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Sample records for acoustic analysis methods

  1. Spectral analysis methods for vehicle interior vibro-acoustics identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini Fouladi, Mohammad; Nor, Mohd. Jailani Mohd.; Ariffin, Ahmad Kamal

    2009-02-01

    Noise has various effects on comfort, performance and health of human. Sound are analysed by human brain based on the frequencies and amplitudes. In a dynamic system, transmission of sound and vibrations depend on frequency and direction of the input motion and characteristics of the output. It is imperative that automotive manufacturers invest a lot of effort and money to improve and enhance the vibro-acoustics performance of their products. The enhancement effort may be very difficult and time-consuming if one relies only on 'trial and error' method without prior knowledge about the sources itself. Complex noise inside a vehicle cabin originated from various sources and travel through many pathways. First stage of sound quality refinement is to find the source. It is vital for automotive engineers to identify the dominant noise sources such as engine noise, exhaust noise and noise due to vibration transmission inside of vehicle. The purpose of this paper is to find the vibro-acoustical sources of noise in a passenger vehicle compartment. The implementation of spectral analysis method is much faster than the 'trial and error' methods in which, parts should be separated to measure the transfer functions. Also by using spectral analysis method, signals can be recorded in real operational conditions which conduce to more consistent results. A multi-channel analyser is utilised to measure and record the vibro-acoustical signals. Computational algorithms are also employed to identify contribution of various sources towards the measured interior signal. These achievements can be utilised to detect, control and optimise interior noise performance of road transport vehicles.

  2. Method of detection, classification, and identification of objects employing acoustic signal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orzanowski, Tomasz; Madura, Henryk; Sosnowski, Tomasz; Chmielewski, Krzysztof

    2008-10-01

    The methods of detection and identification of objects based on acoustic signal analysis are used in many applications, e.g., alarm systems, military battlefield reconnaissance systems, intelligent ammunition, and others. The construction of technical objects such as vehicle or helicopter gives some possibilities to identify them on the basis of acoustic signals generated by those objects. In this paper a method of automatic detection, classification and identification of military vehicles and helicopters using a digital analysis of acoustic signals is presented. The method offers a relatively high probability of object detection in attendance of other disturbing acoustic signals. Moreover, it provides low probability of false classification and identification of object. The application of this method to acoustic sensor for the anti-helicopter mine is also presented.

  3. A probability density function method for acoustic field uncertainty analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Kevin R.; Dowling, David R.

    2005-11-01

    Acoustic field predictions, whether analytical or computational, rely on knowledge of the environmental, boundary, and initial conditions. When knowledge of these conditions is uncertain, acoustic field predictions will also be uncertain, even if the techniques for field prediction are perfect. Quantifying acoustic field uncertainty is important for applications that require accurate field amplitude and phase predictions, like matched-field techniques for sonar, nondestructive evaluation, bio-medical ultrasound, and atmospheric remote sensing. Drawing on prior turbulence research, this paper describes how an evolution equation for the probability density function (PDF) of the predicted acoustic field can be derived and used to quantify predicted-acoustic-field uncertainties arising from uncertain environmental, boundary, or initial conditions. Example calculations are presented in one and two spatial dimensions for the one-point PDF for the real and imaginary parts of a harmonic field, and show that predicted field uncertainty increases with increasing range and frequency. In particular, at 500 Hz in an ideal 100 m deep underwater sound channel with a 1 m root-mean-square depth uncertainty, the PDF results presented here indicate that at a range of 5 km, all phases and a 10 dB range of amplitudes will have non-negligible probability. Evolution equations for the two-point PDF are also derived.

  4. Analysis of random structure-acoustic interaction problems using coupled boundary element and finite element methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh; Pates, Carl S., III

    1994-01-01

    A coupled boundary element (BEM)-finite element (FEM) approach is presented to accurately model structure-acoustic interaction systems. The boundary element method is first applied to interior, two and three-dimensional acoustic domains with complex geometry configurations. Boundary element results are very accurate when compared with limited exact solutions. Structure-interaction problems are then analyzed with the coupled FEM-BEM method, where the finite element method models the structure and the boundary element method models the interior acoustic domain. The coupled analysis is compared with exact and experimental results for a simplistic model. Composite panels are analyzed and compared with isotropic results. The coupled method is then extended for random excitation. Random excitation results are compared with uncoupled results for isotropic and composite panels.

  5. Analysis of the 3D acoustic cloaking problems using optimization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, G. V.; Spivak, Yu E.

    2016-06-01

    Control problems for the 3D model of acoustic scattering which describes scattering acoustic waves by a permeable obstacle with the form of a spherical layer are considered. These problems arise while developing the design technologies of acoustic cloaking devices using the wave flow method. The solvability of direct and control problems for the acoustic scattering model under study is proved. The sufficient conditions which provide local uniqueness and stability of optimal solutions are established.

  6. Acoustic bubble removal method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Elleman, D. D.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for removing bubbles from a liquid bath such as a bath of molten glass to be used for optical elements. Larger bubbles are first removed by applying acoustic energy resonant to a bath dimension to drive the larger bubbles toward a pressure well where the bubbles can coalesce and then be more easily removed. Thereafter, submillimeter bubbles are removed by applying acoustic energy of frequencies resonant to the small bubbles to oscillate them and thereby stir liquid immediately about the bubbles to facilitate their breakup and absorption into the liquid.

  7. Acoustical analysis and modeling of reciprocating compressors, noise produced by gas pulsation, using four-pole method. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herfat, Ali T.; Seel, Robert V.

    2003-04-01

    Presented in Paper II is the noise analysis of reciprocating compressors (such as air conditioning and refrigeration reciprocating compressors) using the four-pole method. The gas pulsation noise inside compressor head cavities, mufflers, and through-valves can be analyzed by applying the FPM. This method formulates the characteristics of acoustic elements by establishing a relationship between their input and output gas pressures and volume flow rates. When the acoustic elements in the system (compressor) are connected at points between them, the FPM allows an easy assembly of element equations to obtain system acoustical model.

  8. Comparison of Modal Analysis Methods Applied to a Vibro-Acoustic Test Article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchard, Jocelyn; Pappa, Richard; Buehrle, Ralph; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2001-01-01

    Modal testing of a vibro-acoustic test article referred to as the Aluminum Testbed Cylinder (ATC) has provided frequency response data for the development of validated numerical models of complex structures for interior noise prediction and control. The ATC is an all aluminum, ring and stringer stiffened cylinder, 12 feet in length and 4 feet in diameter. The cylinder was designed to represent typical aircraft construction. Modal tests were conducted for several different configurations of the cylinder assembly under ambient and pressurized conditions. The purpose of this paper is to present results from dynamic testing of different ATC configurations using two modal analysis software methods: Eigensystem Realization Algorithm (ERA) and MTS IDEAS Polyreference method. The paper compares results from the two analysis methods as well as the results from various test configurations. The effects of pressurization on the modal characteristics are discussed.

  9. a Computational Method for the Analysis of Acoustic Radiation from Turbofan Inlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raviprakash, G. K.

    1992-01-01

    A computational method is presented for the analysis of the noise radiation from turbofan inlets. The method developed considers the effect of mean flow and can be used at high frequencies. The techniques for generating the grid, solving the acoustic equations, applying radiating conditions on the far-field boundary, imposing inlet-fan interface conditions as well as solving the steady compressible flow equations are embodied in the Inlet Acoustic Analysis Method. The theoretical basis, formulated for 3-D acoustics within an axisymmetric domain, considers the effect of non-uniform mean flow. The discretization of the field equations is done using a finite volume type differencing. This leads to a block tri-diagonal system of equations which is then efficiently solved. A new and powerful method is developed for the application of radiating conditions. A layer potential representation is used in obtaining numerically local radiating conditions. The locally radiating conditions, developed using the single layer source representation, can be used even at the interior eigenvalues. Using this technique, the radiating conditions can be applied very close to the inlet, and hence the computational efficiency can be significantly increased. The irrotationality conditions for the axisymmetric compressible flow are discretized for solving the mean flow field. An iterative scheme is developed to solve for the stream function, the density, and the speed of sound. The inlet-fan interface conditions are incorporated to properly specify the source of noise. The noise source is either directly specified or the interface potential distribution is split into a combination of an imposed right traveling disturbance and an unknown combination of left traveling disturbances, that come out as part of the solution process. The grid generation procedure utilizes algebraic transformations as well as the grid blending technique. This process is automated to accommodate variations in the grid

  10. A computational method for the analysis of acoustic radiation from turbofan inlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raviprakash, G. K.

    A computational method is presented for the analysis of the noise radiation from turbofan inlets. The method developed considers the effect of mean flow and can be used at high frequencies. The techniques for generating the grid, solving the acoustic equations, applying radiating conditions on the far-field boundary, imposing inlet-fan interface conditions as well as solving the steady compressible flow equations are embodied in the Inlet Acoustic Analysis Method. The theoretical basis, formulated for 3-D acoustics within an axisymmetric domain, considers the effect of non-uniform mean flow. The discretization of the field equations is done using a finite volume type differencing. This leads to a block tri-diagonal system of equations which is then efficiently solved. A new and powerful method is developed for the application of radiating conditions. A layer potential representation is used in obtaining numerically local radiating conditions. The locally radiating conditions, developed using the single layer source representation, can be used even at the interior eigenvalues. Using this technique, the radiating conditions can be applied very close to the inlet, and hence the computational efficiency can be significantly increased. The irrotationality conditions for the axisymmetric compressible flow are discretized for solving the mean flow field. An iterative scheme is developed to solve for the stream function, the density, and the speed of sound. The inlet-fan interface conditions are incorporated to properly specify the source of noise. The noise source is either directly specified or the interface potential distribution is split into a combination of an imposed right traveling disturbance and an unknown combination of left traveling disturbances, that come out as part of the solution process. The grid generation procedure utilizes algebraic transformations as well as the grid blending techniques. This process is automated to accommodate variations in the grid

  11. Analysis of acoustic networks including cavities by means of a linear finite volume method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torregrosa, A. J.; Broatch, A.; Gil, A.; Moreno, D.

    2012-09-01

    A procedure allowing for the analysis of complex acoustic networks, including three-dimensional cavities described in terms of zero-dimensional equivalent elements, is presented and validated. The procedure is based on the linearization of the finite volume method often used in gas-dynamics, which is translated into an acoustic network comprising multi-ports accounting for mass exchanges between the finite volumes, and equivalent 2-ports describing momentum exchange across the volume surfaces. The application of the concept to a one-dimensional case shows that it actually converges to the exact analytical solution when a sufficiently large number of volumes are considered. This has allowed the formulation of an objective criterion for the choice of a mesh providing results with a prefixed error up to a certain Helmholtz number, which has been generalized to three-dimensional cases. The procedure is then applied to simple but relevant three-dimensional geometries in the absence of a mean flow, showing good agreement with experimental and other computational results.

  12. A wideband FMBEM for 2D acoustic design sensitivity analysis based on direct differentiation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Leilei; Zheng, Changjun; Chen, Haibo

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents a wideband fast multipole boundary element method (FMBEM) for two dimensional acoustic design sensitivity analysis based on the direct differentiation method. The wideband fast multipole method (FMM) formed by combining the original FMM and the diagonal form FMM is used to accelerate the matrix-vector products in the boundary element analysis. The Burton-Miller formulation is used to overcome the fictitious frequency problem when using a single Helmholtz boundary integral equation for exterior boundary-value problems. The strongly singular and hypersingular integrals in the sensitivity equations can be evaluated explicitly and directly by using the piecewise constant discretization. The iterative solver GMRES is applied to accelerate the solution of the linear system of equations. A set of optimal parameters for the wideband FMBEM design sensitivity analysis are obtained by observing the performances of the wideband FMM algorithm in terms of computing time and memory usage. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the efficiency and validity of the proposed algorithm.

  13. Acoustic emission analysis: A test method for metal joints bonded by adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockmann, W.; Fischer, T.

    1978-01-01

    Acoustic emission analysis is applied to study adhesive joints which had been subjected to mechanical and climatic stresses, taking into account conditions which make results applicable to adhesive joints used in aerospace technology. Specimens consisting of the alloy AlMgSi0.5 were used together with a phenolic resin adhesive, an epoxy resin modified with a polyamide, and an epoxy resin modified with a nitrile. Results show that the acoustic emission analysis provides valuable information concerning the behavior of adhesive joints under load and climatic stresses.

  14. Theoretical and experimental dynamic analysis aimed at the improvement of an acoustic method for fresco detachment diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Vescovo, Dionisio; Fregolent, Annalisa

    2009-10-01

    An acoustic non-invasive method for the diagnosis of detachment in frescos was previously proposed by the authors. This method is based on the indirect evaluation of the vibrations due to detachments, by means of a surface inspection. In this paper the relations between the dynamics of the structure to be inspected and the operational principles of the acoustic method of diagnosis are presented. The dynamic analysis is carried out using experimental investigations and analytical and numerical models. It shows that the quality of the diagnosis depends on the capability of the acoustic device to excite the structural resonances related to the detachments. These results are useful for future improvements, in particular to enhance the sensitivity of the proposed method.

  15. [Determination of a Spectrum of Lytic Activity of Bacteriophages by the Method of Acoustic Analysis].

    PubMed

    Guliy, O I; Zaitsev, B D; Kuznetsova, I E; Shikhabudinov, A M; Dykman, L A; Staroverov, S A; Karavaeva, O A; Pavliy, S A; Ignatov, O V

    2015-01-01

    The changes in the electro-acoustic parameters of cell suspension due to the interaction of cells with bacteriophages both in a pure. culture and in the presence of extraneous microflora were investigated. It has been found that the specific changes in the electroacoustic parameters of cell suspension under the action of bacteriophage occur only in microbial cells which are sensitive to the bacteriophage studied. It has been established that a sensor unit allows of distinguishing a situation when the bacterial cells are infected with specific bacteriophages of the control experiments and a situation with no introduction of infection. An approximate criterion of the presence of specific interactions of bacteriophages and cells in suspension was developed. In accordance with this criterion the change in electrical impedance of the sensor unit must not be less than - 1%. In control experiments a standard microbiological technique, plating the cells infected with bacteriophages on solid nutrient medium, was used. For the first time the possibility of using the method of electroacoustic analysis for determination of a spectrum of lytic activity of bacteriophages was shown. The results obtained may be used for development of a new express method for determining the sensitivity to bacteriophages of the microbial cells. PMID:26394472

  16. Finite element method analysis of surface acoustic wave devices with microcavities for detection of liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senveli, Sukru U.; Tigli, Onur

    2013-12-01

    This paper introduces the use of finite element method analysis tools to investigate the use of a Rayleigh type surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor to interrogate minute amounts of liquids trapped in microcavities placed on the delay line. Launched surface waves in the ST-X quartz substrate couple to the liquid and emit compressional waves. These waves form a resonant cavity condition and interfere with the surface waves in the substrate. Simulations show that the platform operates in a different mechanism than the conventional mass loading of SAW devices. Based on the proposed detection mechanism, it is able to distinguish between variations of 40% and 90% glycerin based on phase relations while using liquid volumes smaller than 10 pl. Results from shallow microcavities show high correlation with sound velocity parameter of the liquid whereas deeper microcavities display high sensitivities with respect to glycerin concentration. Simulated devices yield a maximum sensitivity of -0.77°/(% glycerin) for 16 μm wavelength operation with 8 μm deep, 24 μm wide, and 24 μm long microcavities.

  17. Acoustic Suppression Systems and Related Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R. (Inventor); Kern, Dennis L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An acoustic suppression system for absorbing and/or scattering acoustic energy comprising a plurality of acoustic targets in a containment is described, the acoustic targets configured to have resonance frequencies allowing the targets to be excited by incoming acoustic waves, the resonance frequencies being adjustable to suppress acoustic energy in a set frequency range. Methods for fabricating and implementing the acoustic suppression system are also provided.

  18. Acoustic agglomeration methods and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Methods are described for using acoustic energy to agglomerate fine particles on the order of one micron diameter that are suspended in gas, to provide agglomerates large enough for efficient removal by other techniques. The gas with suspended particles, is passed through the length of a chamber while acoustic energy at a resonant chamber mode is applied to set up one or more acoustic standing wave patterns that vibrate the suspended particles to bring them together so they agglomerate. Several widely different frequencies can be applied to efficiently vibrate particles of widely differing sizes. The standing wave pattern can be applied along directions transversed to the flow of the gas. The particles can be made to move in circles by applying acoustic energy in perpendicular directions with the energy in both directions being of the same wavelength but 90 deg out of phase.

  19. Axisymmetric analysis of a tube-type acoustic levitator by a finite element method.

    PubMed

    Hatano, H

    1994-01-01

    A finite element approach was taken for the study of the sound field and positioning force in a tube-type acoustic levitator. An axisymmetric model, where a rigid sphere is suspended on the tube axis, was introduced to model a cylindrical chamber of a levitation tube furnace. Distributions of velocity potential, magnitudes of positioning force, and resonance frequency shifts of the chamber due to the presence of the sphere were numerically estimated in relation to the sphere's position and diameter. Experiments were additionally made to compare with the simulation. The finite element method proved to be a useful tool for analyzing and designing the tube-type levitator. PMID:18263265

  20. GPU performance analysis of a nodal discontinuous Galerkin method for acoustic and elastic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modave, A.; St-Cyr, A.; Warburton, T.

    2016-06-01

    Finite element schemes based on discontinuous Galerkin methods possess features amenable to massively parallel computing accelerated with general purpose graphics processing units (GPUs). However, the computational performance of such schemes strongly depends on their implementation. In the past, several implementation strategies have been proposed. They are based exclusively on specialized compute kernels tuned for each operation, or they can leverage BLAS libraries that provide optimized routines for basic linear algebra operations. In this paper, we present and analyze up-to-date performance results for different implementations, tested in a unified framework on a single NVIDIA GTX980 GPU. We show that specialized kernels written with a one-node-per-thread strategy are competitive for polynomial bases up to the fifth and seventh degrees for acoustic and elastic models, respectively. For higher degrees, a strategy that makes use of the NVIDIA cuBLAS library provides better results, able to reach a net arithmetic throughput 35.7% of the theoretical peak value.

  1. Acoustic emission and signal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, A. K.

    1990-01-01

    A review is given of the acoustic emission (AE) phenomenon and its applications in NDE and geological rock mechanics. Typical instrumentation used in AE signal detection, data acquisition, processing, and analysis is discussed. The parameters used in AE signal analysis are outlined, and current methods of AE signal analysis procedures are discussed. A literature review is presented on the pattern classification of AE signals. A discussion then follows on the application of AE in aircraft component monitoring, with an experiment described which focuses on in-flight AE monitoring during fatigue crack growth in an aero engine mount. A pattern recognition approach is detailed for the classification of the experimental data. The approach subjects each of the data files to a cluster analysis by the threshold-k-means scheme. The technique is shown to classify the data successfully.

  2. Investigation of dispersion-relation-preserving scheme and spectral analysis methods for acoustic waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanel, Florence O.; Baysal, Oktay

    1995-01-01

    Important characteristics of the aeroacoustic wave propagation are mostly encoded in their dispersion relations. Hence, a computational aeroacoustic (CAA) algorithm, which reasonably preserves these relations, was investigated. It was derived using an optimization procedure to ensure, that the numerical derivatives preserved the wave number and angular frequency of the differential terms in the linearized, 2-D Euler equations. Then, simulations were performed to validate the scheme and a compatible set of discretized boundary conditions. The computational results were found to agree favorably with the exact solutions. The boundary conditions were transparent to the outgoing waves, except when the disturbance source was close to a boundary. The time-domain data generated by such CAA solutions were often intractable until their spectra was analyzed. Therefore, the relative merits of three different methods were included in the study. For simple, periodic waves, the periodogram method produced better estimates of the steep-sloped spectra than the Blackman-Tukey method. Also, for this problem, the Hanning window was more effective when used with the weighted-overlapped-segment-averaging and Blackman-Tukey methods gave better results than the periodogram method. Finally, it was demonstrated that the representation of time domain-data was significantly dependent on the particular spectral analysis method employed.

  3. Vibro-acoustic analysis of the acoustic-structure interaction of flexible structure due to acoustic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djojodihardjo, Harijono

    2015-03-01

    The application of BE-FE acoustic-structure interaction on a structure subject to acoustic load is elaborated using the boundary element-finite element acoustic structural coupling and the utilization of the computational scheme developed earlier. The plausibility of the numerical treatment is investigated and validated through application to generic cases. The analysis carried out in the work is intended to serve as a baseline in the analysis of acoustic structure interaction for lightweight structures. Results obtained thus far exhibit the robustness of the method developed.

  4. Analysis and experimental validation of the middle-frequency vibro-acoustic coupling property for aircraft structural model based on the wave coupling hybrid FE-SEA method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yunju; Li, Pengbo; Lin, Huagang

    2016-06-01

    The finite element (FE) method is suitable for low frequency analysis and the statistical energy analysis (SEA) for high frequency analysis, but the vibro-acoustic coupling analysis at middle frequency, especially with a certain range of uncertainty system, requires some new methods. A hybrid FE-SEA method is proposed in this study and the Monte Carlo method is used to check the hybrid FE-SEA method through the energy response analysis of a beam-plate built-up structure with some uncertainty, and the results show that two kinds of calculation results match well consistently. Taking the advantage of the hybrid FE-SEA method, the structural vibration and the cabin noise field responses under the vibro-acoustic coupling for an aircraft model are numerically analyzed, and, also, the corresponding experiment is carried out to verify the simulated results. Results show that the structural vibration responses at low frequency accord well with the experiment, but the error at high frequency is greater. The error of sound pressure response level in cabin throughout the spectrum is less than 3 dB. The research proves the reliability of the method proposed in this paper. This indicates that the proposed method can overcome the strict limitations of the traditional method for a large complex structure with uncertainty factors, and it can also avoid the disadvantages of solving complex vibro-acoustic system using the finite element method or statistical energy analysis in the middle frequency.

  5. Method and apparatus for generating acoustic energy

    DOEpatents

    Guerrero, Hector N.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for generating and emitting amplified coherent acoustic energy. A cylindrical transducer is mounted within a housing, the transducer having an acoustically open end and an acoustically closed end. The interior of the transducer is filled with an active medium which may include scattering nuclei. Excitation of the transducer produces radially directed acoustic energy in the active medium, which is converted by the dimensions of the transducer, the acoustically closed end thereof, and the scattering nuclei, to amplified coherent acoustic energy directed longitudinally within the transducer. The energy is emitted through the acoustically open end of the transducer. The emitted energy can be used for, among other things, effecting a chemical reaction or removing scale from the interior walls of containment vessels.

  6. Acoustic Gaits: Gait Analysis With Footstep Sounds.

    PubMed

    Altaf, M Umair Bin; Butko, Taras; Juang, Biing-Hwang Fred

    2015-08-01

    We describe the acoustic gaits-the natural human gait quantitative characteristics derived from the sound of footsteps as the person walks normally. We introduce the acoustic gait profile, which is obtained from temporal signal analysis of sound of footsteps collected by microphones and illustrate some of the spatio-temporal gait parameters that can be extracted from the acoustic gait profile by using three temporal signal analysis methods-the squared energy estimate, Hilbert transform and Teager-Kaiser energy operator. Based on the statistical analysis of the parameter estimates, we show that the spatio-temporal parameters and gait characteristics obtained using the acoustic gait profile can consistently and reliably estimate a subset of clinical and biometric gait parameters currently in use for standardized gait assessments. We conclude that the Teager-Kaiser energy operator provides the most consistent gait parameter estimates showing the least variation across different sessions and zones. Acoustic gaits use an inexpensive set of microphones with a computing device as an accurate and unintrusive gait analysis system. This is in contrast to the expensive and intrusive systems currently used in laboratory gait analysis such as the force plates, pressure mats and wearable sensors, some of which may change the gait parameters that are being measured. PMID:25769144

  7. Nondestructive acoustic electric field probe apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Migliori, Albert

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a nondestructive acoustic electric field probe and its method of use. A source of acoustic pulses of arbitrary but selected shape is placed in an oil bath along with material to be tested across which a voltage is disposed and means for receiving acoustic pulses after they have passed through the material. The received pulses are compared with voltage changes across the material occurring while acoustic pulses pass through it and analysis is made thereof to determine preselected characteristics of the material.

  8. Pulse analysis of acoustic emission signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, J. R.; Packman, P. F.

    1977-01-01

    A method for the signature analysis of pulses in the frequency domain and the time domain is presented. Fourier spectrum, Fourier transfer function, shock spectrum and shock spectrum ratio were examined in the frequency domain analysis, and pulse shape deconvolution was developed for use in the time domain analysis. Comparisons of the relative performance of each analysis technique are made for the characterization of acoustic emission pulses recorded by a measuring system. To demonstrate the relative sensitivity of each of the methods to small changes in the pulse shape, signatures of computer modeled systems with analytical pulses are presented. Optimization techniques are developed and used to indicate the best design parameters values for deconvolution of the pulse shape. Several experiments are presented that test the pulse signature analysis methods on different acoustic emission sources. These include acoustic emissions associated with: (1) crack propagation, (2) ball dropping on a plate, (3) spark discharge and (4) defective and good ball bearings. Deconvolution of the first few micro-seconds of the pulse train are shown to be the region in which the significant signatures of the acoustic emission event are to be found.

  9. Pulse analysis of acoustic emission signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, J. R.; Packman, P. F.

    1977-01-01

    A method for the signature analysis of pulses in the frequency domain and the time domain is presented. Fourier spectrum, Fourier transfer function, shock spectrum and shock spectrum ratio were examined in the frequency domain analysis and pulse shape deconvolution was developed for use in the time domain analysis. Comparisons of the relative performance of each analysis technique are made for the characterization of acoustic emission pulses recorded by a measuring system. To demonstrate the relative sensitivity of each of the methods to small changes in the pulse shape, signatures of computer modeled systems with analytical pulses are presented. Optimization techniques are developed and used to indicate the best design parameter values for deconvolution of the pulse shape. Several experiments are presented that test the pulse signature analysis methods on different acoustic emission sources. These include acoustic emission associated with (a) crack propagation, (b) ball dropping on a plate, (c) spark discharge, and (d) defective and good ball bearings. Deconvolution of the first few micro-seconds of the pulse train is shown to be the region in which the significant signatures of the acoustic emission event are to be found.

  10. Development and experimental verification of a finite element method for accurate analysis of a surface acoustic wave device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohibul Kabir, K. M.; Matthews, Glenn I.; Sabri, Ylias M.; Russo, Salvy P.; Ippolito, Samuel J.; Bhargava, Suresh K.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate analysis of surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices is highly important due to their use in ever-growing applications in electronics, telecommunication and chemical sensing. In this study, a novel approach for analyzing the SAW devices was developed based on a series of two-dimensional finite element method (FEM) simulations, which has been experimentally verified. It was found that the frequency response of the two SAW device structures, each having slightly different bandwidth and center lobe characteristics, can be successfully obtained utilizing the current density of the electrodes via FEM simulations. The two SAW structures were based on XY Lithium Niobate (LiNbO3) substrates and had two and four electrode finger pairs in both of their interdigital transducers, respectively. Later, SAW devices were fabricated in accordance with the simulated models and their measured frequency responses were found to correlate well with the obtained simulations results. The results indicated that better match between calculated and measured frequency response can be obtained when one of the input electrode finger pairs was set at zero volts and all the current density components were taken into account when calculating the frequency response of the simulated SAW device structures.

  11. Inharmonicity Analysis: A Novel Physical Method for Acoustic Screening of Dysphonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteson, Sam; Lu, Fang-Ling

    2008-10-01

    In the United States 6.8% of men, women, and children report current voice problems and approximately 29% will report some problems during their lifetime. Often this dysphonia is due to pathologies of the vocal folds. The authors (a physicist and a speech pathologist) describe an interdisciplinary approach that shows promise of detecting physiological abnormalities of the vocal folds from an analysis of the Fourier spectrum of spoken ``tokens.'' The underlying principle maintains that the normal human vocal fold is a linear oscillator that emits overtones that are very nearly precise integral values of the fundamental. Physiological problems of the vocal folds, however, introduce mechanical non-linearities that manifest themselves as frequency deviations from the ideal harmonic (that is, integral) values. The authors quantify this inharmonicity, describing and illustrating how one can obtain and analyze such data. They outline, as well, a proposed program to assess the clinical sensitivity and significance of the analysis discussed in this work.

  12. Experimental verification of the asymtotic modal analysis method as applied to a rectangular acoustic cavity excited by structural vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peretti, L. F.; Dowell, E. H.

    1992-01-01

    An experiment was performed on a rigid wall rectangular acoustic cavity driven by a flexible plate mounted in a quarter of one end wall and excited by white noise. The experiment was designed so that the assumptions of Asymptotic Modal Analysis (AMA) were satisfied for certain bandwidths and center frequencies. Measurements of sound pressure levels at points along the boundaries and incrementally into tbe interior were taken. These were compared with the theoretical results predicted with AMA, and found to be in good agreement, particularly for moderate (1/3 octave) bandwidths and sufficiently high center frequencies. Sound pressure level measurements were also taken well into the cavity interior at various points along the 5 totally rigid walls. The AMA theory, including boundary intensification effects, was shown to be accurate provided the assumption of large number of acoustic modes is satisfied, and variables such as power spectra of the wall acceleration, frequency, and damping are slowly varying in the frequency of bandwidth.

  13. Matrix method for acoustic levitation simulation.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Marco A B; Perez, Nicolas; Buiochi, Flavio; Adamowski, Julio C

    2011-08-01

    A matrix method is presented for simulating acoustic levitators. A typical acoustic levitator consists of an ultrasonic transducer and a reflector. The matrix method is used to determine the potential for acoustic radiation force that acts on a small sphere in the standing wave field produced by the levitator. The method is based on the Rayleigh integral and it takes into account the multiple reflections that occur between the transducer and the reflector. The potential for acoustic radiation force obtained by the matrix method is validated by comparing the matrix method results with those obtained by the finite element method when using an axisymmetric model of a single-axis acoustic levitator. After validation, the method is applied in the simulation of a noncontact manipulation system consisting of two 37.9-kHz Langevin-type transducers and a plane reflector. The manipulation system allows control of the horizontal position of a small levitated sphere from -6 mm to 6 mm, which is done by changing the phase difference between the two transducers. The horizontal position of the sphere predicted by the matrix method agrees with the horizontal positions measured experimentally with a charge-coupled device camera. The main advantage of the matrix method is that it allows simulation of non-symmetric acoustic levitators without requiring much computational effort. PMID:21859587

  14. Particle analysis in an acoustic cytometer

    DOEpatents

    Kaduchak, Gregory; Ward, Michael D

    2012-09-18

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for acoustically manipulating one or more particles. Acoustically manipulated particles may be separated by size. The particles may be flowed in a flow stream and acoustic radiation pressure, which may be radial, may be applied to the flow stream. This application of acoustic radiation pressure may separate the particles. In one embodiment, the particles may be separated by size, and as a further example, the larger particles may be transported to a central axis.

  15. Circuit-field coupled finite element analysis method for an electromagnetic acoustic transducer under pulsed voltage excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Kuan-Sheng; Huang, Song-Ling; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Shen

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents an analytical method for electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) under voltage excitation and considers the non-uniform distribution of the biased magnetic field. A complete model of EMATs including the non-uniform biased magnetic field, a pulsed eddy current field and the acoustic field is built up. The pulsed voltage excitation is transformed to the frequency domain by fast Fourier transformation (FFT). In terms of the time harmonic field equations of the EMAT system, the impedances of the coils under different frequencies are calculated according to the circuit-field coupling method and Poynting's theorem. Then the currents under different frequencies are calculated according to Ohm's law and the pulsed current excitation is obtained by inverse fast Fourier transformation (IFFT). Lastly, the sequentially coupled finite element method (FEM) is used to calculate the Lorentz force in the EMATs under the current excitation. An actual EMAT with a two-layer two-bundle printed circuit board (PCB) coil, a rectangular permanent magnet and an aluminium specimen is analysed. The coil impedances and the pulsed current are calculated and compared with the experimental results. Their agreement verified the validity of the proposed method. Furthermore, the influences of lift-off distances and the non-uniform static magnetic field on the Lorentz force under pulsed voltage excitation are studied.

  16. Traceability of Acoustic Emission measurements for a proposed calibration method - Classification of characteristics and identification using signal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, James

    2015-01-01

    When using Acoustic Emission (AE) technologies, tensile, compressive and shear stress/strain tests can provide a detector for material deformation and dislocations. In this paper improvements are made to standardise calibration techniques for AE against known metrics such as force. AE signatures were evaluated from various calibration energy sources based on the energy from the first harmonic (dominant energy band) [1,2]. The effects of AE against its calibration identity are investigated: where signals are correlated to the average energy and distance of the detected phenomena. In addition, extra tests are investigated in terms of the tensile tests and single grit tests characterising different materials. Necessary translations to the time-frequency domain were necessary when segregating salient features between different material properties. Continuing this work the obtained AE is summarised and evaluated by a Neural Network (NN) regression classification technique which identifies how far the malformation has progressed (in terms of energy/force) during material transformation. Both genetic-fuzzy clustering and tree rule based classifier techniques were used as the second and third classification techniques respectively to verify the NN output giving a weighted three classifier system. The work discussed in this paper looks at both distance and force relationships for various prolonged Acoustic Emission stresses. Later such analysis was realised with different classifier models and finally implemented into the Simulink simulations. Further investigations were made into classifier models for different material interactions in terms of force and distance which add further dimension to this work with different materials based simulation realisations. Within the statistical analysis section there are two varying prolonged stress tests which together offer the mechanical calibration system (automated solenoid and pencil break calibration system). Taking such a

  17. Acoustic microscope surface inspection system and method

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Parent, Philippe; Reinholdtsen, Paul A.

    1991-01-01

    An acoustic microscope surface inspection system and method in which pulses of high frequency electrical energy are applied to a transducer which forms and focuses acoustic energy onto a selected location on the surface of an object and receives energy from the location and generates electrical pulses. The phase of the high frequency electrical signal pulses are stepped with respected to the phase of a reference signal at said location. An output signal is generated which is indicative of the surface of said selected location. The object is scanned to provide output signals representative of the surface at a plurality of surface locations.

  18. Acoustic microscope surface inspection system and method

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Parent, P.; Reinholdtsen, P.A.

    1991-02-26

    An acoustic microscope surface inspection system and method are described in which pulses of high frequency electrical energy are applied to a transducer which forms and focuses acoustic energy onto a selected location on the surface of an object and receives energy from the location and generates electrical pulses. The phase of the high frequency electrical signal pulses are stepped with respect to the phase of a reference signal at said location. An output signal is generated which is indicative of the surface of said selected location. The object is scanned to provide output signals representative of the surface at a plurality of surface locations. 7 figures.

  19. Consecutive plate acoustic suppressor apparatus and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doychak, Joseph (Inventor); Parrott, Tony (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus and method for suppressing acoustic noise utilizes consecutive plates, closely spaced to each other so as to exploit dissipation associated with sound propagation in narrow channels to optimize the acoustic resistance at a liner surface. The closely spaced plates can be utilized as high temperature structural materials for jet engines by constructing the plates from composite materials. Geometries of the plates, such as plate depth, shape, thickness, inter-plate spacing, arrangement, etc., can be selected to achieve bulk material-like behavior.

  20. Consecutive Plate Acoustic Suppressor Apparatus and Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doychak, Joseph (Inventor); Parrott, Tony L. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus and method for suppressing acoustic noise utilizes consecutive plates, closely spaced to each other so as to exploit dissipation associated with sound propagation in narrow channels to optimize the acoustic resistance at a liner surface. The closely spaced plates can be utilized as high temperature structural materials for jet engines by constructing the plates from composite materials. Geometries of the plates, such as plate depth, shape, thickness, inter-plate spacing, arrangement, etc., can be selected to achieve bulk material-like behavior.

  1. Acoustical analysis of gear housing vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seybert, A. F.; Wu, T. W.; Wu, X. F.; Oswald, Fred B.

    1991-01-01

    The modal and acoustical analysis of the NASA gear-noise rig is described. Experimental modal analysis techniques were used to determine the modes of vibration of the transmission housing. The resulting modal data were then used in a boundary element method (BEM) analysis to calculate the sound pressure and sound intensity on the surface of the housing as well as the radiation efficiency of each mode. The radiation efficiencies of the transmission housing modes are compared with theoretical results for finite, baffled plates. A method that uses the measured mode shapes and the BEM to predict the effect of simple structural changes on the sound radiation efficiency of the modes of vibration is also described.

  2. Acoustic analysis of explosions in high noise environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Hong; Desai, Sachi

    2008-04-01

    Explosion detection and recognition is a critical capability to provide situational awareness to the war-fighters in battlefield. Acoustic sensors are frequently deployed to detect such events and to trigger more expensive sensing/sensor modalities (i.e. radar, laser spectroscope, IR etc.). Acoustic analysis of explosions has been intensively studied to reliably discriminate mortars, artillery, round variations, and type of blast (i.e. chemical/biological or high-explosive). One of the major challenges is high level of noise, which may include non-coherent noise generated from the environmental background and coherent noise induced by possible mobile acoustic sensor platform. In this work, we introduce a new acoustic scene analysis method to effectively enhance explosion classification reliability and reduce the false alarm rate at low SNR and with high coherent noise. The proposed method is based on acoustic signature modeling using Hidden Markov Models (HMMs). Special frequency domain acoustic features characterizing explosions as well as coherent noise are extracted from each signal segment, which forms an observation vector for HMM training and test. Classification is based on a unique model similarity measure between the HMM estimated from the test observations and the trained HMMs. Experimental tests are based on the acoustic explosion dataset from US ARMY ARDEC, and experimental results have demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  3. Method of Adjusting Acoustic Impedances for Impedance-Tunable Acoustic Segments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Kennie H (Inventor); Nark, Douglas M. (Inventor); Jones, Michael G. (Inventor); Parrott, Tony L. (Inventor); Lodding, Kenneth N. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method is provided for making localized decisions and taking localized actions to achieve a global solution. In an embodiment of the present invention, acoustic impedances for impedance-tunable acoustic segments are adjusted. A first acoustic segment through an N-th acoustic segment are defined. To start the process, the first acoustic segment is designated as a leader and a noise-reducing impedance is determined therefor. This is accomplished using (i) one or more metrics associated with the acoustic wave at the leader, and (ii) the metric(s) associated with the acoustic wave at the N-th acoustic segment. The leader, the N-th acoustic segment, and each of the acoustic segments exclusive of the leader and the N-th acoustic segment, are tuned to the noise-reducing impedance. The current leader is then excluded from subsequent processing steps. The designation of leader is then given one of the remaining acoustic segments, and the process is repeated for each of the acoustic segments through an (N-1)-th one of the acoustic segments.

  4. Acoustic method of damage sensing in composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Walker, James; Lansing, Matthew

    1994-01-01

    The use of acoustic emission and acousto-ultrasonics to characterize impact damage in composite structures is being performed on both graphite epoxy and kevlar bottles. Further development of the acoustic emission methodology to include neural net analysis and/or other multivariate techniques will enhance the capability of the technique to identify failure mechanisms during fracture. The acousto-ultrasonics technique will be investigated to determine its ability to predict regions prone to failure prior to the burst tests. The combination of the two methods will allow for simple nondestructive tests to be capable of predicting the performance of a composite structure prior to being placed in service and during service.

  5. Acoustic levitation methods for density measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Hsu, C. J.

    1986-12-01

    The capability of ultrasonic levitators operating in air to perform density measurements has been demonstrated. The remote determination of the density of ordinary liquids as well as low density solid metals can be carried out using levitated samples with size on the order of a few millimeters and at a frequency of 20 kHz. Two basic methods may be used. The first one is derived from a previously known technique developed for acoustic levitation in liquid media, and is based on the static equilibrium position of levitated samples in the earth's gravitational field. The second approach relies on the dynamic interaction between a levitated sample and the acoustic field. The first technique appears more accurate (1 percent uncertainty), but the latter method is directly applicable to a near gravity-free environment such as that found in space.

  6. Acoustic levitation methods for density measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Hsu, C. J.

    1986-01-01

    The capability of ultrasonic levitators operating in air to perform density measurements has been demonstrated. The remote determination of the density of ordinary liquids as well as low density solid metals can be carried out using levitated samples with size on the order of a few millimeters and at a frequency of 20 kHz. Two basic methods may be used. The first one is derived from a previously known technique developed for acoustic levitation in liquid media, and is based on the static equilibrium position of levitated samples in the earth's gravitational field. The second approach relies on the dynamic interaction between a levitated sample and the acoustic field. The first technique appears more accurate (1 percent uncertainty), but the latter method is directly applicable to a near gravity-free environment such as that found in space.

  7. Vibro-acoustic analysis of composite plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarigül, A. S.; Karagözlü, E.

    2014-03-01

    Vibro-acoustic analysis plays a vital role on the design of aircrafts, spacecrafts, land vehicles and ships produced from thin plates backed by closed cavities, with regard to human health and living comfort. For this type of structures, it is required a coupled solution that takes into account structural-acoustic interaction which is crucial for sensitive solutions. In this study, coupled vibro-acoustic analyses of plates produced from composite materials have been performed by using finite element analysis software. The study has been carried out for E-glass/Epoxy, Kevlar/Epoxy and Carbon/Epoxy plates with different ply angles and numbers of ply. The effects of composite material, ply orientation and number of layer on coupled vibro-acoustic characteristics of plates have been analysed for various combinations. The analysis results have been statistically examined and assessed.

  8. A meshless method for unbounded acoustic problems.

    PubMed

    Shojaei, Arman; Boroomand, Bijan; Soleimanifar, Ehsan

    2016-05-01

    In this paper an effective meshless method is proposed to solve time-harmonic acoustic problems defined on unbounded domains. To this end, the near field is discretized by a set of nodes and the far field effect is taken into account by considering radiative boundary conditions. The approximation within the near field is performed using a set of local residual-free basis functions defined on a series of finite clouds. For considering the far field effect, a series of infinite clouds are defined on which another set of residual-free bases, satisfying the radiation conditions, are considered for the approximation. Validation of the results is performed through solving some acoustic problems. PMID:27250155

  9. Methods And Apparatus For Acoustic Fiber Fractionation

    DOEpatents

    Brodeur, Pierre

    1999-11-09

    Methods and apparatus for acoustic fiber fractionation using a plane ultrasonic wave field interacting with water suspended fibers circulating in a channel flow using acoustic radiation forces to separate fibers into two or more fractions based on fiber radius, with applications of the separation concept in the pulp and paper industry. The continuous process relies on the use of a wall-mounted, rectangular cross-section piezoelectric ceramic transducer to selectively deflect flowing fibers as they penetrate the ultrasonic field. The described embodiment uses a transducer frequency of approximately 150 kHz. Depending upon the amount of dissolved gas in water, separation is obtained using a standing or a traveling wave field.

  10. Methods and apparatus for multi-parameter acoustic signature inspection

    DOEpatents

    Diaz, Aaron A.; Samuel, Todd J.; Valencia, Juan D.; Gervais, Kevin L.; Tucker, Brian J.; Kirihara, Leslie J.; Skorpik, James R.; Reid, Larry D.; Munley, John T.; Pappas, Richard A.; Wright, Bob W.; Panetta, Paul D.; Thompson, Jason S.

    2007-07-24

    A multiparameter acoustic signature inspection device and method are described for non-invasive inspection of containers. Dual acoustic signatures discriminate between various fluids and materials for identification of the same.

  11. The acoustic simulation and analysis of complicated reciprocating compressor piping systems, I: Analysis technique and parameter matrices of acoustic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    To, C. W. S.

    1984-09-01

    This paper describes the mathematical formulation, equations, and procedures employed in the development of a comprehensive digital computer program for acoustic simulation and analysis of large and complicated piping systems. The analysis technique used is the transfer matrix method in which the piping system, with or without multiple inputs and outputs, is represented by a combination of discrete acoustic elements interconnected to one another at two stations such that the acoustic pressure and volume velocity at one station are uniquely related to those at the other by a two-by-two parameter matrix. Parameter matrices of 19 acoustic elements are included in this paper. By making use of these parameter matrices and the analysis technique, any complicated practical reciprocating compressor piping system can be modelled or analyzed.

  12. A Spectral Analysis Approach for Acoustic Radiation from Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.; Singh, Mahendra P.; Mei, Chuh

    2004-01-01

    A method is developed to predict the vibration response of a composite panel and the resulting far-field acoustic radiation due to acoustic excitation. The acoustic excitation is assumed to consist of obliquely incident plane waves. The panel is modeled by a finite element analysis and the radiated field is predicted using Rayleigh's integral. The approach can easily include other effects such as shape memory alloy (SMA) ber reinforcement, large detection thermal postbuckling, and non-symmetric SMA distribution or lamination. Transmission loss predictions for the case of an aluminum panel excited by a harmonic acoustic pressure are shown to compare very well with a classical analysis. Results for a composite panel with and without shape memory alloy reinforcement are also presented. The preliminary results demonstrate that the transmission loss can be significantly increased with shape memory alloy reinforcement. The mechanisms for further transmission loss improvement are identified and discussed.

  13. Acoustic resonator and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Kline, Gerald R.; Lakin, Kenneth M.

    1985-03-05

    A method of fabricating an acoustic wave resonator wherein all processing steps are accomplished from a single side of said substrate. The method involves deposition of a multi-layered Al/AlN structure on a GaAs substrate followed by a series of fabrication steps to define a resonator from said composite. The resulting resonator comprises an AlN layer between two Al layers and another layer of AlN on an exterior of one of said Al layers.

  14. Acoustic resonator and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Kline, G.R.; Lakin, K.M.

    1983-10-13

    A method of fabricating an acoustic wave resonator wherein all processing steps are accomplished from a single side of said substrate. The method involves deposition of a multi-layered Al/AlN structure on a GaAs substrate followed by a series of fabrication steps to define a resonator from said composite. The resulting resonator comprises an AlN layer between two Al layers and another layer of AlN on an exterior of one of said Al layers.

  15. Acoustic resonator and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Kline, G.R.; Lakin, K.M.

    1985-03-05

    A method is disclosed of fabricating an acoustic wave resonator wherein all processing steps are accomplished from a single side of said substrate. The method involves deposition of a multi-layered Al/AlN structure on a GaAs substrate followed by a series of fabrication steps to define a resonator from said composite. The resulting resonator comprises an AlN layer between two Al layers and another layer of AlN on an exterior of one of said Al layers. 4 figs.

  16. Numerical analysis of acoustic impedance microscope utilizing acoustic lens transducer to examine cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Gunawan, Agus Indra; Hozumi, Naohiro; Takahashi, Kenta; Yoshida, Sachiko; Saijo, Yoshifumi; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yamamoto, Seiji

    2015-12-01

    A new technique is proposed for non-contact quantitative cell observation using focused ultrasonic waves. This technique interprets acoustic reflection intensity into the characteristic acoustic impedance of the biological cell. The cells are cultured on a plastic film substrate. A focused acoustic beam is transmitted through the substrate to its interface with the cell. A two-dimensional (2-D) reflection intensity profile is obtained by scanning the focal point along the interface. A reference substance is observed under the same conditions. These two reflections are compared and interpreted into the characteristic acoustic impedance of the cell based on a calibration curve that was created prior to the observation. To create the calibration curve, a numerical analysis of the sound field is performed using Fourier Transforms and is verified using several saline solutions. Because the cells are suspended by two plastic films, no contamination is introduced during the observation. In a practical observation, a sapphire lens transducer with a center frequency of 300 MHz was employed using ZnO thin film. The objects studied were co-cultured rat-derived glial (astrocyte) cells and glioma cells. The result was the clear observation of the internal structure of the cells. The acoustic impedance of the cells was spreading between 1.62 and 1.72 MNs/m(3). Cytoskeleton was indicated by high acoustic impedance. The introduction of cytochalasin-B led to a significant reduction in the acoustic impedance of the glioma cells; its effect on the glial cells was less significant. It is believed that this non-contact observation method will be useful for continuous cell inspections. PMID:26163739

  17. Method and apparatus for acoustic imaging of objects in water

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Telschow, Kenneth L.

    2005-01-25

    A method, system and underwater camera for acoustic imaging of objects in water or other liquids includes an acoustic source for generating an acoustic wavefront for reflecting from a target object as a reflected wavefront. The reflected acoustic wavefront deforms a screen on an acoustic side and correspondingly deforms the opposing optical side of the screen. An optical processing system is optically coupled to the optical side of the screen and converts the deformations on the optical side of the screen into an optical intensity image of the target object.

  18. Minimizing vehicle noise and weight using panel acoustic contribution analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Gordon M.

    1998-05-01

    Panel acoustic contribution analysis (PACA) is an advanced engineering tool to improve noise, vibration, and harshness quality and minimize weight of vehicles. It is a technique to categorize areas of vehicle body panels as positive (sound level increases as vibration amplitude increases), negative or neutral according to their contribution to the total sound. PACA is a hybrid of computer aided engineering and experimental methods. Computer aided holometry, scanning laser velocimetry, or an accelerometer net is used to experimentally measure structure vibration complex velocities. These velocities are the boundary conditions for a boundary element model of the acoustic cavity. Boundary element analysis is then used to predict the vehicle interior sound and calculate panel acoustic contributions. Experimental results for a welded steel box (validation) and vehicle application are presented.

  19. Acoustic Treatment Design Scaling Methods. Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, L. (Technical Monitor); Parrott, T. (Technical Monitor); Jones, M. (Technical Monitor); Kraft, R. E.; Yu, J.; Kwan, H. W.; Beer, B.; Seybert, A. F.; Tathavadekar, P.

    2003-01-01

    The ability to design, build and test miniaturized acoustic treatment panels on scale model fan rigs representative of full scale engines provides not only cost-savings, but also an opportunity to optimize the treatment by allowing multiple tests. To use scale model treatment as a design tool, the impedance of the sub-scale liner must be known with confidence. This study was aimed at developing impedance measurement methods for high frequencies. A normal incidence impedance tube method that extends the upper frequency range to 25,000 Hz. without grazing flow effects was evaluated. The free field method was investigated as a potential high frequency technique. The potential of the two-microphone in-situ impedance measurement method was evaluated in the presence of grazing flow. Difficulties in achieving the high frequency goals were encountered in all methods. Results of developing a time-domain finite difference resonator impedance model indicated that a re-interpretation of the empirical fluid mechanical models used in the frequency domain model for nonlinear resistance and mass reactance may be required. A scale model treatment design that could be tested on the Universal Propulsion Simulator vehicle was proposed.

  20. Application of the Spectral Element Method to Acoustic Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, James F.; Rizzi, Stephen A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This report summarizes research to develop a capability for analysis of interior noise in enclosed structures when acoustically excited by an external random source. Of particular interest was the application to the study of noise and vibration transmission in thin-walled structures as typified by aircraft fuselages. Three related topics are focused upon. The first concerns the development of a curved frame spectral element, the second shows how the spectral element method for wave propagation in folded plate structures is extended to problems involving curved segmented plates. These are of significance because by combining these curved spectral elements with previously presented flat spectral elements, the dynamic response of geometrically complex structures can be determined. The third topic shows how spectral elements, which incorporate the effect of fluid loading on the structure, are developed for analyzing acoustic radiation from dynamically loaded extended plates.

  1. Pulse analysis of acoustic emission signals. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    A method for the signature analysis of pulses in the frequency domain and the time domain is presented. Fourier spectrum, Fourier transfer function, shock spectrum and shock spectrum ratio are examined in the frequency domain analysis, and pulse shape deconvolution is developed for use in the time domain analysis. To demonstrate the relative sensitivity of each of the methods to small changes in the pulse shape, signatures of computer modeled systems with analytical pulses are presented. Optimization techniques are developed and used to indicate the best design parameters values for deconvolution of the pulse shape. Several experiments are presented that test the pulse signature analysis methods on different acoustic emission sources. These include acoustic emissions associated with: (1) crack propagation, (2) ball dropping on a plate, (3) spark discharge and (4) defective and good ball bearings.

  2. Method and means for measuring acoustic emissions

    DOEpatents

    Renken, Jr., Claus J.

    1976-01-06

    The detection of acoustic emissions emanating from an object is achieved with a capacitive transducer coupled to the object. The capacitive transducer is charged and then allowed to discharge with the rate of discharge being monitored. Oscillations in the rate of discharge about the normally exponential discharge curve for the capacitive transducer indicate the presence of acoustic emissions.

  3. Estimating surface acoustic impedance with the inverse method.

    PubMed

    Piechowicz, Janusz

    2011-01-01

    Sound field parameters are predicted with numerical methods in sound control systems, in acoustic designs of building and in sound field simulations. Those methods define the acoustic properties of surfaces, such as sound absorption coefficients or acoustic impedance, to determine boundary conditions. Several in situ measurement techniques were developed; one of them uses 2 microphones to measure direct and reflected sound over a planar test surface. Another approach is used in the inverse boundary elements method, in which estimating acoustic impedance of a surface is expressed as an inverse boundary problem. The boundary values can be found from multipoint sound pressure measurements in the interior of a room. This method can be applied to arbitrarily-shaped surfaces. This investigation is part of a research programme on using inverse methods in industrial room acoustics. PMID:21939599

  4. Acoustic methods of remote probing of the lower atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Little, C. G.

    1969-01-01

    The potential usefulness of acoustic methods for the remote probing of the lower atmosphere is reviewed. Starting with a comparison of the effects of temperature, wind, and humidity fluctuations upon the refractive index of air to electromagnetic and acoustic waves, it is shown that the fluctuations in acoustic refractive index may be expected to be about one thousand times stronger than in the radio case. Since the scattered power is proportional to the square of the refractive index fluctuations, the scatter of acoustic waves may be expected to be roughly one million times stronger than for radio waves. In addition, the million-fold ratio between the velocities of electromagnetic and acoustic waves results in an acoustic system requiring one million times less bandwidth to interrogate a given atmospheric volume.

  5. Acoustical analysis and modeling of reciprocating compressors, noise produced by gas pulsation, using four-pole method. I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herfat, Ali T.; Seel, Robert V.

    2003-04-01

    Presented in Paper I are the fluid-structure interactions, structural dynamics, and thermodynamic analyses of reciprocating compressors (such as air conditioning and refrigeration reciprocating compressors). The compressor performance can be analyzed using the follows criteria: (1) thermodynamic model of the cylinder process, using the polytropic process model for thermodynamic model of cylinder; (2) suction and discharge valves dynamics analysis and modeling; (3) the valves modeling and the cylinder volume calculation; (4) Effective flow area and effective force area models.

  6. Wavelet Analysis for Acoustic Phased Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Inna; Zlotnick, Zvi

    2003-03-01

    Wavelet spectrum analysis is known to be one of the most powerful tools for exploring quasistationary signals. In this paper we use wavelet technique to develop a new Direction Finding (DF) Algorithm for the Acoustic Phased Array (APA) systems. Utilising multi-scale analysis of libraries of wavelets allows us to work with frequency bands instead of individual frequency of an acoustic source. These frequency bands could be regarded as features extracted from quasistationary signals emitted by a noisy object. For detection, tracing and identification of a sound source in a noisy environment we develop smart algorithm. The essential part of this algorithm is a special interacting procedure of the above-mentioned DF-algorithm and the wavelet-based Identification (ID) algorithm developed in [4]. Significant improvement of the basic properties of a receiving APA pattern is achieved.

  7. Acoustic Analysis Before and After Voice Therapy for Laryngeal Pathology.

    PubMed

    Chhetri, S S; Gautam, R

    2015-01-01

    Background Voice problems caused by pathologies in vocal folds are well known. Some types of laryngeal pathologies have certain acoustic characteristics. Objective evaluation helps characterize the voice and voice problems providing supporting evidences, severity of disorders. It helps assess the response to the treatment and measures the outcomes. Objective The objective of the study is to determine the effectiveness of the voice therapy and quantify the results objectively by voice parameters. Method Study includes 61 patients who presented with different types of laryngeal pathologies. Acoustic analyses and voice assessment was done with Dr. Speech ver 4 (Tiger DRS Inc.). Acoustic parameters including fundamental frequency, jitters, shimmers, Harmonic to noise ratio (HNR), Normalized noise energy (NNE) were analyzed before and after voice therapy. Result Bilateral vocal nodules were the most common pathologies comprising 44.26%. All acoustic parameters showed a significant difference after the therapy (p<0.05) except for NNE. Dysphonia due to vocal fold polyp showed no improvement even after voice therapy (p>0.05). Conclusion Acoustic analysis provides an objective, recordable data regarding the voice parameters and its pathologies. Though, few pathology require alternative therapy rather than voice therapy, overall it has a good effect on glottic closure. As the voice therapy can improve the different indices of voice, it can be viewed as imperative part of treatment and to monitor progression. PMID:27423282

  8. Acoustic Emission Analysis Applet (AEAA) Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Charles T.; Roth, Don J.

    2013-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research and NASA White Sands Test Facility have developed software supporting an automated pressure vessel structural health monitoring (SHM) system based on acoustic emissions (AE). The software, referred to as the Acoustic Emission Analysis Applet (AEAA), provides analysts with a tool that can interrogate data collected on Digital Wave Corp. and Physical Acoustics Corp. software using a wide spectrum of powerful filters and charts. This software can be made to work with any data once the data format is known. The applet will compute basic AE statistics, and statistics as a function of time and pressure (see figure). AEAA provides value added beyond the analysis provided by the respective vendors' analysis software. The software can handle data sets of unlimited size. A wide variety of government and commercial applications could benefit from this technology, notably requalification and usage tests for compressed gas and hydrogen-fueled vehicles. Future enhancements will add features similar to a "check engine" light on a vehicle. Once installed, the system will ultimately be used to alert International Space Station crewmembers to critical structural instabilities, but will have little impact to missions otherwise. Diagnostic information could then be transmitted to experienced technicians on the ground in a timely manner to determine whether pressure vessels have been impacted, are structurally unsound, or can be safely used to complete the mission.

  9. Acoustic Analysis of Speech of Cochlear Implantees and Its Implications

    PubMed Central

    Patadia, Rajesh; Govale, Prajakta; Rangasayee, R.; Kirtane, Milind

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Cochlear implantees have improved speech production skills compared with those using hearing aids, as reflected in their acoustic measures. When compared to normal hearing controls, implanted children had fronted vowel space and their /s/ and /∫/ noise frequencies overlapped. Acoustic analysis of speech provides an objective index of perceived differences in speech production which can be precursory in planning therapy. The objective of this study was to compare acoustic characteristics of speech in cochlear implantees with those of normal hearing age matched peers to understand implications. Methods Group 1 consisted of 15 children with prelingual bilateral severe-profound hearing loss (age, 5-11 years; implanted between 4-10 years). Prior to an implant behind the ear, hearing aids were used; prior & post implantation subjects received at least 1 year of aural intervention. Group 2 consisted of 15 normal hearing age matched peers. Sustained productions of vowels and words with selected consonants were recorded. Using Praat software for acoustic analysis, digitized speech tokens were measured for F1, F2, and F3 of vowels; centre frequency (Hz) and energy concentration (dB) in burst; voice onset time (VOT in ms) for stops; centre frequency (Hz) of noise in /s/; rise time (ms) for affricates. A t-test was used to find significant differences between groups. Results Significant differences were found in VOT for /b/, F1 and F2 of /e/, and F3 of /u/. No significant differences were found for centre frequency of burst, energy concentration for stops, centre frequency of noise in /s/, or rise time for affricates. These findings suggest that auditory feedback provided by cochlear implants enable subjects to monitor production of speech sounds. Conclusion Acoustic analysis of speech is an essential method for discerning characteristics which have or have not been improved by cochlear implantation and thus for planning intervention. PMID:22701768

  10. Airborne chemistry: acoustic levitation in chemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Santesson, Sabina; Nilsson, Staffan

    2004-04-01

    This review with 60 references describes a unique path to miniaturisation, that is, the use of acoustic levitation in analytical and bioanalytical chemistry applications. Levitation of small volumes of sample by means of a levitation technique can be used as a way to avoid solid walls around the sample, thus circumventing the main problem of miniaturisation, the unfavourable surface-to-volume ratio. Different techniques for sample levitation have been developed and improved. Of the levitation techniques described, acoustic or ultrasonic levitation fulfils all requirements for analytical chemistry applications. This technique has previously been used to study properties of molten materials and the equilibrium shape()and stability of liquid drops. Temperature and mass transfer in levitated drops have also been described, as have crystallisation and microgravity applications. The airborne analytical system described here is equipped with different and exchangeable remote detection systems. The levitated drops are normally in the 100 nL-2 microL volume range and additions to the levitated drop can be made in the pL-volume range. The use of levitated drops in analytical and bioanalytical chemistry offers several benefits. Several remote detection systems are compatible with acoustic levitation, including fluorescence imaging detection, right angle light scattering, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Applications include liquid/liquid extractions, solvent exchange, analyte enrichment, single-cell analysis, cell-cell communication studies, precipitation screening of proteins to establish nucleation conditions, and crystallisation of proteins and pharmaceuticals. PMID:14762640

  11. Acoustic-velocity measurements in materials using a regenerative method

    DOEpatents

    Laine, E.F.

    1982-09-30

    Acoustic energy is propatated through earth material between an electro-acoustic generator and a receiver which converts the received acoustic energy into electrical signals. A closed loop is formed by a variable gain amplifier system connected between the receiver and the generator. The gain of the amplifier system is increased until sustained oscillations are produced in the closed loop. The frequency of the oscillations is measured as an indication of the acoustic propagation velocity through the earth material. The amplifier gain is measured as an indication of the acoustic attenuation through the earth materials. The method is also applicable to the non-destructive testing of structural materials, such as steel, aluminum and concrete.

  12. Acoustic velocity measurements in materials using a regenerative method

    DOEpatents

    Laine, Edwin F.

    1986-01-01

    Acoustic energy is propagated through earth material between an electro-acoustic generator and a receiver which converts the received acoustic energy into electrical signals. A closed loop is formed by a variable gain amplifier system connected between the receiver and the generator. The gain of the amplifier system is increased until sustained oscillations are produced in the closed loop. The frequency of the oscillations is measured as an indication of the acoustic propagation velocity through the earth material. The amplifier gain is measured as an indication of the acoustic attenuation through the earth materials. The method is also applicable to the non-destructive testing of structural materials, such as steel, aluminum and concrete.

  13. A time domain sampling method for inverse acoustic scattering problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yukun; Hömberg, Dietmar; Hu, Guanghui; Li, Jingzhi; Liu, Hongyu

    2016-06-01

    This work concerns the inverse scattering problems of imaging unknown/inaccessible scatterers by transient acoustic near-field measurements. Based on the analysis of the migration method, we propose efficient and effective sampling schemes for imaging small and extended scatterers from knowledge of time-dependent scattered data due to incident impulsive point sources. Though the inverse scattering problems are known to be nonlinear and ill-posed, the proposed imaging algorithms are totally "direct" involving only integral calculations on the measurement surface. Theoretical justifications are presented and numerical experiments are conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of our methods. In particular, the proposed static imaging functionals enhance the performance of the total focusing method (TFM) and the dynamic imaging functionals show analogous behavior to the time reversal inversion but without solving time-dependent wave equations.

  14. Evaluation of the successive approximations method for acoustic streaming numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Catarino, S O; Minas, G; Miranda, J M

    2016-05-01

    This work evaluates the successive approximations method commonly used to predict acoustic streaming by comparing it with a direct method. The successive approximations method solves both the acoustic wave propagation and acoustic streaming by solving the first and second order Navier-Stokes equations, ignoring the first order convective effects. This method was applied to acoustic streaming in a 2D domain and the results were compared with results from the direct simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations. The velocity results showed qualitative agreement between both methods, which indicates that the successive approximations method can describe the formation of flows with recirculation. However, a large quantitative deviation was observed between the two methods. Further analysis showed that the successive approximation method solution is sensitive to the initial flow field. The direct method showed that the instantaneous flow field changes significantly due to reflections and wave interference. It was also found that convective effects contribute significantly to the wave propagation pattern. These effects must be taken into account when solving the acoustic streaming problems, since it affects the global flow. By adequately calculating the initial condition for first order step, the acoustic streaming prediction by the successive approximations method can be improved significantly. PMID:27250122

  15. Acoustic scattering from ellipses by the modal element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreider, Kevin L.; Baumeister, Kenneth J.

    1995-01-01

    The modal element method is used to study acoustic scattering from ellipses, which may be acoustically soft (absorbing) or hard (reflecting). Because exact solutions are available, the results provide a benchmark for algorithm performance for scattering from airfoils and similar shapes. Numerical results for scattering from rigid ellipses are presented for a wide variety of eccentricities at moderate frequencies. These results indicate that the method is practical.

  16. Acoustic attenuation analysis program for ducts with mean flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunze, R. K., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A computerized acoustic attenuation prediction procedure has been developed to evaluate acoustically lined ducts for various geometric and environmental parameters. The analysis procedure is based on solutions to the acoustic wave equation, assuming uniform airflow on a duct cross section, combined with appropriate mathematical lining impedance models. The impedance models included in the analysis procedure are representative of either perforated sheet or porous polyimide impregnated fiberglass facing sheet coupled with a cellular backing space. Advantages and limitations of the analysis procedure are reviewed.

  17. Determination of acoustical transfer functions using an impulse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacPherson, J.

    1985-02-01

    The Transfer Function of a system may be defined as the relationship of the output response to the input of a system. Whilst recent advances in digital processing systems have enabled Impulse Transfer Functions to be determined by computation of the Fast Fourier Transform, there has been little work done in applying these techniques to room acoustics. Acoustical Transfer Functions have been determined for auditoria, using an impulse method. The technique is based on the computation of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) of a non-ideal impulsive source, both at the source and at the receiver point. The Impulse Transfer Function (ITF) is obtained by dividing the FFT at the receiver position by the FFT of the source. This quantity is presented both as linear frequency scale plots and also as synthesized one-third octave band data. The technique enables a considerable quantity of data to be obtained from a small number of impulsive signals recorded in the field, thereby minimizing the time and effort required on site. As the characteristics of the source are taken into account in the calculation, the choice of impulsive source is non-critical. The digital analysis equipment required for the analysis is readily available commercially.

  18. Combination of acoustical radiosity and the image source method.

    PubMed

    Koutsouris, Georgios I; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Jacobsen, Finn

    2013-06-01

    A combined model for room acoustic predictions is developed, aiming to treat both diffuse and specular reflections in a unified way. Two established methods are incorporated: acoustical radiosity, accounting for the diffuse part, and the image source method, accounting for the specular part. The model is based on conservation of acoustical energy. Losses are taken into account by the energy absorption coefficient, and the diffuse reflections are controlled via the scattering coefficient, which defines the portion of energy that has been diffusely reflected. The way the model is formulated allows for a dynamic control of the image source production, so that no fixed maximum reflection order is required. The model is optimized for energy impulse response predictions in arbitrary polyhedral rooms. The predictions are validated by comparison with published measured data for a real music studio hall. The proposed model turns out to be promising for acoustic predictions providing a high level of detail and accuracy. PMID:23742350

  19. Acoustical Characteristics of Mastication Sounds: Application of Speech Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brochetti, Denise

    Food scientists have used acoustical methods to study characteristics of mastication sounds in relation to food texture. However, a model for analysis of the sounds has not been identified, and reliability of the methods has not been reported. Therefore, speech analysis techniques were applied to mastication sounds, and variation in measures of the sounds was examined. To meet these objectives, two experiments were conducted. In the first experiment, a digital sound spectrograph generated waveforms and wideband spectrograms of sounds by 3 adult subjects (1 male, 2 females) for initial chews of food samples differing in hardness and fracturability. Acoustical characteristics were described and compared. For all sounds, formants appeared in the spectrograms, and energy occurred across a 0 to 8000-Hz range of frequencies. Bursts characterized waveforms for peanut, almond, raw carrot, ginger snap, and hard candy. Duration and amplitude of the sounds varied with the subjects. In the second experiment, the spectrograph was used to measure the duration, amplitude, and formants of sounds for the initial 2 chews of cylindrical food samples (raw carrot, teething toast) differing in diameter (1.27, 1.90, 2.54 cm). Six adult subjects (3 males, 3 females) having normal occlusions and temporomandibular joints chewed the samples between the molar teeth and with the mouth open. Ten repetitions per subject were examined for each food sample. Analysis of estimates of variation indicated an inconsistent intrasubject variation in the acoustical measures. Food type and sample diameter also affected the estimates, indicating the variable nature of mastication. Generally, intrasubject variation was greater than intersubject variation. Analysis of ranks of the data indicated that the effect of sample diameter on the acoustical measures was inconsistent and depended on the subject and type of food. If inferences are to be made concerning food texture from acoustical measures of mastication

  20. An acoustic intensity-based method and its aeroacoustic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chao

    Aircraft noise prediction and control is one of the most urgent and challenging tasks worldwide. A hybrid approach is usually considered for predicting the aerodynamic noise. The approach separates the field into aerodynamic source and acoustic propagation regions. Conventional CFD solvers are typically used to evaluate the flow field in the source region. Once the sound source is predicted, the linearized Euler Equations (LEE) can be used to extend the near-field CFD solution to the mid-field acoustic radiation. However, the far-field extension is very time consuming and always prohibited by the excessive computer memory requirements. The FW-H method, instead, predicts the far-field radiation using the flow-field quantities on a closed control surface (that encloses the entire aerodynamic source region) if the wave equation is assumed outside. The surface integration, however, has to be carried out for each far-field location. This would be still computationally intensive for a practical 3D problem even though the intensity in terms of the CPU time has been much decreased compared with that required by the LEE methods. For an accurate far-field prediction, the other difficulty of using the FW-H method is that the complete control surface may be infeasible to accomplish for most practical applications. Motivated by the need for the accurate and efficient far-field prediction techniques, an Acoustic Intensity-Based Method (AIBM) has been developed based on an acoustic input from an OPEN control surface. The AIBM assumes that the sound propagation is governed by the modified Helmholtz equation on and outside a control surface that encloses all the nonlinear effects and noise sources. The prediction of the acoustic radiation field is carried out by the inverse method with an input of acoustic pressure derivative and its simultaneous, co-located acoustic pressure. The reconstructed acoustic radiation field using the AIBM is unique due to the unique continuation theory

  1. Acoustic Facies Analysis of Side-Scan Sonar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwan, Fa Shu

    Acoustic facies analysis methods have allowed the generation of system-independent values for the quantitative seafloor acoustic parameter, backscattering strength, from GLORIA and (TAMU) ^2 side-scan sonar data. The resulting acoustic facies parameters enable quantitative comparisons of data collected by different sonar systems, data from different environments, and measurements made with survey geometries. Backscattering strength values were extracted from the sonar amplitude data by inversion based on the sonar equation. Image processing products reveal seafloor features and patterns of relative intensity. To quantitatively compare data collected at different times or by different systems, and to ground truth-measurements and geoacoustic models, quantitative corrections must be made on any given data set for system source level, beam pattern, time-varying gain, processing gain, transmission loss, absorption, insonified area contribution, and grazing angle effects. In the sonar equation, backscattering strength is the sonar parameter which is directly related to seafloor properties. The GLORIA data used in this study are from the edge of a distal lobe of the Monterey Fan. An interfingered region of strong and weak seafloor signal returns from a flat seafloor region provides an ideal data set for this study. Inversion of imagery data from the region allows the quantitative definition of different acoustic facies. The (TAMU) ^2 data used are from a calibration site near the Green Canyon area of the Gulf of Mexico. Acoustic facies analysis techniques were implemented to generate statistical information for acoustic facies based on the estimates of backscattering strength. The backscattering strength values have been compared with Lambert's Law and other functions to parameterize the description of the acoustic facies. The resulting Lambertian constant values range from -26 dB to -36 dB. A modified Lambert relationship, which consists of both intercept and slope

  2. Acoustic method for levitation of small living animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, W. J.; Cao, C. D.; Lü, Y. J.; Hong, Z. Y.; Wei, B.

    2006-11-01

    Ultrasonic levitation of some small living animals such as ant, ladybug, and young fish has been achieved with a single-axis acoustic levitator. The vitality of ant and ladybug is not evidently influenced during the acoustic levitation, whereas that of the young fish is reduced because of the inadequacy of water supply. Numerical analysis shows that the sound pressures on the ladybug's surface almost reach the incident pressure amplitude p0 due to sound scattering. It is estimated that 99.98% of the acoustic energy is reflected away from the ladybug. The acoustic radiation pressure pa on the ladybug's surface is only 1%-3% of p0, which plays a compression role on the central region and a suction role on the peripheral region.

  3. Acoustic capture-recapture method for towed acoustic surveys of echolocating porpoises.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Satoko; Akamatsu, Tomonari; Dong, Lijun; Wang, Kexiong; Wang, Ding; Shibata, Yasutoki; Arai, Nobuaki

    2014-06-01

    Passive acoustic monitoring for cetaceans mainly employ fixed-location methods or point transect samplings; an acoustic survey from a moving platform to conduct line transects is less common. In this study, acoustic capture-recapture by combining a double-observer method with line transect sampling was performed to observe Yangtze finless porpoises. Two acoustic devices were towed with the distance between them varying 0.5 to 89.5 m. The conditional probabilities that both devices would detect the porpoises within the same time window were calculated. In a 1-s time window, it became smaller as the distance between the devices increased, approaching zero when the distance between them was more than 50 m. It was considered that the devices with less than 50 m distance detected the same signals from the same animals, which means the identical detection. When the distance between them is too great, the recapture rate is reduced and the incidence of false matching may increase. Thus, a separation distance of around 50 m between two devices in acoustic capture-recapture of Yangtze finless porpoises was recommended. Note that the performance of the double detections can change depending on the particular device used and on animal behaviors such as vocalizing interval, ship avoidance. PMID:24907799

  4. An acoustic method for the remote measurement of seagrass metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, M.; Lefebvre, A.; Manca, E.; Amos, C. L.

    2011-05-01

    Seagrass meadows are ecosystems of great ecological and economical value and their monitoring is an important task within coastal environmental management. In this paper, an acoustic mapping technique is presented using a profiling sonar. The method has been applied to three different sites with meadows of Zostera marina, Zostera noltii and Posidonia oceanica respectively, with the aim to test the method's applicability. From the backscatter data the seabed could be identified as the strongest scatterer along an acoustic beam. The presented algorithm was used to compute water depth, seagrass canopy height and seagrass coverage and to produce maps of the survey areas. Canopy height was estimated as the distance between the bed and the point where backscatter values decrease to water column values. The algorithm was extended from previous methods to account for a variety of meadow types. Seagrass coverage was defined as the percentage of beams in a sweep where the backscatter 5-10 cm above the bed was higher than a threshold value. This threshold value is dynamic and depends on the average backscatter value throughout the water column. The method is therefore applicable in a range of turbidity conditions. Comparison with results from other survey techniques (i.e. dive surveys, underwater videos) yielded a high correlation which indicates that the method is suited to measure seagrass coverage and height. Analysis of the data showed that each seagrass species has a characteristic canopy height and spatial coverage distribution. These differences were used to undertake a preliminary species identification, as each species has a typical canopy height and preferred depth range. Furthermore, the results show that these differences can be used to track boundaries between species remotely. Finally, the application of the meadow distribution pattern to the health of a meadow is discussed.

  5. Wavenumber transform analysis for acoustic black hole design.

    PubMed

    Feurtado, Philip A; Conlon, Stephen C

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic black holes (ABHs) are effective, passive, lightweight vibration absorbers that have been developed and shown to effectively reduce the structural vibration and radiated sound of beam and plate structures. ABHs employ a local thickness change that reduces the speed of bending waves and increases the transverse vibration amplitude. The vibrational energy can then be effectively focused and dissipated by material losses or through conventional viscoelastic damping treatments. In this work, the measured vibratory response of embedded ABH plates was transformed into the wavenumber domain in order to investigate the use of wavenumber analysis for characterizing, designing, and optimizing practical ABH systems. The results showed that wavenumber transform analysis can be used to simultaneously visualize multiple aspects of ABH performance including changes in bending wave speed, transverse vibration amplitude, and energy dissipation. The analysis was also used to investigate the structural acoustic coupling of the ABH system and determine the radiation efficiency of the embedded ABH plates compared to a uniform plate. The results demonstrated that the ABH effect results in acoustic decoupling as well as vibration reduction. The wavenumber transform based methods and results will be useful for implementing ABHs into real world structures. PMID:27475193

  6. Quantitative measurement of acoustic pressure in the focal zone of acoustic lens-line focusing using the Schlieren method.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xueping; Cheng, Qian; Xu, Zheng; Qian, Menglu; Han, Qingbang

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes a theory and method for quantitative measurement of the acoustic lens-line focusing ultrasonic (ALLFU) field in its focal spot size and acoustic pressure using the Schlieren imaging technique. Using Fourier transformation, the relationship between the brightness of the Schlieren image and the acoustic pressure was introduced. The ALLFU field was simulated using finite element method and compared with the Schlieren acoustic field image. The measurement of the focal spot size was performed using the Schlieren method. The acoustic pressure in the focal zone of the ALLFU field and the transducer-transmitting voltage response were quantitatively determined by measuring the diffraction light fringe intensity. The results show that the brightness of the Schlieren image is a linear function of the acoustic intensity when the acousto-optic interaction length remains constant and the acoustic field is weak. PMID:27139646

  7. Modal analysis and intensity of acoustic radiation of the kettledrum.

    PubMed

    Tronchin, Lamberto

    2005-02-01

    The acoustical features of kettledrums have been analyzed by means of modal analysis and acoustic radiation (p/v ratio) measurements. Modal analysis of two different kettledrums was undertaken, exciting the system both by a hammer and a shaker. Up to 15 vibrational modes were clearly identified. Acoustic radiation was studied using two ways. Based on previous experiments of other researchers, a new parameter, called intensity of acoustic radiation (IAR), has been defined and measured. Results show a strict relationship between IAR and the frequency response function (FRF, which is the v/F ratio), and IAR also strongly relates the modal pattern to acoustic radiation. Finally, IAR is proposed for vibro-acoustical characterization of kettledrums and other musical instruments such as strings, pianos, and harpsichords. PMID:15759711

  8. Comparison of Two Acoustic Waveguide Methods for Determining Liner Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Watson, Willie R.; Tracy, Maureen B.; Parrott, Tony L.

    2001-01-01

    Acoustic measurements taken in a flow impedance tube are used to assess the relative accuracy of two waveguide methods for impedance eduction in the presence of grazing flow. The aeroacoustic environment is assumed to contain forward and backward-traveling acoustic waves, consisting of multiple modes, and uniform mean flow. Both methods require a measurement of the complex acoustic pressure profile over the length of the test liner. The Single Mode Method assumes that the sound pressure level and phase decay-rates of a single progressive mode can be extracted from this measured complex acoustic pressure profile. No a priori assumptions are made in the Finite Element. Method regarding the modal or reflection content in the measured acoustic pressure profile. The integrity of each method is initially demonstrated by how well their no-flow impedances match those acquired in a normal incidence impedance tube. These tests were conducted using ceramic tubular and conventional perforate liners. Ceramic tubular liners were included because of their impedance insensitivity to mean flow effects. Conversely, the conventional perforate liner was included because its impedance is known to be sensitive to mean flow velocity effects. Excellent comparisons between impedance values educed with the two waveguide methods in the absence of mean flow and the corresponding values educed with the normal incident impedance tube were observed. The two methods are then compared for mean flow Mach numbers up to 0.5, and are shown to give consistent results for both types of test liners. The quality of the results indicates that the Single Mode Method should be used when the measured acoustic pressure profile is clearly dominated by a single progressive mode, and the Finite Element Method should be used for all other cases.

  9. Acoustic Testing of Flight Hardware Using Loudspeakers: How Much do We Know About This Method of Testing?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Kern, Dennis L

    2011-01-01

    Loudspeakers have been used for acoustic qualification of spacecrafts, reflectors, solar panels, and other acoustically responsive structures for more than a decade. Even though a lot of hardware has been acoustic tested using this method, the nature of the acoustic field generated by controlling an ensemble of speakers with and without the hardware in the test volume has not been thoroughly investigated. Limited measurements from some of the recent speaker tests used to qualify flight hardware have indicated significant spatial variation of the acoustic field within the test volume. Also structural responses have been reported to differ when similar tests were performed using reverberant chambers. Unlike the reverberant chamber acoustic test, for which the acoustic field in most chambers is known to be diffuse except below several tens of Hz where acoustic standing waves and large spatial variations exist, the characteristics of the acoustic field within the speaker test volume has not been quantified. It has only been recently that a detailed acoustic field characterization of speaker testing has been made at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) with involvement of various organizations. To address the impact of non-uniform acoustic field on structures, a series of acoustic tests were performed using a flat panel and a 3-ft cylinder exposed to the field controlled by speakers and repeated in a reverberant chamber. The analysis of the data from this exercise reveals that there are significant differences both in the acoustic field and in the structural responses. In this paper the differences between the two methods are reviewed in some detail and the over- or under-testing of articles that could pose un-anticipated structural and flight qualification issues are discussed. A framework for discussing the validity of the speaker acoustic testing method with the current control system and a path forward for improving it will be provided.

  10. Acoustic analysis of speech under stress.

    PubMed

    Sondhi, Savita; Khan, Munna; Vijay, Ritu; Salhan, Ashok K; Chouhan, Satish

    2015-01-01

    When a person is emotionally charged, stress could be discerned in his voice. This paper presents a simplified and a non-invasive approach to detect psycho-physiological stress by monitoring the acoustic modifications during a stressful conversation. Voice database consists of audio clips from eight different popular FM broadcasts wherein the host of the show vexes the subjects who are otherwise unaware of the charade. The audio clips are obtained from real-life stressful conversations (no simulated emotions). Analysis is done using PRAAT software to evaluate mean fundamental frequency (F0) and formant frequencies (F1, F2, F3, F4) both in neutral and stressed state. Results suggest that F0 increases with stress; however, formant frequency decreases with stress. Comparison of Fourier and chirp spectra of short vowel segment shows that for relaxed speech, the two spectra are similar; however, for stressed speech, they differ in the high frequency range due to increased pitch modulation. PMID:26558301

  11. Acoustic radiation force-based elasticity imaging methods

    PubMed Central

    Palmeri, Mark L.; Nightingale, Kathryn R.

    2011-01-01

    Conventional diagnostic ultrasound images portray differences in the acoustic properties of soft tissues, whereas ultrasound-based elasticity images portray differences in the elastic properties of soft tissues (i.e. stiffness, viscosity). The benefit of elasticity imaging lies in the fact that many soft tissues can share similar ultrasonic echogenicities, but may have different mechanical properties that can be used to clearly visualize normal anatomy and delineate pathological lesions. Acoustic radiation force-based elasticity imaging methods use acoustic radiation force to transiently deform soft tissues, and the dynamic displacement response of those tissues is measured ultrasonically and is used to estimate the tissue's mechanical properties. Both qualitative images and quantitative elasticity metrics can be reconstructed from these measured data, providing complimentary information to both diagnose and longitudinally monitor disease progression. Recently, acoustic radiation force-based elasticity imaging techniques have moved from the laboratory to the clinical setting, where clinicians are beginning to characterize tissue stiffness as a diagnostic metric, and commercial implementations of radiation force-based ultrasonic elasticity imaging are beginning to appear on the commercial market. This article provides an overview of acoustic radiation force-based elasticity imaging, including a review of the relevant soft tissue material properties, a review of radiation force-based methods that have been proposed for elasticity imaging, and a discussion of current research and commercial realizations of radiation force based-elasticity imaging technologies. PMID:22419986

  12. Modal decomposition method for acoustic impedance testing in square ducts.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Todd; Cattafesta, Louis N; Sheplak, Mark

    2006-12-01

    Accurate duct acoustic propagation models are required to predict and reduce aircraft engine noise. These models ultimately rely on measurements of the acoustic impedance to characterize candidate engine nacelle liners. This research effort increases the frequency range of normal-incidence acoustic impedance testing in square ducts by extending the standard two-microphone method (TMM), which is limited to plane wave propagation, to include higher-order modes. The modal decomposition method (MDM) presented includes four normal modes in the model of the sound field, thus increasing the bandwidth from 6.7 to 13.5 kHz for a 25.4 mm square waveguide. The MDM characterizes the test specimen for normal- and oblique-incident acoustic impedance and mode scattering coefficients. The MDM is first formulated and then applied to the measurement of the reflection coefficient matrix for a ceramic tubular specimen. The experimental results are consistent with results from the TMM for the same specimen to within the 95% confidence intervals for the TMM. The MDM results show a series of resonances for the ceramic tubular material exhibiting a monotonic decrease in the resonant peaks of the acoustic resistance with increasing frequency, resembling a rigidly-terminated viscous tube, and also evidence of mode scattering is visible at the higher frequencies. PMID:17225402

  13. Analysis of Rayleigh-Mode Spurious Response Using Finite Element Method/Spectrum Domain Analysis for Surface Acoustic Wave Resonator on Nonflat SiO2/Al/LiNbO3 Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Nakanishi, Hidekazu; Goto, Rei; Hashimoto, Ken-ya; Yamaguchi, Masatsune

    2010-07-01

    Because of their low insertion loss, high out-of-band rejection, and high power durability, miniature surface acoustic wave (SAW) duplexers are widely used in mobile phones. Substrate materials substantially limit and determine the performance of SAW duplexers; for their applications to Band I and Band IV systems with large pass-band widths and wide frequency separations between the transmitting and receiving frequency bands, a larger coupling coefficient (K2) is of primary importance. We have developed a shape-controlled SiO2 film/Al electrode/LiNbO3 substrate structure for their applications. It could lead to a large K2 and suppression of Rayleigh-mode spurious response. In this paper, we report the analysis using finite element method/spectrum domain analysis (FEM/SDA) for the SAW resonator on a nonflat SiO2 film/Al electrode/LiNbO3 structure. It was clarified that the shape-controlled SiO2 was effective in terms of achieving a large K2 for the SAW resonator with suppressed Rayleigh-mode spurious responses and bulk wave radiation. Furthermore, the experiment results showed a good agreement with the analysis results.

  14. Acoustic Analysis of Vowels Following Glossectomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehill, Tara L.; Ciocca, Valter; Chan, Judy C-T.; Samman, Nabil

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the acoustic characteristics of vowels produced by speakers with partial glossectomy. Acoustic variables investigated included first formant (F1) frequency, second formant (F2) frequency, F1 range, F2 range and vowel space area. Data from the speakers with partial glossectomy were compared with age- and gender-matched controls.…

  15. A unique method to study acoustic transmission through ducts using signal synthesis and averaging of acoustic pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salikuddin, M.; Ramakrishnan, R.; Ahuja, K. K.; Brown, W. H.

    1981-01-01

    An acoustic impulse technique using a loudspeaker driver is developed to measure the acoustic properties of a duct/nozzle system. A signal synthesis method is used to generate a desired single pulse with a flat spectrum. The convolution of the desired signal and the inverse Fourier transform of the reciprocal of the driver's response are then fed to the driver. A signal averaging process eliminates the jet mixing noise from the mixture of jet noise and the internal noise, thereby allowing very low intensity signals to be measured accurately, even for high velocity jets. A theoretical analysis is carried out to predict the incident sound field; this is used to help determine the number and locations of the induct measurement points to account for the contributions due to higher order modes present in the incident tube method. The impulse technique is validated by comparing experimentally determined acoustic characteristics of a duct-nozzle system with similar results obtained by the impedance tube method. Absolute agreement in the comparisons was poor, but the overall shapes of the time histories and spectral distributions were much alike.

  16. Development of acoustic observation method for seafloor hydrothermal flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, M.; Tamura, H.; Asada, A.; Kinoshita, M.; Tamaki, K.

    2012-12-01

    In October 2009, we conducted seafloor reconnaissance using a manned deep-sea submersible Shinkai6500 in Central Indian Ridge 18-20deg.S, where hydrothermal plume signatures were previously perceived. Acoustic video camera "DIDSON" was equipped on the top of Shinkai6500 in order to get acoustic video images of hydrothermal plumes. The acoustic video images of the hydrothermal plumes had been captured in three of seven dives. We could identify shadings inside the acoustic video images of the hydrothermal plumes. Silhouettes of the hydrothermal plumes varied from second to second, and the shadings inside them also varied. These variations corresponded to internal structures and flows of the plumes. DIDSON (Dual-Frequency IDentification SONar) is acoustic lens-based sonar. It has sufficiently high resolution and rapid refresh rate that it can substitute for optical system in turbid or dark water where optical systems fail. Ins. of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo has understood DIDSON's superior performance and tried to develop a new observation method based on DIDSON for hydrothermal discharging from seafloor vent. We expected DIDSON to reveal whole image of hydrothermal plume as well as detail inside the plume. The proposed method to observe and measure hydrothermal flow is the one to utilize a sheet-like acoustic beam. Scanning with concentrated acoustic beam gives distances to the edges of the hydrothermal flows. And then, the shapes of the flows can be identified even in low and zero visibility conditions. Tank experiment was conducted. The purposes of this experiment were to make an attempt at proposed method to delineate underwater hydrothermal flows and to understand relationships among acoustic video image, flow rate and water temperature. Water was heated in the hot tub and pumped to the water tank through the silicon tube. We observed water flows discharging from the tip of the tube with DIDSON. Flow rate had been controlled and temperatures of the

  17. Characterizations of biobased materials using acoustic emission methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For many years, the Eastern Regional Research Center (ERRC) has demonstrated that acoustic emission (AE) is a powerful tool for characterizing the properties of biobased materials with fibrous and composite structure. AE often reveals structural information of a material that other methods cannot o...

  18. An Acoustic Method for the Determination of Avogadro's Number

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houari, Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    To diversify the measurement techniques of Avogadro's number in physics teaching, I propose a simple acoustic method for the experimental determination of Avogadro's number based only on the measurement of the speed of sound in metals, provided that their Debye temperatures are known. (Contains 2 figures.)

  19. An acoustic method for the determination of Avogadro's number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houari, Ahmed

    2011-07-01

    To diversify the measurement techniques of Avogadro's number in physics teaching, I propose a simple acoustic method for the experimental determination of Avogadro's number based only on the measurement of the speed of sound in metals, provided that their Debye temperatures are known.

  20. Ambient noise analysis of underwater acoustic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Mark A.; Orlin, Pete; Schulte, Annette; Newcomb, Joal

    2003-04-01

    The Littoral Acoustic Demonstration Center (LADC) deployed three Environmental Acoustic Recording System (EARS) buoys in the northern Gulf of Mexico during the summers of 2001 and 2002. The buoys recorded frequencies up to 5859 Hz continuously for 36 days in 2001 and for 72 days in 2002. The acoustic signals recorded include sperm whale vocalizations, seismic airguns, and shipping traffic. The variability of the ambient noise is analyzed using spectrograms, time series, and statistical measurements. Variations in ambient noise before, during, and after tropical storm/hurricane passage are also investigated.

  1. System and method for sonic wave measurements using an acoustic beam source

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2015-08-11

    A method and system for investigating structure near a borehole are described herein. The method includes generating an acoustic beam by an acoustic source; directing at one or more azimuthal angles the acoustic beam towards a selected location in a vicinity of a borehole; receiving at one or more receivers an acoustic signal, the acoustic signal originating from a reflection or a refraction of the acoustic wave by a material at the selected location; and analyzing the received acoustic signal to characterize features of the material around the borehole.

  2. Acoustic ship signature measurements by cross-correlation method.

    PubMed

    Fillinger, Laurent; Sutin, Alexander; Sedunov, Alexander

    2011-02-01

    Cross-correlation methods were applied for the estimation of the power spectral density and modulation spectrum of underwater noise generated by moving vessels. The cross-correlation of the signal from two hydrophones allows the separation of vessel acoustic signatures in a busy estuary. Experimental data recorded in the Hudson River are used for demonstration that cross-correlation method measured the same ship noise and ship noise modulation spectra as conventional methods. The cross-correlation method was then applied for the separation of the acoustic signatures of two ships present simultaneously. Presented methods can be useful for ship traffic monitoring and small ship classification, even in noisy harbor environments. PMID:21361436

  3. Understanding acoustic methods for cement bond logging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Tao, Guo; Shang, Xuefeng

    2016-05-01

    Well cementation is important for oil/gas production, underground gas storage, and CO2 storage, since it isolates the reservoir layers from aquifers to increase well integrity and reduce environmental footprint. This paper analyzes wave modes of different sonic/ultrasonic methods for cement bonding evaluation. A Two dimensional finite difference method is then used to simulate the wavefield for the ultrasonic methods in the cased-hole models. Waveforms of pulse-echo method from different interfaces in a good bonded well are analyzed. Wavefield of the pitch-catch method for free casing, partial or full bonded models with ultra-low density cement are studied. Based on the studies, the modes in different methods are considered as follows: the zero-order symmetric Leaky-Lamb mode (S0) for sonic method, the first-order symmetric Leaky-Lamb mode (S1) for the pulse-echo method, and the zero-order anti-symmetric Leaky-Lamb mode (A0) for the pitch-catch method. For the sonic method, a directional transmitter in both the azimuth and axial directions can generate energy with a large incidence angle and azimuth resolution, which can effectively generate S0 and break out the azimuth limitation of the conventional sonic method. Although combination of pulse-echo and pitch-catch methods can determine the bonding condition of the third interface for the ultra-low density cement case, the pitch-catch cannot tell the fluid annulus thickness behind casing for the partial bonded cased-hole. PMID:27250137

  4. Graphical Acoustic Liner Design and Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howerton, Brian M. (Inventor); Jones, Michael G. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An interactive liner design and impedance modeling tool comprises software utilized to design acoustic liners for use in constrained spaces, both regularly and irregularly shaped. A graphical user interface allows the acoustic channel geometry to be drawn in a liner volume while the surface impedance calculations are updated and displayed in real-time. A one-dimensional transmission line model may be used as the basis for the impedance calculations.

  5. A Requirements-Driven Optimization Method for Acoustic Treatment Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic treatment designers have long been able to target specific noise sources inside turbofan engines. Facesheet porosity and cavity depth are key design variables of perforate-over-honeycomb liners that determine levels of noise suppression as well as the frequencies at which suppression occurs. Layers of these structures can be combined to create a robust attenuation spectrum that covers a wide range of frequencies. Looking to the future, rapidly-emerging additive manufacturing technologies are enabling new liners with multiple degrees of freedom, and new adaptive liners with variable impedance are showing promise. More than ever, there is greater flexibility and freedom in liner design. Subject to practical considerations, liner design variables may be manipulated to achieve a target attenuation spectrum. But characteristics of the ideal attenuation spectrum can be difficult to know. Many multidisciplinary system effects govern how engine noise sources contribute to community noise. Given a hardwall fan noise source to be suppressed, and using an analytical certification noise model to compute a community noise measure of merit, the optimal attenuation spectrum can be derived using multidisciplinary systems analysis methods. The subject of this paper is an analytical method that derives the ideal target attenuation spectrum that minimizes noise perceived by observers on the ground.

  6. Structure analysis using acoustically levitated droplets.

    PubMed

    Leiterer, J; Delissen, F; Emmerling, F; Thünemann, A F; Panne, U

    2008-06-01

    Synchrotron diffraction with a micrometer-sized X-ray beam permits the efficient characterization of micrometer-sized samples, even in time-resolved experiments, which is important because often the amount of sample available is small and/or the sample is expensive. In this context, we will present acoustic levitation as a useful sample handling method for small solid and liquid samples, which are suspended in a gaseous environment (air) by means of a stationary ultrasonic field. A study of agglomeration and crystallization processes in situ was performed by continuously increasing the concentration of the samples by evaporating the solvent. Absorption and contamination processes on the sample container walls were suppressed strongly by this procedure, and parasitic scattering such as that observed when using glass capillaries was also absent. The samples investigated were either dissolved or dispersed in water droplets with diameters in the range of 1 micrometer to 2 millimeters. Initial results from time-resolved synchrotron small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering measurements of ascorbic acid, acetylsalicylic acid, apoferritin, and colloidal gold are presented. PMID:18373085

  7. Acoustic boundary control method for interior sound suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jian Q.; Hirsch, S. M.

    1997-06-01

    Suppressing interior sound radiation in helicopters, fixed- wing aircraft and land vehicles is a very important problem. It has been studied quite extensively in the past few decades. There are two mainstream methods for this problem: active noise cancellation (ANC) using loudspeakers and sound radiation reduction via structural controls (often called active structural acoustic control or ASAC). An ANC system often requires an impractically high dimensionality to achieve the level of global noise reduction in a three dimensional volume that ASAC systems with a relatively low dimensionality are capable of, while actuators for structural control systems are power intensive and less reliable. This paper presents an acoustic boundary control method that may reserve the advantages of both ANC and ASAC. Numerical simulation results of interior noise control are presented to demonstrate the ability of the acoustic boundary control to cancel sound fields due to different primary sources. A discussion is also presented on the spatial characteristics of the acoustic boundary control as a function of frequency. An interesting phenomenon is discovered that may have significant implications to the actuator grouping studies.

  8. Acoustic emission spectral analysis of fiber composite failure mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, D. M.; Williams, J. H., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The acoustic emission of graphite fiber polyimide composite failure mechanisms was investigated with emphasis on frequency spectrum analysis. Although visual examination of spectral densities could not distinguish among fracture sources, a paired-sample t statistical analysis of mean normalized spectral densities did provide quantitative discrimination among acoustic emissions from 10 deg, 90 deg, and plus or minus 45 deg, plus or minus 45 deg sub s specimens. Comparable discrimination was not obtained for 0 deg specimens.

  9. Comparison of Transmission Line Methods for Surface Acoustic Wave Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William; Atkinson, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) technology is low cost, rugged, lightweight, extremely low power and can be used to develop passive wireless sensors. For these reasons, NASA is investigating the use of SAW technology for Integrated Vehicle Health Monitoring (IVHM) of aerospace structures. To facilitate rapid prototyping of passive SAW sensors for aerospace applications, SAW models have been developed. This paper reports on the comparison of three methods of modeling SAWs. The three models are the Impulse Response Method (a first order model), and two second order matrix methods; the conventional matrix approach, and a modified matrix approach that is extended to include internal finger reflections. The second order models are based upon matrices that were originally developed for analyzing microwave circuits using transmission line theory. Results from the models are presented with measured data from devices. Keywords: Surface Acoustic Wave, SAW, transmission line models, Impulse Response Method.

  10. Scaling and dimensional analysis of acoustic streaming jets

    SciTech Connect

    Moudjed, B.; Botton, V.; Henry, D.; Ben Hadid, H.

    2014-09-15

    This paper focuses on acoustic streaming free jets. This is to say that progressive acoustic waves are used to generate a steady flow far from any wall. The derivation of the governing equations under the form of a nonlinear hydrodynamics problem coupled with an acoustic propagation problem is made on the basis of a time scale discrimination approach. This approach is preferred to the usually invoked amplitude perturbations expansion since it is consistent with experimental observations of acoustic streaming flows featuring hydrodynamic nonlinearities and turbulence. Experimental results obtained with a plane transducer in water are also presented together with a review of the former experimental investigations using similar configurations. A comparison of the shape of the acoustic field with the shape of the velocity field shows that diffraction is a key ingredient in the problem though it is rarely accounted for in the literature. A scaling analysis is made and leads to two scaling laws for the typical velocity level in acoustic streaming free jets; these are both observed in our setup and in former studies by other teams. We also perform a dimensional analysis of this problem: a set of seven dimensionless groups is required to describe a typical acoustic experiment. We find that a full similarity is usually not possible between two acoustic streaming experiments featuring different fluids. We then choose to relax the similarity with respect to sound attenuation and to focus on the case of a scaled water experiment representing an acoustic streaming application in liquid metals, in particular, in liquid silicon and in liquid sodium. We show that small acoustic powers can yield relatively high Reynolds numbers and velocity levels; this could be a virtue for heat and mass transfer applications, but a drawback for ultrasonic velocimetry.

  11. An acoustical analysis of a room with a concave dome ceiling element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utami, Sentagi S.

    2001-05-01

    Concave surfaces are often considered detrimental in room acoustics, especially because of the impact they have on the distribution of sound energy. This paper explores certain acoustical characteristics and anomalies found in spaces below concave dome ceiling elements. The architectural design of the Darusshollah mosque in East Java, Indonesia is used as a case study with specific spatial and functional concerns. Investigations of the mosque have been conducted through both a 1:12 scale model and a computer model that utilizes ray tracing and image source methods. Analysis techniques are discussed. Results are presented and compared to provide useful insights into the acoustics of such distinctive environments.

  12. A wave superposition method formulated in digital acoustic space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Yong-Sin

    In this thesis, a new formulation of the Wave Superposition method is proposed wherein the conventional mesh approach is replaced by a simple 3-D digital work space that easily accommodates shape optimization for minimizing or maximizing radiation efficiency. As sound quality is in demand in almost all product designs and also because of fierce competition between product manufacturers, faster and accurate computational method for shape optimization is always desired. Because the conventional Wave Superposition method relies solely on mesh geometry, it cannot accommodate fast shape changes in the design stage of a consumer product or machinery, where many iterations of shape changes are required. Since the use of a mesh hinders easy shape changes, a new approach for representing geometry is introduced by constructing a uniform lattice in a 3-D digital work space. A voxel (a portmanteau, a new word made from combining the sound and meaning, of the words, volumetric and pixel) is essentially a volume element defined by the uniform lattice, and does not require separate connectivity information as a mesh element does. In the presented method, geometry is represented with voxels that can easily adapt to shape changes, therefore it is more suitable for shape optimization. The new method was validated by computing radiated sound power of structures of simple and complex geometries and complex mode shapes. It was shown that matching volume velocity is a key component to an accurate analysis. A sensitivity study showed that it required at least 6 elements per acoustic wavelength, and a complexity study showed a minimal reduction in computational time.

  13. Wavelet-based acoustic emission detection method with adaptive thresholding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Sunil; Schoess, Jeffrey N.; Hamza, Rida; Busch, Darryl

    2000-06-01

    Reductions in Navy maintenance budgets and available personnel have dictated the need to transition from time-based to 'condition-based' maintenance. Achieving this will require new enabling diagnostic technologies. One such technology, the use of acoustic emission for the early detection of helicopter rotor head dynamic component faults, has been investigated by Honeywell Technology Center for its rotor acoustic monitoring system (RAMS). This ambitious, 38-month, proof-of-concept effort, which was a part of the Naval Surface Warfare Center Air Vehicle Diagnostics System program, culminated in a successful three-week flight test of the RAMS system at Patuxent River Flight Test Center in September 1997. The flight test results demonstrated that stress-wave acoustic emission technology can detect signals equivalent to small fatigue cracks in rotor head components and can do so across the rotating articulated rotor head joints and in the presence of other background acoustic noise generated during flight operation. This paper presents the results of stress wave data analysis of the flight-test dataset using wavelet-based techniques to assess background operational noise vs. machinery failure detection results.

  14. Comprehensive rotorcraft analysis methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Wendell B.; Austin, Edward E.

    1988-01-01

    The development and application of comprehensive rotorcraft analysis methods in the field of rotorcraft technology are described. These large scale analyses and the resulting computer programs are intended to treat the complex aeromechanical phenomena that describe the behavior of rotorcraft. They may be used to predict rotor aerodynamics, acoustic, performance, stability and control, handling qualities, loads and vibrations, structures, dynamics, and aeroelastic stability characteristics for a variety of applications including research, preliminary and detail design, and evaluation and treatment of field problems. The principal comprehensive methods developed or under development in recent years and generally available to the rotorcraft community because of US Army Aviation Research and Technology Activity (ARTA) sponsorship of all or part of the software systems are the Rotorcraft Flight Simulation (C81), Dynamic System Coupler (DYSCO), Coupled Rotor/Airframe Vibration Analysis Program (SIMVIB), Comprehensive Analytical Model of Rotorcraft Aerodynamics and Dynamics (CAMRAD), General Rotorcraft Aeromechanical Stability Program (GRASP), and Second Generation Comprehensive Helicopter Analysis System (2GCHAS).

  15. Method for Fabricating Piezoelectric Polymer Acoustic Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Thomas E., Jr. (Inventor); Bryant, Timothy D. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A method for forming a sensor includes providing a first and a second film and bonding an internal connection tab there between. The internal connection tab is positioned between the inner surfaces of the first and second film. Then, a conductive adhesive is applied to either the tab or to the inner film surfaces such that the inner surfaces of the film and the tab are electrically connected. Finally, the films are pressed together to bond the film together with the internal connection tab in between.

  16. Analysis of Vibration and Acoustic Noise in Permanent Magnet Motors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Sangmoon

    The drive motor is a frequent source of vibration and acoustic noise in many precision spindle motors. One of the electromagnetic sources of vibration in permanent magnet motors is the torque ripple, consisting of the reluctance torque and electromagnetic torque fluctuation. This type of vibration is becoming more serious with the advent of new high-grade magnets with increased flux density. Acoustic noise of electromagnetic origin is difficult to predict and its exact mechanism is unclear. The mechanism of noise generation should be revealed to design a quieter motor which is the modern customer's demand. For motor operation at low speeds and loads, torque ripple due to the reluctance torque is often a source of vibration and control difficulty. The reluctance torque in a motor was calculated from the flux density by a finite element method and the Maxwell stress method. Effects of design parameters, such as stator slot width, permanent slot width, airgap length and magnetization direction, were investigated. Magnet pole shaping, by gradually decreasing the magnet thickness toward edges, yields a sinusoidal shape of the reluctance torque with reduced harmonics, thus reducing the vibration. This dissertation also presents two motor design techniques: stator tooth notching and rotor pole skewing with magnet pole shaping, and the effect of each method on the output torque. The analysis shows that the reluctance torque can be nearly eliminated by the suggested designs, with minimal sacrifice of the output torque. In permanent magnet DC motors, the most popular design type is the trapezoidal back electro-motive force (BEMF), for switched DC controllers. It is demonstrated that the output torque profile of one phase energized is qualitatively equivalent to the BEMF profile for motors with reduced reluctance torque. It implies that design of BEMF profile is possible by magnetic modeling of a motor, without expensive and time-consuming experiments for different designs

  17. Dynamical energy analysis for built-up acoustic systems at high frequencies.

    PubMed

    Chappell, D J; Giani, S; Tanner, G

    2011-09-01

    Standard methods for describing the intensity distribution of mechanical and acoustic wave fields in the high frequency asymptotic limit are often based on flow transport equations. Common techniques are statistical energy analysis, employed mostly in the context of vibro-acoustics, and ray tracing, a popular tool in architectural acoustics. Dynamical energy analysis makes it possible to interpolate between standard statistical energy analysis and full ray tracing, containing both of these methods as limiting cases. In this work a version of dynamical energy analysis based on a Chebyshev basis expansion of the Perron-Frobenius operator governing the ray dynamics is introduced. It is shown that the technique can efficiently deal with multi-component systems overcoming typical geometrical limitations present in statistical energy analysis. Results are compared with state-of-the-art hp-adaptive discontinuous Galerkin finite element simulations. PMID:21895083

  18. The applicability of acoustic emission method to modeling the endurance of metallic construction elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev, S. V.; Rikkonen, S.; Azin, A.; Karavatskiy, A.; Maritskiy, N.; Ponomarev, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Acoustic emission method is the most effective nondestructive inspection technique of construction elements. This paper considers the expanded applicability of acoustic emission method to modeling the damage and the remaining operational life of building structures, including the high-ductile metals. The modeling of damage accumulation was carried out to predict endurance using acoustic emission method.

  19. Acoustic processing method for MS/MS experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whymark, R. R.

    1973-01-01

    Acoustical methods in which intense sound beams can be used to control the position of objects are considered. The position control arises from the radiation force experienced when a body is placed in a sound field. A description of the special properties of intense sound fields useful for position control is followed by a discussion of the more obvious methods of position, namely the use of multiple sound beams. A new type of acoustic position control device is reported that has advantages of simplicity and reliability and utilizes only a single sound beam. Finally a description is given of an experimental single beam levitator, and the results obtained in a number of key levitation experiments.

  20. Method of measuring reactive acoustic power density in a fluid

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1985-01-01

    A method for determining reactive acoustic power density level and its direction in a fluid using a single sensor is disclosed. In the preferred embodiment, an apparatus for conducting the method, which is termed a thermoacoustic couple, consists of a stack of thin, spaced apart polymeric plates, selected ones of which include multiple bimetallic thermocouple junctions positioned along opposite end edges thereof. The thermocouple junctions are connected in series in the nature of a thermopile, and are arranged so as to be responsive to small temperature differences between the opposite edges of the plates. The magnitude of the temperature difference, as represented by the magnitude of the electrical potential difference generated by the thermopile, is found to be directly related to the level of acoustic power density in the gas.

  1. Method of measuring reactive acoustic power density in a fluid

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1985-09-03

    A method for determining reactive acoustic power density level and its direction in a fluid using a single sensor is disclosed. In the preferred embodiment, an apparatus for conducting the method, which is termed a thermoacoustic couple, consists of a stack of thin, spaced apart polymeric plates, selected ones of which include multiple bimetallic thermocouple junctions positioned along opposite end edges thereof. The thermocouple junctions are connected in series in the nature of a thermopile, and are arranged so as to be responsive to small temperature differences between the opposite edges of the plates. The magnitude of the temperature difference, as represented by the magnitude of the electrical potential difference generated by the thermopile, is found to be directly related to the level of acoustic power density in the gas. 5 figs.

  2. An iterative algorithm for analysis of coupled structural-acoustic systems subject to random excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guo-Zhong; Chen, Gang; Kang, Zhan

    2012-04-01

    This paper analyzes the random response of structural-acoustic coupled systems. Most existing works on coupled structural-acoustic analysis are limited to systems under deterministic excitations due to high computational cost required by a random response analysis. To reduce the computational burden involved in the coupled random analysis, an iterative procedure based on the Pseudo excitation method has been developed. It is found that this algorithm has an overwhelming advantage in computing efficiency over traditional methods, as demonstrated by some numerical examples given in this paper.

  3. Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The acoustics research activities of the DLR fluid-mechanics department (Forschungsbereich Stroemungsmechanik) during 1988 are surveyed and illustrated with extensive diagrams, drawings, graphs, and photographs. Particular attention is given to studies of helicopter rotor noise (high-speed impulsive noise, blade/vortex interaction noise, and main/tail-rotor interaction noise), propeller noise (temperature, angle-of-attack, and nonuniform-flow effects), noise certification, and industrial acoustics (road-vehicle flow noise and airport noise-control installations).

  4. Neural network data analysis for laser-induced thermal acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlamp, Stefan; Hornung, Hans G.; Cummings, Eric B.

    2000-06-01

    A general, analytical closed-form solution for laser-induced thermal acoustic (LITA) signals using homodyne or heterodyne detection and using electrostrictive and thermal gratings is derived. A one-hidden-layer feed-forward neural network is trained using back-propagation learning and a steepest descent learning rule to extract the speed of sound and flow velocity from a heterodyne LITA signal. The effect of the network size on the performance is demonstrated. The accuracy is determined with a second set of LITA signals that were not used during the training phase. The accuracy is found to be better than that of a conventional frequency decomposition technique while being computationally as efficient. This data analysis method is robust with respect to noise, numerically stable and fast enough for real-time data analysis.

  5. Chemical analysis of acoustically levitated drops by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tuckermann, Rudolf; Puskar, Ljiljana; Zavabeti, Mahta; Sekine, Ryo; McNaughton, Don

    2009-07-01

    An experimental apparatus combining Raman spectroscopy with acoustic levitation, Raman acoustic levitation spectroscopy (RALS), is investigated in the field of physical and chemical analytics. Whereas acoustic levitation enables the contactless handling of microsized samples, Raman spectroscopy offers the advantage of a noninvasive method without complex sample preparation. After carrying out some systematic tests to probe the sensitivity of the technique to drop size, shape, and position, RALS has been successfully applied in monitoring sample dilution and preconcentration, evaporation, crystallization, an acid-base reaction, and analytes in a surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy colloidal suspension. PMID:19418043

  6. Analysis of some acoustics-jet flow interaction problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, P. L.

    1984-01-01

    Analytical problems in the interactions between the mean-shear flows and the acoustic field in the planar and circular jets are examined. These problems are basic in understanding the effects of coherent large structure on the generation and complications of sound in a sub-sonic jet. Three problems were investigated: (1) spatial (vs. temporal) normal mode analysis in a planar jets; (2) a slightly divergent, planar jet; and (3) acoustic waves in an axisymmetrical jet.

  7. LES and acoustic analysis of thermo-acoustic instabilities in a partially premixed model combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, Ignacio; Staffelbach, Gabriel; Poinsot, Thierry; Román Casado, Juan C.; Kok, Jim B. W.

    2013-01-01

    Numerical simulations were performed using Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and acoustic analysis tools to study thermo-acoustic instabilities in a methane/air academic burner installed at the University of Twente (The Netherlands). It operates under fuel-lean partially premixed conditions at atmospheric pressure, and was built to study thermo-acoustic instabilities in conditions representative of gas turbine Lean Premixed systems: gaseous fuel is injected upstream of the combustor and has a limited time to mix with air. Even though the objective is to burn in a premixed mode, the actual regime corresponds to a partially premixed flame where strong equivalence ratio variations are created especially during combustion instabilities. Capturing these modes with LES is a challenge: here, simulations for both stable and unstable regimes are performed. In the unstable case, the limit cycle oscillations (LCO) are characterized and compared to experimental results. Reasonable agreement is found between simulations and experiments.

  8. Computer method for design of acoustic liners for turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minner, G. L.; Rice, E. J.

    1976-01-01

    A design package is presented for the specification of acoustic liners for turbofans. An estimate of the noise generation was made based on modifications of existing noise correlations, for which the inputs are basic fan aerodynamic design variables. The method does not predict multiple pure tones. A target attenuation spectrum was calculated which was the difference between the estimated generation spectrum and a flat annoyance-weighted goal attenuated spectrum. The target spectrum was combined with a knowledge of acoustic liner performance as a function of the liner design variables to specify the acoustic design. The liner design method at present is limited to annular duct configurations. The detailed structure of the liner was specified by combining the required impedance (which is a result of the previous step) with a mathematical model relating impedance to the detailed structure. The design procedure was developed for a liner constructed of perforated sheet placed over honeycomb backing cavities. A sample calculation was carried through in order to demonstrate the design procedure, and experimental results presented show good agreement with the calculated results of the method.

  9. Device and method for generating a beam of acoustic energy from a borehole, and applications thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N; Pantea, Cristian; Nihei, Kurt T; Schmitt, Denis P; Skelt, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    In some aspects of the invention, a method of generating a beam of acoustic energy in a borehole is disclosed. The method includes generating a first acoustic wave at a first frequency; generating a second acoustic wave at a second frequency different than the first frequency, wherein the first acoustic wave and second acoustic wave are generated by at least one transducer carried by a tool located within the borehole; transmitting the first and the second acoustic waves into an acoustically non-linear medium, wherein the composition of the non-linear medium produces a collimated beam by a non-linear mixing of the first and second acoustic waves, wherein the collimated beam has a frequency based upon a difference between the first frequency and the second frequency; and transmitting the collimated beam through a diverging acoustic lens to compensate for a refractive effect caused by the curvature of the borehole.

  10. Acoustic analysis of a mechanical circulatory support.

    PubMed

    Hubbert, Laila; Sundbom, Per; Loebe, Matthias; Peterzén, Bengt; Granfeldt, Hans; Ahn, Henrik

    2014-07-01

    Mechanical circulatory support technology is continually improving. However, adverse complications do occur with devastating consequences, for example, pump thrombosis that may develop in several parts of the pump system. The aim of this study was to design an experimental clot/thrombosis model to register and analyze acoustic signals from the left ventricular assist device (LVAD) HeartMate II (HMII) (Thoratec Corporation, Inc., Pleasanton, CA, USA) and detect changes in sound signals correlating to clots in the inflow, outflow, and pump housing. Using modern telecom techniques, it was possible to register and analyze the HMII pump-specific acoustic fingerprint in an experimental model of LVAD support using a mock loop. Increase in pump speed significantly (P<0.005) changed the acoustic fingerprint at certain frequency (0-23,000 Hz) intervals (regions: R1-3 and peaks: P1,3-4). When the ball valves connected to the tubing were narrowed sequentially by ∼50% of the inner diameter (to mimic clot in the out- and inflow tubing), the frequency spectrum changed significantly (P<0.005) in P1 and P2 and R1 when the outflow tubing was narrowed. This change was not seen to the same extent when the lumen of the ball valve connected to the inflow tube was narrowed by ∼50%. More significant (P<0.005) acoustic changes were detected in P1 and P2 and R1 and R3, with the largest dB figs. in the lower frequency ranges in R1 and P2, when artificial clots and blood clots passed through the pump system. At higher frequencies, a significant change in dB figs. in R3 and P4 was detected when clots passed through the pump system. Acoustic monitoring of pump sounds may become a valuable tool in LVAD surveillance. PMID:24372095

  11. Acoustic vibration analysis for utilization of woody plant in space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chida, Yukari; Yamashita, Masamichi; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Sato, Seigo; Tomita-Yokotani, Kaori; Baba, Keiichi; Suzuki, Toshisada; Motohashi, Kyohei; Sakurai, Naoki; Nakagawa-izumi, Akiko

    2012-07-01

    We are proposing to raise woody plants for space agriculture in Mars. Space agriculture has the utilization of wood in their ecosystem. Nobody knows the real tree shape grown under space environment under the low or micro gravitational conditions such as outer environment. Angiosperm tree forms tension wood for keeping their shape. Tension wood formation is deeply related to gravity, but the details of the mechanism of its formation has not yet been clarified. For clarifying the mechanism, the space experiment in international space station, ISS is the best way to investigate about them as the first step. It is necessary to establish the easy method for crews who examine the experiments at ISS. Here, we are proposing to investigate the possibility of the acoustic vibration analysis for the experiment at ISS. Two types of Japanese cherry tree, weeping and upright types in Prunus sp., were analyzed by the acoustic vibration method. Coefficient-of-variation (CV) of sound speed was calculated by the acoustic vibration analysis. The amount of lignin and decomposed lignin were estimated by both Klason and Py-GC/MS method, respectively. The relationships of the results of acoustic vibration analysis and the inner components in tested woody materials were investigated. After the experiments, we confirm the correlation about them. Our results indicated that the acoustic vibration analysis would be useful for determining the inside composition as a nondestructive method in outer space environment.

  12. Acoustic methods to monitor sliver linear density and yarn strength

    DOEpatents

    Sheen, Shuh-Haw; Chien, Hual-Te; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    1997-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided for monitoring sliver and yarn characteristics. Transverse waves are generated relative to the sliver or yarn. At least one acoustic sensor is in contact with the sliver or yarn for detecting waves coupled to the sliver or yarn and for generating a signal. The generated signal is processed to identify the predefined characteristics including sliver or yarn linear density. The transverse waves can be generated with a high-powered acoustic transmitter spaced relative to the sliver or yarn with large amplitude pulses having a central frequency in a range between 20 KHz and 40 KHz applied to the transmitter. The transverse waves can be generated by mechanically agitating the sliver or yarn with a tapping member.

  13. Method for distinguishing multiple targets using time-reversal acoustics

    DOEpatents

    Berryman, James G.

    2004-06-29

    A method for distinguishing multiple targets using time-reversal acoustics. Time-reversal acoustics uses an iterative process to determine the optimum signal for locating a strongly reflecting target in a cluttered environment. An acoustic array sends a signal into a medium, and then receives the returned/reflected signal. This returned/reflected signal is then time-reversed and sent back into the medium again, and again, until the signal being sent and received is no longer changing. At that point, the array has isolated the largest eigenvalue/eigenvector combination and has effectively determined the location of a single target in the medium (the one that is most strongly reflecting). After the largest eigenvalue/eigenvector combination has been determined, to determine the location of other targets, instead of sending back the same signals, the method sends back these time reversed signals, but half of them will also be reversed in sign. There are various possibilities for choosing which half to do sign reversal. The most obvious choice is to reverse every other one in a linear array, or as in a checkerboard pattern in 2D. Then, a new send/receive, send-time reversed/receive iteration can proceed. Often, the first iteration in this sequence will be close to the desired signal from a second target. In some cases, orthogonalization procedures must be implemented to assure the returned signals are in fact orthogonal to the first eigenvector found.

  14. Method for chemically analyzing a solution by acoustic means

    DOEpatents

    Beller, L.S.

    1997-04-22

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for determining a type of solution and the concentration of that solution by acoustic means. Generally stated, the method consists of: immersing a sound focusing transducer within a first liquid filled container; locating a separately contained specimen solution at a sound focal point within the first container; locating a sound probe adjacent to the specimen, generating a variable intensity sound signal from the transducer; measuring fundamental and multiple harmonic sound signal amplitudes; and then comparing a plot of a specimen sound response with a known solution sound response, thereby determining the solution type and concentration. 10 figs.

  15. Method for chemically analyzing a solution by acoustic means

    DOEpatents

    Beller, Laurence S.

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining a type of solution and the concention of that solution by acoustic means. Generally stated, the method consists of: immersing a sound focusing transducer within a first liquid filled container; locating a separately contained specimen solution at a sound focal point within the first container; locating a sound probe adjacent to the specimen, generating a variable intensity sound signal from the transducer; measuring fundamental and multiple harmonic sound signal amplitudes; and then comparing a plot of a specimen sound response with a known solution sound response, thereby determining the solution type and concentration.

  16. APPLICATIONS OF BOREHOLE-ACOUSTIC METHODS IN ROCK MECHANICS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paillet, Frederick L.

    1985-01-01

    Acoustic-logging methods using a considerable range of wavelengths and frequencies have proven very useful in the in situ characterization of deeply buried crystalline rocks. Seismic velocities are useful in investigating the moduli of unfractured rock, and in producing a continuous record of rock quality for comparison with discontinuous intervals of core. The considerable range of frequencies makes the investigation of scale effects possible in both fractured and unfractured rock. Several specific methods for the characterization of in situ permeability have been developed and verified in the field.

  17. Method for chemically analyzing a solution by acoustic means

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, L.S.

    1995-12-31

    A method and apparatus are described for determining a type of solution and the concentration of that solution by acoustic means. Generally stated, the method consists of: immersing a sound focusing transducer within a first liquid filled container; locating a separately contained specimen solution at a sound focal point within the first container; locating a sound probe adjacent to the specimen, generating a variable intensity sound signal from the transducer; measuring fundamental and multiple harmonic sound signal amplitudes; and then comparing plot of a specimen sound response with a known solution sound response, thereby determining the solution type and concentration.

  18. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  19. Device and method for generating a beam of acoustic energy from a borehole, and applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian; Nihei, Kurt T.; Schmitt, Denis P.; Skelt, Chirstopher

    2013-10-15

    In some aspects of the invention, a method of generating a beam of acoustic energy in a borehole is disclosed. The method includes generating a first acoustic wave at a first frequency; generating a second acoustic wave at a second frequency different than the first frequency, wherein the first acoustic wave and second acoustic wave are generated by at least one transducer carried by a tool located within the borehole; transmitting the first and the second acoustic waves into an acoustically non-linear medium, wherein the composition of the non-linear medium produces a collimated beam by a non-linear mixing of the first and second acoustic waves, wherein the collimated beam has a frequency based upon a difference between the first frequency range and the second frequency, and wherein the non-linear medium has a velocity of sound between 100 m/s and 800 m/s.

  20. Equivalent Source Method Applied to Launch Acoustic Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housman, Jeffrey A.; Barad, Michael F.; Kiris, Cetin

    2012-01-01

    Aeroacoustic simulations of the launch environment are described. A hybrid computational fluid dynamics (CFD)/computational aeroacoustic (CAA) approach is developed in order to accurately and efficiently predict the sound pressure level spectrum on the launch vehicle and surrounding structures. The high-fidelity CFD code LAVA (Launch Ascent and Vehicle Analysis), is used to generate pressure time history at select locations in the flow field. A 3D exterior Helmholtz solver is then used to iteratively determine a set of monopole sources which mimic the noise generating mechanisms identified by the CFD solver. The acoustic pressure field generated from the Helmholtz solver is then used to evaluate the sound pressure levels.

  1. Solution of Exterior Acoustic Problems by the Boundary Element Method.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkup, Stephen Martin

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The boundary element method is described and investigated, especially in respect of its application to exterior two -dimensional Laplace problems. Both empirical and algebraic analyses (including the effects of approximation of the boundary and boundary functions and the precision of the evaluation of the discrete forms) are developed. Methods for the automatic evaluation of the discrete forms of the Laplace and Helmholtz integral operators are reviewed and extended. Boundary element methods for the solution of exterior Helmholtz problems with general (but most importantly Neumann) boundary conditions are reviewed and some are explicitly stated using a new notation. Boundary element methods based on the boundary integral equations introduced by Brakhage & Werner/ Leis/ Panich/ Kussmaul (indirect) and Burton & Miller (direct) are given prime consideration and implemented for three -dimensional problems. The influence of the choice of weighting parameter on the performance of the methods is explored and further guidance is given. The application of boundary element methods and methods based on the Rayleigh integral to acoustic radiation problems are considered. Methods for speeding up their solution via the boundary element method are developed. Library subroutines for the solution of acoustic radiation problems are described and demonstrated. Computational techniques for the problem of predicting the noise produced by a running engine are reviewed and appraised. The application of the boundary element method to low-noise engine design and in the design of noise shields is considered. The boundary element method is applied to the Ricardo crankcase simulation rig, which is an engine -like structure. A comparison of predicted and measured sound power spectra is given.

  2. Solution of exterior acoustic problems by the boundary element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkup, Stephen Martin

    The boundary element method is described and investigated, especially in respect of its application to exterior two-dimensional Laplace problems. Both empirical and algebraic analyses (including the effects of approximation of the boundary and boundary functions and the precision of the evaluation of the discrete forms) are developed. Methods for the automatic evaluation of the discrete forms of the Laplace and Helmholtz integral operators are reviewed and extended. Boundary element methods for the solution of exterior Helmholtz problems with general (but most importantly Neumann) boundary conditions are reviewed and some are explicitly stated using a new notation. Boundary element methods based on the boundary integral equations introduced by Brakhage and Werner/Leis/Panich/Kussmaul (indirect) and Burton and Miller (direct) are given prime consideration and implemented for three-dimensional problems. The influence of the choice of weighting parameter on the performance of the methods is explored and further guidance is given. The application of boundary element methods and methods based on the Rayleigh integral to acoustic radiation problems are considered. Methods for speeding up their solution via the boundary element method are developed. Library subroutines for the solution of acoustic radiation problems are described and demonstrated. Computational techniques for the problem of predicting the noise produced by a running engine are reviewed and appraised. The application of the boundary element method to low-noise engine design and in the design of noise shields is considered. The boundary element method is applied to the Ricardo crankcase simulation rig, which is an engine-like structure. A comparison of predicted and measured sound power spectra is given.

  3. Analysis of passive acoustic ranging of helicopters from the joint acoustic propagation experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnes, Benny L.; Morgan, John C.

    1993-01-01

    For more than twenty years, personnel of the U.S.A.E. Waterways Experiment Station (WES) have been performing research dealing with the application of sensors for detection of military targets. The WES research has included the use of seismic, acoustic, magnetic, and other sensors to detect, track, and classify military ground targets. Most of the WES research has been oriented toward the employment of such sensors in a passive mode. Techniques for passive detection are of particular interest in the Army because of the advantages over active detection. Passive detection methods are not susceptible to interception, detection, jamming, or location of the source by the threat. A decided advantage for using acoustic and seismic sensors for detection in tactical situations is the non-line-of-sight capability; i.e., detection of low flying helicopters at long distances without visual contact. This study was conducted to analyze the passive acoustic ranging (PAR) concept using a more extensive data set from the Joint Acoustic Propagation Experiment (JAPE).

  4. The vibro-acoustic analysis of built-up systems using a hybrid method with parametric and non-parametric uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicirello, Alice; Langley, Robin S.

    2013-04-01

    An existing hybrid finite element (FE)/statistical energy analysis (SEA) approach to the analysis of the mid- and high frequency vibrations of a complex built-up system is extended here to a wider class of uncertainty modeling. In the original approach, the constituent parts of the system are considered to be either deterministic, and modeled using FE, or highly random, and modeled using SEA. A non-parametric model of randomness is employed in the SEA components, based on diffuse wave theory and the Gaussian Orthogonal Ensemble (GOE), and this enables the mean and variance of second order quantities such as vibrational energy and response cross-spectra to be predicted. In the present work the assumption that the FE components are deterministic is relaxed by the introduction of a parametric model of uncertainty in these components. The parametric uncertainty may be modeled either probabilistically, or by using a non-probabilistic approach such as interval analysis, and it is shown how these descriptions can be combined with the non-parametric uncertainty in the SEA subsystems to yield an overall assessment of the performance of the system. The method is illustrated by application to an example built-up plate system which has random properties, and benchmark comparisons are made with full Monte Carlo simulations.

  5. Nested sampling applied in Bayesian room-acoustics decay analysis.

    PubMed

    Jasa, Tomislav; Xiang, Ning

    2012-11-01

    Room-acoustic energy decays often exhibit single-rate or multiple-rate characteristics in a wide variety of rooms/halls. Both the energy decay order and decay parameter estimation are of practical significance in architectural acoustics applications, representing two different levels of Bayesian probabilistic inference. This paper discusses a model-based sound energy decay analysis within a Bayesian framework utilizing the nested sampling algorithm. The nested sampling algorithm is specifically developed to evaluate the Bayesian evidence required for determining the energy decay order with decay parameter estimates as a secondary result. Taking the energy decay analysis in architectural acoustics as an example, this paper demonstrates that two different levels of inference, decay model-selection and decay parameter estimation, can be cohesively accomplished by the nested sampling algorithm. PMID:23145609

  6. Improvements to the methods used to measure bubble attenuation using an underwater acoustical resonator.

    PubMed

    Czerski, Helen; Vagle, Svein; Farmer, David M; Hall-Patch, Nick

    2011-11-01

    Active acoustic techniques are commonly used to measure oceanic bubble size distributions, by inverting the bulk acoustical properties of the water (usually the attenuation) to infer the bubble population. Acoustical resonators have previously been used to determine attenuation over a wide range of frequencies (10-200 kHz) in a single measurement, corresponding to the simultaneous measurement of a wide range of bubble sizes (20-300 μm radii). However, there is now also considerable interest in acquiring measurements of bubbles with radii smaller than 16 μm, since these are thought to be important for ocean optics and as tracers for near-surface flow. To extend the bubble population measurement to smaller radii, it is necessary to extend the attenuation measurements to higher frequencies. Although the principles of resonator operation do not change as the frequency increases, the assumptions previously made during the spectral analysis may no longer be valid. In order to improve the methods used to calculate attenuation from acoustical resonator outputs, a more complete analysis of the resonator operation is presented here than has been published previously. This approach allows for robust attenuation measurements over a much wider frequency range and enables accurate measurements from lower-quality spectral peaks. PMID:22088016

  7. Acoustic analysis in Mudejar-Gothic churches: experimental results.

    PubMed

    Galindo, Miguel; Zamarreño, Teófilo; Girón, Sara

    2005-05-01

    This paper describes the preliminary results of research work in acoustics, conducted in a set of 12 Mudejar-Gothic churches in the city of Seville in the south of Spain. Despite common architectural style, the churches feature individual characteristics and have volumes ranging from 3947 to 10 708 m3. Acoustic parameters were measured in unoccupied churches according to the ISO-3382 standard. An extensive experimental study was carried out using impulse response analysis through a maximum length sequence measurement system in each church. It covered aspects such as reverberation (reverberation times, early decay times), distribution of sound levels (sound strength); early to late sound energy parameters derived from the impulse responses (center time, clarity for speech, clarity, definition, lateral energy fraction), and speech intelligibility (rapid speech transmission index), which all take both spectral and spatial distribution into account. Background noise was also measured to obtain the NR indices. The study describes the acoustic field inside each temple and establishes a discussion for each one of the acoustic descriptors mentioned by using the theoretical models available and the principles of architectural acoustics. Analysis of the quality of the spaces for music and speech is carried out according to the most widespread criteria for auditoria. PMID:15957758

  8. Acoustic analysis in Mudejar-Gothic churches: Experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo, Miguel; Zamarreño, Teófilo; Girón, Sara

    2005-05-01

    This paper describes the preliminary results of research work in acoustics, conducted in a set of 12 Mudejar-Gothic churches in the city of Seville in the south of Spain. Despite common architectural style, the churches feature individual characteristics and have volumes ranging from 3947 to 10 708 m3. Acoustic parameters were measured in unoccupied churches according to the ISO-3382 standard. An extensive experimental study was carried out using impulse response analysis through a maximum length sequence measurement system in each church. It covered aspects such as reverberation (reverberation times, early decay times), distribution of sound levels (sound strength); early to late sound energy parameters derived from the impulse responses (center time, clarity for speech, clarity, definition, lateral energy fraction), and speech intelligibility (rapid speech transmission index), which all take both spectral and spatial distribution into account. Background noise was also measured to obtain the NR indices. The study describes the acoustic field inside each temple and establishes a discussion for each one of the acoustic descriptors mentioned by using the theoretical models available and the principles of architectural acoustics. Analysis of the quality of the spaces for music and speech is carried out according to the most widespread criteria for auditoria. .

  9. Modeling ground vehicle acoustic signatures for analysis and synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Haschke, G.; Stanfield, R.

    1995-07-01

    Security and weapon systems use acoustic sensor signals to classify and identify moving ground vehicles. Developing robust signal processing algorithms for this is expensive, particularly in presence of acoustic clutter or countermeasures. This paper proposes a parametric ground vehicle acoustic signature model to aid the system designer in understanding which signature features are important, developing corresponding feature extraction algorithms and generating low-cost, high-fidelity synthetic signatures for testing. The authors have proposed computer-generated acoustic signatures of armored, tracked ground vehicles to deceive acoustic-sensored smart munitions. They have developed quantitative measures of how accurately a synthetic acoustic signature matches those produced by actual vehicles. This paper describes parameters of the model used to generate these synthetic signatures and suggests methods for extracting these parameters from signatures of valid vehicle encounters. The model incorporates wide-bandwidth and narrow- bandwidth components that are modulated in a pseudo-random fashion to mimic the time dynamics of valid vehicle signatures. Narrow- bandwidth feature extraction techniques estimate frequency, amplitude and phase information contained in a single set of narrow frequency- band harmonics. Wide-bandwidth feature extraction techniques estimate parameters of a correlated-noise-floor model. Finally, the authors propose a method of modeling the time dynamics of the harmonic amplitudes as a means adding necessary time-varying features to the narrow-bandwidth signal components. The authors present results of applying this modeling technique to acoustic signatures recorded during encounters with one armored, tracked vehicle. Similar modeling techniques can be applied to security systems.

  10. An improved multivariate analytical method to assess the accuracy of acoustic sediment classification maps.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biondo, M.; Bartholomä, A.

    2014-12-01

    between the acoustic and ground-thruthing datasets were quantified through the method. The effectiveness of the analytical approach was tested by extending the latter to the analysis of data collected in the area during a strategically designed survey carried out in July 2014.

  11. Perturbation analysis of electromagnetic geodesic acoustic modes

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Haijun

    2014-06-15

    Lagrangian displacement and magnetic field perturbation response to the geodesic acoustic mode is analyzed by using the ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations in a large-aspect-ratio tokamak. δB{sub θ}, the poloidal component of magnetic field perturbation, has poloidal wave number m = 2 created by the poloidal displacement ξ{sub θ}. The parallel perturbation of magnetic field, δB{sub ∥}, has a poloidally asymmetric structure with m = 1 and is on the same order of magnitude with δB{sub θ} to the leading order. The radial displacement ξ{sub r} is of order O(βϵξ{sub θ}) but plays a significant role in determining δB{sub ∥}, where β is the plasma/magnetic pressure ratio and ϵ is the inverse aspect ratio.

  12. Wave envelopes method for description of nonlinear acoustic wave propagation.

    PubMed

    Wójcik, J; Nowicki, A; Lewin, P A; Bloomfield, P E; Kujawska, T; Filipczyński, L

    2006-07-01

    A novel, free from paraxial approximation and computationally efficient numerical algorithm capable of predicting 4D acoustic fields in lossy and nonlinear media from arbitrary shaped sources (relevant to probes used in medical ultrasonic imaging and therapeutic systems) is described. The new WE (wave envelopes) approach to nonlinear propagation modeling is based on the solution of the second order nonlinear differential wave equation reported in [J. Wójcik, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 104 (1998) 2654-2663; V.P. Kuznetsov, Akust. Zh. 16 (1970) 548-553]. An incremental stepping scheme allows for forward wave propagation. The operator-splitting method accounts independently for the effects of full diffraction, absorption and nonlinear interactions of harmonics. The WE method represents the propagating pulsed acoustic wave as a superposition of wavelet-like sinusoidal pulses with carrier frequencies being the harmonics of the boundary tone burst disturbance. The model is valid for lossy media, arbitrarily shaped plane and focused sources, accounts for the effects of diffraction and can be applied to continuous as well as to pulsed waves. Depending on the source geometry, level of nonlinearity and frequency bandwidth, in comparison with the conventional approach the Time-Averaged Wave Envelopes (TAWE) method shortens computational time of the full 4D nonlinear field calculation by at least an order of magnitude; thus, predictions of nonlinear beam propagation from complex sources (such as phased arrays) can be available within 30-60 min using only a standard PC. The approximate ratio between the computational time costs obtained by using the TAWE method and the conventional approach in calculations of the nonlinear interactions is proportional to 1/N2, and in memory consumption to 1/N where N is the average bandwidth of the individual wavelets. Numerical computations comparing the spatial field distributions obtained by using both the TAWE method and the conventional approach

  13. Frequency-domain methods for modeling a nonlinear acoustic orifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egolf, David P.; Murphy, William J.; Franks, John R.; Kirlin, R. Lynn

    2002-11-01

    This presentation describes frequency-domain methods for simulating transmission loss across a single orifice mounted in an acoustic waveguide. The work was a preamble to research involving earplugs containing one or more orifices. Simulation methods included direct Fourier transformation, linearization about an operating point, and Volterra series. They were applied to an electric-circuit analog of the acoustic system containing the orifice. The orifice itself was characterized by an empirical expression for nonlinear impedance obtained by fitting curves to experimental resistance and reactance data reported by other authors. Their data-collection procedures required the impedance expression presented herein to be properly labeled as a describing function, a quantity well known in the nonlinear control systems literature. Results of the computer simulations were compared to experimental transmission-loss data. For a single-tone input sound pressure, the computer code accurately predicted the output fundamental (i.e., without harmonics). For a broadband input, the simulated output was less accurate, but acceptable. Levels of the sound-pressure input ranged from 60 to 160 dB. [Work supported by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH, through a research associateship granted the first author by the National Research Council.] a)Currently on leave at National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH.

  14. A Comparison of Surface Acoustic Wave Modeling Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, W. c.; Atkinson, G. M.

    2009-01-01

    Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) technology is low cost, rugged, lightweight, extremely low power and can be used to develop passive wireless sensors. For these reasons, NASA is investigating the use of SAW technology for Integrated Vehicle Health Monitoring (IVHM) of aerospace structures. To facilitate rapid prototyping of passive SAW sensors for aerospace applications, SAW models have been developed. This paper reports on the comparison of three methods of modeling SAWs. The three models are the Impulse Response Method a first order model, and two second order matrix methods; the conventional matrix approach, and a modified matrix approach that is extended to include internal finger reflections. The second order models are based upon matrices that were originally developed for analyzing microwave circuits using transmission line theory. Results from the models are presented with measured data from devices.

  15. A mesh-free method with arbitrary-order accuracy for acoustic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takekawa, Junichi; Mikada, Hitoshi; Imamura, Naoto

    2015-05-01

    In the present study, we applied a novel mesh-free method to solve acoustic wave equation. Although the conventional finite difference methods determine the coefficients of its operator based on the regular grid alignment, the mesh-free method is not restricted to regular arrangements of calculation points. We derive the mesh-free approach using the multivariable Taylor expansion. The methodology can use arbitrary-order accuracy scheme in space by expanding the influence domain which controls the number of neighboring calculation points. The unique point of the method is that the approach calculates the approximation of derivatives using the differences of spatial variables without parameters as e.g. the weighting functions, basis functions. Dispersion analysis using a plane wave reveals that the choice of the higher-order scheme improves the dispersion property of the method although the scheme for the irregular distribution of the calculation points is more dispersive than that of the regular alignment. In numerical experiments, a model of irregular distribution of the calculation points reproduces acoustic wave propagation in a homogeneous medium same as that of a regular lattice. In an inhomogeneous model which includes low velocity anomalies, partially fine arrangement improves the effectiveness of computational cost without suffering from accuracy reduction. Our result indicates that the method would provide accurate and efficient solutions for acoustic wave propagation using adaptive distribution of the calculation points.

  16. Quantitative and Descriptive Comparison of Four Acoustic Analysis Systems: Vowel Measurements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burris, Carlyn; Vorperian, Houri K.; Fourakis, Marios; Kent, Ray D.; Bolt, Daniel M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines accuracy and comparability of 4 trademarked acoustic analysis software packages (AASPs): Praat, WaveSurfer, TF32, and CSL by using synthesized and natural vowels. Features of AASPs are also described. Method: Synthesized and natural vowels were analyzed using each of the AASP's default settings to secure 9…

  17. Automated pattern analysis: A newsilent partner in insect acoustic detection studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This seminar reviews methods that have been developed for automated analysis of field-collected sounds used to estimate pest populations and guide insect pest management decisions. Several examples are presented of successful usage of acoustic technology to map insect distributions in field environ...

  18. [Acoustic analysis of voice production. Production trial from a clinical perspective].

    PubMed

    Dejonckere, P H

    1986-01-01

    This article presents an overview of relevant methods for acoustic analysis of voice from a clinical point of view: Mean speaking frequency and fundamental frequency in singing; frequency range of phonation; pitch perturbations; intensity range of phonation and phonetogram; cycle-to-cycle amplitude variations; Sound spectrography (Visible Speech) and Long-Time-Average-Spectrum. PMID:3751531

  19. Photo-acoustic analysis of dental materials and tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeleva, Pavlina Jetchkova

    2005-11-01

    The goal of the presented study is the investigation of the feasibility of using optically generated acoustic waves for analysis of dental material below laser-ablation threshold. The temperature rise of dental material and tissue has been modeled analytically and numerically, and measured experimentally. Following interactions with nano- and femto-second laser radiation the temperature rises at a rate of typically 1°C per J/cm 2, along with the generation of an acoustical wave. The results from the models agree with the experiment. The acoustic measurements show differences in the acoustic signal strength and the frequency spectrum when the canal in the porcelain phantom is empty or filled with intralipid solution. The photo-acoustic technique is found to be suitable for detection of liquids under a layer of dental porcelain material, consequently it can be the basis for building an imaging tool for dental diagnostic applications. By generating sound waves in the pulp, one would be able to evaluate it's state and the overall health of the tooth. This is of vital importance for diagnosing initial-stage inflammation.

  20. Surface acoustic wave nebulization facilitating lipid mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sung Hwan; Huang, Yue; Edgar, J Scott; Ting, Ying S; Heron, Scott R; Kao, Yuchieh; Li, Yanyan; Masselon, Christophe D; Ernst, Robert K; Goodlett, David R

    2012-08-01

    Surface acoustic wave nebulization (SAWN) is a novel method to transfer nonvolatile analytes directly from the aqueous phase to the gas phase for mass spectrometric analysis. The lower ion energetics of SAWN and its planar nature make it appealing for analytically challenging lipid samples. This challenge is a result of their amphipathic nature, labile nature, and tendency to form aggregates, which readily precipitate clogging capillaries used for electrospray ionization (ESI). Here, we report the use of SAWN to characterize the complex glycolipid, lipid A, which serves as the membrane anchor component of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and has a pronounced tendency to clog nano-ESI capillaries. We also show that unlike ESI SAWN is capable of ionizing labile phospholipids without fragmentation. Lastly, we compare the ease of use of SAWN to the more conventional infusion-based ESI methods and demonstrate the ability to generate higher order tandem mass spectral data of lipid A for automated structure assignment using our previously reported hierarchical tandem mass spectrometry (HiTMS) algorithm. The ease of generating SAWN-MS(n) data combined with HiTMS interpretation offers the potential for high throughput lipid A structure analysis. PMID:22742654

  1. Temporal analysis of acoustic emission from a plunged granular bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Daisuke; Katsuragi, Hiroaki

    2015-10-01

    The statistical property of acoustic emission (AE) events from a plunged granular bed is analyzed by means of actual-time and natural-time analyses. These temporal analysis methods allow us to investigate the details of AE events that follow a power-law distribution. In the actual-time analysis, the calm-time distribution, and the decay of the event-occurrence density after the largest event (i.e., the Omori-Utsu law) are measured. Although the former always shows a power-law form, the latter does not always obey a power law. Markovianity of the event-occurrence process is also verified using a scaling law by assuming that both of them exhibit power laws. We find that the effective shear strain rate is a key parameter to classify the emergence rate of power-law nature and Markovianity in granular AE events. For the natural-time analysis, the existence of self-organized critical states is revealed by calculating the variance of natural time χk, where k th natural time of N events is defined as χk=k /N . In addition, the energy difference distribution can be fitted by a q -Gaussian form, which is also consistent with the criticality of the system.

  2. Graphical analysis of electron inertia induced acoustic instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, P. K.; Deka, U.; Dwivedi, C. B.

    2005-03-01

    Recently, the practical significance of the asymptotic limit of me/mi→0 for electron density distribution has been judged in a two-component plasma system with drifting ions. It is reported that in the presence of drifting ions with drift speed exceeding the ion acoustic wave speed, the electron inertial delay effect facilitates the resonance coupling of the usual fluid ion acoustic mode with the ion-beam mode. In this contribution the same instability is analyzed by graphical and numerical methods. This is to note that the obtained dispersion relation differs from those of the other known normal modes of low frequency ion plasma oscillations and waves. This is due to consideration of electron inertial delay in derivation of the dispersion relation of the ion acoustic wave fluctuations. Numerical calculations of the dispersion relation and wave energy are carried out to depict the graphical appearance of poles and positive-negative enegy modes. It is found that the electron inertia induced ion acoustic wave instability arises out of linear resonance coupling between the negative and positive energy modes. Characterization of the resonance nature of the instability in Mach number space for different wave numbers of the ion acoustic mode is presented.

  3. Acoustic effects analysis utilizing speckle pattern with fixed-particle Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakili, Ali; Hollmann, Joseph A.; Holt, R. Glynn; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2016-03-01

    Optical imaging in a turbid medium is limited because of multiple scattering a photon undergoes while traveling through the medium. Therefore, optical imaging is unable to provide high resolution information deep in the medium. In the case of soft tissue, acoustic waves unlike light, can travel through the medium with negligible scattering. However, acoustic waves cannot provide medically relevant contrast as good as light. Hybrid solutions have been applied to use the benefits of both imaging methods. A focused acoustic wave generates a force inside an acoustically absorbing medium known as acoustic radiation force (ARF). ARF induces particle displacement within the medium. The amount of displacement is a function of mechanical properties of the medium and the applied force. To monitor the displacement induced by the ARF, speckle pattern analysis can be used. The speckle pattern is the result of interfering optical waves with different phases. As light travels through the medium, it undergoes several scattering events. Hence, it generates different scattering paths which depends on the location of the particles. Light waves that travel along these paths have different phases (different optical path lengths). ARF induces displacement to scatterers within the acoustic focal volume, and changes the optical path length. In addition, temperature rise due to conversion of absorbed acoustic energy to heat, changes the index of refraction and therefore, changes the optical path length of the scattering paths. The result is a change in the speckle pattern. Results suggest that the average change in the speckle pattern measures the displacement of particles and temperature rise within the acoustic wave focal area, hence can provide mechanical and thermal properties of the medium.

  4. Acoustic emission location on aluminum alloy structure by using FBG sensors and PSO method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shizeng; Jiang, Mingshun; Sui, Qingmei; Dong, Huijun; Sai, Yaozhang; Jia, Lei

    2016-04-01

    Acoustic emission location is important for finding the structural crack and ensuring the structural safety. In this paper, an acoustic emission location method by using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors and particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm were investigated. Four FBG sensors were used to form a sensing network to detect the acoustic emission signals. According to the signals, the quadrilateral array location equations were established. By analyzing the acoustic emission signal propagation characteristics, the solution of location equations was converted to an optimization problem. Thus, acoustic emission location can be achieved by using an improved PSO algorithm, which was realized by using the information fusion of multiple standards PSO, to solve the optimization problem. Finally, acoustic emission location system was established and verified on an aluminum alloy plate. The experimental results showed that the average location error was 0.010 m. This paper provided a reliable method for aluminum alloy structural acoustic emission location.

  5. Application of Finite Elements Method for Improvement of Acoustic Emission Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimov, S.; Sych, T.; Kuleshov, V.

    2016-01-01

    The paper deals with the acoustic emission sensor modeling by means of FEM system COSMOS/M. The following types of acoustic waves in the acoustic emission sensors are investigated: the longitudinal wave and transversal wave. As a material is used piezoelectric ceramics. The computed displacements are compared with physical model under consideration. The results of numerical and physical simulations of the processes of acoustic wave propagation in solebar of the freight-car truck are presented. The fields of dynamic displacements and stresses were calculated for improvement of acoustic emission testing method.

  6. Band-limited Green's Functions for Quantitative Evaluation of Acoustic Emission Using the Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leser, William P.; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo; Leser, William P.

    2013-01-01

    A method of numerically estimating dynamic Green's functions using the finite element method is proposed. These Green's functions are accurate in a limited frequency range dependent on the mesh size used to generate them. This range can often match or exceed the frequency sensitivity of the traditional acoustic emission sensors. An algorithm is also developed to characterize an acoustic emission source by obtaining information about its strength and temporal dependence. This information can then be used to reproduce the source in a finite element model for further analysis. Numerical examples are presented that demonstrate the ability of the band-limited Green's functions approach to determine the moment tensor coefficients of several reference signals to within seven percent, as well as accurately reproduce the source-time function.

  7. Assessing the accuracy of auralizations computed using a hybrid geometrical-acoustics and wave-acoustics method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Jason E.; Takahashi, Kengo; Shimizu, Yasushi; Yamakawa, Takashi

    2001-05-01

    When based on geometrical acoustics, computational models used for auralization of auditorium sound fields are physically inaccurate at low frequencies. To increase accuracy while keeping computation tractable, hybrid methods using computational wave acoustics at low frequencies have been proposed and implemented in small enclosures such as simplified models of car cabins [Granier et al., J. Audio Eng. Soc. 44, 835-849 (1996)]. The present work extends such an approach to an actual 2400-m3 auditorium using the boundary-element method for frequencies below 100 Hz. The effect of including wave-acoustics at low frequencies is assessed by comparing the predictions of the hybrid model with those of the geometrical-acoustics model and comparing both with measurements. Conventional room-acoustical metrics are used together with new methods based on two-dimensional distance measures applied to time-frequency representations of impulse responses. Despite in situ measurements of boundary impedance, uncertainties in input parameters limit the accuracy of the computed results at low frequencies. However, aural perception ultimately defines the required accuracy of computational models. An algorithmic method for making such evaluations is proposed based on correlating listening-test results with distance measures between time-frequency representations derived from auditory models of the ear-brain system. Preliminary results are presented.

  8. Acoustic analysis of an Olmecan whistle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beristain, Sergio; Menchaca, Rolando; Velazquez, Roberto

    2002-05-01

    Thousands of stone artifacts over 2500 years of age have been found in the Olmecan area in the southeast region of Mexico. These range from the famous big heads with helmets (about 2 m in diameter), to small pieces with precisely drilled holes, which some archaeologists consider to have some simple uses, much simpler than the work needed to produce the stone artifact itself. The one studied here (about 3 cm in size), is considered by the acoustics community as an air-phone, and a detailed anaysis has been done employing FFT techniques in order to find out the frequency spread, the particular tones produced and the sound radiated power through the different holes and cavities. The artifact is made of a very solid stone, so-called ilmenite, believed to have titanium, which is very hard to drill. Nevertheless, many similar pieces have been found in the area, which means they were built on purpose, and the material used gives the idea of a sacred application. Attempts have been made to reproduce the artifacts, which produce sounds similar to those from the original pieces.

  9. Method of representation of acoustic spectra and reflection corrections applied to externally blown flap noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    A computer method for obtaining a rational function representation of an acoustic spectrum and for correcting reflection effects is introduced. The functional representation provides a means of compact storage of data and the nucleus of the data analysis method. The method is applied to noise from a full-scale externally blown flap system with a quiet 6:1 bypass ratio turbofan engine and a three-flap wing section designed to simulate the take-off condition of a conceptual STOL aircraft.

  10. Bayesian probability analysis for acoustic-seismic landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Ning; Sabatier, James M.; Goggans, Paul M.

    2002-11-01

    Landmines buried in the subsurface induce distinct changes in the seismic vibration of the ground surface when an acoustic source insonifies the ground. A scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV) senses the acoustically-induced seismic vibration of the ground surface in a noncontact, remote manner. The SLDV-based acoustic-to-seismic coupling technology exhibits significant advantages over conventional sensors due to its capability for detecting both metal and nonmetal mines and its stand-off distance. The seismic vibration data scanned from the SLDV are preprocessed to form images. The detection of landmines relies primarily on an analysis of the target amplitude, size, shape, and frequency range. A parametric model has been established [Xiang and Sabatier, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 110, 2740 (2001)] to describe the amplified surface vibration velocity induced by buried landmines within an appropriate frequency range. This model incorporates vibrational amplitude, size, position of landmines, and the background amplitude into a model-based analysis process in which Bayesian target detection and parameter estimation have been applied. Based on recent field measurement results, the landmine detection procedure within a Bayesian framework will be discussed. [Work supported by the United States Army Communications-Electronics Command, Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate.

  11. Acoustic apparatus and method for detecting borhole wall discontinuities such as vertical fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Havira, R.M.; Seeman, B.

    1989-12-05

    This patent describes an acoustic investigation method for detecting discontinuities in a wall of a borehold penetrating an earth formation. It comprises: directing from inside the borehole pulses of acoustic energy each at beam forming frequencies towards the borehold wall with orientations of the beams selected to preferentially enhance the excitation of transverse acoustic waves traveling away from the borehole wall segments in directions determined by the angle of incidence of the acoustic beams upon the borehole wall segment, while substantially maintaining the beam orientations, varying the direction which the acoustic beams are incident upon the borehole wall segments to correspondingly vary the directions which the transverse waves travel from the borehole wall segments; detecting acoustic reflections produced by the transverse waves when these are incident upon a discontinuity in the borehole wall; deriving fracture signals representative of the presence of a the discontinuity from the detected acoustic reflections; and recording the derived signals.

  12. The Identification of Nanoscale Structures According to a Parameters of Acoustic Structuroscopy Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ababkov, N. V.; Smirnov, A. N.; Bykova, N. V.

    2016-04-01

    The fracture surface of a destroyed steam turbine rotor is studied by acoustic structuroscopy method. The structural-phase state of the metal of the destroyed rotor of a steam turbine is studied using the methods of electron microscopy. It was established that in the areas of control, where the values of the acoustic characteristics have significant differences from the rest of the metal, detected nanocrystalline structure. The possibility of determining the structure of the nanoscale metal by acoustic structuroscopy is shown.

  13. Online sizing of pneumatically conveyed particles by acoustic emission method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yonghui; Qian, Xiangchen; Huang, Xiaobin; Gao, Lingjun; Yan, Yong

    2014-04-01

    Accurate determination of particle size distribution is critical to achieving optimal combustion efficiency and minimum pollutant emissions in both biomass and biomass/coal fired power plants. This paper presents an instrumentation system for online continuous measurement of particle size distribution based on acoustic emission (AE) method. Impulsive AE signals arising from impacts of particles with a metallic waveguide protruding into the flow carry information about the particle size. With detailed information about the generation, propagation and detection of impact AE signals, the particle size can be quantitatively characterized. Experimental results obtained with glass beads demonstrate the capability of the system to discriminate particles of different sizes from the recorded AE signals. The system has several appealing features such as online measurement, high sensitivity, simple structure, minimum invasiveness and low cost, which make it well suited for industrial applications.

  14. Perceptual centres in speech - an acoustic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Sophie Kerttu

    Perceptual centres, or P-centres, represent the perceptual moments of occurrence of acoustic signals - the 'beat' of a sound. P-centres underlie the perception and production of rhythm in perceptually regular speech sequences. P-centres have been modelled both in speech and non speech (music) domains. The three aims of this thesis were toatest out current P-centre models to determine which best accounted for the experimental data bto identify a candidate parameter to map P-centres onto (a local approach) as opposed to the previous global models which rely upon the whole signal to determine the P-centre the final aim was to develop a model of P-centre location which could be applied to speech and non speech signals. The first aim was investigated by a series of experiments in which a) speech from different speakers was investigated to determine whether different models could account for variation between speakers b) whether rendering the amplitude time plot of a speech signal affects the P-centre of the signal c) whether increasing the amplitude at the offset of a speech signal alters P-centres in the production and perception of speech. The second aim was carried out by a) manipulating the rise time of different speech signals to determine whether the P-centre was affected, and whether the type of speech sound ramped affected the P-centre shift b) manipulating the rise time and decay time of a synthetic vowel to determine whether the onset alteration was had more affect on P-centre than the offset manipulation c) and whether the duration of a vowel affected the P-centre, if other attributes (amplitude, spectral contents) were held constant. The third aim - modelling P-centres - was based on these results. The Frequency dependent Amplitude Increase Model of P-centre location (FAIM) was developed using a modelling protocol, the APU GammaTone Filterbank and the speech from different speakers. The P-centres of the stimuli corpus were highly predicted by attributes of

  15. An analysis of blade vortex interaction aerodynamics and acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    The impulsive noise associated with helicopter flight due to Blade-Vortex Interaction, sometimes called blade slap is analyzed especially for the case of a close encounter of the blade-tip vortex with a following blade. Three parts of the phenomena are considered: the tip-vortex structure generated by the rotating blade, the unsteady pressure produced on the following blade during the interaction, and the acoustic radiation due to the unsteady pressure field. To simplify the problem, the analysis was confined to the situation where the vortex is aligned parallel to the blade span in which case the maximum acoustic pressure results. Acoustic radiation due to the interaction is analyzed in space-fixed coordinates and in the time domain with the unsteady pressure on the blade surface as the source of chordwise compact, but spanwise non-compact radiation. Maximum acoustic pressure is related to the vortex core size and Reynolds number which are in turn functions of the blade-tip aerodynamic parameters. Finally noise reduction and performance are considered.

  16. Analysis of acoustic and entropy disturbances in a hypersonic wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilden, Thomas; Schröder, Wolfgang; Ali, Syed Raza Christopher; Schreyer, Anne-Marie; Wu, Jie; Radespiel, Rolf

    2016-05-01

    The tunnel noise in a Mach 5.9 Ludwieg tube is determined by two methods, a newly developed cone-probe-DNS method and a reliable hot-wire-Pitot-probe method. The new method combines pressure and heat flux measurements using a cone probe and direct numerical simulation (DNS). The modal analysis is based on transfer functions obtained by the DNS to link the measured quantities to the tunnel noise. The measurements are performed for several unit-Reynolds numbers in the range of 5 ṡ 106 ≤ Re/m ≤ 16 ṡ 106 and probe positions to identify the sensitivities of tunnel noise. The DNS solutions show similar response mechanisms of the cone probe to incident acoustic and entropy waves which leads to high condition numbers of the transfer matrix such that a unique relationship between response and source mechanism can be only determined by neglecting the contribution of the non-acoustic modes to the pressure and heat flux fluctuations. The results of the cone-probe-DNS method are compared to a modal analysis based on the hot-wire-Pitot-probe method which provides reliable results in the frequency range less than 50 kHz. In this low frequency range the findings of the two different mode analyses agree well. At higher frequencies, the newly developed cone-probe-DNS method is still valid. The tunnel noise is dominated by the acoustic mode, since the entropy mode is lower by one order of magnitude and the vorticity mode can be neglected. The acoustic mode is approximately 0.5% at 30 kHz and the cone-probe-DNS data illustrate the acoustic mode to decrease and to asymptotically approach 0.2%.

  17. A comprehensive strategy for the analysis of acoustic compressibility and optical deformability on single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tie; Bragheri, Francesca; Nava, Giovanni; Chiodi, Ilaria; Mondello, Chiara; Osellame, Roberto; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine; Cristiani, Ilaria; Minzioni, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    We realized an integrated microfluidic chip that allows measuring both optical deformability and acoustic compressibility on single cells, by optical stretching and acoustophoresis experiments respectively. Additionally, we propose a measurement protocol that allows evaluating the experimental apparatus parameters before performing the cell-characterization experiments, including a non-destructive method to characterize the optical force distribution inside the microchannel. The chip was used to study important cell-mechanics parameters in two human breast cancer cell lines, MCF7 and MDA-MB231. Results indicate that MDA-MB231 has both higher acoustic compressibility and higher optical deformability than MCF7, but statistical analysis shows that optical deformability and acoustic compressibility are not correlated parameters. This result suggests the possibility to use them to analyze the response of different cellular structures. We also demonstrate that it is possible to perform both measurements on a single cell, and that the order of the two experiments does not affect the retrieved values.

  18. Multi-crack imaging using nonclassical nonlinear acoustic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lue; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Xiao-Zhou; Gong, Xiu-Fen

    2014-10-01

    Solid materials with cracks exhibit the nonclassical nonlinear acoustical behavior. The micro-defects in solid materials can be detected by nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy (NEWS) method with a time-reversal (TR) mirror. While defects lie in viscoelastic solid material with different distances from one another, the nonlinear and hysteretic stress—strain relation is established with Preisach—Mayergoyz (PM) model in crack zone. Pulse inversion (PI) and TR methods are used in numerical simulation and defect locations can be determined from images obtained by the maximum value. Since false-positive defects might appear and degrade the imaging when the defects are located quite closely, the maximum value imaging with a time window is introduced to analyze how defects affect each other and how the fake one occurs. Furthermore, NEWS-TR-NEWS method is put forward to improve NEWS-TR scheme, with another forward propagation (NEWS) added to the existing phases (NEWS and TR). In the added phase, scanner locations are determined by locations of all defects imaged in previous phases, so that whether an imaged defect is real can be deduced. NEWS-TR-NEWS method is proved to be effective to distinguish real defects from the false-positive ones. Moreover, it is also helpful to detect the crack that is weaker than others during imaging procedure.

  19. Acoustic methods for cavitation mapping in biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, M.; Xu, S.; Ding, T.; Hu, H.; Liu, R.; Bai, C.; Lu, S.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, cavitation is increasingly utilized in a wide range of applications in biomedical field. Monitoring the spatial-temporal evolution of cavitation bubbles is of great significance for efficiency and safety in biomedical applications. In this paper, several acoustic methods for cavitation mapping proposed or modified on the basis of existing work will be presented. The proposed novel ultrasound line-by-line/plane-by-plane method can depict cavitation bubbles distribution with high spatial and temporal resolution and may be developed as a potential standard 2D/3D cavitation field mapping method. The modified ultrafast active cavitation mapping based upon plane wave transmission and reception as well as bubble wavelet and pulse inversion technique can apparently enhance the cavitation to tissue ratio in tissue and further assist in monitoring the cavitation mediated therapy with good spatial and temporal resolution. The methods presented in this paper will be a foundation to promote the research and development of cavitation imaging in non-transparent medium.

  20. Wideband link-budget analysis for undersea acoustic signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Joseph A.; Hansen, Joseph T.

    2002-11-01

    Link-budget analysis is commonly applied to satellite and wireless communications for estimating the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at the receiver. Link-budget analysis considers transmitter power, transmitter antenna gain, channel losses, channel noise, and receiver antenna gain. For underwater signaling, the terms of the sonar equation readily translate to a formulation of the link budget. However, the strong frequency dependence of underwater acoustic propagation requires special consideration, and is represented as an intermediate result called the channel SNR. The channel SNR includes ambient-noise and transmission-loss components. Several acoustic communication and navigation problems are addressed through wideband link-budget analyses. [Work sponsored by ONR 321.

  1. Acoustical and functional analysis of Mountain lion (Puma concolor) vocalizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Jacquelyn

    2002-05-01

    A 2-year study resulted in acoustic analysis of the structure of over 900 mountain lion vocalizations recorded in a seminatural setting at Wildlife Prairie Park near Peoria, Illinois. A vocal repertoire was obtained by describing quantitative variables about the sounds, i.e., frequency of the dominant part of the sound (beginning, ending, maximum, and minimum), duration, and number of components. Other variables described the tonal, harmonic, and wideband qualities of the sounds. Behavioral data were collected during the same period. Further analysis of both acoustic and behavioral data was completed to develop a correlation matrix between vocalizations and behavior. This study also looked at the effects of seasons on vocal behavior. Correlations were found between vocalization types and rates of usage with specific behaviors. Vocalization type and the usage rate also varied by season.

  2. Frequency Analysis of Acoustic Emission - Application to machining and welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snoussi, A.

    1987-01-01

    Ultrasonic acoustic waves were seized and exploited within a bandwidth ranging from 30 kHz to 55 kHz for non-destructive control when boring three kinds of steel with a digitally programmed drill. In addition, these waves were considered in soldering two steels and one aluminum using T.I.G. process. Spectrum analysis of acoustic emissions produced during the drill is closely related to the extraction of turnings from the metal. Because of the wick's progressive wearing out, the spectrum tends to be close to the machine's own noise spectrum. Meanwhile in the soldering operation of test-tubes of 2 mm thickness, the frequency analysis shows a particular frequency called signature corresponding to the flow of protection gas. Other frequencies associated to some internal defects in the soldering process as a delay in the fissure and a lack in the fusion were detected.

  3. Identification of vibration excitations from acoustic measurements using near field acoustic holography and the force analysis technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pézerat, C.; Leclère, Q.; Totaro, N.; Pachebat, M.

    2009-10-01

    This study presents a method of using acoustic holography and the force analysis technique to identify vibration sources from radiated noise measurements. The structure studied is a plate excited by a shaker on which three measurements were performed: the first is a reference measurement of plate velocity obtained by scanning laser vibrometry, the second is based on sound pressure measurements in the near field of the structure, and the third is the measurement of normal acoustic velocities by using a p-U probe recently developed by Microflown Technologies. This was followed by the application of classical NAH, known as pressure-to-velocity holography and velocity-to-velocity holography to predict the plate velocity field from acoustic measurements at distances of 1 and 5 cm. Afterwards, the force analysis technique, also known as the RIFF technique, is applied with these five data sets. The principle is to inject the displacement field of the structure into its equation of motion and extract the resulting force distribution. This technique requires regularization done by a low-pass filter in the wavenumber domain. Apart from pressure-to-velocity holography at 5 cm, the reconstructed force distribution allows localizing the excitation point in the measurement area. FAT regularization is also shown to improve results as its cutoff wavenumber is optimized with the natural wavenumber of the plate. Lastly, quantitative force values are extracted from force distributions at all frequencies of the band 0-4 kHz studied and compared with the force spectrum measured directly by a piezoelectric sensor.

  4. A Flexible Analysis Tool for the Quantitative Acoustic Assessment of Infant Cry

    PubMed Central

    Reggiannini, Brian; Sheinkopf, Stephen J.; Silverman, Harvey F.; Li, Xiaoxue; Lester, Barry M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In this article, the authors describe and validate the performance of a modern acoustic analyzer specifically designed for infant cry analysis. Method Utilizing known algorithms, the authors developed a method to extract acoustic parameters describing infant cries from standard digital audio files. They used a frame rate of 25 ms with a frame advance of 12.5 ms. Cepstral-based acoustic analysis proceeded in 2 phases, computing frame-level data and then organizing and summarizing this information within cry utterances. Using signal detection methods, the authors evaluated the accuracy of the automated system to determine voicing and to detect fundamental frequency (F0) as compared to voiced segments and pitch periods manually coded from spectrogram displays. Results The system detected F0 with 88% to 95% accuracy, depending on tolerances set at 10 to 20 Hz. Receiver operating characteristic analyses demonstrated very high accuracy at detecting voicing characteristics in the cry samples. Conclusions This article describes an automated infant cry analyzer with high accuracy to detect important acoustic features of cry. A unique and important aspect of this work is the rigorous testing of the system’s accuracy as compared to ground-truth manual coding. The resulting system has implications for basic and applied research on infant cry development. PMID:23785178

  5. Systems and methods of monitoring acoustic pressure to detect a flame condition in a gas turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Krull, Anthony Wayne; Healy, Timothy Andrew , Yilmaz, Ertan

    2011-05-17

    A method may detect a flashback condition in a fuel nozzle of a combustor. The method may include obtaining a current acoustic pressure signal from the combustor, analyzing the current acoustic pressure signal to determine current operating frequency information for the combustor, and indicating that the flashback condition exists based at least in part on the current operating frequency information.

  6. System And Method For Characterizing Voiced Excitations Of Speech And Acoustic Signals, Removing Acoustic Noise From Speech, And Synthesizi

    DOEpatents

    Burnett, Greg C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2006-04-25

    The present invention is a system and method for characterizing human (or animate) speech voiced excitation functions and acoustic signals, for removing unwanted acoustic noise which often occurs when a speaker uses a microphone in common environments, and for synthesizing personalized or modified human (or other animate) speech upon command from a controller. A low power EM sensor is used to detect the motions of windpipe tissues in the glottal region of the human speech system before, during, and after voiced speech is produced by a user. From these tissue motion measurements, a voiced excitation function can be derived. Further, the excitation function provides speech production information to enhance noise removal from human speech and it enables accurate transfer functions of speech to be obtained. Previously stored excitation and transfer functions can be used for synthesizing personalized or modified human speech. Configurations of EM sensor and acoustic microphone systems are described to enhance noise cancellation and to enable multiple articulator measurements.

  7. System and method for characterizing voiced excitations of speech and acoustic signals, removing acoustic noise from speech, and synthesizing speech

    DOEpatents

    Burnett, Greg C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2004-03-23

    The present invention is a system and method for characterizing human (or animate) speech voiced excitation functions and acoustic signals, for removing unwanted acoustic noise which often occurs when a speaker uses a microphone in common environments, and for synthesizing personalized or modified human (or other animate) speech upon command from a controller. A low power EM sensor is used to detect the motions of windpipe tissues in the glottal region of the human speech system before, during, and after voiced speech is produced by a user. From these tissue motion measurements, a voiced excitation function can be derived. Further, the excitation function provides speech production information to enhance noise removal from human speech and it enables accurate transfer functions of speech to be obtained. Previously stored excitation and transfer functions can be used for synthesizing personalized or modified human speech. Configurations of EM sensor and acoustic microphone systems are described to enhance noise cancellation and to enable multiple articulator measurements.

  8. System and method for characterizing voiced excitations of speech and acoustic signals, removing acoustic noise from speech, and synthesizing speech

    DOEpatents

    Burnett, Greg C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2006-02-14

    The present invention is a system and method for characterizing human (or animate) speech voiced excitation functions and acoustic signals, for removing unwanted acoustic noise which often occurs when a speaker uses a microphone in common environments, and for synthesizing personalized or modified human (or other animate) speech upon command from a controller. A low power EM sensor is used to detect the motions of windpipe tissues in the glottal region of the human speech system before, during, and after voiced speech is produced by a user. From these tissue motion measurements, a voiced excitation function can be derived. Further, the excitation function provides speech production information to enhance noise removal from human speech and it enables accurate transfer functions of speech to be obtained. Previously stored excitation and transfer functions can be used for synthesizing personalized or modified human speech. Configurations of EM sensor and acoustic microphone systems are described to enhance noise cancellation and to enable multiple articulator measurements.

  9. System and method for characterizing voiced excitations of speech and acoustic signals, removing acoustic noise from speech, and synthesizing speech

    DOEpatents

    Burnett, Greg C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2006-08-08

    The present invention is a system and method for characterizing human (or animate) speech voiced excitation functions and acoustic signals, for removing unwanted acoustic noise which often occurs when a speaker uses a microphone in common environments, and for synthesizing personalized or modified human (or other animate) speech upon command from a controller. A low power EM sensor is used to detect the motions of windpipe tissues in the glottal region of the human speech system before, during, and after voiced speech is produced by a user. From these tissue motion measurements, a voiced excitation function can be derived. Further, the excitation function provides speech production information to enhance noise removal from human speech and it enables accurate transfer functions of speech to be obtained. Previously stored excitation and transfer functions can be used for synthesizing personalized or modified human speech. Configurations of EM sensor and acoustic microphone systems are described to enhance noise cancellation and to enable multiple articulator measurements.

  10. Application of Wavelet Packet Analysis to the Measurement of the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadowaki, Kevin; Garcia, Noel; Ford, Taurean; Pando, Jesus; SDSS-FAST Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We develop a method of wavelet packet analysis to measure the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) peak and apply this method to the CMASS galaxy catalog from the SDSS Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) collaboration. We compare our results to a fiducial ?CDM flat cosmological model and detect a BAO signature in the power spectrum comparable to the previous consensus results of the BOSS collaboration. We find DA = 1365rd /rd , fid at z = . 54 . Member ID Forthcoming.

  11. Data-driven automated acoustic analysis of human infant vocalizations using neural network tools

    PubMed Central

    Warlaumont, Anne S.; Oller, D. Kimbrough; Buder, Eugene H.; Dale, Rick; Kozma, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Acoustic analysis of infant vocalizations has typically employed traditional acoustic measures drawn from adult speech acoustics, such as f0, duration, formant frequencies, amplitude, and pitch perturbation. Here an alternative and complementary method is proposed in which data-derived spectrographic features are central. 1-s-long spectrograms of vocalizations produced by six infants recorded longitudinally between ages 3 and 11 months are analyzed using a neural network consisting of a self-organizing map and a single-layer perceptron. The self-organizing map acquires a set of holistic, data-derived spectrographic receptive fields. The single-layer perceptron receives self-organizing map activations as input and is trained to classify utterances into prelinguistic phonatory categories (squeal, vocant, or growl), identify the ages at which they were produced, and identify the individuals who produced them. Classification performance was significantly better than chance for all three classification tasks. Performance is compared to another popular architecture, the fully supervised multilayer perceptron. In addition, the network’s weights and patterns of activation are explored from several angles, for example, through traditional acoustic measurements of the network’s receptive fields. Results support the use of this and related tools for deriving holistic acoustic features directly from infant vocalization data and for the automatic classification of infant vocalizations. PMID:20370038

  12. Voice-over: perceptual and acoustic analysis of vocal features.

    PubMed

    Medrado, Reny; Ferreira, Leslie Piccolotto; Behlau, Mara

    2005-09-01

    Voice-overs are professional voice users who use their voices to market products in the electronic media. The purposes of this study were to (1) analyze voice-overed and non-overed productions of an advertising text in two groups consisting of 10 male professional voice-overs and 10 male non-voice-overs; and (2) determine specific acoustic features of voice-over productions in both groups. A naïve group of listeners were engaged for the perceptual analysis of the recorded advertising text. The voice-overed production samples from both groups were submitted for analysis of acoustic and temporal features. The following parameters were analyzed: (1) the total text length, (2) the length of the three emphatic pauses, (3) values of the mean, (4) minimum, (5) maximum fundamental frequency, and (6) the semitone range. The majority of voice-overs and non-voice-overs were correctly identified by the listeners in both productions. However voice-overs were more consistently correctly identified than non-voice-overs. The total text length was greater for voice-overs. The pause time distribution was statistically more homogeneous for the voice-overs. The acoustic analysis indicated that the voice-overs had lower values of mean, minimum, and maximum fundamental frequency and a greater range of semitones. The voice-overs carry the voice-overed production features to their non-voice-overed production. PMID:16102662

  13. Methods for Characterization of Batteries Using Acoustic Interrogation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadra, Shoham

    Batteries are a ubiquitous form of electrochemical energy storage, but thus far the methods for measuring the mechanical properties of batteries and their component materials in operando have lagged far behind the methods for measuring the corresponding electrical properties. In this thesis, I demonstrate methods for determining the changes in materials properties of an electrochemical energy storage cell both ex situ and in operando.. I begin by establishing the impact of micro-scale morphology changes on the macro-scale dynamic mechanical response in commercial alkaline AA cells. Using a bounce test, the coefficient of restitution (COR) of the cell is shown to increase non-linearly as a function of state of charge (SOC). I show that the reason for the increase in the COR stems from the spatially-dependent oxidation of the Zn anode, with an initial increase corresponding to the formation of a percolation pathway of ZnO-clad Zn particles spanning the radius of the anode. The subsequent saturation of the COR is shown to result from the ultimate solidification and desiccation of the Zn anode. Building from this, I present a generalized in operando solution for materials characterization in batteries using ultrasonic interrogation. The materials properties of battery components change during charge and discharge, resulting in a change in the sound speed of the materials. By attaching transducers to a battery during cycling and sending ultrasonic pulses through each cell I observe the changes in the time of flight (ToF) of the pulses, both in reflection and transmission. I show that the changes in ToF correspond to both SOC and state of health (SOH) in a variety of battery chemistries and geometries, and detail a corresponding acoustic conservation law model framework. Finally, I perform these electrochemical acoustic time of flight (EAToF) experiments on commercial alkaline AA cells. By correlating the results with energy dispersive x-ray diffraction (EDXRD) data and

  14. Analysis of the STS-126 Flow Control Valve Structural-Acoustic Coupling Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Trevor M.; Larko, Jeffrey M.; McNelis, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    During the Space Transportation System mission STS-126, one of the main engine's flow control valves incurred an unexpected failure. A section of the valve broke off during liftoff. It is theorized that an acoustic mode of the flowing fuel, coupled with a structural mode of the valve, causing a high cycle fatigue failure. This report documents the analysis efforts conducted in an attempt to verify this theory. Hand calculations, computational fluid dynamics, and finite element methods are all implemented and analyses are performed using steady-state methods in addition to transient analysis methods. The conclusion of the analyses is that there is a critical acoustic mode that aligns with a structural mode of the valve

  15. Linear Stability Analysis of an Acoustically Vaporized Droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Junaid; Qamar, Adnan; Samtaney, Ravi

    2015-11-01

    Acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) is a phase transition phenomena of a superheat liquid (Dodecafluoropentane, C5F12) droplet to a gaseous bubble, instigated by a high-intensity acoustic pulse. This approach was first studied in imaging applications, and applicable in several therapeutic areas such as gas embolotherapy, thrombus dissolution, and drug delivery. High-speed imaging and theoretical modeling of ADV has elucidated several physical aspects, ranging from bubble nucleation to its subsequent growth. Surface instabilities are known to exist and considered responsible for evolving bubble shapes (non-spherical growth, bubble splitting and bubble droplet encapsulation). We present a linear stability analysis of the dynamically evolving interfaces of an acoustically vaporized micro-droplet (liquid A) in an infinite pool of a second liquid (liquid B). We propose a thermal ADV model for the base state. The linear analysis utilizes spherical harmonics (Ynm, of degree m and order n) and under various physical assumptions results in a time-dependent ODE of the perturbed interface amplitudes (one at the vapor/liquid A interface and the other at the liquid A/liquid B interface). The perturbation amplitudes are found to grow exponentially and do not depend on m. Supported by KAUST Baseline Research Funds.

  16. Study of acoustic field modulation in the regenerator by double loudspeakers method.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lihua; Xie, Xiujuan; Li, Qing

    2011-11-01

    A model to modulate acoustic field in a regenerator of a thermoacoustic system by the double loudspeakers method is presented in this paper. The equations are derived for acoustic field modulation. They represent the relations among acoustic field (complex pressure p(0), complex velocity u(0), and acoustic impedance Z(0)), driving parameters of loudspeakers (voltage amplitude and its phase difference), and operating parameters involved in a matrix H (frequency, temperature of regenerator). The range of acoustic field is adjustable and limited by the maximal driving voltages of loudspeakers according to driving parameters. The range is simulated and analyzed in the amplitude-phase and complex coordinate planes for a given or variable H. The simulated results indicate that the range has its intrinsic characteristics. The expected acoustic field in a regenerator can be obtained feasibly by the modulation. PMID:22087899

  17. Treated cabin acoustic prediction using statistical energy analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoerkie, Charles A.; Ingraham, Steven T.; Moore, James A.

    1987-01-01

    The application of statistical energy analysis (SEA) to the modeling and design of helicopter cabin interior noise control treatment is demonstrated. The information presented here is obtained from work sponsored at NASA Langley for the development of analytic modeling techniques and the basic understanding of cabin noise. Utility and executive interior models are developed directly from existing S-76 aircraft designs. The relative importance of panel transmission loss (TL), acoustic leakage, and absorption to the control of cabin noise is shown using the SEA modeling parameters. It is shown that the major cabin noise improvement below 1000 Hz comes from increased panel TL, while above 1000 Hz it comes from reduced acoustic leakage and increased absorption in the cabin and overhead cavities.

  18. Method and apparatus for using magneto-acoustic remanence to determine embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor); Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, John H. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus for testing steel components for temperature embrittlement uses magneto-acoustic emission to nondestructively evaluate the component are presented. Acoustic emission signals occur more frequently at higher levels in embrittled components. A pair of electromagnets are used to create magnetic induction in the test component. Magneto-acoustic emission signals may be generated by applying an AC current to the electromagnets. The acoustic emission signals are analyzed to provide a comparison between a component known to be unembrittled and a test component. Magnetic remanence is determined by applying a DC current to the electromagnets and then by turning the magnets off and observing the residual magnetic induction.

  19. New high-order, semi-implicit Hybridized Discontinuous Galerkin - Spectral Element Method (HDG-SEM) for simulation of complex wave propagation involving coupling between seismic, hydro-acoustic and infrasonic waves: numerical analysis and case studies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrana, S.; Vilotte, J. P.; Guillot, L.

    2015-12-01

    New seismological monitoring networks combine broadband seismic receivers, hydrophones and micro-barometers antenna, providing complementary observation of source-radiated waves. Exploiting these observations requires accurate and multi-media - elastic, hydro-acoustic, infrasound - wave simulation methods, in order to improve our physical understanding of energy exchanges at material interfaces.We present here a new development of a high-order Hybridized Discontinuous Galerkin (HDG) method, for the simulation of coupled seismic and acoustic wave propagation, within a unified framework ([1],[2]) allowing for continuous and discontinuous Spectral Element Methods (SEM) to be used in the same simulation, with conforming and non-conforming meshes. The HDG-SEM approximation leads to differential - algebraic equations, which can be solved implicitly using energy-preserving time-schemes.The proposed HDG-SEM is computationally attractive, when compared with classical Discontinuous Galerkin methods, involving only the approximation of the single-valued traces of the velocity field along the element interfaces as globally coupled unknowns. The formulation is based on a variational approximation of the physical fluxes, which are shown to be the explicit solution of an exact Riemann problem at each element boundaries. This leads to a highly parallel and efficient unstructured and high-order accurate method, which can be space-and-time adaptive.A numerical study of the accuracy and convergence of the HDG-SEM is performed through a number of case studies involving elastic-acoustic (infrasound) coupling with geometries of increasing complexity. Finally, the performance of the method is illustrated through realistic case studies involving ground wave propagation associated to topography effects.In conclusion, we outline some on-going extensions of the method.References:[1] Cockburn, B., Gopalakrishnan, J., Lazarov, R., Unified hybridization of discontinuous Galerkin, mixed and

  20. Music Structure Analysis from Acoustic Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannenberg, Roger B.; Goto, Masataka

    Music is full of structure, including sections, sequences of distinct musical textures, and the repetition of phrases or entire sections. The analysis of music audio relies upon feature vectors that convey information about music texture or pitch content. Texture generally refers to the average spectral shape and statistical fluctuation, often reflecting the set of sounding instruments, e.g., strings, vocal, or drums. Pitch content reflects melody and harmony, which is often independent of texture. Structure is found in several ways. Segment boundaries can be detected by observing marked changes in locally averaged texture.

  1. Moving fluid mud sondes, optical and acoustic sensing methods in support of coastal waterway dredging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostater, Charles R.; Rotkiske, Tyler

    2015-10-01

    Airborne, Satellite and In-Situ optical and acoustical imaging provides a means to characterize surface and subsurface water conditions in shallow marine systems. An important research topic to be studied during dredging operations in harbors and navigable waterways is the movement of fluidized muds before, during and after dredging operations. The fluid movement of the surficial sediments in the form of flocs, muck and mud is important to estimate in order to model the transport of solids material during dredging operations. Movement of highly turbid bottom material creates a lutocline or near bottom nephelometric layers, reduces the penetration of light reaching the water bottom. Monitoring and measurement systems recently developed for use in shallow marine areas, such as the Indian River Lagoon are discussed. Newly developed passive sondes and subsurface imaging are described. Methods and techniques for quantifying the mass density flux of total particulate matter demonstrate the use of multiple sensor systems for environmental monitoring and provide directional fluxes and movement of the fluidized solids. Airborne imaging of dredge site provide wide area surveillance during these activities. Passive sondes, optical imaging and acoustical sensors are used to understand horizontal and vertical mass flux processes. The passive sondes can be directionally oriented and are deployed during optical particle velocimetry system (OPVS) imaging of the flocs, particles and colloidal material motion. Comparison of the image based particle velocities are compared to electromagnetic and acoustic velocity imaging results. The newly developed imaging system provides a pathway for integration of subsurface hyperspectral imaging for particle compositional analysis.

  2. Acoustic energy-driven fluid pump and method

    SciTech Connect

    Janus, Michael C.; Richards, George A.; Robey, Edward H.

    1997-12-01

    Bulk fluid motion is promoted in a gaseous fluid contained within a conduit system provided with a diffuser without the need for a mean pressure differential across the conduit system. The contacting of the gaseous fluid with unsteady energy at a selected frequency and pressure amplitude induces fluid flow through the conical diffuser. The unsteady energy can be provided by pulse combustors, thermoacoustic engines, or acoustic energy generators such as acoustic speakers.

  3. High-temperature acoustic test facilities and methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Jerome

    1994-09-01

    The Wright Laboratory is the Air Force center for air vehicles, responsible for developing advanced technology and incorporating it into new flight vehicles and for continuous technological improvement of operational air vehicles. Part of that responsibility is the problem of acoustic fatigue. With the advent of jet aircraft in the 1950's, acoustic fatigue of aircraft structure became a significant problem. In the 1960's the Wright Laboratory constructed the first large acoustic fatigue test facilities in the United States, and the laboratory has been a dominant factor in high-intensity acoustic testing since that time. This paper discusses some of the intense environments encountered by new and planned Air Force flight vehicles, and describes three new acoustic test facilities of the Wright Laboratory designed for testing structures in these dynamic environments. These new test facilities represent the state of the art in high-temperature, high-intensity acoustic testing and random fatigue testing. They will allow the laboratory scientists and engineers to test the new structures and materials required to withstand the severe environments of captive-carry missiles, augmented lift wings and flaps, exhaust structures of stealth aircraft, and hypersonic vehicle structures well into the twenty-first century.

  4. A reliable acoustic path: Physical properties and a source localization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Rui; Yang, Kun-De; Ma, Yuan-Liang; Lei, Bo

    2012-12-01

    The physical properties of a reliable acoustic path (RAP) are analysed and subsequently a weighted-subspace-fitting matched field (WSF-MF) method for passive localization is presented by exploiting the properties of the RAP environment. The RAP is an important acoustic duct in the deep ocean, which occurs when the receiver is placed near the bottom where the sound velocity exceeds the maximum sound velocity in the vicinity of the surface. It is found that in the RAP environment the transmission loss is rather low and no blind zone of surveillance exists in a medium range. The ray theory is used to explain these phenomena. Furthermore, the analysis of the arrival structures shows that the source localization method based on arrival angle is feasible in this environment. However, the conventional methods suffer from the complicated and inaccurate estimation of the arrival angle. In this paper, a straightforward WSF-MF method is derived to exploit the information about the arrival angles indirectly. The method is to minimize the distance between the signal subspace and the spanned space by the array manifold in a finite range-depth space rather than the arrival-angle space. Simulations are performed to demonstrate the features of the method, and the results are explained by the arrival structures in the RAP environment.

  5. Acoustical analysis capability for pusher propeller installations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weir, Donald S.; Marsan, Mehmet; Lyon, Craig

    1990-01-01

    A new capability to predict the noise from pusher propeller installations has been developed. The pylon flowfield is modeled by potential flow theory for the outer solution and boundary layer theory for the inner solution. This flowfield is added to the performance prediction for a propeller contained in the NASA Aircraft Noise Prediction Program (ANOPP). Predictions of the noise are made using Farassat's method in the ANOPP Subsonic Propeller Noise Module. Comparisons of the predictions are made with noise data from a model scale SR-2 propeller in both tractor and pusher configurations taken in the NASA Langley Research Center Quiet Flow Facility. The results show good agreement near the plane of the propeller, but the quality of the agreement decreases toward the propeller axis.

  6. Methods And Systems For Using Reference Images In Acoustic Image Processing

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Thomas L.; Barter, Robert Henry

    2005-01-04

    A method and system of examining tissue are provided in which a field, including at least a portion of the tissue and one or more registration fiducials, is insonified. Scattered acoustic information, including both transmitted and reflected waves, is received from the field. A representation of the field, including both the tissue and the registration fiducials, is then derived from the received acoustic radiation.

  7. Standardization of pitch range settings in voice acoustic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Adam P.; Maruff, Paul; Snyder, Peter J.; Mundt, James C.

    2009-01-01

    Voice acoustic analysis is typically a labor intensive, time consuming process that requires the application of idiosyncratic parameters tailored to individual aspects of the speech signal. These processes limit the efficiency and utility of voice analysis in clinical practice as well as applied research and development. In the current study, we analyzed 1120 voice files using standard techniques (case by case hand analysis); taking roughly 8 weeks of personnel time complete. The obtained results were then compared to the analytic output of several automated analysis scripts that made use of pre-set pitch range parameters. The automated analysis scripts reduced processing time of the 1680 speech samples to less than 2.5 hours and produced results comparable to the hand analysis when pitch window were appropriately selected to account for known population differences (i.e., sex differences). Caution should be exercised when applying suggested settings to pathological voice populations. PMID:19363172

  8. Apparatus and method for comparing corresponding acoustic resonances in liquids

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, D.N.

    1999-03-23

    Apparatus and method are disclosed for comparing corresponding acoustic resonances in liquids. The present invention permits the measurement of certain characteristics of liquids which affect the speed of sound therein. For example, a direct correlation between the octane rating of gasoline and the speed of sound in a gasoline sample has been experimentally observed. Therefore, changes in the speed of sound therein can be utilized as a sensitive parameter for determining changes in composition of a liquid sample. The present apparatus establishes interference patterns inside of a liquid without requiring the use of very thin, rigorously parallel ceramic discs, but rather uses readily available piezoelectric transducers attached to the outside surface of the usual container for the liquid and located on the same side thereof in the vicinity of one another. That is, various receptacle geometries may be employed, and the driving and receiving transducers may be located on the same side of the receptacle. The cell may also be constructed of any material that is inert to the liquid under investigation. A single-transducer embodiment, where the same transducer provides the excitation to the sample container and receives signals impressed therein, is also described. 5 figs.

  9. Apparatus and method for comparing corresponding acoustic resonances in liquids

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    1999-01-01

    Apparatus and method for comparing corresponding acoustic resonances in liquids. The present invention permits the measurement of certain characteristics of liquids which affect the speed of sound therein. For example, a direct correlation between the octane rating of gasoline and the speed of sound in a gasoline sample has been experimentally observed. Therefore, changes in the speed of sound therein can be utilized as a sensitive parameter for determining changes in composition of a liquid sample. The present apparatus establishes interference patterns inside of a liquid without requiring the use of very thin, rigorously parallel ceramic discs, but rather uses readily available piezoelectric transducers attached to the outside surface of the usual container for the liquid and located on the same side thereof in the vicinity of one another. That is, various receptacle geometries may be employed, and the driving and receiving transducers may be located on the same side of the receptacle. The cell may also be constructed of any material that is inert to the liquid under investigation. A single-transducer embodiment, where the same transducer provides the excitation to the sample container and receives signals impressed therein, is also described.

  10. Acoustical method of whole-body hydration status monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarvazyan, A. P.; Tsyuryupa, S. N.; Calhoun, M.; Utter, A.

    2016-07-01

    An acoustical handheld hydration monitor (HM) for assessing the water balance of the human body was developed. Dehydration is a critical public health problem. Many elderly over age of 65 are particularly vulnerable as are infants and young children. Given that dehydration is both preventable and reversible, the need for an easy-to-perform method for the detection of water imbalance is of the utmost clinical importance. The HM is based on an experimental fact that ultrasound velocity in muscle is a linear function of water content and can be referenced to the hydration status of the body. Studies on the validity of HM for the assessment of whole-body hydration status were conducted in the Appalachian State University, USA, on healthy young adults and on elderly subjects residing at an assisted living facility. The HM was able to track changes in total body water during periods of acute dehydration and rehydration in athletes and day-to-day and diurnal variability of hydration in elderly. Results of human studies indicate that HM has a potential to become an efficient tool for detecting abnormal changes in the body hydration status.

  11. Structure borne noise analysis using Helmholtz equation least squares based forced vibro acoustic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, Logesh Kumar

    This dissertation presents a structure-borne noise analysis technology that is focused on providing a cost-effective noise reduction strategy. Structure-borne sound is generated or transmitted through structural vibration; however, only a small portion of the vibration can effectively produce sound and radiate it to the far-field. Therefore, cost-effective noise reduction is reliant on identifying and suppressing the critical vibration components that are directly responsible for an undesired sound. However, current technologies cannot successfully identify these critical vibration components from the point of view of direct contribution to sound radiation and hence cannot guarantee the best cost-effective noise reduction. The technology developed here provides a strategy towards identifying the critical vibration components and methodically suppressing them to achieve a cost-effective noise reduction. The core of this technology is Helmholtz equation least squares (HELS) based nearfield acoustic holography method. In this study, the HELS formulations derived in spherical co-ordinates using spherical wave expansion functions utilize the input data of acoustic pressures measured in the nearfield of a vibrating object to reconstruct the vibro-acoustic responses on the source surface and acoustic quantities in the far field. Using these formulations, three steps were taken to achieve the goal. First, hybrid regularization techniques were developed to improve the reconstruction accuracy of normal surface velocity of the original HELS method. Second, correlations between the surface vibro-acoustic responses and acoustic radiation were factorized using singular value decomposition to obtain orthogonal basis known here as the forced vibro-acoustic components (F-VACs). The F-VACs enables one to identify the critical vibration components for sound radiation in a similar manner that modal decomposition identifies the critical natural modes in a structural vibration. Finally

  12. Acoustic analysis of a computer cooling fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lixi; Wang, Jian

    2005-10-01

    Noise radiated by a typical computer cooling fan is investigated experimentally and analyzed within the framework of rotor-stator interaction noise using point source formulation. The fan is 9 cm in rotor casing diameter and its design speed is 3000 rpm. The main noise sources are found and quantified; they are (a) the inlet flow distortion caused by the sharp edges of the incomplete bellmouth due to the square outer framework, (b) the interaction of rotor blades with the downstream struts which hold the motor, and (c) the extra size of one strut carrying electrical wiring. Methods are devised to extract the rotor-strut interaction noise, (b) and (c), radiated by the component forces of drag and thrust at the leading and higher order spinning pressure modes, as well as the leading edge noise generated by (a). By re-installing the original fan rotor in various casings, the noises radiated by the three features of the original fan are separated, and details of the directivity are interpreted. It is found that the inlet flow distortion and the unequal set of four struts make about the same amount of noise. Their corrections show a potential of around 10-dB sound power reduction.

  13. Reconstructed imaging of acoustic cloak using time-lapse reversal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chen; Cheng, Ying; Xu, Jian-yi; Li, Bo; Liu, Xiao-jun

    2014-08-01

    We proposed and investigated a solution to the inverse acoustic cloak problem, an anti-stealth technology to make cloaks visible, using the time-lapse reversal (TLR) method. The TLR method reconstructs the image of an unknown acoustic cloak by utilizing scattered acoustic waves. Compared to previous anti-stealth methods, the TLR method can determine not only the existence of a cloak but also its exact geometric information like definite shape, size, and position. Here, we present the process for TLR reconstruction based on time reversal invariance. This technology may have potential applications in detecting various types of cloaks with different geometric parameters.

  14. [Acoustic analysis of the voice in singing children].

    PubMed

    Shilenkova, V V; Korotchenko, V V

    2010-01-01

    The present acoustic analysis of the voice is based on the data obtained from 54 singing children (19 boys and 25 girls). They were divided into two groups of 27 subjects each, with one including premutational-age the other mutational-age children (from 8 to 12 and from 13 to 16 years respectively). software package was used to analyse phonetograms and spectrograms of the voice and to study the speech profile. The acoustic parameters measured included voice frequency range, strength, and Jitter, maximum phonation time, and dysphonic index (DSI) depending on the age of the singing children. Premutational acoustic voice characteristics were essentially similar in boys and girls unlike mutational ones that differed dramatically, in the first place due to their substantial change in boys. The boys' voice underwent marked narrowing of the frequency range and its shift toward lower values, the jitter increased, and DSI became negative (-1.7+/-2.6). On the contrary, the voice frequency range in girls broadened and shifted toward both high and low frequencies; the girls showed only small amounts of Jitter and high DSI (2.4+/-2.2). PMID:20436424

  15. Damage Detection and Analysis in CFRPs Using Acoustic Emission Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitlow, Travis Laron

    Real time monitoring of damage is an important aspect of life management of critical structures. Acoustic emission (AE) techniques allow for measurement and assessment of damage in real time. Acoustic emission parameters such as signal amplitude and duration were monitored during the loading sequences. Criteria that can indicate the onset of critical damage to the structure were developed. Tracking the damage as it happens gives a better analysis of the failure evolution that will allow for a more accurate determination of structural life. The main challenge is distinguishing between legitimate damage signals and "false positives" which are unrelated to damage growth. Such false positives can be related to electrical noise, friction, or mechanical vibrations. This research focuses on monitoring signals of damage growth in carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs) and separating the relevant signals from the false ones. In this Dissertation, acoustic emission signals from CFRP specimens were experimentally recorded and analyzed. The objectives of this work are: (1) perform static and fatigue loading of CFRP composite specimens and measure the associated AE signals, (2) accurately determine the AE parameters (energy, frequency, duration, etc.) of signals generated during failure of such specimens, (3) use fiber optic sensors to monitor the strain distribution of the damage zone and relate these changes in strain measurements to AE data.

  16. Acoustic analysis by spherical microphone array processing of room impulse responses.

    PubMed

    Khaykin, Dima; Rafaely, Boaz

    2012-07-01

    Spherical microphone arrays have been recently used for room acoustics analysis, to detect the direction-of-arrival of early room reflections, and compute directional room impulse responses and other spatial room acoustics parameters. Previous works presented methods for room acoustics analysis using spherical arrays that are based on beamforming, e.g., delay-and-sum, regular beamforming, and Dolph-Chebyshev beamforming. Although beamforming methods provide useful directional selectivity, optimal array processing methods can provide enhanced performance. However, these algorithms require an array cross-spectrum matrix with a full rank, while array data based on room impulse responses may not satisfy this condition due to the single frame data. This paper presents a smoothing technique for the cross-spectrum matrix in the frequency domain, designed for spherical microphone arrays, that can solve the problem of low rank when using room impulse response data, therefore facilitating the use of optimal array processing methods. Frequency smoothing is shown to be performed effectively using spherical arrays, due to the decoupling of frequency and angular components in the spherical harmonics domain. Experimental study with data measured in a real auditorium illustrates the performance of optimal array processing methods such as MUSIC and MVDR compared to beamforming. PMID:22779475

  17. Effects of different analysis techniques and recording duty cycles on passive acoustic monitoring of killer whales.

    PubMed

    Riera, Amalis; Ford, John K; Ross Chapman, N

    2013-09-01

    Killer whales in British Columbia are at risk, and little is known about their winter distribution. Passive acoustic monitoring of their year-round habitat is a valuable supplemental method to traditional visual and photographic surveys. However, long-term acoustic studies of odontocetes have some limitations, including the generation of large amounts of data that require highly time-consuming processing. There is a need to develop tools and protocols to maximize the efficiency of such studies. Here, two types of analysis, real-time and long term spectral averages, were compared to assess their performance at detecting killer whale calls in long-term acoustic recordings. In addition, two different duty cycles, 1/3 and 2/3, were tested. Both the use of long term spectral averages and a lower duty cycle resulted in a decrease in call detection and positive pod identification, leading to underestimations of the amount of time the whales were present. The impact of these limitations should be considered in future killer whale acoustic surveys. A compromise between a lower resolution data processing method and a higher duty cycle is suggested for maximum methodological efficiency. PMID:23968036

  18. Finite element analysis and optimization of a single-axis acoustic levitator.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Marco A B; Buiochi, Flávio; Adamowski, Julio C

    2010-01-01

    A finite element analysis and a parametric optimization of single-axis acoustic levitators are presented. The finite element method is used to simulate a levitator consisting of a Langevin ultrasonic transducer with a plane radiating surface and a plane reflector. The transducer electrical impedance, the transducer face displacement, and the acoustic radiation potential that acts on small spheres are determined by the finite element method. The numerical electrical impedance is compared with that acquired experimentally by an impedance analyzer, and the predicted displacement is compared with that obtained by a fiber-optic vibration sensor. The numerical acoustic radiation potential is verified experimentally by placing small spheres in the levitator. The same procedure is used to optimize a levitator consisting of a curved reflector and a concave-faced transducer. The numerical results show that the acoustic radiation force in the new levitator is enhanced 604 times compared with the levitator consisting of a plane transducer and a plane reflector. The optimized levitator is able to levitate 3, 2.5-mm diameter steel spheres with a power consumption of only 0.9 W. PMID:20178913

  19. Blend uniformity analysis of pharmaceutical products by Broadband Acoustic Resonance Dissolution Spectroscopy (BARDS).

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Dara; Scanlon, Eoin; Krüse, Jacob; Vos, Bastiaan; Evans-Hurson, Rachel; Fitzpatrick, Eileen; McSweeney, Seán

    2012-11-15

    Blend uniformity analysis (BUA) is a routine and highly regulated aspect of pharmaceutical production. In most instances, it involves quantitative determination of individual components of a blend in order to ascertain the mixture ratio. This approach often entails the use of costly and sophisticated instrumentation and complex statistical methods. In this study, a new and simple qualitative blend confirmatory test is introduced based on a well known acoustic phenomenon. Several over the counter (OTC) product powder blends are analysed and it is shown that each product has a unique and highly reproducible acoustic signature. The acoustic frequency responses generated during the dissolution of the product are measured and recorded in real time. It is shown that intra-batch and inter-batch variation for each product is either insignificant or non-existent when measured in triplicate. This study demonstrates that Broadband Acoustic Resonance Dissolution Spectroscopy or BARDS can be used successfully to determine inter-batch variability, stability and uniformity of powder blends. This is just one application of a wide range of BARDS applications which are more cost effective and time efficient than current methods. PMID:22884840

  20. Design and Analysis of Underwater Acoustic Networks with Reflected Links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emokpae, Lloyd

    -of-sight (LOS) and NLOS links by utilizing directional antennas, which will boost the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at the receiver while promoting NLOS usage. In our model, we employ a directional underwater acoustic antenna composed of an array of hydrophones that can be summed up at various phases and amplitudes resulting in a beam-former. We have also adopted a practical multimodal directional transducer concept which generates both directional and omni-directional beam patterns by combining the fundamental vibration modes of a cylindrical acoustic radiator. This allows the transducer to be electrically controlled and steered by simply adjusting the electrical voltage weights. A prototype acoustic modem is then developed to utilize the multimodal directional transducer for both LOS and NLOS communication. The acoustic modem has also been used as a platform for empirically validating our SBR communication model in a tank and with empirical data. Networking protocols have been developed to exploit the SBR communication model. These protocols include node discovery and localization, directional medium access control (D-MAC) and geographical routing. In node discovery and localization, each node will utilize SBR-based range measurements to its neighbors to determine their relative position. The D-MAC protocol utilizes directional antennas to increase the network throughput due to the spatial efficiency of the antenna model. In the proposed reflection-enabled directional MAC protocol (RED-MAC), each source node will be able to determine if an obstacle is blocking the LOS link to the destination and switch to the best NLOS link by utilizing surface/bottom reflections. Finally, we have developed a geographical routing algorithm which aims to establish the best stable route from a source node to a destination node. The optimized route is selected to achieve maximum network throughput. Extensive analysis of the network throughput when utilizing directional antennas is also presented

  1. A numerical method for the calculation of dynamic response and acoustic radiation from an underwater structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Q.; Joseph, P. F.

    2005-05-01

    An approach combining finite element with boundary element methods is proposed to calculate the elastic vibration and acoustic field radiated from an underwater structure. The FEM software NASTRAN is employed for computation of the structural vibration. An uncoupled boundary element method, based on the potential decomposition technique, is described to determine the acoustic added mass and damping coefficients that result due to fluid loading effects. The acoustic matrices of added mass and damping coefficients are then added to the structural mass and damping matrices, respectively, by the DMAP modules of NASTRAN. Numerical results are shown to be in good agreement with experimental data. The complex eigenvalue analyses of underwater structure are obtained by NASTRAN solution sequence SOL107. Results obtained from this study suggest that the natural frequencies of underwater structures are only weakly dependent on the acoustic frequency if the acoustic wavelength is roughly twice as large as the maximum structural dimension.

  2. Numerical analysis of sound propagation for acoustic lens array in different fluid mediums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujisawa, Kei; Asada, Akira

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, an acoustic sound focusing method using acoustic lens array is investigated numerically. To understand the sound propagation in the acoustic field in water with a lens material of glycerin, compressible Navier-Stokes equation, the mass conservation, energy equation, state equation in cylindrical coordinate system are solved without applying parabolic approximation. The numerical method is based on the finite difference time domain method. The numerical calculation of the sound propagation is carried out in the near field of the acoustic lens array of variable thickness normal to the acoustic beam. The numerical result shows that the sound pressure level along the beam axis increases due to the influence of the acoustic lens array, which indicates the capability of the acoustic lens array to the sound focusing.

  3. Risk Factors of Acoustic Neuroma: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mantao; Fan, Zuoxu; Cao, Fei; Wang, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Many epidemiological studies have investigated environmental risk factors for the development of acoustic neuroma. However, these results are controversial. We conducted a meta-analysis of case-control studies to identify any potential relationship between history of noise exposure, smoking, allergic diseases, and risk of acoustic neuroma. Materials and Methods We searched PubMed to identify relevant articles. Two researchers evaluated the eligibility and extracted the data independently. Results Eleven case-control studies were included in our meta-analysis. Acoustic neuroma was found to be associated with leisure noise exposure [odds ratio (OR)=1.33, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.05–1.68], but not with occupational noise exposure and ever noise exposure (OR=1.20, 95% CI: 0.84–1.72 and OR=1.15, 95% CI: 0.80–1.65). The OR of acoustic neuroma for ever (versus never) smoking was 0.53 (95% CI: 0.30–0.94), while the subgroup analysis indicated ORs of 0.95 (95% CI: 0.81–1.10) and 0.49 (95% CI: 0.41–0.59) for ex-smoker and current smoker respectively. The ORs for asthma, eczema, and seasonal rhinitis were 0.98 (95% CI: 0.80–1.18), 0.91 (95% CI: 0.76–1.09), and 1.52 (95% CI: 0.90–2.54), respectively. Conclusion Our meta-analysis is suggestive of an elevated risk of acoustic neuroma among individuals who were ever exposed to leisure noise, but not to occupational noise. Our study also indicated a lower acoustic neuroma risk among ever and current cigarette smokers than never smokers, while there was no significant relationship for ex-smokers. No significant associations were found between acoustic neuroma and history of any allergic diseases, such as asthma, eczema, and seasonal rhinitis. PMID:26996581

  4. Device and method for generating a beam of acoustic energy from a borehole, and applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N; Pantea, Cristian; Nihei, Kurt T; Schmitt, Denis P; Skelt, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    In some aspects of the invention, a method of generating a beam of acoustic energy in a borehole is disclosed. The method includes generating a first broad-band acoustic pulse at a first broad-band frequency range having a first central frequency and a first bandwidth spread; generating a second broad-band acoustic pulse at a second broad-band frequency range different than the first frequency range having a second central frequency and a second bandwidth spread, wherein the first acoustic pulse and second acoustic pulse are generated by at least one transducer arranged on a tool located within the borehole; and transmitting the first and the second broad-band acoustic pulses into an acoustically non-linear medium, wherein the composition of the non-linear medium produces a collimated pulse by a non-linear mixing of the first and second acoustic pulses, wherein the collimated pulse has a frequency equal to the difference in frequencies between the first central frequency and the second central frequency and a bandwidth spread equal to the sum of the first bandwidth spread and the second bandwidth spread.

  5. Measuring acoustic energy density in microchannel acoustophoresis using a simple and rapid light-intensity method.

    PubMed

    Barnkob, Rune; Iranmanesh, Ida; Wiklund, Martin; Bruus, Henrik

    2012-07-01

    We present a simple and rapid method for measuring the acoustic energy density in microchannel acoustophoresis based on light-intensity measurements of a suspension of particles. The method relies on the assumption that each particle in the suspension undergoes single-particle acoustophoresis. It is validated by the single-particle tracking method, and we show by proper re-scaling that the re-scaled light intensity plotted versus re-scaled time falls on a universal curve. The method allows for analysis of moderate-resolution images in the concentration range encountered in typical experiments, and it is an attractive alternative to particle tracking and particle image velocimetry for quantifying acoustophoretic performance in microchannels. PMID:22522812

  6. Acoustic spectroscopy: A powerful analytical method for the pharmaceutical field?

    PubMed

    Bonacucina, Giulia; Perinelli, Diego R; Cespi, Marco; Casettari, Luca; Cossi, Riccardo; Blasi, Paolo; Palmieri, Giovanni F

    2016-04-30

    Acoustics is one of the emerging technologies developed to minimize processing, maximize quality and ensure the safety of pharmaceutical, food and chemical products. The operating principle of acoustic spectroscopy is the measurement of the ultrasound pulse intensity and phase after its propagation through a sample. The main goal of this technique is to characterise concentrated colloidal dispersions without dilution, in such a way as to be able to analyse non-transparent and even highly structured systems. This review presents the state of the art of ultrasound-based techniques in pharmaceutical pre-formulation and formulation steps, showing their potential, applicability and limits. It reports in a simplified version the theory behind acoustic spectroscopy, describes the most common equipment on the market, and finally overviews different studies performed on systems and materials used in the pharmaceutical or related fields. PMID:26976503

  7. Signature analysis of acoustic emission from graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, S. S.; Henneke, E. G., II

    1977-01-01

    Acoustic emissions were monitored for crack extension across and parallel to the fibers in a single ply and multiply laminates of graphite epoxy composites. Spectrum analysis was performed on the transient signal to ascertain if the fracture mode can be characterized by a particular spectral pattern. The specimens were loaded to failure quasistatically in a tensile machine. Visual observations were made via either an optical microscope or a television camera. The results indicate that several types of characteristics in the time and frequency domain correspond to different types of failure.

  8. Quality Prediction of Twin Wire Arc Sprayed Coatings Using Acoustic Emission Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, W.; Abdulgader, M.; Wang, G.; Zielke, R.

    2013-03-01

    In this work, acoustic emission analysis is utilized in the twin wire arc spraying (TWAS) process to study the influence of the adjustable process parameters on the simultaneously obtained acoustic signals at the nozzle and at the substrate. The amplitude of recorded signals at the substrate was in general much higher than those recorded at the nozzle. At the substrate side, the amplitude of emitted acoustic signals is dependent on feedstock materials and is higher when using solid wires. The acoustic signals were recorded at the spraying gun for different gas pressures without arc ignition (as dry runs) in order to reveal the effect of the arc on the emitted acoustic signals. A correlation between controllable parameters, the acoustic signals, and the obtained in-flight particle characteristics was observed. This work contributes to the online control of TWAS processes and is one of many proposed publications in the research field of the conducted acoustic emission analysis.

  9. Development of an Efficient Binaural Simulation for the Analysis of Structural Acoustic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lalime, Aimee L.; Johnson, Marty E.; Rizzi, Stephen A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Binaural or "virtual acoustic" representation has been proposed as a method of analyzing acoustic and vibroacoustic data. Unfortunately, this binaural representation can require extensive computer power to apply the Head Related Transfer Functions (HRTFs) to a large number of sources, as with a vibrating structure. This work focuses on reducing the number of real-time computations required in this binaural analysis through the use of Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) and Equivalent Source Reduction (ESR). The SVD method reduces the complexity of the HRTF computations by breaking the HRTFs into dominant singular values (and vectors). The ESR method reduces the number of sources to be analyzed in real-time computation by replacing sources on the scale of a structural wavelength with sources on the scale of an acoustic wavelength. It is shown that the effectiveness of the SVD and ESR methods improves as the complexity of the source increases. In addition, preliminary auralization tests have shown that the results from both the SVD and ESR methods are indistinguishable from the results found with the exhaustive method.

  10. Statistical analysis of storm electrical discharges reconstituted from a lightning mapping system, a lightning location system, and an acoustic array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallin, Louis-Jonardan; Farges, Thomas; Marchiano, Régis; Coulouvrat, François; Defer, Eric; Rison, William; Schulz, Wolfgang; Nuret, Mathieu

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of the European Hydrological Cycle in the Mediterranean Experiment project, a field campaign devoted to the study of electrical activity during storms took place in the south of France in 2012. An acoustic station composed of four microphones and four microbarometers was deployed within the coverage of a Lightning Mapping Array network. On the 26 October 2012, a thunderstorm passed just over the acoustic station. Fifty-six natural thunder events, due to cloud-to-ground and intracloud flashes, were recorded. This paper studies the acoustic reconstruction, in the low frequency range from 1 to 40 Hz, of the recorded flashes and their comparison with detections from electromagnetic networks. Concurrent detections from the European Cooperation for Lightning Detection lightning location system were also used. Some case studies show clearly that acoustic signal from thunder comes from the return stroke but also from the horizontal discharges which occur inside the clouds. The huge amount of observation data leads to a statistical analysis of lightning discharges acoustically recorded. Especially, the distributions of altitudes of reconstructed acoustic detections are explored in detail. The impact of the distance to the source on these distributions is established. The capacity of the acoustic method to describe precisely the lower part of nearby cloud-to-ground discharges, where the Lightning Mapping Array network is not effective, is also highlighted.

  11. Statistical Analysis of Acoustic Wave Parameters Near Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabello-Soares, M. Cristina; Bogart, Richard S.; Scherrer, Philip H.

    2016-08-01

    In order to quantify the influence of magnetic fields on acoustic mode parameters and flows in and around active regions, we analyze the differences in the parameters in magnetically quiet regions nearby an active region (which we call “nearby regions”), compared with those of quiet regions at the same disk locations for which there are no neighboring active regions. We also compare the mode parameters in active regions with those in comparably located quiet regions. Our analysis is based on ring-diagram analysis of all active regions observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) during almost five years. We find that the frequency at which the mode amplitude changes from attenuation to amplification in the quiet nearby regions is around 4.2 mHz, in contrast to the active regions, for which it is about 5.1 mHz. This amplitude enhacement (the “acoustic halo effect”) is as large as that observed in the active regions, and has a very weak dependence on the wave propagation direction. The mode energy difference in nearby regions also changes from a deficit to an excess at around 4.2 mHz, but averages to zero over all modes. The frequency difference in nearby regions increases with increasing frequency until a point at which the frequency shifts turn over sharply, as in active regions. However, this turnover occurs around 4.9 mHz, which is significantly below the acoustic cutoff frequency. Inverting the horizontal flow parameters in the direction of the neigboring active regions, we find flows that are consistent with a model of the thermal energy flow being blocked directly below the active region.

  12. Thermal Acoustic Oscillation: Causes, Detection, Analysis, and Prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christie, R. J.; Hartwig, J. W.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal Acoustic Oscillations (TAO) can occur in cryogenic systems and produce significant sources of heat. This source of heat can increase the boil off rate of cryogenic propellants in spacecraft storage tanks and reduce mission life. This paper discusses the causes of TAO, how it can be detected, what analyses can be done to predict it, and how to prevent it from occurring.The paper provides practical insight into what can aggravate instability, practical methods for mitigation, and when TAO does not occur. A real life example of a cryogenic system with an unexpected heat source is discussed, along with how TAO was confirmed and eliminated.

  13. Systems and methods for biometric identification using the acoustic properties of the ear canal

    DOEpatents

    Bouchard, Ann Marie; Osbourn, Gordon Cecil

    1998-01-01

    The present invention teaches systems and methods for verifying or recognizing a person's identity based on measurements of the acoustic response of the individual's ear canal. The system comprises an acoustic emission device, which emits an acoustic source signal s(t), designated by a computer, into the ear canal of an individual, and an acoustic response detection device, which detects the acoustic response signal f(t). A computer digitizes the response (detected) signal f(t) and stores the data. Computer-implemented algorithms analyze the response signal f(t) to produce ear-canal feature data. The ear-canal feature data obtained during enrollment is stored on the computer, or some other recording medium, to compare the enrollment data with ear-canal feature data produced in a subsequent access attempt, to determine if the individual has previously been enrolled. The system can also be adapted for remote access applications.

  14. Systems and methods for biometric identification using the acoustic properties of the ear canal

    DOEpatents

    Bouchard, A.M.; Osbourn, G.C.

    1998-07-28

    The present invention teaches systems and methods for verifying or recognizing a person`s identity based on measurements of the acoustic response of the individual`s ear canal. The system comprises an acoustic emission device, which emits an acoustic source signal s(t), designated by a computer, into the ear canal of an individual, and an acoustic response detection device, which detects the acoustic response signal f(t). A computer digitizes the response (detected) signal f(t) and stores the data. Computer-implemented algorithms analyze the response signal f(t) to produce ear-canal feature data. The ear-canal feature data obtained during enrollment is stored on the computer, or some other recording medium, to compare the enrollment data with ear-canal feature data produced in a subsequent access attempt, to determine if the individual has previously been enrolled. The system can also be adapted for remote access applications. 5 figs.

  15. An objective method and measuring equipment for noise control and acoustic diagnostics of motorcars. [acoustic diagnostics on automobile engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kacprowski, J.; Motylewski, J.; Miazga, J.

    1974-01-01

    An objective method and apparatus for noise control and acoustic diagnostics of motorcar engines are reported. The method and apparatus let us know whether the noisiness of the vehicle under test exceeds the admissible threshold levels given by appropriate standards and if so what is the main source of the excessive noise. The method consists in measuring both the overall noise level and the sound pressure levels in definite frequency bands while the engine speed is controlled as well and may be fixed at prescribed values. Whenever the individually adjusted threshold level has been exceeded in any frequency band, a self-sustaining control signal is sent.

  16. Filterbank-based independent component analysis for acoustic mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyung-Min

    2011-06-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) for acoustic mixtures has been a challenging problem due to very complex reverberation involved in real-world mixing environments. In an effort to overcome disadvantages of the conventional time domain and frequency domain approaches, this paper describes filterbank-based independent component analysis for acoustic mixtures. In this approach, input signals are split into subband signals and decimated. A simplified network performs ICA on the decimated signals, and finally independent components are synthesized. First, a uniform filterbank is employed in the approach for basic and simple derivation and implementation. The uniform-filterbank-based approach achieves better separation performance than the frequency domain approach and gives faster convergence speed with less computational complexity than the time domain approach. Since most of natural signals have exponentially or more steeply decreasing energy as the frequency increases, the spectral characteristics of natural signals introduce a Bark-scale filterbank which divides low frequency region minutely and high frequency region widely. The Bark-scale-filterbank-based approach shows faster convergence speed than the uniform-filterbank-based one because it has more whitened inputs in low frequency subbands. It also improves separation performance as it has enough data to train adaptive parameters exactly in high frequency subbands.

  17. Multi-dimensional analysis of subjective acoustical ratings and acoustical measures in existing concert halls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okano, Toshiyuki

    2001-05-01

    Correlations between subjective acoustical ratings and hall-averaged values of acoustical measures are studied among existing worldwide major concert halls. It was shown that the classified acoustical ratings by Beranek [Concert and Opera Halls, How They Sound (ASA, 1996)] are discriminated correctly by combining binaural quality index (BQI) with some other acoustical measures. BQI is determined by the arithmetic average of inter-aural cross correlation coefficient in three octave bands of 500, 1000, and 2000 Hz, subtracted from unity, calculated from the early 80-ms part of binaural impulse response. Considering that the upper limit value of BQI not to cause disturbing image shift is approximately 0.85 at individual seat [Okano, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 2219-2230 (2000)], the values of 0.6 or higher in hall averaged value of BQI, 0.85 or smaller in individual seat value of BQI, and approximately 5 dB or higher in strength factor at middle frequencies are proposed as design objectives to attain a high acoustical quality. It should be provided that other acoustical measures are also optimized. These target values will be very effective in studying room shape of halls, using scale models or computer models.

  18. Impact-acoustics-based health monitoring of tile-wall bonding integrity using principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, F.; Tso, S. K.; Hung, M. Y. Y.

    2006-06-01

    The use of the acoustic features extracted from the impact sounds for bonding integrity assessment has been extensively investigated. Nonetheless, considering the practical implementation of tile-wall non-destructive evaluation (NDE), the traditional defects classification method based directly on frequency-domain features has been of limited application because of the overlapping feature patterns corresponding to different classes whenever there is physical surface irregularity. The purpose of this paper is to explore the clustering and classification ability of principal component analysis (PCA) as applied to the impact-acoustics signature in tile-wall inspection with a view to mitigating the adverse influence of surface non-uniformity. A clustering analysis with signature acquired on sample slabs shows that impact-acoustics signatures of different bonding quality and different surface roughness are well separated into different clusters when using the first two principal components obtained. By adopting as inputs the feature vectors extracted with PCA applied, a multilayer back-propagation artificial neural network (ANN) classifier is developed for automatic health monitoring and defects classification of tile-walls. The inspection results obtained experimentally on the prepared sample slabs are presented and discussed, confirming the utility of the proposed method, particularly in dealing with tile surface irregularity.

  19. Acoustic streaming jets: A scaling and dimensional analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Botton, V. Henry, D.; Millet, S.; Ben-Hadid, H.; Garandet, J. P.

    2015-10-28

    We present our work on acoustic streaming free jets driven by ultrasonic beams in liquids. These jets are steady flows generated far from walls by progressive acoustic waves. As can be seen on figure 1, our set-up, denominated AStrID for Acoustic Streaming Investigation Device, is made of a water tank in which a 29 mm plane source emits continuous ultrasonic waves at typically 2 MHz. Our approach combines an experimental characterization of both the acoustic pressure field (hydrophone) and the obtained acoustic streaming velocity field (PIV visualization) on one hand, with CFD using an incompressible Navier-Stokes solver on the other hand.

  20. Quantitative Analysis Of Acoustic Emission From Rock Fracture Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodfellow, Sebastian David

    This thesis aims to advance the methods of quantitative acoustic emission (AE) analysis by calibrating sensors, characterizing sources, and applying the results to solve engi- neering problems. In the first part of this thesis, we built a calibration apparatus and successfully calibrated two commercial AE sensors. The ErgoTech sensor was found to have broadband velocity sensitivity and the Panametrics V103 was sensitive to surface normal displacement. These calibration results were applied to two AE data sets from rock fracture experiments in order to characterize the sources of AE events. The first data set was from an in situ rock fracture experiment conducted at the Underground Research Laboratory (URL). The Mine-By experiment was a large scale excavation response test where both AE (10 kHz - 1 MHz) and microseismicity (MS) (1 Hz - 10 kHz) were monitored. Using the calibration information, magnitude, stress drop, dimension and energy were successfully estimated for 21 AE events recorded in the tensile region of the tunnel wall. Magnitudes were in the range -7.5 < Mw < -6.8, which is consistent with other laboratory AE results, and stress drops were within the range commonly observed for induced seismicity in the field (0.1 - 10 MPa). The second data set was AE collected during a true-triaxial deformation experiment, where the objectives were to characterize laboratory AE sources and identify issues related to moving the analysis from ideal in situ conditions to more complex laboratory conditions in terms of the ability to conduct quantitative AE analysis. We found AE magnitudes in the range -7.8 < Mw < -6.7 and as with the in situ data, stress release was within the expected range of 0.1 - 10 MPa. We identified four major challenges to quantitative analysis in the laboratory, which in- hibited our ability to study parameter scaling (M0 ∝ fc -3 scaling). These challenges were 0c (1) limited knowledge of attenuation which we proved was continuously evolving, (2

  1. Acoustically levitated droplets: a contactless sampling method for fluorescence studies.

    PubMed

    Leiterer, Jork; Grabolle, Markus; Rurack, Knut; Resch-Genger, Ute; Ziegler, Jan; Nann, Thomas; Panne, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Acoustic levitation is used as a new tool to study concentration-dependent processes in fluorescence spectroscopy. With this technique, small amounts of liquid and solid samples can be measured without the need for sample supports or containers, which often limits signal acquisition and can even alter sample properties due to interactions with the support material. We demonstrate that, because of the small sample volume, fluorescence measurements at high concentrations of an organic dye are possible without the limitation of inner-filter effects, which hamper such experiments in conventional, cuvette-based measurements. Furthermore, we show that acoustic levitation of liquid samples provides an experimentally simple way to study distance-dependent fluorescence modulations in semiconductor nanocrystals. The evaporation of the solvent during levitation leads to a continuous increase of solute concentration and can easily be monitored by laser-induced fluorescence. PMID:18596335

  2. Application of an acoustic noise removal method to aircraft-based atmospheric temperature measurements.

    PubMed

    Hugo, Ronald J; Nowlin, Scott R; Hahn, Ila L; Eaton, Frank D; McCrae, Kim A

    2003-01-01

    An acoustic noise removal method is used to reject engine acoustical disturbances from aircraft-based atmospheric temperature measurements. Removal of engine noise from atmospheric temperature measurements allows a larger wave number range to be fit while quantifying the magnitude of atmospheric temperature turbulence. The larger wave number range was found to result in a more statistically certain spectral slope estimate, with up to a 50% reduction in the standard deviation of measured spectral slopes. The noise removal technique was found to break down under conditions of weak atmospheric temperature turbulence where the engine acoustical disturbance can be several orders of magnitude larger than atmospheric temperature turbulence. PMID:12558258

  3. Application of an acoustic noise removal method to aircraft-based atmospheric temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugo, Ronald J.; Nowlin, Scott R.; Hahn, Ila L.; Eaton, Frank D.; McCrae, Kim A.

    2003-01-01

    An acoustic noise removal method is used to reject engine acoustical disturbances from aircraft-based atmospheric temperature measurements. Removal of engine noise from atmospheric temperature measurements allows a larger wave number range to be fit while quantifying the magnitude of atmospheric temperature turbulence. The larger wave number range was found to result in a more statistically certain spectral slope estimate, with up to a 50% reduction in the standard deviation of measured spectral slopes. The noise removal technique was found to break down under conditions of weak atmospheric temperature turbulence where the engine acoustical disturbance can be several orders of magnitude larger than atmospheric temperature turbulence.

  4. Coefficient of variation spectral analysis: An application to underwater acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herstein, P. D.; Laplante, R. F.

    1983-05-01

    Acoustic noise in the ocean is often described in terms of its power spectral density. Just as in other media, this noise consists of both narrowband and broadband frequency components. A major problem in the analysis of power spectral density measurements is distinguishing between narrowband spectral components of interest and contaminating narrowband components. In this paper, the use of coefficient of variation (Cv) spectrum is examined as an adjunct to the conventional power spectrum to distinguish narrowband components of interest from contaminating components. The theory of the Cv is presented. Coefficients for several classical input distributions are developed. It is shown that Cv spectra can be easily implemented as an adjunct procedure during the computation of the ensemble of averaged power spectra. Power and Cv spectra derived from actual at-sea sonobuoy measurements of deep ocean ambient noise separate narrowband components from narrowband lines of interest in the ensemble of averaged power spectra, these acoustic components of interest can be distinguished in the Cv spectra.

  5. An analysis of the acoustic input impedance of the ear.

    PubMed

    Withnell, Robert H; Gowdy, Lauren E

    2013-10-01

    Ear canal acoustics was examined using a one-dimensional lossy transmission line with a distributed load impedance to model the ear. The acoustic input impedance of the ear was derived from sound pressure measurements in the ear canal of healthy human ears. A nonlinear least squares fit of the model to data generated estimates for ear canal radius, ear canal length, and quantified the resistance that would produce transmission losses. Derivation of ear canal radius has application to quantifying the impedance mismatch at the eardrum between the ear canal and the middle ear. The length of the ear canal was found, in general, to be longer than the length derived from the one-quarter wavelength standing wave frequency, consistent with the middle ear being mass-controlled at the standing wave frequency. Viscothermal losses in the ear canal, in some cases, may exceed that attributable to a smooth rigid wall. Resistance in the middle ear was found to contribute significantly to the total resistance. In effect, this analysis "reverse engineers" physical parameters of the ear from sound pressure measurements in the ear canal. PMID:23917695

  6. Wavelet analysis of baryon acoustic structures in the galaxy distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnalte-Mur, P.; Labatie, A.; Clerc, N.; Martínez, V. J.; Starck, J.-L.; Lachièze-Rey, M.; Saar, E.; Paredes, S.

    2012-06-01

    Context. Baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) are imprinted in the density field by acoustic waves travelling in the plasma of the early universe. Their fixed scale can be used as a standard ruler to study the geometry of the universe. Aims: The BAO have been previously detected using correlation functions and power spectra of the galaxy distribution. We present a new method to detect the real-space structures associated with BAO. These baryon acoustic structures are spherical shells of relatively small density contrast, surrounding high density central regions. Methods: We design a specific wavelet adapted to search for shells, and exploit the physics of the process by making use of two different mass tracers, introducing a specific statistic to detect the BAO features. We show the effect of the BAO signal in this new statistic when applied to the Λ - cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model, using an analytical approximation to the transfer function. We confirm the reliability and stability of our method by using cosmological N-body simulations from the MareNostrum Institut de Ciències de l'Espai (MICE). Results: We apply our method to the detection of BAO in a galaxy sample drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We use the "main" catalogue to trace the shells, and the luminous red galaxies (LRG) as tracers of the high density central regions. Using this new method, we detect, with a high significance, that the LRG in our sample are preferentially located close to the centres of shell-like structures in the density field, with characteristics similar to those expected from BAO. We show that stacking selected shells, we can find their characteristic density profile. Conclusions: We delineate a new feature of the cosmic web, the BAO shells. As these are real spatial structures, the BAO phenomenon can be studied in detail by examining those shells. Full Table 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  7. Perceptually-driven signal analysis for acoustic event classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philips, Scott M.

    In many acoustic signal processing applications human listeners are able to outperform automated processing techniques, particularly in the identification and classification of acoustic events. The research discussed in this paper develops a framework for employing perceptual information from human listening experiments to improve automatic event classification. We focus on the identification of new signal attributes, or features, that are able to predict the human performance observed in formal listening experiments. Using this framework, our newly identified features have the ability to elevate automatic classification performance closer to the level of human listeners. We develop several new methods for learning a perceptual feature transform from human similarity measures. In addition to providing a more fundamental basis for uncovering perceptual features than previous approaches, these methods also lead to a greater insight into how humans perceive sounds in a dataset. We also develop a new approach for learning a perceptual distance metric. This metric is shown to be applicable to modern kernel-based techniques used in machine learning and provides a connection between the fields of psychoacoustics and machine learning. Our research demonstrates these new methods in the area of active sonar signal processing. There is anecdotal evidence within the sonar community that human operators are adept in the task of discriminating between active sonar target and clutter echoes. We confirm this ability in a series of formal listening experiments. With the results of these experiments, we then identify perceptual features and distance metrics using our novel methods. The results show better agreement with human performance than previous approaches. While this work demonstrates these methods using perceptual similarity measures from active sonar data, they are applicable to any similarity measure between signals.

  8. An acoustic emission and acousto-ultrasonic analysis of impact damaged composite pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L. (Principal Investigator); Walker, James L.

    1996-01-01

    The use of acoustic emission to characterize impact damage in composite structures is being performed on composite bottles wrapped with graphite epoxy and kevlar bottles. Further development of the acoustic emission methodology will include neural net analysis and/or other multivariate techniques to enhance the capability of the technique to identify dominant failure mechanisms during fracture. The acousto-ultrasonics technique will also continue to be investigated to determine its ability to predict regions prone to failure prior to the burst tests. Characterization of the stress wave factor before, and after impact damage will be useful for inspection purposes in manufacturing processes. The combination of the two methods will also allow for simple nondestructive tests capable of predicting the performance of a composite structure prior to its being placed in service and during service.

  9. Acoustical analysis and multiple source auralizations of charismatic worship spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Richard W.

    2001-05-01

    Because of the spontaneity and high level of call and response, many charismatic churches have verbal and musical communication problems that stem from highly reverberant sound fields, poor speech intelligibility, and muddy music. This research looks at the subjective dimensions of room acoustics perception that affect a charismatic worship space, which is summarized using the acronym RISCS (reverberation, intimacy, strength, coloration, and spaciousness). The method of research is to obtain acoustical measurements for three worship spaces in order to analyze the objective parameters associated with the RISCS subjective dimensions. For the same spaces, binaural room impulse response (BRIR) measurements are done for different receiver positions in order to create an auralization for each position. The subjective descriptors of RISCS are analyzed through the use of listening tests of the three auralized spaces. The results from the measurements and listening tests are analyzed to determine if listeners' perceptions correlate with the objective parameter results, the appropriateness of the subjective parameters for the use of the space, and which parameters seem to take precedent. A comparison of the multi-source auralization to a conventional single-source auralization was done with the mixed down version of the synchronized multi-track anechoic signals.

  10. Acoustic intensity-based method for sound radiations in a uniform flow.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chao; Zhou, Zhengfang; Zhuang, Mei

    2009-11-01

    An acoustic intensity-based method (AIBM) is extended and verified for predicting sound radiation in a subsonic uniform flow. The method assumes that the acoustic propagation is governed by the modified Helmholtz equation on and outside of a control surface, which encloses all the noise sources and nonlinear effects. With acoustic pressure derivative and its co-located acoustic pressure as input from an open control surface, the unique solution of the modified Helmholtz equation is obtained by solving the least squares problem. The AIBM is coupled with near-field Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)/Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA) methods to predict sound radiation of model aeroacoustic problems. The effectiveness of this hybrid approach has been demonstrated by examples of both tonal and broadband noise. Since the AIBM method is stable and accurate based on the input acoustic data from an open surface in a radiated field, it is therefore advantageous for the far-field prediction of aerodynamics noise propagation when an acoustic input from a closed control surface, like the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings surface, is not available [Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 264, 321-342 (1969)]. PMID:19894800

  11. A Novel Analysis of Acoustic Oscillations in Chromospheric Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsue, Teresa; Hill, Frank; Stassun, Keivan G.

    2015-04-01

    A helioseismic analysis of the chromosphere is employed in H-alpha to study how solar flares around active regions affect the behavior of acoustic oscillations. Our analysis deals with flares directly over sunspots, where the region is highly magnetized. In our current study of analyzing these oscillations in the chromosphere we study the temporal evolution of the oscillatory behavior from data taken from the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) H-alpha detectors. We investigate the wave behavior across different frequency bands (1 < ν < 8.33 mHz). In order to analyze the frequency bands of the oscillations, our analysis utilizes time series data to create Fourier power spectra of individual pixels spatially resolved and temporally evolved around the flare region; thereby creating a movie of each frequency band. This study entails three active regions, directly over sunspots, in which flaring activity is taking place from two solar flares, which occurred on June 13th and July 12th, 2012. We found that the intensity of the flare has an effect on the oscillations within different frequency bands. A suppression of power was observed in dark anomalous structures across the total frequency bands and in other regions there was an observed boost in power due to flaring activity. We find that, in the heart of all three regions, the low-frequency power (˜1-2 mHz) is substantially enhanced immediately prior to and after the flare, and that power at all frequencies up to 8 mHz is depleted at flare maximum. This depletion is both frequency and time dependent, which probably reflects the changing depths visible during the flare in the bandpass of the filter. These variations are not observed outside the flaring region. The depletion may indicate that acoustic energy is being converted into thermal energy at flare maximum, while the low-frequency enhancement may arise from an instability in the chromosphere and provide an early warning of the flare onset.

  12. Acoustical analysis of mechanical heart valve sounds for early detection of malfunction.

    PubMed

    Famaey, Nele; Defever, Korijn; Bielen, Paul; Flameng, Willem; Vander Sloten, Jos; Sas, Paul; Meuris, Bart

    2010-10-01

    Mechanical heart valves carry the disadvantage of lifelong antithrombotic therapy, due to the high risk of thrombus formation on the valve surface. Current diagnostic methods are incapable of detecting thrombus formation in an early stage. This article investigates a new diagnostic method, based on the analysis of the acoustic signal produced by the valve. This method should be capable of early detection of malfunction, thus permitting targeted medication and reducing valve-related complications and mortality. A measurement setup assuring optimal signal quality was developed, and a signal analysis program was implemented and validated on an in vitro mock circulatory loop. Next, four sheep were implanted with a bileaflet mechanical valve. The signals of their valves developing thrombosis were assessed on a weekly basis before explantation. Three sheep were sacrificed shortly after detection of malfunction according to the newly developed method. In each case, thrombus or membrane formation was detected on the leaflets upon explantation. In one sheep, no malfunction was found in the analysis, which was also confirmed by the condition of the valve upon explantation. These preliminary results indicate that acoustical analysis of mechanical heart valves permits early detection of valvular malfunction. Further research with more in vitro and animal testing is required to statistically validate these findings. PMID:20573536

  13. Interlaminar Fracture Toughness Evaluation in Glass/Epoxy Composites Using Acoustic Emission and Finite Element Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeedifar, Milad; Fotouhi, Mohamad; Najafabadi, Mehdi Ahmadi; Toudeshky, Hossein Hosseini

    2015-01-01

    Delamination is one of the most common modes of failure in laminated composites and it leads to the loss of structural strength and stiffness. In this paper, mode I, mode II, and mixed of these pure modes were investigated using mechanical data, Finite Element Method (FEM) and Acoustic Emission (AE) signals. Experimental data were obtained from in situ monitoring of glass/epoxy laminated composites with different lay-ups when subjected to different modes of failure. The main objective was to investigate the behavior of delamination propagation and to evaluate the critical value of the strain energy which is required for onset of the delamination ( G C). For the identification of interlaminar fracture toughness of the specimens, four methods were used: (a) ASTM standard methods, (b) FEM analysis, (c) AE method, and (d) sentry function method which is a function of mechanical and AE behaviors of the specimens. The results showed that the G C values obtained by the sentry function method and FEM analysis were in a close agreement with the results of nonlinearity methods which is recommended in the ASTM standards. It was also found that the specimens under different loading conditions and various lay-up have different G C values. These differences are related to different stress components distribution in the specimens which induce various damage mechanisms. Accordingly, stress components distribution obtained from FEM analyses were in agreement with SEM observations of the damaged surfaces of the specimens.

  14. A review of underwater acoustic systems and methods for locating objects lost at sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovelady, R. W.; Ferguson, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Information related to the location of objects lost at sea is presented. Acoustic devices attached to an object prior to being transported is recommended as a homing beacon. Minimum requirements and some environmental constraints are defined. Methods and procedures for search and recovery are also discussed. Both an interim system and a more advanced system are outlined. Controlled acoustic emission to enhance security is the theme followed.

  15. Prediction of sound fields in acoustical cavities using the boundary element method. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kipp, C. R.; Bernhard, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    A method was developed to predict sound fields in acoustical cavities. The method is based on the indirect boundary element method. An isoparametric quadratic boundary element is incorporated. Pressure, velocity and/or impedance boundary conditions may be applied to a cavity by using this method. The capability to include acoustic point sources within the cavity is implemented. The method is applied to the prediction of sound fields in spherical and rectangular cavities. All three boundary condition types are verified. Cases with a point source within the cavity domain are also studied. Numerically determined cavity pressure distributions and responses are presented. The numerical results correlate well with available analytical results.

  16. An improved method for the calculation of Near-Field Acoustic Radiation Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zu-Bin; Maury, Cédric

    2016-02-01

    Sensing and controlling Acoustic Radiation Modes (ARMs) in the near-field of vibrating structures is of great interest for broadband noise reduction or enhancement, as ARMs are velocity distributions defined over a vibrating surface, that independently and optimally contribute to the acoustic power in the acoustic field. But present methods only provide far-field ARMs (FFARMs) that are inadequate for the acoustic near-field problem. The Near-Field Acoustic Radiation Modes (NFARMs) are firstly studied with an improved numerical method, the Pressure-Velocity method, which rely on the eigen decomposition of the acoustic transfers between the vibrating source and a conformal observation surface, including sound pressure and velocity transfer matrices. The active and reactive parts of the sound power are separated and lead to the active and reactive ARMs. NFARMs are studied for a 2D baffled beam and for a 3D baffled plate, and so as differences between the NFARMS and the classical FFARMs. Comparisons of the NFARMs are analyzed when varying frequency and observation distance to the source. It is found that the efficiencies and shapes of the optimal active ARMs are independent on the distance while that of the reactive ones are distinctly related on.

  17. Development of an Acoustic Signal Analysis Tool “Auto-F” Based on the Temperament Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modegi, Toshio

    The MIDI interface is originally designed for electronic musical instruments but we consider this music-note based coding concept can be extended for general acoustic signal description. We proposed applying the MIDI technology to coding of bio-medical auscultation sound signals such as heart sounds for retrieving medical records and performing telemedicine. Then we have tried to extend our encoding targets including vocal sounds, natural sounds and electronic bio-signals such as ECG, using Generalized Harmonic Analysis method. Currently, we are trying to separate vocal sounds included in popular songs and encode both vocal sounds and background instrumental sounds into separate MIDI channels. And also, we are trying to extract articulation parameters such as MIDI pitch-bend parameters in order to reproduce natural acoustic sounds using a GM-standard MIDI tone generator. In this paper, we present an overall algorithm of our developed acoustic signal analysis tool, based on those research works, which can analyze given time-based signals on the musical temperament scale. The prominent feature of this tool is producing high-precision MIDI codes, which reproduce the similar signals as the given source signal using a GM-standard MIDI tone generator, and also providing analyzed texts in the XML format.

  18. The use of acoustic methods to determine the parameters of porous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malecki, Ignacy; Ranachowski, Jerzy

    Porous media are a subject of research in a variety of scientific disciplines, including physics, mechanics, electrical engineering, materials science, and acoustics. The subject of this article is a comparison of the methods used in theoretical mechanics with standard acoustic methods. The authors start by examining the method of static averaging of the mechanical properties of porous media. This method makes it possible to determine substitute static moduli of elasticity, which, however, does not meet the needs of acoustics. More suitable methods include the dynamic methods developed in the works of J. Lewandowski, among others. These methods are based on a motion equation in which the tensor of elasticity is assigned a complex value which accounts for the medium's dynamic properties and losses. The transition from a complex tensor of elasticity to the velocity and damping of an acoustic wave poses no particular problems. On the backdrop of the theory of porous materials used in mechanics, the authors present their own theory for the acoustic properties of these materials. They call it the theory of 'compound obstacles', which initially examines the interference offered by a solitary inclusion in a homogeneous medium to the propagation of an acoustic wave. This is followed by the calculation of the interference caused by a group of inclusions using the concept of the density of obstacles. In turn, this leads to general formulas for acoustic wave velocity and damping as functions of obstacle density. The authors consider examples of a spherical inclusion in a liquid and a hollow spheroidal inclusion in a solid. The article also contains the results of experiments conducted to verify the 'compound obstacles' theory. The authors measured the velocity of an ultrasound wave in electrical engineering porcelain with varying degrees of porosity and in glycerine in which glass balls were suspended.

  19. Low-dispersion finite difference methods for acoustic waves in a pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Sanford

    1991-01-01

    A new algorithm for computing one-dimensional acoustic waves in a pipe is demonstrated by solving the acoustic equations as an initial-boundary-value problem. Conventional dissipation-free second-order finite difference methods suffer severe phase distortion for grids with less that about ten mesh points per wavelength. Using the signal generation by a piston in a duct as an example, transient acoustic computations are presented using a new compact three-point algorithm which allows about 60 percent fewer mesh points per wavelength. Both pulse and harmonic excitation are considered. Coupling of the acoustic signal with the pipe resonant modes is shown to generate a complex transient wave with rich harmonic content.

  20. The discrimination of man-made explosions from earthquakes using seismo-acoustic analysis in the Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, Il-Young; Jeon, Jeong-Soo

    2010-05-01

    Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) operates an infrasound network consisting of seven seismo-acoustic arrays in South Korea. Development of the arrays began in 1999, partially in collaboration with Southern Methodist University, with the goal of detecting distant infrasound signals from natural and anthropogenic phenomena in and around the Korean Peninsula. The main operational purpose of this network is to discriminate man-made seismic events from seismicity including thousands of seismic events per year in the region. The man-made seismic events are major cause of error in estimating the natural seismicity, especially where the seismic activity is weak or moderate such as in the Korean Peninsula. In order to discriminate the man-made explosions from earthquakes, we have applied the seismo-acoustic analysis associating seismic and infrasonic signals generated from surface explosion. The observations of infrasound at multiple arrays made it possible to discriminate surface explosion, because small or moderate size earthquake is not sufficient to generate infrasound. Till now we have annually discriminated hundreds of seismic events in seismological catalog as surface explosions by the seismo-acoustic analysis. Besides of the surface explosions, the network also detected infrasound signals from other sources, such as bolide, typhoons, rocket launches, and underground nuclear test occurred in and around the Korean Peninsula. In this study, ten years of seismo-acoustic data are reviewed with recent infrasonic detection algorithm and association method that finally linked to the seismic monitoring system of the KIGAM to increase the detection rate of surface explosions. We present the long-term results of seismo-acoustic analysis, the detection capability of the multiple arrays, and implications for seismic source location. Since the seismo-acoustic analysis is proved as a definite method to discriminate surface explosion, the analysis will be

  1. A Galerkin method for linear PDE systems in circular geometries with structural acoustic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Ralph C.

    1994-01-01

    A Galerkin method for systems of PDE's in circular geometries is presented with motivating problems being drawn from structural, acoustic, and structural acoustic applications. Depending upon the application under consideration, piecewise splines or Legendre polynomials are used when approximating the system dynamics with modifications included to incorporate the analytic solution decay near the coordinate singularity. This provides an efficient method which retains its accuracy throughout the circular domain without degradation at singularity. Because the problems under consideration are linear or weakly nonlinear with constant or piecewise constant coefficients, transform methods for the problems are not investigated. While the specific method is developed for the two dimensional wave equations on a circular domain and the equation of transverse motion for a thin circular plate, examples demonstrating the extension of the techniques to a fully coupled structural acoustic system are used to illustrate the flexibility of the method when approximating the dynamics of more complex systems.

  2. Hypersingular meshless method using double-layer potentials for three-dimensional exterior acoustic problems.

    PubMed

    Young, D L; Chen, K H; Liu, T Y; Wu, C S

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional exterior acoustic problems with irregular domains are solved using a hypersingular meshless method. In particular, the method of fundamental solutions (MFS) is used to formulate and analyze such acoustic problems. It is well known that source points for MFS cannot be located on the real boundary due to the singularity of the kernel functions. Thus, the diagonal terms of the influence matrices are unobtainable when source points are located on the boundary. An efficient approach is proposed to overcome such difficulties, when the MFS is used for three-dimensional exterior acoustic problems. This work is an extension of previous research on two-dimensional problems. The solution of the problem is expressed in terms of a double-layer potential representation on the physical boundary. Three examples are presented in which the proposed method is compared to the MFS and boundary element method. Good numerical performance is demonstrated by the proposed hypersingular meshless method. PMID:26827046

  3. Krylov subspace iterative methods for boundary element method based near-field acoustic holography.

    PubMed

    Valdivia, Nicolas; Williams, Earl G

    2005-02-01

    The reconstruction of the acoustic field for general surfaces is obtained from the solution of a matrix system that results from a boundary integral equation discretized using boundary element methods. The solution to the resultant matrix system is obtained using iterative regularization methods that counteract the effect of noise on the measurements. These methods will not require the calculation of the singular value decomposition, which can be expensive when the matrix system is considerably large. Krylov subspace methods are iterative methods that have the phenomena known as "semi-convergence," i.e., the optimal regularization solution is obtained after a few iterations. If the iteration is not stopped, the method converges to a solution that generally is totally corrupted by errors on the measurements. For these methods the number of iterations play the role of the regularization parameter. We will focus our attention to the study of the regularizing properties from the Krylov subspace methods like conjugate gradients, least squares QR and the recently proposed Hybrid method. A discussion and comparison of the available stopping rules will be included. A vibrating plate is considered as an example to validate our results. PMID:15759691

  4. Testing of containers made of glass-fiber reinforced plastic with the aid of acoustic emission analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolitz, K.; Brockmann, W.; Fischer, T.

    1979-01-01

    Acoustic emission analysis as a quasi-nondestructive test method makes it possible to differentiate clearly, in judging the total behavior of fiber-reinforced plastic composites, between critical failure modes (in the case of unidirectional composites fiber fractures) and non-critical failure modes (delamination processes or matrix fractures). A particular advantage is that, for varying pressure demands on the composites, the emitted acoustic pulses can be analyzed with regard to their amplitude distribution. In addition, definite indications as to how the damages occurred can be obtained from the time curves of the emitted acoustic pulses as well as from the particular frequency spectrum. Distinct analogies can be drawn between the various analytical methods with respect to whether the failure modes can be classified as critical or non-critical.

  5. A mixed time integration method for large scale acoustic fluid-structure interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Christon, M.A.; Wineman, S.J.; Goudreau, G.L.; Foch, J.D.

    1994-07-18

    The transient, coupled, interaction of sound with structures is a process in which an acoustic fluid surrounding an elastic body contributes to the effective inertia and elasticity of the body. Conversely, the presence of an elastic body in an acoustic medium influences the behavior of propagating disturbances. This paper details the application of a mixed explicit-implicit time integration algorithm to the fully coupled acoustic fluidstructure interaction problem. Based upon a dispersion analysis of the semi-discrete wave equation a second-order, explicit scheme for solving the wave equation is developed. The combination of a highly vectorized, explicit, acoustic fluid solver with an implicit structural code for linear elastodynamics has resulted in a simulation tool, PING, for acoustic fluid-structure interaction. PING`s execution rates range from 1{mu}s/Element/{delta}t for rigid scattering to 10{mu}s/Element/{delta}t for fully coupled problems. Several examples of PING`s application to 3-D problems serve in part to validate the code, and also to demonstrate the capability to treat complex geometry, acoustic fluid-structure problems which require high resolution meshes.

  6. Using rotor or tip speed in the acoustical analysis of small wind turbines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acoustical noise data have been collected and analyzed on small wind turbines used for water pumping at the USDA-ARS Conservation and Production Research Laboratory (CPRL) near Bushland, Texas. This acoustical analysis differed from previous research in that the data were analyzed with rotor or tip ...

  7. Acoustic emission analysis as a non-destructive test procedure for fiber compound structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Block, J.

    1983-01-01

    The concept of acoustic emission analysis is explained in scientific terms. The detection of acoustic events, their localization, damage discrimination, and event summation curves are discussed. A block diagram of the concept of damage-free testing of fiber-reinforced synthetic materials is depicted. Prospects for application of the concept are assessed.

  8. Auralization of concert hall acoustics using finite difference time domain methods and wave field synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochgraf, Kelsey

    Auralization methods have been used for a long time to simulate the acoustics of a concert hall for different seat positions. The goal of this thesis was to apply the concept of auralization to a larger audience area that the listener could walk through to compare differences in acoustics for a wide range of seat positions. For this purpose, the acoustics of Rensselaer's Experimental Media and Performing Arts Center (EMPAC) Concert Hall were simulated to create signals for a 136 channel wave field synthesis (WFS) system located at Rensselaer's Collaborative Research Augmented Immersive Virtual Environment (CRAIVE) Laboratory. By allowing multiple people to dynamically experience the concert hall's acoustics at the same time, this research gained perspective on what is important for achieving objective accuracy and subjective plausibility in an auralization. A finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulation on a three-dimensional face-centered cubic grid, combined at a crossover frequency of 800 Hz with a CATT-Acoustic(TM) simulation, was found to have a reverberation time, direct to reverberant sound energy ratio, and early reflection pattern that more closely matched measured data from the hall compared to a CATT-Acoustic(TM) simulation and other hybrid simulations. In the CRAIVE lab, nine experienced listeners found all hybrid auralizations (with varying source location, grid resolution, crossover frequency, and number of loudspeakers) to be more perceptually plausible than the CATT-Acoustic(TM) auralization. The FDTD simulation required two days to compute, while the CATT-Acoustic(TM) simulation required three separate TUCT(TM) computations, each taking four hours, to accommodate the large number of receivers. Given the perceptual advantages realized with WFS for auralization of a large, inhomogeneous sound field, it is recommended that hybrid simulations be used in the future to achieve more accurate and plausible auralizations. Predictions are made for a

  9. A comprehensive strategy for the analysis of acoustic compressibility and optical deformability on single cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tie; Bragheri, Francesca; Nava, Giovanni; Chiodi, Ilaria; Mondello, Chiara; Osellame, Roberto; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine; Cristiani, Ilaria; Minzioni, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    We realized an integrated microfluidic chip that allows measuring both optical deformability and acoustic compressibility on single cells, by optical stretching and acoustophoresis experiments respectively. Additionally, we propose a measurement protocol that allows evaluating the experimental apparatus parameters before performing the cell-characterization experiments, including a non-destructive method to characterize the optical force distribution inside the microchannel. The chip was used to study important cell-mechanics parameters in two human breast cancer cell lines, MCF7 and MDA-MB231. Results indicate that MDA-MB231 has both higher acoustic compressibility and higher optical deformability than MCF7, but statistical analysis shows that optical deformability and acoustic compressibility are not correlated parameters. This result suggests the possibility to use them to analyze the response of different cellular structures. We also demonstrate that it is possible to perform both measurements on a single cell, and that the order of the two experiments does not affect the retrieved values. PMID:27040456

  10. A perturbative analysis of surface acoustic wave propagation and reflection in interdigital transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoma, Carsten Hilmar

    1997-12-01

    The coupling of stress and strain fields to electric fields present in anisotropic piezoelectric crystals makes them ideal for use as electromechanical transducers in a wide variety of applications. In recent years such crystals have been utilized to produce surface acoustic wave devices for signal processing applications, in which an applied metallic grating both transmits and receives, through the piezoelectric effect, electromechanical surface waves. The design of such interdigital transducers requires an accurate knowledge of wave propagation and reflection. The presence of the metal grating in addition to its ideal transduction function, by means of electrical and mechanical loading, also introduces a velocity shift as well as reflection into substrate surface waves. We seek to obtain a consistent formulation of the wave behavior due to the electrical and mechanical loading of the substrate crystal by the metallic grating. A perturbative solution up to second order in h//lambda is developed, where h is the maximum grating height and λ the acoustic wavelength. For the operating frequencies and physical parameters of modern surface acoustic wave devices such an analysis will provide an adequate description of device behavior in many cases, thereby circumventing the need for more computationally laborious methods. Numerical calculations are presented and compared with available experimental data.

  11. A comprehensive strategy for the analysis of acoustic compressibility and optical deformability on single cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tie; Bragheri, Francesca; Nava, Giovanni; Chiodi, Ilaria; Mondello, Chiara; Osellame, Roberto; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine; Cristiani, Ilaria; Minzioni, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    We realized an integrated microfluidic chip that allows measuring both optical deformability and acoustic compressibility on single cells, by optical stretching and acoustophoresis experiments respectively. Additionally, we propose a measurement protocol that allows evaluating the experimental apparatus parameters before performing the cell-characterization experiments, including a non-destructive method to characterize the optical force distribution inside the microchannel. The chip was used to study important cell-mechanics parameters in two human breast cancer cell lines, MCF7 and MDA-MB231. Results indicate that MDA-MB231 has both higher acoustic compressibility and higher optical deformability than MCF7, but statistical analysis shows that optical deformability and acoustic compressibility are not correlated parameters. This result suggests the possibility to use them to analyze the response of different cellular structures. We also demonstrate that it is possible to perform both measurements on a single cell, and that the order of the two experiments does not affect the retrieved values. PMID:27040456

  12. Electron density measurement in gas discharge plasmas by optical and acoustic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagioni, A.; Anania, M. P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Filippi, F.; Mostacci, A.; Pompili, R.; Shpakov, V.; Vaccarezza, C.; Villa, F.; Zigler, A.

    2016-08-01

    Plasma density represents a very important parameter for both laser wakefield and plasma wakefield acceleration, which use a gas-filled capillary plasma source. Several techniques can be used to measure the plasma density within a capillary discharge, which are mainly based on optical diagnostic methods, as for example the well-known spectroscopic method using the Stark broadening effect. In this work, we introduce a preliminary study on an alternative way to detect the plasma density, based on the shock waves produced by gas discharge in a capillary. Firstly, the measurements of the acoustic spectral content relative to the laser-induced plasmas by a solid target allowed us to understand the main properties of the acoustic waves produced during this kind of plasma generation; afterwards, we have extended such acoustic technique to the capillary plasma source in order to calibrate it by comparison with the stark broadening method.

  13. Method and apparatus for acoustic plate mode liquid-solid phase transition detection

    DOEpatents

    Blair, Dianna S.; Freye, Gregory C.; Hughes, Robert C.; Martin, Stephen J.; Ricco, Antonio J.

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus for sensing a liquid-solid phase transition event is provided which comprises an acoustic plate mode detecting element placed in contact with a liquid or solid material which generates a high-frequency acoustic wave that is attenuated to an extent based on the physical state of the material is contact with the detecting element. The attenuation caused by the material in contact with the acoustic plate mode detecting element is used to determine the physical state of the material being detected. The method and device are particularly suited for detecting conditions such as the icing and deicing of wings of an aircraft. In another aspect of the present invention, a method is provided wherein the adhesion of a solid material to the detecting element can be measured using the apparatus of the invention.

  14. Modeling of Structural-Acoustic Interaction Using Coupled FE/BE Method and Control of Interior Acoustic Pressure Using Piezoelectric Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh; Shi, Yacheng

    1997-01-01

    A coupled finite element (FE) and boundary element (BE) approach is presented to model full coupled structural/acoustic/piezoelectric systems. The dual reciprocity boundary element method is used so that the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the coupled system can be obtained, and to extend this approach to time dependent problems. The boundary element method is applied to interior acoustic domains, and the results are very accurate when compared with limited exact solutions. Structural-acoustic problems are then analyzed with the coupled finite element/boundary element method, where the finite element method models the structural domain and the boundary element method models the acoustic domain. Results for a system consisting of an isotropic panel and a cubic cavity are in good agreement with exact solutions and experiment data. The response of a composite panel backed cavity is then obtained. The results show that the mass and stiffness of piezoelectric layers have to be considered. The coupled finite element and boundary element equations are transformed into modal coordinates, which is more convenient for transient excitation. Several transient problems are solved based on this formulation. Two control designs, a linear quadratic regulator (LQR) and a feedforward controller, are applied to reduce the acoustic pressure inside the cavity based on the equations in modal coordinates. The results indicate that both controllers can reduce the interior acoustic pressure and the plate deflection.

  15. Flow analysis system and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Wayne S. (Inventor); Barck, Bruce N. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A non-invasive flow analysis system and method wherein a sensor, such as an acoustic sensor, is coupled to a conduit for transmitting a signal which varies depending on the characteristics of the flow in the conduit. The signal is amplified and there is a filter, responsive to the sensor signal, and tuned to pass a narrow band of frequencies proximate the resonant frequency of the sensor. A demodulator generates an amplitude envelope of the filtered signal and a number of flow indicator quantities are calculated based on variations in amplitude of the amplitude envelope. A neural network, or its equivalent, is then used to determine the flow rate of the flow in the conduit based on the flow indicator quantities.

  16. The phase shift method for studying nonlinear acoustics in a soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this paper, a phase shift method for studying nonlinear acoustic behaviors of a soil is described. The method uses a phase-lock-in technique to measure the phase shift caused by increments in the amplitude of an excitation. The measured phase shift as a function of dynamic strain amplitude is use...

  17. An Efficient Acoustic Density Estimation Method with Human Detectors Applied to Gibbons in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Kidney, Darren; Rawson, Benjamin M.; Borchers, David L.; Stevenson, Ben C.; Marques, Tiago A.; Thomas, Len

    2016-01-01

    Some animal species are hard to see but easy to hear. Standard visual methods for estimating population density for such species are often ineffective or inefficient, but methods based on passive acoustics show more promise. We develop spatially explicit capture-recapture (SECR) methods for territorial vocalising species, in which humans act as an acoustic detector array. We use SECR and estimated bearing data from a single-occasion acoustic survey of a gibbon population in northeastern Cambodia to estimate the density of calling groups. The properties of the estimator are assessed using a simulation study, in which a variety of survey designs are also investigated. We then present a new form of the SECR likelihood for multi-occasion data which accounts for the stochastic availability of animals. In the context of gibbon surveys this allows model-based estimation of the proportion of groups that produce territorial vocalisations on a given day, thereby enabling the density of groups, instead of the density of calling groups, to be estimated. We illustrate the performance of this new estimator by simulation. We show that it is possible to estimate density reliably from human acoustic detections of visually cryptic species using SECR methods. For gibbon surveys we also show that incorporating observers’ estimates of bearings to detected groups substantially improves estimator performance. Using the new form of the SECR likelihood we demonstrate that estimates of availability, in addition to population density and detection function parameters, can be obtained from multi-occasion data, and that the detection function parameters are not confounded with the availability parameter. This acoustic SECR method provides a means of obtaining reliable density estimates for territorial vocalising species. It is also efficient in terms of data requirements since since it only requires routine survey data. We anticipate that the low-tech field requirements will make this method

  18. An Efficient Acoustic Density Estimation Method with Human Detectors Applied to Gibbons in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Kidney, Darren; Rawson, Benjamin M; Borchers, David L; Stevenson, Ben C; Marques, Tiago A; Thomas, Len

    2016-01-01

    Some animal species are hard to see but easy to hear. Standard visual methods for estimating population density for such species are often ineffective or inefficient, but methods based on passive acoustics show more promise. We develop spatially explicit capture-recapture (SECR) methods for territorial vocalising species, in which humans act as an acoustic detector array. We use SECR and estimated bearing data from a single-occasion acoustic survey of a gibbon population in northeastern Cambodia to estimate the density of calling groups. The properties of the estimator are assessed using a simulation study, in which a variety of survey designs are also investigated. We then present a new form of the SECR likelihood for multi-occasion data which accounts for the stochastic availability of animals. In the context of gibbon surveys this allows model-based estimation of the proportion of groups that produce territorial vocalisations on a given day, thereby enabling the density of groups, instead of the density of calling groups, to be estimated. We illustrate the performance of this new estimator by simulation. We show that it is possible to estimate density reliably from human acoustic detections of visually cryptic species using SECR methods. For gibbon surveys we also show that incorporating observers' estimates of bearings to detected groups substantially improves estimator performance. Using the new form of the SECR likelihood we demonstrate that estimates of availability, in addition to population density and detection function parameters, can be obtained from multi-occasion data, and that the detection function parameters are not confounded with the availability parameter. This acoustic SECR method provides a means of obtaining reliable density estimates for territorial vocalising species. It is also efficient in terms of data requirements since since it only requires routine survey data. We anticipate that the low-tech field requirements will make this method

  19. Acoustic analysis and mood classification of pain-relieving music.

    PubMed

    Knox, Don; Beveridge, Scott; Mitchell, Laura A; MacDonald, Raymond A R

    2011-09-01

    Listening to preferred music (that which is chosen by the participant) has been shown to be effective in mitigating the effects of pain when compared to silence and a variety of distraction techniques. The wide range of genre, tempo, and structure in music chosen by participants in studies utilizing experimentally induced pain has led to the assertion that structure does not play a significant role, rather listening to preferred music renders the music "functionally equivalent" as regards its effect upon pain perception. This study addresses this assumption and performs detailed analysis of a selection of music chosen from three pain studies. Music analysis showed significant correlation between timbral and tonal aspects of music and measurements of pain tolerance and perceived pain intensity. Mood classification was performed using a hierarchical Gaussian Mixture Model, which indicated the majority of the chosen music expressed contentment. The results suggest that in addition to personal preference, associations with music and the listening context, emotion expressed by music, as defined by its acoustical content, is important to enhancing emotional engagement with music and therefore enhances the level of pain reduction and tolerance. PMID:21895104

  20. Acoustic emission analysis of tooth-composite interfacial debonding.

    PubMed

    Cho, N Y; Ferracane, J L; Lee, I B

    2013-01-01

    This study detected tooth-composite interfacial debonding during composite restoration by means of acoustic emission (AE) analysis and investigated the effects of composite properties and adhesives on AE characteristics. The polymerization shrinkage, peak shrinkage rate, flexural modulus, and shrinkage stress of a methacrylate-based universal hybrid, a flowable, and a silorane-based composite were measured. Class I cavities on 49 extracted premolars were restored with 1 of the 3 composites and 1 of the following adhesives: 2 etch-and-rinse adhesives, 2 self-etch adhesives, and an adhesive for the silorane-based composite. AE analysis was done for 2,000 sec during light-curing. The silorane-based composite exhibited the lowest shrinkage (rate), the longest time to peak shrinkage rate, the lowest shrinkage stress, and the fewest AE events. AE events were detected immediately after the beginning of light-curing in most composite-adhesive combinations, but not until 40 sec after light-curing began for the silorane-based composite. AE events were concentrated at the initial stage of curing in self-etch adhesives compared with etch-and-rinse adhesives. Reducing the shrinkage (rate) of composites resulted in reduced shrinkage stress and less debonding, as evidenced by fewer AE events. AE is an effective technique for monitoring, in real time, the debonding kinetics at the tooth-composite interface. PMID:23100273

  1. Method for determining the octane rating of gasoline samples by observing corresponding acoustic resonances therein

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Dipen N.; Anthony, Brian W.

    1997-01-01

    A method for determining the octane rating of gasoline samples by observing corresponding acoustic resonances therein. A direct correlation between the octane rating of gasoline and the frequency of corresponding acoustic resonances therein has been experimentally observed. Therefore, the octane rating of a gasoline sample can be directly determined through speed of sound measurements instead of by the cumbersome process of quantifying the knocking quality of the gasoline. Various receptacle geometries and construction materials may be employed. Moreover, it is anticipated that the measurements can be performed on flowing samples in pipes, thereby rendering the present method useful in refineries and distilleries.

  2. Method for determining the octane rating of gasoline samples by observing corresponding acoustic resonances therein

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, D.N.; Anthony, B.W.

    1997-02-25

    A method is described for determining the octane rating of gasoline samples by observing corresponding acoustic resonances therein. A direct correlation between the octane rating of gasoline and the frequency of corresponding acoustic resonances therein has been experimentally observed. Therefore, the octane rating of a gasoline sample can be directly determined through speed of sound measurements instead of by the cumbersome process of quantifying the knocking quality of the gasoline. Various receptacle geometries and construction materials may be employed. Moreover, it is anticipated that the measurements can be performed on flowing samples in pipes, thereby rendering the present method useful in refineries and distilleries. 3 figs.

  3. Density, ultrasound velocity, acoustic impedance, reflection and absorption coefficient determination of liquids via multiple reflection method.

    PubMed

    Hoche, S; Hussein, M A; Becker, T

    2015-03-01

    The accuracy of density, reflection coefficient, and acoustic impedance determination via multiple reflection method was validated experimentally. The ternary system water-maltose-ethanol was used to execute a systematic, temperature dependent study over a wide range of densities and viscosities aiming an application as inline sensor in beverage industries. The validation results of the presented method and setup show root mean square errors of: 1.201E-3 g cm(-3) (±0.12%) density, 0.515E-3 (0.15%) reflection coefficient and 1.851E+3 kg s(-1) m(-2) (0.12%) specific acoustic impedance. The results of the diffraction corrected absorption showed an average standard deviation of only 0.12%. It was found that the absorption change shows a good correlation to concentration variations and may be useful for laboratory analysis of sufficiently pure liquids. The main part of the observed errors can be explained by the observed noise, temperature variation and the low signal resolution of 50 MHz. In particular, the poor signal-to-noise ratio of the second reflector echo was found to be a main accuracy limitation. Concerning the investigation of liquids the unstable properties of the reference material PMMA, due to hygroscopicity, were identified to be an additional, unpredictable source of uncertainty. While dimensional changes can be considered by adequate methodology, the impact of the time and temperature dependent water absorption on relevant reference properties like the buffer's sound velocity and density could not be considered and may explain part of the observed deviations. PMID:25465962

  4. Photoacoustic sample vessel and method of elevated pressure operation

    DOEpatents

    Autrey, Tom; Yonker, Clement R.

    2004-05-04

    An improved photoacoustic vessel and method of photoacoustic analysis. The photoacoustic sample vessel comprises an acoustic detector, an acoustic couplant, and an acoustic coupler having a chamber for holding the acoustic couplant and a sample. The acoustic couplant is selected from the group consisting of liquid, solid, and combinations thereof. Passing electromagnetic energy through the sample generates an acoustic signal within the sample, whereby the acoustic signal propagates through the sample to and through the acoustic couplant to the acoustic detector.

  5. A Correlated Study of the Response of a Satellite to Acoustic Radiation Using Statistical Energy Analysis and Acoustic Test Data

    SciTech Connect

    CAP,JEROME S.; TRACEY,BRIAN

    1999-11-15

    Aerospace payloads, such as satellites, are subjected to vibroacoustic excitation during launch. Sandia's MTI satellite has recently been certified to this environment using a combination of base input random vibration and reverberant acoustic noise. The initial choices for the acoustic and random vibration test specifications were obtained from the launch vehicle Interface Control Document (ICD). In order to tailor the random vibration levels for the laboratory certification testing, it was necessary to determine whether vibration energy was flowing across the launch vehicle interface from the satellite to the launch vehicle or the other direction. For frequencies below 120 Hz this issue was addressed using response limiting techniques based on results from the Coupled Loads Analysis (CLA). However, since the CLA Finite Element Analysis FEA model was only correlated for frequencies below 120 Hz, Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) was considered to be a better choice for predicting the direction of the energy flow for frequencies above 120 Hz. The existing SEA model of the launch vehicle had been developed using the VibroAcoustic Payload Environment Prediction System (VAPEPS) computer code [1]. Therefore, the satellite would have to be modeled using VAPEPS as well. As is the case for any computational model, the confidence in its predictive capability increases if one can correlate a sample prediction against experimental data. Fortunately, Sandia had the ideal data set for correlating an SEA model of the MTI satellite--the measured response of a realistic assembly to a reverberant acoustic test that was performed during MTI's qualification test series. The first part of this paper will briefly describe the VAPEPS modeling effort and present the results of the correlation study for the VAPEPS model. The second part of this paper will present the results from a study that used a commercial SEA software package [2] to study the effects of in-plane modes and to

  6. Combustion-acoustic stability analysis for premixed gas turbine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darling, Douglas; Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Oyediran, Ayo; Cowan, Lizabeth

    1995-01-01

    Lean, prevaporized, premixed combustors are susceptible to combustion-acoustic instabilities. A model was developed to predict eigenvalues of axial modes for combustion-acoustic interactions in a premixed combustor. This work extends previous work by including variable area and detailed chemical kinetics mechanisms, using the code LSENS. Thus the acoustic equations could be integrated through the flame zone. Linear perturbations were made of the continuity, momentum, energy, chemical species, and state equations. The qualitative accuracy of our approach was checked by examining its predictions for various unsteady heat release rate models. Perturbations in fuel flow rate are currently being added to the model.

  7. Method and apparatus of spectro-acoustically enhanced ultrasonic detection for diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Norton, Stephen J.

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus for detecting a discontinuity in a material includes a source of electromagnetic radiation has a wavelength and an intensity sufficient to induce an enhancement in contrast between a manifestation of an acoustic property in the material and of the acoustic property in the discontinuity, as compared to when the material is not irradiated by the electromagnetic radiation. An acoustic emitter directs acoustic waves to the discontinuity in the material. The acoustic waves have a sensitivity to the acoustic property. An acoustic receiver receives the acoustic waves generated by the acoustic emitter after the acoustic waves have interacted with the material and the discontinuity. The acoustic receiver also generates a signal representative of the acoustic waves received by the acoustic receiver. A processor, in communication with the acoustic receiver and responsive to the signal generated by the acoustic receiver, is programmed to generate informational output about the discontinuity based on the signal generated by the acoustic receiver.

  8. Thermal Acoustic Oscillation: Causes, Detection, Analysis and Prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christie, Robert J.; Hartwig, Jason W.

    2014-01-01

    The presentation discusses the causes of Thermal Acoustic Oscillations, how it can be detected, analyzed and prevented. It also discusses where it can occur, where it doesn't occur and practical mitigation techniques.

  9. Acoustic modal analysis of a full-scale annular combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karchmer, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    An acoustic modal decomposition of the measured pressure field in a full scale annular combustor installed in a ducted test rig is described. The modal analysis, utilizing a least squares optimization routine, is facilitated by the assumption of randomly occurring pressure disturbances which generate equal amplitude clockwise and counter-clockwise pressure waves, and the assumption of statistical independence between modes. These assumptions are fully justified by the measured cross spectral phases between the various measurement points. The resultant modal decomposition indicates that higher order modes compose the dominant portion of the combustor pressure spectrum in the range of frequencies of interest in core noise studies. A second major finding is that, over the frequency range of interest, each individual mode which is present exists in virtual isolation over significant portions of the spectrum. Finally, a comparison between the present results and a limited amount of data obtained in an operating turbofan engine with the same combustor is made. The comparison is sufficiently favorable to warrant the conclusion that the structure of the combustor pressure field is preserved between the component facility and the engine.

  10. Analysis of Measured and Simulated Supraglottal Acoustic Waves.

    PubMed

    Fraile, Rubén; Evdokimova, Vera V; Evgrafova, Karina V; Godino-Llorente, Juan I; Skrelin, Pavel A

    2016-09-01

    To date, although much attention has been paid to the estimation and modeling of the voice source (ie, the glottal airflow volume velocity), the measurement and characterization of the supraglottal pressure wave have been much less studied. Some previous results have unveiled that the supraglottal pressure wave has some spectral resonances similar to those of the voice pressure wave. This makes the supraglottal wave partially intelligible. Although the explanation for such effect seems to be clearly related to the reflected pressure wave traveling upstream along the vocal tract, the influence that nonlinear source-filter interaction has on it is not as clear. This article provides an insight into this issue by comparing the acoustic analyses of measured and simulated supraglottal and voice waves. Simulations have been performed using a high-dimensional discrete vocal fold model. Results of such comparative analysis indicate that spectral resonances in the supraglottal wave are mainly caused by the regressive pressure wave that travels upstream along the vocal tract and not by source-tract interaction. On the contrary and according to simulation results, source-tract interaction has a role in the loss of intelligibility that happens in the supraglottal wave with respect to the voice wave. This loss of intelligibility mainly corresponds to spectral differences for frequencies above 1500 Hz. PMID:26377510

  11. Theoretical analysis of a cell's oscillations in an acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, John S.; Zinin, Pavel

    2005-09-01

    The analysis and deformation of an individual cell in a high-frequency acoustic field is of fundamental interest for a variety of applications such as ultrasound cell separation and drug delivery. The oscillations of biological cells in a sound field are investigated using a shell model for the cell following an approach developed previously [Zinin, Ultrasonics, 30, 26-34 (1992)]. The model accounts for the three components which comprise the cell's motion: the internal fluid (cytoplasma), the cell membrane, and the surrounding fluid. The cell membrane whose thickness is small compared to the cell radius can be approximated as a thin elastic shell. The elastic properties of this shell together with the viscosities of the internal and external fluids determine the oscillations of the cell. The dipole oscillations of the cell depend on the surface area modulus and the maximum frequency for the relative change in cell area can be determined. Moreover, the higher order oscillations starting with the quadrupole oscillations are governed by the shell's shear modulus. Induced stresses in bacteria cell membranes in the vicinity of an oscillating bubble are investigated and cell rupture with respect to these stresses is analyzed.

  12. Acoustic modal analysis of a full-scale annular combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karchmer, A. M.

    1983-01-01

    An acoustic modal decomposition of the measured pressure field in a full scale annular combustor installed in a ducted test rig is described. The modal analysis, utilizing a least squares optimization routine, is facilitated by the assumption of randomly occurring pressure disturbances which generate equal amplitude clockwise and counter-clockwise pressure waves, and the assumption of statistical independence between modes. These assumptions are fully justified by the measured cross spectral phases between the various measurement points. The resultant modal decomposition indicates that higher order modes compose the dominant portion of the combustor pressure spectrum in the range of frequencies of interest in core noise studies. A second major finding is that, over the frequency range of interest, each individual mode which is present exists in virtual isolation over significant portions of the spectrum. Finally, a comparison between the present results and a limited amount of data obtained in an operating turbofan engine with the same combustor is made. The comparison is sufficiently favorable to warrant the conclusion that the structure of the combustor pressure field is preserved between the component facility and the engine. Previously announced in STAR as N83-21896

  13. Parallel Finite Element Domain Decomposition for Structural/Acoustic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Duc T.; Tungkahotara, Siroj; Watson, Willie R.; Rajan, Subramaniam D.

    2005-01-01

    A domain decomposition (DD) formulation for solving sparse linear systems of equations resulting from finite element analysis is presented. The formulation incorporates mixed direct and iterative equation solving strategics and other novel algorithmic ideas that are optimized to take advantage of sparsity and exploit modern computer architecture, such as memory and parallel computing. The most time consuming part of the formulation is identified and the critical roles of direct sparse and iterative solvers within the framework of the formulation are discussed. Experiments on several computer platforms using several complex test matrices are conducted using software based on the formulation. Small-scale structural examples are used to validate thc steps in the formulation and large-scale (l,000,000+ unknowns) duct acoustic examples are used to evaluate the ORIGIN 2000 processors, and a duster of 6 PCs (running under the Windows environment). Statistics show that the formulation is efficient in both sequential and parallel computing environmental and that the formulation is significantly faster and consumes less memory than that based on one of the best available commercialized parallel sparse solvers.

  14. Acoustic emission intensity analysis of corrosion in prestressed concrete piles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vélez, William; Matta, Fabio; Ziehl, Paul

    2014-02-01

    Corrosion of steel strands in prestressed concrete (PC) bridges may lead to substantial damage or collapse well before the end of the design life. Acoustic Emission (AE) is a suitable nondestructive technique to detect and locate corrosion in reinforced and prestressed concrete, which is key to prioritize inspection and maintenance. An effective tool to analyze damage-related AE data is intensity analysis (IA), which is based on two data trends, namely Severity (average signal strength of high amplitude hits) and Historic Index (ratio of the average signal strength of the most recent hits to the average of all hits). IA criteria for corrosion assessment in PC were recently proposed based on empirical evidence from accelerated corrosion tests. In this paper, AE data from prestressed and non-prestressed concrete pile specimens exposed to salt water wet-dry cycling for over 600 days are used to analyze the relation between Severity and Historic Index and actual corrosion. Evidence of corrosion is gained from the inspection of decommissioned specimens. The selection of suitable J and K parameters for IA is discussed, and an IA chart with updated corrosion criteria for PC piles is presented.

  15. Empirical mode decomposition for analyzing acoustical signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Norden E. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention discloses a computer implemented signal analysis method through the Hilbert-Huang Transformation (HHT) for analyzing acoustical signals, which are assumed to be nonlinear and nonstationary. The Empirical Decomposition Method (EMD) and the Hilbert Spectral Analysis (HSA) are used to obtain the HHT. Essentially, the acoustical signal will be decomposed into the Intrinsic Mode Function Components (IMFs). Once the invention decomposes the acoustic signal into its constituting components, all operations such as analyzing, identifying, and removing unwanted signals can be performed on these components. Upon transforming the IMFs into Hilbert spectrum, the acoustical signal may be compared with other acoustical signals.

  16. An Application of the Acoustic Similarity Law to the Numerical Analysis of Centrifugal Fan Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Wan-Ho; Lee, Duck-Joo; Rhee, Huinam

    Centrifugal fans, which are frequently used in our daily lives and various industries, usually make severe noise problems. Generally, the centrifugal fan noise consists of tones at the blade passing frequency and its higher harmonics. These tonal sounds come from the interaction between the flow discharged from the impeller and the cutoff in the casing. Prediction of the noise from a centrifugal fan becomes more necessary to optimize the design to meet both the performance and noise criteria. However, only some limited studies on noise prediction method exist because there are difficulties in obtaining detailed information about the flow field and casing effect on noise radiation. This paper aims to investigate the noise generation mechanism of a centrifugal fan and to develop a prediction method for the unsteady flow and acoustic pressure fields. In order to do this, a numerical analysis method using acoustic similarity law is proposed, and it is verified that the method can predict the noise generation mechanism very well by comparing the predicted results with available experimental results.

  17. Asymptotic modal analysis and statistical energy analysis of an acoustic cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubota, Y.; Dionne, H. D.; Dowell, E. H.

    1988-01-01

    A basic asymptotic theory for structural wall/acoustic cavity interaction is presented, and the analysis is illustrated with examples of the acoustic cavity response to a prescribed wall motion. Although, when spatially averaged, the classical modal analysis (CMA) response approaches the asymptotic modal analysis (AMA) response more rapidly as the number of modes increases, it is shown that information about local response intensification is lost in the averaging process. A larger bandwidth at a given center frequency is found to contain more excited modes than a smaller bandwidth; however, the AMA is slightly more accurate in the smaller bandwidth. All AMA asymptotes were shown to be approached from below by a CMA with fixed bandwidth and increasing center frequency.

  18. A modal test method using sound pressure transducers based on vibro-acoustic reciprocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W. D.; Liu, J. M.; Xu, Y. F.; Ying, H. Q.

    2014-06-01

    A modal test method that uses sound pressure transducers at fixed locations and an impact hammer roving over a test structure is developed in this work. Since sound pressure transducers are used, the current method deals with a coupled structural-acoustic system. Based on the vibro-acoustic reciprocity, the method is equivalent to one, where acoustic excitations at fixed locations are given and the resulting acceleration of the test structure is measured. The current method can eliminate mass loading due to use of accelerometers, which can destroy existence of repeated or close natural frequencies of a symmetric structure. It can also avoid effects of a nodal line of a mode and an inactive area of a local mode, and measure all the out-of-plane modes within a frequency range of interest, including global and local ones. The coupling between the structure and the acoustic field in a structural-acoustic system introduces asymmetry in the model formulation. An equivalent state space formulation is used for a damped structural-acoustic system and the associated eigenvalue problem is derived. The biorthonormality relations between the left and right eigenvectors and the relations between the structural and acoustic components in the left and right eigenvectors are proved. The frequency response functions associated with the current method are derived and their physical meanings are explained. The guidelines for using the current method, including the types of structures that are suitable for the method, the positions of the sound pressure transducers, and the orientation of the test structure relative to the transducers, are provided. Modal tests were carried out on an automotive disk brake using the traditional and current methods, where multiple accelerometers and microphones were used to measure its dynamic responses induced by impacts, respectively. The differences between the measured natural frequencies using the current method and those from the finite element

  19. Site effect determination using seismic noise from Tungurahua volcano (Ecuador): implications for seismo-acoustic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios, Pablo; Kendall, J.-Michael; Mader, Heidy

    2015-05-01

    Scattering and refractions that occur in the heterogenous near-surface beneath seismic stations can strongly affect the relative amplitudes recorded by three-component seismometers. Using data from Tungurahua volcano we have developed a procedure to correct these `site effects'. We show that seismic noise signals store site information, and then use their normalized spectral amplitudes as site frequency response functions. The process does not require a reference station (as per the S-wave and coda methods) or assume that the vertical amplitude is constant (the H/V component ratio method). Correcting the site effects has three consequences on data analysis: (1) improvement of the seismic source location and its energy estimation; (2) identification of a strong influence on the volcanic acoustic seismic ratio (VASR) and (3) decoupling the air wave impact on the ground caused by explosions or eruption jets. We show how site effect corrections improve the analysis of an eruption jet on 2006 July 14-15, appearing two periods of strong acoustic energy release and a progressive increase of the seismic energy, reaching the maximum before finishing the eruption.

  20. An analysis and retrofit of the acoustics at Image Creators Health and Beauty Salon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Donna

    2002-11-01

    This paper discusses the analysis and retrofit of the acoustics in a high-volume beauty salon in Severna Park, MD. The major issues in what was designed to be a serene environment are reverberation times of 1-1.68 s in the mid- to upper-frequency range. Employee and customer complaints include heightened stress, vocal strain, headaches, and poor intelligibility. Existing analysis and acoustical retrofit solutions will be demonstrated.

  1. A new method for the estimation of high temperature radiant heat emittance by means of aero-acoustic levitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greffrath, Fabian; Prieler, Robert; Telle, Rainer

    2014-11-01

    A new method for the experimental estimation of radiant heat emittance at high temperatures has been developed which involves aero-acoustic levitation of samples, laser heating and contactless temperature measurement. Radiant heat emittance values are determined from the time dependent development of the sample temperature which requires analysis of both the radiant and convective heat transfer towards the surroundings by means of fluid dynamics calculations. First results for the emittance of a corundum sample obtained with this method are presented in this article and found in good agreement with literature values.

  2. A passive acoustic monitoring method applied to observation and group size estimation of finless porpoises.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kexiong; Wang, Ding; Akamatsu, Tomonari; Li, Songhai; Xiao, Jianqiang

    2005-08-01

    The present study aimed at determining the detection capabilities of an acoustic observation system to recognize porpoises under local riverine conditions and compare the results with sighting observations. Arrays of three to five acoustic data loggers were stationed across the main channel of the Tian-e-zhou Oxbow of China's Yangtze River at intervals of 100-150 m to record sonar signals of free-ranging finless porpoises (Neophocaena phocaenoides). Acoustic observations, concurrent with visual observations, were conducted at two occasions on 20-22 October 2003 and 17-19 October 2004. During a total of 42 h of observation, 316 finless porpoises were sighted and 7041 sonar signals were recorded by loggers. The acoustic data loggers recorded ultrasonic signals of porpoises clearly, and detected the presence of porpoises with a correct detection level of 77.6% and a false alarm level of 5.8% within an effective distance of 150 m. Results indicated that the stationed passive acoustic observation method was effective in detecting the presence of porpoises and showed potential in estimating the group size. A positive linear correlation between the number of recorded signals and the group size of sighted porpoises was indicated, although it is faced with some uncertainty and requires further investigation. PMID:16158672

  3. A passive acoustic monitoring method applied to observation and group size estimation of finless porpoises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kexiong; Wang, Ding; Akamatsu, Tomonari; Li, Songhai; Xiao, Jianqiang

    2005-08-01

    The present study aimed at determining the detection capabilities of an acoustic observation system to recognize porpoises under local riverine conditions and compare the results with sighting observations. Arrays of three to five acoustic data loggers were stationed across the main channel of the Tian-e-zhou Oxbow of China's Yangtze River at intervals of 100-150 m to record sonar signals of free-ranging finless porpoises (Neophocaena phocaenoides). Acoustic observations, concurrent with visual observations, were conducted at two occasions on 20-22 October 2003 and 17-19 October 2004. During a total of 42 h of observation, 316 finless porpoises were sighted and 7041 sonar signals were recorded by loggers. The acoustic data loggers recorded ultrasonic signals of porpoises clearly, and detected the presence of porpoises with a correct detection level of 77.6% and a false alarm level of 5.8% within an effective distance of 150 m. Results indicated that the stationed passive acoustic observation method was effective in detecting the presence of porpoises and showed potential in estimating the group size. A positive linear correlation between the number of recorded signals and the group size of sighted porpoises was indicated, although it is faced with some uncertainty and requires further investigation.

  4. a Psycholinguistic Model for Simultaneous Translation, and Proficiency Assessment by Automated Acoustic Analysis of Discourse.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaghi, Hussein M.

    Two separate but related issues are addressed: how simultaneous translation (ST) works on a cognitive level and how such translation can be objectively assessed. Both of these issues are discussed in the light of qualitative and quantitative analyses of a large corpus of recordings of ST and shadowing. The proposed ST model utilises knowledge derived from a discourse analysis of the data, many accepted facts in the psychology tradition, and evidence from controlled experiments that are carried out here. This model has three advantages: (i) it is based on analyses of extended spontaneous speech rather than word-, syllable-, or clause -bound stimuli; (ii) it draws equally on linguistic and psychological knowledge; and (iii) it adopts a non-traditional view of language called 'the linguistic construction of reality'. The discourse-based knowledge is also used to develop three computerised systems for the assessment of simultaneous translation: one is a semi-automated system that treats the content of the translation; and two are fully automated, one of which is based on the time structure of the acoustic signals whilst the other is based on their cross-correlation. For each system, several parameters of performance are identified, and they are correlated with assessments rendered by the traditional, subjective, qualitative method. Using signal processing techniques, the acoustic analysis of discourse leads to the conclusion that quality in simultaneous translation can be assessed quantitatively with varying degrees of automation. It identifies as measures of performance (i) three content-based standards; (ii) four time management parameters that reflect the influence of the source on the target language time structure; and (iii) two types of acoustical signal coherence. Proficiency in ST is shown to be directly related to coherence and speech rate but inversely related to omission and delay. High proficiency is associated with a high degree of simultaneity and

  5. Continuous wavelet transform analysis and modal location analysis acoustic emission source location for nuclear piping crack growth monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Mohd, Shukri; Holford, Karen M.; Pullin, Rhys

    2014-02-12

    Source location is an important feature of acoustic emission (AE) damage monitoring in nuclear piping. The ability to accurately locate sources can assist in source characterisation and early warning of failure. This paper describe the development of a novelAE source location technique termed 'Wavelet Transform analysis and Modal Location (WTML)' based on Lamb wave theory and time-frequency analysis that can be used for global monitoring of plate like steel structures. Source location was performed on a steel pipe of 1500 mm long and 220 mm outer diameter with nominal thickness of 5 mm under a planar location test setup using H-N sources. The accuracy of the new technique was compared with other AE source location methods such as the time of arrival (TOA) techniqueand DeltaTlocation. Theresults of the study show that the WTML method produces more accurate location resultscompared with TOA and triple point filtering location methods. The accuracy of the WTML approach is comparable with the deltaT location method but requires no initial acoustic calibration of the structure.

  6. Acoustic method for measuring the sound speed of gases over small path lengths.

    PubMed

    Olfert, J S; Checkel, M D; Koch, C R

    2007-05-01

    Acoustic "phase shift" methods have been used in the past to accurately measure the sound speed of gases. In this work, a phase shift method for measuring the sound speed of gases over small path lengths is presented. We have called this method the discrete acoustic wave and phase detection (DAWPD) method. Experimental results show that the DAWPD method gives accurate (+/-3.2 ms) and predictable measurements that closely match theory. The sources of uncertainty in the DAWPD method are examined and it is found that ultrasonic reflections and changes in the frequency ratio of the transducers (the ratio of driving frequency to resonant frequency) can be major sources of error. Experimentally, it is shown how these sources of uncertainty can be minimized. PMID:17552851

  7. Analysis of acoustic signals on welding and cutting

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Takao; Ogawa, Yoji; Sumitomo, Takashi

    1995-12-31

    The sounds emitted during the welding and cutting processes are closely related to the processing phenomena, and sometimes they provide useful information for evaluation of their processing conditions. The analyses of acoustic signals from arc welding, plasma arc cutting, oxy-flame cutting, and water jet cutting are carried out in details in order to develop effective signal processing algorithm. The sound from TIG arc welding has the typical line spectrum which principal frequency, is almost the same as that of supplied electricity. The disturbance of welding process is clearly appeared oil the acoustic emission. The sound exposure level for CO{sub 2} or MIG welding is higher than that for TIG welding, and the relative intensity of the typical line spectrum caused by supplied electricity becomes low. But the sudden transition of welding condition oil produces an apparent change of sound exposure level. On the contrary, the acoustics from cutting processes are much louder than those of arc welding and show more chaotic behavior because the supplied fluid velocity and temperature of arc for cutting processes are much higher than those for welding processes. Therefore, it requires a special technique to extract the well meaning signals from the loud acoustic sounds. Further point of view, the reduction of acoustic exposure level becomes an important research theme with the growth of application fields of cutting processes.

  8. A comparative analysis of acoustic energy models for churches.

    PubMed

    Berardi, Umberto; Cirillo, Ettore; Martellotta, Francesco

    2009-10-01

    Different models to improve prediction of energy-based acoustic parameters in churches have been proposed by different researchers [E. Cirillo and F. Martellotta, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 118, 232-248 (2005); T. Zamarreño et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 121, 234-250 (2006)]. They all suggested variations to the "revised" theory proposed by Barron and Lee [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 84, 618-628 (1988)], starting from experimental observations. The present paper compares these models and attempts to generalize their use taking advantage of the measurements carried out in 24 Italian churches differing in style, typology, and location. The whole sample of churches was divided into two groups. The first was used to fine-tune existing models, with particular reference to the "mu model," which was originally tested only on Mudejar-Gothic churches. Correlations between model parameters and major typological and architectural factors were found, leading to a classification that greatly simplifies parameter choice. Finally, the reliability of each model was verified on the rest of the sample, showing that acoustic parameters can be predicted with reasonable accuracy provided that one of the specifically modified theories is used. The results show that the model requiring more input parameters performs slightly better than the other which, conversely, is simpler to apply. PMID:19813798

  9. Selecting Needs Analysis Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newstrom, John W.; Lilyquist, John M.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a contingency model for decision making with regard to needs analysis methods. Focus is on 12 methods with brief discussion of their defining characteristics and some operational guidelines for their use. (JOW)

  10. On the vibro-acoustical operational modal analysis of a helicopter cabin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierro, E.; Mucchi, E.; Soria, L.; Vecchio, A.

    2009-05-01

    This paper aims to present a modal decomposition formulation for a vibro-acoustical operational modal analysis (OMA). In literature many works can be found on this topic, but until now no attention has been focused on the analytical form of the cross-power spectra (CPs) between the system outputs when a fluid-structure coupling is present. In this work it is shown that the CPs modal decomposition depends on the choice of the references, i.e. acoustical or structural. At first it is theoretically pointed out that the CP formulation for the acoustical and structural case is formally identical if appropriately pre-processed. Then, this theoretical result is verified through the results of an extensive experimental testing on the helicopter EUROCOPTER EC-135. The CPs between the structural output velocities and the acoustical response of the microphone inside the helicopter cabin are considered as inputs of an OMA. In order to verify the effectiveness of the modal model so obtained a classical modal analysis is also performed. The acoustical reference choice reveals to be suitable for a vibro-acoustical OMA. It is highlighted, indeed, that the acoustical pressure measurement inside the enclosure can be used as reference instead of the commonly used structural sensors, both from the theoretical and practical point of view. This is useful for high scale structures where the structural responses are usually measured by means of moving sensor arrays and additional fixed reference sensors should be positioned on the surface.

  11. Acoustic Analysis of Inhaler Sounds From Community-Dwelling Asthmatic Patients for Automatic Assessment of Adherence

    PubMed Central

    D'arcy, Shona; Costello, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    Inhalers are devices which deliver medication to the airways in the treatment of chronic respiratory diseases. When used correctly inhalers relieve and improve patients' symptoms. However, adherence to inhaler medication has been demonstrated to be poor, leading to reduced clinical outcomes, wasted medication, and higher healthcare costs. There is a clinical need for a system that can accurately monitor inhaler adherence as currently no method exists to evaluate how patients use their inhalers between clinic visits. This paper presents a method of automatically evaluating inhaler adherence through acoustic analysis of inhaler sounds. An acoustic monitoring device was employed to record the sounds patients produce while using a Diskus dry powder inhaler, in addition to the time and date patients use the inhaler. An algorithm was designed and developed to automatically detect inhaler events from the audio signals and provide feedback regarding patient adherence. The algorithm was evaluated on 407 audio files obtained from 12 community dwelling asthmatic patients. Results of the automatic classification were compared against two expert human raters. For patient data for whom the human raters Cohen's kappa agreement score was \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}${>}{0.81}$\\end{document}, results indicated that the algorithm's accuracy was 83% in determining the correct inhaler technique score compared with the raters. This paper has several clinical implications as it demonstrates the feasibility of using acoustics to objectively monitor patient inhaler adherence and provide real-time personalized medical care for a chronic respiratory illness. PMID:27170883

  12. Assessment of infant cry: acoustic cry analysis and parental perception.

    PubMed

    LaGasse, Linda L; Neal, A Rebecca; Lester, Barry M

    2005-01-01

    Infant crying signals distress to potential caretakers who can alleviate the aversive conditions that gave rise to the cry. The cry signal results from coordination among several brain regions that control respiration and vocal cord vibration from which the cry sounds are produced. Previous work has shown a relationship between acoustic characteristics of the cry and diagnoses related to neurological damage, SIDS, prematurity, medical conditions, and substance exposure during pregnancy. Thus, assessment of infant cry provides a window into the neurological and medical status of the infant. Assessment of infant cry is brief and noninvasive and requires recording equipment and a standardized stimulus to elicit a pain cry. The typical protocol involves 30 seconds of crying from a single application of the stimulus. The recorded cry is submitted to an automated computer analysis system that digitizes the cry and either presents a digital spectrogram of the cry or calculates measures of cry characteristics. The most common interpretation of cry measures is based on deviations from typical cry characteristics. Another approach evaluates the pattern across cry characteristics suggesting arousal or under-arousal or difficult temperament. Infants with abnormal cries should be referred for a full neurological evaluation. The second function of crying--to elicit caretaking--involves parent perception of the infant's needs. Typically, parents are sensitive to deviations in cry characteristics, but their perception can be altered by factors in themselves (e.g., depression) or in the context (e.g., culture). The potential for cry assessment is largely untapped. Infant crying and parental response is the first language of the new dyadic relationship. Deviations in the signal and/or misunderstanding the message can compromise infant care, parental effectiveness, and undermine the budding relationship. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc. MRDD Research Reviews 2005;11:83-93. PMID:15856439

  13. Analysis of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) Data for Acoustic Velocity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackshire, James L.

    1997-01-01

    Acoustic velocity measurements were taken using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in a Normal Incidence Tube configuration at various frequency, phase, and amplitude levels. This report presents the results of the PIV analysis and data reduction portions of the test and details the processing that was done. Estimates of lower measurement sensitivity levels were determined based on PIV image quality, correlation, and noise level parameters used in the test. Comparison of measurements with linear acoustic theory are presented. The onset of nonlinear, harmonic frequency acoustic levels were also studied for various decibel and frequency levels ranging from 90 to 132 dB and 500 to 3000 Hz, respectively.

  14. Modification of computational auditory scene analysis (CASA) for noise-robust acoustic feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Minseok

    While there have been many attempts to mitigate interferences of background noise, the performance of automatic speech recognition (ASR) still can be deteriorated by various factors with ease. However, normal hearing listeners can accurately perceive sounds of their interests, which is believed to be a result of Auditory Scene Analysis (ASA). As a first attempt, the simulation of the human auditory processing, called computational auditory scene analysis (CASA), was fulfilled through physiological and psychological investigations of ASA. CASA comprised of Zilany-Bruce auditory model, followed by tracking fundamental frequency for voice segmentation and detecting pairs of onset/offset at each characteristic frequency (CF) for unvoiced segmentation. The resulting Time-Frequency (T-F) representation of acoustic stimulation was converted into acoustic feature, gammachirp-tone frequency cepstral coefficients (GFCC). 11 keywords with various environmental conditions are used and the robustness of GFCC was evaluated by spectral distance (SD) and dynamic time warping distance (DTW). In "clean" and "noisy" conditions, the application of CASA generally improved noise robustness of the acoustic feature compared to a conventional method with or without noise suppression using MMSE estimator. The intial study, however, not only showed the noise-type dependency at low SNR, but also called the evaluation methods in question. Some modifications were made to capture better spectral continuity from an acoustic feature matrix, to obtain faster processing speed, and to describe the human auditory system more precisely. The proposed framework includes: 1) multi-scale integration to capture more accurate continuity in feature extraction, 2) contrast enhancement (CE) of each CF by competition with neighboring frequency bands, and 3) auditory model modifications. The model modifications contain the introduction of higher Q factor, middle ear filter more analogous to human auditory system

  15. The effect of recording and analysis bandwidth on acoustic identification of delphinid species.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Julie N; Rankin, Shannon; Barlow, Jay

    2004-11-01

    Because many cetacean species produce characteristic calls that propagate well under water, acoustic techniques can be used to detect and identify them. The ability to identify cetaceans to species using acoustic methods varies and may be affected by recording and analysis bandwidth. To examine the effect of bandwidth on species identification, whistles were recorded from four delphinid species (Delphinus delphis, Stenella attenuata, S. coeruleoalba, and S. longirostris) in the eastern tropical Pacific ocean. Four spectrograms, each with a different upper frequency limit (20, 24, 30, and 40 kHz), were created for each whistle (n = 484). Eight variables (beginning, ending, minimum, and maximum frequency; duration; number of inflection points; number of steps; and presence/absence of harmonics) were measured from the fundamental frequency of each whistle. The whistle repertoires of all four species contained fundamental frequencies extending above 20 kHz. Overall correct classification using discriminant function analysis ranged from 30% for the 20-kHz upper frequency limit data to 37% for the 40-kHz upper frequency limit data. For the four species included in this study, an upper bandwidth limit of at least 24 kHz is required for an accurate representation of fundamental whistle contours. PMID:15603163

  16. The effect of recording and analysis bandwidth on acoustic identification of delphinid species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oswald, Julie N.; Rankin, Shannon; Barlow, Jay

    2004-11-01

    Because many cetacean species produce characteristic calls that propagate well under water, acoustic techniques can be used to detect and identify them. The ability to identify cetaceans to species using acoustic methods varies and may be affected by recording and analysis bandwidth. To examine the effect of bandwidth on species identification, whistles were recorded from four delphinid species (Delphinus delphis, Stenella attenuata, S. coeruleoalba, and S. longirostris) in the eastern tropical Pacific ocean. Four spectrograms, each with a different upper frequency limit (20, 24, 30, and 40 kHz), were created for each whistle (n=484). Eight variables (beginning, ending, minimum, and maximum frequency; duration; number of inflection points; number of steps; and presence/absence of harmonics) were measured from the fundamental frequency of each whistle. The whistle repertoires of all four species contained fundamental frequencies extending above 20 kHz. Overall correct classification using discriminant function analysis ranged from 30% for the 20-kHz upper frequency limit data to 37% for the 40-kHz upper frequency limit data. For the four species included in this study, an upper bandwidth limit of at least 24 kHz is required for an accurate representation of fundamental whistle contours..

  17. Vibro-acoustic modelling of the outer and middle ear using the finite-element method.

    PubMed

    Prendergast, P J; Ferris, P; Rice, H J; Blayney, A W

    1999-01-01

    In this study, a computer-based method called finite-element analysis is used to predict the forced-frequency response of the ear, with and without an ossicular replacement prosthesis (PORP 0362, Xomed Surgical Products). The method allows visualisation of the dynamical behaviour of the tympanic membrane (TM) and of the ossicles. The finite-element model is fully three-dimensional and includes both ligaments and muscles, and accounts for damping caused by the TM, ligaments, incudostapedial joint and the fluids of the inner ear. For validation, comparison is made with experimental measurements of umbo displacement taken from the literature. The translation and rotation (both anterior-posterior and inferior-superior) of the stapedial footplate are investigated. It is predicted that the translatory motion of the footplate decreases with increasing frequency, except when the frequency of the acoustic signal matches the natural frequencies of the ossicular chain or outer ear canal. The tilting motion of the stapedial footplate is also predicted to depend on frequency of excitation. The presence of a prosthesis changes the dynamical response considerably by shifting the natural frequencies of the ossicular chain. Ratios of stapes motion with and without the prostheses are plotted as a function of frequency allowing this effect to be clearly observed. PMID:10187928

  18. A Nonlinear Reduced Order Method for Prediction of Acoustic Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przekop, Adam; Rizzi, Stephen A.

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this investigation is to assess the quality of high-cycle-fatigue life estimation via a reduced order method, for structures undergoing geometrically nonlinear random vibrations. Modal reduction is performed with several different suites of basis functions. After numerically solving the reduced order system equations of motion, the physical displacement time history is obtained by an inverse transformation and stresses are recovered. Stress ranges obtained through the rainflow counting procedure are used in a linear damage accumulation method to yield fatigue estimates. Fatigue life estimates obtained using various basis functions in the reduced order method are compared with those obtained from numerical simulation in physical degrees-of-freedom.

  19. Estimation of crack and damage progression in concrete by quantitative acoustic emission analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtsu, Masayasu

    1999-05-01

    The kinematics of cracking can be represented by the moment tensor. To distinguish moment tensor components from acoustic emission waveforms, the SiGMA (simplified Green`s functions for moment tensor analysis) procedure was developed. By applying the procedure to bending tests of notched beams, cracks in the fracture process zone of cementitious materials can be identified by kinematic means. In addition to cracks, estimation of the damage level in structural concrete is also conducted, based on acoustic emission activity of a concrete sample under compression. Depending on the damage resulting from existing microcracks, acoustic emission generated behavior is quantitatively estimated by the rate process analysis. The damage mechanics are introduced to quantify the degree of damage. Determining the current damage level using acoustic emission without information on undamaged concrete is attempted by correlating the damage value with the rate process.

  20. Flow patterns and transport in Rayleigh surface acoustic wave streaming: combined finite element method and raytracing numerics versus experiments.

    PubMed

    Frommelt, Thomas; Gogel, Daniel; Kostur, Marcin; Talkner, Peter; Hänggi, Peter; Wixforth, Achim

    2008-10-01

    This work presents an approach for determining the streaming patterns that are generated by Rayleigh surface acoustic waves in arbitrary 3-D geometries by finite element method (FEM) simulations. An efficient raytracing algorithm is applied on the acoustic subproblem to avoid the unbearable memory demands and computational time of a conventional FEM acoustics simulation in 3-D. The acoustic streaming interaction is modeled by a body force term in the Stokes equation. In comparisons between experiments and simulated flow patterns, we demonstrate the quality of the proposed technique. PMID:18986877

  1. Acoustic contrast, planarity and robustness of sound zone methods using a circular loudspeaker array.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Philip; Jackson, Philip J B; Olik, Marek; Møller, Martin; Olsen, Martin; Abildgaard Pedersen, Jan

    2014-04-01

    Since the mid 1990s, acoustics research has been undertaken relating to the sound zone problem-using loudspeakers to deliver a region of high sound pressure while simultaneously creating an area where the sound is suppressed-in order to facilitate independent listening within the same acoustic enclosure. The published solutions to the sound zone problem are derived from areas such as wave field synthesis and beamforming. However, the properties of such methods differ and performance tends to be compared against similar approaches. In this study, the suitability of energy focusing, energy cancelation, and synthesis approaches for sound zone reproduction is investigated. Anechoic simulations based on two zones surrounded by a circular array show each of the methods to have a characteristic performance, quantified in terms of acoustic contrast, array control effort and target sound field planarity. Regularization is shown to have a significant effect on the array effort and achieved acoustic contrast, particularly when mismatched conditions are considered between calculation of the source weights and their application to the system. PMID:25234991

  2. Numerical method to compute acoustic scattering effect of a moving source.

    PubMed

    Song, Hao; Yi, Mingxu; Huang, Jun; Pan, Yalin; Liu, Dawei

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the aerodynamic characteristic of a ducted tail rotor in hover has been numerically studied using CFD method. An analytical time domain formulation based on Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FW-H) equation is derived for the prediction of the acoustic velocity field and used as Neumann boundary condition on a rigid scattering surface. In order to predict the aerodynamic noise, a hybrid method combing computational aeroacoustics with an acoustic thin-body boundary element method has been proposed. The aerodynamic results and the calculated sound pressure levels (SPLs) are compared with the known method for validation. Simulation results show that the duct can change the value of SPLs and the sound directivity. Compared with the isolate tail rotor, the SPLs of the ducted tail rotor are smaller at certain azimuth. PMID:27610323

  3. Detection and characterization of stainless steel SCC by the analysis of crack related acoustic emission.

    PubMed

    Kovač, Jaka; Legat, Andraž; Zajec, Bojan; Kosec, Tadeja; Govekar, Edvard

    2015-09-01

    In the paper the results of the acoustic emission (AE) based detection and characterization of stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) in stainless steel are presented. As supportive methods for AE interpretation, electrochemical noise, specimen elongation measurements, and digital imaging of the specimen surface were used. Based on the defined qualitative and quantitative time and power spectra characteristics of the AE bursts, a manual and an automatic procedure for the detection of crack related AE bursts were introduced. The results of the analysis of the crack related AE bursts indicate that the AE method is capable of detecting large scale cracks, where, apart from intergranular crack propagation, also some small ductile fractures occur. The sizes of the corresponding ductile fracture areas can be estimated based on a relative comparison of the energies of the detected AE bursts. It has also been shown that AE burst time and power spectra features can be successfully used for the automatic detection of SCC. PMID:26112425

  4. Reduced Order Methods for Prediction of Thermal-Acoustic Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przekop, A.; Rizzi, S. A.

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this investigation is to assess the quality of high-cycle-fatigue life estimation via a reduced order method, for structures undergoing random nonlinear vibrations in a presence of thermal loading. Modal reduction is performed with several different suites of basis functions. After numerically solving the reduced order system equations of motion, the physical displacement time history is obtained by an inverse transformation and stresses are recovered. Stress ranges obtained through the rainflow counting procedure are used in a linear damage accumulation method to yield fatigue estimates. Fatigue life estimates obtained using various basis functions in the reduced order method are compared with those obtained from numerical simulation in physical degrees-of-freedom.

  5. Computational methods for studying acoustic propagation in nonuniform waveguides.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckemeyer, R. J.; Eversman, W.

    1973-01-01

    A variational technique is used to model sound transmission through a nonuniform duct segment consisting of an axial variation in wall admittance or cross sectional area. The method involves the Ritz minimization of functionals which have the governing equations as stationary conditions. The variational method is verified by application to segments of variables-separable geometry for which eigenfunction expansion techniques offer an alternative solution procedure, and by comparison with the results of stepped duct approximations to the nonuniformity. Quantitative data are presented which indicate the boundary condition matching to be a suitable measure of the accuracy of the transmitted field.

  6. Acoustic Radiation From Rotating Blades: The Kirchhoff Method in Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.

    2000-01-01

    This paper reviews the current status of discrete frequency noise prediction for rotating blade machinery in the time domain. There are two major approaches both of which can be classified as the Kirchhoff method. These methods depend on the solution of two linear wave equations called the K and FW-H equations. The solutions of these equations for subsonic and supersonic surfaces are discussed and some important results of the research in the past years are presented. This paper is analytical in nature and emphasizes the work of the author and coworkers at NASA Langley Research Center.

  7. Application of acoustic radiosity methods to noise propagation within buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muehleisen, Ralph T.; Beamer, C. Walter

    2005-09-01

    The prediction of sound pressure levels in rooms from transmitted sound is a difficult problem. The sound energy in the source room incident on the common wall must be accurately predicted. In the receiving room, the propagation of sound from the planar wall source must also be accurately predicted. The radiosity method naturally computes the spatial distribution of sound energy incident on a wall and also naturally predicts the propagation of sound from a planar area source. In this paper, the application of the radiosity method to sound transmission problems is introduced and explained.

  8. Prediction of ultrasound-mediated disruption of cell membranes using machine learning techniques and statistical analysis of acoustic spectra.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eva K; Gallagher, Richard J; Campbell, Ann Melissa; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2004-01-01

    Although biological effects of ultrasound must be avoided for safe diagnostic applications, ultrasound's ability to disrupt cell membranes has attracted interest as a method to facilitate drug and gene delivery. This paper seeks to develop "prediction rules" for predicting the degree of cell membrane disruption based on specified ultrasound parameters and measured acoustic signals. Three techniques for generating prediction rules (regression analysis, classification trees and discriminant analysis) are applied to data obtained from a sequence of experiments on bovine red blood cells. For each experiment, the data consist of four ultrasound parameters, acoustic measurements at 400 frequencies, and a measure of cell membrane disruption. To avoid over-training, various combinations of the 404 predictor variables are used when applying the rule generation methods. The results indicate that the variable combination consisting of ultrasound exposure time and acoustic signals measured at the driving frequency and its higher harmonics yields the best rule for all three rule generation methods. The methods used for deriving the prediction rules are broadly applicable, and could be used to develop prediciton rules in other scenarios involving different cell types or tissues. These rules and the methods used to derive them could be used for real-time feedback about ultrasound's biological effects. PMID:14723497

  9. Multi-bearing defect detection with trackside acoustic signal based on a pseudo time-frequency analysis and Dopplerlet filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haibin; Lu, Siliang; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of train bearing defects based on the acoustic signal acquired by a trackside microphone plays a significant role in the transport system. However, the wayside acoustic signal suffers from the Doppler distortion due to the high moving speed and also contains the multi-source signals from different train bearings. This paper proposes a novel solution to overcome the two difficulties in trackside acoustic diagnosis. In the method a pseudo time-frequency analysis (PTFA) based on an improved Dopplerlet transform (IDT) is presented to acquire the time centers for different bearings. With the time centers, we design a series of Dopplerlet filters (DF) in time-frequency domain to work on the signal's time-frequency distribution (TFD) gained by the short time Fourier transform (STFT). Then an inverse STFT (ISTFT) is utilized to get the separated signals for each sound source which means bearing here. Later the resampling method based on certain motion parameters eliminates the Doppler Effect and finally the diagnosis can be made effectively according to the envelope spectrum of each separated signal. With the effectiveness of the technique validated by both simulated and experimental cases, the proposed wayside acoustic diagnostic scheme is expected to be available in wayside defective bearing detection.

  10. New Acoustic Methods for Nondestructive Evaluation of Leather Quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Currently, there is no on-line test method to monitor the physical properties of semi-products such as wet blue or crust during the leather-making processes. Inferior leather semi-products, such as wet blue, cannot be downgraded earlier or removed before going through many expensive processes (incl...

  11. Development of acoustic sniper localization methods and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasing, David; Ellwood, Benjamin

    2010-04-01

    A novel examination of a method capable of providing situational awareness of sniper fire from small arms fire is presented. Situational Awareness (SA) information is extracted by exploiting two distinct sounds created by small arms discharge: the muzzle blast (created when the bullet leaves the barrel of the gun) and the shockwave (sound created by a supersonic bullet). The direction of arrival associated with the muzzle blast will always point in the direction of the shooter. Range can be estimated from the muzzle blast alone, however at greater distances geometric dilution of precision will make obtaining accurate range estimates difficult. To address this issue, additional information obtained from the shockwave is utilized in order to estimate range to shooter. The focus of the paper is the development of a shockwave propagation model, the development of ballistics models (based off empirical measurements), and the subsequent application towards methods of determining shooter position. Knowledge of the rounds ballistics is required to estimate range to shooter. Many existing methods rely on extracting information from the shockwave in an attempt to identify the round type and thus the ballistic model to use ([1]). It has been our experience that this information becomes unreliable at greater distances or in high noise environments. Our method differs from existing solutions in that classification of the round type is not required, thus making the proposed solution more robust. Additionally, we demonstrate that sufficient accuracy can be achieved without the need to classify the round.

  12. Acoustic method for measuring air temperature and humidity in rooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanev, N. G.

    2014-05-01

    A method is proposed to determine air temperature and humidity in rooms with a system of sound sources and receivers, making it possible to find the sound velocity and reverberation time. Nomograms for determining the air temperature and relative air humidity are constructed from the found sound velocity and time reverberation values. The required accuracy of measuring these parameters is estimated.

  13. Comparison of temporal and spectral scattering methods using acoustically large breast models derived from magnetic resonance images

    PubMed Central

    Hesford, Andrew J.; Tillett, Jason C.; Astheimer, Jeffrey P.; Waag, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate and efficient modeling of ultrasound propagation through realistic tissue models is important to many aspects of clinical ultrasound imaging. Simplified problems with known solutions are often used to study and validate numerical methods. Greater confidence in a time-domain k-space method and a frequency-domain fast multipole method is established in this paper by analyzing results for realistic models of the human breast. Models of breast tissue were produced by segmenting magnetic resonance images of ex vivo specimens into seven distinct tissue types. After confirming with histologic analysis by pathologists that the model structures mimicked in vivo breast, the tissue types were mapped to variations in sound speed and acoustic absorption. Calculations of acoustic scattering by the resulting model were performed on massively parallel supercomputer clusters using parallel implementations of the k-space method and the fast multipole method. The efficient use of these resources was confirmed by parallel efficiency and scalability studies using large-scale, realistic tissue models. Comparisons between the temporal and spectral results were performed in representative planes by Fourier transforming the temporal results. An RMS field error less than 3% throughout the model volume confirms the accuracy of the methods for modeling ultrasound propagation through human breast. PMID:25096103

  14. Comparison of temporal and spectral scattering methods using acoustically large breast models derived from magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Hesford, Andrew J; Tillett, Jason C; Astheimer, Jeffrey P; Waag, Robert C

    2014-08-01

    Accurate and efficient modeling of ultrasound propagation through realistic tissue models is important to many aspects of clinical ultrasound imaging. Simplified problems with known solutions are often used to study and validate numerical methods. Greater confidence in a time-domain k-space method and a frequency-domain fast multipole method is established in this paper by analyzing results for realistic models of the human breast. Models of breast tissue were produced by segmenting magnetic resonance images of ex vivo specimens into seven distinct tissue types. After confirming with histologic analysis by pathologists that the model structures mimicked in vivo breast, the tissue types were mapped to variations in sound speed and acoustic absorption. Calculations of acoustic scattering by the resulting model were performed on massively parallel supercomputer clusters using parallel implementations of the k-space method and the fast multipole method. The efficient use of these resources was confirmed by parallel efficiency and scalability studies using large-scale, realistic tissue models. Comparisons between the temporal and spectral results were performed in representative planes by Fourier transforming the temporal results. An RMS field error less than 3% throughout the model volume confirms the accuracy of the methods for modeling ultrasound propagation through human breast. PMID:25096103

  15. Acoustic propagation in the Hudson River Estuary: Analysis of experimental measurements and numerical modeling results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, Sreeram

    Underwater intrusion detection is an ongoing security concern in port and harbor areas. Of particular interest is to detect SCUBA divers, unmanned underwater vehicles and small boats from their acoustic signature. A thorough understanding of the effects of the shallow water propagating medium on acoustic signals can help develop new technologies and improve the performance of existing acoustic based surveillance systems. The Hudson River Estuary provides us with such a shallow water medium to conduct research and improve our knowledge of shallow water acoustics. Acoustic propagation in the Hudson River Estuary is highly affected by the temporal and spatial variability of salinity and temperature due to tides, freshwater inflows, winds etc. The primary goal of this research is to help develop methodologies to predict the formation of an acoustic field in the realistic environment of the lower Hudson River Estuary. Shallow water high-frequency acoustic propagation experiments were conducted in the Hudson River near Hoboken, New Jersey. Channel Impulse Response (CIR) measurements were carried out in the frequency band from 10 to 100 kHz for distances up to 200 meters in a water depth of 8-10 meters which formed the basis for experimental Transmission Loss (TL). CIR data was also utilized to demonstrate multi-path propagation in shallow water. Acoustic propagation models based on Ray Theory and Parabolic Equation methods were implemented in the frequency band from 10 to 100 kHz and TL was estimated. The sound velocity profiles required as input by acoustic propagation models were calculated from in-situ measurements of temperature, salinity and depth. Surface reflection loss was obtained from CIR data and incorporated into the acoustic propagation models. Experimentally obtained TL was used to validate the acoustic model predictions. An outcome of this research is an operational acoustic transmission loss (TL) forecast system based on the existing, Stevens New York

  16. Asymptotic modal analysis of a rectangular acoustic cavity excited by wall vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peretti, Linda F.; Dowell, Earl H.

    1992-01-01

    Asymptotic modal analysis, a method that has recently been developed for structural dynamical systems, has been applied to a rectangular acoustic cavity. The cavity had a flexible vibrating portion on one wall, and the other five walls were rigid. Banded white noise was transmitted through the flexible portion (plate) only. Both the location along the wall and the size of the plate were varied. The mean square pressure levels of the cavity interior were computed as a ratio of the result obtained from classical modal analysis to that obtained from asymptotic modal analysis for the various plate configurations. In general, this ratio converged to 1.0 as the number of responding modes increased. Intensification effects were found due to both the excitation location and the response location. The asymptotic modal analysis method was both efficient and accurate in solving the given problem. The method has advantages over the traditional methods that are used for solving dynamics problems with a large number of responding modes.

  17. Finite-difference, time-domain analysis of a folded acoustic transmission line.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Charles M

    2005-03-01

    Recently designed, modern versions of renais sance woodwind instruments such as the recorder and serpent use square cross sections and a folded acoustic transmission line. Conventional microwave techniques would expect that this bend would cause unwanted reflections and impedance discontinuities. This paper analyses the folded acoustic transmission line using finite-difference, time-domain techniques and shows that the discontinuity can be compensated with by the use of a manufacturable method. PMID:15857045

  18. Numerical modeling of undersea acoustics using a partition of unity method with plane waves enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hospital-Bravo, Raúl; Sarrate, Josep; Díez, Pedro

    2016-05-01

    A new 2D numerical model to predict the underwater acoustic propagation is obtained by exploring the potential of the Partition of Unity Method (PUM) enriched with plane waves. The aim of the work is to obtain sound pressure level distributions when multiple operational noise sources are present, in order to assess the acoustic impact over the marine fauna. The model takes advantage of the suitability of the PUM for solving the Helmholtz equation, especially for the practical case of large domains and medium frequencies. The seawater acoustic absorption and the acoustic reflectance of the sea surface and sea bottom are explicitly considered, and perfectly matched layers (PML) are placed at the lateral artificial boundaries to avoid spurious reflexions. The model includes semi-analytical integration rules which are adapted to highly oscillatory integrands with the aim of reducing the computational cost of the integration step. In addition, we develop a novel strategy to mitigate the ill-conditioning of the elemental and global system matrices. Specifically, we compute a low-rank approximation of the local space of solutions, which in turn reduces the number of degrees of freedom, the CPU time and the memory footprint. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the capabilities of the model and to assess its accuracy.

  19. Acoustic intensity methods and their applications to vector sensor use and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naluai, Nathan Kahikina

    Applications of acoustic intensity processing methods to vector sensor output signals are investigated for three specific cases: acoustic intensity scattering, spatial correlations of intensities, and conceptual design of a high frequency inertial vector sensor with a novel suspension. An overview of intensity processing is presented and the concept of a complex intensity is illustrated. Measurement techniques for determining the complex intensity spectra from the signals received by a standard acoustic vector sensor are demonstrated. Acoustic intensity processing of signals from SSQ-53D sonobuoys is used to enhance the detection of submerged bodies in bi-static sonar applications. Deep water experiments conducted at Lake Pend Oreille in northern Idaho are described. A submerged body is located between a source and a number of SSQ-53D sonobuoy receivers. Scalar pressure measurements change by less than 0.5 dB when the scattering body is inserted in the field. The phase of the orthogonal intensity component shows repeatable and strong variations of nearly 55°. The classical solution for the spatial correlation of the pressure field is presented. The derivation techniques are expanded to derive previously unsolved analytic forms for the spatial correlations of separated intensity field components based on combinations of the solutions for various pressure and velocity components. Experimental validation of these correlation solutions are performed computationally and in an underwater environment. The computational experiments are designed to test highly controlled variations to the idealized case (e.g. sound field content, transducer phasing issues, additive output noise, etc.) Additional verification is provided from physical tests measuring the correlations between a pair of acoustic vector sensors in a large reverberant tank which is excited acoustically with broadband noise. The results successfully corroborate the derivation methods for correlations of

  20. Method and apparatus for multipole acoustic wave borehole logging

    SciTech Connect

    Winbow, G.A.; Baker, L.J.

    1987-03-10

    A method is described for determining the radial thickness of an invaded zone of an earth formation surrounding a borehole where a virgin earth formation surrounds the borehole and is separated from the borehole by the invaded zone. The method comprises: (a) transmitting a 2/sup n/-pole P-wave from a point in the borehole into the earth formation surrounding the borehole, n being an integer greater than zero; (b) measuring the P-wave velocity of a zone of the earth formation located at a first radial distance from the borehole by detecting the arrival of the 2/sup n/-pole P-wave at a first location and at a second location in the borehole spaced longitudinally along the borehole from the point of transmission and from each other. The second location is spaced farther from the point of transmission than is the first location, the time arrival between the detections of the 2/sup n/-pole P-wave arrival is measured at the first location and the second location; and (c) repeating the steps (a) and (b) with successively increased longitudinal spacings between the point of transmission and the first location and between the point of transmission and the second location to measure the P-wave velocities of zones of the earth formation located successively radially farther away from the borehole.

  1. Quantitative analysis of the acoustic repertoire of southern right whales in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Webster, Trudi A; Dawson, Stephen M; Rayment, William J; Parks, Susan E; Van Parijs, Sofie M

    2016-07-01

    Quantitatively describing the acoustic repertoire of a species is important for establishing effective passive acoustic monitoring programs and developing automated call detectors. This process is particularly important when the study site is remote and visual surveys are not cost effective. Little is known about the vocal behavior of southern right whales (Eubalaena australis) in New Zealand. The aim of this study was to describe and quantify their entire vocal repertoire on calving grounds in the sub-Antarctic Auckland Islands. Over three austral winters (2010-2012), 4349 calls were recorded, measured, and classified into 10 call types. The most frequently observed types were pulsive, upcall, and tonal low vocalizations. A long tonal low call (≤15.5 s duration) and a very high call (peak frequency ∼750 Hz) were described for the first time. Random Forest multivariate analysis of 28 measured variables was used to classify calls with a high degree of accuracy (82%). The most important variables for classification were maximum ceiling frequency, number of inflection points, duration, and the difference between the start and end frequency. This classification system proved to be a repeatable, fast, and objective method for categorising right whale calls and shows promise for other vocal taxa. PMID:27475156

  2. Amplitude-Frequency Analysis of Signals of Acoustic Emission from Granite Fractured at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakov, I. P.; Chmel‧, A. E.

    2015-05-01

    The problem of stability of underground structures serving to store radioactive waste, to gasify carbon, and to utilize geothermal energy is associated with the action of elevated temperatures and pressures. The acoustic-emission method makes it possible to monitor the accumulation of microcracks arising in stress fields of both thermal and mechanical origin. In this report, the authors give results of a laboratory investigation into the acoustic emission from granite subjected to impact fracture at temperatures of up to 600°C. An amplitude-frequency analysis of acousticemission signals has enabled the authors to evaluate the dimension of the arising microcracks and to determine their character (intergranular or intragranular). It has been shown that intergranular faults on the boundaries between identical minerals predominate at room temperature (purely mechanical action); at a temperature of 300°C (impact plus thermoelastic stresses), there also appear cracks on the quartz-feldspar boundaries; finally, at temperatures of 500-600°C, it is intragranular faults that predominate in feldspar. The dimensions of the above three types of microcracks are approximately 2, 0.8, and 0.3 mm respectively.

  3. Efficient modeling of flat and homogeneous acoustic treatments for vibroacoustic finite element analysis. Direct field formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimonti, L.; Atalla, N.

    2016-04-01

    This paper is concerned with the development of a simplified model for noise control treatments to speed up finite element analysis in vibroacoustic applications. The methodology relies on the assumption that the acoustic treatment is flat and homogeneous. Moreover, its finite lateral extent is neglected. This hypothesis is justified by short wavelength and large dissipation, which suggest that the reflected field emanating from the acoustic treatment lateral boundaries does not substantially affect its dynamic response. Under these circumstances, the response of the noise control treatment can be formally obtained by means of convolution integrals involving simple analytical kernels (i.e. Green functions). Such fundamental solutions can be computed efficiently by the transfer matrix method. However, some arbitrariness arises in the formulation of the mathematical model, resulting in different baffling conditions at the two ends of the treatment to be considered. Thus, the paper investigates the possibility of different formulations (i.e. baffling conditions) within the same hybrid finite element-transfer matrix framework, seeking for the best strategy in terms of tradeoff between efficiency and accuracy. Numerical examples are provided to show strengths and limitations of the proposed methodology.

  4. Features of different honeys identified by acoustic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czech, B.; Dzida, M.; Cembala, T.; Marczak, W.

    2008-02-01

    A physicochemical method of identification of bee honeys has not been worked out yet. Instead, rather subjective tasting is a common practice in honey processing plants. This work was aimed on identification of honeys on the basis of differences in the speed of ultrasound. 20 samples of honey belonging to four types were investigated. Correlations between the speed of sound in aqueous solutions of honeys and the sugar content were found for three out of the four types. Although interesting and explicable in terms of the honey composition, the results seem to have rather limited practical use. Correlation of speeds of sound with concentration of main components of honey would probably give more promising results, but practical application of such approach seems difficult to foresee.

  5. A method for reducing ground reflection effects from acoustic measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noerager, J. A.; Rice, E. J.; Feiler, C. E.

    1972-01-01

    The method involved placing foam blocks on the ground between sound source and receiver in an approximation of the wedges in an anechoic chamber. The tests were performed out of doors as a function of the receiver height and source-receiver separation distance. The spacing between blocks and the extent of ground covered were varied to estimate the optimum placement and minimum amount of foam treatment needed. Base-line tests without foam were also performed. It was found that the foam treatment reduced the amplitude of the peaks and valleys in the sound pressure spectra substantially. The foam was least effective at low frequency, especially for the low receiver height and for large source-receiver distances. Results from the base-line tests were compared with theoretically predicted results. These base-line test results were in reasonable agreement with those from theory.

  6. Acoustic Treatment Design Scaling Methods. Volume 1; Overview, Results, and Recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, R. E.; Yu, J.

    1999-01-01

    Scale model fan rigs that simulate new generation ultra-high-bypass engines at about 1/5-scale are achieving increased importance as development vehicles for the design of low-noise aircraft engines. Testing at small scale allows the tests to be performed in existing anechoic wind tunnels, which provides an accurate simulation of the important effects of aircraft forward motion on the noise generation. The ability to design, build, and test miniaturized acoustic treatment panels on scale model fan rigs representative of the fullscale engine provides not only a cost-savings, but an opportunity to optimize the treatment by allowing tests of different designs. The primary objective of this study was to develop methods that will allow scale model fan rigs to be successfully used as acoustic treatment design tools. The study focuses on finding methods to extend the upper limit of the frequency range of impedance prediction models and acoustic impedance measurement methods for subscale treatment liner designs, and confirm the predictions by correlation with measured data. This phase of the program had as a goal doubling the upper limit of impedance measurement from 6 kHz to 12 kHz. The program utilizes combined analytical and experimental methods to achieve the objectives.

  7. A wideband fast multipole boundary element method for half-space/plane-symmetric acoustic wave problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chang-Jun; Chen, Hai-Bo; Chen, Lei-Lei

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents a novel wideband fast multipole boundary element approach to 3D half-space/plane-symmetric acoustic wave problems. The half-space fundamental solution is employed in the boundary integral equations so that the tree structure required in the fast multipole algorithm is constructed for the boundary elements in the real domain only. Moreover, a set of symmetric relations between the multipole expansion coefficients of the real and image domains are derived, and the half-space fundamental solution is modified for the purpose of applying such relations to avoid calculating, translating and saving the multipole/local expansion coefficients of the image domain. The wideband adaptive multilevel fast multipole algorithm associated with the iterative solver GMRES is employed so that the present method is accurate and efficient for both lowand high-frequency acoustic wave problems. As for exterior acoustic problems, the Burton-Miller method is adopted to tackle the fictitious eigenfrequency problem involved in the conventional boundary integral equation method. Details on the implementation of the present method are described, and numerical examples are given to demonstrate its accuracy and efficiency.

  8. A low order flow/acoustics interaction method for the prediction of sound propagation using 3D adaptive hybrid grids

    SciTech Connect

    Kallinderis, Yannis; Vitsas, Panagiotis A.; Menounou, Penelope

    2012-07-15

    A low-order flow/acoustics interaction method for the prediction of sound propagation and diffraction in unsteady subsonic compressible flow using adaptive 3-D hybrid grids is investigated. The total field is decomposed into the flow field described by the Euler equations, and the acoustics part described by the Nonlinear Perturbation Equations. The method is shown capable of predicting monopole sound propagation, while employment of acoustics-guided adapted grid refinement improves the accuracy of capturing the acoustic field. Interaction of sound with solid boundaries is also examined in terms of reflection, and diffraction. Sound propagation through an unsteady flow field is examined using static and dynamic flow/acoustics coupling demonstrating the importance of the latter.

  9. System and method for investigating sub-surface features of a rock formation with acoustic sources generating coded signals

    SciTech Connect

    Vu, Cung Khac; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Paul A; Guyer, Robert; Ten Cate, James A; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Larmat, Carene S

    2014-12-30

    A system and a method for investigating rock formations includes generating, by a first acoustic source, a first acoustic signal comprising a first plurality of pulses, each pulse including a first modulated signal at a central frequency; and generating, by a second acoustic source, a second acoustic signal comprising a second plurality of pulses. A receiver arranged within the borehole receives a detected signal including a signal being generated by a non-linear mixing process from the first-and-second acoustic signal in a non-linear mixing zone within the intersection volume. The method also includes-processing the received signal to extract the signal generated by the non-linear mixing process over noise or over signals generated by a linear interaction process, or both.

  10. Power method for calculating the far acoustic field of the helicopter lift rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samokhin, V. F.

    2011-05-01

    A semiempirical method for calculating the far acoustic field of the lift rotor of a helicopter operating in the regime of oblique flow over it is described. The basic parametric relations for the acoustic radiation power of rotor noise components have been obtained on the basis of the Lamb idea that vortex-free motion arises under the action of a periodic force on an infinitely small volume of the medium. All sources of lift rotor noise are subdivided into two groups pertaining, respectively, to the inductive and profile parts of the total power supplied to the rotor. A comparison has been made between the results of calculation of the harmonic components of lift rotor noise made on the basis of the power method and the experimental data for the Mi-28 helicopter.

  11. Method for rapid localization of seafloor petroleum contamination using concurrent mass spectrometry and acoustic positioning.

    PubMed

    Camilli, R; Bingham, B; Reddy, C M; Nelson, R K; Duryea, A N

    2009-10-01

    Locating areas of seafloor contamination caused by heavy oil spills is challenging, in large part because of observational limitations in aquatic subsurface environments. Accepted methods for surveying and locating sunken oil are generally slow, labor intensive and spatially imprecise. This paper describes a method to locate seafloor contamination caused by heavy oil fractions using in situ mass spectrometry and concurrent acoustic navigation. We present results of laboratory sensitivity tests and proof-of-concept evaluations conducted at the US Coast Guard OHMSETT national oil spill response test facility. Preliminary results from a robotic seafloor contamination survey conducted in deep water using the mass spectrometer and a geo-referenced acoustic navigation system are also described. Results indicate that this technological approach can accurately localize seafloor oil contamination in real-time at spatial resolutions better than a decimeter. PMID:19540535

  12. Acoustic imaging with time reversal methods: From medicine to NDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Mathias

    2015-03-01

    This talk will present an overview of the research conducted on ultrasonic time-reversal methods applied to biomedical imaging and to non-destructive testing. We will first describe iterative time-reversal techniques that allow both focusing ultrasonic waves on reflectors in tissues (kidney stones, micro-calcifications, contrast agents) or on flaws in solid materials. We will also show that time-reversal focusing does not need the presence of bright reflectors but it can be achieved only from the speckle noise generated by random distributions of non-resolved scatterers. We will describe the applications of this concept to correct distortions and aberrations in ultrasonic imaging and in NDT. In the second part of the talk we will describe the concept of time-reversal processors to get ultrafast ultrasonic images with typical frame rates of order of 10.000 F/s. It is the field of ultrafast ultrasonic imaging that has plenty medical applications and can be of great interest in NDT. We will describe some applications in the biomedical domain: Quantitative Elasticity imaging of tissues by following shear wave propagation to improve cancer detection and Ultrafast Doppler imaging that allows ultrasonic functional imaging.

  13. Coherent active methods for applications in room acoustics.

    PubMed

    Guicking, D; Karcher, K; Rollwage, M

    1985-10-01

    An adjustment of reverberation time in rooms is often desired, even for low frequencies where passive absorbers fail. Among the active (electroacoustic) systems, incoherent ones permit lengthening of reverberation time only, whereas coherent active methods will allow sound absorption as well. A coherent-active wall lining consists of loudspeakers with microphones in front and adjustable control electronics. The microphones pick up the incident sound and drive the speakers in such a way that the reflection coefficient takes on prescribed values. An experimental device for the one-dimensional case allows reflection coefficients between almost zero and about 1.5 to be realized below 1000 Hz. The extension to three dimensions presents problems, especially by nearfield effects. Experiments with a 3 X 3 loudspeaker array and computer simulations proved that the amplitude reflection coefficient can be adjusted between 10% and 200% for sinusoidal waves at normal and oblique incidence. Future developments have to make the system work with broadband excitation and in more diffuse sound fields. It is also planned to combine the active reverberation control with active diffusion control. PMID:3840501

  14. Acoustic Inspection and Analysis of Liquids in Sealed Containers

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, Aaron A.

    2003-12-01

    This article describes the Acoustic Inspection Device (AID) developed by PNNL which uses acoustic to determine the contents and fill level of sealed containers. AID is a power drill shaped battery operated device fitted with a transducer that sends an ultrasonic pusle through a container of liquid and measure the return echo. The device compares the echo velocity and attnuation and compares that data to a materials database in an Palm Pilot vlecored to the top of the device to give the operator a text identification of the substance with 5 seconds. The device is sensitive enough to distinguish coke from diet coke and and can distinguish subtances at a variety of temperatures ranging from below freezing to over 100degreesF. PNNL won an R&D 100 award for the technology in 2003.

  15. Surface Acoustic Wave Monitor for Deposition and Analysis of Ultra-Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Jacqueline H. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW) based thin film deposition monitor device and system for monitoring the deposition of ultra-thin films and nanomaterials and the analysis thereof is characterized by acoustic wave device embodiments that include differential delay line device designs, and which can optionally have integral reference devices fabricated on the same substrate as the sensing device, or on a separate device in thermal contact with the film monitoring/analysis device, in order to provide inherently temperature compensated measurements. These deposition monitor and analysis devices can include inherent temperature compensation, higher sensitivity to surface interactions than quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) devices, and the ability to operate at extreme temperatures.

  16. Vibro-acoustic analysis procedures for the evaluation of the sound insulation characteristics of agricultural machinery cabins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmet, W.; Pluymers, B.; Sas, P.

    2003-09-01

    Over the last few years, customer demands regarding acoustic performance, along with the tightening of legal regulations on noise emission levels and human exposure to noise, have made the noise and vibration properties into important design criteria for agricultural machinery cabins. In this framework, both experimental analysis procedures for prototype testing as well as reliable numerical prediction tools for early design assessment are compulsory for an efficient optimization of the cabin noise and vibration comfort. This paper discusses several numerical approaches, which are based on the finite element and boundary element method, in terms of their practical use for airborne sound insulation predictions. To illustrate the efficiency and reliability of the various vibro-acoustic analysis procedures, the numerical procedures are applied for the case of a harvester driver's cabin and validated with experimental results.

  17. Imaging and characterizing shear wave and shear modulus under orthogonal acoustic radiation force excitation using OCT Doppler variance method.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiang; Qu, Yueqiao; Ma, Teng; Li, Rui; Du, Yongzhao; Huang, Shenghai; Shung, K Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-05-01

    We report on a novel acoustic radiation force orthogonal excitation optical coherence elastography (ARFOE-OCE) technique for imaging shear wave and quantifying shear modulus under orthogonal acoustic radiation force (ARF) excitation using the optical coherence tomography (OCT) Doppler variance method. The ARF perpendicular to the OCT beam is produced by a remote ultrasonic transducer. A shear wave induced by ARF excitation propagates parallel to the OCT beam. The OCT Doppler variance method, which is sensitive to the transverse vibration, is used to measure the ARF-induced vibration. For analysis of the shear modulus, the Doppler variance method is utilized to visualize shear wave propagation instead of Doppler OCT method, and the propagation velocity of the shear wave is measured at different depths of one location with the M scan. In order to quantify shear modulus beyond the OCT imaging depth, we move ARF to a deeper layer at a known step and measure the time delay of the shear wave propagating to the same OCT imaging depth. We also quantitatively map the shear modulus of a cross-section in a tissue-equivalent phantom after employing the B scan. PMID:25927794

  18. Imaging and characterizing shear wave and shear modulus under orthogonal acoustic radiation force excitation using OCT Doppler variance method

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jiang; Qu, Yueqiao; Ma, Teng; Li, Rui; Du, Yongzhao; Huang, Shenghai; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-01-01

    We report on a novel acoustic radiation force orthogonal excitation optical coherence elastography (ARFOE-OCE) technique for imaging shear wave and quantifying shear modulus under orthogonal acoustic radiation force (ARF) excitation using the optical coherence tomography (OCT) Doppler variance method. The ARF perpendicular to the OCT beam is produced by a remote ultrasonic transducer. A shear wave induced by ARF excitation propagates parallel to the OCT beam. The OCT Doppler variance method, which is sensitive to the transverse vibration, is used to measure the ARF-induced vibration. For analysis of the shear modulus, the Doppler variance method is utilized to visualize shear wave propagation instead of Doppler OCT method, and the propagation velocity of the shear wave is measured at different depths of one location with the M scan. In order to quantify shear modulus beyond the OCT imaging depth, we move ARF to a deeper layer at a known step and measure the time delay of the shear wave propagating to the same OCT imaging depth. We also quantitatively map the shear modulus of a cross-section in a tissue-equivalent phantom after employing the B scan. PMID:25927794

  19. Finite element approach analysis for characteristics of electromagnetic acoustic Lamb wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaoming; Li, Songsong

    2016-04-01

    The electromagnetic acoustic Lamb wave, with the advantages of quickly detecting the defect and sensitivity to the defects, is widely used in non-destructive testing of thin sheet. In this paper, the directivity of sound field, Phase velocity, group velocity and particle displacement amplitude of Lamb wave are study based on finite element analysis method. The results show that, for 1mm aluminum, when the excitation frequency 0.64MHz, the displacement amplitude of A0 mode is minimum, and the displacement amplitude S0 mode is largest. Appropriate to increase the displacement amplitude of a mode, while reducing displacement amplitude of another mode, to achieve the excitation of a single mode Lamb wave. It is helpful to the Optimization of transducer parameters, the choice of Lamb wave modes and providing optimal excitation frequency.

  20. Fdtd Calculation of Linear Acoustic Phenomena and Its Application to Architectural Acoustics and Environmental Noise Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, S.

    The finite difference time domain (FDTD) method is widely used as an effective and powerful tool for analyzing acoustic problems. In architectural acoustics, impulse response is the most important quantity and therefore the FDTD method, by which the physical quantities are obtained in time domain, is more advantageous than other wave-based analysis methods, by many of which the calculation is performed in frequency domain. This paper reports application of the FDTD method to room acoustics and outdoor noise assessment.

  1. In situ high temperature oxidation analysis of Zircaloy-4 using acoustic emission coupled with thermogravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, Al Haj; Véronique, Peres; Eric, Serris; François, Grosjean; Jean, Kittel; François, Ropital; Michel, Cournil

    2015-06-01

    Zircaloy-4 oxidation behavior at high temperature (900 °C), which can be reached in case of severe accidental situations in nuclear pressurised water reactor, was studied using acoustic emission analysis coupled with thermogravimetry. Two different atmospheres were used to study the oxidation of Zircaloy-4: (a) helium and pure oxygen, (b) helium and oxygen combined with slight addition of air. The experiments with 20% of oxygen confirm the dependence on oxygen anions diffusion in the oxide scale. Under a mixture of oxygen and air in helium, an acceleration of the corrosion was observed due to the detrimental effect of nitrogen. The kinetic rate increased significantly after a kinetic transition (breakaway). This acceleration was accompanied by an acoustic emission activity. Most of the acoustic emission bursts were recorded after the kinetic transition (post-transition) or during the cooling of the sample. The characteristic features of the acoustic emission signals appear to be correlated with the different populations of cracks and their occurrence in the ZrO2 layer or in the α-Zr(O) layer. Acoustic events were recorded during the isothermal dwell time at high temperature under air. They were associated with large cracks in the zirconia porous layer. Acoustic events were also recorded during cooling after oxidation tests both under air or oxygen. For the latter, cracks were observed in the oxygen enriched zirconium metal phase and not in the dense zirconia layer after 5 h of oxidation.

  2. Acoustic Analysis of Snoring in the Diagnosis of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome: A Call for More Rigorous Studies

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hui; Lee, Li-Ang; Song, Lijuan; Li, Yanmei; Peng, Jianxin; Zhong, Nanshan; Li, Hsueh-Yu; Zhang, Xiaowen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Snoring is a common symptom of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) and has recently been considered for diagnosis of OSA. Objectives: The goal of the current study was to systematically determine the accuracy of acoustic analysis of snoring in the diagnosis of OSA using a meta-analysis. Methods: PubMed, Cochrane Library database, and EMBASE were searched up to July 15, 2014. A systematic review and meta-analysis of sensitivity, specificity, and other measures of accuracy of acoustic analysis of snoring in the diagnosis of OSA were conducted. The median of apneahypopnea index threshold was 10 events/h, range: 5–15 or 10–15 if aforementioned suggestion is adopted. Results: A total of seven studies with 273 patients were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled estimates were as follows: sensitivity, 88% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 82–93%); specificity, 81% (95% CI: 72–88%); positive likelihood ratio (PLR), 4.44 (95% CI: 2.39–8.27); negative likelihood ratio (NLR), 0.15 (95% CI: 0.10–0.24); and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR), 32.18 (95% CI: 13.96–74.81). χ2 values of sensitivity, specificity, PLR, NLR, and DOR were 2.37, 10.39, 12.57, 3.79, and 6.91 respectively (All p > 0.05). The area under the summary receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.93. Sensitivity analysis demonstrated that the pooled estimates were stable and reliable. The results of publication bias were not significant (p = 0.30). Conclusions: Acoustic analysis of snoring is a relatively accurate but not a strong method for diagnosing OSA. There is an urgent need for rigorous studies involving large samples and single snore event tests with an efficacy criterion that reflects the particular features of snoring acoustics for OSA diagnosis. Citation: Jin H, Lee LA, Song L, Li Y, Peng J, Zhong N, Li HY, Zhang X. Acoustic analysis of snoring in the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: a call for more rigorous studies. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(7):765–771. PMID

  3. Estimation of the detection probability for Yangtze finless porpoises (Neophocaena phocaenoides asiaeorientalis) with a passive acoustic method.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, T; Wang, D; Wang, K; Li, S; Dong, S; Zhao, X; Barlow, J; Stewart, B S; Richlen, M

    2008-06-01

    Yangtze finless porpoises were surveyed by using simultaneous visual and acoustical methods from 6 November to 13 December 2006. Two research vessels towed stereo acoustic data loggers, which were used to store the intensity and sound source direction of the high frequency sonar signals produced by finless porpoises at detection ranges up to 300 m on each side of the vessel. Simple stereo beam forming allowed the separation of distinct biosonar sound source, which enabled us to count the number of vocalizing porpoises. Acoustically, 204 porpoises were detected from one vessel and 199 from the other vessel in the same section of the Yangtze River. Visually, 163 and 162 porpoises were detected from two vessels within 300 m of the vessel track. The calculated detection probability using acoustic method was approximately twice that for visual detection for each vessel. The difference in detection probabilities between the two methods was caused by the large number of single individuals that were missed by visual observers. However, the sizes of large groups were underestimated by using the acoustic methods. Acoustic and visual observations complemented each other in the accurate detection of porpoises. The use of simple, relatively inexpensive acoustic monitoring systems should enhance population surveys of free-ranging, echolocating odontocetes. PMID:18537391

  4. Optimal design and evaluation criteria for acoustic emission pulse signature analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, J. R.; Townsend, M. A.; Packman, P. F.

    1977-01-01

    Successful pulse recording and evaluation is strongly dependent on the instrumentation system selected and the method of analyzing the pulse signature. The paper studies system design, signal analysis techniques, and interdependences with a view toward defining optimal approaches to pulse signal analysis. For this purpose, the instrumentation system is modeled, and analytical pulses, representative of the types of acoustic emissions to be distinguished are passed through the system. Particular attention is given to comparing frequency spectrum analysis and deconvolution referred to as time domain reconstruction of the pulse or pulse train. The possibility of optimal transducer-filter system parameters is investigated. Deconvolution of a pulse is shown to be a superior approach for transient pulse analysis. Reshaping of a transducer output back to the original input pulse is possible and gives an accurate representation of the generating pulse in the time domain. Any definable transducer and filter system can be used for measurement of pulses by means of the deconvolution method. Selection of design variables for general usage is discussed.

  5. Passive pavement-mounted acoustical linguistic drive alert system and method

    DOEpatents

    Kisner, Roger A.; Anderson, Richard L.; Carnal, Charles L.; Hylton, James O.; Stevens, Samuel S.

    2001-01-01

    Systems and methods are described for passive pavement-mounted acoustical alert of the occupants of a vehicle. A method of notifying a vehicle occupant includes providing a driving medium upon which a vehicle is to be driven; and texturing a portion of the driving medium such that the textured portion interacts with the vehicle to produce audible signals, the textured portion pattern such that a linguistic message is encoded into the audible signals. The systems and methods provide advantages because information can be conveyed to the occupants of the vehicle based on the location of the vehicle relative to the textured surface.

  6. An information processing method for acoustic emission signal inspired from musical staff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wei; Wu, Chunxian

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes a musical-staff-inspired signal processing method for standard description expressions for discrete signals and describing the integrated characteristics of acoustic emission (AE) signals. The method maps various AE signals with complex environments into the normalized musical space. Four new indexes are proposed to comprehensively describe the signal. Several key features, such as contour, amplitude, and signal changing rate, are quantitatively expressed in a normalized musical space. The processed information requires only a small storage space to maintain high fidelity. The method is illustrated by using experiments on sandstones and computed tomography (CT) scanning to determine its validity for AE signal processing.

  7. High-order Hybridized Discontinuous Galerkin (HDG) method for wave propagation simulation in complex geophysical media (elastic, acoustic and hydro-acoustic); an unifying framework to couple continuous Spectral Element and Discontinuous Galerkin Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrana, Sebastien; Vilotte, Jean-Pierre; Guillot, Laurent; Mariotti, Christian

    2015-04-01

    assessed against classical SEMs and DGMs through two-dimensional geophysical examples, as well as the coupling between hybridized SEMs and DGMs in the same computational domain. Finally on-going extension of this HDG method for three-dimensional wave propagation phenomena will be outlined in conclusion. References: Chaljub, E., Komatitsch, D., Vilotte, J.-P., Capdeville, Y., Valette, B., Festa, G., Spectral Element analysis in seismology, Advances in Geophysics, 48, 365-419, 2006. Cockburn, B., Gopalakrishnan, J., Lazarov, R., Unified hybridization of discontinuous Galerkin, mixed and continuous Galerkin methods for second order elliptic problems, SIAM J. Num. Anal., 47, 2, 1319-1365, 2009. Dumbser, M. and M. Käser, An abitrary high-order discontinuous Galerkin method for elastic waves on unstructured meshes II : the three-dimensional isotropic case, Geophys. J. Int., 167 (1), 319-336, 2006. Etienne, V., Chaljub, E., Virieux, J., Glinsky N., A hp-adaptative Discontinuous Galerkin finite element method for 3-D elastic wave modelling, Geophys. J. Int., 183, 941-962, 2010. Komatitsch, D. and J.-P. Vilotte, The Spectral Element Method : An efficient tool to simulate the seismic response of 2-D and 3-D geological structures, Bull. Seism. Soc. Am., 88, 368-392, 1998. Nguyen, N., Peraire, J., Cockburn, B., High-order implicit hybridizable discontinuous Galerkin methods for acoustics and elastodynamics, J. Comp. Physics, 230, 10, 3695-3718, 2011. Wilcox, L., Stadler, G., Burstede, C., Ghattas, O., A high-order discontinuous Galerkin method for wave propagation through coupled elastic-acoustic media, J. Comp. Phys., 229, 9379-9386, 2010.

  8. Numerical Analysis of the Acoustic Field of Tip-Clearance Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alavi Moghadam, S. M.; M. Meinke Team; W. Schröder Team

    2015-11-01

    Numerical simulations of the acoustic field generated by a shrouded axial fan are studied by a hybrid fluid-dynamics-acoustics method. In a first step, large-eddy simulations are performed to investigate the dynamics of tip clearance flow for various tip gap sizes and to determine the acoustic sources. The simulations are performed for a single blade out of five blades with periodic boundary conditions in the circumferential direction on a multi-block structured mesh with 1.4 ×108 grid points. The turbulent flow is simulated at a Reynolds number of 9.36 ×105 at undisturbed inflow condition and the results are compared with experimental data. The diameter and strength of the tip vortex increase with the tip gap size, while simultaneously the efficiency of the fan decreases. In a second step, the acoustic field on the near field is determined by solving the acoustic perturbation equations (APE) on a mesh for a single blade consisting of approx. 9.8 ×108 grid points. The overall agreement of the pressure spectrum and its directivity with measurements confirm the correct identification of the sound sources and accurate prediction of the acoustic duct propagation. The results show that the longer the tip gap size the higher the broadband noise level. Senior Scientist, Institute of Aerodynamics, RWTH Aachen University.

  9. Objective approach for analysis of noise source characteristics and acoustic conditions in noisy computerized embroidery workrooms.

    PubMed

    Aliabadi, Mohsen; Golmohammadi, Rostam; Mansoorizadeh, Muharram

    2014-03-01

    It is highly important to analyze the acoustic properties of workrooms in order to identify best noise control measures from the standpoint of noise exposure limits. Due to the fact that sound pressure is dependent upon environments, it cannot be a suitable parameter for determining the share of workroom acoustic characteristics in producing noise pollution. This paper aims to empirically analyze noise source characteristics and acoustic properties of noisy embroidery workrooms based on special parameters. In this regard, reverberation time as the special room acoustic parameter in 30 workrooms was measured based on ISO 3382-2. Sound power quantity of embroidery machines was also determined based on ISO 9614-3. Multiple linear regression was employed for predicting reverberation time based on acoustic features of the workrooms using MATLAB software. The results showed that the measured reverberation times in most of the workrooms were approximately within the ranges recommended by ISO 11690-1. Similarity between reverberation time values calculated by the Sabine formula and measured values was relatively poor (R (2) = 0.39). This can be due to the inaccurate estimation of the acoustic influence of furniture and formula preconditions. Therefore, this value cannot be considered representative of an actual acoustic room. However, the prediction performance of the regression method with root mean square error (RMSE) = 0.23 s and R (2) = 0.69 is relatively acceptable. Because the sound power of the embroidery machines was relatively high, these sources get the highest priority when it comes to applying noise controls. Finally, an objective approach for the determination of the share of workroom acoustic characteristics in producing noise could facilitate the identification of cost-effective noise controls. PMID:24214295

  10. Vibro-acoustic modelling of aircraft double-walls with structural links using Statistical Energy Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campolina, Bruno L.

    The prediction of aircraft interior noise involves the vibroacoustic modelling of the fuselage with noise control treatments. This structure is composed of a stiffened metallic or composite panel, lined with a thermal and acoustic insulation layer (glass wool), and structurally connected via vibration isolators to a commercial lining panel (trim). The goal of this work aims at tailoring the noise control treatments taking design constraints such as weight and space optimization into account. For this purpose, a representative aircraft double-wall is modelled using the Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) method. Laboratory excitations such as diffuse acoustic field and point force are addressed and trends are derived for applications under in-flight conditions, considering turbulent boundary layer excitation. The effect of the porous layer compression is firstly addressed. In aeronautical applications, compression can result from the installation of equipment and cables. It is studied analytically and experimentally, using a single panel and a fibrous uniformly compressed over 100% of its surface. When compression increases, a degradation of the transmission loss up to 5 dB for a 50% compression of the porous thickness is observed mainly in the mid-frequency range (around 800 Hz). However, for realistic cases, the effect should be reduced since the compression rate is lower and compression occurs locally. Then the transmission through structural connections between panels is addressed using a four-pole approach that links the force-velocity pair at each side of the connection. The modelling integrates experimental dynamic stiffness of isolators, derived using an adapted test rig. The structural transmission is then experimentally validated and included in the double-wall SEA model as an equivalent coupling loss factor (CLF) between panels. The tested structures being flat, only axial transmission is addressed. Finally, the dominant sound transmission paths are

  11. Acoustic methods for high-throughput protein crystal mounting at next-generation macromolecular crystallographic beamlines.

    PubMed

    Roessler, Christian G; Kuczewski, Anthony; Stearns, Richard; Ellson, Richard; Olechno, Joseph; Orville, Allen M; Allaire, Marc; Soares, Alexei S; Héroux, Annie

    2013-09-01

    To take full advantage of advanced data collection techniques and high beam flux at next-generation macromolecular crystallography beamlines, rapid and reliable methods will be needed to mount and align many samples per second. One approach is to use an acoustic ejector to eject crystal-containing droplets onto a solid X-ray transparent surface, which can then be positioned and rotated for data collection. Proof-of-concept experiments were conducted at the National Synchrotron Light Source on thermolysin crystals acoustically ejected onto a polyimide `conveyor belt'. Small wedges of data were collected on each crystal, and a complete dataset was assembled from a well diffracting subset of these crystals. Future developments and implementation will focus on achieving ejection and translation of single droplets at a rate of over one hundred per second. PMID:23955046

  12. Design of an Acoustic Array for Comparison with an Alternative Source Localization Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coombs, Deshawn; Lewalle, Jacques; Glauser, Mark; Wang, Guannan

    2013-11-01

    We report on the design, testing and construction of a conventional acoustic array, and document an alternate method of signal processing. The purpose of the new algorithm is to improve the spatial localization of acoustic sources. The reference results are obtained using the beamforming algorithm. The array design includes 60 microphones with a maximum aperture diameter of 39 inches. The arrays target frequency range is 500-5000 Hz. The new algorithm uses fewer microphones. We will show results with simulated signals and with jet noise experimental data. Details of the array calibration and representative data from measurements will be presented along with data post-processing procedures. Support from Syracuse University MAE department and LSAMP.

  13. Signal recovery technique based on a physical method of underwater acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xinyi; Wu, Guoqing; Ma, Li

    2010-09-01

    In the underwater sound channel we often use an array to receive signals from distant sources. The received signals are often mixed with environmental interference. In the complex acoustic environment, received signals are distorted greatly and elongated in time. In many practical applications such as sound communications, sound remote sensing and active sonar signals, we hope to obtain the original signal's waveform. In general theory, the received signals are the convolution of emission signals and Green's function of environment. In unknown Green's function of environment, simply relying on the array to record the information to determine the sound source signal wave propagation features and the environment is not enough. However, in certain circumstances, based on a physics method of underwater acoustics, the spread of recovery technology is successful.

  14. Compensation for acoustic heterogeneities in photoacoustic computed tomography using a variable temporal data truncation reconstruction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poudel, Joemini; Matthews, Thomas P.; Anastasio, Mark A.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-03-01

    Photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) is an emerging computed imaging modality that exploits optical contrast and ultrasonic detection principles to form images of the absorbed optical energy density within tissue. If the object possesses spatially variant acoustic properties that are unaccounted for by the reconstruction algorithm, the estimated image can contain distortions. While reconstruction algorithms have recently been developed for compensating for this effect, they generally require the objects acoustic properties to be known a priori. To circumvent the need for detailed information regarding an objects acoustic properties, we have previously proposed a half-time reconstruction method for PACT. A half-time reconstruction method estimates the PACT image from a data set that has been temporally truncated to exclude the data components that have been strongly aberrated. In this approach, the degree of temporal truncation is the same for all measurements. However, this strategy can be improved upon it when the approximate sizes and locations of strongly heterogeneous structures such as gas voids or bones are known. In this work, we investigate PACT reconstruction algorithms that are based on a variable temporal data truncation (VTDT) approach that represents a generalization of the half-time reconstruction approach. In the VTDT approach, the degree of temporal truncation for each measurement is determined by the distance between the corresponding transducer location and the nearest known bone or gas void location. Reconstructed images from a numerical phantom is employed to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the approach.

  15. A comparison of acoustic montoring methods for common anurans of the northeastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brauer, Corinne; Donovan, Therese; Mickey, Ruth M.; Katz, Jonathan; Mitchell, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Many anuran monitoring programs now include autonomous recording units (ARUs). These devices collect audio data for extended periods of time with little maintenance and at sites where traditional call surveys might be difficult. Additionally, computer software programs have grown increasingly accurate at automatically identifying the calls of species. However, increased automation may cause increased error. We collected 435 min of audio data with 2 types of ARUs at 10 wetland sites in Vermont and New York, USA, from 1 May to 1 July 2010. For each minute, we determined presence or absence of 4 anuran species (Hyla versicolor, Pseudacris crucifer, Anaxyrus americanus, and Lithobates clamitans) using 1) traditional human identification versus 2) computer-mediated identification with software package, Song Scope® (Wildlife Acoustics, Concord, MA). Detections were compared with a data set consisting of verified calls in order to quantify false positive, false negative, true positive, and true negative rates. Multinomial logistic regression analysis revealed a strong (P < 0.001) 3-way interaction between the ARU recorder type, identification method, and focal species, as well as a trend in the main effect of rain (P = 0.059). Overall, human surveyors had the lowest total error rate (<2%) compared with 18–31% total errors with automated methods. Total error rates varied by species, ranging from 4% for A. americanus to 26% for L. clamitans. The presence of rain may reduce false negative rates. For survey minutes where anurans were known to be calling, the odds of a false negative were increased when fewer individuals of the same species were calling.

  16. Helicopter blade-vortex interaction locations: Scale-model acoustics and free-wake analysis results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoad, Danny R.

    1987-01-01

    The results of a model rotor acoustic test in the Langley 4by 7-Meter Tunnel are used to evaluate a free-wake analytical technique. An acoustic triangulation technique is used to locate the position in the rotor disk where the blade-vortex interaction noise originates. These locations, along with results of the rotor free-wake analysis, are used to define the geometry of the blade-vortex interaction noise phenomena as well as to determine if the free-wake analysis is a capable diagnostic tool. Data from tests of two teetering rotor systems are used in these analyses.

  17. A high-order discontinuous Galerkin method for wave propagation through coupled elastic-acoustic media

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, Lucas C.; Stadler, Georg; Burstedde, Carsten; Ghattas, Omar

    2010-12-10

    We introduce a high-order discontinuous Galerkin (dG) scheme for the numerical solution of three-dimensional (3D) wave propagation problems in coupled elastic-acoustic media. A velocity-strain formulation is used, which allows for the solution of the acoustic and elastic wave equations within the same unified framework. Careful attention is directed at the derivation of a numerical flux that preserves high-order accuracy in the presence of material discontinuities, including elastic-acoustic interfaces. Explicit expressions for the 3D upwind numerical flux, derived as an exact solution for the relevant Riemann problem, are provided. The method supports h-non-conforming meshes, which are particularly effective at allowing local adaptation of the mesh size to resolve strong contrasts in the local wavelength, as well as dynamic adaptivity to track solution features. The use of high-order elements controls numerical dispersion, enabling propagation over many wave periods. We prove consistency and stability of the proposed dG scheme. To study the numerical accuracy and convergence of the proposed method, we compare against analytical solutions for wave propagation problems with interfaces, including Rayleigh, Lamb, Scholte, and Stoneley waves as well as plane waves impinging on an elastic-acoustic interface. Spectral rates of convergence are demonstrated for these problems, which include a non-conforming mesh case. Finally, we present scalability results for a parallel implementation of the proposed high-order dG scheme for large-scale seismic wave propagation in a simplified earth model, demonstrating high parallel efficiency for strong scaling to the full size of the Jaguar Cray XT5 supercomputer.

  18. A high-order discontinuous Galerkin method for wave propagation through coupled elastic-acoustic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, Lucas C.; Stadler, Georg; Burstedde, Carsten; Ghattas, Omar

    2010-12-01

    We introduce a high-order discontinuous Galerkin (dG) scheme for the numerical solution of three-dimensional (3D) wave propagation problems in coupled elastic-acoustic media. A velocity-strain formulation is used, which allows for the solution of the acoustic and elastic wave equations within the same unified framework. Careful attention is directed at the derivation of a numerical flux that preserves high-order accuracy in the presence of material discontinuities, including elastic-acoustic interfaces. Explicit expressions for the 3D upwind numerical flux, derived as an exact solution for the relevant Riemann problem, are provided. The method supports h-non-conforming meshes, which are particularly effective at allowing local adaptation of the mesh size to resolve strong contrasts in the local wavelength, as well as dynamic adaptivity to track solution features. The use of high-order elements controls numerical dispersion, enabling propagation over many wave periods. We prove consistency and stability of the proposed dG scheme. To study the numerical accuracy and convergence of the proposed method, we compare against analytical solutions for wave propagation problems with interfaces, including Rayleigh, Lamb, Scholte, and Stoneley waves as well as plane waves impinging on an elastic-acoustic interface. Spectral rates of convergence are demonstrated for these problems, which include a non-conforming mesh case. Finally, we present scalability results for a parallel implementation of the proposed high-order dG scheme for large-scale seismic wave propagation in a simplified earth model, demonstrating high parallel efficiency for strong scaling to the full size of the Jaguar Cray XT5 supercomputer.

  19. Method and apparatus for measuring surface changes, in porous materials, using multiple differently-configured acoustic sensors

    DOEpatents

    Hietala, Susan Leslie; Hietala, Vincent Mark; Tigges, Chris Phillip

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring surface changes, such as mass uptake at various pressures, in a thin-film material, in particular porous membranes, using multiple differently-configured acoustic sensors.

  20. Diagnostics of DC and Induction Motors Based on the Analysis of Acoustic Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glowacz, A.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, a non-invasive method of early fault diagnostics of electric motors was proposed. This method uses acoustic signals generated by electric motors. Essential features were extracted from acoustic signals of motors. A plan of study of acoustic signals of electric motors was proposed. Researches were carried out for faultless induction motor, induction motor with one faulty rotor bar, induction motor with two faulty rotor bars and flawless Direct Current, and Direct Current motor with shorted rotor coils. Researches were carried out for methods of signal processing: log area ratio coefficients, Multiple signal classification, Nearest Neighbor classifier and the Bayes classifier. A pattern creation process was carried out using 40 samples of sound. In the identification process 130 five-second test samples were used. The proposed approach will also reduce the costs of maintenance and the number of faulty motors in the industry.

  1. System and method for investigating sub-surface features of a rock formation with acoustic sources generating conical broadcast signals

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Skelt, Christopher; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Paul A.; Guyer, Robert; Ten Cate, James A.; Le Bas, Pierre -Yves; Larmat, Carene S.

    2015-08-18

    A method of interrogating a formation includes generating a conical acoustic signal, at a first frequency--a second conical acoustic signal at a second frequency each in the between approximately 500 Hz and 500 kHz such that the signals intersect in a desired intersection volume outside the borehole. The method further includes receiving, a difference signal returning to the borehole resulting from a non-linear mixing of the signals in a mixing zone within the intersection volume.

  2. Methods for tracking multiple marine mammals with wide-baseline passive acoustic arrays.

    PubMed

    Nosal, Eva-Marie

    2013-09-01

    Most methods used to track marine mammals with passive acoustics require that time differences of arrivals (TDOAs) are established and are associated between hydrophone pairs. Consequently, multiple animal trackers commonly apply single-animal TDOA localization methods after performing a call separation and/or TDOA association step. When a wide-baseline array is used with multiple animals that make similar calls with short inter-call-intervals, the separation/association step can be challenging and potentially rejects valid TDOAs. This paper extends a model-based TDOA method to deal with multiple-animal datasets in a way that does not require a TDOA association step; animals are separated based on position. Advantageously, false TDOAs (e.g., a direct path associated with a multipath arrival) do not need to be removed. An analogous development is also presented for a model-based time of arrival tracking method. Results from simulations and application to a multiple sperm whale dataset are used to illustrate the multiple-animal methods. Although computationally more demanding than most track-after-association methods because separation is performed in a higher-dimensional space, the methods are computationally tractable and represent a useful new tool in the suite of options available for tracking multiple animals with passive acoustics. PMID:23968035

  3. Field support, data analysis and associated research for the acoustic grenade sounding program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, T. G.; Bullard, E. R.

    1976-01-01

    Temperature and horizontal winds in the 30 to 90 km altitude range of the upper atmosphere, were determined by acoustic grenade soundings conducted at Wallops Island, Virginia and Kourou, French Guiana. Field support provided at these locations included deployment of the large area microphone system, supervision, maintenance and operation of sound ranging stations; and coordination of activities. Data analysis efforts included the analysis of field data to determine upper atmospheric meteorological parameters. Profiles for upper atmospheric temperature, wind and density are provided in plots and tables for each of the acoustic grenade soundings conducted during the contract period. Research efforts were directed toward a systematic comparison of temperature data from acoustic grenade with other meteorological sensor probes in the upper atmosphere.

  4. FRP/steel composite damage acoustic emission monitoring and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongsheng; Chen, Zhi

    2015-04-01

    FRP is a new material with good mechanical properties, such as high strength of extension, low density, good corrosion resistance and anti-fatigue. FRP and steel composite has gotten a wide range of applications in civil engineering because of its good performance. As the FRP/steel composite get more and more widely used, the monitor of its damage is also getting more important. To monitor this composite, acoustic emission (AE) is a good choice. In this study, we prepare four identical specimens to conduct our test. During the testing process, the AE character parameters and mechanics properties were obtained. Damaged properties of FRP/steel composite were analyzed through acoustic emission (AE) signals. By the growing trend of AE accumulated energy, the severity of the damage made on FRP/steel composite was estimated. The AE sentry function has been successfully used to study damage progression and fracture emerge release rate of composite laminates. This technique combines the cumulative AE energy with strain energy of the material rather than analyzes the AE information and mechanical separately.

  5. Acoustical analysis of Spanish vowels produced by laryngectomized subjects.

    PubMed

    Cervera, T; Miralles, J L; González-Alvarez, J

    2001-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the acoustic characteristics of Spanish vowels in subjects who had undergone a total laryngectomy and to compare the results with those obtained in a control group of subjects who spoke normally. Our results are discussed in relation to those obtained in previous studies with English-speaking laryngectomized patients. The comparison between English and Spanish, which diFfer widely in the size of their vowel inventories, will help us to determine specific or universal vowel production characteristics in these patients. Our second objective was to relate the acoustic properties of these vowels to the perceptual data obtained in our previous work (J. L. Miralles & T. Cervera, 1995). In that study, results indicated that vowels produced by alaryngeal speakers were well perceived in word context. Vowels were produced in CVCV word context by two groups of patients who had undergone laryngectomy: tracheoesophageal speakers (TES) and esophageal speakers. In addition a control group of normal talkers was included. Audio recordings of 24 Spanish words produced by each speaker were analyzed using CSL (Kay Elemetrics). Results showed that F1, F2, and vowel duration of alaryngeal speakers differ significantly from normal values. In general, laryngectomized patients produce vowels with higher formant frequencies and longer durations than the group of laryngeal subjects. Thus, the data indicate modifications either in the frequency or temporal domain, following the same tendency found in previous studies with English-speaking laryngectomized speakers. PMID:11708538

  6. Acoustic Analysis of Plutonium and Nuclear Weapon Components at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, T. A.; Reynolds, J. J.; Rowe, C. A.; Freibert, F. J.; Ten Cate, J. A.; Ulrich, T. J.; Farrow, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    One of the primary missions of Los Alamos National Laboratory is to use science based techniques to certify the nuclear weapons stockpile of the United States. As such we use numerous NDE techniques to monitor materials and systems properties in weapons. Two techniques will be discussed in this presentation, Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy (ARS) and Acoustic Emission (AE). ARS is used to observe manufacturing variations or changes in the plutonium containing component (pit) of the weapon system. Both quantitative and qualitative comparisons can be used to determine variation in the pit components. Piezoelectric transducer driven acoustic resonance experiments will be described along with initial qualitative and more complex analysis and comparison techniques derived from earthquake analysis performed at LANL. Similarly, AE is used to measure the time of arrival of acoustic signals created by mechanical events that can occur in nuclear weapon components. Both traditional time of arrival techniques and more advanced techniques are used to pinpoint the location and type of acoustic emission event. Similar experiments on tensile tests of brittle phases of plutonium metal will be described.

  7. Linear and nonlinear analysis of dust acoustic waves in dissipative space dusty plasmas with trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Hanbaly, A. M.; El-Shewy, E. K.; Sallah, M.; Darweesh, H. F.

    2015-05-01

    The propagation of linear and nonlinear dust acoustic waves in a homogeneous unmagnetized, collisionless and dissipative dusty plasma consisted of extremely massive, micron-sized, negative dust grains has been investigated. The Boltzmann distribution is suggested for electrons whereas vortex-like distribution for ions. In the linear analysis, the dispersion relation is obtained, and the dependence of damping rate of the waves on the carrier wave number , the dust kinematic viscosity coefficient and the ratio of the ions to the electrons temperatures is discussed. In the nonlinear analysis, the modified Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers (mKdV-Burgers) equation is derived via the reductive perturbation method. Bifurcation analysis is discussed for non-dissipative system in the absence of Burgers term. In the case of dissipative system, the tangent hyperbolic method is used to solve mKdV-Burgers equation, and yield the shock wave solution. The obtained results may be helpful in better understanding of waves propagation in the astrophysical plasmas as well as in inertial confinement fusion laboratory plasmas.

  8. Mathematical justification of the acoustic method for measuring the impedance of the respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Bogomolov, A V; Dragan, S P

    2015-01-01

    A new method for measuring a complex frequency-dependent acoustic impedance of the respiratory tract based on two-microphone method was developed. The measuring device consists of a waveguide connected through a mouthpiece to the patient's mouth. A sound field with a frequency range from 5 to 100 Hz is created in the waveguide. The impedance of the respiratory tract is determined at free respiration of the patient in the set frequency range; the duration of examination does not exceed 15 s. The criteria for the recognition of respiratory tract pathologies are proposed. PMID:26518558

  9. Approximation methods for control of acoustic/structure models with piezoceramic actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Fang, W.; Silcox, R. J.; Smith, R. C.

    1991-01-01

    The active control of acoustic pressure in a 2-D cavity with a flexible boundary (a beam) is considered. Specifically, this control is implemented via piezoceramic patches on the beam which produces pure bending moments. The incorporation of the feedback control in this manner leads to a system with an unbounded input term. Approximation methods in this manner leads to a system with an unbounded input term. Approximation methods in the context of linear quadratic regulator (LQR) state space control formulation are discussed and numerical results demonstrating the effectiveness of this approach in computing feedback controls for noise reduction are presented.

  10. Simultaneous evaluation of acoustic nonlinearity parameter and attenuation coefficients using the finite amplitude method

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shuzeng; Li, Xiongbing; Jeong, Hyunjo Cho, Sungjong

    2015-07-15

    A novel method to determine acoustic parameters involved in measuring the nonlinearity parameter of fluids or solids is proposed. The approach is based on the measurement of fundamental and second harmonic pressures with a calibrated receiver, and on a nonlinear least squares data-fitting to multi-Gaussian beam (MGB) equations which explicitly define the attenuation and diffraction effects in the quasilinear regime. Results obtained in water validate the proposed method. The choice of suitable source pressure is discussed with regard to the quasilinear approximation involved. The attenuation coefficients are also acquired in nonlinear regime and their relations are discussed.

  11. Recent advances in Euler and Navier-Stokes methods for calculating helicopter rotor aerodynamics and acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, G. R.; Baeder, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    This paper outlines some recent advances in the application of the Euler and Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics methods to analyze nonlinear problems of helicopter aerodynamics and acoustics. A complete flowfield simulation of helicopters is currently not feasible with these methods. However, the use of the state-of-the-art numerical algorithms in conjunction with powerful supercomputers, like the Cray-2, have enabled notable progress to be made in modeling several individual components of this complex flow in hover and forward flight.

  12. A method for reducing the level of spurious signals in surface acoustic wave filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodii, Iu. N.; Grankin, I. M.; Zapunnyi, A. P.; Kolomeiko, A. V.

    1986-03-01

    A method for reducing spurious signals in surface acoustic wave (SAW) filters is proposed whereby both bulk and reflected wave signals are attenuated by electrodes of special configuration providing synphase addition of the useful signal and nonsynphase addition of spurious signal components. The electrodes of the input and output converters are made with a common focus point and equal angular apertures. The shape of the electrodes of the focusing converters on anisotropic crystal surfaces is determined by the corresponding SAW group velocity curve. An implementation of the method proposed here is examined together with some test results.

  13. Acoustic monitoring method and system in laser-induced optical breakdown (LIOB)

    DOEpatents

    O'Donnell, Matthew; Ye, Jing Yong; Norris, Theodore B.; Baker, Jr., James R.; Balogh, Lajos P.; Milas, Susanne M.; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.; Hollman, Kyle W.

    2008-05-06

    An acoustic monitoring method and system in laser-induced optical breakdown (LIOB) provides information which characterize material which is broken down, microbubbles in the material, and/or the microenvironment of the microbubbles. In one embodiment of the invention, femtosecond laser pulses are focused just inside the surface of a volume of aqueous solution which may include dendrimer nanocomposite (DNC) particles. A tightly focused, high frequency, single-element ultrasonic transducer is positioned such that its focus coincides axially and laterally with this laser focus. When optical breakdown occurs, a microbubble forms and a shock or pressure wave is emitted (i.e., acoustic emission). In addition to this acoustic signal, the microbubble may be actively probed with pulse-echo measurements from the same transducer. After the microbubble forms, received pulse-echo signals have an extra pulse, describing the microbubble location and providing a measure of axial microbubble size. Wavefield plots of successive recordings illustrate the generation, growth, and collapse of microbubbles due to optical breakdown. These same plots can also be used to quantify LIOB thresholds.

  14. Modeling of acoustic and gravity waves propagation through the atmosphere with spectral element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissaud, Q.; Garcia, R.; Martin, R.; Komatitsch, D.

    2014-12-01

    Low-frequency events such as tsunamis generate acoustic and gravity waves which quickly propagate in the atmosphere. Since the atmospheric density decreases exponentially as the altitude increases and from the conservation of the kinetic energy, those waves see their amplitude raise (to the order of 105 at 200km of altitude), allowing their detection in the upper atmosphere. Various tools have been developed through years to model this propagation, such as normal modes modeling or to a greater extent time-reversal techniques, but none offer a low-frequency multi-dimensional atmospheric wave modelling.A modeling tool is worthy interest since there are many different phenomena, from quakes to atmospheric explosions, able to propagate acoustic and gravity waves. In order to provide a fine modeling of the precise observations of these waves by GOCE satellite data, we developed a new numerical modeling tool.Starting from the SPECFEM program that already propagate waves in solid, porous or fluid media using a spectral element method, this work offers a tool with the ability to model acoustic and gravity waves propagation in a stratified attenuating atmosphere with a bottom forcing or an atmospheric source.Atmospheric attenuation is required in a proper modeling framework since it has a crucial impact on acoustic wave propagation. Indeed, it plays the role of a frequency filter that damps high-frequency signals. The bottom forcing feature has been implemented due to its ability to easily model the coupling with the Earth's or ocean's surface (that vibrates when a surface wave go through it) but also huge atmospheric events.

  15. Numerical modeling of acoustic and gravity waves propagation in the atmosphere using a spectral element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Roland; Brissaud, Quentin; Garcia, Raphael; Komatitsch, Dimitri

    2015-04-01

    During low-frequency events such as tsunamis, acoustic and gravity waves are generated and quickly propagate in the atmosphere. Due to the exponential decrease of the atmospheric density with the altitude, the conservation of the kinetic energy imposes that the amplitude of those waves increases (to the order of 105 at 200km of altitude), which allows their detection in the upper atmosphere. This propagation bas been modelled for years with different tools, such as normal modes modeling or to a greater extent time-reversal techniques, but a low-frequency multi-dimensional atmospheric wave modelling is still crucially needed. A modeling tool is worth of interest since there are many different sources, as earthquakes or atmospheric explosions, able to propagate acoustic and gravity waves. In order to provide a fine modeling of the precise observations of these waves by GOCE satellite data, we developed a new numerical modeling tool. By adding some developments to the SPECFEM package that already models wave propagation in solid, porous or fluid media using a spectral element method, we show here that acoustic and gravity waves propagation can now be modelled in a stratified attenuating atmosphere with a bottom forcing or an atmospheric source. The bottom forcing feature has been implemented to easily model the coupling with the Earth's or ocean's vibrating surfaces but also huge atmospheric events. Atmospheric attenuation is also introduced since it has a crucial impact on acoustic wave propagation. Indeed, it plays the role of a frequency filter that damps high-frequency signals.

  16. Discontinuous Galerkin method with Gaussian artificial viscosity on graphical processing units for nonlinear acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Bharat B.; Marchiano, Régis; Baskar, Sambandam; Coulouvrat, François

    2015-10-01

    Propagation of acoustical shock waves in complex geometry is a topic of interest in the field of nonlinear acoustics. For instance, simulation of Buzz Saw Noice requires the treatment of shock waves generated by the turbofan through the engines of aeroplanes with complex geometries and wall liners. Nevertheless, from a numerical point of view it remains a challenge. The two main hurdles are to take into account the complex geometry of the domain and to deal with the spurious oscillations (Gibbs phenomenon) near the discontinuities. In this work, first we derive the conservative hyperbolic system of nonlinear acoustics (up to quadratic nonlinear terms) using the fundamental equations of fluid dynamics. Then, we propose to adapt the classical nodal discontinuous Galerkin method to develop a high fidelity solver for nonlinear acoustics. The discontinuous Galerkin method is a hybrid of finite element and finite volume method and is very versatile to handle complex geometry. In order to obtain better performance, the method is parallelized on Graphical Processing Units. Like other numerical methods, discontinuous Galerkin method suffers with the problem of Gibbs phenomenon near the shock, which is a numerical artifact. Among the various ways to manage these spurious oscillations, we choose the method of parabolic regularization. Although, the introduction of artificial viscosity into the system is a popular way of managing shocks, we propose a new approach of introducing smooth artificial viscosity locally in each element, wherever needed. Firstly, a shock sensor using the linear coefficients of the spectral solution is used to locate the position of the discontinuities. Then, a viscosity coefficient depending on the shock sensor is introduced into the hyperbolic system of equations, only in the elements near the shock. The viscosity is applied as a two-dimensional Gaussian patch with its shape parameters depending on the element dimensions, referred here as Element

  17. Revealing, identifying, and assessing flaws in operating equipment by the acoustic emission image recognition method under strong background noise condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muravin, Gregory; Muravin, Boris; Lezvisky, Ludmila

    2004-05-01

    The analysis has shown that high pressure and high temperature piping in fossil and nuclear power plants suffer from unexpected and rarely predictable failures. To guarantee operational safety and to prevent failures authors have performed the complex investigations and have created Quantitative Acoustic Emission NDI technology for revealing, identifying and assessing flaws in equipment operated under strong background noise condition. These enabled: Overall inspection of the piping operated under stress, temperature, pressure, steam flow and loading, variation. Locating suspected zones and zones of flaw development with low J-integral value and the great variation of the dynamic range of flaws danger level. Identification of flaw types and their danger level. Detection of defective components in service prior to shut down. The continuous and the burst Acoustic Emission (AE) were used in combination as an information tool. As result, the significant number of flaws such as creep at stage 3a-3b, closed-edge micro-cracks, systems of randomly dispersed pores and inclusions, plastic deformation development around them, or/and individual micro-cracking were revealed, identified and assessed in 50 operating high energy piping. The findings and assessing flaw danger level obtained by QAE NDI were confirmed by independent NDI methods as TOFD, X-ray, replication, metallurgical investigations, etc. The findings and assessing flaw danger level obtained by QAE NDI were confirmed by independent NDI methods such as TOFD, X-ray, replication, metallurgical investigations, etc

  18. Structural-acoustic optimum design of shell structures in open/closed space based on a free-form optimization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimoda, Masatoshi; Shimoide, Kensuke; Shi, Jin-Xing

    2016-03-01

    Noise reduction by structural geometry optimization has attracted much attention among designers. In the present work, we propose a free-form optimization method for the structural-acoustic design optimization of shell structures to reduce the noise of a targeted frequency or frequency range in an open or closed space. The objective of the design optimization is to minimize the average structural vibration-induced sound pressure at the evaluation points in the acoustic field under a volume constraint. For the shape design optimization, we carry out structural-acoustic coupling analysis and adjoint analysis to calculate the shape gradient functions. Then, we use the shape gradient functions in velocity analysis to update the shape of shell structures. We repeat this process until convergence is confirmed to obtain the optimum shape of the shell structures in a structural-acoustic coupling system. The numerical results for the considered examples showed that the proposed design optimization process can significantly reduce the noise in both open and closed spaces.

  19. Vibration analysis methods for piping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibert, R. J.

    1981-09-01

    Attention is given to flow vibrations in pipe flow induced by singularity points in the piping system. The types of pressure fluctuations induced by flow singularities are examined, including the intense wideband fluctuations immediately downstream of the singularity and the acoustic fluctuations encountered in the remainder of the circuit, and a theory of noise generation by unsteady flow in internal acoustics is developed. The response of the piping systems to the pressure fluctuations thus generated is considered, and the calculation of the modal characteristics of piping containing a dense fluid in order to obtain the system transfer function is discussed. The TEDEL program, which calculates the vibratory response of a structure composed of straight and curved pipes with variable mechanical characteristics forming a three-dimensional network by a finite element method, is then presented, and calculations of fluid-structural coupling in tubular networks are illustrated.

  20. Acoustic measurement method of the volume flux of a seafloor hydrothermal plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, G.; Jackson, D. R.; Bemis, K. G.; Rona, P. A.

    2011-12-01

    Measuring fluxes (volume, chemical, heat, etc.) of the deep sea hydrothermal vents has been a crucial but challenging task faced by the scientific community since the discovery of the vent systems. However, the great depths and complexities of the hydrothermal vents make traditional sampling methods laborious and almost daunting missions. Furthermore, the samples, in most cases both sparse in space and sporadic in time, are hardly enough to provide a result with moderate uncertainty. In September 2010, our Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar System (COVIS, http://vizlab.rutgers.edu/AcoustImag/covis.html) was connected to the Neptune Canada underwater ocean observatory network (http://www.neptunecanada.ca) at the Main Endeavour vent field on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. During the experiment, the COVIS system produced 3D images of the buoyant plume discharged from the vent complex Grotto by measuring the back-scattering intensity of the acoustic signal. Building on the methodology developed in our previous work, the vertical flow velocity of the plume is estimated from the Doppler shift of the acoustic signal using geometric correction to compensate for the ambient horizontal currents. A Gaussian distribution curve is fitted to the horizontal back-scattering intensity profile to determine the back-scattering intensity at the boundary of the plume. Such a boundary value is used as the threshold in a window function for separating the plume from background signal. Finally, the volume flux is obtained by integrating the resulting 2D vertical velocity profile over the horizontal cross-section of the plume. In this presentation, we discuss preliminary results from the COVIS experiment. In addition, several alternative approaches are applied to determination of the accuracy of the estimated plume vertical velocity in the absence of direct measurements. First, the results from our previous experiment (conducted in 2000 at the same vent complex using a

  1. Analysis of Fumarole Acoustics at Aso Volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, K. F.; Yokoo, A.; Fee, D.; Huang, Y. C.; Yoshikawa, S.; Utsugi, M.; Minami, T.; Ohkura, T.

    2015-12-01

    The lowermost portion of large eruption columns is the momentum-driven, fluid flow portion known as a volcanic jet. The perturbation of the atmosphere from this region produces a sound known as jetting or jet noise. Recent work has shown that this volcanic jet noise produced by a volcano has similar characteristics as the sound from jet and rocket engines. The study of volcanic jet noise has gained much from laboratory jet engine studies; however, jet engines have been engineered to reduce noise thereby limiting their use as a comparison tool to the complex, ever-changing volcanic jet. Previous studies have noted that fumaroles produce jet noise without further detailed investigation. The goal of this work is to enhance our understanding of large-scale volcanic jets by studying an accessible, less hazardous fumarolic jet. We aim to characterize the acoustic signature of fumaroles and evaluate if fumarolic jets scale to that of large volcanic jets. To investigate this, we deployed a 6-element acoustic array at two different locations along the edge of the crater wall at Aso Volcano, Japan from early July through mid-August 2015. Approximately two months before this deployment, the pyroclastic cone within Aso's crater partially collapsed into the vent. The cone was constructed during both ash venting and strombolian-style explosive activity in the last year. After the deployment, on July 13 a new small vent opened on the southwest flank of the pyroclastic cone. The vent is several meters in diameter and has consistent gas jetting which produces audible jet noise. To better capture the acoustic signature of the gas jetting we moved the array to the southwestern edge of the crater. The array is 230 meters from the vent and is positioned 54 degrees from the vertical jet axis, a recording angle usually not feasible in volcanic environments. Preliminary investigations suggest directionality at the source and the influence of topography along the propagation path as

  2. Acoustic detection of pneumothorax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansy, Hansen A.; Royston, Thomas J.; Balk, Robert A.; Sandler, Richard H.

    2003-04-01

    This study aims at investigating the feasibility of using low-frequency (<2000 Hz) acoustic methods for medical diagnosis. Several candidate methods of pneumothorax detection were tested in dogs. In the first approach, broadband acoustic signals were introduced into the trachea during end-expiration and transmitted waves were measured at the chest surface. Pneumothorax was found to consistently decrease pulmonary acoustic transmission in the 200-1200-Hz frequency band, while less change was observed at lower frequencies (p<0.0001). The ratio of acoustic energy between low (<220 Hz) and mid (550-770 Hz) frequency bands was significantly different in the control (healthy) and pneumothorax states (p<0.0001). The second approach measured breath sounds in the absence of an external acoustic input. Pneumothorax was found to be associated with a preferential reduction of sound amplitude in the 200- to 700-Hz range, and a decrease of sound amplitude variation (in the 300 to 600-Hz band) during the respiration cycle (p<0.01 for each). Finally, chest percussion was implemented. Pneumothorax changed the frequency and decay rate of percussive sounds. These results imply that certain medical conditions may be reliably detected using appropriate acoustic measurements and analysis. [Work supported by NIH/NHLBI #R44HL61108.

  3. Operational Performance Analysis of Passive Acoustic Monitoring for Killer Whales

    SciTech Connect

    Matzner, Shari; Fu, Tao; Ren, Huiying; Deng, Zhiqun; Sun, Yannan; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2011-09-30

    For the planned tidal turbine site in Puget Sound, WA, the main concern is to protect Southern Resident Killer Whales (SRKW) due to their Endangered Species Act status. A passive acoustic monitoring system is proposed because the whales emit vocalizations that can be detected by a passive system. The algorithm for detection is implemented in two stages. The first stage is an energy detector designed to detect candidate signals. The second stage is a spectral classifier that is designed to reduce false alarms. The evaluation presented here of the detection algorithm incorporates behavioral models of the species of interest, environmental models of noise levels and potential false alarm sources to provide a realistic characterization of expected operational performance.

  4. FY-93 noncontacting acoustic ultrasonic signature analysis development

    SciTech Connect

    Tow, D.M.; Rodriguez, J.G.; Williamson, R.L.; Blackwood, L.G.

    1994-04-01

    A noncontacting, long-standoff inspection system with proven capabilities in container fill identification has been under development at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The system detects subtle change in container vibration characteristics caused by differences in the physical properties of the fill materials. A container is inspected by acoustically inducting it to vibrate and sensing the vibrational response with a laser vibrometer. A standoff distance of several meters is feasible. In previous work the system proved to be a reliable means of distinguishing between munitions with a variety of chemical fills. During FY-93, the system was modified to improve performance and simplify operation. Other FY-93 accomplishments include progress in modeling the vibrational characteristics of containers and refinements to the statistical classification algorithms. Progress was also made in identifying other applications for this technology.

  5. A novel numerical approach and stability analysis of thermo-acoustic phenomenon in the Rijke tube problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayadi, Taraneh; Le Chenadec, Vincent; Schmid, Peter; Richecoeur, Franck; Massot, Marc

    2013-11-01

    The modeling of thermo-acoustic coupling in reactive flows represents a challenging task. In this study, we focus on the Rijke tube problem, which includes relevant features such as a compact acoustic source, an empirical modeling of the heat source, and non-linearities. This thermo-acoustic system features a complex dynamical behavior, which renders the characterization of the different encountered flow regimes difficult. In order to synthesize accurate time series, we tackle this problem from a numerical point-of-view, and start by proposing a dedicated solver designed for dealing with the underlying stiffness, in particular, the retarded time and the discontinuity at the location of the heat source. Convergence and parametric studies are carried out to assess the accuracy of the discretization, hence laying a foundation for a stability analysis of the semi-discrete system. This stability analysis is performed by means of the projection method proposed by Jarlebring, which alleviates the linearization of the retarded term, and is used to validate the numerical results. Finally, the focus is set on the application of the dynamic mode decomposition technique to study bifurcations.

  6. Acoustic analysis reveals a new cryptic bush–cricket in the Carpathian Mountains (Orthoptera, Phaneropteridae)

    PubMed Central

    Iorgu, Ionuţ Ştefan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A new morphologically cryptic species of phaneropterid bush–cricket from the genus Isophya is described from the Eastern Carpathian Mountains: Isophya dochia sp. n. Sound analysis and morphological details are discussed in the paper comparing the new species with several Isophya species having similar morphology and acoustic behavior. PMID:23378813

  7. Acoustic Analysis of the Tremulous Voice: Assessing the Utility of the Correlation Dimension and Perturbation Parameters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shao, Jun; MacCallum, Julia K.; Zhang, Yu; Sprecher, Alicia; Jiang, Jack J.

    2010-01-01

    Acoustic analysis may provide a useful means to quantitatively characterize the tremulous voice. Signals were obtained from 25 subjects with diagnoses of either Parkinson's disease or vocal polyps exhibiting vocal tremor. These were compared to signals from 24 subjects with normal voices. Signals were analyzed via correlation dimension and several…

  8. System and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F.; Burnett, Greg C.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2007-10-16

    A system and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources is disclosed. Propagating wave electromagnetic sensors monitor excitation sources in sound producing systems, such as machines, musical instruments, and various other structures. Acoustical output from these sound producing systems is also monitored. From such information, a transfer function characterizing the sound producing system is generated. From the transfer function, acoustical output from the sound producing system may be synthesized or canceled. The methods disclosed enable accurate calculation of matched transfer functions relating specific excitations to specific acoustical outputs. Knowledge of such signals and functions can be used to effect various sound replication, sound source identification, and sound cancellation applications.

  9. System and method for characterizing synthesizing and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F.; Burnett, Greg C.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2003-01-01

    A system and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources is disclosed. Propagating wave electromagnetic sensors monitor excitation sources in sound producing systems, such as machines, musical instruments, and various other structures. Acoustical output from these sound producing systems is also monitored. From such information, a transfer function characterizing the sound producing system is generated. From the transfer function, acoustical output from the sound producing system may be synthesized or canceled. The methods disclosed enable accurate calculation of matched transfer functions relating specific excitations to specific acoustical outputs. Knowledge of such signals and functions can be used to effect various sound replication, sound source identification, and sound cancellation applications.

  10. System and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F; Burnett, Greg C; Ng, Lawrence C

    2013-05-21

    A system and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources is disclosed. Propagating wave electromagnetic sensors monitor excitation sources in sound producing systems, such as machines, musical instruments, and various other structures. Acoustical output from these sound producing systems is also monitored. From such information, a transfer function characterizing the sound producing system is generated. From the transfer function, acoustical output from the sound producing system may be synthesized or canceled. The methods disclosed enable accurate calculation of matched transfer functions relating specific excitations to specific acoustical outputs. Knowledge of such signals and functions can be used to effect various sound replication, sound source identification, and sound cancellation applications.

  11. A finite difference analysis of the field present behind an acoustically impenetrable two-layer barrier.

    PubMed

    Hurrell, Andrew M

    2008-06-01

    The interaction of an incident sound wave with an acoustically impenetrable two-layer barrier is considered. Of particular interest is the presence of several acoustic wave components in the shadow region of this barrier. A finite difference model capable of simulating this geometry is validated by comparison to the analytical solution for an idealized, hard-soft barrier. A panel comprising a high air-content closed cell foam backed with an elastic (metal) back plate is then examined. The insertion loss of this panel was found to exceed the dynamic range of the measurement system and was thus acoustically impenetrable. Experimental results from such a panel are shown to contain artifacts not present in the diffraction solution, when acoustic waves are incident upon the soft surface. A finite difference analysis of this experimental configuration replicates the presence of the additional field components. Furthermore, the simulated results allow the additional components to be identified as arising from the S(0) and A(0) Lamb modes traveling in the elastic plate. These Lamb mode artifacts are not found to be present in the shadow region when the acoustic waves are incident upon the elastic surface. PMID:18537372

  12. Acoustic Propagation Studies For Sperm Whale Phonation Analysis During LADC Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorovskaia, Natalia A.; Ioup, George E.; Ioup, Juliette W.; Caruthers, Jerald W.

    2004-11-01

    The Littoral Acoustic Demonstration Center (LADC) conducted a series of passive acoustic experiments in the Northern Gulf of Mexico and the Ligurian Sea in 2001 and 2002. Environmental and acoustic moorings were deployed in areas of large concentrations of marine mammals (mainly, sperm whales). Recordings and analysis of whale phonations are among the objectives of the project. Each mooring had a single autonomously recording hydrophone (Environmental Acoustic Recording System (EARS)) obtained from the U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office after modification to record signals up to 5,859 Hz in the Gulf of Mexico and up to 12,500 Hz in the Ligurian Sea. Self-recording environmental sensors, attached to the moorings, and concurrent environmental ship surveys provided the environmental data for the experiments. The results of acoustic simulations of long-range propagation of the broad-band (500-6,000 Hz) phonation pulses from a hypothetical whale location to the recording hydrophone in the experimental environments are presented. The utilization of the simulation results for an interpretation of the spectral features observed in whale clicks and for the development of tracking algorithms from single hydrophone recordings based on the identification of direct and surface and bottom reflected arrivals are discussed. [Research supported by ONR.

  13. A comparison of matrix methods for calculating eigenvalues in acoustically lined ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, W.; Lansing, D. L.

    1976-01-01

    Three approximate methods - finite differences, weighted residuals, and finite elements - were used to solve the eigenvalue problem which arises in finding the acoustic modes and propagation constants in an absorptively lined two-dimensional duct without airflow. The matrix equations derived for each of these methods were solved for the eigenvalues corresponding to various values of wall impedance. Two matrix orders, 20 x 20 and 40 x 40, were used. The cases considered included values of wall admittance for which exact eigenvalues were known and for which several nearly equal roots were present. Ten of the lower order eigenvalues obtained from the three approximate methods were compared with solutions calculated from the exact characteristic equation in order to make an assessment of the relative accuracy and reliability of the three methods. The best results were given by the finite element method using a cubic polynomial. Excellent accuracy was consistently obtained, even for nearly equal eigenvalues, by using a 20 x 20 order matrix.

  14. Numerical simulations of acoustics problems using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanford, Amanda Danforth

    In the current study, real gas effects in the propagation of sound waves are simulated using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method for a wide range of systems. This particle method allows for treatment of acoustic phenomena for a wide range of Knudsen numbers, defined as the ratio of molecular mean free path to wavelength. Continuum models such as the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations break down for flows greater than a Knudsen number of approximately 0.05. Continuum models also suffer from the inability to simultaneously model nonequilibrium conditions, diatomic or polyatomic molecules, nonlinearity and relaxation effects and are limited in their range of validity. Therefore, direct simulation Monte Carlo is capable of directly simulating acoustic waves with a level of detail not possible with continuum approaches. The basis of direct simulation Monte Carlo lies within kinetic theory where representative particles are followed as they move and collide with other particles. A parallel, object-oriented DSMC solver was developed for this problem. Despite excellent parallel efficiency, computation time is considerable. Monatomic gases, gases with internal energy, planetary environments, and amplitude effects spanning a large range of Knudsen number have all been modeled with the same method and compared to existing theory. With the direct simulation method, significant deviations from continuum predictions are observed for high Knudsen number flows.

  15. Non-Destructive Evaluation Method and Apparatus for Measuring Acoustic Material Nonlinearity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, John H. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An acoustic non-linearity parameter (beta) measurement method and system for Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) of materials and structural members obviates the need for electronic calibration of the measuring equipment. Unlike known substitutional measuring techniques requiring elaborate calibration procedures, the electrical outputs of the capacitive detector of a sample with known beta and the test sample of unknown beta are compared to determine the unknown beta. In order to provide the necessary stability of the present-inventive reference-based approach, the bandpass filters of the measurement system are maintained in a temperature-controlled environment, and the line voltage supplied to said amplifiers is well-regulated.

  16. Acoustic natural frequency analysis of tree-structure pipeline systems by personal computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Györi, I.; Joó, Gy.

    1986-02-01

    The paper gives the extension of the Schmidt-Kuhlmann method for reciprocating compressor pipeline systems having a tree-structure, consisting of receivers and pipes with an optional number of branchings. It gives a generalized algorithm which makes it possible to mechanize program constructing for the purpose of determining acoustic natural frequencies of complex structures, and it illustrates the use of personal computers—besides the actual numerical calculations—for automatic program-writing as well. The program developed is very useful in design practice for determining the effects caused by modification of the geometric dimensions, and it permits one to shift and avoid harmful acoustic resonances in preliminary planning.

  17. Property evaluation of thermal sprayed metallic coating by acoustic emission analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, Asako; Mizutani, Yoshihiro; Takemoto, Mikio; Ono, Kanji

    2000-03-01

    The authors analyzed acoustic emission signals from plasma sprayed sheets by first obtaining the Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and density. The sheets of a high Cr-Ni alloy (55Cr-41Ni-Mo, Si, B) were made by low pressure plasma spraying (LPPS) and heat treated. Utilizing laser induced surface acoustic waves (SAWs), the group velocity dispersion data of Rayleigh waves was obtained and matched to that computed by Adler's matrix transfer method. They monitored the acoustic emissions (Lamb waves) produced by microfractures in free standing as sprayed coating subjected to bending. Fast cleavage type microfracture with source rise time of around 2 {micro}s occurred as precursors to the final brittle fracture. The velocity and time-frequency amplitude spectrograms (wavelet contour maps) of the Lamb waves were utilized for the source location and fracture kinetic analyses.

  18. Investigation of the thickness effect to impedance analysis results AlGaN acoustic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özen, Soner; Bilgiç, Eyüp; Gülmez, Gülay; Şenay, Volkan; Pat, Suat; Korkmaz, Şadan; Mohammadigharehbagh, Reza

    2016-03-01

    In this study, AlGaN acoustic sensors were deposited on aluminum metal substrate by thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) method, for the first time. Impedance analyses of the fabricated acoustic sensors were investigated for the determining of effect of the nano layer thickness. Thickness values are very close to each others. Fabricated sensors have been fabricated from AlGaN deposited on aluminum substrates. Gallium materials are used in many applications for optoelectronic device and semiconductor technology. Thermionic vacuum arc is the deposition technology for the variously materials and applications field. TVA production parameters and some properties of the deposited layers were investigated. TVA is the fast deposition technology for the gallium compounds and doped gallium compounds. Obtained results that AlGaN layer are very promising material for an acoustic sensor but also TVA is proper fast technology for the production.

  19. Articulatory-to-Acoustic Relations in Talkers with Dysarthria: A First Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mefferd, Antje

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The primary purpose of this study was to determine the strength of interspeaker and intraspeaker articulatory-to-acoustic relations of vowel contrast produced by talkers with dysarthria and controls. Methods: Six talkers with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), six talkers with Parkinson's disease (PD), and 12 controls repeated a…

  20. Parametric Quantitative Acoustic Analysis of Conversation Produced by Speakers with Dysarthria and Healthy Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Kristin M.; Kent, Raymond D.; Delaney, Amy L.; Duffy, Joseph R.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This study's main purpose was to (a) identify acoustic signatures of hypokinetic dysarthria (HKD) that are robust to phonetic variation in conversational speech and (b) determine specific characteristics of the variability associated with HKD. Method: Twenty healthy control (HC) participants and 20 participants with HKD associated with…

  1. Quadratic Time-Frequency Analysis of Hydroacoustic Signals as Applied to Acoustic Emissions of Large Whales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bras, Ronan; Victor, Sucic; Damir, Malnar; Götz, Bokelmann

    2014-05-01

    In order to enrich the set of attributes in setting up a large database of whale signals, as envisioned in the Baleakanta project, we investigate methods of time-frequency analysis. The purpose of establishing the database is to increase and refine knowledge of the emitted signal and of its propagation characteristics, leading to a better understanding of the animal migrations in a non-invasive manner and to characterize acoustic propagation in oceanic media. The higher resolution for signal extraction and a better separation from other signals and noise will be used for various purposes, including improved signal detection and individual animal identification. The quadratic class of time-frequency distributions (TFDs) is the most popular set of time-frequency tools for analysis and processing of non-stationary signals. Two best known and most studied members of this class are the spectrogram and the Wigner-Ville distribution. However, to be used efficiently, i.e. to have highly concentrated signal components while significantly suppressing interference and noise simultaneously, TFDs need to be optimized first. The optimization method used in this paper is based on the Cross-Wigner-Ville distribution, and unlike similar approaches it does not require prior information on the analysed signal. The method is applied to whale signals, which, just like the majority of other real-life signals, can generally be classified as multicomponent non-stationary signals, and hence time-frequency techniques are a natural choice for their representation, analysis, and processing. We present processed data from a set containing hundreds of individual calls. The TFD optimization method results into a high resolution time-frequency representation of the signals. It allows for a simple extraction of signal components from the TFD's dominant ridges. The local peaks of those ridges can then be used for the signal components instantaneous frequency estimation, which in turn can be used as

  2. Comparison of acoustic and impedance methods with mask capnometry to assess respiration rate in obese patients recovering from general anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Frasca, D; Geraud, L; Charriere, J M; Debaene, B; Mimoz, O

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory depression, a potentially serious complication after general anaesthesia, can be detected promptly by close monitoring of both oxygen saturation and respiratory rate. Obese patients have morphological changes that may impair the reliability of monitoring devices. In this study, respiration rate was simultaneously recorded every second for up to 60 min using a computer in 30 adult obese patients (body mass index ≥ 35 kg.m(-2)), by three methods: acoustic; thoracic impedance; and capnometry via a facemask (Capnomask, reference method). Of the 99,771 data triplets collected, only 85,520 (86%) were included; 12,021 (84%) were not studied due to failure of capnometry and 2240 (16%) due to failure of the acoustic method. Compared with capnometry, bias was similar using both the acoustic method and impedance (-0.3 bpm vs. -0.6 bpm, respectively, p = 0.09), but limits of agreement were narrower for the acoustic method (±3.5 bpm vs. ±5.3 bpm, respectively, p = 0.0008). The proportion of respiration rate values obtained with the acoustic method and impedance that differed by at least 10% or 20% for more than 15 s were 11% vs. 23% and 2% vs. 6%, respectively (p = 0.0009 for both comparisons). The acoustic sensor was well tolerated, while the facemask was pulled off on several occasions by four (13%) agitated patients. In obese patients requiring close monitoring of respiration rate, the acoustic method may be more precise than thoracic impedance and better tolerated than capnometry with a facemask. PMID:25040754

  3. Acoustic emission-based condition monitoring methods: Review and application for low speed slew bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caesarendra, Wahyu; Kosasih, Buyung; Tieu, Anh Kiet; Zhu, Hongtao; Moodie, Craig A. S.; Zhu, Qiang

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents an acoustic emission-based method for the condition monitoring of low speed reversible slew bearings. Several acoustic emission (AE) hit parameters as the monitoring parameters for the detection of impending failure of slew bearings are reviewed first. The review focuses on: (1) the application of AE in typical rolling element bearings running at different speed classifications, i.e. high speed (>600 rpm), low speed (10-600 rpm) and very low speed (<10 rpm); (2) the commonly used AE hit parameters in rolling element bearings and (3) AE signal processing, feature extraction and pattern recognition methods. In the experiment, impending failure of the slew bearing was detected by the AE hit parameters after the new bearing had run continuously for approximately 15 months. The slew bearing was then dismantled and the evidence of the early defect was analysed. Based on the result, we propose a feature extraction method of the AE waveform signal using the largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE) algorithm and demonstrate that the LLE feature can detect the sign of failure earlier than the AE hit parameters with improved prediction of the progressive trend of the defect.

  4. Evaluation of a multi-point method for determining acoustic impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Parrott, Tony L.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to explore potential improvements provided by a Multi-Point Method (MPM) over the Standing Wave Method (SWM) and Two-Microphone Method (TMM) for determining acoustic impedance. A wave propagation model was developed to model the standing wave pattern in an impedance tube. The acoustic impedance of a test specimen was calculated from a best fit of this standing wave pattern to pressure measurements obtained along the impedance tube centerline. Three measurement spacing distributions were examined: uniform, random, and selective. Calculated standing wave patterns match the point pressure measurement distributions with good agreement for a reflection factor magnitude range of 0.004 to 0.999. Comparisons of results using 2, 3, 6, and 18 measurement points showed that the most consistent results are obtained when using at least 6 evenly spaced pressure measurements per half-wavelength. Also, data were acquired with broadband noise added to the discrete frequency noise and impedances were calculated using the MPM and TMM algorithms. The results indicate that the MPM will be superior to the TMM in the presence of significant broadband noise levels associated with mean flow.

  5. Examination of the Measurement of Absorption Using the Reverberant Room Method for Highly Absorptive Acoustic Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Anne M.; Chris Nottoli; Eric Wolfram

    2015-01-01

    The absorption coefficient for material specimens are needed to quantify the expected acoustic performance of that material in its actual usage and environment. The ASTM C423-09a standard, "Standard Test Method for Sound Absorption and Sound Absorption Coefficients by the Reverberant Room Method" is often used to measure the absorption coefficient of material test specimens. This method has its basics in the Sabine formula. Although widely used, the interpretation of these measurements are a topic of interest. For example, in certain cases the measured Sabine absorption coefficients are greater than 1.0 for highly absorptive materials. This is often attributed to the diffraction edge effect phenomenon. An investigative test program to measure the absorption properties of highly absorbent melamine foam has been performed at the Riverbank Acoustical Laboratories. This paper will present and discuss the test results relating to the effect of the test materials' surface area, thickness and edge sealing conditions. A follow-on paper is envisioned that will present and discuss the results relating to the spacing between multiple piece specimens, and the mounting condition of the test specimen.

  6. Evaluation of shrinkage and cracking in concrete of ring test by acoustic emission method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Chikanori

    2015-03-01

    Drying shrinkage of concrete is one of the typical problems related to reduce durability and defilation of concrete structures. Lime stone, expansive additive and low-heat Portland cement are used to reduce drying shrinkage in Japan. Drying shrinkage is commonly evaluated by methods of measurement for length change of mortar and concrete. In these methods, there is detected strain due to drying shrinkage of free body, although visible cracking does not occur. In this study, the ring test was employed to detect strain and age cracking of concrete. The acoustic emission (AE) method was adopted to detect micro cracking due to shrinkage. It was recognized that in concrete using lime stone, expansive additive and low-heat Portland cement are effective to decrease drying shrinkage and visible cracking. Micro cracking due to shrinkage of this concrete was detected and evaluated by the AE method.

  7. Wideband nonlinear time reversal seismo-acoustic method for landmine detection.

    PubMed

    Sutin, Alexander; Libbey, Brad; Fillinger, Laurent; Sarvazyan, Armen

    2009-04-01

    Acoustic and seismic waves provide a method to localize compliant mines by vibrating the top plate and a thin soil layer above the mine. This vibration is mostly linear, but also includes a small nonlinear deviation. The main goal of this paper is to introduce a method of processing that uses phase-inversion to observe nonlinear effects in a wide frequency band. The method extracts a nonlinear part of surface velocity from two similar broadcast signals of opposite sign by summing and cancelling the linear components and leaving the nonlinear components. This phase-inversion method is combined with time reversal focusing to provide increased seismic vibration and enhance the nonlinear effect. The experiments used six loudspeakers in a wood box placed over sand in which inert landmines were buried. The nonlinear surface velocity of the sand with a mine compared to the sand without a mine was greater as compared to a linear technique. PMID:19354365

  8. High Sensitivity Detection of Broadband Acoustic Vibration Using Optical Demodulation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen

    Measuring the high frequency acoustic vibrations represents the fundamental interest in revealing the intrinsic dynamic characteristic of board range of systems, such as the growth of the fetus, blood flow in human palms, and vibrations of carbon nanotube. However, the acoustic wave detection capability is limited by the detection bandwidth and sensitivity of the commonly used piezoelectric based ultrasound detectors. To overcome these limitations, this thesis focuses on exploring the optical demodulation method for highly sensitive detection of broadband acoustic vibration. First, a transparent optical ultrasonic detector has been developed using micro-ring resonator (MRR) made of soft polymeric materials. It outperforms the traditional piezoelectric detectors with broader detection bandwidth, miniaturized size and wide angular sensitivity. Its ease of integration into photoacoustic microscopy system has resulted in the great improvement of the imaging resolution. A theoretic framework has been developed to establish the quantitative understanding of its unique distance and angular dependent detection characteristics and was subsequently validated experimentally. The developed theoretic framework provides a guideline to fully accounts for the trade-offs between axial and lateral resolution, working distance, and the field of view in developing optimal imaging performance for a wide range of biological and clinical applications. MRR-based ultrasonic detector is further integrated into confocal fluorescence microscopy to realize the simultaneous imaging of fluorescence and optical absorption of retinal pigment epithelium, achieving multi-contrast imaging at sub-cellular level. The needs to resolve the fine details of the biological specimen with the resolution beyond the diffraction limit further motivate the development of optical demodulated ultrasonic detection method based on near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM). The nano-focusing probe was developed

  9. Vibroacoustic analysis and experimental validation of the structural responses of NASA Mars Exploration Rover spacecraft due to acoustic launch load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, H. J.

    2003-01-01

    Structural responses of a spacecraft during liftoff are dominated by the intense acoustic pressure field imping on the exterior of the launch vehicle. Statistical Energy Analysis model of the NASA Mars Exploration Rover spacecraft has been developed and the SEA model was analyzed to predict vibroacoustic responses of the spacecraft under the diffuse acoustic loading condition.

  10. Analysis of clot formation with acoustic radiation force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, Francesco; Longo, Diane M.; Lawrence, Michael B.; Walker, William F.

    2002-04-01

    Inappropriate blood coagulation plays an important role in diseases including stroke, heart attack, and deep vein thrombosis (DVT). DVT arises when a blood clot forms in a large vein of the leg. DVT is detrimental because the blood flow may be partially or completely obstructed. More importantly, a potentially fatal situation may arise if part of the clot travels to the arteries in the lungs, forming a pulmonary embolism (PE). Characterization of the mechanical properties of DVT could improve diagnosis and suggest appropriate treatment. We are developing a technique to assess mechanical properties of forming thrombi. The technique uses acoustic radiation force as a means to produce small, localized displacements within the sample. Returned ultrasound echoes are processed to estimate the time dependent displacement of the sample. Appropriate mechanical modeling and signal processing produce plots depicting relative mechanical properties (relative elasticity and relative viscosity) and force-free parameters (time constant, damping ratio, and natural frequency). We present time displacement curves of blood samples obtained during coagulation, and show associated relative and force-free parameter plots. These results show that the Voigt model with added mass accurately characterizes blood behavior during clot formation.

  11. Analysis of In Mine Acoustic Recordings for Single Fired Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, S.; Hayward, C.; Stump, B.

    2003-12-01

    In August of 2003, a series of single fired test shots were executed at a copper mine in Arizona. The ten shots, fired on August 18 and 19, 2003, ranged in size from 1700 lbs to 13600 lbs in simultaneously detonated patterns ranging from a single hole to eight holes. All were located within the same pit and within 100 m of each other. Both free face and bench shots were included. Southern Methodist University had previously deployed a set of acoustic gauges ringing the active production areas of the mine. The five Validyne DP250 sensors recorded not only the ten test shots, but also seven delay fired production shots over the four day period from August 18 to 21, 2003. Each recorded blast arrival was analyzed for peak amplitude and spectrum. Signals were then compared for the variability between shots and sensors as well as a comparison between fully contained and poorly contained shots. Blast yield, scale depth, and centroid depth were compared to the above measured quantities for each of the single-fired and production shots.

  12. Analysis of underwater decoupling properties of a locally resonant acoustic metamaterial coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling-Zhi, Huang; Yong, Xiao; Ji-Hong, Wen; Hai-Bin, Yang; Xi-Sen, Wen

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a semi-analytical solution for the vibration and sound radiation of a semi-infinite plate covered by a decoupling layer consisting of locally resonant acoustic metamaterial. Formulations are derived based on a combination use of effective medium theory and the theory of elasticity for the decoupling material. Theoretical results show good agreements between the method developed in this paper and the conventional finite element method (FEM), but the method of this paper is more efficient than FEM. Numerical results also show that system with acoustic metamaterial decoupling layer exhibits significant noise reduction performance at the local resonance frequency of the acoustic metamaterial, and such performance can be ascribed to the vibration suppression of the base plate. It is demonstrated that the effective density of acoustic metamaterial decoupling layer has a great influence on the mechanical impedance of the system. Furthermore, the resonance frequency of locally resonant structure can be effectively predicted by a simple model, and it can be significantly affected by the material properties of the locally resonant structure. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51305448 and 51275519).

  13. Development of an Efficient Binaural Simulation for the Analysis of Structural Acoustic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Marty E.; Lalime, Aimee L.; Grosveld, Ferdinand W.; Rizzi, Stephen A.; Sullivan, Brenda M.

    2003-01-01

    Applying binaural simulation techniques to structural acoustic data can be very computationally intensive as the number of discrete noise sources can be very large. Typically, Head Related Transfer Functions (HRTFs) are used to individually filter the signals from each of the sources in the acoustic field. Therefore, creating a binaural simulation implies the use of potentially hundreds of real time filters. This paper details two methods of reducing the number of real-time computations required by: (i) using the singular value decomposition (SVD) to reduce the complexity of the HRTFs by breaking them into dominant singular values and vectors and (ii) by using equivalent source reduction (ESR) to reduce the number of sources to be analyzed in real-time by replacing sources on the scale of a structural wavelength with sources on the scale of an acoustic wavelength. The ESR and SVD reduction methods can be combined to provide an estimated computation time reduction of 99.4% for the structural acoustic data tested. In addition, preliminary tests have shown that there is a 97% correlation between the results of the combined reduction methods and the results found with the current binaural simulation techniques

  14. AUV Positioning Method Based on Tightly Coupled SINS/LBL for Underwater Acoustic Multipath Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tao; Shi, Hongfei; Chen, Liping; Li, Yao; Tong, Jinwu

    2016-01-01

    This paper researches an AUV (Autonomous Underwater Vehicle) positioning method based on SINS (Strapdown Inertial Navigation System)/LBL (Long Base Line) tightly coupled algorithm. This algorithm mainly includes SINS-assisted searching method of optimum slant-range of underwater acoustic propagation multipath, SINS/LBL tightly coupled model and multi-sensor information fusion algorithm. Fuzzy correlation peak problem of underwater LBL acoustic propagation multipath could be solved based on SINS positional information, thus improving LBL positional accuracy. Moreover, introduction of SINS-centered LBL locating information could compensate accumulative AUV position error effectively and regularly. Compared to loosely coupled algorithm, this tightly coupled algorithm can still provide accurate location information when there are fewer than four available hydrophones (or within the signal receiving range). Therefore, effective positional calibration area of tightly coupled system based on LBL array is wider and has higher reliability and fault tolerance than loosely coupled. It is more applicable to AUV positioning based on SINS/LBL. PMID:26978361

  15. AUV Positioning Method Based on Tightly Coupled SINS/LBL for Underwater Acoustic Multipath Propagation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Shi, Hongfei; Chen, Liping; Li, Yao; Tong, Jinwu

    2016-01-01

    This paper researches an AUV (Autonomous Underwater Vehicle) positioning method based on SINS (Strapdown Inertial Navigation System)/LBL (Long Base Line) tightly coupled algorithm. This algorithm mainly includes SINS-assisted searching method of optimum slant-range of underwater acoustic propagation multipath, SINS/LBL tightly coupled model and multi-sensor information fusion algorithm. Fuzzy correlation peak problem of underwater LBL acoustic propagation multipath could be solved based on SINS positional information, thus improving LBL positional accuracy. Moreover, introduction of SINS-centered LBL locating information could compensate accumulative AUV position error effectively and regularly. Compared to loosely coupled algorithm, this tightly coupled algorithm can still provide accurate location information when there are fewer than four available hydrophones (or within the signal receiving range). Therefore, effective positional calibration area of tightly coupled system based on LBL array is wider and has higher reliability and fault tolerance than loosely coupled. It is more applicable to AUV positioning based on SINS/LBL. PMID:26978361

  16. Acoustic attenuation logging using centroid frequency shift and amplitude ratio methods: A numerical study

    SciTech Connect

    Quan, Y.; Harris, J.M.; Chen, X.

    1994-12-31

    The centroid frequency shift method is proposed to estimate seismic attenuation from full waveform acoustic logs. This approach along with the amplitude ratio method is applied to investigate the attenuation properties of the P head wave in fluid-filled boreholes. The generalized reflection and transmission coefficients method is used to perform forward modeling. The authors suggest an empirical formula to describe the frequency-dependent geometrical spreading of the P-wave in a borehole. They simulate a more realistic borehole by including a mudcake and an invaded zone which are modeled by a large number of radially symmetric thin layers. The numerical tests show that this invaded zone exhibits very strong influence on the attenuation measurement.

  17. RAPID COMMUNICATION: Traceability of acoustic emission measurements using energy calibration methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, T.; Jones, B. E.

    2000-11-01

    Passive acoustic emission (AE) methods are becoming useful tools for integrity assessment of structures, monitoring of industrial processes and machines, and materials characterization. Unfortunately, there are no measurement standards for estimating the absolute strength of the AE sources. The lack of standardization makes it very difficult to compare the results obtained in different laboratories or on different structures, and to obtain meaningful repeatability of measurements. Therefore, current methods only give a qualitative rather than quantitative indication of the change of state of structure or process. This communication outlines a way of calibrating AE transducer systems in situ using a pulsed-laser-generated thermoelastic AE energy source or a bouncing-ball-generated elastic impact AE energy source. The methods presented here should enable traceable measurement standards to be established for AE.

  18. Mapped orthogonal functions method applied to acoustic waves-based devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, J. E.; Yu, J. G.; Ratolojanahary, F. E.; Elmaimouni, L.; Xu, W. J.; Gryba, T.

    2016-06-01

    This work presents the modelling of acoustic wave-based devices of various geometries through a mapped orthogonal functions method. A specificity of the method, namely the automatic incorporation of boundary conditions into equations of motion through position-dependent physical constants, is presented in detail. Formulations are given for two classes of problems: (i) problems with guided mode propagation and (ii) problems with stationary waves. The method's interest is demonstrated by several examples, a seven-layered plate, a 2D rectangular resonator and a 3D cylindrical resonator, showing how it is easy to obtain either dispersion curves and field profiles for devices with guided mode propagation or electrical response for devices with stationary waves. Extensions and possible further developments are also given.

  19. Effect of stimuli presentation method on perception of room size using only acoustic cues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Jeffrey Barnabas

    People listen to music and speech in a large variety of rooms and many room parameters, including the size of the room, can drastically affect how well the speech is understood or the music enjoyed. While multi-modal (typically hearing and sight) tests may be more realistic, in order to isolate what acoustic cues listeners use to determine the size of a room, a listening-only tests is conducted here. Nearly all of the studies to-date on the perception of room volume using acoustic cues have presented the stimuli only over headphones and these studies have reported that, in most cases, the perceived room volume is more highly correlated with the perceived reverberation (reverberance) than with actual room volume. While reverberance may be a salient acoustic cue used for the determination or room size, the actual sound field in a room is not accurately reproduced when presented over headphones and it is thought that some of the complexities of the sound field that relate to perception of geometric volume, specifically directional information of reflections, may be lost. It is possible that the importance of reverberance may be overemphasized when using only headphones to present stimuli so a comparison of room-size perception is proposed where the sound field (from modeled and recorded impulse responses) is presented both over headphones and also over a surround system using higher order ambisonics to more accurately produce directional sound information. Major results are that, in this study, no difference could be seen between the two presentation methods and that reverberation time is highly correlated to room-size perception while real room size is not.

  20. Acoustic change responses to amplitude modulation: a method to quantify cortical temporal processing and hemispheric asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ji Hye; Dimitrijevic, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Sound modulation is a critical temporal cue for the perception of speech and environmental sounds. To examine auditory cortical responses to sound modulation, we developed an acoustic change stimulus involving amplitude modulation (AM) of ongoing noise. The AM transitions in this stimulus evoked an acoustic change complex (ACC) that was examined parametrically in terms of rate and depth of modulation and hemispheric symmetry. Methods: Auditory cortical potentials were recorded from 64 scalp electrodes during passive listening in two conditions: (1) ACC from white noise to 4, 40, 300 Hz AM, with varying AM depths of 100, 50, 25% lasting 1 s and (2) 1 s AM noise bursts at the same modulation rate. Behavioral measures included AM detection from an attend ACC condition and AM depth thresholds (i.e., a temporal modulation transfer function, TMTF). Results: The N1 response of the ACC was large to 4 and 40 Hz and small to the 300 Hz AM. In contrast, the opposite pattern was observed with bursts of AM showing larger responses with increases in AM rate. Brain source modeling showed significant hemispheric asymmetry such that 4 and 40 Hz ACC responses were dominated by right and left hemispheres respectively. Conclusion: N1 responses to the ACC resembled a low pass filter shape similar to a behavioral TMTF. In the ACC paradigm, the only stimulus parameter that changes is AM and therefore the N1 response provides an index for this AM change. In contrast, an AM burst stimulus contains both AM and level changes and is likely dominated by the rise time of the stimulus. The hemispheric differences are consistent with the asymmetric sampling in time hypothesis suggesting that the different hemispheres preferentially sample acoustic time across different time windows. Significance: The ACC provides a novel approach to studying temporal processing at the level of cortex and provides further evidence of hemispheric specialization for fast and slow stimuli. PMID:25717291

  1. Phase Time and Envelope Time in Time-Distance Analysis and Acoustic Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Dean-Yi; Duvall, Thomas L.; Sun, Ming-Tsung; Chang, Hsiang-Kuang; Jimenez, Antonio; Rabello-Soares, Maria Cristina; Ai, Guoxiang; Wang, Gwo-Ping; Goode Philip; Marquette, William; Ehgamberdiev, Shuhrat; Landenkov, Oleg

    1999-01-01

    Time-distance analysis and acoustic imaging are two related techniques to probe the local properties of solar interior. In this study, we discuss the relation of phase time and envelope time between the two techniques. The location of the envelope peak of the cross correlation function in time-distance analysis is identified as the travel time of the wave packet formed by modes with the same w/l. The phase time of the cross correlation function provides information of the phase change accumulated along the wave path, including the phase change at the boundaries of the mode cavity. The acoustic signals constructed with the technique of acoustic imaging contain both phase and intensity information. The phase of constructed signals can be studied by computing the cross correlation function between time series constructed with ingoing and outgoing waves. In this study, we use the data taken with the Taiwan Oscillation Network (TON) instrument and the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) instrument. The analysis is carried out for the quiet Sun. We use the relation of envelope time versus distance measured in time-distance analyses to construct the acoustic signals in acoustic imaging analyses. The phase time of the cross correlation function of constructed ingoing and outgoing time series is twice the difference between the phase time and envelope time in time-distance analyses as predicted. The envelope peak of the cross correlation function between constructed ingoing and outgoing time series is located at zero time as predicted for results of one-bounce at 3 mHz for all four data sets and two-bounce at 3 mHz for two TON data sets. But it is different from zero for other cases. The cause of the deviation of the envelope peak from zero is not known.

  2. Synergy of seismic, acoustic, and video signals in blast analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.P.; Stump, B.W.; Weigand, J.

    1997-09-01

    The range of mining applications from hard rock quarrying to coal exposure to mineral recovery leads to a great variety of blasting practices. A common characteristic of many of the sources is that they are detonated at or near the earth`s surface and thus can be recorded by camera or video. Although the primary interest is in the seismic waveforms that these blasts generate, the visual observations of the blasts provide important constraints that can be applied to the physical interpretation of the seismic source function. In particular, high speed images can provide information on detonation times of individuals charges, the timing and amount of mass movement during the blasting process and, in some instances, evidence of wave propagation away from the source. All of these characteristics can be valuable in interpreting the equivalent seismic source function for a set of mine explosions and quantifying the relative importance of the different processes. This paper documents work done at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and Southern Methodist University to take standard Hi-8 video of mine blasts, recover digital images from them, and combine them with ground motion records for interpretation. The steps in the data acquisition, processing, display, and interpretation are outlined. The authors conclude that the combination of video with seismic and acoustic signals can be a powerful diagnostic tool for the study of blasting techniques and seismology. A low cost system for generating similar diagnostics using consumer-grade video camera and direct-to-disk video hardware is proposed. Application is to verification of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty.

  3. Efficient blind dereverberation and echo cancellation based on independent component analysis for actual acoustic signals.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Ryu; Nakadai, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Toru; Komatani, Kazunori; Ogata, Tetsuya; Okuno, Hiroshi G

    2012-01-01

    This letter presents a new algorithm for blind dereverberation and echo cancellation based on independent component analysis (ICA) for actual acoustic signals. We focus on frequency domain ICA (FD-ICA) because its computational cost and speed of learning convergence are sufficiently reasonable for practical applications such as hands-free speech recognition. In applying conventional FD-ICA as a preprocessing of automatic speech recognition in noisy environments, one of the most critical problems is how to cope with reverberations. To extract a clean signal from the reverberant observation, we model the separation process in the short-time Fourier transform domain and apply the multiple input/output inverse-filtering theorem (MINT) to the FD-ICA separation model. A naive implementation of this method is computationally expensive, because its time complexity is the second order of reverberation time. Therefore, the main issue in dereverberation is to reduce the high computational cost of ICA. In this letter, we reduce the computational complexity to the linear order of the reverberation time by using two techniques: (1) a separation model based on the independence of delayed observed signals with MINT and (2) spatial sphering for preprocessing. Experiments show that the computational cost grows in proportion to the linear order of the reverberation time and that our method improves the word correctness of automatic speech recognition by 10 to 20 points in a RT₂₀= 670 ms reverberant environment. PMID:22023192

  4. Improved algorithms and methods for room sound-field prediction by acoustical radiosity in arbitrary polyhedral rooms.

    PubMed

    Nosal, Eva-Marie; Hodgson, Murray; Ashdown, Ian

    2004-08-01

    This paper explores acoustical (or time-dependent) radiosity--a geometrical-acoustics sound-field prediction method that assumes diffuse surface reflection. The literature of acoustical radiosity is briefly reviewed and the advantages and disadvantages of the method are discussed. A discrete form of the integral equation that results from meshing the enclosure boundaries into patches is presented and used in a discrete-time algorithm. Furthermore, an averaging technique is used to reduce computational requirements. To generalize to nonrectangular rooms, a spherical-triangle method is proposed as a means of evaluating the integrals over solid angles that appear in the discrete form of the integral equation. The evaluation of form factors, which also appear in the numerical solution, is discussed for rectangular and nonrectangular rooms. This algorithm and associated methods are validated by comparison of the steady-state predictions for a spherical enclosure to analytical solutions. PMID:15376663

  5. Improved algorithms and methods for room sound-field prediction by acoustical radiosity in arbitrary polyhedral rooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosal, Eva-Marie; Hodgson, Murray; Ashdown, Ian

    2004-08-01

    This paper explores acoustical (or time-dependent) radiosity-a geometrical-acoustics sound-field prediction method that assumes diffuse surface reflection. The literature of acoustical radiosity is briefly reviewed and the advantages and disadvantages of the method are discussed. A discrete form of the integral equation that results from meshing the enclosure boundaries into patches is presented and used in a discrete-time algorithm. Furthermore, an averaging technique is used to reduce computational requirements. To generalize to nonrectangular rooms, a spherical-triangle method is proposed as a means of evaluating the integrals over solid angles that appear in the discrete form of the integral equation. The evaluation of form factors, which also appear in the numerical solution, is discussed for rectangular and nonrectangular rooms. This algorithm and associated methods are validated by comparison of the steady-state predictions for a spherical enclosure to analytical solutions.

  6. Mobility power flow analysis of an L-shaped plate structure subjected to acoustic excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuschieri, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    An analytical investigation based on the Mobility Power Flow method is presented for the determination of the vibrational response and power flow for two coupled flat plate structures in an L-shaped configuration, subjected to acoustical excitation. The principle of the mobility power flow method consists of dividing the global structure into a series of subsystems coupled together using mobility functions. Each separate subsystem is analyzed independently to determine the structural mobility functions for the junction and excitation locations. The mobility functions, together with the characteristics of the junction between the subsystems, are then used to determine the response of the global structure and the power flow. In the coupled plate structure considered here, mobility power flow expressions are derived for excitation by an incident acoustic plane wave. In this case, the forces (acoustic pressures) acting on the structure are dependent on the response of the structure because of the scattered pressure component. The interaction between the structure and the fluid leads to the derivation of a corrected mode shape for the plates' normal surface velocity and also for the structure mobility functions. The determination of the scattered pressure components in the expressions for the power flow represents an additional component in the power flow balance for the source plate and the receiver plate. This component represents the radiated acoustical power from the plate structure.

  7. Method and apparatus for sizing and separating warp yarns using acoustical energy

    DOEpatents

    Sheen, Shuh-Haw; Chien, Hual-Te; Raptis, Apostolos C.; Kupperman, David S.

    1998-01-01

    A slashing process for preparing warp yarns for weaving operations including the steps of sizing and/or desizing the yarns in an acoustic resonance box and separating the yarns with a leasing apparatus comprised of a set of acoustically agitated lease rods. The sizing step includes immersing the yarns in a size solution contained in an acoustic resonance box. Acoustic transducers are positioned against the exterior of the box for generating an acoustic pressure field within the size solution. Ultrasonic waves that result from the acoustic pressure field continuously agitate the size solution to effect greater mixing and more uniform application and penetration of the size onto the yarns. The sized yarns are then separated by passing the warp yarns over and under lease rods. Electroacoustic transducers generate acoustic waves along the longitudinal axis of the lease rods, creating a shearing motion on the surface of the rods for splitting the yarns.

  8. Method and apparatus for sizing and separating warp yarns using acoustical energy

    DOEpatents

    Sheen, S.H.; Chien, H.T.; Raptis, A.C.; Kupperman, D.S.

    1998-05-19

    A slashing process is disclosed for preparing warp yarns for weaving operations including the steps of sizing and/or desizing the yarns in an acoustic resonance box and separating the yarns with a leasing apparatus comprised of a set of acoustically agitated lease rods. The sizing step includes immersing the yarns in a size solution contained in an acoustic resonance box. Acoustic transducers are positioned against the exterior of the box for generating an acoustic pressure field within the size solution. Ultrasonic waves that result from the acoustic pressure field continuously agitate the size solution to effect greater mixing and more uniform application and penetration of the size onto the yarns. The sized yarns are then separated by passing the warp yarns over and under lease rods. Electroacoustic transducers generate acoustic waves along the longitudinal axis of the lease rods, creating a shearing motion on the surface of the rods for splitting the yarns. 2 figs.

  9. ACOUSTIC RADIATION FORCE-DRIVEN ASSESSMENT OF MYOCARDIAL ELASTICITY USING THE DISPLACEMENT RATIO RATE (DRR) METHOD

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Richard R.; Hsu, Stephen J.; Palmeri, Mark L.; Rouze, Ned C.; Nightingale, Kathryn R.; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2011-01-01

    A noninvasive method of characterizing myocardial stiffness could have significant implications in diagnosing cardiac disease. Acoustic radiation force (ARF)–driven techniques have demonstrated their ability to discern elastic properties of soft tissue. For the purpose of myocardial elasticity imaging, a novel ARF-based imaging technique, the displacement ratio rate (DRR) method, was developed to rank the relative stiffnesses of dynamically varying tissue. The basis and performance of this technique was demonstrated through numerical and phantom imaging results. This new method requires a relatively small temporal (<1 ms) and spatial (tenths of mm2) sampling window and appears to be independent of applied ARF magnitude. The DRR method was implemented in two in vivo canine studies, during which data were acquired through the full cardiac cycle by imaging directly on the exposed epicardium. These data were then compared with results obtained by acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging and shear wave velocimetry, with the latter being used as the gold standard. Through the cardiac cycle, velocimetry results portray a range of shear wave velocities from 0.76–1.97 m/s, with the highest velocities observed during systole and the lowest observed during diastole. If a basic shear wave elasticity model is assumed, such a velocity result would suggest a period of increased stiffness during systole (when compared with diastole). Despite drawbacks of the DRR method (i.e., sensitivity to noise and limited stiffness range), its results predicted a similar cyclic stiffness variation to that offered by velocimetry while being insensitive to variations in applied radiation force. PMID:21645966

  10. An FRF bounding method for randomly uncertain structures with or without coupling to an acoustic cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunne, L. W.; Dunne, J. F.

    2009-04-01

    An efficient frequency response function (FRF) bounding method is proposed using asymptotic extreme-value theory. The method exploits a small random sample of realised FRFs obtained from nominally identical structures to predict corresponding FRF bounds for a substantially larger batch. This is useful for predicting forced-vibration levels in automotive vehicle bodies when parameters are assumed to vary statistically. Small samples are assumed to come either from Monte Carlo simulation using a vibration model, or via measurements from real structures. The basis of the method is to undertake a hypothesis test and if justified, repeatedly fit inverted Type I asymptotic threshold exceedance models at discrete frequencies, for which the models are not locked to a block size (as in classical extreme-value models). The chosen FRF 'bound' is predicted from the inverse model in the form of the ' m-observational return level', namely the level that will be exceeded on average once in every m structures realised. The method is tested on simulated linear structures, initially to establish its scope and limitations. Initial testing is performed on a sdof system followed by small and medium-sized uncoupled mdof grillages. Testing then continues to: (i) a random acoustically coupled grillage structure; and (ii) a partially random industrial-scale box structure which exhibits similar dynamic characteristics to a small vehicle structure and is analysed in NASTRAN. In both cases, structural and acoustic responses to a single deterministic load are examined. The paper shows that the method is not suitable for very small uncoupled systems but rapidly becomes very appropriate for both uncoupled and coupled mdof structures.

  11. Generalized Multicoincidence Analysis Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Glen A.; Smith, Leon E.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Ellis, J. E.; Valsan, Andrei B.; Mengesha, Wondwosen

    2005-10-01

    The ability to conduct automated trace radionuclide analysis at or near the sample collection point would provide a valuable tool for emergency response, nuclear forensics and environmental monitoring. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing systems for this purpose based on dual gamma-ray spectrometers, e.g. NaI(TI) or HPGe, combined with thin organic scintillator sensors to detect light charged particles. Translating the coincident signatures recorded by these systems, which include , and , into the concentration of detectable radionuclides in the sample requires generalized multicoincidence analysis tools. The development and validation of the Coincidence Lookup Library, which currently contains the probabilities of single and coincidence signatures from more than 420 isotopes, is described. Also discussed is a method to calculate the probability of observing a coincidence signature which incorporates true coincidence summing effects. These effects are particularly important for high-geometric-efficiency detection systems. Finally, a process for validating the integrated analysis software package is demonstrated using GEANT 4 simulations of the prototype detector systems.

  12. Generalized Multicoincidence Analysis Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Glen A.; Smith, Leon E.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Ellis, J. E.; Valsan, Andrei B.; Mengesha, Wondwosen

    2006-02-01

    The ability to conduct automated trace radionuclide analysis at or near the sample collection point would provide a valuable tool for emergency response, environmental monitoring, and verification of treaties and agreements. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing systems for this purpose based on dual gamma-ray spectrometers, e.g. NaI(TI) or HPGe, combined with thin organic scintillator sensors to detect light charged particles. Translating the coincident signatures recorded by these systems, which include beta-gamma, gamma-gamma and beta-gamma-gamma, into the concentration of detectable radionuclides in the sample requires generalized multicoincidence analysis tools. The development and validation of the Coincidence Lookup Library, which currently contains the probabilities of single and coincidence signatures from more than 420 isotopes, is described. Also discussed is a method to calculate the probability of observing a coincidence signature which incorporates true coincidence summing effects. These effects are particularly important for high-geometric-efficiency detection systems. Finally, a process for verifying the integrated analysis software package is demonstrated using GEANT 4 simulations of the prototype detector systems.

  13. Refined acoustic modeling and analysis of shotgun microphones.

    PubMed

    Bai, Mingsian R; Lo, Yi-Yang

    2013-04-01

    A shotgun microphone is a highly directional pickup device widely used in noisy environments. The key element that leads to its superior directivity is a tube with multiple slot openings along its length. One traditional way to model the directional response of a shotgun is to assume plane waves traveling in the tube as if it is in the free field. However, the frequency response and directivity predicted by this traveling wave model can differ drastically from practical measurements. In this paper, an in-depth electroacoustic analysis was conducted to examine the problem by considering the standing waves inside the tube with an analogous circuit containing phased pressure sources and T-networks of tube segments. A further refinement is to model the housing diffraction effect with the aid of the equivalent source method (ESM). The on-axis frequency response and directivity pattern predicted by the proposed model are in close agreement with the measurements. From the results, a peculiar bifurcation phenomenon of directivity pattern at the Helmholtz frequency was also noted. While the shotgun behaves like an endfire array above the Helmholtz frequency, it becomes a broadside array below the Helmholtz frequency. The standing wave effect can be mitigated by covering the slot openings with mesh screen, which was found to alter the shotgun response to be closer to that of the traveling wave model above a critical frequency predicted by the half-wavelength rule. A mode-switching model was developed to predict the directional responses of mesh-treated shotguns. PMID:23556574

  14. Voice assessment: Updates on perceptual, acoustic, aerodynamic, and endoscopic imaging methods

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Daryush D.; Hillman, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review This paper describes recent advances in perceptual, acoustic, aerodynamic, and endoscopic imaging methods for assessing voice production. Recent findings Perceptual assessment Speech-language pathologists are being encouraged to use the new CAPE-V inventory for auditory perceptual assessment of voice quality, and recent studies have provided new insights into listener reliability issues that have plagued subjective perceptual judgments of voice quality. Acoustic assessment Progress is being made on the development of algorithms that are more robust for analyzing disordered voices, including the capability to extract voice quality-related measures from running speech segments. Aerodynamic assessment New devices for measuring phonation threshold air pressures and air flows have the potential to serve as sensitive indices of glottal phonatory conditions, and recent developments in aeroacoustic theory may provide new insights into laryngeal sound production mechanisms. Endoscopic imaging The increased light sensitivity of new ultra high-speed color digital video processors is enabling high-quality endoscopic imaging of vocal fold tissue motion at unprecedented image capture rates, which promises to provide new insights into mechanisms of normal and disordered voice production. Summary Some of the recent research advances in voice quality assessment could be more readily adopted into clinical practice, while others will require further development. PMID:18475073

  15. Laser tattoo removal as an ablation process monitored by acoustical and optical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cencič, Boris; Gregorčič, Peter; Možina, Janez; Jezeršek, Matija

    2013-07-01

    Strength of the laser-tissue interaction varies even within a single tattoo because of the inhomogeneous distribution of the tattoo pigment embedded in the skin. A monitoring system is therefore developed for simultaneous monitoring of the laser tattoo removal process based on acoustical and optical techniques. A laser-beam-deflection probe is used for measuring the acoustical signals accompanying the breakdown, and a CCD camera captures the level and the spatial distribution of the plasma radiation. Using these methods we examine the degree of excitation-pulse absorption within the pigment and the degree of the structural changes of the skin. A Nd:YAG laser with a top-hat beam profile, designed for tattoo removal, is used as the excitation source in our experiments. Special attention is given to structural changes in the skin, which depend on the applied fluence. Tattoo removal with multiple pulses is also analyzed. Experiments are made in vitro (skin phantoms) and ex vivo (marking tattoos on the pig skin). The presented results are important for the understanding and optimization of the process used in medical therapies.

  16. Seismo-acoustic analysis of thunderstorms at Plostina (Romania) site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grecu, Bogdan; Ghica, Daniela; Moldovan, Iren; Ionescu, Constantin

    2013-04-01

    The National Institute for Earth Physics (Romania) operates one of the largest seismic networks in the Eastern Europe. The network includes 97 stations with velocity sensors of which 52 are broadband and 45 are short period, 102 strong motion stations and 8 seismic observatories. Located in the most active seismic region of Romania, i.e. Vrancea area, the Plostina Observatory included initially two seismic stations, one at surface with both broadband and accelerometer sensors and one at 30 m depth with only short period velocity sensor. Starting with 2007, the facilities at Plostina have been upgraded so that at present, the observatory also includes one seismic array (PLOR) of seven elements (PLOR1, PLOR2, PLOR3, PLOR4, PLOR5, PLOR6, PLOR7) with an aperture of 2.5 km, seven infrasound elements (IPL2, IPL3, IPL4, IPH4, IPH5, IPH6, IPH7), two three-component fluxgate sensors, one Boltek EFM-100 electrometer and one La Crosse weather station. The element PLOR4 is co-located with the accelerometer and borehole sensor, two infrasonic elements (IPL4 and IPH4), one fluxgate sensor, the Boltek electrometer and the weather station. All the date are continuously recorded and real-time transmitted to the Romanian National Data Centre (RONDC) in Magurele. The recent developments at Plostina site made possible the improvement of the local miscroseismic activity monitoring as well as conducting of other geophysical studies such as acoustic measurements, observations of the variation of the magnetic field in correlation with solar activity, observations of the variation of radioactive alpha gases concentration, observations of the telluric currents. In this work, we investigate the signals emitted due to the process of lightning and thunder during thunderstorms activity at Plostina site. These signals are well recorded by both seismic and infrasound networks and they are used to perform spectral and specific array analyses. We also perform multiple correlations between the

  17. Method for noninvasive determination of acoustic properties of fluids inside pipes

    DOEpatents

    None

    2016-08-02

    A method for determining the composition of fluids flowing through pipes from noninvasive measurements of acoustic properties of the fluid is described. The method includes exciting a first transducer located on the external surface of the pipe through which the fluid under investigation is flowing, to generate an ultrasound chirp signal, as opposed to conventional pulses. The chirp signal is received by a second transducer disposed on the external surface of the pipe opposing the location of the first transducer, from which the transit time through the fluid is determined and the sound speed of the ultrasound in the fluid is calculated. The composition of a fluid is calculated from the sound speed therein. The fluid density may also be derived from measurements of sound attenuation. Several signal processing approaches are described for extracting the transit time information from the data with the effects of the pipe wall having been subtracted.

  18. Combined Immersed-Boundary/High-Order Finite Difference Methods For Simulations of Acoustic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias-Ramirez, Walter; Olson, Britton; Wolf, William; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Team; University of Campinas Team

    2015-11-01

    The suitability of a continuing forcing immersed boundary method (IBM) combined with a high-order finite difference method is examined on several acoustic scattering problems. A suite of two-dimensional numerical simulations of canonical cases are conducted with the aim of analyzing the error behavior associated with the IBM, through wave reflection, wave diffraction, and the shock-boundary layer interaction phenomena. The compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved using the Miranda code developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Comparison of analytical solution against numerical results is shown for different flow parameters. Preliminary results indicate that the continuing forcing approach has the largest error in wave reflection compared to analytical solution. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. Information-theoretic analysis of iterated Bayesian acoustic source localization in a static ocean waveguide.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Thomas J

    2015-05-01

    Fundamental constructs of information theory are applied to quantify the performance of iterated (sequential) Bayesian localization of a time-harmonic source in a range- and time-invariant acoustic waveguide using the segmented Fourier transforms of the received pressure time series. The nonlinear relation, defined by acoustic propagation, between the source location and the received narrowband spectral components is treated as a nonlinear communication channel. The performance analysis includes mismatch between the acoustic channel and the model channel on which the Bayesian inference is based. Source location uncertainty is quantified by the posterior probability density of source location, by the posterior entropy and associated uncertainty area, by the information gain (relative entropy) at each iteration, and by large-ensemble limits of these quantities. A computational example for a vertical receiver array in a shallow-water waveguide is presented with acoustic propagation represented by normal modes and ambient noise represented by a Kuperman-Ingenito model. Performance degradation due to noise-model mismatch is quantified in an example. Potential extensions to uncertain and stochastic environments are discussed. PMID:25994704

  20. Fault diagnosis of reciprocating compressor valve with the method integrating acoustic emission signal and simulated valve motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuefei; Xue, Chuang; Jia, Xiaohan; Peng, Xueyuan

    2015-05-01

    This paper proposes a method of diagnosing faults in reciprocating compressor valves using the acoustic emission signal coupled with the simulated valve motion. The actual working condition of a valve can be obtained by analyzing the acoustic emission signal in the crank angle domain and the valve movement can be predicted by simulating the valve motion. The exact opening and closing locations of a normal valve, provided by the simulated valve motion, can be used as references for the valve fault diagnosis. The typical valve faults are diagnosed to validate the feasibility and accuracy of the proposed method. The experimental results indicate that this method can easily distinguish the normal valve, valve flutter and valve delayed closing conditions. The characteristic locations of the opening and closing of the suction and discharge valves can be clearly identified in the waveform of the acoustic emission signal and the simulated valve motion.

  1. Crack propagation analysis using acoustic emission sensors for structural health monitoring systems.

    PubMed

    Kral, Zachary; Horn, Walter; Steck, James

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace systems are expected to remain in service well beyond their designed life. Consequently, maintenance is an important issue. A novel method of implementing artificial neural networks and acoustic emission sensors to form a structural health monitoring (SHM) system for aerospace inspection routines was the focus of this research. Simple structural elements, consisting of flat aluminum plates of AL 2024-T3, were subjected to increasing static tensile loading. As the loading increased, designed cracks extended in length, releasing strain waves in the process. Strain wave signals, measured by acoustic emission sensors, were further analyzed in post-processing by artificial neural networks (ANN). Several experiments were performed to determine the severity and location of the crack extensions in the structure. ANNs were trained on a portion of the data acquired by the sensors and the ANNs were then validated with the remaining data. The combination of a system of acoustic emission sensors, and an ANN could determine crack extension accurately. The difference between predicted and actual crack extensions was determined to be between 0.004 in. and 0.015 in. with 95% confidence. These ANNs, coupled with acoustic emission sensors, showed promise for the creation of an SHM system for aerospace systems. PMID:24023536

  2. Crack Propagation Analysis Using Acoustic Emission Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring Systems

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kral, Zachary; Horn, Walter; Steck, James

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace systems are expected to remain in service well beyond their designed life. Consequently, maintenance is an important issue. A novel method of implementing artificial neural networks and acoustic emission sensors to form a structural health monitoring (SHM) system for aerospace inspection routines was the focus of this research. Simple structural elements, consisting of flat aluminum plates of AL 2024-T3, were subjected to increasing static tensile loading. As the loading increased, designed cracks extended in length, releasing strain waves in the process. Strain wave signals, measured by acoustic emission sensors, were further analyzed in post-processing by artificial neural networks (ANN).more » Several experiments were performed to determine the severity and location of the crack extensions in the structure. ANNs were trained on a portion of the data acquired by the sensors and the ANNs were then validated with the remaining data. The combination of a system of acoustic emission sensors, and an ANN could determine crack extension accurately. The difference between predicted and actual crack extensions was determined to be between 0.004 in. and 0.015 in. with 95% confidence. These ANNs, coupled with acoustic emission sensors, showed promise for the creation of an SHM system for aerospace systems.« less

  3. Crack Propagation Analysis Using Acoustic Emission Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring Systems

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Walter; Steck, James

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace systems are expected to remain in service well beyond their designed life. Consequently, maintenance is an important issue. A novel method of implementing artificial neural networks and acoustic emission sensors to form a structural health monitoring (SHM) system for aerospace inspection routines was the focus of this research. Simple structural elements, consisting of flat aluminum plates of AL 2024-T3, were subjected to increasing static tensile loading. As the loading increased, designed cracks extended in length, releasing strain waves in the process. Strain wave signals, measured by acoustic emission sensors, were further analyzed in post-processing by artificial neural networks (ANN). Several experiments were performed to determine the severity and location of the crack extensions in the structure. ANNs were trained on a portion of the data acquired by the sensors and the ANNs were then validated with the remaining data. The combination of a system of acoustic emission sensors, and an ANN could determine crack extension accurately. The difference between predicted and actual crack extensions was determined to be between 0.004 in. and 0.015 in. with 95% confidence. These ANNs, coupled with acoustic emission sensors, showed promise for the creation of an SHM system for aerospace systems. PMID:24023536

  4. Acoustic Emission Analysis of Damage Progression in Thermal Barrier Coatings Under Thermal Cyclic Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, Matthew; Zhu, Dongming; Morscher, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Damage evolution of electron beam-physical vapor deposited (EBVD-PVD) ZrO2-7 wt.% Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) under thermal cyclic conditions was monitored using an acoustic emission (AE) technique. The coatings were heated using a laser heat flux technique that yields a high reproducibility in thermal loading. Along with AE, real-time thermal conductivity measurements were also taken using infrared thermography. Tests were performed on samples with induced stress concentrations, as well as calcium-magnesium-alumino-silicate (CMAS) exposure, for comparison of damage mechanisms and AE response to the baseline (as-produced) coating. Analysis of acoustic waveforms was used to investigate damage development by comparing when events occurred, AE event frequency, energy content and location. The test results have shown that AE accumulation correlates well with thermal conductivity changes and that AE waveform analysis could be a valuable tool for monitoring coating degradation and provide insight on specific damage mechanisms.

  5. Treatment of acoustic fluid-structure interaction by Localized Lagrange Multipliers and comparison to alternative interface coupling methods.

    SciTech Connect

    Felippa, Carlos A.; Sprague, Michael A.; Ross, Michael R.; Park, K. C.

    2008-11-01

    This paper is a sequel on the topic of localized Lagrange multipliers (LLM) for applications of fluid-structure interaction (FSI) between finite-element models of an acoustic fluid and an elastic structure. The prequel paper formulated the spatial-discretization methods, the LLM interface treatment, the time-marching partitioned analysis procedures, and the application to 1D benchmark problems. Here, we expand on formulation aspects required for successful application to more realistic 2D and 3D problems. Additional topics include duality relations at the fluid-structure interface, partitioned vibration analysis, reduced-order modeling, handling of curved interface surfaces, and comparison of LLM with other coupling methods. Emphasis is given to non-matching fluid-structure meshes. We present benchmark examples that illustrate the benefits and drawbacks of competing interface treatments. Realistic application problems involving the seismic response of two existing dams are considered. These include 2D modal analyses of the Koyna gravity dam, transient-response analyses of that dam with and without reduced-order modeling, incorporation of nonlinear cavitation effects, and the 3D transient-response analysis of the Morrow Point arch dam.

  6. Detection of geodesic acoustic mode oscillations, using multiple signal classification analysis of Doppler backscattering signal on Tore Supra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermare, L.; Hennequin, P.; Gürcan, Ö. D.; the Tore Supra Team

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents the first observation of geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) on Tore Supra plasmas. Using the Doppler backscattering system, the oscillations of the plasma flow velocity, localized between r/a = 0.85 and r/a = 0.95, and with a frequency, typically around 10 kHz, have been observed at the plasma edge in numerous discharges. When the additional heating power is varied, the frequency is found to scale with Cs/R. The MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) algorithm is employed to access the temporal evolution of the perpendicular velocity of density fluctuations. The method is presented in some detail, and is validated and compared against standard methods, such as the conventional fast Fourier transform method, using a synthetic signal. It stands out as a powerful data analysis method to follow the Doppler frequency with a high temporal resolution, which is important in order to extract the dynamics of GAMs.

  7. Membrane-enhanced surface acoustic wave analysis of grafted polymer brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brass, David A.; Shull, Kenneth R.

    2008-04-01

    An analysis is developed for the frequency response of a quartz crystal resonator (often referred to as a quartz crystal microbalance) that is modified with a grafted solvent-swollen polymer brush and placed in contact with a membrane capping layer. The shear wave generated at the resonator surface couples into the membrane layer with an efficiency that is strongly dependent on the thickness of the swollen brush layer. As a result, the resonant frequency changes by a maximum amount that is closely approximated by the Sauerbrey shift for the capping layer. The calculated shift substantially decreases for increases in the brush thickness of approximately 10nm, which gives a net frequency response that is extremely sensitive to the degree of swelling of the polymer brush. An optimum capping layer thickness is determined by balancing the Sauerbrey shift against dissipative effects that weaken the crystal resonance. This optimum membrane thickness depends only weakly on the properties of the membrane material and is in the micron range. Detailed multilayer calculations are presented for the specific case of a poly(ethylene glycol) brush swollen with water and brought into contact with an elastomeric water-permeable membrane. These calculations confirm that the method is sensitive to the properties of the brush layer in the experimentally relevant thickness regime. Connections are also made to conceptually simpler two and three layer models of the acoustic impedance of the material systems that are brought into contact with the resonator.

  8. Acoustic method for defining the stress state of a rock massif based on solution of the seismic inverse problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarov, L. A.; Nazarova, L. A.; Romenskii, E. I.; Tcheverda, V. A.; Epov, M. I.

    2016-02-01

    A method for estimating the stress-strain state of a rock massif in the vicinity of underground facilities is substantiated. This method is based on solution of the boundary inverse problem of defining the components of an external stress field from the acoustic sounding data. The acoustic sounding data used are the arrival times of diving head longitudinal waves, recorded in a long mine shaft. Numerical experiments have revealed the optimal arrangement of the recording network and the limited relative error in the input data, which, taken together, provide for solvability of the inverse problem.

  9. Computerized Analysis of Acoustic Characteristics of Patients with Internal Nasal Valve Collapse Before and After Functional Rhinoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Rezaei, Fariba; Omrani, Mohammad Reza; Abnavi, Fateme; Mojiri, Fariba; Golabbakhsh, Marzieh; Barati, Sohrab; Mahaki, Behzad

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic analysis of sounds produced during speech provides significant information about the physiology of larynx and vocal tract. The analysis of voice power spectrum is a fundamental sensitive method of acoustic assessment that provides valuable information about the voice source and characteristics of vocal tract resonance cavities. The changes in long-term average spectrum (LTAS) spectral tilt and harmony to noise ratio (HNR) were analyzed to assess the voice quality before and after functional rhinoplasty in patients with internal nasal valve collapse. Before and 3 months after functional rhinoplasty, 12 participants were evaluated and HNR and LTAS spectral tilt in /a/ and /i/ vowels were estimated. It was seen that an increase in HNR and a decrease in LTAS spectral tilt existed after surgery. Mean LTAS spectral tilt in vowel /a/ decreased from 2.37 ± 1.04 to 2.28 ± 1.17 (P = 0.388), and it was decreased from 4.16 ± 1.65 to 2.73 ± 0.69 in vowel /i/ (P = 0.008). Mean HNR in the vowel /a/ increased from 20.71 ± 3.93 to 25.06 ± 2.67 (P = 0.002), and it was increased from 21.28 ± 4.11 to 25.26 ± 3.94 in vowel /i/ (P = 0.002). Modification of the vocal tract caused the vocal cords to close sufficiently, and this showed that although rhinoplasty did not affect the larynx directly, it changes the structure of the vocal tract and consequently the resonance of voice production. The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in voice parameters after functional rhinoplasty in patients with internal nasal valve collapse by computerized analysis of acoustic characteristics. PMID:26955564

  10. Computerized Analysis of Acoustic Characteristics of Patients with Internal Nasal Valve Collapse Before and After Functional Rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Fariba; Omrani, Mohammad Reza; Abnavi, Fateme; Mojiri, Fariba; Golabbakhsh, Marzieh; Barati, Sohrab; Mahaki, Behzad

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic analysis of sounds produced during speech provides significant information about the physiology of larynx and vocal tract. The analysis of voice power spectrum is a fundamental sensitive method of acoustic assessment that provides valuable information about the voice source and characteristics of vocal tract resonance cavities. The changes in long-term average spectrum (LTAS) spectral tilt and harmony to noise ratio (HNR) were analyzed to assess the voice quality before and after functional rhinoplasty in patients with internal nasal valve collapse. Before and 3 months after functional rhinoplasty, 12 participants were evaluated and HNR and LTAS spectral tilt in /a/ and /i/ vowels were estimated. It was seen that an increase in HNR and a decrease in LTAS spectral tilt existed after surgery. Mean LTAS spectral tilt in vowel /a/ decreased from 2.37 ± 1.04 to 2.28 ± 1.17 (P = 0.388), and it was decreased from 4.16 ± 1.65 to 2.73 ± 0.69 in vowel /i/ (P = 0.008). Mean HNR in the vowel /a/ increased from 20.71 ± 3.93 to 25.06 ± 2.67 (P = 0.002), and it was increased from 21.28 ± 4.11 to 25.26 ± 3.94 in vowel /i/ (P = 0.002). Modification of the vocal tract caused the vocal cords to close sufficiently, and this showed that although rhinoplasty did not affect the larynx directly, it changes the structure of the vocal tract and consequently the resonance of voice production. The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in voice parameters after functional rhinoplasty in patients with internal nasal valve collapse by computerized analysis of acoustic characteristics. PMID:26955564

  11. Linearized Unsteady Aerodynamic Analysis of the Acoustic Response to Wake/Blade-Row Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verdon, Joseph M.; Huff, Dennis L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The three-dimensional, linearized Euler analysis, LINFLUX, is being developed to provide a comprehensive and efficient unsteady aerodynamic scheme for predicting the aeroacoustic and aeroelastic responses of axial-flow turbomachinery blading. LINFLUX couples a near-field, implicit, wave-split, finite-volume solution to far-field acoustic eigensolutions, to predict the aerodynamic responses of a blade row to prescribed structural and aerodynamic excitations. It is applied herein to predict the acoustic responses of a fan exit guide vane (FEGV) to rotor wake excitations. The intent is to demonstrate and assess the LINFLUX analysis via application to realistic wake/blade-row interactions. Numerical results are given for the unsteady pressure responses of the FEGV, including the modal pressure responses at inlet and exit. In addition, predictions for the modal and total acoustic power levels at the FEGV exit are compared with measurements. The present results indicate that the LINFLUX analysis should be useful in the aeroacoustic design process, and for understanding the three-dimensional flow physics relevant to blade-row noise generation and propagation.

  12. A method for the frequency control in time-resolved two-dimensional gigahertz surface acoustic wave imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, Shogo; Tomoda, Motonobu; Matsuda, Osamu

    2014-01-15

    We describe an extension of the time-resolved two-dimensional gigahertz surface acoustic wave imaging based on the optical pump-probe technique with periodic light source at a fixed repetition frequency. Usually such imaging measurement may generate and detect acoustic waves with their frequencies only at or near the integer multiples of the repetition frequency. Here we propose a method which utilizes the amplitude modulation of the excitation pulse train to modify the generation frequency free from the mentioned limitation, and allows for the first time the discrimination of the resulted upper- and lower-side-band frequency components in the detection. The validity of the method is demonstrated in a simple measurement on an isotropic glass plate covered by a metal thin film to extract the dispersion curves of the surface acoustic waves.

  13. Generation and Radiation of Acoustic Waves from a 2-D Shear Layer using the CE/SE Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loh, Ching Y.; Wang, Xiao Y.; Chang, Sin-Chung; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.

    2000-01-01

    In the present work, the generation and radiation of acoustic waves from a 2-D shear layer problem is considered. An acoustic source inside of a 2-D jet excites an instability wave in the shear layer, resulting in sound Mach radiation. The numerical solution is obtained by solving the Euler equations using the space time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) method. Linearization is achieved through choosing a small acoustic source amplitude. The Euler equations are nondimensionalized as instructed in the problem statement. All other conditions are the same except that the Crocco's relation has a slightly different form. In the following, after a brief sketch of the CE/SE method, the numerical results for this problem are presented.

  14. An Amplitude-Based Estimation Method for International Space Station (ISS) Leak Detection and Localization Using Acoustic Sensor Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Jialin; Madaras, Eric I.

    2009-01-01

    The development of a robust and efficient leak detection and localization system within a space station environment presents a unique challenge. A plausible approach includes the implementation of an acoustic sensor network system that can successfully detect the presence of a leak and determine the location of the leak source. Traditional acoustic detection and localization schemes rely on the phase and amplitude information collected by the sensor array system. Furthermore, the acoustic source signals are assumed to be airborne and far-field. Likewise, there are similar applications in sonar. In solids, there are specialized methods for locating events that are used in geology and in acoustic emission testing that involve sensor arrays and depend on a discernable phase front to the received signal. These methods are ineffective if applied to a sensor detection system within the space station environment. In the case of acoustic signal location, there are significant baffling and structural impediments to the sound path and the source could be in the near-field of a sensor in this particular setting.

  15. Integrated acoustic phase separator and multiphase fluid composition monitoring apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Dipen N

    2014-02-04

    An apparatus and method for down hole gas separation from the multiphase fluid flowing in a wellbore or a pipe, for determining the quantities of the individual components of the liquid and the flow rate of the liquid, and for remixing the component parts of the fluid after which the gas volume may be measured, without affecting the flow stream, are described. Acoustic radiation force is employed to separate gas from the liquid, thereby permitting measurements to be separately made for these two components; the liquid (oil/water) composition is determined from ultrasonic resonances; and the gas volume is determined from capacitance measurements. Since the fluid flows around and through the component parts of the apparatus, there is little pressure difference, and no protection is required from high pressure differentials.

  16. Integrated acoustic phase separator and multiphase fluid composition monitoring apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    2016-01-12

    An apparatus and method for down hole gas separation from the multiphase fluid flowing in a wellbore or a pipe, for determining the quantities of the individual components of the liquid and the flow rate of the liquid, and for remixing the component parts of the fluid after which the gas volume may be measured, without affecting the flow stream, are described. Acoustic radiation force is employed to separate gas from the liquid, thereby permitting measurements to be separately made for these two components; the liquid (oil/water) composition is determined from ultrasonic resonances; and the gas volume is determined from capacitance measurements. Since the fluid flows around and through the component parts of the apparatus, there is little pressure difference, and no protection is required from high pressure differentials.

  17. Topics in structural dynamics: Nonlinear unsteady transonic flows and Monte Carlo methods in acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haviland, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    The results are reported of two unrelated studies. The first was an investigation of the formulation of the equations for non-uniform unsteady flows, by perturbation of an irrotational flow to obtain the linear Green's equation. The resulting integral equation was found to contain a kernel which could be expressed as the solution of the adjoint flow equation, a linear equation for small perturbations, but with non-constant coefficients determined by the steady flow conditions. It is believed that the non-uniform flow effects may prove important in transonic flutter, and that in such cases, the use of doublet type solutions of the wave equation would then prove to be erroneous. The second task covered an initial investigation into the use of the Monte Carlo method for solution of acoustical field problems. Computed results are given for a rectangular room problem, and for a problem involving a circular duct with a source located at the closed end.

  18. Method and apparatus for acoustically monitoring the flow of suspended solid particulate matter

    DOEpatents

    Roach, Paul D.; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    1982-01-01

    A method and apparatus for monitoring char flow in a coal gasifier system cludes flow monitor circuits which measure acoustic attenuation caused by the presence of char in a char line and provide a char flow/no flow indication and an indication of relative char density. The flow monitor circuits compute the ratio of signals in two frequency bands, a first frequency band representative of background noise, and a second higher frequency band in which background noise is attenuated by the presence of char. Since the second frequency band contains higher frequencies, the ratio can be used to provide a flow/no flow indication. The second band can also be selected so that attenuation is monotonically related to particle concentration, providing a quantitative measure of char concentration.

  19. Novel Transfer Method Using Near-Field Acoustic Levitation and Its Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Ryuto; Aoyagi, Manabu; Tamura, Hideki; Takano, Takehiro

    2011-07-01

    The holding of a levitated object above stator vibrators by utilizing the holding force, which is generated by near-field acoustic levitation, is possible. The holding force yields at the edge of a vibration plate and nodes of a bending vibration mode, and it is in proportion to the vibration amplitude of the vibration plate. In this paper, we describe methods of transfer and positioning of a levitated object above many aligned stator vibrators, some experimental results, and the proposition of the application as a noncontact-stepping ultrasonic motor (NCS-USM). Linear-type and rotary-type NCS-USMs can be flexibly constructed. The NCS-USM has a possibility of high torque performance compared with an ordinary noncontact USM using a traveling wave.

  20. Deconvolution methods and systems for the mapping of acoustic sources from phased microphone arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F. (Inventor); Humphreys, Jr., William M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method and system for mapping acoustic sources determined from a phased microphone array. A plurality of microphones are arranged in an optimized grid pattern including a plurality of grid locations thereof. A linear configuration of N equations and N unknowns can be formed by accounting for a reciprocal influence of one or more beamforming characteristics thereof at varying grid locations among the plurality of grid locations. A full-rank equation derived from the linear configuration of N equations and N unknowns can then be iteratively determined. A full-rank can be attained by the solution requirement of the positivity constraint equivalent to the physical assumption of statically independent noise sources at each N location. An optimized noise source distribution is then generated over an identified aeroacoustic source region associated with the phased microphone array in order to compile an output presentation thereof, thereby removing the beamforming characteristics from the resulting output presentation.

  1. Deconvolution Methods and Systems for the Mapping of Acoustic Sources from Phased Microphone Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F. (Inventor); Humphreys, Jr., William M. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Mapping coherent/incoherent acoustic sources as determined from a phased microphone array. A linear configuration of equations and unknowns are formed by accounting for a reciprocal influence of one or more cross-beamforming characteristics thereof at varying grid locations among the plurality of grid locations. An equation derived from the linear configuration of equations and unknowns can then be iteratively determined. The equation can be attained by the solution requirement of a constraint equivalent to the physical assumption that the coherent sources have only in phase coherence. The size of the problem may then be reduced using zoning methods. An optimized noise source distribution is then generated over an identified aeroacoustic source region associated with a phased microphone array (microphones arranged in an optimized grid pattern including a plurality of grid locations) in order to compile an output presentation thereof, thereby removing beamforming characteristics from the resulting output presentation.

  2. Characterizing noise in nonhuman vocalizations: Acoustic analysis and human perception of barks by coyotes and dogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riede, Tobias; Mitchell, Brian R.; Tokuda, Isao; Owren, Michael J.

    2005-07-01

    Measuring noise as a component of mammalian vocalizations is of interest because of its potential relevance to the communicative function. However, methods for characterizing and quantifying noise are less well established than methods applicable to harmonically structured aspects of signals. Using barks of coyotes and domestic dogs, we compared six acoustic measures and studied how they are related to human perception of noisiness. Measures of harmonic-to-noise-ratio (HNR), percent voicing, and shimmer were found to be the best predictors of perceptual rating by human listeners. Both acoustics and perception indicated that noisiness was similar across coyote and dog barks, but within each species there was significant variation among the individual vocalizers. The advantages and disadvantages of the various measures are discussed.

  3. Advanced numerical technique for analysis of surface and bulk acoustic waves in resonators using periodic metal gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumenko, Natalya F.

    2014-09-01

    A numerical technique characterized by a unified approach for the analysis of different types of acoustic waves utilized in resonators in which a periodic metal grating is used for excitation and reflection of such waves is described. The combination of the Finite Element Method analysis of the electrode domain with the Spectral Domain Analysis (SDA) applied to the adjacent upper and lower semi-infinite regions, which may be multilayered and include air as a special case of a dielectric material, enables rigorous simulation of the admittance in resonators using surface acoustic waves, Love waves, plate modes including Lamb waves, Stonely waves, and other waves propagating along the interface between two media, and waves with transient structure between the mentioned types. The matrix formalism with improved convergence incorporated into SDA provides fast and robust simulation for multilayered structures with arbitrary thickness of each layer. The described technique is illustrated by a few examples of its application to various combinations of LiNbO3, isotropic silicon dioxide and silicon with a periodic array of Cu electrodes. The wave characteristics extracted from the admittance functions change continuously with the variation of the film and plate thicknesses over wide ranges, even when the wave nature changes. The transformation of the wave nature with the variation of the layer thicknesses is illustrated by diagrams and contour plots of the displacements calculated at resonant frequencies.

  4. Acoustic Analysis of Voice in Dysarthria following Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yu-Tsai; Kent, Ray D.; Kent, Jane Finley; Duffy, Joseph R.; Thomas, Jack E.

    2009-01-01

    Although perceptual studies indicate the likelihood of voice disorders in persons with stroke, there have been few objective instrumental studies of voice dysfunction in dysarthria following stroke. This study reports automatic analysis of sustained vowel phonation for 61 speakers with stroke. The results show: (1) men with stroke and healthy…

  5. Effective finite-difference modelling methods with 2D acoustic wave equation using a combination of cross and rhombus stencils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Enjiang; Liu, Yang; Sen, Mrinal K.

    2016-07-01

    The 2D acoustic wave equation is commonly solved numerically by finite-difference (FD) methods in which the accuracy of solution is significantly affected by the FD stencils. The commonly used cross stencil can reach either only second-order accuracy for space domain dispersion-relation-based FD method or (2 M)th-order accuracy along eight specific propagation directions for time-space domain dispersion-relation-based FD method, if the conventional (2 M)th-order spatial FD and second-order temporal FD are used to discretize the equation. One other newly developed rhombus stencil can reach arbitrary even-order accuracy. However, this stencil adds significantly computational cost when the operator length is large. To achieve a balance between the solution accuracy and efficiency, we develop a new FD stencil to solve the 2D acoustic wave equation. This stencil is a combination of the cross stencil and rhombus stencil. A cross stencil with an operator length parameter M is used to approximate the spatial partial derivatives while a rhombus stencil with an operator length parameter N together with the conventional 2nd-order temporal FD is employed in approximating the temporal partial derivatives. Using this stencil, a new FD scheme is developed; we demonstrate that this scheme can reach (2 M)th-order accuracy in space and (2 N)th-order accuracy in time when spatial FD coefficients and temporal FD coefficients are derived from respective dispersion relation using Taylor-series expansion (TE) method. To further increase the accuracy, we derive the FD coefficients by employing the time-space domain dispersion relation of this FD scheme using TE. We also use least-squares (LS) optimization method to reduce dispersion at high wavenumbers. Dispersion analysis, stability analysis and modelling examples demonstrate that our new scheme has greater accuracy and better stability than conventional FD schemes, and thus can adopt large time steps. To reduce the extra computational

  6. Quantitative measurement of ultrasound pressure field by optical phase contrast method and acoustic holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyama, Seiji; Yasuda, Jun; Hanayama, Hiroki; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    A fast and accurate measurement of an ultrasound field with various exposure sequences is necessary to ensure the efficacy and safety of various ultrasound applications in medicine. The most common method used to measure an ultrasound pressure field, that is, hydrophone scanning, requires a long scanning time and potentially disturbs the field. This may limit the efficiency of developing applications of ultrasound. In this study, an optical phase contrast method enabling fast and noninterfering measurements is proposed. In this method, the modulated phase of light caused by the focused ultrasound pressure field is measured. Then, a computed tomography (CT) algorithm used to quantitatively reconstruct a three-dimensional (3D) pressure field is applied. For a high-intensity focused ultrasound field, a new approach that combines the optical phase contrast method and acoustic holography was attempted. First, the optical measurement of focused ultrasound was rapidly performed over the field near a transducer. Second, the nonlinear propagation of the measured ultrasound was simulated. The result of the new approach agreed well with that of the measurement using a hydrophone and was improved from that of the phase contrast method alone with phase unwrapping.

  7. Full skin quantitative optical coherence elastography achieved by combining vibration and surface acoustic wave methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunhui; Guan, Guangying; Huang, Zhihong; Wang, Ruikang K.; Nabi, Ghulam

    2015-03-01

    By combining with the phase sensitive optical coherence tomography (PhS-OCT), vibration and surface acoustic wave (SAW) methods have been reported to provide elastography of skin tissue respectively. However, neither of these two methods can provide the elastography in full skin depth in current systems. This paper presents a feasibility study on an optical coherence elastography method which combines both vibration and SAW in order to give the quantitative mechanical properties of skin tissue with full depth range, including epidermis, dermis and subcutaneous fat. Experiments are carried out on layered tissue mimicking phantoms and in vivo human forearm and palm skin. A ring actuator generates vibration while a line actuator were used to excited SAWs. A PhS-OCT system is employed to provide the ultrahigh sensitive measurement of the generated waves. The experimental results demonstrate that by the combination of vibration and SAW method the full skin bulk mechanical properties can be quantitatively measured and further the elastography can be obtained with a sensing depth from ~0mm to ~4mm. This method is promising to apply in clinics where the quantitative elasticity of localized skin diseases is needed to aid the diagnosis and treatment.

  8. A practical acoustical absorption analysis of coir fiber based on rigid frame modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayub, Md.; Nor, Mohd Jailani Mohd; Fouladi, Mohammad Hosseini; Zulkifli, Rozli; Amin, Nowshad

    2012-03-01

    An analytical study based on rigid frame model is demonstrated to evaluate the acoustic absorption of coir fiber. Effects of different conditions such as combination of air gap and perforated plate (PP) are studied in this work. Materials used here are treated as rigid rather than elastic, since the flow resistivity of coir fiber is very low. The well-known rigid frame Johnson-Allard equivalent-fluid model is applied to obtain the acoustic impedance of single layer coir fiber. Atalla and Sgard model is employed to estimate the surface impedance of PP. Acoustic transmission approach (ATA) is utilized for adding various consecutive layers in multilayer structure. Models are examined in different conditions such as single layer coir fiber, coir fiber backed with air gap, single layer PP in combination with coir fiber and air gap. Experiments are conducted in impedance tube on normal incidence sound absorption to validate the results. Results from the measurement are found to be in well agreement with the theoretical absorption coefficients. The performance of the rigid frame modeling method is checked more specifically in all conditions, by the mean prediction error rate of normal incidence sound absorption coefficients. Comparison between the measured absorption coefficients and predicted by rigid frame method shows discrepancy lower than 20 and 15% for most of the conditions in the frequency range of 0.2-1.5 and 1.5-5 kHz, respectively. Moreover, acoustic absorption of various single and multilayer structures is compared with the simpler empirical methods such as Delany-Bazley and Miki model; and complicated method such as Biot-Allard Model and Allard Transfer Function (TF) method. Comparisons show that the presented method offers a better accuracy of the results than the empirical models. Subsequently, it can provide almost same absorption plot with Biot-Allard model (single layer combination) and TF method (multilayer combination) proving it to be a

  9. Numerical analysis of tonal airfoil self-noise and acoustic feedback-loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Lloyd E.; Sandberg, Richard D.

    2011-12-01

    In this study the role of acoustic feedback instabilities in the tonal airfoil self-noise phenomenon is investigated. First, direct numerical simulations are conducted of the flow around a NACA-0012 airfoil at Re=1×105 and four angles of attack. At the two lowest angles of attack considered the airfoil self-noise exhibits a clear tonal contribution, whereas at the two higher angles of attack the tonal contribution becomes less significant in comparison to the broadband noise. Classical linear stability analysis of time-averaged boundary layer profiles shows that the tonal noise occurs at a frequency significantly lower than that of the most convectively amplified instability wave. Two-dimensional linear stability analysis of the time-averaged flowfield is then performed, illustrating the presence of an acoustic feedback loop involving the airfoil trailing edge. The feedback loop is found to be unstable only for the cases where tonal self-noise is prominent, and is found to self-select a frequency almost identical to that of the tonal self-noise. The constituent mechanisms of the acoustic feedback loop are considered, which appear to explain why the preferred frequency is lower than that of the most convectively amplified instability wave.

  10. Three-dimensional coupled mode analysis of internal-wave acoustic ducts.

    PubMed

    Shmelev, Alexey A; Lynch, James F; Lin, Ying-Tsong; Schmidt, Henrik

    2014-05-01

    A fully three-dimensional coupled mode approach is used in this paper to describe the physics of low frequency acoustic signals propagating through a train of internal waves at an arbitrary azimuth. A three layer model of the shallow water waveguide is employed for studying the properties of normal modes and their coupled interaction due to the presence of nonlinear internal waves. Using a robust wave number integration technique for Fourier transform computation and a direct global matrix approach, an accurate three-dimensional coupled mode full field solution is obtained for the tonal signal propagation through straight and parallel internal waves. This approach provides accurate results for arbitrary azimuth and includes the effects of backscattering. This enables one to provide an azimuthal analysis of acoustic propagation and separate the effects of mode coupled transparent resonance, horizontal reflection and refraction, the horizontal Lloyd's mirror, horizontal ducting and anti-ducting, and horizontal tunneling and secondary ducting. PMID:24815234

  11. Multi-scale morphology analysis of acoustic emission signal and quantitative diagnosis for bearing fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen-Jing; Cui, Ling-Li; Chen, Dao-Yun

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring of potential bearing faults in operation is of critical importance to safe operation of high speed trains. One of the major challenges is how to differentiate relevant signals to operational conditions of bearings from noises emitted from the surrounding environment. In this work, we report a procedure for analyzing acoustic emission signals collected from rolling bearings for diagnosis of bearing health conditions by examining their morphological pattern spectrum (MPS) through a multi-scale morphology analysis procedure. The results show that acoustic emission signals resulted from a given type of bearing faults share rather similar MPS curves. Further examinations in terms of sample entropy and Lempel-Ziv complexity of MPS curves suggest that these two parameters can be utilized to determine damage modes.

  12. Acoustic Methods to Monitor Protein Crystallization and to Detect Protein Crystals in Suspensions of Agarose and Lipidic Cubic Phase.

    PubMed

    Ericson, Daniel L; Yin, Xingyu; Scalia, Alexander; Samara, Yasmin N; Stearns, Richard; Vlahos, Harry; Ellson, Richard; Sweet, Robert M; Soares, Alexei S

    2016-02-01

    Improvements needed for automated crystallography include crystal detection and crystal harvesting. A technique that uses acoustic droplet ejection to harvest crystals was previously reported. Here a method is described for using the same acoustic instrument to detect protein crystals and to monitor crystal growth. Acoustic pulses were used to monitor the progress of crystallization trials and to detect the presence and location of protein crystals. Crystals were detected, and crystallization was monitored in aqueous solutions and in lipidic cubic phase. Using a commercially available acoustic instrument, crystals measuring ~150 µm or larger were readily detected. Simple laboratory techniques were used to increase the sensitivity to 50 µm by suspending the crystals away from the plastic surface of the crystallization plate. This increased the sensitivity by separating the strong signal generated by the plate bottom that can mask the signal from small protein crystals. It is possible to further boost the acoustic reflection from small crystals by reducing the wavelength of the incident sound pulse, but our current instrumentation does not allow this option. In the future, commercially available sound-emitting transducers with a characteristic frequency near 300 MHz should detect and monitor the growth of individual 3 µm crystals. PMID:26574563

  13. High Frequency Acoustic Response Characterization and Analysis of the Deep Throttling Common Extensible Cryogenic Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casiano, M. J.

    2011-01-01

    The Common Extensive Cryogenic Engine program demonstrated the operation of a deep throttling engine design. The program, spanning five years from August 2005 to July 2010, funded testing through four separate engine demonstration test series. Along with successful completion of multiple objectives, a discrete response of approximately 4000 Hz was discovered and explored throughout the program. The typical low-amplitude acoustic response was evident in the chamber measurement through almost every operating condition; however, at certain off-nominal operating conditions, the response became discrete with higher amplitude. This paper summarizes the data reduction, characterization, and analysis of the 4,000 Hz response for the entire program duration, using the large amount of data collected. Upon first encountering the response, new objectives and instrumentation were incorporated in future test series to specifically collect 4,000 Hz data. The 4,000 Hz response was identified as being related to the first tangential acoustic mode by means of frequency estimation and spatial decomposition. The latter approach showed that the effective node line of the mode was aligned with the manifold propellant inlets with standing waves and quasi-standing waves present at various times. Contour maps that contain instantaneous frequency and amplitude trackings of the response were generated as a significant improvement to historical manual approaches of data reduction presentation. Signal analysis and dynamic data reduction also uncovered several other features of the response including a stable limit cycle, the progressive engagement of subsequent harmonics, the U-shaped time history, an intermittent response near the test-based neutral stability region, other acoustic modes, and indications of modulation with a separate subsynchronous response. Although no engine damage related to the acoustic mode was noted, the peak-to-peak fluctuating pressure amplitude achieved 12.1% of the

  14. Vibro-acoustic analysis of manned spacecraft using SEA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigo, G. Alonso; Klein, M.; Borello, G.

    A comprehensive preliminary statistical energy analysis (SEA) model of a typical manned spacecraft (Columbus APM) has been built and interesting results have been extracted from it. In the process, a good understanding of the noise transmission in this type of structure has been achieved and what is more important, the critical parameters governing the behavior of the system have been identified. In general, all the damping loss factors as well as the coupling loss factors are critical parameters, but among them we can underline the coupling loss factor between the external shell and the rack rear panel. The other two most critical items are the so called small cavities (air cavities between the external shell and the racks rear panel) and the equipment mass distribution among the different panels of a rack. The importance of the SEA parameters has proved to be capital. With the sensitivity analysis we have shown that a great scatter in the results is achieved modifying the values of certain critical parameters. This conclusion could be expected because looking at the literature we can see that success in SEA prediction has never been reached without an appropriate test campaign aiming at measuring the relevant SEA parameters. This is why it is strongly recommended to build an experimental SEA parameters database for APM-like structures. Existing hardware, such as the SPACELAB, could be used for such a task.

  15. Burton-Miller-type singular boundary method for acoustic radiation and scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Zhuo-Jia; Chen, Wen; Gu, Yan

    2014-08-01

    This paper proposes the singular boundary method (SBM) in conjunction with Burton and Miller's formulation for acoustic radiation and scattering. The SBM is a strong-form collocation boundary discretization technique using the singular fundamental solutions, which is mathematically simple, easy-to-program, meshless and introduces the concept of source intensity factors (SIFs) to eliminate the singularities of the fundamental solutions. Therefore, it avoids singular numerical integrals in the boundary element method (BEM) and circumvents the troublesome placement of the fictitious boundary in the method of fundamental solutions (MFS). In the present method, we derive the SIFs of exterior Helmholtz equation by means of the SIFs of exterior Laplace equation owing to the same order of singularities between the Laplace and Helmholtz fundamental solutions. In conjunction with the Burton-Miller formulation, the SBM enhances the quality of the solution, particularly in the vicinity of the corresponding interior eigenfrequencies. Numerical illustrations demonstrate efficiency and accuracy of the present scheme on some benchmark examples under 2D and 3D unbounded domains in comparison with the analytical solutions, the boundary element solutions and Dirichlet-to-Neumann finite element solutions.

  16. A Compressive Multi-Frequency Linear Sampling Method for Underwater Acoustic Imaging.

    PubMed

    Alqadah, Hatim F

    2016-06-01

    This paper investigates the use of a qualitative inverse scattering method known as the linear sampling method (LSM) for imaging underwater scenes using limited aperture receiver configurations. The LSM is based on solving a set of unstable integral equations known as the far-field equations and whose stability breaks down even further for under-sampled observation aperture data. Based on the results of a recent study concerning multi-frequency LSM imaging, we propose an iterative inversion method that is founded upon a compressive sensing framework. In particular, we leverage multi-frequency diversity in the data by imposing a partial frequency variation prior on the solution which we show is justified when the frequency bandwidth is sampled finely enough. We formulate an alternating direction method of multiplier approach to minimize the proposed cost function. Proof of concept is established through numerically generated data as well as experimental acoustic measurements taken in a shallow pool facility at the U.S Naval Research Laboratory. PMID:27093719

  17. A new calibration method for measuring acoustic transfer matrixes with flow and application to an automotive compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousselet, Benoit; Gibiat, Vincent; Guilain, Stéphane; Lefebvre, Alain

    2014-12-01

    A new method for measuring acoustic transfer matrixes with flow has been developed. It is based on two-load technique. Great improvements were obtained on specific calibration of the connections. We present here the calibration principles and validation. Measurements of basic resonating systems, first without flow then with flow up to Mach 0.2 clearly validated the accuracy of the technique, even under extreme flow conditions. This technique was developed to allow the determination of the acoustic behavior of an automotive engine intake line, comprising a compressor. Measurements of the transfer matrix of an automotive compressor are presented without flow then under realistic engine conditions. The results obtained are compared to those of a basic acoustic model of the compressor.

  18. A new sparse design method on phased array-based acoustic emission sensor for partial discharge detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Qing; Cheng, Shuyi; Lü, Fangcheng; Li, Yanqing

    2014-03-01

    The acoustic detecting performance of a partial discharge (PD) ultrasonic sensor array can be improved by increasing the number of array elements. However, it will increase the complexity and cost of the PD detection system. Therefore, a sparse sensor with an optimization design can be chosen to ensure good acoustic performance. In this paper, first, a quantitative method is proposed for evaluating the acoustic performance of a square PD ultrasonic array sensor. Second, a method of sparse design is presented to combine the evaluation method with the chaotic monkey algorithm. Third, an optimal sparse structure of a 3 × 3 square PD ultrasonic array sensor is deduced. It is found that, under different sparseness and sparse structure, the main beam width of the directivity function shows a small variation, while the sidelobe amplitude shows a bigger variation. For a specific sparseness, the acoustic performance under the optimal sparse structure is close to that using a full array. Finally, some simulations based on the above method show that, for certain sparseness, the sensor with the optimal sparse structure exhibits superior positioning accuracy compared to that with a stochastic one. The sensor array structure may be chosen according to the actual requirements for an actual engineering application.

  19. Can the Acoustic Analysis of Expressive Prosody Discriminate Schizophrenia?

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sánchez, Francisco; Muela-Martínez, José Antonio; Cortés-Soto, Pedro; García Meilán, Juan José; Vera Ferrándiz, Juan Antonio; Egea Caparrós, Amaro; Pujante Valverde, Isabel María

    2015-01-01

    Emotional states, attitudes and intentions are often conveyed by modulations in the tone of voice. Impaired recognition of emotions from a tone of voice (receptive prosody) has been described as characteristic symptoms of schizophrenia. However, the ability to express non-verbal information in speech (expressive prosody) has been understudied. This paper describes a useful technique for quantifying the degree of expressive prosody deficits in schizophrenia, using a semi-automatic method, and evaluates this method's ability to discriminate between patient and control groups. Forty-five medicated patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia were matched with thirty-five healthy comparison subjects. Production of expressive prosodic speech was analyzed using variation in fundamental frequency (F0) measures on an emotionally neutral reading task. Results revealed that patients with schizophrenia exhibited significantly more pauses (p < .001), were slower (p < .001), and showed less pitch variability in speech (p < .05) and fewer variations in syllable timing (p < .001) than control subjects. These features have been associated with «flat» speech prosody. Signal processing algorithms applied to speech were shown to be capable of discriminating between patients and controls with an accuracy of 93.8%. These speech parameters may have a diagnostic and prognosis value and therefore could be used as a dependent measure in clinical trials. PMID:26522128

  20. Reducing the effects of acoustic heterogeneity with an iterative reconstruction method from experimental data in microwave induced thermoacoustic tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jinguo; Zhao, Zhiqin Song, Jian; Chen, Guoping; Nie, Zaiping; Liu, Qing-Huo

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: An iterative reconstruction method has been previously reported by the authors of this paper. However, the iterative reconstruction method was demonstrated by solely using the numerical simulations. It is essential to apply the iterative reconstruction method to practice conditions. The objective of this work is to validate the capability of the iterative reconstruction method for reducing the effects of acoustic heterogeneity with the experimental data in microwave induced thermoacoustic tomography. Methods: Most existing reconstruction methods need to combine the ultrasonic measurement technology to quantitatively measure the velocity distribution of heterogeneity, which increases the system complexity. Different to existing reconstruction methods, the iterative reconstruction method combines time reversal mirror technique, fast marching method, and simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique to iteratively estimate the velocity distribution of heterogeneous tissue by solely using the measured data. Then, the estimated velocity distribution is used subsequently to reconstruct the highly accurate image of microwave absorption distribution. Experiments that a target placed in an acoustic heterogeneous environment are performed to validate the iterative reconstruction method. Results: By using the estimated velocity distribution, the target in an acoustic heterogeneous environment can be reconstructed with better shape and higher image contrast than targets that are reconstructed with a homogeneous velocity distribution. Conclusions: The distortions caused by the acoustic heterogeneity can be efficiently corrected by utilizing the velocity distribution estimated by the iterative reconstruction method. The advantage of the iterative reconstruction method over the existing correction methods is that it is successful in improving the quality of the image of microwave absorption distribution without increasing the system complexity.