Science.gov

Sample records for acoustic absorption coefficient

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of acoustic streaming: absorption coefficient and acoustic field shape estimation.

    PubMed

    Madelin, Guillaume; Grucker, Daniel; Franconi, Jean-Michel; Thiaudiere, Eric

    2006-07-01

    In this study, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used to visualize acoustic streaming in liquids. A single-shot spin echo sequence (HASTE) with a saturation band perpendicular to the acoustic beam permits the acquisition of an instantaneous image of the flow due to the application of ultrasound. An average acoustic streaming velocity can be estimated from the MR images, from which the ultrasonic absorption coefficient and the bulk viscosity of different glycerol-water mixtures can be deduced. In the same way, this MRI method could be used to assess the acoustic field and time-average power of ultrasonic transducers in water (or other liquids with known physical properties), after calibration of a geometrical parameter that is dependent on the experimental setup. PMID:16650447

  2. Optimization of the acoustic absorption coefficients of certain functional absorbents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pocsa, V.; Biborosch, L.; Veres, A.; Halpert, E.; Lorian, R.; Botos, T.

    1974-01-01

    The sound absorption coefficients of some functional absorbents (mineral wool plates) are determined by the reverberation chamber method. The influence of the angle of inclination of the sound absorbing material with respect to the surface to be treated is analyzed as well as the influence of the covering index, defined as the ratio of the designed area of a plate and the area of the treated surface belonging to another plate. As compared with the conventional method of applying sound-absorbing plates, the analyzed structures have a higher technological and economical efficiency. The optimum structure corresponds to an angle of inclination of 15 deg and a covering index of 0.8.

  3. Density, ultrasound velocity, acoustic impedance, reflection and absorption coefficient determination of liquids via multiple reflection method.

    PubMed

    Hoche, S; Hussein, M A; Becker, T

    2015-03-01

    The accuracy of density, reflection coefficient, and acoustic impedance determination via multiple reflection method was validated experimentally. The ternary system water-maltose-ethanol was used to execute a systematic, temperature dependent study over a wide range of densities and viscosities aiming an application as inline sensor in beverage industries. The validation results of the presented method and setup show root mean square errors of: 1.201E-3 g cm(-3) (±0.12%) density, 0.515E-3 (0.15%) reflection coefficient and 1.851E+3 kg s(-1) m(-2) (0.12%) specific acoustic impedance. The results of the diffraction corrected absorption showed an average standard deviation of only 0.12%. It was found that the absorption change shows a good correlation to concentration variations and may be useful for laboratory analysis of sufficiently pure liquids. The main part of the observed errors can be explained by the observed noise, temperature variation and the low signal resolution of 50 MHz. In particular, the poor signal-to-noise ratio of the second reflector echo was found to be a main accuracy limitation. Concerning the investigation of liquids the unstable properties of the reference material PMMA, due to hygroscopicity, were identified to be an additional, unpredictable source of uncertainty. While dimensional changes can be considered by adequate methodology, the impact of the time and temperature dependent water absorption on relevant reference properties like the buffer's sound velocity and density could not be considered and may explain part of the observed deviations. PMID:25465962

  4. Measurement of the absorption coefficient of acoustical materials using the sound intensity method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwal, Mahabir S.; Crocker, Malcolm J.

    1987-01-01

    In this study the possibility of using the two-microphone sound intensity technique to measure the normal incidence and the random incidence sound absorption coefficient was investigated. The normal incidence absorption coefficient was determined by measuring the intensity incidence on the sample and the intensity reflected by the sample placed in an anechoic chamber. The random incidence absorption coefficient was determined by measuring the intensity incident on the sample and the intensity reflected by the sample placed in a reverberation chamber. Absorption coefficient results obtained by the sound intensity technique were compared with standard techniques, namely the reverberation chamber and the standing wave tube. The major advantages of using the sound intensity technique are that it permits 'in situ' measurements and the absorption coefficient for a large range of frequencies can be obtained from a single measurement.

  5. Measuring the acoustic absorption coefficient in biological tissue specimens using ultrasonic phase conjugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smagin, N. V.; Krutyansky, L. M.; Zelenova, Z. V.; Brysev, A. P.

    2014-03-01

    Acoustic absorption has been measured in a series of biological tissue specimens—porcine muscle, renal and fat tissues—by the standard insert-substitution method, as well as by ultrasonic phase conjugation. Comparison of the experimental results and revealed differences confirm the promise of using phase conjugate waves to measure acoustic losses in biological objects. It is demonstrated that in inhomogeneous tissues, the phase conjugation method makes it possible to obtain a more reliable estimate of dissipative losses.

  6. Acoustic Absorption Characteristics of People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingsbury, H. F.; Wallace, W. J.

    1968-01-01

    The acoustic absorption characteristics of informally dressed college students in typical classroom seating are shown to differ substantially from data for formally dressed audiences in upholstered seating. Absorption data, expressed as sabins per person or absorption coefficient per square foot, shows that there is considerable variation between…

  7. A method to determine the acoustic reflection and absorption coefficients of porous media by using modal dispersion in a waveguide.

    PubMed

    Prisutova, Jevgenija; Horoshenkov, Kirill; Groby, Jean-Philippe; Brouard, Bruno

    2014-12-01

    The measurement of acoustic material characteristics using a standard impedance tube method is generally limited to the plane wave regime below the tube cut-on frequency. This implies that the size of the tube and, consequently, the size of the material specimen must remain smaller than a half of the wavelength. This paper presents a method that enables the extension of the frequency range beyond the plane wave regime by at least a factor of 3, so that the size of the material specimen can be much larger than the wavelength. The proposed method is based on measuring of the sound pressure at different axial locations and applying the spatial Fourier transform. A normal mode decomposition approach is used together with an optimization algorithm to minimize the discrepancy between the measured and predicted sound pressure spectra. This allows the frequency and angle dependent reflection and absorption coefficients of the material specimen to be calculated in an extended frequency range. The method has been tested successfully on samples of melamine foam and wood fiber. The measured data are in close agreement with the predictions by the equivalent fluid model for the acoustical properties of porous media. PMID:25480044

  8. Acoustic Absorption in Porous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Johnston, James C.

    2011-01-01

    An understanding of both the areas of materials science and acoustics is necessary to successfully develop materials for acoustic absorption applications. This paper presents the basic knowledge and approaches for determining the acoustic performance of porous materials in a manner that will help materials researchers new to this area gain the understanding and skills necessary to make meaningful contributions to this field of study. Beginning with the basics and making as few assumptions as possible, this paper reviews relevant topics in the acoustic performance of porous materials, which are often used to make acoustic bulk absorbers, moving from the physics of sound wave interactions with porous materials to measurement techniques for flow resistivity, characteristic impedance, and wavenumber.

  9. Sensitivity of room acoustic parameters to changes in scattering coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathsam, Jonathan; Wang, Lily M.

    2001-05-01

    This project uses the room acoustics computer modeling program, ODEON, to investigate the sensitivity of room acoustic parameters to changes in scattering coefficients. Particularly, the study is interested in determining if the results from certain room models are more sensitive to scattering coefficients than from other models, due to their geometry or absorption characteristics. If so, how can one quantify a model's susceptibility to being sensitive to scattering? Various models of three real spaces in Omaha, Nebraska are tested. The predicted reverberation, clarity, and spaciousness parameters are compared at various receiver locations, while the scattering coefficient of all surfaces is varied from 0 to 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, and 0.8. The resulting data are analyzed by frequency according to the (1) average absorption of the room; (2) magnitude variation of absorption within the room; (3) spatial distribution of absorption within the room; and (4) level of model detail. Initial results indicate that parameters studied may show more sensitivity to scattering coefficients in models that have a wider range of absorption values, more disparate distribution of absorption, and lower detail level. Various schemes that include these aspects are proposed for computing a model's sensitivity to changes in scattering.

  10. A high absorption coefficient DL-MPP imitating owl skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lijun; Zhao, Zhan; Kong, Deyi; Wu, Shaohua; Du, Lidong; Fang, Zhen

    2012-11-01

    This paper proposes a high absorption coefficient micro-perforated panel (MPP) imitating owl skin structure for acoustic noise reduction. Compared to the traditional micro-perforated panel, this device has two unique characteristics-simulating the owl skin structure, its radius of perforated apertures even can be as small as 55μ, and its material is silicon and fabricated by micro-electrical mechanical system (MEMS) technology; So that its absorption coefficients of acoustic noise for normal incidence sound wave whose frequencies arrange from 1.5 kHz to 6.0 kHz are all above 0.8 which is the owl's hunts sensitivity frequency band. Double leaf MPP fabricated by MEMS technology is an absolutely bionic success in functional-imitation.

  11. Radiometer gives true absorption and emission coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fymat, A. L.

    1977-01-01

    Novel radiometer, unaffected by scattering and polarization, measures true absorption and emmission coefficients for arbitrary mixture of gases and polluting particles. It has potential astronomical, meteorological, and environmental applications, such as determination of radiative heat budget, aerosol relative concentration, and morphology of cloud, haze, and fog formations. Data and temperature can be coupled directly to small computer for online calculation of radiation coefficients.

  12. Quantitative Ultrasound Imaging Using Acoustic Backscatter Coefficients.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boote, Evan Jeffery

    Current clinical ultrasound scanners render images which have brightness levels related to the degree of backscattered energy from the tissue being imaged. These images offer the interpreter a qualitative impression of the scattering characteristics of the tissue being examined, but due to the complex factors which affect the amplitude and character of the echoed acoustic energy, it is difficult to make quantitative assessments of scattering nature of the tissue, and thus, difficult to make precise diagnosis when subtle disease effects are present. In this dissertation, a method of data reduction for determining acoustic backscatter coefficients is adapted for use in forming quantitative ultrasound images of this parameter. In these images, the brightness level of an individual pixel corresponds to the backscatter coefficient determined for the spatial position represented by that pixel. The data reduction method utilized rigorously accounts for extraneous factors which affect the scattered echo waveform and has been demonstrated to accurately determine backscatter coefficients under a wide range of conditions. The algorithms and procedures used to form backscatter coefficient images are described. These were tested using tissue-mimicking phantoms which have regions of varying scattering levels. Another phantom has a fat-mimicking layer for testing these techniques under more clinically relevant conditions. Backscatter coefficient images were also formed of in vitro human liver tissue. A clinical ultrasound scanner has been adapted for use as a backscatter coefficient imaging platform. The digital interface between the scanner and the computer used for data reduction are described. Initial tests, using phantoms are presented. A study of backscatter coefficient imaging of in vivo liver was performed using several normal, healthy human subjects.

  13. Determination of absorption coefficients of thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Lodenquai, J.F. )

    1994-08-01

    The equations that are usually presented as those used to determine the absorption coefficients of materials in film form based on measurements of transmission and reflection coefficients are fundamentally incorrect. These equations omit a multiplicative factor arising from the complex nature of the refractive indices of the materials. This factor enters explicitly into the relationship between the transmission and reflection coefficients for such materials and is not necessarily close to unity, although in practice this factor can be approximated by unity at least in the infrared through the optical range of wavelengths.

  14. Absorption cross section of canonical acoustic holes

    SciTech Connect

    Crispino, Luis C. B.; Oliveira, Ednilton S.; Matsas, George E. A.

    2007-11-15

    We compute numerically the absorption cross section of a canonical acoustic hole for sound waves with arbitrary frequencies. Our outputs are in full agreement with the expected low- and high-frequency limits.

  15. Inversion of instantaneous equivalent absorption coefficient and its application

    SciTech Connect

    Weihua, W. )

    1992-01-01

    Absorption coefficient is an important parameter for reservoir description. The major troubles in extracting absorption coefficient from seismic data are amplitude and waveform distortions; they greatly restrict the inversion which is based on reflection amplitude variation or reflection frequency variation. This paper presents a new method which avoids amplitude and uses waveform variation gradient in wave propagation to make the inversion of absorption coefficient. Apparent absorption coefficient and pseudo absorption coefficient are adopted so as to remove the influence which the waveform distortion due to thin bed tuning brings to absorption coefficient extraction. The final instantaneous equivalent absorption coefficient, a true absorption coefficient which reflects real absorptive character of a seismic medium, can be obtained by subtracting the pseudo absorption coefficient (inversely calculated using maximum entropy) from the apparent absorption coefficient the authors have calculated.

  16. SPATIAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF ABSORPTION, LOCAL SUPPRESSION, AND EMISSIVITY REDUCTION OF SOLAR ACOUSTIC WAVES IN MAGNETIC REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, D.-Y.; Yang, M.-H.; Zhao Hui; Liang Zhichao; Sun, M.-T.

    2009-11-20

    Observed acoustic power in magnetic regions is lower than the quiet Sun because of absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression of solar acoustic waves in magnetic regions. In the previous studies, we have developed a method to measure the coefficients of absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression of sunspots. In this study, we go one step further to measure the spatial distributions of three coefficients in two active regions, NOAA 9055 and 9057. The maps of absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression coefficients correlate with the magnetic map, including plage regions, except the emissivity reduction coefficient of NOAA 9055 where the emissivity reduction coefficient is too weak and lost among the noise.

  17. Examination of the Measurement of Absorption Using the Reverberant Room Method for Highly Absorptive Acoustic Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Anne M.; Chris Nottoli; Eric Wolfram

    2015-01-01

    The absorption coefficient for material specimens are needed to quantify the expected acoustic performance of that material in its actual usage and environment. The ASTM C423-09a standard, "Standard Test Method for Sound Absorption and Sound Absorption Coefficients by the Reverberant Room Method" is often used to measure the absorption coefficient of material test specimens. This method has its basics in the Sabine formula. Although widely used, the interpretation of these measurements are a topic of interest. For example, in certain cases the measured Sabine absorption coefficients are greater than 1.0 for highly absorptive materials. This is often attributed to the diffraction edge effect phenomenon. An investigative test program to measure the absorption properties of highly absorbent melamine foam has been performed at the Riverbank Acoustical Laboratories. This paper will present and discuss the test results relating to the effect of the test materials' surface area, thickness and edge sealing conditions. A follow-on paper is envisioned that will present and discuss the results relating to the spacing between multiple piece specimens, and the mounting condition of the test specimen.

  18. Reflection and Scattering of Acoustical Waves from a Discontinuity in Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J. P.; Leeman, S.; Nolan, E.; Lee, D.

    The reflection and transmission of a plane acoustical wave from a planar boundary at the interface between two homogeneous media of different acoustical properties is a classical problem in acoustics that has served as a basis for many developments in acoustics for over 100 years. This problem, detailed in virtually every textbook on acoustics, provides us with the acoustical analogue to Snell's Law in optics and gives us correspondingly simple results. Classical acoustics predicts that a reflection from a boundary occurs only if the characteristic acoustical impedances of the two media are different. Here we show that a reflection also occurs if the media have the same impedances but different absorption coefficients. Our analysis yields some surprising results. For example, a reflection will occur at a discontinuity in absorption even if the impedance is uniform and continuous across the interface. In addition, a discontinuity in impedance at an interface between two media that have constant and equal, but non-zero absorption, results in a reflection coefficient that is dependent on absorption as well as impedance. In general, reflection coefficients now become frequency dependent. To experimentally test our results, we measured the reflection at the interface between water and castor oil, two liquids with similar impedances but very different absorption coefficients. Measurement of the reflection coefficient between 1 and 50 MHz demonstrated a frequency dependence that was in good agreement with our analysis.

  19. Aerosol Angstrom Absorption Coefficient Comparisons during MILAGRO.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marley, N. A.; Marchany-Rivera, A.; Kelley, K. L.; Mangu, A.; Gaffney, J. S.

    2007-12-01

    aerosol Angstrom absorption exponents by linear regression over the entire UV-visible spectral range. These results are compared to results obtained from the absorbance measurements obtained in the field. The differences in calculated Angstrom absorption exponents between the field and laboratory measurements are attributed partly to the differences in time resolution of the sample collection resulting in heavier particle pileup on the filter surface of the 12-hour samples. Some differences in calculated results can also be attributed to the presence of narrow band absorbers below 400 nm that do not fall in the wavelengths covered by the 7 wavelengths of the aethalometer. 1. Marley, N.A., J.S. Gaffney, J.C. Baird, C.A. Blazer, P.J. Drayton, and J.E. Frederick, "The determination of scattering and absorption coefficients of size-fractionated aerosols for radiative transfer calculations." Aerosol Sci. Technol., 34, 535-549, (2001). This work was conducted as part of the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Science Program as part of the Megacity Aerosol Experiment - Mexico City during MILAGRO. This research was supported by the Office of Science (BER), U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64329. We also wish to thank Mexican Scientists and students for their assistance from the Instituto Mexicano de Petroleo (IMP) and CENICA.

  20. Linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients of spherical dome shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Kangxian; Liu, Guanghui; Huang, Lu; Zheng, Xianyi

    2015-08-01

    Linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients of spherical dome shells are theoretically investigated within analytical wave functions and numerical quantized energy levels. Our results show that the inner radius, the outer radius and the cut-off angle of spherical dome shells have great influences on linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients as well as the total optical absorption coefficients. It is found that with the increase of the inner radius and the outer radius, linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients exhibit a blueshift and a redshift, respectively. However, with the increase of the cut-off angle, linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients do not shift. Besides, the resonant peaks of linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients climb up and then decrease with increasing the cut-off angle. The influences of the incident optical intensity on the total optical absorption coefficients are studied. It is found that the bleaching effect occurs at higher incident optical intensity.

  1. Power absorption in acoustically driven ferromagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labanowski, D.; Jung, A.; Salahuddin, S.

    2016-01-01

    Surface acoustic waves (SAWs) have recently been used to drive ferromagnetic resonance by exploiting the coupling between strain and magnetization in magnetostrictive materials in a technique called acoustically driven ferromagnetic resonance (ADFMR). In this work, we quantitatively examine the power absorbed by the magnetic elements in such systems. We find that power absorption scales exponentially with the length of the magnetic element in the direction of SAW propagation, with the rate of scaling set by the thickness of magnetic material. In addition, we find that ADFMR behaves consistently across a wide range of input power values (>65 dB). Our results indicate that devices such as filters, oscillators, and sensors can be designed that operate with very low power, yet provide high tunability.

  2. Determination of decay coefficients for combustors with acoustic absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, C. E.; Espander, W. R.; Baer, M. R.

    1972-01-01

    An analytical technique for the calculation of linear decay coefficients in combustors with acoustic absorbers is presented. Tuned circumferential slot acoustic absorbers were designed for the first three transverse modes of oscillation, and decay coefficients for these absorbers were found as a function of backing distance for seven different chamber configurations. The effectiveness of the absorbers for off-design values of the combustion response and acoustic mode is also investigated. Results indicate that for tuned absorbers the decay coefficient increases approximately as the cube of the backing distance. For most off-design situations the absorber still provides a damping effect. However, if an absorber designed for some higher mode of oscillation is used to damp lower mode oscillations, a driving effect is frequently found.

  3. Continuous wavelet-transform analysis of photoacoustic signal waveform to determine optical absorption coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirasawa, T.; Ishihara, M.; Tsujita, K.; Hirota, K.; Irisawa, K.; Kitagaki, M.; Fujita, M.; Kikuchi, M.

    2012-02-01

    In photo-acoustic (PA) imaging, valuable medical applications based on optical absorption spectrum such as contrast agent imaging and blood oxygen saturation measurement have been investigated. In these applications, there is an essential requirement to determine optical absorption coefficients accurately. In present, PA signal intensities have been commonly used to determine optical absorption coefficients. This method achieves practical accuracy by combining with radiative transfer analysis. However, time consumption of radiative transfer analysis and effects of signal generation efficiencies were problems of this method. In this research, we propose a new method to determine optical absorption coefficients using continuous wavelet transform (CWT). We used CWT to estimate instantaneous frequencies of PA signals which reflects optical absorption distribution. We validated the effectiveness of CWT in determination of optical absorption coefficients through an experiment. In the experiment, planar shaped samples were illuminated to generate PA signal. The PA signal was measured by our fabricated PA probe in which an optical fiber and a ring shaped P(VDFTrFE) ultrasound sensor were coaxially aligned. Optical properties of samples were adjusted by changing the concentration of dye solution. Tunable Ti:Sapphire laser (690 - 1000 nm) was used as illumination source. As a result, we confirmed strong correlation between optical absorption coefficients of samples and the instantaneous frequency of PA signal obtained by CWT. Advantages of this method were less interference of light transfer and signal generation efficiency.

  4. Effect of applied mechanical stress on absorption coefficient of compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Manoj Kumar; Singh, Gurinderjeet; Dhaliwal, A. S.; Kahlon, K. S.

    2015-08-28

    The absorption coefficient of given materials is the parameter required for the basic information. The measurement of absorption coefficient of compounds Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CaCO{sub 3}, ZnO{sub 2}, SmO{sub 2} and PbO has been taken at different incident photon energies 26, 59.54, 112, 1173, 1332keV. The studies involve the measurements of absorption coefficient of the self supporting samples prepared under different mechanical stress. This mechanical stress is render in terms of pressure up to 0-6 ton by using hydraulic press. Measurements shows that absorption coefficient of a material is directly proportional to applied mechanical stress on it up to some extent then become independent. Experimentally measured results are in fairly good agreement with in theoretical values obtained from WinXCOM.

  5. Effect of applied mechanical stress on absorption coefficient of compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Manoj Kumar; Singh, Gurinderjeet; Dhaliwal, A. S.; Kahlon, K. S.

    2015-08-01

    The absorption coefficient of given materials is the parameter required for the basic information. The measurement of absorption coefficient of compounds Al2O3, CaCO3, ZnO2, SmO2 and PbO has been taken at different incident photon energies 26, 59.54, 112, 1173, 1332keV. The studies involve the measurements of absorption coefficient of the self supporting samples prepared under different mechanical stress. This mechanical stress is render in terms of pressure up to 0-6 ton by using hydraulic press. Measurements shows that absorption coefficient of a material is directly proportional to applied mechanical stress on it up to some extent then become independent. Experimentally measured results are in fairly good agreement with in theoretical values obtained from WinXCOM.

  6. Multi-wavelength measurements of aerosol optical absorption coefficients using a photoacoustic spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiang; Huang, Hong-Hua; Wang, Yao; Wang, Gui-Shi; Cao, Zhen-Song; Liu, Kun; Chen, Wei-Dong; Gao, Xiao-Ming

    2014-06-01

    The atmospheric aerosol absorption capacity is a critical parameter determining its direct and indirect effects on climate. Accurate measurement is highly desired for the study of the radiative budget of the Earth. A multi-wavelength (405 nm, 532 nm, 780 nm) aerosol absorption meter based on photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) invovling a single cylindrical acoustic resonator is developed for measuring the aerosol optical absorption coefficients (OACs). A sensitivity of 1.3 Mm-1 (at 532 nm) is demonstrated. The aerosol absorption meter is successfully tested through measuring the OACs of atmospheric nigrosin and ambient aerosols in the suburbs of Hefei city. The absorption cross section and absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) for ambient aerosol are determined for characterizing the component of the ambient aerosol.

  7. Continuum Absorption Coefficient of Atoms and Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armaly, B. F.

    1979-01-01

    The rate of heat transfer to the heat shield of a Jupiter probe has been estimated to be one order of magnitude higher than any previously experienced in an outer space exploration program. More than one-third of this heat load is due to an emission of continuum radiation from atoms and ions. The existing computer code for calculating the continuum contribution to the total load utilizes a modified version of Biberman's approximate method. The continuum radiation absorption cross sections of a C - H - O - N ablation system were examined in detail. The present computer code was evaluated and updated by being compared with available exact and approximate calculations and correlations of experimental data. A detailed calculation procedure, which can be applied to other atomic species, is presented. The approximate correlations can be made to agree with the available exact and experimental data.

  8. Reciprocity in the scattering coefficients of acoustic waveguide modes.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yuhui; Pan, Jie

    2013-09-01

    In this Letter, a proof is provided for the reciprocity between modal scattering coefficients of the acoustic waveguides connected by a junction enclosure. The result holds for all waveguide modes and for junction enclosures with locally reactive boundary conditions away from the interfaces between the junction and waveguides. Also provided is a physical interpretation of the reciprocity of the modal scattering coefficients. The scattering of two-dimensional waveguide modes by a right-angled bend in a rectangular duct is used as an illustrating example. PMID:23967907

  9. [Influencing factors in measuring absorption coefficient of suspended particulate matters].

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao-long; Shen, Fang; Zhang, Jin-fang

    2013-05-01

    Absorption coefficient of suspended particulate matters in natural water is one of the key parameters in ocean color remote sensing. In order to study the influencing factors that affect the measurement, a series of experiments were designed to measure samples using transmittance method (T method), transmittance-reflectance method (T-R method) and absorptance method (A method). The results shows that absorption coefficient measured by the A method has a much lower error compared to the T method and T-R method due to influencing factors,such as filter-to-filter variations, water content of the filter, and homogeneity of filter load and so on. Another factor influence absorption coefficient is path-length amplification induced by multiple scattering inside the filter. To determine the path-length amplification, the true absorption was measured by AC-s (WetLabs). The linear fitting result shows that the mean path-length amplification is much higher for the A method than that of the T-R method and the T method (4.01 versus 2.20 and 2.32), and the corresponding correlation coefficient are 0.90, 0.87 and 0.80. For the A method and the T-R method, higher correlation coefficients are calculated when using polynomial fitting, and the value are 0.95 and 0.94. Analysis of the mean relative error caused by different influencing factors indicates that path-length amplification is the largest error source in measuring the absorption coefficient. PMID:23914523

  10. Absorption coefficients of a hydrogen plasma for laser radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcop, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    The formalism for the calculation of the absorption of radiation by a hydrogen plasma at common laboratory conditions is summarized. The hydrogen plasma absorption coefficient for laser radiation has been computed for a wide range of electron densities and temperatures (10,000-40,000 K). The results of this computation are presented in a graphical form that permits a determination of the absorption coefficient for the following laser wavelengths: 0.176, 0.325, 0.337, 0.442, 0.488, 0.515, 0.633, 0.694, 1.06, 1.15, 2.36, 3.39, 5.40 and 10.6 microns. The application of these results and laser radiation absorption measurements to plasma diagnostics is discussed briefly.

  11. Sound absorption coefficient in situ: an alternative for estimating soil loss factors.

    PubMed

    Freire, Rosane; Meletti de Abreu, Marco Henrique; Okada, Rafael Yuri; Soares, Paulo Fernando; GranhenTavares, Célia Regina

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between the sound absorption coefficient and factors of the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) was determined in a section of the Maringá Stream basin, Paraná State, by using erosion plots. In the field, four erosion plots were built on a reduced scale, with dimensions of 2.0×12.5m. With respect to plot coverage, one was kept with bare soil and the others contained forage grass (Brachiaria), corn and wheat crops, respectively. Planting was performed without any type of conservation practice in an area with a 9% slope. A sedimentation tank was placed at the end of each plot to collect the material transported. For the acoustic system, pink noise was used in the measurement of the proposed monitoring, for collecting information on incident and reflected sound pressure levels. In general, obtained values of soil loss confirmed that 94.3% of material exported to the basin water came from the bare soil plot, 2.8% from the corn plot, 1.8% from the wheat plot, and 1.1% from the forage grass plot. With respect to the acoustic monitoring, results indicated that at 16kHz erosion plot coverage type had a significant influence on the sound absorption coefficient. High correlation coefficients were found in estimations of the A and C factors of the USLE, confirming that the acoustic technique is feasible for the determination of soil loss directly in the field. PMID:24972796

  12. Scattering and absorption coefficients of silica-doped alumina aerogels.

    PubMed

    Fu, Tairan; Tang, Jiaqi; Chen, Kai; Zhang, Fan

    2016-02-01

    Alumina-based aerogels are especially useful in many applications due to their excellent stability at high temperatures. This study experimentally analyzed the radiative properties of silica-doped alumina aerogels through spectral directional-hemispherical measurements for wavelengths of 0.38-25 μm. The silica-doped alumina aerogel samples were prepared with a 1.4∶1 molar ratio of silica to alumina. A two-flux model was used to describe the radiation propagation in a 1D scattering absorbing sample to derive expressions for the normal-hemispherical transmittances and reflectances based on the transport approximation. The normal-hemispherical transmittances and reflectances were measured at various spectral wavelengths and sample thicknesses using the integrating sphere method. The spectral absorption and transport scattering coefficients of silica-doped alumina aerogels were then determined from the measured normal-hemispherical data. The absorption and transport scattering coefficients of silica-doped alumina aerogels are (0.1  cm-1, 36  cm-1) and (0.1  cm-1, 112  cm-1) for wavelengths of 0.38-8.0 μm. The spectral transport scattering coefficient varies in the opposite direction from the spectral absorption coefficient for various wavelengths. The radiative properties for silica and alumina aerogels were quite different for the absorption coefficient for wavelengths of 2.5-8.0 μm and for the transport scattering coefficient for wavelengths of 0.38-2.5 and 3.5-6.0 μm. The measured radiative properties were used to predict the spectral normal-hemispherical reflectance and transmittance of the silica-doped alumina aerogels for various sample thicknesses and wavelengths. The predicted values do not change for the sample thicknesses greater than a critical value. The analysis provides valuable reference data for alumina aerogels for high-temperature applications. PMID:26836071

  13. Coefficient of variation spectral analysis: An application to underwater acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herstein, P. D.; Laplante, R. F.

    1983-05-01

    Acoustic noise in the ocean is often described in terms of its power spectral density. Just as in other media, this noise consists of both narrowband and broadband frequency components. A major problem in the analysis of power spectral density measurements is distinguishing between narrowband spectral components of interest and contaminating narrowband components. In this paper, the use of coefficient of variation (Cv) spectrum is examined as an adjunct to the conventional power spectrum to distinguish narrowband components of interest from contaminating components. The theory of the Cv is presented. Coefficients for several classical input distributions are developed. It is shown that Cv spectra can be easily implemented as an adjunct procedure during the computation of the ensemble of averaged power spectra. Power and Cv spectra derived from actual at-sea sonobuoy measurements of deep ocean ambient noise separate narrowband components from narrowband lines of interest in the ensemble of averaged power spectra, these acoustic components of interest can be distinguished in the Cv spectra.

  14. Ultra-broadband sound absorption by acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xue; Liang, Bin; Cheng, Jian-Chun

    2015-03-01

    Metamaterials with extraordinary properties unavailable in nature have opened up new design possibilities. Acoustic absorbers are of particular significances for acoustics-based devices and find applications in various scenarios, but subject to the inherent restriction of the natural acoustical parameters and limited operating bandwidth. We report the theoretical design, numerical calculation and experimental study on the realization of a metamaterial-based acoustic absorber with a simple yet efficient structure. The proposed acoustic absorber works in an ultra-broad band without restricted by the material type or requiring extra absorbing material. Such distinct effects stem from the localization and dissipation of different spectrum components at predesigned spatial positions. Theoretical predictions developed based on classical acoustic theory agree well with numerical and experimental results. The realization of ultra-broadband acoustic absorber with unique properties of stiffness and environmental-friendliness has paved the way for designing conceptual acoustic devices, and has potential applications in situations with special requirements on acoustic absorption characteristics. Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, MOE, Department of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093, China.

  15. Absorption of surface acoustic waves by topological insulator thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Li, L. L.; Xu, W.

    2014-08-11

    We present a theoretical study on the absorption of the surface acoustic waves (SAWs) by Dirac electrons in topological insulator (TI) thin films (TITFs). We find that due to momentum and energy conservation laws, the absorption of the SAWs in TITFs can only be achieved via intra-band electronic transitions. The strong absorption can be observed up to sub-terahertz frequencies. With increasing temperature, the absorption intensity increases significantly and the cut-off frequency is blue-shifted. More interestingly, we find that the absorption of the SAWs by the TITFs can be markedly enhanced by the tunable subgap in the Dirac energy spectrum of the TI surface states. Such a subgap is absent in conventional two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) and in the gapless Dirac 2DEG such as graphene. This study is pertinent to the exploration of the acoustic properties of TIs and to potential application of TIs as tunable SAW devices working at hypersonic frequencies.

  16. Impact of inhomogeneous optical scattering coefficient distribution on recovery of optical absorption coefficient maps using tomographic photoacoustic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoqi; Jiang, Huabei

    2013-02-01

    We present a study through extensive simulation that considers the impact of inhomogeneous optical scattering coefficient distribution on recovery of optical absorption coefficient maps using tomographic photoacoustic data collected from media mimicking breast tissue. We found that while the impact of scattering heterogeneities/targets is modest on photoacoustic recovery of optical absorption coefficients, the impact of scattering contrast caused by adipose tissue, a layer of normal tissue along the boundary of the breast, is dramatic on reconstruction of optical absorption coefficients using photoacoustic data—up to 25.8% relative error in recovering the absorption coefficient is estimated in such cases. To overcome this problem, we propose a new method to enhance photoacoustic recovery of the optical absorption coefficient in heterogeneous media by considering inhomogeneous scattering coefficient distribution provided by diffuse optical tomography (DOT). Results from extensive simulations show that photoacoustic recovery of absorption coefficient maps can be improved considerably with a priori scattering information from DOT.

  17. Absorption-coefficient-determination method for particulate materials.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, J D; Douglass, R E; Garvey, D M

    1994-07-01

    A method is presented for determining the optical absorption coefficient, or the imaginary refractive index, of particulate material that has been collected from aerosols or hydrosols by means of filtration. The method, based on the Kubelka-Munk theory of diffuse reflectance, is nondestructive and requires no other knowledge of the sample than the amount present, the specific gravity, and an estimate of the real index of refraction. The theoretical development of the method is discussed along with an analysis of photometric and gravimetric errors. We test the method by comparing results obtained for powdered didymium glass with measurements made before the glass was crushed. An example of the method's application to the determination of the absorption coefficient of atmospheric dust at UV, visible, and near-IR wavelengths is also presented. PMID:20935789

  18. Light fluence correction for quantitative determination of tissue absorption coefficient using multi-spectral optoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brochu, Frederic M.; Joseph, James; Tomaszewski, Michal; Bohndiek, Sarah E.

    2015-07-01

    MultiSpectral Optoacoustic Tomography (MSOT) is a fast developing imaging modality, combining the high resolution and penetration depth of ultrasound with the excellent contrast from optical imaging of tissue. Absorption and scattering of the near infrared excitation light modulates the spectral profile of light as it propagates deep into biological tissue, meaning the images obtained provide only qualitative insight into the distribution of tissue chromophores. The goal of this work is to accurately recover the spectral profile of excitation light by modelling light fluence in the data reconstruction, to enable quantitative imaging. We worked with a commercial small animal MSOT scanner and developed our light fluence correction for its' cylindrical geometry. Optoacoustic image reconstruction pinpoints the sources of acoustic waves detected by the transducers and returns the initial pressure amplitude at these points. This pressure is the product of the dimensionless Grüneisen parameter, the absorption coefficient and the light fluence. Under the condition of constant Grüneisen parameter and well modelled light fluence, there is a linear relationship between the initial pressure amplitude measured in the optoacoustic image and the absorption coefficient. We were able to reproduce this linear relationship in different physical regions of an agarose gel phantom containing targets of known optical absorption coefficient, demonstrating that our light fluence model was working. We also demonstrate promising results of light fluence correction effects on in vivo data.

  19. Subwavelength total acoustic absorption with degenerate resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Min; Meng, Chong; Fu, Caixing; Li, Yong; Yang, Zhiyu; Sheng, Ping

    2015-09-01

    We report the experimental realization of perfect sound absorption by sub-wavelength monopole and dipole resonators that exhibit degenerate resonant frequencies. This is achieved through the destructive interference of two resonators' transmission responses, while the matching of their averaged impedances to that of air implies no backscattering, thereby leading to total absorption. Two examples, both using decorated membrane resonators (DMRs) as the basic units, are presented. The first is a flat panel comprising a DMR and a pair of coupled DMRs, while the second one is a ventilated short tube containing a DMR in conjunction with a sidewall DMR backed by a cavity. In both examples, near perfect absorption, up to 99.7%, has been observed with the airborne wavelength up to 1.2 m, which is at least an order of magnitude larger than the composite absorber. Excellent agreement between theory and experiment is obtained.

  20. A practical acoustical absorption analysis of coir fiber based on rigid frame modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayub, Md.; Nor, Mohd Jailani Mohd; Fouladi, Mohammad Hosseini; Zulkifli, Rozli; Amin, Nowshad

    2012-03-01

    An analytical study based on rigid frame model is demonstrated to evaluate the acoustic absorption of coir fiber. Effects of different conditions such as combination of air gap and perforated plate (PP) are studied in this work. Materials used here are treated as rigid rather than elastic, since the flow resistivity of coir fiber is very low. The well-known rigid frame Johnson-Allard equivalent-fluid model is applied to obtain the acoustic impedance of single layer coir fiber. Atalla and Sgard model is employed to estimate the surface impedance of PP. Acoustic transmission approach (ATA) is utilized for adding various consecutive layers in multilayer structure. Models are examined in different conditions such as single layer coir fiber, coir fiber backed with air gap, single layer PP in combination with coir fiber and air gap. Experiments are conducted in impedance tube on normal incidence sound absorption to validate the results. Results from the measurement are found to be in well agreement with the theoretical absorption coefficients. The performance of the rigid frame modeling method is checked more specifically in all conditions, by the mean prediction error rate of normal incidence sound absorption coefficients. Comparison between the measured absorption coefficients and predicted by rigid frame method shows discrepancy lower than 20 and 15% for most of the conditions in the frequency range of 0.2-1.5 and 1.5-5 kHz, respectively. Moreover, acoustic absorption of various single and multilayer structures is compared with the simpler empirical methods such as Delany-Bazley and Miki model; and complicated method such as Biot-Allard Model and Allard Transfer Function (TF) method. Comparisons show that the presented method offers a better accuracy of the results than the empirical models. Subsequently, it can provide almost same absorption plot with Biot-Allard model (single layer combination) and TF method (multilayer combination) proving it to be a

  1. Sound absorption of microperforated panels inside compact acoustic enclosures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Cheng; Cheng, Li

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the sound absorption effect of microperforated panels (MPPs) in small-scale enclosures, an effort stemming from the recent interests in using MPPs for noise control in compact mechanical systems. Two typical MPP backing cavity configurations (an empty backing cavity and a honeycomb backing structure) are studied. Although both configurations provide basically the same sound absorption curves from standard impedance tube measurements, their in situ sound absorption properties, when placed inside a small enclosure, are drastically different. This phenomenon is explained using a simple system model based on modal analyses. It is shown that the accurate prediction of the in situ sound absorption of the MPPs inside compact acoustic enclosures requires meticulous consideration of the configuration of the backing cavity and its coupling with the enclosure in front. The MPP structure should be treated as part of the entire system, rather than an absorption boundary characterized by the surface impedance, calculated or measured in simple acoustic environment. Considering the spatial matching between the acoustic fields across the MPP, the possibility of attenuating particular enclosure resonances by partially covering the enclosure wall with a properly designed MPP structure is also demonstrated.

  2. Focused optical and acoustic beams in media with nonlinear absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudenko, O. V.; Sukhorukov, A. A.

    1996-11-01

    Optical and acoustic beams are known to be useful for medical and biological applications, such as diagnostics, surgery, etc. At high intensities both nonlinear lens effects and nonlinear absorption can be significant for the beams. The nonlinear absorption arises due to two-photon optical processes or acoustic shock wave formation. The present work is devoted to the theoretical description of nonlinear beam propagation and focal spot formation taking into account the competition between focusing, diffraction and absorption. We derived a new nonlinear integro- differential equation describing the spatial evolution of the beam width. The general analytical solution of this equation is obtained for arbitrary boundary conditions. The simple formulas are derived for the angle divergence in the far field, as well as for beam width at nonlinear waist. The results of the analysis of these key parameters in different situations are presented.

  3. A method for monitoring nuclear absorption coefficients of aviation fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprinkle, Danny R.; Shen, Chih-Ping

    1989-01-01

    A technique for monitoring variability in the nuclear absorption characteristics of aviation fuels has been developed. It is based on a highly collimated low energy gamma radiation source and a sodium iodide counter. The source and the counter assembly are separated by a geometrically well-defined test fuel cell. A computer program for determining the mass attenuation coefficient of the test fuel sample, based on the data acquired for a preset counting period, has been developed and tested on several types of aviation fuel.

  4. Measurements of the absorption coefficient of stratospheric aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogren, J. A.; Ahlquist, N. C.; Clarke, A. D.; Charlson, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The absorption coefficients of stratospheric aerosols are measured using a variation on the integrating plate method. The technique is based on the decrease in the transparency of a substrate when an absorbing aerosol is deposited on it. A Lambert scatterer is placed behind the substrate to integrate forward scattered light and minimize the effect of scattering on the measurement. The low pressure in the stratosphere is used for the direct impaction of particles onto a narrow strip of opal glass. The eight samples collected had a median value of 4 x 10 to the -9th m with an uncertainty of + or - 5 x 10 to the -9th m. If this absorption is due to graphitic carbon, then its concentration is estimated at about 0.4 ng/cu m, or about 0.25% of the total aerosol mass concentration. Estimates of the aerosol scattering coefficients based on satellite extinction inversions result in an aerosol single-scattering albedo in the range of 0.96-1.0.

  5. Method and apparatus for background signal reduction in opto-acoustic absorption measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosengren, L. G. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    The sensitivity of an opto-acoustic absorption detector is increased to make it possible to measure trace amounts of constituent gases. A second beam radiation path is created through the sample cell identical to a first path except as to length, alternating the beam through the two paths and minimizing the detected pressure difference for the two paths while the beam wavelength is tuned away from the absorption lines of the sample. Then with the beam wavelength tuned to the absorption line of any constituent of interest, the pressure difference is a measure of trace amounts of the constituent. The same improved detector may also be used for measuring the absorption coefficient of known concentrations of absorbing gases.

  6. A novel acoustic sensor approach to classify seeds based on sound absorption spectra.

    PubMed

    Gasso-Tortajada, Vicent; Ward, Alastair J; Mansur, Hasib; Brøchner, Torben; Sørensen, Claus G; Green, Ole

    2010-01-01

    A non-destructive and novel in situ acoustic sensor approach based on the sound absorption spectra was developed for identifying and classifying different seed types. The absorption coefficient spectra were determined by using the impedance tube measurement method. Subsequently, a multivariate statistical analysis, i.e., principal component analysis (PCA), was performed as a way to generate a classification of the seeds based on the soft independent modelling of class analogy (SIMCA) method. The results show that the sound absorption coefficient spectra of different seed types present characteristic patterns which are highly dependent on seed size and shape. In general, seed particle size and sphericity were inversely related with the absorption coefficient. PCA presented reliable grouping capabilities within the diverse seed types, since the 95% of the total spectral variance was described by the first two principal components. Furthermore, the SIMCA classification model based on the absorption spectra achieved optimal results as 100% of the evaluation samples were correctly classified. This study contains the initial structuring of an innovative method that will present new possibilities in agriculture and industry for classifying and determining physical properties of seeds and other materials. PMID:22163455

  7. A Novel Acoustic Sensor Approach to Classify Seeds Based on Sound Absorption Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Gasso-Tortajada, Vicent; Ward, Alastair J.; Mansur, Hasib; Brøchner, Torben; Sørensen, Claus G.; Green, Ole

    2010-01-01

    A non-destructive and novel in situ acoustic sensor approach based on the sound absorption spectra was developed for identifying and classifying different seed types. The absorption coefficient spectra were determined by using the impedance tube measurement method. Subsequently, a multivariate statistical analysis, i.e., principal component analysis (PCA), was performed as a way to generate a classification of the seeds based on the soft independent modelling of class analogy (SIMCA) method. The results show that the sound absorption coefficient spectra of different seed types present characteristic patterns which are highly dependent on seed size and shape. In general, seed particle size and sphericity were inversely related with the absorption coefficient. PCA presented reliable grouping capabilities within the diverse seed types, since the 95% of the total spectral variance was described by the first two principal components. Furthermore, the SIMCA classification model based on the absorption spectra achieved optimal results as 100% of the evaluation samples were correctly classified. This study contains the initial structuring of an innovative method that will present new possibilities in agriculture and industry for classifying and determining physical properties of seeds and other materials. PMID:22163455

  8. Photosensitizer absorption coefficient modeling and necrosis prediction during Photodynamic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Salas-García, Irene; Fanjul-Vélez, Félix; Arce-Diego, José Luis

    2012-09-01

    The development of accurate predictive models for Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) has emerged as a valuable tool to adjust the current therapy dosimetry to get an optimal treatment response, and definitely to establish new personal protocols. Several attempts have been made in this way, although the influence of the photosensitizer depletion on the optical parameters has not been taken into account so far. We present a first approach to predict the spatio-temporal variation of the photosensitizer absorption coefficient during PDT applied to dermatological diseases, taking into account the photobleaching of a topical photosensitizer. This permits us to obtain the photons density absorbed by the photosensitizer molecules as the treatment progresses and to determine necrosis maps to estimate the short term therapeutic effects in the target tissue. The model presented also takes into account an inhomogeneous initial photosensitizer distribution, light propagation in biological media and the evolution of the molecular concentrations of different components involved in the photochemical reactions. The obtained results allow to investigate how the photosensitizer depletion during the photochemical reactions affects light absorption by the photosensitizer molecules as the optical radiation propagates through the target tissue, and estimate the necrotic tumor area progression under different treatment conditions. PMID:22704663

  9. MEASUREMENTS OF ABSORPTION, EMISSIVITY REDUCTION, AND LOCAL SUPPRESSION OF SOLAR ACOUSTIC WAVES IN SUNSPOTS

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, D.-Y.; Liang, Z.-C.; Yang, M.-H.; Zhao Hui; Sun, M.-T.

    2009-05-01

    The power of solar acoustic waves in magnetic regions is lower relative to the quiet Sun. Absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression of acoustic waves contribute to the observed power reduction in magnetic regions. We propose a model for the energy budget of acoustic waves propagating through a sunspot in terms of the coefficients of absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression of the sunspot. Using the property that the waves emitted along the wave path between two points have no correlation with the signal at the starting point, we can separate the effects of these three mechanisms. Applying this method to helioseismic data filtered with direction and phase-velocity filters, we measure the fraction of the contribution of each mechanism to the power deficit in the umbra of the leading sunspot of NOAA 9057. The contribution from absorption is 23.3 {+-} 1.3%, emissivity reduction 8.2 {+-} 1.4%, and local suppression 68.5 {+-} 1.5%, for a wave packet corresponding to a phase velocity of 6.98 x 10{sup -5} rad s{sup -1}.

  10. Absorption of acoustic waves by sunspots. II - Resonance absorption in axisymmetric fibril models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenthal, C. S.

    1992-01-01

    Analytical calculations of acoustic waves scattered by sunspots which concentrate on the absorption at the magnetohydrodynamic Alfven resonance are extended to the case of a flux-tube embedded in a uniform atmosphere. The model is based on a flux-tubes of varying radius that are highly structured, translationally invariant, and axisymmetric. The absorbed fractional energy is determined for different flux-densities and subphotospheric locations with attention given to the effects of twist. When the flux is highly concentrated into annuli efficient absorption is possible even when the mean magnetic flux density is low. The model demonstrates low absorption at low azimuthal orders even in the presence of twist which generally increases the range of wave numbers over which efficient absorption can occur. Resonance absorption is concluded to be an efficient mechanism in monolithic sunspots, fibril sunspots, and plage fields.

  11. Scattering coefficients and gray-body factor for 1D BEC acoustic black holes: Exact results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbri, Alessandro; Balbinot, Roberto; Anderson, Paul R.

    2016-03-01

    A complete set of exact analytic solutions to the mode equation is found in the region exterior to the acoustic horizon for a class of 1D Bose-Einstein condensate acoustic black holes. From these, analytic expressions for the scattering coefficients and gray-body factor are obtained. The results are used to verify previous predictions regarding the behaviors of the scattering coefficients and gray-body factor in the low-frequency limit.

  12. Accurate estimation of normal incidence absorption coefficients with confidence intervals using a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuye, Cedric; Vanlanduit, Steve; Guillaume, Patrick

    2009-06-01

    When using optical measurements of the sound fields inside a glass tube, near the material under test, to estimate the reflection and absorption coefficients, not only these acoustical parameters but also confidence intervals can be determined. The sound fields are visualized using a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV). In this paper the influence of different test signals on the quality of the results, obtained with this technique, is examined. The amount of data gathered during one measurement scan makes a thorough statistical analysis possible leading to the knowledge of confidence intervals. The use of a multi-sine, constructed on the resonance frequencies of the test tube, shows to be a very good alternative for the traditional periodic chirp. This signal offers the ability to obtain data for multiple frequencies in one measurement, without the danger of a low signal-to-noise ratio. The variability analysis in this paper clearly shows the advantages of the proposed multi-sine compared to the periodic chirp. The measurement procedure and the statistical analysis are validated by measuring the reflection ratio at a closed end and comparing the results with the theoretical value. Results of the testing of two building materials (an acoustic ceiling tile and linoleum) are presented and compared to supplier data.

  13. A sound absorptive element comprising an acoustic resonance nanofibrous membrane.

    PubMed

    Kalinova, Klara

    2015-01-01

    As absorption of sound of lower frequencies is quite problematic with fibrous material made up of coarser fibers, development of highly efficient sound absorption material is called for. This is why this work deals with the development of new high sound absorption material. To absorb the low frequencies, especially the structures based on resonance principle of nanofibrous layers are used, when through resonance of some elements the acoustic energy is transferred into thermal energy. The goal of the invention is achieved by a sound absorbing means which contains resonance membrane formed by a layer of polymeric nanofibers, which is attached to a frame. For production of nanofibrous membranes, the cord electrospinning was used. The resonance membrane was then, upon impact of sound waves of low frequency, brought into forced vibrations, whereby the kinetic energy of the membrane was converted into thermal energy by friction of individual nanofibers, by the friction of the membrane with ambient air and possibly with other layers of material arranged in its proximity, and some of the energy was also transmitted to the frame, through which the vibrations of the resonance membrane were damped. The density and shape of the mesh of frame formations determine the resonance frequency of the acoustic means. The goal of the invention is therefore to eliminate or at least reduce the disadvantages of the present state of the art and to propose sound absorbing means that would be capable of absorbing, with good results sounds in as broadest frequency range as possible. Here, we also discussed some patents relevant to the topic. PMID:25986230

  14. Absorption coefficient at 10.6 microm in CdTe modulator crystals.

    PubMed

    Tucker, A W; Birnbaum, M; Montes, H; Fincher, C L

    1982-08-15

    The bulk and surface absorption coefficients of CdTe modulator crystals at 10.6 microm were compared with those of single-crystal KC1 and NaCl which served to calibrate the laser calorimeter. High-resistivity (>10(7) ohm/cm) CdTe crystals exhibited a bulk absorption coefficient of 0.0014 cm(-1). PMID:20396150

  15. FTIR-spectrometer-determined absorption coefficients of seven hydrazine fuel gases - Implications for laser remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molina, L. T.; Grant, W. B.

    1984-01-01

    The absorption spectra of three hydrazines and four of their air-oxidation products were measured in the 9-12-micron spectral region with a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer with a 0.05-kayser resolution to determine absorption coefficients at CO2 and tunable diode laser wavelengths. The measurements agreed well with published CO2 laser determinations for many of the absorption coefficients, except where the published values are thought to be in error. The coefficients were then used to estimate the sensitivity for remote detection of these gases using CO2 and tunable diode lasers in long-path differential absorption measurements.

  16. Dynamic absorption coefficients of CAR and non-CAR resists at EUV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallica, Roberto; Stowers, Jason K.; Grenville, Andrew; Frommhold, Andreas; Robinson, Alex P. G.; Ekinci, Yasin

    2016-03-01

    The dynamic absorption coefficients of several CAR and non-CAR EUV photoresists are measured experimentally using a specifically developed setup in transmission mode at the XIL beamline of the Swiss Light Source. The absorption coefficient α and the Dill parameters ABC were measured with unprecedented accuracy. In general the α of resists match very closely with the theoretical value calculated from elemental densities and absorption coefficients, whereas exceptions are observed. In addition, through the direct measurements of the absorption coefficients and dose-to-clear values, we introduce a new figure of merit called Chemical Sensitivity to account for all the post-absorption chemical reaction ongoing in the resist, which is also predicts a quantitative clearing volume, and respectively clearing radius, due to the photon absorption in the resist. These parameters may help in deeper insight into the underlying mechanisms of EUV concept of clearing volume and clearing radius are then defined and quantitatively calculated.

  17. Measurement of the absorption coefficient using the sound-intensity technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwal, M.; Bernhard, R.

    1984-01-01

    The possibility of using the sound intensity technique to measure the absorption coefficient of a material is investigated. This technique measures the absorption coefficient by measuring the intensity incident on the sample and the net intensity reflected by the sample. Results obtained by this technique are compared with the standard techniques of measuring the change in the reverberation time and the standing wave ratio in a tube, thereby, calculating the random incident and the normal incident adsorption coefficient.

  18. Symmetrical and anti-symmetrical coherent perfect absorption for acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Pengjiang; Croënne, Charles; Tak Chu, Sai; Li, Jensen

    2014-03-24

    We investigate tunable acoustic absorption enabled by the coherent control of input waves. It relies on coherent perfect absorption originally proposed in optics. By designing appropriate acoustic metamaterial structures with resonating effective bulk modulus or density, we show that complete absorption of incident waves impinging on the metamaterial can be achieved for either symmetrical or anti-symmetrical inputs in the forward and backward directions. By adjusting the relative phase between the two incident beams, absorption can be tuned effectively from unity to zero, making coherent control useful in applications like acoustic modulators, noise controllers, transducers, and switches.

  19. Spectral absorption coefficients and imaginary parts of refractive indices of Saharan dust during SAMUM-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, T.; Schladitz, A.; Massling, A.; Kaaden, N.; Kandler, K.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2009-02-01

    ABSTRACT During the SAMUM-1 experiment, absorption coefficients and imaginary parts of refractive indices of mineral dust particles were investigated in southern Morocco. Main absorbing constituents of airborne samples were identified to be iron oxide and soot. Spectral absorption coefficients were measured using a spectral optical absorption photometer (SOAP) in the wavelength range from 300 to 800 nm with a resolution of 50 nm. A new method that accounts for a loading-dependent correction of fibre filter based absorption photometers, was developed. The imaginary part of the refractive index was determined using Mie calculations from 350 to 800 nm. The spectral absorption coefficient allowed a separation between dust and soot absorption. A correlation analysis showed that the dust absorption coefficient is correlated (R2 up to 0.55) with the particle number concentration for particle diameters larger than 0.5 μm, whereas the coefficient of determination R2 for smaller particles is below 0.1. Refractive indices were derived for both the total aerosol and a dust aerosol that was corrected for soot absorption. Average imaginary parts of refractive indices of the entire aerosol are 7.4 × 10-3, 3.4 × 10-3 and 2.0 × 10-3 at wavelengths of 450, 550 and 650 nm. After a correction for the soot absorption, imaginary parts of refractive indices are 5.1 × 10-3, 1.6 × 10-3 and 4.5 × 10-4.

  20. Absorption of laser radiation in a H-He plasma. I - Theoretical calculation of the absorption coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcop, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    The theory for calculating the absorption of laser radiation by hydrogen is outlined for the temperatures and pressures of common laboratory plasmas. Nonhydrogenic corrections for determining the absorption by helium are also included. The coefficients for the absorption of He-Ne laser radiation at the wavelengths of 0.633, 1.15, and 3.39 microns in a H plasma is presented for temperatures in the range from 10,000 to 40,000 K and electron number densities in the range from 10 to the 15th power to 10 to the 18th power per cu cm. The total absorption of a H-He plasma calculated from this theory is compared with the measured absorption. The theoretical composition of the H-He absorption is analyzed with respect to the significant absorption processes, inverse bremsstrahlung, photoionization, resonance excitation, and photodetachment.

  1. Absorption Coefficient Imaging by Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscopy in Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paula, Ana M.; Chaves, Claudilene R.; Silva, Haroldo B.; Weber, Gerald

    2003-06-01

    We present a method for obtaining a position-dependent absorption coefficient from near-field scanning optical transmission microscopy. We show that the optical transmission intensity can be combined with the topography, resulting into an absorption coefficient that simplifies the analysis of different materials within a sample. The method is tested with the dye rhodamine 6G, and we show some analysis in biological samples such as bacteria Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa . The calculated absorption coefficient images show important details of the bacteria, in particular for P. aeruginosa , in which membrane vesicles are clearly seen.

  2. Binary TLBO algorithm assisted for designing plasmonic nano bi-pyramids-based absorption coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhlaghi, Majid; Emami, Farzin; Nozhat, Najmeh

    2014-07-01

    A new efficient binary optimization method based on Teaching-Learning-Based Optimization (TLBO) algorithm is proposed to design an array of plasmonic nano bi-pyramids in order to achieve maximum absorption coefficient spectrum. In binary TLBO, a group of learners consisting of a matrix with binary entries controls the presence ('1') or the absence ('0') of nanoparticles in the array. Simulation results show that absorption coefficient strongly depends on the localized position of plasmonic nanoparticles. Non-periodic structures have more appropriate response in term of absorption coefficient. This approach is useful in optical applications such as solar cells and plasmonic nano antenna.

  3. Acoustic speed and attenuation coefficient in sheep aorta measured at 5-9 MHz.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Katharine H; Poepping, Tamie L; McNeilly, Alan; Megson, Ian L; Hoskins, Peter R

    2006-06-01

    B-mode ultrasound (US) images from blood vessels in vivo differ significantly from vascular flow phantom images. Phantoms with acoustic properties more closely matched to those of in vivo arteries may give better images. A method was developed for measuring the speed and attenuation coefficient of US over the range 5 to 9 MHz in samples of sheep aorta using a pulse-echo technique. The times-of-flight method was used with envelope functions to identify the reference points. The method was tested with samples of tissue-mimicking material of known acoustic properties. The tissue samples were stored in Krebs physiologic buffer solution and measured over a range of temperatures. At 37 degrees C, the acoustic speed and attenuation coefficient as a function of frequency in MHz were 1600 +/- 50 ms(-1) and 1.5 +/- 4f(0.94 +/- 1.3) dB cm(-1), respectively. PMID:16785018

  4. Absorption coefficients for water vapor at 193 nm from 300 to 1073 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, W. J.; Carleton, K. L.; Marinelli, W. J.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of the water absorption coefficient at 193 nm from 300 to 1073 K are reported. The measurements were made using broadband VUV radiation and a monochromator-based detection system. The water vapor was generated by a saturator and metered into a flowing, 99 cm absorption cell via a water vapor mass flow meter. The 193 nm absorption coefficient measurements are compared to room temperature and high temperature shock tube measurements with good agreement. The absorption can be parameterized by a nu3 vibrational mode reaction coordinate and the thermal population of the nu3 mode.

  5. Particle scattering, backscattering, and absorption coefficients: An in situ closure and sensitivity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wex, Heike; Neusüß, Christian; Wendisch, Manfred; Stratmann, Frank; Koziar, Christian; Keil, Andreas; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Ebert, Martin

    2002-11-01

    Comparisons between measured and calculated aerosol scattering, backscattering, and absorption coefficients were made based on in situ, ground-based measurements during the Melpitz INTensive (MINT) and Lindenberg Aerosol Characterization Experiment 1998 (LACE 98) field studies. Furthermore, airborne measurements made with the same type of instruments are reviewed and compared with the ground-based measurements. Agreement between measured and calculated values is on the order of ±20% for scattering and backscattering coefficients. A sensitivity analysis showed a large influence on the calculated particle scattering and backscattering coefficients resulting from sizing uncertainties in the measured number size distributions. Measured absorption coefficients were significantly smaller than the corresponding calculated values. The largest uncertainty for the calculated absorption coefficients resulted from the size-dependent fraction of elemental carbon (EC) of the aerosol. A correction for the measured fractions of EC could significantly improve the agreement between measured and calculated absorption coefficients. The overall uncertainty of the calculated values was investigated with a Monte Carlo method by simultaneously and randomly varying the input parameters of the calculations, where the variation of each parameter was bounded by its uncertainty. The measurements were mostly found to be within the range of uncertainties of the calculations, with uncertainties for the calculated scattering and backscattering coefficients of about ±20% and for the absorption coefficients of about ±30%. Thus, to increase the accuracy of calculated scattering, backscattering, and absorption coefficients, it is crucial to further reduce the error in particle number size distribution measurement techniques. In addition, further improvement of the techniques for measuring absorption coefficients and further investigation of the measurement of the fraction of EC of the aerosol is

  6. Experimental measurements of the spectral absorption coefficient of pure fused silica optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Moore, Travis J; Jones, Matthew R

    2015-02-20

    Knowledge of the spectral absorption coefficient of fused silica optical fibers is important in modeling heat transfer in the processes and applications in which these fibers are used. An experimental method used to measure the spectral absorption coefficient of optical fibers is presented. Radiative energy from a blackbody radiator set at different temperatures is directed through the optical fibers and into an FTIR spectrometer. Spectral instrument response functions are calculated for different fiber lengths. The ratios of the slopes of the instrument response functions for the different lengths of fibers are used to solve for the spectral absorption coefficient of the fibers. The spectral absorption coefficient of low OH pure fused silica optical fibers is measured between the wavelengths 1.5 and 2.5 μm. PMID:25968202

  7. A method for determination mass absorption coefficient of gamma rays by Compton scattering.

    PubMed

    El Abd, A

    2014-12-01

    A method was proposed for determination mass absorption coefficient of gamma rays for compounds, alloys and mixtures. It is based on simulating interaction processes of gamma rays with target elements having atomic numbers from Z=1 to Z=92 using the MCSHAPE software. Intensities of Compton scattered gamma rays at saturation thicknesses and at a scattering angle of 90° were calculated for incident gamma rays of different energies. The obtained results showed that the intensity of Compton scattered gamma rays at saturations and mass absorption coefficients can be described by mathematical formulas. These were used to determine mass absorption coefficients for compound, alloys and mixtures with the knowledge of their Compton scattered intensities. The method was tested by calculating mass absorption coefficients for some compounds, alloys and mixtures. There is a good agreement between obtained results and calculated ones using WinXom software. The advantages and limitations of the method were discussed. PMID:25241360

  8. Absorption of laser radiation in a H-He plasma. II - Experimental measurement of the absorption coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billman, K. W.; Rowley, P. D.; Stallcop, J. R.; Presley, L.

    1974-01-01

    The absorption coefficients of 0.633-, 1.15-, and 3.39-micron laser radiation for a homogeneous H-He plasma have been measured in the temperature range from 12.2 to 21.7 (x 1000 K) and in the electron number density range 0.45 to 6.5 (x 10 to the 17th power per cu cm). Good agreement is found between the experimentally determined total absorption for each of the wavelengths and that calculated from theory. Furthermore, because the 3.39-micron absorption is dominated by inverse bremsstrahlung, while the 0.633-micron absorption is dominated by photoionization and resonance absorption, the experiment indicates a correct assessment by the theory of these individual absorption mechanisms.

  9. Identification of a reflection boundary coefficient in an acoustic wave equation by optimal control techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Lenhart, S. |; Protopopescu, V.; Yong, J.

    1997-12-31

    The authors apply optimal control techniques to find approximate solutions to an inverse problem for the acoustic wave equation. The inverse problem (assumed here to have a solution) is to determine the boundary reflection coefficient from partial measurements of the acoustic signal. The sought reflection coefficient is treated as a control and the goal--quantified by an approximate functional--is to drive the model solution close to the experimental data by adjusting this coefficient. The problem is solved by finding the optimal control that minimizes the approximate functional. Then by driving the cost of the control to zero one proves that the corresponding sequence of optimal controls represents a converging sequence of estimates for the solution of the inverse problem. Compared to classical regularization methods (e.g., Tikhonov coupled with optimization schemes), their approach yields: (1) a systematic procedure to solve inverse problems of identification type and (ii) an explicit expression for the approximations of the solution.

  10. Noncontact technique for determining the thermal diffusivity coefficient on acoustically levitated liquid drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohsaka, K.; Rednikov, A.; Sadhal, S. S.

    2003-02-01

    We present a technique that can be used to determine the thermal diffusivity coefficient of undercooled liquids, which exist at temperatures below their freezing points. The technique involves levitation of a small amount of liquid in a flattened drop shape using an acoustic levitator and heating it with a laser beam. The heated drop is then subjected to natural cooling by heat loss from the surface. Due to acoustic streaming, the heat loss mainly occurs through the equator section of the drop. The measured cooling rate in combination with a radial heat conduction model allows us to calculate the thermal diffusivity coefficient of the drop. We demonstrate the feasibility of the technique using glycerin drops as a model liquid. The technique is well suited if the thermal diffusivity coefficient of the liquid in the normal state (i.e., above the freezing point) is known or can be measured by conventional techniques.

  11. Satellite retrieval of the absorption coefficient of phytoplankton phycoerythrin pigment: theory and feasibility status.

    PubMed

    Hoge, F E; Wright, C W; Lyon, P E; Swift, R N; Yungel, J K

    1999-12-20

    Oceanic radiance model inversion methods are used to develop a comprehensive algorithm for retrieval of the absorption coefficients of phycourobilin (PUB) pigment, type I phycoerythrobilin (PEB) pigment rich in PUB, and type II PEB deficient in PUB pigment (together with the usual "big three" inherent optical properties: the total backscattering coefficient and the absorption coefficients of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM)-detritus and phytoplankton). This fully modeled inversion algorithm is then simplified to yield a hybrid modeled-unmodeled inversion algorithm in which the phycoerythrin (PE) absorption coefficient is retrieved as unmodeled 488-nm absorption (which exceeds the modeled phytoplankton and the CDOM-detritus absorption coefficients). Each algorithm was applied to water-leaving radiances, but only hybrid modeled-unmodeled inversions yielded viable retrievals of the PE absorption coefficient. Validation of the PE absorption coefficient retrieval was achieved by relative comparison with airborne laser-induced PEB fluorescence. The modeled-unmodeled retrieval of four inherent optical properties by direct matrix inversion is rapid and well conditioned, but the accuracy is strongly limited by the accuracy of the three principal inherent optical property models across all four spectral bands. Several research areas are identified to enhance the radiance-model-based retrievals: (a) improved PEB and PUB absorption coefficient models, (b) PE spectral shifts induced by PUB chromophore substitution at chromophore binding sites, (c) specific absorption-sensitive phytoplankton absorption modeling, (d) total constituent backscattering modeling, (e) unmodeled carotinoid and phycocyanin absorption that are not now accounted for in the chlorophyll-dominated phytoplankton absorption coefficient model, and (f) iterative inversion techniques to solve for six constituents with only five radiances. Although considerable progress has been made toward the

  12. Satellite Retrieval of the Absorption Coefficient of Phytoplankton Phycoerythrin Pigment: Theory and Feasibility Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoge, Frank E.; Wright, C. Wayne; Lyon, Paul E.; Swift, Robert N.; Yungel, James K.

    1999-12-01

    Oceanic radiance model inversion methods are used to develop a comprehensive algorithm for retrieval of the absorption coefficients of phycourobilin (PUB) pigment, type I phycoerythrobilin (PEB) pigment rich in PUB, and type II PEB deficient in PUB pigment (together with the usual big three inherent optical properties: the total backscattering coefficient and the absorption coefficients of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) detritus and phytoplankton). This fully modeled inversion algorithm is then simplified to yield a hybrid modeled unmodeled inversion algorithm in which the phycoerythrin (PE) absorption coefficient is retrieved as unmodeled 488-nm absorption (which exceeds the modeled phytoplankton and the CDOM detritus absorption coefficients). Each algorithm was applied to water-leaving radiances, but only hybrid modeled unmodeled inversions yielded viable retrievals of the PE absorption coefficient. Validation of the PE absorption coefficient retrieval was achieved by relative comparison with airborne laser-induced PEB fluorescence. The modeled unmodeled retrieval of four inherent optical properties by direct matrix inversion is rapid and well conditioned, but the accuracy is strongly limited by the accuracy of the three principal inherent optical property models across all four spectral bands. Several research areas are identified to enhance the radiance-model-based retrievals: (a) improved PEB and PUB absorption coefficient models, (b) PE spectral shifts induced by PUB chromophore substitution at chromophore binding sites, (c) specific absorption-sensitive phytoplankton absorption modeling, (d) total constituent backscattering modeling, (e) unmodeled carotinoid and phycocyanin absorption that are not now accounted for in the chlorophyll-dominated phytoplankton absorption coefficient model, and (f) iterative inversion techniques to solve for six constituents with only five radiances. Although considerable progress has been made toward the satellite

  13. Experiment to Determine the Absorption Coefficient of Gamma Rays as a Function of Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ouseph, P. J.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Simpler than x-ray diffractometer experiments, the experiment described illustrates certain concepts regarding the interaction of electromagnetic rays with matter such as the exponential decrease in the intensity with absorber thickness, variation of the coefficient of absorption with energy, and the effect of the K-absorption edge on the…

  14. Air-ground interface: Surface waves, surface impedance and acoustic-to-seismic coupling coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigle, Gilles; Embleton, Tony

    1990-01-01

    In atmospheric acoustics, the subject of surface waves has been an area of discussion for many years. The existence of an acoustic surface wave is now well established theoretically. The mathematical solution for spherical wave propagation above an impedance boundary includes the possibility of a contribution that possesses all the standard properties for a surface wave. Surface waves exist when the surface is sufficiently porous, relative to its acoustical resistance, that it can influence the airborne particle velocity near the surface and reduce the phase velocity of sound waves in air at the surface. This traps some of the sound energy in the air to remain near the surface as it propagates. Above porous grounds, the existence of surface waves has eluded direct experimental confirmation (pulse experiments have failed to show a separate arrival expected from the reduced phase speed) and indirect evidence for its existence has appeared contradictory. The experimental evidence for the existence of an acoustical surface wave above porous boundaries is reviewed. Recent measurements including pulse experiments are also described. A few years ago the acoustic impedance of a grass-covered surface was measured in the frequency range 30 to 300 Hz. Here, further measurements on the same site are discussed. These measurements include core samples, a shallow refractive survey to determine the seismic velocities, and measurements of the acoustic-to-seismic coupling coefficient.

  15. Absorption and Scattering Coefficients: A Biophysical-Chemistry Experiment Using Reflectance Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordon, Gabriela B.; Lagorio, M. Gabriela

    2007-01-01

    A biophysical-chemistry experiment, based on the reflectance spectroscopy for calculating the absorption and scattering coefficients of leaves is described. The results show that different plants species exhibit different values for both the coefficients because of their different pigment composition.

  16. Tunable diode laser measurements of HO2NO2 absorption coefficients near 12.5 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, R. D.; Molina, L. T.; Webster, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    A tunable diode laser spectrometer has been used to measure absorption coefficients of peroxynitric acid (HO2NO2) near the 803/cm Q branch. HO2NO2 concentrations in a low-pressure flowing gas mixture were determined from chemical titration procedures and UV absorption spectroscopy. The diode laser measured absorption coefficients, at a spectral resolution of better than 0.001/cm, are about 10 percent larger than previous Fourier transform infrared measurements made at a spectral resolution of 0.06/cm.

  17. Correlation analysis of optical absorption cross section and rate coefficient measurements in reacting systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hessler, J.P.; Ogren, P.J.

    1992-08-31

    A technique was developed for determining relative importance and correlation between reactions making up a complex kinetic system. This technique was used to investigate measurements of optical absorption cross sections and the correlation between cross sections and measured rate coefficients. It is concluded that (1) species, initial conditions, and temporal regions may be identified where cross sections may be measured without interference from the kinetic behavior of the observed species and (2) experiments designed to measure rate coefficients will always be correlated with the absorption cross section of the observed species. This correlation may reduce the accuracy of rate coefficient measurements.

  18. A reverberation room round robin on the determination of absorption coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kath, U.

    In ten reverberation rooms with very different volumes and different room shapes, the absorption coefficients for mineral fiber mat were measured. The particular feature of this round robin was that the absorption material was much thicker than in other similar experiments and that it was measured not only with an area of 12 sq m on the floor, but also as a complete surface covering of a small wall in order to avoid the edge effect. The decay curves were evaluated in at least two institutions and the absorption coefficients were calculated using the Eyring equation. The absorption coefficients were quite dispersed from one room to another and also from one-third octave band to the adjacent ones. Errors due to change are small, thus one is dealing with systematic errors.

  19. Thermal diffusivity coefficient of glycerin determined on an acoustically levitated drop.

    PubMed

    Ohsaka, K; Rednikov, A; Sadhal, S S

    2002-10-01

    We present a technique that can be used to determine the thermal diffusivity coefficient of undercooled liquids that exist at temperatures below their freezing points. The technique involves levitation of a small amount of liquid in the shape of a flattened drop using an acoustic levitator and heating it with a CO2 laser. The heated drop is then allowed to cool naturally by heat loss from the surface. Due to acoustic streaming, heat loss is highly non-uniform and appears to mainly occur at the drop circumference (equatorial region). This fact allows us to relate the heat loss rate with a heat transfer model to determine the thermal diffusion coefficient. We demonstrate the feasibility of the technique using glycerin drops as a model liquid. PMID:12446319

  20. Measurements of Soot Mass Absorption Coefficients from 300 to 660 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renbaum-Wolff, Lindsay; Fisher, Al; Helgestad, Taylor; Lambe, Andrew; Sedlacek, Arthur; Smith, Geoffrey; Cappa, Christopher; Davidovits, Paul; Onasch, Timothy; Freedman, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Soot, a product of incomplete combustion, plays an important role in the earth's climate system through the absorption and scattering of solar radiation. In particular, the assumed mass absorption coefficient (MAC) of soot and its variation with wavelength presents a significant uncertainty in the calculation of radiative forcing in global climate change models. As part of the fourth Boston College/Aerodyne soot properties measurement campaign, we have measured the mass absorption coefficient of soot produced by an inverted methane diffusion flame over a spectral range of 300-660 nm using a variety of optical absorption techniques. Extinction and absorption were measured using a dual cavity ringdown photoacoustic spectrometer (CRD-PAS, UC Davis) at 405 nm and 532 nm. Scattering and extinction were measured using a CAPS PMssa single scattering albedo monitor (Aerodyne) at 630 nm; the absorption coefficient was determined by subtraction. In addition, the absorption coefficients in 8 wavelength bands from 300 to 660 nm were measured using a new broadband photoacoustic absorption monitor (UGA). Soot particle mass was quantified using a centrifugal particle mass analyzer (CPMA, Cambustion), mobility size with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS, TSI) and soot concentration with a CPC (Brechtel). The contribution of doubly charged particles to the sample mass was determined using a Single Particle Soot Photometer (DMT). Over a mass range of 1-8 fg, corresponding to differential mobility diameters of ~150 nm to 550 nm, the value of the soot MAC proved to be independent of mass for all wavelengths. The wavelength dependence of the MAC was best fit to a power law with an Absorption Ångstrom Coefficient slightly greater than 1.

  1. Determining the nominal power transfer coefficient for passive surface acoustic wave devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timoshenko, A. N.; Palamarchuk, A. A.; Semenko, A. I.

    1982-05-01

    A method for calculating the nominal power transfer coefficient of passive SAW devices operating in a linear mode is described. Relations of practical importance are obtained, making it possible, on the basis of known characteristics of acousto-electric transducers and acoustic lines, to determine the losses incurred by devices when they are connected to radioelectronic equipment. The relations also permit an assessment of the uniformity of the amplitude-frequency characteristics of the devices.

  2. Nonlinear absorption coefficient of pulsed laser deposited MgZnO thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, Arpana Dar, Tanveer A.; Solanki, Ravi; Sen, Pratima; Phase, D. M.

    2015-06-24

    We report the imaginary part of 3{sup rd} order nonlinear susceptibility and the nonlinear absorption coefficient of Mg doped ZnO thin film using standard Z-scan technique. The origin of nonlinear absorption is attributed to the two photon absorption followed by the free carrier absorption because of the presence of oxygen vacancy defects. We have also confirmed the experimental results with the theoretical results obtained by considering the steady state response of a two level atom with the monochromatic field models.

  3. In situ measurements of the oblique incidence sound absorption coefficient for finite sized absorbers.

    PubMed

    Ottink, Marco; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Fernandez-Grande, Efren; Trojgaard, Per; Tiana-Roig, Elisabet

    2016-01-01

    Absorption coefficients are mostly measured in reverberation rooms or with impedance tubes. Since these methods are only suitable for measuring the random incidence and the normal incidence absorption coefficient, there exists an increasing need for absorption coefficient measurement of finite absorbers at oblique incidence in situ. Due to the edge diffraction effect, oblique incidence methods considering an infinite sample fail to measure the absorption coefficient at large incidence angles of finite samples. This paper aims for the development of a measurement method that accounts for the finiteness of the absorber. A sound field model, which accounts for scattering from the finite absorber edges, assuming plane wave incidence is derived. A significant influence of the finiteness on the radiation impedance and the corresponding absorption coefficient is found. A finite surface method, which combines microphone array measurements over a finite sample with the sound field model in an inverse manner, is proposed. Besides, a temporal subtraction method, a microphone array method, impedance tube measurements, and an equivalent fluid model are used for validation. The finite surface method gives promising agreement with theory, especially at near grazing incidence. Thus, the finite surface method is proposed for further measurements at large incidence angles. PMID:26827003

  4. Minority carrier diffusion lengths and absorption coefficients in silicon sheet material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumas, K. A.; Swimm, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    Most of the methods which have been developed for the measurement of the minority carrier diffusion length of silicon wafers require that the material have either a Schottky or an ohmic contact. The surface photovoltage (SPV) technique is an exception. The SPV technique could, therefore, become a valuable diagnostic tool in connection with current efforts to develop low-cost processes for the production of solar cells. The technique depends on a knowledge of the optical absorption coefficient. The considered investigation is concerned with a reevaluation of the absorption coefficient as a function of silicon processing. A comparison of absorption coefficient values showed these values to be relatively consistent from sample to sample, and independent of the sample growth method.

  5. Methane Absorption Coefficients in the 750-940 nm region derived from Intracavity Laser Absorption Spectral Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, J. J.

    2002-09-01

    The absorption spectrum of methane has been recorded in the visible to near-IR region using the intracavity laser spectroscopy technique. Spectra are recorded at high spectral resolution for narrow overlapping intervals in the region for room and 77 K temperature methane samples. After spectra are deconvolved for the instrument function, absorption coefficients are derived. These will be presented (750-940 nm for room temperature methane; 850-920 nm for 77 K methane) and compared with results reported by other workers. Future work in this area also will be indicated. Support from NASA's Planetary Atmospheres Program (NAG5-6091 and a Major Equipment Grant) is gratefully acknowledged.

  6. Measurement of nanofluids absorption coefficient by Moiré deflectometry technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madanipour, Khosro; Koohian, Ataollah; Shahrabi Farahani, Shahrzad

    2015-05-01

    Nanoparticles exhibit many unique and interesting optical properties which make them very useful in biomedical applications. In order to employ NPs for disease treatment, comprehensive knowledge of their important properties is crucial. One of these parameters is absorption coefficient. In this work, absorption coefficient of a nanofluid (Au nanoparticles in water) is measured by using Moiré deflectometry technique. Two laser beams are used: a comparatively high intensity laser beam as interacting beam and a low intensity as a probe beam. This method is fast, easy and nonscanning, also insensitive to vibrations.

  7. In vivo light fluence correction for determination of tissue absorption coefficient using Multispectral Optoacoustic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brochu, Frederic M.; Joseph, James; Tomaszewski, Michal R.; Bohndiek, Sarah E.

    2016-03-01

    Optoacoustic Tomography is a fast developing imaging modality, combining the high resolution and penetration depth of ultrasound detection with the high contrast available from optical absorption in tissue. The spectral profile of near infrared excitation light used in optoacoustic tomography instruments is modified by absorption and scattering as it propagates deep into biological tissue. The resulting images therefore provide only qualitative insight into the distribution of tissue chromophores. Knowledge of the spectral profile of excitation light across the mouse is needed for accurate determination of the absorption coefficient in vivo. Under the conditions of constant Grueneisen parameter and accurate knowledge of the light fluence, a linear relationship should exist between the initial optoacoustic pressure amplitude and the tissue absorption coefficient. Using data from a commercial optoacoustic tomography system, we implemented an iterative optimization based on the σ-Eddington approximation to the Radiative Transfer Equation to derive a light fluence map within a given object. We segmented the images based on the positions of phantom inclusions, or mouse organs, and used known scattering coefficients for initialization. Performing the fluence correction in simple phantoms allowed the expected linear relationship between recorded and independently measured absorption coefficients to be retrieved and spectral coloring to be compensated. For in vivo data, the correction resulted in an enhancement of signal intensities in deep tissues. This improved our ability to visualize organs at depth (> 5mm). Future work will aim to perform the optimization without data normalization and explore the need for methodology that enables routine implementation for in vivo imaging.

  8. Determination of the Accommodation Coefficient Using Vapor/gas Bubble Dynamics in an Acoustic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gumerov, Nail A.; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung; Goumilevski, Alexei G.; Allen, Jeff (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Nonequilibrium liquid/vapor phase transformations can occur in superheated or subcooled liquids in fast processes such as in evaporation in a vacuum. The rate at which such a phase transformation occurs depends on the "condensation" or "accommodation" coefficient, Beta, which is a property of the interface. Existing measurement techniques for Beta are complex and expensive. The development of a relatively inexpensive and reliable technique for measurement of Beta for a wide range of substances and temperatures is of great practical importance. The dynamics of a bubble in an acoustic field strongly depends on the value of Beta. It is known that near the saturation temperature, small vapor bubbles grow under the action of an acoustic field due to "rectified heat transfer." This finding can be used as the basis for an effective measurement technique of Beta. We developed a theory of vapor bubble behavior in an isotropic acoustic wave and in a plane standing acoustic wave. A numerical code was developed which enables simulation of a variety of experimental situations and accurately takes into account slowly evolving temperature. A parametric study showed that the measurement of Beta can be made over a broad range of frequencies and bubble sizes. We found several interesting regimes and conditions which can be efficiently used for measurements of Beta. Measurements of Beta can be performed in both reduced and normal gravity environments.

  9. Field calibration of multi-scattering correction factor for aethalometer aerosol absorption coefficient during CAPMEX Campaign, 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. H.; Kim, S. W.; Yoon, S. C.; Park, R.; Ogren, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Filter-based instrument, such as aethalometer, is being widely used to measure equivalent black carbon(EBC) mass concentration and aerosol absorption coefficient(AAC). However, many other previous studies have poited that AAC and its aerosol absorption angstrom exponent(AAE) are strongly affected by the multi-scattering correction factor(C) when we retrieve AAC from aethalometer EBC mass concentration measurement(Weingartner et al., 2003; Arnott et al., 2005; Schmid et al., 2006; Coen et al., 2010). We determined the C value using the method given in Weingartner et al. (2003) by comparing 7-wavelngth aethalometer (AE-31, Magee sci.) to 3-wavelength Photo-Acoustic Soot Spectrometer (PASS-3, DMT) at Gosan climate observatory, Korea(GCO) during Cheju ABC plume-asian monsoon experiment(CAPMEX) campaign(August and September, 2008). In this study, C was estimated to be 4.04 ± 1.68 at 532 nm and AAC retrieved with this value was decreased as approximately 100% as than that retrieved with soot case value from Weingartner et al (2003). We compared the AAC determined from aethalomter measurements to that from collocated Continuous Light Absorption Photometer (CLAP) measurements from January 2012 to December 2013 at GCO and found good agreement in both AAC and AAE. This result suggests the determination of site-specific C is crucially needed when we calculate AAC from aethalometer measurements.

  10. Measurement and modelling of the reflection coefficient of an Acoustic Black Hole termination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denis, V.; Gautier, F.; Pelat, A.; Poittevin, J.

    2015-08-01

    The flexural waves propagating in a beam can be efficiently absorbed if one extremity is tapered with a power law profile and covered by a thin layer of additional damping material. Such a termination induces the so-called "Acoustic Black Hole effect" (ABH): if the thickness decreases locally, flexural waves slow down and the amplitude of the displacement field increases, leading to efficient energy dissipation if an absorbing layer is placed where the thickness is minimum. This paper presents a specific study of the reflection coefficient of ABH beam terminations. A Kundt-like measurement method of the reflection coefficient of a beam termination is proposed. The method is validated using theoretical results in the case of a beam free end. Results for several ABH extremities show a clear decrease of the modulus of the reflection coefficient R. The phase of R due to the decreasing thickness profile is also investigated and is interpreted by defining a correction length for the tapered termination. These experimental results are compared with several models: geometrical acoustics based model, beam waveguide model and plate model.

  11. Studies on mass energy-absorption coefficients and effective atomic energy-absorption cross sections for carbohydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladhaf, Bibifatima M.; Pawar, Pravina P.

    2015-04-01

    We measured here the mass attenuation coefficients (μ/ρ) of carbohydrates, Esculine (C15H16O9), Sucrose (C12H22O11), Sorbitol (C6H14O6), D-Galactose (C6H12O6), Inositol (C6H12O6), D-Xylose (C5H10O5) covering the energy range from 122 keV up to 1330 keV photon energies by using gamma ray transmission method in a narrow beam good geometry set-up. The gamma-rays were detected using NaI(Tl) scintillation detection system with a resolution of 8.2% at 662 keV. The attenuation coefficient data were then used to obtain the total attenuation cross-section (σtot), molar extinction coefficients (ε), mass-energy absorption coefficients (μen/ρ) and effective (average) atomic energy-absorption cross section (σa,en) of the compounds. These values are found to be in good agreement with the theoretical values calculated based on XCOM data.

  12. Photoacoustic measurements of black carbon light absorption coefficients in Irbid city, Jordan.

    PubMed

    Hamasha, Khadeejeh M; Arnott, W Patrick

    2010-07-01

    There is a need to recognize air pollution levels by particles, especially in developing countries such as Jordan where data are scarce due to the absence of routine monitoring of ambient air quality. This study aims at studying the air quality in different locations at Irbid, Jordan through the measurement and analysis of the time series of black carbon light absorption coefficients (B (abs)). Black carbon light absorption coefficients were measured with a photoacoustic instrument at a wavelength of 870 nm. The measurements were conducted during July 2007 at six sites in Irbid city, Jordan. Comparisons of black carbon concentrations at various locations were conducted to understand where values tend to be largest. The average value of B (abs) of all sites was 40.4 Mm(-1). The largest value of B (abs) was 61.2 Mm(-1) at Palestine Street which is located at a very crowded street in a highly populated region in the city center. The lowest value was 14.1 Mm(-1) at Thirtieth Street which is located at a main street in an open plain region in the east of the city. The black carbon light absorption coefficients fluctuate above a background level (transported black carbon from the neighboring states), which are almost identical at all sampling sites. The light absorption coefficients will be used as a benchmark in later years as combustion efficiencies and population patterns change. PMID:19479334

  13. The average ion model. Computation of the absorption and emission coefficients in hot plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Jean-Claude; Geindre, Jean-Paul

    1988-06-01

    A program was developed to evaluate the emission and absorption plasma coefficient variations as a function of the density, temperature and the atomic number of the specimen. The treatment is simplified because of the reduced number of characteristic frequencies which are necessary for the hydrodynamic code. The approach is less efficient when applied to high Z atoms.

  14. Calculation of an axial temperature distribution using the reflection coefficient of an acoustic wave.

    PubMed

    Červenka, Milan; Bednařík, Michal

    2015-10-01

    This work verifies the idea that in principle it is possible to reconstruct axial temperature distribution of fluid employing reflection or transmission of acoustic waves. It is assumed that the fluid is dissipationless and its density and speed of sound vary along the wave propagation direction because of the fluid temperature distribution. A numerical algorithm is proposed allowing for calculation of the temperature distribution on the basis of known frequency characteristics of reflection coefficient modulus. Functionality of the algorithm is illustrated on a few examples, its properties are discussed. PMID:26520344

  15. Simultaneous evaluation of acoustic nonlinearity parameter and attenuation coefficients using the finite amplitude method

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shuzeng; Li, Xiongbing; Jeong, Hyunjo Cho, Sungjong

    2015-07-15

    A novel method to determine acoustic parameters involved in measuring the nonlinearity parameter of fluids or solids is proposed. The approach is based on the measurement of fundamental and second harmonic pressures with a calibrated receiver, and on a nonlinear least squares data-fitting to multi-Gaussian beam (MGB) equations which explicitly define the attenuation and diffraction effects in the quasilinear regime. Results obtained in water validate the proposed method. The choice of suitable source pressure is discussed with regard to the quasilinear approximation involved. The attenuation coefficients are also acquired in nonlinear regime and their relations are discussed.

  16. [Development of a photoacoustic spectroscopy system for the measurement of absorption coefficient of atmospheric aerosols].

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Niu, Ming-Sheng; Wang, Gui-Shi; Cao, Zhen-Song; Liu, Kun; Chen, Wei-Dong; Gao, Xiao-Ming

    2013-07-01

    In the present paper, the authors focus on the effect of the resonance frequency shift due to the changes in temperature and humidity on the PA signal, present several methods to control the noise derived form gas flow and vibration from the sampling pump. Based on the efforts mentioned above, a detection limit of 1.4 x 10(-8) W x cm(-1) x Hz(-1/2) was achieved for the measurement of atmospheric aerosols absorption coefficient. During the experiments, the PA cell was calibrated with the absorption of standard NO2 gas at 532 nm and the atmospheric aerosols were measured continuously. The measurement results show that the PAS is suitable for the real-time measurement of the absorption coefficient of atmospheric aerosols in their natural suspended state. PMID:24059163

  17. Mass specific optical absorption coefficients of mineral dust components measured by a multi wavelength photoacoustic spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utry, N.; Ajtai, T.; Pintér, M.; Tombácz, E.; Illés, E.; Bozóki, Z.; Szabó, G.

    2014-09-01

    Mass specific optical absorption coefficients of various mineral dust components including silicate clays (illite, kaolin and bentonite), oxides (quartz, hematite and rutile), and carbonate (limestone) were determined at wavelengths of 1064, 532, 355 and 266 nm. These values were calculated from aerosol optical absorption coefficients measured by a multi-wavelength photoacoustic (PA) instrument, the mass concentration and the number size distribution of the generated aerosol samples as well as the size transfer functions of the measuring instruments. These results are expected to have considerable importance in global radiative forcing calculations. They can also serve as reference for validating calculated wavelength dependent imaginary parts (κ) of complex refractive indices which up to now have been typically deduced from bulk phase measurements by using indirect measurement methods. Accordingly, the presented comparison of the measured and calculated aerosol optical absorption spectra revealed the strong need for standardized sample preparation and measurement methodology in case of bulk phase measurements.

  18. Temperature- and pressure-dependent absorption coefficients for CO2 and O2 at 193 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartinger, K. T.; Nord, S.; Monkhouse, P. B.

    Absorption of laser radiation at 193 nm by CO2 and O2 was studied at a series of different temperatures up to 1273 K and pressures up to 1 bar. The spectrum for CO2 was found to be broadband, so that absorption could be fitted to a Beer-Lambert law. On the other hand, the corresponding O2 spectrum is strongly structured and parameterisation requires a more complex relation, depending on both temperature and the product (pressure × absorption path length). In this context, the influence of spectral structure on the resulting spectrally integrated absorption coefficients is discussed. Using the fitting parameters obtained, effective transmissions at 193 nm can be calculated for a wide range of experimental conditions. As an illustration of the practical application of these data, the calculation of effective transmission for a typical industrial flue gas is described.

  19. Absorption Coefficients of Particulate Matter off the Southwest Coast of Europe: A Contribution to Validation of the MERIS Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goela, P.; Icely, J.; Cristina, S.; Newton, A.

    2010-12-01

    Variability of particulate absorption coefficients was studied off the south-west coast of Portugal, as part of a validation exercise for the Medium Resolution Image Spectrometer Sensor. Regular sampling campaigns occurred at three stations on a transect from inshore to offshore to compare fluctuations in these coefficients at the local scale. Transmittance-reflectance method with sodium hypochlorite bleaching was used to determine absorption coefficients for phytoplankton and non-algal particles. Photosynthetic pigment concentrations were determined by High Performance Liquid Chromatography. Results show that the absorption of light by particulate matter is almost totally dependent on the phytoplankton, with no significant contribution from non-algal particles, both in coastal and oceanic waters. Specific phytoplankton coefficients show significant fluctuations between seasons and stations, ranging from 0.012 to 0.038 at 678 nm. Particulate absorption is dominant over dissolved absorption. The variations in the coefficients of absorption are analysed as a function of species assemblages.

  20. Traffic-related differences in indoor and personal absorption coefficient measurements in Amsterdam, the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wichmann, Janine; Janssen, Nicole A. H.; van der Zee, Saskia; Brunekreef, Bert

    Population studies indicate that study participants living near major roads are more prone to chronic respiratory symptoms, lung function decrements and hospital admissions for asthma. The majority of the studies used proxy measures, such as distance to major roads or traffic intensity in the surroundings of the home. Few studies have communicated findings of concurrently performed measurements of outdoor, indoor and personal air pollution in urban streets with high- and low-traffic density. Measuring light absorption or reflectance of particulate matter (PM) collected on filters is an alternative method to determine elemental carbon, a marker for particles produced by incomplete combustion, compared to expensive and destructive analytical methods. This study sets out to test the null hypothesis that there is no difference in personal and indoor filter absorption coefficients for participants living along busy and quiet roads in Amsterdam. In one study we measured personal and indoor absorption coefficients in a sample of adults (50-70 years) and, in another study, the indoor levels in a population of adults (50-70 years) and school children (10-12 years). In the first study, the ratios of personal and indoor absorption coefficients in homes along busy roads compared with homes on quiet streets were significantly higher by 29% for personal measurements ( n=16 days, p<0.001), and by 19% for indoor measurements ( n=20, p<0.001), while in the second study, the ratio for the indoor measurements was higher by 26% ( n=25 days, p<0.05). Exposure differences between homes along busy compared to homes along quiet streets remained and significant after adjustment for potential indoor sources (such as cooking and use of unvented heating appliances). This study therefore provides tentative support for the use of the type of road as proxy measure for indoor and personal absorption coefficient measurements in epidemiological studies due to the limitations of the study.

  1. Derivation of absorption coefficient and reduced scattering coefficient with edge-loss method and comparison with video reflectometry method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Kenichiro

    2016-08-01

    We derived the absorption coefficient ( μ a) and the reduced scattering coefficient ( μ s') using the edge-loss method (ELM) and the video reflectometry method (VRM), and compared the results. In a previous study, we developed the ELM to easily evaluate the lateral spread in the skin; the VRM is a conventional method. The ELM measures the translucency index, which is correlated with μ a and μ s'. To obtain a precise estimation of these parameters, we improved the treatment of a white standard and the surface reflection. For both skin phantoms and actual skin, the values for μ a and μ s' that we obtained using the ELM were similar to those obtained using the VRM, when μ a/ μ s' was less than or equal to 0.05 and the diffusion approximation was applicable. Under this condition, the spectral reflectivity is greater than 0.4. In this study, we considered wavelengths longer than 600 nm for Types III and IV of the Fitzpatrick scale. For skin, the repeatability errors of the parameters obtained with the ELM were smaller than those obtained with the VRM; this can be an advantage in field tests.

  2. Derivation of absorption coefficient and reduced scattering coefficient with edge-loss method and comparison with video reflectometry method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Kenichiro

    2016-07-01

    We derived the absorption coefficient (μ a) and the reduced scattering coefficient (μ s') using the edge-loss method (ELM) and the video reflectometry method (VRM), and compared the results. In a previous study, we developed the ELM to easily evaluate the lateral spread in the skin; the VRM is a conventional method. The ELM measures the translucency index, which is correlated with μ a and μ s'. To obtain a precise estimation of these parameters, we improved the treatment of a white standard and the surface reflection. For both skin phantoms and actual skin, the values for μ a and μ s' that we obtained using the ELM were similar to those obtained using the VRM, when μ a/μ s' was less than or equal to 0.05 and the diffusion approximation was applicable. Under this condition, the spectral reflectivity is greater than 0.4. In this study, we considered wavelengths longer than 600 nm for Types III and IV of the Fitzpatrick scale. For skin, the repeatability errors of the parameters obtained with the ELM were smaller than those obtained with the VRM; this can be an advantage in field tests.

  3. A new photoacoustic method based on the modulation of the light induced absorption coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, S.; Wenisch, C.; Müller, F. A.; Gräf, S.

    2016-04-01

    The present study reports on a new photoacoustic (PA) measurement method that is suitable for the investigation of light induced absorption effects including e.g. excited state absorption. Contrary to the modulation of the radiation intensity used in conventional PA-methods, the key principle of this novel setup is based on the modulation of the induced absorption coefficient by light. For this purpose, a pump-probe setup with a pulsed pump laser beam and a continuous probe laser beam is utilized. In this regime, the potential influence of heat on the PA-signal is much smaller when compared to arrangements with pulsed probe beam and continuous pump beam. Beyond that, the negative effect of thermal lenses can be neglected. Thus, the measurement technique is well-suited for materials exhibiting a strong absorption at the pump wavelength. The quantitative analysis of the induced absorption coefficient was achieved by the calibration of the additional PA-signal caused by the continuous probe laser to the PA-signal resulting from the pulsed pump laser using thallium bromoiodide (KRS-5) as sample material.

  4. Measurements of the optical absorption coefficient of Ar8+ ion implanted silicon layers using the photothermal radiometry and the modulated free carrier absorption methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrobak, Ł.; Maliński, M.; Pawlak, M.

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a method of the measurement of the optical absorption coefficient of the Ar8+ ions implanted layers in the p-type silicon substrate. The absorption coefficient is calculated using a value of the attenuation of amplitudes of a photothermal radiometry (PTR) and/or a modulation free carrier absorption (MFCA) signals and the implanted layer thickness calculated by means of the TRIM program. The proposed method can be used to indicate the amorphization of the ions implanted layers.

  5. Absorption coefficients of GeSn extracted from PIN photodetector response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Kaiheng; Zhang, Wogong; Oehme, Michael; Schmid, Marc; Gollhofer, Martin; Kostecki, Konrad; Widmann, Daniel; Körner, Roman; Kasper, Erich; Schulze, Jörg

    2015-08-01

    In this paper the optical absorption of the GeSn PIN photodetector was investigated. The vertical GeSn PIN photodetectors were fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and dry etching. By means of current density-voltage (J-V) and capacity-voltage (C-V) measurements the photodetector device was characterized. The absorption coefficients of GeSn material were finally extracted from the optical response of PIN structure. With further direct bandgap analysis the influences of device structure was proved negligible.

  6. Heat/Mass Transfer Coefficients of an Absorber in Absorption Refrigeration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Isamu; Hihara, Eiji

    This paper presents a new method to calculate heat and mass transfer coefficients applicable to the vertical tube or plate type absorber of absorption refrigeration system. Conventional method for calculating the coefficients using logarithmic mean temperature/ concentration differences is criticized for its lacking in the theoretical rationality and usually giving untrue values except some limited situations such that temperature of the solution can be assumed to change linearly along the heat transfer surface. The newly introduced method, which is intended to overcome this difficulty, is verified by numerical simulation and is accompanied by an example applied to the experimental results.

  7. An Evaluation of the Additional Acoustic Power Needed to Overcome the Effects of a Test-Articles Absorption During Reverberant Chamber Acoustic Testing of Spaceflight Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hozman, Aron D.; Hughes, William O.

    2014-01-01

    It is important to realize that some test-articles may have significant sound absorption that may challenge the acoustic power capabilities of a test facility. Therefore, to mitigate this risk of not being able to meet the customers target spectrum, it is prudent to demonstrate early-on an increased acoustic power capability which compensates for this test-article absorption. This paper describes a concise method to reduce this risk when testing aerospace test-articles which have significant absorption. This method was successfully applied during the SpaceX Falcon 9 Payload Fairing acoustic test program at the NASA Glenn Research Center Plum Brook Stations RATF.

  8. Index of Refraction and Absorption Coefficient Spectra of Paratellurite in the Terahertz Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unferdorben, Márta; Buzády, Andrea; Hebling, János; Kiss, Krisztián; Hajdara, Ivett; Kovács, László; Péter, Ágnes; Pálfalvi, László

    2016-07-01

    Index of refraction and absorption coefficient spectra of pure paratellurite (α-TeO2) crystal as a potential material for terahertz (THz) applications were determined in the 0.25-2 THz frequency range at room temperature by THz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). The investigation was performed with beam polarization both parallel (extraordinary polarization) and perpendicular (ordinary polarization) to the optical axis [001] of the crystal. Similarly to the visible spectral range, positive birefringence was observed in the THz range as well. It was shown that the values of the refractive index for extraordinary polarization are higher and show significantly larger dispersion than for the ordinary one. The absorption coefficient values are also larger for extraordinary polarization. The measured values were fitted by theoretical curves derived from the complex dielectric function containing independent terms of Lorentz oscillators due to phonon-polariton resonances. The results are compared with earlier publications, and the observed significant discrepancies are discussed.

  9. Simultaneous retrieval of temperature-dependent absorption coefficient and conductivity of participating media

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yatao; Qi, Hong; Zhao, Fangzhou; Ruan, Liming; Tan, Heping

    2016-01-01

    A secondary optimization technique was proposed to estimate the temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and absorption coefficient. In the proposed method, the stochastic particle swarm optimization was applied to solve the inverse problem. The coupled radiation and conduction problem was solved in a 1D absorbing, emitting, but non-scattering slab exposed to a pulse laser. It is found that in the coupled radiation and conduction problem, the temperature response is highly sensitive to conductivity but slightly sensitive to the optical properties. On the contrary, the radiative intensity is highly sensitive to optical properties but slightly sensitive to thermal conductivity. Therefore, the optical and thermal signals should both be considered in the inverse problem to estimate the temperature-dependent properties of the transparent media. On this basis, the temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and absorption coefficient were both estimated accurately by measuring the time-dependent temperature, and radiative response at the boundary of the slab. PMID:26912418

  10. Effective infrared absorption coefficient for photothermal radiometric measurements in biological tissues.

    PubMed

    Majaron, Boris; Milanic, Matija

    2008-01-01

    Although photothermal radiometric (PTR) measurements commonly employ broad-band signal acquisition to increase the signal-to-noise ratio, all reported studies apply a fixed infrared (IR) absorption coefficient to simplify the involved signal analysis. In samples with large spectral variation of micro(lambda) in mid-IR, which includes most biological tissues, the selection of the effective IR absorption coefficient value (micro(eff)) can strongly affect the accuracy of the result. We present a novel analytical approach for the determination of optimal micro(eff) from spectral properties of the sample and radiation detector. In extensive numerical simulations of pulsed PTR temperature profiling in human skin using three common IR radiation detectors and several acquisition spectral bands, we demonstrate that our approach produces viable values micro(eff). Two previously used analytical estimations perform much worse in the same comparison. PMID:18182701

  11. Determination of RW3-to-water mass-energy absorption coefficient ratio for absolute dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Seet, Katrina Y T; Hanlon, Peta M; Charles, Paul H

    2011-12-01

    The measurement of absorbed dose to water in a solid-phantom may require a conversion factor because it may not be radiologically equivalent to water. One phantom developed for the use of dosimetry is a solid water, RW3 white-polystyrene material by IBA. This has a lower mass-energy absorption coefficient than water due to high bremsstrahlung yield, which affects the accuracy of absolute dosimetry measurements. In this paper, we demonstrate the calculation of mass-energy absorption coefficient ratios, relative to water, from measurements in plastic water and RW3 with an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator (6 and 10 MV photon beams) as well as Monte Carlo modeling in BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc. From this, the solid-phantom-to-water correction factor was determined for plastic water and RW3. PMID:21960410

  12. Simultaneous retrieval of temperature-dependent absorption coefficient and conductivity of participating media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yatao; Qi, Hong; Zhao, Fangzhou; Ruan, Liming; Tan, Heping

    2016-02-01

    A secondary optimization technique was proposed to estimate the temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and absorption coefficient. In the proposed method, the stochastic particle swarm optimization was applied to solve the inverse problem. The coupled radiation and conduction problem was solved in a 1D absorbing, emitting, but non-scattering slab exposed to a pulse laser. It is found that in the coupled radiation and conduction problem, the temperature response is highly sensitive to conductivity but slightly sensitive to the optical properties. On the contrary, the radiative intensity is highly sensitive to optical properties but slightly sensitive to thermal conductivity. Therefore, the optical and thermal signals should both be considered in the inverse problem to estimate the temperature-dependent properties of the transparent media. On this basis, the temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and absorption coefficient were both estimated accurately by measuring the time-dependent temperature, and radiative response at the boundary of the slab.

  13. Simultaneous retrieval of temperature-dependent absorption coefficient and conductivity of participating media.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yatao; Qi, Hong; Zhao, Fangzhou; Ruan, Liming; Tan, Heping

    2016-01-01

    A secondary optimization technique was proposed to estimate the temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and absorption coefficient. In the proposed method, the stochastic particle swarm optimization was applied to solve the inverse problem. The coupled radiation and conduction problem was solved in a 1D absorbing, emitting, but non-scattering slab exposed to a pulse laser. It is found that in the coupled radiation and conduction problem, the temperature response is highly sensitive to conductivity but slightly sensitive to the optical properties. On the contrary, the radiative intensity is highly sensitive to optical properties but slightly sensitive to thermal conductivity. Therefore, the optical and thermal signals should both be considered in the inverse problem to estimate the temperature-dependent properties of the transparent media. On this basis, the temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and absorption coefficient were both estimated accurately by measuring the time-dependent temperature, and radiative response at the boundary of the slab. PMID:26912418

  14. Simultaneous measurement of thermal diffusivity and optical absorption coefficient using photothermal radiometry. II Multilayered solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, Agustín; Fuente, Raquel; Apiñaniz, Estibaliz; Mendioroz, Arantza; Celorrio, R.

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze the ability of modulated photothermal radiometry to retrieve the thermal diffusivity and the optical absorption coefficient of layered materials simultaneously. First, we extend the thermal quadrupole method to calculate the surface temperature of semitransparent multilayered materials. Then, this matrix method is used to evaluate the influence of heat losses by convection and radiation, the influence of the use of thin paint layers on the accuracy of thermal diffusivity measurements, and the effect of lateral heat diffusion due to the use of Gaussian laser beams. Finally, we apply the quadrupole method to retrieve (a) the thermal contact resistance in glass stacks and (b) the thermal diffusivity and optical absorption coefficient depth profiles in heterogeneous materials with continuously varying physical properties, as is the case of functionally graded materials and partially cured dental resins.

  15. Measurement and calculation of the sound absorption coefficient of pine wood charcoal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Jae Gap; Baik, Kyung min; Kim, Yong Tae; Jung, Sung Soo

    2013-10-01

    Although charcoal has been widely utilized for physical therapy and as a deodorant, water purifier, etc. due to its porous features, research on its role as a sound-absorbing material is rarely found. Thus, the sound absorption coefficients of pine wood charcoal were measured using an impedance tube and were compared with the theoretical predictions in the frequency range of 500˜ 5000 Hz. The theory developed in the current study only considers the lowest possible mode propagating along the air channels of the charcoal and shows good agreements with the measurements. As the frequency is increased, the sound absorption coefficients of pine wood charcoals also increase, but are lower than those of other commonly-used sound-absorbing materials.

  16. AN INTERCOMPARISON CF THE INTEGRATING PLATE AND THE LASER TRANSMISSION METHODS FOR DETERMINATION OF AEROSOL ABSORPTION COEFFICIENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Sadler, M.; Charlson, R.J.; Rosen, H.; Novakov, T.

    1980-07-01

    The absorption coefficients determined by the integrating plate method and the laser transmission method are found to be comparable and highly correlated. Furthermore, a high correlation is found between these absorption coefficients and the carbon content of the aerosol in urbanized regions.

  17. Infrared absorption-coefficient data on SF6 applicable to atmospheric remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varanasi, P.; Gopalan, A.; Brannon, J. F., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Spectral absorption coefficients, k(nu)/cm per atm, of SF6 have been measured in the central Q-branches of the nu(3)-fundamental at 947/cm at various temperature-pressure combinations representing tangent heights in solar-occultation experiments or layers in the atmosphere. The data obtained with the Doppler-limited spectral resolution (about 0.0001/cm) of a tunable-diode laser spectrometer are useful in the atmospheric remote sensing of this trace gas.

  18. A wave based method to predict the absorption, reflection and transmission coefficient of two-dimensional rigid frame porous structures with periodic inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deckers, Elke; Claeys, Claus; Atak, Onur; Groby, Jean-Philippe; Dazel, Olivier; Desmet, Wim

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents an extension to the Wave Based Method to predict the absorption, reflection and transmission coefficients of a porous material with an embedded periodic set of inclusions. The porous unit cell is described using the Multi-Level methodology and by embedding Bloch-Floquet periodicity conditions in the weighted residual scheme. The dynamic pressure field in the semi-infinite acoustic domains is approximated using a novel wave function set that fulfils the Helmholtz equation, the Bloch-Floquet periodicity conditions and the Sommerfeld radiation condition. The method is meshless and computationally efficient, which makes it well suited for optimisation studies.

  19. Concerning the sound insulation of building elements made up of light concretes. [acoustic absorption efficiency calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giurgiu, I. I.

    1974-01-01

    The sound insulating capacity of building elements made up of light concretes is considered. Analyzing differentially the behavior of light concrete building elements under the influence of incident acoustic energy and on the basis of experimental measurements, coefficients of correction are introduced into the basic formulas for calculating the sound insulating capacity for the 100-3,2000 Hz frequency band.

  20. Water vapor absorption coefficients in the 8-13-micron spectral region - A critical review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, William B.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of water vapor absorption coefficients in the thermal IR atmospheric window (8-13 microns) during the past 20 years obtained by a variety of techniques are reviewed for consistency and compared with computed values based on the AFGL spectral data tapes. The methods of data collection considered were atmospheric long path absorption with a CO2 laser or a broadband source and filters, a White cell and a CO2 laser or a broadband source and a spectrometer, and a spectrophone with a CO2 laser. Advantages and disadvantages of each measurement approach are given as a guide to further research. Continuum absorption has apparently been measured accurately to about the 5-10 percent level in five of the measurements reported.

  1. Use of radial symmetry for the calculation of cylindrical absorption coefficients and optimal capillary loadings

    SciTech Connect

    Khalifah, Peter

    2015-02-01

    The problem of numerically evaluating absorption correction factors for cylindrical samples has been revisited using a treatment that fully takes advantage of the sample symmetry. It is shown that the path lengths for all points within the sample at all possible diffraction angles can be trivially determined once the angle-dependent distance distribution for a single line of points is calculated. This provides advantages in both computational efficiency and in gaining an intuitive understanding of the effects of absorption on diffraction data. A matrix of absorption coefficients calculated for µR products between 0 and 20 for diffraction angles θD of 0° to 90° were used to examine the influence of (1) capillary diameter and of (2) sample density on the overall scattered intensity as a function of diffraction angle, where µ is the linear absorption coefficient for the sample and R is the capillary radius. Based on this analysis, the optimal sample loading for a capillary experiment to maximize diffraction at angles of 0 – 50° is in general expected to be achieved when the maximum radius capillary compatible with the beam is used, and when the sample density is adjusted to be 3/(4µR) of its original density.

  2. Use of radial symmetry for the calculation of cylindrical absorption coefficients and optimal capillary loadings

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khalifah, Peter

    2015-02-01

    The problem of numerically evaluating absorption correction factors for cylindrical samples has been revisited using a treatment that fully takes advantage of the sample symmetry. It is shown that the path lengths for all points within the sample at all possible diffraction angles can be trivially determined once the angle-dependent distance distribution for a single line of points is calculated. This provides advantages in both computational efficiency and in gaining an intuitive understanding of the effects of absorption on diffraction data. A matrix of absorption coefficients calculated for µR products between 0 and 20 for diffraction angles θD of 0°more » to 90° were used to examine the influence of (1) capillary diameter and of (2) sample density on the overall scattered intensity as a function of diffraction angle, where µ is the linear absorption coefficient for the sample and R is the capillary radius. Based on this analysis, the optimal sample loading for a capillary experiment to maximize diffraction at angles of 0 – 50° is in general expected to be achieved when the maximum radius capillary compatible with the beam is used, and when the sample density is adjusted to be 3/(4µR) of its original density.« less

  3. Two-photon interband absorption coefficients in tungstate and molybdate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukanin, V. I.; Karasik, A. Ya.

    2015-02-01

    Two-photon absorption (TPA) coefficients were measured in tungstate and molybdate crystals - BaWO4, KGW, CaMoO4, BaMoO4, CaWO4, PbWO4 and ZnWO4 upon different orientations of excitation polarization with respect to the crystallographic axes. Trains of 25 ps pulses with variable radiation intensities of third (349 nm) harmonics of passively mode-locked 1047 nm Nd:YLF laser were used for interband two-photon excitation of the crystals. It was suggested that in the case, when 349 nm radiation pumping energy exceeds the bandgap width (hν>Eg), the nonlinear excitation process can be considered as two-step absorption. The interband two-photon absorption in all the studied crystals induces the following one-photon absorption from the exited states, which affects the nonlinear process dynamics and leads to a hysteresis in the dependence of the transmission on the excitation intensity. This fact was taken into account under analysis of the experimental dependences of the reciprocal transmission on the excitation intensity. Laser excitation in the transparency region of the crystals caused stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) not for all the crystals studied. The measured nonlinear coefficients allowed us to explain the suppression of SRS in crystals as a result of competition between the SRS and TPA.

  4. Experimental investigation of sound absorption of acoustic wedges for anechoic chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, I. V.; Golubev, A. Yu.; Zverev, A. Ya.; Makashov, S. Yu.; Palchikovskiy, V. V.; Sobolev, A. F.; Chernykh, V. V.

    2015-09-01

    The results of measuring the sound absorption by acoustic wedges, which were performed in AC-3 and AC-11 reverberation chambers at the Central Aerohydrodynamic Institute (TsAGI), are presented. Wedges of different densities manufactured from superfine basaltic and thin mineral fibers were investigated. The results of tests of these wedges were compared to the sound absorption of wedges of the operating AC-2 anechoic facility at TsAGI. It is shown that basaltic-fiber wedges have better sound-absorption characteristics than the investigated analogs and can be recommended for facing anechoic facilities under construction.

  5. Delay Coefficients Based Variable Regularization Subband Affine Projection Algorithms in Acoustic Echo Cancellation Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muralidhar, Karthik; Li, Kwok Hung; George, Sapna

    To attain good performance in an acoustic echo cancellation system, it is important to have a variable step size (VSS) algorithm as part of an adaptive filter. In this paper, we are concerned with the development of a VSS algorithm for a recently proposed subband affine projection (SAP) adaptive filter. Two popular VSS algorithms in the literature are the methods of delayed coefficients (DC) and variable regularization (VR). However, the merits and demerits of them are mutually exclusive. We propose a VSS algorithm* that is a hybrid of both methods and combines their advantages. An extensive study of the new algorithm in different scenarios like the presence double-talk (DT) during the transient phase of the adaptive filter, DT during steady state, and varying DT power is conducted and reasoning is given to support the observed behavior. The importance of the method of VR as part of a VSS algorithm is emphasized.

  6. Control of acoustic absorption in one-dimensional scattering by resonant scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkel, A.; Theocharis, G.; Richoux, O.; Romero-García, V.; Pagneux, V.

    2015-12-01

    We experimentally report perfect acoustic absorption through the interplay of the inherent losses and transparent modes with high Q factor. These modes are generated in a two-port, one-dimensional waveguide, which is side-loaded by isolated resonators of moderate Q factor. In symmetric structures, we show that in the presence of small inherent losses, these modes lead to coherent perfect absorption associated with one-sided absorption slightly larger than 0.5. In asymmetric structures, near perfect one-sided absorption is possible (96%) with a deep sub-wavelength sample ( λ / 28 , where λ is the wavelength of the sound wave in the air). The control of strong absorption by the proper tuning of the radiation leakage of few resonators with weak losses will open possibilities in various wave-control devices.

  7. Diffusion Coefficients of Water and Leachables in Methacrylate-based Crosslinked Polymers using Absorption Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Parthasarathy, Ranganathan; Misra, Anil; Park, Jonggu; Ye, Qiang; Spencer, Paulette

    2012-01-01

    The diffusion of water into dentin adhesive polymers and leaching of unpolymerized monomer from the adhesive are linked to their mechanical softening and hydrolytic degradation. Therefore, diffusion coefficient data are critical for the mechanical design of these polymeric adhesives. In this study, diffusion coefficients of water and leachables were obtained for sixteen methacrylate-based crosslinked polymers using absorption experiments. The experimental mass change data was interpreted using numerical solution of the two-dimensional diffusion equations. The calculated diffusion coefficients varied from 1.05 × 10−8 cm2/sec (co-monomer TMTMA) to 3.15 × 10−8 cm2/sec (co-monomer T4EGDMA). Correlation of the diffusion coefficients with crosslink density and hydrophilicity showed an inverse trend (R2 = 0.41). The correlation of diffusion coefficient with crosslink density and hydrophilicity are closer for molecules differing by simple repeat units (R2 = 0.95). These differences in the trends reveal mechanisms of interaction of the diffusing water with the polymer structure. PMID:22430592

  8. Microwave Resonator Measurements of Atmospheric Absorption Coefficients: A Preliminary Design Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Steven J.; Spilker, Thomas R.

    1995-01-01

    A preliminary design study examined the feasibility of using microwave resonator measurements to improve the accuracy of atmospheric absorption coefficients and refractivity between 18 and 35 GHz. Increased accuracies would improve the capability of water vapor radiometers to correct for radio signal delays caused by Earth's atmosphere. Calibration of delays incurred by radio signals traversing the atmosphere has applications to both deep space tracking and planetary radio science experiments. Currently, the Cassini gravity wave search requires 0.8-1.0% absorption coefficient accuracy. This study examined current atmospheric absorption models and estimated that current model accuracy ranges from 5% to 7%. The refractivity of water vapor is known to 1% accuracy, while the refractivity of many dry gases (oxygen, nitrogen, etc.) are known to better than 0.1%. Improvements to the current generation of models will require that both the functional form and absolute absorption of the water vapor spectrum be calibrated and validated. Several laboratory techniques for measuring atmospheric absorption and refractivity were investigated, including absorption cells, single and multimode rectangular cavity resonators, and Fabry-Perot resonators. Semi-confocal Fabry-Perot resonators were shown to provide the most cost-effective and accurate method of measuring atmospheric gas refractivity. The need for accurate environmental measurement and control was also addressed. A preliminary design for the environmental control and measurement system was developed to aid in identifying significant design issues. The analysis indicated that overall measurement accuracy will be limited by measurement errors and imprecise control of the gas sample's thermodynamic state, thermal expansion and vibration- induced deformation of the resonator structure, and electronic measurement error. The central problem is to identify systematic errors because random errors can be reduced by averaging

  9. Spectroscopic method for determination of the absorption coefficient in brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Johannes D.

    2010-09-01

    I use Monte Carlo simulations and phantom measurements to characterize a probe with adjacent optical fibres for diffuse reflectance spectroscopy during stereotactic surgery in the brain. Simulations and measurements have been fitted to a modified Beer-Lambert model for light transport in order to be able to quantify chromophore content based on clinically measured spectra in brain tissue. It was found that it is important to take the impact of the light absorption into account when calculating the apparent optical path length, lp, for the photons in order to get good estimates of the absorption coefficient, μa. The optical path length was found to be well fitted to the equation lp=a+b ln(Is)+c ln(μa)+d ln(Is)ln(μa), where Is is the reflected light intensity for scattering alone (i.e., zero absorption). Although coefficients a-d calculated in this study are specific to the probe used here, the general form of the equation should be applicable to similar probes.

  10. Pressure-induced absorption coefficients for radiative transfer calculations in Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Courtin, Regis

    1988-01-01

    The semiempirical theory of Birnbaum and Cohen (1976) is used to calculate the FIR pressure-induced absorption (PIA) spectra of N2, CH4, N2 + Ar, N2 + CH4, and N2 + H2 under conditions like those in the Titan troposphere. The results are presented graphically and compared with published data from laboratory measurements of PIA in the same gases and mixtures (Dagg et al., 1986; Dore et al., 1986). Good agreement is obtained, with only a slight underestimation of PIA at 300-400/cm in the case of CH4. The absorption coefficients are presented in tables, and it is suggested that the present findings are of value for evaluating the effects of tropospheric clouds on the Titan FIR spectrum and studying the greenhouse effect near the Titan surface.

  11. Statistical Estimation of the Atmospheric Aerosol Absorption Coefficient Based on the Data of Optical Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Uzhegov, V.N.; Kozlov, V.S.; Panchenko, M.V.; Pkhalagov, Yu.A.; Pol'kin, V.V.; Terpugova, S.A.; Shmargunov, V.P.; Yausheva, E.P.

    2005-03-18

    The problem of the choice of the aerosol optical constants and, in particular, imaginary part of the refractive index of particles in visible and infrared (IR) wavelength ranges is very important for calculation of the global albedo of the atmosphere in climatic models. The available models of the aerosol optical constants obtained for the prescribed chemical composition of particles (see, for example, Ivlev et al. 1973; Ivlev 1982; Volz 1972), often are far from real aerosol. It is shown in (Krekov et al. 1982) that model estimates of the optical characteristics of the atmosphere depending on the correctness of real and imaginary parts of the aerosol complex refractive index can differ by some hundreds percent. It is known that the aerosol extinction coefficient {alpha}({lambda}) obtained from measurements on a long horizontal path can be represented as {alpha}({lambda})={sigma}({lambda})+{beta}({lambda}), where {sigma} is the directed light scattering coefficient, and {beta} is the aerosol absorption coefficient. The coefficient {sigma}({lambda}) is measured by means of a nephelometer. Seemingly, if measure the values {alpha}({lambda}) and {sigma}({lambda}), it is easy to determine the value {beta}({lambda}). However, in practice it is almost impossible for a number of reasons. Firstly, the real values {alpha}({lambda}) and {sigma}({lambda}) are very close to each other, and the estimate of the parameter {beta}({lambda}) is concealed by the errors of measurements. Secondly, the aerosol optical characteristics on the long path and in the local volume of nephelometer can be different, that also leads to the errors in estimating {beta}({lambda}). Besides, there are serious difficulties in performing spectral measurements of {sigma}({lambda}) in infrared wavelength range. Taking into account these circumstances, in this paper we consider the statistical technique, which makes it possible to estimate the absorption coefficient of real aerosol on the basis of analysis

  12. A comparison of methods for the measurement of the absorption coefficient in natural waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pegau, W. Scott; Cleveland, Joan S.; Doss, W.; Kennedy, C. Dan; Maffione, Robert A.; Mueller, James L.; Stone, R.; Trees, Charles C.; Weidemann, Alan D.; Wells, Willard H.

    1995-01-01

    In the spring of 1992 an optical closure experiment was conducted at Lake Pend Orielle, Idaho. A primary objective of the experiment was to compare techniques for the measurement of the spectral absorption coefficent and other inherent optical properties of natural waters. Daily averages of absorption coefficents measured using six methods are compared at wavelengths of 456, 488, and 532 nm. Overall agreement was within 40% at 456 nm and improved with increasing wavelength to 25% at 532 nm. These absorption measurements were distributed over the final 9 days of the experiement, when bio-optical conditions in Lake Pend Oreille (as indexed by the beam attenuation coefficent c(sub p)(660) and chlorophyll a fluorescence profiles) were representative of those observed throughout the experiment. However, profiles of stimulated chlorophyll a fluorescence and beam transmission showed that bio-optical properties in the lake varied strongly on all time and space scales. Therefore environmental variabilty contributed significantly to deviations between daily mean absorption coefficients measured using the different techniques.

  13. Mesure de coefficients d'absorption de plasmas créés par laser nanoseconde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thais, F.; Chenais-Popovics, C.; Eidmann, K.; Bastiani, S.; Blenski, T.; Gilleron, F.

    2005-06-01

    La mesure des coefficients d'absorption dans les plasmas chauds est particulièrement utile dans le domaine de la fusion par confinement inertiel ainsi que dans divers contextes en astrophysique. Le développement des calculs de physique atomique qui y sont associés repose sur des hypothèses qu'il est nécessaire de vérifier dans la plus large gamme possible de conditions physiques. Nous présentons ici la méthode de mesure et d'analyse employée en nous appuyant sur l'exemple des cibles multicouches nickel/aluminium.

  14. Determination of Absorption Coefficient of a Solution by a Simple Experimental Setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, Deepak; Akhildev, C.; Sreenivasan, P. V.; Leelamma, K. K.; Joseph, Lyjo K.; Anila, E. I.

    2011-10-01

    The absorption coefficients of aqueous potassium permanganate (KMnO4) solution at 638.8 nm for various concentrations are determined using a simple experimental set up. The setup consists of He-Ne laser source (Red, 638.8 nm, 10 mW), a glass jar in which the KMnO4 sample is taken, a mirror strip inclined at 45° to direct the laser beam towards the bottom of the glass jar, a traveling microscope to adjust the position of light dependent resistor (LDR) and a digital multimeter to measure the resistance.

  15. Water in the Earth's Mantle: Mineral-specific IR Absorption Coefficients and Radiative Thermal Conductivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Minor and trace element chemistry, phase relations, rheology, thermal structure and the role of volatiles and their abundance in the deep Earth mantle are still far from fully explored, but fundamental to understanding the processes involved in Earth formation and evolution. Theory and high pressure experiments imply a significant water storage capacity of nominally anhydrous minerals, such as majoritic garnet, olivine, wadsleyite and ringwoodite, composing the Earth's upper mantle and transition zone to a depth of 660 km. Studying the effect of water incorporation on chemical and physical mineral properties is of importance, because the presence of trace amounts of water, incorporated as OH through charge-coupled chemical substitutions into such nominally anhydrous high-pressure silicates, notably influences phase relations, melting behavior, conductivity, elasticity, viscosity and rheology. Knowledge of absolute water contents in nominally anhydrous minerals is essential for modeling the Earth's interior water cycle. One of the most common and sensitive tools for water quantification is IR spectroscopy for which mineral-specific absorption coefficients are required. Such calibration constants can be derived from hydrogen concentrations determined by independent techniques, such as secondary ion mass spectrometry, Raman spectroscopy or proton-proton(pp)-scattering. Here, analytical advances and mineral-specific IR absorption coefficients for the quantification of H2O in major phases of the Earth's mantle will be discussed. Furthermore, new data from optical absorption measurements in resistively heated diamond-anvil cells at high pressures and temperatures up to 1000 K will be presented. Experiments were performed on synthetic single-crystals of olivine, ringwoodite, majoritic garnet, and Al-bearing phase D with varying iron, aluminum and OH contents to calculate radiative thermal conductivities and study their contribution to heat transfer in the Earth's interior

  16. Theoretical calculations of nonlinear refraction and absorption coefficients of doped graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulis, Vl A.; Muryumin, E. E.; Gaiduk, E. A.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we present the first theoretical predictions concerning the nonlinear refractive and absorptive properties of the doped graphene in which the Fermi energy {{E}F} of charge carriers (noninteracting massless Dirac fermions) is controlled by an external gate voltage. We base our study on the original perturbation theory technique developed by Genkin and Mednis (1968 Sov. Phys. JETP 27 609) for calculating the nonlinear-optical (NLO) response coefficients of bulk crystalline semiconductors with partially filled bands. Using a simple tight-binding model for the π-electron energy bands of graphene, we obtain analytic expressions for the nonlinear refractive index {{n}2}(ω ) and the nonlinear absorption coefficient {{α }2}(ω ) of the doped graphene at photon energies above twice the value of the Fermi energy (\\hbar ω \\gt 2{{E}F}). We show that in this spectral region, both the nonlinear refraction ant the nonlinear absorption are determined predominantly by the combined processes which simultaneously involve intraband and interband motion of π-electrons. Our calculations indicate that extremely large negative values of n2 (of the order of -{{10}-6} cm2 W-1) can be achieved in the graphene at a relatively low doping level (of about 1012 cm-2) provided that the excitation frequency slightly exceeds the threshold frequency corresponding to the onset of interband transitions. With a further increase of the radiation frequency, the {{n}2}(ω ) becomes positive and begins to decrease in its absolute magnitude. The peculiar frequency dispersion of n2 and a negative sign of the {{α }2} (absorption bleaching), as predicted by our theory, suggest that the doped graphene is a prospective NLO material to be used in practical optical switching applications.

  17. Angular measurement of acoustic reflection coefficients by the inversion of V(z, t) data with high frequency time-resolved acoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian; Bai, Xiaolong; Yang, Keji; Ju, Bing-Feng

    2012-01-01

    For inspection of mechanical properties and integrity of critical components such as integrated circuits or composite materials by acoustic methodology, it is imperative to evaluate their acoustic reflection coefficients, which are in close correlation with the elastic properties, thickness, density, and attenuation and interface adhesion of these layered structures. An experimental method based on angular spectrum to evaluate the acoustic coefficient as a function of the incident angle, θ, and frequency, ω, is presented with high frequency time-resolved acoustic microscopy. In order to achieve a high spatial resolution for evaluation of thin plates with thicknesses about one or two wavelengths, a point focusing transducer with a nominal center frequency of 25 MHz is adopted. By measuring the V(z, t) data in pulse mode, the reflection coefficient, R(θ, ω), can be reconstructed from its two-dimensional spectrum. It brings simplicity to experimental setup and measurement procedure since only single translation of the transducer in the vertical direction is competent for incident angle and frequency acquisition. It overcomes the disadvantages of the conventional methods requiring the spectroscopy for frequency scanning and/or ultrasonic goniometer for angular scanning. Two substrates of aluminum and Plexiglas and four stainless plates with various thicknesses of 100 μm, 150 μm, 200 μm, and 250 μm were applied. The acoustic reflection coefficients are consistent with the corresponding theoretical calculations. It opened the way of non-destructive methodology to evaluate the elastic and geometrical properties of very thin multi-layers structures simultaneously.

  18. Absorption of intense microwaves and ion acoustic turbulence due to heat transport

    SciTech Connect

    De Groot, J.S.; Liu, J.M.; Matte, J.P.

    1994-02-04

    Measurements and calculations of the inverse bremsstrahlung absorption of intense microwaves are presented. The isotropic component of the electron distribution becomes flat-topped in agreement with detailed Fokker-Planck calculations. The plasma heating is reduced due to the flat-topped distributions in agreement with calculations. The calculations show that the heat flux at high microwave powers is very large, q{sub max} {approx} 0.3 n{sub e}v{sub e}T{sub e}. A new particle model to, calculate the heat transport inhibition due to ion acoustic turbulence in ICF plasmas is also presented. One-dimensional PIC calculations of ion acoustic turbulence excited due to heat transport are presented. The 2-D PIC code is presently being used to perform calculations of heat flux inhibition due to ion acoustic turbulence.

  19. Experiments on hypersonic boundary layer transition on blunt cones with acoustic-absorption coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiplyuk, A.; Lukashevich, S.; Bountin, D.; Maslov, A.; Knaus, H.

    2012-01-01

    The laminar-turbulent transition is studied experimentally on a cone with an acoustic-absorption coating and with different nose bluntness in a high-speed flow. The acoustic-absorption coating is a felt metal sheet with a random microstructure. Experiments were carried out on a 1-meter length 7 degree cone at free-stream Mach number M = 8 and zero angle of attack. Locations of the laminar-turbulent transition are detected using heat flux distributions registered by calorimeter sensors. In addition, boundary layer pulsations are measured by means of ultrafast heat flux sensors. It is shown that the laminar-turbulent transition is caused by the second-mode instability, and the laminar run extends as the bluntness is increased. The porous coating effectively suppresses this instability for all tested bluntness values and 1.3-1.85 times extends the laminar run.

  20. Temperature and pressure dependence of dichloro-difluoromethane (CF2C12) absorption coefficients for CO2 waveguide laser radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harward, C. N.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements were performed to determine the pressure and temperature dependence of CFM-12 absorption coefficients for CO2 waveguide laser radiation. The absorption coefficients of CFM-12 for CO2 waveguide laser radiation were found to have no spectral structure within small spectral bandwidths around the CO2 waveguide laser lines in the CO2 spectral band for pressures above 20 torr. All of the absorption coefficients for the CO2 laser lines studied are independent of pressure above 100 torr, except for the P(36) laser CO2 spectral band. The absorption coefficients associated with the P(42) line in the same band showed the greatest change with temperature, and it also has the largest value of all the lines studied.

  1. The effect of metal nano particle on optical absorption coefficient of multi-layer spherical quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamani, N.; Keshavarz, A.; Nadgaran, H.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate the optical absorption coefficient of hybrid structure consisting of metal nano particle (MNP) coupled to multi-layer spherical quantum dot (MSQD). Energy eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of Schrödinger equation in this structure are obtained by using numerical solution (by the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method). The effect of MNP in the vicinity of MSQD is calculated by considering local field theory. Then the variation of optical absorption coefficient hybrid structure is calculated. The results show that the presence of MNP near MSQD enhances the optical absorption coefficient. Also, by changing the distance between MNP and MSQD and radius of MNP, variation of optical absorption coefficient and refractive index changes are introduced.

  2. Spectral absorption coefficients of argon and silicon and spectral reflectivity of aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krascella, N. L.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical investigation was conducted to estimate the spectral properties of argon as a function of pressure, temperature, and wave number. The spectral characteristics of the argon buffer gas exert a strong influence on radiative energy transfer in the in-reactor test configuration of the nuclear light bulb engine. An existing computer program was modified and used to calculate the spectral absorption coefficients of argon at total pressures of 50, 100, 250, 500, 750 and 1000 atm in the temperature interval between 1000 and 30,000 K. At each pressure and temperature, spectral properties were calculated for forty-seven wave numbers in the interval between 1000 and 1,000,000 cm/1. Estimates of the spectral absorption coefficients of silicon were made as part of an evaluation of silicon vapor as a possible buffer-gas seeding agent for the reference nuclear light bulb engine. Existing cross-section data were used to calculate the spectral characteristics of silicon at twenty-four temperatures in the interval between 2000 and 10,000 K.

  3. Spectral variation of the infrared absorption coefficient in pulsed photothermal profiling of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Majaron, Boris; Verkruysse, Wim; Tanenbaum, B Samuel; Milner, Thomas E; Nelson, J Stuart

    2002-06-01

    Pulsed photothermal radiometry can be used for non-invasive depth profiling of optically scattering samples, including biological tissues such as human skin. Computational reconstruction of the laser-induced temperature profile from recorded radiometric signals is sensitive to the value of the tissue absorption coefficient in the infrared detection band (muIR). While assumed constant in reported reconstruction algorithms, muIR of human skin varies by two orders of magnitude in the commonly used 3-5 microm detection band. We analyse the problem of selecting the effective absorption coefficient value to be used with such algorithms. In a numerical simulation of photothermal profiling we demonstrate that results can be markedly impaired, unless the reconstruction algorithm is augmented by accounting for spectral variation muIR(lambda). Alternatively, narrowing the detection band to 4.5-5 microm reduces the spectral variation muIR(lambda) to a level that permits the use of the simpler, unaugmented algorithm. Implementation of the latter approach for depth profiling of port wine stain birthmarks in vivo is presented and discussed. PMID:12108776

  4. Effect of the absorption coefficient of aluminium plates on their thermoelastic bending in photoacoustic experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markushev, D. D.; Ordonez-Miranda, J.; Rabasović, M. D.; Galović, S.; Todorović, D. M.; Bialkowski, S. E.

    2015-06-01

    The open-cell photoacoustic signal measured in the transmission configuration for aluminum thin plates with thicknesses of 280 μm, 197 μm, and 112 μm is experimentally and theoretically analyzed, in the 20 Hz-7 kHz modulation frequency range. It is shown that the observed differences between the predictions of the standard thermoelastic model and the experiment data of both the amplitude and phase of the photoacoustic signal can be overcome by considering the aluminum samples coated with a thin layer of black paint as volume-absorber materials. This new approach provides a quite good agreement with the obtained experimental data, in the whole frequency range, and yields an effective absorption coefficient of (16 ± 2) mm-1, for a 280 μm-thick sample. The introduction of the finite absorption coefficient led to the correct ratio between the thermal diffusion and thermoelastic components of the photoacoustic signal. Furthermore, it is found that the "volume-absorber" approach accurately describes the behavior of the amplitude, but not that of the phase recorded for a 112 μm-thick sample, due to its relatively strong thermoelastic bending, which is not considered by this theory. Within the approximation of the small bending, the proposed "volume-absorber" model provides a reliable description of the photoacoustic signal for Al samples thicker than 112 μm, and extends the applicability of the classical "opaque" approach.

  5. Effect of hydrogenic impurity on linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients and refractive index changes in a quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Kangxian; Zhang, Zhongmin; Mou, Sen; Xiao, Bo

    2015-05-01

    The analytical expressions of linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients and refractive index changes in a quantum dot with a hydrogenic impurity are obtained by using the compact-density-matrix approach and iterative method. The wave functions and the energy levels are obtained by using the variational method. Numerical results show that the optical absorption coefficients and refractive index changes are strongly affected by the hydrogenic impurity.

  6. Absorption Spectra and Absorption Coefficients for Methane in the 750-940 nm region obtained by Intracavity Laser Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, J. J.; Cao, H.

    2000-10-01

    Methane spectral features are prominent in the reflected sunlight spectra from the outer planets and some of their major satellites and can provide useful information on the atmospheres of those bodies. Methane bands occurring in the visible to near-IR region are particularly important because for many of these planetary bodies, methane bands occurring in the IR are saturated. Spectral observations of these bodies also are being made at increasingly higher resolution. In order to interpret the planetary spectra, laboratory data for methane obtained at appropriate sample conditions and spectral resolution are required. Since the visible to near-IR spectrum of methane is intrinsically weak, sensitive techniques are required to perform the laboratory measurements. We have employed the intracavity laser spectroscopy (ILS) technique to record methane spectrum in the visible to near-IR region. New results for room temperature methane in the 10,635 - 13,300 cm-1 region and for liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K) methane in the 10,860 - 11,605 cm-1 region will be presented. Spectra throughout the more strongly absorbing sections will be shown. These spectra are acquired at a resolution of 400,000 - 500,000 and are calibrated using iodine reference spectra acquired from an extra-cavity cell at nearly the same time as when the methane data are recorded. From the spectra, absorption coefficients are determined and these are presented as averages over 1 Å and 1 cm-1 intervals. In order to obtain the results, spectra are deconvolved for the instrument function using a Fourier transform technique. The validity of the approach is verified from studies of isolated oxygen lines in the A band occurring around 760 nm. Good agreement is observed between the intensity values determined from the FT deconvolution and integration method and those derived by fitting the observed line profiles to Voigt line-shapes convoluted with the instrument function. The methane results are compared

  7. Measuring absorption coefficient of scattering liquids using a tube inside an integrating sphere.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Yolanda; Veenstra, Colin; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2016-04-10

    A method for measuring the absorption coefficient μa of absorbing and scattering liquid samples is presented. The sample is injected into a small transparent tube mounted through an integrating sphere. Two models for determining the absorption coefficient using the relative optical output signal are described and validated using aqueous ink absorbers of 0.5 vol.% (0.3  mm-1a<1.55  mm-1) and 1.0 vol.% (1.0  mm-1a<4.0  mm-1) concentrations with 1 vol.% (μs'≈1.4  mm-1) and 10 vol.% (μs'≈14  mm-1) Intralipid dilutions. The low concentrations give μa and μs values, which are comparable with those of biological tissues. One model assumes a uniform light distribution within the sample, which is valid for low absorption. Another model considers light attenuation that obeys Lambert-Beer's law, which may be used for relatively high absorption. Measurements with low and high scattering samples are done for the wavelength range of 400-900 nm. Measured spectra of purely absorbing samples are within 15% agreement with measurements using standard transmission spectrophotometry. For 0.5 vol.% ink absorbers and at wavelengths below 700 nm, measured μa values are higher for samples with low scattering and lower for those with high scattering. At wavelengths above 700 nm, measured μa values do not vary significantly with amount of scattering. For 1.0 vol.% ink absorbers, measured spectra do not change with low scattering. These results indicate that the method can be used for measuring absorption spectra of scattering liquid samples with optical properties similar to biological absorbers, particularly at wavelengths above 700 nm, which is difficult to accomplish with standard transmission spectrophotometry. PMID:27139871

  8. Determination of absorption coefficient based on laser beam thermal blooming in gas-filled tube.

    PubMed

    Hafizi, B; Peñano, J; Fischer, R; DiComo, G; Ting, A

    2014-08-01

    Thermal blooming of a laser beam propagating in a gas-filled tube is investigated both analytically and experimentally. A self-consistent formulation taking into account heating of the gas and the resultant laser beam spreading (including diffraction) is presented. The heat equation is used to determine the temperature variation while the paraxial wave equation is solved in the eikonal approximation to determine the temporal and spatial variation of the Gaussian laser spot radius, Gouy phase (longitudinal phase delay), and wavefront curvature. The analysis is benchmarked against a thermal blooming experiment in the literature using a CO₂ laser beam propagating in a tube filled with air and propane. New experimental results are presented in which a CW fiber laser (1 μm) propagates in a tube filled with nitrogen and water vapor. By matching laboratory and theoretical results, the absorption coefficient of water vapor is found to agree with calculations using MODTRAN (the MODerate-resolution atmospheric TRANsmission molecular absorption database) and HITRAN (the HIgh-resolution atmospheric TRANsmission molecular absorption database). PMID:25090334

  9. The Optical Absorption Coefficient of Bean Seeds Investigated Using Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Hernandez, G.; Hernandez-Aguilar, C.; Dominguez-Pacheco, A.; Cruz-Orea, A.; Perez-Reyes, M. C. J.; Martinez, E. Moreno

    2015-06-01

    A knowledge about seed optical parameters is of great relevance in seed technology practice. Such parameters provide information about its absorption and reflectance, which could be useful for biostimulation processes, by light sources, in early stages of seed germination. In the present research photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) and the Rosencwaig and Gersho model were used to determine the optical absorption coefficient () of five varieties of bean seeds ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.), of different productive cycles; the seeds were biostimulated by laser treatment to evaluate the effects of biostimulation pre-sowing. It was found that the bean varieties V1, V2, V4, and V5 were optically opaque in the visible spectrum; in the case of the V3 variety, this sample was optically transparent from 680 nm. The varieties of the studied bean seeds showed significant statistical differences in sizes and also in their optical absorption spectra. The biostimulation effects showed that the seed samples with a higher optical penetration length had a positive biostimulation, in the percentage of germination, obtaining an enhancement of 47 % compared to the control sample. The utility of PAS for the optical characterization of seeds has been demonstrated in this study of the laser biostimulation process of this kind of samples.

  10. The melanosome: threshold temperature for explosive vaporization and internal absorption coefficient during pulsed laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Jacques, S L; McAuliffe, D J

    1991-06-01

    The explosive vaporization of melanosomes in situ in skin during pulsed laser irradiation (pulse duration less than 1 microsecond) is observed as a visible whitening of the superficial epidermal layer due to stratum corneum disruption. In this study, the ruby laser (694 nm) was used to determine the threshold radiant exposure, H0 (J/cm2), required to elicit whitening for in vitro black (Negroid) human skin samples which were pre-equilibrated at an initial temperature, Ti, of 0, 20, or 50 degrees C. A plot of H0 vs Ti yields a straight line whose x-intercept indicates the threshold temperature of explosive vaporization to be 112 +/- 7 degrees C (SD, N = 3). The slope, delta H0/delta Ti, specifies the internal absorption coefficient, mua, within the melanosome: mua = -rho C/(slope(1 + 7.1 Rd)), where rho C is the product of density and specific heat, and Rd is the total diffuse reflectance from the skin. A summary of the absorption spectrum (mua) for the melanosome interior (351-1064 nm) is presented based on H0 data from this study and the literature. The in vivo absorption spectrum (380-820 nm) for human epidermal melanin was measured by an optical fiber spectrophotometer and is compared with the melanosome spectrum. PMID:1886936

  11. Highly Dynamic Ligand Binding and Light Absorption Coefficient of Cesium Lead Bromide Perovskite Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    De Roo, Jonathan; Ibáñez, Maria; Geiregat, Pieter; Nedelcu, Georgian; Walravens, Willem; Maes, Jorick; Martins, Jose C; Van Driessche, Isabel; Kovalenko, Maksym V; Hens, Zeger

    2016-02-23

    Lead halide perovskite materials have attracted significant attention in the context of photovoltaics and other optoelectronic applications, and recently, research efforts have been directed to nanostructured lead halide perovskites. Collodial nanocrystals (NCs) of cesium lead halides (CsPbX3, X = Cl, Br, I) exhibit bright photoluminescence, with emission tunable over the entire visible spectral region. However, previous studies on CsPbX3 NCs did not address key aspects of their chemistry and photophysics such as surface chemistry and quantitative light absorption. Here, we elaborate on the synthesis of CsPbBr3 NCs and their surface chemistry. In addition, the intrinsic absorption coefficient was determined experimentally by combining elemental analysis with accurate optical absorption measurements. (1)H solution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to characterize sample purity, elucidate the surface chemistry, and evaluate the influence of purification methods on the surface composition. We find that ligand binding to the NC surface is highly dynamic, and therefore, ligands are easily lost during the isolation and purification procedures. However, when a small amount of both oleic acid and oleylamine is added, the NCs can be purified, maintaining optical, colloidal, and material integrity. In addition, we find that a high amine content in the ligand shell increases the quantum yield due to the improved binding of the carboxylic acid. PMID:26786064

  12. An Evaluation of the Additional Acoustic Power Needed to Overcome the Effects of a Test-Article's Absorption During Reverberant Chamber Acoustic Testing of Spaceflight Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hozman, Aron D.; Hughes, William O.

    2014-01-01

    The exposure of a customer's aerospace test-article to a simulated acoustic launch environment is typically performed in a reverberant acoustic test chamber. The acoustic pre-test runs that will ensure that the sound pressure levels of this environment can indeed be met by a test facility are normally performed without a test-article dynamic simulator of representative acoustic absorption and size. If an acoustic test facility's available acoustic power capability becomes maximized with the test-article installed during the actual test then the customer's environment requirement may become compromised. In order to understand the risk of not achieving the customer's in-tolerance spectrum requirement with the test-article installed, an acoustic power margin evaluation as a function of frequency may be performed by the test facility. The method for this evaluation of acoustic power will be discussed in this paper. This method was recently applied at the NASA Glenn Research Center Plum Brook Station's Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility for the SpaceX Falcon 9 Payload Fairing acoustic test program.

  13. An Evaluation of the Additional Acoustic Power Needed to Overcome the Effects of a Test-Article's Absorption during Reverberant Chamber Acoustic Testing of Spaceflight Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hozman, Aron D.; Hughes, William O.

    2014-01-01

    The exposure of a customers aerospace test-article to a simulated acoustic launch environment is typically performed in a reverberant acoustic test chamber. The acoustic pre-test runs that will ensure that the sound pressure levels of this environment can indeed be met by a test facility are normally performed without a test-article dynamic simulator of representative acoustic absorption and size. If an acoustic test facilitys available acoustic power capability becomes maximized with the test-article installed during the actual test then the customers environment requirement may become compromised. In order to understand the risk of not achieving the customers in-tolerance spectrum requirement with the test-article installed, an acoustic power margin evaluation as a function of frequency may be performed by the test facility. The method for this evaluation of acoustic power will be discussed in this paper. This method was recently applied at the NASA Glenn Research Center Plum Brook Stations Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility for the SpaceX Falcon 9 Payload Fairing acoustic test program.

  14. Absorption coefficients of selected explosives and related compounds in the range of 0.1-2.8 THz.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Chen, Yunqing; Zhao, Hongwei; Bastiaans, Glenn J; Zhang, X-C

    2007-09-17

    We have investigated the absorption spectra of seventeen explosives and related compounds (ERCs) by using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy in the 0.1-2.8 THz region. Most of these substances show characteristic absorption features in this frequency range. The measured absorption coefficients of these ERCs form a database, which is of great importance for biochemical, defense and security related applications. PMID:19547570

  15. Determination of Scattering and Absorption Coefficients for Plasma-Sprayed Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coatings at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Spuckler, Charles M.; Markham, James R.

    2009-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the scattering and absorption coefficients for a set of freestanding plasma-sprayed 8 wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) was determined at temperatures up to 1360 C in a wavelength range from 1.2 micrometers up to the 8YSZ absorption edge. The scattering and absorption coefficients were determined by fitting the directional-hemispherical reflectance and transmittance values calculated by a four-flux Kubelka Munk method to the experimentally measured hemispherical-directional reflectance and transmittance values obtained for five 8YSZ thicknesses. The scattering coefficient exhibited a continuous decrease with increasing wavelength and showed no significant temperature dependence. The scattering is primarily attributed to the relatively temperature-insensitive refractive index mismatch between the 8YSZ and its internal voids. The absorption coefficient was very low (less than 1 per centimeter) at wavelengths between 2 micrometers and the absorption edge and showed a definite temperature dependence that consisted of a shift of the absorption edge to shorter wavelengths and an increase in the weak absorption below the absorption edge with increasing temperature. The shift in the absorption edge with temperature is attributed to strongly temperature-dependent multiphonon absorption. While TBC hemispherical transmittance beyond the absorption edge can be predicted by a simple exponential decrease with thickness, below the absorption edge, typical TBC thicknesses are well below the thickness range where a simple exponential decrease in hemispherical transmittance with TBC thickness is expected. [Correction added after online publication August 11, 2009: "edge to a shorter wavelengths" has been updated as edge to shorter wavelengths."

  16. Experimental investigation of X-ray spectral absorption coefficients in heated Al and Ge on the Iskra-5 laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bondarenko, S V; Garanin, Sergey G; Zhidkov, N V; Pinegin, A V; Suslov, N A

    2012-01-31

    We set forth the data of experimental investigation of X-ray spectral absorption coefficients in the 1.1 - 1.6 keV photon energy range for Al and Ge specimens bulk heated by soft X-ray radiation. Two experimental techniques are described: with the use of one facility channel and the heating of specimens by the X-ray radiation from a plane burnthrough target, as well as with the use of four channels and the heating by the radiation from two cylindrical targets with internal input of laser radiation. The X-ray radiation absorption coefficients were studied by way of transmission absorption spectroscopy using backlighting X-ray radiation from a point source. The results of investigation of X-ray spectral absorption coefficients on the 1s - 2p transitions in Al atoms and the 2p - 3d transitions in Ge atoms are presented.

  17. Spectral absorption-coefficient data on HCFC-22 and SF6 for remote-sensing applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varanasi, P.; Li, Z.; Nemtchinov, V.; Cherukuri, A.

    1994-01-01

    Spectral absorption-coefficients (cross-sections) kappa(sub nu) (/cm/atm) have been measured in the 7.62, 8.97, and 12.3 micrometer bands of HCFC-22 (CHClF2) and the 10.6 micrometer bands of SF6 employing a high-resolution Fourier-transform spectrometer. Temperature and total pressure have been varied to simulate conditions corresponding to tropospheric and stratospheric layers in the atmosphere. The kappa(sub nu) are compared with values measured by us previously using a tunable diode laser spectrometer and with the appropriate entries in HITRAN and GEISA, two of the databases known to the atmospheric scientist. The measured absolute intensities of the bands are compared with previously published values.

  18. Determination of acoustic properties of thin polymer films utilizing the frequency dependence of the reflection coefficient of ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohmyoh, Hironori; Sakamoto, Yuhei

    2015-11-01

    This paper reports on a technique to measure the acoustic properties of a thin polymer film utilizing the frequency dependence of the reflection coefficient of ultrasound reflected back from a system comprising a reflection plate, the film, and a material that covers the film. The frequency components of the echo reflected from the back of the plate, where the film is attached, take their minimum values at the resonant frequency, and from these frequency characteristics, the acoustic impedance, sound velocity, and the density of the film can be determined. We applied this technique to characterize an ion exchange membrane, which has high water absorbability, and successfully determined the acoustic properties of the membrane without getting it wet.

  19. Study of the absorption coefficient of alpha particles to lower hybrid waves in tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jianbing Zhang, Xianmei Yu, Limin Zhao, Xiang

    2014-02-12

    Part of the energy of the Lower Hybrid (LH) waves may be absorbed by the α particles via the so-called perpendicular landau damping mechanism, which depends on various parameters of fusion reactors and the LH waves. In this article, we calculate the absorption coefficient γ{sub α} of LH waves due to α particles. Results show that, the γ{sub α} increases with the parallel refraction index n{sub ∥} while deceases with increasing the frequency of LH waves ω{sub LH} over a wide range. Higher background plasma temperature and toroidal magnetic field will increase the absorption, and there is a peak value of γ{sub α} when n{sub e}≈8×10{sup 19}m{sup −3} for ITER-like scenario. The thermal corrections to the cold plasma dispersion relation will change the damping rate to a certain extent under some specific conditions. We have also evaluated the fraction of LH power absorbed by the alpha particles, η ≈ 0.47% and 4.1% for an LH frequency of 5 GHz and 3.7 GHz respectively for ITER-like scenario. This work gives the effective reference for the choice of parameters of future fusion reactors.

  20. A new method to retrieve spectral absorption coefficient of highly-scattering and weakly-absorbing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dombrovsky, Leonid A.

    2016-03-01

    A significant uncertainty in the absorption coefficient of highly scattering dispersed materials is typical in the spectral ranges of very weak absorption. The traditional way to identify the main absorption and scattering characteristics of semi-transparent materials is based on spectral measurements of normal-hemispherical reflectance and transmittance for the material sample. Unfortunately this way cannot be used in the case of in vivo measurements of optical properties of biological tissues. A method suggested in the present paper is based on thermal response to the periodic radiative heating of the open surface of a semi-transparent material. It is shown that the period of a variation of the surface temperature is sensitive to the value of an average absorption coefficient in the surface layer. As a result, the monochromatic external irradiation combined with the surface temperature measurements can be used to retrieve the spectral values of absorption coefficient. Possible application of this method to porous semi-transparent ceramics is considered. An example problem is also solved to illustrate the applicability of this method to human skin. The approach suggested enables one to estimate an average absorption coefficient of human skin of a patient just before the thermal processing.

  1. Pressure measurement in supersonic air flow by differential absorptive laser-induced thermal acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Roger C.; Herring, G. C.; Balla, R. Jeffrey

    2007-06-01

    Nonintrusive, off-body flow barometry in Mach 2 airflow has been demonstrated in a large-scale supersonic wind tunnel using seedless laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA). The static pressure of the gas flow is determined with a novel differential absorption measurement of the ultrasonic sound produced by the LITA pump process. Simultaneously, the streamwise velocity and static gas temperature of the same spatially resolved sample volume were measured with this nonresonant time-averaged LITA technique. Mach number, temperature, and pressure have 0.2%, 0.4%, and 4% rms agreement, respectively, in comparison with known free-stream conditions.

  2. Pressure Measurement in Supersonic Air Flow by Differential Absorptive Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Roger C.; Herring, Gregory C.; Balla, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Nonintrusive, off-body flow barometry in Mach-2 airflow has been demonstrated in a large-scale supersonic wind tunnel using seedless laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA). The static pressure of the gas flow is determined with a novel differential absorption measurement of the ultrasonic sound produced by the LITA pump process. Simultaneously, stream-wise velocity and static gas temperature of the same spatially-resolved sample volume were measured with this nonresonant time-averaged LITA technique. Mach number, temperature and pressure have 0.2%, 0.4%, and 4% rms agreement, respectively, in comparison with known free-stream conditions.

  3. Retrieval of phytoplankton and colored detrital matter absorption coefficients with remote sensing reflectance in an ultraviolet band.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jianwei; Lee, Zhongping

    2015-02-01

    The light absorption of phytoplankton and colored detrital matter (CDM), which includes contribution of gelbstoff and detrital matters, has distinctive yet overlapping features in the ultraviolet (UV) and visible domain. The CDM absorption (a(dg)) increases exponentially with decreasing wavelength while the absorption coefficient of phytoplankton (a(ph)) generally decreases toward the shorter bands for the range of 350-450 nm. It has long been envisioned that including ocean color measurements in the UV range may help the separation of these two components from the remotely sensed ocean color spectrum. An attempt is made in this study to provide an analytical assessment of this expectation. We started with the development of an absorption decomposition model [quasi-analytical algorithm (QAA)-UV], analogous to the QAA, that partitions the total absorption coefficient using information at bands 380 and 440 nm. Compared to the retrieval results relying on the absorption information at 410 and 440 nm of the original QAA, our analyses indicate that QAA-UV can improve the retrieval of a(ph) and a(dg), although the improvement in accuracy is not significant for values at 440 nm. The performance of the UV-based algorithm is further evaluated with in situ measurements. The limited improvement observed with the field measurements highlights that the separation of a(dg) and a(ph) is highly dependent on the accuracy of the ocean color measurements and the estimated total absorption coefficient. PMID:25967770

  4. Variation of phytoplankton absorption coefficients in the northern South China Sea during spring and autumn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J.; Hong, H.; Shang, S.; Dai, M.; Lee, Z.

    2007-05-01

    We examined the temporal and spatial variabilities of phytoplankton absorption coefficients (αphλ)) and their relationships with physical processes in the northern South China Sea from two cruise surveys during spring (May 2001) and late autumn (November 2002). A large river plume induced by heavy precipitation in May stimulated a phytoplankton bloom on the inner shelf, causing significant changes in the surface water in αph values and B/R ratios (αph(440)/αph(675)). This was consistent with the observed one order of magnitude elevation of chlorophyll α and a shift from a pico/nano dominated phytoplankton community to one dominated by micro-algae. At the seasonal level, enhanced vertical mixing due to strengthened northeast monsoon in November has been observed to result in higher surface αph(675) (0.002-0.006 m-1 higher) and less pronounced subsurface maximum on the outer shelf/slope in November as compared that in May. Measurements of αph and B/R ratios from three transects in November revealed a highest surface αph(675) immediately outside the mouth of the Pearl River Estuary, whereas lower αph(675) and higher B/R ratios were featured in the outer shelf/slope waters, demonstrating the respective influence of the Pearl River plume and the oligotrophic nature of South China Sea water. The difference in spectral shapes of phytoplankton absorption (measured by B/R ratios and bathochromic shifts) on these three transects infers that picoprocaryotes are the major component of the phytoplankton community on the outer shelf/slope rather than on the inner shelf. In addition, a regional tuning of the phytoplankton absorption spectral model (Carder et al., 1999) demonstrated a greater spatial variation than seasonal variation in the lead parameter a0(λ). These results suggest that phytoplankton absorption properties in a coastal region such as the northern South China Sea are complex and region-based parameterization is mandatory in order for remote sensing

  5. Application of the Z-scan technique to determine the optical Kerr coefficient and two-photon absorption coefficient of magnetite nanoparticles colloidal suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivacqua, Marco; Espinosa, Daniel; Martins Figueiredo Neto, Antônio

    2012-06-01

    We investigate the occurrence of the optical Kerr effect and two-photon absorption when an oil-based magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles colloidal suspension is illuminated with high intensity femtosecond laser pulses. The frequency of the pulses is controlled and the Z-scan technique is employed in our measurements of the nonlinear optical Kerr coefficient (n2) and two-photon absorption coefficient (β). From these values it was possible to calculate the real and imaginary parts of the third-order susceptibility. We observed that increasing the pulse frequency, additional physical processes take place, increasing artificially the absolute values of n2 and β. The experimental conditions are discussed to assure the obtention of reliable values of these nonlinear optical parameters, which may be useful in all-optical switching and optical power limiting applications.

  6. Laboratory measurements of the ozone absorption coefficient in the wavelength region 339 to 362 nm at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacciani, Marco; Disarra, Alcide; Fiocco, Giorgio

    1987-06-01

    Instrumentation for the absolute measurement of the ozone absorption coefficient in the Huggins bands at different temperatures was set up. Ozone is produced with an electrical discharge and stored cryogenically; differential absorption measurements are carried out in a slowly evolving mixture of ozone and molecular oxygen. Results in the region 339 to 362 nm at temperatures between minus 30 and plus 40 C are reported. Results support Katayama's (1979) model of the transitions giving rise to the Huggins absorption bands of ozone. For measurements of atmospheric ozone profiles by DIAL techniques, the results on the temperature dependence of the absorption coefficient at the wavelength corresponding to the third harmonic of an NdYAG laser are stressed.

  7. The fourth-order absorbing boundary condition with optimized coefficients for the simulation of the acoustic equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Peng; Liu, Zhaolun; Zhang, Xiaobo; Tan, Jun; Xia, Dongming; Li, Jing; Zhu, Bo

    2015-12-01

    This paper introduces the fourth-order absorbing boundary condition (ABC) into staggered-grid finite difference forward modeling of the first-order stress-velocity acoustic equation, and develops a new method to optimize coefficients of the fourth-order ABC to further improve its overall absorbing effect. Theoretical analysis and the results of numerical tests demonstrate that the fourth-order ABC with optimized coefficients has much higher absorbing efficiency than both the conventional second-order and fourth-order ABCs without optimized coefficients, for waves with large incident angles. Compared with the perfectly matched layer (PML) with 40 layers, the fourth-order ABC not only has a much better absorbing effect, but also uses far less computer memory for calculation. We present the fourth-order ABC with optimized coefficients as an ideal artificial boundary for the simulation of the acoustic equation based on extensive and complex structure models. Supported by the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (201513005).

  8. Mass-energy absorption coefficient and backscatter factor ratios for kilovoltage x-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C.-M.; Seuntjens, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    For low-energy (up to 150 kV) x-rays, the ratio of mass-energy absorption coefficients for water to air, , and the backscatter factor B are used in the conversion of air kerma, measured free-in-air, to water kerma on the surface of a water phantom. For clinical radiotherapy, similar conversion factors are needed for the determination of the absorbed dose to biological tissues on (or near) the surface of a human body. We have computed the ratios and B factor ratios for different biological tissues including muscle, soft tissue, lung, skin and bone relative to water. The ratios were obtained by integrating the respective mass-energy absorption coefficients over the in-air primary photon spectra. We have also calculated the ratios at different depths in a water phantom in order to convert the measured in-phantom water kerma to the absorbed dose to various biological tissues. The EGS4/DOSIMETER Monte Carlo code system has been used for the simulation of the energy fluence at different depths in a water phantom irradiated by a kilovoltage x-ray beam of variable beam quality (HVL: 0.1 mm Al-5 mm Cu), field size and source-surface distance (SSD). The same code was also used in the calculation of the B factor ratios, soft tissue to water and bone to water. The results show that the B factor for bone differs from the B factor for water by up to 20% for a 100 kV beam (HVL: 2.65 mm Al) with a 100 field. On the other hand, the difference in the B factor between water and soft tissue is insignificant (well within 1% generally). This means that the B factors for water may be directly used to

  9. Absorption coefficients for the 6190-A CH4 band between 290 and 100 K with application to Uranus' atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Wm. Hayden; Conner, Charles P.; Baines, Kevin H.

    1990-01-01

    A novel laser intracavity photoacoustic spectroscopy method allowing high sample control accuracy due to the small sample volume required has been used to obtain absorption coefficients for the CH4 6190 A band as a function of temperature, from 290 to 100 K. The peak absorption coefficient is found to increase from 0.6 to 1.0/cm, and to be accompanied by significant band shape changes. When used to further constrain the Baines and Bergstrahl (1986) standard model of the Uranus atmosphere, the low-temperature data yield an excellent fit to the bandshape near the 6190 A band's minimum.

  10. Absorption coefficients for the 6190-A CH sub 4 band between 290 and 100 K with application to Uranus' atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, WM.H.; Conner, C.P.; Baines, K.H. JPL, Pasadena, CA )

    1990-05-01

    A novel laser intracavity photoacoustic spectroscopy method allowing high sample control accuracy due to the small sample volume required has been used to obtain absorption coefficients for the CH{sub 4} 6190 A band as a function of temperature, from 290 to 100 K. The peak absorption coefficient is found to increase from 0.6 to 1.0/cm, and to be accompanied by significant band shape changes. When used to further constrain the Baines and Bergstrahl (1986) standard model of the Uranus atmosphere, the low-temperature data yield an excellent fit to the bandshape near the 6190 A band's minimum. 18 refs.

  11. Measurement of diffusion coefficients important in modeling the absorption rate of carbon dioxide into aqueous N-methyldiethanolamine

    SciTech Connect

    Rowley, R.L.; Adams, M.E.; Marshall, T.L.; Oscarson, J.L.; Wilding, W.V.; Anderson, D.J.

    1997-03-01

    Natural gas processors use amine treating processes to remove the acid gases H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2} from gas streams. Absorption rates of gaseous CO{sub 2} into aqueous N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) solutions were measured in a quiescent, inverted-tube diffusiometer by monitoring the rate of pressure drop. The absorption rate was found to be insensitive to the diffusion coefficient of CO{sub 2} in solution but very sensitive to the diffusion rate of bicarbonate and protonated MDEA ions. Evidence also suggested that chemical reaction equilibrium is rapid relative to diffusion. A numerical model was developed on the basis of these observations. The model was used to regress diffusion coefficients of bicarbonate and protonated amine, which must be equivalent by electroneutrality arguments, from measured absorption rates. Complete modeling of the absorption process also required data for the diffusion coefficient of MDEA in water. These were measured using a Taylor dispersion apparatus. CO{sub 2} absorption rates and diffusion coefficients of bicarbonate and protonated MDEA were obtained at 298.2 K and 318.2 K in solutions containing 20, 35, and 50 mass % MDEA in water.

  12. Re-evaluation of pulsed photothermal radiometric profiling in samples with spectrally varied infrared absorption coefficient.

    PubMed

    Majaron, Boris; Milanic, Matija

    2007-02-21

    Spectral variation of the sample absorption coefficient in mid-infrared (muIR) demands caution in photothermal radiometric measurements, because a constant muIR is regularly assumed in inverse analysis of the acquired signals. Adverse effects of such approximation were recently demonstrated in numerical simulations of pulsed photothermal radiometric (PPTR) temperature profiling in soft biological tissues, utilizing a general-purpose optimization code in the reconstruction process. We present here an original reconstruction code, which combines a conjugate gradient minimization algorithm with non-negativity constraint to the sought temperature vector. For the same test examples as in the former report (hyper-Gaussian temperature profiles, InSb detector with 3-5 microm acquisition band, signal-to-noise ratio SNR=300) we obtain markedly improved reconstruction results, both when using a constant value mueff and when the spectral variation muIR(lambda) is accounted for in the analysis. By comparing the results, we find that the former approach introduces observable artefacts, especially in the superficial part of the profile (z<100 microm). However, the artefacts are much less severe than previously reported and are almost absent in the case of a deeper, single-lobed test profile. We demonstrate that the observed artefacts do not result from sub-optimal selection of mueff, and that they vary with specific realizations of white noise added to the simulated signals. The same holds also for a two-lobed test profile. PMID:17264372

  13. Simultaneous measurement of thermal diffusivity and optical absorption coefficient using photothermal radiometry. I. Homogeneous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuente, Raquel; Apiñaniz, Estibaliz; Mendioroz, Arantza; Salazar, Agustín

    2011-08-01

    Modulated photothermal radiometry (PTR) has been widely used to measure the thermal diffusivity of bulk materials. The method is based on illuminating the sample with a plane light beam and measuring the infrared emission with an infrared detector. The amplitude and phase of the PTR voltage is recorded as a function of the modulation frequency and then fitted to the theoretical model. In this work, we test the ability of modulated PTR to retrieve simultaneously the thermal diffusivity and the optical absorption coefficient of homogeneous slabs. In order to eliminate the instrumental factor, self-normalization is used, i.e., the ratio of the PTR signal recorded at the rear and front surfaces. The influence of the multiple reflections of the light beam, the heat losses, and the transparency to infrared wavelengths are analyzed. Measurements performed on a wide variety of homogeneous materials, covering the whole range from transparent to opaque, confirm the validity of the method. In Part II of this work, the method is extended to multilayered materials.

  14. Noise-driven optical absorption coefficients of impurity doped quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Jayanta; Saha, Surajit; Pal, Suvajit; Ghosh, Manas

    2016-01-01

    We make an extensive investigation of linear, third-order nonlinear, and total optical absorption coefficients (ACs) of impurity doped quantum dots (QDs) in presence and absence of noise. The noise invoked in the present study is a Gaussian white noise. The quantum dot is doped with repulsive Gaussian impurity. Noise has been introduced to the system additively and multiplicatively. A perpendicular magnetic field acts as a source of confinement and a static external electric field has been applied. The AC profiles have been studied as a function of incident photon energy when several important parameters such as optical intensity, electric field strength, magnetic field strength, confinement energy, dopant location, relaxation time, Al concentration, dopant potential, and noise strength take on different values. In addition, the role of mode of application of noise (additive/multiplicative) on the AC profiles has also been analyzed meticulously. The AC profiles often consist of a number of interesting observations such as one photon resonance enhancement, shift of AC peak position, variation of AC peak intensity, and bleaching of AC peak. However, presence of noise alters the features of AC profiles and leads to some interesting manifestations. Multiplicative noise brings about more complexity in the AC profiles than its additive counterpart. The observations indeed illuminate several useful aspects in the study of linear and nonlinear optical properties of doped QD systems, specially in presence of noise. The findings are expected to be quite relevant from a technological perspective.

  15. An empirical determination of the dust mass absorption coefficient, κd, using the Herschel Reference Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Christopher J. R.; Schofield, Simon P.; Gomez, Haley L.; Davies, Jonathan I.

    2016-06-01

    We use the published photometry and spectroscopy of 22 galaxies in the Herschel Reference Survey to determine that the value of the dust mass absorption coefficient κd at a wavelength of 500 μm is kappa _{500} = 0.051^{+0.070}_{-0.026} m^{2 kg^{-1}}. We do so by taking advantage of the fact that the dust-to-metals ratio in the interstellar medium of galaxies appears to be constant. We argue that our value for κd supersedes that of James et al. - who pioneered this approach for determining κd - because we take advantage of superior data, and account for a number of significant systematic effects that they did not consider. We comprehensively incorporate all methodological and observational contributions to establish the uncertainty on our value, which represents a marked improvement on the oft-quoted `order-of-magnitude' uncertainty on κd. We find no evidence that the value of κd differs significantly between galaxies, or that it correlates with any other measured or derived galaxy properties. We note, however, that the availability of data limits our sample to relatively massive (109.7 < M⋆ < 1011.0 M⊙), high metallicity (8.61 < [ 12 + log_{10} fracOH ] < 8.86) galaxies; future work will allow us to investigate a wider range of systems.

  16. Effects of nanosilver on sound absorption coefficients in solid wood species.

    PubMed

    Taghiyari, Hamid Reza; Esmailpour, Ayoub; Zolfaghari, Habib

    2016-06-01

    Sound absorption coefficients (ACs) were determined in five solid woods (poplar, beech, walnut, mulberry, and fir) in the longitudinal and tangential directions at four different frequencies of 800, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz. The length of the longitudinal and tangential specimens was 50-mm and 10-mm, respectively. Separate sets of specimens were impregnated with either nanosilver suspension or water. The size range of nanoparticles was 30-80 nm. Results showed that sound ACs were lower in longitudinal specimens because sound waves could penetrate the open ends of vessels more easily, being trapped and damped there. Impregnation with both nanosilver suspension and water resulted in a significant decrease in the sound ACs. The decrease in the ACs was due to the collapsing and accumulation of perforation plates and cell parts, blocking the way through which waves could pass through the vessels. This caused higher damping due to a phenomenon called vibration decay. Correlation between gas permeability versus sound AC is significantly dependant on the porous structure of individual specimens. PMID:27256895

  17. Determination of the diffusion length and the optical self absorption coefficient using EBIC model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guermazi, S.; Guermazi, H.; Mlik, Y.; El Jani, B.; Grill, C.; Toureille, A.

    2001-10-01

    We have developed a model of calculation of the induced current due to an electron beam. The expression for the electron beam induced current (EBIC) with an extended generation profile is obtained via the resolution of a steady state continuity equation by the Green function method, satisfying appropriated boundary conditions to the physical model. The generation profile takes into account the lateral diffusion, the effect of defects, dislocations and recombination surfaces besides the number of absorbed electrons and that of diffuse electrons as a function of the depth. In the case of a Schottky diode Au/GaAs obtained by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE) method, the theoretical induced current profile is compared to the experimental one and to theoretical profiles whose analytical expressions are given by van Roosbroeck and Bresse. The minority carriers diffusion length L_n = 2 μm and the optical self-absorption coefficient a=0.034 μm^{-1} can be deduced from the experimental current profile, measured by scanning electron microscopy. The theoretical curve, obtained from the proposed model is in a good agreement with the experimental one for surface recombination velocity 10^6 cm s^{-1} except for distances far from the depletion layer (x_0 > 2.3 μm) where the photocurrent produced by the multiple process of the reabsorbed recombination radiation is preponderant. Our results are in agreement with those obtained by other experimental techniques on the same samples.

  18. Effects of combined scattering and absorption coefficients on laser speckle contrast imaging values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaksari, Kosar; Kirkpatrick, Sean J.

    2015-03-01

    Laser Speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is a non-invasive or minimally invasive method for visualizing blood flow and perfusion in biological tissues. In LSCI the motion of scattering particles results in a reduction in global and regional speckle contrast. A variety of parameters can affect the calculated contrast values in LSCI techniques, including the optical properties of the fluid and surrounding tissue. In typical LSCI where the motion of blood is of interests, optical properties are influenced by hematocrit levels. In this work we considered the combined effects of both the scattering and absorption coefficients on LSCI measurements on a flow phantom. Fluid phantoms consisting of various concentrations of neutrally buoyant ~10 micron microspheres and India ink mixed with DI water were formulated to mimic the optical properties of whole blood with various levels of hematocrit. In these flow studies, it was found that an increase in μa and/or μs led to a decrease in contrast values when all other experimental parameters were held constant. The observed reduction in contrast due to optical property changes could easily be confused with a contrast reduction due to increased flow velocity. These results suggest that optical properties need to be considered when using LSCI to make flow estimates.

  19. Analysis of acoustic damping in duct terminated by porous absorption materials based on analytical models and finite element simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan Qiming

    Acoustic absorption materials are widely used today to dampen and attenuate the noises which exist almost everywhere and have adverse impact upon daily life of human beings. In order to evaluate the absorption performance of such materials, it is necessary to experimentally determine acoustic properties of absorption materials. Two experimental methods, one is Standing Wave Ratio Method and the other is Transfer-Function Method, which also totally called as Impedance Tube Method, are based on two analytical models people have used to evaluate and validate the data obtained from acoustic impedance analyzers. This thesis first reviews the existing analytical models of previous two experimental methods in the literature by looking at their analytical models, respectively. Then a new analytical model is developed is developed based on One-Microphone Method and Three-Microphone Method, which are two novel experimental approaches. Comparisons are made among these analytical models, and their advantages and disadvantages are discussed.

  20. Effect of absorption parameters on calculation of the dose coefficient: example of classification of industrial uranium compounds.

    PubMed

    Chazel, V; Houpert, P; Paquet, F; Ansoborlo, E

    2001-01-01

    In the Human Respiratory Tract Model (HRTM) described in ICRP Publication 66, time-dependent dissolution is described by three parameters: the fraction dissolved rapidly, fr, and the rapid and slow dissolution rates sr and ss. The effect of these parameters on the dose coefficient has been studied. A theoretical analysis was carried out to determine the sensitivity of the dose coefficient to variations in the values of these absorption parameters. Experimental values of the absorption parameters and the doses per unit intake (DPUI) were obtained from in vitro dissolution tests, or from in vivo experiments with rats, for five industrial uranium compounds UO2, U3O8, UO4, UF4 and a mixture of uranium oxides. These compounds were classified in terms of absorption types (F, M or S) according to ICRP. The overall result was that the factor which has the greatest influence on the dose coefficient was the slow dissolution rate ss. This was verified experimentally, with a variation of 20% to 55% for the DPUI according to the absorption type of the compound. In contrast, the rapid dissolution rate sr had little effect on the dose coefficient, excepted for Type F compounds. PMID:11487809

  1. ABSORBANCE, ABSORPTION COEFFICIENT, AND APPARENT QUANTUM YIELD: A COMMENT ON AMBIGUITY IN THE USE OF THESE OPTICAL CONCEPTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several important optical terms such as "absorbance" and "absorption coefficient" are frequently used ambiguously in the current peer-reviewed literature. Since they are important terms that are required to derive other quantities such as the "apparent quantum yield" of photoprod...

  2. Linear absorption coefficient of beryllium in the 50-300-A wavelength range. [bandpass filter materials for ultraviolet astronomy instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barstow, M. A.; Lewis, M.; Petre, R.

    1983-01-01

    Transmittances of thin-film filters fabricated for an extreme-UV astronomy sounding-rocket experiment yield values for the linear absorption coefficient of beryllium in the 50-300-A wavelength range, in which previous measurements are sparse. The inferred values are consistent with the lowest data previously published and may have important consequences for extreme-UV astronomers.

  3. Investigation of linear optical absorption coefficients in core-shell quantum dot (QD) luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimipour, Bahareh Alsadat; Askari, Hassan Ranjbar; Ramezani, Ali Behjat

    2016-09-01

    The interlevel absorption coefficient of CdSe/ZnS and ZnS/CdSe core-shell Quantum Dot (QD) in luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) is reported. By considering the quantum confinement effects, the wave functions and eigenenergies of electrons in the nonperturebative system consists of a core-shell QD have been numerically calculated under the frame work of effective-mass approximation by solving a three-dimensional Schrӧdinger equation. And then the absorption coefficient is obtained under density matrix approximation considering in the polymer sheets of the concentrator including the core-shell QDs. The effect of the hetero-structure geometry upon the energy spectrum and absorption coefficient associated to interlevel transitions was also considered. The results show that the core-shell QDs can absorb the photons with higher energy in solar spectrum as compared to the inverted core-shell. And with a small shell layer diameter, the core-shell QDs produce larger linear absorption coefficients and consequently higher efficiency values, however it is inversed for inverted core-shell QDs. The work described here gives a detailed insight into the promise of QD-based LSCs and the optoelectronic devices applications.

  4. Influence of plasma parameters on the absorption coefficient of alpha particles to lower hybrid waves in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Zhang, X. Yu, L.; Zhao, X.

    2014-12-15

    In tokamaks, fusion generated α particles may absorb lower hybrid (LH) wave energy, thus reducing the LH current drive efficiency. The absorption coefficient γ{sub α} of LH waves due to α particles changing with some typical parameters is calculated in this paper. Results show that γ{sub α} increases with the parallel refraction index n{sub ‖}, while decreases with the frequency of LH waves ω over a wide range. Higher background plasma temperature and toroidal magnetic field will increase the absorption. The absorption coefficient γ{sub α} increases with n{sub e} when n{sub e} ≤ 8 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}, while decreases with n{sub e} when n{sub e} becomes larger, and there is a peak value of γ{sub α} when n{sub e} ≈ 8 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −1} for the ITER-like scenario. The influence of spectral broadening in parametric decay instabilities on the absorption coefficient is evaluated. The value of γ{sub α} with n{sub ‖} being 2.5 is almost two times larger than that with n{sub ‖} being 2.0 and is even lager in the case of 2.9, which will obviously increase the absorption of the LH power by alpha particles.

  5. Absorption coefficient of urban aerosol in Nanjing, west Yangtze River Delta, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, B. L.; Wang, T. J.; Liu, J.; Ma, Y.; Yin, C. Q.; Li, S.; Xie, M.; Han, Y.; Zhu, J. L.; Yang, X. Q.; Fu, C. B.

    2015-12-01

    Absorbing aerosols can significantly modulate short-wave solar radiation in the atmosphere, affecting regional and global climate. The aerosol absorption coefficient (AAC) is an indicator that assesses the impact of absorbing aerosols on radiative forcing. In this study, the near-surface AAC and absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) in the urban area of Nanjing, China, are characterized on the basis of measurements in 2012 and 2013 using the seven-channel Aethalometer (model AE-31, Magee Scientific, USA). The AAC is estimated with direct and indirect corrections, which result in consistent temporal variations and magnitudes of AAC at 532 nm. The mean AAC at 532 nm is about 43.23 ± 28.13 M m-1 in the urban area of Nanjing, which is much lower than that in Pearl River Delta and the same as in rural areas (Lin'an) in Yangtze River Delta. The AAC in the urban area of Nanjing shows strong seasonality (diurnal variations); it is high in cold seasons (at rush hour) and low in summer (in the afternoon). It also shows synoptic and quasi-2-week cycles in response to weather systems. Its frequency distribution follows a typical log-normal pattern. The 532 nm AAC ranging from 15 to 65 M m-1 dominates, accounting for more than 72 % of the total data samples in the entire study period. Frequent high pollution episodes, such as those observed in June 2012 and in winter 2013, greatly enhanced AAC and altered its temporal variations and frequency distributions. These episodes are mostly due to local emissions and regional pollution. Air masses flowing from northern China to Nanjing can sometimes be highly polluted and lead to high AAC at the site. AAE at 660/470 nm from the Schmid correction (Schmid et al., 2006) is about 1.56, which might be more reasonable than from the Weingartner correction (Weingartner et al., 2003). Low AAEs mainly occur in summer, likely due to high relative humidity (RH) in the season. AAC increases with increasing AAE at a fixed aerosol loading. The RH

  6. Absorption coefficient of urban aerosol in Nanjing, west Yangtze River Delta of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, B. L.; Wang, T. J.; Liu, J.; Ma, Y.; Yin, C. Q.; Li, S.; Xie, M.; Han, Y.; Zhu, J. L.; Yang, X. Q.; Fu, C. B.

    2015-06-01

    Absorbing aerosols can significantly modulate shortwave solar radiation in the atmosphere, affecting regional and global climate. Aerosol absorption coefficient (AAC) is an indicator to assess the impact of absorbing aerosols on radiative forcing. In this study, the near-surface AAC and absorption angstrom exponent (AAE) in urban Nanjing, China, are characterized on the basis of measurements in 2012 and 2013 using the 7-channel Aethalometer (model AE-31, Magee Scientific, USA). The AAC is estimated with direct and indirect corrections, which show consistent temporal variations and magnitudes of AAC at 532 nm. The mean AAC at 532 nm is about 43.23 ± 28.13 M m-1 in urban Nanjing, which is much lower than that in Pearl River Delta and as the same as that in rural areas (Lin'an) in Yangtze River Delta. The AAC in urban Nanjing shows strong seasonality (diurnal variations), high in cold seasons (at rush hours) and low in summer (in afternoon). It also show synoptic and quasi-two-week cycles in response to weather systems. Its frequency distribution follows a typical lognormal pattern. The 532 nm-AAC ranging from 15 to 65 M m-1 dominates, accounting for more than 72% of the total data samples in the entire study period. Frequent high pollution episodes, such as those observed in June 2012 and in winter 2013, greatly enhanced AAC and altered its temporal variations and frequency distributions. These episodes are mostly due to local emissions and regional pollutions. Air masses from northern China to Nanjing can sometimes be highly polluted and lead to high AAC at the site. AAE at 660/470 nm from the Schmid correction (Schmid et al., 2006) is about 1.56, which might be more reasonable compared to that from the Weingartner correction (Weingartner et al., 2003). Low AAEs mainly appear in summer in response to the relative humidity (RH). AAC increases with increasing AAE at a fixed aerosol loading. The RH-AAC relationship is more complex. Overall, AAC peaks around RH values

  7. Anomalous atmospheric spectral features between 300 and 310 nm interpreted in light or new ozone absorption coefficient measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpeters, R. D.; Bass, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    Real structure is revealed, by an analysis of continuous scan data from the solar backscattered UV instrument on Nimbus 7, in the backscattered atmospheric albedo region between 300 and 310 nm where spectral anomalies have been reported in ground-based observation. The spectral anomalies are explainable as structure at the 1-5% level in the ozone absorption coefficient, as measured by Bass and Paur (1981). The new absorption coefficient measurements are judged to approach the 1%-level of accuracy in atmospheric radiation calculation, which should resolve discrepancies between different Dobson wavelength pairs and between different instruments and permit the more accurate analysis of such second-order effects as NO emission, SO2 absorption in polluted atmospheres, and Raman scattering effects.

  8. How to measure and predict the molar absorption coefficient of a protein.

    PubMed Central

    Pace, C. N.; Vajdos, F.; Fee, L.; Grimsley, G.; Gray, T.

    1995-01-01

    The molar absorption coefficient, epsilon, of a protein is usually based on concentrations measured by dry weight, nitrogen, or amino acid analysis. The studies reported here suggest that the Edelhoch method is the best method for measuring epsilon for a protein. (This method is described by Gill and von Hippel [1989, Anal Biochem 182:319-326] and is based on data from Edelhoch [1967, Biochemistry 6:1948-1954]). The absorbance of a protein at 280 nm depends on the content of Trp, Tyr, and cystine (disulfide bonds). The average epsilon values for these chromophores in a sample of 18 well-characterized proteins have been estimated, and the epsilon values in water, propanol, 6 M guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl), and 8 M urea have been measured. For Trp, the average epsilon values for the proteins are less than the epsilon values measured in any of the solvents. For Tyr, the average epsilon values for the proteins are intermediate between those measured in 6 M GdnHCl and those measured in propanol. Based on a sample of 116 measured epsilon values for 80 proteins, the epsilon at 280 nm of a folded protein in water, epsilon (280), can best be predicted with this equation: epsilon (280) (M-1 cm-1) = (#Trp)(5,500) + (#Tyr)(1,490) + (#cystine)(125) These epsilon (280) values are quite reliable for proteins containing Trp residues, and less reliable for proteins that do not. However, the Edelhoch method is convenient and accurate, and the best approach is to measure rather than predict epsilon. PMID:8563639

  9. Thin broadband noise absorption through acoustic reactance control by electro-mechanical coupling without sensor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yumin; Chan, Yum-Ji; Huang, Lixi

    2014-05-01

    Broadband noise with profound low-frequency profile is prevalent and difficult to be controlled mechanically. This study demonstrates effective broadband sound absorption by reducing the mechanical reactance of a loudspeaker using a shunt circuit through electro-mechanical coupling, which induces reactance with different signs from that of loudspeaker. An RLC shunt circuit is connected to the moving coil to provide an electrically induced mechanical impedance which counters the cavity stiffness at low frequencies and reduces the system inertia above the resonance frequency. A sound absorption coefficient well above 0.5 is demonstrated across frequencies between 150 and 1200 Hz. The performance of the proposed device is superior to existing passive absorbers of the same depth (60 mm), which has lower frequency limits of around 300 Hz. A passive noise absorber is further proposed by paralleling a micro-perforated panel with shunted loudspeaker which shows potentials in absorbing band-limit impulse noise. PMID:24815257

  10. The determination of acoustic reflection coefficients by using cepstral techniques, I: Experimental procedures and measurements of polyurethane foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolton, J. S.; Gold, E.

    1986-10-01

    The authors have previously outlined a transient free field technique, based on cepstral analysis, for the measurement of acoustic reflection coefficients. In this paper are described laboratory acoustical measurements of the normal incidence reflection coefficient of an absorbent material: emphasis is placed on practical aspects of the technique. Specifically, the origin of extraction noise, which distorts the reflector impulse response as it appears in the power cepstrum, is discussed and means of reducing it are described and implemented. Secondly, a means of identifying and removing the time delay introduced when the reflector impulse response is copied from the cepstrum is described; this procedure eliminates the need for highly accurate measurements of path length difference. The absorbent material tested was a commercial partially reticulated polyurethane foam. Bonded to one side of the foam was an impermeable polyurethane membrane, and the foam was measured in two configurations: first with its film covered face uppermost, then with its uncovered face uppermost. The broad frequency range of the measurements made possible by the cepstral technique has given a good picture of the properties of this material. These results will be considered in detail in a subsequent publication.

  11. The absorption coefficient of the liquid N2 2.15-micron band and application to Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grundy, William M.; Fink, Uwe

    1991-01-01

    The present measurements of the temperature dependence exhibited by the liquid N2 2.15-micron 2-0 collision-induced band's absorption coefficient and integrated absorption show the latter to be smaller than that of the N2 gas, and to decrease with decreasing temperature. Extrapolating this behavior to Triton's nominal surface temperature yields a new estimate of the N2-ice grain size on the Triton south polar cap; a mean N2 grain size of 0.7-3.0 cm is consistent with grain growth rate calculation results.

  12. Gaseous Absorption and Dispersion of Sound in a Resonant Cylindrical Cavity: AN Acoustic and Photoacoustic Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckwith, Clyfe Gordon

    This research investigated the feasibility of accurately measuring Virial coefficients in an acoustically resonant cylindrical cavity. Gases studied were: Argon, Helium, Nitrogen, Carbon Dioxide, and Methane. Parameters considered were: resonant frequencies (f_ {rm r}- also a measure of speed of sound), quality factors (Q), and signal amplitudes. We studied the longitudinal modes smaller than 2000 Hz, at room temperature and at pressures of 200, 500, and 800 mm of Hg. The choice of the longitudinal modes was predetermined by our wish to compare acoustic and photoacoustic resonance techniques of the same mode. The acoustic excitation is limited to the longitudinal modes and is achieved by placing a loudspeaker close to one end of the cavity. Photoacoustically we excite a small concentration of molecular Iodine, mixed in with the buffer gases, by a periodically interrupted Xenon light beam. By increasing the length of the cavity we could decrease the space between the modes of frequency. Our observations focused on the behaviors that (a) f_{rm r} shifted with pressure, (b) the f_{rm r} deviated from the simple laws of harmonics, and (c) the amplitudes for the two techniques varied differently with frequency. Effect (a) is due to the fact that the gases are not "ideal", and due to the presence of boundary layers caused by thermal conduction and viscosity gradients. Effect (b) arises because of the f_{rm r}'s mode dependence, caused by the wave scattering due to imperfect geometrical symmetries. Effect (c) is governed by the coupling factors. All measurements could theoretically be justified to within instrumental error, the only noted discrepancy is the lack of a theoretical mode dependence. We conclude that it is feasible to study the accuracy of Virial coefficients of simple gases provided that the boundary layer loss effects and the mode dependent wave scattering can be quantified; in regions of high pressures and high frequencies the Virial effects dominate the

  13. On the uncertainties of photon mass energy-absorption coefficients and their ratios for radiation dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreo, Pedro; Burns, David T.; Salvat, Francesc

    2012-04-01

    A systematic analysis of the available data has been carried out for mass energy-absorption coefficients and their ratios for air, graphite and water for photon energies between 1 keV and 2 MeV, using representative kilovoltage x-ray spectra for mammography and diagnostic radiology below 100 kV, and for 192Ir and 60Co gamma-ray spectra. The aim of this work was to establish ‘an envelope of uncertainty’ based on the spread of the available data. Type A uncertainties were determined from the results of Monte Carlo (MC) calculations with the PENELOPE and EGSnrc systems, yielding mean values for µen/ρ with a given statistical standard uncertainty. Type B estimates were based on two groupings. The first grouping consisted of MC calculations based on a similar implementation but using different data and/or approximations. The second grouping was formed by various datasets, obtained by different authors or methods using the same or different basic data, and with different implementations (analytical, MC-based, or a combination of the two); these datasets were the compilations of NIST, Hubbell, Johns-Cunningham, Attix and Higgins, plus MC calculations with PENELOPE and EGSnrc. The combined standard uncertainty, uc, for the µen/ρ values for the mammography x-ray spectra is 2.5%, decreasing gradually to 1.6% for kilovoltage x-ray spectra up to 100 kV. For 60Co and 192Ir, uc is approximately 0.1%. The Type B uncertainty analysis for the ratios of µen/ρ values includes four methods of analysis and concludes that for the present data the assumption that the data interval represents 95% confidence limits is a good compromise. For the mammography x-ray spectra, the combined standard uncertainties of (µen/ρ)graphite,air and (µen/ρ)graphite,water are 1.5%, and 0.5% for (µen/ρ)water,air, decreasing gradually down to uc = 0.1% for the three µen/ρ ratios for the gamma-ray spectra. The present estimates are shown to coincide well with those of Hubbell (1977 Rad. Res

  14. I-scan thermal lens experiment in the pulse regime for measuring two-photon absorption coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, L.; Echevarria, L.; Fernandez, A.

    2007-09-01

    We present a new pump-probe mode-mismatched thermal lens method for pulse excitation aimed to the measurement of nonlinear absorption coefficient in optical materials. We develop a theoretical model based on the Fresnel diffraction approximation and their predictions are verified experimentally with samples of Rhodamine 6G and Rhodamine B in ethanol solution. The principal advantage of this technique is that it does not require any mechanical movement during measurement. Below we perform the new type of thermal lens experiment in the pulse regime for the measurement of nonlinear absorption coefficient in transparent samples and we demonstrate the validity of theoretical predictions using an alternative method to the classical thermal lens technique.

  15. Experimental and numerical investigation of the reflection coefficient and the distributions of Wigner's reaction matrix for irregular graphs with absorption.

    PubMed

    Lawniczak, Michał; Hul, Oleh; Bauch, Szymon; Seba, Petr; Sirko, Leszek

    2008-05-01

    We present the results of an experimental and numerical study of the distribution of the reflection coefficient P(R) and the distributions of the imaginary P(v) and the real P(u) parts of the Wigner reaction K matrix for irregular fully connected hexagon networks (graphs) in the presence of strong absorption. In the experiment we used microwave networks, which were built of coaxial cables and attenuators connected by joints. In the numerical calculations experimental networks were described by quantum fully connected hexagon graphs. The presence of absorption introduced by attenuators was modeled by optical potentials. The distribution of the reflection coefficient P(R) and the distributions of the reaction K matrix were obtained from measurements and numerical calculations of the scattering matrix S of the networks and graphs, respectively. We show that the experimental and numerical results are in good agreement with the exact analytic ones obtained within the framework of random matrix theory. PMID:18643145

  16. Absorption coefficients of CFC-11 and CFC-12 needed for atmospheric remote sensing and global warming studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varanasi, Prasad

    1992-01-01

    Spectral absorption coefficients k(v) in the atmospheric window are reported for CFC-11 and CFC-12. Data obtained with a grating spectrometer are compared with NCAR cross sections and measurements of k(v) made with a tunable diode laser spectrometer at various temperature-pressure combinations representing tangent heights or layers in the atmosphere are presented. The results are suitable for atmospheric remote sensing and global warming studies.

  17. Effects of temperature-dependent molecular absorption coefficients on the thermal infrared remote sensing of the earth surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wan, Zhengming; Dozier, Jeff

    1992-01-01

    The effect of temperature-dependent molecular absorption coefficients on thermal infrared spectral signatures measured from satellite sensors is investigated by comparing results from the atmospheric transmission and radiance codes LOWTRAN and MODTRAN and the accurate multiple scattering radiative transfer model ATRAD for different atmospheric profiles. The sensors considered include the operational NOAA AVHRR and two research instruments planned for NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS): MODIS-N (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer-Nadir-Mode) and ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer). The difference in band transmittance is as large as 6 percent for some thermal bands within atmospheric windows and more than 30 percent near the edges of these atmospheric windows. The effect of temperature-dependent molecular absorption coefficients on satellite measurements of sea-surface temperature can exceed 0.6 K. Quantitative comparison and factor analysis indicate that more accurate measurements of molecular absorption coefficients and better radiative transfer simulation methods are needed to achieve SST accuracy of 0.3 K, as required for global numerical models of climate, and to develop land-surface temperature algorithms at the 1-K accuracy level.

  18. Temperature anomaly of the coefficient of ultrasonic absorption by electrons of hybridized states of cobalt impurities in mercury selenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhevstovskikh, I. V.; Okulov, V. I.; Gudkov, V. V.; Mayakin, V. Yu.; Sarychev, M. N.; Andriichuk, M. D.; Paranchich, L. D.

    2015-05-01

    The effects of the interaction of ultrasound with donor d electrons of cobalt impurity atoms at low concentrations in mercury selenide crystals have been investigated. The temperature dependences of the electronic contribution to the absorption coefficient at a frequency of 53 MHz in crystals with cobalt concentrations from 1018 to 1020 cm-3 and in the undoped crystal have been observed experimentally. It has been found that crystals with impurities are characterized by an anomalous nonmonotonic temperature dependence of the absorption coefficient of the slow transverse wave in a narrow temperature range near 10 K. A smooth monotonic temperature dependence has been observed for longitudinal and fast transverse waves. Based on the developed theoretical interpretation, it has been established that the anomaly in the temperature dependence of the absorption coefficient of a slow transverse wave is associated with the hybridization of impurity d states in the conduction band of the crystal. A comparison of the theoretical and experimental dependences has made it possible to determine the parameters characterizing the hybridized electronic states.

  19. Mass Absorption Coefficient of Tungsten and Tantalum, 1450 eV to 2350 eV: Experiment, Theory, and Application

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Zachary H.; Grantham, Steven; Tarrio, Charles; Paterson, David J.; McNulty, Ian; Levin, T. M.; Ankudinov, Alexei L.; Rehr, John J.

    2003-01-01

    The mass absorption coefficients of tungsten and tantalum were measured with soft x-ray photons from 1450 eV to 2350 eV using an undulator source. This region includes the M3, M4, and M5 absorption edges. X-ray absorption fine structure was calculated within a real-space multiple scattering formalism; the predicted structure was observed for tungsten and to a lesser degree tantalum as well. Separately, the effects of dynamic screening were observed as shown by an atomic calculation within the relativistic time-dependent local-density approximation. Dynamic screening effects influence the spectra at the 25 % level and are observed for both tungsten and tantalum. We applied these results to characterize spatially-resolved spectra of a tungsten integrated circuit interconnect obtained using a scanning transmission x-ray microscope. The results indicate tungsten fiducial markers were deposited into silica trenches with a depths of 50 % and 60 % of the markers’ heights.

  20. Backscattering and absorption coefficients for electrons: Solutions of invariant embedding transport equations using a method of convergence

    SciTech Connect

    Figueroa, C.; Brizuela, H.; Heluani, S. P.

    2014-05-21

    The backscattering coefficient is a magnitude whose measurement is fundamental for the characterization of materials with techniques that make use of particle beams and particularly when performing microanalysis. In this work, we report the results of an analytic method to calculate the backscattering and absorption coefficients of electrons in similar conditions to those of electron probe microanalysis. Starting on a five level states ladder model in 3D, we deduced a set of integro-differential coupled equations of the coefficients with a method know as invariant embedding. By means of a procedure proposed by authors, called method of convergence, two types of approximate solutions for the set of equations, namely complete and simple solutions, can be obtained. Although the simple solutions were initially proposed as auxiliary forms to solve higher rank equations, they turned out to be also useful for the estimation of the aforementioned coefficients. In previous reports, we have presented results obtained with the complete solutions. In this paper, we present results obtained with the simple solutions of the coefficients, which exhibit a good degree of fit with the experimental data. Both the model and the calculation method presented here can be generalized to other techniques that make use of different sorts of particle beams.

  1. Effect of electron collisions on transport coefficients induced by the inverse bremsstrahlung absorption in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bendib, A.; Tahraoui, A.; Bendib, K.; Mohammed El Hadj, K.; Hueller, S.

    2005-03-01

    The transport coefficients of fully ionized plasmas under the influence of a high-frequency electric field are derived solving numerically the electron Fokker-Planck equation using a perturbation method, parametrized as a function of the electron mean-free-path {lambda}{sub ei} compared to the spatial scales L. The isotropic and anisotropic contributions of the inverse bremsstrahlung heating are considered. Electron-electron collision terms are kept in the analysis, which allows us to consider with sufficient accuracy to describe plasmas with arbitrary atomic number Z. Practical numerical fits of the transport coefficients are proposed as functions of Z and the collisionality parameter {lambda}{sub ei}/L.

  2. High performance AlScN thin film based surface acoustic wave devices with large electromechanical coupling coefficient

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wenbo; He, Xingli; Ye, Zhi E-mail: jl2@bolton.ac.uk; Wang, Xiaozhi; Mayrhofer, Patrick M.; Gillinger, Manuel; Bittner, Achim; Schmid, Ulrich

    2014-09-29

    AlN and AlScN thin films with 27% scandium (Sc) were synthesized by DC magnetron sputtering deposition and used to fabricate surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices. Compared with AlN-based devices, the AlScN SAW devices exhibit much better transmission properties. Scandium doping results in electromechanical coupling coefficient, K{sup 2}, in the range of 2.0% ∼ 2.2% for a wide normalized thickness range, more than a 300% increase compared to that of AlN-based SAW devices, thus demonstrating the potential applications of AlScN in high frequency resonators, sensors, and high efficiency energy harvesting devices. The coupling coefficients of the present AlScN based SAW devices are much higher than that of the theoretical calculation based on some assumptions for AlScN piezoelectric material properties, implying there is a need for in-depth investigations on the material properties of AlScN.

  3. Spatial variability of absorption coefficients over a biogeochemical gradient in a large and optically complex shallow lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddick, Caitlin A. L.; Hunter, Peter D.; Tyler, Andrew N.; Martinez-Vicente, Victor; Horváth, Hajnalka; Kovács, Attila W.; Vörös, Lajos; Preston, Tom; Présing, Mátyás.

    2015-10-01

    In order to improve robustness of remote sensing algorithms for lakes, it is vital to understand the variability of inherent optical properties (IOPs) and their mass-specific representations (SIOPs). In this study, absorption coefficients for particulate and dissolved constituents were measured at 38 stations distributed over a biogeochemical gradient in Lake Balaton, Hungary. There was a large range of phytoplankton absorption (aph(λ)) over blue and red wavelengths (aph(440) = 0.11-4.39 m-1, aph(675) = 0.048-2.52 m-1), while there was less variability in chlorophyll-specific phytoplankton absorption (a*ph(λ)) in the lake (a*ph(440) = 0.022 ± 0.0046 m2 mg-1, a*ph(675) = 0.010 ± 0.0020 m2 mg-1) and adjoining wetland system, Kis-Balaton (a*ph(440) = 0.017 ± 0.0015 m2 mg-1, a*ph(675) = 0.0088 ± 0.0017 m2 mg-1). However, in the UV, a*ph(350) significantly increased with increasing distance from the main inflow (Zala River). This was likely due to variable production of photoprotective pigments (e.g., MAAs) in response to the decreasing gradient of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM). The slope of CDOM absorption (SCDOM) also increased from west to east due to larger terrestrial CDOM input in the western basins. Absorption by nonalgal particles (aNAP(λ)) was highly influenced by inorganic particulates, as a result of the largely mineral sediments in Balaton. The relative contributions to the absorption budget varied more widely than oceans with a greater contribution from NAP (up to 30%), and wind speed affected the proportion attributed to NAP, phytoplankton, or CDOM. Ultimately, these data provide knowledge of the heterogeneity of (S)IOPs in Lake Balaton, suggesting the full range of variability must be considered for future improvement of analytical algorithms for constituent retrieval in inland waters.

  4. Comparisons of polymer/gas partition coefficients calculated from responses of thickness shear mode and surface acoustic wave vapor sensors.

    PubMed

    Grate, J W; Kaganove, S N; Bhethanabotla, V R

    1998-01-01

    Apparent partition coefficients, K, for the sorption of toluene by four different polymer thin films on thickness shear mode (TSM) and surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices are compared. The polymers examined were poly(isobutylene) (PIB), poly(epichlorohydrin) (PECH), poly(butadiene) (PBD), and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). Independent data on partition coefficients for toluene in these polymers were compiled for comparison, and TSM sensor measurements were made using both oscillator and impedance analysis methods. K values from SAW sensor measurements were about twice those calculated from TSM sensor measurements when the polymers were PIB and PECH, and they were also at least twice the values of the independent partition coefficient data, which is interpreted as indicating that the SAW sensor responds to polymer modulus changes as well as to mass changes. K values from SAW and TSM measurements were in agreement with each other and with independent data when the polymer was PBD. Similarly, K values from the PDMS-coated SAW sensor were not much larger than values from independent measurements. These results indicate that modulus effects were not contributing to the SAW sensor responses in the cases of PBD and PDMS. However, K values from the PDMS-coated TSM device were larger than the values from the SAW device or independent measurements, and the impedance analyzer results indicated that this sensor using our sample of PDMS at the applied thickness did not behave as a simple mass sensor. Differences in behavior among the test polymers on SAW devices are interpreted in terms of their differing viscoelastic properties. PMID:21644612

  5. The Optical Absorption Coefficient of Barley Seeds Investigated by Photoacoustic Spectroscopy and Their Effects by Laser Biostimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez Reyes, Ma. C.; Hernandez-Aguilar, C.; Dominguez-Pacheco, A.; Cruz-Orea, A.; Moreno Martínez, E.

    2015-09-01

    Laser light as a biostimulator has been applied in agriculture, and some scientific reports evidence its usefulness. A knowledge about seed optical parameters is of great relevance in the biostimulation process, because information can be provided about the light absorption of seeds. Thus, the objective of the present study was to determine the optical absorption coefficient (β ) of barley ( Hordeum vulgare L.) seeds by means of photoacoustic spectroscopy; these seeds were studied in two conditions: seeds in their natural color and seeds dyed with methylene blue. The seeds were biostimulated by a laser beam (650 nm wavelength) to evaluate the effects of pre-sowing biostimulation in natural mycobiota associated with different laser irradiation times (0 s, 60 s, 120 s, 240 s, and 480 s). The results of this research demonstrated changes in the optical parameters (absorption and penetration) that occur in the seeds by changing the natural condition to a dyed condition. The dyed seeds, by the methylene blue photosensitizer, become optically opaque, producing greater optical absorption at 650 nm which causes an increase in the effect of laser stimulation. The experimental results showed that the biggest mycobiota reduction (52 %) corresponded to dyed seeds irradiated with a laser for 120 s.

  6. Absorption coefficients and band strengths for the 703 nm and 727 bands of methane at 77 K

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, J.J.; Singh, K.

    1996-12-31

    The technique of intracavity laser spectroscopy has been used to obtain methane absorption spectra for the vibrational overtone bands that occur around 703 nm and 727 nm. Absorption coefficients for the 690-742 nm range have been obtained for a sample temperature of 77 K at a spectral resolution of <0.02 cm{sup -1}. A new method of data analysis is utilized in obtaining the results. It involves deconvolving the many ILS spectral profiles that comprise the absorption bands and summing the results. Values averaged over 1 cm{sup -1} and 1 {Angstrom} intervals are provided. Band strengths also are obtained. The total intensities of the 703 and 727 nm bands are in reasonable agreement with previous laboratory determinations which were obtained for relatively high pressures of methane at room temperature using lower spectral resolution. The methane bands appear in the reflected sunlight spectra from the outer planets. Results averaged over 1 nm intervals are compared with other laboratory studies and with those derived from observations of the outer planets. The band profiles differ considerably from other laboratory results but are in good accord with the planetary observations. Laboratory spectra of methane at appropriate conditions are required for the proper interpretation of the observational data. Absorption spectra can provide some of the most sensitive diagnostic data on the atmospheres of those bodies.

  7. Whistler Emission and Absorption Coefficients from AN Anisotropic, Multi-Component Plasma Including Dielectric Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leid, Terrence Vincent

    The emission of electron cyclotron radiation parallel to the magnetic field direction near the fundamental frequency from a fully ionized, multi-component plasma, is investigated for finite (omega)(,p)/(omega)(,c) within the Klimontovich formalism. Each species may have T(,(PARLL)) different from T(,(PERP)) and may possess a loss cone. We use a bi- maxwellian with an analytic loss cone for each component. In addition, the source function for a multi-component plasma is calculated. We find that for a Maxwellian distribution function the emission coefficient is that of a system of shielded charges. It is shown that only in the case of a tenuous Maxwellian plasma is the source function the Rayleigh-Jeans blackbody intensity. For the case of the Maxwellian we present experimental evidence for finite density emission, (omega)('2)(,p)/(omega)('2) >> (beta). We have constructed a computer code that solves the radiative transfer equation. The resulting power spectra are used as an aid in extracting from experimental data the temperature and density of the various components of the TMX-Upgrade end cell plasma. The code compares both the Ellis-Tsakiris scheme for computing the emission coefficient for a multi-component plasma and the finite density multi -component emission coefficient. The Ellis- Tsakiris scheme estimates the emission coefficient by assuming. that each species radiates independently of each other.('1) Results are presented for the case of the TMX -Upgrade tandem mirror device. ('1)R. F. Ellis and G. D. Tsakiris, Nucl. Fusion 23, 1115 (1984).

  8. TU-A-9A-07: X-Ray Acoustic Computed Tomography (XACT): 100% Sensitivity to X-Ray Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, L; Ahmad, M; Nikoozadeh, A; Pratx, G; Khuri-Yakub, B; Xing, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To assess whether X-ray acoustic computed tomography (XACT) is more sensitive to X-ray absorption than that of the conventional X-ray imaging. Methods: First, a theoretical model was built to analyze the X-ray absorption sensitivity of XACT imaging and conventional X-ray imaging. Second, an XACT imaging system was developed to evaluate the X-ray induced acoustic signal generation as well as the sensitivity improvement over transmission x-ray imaging. Ultra-short x-ray pulses (60-nanosecond) were generated from an X-ray source operated at the energy of 150 kVp with a 10-Hz repetition rate. The X-ray pulse was synchronized with the acoustic detection via a x-ray scintillation triggering to acquire the X-ray induced acoustic signal. Results: Theoretical analysis shows that X-ray induced acoustic signal is sensitive only to the X-ray absorption, while completely insensitive to out the X-ray scattering and fluorescence. XACT has reduced background and increased contrast-to-noise ratio, and therefore has increased sensitivity compared to transmission x-ray imaging. For a 50-μm size, gadolinium insertion in tissue exposed to 40 keV X-rays; the sensitivity of XACT imaging is about 28.9 times higher than that of conventional X-ray imaging. Conclusion: X-ray acoustic computer tomography (XACT) as a new imaging modality combines X-ray absorption contrast and high ultrasonic resolution in a single modality. It is feasible to improve the imaging sensitivity with XACT imaging compared with conventional X-ray imaging. Taking advantage of the high ultrasonic resolution, it is possible to perform 3-D imaging with a single x-ray pulse with arrays of transducers without any mechanical motion of the imaging system. This single-shot capability offers the potential of reducing radiation dose by a factor of 1000, and imaging 100 times faster when compared to the conventional X-ray CT, and thus revolutionizing x-ray imaging applications in medicine and biology. The authors

  9. Effect of quantum dot size and size distribution on the intersublevel transitions and absorption coefficients of III-V semiconductor quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Kabi, Sanjib; Perera, A. G. Unil

    2015-03-28

    The intersublevel absorption peak energy and absorption coefficient of non-uniform quantum dot (QD) ensembles are calculated analytically. The effect of size variations and size distribution of QDs on their energy states is analyzed. The dots are considered as a quantum box with finite potential at the barriers and the size distribution described by a Gaussian function. The influence of the aspect ratio (base to height ratio) of the QDs on the optical transitions is studied. Our model predicts the dot size (height and base) accurately to determine the absorption peaks and corresponding absorption coefficient. We also compute the absorption coefficient of the QD with different size distributions to verify the results calculated using this model with the reported experimental and other theoretical results.

  10. Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The acoustics research activities of the DLR fluid-mechanics department (Forschungsbereich Stroemungsmechanik) during 1988 are surveyed and illustrated with extensive diagrams, drawings, graphs, and photographs. Particular attention is given to studies of helicopter rotor noise (high-speed impulsive noise, blade/vortex interaction noise, and main/tail-rotor interaction noise), propeller noise (temperature, angle-of-attack, and nonuniform-flow effects), noise certification, and industrial acoustics (road-vehicle flow noise and airport noise-control installations).

  11. Determination of scattering coefficient considering wavelength and absorption dependence of anisotropy factor measured by polarized beam for biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukutomi, D.; Ishii, K.; Awazu, K.

    2015-12-01

    Anisotropy factor g, one of the optical properties of biological tissues, is the most important parameter to accurately determine scattering coefficient μs in the inverse Monte Carlo (iMC) simulation. It has been reported that g has wavelength and absorption dependence, however, there are few attempts in order to calculate μs of biological tissue considering the wavelength and absorption dependence of g. In this study, the scattering angular distributions of biological tissue phantoms were measured in order to determine g by using goniometric measurements with three polarization conditions at strongly and weakly absorbing wavelengths of hemoglobin. Then, optical properties, especially, μs were measured by integrating sphere measurements and iMC simulation in order to confirm the influence of measured g on optical properties in comparison of with general value of g (0.9) for soft biological tissue. Consequently, it was found that μs was overestimated at strongly absorbing wavelength, however, μs was underestimated at weakly absorbing wavelength if the g was not considered its wavelength and absorption dependence.

  12. Inverse Bremsstrahlung in Astrophysical Plasmas: The Absorption Coefficients and Gaunt Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihajlov, A. A.; Srećković, V. A.; Sakan, N. M.

    2015-12-01

    The electron-ion inverse Bremsstrahlung is considered here as a factor of the influence on the opacity of the different stellar atmospheres and other astrophysical plasmas. It is shown that this process can be successfully described in the frames of cut-off Coulomb potential model within the regions of the electron densities and temperatures. The relevant quantum mechanical method of the calculation of the corresponding spectral coefficient processes is described and discussed. The results obtained for the plasmas with the electron densities from 1014 c m -3 to 2ṡ1019 c m -3 and temperatures from 5ṡ103 K to 3ṡ104 K in the wavelength region 100 nm< λ<3000 nm are presented. Also, these results can be of interest for different laboratory plasmas.

  13. Absorption coefficients of the methane-nitrogen binary ice system: Implications for Pluto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protopapa, S.; Grundy, W. M.; Tegler, S. C.; Bergonio, J. M.

    2015-06-01

    The methane-nitrogen phase diagram of Prokhvatilov and Yantsevich (1983. Sov. J. Low Temp. Phys. 9, 94-98) indicates that at temperatures relevant to the surfaces of icy dwarf planets like Pluto, two phases contribute to the methane absorptions: nitrogen saturated with methane N2 ‾ :CH4 and methane saturated with nitrogen CH4 ‾ :N2 . No optical constants are available so far for the latter component limiting construction of a proper model, in compliance with thermodynamic equilibrium considerations. New optical constants for solid solutions of methane diluted in nitrogen (N2 :CH4) and nitrogen diluted in methane (CH4 :N2) are presented at temperatures between 40 and 90 K, in the wavelength range 1.1-2.7 μm at different mixing ratios. These optical constants are derived from transmission measurements of crystals grown from the liquid phase in closed cells. A systematic study of the changes of methane and nitrogen solid mixtures spectral behavior with mixing ratio and temperature is presented.

  14. Acoustic phonon assisted free-carrier optical absorption in an n-type monolayer MoS{sub 2} and other transition-metal dichalcogenides

    SciTech Connect

    Bhargavi, K. S.; Patil, Sukanya; Kubakaddi, S. S.

    2015-07-28

    The theory of free-carrier absorption (FCA) is given for monolayers of transition-metal dichalcogenides, particularly for molybdenum disulphide (MoS{sub 2}), when carriers are scattered by phonons. Explicit expressions for the absorption coefficient α are obtained and discussed for acoustic phonon scattering via screened deformation potential and piezoelectric coupling taking polarization of the radiation in the plane of the layer. It is found that α monotonously decreases with the increasing photon frequency Ω, increases with the increasing temperature T, and linearly depends on two-dimensional electron concentration n{sub s}. Effect of screening, which is ignored in all the earlier FCA studies, is found to reduce α significantly, attributing to the larger effective mass of the electrons. Results are also obtained in the classical and quantum limit giving the power laws α ∼ Ω{sup −2} and T. Comparison of the results is made with those in bulk semiconductors and semiconductor quantum wells.

  15. Systematic study of Ge1-xSnx absorption coefficient and refractive index for the device applications of Si-based optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Huong; Du, Wei; Ghetmiri, Seyed A.; Mosleh, Aboozar; Sun, Greg; Soref, Richard A.; Margetis, Joe; Tolle, John; Li, Baohua; Naseem, Hameed A.; Yu, Shui-Qing

    2016-03-01

    The absorption coefficient and refractive index of Ge1-xSnx alloys (x from 0% to 10%) were characterized for the wavelength range from 1500 to 2500 nm via spectroscopic ellipsometry at room temperature. By applying physical models to fit the obtained data, two empirical formulae with extracted constants and coefficients were developed: (1) Absorption coefficient. The absorption regarding Urbach tail, indirect and direct bandgap transitions were comprehensively taken into account; (2) refractive index. The Sellmeier coefficients associated with dispersion relationship were extracted. In these formulae, the Sn composition and strain percentage were the input parameters, by inputting which the spectral absorption coefficient and spectral refractive index can be obtained. Since the absorption coefficient is key information to determine the performance of the photodetectors including operation wavelength range, responsivity, and specific detectivity, and the refractive index is very useful for the design of the anti-reflection coating for photodetectors and the layer structure for waveguides, the developed formulae could simplify the optoelectronic device design process due to their parameter-based expressions.

  16. Antimony orthophosphate glasses with large nonlinear refractive indices, low two-photon absorption coefficients, and ultrafast response

    SciTech Connect

    Falcao-Filho, E.L.; Araujo, Cid B. de; Bosco, C.A.C.; Maciel, G.S.; Acioli, L.H.; Nalin, M.; Messaddeq, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Antimony glasses based on the composition Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SbPO{sub 4} were prepared and characterized. The samples present high refractive index, good transmission from 380 to 2000 nm, and high thermal stability. The nonlinear refractive index, n{sub 2}, of the samples was studied using the optical Kerr shutter technique at 800 nm. The third-order correlation signals between pump and probe pulses indicate ultrafast response (<100 fs) for all compositions. Enhancement of n{sub 2} was observed by adding lead oxide to the Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SbPO{sub 4} composition. Large values of n{sub 2}{approx_equal}10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}/W and negligible two-photon absorption coefficients (smaller than 0.01 cm/GW) were determined for all samples. The glass compositions studied present appropriate figure-of-merit for all-optical switching applications.

  17. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  18. HCFC-133a (CF3CH2Cl): OH rate coefficient, UV and infrared absorption spectra, and atmospheric implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGillen, Max R.; Bernard, François; Fleming, Eric L.; Burkholder, James B.

    2015-07-01

    HCFC-133a (CF3CH2Cl), an ozone-depleting substance, is primarily removed from the atmosphere by gas-phase reaction with OH radicals and by UV photolysis. The rate coefficient, k, for the OH + HCFC-133a reaction was measured between 233 and 379 K and is given by k(T) = (9.32 ± 0.8) × 10-13 exp(-(1296 ± 28)/T), where k(296 K) was measured to be (1.10 ± 0.02) × 10-14 (cm3 molecule-1 s-1) (2σ precision uncertainty). The HCFC-133a UV absorption spectrum was measured between 184.95 and 240 nm at 213-323 K, and a spectrum parameterization is presented. The HCFC-133a atmospheric loss processes, lifetime, ozone depletion potential, and uncertainties were evaluated using a 2-D atmospheric model. The global annually averaged steady state lifetime and ozone depletion potential (ODP) were determined to be 4.45 (4.04-4.90) years and 0.017 (±0.001), respectively, where the ranges are based solely on the 2σ uncertainty in the kinetic and photochemical parameters. The infrared absorption spectrum of HCFC-133a was measured, and its global warming potential was determined to be 380 on the 100 year time horizon.

  19. Determination of the scattering coefficient of biological tissue considering the wavelength and absorption dependence of the anisotropy factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukutomi, Daichi; Ishii, Katsunori; Awazu, Kunio

    2016-04-01

    The anisotropy factor g, one of the optical properties of biological tissues, has a strong influence on the calculation of the scattering coefficient μ s in inverse Monte Carlo (iMC) simulations. It has been reported that g has the wavelength and absorption dependence; however, few attempts have been made to calculate μ s using g values by taking the wavelength and absorption dependence into account. In this study, the angular distributions of scattered light for biological tissue phantoms containing hemoglobin as a light absorber were measured by a goniometric optical setup at strongly (405 nm) and weakly (664 nm) absorbing wavelengths to obtain g. Subsequently, the optical properties were calculated with the measured values of g by integrating sphere measurements and an iMC simulation, and compared with the results obtained with a conventional g value of 0.9. The μ s values with measured g were overestimated at the strongly absorbing wavelength, but underestimated at the weakly absorbing wavelength if 0.9 was used in the iMC simulation.

  20. Integrating sphere-based photoacoustic setup for simultaneous absorption coefficient and Grüneisen parameter measurements of biomedical liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva, Yolanda; Hondebrink, Erwin; Petersen, Wilma; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2015-03-01

    A method for simultaneously measuring the absorption coefficient μa and Grüneisen parameter Γ of biological absorbers in photoacoustics is designed and implemented using a coupled-integrating sphere system. A soft transparent tube with inner diameter of 0.58mm is used to mount the liquid absorbing sample horizontally through the cavity of two similar and adjacent integrating spheres. One sphere is used for measuring the sample's μa using a continuous halogen light source and a spectrometer fiber coupled to the input and output ports, respectively. The other sphere is used for simultaneous photoacoustic measurement of the sample's Γ using an incident pulsed light with wavelength of 750nm and a flat transducer with central frequency of 5MHz. Absolute optical energy and pressure measurements are not necessary. However, the derived equations for determining the sample's μa and Γ require calibration of the setup using aqueous ink dilutions. Initial measurements are done with biological samples relevant to biomedical imaging such as human whole blood, joint and cyst fluids. Absorption of joint and cyst fluids is enhanced using a contrast agent like aqueous indocyanine green dye solution. For blood sample, measured values of μa = 0.580 +/- 0.016 mm-1 and Γ = 0.166 +/- 0.006 are within the range of values reported in literature. Measurements with the absorbing joint and cyst fluid samples give Γ values close to 0.12, which is similar to that of water and plasma.

  1. Spectral slopes of the absorption coefficient of colored dissolved and detrital material inverted from UV-visible remote sensing reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jianwei; Lee, Zhongping; Ondrusek, Michael; Mannino, Antonio; Tzortziou, Maria; Armstrong, Roy

    2016-03-01

    The spectral slope of the absorption coefficient of colored dissolved and detrital material (CDM), Scdm (units: nm-1), is an important optical parameter for characterizing the absorption spectral shape of CDM. Although highly variable in natural waters, in most remote sensing algorithms, this slope is either kept as a constant or empirically modeled with multiband ocean color in the visible domain. In this study, we explore the potential of semianalytically retrieving Scdm with added ocean color information in the ultraviolet (UV) range between 360 and 400 nm. Unique features of hyperspectral remote sensing reflectance in the UV-visible wavelengths (360-500 nm) have been observed in various waters across a range of coastal and open ocean environments. Our data and analyses indicate that ocean color in the UV domain is particularly sensitive to the variation of the CDM spectral slope. Here, we used a synthesized dataset to show that adding UV wavelengths to the ocean color measurements will improve the retrieval of Scdm from remote sensing reflectance considerably, while the spectral band settings of past and current satellite ocean color sensors cannot fully account for the spectral variation of remote sensing reflectance. Results of this effort support the concept to include UV wavelengths in the next generation of satellite ocean color sensors.

  2. Light absorption coefficient measurement of SOA using a UV-Visible spectrometer connected with an integrating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Min; Jang, Myoseon

    2011-08-01

    A method for measuring an aerosol light absorption coefficient ( B a) has been developed using a conventional UV-visible spectrometer equipped with an integrating sphere covering a wide range of wavelengths (280-800 nm). The feasibility of the proposed method was evaluated in both the transmittance mode (TUV-IS) and the reflective mode (RUV-IS) using the reference aerosol known for the cross-sectional area. The aerosol was collected on a conventional filter and measured for B a values. The resulting RUV-IS method was applied to measure light absorption of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). SOA was produced through photooxidation of different precursor hydrocarbons such as toluene, d-limonene and α-pinene in the presence of NO x (60-70 ppb) and inorganic seed aerosol using a 2-m 3 indoor Teflon film chamber. Of the three precursor hydrocarbons, the B a value of toluene SOA (0.574 m 2 g -1 at 350 nm) was the highest compared with B a values for α-pinene SOA (0.029 m 2 g -1) and d-limonene SOA (0.038 m 2 g -1). When d-limonene SOA or toluene SOA was internally mixed with neutral [(NH 4) 2SO 4] or acidic inorganic seed (NH 4HSO 4:H 2SO 4 = 1:1 by mole), the SOA showed 2-3 times greater B a values at 350 nm than the SOA with no seed. Aerosol aging with a light source for this study reduced B a values of SOA (e.g., on average 10% for toluene SOA and 30% for d-limonene SOA within 4 h). Overall, weak absorption appeared for chamber-generated SOA over wavelengths ranging from 280 to 550 nm, which fall into the sunlight spectrum.

  3. Visible absorption spectrum of liquid ethylene

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Edward T.; Patel, C. Kumar N.

    1981-01-01

    The visible absorption spectrum of liquid ethylene at ≈ 108 K from 5500 Å to 7200 Å was measured by using a pulsed tunable dye laser, immersed-transducer, gated-detection opto-acoustic spectroscopy technique. The absorption features show the strongest band with an absorption coefficient of ≈2 × 10-2 cm-1 and the weakest band with an absorption coefficient of ≈1 × 10-4 cm-1. Proposed assignments of the observed absorption peaks involve combinations of overtones of local and normal modes of vibration of ethylene. PMID:16592978

  4. Theoretical Estimation of the Acoustic Energy Generation and Absorption Caused by Jet Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kin'ya; Iwagami, Sho; Kobayashi, Taizo; Takami, Toshiya

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the energy transfer between the fluid field and acoustic field caused by a jet driven by an acoustic particle velocity field across it, which is the key to understanding the aerodynamic sound generation of flue instruments, such as the recorder, flute, and organ pipe. Howe's energy corollary allows us to estimate the energy transfer between these two fields. For simplicity, we consider the situation such that a free jet is driven by a uniform acoustic particle velocity field across it. We improve the semi-empirical model of the oscillating jet, i.e., exponentially growing jet model, which has been studied in the field of musical acoustics, and introduce a polynomially growing jet model so as to apply Howe's formula to it. It is found that the relative phase between the acoustic oscillation and jet oscillation, which changes with the distance from the flue exit, determines the quantity of the energy transfer between the two fields. The acoustic energy is mainly generated in the downstream area, but it is consumed in the upstream area near the flue exit in driving the jet. This theoretical examination well explains the numerical calculation of Howe's formula for the two-dimensional flue instrument model in our previous work [Fluid Dyn. Res. 46, 061411 (2014)] as well as the experimental result of Yoshikawa et al. [J. Sound Vib. 331, 2558 (2012)].

  5. Measurements of the Absorption and Scattering Cross Sections for the Interaction of Solar Acoustic Waves with Sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hui; Chou, Dean-Yi

    2016-05-01

    The solar acoustic waves are modified by the interaction with sunspots. The interaction can be treated as a scattering problem: an incident wave propagating toward a sunspot is scattered by the sunspot into different modes. The absorption cross section and scattering cross section are two important parameters in the scattering problem. In this study, we use the wavefunction of the scattered wave, measured with a deconvolution method, to compute the absorption cross section σ ab and the scattering cross section σ sc for the radial order n = 0–5 for two sunspots, NOAA 11084 and NOAA 11092. In the computation of the cross sections, the random noise and dissipation in the measured acoustic power are corrected. For both σ ab and σ sc, the value of NOAA 11092 is greater than that of NOAA 11084, but their overall n dependence is similar: decreasing with n. The ratio of σ ab of NOAA 11092 to that of NOAA 11084 approximately equals the ratio of sunspot radii for all n, while the ratio of σ sc of the two sunspots is greater than the ratio of sunspot radii and increases with n. This suggests that σ ab is approximately proportional to the sunspot radius, while the dependence of σ sc on radius is faster than the linear increase.

  6. Acoustical study on the impact of sound absorptions, distances of workstations, and height of partitions in open plan offices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utami, Sentagi Sesotya; Al Rochmadi, Nurwachid; Sarwono, R. Sugeng Joko

    2015-09-01

    Low partitions are commonly found in open-plan offices as the boundaries of workstation islands or groups of workstations. This room layout often cause excessive speech intelligibility, which creates work distraction and reduce the quality of speech privacy. Sound absorption, distance between workstations, and height of partitions are factors that were investigated on their impact to the room acoustics condition, referred to ISO 3382-3:2012. Observed room acoustics conditions were speech intelligibility, speech privacy, and distraction to concentrate in work using parameters of T30, C50, and RASTI. Parameters of T30, C50, and RASTI were used to evaluate the speech intelligibility. The level of speech privacy was indicated by parameter of privacy distance (rP). Distraction to concentrate in work was indicated by distraction distance (rD). The results from 2 experimental setups show that sound absorption, distance between workstations, and partitions influenced the level of speech intelligibility, speech privacy, and distraction to concentration at work. The value of C50 decline, by 76.9% and 77.4%, each for scenario A and B. RASTI decline, by 18.7% and 14.8%. Difference in percentage of speech privacy, by 6% and 11%. Difference in percentage of distraction to concentration at work, by 79% and 70%.

  7. Modeling the effects of wind tunnel wall absorption on the acoustic radiation characteristics of propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Eversman, W.

    1986-01-01

    Finite element theory is used to calculate the acoustic field of a propeller in a soft walled circular wind tunnel and to compare the radiation patterns to the same propeller in free space. Parametric solutions are present for a "Gutin" propeller for a variety of flow Mach numbers, admittance values at the wall, microphone position locations, and propeller to duct radius ratios. Wind tunnel boundary layer is not included in this analysis. For wall admittance nearly equal to the characteristic value of free space, the free field and ducted propeller models agree in pressure level and directionality. In addition, the need for experimentally mapping the acoustic field is discussed.

  8. Modeling the effects of wind tunnel wall absorption on the acoustic radiation characteristics of propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Eversman, W.

    1986-01-01

    Finite element theory is used to calculate the acoustic field of a propeller in a soft walled circular wind tunnel and to compare the radiation patterns to the same propeller in free space. Parametric solutions are present for a 'Gutin' propeller for a variety of flow Mach numbers, admittance values at the wall, microphone position locations, and propeller to duct radius ratios. Wind tunnel boundary layer is not included in this analysis. For wall admittance nearly equal to the characteristic value of free space, the free field and ducted propeller models agree in pressure level and directionality. In addition, the need for experimentally mapping the acoustic field is discussed.

  9. Laboratory investigation on the role of tubular shaped micro resonators phononic crystal insertion on the absorption coefficient of profiled sound absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahya, I.; Kusuma, J. I.; Harjana; Kristiani, R.; Hanina, R.

    2016-02-01

    This paper emphasizes the influence of tubular shaped microresonators phononic crystal insertion on the sound absorption coefficient of profiled sound absorber. A simple cubic and two different bodies centered cubic phononic crystal lattice model were analyzed in a laboratory test procedure. The experiment was conducted by using transfer function based two microphone impedance tube method refer to ASTM E-1050-98. The results show that sound absorption coefficient increase significantly at the mid and high-frequency band (600 - 700 Hz) and (1 - 1.6 kHz) when tubular shaped microresonator phononic crystal inserted into the tested sound absorber element. The increment phenomena related to multi-resonance effect that occurs when sound waves propagate through the phononic crystal lattice model that produce multiple reflections and scattering in mid and high-frequency band which increases the sound absorption coefficient accordingly

  10. Active Control of Fan Noise: Feasibility Study. Volume 5; Numerical Computation of Acoustic Mode Reflection Coefficients for an Unflanged Cylindrical Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    A computational method to predict modal reflection coefficients in cylindrical ducts has been developed based on the work of Homicz, Lordi, and Rehm, which uses the Wiener-Hopf method to account for the boundary conditions at the termination of a thin cylindrical pipe. The purpose of this study is to develop a computational routine to predict the reflection coefficients of higher order acoustic modes impinging on the unflanged termination of a cylindrical duct. This effort was conducted wider Task Order 5 of the NASA Lewis LET Program, Active Noise Control of aircraft Engines: Feasibility Study, and will be used as part of the development of an integrated source noise, acoustic propagation, ANC actuator coupling, and control system algorithm simulation. The reflection coefficient prediction will be incorporated into an existing cylindrical duct modal analysis to account for the reflection of modes from the duct termination. This will provide a more accurate, rapid computation design tool for evaluating the effect of reflected waves on active noise control systems mounted in the duct, as well as providing a tool for the design of acoustic treatment in inlet ducts. As an active noise control system design tool, the method can be used preliminary to more accurate but more numerically intensive acoustic propagation models such as finite element methods. The resulting computer program has been shown to give reasonable results, some examples of which are presented. Reliable data to use for comparison is scarce, so complete checkout is difficult, and further checkout is needed over a wider range of system parameters. In future efforts the method will be adapted as a subroutine to the GEAE segmented cylindrical duct modal analysis program.

  11. Influence of Diffraction Effects on the Result of Measuring the Absorption Coefficient of Ultrasound in Weakly Absorbing Liquids by the Pulse Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shatsky, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    We consider the problem of the influence of diffraction effects on the result of measuring the absorption coefficient of ultrasound in weakly absorbing liquids by the pulse method. Diffraction attenuation of an ultrasonic signal in a measuring cell using solid-state delay lines is calculated. It is shown that the use of delay lines of the ultrasonic signal leads to a considerable distortion of the measured absorption coefficient in the low-frequency range from the true value and can either overestimate or underestimate the results.

  12. Influence of the light propagation models on a linearized photoacoustic image reconstruction of the light absorption coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okawa, Shinpei; Hirasawa, Takeshi; Kushibiki, Toshihiro; Ishihara, Miya

    2015-03-01

    Quantification of the optical properties of the tissues and blood by noninvasive photoacoustic (PA) imaging may provide useful information for screening and early diagnosis of diseases. Linearized 2D image reconstruction algorithm based on PA wave equation and the photon diffusion equation (PDE) can reconstruct the image with computational cost smaller than a method based on 3D radiative transfer equation. However, the reconstructed image is affected by the differences between the actual and assumed light propagations. A quantitative capability of a linearized 2D image reconstruction was investigated and discussed by the numerical simulations and the phantom experiment in this study. The numerical simulations with the 3D Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and the 2D finite element calculation of the PDE were carried out. The phantom experiment was also conducted. In the phantom experiment, the PA pressures were acquired by a probe which had an optical fiber for illumination and the ring shaped P(VDF-TrFE) ultrasound transducer. The measured object was made of Intralipid and Indocyanine green. In the numerical simulations, it was shown that the linearized image reconstruction method recovered the absorption coefficients with alleviating the dependency of the PA amplitude on the depth of the photon absorber. The linearized image reconstruction method worked effectively under the light propagation calculated by 3D MC simulation, although some errors occurred. The phantom experiments validated the result of the numerical simulations.

  13. Simultaneous Measurement of Thermal Diffusivity and Optical Absorption Coefficient of Solids Using PTR and PPE: A Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuente, R.; Mendioroz, A.; Apiñaniz, E.; Salazar, A.

    2012-11-01

    Modulated photothermal radiometry (PTR) and a modulated photopyroelectric (PPE) technique have been widely used to measure the thermal diffusivity of bulk materials. The method is based on illuminating the sample with a plane light beam and measuring the infrared emission with an infrared detector (PTR) or the electric voltage produced by a pyroelectric sensor in contact with the sample (PPE). The amplitude and phase of both photothermal signals are recorded as a function of the modulation frequency and then fitted to the theoretical model. In this work, we compare the ability of modulated PTR and PPE to retrieve simultaneously the thermal diffusivity and the optical absorption coefficient of homogeneous slabs. In order to eliminate the instrumental factor, self-normalization is used, i.e., the ratio of the photothermal signal recorded at the rear and front surfaces. The influence of the multiple reflections of the light beam and the transparency to infrared wavelengths are analyzed. Measurements performed on a wide variety of homogeneous materials, transparent and opaque, good and bad thermal conductors, confirm the validity of the method. The advantages and disadvantages of both techniques are discussed.

  14. Acoustic wave absorption as a probe of dynamical geometrical response of fractional quantum Hall liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kun

    2016-04-01

    We show that an acoustic crystalline wave gives rise to an effect similar to that of a gravitational wave to an electron gas. Applying this idea to a two-dimensional electron gas in the fractional quantum Hall regime, this allows for experimental study of its intra-Landau level dynamical response in the long-wavelength limit. To study such response we generalize Haldane's geometrical description of fractional quantum Hall states to situations where the external metric is time dependent. We show that such time-dependent metric (generated by acoustic wave) couples to collective modes of the system, including a quadrapolar mode at long wavelength, and magnetoroton at finite wavelength. Energies of these modes can be revealed in spectroscopic measurements, controlled by strain-induced Fermi velocity anisotropy. We argue that such geometrical probe provides a potentially highly useful alternative probe of quantum Hall liquids, in addition to the usual electromagnetic response.

  15. Monitoring spacecraft atmosphere contaminants by laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinfeld, J. I.

    1975-01-01

    Data were obtained which will provide a test of the accuracy of the differential absorption method for trace contaminant detection in many-component gas mixtures. The necessary accurate absorption coefficient determinations were carried out for several gases; acetonitrile, 1,2-dichloroethane, Freon-113, furan, methyl ethyl ketone, and t-butyl alcohol. The absorption coefficients are displayed graphically. An opto-acoustic method was tested for measuring absorbance, similar to the system described by Dewey.

  16. Absolute absorption coefficient of C6H2 in the mid-UV range at low temperature; implications for the interpretation of Titan atmospheric spectra.

    PubMed

    Bénilan, Y; Bruston, P; Raulin, F; Courtin, R; Guillemin, J C

    1995-01-01

    The interpretation of mid-UV albedo spectra of planetary atmospheres, especially that of Titan, is the main goal of the SIPAT (Spectroscopie uv d'Interet Prebiologique dans l'Atmosphere de Titan) research program. This laboratory experiment has been developed in order to systematically determine the absorption coefficients of molecular compounds which are potential absorbers of scattered sunlight in planetary atmospheres, with high spectral resolution, and at various temperatures below room temperature. From photochemical modelling and experimental simulations, we may expect triacetylene (C6H2) to be present in the atmosphere of Titan, even though it has not yet been detected. We present here the first determination of the absolute absorption coefficient of that compound in the 200-300 nm range and at two temperatures (296 K and 233 K). The temperature dependence of the C6H2 absorption coefficient in that wavelength range is compared to that previously observed in the case of cyanoacetylene (HC3N). We then discuss the implications of the present results for the interpretation of Titan UV spectra, where it appears that large uncertainities can be introduced either by the presence of trace impurities in laboratory samples or by the variations of absorption coefficients with temperature. PMID:11538441

  17. Perfect and broadband acoustic absorption by critically coupled sub-wavelength resonators.

    PubMed

    Romero-García, V; Theocharis, G; Richoux, O; Merkel, A; Tournat, V; Pagneux, V

    2016-01-01

    Perfect absorption is an interdisciplinary topic with a large number of applications, the challenge of which consists of broadening its inherently narrow frequency-band performance. We experimentally and analytically report perfect and broadband absorption for audible sound, by the mechanism of critical coupling, with a sub-wavelength multi-resonant scatterer (SMRS) made of a plate-resonator/closed waveguide structure. In order to introduce the role of the key parameters, we first present the case of a single resonant scatterer (SRS) made of a Helmholtz resonator/closed waveguide structure. In both cases the controlled balance between the energy leakage of the several resonances and the inherent losses of the system leads to perfect absorption peaks. In the case of the SMRS we show that systems with large inherent losses can be critically coupled using resonances with large leakage. In particular, we show that in the SMRS system, with a thickness of λ/12 and diameter of λ/7, several perfect absorption peaks overlap to produce absorption bigger than 93% for frequencies that extend over a factor of 2 in audible frequencies. The reported concepts and methodology provide guidelines for the design of broadband perfect absorbers which could contribute to solve the major issue of noise reduction. PMID:26781863

  18. Perfect and broadband acoustic absorption by critically coupled sub-wavelength resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-García, V.; Theocharis, G.; Richoux, O.; Merkel, A.; Tournat, V.; Pagneux, V.

    2016-01-01

    Perfect absorption is an interdisciplinary topic with a large number of applications, the challenge of which consists of broadening its inherently narrow frequency-band performance. We experimentally and analytically report perfect and broadband absorption for audible sound, by the mechanism of critical coupling, with a sub-wavelength multi-resonant scatterer (SMRS) made of a plate-resonator/closed waveguide structure. In order to introduce the role of the key parameters, we first present the case of a single resonant scatterer (SRS) made of a Helmholtz resonator/closed waveguide structure. In both cases the controlled balance between the energy leakage of the several resonances and the inherent losses of the system leads to perfect absorption peaks. In the case of the SMRS we show that systems with large inherent losses can be critically coupled using resonances with large leakage. In particular, we show that in the SMRS system, with a thickness of λ/12 and diameter of λ/7, several perfect absorption peaks overlap to produce absorption bigger than 93% for frequencies that extend over a factor of 2 in audible frequencies. The reported concepts and methodology provide guidelines for the design of broadband perfect absorbers which could contribute to solve the major issue of noise reduction.

  19. Perfect and broadband acoustic absorption by critically coupled sub-wavelength resonators

    PubMed Central

    Romero-García, V.; Theocharis, G.; Richoux, O.; Merkel, A.; Tournat, V.; Pagneux, V.

    2016-01-01

    Perfect absorption is an interdisciplinary topic with a large number of applications, the challenge of which consists of broadening its inherently narrow frequency-band performance. We experimentally and analytically report perfect and broadband absorption for audible sound, by the mechanism of critical coupling, with a sub-wavelength multi-resonant scatterer (SMRS) made of a plate-resonator/closed waveguide structure. In order to introduce the role of the key parameters, we first present the case of a single resonant scatterer (SRS) made of a Helmholtz resonator/closed waveguide structure. In both cases the controlled balance between the energy leakage of the several resonances and the inherent losses of the system leads to perfect absorption peaks. In the case of the SMRS we show that systems with large inherent losses can be critically coupled using resonances with large leakage. In particular, we show that in the SMRS system, with a thickness of λ/12 and diameter of λ/7, several perfect absorption peaks overlap to produce absorption bigger than 93% for frequencies that extend over a factor of 2 in audible frequencies. The reported concepts and methodology provide guidelines for the design of broadband perfect absorbers which could contribute to solve the major issue of noise reduction. PMID:26781863

  20. Acoustic characteristics of the medium with gradient change of impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bo; Yang, Desen; Sun, Yu; Shi, Jie; Shi, Shengguo; Zhang, Haoyang

    2015-10-01

    The medium with gradient change of acoustic impedance is a new acoustic structure which developed from multiple layer structures. In this paper, the inclusion is introduced and a new set of equations is developed. It can obtain better acoustic properties based on the medium with gradient change of acoustic impedance. Theoretical formulation has been systematically addressed which demonstrates how the idea of utilizing this method. The sound reflection and absorption coefficients were obtained. At last, the validity and the correctness of this method are assessed by simulations. The results show that appropriate design of parameters of the medium can improve underwater acoustic properties.

  1. Broadband Measurement of Black Carbon Absorption and Scattering Coefficients using a Supercontinuum Integrated Photoacoustic and Nephelometer Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    sharma, N.; Arnold, I. J.; Moosmuller, H.; Arnott, P.; Mazzoleni, C.

    2012-12-01

    the Desert Research Institute, measuring absorption and scattering coefficients of kerosene soot and sodium chloride aerosols. As a reference system we used a commercial three-wavelength photoacoustic-nephelometer instrument (DMT Inc.). Here, we present the results of this laboratory intercomparison.

  2. Seismic scattering and absorption parameters in the W-Bohemia/Vogtland region from elastic and acoustic radiative transfer theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaebler, Peter J.; Eulenfeld, Tom; Wegler, Ulrich

    2015-12-01

    In this study, frequency-dependent seismic scattering and intrinsic attenuation parameters for the crustal structure beneath the W-Bohemia/Vogtland swarm earthquake region close to the border of Czech Republic and Germany are estimated. Synthetic seismogram envelopes are modelled using elastic and acoustic radiative transfer theory. Scattering and absorption parameters are determined by fitting these synthetic envelopes to observed seismogram envelopes from 14 shallow local events from the October 2008 W-Bohemia/Vogtland earthquake swarm. The two different simulation approaches yield similar results for the estimated crustal parameters and show a comparable frequency dependence of both transport mean free path and intrinsic absorption path length. Both methods suggest that intrinsic attenuation is dominant over scattering attenuation in the W-Bohemia/Vogtland region for the investigated epicentral distance range and frequency bands from 3 to 24 Hz. Elastic simulations of seismogram envelopes suggest that forward scattering is required to explain the data, however, the degree of forward scattering is not resolvable. Errors in the parameter estimation are smaller in the elastic case compared to results from the acoustic simulations. The frequency decay of the transport mean free path suggests a random medium described by a nearly exponential autocorrelation function. The fluctuation strength and correlation length of the random medium cannot be estimated independently, but only a combination of the parameters related to the transport mean free path of the medium can be computed. Furthermore, our elastic simulations show, that using our numerical method, it is not possible to resolve the value of the mean free path of the random medium.

  3. Intensities and N2 collision-broadening coefficients measured for selected H2O absorption lines between 715 and 732 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkerson, T. D.; Schwemmer, G.; Gentry, B.; Giver, L. P.

    1979-01-01

    Intensities and N2 collision-broadening coefficients are measured for 62 water vapor absorption lines between 715 and 732 nm potentially applicable to laser remote sensing of atmospheric water vapor. Absolute line strengths and widths were determined from spectra corrected for instrument resolution, air-path absorption and Lorentz and Doppler broadening for pure water vapor and water vapor-nitrogen mixtures in a multipass absorption cell with a base path length of 25 m (White cell). Line strengths are observed to range from 4 x 10 to the -25th to 4 x 10 to the -23rd kayser/molecule per sq cm, and collision broadening coefficients are found to be approximately equal to 0.1 kayser/atm.

  4. Mass energy-absorption coefficients and average atomic energy-absorption cross-sections for amino acids in the energy range 0.122-1.330 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    More, Chaitali V.; Lokhande, Rajkumar M.; Pawar, Pravina. P.

    2016-05-01

    Mass attenuation coefficients of amino acids such as n-acetyl-l-tryptophan, n-acetyl-l-tyrosine and d-tryptophan were measured in the energy range 0.122-1.330 MeV. NaI (Tl) scintillation detection system was used to detect gamma rays with a resolution of 8.2% at 0.662 MeV. The measured attenuation coefficient values were then used to determine the mass energy-absorption coefficients (σa,en) and average atomic energy-absorption cross sections (μen/ρ) of the amino acids. Theoretical values were calculated based on XCOM data. Theoretical and experimental values are found to be in good agreement.

  5. Enhancement of acoustical performance of hollow tube sound absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putra, Azma; Khair, Fazlin Abd; Nor, Mohd Jailani Mohd

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents acoustical performance of hollow structures utilizing the recycled lollipop sticks as acoustic absorbers. The hollow cross section of the structures is arranged facing the sound incidence. The effects of different length of the sticks and air gap on the acoustical performance are studied. The absorption coefficient was measured using impedance tube method. Here it is found that improvement on the sound absorption performance is achieved by introducing natural kapok fiber inserted into the void between the hollow structures. Results reveal that by inserting the kapok fibers, both the absorption bandwidth and the absorption coefficient increase. For test sample backed by a rigid surface, best performance of sound absorption is obtained for fibers inserted at the front and back sides of the absorber. And for the case of test sample with air gap, this is achieved for fibers introduced only at the back side of the absorber.

  6. Nonlinear acoustic enhancement in photoacoustic imaging with wideband absorptive nanoemulsion beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chen-wei; Lombardo, Michael; Xia, Jinjun; Pelivanov, Ivan; Perez, Camilo; Larson-Smith, Kjersta; Matula, Thomas J.; Pozzo, Danilo; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2014-03-01

    A nanoemulsion contrast agent with a perfluorohexane core and optically absorptive gold nanospheres (GNSs) assembled on the surface, is presented to improve the specificity of photoacoustic (PA) molecular imaging in differentiating targeted cells or aberrant regions from heterogeneous background signals. Compared to distributed GNSs, clustered GNSs at the emulsion oil-water interface produce a red-shifted and broadened absorption spectrum, exhibiting fairly high absorption in the near-infrared region commonly used for deep tissue imaging. Above a certain laser irradiation fluence threshold, a phase transition creating a microbubble in the emulsion core leads to more than 10 times stronger PA signals compared with conventional thermal-expansion-induced PA signals. These signals are also strongly non-linear, as verified by a differential scheme using recorded PA images at different laser fluences. Assuming a linear relation between laser fluence and the PA signal amplitude, differential processing results in nearly perfect suppression of linear sources, but retains a significant residue for the non-linear nanoemulsion with more than 35 dB enhancement. This result demonstrates that contrast specificity can be improved using the nanoemulsion as a targeting agent in PA molecular imaging by suppressing all background signals related to a linear PA response. Furthermore, combined with a system providing simultaneous laser/ultrasound excitation, cavitation-generated bubbles have the potential to be a highly specific contrast agent for ultrasound molecular imaging and harmonic imaging, as well as a targeted means for noninvasive ultrasound-based therapies.

  7. Water absorption lines, 931-961 nm - Selected intensities, N2-collision-broadening coefficients, self-broadening coefficients, and pressure shifts in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giver, L. P.; Gentry, B.; Schwemmer, G.; Wilkerson, T. D.

    1982-01-01

    Intensities were measured for 97 lines of H2O vapor between 932 and 961 nm. The lines were selected for their potential usefulness for remote laser measurements of H2O vapor in the earth's atmosphere. The spectra were obtained with several different H2O vapor abundances and N2 broadening gas pressures; the spectral resolution was 0.046/cm FWHM. Measured H2O line intensities range from 7 x 10 to the -25th to 7 x 10 to the -22nd/cm per (molecules/sq cm). H2O self-broadening coefficients were measured for 13 of these strongest lines; the mean value was 0.5/cm per atm. N2-collision-broadening coefficients were measured for 73 lines, and the average was 0.11 cm per atm HWHM. Pressure shifts in air were determined for a sample of six lines between 948 and 950 nm; these lines shift to lower frequency by an amount comparable to 0.1 of the collision-broadened widths measured in air or N2. The measured intensities of many lines of 300-000 band are much larger than expected from prior computations, in some cases by over an order of magnitude. Coriolis interactions with the stronger 201-000 band appear to be the primary cause of the enhancement of these line intensities.

  8. Acoustic Absorption Characteristics of an Orifice With a Mean Bias Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Gaeta, R. J., Jr.; DAgostino, M.; Jones, Mike (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The objective of the study reported here was to acquire acoustic and flow data for numerical validation of impedance models that simulate bias flow through perforates. The impedance model is being developed by researchers at High Technology Corporation. This report documents normal incidence impedance measurements a singular circular orifice with mean flow passing through it. All measurements are made within a 1.12 inch (28.5 mm) diameter impedance tube. The mean flow is introduced upstream of the orifice (with the flow and incident sound wave travelling in the same direction) with an anechoic termination downstream of the orifice. Velocity profiles are obtained upstream of the orifice to characterize the inflow boundary conditions. Velocity in the center of the orifice is also obtained. All velocity measurements are made with a hot wire anemometer and subsequent checked with mass flow measurements made concurrently. All impedance measurements are made using the Two-Microphone Method. Although we have left the analysis of the data to the developers of the impedance models that simulate bias flow through perforate, our initial examination indicates that our results follow the trends consistent with published theory on impedance of perforates with a steady bias flow.

  9. Determination of the carrier concentration in CdSe crystals from the effective infrared absorption coefficient measured by means of the photothermal infrared radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlak, M.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a non-contact method that allows to determine the carrier concentration in CdSe crystals is presented. The method relies on the measurement of the effective infrared absorption coefficient by means of the photothermal infrared radiometry (PTR). In order to obtain the effective infrared absorption coefficient and thermal diffusivity, the frequency characteristics of the PTR signal were analyzed in the frame of a one-dimensional heat transport model for infrared semitransparent crystals. The carrier concentrations were estimated using a theory introduced by Ruda and a recently proposed normalization procedure for the PTR signal. The deduced carrier concentrations of the investigated CdSe crystals are in reasonable agreement with those obtained using Hall measurements and infrared spectroscopy. The method presented in this paper can also be applied to other semiconductors with the carrier concentration in the range of 1014-1017 cm-3.

  10. Acceptor End-Capped Oligomeric Conjugated Molecules with Broadened Absorption and Enhanced Extinction Coefficients for High-Efficiency Organic Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Liu; Lu, Kun; Xia, Benzheng; Zhang, Jianqi; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Zaiyu; Deng, Dan; Fang, Jin; Zhu, Lingyun; Wei, Zhixiang

    2016-07-01

    Acceptor end-capping of oligomeric conjugated molecules is found to be an effective strategy for simultaneous spectral broadening, extinction coefficient enhancement, and energy level optimization, resulting in profoundly enhanced power conversion efficiencies (of 9.25% and 8.91%) compared to the original oligomers. This strategy is effective in overcoming the absorption disadvantage of oligomers and small molecules due to conjugation limitation. PMID:27172541

  11. Limitations arising from two-photon absorption of solvent in pulsed-laser thermal lens detection: determination of the two-photon absorption coefficient of ethanol at 266 nm.

    PubMed

    Abbas Ghaleb, Khalil; Georges, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Two-photon absorption of the solvent under pulsed-laser excitation at 266 nm produces a high background thermal lens signal interfering with the analyte signal. Discrimination of both solvent and analyte signals along with calibration of the photothermal response has allowed the determination of the two-photon absorption coefficient of ethanol. The obtained value, 3.0x10(-10) cm W-1, is close to the literature values obtained from transmittance measurements using picosecond or femtosecond laser pulses. PMID:16454917

  12. Remote Sensing of the Absorption Coefficients and Chlorophyll a Concentration in the U.S. Southern Middle Atlantic Bight from SeaWiFS and MODIS-Aqua

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, Xiaoju; Mannino, Antonio; Russ, Mary E.; Hooker, Stanford B.

    2008-01-01

    At present, satellite remote sensing of coastal water quality and constituent concentration is subject to large errors as compared to the capability of satellite sensors in oceanic waters. In this study, field measurements collected on a series of cruises within U.S. southern Middle Atlantic Bight (SMAB) were applied to improve retrievals of satellite ocean color products in order to examine the factors that regulate the bio-optical properties within the continental shelf waters of the SMAB. The first objective was to develop improvements in satellite retrievals of absorption coefficients of phytoplankton (a(sub ph)), colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) (a(sub g)), non-pigmented particles (a(sub d)), and non-pigmented particles plus CDOM (a(sub dg)), and chlorophyll a concentration ([Chl_a]). Several algorithms were compared to derive constituent absorption coefficients from remote sensing reflectance (R(sub rs)) ratios. The validation match-ups showed that the mean absolute percent differences (MAPD) were typically less than 35%, although higher errors were found for a(sub d) retrievals. Seasonal and spatial variability of satellite-derived absorption coefficients and [Chl_a] was apparent and consistent with field data. CDOM is a major contributor to the bio-optical properties of the SMAB, accounting for 35-70% of total light absorption by particles plus CDOM at 443 nm, as compared to 30-45% for phytoplankton and 0-20% for non-pigmented particles. The overestimation of [Chl_a] from the operational satellite algorithms may be attributed to the strong CDOM absorption in this region. River discharge is important in controlling the bio-optical environment, but cannot explain all of the regional and seasonal variability of biogeochemical constituents in the SMAB.

  13. Long-pathlength infrared absorption measurements in the 8- to 14-{mu}m atmospheric window: Self-broadening coefficient data

    SciTech Connect

    Kulp, T.J.; Shinn, J.

    1995-04-01

    The accurate characterization of the latent infrared (IR) absorption in the atmospheric window regions continues to be an area of research interest for the global climate modeling community. In the window between 8 and 14 {mu}m, this absorption can be attributed primarily to water vapor. It consists of (1) weak lines originating from the edge of the water vapor pure rotational band (at low wavenumbers) and the trailing P-branch of the v{sub 2} rovibrational band (at the high-wavenumber boundary of the window); and (2) the water vapor continuum absorption. The goal of our project has been to improve our quantitative and physical understanding of both of these absorption processes. Specifically, our immediate aims are to fill gaps in the experimental radiative transfer databases pertaining to the line parameters (i.e., line intensities and broadening coefficients) and to the self- and foreign-broadened water vapor continuum. To accomplish our goals, we have made long-pathlength absorption measurements using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) (for the continuum and line measurements, at low resolution) and a tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDLAS) (for the line measurements, at high resolution). These measurements were made on gas samples contained in a 400-m maximum pathlength Horn Pimentel multipass cell designed and constructed for this project.

  14. Exponential Sum Absorption Coefficients of Phosphine from 2750 to 3550/cm for Application to Radiative Transfer Analyses on Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temma, T.; Baines, K. H.; Butler, R. A. H.; Brown, L. R.; Sagui, L.; Kleiner, I.

    2006-01-01

    PH3 exponential sum k coefficients were computed between 2750 and 3550/cm (2.82-3.64 (microns), in view of future application to radiative transfer analyses of Jupiter and Saturn in a phosphine absorption band near 3 microns. The temperature and pressure of this data set cover the ranges from 80 to 350 K and from 10 (exp -3)to 10(exp 1) bars, respectively. Transmission uncertainty incurred by the use of the k coefficients is smaller than a few percent as long as the radiation is confined above an altitude of a few bars in the giant planets. In spectral regions of weak absorption at high pressures close to 10 bars, contributions from far wings of strong absorption lines must be carefully taken into account. Our data set helps map the three-dimensional distribution of PH3 on the giant planets, revealing their global atmospheric dynamics extending down to the deep interior. The complete k coefficient data set of this work is available at the Web site of the NASA Planetary Data System Atmospheres Node.

  15. Control of optical bandgap energy and optical absorption coefficient by geometric parameters in sub-10 nm silicon-nanodisc array structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairuz Budiman, Mohd; Hu, Weiguo; Igarashi, Makoto; Tsukamoto, Rikako; Isoda, Taiga; Itoh, Kohei M.; Yamashita, Ichiro; Murayama, Akihiro; Okada, Yoshitaka; Samukawa, Seiji

    2012-02-01

    A sub-10 nm, high-density, periodic silicon-nanodisc (Si-ND) array has been fabricated using a new top-down process, which involves a 2D array bio-template etching mask made of Listeria-Dps with a 4.5 nm diameter iron oxide core and damage-free neutral-beam etching (Si-ND diameter: 6.4 nm). An Si-ND array with an SiO2 matrix demonstrated more controllable optical bandgap energy due to the fine tunability of the Si-ND thickness and diameter. Unlike the case of shrinking Si-ND thickness, the case of shrinking Si-ND diameter simultaneously increased the optical absorption coefficient and the optical bandgap energy. The optical absorption coefficient became higher due to the decrease in the center-to-center distance of NDs to enhance wavefunction coupling. This means that our 6 nm diameter Si-ND structure can satisfy the strict requirements of optical bandgap energy control and high absorption coefficient for achieving realistic Si quantum dot solar cells.

  16. Some new methods of determining and studying the absorptivity of a medium and the generalized angular coefficients of radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surinov, Y. A.; Sosnovyy, N. V.

    1975-01-01

    Local and average radiation functions, which represent purely geometric characteristics of the radiating system, are used to determine the absorptivity in a system of bodies separated by an attenuating medium.

  17. Quasi-random narrow-band model fits to near-infrared low-temperature laboratory methane spectra and derived exponential-sum absorption coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baines, Kevin H.; West, Robert A.; Giver, Lawrence P.; Moreno, Fernando

    1993-01-01

    Near-infrared 10/cm resolution spectra of methane obtained at various temperatures, pressures, and abundances are fit to a quasi-random narrow-band model. Exponential-sum absorption coefficients for three temperatures (112, 188, and 295 K), and 20 pressures from 0.0001 to 5.6 bars, applicable to the cold environments of the major planets, are then derived from the band model for the 230 wavelengths measured from 1.6 to 2.5 microns. RMS deviations between the laboratory and the exponential-sum synthetic transmissions are reported for the best fitting 50 wavelengths. Deviations relevant to broadband, 1-percent spectral resolution observations are also presented. The validity of exponential-sum coefficients derived from broadband (10/cm) transmission data is demonstrated via direct comparison with line-by-line calculations. The complete atlas of coefficients is available from the Planetary Data System-Planetary Atmospheres Discipline Node.

  18. Mineral Specific IR Molar Absorption Coefficients for Routine Water Determination in Olivine, SiO2 polymorphs and Garnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, S.; Koch-Mueller, M.; Reichart, P.; Rhede, D.; Thomas, R.

    2007-12-01

    Conventionally applied Infrared (IR) calibrations [1, 2] for quantitative water analyses in solids are established on hydrous minerals and glasses with several wt% water. These calibrations are based on a negative correlation between the IR molar absorption coefficient (ɛ) for water and the mean wavenumber of the corresponding OH pattern. The correlation reflects the dependence of the OH band position on the appropriate O- H...O distances and thereby the magnitude of the dipole momentum which is proportional to the band intensity. However, it has been observed that these calibrations can not be adopted to nominally anhydrous minerals (NAMs) [3].To study the potential dependence of ɛ on structure and chemistry in NAMs we synthesized olivine and SiO2 polymorphs with specific isolated hydroxyl point defects, e.g. quartz, coesite and stishovite with B3++H+=Si4+ and/or Al3++H+=Si4+ substitutions. Experiments were performed with water in excess in piston cylinder and multi-anvil presses. Single crystal IR spectra demonstrate that we successfully managed to seperate generally complex OH patterns as e.g. observed in natural quartz and synthetic coesite. We quantified sample water contents of both natural samples and our run products by applying proton-proton-scattering [4], confocal microRaman spectroscopy [5] and Secondary Ion mass spectrometry. Resulting water concentrations were used to calculate new mineral specific ɛs. For olivine with the mean wavenumber of 3517 cm-1 we determined an ɛ value of 41,000±5,000 lmol-1H2Ocm-2. Quantification of olivine with the mean wavenumber of 3550 cm-1 in contrast resulted in an ɛ value of 47,000±1,000 lmol-1H2Ocm-2. Taking into account previous studies [6, 7] there is evidence to suggest a linear wavenumber dependent correlation for olivine, where ɛ increases with decreasing wavenumber. In case of the SiO2 system it turns out that the magnitude of ɛ within one structure type is independent of the liable OH point defect and

  19. Mass-specific optical absorption coefficients and imaginary part of the complex refractive indices of mineral dust components measured by a multi-wavelength photoacoustic spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utry, N.; Ajtai, T.; Pintér, M.; Tombácz, E.; Illés, E.; Bozóki, Z.; Szabó, G.

    2015-01-01

    Mass-specific optical absorption coefficients (MACs) and the imaginary part (κ) of the refractive indices of various mineral dust components including silicate clays (illite, kaolin and bentonite), oxides (quartz, hematite and rutile), and carbonate (limestone) were determined at the wavelengths of 1064, 532, 355 and 266 nm. The MAC values were calculated from aerosol optical absorption coefficients measured by a multi-wavelength photoacoustic (PA) instrument, the mass concentration and the number size distribution of the generated aerosol samples as well as the size transfer functions of the measuring instruments. Values of κ were calculated from the measured and particle-loss-corrected data by using a Mie-theory-based retrieval algorithm. The determined values could be used for comparisons with calculated wavelength-dependent κ values typically deduced from bulk-phase measurements by using indirect measurement methods. Accordingly, the presented comparison of the measured and calculated aerosol optical absorption spectra revealed the strong need for standardized sample preparation and measurement methodology in case of bulk-phase measurements.

  20. CO2 laser photoacoustic measurements of ethanol absorption coefficients within infrared region of 9.2-10.8 μm.

    PubMed

    Ivascu, I R; Matei, C E; Patachia, M; Bratu, A M; Dumitras, D C

    2016-06-15

    Absorption coefficients of the ethanol vapors at atmospheric pressure and room temperature were measured by photoacoustic technique using a cw, line-tunable, frequency-stabilized CO2 laser as radiation source. The spectrum of the employed CO2 laser includes 54 lines with wavelengths in the infrared region of 9.2-10.8μm and power levels up to 4.7W. Measurements revealed a predominant absorption for ethanol within 9.4μm band of the CO2 laser spectrum, where the highest values of the absorption coefficients were recorded: 3.68cm(-1)atm(-1) at 9R(20) line and 3.65cm(-1)atm(-1) at 9R(22) line. The estimated detection range covers six orders of magnitude, from a minimum of 30ppbV to a maximum of 4% concentration of ethanol in nitrogen, which proves the suitability of the photoacoustic technique for accurate measurements of the ethanol concentration in various applications. PMID:27045783

  1. CO2 laser photoacoustic measurements of ethanol absorption coefficients within infrared region of 9.2-10.8 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivascu, I. R.; Matei, C. E.; Patachia, M.; Bratu, A. M.; Dumitras, D. C.

    2016-06-01

    Absorption coefficients of the ethanol vapors at atmospheric pressure and room temperature were measured by photoacoustic technique using a cw, line-tunable, frequency-stabilized CO2 laser as radiation source. The spectrum of the employed CO2 laser includes 54 lines with wavelengths in the infrared region of 9.2-10.8 μm and power levels up to 4.7 W. Measurements revealed a predominant absorption for ethanol within 9.4 μm band of the CO2 laser spectrum, where the highest values of the absorption coefficients were recorded: 3.68 cm- 1 atm- 1 at 9R(20) line and 3.65 cm- 1 atm- 1 at 9R(22) line. The estimated detection range covers six orders of magnitude, from a minimum of 30 ppbV to a maximum of 4% concentration of ethanol in nitrogen, which proves the suitability of the photoacoustic technique for accurate measurements of the ethanol concentration in various applications.

  2. Acoustical Studies of L-leucine and L-asparagine in aqueous electrolyte through thermal expansion coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jajodia, S.; Chimankar, O. P.; Kalambe, A.; Goswami, S. G.

    2012-12-01

    Amino acids are the building blocks of the proteins; their study provides important information, about the behaviour of larger biomolecules such as proteins. The properties of proteins such as their structure, solubility, denaturation, etc. are greatly influenced by electrolytes. Ultrasonic velocity and density values have been used for evaluation of thermal expansion coefficient and adiabatic compressibility for ternary systems (amino acid/salt + water) namely L-leucine / L-asparagine each in 1.5 M aqueous solution of NaCl used as solvent for various concentrations and at different temperatures (298.15K - 323.15K). Present paper reports the variation of various thermoacoustical parameters such as Moelwyn-Hughes parameter (C1), Beyer's non-linearity parameter (B/A), internal pressure (Pi), fractional free volume (f), available volume (Va), repulsive exponent (n), molecular constant (r), van der Waals' constant (b), Debye temperatue (θD), etc. have been computed from the thermal expansion coefficient with the change of concentration and temperature. The variations of all these parameters have been interpreted in terms of various intermolecular interactions such as strong, weak, charge transfer, complex formation, hydrogen bonding interaction. The structure making and breaking properties of the interacting components existing in proposed ternary systems. It shows the associating and dissociating tendency of the molecules of solute in solvent.The hetromolecular interactions are present in both the ternary systems.

  3. Characterization of penetration depth as a function of optical fiber separation at various absorption and scatter coefficients for a noninvasive metabolic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMilo, Charles; Brukilacchio, Thomas; Soller, Babs R.; Soyemi, Olusola

    2004-06-01

    A visible-near IR (500-1,000nm) fiber optic sensor is under development that is intended to non-invasively assess muscle metabolism through the measurement of tissue pH and oxygen partial pressure. These parameters are calculated from the spectra of hemoglobin and myoglobin in muscle. The sensor consists of transmit (illumination) fibers and receive (detection) fibers that are coupled to a spectrometer. Light from the probe must penetrate below the surface of the skin and into a 5-10mm thick layer of muscle. A study was conducted to quantify the relationship between transmit and receive fiber separation and sensor penetration depth below the surface of the skin. A liquid phantom was created to replicate the absorption (μa) and reduced scatter coefficient (μs') profiles typically found in human blood and tissue. The phantom consisted of a solution of Intralipid and India ink in the appropriate concentrations to achieve desired reduced scatter coefficient and absorption profiles. The reduced scatter coefficient of the liquid phantom was achieved to an accuracy of +/-10% compared to previously published data. A fixed illumination fiber and translatable detector fiber were placed in the liquid phantom, and the fiber separation was varied from 3-40mm. Values of μa and μs' varied from 0.03-0.40 cm-1 and 5.0-15.0 cm-1 respectively. Results from the experiment demonstrate a strong correlation between penetration depth and fiber separation. Additionally, it was found that penetration depth was not substantially influenced by absorption and scatter concentration. As signal-to-noise is an important parameter in many non-invasive biomedical applications, the relative signal as a function of fiber separation was determined to follow an exponential relationship.

  4. A Multi-Band Analytical Algorithm for Deriving Absorption and Backscattering Coefficients from Remote-Sensing Reflectance of Optically Deep Waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Zhong-Ping; Carder, Kendall L.

    2001-01-01

    A multi-band analytical (MBA) algorithm is developed to retrieve absorption and backscattering coefficients for optically deep waters, which can be applied to data from past and current satellite sensors, as well as data from hyperspectral sensors. This MBA algorithm applies a remote-sensing reflectance model derived from the Radiative Transfer Equation, and values of absorption and backscattering coefficients are analytically calculated from values of remote-sensing reflectance. There are only limited empirical relationships involved in the algorithm, which implies that this MBA algorithm could be applied to a wide dynamic range of waters. Applying the algorithm to a simulated non-"Case 1" data set, which has no relation to the development of the algorithm, the percentage error for the total absorption coefficient at 440 nm a (sub 440) is approximately 12% for a range of 0.012 - 2.1 per meter (approximately 6% for a (sub 440) less than approximately 0.3 per meter), while a traditional band-ratio approach returns a percentage error of approximately 30%. Applying it to a field data set ranging from 0.025 to 2.0 per meter, the result for a (sub 440) is very close to that using a full spectrum optimization technique (9.6% difference). Compared to the optimization approach, the MBA algorithm cuts the computation time dramatically with only a small sacrifice in accuracy, making it suitable for processing large data sets such as satellite images. Significant improvements over empirical algorithms have also been achieved in retrieving the optical properties of optically deep waters.

  5. The impact of absorption coefficient on polarimetric determination of Berry phase based depth resolved characterization of biomedical scattering samples: a polarized Monte Carlo investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Baba, Justin S; Koju, Vijay; John, Dwayne O

    2016-01-01

    The modulation of the state of polarization of photons due to scatter generates associated geometric phase that is being investigated as a means for decreasing the degree of uncertainty in back-projecting the paths traversed by photons detected in backscattered geometry. In our previous work, we established that polarimetrically detected Berry phase correlates with the mean photon penetration depth of the backscattered photons collected for image formation. In this work, we report on the impact of state-of-linear-polarization (SOLP) filtering on both the magnitude and population distributions of image forming detected photons as a function of the absorption coefficient of the scattering sample. The results, based on Berry phase tracking implemented Polarized Monte Carlo Code, indicate that sample absorption plays a significant role in the mean depth attained by the image forming backscattered detected photons.

  6. Determination of mass attenuation coefficient by numerical absorption calibration with Monte-Carlo simulations at 59.54 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degrelle, D.; Mavon, C.; Groetz, J.-E.

    2016-04-01

    This study presents a numerical method in order to determine the mass attenuation coefficient of a sample with an unknown chemical composition at low energy. It is compared with two experimental methods: a graphic method and a transmission method. The method proposes to realise a numerical absorption calibration curve to process experimental results. Demineralised water with known mass attenuation coefficient (0.2066cm2g-1 at 59.54 keV) is chosen to confirm the method. 0.1964 ± 0.0350cm2g-1 is the average value determined by the numerical method, that is to say less than 5% relative deviation compared to more than 47% for the experimental methods.

  7. Bias in Dobson total ozone measurements at high latitudes due to approximations in calculations of ozone absorption coefficients and air mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhard, G.; Evans, R. D.; Labow, G. J.; Oltmans, S. J.

    2005-05-01

    The Dobson spectrophotometer is the primary standard instrument for ground-based measurements of total column ozone. The accuracy of its data depends on the knowledge of ozone absorption coefficients used for data reduction. We document an error in the calculations that led to the set of absorption coefficients currently recommended by the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO). This error has little effect because an empirical adjustment was applied to the original calculations before the coefficients were adopted by WMO. We provide evidence that this adjustment was physically sound. The coefficients recommended by WMO are applied in the Dobson network without correction for the temperature dependence of the ozone absorption cross sections. On the basis of data measured by Dobson numbers 80 and 82, which were operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory at the South Pole, we find that omission of temperature corrections may lead to systematic errors in Dobson ozone data of up to 4%. The standard Dobson ozone retrieval method further assumes that the ozone layer is located at a fixed height. This approximation leads to errors in air mass calculations, which are particularly relevant at high latitudes where ozone measurements are performed at large solar zenith angles (SZA). At the South Pole, systematic errors caused by this approximation may exceed 2% for SZAs larger than 80°. The bias is largest when the vertical ozone distribution is distorted by the "ozone hole" and may lead to underestimation of total ozone by 4% at SZA = 85° (air mass 9). Dobson measurements at the South Pole were compared with ozone data from a collocated SUV-100 UV spectroradiometer and Version 8 overpass data from NASA's Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS). Uncorrected Dobson ozone values tend to be lower than data from the two other instruments when total ozone is below 170 Dobson units or SZAs are larger than

  8. Normalized-constraint method for minimizing interparameter cross-talk in reconstructed images of spatially heterogeneous scattering and absorption coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Yaling; Graber, Harry L.; Barbour, Randall L.

    2001-06-01

    In this report, we present a method to reduce the cross-talk problem in optical tomography. The method described is an extension of a previously reported perturbation formulation related to relative detector values, and employs a weight matrix scaling technique together with a constrained CGD method for imaging reconstruction. Results from numerical and experimental studies using DC measurement data demonstrate that the approach can effectively isolate absorption and scattering heterogeneities, even for complex combinations of perturbations in optical properties. The derive method is remarkably stable to errors originating from an insufficiently accurate estimate of properties of the reference medium.

  9. Donor impurity-related linear and nonlinear intraband optical absorption coefficients in quantum ring: effects of applied electric field and hydrostatic pressure

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The linear and nonlinear intraband optical absorption coefficients in GaAs three-dimensional single quantum rings are investigated. Taking into account the combined effects of hydrostatic pressure and electric field, applied along the growth direction of the heterostructure, the energies of the ground and first excited states of a donor impurity have been found using the effective mass approximation and a variational method. The energies of these states are examined as functions of the dimensions of the structure, electric field, and hydrostatic pressure. We have also investigated the dependencies of the linear, nonlinear, and total optical absorption coefficients as a function of incident photon energy for several configurations of the system. It is found that the variation of distinct sizes of the structure leads to either a redshift and/or a blueshift of the resonant peaks of the intraband optical spectrum. In addition, we have found that the application of an electric field leads to a redshift, whereas the influence of hydrostatic pressure leads to a blueshift (in the case of on-ring-center donor impurity position) of the resonant peaks of the intraband optical spectrum. PMID:23021497

  10. Absorption coefficient and relative refractive index change for a double δ-doped GaAs MIGFET-like structure: Electric and magnetic field effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Orozco, J. C.; Rodríguez-Magdaleno, K. A.; Suárez-López, J. R.; Duque, C. A.; Restrepo, R. L.

    2016-04-01

    In this work we present theoretical results for the electronic structure as well as for the absorption coefficient and relative refractive index change for an asymmetric double δ-doped like confining potential in the active region of a Multiple Independent Gate Field Effect Transistor (MIGFET) system. We model the potential profile as a double δ-doped like potential profile between two Schottky (parabolic) potential barriers that are just the main characteristics of the MIGFET configuration. We investigate the effect of external electromagnetic fields in this kind of quantum structures, in particular we applied a homogeneous constant electric field in the growth direction z as well as a homogeneous constant magnetic field in the x-direction. In general we conclude that by applying electromagnetic fields we can modulate the resonant peaks of the absorption coefficient as well as their energy position. Also with such probes it is possible to control the nodes and amplitude of the relative refractive index changes related to resonant intersubband optical transitions.

  11. Donor impurity-related linear and nonlinear intraband optical absorption coefficients in quantum ring: effects of applied electric field and hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Barseghyan, Manuk G; Restrepo, Ricardo L; Mora-Ramos, Miguel E; Kirakosyan, Albert A; Duque, Carlos A

    2012-01-01

    : The linear and nonlinear intraband optical absorption coefficients in GaAs three-dimensional single quantum rings are investigated. Taking into account the combined effects of hydrostatic pressure and electric field, applied along the growth direction of the heterostructure, the energies of the ground and first excited states of a donor impurity have been found using the effective mass approximation and a variational method. The energies of these states are examined as functions of the dimensions of the structure, electric field, and hydrostatic pressure. We have also investigated the dependencies of the linear, nonlinear, and total optical absorption coefficients as a function of incident photon energy for several configurations of the system. It is found that the variation of distinct sizes of the structure leads to either a redshift and/or a blueshift of the resonant peaks of the intraband optical spectrum. In addition, we have found that the application of an electric field leads to a redshift, whereas the influence of hydrostatic pressure leads to a blueshift (in the case of on-ring-center donor impurity position) of the resonant peaks of the intraband optical spectrum. PMID:23021497

  12. Effects of soot absorption coefficient-Planck function correlation on radiative heat transfer in oxygen-enriched propane turbulent diffusion flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consalvi, J. L.; Nmira, F.

    2016-03-01

    The main objective of this article is to quantify the influence of the soot absorption coefficient-Planck function correlation on radiative loss and flame structure in an oxygen-enhanced propane turbulent diffusion flame. Calculations were run with and without accounting for this correlation by using a standard k-ε model and the steady laminar flamelet model (SLF) coupled to a joint Probability Density Function (PDF) of mixture fraction, enthalpy defect, scalar dissipation rate, and soot quantities. The PDF transport equation is solved by using a Stochastic Eulerian Field (SEF) method. The modeling of soot production is carried out by using a flamelet-based semi-empirical acetylene/benzene soot model. Radiative heat transfer is modeled by using a wide band correlated-k model and turbulent radiation interactions (TRI) are accounted for by using the Optically-Thin Fluctuation Approximation (OTFA). Predicted soot volume fraction, radiant wall heat flux distribution and radiant fraction are in good agreement with the available experimental data. Model results show that soot absorption coefficient and Planck function are negatively correlated in the region of intense soot emission. Neglecting this correlation is found to increase significantly the radiative loss leading to a substantial impact on flame structure in terms of mean and rms values of temperature. In addition mean and rms values of soot volume fraction are found to be less sensitive to the correlation than temperature since soot formation occurs mainly in a region where its influence is low.

  13. Airborne Measurements of Scattering and Absorption Coefficients in the Planetary Boundary Layer above the Po Valley, Italy, during the PEGASOS Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosati, B.; Weingartner, E.; Gysel, M.; Tillmann, R.; Mentel, T. F.; Decesari, S.; Marinoni, A.; Gobbi, G. P.; Fierli, F.; Cairo, F.; Bucci, S.; Zanatta, M.; Größ, J.; Baltensperger, U.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol particles influence the Earth's radiation budget by interacting with the incoming sunlight. The chemical composition and size of aerosol particles determine their potential to scatter and absorb radiation as well as their capability to take up water (Zieger et al., 2011). If particles are hygroscopic their optical properties will be altered at enhanced relative humidities (RH) due to the increase in size and change in index of refraction. It is known that RH but also the chemical composition of aerosols change with altitude (Morgan et al., 2010) which makes it very important to investigate optical properties at different heights. Within the Pan-European Gas-Aerosols-climate interaction Study (PEGASOS) a set of instruments was installed on a Zeppelin to investigate changes of light scattering and absorption in the planetary boundary layer. In order to obtain the scattering properties, Mie calculations were performed for size distributions recorded with SMPS (scanning mobility particle sizer) and WELAS (optical size spectrometer). The index of refraction and the hygroscopicity of the aerosol particles were measured with the white-light humidified optical particle spectrometer (WHOPS). These measurements further allowed studying the RH-dependence of the optical properties. Moreover, a seven wavelength portable aethalometer was employed to determine the light absorption properties of the aerosol. In this work we will present vertical profiles of scattering and absorption coefficients measured during Zeppelin flights of the PEGASOS campaigns in Italy in 2012. Additionally comparisons with ground based measurements from nephelometers and aethalometers, as well as remote sensing results will be shown. W.T. Morgan et al., Enhancement of the aerosol direct radiative effect by semi-volatile aerosol components: Airborne measurements in North-Western Europe, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics 10(2010), pp. 8151-8171.P. Zieger et al., Comparison of ambient aerosol

  14. On boundary conditions for the diffusion equation in room-acoustic prediction: Theory, simulations, and experiments.

    PubMed

    Jing, Yun; Xiang, Ning

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a modified boundary condition to improve the room-acoustic prediction accuracy of a diffusion equation model. Previous boundary conditions for the diffusion equation model have certain limitations which restrict its application to a certain number of room types. The boundary condition employing the Sabine absorption coefficient [V. Valeau et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 119, 1504-1513 (2006)] cannot predict the sound field well when the absorption coefficient is high, while the boundary condition employing the Eyring absorption coefficient [Y. Jing and N. Xiang, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 121, 3284-3287 (2007); A. Billon et al., Appl. Acoust. 69, (2008)] has a singularity whenever any surface material has an absorption coefficient of 1.0. The modified boundary condition is derived based on an analogy between sound propagation and light propagation. Simulated and experimental data are compared to verify the modified boundary condition in terms of room-acoustic parameter prediction. The results of this comparison suggest that the modified boundary condition is valid for a range of absorption coefficient values and successfully eliminates the singularity problem. PMID:18177146

  15. Absorption and Attenuation Coefficients Using the WET Labs ac-s in the Mid-Atlantic Bight: Field Measurements and Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohi, Nobuaki; Makinen, Carla P.; Mitchell, Richard; Moisan, Tiffany A.

    2008-01-01

    Ocean color algorithms are based on the parameterization of apparent optical properties as a function of inherent optical properties. WET Labs underwater absorption and attenuation meters (ac-9 and ac-s) measure both the spectral beam attenuation [c (lambda)] and absorption coefficient [a (lambda)]. The ac-s reports in a continuous range of 390-750 nm with a band pass of 4 nm, totaling approximately 83 distinct wavelengths, while the ac-9 reports at 9 wavelengths. We performed the ac-s field measurements at nine stations in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from water calibrations to data analysis. Onboard the ship, the ac-s was calibrated daily using Milli Q-water. Corrections for the in situ temperature and salinity effects on optical properties of water were applied. Corrections for incomplete recovery of the scattered light in the ac-s absorption tube were performed. The fine scale of spectral and vertical distributions of c (lambda) and a (lambda) were described from the ac-s. The significant relationships between a (674) and that of spectrophotometric analysis and chlorophyll a concentration of discrete water samples were observed.

  16. Characterization of thin poly(dimethylsiloxane)-based tissue-simulating phantoms with tunable reduced scattering and absorption coefficients at visible and near-infrared wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Greening, Gage J; Istfan, Raeef; Higgins, Laura M; Balachandran, Kartik; Roblyer, Darren; Pierce, Mark C; Muldoon, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    Optical phantoms are used in the development of various imaging systems. For certain applications, the development of thin phantoms that simulate the physical size and optical properties of tissue is important. Here, we demonstrate a method for producing thin phantom layers with tunable optical properties using poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) as a substrate material. The thickness of each layer (between 115 and 880 μm) was controlled using a spin coater. The reduced scattering and absorption coefficients were controlled using titanium dioxide and alcohol-soluble nigrosin, respectively. These optical coefficients were quantified at six discrete wavelengths (591, 631, 659, 691, 731, and 851 nm) at varying concentrations of titanium dioxide and nigrosin using spatial frequency domain imaging. From the presented data, we provide lookup tables to determine the appropriate concentrations of scattering and absorbing agents to be used in the design of PDMS-based phantoms with specific optical coefficients. In addition, heterogeneous phantoms mimicking the layered features of certain tissue types may be fabricated from multiple stacked layers, each with custom optical properties. These thin, tunable PDMS optical phantoms can simulate many tissue types and have broad imaging calibration applications in endoscopy, diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging, and optical coherence tomography, etc. PMID:25387084

  17. The in vitro permeability coefficient and short-term absorption rates for vinyl toluene using human cadaver skin mounted in a static diffusion cell model.

    PubMed

    Fasano, William J; Baer, Kevin N

    2006-01-01

    Vinyl toluene is one of several methylstyrene monomers that provide improved performance in resins for specialty paints, hydrocarbon resins for adhesives, specialty polymers, and unsaturated polyester resins. The purpose of this study was to determine a permeability coefficient (Kp) and short-term absorption rate for vinyl toluene using human cadaver skin mounted in an in vitro static diffusion cell model with an exposure area of 0.64 cm2. For the Kp determination, vinyl toluene was applied at a rate of 100 microL/cm2 to 6 skin replicates representing 4 human subjects. Serial receptor fluid samples were collected at 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 24, 36, and 48 h postapplication and analyzed for vinyl toluene by HPLC-UV. Based on the slope at steady-state (203.3 microg cm(-2) h(-1) +/- 120.0 microg cm(-2) h(-1)) and the concentration of the applied dose of vinyl toluene, taken as its density (894,600 microg/cm3), the Kp was calculated to be 2.27 x 10(-4) cm/h (+/-1.34 x 10(-4) cm/h). For the short-term absorption experiments, 12 skin replicates representing 3 human subjects were employed. Following 10- and 60-min exposures to a finite dose of vinyl toluene (10 microL/cm2), the respective short-term absorption rates were calculated to be 66.0 (+/-29.9) and 104.2 (+/-63.0) microg cm(-2) h(-1). These data provide industrial hygienists and safety personnel values to estimate the amount of vinyl toluene that may be absorbed via the dermal exposure route, given a variety of exposure scenarios, and the time it takes (skin absorption time) to reach a body burden equal to the Occupational Safety and Health Administrative permissible exposure level (OSHA PEL) or ACGIH TLV. PMID:16455589

  18. Mean absorption coefficient of H2O-air-MgCl2/CaCl2/NaCl thermal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannachi, R.; Cressault, Y.; Salem, D.; Teulet, Ph; Béji, L.; Ben Lakhdar, Z.

    2012-12-01

    Under the local thermodynamic equilibrium hypothesis, the mean absorption coefficients (MACs) were calculated for H2O-air-MgCl2/CaCl2/NaCl thermal plasmas in a temperature range from 300 to 30 000 K and at atmospheric pressure. The MACs were computed under the hypothesis of isothermal plasmas which allows a good description of the radiation absorbed in cold regions. In this study, we took into account the absorption radiation resulting from the atomic continuum, molecular continuum, atomic lines and some molecular bands. Free-free transitions (bremsstrahlung) and free-bound (electron-ion recombination and electron attachment) or bound-free transitions in terms of absorption were considered for the calculation of atomic continuum. For bound-bound transitions, natural, resonance, van der Waals, Stark and Doppler effects were taken into account for the line broadenings while the escape factors were used to treat the self-absorption of the resonance lines. Molecular continuum was considered for the main molecules (H2, O2, N2, OH, NO, H2O, N2O, NO2, O3, NO3 and N2O5) whereas we studied only diatomic systems O2, N2, NO and N_2^+ for the absorption of molecular bands. The influence of the proportion of MgCl2, CaCl2 or NaCl in a water-air mixture was analysed as the effect of the strong self-absorbed resonance lines of the alkaline salts (Ca, Ca+, Na, Na+, Mg, Mg+, Cl and Cl+). Our results show that a low concentration of alkaline salts (less than 1% in molar proportions) in the plasma increased the MACs at low temperatures (T < 10 000 K) due to the resonance lines mainly localized in the near-UV and visible spectral regions in opposition to hydrogen, oxygen or nitrogen species for which 90% of them exist in ultraviolet. In addition to the atomic and molecular continuum, the absorption radiation of molecular bands is important at low temperatures.

  19. Inherent optical properties of the ocean: retrieval of the absorption coefficient of chromophoric dissolved organic matter from airborne laser spectral fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoge, Frank E.; Vodacek, Anthony; Swift, Robert N.; Yungel, James K.; Blough, Neil V.

    1995-10-01

    The absorption coefficient of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) at 355 nm has been retrieved from airborne laser-induced and water Raman-normalized CDOM fluorescence. Four combined airborne and ship field experiments have demonstrated that (1) the airborne CDOM fluorescence-to--water Raman ratio is linearly related to concurrent quinine-sulfate-standardized CDOM shipboard fluorescence measurements over a wide range of water masses (coastal to blue water); (2) the vicarious calibration of the airborne fluorosensor in units traceable to a fluorescence standard can be established and then maintained over an extended time period by tungsten lamp calibration; (3) the vicariously calibrated airborne CDOM fluorescence-to-water Raman ratio can be directly applied to previously developed

  20. Analyzing total optical absorption coefficient of impurity doped quantum dots in presence of noise with special emphasis on electric field, magnetic field and confinement potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Arkajit; Sarkar, Sucharita; Ghosh, Arghya Pratim; Ghosh, Manas

    2015-12-01

    We make an extensive investigation of total optical absorption coefficient (TOAC) of impurity doped quantum dots (QDs) in presence and absence of Gaussian white noise. The TOAC profiles have been monitored against incident photon energy with special emphasis on the roles played by the electric field, magnetic field, and the dot confinement potential. Presence of impurity also influences the TOAC profile. In general, presence of noise causes enhancement of TOAC over that of noise-free condition. However, the interplay between the noise and the quantities like electric field, magnetic field, confinement potential and impurity potential bring about rich subtleties in the TOAC profiles. The said subtleties are often manifested by the alterations in TOAC peak intensity, extent of TOAC peak bleaching, and value of saturation intensity. The findings reveal some technologically relevant aspects of TOAC for the doped QD systems, specially in presence of noise.

  1. Comparison of the light absorption coefficient and carbon measures for remote aerosols: An independent analysis of data from the IMPROVE network—I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, H. Dale

    Using the IMPROVE network aerosol data from rural or remote sites across the United States, the ratio of the optically measured light absorption coefficient ( σa) to the elemental carbon measured by Thermal/Optical Reflectance (TOR) analysis consistently indicates an absorption efficiency that is twice the accepted value of 10m 2g -1. Correlations between σa and the TOR carbon strongly suggest that the discrepancy is due to an underevaluation of light-absorbing carbon rather than to an overestimation of σa or a real, higher value of the absorption efficiency. In particular, past doubts about the accuracy and precision of the IMPROVE σa measurement are here shown to be unsupported by the IMPROVE data. The large empirical correction that is applied to this σa measurement, for multiple scattering effects due to filter mass loading, is given a new explanation as the effect of an increasing forward scattering fraction as sample thickness increases. The old explanation of shadowing by overlying particles in the sample is rejected as having just the opposite effect to that needed to explain the correction. The use of a diffuse source rather than a laser beam is indicated as a way to avoid the large empirical correction of σa. Modelling of the light absorption by TOR carbon measurements, at twelve remote sites over a wide portion of the western United States, suggests the following errors in the current interpretation of TOR analysis for these sites: (1) The pyrolysis correction, based upon optical reflectance monitoring, appears to be largely wrong; and (2) The carbon evolving between 450 and 550°C in a pure helium atmosphere, currently interpreted as organic and therefore non-light-absorbing, appears to be as strongly light-absorbing as elemental carbon. However, the present analysis indicates that for a large majority (˜90%) of samples the light-absorbing carbons, as reinterpreted herein, are not only measured accurately by TOR, they are also reasonably well

  2. An inversion model based on salinity and remote sensing reflectance for estimating the phytoplankton absorption coefficient in the Saint Lawrence Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes-Hugo, Martin; Xie, Huxiang

    2015-10-01

    The inversion of individual inherent optical properties (IOPs) is very challenging in optically complex waters and within the violet spectral range (i.e., 380-450 nm) due to the strong light attenuation caused by chromophoric dissolved organic matter, nonalgal particulates, and phytoplankton. Here we present a technique to better discriminate light absorption contributions due to phytoplankton based on a hybrid model (QAA-hybrid) that combines regional Saint Lawrence System estimates of IOPs derived from a quasi-analytical algorithm (hereafter QAA-SLE) and empirical relationships between salinity and IOPs. Preliminary results in the Saint Lawrence System during May 2000 and April 2001 showed that QAA-hybrid estimates of phytoplankton absorption coefficient at 443 nm have a smaller bias with respect to in situ measurements (root-mean-square deviation, RMSD = 0.156) than those derived from QAA-SLE (RMSD = 0.341). These results were valid for surface waters (i.e., 0-5 m depth) of the lower estuary with a salinity and chlorophyll-a concentration range of 22-28 psu and 2.1-13.8 mg m-3, respectively.

  3. Measurement of mass attenuation coefficients in some Cr, Co and Fe compounds around the absorption edge and the validity of the mixture rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turgut, U.; Simsek, O.; Büyükkasap, E.

    2007-08-01

    The total mass attenuation coefficients for elements Cr, Co and Fe and compounds CrCl_{2}, CrCl_{3}, Cr_{2}(SO_{4})_{3}K_{2}SO_{4}\\cdot24H_{2}O, CoO, CoCl_{2}, Co(CH_{3}COO)_{2}, FePO_{4}, FeCl_{3}\\cdot6H_{2}O, Fe(SO_{4})_{2}NH_{4}\\cdot12H_{2}O were measured at different energies between 4.508 and 14.142 keV using secondary excitation method. Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Br, Rb, Sr were chosen as secondary exciters. 59.5 keV γ-rays emitted from a ^{241}Am annular source were used to excite a secondary exciter and K_{α}(K-L_{3}, L_{2}) lines emitted by the secondary exciter were counted by a Si(Li) detector with a resolution of 160 eV at 5.9 keV. It was observed that mixture rule method is not a suitable method for determination of the mass attenuation coefficients of compounds, especially at an energy that is near the absorption edge. The obtained values were compared with theoretical values.

  4. Acoustical properties of highly porous fibrous materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    Highly porous, fibrous bulk sound absorbing materials are studied with a view toward understanding their acoustical properties and performance in a wide variety of applications including liners of flow ducts. The basis and criteria for decoupling of acoustic waves in the pores of the frame and compressional waves in the frame structure are established. The equations of motion are recast in a form that elucidates the coupling mechanisms. The normal incidence surface impedance and absorption coefficient of two types of Kevlar 29 and an open celled foam material are studied. Experimental values and theoretical results are brought into agreement when the structure factor is selected to provide a fit to the experimental data. A parametric procedure for achieving that fit is established. Both a bulk material quality factor and a high frequency impedance level are required to characterize the real and imaginary part of the surface impedance and absorption coefficient. A derivation of the concepts of equivalent density and dynamic resistance is presented.

  5. Effects of core position of locally resonant scatterers on low-frequency acoustic absorption in viscoelastic panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jie; Wen, Ji-Hong; Zhao, Hong-Gang; Yin, Jian-Fei; Yang, Hai-Bin

    2015-08-01

    Locally resonant sonic materials, due to their ability to control the propagation of low-frequency elastic waves, have become a promising option for underwater sound absorption materials. In this paper, the finite element method is used to investigate the absorption characteristics of a viscoelastic panel periodically embedded with a type of infinite-long non-coaxially cylindrical locally resonant scatterers (LRSs). The effect of the core position in the coating layer of the LRS on the low-frequency (500 Hz-3000 Hz) sound absorption property is investigated. With increasing the longitudinal core eccentricity e, there occur few changes in the absorptance at the frequencies below 1500 Hz, however, the absorptance above 1500 Hz becomes gradually better and the valid absorption (with absorptance above 0.8) frequency band (VAFB) of the viscoelastic panel becomes accordingly broader. The absorption mechanism is revealed by using the displacement field maps of the viscoelastic panel and the steel slab. The results show two typical resonance modes. One is the overall resonance mode (ORM) caused by steel backing, and the other is the core resonance mode (CRM) caused by LRS. The absorptance of the viscoelastic panel by ORM is induced mainly by the vibration of the steel slab and affected little by core position. On the contrary, with increasing the core eccentricity, the CRM shifts toward high frequency band and decouples with the ORM, leading to two separate absorption peaks and the broadened VAFB of the panel. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51275519).

  6. Diffusion coefficients significant in modeling the absorption rate of carbon dioxide into aqueous blends of N-methyldiethanolamine and diethanolamine and of hydrogen sulfide into aqueous N-methyldiethanolamine

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.E.; Marshall, T.L.; Rowley, R.L.

    1998-07-01

    Absorption rates of gaseous CO{sub 2} into aqueous blends of N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) and diethanolamine (DEA) and of gaseous H{sub 2}S into aqueous MDEA were measured in a quiescent, inverted-tube diffusiometer by monitoring the rate of pressure drop. A numerical model for absorption, diffusion, and reaction of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S in blends of MDEA, DEA, and water was developed. The model was used to regress diffusion coefficients of bicarbonate, carbamate, and MDEAH{sub 2}CO{sub 3} for the case of CO{sub 2} absorption and of bisulfide ion for the case of H{sub 2}S absorption from measured absorption rates. CO{sub 2} absorption rates and diffusion coefficients of bicarbonate, carbamate, and MDEAH{sub 2}CO{sub 3} were obtained at 298.2 K and 318.2 K in aqueous solutions containing 50 mass % total amine at DEA:MDEA mole ratios of 1:20, 1:4, 1L3, and 2:3. H{sub 2}S absorption rates and diffusion coefficients of bisulfide ion were obtained at 298.2 K and 318.2 K in aqueous solutions containing 20, 35, and 50 mass % MDEA.

  7. Theoretical requirements for broadband perfect absorption of acoustic waves by ultra-thin elastic meta-films

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Yuetao; Luo, Jie; Wang, Guanghao; Hang, Zhi Hong; Hou, Bo; Li, Jensen; Sheng, Ping; Lai, Yun

    2015-01-01

    We derive and numerically demonstrate that perfect absorption of elastic waves can be achieved in two types of ultra-thin elastic meta-films: one requires a large value of almost pure imaginary effective mass density and a free space boundary, while the other requires a small value of almost pure imaginary effective modulus and a hard wall boundary. When the pure imaginary density or modulus exhibits certain frequency dispersions, the perfect absorption effect becomes broadband, even in the low frequency regime. Through a model analysis, we find that such almost pure imaginary effective mass density with required dispersion for perfect absorption can be achieved by elastic metamaterials with large damping. Our work provides a feasible approach to realize broadband perfect absorption of elastic waves in ultra-thin films. PMID:26184117

  8. Aerosol absorption coefficient and Equivalent Black Carbon by parallel operation of AE31 and AE33 aethalometers at the Zeppelin station, Ny Ålesund, Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eleftheriadis, Konstantinos; Kalogridis, Athina-Cerise; Vratolis, Sterios; Fiebig, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Light absorbing carbon in atmospheric aerosol plays a critical role in radiative forcing and climate change. Despite the long term measurements across the Arctic, comparing data obtained by a variety of methods across stations requires caution. A method for extracting the aerosol absorption coefficient from data obtained over the decades by filter based instrument is still under development. An IASOA Aerosol working group has been initiated to address this and other cross-site aerosol comparison opportunities. Continuous ambient measurements of EBC/light attenuation by means of a Magee Sci. AE-31 aethalometer operating at the Zeppelinfjellet station (474 m asl; 78°54'N, 11°53'E), Ny Ålesund, Svalbard, have been available since 2001 (Eleftheriadis et al, 2009), while a new aethalometer model (AE33, Drinovec et al, 2014) has been installed to operate in parallel from the same inlet since June 2015. Measurements are recorded by a Labview routine collecting all available parameters reported by the two instrument via RS232 protocol. Data are reported at 1 and 10 minute intervals as averages for EBC (μg m-3) and aerosol absorption coefficients (Mm-1) by means of routine designed to report Near Real Time NRT data at the EBAS WDCA database (ebas.nilu.no) Results for the first 6 month period are reported here in an attempt to evaluate comparative performance of the two instruments in terms of their response with respect to the variable aerosol load of light absorbing carbon during the warm and cold seasons found in the high arctic. The application of available conversion schemes for obtaining the absorption coefficient by the two instruments is found to demonstrate a marked difference in their output. During clean periods of low aerosol load (EBC < 30 ng m-3), the two instruments display a better agreement with regression slope for the 880 nm signal between the two at ~ 0.9 compared to a slope at ~ 0.6 during the period of higher absorbing carbon loads (400< EBC<30 ng m

  9. Distinct effects of moisture and air contents on acoustic properties of sandy soil.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Takuya; Hiraguri, Yasuhiro; Okuzono, Takeshi

    2015-09-01

    Knowledge of distinct effects of moisture content and air volume on acoustic properties of soil is sought to predict the influence of human activities such as cultivation on acoustic propagation outdoors. This work used an impedance tube with the two-thickness method to investigate such effects. For a constant moisture weight percentage, the magnitude of the characteristic impedance became smaller and the absorption coefficient became higher with increase of the air space ratio. For a constant air space ratio, the absorption coefficient became larger and the magnitude of the propagation constant became smaller with increasing moisture weight percentage. PMID:26428823

  10. Acoustic properties of low growing plants.

    PubMed

    Horoshenkov, Kirill V; Khan, Amir; Benkreira, Hadj

    2013-05-01

    The plane wave normal incidence acoustic absorption coefficient of five types of low growing plants is measured in the presence and absence of soil. These plants are generally used in green living walls and flower beds. Two types of soil are considered in this work: a light-density, man-made soil and a heavy-density natural clay base soil. The absorption coefficient data are obtained in the frequency range of 50-1600 Hz using a standard impedance tube of diameter 100 mm. The equivalent fluid model for sound propagation in rigid frame porous media proposed by Miki [J. Acoust. Soc. Jpn. (E) 11, 25-28 (1990)] is used to predict the experimentally observed behavior of the absorption coefficient spectra of soils, plants, and their combinations. Optimization analysis is employed to deduce the effective flow resistivity and tortuosity of plants which are assumed to behave acoustically as an equivalent fluid in a rigid frame porous medium. It is shown that the leaf area density and dominant angle of leaf orientation are two key morphological characteristics which can be used to predict accurately the effective flow resistivity and tortuosity of plants. PMID:23654364

  11. Combination of acoustical radiosity and the image source method.

    PubMed

    Koutsouris, Georgios I; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Jacobsen, Finn

    2013-06-01

    A combined model for room acoustic predictions is developed, aiming to treat both diffuse and specular reflections in a unified way. Two established methods are incorporated: acoustical radiosity, accounting for the diffuse part, and the image source method, accounting for the specular part. The model is based on conservation of acoustical energy. Losses are taken into account by the energy absorption coefficient, and the diffuse reflections are controlled via the scattering coefficient, which defines the portion of energy that has been diffusely reflected. The way the model is formulated allows for a dynamic control of the image source production, so that no fixed maximum reflection order is required. The model is optimized for energy impulse response predictions in arbitrary polyhedral rooms. The predictions are validated by comparison with published measured data for a real music studio hall. The proposed model turns out to be promising for acoustic predictions providing a high level of detail and accuracy. PMID:23742350

  12. Evaluation of Compton attenuation and photoelectric absorption coefficients by convolution of scattering and primary functions and counts ratio on energy spectra

    PubMed Central

    Ashoor, Mansour; Asgari, Afrouz; Khorshidi, Abdollah; Rezaei, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Estimation of Compton attenuation and the photoelectric absorption coefficients were explored at various depths. Methods: A new method was proposed for estimating the depth based on the convolution of two exponential functions, namely convolution of scattering and primary functions (CSPF), which the convolved result will conform to the photopeak region of energy spectrum with the variable energy-window widths (EWWs) and a theory on the scattering cross-section. The triple energy-windows (TEW) and extended triple energy-windows scatter correction (ETEW) methods were used to estimate the scattered and primary photons according to the energy spectra at various depths due to a better performance than the other methods in nuclear medicine. For this purpose, the energy spectra were employed, and a distinct phantom along with a technetium-99 m source was simulated by Monte Carlo method. Results: The simulated results indicate that the EWW, used to calculate the scattered and primary counts in terms of the integral operators on the functions, was proportional to the depth as an exponential function. The depth will be calculated by the combination of either TEW or ETEW and proposed method resulting in the distinct energy-window. The EWWs for primary photons were in good agreement with those of scattered photons at the same as depths. The average errors between these windows for both methods TEW, and ETEW were 7.25% and 6.03% at different depths, respectively. The EWW value for functions of scattered and primary photons was reduced by increasing the depth in the CSPF method. Conclusions: This coefficient may be an index for the scattering cross-section. PMID:26170567

  13. Experimental determination of the absorption cross-section and molar extinction coefficient of CdSe and CdTe nanowires.

    PubMed

    Protasenko, Vladimir; Bacinello, Daniel; Kuno, Masaru

    2006-12-21

    Absorption cross-sections and corresponding molar extinction coefficients of solution-based CdSe and CdTe nanowires (NWs) are determined. Chemically grown semiconductor NWs are made via a recently developed solution-liquid-solid (SLS) synthesis, employing low melting Au/Bi bimetallic nanoparticle "catalysts" to induce one-dimensional (1D) growth. Resulting wires are highly crystalline and have diameters between 5 and 12 nm as well as lengths exceeding 10 microm. Narrow diameters, below twice the corresponding bulk exciton Bohr radius of each material, place CdSe and CdTe NWs within their respective intermediate to weak confinement regimes. Supporting this are solution linear absorption spectra of NW ensembles showing blue shifts relative to the bulk band gap as well as structure at higher energies. In the case of CdSe, the wires exhibit band edge emission as well as strong absorption/emission polarization anisotropies at the ensemble and single-wire levels. Analogous photocurrent polarization anisotropies have been measured in recently developed CdSe NW photodetectors. To further support fundamental NW optical/electrical studies as well as to promote their use in device applications, experimental absorption cross-sections are determined using correlated transmission electron microscopy, UV/visible extinction spectroscopy, and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. Measured CdSe NW cross-sections for 1 microm long wires (diameters, 6-42 nm) range from 6.93 x 10(-13) to 3.91 x 10(-11) cm2 at the band edge (692-715 nm, 1.73-1.79 eV) and between 3.38 x 10(-12) and 5.50 x 10(-11) cm2 at 488 nm (2.54 eV). Similar values are obtained for 1 microm long CdTe NWs (diameters, 7.5-11.5 nm) ranging from 4.32 x 10(-13) to 5.10 x 10(-12) cm2 at the band edge (689-752 nm, 1.65-1.80 eV) and between 1.80 x 10(-12) and 1.99 x 10(-11) cm2 at 2.54 eV. These numbers compare well with previous theoretical estimates of CdSe/CdTe NW cross-sections far to the blue of the

  14. Estimating surface acoustic impedance with the inverse method.

    PubMed

    Piechowicz, Janusz

    2011-01-01

    Sound field parameters are predicted with numerical methods in sound control systems, in acoustic designs of building and in sound field simulations. Those methods define the acoustic properties of surfaces, such as sound absorption coefficients or acoustic impedance, to determine boundary conditions. Several in situ measurement techniques were developed; one of them uses 2 microphones to measure direct and reflected sound over a planar test surface. Another approach is used in the inverse boundary elements method, in which estimating acoustic impedance of a surface is expressed as an inverse boundary problem. The boundary values can be found from multipoint sound pressure measurements in the interior of a room. This method can be applied to arbitrarily-shaped surfaces. This investigation is part of a research programme on using inverse methods in industrial room acoustics. PMID:21939599

  15. K-shell absorption jump factors and jump ratios in elements between Tm ( Z = 69) and Os ( Z = 76) derived from new mass attenuation coefficient measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, Necati; Tıraşoğlu, Engin; Apaydın, Gökhan; Aylıkcı, Volkan; Cengiz, Erhan

    2007-08-01

    The K-shell absorption jump factors and jump ratios were derived from new mass attenuation coefficients measured using an energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometer for Tm, Yb elements being Tm 2O 3, Yb 2O 3 compounds and pure Lu, Hf, Ta, W, Re and Os. The measurements, in the region 56-77 keV, were done in a transmission geometry utilizing the K α1 , K α2 , K β1 and K β2 X- rays from different secondary source targets (Yb, Ta, Os, W, Re and Ir, etc.) excited by the 123.6 keV γ-photons from an 57Co annular source and detected by an Ultra-LEGe solid state detector with a resolution of 150 eV at 5.9 keV. Experimental results have been compared with theoretically calculated values. The measured values of Tm, Yb, Lu, Hf, Ta, W, Re and Os are reported here for the first time.

  16. H + O3 Fourier-transform infrared emission and laser absorption studies of OH(X2Pi) radical - An experimental dipole moment function and state-to-state Einstein A coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, David D., Jr.; Schiffman, Aram; Nesbitt, David J.; Orlando, John J.; Burkholder, James B.

    1990-01-01

    FTIR emission/absorption spectroscopy is used to measure the relative intensities of 88 pairs of rovibrational transitions of OH(X2Pi) distributed over 16 vibrational bands. The experimental technique used to obtain the Einstein A ratios is discussed. The dipole moment function which follows from the intensity ratios along with Einstein A coefficients calculated from mu(r) is presented.

  17. A New Wave of Acoustics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyer, Robert

    1981-01-01

    Surveys 50 years of acoustical studies by discussing selected topics including the ear, nonlinear representations, underwater sound, acoustical diagnostics, absorption, electrolytes, phonons, magnetic interaction, and superfluidity and the five sounds. (JN)

  18. Acoustic and relaxation behaviors of polydimethylsiloxane studied by using brillouin and dielectric spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byoung Wan; Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Park, Jaehoon; Shin, Dong-Myeong; Hwang, Yoon-Hwae

    2016-04-01

    The temperature dependences of the acoustic properties and the dielectric relaxation times of polydimethylsiloxane were investigated by using high-resolution Brillouin and broadband dielectric spectroscopies. The longitudinal sound velocity showed a large increase upon approaching the glass transition temperature while the acoustic absorption coefficient exhibited a maximum at ~263 K. Comparison of these results with previous ultrasonic data revealed a substantial frequency dispersion of the acoustic properties of this silicone-based elastomer. The relaxation times derived from the acoustic absorption peaks were consistent with the temperature dependence of the dielectric relaxation time of the structural a process, indicating a strong coupling between the acoustic waves and the segmental motions of the main chains.

  19. Effect of Coversheet Materials on the Acoustic Performance of Melamine Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNelis, Anne M.; Hughes, William O.

    2015-01-01

    Melamine foam is a highly absorptive material that is often used inside the payload fairing walls of a launch vehicle. This foam reduces the acoustic excitation environment that the spacecraft experiences during launch. Often, the melamine foam is enclosed by thin coversheet materials for contamination protection, thermal protection, and electrostatic discharge control. Previous limited acoustic testing by NASA Glenn Research Center has shown that the presence of a coversheet material on the melamine foam can have a significant impact on the absorption coefficient and the transmission loss. As a result of this preliminary finding a more extensive acoustic test program using several different coversheet materials on melamine foam was performed. Those test results are summarized in this paper. Additionally, a method is provided to use the acoustic absorption and transmission loss data obtained from panel level testing to predict their combined effect for the noise reduction of a launch vehicle payload fairing.

  20. Absorption coefficients and frequency shifts measurement in the spectral range of 1071.88-1084.62 cm-1 vs. pressure for chlorodifluoromethane (CHClF2) using tunable CW CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Hawat, Sharif

    2013-02-01

    Infrared (IR) absorption in the spectral range of (1071.88-1084.62 cm-1) vs. pressure in chlorodifluoromethane (CFC-22, F-22, and CHClF2) was studied using a tunable continuous wave (CW) CO2 laser radiation on 9R branch lines with a maximum output power of about 2.12 W, provided with an absorber cell located outside the laser cavity. The absorption coefficients were determined vs. the gas pressure between 0.2 mbar and 170 mbar at lines from 9R branch for CFC-22. The frequency shifts of the absorption lines of CFC-22 in relative to the central frequencies of laser lines were calculated vs. the pressure on the basis of these absorption coefficients. The chosen lines were selected according to IR spectrum of the studied gas given by HITRAN cross section database. So the absorption was achieved for CFC-22 at the spectral lines of 9R branch situated from 9R (10) to 9R (30) emitted by a tunable CW CO2 laser. The absorption cross sections of CFC-22 determined in this work were compared with the relevant data given by HITRAN cross section database and a reasonable agreement was observed.

  1. A neural network-based four-band model for estimating the total absorption coefficients from the global oceanic and coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Cui, Tingwei; Quan, Wenting

    2015-01-01

    this study, a neural network-based four-band model (NNFM) for the global oceanic and coastal waters has been developed in order to retrieve the total absorption coefficients a(λ). The applicability of the quasi-analytical algorithm (QAA) and NNFM models is evaluated by five independent data sets. Based on the comparison of a(λ) predicted by these two models with the field measurements taken from the global oceanic and coastal waters, it was found that both the QAA and NNFM models had good performances in deriving a(λ), but that the NNFM model works better than the QAA model. The results of the QAA model-derived a(λ), especially in highly turbid waters with strong backscattering properties of optical activity, was found to be lower than the field measurements. The QAA and NNFM models-derived a(λ) could be obtained from the MODIS data after atmospheric corrections. When compared with the field measurements, the NNFM model decreased by a 0.86-24.15% uncertainty (root-mean-square relative error) of the estimation from the QAA model in deriving a(λ) from the Bohai, Yellow, and East China seas. Finally, the NNFM model was applied to map the global climatological seasonal mean a(443) for the time range of July 2002 to May 2014. As expected, the a(443) value around the coastal regions was always larger than the open ocean around the equator. Viewed on a global scale, the oceans at a high latitude exhibited higher a(443) values than those at a low latitude.

  2. The spectral absorption coefficient at 254 nm as a real-time early warning proxy for detecting faecal pollution events at alpine karst water resources.

    PubMed

    Stadler, H; Klock, E; Skritek, P; Mach, R L; Zerobin, W; Farnleitner, A H

    2010-01-01

    Because spring water quality from alpine karst aquifers can change very rapidly during event situations, water abstraction management has to be performed in near real-time. Four summer events (2005-2008) at alpine karst springs were investigated in detail in order to evaluate the spectral absorption coefficient at 254 nm (SAC254) as a real-time early warning proxy for faecal pollution. For the investigation Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) Satellite-based data communication between portable hydrometeorological measuring stations and an automated microbiological sampling device was used. The method for event triggered microbial sampling and analyzing was already established and described in a previous paper. Data analysis including on-line event characterisation (i.e. precipitation, discharge, turbidity, SAC254) and comprehensive E. coli determination (n>800) indicated that SAC254 is a useful early warning proxy. Irrespective of the studied event situations SAC254 always increased 3 to 6 hours earlier than the onset of faecal pollution, featuring different correlation phases. Furthermore, it seems also possible to use SAC254 as a real-time proxy parameter for estimating the extent of faecal pollution after establishing specific spring and event-type calibrations that take into consideration the variability of the occurrence and the transferability of faecal material It should be highlighted that diffuse faecal pollution from wildlife and live stock sources was responsible for spring water contamination at the investigated catchments. In this respect, the SAC254 can also provide useful information to support microbial source tracking efforts where different situations of infiltration have to be investigated. PMID:20962406

  3. A simplified physical model of pressure wave dynamics and acoustic wave generation induced by laser absorption in the retina.

    PubMed

    Till, S J; Milsom, P K; Rowlands, G

    2004-07-01

    Shock waves have been proposed in the literature as a mechanism for retinal damage induced by ultra-short laser pulses. For a spherical absorber, we derive a set of linear equations describing the propagation of pressure waves. We show that the formation of shock fronts is due to the form of the absorber rather than the inclusion of nonlinear terms in the equations. The analytical technique used avoids the need for a Laplace transform approach and is easily applied to other absorber profiles. Our analysis suggests that the 'soft' nature of the membrane surrounding retinal melanosomes precludes shock waves as a mechanism for the retinal damage induced by ultra-short pulse lasers. The quantitative estimates of the pressure gradients induced by laser absorption which are made possible by this work, together with detailed meso-scale or molecular modelling, will allow alternative damage mechanisms to be identified. PMID:15210319

  4. Absorption coefficient, transition probability, and collision-broadening frequency of dimethylether at He-Xe laser 3.51-micron wavelength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegman, A. E.; Wang, S. C.

    1970-01-01

    Absorptivity, transition probability and collision broadening frequency of dimethylether at 3.51 micron He-Xe laser wavelength, noting pressure dependence, transition lifetime and saturation intensity

  5. Biot theory and acoustical properties of high porosity fibrous materials and plastic foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allard, J.; Aknine, A.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental values of acoustic wave propagation constant and characteristic impedance in fibrous materials, and normal absorption for two plastic foams, were compared to theoretical predictions obtained with Biot's theory. The best agreement was observed for fibrous materials between Biot's theory and Delany and Bazley experiments for a nearly zero mass coupling parameter. For foams, the lambda/4 structure resonance effect on absorption was calculated by using four-pole modelling of the medium. A significant mass coupling parameter is then necessary for obtaining agreement between the behavior of the measured absorption coefficients and the theoretical predictions. It is shown how the formalism used for predicting foams absorption coefficients may be used for studying the acoustic behavior of multi-layered media.

  6. Prediction of sound absorption in rigid porous media with the lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Andrey Ricardo; Mareze, Paulo; Brandão, Eric

    2016-02-01

    In this work, sound absorption phenomena associated with the viscous shear stress within rigid porous media is investigated with a simple isothermal lattice Boltzmann BGK model. Simulations are conducted for different macroscopic material properties such as sample thickness and porosity and the results are compared with the exact analytical solution for materials with slit-like structure in terms of acoustic impedance and sound absorption coefficient. The numerical results agree very well with the exact solution, particularly for the sound absorption coefficient. The small deviations found in the low frequency limit for the real part of the acoustic impedance are attributed to the ratio between the thicknesses of the slit and the viscous boundary layer. The results suggest that the lattice Boltzmann method can be a very compelling numerical tool for simulating viscous sound absorption phenomena in the time domain, particularly due to its computational simplicity when compared to traditional continuum based techniques.

  7. A modified diffusion equation for room-acoustic predication.

    PubMed

    Jing, Yun; Xiang, Ning

    2007-06-01

    This letter presents a modified diffusion model using an Eyring absorption coefficient to predict the reverberation time and sound pressure distributions in enclosures. While the original diffusion model [Ollendorff, Acustica 21, 236-245 (1969); J. Picaut et al., Acustica 83, 614-621 (1997); Valeau et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 119, 1504-1513 (2006)] usually has good performance for low absorption, the modified diffusion model yields more satisfactory results for both low and high absorption. Comparisons among the modified model, the original model, a geometrical-acoustics model, and several well-established theories in terms of reverberation times and sound pressure level distributions, indicate significantly improved prediction accuracy by the modification. PMID:17552680

  8. A linear relationship between the Hall carrier concentration and the effective absorption coefficient measured by means of photothermal radiometry in IR semi-transparent n-type CdMgSe mixed crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlak, M.; Maliński, M.; Firszt, F.; Pelzl, J.; Ludwig, A.; Marasek, A.

    2014-03-01

    In this work we demonstrate the ability to measure the effective infrared absorption coefficient in semiconductors by a photothermal infrared radiometry (PTR) experiment, and its correlation with the Hall carrier concentration. The amplitude and phase of the PTR signal were measured for Cd1-xMgxSe mixed crystals, with the magnesium content varying from x = 0 to x = 0.15. The PTR experiments were performed at room temperature in thermal reflection and transmission configurations using a mercury cadmium telluride infrared detector. The PTR data were analyzed in the frame of the one-dimensional heat transport model for infrared semi-transparent crystals. Based on the variation of the normalized PTR phase and amplitude on the modulation frequency, the thermal diffusivity and the effective infrared absorption coefficient were obtained by fitting the theoretical expression to experimental data and compared with the Hall carrier concentration determined by supplementary Hall experiments. A linear relationship between the effective infrared absorption coefficient and the Hall carrier concentration was found which is explained in the frame of the Drude theory. The uncertainty of the measured slope was 6%. The value of the slope depends on (1) the sample IR absorption spectrum and (2) the spectral range of the infrared detector. It has to be pointed out that this method is suitable for use in an industrial environment for a fast and contactless carrier concentration measurement. This method can be used for the characterization of other semiconductors after a calibration procedure is carried out. In addition, the PTR technique yields information on the thermal properties in the same experiment.

  9. Acoustic simulations of Mudejar-Gothic churches.

    PubMed

    Galindo, Miguel; Zamarreño, Teófilo; Girón, Sara

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, an iterative process is used in order to estimate the values of absorption coefficients of those materials of which little is known in the literature, so that an acoustic simulation can be carried out in Mudejar-Gothic churches. The estimation of the scattering coefficients, which is even less developed, is based on the size of the irregularities. This methodology implemented is applied to six Mudejar-Gothic churches of Seville (southern Spain). The simulated monophonic acoustic parameters, both in the frequency domain and as a function of source-receiver distance (spatial distribution), are analyzed and compared with the in situ measures. Good agreement has been found between these sets of values, whereby each parameter is discussed in terms of the just noticeable difference. This procedure for existing buildings, especially for those which are rich in heritage, enables a reliable evaluation of the effect on the maintenance, restoration, and conditioning for new uses, as well as the recreation of the acoustic environment of ancient times. Along these lines, the acoustic influence of the timber roof and the presence of the public in these churches have also been studied. PMID:19739734

  10. Temperature Dependence of Surface Acoustic Wave Propagation Velocity in InxGa1-xN Films Obtained by High-Resolution Brillouin Spectroscopy: Determination of Temperature Coefficient of Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riobóo, Rafael J. Jiménez; Prieto, Carlos; Cuscó, Ramón; Artús, Lluís; Boney, Chris; Bensaoula, Abdelhak; Yamaguchi, Tomohiro; Nanishi, Yasushi

    2013-05-01

    Temperature-dependent surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagation velocity and temperature coefficient of frequency (TCF) have been determined for the first time in InxGa1-xN alloys by means of high-resolution Brillouin spectroscopy (HRBS). HRBS offers an alternative way of determining TCF. The obtained TCF values present a non-linear behavior with the In concentration. TCF of pure InN (-13.75 ppm/K) is similar to those of AlN and GaN (-19 and -17.7 ppm/K, respectively). InxGa1-xN samples exhibit frequency values that are very stable against temperature changes, which makes InxGa1-xN a good candidate for current SAW-based technological applications.

  11. Acoustic neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Vestibular schwannoma; Tumor - acoustic; Cerebellopontine angle tumor; Angle tumor ... Acoustic neuromas have been linked with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). Acoustic neuromas are uncommon.

  12. Semi-active control of piezoelectric coating's underwater sound absorption by combining design of the shunt impedances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yang; Li, Zhaohui; Huang, Aigen; Li, Qihu

    2015-10-01

    Piezoelectric shunt damping technology has been applied in the field of underwater sound absorption in recent years. In order to achieve broadband echo reduction, semi-active control of sound absorption of multi-layered piezoelectric coating by shunt damping is significant. In this paper, a practical method is proposed to control the underwater sound absorption coefficients of piezoelectric coating layers by combining design of the shunt impedance that allows certain sound absorption coefficients at setting frequencies. A one-dimensional electro-acoustic model of the piezoelectric coating and the backing is established based on the Mason equivalent circuit theory. First, the shunt impedance of the coating is derived under the constraint of sound absorption coefficient at one frequency. Then, taking the 1-3 piezoelectric composite coating as an example, the sound absorption properties of the coating shunted to the designed shunt impedance are investigated. Next, on the basis of that, an iterative method for two constrained frequencies and an optimizing algorithm for multiple constrained frequencies are provided for combining design of the shunt impedances. At last, an experimental sample with four piezoelectric material layers is manufactured, of which the sound absorption coefficients are measured in an impedance tube. The experimental results show good agreement with the finite element simulation results. It is proved that a serial R-L circuit can control the peak frequency, maximum and bandwidth of the sound absorption coefficient and the combining R-L circuits shunted to multiple layers can control the sound absorption coefficients at multiple frequencies.

  13. ABSORPTION OF p MODES BY THIN MAGNETIC FLUX TUBES

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Rekha; Hindman, Bradley W.; Braun, Doug C.; Birch, Aaron C.

    2009-04-10

    We study the interaction between p modes and the many magnetic fibrils that lace the solar convection zone. In particular, we investigate the resulting absorption of p-mode energy by the fibril magnetic field. Through mechanical buffeting, the p modes excite tube waves on the magnetic fibrils-in the form of longitudinal sausage waves and transverse kink waves. The tube waves propagate up and down the magnetic fibrils and out of the p-mode cavity, thereby removing energy from the incident acoustic waves. We compute the absorption coefficient associated with this damping mechanism and model the absorption that would be observed for magnetic plage. We compare our results to the absorption coefficient that is measured using the local-helioseismic technique of ridge-filtered holography. We find that, depending on the mode order and the photospheric boundary conditions, we can achieve absorption coefficients for simulated plage that exceed 50%. The observed increase of the absorption coefficient as a function of frequency is reproduced for all model parameters.

  14. Direct opto-acoustic in vitro measurement of the spatial distribution of laser radiation in biological media

    SciTech Connect

    Pelivanov, Ivan M; Belov, Sergej A; Solomatin, Vladimir S; Khokhlova, Tanya D; Karabutov, Aleksander A

    2006-12-31

    The problem of opto-acoustic (AO) diagnostics of light scattering and absorption in biological media is considered. The objects under study were milk, bovine and porcine liver, and bovine muscle tissue. The forward and backward schemes for recording acoustic signals were used in experiments. The spatial distribution of the light intensity was measured for each biological medium from the temporal profile of the excited OA pulse and the absorption coefficient and reduced scattering coefficient were determined. Opto-acoustic signals were excited by a 1064-nm pulsed Nd:YAG laser and a tunable Ti:sapphire laser at 779 nm. It is shown that the proposed method can be used for obtaining a priori information on a biological medium in problems of optical and AO tomography. (special issue devoted to multiple radiation scattering in random media)

  15. Linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients and refractive index changes in GaN/Al{sub x}Ga{sub (1−x)}N double quantum wells operating at 1.55 μm

    SciTech Connect

    Dakhlaoui, Hassen

    2015-04-07

    In the present paper, the linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients and refractive index changes between the ground and the first excited states in double GaN/Al{sub x}Ga{sub (1−x)}N quantum wells are studied theoretically. The electronic energy levels and their corresponding wave functions are obtained by solving Schrödinger-Poisson equations self-consistently within the effective mass approximation. The obtained results show that the optical absorption coefficients and refractive index changes can be red- and blue-shifted through varying the left quantum well width and the aluminum concentration x{sub b2} of the central barrier, respectively. These structural parameters are found to present optimum values for carrying out the transition of 0.8 eV (1.55 μm). Furthermore, we show that the desired transition can also be achieved by replacing the GaN in the left quantum well with Al{sub y}Ga{sub (1−y)}N and by varying the aluminum concentration y{sub Al}. The obtained results give a new degree of freedom in optoelectronic device applications such as optical fiber telecommunications operating at (1.55 μm)

  16. Intensities and self-broadening coefficients of the strongest water vapour lines in the 2.7 and 6.25 μm absorption bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptashnik, Igor V.; McPheat, Robert; Polyansky, Oleg L.; Shine, Keith P.; Smith, Kevin M.

    2016-07-01

    Intensities and self-broadening coefficients are presented for about 460 of the strongest water vapour lines in the spectral regions 1400-1840 cm-1 and 3440-3970 cm-1 at room temperature, obtained from rather unique measurements using a 5-mm-path-length cell. The retrieved spectral line parameters are compared with those in the HITRAN database ver. 2008 and 2012 and with recent ab-initio calculations. Both the retrieved intensities and half-widths are on average in reasonable agreement with those in HITRAN-2012. Maximum systematic differences do not exceed 4% for intensities (1600 cm-1 band) and 7% for self-broadening coefficients (3600 cm-1 band). For many lines however significant disagreements were detected with the HITRAN-2012 data, exceeding the average uncertainty of the retrieval. In addition, water vapour line parameters for 5300 cm-1 (1.9 μm) band reported by us in 2005 were also compared with HITRAN-2012, and show average differences of 4-5% for both intensities and half-widths.

  17. Dual-energy X-ray analysis using synchrotron computed tomography at 35 and 60 keV for the estimation of photon interaction coefficients describing attenuation and energy absorption.

    PubMed

    Midgley, Stewart; Schleich, Nanette

    2015-05-01

    A novel method for dual-energy X-ray analysis (DEXA) is tested using measurements of the X-ray linear attenuation coefficient μ. The key is a mathematical model that describes elemental cross sections using a polynomial in atomic number. The model is combined with the mixture rule to describe μ for materials, using the same polynomial coefficients. Materials are characterized by their electron density Ne and statistical moments Rk describing their distribution of elements, analogous to the concept of effective atomic number. In an experiment with materials of known density and composition, measurements of μ are written as a system of linear simultaneous equations, which is solved for the polynomial coefficients. DEXA itself involves computed tomography (CT) scans at two energies to provide a system of non-linear simultaneous equations that are solved for Ne and the fourth statistical moment R4. Results are presented for phantoms containing dilute salt solutions and for a biological specimen. The experiment identifies 1% systematic errors in the CT measurements, arising from third-harmonic radiation, and 20-30% noise, which is reduced to 3-5% by pre-processing with the median filter and careful choice of reconstruction parameters. DEXA accuracy is quantified for the phantom as the mean absolute differences for Ne and R4: 0.8% and 1.0% for soft tissue and 1.2% and 0.8% for bone-like samples, respectively. The DEXA results for the biological specimen are combined with model coefficients obtained from the tabulations to predict μ and the mass energy absorption coefficient at energies of 10 keV to 20 MeV. PMID:25931101

  18. The resonant absorption of p-modes by sunspots with twisted magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chitre, S. M.; Davila, Joseph M.

    1991-01-01

    A simplified inhomogeneous sunspot model with an axial current (twisted magnetic field) is considered. The absorption of incoming acoustic modes in a narrow resonance layer inside the sunspot flux tube is investigated, and the energy loss is estimated. For nonaxisymmetric modes the results are consistent with previous calculations. However, contrary to previous work, it is demonstrated that the existence of an azimuthal component of the magnetic field can lead to significant absorption of even the axisymmetric modes. If the absorption rate calculated in this paper is used in conjunction with the observed wavelength dependence of the absorption coefficient, it is found that the sunspot flux tube must have significant twist in the subsurface layers. Furthermore, the presence of twist in the magnetic field leads to a natural explanation for the observed dependence on m, the azimuthal wave mode number, and the magnitude of the absorption coefficient can be accounted for in a self-consistent way.

  19. EXTENSION OF THE INVERSE ADDING-DOUBLING METHOD TO THE MEASUREMENT OF WAVELENGTH-DEPENDENT ABSORPTION AND SCATTERING COEFFICIENTS OF BIOLOGICAL SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Allegood, M.S.; Baba, J.S.

    2008-01-01

    Light interaction with biological tissue can be described using three parameters: the scattering and absorption coeffi cients (μs and μa), as well as the anisotropy (g) which describes the directional dependence of the scattered photons. Accurately determining these optical properties for different tissue types at specifi c wavelengths simultaneously would be benefi cial for a variety of different biomedical applications. The goal of this project was to take a user defi ned g-value and determine the remaining two parameters for a specifi ed wavelength range. A fully automated computer program and process was developed to collect data for all wavelengths in a timely and accurate manner. LabVIEW® was used to write programs to automate raw intensity data collection from a spectrometer equipped integrating sphere, conversion of the data into a format for analysis via Scott Prahl’s Inverse Adding-Doubling (IAD) C code execution, and fi nally computation of the optical properties based on the output from the IAD code. To allow data to be passed effi ciently between LabVIEW® and C code program modules, the two were combined into a single program (OPT 3.1). OPT 3.1 was tested using tissue mimicking phantoms. Determination of the absorption and scattering coeffi cients showed excellent agreement with theory for wavelengths where the user inputted single g-value was suffi ciently precise. Future improvements entail providing for multi-wavelength g-value entry to extend the accuracy of results to encompass the complete multispectral range. Ultimately, the data collection process and algorithms developed through this effort will be used to examine actual biological tissues for the purpose of building and refi ning models for light-tissue interactions.

  20. Unusually high sound absorption in topological interlocking materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrin, Yuri; Molotnikov, Andrey; Carlesso, Mateus

    2015-04-01

    Topological interlocking materials are a new class of architectured materials, which have a range of unusual mechanical and acoustic properties. We present a novel approach for combating noise pollution based on the concept of topological interlocking. Specifically, we propose to segment monolithic plates into an assembly of topologically interlocked building blocks and show experimentally that this leads to a spectacular increase of the sound absorption coefficient over that in the original material, as exemplified by ceramics. Measurements of the airflow resistance confirmed the primary role of segmentation in enhancing sound absorption capability of the material in the audible frequency range. The absorption coefficient was further boosted by design of the material itself. The new material design proposed poses some interesting challenges to theory of sound wave propagation in heterogeneous media.

  1. Analysis of Sabine and Eyring equations and their application to concert hall audience and chair absorption.

    PubMed

    Beranek, Leo L

    2006-09-01

    Historically, two equations have been used for predicting reverberation times, Sabine and Eyring. A precise means is presented for determining Eyring absorption coefficients alpha(eyring) when the Sabine coefficients alpha(sabine) are known, and vice versa. Thus, either formula can be used provided the absorption coefficients for the Sabine formula are allowed to exceed 1.0. The Sabine formula is not an approximation to the Eyring equation and is not a shortcoming. Given low reverberation times, the ratio of alpha(sabine) to alpha(eyring) may become greater than 2.0. It is vital that, for correct prediction of reverberation times, the absorption coefficients used in either formula must have been determined in spaces similar in size and shape, with similar locations of high absorption (audience) areas, and with similar reverberation times. For concert halls, it is found that, when the audience area (fully occupied) and midfrequency reverberation time are postulated, the hall volume is directly proportional to the audience absorption coefficient. Approximately 6% greater room volumes are needed when choosing nonrectangular versus classical-rectangular shaped halls and approximately 10% greater volumes when choosing heavily upholstered versus medium upholstered chairs. Determinations of audience sound absorption coefficients are presented, based on published acoustical and architectural data for 20 halls. PMID:17004464

  2. Taking advantage of acoustic inhomogeneities in photoacoustic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Silva, Anabela; Handschin, Charles; Riedinger, Christophe; Piasecki, Julien; Mensah, Serge; Litman, Amélie; Akhouayri, Hassan

    2016-03-01

    Photoacoustic offers promising perspectives in probing and imaging subsurface optically absorbing structures in biological tissues. The optical uence absorbed is partly dissipated into heat accompanied with microdilatations that generate acoustic pressure waves, the intensity which is related to the amount of fluuence absorbed. Hence the photoacoustic signal measured offers access, at least potentially, to a local monitoring of the absorption coefficient, in 3D if tomographic measurements are considered. However, due to both the diffusing and absorbing nature of the surrounding tissues, the major part of the uence is deposited locally at the periphery of the tissue, generating an intense acoustic pressure wave that may hide relevant photoacoustic signals. Experimental strategies have been developed in order to measure exclusively the photoacoustic waves generated by the structure of interest (orthogonal illumination and detection). Temporal or more sophisticated filters (wavelets) can also be applied. However, the measurement of this primary acoustic wave carries a lot of information about the acoustically inhomogeneous nature of the medium. We propose a protocol that includes the processing of this primary intense acoustic wave, leading to the quantification of the surrounding medium sound speed, and, if appropriate to an acoustical parametric image of the heterogeneities. This information is then included as prior knowledge in the photoacoustic reconstruction scheme to improve the localization and quantification.

  3. Transverse-Mode Spurious Suppression Technique for Surface Acoustic Wave Resonator with Zero Temperature Coefficient of Frequency on a SiO2/Al/LiNbO3 Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, Hidekazu; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Tsurunari, Tetsuya; Fujiwara, Joji; Hamaoka, Yosuke; Hashimoto, Ken-ya

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we describe a suppression technique of transverse-mode spurious responses for a surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonator with a near zero temperature coefficient of frequency (TCF) on a SiO2/Al/LiNbO3 structure. We investigated the thinning of SiO2 on the dummy electrode region and studied how the transverse-mode responses change with remaining SiO2 thickness h on the dummy electrode region. As the results, we clarified that the remaining SiO2 thickness h on the dummy electrode region has an optimum value and could suppress the transverse-mode spurious responses completely when H and h are set at 0.35 λ and 0.20 λ, respectively. It was demonstrated that the selective SiO2 removal technique is effective to suppress transverse-mode spurious responses for SAW resonators employing the SiO2/Al/LiNbO3 structure for a wide range of SiO2 thicknesses, provided that the SiO2 thickness at the dummy electrode region is adjusted properly.

  4. 40 CFR 796.1050 - Absorption in aqueous solution: Ultraviolet/visible spectra.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... by both molar absorption coefficient (molar extinction coefficient) and band width. However, the..., expressed in cm; and the molar absorption (extinction) coefficient,εi, of each species. The...

  5. 40 CFR 796.1050 - Absorption in aqueous solution: Ultraviolet/visible spectra.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... by both molar absorption coefficient (molar extinction coefficient) and band width. However, the..., expressed in cm; and the molar absorption (extinction) coefficient,εi, of each species. The...

  6. 40 CFR 796.1050 - Absorption in aqueous solution: Ultraviolet/visible spectra.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... by both molar absorption coefficient (molar extinction coefficient) and band width. However, the..., expressed in cm; and the molar absorption (extinction) coefficient,εi, of each species. The...

  7. 40 CFR 796.1050 - Absorption in aqueous solution: Ultraviolet/visible spectra.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... by both molar absorption coefficient (molar extinction coefficient) and band width. However, the..., expressed in cm; and the molar absorption (extinction) coefficient,εi, of each species. The...

  8. 40 CFR 796.1050 - Absorption in aqueous solution: Ultraviolet/visible spectra.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... by both molar absorption coefficient (molar extinction coefficient) and band width. However, the..., expressed in cm; and the molar absorption (extinction) coefficient,εi, of each species. The...

  9. Evaluation of time-resolved multi-distance methods to retrieve absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of adult heads in vivo: Optical parameters dependences on geometrical structures of the models used to calculate reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanifuji, T.

    2016-03-01

    Time-resolved multi-distance measurements are studied to retrieve absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of adult heads, which have enough depth sensitivity to determine the optical parameters in superficial tissues and brain separately. Measurements were performed by putting the injection and collection fibers on the left semi-sphere of the forehead, with the injection fiber placed toward the temporal region, and by moving the collection fiber between 10 and 60 mm from the central sulcus. It became clear that optical parameters of the forehead at all collection fibers were reasonably determined by selecting the appropriate visibility length of the geometrical head models, which is related to head surface curvature at each position.

  10. Experimental investigation of chair type, row spacing, occupants, and carpet on theatre chair absorption.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young-Ji; Bradley, John S; Jeong, Dae-Up

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines how the individual variations of chair type, row spacing, as well as the presence of occupants and carpet, combine to influence the absorption characteristics of theater chairs as a function of sample perimeter-to-area (P/A) ratios. Scale models were used to measure the interactive effects of the four test variables on the chair absorption characteristics, avoiding the practical difficulties of full scale measurements. All of the test variables led to effects that could lead to important changes to auditorium acoustics conditions. At mid and higher frequencies, the various effects can usually be explained as due to, more or less, porous absorbing material. In the 125 and 250 Hz octave bands, the major changes were attributed to resonant absorbing mechanisms. The results indicate that for accurate predictions of the effective absorption of the chairs in an auditorium, one should use the P/A method and reverberation chamber tests of the chair absorption coefficients to predict the absorption coefficients of each block of chairs and use these results as input in a room acoustics computer model of the auditorium. The application of these results to auditorium acoustics design is described, more approximate approaches are considered, and relations to existing methods are discussed. PMID:25618043

  11. The emission coefficient of uranium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, R. T.; Campbell, H. D.; Mack, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    The emission coefficient for uranium plasmas (Temperature: 8000 K) was measured for the wavelength range (200 A - 6000 A). The results are compared to theory and other measurements. The absorption coefficient for the same wavelength interval is also given.

  12. Three-axis acoustic device for levitation of droplets in an open gas stream and its application to examine sulfur dioxide absorption by water droplets.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Terrance L; Budwig, Ralph S

    2007-01-01

    Two acoustic devices to stabilize a droplet in an open gas stream (single-axis and three-axis levitators) have been designed and tested. The gas stream was provided by a jet apparatus with a 64 mm exit diameter and a uniform velocity profile. The acoustic source used was a Langevin vibrator with a concave reflector. The single-axis levitator relied primarily on the radial force from the acoustic field and was shown to be limited because of significant droplet wandering. The three-axis levitator relied on a combination of the axial and radial forces. The three-axis levitator was applied to examine droplet deformation and circulation and to investigate the uptake of SO(2) from the gas stream to the droplet. Droplets ranging in diameters from 2 to 5 mm were levitated in gas streams with velocities up to 9 ms. Droplet wandering was on the order of a half droplet diameter for a 3 mm diameter droplet. Droplet circulation ranged from the predicted Hadamard-Rybczynski pattern to a rotating droplet pattern. Droplet pH over a central volume of the droplet was measured by planar laser induced fluorescence. The results for the decay of droplet pH versus time are in general agreement with published theory and experiments. PMID:17503939

  13. A study of sound absorption by street canyon boundaries and asphalt rubber concrete pavement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drysdale, Graeme Robert

    A sound field model, based on a classical diffusion equation, is extended to account for sound absorption in a diffusion parameter used to model sound energy in a narrow street canyon. The model accounts for a single sound absorption coefficient, separate accommodation coefficients and a combination of separate absorption and accommodation coefficients from parallel canyon walls. The new expressions are compared to the original formula through numerical simulations to reveal the effect of absorption on sound diffusion. The newly established analytical formulae demonstrate satisfactory agreement with their predecessor under perfect reflection. As well, the influence of the extended diffusion parameter on normalized sound pressure levels in a narrow street canyon is in agreement with experimental data. The diffusion parameters are used to model sound energy density in a street canyon as a function of the sound absorption coefficient of the street canyon walls. The acoustic and material properties of conventional and asphalt rubber concrete (ARC) pavement are also studied to assess how the crumb rubber content influences sound absorption in street canyons. The porosity and absolute permeability of compacted specimens of asphalt rubber concrete are measured and compared to their normal and random incidence sound absorption coefficients as a function of crumb rubber content in the modified binder. Nonlinear trends are found between the sound absorption coefficients, porosity and absolute permeability of the compacted specimens and the percentage of crumb rubber in the modified binders. The cross-sectional areas of the air voids on the surfaces of the compacted specimens are measured using digital image processing techniques and a linear relationship is obtained between the average void area and crumb rubber content. The measured material properties are used to construct an empirical formula relating the average porosity, normal incidence noise reduction coefficients and

  14. Hierarchical Assembly of Tungsten Spheres and Epoxy Composites in Three-Dimensional Graphene Foam and Its Enhanced Acoustic Performance as a Backing Material.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yunfeng; Liu, Jingjing; Lu, Yue; Zhang, Rui; Cao, Wenwu; Hu, PingAn

    2016-07-20

    Backing materials play important role in enhancing the acoustic performance of an ultrasonic transducer. Most backing materials prepared by conventional methods failed to show both high acoustic impedance and attenuation, which however determine the bandwidth and axial resolution of acoustic transducer, respectively. In the present work, taking advantage of the structural feature of 3D graphene foam as a confined space for dense packing of tungsten spheres with the assistance of centrifugal force, the desired structural requirement for high impedance is obtained. Meanwhile, superior thermal conductivity of graphene contributes to the acoustic attenuation via the conversion of acoustic waves to thermal energy. The tight contact between tungstate spheres, epoxy matrix, or graphene makes the acoustic wave depleted easily for the absence of air barrier. The as-prepared 3DG/W80 wt %/epoxy film in 1 mm, prepared using ∼41 μm W spheres in diameter, not only displays acoustic impedance of 13.05 ± 0.11 MRayl but also illustrates acoustic attenuation of 110.15 ± 1.23 dB/cm MHz. Additionally, the composite film exhibits a high acoustic absorption coefficient, which is 94.4% at 1 MHz and 100% at 3 MHz, respectively. Present composite film outperforms most of the reported backing materials consisting of metal fillers/polymer blending in terms of the acoustic impedance and attenuation. PMID:27352024

  15. Hydroxyl radical reaction rate coefficients as a function of temperature and IR absorption cross sections for CF3CH=CH2 (HFO-1243zf), potential replacement of CF3CH2F (HFC-134a).

    PubMed

    González, Sergio; Jiménez, Elena; Ballesteros, Bernabé; Martínez, Ernesto; Albaladejo, José

    2015-04-01

    CF3CH=CH2 (hydrofluoroolefin, HFO-1243zf) is a potential replacement of high global-warming potential (GWP) hydrofluorocarbon (HFC-134a, CF3CFH2). Both the atmospheric lifetime and the radiative efficiency of HFO-1243zf are parameters needed for estimating the GWP of this species. Therefore, the aim of this work is (i) to estimate the atmospheric lifetime of HFO-1243zf from the reported OH rate coefficients, k OH, determined under tropospheric conditions and (ii) to calculate its radiative efficiency from the reported IR absorption cross sections. The OH rate coefficient at 298 K also allows the estimation of the photochemical ozone creation potential (ε(POCP)). The pulsed laser photolysis coupled to a laser-induced fluorescence technique was used to determine k OH for the reaction of OH radicals with HFO-1243zf as a function of pressure (50-650 Torr of He) and temperature (263-358 K). Gas-phase IR spectra of HFO-1243zf were recorded at room temperature using a Fourier transform IR spectrometer between 500 and 4,000 cm(-1). At all temperatures, k OH did not depend on bath gas concentration (i.e., on the total pressure between 50 and 650 Torr of He). A slight but noticeable T dependence of k OH was observed in the temperature range investigated. The observed behavior is well described by the following Arrhenius expression: k OH(T) = (7.65 ± 0.26) × 10(-13) exp [(165 ± 10) / T] cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). Negligible IR absorption of HFO-1243zf was observed at wavenumbers greater than 1,700 cm(-1). Therefore, IR absorption cross sections, [Formula: see text], were determined in the 500-1,700 cm(-1) range. Integrated [Formula: see text] were determined between 650 and 1,800 cm(-1) for comparison purposes. The main diurnal removal pathway for HFO-1243zf is the reaction with OH radicals, which accounts for 64% of the overall loss by homogeneous reactions at 298 K. Globally, the lifetime due to OH reaction (τ OH) was estimated to be 8.7 days under

  16. Acoustic cooling engine

    DOEpatents

    Hofler, Thomas J.; Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1988-01-01

    An acoustic cooling engine with improved thermal performance and reduced internal losses comprises a compressible fluid contained in a resonant pressure vessel. The fluid has a substantial thermal expansion coefficient and is capable of supporting an acoustic standing wave. A thermodynamic element has first and second ends and is located in the resonant pressure vessel in thermal communication with the fluid. The thermal response of the thermodynamic element to the acoustic standing wave pumps heat from the second end to the first end. The thermodynamic element permits substantial flow of the fluid through the thermodynamic element. An acoustic driver cyclically drives the fluid with an acoustic standing wave. The driver is at a location of maximum acoustic impedance in the resonant pressure vessel and proximate the first end of the thermodynamic element. A hot heat exchanger is adjacent to and in thermal communication with the first end of the thermodynamic element. The hot heat exchanger conducts heat from the first end to portions of the resonant pressure vessel proximate the hot heat exchanger. The hot heat exchanger permits substantial flow of the fluid through the hot heat exchanger. The resonant pressure vessel can include a housing less than one quarter wavelength in length coupled to a reservoir. The housing can include a reduced diameter portion communicating with the reservoir. The frequency of the acoustic driver can be continuously controlled so as to maintain resonance.

  17. Theoretical analysis of the sound absorption characteristics of periodically stiffened micro-perforated plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hai-An; Wang, Xiao-Ming; Mei, Yu-Lin

    2014-10-01

    The vibro-acoustic responses and sound absorption characteristics of two kinds of periodically stiffened micro-perforated plates are analyzed theoretically. The connected periodical structures of the stiffened plates can be ribs or block-like structures. Based on fundamental acoustic formulas of the micro-perforated plate of Maa and Takahashi, semi-analytical models of the vibrating stiffened plates are developed in this paper. Approaches like the space harmonicmethod, Fourier transforms and finite elementmethod (FEM) are adopted to investigate both kinds of the stiffened plates. In the present work, the vibro-acoustic responses of micro-perforated stiffened plates in the wavenumber space are expressed as functions of plate displacement amplitudes. After approximate numerical solutions of the amplitudes, the vibration equations and sound absorption coefficients of the two kinds of stiffened plates in the physical space are then derived by employing the Fourier inverse transform. In numerical examples, the effects of some physical parameters, such as the perforation ratio, incident angles and periodical distances etc., on the sound absorption performance are examined. The proposed approaches are also validated by comparing the present results with solutions of Takahashi and previous studies of stiffened plates. Numerical results indicate that the flexural vibration of the plate has a significant effect on the sound absorption coefficient in the water but has little influence in the air.

  18. Development of an analytical solution of modified Biot's equations for the optimization of lightweight acoustic protection.

    PubMed

    Kanfoud, Jamil; Ali Hamdi, Mohamed; Becot, François-Xavier; Jaouen, Luc

    2009-02-01

    During lift-off, space launchers are submitted to high-level of acoustic loads, which may damage sensitive equipments. A special acoustic absorber has been previously integrated inside the fairing of space launchers to protect the payload. A new research project has been launched to develop a low cost fairing acoustic protection system using optimized layers of porous materials covered by a thin layer of fabric. An analytical model is used for the analysis of acoustic wave propagation within the multilayer porous media. Results have been validated by impedance tube measurements. A parametric study has been conducted to determine optimal mechanical and acoustical properties of the acoustic protection under dimensional thickness constraints. The effect of the mounting conditions has been studied. Results reveal the importance of the lateral constraints on the absorption coefficient particularly in the low frequency range. A transmission study has been carried out, where the fairing structure has been simulated by a limp mass layer. The transmission loss and noise reduction factors have been computed using Biot's theory and the local acoustic impedance approximation to represent the porous layer effect. Comparisons between the two models show the frequency domains for which the local impedance model is valid. PMID:19206863

  19. Aerosol Absorption Measurements in MILAGRO.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Arnott, W. P.; Paredes-Miranda, L.; Barnard, J. C.

    2007-12-01

    to carbonyl- and nitro- functional groups on conjugated and aromatic organic structures (e.g. PAH, and terpene derived products). Using 12-hour fine (0.1-1.0 micron) aerosol samples collected in the field on quartz filters, uv/vis and infrared spectra were obtained in the laboratory using integrating spheres and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, respectively. An inter-comparison of the "real-time" measurements made by the photo-acoustic, aethalometer and MAAP techniques have been described. In addition, the in situ aethalometer (seven-channel) results are compared with continuous integrating sphere uv-visible spectra to examine the angstrom absorption coefficient variance. These results will be briefly overviewed and the specific posters detailing these results will be highlighted highlighted. This work was performed as part of the Department of Energy's Megacity Aerosol Experiment - Mexico City under the support of the Atmospheric Science Program. "This researchwas supported by the Office of Science (BER), U. S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64329.

  20. Experimental investigation of sound absorption properties of perforated date palm fibers panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elwaleed, A. K.; Nikabdullah, N.; Nor, M. J. M.; Tahir, M. F. M.; Zulkifli, R.

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents the sound absorption properties of a natural waste of date palm fiber perforated panel. A single layer of the date palm fibers was tested in this study for its sound absorption properties. The experimental measurements were carried out using impedance tube at the acoustic lab, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia. The experiment was conducted for the panel without air gap, with air gap and with perforated plate facing. Three air gap thicknesses of 10 mm, 20 mm and 30 mm were used between the date palm fiber sample and the rigid backing of the impedance tube. The results showed that when facing the palm date fiber sample with perforated plate the sound absorption coefficient improved at the higher and lower frequency ranges. This increase in sound absorption coincided with reduction in medium frequency absorption. However, this could be improved by using different densities or perforated plate with the date palm fiber panel.

  1. Acoustic Test Characterization of Melamine Foam for Usage in NASA's Payload Fairing Acoustic Attenuation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Anne M.; McNelis, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    The external acoustic liftoff levels predicted for NASA's future heavy lift launch vehicles are expected to be significantly higher than the environment created by today's commercial launch vehicles. This creates a need to develop an improved acoustic attenuation system for future NASA payload fairings. NASA Glenn Research Center initiated an acoustic test series to characterize the acoustic performance of melamine foam, with and without various acoustic enhancements. This testing was denoted as NEMFAT, which stands for NESC Enhanced Melamine Foam Acoustic Test, and is the subject of this paper. Both absorption and transmission loss testing of numerous foam configurations were performed at the Riverbank Acoustical Laboratory in July 2013. The NEMFAT test data provides an initial acoustic characterization and database of melamine foam for NASA. Because of its acoustic performance and lighter mass relative to fiberglass blankets, melamine foam is being strongly considered for use in the acoustic attenuation systems of NASA's future launch vehicles.

  2. Two-Phonon Absorption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, M. W.

    2007-01-01

    A nonlinear aspect of the acousto-optic interaction that is analogous to multi-photon absorption is discussed. An experiment is described in which the second-order acousto-optically scattered intensity is measured and found to scale with the square of the acoustic intensity. This experiment using a commercially available acousto-optic modulator is…

  3. An environmental and economical solution to sound absorption using straw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGinnes, Courtney; Kleiner, Mendel; Xiang, Ning

    2005-09-01

    The growing attentiveness to using environmentally friendly materials in the building construction industry as a whole has led many architects to research the use of natural materials. Natural fibers, such as straw, are advantageous due to their accessibility, ease of processing, and their ability to be discarded with a lesser environmental impact through biodegradability. While the material focus may have shifted, the need for quality acoustic environments has remained the same. In a set of preliminary studies, the absorption coefficients of sound absorbers using natural fibers have been proven to have comparable values relative to other highly absorptive, nonenvironmentally friendly materials such as mineral wool and fiberglass. The absorption coefficients were evaluated for octave and third-octave frequencies (125 to 4000 Hz) using the impedance tube method with one microphone. While these absorbers may be acoustically effective as well as environmentally friendly, there may be potential concerns in using natural fibers such as their life span, fire rating, and potential health risks, i.e., disposal techniques, allergenic reactions, and insect and fungus infestation.

  4. Acoustic bubble removal method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Elleman, D. D.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for removing bubbles from a liquid bath such as a bath of molten glass to be used for optical elements. Larger bubbles are first removed by applying acoustic energy resonant to a bath dimension to drive the larger bubbles toward a pressure well where the bubbles can coalesce and then be more easily removed. Thereafter, submillimeter bubbles are removed by applying acoustic energy of frequencies resonant to the small bubbles to oscillate them and thereby stir liquid immediately about the bubbles to facilitate their breakup and absorption into the liquid.

  5. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. ... can press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the ...

  6. Comparison between design and installed acoustic characteristics of NASA Lewis 9- by 15-foot low-speed wind tunnel acoustic treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.; Woodward, Richard P.

    1990-01-01

    The test section of the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel was acoustically treated to allow the measurement of sound under simulated free-field conditions. The treatment was designed for high sound absorption at frequencies above 250 Hz and for withstanding the environmental conditions in the test section. In order to achieve the design requirements, a fibrous, bulk-absorber material was packed into removable panel sections. Each section was divided into two equal-depth layers packed with material to different bulk densities. The lower density was next to the facing of the treatment. The facing consisted of a perforated plate and screening material layered together. Sample tests for normal-incidence acoustic absorption were also conducted in an impedance tube to provide data to aid in the treatment design. Tests with no airflow, involving the measurement of the absorptive properties of the treatment installed in the 9- by 15-foot wind tunnel test section, combined the use of time-delay spectrometry with a previously established free-field measurement method. This new application of time-delay spectrometry enabled these free-field measurements to be made in nonanechoic conditions. The results showed that the installed acoustic treatment had absorption coefficients greater than 0.95 over the frequency range 250 Hz to 4 kHz. The measurements in the wind tunnel were in good agreement with both the analytical prediction and the impedance tube test data.

  7. Acoustic Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  8. Acoustic seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  9. Acoustic power absorption and enhancement generated by slow and fast MHD waves. Evidence of solar cycle velocity/intensity amplitude changes consistent with the mode conversion theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoniello, R.; Finsterle, W.; García, R. A.; Salabert, D.; Jiménez, A.; Elsworth, Y.; Schunker, H.

    2010-06-01

    We used long duration, high quality, unresolved (Sun-as-a star) observations collected by the ground based network BiSON and by the instruments GOLF and VIRGO on board the ESA/NASA SOHO satellite to search for solar-cycle-related changes in mode characteristics in velocity and continuum intensity for the frequency range between 2.5 mHz <ν< 6.8 mHz. Over the ascending phase of solar cycle 23 we found a suppression in the p-mode amplitudes both in the velocity and intensity data between 2.5 mHz <ν< 4.5 mHz with a maximum suppression for frequencies in the range between 2.5 mHz <ν< 3.5 mHz. The size of the amplitude suppression is 13 ± 2 per cent for the velocity and 9 ± 2 per cent for the intensity observations. Over the range of 4.5 mHz <ν< 5.5 mHz the findings hint within the errors to a null change both in the velocity and intensity amplitudes. At still higher frequencies, in the so called High-frequency Interference Peaks (HIPs) between 5.8 mHz <ν< 6.8 mHz, we found an enhancement in the velocity amplitudes with the maximum 36 ± 7 per cent occurring for 6.3 mHz <ν< 6.8 mHz. However, in intensity observations we found a rather smaller enhancement of about 5 ± 2 per cent in the same interval. There is evidence that the frequency dependence of solar-cycle velocity amplitude changes is consistent with the theory behind the mode conversion of acoustic waves in a non-vertical magnetic field, but there are some problems with the intensity data, which may be due to the height in the solar atmosphere at which the VIRGO data are taken.

  10. Theoretical Consolidation of Acoustic Dissipation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casiano, M. J.; Zoladz, T. F.

    2012-01-01

    In many engineering problems, the effects of dissipation can be extremely important. Dissipation can be represented by several parameters depending on the context and the models that are used. Some examples of dissipation-related parameters are damping ratio, viscosity, resistance, absorption coefficients, pressure drop, or damping rate. This Technical Memorandum (TM) describes the theoretical consolidation of the classic absorption coefficients with several other dissipation parameters including linearized resistance. The primary goal of this TM is to theoretically consolidate the linearized resistance with the absorption coefficient. As a secondary goal, other dissipation relationships are presented.

  11. Topological Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Zhen; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-03-01

    The manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as "topological edge states," has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers.

  12. Topological acoustics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Zhen; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-03-20

    The manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as "topological edge states," has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers. PMID:25839273

  13. Acoustic neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Vestibular schwannoma; Tumor - acoustic; Cerebellopontine angle tumor; Angle tumor ... 177. Battista RA. Gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma. Otolaryngol Clin North Am . 2009;42:635-654. ...

  14. Reflection properties of gravito-acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanović, Gordana

    2016-03-01

    We derive the dispersion equation for gravito-acoustic waves in an isothermal gravitationally stratified nonmagnetized atmosphere. In this model, with constant sound speed, it is possible to derive analytically the equations for gravito-acoustic waves. The large value of the viscous Reynolds number in the solar atmosphere imply that the dissipative terms in HD (hydrodynamics) equations are negligible. We consider the plane boundary z = 0 between two isothermal atmosphere regions and using the boundary conditions we derive the equation for the reflection coeffcient of gravito-acoustic waves. For the frequencies much greater than acoustic cutoff frequency, the reflection coefficient of the acoustic waves modified by gravity is the same as in the case of the pure acoustic waves. Reflection coefficient for the gravity waves is very high, R ≈ 1.

  15. Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Merlino, Robert L.

    2009-11-10

    A historical overview of some of the early theoretical and experimental work on dust acoustic waves is given. The basic physics of the dust acoustic wave and some of the theoretical refinements that have been made, including the effects of collisions, plasma absorption, dust charge fluctuations, particle drifts and strong coupling effects are discussed. Some recent experimental findings and outstanding problems are also presented.

  16. Musical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, Colin

    This chapter provides an introduction to the physical and psycho-acoustic principles underlying the production and perception of the sounds of musical instruments. The first section introduces generic aspects of musical acoustics and the perception of musical sounds, followed by separate sections on string, wind and percussion instruments.

  17. Development of fly ash boards with thermal, acoustic and fire insulation properties.

    PubMed

    Leiva, C; Arenas, C; Vilches, L F; Alonso-Fariñas, B; Rodriguez-Galán, M

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an experimental analysis on a new board composed of gypsum and fly ashes from coal combustion, which are mutually compatible. Physical and mechanical properties, sound absorption coefficient, thermal properties and leaching test have been obtained. The mechanical properties showed similar values to other commercial products. As far as the acoustic insulation characteristics are concerned, sound absorption coefficients of 0.3 and 0.8 were found. The board presents a low thermal conductivity and a fire resistance higher than 50 min (for 4 cm of thickness). The leaching of trace elements was below the leaching limit values. These boards can be considered as suitable to be used in building applications as partitions. PMID:26337964

  18. Measurement of attenuation coefficients of the fundamental and second harmonic waves in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuzeng; Jeong, Hyunjo; Cho, Sungjong; Li, Xiongbing

    2016-02-01

    Attenuation corrections in nonlinear acoustics play an important role in the study of nonlinear fluids, biomedical imaging, or solid material characterization. The measurement of attenuation coefficients in a nonlinear regime is not easy because they depend on the source pressure and requires accurate diffraction corrections. In this work, the attenuation coefficients of the fundamental and second harmonic waves which come from the absorption of water are measured in nonlinear ultrasonic experiments. Based on the quasilinear theory of the KZK equation, the nonlinear sound field equations are derived and the diffraction correction terms are extracted. The measured sound pressure amplitudes are adjusted first for diffraction corrections in order to reduce the impact on the measurement of attenuation coefficients from diffractions. The attenuation coefficients of the fundamental and second harmonics are calculated precisely from a nonlinear least squares curve-fitting process of the experiment data. The results show that attenuation coefficients in a nonlinear condition depend on both frequency and source pressure, which are much different from a linear regime. In a relatively lower drive pressure, the attenuation coefficients increase linearly with frequency. However, they present the characteristic of nonlinear growth in a high drive pressure. As the diffraction corrections are obtained based on the quasilinear theory, it is important to use an appropriate source pressure for accurate attenuation measurements.

  19. Chaotic Systems with Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altmann, Eduardo G.; Portela, Jefferson S. E.; Tél, Tamás

    2013-10-01

    Motivated by applications in optics and acoustics we develop a dynamical-system approach to describe absorption in chaotic systems. We introduce an operator formalism from which we obtain (i) a general formula for the escape rate κ in terms of the natural conditionally invariant measure of the system, (ii) an increased multifractality when compared to the spectrum of dimensions Dq obtained without taking absorption and return times into account, and (iii) a generalization of the Kantz-Grassberger formula that expresses D1 in terms of κ, the positive Lyapunov exponent, the average return time, and a new quantity, the reflection rate. Simulations in the cardioid billiard confirm these results.

  20. Mean Flow Augmented Acoustics in Rocket Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischbach, Sean R.

    2014-01-01

    present study employs the COMSOL Multphysics framework to solve the coupled eigenvalue problem using the finite element approach. The study requires one way coupling of the CFD High Mach Number Flow (HMNF) and mathematics module. The HMNF module evaluated the gas flow inside of a solid rocket motor using St. Robert's law modeling solid propellant burn rate, slip boundary conditions, and the supersonic outflow condition. Results from the HMNF model are used by the coefficient form of the mathematics module to determine the eigenvalues of the AVPE. The mathematics model is truncated at the nozzle sonic line, where a zero flux boundary condition is self-satisfying. The remaining boundaries are modeled with a zero flux boundary condition, assuming zero acoustic absorption on all surfaces. Pertinent results from these analyses are the complex valued eigenvalue and eigenvectors. Comparisons are made to the French results to evaluate the modeling approach. A comparison of the French results with that of the present analysis is displayed in figures 1 and 2, respectively. The graphic shows the first tangential eigenvector's real (a) and imaginary (b) values.

  1. Optical absorption measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Draggoo, Vaughn G.; Morton, Richard G.; Sawicki, Richard H.; Bissinger, Horst D.

    1989-01-01

    The system of the present invention contemplates a non-intrusive method for measuring the temperature rise of optical elements under high laser power optical loading to determine the absorption coefficient. The method comprises irradiating the optical element with a high average power laser beam, viewing the optical element with an infrared camera to determine the temperature across the optical element and calculating the absorption of the optical element from the temperature.

  2. Fast wideband acoustical holography.

    PubMed

    Hald, Jørgen

    2016-04-01

    Patch near-field acoustical holography methods like statistically optimized near-field acoustical holography and equivalent source method are limited to relatively low frequencies, where the average array-element spacing is less than half of the acoustic wavelength, while beamforming provides useful resolution only at medium-to-high frequencies. With adequate array design, both methods can be used with the same array. But for holography to provide good low-frequency resolution, a small measurement distance is needed, whereas beamforming requires a larger distance to limit sidelobe issues. The wideband holography method of the present paper was developed to overcome that practical conflict. Only a single measurement is needed at a relatively short distance and a single result is obtained covering the full frequency range. The method uses the principles of compressed sensing: A sparse sound field representation is assumed with a chosen set of basis functions, a measurement is taken with an irregular array, and the inverse problem is solved with a method that enforces sparsity in the coefficient vector. Instead of using regularization based on the 1-norm of the coefficient vector, an iterative solution procedure is used that promotes sparsity. The iterative method is shown to provide very similar results in most cases and to be computationally much more efficient. PMID:27106299

  3. Model of propagation of acoustic pulses caused by underground nuclear explosion and theirs influence on the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnov, V.; Drobzheva, Y.

    2003-04-01

    To describe the propagation of an acoustic pulse through the inhomogeneity atmosphere we developed new equation and correspondent computer simulation code. The equation takes into account nonlinear effects, inhomogeneities of the atmosphere, absorption, expansion of a wave acoustic front, etc. The model includes subroutine of vertical movement of earth surface during an underground nuclear explosion (we use an empirical model), subroutine of acoustic pulse generation by a spall zone, subroutine of propagation of acoustic pulse up to the ionospheric height, subroutine of acoustic wave influence on the ionospheric plasma, subroutine of ionospheric perturbation influence on Doppler frequency of a radio wave. All calculations take into account geomagnetic field and neutral wind. The data measurement of acoustic pulses at heights of the ionosphere with helping Doppler radio sounding were used to test the model. We used data of Doppler shift records which were obtained during 9 underground nuclear explosion for 16 traces of radio sounding of the ionoshphere. Coefficients correlation between calculated and experimental forms is 0.7-0.94.

  4. Room Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  5. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... slow growing tumor which arise primarily from the vestibular portion of the VIII cranial nerve and lie ... you have a "brain tumor" called acoustic neuroma (vestibular schwannoma). You think you are the only one ...

  6. Underwater Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuperman, William A.; Roux, Philippe

    It is well underwater established that sound waves, compared to electromagnetic waves, propagate long distances in the ocean. Hence, in the ocean as opposed to air or a vacuum, one uses sound navigation and ranging (SONAR) instead navigation and ranging (SONAR) of radar, acoustic communication instead of radio, and acoustic imaging and tomography instead of microwave or optical imaging or X-ray tomography. Underwater acoustics is the science of sound in water (most commonly in the ocean) and encompasses not only the study of sound propagation, but also the masking of sound signals by interfering phenomenon and signal processing for extracting these signals from interference. This chapter we will present the basics physics of ocean acoustics and then discuss applications.

  7. Alaskan river environmental acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl, Peter H.; Pfisterer, Carl; Geiger, Harold J.

    2005-04-01

    Sonars are used by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) to obtain daily and hourly estimates of at least four species of migratory salmon during their seasonal migration which lasts from June to beginning of September. Suspended sediments associated with a river's sediment load is an important issue for ADF&G's sonar operations. Acoustically, the suspended sediments are a source of both volume reverberation and excess attenuation beyond that expected in fresh water. Each can impact daily protocols for fish enumeration via sonar. In this talk, results from an environmental acoustic study conducted in the Kenai River (June 1999) using 420 kHz and 200 kHz side looking sonars, and in the Yukon River (July 2001) using a 120 kHz side looking sonar, are discussed. Estimates of the volume scattering coefficient and attenuation are related to total suspended sediments. The relative impact of bubble scattering and sediment scattering is also discussed.

  8. A normalized wave number variation parameter for acoustic black hole design.

    PubMed

    Feurtado, Philip A; Conlon, Stephen C; Semperlotti, Fabio

    2014-08-01

    In recent years, the concept of the Acoustic Black Hole has been developed as an efficient passive, lightweight absorber of bending waves in plates and beams. Theory predicts greater absorption for a higher thickness taper power. However, a higher taper power also increases the violation of an underlying theory smoothness assumption. This paper explores the effects of high taper power on the reflection coefficient and spatial change in wave number and discusses the normalized wave number variation as a spatial design parameter for performance, assessment, and optimization. PMID:25096139

  9. Experimental study of acoustical characteristics of honeycomb sandwich structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Portia Renee

    Loss factor measurements were performed on sandwich panels to determine the effects of different skin and core materials on the acoustical properties. Results revealed inserting a viscoelastic material in the core's mid-plane resulted in the highest loss factor. Panels constructed with carbon-fiber skins exhibited larger loss factors than glass-fiber skins. Panels designed to achieve subsonic wave speed did not show a significant increase in loss factor above the coincidence frequency. The para-aramid core had a larger loss factor value than the meta-aramid core. Acoustic absorption coefficients were measured for honeycomb sandwiches designed to incorporate multiple sound-absorbing devices, including Helmholtz resonators and porous absorbers. The structures consisted of conventional honeycomb cores filled with closed-cell polyurethane foams of various densities and covered with perforated composite facesheets. Honeycomb cores filled with higher density foam resulted in higher absorption coefficients over the frequency range of 50 -- 1250 Hz. However, this trend was not observed at frequencies greater than 1250 Hz, where the honeycomb filled with the highest density foam yielded the lowest absorption coefficient among samples with foam-filled cores. The energy-recycling semi-active vibration suppression method (ERSA) was employed to determine the relationship between vibration suppression and acoustic damping for a honeycomb sandwich panel. Results indicated the ERSA method simultaneously reduced the sound transmitted through the panel and the panel vibration. The largest reduction in sound transmitted through the panel was 14.3% when the vibrations of the panel were reduced by 7.3%. The influence of different design parameters, such as core density, core material, and cell size on wave speeds of honeycomb sandwich structures was experimentally analyzed. Bending and shear wave speeds were measured and related to the transmission loss performance for various material

  10. Near-infrared absorbing polymer nano-particle as a sensitive contrast agent for photo-acoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Hiroyuki; Nojiri, Mayumi; Mukai, Rieko; Ito, Shinzaburo

    2015-01-01

    Polymer nano-particles (PNPs) with a near-infrared (NIR) light absorption were prepared by the nano-emulsion method to develop contrast agents for photo-acoustic (PA) imaging. The PNP containing silicon naphthalocyanine showed a high absorption coefficient up to 10(10) M(-1) cm(-1). This is comparable to plasmonic gold nano-particles, which have been studied as PA contrast agents. For the PNP larger than 100 nm, the enhancement of the PA signal was observed compared to the gold nano-particle with a similar absorption coefficient and size. In the case of the PNP, the heat by the light absorption is confined in the particle due to the low thermal diffusivity of polymer materials. We showed that the strong thermal confinement effect of PNP results in the enhancement of the efficiency of the PA signal generation and that the PA intensity can be enhanced by the increase of the Grüneisen parameter of the matrix polymer of PNP. The PA signal from the PNP of poly(methyl methacrylate) was 9-fold larger than that of gold nano-particles with the same absorption coefficient. We demonstrated that in the in vivo PA imaging the detection limit of PNP was of the order of 10(-13) M. The NIR absorbing PNP will be a promising candidate of a sensitive contrast agent for PA imaging. PMID:25407911

  11. Acoustic biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Ronen; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  12. Acoustic biosensors.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  13. Low loading of carbon nanotubes to enhance acoustical properties of poly(ether)urethane foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basirjafari, Sedigheh; Malekfar, Rasoul; Esmaielzadeh Khadem, Siamak

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to fabricate a sound absorber flexible semi-open cell polymeric foam based on polyether urethane (PEU) with carboxylic functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (COOH-MWCNTs) as an energy decaying filler at low loadings up to 0.20 wt. %. This paper provides the relationship between the mentioned foam microstructure via field emission scanning electron microscopy and different acoustical and non-acoustical properties of PEU/COOH-MWCNT composites. Addition of just 0.05 wt. % COOH-MWCNTs enhanced the sound absorption coefficient of the mentioned nanocomposite foam over the entire frequency range. Raman spectra revealed the better dispersion of COOH-MWCNTs in the PEU matrix leading to more stress transfer between them to cause a significant dissipation of energy.

  14. Opto-acoustic cell permeation

    SciTech Connect

    Visuri, S R; Heredia, N

    2000-03-09

    Optically generated acoustic waves have been used to temporarily permeate biological cells. This technique may be useful for enhancing transfection of DNA into cells or enhancing the absorption of locally delivered drugs. A diode-pumped frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser operating at kHz repetition rates was used to produce a series of acoustic pulses. An acoustic wave was formed via thermoelastic expansion by depositing laser radiation into an absorbing dye. Generated pressures were measured with a PVDF hydrophone. The acoustic waves were transmitted to cultured and plated cells. The cell media contained a selection of normally- impermeable fluorescent-labeled dextran dyes. Following treatment with the opto-acoustic technique, cellular incorporation of dyes, up to 40,000 Molecular Weight, was noted. Control cells that did not receive opto-acoustic treatment had unremarkable dye incorporation. Uptake of dye was quantified via fluorescent microscopic analysis. Trypan Blue membrane exclusion assays and fluorescent labeling assays confirmed the vitality of cells following treatment. This method of enhanced drug delivery has the potential to dramatically reduce required drug dosages and associated side effects and enable revolutionary therapies.

  15. ELECTROMAGNETISM, OPTICS, ACOUSTICS, HEAT TRANSFER, CLASSICAL MECHANICS, AND FLUID DYNAMICS Painlevé Integrability of Nonlinear Schrödinger Equations with both Space- and Time-Dependent Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyoung, Ho Han; H. J., Shin

    2010-12-01

    We investigate the Painlevé integrability of nonautonomous nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equations with both space- and time-dependent dispersion, nonlinearity, and external potentials. The Painlevé analysis is carried out without using the Kruskal's simplification, which results in more generalized form of inhomogeneous equations. The obtained equations are shown to be reducible to the standard NLS equation by using a point transformation. We also construct the corresponding Lax pair and carry out its Kundu-type reduction to the standard Lax pair. Special cases of equations from choosing limited form of coefficients coincide with the equations from the previous Painlevé analyses and/or become unknown new equations.

  16. Absorption of oblique incidence sound by a finite micro-perforated panel absorber.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng; Cheng, Li; Pan, Jie

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a theoretical model of a micro-perforated panel (MPP) backed by a finite cavity and flush-mounted in an infinite baffle is developed and its performance in terms of sound absorption is analyzed. The model allows an oblique incidence sound impinging upon the MPP absorber. The simplified Rayleigh integral method, thin plate theory and the acoustical impedance of the MPP are used to calculate the sound energy absorbed by the MPP's surface. Results show that the absorption coefficient of the absorber is a function of angle and frequency of the incident sound, and is controlled by the coupling between the MPP and the acoustical modes in the back cavity. In particular, grazing modes can be induced in the cavity by sound with an oblique angle of incidence, which may result in peak sound absorptions at the natural frequencies of the modes. The mechanism involved is used to explain the absorption properties of the MPP absorber for a diffuse incidence of sound. PMID:23297895

  17. Characterization of HIFU transducers designed for sonochemistry application: Acoustic streaming.

    PubMed

    Hallez, L; Touyeras, F; Hihn, J-Y; Bailly, Y

    2016-03-01

    Cavitation distribution in a High Intensity Focused Ultrasound sonoreactors (HIFU) has been extensively described in the recent literature, including quantification by an optical method (Sonochemiluminescence SCL). The present paper provides complementary measurements through the study of acoustic streaming generated by the same kind of HIFU transducers. To this end, results of mass transfer measurements (electrodiffusional method) were compared to optical method ones (Particle Image Velocimetry). This last one was used in various configurations: with or without an electrode in the acoustic field in order to have the same perturbation of the wave propagation. Results show that the maximum velocity is not located at the focal but shifted near the transducer, and that this shift is greater for high powers. The two cavitation modes (stationary and moving bubbles) are greatly affect the hydrodynamic behavior of our sonoreactors: acoustic streaming and the fluid generated by bubble motion. The results obtained by electrochemical measurements show the same low hydrodynamic activity in the transducer vicinity, the same shift of the active focal toward the transducer, and the same absence of activity in the post-focal axial zone. The comparison with theoretical Eckart's velocities (acoustic streaming in non-cavitating media) confirms a very high activity at the "sonochemical focal", accounted for by wave distortion, which induced greater absorption coefficients. Moreover, the equivalent liquid velocities are one order of magnitude larger than the ones measured by PIV, confirming the enhancement of mass transfer by bubbles oscillation and collapse close to the surface, rather than from a pure streaming effect. PMID:26585023

  18. Results of measurement of radio wave absorption in the ionosphere by the AI method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korinevskaya, N. A.

    1972-01-01

    Median noon absorption values for each month from 1964 through 1967, the diurnal variations of absorption on the regular world days, and the seasonal variations of absorption are given. The dependence of the absorption coefficient on sunspot number is analyzed.

  19. Acoustic metasurface with hybrid resonances.

    PubMed

    Ma, Guancong; Yang, Min; Xiao, Songwen; Yang, Zhiyu; Sheng, Ping

    2014-09-01

    An impedance-matched surface has the property that an incident wave generates no reflection. Here we demonstrate that by using a simple construction, an acoustically reflecting surface can acquire hybrid resonances and becomes impedance-matched to airborne sound at tunable frequencies, such that no reflection is generated. Each resonant cell of the metasurface is deep-subwavelength in all its spatial dimensions, with its thickness less than the peak absorption wavelength by two orders of magnitude. As there can be no transmission, the impedance-matched acoustic wave is hence either completely absorbed at one or multiple frequencies, or converted into other form(s) of energy, such as an electrical current. A high acoustic-electrical energy conversion efficiency of 23% is achieved. PMID:24880731

  20. Recent Enhancements to the NASA Langley Structural Acoustics Loads and Transmission (SALT) Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Cabell, Randolph H.; Allen, Albert R.

    2013-01-01

    The Structural Acoustics Loads and Transmission (SALT) facility at the NASA Langley Research Center is comprised of an anechoic room and a reverberant room, and may act as a transmission loss suite when test articles are mounted in a window connecting the two rooms. In the latter configuration, the reverberant room acts as the noise source side and the anechoic room as the receiver side. The noise generation system used for qualification testing in the reverberant room was previously shown to achieve a maximum overall sound pressure level of 141 dB. This is considered to be marginally adequate for generating sound pressure levels typically required for launch vehicle payload qualification testing. Recent enhancements to the noise generation system increased the maximum overall sound pressure level to 154 dB, through the use of two airstream modulators coupled to 35 Hz and 160 Hz horns. This paper documents the acoustic performance of the enhanced noise generation system for a variety of relevant test spectra. Additionally, it demonstrates the capability of the SALT facility to conduct transmission loss and absorption testing in accordance with ASTM and ISO standards, respectively. A few examples of test capabilities are shown and include transmission loss testing of simple unstiffened and built up structures and measurement of the diffuse field absorption coefficient of a fibrous acoustic blanket.

  1. Factor Scores, Structure Coefficients, and Communality Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwyn, Fara

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents heuristic explanations of factor scores, structure coefficients, and communality coefficients. Common misconceptions regarding these topics are clarified. In addition, (a) the regression (b) Bartlett, (c) Anderson-Rubin, and (d) Thompson methods for calculating factor scores are reviewed. Syntax necessary to execute all four…

  2. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Chou, Ching H.

    1990-01-01

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens.

  3. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Chou, C.H.

    1990-03-20

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system is described in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens. 9 figs.

  4. Acoustics in the Martian Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, J.-P.

    2000-10-01

    With the advent of the first attempt to deliver an acoustic microphone to the Martian surface aboard the failed Mars Polar Lander, there has been growing interests in the development of acoustic sensors to compliment scientific payloads on future spacecraft. Terrestrial scientist have been very successful in using infrasound (sound at frequencies below human detection, < 20 Hz) to detect and monitor atmospheric phenomena related to weather, tornadoes, mountain waves, microbaroms, ionospheric and auroral disturbances, and meteror/fireballs, as well as anthropogenic sources such as aircraft and nuclear explosions. Sounds on Mars at the audible frequencies (20 Hz to 20 kHz) will be severely attenuated due to viscous relaxation and thermal diffusion (collectively referred to as classical attenuation) which will be much more severe in the colder, less dense Martian atmosphere. Molecular relaxation of carbon dioxide will also contribute to the sound absorption in the lower audible frequencies. Since classical attenuation increases as a function of the frequency squared, at low infrasonic frequencies ( < 10 Hz), classical attenuation becomes less significant and sound absorption in the Martian atmosphere becomes more similar to that of the terrestrial atmosphere for the same frequencies. At these longer wavelengths, geometric spreading will dominate as the source of attenuation as the acoustic energy is spread out over an ever increasing spherical wave front. This implies that infrasound (10 to 0.01 Hz) will be a useful frequency range for future acoustic sensors developed for scientific payloads delivered to the Martian surface.

  5. Second coefficient of viscosity in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, Robert L.; Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Zheng, Zhonquan

    1991-01-01

    Acoustic attenuation measurements in air were analyzed in order to estimate the second coefficient of viscosity. Data over a temperature range of 11 C to 50 C and at relative humidities between 6 percent and 91 percent were used. This analysis showed that the second coefficient of viscosity varied between 1900 and 20,000 times larger than the dynamic or first coefficient of viscosity over the temperature and humidity range of the data. In addition, the data showed that the molecular relaxation effects, which are responsible for the magnitude of the second coefficient of viscosity, place severe limits on the use of time-independent, thermodynamic equations of state. Compressible flows containing large streamwise velocity gradients, like shock waves, which cause significant changes in particle properties to occur during time intervals shorter than hundredths of seconds, must be modeled using dynamic equations of state. The dynamic model approach is described briefly.

  6. Acoustic behavior of a rigidly backed poroelastic layer with periodic resonant inclusions by a multiple scattering approach.

    PubMed

    Weisser, Thomas; Groby, Jean-Philippe; Dazel, Olivier; Gaultier, François; Deckers, Elke; Futatsugi, Sideto; Monteiro, Luciana

    2016-02-01

    The acoustic response of a rigidly backed poroelastic layer with a periodic set of elastic cylindrical inclusions embedded is studied. A semi-analytical approach is presented, based on Biot's 1956 theory to account for the deformation of the skeleton, coupling mode matching technique, Bloch wave representation, and multiple scattering theory. This model is validated by comparing the derived absorption coefficients to finite element simulations. Numerical results are further exposed to investigate the influence of the properties of the inclusions (type, material properties, size) of this structure, while a modal analysis is performed to characterize the dynamic behaviors leading to high acoustic absorption. Particularly, in the case of thin viscoelastic membranes, an absorption coefficient larger than 0.8 is observed on a wide frequency band. This property is found to be due to the coupling between the first volume mode of the inclusion and the trapped mode induced by the periodic array and the rigid backing, for a wavelength in the air smaller than 11 times the material thickness. PMID:26936546

  7. Absorption of planar waves in a draining bathtub

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Ednilton S.; Dolan, Sam R.; Crispino, Luís C. B.

    2010-06-01

    We present an analysis of the absorption of acoustic waves by a black hole analogue in (2+1) dimensions generated by a fluid flow in a draining bathtub. We show that the low-frequency absorption length is equal to the acoustic hole circumference and that the high-frequency absorption length is 4 times the ergoregion radius. For intermediate values of the wave frequency, we compute the absorption length numerically and show that our results are in excellent agreement with the low- and high-frequency limits. We analyze the occurrence of superradiance, manifested as negative partial absorption lengths for corotating modes at low frequencies.

  8. Absorption of planar waves in a draining bathtub

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, Ednilton S.; Dolan, Sam R.; Crispino, Luis C. B.

    2010-06-15

    We present an analysis of the absorption of acoustic waves by a black hole analogue in (2+1) dimensions generated by a fluid flow in a draining bathtub. We show that the low-frequency absorption length is equal to the acoustic hole circumference and that the high-frequency absorption length is 4 times the ergoregion radius. For intermediate values of the wave frequency, we compute the absorption length numerically and show that our results are in excellent agreement with the low- and high-frequency limits. We analyze the occurrence of superradiance, manifested as negative partial absorption lengths for corotating modes at low frequencies.

  9. Chaotic systems with absorption.

    PubMed

    Altmann, Eduardo G; Portela, Jefferson S E; Tél, Tamás

    2013-10-01

    Motivated by applications in optics and acoustics we develop a dynamical-system approach to describe absorption in chaotic systems. We introduce an operator formalism from which we obtain (i) a general formula for the escape rate κ in terms of the natural conditionally invariant measure of the system, (ii) an increased multifractality when compared to the spectrum of dimensions D(q) obtained without taking absorption and return times into account, and (iii) a generalization of the Kantz-Grassberger formula that expresses D(1) in terms of κ, the positive Lyapunov exponent, the average return time, and a new quantity, the reflection rate. Simulations in the cardioid billiard confirm these results. PMID:24138240

  10. Viscous flow drag reduction by acoustic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, Robert T.

    1986-12-01

    An experimental program in which the effectiveness of a single large eddy break up (LEBU) blade is enhanced by proper acoustic excitation is described. Acoustic waves are generated in response to the incident large scale eddies and directed at the blade trailing edge through the test surface floor below the manipulator blade. The acoustic input is phase locked to the incident flow. Control of the acoustic input apparently allows enhancement of the large eddy cancellation process leading to a decrease of skin friction coefficient. Control of this process with acoustic excitation indicates that vortex unwinding is the mechanism for large eddy destruction in the boundary layer. A deeper understanding of this phenomena could lead to better drag reduction technology and further understanding of the physics of the turbulent boundary layer.

  11. Medical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Kirk; Dunmire, Barbrina

    Medical acoustics can be subdivided into diagnostics and therapy. Diagnostics are further separated into auditory and ultrasonic methods, and both employ low amplitudes. Therapy (excluding medical advice) uses ultrasound for heating, cooking, permeablizing, activating and fracturing tissues and structures within the body, usually at much higher amplitudes than in diagnostics. Because ultrasound is a wave, linear wave physics are generally applicable, but recently nonlinear effects have become more important, even in low-intensity diagnostic applications.

  12. Acoustic chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Lauterborn, W.; Parlitz, U.; Holzfuss, J.; Billo, A.; Akhatov, I.

    1996-06-01

    Acoustic cavitation, a complex, spatio-temporal dynamical system, is investigated with respect to its chaotic properties. The sound output, the {open_quote}{open_quote}noise{close_quote}{close_quote}, is subjected to time series analysis. The spatial dynamics of the bubble filaments is captured by high speed holographic cinematography and subsequent digital picture processing from the holograms. Theoretical models are put forward for describing the pattern formation. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. A theoretical study of the feasibility of acoustical tweezers: Ray acoustics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jungwoo; Ha, Kanglyeol; Shung, K. Kirk

    2005-05-01

    The optical tweezer has been found to have many biomedical applications in trapping macromolecules and cells. For the trapping mechanism, there has to be a sharp spatial change in axial optical intensity and the particle size must be much greater than the wavelength. Similar phenomenon may exist in acoustics. This work was undertaken to demonstrate theoretically that it is possible to acoustically trap particles near the focal point where most of the acoustic energy is concentrated if certain conditions are met. Acoustic force exerted on a fluid particle in ultrasonic fields is analyzed in a ray acoustics regime where the wavelength of acoustic beam is much smaller than the size of the particle. In order to apply the acoustical tweezer to manipulating macromolecules and cells whose size is in the order of a few microns or less, a prerequisite is that the ultrasound wavelength has to be much smaller than a few microns. In this paper, the analysis is therefore based on the field pattern produced by a strongly focused 100 MHz ultrasonic transducer with Gaussian intensity distribution. For the realization of acoustic trapping, negative axial radiation force has to be generated to pull a particle towards a focus. The fat particle considered for acoustic trapping in this paper has an acoustic impedance of 1.4 MRayls. The magnitude of the acoustic axial radiation force that has been calculated as the size of the fat particle is varied from 8λ to 14λ. In addition, both Fresnel coefficients at various positions are also calculated to assess the interaction of reflection and refraction and their relative contribution to the effect of the acoustical tweezer. The simulation results show that the feasibility of the acoustical tweezer depends on both the degree of acoustic impedance mismatch and the degree of focusing relative to the particle size. .

  14. Measuring sound absorption properties of porous materials using a calibrated volume velocity source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenas, Jorge P.; Darmendrail, Luis

    2013-10-01

    Measurement of acoustic properties of sound-absorbing materials has been the source of much investigation that has produced practical measuring methods. In particular, the measurement of the normal incidence sound absorption coefficient is commonly done using a well-known configuration of a tube carrying a plane wave. The sound-absorbing coefficient is calculated from the surface impedance measured on a sample of material. Therefore, a direct measurement of the impedance requires knowing the ratio between the sound pressure and the volume velocity. However, the measurement of volume velocity is not straightforward in practice and many methods have been proposed including complex transducers, laser vibrometry, accelerometers and calibrated volume velocity sources. In this paper, a device to directly measure the acoustic impedance of a sample of sound-absorbing material is presented. The device uses an internal microphone in a small cavity sealed by a loudspeaker and a second microphone mounted in front of this source. The calibration process of the device and the limitations of the method are also discussed and measurement examples are presented. The accuracy of the device was assessed by direct comparison with the standardized method. The proposed measurement method was tested successfully with various types of commercial acoustic porous materials.

  15. Evaluation of the use of partition coefficients and molecular surface properties as predictors of drug absorption: a provisional biopharmaceutical classification of the list of national essential medicines of Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Shawahna, R.; Rahman, NU.

    2011-01-01

    Background and the purpose of the study Partition coefficients (log D and log P) and molecular surface area (PSA) are potential predictors of the intestinal permeability of drugs. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate and compare these intestinal permeability indicators. Methods Aqueous solubility data were obtained from literature or calculated using ACD/Labs and ALOGPS. Permeability data were predicted based on log P, log D at pH 6.0 (log D6.0), and PSA. Results Metoprolol's log P, log D6.0, and a PSA of <65 Å correctly predicted 55.9%, 50.8% and 54.2% of permeability classes, respectively. Labetalol's log P, log D6.0 and PSA correctly predicted 54.2%, 64.4% and 61% of permeability classes, respectively. Log D6.0 correlated well (81%) with Caco-2 permeability (Papp). Of the list of national essential medicines, 135 orally administered drugs were classified into biopharmaceutical classification system (BCS). Of these, 57 (42.2%), 28 (20.7%), 44 (32.6%), and 6 (4.4%) were class I, II, III and IV respectively. Conclusion Log D6.0 showed better prediction capability than log P. Metoprolol as permeability internal standard was more conservative than labetalol. PMID:22615645

  16. The dyadic diffraction coefficient for a curved edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouyoumjian, R. G.; Pathak, P. H.

    1974-01-01

    A compact dyadic diffraction coefficient for electromagnetic waves obliquely incident on a curved edge formed by perfectly conducting curved or plane surfaces is obtained. This diffraction coefficent remains valid in the transition regions adjacent to shadow and reflection boundaries, where the diffraction coefficients of Keller's original theory fail. The method is on Keller's method of the canonical problem, which in this case is the perfectly conducting wedge illuminated by plane, cylindrical, conical, and spherical waves. When the proper ray fixed coordinate system is introduced, the dyadic diffraction coefficient for the wedge is found to be the sum of only two dyads, and it is shown that this is also true for the dyadic diffraction coefficients of higher order edges. One dyad contains the acoustic soft diffraction coefficient; the other dyad contains the acoustic hard diffraction coefficient. The expressions for the acoustic wedge diffraction coefficients contain Fresnel integrals, which ensure that the total field is continuous at shadow and reflection boundaries. The diffraction coefficients have the same form for the different types of edge illumination; only the arguments of the Fresnel integrals are different. Since diffraction is a local phenomenon, and locally the curved edge structure is wedge shaped, this result is readily extended to the curved edge.

  17. Time-dependent seafloor acoustic backscatter (10-100 kHz).

    PubMed

    Sternlicht, Daniel D; de Moustier, Christian P

    2003-11-01

    A time-dependent model of the acoustic intensity backscattered by the seafloor is described and compared with data from a calibrated, vertically oriented, echo-sounder operating at 33 and 93 kHz. The model incorporates the characteristics of the echo-sounder and transmitted pulse, and the water column spreading and absorption losses. Scattering from the water-sediment interface is predicted using Helmholtz-Kirchhoff theory, parametrized by the mean grain size, the coherent reflection coefficient, and the strength and exponent of a power-law roughness spectrum. The composite roughness approach of Jackson et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 79, 1410-1422 (1986)], modified for the finite duration of the transmitted signal, is used to predict backscatter from subbottom inhomogeneities. It depends on the sediment's volume scattering and attenuation coefficients, as well as the interface characteristics governing sound transmission into the sediment. Estimation of model parameters (mean grain size, roughness spectrum strength and exponent, volume scattering coefficient) reveals ambiguous ranges for the two spectral components. Analyses of model outputs and of physical measurements reported in the literature yield practical constraints on roughness spectrum parameter settings appropriate for echo-envelope-based sediment classification procedures. PMID:14650007

  18. On the emission coefficient of uranium plasmas.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, R. T.; Campbell, H. D.; Mack, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    The emission coefficient for uranium plasmas (temperature: 8000 K) was measured for the wavelength range from 1200 to 6000 A. The results were compared to theoretical calculations and other measurements. Reasonable agreement between theoretical predictions and our measurements was found in the region from 1200 to 2000 A. Although it was difficult to make absolute comparisons among the different reported measurements, considerable disagreement was found for the higher wavelength region. A short discussion regarding the overall comparisons is given, and final suggestions are made as to the most appropriate emission coefficient values to be used in future design calculations. The absorption coefficient for the same wavelength interval is also reported.

  19. Diffuse reflection coefficient of a stratified sea.

    PubMed

    Haltrin, V I

    1999-02-20

    A differential equation of a Riccati type for the diffuse reflection coefficient of a stratified sea is proposed. For a homogeneous sea with arbitrary inherent optical properties this equation is solved analytically. For an inhomogeneous sea it is solved approximately for any arbitrary stratification. The resulting equation expresses the diffuse reflection coefficient of the sea through vertical profiles of absorption and backscattering coefficients, bottom albedo, and sea depth. The results of calculations with this equation are compared with Monte Carlo computations. It was found that the precision of this approach is in the range of 15%. PMID:18305694

  20. Acoustic Tooth Cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustically-energized water jet aids in plaque breakdown. Acoustic Wand includes acoustic transducer 1/4 wave plate, and tapered cone. Together elements energize solution of water containing mild abrasive injected into mouth to help prevent calculous buildup.

  1. Coefficients for Interrater Agreement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zegers, Frits E.

    1991-01-01

    The degree of agreement between two raters rating several objects for a single characteristic can be expressed through an association coefficient, such as the Pearson product-moment correlation. How to select an appropriate association coefficient, and the desirable properties and uses of a class of such coefficients--the Euclidean…

  2. The acoustic properties of panels with rectangular apertures.

    PubMed

    Vigran, T E

    2014-05-01

    A model for the acoustic properties of a plate perforated with slots of rectangular shape is proposed. The model is based on known expressions for the complex density and compressibility of a pore of rectangular shape together with the radiation impedance of a rectangular shaped piston in a baffle. For the so-called end correction of a rectangular aperture in a plate, an approximate solution is shown to fit an exact solution for the imaginary part of the radiation impedance, the latter solution based on the work of Lindemann [J. Acoust. Soc. Am, 55, 708-717 (1974)]. Two different procedures are tested to calculate the mutual influence of the apertures on the end correction, the one calculating the mutual impedance of neighboring pistons in the plate, the other by calculating the end correction of a piston placed in the end of an infinitely long tube. The model is used calculating the input impedance and absorption coefficient of a Helmholtz resonator with such a plate, comparing with measurement results. The fit between predicted and measured results, using plates with narrow slits, is good, but it is believed that the model also cover a wider range of dimensions for such a slotted plate. PMID:24815260

  3. Comment on "Optimum absorption and aperture parameters for realistic coupled volume spaces determined from computational analysis and subjective testing results" [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 127, 223-232 (2010)].

    PubMed

    Xiang, Ning; Robinson, Philip; Botts, Jonathan

    2010-11-01

    A recent paper [D. T. Bradley and L. M. Wang, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 127, 223-232 (2010)] has reported inconsistencies between the results of two different approaches for characterizing non-exponential decays in coupled-volume systems. This letter aims to expose the origin of these inconsistencies, which are due to a limitation in the methodology utilized for the analysis presented in the paper referenced above. PMID:21110551

  4. Optical absorption components of light-modulated absorption spectrum of CdS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, E. J.; Long, E. R.

    1975-01-01

    The amplitude and decay coefficient of light-induced modulation of absorption (LIMA) was measured as a function of wavelength from 535 to 850 nm for single-crystal CdS. The decay coefficient exhibited a discontinuous resonance at 710 nm which was due to the overlap and cancellation of two opposing absorption changes. A method was developed to separate these opposing absorption changes using the measured decay coefficients. The discrete-level-to-band energy for one absorption change was found to be 1.64 eV. An improved model was developed which contains two associated levels in the band gap separated by 0.32 eV.

  5. Cholesterol absorption.

    PubMed

    Ostlund, Richard E

    2002-03-01

    Cholesterol absorption is a key regulatory point in human lipid metabolism because it determines the amount of endogenous biliary as well as dietary cholesterol that is retained, thereby influencing whole body cholesterol balance. Plant sterols (phytosterols) and the drug ezetimibe reduce cholesterol absorption and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in clinical trials, complementing the statin drugs, which inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis. The mechanism of cholesterol absorption is not completely known but involves the genes ABC1, ABCG5, and ABCG8, which are members of the ATP-binding cassette protein family and appear to remove unwanted cholesterol and phytosterols from the enterocyte. ABC1 is upregulated by the liver X (LXR) and retinoid X (RXR) nuclear receptors. Acylcholesterol acytransferase-2 is an intestinal enzyme that esterifies absorbed cholesterol and increases cholesterol absorption when dietary intake is high. New clinical treatments based on better understanding of absorption physiology are likely to substantially improve clinical cholesterol management in the future. PMID:17033296

  6. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1997-12-30

    An acoustic transducer is described comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2,000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers. 4 figs.

  7. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1997-01-01

    An acoustic transducer comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers.

  8. Acoustic Test Results of Melamine Foam with Application to Payload Fairing Acoustic Attenuation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2014-01-01

    A spacecraft at launch is subjected to a harsh acoustic and vibration environment resulting from the passage of acoustic energy, created during the liftoff of a launch vehicle, through the vehicle's payload fairing. In order to ensure the mission success of the spacecraft it is often necessary to reduce the resulting internal acoustic sound pressure levels through the usage of acoustic attenuation systems. Melamine foam, lining the interior walls of the payload fairing, is often utilized as the main component of such a system. In order to better understand the acoustic properties of melamine foam, with the goal of developing improved acoustic attenuation systems, NASA has recently performed panel level testing on numerous configurations of melamine foam acoustic treatments at the Riverbank Acoustical Laboratory. Parameters assessed included the foam's thickness and density, as well as the effects of a top outer cover sheet material and mass barriers embedded within the foam. This testing followed the ASTM C423 standard for absorption and the ASTM E90 standard for transmission loss. The acoustic test data obtained and subsequent conclusions are the subjects of this paper.

  9. Subgap Absorption in Conjugated Polymers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Sinclair, M.; Seager, C. H.; McBranch, D.; Heeger, A. J; Baker, G. L.

    1991-01-01

    Along with X{sup (3)}, the magnitude of the optical absorption in the transparent window below the principal absorption edge is an important parameter which will ultimately determine the utility of conjugated polymers in active integrated optical devices. With an absorptance sensitivity of < 10{sup {minus}5}, Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy (PDS) is ideal for determining the absorption coefficients of thin films of transparent'' materials. We have used PDS to measure the optical absorption spectra of the conjugated polymers poly(1,4-phenylene-vinylene) (and derivitives) and polydiacetylene-4BCMU in the spectral region from 0.55 eV to 3 eV. Our spectra show that the shape of the absorption edge varies considerably from polymer to polymer, with polydiacetylene-4BCMU having the steepest absorption edge. The minimum absorption coefficients measured varied somewhat with sample age and quality, but were typically in the range 1 cm{sup {minus}1} to 10 cm{sup {minus}1}. In the region below 1 eV, overtones of C-H stretching modes were observed, indicating that further improvements in transparency in this spectral region might be achieved via deuteration of fluorination.

  10. Nondestructive Method For Measuring The Scattering Coefficient Of Bulk Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groenhuis, R. A. J.; ten Bosch, J. J.

    1981-05-01

    During demineralization and remineralization of dental enamel its structure changes resulting in a change of the absorption and scattering coefficients of the enamel. By measuring these coefficients during demineralization and remineralization these processes can be monitored in a non-destructive way. For this purpose an experimental arrangement was made: a fibre illuminates a spot on the sample with monochromatic light with a wave-length between 400 nm and 700 nm; a photomultiplier measures the luminance of the light back-scattered by the sample as a function of the distance from the measuring snot to the spot of illumination. In a Monte Carlo-model this luminance is simulated using the same geometry given the scattering and absorption coefficients in a sample. Then the scattering and absorption coefficients in the sample are determined by selecting the theoretical curve fitting the experimental one. Scattering coefficients below 10 mm-1 and absorption coefficients obtained with this method on calibration samples correspond well with those obtained with another method. Scattering coefficients above 10 mm-1 (paper samples) were measured ton low. This perhaps is caused by the anisotropic structure of paper sheets. The method is very suitable to measure the scattering and absorption coefficients of bulk materials.

  11. Acoustical properties of double porosity granular materials.

    PubMed

    Venegas, Rodolfo; Umnova, Olga

    2011-11-01

    Granular materials have been conventionally used for acoustic treatment due to their sound absorptive and sound insulating properties. An emerging field is the study of the acoustical properties of multiscale porous materials. An example of these is a granular material in which the particles are porous. In this paper, analytical and hybrid analytical-numerical models describing the acoustical properties of these materials are introduced. Image processing techniques have been employed to estimate characteristic dimensions of the materials. The model predictions are compared with measurements on expanded perlite and activated carbon showing satisfactory agreement. It is concluded that a double porosity granular material exhibits greater low-frequency sound absorption at reduced weight compared to a solid-grain granular material with similar mesoscopic characteristics. PMID:22087905

  12. Optically selective, acoustically resonant gas detecting transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimeff, J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A gas analyzer is disclosed which responds to the resonant absorption or emission spectrum of a specific gas by producing an acoustic resonance in a chamber containing a sample of that gas, and which measures the amount of that emission or absorption by measuring the strength of that acoustic resonance, e.g., the maximum periodic pressure, velocity or density achieved. In the preferred embodiment, a light beam is modulated periodically at the acoustical resonance frequency of a closed chamber which contains an optically dense sample of the gas of interest. Periodic heating of the absorbing gas by the light beam causes a cyclic expansion, movement, and pressure within the gas. An amplitude is reached where the increased losses were the cyclic radiation energy received. A transducing system is inclined for converting the pressure variations of the resonant gas into electronic readout signals.

  13. Enhancing sound absorption and transmission through flexible multi-layer micro-perforated structures.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Teresa; Maury, Cédric; Pinhède, Cédric

    2013-11-01

    Theoretical and experimental results are presented into the sound absorption and transmission properties of multi-layer structures made up of thin micro-perforated panels (ML-MPPs). The objective is to improve both the absorption and insulation performances of ML-MPPs through impedance boundary optimization. A fully coupled modal formulation is introduced that predicts the effect of the structural resonances onto the normal incidence absorption coefficient and transmission loss of ML-MPPs. This model is assessed against standing wave tube measurements and simulations based on impedance translation method for two double-layer MPP configurations of relevance in building acoustics and aeronautics. Optimal impedance relationships are proposed that ensure simultaneous maximization of both the absorption and the transmission loss under normal incidence. Exhaustive optimization of the double-layer MPPs is performed to assess the absorption and/or transmission performances with respect to the impedance criterion. It is investigated how the panel volumetric resonances modify the excess dissipation that can be achieved from non-modal optimization of ML-MPPs. PMID:24180777

  14. Acoustic cryocooler

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Gregory W.; Martin, Richard A.; Radenbaugh, Ray

    1990-01-01

    An acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effective to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15-60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintian a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K.

  15. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    2000-01-01

    An active acoustic transducer tool for use down-hole applications. The tool includes a single cylindrical mandrel including a shoulder defining the boundary of a narrowed portion over which is placed a sandwich-style piezoelectric tranducer assembly. The piezoelectric transducer assembly is prestressed by being placed in a thermal interference fit between the shoulder of the mandrel and the base of an anvil which is likewise positioned over the narrower portion of the mandrel. In the preferred embodiment, assembly of the tool is accomplished using a hydraulic jack to stretch the mandrel prior to emplacement of the cylindrical sandwich-style piezoelectric transducer assembly and anvil. After those elements are positioned and secured, the stretched mandrel is allowed to return substantially to its original (pre-stretch) dimensions with the result that the piezoelectric transducer elements are compressed between the anvil and the shoulder of the mandrel.

  16. Acoustic hemostasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, L.; Andrew, M.; Bailey, M.; Beach, K.; Brayman, A.; Curra, F.; Kaczkowski, P.; Kargl, S.; Martin, R.; Vaezy, S.

    2003-04-01

    Over the past several years, the Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound (CIMU) at the Applied Physics Laboratory in the University of Washington has undertaken a broad research program in the general area of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). Our principal emphasis has been on the use of HIFU to induce hemostasis; in particular, CIMU has sought to develop a small, lightweight, portable device that would use ultrasound for both imaging and therapy. Such a technology is needed because nearly 50% of combat casualty mortality results from exsanguinations, or uncontrolled bleeding. A similar percentage occurs for civilian death due to trauma. In this general review, a presentation of the general problem will be given, as well as our recent approaches to the development of an image-guided, transcutaneous, acoustic hemostasis device. [Work supported in part by the USAMRMC, ONR and the NIH.

  17. Acoustics of Fluid-Structure Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, M. S.

    1998-08-01

    Acoustics of Fluid-Structure Interactions addresses an increasingly important branch of fluid mechanics--the absorption of noise and vibration by fluid flow. This subject, which offers numerous challenges to conventional areas of acoustics, is of growing concern in places where the environment is adversely affected by sound. Howe presents useful background material on fluid mechanics and the elementary concepts of classical acoustics and structural vibrations. Using examples, many of which include complete worked solutions, he vividly illustrates the theoretical concepts involved. He provides the basis for all calculations necessary for the determination of sound generation by aircraft, ships, general ventilation and combustion systems, as well as musical instruments. Both a graduate textbook and a reference for researchers, Acoustics of Fluid-Structure Interactions is an important synthesis of information in this field. It will also aid engineers in the theory and practice of noise control.

  18. Acoustic energy in ducts - Further observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eversman, W.

    1979-01-01

    The transmission of acoustic energy in uniform ducts carrying uniform flow is investigated with the purpose of clarifying two points of interest. The two commonly used definitions of acoustic 'energy' flux are shown to be related by a Legendre transformation of the Lagrangian density exactly as in deriving the Hamiltonian density in mechanics. In the acoustic case the total energy density and the Hamiltonian density are not the same which accounts for two different 'energy' fluxes. When the duct has acoustically absorptive walls neither of the two flux expressions gives correct results. A reevaluation of the basis of derivation of the energy density and energy flux provides forms which yield consistent results for soft walled ducts.

  19. Acoustic telemetry.

    SciTech Connect

    Drumheller, Douglas Schaeffer; Kuszmaul, Scott S.

    2003-08-01

    Broadcasting messages through the earth is a daunting task. Indeed, broadcasting a normal telephone conversion through the earth by wireless means is impossible with todays technology. Most of us don't care, but some do. Industries that drill into the earth need wireless communication to broadcast navigation parameters. This allows them to steer their drill bits. They also need information about the natural formation that they are drilling. Measurements of parameters such as pressure, temperature, and gamma radiation levels can tell them if they have found a valuable resource such as a geothermal reservoir or a stratum bearing natural gas. Wireless communication methods are available to the drilling industry. Information is broadcast via either pressure waves in the drilling fluid or electromagnetic waves in the earth and well tubing. Data transmission can only travel one way at rates around a few baud. Given that normal Internet telephone modems operate near 20,000 baud, these data rates are truly very slow. Moreover, communication is often interrupted or permanently blocked by drilling conditions or natural formation properties. Here we describe a tool that communicates with stress waves traveling through the steel drill pipe and production tubing in the well. It's based on an old idea called Acoustic Telemetry. But what we present here is more than an idea. This tool exists, it's drilled several wells, and it works. Currently, it's the first and only acoustic telemetry tool that can withstand the drilling environment. It broadcasts one way over a limited range at much faster rates than existing methods, but we also know how build a system that can communicate both up and down wells of indefinite length.

  20. ELECTROMAGNETISM, OPTICS, ACOUSTICS, HEAT TRANSFER, CLASSICAL MECHANICS, AND FLUID DYNAMICS: Local Control of Two-Photon Absorption in a Six-Level Atomic System by Using a Coherent Perturbation Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Wen-Zhi; Wang, Shun-Jin

    2009-11-01

    If a coherent perturbation field is used to couple the excited level of the coupling transition in the five-level K-type atom with another higher excited level, the two-photon electromagnetically induced transparency can be locally modulated by altering the parameters of the additional perturbation field. With different detunings of the coherent perturbation field, the absorption peak or transparency window with sharp and high-contrast spectral feature can be generated in the two-photon absorption spectrum. The physical interpretation of these phenomena is given in terms of the dressed states.

  1. Diffusion coefficients of several aqueous alkanolamine solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Snijder, E.D.; Riele, M.J.M. te; Versteeg, G.F.; Swaaij, W.P.M. van . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-07-01

    In absorption processes of acid gases (H[sub 2]S, CO[sub 2], COS) in alkanolamine solutions, diffusion coefficients are used for the calculation of the mass transfer rate. The Taylor dispersion technique was applied for the determination of diffusion coefficients of various systems. Experiments with the system KCl in water showed that the experimental setup provides accurate data. For the alkanolamines monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine (DEA), methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), and di-2-propanolamine (DIPA), correlations for the diffusion coefficient as a function of temperature at different concentrations are given. A single relation for every amine has been derived which correlates the diffusion coefficients as a function of temperature and concentration. The temperature was varied between 298 and 348 K, and the concentration between 0 and 4000-5000 mol/m[sup 3]. Furthermore, a modified Stokes-Einstein relation is presented for the prediction of the diffusion coefficients in the alkanolamines in relation to the viscosity of the solvent and the diffusion coefficient at infinite dilution. The diffusion coefficients at low concentrations are compared with some available relations for the estimation of diffusion coefficients at infinite dilution, and it appears that the agreement is fairly good.

  2. Influence of Brown Carbon Aerosols on Absorption Enhancement and Radiative Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamjad, Puthukkadan; Nand Tripathi, Sachchida; Kant Pathak, Ravi; Hallquist, Mattias

    2015-04-01

    This study presents aerosol mass and optical properties measured during winter-spring months (February-March) of two consecutive years (2013-2014) from Kanpur, India located inside Gangetic Plain. Spectral absorption and scattering coefficients (405, 532 and 781 nm) of both atmospheric and denuded (at 300° C) is measured using a 3 wavelength Photo Acoustic Soot Spectrometer (PASS 3). Ratio between the atmospheric and denuded absorption is reported as enhancement in absorption (Eabs). Eabs values shows presence of large quantities of Brown Carbon (BrC) aerosols in the location. Diurnal trend of Eabs shows similar patterns at 405 and 532 nm. But at 781 nm Eabs values increased during day time (10:00 to 18:00) while that 405 and 532 nm decreased. Positive Matrix Analysis (PMF) of organic aerosols measured using HR-ToF-AMS shows factors with different trends with total absorption. Semi-volatile factor (SV-OOA) show no correlation with absorption but other factors such as Low-volatile (LV-OOA), Hydrocarbon (HOA) and Biomass burning (BBOA) organic aerosols shows a positive trend. All factors shows good correlation with scattering coefficient. Also a strong dependence of absorption is observed at 405 and 532 nm and a weak dependence at 781 nm is observed during regression analysis with factors and mass loading. We also present direct radiative forcing (DRF) calculated from measured optical properties due to total aerosol loading and only due to BrC. Total and BrC aerosol DRF shows cooling trends at top of atmosphere (TOA) and surface and warming trend in atmosphere. Days with biomass burning events shows increase in magnitude of DRF at atmosphere and surface up to 30 % corresponding to clear days. TOA forcing during biomass burning days shows increase in magnitude indicating change from negative to less negative.

  3. Microwave-Field Driven Acoustic Modes in Selected DNA Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Glenn Steven

    The direct coupling of a microwave field to selected DNA molecules is demonstrated using standard dielectrometry. The absorption is resonant with a typical lifetime of 300 picoseconds. Such a long lifetime is unexpected for DNA in aqueous solution at room temperature and has interesting implications for microscopic considerations in future models of solvent damping. Resonant absorption at fundamental and harmonic frequencies for both supercoiled circular and linear DNA agrees with an acoustic mode model. Our associated acoustic velocities for linear DNA are very close to the acoustic velocity of the longitudinal acoustic mode independently observed on DNA fibers using Brillouin Spectroscopy. The difference in acoustic velocities for supercoiled circular and linear DNA is discussed in terms of a conformation dependent model. *This research has been funded by the Office of Naval Research, the Center for Devices and Radiological Health, and the National Science Foundation.

  4. Numerical and experimental investigation of the acoustic damping effect of single-layer perforated liners with joint bias-grazing flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dan; Ang, Linus; Ji, C. Z.

    2015-04-01

    As one of the most commonly used acoustic dampers, perforated liners are receiving wide spread interest for reducing engine noise and stabilizing combustion systems. Generally, acoustic liner is a cylindrical sheet with perforated orifices fitted along the bounding wall of the combustor. In this work, the damping performances of seven single- and one double-layer perforated liners with different open area ratios are experimentally investigated. For this, a cold-flow pipe with a lined section is designed. Both grazing (mean flow through the pipe) and bias flows (air flow through the perforated holes) are applied and their flow rates are variable. The effects of the open area ratio η, the joint grazing-bias flow and the number of perforated layers on the liner's damping behavior are studied. It is shown experimentally that increasing the liner's open area ratio can increase its damping effect at higher frequency in terms of power absorption. In addition, increasing the grazing flow is shown to reduce the maximum acoustic power absorption, while the bias flow can increase the liners damping effect. Furthermore, the power absorption coefficient is varied periodically over forcing frequency. And the local maximum value is decreased with increased frequency. Comparison is then made between the performance of the single-layer liner and that of double-layer one. It is found that the double-layer liner can increase the damping effect at higher frequency range. In order to simulate the liner damping behavior, a time-domain numerical model is used. It is shown that the liner thickness needs to be considered to correct the predicted damping trend so that the estimated acoustic power absorption agrees well with the measured one over the interested frequency range.

  5. Investigation of reverberation synthesized by electro-acoustic enhancement systems, from a subjective and physical acoustic standpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Yasushi

    2002-05-01

    Current electro-acoustic enhancement technology enables wide control over concert hall acoustics. The goal of sound field synthesis in anechoic space is to reconstruct a specific sound field. However, applying acoustic enhancement technology to existing reverberant spaces is a less developed research direction. This presentation demonstrates a methodology of electro-acoustic enhancement using regenerative reverberation through SAAF (spatially averaged acoustic feedback), an acceptable variation of RT and SPL in enhanced acoustical conditions. That was presented by YAMAHA Acoustic Research Laboratories. SAAF technology can flatten amplitude peaks at the howling frequency of acoustical feedback loops by using time variant finite impulse response filters. Therefore it enables regeneration of reverberated sound by wide band feedback in frequency without coloration. This system has been applied to ``negative absorption control'' and loudness equalization of under-balcony seats in current concert halls, to optimize concert hall acoustics electronically instead of architecturally. Adjusted reverberation time in enhanced condition should be between 1.5 and 2.0 times higher than the natural RT (ex. RTon/Rtoff=1.8). The SPL increases about 1 dB to 3 dB based on measured results of more than 30 performing halls integrated with acoustic enhancement system in Japan. Examples of the major Japanese concert halls with acoustic enhancement systems are presented.

  6. Temperature and Strain Coefficient of Velocity for Langasite SAW Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, W. C.; Atkinson, G. M.

    2013-01-01

    Surface Acoustic Wave sensors on Langasite substrates are being investigated for aerospace applications. Characterization of the Langasite material properties must be performed before sensors can be installed in research vehicles. The coefficients of velocity for both strain and temperature have been determined. These values have also been used to perform temperature compensation of the strain measurements.

  7. Ultraviolet absorption cross sections of hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. L.; Rohatgi, N. K.; Demore, W. B.

    1978-01-01

    Absorption cross-sections of hydrogen peroxide vapor and of neutral aqueous solutions of hydrogen peroxide were measured in the wavelength range from 195 to 350 nm at 296 K. The spectrophotometric procedure is described, and the reported cross-sections are compared with values obtained by other researchers. Photodissociation coefficients of atmospheric H2O2 were calculated for direct absorption of unscattered solar radiation, and the vertical distributions of these coefficients are shown for various solar zenith angles.

  8. Acoustic hemostasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Lawrence; Beach, Kirk; Carter, Stephen; Chandler, Wayne; Curra, Francesco; Kaczkowski, Peter; Keilman, George; Khokhlova, Vera; Martin, Roy; Mourad, Pierre; Vaezy, Shahram

    2000-07-01

    In cases of severe injury, physicians speak of a "golden hour"—a brief grace period in which quickly applied, proper therapy can save the life of the patient. Much of this mortality results from exsanguination, i.e., bleeding to death—often from internal hemorrhage. The inability of a paramedic to treat breaches in the vascular system deep within the body or to stem the loss of blood from internal organs is a major reason for the high level of mortality associated with blunt trauma. We have undertaken an extensive research program to treat the problem of internal bleeding. Our approach is as follows: (a) We use scanning ultrasound to identify internal bleeding and hemorrhage, (b) we use ultrasound imaging to locate specific breaches in the vascular system, both from damaged vessels and gross damage to the capillary bed, and (c) we use High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) to treat the damaged region and to induce hemostasis. We present a general review of this research with some emphasis on the role of nonlinear acoustics.

  9. Research on absorption test methods of Yb-doped double cladding fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pupu; Li, Rundong; Rong, Liang; Ji, Wei; Gao, Yankun; Jiang, Cong; Gu, Shaoyi

    2016-01-01

    Absorption coefficient is a very useful feature for active fiber. In fiber laser system, the length of active fiber is chosen according to absorption coefficient. And the length of fiber can directly influence the feature of fiber laser. Therefore, how to obtain an accurate absorption coefficient is very important. Because fiber exists re-emission in typical absorption band pumped by power. It is difficult to accurately measure absorption coefficient. The absorption coefficients of Yb-doped double cladding fiber at 975 nm measured by several methods were compared. In conclusion, for the fibers with same length pumped by white light, the absorption coefficient is the highest when cutback only once. Meanwhile, when fibers with different length were measured by the same method, the absorption coefficient is inversely proportional to optical fiber length.

  10. Acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2016-05-31

    An acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam includes a housing; a plurality of spaced apart piezo-electric layers disposed within the housing; and a non-linear medium filling between the plurality of layers. Each of the plurality of piezoelectric layers is configured to generate an acoustic wave. The non-linear medium and the plurality of piezo-electric material layers have a matching impedance so as to enhance a transmission of the acoustic wave generated by each of plurality of layers through the remaining plurality of layers.

  11. Coefficients of Effective Length.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Roger H.

    1981-01-01

    Under certain conditions, a validity Coefficient of Effective Length (CEL) can produce highly misleading results. A modified coefficent is suggested for use when empirical studies indicate that underlying assumptions have been violated. (Author/BW)

  12. Acoustic Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yang-Hann

    One of the subtle problems that make noise control difficult for engineers is the invisibility of noise or sound. A visual image of noise often helps to determine an appropriate means for noise control. There have been many attempts to fulfill this rather challenging objective. Theoretical (or numerical) means for visualizing the sound field have been attempted, and as a result, a great deal of progress has been made. However, most of these numerical methods are not quite ready for practical applications to noise control problems. In the meantime, rapid progress with instrumentation has made it possible to use multiple microphones and fast signal-processing systems. Although these systems are not perfect, they are useful. A state-of-the-art system has recently become available, but it still has many problematic issues; for example, how can one implement the visualized noise field. The constructed noise or sound picture always consists of bias and random errors, and consequently, it is often difficult to determine the origin of the noise and the spatial distribution of the noise field. Section 26.2 of this chapter introduces a brief history, which is associated with sound visualization, acoustic source identification methods and what has been accomplished with a line or surface array. Section 26.2.3 introduces difficulties and recent studies, including de-Dopplerization and de-re verberation methods, both essential for visualizing a moving noise source, such as occurs for cars or trains. This section also addresses what produces ambiguity in realizing real sound sources in a room or closed space. Another major issue associated with sound/noise visualization is whether or not we can distinguish between mutual dependencies of noise in space (Sect. 26.2.4); for example, we are asked to answer the question, Can we see two birds singing or one bird with two beaks?

  13. Acoustic Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yang-Hann

    One of the subtle problems that make noise control difficult for engineers is the invisibility of noise or sound. A visual image of noise often helps to determine an appropriate means for noise control. There have been many attempts to fulfill this rather challenging objective. Theoretical (or numerical) means for visualizing the sound field have been attempted, and as a result, a great deal of progress has been made. However, most of these numerical methods are not quite ready for practical applications to noise control problems. In the meantime, rapid progress with instrumentation has made it possible to use multiple microphones and fast signal-processing systems. Although these systems are not perfect, they are useful. A state-of-the-art system has recently become available, but it still has many problematic issues; for example, how can one implement the visualized noise field. The constructed noise or sound picture always consists of bias and random errors, and consequently, it is often difficult to determine the origin of the noise and the spatial distribution of the noise field. Section 26.2 of this chapter introduces a brief history, which is associated with "sound visualization," acoustic source identification methods and what has been accomplished with a line or surface array. Section 26.2.3 introduces difficulties and recent studies, including de-Dopplerization and de-reverberation methods, both essentialfor visualizing a moving noise source, such as occurs for cars or trains. This section also addresses what produces ambiguity in realizing real sound sources in a room or closed space. Another major issue associated with sound/noise visualization is whether or not we can distinguish between mutual dependencies of noise in space (Sect. 26.2.4); for example, we are asked to answer the question, "Can we see two birds singing or one bird with two beaks?"

  14. Detailed Tabulation of Atomic Form Factors, Photoelectric Absorption and Scattering Cross Section, and Mass Attenuation Coefficients in the Vicinity of Absorption Edges in the Soft X-Ray (Z=30-36, Z=60-89, E=0.1 keV-10 keV), Addressing Convergence Issues of Earlier Work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantler, C. T.

    2000-07-01

    Reliable knowledge of the complex x-ray form factor [Re(f ) and f″] and the photoelectric attenuation coefficient (σPE) is required for crystallography, medical diagnosis, radiation safety, and XAFS studies. Discrepancies between currently used theoretical approaches of 200% exist for numerous elements from 1 to 3 keV x-ray energies. The key discrepancies are due to the smoothing of edge structure, the use of nonrelativistic wave functions, and the lack of appropriate convergence of wave functions. This paper addresses these key discrepancies and derives new theoretical results of substantially higher accuracy in near-edge soft x-ray regions. The high-energy limitations of the current approach are also illustrated. The energy range covered is 0.1 to 10 keV. The associated figures and tabulation demonstrate the current comparison with alternate theory and with available experimental data. In general, experimental data are not sufficiently accurate to establish the errors and inadequacies of theory at this level. However, the best experimental data and the observed experimental structure as a function of energy are strong indicators of the validity of the current approach. New developments in experimental measurement hold great promise in making critical comparisons with theory in the near future.

  15. Photoelectric absorption cross sections with variable abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balucinska-Church, Monika; Mccammon, Dan

    1992-01-01

    Polynomial fit coefficients have been obtained for the energy dependences of the photoelectric absorption cross sections of 17 astrophysically important elements. These results allow the calculation of X-ray absorption in the energy range 0.03-10 keV in material with noncosmic abundances.

  16. Acoustic emission of coal in the postlimiting deformation state

    SciTech Connect

    Voznesenskii, A.S.; Tavostin, M.N.

    2005-08-01

    The features of acoustic emission in coal samples in the state of pre- and postlimiting deformation are considered. It is shown that in the postlimiting deformation stages and in the transient period, a contrary change is observed in a correlation coefficient of the acoustic emission activity N{Sigma} recorded in the upper and lower portions of a sample; whereas in the prelimiting deformation stages, this change is consistent. It is proposed to recognize the stages of deformation by the correlation coefficient of N{Sigma} recorded in different zones: a positive coefficient corresponds to the prelimiting stage of deformation, and a negative one corresponds to the postlimiting stage.

  17. What Is an Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acoustic Neuroma An acoustic neuroma, also called a vestibular schwannoma, is a rare benign tumor of the ... Acoustic Neuroma? An acoustic neuroma, known as a vestibular schwannoma, is a benign (non-cancerous) growth that ...

  18. Canonical Acoustics and Its Application to Surface Acoustic Wave on Acoustic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2016-08-01

    In a conventional formalism of acoustics, acoustic pressure p and velocity field u are used for characterizing acoustic waves propagating inside elastic/acoustic materials. We shall treat some fundamental problems relevant to acoustic wave propagation alternatively by using canonical acoustics (a more concise and compact formalism of acoustic dynamics), in which an acoustic scalar potential and an acoustic vector potential (Φ ,V), instead of the conventional acoustic field quantities such as acoustic pressure and velocity field (p,u) for characterizing acoustic waves, have been defined as the fundamental variables. The canonical formalism of the acoustic energy-momentum tensor is derived in terms of the acoustic potentials. Both the acoustic Hamiltonian density and the acoustic Lagrangian density have been defined, and based on this formulation, the acoustic wave quantization in a fluid is also developed. Such a formalism of acoustic potentials is employed to the problem of negative-mass-density assisted surface acoustic wave that is a highly localized surface bound state (an eigenstate of the acoustic wave equations). Since such a surface acoustic wave can be strongly confined to an interface between an acoustic metamaterial (e.g., fluid-solid composite structures with a negative dynamical mass density) and an ordinary material (with a positive mass density), it will give rise to an effect of acoustic field enhancement on the acoustic interface, and would have potential applications in acoustic device design for acoustic wave control.

  19. Symptoms of Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ...

  20. Acoustic emission frequency discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugg, Frank E. (Inventor); Graham, Lloyd J. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    In acoustic emission nondestructive testing, broadband frequency noise is distinguished from narrow banded acoustic emission signals, since the latter are valid events indicative of structural flaws in the material being examined. This is accomplished by separating out those signals which contain frequency components both within and beyond (either above or below) the range of valid acoustic emission events. Application to acoustic emission monitoring during nondestructive bond verification and proof loading of undensified tiles on the Space Shuttle Orbiter is considered.

  1. Tutorial on architectural acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Neil; Talaske, Rick; Bistafa, Sylvio

    2002-11-01

    This tutorial is intended to provide an overview of current knowledge and practice in architectural acoustics. Topics covered will include basic concepts and history, acoustics of small rooms (small rooms for speech such as classrooms and meeting rooms, music studios, small critical listening spaces such as home theatres) and the acoustics of large rooms (larger assembly halls, auditoria, and performance halls).

  2. A theoretical study of the feasibility of acoustical tweezer: Ray acoustics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jungwoo; Shung, Kirk

    2005-04-01

    Optical tweezer has been found to have many biomedical applications in trapping macromolecules and cells. For the trapping mechanism, there has to be a sharp spatial change in axial optical intensity and the particle size must be much greater than the wavelength. Similar phenomenon may exist in acoustics. This work was undertaken to demonstrate theoretically that it is possible to acoustically trap particles near the focal point if certain conditions are met. Acoustic force exerted on fat tissue in ultrasonic fields is analyzed in ray acoustics regime where the wavelength of acoustic beam is much smaller than the size of the particle. In this paper, the analysis is therefore based on the field pattern produced by a strongly focused 100 MHz ultrasonic transducer with Gaussian intensity distribution. The magnitude of force and Fresnel coefficients at various positions are calculated. According to the simulation results, acoustical tweezer works particularly when the beam width at focus is one wavelength and the tolerance of acoustic impedance mismatch between two media lies within 6.7%. [Work supported by NIH Grant P41-EB2182.

  3. Multi-dimensional analysis of subjective acoustical ratings and acoustical measures in existing concert halls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okano, Toshiyuki

    2001-05-01

    Correlations between subjective acoustical ratings and hall-averaged values of acoustical measures are studied among existing worldwide major concert halls. It was shown that the classified acoustical ratings by Beranek [Concert and Opera Halls, How They Sound (ASA, 1996)] are discriminated correctly by combining binaural quality index (BQI) with some other acoustical measures. BQI is determined by the arithmetic average of inter-aural cross correlation coefficient in three octave bands of 500, 1000, and 2000 Hz, subtracted from unity, calculated from the early 80-ms part of binaural impulse response. Considering that the upper limit value of BQI not to cause disturbing image shift is approximately 0.85 at individual seat [Okano, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 2219-2230 (2000)], the values of 0.6 or higher in hall averaged value of BQI, 0.85 or smaller in individual seat value of BQI, and approximately 5 dB or higher in strength factor at middle frequencies are proposed as design objectives to attain a high acoustical quality. It should be provided that other acoustical measures are also optimized. These target values will be very effective in studying room shape of halls, using scale models or computer models.

  4. Detection and Classification of Whale Acoustic Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xian, Yin

    This dissertation focuses on two vital challenges in relation to whale acoustic signals: detection and classification. In detection, we evaluated the influence of the uncertain ocean environment on the spectrogram-based detector, and derived the likelihood ratio of the proposed Short Time Fourier Transform detector. Experimental results showed that the proposed detector outperforms detectors based on the spectrogram. The proposed detector is more sensitive to environmental changes because it includes phase information. In classification, our focus is on finding a robust and sparse representation of whale vocalizations. Because whale vocalizations can be modeled as polynomial phase signals, we can represent the whale calls by their polynomial phase coefficients. In this dissertation, we used the Weyl transform to capture chirp rate information, and used a two dimensional feature set to represent whale vocalizations globally. Experimental results showed that our Weyl feature set outperforms chirplet coefficients and MFCC (Mel Frequency Cepstral Coefficients) when applied to our collected data. Since whale vocalizations can be represented by polynomial phase coefficients, it is plausible that the signals lie on a manifold parameterized by these coefficients. We also studied the intrinsic structure of high dimensional whale data by exploiting its geometry. Experimental results showed that nonlinear mappings such as Laplacian Eigenmap and ISOMAP outperform linear mappings such as PCA and MDS, suggesting that the whale acoustic data is nonlinear. We also explored deep learning algorithms on whale acoustic data. We built each layer as convolutions with either a PCA filter bank (PCANet) or a DCT filter bank (DCTNet). With the DCT filter bank, each layer has different a time-frequency scale representation, and from this, one can extract different physical information. Experimental results showed that our PCANet and DCTNet achieve high classification rate on the whale

  5. Measuring Seebeck Coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, G. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A high temperature Seebeck coefficient measurement apparatus and method with various features to minimize typical sources of errors is described. Common sources of temperature and voltage measurement errors which may impact accurate measurement are identified and reduced. Applying the identified principles, a high temperature Seebeck measurement apparatus and method employing a uniaxial, four-point geometry is described to operate from room temperature up to 1300K. These techniques for non-destructive Seebeck coefficient measurements are simple to operate, and are suitable for bulk samples with a broad range of physical types and shapes.

  6. The ion acoustic decay instability, and anomalous laser light absorption for the OMEGA upgrade, large scale hot plasma application to a critical surface diagnostic, and instability at the quarter critical density. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, K.; DeGroot, J.S.; Seka, W.

    1996-11-01

    It is shown that laser light can be anomalously absorbed with a moderate intensity laster (I{lambda}{sup 2}{approx}10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}-{mu}m{sup 2}) in a large scale, laser produced plasma. The heating regime, which is characterized by a relatively weak instability in a large region, is different from the regime studied previously, which is characterized by a strong instability in a narrow region. The two dimensional geometrical effect (lateral heating) has an important consequence on the anomalous electron heating. The characteristics of the IADI, and the anomalous absorption of the laser light were studied in a large scale, hot plasma applicable to OMEGA upgrade plasma. These results are important for the diagnostic application of the IADI.

  7. Computation of instantaneous and time-averaged active acoustic intensity field around rotating source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yijun; Xu, Chen; Qi, Datong

    2015-02-01

    A vector aeroacoustics method is developed to analyze the acoustic energy flow path from the rotating source. In this method, the instantaneous and time-averaged active acoustic intensity vectors are evaluated from the time-domain and frequency-domain acoustic pressure and acoustic velocity formulations, respectively. With the above method, the acoustic intensity vectors and the acoustic energy streamlines are visualized to investigate the propagation feature of the noise radiated from the monopole and dipole point sources and the rotor in subsonic rotation. The result reveals that a portion of the acoustic energy spirals many circles before moving towards the far field, and another portion of the acoustic energy firstly flows inward along the radial direction and then propagates along the axial direction. Further, an acoustic black hole exists in the plane of source rotation, from which the acoustic energy cannot escape once the acoustic energy flows into it. Moreover, by visualizing the acoustic intensity field around the rotating sources, the acoustic-absorption performance of the acoustic liner built in the casing and centerbody is discussed.

  8. Payload configuration influence of the Ariane 4 launcher on the internal acoustic environment at lift-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borello, G.

    The prediction of payload-fairing noise interaction is addressed by studying the effect of payload parameters on the internal vibroacoustic environment of the Ariane 4. The primary determinants are identified as volume and acoustic-absorption effects, and a test sequence is used to evaluate a critical parameter called the acoustic absorption area. The proposed analytical methods can be used to characterize the influence of the payload configuration on the internal acoustic environment.

  9. Bounding the Bogoliubov coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Boonserm, Petarpa; Visser, Matt

    2008-11-15

    While over the last century or more considerable effort has been put into the problem of finding approximate solutions for wave equations in general, and quantum mechanical problems in particular, it appears that as yet relatively little work seems to have been put into the complementary problem of establishing rigourous bounds on the exact solutions. We have in mind either bounds on parametric amplification and the related quantum phenomenon of particle production (as encoded in the Bogoliubov coefficients), or bounds on transmission and reflection coefficients. Modifying and streamlining an approach developed by one of the present authors [M. Visser, Phys. Rev. A 59 (1999) 427-438, (arXiv:quant-ph/9901030)], we investigate this question by developing a formal but exact solution for the appropriate second-order linear ODE in terms of a time-ordered exponential of 2x2 matrices, then relating the Bogoliubov coefficients to certain invariants of this matrix. By bounding the matrix in an appropriate manner, we can thereby bound the Bogoliubov coefficients.

  10. Mechanism of sound absorption by seated audience in halls.

    PubMed

    Nishihara, N; Hidaka, T; Beranek, L L

    2001-11-01

    Four methods are explored for predicting the reverberation times in fully occupied halls for music as related to the sound absorption by their audiences. The methods for providing audience absorptions include two that use reverberation chambers, namely, the ISO 354 method (and other similar standards) (ISO) and Kath and Kuhl's method (K & K) [Acustica 15, 127-131 (1965)], and two that use average data from halls, i.e., Beranek's method (COH) [Concert and Opera Halls: How They Sound (Acoustical Society of America, Melville, NY, 1996)], and the average audience power-per-seat absorption which in practice is multiplied by the number of seats (AA). These methods are applied to the calculation of reverberation times in six existing halls, fully occupied, and the results were compared with actual measurements. The COH method was best for predictions over the entire frequency range. The K & K method showed the highest accuracy at mid-frequencies. Both the ISO and the K & K methods yielded wide differences for the measurements in the 125- and 250-Hz bands. The AA method was as good as the COH method when the measurements for the six halls were averaged, but showed a wide spread in the predictions around the average because it does not consider the degree of upholstering of the seats. It was hypothecated by the authors that the principal reasons for the ISO and K & K discrepancies at low frequencies were (a) differences between the degree of sound diffusion in actual halls and that in reverberation chambers, and (b) lack of information on the mechanisms of absorption of sound by people seated side-by-side in rows, particularly for near-grazing incidence sound fields. First, this article explores the sound diffusivity in a reverberation chamber and in the halls using CAD models. A probability density function of the incident angles of the sound rays that impinge on the audiences is defined and was measured for each case. Using a unique method, the sound absorption

  11. Acoustic and elastic properties of Sn(2)P(2)S(6) crystals.

    PubMed

    Mys, O; Martynyuk-Lototska, I; Grabar, A; Vlokh, R

    2009-07-01

    We present the results concerned with acoustic and elastic properties of Sn(2)P(2)S(6) crystals. The complete matrices of elastic stiffness and compliance coefficients are determined in both the crystallographic coordinate system and the system associated with eigenvectors of the elastic stiffness tensor. The acoustic slowness surfaces are constructed and the propagation and polarization directions of the slowest acoustic waves promising for acousto-optic interactions are determined on this basis. The acoustic obliquity angle and the deviation of polarization of the acoustic waves from purely transverse or longitudinal states are quantitatively analysed. PMID:21828470

  12. A study of acoustic resonance in a low-speed multistage compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Camp, T.R.

    1999-01-01

    Measurements are presented of a resonant acoustic phenomenon occurring in a low-speed multistage compressor. The results show that this phenomenon shares many characteristics with acoustic resonance as measured in high-speed compressors. These similarities include a rotating pressure field, several acoustic frequencies corresponding to different circumferential modes, step changes in frequency as the flow rate is increased, and acoustic frequencies that are independent of flow coefficient, shaft speed, and the axial length of the compression system. The paper includes measurements of the helical structure of the rotating pressure field and of the variation in amplitude of the acoustic signal over a stator exit plane.

  13. Selective optical generation of a coherent acoustic nanocavity mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascual Winter, M. F.; Rozas, G.; Jusserand, B.; Perrin, B.; Fainstein, A.; Vaccaro, P. O.; Saravanan, S.

    2007-04-01

    We report the first experimental evidence of selective generation of a confined acoustic mode in a Ga0.85In0.15As nanocavity enclosed by two Ga0.85In0.15As/AlAs phonon Bragg mirrors. Femtosecond pump-probe experiments reveal the generation of a cavity mode within the acoustic mini-gap of the mirrors, in addition to their folded acoustic modes. Selective generation of the confined mode alone is achievable for certain energies below the absorption of the quantum wells in the phonon mirrors. These energies are experimentally identified with the cavity spacer electronic transitions. The amplitude of the acoustic nanocavity mode can be controlled by detuning the excitation from the spacer transitions. The present work finds a direct interest in the seek of monochromatic MHz-THz acoustic sources.

  14. Acoustical properties of air-saturated porous material with periodically distributed dead-end pores.

    PubMed

    Leclaire, P; Umnova, O; Dupont, T; Panneton, R

    2015-04-01

    A theoretical and numerical study of the sound propagation in air-saturated porous media with straight main pores bearing lateral cavities (dead-ends) is presented. The lateral cavities are located at "nodes" periodically spaced along each main pore. The effect of periodicity in the distribution of the lateral cavities is studied, and the low frequency limit valid for the closely spaced dead-ends is considered separately. It is shown that the absorption coefficient and transmission loss are influenced by the viscous and thermal losses in the main pores as well as their perforation rate. The presence of long or short dead-ends significantly alters the acoustical properties of the material and can increase significantly the absorption at low frequencies (a few hundred hertz). These depend strongly on the geometry (diameter and length) of the dead-ends, on their number per node, and on the periodicity along the propagation axis. These effects are primarily due to low sound speed in the main pores and to thermal losses in the dead-end pores. The model predictions are compared with experimental results. Possible designs of materials of a few cm thicknesses displaying enhanced low frequency absorption at a few hundred hertz are proposed. PMID:25920830

  15. Generation of currents in the solar atmosphere by acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riutov, D. D.; Riutova, M. P.

    The novel mechanism presented for current and magnetic field generation by acoustic-wave fluxes in solar plasmas is especially potent in the region where acoustic-wave damping is due to such nonlinear effects as weak-shock formation. An evaluation is made of the significance of this effect for the solar atmosphere, under the proviso that this treatment is restricted to effects due to the usual acoustic waves. Wave absorption is governed by the classical collisional effects of thermal conductivity, viscosity, and ohmic losses.

  16. Design, characterization and modeling of biobased acoustic foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffari Mosanenzadeh, Shahrzad

    Polymeric open cell foams are widely used as sound absorbers in sectors such as automobile, aerospace, transportation and building industries, yet there is a need to improve sound absorption of these foams through understanding the relation between cell morphology and acoustic properties of porous material. Due to complicated microscopic structure of open cell foams, investigating the relation between foam morphology and acoustic properties is rather intricate and still an open problem in the field. The focus of this research is to design and develop biobased open cell foams for acoustic applications to replace conventional petrochemical based foams as well as investigating the link between cell morphology and macroscopic properties of open cell porous structures. To achieve these objectives, two industrially produced biomaterials, polylactide (PLA) and polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) and their composites were examined and highly porous biobased foams were fabricated by particulate leaching and compression molding. Acoustic absorption capability of these foams was enhanced utilizing the effect of co-continuous blends to form a bimodal porous structure. To tailor mechanical and acoustic properties of biobased foams, blends of PLA and PHA were studied to reach the desired mechanical and viscoelastic properties. To enhance acoustic properties of porous medium for having a broad band absorption effect, cell structure must be appropriately graded. Such porous structures with microstructural gradation are called Functionally Graded Materials (FGM). A novel graded foam structure was designed with superior sound absorption to demonstrate the effect of cell arrangement on performance of acoustic fixtures. Acoustic measurements were performed in a two microphone impedance tube and acoustic theory of Johnson-Champoux-Allard was applied to the fabricated foams to determine micro cellular properties such as tortuosity, viscous and thermal lengths from sound absorption impedance tube

  17. AST Launch Vehicle Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, Janice; Counter, D.; Giacomoni, D.

    2015-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are then used in the prediction of internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components which result in the qualification levels. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic (LOA) environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle. If there is a significant amount of uncertainty in the predictions or if acoustic mitigation options must be implemented, a subscale acoustic test is a feasible pre-launch test option to verify the LOA environments. The NASA Space Launch System (SLS) program initiated the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) to verify the predicted SLS LOA environments and to determine the acoustic reduction with an above deck water sound suppression system. The SMAT was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center and the test article included a 5% scale SLS vehicle model, tower and Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 250 instruments. The SMAT liftoff acoustic results are presented, findings are discussed and a comparison is shown to the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) results.

  18. Acoustic agglomeration of power plant fly ash. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Reethof, G.; McDaniel, O.H.

    1982-01-01

    The work has shown that acoustic agglomeration at practical acoustic intensities and frequencies is technically and most likely economically viable. The following studies were performed with the listed results: The physics of acoustic agglomeration is complex particularly at the needed high acoustic intensities in the range of 150 to 160 dB and frequencies in the 2500 Hz range. The analytical model which we developed, although not including nonlinear acoustic efforts, agreed with the trends observed. We concentrated our efforts on clarifying the impact of high acoustic intensities on the generation of turbulence. Results from a special set of tests show that although some acoustically generated turbulence of sorts exists in the 150 to 170 dB range with acoustic streaming present, such turbulence will not be a significant factor in acoustic agglomeration compared to the dominant effect of the acoustic velocities at the fundamental frequency and its harmonics. Studies of the robustness of the agglomerated particles using the Anderson Mark III impactor as the source of the shear stresses on the particles show that the agglomerates should be able to withstand the rigors of flow through commercial cyclones without significant break-up. We designed and developed a 700/sup 0/F tubular agglomerator of 8'' internal diameter. The electrically heated system functioned well and provided very encouraging agglomeration results at acoustic levels in the 150 to 160 dB and 2000 to 3000 Hz ranges. We confirmed earlier results that an optimum frequency exists at about 2500 Hz and that larger dust loadings will give better results. Studies of the absorption of acoustic energy by various common gases as a function of temperature and humidity showed the need to pursue such an investigation for flue gas constituents in order to provide necessary data for the design of agglomerators. 65 references, 56 figures, 4 tables.

  19. Two-dimensional acoustic metamaterial structure for potential image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hongwei; Han, Yu; Li, Ying; Pai, Frank

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents modeling, analysis techniques and experiment of for two-Dimensional Acoustic metamaterial Structure for filtering acoustic waves. For a unit cell of an infinite two-Dimensional Acoustic metamaterial Structure, governing equations are derived using the extended Hamilton principle. The concepts of negative effective mass and stiffness and how the spring-mass-damper subsystems create a stopband are explained in detail. Numerical simulations reveal that the actual working mechanism of the proposed acoustic metamaterial structure is based on the concept of conventional mechanical vibration absorbers. It uses the incoming wave in the structure to resonate the integrated membrane-mass-damper absorbers to vibrate in their optical mode at frequencies close to but above their local resonance frequencies to create shear forces and bending moments to straighten the panel and stop the wave propagation. Moreover, a two-dimension acoustic metamaterial structure consisting of lumped mass and elastic membrane is fabricated in the lab. We do experiments on the model and The results validate the concept and show that, for two-dimension acoustic metamaterial structure do exist two vibration modes. For the wave absorption, the mass of each cell should be considered in the design. With appropriate design calculations, the proposed two-dimension acoustic metamaterial structure can be used for absorption of low-frequency waves. Hence this special structure can be used in filtering the waves, and the potential using can increase the ultrasonic imaging quality.

  20. Acoustic Translation of an Acoustically Levitated Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Allen, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Acoustic-levitation apparatus uses only one acoustic mode to move sample from one region of chamber to another. Sample heated and cooled quickly by translation between hot and cold regions of levitation chamber. Levitated sample is raised into furnace region by raising plunger. Frequency of sound produced by transducers adjusted by feedback system to maintain (102) resonant mode, which levitates sample midway between transducers and plunger regardless of plunger position.

  1. General properties of the acoustic plate modes at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Anisimkin, V I; Anisimkin, I V; Voronova, N V; Puсhkov, Yu V

    2015-09-01

    Using acoustic plate modes with SH-polarization and quartz crystal with Euler angles 0°, 132.75°, 90°, as an example, general properties of the acoustic plate modes at different temperatures are studied theoretically and experimentally in the range from -40 to +80°C. It is shown that in addition to well-known parameters responsible for temperature characteristics of acoustic waves the temperature coefficients of the acoustic plate modes depend on the mode order n, plate thickness h/λ, and expansion of the plate in direction of its thickness (h - thickness, λ - acoustic wavelength). These properties permit the mode sensitivity to be increased or decreased without replacing plate material and orientation. PMID:26002698

  2. Virtual Acoustics: Evaluation of Psychoacoustic Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, Durand R.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Current virtual acoustic displays for teleconferencing and virtual reality are usually limited to very simple or non-existent renderings of reverberation, a fundamental part of the acoustic environmental context that is encountered in day-to-day hearing. Several research efforts have produced results that suggest that environmental cues dramatically improve perceptual performance within virtual acoustic displays, and that is possible to manipulate signal processing parameters to effectively reproduce important aspects of virtual acoustic perception in real-time. However, the computational resources for rendering reverberation remain formidable. Our efforts at NASA Ames have been focused using a several perceptual threshold metrics, to determine how various "trade-offs" might be made in real-time acoustic rendering. This includes both original work and confirmation of existing data that was obtained in real rather than virtual environments. The talk will consider the importance of using individualized versus generalized pinnae cues (the "Head-Related Transfer Function"); the use of head movement cues; threshold data for early reflections and late reverberation; and consideration of the necessary accuracy for measuring and rendering octave-band absorption characteristics of various wall surfaces. In addition, a consideration of the analysis-synthesis of the reverberation within "everyday spaces" (offices, conference rooms) will be contrasted to the commonly used paradigm of concert hall spaces.

  3. Geometric absorption of electromagnetic angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konz, C.; Benford, Gregory

    2003-10-01

    Circularly polarized electromagnetic fields carry both energy and angular momentum. We investigate the conditions under which a circularly polarized wave field transfers angular momentum to a perfectly conducting macroscopic object, using exact electromagnetic wave theory in a steady-state calculation. We find that axisymmetric perfect conductors cannot absorb or radiate angular momentum when illuminated. However, any asymmetry allows absorption. A rigorous, steady-state solution of the boundary value problem for the reflection from a perfectly conducting infinite wedge shows that waves convey angular momentum at the edges of asymmetries. Conductors can also radiate angular momentum, so their geometric absorption coefficient for angular momentum can be negative. Such absorption or radiation depends solely on the specific geometry of the conductor. The geometric absorption coefficient can be as high as 0.8, and the coefficient for radiation can be -0.4, larger than typical material absorption coefficients. We apply the results to recent experiments which spun roof-shaped aluminum sheets with polarized microwave beams. Applications of geometric, instead of material, absorption can be quite varied. Though experiments testing these ideas will be simpler at microwavelengths, the ideas work for optical ones as well.

  4. ABSORPTION ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Brooksbank, W.A. Jr.; Leddicotte, G.W.; Strain, J.E.; Hendon, H.H. Jr.

    1961-11-14

    A means was developed for continuously computing and indicating the isotopic assay of a process solution and for automatically controlling the process output of isotope separation equipment to provide a continuous output of the desired isotopic ratio. A counter tube is surrounded with a sample to be analyzed so that the tube is exactly in the center of the sample. A source of fast neutrons is provided and is spaced from the sample. The neutrons from the source are thermalized by causing them to pass through a neutron moderator, and the neutrons are allowed to diffuse radially through the sample to actuate the counter. A reference counter in a known sample of pure solvent is also actuated by the thermal neutrons from the neutron source. The number of neutrons which actuate the detectors is a function of a concentration of the elements in solution and their neutron absorption cross sections. The pulses produced by the detectors responsive to each neu tron passing therethrough are amplified and counted. The respective times required to accumulate a selected number of counts are measured by associated timing devices. The concentration of a particular element in solution may be determined by utilizing the following relation: T2/Ti = BCR, where B is a constant proportional to the absorption cross sections, T2 is the time of count collection for the unknown solution, Ti is the time of count collection for the pure solvent, R is the isotopic ratlo, and C is the molar concentration of the element to be determined. Knowing the slope constant B for any element and when the chemical concentration is known, the isotopic concentration may be readily determined, and conversely when the isotopic ratio is known, the chemical concentrations may be determined. (AEC)

  5. Use of co-combustion bottom ash to design an acoustic absorbing material for highway noise barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Arenas, Celia; Leiva, Carlos; Vilches, Luis F.

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • The particle size of bottom ash influenced the acoustic behavior of the barrier. • The best sound absorption coefficients were measured for larger particle sizes. • The maximum noise absorption is displaced to lower frequencies for higher thickness. • A noise barrier was designed with better properties than commercial products. • Recycling products from bottom ash no present leaching and radioactivity problems. - Abstract: The present study aims to determine and evaluate the applicability of a new product consisting of coal bottom ash mixed with Portland cement in the application of highway noise barriers. In order to effectively recycle the bottom ash, the influence of the grain particle size of bottom ash, the thickness of the panel and the combination of different layers with various particle sizes have been studied, as well as some environmental properties including leachability (EN-12457-4, NEN-7345) and radioactivity tests. Based on the obtained results, the acoustic properties of the final composite material were similar or even better than those found in porous concrete used for the same application. According to this study, the material produced presented no environmental risk.

  6. Nonlinear Acoustics in Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauterborn, Werner; Kurz, Thomas; Akhatov, Iskander

    At high sound intensities or long propagation distances at in fluids sufficiently low damping acoustic phenomena become nonlinear. This chapter focuses on nonlinear acoustic wave properties in gases and liquids. The origin of nonlinearity, equations of state, simple nonlinear waves, nonlinear acoustic wave equations, shock-wave formation, and interaction of waves are presented and discussed. Tables are given for the nonlinearity parameter B/A for water and a range of organic liquids, liquid metals and gases. Acoustic cavitation with its nonlinear bubble oscillations, pattern formation and sonoluminescence (light from sound) are modern examples of nonlinear acoustics. The language of nonlinear dynamics needed for understanding chaotic dynamics and acoustic chaotic systems is introduced.

  7. Acoustical evaluation of carbonized and activated cotton nonwovens.

    PubMed

    Jiang, N; Chen, J Y; Parikh, D V

    2009-12-01

    An activated carbon fiber nonwoven (ACF) was manufactured from a cotton nonwoven fabric. For the ACF acoustic application, a nonwoven composite of ACF with cotton nonwoven as a base layer was developed. Also produced were the composites of the cotton nonwoven base layer with a layer of glassfiber nonwoven, and the cotton nonwoven base layer with a layer of cotton fiber nonwoven. Their noise absorption coefficients and sound transmission loss were measured using the Brüel and Kjaer impedance tube instrument. Statistical significance of the differences between the composites was tested using the method of Duncan's grouping. The study concluded that the ACF composite exhibited a greater ability to absorb normal incidence sound waves than the composites with either glassfiber or cotton fiber. The analysis of sound transmission loss revealed that the three composites still obeyed the mass law of transmission loss. The composite with the surface layer of cotton fiber nonwoven possessed a higher fabric density and therefore showed a better sound insulation than the composites with glassfiber and ACF. PMID:19664919

  8. Localized acoustic surface modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Mohamed; Chen, Pai-Yen; Bağcı, Hakan

    2016-04-01

    We introduce the concept of localized acoustic surface modes. We demonstrate that they are induced on a two-dimensional cylindrical rigid surface with subwavelength corrugations under excitation by an incident acoustic plane wave. Our results show that the corrugated rigid surface is acoustically equivalent to a cylindrical scatterer with uniform mass density that can be represented using a Drude-like model. This, indeed, suggests that plasmonic-like acoustic materials can be engineered with potential applications in various areas including sensing, imaging, and cloaking.

  9. Low frequency acoustic microscope

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    1986-11-04

    A scanning acoustic microscope is disclosed for the detection and location of near surface flaws, inclusions or voids in a solid sample material. A focused beam of acoustic energy is directed at the sample with its focal plane at the subsurface flaw, inclusion or void location. The sample is scanned with the beam. Detected acoustic energy specularly reflected and mode converted at the surface of the sample and acoustic energy reflected by subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids at the focal plane are used for generating an interference signal which is processed and forms a signal indicative of the subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids.

  10. Acoustic dispersive prism.

    PubMed

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz-1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium. PMID:26739504

  11. Acoustic dispersive prism

    PubMed Central

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz–1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium. PMID:26739504

  12. Acoustic dispersive prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz-1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium.

  13. THE USE OF ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICAL MATERIALS, THEORY AND PRACTICE. SECOND EDITION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acoustical Materials Association, New York, NY.

    THIS DISCUSSION OF THE BASIC FUNCTION OF ACOUSTICAL MATERIALS--THE CONTROL OF SOUND BY SOUND ABSORPTION--IS BASED ON THE WAVE AND ENERGY PROPERTIES OF SOUND. IT IS STATED THAT, IN GENERAL, A MUCH LARGER VOLUME OF ACOUSTICAL MATERIALS IS NEEDED TO REMOVE DISTRACTING NOISE FROM CLASSROOMS AND OFFICES, FOR EXAMPLE, THAN FROM AUDITORIUMS, WHERE A…

  14. Distribution of reflection coefficients in absorbing chaotic microwave cavities.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Sánchez, R A; Kuhl, U; Barth, M; Lewenkopf, C H; Stöckmann, H-J

    2003-10-24

    The distribution of reflection coefficients P(R) for chaotic microwave cavities with time-reversal symmetry is investigated in different absorption and antenna coupling regimes. For all regimes the agreement between experimental distributions and random-matrix theory predictions is very good, provided both the antenna coupling T(a) and the wall absorption strength T(w) are taken into account in an appropriate way. These parameters are determined by independent experimental quantities. PMID:14611349

  15. Axial resolution of laser opto-acoustic imaging: influence of acoustic attenuation and diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esenaliev, Rinat O.; Alma, Herve; Tittel, Frank K.; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    1998-05-01

    Laser optoacoustic imaging can be applied for characterization of layered and heterogeneous tissue structures in vivo. Accurate tissue characterization may provide: (1) means for medical diagnoses, and (2) pretreatment tissue properties important for therapeutic laser procedures. Axial resolution of the optoacoustic imaging is higher than that of optical imaging. However, the resolution may degrade due to either attenuation of high-frequency ultrasonic waves in tissue, or/and diffraction of low-frequency acoustic waves. The goal of this study was to determine the axial resolution as a function of acoustic attenuation and diffraction upon propagation of laser-induced pressure waves in water with absorbing layer, in breast phantoms, and in biological tissues. Acoustic pressure measurements were performed in absolute values using piezoelectric transducers. A layer or a small sphere of absorbing medium was placed within a medium with lower optical absorption. The distance between the acoustic transducer and the absorbing object was varied, so that the effects of acoustic attenuation and diffraction could be observed. The location of layers or spheres was measured from recorded optoacoustic pressure profiles and compared with real values measured with a micrometer. The experimental results were analyzed using theoretical models for spherical and planar acoustic waves. Our studies demonstrated that despite strong acoustic attenuation of high-frequency ultrasonic waves, the axial resolution of laser optoacoustic imaging may be as high as 20 micrometers for tissue layers located at a 5-mm depth. An axial resolution of 10 micrometers to 20 micrometers was demonstrated for an absorbing layer at a distance of 5 cm in water, when the resolution is affected only by diffraction. Acoustic transducers employed in optoacoustic imaging can have either high sensitivity or fast temporal response. Therefore, a high resolution may not be achieved with sensitive transducers utilized in

  16. Infrared absorption modeling of VOx microbolometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggoun, Mehdi; Jiang, Jianliang; Khan, M. K.

    2015-08-01

    The absorption model plays an important role in the design of the microbolometer structure regarding the determination of the optimum thickness of the structure layers. Moreover, the infrared absorption depends on the wavelength of the radiation and the material properties. In this paper, we presented an Infrared absorption model with absorption coefficient of 96% at maximum absorption wavelength of 9.89μm which is very close to the expected value 10μm. This model was established by using MATLAB so that the simulation of the infrared absorption of the VOx microbolometer could be accomplished. In order to confirm the role of this modeling in the design of the device structure, comparison with other structures is also studied in this paper.

  17. Coherent acoustic phonon oscillation accompanied with backward acoustic pulse below exciton resonance in a ZnO epifilm on oxide-buffered Si(1 1 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ja-Hon; Shen, Yu-Kai; Liu, Wei-Rein; Lu, Chia-Hui; Chen, Yao-Hui; Chang, Chun-peng; Lee, Wei-Chin; Hong, Minghwei; Kwo, Jueinai-Raynien; Hsu, Chia-Hung; Hsieh, Wen-Feng

    2016-08-01

    Unlike coherent acoustic phonons (CAPs) generated from heat induced thermal stress by the coated Au film, we demonstrated the oscillation from c-ZnO epitaxial film on oxide buffered Si through a degenerate pump–probe technique. As the excited photon energy was set below the exciton resonance, the electronic stress that resulted from defect resonance was used to induce acoustic wave. The damped oscillation revealed a superposition of a high frequency and long decay CAP signal with a backward propagating acoustic pulse which was generated by the absorption of the penetrated pump beam at the Si surface and selected by the ZnO layer as the acoustic resonator.

  18. Coupled vibro-acoustic model updating using frequency response functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehete, D. V.; Modak, S. V.; Gupta, K.

    2016-03-01

    Interior noise in cavities of motorized vehicles is of increasing significance due to the lightweight design of these structures. Accurate coupled vibro-acoustic FE models of such cavities are required so as to allow a reliable design and analysis. It is, however, experienced that the vibro-acoustic predictions using these models do not often correlate acceptably well with the experimental measurements and hence require model updating. Both the structural and the acoustic parameters addressing the stiffness as well as the damping modeling inaccuracies need to be considered simultaneously in the model updating framework in order to obtain an accurate estimate of these parameters. It is also noted that the acoustic absorption properties are generally frequency dependent. This makes use of modal data based methods for updating vibro-acoustic FE models difficult. In view of this, the present paper proposes a method based on vibro-acoustic frequency response functions that allow updating of a coupled FE model by considering simultaneously the parameters associated with both the structural as well as the acoustic model of the cavity. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated through numerical studies on a 3D rectangular box cavity with a flexible plate. Updating parameters related to the material property, stiffness of joints between the plate and the rectangular cavity and the properties of absorbing surfaces of the acoustic cavity are considered. The robustness of the method under presence of noise is also studied.

  19. Effect of the payload on the surrounding internal acoustic environment at lift-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borello, G.

    1991-10-01

    A predictive limit can be fixed to the influence of payloads on the internal acoustic pressure at lift-off. For this purpose, the vibroacoustic interaction between the fairing, the acoustic cavity and the payload, is analyzed through global parameters: the absorption area of the fairing, which was determined by a specific test campaign on the Ariane 4 fairing in reverberant chamber; the absorption area of a set of payloads which were estimated using specific tests performed on two payloads.

  20. Time-dependent oral absorption models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higaki, K.; Yamashita, S.; Amidon, G. L.

    2001-01-01

    The plasma concentration-time profiles following oral administration of drugs are often irregular and cannot be interpreted easily with conventional models based on first- or zero-order absorption kinetics and lag time. Six new models were developed using a time-dependent absorption rate coefficient, ka(t), wherein the time dependency was varied to account for the dynamic processes such as changes in fluid absorption or secretion, in absorption surface area, and in motility with time, in the gastrointestinal tract. In the present study, the plasma concentration profiles of propranolol obtained in human subjects following oral dosing were analyzed using the newly derived models based on mass balance and compared with the conventional models. Nonlinear regression analysis indicated that the conventional compartment model including lag time (CLAG model) could not predict the rapid initial increase in plasma concentration after dosing and the predicted Cmax values were much lower than that observed. On the other hand, all models with the time-dependent absorption rate coefficient, ka(t), were superior to the CLAG model in predicting plasma concentration profiles. Based on Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC), the fluid absorption model without lag time (FA model) exhibited the best overall fit to the data. The two-phase model including lag time, TPLAG model was also found to be a good model judging from the values of sum of squares. This model also described the irregular profiles of plasma concentration with time and frequently predicted Cmax values satisfactorily. A comparison of the absorption rate profiles also suggested that the TPLAG model is better at prediction of irregular absorption kinetics than the FA model. In conclusion, the incorporation of a time-dependent absorption rate coefficient ka(t) allows the prediction of nonlinear absorption characteristics in a more reliable manner.

  1. In-vivo absorption properties of algal pigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidigare, Robert R.; Ondrusek, Michael E.; Morrow, John H.; Kiefer, Dale A.

    1990-09-01

    Estimates of the in vivo specific absorption coefficients (m2 mg'; 400-750 nm, 2 nm intervals) for the major algal pigment groups (chlorophylls, carotenoids and phycobilins) are presented. "Unpackaged" absorption coefficients were initially obtained by measuring the absorption properties of pure pigment standards spectrophotometrically and "shifting" their absorption maxima to match in vivo positions. Two approaches for estimating the phytoplankton absorption coefficient (spectral reconstruction and spectral decomposition) are compared by linear regression analysis, incorporating concurrent measurements of particulate absorption and pigmentation performed in the Sargasso Sea. Results suggest that "pigment package" effects are minimal for natural assemblages of open-oceanic phytoplankton and that accessory pigments do not always co-vary with chlorophyll a over depth and time.

  2. Imaging of highly turbid media by the absorption method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contini, Daniele; Liszka, Heather; Sassaroli, Angelo; Zaccanti, Giovanni

    1996-05-01

    The results of a study on imaging that is based on the absorption method are presented. This method is based on attenuation measurements carried out in the presence of a sufficiently high absorption coefficient by the use of a continuous-wave source. The benefit of absorption on image quality comes from the strong attenuation of photons traveling along long trajectories. When the absorption coefficient is increased, the received energy decreases, but the mean path length of received photons decreases. The effect of increasing the absorption coefficient is similar to that of decreasing the gating time when the time-gating technique is used. Experimental results showed that the spatial resolution obtained with the absorption technique is similar to that obtained with the time-gating technique. method, spatial resolution, turbid media.

  3. Acoustics Critical Readiness Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, Kenny

    2010-01-01

    This presentation reviews the status of the acoustic equipment from the medical operations perspective. Included is information about the acoustic dosimeters, sound level meter, and headphones that are planned for use while on orbit. Finally there is information about on-orbit hearing assessments.

  4. The challenge of acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lord, P.

    1981-01-01

    The various applications of acoustics, including sonar, ultrasonic examination of unborn foetuses and architectural applications, are briefly reviewed. Problems in traffic and industrial noise, auditorium design and explosive noise are considered in more detail. The educational aspects of acoustical science and technology are briefly considered.

  5. Highly directional acoustic receivers.

    PubMed

    Cray, Benjamin A; Evora, Victor M; Nuttall, Albert H

    2003-03-01

    The theoretical directivity of a single combined acoustic receiver, a device that can measure many quantities of an acoustic field at a collocated point, is presented here. The formulation is developed using a Taylor series expansion of acoustic pressure about the origin of a Cartesian coordinate system. For example, the quantities measured by a second-order combined receiver, denoted a dyadic sensor, are acoustic pressure, the three orthogonal components of acoustic particle velocity, and the nine spatial gradients of the velocity vector. The power series expansion, which can be of any order, is cast into an expression that defines the directivity of a single receiving element. It is shown that a single highly directional dyadic sensor can have a directivity index of up to 9.5 dB. However, there is a price to pay with highly directive sensors; these sensors can be significantly more sensitive to nonacoustic noise sources. PMID:12656387

  6. Ocean acoustic hurricane classification.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Joshua D; Makris, Nicholas C

    2006-01-01

    Theoretical and empirical evidence are combined to show that underwater acoustic sensing techniques may be valuable for measuring the wind speed and determining the destructive power of a hurricane. This is done by first developing a model for the acoustic intensity and mutual intensity in an ocean waveguide due to a hurricane and then determining the relationship between local wind speed and underwater acoustic intensity. From this it is shown that it should be feasible to accurately measure the local wind speed and classify the destructive power of a hurricane if its eye wall passes directly over a single underwater acoustic sensor. The potential advantages and disadvantages of the proposed acoustic method are weighed against those of currently employed techniques. PMID:16454274

  7. Acoustic Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, David R.; Sabra, Karim G.

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic waves carry information about their source and collect information about their environment as they propagate. This article reviews how these information-carrying and -collecting features of acoustic waves that travel through fluids can be exploited for remote sensing. In nearly all cases, modern acoustic remote sensing involves array-recorded sounds and array signal processing to recover multidimensional results. The application realm for acoustic remote sensing spans an impressive range of signal frequencies (10-2 to 107 Hz) and distances (10-2 to 107 m) and involves biomedical ultrasound imaging, nondestructive evaluation, oil and gas exploration, military systems, and Nuclear Test Ban Treaty monitoring. In the past two decades, approaches have been developed to robustly localize remote sources; remove noise and multipath distortion from recorded signals; and determine the acoustic characteristics of the environment through which the sound waves have traveled, even when the recorded sounds originate from uncooperative sources or are merely ambient noise.

  8. Acoustic integrated extinction

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Andrew N.

    2015-01-01

    The integrated extinction (IE) is defined as the integral of the scattering cross section as a function of wavelength. Sohl et al. (2007 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 122, 3206–3210. (doi:10.1121/1.2801546)) derived an IE expression for acoustic scattering that is causal, i.e. the scattered wavefront in the forward direction arrives later than the incident plane wave in the background medium. The IE formula was based on electromagnetic results, for which scattering is causal by default. Here, we derive a formula for the acoustic IE that is valid for causal and non-causal scattering. The general result is expressed as an integral of the time-dependent forward scattering function. The IE reduces to a finite integral for scatterers with zero long-wavelength monopole and dipole amplitudes. Implications for acoustic cloaking are discussed and a new metric is proposed for broadband acoustic transparency. PMID:27547100

  9. Virtual acoustics displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Fisher, Scott S.; Stone, Philip K.; Foster, Scott H.

    1991-01-01

    The real time acoustic display capabilities are described which were developed for the Virtual Environment Workstation (VIEW) Project at NASA-Ames. The acoustic display is capable of generating localized acoustic cues in real time over headphones. An auditory symbology, a related collection of representational auditory 'objects' or 'icons', can be designed using ACE (Auditory Cue Editor), which links both discrete and continuously varying acoustic parameters with information or events in the display. During a given display scenario, the symbology can be dynamically coordinated in real time with 3-D visual objects, speech, and gestural displays. The types of displays feasible with the system range from simple warnings and alarms to the acoustic representation of multidimensional data or events.

  10. Cochlear bionic acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Fuyin; Wu, Jiu Hui; Huang, Meng; Fu, Gang; Bai, Changan

    2014-11-01

    A design of bionic acoustic metamaterial and acoustic functional devices was proposed by employing the mammalian cochlear as a prototype. First, combined with the experimental data in previous literatures, it is pointed out that the cochlear hair cells and stereocilia cluster are a kind of natural biological acoustic metamaterials with the negative stiffness characteristics. Then, to design the acoustic functional devices conveniently in engineering application, a simplified parametric helical structure was proposed to replace actual irregular cochlea for bionic design, and based on the computational results of such a bionic parametric helical structure, it is suggested that the overall cochlear is a local resonant system with the negative dynamic effective mass characteristics. There are many potential applications in the bandboard energy recovery device, cochlear implant, and acoustic black hole.

  11. Issues Related to Large Flight Hardware Acoustic Qualification Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Perry, Douglas C.; Kern, Dennis L.

    2011-01-01

    The characteristics of acoustical testing volumes generated by reverberant chambers or a circle of loudspeakers with and without large flight hardware within the testing volume are significantly different. The parameters attributing to these differences are normally not accounted for through analysis or acoustic tests prior to the qualification testing without the test hardware present. In most cases the control microphones are kept at least 2-ft away from hardware surfaces, chamber walls, and speaker surfaces to minimize the impact of the hardware in controlling the sound field. However, the acoustic absorption and radiation of sound by hardware surfaces may significantly alter the sound pressure field controlled within the chamber/speaker volume to a given specification. These parameters often result in an acoustic field that may provide under/over testing scenarios for flight hardware. In this paper the acoustic absorption by hardware surfaces will be discussed in some detail. A simple model is provided to account for some of the observations made from Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft that recently underwent acoustic qualification tests in a reverberant chamber.

  12. Ocean seismo-acoustics. Low-frequency underwater acoustics

    SciTech Connect

    Akal, T.; berkson, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents information on seismo-acoustic propagation in seawater and sea beds that includes theoretical developments, modelling and experiments, and fluctuations. Boundary scatteiring, seismo-acoustic waves and seismo-acoustic noise are discussed. Technology and new approaches in seismo-acoustic measurements are presented.

  13. High Resolution X-ray-Induced Acoustic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Tang, Shanshan; Ahmad, Moiz; Xing, Lei

    2016-05-01

    Absorption based CT imaging has been an invaluable tool in medical diagnosis, biology, and materials science. However, CT requires a large set of projection data and high radiation dose to achieve superior image quality. In this letter, we report a new imaging modality, X-ray Induced Acoustic Tomography (XACT), which takes advantages of high sensitivity to X-ray absorption and high ultrasonic resolution in a single modality. A single projection X-ray exposure is sufficient to generate acoustic signals in 3D space because the X-ray generated acoustic waves are of a spherical nature and propagate in all directions from their point of generation. We demonstrate the successful reconstruction of gold fiducial markers with a spatial resolution of about 350 μm. XACT reveals a new imaging mechanism and provides uncharted opportunities for structural determination with X-ray.

  14. High Resolution X-ray-Induced Acoustic Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Tang, Shanshan; Ahmad, Moiz; Xing, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Absorption based CT imaging has been an invaluable tool in medical diagnosis, biology, and materials science. However, CT requires a large set of projection data and high radiation dose to achieve superior image quality. In this letter, we report a new imaging modality, X-ray Induced Acoustic Tomography (XACT), which takes advantages of high sensitivity to X-ray absorption and high ultrasonic resolution in a single modality. A single projection X-ray exposure is sufficient to generate acoustic signals in 3D space because the X-ray generated acoustic waves are of a spherical nature and propagate in all directions from their point of generation. We demonstrate the successful reconstruction of gold fiducial markers with a spatial resolution of about 350 μm. XACT reveals a new imaging mechanism and provides uncharted opportunities for structural determination with X-ray. PMID:27189746

  15. High Resolution X-ray-Induced Acoustic Tomography.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Tang, Shanshan; Ahmad, Moiz; Xing, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Absorption based CT imaging has been an invaluable tool in medical diagnosis, biology, and materials science. However, CT requires a large set of projection data and high radiation dose to achieve superior image quality. In this letter, we report a new imaging modality, X-ray Induced Acoustic Tomography (XACT), which takes advantages of high sensitivity to X-ray absorption and high ultrasonic resolution in a single modality. A single projection X-ray exposure is sufficient to generate acoustic signals in 3D space because the X-ray generated acoustic waves are of a spherical nature and propagate in all directions from their point of generation. We demonstrate the successful reconstruction of gold fiducial markers with a spatial resolution of about 350 μm. XACT reveals a new imaging mechanism and provides uncharted opportunities for structural determination with X-ray. PMID:27189746

  16. Broadband acoustic omnidirectional absorber based on temperature gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Feng; Zhao, Ping; Quan, Li; Liu, Xiaozhou; Gong, Xiufen

    2014-08-01

    Previous research into acoustic omnidirectional absorber (AOA) has shown the feasibility of forming acoustic black hole to guide the incident wave into the central absorptive cavity. However, major restrictions to practical applications exist due to complexity of designing metamaterials and unchangeable working states. Here, we propose two cylindrical, two-dimensional AOA schemes based on temperature gradients for airborne applications. One scheme with accurately designed temperature gradients has a better absorption performance which can almost completely absorb the incident wave, while the other one with a simplified configuration has low complexity which makes it much easier to realize. Geometric acoustics is used to obtain the refractive index distributions with different radii, which is then utilized to deduce the desired temperature gradients. Both schemes are temperature-tuned with broad working bandwidth.

  17. Averaging Internal Consistency Reliability Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldt, Leonard S.; Charter, Richard A.

    2006-01-01

    Seven approaches to averaging reliability coefficients are presented. Each approach starts with a unique definition of the concept of "average," and no approach is more correct than the others. Six of the approaches are applicable to internal consistency coefficients. The seventh approach is specific to alternate-forms coefficients. Although the…

  18. Evaluation of Fourier transform coefficients for the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis from diffuse optical tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montejo, Ludguier D.; Jia, Jingfei; Kim, Hyun K.; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2013-03-01

    We apply the Fourier Transform to absorption and scattering coefficient images of proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints and evaluate the performance of these coefficients as classifiers using receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. We find 25 features that yield a Youden index over 0.7, 3 features that yield a Youden index over 0.8, and 1 feature that yields a Youden index over 0.9 (90.0% sensitivity and 100% specificity). In general, scattering coefficient images yield better one-dimensional classifiers compared to absorption coefficient images. Using features derived from scattering coefficient images we obtain an average Youden index of 0.58 +/- 0.16, and an average Youden index of 0.45 +/- 0.15 when using features from absorption coefficient images.

  19. Acoustics Reflections of Full-Scale Rotor Noise Measurements in NFAC 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbely, Natasha Lydia; Kitaplioglu, Cahit; Sim, Ben W.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of current research is to identify the extent of acoustic time history distortions due to wind tunnel wall reflections. Acoustic measurements from the recent full-scale Boeing-SMART rotor test (Fig. 2) will be used to illustrate the quality of noise measurement in the NFAC 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel test section. Results will be compared to PSU-WOPWOP predictions obtained with and without adjustments due to sound reflections off wind tunnel walls. Present research assumes a rectangular enclosure as shown in Fig. 3a. The Method of Mirror Images7 is used to account for reflection sources and their acoustic paths by introducing mirror images of the rotor (i.e. acoustic source), at each and every wall surface, to enforce a no-flow boundary condition at the position of the physical walls (Fig. 3b). While conventional approach evaluates the "combined" noise from both the source and image rotor at a single microphone position, an alternative approach is used to simplify implementation of PSU-WOPWOP for this reflection analysis. Here, an "equivalent" microphone position is defined with respect to the source rotor for each mirror image that effectively renders the reflection analysis to be a one rotor, multiple microphones problem. This alternative approach has the advantage of allowing each individual "equivalent" microphone, representing the reflection pulse from the associated wall surface, to be adjusted by the panel absorption coefficient illustrated in Fig. 1a. Note that the presence of parallel wall surfaces requires an infinite number of mirror images (Fig. 3c) to satisfy the no-flow boundary conditions. In the present analysis, up to four mirror images (per wall surface) are accounted to achieve convergence in the predicted time histories

  20. Broadband acoustic properties of a murine skull

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Héctor; Rebling, Johannes; Turner, Jake; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    It has been well recognized that the presence of a skull imposes harsh restrictions on the use of ultrasound and optoacoustic techniques in the study, treatment and modulation of the brain function. We propose a rigorous modeling and experimental methodology for estimating the insertion loss and the elastic constants of the skull over a wide range of frequencies and incidence angles. A point-source-like excitation of ultrawideband acoustic radiation was induced via the absorption of nanosecond duration laser pulses by a 20 μm diameter microsphere. The acoustic waves transmitted through the skull are recorded by a broadband, spherically focused ultrasound transducer. A coregistered pulse-echo ultrasound scan is subsequently performed to provide accurate skull geometry to be fed into an acoustic transmission model represented in an angular spectrum domain. The modeling predictions were validated by measurements taken from a glass cover-slip and ex vivo adult mouse skulls. The flexible semi-analytical formulation of the model allows for seamless extension to other transducer geometries and diverse experimental scenarios involving broadband acoustic transmission through locally flat solid structures. It is anticipated that accurate quantification and modeling of the skull transmission effects would ultimately allow for skull aberration correction in a broad variety of applications employing transcranial detection or transmission of high frequency ultrasound.