of a thermoacoustic refrigerator using particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berson, Arganthaël; Michard, Marc; Blanc-Benon, Philippe

    2008-06-01

    Thermoacoustic refrigeration systems generate cooling power from a high-amplitude acoustic standing wave. There has recently been a growing interest in this technology because of its simple and robust architecture and its use of environmentally safe gases. With the prospect of commercialization, it is necessary to enhance the efficiency of thermoacoustic cooling systems and more particularly of some of their components such as the heat exchangers. The characterization of the flow field at the end of the stack plates is a crucial step for the understanding and optimization of heat transfer between the stack and the heat exchangers. In this study, a specific particle image velocimetry measurement is performed inside a thermoacoustic refrigerator. Acoustic velocity is measured using synchronization and phase-averaging. The measurement method is validated inside a void resonator by successfully comparing experimental data with an acoustic plane wave model. Velocity is measured inside the oscillating boundary layers, between the plates of the stack, and compared to a linear model. The flow behind the stack is characterized, and it shows the generation of symmetric pairs of counter-rotating vortices at the end of the stack plates at low acoustic pressure level. As the acoustic pressure level increases, detachment of the vortices and symmetry breaking are observed.

  3. Synchronized imaging and acoustic analysis of the upper airway in patients with sleep-disordered breathing.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi-Chung; Huon, Leh-Kiong; Pham, Van-Truong; Chen, Yunn-Jy; Jiang, Sun-Fen; Shih, Tiffany Ting-Fang; Tran, Thi-Thao; Wang, Yung-Hung; Lin, Chen; Tsao, Jenho; Lo, Men-Tzung; Wang, Pa-Chun

    2014-12-01

    Progressive narrowing of the upper airway increases airflow resistance and can produce snoring sounds and apnea/hypopnea events associated with sleep-disordered breathing due to airway collapse. Recent studies have shown that acoustic properties during snoring can be altered with anatomic changes at the site of obstruction. To evaluate the instantaneous association between acoustic features of snoring and the anatomic sites of obstruction, a novel method was developed and applied in nine patients to extract the snoring sounds during sleep while performing dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The degree of airway narrowing during the snoring events was then quantified by the collapse index (ratio of airway diameter preceding and during the events) and correlated with the synchronized acoustic features. A total of 201 snoring events (102 pure retropalatal and 99 combined retropalatal and retroglossal events) were recorded, and the collapse index as well as the soft tissue vibration time were significantly different between pure retropalatal (collapse index, 2 ± 11%; vibration time, 0.2 ± 0.3 s) and combined (retropalatal and retroglossal) snores (collapse index, 13 ± 7% [P ≤ 0.0001]; vibration time, 1.2 ± 0.7 s [P ≤ 0.0001]). The synchronized dynamic MRI and acoustic recordings successfully characterized the sites of obstruction and established the dynamic relationship between the anatomic site of obstruction and snoring acoustics.

  4. Application of mathematical modelling methods for acoustic images reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolotina, I.; Kazazaeva, A.; Kvasnikov, K.; Kazazaev, A.

    2016-04-01

    The article considers the reconstruction of images by Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique (SAFT). The work compares additive and multiplicative methods for processing signals received from antenna array. We have proven that the multiplicative method gives a better resolution. The study includes the estimation of beam trajectories for antenna arrays using analytical and numerical methods. We have shown that the analytical estimation method allows decreasing the image reconstruction time in case of linear antenna array implementation.

  5. Methods And Systems For Using Reference Images In Acoustic Image Processing

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Thomas L.; Barter, Robert Henry

    2005-01-04

    A method and system of examining tissue are provided in which a field, including at least a portion of the tissue and one or more registration fiducials, is insonified. Scattered acoustic information, including both transmitted and reflected waves, is received from the field. A representation of the field, including both the tissue and the registration fiducials, is then derived from the received acoustic radiation.

  6. Three dimensional full-wave nonlinear acoustic simulations: Applications to ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinton, Gianmarco

    2015-10-01

    Characterization of acoustic waves that propagate nonlinearly in an inhomogeneous medium has significant applications to diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasound. The generation of an ultrasound image of human tissue is based on the complex physics of acoustic wave propagation: diffraction, reflection, scattering, frequency dependent attenuation, and nonlinearity. The nonlinearity of wave propagation is used to the advantage of diagnostic scanners that use the harmonic components of the ultrasonic signal to improve the resolution and penetration of clinical scanners. One approach to simulating ultrasound images is to make approximations that can reduce the physics to systems that have a low computational cost. Here a maximalist approach is taken and the full three dimensional wave physics is simulated with finite differences. This paper demonstrates how finite difference simulations for the nonlinear acoustic wave equation can be used to generate physically realistic two and three dimensional ultrasound images anywhere in the body. A specific intercostal liver imaging scenario for two cases: with the ribs in place, and with the ribs removed. This configuration provides an imaging scenario that cannot be performed in vivo but that can test the influence of the ribs on image quality. Several imaging properties are studied, in particular the beamplots, the spatial coherence at the transducer surface, the distributed phase aberration, and the lesion detectability for imaging at the fundamental and harmonic frequencies. The results indicate, counterintuitively, that at the fundamental frequency the beamplot improves due to the apodization effect of the ribs but at the same time there is more degradation from reverberation clutter. At the harmonic frequency there is significantly less improvement in the beamplot and also significantly less degradation from reverberation. It is shown that even though simulating the full propagation physics is computationally challenging it

  7. Three dimensional full-wave nonlinear acoustic simulations: Applications to ultrasound imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Pinton, Gianmarco

    2015-10-28

    Characterization of acoustic waves that propagate nonlinearly in an inhomogeneous medium has significant applications to diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasound. The generation of an ultrasound image of human tissue is based on the complex physics of acoustic wave propagation: diffraction, reflection, scattering, frequency dependent attenuation, and nonlinearity. The nonlinearity of wave propagation is used to the advantage of diagnostic scanners that use the harmonic components of the ultrasonic signal to improve the resolution and penetration of clinical scanners. One approach to simulating ultrasound images is to make approximations that can reduce the physics to systems that have a low computational cost. Here a maximalist approach is taken and the full three dimensional wave physics is simulated with finite differences. This paper demonstrates how finite difference simulations for the nonlinear acoustic wave equation can be used to generate physically realistic two and three dimensional ultrasound images anywhere in the body. A specific intercostal liver imaging scenario for two cases: with the ribs in place, and with the ribs removed. This configuration provides an imaging scenario that cannot be performed in vivo but that can test the influence of the ribs on image quality. Several imaging properties are studied, in particular the beamplots, the spatial coherence at the transducer surface, the distributed phase aberration, and the lesion detectability for imaging at the fundamental and harmonic frequencies. The results indicate, counterintuitively, that at the fundamental frequency the beamplot improves due to the apodization effect of the ribs but at the same time there is more degradation from reverberation clutter. At the harmonic frequency there is significantly less improvement in the beamplot and also significantly less degradation from reverberation. It is shown that even though simulating the full propagation physics is computationally challenging it

  8. Focused acoustic beam imaging of grain structure and local Young's modulus with Rayleigh and surface skimming longitudinal waves

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R. W.; Sathish, S.; Blodgett, M. P.

    2013-01-25

    The interaction of a focused acoustic beam with materials generates Rayleigh surface waves (RSW) and surface skimming longitudinal waves (SSLW). Acoustic microscopic investigations have used the RSW amplitude and the velocity measurements, extensively for grain structure analysis. Although, the presence of SSLW has been recognized, it is rarely used in acoustic imaging. This paper presents an approach to perform microstructure imaging and local elastic modulus measurements by combining both RSW and SSLW. The acoustic imaging of grain structure was performed by measuring the amplitude of RSW and SSLW signal. The microstructure images obtained on the same region of the samples with RSW and SSLW are compared and the difference in the contrast observed is discussed based on the propagation characteristics of the individual surface waves. The velocity measurements are determined by two point defocus method. The surface wave velocities of RSW and SSLW of the same regions of the sample are combined and presented as average Young's modulus image.

  9. Synthetic aperture acoustic imaging of canonical targets with a 2-15 kHz linear FM chirp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignola, Joseph F.; Judge, John A.; Good, Chelsea E.; Bishop, Steven S.; Gugino, Peter M.; Soumekh, Mehrdad

    2011-06-01

    Synthetic aperture image reconstruction applied to outdoor acoustic recordings is presented. Acoustic imaging is an alternate method having several military relevant advantages such as being immune to RF jamming, superior spatial resolution, capable of standoff side and forward-looking scanning, and relatively low cost, weight and size when compared to 0.5 - 3 GHz ground penetrating radar technologies. Synthetic aperture acoustic imaging is similar to synthetic aperture radar, but more akin to synthetic aperture sonar technologies owing to the nature of longitudinal or compressive wave propagation in the surrounding acoustic medium. The system's transceiver is a quasi mono-static microphone and audio speaker pair mounted on a rail 5meters in length. Received data sampling rate is 80 kHz with a 2- 15 kHz Linear Frequency Modulated (LFM) chirp, with a pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 10 Hz and an inter-pulse period (IPP) of 50 milliseconds. Targets are positioned within the acoustic scene at slant range of two to ten meters on grass, dirt or gravel surfaces, and with and without intervening metallic chain link fencing. Acoustic image reconstruction results in means for literal interpretation and quantifiable analyses. A rudimentary technique characterizes acoustic scatter at the ground surfaces. Targets within the acoustic scene are first digitally spotlighted and further processed, providing frequency and aspect angle dependent signature information.

  10. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr., Ph.D.; Younane Abousleiman, Ph.D.; Musharraf Zaman, Ph.D., P.E.

    2001-01-31

    During this phase of the project the research team concentrated on acquisition of acoustic emission data from the high porosity rock samples. The initial experiments indicated that the acoustic emission activity from high porosity Danian chalk were of a very low amplitude. Even though the sample underwent yielding and significant plastic deformation the sample did not generate significant AE activity. This was somewhat surprising. These initial results call into question the validity of attempting to locate AE activity in this weak rock type. As a result the testing program was slightly altered to include measuring the acoustic emission activity from many of the rock types listed in the research program. The preliminary experimental results indicate that AE activity in the sandstones is much higher than in the carbonate rocks (i.e., the chalks and limestones). This observation may be particularly important for planning microseismic imaging of reservoir rocks in the field environment. The preliminary results suggest that microseismic imaging of reservoir rock from acoustic emission activity generated from matrix deformation (during compaction and subsidence) would be extremely difficult to accomplish.

  11. Acoustic reciprocity of spatial coherence in ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Bottenus, Nick; Üstüner, Kutay F

    2015-05-01

    A conventional ultrasound image is formed by transmitting a focused wave into tissue, time-shifting the backscattered echoes received on an array transducer, and summing the resulting signals. The van Cittert-Zernike theorem predicts a particular similarity, or coherence, of these focused signals across the receiving array. Many groups have used an estimate of the coherence to augment or replace the B-mode image in an effort to suppress noise and stationary clutter echo signals, but this measurement requires access to individual receive channel data. Most clinical systems have efficient pipelines for producing focused and summed RF data without any direct way to individually address the receive channels. We describe a method for performing coherence measurements that is more accessible for a wide range of coherence-based imaging. The reciprocity of the transmit and receive apertures in the context of coherence is derived and equivalence of the coherence function is validated experimentally using a research scanner. The proposed method is implemented on a commercial ultrasound system and in vivo short-lag spatial coherence imaging is demonstrated using only summed RF data. The components beyond the acquisition hardware and beamformer necessary to produce a real-time ultrasound coherence imaging system are discussed. PMID:25965679

  12. Three-dimensional ghost imaging using acoustic transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chi; Guo, Shuxu; Guan, Jian; Cao, Junsheng; Gao, Fengli

    2016-06-01

    We propose a novel three-dimensional (3D) ghost imaging method using unfocused ultrasonic transducer, where the transducer is used as the bucket detector to collect the total photoacoustic signal intensity from spherical surfaces with different radius circling the transducer. This collected signal is a time sequence corresponding to the optic absorption information on the spherical surfaces, and the values at the same moments in all the sequences are used as the bucket signals to restore the corresponding spherical images, which are assembled as the object 3D reconstruction. Numerical experiments show this method can effectively accomplish the 3D reconstruction and by adding up each sequence on time domain as a bucket signal it can also realize two dimensional (2D) ghost imaging. The influence of the measurement times on the 3D and 2D reconstruction is analyzed with Peak Signal to Noise Ratio (PSNR) as the yardstick, and the transducer as a bucket detector is also discussed.

  13. An Objective Focussing Measure for Acoustically Obtained Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnecki, Krzysztof; Moszyński, Marek; Rojewski, Mirosław

    In scientific literature many parameters of an image sharpness can be defined, that can be used for the evaluation of display energy concentration (EC). This paper proposes a new, simple approach to EC quantitative evaluation in spectrograms, which are used for the analysis and visualization of sonar signals. The presented approach of the global-image EC measure was developed to the evaluation of EC in arbitrary direction (or at an arbitrary angle) and along an arbitrary path that is contained within the displayed area. The proposed measures were used to establish optimum spectrograph parameters, subject to high EC in images, in particular the type and width of the window. Moreover, the paper defines the marginal EC distributions that can be used in sonar signal detection as a support to the main detector.

  14. Near-Field Imaging with Sound: An Acoustic STM Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Euler, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    The invention of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) 30 years ago opened up a visual window to the nano-world and sparked off a bunch of new methods for investigating and controlling matter and its transformations at the atomic and molecular level. However, an adequate theoretical understanding of the method is demanding; STM images can be…

  15. Observations of Brine Pool Surface Characteristics and Internal Structure Through Remote Acoustic and Structured Light Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, C.; Roman, C.; Michel, A.; Wankel, S. D.

    2015-12-01

    Observations and analysis of the surface characteristics and internal structure of deep-sea brine pools are currently limited to discrete in-situ observations. Complementary acoustic and structured light imaging sensors mounted on a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) have demonstrated the ability systematically detect variations in surface characteristics of a brine pool, reveal internal stratification and detect areas of active hydrocarbon activity. The presented visual and acoustic sensors combined with a stereo camera pair are mounted on the 4000m rated ROV Hercules (Ocean Exploration Trust). These three independent sensors operate simultaneously from a typical 3m altitude resulting in visual and bathymetric maps with sub-centimeter resolution. Applying this imaging technology to 2014 and 2015 brine pool surveys in the Gulf of Mexico revealed acoustic and visual anomalies due to the density changes inherent in the brine. Such distinct changes in acoustic impedance allowed the high frequency 1350KHz multibeam sonar to detect multiple interfaces. For instance, distinct acoustic reflections were observed at 3m and 5.5m below the vehicle. Subsequent verification using a CDT and lead line indicated the acoustic return from the brine surface was the signal at 3m, while a thicker muddy and more saline interface occurred at 5.5m, the bottom of the brine pool was not located but is assumed to be deeper than 15m. The multibeam is also capable of remotely detecting emitted gas bubbles within the brine pool, indicative of active hydrocarbon seeps. Bubbles associated with these seeps were not consistently visible above the brine while using the HD camera on the ROV. Additionally, while imaging the surface of brine pool the structured light sheet laser became diffuse, refracting across the main interface. Analysis of this refraction combined with varying acoustic returns allow for systematic and remote detection of the density, stratification and activity levels within and

  16. Finite Difference Time Domain Analysis of Underwater Acoustic Lens System for Ambient Noise Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Kazuyoshi; Miyazaki, Ayano; Ogasawara, Hanako; Yokoyama, Tomoki; Nakamura, Toshiaki

    2006-05-01

    Much attention has been paid to the new idea of detecting objects using ocean ambient noise. This concept is called ambient noise imaging (ANI). In this study, sound fields focused by an acoustic lens system constructed with a single biconcave lens were analyzed using the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method for realizing an ANI system. The size of the lens aperture that would have sufficient resolution—for example, the beam width is 1° at 60 kHz—was roughly determined by comparing the image points and -3 dB areas of sound pressure fields generated by lenses with various apertures. Then, in another FDTD analysis, we successfully used a lens with a determined aperture to detect rigid target objects in an acoustic noise field generated by a large number of point sources.

  17. Fluorocarbon nanodrops as acoustic temperature probes.

    PubMed

    Mountford, Paul A; Smith, William S; Borden, Mark A

    2015-10-01

    This work investigated the use of superheated fluorocarbon nanodrops for ultrasound thermal imaging and the use of mixed fluorocarbons for tuning thermal and acoustic thresholds for vaporization. Droplets were fabricated by condensing phospholipid-coated microbubbles containing C3F8 and C4F10 mixed at various molar ratios. Vaporization temperatures first were measured in a closed system by optical transmission following either isothermal pressure release or isobaric heating. The vaporization temperature was found to depend linearly on the percentage of C4F10 in the droplet core, indicating excellent tunability under these fluorocarbon-saturated conditions. Vaporization temperatures were then measured in an open system using contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging, where it was found that the mixed droplets behaved like pure C4F10 drops. Additionally, the critical mechanical index for vaporization was measured at the limits of therapeutic hyperthermia (37 and 60 °C), and again the mixed droplets were found to behave like pure C4F10 drops. These results suggested that C3F8 preferentially dissolves out of the droplet core in open systems, as shown by a simple mass transfer model of multicomponent droplet dissolution. Finally, proof-of-concept was shown that pure C4F10 nanodrops can be used as an acoustic temperature probe. Overall, these results not only demonstrate the potential of superheated fluorocarbon emulsions for sonothermetry but also point to the limits of tunability for fluorocarbon mixtures owing to preferential release of the more soluble species to the atmosphere.

  18. Underwater Acoustic Matched Field Imaging Based on Compressed Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Huichen; Xu, Jia; Long, Teng; Zhang, Xudong

    2015-01-01

    Matched field processing (MFP) is an effective method for underwater target imaging and localizing, but its performance is not guaranteed due to the nonuniqueness and instability problems caused by the underdetermined essence of MFP. By exploiting the sparsity of the targets in an imaging area, this paper proposes a compressive sensing MFP (CS-MFP) model from wave propagation theory by using randomly deployed sensors. In addition, the model’s recovery performance is investigated by exploring the lower bounds of the coherence parameter of the CS dictionary. Furthermore, this paper analyzes the robustness of CS-MFP with respect to the displacement of the sensors. Subsequently, a coherence-excluding coherence optimized orthogonal matching pursuit (CCOOMP) algorithm is proposed to overcome the high coherent dictionary problem in special cases. Finally, some numerical experiments are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed CS-MFP method. PMID:26457708

  19. Underwater Acoustic Matched Field Imaging Based on Compressed Sensing.

    PubMed

    Yan, Huichen; Xu, Jia; Long, Teng; Zhang, Xudong

    2015-01-01

    Matched field processing (MFP) is an effective method for underwater target imaging and localizing, but its performance is not guaranteed due to the nonuniqueness and instability problems caused by the underdetermined essence of MFP. By exploiting the sparsity of the targets in an imaging area, this paper proposes a compressive sensing MFP (CS-MFP) model from wave propagation theory by using randomly deployed sensors. In addition, the model's recovery performance is investigated by exploring the lower bounds of the coherence parameter of the CS dictionary. Furthermore, this paper analyzes the robustness of CS-MFP with respect to the displacement of the sensors. Subsequently, a coherence-excluding coherence optimized orthogonal matching pursuit (CCOOMP) algorithm is proposed to overcome the high coherent dictionary problem in special cases. Finally, some numerical experiments are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed CS-MFP method. PMID:26457708

  20. A magnetic resonance imaging study on the articulatory and acoustic speech parameters of Malay vowels

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The phonetic properties of six Malay vowels are investigated using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to visualize the vocal tract in order to obtain dynamic articulatory parameters during speech production. To resolve image blurring due to the tongue movement during the scanning process, a method based on active contour extraction is used to track tongue contours. The proposed method efficiently tracks tongue contours despite the partial blurring of MRI images. Consequently, the articulatory parameters that are effectively measured as tongue movement is observed, and the specific shape of the tongue and its position for all six uttered Malay vowels are determined. Speech rehabilitation procedure demands some kind of visual perceivable prototype of speech articulation. To investigate the validity of the measured articulatory parameters based on acoustic theory of speech production, an acoustic analysis based on the uttered vowels by subjects has been performed. As the acoustic speech and articulatory parameters of uttered speech were examined, a correlation between formant frequencies and articulatory parameters was observed. The experiments reported a positive correlation between the constriction location of the tongue body and the first formant frequency, as well as a negative correlation between the constriction location of the tongue tip and the second formant frequency. The results demonstrate that the proposed method is an effective tool for the dynamic study of speech production. PMID:25060583

  1. Acoustical standards in engineering acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhard, Mahlon D.

    2001-05-01

    The Engineering Acoustics Technical Committee is concerned with the evolution and improvement of acoustical techniques and apparatus, and with the promotion of new applications of acoustics. As cited in the Membership Directory and Handbook (2002), the interest areas include transducers and arrays; underwater acoustic systems; acoustical instrumentation and monitoring; applied sonics, promotion of useful effects, information gathering and transmission; audio engineering; acoustic holography and acoustic imaging; acoustic signal processing (equipment and techniques); and ultrasound and infrasound. Evident connections between engineering and standards are needs for calibration, consistent terminology, uniform presentation of data, reference levels, or design targets for product development. Thus for the acoustical engineer standards are both a tool for practices, for communication, and for comparison of his efforts with those of others. Development of many standards depends on knowledge of the way products are put together for the market place and acoustical engineers provide important input to the development of standards. Acoustical engineers and members of the Engineering Acoustics arm of the Society both benefit from and contribute to the Acoustical Standards of the Acoustical Society.

  2. Frequency-space prediction filtering for acoustic clutter and random noise attenuation in ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Junseob; Huang, Lianjie

    2016-04-01

    Frequency-space prediction filtering (FXPF), also known as FX deconvolution, is a technique originally developed for random noise attenuation in seismic imaging. FXPF attempts to reduce random noise in seismic data by modeling only real signals that appear as linear or quasilinear events in the aperture domain. In medical ultrasound imaging, channel radio frequency (RF) signals from the main lobe appear as horizontal events after receive delays are applied while acoustic clutter signals from off-axis scatterers and electronic noise do not. Therefore, FXPF is suitable for preserving only the main-lobe signals and attenuating the unwanted contributions from clutter and random noise in medical ultrasound imaging. We adapt FXPF to ultrasound imaging, and evaluate its performance using simulated data sets from a point target and an anechoic cyst. Our simulation results show that using only 5 iterations of FXPF achieves contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) improvements of 67 % in a simulated noise-free anechoic cyst and 228 % in a simulated anechoic cyst contaminated with random noise of 15 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Our findings suggest that ultrasound imaging with FXPF attenuates contributions from both acoustic clutter and random noise and therefore, FXPF has great potential to improve ultrasound image contrast for better visualization of important anatomical structures and detection of diseased conditions.

  3. Novel methods for acoustic and elastic wave-based subsurface imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidari, Amir Homayoun

    Novel, accurate and computationally efficient methods for wave-based subsurface imaging in acoustic and elastic media are developed. The methods are based on Arbitrarily Wide-Angle Wave Equations (AWWE), which are highly-accurate space domain one-way wave equations, formulated in terms of displacement components. Main contributions of this research are as follows: (I) Acoustic-AWWE Imaging, a new time-domain migration technique that is highly accurate for imaging steep dips in heterogeneous media. Similar in form to conventional 15° equation, the acoustic AWWE is implemented using an efficient double-marching explicit finite-difference scheme. Its accuracy and efficiency is studied both analytically and through numerical experiments. The method is able to achieve highly accurate images with only a few times the computational cost of the conventional low-order methods. (II) A new class of highly-accurate Absorbing Boundary Conditions (ABCs) for modeling and imaging with high-order one-way wave equations and parabolic equations. These ABCs, are developed using special imaginary-length finite elements. They effectively absorb the incident wave front and generate artifact-free images with as few as three absorbing layers. They are essential tools in imaging in truncated domains and underwater acoustics. (III) Elastic-AWWE imaging: The first high-order space-domain displacement-based elastic imaging method is developed in this research. The method, which is applicable to complex elastic media, is implemented using a unique downward continuation technique. At each depth step, a half-space is attached to the physical layer to simulate one-way propagation. The half-space is effectively approximated using special imaginary-length finite elements. The method is eventually implemented in frequency-space domain using a finite difference method. Numerical instabilities due to improper mapping of complex wave modes are suppressed by rotating the AWWE parameters in complex

  4. Acoustic property reconstruction of a pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps) forehead based on computed tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhongchang; Xu, Xiao; Dong, Jianchen; Xing, Luru; Zhang, Meng; Liu, Xuecheng; Zhang, Yu; Li, Songhai; Berggren, Per

    2015-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) imaging and sound experimental measurements were used to reconstruct the acoustic properties (density, velocity, and impedance) of the forehead tissues of a deceased pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps). The forehead was segmented along the body axis and sectioned into cross section slices, which were further cut into sample pieces for measurements. Hounsfield units (HUs) of the corresponding measured pieces were obtained from CT scans, and regression analyses were conducted to investigate the linear relationships between the tissues' HUs and velocity, and HUs and density. The distributions of the acoustic properties of the head at axial, coronal, and sagittal cross sections were reconstructed, revealing that the nasal passage system was asymmetric and the cornucopia-shaped spermaceti organ was in the right nasal passage, surrounded by tissues and airsacs. A distinct dense theca was discovered in the posterior-dorsal area of the melon, which was characterized by low velocity in the inner core and high velocity in the outer region. Statistical analyses revealed significant differences in density, velocity, and acoustic impedance between all four structures, melon, spermaceti organ, muscle, and connective tissue (p < 0.001). The obtained acoustic properties of the forehead tissues provide important information for understanding the species' bioacoustic characteristics.

  5. Acoustic property reconstruction of a pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps) forehead based on computed tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhongchang; Xu, Xiao; Dong, Jianchen; Xing, Luru; Zhang, Meng; Liu, Xuecheng; Zhang, Yu; Li, Songhai; Berggren, Per

    2015-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) imaging and sound experimental measurements were used to reconstruct the acoustic properties (density, velocity, and impedance) of the forehead tissues of a deceased pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps). The forehead was segmented along the body axis and sectioned into cross section slices, which were further cut into sample pieces for measurements. Hounsfield units (HUs) of the corresponding measured pieces were obtained from CT scans, and regression analyses were conducted to investigate the linear relationships between the tissues' HUs and velocity, and HUs and density. The distributions of the acoustic properties of the head at axial, coronal, and sagittal cross sections were reconstructed, revealing that the nasal passage system was asymmetric and the cornucopia-shaped spermaceti organ was in the right nasal passage, surrounded by tissues and airsacs. A distinct dense theca was discovered in the posterior-dorsal area of the melon, which was characterized by low velocity in the inner core and high velocity in the outer region. Statistical analyses revealed significant differences in density, velocity, and acoustic impedance between all four structures, melon, spermaceti organ, muscle, and connective tissue (p < 0.001). The obtained acoustic properties of the forehead tissues provide important information for understanding the species' bioacoustic characteristics. PMID:26627786

  6. Military jet noise source imaging using multisource statistically optimized near-field acoustical holography.

    PubMed

    Wall, Alan T; Gee, Kent L; Neilsen, Tracianne B; McKinley, Richard L; James, Michael M

    2016-04-01

    The identification of acoustic sources is critical to targeted noise reduction efforts for jets on high-performance tactical aircraft. This paper describes the imaging of acoustic sources from a tactical jet using near-field acoustical holography techniques. The measurement consists of a series of scans over the hologram with a dense microphone array. Partial field decomposition methods are performed to generate coherent holograms. Numerical extrapolation of data beyond the measurement aperture mitigates artifacts near the aperture edges. A multisource equivalent wave model is used that includes the effects of the ground reflection on the measurement. Multisource statistically optimized near-field acoustical holography (M-SONAH) is used to reconstruct apparent source distributions between 20 and 1250 Hz at four engine powers. It is shown that M-SONAH produces accurate field reconstructions for both inward and outward propagation in the region spanned by the physical hologram measurement. Reconstructions across the set of engine powers and frequencies suggests that directivity depends mainly on estimated source location; sources farther downstream radiate at a higher angle relative to the inlet axis. At some frequencies and engine powers, reconstructed fields exhibit multiple radiation lobes originating from overlapped source regions, which is a phenomenon relatively recently reported for full-scale jets. PMID:27106340

  7. A comparison of traffic estimates of nocturnal flying animals using radar, thermal imaging, and acoustic recording.

    PubMed

    Horton, Kyle G; Shriver, W Gregory; Buler, Jeffrey J

    2015-03-01

    There are several remote-sensing tools readily available for the study of nocturnally flying animals (e.g., migrating birds), each possessing unique measurement biases. We used three tools (weather surveillance radar, thermal infrared camera, and acoustic recorder) to measure temporal and spatial patterns of nocturnal traffic estimates of flying animals during the spring and fall of 2011 and 2012 in Lewes, Delaware, USA. Our objective was to compare measures among different technologies to better understand their animal detection biases. For radar and thermal imaging, the greatest observed traffic rate tended to occur at, or shortly after, evening twilight, whereas for the acoustic recorder, peak bird flight-calling activity was observed just prior to morning twilight. Comparing traffic rates during the night for all seasons, we found that mean nightly correlations between acoustics and the other two tools were weakly correlated (thermal infrared camera and acoustics, r = 0.004 ± 0.04 SE, n = 100 nights; radar and acoustics, r = 0.14 ± 0.04 SE, n = 101 nights), but highly variable on an individual nightly basis (range = -0.84 to 0.92, range = -0.73 to 0.94). The mean nightly correlations between traffic rates estimated by radar and by thermal infrared camera during the night were more strongly positively correlated (r = 0.39 ± 0.04 SE, n = 125 nights), but also were highly variable for individual nights (range = -0.76 to 0.98). Through comparison with radar data among numerous height intervals, we determined that flying animal height above the ground influenced thermal imaging positively and flight call detections negatively. Moreover, thermal imaging detections decreased with the presence of cloud cover and increased with mean ground flight speed of animals, whereas acoustic detections showed no relationship with cloud cover presence but did decrease with increased flight speed. We found sampling methods to be positively correlated when comparing mean nightly

  8. A comparison of traffic estimates of nocturnal flying animals using radar, thermal imaging, and acoustic recording.

    PubMed

    Horton, Kyle G; Shriver, W Gregory; Buler, Jeffrey J

    2015-03-01

    There are several remote-sensing tools readily available for the study of nocturnally flying animals (e.g., migrating birds), each possessing unique measurement biases. We used three tools (weather surveillance radar, thermal infrared camera, and acoustic recorder) to measure temporal and spatial patterns of nocturnal traffic estimates of flying animals during the spring and fall of 2011 and 2012 in Lewes, Delaware, USA. Our objective was to compare measures among different technologies to better understand their animal detection biases. For radar and thermal imaging, the greatest observed traffic rate tended to occur at, or shortly after, evening twilight, whereas for the acoustic recorder, peak bird flight-calling activity was observed just prior to morning twilight. Comparing traffic rates during the night for all seasons, we found that mean nightly correlations between acoustics and the other two tools were weakly correlated (thermal infrared camera and acoustics, r = 0.004 ± 0.04 SE, n = 100 nights; radar and acoustics, r = 0.14 ± 0.04 SE, n = 101 nights), but highly variable on an individual nightly basis (range = -0.84 to 0.92, range = -0.73 to 0.94). The mean nightly correlations between traffic rates estimated by radar and by thermal infrared camera during the night were more strongly positively correlated (r = 0.39 ± 0.04 SE, n = 125 nights), but also were highly variable for individual nights (range = -0.76 to 0.98). Through comparison with radar data among numerous height intervals, we determined that flying animal height above the ground influenced thermal imaging positively and flight call detections negatively. Moreover, thermal imaging detections decreased with the presence of cloud cover and increased with mean ground flight speed of animals, whereas acoustic detections showed no relationship with cloud cover presence but did decrease with increased flight speed. We found sampling methods to be positively correlated when comparing mean nightly

  9. Resonant acoustic nonlinearity for defect-selective imaging and NDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodov, Igor

    2015-10-01

    The bottleneck problem of nonlinear NDT is a low efficiency of conversion from fundamental frequency to nonlinear frequency components. In this paper, it is proposed to use a combination of mechanical resonance and nonlinearity of defects to enhance the input-output conversion. The concept of the defect as a nonlinear oscillator brings about new dynamic and frequency scenarios characteristic of parametric oscillations. The modes observed in experiment include sub- and superharmonic resonances with anomalously efficient generation of the higher harmonics and subharmonics. A modified version of the superharmonic resonance (combination frequency resonance) is used to enhance the efficiency of frequency mixing mode of nonlinear NDT. All the resonant nonlinear modes are strongly localized in the defect area that provides a background for high-contrast highly-sensitive defect- and frequency-selective imaging.

  10. Microstructure Imaging Using Frequency Spectrum Spatially Resolved Acoustic Spectroscopy F-Sras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharples, S. D.; Li, W.; Clark, M.; Somekh, M. G.

    2010-02-01

    Material microstructure can have a profound effect on the mechanical properties of a component, such as strength and resistance to creep and fatigue. SRAS—spatially resolved acoustic spectroscopy—is a laser ultrasonic technique which can image microstructure using highly localized surface acoustic wave (SAW) velocity as a contrast mechanism, as this is sensitive to crystallographic orientation. The technique is noncontact, nondestructive, rapid, can be used on large components, and is highly tolerant of acoustic aberrations. Previously, the SRAS technique has been demonstrated using a fixed frequency excitation laser and a variable grating period (к-vector) to determine the most efficiently generated SAWs, and hence the velocity. Here, we demonstrate an implementation which uses a fixed grating period with a broadband laser excitation source. The velocity is determined by analyzing the measured frequency spectrum. Experimental results using this "frequency spectrum SRAS" (f-SRAS) method are presented. Images of microstructure on an industrially relevant material are compared to those obtained using the previous SRAS method ("k-SRAS"), excellent agreement is observed. Moreover, f-SRAS is much simpler and potentially much more rapid than k-SRAS as the velocity can be determined at each sample point in one single laser shot, rather than scanning the grating period.

  11. Symmetry analysis for nonlinear time reversal methods applied to nonlinear acoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dos Santos, Serge; Chaline, Jennifer

    2015-10-01

    Using symmetry invariance, nonlinear Time Reversal (TR) and reciprocity properties, the classical NEWS methods are supplemented and improved by new excitations having the intrinsic property of enlarging frequency analysis bandwidth and time domain scales, with now both medical acoustics and electromagnetic applications. The analysis of invariant quantities is a well-known tool which is often used in nonlinear acoustics in order to simplify complex equations. Based on a fundamental physical principle known as symmetry analysis, this approach consists in finding judicious variables, intrinsically scale dependant, and able to describe all stages of behaviour on the same theoretical foundation. Based on previously published results within the nonlinear acoustic areas, some practical implementation will be proposed as a new way to define TR-NEWS based methods applied to NDT and medical bubble based non-destructive imaging. This paper tends to show how symmetry analysis can help us to define new methodologies and new experimental set-up involving modern signal processing tools. Some example of practical realizations will be proposed in the context of biomedical non-destructive imaging using Ultrasound Contrast Agents (ACUs) where symmetry and invariance properties allow us to define a microscopic scale-invariant experimental set-up describing intrinsic symmetries of the microscopic complex system.

  12. Eigenfunction analysis of stochastic backscatter for characterization of acoustic aberration in medical ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varslot, Trond; Krogstad, Harald; Mo, Eirik; Angelsen, Bjørn A.

    2004-06-01

    Presented here is a characterization of aberration in medical ultrasound imaging. The characterization is optimal in the sense of maximizing the expected energy in a modified beamformer output of the received acoustic backscatter. Aberration correction based on this characterization takes the form of an aberration correction filter. The situation considered is frequently found in applications when imaging organs through a body wall: aberration is introduced in a layer close to the transducer, and acoustic backscatter from a scattering region behind the body wall is measured at the transducer surface. The scattering region consists of scatterers randomly distributed with very short correlation length compared to the acoustic wavelength of the transmit pulse. The scatterer distribution is therefore assumed to be δ correlated. This paper shows how maximizing the expected energy in a modified beamformer output signal naturally leads to eigenfunctions of a Fredholm integral operator, where the associated kernel function is a spatial correlation function of the received stochastic signal. Aberration characterization and aberration correction are presented for simulated data constructed to mimic aberration introduced by the abdominal wall. The results compare well with what is obtainable using data from a simulated point source.

  13. Fish population dynamics revealed by instantaneous continental-shelf scale acoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratilal, Purnima; Symonds, Deanelle; Makris, Nicholas C.; Nero, Redwood

    2005-04-01

    Video images of fish population densities over vast areas of the New Jersey continental shelf have been produced from acoustic data collected on a long range bistatic sonar system during the Acoustic Clutter 2003 experiment. Areal fish population densities were obtained after correcting the acoustic data for two-way transmission loss modeled using the range-dependent parabolic equation, spatially varying beampattern of the array, source level and mean target strength per fish. The wide-area fish density images reveal the temporal evolution of fish school distributions, their migration, as well as shoal formation and fragmentation at 50 s interval. Time series of the fish population within various density thresholds were made over the period of a day in an area containing millions of fish that at some instances formed a massive shoal extending over 12 km. The analysis shows that fish population in the area can be decomposed into a stable ambient population from lower-fish-density regions and a time-varying population composed from higher-density regions. Estimates of the differential speed between population centers of various shoals show that the average speed is on the order of a slow-moving surface vessel or submarine.

  14. Bond-selective photoacoustic imaging by converting molecular vibration into acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Jie; Li, Rui; Phillips, Evan H.; Goergen, Craig J.; Sturek, Michael; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2016-01-01

    The quantized vibration of chemical bonds provides a way of detecting specific molecules in a complex tissue environment. Unlike pure optical methods, for which imaging depth is limited to a few hundred micrometers by significant optical scattering, photoacoustic detection of vibrational absorption breaks through the optical diffusion limit by taking advantage of diffused photons and weak acoustic scattering. Key features of this method include both high scalability of imaging depth from a few millimeters to a few centimeters and chemical bond selectivity as a novel contrast mechanism for photoacoustic imaging. Its biomedical applications spans detection of white matter loss and regeneration, assessment of breast tumor margins, and diagnosis of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques. This review provides an overview of the recent advances made in vibration-based photoacoustic imaging and various biomedical applications enabled by this new technology. PMID:27069873

  15. Bond-selective photoacoustic imaging by converting molecular vibration into acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Hui, Jie; Li, Rui; Phillips, Evan H; Goergen, Craig J; Sturek, Michael; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2016-03-01

    The quantized vibration of chemical bonds provides a way of detecting specific molecules in a complex tissue environment. Unlike pure optical methods, for which imaging depth is limited to a few hundred micrometers by significant optical scattering, photoacoustic detection of vibrational absorption breaks through the optical diffusion limit by taking advantage of diffused photons and weak acoustic scattering. Key features of this method include both high scalability of imaging depth from a few millimeters to a few centimeters and chemical bond selectivity as a novel contrast mechanism for photoacoustic imaging. Its biomedical applications spans detection of white matter loss and regeneration, assessment of breast tumor margins, and diagnosis of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques. This review provides an overview of the recent advances made in vibration-based photoacoustic imaging and various biomedical applications enabled by this new technology.

  16. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr., Ph.D.; Younane Abousleiman, Ph.D.; Musharraf Zaman, Ph.D., P.E.

    2002-11-18

    During the sixth quarter of this research project the research team developed a method and the experimental procedures for acquiring the data needed for ultrasonic tomography of rock core samples under triaxial stress conditions as outlined in Task 10. Traditional triaxial compression experiments, where compressional and shear wave velocities are measured, provide little or no information about the internal spatial distribution of mechanical damage within the sample. The velocities measured between platen-to-platen or sensor-to-sensor reflects an averaging of all the velocities occurring along that particular raypath across the boundaries of the rock. The research team is attempting to develop and refine a laboratory equivalent of seismic tomography for use on rock samples deformed under triaxial stress conditions. Seismic tomography, utilized for example in crosswell tomography, allows an imaging of the velocities within a discrete zone within the rock. Ultrasonic or acoustic tomography is essentially the extension of that field technology applied to rock samples deforming in the laboratory at high pressures. This report outlines the technical steps and procedures for developing this technology for use on weak, soft chalk samples. Laboratory tests indicate that the chalk samples exhibit major changes in compressional and shear wave velocities during compaction. Since chalk is the rock type responsible for the severe subsidence and compaction in the North Sea it was selected for the first efforts at tomographic imaging of soft rocks. Field evidence from the North Sea suggests that compaction, which has resulted in over 30 feet of subsidence to date, is heterogeneously distributed within the reservoir. The research team will attempt to image this very process in chalk samples. The initial tomographic studies (Scott et al., 1994a,b; 1998) were accomplished on well cemented, competent rocks such as Berea sandstone. The extension of the technology to weaker samples is

  17. Acoustic Image Models for Obstacle Avoidance with Forward-Looking Sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masek, T.; Kölsch, M.

    Long-range forward-looking sonars (FLS) have recently been deployed in autonomous unmanned vehicles (AUV). We present models for various features in acoustic images, with the goal of using this sensor for altitude maintenance, obstacle detection and obstacle avoidance. First, we model the backscatter and FLS noise as pixel-based, spatially-varying intensity distributions. Experiments show that these models predict noise with an accuracy of over 98%. Next, the presence of acoustic noise from two other sources including a modem is reliably detected with a template-based filter and a threshold learned from training data. Lastly, the ocean floor location and orientation is estimated with a gradient-descent method using a site-independent template, yielding sufficiently accurate results in 95% of the frames. Temporal information is expected to further improve the performance.

  18. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr., Ph.D.; Younane Abousleiman, Ph.D.; Musharraf Zaman, Ph.D., P.E.

    2002-11-18

    During the seven quarter of the project the research team analyzed some of the acoustic velocity data and rock deformation data. The goal is to create a series of ''deformation-velocity maps'' which can outline the types of rock deformational mechanisms which can occur at high pressures and then associate those with specific compressional or shear wave velocity signatures. During this quarter, we began to analyze both the acoustical and deformational properties of the various rock types. Some of the preliminary velocity data from the Danian chalk will be presented in this report. This rock type was selected for the initial efforts as it will be used in the tomographic imaging study outlined in Task 10. This is one of the more important rock types in the study as the Danian chalk is thought to represent an excellent analog to the Ekofisk chalk that has caused so many problems in the North Sea. Some of the preliminary acoustic velocity data obtained during this phase of the project indicates that during pore collapse and compaction of this chalk, the acoustic velocities can change by as much as 200 m/s. Theoretically, this significant velocity change should be detectable during repeated successive 3-D seismic images. In addition, research continues with an analysis of the unconsolidated sand samples at high confining pressures obtained in Task 9. The analysis of the results indicate that sands with 10% volume of fines can undergo liquefaction at lower stress conditions than sand samples which do not have fines added. This liquefaction and/or sand flow is similar to ''shallow water'' flows observed during drilling in the offshore Gulf of Mexico.

  19. Acoustic imaging of the Mediterranean water outflowing through the Strait of Gibraltar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biescas Gorriz, Berta; Carniel, Sandro; Sallarès, Valentí; Rodriguez Ranero, Cesar

    2016-04-01

    Acoustic imaging of the Mediterranean water outflowing through the Strait of Gibraltar Berta Biescas (1), Sandro Carniel (2) , Valentí Sallarès (3) and Cesar R. Ranero(3) (1) Istituto di Scienze Marine, CNR, Bologna, Italy (2) Istituto di Scienze Marine, CNR, Venice, Italy (3) Institut de Ciències del Mar, CSIC, Barcelona, Spain Acoustic reflectivity acquired with multichannel seismic reflection (MCS) systems allow to detect and explore the thermohaline structure in the ocean with vertical and lateral resolutions in the order of 10 m, covering hundreds of kilometers in the lateral dimension and the full-depth water column. In this work we present a MCS 2D profile that crosses the Strait of Gibraltar, from the Alboran Sea to the internal Gulf of Cadiz (NE Atlantic Ocean). The MCS data was acquired during the Topomed-Gassis Cruise (European Science Foundation TopoEurope), which was carried out on board of the Spanish R/V Sarmiento de Gamboa in October 2011. The strong thermohaline contrast between the Mediterranean water and the Atlantic water, characterizes this area and allows to visualize, with unprecedented resolution, the acoustic reflectivity associated to the dense flow of the Mediterranean water outflowing through the prominent slope of the Strait of Gibraltar. During the first kilometers, the dense flow drops attached to the continental slope until it reaches the buoyancy depth at 700 m. Then, it detaches from the sea floor and continues flowing towards the Atlantic Ocean, occupying the layer at 700-1500 m deep and developing clear staircase layers. The reflectivity images display near seabed reflections that could well correspond to turbidity layers. The XBT data acquired coincident in time and space with the MCS data will help us in the interpretation and analysis of the acoustic data.

  20. Intracardiac Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging: A Novel Imaging Method for Intraprocedural Evaluation of Radiofrequency Ablation Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Eyerly, Stephanie A.; Bahnson, Tristram D.; Koontz, Jason I.; Bradway, David P.; Dumont, Douglas M.; Trahey, Gregg E.; Wolf, Patrick D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Arrhythmia recurrence after cardiac radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for atrial fibrillation (AF) has been linked to conduction through discontinuous lesion lines. Intraprocedural visualization and corrective ablation of lesion line discontinuities could decrease post-procedure AF recurrence. Intracardiac acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging is a new imaging technique that visualizes RFA lesions by mapping the relative elasticity contrast between compliant-unablated and stiff-RFA treated myocardium. Objective To determine if intraprocedure ARFI images can identify RFA treated myocardium in vivo. Methods In eight canines, an electroanatomical mapping (EAM) guided intracardiac echo catheter (ICE) was used to acquire 2D ARFI images along right atrial ablation lines before and after RFA. ARFI images were acquired during diastole with the myocardium positioned at the ARFI focus (1.5 cm) and parallel to the ICE transducer for maximal and uniform energy delivery to the tissue. Three reviewers categorized each ARFI image as depicting no lesion, non-contiguous, or contiguous lesion. For comparison, three separate reviewers confirmed RFA lesion presence and contiguity based on functional conduction block at the imaging plane location on EAM activation maps. Results Ten percent of ARFI images were discarded due to motion artifacts. Reviewers of the ARFI images detected RFA-treated sites with high sensitivity (95.7%) and specificity (91.5%). Reviewer identification of contiguous lesion had 75.3% specificity and 47.1% sensitivity. Conclusions Intracardiac ARFI imaging was successful in identifying endocardial RFA treatment when specific imaging conditions were maintained. Further advances in ARFI imaging technology would facilitate a wider range of imaging opportunities for clinical lesion evaluation. PMID:22772134

  1. The coordination chemistry and magnetism of some 3d–4f and 4f amino-polyalcohol compounds

    PubMed Central

    Sharples, Joseph W.; Collison, David

    2014-01-01

    Triethanolamine, teaH3, and diethanolamine, RdeaH2, 3d–4f and 4f compounds demonstrate an enormous variety in their structure and bonding. This review examines the synthetic strategies to these molecules and their magnetic properties, whilst trying to assess these ligands’ suitability towards new SMMs and magnetic refrigerants. PMID:25009361

  2. Using numerical models and volume rendering to interpret acoustic imaging of hydrothermal flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemis, K. G.; Bennett, K.; Takle, J.; Rona, P. A.; Silver, D.

    2009-12-01

    Our acoustic imaging system will be installed onto the Neptune Canada observatory at the Main Endeavour Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge, which is a Ridge 2000 Integrated Study Site. Thereafter, 16-30 Gb of acoustic imaging data will be collected daily. We are developing a numerical model of merging plumes that will be used to guide expectations and volume rendering software that transforms volumetric acoustic data into photo-like images. Hydrothermal flow is modeled as a combination of merged point sources which can be configured in any geometry. The model stipulates the dissipation or dilution of the flow and uses potential fields and complex analysis to combine the entrainment fields produced by each source. The strengths of this model are (a) the ability to handle a variety of scales especially the small scale as the potential fields can be specified with an effectively infinite boundary condition, (b) the ability to handle line, circle and areal source configurations, and (c) the ability to handle both high temperature focused flow and low temperature diffuse flow. This model predicts the vertical and horizontal velocities and the spatial distribution of effluent from combined sources of variable strength in a steady ambient velocity field. To verify the accuracy of the model’s results, we compare the model predictions of plume centerlines for the merging of two relatively strong point sources with the acoustic imaging data collected at Clam Acres, Southwest Vent Field, EPR 21°N in 1990. The two chimneys are 3.5 m apart and the plumes emanating from their tops merge approximately 18 mab. The model is able to predict the height of merging and the bending of the centerlines. Merging is implicitly observed at Grotto Vent, Main Endeavour Field, in our VIP 2000 data from July 2000: although there are at least 5 vigorous black smokers only a single plume is discernable in the acoustic imaging data. Furthermore, the observed Doppler velocity data increases with height

  3. Ultrasound-Stimulated Acoustic Emission in Thermal Image-Guided HIFU Therapy: A Phantom Study

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, C. P.; Lin, W. T.; Chen, W. S.

    2006-05-08

    Magnetic resonance image (MRI) is a promising monitoring tool for non-invasive real-time thermal guidance in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) during thermal ablation surgery. However, this approach has two main drawbacks: 1) majority of components need to be redesigned to be MR compatible in order to avoid effecting MR images, and 2) the cost of operating MRI facilities is high. Alternately, ultrasound-stimulated acoustic emission (USAE) method has been applied for detecting thermal variations in tissues. An optical transparent phantom, made from polyacrylamide, containing thermal sensitive indicator protein (Bovine Serum Albumin), was prepared for observing the HIFU-induced denaturalization. A thermal-couple was set up for validation of temperature distribution. Experimental results show that thermal image can be captured clearly under stationary conditions.

  4. Sensing the delivery and endocytosis of nanoparticles using magneto-photo-acoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Qu, M.; Mehrmohammadi, M.; Emelianov, S.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Many biomedical applications necessitate a targeted intracellular delivery of the nanomaterial to specific cells. Therefore, a non-invasive and reliable imaging tool is required to detect both the delivery and cellular endocytosis of the nanoparticles. Herein, we demonstrate that magneto-photo-acoustic (MPA) imaging can be used to monitor the delivery and to identify endocytosis of magnetic and optically absorbing nanoparticles. The relationship between photoacoustic (PA) and magneto-motive ultrasound (MMUS) signals from the in vitro samples were analyzed to identify the delivery and endocytosis of nanoparticles. The results indicated that during the delivery of nanoparticles to the vicinity of the cells, both PA and MMUS signals are almost linearly proportional. However, accumulation of nanoparticles within the cells leads to nonlinear MMUS-PA relationship, due to non-linear MMUS signal amplification. Therefore, through longitudinal MPA imaging, it is possible to monitor the delivery of nanoparticles and identify the endocytosis of the nanoparticles by living cells. PMID:26640773

  5. The concept of cyclic sound intensity and its application to acoustical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafon, B.; Antoni, J.; Sidahmed, M.; Polac, L.

    2011-04-01

    This paper demonstrates how to take advantage of the cyclostationarity property of engine signals to define a new acoustical quantity, the cyclic sound intensity, which displays the instantaneous flux of acoustical energy in the angle-frequency domain during an average engine cycle. This quantity is attractive in that it possesses the ability of being instantaneous and averaged at the same time, thus reconciling two conflicting properties into a rigourous and unambiguous framework. Cyclic sound intensity is a rich concept with several original ramifications. Among other things, it returns a unique decomposition into instantaneous active and reactive parts. Associated to acoustical imaging techniques, it allows the construction of sound radiation movies that evolve within the engine cycle and whose each frame is a sound intensity map calculated at a specific time - or crankshaft angle - in the engine cycle. This enables the accurate localisation of sources in space, in frequency and in time (crankshaft angle). Furthermore, associated to cyclic Wiener filtering, this methodology makes it possible to decompose the overall radiated sound into several noise source contributions whose cyclic sound intensities can then be analysed independently.

  6. Acoustic Property Reconstruction of a Neonate Yangtze Finless Porpoise's (Neophocaena asiaeorientalis) Head Based on CT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Chong; Wang, Zhitao; Song, Zhongchang; Wang, Kexiong; Wang, Ding; Au, Whitlow W. L.; Zhang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    The reconstruction of the acoustic properties of a neonate finless porpoise’s head was performed using X-ray computed tomography (CT). The head of the deceased neonate porpoise was also segmented across the body axis and cut into slices. The averaged sound velocity and density were measured, and the Hounsfield units (HU) of the corresponding slices were obtained from computed tomography scanning. A regression analysis was employed to show the linear relationships between the Hounsfield unit and both sound velocity and density of samples. Furthermore, the CT imaging data were used to compare the HU value, sound velocity, density and acoustic characteristic impedance of the main tissues in the porpoise’s head. The results showed that the linear relationships between HU and both sound velocity and density were qualitatively consistent with previous studies on Indo-pacific humpback dolphins and Cuvier’s beaked whales. However, there was no significant increase of the sound velocity and acoustic impedance from the inner core to the outer layer in this neonate finless porpoise’s melon. PMID:25856588

  7. Acoustic property reconstruction of a neonate Yangtze finless porpoise's (Neophocaena asiaeorientalis) head based on CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chong; Wang, Zhitao; Song, Zhongchang; Wang, Kexiong; Wang, Ding; Au, Whitlow W L; Zhang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    The reconstruction of the acoustic properties of a neonate finless porpoise's head was performed using X-ray computed tomography (CT). The head of the deceased neonate porpoise was also segmented across the body axis and cut into slices. The averaged sound velocity and density were measured, and the Hounsfield units (HU) of the corresponding slices were obtained from computed tomography scanning. A regression analysis was employed to show the linear relationships between the Hounsfield unit and both sound velocity and density of samples. Furthermore, the CT imaging data were used to compare the HU value, sound velocity, density and acoustic characteristic impedance of the main tissues in the porpoise's head. The results showed that the linear relationships between HU and both sound velocity and density were qualitatively consistent with previous studies on Indo-pacific humpback dolphins and Cuvier's beaked whales. However, there was no significant increase of the sound velocity and acoustic impedance from the inner core to the outer layer in this neonate finless porpoise's melon.

  8. Contribution of the supraglottic larynx to the vocal product: imaging and acoustic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gracco, L. Carol

    1996-04-01

    Horizontal supraglottic laryngectomy is a surgical procedure to remove a mass lesion located in the region of the pharynx superior to the true vocal folds. In contrast to full or partial laryngectomy, patients who undergo horizontal supraglottic laryngectomy often present with little or nor involvement to the true vocal folds. This population provides an opportunity to examine the acoustic consequences of altering the pharynx while sparing the laryngeal sound source. Acoustic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data were acquired in a group of four patients before and after supraglottic laryngectomy. Acoustic measures included the identification of vocal tract resonances and the fundamental frequency of the vocal fold vibration. 3D reconstruction of the pharyngeal portion of each subjects' vocal tract were made from MRIs taken during phonation and volume measures were obtained. These measures reveal a variable, but often dramatic difference in the surgically-altered area of the pharynx and changes in the formant frequencies of the vowel/i/post surgically. In some cases the presence of the tumor created a deviation from the expected formant values pre-operatively with post-operative values approaching normal. Patients who also underwent radiation treatment post surgically tended to have greater constriction in the pharyngeal area of the vocal tract.

  9. [Quantification and improvement of speech transmission performance using headphones in acoustic stimulated functional magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Ken ichiro; Takatsu, Yasuo; Miyati, Tosiaki; Kimura, Tetsuya

    2014-10-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has made a major contribution to the understanding of higher brain function, but fMRI with auditory stimulation, used in the planning of brain tumor surgery, is often inaccurate because there is a risk that the sounds used in the trial may not be correctly transmitted to the subjects due to acoustic noise. This prompted us to devise a method of digitizing sound transmission ability from the accuracy rate of 67 syllables, classified into three types. We evaluated this with and without acoustic noise during imaging. We also improved the structure of the headphones and compared their sound transmission ability with that of conventional headphones attached to an MRI device (a GE Signa HDxt 3.0 T). We calculated and compared the sound transmission ability of the conventional headphones with that of the improved model. The 95 percent upper confidence limit (UCL) was used as the threshold for accuracy rate of hearing for both headphone models. There was a statistically significant difference between the conventional model and the improved model during imaging (p < 0.01). The rate of accuracy of the improved model was 16 percent higher. 29 and 22 syllables were accurate at a 95% UCL in the improved model and the conventional model, respectively. This study revealed the evaluation system used in this study to be useful for correctly identifying syllables during fMRI.

  10. Reconstruction of an acoustic pressure field in a resonance tube by particle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Kuzuu, K; Hasegawa, S

    2015-11-01

    A technique for estimating an acoustic field in a resonance tube is suggested. The estimation of an acoustic field in a resonance tube is important for the development of the thermoacoustic engine, and can be conducted employing two sensors to measure pressure. While this measurement technique is known as the two-sensor method, care needs to be taken with the location of pressure sensors when conducting pressure measurements. In the present study, particle image velocimetry (PIV) is employed instead of a pressure measurement by a sensor, and two-dimensional velocity vector images are extracted as sequential data from only a one- time recording made by a video camera of PIV. The spatial velocity amplitude is obtained from those images, and a pressure distribution is calculated from velocity amplitudes at two points by extending the equations derived for the two-sensor method. By means of this method, problems relating to the locations and calibrations of multiple pressure sensors are avoided. Furthermore, to verify the accuracy of the present method, the experiments are conducted employing the conventional two-sensor method and laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV). Then, results by the proposed method are compared with those obtained with the two-sensor method and LDV.

  11. Imaging of transient surface acoustic waves by full-field photorefractive interferometry.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jichuan; Xu, Xiaodong; Glorieux, Christ; Matsuda, Osamu; Cheng, Liping

    2015-05-01

    A stroboscopic full-field imaging technique based on photorefractive interferometry for the visualization of rapidly changing surface displacement fields by using of a standard charge-coupled device (CCD) camera is presented. The photorefractive buildup of the space charge field during and after probe laser pulses is simulated numerically. The resulting anisotropic diffraction upon the refractive index grating and the interference between the polarization-rotated diffracted reference beam and the transmitted signal beam are modeled theoretically. The method is experimentally demonstrated by full-field imaging of the propagation of photoacoustically generated surface acoustic waves with a temporal resolution of nanoseconds. The surface acoustic wave propagation in a 23 mm × 17 mm area on an aluminum plate was visualized with 520 × 696 pixels of the CCD sensor, yielding a spatial resolution of 33 μm. The short pulse duration (8 ns) of the probe laser yields the capability of imaging SAWs with frequencies up to 60 MHz. PMID:26026514

  12. Imaging of Acoustically Coupled Oscillations Due to Flow Past a Shallow Cavity: Effect of Cavity Length Scale

    SciTech Connect

    P. Oshkai; M. Geveci; D. Rockwell; M. Pollack

    2002-12-12

    Flow-acoustic interactions due to fully turbulent inflow past a shallow axisymmetric cavity mounted in a pipe are investigated using a technique of high-image-density particle image velocimetry in conjunction with unsteady pressure measurements. This imaging leads to patterns of velocity, vorticity, streamline topology, and hydrodynamic contributions to the acoustic power integral. Global instantaneous images, as well as time-averaged images, are evaluated to provide insight into the flow physics during tone generation. Emphasis is on the manner in which the streamwise length scale of the cavity alters the major features of the flow structure. These image-based approaches allow identification of regions of the unsteady shear layer that contribute to the instantaneous hydrodynamic component of the acoustic power, which is necessary to maintain a flow tone. In addition, combined image analysis and pressure measurements allow categorization of the instantaneous flow patterns that are associated with types of time traces and spectra of the fluctuating pressure. In contrast to consideration based solely on pressure spectra, it is demonstrated that locked-on tones may actually exhibit intermittent, non-phase-locked images, apparently due to low damping of the acoustic resonator. Locked-on flow tones (without modulation or intermittency), locked-on flow tones with modulation, and non-locked-on oscillations with short-term, highly coherent fluctuations are defined and represented by selected cases. Depending on which of,these regimes occur, the time-averaged Q (quality)-factor and the dimensionless peak pressure are substantially altered.

  13. Investigating the emotional response to room acoustics: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Lawless, M S; Vigeant, M C

    2015-10-01

    While previous research has demonstrated the powerful influence of pleasant and unpleasant music on emotions, the present study utilizes functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess the positive and negative emotional responses as demonstrated in the brain when listening to music convolved with varying room acoustic conditions. During fMRI scans, subjects rated auralizations created in a simulated concert hall with varying reverberation times. The analysis detected activations in the dorsal striatum, a region associated with anticipation of reward, for two individuals for the highest rated stimulus, though no activations were found for regions associated with negative emotions in any subject.

  14. Investigating the emotional response to room acoustics: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Lawless, M S; Vigeant, M C

    2015-10-01

    While previous research has demonstrated the powerful influence of pleasant and unpleasant music on emotions, the present study utilizes functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess the positive and negative emotional responses as demonstrated in the brain when listening to music convolved with varying room acoustic conditions. During fMRI scans, subjects rated auralizations created in a simulated concert hall with varying reverberation times. The analysis detected activations in the dorsal striatum, a region associated with anticipation of reward, for two individuals for the highest rated stimulus, though no activations were found for regions associated with negative emotions in any subject. PMID:26520354

  15. 4f electron delocalization and volume collapse in praseodymium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, Joseph A.; Moore, Kevin T.; Lipp, Magnus J.; Mattern, Brian A.; Pacold, Joseph I.; Seidler, Gerald T.; Chow, Paul; Rod, Eric; Xiao, Yuming; Evans, William J.

    2012-04-17

    We study the pressure evolution of the 4f electrons in elemental praseodymium metal compressed through several crystallographic phases, including the large volume-collapse transition at 20 GPa. Using resonant x-ray emission, we directly and quantitatively measure the development of multiple electronic configurations with differing 4f occupation numbers, the key quantum observable related to the delocalization of the strongly correlated 4f electrons. These results provide a high-fidelity test of prior predictions by dynamical mean-field theory, and support the hypothesis of a strong connection between electronic and structural degrees of freedom at the volume-collapse transition.

  16. Temperature-dependent differences in the nonlinear acoustic behavior of ultrasound contrast agents revealed by high-speed imaging and bulk acoustics.

    PubMed

    Mulvana, Helen; Stride, Eleanor; Tang, Mengxing; Hajnal, Jo V; Eckersley, Robert

    2011-09-01

    Previous work by the authors has established that increasing the temperature of the suspending liquid from 20°C to body temperature has a significant impact on the bulk acoustic properties and stability of an ultrasound contrast agent suspension (SonoVue, Bracco Suisse SA, Manno, Lugano, Switzerland). In this paper the influence of temperature on the nonlinear behavior of microbubbles is investigated, because this is one of the most important parameters in the context of diagnostic imaging. High-speed imaging showed that raising the temperature significantly influences the dynamic behavior of individual microbubbles. At body temperature, microbubbles exhibit greater radial excursion and oscillate less spherically, with a greater incidence of jetting and gas expulsion, and therefore collapse, than they do at room temperature. Bulk acoustics revealed an associated increase in the harmonic content of the scattered signals. These findings emphasize the importance of conducting laboratory studies at body temperature if the results are to be interpreted for in vivo applications.

  17. Acoustic structure quantification by using ultrasound Nakagami imaging for assessing liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Ho, Ming-Chih; Tai, Dar-In; Lin, Ying-Hsiu; Wang, Chiao-Yin; Ma, Hsiang-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic structure quantification (ASQ) is a recently developed technique widely used for detecting liver fibrosis. Ultrasound Nakagami parametric imaging based on the Nakagami distribution has been widely used to model echo amplitude distribution for tissue characterization. We explored the feasibility of using ultrasound Nakagami imaging as a model-based ASQ technique for assessing liver fibrosis. Standard ultrasound examinations were performed on 19 healthy volunteers and 91 patients with chronic hepatitis B and C (n = 110). Liver biopsy and ultrasound Nakagami imaging analysis were conducted to compare the METAVIR score and Nakagami parameter. The diagnostic value of ultrasound Nakagami imaging was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. The Nakagami parameter obtained through ultrasound Nakagami imaging decreased with an increase in the METAVIR score (p < 0.0001), representing an increase in the extent of pre-Rayleigh statistics for echo amplitude distribution. The area under the ROC curve (AUROC) was 0.88 for the diagnosis of any degree of fibrosis (≥F1), whereas it was 0.84, 0.69, and 0.67 for ≥F2, ≥F3, and ≥F4, respectively. Ultrasound Nakagami imaging is a model-based ASQ technique that can be beneficial for the clinical diagnosis of early liver fibrosis. PMID:27605260

  18. Acoustic structure quantification by using ultrasound Nakagami imaging for assessing liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Ho, Ming-Chih; Tai, Dar-In; Lin, Ying-Hsiu; Wang, Chiao-Yin; Ma, Hsiang-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic structure quantification (ASQ) is a recently developed technique widely used for detecting liver fibrosis. Ultrasound Nakagami parametric imaging based on the Nakagami distribution has been widely used to model echo amplitude distribution for tissue characterization. We explored the feasibility of using ultrasound Nakagami imaging as a model-based ASQ technique for assessing liver fibrosis. Standard ultrasound examinations were performed on 19 healthy volunteers and 91 patients with chronic hepatitis B and C (n = 110). Liver biopsy and ultrasound Nakagami imaging analysis were conducted to compare the METAVIR score and Nakagami parameter. The diagnostic value of ultrasound Nakagami imaging was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. The Nakagami parameter obtained through ultrasound Nakagami imaging decreased with an increase in the METAVIR score (p < 0.0001), representing an increase in the extent of pre-Rayleigh statistics for echo amplitude distribution. The area under the ROC curve (AUROC) was 0.88 for the diagnosis of any degree of fibrosis (≥F1), whereas it was 0.84, 0.69, and 0.67 for ≥F2, ≥F3, and ≥F4, respectively. Ultrasound Nakagami imaging is a model-based ASQ technique that can be beneficial for the clinical diagnosis of early liver fibrosis. PMID:27605260

  19. Acoustic quasi-holographic images of scattering by vertical cylinders from one-dimensional bistatic scans.

    PubMed

    Baik, Kyungmin; Dudley, Christopher; Marston, Philip L

    2011-12-01

    When synthetic aperture sonar (SAS) is used to image elastic targets in water, subtle features can be present in the images associated with the dynamical response of the target being viewed. In an effort to improve the understanding of such responses, as well as to explore alternative image processing methods, a laboratory-based system was developed in which targets were illuminated by a transient acoustic source, and bistatic responses were recorded by scanning a hydrophone along a rail system. Images were constructed using a relatively conventional bistatic SAS algorithm and were compared with images based on supersonic holography. The holographic method is a simplification of one previously used to view the time evolution of a target's response [Hefner and Marston, ARLO 2, 55-60 (2001)]. In the holographic method, the space-time evolution of the scattering was used to construct a two-dimensional image with cross range and time as coordinates. Various features for vertically hung cylindrical targets were interpreted using high frequency ray theory. This includes contributions from guided surface elastic waves, as well as transmitted-wave features and specular reflection.

  20. 23 CFR 774.3 - Section 4(f) approvals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Section 4(f) evaluations will be coordinated with the Department of Interior, Department of Agriculture, and Department of Housing and Urban Development, and published in the Federal Register for...

  1. 23 CFR 774.3 - Section 4(f) approvals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Section 4(f) evaluations will be coordinated with the Department of Interior, Department of Agriculture, and Department of Housing and Urban Development, and published in the Federal Register for...

  2. Stress-Induced Fracturing of Reservoir Rocks: Acoustic Monitoring and μCT Image Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Srutarshi; Stroisz, Anna M.; Fjær, Erling; Stenebråten, Jørn F.; Lund, Hans K.; Sønstebø, Eyvind F.

    2015-11-01

    Stress-induced fracturing in reservoir rocks is an important issue for the petroleum industry. While productivity can be enhanced by a controlled fracturing operation, it can trigger borehole instability problems by reactivating existing fractures/faults in a reservoir. However, safe fracturing can improve the quality of operations during CO2 storage, geothermal installation and gas production at and from the reservoir rocks. Therefore, understanding the fracturing behavior of different types of reservoir rocks is a basic need for planning field operations toward these activities. In our study, stress-induced fracturing of rock samples has been monitored by acoustic emission (AE) and post-experiment computer tomography (CT) scans. We have used hollow cylinder cores of sandstones and chalks, which are representatives of reservoir rocks. The fracture-triggering stress has been measured for different rocks and compared with theoretical estimates. The population of AE events shows the location of main fracture arms which is in a good agreement with post-test CT image analysis, and the fracture patterns inside the samples are visualized through 3D image reconstructions. The amplitudes and energies of acoustic events clearly indicate initiation and propagation of the main fractures. Time evolution of the radial strain measured in the fracturing tests will later be compared to model predictions of fracture size.

  3. A novel imaging technique based on the spatial coherence of backscattered waves: demonstration in the presence of acoustical clutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl, Jeremy J.; Pinton, Gianmarco F.; Lediju, Muyinatu; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2011-03-01

    In the last 20 years, the number of suboptimal and inadequate ultrasound exams has increased. This trend has been linked to the increasing population of overweight and obese individuals. The primary causes of image degradation in these individuals are often attributed to phase aberration and clutter. Phase aberration degrades image quality by distorting the transmitted and received pressure waves, while clutter degrades image quality by introducing incoherent acoustical interference into the received pressure wavefront. Although significant research efforts have pursued the correction of image degradation due to phase aberration, few efforts have characterized or corrected image degradation due to clutter. We have developed a novel imaging technique that is capable of differentiating ultrasonic signals corrupted by acoustical interference. The technique, named short-lag spatial coherence (SLSC) imaging, is based on the spatial coherence of the received ultrasonic wavefront at small spatial distances across the transducer aperture. We demonstrate comparative B-mode and SLSC images using full-wave simulations that include the effects of clutter and show that SLSC imaging generates contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) and signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) that are significantly better than B-mode imaging under noise-free conditions. In the presence of noise, SLSC imaging significantly outperforms conventional B-mode imaging in all image quality metrics. We demonstrate the use of SLSC imaging in vivo and compare B-mode and SLSC images of human thyroid and liver.

  4. Acoustic wavefield and Mach wave radiation of flashing arcs in strombolian explosion measured by image luminance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genco, Riccardo; Ripepe, Maurizio; Marchetti, Emanuele; Bonadonna, Costanza; Biass, Sebastien

    2014-10-01

    Explosive activity often generates visible flashing arcs in the volcanic plume considered as the evidence of the shock-front propagation induced by supersonic dynamics. High-speed image processing is used to visualize the pressure wavefield associated with flashing arcs observed in strombolian explosions. Image luminance is converted in virtual acoustic signal compatible with the signal recorded by pressure transducer. Luminance variations are moving with a spherical front at a 344.7 m/s velocity. Flashing arcs travel at the sound speed already 14 m above the vent and are not necessarily the evidence of a supersonic explosive dynamics. However, seconds later, the velocity of small fragments increases, and the spherical acousto-luminance wavefront becomes planar recalling the Mach wave radiation generated by large scale turbulence in high-speed jet. This planar wavefront forms a Mach angle of 55° with the explosive jet axis, suggesting an explosive dynamics moving at Mo = 1.22 Mach number.

  5. Imaging the position-dependent 3D force on microbeads subjected to acoustic radiation forces and streaming.

    PubMed

    Lamprecht, Andreas; Lakämper, Stefan; Baasch, Thierry; Schaap, Iwan A T; Dual, Jurg

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic particle manipulation in microfluidic channels is becoming a powerful tool in microfluidics to control micrometer sized objects in medical, chemical and biological applications. By creating a standing acoustic wave in the channel, the resulting pressure field can be employed to trap or sort particles. To design efficient and reproducible devices, it is important to characterize the pressure field throughout the volume of the microfluidic device. Here, we used an optically trapped particle as probe to measure the forces in all three dimensions. By moving the probe through the volume of the channel, we imaged spatial variations in the pressure field. In the direction of the standing wave this revealed a periodic energy landscape for 2 μm beads, resulting in an effective stiffness of 2.6 nN m(-1) for the acoustic trap. We found that multiple fabricated devices showed consistent pressure fields. Surprisingly, forces perpendicular to the direction of the standing wave reached values of up to 20% of the main-axis-values. To separate the direct acoustic force from secondary effects, we performed experiments with different bead sizes, which attributed some of the perpendicular forces to acoustic streaming. This method to image acoustically generated forces in 3D can be used to either minimize perpendicular forces or to employ them for specific applications in novel acoustofluidic designs. PMID:27302661

  6. Imaging the position-dependent 3D force on microbeads subjected to acoustic radiation forces and streaming.

    PubMed

    Lamprecht, Andreas; Lakämper, Stefan; Baasch, Thierry; Schaap, Iwan A T; Dual, Jurg

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic particle manipulation in microfluidic channels is becoming a powerful tool in microfluidics to control micrometer sized objects in medical, chemical and biological applications. By creating a standing acoustic wave in the channel, the resulting pressure field can be employed to trap or sort particles. To design efficient and reproducible devices, it is important to characterize the pressure field throughout the volume of the microfluidic device. Here, we used an optically trapped particle as probe to measure the forces in all three dimensions. By moving the probe through the volume of the channel, we imaged spatial variations in the pressure field. In the direction of the standing wave this revealed a periodic energy landscape for 2 μm beads, resulting in an effective stiffness of 2.6 nN m(-1) for the acoustic trap. We found that multiple fabricated devices showed consistent pressure fields. Surprisingly, forces perpendicular to the direction of the standing wave reached values of up to 20% of the main-axis-values. To separate the direct acoustic force from secondary effects, we performed experiments with different bead sizes, which attributed some of the perpendicular forces to acoustic streaming. This method to image acoustically generated forces in 3D can be used to either minimize perpendicular forces or to employ them for specific applications in novel acoustofluidic designs.

  7. Acoustic radiation- and streaming-induced microparticle velocities determined by microparticle image velocimetry in an ultrasound symmetry plane.

    PubMed

    Barnkob, Rune; Augustsson, Per; Laurell, Thomas; Bruus, Henrik

    2012-11-01

    We present microparticle image velocimetry measurements of suspended microparticles of diameters from 0.6 to 10 μm undergoing acoustophoresis in an ultrasound symmetry plane in a microchannel. The motion of the smallest particles is dominated by the Stokes drag from the induced acoustic streaming flow, while the motion of the largest particles is dominated by the acoustic radiation force. For all particle sizes we predict theoretically how much of the particle velocity is due to radiation and streaming, respectively. These predictions include corrections for particle-wall interactions and ultrasonic thermoviscous effects and match our measurements within the experimental uncertainty. Finally, we predict theoretically and confirm experimentally that the ratio between the acoustic radiation- and streaming-induced particle velocities is proportional to the actuation frequency, the acoustic contrast factor, and the square of the particle size, while it is inversely proportional to the kinematic viscosity.

  8. Acoustic radiation force impulse and supersonic shear imaging versus transient elastography for liver fibrosis assessment.

    PubMed

    Sporea, Ioan; Bota, Simona; Jurchis, Ana; Sirli, Roxana; Grădinaru-Tascău, Oana; Popescu, Alina; Ratiu, Iulia; Szilaski, Milana

    2013-11-01

    Our study compared three elastographic methods--transient elastography (TE), acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging and supersonic shear imaging (SSI)--with respect to the feasibility of their use in liver fibrosis evaluation. We also compared the performance of ARFI imaging and SSI, with TE as the reference method. The study included 332 patients, with or without hepatopathies, in which liver stiffness was evaluated using TE, ARFI and SSI. Reliable measurements were defined as a median value of 10 (TE, ARFI imaging) or 5 (SSI) liver stiffness measurements with a success rate ≥60% and an interquartile range interval <30%. A significantly higher percentage of reliable measurements were obtained using ARFI than by using TE and SSI: 92.1% versus 72.2% (p < 0.0001) and 92.1% versus 71.3% (p < 0.0001). Higher body mass index and older age were significantly associated with inability to obtain reliable measurements of liver stiffness using TE and SSI. In 55.4% of patients, reliable liver stiffness measurements were obtained using all three elastographic methods, and ARFI imaging and TE were similarly accurate in diagnosing significant fibrosis and cirrhosis, with TE as the reference method.

  9. Design factors of intravascular dual frequency transducers for super-harmonic contrast imaging and acoustic angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jianguo; Martin, K. Heath; Li, Yang; Dayton, Paul A.; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2015-05-01

    Imaging of coronary vasa vasorum may lead to assessment of the vulnerable plaque development in diagnosis of atherosclerosis diseases. Dual frequency transducers capable of detection of microbubble super-harmonics have shown promise as a new contrast-enhanced intravascular ultrasound (CE-IVUS) platform with the capability of vasa vasorum imaging. Contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) in CE-IVUS imaging can be closely associated with low frequency transmitter performance. In this paper, transducer designs encompassing different transducer layouts, transmitting frequencies, and transducer materials are compared for optimization of imaging performance. In the layout selection, the stacked configuration showed superior super-harmonic imaging compared with the interleaved configuration. In the transmitter frequency selection, a decrease in frequency from 6.5 MHz to 5 MHz resulted in an increase of CTR from 15 dB to 22 dB when receiving frequency was kept constant at 30 MHz. In the material selection, the dual frequency transducer with the lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) 1-3 composite transmitter yielded higher axial resolution compared to single crystal transmitters (70 μm compared to 150 μm pulse length). These comparisons provide guidelines for the design of intravascular acoustic angiography transducers.

  10. Design factors of intravascular dual frequency transducers for super-harmonic contrast imaging and acoustic angiography

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jianguo; Martin, K. Heath; Li, Yang; Dayton, Paul A.; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2015-01-01

    Imaging of coronary vasa vasorum may lead to assessment of the vulnerable plaque development in diagnosis of atherosclerosis diseases. Dual frequency transducers capable of detection of microbubble super-harmonics have shown promise as a new contrast-enhanced intravascular ultrasound (CE-IVUS) platform with the capability of vasa vasorum imaging. Contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) in CE-IVUS imaging can be closely associated with the low frequency transmitter performance. In this paper, transducer designs encompassing different transducer layouts, transmitting frequencies, and transducer materials are compared for optimization of imaging performance. In the layout selection, the stacked configuration showed superior super-harmonic imaging compared with the interleaved configuration. In the transmitter frequency selection, a decrease in frequency from 6.5 MHz to 5 MHz resulted in an increase of CTR from 15 dB to 22 dB when receiving frequency was kept constant at 30 MHz. In the material selection, the dual frequency transducer with the lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) 1-3 composite transmitter yielded higher axial resolution compared to single crystal transmitters (70 μm compared to 150 μm pulse length). These comparisons provide guidelines for design of intravascular acoustic angiography transducers. PMID:25856384

  11. Design factors of intravascular dual frequency transducers for super-harmonic contrast imaging and acoustic angiography.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianguo; Martin, K Heath; Li, Yang; Dayton, Paul A; Shung, K Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2015-05-01

    Imaging of coronary vasa vasorum may lead to assessment of the vulnerable plaque development in diagnosis of atherosclerosis diseases. Dual frequency transducers capable of detection of microbubble super-harmonics have shown promise as a new contrast-enhanced intravascular ultrasound (CE-IVUS) platform with the capability of vasa vasorum imaging. Contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) in CE-IVUS imaging can be closely associated with low frequency transmitter performance. In this paper, transducer designs encompassing different transducer layouts, transmitting frequencies, and transducer materials are compared for optimization of imaging performance. In the layout selection, the stacked configuration showed superior super-harmonic imaging compared with the interleaved configuration. In the transmitter frequency selection, a decrease in frequency from 6.5 MHz to 5 MHz resulted in an increase of CTR from 15 dB to 22 dB when receiving frequency was kept constant at 30 MHz. In the material selection, the dual frequency transducer with the lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) 1-3 composite transmitter yielded higher axial resolution compared to single crystal transmitters (70 μm compared to 150 μm pulse length). These comparisons provide guidelines for the design of intravascular acoustic angiography transducers. PMID:25856384

  12. Green's Function Retrieval and Marchenko Imaging in a Dissipative Acoustic Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slob, Evert

    2016-04-01

    Single-sided Marchenko equations for Green's function construction and imaging relate the measured reflection response of a lossless heterogeneous medium to an acoustic wave field inside this medium. I derive two sets of single-sided Marchenko equations for the same purpose, each in a heterogeneous medium, with one medium being dissipative and the other a corresponding medium with negative dissipation. Double-sided scattering data of the dissipative medium are required as input to compute the surface reflection response in the corresponding medium with negative dissipation. I show that each set of single-sided Marchenko equations leads to Green's functions with a virtual receiver inside the medium: one exists inside the dissipative medium and one in the medium with negative dissipation. This forms the basis of imaging inside a dissipative heterogeneous medium. I relate the Green's functions to the reflection response inside each medium, from which the image can be constructed. I illustrate the method with a one-dimensional example that shows the image quality. The method has a potentially wide range of imaging applications where the material under test is accessible from two sides.

  13. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr., Ph.D.; Musharraf Zaman, Ph.D.; Younane Abousleiman, Ph.D.

    2001-04-01

    The oil and gas industry has encountered significant problems in the production of oil and gas from weak rocks (such as chalks and limestones) and from unconsolidated sand formations. Problems include subsidence, compaction, sand production, and catastrophic shallow water sand flows during deep water drilling. Together these cost the petroleum industry hundreds of millions of dollars annually. The goals of this first quarterly report is to document the progress on the project to provide data on the acoustic imaging and mechanical properties of soft rock and marine sediments. The project is intended to determine the geophysical (acoustic velocities) rock properties of weak, poorly cemented rocks and unconsolidated sands. In some cases these weak formations can create problems for reservoir engineers. For example, it cost Phillips Petroleum 1 billion dollars to repair of offshore production facilities damaged during the unexpected subsidence and compaction of the Ekofisk Field in the North Sea (Sulak 1991). Another example is the problem of shallow water flows (SWF) occurring in sands just below the seafloor encountered during deep water drilling operations. In these cases the unconsolidated sands uncontrollably flow up around the annulus of the borehole resulting in loss of the drill casing. The $150 million dollar loss of the Ursa development project in the U.S. Gulf Coast resulted from an uncontrolled SWF (Furlow 1998a,b; 1999a,b). The first three tasks outlined in the work plan are: (1) obtain rock samples, (2) construct new acoustic platens, (3) calibrate and test the equipment. These have been completed as scheduled. Rock Mechanics Institute researchers at the University of Oklahoma have obtained eight different types of samples for the experimental program. These include: (a) Danian Chalk, (b) Cordoba Cream Limestone, (c) Indiana Limestone, (d) Ekofisk Chalk, (e) Oil Creek Sandstone, (f) unconsolidated Oil Creek sand, and (g) unconsolidated Brazos river sand

  14. Variable ultrasound trigger delay for improved magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mougenot, Charles; Waspe, Adam; Looi, Thomas; Drake, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) allows the quantification of microscopic displacements induced by ultrasound pulses, which are proportional to the local acoustic intensity. This study describes a new method to acquire MR-ARFI maps, which reduces the measurement noise in the quantification of displacement as well as improving its robustness in the presence of motion. Two MR-ARFI sequences were compared in this study. The first sequence ‘variable MSG’ involves switching the polarity of the motion sensitive gradient (MSG) between odd and even image frames. The second sequence named ‘static MSG’ involves a variable ultrasound trigger delay to sonicate during the first or second MSG for odd and even image frames, respectively. As previously published, the data acquired with a variable MSG required the use of reference data acquired prior to any sonication to process displacement maps. In contrary, data acquired with a static MSG were converted to displacement maps without using reference data acquired prior to the sonication. Displacement maps acquired with both sequences were compared by performing sonications for three different conditions: in a polyacrylamide phantom, in the leg muscle of a freely breathing pig and in the leg muscle of pig under apnea. The comparison of images acquired at even image frames and odd image frames indicates that the sequence with a static MSG provides a significantly better steady state (p  <  0.001 based on a Student’s t-test) than the images acquired with a variable MSG. In addition no reference data prior to sonication were required to process displacement maps for data acquired with a static MSG. The absence of reference data prior to sonication provided a 41% reduction of the spatial distribution of noise (p  <  0.001 based on a Student’s t-test) and reduced the sensitivity to motion for displacements acquired with a static MSG. No significant differences were expected and

  15. Preliminary study of copper oxide nanoparticles acoustic and magnetic properties for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlman, Or; Weitz, Iris S.; Azhari, Haim

    2015-03-01

    The implementation of multimodal imaging in medicine is highly beneficial as different physical properties may provide complementary information, augmented detection ability, and diagnosis verification. Nanoparticles have been recently used as contrast agents for various imaging modalities. Their significant advantage over conventional large-scale contrast agents is the ability of detection at early stages of the disease, being less prone to obstacles on their path to the target region, and possible conjunction to therapeutics. Copper ions play essential role in human health. They are used as a cofactor for multiple key enzymes involved in various fundamental biochemistry processes. Extremely small size copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO-NPs) are readily soluble in water with high colloidal stability yielding high bioavailability. The goal of this study was to examine the magnetic and acoustic characteristics of CuO-NPs in order to evaluate their potential to serve as contrast imaging agent for both MRI and ultrasound. CuO-NPs 7nm in diameter were synthesized by hot solution method. The particles were scanned using a 9.4T MRI and demonstrated a concentration dependent T1 relaxation time shortening phenomenon. In addition, it was revealed that CuO-NPs can be detected using the ultrasonic B-scan imaging. Finally, speed of sound based ultrasonic computed tomography was applied and showed that CuO-NPs can be clearly imaged. In conclusion, the preliminary results obtained, positively indicate that CuO-NPs may be imaged by both MRI and ultrasound. The results motivate additional in-vivo studies, in which the clinical utility of fused images derived from both modalities for diagnosis improvement will be studied.

  16. Evaluation of real-time acoustical holography for breast imaging and biopsy guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehman, Constance D.; Andre, Michael P.; Fecht, Barbara A.; Johansen, Jennifer M.; Shelby, Ronald L.; Shelby, Jerod O.

    1999-05-01

    Ultrasound is an attractive modality for adjunctive characterization of certain breast lesions, but it is not considered specific for cancer and it is not recommended for screening. An imaging technique remarkably different from pulse-echo ultrasound, termed Optical SonographyTM (Advanced Diagnostics, Inc.), uses the through-transmission signal. The method was applied to breast examinations in 41 asymptomatic and symptomatic women ranging in age from 18 to 83 years to evaluate this imaging modality for detection and characterization of breast disease and normal tissue. This approach uses coherent sound and coherent light to produce real-time, large field-of-view images with pronounced edge definition in soft tissues of the body. The system patient interface was modified to improve coupling to the breast and bring the chest wall to within 3 cm of the sound beam. System resolution (full width half maximum of the line-spread function) was 0.5 mm for a swept-frequency beam centered at 2.7 MHz. Resolution degrades slightly in the periphery of the very large 15.2-cm field of view. Dynamic range of the reconstructed 'raw' images (no post processing) was 3000:1. Included in the study population were women with dense parenchyma, palpable ductal carcinoma in situ with negative mammography, superficial and deep fibroadenomas, and calcifications. Successful breast imaging was performed in 40 of 41 women. These images were then compared with images generated using conventional X-ray mammography and pulse-echo ultrasound. Margins of lesions and internal textures were particularly well defined and provided substantial contrast to fatty and dense parenchyma. In two malignant lesions, Optical SonographyTM appeared to approximate more closely tumor extent compared to mammography than pulse-echo sonography. These preliminary studies indicate the method has unique potential for detecting, differentiating, and guiding the biopsy of breast lesions using real-time acoustical holography.

  17. Imaging of human tooth using ultrasound based chirp-coded nonlinear time reversal acoustics.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Serge; Prevorovsky, Zdenek

    2011-08-01

    Human tooth imaging sonography is investigated experimentally with an acousto-optic noncoupling set-up based on the chirp-coded nonlinear time reversal acoustic concept. The complexity of the tooth internal structure (enamel-dentine interface, cracks between internal tubules) is analyzed by adapting the nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy (NEWS) with the objective of the tomography of damage. Optimization of excitations using intrinsic symmetries, such as time reversal (TR) invariance, reciprocity, correlation properties are then proposed and implemented experimentally. The proposed medical application of this TR-NEWS approach is implemented on a third molar human tooth and constitutes an alternative of noncoupling echodentography techniques. A 10 MHz bandwidth ultrasonic instrumentation has been developed including a laser vibrometer and a 20 MHz contact piezoelectric transducer. The calibrated chirp-coded TR-NEWS imaging of the tooth is obtained using symmetrized excitations, pre- and post-signal processing, and the highly sensitive 14 bit resolution TR-NEWS instrumentation previously calibrated. Nonlinear signature coming from the symmetry properties is observed experimentally in the tooth using this bi-modal TR-NEWS imaging after and before the focusing induced by the time-compression process. The TR-NEWS polar B-scan of the tooth is described and suggested as a potential application for modern echodentography. It constitutes the basis of the self-consistent harmonic imaging sonography for monitoring cracks propagation in the dentine, responsible of human tooth structural health.

  18. Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging of vulnerable plaques: a finite element method parametric analysis

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Joshua R.; Dumont, Douglas M.; Trahey, Gregg E.; Palmeri, Mark L.

    2012-01-01

    Plaque rupture is the most common cause of complications such as stroke and coronary heart failure. Recent histopathological evidence suggests that several plaque features, including a large lipid core and a thin fibrous cap, are associated with plaques most at risk for rupture. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging, a recently developed ultrasound-based elasticity imaging technique, shows promise for imaging these features noninvasively. Clinically, this could be used to distinguish vulnerable plaques, for which surgical intervention may be required, from those less prone to rupture. In this study, a parametric analysis using Finite-Element Method (FEM) models was performed to simulate ARFI imaging of five different carotid artery plaques across a wide range of material properties. It was demonstrated that ARFI could resolve the softer lipid pool from the surrounding, stiffer media and fibrous cap and was most dependent upon the stiffness of the lipid pool component. Stress concentrations due to an ARFI excitation were located in the media and fibrous cap components. In all cases, the maximum Von Mises stress was < 1.2 kPa. In comparing these results with others investigating plaque rupture, it is concluded that while the mechanisms may be different, the Von Mises stresses imposed by ARFI are orders of magnitude lower than the stresses associated with blood pressure. PMID:23122224

  19. Photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging with a gas-coupled laser acoustic line detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jami L.; van Wijk, Kasper; Caron, James N.; Timmerman, Miriam

    2016-03-01

    Conventional contacting transducers are highly sensitive and readily available for ultrasonic and photoacoustic imaging. On the other hand, optical detection can be advantageous when a small sensor footprint, large bandwidth and no contact are essential. However, most optical methods utilizing interferometry or Doppler vibrometry rely on the reflection of light from the object. We present a non-contact detection method for photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging--termed Gas-Coupled Laser Acoustic Detection (GCLAD)--that does not involve surface reflectivity. GCLAD measures the displacement along a line in the air parallel to the object. Information about point displacements along the line is lost with this method, but resolution is increased over techniques that utilize finite point-detectors when used as an integrating line detector. In this proceeding, we present a formula for quantifying surface displacement remotely with GCLAD. We will validate this result by comparison with a commercial vibrometer. Finally, we will present two-dimensional imaging results using GCLAD as a line detector for photoacoustic and laser-ultrasound imaging.

  20. Acoustically active liposome-nanobubble complexes for enhanced ultrasonic imaging and ultrasound-triggered drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, An T; Wrenn, Steven P

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound is well known as a safe, reliable imaging modality. A historical limitation of ultrasound, however, was its inability to resolve structures at length scales less than nominally 20 µm, which meant that classical ultrasound could not be used in applications such as echocardiography and angiogenesis where one requires the ability to image small blood vessels. The advent of ultrasound contrast agents, or microbubbles, removed this limitation and ushered in a new wave of enhanced ultrasound applications. In recent years, the microbubbles have been designed to achieve yet another application, namely ultrasound-triggered drug delivery. Ultrasound contrast agents are thus tantamount to 'theranostic' vehicles, meaning they can do both therapy (drug delivery) and imaging (diagnostics). The use of ultrasound contrast agents as drug delivery vehicles, however, is perhaps less than ideal when compared to traditional drug delivery vehicles (e.g., polymeric microcapsules and liposomes) which have greater drug carrying capacities. The drawback of the traditional drug delivery vehicles is that they are not naturally acoustically active and cannot be used for imaging. The notion of a theranostic vehicle is sufficiently intriguing that many attempts have been made in recent years to achieve a vehicle that combines the echogenicity of microbubbles with the drug carrying capacity of liposomes. The attempts can be classified into three categories, namely entrapping, tethering, and nesting. Of these, nesting is the newest-and perhaps the most promising.

  1. Comparison of ultrasound B-mode, strain imaging, acoustic radiation force impulse displacement and shear wave velocity imaging using real time clinical breast images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manickam, Kavitha; Machireddy, Ramasubba Reddy; Raghavan, Bagyam

    2016-04-01

    It has been observed that many pathological process increase the elastic modulus of soft tissue compared to normal. In order to image tissue stiffness using ultrasound, a mechanical compression is applied to tissues of interest and local tissue deformation is measured. Based on the mechanical excitation, ultrasound stiffness imaging methods are classified as compression or strain imaging which is based on external compression and Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging which is based on force generated by focused ultrasound. When ultrasound is focused on tissue, shear wave is generated in lateral direction and shear wave velocity is proportional to stiffness of tissues. The work presented in this paper investigates strain elastography and ARFI imaging in clinical cancer diagnostics using real time patient data. Ultrasound B-mode imaging, strain imaging, ARFI displacement and ARFI shear wave velocity imaging were conducted on 50 patients (31 Benign and 23 malignant categories) using Siemens S2000 machine. True modulus contrast values were calculated from the measured shear wave velocities. For ultrasound B-mode, ARFI displacement imaging and strain imaging, observed image contrast and Contrast to Noise Ratio were calculated for benign and malignant cancers. Observed contrast values were compared based on the true modulus contrast values calculated from shear wave velocity imaging. In addition to that, student unpaired t-test was conducted for all the four techniques and box plots are presented. Results show that, strain imaging is better for malignant cancers whereas ARFI imaging is superior than strain imaging and B-mode for benign lesions representations.

  2. Acoustically induced tissue displacement for shear wave elasticity imaging using MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haworth, Kevin; Kripfgans, Oliver; Steele, Derek; Swanson, Scott; Sutin, Alexander; Sarvazyan, Armen

    2005-09-01

    Palpitation detects tissue abnormalities by exploiting the vast range of elastic properties found in vivo. The method is limited by tactile sensitivity and the inability to probe tissues at depth. Recent efforts seek to remove these limitation by developing a medical imaging modality based on radiation force shear wave excitation. Our approach uses an acoustic source to launch a shear wave in a tissue-mimicking phantom and MRI to record microscopic displacements. Gelatin (10% wt/vol) was used for the tissue-mimicking phantom. Results for in situ elasticity were obtained using an air-backed 10-cm-diam piezoelectric crystal. To correct for future in vivo beam aberrations, we also employ a high-pressure 1-bit time-reversal cavity. Frequency and pulse duration were selected to optimize the TRA system for acoustic output pressure. Shear wave displacements were recorded by MRI in 1-ms time increments in a complete basis that allowed for 3-D reconstruction and analysis. The Lamé coefficients are then derived from the shear wave velocity and attenuation.

  3. Evaluating the intensity of the acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) in intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging: Preliminary in vitro results.

    PubMed

    Shih, Cho-Chiang; Lai, Ting-Yu; Huang, Chih-Chung

    2016-08-01

    The ability to measure the elastic properties of plaques and vessels is significant in clinical diagnosis, particularly for detecting a vulnerable plaque. A novel concept of combining intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging has recently been proposed. This method has potential in elastography for distinguishing between the stiffness of plaques and arterial vessel walls. However, the intensity of the acoustic radiation force requires calibration as a standard for the further development of an ARFI-IVUS imaging device that could be used in clinical applications. In this study, a dual-frequency transducer with 11MHz and 48MHz was used to measure the association between the biological tissue displacement and the applied acoustic radiation force. The output intensity of the acoustic radiation force generated by the pushing element ranged from 1.8 to 57.9mW/cm(2), as measured using a calibrated hydrophone. The results reveal that all of the acoustic intensities produced by the transducer in the experiments were within the limits specified by FDA regulations and could still displace the biological tissues. Furthermore, blood clots with different hematocrits, which have elastic properties similar to the lipid pool of plaques, with stiffness ranging from 0.5 to 1.9kPa could be displaced from 1 to 4μm, whereas the porcine arteries with stiffness ranging from 120 to 291kPa were displaced from 0.4 to 1.3μm when an acoustic intensity of 57.9mW/cm(2) was used. The in vitro ARFI images of the artery with a blood clot and artificial arteriosclerosis showed a clear distinction of the stiffness distributions of the vessel wall. All the results reveal that ARFI-IVUS imaging has the potential to distinguish the elastic properties of plaques and vessels. Moreover, the acoustic intensity used in ARFI imaging has been experimentally quantified. Although the size of this two-element transducer is unsuitable for IVUS imaging, the

  4. System design of programmable 4f phase modulation techniques for rapid intensity shaping: a conceptual comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Matthias; Heber, Jörg; Janschek, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    The present study analyses three beam shaping approaches with respect to a light-efficient generation of i) patterns and ii) multiple spots by means of a generic optical 4f-setup. 4f approaches share the property that due to the one-to-one relationship between output intensity and input phase, the need for time-consuming, iterative calculation can be avoided. The resulting low computational complexity offers a particular advantage compared to the widely used holographic principles and makes them potential candidates for real-time applications. The increasing availability of high-speed phase modulators, e.g. on the basis of MEMS, calls for an evaluation of the performances of these concepts. Our second interest is the applicability of 4f methods to high-power applications. We discuss the variants of 4f intensity shaping by phase modulation from a system-level point of view which requires the consideration of application relevant boundary conditions. The discussion includes i) the micro mirror based phase manipulation combined with amplitude masking in the Fourier plane, ii) the Generalized Phase Contrast, and iii) matched phase-only correlation filtering combined with GPC. The conceptual comparison relies on comparative figures of merit for energy efficiency, pattern homogeneity, pattern image quality, maximum output intensity and flexibility with respect to the displayable pattern. Numerical simulations illustrate our findings.

  5. Simultaneous bilateral real-time 3-d transcranial ultrasound imaging at 1 MHz through poor acoustic windows.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Brooks D; Nicoletto, Heather A; Bennett, Ellen R; Laskowitz, Daniel T; Smith, Stephen W

    2013-04-01

    Ultrasound imaging has been proposed as a rapid, portable alternative imaging modality to examine stroke patients in pre-hospital or emergency room settings. However, in performing transcranial ultrasound examinations, 8%-29% of patients in a general population may present with window failure, in which case it is not possible to acquire clinically useful sonographic information through the temporal bone acoustic window. In this work, we describe the technical considerations, design and fabrication of low-frequency (1.2 MHz), large aperture (25.3 mm) sparse matrix array transducers for 3-D imaging in the event of window failure. These transducers are integrated into a system for real-time 3-D bilateral transcranial imaging-the ultrasound brain helmet-and color flow imaging capabilities at 1.2 MHz are directly compared with arrays operating at 1.8 MHz in a flow phantom with attenuation comparable to the in vivo case. Contrast-enhanced imaging allowed visualization of arteries of the Circle of Willis in 5 of 5 subjects and 8 of 10 sides of the head despite probe placement outside of the acoustic window. Results suggest that this type of transducer may allow acquisition of useful images either in individuals with poor windows or outside of the temporal acoustic window in the field.

  6. Redetermination of durangite, NaAl(AsO4)F

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Gordon W.; Yang, Betty N.; Thompson, Richard M.; Wenz, Michelle D.; Andrade, Marcelo B.

    2012-01-01

    The crystal structure of durangite, ideally NaAl(AsO4)F (chemical name sodium aluminium arsenate fluoride), has been determined previously [Kokkoros (1938). Z. Kristallogr. 99, 38–49] using Weissenberg film data without reporting displacement parameters of atoms or a reliability factor. This study reports the redetermination of the structure of durangite using single-crystal X-ray diffraction data from a natural sample with composition (Na0.95Li0.05)(Al0.91Fe3+ 0.07Mn3+ 0.02)(AsO4)(F0.73(OH)0.27) from the type locality, the Barranca mine, Coneto de Comonfort, Durango, Mexico. Durangite is isostructural with minerals of the titanite group in the space group C2/c. Its structure is characterized by kinked chains of corner-sharing AlO4F2 octa­hedra parallel to the c axis. These chains are cross-linked by isolated AsO4 tetra­hedra, forming a three-dimensional framework. The Na+ cation (site symmetry 2) occupies the inter­stitial sites and is coordinated by one F− and six O2− anions. The AlO4F2 octa­hedron has symmetry -1; it is flattened, with the Al—F bond length [1.8457 (4) Å] shorter than the Al—O bond lengths [1.8913 (8) and 1.9002 (9) Å]. Examination of the Raman spectra for arsenate minerals in the titanite group reveals that the position of the band originating from the As—O symmetric stretching vibrations shifts to lower wavenumbers from durangite, maxwellite [ideally NaFe(AsO4)F], to tilasite [CaMg(AsO4)F]. PMID:23284315

  7. Acoustic characterization of ultrasound contrast microbubbles and echogenic liposomes: Applications to imaging and drug-delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Shirshendu

    Micron- to nanometer - sized ultrasound agents, like encapsulated microbubbles and echogenic liposomes (ELIPs), are being actively developed for possible clinical implementations in diagnostic imaging and ultrasound mediated drug/gene delivery. The primary objective of this thesis is to characterize the acoustic behavior of and the ultrasound-mediated contents release from these contrast agents for developing multi-functional ultrasound contrast agents. Subharmonic imaging using contrast microbubbles can improve image quality by providing a higher signal to noise ratio. However, the design and development of contrast microbubbles with favorable subharmonic behavior requires accurate mathematical models capable of predicting their nonlinear dynamics. To this goal, 'strain-softening' viscoelastic interfacial models of the encapsulation were developed and subsequently utilized to simulate the dynamics of encapsulated microbubbles. A hierarchical two-pronged approach of modeling --- a model is applied to one set of experimental data to obtain the model parameters (material characterization), and then the model is validated against a second independent experiment --- is demonstrated in this thesis for two lipid coated (SonazoidRTM and DefinityRTM) and a few polymer (polylactide) encapsulated microbubbles. The proposed models were successful in predicting several experimentally observed behaviors e.g., low subharmonic thresholds and "compression-only" radial oscillations. Results indicate that neglecting the polydisperse size distribution of contrast agent suspensions, a common practice in the literature, can lead to inaccurate results. In vitro experimental investigation of the dependence of subharmonic response from these microbubbles on the ambient pressure is also in conformity with the recent numerical investigations, showing both increase or decrease under appropriate excitation conditions. Experimental characterization of the ELIPs and polymersomes was performed

  8. Imaging of Acoustically Coupled Oscillations Due to Flow Past a Shallow Cavity: Effect of Cavity Length Scale

    SciTech Connect

    P Oshkai; M Geveci; D Rockwell; M Pollack

    2004-05-24

    Flow-acoustic interactions due to fully turbulent inflow past a shallow axisymmetric cavity mounted in a pipe, which give rise to flow tones, are investigated using a technique of high-image-density particle image velocimetry in conjunction with unsteady pressure measurements. This imaging leads to patterns of velocity, vorticity, streamline topology, and hydrodynamic contributions to the acoustic power integral. Global instantaneous images, as well as time-averaged images, are evaluated to provide insight into the flow physics during tone generation. Emphasis is on the manner in which the streamwise length scale of the cavity alters the major features of the flow structure. These image-based approaches allow identification of regions of the unsteady shear layer that contribute to the instantaneous hydrodynamic component of the acoustic power, which is necessary to maintain a flow tone. In addition, combined image analysis and pressure measurements allow categorization of the instantaneous flow patterns that are associated with types of time traces and spectra of the fluctuating pressure. In contrast to consideration based solely on pressure spectra, it is demonstrated that locked-on tones may actually exhibit intermittent, non-phase-locked images, apparently due to low damping of the acoustic resonator. Locked-on flow tones (without modulation or intermittency), locked-on flow tones with modulation, and non-locked-on oscillations with short-term, highly coherent fluctuations are defined and represented by selected cases. Depending on which of these regimes occur, the time-averaged Q (quality)-factor and the dimensionless peak pressure are substantially altered.

  9. A Bayesian approach for characterization of soft tissue viscoelasticity in acoustic radiation force imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaodong; Pelegri, Assimina A

    2016-04-01

    Biomechanical imaging techniques based on acoustic radiation force (ARF) have been developed to characterize the viscoelasticity of soft tissue by measuring the motion excited by ARF non-invasively. The unknown stress distribution in the region of excitation limits an accurate inverse characterization of soft tissue viscoelasticity, and single degree-of-freedom simplified models have been applied to solve the inverse problem approximately. In this study, the ARF-induced creep imaging is employed to estimate the time constant of a Voigt viscoelastic tissue model, and an inverse finite element (FE) characterization procedure based on a Bayesian formulation is presented. The Bayesian approach aims to estimate a reasonable quantification of the probability distributions of soft tissue mechanical properties in the presence of measurement noise and model parameter uncertainty. Gaussian process metamodeling is applied to provide a fast statistical approximation based on a small number of computationally expensive FE model runs. Numerical simulation results demonstrate that the Bayesian approach provides an efficient and practical estimation of the probability distributions of time constant in the ARF-induced creep imaging. In a comparison study with the single degree of freedom models, the Bayesian approach with FE models improves the estimation results even in the presence of large uncertainty levels of the model parameters.

  10. An application of time-reversed acoustics to the imaging of a salt-dome flank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, M. E.; Lu, R.; Campman, X.; Toksöz, N.; Zhang, Y.; de Hoop, M. V.

    2005-12-01

    We present results of applying the concept of time-reversed acoustics (TRA) to the imaging of a salt-dome flank in a v(z) medium. A simulated multi-level walk-away VSP survey with sources at the surface and receivers in the borehole can be sorted into an equivalent reverse VSP (RVSP) with effective downhole sources and surface receivers. We apply the TRA process to the RVSP traces and create a zero offset seismic section as if it had been collected from collocated downhole sources and receivers. This procedure effectively redatums the wavefield from the surface to the borehole, eliminating the need for any complicated processing. The redatummed traces are created by summing the autocorrelations of the traces in the RVSP common shot gather. Theory says that each shot gather should be from receivers which completely surround the source. From practical considerations, we only have available the RVSP common receivers on the earth's surface, so we obtain an approximate zero offset section. Even with this restriction, our example shows that the results are encouraging. The image of the salt dome flank is created from the redatummed traces using a standard post-stack depth migration algorithm. This image compares favorably with the salt dome flank model.

  11. A Bayesian approach for characterization of soft tissue viscoelasticity in acoustic radiation force imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaodong; Pelegri, Assimina A

    2016-04-01

    Biomechanical imaging techniques based on acoustic radiation force (ARF) have been developed to characterize the viscoelasticity of soft tissue by measuring the motion excited by ARF non-invasively. The unknown stress distribution in the region of excitation limits an accurate inverse characterization of soft tissue viscoelasticity, and single degree-of-freedom simplified models have been applied to solve the inverse problem approximately. In this study, the ARF-induced creep imaging is employed to estimate the time constant of a Voigt viscoelastic tissue model, and an inverse finite element (FE) characterization procedure based on a Bayesian formulation is presented. The Bayesian approach aims to estimate a reasonable quantification of the probability distributions of soft tissue mechanical properties in the presence of measurement noise and model parameter uncertainty. Gaussian process metamodeling is applied to provide a fast statistical approximation based on a small number of computationally expensive FE model runs. Numerical simulation results demonstrate that the Bayesian approach provides an efficient and practical estimation of the probability distributions of time constant in the ARF-induced creep imaging. In a comparison study with the single degree of freedom models, the Bayesian approach with FE models improves the estimation results even in the presence of large uncertainty levels of the model parameters. PMID:26255624

  12. Intracardiac Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) and Shear Wave Imaging in Pigs with Focal Infarctions

    PubMed Central

    Hollender, Peter; Bradway, David; Wolf, Patrick; Goswami, Robi; Trahey, Gregg

    2013-01-01

    Four pigs, three with focal infarctions in the apical intraventricular septum (IVS) and/or left ventricular free wall (LVFW), were imaged with an intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) transducer. Custom beam sequences were used to excite the myocardium with focused acoustic radiation force (ARF) impulses and image the subsequent tissue response. Tissue displacement in response to the ARF excitation was calculated with a phase-based estimator, and transverse wave magnitude and velocity were each estimated at every depth. The excitation sequence was repeated rapidly, either in the same location to generate 40 Hz M-Modes at a single steering angle, or with a modulated steering angle to synthesize 2-D displacement magnitude and shear wave velocity images at 17 points in the cardiac cycle. Both types of images were acquired from various views in the right and left ventricles, in and out of infarcted regions. In all animals, ARFI and SWEI estimates indicated diastolic relaxation and systolic contraction in non-infarcted tissues. The M-Mode sequences showed high beat-to-beat spatio-temporal repeatability of the measurements for each imaging plane. In views of noninfarcted tissue in the diseased animals, no significant elastic remodeling was indicated when compared to the control. Where available, views of infarcted tissue were compared to similar views from the control animal. In views of the LVFW, the infarcted tissue presented as stiff and non-contractile compared to the control. In a view of the IVS, no significant difference was seen between infarcted and healthy tissue, while in another view, a heterogeneous infarction was seen presenting itself as non-contractile in systole. PMID:25004538

  13. Plant Cap-binding Complexes Eukaryotic Initiation Factors eIF4F and eIFISO4F

    PubMed Central

    Mayberry, Laura K.; Allen, M. Leah; Nitka, Kelley R.; Campbell, Lara; Murphy, Patricia A.; Browning, Karen S.

    2011-01-01

    The initiation of translation in eukaryotes requires a suite of eIFs that include the cap-binding complex, eIF4F. eIF4F is comprised of the subunits eIF4G and eIF4E and often the helicase, eIF4A. The eIF4G subunit serves as an assembly point for other initiation factors, whereas eIF4E binds to the 7-methyl guanosine cap of mRNA. Plants have an isozyme form of eIF4F (eIFiso4F) with comparable subunits, eIFiso4E and eIFiso4G. Plant eIF4A is very loosely associated with the plant cap-binding complexes. The specificity of interaction of the individual subunits of the two complexes was previously unknown. To address this issue, mixed complexes (eIF4E-eIFiso4G or eIFiso4E-eIF4G) were expressed and purified from Escherichia coli for biochemical analysis. The activity of the mixed complexes in in vitro translation assays correlated with the large subunit of the respective correct complex. These results suggest that the eIF4G or eIFiso4G subunits influence translational efficiency more than the cap-binding subunits. The translation assays also showed varying responses of the mRNA templates to eIF4F or eIFiso4F, suggesting that some level of mRNA discrimination is possible. The dissociation constants for the correct complexes have KD values in the subnanomolar range, whereas the mixed complexes were found to have KD values in the ∼10 nm range. Displacement assays showed that the correct binding partner readily displaces the incorrect binding partner in a manner consistent with the difference in KD values. These results show molecular specificity for the formation of plant eIF4F and eIFiso4F complexes and suggest a role in mRNA discrimination during initiation of translation. PMID:21965660

  14. Spatially resolved acoustic spectroscopy for rapid imaging of material microstructure and grain orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Richard J.; Li, Wenqi; Coulson, Jethro; Clark, Matt; Somekh, Michael G.; Sharples, Steve D.

    2014-05-01

    Measuring the grain structure of aerospace materials is very important to understand their mechanical properties and in-service performance. Spatially resolved acoustic spectroscopy is an acoustic technique utilizing surface acoustic waves to map the grain structure of a material. When combined with measurements in multiple acoustic propagation directions, the grain orientation can be obtained by fitting the velocity surface to a model. The new instrument presented here can take thousands of acoustic velocity measurements per second. The spatial and velocity resolution can be adjusted by simple modification to the system; this is discussed in detail by comparison of theoretical expectations with experimental data.

  15. A view of the world through the bat's ear: the formation of acoustic images in echolocation.

    PubMed

    Simmons, J A

    1989-11-01

    Echolocating bats perceive objects as acoustic images derived from echoes of the ultrasonic sounds they emit. They can detect, track, identify, and intercept flying insects using sonar. Many species, such as the big brown bat, Eptesicus fuscus, emit frequency-modulated sonar sounds and perceive the distance to targets, or target range, from the delay of echoes. For Eptesicus, a point-target's image has a sharpness along the range axis that is determined by the acuity of echo-delay perception, which is about 10 ns under favorable conditions. The image as a whole has a fine range structure that corresponds to the cross-correlation function between emissions and echoes. A complex target- which has reflecting points, called "glints", located at slightly different distances and reflects echoes containing overlapping components with slightly different delays--is perceived in terms of its range profile. The separation of the glints along the range dimension is encoded by the shape of the echo spectrum created by interference between overlapping echo components. However, Eptesicus transforms the echo spectrum back into an estimate of the original delay separation of echo components. The bat thus converts spectral cues into elements of an image expressed in terms of range. The absolute range of the nearest glint is encoded by the arrival time of the earliest echo component, and the spectrally encoded range separation of additional glints is referred to this time-encoded reference range for the image as a whole. Each individual glint is represented by a cross-correlation function for its own echo component, the nearest of which is computed directly from arrival-time measurements while further ones are computed by transformation of the echo spectrum. The bat then sums the cross-correlation functions for multiple glints to form the entire image of the complex target. Range and shape are two distinct features of targets that are separately encoded by the bat's auditory system

  16. Imaging velocity and attenuation anomalies in mining environments using Acoustic Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesca, S.; Monna, S.; Kaiser, D.; Dahm, T.

    2012-04-01

    Imaging structural properties and monitoring fracturing processes in mining environments is of importance for mining exploitation. It is also helpful to characterize damages induced by mining activities, thus it is of primary interest for mining engineering and civil protection. Additionally, the development of improved monitoring and imaging methods is of great importance for salt deposits as potential reservoirs for CO2 sequestration. The analysis of Acoustic Emission (AE) and microseismicity data, which are routinely used in mining survey, is typically limited to estimate location of induced microcracks and seismicity. AE data will be here further analysed to obtain images of the seismic structure. We focus on an AE dataset recorded at the Morsleben salt mine, in Germany; the dataset contains more than 1 million events, recorded during a period of two months, with AE magnitudes spanning 5 units. Arrival times of first P and S onsets, as well as maximal amplitudes recorded for both seismic phases, are used to assess the seismic velocities and attenuation properties of the mining environment. Given the large size of the considered dataset, a spatial clustering of the events is first performed and a spatial homogeneous catalog of averaged "pseudoevents" is built. This new catalog is then used to provide first averaged images of the attenuation and velocity anomalies at specific depths. Results points to clear velocity and attenuation anomalies, which are correlated with the main structural features and the geometry of the salt body. The potential of the dataset for tomographic applications is investigated, both including synthetic simulations and considering real data. This study is funded by the project MINE, which is part of the R&D-Programme GEOTECHNOLOGIEN. The project MINE is funded by the German Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), Grant of project BMBF03G0737.

  17. Quantitative observations of a deep-sea hydrothermal plume using an acoustic imaging sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guangyu

    The Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar (COVIS) is used to quantitatively monitor the hydrothermal discharge from the Grotto mound, a venting sulfide structure on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Since its deployment in September 2010, COVIS has recorded a multi-year long, near-continuous acoustic backscatter dataset. Further analysis of this dataset sheds light on the backscattering mechanisms within the buoyant plumes above Grotto and yields quantitative information on the influences of oceanic, atmospheric, and geological processes on the dynamics and heat source of the plumes. An investigation of the acoustic scattering mechanisms within the buoyant plumes issuing from Grotto suggests the dominant scattering mechanism within the plumes is the temperature fluctuations caused by the turbulent mixing of the buoyant plumes with the ambient seawater. In comparison, the backscatter from plume particles is negligible at lower levels of the plume but can potentially be significant at higher levels. Furthermore, this finding demonstrates the potential of inverting the acoustic backsatter to estimate the temperature fluctuations within the plumes. Processing the backscatter dataset recorded by COVIS yields time-series measurements of the vertical flow rate, volume transport, expansion rate of the largest buoyant plume above Grotto. Further analysis of those time-series measurements suggests the rate at which the ambient seawater is entrained into the plume increases with the magnitude of the ambient ocean currents---the current-driven entrainment. Furthermore, the oscillations in the ambient ocean currents that are driven by tidal and atmospheric forcing are introduced into the flow field within the plume through the current-driven entrainment. An inverse method has been developed to estimate the source heat transport driving the largest plume above Grotto from its volume transport estimates. The result suggests the heat transport driving the plume was

  18. An electrochemical and high-speed imaging study of micropore decontamination by acoustic bubble entrapment.

    PubMed

    Offin, Douglas G; Birkin, Peter R; Leighton, Timothy G

    2014-03-14

    Electrochemical and high-speed imaging techniques are used to study the abilities of ultrasonically-activated bubbles to clean out micropores. Cylindrical pores with dimensions (diameter × depth) of 500 μm × 400 μm (aspect ratio 0.8), 125 μm × 350 μm (aspect ratio 2.8) and 50 μm × 200 μm (aspect ratio 4.0) are fabricated in glass substrates. Each pore is contaminated by filling it with an electrochemically inactive blocking organic material (thickened methyl salicylate) before the substrate is placed in a solution containing an electroactive species (Fe(CN)6(3-)). An electrode is fabricated at the base of each pore and the Faradaic current is used to monitor the decontamination as a function of time. For the largest pore, decontamination driven by ultrasound (generated by a horn type transducer) and bulk fluid flow are compared. It is shown that ultrasound is much more effective than flow alone, and that bulk fluid flow at the rates used cannot decontaminate the pore completely, but that ultrasound can. In the case of the 125 μm pore, high-speed imaging is used to elucidate the cleaning mechanisms involved in ultrasonic decontamination and reveals that acoustic bubble entrapment is a key feature. The smallest pore is used to explore the limits of decontamination and it is found that ultrasound is still effective at this size under the conditions employed.

  19. Inferences of Particle Size and Composition From Video-like Images Based on Acoustic Data: Grotto Plume, Main Endeavor Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemis, K. G.; Rona, P. A.; Santilli, K.; Dastur, J.; Silver, D.

    2004-12-01

    Optical and acoustic scattering from particles in a seafloor hydrothermal plume can be related if the particle properties and scattering mechanisms are known. We assume Rayleigh backscattering of sound and Mie forward scattering of light. We then use the particle concentrations implicit in the observed acoustic backscatter intensity to recreate the optical image a camera would see given a particular lighting level. The motivation for this study is to discover what information on particle size and composition in the buoyant plume can be inferred from a comparison of the calculated optical images (based on acoustic data) with actual video images from the acoustic acquisition cruise and the IMAX film "Volcanoes of the Deep Sea" (Stephen Low Productions, Inc.). Because the geologists, biologists and oceanographers involved in the study of seafloor hydrothermal plumes all "see" plumes in different ways, an additional motivation is to create more realistic plume images from the acoustic data. By using visualization techniques, with realistic lighting models, we can convert the plume image from mechanical waves (sound) to electromagnetic waves (light). The resulting image depends on assumptions about the particle size distribution and composition. Conversion of the volume scattering coefficients from Rayleigh to Mie scattering is accomplished by an extinction scale factor that depends on the wavelengths of light and sound and on the average particle size. We also make an adjustment to the scattered light based on the particles reflectivity (albedo) and color. We present a series of images of acoustic data for Grotto Plume, Main Endeavour Field (within the Endeavour ISS Site) using both realistic lighting models and traditional visualization techniques to investigate the dependence of the images on assumptions about particle composition and size. Sensitivity analysis suggests that the visibility of the buoyant plume increases as the intensity of supplied light increases

  20. Measurement of acoustic noise effect due to the gradient pulsing in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, SungTaek; Song, Inchang; Park, Hyun Wook

    1999-05-01

    In MRI, gradient magnetic fields are used to obtain the spatial information by frequency modulation of the received signal. The gradient fields are generated by switching currents on the gradient coils, which generates acoustic noise due to Lorentzian force. In particular, fast imaging methods, which are usually used for fMRI, require fast switching of the gradient pulse, thereby generating large acoustic noise. The intensity of the acoustic noise depends on the imaging method and the pulse sequences. The acoustic noise induced by gradient pulsing may interfere for signal enhancement of brain areas with the presentation of auditory stimuli during fMRI. In this paper, the gradient pulsing effects on fMRI are analyzed for different combinations of gradients. The experimental results show that total activations by visual stimulation are slightly larger for a combination of Z readout and Y phase-encoding gradients than those for a combination of Y readout and Z phase-encoding gradients when sagittal-view fMRI is performed.

  1. Acoustic Imaging of Microstructure and Evaluation of the Adhesive's Physical, Mechanical and Chemical Properties Changes at Different Cure States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severina, I. A.; Fabre, A. J.; Maeva, E. Yu.

    Epoxy thermoset adhesives transform during cure from liquid state into the highly cross-linked solid. Cure state of the material depends on condition of the reaction (temperature, pressure, time etc.) and resin/hardener ratio. It is known that the cure degree of the adhesive correlates with adhesion strength, which is critical for structural adhesives used in automotive, aerospace and marine industries. In this work, characterization of cure process of the adhesive with acoustic methods is presented. Evolution of the acoustic and elastic properties (attenuation, sound velocity, density, elastic moduli) during cure reaction was monitored in relation to the substantial physical and chemical changes of the material. These macro parameters of the adhesive were compared with the material's microstructure obtained by high-resolution acoustic microscopy technique in frequencies range of 50-400 MHz. Development of the microstructure of the adhesive as it cures at different conditions has been investigated. Appearance and development of the granular structure on the adhesive interface during cure reaction has been demonstrated. Acoustic images were analyzed by mathematical method to quantitatively characterize distribution of the adhesive's components. Statistical analysis of such images provides an accurate quantitative measure of the degree of cure of such samples. Research results presented in this paper can be useful as a basis for non-destructive evaluation of the adhesive materials

  2. Imaging electrical impedance from acoustic measurements by means of magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI).

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Xu, Yuan; He, Bin

    2007-02-01

    We have conducted computer simulation and experimental studies on magnetoacoustic-tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI) for electrical impedance imaging. In MAT-MI, the object to be imaged is placed in a static magnetic field, while pulsed magnetic stimulation is applied in order to induce eddy current in the object. In the static magnetic field, the Lorentz force acts upon the eddy current and causes acoustic vibrations in the object. The propagated acoustic wave is then measured around the object to reconstruct the electrical impedance distribution. In the present simulation study, a two-layer spherical model is used. Parameters of the model such as sample size, conductivity values, strength of the static and pulsed magnetic field, are set to simulate features of biological tissue samples and feasible experimental constraints. In the forward simulation, the electrical potential and current density are solved using Poisson's equation, and the acoustic pressure is calculated as the forward solution. The electrical impedance distribution is then reconstructed from the simulated pressure distribution surrounding the sample. The present computer simulation results suggest that MAT-MI can reconstruct conductivity images of biological tissue with high spatial resolution and high contrast. The feasibility of MAT-MI in providing high spatial resolution images containing impedance-related information has also been demonstrated in a phantom experiment.

  3. Non-intrusive, high-resolution, real-time, two-dimensional imaging of multiphase materials using acoustic array sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassiède, M.; Shaw, J. M.

    2015-04-01

    Two parallel multi-element ultrasonic acoustic arrays combined with sets of focal laws for acoustic signal generation and a classical tomographic inversion algorithm are used to generate real-time two-dimensional micro seismic acoustic images of multiphase materials. Proof of concept and calibration measurements were performed for single phase and two phase liquids, uniform polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plates, and aluminum cylinders imbedded in PVC plates. Measurement artefacts, arising from the limited range of viewing angles, and the compromise between data acquisition rate and image quality are discussed. The angle range of scanning and the image resolution were varied, and the effects on the quality of the reproduction of the speed of sound profiles of model solids and liquids with known geometries and compositions were analysed in detail. The best image quality results were obtained for a scanning angle range of [-35°, 35°] at a step size of 2.5° post processed to generate images on a 40 μm square grid. The data acquisition time for high quality images with a 30 mm × 40 mm view field is 10 min. Representation of two-phase solids with large differences in speed of sound between phases and where one phase is dispersed in the form of macroscopic objects (greater than 1 mm in diameter) proved to be the most difficult to image accurately. Liquid-liquid and liquid-vapor phase boundaries, in micro porous solids by contrast, were more readily defined. Displacement of air by water and water by heptane in natural porous limestone provides illustrative kinetic examples. Measurement results with these realistic cases demonstrate the feasibility of the technique to monitor in real time and on the micrometer length scale local composition and flow of organic liquids in inorganic porous media, one of many envisioned engineering applications. Improvement of data acquisition rate is an area for future collaborative study.

  4. Non-intrusive, high-resolution, real-time, two-dimensional imaging of multiphase materials using acoustic array sensors.

    PubMed

    Cassiède, M; Shaw, J M

    2015-04-01

    Two parallel multi-element ultrasonic acoustic arrays combined with sets of focal laws for acoustic signal generation and a classical tomographic inversion algorithm are used to generate real-time two-dimensional micro seismic acoustic images of multiphase materials. Proof of concept and calibration measurements were performed for single phase and two phase liquids, uniform polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plates, and aluminum cylinders imbedded in PVC plates. Measurement artefacts, arising from the limited range of viewing angles, and the compromise between data acquisition rate and image quality are discussed. The angle range of scanning and the image resolution were varied, and the effects on the quality of the reproduction of the speed of sound profiles of model solids and liquids with known geometries and compositions were analysed in detail. The best image quality results were obtained for a scanning angle range of [-35°, 35°] at a step size of 2.5° post processed to generate images on a 40 μm square grid. The data acquisition time for high quality images with a 30 mm × 40 mm view field is 10 min. Representation of two-phase solids with large differences in speed of sound between phases and where one phase is dispersed in the form of macroscopic objects (greater than 1 mm in diameter) proved to be the most difficult to image accurately. Liquid-liquid and liquid-vapor phase boundaries, in micro porous solids by contrast, were more readily defined. Displacement of air by water and water by heptane in natural porous limestone provides illustrative kinetic examples. Measurement results with these realistic cases demonstrate the feasibility of the technique to monitor in real time and on the micrometer length scale local composition and flow of organic liquids in inorganic porous media, one of many envisioned engineering applications. Improvement of data acquisition rate is an area for future collaborative study. PMID:25933884

  5. Non-intrusive, high-resolution, real-time, two-dimensional imaging of multiphase materials using acoustic array sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Cassiède, M.; Shaw, J. M.

    2015-04-15

    Two parallel multi-element ultrasonic acoustic arrays combined with sets of focal laws for acoustic signal generation and a classical tomographic inversion algorithm are used to generate real-time two-dimensional micro seismic acoustic images of multiphase materials. Proof of concept and calibration measurements were performed for single phase and two phase liquids, uniform polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plates, and aluminum cylinders imbedded in PVC plates. Measurement artefacts, arising from the limited range of viewing angles, and the compromise between data acquisition rate and image quality are discussed. The angle range of scanning and the image resolution were varied, and the effects on the quality of the reproduction of the speed of sound profiles of model solids and liquids with known geometries and compositions were analysed in detail. The best image quality results were obtained for a scanning angle range of [−35°, 35°] at a step size of 2.5° post processed to generate images on a 40 μm square grid. The data acquisition time for high quality images with a 30 mm × 40 mm view field is 10 min. Representation of two-phase solids with large differences in speed of sound between phases and where one phase is dispersed in the form of macroscopic objects (greater than 1 mm in diameter) proved to be the most difficult to image accurately. Liquid-liquid and liquid-vapor phase boundaries, in micro porous solids by contrast, were more readily defined. Displacement of air by water and water by heptane in natural porous limestone provides illustrative kinetic examples. Measurement results with these realistic cases demonstrate the feasibility of the technique to monitor in real time and on the micrometer length scale local composition and flow of organic liquids in inorganic porous media, one of many envisioned engineering applications. Improvement of data acquisition rate is an area for future collaborative study.

  6. Super-resolution imaging by resonant tunneling in anisotropic acoustic metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Liu, Aiping; Zhou, Xiaoming; Huang, Guoliang; Hu, Gengkai

    2012-10-01

    The resonant tunneling effects that could result in complete transmission of evanescent waves are examined in acoustic metamaterials of anisotropic effective mass. The tunneling conditions are first derived for the metamaterials composed of classical mass-in-mass structures. It is found that the tunneling transmission occurs when the total length of metamaterials is an integral number of half-wavelengths of the periodic Bloch wave. Due to the local resonance of building units of metamaterials, the Bloch waves are spatially modulated within the periodic structures, leading to the resonant tunneling occurring in the low-frequency region. The metamaterial slab lens with anisotropic effective mass is designed by which the physics of resonant tunneling and the features for evanescent field manipulations are examined. The designed lens interacts with evanescent waves in the way of the propagating wavenumber weakly dependent on the spatial frequency of evanescent waves. Full-wave simulations validate the imaging performance of the proposed lens with the spatial resolution beyond the diffraction limit.

  7. Three-dimensional acoustic imaging with planar microphone arrays and compressive sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Fangli; Wei, Jingang; Qiu, Lianfang; Shi, Hongbing; Li, Xiaofan

    2016-10-01

    For obtaining super-resolution source maps, we extend compressive sensing (CS) to three-dimensional acoustic imaging. Source maps are simulated with a planar microphone array and a CS algorithm. Comparing the source maps of the CS algorithm with those of the conventional beamformer (CBF) and Tikhonov Regularization (TIKR), we find that the CS algorithm is computationally more effective and can obtain much higher resolution source maps than the CBF and TIKR. The effectiveness of the CS algorithm is analyzed. The CS algorithm can locate the sound sources exactly when the frequency is above 4000 Hz and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is above 12 dB. The location error of the CS algorithm increases as the frequency drops below the threshold, and the errors in location and power increase as SNR decreases. The further from the array the source is, the larger the location error is. The lateral resolution of the CS algorithm is much better than the range resolution. Finally, experimental measurements are conducted in a semi-anechoic room. Two mobile phones are served as sound sources. The results show that the CS algorithm can reconstruct two sound sources near the bottom of the two mobile phones where the speakers are located. The feasibility of the CS algorithm is also validated with the experiment.

  8. Super-resolution imaging by resonant tunneling in anisotropic acoustic metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Liu, Aiping; Zhou, Xiaoming; Huang, Guoliang; Hu, Gengkai

    2012-10-01

    The resonant tunneling effects that could result in complete transmission of evanescent waves are examined in acoustic metamaterials of anisotropic effective mass. The tunneling conditions are first derived for the metamaterials composed of classical mass-in-mass structures. It is found that the tunneling transmission occurs when the total length of metamaterials is an integral number of half-wavelengths of the periodic Bloch wave. Due to the local resonance of building units of metamaterials, the Bloch waves are spatially modulated within the periodic structures, leading to the resonant tunneling occurring in the low-frequency region. The metamaterial slab lens with anisotropic effective mass is designed by which the physics of resonant tunneling and the features for evanescent field manipulations are examined. The designed lens interacts with evanescent waves in the way of the propagating wavenumber weakly dependent on the spatial frequency of evanescent waves. Full-wave simulations validate the imaging performance of the proposed lens with the spatial resolution beyond the diffraction limit. PMID:23039546

  9. Response of acoustic imaging systems using convergent leaky waves to cylindrical flaws.

    PubMed

    Gunalp, N; Atalar, A

    1989-01-01

    A theoretical study of imaging systems utilizing focused leaky surface acoustic waves (SAWs), and their response to certain kind of defects is presented. In particular, circular cylindrical inhomogeneities with axes perpendicular to the surface are considered. The scattering of the SAW from this cylinder is formulated with some approximations. The surface wave incident on the inhomogeneity is initially found as an angular spectrum of plane waves. However, to apply the boundary conditions at the cylindrical surface, the incident field has to be transformed into a superposition of cylindrical waves. Similarly, the scattered field, which is found in the form of outgoing cylindrical SAWs, is converted back to a plane wave spectrum. A formula is obtained for the transducer output voltage in terms of the position and the radius of the cylinder, and it is suitable for computer evaluation. By considering various locations for the cylinder, the sensitivity of the system around the focal point is studied. By comparing the output voltages for cylinders of different radii, the sensitivity of the system to the size of the inhomogeneity is examined. The numerical results are in agreement with the experimental observations.

  10. Testicular microlithiasis and preliminary experience of acoustic radiation force impulse imaging

    PubMed Central

    Osther, Palle Jørn Sloth; Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Background Elastography of the testis can be used as a part of multiparametric examination of the scrotum. Purpose To determine the testicular stiffness using acoustic radiation force impulse imaging (ARFI) technique in men with testicular microlithiasis (TML). Material and Methods In 2013, 12 patients with diagnosed testicular microlithiasis in 2008 (mean age, 51 years; age range, 25–76 years) underwent a 5-year follow-up B-mode ultrasonography with three ARFI elastography measurements of each testis. We used a Siemens Acuson S3000 machine. Results No malignancy was found at the 5-year follow-up B-mode and elastography in 2013. However, we found an increase in TML; in the previous ultrasonography in 2008, eight men had bilateral TML, whereas in 2013, 10 men were diagnosed with bilateral TML. The mean elasticity of testicles with TML was 0.82 m/s (interquartile range [IQR], 0.72–0.88 m/s; range, 65–1.08 m/s). Conclusion Elastography velocity of testis with TML seems to be in the same velocity range as in men with normal testis tissue. PMID:27504193

  11. Bats use a neuronally implemented computational acoustic model to form sonar images.

    PubMed

    Simmons, James A

    2012-04-01

    This paper reexamines neurophysiological results from echolocating big brown bats to propose a new perspective on FM biosonar processing in the auditory system. Individual auditory neurons are frequency-tuned and respond to brief, 2-10 ms FM sweeps with an average of one spike per sound to register their tuned frequencies, to detect echo arrival, or to register a local null in the echo spectrum. When initiated by the broadcast, these responses comprise a cascade of single spikes distributed across time in neurons tuned to different frequencies that persists for 30-50 ms, long after the sound has ended. Their progress mirrors the broadcast's propagation away from the bat and the return of echoes for distances out to 5-8 m. Each returning echo evokes a similar pattern of single spikes that coincide with ongoing responses to the broadcast to register the target's distance and shape. The hypothesis advanced here is that this flow of responses over time acts as an internal model of sonar acoustics that the bat executes using neuronal computations distributed across many neurons to accumulate a dynamic image of the bat's surroundings.

  12. Development and validation of a combined phased acoustical radiosity and image source model for predicting sound fields in rooms.

    PubMed

    Marbjerg, Gerd; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Nilsson, Erling

    2015-09-01

    A model, combining acoustical radiosity and the image source method, including phase shifts on reflection, has been developed. The model is denoted Phased Acoustical Radiosity and Image Source Method (PARISM), and it has been developed in order to be able to model both specular and diffuse reflections with complex-valued and angle-dependent boundary conditions. This paper mainly describes the combination of the two models and the implementation of the angle-dependent boundary conditions. It furthermore describes how a pressure impulse response is obtained from the energy-based acoustical radiosity by regarding the model as being stochastic. Three methods of implementation are proposed and investigated, and finally, recommendations are made for their use. Validation of the image source method is done by comparison with finite element simulations of a rectangular room with a porous absorber ceiling. Results from the full model are compared with results from other simulation tools and with measurements. The comparisons of the full model are done for real-valued and angle-independent surface properties. The proposed model agrees well with both the measured results and the alternative theories, and furthermore shows a more realistic spatial variation than energy-based methods due to the fact that interference is considered. PMID:26428783

  13. Test-bench system for a borehole azimuthal acoustic reflection imaging logging tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xianping; Ju, Xiaodong; Qiao, Wenxiao; Lu, Junqiang; Men, Baiyong; Liu, Dong

    2016-06-01

    The borehole azimuthal acoustic reflection imaging logging tool (BAAR) is a new generation of imaging logging tool, which is able to investigate stratums in a relatively larger range of space around the borehole. The BAAR is designed based on the idea of modularization with a very complex structure, so it has become urgent for us to develop a dedicated test-bench system to debug each module of the BAAR. With the help of a test-bench system introduced in this paper, test and calibration of BAAR can be easily achieved. The test-bench system is designed based on the client/server model. The hardware system mainly consists of a host computer, an embedded controlling board, a bus interface board, a data acquisition board and a telemetry communication board. The host computer serves as the human machine interface and processes the uploaded data. The software running on the host computer is designed based on VC++. The embedded controlling board uses Advanced Reduced Instruction Set Machines 7 (ARM7) as the micro controller and communicates with the host computer via Ethernet. The software for the embedded controlling board is developed based on the operating system uClinux. The bus interface board, data acquisition board and telemetry communication board are designed based on a field programmable gate array (FPGA) and provide test interfaces for the logging tool. To examine the feasibility of the test-bench system, it was set up to perform a test on BAAR. By analyzing the test results, an unqualified channel of the electronic receiving cabin was discovered. It is suggested that the test-bench system can be used to quickly determine the working condition of sub modules of BAAR and it is of great significance in improving production efficiency and accelerating industrial production of the logging tool.

  14. A simulation technique for 3D MR-guided acoustic radiation force imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Allison; Bever, Josh de; Farrer, Alexis; Coats, Brittany; Parker, Dennis L.; Christensen, Douglas A.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: In magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) therapies, the in situ characterization of the focal spot location and quality is critical. MR acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) is a technique that measures the tissue displacement caused by the radiation force exerted by the ultrasound beam. This work presents a new technique to model the displacements caused by the radiation force of an ultrasound beam in a homogeneous tissue model. Methods: When a steady-state point-source force acts internally in an infinite homogeneous medium, the displacement of the material in all directions is given by the Somigliana elastostatic tensor. The radiation force field, which is caused by absorption and reflection of the incident ultrasound intensity pattern, will be spatially distributed, and the tensor formulation takes the form of a convolution of a 3D Green’s function with the force field. The dynamic accumulation of MR phase during the ultrasound pulse can be theoretically accounted for through a time-of-arrival weighting of the Green’s function. This theoretical model was evaluated experimentally in gelatin phantoms of varied stiffness (125-, 175-, and 250-bloom). The acoustic and mechanical properties of the phantoms used as parameters of the model were measured using independent techniques. Displacements at focal depths of 30- and 45-mm in the phantoms were measured by a 3D spin echo MR-ARFI segmented-EPI sequence. Results: The simulated displacements agreed with the MR-ARFI measured displacements for all bloom values and focal depths with a normalized RMS difference of 0.055 (range 0.028–0.12). The displacement magnitude decreased and the displacement pattern broadened with increased bloom value for both focal depths, as predicted by the theory. Conclusions: A new technique that models the displacements caused by the radiation force of an ultrasound beam in a homogeneous tissue model theory has been rigorously validated through comparison

  15. Comparison of Some Aspherical Curved Surfaces of A Single Biconcave Acoustic Lens System for Ambient Noise Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, K.; Ogasawara, H.; Nakamura, T.

    Ambient Noise Imaging (ANI) is a revolutionary method for detecting silent objects using the ocean's background noise. In this study, a sound field focused by an acoustic lens system constructed with a single biconcave lens was analyzed using the 2-D Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method in order to design an ANI system. The -3dB areas and relative pressure level at image points were surveyed using lenses with some aspherical curved surfaces, such as popular aspherical lenses (elliptical, parabolic, and hyperbolic) and an aplanatic lens. The analysis results indicate that the effects of both spherical and coma aberrations were corrected by the aplanatic lens.

  16. Toward Molecular 4f Single-Ion Magnet Qubits.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Kasper S; Ariciu, Ana-Maria; McAdams, Simon; Weihe, Høgni; Bendix, Jesper; Tuna, Floriana; Piligkos, Stergios

    2016-05-11

    Quantum coherence is detected in the 4f single-ion magnet (SIM) Yb(trensal), by isotope selective pulsed EPR spectroscopy on an oriented single crystal. At X-band, the spin-lattice relaxation (T1) and phase memory (Tm) times are found to be independent of the nuclei bearing, or not, a nuclear spin. The observation of Rabi oscillations of the spin echo demonstrates the possibility to coherently manipulate the system for more than 70 rotations. This renders Yb(trensal), a sublimable and chemically modifiable SIM, an excellent candidate for quantum information processing. PMID:27105449

  17. Lattice dynamics of neodymium: Influence of 4 f electron correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waller, O.; Piekarz, P.; Bosak, A.; Jochym, P. T.; Ibrahimkutty, S.; Seiler, A.; Krisch, M.; Baumbach, T.; Parlinski, K.; Stankov, S.

    2016-07-01

    Incorporation of strong electron correlations into the density functional theory (DFT) for the electronic structure calculations of light lanthanides leads to a modification of interatomic forces and consequently the lattice dynamics. Using first-principles theory we demonstrate the substantial influence of the 4 f electron correlations on the phonon dispersion relations of Nd. The calculations are verified by an inelastic x-ray scattering experiment performed on a single-crystalline Nd(0001) film. We show that very good agreement between the calculated and measured data is achieved when electron-electron interactions are treated by the DFT +U approach.

  18. A theoretical study of inertial cavitation from acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging and implications for the mechanical index

    PubMed Central

    Church, Charles C.; Labuda, Cecille; Nightingale, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical index (MI) attempts to quantify the likelihood that exposure to diagnostic ultrasound will produce an adverse biological effect by a nonthermal mechanism. The current formulation of the MI implicitly assumes that the acoustic field is generated using the short pulse durations appropriate to B-mode imaging. However, acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging employs high-intensity pulses up to several hundred acoustic periods long. The effect of increased pulse durations on the thresholds for inertial cavitation was studied computationally in water, urine, blood, cardiac and skeletal muscle, brain, kidney, liver and skin. The results show that while the effect of pulse duration on cavitation thresholds in the three liquids can be considerable, reducing them by, e.g., 6% – 24% at 1 MHz, the effect in tissue is minor. More importantly, the frequency dependence of the MI appears to be unnecessarily conservative, i.e., that the magnitude of the exponent on frequency could be increased to 0.75. Comparison of these theoretical results with experimental measurements suggests that some tissues do not contain the pre-existing, optimally sized bubbles assumed for the MI. This means that in these tissues the MI is not necessarily a strong predictor of the probability for an adverse biological effect. PMID:25592457

  19. Hierarchical multilayer perceptron network-based fusion algorithms for detection/classification of mines using multiple acoustic images and magnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bello, Martin G.

    1996-05-01

    Hierarchical neural network approaches have been developed first for combining high and low frequency (HF and LF) Side Scan Sonar imagery, and then for the combination of both acoustic images and Magnetic data. The adopted acoustic data fusion approach consists in a image-screening/HF, LF blob matching stage, followed by an information fusion/classification stage. Three variants of the information fusion/classification algorithm were conceived and evaluated based on `aggregate-feature-combining', `neural-network-discriminant-combining', and individual classifier `decision-based-combining', respectively. The `discriminant- combining' case yielded the best classification performance, and when compared with individual HF, LF classifier performance resulted in at least an order of magnitude reduction in the density of false alarms. Next, results are obtained for combining both acoustic and magnetic data using the described high and low frequency side scan sonar discriminant combining fusion algorithm as a starting point. In the next step, acoustic image pair `tokens' are associated with magnetic `tokens', resulting in three classes of resulting `tokens': `associated' acoustic-pair and magnetic tokens, isolated acoustic-pair tokens, and isolated magnetic `tokens'. Neural network output discriminants are derived for each of the three types of tokens mentioned above, and are employed to make classification decisions. The resulting Detection/Classification Algorithm is evaluated based on a combined ground truth obtained from both acoustic and magnetic sources.

  20. Self-assembly of the first discrete 3d-4f-4f triple-stranded helicate.

    PubMed

    Riis-Johannessen, Thomas; Bernardinelli, Gérald; Filinchuk, Yaroslav; Clifford, Sarah; Dalla Favera, Natalia; Piguet, Claude

    2009-06-15

    The connection of an additional bidentate chelating unit at the extremity of a segmental bis-tridentate ligand in L5 provides an unprecedented sequence of binding sites for the self-assembly of heterometallic 3d-4f triple-stranded helicates. Thorough thermodynamic and structural investigations in acetonitrile show the formation of intricate mixtures of complexes when a single type of metal (3d or 4f) is reacted with L5. However, the situation is greatly simplified when Zn(II) (3d-block) and Lu(III) (4f-block) are simultaneously coordinated to L5, thus leading to only two identified species: the target C(3)-symmetrical trinuclear triple-stranded d-f-f helicate HHH-[ZnLu(2)(L5)(3)](8+) and a tetranuclear double-stranded complex [Zn(2)Lu(2)(L5)(2)](10+). Interestingly, the removal of Zn(II) from the former triple-helical complex has only a minor effect on the coordination of Lu(III), and translational autodiffusion coefficients show a simple reduction of the length of the molecular rigid cylinder from L = 2.7 nm in HHH-[ZnLu(2)(L5)(3)](8+) to L = 2.3 nm in HHH-[Lu(2)(L5)(3)](6+). Finally, the complete thermodynamic picture provides five novel stability macroconstants containing information about short-range (ca. 9 A) and long-range (ca. 18 A) intramolecular intermetallic d-f and f-f interactions. PMID:19499959

  1. Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging for assessing liver fibrosis in alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Kiani, Anita; Brun, Vanessa; Lainé, Fabrice; Turlin, Bruno; Morcet, Jeff; Michalak, Sophie; Le Gruyer, Antonia; Legros, Ludivine; Bardou-Jacquet, Edouard; Gandon, Yves; Moirand, Romain

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the performance of elastography by ultrasound with acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) in determining fibrosis stage in patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD) undergoing alcoholic detoxification in relation to biopsy. METHODS: Eighty-three patients with ALD undergoing detoxification were prospectively enrolled. Each patient underwent ARFI imaging and a liver biopsy on the same day. Fibrosis was staged according to the METAVIR scoring system. The median of 10 valid ARFI measurements was calculated for each patient. RESULTS: Sixty-nine males and thirteen females (one patient excluded due to insufficient biopsy size) were assessed with a mean alcohol consumption of 132.4 ± 128.8 standard drinks per week and mean cumulative year duration of 17.6 ± 9.5 years. Sensitivity and specificity were respectively 82.4% (0.70-0.95) and 83.3% (0.73-0.94) (AUROC = 0.87) for F ≥ 2 with a cut-off value of 1.63m/s; 82.4% (0.64-1.00) and 78.5% (0.69-0.89) (AUROC = 0.86) for F ≥ 3 with a cut-off value of 1.84m/s; and 92.3% (0.78-1.00] and 81.6% (0.72-0.90) (AUROC = 0.89) for F = 4 with a cut-off value of 1.94 m/s. CONCLUSION: ARFI is an accurate, non-invasive and easy method for assessing liver fibrosis in patients with ALD undergoing alcoholic detoxification. PMID:27239119

  2. High-speed imaging, acoustic features, and aeroacoustic computations of jet noise from Strombolian (and Vulcanian) explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddeucci, J.; Sesterhenn, J.; Scarlato, P.; Stampka, K.; Del Bello, E.; Pena Fernandez, J. J.; Gaudin, D.

    2014-05-01

    High-speed imaging of explosive eruptions at Stromboli (Italy), Fuego (Guatemala), and Yasur (Vanuatu) volcanoes allowed visualization of pressure waves from seconds-long explosions. From the explosion jets, waves radiate with variable geometry, timing, and apparent direction and velocity. Both the explosion jets and their wave fields are replicated well by numerical simulations of supersonic jets impulsively released from a pressurized vessel. The scaled acoustic signal from one explosion at Stromboli displays a frequency pattern with an excellent match to those from the simulated jets. We conclude that both the observed waves and the audible sound from the explosions are jet noise, i.e., the typical acoustic field radiating from high-velocity jets. Volcanic jet noise was previously quantified only in the infrasonic emissions from large, sub-Plinian to Plinian eruptions. Our combined approach allows us to define the spatial and temporal evolution of audible jet noise from supersonic jets in small-scale volcanic eruptions.

  3. An analysis and retrofit of the acoustics at Image Creators Health and Beauty Salon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Donna

    2002-11-01

    This paper discusses the analysis and retrofit of the acoustics in a high-volume beauty salon in Severna Park, MD. The major issues in what was designed to be a serene environment are reverberation times of 1-1.68 s in the mid- to upper-frequency range. Employee and customer complaints include heightened stress, vocal strain, headaches, and poor intelligibility. Existing analysis and acoustical retrofit solutions will be demonstrated.

  4. ee4fγ—A program for e+e-→4f,4f γ with nonzero fermion masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kołodziej, Karol; Jegerlehner, Fred

    2004-05-01

    A computer program ee4fγ for calculating cross-sections of any four fermion final state of e+e--annihilation at high energy and the corresponding bremsstrahlung reaction that is possible in the framework of the Standard Model is presented. As the fermion masses are arbitrary, the cross-sections for channels that do not contain e+ and/or e- in the final state can be computed without any collinear cut, the on-shell top quark production can be studied and the Higgs boson exchange can be incorporated in a consistent way. The program can be used as a Monte Carlo generator of unweighted events as well. Program summaryTitle of program:ee4fγ Version: 1.0 (February 2004) Catalogue identifier: ADTQ Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADTQ Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: none Computers: all Operating systems: Unix/Linux Programming language used:FORTRAN 90 CPC Program Library subprograms used:RANLUX, ACPR RANLUX 79 (1994) 111—a random number generator Memory required to execute with typical data: 4.0 Mb No. of bits in a word: 32 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 364 490 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 45 278 Distribution format: tar gzip file Nature of physical problem: Description of all e+e-→4 fermions and corresponding bremsstrahlung reactions that are possible in the Standard Model (SM) to lowest order and with nonzero fermion masses at center of mass energies typical for next generation linear colliders. Such reactions are relevant, typically, for W-pair or intermediate mass Higgs boson production and decay. Method of solution: Matrix elements are calculated with the helicity amplitude method. The phase space integration is performed numerically utilizing a multi-channel Monte Carlo method. Restrictions on complexity of the problem: No higher order effects are taken into account, except for assuming the fine

  5. Functional characterization of genetic polymorphisms identified in the human cytochrome P450 4F12 (CYP4F12) promoter region.

    PubMed

    Cauffiez, Christelle; Klinzig, Florian; Rat, Emmanuel; Tournel, Gilles; Allorge, Delphine; Chevalier, Dany; Lovecchio, Tonio; Pottier, Nicolas; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric; Lhermitte, Michel; D'Halluin, Jean-Claude; Broly, Franck; Lo-Guidice, Jean-Marc

    2004-06-15

    The human cytochrome CYP4F12 has been shown to be active toward inflammatory mediators and exogenous compounds such as antihistaminic drugs. In the present study, we report the first investigation of polymorphisms in the human CYP4F12 gene. A screening for sequence variations in the 5'-flanking region was performed by a Polymerase Chain Reaction-Single Strand Conformational Polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) strategy, using DNA samples from 53 unrelated French individuals of Caucasian origin. Several polymorphisms were identified, comprising a large deletion located in intron 1 (CYP4F12*v1), two isolated substitutions -402G>A (CYP4F12*v3) and -188 T>C (CYP4F12*v4) and nine combined mutations, -474T>C, -279A>C, -224A>G, -173G>A, -145C>G, -140T>C, -126T>C, -56T>C, and -21T>G (CYP4F12*v2). Considering the nature and location of the polymorphisms characterizing the CYP4F12*v1 and *v2, the functional relevance of those two allelic variants was further examined by transfecting different cell lines with constructs of the related region of the CYP4F12/luciferase reporter gene. Both alleles lead to a significant decrease of CYP4F12 gene expression in HepG2 cell line and, therefore, are likely to determine interindividual differences in CYP4F12 gene expression. PMID:15163554

  6. Apparatus for real-time acoustic imaging of Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    SciTech Connect

    Kuehn, Kerry, K.

    2008-10-28

    We have successfully designed, built and tested an experimental apparatus which is capable of providing the first real-time ultrasound images of Rayleigh-B\\'{e}nard convection in optically opaque fluids confined to large aspect ratio experimental cells. The apparatus employs a modified version of a commercially available ultrasound camera to capture images (30 frames per second) of flow patterns in a fluid undergoing Rayleigh Bénard convection. The apparatus was validated by observing convection rolls in 5cSt polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer fluid. Our first objective, after having built the apparatus, was to use it to study the sequence of transitions from diffusive to time--dependent heat transport in liquid mercury. The aim was to provide important information on pattern formation in the largely unexplored regime of very low Prandtl number fluids. Based on the theoretical stability diagram for liquid mercury, we anticipated that straight rolls should be stable over a range of Rayleigh numbers, between 1708 and approximately 1900. Though some of our power spectral densities were suggestive of the existence of weak convection, we have been unable to unambiguously visualize stable convection rolls above the theoretical onset of convection in liquid mercury. Currently, we are seeking ways to increase the sensitivity of our apparatus, such as (i) improving the acoustic impedance matching between our materials in the ultrasound path and (ii) reducing the noise level in our acoustic images due to turbulence and cavitation in the cooling fluids circulating above and below our experimental cell. If we are able to convincingly improve the sensitivity of our apparatus, and we still do not observe stable convection rolls in liquid mercury, then it may be the case that the theoretical stability diagram requires revision. In that case, either (i) straight rolls are not stable in a large aspect ratio cell at the Prandtl numbers associated with liquid mercury, or (ii) they

  7. Optical-resolution photoacoustic imaging through thick tissue with a thin capillary as a dual optical-in acoustic-out waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simandoux, Olivier; Stasio, Nicolino; Gateau, Jérome; Huignard, Jean-Pierre; Moser, Christophe; Psaltis, Demetri; Bossy, Emmanuel

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate the ability to guide high-frequency photoacoustic waves through thick tissue with a water-filled silica-capillary (150 μm inner diameter and 30 mm long). An optical-resolution photoacoustic image of a 30 μm diameter absorbing nylon thread was obtained by guiding the acoustic waves in the capillary through a 3 cm thick fat layer. The transmission loss through the capillary was about -20 dB, much lower than the -120 dB acoustic attenuation through the fat layer. The overwhelming acoustic attenuation of high-frequency acoustic waves by biological tissue can therefore be avoided by the use of a small footprint capillary acoustic waveguide for remote detection. We finally demonstrate that the capillary can be used as a dual optical-in acoustic-out waveguide, paving the way for the development of minimally invasive optical-resolution photoacoustic endoscopes free of any acoustic or optical elements at their imaging tip.

  8. Application of pulse compression signal processing techniques to electromagnetic acoustic transducers for noncontact thickness measurements and imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, K.S.; Gan, T.H.; Billson, D.R.; Hutchins, D.A.

    2005-05-15

    A pair of noncontact Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducers (EMATs) has been used for thickness measurements and imaging of metallic plates. This was performed using wide bandwidth EMATs and pulse-compression signal processing techniques, using chirp excitation. This gives a greatly improved signal-to-noise ratio for air-coupled experiments, increasing the speed of data acquisition. A numerical simulation of the technique has confirmed the performance. Experimental results indicate that it is possible to perform noncontact ultrasonic imaging and thickness gauging in a wide range of metal plates. An accuracy of up to 99% has been obtained for aluminum, brass, and copper samples. The resolution of the image obtained using the pulse compression approach was also improved compared to a transient pulse signal from conventional pulser(receiver). It is thus suggested that the combination of EMATs and pulse compression can lead to a wide range of online applications where fast time acquisition is required.

  9. Studies of low-lying triplet states in 1,3-C4F6, c-C4F6 and 2-C4F6 by electron energy-loss spectroscopy and ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limão-Vieira, P.; Duflot, D.; Anzai, K.; Kato, H.; Hoshino, M.; Silva, F. Ferreira da; Mogi, D.; Tanioka, T.; Tanaka, H.

    2013-06-01

    This Letter reports on the first measurements of the lowest lying triplet states as studied by electron energy loss spectroscopy for C4F6 isomers, hexafluoro-1,3-butadiene (1,3-C4F6), hexafluorocyclobutene (c-C4F6) and hexafluoro-2-butyne (2-C4F6). This study has been performed at an incident electron energy of 30 eV, 30°, whilst sweeping the energy loss over the range 2.0-15.0 eV. The electronic state spectroscopy has been investigated and the assignments supported by multi-reference quantum chemical calculations. The transition to the steepest electronic excited potential energy curve, is suggested to be dominant for 2-C4F6, due to the large broadening in its energy profile.

  10. Energies of 4f^N and 4f^N-15d States Relative to Host Bands in Rare-earth-doped Fluorides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiel, C. W.; Joubert, M.-F.; Tkachuk, A.

    2005-03-01

    Energies of 4f^N states relative to crystal band states were measured for rare-earth ions in the optical host materials LiYF4, Na0.4Y0.6F2.2, and LaF3 using x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. Spectra were modeled to determine the valence band maximum and 4f^ electron binding energies in each material. These results were combined with 4f^N to 4f^N-15d transition energies to determine 5d binding energies for the lowest levels of excited 4f^N-15d configurations. While 4f^N ground-state energies vary within several eV of the valence band maximum for different rare-earth ions in each host, the lowest 4f^N-15d states have similar energies and are several eV below the bottom of the conduction band. A simple model accurately described 4f^N and 4f^N-15d binding energies across the entire series of rare-earth ions. These results improve the understanding of optical materials for lasers, phosphors, and spectral hole burning applications for optical signal processing and data storage.

  11. Spatiotemporal Imaging of the Acoustic Field Emitted by a Single Copper Nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean, Cyril; Belliard, Laurent; Cornelius, Thomas W.; Thomas, Olivier; Pennec, Yan; Cassinelli, Marco; Toimil-Molares, Maria Eugenia; Perrin, Bernard

    2016-10-01

    The monochromatic and geometrically anisotropic acoustic field generated by 400 nm and 120 nm diameter copper nanowires simply dropped on a 10 $\\mu$m silicon membrane is investigated in transmission using three-dimensional time-resolved femtosecond pump-probe experiments. Two pump-probe time-resolved experiments are carried out at the same time on both side of the silicon substrate. In reflection, the first radial breathing mode of the nanowire is excited and detected. In transmission, the longitudinal and shear waves are observed. The longitudinal signal is followed by a monochromatic component associated with the relaxation of the nanowire's first radial breathing mode. Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) simulations are performed and accurately reproduce the diffracted field. A shape anisotropy resulting from the large aspect ratio of the nanowire is detected in the acoustic field. The orientation of the underlying nanowires is thus acoustically deduced.

  12. A rapid magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging sequence for ultrasonic refocusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mougenot, Charles; Pichardo, Samuel; Engler, Steven; Waspe, Adam; Constanciel Colas, Elodie; Drake, James M.

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic resonance guided acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) is being used to correct for aberrations induced by tissue heterogeneities when using high intensity focusing ultrasound (HIFU). A compromise between published MR-ARFI adaptive solutions is proposed to achieve efficient refocusing of the ultrasound beam in under 10 min. In addition, an ARFI sequence based on an EPI gradient echo sequence was used to simultaneously monitor displacement and temperature with a large SNR and low distortion. This study was conducted inside an Achieva 3T clinical MRI using a Philips Sonalleve MR-HIFU system to emit a 1 ms pulsed sonication with duty cycle of 2.3% at 300 Wac inside a polymer phantom. Virtual elements defined by a Hadamard array with sonication patterns composed of 6 phase steps were used to characterize 64 groups of 4 elements to find the optimal phase of the 256 elements of the transducer. The 384 sonication patterns were acquired in 580 s to identify the set of phases that maximize the displacement at the focal point. Three aberrators (neonatal skull, 8 year old skull and a checkered pattern) were added to each sonication pattern to evaluate the performance of this refocusing algorithm (n  =  4). These aberrators reduced the relative intensities to 95.3%, 69.6% and 25.5% for the neonatal skull, 8 year old skull, and checkered pattern virtual aberrators respectively. Using a 10 min refocusing algorithm, relative intensities of 101.6%, 91.3% and 93.3% were obtained. Better relative intensities of 103.9%, 94.3% and 101% were achieved using a 25 min refocusing algorithm. An average temperature increase of 4.2 °C per refocusing test was induced for the 10 min refocusing algorithm, resulting in a negligible thermal dose of 2 EM. A rapid refocusing of the beam can be achieved while keeping thermal effects to a minimum.

  13. A rapid magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging sequence for ultrasonic refocusing.

    PubMed

    Mougenot, Charles; Pichardo, Samuel; Engler, Steven; Waspe, Adam; Colas, Elodie Constanciel; Drake, James M

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic resonance guided acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) is being used to correct for aberrations induced by tissue heterogeneities when using high intensity focusing ultrasound (HIFU). A compromise between published MR-ARFI adaptive solutions is proposed to achieve efficient refocusing of the ultrasound beam in under 10 min. In addition, an ARFI sequence based on an EPI gradient echo sequence was used to simultaneously monitor displacement and temperature with a large SNR and low distortion. This study was conducted inside an Achieva 3T clinical MRI using a Philips Sonalleve MR-HIFU system to emit a 1 ms pulsed sonication with duty cycle of 2.3% at 300 Wac inside a polymer phantom. Virtual elements defined by a Hadamard array with sonication patterns composed of 6 phase steps were used to characterize 64 groups of 4 elements to find the optimal phase of the 256 elements of the transducer. The 384 sonication patterns were acquired in 580 s to identify the set of phases that maximize the displacement at the focal point. Three aberrators (neonatal skull, 8 year old skull and a checkered pattern) were added to each sonication pattern to evaluate the performance of this refocusing algorithm (n  =  4). These aberrators reduced the relative intensities to 95.3%, 69.6% and 25.5% for the neonatal skull, 8 year old skull, and checkered pattern virtual aberrators respectively. Using a 10 min refocusing algorithm, relative intensities of 101.6%, 91.3% and 93.3% were obtained. Better relative intensities of 103.9%, 94.3% and 101% were achieved using a 25 min refocusing algorithm. An average temperature increase of 4.2 °C per refocusing test was induced for the 10 min refocusing algorithm, resulting in a negligible thermal dose of 2 EM. A rapid refocusing of the beam can be achieved while keeping thermal effects to a minimum. PMID:27401452

  14. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr., Ph.D.; Younane Abousleiman, Ph.D.; Musharraf Zaman, Ph.D., P.E.

    2001-07-01

    Mechanically weak formations, such as chalks, high porosity sandstones, and marine sediments, pose significant problems for oil and gas operators. Problems such as compaction, subsidence, and loss of permeability can affect reservoir production operations. For example, the unexpected subsidence of the Ekofisk chalk in the North Sea required over one billion dollars to re-engineer production facilities to account for losses created during that compaction (Sulak 1991). Another problem in weak formations is that of shallow water flows (SWF). Deep water drilling operations sometimes encounter cases where the marine sediments, at shallow depths just below the seafloor, begin to uncontrollably flow up and around the drill pipe. SWF problems created a loss of $150 million for the Ursa development project in the U.S. Gulf Coast SWF (Furlow 1998a,b; 1999a,b). The goal of this project is to provide a database on both the rock mechanical properties and the geophysical properties of weak rocks and sediments. These could be used by oil and gas companies to detect, evaluate, and alleviate potential production and drilling problems. The results will be useful in, for example, pre-drill detection of events such as SWF's by allowing a correlation of seismic data (such as hazard surveys) to rock mechanical properties. The data sets could also be useful for 4-D monitoring of the compaction and subsidence of an existing reservoir and imaging the zones of damage. During the second quarter of the project the research team has: (1) completed acoustic sensor construction, (2) conducted reconnaissance tests to map the deformational behaviors of the various rocks, (3) developed a sample assembly for the measurement of dynamic elastic and poroelastic parameters during triaxial testing, and (4) conducted a detailed review of the scientific literature and compiled a bibliography of that review. During the first quarter of the project the research team acquired several rock types for testing

  15. Primary biliary cirrhosis degree assessment by acoustic radiation force impulse imaging and hepatic fibrosis indicators

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hai-Chun; Hu, Rong-Fei; Zhu, Ting; Tong, Ling; Zhang, Qiu-Qin

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the assessment of primary biliary cirrhosis degree by acoustic radiation force impulse imaging (ARFI) and hepatic fibrosis indicators. METHODS: One hundred and twenty patients who developed liver cirrhosis secondary to primary biliary cirrhosis were selected as the observation group, with the degree of patient liver cirrhosis graded by Child-Pugh (CP) score. Sixty healthy individuals were selected as the control group. The four indicators of hepatic fibrosis were detected in all research objects, including hyaluronic acid (HA), laminin (LN), type III collagen (PC III), and type IV collagen (IV-C). The liver parenchyma hardness value (LS) was then measured by ARFI technique. LS and the four indicators of liver fibrosis (HA, LN, PC III, and IV-C) were observed in different grade CP scores. The diagnostic value of LS and the four indicators of liver fibrosis in determining liver cirrhosis degree with PBC, whether used alone or in combination, were analyzed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. RESULTS: LS and the four indicators of liver fibrosis within the three classes (A, B, and C) of CP scores in the observation group were higher than in the control group, with C class > B class > A class; the differences were statistically significant (P < 0.01). Although AUC values of LS within the three classes of CP scores were higher than in the four indicators of liver fibrosis, sensitivity and specificity were unstable. The ROC curves of LS combined with the four indicators of liver fibrosis revealed that: AUC and sensitivity in all indicators combined in the A class of CP score were higher than in LS alone, albeit with slightly decreased specificity; AUC and specificity in all indicators combined in the B class of CP score were higher than in LS alone, with unchanged sensitivity; AUC values (0.967), sensitivity (97.4%), and specificity (90%) of all indicators combined in the C class of CP score were higher than in LS alone (0.936, 92.1%, 83

  16. Integration of Acoustic Radiation Force and Optical Imaging for Blood Plasma Clot Stiffness Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Caroline W.; Perez, Matthew J.; Helmke, Brian P.; Viola, Francesco; Lawrence, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the life-preserving function blood clotting serves in the body, inadequate or excessive blood clot stiffness has been associated with life-threatening diseases such as stroke, hemorrhage, and heart attack. The relationship between blood clot stiffness and vascular diseases underscores the importance of quantifying the magnitude and kinetics of blood’s transformation from a fluid to a viscoelastic solid. To measure blood plasma clot stiffness, we have developed a method that uses ultrasound acoustic radiation force (ARF) to induce micron-scaled displacements (1-500 μm) on microbeads suspended in blood plasma. The displacements were detected by optical microscopy and took place within a micro-liter sized clot region formed within a larger volume (2 mL sample) to minimize container surface effects. Modulation of the ultrasound generated acoustic radiation force allowed stiffness measurements to be made in blood plasma from before its gel point to the stage where it was a fully developed viscoelastic solid. A 0.5 wt % agarose hydrogel was 9.8-fold stiffer than the plasma (platelet-rich) clot at 1 h post-kaolin stimulus. The acoustic radiation force microbead method was sensitive to the presence of platelets and strength of coagulation stimulus. Platelet depletion reduced clot stiffness 6.9 fold relative to platelet rich plasma. The sensitivity of acoustic radiation force based stiffness assessment may allow for studying platelet regulation of both incipient and mature clot mechanical properties. PMID:26042775

  17. Integration of acoustic radiation force and optical imaging for blood plasma clot stiffness measurement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Caroline W; Perez, Matthew J; Helmke, Brian P; Viola, Francesco; Lawrence, Michael B

    2015-01-01

    Despite the life-preserving function blood clotting serves in the body, inadequate or excessive blood clot stiffness has been associated with life-threatening diseases such as stroke, hemorrhage, and heart attack. The relationship between blood clot stiffness and vascular diseases underscores the importance of quantifying the magnitude and kinetics of blood's transformation from a fluid to a viscoelastic solid. To measure blood plasma clot stiffness, we have developed a method that uses ultrasound acoustic radiation force (ARF) to induce micron-scaled displacements (1-500 μm) on microbeads suspended in blood plasma. The displacements were detected by optical microscopy and took place within a micro-liter sized clot region formed within a larger volume (2 mL sample) to minimize container surface effects. Modulation of the ultrasound generated acoustic radiation force allowed stiffness measurements to be made in blood plasma from before its gel point to the stage where it was a fully developed viscoelastic solid. A 0.5 wt % agarose hydrogel was 9.8-fold stiffer than the plasma (platelet-rich) clot at 1 h post-kaolin stimulus. The acoustic radiation force microbead method was sensitive to the presence of platelets and strength of coagulation stimulus. Platelet depletion reduced clot stiffness 6.9 fold relative to platelet rich plasma. The sensitivity of acoustic radiation force based stiffness assessment may allow for studying platelet regulation of both incipient and mature clot mechanical properties. PMID:26042775

  18. Acoustic profiles and images of the Palos Verdes Margin: Implications concerning deposition from the White's Point outfall

    SciTech Connect

    Hampton, M A.; Karl, H; Murray, Christopher J. )

    2001-12-01

    Subbottom profiles and sidescan-sonar images collected on and around the Palos Verdes shelf show a surficial deposit interpreted to contain effluent from the White's Point diffusers, as well as showing several geologic features that affect the deposit's distribution. The effluent-affected deposit is visible in high-resolution subbottom profiles on the shelf and the adjacent San Pedro basin slope to water depths of 170 m. It has a maximum thickness of 75 cm and was mapped acoustically over an area of 10.8 km{sup 2}, which encompasses a volume of about 3.2 million m{sup 3}. The deposit's basal reflector is acoustically distinct over most of the mapped area, implying that the deposit has not been extensively mixed across its base, perhaps being relatively free of reworking since its initial deposition. Nearshore, the basal reflector is weak and fades away toward land, which could result from syndepositional intermixing of coarse native sediment (particularly from the Portuguese Bend landslide) with effluent in the high-energy nearshore zone, or postdepositionally by physical (wave) or biological mixing across the interface. The geometry of the deposit implies that effluent is dispersed primarily in a northwesterly and seaward direction from the diffusers. Dispersal across the shelf break is in some places strongly affected by topography, particularly by submarine canyons. The deposit overlies stratified and unstratified Quaternary sediment, up to 30 m thick, that in turn overlies the irregular erosional surface of deformed Miocene bedrock that crops out in places on the shelf and upper basin slope. The effluent-affected deposit rests on potentially unstable landslide deposits on the San Pedro basin slope. The acoustic profiles and side-scan images show evidence for active and inactive vents, probably of hot water and gas, some of which are within the boundary of the effluent-affected sediment deposit and could disrupt it if seepage occurs.

  19. Acoustic profiles and images of the Palos Verdes margin: Implications concerning deposition from the White's Point outfall

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hampton, M.A.; Karl, Herman A.; Murray, C.J.

    2002-01-01

    Subbottom profiles and sidescan-sonar images collected on and around the Palos Verdes Shelf show a surficial deposit interpreted to contain effluent from the White's Point diffusers, as well as showing several geologic features that affect the deposit's distribution. The effluent-affected deposit is visible in high-resolution subbottom profiles on the shelf and the adjacent San Pedro basin slope to water depths of 170 m. It has a maximum thickness of 75 cm and was mapped acoustically over an area of 10.8 km2, which encompasses a volume of about 3.2 million m3. The deposit's basal reflector is acoustically distinct over most of the mapped area. implying that the deposit has not been extensively mixed across its base, perhaps being relatively free of reworking since its initial deposition. Nearshore, the basal reflector is weak and fades away toward land, which could result from syndepositional intermixing of coarse native sediment (particularly from the Portuguese Bend landslide) with effluent in the high-energy nearshore zone, or postdepositionally by physical (wave) or biological mixing across the interface. The geometry of the deposit implies that effluent is dispersed primarily in a northwesterly and seaward direction from the diffusers. Dispersal across the shelf break is in some places strongly affected by topography, particularly by submarine canyons. The deposit overlies stratified and unstratified Quaternary sediment, up to 30m thick, that in turn overlies the irregular erosional surface of deformed Miocene bedrock that crops out in places on the shelf and upper basin slope. The effluent-affected deposit rests on potentially unstable landslide deposits on the San Pedro basin slope. The acoustic profiles and side-scan images show evidence for active and inactive vents, probably of hot water and gas, some of which are within the boundary of the effluent-affected sediment deposit and could disrupt it if seepage occurs. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights

  20. Clinical feasibility study of combined opto-acoustic and ultrasonic imaging modality providing coregistered functional and anatomical maps of breast tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalev, Jason; Clingman, Bryan; Smith, Remie J.; Herzog, Don; Miller, Tom; Stavros, A. Thomas; Ermilov, Sergey; Conjusteau, André; Tsyboulski, Dmitri; Oraevsky, Alexander A.; Kist, Kenneth; Dornbluth, N. C.; Otto, Pamela

    2013-03-01

    We report on findings from the clinical feasibility study of the ImagioTM. Breast Imaging System, which acquires two-dimensional opto-acoustic (OA) images co-registered with conventional ultrasound using a specialized duplex hand-held probe. Dual-wavelength opto-acoustic technology is used to generate parametric maps based upon total hemoglobin and its oxygen saturation in breast tissues. This may provide functional diagnostic information pertaining to tumor metabolism and microvasculature, which is complementary to morphological information obtained with conventional gray-scale ultrasound. We present co-registered opto-acoustic and ultrasonic images of malignant and benign tumors from a recent clinical feasibility study. The clinical results illustrate that the technology may have the capability to improve the efficacy of breast tumor diagnosis. In doing so, it may have the potential to reduce biopsies and to characterize cancers that were not seen well with conventional gray-scale ultrasound alone.

  1. Accessing 4f-states in single-molecule spintronics.

    PubMed

    Fahrendorf, Sarah; Atodiresei, Nicolae; Besson, Claire; Caciuc, Vasile; Matthes, Frank; Blügel, Stefan; Kögerler, Paul; Bürgler, Daniel E; Schneider, Claus M

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic molecules are potential functional units for molecular and supramolecular spintronic devices. However, their magnetic and electronic properties depend critically on their interaction with metallic electrodes. Charge transfer and hybridization modify the electronic structure and thereby influence or even quench the molecular magnetic moment. Yet, detection and manipulation of the molecular spin state by means of charge transport, that is, spintronic functionality, mandates a certain level of hybridization of the magnetic orbitals with electrode states. Here we show how a judicious choice of the molecular spin centres determines these critical molecule-electrode contact characteristics. In contrast to late lanthanide analogues, the 4f-orbitals of single bis(phthalocyaninato)-neodymium(III) molecules adsorbed on Cu(100) can be directly accessed by scanning tunnelling microscopy. Hence, they contribute to charge transport, whereas their magnetic moment is sustained as evident from comparing spectroscopic data with ab initio calculations. Our results showcase how tailoring molecular orbitals can yield all-electrically controlled spintronic device concepts.

  2. Comparison of temporal and spectral scattering methods using acoustically large breast models derived from magnetic resonance images

    PubMed Central

    Hesford, Andrew J.; Tillett, Jason C.; Astheimer, Jeffrey P.; Waag, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate and efficient modeling of ultrasound propagation through realistic tissue models is important to many aspects of clinical ultrasound imaging. Simplified problems with known solutions are often used to study and validate numerical methods. Greater confidence in a time-domain k-space method and a frequency-domain fast multipole method is established in this paper by analyzing results for realistic models of the human breast. Models of breast tissue were produced by segmenting magnetic resonance images of ex vivo specimens into seven distinct tissue types. After confirming with histologic analysis by pathologists that the model structures mimicked in vivo breast, the tissue types were mapped to variations in sound speed and acoustic absorption. Calculations of acoustic scattering by the resulting model were performed on massively parallel supercomputer clusters using parallel implementations of the k-space method and the fast multipole method. The efficient use of these resources was confirmed by parallel efficiency and scalability studies using large-scale, realistic tissue models. Comparisons between the temporal and spectral results were performed in representative planes by Fourier transforming the temporal results. An RMS field error less than 3% throughout the model volume confirms the accuracy of the methods for modeling ultrasound propagation through human breast. PMID:25096103

  3. Experimental Study of High-Range-Resolution Medical Acoustic Imaging for Multiple Target Detection by Frequency Domain Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Tomoki; Taki, Hirofumi; Sakamoto, Takuya; Sato, Toru

    2009-07-01

    We employed frequency domain interferometry (FDI) for use as a medical acoustic imager to detect multiple targets with high range resolution. The phase of each frequency component of an echo varies with the frequency, and target intervals can be estimated from the phase variance. This processing technique is generally used in radar imaging. When the interference within a range gate is coherent, the cross correlation between the desired signal and the coherent interference signal is nonzero. The Capon method works under the guiding principle that output power minimization cancels the desired signal with a coherent interference signal. Therefore, we utilize frequency averaging to suppress the correlation of the coherent interference. The results of computational simulations using a pseudoecho signal show that the Capon method with adaptive frequency averaging (AFA) provides a higher range resolution than a conventional method. These techniques were experimentally investigated and we confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed method of processing by FDI.

  4. Infrared and Raman spectra of the fluoroxysulfate ion, SO/sub 4/F/sup -1 -/, and of fluorine perchlorate, ClO/sub 4/F

    SciTech Connect

    Appelman, E.H.; Basile, L.J.; Kim, H.

    1982-07-01

    The infrared and Raman spectra of solid cesium and rubidium fluoroxysulfates, CsSO/sub 4/F and RbSO/sub 4/F, have been measured, along with the gas-phase spectra of the isoelectronic molecule fluorine perchlorate, ClO/sub 4/F. The spectra are consistent with a perchloric acid type structure of C/sub s/ symmetry, and the vibrational bands have been assigned with reference to the analogous species of C/sub 3..nu../ symmetry: the fluorosulfate ion, SO/sub 3/F/sup -/, and perchloryl fluoride, ClO/sub 3/F. Normal-coordinate analyses have been carried out for both ClO/sub 4/F and SO/sub 4/F/sup -/. 6 figures, 4 tables.

  5. Multiscale monitoring of interface failure of brittle coating/ductile substrate systems: A non-destructive evaluation method combined digital image correlation with acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, W. G.; Wu, D. J.; Yao, W. B.; Zhou, M.; Lu, C.

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, we proposed a non-destructive evaluation method combined digital image correlation with acoustic emission techniques. The method was used to in situ monitor interface failure and internal damage of brittle coating/ductile substrate systems with different size scales. The results show that there is a good relationship between digital image correlation and acoustic emission signals, which can be applied to judge cracking formation and coating delamination and to determine fracture toughness of a thermal barrier coating system subjected to bending.

  6. The Acoustic Lens Design and in Vivo Use of a Multifunctional Catheter Combining Intracardiac Ultrasound Imaging and Electrophysiology Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Douglas N.; Cannata, Jonathan; Liu, Ruibin; Zhao, Jian Zhong; Shung, K. Kirk; Nguyen, Hien; Chia, Raymond; Dentinger, Aaron; Wildes, Douglas; Thomenius, Kai E.; Mahajan, Aman; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; Kim, Kang; O’Donnell, Matthew; Sahn, David

    2009-01-01

    A multifunctional 9F intracardiac imaging and electrophysiology mapping catheter was developed and tested to help guide diagnostic and therapeutic intracardiac electrophysiology (EP) procedures. The catheter tip includes a 7.25-MHz, 64-element, side-looking phased array for high resolution sector scanning. Multiple electrophysiology mapping sensors were mounted as ring electrodes near the array for electrocardiographic synchronization of ultrasound images. The catheter array elevation beam performance in particular was investigated. An acoustic lens for the distal tip array designed with a round cross section can produce an acceptable elevation beam shape; however, the velocity of sound in the lens material should be approximately 155 m/s slower than in tissue for the best beam shape and wide bandwidth performance. To help establish the catheter’s unique ability for integration with electrophysiology interventional procedures, it was used in vivo in a porcine animal model, and demonstrated both useful intracardiac echocardiographic visualization and simultaneous 3-D positional information using integrated electroanatomical mapping techniques. The catheter also performed well in high frame rate imaging, color flow imaging, and strain rate imaging of atrial and ventricular structures. PMID:18407850

  7. Evidence from acoustic imaging for submarine volcanic activity in 2012 off the west coast of El Hierro (Canary Islands, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Nemesio M.; Somoza, Luis; Hernández, Pedro A.; de Vallejo, Luis González; León, Ricardo; Sagiya, Takeshi; Biain, Ander; González, Francisco J.; Medialdea, Teresa; Barrancos, José; Ibáñez, Jesús; Sumino, Hirochika; Nogami, Kenji; Romero, Carmen

    2014-12-01

    We report precursory geophysical, geodetic, and geochemical signatures of a new submarine volcanic activity observed off the western coast of El Hierro, Canary Islands. Submarine manifestation of this activity has been revealed through acoustic imaging of submarine plumes detected on the 20-kHz chirp parasound subbottom profiler (TOPAS PS18) mounted aboard the Spanish RV Hespérides on June 28, 2012. Five distinct "filament-shaped" acoustic plumes emanating from the flanks of mounds have been recognized at water depth between 64 and 88 m on a submarine platform located NW El Hierro. These plumes were well imaged on TOPAS profiles as "flares" of high acoustic contrast of impedance within the water column. Moreover, visible plumes composed of white rafts floating on the sea surface and sourcing from the location of the submarine plumes were reported by aerial photographs on July 3, 2012, 5 days after acoustic plumes were recorded. In addition, several geophysical and geochemical data support the fact that these submarine vents were preceded by several precursory signatures: (i) a sharp increase of the seismic energy release and the number of daily earthquakes of magnitude ≥2.5 on June 25, 2012, (ii) significant vertical and horizontal displacements observed at the Canary Islands GPS network (Nagoya University-ITER-GRAFCAN) with uplifts up to 3 cm from June 25 to 26, 2012, (iii) an anomalous increase of the soil gas radon activity, from the end of April until the beginning of June reaching peak values of 2.7 kBq/m3 on June 3, 2012, and (iv) observed positive peak in the air-corrected value of 3He/4He ratio monitored in ground waters (8.5 atmospheric 3He/4He ratio ( R A)) at the northwestern El Hierro on June 16, 2012. Combining these submarine and subaerial information, we suggest these plumes are the consequence of submarine vents exhaling volcanic gas mixed with fine ash as consequence of an event of rapid rise of volatile-rich magma beneath the NW submarine ridge

  8. Pressure variation of 4f excitation energies in Eu and Tm metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbst, J. F.; Wilkins, J. W.

    1987-08-01

    Calculations of 4f-electron excitation energies as functions of the Wigner-Seitz radius rWS in europium and thulium metals are reported. Crystal potentials are constructed by the renormalized-atom method for integrally-occupied 4f configurations, and each excitation energy is derived from a difference of band total energies. As rWS decreases for each metal the 6s and 5d levels are progressively depopulated, leading to enhancement of the 4f occupancy at elevated pressures. In particular our results predict a 4f7-->4f8 transition in Eu at a pressure P~44 Mbar and a 4f12-->4f13 transition in Tm at P~3 Mbar.

  9. Copper Causes Regiospecific Formation of C4 F8 -Containing Six-Membered Rings and their Defluorination/Aromatization to C4 F4 -Containing Rings in Triphenylene/1,4-C4 F8 I2 Reactions.

    PubMed

    Rippy, Kerry C; Bukovsky, Eric V; Clikeman, Tyler T; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Hou, Gao-Lei; Wang, Xue-Bin; Popov, Alexey A; Boltalina, Olga V; Strauss, Steven H

    2016-01-18

    The presence of Cu in reactions of triphenylene (TRPH) and 1,4-C4 F8 I2 at 360 °C led to regiospecific substitution of TRPH ortho C(β) atoms to form C4 F8 -containing rings, completely suppressing substitution on C(α) atoms. In addition, Cu caused selective reductive-defluorination/aromatization (RD/A) to form C4 F4 -containing aromatic rings. Without Cu, the reactions of TRPH and 1,4-C4 F8 I2 were not regiospecific and no RD/A was observed. These results, supported by DFT calculations, are the first examples of Cu-promoted 1) regiospecific perfluoroannulation, 2) preparative C-F activation, and 3) RD/A. HPLC-purified products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, low-temperature PES, and (1) H/(19) F NMR. PMID:26581454

  10. Experimental and theoretical investigation of 4f3↔4f25d interconfigurational transitions in Nd3+:LiYF4 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collombet, A.; Guyot, Y.; Joubert, M. F.; Laroche, M.; Margerie, J.; Moncorgé, R.; Descroix, E.

    2003-07-01

    A complete spectroscopic investigation of the 4f3↔4f25d optical transitions of the Nd3+ ion is performed in the case of Nd:LiYF4, based on emission, excitation, ground-state absorption as well as excited-state absorption measurements. The global shape of all the experimental spectra is well reproduced by means of crystal-field calculations of the 4f25d sublevels, and the differences observed between polarized spectra on one hand, and between those recorded at low and room temperatures on the other hand, are successfully accounted for. It is also found that the absorption barycentre is shifted toward higher 4f25d energies when the chosen initial 4f3 sublevel itself is shifted toward higher energies. This behavior is assigned to a total or partial “memory” during the optical transition for the expectation values of different terms of the hamiltonian, especially the electrostatic ones. It is demonstrated that this effect should not be specific of Nd3+:LiYF4 and that it should occur, on the contrary, in every crystalline matrix and for any rare-earth ion from Pr3+ (4f2) to Tm3+ (4f12).

  11. Effects of using inclined parametric echosounding on sub-bottom acoustic imaging and advances in buried object detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider von Deimling, Jens; Held, Philipp; Feldens, Peter; Wilken, Dennis

    2016-04-01

    This study reports an adaptation of a parametric echosounder system using 15 kHz as secondary frequency to investigate the angular response of sub-bottom backscatter strength of layered mud, providing a new method for enhanced acoustic detection of buried targets. Adaptions to achieve both vertical (0°) and non-vertical inclination (1-15°, 30°, 45° and 60°) comprise mechanical tilting of the acoustic transducer and electronic beam steering. Data were acquired at 18 m water depth at a study site characterized by a flat, muddy seafloor where a 0.1 m diameter power cable lies 1-2 m below the seafloor. Surveying the cable with vertical incidence revealed that the buried cable can hardly be discriminated against the backscatter strength of the layered mud. However, the backscatter strength of layered mud decreases strongly at >3±0.5° incidence and the layered mud echo pattern vanishes beyond 5°. As a consequence, the backscatter pattern of the buried cable is very pronounced in acoustic images gathered at 15°, 30°, 45° and 60° incidence. The size of the cable echo pattern increases linearly with incidence. These effects are attributed to reflection loss from layered mud at larger incidence and to the scattering of the 0.1 m diameter buried cable. Data analyses support the visual impression of superior detection of the cable with an up to 2.6-fold increase of the signal-to-noise ratio at 40° incidence compared to the vertical incidence case.

  12. Investigation of the acoustic field in a standing wave thermoacoustic refrigerator using time-resolved particule image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc-Benon, Ph.; Poignand, G.; Jondeau, E.

    2012-09-01

    In thermoacoustic devices, the full understanding of the heat transfer between the stack and the heat exchangers is a key issue to improve the global efficiency of these devices. The goal of this paper is to investigate the vortex structures, which appear at the stack plates extremities and may impact the heat transfer. Here, the aerodynamic field between a stack and a heat exchanger is characterised with a time-resolved particle image velocimetry (TR- PIV) set-up. Measurements are performed in a standing wave thermoacoustic refrigerator operating at a frequency of 200 Hz. The employed TR-PIV set-up offers the possibility to acquire 3000 instantaneous velocity fields at a frequency of 3125 Hz (15 instantaneous velocity fields per acoustic period). Measurements show that vortex shedding can occur at high pressure level, when a nonlinear acoustic regime preveals, leading to an additional heating generated by viscous dissipation in the gap between the stack and the heat exchangers and a loss of efficiency.

  13. Detecting the Activation of a Self-Healing Mechanism in Concrete by Acoustic Emission and Digital Image Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Tsangouri, E.; Aggelis, D. G.; Van Tittelboom, K.; De Belie, N.; Van Hemelrijck, D.

    2013-01-01

    Autonomous crack healing in concrete is obtained when encapsulated healing agent is embedded into the material. Cracking damage in concrete elements ruptures the capsules and activates the healing process by healing agent release. Previously, the strength and stiffness recovery as well as the sealing efficiency after autonomous crack repair was well established. However, the mechanisms that trigger capsule breakage remain unknown. In parallel, the conditions under which the crack interacts with embedded capsules stay black-box. In this research, an experimental approach implementing an advanced optical and acoustic method sets up scopes to monitor and justify the crack formation and capsule breakage of concrete samples tested under three-point bending. Digital Image Correlation was used to visualize the crack opening. The optical information was the basis for an extensive and analytical study of the damage by Acoustic Emission analysis. The influence of embedding capsules on the concrete fracture process, the location of capsule damage, and the differentiation between emissions due to capsule rupture and crack formation are presented in this research. A profound observation of the capsules performance provides a clear view of the healing activation process. PMID:24381518

  14. Compressive sensing beamforming based on covariance for acoustic imaging with noisy measurements.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Siyang; Wei, Qingkai; Huang, Xun

    2013-11-01

    Compressive sensing, a newly emerging method from information technology, is applied to array beamforming and associated acoustic applications. A compressive sensing beamforming method (CSB-II) is developed based on sampling covariance matrix, assuming spatially sparse and incoherent signals, and then examined using both simulations and aeroacoustic measurements. The simulation results clearly show that the proposed CSB-II method is robust to sensing noise. In addition, aeroacoustic tests of a landing gear model demonstrate the good performance in terms of resolution and sidelobe rejection. PMID:24181989

  15. Compressive sensing beamforming based on covariance for acoustic imaging with noisy measurements.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Siyang; Wei, Qingkai; Huang, Xun

    2013-11-01

    Compressive sensing, a newly emerging method from information technology, is applied to array beamforming and associated acoustic applications. A compressive sensing beamforming method (CSB-II) is developed based on sampling covariance matrix, assuming spatially sparse and incoherent signals, and then examined using both simulations and aeroacoustic measurements. The simulation results clearly show that the proposed CSB-II method is robust to sensing noise. In addition, aeroacoustic tests of a landing gear model demonstrate the good performance in terms of resolution and sidelobe rejection.

  16. Experimental demonstration of passive acoustic imaging in the human skull cavity using CT-based aberration corrections

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Ryan M.; O’Reilly, Meaghan A.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Experimentally verify a previously described technique for performing passive acoustic imaging through an intact human skull using noninvasive, computed tomography (CT)-based aberration corrections Jones et al. [Phys. Med. Biol. 58, 4981–5005 (2013)]. Methods: A sparse hemispherical receiver array (30 cm diameter) consisting of 128 piezoceramic discs (2.5 mm diameter, 612 kHz center frequency) was used to passively listen through ex vivo human skullcaps (n = 4) to acoustic emissions from a narrow-band fixed source (1 mm diameter, 516 kHz center frequency) and from ultrasound-stimulated (5 cycle bursts, 1 Hz pulse repetition frequency, estimated in situ peak negative pressure 0.11–0.33 MPa, 306 kHz driving frequency) Definity™ microbubbles flowing through a thin-walled tube phantom. Initial in vivo feasibility testing of the method was performed. The performance of the method was assessed through comparisons to images generated without skull corrections, with invasive source-based corrections, and with water-path control images. Results: For source locations at least 25 mm from the inner skull surface, the modified reconstruction algorithm successfully restored a single focus within the skull cavity at a location within 1.25 mm from the true position of the narrow-band source. The results obtained from imaging single bubbles are in good agreement with numerical simulations of point source emitters and the authors’ previous experimental measurements using source-based skull corrections O’Reilly et al. [IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 61, 1285–1294 (2014)]. In a rat model, microbubble activity was mapped through an intact human skull at pressure levels below and above the threshold for focused ultrasound-induced blood–brain barrier opening. During bursts that led to coherent bubble activity, the location of maximum intensity in images generated with CT-based skull corrections was found to deviate by less than 1 mm, on average, from the position

  17. Enhanced delivery of gold nanoparticles by acoustic cavitation for photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu-Hsin; Liao, Ai-Ho; Lin, Jia-Yu; Lee, Cheng-Ru; Wu, Cheng-Ham; Liu, Tzu-Min; Wang, Churng-Ren; Li, Pai-Chi

    2013-03-01

    Gold-nanorods incorporated with microbubbles (AuMBs) were introduced as a photoacoustic/ultrasound dual- modality contrast agent in our previous study. The application can be extended to theragnosis purpose. With the unique physical characteristics of AuMBs, we propose an enhanced delivery method for the encapsulated particles. For example, laser thermotherapy mediated by plasmonic nanoparticles can be made more effective by using microbubbles as a targeted carrier and acoustic cavitation for enhanced sonoporation. The hypothesis was experimentally tested. Firts, these AuMBs first act as molecular probes with binding to specific ligands. The improved targeting efficacy was macroscopically observed by an ultrasound system. The extended retention of targeted AuMB was observed and recorded for 30 minutes in a CT-26 tumor bearing mouse. Secondly, cavitation induced by time-varying acoustic field was also applied to disrupt the microbubbles and cause increased transient cellular permeability (a.k.a., sonoporation). Multimodal optical microscope based on a Cr:forsterite laser was used to directly observe these effects. The microscope can acquired third-harmonic generation (THG) and two-photon fluorescent (2PF) signals produced by the AuMBs. In vitro examination shows approximately a 60% improvement in terms of fluorescence signals from the cellular uptake of gold nanoparticles after sonoporation treatment. Therefore, we conclude that the controlled release is feasible and can further improve the therapeutic effects of the nanoparticles.

  18. Ligand field density functional theory calculation of the 4f2→ 4f15d1 transitions in the quantum cutter Cs2KYF6:Pr3+.

    PubMed

    Ramanantoanina, Harry; Urland, Werner; Cimpoesu, Fanica; Daul, Claude

    2013-09-01

    Herein we present a Ligand Field Density Functional Theory (LFDFT) based methodology for the analysis of the 4f(n)→ 4f(n-1)5d(1) transitions in rare earth compounds and apply it for the characterization of the 4f(2)→ 4f(1)5d(1) transitions in the quantum cutter Cs2KYF6:Pr(3+) with the elpasolite structure type. The methodological advances are relevant for the analysis and prospection of materials acting as phosphors in light-emitting diodes. The positions of the zero-phonon energy corresponding to the states of the electron configurations 4f(2) and 4f(1)5d(1) are calculated, where the praseodymium ion may occupy either the Cs(+)-, K(+)- or the Y(3+)-site, and are compared with available experimental data. The theoretical results show that the occupation of the three undistorted sites allows a quantum-cutting process. However size effects due to the difference between the ionic radii of Pr(3+) and K(+) as well as Cs(+) lead to the distortion of the K(+)- and the Cs(+)-site, which finally exclude these sites for quantum-cutting. A detailed discussion about the origin of this distortion is also described.

  19. Reducing the Impacts of Hydroelectric Dams on Juvenile Anadromous Fishes: Bioengineering Evaluations Using Acoustic Imaging in the Columbia River, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Gary E.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hedgepeth, J.; Khan, Fenton; Mueller, Robert P.; Nagy, William T.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Weiland, Mark A.

    2008-07-29

    Dams impact the survival of juvenile anadromous fishes by obstructing migration corridors, lowering water quality, delaying migrations, and entraining fish in turbine discharge. To reduce these impacts, structural and operational modifications to dams— such as voluntary spill discharge, turbine intake guidance screens, and surface flow outlets—are instituted. Over the last six years, we have used acoustic imaging technology to evaluate the effects of these modifications on fish behavior, passage rates, entrainment zones, and fish/flow relationships at hydroelectric projects on the Columbia River. The imaging technique has evolved from studies documenting simple movement patterns to automated tracking of images to merging and analysis with concurrent hydraulic data. This chapter chronicles this evolution and shows how the information gleaned from the scientific evaluations has been applied to improve passage conditions for juvenile salmonids. We present data from Bonneville and The Dalles dams that document fish behavior and entrainment zones at sluiceway outlets (14 to 142 m3/s), fish passage rates through a gap at a turbine intake screen, and the relationship between fish swimming effort and hydraulic conditions. Dam operators and fisheries managers have applied these data to support decisions on operational and structural changes to the dams for the benefit of anadromous fish populations in the Columbia River basin.

  20. Gas-coupled laser acoustic detection as a non-contact line detector for photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jami L.; van Wijk, Kasper; Caron, James N.; Timmerman, Miriam

    2016-02-01

    Conventional contacting transducers for ultrasonic wave detection are highly sensitive and tuned for real-time imaging with fixed array geometries. However, optical detection provides an alternative to contacting transducers when a small sensor footprint, a large frequency bandwidth, or non-contacting detection is required. Typical optical detection relies on a Doppler-shifted reflection of light from the target, but gas coupled-laser acoustic detection (GCLAD) provides an alternative optical detection method for photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasound imaging that does not involve surface reflectivity. Instead, GCLAD is a line-detector that measures the deflection of an optical beam propagating parallel to the sample, as the refractive index of the air near the sample is affected by particle displacement on the sample surface. We describe the underlying principles of GCLAD and derive a formula for quantifying the surface displacement from a remote GCLAD measurement. We discuss a design for removing the location-dependent displacement bias along the probe beam and a method for measuring the attenuation coefficient of the surrounding air. GCLAD results are used to quantify the surface displacement in a laser-ultrasound experiment, which shows 94% agreement to line-integrated data from a commercial laser vibrometer point detector. Finally, we demonstrate the feasibility of PA imaging of an artery-sized absorber using a detector 5.8 cm from a phantom surface.

  1. Comments on the thermoelectric power of intermetallic rare-earth compounds with well localized 4f shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szukiel, A. E.

    2016-05-01

    The anomalous temperature variation of the thermoelectric power in the metallic rare-earth compounds with well-localized 4f shells is sometimes interpreted as resulting from the conduction electrons scattering in the Born approximation on the acoustic phonons and on the localized spins in the s-f exchange interaction. Such an interpretation relies on the results of some theoretical works where the sign reversal and the maxima of the thermoelectric power were obtained within these simple models. In the present paper we prove that neither the electron-phonon scattering nor the magnetic s-f scattering in the Born approximation (nor both of them) do lead to the effects mentioned above.

  2. The screening of 4f moments and delocalization in the compressed light rare earths

    SciTech Connect

    McMahan, A K; Scalettar, R T; Jarrell, M

    2009-08-19

    Spin and charge susceptibilities and the 4f{sup n}, 4f{sup n{+-}1} configuration weights are calculated for compressed Ce (n=1), Pr (n=2), and Nd (n=3) metals using dynamical mean field theory combined with the local-density approximation. At ambient and larger volumes these trivalent rare earths are pinned at sharp 4f{sup n} configurations, their 4f moments assume atomic-limiting values, are unscreened, and the 4f charge fluctuations are small indicating little f state density near the Fermi level. Under compresssion there is dramatic screening of the moments and an associated increase in both the 4f charge fluctuations and static charge susceptibility. These changes are coincident with growing weights of the 4f{sup n-1} configurations, which it is argued are better measures of delocalization than the 4f{sup n+1} weights which are compromised by an increase in the number of 4f electrons caused by rising 6s, 6p bands. This process is continuous and prolonged as a function of volume, with strikingly similarity among the three rare earths, aside from the effects moderating and shifting to smaller volumes for the heavier members. The observed {alpha}-{gamma} collapse in Ce occurs over the large-volume half of this evolution, the Pr analog at smaller volumes, and Nd has no collapse.

  3. Apolipoprotein A-I mimetic peptide 4F blocks sphingomyelinase-induced LDL aggregation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Su Duy; Javanainen, Matti; Rissanen, Sami; Zhao, Hongxia; Huusko, Jenni; Kivelä, Annukka M; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Navab, Mohamad; Fogelman, Alan M; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Kovanen, Petri T; Öörni, Katariina

    2015-06-01

    Lipolytic modification of LDL particles by SMase generates LDL aggregates with a strong affinity for human arterial proteoglycans and may so enhance LDL retention in the arterial wall. Here, we evaluated the effects of apoA-I mimetic peptide 4F on structural and functional properties of the SMase-modified LDL particles. LDL particles with and without 4F were incubated with SMase, after which their aggregation, structure, and proteoglycan binding were analyzed. At a molar ratio of L-4F to apoB-100 of 2.5 to 20:1, 4F dose-dependently inhibited SMase-induced LDL aggregation. At a molar ratio of 20:1, SMase-induced aggregation was fully blocked. Binding of 4F to LDL particles inhibited SMase-induced hydrolysis of LDL by 10% and prevented SMase-induced LDL aggregation. In addition, the binding of the SMase-modified LDL particles to human aortic proteoglycans was dose-dependently inhibited by pretreating LDL with 4F. The 4F stabilized apoB-100 conformation and inhibited SMase-induced conformational changes of apoB-100. Molecular dynamic simulations showed that upon binding to protein-free LDL surface, 4F locally alters membrane order and fluidity and induces structural changes to the lipid layer. Collectively, 4F stabilizes LDL particles by preventing the SMase-induced conformational changes in apoB-100 and so blocks SMase-induced LDL aggregation and the resulting increase in LDL retention.

  4. Wavefront modulation and subwavelength diffractive acoustics with an acoustic metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yangbo; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Huanyang; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A.

    2014-11-01

    Metasurfaces are a family of novel wavefront-shaping devices with planar profile and subwavelength thickness. Acoustic metasurfaces with ultralow profile yet extraordinary wave manipulating properties would be highly desirable for improving the performance of many acoustic wave-based applications. However, designing acoustic metasurfaces with similar functionality to their electromagnetic counterparts remains challenging with traditional metamaterial design approaches. Here we present a design and realization of an acoustic metasurface based on tapered labyrinthine metamaterials. The demonstrated metasurface can not only steer an acoustic beam as expected from the generalized Snell’s law, but also exhibits various unique properties such as conversion from propagating wave to surface mode, extraordinary beam-steering and apparent negative refraction through higher-order diffraction. Such designer acoustic metasurfaces provide a new design methodology for acoustic signal modulation devices and may be useful for applications such as acoustic imaging, beam steering, ultrasound lens design and acoustic surface wave-based applications.

  5. Wavefront modulation and subwavelength diffractive acoustics with an acoustic metasurface.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yangbo; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Huanyang; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A

    2014-11-24

    Metasurfaces are a family of novel wavefront-shaping devices with planar profile and subwavelength thickness. Acoustic metasurfaces with ultralow profile yet extraordinary wave manipulating properties would be highly desirable for improving the performance of many acoustic wave-based applications. However, designing acoustic metasurfaces with similar functionality to their electromagnetic counterparts remains challenging with traditional metamaterial design approaches. Here we present a design and realization of an acoustic metasurface based on tapered labyrinthine metamaterials. The demonstrated metasurface can not only steer an acoustic beam as expected from the generalized Snell's law, but also exhibits various unique properties such as conversion from propagating wave to surface mode, extraordinary beam-steering and apparent negative refraction through higher-order diffraction. Such designer acoustic metasurfaces provide a new design methodology for acoustic signal modulation devices and may be useful for applications such as acoustic imaging, beam steering, ultrasound lens design and acoustic surface wave-based applications.

  6. Localized acoustic surface modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Mohamed; Chen, Pai-Yen; Bağcı, Hakan

    2016-04-01

    We introduce the concept of localized acoustic surface modes. We demonstrate that they are induced on a two-dimensional cylindrical rigid surface with subwavelength corrugations under excitation by an incident acoustic plane wave. Our results show that the corrugated rigid surface is acoustically equivalent to a cylindrical scatterer with uniform mass density that can be represented using a Drude-like model. This, indeed, suggests that plasmonic-like acoustic materials can be engineered with potential applications in various areas including sensing, imaging, and cloaking.

  7. Digital confocal microscopy using a virtual 4f-system based on numerical beam propagation for depth measurement without mechanical scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Yuta; Okamoto, Atsushi; Toda, Masataka; Kuno, Yasuyuki; Nozawa, Jin; Ogawa, Kazuhisa; Tomita, Akihisa

    2016-08-01

    We propose a digital confocal microscope using a virtual 4f-system based on numerical beam propagation for depth measurement without mechanical scanning. In our technique, the information in the sample target along the depth direction is obtained by defocusing the virtual 4f-system, which consists of two virtual lenses arranged in a computer simulation. The principle of our technique is completely different from that of the mechanical scanning method used in the conventional confocal microscope based on digital holography. By using the virtual 4f-system, the measurement and exposure time can be markedly reduced because multilayered tomographic images are generated using a single measurement. In this study, we tested the virtual depth imaging technique by measuring cover glasses arranged along the depth direction.

  8. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr., Ph.D.; Younane Abousleiman, Ph.D.; Musharraf Zaman, Ph.D., P.E.

    2002-04-30

    Three major goals were accomplished during this phase. First, a study was completed of the effects of stress-induced changes in anisotropic elastic moduli in sandstone. Second, a new method for measuring the anisotropic poroelastic moduli from acoustic data was developed. Third, a series of triaxial experiments were conducted on unconsolidated sands to identify pressure/stress conditions where liquefaction occurs under high confining pressures. Stress-induced changes in anisotropic Young's moduli and shear moduli were observed during deformational pathway experiments. A new method was made for the acquisition of compressional and shear wave velocities along a series of 3-dimensional raypaths through a core sample as it is subjected to deformation. Three different deformational pathway experiments were conducted. During the hydrostatic deformation experiment, little or no anisotropy was observed in either the Young's moduli or shear moduli. Significant deformational anisotropies were observed in both moduli during the uniaxial strain test and the triaxial compression experiment but each had a different nature. During the triaxial experiment the axial and lateral Young's moduli and shear moduli continued to diverge as load was applied. During the uniaxial strain experiment the anisotropy was ''locked in'' early in the loading phase but then remained steady as both the confining pressure and axial stress were applied. A new method for measuring anisotropic Biot's effective stress parameters has also been developed. The method involves measuring the compressional and shear wave velocities in the aforementioned acoustic velocity experiments while varying stress paths. For a stress-induced transversely isotropic medium the acoustic velocity data are utilized to calculate the five independent elastic stiffness components. Once the elastic stiffness components are determined these can be used to calculate the anisotropic Biot's effective stress parameters, {alpha}{sub v

  9. Pre- and post-stimulation characterization of geothermal well GRT-1, Rittershoffen, France: insights from acoustic image logs of hard fractured rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, Jeanne; Genter, Albert; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2016-08-01

    Geothermal well GRT-1 (Rittershoffen, Alsace) was drilled in 2012. Its open-hole section (extending down to a depth of 2.6 km) penetrated fractured sandstones and granite. In 2013, the well was subjected to Thermal, Chemical and Hydraulic (TCH) stimulation, which improved the injectivity index fivefold. The goal of the study was to assess the impact of the stimulation by comparing pre- and post-stimulation well-logging (acoustic and temperature [T] logs) and mud-logging data. This comparison revealed modifications of almost all the natural fractures. However, not all of these fractures are associated with permeability enhancement, and the post-stimulation T logs are important for characterizing this enhancement. Chemical alteration due to mechanical erosion at the tops and bottoms of the fractures was observed in the sandstones. These zones display indications of very small new permeability after the TCH stimulation. Because a major fault zone caved extensively where it crosses the borehole, it was not imaged in the acoustic logs. However, this originally permeable zone was enhanced as demonstrated by the T logs. Based on the natural injectivity of this fault zone, hydraulic erosion and thermal microcracking of its internal quartz veins are associated with this permeability enhancement. Although local changes in the borehole wall observed in the acoustic images cannot be directly linked to the improved injectivity index, the comparison of the acoustic image logs allows for identification of fracture zones impacted by the TCH stimulation.

  10. Comparison of analytical and numerical approaches for CT-based aberration correction in transcranial passive acoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Ryan M.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT)-based aberration corrections are employed in transcranial ultrasound both for therapy and imaging. In this study, analytical and numerical approaches for calculating aberration corrections based on CT data were compared, with a particular focus on their application to transcranial passive imaging. Two models were investigated: a three-dimensional full-wave numerical model (Connor and Hynynen 2004 IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 51 1693-706) based on the Westervelt equation, and an analytical method (Clement and Hynynen 2002 Ultrasound Med. Biol. 28 617-24) similar to that currently employed by commercial brain therapy systems. Trans-skull time delay corrections calculated from each model were applied to data acquired by a sparse hemispherical (30 cm diameter) receiver array (128 piezoceramic discs: 2.5 mm diameter, 612 kHz center frequency) passively listening through ex vivo human skullcaps (n  =  4) to emissions from a narrow-band, fixed source emitter (1 mm diameter, 516 kHz center frequency). Measurements were taken at various locations within the cranial cavity by moving the source around the field using a three-axis positioning system. Images generated through passive beamforming using CT-based skull corrections were compared with those obtained through an invasive source-based approach, as well as images formed without skull corrections, using the main lobe volume, positional shift, peak sidelobe ratio, and image signal-to-noise ratio as metrics for image quality. For each CT-based model, corrections achieved by allowing for heterogeneous skull acoustical parameters in simulation outperformed the corresponding case where homogeneous parameters were assumed. Of the CT-based methods investigated, the full-wave model provided the best imaging results at the cost of computational complexity. These results highlight the importance of accurately modeling trans-skull propagation when calculating CT-based aberration corrections

  11. B-Mode and Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) Imaging of Prostate Zonal Anatomy: Comparison with 3T T2-Weighted MR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Palmeri, Mark L.; Miller, Zachary A.; Glass, Tyler J.; Garcia-Reyes, Kirema; Gupta, Rajan T.; Rosenzweig, Stephen J.; Kauffman, Christopher; Polascik, Thomas J.; Buck, Andrew; Kulbacki, Evan; Madden, John; Lipman, Samantha L.; Rouze, Ned C.; Nightingale, Kathryn R.

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common non-cutaneous malignancy among men in the United States and the second leading cause of cancer-related death. Multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) has gained recent popularity to characterize PCa. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging has the potential to aid PCa diagnosis and management by using tissue stiffness to evaluate prostate zonal anatomy and lesions. MR and B-mode/ARFI in vivo imaging datasets were compared with one another and with gross pathology measurements made immediately after radical prostatectomy. Images were manually segmented in 3D Slicer to delineate the central gland (CG) and prostate capsule, and 3D models were rendered to evaluate zonal anatomy dimensions and volumes. Both imaging modalities showed good correlation between estimated organ volume and gross pathologic weights. Ultrasound and MR total prostate volumes were well correlated (R2 = 0.77), but B-mode images yielded prostate volumes that were larger (16.82% ± 22.45%) than MR images, due to overestimation of the lateral dimension (18.4% ± 13.9%), with less significant differences in the other dimensions (7.4% ± 17.6%, anterior-to-posterior, and −10.8% ± 13.9%, apex-to-base). ARFI and MR CG volumes were also well correlated (R2 = 0.85). CG volume differences were attributed to ARFI underestimation of the apex-to-base axis (−28.8% ± 9.4%) and ARFI overestimation of the lateral dimension (21.5% ± 14.3%). B-mode/ARFI imaging yielded prostate volumes and dimensions that were well correlated with MR T2-weighted image (T2WI) estimates, with biases in the lateral dimension due to poor contrast caused by extraprostatic fat. B-mode combined with ARFI imaging is a promising low-cost, portable, real-time modality that can complement mpMRI for PCa diagnosis, treatment planning, and management. PMID:25060914

  12. Characterization of a Broadband All-Optical Ultrasound Transducer—From Optical and Acoustical Properties to Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yang; Kim, Jin-Sung; Huang, Sheng-Wen; Ashkenazi, Shai; Guo, L. Jay; O’Donnell, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    A broadband all-optical ultrasound transducer has been designed, fabricated, and evaluated for high-frequency ultrasound imaging. The device consists of a 2-D gold nanostructure imprinted on top of a glass substrate, followed by a 3 μm PDMS layer and a 30 nm gold layer. A laser pulse at the resonance wavelength of the gold nanostructure is focused onto the surface for ultrasound generation, while the gold nanostructure, together with the 30 nm thick gold layer and the PDMS layer in between, forms an etalon for ultrasound detection, which uses a CW laser at a wavelength far from resonance as the probing beam. The center frequency of a pulse-echo signal recorded in the far field of the transducer is 40 MHz with -6 dB bandwidth of 57 MHz. The signal to noise ratio (SNR) from a 70 μm diameter transmit element combined with a 20 μm diameter receive element probing a near perfect reflector positioned 1.5 mm from the transducer surface is more than 10 dB and has the potential to be improved by at least another 40 dB. A high-frequency ultrasound array has been emulated using multiple measurements from the transducer while mechanically scanning an imaging target. Characterization of the device’s optical and acoustical properties, as well as preliminary imaging results, strongly suggest that all-optical ultrasound transducers can be used to build high-frequency arrays for real-time high-resolution ultrasound imaging. PMID:18986929

  13. Active and passive acoustic imaging inside a large-scale polyaxial hydraulic fracture test

    SciTech Connect

    Glaser, S.D.; Dudley, J.W. II; Shlyapobersky, J.

    1999-07-01

    An automated laboratory hydraulic fracture experiment has been assembled to determine what rock and treatment parameters are crucial to improving the efficiency and effectiveness of field hydraulic fractures. To this end a large (460 mm cubic sample) polyaxial cell, with servo-controlled X,Y,Z, pore pressure, crack-mouth-opening-displacement, and bottom hole pressure, was built. Active imaging with embedded seismic diffraction arrays images the geometry of the fracture. Preliminary tests indicate fracture extent can be imaged to within 5%. Unique embeddible high-fidelity particle velocity AE sensors were designed and calibrated to allow determination of fracture source kinematics.

  14. Nanosized LiVPO4F/graphene composite: A promising anode material for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiexi; Li, Xinhai; Wang, Zhixing; Huang, Bin; Wang, Zhiguo; Guo, Huajun

    2014-04-01

    This study first reports the synthesis of the nanosized LiVPO4F/graphene composite (LVPF/G). The LVPF/G composite is prepared by a facile mechanochemical approach. XRD results reveal that the prepared composite are well crystallized with triclinic LiVPO4F. SEM and TEM images demonstrate that the LiVPO4F nanoparticles in the composite are well enwrapped by graphene. Used as anode material for lithium ion batteries, the prepared LVPF/G composite exhibits greatly improved electrochemical performance. Furthermore, the electrochemical properties the LVPF/G composite depend heavily on the discharge cut-off potential. When the cut-off potential is altered to 0.01 V vs. Li/Li+, it possesses the best electrochemical performance. Under such optimal charge-discharge condition (3-0.01 V vs. Li/Li+), it shows an initial charge capacity of 287 mAh g-1 at 0.1C rate (1C = 310 mA g-1) and shows no capacity fading after 100 cycles. It also exhibits good rate capability, delivering about 168 mAh g-1 at 10C rate.

  15. Liquid Helium Acoustic Microscope.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steer, Andrew Paul

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. In an acoustic microscope, images are generated by monitoring the intensity of the ultrasonic reflection, or echo, from the surface of a sample. In order to achieve this a pulse of acoustic energy is produced by the excitation of a thin film transducer. The pulse thus generated propagates through a crystal and is incident upon the acoustic lens surface, which is the boundary between the crystal and an acoustic coupling liquid. The acoustic lens is a converging element, and brings the ultrasonic beam to a focus within the liquid. A sample, placed at the focus, can act as a reflector, and the returned pulse then contains information regarding the acoustic reflectivity of this specimen. Acoustic pulses are repeatedly launched and detected while the acoustic lens is scanned over the surface of the sample. In this manner an acoustic image is constructed. Acoustic losses in room temperature liquid coupling media represent a considerable source of difficulty in the recovery of acoustic echo signals. At the frequencies of operation required in a microscope which is capable of high resolution, the ultrasonic attenuation is not only large but increases with the square of frequency. In superfluid liquid helium at temperatures below 0.1 K, however, the ultrasonic attenuation becomes negligible. Furthermore, the low sound velocity in liquid helium results in an increase in resolution, since the acoustic wavelength is proportional to velocity. A liquid helium acoustic microscope has been designed and constructed. Details of the various possible detection methods are given, and comparisons are made between them. Measurements of the performance of the system that was adopted are reported. The development of a cooled preamplifier is also described. The variation of reflected signal with object distance has been measured and compared with theoretical predictions. This variation is important in the analysis of acoustic

  16. Imaging Acoustic Phonon Dynamics on the Nanometer-Femtosecond Spatiotemporal Length-Scale with Ultrafast Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plemmons, Dayne; Flannigan, David

    Coherent collective lattice oscillations known as phonons dictate a broad range of physical observables in condensed matter and act as primary energy carriers across a wide range of material systems. Despite this omnipresence, analysis of phonon dynamics on their ultrashort native spatiotemporal length scale - that is, the combined nanometer (nm), spatial and femtosecond (fs), temporal length-scales - has largely remained experimentally inaccessible. Here, we employ ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM) to directly image discrete acoustic phonons in real-space with combined nm-fs resolution. By directly probing electron scattering in the image plane (as opposed to the diffraction plane), we retain phase information critical for following the evolution, propagation, scattering, and decay of phonons in relation to morphological features of the specimen (i.e. interfaces, grain boundaries, voids, ripples, etc.). We extract a variety of morphologically-specific quantitative information from the UEM videos including phonon frequencies, phase velocities, and decays times. We expect these direct manifestations of local elastic properties in the vicinity of material defects and interfaces will aide in the understanding and application of phonon-mediated phenomena in nanostructures. Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA.

  17. Basic investigation on acoustic velocity change imaging method for quantitative assessment of fat content in human liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mano, Kazune; Tanigawa, Shohei; Hori, Makoto; Yokota, Daiki; Wada, Kenji; Matsunaka, Toshiyuki; Morikawa, Hiroyasu; Horinaka, Hiromichi

    2016-07-01

    Fatty liver is a disease caused by the excess accumulation of fat in the human liver. The early diagnosis of fatty liver is very important, because fatty liver is the major marker linked to metabolic syndrome. We already proposed the ultrasonic velocity change imaging method to diagnose fatty liver by using the fact that the temperature dependence of ultrasonic velocity is different in water and in fat. For the diagonosis of a fatty liver stage, we attempted a feasibility study of the quantitative assessment of the fat content in the human liver using our ultrasonic velocity change imaging method. Experimental results showed that the fat content in the tissue mimic phantom containing lard was determined by its ultrasonic velocity change in the flat temperature region formed by a circular warming ultrasonic transducer with an acoustic lens having an appropriate focal length. By considering the results of our simulation using a thermal diffusion equation, we determined whether this method could be applied to fatty liver assessment under the condition that the tissue had the thermal relaxation effect caused by blood flow.

  18. Bioenergetic programming of macrophages by the apolipoprotein A-I mimetic peptide 4F.

    PubMed

    Datta, Geeta; Kramer, Philip A; Johnson, Michelle S; Sawada, Hirotaka; Smythies, Lesley E; Crossman, David K; Chacko, Balu; Ballinger, Scott W; Westbrook, David G; Mayakonda, Palgunachari; Anantharamaiah, G M; Darley-Usmar, Victor M; White, C Roger

    2015-05-01

    The apoA-I (apolipoprotein A-I) mimetic peptide 4F favours the differentiation of human monocytes to an alternatively activated M2 phenotype. The goal of the present study was to test whether the 4F-mediated differentiation of MDMs (monocyte-derived macrophages) requires the induction of an oxidative metabolic programme. 4F treatment induced several genes in MDMs that play an important role in lipid metabolism, including PPARγ (peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor γ) and CD36. Addition of 4F was associated with a significant increase in FA (fatty acid) uptake and oxidation compared with vehicle treatment. Mitochondrial respiration was assessed by measurement of the OCR (oxygen-consumption rate). 4F increased basal and ATP-linked OCR as well as maximal uncoupled mitochondrial respiration. These changes were associated with a significant increase in ΔΨm (mitochondrial membrane potential). The increase in metabolic activity in 4F-treated MDMs was attenuated by etomoxir, an inhibitor of mitochondrial FA uptake. Finally, addition of the PPARγ antagonist T0070907 to 4F-treated MDMs reduced the expression of CD163 and CD36, cell-surface markers for M2 macrophages, and reduced basal and ATP-linked OCR. These results support our hypothesis that the 4F-mediated differentiation of MDMs to an anti-inflammatory phenotype is due, in part, to an increase in FA uptake and mitochondrial oxidative metabolism.

  19. Nonlinear acoustic enhancement in photoacoustic imaging with wideband absorptive nanoemulsion beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chen-wei; Lombardo, Michael; Xia, Jinjun; Pelivanov, Ivan; Perez, Camilo; Larson-Smith, Kjersta; Matula, Thomas J.; Pozzo, Danilo; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2014-03-01

    A nanoemulsion contrast agent with a perfluorohexane core and optically absorptive gold nanospheres (GNSs) assembled on the surface, is presented to improve the specificity of photoacoustic (PA) molecular imaging in differentiating targeted cells or aberrant regions from heterogeneous background signals. Compared to distributed GNSs, clustered GNSs at the emulsion oil-water interface produce a red-shifted and broadened absorption spectrum, exhibiting fairly high absorption in the near-infrared region commonly used for deep tissue imaging. Above a certain laser irradiation fluence threshold, a phase transition creating a microbubble in the emulsion core leads to more than 10 times stronger PA signals compared with conventional thermal-expansion-induced PA signals. These signals are also strongly non-linear, as verified by a differential scheme using recorded PA images at different laser fluences. Assuming a linear relation between laser fluence and the PA signal amplitude, differential processing results in nearly perfect suppression of linear sources, but retains a significant residue for the non-linear nanoemulsion with more than 35 dB enhancement. This result demonstrates that contrast specificity can be improved using the nanoemulsion as a targeting agent in PA molecular imaging by suppressing all background signals related to a linear PA response. Furthermore, combined with a system providing simultaneous laser/ultrasound excitation, cavitation-generated bubbles have the potential to be a highly specific contrast agent for ultrasound molecular imaging and harmonic imaging, as well as a targeted means for noninvasive ultrasound-based therapies.

  20. Expression of CYP4F12 in gastrointestinal and urogenital epithelia.

    PubMed

    Stark, Katarina; Schauer, Lydia; Sahlén, Göran E; Ronquist, Gunnar; Oliw, Ernst H

    2004-04-01

    Cytochrome P450 4F12 (CYP4F12) was originally cloned from human liver and small intestine. CYP4F12 can oxidize arachidonic acid, two stable prostaglandin H2 analogues, and an antihistamine, ebastine, but the tissue distribution and catalytic properties of CYP4F12 have not been fully investigated. An antipeptide polyclonal antibody was raised against the C-terminal of CYP4F12 (PLNVGLQ), evaluated by Western blot analysis and used for immunohistological analysis of 50 human tissues. Western blot analysis of recombinant CYP4F12, expressed in yeast, and microsomal proteins from adult and foetal liver, kidney, placenta at term, seminal vesicles, the prostate gland and purified prostasomes showed that the polyclonal antibody detected a protein of the expected size, approximately 60 kDa. CYP4F12 mRNA could be detected in seminal vesicles and prostate gland by reverse transcription-PCR. Prominent CYP4F12 immunoreactivity occurred, inter alia, in the epithelial cells of the gastrointestinal tract (stomach, small intestine, and colon), collecting tubules, transitional epithelium, ovarian follicles, the endothelium of microvessels of placental villi (first trimester), and epidermis. We screened recombinant CYP4F12 for catalytic activity. Arachidonic acid (20:4n-6) was hydroxylated at C18 and laurate at C11, but significant amounts of metabolites of 18:2n-6, 20:3n-9, 20:5n-3, 22:5n-6, and some prostaglandins could not be detected. We conclude that CYP4F12 is widely distributed in gastrointestinal and urogenital epithelia and exhibits a narrow substrate specificity. PMID:15078342

  1. Assessment of liver fibrosis with 2-D shear wave elastography in comparison to transient elastography and acoustic radiation force impulse imaging in patients with chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Ludmila; Kasper, Daniela; Fitting, Daniel; Knop, Viola; Vermehren, Annika; Sprinzl, Kathrin; Hansmann, Martin L; Herrmann, Eva; Bojunga, Joerg; Albert, Joerg; Sarrazin, Christoph; Zeuzem, Stefan; Friedrich-Rust, Mireen

    2015-09-01

    Two-dimensional shear wave elastography (2-D SWE) is an ultrasound-based elastography method integrated into a conventional ultrasound machine. It can evaluate larger regions of interest and, therefore, might be better at determining the overall fibrosis distribution. The aim of this prospective study was to compare 2-D SWE with the two best evaluated liver elastography methods, transient elastography and acoustic radiation force impulse (point SWE using acoustic radiation force impulse) imaging, in the same population group. The study included 132 patients with chronic hepatopathies, in which liver stiffness was evaluated using transient elastography, acoustic radiation force impulse imaging and 2-D SWE. The reference methods were liver biopsy for the assessment of liver fibrosis (n = 101) and magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomography for the diagnosis of liver cirrhosis (n = 31). No significant difference in diagnostic accuracy, assessed as the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC), was found between the three elastography methods (2-D SWE, transient elastography, acoustic radiation force impulse imaging) for the diagnosis of significant and advanced fibrosis and liver cirrhosis in the "per protocol" (AUROCs for fibrosis stages ≥2: 0.90, 0.95 and 0.91; for fibrosis stage [F] ≥3: 0.93, 0.95 and 0.94; for F = 4: 0.92, 0.96 and 0.92) and "intention to diagnose" cohort (AUROCs for F ≥2: 0.87, 0.92 and 0.91; for F ≥3: 0.91, 0.93 and 0.94; for F = 4: 0.88, 0.90 and 0.89). Therefore, 2-D SWE, ARFI imaging and transient elastography seem to be comparably good methods for non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis.

  2. Effect of liposomal local therapy on salivary glands in acoustic radiation force impulse imaging in Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hofauer, Benedikt; Mansour, Naglaa; Heiser, Clemens; Straßen, Ulrich; Bas, Murat; Knopf, Andreas

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging as a monitoring tool for the effect of a liposomal local therapy in patients with dry mouth symptoms due to primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS). Fifty patients with pSS, diagnosed according to the American-European Consensus Group (AECG) criteria, were included. Clinical data were collected, and sonographic examination including ARFI imaging of the parotid and submandibular glands was performed. Subjective symptoms were evaluated via visual analogue scales (VAS), and the unstimulated whole salivary flow was measured. After a two-month period of liposomal local therapy, sonographic examination was repeated and both subjective and objective symptoms were re-evaluated. Before local treatment, the mean ARFI value of parotid glands was 2.96 m/s (SD 0.97). Mean ARFI value of the submandibular glands was 2.09 m/s (SD 0.71). After the two-month treatment period, a significant decline of ARFI values in the parotid glands to a value of 2.34 m/s (SD 0.70, p < 0.001) could be observed. The submandibular glands did not show any significant change. Further, a significant reduction of the subjective sensation of dry mouth symptoms could be observed (p = 0.0001). With the application of ARFI imaging, a decline in parotid gland stiffness could be observed in patients with primary Sjögren's Syndrome accompanied by a significant improvement of the subjective sensation of dry mouth symptoms. The seromucous submandibular glands did not show any changes compared to the serous parotid glands.

  3. Effect of liposomal local therapy on salivary glands in acoustic radiation force impulse imaging in Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hofauer, Benedikt; Mansour, Naglaa; Heiser, Clemens; Straßen, Ulrich; Bas, Murat; Knopf, Andreas

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging as a monitoring tool for the effect of a liposomal local therapy in patients with dry mouth symptoms due to primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS). Fifty patients with pSS, diagnosed according to the American-European Consensus Group (AECG) criteria, were included. Clinical data were collected, and sonographic examination including ARFI imaging of the parotid and submandibular glands was performed. Subjective symptoms were evaluated via visual analogue scales (VAS), and the unstimulated whole salivary flow was measured. After a two-month period of liposomal local therapy, sonographic examination was repeated and both subjective and objective symptoms were re-evaluated. Before local treatment, the mean ARFI value of parotid glands was 2.96 m/s (SD 0.97). Mean ARFI value of the submandibular glands was 2.09 m/s (SD 0.71). After the two-month treatment period, a significant decline of ARFI values in the parotid glands to a value of 2.34 m/s (SD 0.70, p < 0.001) could be observed. The submandibular glands did not show any significant change. Further, a significant reduction of the subjective sensation of dry mouth symptoms could be observed (p = 0.0001). With the application of ARFI imaging, a decline in parotid gland stiffness could be observed in patients with primary Sjögren's Syndrome accompanied by a significant improvement of the subjective sensation of dry mouth symptoms. The seromucous submandibular glands did not show any changes compared to the serous parotid glands. PMID:27572326

  4. A New Marmoset P450 4F12 Enzyme Expressed in Small Intestines and Livers Efficiently Metabolizes Antihistaminic Drug Ebastine.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Shotaro; Uno, Yasuhiro; Yuki, Yukako; Inoue, Takashi; Sasaki, Erika; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2016-06-01

    Common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) are attracting attention as animal models in preclinical studies for drug development. However, cytochrome P450s (P450s), major drug-metabolizing enzymes, have not been fully identified and characterized in marmosets. In this study, based on the four novel P450 4F genes found on the marmoset genome, we successfully isolated P450 4F2, 4F3B, 4F11, and 4F12 cDNAs in marmoset livers. Deduced amino acid sequences of the four marmoset P450 4F forms exhibited high sequence identities (87%-93%) to the human and cynomolgus monkey P450 4F homologs. Marmoset P450 4F3B and 4F11 mRNAs were predominantly expressed in livers, whereas marmoset P450 4F2 and 4F12 mRNAs were highly expressed in small intestines and livers. Four marmoset P450 4F proteins heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli catalyzed the ω-hydroxylation of leukotriene B4 In addition, marmoset P450 4F12 effectively catalyzed the hydroxylation of antiallergy drug ebastine, a human P450 2J/4F probe substrate. Ebastine hydroxylation activities by small intestine and liver microsomes from marmosets and cynomolgus monkeys showed greatly higher values than those of humans. Ebastine hydroxylation activities by marmoset and cynomolgus monkey small intestine microsomes were inhibited (approximately 60%) by anti-P450 4F antibodies, unlike human small intestine microsomes, suggesting that contribution of P450 4F enzymes for ebastine hydroxylation in the small intestine might be different between marmosets/cynomolgus monkeys and humans. These results indicated that marmoset P450 4F2, 4F3B, 4F11, and 4F12 were expressed in livers and/or small intestines and were functional in the metabolism of endogenous and exogenous compounds, similar to those of cynomolgus monkeys and humans.

  5. A New Marmoset P450 4F12 Enzyme Expressed in Small Intestines and Livers Efficiently Metabolizes Antihistaminic Drug Ebastine.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Shotaro; Uno, Yasuhiro; Yuki, Yukako; Inoue, Takashi; Sasaki, Erika; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2016-06-01

    Common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) are attracting attention as animal models in preclinical studies for drug development. However, cytochrome P450s (P450s), major drug-metabolizing enzymes, have not been fully identified and characterized in marmosets. In this study, based on the four novel P450 4F genes found on the marmoset genome, we successfully isolated P450 4F2, 4F3B, 4F11, and 4F12 cDNAs in marmoset livers. Deduced amino acid sequences of the four marmoset P450 4F forms exhibited high sequence identities (87%-93%) to the human and cynomolgus monkey P450 4F homologs. Marmoset P450 4F3B and 4F11 mRNAs were predominantly expressed in livers, whereas marmoset P450 4F2 and 4F12 mRNAs were highly expressed in small intestines and livers. Four marmoset P450 4F proteins heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli catalyzed the ω-hydroxylation of leukotriene B4 In addition, marmoset P450 4F12 effectively catalyzed the hydroxylation of antiallergy drug ebastine, a human P450 2J/4F probe substrate. Ebastine hydroxylation activities by small intestine and liver microsomes from marmosets and cynomolgus monkeys showed greatly higher values than those of humans. Ebastine hydroxylation activities by marmoset and cynomolgus monkey small intestine microsomes were inhibited (approximately 60%) by anti-P450 4F antibodies, unlike human small intestine microsomes, suggesting that contribution of P450 4F enzymes for ebastine hydroxylation in the small intestine might be different between marmosets/cynomolgus monkeys and humans. These results indicated that marmoset P450 4F2, 4F3B, 4F11, and 4F12 were expressed in livers and/or small intestines and were functional in the metabolism of endogenous and exogenous compounds, similar to those of cynomolgus monkeys and humans. PMID:27044800

  6. Development of acoustic model-based iterative reconstruction technique for thick-concrete imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almansouri, Hani; Clayton, Dwight; Kisner, Roger; Polsky, Yarom; Bouman, Charles; Santos-Villalobos, Hector

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasound signals have been used extensively for non-destructive evaluation (NDE). However, typical reconstruction techniques, such as the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT), are limited to quasi-homogenous thin media. New ultrasonic systems and reconstruction algorithms are in need for one-sided NDE of non-homogenous thick objects. An application example space is imaging of reinforced concrete structures for commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs). These structures provide important foundation, support, shielding, and containment functions. Identification and management of aging and degradation of concrete structures is fundamental to the proposed long-term operation of NPPs. Another example is geothermal and oil/gas production wells. These multi-layered structures are composed of steel, cement, and several types of soil and rocks. Ultrasound systems with greater penetration range and image quality will allow for better monitoring of the well's health and prediction of high-pressure hydraulic fracturing of the rock. These application challenges need to be addressed with an integrated imaging approach, where the application, hardware, and reconstruction software are highly integrated and optimized. Therefore, we are developing an ultrasonic system with Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction (MBIR) as the image reconstruction backbone. As the first implementation of MBIR for ultrasonic signals, this paper document the first implementation of the algorithm and show reconstruction results for synthetically generated data.1

  7. Ultrasonic imaging of human tooth using chirp-coded nonlinear time reversal acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Serge Dos; Domenjoud, Mathieu; Prevorovsky, Zdenek

    2010-01-01

    We report in this paper the first use of TR-NEWS, included chirp-coded excitation and applied for ultrasonic imaging of human tooth. Feasibility of the focusing of ultrasound at the surface of the human tooth is demonstrated and potentiality of a new echodentography of the dentine-enamel interface using TR-NEWS is discussed.

  8. Development of Acoustic Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction Technique for Thick-Concrete Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Almansouri, Hani; Clayton, Dwight A; Kisner, Roger A; Polsky, Yarom; Bouman, Charlie; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound signals have been used extensively for non-destructive evaluation (NDE). However, typical reconstruction techniques, such as the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT), are limited to quasi-homogenous thin media. New ultrasonic systems and reconstruction algorithms are in need for one-sided NDE of non-homogenous thick objects. An application example space is imaging of reinforced concrete structures for commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs). These structures provide important foundation, support, shielding, and containment functions. Identification and management of aging and degradation of concrete structures is fundamental to the proposed long-term operation of NPPs. Another example is geothermal and oil/gas production wells. These multi-layered structures are composed of steel, cement, and several types of soil and rocks. Ultrasound systems with greater penetration range and image quality will allow for better monitoring of the well's health and prediction of high-pressure hydraulic fracturing of the rock. These application challenges need to be addressed with an integrated imaging approach, where the application, hardware, and reconstruction software are highly integrated and optimized. Therefore, we are developing an ultrasonic system with Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction (MBIR) as the image reconstruction backbone. As the first implementation of MBIR for ultrasonic signals, this paper document the first implementation of the algorithm and show reconstruction results for synthetically generated data.

  9. Photo-acoustic imaging of blue nanoparticle targeted brain tumor for intra-operative glioma delineation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Aniruddha; Wang, Xueding; Koo Lee, Yong-Eun; Hah, HoeJin; Kim, Gwangseong; Chen, Thomas; Orrienger, Daniel; Sagher, Oren; Kopelman, Raoul

    2011-07-01

    Distinguishing the tumor from the background neo-plastic tissue is challenging for cancer surgery such as surgical resection of glioma. Attempts have been made to use visible or fluorescent markers to delineate the tumors during surgery. However, the systemic injection of the dyes requires high dose, resulting in negative side effects. A novel method to delineate rat brain tumors intra-operatively, as well as post-operatively, using a highly sensitive photoacoustic imaging technique enhanced by tumor targeting blue nanoparticle as contrast agent is demonstrated. The nanoparticles are made of polyacrylamide (PAA) matrix with covalently linked Coomassie-Blue dye. They contain 7.0% dye and the average size is 80nm. Their surface was conjugated with F3 peptide for active tumor targeting. These nanoparticles are nontoxic, chemically inert and have long plasma circulation lifetime, making them suitable as nanodevices for imaging using photoacoustics. Experiments on phantoms and rat brains tumors ex-vivo demonstrate the high sensitivity of photoacoustic imaging in delineating the tumor, containing contrast agent at concentrations too low to be visualized by eye. The control tumors without nanoparticles did not show any enhanced signal. This study shows that photoacoustic imaging facilitated with the nanoparticle contrast agent could contribute to future surgical procedures for glioma.

  10. Development of Acoustic Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction Technique for Thick-Concrete Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Almansouri, Hani; Clayton, Dwight A; Kisner, Roger A; Polsky, Yarom; Bouman, Charlie; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound signals have been used extensively for non-destructive evaluation (NDE). However, typical reconstruction techniques, such as the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT), are limited to quasi-homogenous thin media. New ultrasonic systems and reconstruction algorithms are in need for one-sided NDE of non-homogenous thick objects. An application example space is imaging of reinforced concrete structures for commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs). These structures provide important foundation, support, shielding, and containment functions. Identification and management of aging and degradation of concrete structures is fundamental to the proposed long-term operation of NPPs. Another example is geothermal and oil/gas production wells. These multi-layered structures are composed of steel, cement, and several types of soil and rocks. Ultrasound systems with greater penetration range and image quality will allow for better monitoring of the well s health and prediction of high-pressure hydraulic fracturing of the rock. These application challenges need to be addressed with an integrated imaging approach, where the application, hardware, and reconstruction software are highly integrated and optimized. Therefore, we are developing an ultrasonic system with Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction (MBIR) as the image reconstruction backbone. As the first implementation of MBIR for ultrasonic signals, this paper document the first implementation of the algorithm and show reconstruction results for synthetically generated data.

  11. E4F1-mediated control of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity is essential for skin homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Goguet-Rubio, Perrine; Seyran, Berfin; Gayte, Laurie; Bernex, Florence; Sutter, Anne; Delpech, Hélène; Linares, Laetitia Karine; Riscal, Romain; Repond, Cendrine; Rodier, Geneviève; Kirsh, Olivier; Touhami, Jawida; Noel, Jean; Vincent, Charles; Pirot, Nelly; Pavlovic, Guillaume; Herault, Yann; Sitbon, Marc; Pellerin, Luc; Sardet, Claude; Lacroix, Matthieu; Le Cam, Laurent

    2016-09-27

    The multifunctional protein E4 transcription factor 1 (E4F1) is an essential regulator of epidermal stem cell (ESC) maintenance. Here, we found that E4F1 transcriptionally regulates a metabolic program involved in pyruvate metabolism that is required to maintain skin homeostasis. E4F1 deficiency in basal keratinocytes resulted in deregulated expression of dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase (Dlat), a gene encoding the E2 subunit of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex. Accordingly, E4f1 knock-out (KO) keratinocytes exhibited impaired PDH activity and a redirection of the glycolytic flux toward lactate production. The metabolic reprogramming of E4f1 KO keratinocytes associated with remodeling of their microenvironment and alterations of the basement membrane, led to ESC mislocalization and exhaustion of the ESC pool. ShRNA-mediated depletion of Dlat in primary keratinocytes recapitulated defects observed upon E4f1 inactivation, including increased lactate secretion, enhanced activity of extracellular matrix remodeling enzymes, and impaired clonogenic potential. Altogether, our data reveal a central role for Dlat in the metabolic program regulated by E4F1 in basal keratinocytes and illustrate the importance of PDH activity in skin homeostasis. PMID:27621431

  12. Photo and thermoluminescence of KMgSO4 F: Ce and :Mn phosphors.

    PubMed

    Poddar, Anuradha; Gedam, S C; Dhoble, S J

    2015-06-01

    KMgSO4 F:Ce and KMgSO4 F:Mn phosphors were prepared by a wet chemical method and studied for their photoluminescence (PL) and thermoluminescence (TL) characteristics. PL emission of KMgSO4 F:Ce peaked at around 440 nm for the excitation at 377 nm due to 5d → 4f transition, while KMgSO4 F:Mn had a peak at 540 nm for an excitation at 363 nm and 247 nm due to (4) T1g  → (6) A1g transition. The phosphors also showed good thermoluminescence characteristics when they were exposed to γ-rays at a 5 Gy dose at the rate of 0.36 kGyh(-1) . KMgSO4 F:Ce exhibited a single thermoluminescence (TL) peak at around 167 °C and KMgSO4 F:Mn also exhibited a single TL peak at around 177 °C. Possible trapping parameters such as order of kinetics (b), the geometrical factor (μg ), the frequency factor (s) and the activation energy were also evaluated by Chen's half width method. This article discusses fundamental PL and TL characteristics in inorganic fluoride material activated by Ce(3+) and Mn(2+) ions and prepared by a wet chemical method.

  13. Alternative splicing determines the function of CYP4F3 by switching substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Christmas, P; Jones, J P; Patten, C J; Rock, D A; Zheng, Y; Cheng, S M; Weber, B M; Carlesso, N; Scadden, D T; Rettie, A E; Soberman, R J

    2001-10-12

    Diversity of cytochrome P450 function is determined by the expression of multiple genes, many of which have a high degree of identity. We report that the use of alternate exons, each coding for 48 amino acids, generates isoforms of human CYP4F3 that differ in substrate specificity, tissue distribution, and biological function. Both isoforms contain a total of 520 amino acids. CYP4F3A, which incorporates exon 4, inactivates LTB4 by omega-hydroxylation (Km = 0.68 microm) but has low activity for arachidonic acid (Km = 185 microm); it is the only CYP4F isoform expressed in myeloid cells in peripheral blood and bone marrow. CYP4F3B incorporates exon 3 and is selectively expressed in liver and kidney; it is also the predominant CYP4F isoform in trachea and tissues of the gastrointestinal tract. CYP4F3B has a 30-fold higher Km for LTB4 compared with CYP4F3A, but it utilizes arachidonic acid as a substrate for omega-hydroxylation (Km = 22 microm) and generates 20-HETE, an activator of protein kinase C and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II. Homology modeling demonstrates that the alternative exon has a position in the molecule which could enable it to contribute to substrate interactions. The results establish that tissue-specific alternative splicing of pre-mRNA can be used as a mechanism for changing substrate specificity and increasing the functional diversity of cytochrome P450 genes.

  14. Acoustic mapping velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muste, M.; Baranya, S.; Tsubaki, R.; Kim, D.; Ho, H.; Tsai, H.; Law, D.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of sediment dynamics in rivers is of great importance for various practical purposes. Despite its high relevance in riverine environment processes, the monitoring of sediment rates remains a major and challenging task for both suspended and bed load estimation. While the measurement of suspended load is currently an active area of testing with nonintrusive technologies (optical and acoustic), bed load measurement does not mark a similar progress. This paper describes an innovative combination of measurement techniques and analysis protocols that establishes the proof-of-concept for a promising technique, labeled herein Acoustic Mapping Velocimetry (AMV). The technique estimates bed load rates in rivers developing bed forms using a nonintrusive measurements approach. The raw information for AMV is collected with acoustic multibeam technology that in turn provides maps of the bathymetry over longitudinal swaths. As long as the acoustic maps can be acquired relatively quickly and the repetition rate for the mapping is commensurate with the movement of the bed forms, successive acoustic maps capture the progression of the bed form movement. Two-dimensional velocity maps associated with the bed form migration are obtained by implementing algorithms typically used in particle image velocimetry to acoustic maps converted in gray-level images. Furthermore, use of the obtained acoustic and velocity maps in conjunction with analytical formulations (e.g., Exner equation) enables estimation of multidirectional bed load rates over the whole imaged area. This paper presents a validation study of the AMV technique using a set of laboratory experiments.

  15. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging for Noninvasive Evaluation of Renal Parenchyma Elasticity: Preliminary Findings

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hui-Xiong; Peng, Ai; Zhang, Yi-Feng; Liu, Lin-Na

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the diagnostic value of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) to test the elasticity of renal parenchyma by measuring the shear wave velocity (SWV) which might be used to detect chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods 327 healthy volunteers and 64 CKD patients were enrolled in the study. The potential influencing factors and measurement reproducibility were evaluated in the healthy volunteers. Correlations between SWV and laboratory tests were analyzed in CKD patients.?Receiver-operating characteristic curve (ROC) analyses were performed to assess the diagnostic performance of ARFI. Results The SWV of healthy volunteers correlated significantly to age (r = −0.22, P<0.001, n = 327) and differed significantly between men and women (2.06±0.48 m/s vs. 2.2±0.52 m/s, P = 0.018, n = 327). However, it did not correlate significantly to height, weight, body mass index, waistline, kidney dimension and the depth for SWV measurement (n = 30). Inter- and intraobserver agreement expressed as intraclass coefficient correlation were 0.64 (95% CI: 0.13 to 0.82, P = 0.011) and 0.6 (95% CI: 0.31 to 0.81, P = 0.001) (n = 40). The mean SWV in healthy volunteers was 2.15±0.51 m/s, while was 1.81±0.43 m/s, 1.79±0.29 m/s, 1.81±0.44 m/s, 1.64±0.55 m/s, and 1.36±0.17 m/s for stage 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 in CKD patients respectively. The SWV was significantly higher for healthy volunteers compared with each stage in CKD patients. ARFI could not predict the different stages of CKD except stage 5. In CKD patients, SWV correlated to e-GFR (r = 0.3, P = 0.018), to urea nitrogen (r =  −0.3, P = 0.016), and to creatinine (r =  −0.41, P = 0.001). ROC analyses indicated that the area under the ROC curve was 0.752 (95% CI: 0.704 to 0.797) (P<0.001). The cut-off value for predicting CKD was 1.88 m/s (sensitivity 71.87% and specificity 69.69%). Conclusion ARFI may be a potentially useful tool in detecting CKD. PMID

  16. Signal/Image Processing of Acoustic Flaw Signatures for Detection and Localization

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J V; Meyer, A W

    2001-06-01

    The timely, nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of critical optics in high energy, pulsed laser experiments is a crucial analysis that must be performed for the experiment to be successful. Failure to detect flaws of critical sizes in vacuum-loaded optical windows can result in a catastrophic failure jeopardizing the safety of both personnel and costly equipment. We discuss the development of signal/image processing techniques to both detect critical flaws and locate their position on the window. The data measured from two Orthogonal arrays of narrow beamwidth ultrasonic transducers are preprocessed using a model-based scheme based on the Green's function of the medium providing individual channel signatures. These signatures are then transformed to the two-dimensional image space using a power-based estimator. A 2D-replicant is then constructed based on the underlying physics of the material along with the geometry of the window. Correlating the replicant with the enhanced power image leads to the optimal 2D-matched filter solution detecting and localizing the flaw. Controlled experimental results on machined flaws are discussed.

  17. Layers and tubes of fluorographene C4F: Stability, structural and electronic properties from DFTB calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enyashin, A. N.; Ivanovskii, A. L.

    2013-06-01

    By means of the DFTB band structure calculations we have explored the layers' isomerism of fluorographene C4F. The relative stability, structural and electronic properties of the C4F layers and nanotubes have been revealed depending on the possible types of fluorine coverage: single-sided, double-sided or so-called non-uniform variants. Our main finding is that the aforementioned types of fluorine coverage are crucial for the morphology of these materials. At the non-uniform or single-sided coverage types the C4F structures aspire to the spontaneous folding in order to minimize their surface tension.

  18. Electron attachment properties of c-C4F8O in different environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chachereau, A.; Fedor, J.; Janečková, R.; Kočišek, J.; Rabie, M.; Franck, C. M.

    2016-09-01

    The electron attachment properties of octafluorotetrahydrofuran (c-C4F8O) are investigated using two complementary experimental setups. The attachment and ionization cross sections of c-C4F8O are measured using an electron beam experiment. The effective ionization rate coefficient, electron drift velocity and electron diffusion coefficient in c-C4F8O diluted to concentrations lower than 0.6% in the buffer gases N2, CO2 and Ar, are measured using a pulsed Townsend experiment. A kinetic model is proposed, which combines the results of the two experiments.

  19. Extraction of Target Scatterings from Received Transients on Target Detection Trial of Ambient Noise Imaging with Acoustic Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Kazuyoshi; Ogasawara, Hanako; Nakamura, Toshiaki; Tsuchiya, Takenobu; Endoh, Nobuyuki

    2012-07-01

    We have already designed and fabricated an aspherical lens with an aperture diameter of 1.0 m to develop a prototype system for ambient noise imaging (ANI). It has also been verified that this acoustic lens realizes a directional resolution, which is a beam width of 1° at the center frequency of 120 kHz over the field of view from -7 to +7°. In this study, a sea trial of silent target detection using the prototype ANI system was conducted under only natural ocean ambient noise at Uchiura Bay, in November of 2010. There were many transients in the received sound. These transients were classified roughly into directly received noises and target scatterings. We proposed a classification method to extract transients of only target scatterings. By analyzing transients extracted as target scatterings, it was verified that the power spectrum density levels of the on-target directions were greater than those of the off-target directions in the higher frequency band over 60 kHz. These results showed that the targets are successfully detected under natural ocean ambient noise, mainly generated by snapping shrimps.

  20. Acoustic Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, David R.; Sabra, Karim G.

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic waves carry information about their source and collect information about their environment as they propagate. This article reviews how these information-carrying and -collecting features of acoustic waves that travel through fluids can be exploited for remote sensing. In nearly all cases, modern acoustic remote sensing involves array-recorded sounds and array signal processing to recover multidimensional results. The application realm for acoustic remote sensing spans an impressive range of signal frequencies (10-2 to 107 Hz) and distances (10-2 to 107 m) and involves biomedical ultrasound imaging, nondestructive evaluation, oil and gas exploration, military systems, and Nuclear Test Ban Treaty monitoring. In the past two decades, approaches have been developed to robustly localize remote sources; remove noise and multipath distortion from recorded signals; and determine the acoustic characteristics of the environment through which the sound waves have traveled, even when the recorded sounds originate from uncooperative sources or are merely ambient noise.

  1. Enhanced characterization of calcified areas in intravascular ultrasound virtual histology images by quantification of the acoustic shadow: validation against computed tomography coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Broersen, Alexander; de Graaf, Michiel A; Eggermont, Jeroen; Wolterbeek, Ron; Kitslaar, Pieter H; Dijkstra, Jouke; Bax, Jeroen J; Reiber, Johan H C; Scholte, Arthur J

    2016-04-01

    We enhance intravascular ultrasound virtual histology (VH) tissue characterization by fully automatic quantification of the acoustic shadow behind calcified plaque. VH is unable to characterize atherosclerosis located behind calcifications. In this study, the quantified acoustic shadows are considered calcified to approximate the real dense calcium (DC) plaque volume. In total, 57 patients with 108 coronary lesions were included. A novel post-processing step is applied on the VH images to quantify the acoustic shadow and enhance the VH results. The VH and enhanced VH results are compared to quantitative computed tomography angiography (QTA) plaque characterization as reference standard. The correlation of the plaque types between enhanced VH and QTA differs significantly from the correlation with unenhanced VH. For DC, the correlation improved from 0.733 to 0.818. Instead of an underestimation of DC in VH with a bias of 8.5 mm(3), there was a smaller overestimation of 1.1 mm(3) in the enhanced VH. Although tissue characterization within the acoustic shadow in VH is difficult, the novel algorithm improved the DC tissue characterization. This algorithm contributes to accurate assessment of calcium on VH and could be applied in clinical studies.

  2. Enhanced characterization of calcified areas in intravascular ultrasound virtual histology images by quantification of the acoustic shadow: validation against computed tomography coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Broersen, Alexander; de Graaf, Michiel A; Eggermont, Jeroen; Wolterbeek, Ron; Kitslaar, Pieter H; Dijkstra, Jouke; Bax, Jeroen J; Reiber, Johan H C; Scholte, Arthur J

    2016-04-01

    We enhance intravascular ultrasound virtual histology (VH) tissue characterization by fully automatic quantification of the acoustic shadow behind calcified plaque. VH is unable to characterize atherosclerosis located behind calcifications. In this study, the quantified acoustic shadows are considered calcified to approximate the real dense calcium (DC) plaque volume. In total, 57 patients with 108 coronary lesions were included. A novel post-processing step is applied on the VH images to quantify the acoustic shadow and enhance the VH results. The VH and enhanced VH results are compared to quantitative computed tomography angiography (QTA) plaque characterization as reference standard. The correlation of the plaque types between enhanced VH and QTA differs significantly from the correlation with unenhanced VH. For DC, the correlation improved from 0.733 to 0.818. Instead of an underestimation of DC in VH with a bias of 8.5 mm(3), there was a smaller overestimation of 1.1 mm(3) in the enhanced VH. Although tissue characterization within the acoustic shadow in VH is difficult, the novel algorithm improved the DC tissue characterization. This algorithm contributes to accurate assessment of calcium on VH and could be applied in clinical studies. PMID:26667446

  3. FISH detection of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome: Exclusion of D4F26 as critical site

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, V.P.; Altherr, M.R.; Blake, J.M.; Keppen, L.D.

    1994-08-01

    Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is due to a deletion in the terminal band of 4p16.3. Among loci that have been involved in deletions are D4S95, D4S125, D4F26, as shown by PCR typing, Southern blot hybridization, and/or fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Currently, FISH detection of WHS is predicated upon the deletion of the D4F26 locus with failure to hybridize to pC847.351, a commercially available cosmid probe. A WHS patient is shown to have an interstitial deletion, by hemizygosity at D4S98 and D4F26. This suggests that the tip of 4p, specifically D4F26, is not a critical deletion site for WHS. 19 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Characterization of the active site properties of CYP4F12.

    PubMed

    Eksterowicz, John; Rock, Dan A; Rock, Brooke M; Wienkers, Larry C; Foti, Robert S

    2014-10-01

    Cytochrome P450 4F12 is a drug-metabolizing enzyme that is primarily expressed in the liver, kidney, colon, small intestine, and heart. The properties of CYP4F12 that may impart an increased catalytic selectivity (decreased promiscuity) were explored through in vitro metabolite elucidation, kinetic isotope effect experiments, and computational modeling of the CYP4F12 active site. By using astemizole as a probe substrate for CYP4F12 and CYP3A4, it was observed that although CYP4F12 favored astemizole O-demethylation as the primary route of metabolism, CYP3A4 was capable of metabolizing astemizole at multiple sites on the molecule. Deuteration of astemizole at the site of O-demethylation resulted in an isotope effect of 7.1 as well as an 8.3-fold decrease in the rate of clearance for astemizole by CYP4F12. Conversely, although an isotope effect of 3.8 was observed for the formation of the O-desmethyl metabolite when deuterated astemizole was metabolized by CYP3A4, there was no decrease in the clearance of astemizole. Development of a homology model of CYP4F12 based on the crystal structure of cytochrome P450 BM3 predicted an active site volume for CYP4F12 that was approximately 76% of the active site volume of CYP3A4. As predicted, multiple favorable binding orientations were available for astemizole docked into the active site of CYP3A4, but only a single binding orientation with the site of O-demethylation oriented toward the heme was identified for CYP4F12. Overall, it appears that although CYP4F12 may be capable of binding similar ligands to other cytochrome P450 enzymes such as CYP3A4, the ability to achieve catalytically favorable orientations may be inherently more difficult because of the increased steric constraints of the CYP4F12 active site. PMID:25074871

  5. Calculation of Thermodynamic Functions of Fluorammonium Complexes of 4 f Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinovskaya, T. D.; Nefedov, R. A.; Sachkov, V. I.

    2013-12-01

    Theoretical estimates are made of the thermodynamic functions of fluorammonium complexes of 4 f elements. Using techniques of statistical thermodynamics, we have obtained the temperature dependences of the basic thermodynamic state functions ( C p , ∆ H, ∆ S, and ∆ G). The decomposition temperatures of the investigated complex fluorides of 4 f elements have been estimated on the basis of an analysis of the obtained dependences.

  6. Construction of nitronyl nitroxide-based 3d-4f clusters: structure and magnetism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiu-Feng; Hu, Peng; Li, Yun-Gai; Li, Li-Cun

    2015-02-01

    Three unprecedented nitronyl nitroxide radical-bridged 3d-4f clusters, [Ln2 Cu2 (hfac)10 (NIT-3py)2 (H2 O)2 ](Ln(III) =Y, Gd, Dy), have been obtained from the self-assembly of Ln(hfac)3 , Cu(hfac)2 , and the radical ligand. The Dy complex shows a slow relaxation of magnetization, representing the first nitronyl nitroxide radical-based 3d-4f cluster with single-molecule magnet behavior.

  7. Tetranuclear Zn/4f coordination clusters as highly efficient catalysts for Friedel-Crafts alkylation.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Kieran; Kumar, Prashant; Akien, Geoffrey R; Chilton, Nicholas F; Abdul-Sada, Alaa; Tizzard, Graham J; Coles, Simon J; Kostakis, George E

    2016-06-14

    A series of custom-designed, high yield, isoskeletal tetranuclear Zn/4f coordination clusters showing high efficiency as catalysts with low catalytic loadings in Friedel-Crafts alkylation are described for the first time. The possibility of altering the 4f centers in these catalysts without altering the core topology allows us to further confirm their stability via EPR and NMR, as well to gain insights into the plausible reaction mechanism, showcasing the usefulness of these bimetallic systems as catalysts. PMID:27248829

  8. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging: A New Tool for the Diagnosis of Papillary Thyroid Microcarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi-Feng; Xu, Jun-Mei; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Lin-Na; Xu, Xiao-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the diagnostic performance of ARFI imaging in differentiating between benign and malignant thyroid nodules <1 cm. Materials and Methods. 173 pathologically proven thyroid nodules (77 benign, 96 malignant) in 157 patients were included in this study. Receiver-operating characteristic curve (ROC) analyses were performed to assess the diagnostic performance of conventional ultrasound (US) and ARFI imaging in papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (PTMC). The independent risk factors for predicting PTMC were evaluated. Results. The mean SWV value of benign and malignant thyroid nodules were 2.57 ± 0.79 m/s (range: 0.90–4.92 m/s) and 3.88 ± 2.24 m/s (range: 1.49–9.00 m/s) (P = 0.000). Az for VTI elastography score was higher than that for hypoechoic, absence of halo sign, and type III vascularity (P < 0.05). The optimal cut-offs for VTI elastography score and SWV were score 4 and 3.10 m/s. Gender, hypoechoic, taller than wide, VTI elastography score ≥ 4, and SWV > 3.10 m/s had been found to be independent risk factors for predicting PTMC. Conclusion. ARFI elastography can provide elasticity information of PTMC quantitatively (VTQ) and directly reflects the overall elastic properties (VTI). Gender, hypoechogenicity, taller than wide, VTI elastography score ≥ 4, and SWV > 3.10 m/s are independent risk factors for predicting PTMC. ARFI elastography seems to be a new tool for the diagnosis of PTMC. PMID:25045673

  9. CYP4F18-Deficient Neutrophils Exhibit Increased Chemotaxis to Complement Component C5a

    PubMed Central

    Vaivoda, Rachel; Vaine, Christine; Boerstler, Cassandra; Galloway, Kristy; Christmas, Peter

    2015-01-01

    CYP4Fs were first identified as enzymes that catalyze hydroxylation of leukotriene B4 (LTB4). CYP4F18 has an unusual expression in neutrophils and was predicted to play a role in regulating LTB4-dependent inflammation. We compared chemotaxis of wild-type and Cyp4f18 knockout neutrophils using an in vitro assay. There was no significant difference in the chemotactic response to LTB4, but the response to complement component C5a increased 1.9–2.25-fold in knockout cells compared to wild-type (P < 0.01). This increase was still observed when neutrophils were treated with inhibitors of eicosanoid synthesis. There were no changes in expression of other CYP4 enzymes in knockout neutrophils that might compensate for loss of CYP4F18 or lead to differences in activity. A mouse model of dextran sodium sulfate colitis was used to investigate the consequences of increased C5a-dependent chemotaxis in vivo, but there was no significant difference in weight loss, disease activity, or colonic tissue myeloperoxidase between wild-type and Cyp4f18 knockout mice. This study demonstrates the limitations of inferring CYP4F function based on an ability to use LTB4 as a substrate, points to expanding roles for CYP4F enzymes in immune regulation, and underscores the in vivo challenges of CYP knockout studies. PMID:26613087

  10. CYP4F18-Deficient Neutrophils Exhibit Increased Chemotaxis to Complement Component C5a.

    PubMed

    Vaivoda, Rachel; Vaine, Christine; Boerstler, Cassandra; Galloway, Kristy; Christmas, Peter

    2015-01-01

    CYP4Fs were first identified as enzymes that catalyze hydroxylation of leukotriene B4 (LTB4). CYP4F18 has an unusual expression in neutrophils and was predicted to play a role in regulating LTB4-dependent inflammation. We compared chemotaxis of wild-type and Cyp4f18 knockout neutrophils using an in vitro assay. There was no significant difference in the chemotactic response to LTB4, but the response to complement component C5a increased 1.9-2.25-fold in knockout cells compared to wild-type (P < 0.01). This increase was still observed when neutrophils were treated with inhibitors of eicosanoid synthesis. There were no changes in expression of other CYP4 enzymes in knockout neutrophils that might compensate for loss of CYP4F18 or lead to differences in activity. A mouse model of dextran sodium sulfate colitis was used to investigate the consequences of increased C5a-dependent chemotaxis in vivo, but there was no significant difference in weight loss, disease activity, or colonic tissue myeloperoxidase between wild-type and Cyp4f18 knockout mice. This study demonstrates the limitations of inferring CYP4F function based on an ability to use LTB4 as a substrate, points to expanding roles for CYP4F enzymes in immune regulation, and underscores the in vivo challenges of CYP knockout studies.

  11. Observations of the volume flux of a seafloor hydrothermal plume using an acoustic imaging sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, G.; Jackson, D. R.; Bemis, K. G.; Rona, P. A.

    2013-07-01

    We present a 26 day time series (October 2010) of physical properties (volume flux, flow velocity, expansion rate) of a vigorous deep-sea hydrothermal plume measured using our Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar (COVIS), which is connected to the Northeast Pacific Time Series Underwater Experiment Canada Cabled Observatory at the Main Endeavour Field on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. COVIS quantitatively monitors the initial buoyant rise of the plume from ˜5 m to ˜15 m above the vents. The time series exhibits temporal variations of the plume vertical volume flux (1.93-5.09 m3/s ), centerline vertical velocity component (0.11-0.24 m/s ) and expansion rate (0.082-0.21 m/m ); these variations have major spectral peaks at semidiurnal (˜2 cycle/day) and inertial oscillation (˜1.5 cycle/day) frequencies. The plume expansion rate (average ˜0.14 m/m ) is inversely proportional to the plume centerline vertical velocity component (coefficient of determination R2˜0.5). This inverse proportionality, as well as the semidiurnal frequency, indicates interaction between the plume and ambient ocean currents consistent with an entrainment of ambient seawater that increases with the magnitude of ambient currents. The inertial oscillations observed in the time series provide evidence for the influence of surface storms on the dynamics of hydrothermal plumes.

  12. Evaluating Directional Resolution of Aplanatic Acoustic Lens for Designing Ambient Noise Imaging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Kazuyoshi; Ogasawara, Hanako; Nakamura, Toshiaki; Sato, Yuji; Tsuchiya, Takenobu; Endoh, Nobuyuki

    2009-07-01

    In our previous studies, it was verified that a spherical biconcave lens with an aperture diameter of 2.0 m has a sufficient directional resolution (e.g., a beam width of 1° at 60 kHz) for realizing an ambient noise imaging (ANI) system. In this study, an aplanatic lens that corrects both spherical and coma aberrations with the same aperture was designed for an ANI system, and its directional resolution was evaluated. First, in order to predict the resolution, we performed a numerical analysis using the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. Second, the numerical analysis results were verified by a small-scale trial of one-fifth of full size in a water tank. The shapes of the -3 dB areas were similar between the numerical analysis and experimental results at small incidence angles, and the -3 dB areas do not overlap at 1° increments of incidence angle. The resolution of the aplanatic lens was closer to that of an ideal lens than to that of the spherical lens. Finally, it was satisfied that the present lens has sufficient directional resolution for use in an ANI system.

  13. A method of construction of information images of the acoustic signals of the human bronchopulmonary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bureev, A. Sh.; Zhdanov, D. S.; Zemlyakov, I. Yu.; Kiseleva, E. Yu.; Khokhlova, L. A.

    2015-11-01

    The present study focuses on the development of a method of identification of respiratory sounds and noises of a human naturally and in various pathological conditions. The existing approaches based on a simple method of frequency and time signal analysis, have insufficient specificity, efficiency and unambiguous interpretation of the results of a clinical study. An algorithm for a phase selection of respiratory cycles and analysis of respiratory sounds resulting from bronchi examination of a patient has been suggested. The algorithm is based on the method of phase timing analysis of bronchi phonograms. The results of the phase-frequency algorithm with high resolution reflects a time position of the traceable signals and the individual structure of recorded signals. This allows using the proposed method for the formation of information images (models) of the diagnostically significant fragments. A weight function, frequency parameters of which can be selectively modified, is used for this purpose. The vision of the weighting function is specific to each type of respiratory noise, traditionally referred to quality characteristics (wet or dry noise, crackling, etc.).

  14. Photoacoustic imaging with an acoustic lens detects prostate cancer cells labeled with PSMA-targeting near-infrared dye-conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogra, Vikram; Chinni, Bhargava; Singh, Shalini; Schmitthenner, Hans; Rao, Navalgund; Krolewski, John J.; Nastiuk, Kent L.

    2016-06-01

    There is an urgent need for sensitive and specific tools to accurately image early stage, organ-confined human prostate cancers to facilitate active surveillance and reduce unnecessary treatment. Recently, we developed an acoustic lens that enhances the sensitivity of photoacoustic imaging. Here, we report the use of this device in conjunction with two molecular imaging agents that specifically target the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) expressed on the tumor cell surface of most prostate cancers. We demonstrate successful imaging of phantoms containing cancer cells labeled with either of two different PSMA-targeting agents, the ribonucleic acid aptamer A10-3.2 and a urea-based peptidomimetic inhibitor, each linked to the near-infrared dye IRDye800CW. By specifically targeting cells with these agents linked to a dye chosen for optimal signal, we are able to discriminate prostate cancer cells that express PSMA.

  15. Ocean acoustic reverberation tomography.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wide-angle imaging using ship-towed acoustic sources and networks of ocean bottom seismographs is a common technique for exploring earth structure beneath the oceans. In these studies, the recorded data are dominated by acoustic waves propagating as reverberations in the water column. For surveys with a small receiver spacing (e.g., <10 km), the acoustic wave field densely samples properties of the water column over the width of the receiver array. A method, referred to as ocean acoustic reverberation tomography, is developed that uses the travel times of direct and reflected waves to image ocean acoustic structure. Reverberation tomography offers an alternative approach for determining the structure of the oceans and advancing the understanding of ocean heat content and mixing processes. The technique has the potential for revealing small-scale ocean thermal structure over the entire vertical height of the water column and along long survey profiles or across three-dimensional volumes of the ocean. For realistic experimental geometries and data noise levels, the method can produce images of ocean sound speed on a smaller scale than traditional acoustic tomography. PMID:26723303

  16. Ocean acoustic reverberation tomography.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wide-angle imaging using ship-towed acoustic sources and networks of ocean bottom seismographs is a common technique for exploring earth structure beneath the oceans. In these studies, the recorded data are dominated by acoustic waves propagating as reverberations in the water column. For surveys with a small receiver spacing (e.g., <10 km), the acoustic wave field densely samples properties of the water column over the width of the receiver array. A method, referred to as ocean acoustic reverberation tomography, is developed that uses the travel times of direct and reflected waves to image ocean acoustic structure. Reverberation tomography offers an alternative approach for determining the structure of the oceans and advancing the understanding of ocean heat content and mixing processes. The technique has the potential for revealing small-scale ocean thermal structure over the entire vertical height of the water column and along long survey profiles or across three-dimensional volumes of the ocean. For realistic experimental geometries and data noise levels, the method can produce images of ocean sound speed on a smaller scale than traditional acoustic tomography.

  17. Low Pretreatment Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging (ARFI) Values Predict Sustained Virological Response in Antiviral Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zopf, Steffen; Rösch, Lara; Konturek, Peter C.; Goertz, Ruediger S.; Neurath, Markus F.; Strobel, Deike

    2016-01-01

    Background Non-invasive procedures such as acoustic radiation force impulse imaging (ARFI) shear-wave elastography are currently used for the assessment of liver fibrosis. In the course of chronic hepatitis C, significant liver fibrosis or cirrhosis develops in approximately 25% of patients, which is a negative predictor of antiviral treatment response. Cirrhosis can be prevented by successful virus elimination. In this prospective study, a pretreatment ARFI cutoff value of 1.5 m/s was evaluated in relation to sustained virological response to anti-HCV therapy. Material/Methods In 23 patients with chronic hepatitis C, liver stiffness was examined with ARFI at defined times before and under antiviral triple therapy (peginterferon, ribavirin in combination with a first-generation protease inhibitor, and telaprevir or boceprevir). Patients were stratified into 2 groups based on pretreatment ARFI values (<1.5 m/s and ≥1.5 m/s) for the assessment of virological response. Results The liver stiffness at baseline for all patients was 1.57±0.79 m/s (ARFI median ± standard deviation; margin: 0.81 m/s to 3.45 m/s). At week 4 of triple therapy, patients with low pretreatment ARFI values had higher rates of HCV-RNA negativity (69% vs. 43%), reflecting an early rapid virological response (eRVR). Sustained virological response (SVR) was found in 75% (12/16) of patients with an ARFI value <1.5 m/s and only 57% (4/7) of patients with ARFI value ≥1.5 m/s. Conclusions Patients with chronic hepatitis C and pretreatment ARFI <1.5 m/s showed earlier virus elimination and better response to treatment. PMID:27690214

  18. Feasibility of High Frequency Acoustic Imaging for Inspection of Containments: Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Rudzinsky, J.; Bondaryk, J.; Conti, M.

    1999-07-01

    The nuclear power industry is concerned with corrosive thinning of portions of the metallic pressure boundary, particularly in areas that are not directly accessible for inspection. This study investigated the feasibility of detecting these thickness degradations using ultrasonic imaging. A commercial ultrasonic system was used to carry out several full-scale, controlled laboratory experiments. Measurements of 0.5 MHz shear wave levels propagated in 25-mm-thick steel plate embedded in concrete showed 1.4-1.6 dB of signal loss for each centimeter of two-way travel in the steel plate (compared to previous numerical predictions of 3-4 dB), and 1.3 dB of signal loss per centimeter of two-way travel in steel plates embedded in concrete prior to setting of the concrete (i.e., plastic). Negligible losses were measured in plates with a decoupling treatment applied between the steel and concrete to simulate the unbonded portions of the pressure boundary. Scattered signals from straight slots of different size and shape were investigated. The return from a 4-mm-deep rectangular slots exhibited levels 23 dB down relative to incidence and 4-6 dB higher than those obtained from both ''v'' shaped and rounded slots of similar depth. The system displayed an input/output dynamic range of 125 dB and measurement variability less than 1-2dB. Based on these results, a 4-mm-deep, rounded degradation embedded 30 cm in concrete has expected returns of -73dB relative to the input and should therefore be detectable. Results of this and a prior study indicate that the technique has merit and should be developed more fully and demonstrated in the field.

  19. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. The tumor ... press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the symptoms ...

  20. Hyperfine structure of the 4f85d6s2 configuration of the Tb atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furmann, B.; Stefanska, D.; Krzykowski, A.

    2015-09-01

    In this work, A and B hyperfine structure constants of electronic levels belonging to the configuration 4f85d6s2 of the terbium atom are presented, obtained via investigation of the hyperfine structure of 42 spectral lines, performed with the method of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) in a hollow cathode discharge. Results for 14 of the investigated levels belonging to the configuration 4f85d6s2 were obtained for the first time. Also results concerning the hyperfine structure of 29 levels, involved in the transitions as upper levels, are presented. For these levels, almost all the results were obtained for the first time. On the basis of the results obtained within this work and those known from the literature, parametrization of the hyperfine structure was performed. The determined values of one-electron parameters for configuration 4f85d6s2 were compared to the values known from literature, determined so far on the basis of a much lower number of electronic levels. Values of relativistic radial integrals of the hyperfine structure for electrons 4f and 5d of the configuration 4f85d6s2 were calculated with the use of the MCDF code. The comparison of radial integrals calculated semi-empirically with those determined with MCDF method yielded an estimate of the values of configuration interaction parameters in the case of both magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole interactions of the terbium atom.

  1. TARGETING THE eIF4F TRANSLATION INITIATION COMPLEX: A CRITICAL NEXUS FOR CANCER DEVELOPMENT

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, Jerry; Graff, Jeremy; Ruggero, Davide; Sonenberg, Nahum

    2014-01-01

    Elevated protein synthesis is an important feature of many cancer cells and often arises as a consequence of increased signaling flux channeled to eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4F, the key regulator of the mRNA-ribosome recruitment phase of translation initiation. In many cellular and pre-clinical models of cancer, eIF4F deregulation results in changes in translational efficiency of specific mRNA classes. Importantly, many of these mRNAs code for proteins that potently regulate critical cellular processes such as cell growth and proliferation, enhanced cell survival, and cell migration that ultimately impinge on several hallmarks of cancer, including increased angiogenesis, deregulated growth control, enhanced cellular survival, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, invasion and metastasis. By being positioned as the molecular nexus downstream of key oncogenic signaling pathways (e.g. Ras, PI3K/AKT/TOR, and Myc), eIF4F serves as a direct link between important steps in cancer development and translation initiation. Identification of mRNAs particularly responsive to elevated eIF4F activity that typifies tumorigenesis underscores the critical role of eIF4F in cancer and raises the exciting possibility of developing new-in-class small molecules targeting translation initiation as anti-neoplastic agents. PMID:25593033

  2. Electron affinity of trans-2-C4F8 from electron attachment-detachment kinetics.

    PubMed

    Van Doren, Jane M; Condon, Laura R; DeSouza-Goding, Antonet; Miller, Thomas M; Bopp, Joseph C; Viggiano, A A

    2010-01-28

    Electron attachment and detachment kinetics of 2-C(4)F(8) were studied over the temperature range 298-487 K with a flowing-afterglow Langmuir-probe apparatus. Only parent anions were formed in the attachment process throughout this temperature range. At the highest temperatures, thermal electron detachment of the parent anions is important. Analysis of the 2-C(4)F(8) gas showed an 82/18 mixture of trans/cis isomers. The kinetic data at the higher temperatures were used to determine the electron affinity EA(trans-2-C(4)F(8)) = 0.79 +/- 0.06 eV after making some reasonable assumptions. The same quantity was calculated using the G3(MP2) compound method, yielding 0.74 eV. The kinetic data were not sufficient to establish a reliable value for EA(cis-2-C(4)F(8)), but G3(MP2) calculations give a value 0.017 eV greater than that for trans-2-C(4)F(8). MP2 and density functional theory were used to study the structural properties of the neutral and anion isomers.

  3. Acoustic Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  4. Acoustic seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  5. Evaluating the Feasibility of Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Shear Wave Elasticity Imaging of the Uterine Cervix With an Intracavity Array: A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Feltovich, Helen; Homyk, Andrew D.; Carlson, Lindsey C.; Hall, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    The uterine cervix softens, shortens, and dilates throughout pregnancy in response to progressive disorganization of its layered collagen microstructure. This process is an essential part of normal pregnancy, but premature changes are associated with preterm birth. Clinically, there are no reliable noninvasive methods to objectively measure cervical softening or assess cervical microstructure. The goal of these preliminary studies was to evaluate the feasibility of using an intracavity ultrasound array to generate acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) excitations in the uterine cervix through simulation, and to optimize the acoustic radiation force (ARF) excitation for shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) of the tissue stiffness. The cervix is a unique soft tissue target for SWEI because it has significantly greater acoustic attenuation (α = 1.3 to 2.0 dB·cm−1·MHz−1) than other soft tissues, and the pathology being studied tends to lead to an increase in tissue compliance, with healthy cervix being relatively stiff compared with other soft tissues (E ≈ 25 kPa). Additionally, the cervix can only be accessed in vivo using a transvaginal or catheter-based array, which places additional constraints on the excitation focal characteristics that can be used during SWEI. Finite element method (FEM) models of SWEI show that larger-aperture, catheter-based arrays can utilize excitation frequencies up to 7 MHz to generate adequate focal gain up to focal depths 10 to 15 mm deep, with higher frequencies suffering from excessive amounts of near-field acoustic attenuation. Using full-aperture excitations can yield ~40% increases in ARFI-induced displacements, but also restricts the depth of field of the excitation to ~0.5 mm, compared with 2 to 6 mm, which limits the range that can be used for shear wave characterization of the tissue. The center-frequency content of the shear wave particle velocity profiles ranges from 1.5 to 2.5 kHz, depending on the focal

  6. Acoustic characterization of contrast-to-tissue ratio and axial resolution for dual-frequency contrast-specific acoustic angiography imaging.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Brooks D; Rojas, Juan D; Martin, K Heath; Shelton, Sarah E; Dayton, Paul A

    2014-10-01

    Recently, dual-frequency transducers have enabled high-spatial-resolution and high-contrast imaging of vasculature with minimal tissue artifacts by transmitting at a low frequency and receiving broadband superharmonic echoes scattered by microbubble contrast agents. In this work, we examine the imaging parameters for optimizing contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) for dual-frequency imaging and the relationship with spatial resolution. Confocal piston transducers are used in a water bath setup to measure the SNR, CTR, and axial resolution for ultrasound imaging of nonlinear scattering of microbubble contrast agents when transmitting at a lower frequency (1.5 to 8 MHz) and receiving at a higher frequency (7.5 to 25 MHz). Parameters varied include the frequency and peak negative pressure of transmitted waves, center frequency of the receiving transducer, microbubble concentration, and microbubble size. CTR is maximized at the lowest transmission frequencies but would be acceptable for imaging in the 1.5 to 3.5 MHz range. At these frequencies, CTR is optimized when a receiving transducer with a center frequency of 10 MHz is used, with the maximum CTR of 25.5 dB occurring when transmitting at 1.5 MHz with a peak negative pressure of 1600 kPa and receiving with a center frequency of 10 MHz. Axial resolution is influenced more heavily by the receiving center frequency, with a weak decrease in measured pulse lengths associated with increasing transmit frequency. A microbubble population containing predominately 4-μm-diameter bubbles yielded the greatest CTR, followed by 1- and then 2-μm bubbles. Varying concentration showed little effect over the tested parameters. CTR dependence on transmit frequency and peak pressure were confirmed through in vivo imaging in two rodents. These findings may lead to improved imaging of vascular remodeling in superficial or luminal cancers such as those of the breast, prostate, and colon. PMID:25265176

  7. Acoustic sniper localization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prado, Gervasio; Dhaliwal, Hardave; Martel, Philip O.

    1997-02-01

    Technologies for sniper localization have received increased attention in recent months as American forces have been deployed to various trouble spots around the world. Among the technologies considered for this task acoustics is a natural choice for various reasons. The acoustic signatures of gunshots are loud and distinctive, making them easy to detect even in high noise background environments. Acoustics provides a passive sensing technology with excellent range and non line of sight capabilities. Last but not least, an acoustic sniper location system can be built at a low cost with off the shelf components. Despite its many advantages, the performance of acoustic sensors can degrade under adverse propagation conditions. Localization accuracy, although good, is usually not accurate enough to pinpoint a sniper's location in some scenarios (for example which widow in a building or behind which tree in a grove). For these more demanding missions, the acoustic sensor can be used in conjunction with an infra red imaging system that detects the muzzle blast of the gun. The acoustic system can be used to cue the pointing system of the IR camera in the direction of the shot's source.

  8. Ultrasoft pseudopotentials for lanthanide solvation complexes: core or valence character of the 4f electrons.

    PubMed

    Pollet, Rodolphe; Clavaguéra, Carine; Dognon, Jean-Pierre

    2006-04-28

    The 4f electrons of lanthanides, because of their strong localization in the region around the nucleus, are traditionally included in a pseudopotential core. This approximation is scrutinized by optimizing the structures and calculating the interaction energies of Gd(3+)(H(2)O) and Gd(3+)(NH(3)) microsolvation complexes within plane wave Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof calculations using ultrasoft pseudopotentials where the 4f electrons are included either in the core or in the valence space. Upon comparison to quantum chemical MP2 and CCSD(T) reference calculations it is found that the explicit treatment of the 4f electrons in the valence shell yields quite accurate results including the required small spin polarization due to ligand charge transfer with only modest computational overhead.

  9. Does the 4f-shell contribute to bonding in tetravalent lanthanide halides?

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Wen-Xin; Xu, Wei; Xiao, Yi; Wang, Shu-Guang

    2014-12-28

    Lanthanide tetrahalide molecules LnX{sub 4} (Ln = Ce, Pr, Tb; X = F, Cl, Br, I) have been investigated by density functional theory at the levels of the relativistic Zero Order Regular Approximation and the relativistic energy-consistent pseudopotentials, using frozen small- and medium-cores. The calculated bond lengths and vibrational frequencies are close to the experimental data. Our calculations indicate 4f shell contributions to bonding in LnX{sub 4}, in particular for the early lanthanides, which show significant overlap between the Ln 4f-shell and the halogen np-shells. The 4f shells contribute to Ln-X bonding in LnX{sub 4} about one third more than in LnX{sub 3}.

  10. Magnetic x-ray linear dichroism in resonant and non-resonant Gd 4f photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, S.; Gammon, W.J.; Pappas, D.P.

    1997-04-01

    The enhancement of the magnetic linear dichroism in resonant 4f photoemission (MLDRPE) is studied from a 50 monolayer film of Gd/Y(0001). The ALS at beamline 7.0.1 provided the source of linearly polarized x-rays used in this study. The polarized light was incident at an angle of 30 degrees relative to the film plane, and the sample magnetization was perpendicular to the photon polarization. The linear dichroism of the 4f core levels is measured as the photon energy is tuned through the 4d-4f resonance. The authors find that the MLDRPE asymmetry is strongest at the resonance. Near the threshold the asymmetry has several features which are out of phase with the fine structure of the total yield.

  11. Pou4f2 knock-in Cre mouse: A multifaceted genetic tool for vision researchers

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Aaron B.; Bloomsburg, Samuel J.; Billingslea, Samuel A.; Merrill, Morgan M.; Li, Shuai; Thomas, Marshall W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: A transgenic mouse that expresses Cre recombinase under control of the Pou4f2-promoter (also referred to as Brn-3b and Brn-3.2) was characterized. Pou4f2 expression has been reported in a subset of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in the retina, in the midbrain, and in the germline. In this study, we characterize the expression pattern of this Cre-recombinase line and report its utility in targeted deletion, temporal deletion, RGC depletion, and germline targeting, which can be regulated by the sex of the Cre-carrying mouse. Methods: Pou4f2Cre was mapped by using a combination of PCR and sequencing of PCR products to better understand the construct and to locate where it was inserted within the Pou4f2 locus. Cre expression patterns were examined by crossing Pou4f2Cre/+ mice to Cre reporter mice. Immunohistochemistry was used to further define the pattern of Cre expression and Cre-mediated recombination within the retina, brain, and other tissues. Results: An internal ribosome entry site (IRES)-Cre cassette was inserted into the Pou4f2 gene disrupting normal gene function, as verified by the depletion of RGCs in mice homozygous for the insert. Pou4f2Cre expression was observed in the retina, brain, peripheral neurons, and male germ cells. Germline recombination was observed when the sire carried the Cre and the target for recombination. In all other breeding schemes, recombination was observed within subsets of cells within the retina, brain, intestines, heart, and gonads. In the retina, Cre efficiently targets recombination in neurons within the RGC layer (RGL), the inner nuclear layer (INL), and a small percentage of photoreceptors, activity that has not been previously reported. Unlike most other Cre lines active in the inner retina, recombination in Müller and other glia was not observed in mice carrying Pou4f2Cre. Within the visual centers of the brain, Cre targets recombination in about 15% of cells within the superchiasmatic nucleus, lateral geniculate

  12. Acoustic emission linear pulse holography

    DOEpatents

    Collins, H.D.; Busse, L.J.; Lemon, D.K.

    1983-10-25

    This device relates to the concept of and means for performing Acoustic Emission Linear Pulse Holography, which combines the advantages of linear holographic imaging and Acoustic Emission into a single non-destructive inspection system. This unique system produces a chronological, linear holographic image of a flaw by utilizing the acoustic energy emitted during crack growth. The innovation is the concept of utilizing the crack-generated acoustic emission energy to generate a chronological series of images of a growing crack by applying linear, pulse holographic processing to the acoustic emission data. The process is implemented by placing on a structure an array of piezoelectric sensors (typically 16 or 32 of them) near the defect location. A reference sensor is placed between the defect and the array.

  13. An In Vivo Validation of the Application of Acoustic Radiation Force to Enhance the Diagnostic Utility of Molecular Imaging Using 3D Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Gessner, Ryan C.; Streeter, Jason E.; Kothadia, Roshni; Feingold, Steven; Dayton, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    For over a decade, the application of acoustic radiation force (ARF) has been proposed as a mechanism to increase ultrasonic molecular imaging (MI) sensitivity in vivo. Presented herein is the first noninvasive in vivo validation of ARF-enhanced MI with an unmodified clinical system. First, an in vitro optical-acoustical setup was used to optimize system parameters and ensure sufficient microbubble translation when exposed to ARF. 3D ARF-enhanced MI was then performed on 7 rat fibrosarcoma tumors using microbubbles targeted to αvβ3 and non-targeted microbubbles. Low-amplitude (< 25 kPa) 3D ARF pulse sequences were tested and compared to passive targeting studies in the same animal. Our results demonstrate that a 78% increase in image intensity from targeted microbubbles can be achieved when using ARF relative to the passive targeting studies. Furthermore, ARF did not significantly increase image contrast when applied to non-targeted agents, suggesting that ARF did not increase non-specific adhesion. PMID:22341052

  14. Kondo physics in a rare earth ion with well localized 4f electrons.

    PubMed

    Stankiewicz, Jolanta; Evangelisti, Marco; Fisk, Zachary; Schlottmann, Pedro; Gor'kov, Lev P

    2012-06-22

    Dilute Nd in simple cubic LaB(6) shows electrical resistance and specific heat features at low temperature consistent with a Kondo scale of T(K) 4f(3) J = 9/2 Hund's rule configuration which is not anticipated to be Kondo coupled to the conduction electrons in LaB(6). We conjecture that the unexpected Kondo effect arises via participation of 4f quadrupolar degrees of freedom of the Nd crystal-field, ground-state quartet.

  15. Evaluating the Acoustic Effect of Over-the-Rotor Foam-Metal Liner Installed on a Low Speed Fan Using Virtual Rotating Microphone Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.; Dougherty, Robert P.; Walker, Bruce E.

    2010-01-01

    An in-duct beamforming technique for imaging rotating broadband fan sources has been used to evaluate the acoustic characteristics of a Foam-Metal Liner installed over-the-rotor of a low-speed fan. The NASA Glenn Research Center s Advanced Noise Control Fan was used as a test bed. A duct wall-mounted phased array consisting of several rings of microphones was employed. The data are mathematically resampled in the fan rotating reference frame and subsequently used in a conventional beamforming technique. The steering vectors for the beamforming technique are derived from annular duct modes, so that effects of reflections from the duct walls are reduced.

  16. 4f photoemission from Ce clusters and disordered reaction products at Ce/Si and Ce/GaAs interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimori, Atsushi; Grioni, M.; Joyce, J. J.; Weaver, J. H.

    1985-06-01

    Synchrotron radiation photoemission has been used to study the 4f emission from 4f electrons in Ce clusters and disordered reaction products at Ce/GaAs(110) and Ce/Si(111) interfaces. For low Ce coverages on GaAs(110), the reacted interface forms Ce-As local configurations with two 4f-derived features similar to those of bulk CeAs. The shallower 4f peak is located ~1 eV below EF, indicating that it is not due to fully relaxed 4f holes, consistent with the As p-->Ce 4f charge-transfer screening mechanism. For the Ce/Si interface, small Ce clusters formed at low coverage have only a single 4f peak at -3.3 eV, with no evidence of a second peak nearer EF. This is attributed to the reduced number of neighboring Ce 5d orbitals for the clusters, apparent stability of the γ phase relative to the α phase (in the ground state), and reducted 5d-->4f charge-transfer screening probability in the photoemission final state. At high coverages, Ce overlayers cover the reacted interfaces, but our results show that the 4f emission near EF is not established until θ~=20 monolayers, suggesting that the 4f-5d hybridization in metallic Ce is long ranged compared with the short-range Ce-4f/As-p hybridization.

  17. Imaging and quantitative data acquisition of biological cell walls with Atomic Force Microscopy and Scanning Acoustic Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tittmann, B. R.; Xi, X.

    2014-09-01

    This chapter demonstrates the feasibility of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and High Frequency Scanning Acoustic Microscopy (HF-SAM) as tools to characterize biological tissues. Both the AFM and the SAM have shown to provide imaging (with different resolution) and quantitative elasticity measuring abilities. Plant cell walls with minimal disturbance and under conditions of their native state have been examined with these two kinds of microscopy. After descriptions of both the SAM and AFM, their special features and the typical sample preparation is discussed. The sample preparation is focused here on epidermal peels of onion scales and celery epidermis cells which were sectioned for the AFM to visualize the inner surface (closest to the plasma membrane) of the outer epidermal wall. The nm-wide cellulose microfibrils orientation and multilayer structure were clearly observed. The microfibril orientation and alignment tend to be more organized in older scales compared with younger scales. The onion epidermis cell wall was also used as a test analog to study cell wall elasticity by the AFM nanoindentation and the SAM V(z) feature. The novelty in this work was to demonstrate the capability of these two techniques to analyze isolated, single layered plant cell walls in their natural state. AFM nanoindentation was also used to probe the effects of Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and calcium ion treatment to modify pectin networks in cell walls. The results suggest a significant modulus increase in the calcium ion treatment and a slight decrease in EDTA treatment. To complement the AFM measurements, the HF-SAM was used to obtain the V(z) signatures of the onion epidermis. These measurements were focused on documenting the effect of pectinase enzyme treatment. The results indicate a significant change in the V(z) signature curves with time into the enzyme treatment. Thus AFM and HF-SAM open the door to a systematic nondestructive structure and mechanical property

  18. Acoustic Force Density Acting on Inhomogeneous Fluids in Acoustic Fields.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Jonas T; Augustsson, Per; Bruus, Henrik

    2016-09-01

    We present a theory for the acoustic force density acting on inhomogeneous fluids in acoustic fields on time scales that are slow compared to the acoustic oscillation period. The acoustic force density depends on gradients in the density and compressibility of the fluid. For microfluidic systems, the theory predicts a relocation of the inhomogeneities into stable field-dependent configurations, which are qualitatively different from the horizontally layered configurations due to gravity. Experimental validation is obtained by confocal imaging of aqueous solutions in a glass-silicon microchip. PMID:27661695

  19. Acoustic Force Density Acting on Inhomogeneous Fluids in Acoustic Fields.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Jonas T; Augustsson, Per; Bruus, Henrik

    2016-09-01

    We present a theory for the acoustic force density acting on inhomogeneous fluids in acoustic fields on time scales that are slow compared to the acoustic oscillation period. The acoustic force density depends on gradients in the density and compressibility of the fluid. For microfluidic systems, the theory predicts a relocation of the inhomogeneities into stable field-dependent configurations, which are qualitatively different from the horizontally layered configurations due to gravity. Experimental validation is obtained by confocal imaging of aqueous solutions in a glass-silicon microchip.

  20. Substituting mouse transcription factor Pou4f2 with a sea urchin orthologue restores retinal ganglion cell development.

    PubMed

    Mao, Chai-An; Agca, Cavit; Mocko-Strand, Julie A; Wang, Jing; Ullrich-Lüter, Esther; Pan, Ping; Wang, Steven W; Arnone, Maria Ina; Frishman, Laura J; Klein, William H

    2016-03-16

    Pou domain transcription factor Pou4f2 is essential for the development of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in the vertebrate retina. A distant orthologue of Pou4f2 exists in the genome of the sea urchin (class Echinoidea) Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (SpPou4f1/2), yet the photosensory structure of sea urchins is strikingly different from that of the mammalian retina. Sea urchins have no obvious eyes, but have photoreceptors clustered around their tube feet disc. The mechanisms that are associated with the development and function of photoreception in sea urchins are largely unexplored. As an initial approach to better understand the sea urchin photosensory structure and relate it to the mammalian retina, we asked whether SpPou4f1/2 could support RGC development in the absence of Pou4f2. To answer this question, we replaced genomic Pou4f2 with an SpPou4f1/2 cDNA. In Pou4f2-null mice, retinas expressing SpPou4f1/2 were outwardly identical to those of wild-type mice. SpPou4f1/2 retinas exhibited dark-adapted electroretinogram scotopic threshold responses, indicating functionally active RGCs. During retinal development, SpPou4f1/2 activated RGC-specific genes and in S. purpuratus, SpPou4f2 was expressed in photoreceptor cells of tube feet in a pattern distinct from Opsin4 and Pax6. Our results suggest that SpPou4f1/2 and Pou4f2 share conserved components of a gene network for photosensory development and they maintain their conserved intrinsic functions despite vast morphological differences in mouse and sea urchin photosensory structures. PMID:26962139

  1. Substituting mouse transcription factor Pou4f2 with a sea urchin orthologue restores retinal ganglion cell development.

    PubMed

    Mao, Chai-An; Agca, Cavit; Mocko-Strand, Julie A; Wang, Jing; Ullrich-Lüter, Esther; Pan, Ping; Wang, Steven W; Arnone, Maria Ina; Frishman, Laura J; Klein, William H

    2016-03-16

    Pou domain transcription factor Pou4f2 is essential for the development of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in the vertebrate retina. A distant orthologue of Pou4f2 exists in the genome of the sea urchin (class Echinoidea) Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (SpPou4f1/2), yet the photosensory structure of sea urchins is strikingly different from that of the mammalian retina. Sea urchins have no obvious eyes, but have photoreceptors clustered around their tube feet disc. The mechanisms that are associated with the development and function of photoreception in sea urchins are largely unexplored. As an initial approach to better understand the sea urchin photosensory structure and relate it to the mammalian retina, we asked whether SpPou4f1/2 could support RGC development in the absence of Pou4f2. To answer this question, we replaced genomic Pou4f2 with an SpPou4f1/2 cDNA. In Pou4f2-null mice, retinas expressing SpPou4f1/2 were outwardly identical to those of wild-type mice. SpPou4f1/2 retinas exhibited dark-adapted electroretinogram scotopic threshold responses, indicating functionally active RGCs. During retinal development, SpPou4f1/2 activated RGC-specific genes and in S. purpuratus, SpPou4f2 was expressed in photoreceptor cells of tube feet in a pattern distinct from Opsin4 and Pax6. Our results suggest that SpPou4f1/2 and Pou4f2 share conserved components of a gene network for photosensory development and they maintain their conserved intrinsic functions despite vast morphological differences in mouse and sea urchin photosensory structures.

  2. Contribution of the 4 f -core-excited states in determination of atomic properties in the Promethium Isoelectronic Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiersdorfer, Peter; Safronova, U. I.; Safronova, A. S.

    2014-05-01

    The atomic properties of Pm-like ions were comprehensively studied using relativistic atomic codes with the main emphasis on W ion. Excitation energies of the 4f14 nl (with nl = 5 s , 6 s , 5 p , 6 p , 5 d , 6 d , and 5 f) states in Pm-like ions with nuclear charge Z ranging from 74 to 100 are evaluated within the framework of relativistic many-body theory (RMBPT). First- and second-order Coulomb energies and first- and second-order Breit corrections to the energies are calculated. The important question of what is the ground state in Pm-like ions was answered. Properties of the 4 f -core-excited states are evaluated using the multiconfiguration relativistic Hebrew University Lawrence Livermore Atomic Code (HULLAC code) and the Hartree-Fock-Relativistic method (COWAN code). Our large scale calculations includes the following set of configurations: 4f14 5 s , 4f14 5 p , 4f13 5s2 , 4f13 5p2 , 4f13 5 s 5 p , 4f12 5s2 5 p , 4f12 5 s 5p2 , and 4f12 5p3 . Excitation energies, transition rates, and lifetimes in Pm-like tungsten are evaluated with additional inclusion of the 4f11 5s2 5p2 , 4f11 5 s 5p3 , 4f10 5s2 5p3 , and 4f10 5 s 5p4 configurations. Wavelengths of the 5 s - 5 p transitions are obtained by the COWAN, HULLAC, and RMBPT codes. This research was sponsored by DOE under the OFES grant DE-FG02-08ER54951 and in part by NNSA Cooperative Agreement DE-NA0001984. Work at Lawrence Livermore National Lab. was performed under the auspices of DOE under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  3. Polyoxometalate-supported 3d-4f heterometallic single-molecule magnets.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaojia; Zhou, Wenzhe; Li, Yangguang; Ke, Hongshan; Tang, Jinkui; Clérac, Rodolphe; Wang, Yonghui; Su, Zhongmin; Wang, Enbo

    2012-03-01

    The reactions of [CuTbL(Schiff)(H(2)O)(3)Cl(2)]Cl complexes with A- or B-type Anderson polyoxoanions lead to new polyoxometalate-supported 3d-4f heterometallic systems with single-molecule-magnet behavior.

  4. The preventive effects of apolipoprotein mimetic D-4F from vibration injury-experiment in rats.

    PubMed

    Rowe, David J; Yan, Ji-Geng; Zhang, Lin Ling; Pritchard, Kirkwood A; Kao, Dennis S; Matloub, Hani S; Riley, Danny A

    2011-03-01

    Hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS) is a debilitating sequela of neurological and vascular injuries caused by prolonged occupational exposure to hand-transmitted vibration. Our previous study demonstrated that short-term exposure to vibration can induce vasoconstriction and endothelial cell damage in the ventral artery of the rat's tail. The present study investigated whether pretreatment with D-4F, an apolipoprotein A-1 mimetic with known anti-oxidant and vasodilatory properties, prevents vibration-induced vasoconstriction, endothelial cell injury, and protein nitration. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with 3 mg/kg D-4F at 1 h before vibration of the tails for 4 h/day at 60 Hz, 49 m/s(2) r.m.s. acceleration for either 1 or 3 days. Vibration-induced endothelial cell damage was examined by light microscopy and nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity (a marker for free radical production). One and 3-day vibration produced vasoconstriction and increased nitrotyrosine. Preemptive treatment with D-4F prevented these negative changes. These findings suggest that D-4F may be useful in the prevention of HAVS.

  5. 48 CFR 47.305-4 - F.o.b. destination solicitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false F.o.b. destination... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Transportation in Supply Contracts 47.305-4 F.o.b. destination solicitations. (a) When preparing f.o.b destination solicitations, the contracting officer shall refer to...

  6. 48 CFR 47.303-4 - F.o.b. origin, freight prepaid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Administration prescribes commercial zones at Subpart B of 49 CFR part 372); and (2) The cost of transportation... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false F.o.b. origin, freight... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Transportation in Supply Contracts 47.303-4 F.o.b. origin,...

  7. 48 CFR 47.303-4 - F.o.b. origin, freight prepaid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Administration prescribes commercial zones at Subpart B of 49 CFR part 372); and (2) The cost of transportation... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false F.o.b. origin, freight... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Transportation in Supply Contracts 47.303-4 F.o.b. origin,...

  8. 48 CFR 47.303-4 - F.o.b. origin, freight prepaid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Administration prescribes commercial zones at Subpart B of 49 CFR part 372); and (2) The cost of transportation... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false F.o.b. origin, freight... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Transportation in Supply Contracts 47.303-4 F.o.b. origin,...

  9. 48 CFR 47.303-4 - F.o.b. origin, freight prepaid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Administration prescribes commercial zones at Subpart B of 49 CFR part 372); and (2) The cost of transportation... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false F.o.b. origin, freight... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Transportation in Supply Contracts 47.303-4 F.o.b. origin,...

  10. 48 CFR 47.303-4 - F.o.b. origin, freight prepaid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Administration prescribes commercial zones at Subpart B of 49 CFR part 372); and (2) The cost of transportation... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false F.o.b. origin, freight... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Transportation in Supply Contracts 47.303-4 F.o.b. origin,...

  11. Late-onset Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease 4F caused by periaxin gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Shoko; Hashiguchi, Akihiro; Yoshimura, Akiko; Maeda, Kengo; Suzuki, Takashi; Haruki, Hiroyo; Nakamura, Tomonori; Okamoto, Yuji; Takashima, Hiroshi

    2012-11-01

    We identified the main features of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, type 4F, caused by a periaxin gene (PRX) mutation in Japanese patients. Periaxin is known as one of the key myelination molecules, forming tight junction between myelin loop and axon. We collected 427 DNA samples from individuals with CMT or CMT-related neuropathy, negative for PMP22 duplication. We investigated PRX mutations using a purpose-built resequencing array screen during the period 2006-2012. We detected two types of PRX mutations in three patients; one patient showed a novel homozygous p.D651N mutation and the other two showed homozygous p.R1070X mutation. All PRX mutations reported so far have been of nonsense or frameshift type. In this study, we found homozygous missense mutation p.D651N. Aspartate 651 is located in a repeat domain; its position might indicate an important function. PRX mutations usually lead to early-onset, autosomal-recessive demyelinating CMT neuropathy 4F (CMT4F) or Dejerine-Sottas disease; their clinical phenotypes are severe. In our three patients, the onset of the disease was at the age of 27 years or later, and their clinical phenotypes were milder compared with those reported in previous studies. We showed a variation of clinical phenotypes for CMT4F caused by a novel, nonsense PRX mutation. PMID:22847150

  12. CYP4F2 genetic polymorphisms are associated with coronary heart disease in a Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To explore the relationship between CYP4F2 gene polymorphism and coronary heart disease (CHD) in a Chinese Han population. Methods We selected 440 CHD patients and 440 control subjects to perform a case - control study. Four SNPs (rs2108622, rs3093100, rs3093105 and rs3093135) in CYP4F2 gene were genotyped using polymerase chain reaction - restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR - RFLP) methods. The genotype and haplotype distributions were compared between the case and the control group. Results We found both rs2108622 and rs3093105 in CYP4F2 gene were associated with the risk for CHD (P <0.01). Haplotype analysis indicated that GGGT haplotype consisted by rs2108622-rs3093100-rs3093105-rs3093135 was associated with CHD risk (OR = 4.367, 95% CI: 2.241 ~ 8.510; P < 0.001), but GGTA haplotype was associated with decreased risk for CHD (OR = 0.450, 95% CI: 0.111 ~ 0.777; P <0.001). Conclusion CYP4F2 gene polymorphisms were associated with the risk of CHD in Chinese population. PMID:24886380

  13. Optimization of real-time acoustical and mechanical monitoring of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment using harmonic motion imaging for high focused ultrasound (HMIFU).

    PubMed

    Hou, Gary Y; Marquet, Fabrice; Wang, Shutao; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2013-01-01

    Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI) for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) is a recently developed high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring method with feasibilities demonstrated in silica, in vitro and in vivo. Its principle is based on emission of an Amplitude-modulated therapeutic ultrasound beam utilizing a therapeutic transducer to induce an oscillatory radiation force while tracking the focal tissue mechanical response during the HIFU treatment using a confocally-aligned diagnostic transducer. In order to translate towards the clinical implementation of HMIFU, a complete assessment study is required in order to investigate the optimal radiation force threshold for reliable monitoring the local tissue mechanical property changes, i.e., the estimation HMIFU displacement under thermal, acoustical, and mechanical effects within focal medium (i.e., boiling, cavitation, and nonlinearity) using biological specimen. In this study, HMIFU technique is applied on HIFU treatment monitoring on freshly excised ex vivo canine liver specimens. In order to perform the multi-characteristic assessment, the diagnostic transducer was operated as either a pulse-echo imager or Passive Cavitation Detector (PCD) to assess the acoustic and mechanical response, while a bare-wire thermocouple was used to monitor the focal temperature change. As the acoustic power of HIFU treatment was ranged from 2.3 to 11.4 W, robust HMI displacement was observed across the entire range. Moreover, an optimized range for high quality displacement monitoring was found to be between 3.6 to 5.2W, where displacement showed an increase followed by significant decrease, indicating a stiffening of focal medium due to thermal lesion formation, while the correlation coefficient was maintained above 0.95.

  14. Optimization of real-time acoustical and mechanical monitoring of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment using harmonic motion imaging for high focused ultrasound (HMIFU).

    PubMed

    Hou, Gary Y; Marquet, Fabrice; Wang, Shutao; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2013-01-01

    Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI) for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) is a recently developed high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring method with feasibilities demonstrated in silica, in vitro and in vivo. Its principle is based on emission of an Amplitude-modulated therapeutic ultrasound beam utilizing a therapeutic transducer to induce an oscillatory radiation force while tracking the focal tissue mechanical response during the HIFU treatment using a confocally-aligned diagnostic transducer. In order to translate towards the clinical implementation of HMIFU, a complete assessment study is required in order to investigate the optimal radiation force threshold for reliable monitoring the local tissue mechanical property changes, i.e., the estimation HMIFU displacement under thermal, acoustical, and mechanical effects within focal medium (i.e., boiling, cavitation, and nonlinearity) using biological specimen. In this study, HMIFU technique is applied on HIFU treatment monitoring on freshly excised ex vivo canine liver specimens. In order to perform the multi-characteristic assessment, the diagnostic transducer was operated as either a pulse-echo imager or Passive Cavitation Detector (PCD) to assess the acoustic and mechanical response, while a bare-wire thermocouple was used to monitor the focal temperature change. As the acoustic power of HIFU treatment was ranged from 2.3 to 11.4 W, robust HMI displacement was observed across the entire range. Moreover, an optimized range for high quality displacement monitoring was found to be between 3.6 to 5.2W, where displacement showed an increase followed by significant decrease, indicating a stiffening of focal medium due to thermal lesion formation, while the correlation coefficient was maintained above 0.95. PMID:24111176

  15. Topological Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Zhen; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-03-01

    The manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as "topological edge states," has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers.

  16. Topological acoustics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Zhen; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-03-20

    The manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as "topological edge states," has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers.

  17. Acoustics: Motion controlled by sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neild, Adrian

    2016-09-01

    A simple technique has been developed that produces holograms made of sound waves. These acoustic landscapes are used to manipulate microscale objects, and offer great potential in medical imaging and selective heating. See Letter p.518

  18. Characterization of Core Samples from a Hardened Crust Layer in Tank 4F

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, M. L.

    2005-09-28

    Waste removal operations in Tank 4F are scheduled to begin in late 2005 to provide material for Sludge Batch 5. Mining/probing operations to support installation of submersible mixer pumps encountered a hard layer of material at {approx}45'' to 50'' from the bottom of the tank. Attempts at penetrating the hard layer using a manual mining tool in several different risers were not successful. A core-sampling tool was used to obtain samples of the hard crust layer in Tank 4F for characterization. Three 12'' core samples and a dip sample of the supernate near the surface of the hard layer were sent to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for characterization. X-ray Diffraction (XRD) results for the crystalline solids from both sample FTF-434 and FTF-435 identifies the major component of both samples as Burkeite (Na{sub 6}(CO{sub 3})(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}). All of the other data collected on the crystalline solids from the Tank 4F core samples support this conclusion. The conditions in Tank 4F for the last twenty years have been ideal for Burkeite formation. The tank has been largely undisturbed with a tank temperature consistently above 30 C, a carbonate to sulfate molar ratio in the supernate conducive to Burkeite formation, and slow evaporation of the supernate phase. Thermodynamic modeling and the results of a Burkeite solubility test confirm that a ratio of 1:1:12 for the volumes of Burkeite solids, supernate, and inhibited water will dissolve all of the Burkeite. These ratios could be used to remove the 6'' layer of Burkeite from Tank 4F with no mixing. However, the thermodynamic modeling and the solubility test neglect the sludge layer beneath the Burkeite crust in Tank 4F. Settled sludge in Savannah River Site (SRS) high-level waste tanks usually contains greater than 75% interstitial supernate by volume. If the supernate in the sludge layer should mix into the solution used to dissolve the Burkeite, significantly more inhibited water would be needed to

  19. A rail system for circular synthetic aperture sonar imaging and acoustic target strength measurements: Design/operation/preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, J. L.; Marston, T. M.; Lee, K.; Lopes, J. L.; Lim, R.

    2014-01-01

    A 22 m diameter circular rail, outfitted with a mobile sonar tower trolley, was designed, fabricated, instrumented with underwater acoustic transducers, and assembled on a 1.5 m thick sand layer at the bottom of a large freshwater pool to carry out sonar design and target scattering response studies. The mobile sonar tower translates along the rail via a drive motor controlled by customized LabVIEW software. The rail system is modular and assembly consists of separately deploying eight circular arc sections, measuring a nominal center radius of 11 m and 8.64 m arc length each, and having divers connect them together in the underwater environment. The system enables full scale measurements on targets of interest with 0.1° angular resolution over a complete 360° aperture, without disrupting target setup, and affording a level of control over target environment conditions and noise sources unachievable in standard field measurements. In recent use, the mobile cart carrying an instrumented sonar tower was translated along the rail in 720 equal position increments and acoustic backscatter data were acquired at each position. In addition, this system can accommodate both broadband monostatic and bistatic scattering measurements on targets of interest, allowing capture of target signature phenomena under diverse configurations to address current scientific and technical issues encountered in mine countermeasure and unexploded ordnance applications. In the work discussed here, the circular rail apparatus is used for acoustic backscatter testing, but this system also has the capacity to facilitate the acquisition of magnetic and optical sensor data from targets of interest. A brief description of the system design and operation will be presented along with preliminary processed results for data acquired from acoustic measurements conducted at the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Panama City Division Test Pond Facility. [Work Supported by the U.S. Office of Naval Research and

  20. A rail system for circular synthetic aperture sonar imaging and acoustic target strength measurements: design/operation/preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, J L; Marston, T M; Lee, K; Lopes, J L; Lim, R

    2014-01-01

    A 22 m diameter circular rail, outfitted with a mobile sonar tower trolley, was designed, fabricated, instrumented with underwater acoustic transducers, and assembled on a 1.5 m thick sand layer at the bottom of a large freshwater pool to carry out sonar design and target scattering response studies. The mobile sonar tower translates along the rail via a drive motor controlled by customized LabVIEW software. The rail system is modular and assembly consists of separately deploying eight circular arc sections, measuring a nominal center radius of 11 m and 8.64 m arc length each, and having divers connect them together in the underwater environment. The system enables full scale measurements on targets of interest with 0.1° angular resolution over a complete 360° aperture, without disrupting target setup, and affording a level of control over target environment conditions and noise sources unachievable in standard field measurements. In recent use, the mobile cart carrying an instrumented sonar tower was translated along the rail in 720 equal position increments and acoustic backscatter data were acquired at each position. In addition, this system can accommodate both broadband monostatic and bistatic scattering measurements on targets of interest, allowing capture of target signature phenomena under diverse configurations to address current scientific and technical issues encountered in mine countermeasure and unexploded ordnance applications. In the work discussed here, the circular rail apparatus is used for acoustic backscatter testing, but this system also has the capacity to facilitate the acquisition of magnetic and optical sensor data from targets of interest. A brief description of the system design and operation will be presented along with preliminary processed results for data acquired from acoustic measurements conducted at the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Panama City Division Test Pond Facility. [Work Supported by the U.S. Office of Naval Research and

  1. Myeloid expression of cytochrome P450 4F3 is determined by a lineage-specific alternative promoter.

    PubMed

    Christmas, Peter; Carlesso, Nadia; Shang, Haibo; Cheng, Shing-Ming; Weber, Brittany M; Preffer, Frederic I; Scadden, David T; Soberman, Roy J

    2003-07-01

    The cytochrome P450 4F3 (CYP4F3) gene encodes two functionally distinct enzymes that differ only by the selection of exon 4 (CYP4F3A) or exon 3 (CYP4F3B). CYP4F3A inactivates leukotriene B4, a reaction that has significance for controlling inflammation. CYP4F3B converts arachidonic acid to 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, a potent activator of protein kinase C. We have previously shown that mRNAs coding for CYP4F3A and CYP4F3B are generated from distinct transcription start sites in neutrophils and liver. We therefore investigated mechanisms that regulate the cell-specific expression of these two isoforms. Initially, we analyzed the distribution of CYP4F3 in human leukocytes and determined a lineage-specific pattern of isoform expression. CYP4F3A is expressed in myeloid cells and is coordinate with myeloid differentiation markers such as CD11b and myeloperoxidase during development in the bone marrow. In contrast, CYP4F3B expression is restricted to a small population of CD3+ T lymphocytes. We identified distinct transcriptional features in myeloid, lymphoid, and hepatic cells that indicate the presence of multiple promoters in the CYP4F3 gene. The hepatic promoter depends on a cluster of hepatocyte nuclear factor sites 123-155 bp upstream of the initiator ATG codon. The myeloid promoter spans 400 bp in a region 468-872 bp upstream of the ATG codon; it is associated with clusters of CACCT sites and can be activated by ZEB-2, a factor primarily characterized as a transcriptional repressor in cells that include lymphocytes. ZEB-2 interacts with C-terminal binding protein and Smads, and this would provide opportunities for integrating environmental signals in myelopoiesis and inflammation.

  2. Acoustic hemostasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Lawrence; Beach, Kirk; Carter, Stephen; Chandler, Wayne; Curra, Francesco; Kaczkowski, Peter; Keilman, George; Khokhlova, Vera; Martin, Roy; Mourad, Pierre; Vaezy, Shahram

    2000-07-01

    In cases of severe injury, physicians speak of a "golden hour"—a brief grace period in which quickly applied, proper therapy can save the life of the patient. Much of this mortality results from exsanguination, i.e., bleeding to death—often from internal hemorrhage. The inability of a paramedic to treat breaches in the vascular system deep within the body or to stem the loss of blood from internal organs is a major reason for the high level of mortality associated with blunt trauma. We have undertaken an extensive research program to treat the problem of internal bleeding. Our approach is as follows: (a) We use scanning ultrasound to identify internal bleeding and hemorrhage, (b) we use ultrasound imaging to locate specific breaches in the vascular system, both from damaged vessels and gross damage to the capillary bed, and (c) we use High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) to treat the damaged region and to induce hemostasis. We present a general review of this research with some emphasis on the role of nonlinear acoustics.

  3. Musical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, Colin

    This chapter provides an introduction to the physical and psycho-acoustic principles underlying the production and perception of the sounds of musical instruments. The first section introduces generic aspects of musical acoustics and the perception of musical sounds, followed by separate sections on string, wind and percussion instruments.

  4. Structural transformation of Li 2CoPO 4F upon Li-deintercalation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khasanova, Nellie R.; Gavrilov, Alexey N.; Antipov, Evgeny V.; Bramnik, Kirill G.; Hibst, Hartmut

    Electrochemical performance and structural properties of the high-voltage cathode material Li 2CoPO 4F have been investigated. The cyclic voltammetry and coulometry under potential step mode in the voltage range 3.0-5.1 V vs. Li revealed a structural transformation at potentials above 4.8 V. This transformation occurring upon Li-extraction appears to be irreversible: the subsequent Li-insertion does not result in restoration of the initial structure, but takes place within a new "modified" framework. According to the structure refinement this modification involves the mutual rotations of (CoO 4F 2) octahedra and (PO 4) tetrahedra accompanied by the considerable unit cell expansion which is expected to enhance the Li-transport upon subsequent cycling. The new framework demonstrates a reversible Li-insertion/extraction in a solid-solution regime with stabilized discharge capacity at around 60 mAh g -1.

  5. Acoustic metafluids.

    PubMed

    Norris, Andrew N

    2009-02-01

    Acoustic metafluids are defined as the class of fluids that allow one domain of fluid to acoustically mimic another, as exemplified by acoustic cloaks. It is shown that the most general class of acoustic metafluids are materials with anisotropic inertia and the elastic properties of what are known as pentamode materials. The derivation uses the notion of finite deformation to define the transformation of one region to another. The main result is found by considering energy density in the original and transformed regions. Properties of acoustic metafluids are discussed, and general conditions are found which ensure that the mapped fluid has isotropic inertia, which potentially opens up the possibility of achieving broadband cloaking. PMID:19206861

  6. Radiation-force-based estimation of acoustic attenuation using harmonic motion imaging (HMI) in phantoms and in vitro livers before and after HIFU ablation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiangang; Hou, Gary Y; Marquet, Fabrice; Han, Yang; Camarena, Francisco; Konofagou, Elisa

    2015-10-01

    Acoustic attenuation represents the energy loss of the propagating wave through biological tissues and plays a significant role in both therapeutic and diagnostic ultrasound applications. Estimation of acoustic attenuation remains challenging but critical for tissue characterization. In this study, an attenuation estimation approach was developed using the radiation-force-based method of harmonic motion imaging (HMI). 2D tissue displacement maps were acquired by moving the transducer in a raster-scan format. A linear regression model was applied on the logarithm of the HMI displacements at different depths in order to estimate the acoustic attenuation. Commercially available phantoms with known attenuations (n = 5) and in vitro canine livers (n = 3) were tested, as well as HIFU lesions in in vitro canine livers (n = 5). Results demonstrated that attenuations obtained from the phantoms showed a good correlation (R² = 0.976) with the independently obtained values reported by the manufacturer with an estimation error (compared to the values independently measured) varying within the range of 15-35%. The estimated attenuation in the in vitro canine livers was equal to 0.32   ±   0.03 dB cm(-1) MHz(-1), which is in good agreement with the existing literature. The attenuation in HIFU lesions was found to be higher (0.58   ±   0.06 dB cm(-1) MHz(-1)) than that in normal tissues, also in agreement with the results from previous publications. Future potential applications of the proposed method include estimation of attenuation in pathological tissues before and after thermal ablation.

  7. Radiation-force-based estimation of acoustic attenuation using harmonic motion imaging (HMI) in phantoms and in vitro livers before and after HIFU ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiangang; Hou, Gary Y.; Marquet, Fabrice; Han, Yang; Camarena, Francisco; Konofagou, Elisa

    2015-10-01

    Acoustic attenuation represents the energy loss of the propagating wave through biological tissues and plays a significant role in both therapeutic and diagnostic ultrasound applications. Estimation of acoustic attenuation remains challenging but critical for tissue characterization. In this study, an attenuation estimation approach was developed using the radiation-force-based method of harmonic motion imaging (HMI). 2D tissue displacement maps were acquired by moving the transducer in a raster-scan format. A linear regression model was applied on the logarithm of the HMI displacements at different depths in order to estimate the acoustic attenuation. Commercially available phantoms with known attenuations (n=5 ) and in vitro canine livers (n=3 ) were tested, as well as HIFU lesions in in vitro canine livers (n=5 ). Results demonstrated that attenuations obtained from the phantoms showed a good correlation ({{R}2}=0.976 ) with the independently obtained values reported by the manufacturer with an estimation error (compared to the values independently measured) varying within the range of 15-35%. The estimated attenuation in the in vitro canine livers was equal to 0.32   ±   0.03 dB cm-1 MHz-1, which is in good agreement with the existing literature. The attenuation in HIFU lesions was found to be higher (0.58   ±   0.06 dB cm-1 MHz-1) than that in normal tissues, also in agreement with the results from previous publications. Future potential applications of the proposed method include estimation of attenuation in pathological tissues before and after thermal ablation.

  8. Radiation-force-based estimation of acoustic attenuation using harmonic motion imaging (HMI) in phantoms and in vitro livers before and after HIFU ablation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiangang; Hou, Gary Y; Marquet, Fabrice; Han, Yang; Camarena, Francisco; Konofagou, Elisa

    2015-10-01

    Acoustic attenuation represents the energy loss of the propagating wave through biological tissues and plays a significant role in both therapeutic and diagnostic ultrasound applications. Estimation of acoustic attenuation remains challenging but critical for tissue characterization. In this study, an attenuation estimation approach was developed using the radiation-force-based method of harmonic motion imaging (HMI). 2D tissue displacement maps were acquired by moving the transducer in a raster-scan format. A linear regression model was applied on the logarithm of the HMI displacements at different depths in order to estimate the acoustic attenuation. Commercially available phantoms with known attenuations (n = 5) and in vitro canine livers (n = 3) were tested, as well as HIFU lesions in in vitro canine livers (n = 5). Results demonstrated that attenuations obtained from the phantoms showed a good correlation (R² = 0.976) with the independently obtained values reported by the manufacturer with an estimation error (compared to the values independently measured) varying within the range of 15-35%. The estimated attenuation in the in vitro canine livers was equal to 0.32   ±   0.03 dB cm(-1) MHz(-1), which is in good agreement with the existing literature. The attenuation in HIFU lesions was found to be higher (0.58   ±   0.06 dB cm(-1) MHz(-1)) than that in normal tissues, also in agreement with the results from previous publications. Future potential applications of the proposed method include estimation of attenuation in pathological tissues before and after thermal ablation. PMID:26371501

  9. Requirement of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4F complex in hepatitis E virus replication.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xinying; Xu, Lei; Wang, Yijin; Wang, Wenshi; Sprengers, Dave; Metselaar, Herold J; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; Pan, Qiuwei

    2015-12-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection, one of the foremost causes of acute hepatitis, is becoming a health problem of increasing magnitude. As other viruses, HEV exploits elements from host cell biochemistry, but we understand little as to which components of the human hepatocellular machinery are perverted for HEV multiplication. It is, however, known that the eukaryotic translation initiation factors 4F (eIF4F) complex, the key regulator of the mRNA-ribosome recruitment phase of translation initiation, serves as an important component for the translation and replication of many viruses. Here we aim to investigate the role of three subunits of the eIF4F complex: eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4A (eIF4A), eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G (eIF4G) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) in HEV replication. We found that efficient replication of HEV requires eIF4A, eIF4G and eIF4E. Consistently, the negative regulatory factors of this complex: programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) and eIF4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) exert anti-HEV activities, which further illustrates the requirement for eIF4A and eIF4E in supporting HEV replication. Notably, phosphorylation of eIF4E induced by MNK1/2 activation is not involved in HEV replication. Although ribavirin and interferon-α (IFN-α), the most often-used off-label drugs for treating hepatitis E, interact with this complex, their antiviral activities are independent of eIF4E. In contrast, eIF4E silencing provokes enhanced anti-HEV activity of these compounds. Thus, HEV replication requires eIF4F complex and targeting essential elements of this complex provides important clues for the development of novel antiviral therapy against HEV.

  10. Origin of the nonplanarity of tetrafluoro cyclobutadiene, C4F4.

    PubMed

    Seal, Prasenjit; Chakrabarti, Swapan

    2007-02-01

    Density functional theory as well as Møller-Plesset investigations has been carried out on tetrafluoro cyclobutadiene, C4F4, to explore the origin of its nonplanarity. Although Petersson et al. (Petersson, E. J.; Fanuele, J. C.; Nimlos, M. R.; Lemal, D. M.; Ellison, G. B.; Radziszewski, J. G. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1997, 119, 11122-11123) had earlier predicted a nonplanar geometry of this compound on the basis of spectral and bond orbital analysis, the explanation of the same from a more fundamental point of view is still missing. In the present study, we provide a heuristic explanation for the origin of nonplanarity of C4F4. The two major driving forces behind this nonplanar geometry are the unusual aromaticity of this cyclic homoatomic 4pi electron system and the second-order Jahn-Teller effect (SOJTE). These driving forces can well be explained by various energy and density parameters and also by nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS) values. Aromaticity of a cyclic homoatomic 4pi electron system is quite remarkable. The enhancement of pi- delocalization as evidenced from molecular orbital analysis may be attributed to s-ppi mixing in nonplanar C4F4.

  11. Superhydrophobic treatment using atmospheric-pressure He/C4F8 plasma for buoyancy improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Sooryun; Moon, A.-Young; Moon, Se Youn

    2015-04-01

    A superhydrophobic miniature boat was fabricated with aluminum alloy plates treated with atmospheric-pressure helium (He)/octafluorocyclobutane (C4F8) plasma using 13.56 MHz rf power. When only 0.13% C4F8 was added to He gas, the contact angle of the surface increased to 140° and the surface showed superhydrophobic properties. On the basis of chemical and morphological analyses, fluorinated functional groups (CF, CF2, and CF3) and nano-/micro-sized particles were detected on the Al surface. These features brought about superhydrophobicity similar to the lotus effect. While the miniature boat, assembled with plasma-treated plates, was immersed in water, a layer of air (i.e., a plastron) surrounded the superhydrophobic surfaces. This effect contributed to the development of a 4.7% increase in buoyancy. In addition, the superhydrophobic properties lasted for two months under the submerged condition. These results demonstrate that treatment with atmospheric-pressure He/C4F8 plasma is a promising method of improving the load capacity and antifouling properties, and reducing the friction of marine ships through a fast and low-cost superhydrophobic treatment process.

  12. The transcription factor E4F1 coordinates CHK1-dependent checkpoint and mitochondrial functions.

    PubMed

    Rodier, Geneviève; Kirsh, Olivier; Baraibar, Martín; Houlès, Thibault; Lacroix, Matthieu; Delpech, Hélène; Hatchi, Elodie; Arnould, Stéphanie; Severac, Dany; Dubois, Emeric; Caramel, Julie; Julien, Eric; Friguet, Bertrand; Le Cam, Laurent; Sardet, Claude

    2015-04-14

    Recent data support the notion that a group of key transcriptional regulators involved in tumorigenesis, including MYC, p53, E2F1, and BMI1, share an intriguing capacity to simultaneously regulate metabolism and cell cycle. Here, we show that another factor, the multifunctional protein E4F1, directly controls genes involved in mitochondria functions and cell-cycle checkpoints, including Chek1, a major component of the DNA damage response. Coordination of these cellular functions by E4F1 appears essential for the survival of p53-deficient transformed cells. Acute inactivation of E4F1 in these cells results in CHK1-dependent checkpoint deficiency and multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions that lead to increased ROS production, energy stress, and inhibition of de novo pyrimidine synthesis. This deadly cocktail leads to the accumulation of uncompensated oxidative damage to proteins and extensive DNA damage, ending in cell death. This supports the rationale of therapeutic strategies simultaneously targeting mitochondria and CHK1 for selective killing of p53-deficient cancer cells.

  13. A novel interaction of Cap-binding protein complexes eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4F and eIF(iso)4F with a region in the 3'-untranslated region of satellite tobacco necrosis virus.

    PubMed

    Gazo, Brandy M; Murphy, Patricia; Gatchel, Jennifer R; Browning, Karen S

    2004-04-01

    Satellite tobacco necrosis virus (STNV) RNA is naturally uncapped at its 5' end and lacks polyadenylation at its 3' end. Despite lacking these two hallmarks of eukaryotic mRNAs, STNV-1 RNA is translated very efficiently. A approximately 130-nucleotide translational enhancer (TED), located 3' to the termination codon, is necessary for efficient cap-independent translation of STNV-1 RNA. The STNV-1 TED RNA fragment binds to the eukaryotic cap-binding complexes, initiation factor (eIF) 4F and eIF(iso)4F, as measured by nitrocellulose binding and fluorescence titration. STNV-1 TED is a potent inhibitor of in vitro translation when added in trans. This inhibition is reversed by the addition of eIF4F or eIF(iso)4F, and the subunits of eIF4F and eIF(iso)4F cross-link to STNV-1 TED, providing additional evidence that these factors interact directly with STNV-1 TED. Deletion mutagenesis of the STNV-1 TED indicates that a minimal region of approximately 100 nucleotides is necessary to promote cap-independent translation primarily through interaction with the cap binding subunits (eIF4E or eIF(iso)4E) of eIF4F or eIF(iso)4F.

  14. Acoustic-emission linear-pulse holography

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, H.D.; Lemon, D.K.; Busse, L.J.

    1982-06-01

    This paper describes Acoustic Emission Linear Pulse Holography which combines the advantages of linear imaging and acoustic emission into a single NDE inspection system. This unique system produces a chronological linear holographic image of a flaw by utilizing the acoustic energy emitted during crack growth. Conventional linear holographic imaging uses an ultrasonic transducer to transmit energy into the volume being imaged. When the crack or defect reflects that energy, the crack acts as a new source of acoustic waves. To formulate an image of that source, a receiving transducer is scanned over the volume of interest and the phase of the received signals is measured at successive points on the scan. The innovation proposed here is the utilization of the crack generated acoustic emission as the acoustic source and generation of a line image of the crack as it grows. A thirty-two point sampling array is used to construct phase-only linear holograms of simulated acoustic emission sources on large metal plates. The phases are calculated using the pulse time-of-flight (TOF) times from the reference transducer to the array of receivers. Computer reconstruction of the image is accomplished using a one-dimensional FFT algorithm (i.e., backward wave). Experimental results are shown which graphically illustrate the unique acoustic emission images of a single point and a linear crack in a 100 mm x 1220 mm x 1220 mm aluminum plate.

  15. Impact of the Kohn-Sham Delocalization Error on the 4f Shell Localization and Population in Lanthanide Complexes.

    PubMed

    Duignan, Thomas J; Autschbach, Jochen

    2016-07-12

    The extent of ligand to metal donation bonding and mixing of 4f (and 5d) orbitals with ligand orbitals is studied by Kohn-Sham (KS) calculations for LaX3 (X = F, Cl, Br, I), GdX3, and LuX3 model complexes, CeCl6(2-), YbCp3, and selected lanthanide complexes with larger ligands. The KS delocalization error (DE) is quantified via the curvature of the energy for noninteger electron numbers. The extent of donation bonding and 4f-ligand mixing correlates well with the DE. For Lu complexes, the DE also correlates with the extent of mixing of ligand and 4f orbitals in the canonical molecular orbitals (MOs). However, the localized set of MOs and population analyses indicate that the closed 4f shell is localized. Attempts to create situations where mixing of 4f and ligand orbitals occurs due to a degeneracy of fragment orbitals were unsuccessful. For La(III) and, in particular, for Ce(IV), Hartree-Fock, KS, and coupled cluster singles and doubles calculations are in agreement in that excess 4f populations arise from ligand donation, along with donation into the 5d shell. Likewise, KS calculations for all systems with incompletely filled 4f shells, even those with "optimally tuned" functionals affording a small DE, produce varying degrees of excess 4f populations which may be only partially attributed to 5d polarization.

  16. Impact of the Kohn-Sham Delocalization Error on the 4f Shell Localization and Population in Lanthanide Complexes.

    PubMed

    Duignan, Thomas J; Autschbach, Jochen

    2016-07-12

    The extent of ligand to metal donation bonding and mixing of 4f (and 5d) orbitals with ligand orbitals is studied by Kohn-Sham (KS) calculations for LaX3 (X = F, Cl, Br, I), GdX3, and LuX3 model complexes, CeCl6(2-), YbCp3, and selected lanthanide complexes with larger ligands. The KS delocalization error (DE) is quantified via the curvature of the energy for noninteger electron numbers. The extent of donation bonding and 4f-ligand mixing correlates well with the DE. For Lu complexes, the DE also correlates with the extent of mixing of ligand and 4f orbitals in the canonical molecular orbitals (MOs). However, the localized set of MOs and population analyses indicate that the closed 4f shell is localized. Attempts to create situations where mixing of 4f and ligand orbitals occurs due to a degeneracy of fragment orbitals were unsuccessful. For La(III) and, in particular, for Ce(IV), Hartree-Fock, KS, and coupled cluster singles and doubles calculations are in agreement in that excess 4f populations arise from ligand donation, along with donation into the 5d shell. Likewise, KS calculations for all systems with incompletely filled 4f shells, even those with "optimally tuned" functionals affording a small DE, produce varying degrees of excess 4f populations which may be only partially attributed to 5d polarization. PMID:27224494

  17. 4-D imaging of seepage in earthen embankments with time-lapse inversion of self-potential data constrained by acoustic emissions localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittgers, J. B.; Revil, A.; Planes, T.; Mooney, M. A.; Koelewijn, A. R.

    2015-02-01

    New methods are required to combine the information contained in the passive electrical and seismic signals to detect, localize and monitor hydromechanical disturbances in porous media. We propose a field experiment showing how passive seismic and electrical data can be combined together to detect a preferential flow path associated with internal erosion in a Earth dam. Continuous passive seismic and electrical (self-potential) monitoring data were recorded during a 7-d full-scale levee (earthen embankment) failure test, conducted in Booneschans, Netherlands in 2012. Spatially coherent acoustic emissions events and the development of a self-potential anomaly, associated with induced concentrated seepage and internal erosion phenomena, were identified and imaged near the downstream toe of the embankment, in an area that subsequently developed a series of concentrated water flows and sand boils, and where liquefaction of the embankment toe eventually developed. We present a new 4-D grid-search algorithm for acoustic emissions localization in both time and space, and the application of the localization results to add spatially varying constraints to time-lapse 3-D modelling of self-potential data in the terms of source current localization. Seismic signal localization results are utilized to build a set of time-invariant yet spatially varying model weights used for the inversion of the self-potential data. Results from the combination of these two passive techniques show results that are more consistent in terms of focused ground water flow with respect to visual observation on the embankment. This approach to geophysical monitoring of earthen embankments provides an improved approach for early detection and imaging of the development of embankment defects associated with concentrated seepage and internal erosion phenomena. The same approach can be used to detect various types of hydromechanical disturbances at larger scales.

  18. Acoustic characterization in whole blood and plasma of site-targeted nanoparticle ultrasound contrast agent for molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Michael S; Marsh, Jon N; Hall, Christopher S; Fuhrhop, Ralph W; Lacy, Elizabeth K; Lanza, Gregory M; Wickline, Samuel A

    2005-02-01

    The ability to enhance specific molecular markers of pathology with ultrasound has been previously demonstrated by our group employing a nanoparticle contrast agent [Lanza et al., Invest. Radiol. 35, 227-234 (2000); Ultrasound Med. Biol. 23, 863-870 (1997)]. One of the advantages of this agent is very low echogenicity in the blood pool that allows increased contrast between the blood pool and the bound, site-targeted agent. We measured acoustic backscatter and attenuation coefficient as a function of the contrast agent concentration, ambient pressure, peak acoustic pressure, and as an effect of duty cycle and wave form shape. Measurements were performed while the nanoparticles were suspended in either whole porcine blood or plasma. The nanoparticles were only detectable when insonified within plasma devoid of red blood cells and were shown to exhibit backscatter levels more than 30 dB below the backscatter from whole blood. Attenuation of nanoparticles in whole porcine blood was not measurably different from that of whole blood alone over a range of concentrations up to eight times the maximum in vivo dose. The resulting data provide upper bounds on blood pool attenuation coefficient and backscatter and will be needed to more precisely define levels of molecular contrast enhancement that may be obtained in vivo.

  19. Acoustic trauma

    MedlinePlus

    Acoustic trauma is a common cause of sensory hearing loss . Damage to the hearing mechanisms within the inner ... Symptoms include: Partial hearing loss that most often involves ... The hearing loss may slowly get worse. Noises, ringing in ...

  20. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... slow growing tumor which arise primarily from the vestibular portion of the VIII cranial nerve and lie ... you have a "brain tumor" called acoustic neuroma (vestibular schwannoma). You think you are the only one ...

  1. Underwater Acoustics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creasey, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Summarizes the history of underwater acoustics and describes related research studies and teaching activities at the University of Birmingham (England). Also includes research studies on transducer design and mathematical techniques. (SK)

  2. Room Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  3. System and method to create three-dimensional images of non-linear acoustic properties in a region remote from a borehole

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung; Nihei, Kurt T.; Schmitt, Denis P.; Skelt, Christopher; Johnson, Paul A.; Guyer, Robert; TenCate, James A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves

    2013-01-01

    In some aspects of the disclosure, a method for creating three-dimensional images of non-linear properties and the compressional to shear velocity ratio in a region remote from a borehole using a conveyed logging tool is disclosed. In some aspects, the method includes arranging a first source in the borehole and generating a steered beam of elastic energy at a first frequency; arranging a second source in the borehole and generating a steerable beam of elastic energy at a second frequency, such that the steerable beam at the first frequency and the steerable beam at the second frequency intercept at a location away from the borehole; receiving at the borehole by a sensor a third elastic wave, created by a three wave mixing process, with a frequency equal to a difference between the first and second frequencies and a direction of propagation towards the borehole; determining a location of a three wave mixing region based on the arrangement of the first and second sources and on properties of the third wave signal; and creating three-dimensional images of the non-linear properties using data recorded by repeating the generating, receiving and determining at a plurality of azimuths, inclinations and longitudinal locations within the borehole. The method is additionally used to generate three dimensional images of the ratio of compressional to shear acoustic velocity of the same volume surrounding the borehole.

  4. Single crystal X-ray structure study of the Li(2-x)Na(x)Ni[PO4]F system.

    PubMed

    Ben Yahia, Hamdi; Shikano, Masahiro; Koike, Shinji; Tatsumi, Kuniaki; Kobayashi, Hironori

    2012-05-21

    The new compounds Li(2-x)Na(x)Ni[PO(4)]F (x = 0.7, 1, and 2) have been synthesized by a solid state reaction route. Their crystal structures were determined from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. Li(1.3)Na(0.7)Ni[PO(4)]F crystallizes with the orthorhombic Li(2)Ni[PO(4)]F structure, space group Pnma, a = 10.7874(3), b = 6.2196(5), c = 11.1780(4) Å and Z = 8, LiNaNi[PO(4)]F crystallizes with a monoclinic pseudomerohedrally twinned structure, space group P2(1)/c, a = 6.772(4), b = 11.154(6), c = 5.021(3) Å, β = 90° and Z = 4, and Na(2)Ni[PO(4)]F crystallizes with a monoclinic twinned structure, space group P2(1)/c, a = 13.4581(8), b = 5.1991(3), c = 13.6978(16) Å, β = 120.58(1)° and Z = 8. For x = 0.7 and 1, the structures contain NiFO(3) chains made up of edge-sharing NiO(4)F(2) octahedra, whereas for x = 2 the chains are formed of dimer units (face-sharing octahedra) sharing corners. These chains are interlinked by PO(4) tetrahedra forming a 3D framework for x = 0.7 and different Ni[PO(4)]F layers for x = 1 and 2. A sodium/lithium disorder over three atomic positions is observed in Li(1.3)Na(0.7)Ni[PO(4)]F structure, whereas the alkali metal atoms are well ordered in between the layers in the LiNaNi[PO(4)]F and Na(2)Ni[PO(4)]F structures, which makes both compounds of great interest as potential positive electrodes for sodium cells.

  5. Identifying Clinically Significant Prostate Cancers using 3-D In Vivo Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging with Whole-Mount Histology Validation.

    PubMed

    Palmeri, Mark L; Glass, Tyler J; Miller, Zachary A; Rosenzweig, Stephen J; Buck, Andrew; Polascik, Thomas J; Gupta, Rajan T; Brown, Alison F; Madden, John; Nightingale, Kathryn R

    2016-06-01

    Overly aggressive prostate cancer (PCa) treatment adversely affects patients and places an unnecessary burden on our health care system. The inability to identify and grade clinically significant PCa lesions is a factor contributing to excessively aggressive PCa treatment, such as radical prostatectomy, instead of more focal, prostate-sparing procedures such as cryotherapy and high-dose radiation therapy. We have performed 3-D in vivo B-mode and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging using a mechanically rotated, side-fire endorectal imaging array to identify regions suspicious for PCa in 29 patients being treated with radical prostatectomies for biopsy-confirmed PCa. Whole-mount histopathology analyses were performed to identify regions of clinically significant/insignificant PCa lesions, atrophy and benign prostatic hyperplasia. Regions of suspicion for PCa were reader-identified in ARFI images based on boundary delineation, contrast, texture and location. These regions of suspicion were compared with histopathology identified lesions using a nearest-neighbor regional localization approach. Of all clinically significant lesions identified on histopathology, 71.4% were also identified using ARFI imaging, including 79.3% of posterior and 33.3% of anterior lesions. Among the ARFI-identified lesions, 79.3% corresponded to clinically significant PCa lesions, with these lesions having higher indices of suspicion than clinically insignificant PCa. ARFI imaging had greater sensitivity for posterior versus anterior lesions because of greater displacement signal-to-noise ratio and finer spatial sampling. Atrophy and benign prostatic hyperplasia can cause appreciable prostate anatomy distortion and heterogeneity that confounds ARFI PCa lesion identification; however, in general, ARFI regions of suspicion did not coincide with these benign pathologies. PMID:26947445

  6. Alternative pre-mRNA splicing in Drosophila spliceosomal assembly factor RNP-4F during development.

    PubMed

    Fetherson, Rebecca A; Strock, Stephen B; White, Kristen N; Vaughn, Jack C

    2006-04-26

    The 5'- and 3'-UTR regions in pre-mRNAs play a variety of roles in controlling eukaryotic gene expression, including translational modulation. Here we report the results of a systematic study of alternative splicing in rnp-4f, which encodes a Drosophila spliceosomal assembly factor. We show that most of the nine introns are constitutively spliced, but several patterns of alternative splicing are observed in two pre-mRNA regions including the 5'-UTR. Intron V is shown to be of recent evolutionary origin and is infrequently spliced, resulting in generation of an in-frame stop codon and a predicted truncated protein lacking a nuclear localization signal, so that alternative splicing regulates its subcellular localization. Intron 0, located in the 5'-UTR, is subject to three different splicing decisions in D. melanogaster. Northern analysis of poly(A+) mRNAs reveals two differently sized rnp-4f mRNA isoforms in this species. A switch in relative isoform abundance occurs during mid-embryo stages, when the larger isoform becomes more abundant. This isoform is shown to represent intron 0 unspliced mRNA, whereas the smaller transcript represents the product of alternative splicing. Comparative genomic analysis predicts that intron 0 is present in diverse Drosophila species. Intron 0 splicing results in loss of an evolutionarily conserved stem-loop constituting a potential cis-regulatory element at the 3'-splice site. A model is proposed for the role of this element both in 5'-UTR alternative splicing decisions and in RNP-4F translational modulation. Preliminary evidences in support of our model are discussed.

  7. Ketoconazole increases fingolimod blood levels in a drug interaction via CYP4F2 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kovarik, John M; Dole, Kiran; Riviere, Gilles-Jacques; Pommier, Francoise; Maton, Steve; Jin, Yi; Lasseter, Kenneth C; Schmouder, Robert L

    2009-02-01

    The sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor modulator fingolimod is predominantly hydroxylated by cytochrome CYP4F2. In vitro experiments showed that ketoconazole significantly inhibited the oxidative metabolism of fingolimod by human liver microsomes and by recombinant CYP4F2. The authors used ketoconazole as a putative CYP4F2 inhibitor to quantify its influence on fingolimod pharmacokinetics in healthy subjects. In a 2-period, single-sequence, crossover study, 22 healthy subjects received a single 5-mg dose of fingolimod in period 1. In period 2, subjects received ketoconazole 200 mg twice daily for 9 days and a single 5-mg dose of fingolimod coadministered on the 4th day of ketoconazole treatment. Ketoconazole did not affect fingolimod t(max) or half-life, but there was a weak average increase in C(max) of 1.22-fold (90% confidence interval, 1.15-1.30). The AUC over the 5 days of ketoconazole coadministration increased 1.40-fold (1.31-1.50), and the full AUC to infinity increased 1.71-fold (1.53-1.91). The AUC of the active metabolite fingolimod-phosphate was increased to a similar extent by 1.67-fold (1.50-1.85). Ketoconazole predose plasma levels were not altered by fingolimod. The magnitude of this interaction suggests that a proactive dose reduction of fingolimod is not necessary when adding ketoconazole to a fingolimod regimen. The clinician, however, should be aware of this interaction and bear in mind the possibility of a fingolimod dose reduction based on clinical monitoring. PMID:19118083

  8. Band structures of 4f and 5f materials studied by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fujimori, Shin-ichi

    2016-04-20

    Recent remarkable progress in angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) has enabled the direct observation of the band structures of 4f and 5f materials. In particular, ARPES with various light sources such as lasers (hν ~ 7 eV) or high-energy synchrotron radiations (hν >/~ 400 eV) has shed light on the bulk band structures of strongly correlated materials with energy scales of a few millielectronvolts to several electronvolts. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the behaviors of 4f and 5f band structures of various rare-earth and actinide materials observed by modern ARPES techniques, and understand how they can be described using various theoretical frameworks. For 4f-electron materials, ARPES studies of CeMIn5(M = Rh, Ir, and Co) and YbRh2Si2 with various incident photon energies are summarized. We demonstrate that their 4f electronic structures are essentially described within the framework of the periodic Anderson model, and that the band-structure calculation based on the local density approximation cannot explain their low-energy electronic structures. Meanwhile, electronic structures of 5f materials exhibit wide varieties ranging from itinerant to localized states. For itinerant U5f compounds such as UFeGa5, their electronic structures can be well-described by the band-structure calculation assuming that all U5f electrons are itinerant. In contrast, the band structures of localized U5f compounds such as UPd3 and UO2 are essentially explained by the localized model that treats U5f electrons as localized core states. In regards to heavy fermion U-based compounds such as the hidden-order compound URu2Si2, their electronic structures exhibit complex behaviors. Their overall band structures are generally well-explained by the band-structure calculation, whereas the states in the vicinity of EF show some deviations due to electron correlation effects. Furthermore, the electronic structures of URu2Si2 in the paramagnetic and hidden-order phases are

  9. Band structures of 4f and 5f materials studied by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fujimori, Shin-ichi

    2016-04-20

    Recent remarkable progress in angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) has enabled the direct observation of the band structures of 4f and 5f materials. In particular, ARPES with various light sources such as lasers (hν ~ 7 eV) or high-energy synchrotron radiations (hν >/~ 400 eV) has shed light on the bulk band structures of strongly correlated materials with energy scales of a few millielectronvolts to several electronvolts. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the behaviors of 4f and 5f band structures of various rare-earth and actinide materials observed by modern ARPES techniques, and understand how they can be described using various theoretical frameworks. For 4f-electron materials, ARPES studies of CeMIn5(M = Rh, Ir, and Co) and YbRh2Si2 with various incident photon energies are summarized. We demonstrate that their 4f electronic structures are essentially described within the framework of the periodic Anderson model, and that the band-structure calculation based on the local density approximation cannot explain their low-energy electronic structures. Meanwhile, electronic structures of 5f materials exhibit wide varieties ranging from itinerant to localized states. For itinerant U5f compounds such as UFeGa5, their electronic structures can be well-described by the band-structure calculation assuming that all U5f electrons are itinerant. In contrast, the band structures of localized U5f compounds such as UPd3 and UO2 are essentially explained by the localized model that treats U5f electrons as localized core states. In regards to heavy fermion U-based compounds such as the hidden-order compound URu2Si2, their electronic structures exhibit complex behaviors. Their overall band structures are generally well-explained by the band-structure calculation, whereas the states in the vicinity of EF show some deviations due to electron correlation effects. Furthermore, the electronic structures of URu2Si2 in the paramagnetic and hidden-order phases are

  10. XeCl laser pumped iodine laser using t-C4F9I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, In Heon; Han, Kwang S.; Lee, Ja H.

    1989-01-01

    An iodine photodissociation laser using t-C4F9I as the active material was pumped by a XeCl laser. An iodine laser output energy of 3 mJ with pulse duration of 25 ns was obtained when the pumping pulse energy was 80 mJ, the iodine pressure was 70 torr, and the reflectance of the output mirror was 85 percent. The high pumping efficiency and low threshold pump power achieved in this experiment are attributable to the high absorption cross section at the pump laser wavelength (308 nm) of the iodide used.

  11. XeCl laser pumped iodine laser using t-C4F9I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, In Heon; Han, Kwang S.

    1989-01-01

    An iodine photodissociation laser using t-C4F9I as the active material was pumped by an XeCl laser. An iodine laser output energy of 3 mJ with pulse duration of 25 ns was obtained when the pumping pulse energy was 80 mJ, the iodide pressure was 70 torr, and the reflectance of the output mirror was 85 percent. The high pumping efficiency and low threshold pump power achieved in this experiment are attributable to the high absorption cross section at the pump laser wavelength (308 nm) of the iodide used.

  12. Band structures of 4f and 5f materials studied by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimori, Shin-ichi

    2016-04-01

    Recent remarkable progress in angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) has enabled the direct observation of the band structures of 4f and 5f materials. In particular, ARPES with various light sources such as lasers (hν ∼ 7~\\text{eV} ) or high-energy synchrotron radiations (hν ≳ 400~\\text{eV} ) has shed light on the bulk band structures of strongly correlated materials with energy scales of a few millielectronvolts to several electronvolts. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the behaviors of 4f and 5f band structures of various rare-earth and actinide materials observed by modern ARPES techniques, and understand how they can be described using various theoretical frameworks. For 4f-electron materials, ARPES studies of \\text{Ce}M\\text{I}{{\\text{n}}5} (M=\\text{Rh} , \\text{Ir} , and \\text{Co} ) and \\text{YbR}{{\\text{h}}2}\\text{S}{{\\text{i}}2} with various incident photon energies are summarized. We demonstrate that their 4f electronic structures are essentially described within the framework of the periodic Anderson model, and that the band-structure calculation based on the local density approximation cannot explain their low-energy electronic structures. Meanwhile, electronic structures of 5f materials exhibit wide varieties ranging from itinerant to localized states. For itinerant \\text{U}~5f compounds such as \\text{UFeG}{{\\text{a}}5} , their electronic structures can be well-described by the band-structure calculation assuming that all \\text{U}~5f electrons are itinerant. In contrast, the band structures of localized \\text{U}~5f compounds such as \\text{UP}{{\\text{d}}3} and \\text{U}{{\\text{O}}2} are essentially explained by the localized model that treats \\text{U}~5f electrons as localized core states. In regards to heavy fermion \\text{U} -based compounds such as the hidden-order compound \\text{UR}{{\\text{u}}2}\\text{S}{{\\text{i}}2} , their electronic structures exhibit complex behaviors. Their overall band structures

  13. 4-[F-18]fluoroproline: A potential tracer for collagen synthesis. Radiosynthesis and biological evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Hamacher, K.; Herz, M.; Truckenbrodt, R.

    1996-05-01

    Proline is an important constituent of the structural protein collagen. It has been shown that its fluorinated analogs (2S,4S)- and particularly (2S,4R)-4-fluoroproline are also incorporated into collagen (Gottlieb et al., Biochemistry (1965), 4: 2507). 4-[F-18]fluoroproline is therefore a potential probe for studying abnormal collagen synthesis e. g. in tumors, lung fibrosis and liver cirrhosis. We have evaluated the two diastereomeric forms using a transplantable osteosarcoma in mice as an in vivo model for elevated collagen synthesis, and a MCF 7 mamma carcinoma cell line for monolayer incubation studies.

  14. Transitions between the 4 f -core-excited states in Ir16+, Ir17+, and Ir18+ ions for clock applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safronova, U. I.; Flambaum, V. V.; Safronova, M. S.

    2016-05-01

    Iridium ions near 4 f - 5 s level crossings are the leading candidates for a new type of atomic clocks with a high projected accuracy and a very high sensitivity to the temporal variation of the fine structure constant α. To identify spectra of these ions in experiment accurate calculations of the spectra and electromagnetic transition probabilities should be performed. Properties of the 4 f -core-excited states in Ir16+, Ir17+, and Ir18+ ions are evaluated using relativistic many-body perturbation theory and Hartree-Fock-Relativistic method (COWAN code). We evaluate excitation energies, wavelengths, oscillator strengths, and transition rates. Our large-scale calculations included the following set of configurations: 4f14 5 s , 4f14 5 p , 4f13 5s2 , 4f13 5p2 , 4f13 5 s 5 p , 4f12 5s2 5 p , and 4f12 5 s 5p2 in Pm-like Ir16+ ; 4f14 , 4f13 5 s , 4f13 5 p , 4f12 5s2 , 4f12 5 s 5 p , and 4f12 5p2 in Nd-like Ir17+; and 4f13 , 4f12 5 s , 4f12 5 p , 4f11 5s2 , and 4f11 5 s 5 p in Pr-like Ir18+. The 5 s - 5 p transitions are illustrated by the synthetic spectra in the 180 - 200 Å range. Large contributions of magnetic-dipole transitions to lifetimes of low-lying states in the region 2.5 Ry.

  15. Seismo-acoustic imaging of marine hard substrate habitats: a case study from the German Bight (SE North Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papenmeier, Svenja; Hass, H. Christian

    2016-04-01

    The detection of hard substrate habitats in sublittoral environments is a considerable challenge in spite of modern high resolution hydroacoustic techniques. In offshore areas those habitats are mainly represented by either cobbles and boulders (stones) often located in wide areas of soft sediments or by glacial relict sediments (heterogeneous mixture of medium sand to gravel size with cobbles and boulders). Sediment classification and object detection is commonly done on the basis of hydroacoustic backscatter intensities recorded with e.g. sidescan sonar (SSS) and multibeam echo sounder (MBES). Single objects lying on the sediment such as stones can generally be recognized by the acoustic shadow behind the object. However, objects close to the sonar's nadir may remain undetected because their shadows are below the data resolution. Further limitation in the detection of objects is caused by sessile communities that thrive on the objects. The bio-cover tends to absorb most of the acoustic signal. Automated identification based on the backscatter signal is often not satisfactory, especially when stones are present in a setting with glacial deposits. Areas characterized by glacial relict sediments are hardly differentiable in their backscatter characteristics from rippled coarse sand and fine gravel (rippled coarse sediments) without an intensive ground-truthing program. From the ecological point of view the relict and rippled coarse sediments are completely different habitats and need to be distinguished. The case study represents a seismo-acoustic approach in which SSS and nonlinear sediment echo sounder (SES) data are combined to enable a reliable and reproducible differentiation between relict sediments (with stones and coarse gravels) and rippled coarse sediments. Elevated objects produce hyperbola signatures at the sediment surface in the echo data which can be used to complement the SSS data. The nonlinear acoustic propagation of the SES sound pulses produces a

  16. Investigation of contact acoustic nonlinearity in delaminations by shearographic imaging, laser doppler vibrometric scanning and finite difference modeling.

    PubMed

    Sarens, Bart; Verstraeten, Bert; Glorieux, Christ; Kalogiannakis, Georgios; Van Hemelrijck, Danny

    2010-06-01

    Full-field dynamic shearography and laser Doppler vibrometric scanning are used to investigate the local contact acoustic nonlinear generation of delamination-induced effects on the vibration of a harmonically excited composite plate containing an artificial defect. Nonlinear elastic behavior caused by the stress-dependent boundary conditions at the delamination interfaces of a circular defect is also simulated by a 3-D second-order, finite-difference, staggered-grid model (displacement-stress formulation). Both the experimental and simulated data reveal an asymmetric motion of the layer above the delamination, which acts as a membrane vibrating with enhanced displacement amplitude around a finite offset displacement. The spectrum of the membrane motion is enriched with clapping-induced harmonics of the excitation frequency. In case of a sufficiently thin and soft membrane, the simulations reveal clear modal behavior at sub-harmonic frequencies caused by inelastic clapping. PMID:20529713

  17. Acoustic emission linear pulse holography

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, H. D.; Busse, L. J.; Lemon, D. K.

    1985-07-30

    Defects in a structure are imaged as they propagate, using their emitted acoustic energy as a monitored source. Short bursts of acoustic energy propagate through the structure to a discrete element receiver array. A reference timing transducer located between the array and the inspection zone initiates a series of time-of-flight measurements. A resulting series of time-of-flight measurements are then treated as aperture data and are transferred to a computer for reconstruction of a synthetic linear holographic image. The images can be displayed and stored as a record of defect growth.

  18. Acoustic emission linear pulse holography

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, H. Dale; Busse, Lawrence J.; Lemon, Douglas K.

    1985-01-01

    Defects in a structure are imaged as they propagate, using their emitted acoustic energy as a monitored source. Short bursts of acoustic energy propagate through the structure to a discrete element receiver array. A reference timing transducer located between the array and the inspection zone initiates a series of time-of-flight measurements. A resulting series of time-of-flight measurements are then treated as aperture data and are transferred to a computer for reconstruction of a synthetic linear holographic image. The images can be displayed and stored as a record of defect growth.

  19. Experimental and theoretical investigations of four 3d-4f butterfly single-molecule magnets.

    PubMed

    Zou, Hua-Hong; Sheng, Liang-Bing; Liang, Fu-Pei; Chen, Zi-Lu; Zhang, Yi-Quan

    2015-11-14

    The syntheses, structures, and characterization of four 3d-4f butterfly clusters are described. With different polyhydroxy Schiff-base ligands 2-(((2-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)methylene)amino)-2-(hydroxymethyl)-1,3-propanediol (H4L1) and 2-(2,3-dihydroxpropyliminomethyl)-6-methoxyphenol (H3L2), three heterotetranuclear NiLn complexes (NiDy-L1 (1), NiTb-L2 (2), NiDy-L2 (3)) and one heterohexanuclear CoDy complex (4) were obtained. The three heterotetranuclear NiLn complexes display a central planar butterfly topology. The heterohexanuclear complex was built from butterfly CoDy clusters and two Dy(III) ions by the bridging of pivalate. The vertices of the body positions of the butterfly are occupied by transition metal ions in all four complexes. Magnetic analyses indicate that the complexes exhibit typical single-molecule magnet behaviour with anisotropy barriers of 33.7 cm(-1), 60.3 cm(-1), 39.6 cm(-1), and 18.4 cm(-1) for 1-4, respectively. Ab initio calculations were performed on these complexes, and the low lying electronic structure of each Ln(III) (Ln = Dy, Tb) ion and the magnetic interactions were determined. It was found that the two Ln ions may have much more contribution to the total relaxation barrier through the stronger 3d-4f exchange couplings compared to weak Ln-Ln interactions.

  20. Sub-molecular modulation of a 4f driven Kondo resonance by surface-induced asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Ben; El Hallak, Fadi; Atodiresei, Nicolae; Seibt, Philipp; Prüser, Henning; Caciuc, Vasile; Waters, Michael; Fisher, Andrew J.; Blügel, Stefan; van Slageren, Joris; Hirjibehedin, Cyrus F.

    2016-01-01

    Coupling between a magnetic impurity and an external bath can give rise to many-body quantum phenomena, including Kondo and Hund's impurity states in metals, and Yu-Shiba-Rusinov states in superconductors. While advances have been made in probing the magnetic properties of d-shell impurities on surfaces, the confinement of f orbitals makes them difficult to access directly. Here we show that a 4f driven Kondo resonance can be modulated spatially by asymmetric coupling between a metallic surface and a molecule containing a 4f-like moment. Strong hybridization of dysprosium double-decker phthalocyanine with Cu(001) induces Kondo screening of the central magnetic moment. Misalignment between the symmetry axes of the molecule and the surface induces asymmetry in the molecule's electronic structure, spatially mediating electronic access to the magnetic moment through the Kondo resonance. This work demonstrates the important role that molecular ligands have in mediating electronic and magnetic coupling and in accessing many-body quantum states. PMID:27666413

  1. Investigations on Pva:. NH4F: ZrO2 Composite Polymer Electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radha, K. P.; Selvasekarapandian, S.; Karthikeyan, S.; Sanjeeviraja, C.

    2013-07-01

    Composite polymer electrolytes have been prepared using Poly (vinyl alcohol), ammonium fluoride, nanofiller ZrO2 by solution casting technique. The amorphous nature of the composite polymer electrolyte has been confirmed by XRD analysis. FTIR analysis confirms the complex formation among the polymer, salt and nanofiller. The maximum ionic conductivity for 85 PVA:15 NH4F has been found to be 6.9 × 10-6 Scm-1 at ambient temperature. In the present work, the addition of 2 mol% nanofilller ZrO2 to the electrolyte 85PVA:15NH4F enhances the conductivity to 3.4 × 10-5 Scm-1. The temperature dependence of the conductivity of composite polymer electrolytes obeys Arrhenius relation. In the modulus spectra, there is a long tail at low frequencies which is an evidence for large capacitance associated with the electrodes. In the high frequency region, ∈'(ω) value saturates and giving rise to the dielectric constant of the material.

  2. Monolacunary Keggin polyoxometalates connected to ten 4d or 4f metal atoms.

    PubMed

    Pang, Haijun; Gómez-García, Carlos J; Peng, Jun; Ma, Huiyuan; Zhang, Chunjing; Wu, Qingyin

    2013-12-21

    The rational self-assembly of mono-lacunary Keggin clusters with 4d and 4f metal salts via a conventional method has yielded two novel polyoxometalate-based 4d-4f heterometallic compounds containing lacunary Keggin anions connected to ten metal atoms: {[Ag{Ag2(H2O)4}{Ln(H2O)6}2H ⊂ {SiW11Ln(H2O)4O39}2]·nH2O (Ln = Ce and n = 7 for 1, Ln = Pr and n = 3 for 2). Their structures were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses and further characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectra, and thermogravimetric (TG) analyses. A structural feature in 1 and 2 is that each [SiW11O39](8-) cluster (SiW11) is connected to ten metals (five Ag(+) and five Ln(3+) cations), representing the highest number of connected metal atoms to any mono-lacunary Keggin anion to date. This large connectivity leads to a structure with a purely inorganic 3D framework with two kinds of channels along the [100] and [010] directions. The magnetic properties of both compounds show the expected magnetic moments (0.8 and 1.6 amu K mol(-1) per Ce(3+) and Pr(3+) ion, respectively) and confirm the presence of isolated Ce(3+) and Pr(3+) ions.

  3. Sub-molecular modulation of a 4f driven Kondo resonance by surface-induced asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Ben; El Hallak, Fadi; Atodiresei, Nicolae; Seibt, Philipp; Pruser, Henning; Caciuc, Vasile; Waters, Michael; Fisher, Andrew J.; Blugel, Stefan; van Slageren, Joris; Hirjibehedin, Cyrus F.

    Coupling between a magnetic impurity and an external bath can give rise to many-body quantum phenomena, including Kondo and Hund's Impurity states in metals, and Yu-Shiba-Rusinov states in superconductors. While advances have been made in probing the magnetic properties of d-shell impurities on surfaces, the confinement of f orbitals makes them much more difficult to access directly. Here we show that a 4f driven Kondo resonance can be modulated spatially by asymmetric coupling between a metallic surface and a molecule containing a 4f-like moment. Strong hybridisation of dysprosium double-decker phthalocyanine (DyPc2) with Cu(001) induces Kondo screening of the central magnetic moment. Misalignment between the symmetry axes of the molecule and the surface induces asymmetry in the molecule's electronic structure, spatially mediating electronic access to the magnetic moment through the Kondo resonance. This work demonstrates the important role that molecular ligands play in mediating electronic and magnetic coupling and in accessing many-body quantum states.

  4. Lattice dynamics and elastic properties of the 4f electron system: CeN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanchana, V.; Vaitheeswaran, G.; Zhang, Xinxin; Ma, Yanming; Svane, A.; Eriksson, O.

    2011-11-01

    The electronic structure, structural stability, and lattice dynamics of cerium mononitride are investigated using ab initio density-functional methods involving an effective potential derived from the generalized gradient approximation and without special treatment for the 4f states. The 4f states are hence allowed to hop from site to site, without an on-site Hubbard U, and contribute to the bonding, in a picture often referred to as itinerant. It is argued that this picture is appropriate for CeN at low temperatures, while the anomalous thermal expansion observed at elevated temperatures indicates entropy-driven localization of the Ce f electrons, similar to the behavior of elemental cerium. The elastic constants are predicted from the total energy variation of strained crystals and are found to be large, typical for nitrides. The phonon dispersions are calculated showing no soft modes, and the Grüneisen parameter behaves smoothly. The electronic structure is also calculated using the quasiparticle self-consistent GW approximation (where G denotes the Green's function and W denotes the screened interaction). The Fermi surface of CeN is dominated by large egg-shaped electron sheets centered on the X points, which stem from the p-f mixing around the X point. In contrast, assuming localized f electrons leads to a semimetallic picture with small band overlaps around X.

  5. Monolacunary Keggin polyoxometalates connected to ten 4d or 4f metal atoms.

    PubMed

    Pang, Haijun; Gómez-García, Carlos J; Peng, Jun; Ma, Huiyuan; Zhang, Chunjing; Wu, Qingyin

    2013-12-21

    The rational self-assembly of mono-lacunary Keggin clusters with 4d and 4f metal salts via a conventional method has yielded two novel polyoxometalate-based 4d-4f heterometallic compounds containing lacunary Keggin anions connected to ten metal atoms: {[Ag{Ag2(H2O)4}{Ln(H2O)6}2H ⊂ {SiW11Ln(H2O)4O39}2]·nH2O (Ln = Ce and n = 7 for 1, Ln = Pr and n = 3 for 2). Their structures were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses and further characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectra, and thermogravimetric (TG) analyses. A structural feature in 1 and 2 is that each [SiW11O39](8-) cluster (SiW11) is connected to ten metals (five Ag(+) and five Ln(3+) cations), representing the highest number of connected metal atoms to any mono-lacunary Keggin anion to date. This large connectivity leads to a structure with a purely inorganic 3D framework with two kinds of channels along the [100] and [010] directions. The magnetic properties of both compounds show the expected magnetic moments (0.8 and 1.6 amu K mol(-1) per Ce(3+) and Pr(3+) ion, respectively) and confirm the presence of isolated Ce(3+) and Pr(3+) ions. PMID:24067933

  6. The 4f-5d luminescence transitions in cerium-doped LuF3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerbous, L.; Krachni, O.

    Emission and excitation spectra of the Ce3+ ion in LuF3 single crystal were measured at 77 K. The broad bands observed in these spectra were attributed to the parity-allowed electric-dipole 4f ← 5d transitions within Ce3+ ion. No zero-phonon lines were observed, which is indicative of a strong electron-phonon coupling in this host. It is shown that Ce3+ 5d excited configuration splits into five crystal-field components in LuF3. The influence of the crystalline environment on the position of the lowest Ce3+ 5d level is investigated. The energy of the lowest level of the 4fN-15d excited configuration was predicted for all the trivalent rare earth ions embedded in LuF3. Positions of crystal field spitting levels of 4fN-15d configuration relative to the host electronic bands were discussed.

  7. A preliminary engineering design of intravascular dual-frequency transducers for contrast-enhanced acoustic angiography and molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianguo; Martin, K; Dayton, Paul A; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2014-05-01

    Current intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) probes are not optimized for contrast detection because of their design for high-frequency fundamental-mode imaging. However, data from transcutaneous contrast imaging suggests the possibility of utilizing contrast ultrasound for molecular imaging or vasa vasorum assessment to further elucidate atherosclerotic plaque deposition. This paper presents the design, fabrication, and characterization of a small-aperture (0.6 × 3 mm) IVUS probe optimized for high-frequency contrast imaging. The design utilizes a dual-frequency (6.5 MHz/30 MHz) transducer arrangement for exciting microbubbles at low frequencies (near their resonance) and detecting their broadband harmonics at high frequencies, minimizing detected tissue backscatter. The prototype probe is able to generate nonlinear microbubble response with more than 1.2 MPa of rarefractional pressure (mechanical index: 0.48) at 6.5 MHz, and is also able to detect microbubble response with a broadband receiving element (center frequency: 30 MHz, -6-dB fractional bandwidth: 58.6%). Nonlinear super-harmonics from microbubbles flowing through a 200-μm-diameter micro-tube were clearly detected with a signal-to-noise ratio higher than 12 dB. Preliminary phantom imaging at the fundamental frequency (30 MHz) and dual-frequency super-harmonic imaging results suggest the promise of small aperture, dual-frequency IVUS transducers for contrast-enhanced IVUS imaging. PMID:24801226

  8. A Preliminary Engineering Design of Intravascular Dual-Frequency Transducers for Contrast-Enhanced Acoustic Angiography and Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jianguo; Martin, K. Heath; Dayton, Paul A.; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2014-01-01

    Current intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) probes are not optimized for contrast detection because of their design for high-frequency fundamental-mode imaging. However, data from transcutaneous contrast imaging suggests the possibility of utilizing contrast ultrasound for molecular imaging or vasa vasorum assessment to further elucidate atherosclerotic plaque deposition. This paper presents the design, fabrication, and characterization of a small-aperture (0.6 × 3 mm) IVUS probe optimized for high-frequency contrast imaging. The design utilizes a dual-frequency (6.5 MHz/30 MHz) transducer arrangement for exciting microbubbles at low frequencies (near their resonance) and detecting their broadband harmonics at high frequencies, minimizing detected tissue backscatter. The prototype probe is able to generate nonlinear microbubble response with more than 1.2 MPa of rarefractional pressure (mechanical index: 0.48) at 6.5 MHz, and is also able to detect microbubble response with a broadband receiving element (center frequency: 30 MHz, −6-dB fractional bandwidth: 58.6%). Nonlinear super-harmonics from microbubbles flowing through a 200-μm-diameter micro-tube were clearly detected with a signal-to-noise ratio higher than 12 dB. Preliminary phantom imaging at the fundamental frequency (30 MHz) and dual-frequency super-harmonic imaging results suggest the promise of small aperture, dual-frequency IVUS transducers for contrast-enhanced IVUS imaging. PMID:24801226

  9. Convergence of temporal and spectral information into acoustic images of complex sonar targets perceived by the echolocating bat, Eptesicus fuscus.

    PubMed

    Simmons, J A; Moss, C F; Ferragamo, M

    1990-02-01

    1. FM echolocating bats (Eptesicus fuscus) were trained to discriminate between a two-component complex target and a one-component simple target simulated by electronically-returned echoes in a series of experiments that explore the composition of the image of the two-component target. In Experiment I, echoes for each target were presented sequentially, and the bats had to compare a stored image of one target with that of the other. The bats made errors when the range of the simple target corresponded to the range of either glint in the complex target, indicating that some trace of the parts of one image interfered with perception of the other image. In Experiment II, echoes were presented simultaneously as well as sequentially, permitting direct masking of echoes from one target to the other. Changes in echo amplitude produced shifts in apparent range whose pattern depended upon the mode of echo presentation. 2. Eptesicus perceives images of complex sonar targets that explicitly represent the location and spacing of discrete glints located at different ranges. The bat perceives the target's structure in terms of its range profile along a psychological range axis using a combination of echo delay and echo spectral representations that together resemble a spectrogram of the FM echoes. The image itself is expressed entirely along a range scale that is defined with reference to echo delay. Spectral information contributes to the image by providing estimates of the range separation of glints, but it is transformed into these estimates. 3. Perceived absolute range is encoded by the timing of neural discharges and is vulnerable to shifts caused by neural amplitude-latency trading, which was estimated at 13 to 18 microseconds per dB from N1 and N4 auditory evoked potentials in Eptesicus. Spectral cues representing the separation of glints within the target are transformed into estimates of delay separations before being incorporated into the image. However, because they

  10. De novo facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy defined by DNA probe p13E-11 (D4F104S1).

    PubMed Central

    Jardine, P E; Koch, M C; Lunt, P W; Maynard, J; Bathke, K D; Harper, P S; Upadhyaya, M

    1994-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an autosomal dominant condition with variable age of onset and severity. Identification of a de novo DNA fragment by probe p13E-11 (D4F104S1) established the diagnosis of new mutation FSHD in 27 of 31 sporadic cases. The clinical data for these certain new mutation cases were as follows: 13 boys, 14 girls; mean age of onset 6.8 years; significant leg weakness in 19/27 (70%) (8/27 (30%) used wheelchairs at a mean age of 17.7 years); high tone sensorineural deafness in 10/27; visual acuity and direct ophthalmoscopy were normal. Congenital facial diplegia and sensorineural deafness in three children suggest that infantile FSHD is not a genetically separate disorder from FSHD. Ascertainment bias may explain the difference in severity between this group and typical familial cases. Molecular analysis for FSHD should be considered in children with either congenital or early onset facial weakness or diplegia. Images PMID:7979495

  11. Acoustic biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Ronen; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  12. Acoustic biosensors.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  13. Time reversed acoustics techniques for elastic imaging in reverberant and nonreverberant media: An experimental study of the chaotic cavity transducer concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Damme, Bart; Van Den Abeele, Koen; Li, YiFeng; Matar, Olivier Bou

    2011-05-01

    In view of emerging imaging technologies based on the combination of Time Reversed Acoustics (TRA) with Nonlinear Elastic Wave Spectroscopy (NEWS) for the detection and localization of micro-damage in solids, we have investigated the benefits of chirped source signal excitation, inverse filtering techniques, and the implementation of chaotic cavity transducers to improve the quality of energy focusing, especially for weakly reverberant media. Chaotic cavity transducer focusing is defined as the hardware-software combination of a piezoelectric ceramic glued on a cavity of chaotic shape on the one hand with the reciprocal Time Reversal (or Inverse Filter) technique on the other hand. Experimental data for reverberant and nonreverberant composite plates show that the use of chirps, inverse filtering and chaotic cavity transducers significantly enhances the focusing process, and enables focusing in a nonreverberant medium using only one transducer. As a potential exploitation, the application of the chaotic cavity transducer concept for synthetic imaging is examined, revealing several properties similar to phased arrays.

  14. Small-Scale Trial for Evaluating Directional Resolution of Single Spherical Biconcave Acoustic Lens in Designing of Ambient Noise Imaging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Kazuyoshi; Ogasawara, Hanako; Nakamura, Toshiaki

    2008-05-01

    Ambient noise imaging (ANI) is the revolutionary idea of detecting objects by using natural ocean background noise. From the analysis results obtained by the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method in our previous studies, it was supposed that a spherical biconcave lens with an aperture diameter of 2.0 m has a sufficient directional resolution (for example, the beam width is 1° at 60 kHz) for realizing an ANI system. In this study, to confirm the analysis results, we performed a small-scale trial of one-fifth space in a water tank. The lens, made of acrylic resin, has an aperture diameter of 400 mm and a radius of curvature of 500 mm. A burst pulse of 25 cycles at 300 kHz, whose frequency increases 5 times, was radiated from the sound source. The sound pressure after passage through the acoustic lens was measured by moving the receiver around the image point. Results show that the shapes of -3 dB areas are similar to the FDTD analysis results at small incidence angles. It was verified that this lens has a sufficient directional resolution for use in the ANI system, because -3 dB areas do not overlap each other.

  15. Ascorbic acid decomposition into oxalate ions: a simple synthetic route towards oxalato-bridged heterometallic 3d-4f clusters.

    PubMed

    Dinca, Alina S; Shova, Sergiu; Ion, Adrian E; Maxim, Catalin; Lloret, Francesc; Julve, Miguel; Andruh, Marius

    2015-04-28

    Two types of oxalato-bridged heterometallic 3d-4f dodeca- and hexanuclear compounds have been obtained by connecting six bi- and, respectively, trinuclear moieties through oxalato bridges arising from the slow decomposition of the L-ascorbic acid.

  16. High-resolution imaging of gigahertz polarization response arising from the interference of reflected surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Yahyaie, I; Buchanan, D A; Bridges, G E; Thomson, D J; Oliver, D R

    2012-06-01

    The surface polarization caused by traveling SAWs at 1.585 GHz has been imaged using a dynamic homodyne electrostatic force microscope technique. Instead of measuring topographic changes caused by the SAW, the reported technique measures polarization in the piezoelectric substrate arising from mechanical stress caused by the SAW. The polarization associated with this stress field modulates the scanning probe cantilever deflection amplitude, which is extracted using a lock-in-based technique. High-resolution imaging is presented with images of the interference arising from a metal reflector on a SAW device. A mathematical model combining SAW generation and force interactions between the probe and the substrate was used to verify the experimental data. In addition to overcoming the challenge associated with detecting and imaging polarization effects at gigahertz frequencies, this imaging technique will greatly assist the development of SAW-based devices that exploit the reflection and interference of SAWs in areas as diverse as microfluidic mixing, cell sorting, and quantum entanglement. PMID:22718871

  17. Virtual touch tissue imaging on acoustic radiation force impulse elastography: a new technique for differential diagnosis between benign and malignant thyroid nodules.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Feng; He, Yong; Xu, Hui-Xiong; Xu, Xiao-Hong; Liu, Chang; Guo, Le-Hang; Liu, Lin-Na; Xu, Jun-Mei

    2014-04-01

    Objectives- Acoustic radiation force impulse elastography is a newly developed ultrasound elasticity imaging technique that included both Virtual Touch tissue quantification and Virtual Touch tissue imaging (VTI; Siemens Medical Solutions, Mountain View, CA). This study aimed to evaluate the usefulness of VTI in differentiating malignant from benign thyroid nodules. Methods- This study included 192 consecutive patients with thyroid nodules (n = 219) who underwent surgery for compressive symptoms or suspicion of malignancy. Tissue stiffness on VTI elastography was scored from 1 (soft) to 6 (hard). The VTI scores between malignant and benign thyroid nodules were compared. The intraobserver and interobserver agreement for VTI elastography was also assessed. Results- On VTI elastography: score 1 was found in 84 nodules (all benign); score 2 in 37 nodules (3 papillary carcinomas and 34 benign nodules); score 3 in 25 nodules (1 medullary carcinoma, 6 papillary carcinomas, and 18 benign nodules); score 4 in 53 nodules (50 papillary carcinomas and 3 benign nodules); score 5 in 17 nodules (14 papillary carcinomas and 3 benign nodules); and score 6 in 3 nodules (all papillary carcinomas). A VTI elasticity score of 4 or greater was highly predictive of malignancy (P< .01), and the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy were 87.0% (67 of 77), 95.8% (136 of 142), 91.8% (67 of 73), 93.1% (136 of 146), and 92.7% (203 of 219), respectively. The κ values were 0.69 for intraobserver agreement and 0.85 for interobserver agreement. Conclusions- Virtual Touch tissue elasticity imaging has great potential as an adjunctive tool combined with conventional sonography for differential diagnosis between benign and malignant thyroid nodules.

  18. Impulse attack-free four random phase mask encryption based on a 4-f optical system.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pramod; Joseph, Joby; Singh, Kehar

    2009-04-20

    Optical encryption methods based on double random phase encryption (DRPE) have been shown to be vulnerable to different types of attacks. The Fourier plane random phase mask (RPM), which is the most important key, can be cracked with a single impulse function attack. Such an attack is viable because the Fourier transform of a delta function is a unity function. Formation of a unity function can be avoided if RPMs are placed in front of both lenses in a 4-f optical setup, thereby protecting the DRPE from an impulse attack. We have performed numerical simulations to verify the proposed scheme. Resistance of this scheme is checked against the brute force and the impulse function attacks. The experimental results validate the feasibility of the scheme.

  19. Optical Evidence of Itinerant-Localized Crossover of 4f Electrons in Cerium Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Shin-ichi; Kwon, Yong Seung; Matsumoto, Yuji; Aoki, Haruyoshi; Sakai, Osamu

    2016-08-01

    Cerium (Ce)-based heavy-fermion materials have a characteristic double-peak structure (mid-IR peak) in the optical conductivity [σ(ω)] spectra originating from the strong conduction (c)-f electron hybridization. To clarify the behavior of the mid-IR peak at a low c-f hybridization strength, we compared the σ(ω) spectra of the isostructural antiferromagnetic and heavy-fermion Ce compounds with the calculated unoccupied density of states and the spectra obtained from the impurity Anderson model. With decreasing c-f hybridization intensity, the mid-IR peak shifts to the low-energy side owing to the renormalization of the unoccupied 4f state, but suddenly shifts to the high-energy side owing to the f-f on-site Coulomb interaction at a slight localized side from the quantum critical point (QCP). This finding gives us information on the change in the electronic structure across QCP.

  20. Magnetism and superconductivity driven by identical 4f states in a heavy-fermion metal

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Joe E; Nair, S; Stockert, O; Witte, U; Nicklas, M; Schedler, R; Bianchi, A; Fisk, Z; Wirth, S; Steglich, K

    2009-01-01

    The apparently inimical relationship between magnetism and superconductivity has come under increasing scrutiny in a wide range of material classes, where the free energy landscape conspires to bring them in close proximity to each other. Particularly enigmatic is the case when these phases microscopically interpenetrate, though the manner in which this can be accomplished remains to be fully comprehended. Here, we present combined measurements of elastic neutron scattering, magnetotransport, and heat capacity on a prototypical heavy fermion system, in which antiferromagnetism and superconductivity are observed. Monitoring the response of these states to the presence of the other, as well as to external thermal and magnetic perturbations, points to the possibility that they emerge from different parts of the Fermi surface. Therefore, a single 4f state could be both localized and itinerant, thus accounting for the coexistence of magnetism and superconductivity.

  1. 4f metals (compounds) under High Pressure (and Temperature): f-electron Correlation Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipp, Magnus; Jenei, Zsolt; Cynn, Hyunchae; Evans, William; Physics Division Team

    The physics of 4f-electron correlation governs the behavior of the most interesting group in the periodic table, the rare-earth elements. Arguably the most celebrated example is cerium with its iso-structural (fcc) volume collapse (VC) from the γ- to the α-phase ending in a critical point. Close to the VC cerium is even auxetic since its Poisson's ratio becomes negative. Radiography tells us that both phases continue on into the melt, possibly separated by a first order transition. The presence of the f-electron can be interrogated via X-ray emission spectroscopy of the satellite intensity of the L γ radiation. Across the VC it experiences a step-like drop which could be interpreted as a discontinuous decrease of the 4f-moment or occupancy. The theoretical models (Hubbard-Mott or Kondo) explain these phenomena with the behavior of the f-electrons themselves or their spin but the contribution of the lattice-phonons also plays an important part. However, its share in the entropy change across the VC decreases with temperature. This work was performed under the auspices of the US DOE by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. The X-ray studies were performed at HPCAT (Sector 16), APS/ANL. HPCAT is supported by CIW, CDAC, UNLV and LLNL through funding from DOE-NNSA, DOE-BES and NSF. APS is supported by DOE-BES, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  2. Surface and bulk 4f-photoemission spectra of CeIn{sub 3} and CeSn{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H.; Tjernberg, O.; Chiaia, G.; Kumigashira, H.; Takahashi, T.; Duo, L.; Sakai, O.; Kasaya, M.; Lindau, I.

    1997-07-01

    Resonant photoemission spectroscopy was performed on CeIn{sub 3} and CeSn{sub 3} at the 4d-4f and 3d-4f core thresholds. Using the different surface sensitivity between the two photon energies, surface and bulk 4f-photoemission spectra were derived for both compounds. With the noncrossing approximation of the Anderson impurity model, the 4d-4f resonant spectra together with the surface and bulk spectra were self-consistently analyzed to obtain the microscopic parameters such as the 4f-electron energy and the hybridization strength with conduction electrons. The result shows a substantial difference in these parameters between the surface and the bulk, indicating that it is important to take into account the surface effect in analyzing photoemission spectra of Ce compounds. It is also found that the 4f surface core-level shift is different between CeIn{sub 3} and CeSn{sub 3}. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. Acoustic Inversion in Optoacoustic Tomography: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Amir; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Razansky, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Optoacoustic tomography enables volumetric imaging with optical contrast in biological tissue at depths beyond the optical mean free path by the use of optical excitation and acoustic detection. The hybrid nature of optoacoustic tomography gives rise to two distinct inverse problems: The optical inverse problem, related to the propagation of the excitation light in tissue, and the acoustic inverse problem, which deals with the propagation and detection of the generated acoustic waves. Since the two inverse problems have different physical underpinnings and are governed by different types of equations, they are often treated independently as unrelated problems. From an imaging standpoint, the acoustic inverse problem relates to forming an image from the measured acoustic data, whereas the optical inverse problem relates to quantifying the formed image. This review focuses on the acoustic aspects of optoacoustic tomography, specifically acoustic reconstruction algorithms and imaging-system practicalities. As these two aspects are intimately linked, and no silver bullet exists in the path towards high-performance imaging, we adopt a holistic approach in our review and discuss the many links between the two aspects. Four classes of reconstruction algorithms are reviewed: time-domain (so called back-projection) formulae, frequency-domain formulae, time-reversal algorithms, and model-based algorithms. These algorithms are discussed in the context of the various acoustic detectors and detection surfaces which are commonly used in experimental studies. We further discuss the effects of non-ideal imaging scenarios on the quality of reconstruction and review methods that can mitigate these effects. Namely, we consider the cases of finite detector aperture, limited-view tomography, spatial under-sampling of the acoustic signals, and acoustic heterogeneities and losses. PMID:24772060

  4. Controlling sound with acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummer, Steven A.; Christensen, Johan; Alù, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    Acoustic metamaterials can manipulate and control sound waves in ways that are not possible in conventional materials. Metamaterials with zero, or even negative, refractive index for sound offer new possibilities for acoustic imaging and for the control of sound at subwavelength scales. The combination of transformation acoustics theory and highly anisotropic acoustic metamaterials enables precise control over the deformation of sound fields, which can be used, for example, to hide or cloak objects from incident acoustic energy. Active acoustic metamaterials use external control to create effective material properties that are not possible with passive structures and have led to the development of dynamically reconfigurable, loss-compensating and parity-time-symmetric materials for sound manipulation. Challenges remain, including the development of efficient techniques for fabricating large-scale metamaterial structures and converting laboratory experiments into useful devices. In this Review, we outline the designs and properties of materials with unusual acoustic parameters (for example, negative refractive index), discuss examples of extreme manipulation of sound and, finally, provide an overview of future directions in the field.

  5. Acoustic Images of Submarine landslide in western Sagami Bay obtained by deep sea AUV “URASHIMA” in Sagami bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasaya, Takafumi; Tsukioka, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Fujio; Hyakudome, Tadahiro; Sawa, Takao; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Ishibashi, Shojiro; Tahara, Junichiro; Kinoshita, Masataka; Aoki, Taro

    To collect bathymetric data and bottom material information, multi narrow beam echo sounder and/or side scan sonar are usually used over wide area. The autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) has the advantage of getting closer to the sea surface as compared with a survey from the vessel. URASHIMA is a 3000 m class AUV, is loaded with multi narrow beam depth sounder, side scan sonar and sub-bottom profiler. Using URASHIMA, side scan sonar images and sub-bottom profiles were collected around off Hatsushima Island where mud flow was generated with some large earthquakes occurrence. We could obtain many enough quality side scan sonar images and sub-bottom profiles. Mosaic image was constructed by obtained side scan sonar images, and shows distinctive surface structure. Some irregular patches are detected around the mudflow area 7km off Hatsushima Island. This structure do not relate to the bathymetry obtained by SeaBat8160 on R/V Natsushima. Therefore, these are interpreted as debris generated with earthquakes. Sub-bottom profiles could detect very clear sedimentary structure.

  6. Imaging sciences workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V.

    1994-11-15

    This workshop on the Imaging Sciences sponsored by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory contains short abstracts/articles submitted by speakers. The topic areas covered include the following: Astronomical Imaging; biomedical imaging; vision/image display; imaging hardware; imaging software; Acoustic/oceanic imaging; microwave/acoustic imaging; computed tomography; physical imaging; imaging algorithms. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  7. Acoustic Characterization of Mesoscale Objects

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, D; Huber, R; Chambers, D; Cole, G; Balogun, O; Spicer, J; Murray, T

    2007-03-13

    This report describes the science and engineering performed to provide state-of-the-art acoustic capabilities for nondestructively characterizing mesoscale (millimeter-sized) objects--allowing micrometer resolution over the objects entire volume. Materials and structures used in mesoscale objects necessitate the use of (1) GHz acoustic frequencies and (2) non-contacting laser generation and detection of acoustic waves. This effort demonstrated that acoustic methods at gigahertz frequencies have the necessary penetration depth and spatial resolution to effectively detect density discontinuities, gaps, and delaminations. A prototype laser-based ultrasonic system was designed and built. The system uses a micro-chip laser for excitation of broadband ultrasonic waves with frequency components reaching 1.0 GHz, and a path-stabilized Michelson interferometer for detection. The proof-of-concept for mesoscale characterization is demonstrated by imaging a micro-fabricated etched pattern in a 70 {micro}m thick silicon wafer.

  8. Data analysis results of the second sea trial of ambient noise imaging with acoustic lens in 2014: Two-dimensional target images affected by direction of field of view and spatial noise distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Kazuyoshi; Ogasawara, Hanako; Tsuchiya, Takenobu; Endoh, Nobuyuki

    2016-07-01

    An aspherical lens with an aperture diameter of 1.0 m has been designed and fabricated to develop a prototype system for ambient noise imaging (ANI). A sea trial of silent target detection using the prototype ANI system was conducted under only natural ocean ambient noise at Uchiura Bay in November 2010. It was verified that targets are successfully detected under natural ocean ambient noise, mainly generated by snapping shrimps. Recently, we have built a second prototype ANI system using an acoustic lens with a two-dimensional (2D) receiver array with 127 elements corresponding to a field of view (FOV) spanning 15° horizontally by 9° vertically. In this study, we investigated the effects of the direction of the FOV and the spatial noise distribution on the 2D target image obtained by ANI. Here, the noise sources in front of the target are called “front light”, and those at the rear of the target are called “back light”. The second sea trial was conducted to image targets arranged in the FOV and measure the positions of noise sources at Uchiura Bay in November 10–14, 2014. For front light, the pixel values in the on-target directions were greater than those in other directions owing to the dominant target scatterings. Reversely, for back light, the pixel values in the on-target directions were lower than those in other directions owing to the dominant direct noises such as “silhouette”.

  9. Data analysis results of the second sea trial of ambient noise imaging with acoustic lens in 2014: Two-dimensional target images affected by direction of field of view and spatial noise distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Kazuyoshi; Ogasawara, Hanako; Tsuchiya, Takenobu; Endoh, Nobuyuki

    2016-07-01

    An aspherical lens with an aperture diameter of 1.0 m has been designed and fabricated to develop a prototype system for ambient noise imaging (ANI). A sea trial of silent target detection using the prototype ANI system was conducted under only natural ocean ambient noise at Uchiura Bay in November 2010. It was verified that targets are successfully detected under natural ocean ambient noise, mainly generated by snapping shrimps. Recently, we have built a second prototype ANI system using an acoustic lens with a two-dimensional (2D) receiver array with 127 elements corresponding to a field of view (FOV) spanning 15° horizontally by 9° vertically. In this study, we investigated the effects of the direction of the FOV and the spatial noise distribution on the 2D target image obtained by ANI. Here, the noise sources in front of the target are called “front light”, and those at the rear of the target are called “back light”. The second sea trial was conducted to image targets arranged in the FOV and measure the positions of noise sources at Uchiura Bay in November 10-14, 2014. For front light, the pixel values in the on-target directions were greater than those in other directions owing to the dominant target scatterings. Reversely, for back light, the pixel values in the on-target directions were lower than those in other directions owing to the dominant direct noises such as “silhouette”.

  10. Holograms for acoustics.

    PubMed

    Melde, Kai; Mark, Andrew G; Qiu, Tian; Fischer, Peer

    2016-01-01

    Holographic techniques are fundamental to applications such as volumetric displays, high-density data storage and optical tweezers that require spatial control of intricate optical or acoustic fields within a three-dimensional volume. The basis of holography is spatial storage of the phase and/or amplitude profile of the desired wavefront in a manner that allows that wavefront to be reconstructed by interference when the hologram is illuminated with a suitable coherent source. Modern computer-generated holography skips the process of recording a hologram from a physical scene, and instead calculates the required phase profile before rendering it for reconstruction. In ultrasound applications, the phase profile is typically generated by discrete and independently driven ultrasound sources; however, these can only be used in small numbers, which limits the complexity or degrees of freedom that can be attained in the wavefront. Here we introduce monolithic acoustic holograms, which can reconstruct diffraction-limited acoustic pressure fields and thus arbitrary ultrasound beams. We use rapid fabrication to craft the holograms and achieve reconstruction degrees of freedom two orders of magnitude higher than commercial phased array sources. The technique is inexpensive, appropriate for both transmission and reflection elements, and scales well to higher information content, larger aperture size and higher power. The complex three-dimensional pressure and phase distributions produced by these acoustic holograms allow us to demonstrate new approaches to controlled ultrasonic manipulation of solids in water, and of liquids and solids in air. We expect that acoustic holograms will enable new capabilities in beam-steering and the contactless transfer of power, improve medical imaging, and drive new applications of ultrasound. PMID:27652563

  11. Holograms for acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melde, Kai; Mark, Andrew G.; Qiu, Tian; Fischer, Peer

    2016-09-01

    Holographic techniques are fundamental to applications such as volumetric displays, high-density data storage and optical tweezers that require spatial control of intricate optical or acoustic fields within a three-dimensional volume. The basis of holography is spatial storage of the phase and/or amplitude profile of the desired wavefront in a manner that allows that wavefront to be reconstructed by interference when the hologram is illuminated with a suitable coherent source. Modern computer-generated holography skips the process of recording a hologram from a physical scene, and instead calculates the required phase profile before rendering it for reconstruction. In ultrasound applications, the phase profile is typically generated by discrete and independently driven ultrasound sources; however, these can only be used in small numbers, which limits the complexity or degrees of freedom that can be attained in the wavefront. Here we introduce monolithic acoustic holograms, which can reconstruct diffraction-limited acoustic pressure fields and thus arbitrary ultrasound beams. We use rapid fabrication to craft the holograms and achieve reconstruction degrees of freedom two orders of magnitude higher than commercial phased array sources. The technique is inexpensive, appropriate for both transmission and reflection elements, and scales well to higher information content, larger aperture size and higher power. The complex three-dimensional pressure and phase distributions produced by these acoustic holograms allow us to demonstrate new approaches to controlled ultrasonic manipulation of solids in water, and of liquids and solids in air. We expect that acoustic holograms will enable new capabilities in beam-steering and the contactless transfer of power, improve medical imaging, and drive new applications of ultrasound.

  12. Visualization of Protease Activity In Vivo Using an Activatable Photo-Acoustic Imaging Probe Based on CuS Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kai; Zhu, Lei; Nie, Liming; Sun, Xiaolian; Cheng, Liang; Wu, Chenxi; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Zhuang

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we for the first time report a novel activatable photoacoustic (PA) imaging nano-probe for in vivo detection of cancer-related matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). A black hole quencher 3 (BHQ3) which absorbs red light is conjugated to near-infrared (NIR)-absorbing copper sulfide (CuS) nanoparticles via a MMP-cleavable peptide linker. The obtained CuS-peptide-BHQ3 (CPQ) nano-probe exhibits two distinctive absorption peaks at 630 nm and 930 nm. Inside the tumor microenviorment where MMPs present, the MMP-sensitive peptide would be cleaved, releasing BHQ3 from the CuS nanoparticles, the former of which as a small molecule is then rapidly cleared out from the tumor, whereas the latter of which as large nanoparticles would retain inside the tumor for a much longer period of time. As the result, the PA signal at 680 nm which is contributed by BHQ3 would be quickly diminished while that at 930 nm would be largely retained. The PA signal ratio of 680 nm / 930 nm could thus serve as an in vivo indicator of MMPs activity inside the tumor. Our work presents a novel strategy of in vivo sensing of MMPs based on PA imaging, which should offer remarkably improved detection depth compared with traditional optical imaging techniques. PMID:24465271

  13. Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging with virtual touch tissue quantification: measurements of normal breast tissue and dependence on the degree of pre-compression.

    PubMed

    Wojcinski, Sebastian; Brandhorst, Kathrin; Sadigh, Gelareh; Hillemanns, Peter; Degenhardt, Friedrich

    2013-12-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging (ARFI) with Virtual Touch tissue quantification (VTTQ) enables the determination of shear wave velocity in meters per second (m/s). We investigated shear wave velocity in normal breast tissue and analyzed the influence of the degree of pre-compression on the measurements. In repeated measurements and with normal pre-compression, the mean shear wave velocity in breast parenchyma was significantly higher than that in breast adipose tissue (3.33 ± 1.18 m/s vs. 2.90 ± 1.10 m/s; p < 0.001; 712 measurements in 89 patients). Furthermore, we found a significant positive correlation between degree of pre-compression and velocity measurements. Shear wave velocities with low, moderate and high pre-compression were 1.89, 3.18 and 4.39 m/s in parenchyma, compared with 1.46, 2.55 and 3.64 m/s in adipose tissue, respectively (p < 0.001; 360 measurements in 60 patients). VTTQ of breast tissue is a feasible method with high accuracy; however, the degree of pre-compression applied may significantly influence the measurements.

  14. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Chou, C.H.

    1990-03-20

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system is described in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens. 9 figs.

  15. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Chou, Ching H.

    1990-01-01

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens.

  16. Comparative 4f-4f absorption spectral study for the interactions of Nd(III) with some amino acids: Preliminary thermodynamics and kinetic studies of interaction of Nd(III):glycine with Ca(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moaienla, T.; Bendangsenla, N.; David Singh, Th.; Sumitra, Ch.; Rajmuhon Singh, N.; Indira Devi, M.

    2012-02-01

    Spectral analysis of Nd(III) complexes with some amino acids viz.; glycine, L-alanine, L-phenylalanine and L-aspartic acid in the presence and absence of Ca 2+ was carried out in some organic solvents; CH 3OH, CH 3CN, DMF and dioxane using comparative absorption spectra of 4f-4f transitions. The study was carried out by evaluating various energy interaction parameters like Slator-Condon ( Fk), Lande factor ( ξ4f), nephelauxetic ratio ( β), bonding parameter ( b1/2), percent-covalency ( δ) by applying partial and multiple regression analysis. The values of oscillator strength ( Pobs) and Judd-Ofelt electric dipole intensity parameter Tλ ( λ = 2, 4, 6) for different 4f-4f transitions have been calculated. On analysis of the variation of the various energy interaction parameters as well as the changes in the oscillator strength ( Pobs) and Tλ values, reveal the mode of binding with the different ligands. Kinetic studies for the complexation of Nd(III):glycine:Ca(II) have also been discussed at different temperatures in DMF medium and from it the values of activation energy ( Ea) and thermodynamic parameters like Δ H°, Δ S° and Δ G° for the complexation are evaluated.

  17. Use of the 4F Roesch Inferior Mesenteric Catheter in Embolization Procedures in the Pelvis: A Review of 300 Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Kroencke, Thomas J. Kluner, Claudia; Hamm, Bernd; Gauruder-Burmester, Annett

    2007-04-15

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the use of a 4F Roesch inferior mesenteric (RIM) catheter for pelvic embolization procedures. Between October 2000 and January 2006, 364 patients (357 female, 7 male; age: 23-67 years) underwent embolization of various pathologies [uterine fibroids (n = 324), pure adenomyosis of the uterus (n = 19), postpartum hemorrhage (n =1), traumatic or postoperative hemorrhage (n = 9), bleeding related to cervical cancer (n =7), AV malformation of the uterus (n = 2) and high-flow priapism (n = 2)] at a single institution. In all cases, bilateral catheterization was primarily attempted with the use of a 4F hook-shaped braided endhole catheter (Roesch-Inferior-Mesenteric, RIM-Catheter, Cordis, Miami, FL). Frequency of initial failure to catheterize the vascular territory of interest and carry out the embolization were recorded and the types of difficulty encountered were noted. Catherization of the main stem of the vessel territory of interest with the use of a unilateral femoral approach and the 4F RIM catherer was successful in 334/364 (91.8%) the embolization cases. Bilateral catheterization of the internal iliac arteries using a single common femoral artery access and the 4F RIM catheter was achieved in 322/364 (88.5%) patients. In 12/364 (3.3%) patients, a contralateral puncture was performed and the same 4F catheter was used. In 28/364 (7.7%) cases the 4F RIM catheter was exchanged for a catheter with a cobra-shaped or sidewinder configuration. The 4F RIM catheter is a simple and valuable alternative to catheters and techniques commonly employed for pelvic artery embolization.

  18. Altered leukotriene B4 metabolism in CYP4F18-deficient mice does not impact inflammation following renal ischemia.

    PubMed

    Winslow, Valeria; Vaivoda, Rachel; Vasilyev, Aleksandr; Dombkowski, David; Douaidy, Karim; Stark, Christopher; Drake, Justin; Guilliams, Evin; Choudhary, Dharamainder; Preffer, Frederic; Stoilov, Ivaylo; Christmas, Peter

    2014-06-01

    Inflammatory responses to infection and injury must be restrained and negatively regulated to minimize damage to host tissue. One proposed mechanism involves enzymatic inactivation of the pro-inflammatory mediator leukotriene B4, but it is difficult to dissect the roles of various metabolic enzymes and pathways. A primary candidate for a regulatory pathway is omega oxidation of leukotriene B4 in neutrophils, presumptively by CYP4F3A in humans and CYP4F18 in mice. This pathway generates ω, ω-1, and ω-2 hydroxylated products of leukotriene B4, depending on species. We created mouse models targeting exons 8 and 9 of the Cyp4f18 allele that allows both conventional and conditional knockouts of Cyp4f18. Neutrophils from wild-type mice convert leukotriene B4 to 19-hydroxy leukotriene B4, and to a lesser extent 18-hydroxy leukotriene B4, whereas these products were not detected in neutrophils from conventional Cyp4f18 knockouts. A mouse model of renal ischemia-reperfusion injury was used to investigate the consequences of loss of CYP4F18 in vivo. There were no significant changes in infiltration of neutrophils and other leukocytes into kidney tissue as determined by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry, or renal injury as assessed by histological scoring and measurement of blood urea nitrogen. It is concluded that CYP4F18 is necessary for omega oxidation of leukotriene B4 in neutrophils, and is not compensated by other CYP enzymes, but loss of this metabolic pathway is not sufficient to impact inflammation and injury following renal ischemia-reperfusion in mice.

  19. A MoS2 coating strategy to improve the comprehensive electrochemical performance of LiVPO4F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhaomeng; Peng, Wenjie; Shih, Kaimin; Wang, Jiexi; Wang, Zhixing; Guo, Huajun; Yan, Guochun; Li, Xinhai; Song, Liubin

    2016-05-01

    To improve the electrochemical performance of LiVPO4F at room and elevated temperature focusing on the stability of LiVPO4F electrode/electrolyte interface, for the first time, MoS2 nanosheets are introduced to modify LiVPO4F/C composites. The coating of MoS2 layers on the surface of LiVPO4F/C nanoparticles is realized via a solution method followed by low-temperature calcination. Morphological observations present that the MoS2 sheets are homogeneously wrapped around the LiVPO4F/C particles. When employed as cathode materials for lithium ion batteries, the MoS2-modified LiVPO4F/C composites exhibit superior high-rate capability and greatly improved cycle ability compared to bare one, and the sample coated with 1.75 wt% MoS2 (2M-LVPF) delivers the best electrochemical performance. In particular, it maintains the capacity retention of 91.7% in 100 cycles at 2.0C and delivers a reversible specific capacity of 112 mAh g-1 at a high rate of 8.0C under room temperature. More importantly, it shows greatly improved cycling stability at elevated temperature (55 °C), maintaining 88.1% of its initial capacity at 0.5C after 50 cycles. The reasons for such improvement lie in the MoS2 coating layer acting as a physical barrier between electrode and electrolyte, as well as electronic/ionic conducting framework for LiVPO4F particles.

  20. Altered Leukotriene B4 metabolism in CYP4F18-deficient mice does not impact inflammation following renal ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Winslow, Valeria; Vaivoda, Rachel; Vasilyev, Aleksandr; Dombkowski, David; Douaidy, Karim; Stark, Christopher; Drake, Justin; Guilliams, Evin; Choudhary, Dharamainder; Preffer, Frederic; Stoilov, Ivaylo; Christmas, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory responses to infection and injury must be restrained and negatively regulated to minimize damage to host tissue. One proposed mechanism involves enzymatic inactivation of the pro-inflammatory mediator leukotriene B4, but it is difficult to dissect the roles of various metabolic enzymes and pathways. A primary candidate for a regulatory pathway is omega oxidation of leukotriene B4 in neutrophils, presumptively by CYP4F3A in humans and CYP4F18 in mice. This pathway generates ω, ω-1, and ω-2 hydroxylated products of leukotriene B4, depending on species. We created mouse models targeting exons 8 and 9 of the Cyp4f18 allele that allows both conventional and conditional knockout of Cyp4f18. Neutrophils from wild-type mice convert leukotriene B4 to 19-hydroxy leukotriene B4, and to a lesser extent 18-hydroxy leukotriene B4, whereas these products were not detected in neutrophils from conventional Cyp4f18 knockouts. A mouse model of renal ischemia-reperfusion injury was used to investigate the consequences of loss of CYP4F18 in vivo. There were no significant changes in infiltration of neutrophils and other leukocytes into kidney tissue as determined by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry, or renal injury as assessed by histological scoring and measurement of blood urea nitrogen. It is concluded that CYP4F18 is necessary for omega oxidation of leukotriene B4 in neutrophils, and is not compensated by other CYP enzymes, but loss of this metabolic pathway is not sufficient to impact inflammation and injury following renal ischemia-reperfusion in mice. PMID:24632148

  1. Quantitative measurement of acoustic pressure in the focal zone of acoustic lens-line focusing using the Schlieren method.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xueping; Cheng, Qian; Xu, Zheng; Qian, Menglu; Han, Qingbang

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes a theory and method for quantitative measurement of the acoustic lens-line focusing ultrasonic (ALLFU) field in its focal spot size and acoustic pressure using the Schlieren imaging technique. Using Fourier transformation, the relationship between the brightness of the Schlieren image and the acoustic pressure was introduced. The ALLFU field was simulated using finite element method and compared with the Schlieren acoustic field image. The measurement of the focal spot size was performed using the Schlieren method. The acoustic pressure in the focal zone of the ALLFU field and the transducer-transmitting voltage response were quantitatively determined by measuring the diffraction light fringe intensity. The results show that the brightness of the Schlieren image is a linear function of the acoustic intensity when the acousto-optic interaction length remains constant and the acoustic field is weak. PMID:27139646

  2. Implementation and Comparison of Acoustic Travel-Time Measurement Procedures for the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager Time-Distance Helioseismology Pipeline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Couvidat, S.; Zhao, J.; Birch, A. C.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Parchevsky, K.; Scherrer, P. H.

    2009-01-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) satellite is designed to produce high-resolution Doppler velocity maps of oscillations at the solar surface with high temporal cadence. To take advantage of these high-quality oscillation data, a time-distance helioseismology pipeline has been implemented at the Joint Science Operations Center (JSOC) at Stanford University. The aim of this pipeline is to generate maps of acoustic travel times from oscillations on the solar surface, and to infer subsurface 3D flow velocities and sound-speed perturbations. The wave travel times are measured from cross covariances of the observed solar oscillation signals. For implementation into the pipeline we have investigated three different travel-time definitions developed in time-distance helioseismology: a Gabor wavelet fitting (Kosovichev and Duvall, 1997), a minimization relative to a reference cross-covariance function (Gizon and Birch, 2002), and a linearized version of the minimization method (Gizon and Birch, 2004). Using Doppler velocity data from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) instrument on board SOHO, we tested and compared these definitions for the mean and difference travel-time perturbations measured from reciprocal signals. Although all three procedures return similar travel times in a quiet Sun region, the method of Gizon and Birch (2004) gives travel times that are significantly different from the others in a magnetic (active) region. Thus, for the pipeline implementation we chose the procedures of Kosovichev and Duvall (1997) and Gizon and Birch (2002). We investigated the relationships among these three travel-time definitions, their sensitivities to fitting parameters, and estimated the random errors they produce

  3. Implementation and Comparison of Acoustic Travel-Time Measurement Procedures for the Solar Dynamics Observatory-Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager Time-Distance Helioseismology Pipeline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Couvidat, S.; Zhao, J.; Birch, A. C.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Duvall, Thomas L., Jr.; Parchevsky, K.; Scherrer, P. H.

    2010-01-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) instrument onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) satellite is designed to produce high-resolution Doppler-velocity maps of oscillations at the solar surface with high temporal cadence. To take advantage of these high-quality oscillation data, a time - distance helioseismology pipeline (Zhao et al., Solar Phys. submitted, 2010) has been implemented at the Joint Science Operations Center (JSOC) at Stanford University. The aim of this pipeline is to generate maps of acoustic travel times from oscillations on the solar surface, and to infer subsurface 3D flow velocities and sound-speed perturbations. The wave travel times are measured from cross-covariances of the observed solar oscillation signals. For implementation into the pipeline we have investigated three different travel-time definitions developed in time - distance helioseismology: a Gabor-wavelet fitting (Kosovichev and Duvall, SCORE'96: Solar Convection and Oscillations and Their Relationship, ASSL, Dordrecht, 241, 1997), a minimization relative to a reference cross-covariance function (Gizon and Birch, Astrophys. J. 571, 966, 2002), and a linearized version of the minimization method (Gizon and Birch, Astrophys. J. 614, 472, 2004). Using Doppler-velocity data from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) instrument onboard SOHO, we tested and compared these definitions for the mean and difference traveltime perturbations measured from reciprocal signals. Although all three procedures return similar travel times in a quiet-Sun region, the method of Gizon and Birch (Astrophys. J. 614, 472, 2004) gives travel times that are significantly different from the others in a magnetic (active) region. Thus, for the pipeline implementation we chose the procedures of Kosovichev and Duvall (SCORE'96: Solar Convection and Oscillations and Their Relationship, ASSL, Dordrecht, 241, 1997) and Gizon and Birch (Astrophys. J. 571, 966, 2002). We investigated the relationships among

  4. Non-intrusive telemetry applications in the oilsands: from visible light and x-ray video to acoustic imaging and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, John M.

    2013-06-01

    While the production, transport and refining of oils from the oilsands of Alberta, and comparable resources elsewhere is performed at industrial scales, numerous technical and technological challenges and opportunities persist due to the ill defined nature of the resource. For example, bitumen and heavy oil comprise multiple bulk phases, self-organizing constituents at the microscale (liquid crystals) and the nano scale. There are no quantitative measures available at the molecular level. Non-intrusive telemetry is providing promising paths toward solutions, be they enabling technologies targeting process design, development or optimization, or more prosaic process control or process monitoring applications. Operation examples include automated large object and poor quality ore during mining, and monitoring the thickness and location of oil water interfacial zones within separation vessels. These applications involve real-time video image processing. X-ray transmission video imaging is used to enumerate organic phases present within a vessel, and to detect individual phase volumes, densities and elemental compositions. This is an enabling technology that provides phase equilibrium and phase composition data for production and refining process development, and fluid property myth debunking. A high-resolution two-dimensional acoustic mapping technique now at the proof of concept stage is expected to provide simultaneous fluid flow and fluid composition data within porous inorganic media. Again this is an enabling technology targeting visualization of diverse oil production process fundamentals at the pore scale. Far infrared spectroscopy coupled with detailed quantum mechanical calculations, may provide characteristic molecular motifs and intermolecular association data required for fluid characterization and process modeling. X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS/USAXS) provides characteristic supramolecular structure information that impacts fluid rheology and process

  5. Imaging feedback for histotripsy by characterizing dynamics of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI)-induced shear waves excited in a treated volume.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tzu-Yin; Hall, Timothy L; Xu, Zhen; Fowlkes, J Brian; Cain, Charles A

    2014-07-01

    Our previous study indicated that shear waves decay and propagate at a lower speed as they propagate into a tissue volume mechanically fractionated by histotripsy. In this paper, we hypothesize that the change in the shear dynamics is related to the degree of tissue fractionation, and can be used to predict histotripsy treatment outcomes. To test this hypothesis, lesions with different degrees of tissue fractionation were created in agar-graphite tissue phantoms and ex vivo kidneys with increasing numbers of therapy pulses, from 0 to 2000 pulses per treatment location. The therapy pulses were 3-cycle 750-kHz focused ultrasound delivered at a peak negative/positive pressure of 17/108 MPa and a repetition rate of 50 Hz. The shear waves were excited by acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) focused at the center of the lesion. The spatial and temporal behavior of the propagating shear waves was measured with ultrasound plane wave imaging. The temporal displacement profile at a lateral location 10 mm offset to the shear excitation region was detected with M-mode imaging. The decay and delay of the shear waves were quantitatively characterized on the temporal displacement profile. Results showed significant changes in two characteristics on the temporal displacement profile: the peak-to-peak displacement decayed exponentially with increasing numbers of therapy pulses; the relative time-to-peak displacement increased with increasing numbers of therapy pulses, and appeared to saturate at higher numbers of pulses. Correspondingly, the degree of tissues fractionation, as indicated by the percentage of structurally intact cell nuclei, decreased exponentially with increasing numbers of therapy pulses. Strong linear correlations were found between the two characteristics and the degree of tissue fractionation. These results suggest that the characteristics of the shear temporal displacement profile may provide useful feedback information regarding the treatment outcomes.

  6. Acoustic imaging of the passage of turbidity currents and associated hydraulic jumps on underlying cyclic step bedforms. Squamish, BC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes Clarke, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    Active channelized turbidity currents have been repeatedly imaged in 60m of water on the Squamish prodelta. Previously in 2011 and 2012, the prodelta has been repetitively surveyed on daily and hourly timescales and is thus known to exhibit trains of bedforms along the channel floors that resemble cyclic steps that migrate upslope intermittently. Beyond the channel mouths, clear turbidity current flows had previously been detected using a seabed mounted ADCP. In order to directly observe the passage of the flow in the channelized section of the prodelta, in June 2013 a vessel was moored using 4 anchors directly above one of the channels. The vessel operated two hull-mounted single beam sonars at 28 and 200 kHz and a multibeam sonar at 95 kHz, all imaging a near stationary point or swath within or across the channel. In addition a 1200 kHz ADCP was suspended 12m above the seabed and two 500 kHz imaging multibeams were suspended 10m above the channel floor. One of the suspended multibeams was oriented facing upslope examining a 150m range, 120 degree, plan view sector of the channel. The second suspended multibeam was oriented downward to derive a ~30m long along-track section over the length of one of the bedforms. A mechanically dipped CTD and optical backscatter probe was lower repeatedly directly into the active flows until it touched the seabed at about one minute periods. Over a period of 5 days, between 1 and 7 discrete flows per day were monitored passing by within one hour of low water. Their head velocities ranged from ~ 0.5 to 2.5m/s and their thicknesses were generally in the 3-5m range. Looking upstream in plan view, the lobate head of the approaching flows could be seen to be constricted to specific talwegs within the channel floor and rise up and over successive cyclic step bedforms. The higher velocity flows exhibit clear turbulent eddies on their upper surface. The duration of the high velocity component of the flow rarely lasted for more than a few

  7. Medical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Kirk W.; Dunmire, Barbrina

    Medical acoustics can be subdivided into diagnostics and therapy. Diagnostics are further separated into auditory and ultrasonic methods, and both employ low amplitudes. Therapy (excluding medical advice) uses ultrasound for heating, cooking, permeablizing, activating and fracturing tissues and structures within the body, usually at much higher amplitudes than in diagnostics. Because ultrasound is a wave, linear wave physics are generally applicable, but recently nonlinear effects have become more important, even in low-intensity diagnostic applications.

  8. Pressure-enhanced superconductivity in Eu3Bi2S4F4

    DOE PAGES

    Luo, Yongkang; Zhai, Hui -Fei; Zhang, Pan; Xu, Zhu -An; Cao, Guang -Han; Thompson, J. D.

    2014-12-17

    The pressure effect on the newly discovered charge-transferred BiS2-based superconductor, Eu3Bi2S4F4, with a Tc of 1.5 K at ambient pressure, is investigated by transport and magnetic measurements. Accompanied with the enhancement of metallicity under pressures, the onset superconducting transition temperature increases abruptly around 1.0 GPa, reaching ~10.0 K at 2.26 GPa. Alternating current magnetic susceptibility measurements indicate that a new superconducting phase with a higher Tc emerges and dominates at high pressures. In the broad pressure window of 0.68GPa≤p≤2.00 GPa, the high-Tc phase coexists with the low-Tc phase. Hall effect measurements reveal a significant difference in electronic structures between themore » two superconducting phases. As a result, our work devotes the effort to establish the commonality of pressure effect on the BiS2-based superconductors, and also uncovers the importance of electron carrier density in the high-Tc phase.« less

  9. Synthesis and Characterization of La 3NbSe 2O 4F 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, Theodore D.; Mansuetto, Michael F.; Ibers, James A.

    1993-12-01

    Crystals of the unusual oxyfluoroselenide La 3NbSe 2O 4F 2 were obtained during the exploration of the quaternary La/Nb/Cu/Se system. Oxygen was extracted from the silica tube, while fluorine was present as a minor impurity in the La powder. The compound crystallizes in space group D 162 h- Pnma of the orthorhombic system with four formula units in a cell with dimensions: a = 11.290(4), b = 4.001(1), and c = 18.062(4) Å ( T = 113 K). The structure has been determined by single-crystal X-ray methods. The presence of F in the crystals was confirmed by windowless EDAX measurements. The two F sites were distinguished from the four O sites from a combination of the X-ray refinement and a bond-valence parameter calculation made with the program EUTAX. In the structure the Nb atom is octahedrally coordinated while each of the three independent La atoms is in a tricapped trigonal prism. The Nb atom is bound to one Se atom and five O atoms while the three La sites are coordinated by various combinations of Se, O, and F atoms. The NbO 5Se octahedra corner share and the LaSe xO yF z tricapped trigonal prisms face share in the b direction.

  10. The function of the Periaxin gene during nerve repair in a model of CMT4F.

    PubMed

    Williams, Anna C; Brophy, Peter J

    2002-04-01

    Mutations in the Periaxin (PRX) gene are known to cause autosomal recessive demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT4F) and Dejerine-Sottas disease. The pathogenesis of these diseases is not fully understood. However, progress is being made by studying both the periaxin-null mouse, a mouse model of the disease, and the protein-protein interactions of periaxin. L-periaxin is a constituent of the dystroglycan-dystrophin-related protein-2 complex linking the Schwann cell cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix. Although periaxin-null mice myelinate normally, they develop a demyelinating peripheral neuropathy later in life. This suggests that periaxin is required for the stable maintenance of a normal myelin sheath. We carried out sciatic nerve crushes in 6-week-old periaxin-null mice, and, 6 weeks later, found that although the number of myelinated axons had returned to normal, the axon diameters remained smaller than in the contralateral uncrushed nerve. Not only do periaxin-null mice have more hyper-myelinated axons than their wild-type counterparts but they also recapitulate this hypermyelination during regeneration. Therefore, periaxin-null mice can undergo peripheral nerve remyelination, but the regulation of peripheral myelin thickness is disrupted. PMID:12090399

  11. Interplay of 4f-3d magnetism and ferroelectricity in DyFeO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeswaran, B.; Sanyal, D.; Chakrabarti, Mahuya; Sundarayya, Y.; Sundaresan, A.; Rao, C. N. R.

    2013-01-01

    DyFeO3 exhibits a weak ferromagnetism (TNFe ˜ 645 K) that disappears below a spin-reorientation (Morin) transition at TSRFe ˜ 50 K. It is also known that applied magnetic field induces ferroelectricity at the magnetic ordering temperature of Dy ions (TNDy ˜ 4.5 K). Here, we show that the ferroelectricity exists in the weak ferromagnetic state (TSRFe 4f) and Fe(3d) and their correlation with ferroelectricity in the weak ferromagnetic state of DyFeO3.

  12. A Search for EUV Emission from the O4f Star Zeta Puppis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waldron, Wayne L.; Vallerga, John

    1996-01-01

    We obtained a 140 ks EUVE observation of the O4f star, zeta Puppis. Because of its low ISM column density and highly ionized stellar wind, a unique EUV window is accessible for viewing between 128 to 140 A, suggesting that this star may he the only O star observable with the EUVE. Although no SW spectrometer wavelength bin had a signal to noise greater than 3, a bin at 136 A had a signal to noise of 2.4. This bin is where models predict the brightest line due to OV emission should occur. We present several EUV line emission models. These models were constrained by fitting the ROSAT PSPC X-ray data and our EUVE data. If the OV emission is real, the best fits to the data suggest that there are discrepancies in our current understanding of EUV/X-ray production mechanisms. In particular, the emission measure of the EUV source is found to be much greater than the total wind emission measure, suggesting that the EUV shock must produce a very large density enhancement. In addition, the location of the EUV and X-ray shocks are found to be separated by approx. 0.3 stellar radii, but the EUV emission region is found to be approx. 400 times larger than the X-ray emission region. We also discuss the implications of a null detection and present relevant upper limits.

  13. Branching ratio and angular distribution of ejected electrons from Eu 4f76p1/2nd auto-ionizing states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiao-Rui; Shen, Li; Zhang, Kai; Dai, Chang-Jian; Yang, Yu-Na

    2016-09-01

    The branching ratios of ions and the angular distributions of electrons ejected from the Eu 4f76p1/2nd auto-ionizing states are investigated with the velocity-map-imaging technique. To populate the above auto-ionizing states, the relevant bound Rydberg states have to be detected first. Two new bound Rydberg states are identified in the region between 41150 cm‑1 and 44580 cm‑1, from which auto-ionization spectra of the Eu 4f76p1/2nd states are observed with isolated core excitation method. With all preparations above, the branching ratios from the above auto-ionizing states to different final ionic states and the angular distributions of electrons ejected from these processes are measured systematically. Energy dependence of branching ratios and anisotropy parameters within the auto-ionization spectra are carefully analyzed, followed by a qualitative interpretation. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11174218).

  14. The VMI study on angular distribution of ejected electrons from Eu 4f76p1/26d autoionizing states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Shen, Li; Dong, Cheng; Dai, Chang-Jian

    2015-10-01

    The combination of a velocity mapping imaging technique and mathematical transformation is adopted to study the angular distribution of electrons ejected from the Eu 4f76p1/26d autoionizing states, which are excited with a three-step excitation scheme via different Eu 4f76s6d 8 DJ (J = 5/2, 7/2, and 9/2) intermediate states. In order to determine the energy dependence of angular distribution of the ejected electrons, the anisotropic parameters are measured in the spectral profile of the 6p1/26d autoionizing states by tuning the wavelength of the third-step laser across the ionic resonance lines of the Eu 6s+ → 6p+. The configuration interaction is discussed by comparing the angular distributions of ejected electrons from the different states. The present study reveals the profound variations of anisotropic parameters in the entire region of autoionization resonance, highlighting the complicated nature of the autoionization process for the lowest member of 6p1/26d autoionization series. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11174218).

  15. Branching ratio and angular distribution of ejected electrons from Eu 4f76p1/2nd auto-ionizing states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiao-Rui; Shen, Li; Zhang, Kai; Dai, Chang-Jian; Yang, Yu-Na

    2016-09-01

    The branching ratios of ions and the angular distributions of electrons ejected from the Eu 4f76p1/2nd auto-ionizing states are investigated with the velocity-map-imaging technique. To populate the above auto-ionizing states, the relevant bound Rydberg states have to be detected first. Two new bound Rydberg states are identified in the region between 41150 cm-1 and 44580 cm-1, from which auto-ionization spectra of the Eu 4f76p1/2nd states are observed with isolated core excitation method. With all preparations above, the branching ratios from the above auto-ionizing states to different final ionic states and the angular distributions of electrons ejected from these processes are measured systematically. Energy dependence of branching ratios and anisotropy parameters within the auto-ionization spectra are carefully analyzed, followed by a qualitative interpretation. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11174218).

  16. Systematics of the 4f energies in a series of rare-earth organic complexes determined by resonant photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, J.; Arima, V.; Zou, Y.; Fink, R.; Umbach, E.; Cingolani, R.; Blyth, R. I. R.

    2004-10-01

    We report a photoemission study of the systematics of the 4f electronic structure of a family of rare-earth organic compounds. Resonant photoemission has been used to determine the binding energies of the 4fN-1 ground states, relative to those of the ligand orbitals, of a number of rare-earth tris-8-hydroxyquinolines ( REQ3 ’s). Using an empirical model these results have been extrapolated to the full series (Ce-Lu) of REQ3 ’s. It is found that in all cases, with the possible exception of Ce, the energy of the 4fN-1 ground state is less than that of the highest occupied molecular orbital, and therefore individual holes on lanthanide sites will not be stable.

  17. Structural changes and self-activated photoluminescence in reductively annealed Sr{sub 3}AlO{sub 4}F

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Robert; Avdeev, Maxim; Vogt, Thomas

    2015-08-15

    White light emission of self-activated photoluminescence (PL) in Sr{sub 3}AlO{sub 4}F under 254 nm light is only observed after annealing in a reducing atmosphere of 5%H{sub 2}/95%Ar. High-resolution neutron powder diffraction reveals that the FSr{sub 6} octahedrons and AlO{sub 4} tetrahedrons in this anti-perovskite structure are closer packed in reduced than in air-annealed samples which show no PL. Careful analysis of temperature-dependent neutron powder diffraction data establishes smaller isotropic displacement parameters for Sr(1) and O in Sr{sub 3}AlO{sub 4}F annealed in a reducing atmosphere indicating that the denser packing of the polyhedral sub-units leads to a slightly deeper potential for the Sr(1) and O atoms. Both the air- and reductively-annealed samples have identical thermal expansion within the temperature range between 3 and 350 K. The Debye temperatures were calculated using the atomic displacement parameters and show no significant differences between the air and reductively annealed samples making the Debye temperature a bad proxy for self-activated PL. - Graphical abstract: Annealing Sr{sub 3}AlO{sub 4}F under reducing conditions results in an intense self-activated photoluminescence which is correlated with a denser packing of FSr{sub 6} and AlO{sub 4} polyhedra. - Highlights: • Sr{sub 3}AlO{sub 4}F made in air does not show self-activated photoluminescence. • Only when annealing Sr{sub 3}AlO{sub 4}F in a reducing gas is photoluminescence observed. • FSr{sub 6} and AlO{sub 4} polyhedra in reduced Sr{sub 3}AlO{sub 4}F structure are packed more efficient. • Smaller displacement parameters are found for under-bonded Sr(1) and O sites.

  18. Acoustic Tooth Cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustically-energized water jet aids in plaque breakdown. Acoustic Wand includes acoustic transducer 1/4 wave plate, and tapered cone. Together elements energize solution of water containing mild abrasive injected into mouth to help prevent calculous buildup.

  19. Superconductivity in KCa2Fe4As4F2 with Separate Double Fe2As2 Layers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Cheng; He, Chao-Yang; Wu, Si-Qi; Tang, Zhang-Tu; Liu, Yi; Ablimit, Abduweli; Feng, Chun-Mu; Cao, Guang-Han

    2016-06-29

    We report the synthesis, crystal structure, and physical properties of a quinary iron arsenide fluoride, KCa2Fe4As4F2. The new compound crystallizes in a body-centered tetragonal lattice (space group I4/mmm, a = 3.8684(2) Å, c = 31.007(1) Å, Z = 2) that contains double Fe2As2 conducting layers separated by insulating Ca2F2 layers. Our measurements of electrical resistivity, direct-current magnetic susceptibility, and heat capacity demonstrate bulk superconductivity at 33 K in KCa2Fe4As4F2. PMID:27321364

  20. Resonant photoemission study of the 4f spectral function of cerium in Ce/Fe(100) interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Witkowski, N.; Bertran, F.; Gourieux, T.; Kierren, B.; Malterre, D.; Panaccione, G. |

    1997-11-01

    In this paper, we present a resonant photoemission study of the cerium 4f spectral function in Ce/Fe(100) interfaces. By covering cerium ultrathin films with lanthanum, we completely suppress the surface contribution of the spectra. Then we show that the cerium atoms at the interface are in an intermediate valent state, whereas the f{sup 1} configuration is stabilized in the top layer. This method allows us to obtain the genuine 4f spectral function of the interface, and could be extended to a study of Ce-based compounds. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  1. Double photoexcitation involving 2p and 4f electrons in L3 -edge x-ray absorption spectra of protactinium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, Christoph; Le Naour, Claire; Auwer, Christophe Den

    2008-06-01

    The L3 -edge x-ray absorption spectrum of Pa(V) fluoride in aqueous solution show clear evidence for the double photoexcitation involving 2p and 4f electrons. A comparison with the [2p4f] double-electron excitations observed in the L3 -edge x-ray absorption spectra of other actinides (thorium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, and americium) indicates a monotonic increase in the excitation energy. The sharp edgelike structure of the multielectron excitation reveals the origin of a shake-up channel.

  2. Time-series observations of hydrothermal discharge using an acoustic imaging sonar: a NEPTUNE observatory case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guangyu; Bemis, Karen; Jackson, Darrell; Light, Russ

    2015-04-01

    One intriguing feature of a mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal system is the intimate interconnections among hydrothermal, geological, oceanic, and biological processes. The advent of the NEPTUNE observatory operated by Ocean Networks Canada at the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge enables scientists to study these interconnections through multidisciplinary, continuous, real-time observations. In this study, we present the time-series observations of a seafloor hydrothermal vent made using the Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar (COVIS). COVIS is currently connected to the NEPTUNE observatory to monitor the hydrothermal discharge from the Grotto mound on the Endeavour Segment. Since its deployment in 2010, COVIS has recorded a 3-year long dataset of the shape and outflow fluxes of the buoyant plumes above Grotto along with the areal coverage of its diffuse flow discharge. The interpretation of these data in light of contemporaneous observations of ocean currents, venting temperature, and seismicity made using other NEPTUNE observatory instruments reveals significant impacts of ocean currents and geological events on hydrothermal venting. In this study, we summarize these findings in the hope of forming a more complete understanding of the intricate interconnections among oceanic, geological, and hydrothermal processes.

  3. Design and Convergence Performance Analysis of Aspherical Acoustic Lens Applied to Ambient Noise Imaging in Actual Ocean Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Kazuyoshi; Ogasawara, Hanako; Nakamura, Toshiaki; Tsuchiya, Takenobu; Endoh, Nobuyuki

    2011-07-01

    In this study, an aspherical lens with the aperture diameter of 1.0 m was designed for utilization in an actual ocean experiment of ambient noise imaging (ANI). It was expected that this ANI system would realize directional resolution, which is a beam width of 1° at the center frequency of 120 kHz. We analyzed the sound pressure distribution focused by the designed lens using the 3D finite difference time domain method. The frequency dependence of a -3 dB area was then compared between 120 kHz and the higher or lower frequency. The analysis results suggested that the designed lens has fine directional resolution over the center frequency of 120 kHz. We had measured the directivity of the designed lens in an actual ocean experiment in Uchiura Bay in November of 2010. It was verified that the ANI system with this lens realizes a beam width of 1° at 120 kHz.

  4. Cyclo-octafluorobutane (PFC-318, c-C4F8) in the global atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhle, J.; Vollmer, M. K.; Ivy, D. J.; Fraser, P.; Arnold, T.; Harth, C. M.; Salameh, P.; O'Doherty, S.; Young, D.; Steele, P.; Krummel, P. B.; Leist, M.; Rhee, T. S.; Schmidbauer, N.; Lunder, C.; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Reimann, S.; Simmonds, P.; Prinn, R. G.; Weiss, R. F.

    2011-12-01

    The perfluorocarbon (PFC) cyclo-octafluorobutane (PFC-318, c-C4F8) is a very long-lived (up to 3,200 years) and potent greenhouse gas (100-year global warming potential up to 10,300) with a wide range of industrial uses. We present an update of our PFC-318 archived air and in situ measurements from remote and urban AGAGE (Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment) sites and affiliated stations in both hemispheres. Most importantly, we have significantly improved our Southern Hemisphere (SH) data density by measuring the Cape Grim Air Archive (1970s-2010). Combined with our previously presented measurements of archived Northern Hemisphere (NH) flasks (1973-2009), we provide thirty year spanning records for both hemispheres. We have also further extended our in situ records by continuing our measurements at all remote stations, with the longest hemispheric records starting in November 2007 at Jungfraujoch (NH) and in June 2010 at Cape Grim (SH). We compare our data with those of Oram (1999) and Oram et al. (2011), who focus on SH data alone, and with other previous data sets. From our measurements, we derive emission estimates using a chemical transport model and inverse method, and compare our results to previous measurement based emission estimates (top-down) and to the EDGAR emission database (bottom-up). As stated previously (Mühle et al., 2010), we find emissions of ~1 Gg/yr in recent years while EDGAR estimates only 0.02 Gg/yr for 2005, similar to what Oram et al. (2011) find. We conclude that PFC-318 is the third most important PFC in terms of abundance and CO2-equivalent emissions. We continue to observe mostly baseline concentrations at remote AGAGE stations and urban sites in the USA, Europe, and Australia, in contrast to frequent pollution episodes measured at sites in East Asia, indicating significant regional emissions in East Asia, as found by Saito et al. (2010). EDGAR, Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research, release version 4.1. http

  5. Observation of cavitation bubbles and acoustic streaming in high intensity ultrasound fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemura, Yuuki; Sasaki, Kazuma; Minami, Kyohei; Sato, Toshio; Choi, Pak-Kon; Takeuchi, Shinichi

    2015-07-01

    We observed the behavior of acoustic cavitation by sonochemical luminescence and ultrasound B-mode imaging with ultrasound diagnostic equipment in a standing-wave ultrasound field and focused ultrasound field. Furthermore, in order to investigate the influence of acoustic streaming on acoustic cavitation bubbles, we performed flow analysis of the sound field using particle image velocimetry. We found that acoustic cavitation bubbles are stirred by circulating acoustic streaming and local vortexes occurring in the water tank of the standing-wave ultrasound exposure system. We considered that the acoustic cavitation bubbles are carried away by acoustic streaming due to the high ultrasound pressure in the focused ultrasound field.

  6. CYP4F2 (rs2108622) Gene Polymorphism Association with Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Sakiene, Ruta; Vilkeviciute, Alvita; Kriauciuniene, Loresa; Balciuniene, Vilma Jurate; Buteikiene, Dovile; Miniauskiene, Goda; Liutkeviciene, Rasa

    2016-01-01

    Background. Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of blindness in elderly individuals where aetiology and pathophysiology of age-related macular degeneration are not absolutely clear. Purpose. To determine the frequency of the genotype of rs2108622 in patients with early and exudative age-related macular degeneration. Methods. The study enrolled 190 patients with early age-related macular degeneration, 181 patients with exudative age-related macular degeneration (eAMD), and a random sample of 210 subjects from the general population (control group). The genotyping of rs2108622 was carried out using the real-time polymerase chain reaction method. Results. The analysis of rs2108622 gene polymorphism did not reveal any differences in the distribution of C/C, C/T, and T/T genotypes between the early AMD group, the eAMD group, and the control group. The CYP4F2 (1347C>T) T/T genotype was more frequent in males with eAMD compared to females (10.2% versus 0.8%; p = 0.0052); also T/T genotype was less frequently present in eAMD females compared to healthy control females (0.8% versus 6.2%; p = 0.027). Conclusion. Rs2108622 gene polymorphism had no predominant effect on the development of early AMD and eAMD. The T/T genotype was more frequent in males with eAMD compared to females and less frequently present in eAMD females compared to healthy females. PMID:27652291

  7. Spectra and energy levels of Tm3+ (4 f12 ) in AlN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, John B.; Vetter, Ulrich; Hofsäss, Hans; Zandi, Bahram; Reid, Michael F.

    2004-12-01

    We report a detailed analysis of the cathodoluminescence spectra of Tm3+ -implanted 2H-aluminum nitride (AlN) covering the wavelength range between 290 and 820nm at temperatures between 12 and 60K . More than 200 transitions are observed, of which more than 100 of these transitions can be identified from emitting multiplet manifolds I61 , D21 , and G41 . Although the emitting levels are not observed directly, emission is also attributed to the P23 and P13 multiplet manifolds based on analyses of transitions to terminal levels F43 , H53 , and F33 . The observed crystal-field splitting of the ground-state multiplet manifold, H63 , and manifolds F43 , H53 , H43 , F33 , F23 , and G41 is established from an analysis based on matching repeated energy differences between transitions. This method is similar to one used in analyzing arc and spark spectra. Temperature-dependent spectra also establish the crystal-field splitting of the P13 and part of the manifold splitting of emitting levels such as I61 . To establish an initial set of crystal-field splitting parameters, Bnm , that can be related to a physical model, we carried out a lattice-sum calculation by computing the crystal-field components, which are the coefficients in a multipolar expansion of the crystal field about the Al3+ sites that have C3v symmetry in the lattice. Emission channeling experiments indicate that the Al3+ sites serve as the substitutional sites for Tm3+ in AlN. With only minor adjustments to the calculated centroids to account for J -mixing, the calculated crystal-field splitting of most multiplet manifolds, LJ2S+1 , of Tm3+(4f12) based on the Bnm obtained from the lattice-sum calculations, is in good agreement with the reported experimental splitting.

  8. Engineering Magnetic Anisotropy in Nanostructured 3d and 4f Ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chin-Jui

    Due to the increased demand for clean energy in recent years, there is a need for the scientific community to develop technology to harvest thermal energy which is ubiquitous but mostly wasted in our environment. However, there is still no efficient approach to harvest thermal energy to date. In this study, the theory of thermomagnetic energy harvesting is reviewed and unique applications of multiferroics (ferromagnetic plus ferroelectric) are introduced. Based on an efficiency analysis using experimentally measured magneto-thermal properties