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Sample records for acoustic analysis revealed

  1. Acoustic analysis reveals a new cryptic bush–cricket in the Carpathian Mountains (Orthoptera, Phaneropteridae)

    PubMed Central

    Iorgu, Ionuţ Ştefan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A new morphologically cryptic species of phaneropterid bush–cricket from the genus Isophya is described from the Eastern Carpathian Mountains: Isophya dochia sp. n. Sound analysis and morphological details are discussed in the paper comparing the new species with several Isophya species having similar morphology and acoustic behavior. PMID:23378813

  2. Acoustic analysis reveals a new cryptic bush-cricket in the Carpathian Mountains (Orthoptera, Phaneropteridae).

    PubMed

    Iorgu, Ionuţ Ştefan

    2012-01-01

    A new morphologically cryptic species of phaneropterid bush-cricket from the genus Isophya is described from the Eastern Carpathian Mountains: Isophya dochiasp. n. Sound analysis and morphological details are discussed in the paper comparing the new species with several Isophya species having similar morphology and acoustic behavior.

  3. Acoustic telemetry and network analysis reveal the space use of multiple reef predators and enhance marine protected area design.

    PubMed

    Lea, James S E; Humphries, Nicolas E; von Brandis, Rainer G; Clarke, Christopher R; Sims, David W

    2016-07-13

    Marine protected areas (MPAs) are commonly employed to protect ecosystems from threats like overfishing. Ideally, MPA design should incorporate movement data from multiple target species to ensure sufficient habitat is protected. We used long-term acoustic telemetry and network analysis to determine the fine-scale space use of five shark and one turtle species at a remote atoll in the Seychelles, Indian Ocean, and evaluate the efficacy of a proposed MPA. Results revealed strong, species-specific habitat use in both sharks and turtles, with corresponding variation in MPA use. Defining the MPA's boundary from the edge of the reef flat at low tide instead of the beach at high tide (the current best in Seychelles) significantly increased the MPA's coverage of predator movements by an average of 34%. Informed by these results, the larger MPA was adopted by the Seychelles government, demonstrating how telemetry data can improve shark spatial conservation by affecting policy directly.

  4. Texture in steel plates revealed by laser ultrasonic surface acoustic waves velocity dispersion analysis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Anmin; Wang, Xiaochen; Glorieux, Christ; Yang, Quan; Dong, Feng; He, Fei; Wang, Yanlong; Sermeus, Jan; Van der Donck, Tom; Shu, Xuedao

    2017-02-24

    A photoacoustic, laser ultrasonics based approach in an Impulsive Stimulated Scattering (ISS) implementation was used to investigate the texture in polycrystalline metal plates. The angular dependence of the 'polycrystalline' surface acoustic wave (SAW) velocity measured along regions containing many grains was experimentally determined and compared with simulated results that were based on the angular dependence of the 'single grain' SAW velocity within single grains and the grain orientation distribution. The polycrystalline SAW velocities turn out to vary with texture. The SAW velocities and their angular variations for {110} texture were found to be larger than that the ones for {111} texture or the strong γ fiber texture. The SAW velocities for {001} texture were larger than for {111} texture, but with almost the same angular dependence. The results infer the feasibility to apply angular SAW angular dispersion measurements by laser ultrasonics for on-line texture monitoring.

  5. Acoustic emission signature analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, O.; Pardee, J. W.

    1981-03-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) in plate glass and steel was studied as a function of angle. The low frequency AE in glass was studied in detail, and contributions from P, S, and Rayleigh waves identified. These results were isotropic, as expected theoretically. Limited high frequency (5 to 20 MHz) results were obtained in glass. The measurement of AE on transgranular crack growth in steel during fatigue crack growth was accomplished by use of a low noise manual hydraulic loading system and an electronic gate to reject grip noise. The concept of the wave momentum of an AE was elaborated and a measurement technique suggested. The theoretical study of this problem led to the discovery of an infinite family of elastic surface (Rayleigh-like) waves, and to further cylindrical, radially propagating plate waves.

  6. Acoustic telemetry reveals cryptic residency of whale sharks.

    PubMed

    Cagua, E Fernando; Cochran, Jesse E M; Rohner, Christoph A; Prebble, Clare E M; Sinclair-Taylor, Tane H; Pierce, Simon J; Berumen, Michael L

    2015-04-01

    Although whale sharks (Rhincodon typus) have been documented to move thousands of kilometres, they are most frequently observed at a few predictable seasonal aggregation sites. The absence of sharks at the surface during visual surveys has led to the assumption that sharks disperse to places unknown during the long 'off-seasons' at most of these locations. Here we compare 2 years of R. typus visual sighting records from Mafia Island in Tanzania to concurrent acoustic telemetry of tagged individuals. Sightings revealed a clear seasonal pattern with a peak between October and February and no sharks observed at other times. By contrast, acoustic telemetry demonstrated year-round residency of R. typus. The sharks use a different habitat in the off-season, swimming deeper and further away from shore, presumably in response to prey distributions. This behavioural change reduces the sharks' visibility, giving the false impression that they have left the area. We demonstrate, for the first time to our knowledge, year-round residency of unprovisioned, individual R. typus at an aggregation site, and highlight the importance of using multiple techniques to study the movement ecology of marine megafauna.

  7. Acoustic telemetry reveals cryptic residency of whale sharks

    PubMed Central

    Cagua, E. Fernando; Cochran, Jesse E. M.; Rohner, Christoph A.; Prebble, Clare E. M.; Sinclair-Taylor, Tane H.; Pierce, Simon J.; Berumen, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Although whale sharks (Rhincodon typus) have been documented to move thousands of kilometres, they are most frequently observed at a few predictable seasonal aggregation sites. The absence of sharks at the surface during visual surveys has led to the assumption that sharks disperse to places unknown during the long ‘off-seasons’ at most of these locations. Here we compare 2 years of R. typus visual sighting records from Mafia Island in Tanzania to concurrent acoustic telemetry of tagged individuals. Sightings revealed a clear seasonal pattern with a peak between October and February and no sharks observed at other times. By contrast, acoustic telemetry demonstrated year-round residency of R. typus. The sharks use a different habitat in the off-season, swimming deeper and further away from shore, presumably in response to prey distributions. This behavioural change reduces the sharks' visibility, giving the false impression that they have left the area. We demonstrate, for the first time to our knowledge, year-round residency of unprovisioned, individual R. typus at an aggregation site, and highlight the importance of using multiple techniques to study the movement ecology of marine megafauna. PMID:25832816

  8. Acoustic terahertz graphene plasmons revealed by photocurrent nanoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-González, Pablo; Nikitin, Alexey Y.; Gao, Yuanda; Woessner, Achim; Lundeberg, Mark B.; Principi, Alessandro; Forcellini, Nicolò; Yan, Wenjing; Vélez, Saül; Huber, Andreas. J.; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Casanova, Félix; Hueso, Luis E.; Polini, Marco; Hone, James; Koppens, Frank H. L.; Hillenbrand, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) fields are widely used for sensing, communication and quality control. In future applications, they could be efficiently confined, enhanced and manipulated well below the classical diffraction limit through the excitation of graphene plasmons (GPs). These possibilities emerge from the strongly reduced GP wavelength, λp, compared with the photon wavelength, λ0, which can be controlled by modulating the carrier density of graphene via electrical gating. Recently, GPs in a graphene/insulator/metal configuration have been predicted to exhibit a linear dispersion (thus called acoustic plasmons) and a further reduced wavelength, implying an improved field confinement, analogous to plasmons in two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) near conductive substrates. Although infrared GPs have been visualized by scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM), the real-space imaging of strongly confined THz plasmons in graphene and 2DEGs has been elusive so far—only GPs with nearly free-space wavelengths have been observed. Here we demonstrate real-space imaging of acoustic THz plasmons in a graphene photodetector with split-gate architecture. To that end, we introduce nanoscale-resolved THz photocurrent near-field microscopy, where near-field excited GPs are detected thermoelectrically rather than optically. This on-chip detection simplifies GP imaging as sophisticated s-SNOM detection schemes can be avoided. The photocurrent images reveal strongly reduced GP wavelengths (λp ≈ λ0/66), a linear dispersion resulting from the coupling of GPs with the metal gate below the graphene, and that plasmon damping at positive carrier densities is dominated by Coulomb impurity scattering.

  9. Acoustic terahertz graphene plasmons revealed by photocurrent nanoscopy.

    PubMed

    Alonso-González, Pablo; Nikitin, Alexey Y; Gao, Yuanda; Woessner, Achim; Lundeberg, Mark B; Principi, Alessandro; Forcellini, Nicolò; Yan, Wenjing; Vélez, Saül; Huber, Andreas J; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Casanova, Félix; Hueso, Luis E; Polini, Marco; Hone, James; Koppens, Frank H L; Hillenbrand, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) fields are widely used for sensing, communication and quality control. In future applications, they could be efficiently confined, enhanced and manipulated well below the classical diffraction limit through the excitation of graphene plasmons (GPs). These possibilities emerge from the strongly reduced GP wavelength, λp, compared with the photon wavelength, λ0, which can be controlled by modulating the carrier density of graphene via electrical gating. Recently, GPs in a graphene/insulator/metal configuration have been predicted to exhibit a linear dispersion (thus called acoustic plasmons) and a further reduced wavelength, implying an improved field confinement, analogous to plasmons in two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) near conductive substrates. Although infrared GPs have been visualized by scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM), the real-space imaging of strongly confined THz plasmons in graphene and 2DEGs has been elusive so far-only GPs with nearly free-space wavelengths have been observed. Here we demonstrate real-space imaging of acoustic THz plasmons in a graphene photodetector with split-gate architecture. To that end, we introduce nanoscale-resolved THz photocurrent near-field microscopy, where near-field excited GPs are detected thermoelectrically rather than optically. This on-chip detection simplifies GP imaging as sophisticated s-SNOM detection schemes can be avoided. The photocurrent images reveal strongly reduced GP wavelengths (λp ≈ λ0/66), a linear dispersion resulting from the coupling of GPs with the metal gate below the graphene, and that plasmon damping at positive carrier densities is dominated by Coulomb impurity scattering.

  10. Acoustic source analysis of supersonic jets from complex nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Joseph W.; Kreitzman, Jordan

    2015-11-01

    We compute acoustic source terms corresponding to Goldstein's generalized acoustic analogy from an unstructured high-fidelity large eddy simulation of a supersonic jet issuing from a rectangular nozzle with chevrons. The simulation data are validated against experimental measurements of mean and turbulence flow statistics as well as far-field noise. We evaluate fourth-order correlations from the simulation data to assess assumptions of quasi-normality and statistical axisymmetry that underpin reduced-order acoustic source models originally developed for round jets. A spatial analysis of these correlations in relation to the complex geometry of the nozzle reveals locations where the validity of these assumptions begins to break down. Using two point two-time correlations of the simulation data, we also directly evaluate and compare the accuracy of four different acoustic source models, including the Gaussian, moving-frame, fixed-frame, and modified distance models. Computational resources were provided by the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility.

  11. Vibro-acoustic analysis of composite plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarigül, A. S.; Karagözlü, E.

    2014-03-01

    Vibro-acoustic analysis plays a vital role on the design of aircrafts, spacecrafts, land vehicles and ships produced from thin plates backed by closed cavities, with regard to human health and living comfort. For this type of structures, it is required a coupled solution that takes into account structural-acoustic interaction which is crucial for sensitive solutions. In this study, coupled vibro-acoustic analyses of plates produced from composite materials have been performed by using finite element analysis software. The study has been carried out for E-glass/Epoxy, Kevlar/Epoxy and Carbon/Epoxy plates with different ply angles and numbers of ply. The effects of composite material, ply orientation and number of layer on coupled vibro-acoustic characteristics of plates have been analysed for various combinations. The analysis results have been statistically examined and assessed.

  12. Multi-tissue stable isotope analysis and acoustic telemetry reveal seasonal variability in the trophic interactions of juvenile bull sharks in a coastal estuary.

    PubMed

    Matich, Philip; Heithaus, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how natural and anthropogenic drivers affect extant food webs is critical to predicting the impacts of climate change and habitat alterations on ecosystem dynamics. In the Florida Everglades, seasonal reductions in freshwater flow and precipitation lead to annual migrations of aquatic taxa from marsh habitats to deep-water refugia in estuaries. The timing and intensity of freshwater reductions, however, will be modified by ongoing ecosystem restoration and predicted climate change. Understanding the importance of seasonally pulsed resources to predators is critical to predicting the impacts of management and climate change on their populations. As with many large predators, however, it is difficult to determine to what extent predators like bull sharks (Carcharhinus leucas) in the coastal Everglades make use of prey pulses currently. We used passive acoustic telemetry to determine whether shark movements responded to the pulse of marsh prey. To investigate the possibility that sharks fed on marsh prey, we modelled the predicted dynamics of stable isotope values in bull shark blood and plasma under different assumptions of temporal variability in shark diets and physiological dynamics of tissue turnover and isotopic discrimination. Bull sharks increased their use of upstream channels during the late dry season, and although our previous work shows long-term specialization in the diets of sharks, stable isotope values suggested that some individuals adjusted their diets to take advantage of prey entering the system from the marsh, and as such this may be an important resource for the nursery. Restoration efforts are predicted to increase hydroperiods and marsh water levels, likely shifting the timing, duration and intensity of prey pulses, which could have negative consequences for the bull shark population and/or induce shifts in behaviour. Understanding the factors influencing the propensity to specialize or adopt more flexible trophic interactions

  13. Quality Prediction of Twin Wire Arc Sprayed Coatings Using Acoustic Emission Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, W.; Abdulgader, M.; Wang, G.; Zielke, R.

    2013-03-01

    In this work, acoustic emission analysis is utilized in the twin wire arc spraying (TWAS) process to study the influence of the adjustable process parameters on the simultaneously obtained acoustic signals at the nozzle and at the substrate. The amplitude of recorded signals at the substrate was in general much higher than those recorded at the nozzle. At the substrate side, the amplitude of emitted acoustic signals is dependent on feedstock materials and is higher when using solid wires. The acoustic signals were recorded at the spraying gun for different gas pressures without arc ignition (as dry runs) in order to reveal the effect of the arc on the emitted acoustic signals. A correlation between controllable parameters, the acoustic signals, and the obtained in-flight particle characteristics was observed. This work contributes to the online control of TWAS processes and is one of many proposed publications in the research field of the conducted acoustic emission analysis.

  14. Pulse analysis of acoustic emission signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, J. R.; Packman, P. F.

    1977-01-01

    A method for the signature analysis of pulses in the frequency domain and the time domain is presented. Fourier spectrum, Fourier transfer function, shock spectrum and shock spectrum ratio were examined in the frequency domain analysis and pulse shape deconvolution was developed for use in the time domain analysis. Comparisons of the relative performance of each analysis technique are made for the characterization of acoustic emission pulses recorded by a measuring system. To demonstrate the relative sensitivity of each of the methods to small changes in the pulse shape, signatures of computer modeled systems with analytical pulses are presented. Optimization techniques are developed and used to indicate the best design parameter values for deconvolution of the pulse shape. Several experiments are presented that test the pulse signature analysis methods on different acoustic emission sources. These include acoustic emission associated with (a) crack propagation, (b) ball dropping on a plate, (c) spark discharge, and (d) defective and good ball bearings. Deconvolution of the first few micro-seconds of the pulse train is shown to be the region in which the significant signatures of the acoustic emission event are to be found.

  15. Pulse analysis of acoustic emission signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, J. R.; Packman, P. F.

    1977-01-01

    A method for the signature analysis of pulses in the frequency domain and the time domain is presented. Fourier spectrum, Fourier transfer function, shock spectrum and shock spectrum ratio were examined in the frequency domain analysis, and pulse shape deconvolution was developed for use in the time domain analysis. Comparisons of the relative performance of each analysis technique are made for the characterization of acoustic emission pulses recorded by a measuring system. To demonstrate the relative sensitivity of each of the methods to small changes in the pulse shape, signatures of computer modeled systems with analytical pulses are presented. Optimization techniques are developed and used to indicate the best design parameters values for deconvolution of the pulse shape. Several experiments are presented that test the pulse signature analysis methods on different acoustic emission sources. These include acoustic emissions associated with: (1) crack propagation, (2) ball dropping on a plate, (3) spark discharge and (4) defective and good ball bearings. Deconvolution of the first few micro-seconds of the pulse train are shown to be the region in which the significant signatures of the acoustic emission event are to be found.

  16. Wavelet Analysis for Acoustic Phased Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Inna; Zlotnick, Zvi

    2003-03-01

    Wavelet spectrum analysis is known to be one of the most powerful tools for exploring quasistationary signals. In this paper we use wavelet technique to develop a new Direction Finding (DF) Algorithm for the Acoustic Phased Array (APA) systems. Utilising multi-scale analysis of libraries of wavelets allows us to work with frequency bands instead of individual frequency of an acoustic source. These frequency bands could be regarded as features extracted from quasistationary signals emitted by a noisy object. For detection, tracing and identification of a sound source in a noisy environment we develop smart algorithm. The essential part of this algorithm is a special interacting procedure of the above-mentioned DF-algorithm and the wavelet-based Identification (ID) algorithm developed in [4]. Significant improvement of the basic properties of a receiving APA pattern is achieved.

  17. Acoustic Emission Analysis Applet (AEAA) Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Charles T.; Roth, Don J.

    2013-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research and NASA White Sands Test Facility have developed software supporting an automated pressure vessel structural health monitoring (SHM) system based on acoustic emissions (AE). The software, referred to as the Acoustic Emission Analysis Applet (AEAA), provides analysts with a tool that can interrogate data collected on Digital Wave Corp. and Physical Acoustics Corp. software using a wide spectrum of powerful filters and charts. This software can be made to work with any data once the data format is known. The applet will compute basic AE statistics, and statistics as a function of time and pressure (see figure). AEAA provides value added beyond the analysis provided by the respective vendors' analysis software. The software can handle data sets of unlimited size. A wide variety of government and commercial applications could benefit from this technology, notably requalification and usage tests for compressed gas and hydrogen-fueled vehicles. Future enhancements will add features similar to a "check engine" light on a vehicle. Once installed, the system will ultimately be used to alert International Space Station crewmembers to critical structural instabilities, but will have little impact to missions otherwise. Diagnostic information could then be transmitted to experienced technicians on the ground in a timely manner to determine whether pressure vessels have been impacted, are structurally unsound, or can be safely used to complete the mission.

  18. Visualization of localized elastic properties in human tooth and jawbone as revealed by scanning acoustic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Shelke, Amit; Blume, Maximilian; Mularczyk, Michael; Landes, Constantin; Sader, Robert; Bereiter-Hahn, Jurgen

    2013-05-01

    The elastic properties of human canine and supporting alveolar bone are measured by the distribution of localized speed of sound using scanning acoustic microscopy. Methods for the dynamic, non-destructive diagnostics of dental hard tissues can have a key role in the early detection of demineralization processes and carious lesions, and they are supposed to open the possibility of early dental restorations. The localized distribution of the ultrasound velocity in canine tooth and alveolar bone was obtained using scanning acoustic microscopy with a 5- and 30-MHz transducer. An acoustic material signature curve signifies the interference of the waves and quantitatively maps the localized speed of sound in alveolar bone and the canine tooth. Seven samples, consisting of alveolar jawbone and tooth sliced along the coronally apical axis, were investigated. The average speed of sound was determined along three independent cross sections at enamel, dentin and cortical bone. The average speed of sound in enamel, bone and dentin was SD 3460 ± 193 m/s, 3232 ± 113 m/s and 2928 ± 106 m/s. The distribution of sound wave propagation reveals a decrease in sound speed from the peripheral parts within the enamel and dentin layers toward the proximal zones. These results prove the possibility of linking the elastic properties to different areas within the osseous and dental hard tissues and visualize them in an extremely high local resolution. The results serve as a basis for further study and substantiate the enormous potential of ultrasound based analysis in the field of dento-alveolar diagnosis.

  19. Acoustic spectrum analysis for gyro bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitzman, C. E.

    1981-08-01

    An acoustic system analyzer has been developed that will be an aid in bearing analysis for displacement gyros. The phenomenon of the Fourier Transform has made possible the development of an optical processor that operates by the interaction of light from a light emitting diode array sweeping across a binary frequency mask and through lenses onto a vidicon tube. This arrangement performs the Fourier Transform of large time samples of sound in a parallel process, preserving amplitude, frequency and phase information. The resultant information can then be entered into a computer for programmed analysis or displayed for visual analysis of the condition of gyro-bearings.

  20. MRI acoustic noise: sound pressure and frequency analysis.

    PubMed

    Counter, S A; Olofsson, A; Grahn, H F; Borg, E

    1997-01-01

    The large gradient coils used in MRI generate, simultaneously with the pulsed radiofrequency (RF) wave, acoustic noise of high intensity that has raised concern regarding hearing safety. The sound pressure levels (SPLs) and power spectra of MRI acoustic noise were measured at the position of the human head in the isocenter of five MRI systems and with 10 different pulse sequences used in clinical MR scanning. Each protocol, including magnetization-prepared rapid gradient echo (MP-RAGE; 113 dB SPL linear), fast gradient echo turbo (114 dB SPL linear), and spin echo T1/2 mm (117 dB SPL linear), was found to have the high SPLs, rapid pulse rates, amplitude-modulated pulse envelopes, and multipeaked spectra. Since thickness and SPL were inversely related, the T1-weighted images generated more intense acoustic noise than the proton-dense T2-weighted measures. The unfiltered linear peak values provided more accurate measurements of the SPL and spectral content of the MRI acoustic noise than the commonly used dB A-weighted scale, which filters out the predominant low frequency components. Fourier analysis revealed predominantly low frequency energy peaks ranging from .05 to approximately 1 kHz, with a steep high frequency cutoff for each pulse sequence. Ear protectors of known attenuation ratings are recommended for all patients during MRI testing.

  1. An analysis of beam parameters on proton-acoustic waves through an analytic approach.

    PubMed

    Aytac Kipergil, Esra; Erkol, Hakan; Kaya, Serhat; Gulsen, Gultekin; Unlu, Mehmet

    2017-03-02

    It has been reported that acoustic waves are generated when a high energy pulsed proton beam is deposited in a small volume within tissue. One possible application of the proton induced acoustics is to get a real-time feedback for intratreatment adjustments by monitoring such acoustic waves. High spatial resolution in ultrasound imaging may reduce proton range uncertainty. Thus, it is crucial to understand the dependence of the acoustic waves on the proton beam characteristics. In this manuscript, firstly, an analytic solution to the proton induced acoustic wave is presented to reveal the dependence of signal on beam parameters, and then combined with an analytic approximation of the Bragg curve. The influence of the beam energy, pulse duration, and beam diameter variation on the acoustic waveform are investigated. Further analysis is performed regarding the Fourier decomposition of proton-acoustic signals. Our results show that smaller spill time of proton beam upsurges the amplitude of acoustic wave for constant number of protons, and hence beneficial for dose monitoring. The increase in the energy of each individual proton in the beam leads to spatial broadening of the Bragg curve, which also yields acoustic waves of greater amplitude. The pulse duration and the beam width of the proton beam do not affect the central frequency of the acoustic wave, but they change the amplitude of the spectral components.

  2. Analysis of acoustic communication by ants.

    PubMed

    Hickling, R; Brown, R L

    2000-10-01

    An analysis is presented of acoustic communication by ants, based on near-field theory and on data obtained from the black imported fire ant Solenopsis richteri and other sources. Generally ant stridulatory sounds are barely audible, but they occur continuously in ant colonies. Because ants appear unresponsive to airborne sound, myrmecologists have concluded that stridulatory signals are transmitted through the substrate. However, transmission through the substrate is unlikely, for reasons given in the paper. Apparently ants communicate mainly through the air, and the acoustic receptors are hairlike sensilla on the antennae that respond to particle sound velocity. This may seem inconsistent with the fact that ants are unresponsive to airborne sound (on a scale of meters), but the inconsistency can be resolved if acoustic communication occurs within the near field, on a scale of about 100 mm. In the near field, the particle sound velocity is significantly enhanced and has a steep gradient. These features can be used to exclude extraneous sound, and to determine the direction and distance of a near-field source. Additionally, we observed that the tracheal air sacs of S. richteri can expand within the gaster, possibly amplifying the radiation of stridulatory sound.

  3. Airborne chemistry: acoustic levitation in chemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Santesson, Sabina; Nilsson, Staffan

    2004-04-01

    This review with 60 references describes a unique path to miniaturisation, that is, the use of acoustic levitation in analytical and bioanalytical chemistry applications. Levitation of small volumes of sample by means of a levitation technique can be used as a way to avoid solid walls around the sample, thus circumventing the main problem of miniaturisation, the unfavourable surface-to-volume ratio. Different techniques for sample levitation have been developed and improved. Of the levitation techniques described, acoustic or ultrasonic levitation fulfils all requirements for analytical chemistry applications. This technique has previously been used to study properties of molten materials and the equilibrium shape()and stability of liquid drops. Temperature and mass transfer in levitated drops have also been described, as have crystallisation and microgravity applications. The airborne analytical system described here is equipped with different and exchangeable remote detection systems. The levitated drops are normally in the 100 nL-2 microL volume range and additions to the levitated drop can be made in the pL-volume range. The use of levitated drops in analytical and bioanalytical chemistry offers several benefits. Several remote detection systems are compatible with acoustic levitation, including fluorescence imaging detection, right angle light scattering, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Applications include liquid/liquid extractions, solvent exchange, analyte enrichment, single-cell analysis, cell-cell communication studies, precipitation screening of proteins to establish nucleation conditions, and crystallisation of proteins and pharmaceuticals.

  4. Acoustical analysis of gear housing vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seybert, A. F.; Wu, T. W.; Wu, X. F.; Oswald, Fred B.

    1991-01-01

    The modal and acoustical analysis of the NASA gear-noise rig is described. Experimental modal analysis techniques were used to determine the modes of vibration of the transmission housing. The resulting modal data were then used in a boundary element method (BEM) analysis to calculate the sound pressure and sound intensity on the surface of the housing as well as the radiation efficiency of each mode. The radiation efficiencies of the transmission housing modes are compared with theoretical results for finite, baffled plates. A method that uses the measured mode shapes and the BEM to predict the effect of simple structural changes on the sound radiation efficiency of the modes of vibration is also described.

  5. Particle analysis in an acoustic cytometer

    DOEpatents

    Kaduchak, Gregory; Ward, Michael D

    2012-09-18

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for acoustically manipulating one or more particles. Acoustically manipulated particles may be separated by size. The particles may be flowed in a flow stream and acoustic radiation pressure, which may be radial, may be applied to the flow stream. This application of acoustic radiation pressure may separate the particles. In one embodiment, the particles may be separated by size, and as a further example, the larger particles may be transported to a central axis.

  6. Acoustic Telemetry Reveals Large-Scale Migration Patterns of Walleye in Lake Huron

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Todd A.; Holbrook, Christopher M.; Fielder, David G.; Vandergoot, Christopher S.; Bergstedt, Roger A.; Dettmers, John M.; Krueger, Charles C.; Cooke, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Fish migration in large freshwater lacustrine systems such as the Laurentian Great Lakes is not well understood. The walleye (Sander vitreus) is an economically and ecologically important native fish species throughout the Great Lakes. In Lake Huron walleye has recently undergone a population expansion as a result of recovery of the primary stock, stemming from changing food web dynamics. During 2011 and 2012, we used acoustic telemetry to document the timing and spatial scale of walleye migration in Lake Huron and Saginaw Bay. Spawning walleye (n = 199) collected from a tributary of Saginaw Bay were implanted with acoustic tags and their migrations were documented using acoustic receivers (n = 140) deployed throughout U.S. nearshore waters of Lake Huron. Three migration pathways were described using multistate mark-recapture models. Models were evaluated using the Akaike Information Criterion. Fish sex did not influence migratory behavior but did affect migration rate and walleye were detected on all acoustic receiver lines. Most (95%) tagged fish migrated downstream from the riverine tagging and release location to Saginaw Bay, and 37% of these fish emigrated from Saginaw Bay into Lake Huron. Remarkably, 8% of walleye that emigrated from Saginaw Bay were detected at the acoustic receiver line located farthest from the release location more than 350 km away. Most (64%) walleye returned to the Saginaw River in 2012, presumably for spawning. Our findings reveal that fish from this stock use virtually the entirety of U.S. nearshore waters of Lake Huron. PMID:25506913

  7. Acoustic telemetry reveals large-scale migration patterns of walleye in Lake Huron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayden, Todd A.; Holbrook, Christopher; Fielder, David G.; Vandergoot, Christopher S.; Bergstedt, Roger A.; Dettmers, John M.; Krueger, Charles C.; Cooke, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Fish migration in large freshwater lacustrine systems such as the Laurentian Great Lakes is not well understood. The walleye (Sander vitreus) is an economically and ecologically important native fish species throughout the Great Lakes. In Lake Huron walleye has recently undergone a population expansion as a result of recovery of the primary stock, stemming from changing food web dynamics. During 2011 and 2012, we used acoustic telemetry to document the timing and spatial scale of walleye migration in Lake Huron and Saginaw Bay. Spawning walleye (n = 199) collected from a tributary of Saginaw Bay were implanted with acoustic tags and their migrations were documented using acoustic receivers (n = 140) deployed throughout U.S. nearshore waters of Lake Huron. Three migration pathways were described using multistate mark-recapture models. Models were evaluated using the Akaike Information Criterion. Fish sex did not influence migratory behavior but did affect migration rate and walleye were detected on all acoustic receiver lines. Most (95%) tagged fish migrated downstream from the riverine tagging and release location to Saginaw Bay, and 37% of these fish emigrated from Saginaw Bay into Lake Huron. Remarkably, 8% of walleye that emigrated from Saginaw Bay were detected at the acoustic receiver line located farthest from the release location more than 350 km away. Most (64%) walleye returned to the Saginaw River in 2012, presumably for spawning. Our findings reveal that fish from this stock use virtually the entirety of U.S. nearshore waters of Lake Huron.

  8. Spectrum analysis for introductory musical acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smedley, John E.

    1998-02-01

    A "real time" fast Fourier transform spectrum analyzer facilitates several experiments for an introductory course in musical acoustics. With its rapidly updated display, the time-dependent vibrations of an aluminum bar are easily studied. Using longer time acquisitions and correspondingly higher resolution facilitates the study of string inharmonicities, resonant energy transfer, and sound radiation patterns in guitar acoustics.

  9. Acoustic Analysis of Vowels Following Glossectomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehill, Tara L.; Ciocca, Valter; Chan, Judy C-T.; Samman, Nabil

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the acoustic characteristics of vowels produced by speakers with partial glossectomy. Acoustic variables investigated included first formant (F1) frequency, second formant (F2) frequency, F1 range, F2 range and vowel space area. Data from the speakers with partial glossectomy were compared with age- and gender-matched controls.…

  10. Ambient noise analysis of underwater acoustic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Mark A.; Orlin, Pete; Schulte, Annette; Newcomb, Joal

    2003-04-01

    The Littoral Acoustic Demonstration Center (LADC) deployed three Environmental Acoustic Recording System (EARS) buoys in the northern Gulf of Mexico during the summers of 2001 and 2002. The buoys recorded frequencies up to 5859 Hz continuously for 36 days in 2001 and for 72 days in 2002. The acoustic signals recorded include sperm whale vocalizations, seismic airguns, and shipping traffic. The variability of the ambient noise is analyzed using spectrograms, time series, and statistical measurements. Variations in ambient noise before, during, and after tropical storm/hurricane passage are also investigated.

  11. Fracture energy analysis via acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslov, I. I.; Gradov, O. M.

    1986-04-01

    The results of previous studies on acoustic emission during fatigue loading are used to relate the characteristics of the acoustic signals to the fracture processes occurring at the crack tip. At stresses below the yield point of the material, discrete acoustic emissions are produced, their amplitude distribution being described by a monotonically decreasing function. At stresses near the yield point, the signals are continuous with a peak observed in the amplitude distribution function, while above the yield point the acoustic emission resumes the character it had below the yield point. It is shown that these emissions correspond to the formation of individual microfractures, to the process of macroplastic deformation and to stepwise crack propagation of the structurally disordered material, respectively.

  12. Graphical Acoustic Liner Design and Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howerton, Brian M. (Inventor); Jones, Michael G. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An interactive liner design and impedance modeling tool comprises software utilized to design acoustic liners for use in constrained spaces, both regularly and irregularly shaped. A graphical user interface allows the acoustic channel geometry to be drawn in a liner volume while the surface impedance calculations are updated and displayed in real-time. A one-dimensional transmission line model may be used as the basis for the impedance calculations.

  13. Scaling and dimensional analysis of acoustic streaming jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moudjed, B.; Botton, V.; Henry, D.; Ben Hadid, H.; Garandet, J.-P.

    2014-09-01

    This paper focuses on acoustic streaming free jets. This is to say that progressive acoustic waves are used to generate a steady flow far from any wall. The derivation of the governing equations under the form of a nonlinear hydrodynamics problem coupled with an acoustic propagation problem is made on the basis of a time scale discrimination approach. This approach is preferred to the usually invoked amplitude perturbations expansion since it is consistent with experimental observations of acoustic streaming flows featuring hydrodynamic nonlinearities and turbulence. Experimental results obtained with a plane transducer in water are also presented together with a review of the former experimental investigations using similar configurations. A comparison of the shape of the acoustic field with the shape of the velocity field shows that diffraction is a key ingredient in the problem though it is rarely accounted for in the literature. A scaling analysis is made and leads to two scaling laws for the typical velocity level in acoustic streaming free jets; these are both observed in our setup and in former studies by other teams. We also perform a dimensional analysis of this problem: a set of seven dimensionless groups is required to describe a typical acoustic experiment. We find that a full similarity is usually not possible between two acoustic streaming experiments featuring different fluids. We then choose to relax the similarity with respect to sound attenuation and to focus on the case of a scaled water experiment representing an acoustic streaming application in liquid metals, in particular, in liquid silicon and in liquid sodium. We show that small acoustic powers can yield relatively high Reynolds numbers and velocity levels; this could be a virtue for heat and mass transfer applications, but a drawback for ultrasonic velocimetry.

  14. Scaling and dimensional analysis of acoustic streaming jets

    SciTech Connect

    Moudjed, B.; Botton, V.; Henry, D.; Ben Hadid, H.

    2014-09-15

    This paper focuses on acoustic streaming free jets. This is to say that progressive acoustic waves are used to generate a steady flow far from any wall. The derivation of the governing equations under the form of a nonlinear hydrodynamics problem coupled with an acoustic propagation problem is made on the basis of a time scale discrimination approach. This approach is preferred to the usually invoked amplitude perturbations expansion since it is consistent with experimental observations of acoustic streaming flows featuring hydrodynamic nonlinearities and turbulence. Experimental results obtained with a plane transducer in water are also presented together with a review of the former experimental investigations using similar configurations. A comparison of the shape of the acoustic field with the shape of the velocity field shows that diffraction is a key ingredient in the problem though it is rarely accounted for in the literature. A scaling analysis is made and leads to two scaling laws for the typical velocity level in acoustic streaming free jets; these are both observed in our setup and in former studies by other teams. We also perform a dimensional analysis of this problem: a set of seven dimensionless groups is required to describe a typical acoustic experiment. We find that a full similarity is usually not possible between two acoustic streaming experiments featuring different fluids. We then choose to relax the similarity with respect to sound attenuation and to focus on the case of a scaled water experiment representing an acoustic streaming application in liquid metals, in particular, in liquid silicon and in liquid sodium. We show that small acoustic powers can yield relatively high Reynolds numbers and velocity levels; this could be a virtue for heat and mass transfer applications, but a drawback for ultrasonic velocimetry.

  15. Acoustic emission spectral analysis of fiber composite failure mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, D. M.; Williams, J. H., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The acoustic emission of graphite fiber polyimide composite failure mechanisms was investigated with emphasis on frequency spectrum analysis. Although visual examination of spectral densities could not distinguish among fracture sources, a paired-sample t statistical analysis of mean normalized spectral densities did provide quantitative discrimination among acoustic emissions from 10 deg, 90 deg, and plus or minus 45 deg, plus or minus 45 deg sub s specimens. Comparable discrimination was not obtained for 0 deg specimens.

  16. Acoustic analysis of prosody in Sydenham's chorea.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Patrícia M; Cardoso, Francisco; Maia, Débora P; Cunningham, Mauro César Q; Teixeira Jr, Antonio Lúcio; Reis, César

    2010-10-01

    There are few studies of language and speech in patients with Sydenham's chorea (SC). We have done an acoustic analysis of fundamental frequency (F0), duration and intensity of declarative and interrogative sentences made by 20 SC patients, 20 patients with rheumatic fever (RF) without chorea, and compared them with 20 healthy age-matched controls (CO). Each group included 12 females. We found that there is no difference between the RF and CO groups in all studied parameters. Patients with SC, however, presented with a speech characterized by decreased F0 range (difference between minimum and maximum F0), shorter duration of sentences, and higher intensity of the first syllable of sentences. The findings were not influenced by the nature of the sentences (i.e. , declarative or interrogative), but for all variables they were significantly more severe in males than females. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that patients with acute SC have an impairment of modulation of F0 and longer duration of emission of sentences, resulting in a monotone and slow speech. This pattern is similar to what has been described in other basal ganglia illnesses, such as Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease and Wilson's disease.

  17. Analysis of Vibration and Acoustic Noise in Permanent Magnet Motors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Sangmoon

    The drive motor is a frequent source of vibration and acoustic noise in many precision spindle motors. One of the electromagnetic sources of vibration in permanent magnet motors is the torque ripple, consisting of the reluctance torque and electromagnetic torque fluctuation. This type of vibration is becoming more serious with the advent of new high-grade magnets with increased flux density. Acoustic noise of electromagnetic origin is difficult to predict and its exact mechanism is unclear. The mechanism of noise generation should be revealed to design a quieter motor which is the modern customer's demand. For motor operation at low speeds and loads, torque ripple due to the reluctance torque is often a source of vibration and control difficulty. The reluctance torque in a motor was calculated from the flux density by a finite element method and the Maxwell stress method. Effects of design parameters, such as stator slot width, permanent slot width, airgap length and magnetization direction, were investigated. Magnet pole shaping, by gradually decreasing the magnet thickness toward edges, yields a sinusoidal shape of the reluctance torque with reduced harmonics, thus reducing the vibration. This dissertation also presents two motor design techniques: stator tooth notching and rotor pole skewing with magnet pole shaping, and the effect of each method on the output torque. The analysis shows that the reluctance torque can be nearly eliminated by the suggested designs, with minimal sacrifice of the output torque. In permanent magnet DC motors, the most popular design type is the trapezoidal back electro-motive force (BEMF), for switched DC controllers. It is demonstrated that the output torque profile of one phase energized is qualitatively equivalent to the BEMF profile for motors with reduced reluctance torque. It implies that design of BEMF profile is possible by magnetic modeling of a motor, without expensive and time-consuming experiments for different designs

  18. Numerical analysis of acoustic impedance microscope utilizing acoustic lens transducer to examine cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Gunawan, Agus Indra; Hozumi, Naohiro; Takahashi, Kenta; Yoshida, Sachiko; Saijo, Yoshifumi; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yamamoto, Seiji

    2015-12-01

    A new technique is proposed for non-contact quantitative cell observation using focused ultrasonic waves. This technique interprets acoustic reflection intensity into the characteristic acoustic impedance of the biological cell. The cells are cultured on a plastic film substrate. A focused acoustic beam is transmitted through the substrate to its interface with the cell. A two-dimensional (2-D) reflection intensity profile is obtained by scanning the focal point along the interface. A reference substance is observed under the same conditions. These two reflections are compared and interpreted into the characteristic acoustic impedance of the cell based on a calibration curve that was created prior to the observation. To create the calibration curve, a numerical analysis of the sound field is performed using Fourier Transforms and is verified using several saline solutions. Because the cells are suspended by two plastic films, no contamination is introduced during the observation. In a practical observation, a sapphire lens transducer with a center frequency of 300 MHz was employed using ZnO thin film. The objects studied were co-cultured rat-derived glial (astrocyte) cells and glioma cells. The result was the clear observation of the internal structure of the cells. The acoustic impedance of the cells was spreading between 1.62 and 1.72 MNs/m(3). Cytoskeleton was indicated by high acoustic impedance. The introduction of cytochalasin-B led to a significant reduction in the acoustic impedance of the glioma cells; its effect on the glial cells was less significant. It is believed that this non-contact observation method will be useful for continuous cell inspections.

  19. A Spectral Analysis Approach for Acoustic Radiation from Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.; Singh, Mahendra P.; Mei, Chuh

    2004-01-01

    A method is developed to predict the vibration response of a composite panel and the resulting far-field acoustic radiation due to acoustic excitation. The acoustic excitation is assumed to consist of obliquely incident plane waves. The panel is modeled by a finite element analysis and the radiated field is predicted using Rayleigh's integral. The approach can easily include other effects such as shape memory alloy (SMA) ber reinforcement, large detection thermal postbuckling, and non-symmetric SMA distribution or lamination. Transmission loss predictions for the case of an aluminum panel excited by a harmonic acoustic pressure are shown to compare very well with a classical analysis. Results for a composite panel with and without shape memory alloy reinforcement are also presented. The preliminary results demonstrate that the transmission loss can be significantly increased with shape memory alloy reinforcement. The mechanisms for further transmission loss improvement are identified and discussed.

  20. Acoustic pathways revealed: simulated sound transmission and reception in Cuvier's beaked whale (Ziphius cavirostris).

    PubMed

    Cranford, Ted W; Krysl, Petr; Hildebrand, John A

    2008-03-01

    The finite element modeling (FEM) space reported here contains the head of a simulated whale based on CT data sets as well as physical measurements of sound-propagation characteristics of actual tissue samples. Simulated sound sources placed inside and outside of an adult male Cuvier's beaked whale (Ziphius cavirostris) reveal likely sound propagation pathways into and out of the head. Two separate virtual sound sources that were located at the left and right phonic lips produced beams that converged just outside the head. This result supports the notion that dual sound sources can interfere constructively to form a biologically useful and, in fact, excellent sonar beam in front of the animal. The most intriguing FEM results concern pathways by which sounds reach the ears. The simulations reveal a previously undescribed 'gular pathway' for sound reception in Ziphius. Propagated sound pressure waves enter the head from below and between the lower jaws, pass through an opening created by the absence of the medial bony wall of the posterior mandibles, and continue toward the bony ear complexes through the internal mandibular fat bodies. This new pathway has implications for understanding the evolution of underwater hearing in odontocetes. Our model also provides evidence for receive beam directionality, off-axis acoustic shadowing and a plausible mechanism for the long-standing orthodox sound reception pathway in odontocetes. The techniques developed for this study can be used to study acoustic perturbation in a wide variety of marine organisms.

  1. Acoustical Analysis of a Test Horn.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-20

    Laboratories, Inc. if /pliable) Flight Dynamics Laboratory (AFWAL/ FIBRA ) n/a Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratories 6c. ADDRESS (City, State, and ZIPCode) 7b...AFWAL/ FIBRA DO Form 1473, JUN 86 Previous editions are obsolete. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE UNCLASSIFIED "S.,, PREFACE This acoustical

  2. Acoustic Analysis of /?/ and /ð/ Sounds in Pakistani English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahmood, Muhammad Asim; Asghar, Muhammad; Jabeen, Farhat

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims at discovering the nature and extent of deviation in the articulation of consonants in Pakistani English due to the impact of mother tongue. A detailed experiment has been carried out with the help of Praat to analyze the acoustic properties of /?/ and /ð/ sounds spoken by Pakistani speakers. The research reveals that Pakistani…

  3. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  4. Comparison of electroglottographic and acoustic analysis of pitch perturbation.

    PubMed

    LaBlance, G R; Maves, M D; Scialfa, T M; Eitnier, C M; Steckol, K F

    1992-11-01

    Pitch perturbation is a measure of the cycle-to-cycle variation in vocal fold vibration. Perturbation can be assessed by means of electroglottographic or acoustic signals. The purpose of this study was to determine if these two analysis techniques are equivalent measures. The Laryngograph, an electroglottograph, and the Visi-Pitch, an acoustic analyzer, were used to measure pitch perturbation in 80 dysphonic subjects. Both instruments use Koike's formula to calculate relative average perturbation. While intra-subject variability appeared erratic, statistical analysis of intersubject data indicated that the two instruments provided an equivalent measure of pitch perturbation.

  5. Acoustic systems containing curved duct sections. [numerical analysis of wave propagation in acoustic ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rostafinski, W.

    1975-01-01

    The analysis of waves in bends in acoustical ducting of rectangular cross section was extended to the study of motion near discontinuities. This included determination of the characteristics of the tangential and radial components of the nonpropagating modes. It is established that attenuation of the nonpropagating modes strongly depends on frequency and that, in general, the sharper the bend, the less attenuation may be expected. Evaluation of a bend's impedance and of impedance-generated reflections is also presented in detail.

  6. Acoustic analysis in Mudejar-Gothic churches: Experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo, Miguel; Zamarreño, Teófilo; Girón, Sara

    2005-05-01

    This paper describes the preliminary results of research work in acoustics, conducted in a set of 12 Mudejar-Gothic churches in the city of Seville in the south of Spain. Despite common architectural style, the churches feature individual characteristics and have volumes ranging from 3947 to 10 708 m3. Acoustic parameters were measured in unoccupied churches according to the ISO-3382 standard. An extensive experimental study was carried out using impulse response analysis through a maximum length sequence measurement system in each church. It covered aspects such as reverberation (reverberation times, early decay times), distribution of sound levels (sound strength); early to late sound energy parameters derived from the impulse responses (center time, clarity for speech, clarity, definition, lateral energy fraction), and speech intelligibility (rapid speech transmission index), which all take both spectral and spatial distribution into account. Background noise was also measured to obtain the NR indices. The study describes the acoustic field inside each temple and establishes a discussion for each one of the acoustic descriptors mentioned by using the theoretical models available and the principles of architectural acoustics. Analysis of the quality of the spaces for music and speech is carried out according to the most widespread criteria for auditoria. .

  7. Acoustic analysis in Mudejar-Gothic churches: experimental results.

    PubMed

    Galindo, Miguel; Zamarreño, Teófilo; Girón, Sara

    2005-05-01

    This paper describes the preliminary results of research work in acoustics, conducted in a set of 12 Mudejar-Gothic churches in the city of Seville in the south of Spain. Despite common architectural style, the churches feature individual characteristics and have volumes ranging from 3947 to 10 708 m3. Acoustic parameters were measured in unoccupied churches according to the ISO-3382 standard. An extensive experimental study was carried out using impulse response analysis through a maximum length sequence measurement system in each church. It covered aspects such as reverberation (reverberation times, early decay times), distribution of sound levels (sound strength); early to late sound energy parameters derived from the impulse responses (center time, clarity for speech, clarity, definition, lateral energy fraction), and speech intelligibility (rapid speech transmission index), which all take both spectral and spatial distribution into account. Background noise was also measured to obtain the NR indices. The study describes the acoustic field inside each temple and establishes a discussion for each one of the acoustic descriptors mentioned by using the theoretical models available and the principles of architectural acoustics. Analysis of the quality of the spaces for music and speech is carried out according to the most widespread criteria for auditoria.

  8. Remote acoustic monitoring of North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis) reveals seasonal and diel variations in acoustic behavior.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Leanna P; McCordic, Jessica A; Parks, Susan E

    2014-01-01

    Remote acoustic monitoring is a non-invasive tool that can be used to study the distribution, behavior, and habitat use of sound-producing species. The North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis) is an endangered baleen whale species that produces a variety of stereotyped acoustic signals. One of these signals, the "gunshot" sound, has only been recorded from adult male North Atlantic right whales and is thought to function for reproduction, either as reproductive advertisement for females or as an agonistic signal toward other males. This study uses remote acoustic monitoring to analyze the presence of gunshots over a two-year period at two sites on the Scotian Shelf to determine if there is evidence that North Atlantic right whales may use these locations for breeding activities. Seasonal analyses at both locations indicate that gunshot sound production is highly seasonal, with an increase in the autumn. One site, Roseway West, had significantly more gunshot sounds overall and exhibited a clear diel trend in production of these signals at night. The other site, Emerald South, also showed a seasonal increase in gunshot production during the autumn, but did not show any significant diel trend. This difference in gunshot signal production at the two sites indicates variation either in the number or the behavior of whales at each location. The timing of the observed seasonal increase in gunshot sound production is consistent with the current understanding of the right whale breeding season, and our results demonstrate that detection of gunshots with remote acoustic monitoring can be a reliable way to track shifts in distribution and changes in acoustic behavior including possible mating activities.

  9. Pressure potential and stability analysis in an acoustical noncontact transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Liu, C. J.; Zhang, W. J.

    2017-01-01

    Near field acoustic traveling wave is one of the most popular principles in noncontact manipulations and transportations. The stability behavior is a key factor in the industrial applications of acoustical noncontact transportation. We present here an in-depth analysis of the transportation stability of a planar object levitated in near field acoustic traveling waves. To more accurately describe the pressure distributions on the radiation surface, a 3D nonlinear traveling wave model is presented. A closed form solution is derived based on the pressure potential to quantitatively calculate the restoring forces and moments under small disturbances. The physical explanations of the effects of fluid inertia and the effects of non-uniform pressure distributions are provided in detail. It is found that a vibration rail with tapered cross section provides more stable transportation than a rail with rectangular cross section. The present study sheds light on the issue of quantitative evaluation of stability in acoustic traveling waves and proposes three main factors that influence the stability: (a) vibration shape, (b) pressure distribution and (c) restoring force/moment. It helps to provide a better understanding of the physics behind the near field acoustic transportation and provide useful design and optimization tools for industrial applications.

  10. Acoustic Analysis Before and After Voice Therapy for Laryngeal Pathology.

    PubMed

    Chhetri, S S; Gautam, R

    2015-01-01

    Background Voice problems caused by pathologies in vocal folds are well known. Some types of laryngeal pathologies have certain acoustic characteristics. Objective evaluation helps characterize the voice and voice problems providing supporting evidences, severity of disorders. It helps assess the response to the treatment and measures the outcomes. Objective The objective of the study is to determine the effectiveness of the voice therapy and quantify the results objectively by voice parameters. Method Study includes 61 patients who presented with different types of laryngeal pathologies. Acoustic analyses and voice assessment was done with Dr. Speech ver 4 (Tiger DRS Inc.). Acoustic parameters including fundamental frequency, jitters, shimmers, Harmonic to noise ratio (HNR), Normalized noise energy (NNE) were analyzed before and after voice therapy. Result Bilateral vocal nodules were the most common pathologies comprising 44.26%. All acoustic parameters showed a significant difference after the therapy (p<0.05) except for NNE. Dysphonia due to vocal fold polyp showed no improvement even after voice therapy (p>0.05). Conclusion Acoustic analysis provides an objective, recordable data regarding the voice parameters and its pathologies. Though, few pathology require alternative therapy rather than voice therapy, overall it has a good effect on glottic closure. As the voice therapy can improve the different indices of voice, it can be viewed as imperative part of treatment and to monitor progression.

  11. MOCHA - Multi-Study Ocean Acoustics Human Effects Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    innovative methods for the analysis of the results from BRSs. The working group is composed of the chief scientists of existing BRS projects ( Sirena sonar...www.creem.st-and.ac.uk/mocha/links • Sirena sonar trials on sperm whales • BRS Bahamas (AUTEC): http://www.nmfs.noaa.gov/pr/acoustics

  12. Basin Acoustic Seamount Scattering Experiment (BASSEX) Data Analysis and Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    Kauai source at various ranges and bearings . OBJECTIVES The primary objective of this work is to measure aspects of acoustic propagation that...horizontal plane, arriving at the array from a different bearing . Further analysis will include processing all of the BASSEX KNPAL receptions and

  13. Acoustic analysis of voice in patients treated by reconstructive subtotal laryngectomy. Evaluation and critical review

    PubMed Central

    Di Nicola, V; Fiorella, ML; Spinelli, DA; Fiorella, R

    2006-01-01

    Summary Aim of this investigation was to analyse the voice in a group of 20 patients submitted to supracricoid partial laryngectomy (cricohyoidopexy, sparing two arytenoids) by the Multi Dimensional Voice Programme acoustic analysis system. Results revealed the following sound characteristics: high rate of noise, lack of periodic component of the signal, high rate of segments with no sound signal, vocal segments with marked air-turbulent flow, variation amplitude and frequency coefficients doubled compared to normal values, average fundamental frequency, if present, extremely variable and unsteady. These results show that the phonatory ability of the residual larynx, due to the altered anatomo-physiology of the structure after surgery, has to be completely re-estimated. In fact, the residual larynx determines a definitely reduced periodic acoustic signal, rich in noise and which can not be modulated. Good phonatory results of this treatment are basically due to preservation of a still understandable (but not perfect!) speech which, by ensuring the subjects’ speech ability, overcomes and has little influence on the really poor quality of the vocal signal in these patients. However, the patient obtains a “new voice” as far as concerns acoustic features and this is very important for communication and social life. Moreover, the possibility of objectively estimating acoustic vocal function ability allows monitoring of the trend and results of possible speech therapy and/or phonosurgical rehabilitation treatment which should start from new anatomical and physiological bases, as well as from the new physical acoustic mechanism of signal production. PMID:16886848

  14. Acoustic analysis of voice in patients treated by reconstructive subtotal laryngectomy. Evaluation and critical review.

    PubMed

    Di Nicola, V; Fiorella, M L; Spinelli, D A; Fiorella, R

    2006-04-01

    Aim of this investigation was to analyse the voice in a group of 20 patients submitted to supracricoid partial laryngectomy (cricohyoidopexy, sparing two arytenoids) by the Multi Dimensional Voice Programme acoustic analysis system. Results revealed the following sound characteristics: high rate of noise, lack of periodic component of the signal, high rate of segments with no sound signal, vocal segments with marked air-turbulent flow, variation amplitude and frequency coefficients doubled compared to normal values, average fundamental frequency, if present, extremely variable and unsteady. These results show that the phonatory ability of the residual larynx, due to the altered anatomo-physiology of the structure after surgery, has to be completely re-estimated. In fact, the residual larynx determines a definitely reduced periodic acoustic signal, rich in noise and which can not be modulated. Good phonatory results of this treatment are basically due to preservation of a still understandable (but not perfect!) speech which, by ensuring the subjects' speech ability, overcomes and has little influence on the really poor quality of the vocal signal in these patients. However, the patient obtains a "new voice" as far as concerns acoustic features and this is very important for communication and social life. Moreover, the possibility of objectively estimating acoustic vocal function ability allows monitoring of the trend and results of possible speech therapy and/or phonosurgical rehabilitation treatment which should start from new anatomical and physiological bases, as well as from the new physical acoustic mechanism of signal production.

  15. Perturbation analysis of electromagnetic geodesic acoustic modes

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Haijun

    2014-06-15

    Lagrangian displacement and magnetic field perturbation response to the geodesic acoustic mode is analyzed by using the ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations in a large-aspect-ratio tokamak. δB{sub θ}, the poloidal component of magnetic field perturbation, has poloidal wave number m = 2 created by the poloidal displacement ξ{sub θ}. The parallel perturbation of magnetic field, δB{sub ∥}, has a poloidally asymmetric structure with m = 1 and is on the same order of magnitude with δB{sub θ} to the leading order. The radial displacement ξ{sub r} is of order O(βϵξ{sub θ}) but plays a significant role in determining δB{sub ∥}, where β is the plasma/magnetic pressure ratio and ϵ is the inverse aspect ratio.

  16. Pulse analysis of acoustic emission signals. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    A method for the signature analysis of pulses in the frequency domain and the time domain is presented. Fourier spectrum, Fourier transfer function, shock spectrum and shock spectrum ratio are examined in the frequency domain analysis, and pulse shape deconvolution is developed for use in the time domain analysis. To demonstrate the relative sensitivity of each of the methods to small changes in the pulse shape, signatures of computer modeled systems with analytical pulses are presented. Optimization techniques are developed and used to indicate the best design parameters values for deconvolution of the pulse shape. Several experiments are presented that test the pulse signature analysis methods on different acoustic emission sources. These include acoustic emissions associated with: (1) crack propagation, (2) ball dropping on a plate, (3) spark discharge and (4) defective and good ball bearings.

  17. Acoustic analysis of an Olmecan whistle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beristain, Sergio; Menchaca, Rolando; Velazquez, Roberto

    2002-05-01

    Thousands of stone artifacts over 2500 years of age have been found in the Olmecan area in the southeast region of Mexico. These range from the famous big heads with helmets (about 2 m in diameter), to small pieces with precisely drilled holes, which some archaeologists consider to have some simple uses, much simpler than the work needed to produce the stone artifact itself. The one studied here (about 3 cm in size), is considered by the acoustics community as an air-phone, and a detailed anaysis has been done employing FFT techniques in order to find out the frequency spread, the particular tones produced and the sound radiated power through the different holes and cavities. The artifact is made of a very solid stone, so-called ilmenite, believed to have titanium, which is very hard to drill. Nevertheless, many similar pieces have been found in the area, which means they were built on purpose, and the material used gives the idea of a sacred application. Attempts have been made to reproduce the artifacts, which produce sounds similar to those from the original pieces.

  18. Acoustic Emission Analysis of Prestressed Concrete Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elfergani, H. A.; Pullin, R.; Holford, K. M.

    2011-07-01

    Corrosion is a substantial problem in numerous structures and in particular corrosion is very serious in reinforced and prestressed concrete and must, in certain applications, be given special consideration because failure may result in loss of life and high financial cost. Furthermore corrosion cannot only be considered a long term problem with many studies reporting failure of bridges and concrete pipes due to corrosion within a short period after they were constructed. The concrete pipes which transport water are examples of structures that have suffered from corrosion; for example, the pipes of The Great Man-Made River Project of Libya. Five pipe failures due to corrosion have occurred since their installation. The main reason for the damage is corrosion of prestressed wires in the pipes due to the attack of chloride ions from the surrounding soil. Detection of the corrosion in initial stages has been very important to avoid other failures and the interruption of water flow. Even though most non-destructive methods which are used in the project are able to detect wire breaks, they cannot detect the presence of corrosion. Hence in areas where no excavation has been completed, areas of serious damage can go undetected. Therefore, the major problem which faces engineers is to find the best way to detect the corrosion and prevent the pipes from deteriorating. This paper reports on the use of the Acoustic Emission (AE) technique to detect the early stages of corrosion prior to deterioration of concrete structures.

  19. Temperature-dependent differences in the nonlinear acoustic behavior of ultrasound contrast agents revealed by high-speed imaging and bulk acoustics.

    PubMed

    Mulvana, Helen; Stride, Eleanor; Tang, Mengxing; Hajnal, Jo V; Eckersley, Robert

    2011-09-01

    Previous work by the authors has established that increasing the temperature of the suspending liquid from 20°C to body temperature has a significant impact on the bulk acoustic properties and stability of an ultrasound contrast agent suspension (SonoVue, Bracco Suisse SA, Manno, Lugano, Switzerland). In this paper the influence of temperature on the nonlinear behavior of microbubbles is investigated, because this is one of the most important parameters in the context of diagnostic imaging. High-speed imaging showed that raising the temperature significantly influences the dynamic behavior of individual microbubbles. At body temperature, microbubbles exhibit greater radial excursion and oscillate less spherically, with a greater incidence of jetting and gas expulsion, and therefore collapse, than they do at room temperature. Bulk acoustics revealed an associated increase in the harmonic content of the scattered signals. These findings emphasize the importance of conducting laboratory studies at body temperature if the results are to be interpreted for in vivo applications.

  20. Unexpected acoustic stimulation during action preparation reveals gradual re-specification of movement direction.

    PubMed

    Marinovic, Welber; Tresilian, James; Chapple, Jack L; Riek, Stephan; Carroll, Timothy J

    2017-02-17

    A loud acoustic stimulus (LAS) is often used as a tool to investigate motor preparation in simple reaction time (RT) tasks, where all movement parameters are known in advance. In this report, we used a LAS to examine direction specification in simple and choice RT tasks. This allowed us to investigate how the specification of movement direction unfolds during the preparation period. In two experiments, participants responded to the appearance of an imperative stimulus (IS) with a ballistic wrist force directed toward one of two targets. In probe trials, a LAS (120dBa) was delivered around the time of IS presentation. In Experiment 1, RTs in the simple RT task were faster when the LAS was presented, but the effect on the movement kinematics was negligible. In the Choice RT task, however, movement direction variability increased when the LAS was presented. In Experiment 2, when we primed movements toward one direction, our analyses revealed that the longer participants took to start a movement, the more accurate their responses became. Our results show not only that movement direction reprogramming occurs quickly and continuously, but also that LAS can be a valuable tool to obtain meaningful readouts of the motor system's preparatory state.

  1. Complex Contact-Based Dynamics of Microsphere Monolayers Revealed by Resonant Attenuation of Surface Acoustic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraiwa, M.; Abi Ghanem, M.; Wallen, S. P.; Khanolkar, A.; Maznev, A. A.; Boechler, N.

    2016-05-01

    Contact-based vibrations play an essential role in the dynamics of granular materials. Significant insights into vibrational granular dynamics have previously been obtained with reduced-dimensional systems containing macroscale particles. We study contact-based vibrations of a two-dimensional monolayer of micron-sized spheres on a solid substrate that forms a microscale granular crystal. Measurements of the resonant attenuation of laser-generated surface acoustic waves reveal three collective vibrational modes that involve displacements and rotations of the microspheres, as well as interparticle and particle-substrate interactions. To identify the modes, we tune the interparticle stiffness, which shifts the frequency of the horizontal-rotational resonances while leaving the vertical resonance unaffected. From the measured contact resonance frequencies we determine both particle-substrate and interparticle contact stiffnesses and find that the former is an order of magnitude larger than the latter. This study paves the way for investigating complex contact-based dynamics of microscale granular crystals and yields a new approach to studying micro- to nanoscale contact mechanics in multiparticle networks.

  2. An analysis of blade vortex interaction aerodynamics and acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    The impulsive noise associated with helicopter flight due to Blade-Vortex Interaction, sometimes called blade slap is analyzed especially for the case of a close encounter of the blade-tip vortex with a following blade. Three parts of the phenomena are considered: the tip-vortex structure generated by the rotating blade, the unsteady pressure produced on the following blade during the interaction, and the acoustic radiation due to the unsteady pressure field. To simplify the problem, the analysis was confined to the situation where the vortex is aligned parallel to the blade span in which case the maximum acoustic pressure results. Acoustic radiation due to the interaction is analyzed in space-fixed coordinates and in the time domain with the unsteady pressure on the blade surface as the source of chordwise compact, but spanwise non-compact radiation. Maximum acoustic pressure is related to the vortex core size and Reynolds number which are in turn functions of the blade-tip aerodynamic parameters. Finally noise reduction and performance are considered.

  3. Perceptual centres in speech - an acoustic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Sophie Kerttu

    Perceptual centres, or P-centres, represent the perceptual moments of occurrence of acoustic signals - the 'beat' of a sound. P-centres underlie the perception and production of rhythm in perceptually regular speech sequences. P-centres have been modelled both in speech and non speech (music) domains. The three aims of this thesis were toatest out current P-centre models to determine which best accounted for the experimental data bto identify a candidate parameter to map P-centres onto (a local approach) as opposed to the previous global models which rely upon the whole signal to determine the P-centre the final aim was to develop a model of P-centre location which could be applied to speech and non speech signals. The first aim was investigated by a series of experiments in which a) speech from different speakers was investigated to determine whether different models could account for variation between speakers b) whether rendering the amplitude time plot of a speech signal affects the P-centre of the signal c) whether increasing the amplitude at the offset of a speech signal alters P-centres in the production and perception of speech. The second aim was carried out by a) manipulating the rise time of different speech signals to determine whether the P-centre was affected, and whether the type of speech sound ramped affected the P-centre shift b) manipulating the rise time and decay time of a synthetic vowel to determine whether the onset alteration was had more affect on P-centre than the offset manipulation c) and whether the duration of a vowel affected the P-centre, if other attributes (amplitude, spectral contents) were held constant. The third aim - modelling P-centres - was based on these results. The Frequency dependent Amplitude Increase Model of P-centre location (FAIM) was developed using a modelling protocol, the APU GammaTone Filterbank and the speech from different speakers. The P-centres of the stimuli corpus were highly predicted by attributes of

  4. The phase transformation of methane caused by pressure change during its rising from seepage, revealed by acoustic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, C.; Aoyama, S.

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this survey is to measure acoustical reflection from the methane plumes at close range by utilizing a remotely-operated vehicle, in order to quantify methane gas flux seeping out from shallow methane hydrates in the sea of japan. In the off-Joetsu area, we conducted acoustic survey for methane plumes distribution using quantitative echo sounder (Simrad EK60) and Multi beam echo sounder (SEABAT 8160) installed on R/V Natsushima, and then conducted underwater survey using ROV Hyper-Dolphin in the following methods, 1) Observing seafloor morphology, 2) Measurement methane discharge with a calibrated collecting equipment , 3) Measuring rising speed of methane bubbles with a ruler, 4) Collecting acoustic reflection data using quantitative echo sounder, 5) Observing rising methane bubbles. All processes in the underwater survey were recorded by a HD camera equipped on ROV, and those videos are used for after-cruise analysis. In the underwater survey by ROV, we found three methane plume points and successfully collected acoustic data which would detect each methane bubble. Based on videos and acoustic data obtained in this survey, detailed analysis conducted.

  5. Acoustical Characteristics of Mastication Sounds: Application of Speech Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brochetti, Denise

    Food scientists have used acoustical methods to study characteristics of mastication sounds in relation to food texture. However, a model for analysis of the sounds has not been identified, and reliability of the methods has not been reported. Therefore, speech analysis techniques were applied to mastication sounds, and variation in measures of the sounds was examined. To meet these objectives, two experiments were conducted. In the first experiment, a digital sound spectrograph generated waveforms and wideband spectrograms of sounds by 3 adult subjects (1 male, 2 females) for initial chews of food samples differing in hardness and fracturability. Acoustical characteristics were described and compared. For all sounds, formants appeared in the spectrograms, and energy occurred across a 0 to 8000-Hz range of frequencies. Bursts characterized waveforms for peanut, almond, raw carrot, ginger snap, and hard candy. Duration and amplitude of the sounds varied with the subjects. In the second experiment, the spectrograph was used to measure the duration, amplitude, and formants of sounds for the initial 2 chews of cylindrical food samples (raw carrot, teething toast) differing in diameter (1.27, 1.90, 2.54 cm). Six adult subjects (3 males, 3 females) having normal occlusions and temporomandibular joints chewed the samples between the molar teeth and with the mouth open. Ten repetitions per subject were examined for each food sample. Analysis of estimates of variation indicated an inconsistent intrasubject variation in the acoustical measures. Food type and sample diameter also affected the estimates, indicating the variable nature of mastication. Generally, intrasubject variation was greater than intersubject variation. Analysis of ranks of the data indicated that the effect of sample diameter on the acoustical measures was inconsistent and depended on the subject and type of food. If inferences are to be made concerning food texture from acoustical measures of mastication

  6. Acoustical and functional analysis of Mountain lion (Puma concolor) vocalizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Jacquelyn

    2002-05-01

    A 2-year study resulted in acoustic analysis of the structure of over 900 mountain lion vocalizations recorded in a seminatural setting at Wildlife Prairie Park near Peoria, Illinois. A vocal repertoire was obtained by describing quantitative variables about the sounds, i.e., frequency of the dominant part of the sound (beginning, ending, maximum, and minimum), duration, and number of components. Other variables described the tonal, harmonic, and wideband qualities of the sounds. Behavioral data were collected during the same period. Further analysis of both acoustic and behavioral data was completed to develop a correlation matrix between vocalizations and behavior. This study also looked at the effects of seasons on vocal behavior. Correlations were found between vocalization types and rates of usage with specific behaviors. Vocalization type and the usage rate also varied by season.

  7. Is acoustic analysis of snoring an alternative to sleep nasendoscopy?

    PubMed

    Saunders, N C; Tassone, P; Wood, G; Norris, A; Harries, M; Kotecha, B

    2004-06-01

    Previous studies have suggested that acoustic analysis may be useful in distinguishing different types of snoring prior to possible corrective surgery. This study aimed to establish whether it could replace sleep nasendoscopy in a clinical setting. Thirty-five patients undergoing sleep nasendoscopy had their snoring recorded and analysed using commercially available equipment. It was found that centre frequency can be used to distinguish pure palatal from tongue base snoring, with a clear cut-off value of 90 Hz between the two. Multisegmental snoring cannot be identified on the basis of centre frequency alone. It may be distinguished from tongue base, but not palatal snoring by the nature of the frequency distribution plot (sensitivity 77%, specificity 81%). Blinded assessment of waveforms of individual snores gave poor accuracy (53%) and poor interobserver agreement (kappa = 0.10). Acoustic analysis may help screen for pure tongue base snoring. However, we feel that it is unlikely to replace sleep nasendoscopy.

  8. Electron–acoustic phonon coupling in single crystal CH3NH3PbI3 perovskites revealed by coherent acoustic phonons

    PubMed Central

    Mante, Pierre-Adrien; Stoumpos, Constantinos C.; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Yartsev, Arkady

    2017-01-01

    Despite the great amount of attention CH3NH3PbI3 has received for its solar cell application, intrinsic properties of this material are still largely unknown. Mobility of charges is a quintessential property in this aspect; however, there is still no clear understanding of electron transport, as reported values span over three orders of magnitude. Here we develop a method to measure the electron and hole deformation potentials using coherent acoustic phonons generated by femtosecond laser pulses. We apply this method to characterize a CH3NH3PbI3 single crystal. We measure the acoustic phonon properties and characterize electron-acoustic phonon scattering. Then, using the deformation potential theory, we calculate the carrier intrinsic mobility and compare it to the reported experimental and theoretical values. Our results reveal high electron and hole mobilities of 2,800 and 9,400 cm2 V−1 s−1, respectively. Comparison with literature values of mobility demonstrates the potential role played by polarons in charge transport in CH3NH3PbI3. PMID:28176755

  9. Electron-acoustic phonon coupling in single crystal CH3NH3PbI3 perovskites revealed by coherent acoustic phonons.

    PubMed

    Mante, Pierre-Adrien; Stoumpos, Constantinos C; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G; Yartsev, Arkady

    2017-02-08

    Despite the great amount of attention CH3NH3PbI3 has received for its solar cell application, intrinsic properties of this material are still largely unknown. Mobility of charges is a quintessential property in this aspect; however, there is still no clear understanding of electron transport, as reported values span over three orders of magnitude. Here we develop a method to measure the electron and hole deformation potentials using coherent acoustic phonons generated by femtosecond laser pulses. We apply this method to characterize a CH3NH3PbI3 single crystal. We measure the acoustic phonon properties and characterize electron-acoustic phonon scattering. Then, using the deformation potential theory, we calculate the carrier intrinsic mobility and compare it to the reported experimental and theoretical values. Our results reveal high electron and hole mobilities of 2,800 and 9,400 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), respectively. Comparison with literature values of mobility demonstrates the potential role played by polarons in charge transport in CH3NH3PbI3.

  10. Electron–acoustic phonon coupling in single crystal CH3NH3PbI3 perovskites revealed by coherent acoustic phonons

    DOE PAGES

    Mante, Pierre-Adrien; Stoumpos, Constantinos C.; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; ...

    2017-02-08

    The intrinsic properties of CH3NH3PbI3 are still largely unknown in spite of the great amount of attention it has received for its solar cell application. Mobility of charges is a quintessential property in this aspect; however, there is still no clear understanding of electron transport, as reported values span over three orders of magnitude. Here we develop a method to measure the electron and hole deformation potentials using coherent acoustic phonons generated by femtosecond laser pulses. Furthermore, we apply this method to characterize a CH3NH3PbI3 single crystal.We measure the acoustic phonon properties and characterize electron-acoustic phonon scattering. Then, using themore » deformation potential theory, we calculate the carrier intrinsic mobility and compare it to the reported experimental and theoretical values. These results reveal high electron and hole mobilities of 2,800 and 9,400 cm2V-1 s -1 , respectively. Comparison with literature values of mobility demonstrates the potential role played by polarons in charge transport in CH3NH3PbI3.« less

  11. Electron-acoustic phonon coupling in single crystal CH3NH3PbI3 perovskites revealed by coherent acoustic phonons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mante, Pierre-Adrien; Stoumpos, Constantinos C.; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Yartsev, Arkady

    2017-02-01

    Despite the great amount of attention CH3NH3PbI3 has received for its solar cell application, intrinsic properties of this material are still largely unknown. Mobility of charges is a quintessential property in this aspect; however, there is still no clear understanding of electron transport, as reported values span over three orders of magnitude. Here we develop a method to measure the electron and hole deformation potentials using coherent acoustic phonons generated by femtosecond laser pulses. We apply this method to characterize a CH3NH3PbI3 single crystal. We measure the acoustic phonon properties and characterize electron-acoustic phonon scattering. Then, using the deformation potential theory, we calculate the carrier intrinsic mobility and compare it to the reported experimental and theoretical values. Our results reveal high electron and hole mobilities of 2,800 and 9,400 cm2 V-1 s-1, respectively. Comparison with literature values of mobility demonstrates the potential role played by polarons in charge transport in CH3NH3PbI3.

  12. MOCHA - Multi-Study Ocean Acoustics Human Effects Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    understanding of the response of marine mammals to navy sonar and other acoustic stimuli, by maximizing the information gain from Behavioral Response Studies...of this project has been to develop and implement innovative statistical methodologies for the analysis of behavioral response study data. Our focus...project has four specific objectives: 1. Improve methods for combining diverse behavioral measures into metrics of behavioral response

  13. Wavenumber transform analysis for acoustic black hole design.

    PubMed

    Feurtado, Philip A; Conlon, Stephen C

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic black holes (ABHs) are effective, passive, lightweight vibration absorbers that have been developed and shown to effectively reduce the structural vibration and radiated sound of beam and plate structures. ABHs employ a local thickness change that reduces the speed of bending waves and increases the transverse vibration amplitude. The vibrational energy can then be effectively focused and dissipated by material losses or through conventional viscoelastic damping treatments. In this work, the measured vibratory response of embedded ABH plates was transformed into the wavenumber domain in order to investigate the use of wavenumber analysis for characterizing, designing, and optimizing practical ABH systems. The results showed that wavenumber transform analysis can be used to simultaneously visualize multiple aspects of ABH performance including changes in bending wave speed, transverse vibration amplitude, and energy dissipation. The analysis was also used to investigate the structural acoustic coupling of the ABH system and determine the radiation efficiency of the embedded ABH plates compared to a uniform plate. The results demonstrated that the ABH effect results in acoustic decoupling as well as vibration reduction. The wavenumber transform based methods and results will be useful for implementing ABHs into real world structures.

  14. Multivariate analysis of the modifications induced by an environmental acoustic cue on rat exploratory behavior.

    PubMed

    Casarrubea, Maurizio; Sorbera, Filippina; Crescimanno, Giuseppe

    2008-03-18

    The aim of the present paper is to study by means of a multivariate analysis the modifications induced by an environmental acoustic cue on the structure of rat exploratory behavior. Adult male Wistar rats were observed during the exploration of a soundproof observation box. Each rat was acoustically stimulated after 150 s from the beginning of the experimental session, lasting 300 s, and recorded through a digital videocamera. A frame by frame analysis was thereafter carried out using a professional video-recording system. Thirteen behavioral patterns were selected: immobility, immobile-sniffing, walking, rearing, climbing, chewing, paw-licking, face-grooming, body-grooming, head-turning, tuning, oriented-sniffing, focusing. Both descriptive and multivariate analyses (cluster, stochastic, adjusted residuals) were carried out. Through descriptive statistical analysis, latencies and per cent distribution of each pattern were studied. A multivariate cluster analysis revealed the presence of three main behavioral clusters, an additional one being identified following acoustic stimulation. Multivariate stochastic analysis showed that all the patterns converged on immobile-sniffing which could represent a key component in behavioral switching processes related to environmental exploration. Moreover, through adjusted residuals, the degree of relationship among different patterns was shown according to statistic Z-distribution. Our data assign new ethological meanings to different behavioral patterns. Notably, head-turning is suggested to be considered as a generic directional search and tuning as a subtle activity of stimulus localization.

  15. Link Budget Analysis for Undersea Acoustic Signaling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-01

    wireless communications for estimating signal-to- noise ratio ( SNR ) at the receiver. Link-budget analysis considers transmitter power, transmitter...is represented as an intermediate result called the channel SNR . The channel SNR includes ambient-noise and transmission-loss components. Several...to satellite and wireless communications for estimating signal-to-noise ratio ( SNR ) at the receiver. Link-budget analysis considers transmitter

  16. Linear Stability Analysis of an Acoustically Vaporized Droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Junaid; Qamar, Adnan; Samtaney, Ravi

    2015-11-01

    Acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) is a phase transition phenomena of a superheat liquid (Dodecafluoropentane, C5F12) droplet to a gaseous bubble, instigated by a high-intensity acoustic pulse. This approach was first studied in imaging applications, and applicable in several therapeutic areas such as gas embolotherapy, thrombus dissolution, and drug delivery. High-speed imaging and theoretical modeling of ADV has elucidated several physical aspects, ranging from bubble nucleation to its subsequent growth. Surface instabilities are known to exist and considered responsible for evolving bubble shapes (non-spherical growth, bubble splitting and bubble droplet encapsulation). We present a linear stability analysis of the dynamically evolving interfaces of an acoustically vaporized micro-droplet (liquid A) in an infinite pool of a second liquid (liquid B). We propose a thermal ADV model for the base state. The linear analysis utilizes spherical harmonics (Ynm, of degree m and order n) and under various physical assumptions results in a time-dependent ODE of the perturbed interface amplitudes (one at the vapor/liquid A interface and the other at the liquid A/liquid B interface). The perturbation amplitudes are found to grow exponentially and do not depend on m. Supported by KAUST Baseline Research Funds.

  17. Acoustic source analysis of a supersonic rectangular chevron jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreitzman, Jordan Richard

    Source terms corresponding to Goldstein's generalized acoustic analogy are computed from a high-fidelity simulation of a supersonic jet issuing from a rectangular nozzle with chevrons. Simulated data are validated against experimental data. We investigate the theoretical underpinning of reduced-order acoustic source models by testing the assumptions of quasi-normality and statistical axisymmetry. It is found that the flow is not quasi-normal in the axial direction but is quasi-normal in the transverse directions. Our analysis also shows that the flow is locally statistically axisymmetric close to the edges of the flow but not near the center. Fourth order correlation statistics are fit to previously used acoustic source models originally developed for axisymmetric jets. This thesis performs a detailed analysis of four different models: the Gaussian, moving-frame, fixed-frame, and modified-distance models. The latter three models are found to be similar in accuracy, while the Gaussian model is found to be a poorer fit.

  18. Acoustofluidics 13: Analysis of acoustic streaming by perturbation methods.

    PubMed

    Sadhal, S S

    2012-07-07

    In this Part 13 of the tutorial series "Acoustofluidics--exploiting ultrasonic standing waves forces and acoustic streaming in microfluidic systems for cell and particle manipulation," the streaming phenomenon is presented from an analytical standpoint, and perturbation methods are developed for analyzing such flows. Acoustic streaming is the phenomenon that takes place when a steady flow field is generated by the absorption of an oscillatory field. This can happen either by attenuation (quartz wind) or by interaction with a boundary. The latter type of streaming can also be generated by an oscillating solid in an otherwise still fluid medium or vibrating enclosure of a fluid body. While we address the first kind of streaming, our focus is largely on the second kind from a practical standpoint for application to microfluidic systems. In this Focus article, we limit the analysis to one- and two-dimensional problems in order to understand the analytical techniques with examples that most-easily illustrate the streaming phenomenon.

  19. Acoustic Emission Analysis of Shuttle Thermal Protection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, John; Hooker, Jeffery; Immer, Christopher; Walker, James

    2004-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) signals generated from projectile impacts on reinforced and advanced carbon/carbon (RCC and ACC) panels, fired from a compressed-gas gun, identify the type and severity of damage sustained by the target. This type of testing is vital in providing the required "return to flight" (RTF) data needed to ensure continued and safe operation of NASA's Space Shuttle fleet. The gas gun at Kennedy Space Center is capable of propelling 12-inch by 3-inch cylinders of external tank (ET) foam at exit velocities exceeding 1,000 feet per second. Conventional AE analysis techniques require time domain processing of impulse data, along with amplitude distribution analysis. It is well known that identical source excitations can produce a wide range of AE signals amplitudes. In order to satisfy RTF goals, it is necessary to identify impact energy levels above and below damage thresholds. Spectral analysis techniques involving joint time frequency analysis (JTFA) are used to reinforce time domain AE analysis. JTFA analysis of the AE signals consists of short-time Fourier transforms (STFT) and the Huang-Hilbert transform (HHT). The HHT provides a very good measure of the instantaneous frequency of impulse events dominated by a single component. Identifying failure modes and cracking of fibers from flexural and/or extensional mode acoustic signals will help support in-flight as well as postflight impact analysis.

  20. Damage Detection and Analysis in CFRPs Using Acoustic Emission Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitlow, Travis Laron

    Real time monitoring of damage is an important aspect of life management of critical structures. Acoustic emission (AE) techniques allow for measurement and assessment of damage in real time. Acoustic emission parameters such as signal amplitude and duration were monitored during the loading sequences. Criteria that can indicate the onset of critical damage to the structure were developed. Tracking the damage as it happens gives a better analysis of the failure evolution that will allow for a more accurate determination of structural life. The main challenge is distinguishing between legitimate damage signals and "false positives" which are unrelated to damage growth. Such false positives can be related to electrical noise, friction, or mechanical vibrations. This research focuses on monitoring signals of damage growth in carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs) and separating the relevant signals from the false ones. In this Dissertation, acoustic emission signals from CFRP specimens were experimentally recorded and analyzed. The objectives of this work are: (1) perform static and fatigue loading of CFRP composite specimens and measure the associated AE signals, (2) accurately determine the AE parameters (energy, frequency, duration, etc.) of signals generated during failure of such specimens, (3) use fiber optic sensors to monitor the strain distribution of the damage zone and relate these changes in strain measurements to AE data.

  1. Bayesian inference approach to room-acoustic modal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Wesley; Goggans, Paul; Xiang, Ning; Botts, Jonathan

    2013-08-01

    Spectrum estimation is a problem common to many fields of physics, science, and engineering, and it has thus received a great deal of attention from the Bayesian data analysis community. In room acoustics, the modal or frequency response of a room is important for diagnosing and remedying acoustical defects. The physics of a sound field in a room dictates a model comprised of exponentially decaying sinusoids. Continuing in the tradition of the seminal work of Bretthorst and Jaynes, this work contributes an approach to analyzing the modal responses of rooms with a time-domain model. Room acoustic spectra are constructed of damped sinusoids, and the modelbased approach allows estimation of the number of sinusoids in the signal as well as their frequencies, amplitudes, damping constants, and phase delays. The frequency-amplitude spectrum may be most useful for characterizing a room, but in some settings the damping constants are of primary interest. This is the case for measuring the absorptive properties of materials, for example. A further challenge of the room acoustic spectrum problem is that modal density increases quadratically with frequency. At a point called the Schroeder frequency, adjacent modes overlap enough that the spectrum - particularly when estimated with the discrete Fourier transform - can be treated as a continuum. The time-domain, model-based approach can resolve overlapping modes and in some cases be used to estimate the Schroeder frequency. The proposed approach addresses the issue of filtering and preprocessing in order for the sampling to accurately identify all present room modes with their quadratically increasing density.

  2. Design and Analysis of Underwater Acoustic Networks with Reflected Links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emokpae, Lloyd

    -of-sight (LOS) and NLOS links by utilizing directional antennas, which will boost the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at the receiver while promoting NLOS usage. In our model, we employ a directional underwater acoustic antenna composed of an array of hydrophones that can be summed up at various phases and amplitudes resulting in a beam-former. We have also adopted a practical multimodal directional transducer concept which generates both directional and omni-directional beam patterns by combining the fundamental vibration modes of a cylindrical acoustic radiator. This allows the transducer to be electrically controlled and steered by simply adjusting the electrical voltage weights. A prototype acoustic modem is then developed to utilize the multimodal directional transducer for both LOS and NLOS communication. The acoustic modem has also been used as a platform for empirically validating our SBR communication model in a tank and with empirical data. Networking protocols have been developed to exploit the SBR communication model. These protocols include node discovery and localization, directional medium access control (D-MAC) and geographical routing. In node discovery and localization, each node will utilize SBR-based range measurements to its neighbors to determine their relative position. The D-MAC protocol utilizes directional antennas to increase the network throughput due to the spatial efficiency of the antenna model. In the proposed reflection-enabled directional MAC protocol (RED-MAC), each source node will be able to determine if an obstacle is blocking the LOS link to the destination and switch to the best NLOS link by utilizing surface/bottom reflections. Finally, we have developed a geographical routing algorithm which aims to establish the best stable route from a source node to a destination node. The optimized route is selected to achieve maximum network throughput. Extensive analysis of the network throughput when utilizing directional antennas is also presented

  3. Multi-channel acoustic recording and automated analysis of Drosophila courtship songs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Drosophila melanogaster has served as a powerful model system for genetic studies of courtship songs. To accelerate research on the genetic and neural mechanisms underlying courtship song, we have developed a sensitive recording system to simultaneously capture the acoustic signals from 32 separate pairs of courting flies as well as software for automated segmentation of songs. Results Our novel hardware design enables recording of low amplitude sounds in most laboratory environments. We demonstrate the power of this system by collecting, segmenting and analyzing over 18 hours of courtship song from 75 males from five wild-type strains of Drosophila melanogaster. Our analysis reveals previously undetected modulation of courtship song features and extensive natural genetic variation for most components of courtship song. Despite having a large dataset with sufficient power to detect subtle modulations of song, we were unable to identify previously reported periodic rhythms in the inter-pulse interval of song. We provide detailed instructions for assembling the hardware and for using our open-source segmentation software. Conclusions Analysis of a large dataset of acoustic signals from Drosophila melanogaster provides novel insight into the structure and dynamics of species-specific courtship songs. Our new system for recording and analyzing fly acoustic signals should therefore greatly accelerate future studies of the genetics, neurobiology and evolution of courtship song. PMID:23369160

  4. Statistical Analysis of Acoustic Wave Parameters Near Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabello-Soares, M. Cristina; Bogart, Richard S.; Scherrer, Philip H.

    2016-08-01

    In order to quantify the influence of magnetic fields on acoustic mode parameters and flows in and around active regions, we analyze the differences in the parameters in magnetically quiet regions nearby an active region (which we call “nearby regions”), compared with those of quiet regions at the same disk locations for which there are no neighboring active regions. We also compare the mode parameters in active regions with those in comparably located quiet regions. Our analysis is based on ring-diagram analysis of all active regions observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) during almost five years. We find that the frequency at which the mode amplitude changes from attenuation to amplification in the quiet nearby regions is around 4.2 mHz, in contrast to the active regions, for which it is about 5.1 mHz. This amplitude enhacement (the “acoustic halo effect”) is as large as that observed in the active regions, and has a very weak dependence on the wave propagation direction. The mode energy difference in nearby regions also changes from a deficit to an excess at around 4.2 mHz, but averages to zero over all modes. The frequency difference in nearby regions increases with increasing frequency until a point at which the frequency shifts turn over sharply, as in active regions. However, this turnover occurs around 4.9 mHz, which is significantly below the acoustic cutoff frequency. Inverting the horizontal flow parameters in the direction of the neigboring active regions, we find flows that are consistent with a model of the thermal energy flow being blocked directly below the active region.

  5. Spectral analysis methods for vehicle interior vibro-acoustics identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini Fouladi, Mohammad; Nor, Mohd. Jailani Mohd.; Ariffin, Ahmad Kamal

    2009-02-01

    Noise has various effects on comfort, performance and health of human. Sound are analysed by human brain based on the frequencies and amplitudes. In a dynamic system, transmission of sound and vibrations depend on frequency and direction of the input motion and characteristics of the output. It is imperative that automotive manufacturers invest a lot of effort and money to improve and enhance the vibro-acoustics performance of their products. The enhancement effort may be very difficult and time-consuming if one relies only on 'trial and error' method without prior knowledge about the sources itself. Complex noise inside a vehicle cabin originated from various sources and travel through many pathways. First stage of sound quality refinement is to find the source. It is vital for automotive engineers to identify the dominant noise sources such as engine noise, exhaust noise and noise due to vibration transmission inside of vehicle. The purpose of this paper is to find the vibro-acoustical sources of noise in a passenger vehicle compartment. The implementation of spectral analysis method is much faster than the 'trial and error' methods in which, parts should be separated to measure the transfer functions. Also by using spectral analysis method, signals can be recorded in real operational conditions which conduce to more consistent results. A multi-channel analyser is utilised to measure and record the vibro-acoustical signals. Computational algorithms are also employed to identify contribution of various sources towards the measured interior signal. These achievements can be utilised to detect, control and optimise interior noise performance of road transport vehicles.

  6. Dynamic response analysis of an aircraft structure under thermal-acoustic loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, H.; Li, H. B.; Zhang, W.; Wu, Z. Q.; Liu, B. R.

    2016-09-01

    Future hypersonic aircraft will be exposed to extreme combined environments includes large magnitude thermal and acoustic loads. It presents a significant challenge for the integrity of these vehicles. Thermal-acoustic test is used to test structures for dynamic response and sonic fatigue due to combined loads. In this research, the numerical simulation process for the thermal acoustic test is presented, and the effects of thermal loads on vibro-acoustic response are investigated. To simulate the radiation heating system, Monte Carlo theory and thermal network theory was used to calculate the temperature distribution. Considering the thermal stress, the high temperature modal parameters are obtained with structural finite element methods. Based on acoustic finite element, modal-based vibro-acoustic analysis is carried out to compute structural responses. These researches are very vital to optimum thermal-acoustic test and structure designs for future hypersonic vehicles structure

  7. Revealing Student Teacher's Thinking through Dilemma Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talanquer, Vicente; Tomanek, Debra; Novodvorsky, Ingrid

    2007-01-01

    We explore the potential of dilemma analysis as an assessment tool to reveal student teachers' thinking and concerns about their practice. For this purpose we analyze the dilemma analyses completed by 22 student teachers enrolled in our science teacher preparation program over a period of four semesters. Student teachers' dilemmas fall into two…

  8. DARHT Multi-intelligence Seismic and Acoustic Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Garrison Nicole; Van Buren, Kendra Lu; Hemez, Francois M.

    2016-07-21

    The purpose of this report is to document the analysis of seismic and acoustic data collected at the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory for robust, multi-intelligence decision making. The data utilized herein is obtained from two tri-axial seismic sensors and three acoustic sensors, resulting in a total of nine data channels. The goal of this analysis is to develop a generalized, automated framework to determine internal operations at DARHT using informative features extracted from measurements collected external of the facility. Our framework involves four components: (1) feature extraction, (2) data fusion, (3) classification, and finally (4) robustness analysis. Two approaches are taken for extracting features from the data. The first of these, generic feature extraction, involves extraction of statistical features from the nine data channels. The second approach, event detection, identifies specific events relevant to traffic entering and leaving the facility as well as explosive activities at DARHT and nearby explosive testing sites. Event detection is completed using a two stage method, first utilizing signatures in the frequency domain to identify outliers and second extracting short duration events of interest among these outliers by evaluating residuals of an autoregressive exogenous time series model. Features extracted from each data set are then fused to perform analysis with a multi-intelligence paradigm, where information from multiple data sets are combined to generate more information than available through analysis of each independently. The fused feature set is used to train a statistical classifier and predict the state of operations to inform a decision maker. We demonstrate this classification using both generic statistical features and event detection and provide a comparison of the two methods. Finally, the concept of decision robustness is presented through a preliminary analysis where

  9. Acoustic streaming jets: A scaling and dimensional analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Botton, V. Henry, D.; Millet, S.; Ben-Hadid, H.; Garandet, J. P.

    2015-10-28

    We present our work on acoustic streaming free jets driven by ultrasonic beams in liquids. These jets are steady flows generated far from walls by progressive acoustic waves. As can be seen on figure 1, our set-up, denominated AStrID for Acoustic Streaming Investigation Device, is made of a water tank in which a 29 mm plane source emits continuous ultrasonic waves at typically 2 MHz. Our approach combines an experimental characterization of both the acoustic pressure field (hydrophone) and the obtained acoustic streaming velocity field (PIV visualization) on one hand, with CFD using an incompressible Navier-Stokes solver on the other hand.

  10. Acoustic streaming jets: A scaling and dimensional analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botton, V.; Moudjed, B.; Henry, D.; Millet, S.; Ben-Hadid, H.; Garandet, J. P.

    2015-10-01

    We present our work on acoustic streaming free jets driven by ultrasonic beams in liquids. These jets are steady flows generated far from walls by progressive acoustic waves. As can be seen on figure 1, our set-up, denominated AStrID for Acoustic Streaming Investigation Device, is made of a water tank in which a 29 mm plane source emits continuous ultrasonic waves at typically 2 MHz. Our approach combines an experimental characterization of both the acoustic pressure field (hydrophone) and the obtained acoustic streaming velocity field (PIV visualization) on one hand, with CFD using an incompressible Navier-Stokes solver on the other hand.

  11. Finite element analysis for acoustic characteristics of a magnetostrictive transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaehwan; Jung, Eunmi

    2005-12-01

    This paper presents a finite element analysis for a magnetostrictive transducer by taking into account the nonlinear behavior of the magnetostrictive material and fluid interaction. A finite element formulation is derived for the coupling of magnetostrictive and elastic materials based upon a separated magnetic and displacement field calculation and a curve fitting technique of material properties. The fluid and structure coupled problem is taken into account based upon pressure and velocity potential fields formulation. Infinite wave envelope elements are introduced at an artificial boundary to deal with the infinite fluid domain. A finite element code for the analysis of a magnetostrictive transducer is developed. A magnetostrictive tonpilz transducer is taken as an example and verification for the developed program is made by comparing with a commercial code. The acoustic characteristics of the magnetostrictive tonpilz transducer are calculated in terms of radiation pattern and transmitted current response.

  12. CH-46 rotor head acoustic fault detection analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoess, Jeffrey N.; Busch, Darryl; Menon, Sunil

    1999-05-01

    Reductions in Navy maintenance budgets and available personnel have dictated the need to transition from time-based to 'condition-based' maintenance. Achieving this requires new enabling diagnostic technologies. Stress-wave acoustic emission technology has shown promise for the early detection of helicopter rotor head dynamic component faults. In September 1997, Honeywell Technology Center (HTC) successfully completed a three-week flight test of its rotor acoustic monitoring system (RAMS) at Patuxent River Flight Test Center. This flight test was the culmination of an ambitious 38-month, proof-of-concept effort directed at demonstrating the feasibility of detecting crack propagation in helicopter rotor components. Honeywell is presently developing a time- frequency-based real-time processing algorithm under internal research efforts to automate the fault-detection process. The focus of this paper is to overview the CH-46 flight test and system configuration and present preliminary results of the time-frequency analysis of the flight-test dataset.

  13. Authentic and Play-Acted Vocal Emotion Expressions Reveal Acoustic Differences

    PubMed Central

    Jürgens, Rebecca; Hammerschmidt, Kurt; Fischer, Julia

    2011-01-01

    Play-acted emotional expressions are a frequent aspect in our life, ranging from deception to theater, film, and radio drama, to emotion research. To date, however, it remained unclear whether play-acted emotions correspond to spontaneous emotion expressions. To test whether acting influences the vocal expression of emotion, we compared radio sequences of naturally occurring emotions to actors’ portrayals. It was hypothesized that play-acted expressions were performed in a more stereotyped and aroused fashion. Our results demonstrate that speech segments extracted from play-acted and authentic expressions differ in their voice quality. Additionally, the play-acted speech tokens revealed a more variable F0-contour. Despite these differences, the results did not support the hypothesis that the variation was due to changes in arousal. This analysis revealed that differences in perception of play-acted and authentic emotional stimuli reported previously cannot simply be attributed to differences in arousal, but by slight and implicitly perceptible differences in encoding. PMID:21847385

  14. What Is an Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... ANAUSA.org Connect with us! What is an Acoustic Neuroma? Each heading slides to reveal information. Important ... Acoustic Neuroma Important Points To Know About an Acoustic Neuroma An acoustic neuroma, also called a vestibular ...

  15. Seasonal dynamics of zooplankton in the southern Chukchi Sea revealed from acoustic backscattering strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Minoru; Amakasu, Kazuo; Kikuchi, Takashi; Nishino, Shigeto

    2017-02-01

    To understand the seasonal dynamics of zooplankton in the southern Chukchi Sea, we use observations from a moored multi-frequency echo-sounder from July 2012 to July 2014. Zooplankton biomass, as indicated by area backscattering strength, was high during autumn and low in early spring; the seasonal peak in zooplankton biomass did not coincide with the spring phytoplankton bloom. This suggests that the seasonal zooplankton dynamics in the southern Chukchi Sea are less influenced by local growth of zooplankton during the spring phytoplankton bloom and more influenced by advection of zooplankton from the Bering Sea. The differences between volume backscattering strengths at 200 and 125 kHz suggest that the main acoustic scatterers are large zooplankton (euphausiids and Neocalanus cristatus) in late summer and autumn and small zooplankton (other copepods) in other seasons. The decrease in acoustic backscatter from large zooplankton from winter to early summer also suggests the unsuccessful overwintering of advected Pacific zooplankton. The temporal mismatch between zooplankton and phytoplankton production suggests that there is still tight pelagic-benthic coupling in the southern Chukchi Sea.

  16. Transcriptomic analysis of the zebrafish inner ear points to growth hormone mediated regeneration following acoustic trauma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Unlike mammals, teleost fishes are capable of regenerating sensory inner ear hair cells that have been lost following acoustic or ototoxic trauma. Previous work indicated that immediately following sound exposure, zebrafish saccules exhibit significant hair cell loss that recovers to pre-treatment levels within 14 days. Following acoustic trauma in the zebrafish inner ear, we used microarray analysis to identify genes involved in inner ear repair following acoustic exposure. Additionally, we investigated the effect of growth hormone (GH) on cell proliferation in control zebrafish utricles and saccules, since GH was significantly up-regulated following acoustic trauma. Results Microarray analysis, validated with the aid of quantitative real-time PCR, revealed several genes that were highly regulated during the process of regeneration in the zebrafish inner ear. Genes that had fold changes of ≥ 1.4 and P -values ≤ 0.05 were considered significantly regulated and were used for subsequent analysis. Categories of biological function that were significantly regulated included cancer, cellular growth and proliferation, and inflammation. Of particular significance, a greater than 64-fold increase in growth hormone (gh1) transcripts occurred, peaking at 2 days post-sound exposure (dpse) and decreasing to approximately 5.5-fold by 4 dpse. Pathway Analysis software was used to reveal networks of regulated genes and showed how GH affected these networks. Subsequent experiments showed that intraperitoneal injection of salmon growth hormone significantly increased cell proliferation in the zebrafish inner ear. Many other gene transcripts were also differentially regulated, including heavy and light chain myosin transcripts, both of which were down-regulated following sound exposure, and major histocompatability class I and II genes, several of which were significantly regulated on 2 dpse. Conclusions Transcripts for GH, MHC Class I and II genes, and heavy- and

  17. Thermodynamical analysis of acoustical perturbations in the bronchial tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puente, Margarita; Perez-Guerrero, Armando; Alvarado, Manuel

    2002-11-01

    In the airways, very complex flows occur because of different conditions and the existence of a lot of complications: constantly changing temperature and pressure during the respiration process, a normally turbulent flow in the trachea which, in heavy breathing, remains so in the first three or four generations of airways, changes of the direction of the flow over the breathing cycle, from inspiration to expiration, etc. We also know the air that flows in the bronchial tree is perturbed by several sources such as the heart and the circulatory system, the diaphragm and stomach movements, etc., which produce sound waves. Thus an acoustical analysis of the phenomenon can lead us to a physical model which could help us to better understand the phenomena and to demonstrate the importance to clinical applications such as the pneumocardiograms. To this purpose we use a thermodynamical model that originally was developed to analyze supersonic air jets to explain the production of shock waves in the bronchial tree.

  18. Near-field beamforming analysis for acoustic emission source localization.

    PubMed

    He, Tian; Pan, Qiang; Liu, Yaoguang; Liu, Xiandong; Hu, Dayong

    2012-07-01

    This paper attempts to introduce a near-field acoustic emission (AE) beamforming method to estimate the AE source locations by using a small array of sensors closely placed in a local region. The propagation characteristics of AE signals are investigated based on guided wave theory to discuss the feasibility of using beamforming techniques in AE signal processing. To validate the effectiveness of the AE beamforming method, a series of pencil lead break tests at various regions of a thin steel plate are conducted. The potential of this method for engineering applications are explored through rotor-stator rubbing tests. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can effectively determine the region where rubbing occurs. It is expected that the work of this paper may provide a helpful analysis tool for near-field AE source localization.

  19. Freddie Mercury-acoustic analysis of speaking fundamental frequency, vibrato, and subharmonics.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Christian T; Hertegard, Stellan; Zangger-Borch, Daniel; Lindestad, Per-Åke

    2017-04-01

    Freddie Mercury was one of the twentieth century's best-known singers of commercial contemporary music. This study presents an acoustical analysis of his voice production and singing style, based on perceptual and quantitative analysis of publicly available sound recordings. Analysis of six interviews revealed a median speaking fundamental frequency of 117.3 Hz, which is typically found for a baritone voice. Analysis of voice tracks isolated from full band recordings suggested that the singing voice range was 37 semitones within the pitch range of F#2 (about 92.2 Hz) to G5 (about 784 Hz). Evidence for higher phonations up to a fundamental frequency of 1,347 Hz was not deemed reliable. Analysis of 240 sustained notes from 21 a-cappella recordings revealed a surprisingly high mean fundamental frequency modulation rate (vibrato) of 7.0 Hz, reaching the range of vocal tremor. Quantitative analysis utilizing a newly introduced parameter to assess the regularity of vocal vibrato corroborated its perceptually irregular nature, suggesting that vibrato (ir)regularity is a distinctive feature of the singing voice. Imitation of subharmonic phonation samples by a professional rock singer, documented by endoscopic high-speed video at 4,132 frames per second, revealed a 3:1 frequency locked vibratory pattern of vocal folds and ventricular folds.

  20. Acoustic Seaglider: PhilSea10 Data Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-13

    understanding that the navigation and the ocean sound speed and currents be jointly determined. LONG-TERM GOALS Within the Ocean Acoustics Deep Water... temperature and salinity were deployed (Figure 1). General objectives of the experiment are to understand the acoustic propagation in the...an acoustic recording system (ARS) to record the moored source transmissions, as well as temperature , salinity and pressure sensors (from which

  1. Revealing Student Teachers' Thinking through Dilemma Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talanquer, Vicente; Tomanek, Debra; Novodvorsky, Ingrid

    2007-06-01

    We explore the potential of dilemma analysis as an assessment tool to reveal student teachers’ thinking and concerns about their practice. For this purpose we analyze the dilemma analyses completed by 22 student teachers enrolled in our science teacher preparation program over a period of four semesters. Student teachers’ dilemmas fall into two main groups: dilemmas about student performance and dilemmas associated with instructional decisions. These dilemmas reveal a variety of concerns that student teachers have about their work. In particular, concerns about lack of student motivation and its consequences on performance and instruction play a central role in student teachers’ thinking. The recognition of common patterns of thought in our student teacher thinking has made us reflect on and re-evaluate important components of the curriculum in our science teacher preparation program.

  2. Picosecond x-ray strain rosette reveals direct laser excitation of coherent transverse acoustic phonons

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sooheyong; Williams, G. Jackson; Campana, Maria I.; Walko, Donald A.; Landahl, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    Using a strain-rosette, we demonstrate the existence of transverse strain using time-resolved x-ray diffraction from multiple Bragg reflections in laser-excited bulk gallium arsenide. We find that anisotropic strain is responsible for a considerable fraction of the total lattice motion at early times before thermal equilibrium is achieved. Our measurements are described by a new model where the Poisson ratio drives transverse motion, resulting in the creation of shear waves without the need for an indirect process such as mode conversion at an interface. Using the same excitation geometry with the narrow-gap semiconductor indium antimonide, we detected coherent transverse acoustic oscillations at frequencies of several GHz. PMID:26751616

  3. Picosecond x-ray strain rosette reveals direct laser excitation of coherent transverse acoustic phonons

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sooheyong; Williams, G. Jackson; Campana, Maria I.; Walko, Donald A.; Landahl, Eric C.

    2016-01-11

    Using a strain-rosette, we demonstrate the existence of transverse strain using time-resolved x-ray diffraction from multiple Bragg reflections in laser-excited bulk gallium arsenide. We find that anisotropic strain is responsible for a considerable fraction of the total lattice motion at early times before thermal equilibrium is achieved. Our measurements are described by a new model where the Poisson ratio drives transverse motion, resulting in the creation of shear waves without the need for an indirect process such as mode conversion at an interface. Finally, using the same excitation geometry with the narrow-gap semiconductor indium antimonide, we detected coherent transverse acoustic oscillations at frequencies of several GHz.

  4. Brain responses in humans reveal ideal observer-like sensitivity to complex acoustic patterns

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Marcus T.; Griffiths, Timothy D.; Chait, Maria

    2016-01-01

    We use behavioral methods, magnetoencephalography, and functional MRI to investigate how human listeners discover temporal patterns and statistical regularities in complex sound sequences. Sensitivity to patterns is fundamental to sensory processing, in particular in the auditory system, because most auditory signals only have meaning as successions over time. Previous evidence suggests that the brain is tuned to the statistics of sensory stimulation. However, the process through which this arises has been elusive. We demonstrate that listeners are remarkably sensitive to the emergence of complex patterns within rapidly evolving sound sequences, performing on par with an ideal observer model. Brain responses reveal online processes of evidence accumulation—dynamic changes in tonic activity precisely correlate with the expected precision or predictability of ongoing auditory input—both in terms of deterministic (first-order) structure and the entropy of random sequences. Source analysis demonstrates an interaction between primary auditory cortex, hippocampus, and inferior frontal gyrus in the process of discovering the regularity within the ongoing sound sequence. The results are consistent with precision based predictive coding accounts of perceptual inference and provide compelling neurophysiological evidence of the brain's capacity to encode high-order temporal structure in sensory signals. PMID:26787854

  5. Using rotor or tip speed in the acoustical analysis of small wind turbines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acoustical noise data have been collected and analyzed on small wind turbines used for water pumping at the USDA-ARS Conservation and Production Research Laboratory (CPRL) near Bushland, Texas. This acoustical analysis differed from previous research in that the data were analyzed with rotor or tip ...

  6. Acoustic emission analysis as a non-destructive test procedure for fiber compound structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Block, J.

    1983-01-01

    The concept of acoustic emission analysis is explained in scientific terms. The detection of acoustic events, their localization, damage discrimination, and event summation curves are discussed. A block diagram of the concept of damage-free testing of fiber-reinforced synthetic materials is depicted. Prospects for application of the concept are assessed.

  7. Analysis of passive acoustic ranging of helicopters from the joint acoustic propagation experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnes, Benny L.; Morgan, John C.

    1993-01-01

    For more than twenty years, personnel of the U.S.A.E. Waterways Experiment Station (WES) have been performing research dealing with the application of sensors for detection of military targets. The WES research has included the use of seismic, acoustic, magnetic, and other sensors to detect, track, and classify military ground targets. Most of the WES research has been oriented toward the employment of such sensors in a passive mode. Techniques for passive detection are of particular interest in the Army because of the advantages over active detection. Passive detection methods are not susceptible to interception, detection, jamming, or location of the source by the threat. A decided advantage for using acoustic and seismic sensors for detection in tactical situations is the non-line-of-sight capability; i.e., detection of low flying helicopters at long distances without visual contact. This study was conducted to analyze the passive acoustic ranging (PAR) concept using a more extensive data set from the Joint Acoustic Propagation Experiment (JAPE).

  8. Feigned Depression and Feigned Sleepiness: A Voice Acoustical Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, Nicole; Cannizzaro, Michael S.; Harel, Brian T.; Snyder, Peter J.

    2004-01-01

    We sought to profile the voice acoustical correlates of simulated, or feigned depression by neurologically and psychiatrically healthy control subjects. We also sought to identify the voice acoustical correlates of feigned sleepiness for these same subjects. Twenty-two participants were asked to speak freely about a cartoon, to count from 1 to 10,…

  9. Alignment of an acoustic manipulation device with cepstral analysis of electronic impedance data.

    PubMed

    Hughes, D A; Qiu, Y; Démoré, C; Weijer, C J; Cochran, S

    2015-02-01

    Acoustic particle manipulation is an emerging technology that uses ultrasonic standing waves to position objects with pressure gradients and acoustic radiation forces. To produce strong standing waves, the transducer and the reflector must be aligned properly such that they are parallel to each other. This can be a difficult process due to the need to visualise the ultrasound waves and as higher frequencies are introduced, this alignment requires higher accuracy. In this paper, we present a method for aligning acoustic resonators with cepstral analysis. This is a simple signal processing technique that requires only the electrical impedance measurement data of the resonator, which is usually recorded during the fabrication process of the device. We first introduce the mathematical basis of cepstral analysis and then demonstrate and validate it using a computer simulation of an acoustic resonator. Finally, the technique is demonstrated experimentally to create many parallel linear traps for 10 μm fluorescent beads inside an acoustic resonator.

  10. Environmental controls of frost cracking revealed through in situ acoustic emission measurements in steep bedrock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, Lucas; Gruber, Stephan; Weber, Samuel; Beutel, Jan

    2013-05-01

    Frost cracking, the breakdown of rock by freezing, is one of the most important mechanical weathering processes acting on Earth's surface. Insights on the mechanisms driving frost cracking stem mainly from laboratory and theoretical studies. Transferring insights from such studies to natural conditions, involving jointed bedrock and heterogeneous thermal and hydrological properties, is a major challenge. We address this problem with simultaneous in situ measurements of acoustic emissions, used as proxy of rock damage, and rock temperature/moisture content. The 1 year data set acquired in an Alpine rock wall shows that (1) liquid water content has an important impact on freezing-induced rock damage, (2) sustained freezing can yield much stronger damage than repeated freeze-thaw cycling, and (3) that frost cracking occurs over the full range of temperatures measured extending from 0 down to -15°C. These new measurements yield a slightly different picture than previous field studies where ice segregation appears to play an important role.

  11. Acoustic Observation of Living Organisms Reveals the Upper Limit of the Oxygen Minimum Zone

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Arnaud; Ballón, Michael; Chaigneau, Alexis

    2010-01-01

    Background Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) are expanding in the World Ocean as a result of climate change and direct anthropogenic influence. OMZ expansion greatly affects biogeochemical processes and marine life, especially by constraining the vertical habitat of most marine organisms. Currently, monitoring the variability of the upper limit of the OMZs relies on time intensive sampling protocols, causing poor spatial resolution. Methodology/Principal Findings Using routine underwater acoustic observations of the vertical distribution of marine organisms, we propose a new method that allows determination of the upper limit of the OMZ with a high precision. Applied in the eastern South-Pacific, this original sampling technique provides high-resolution information on the depth of the upper OMZ allowing documentation of mesoscale and submesoscale features (e.g., eddies and filaments) that structure the upper ocean and the marine ecosystems. We also use this information to estimate the habitable volume for the world's most exploited fish, the Peruvian anchovy (Engraulis ringens). Conclusions/Significance This opportunistic method could be implemented on any vessel geared with multi-frequency echosounders to perform comprehensive high-resolution monitoring of the upper limit of the OMZ. Our approach is a novel way of studying the impact of physical processes on marine life and extracting valid information about the pelagic habitat and its spatial structure, a crucial aspect of Ecosystem-based Fisheries Management in the current context of climate change. PMID:20442791

  12. Diel vertical migration of zooplankton at the S1 biogeochemical mooring revealed from acoustic backscattering strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Ryuichiro; Kitamura, Minoru; Fujiki, Tetsuichi

    2016-02-01

    We examined the diel vertical migration of zooplankton by using the backscatter strength obtained from moored acoustic Doppler current profilers at mooring site S1 in the North Pacific subtropical gyre. There was seasonal variability in the vertical distribution and migration of the high-backscatter layers in that they became deeper than the euphotic zone (<100 m) in winter and were confined above this depth in other seasons. Seasonal changes in daylight hours also affected the timing of the diel migration. We found that lunar cycles affected vertical distributions of zooplankton near the surface by changing the light intensity. Physical events, such as mixed-layer deepening and restratification and the passage of a mesoscale eddy, also affected zooplankton behavior possibly by changing food environment in the euphotic zone. Since the comparison with net samples indicated that the backscatter likely represents the bulk biomass, the accuracy of biomass estimates based on net samples could be influenced by the high temporal variability of zooplankton distributions.

  13. Combining AFM and Acoustic Probes to Reveal Changes in the Elastic Stiffness Tensor of Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nijenhuis, Nadja; Zhao, Xuegen; Carisey, Alex; Ballestrem, Christoph; Derby, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of how the elastic stiffness of a cell affects its communication with its environment is of fundamental importance for the understanding of tissue integrity in health and disease. For stiffness measurements, it has been customary to quote a single parameter quantity, e.g., Young’s modulus, rather than the minimum of two terms of the stiffness tensor required by elasticity theory. In this study, we use two independent methods (acoustic microscopy and atomic force microscopy nanoindentation) to characterize the elastic properties of a cell and thus determine two independent elastic constants. This allows us to explore in detail how the mechanical properties of cells change in response to signaling pathways that are known to regulate the cell’s cytoskeleton. In particular, we demonstrate that altering the tensioning of actin filaments in NIH3T3 cells has a strong influence on the cell's shear modulus but leaves its bulk modulus unchanged. In contrast, altering the polymerization state of actin filaments influences bulk and shear modulus in a similar manner. In addition, we can use the data to directly determine the Poisson ratio of a cell and show that in all cases studied, it is less than, but very close to, 0.5 in value. PMID:25296302

  14. REVEAL: Receiver Exploiting Variability in Estimated Acoustic Levels FY08 Year End Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-02

    processing structure developed under the REVEAL project 4 Figure 4: Performance of the REVEAL Likelihood Ratio processor under Gaussian noise and for...Figure 6: Likelihood ratio test constructed by point-wake dividing the kernel density estimates 9 Figure 7: Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC...curves for a detector like that shown in Fig. 6. . 10 Figure 9: Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves for likelihood ratio receivers applied

  15. A Correlated Study of the Response of a Satellite to Acoustic Radiation Using Statistical Energy Analysis and Acoustic Test Data

    SciTech Connect

    CAP,JEROME S.; TRACEY,BRIAN

    1999-11-15

    Aerospace payloads, such as satellites, are subjected to vibroacoustic excitation during launch. Sandia's MTI satellite has recently been certified to this environment using a combination of base input random vibration and reverberant acoustic noise. The initial choices for the acoustic and random vibration test specifications were obtained from the launch vehicle Interface Control Document (ICD). In order to tailor the random vibration levels for the laboratory certification testing, it was necessary to determine whether vibration energy was flowing across the launch vehicle interface from the satellite to the launch vehicle or the other direction. For frequencies below 120 Hz this issue was addressed using response limiting techniques based on results from the Coupled Loads Analysis (CLA). However, since the CLA Finite Element Analysis FEA model was only correlated for frequencies below 120 Hz, Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) was considered to be a better choice for predicting the direction of the energy flow for frequencies above 120 Hz. The existing SEA model of the launch vehicle had been developed using the VibroAcoustic Payload Environment Prediction System (VAPEPS) computer code [1]. Therefore, the satellite would have to be modeled using VAPEPS as well. As is the case for any computational model, the confidence in its predictive capability increases if one can correlate a sample prediction against experimental data. Fortunately, Sandia had the ideal data set for correlating an SEA model of the MTI satellite--the measured response of a realistic assembly to a reverberant acoustic test that was performed during MTI's qualification test series. The first part of this paper will briefly describe the VAPEPS modeling effort and present the results of the correlation study for the VAPEPS model. The second part of this paper will present the results from a study that used a commercial SEA software package [2] to study the effects of in-plane modes and to

  16. Acoustic analysis and mood classification of pain-relieving music.

    PubMed

    Knox, Don; Beveridge, Scott; Mitchell, Laura A; MacDonald, Raymond A R

    2011-09-01

    Listening to preferred music (that which is chosen by the participant) has been shown to be effective in mitigating the effects of pain when compared to silence and a variety of distraction techniques. The wide range of genre, tempo, and structure in music chosen by participants in studies utilizing experimentally induced pain has led to the assertion that structure does not play a significant role, rather listening to preferred music renders the music "functionally equivalent" as regards its effect upon pain perception. This study addresses this assumption and performs detailed analysis of a selection of music chosen from three pain studies. Music analysis showed significant correlation between timbral and tonal aspects of music and measurements of pain tolerance and perceived pain intensity. Mood classification was performed using a hierarchical Gaussian Mixture Model, which indicated the majority of the chosen music expressed contentment. The results suggest that in addition to personal preference, associations with music and the listening context, emotion expressed by music, as defined by its acoustical content, is important to enhancing emotional engagement with music and therefore enhances the level of pain reduction and tolerance.

  17. Surface acoustic wave nebulization facilitating lipid mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sung Hwan; Huang, Yue; Edgar, J Scott; Ting, Ying S; Heron, Scott R; Kao, Yuchieh; Li, Yanyan; Masselon, Christophe D; Ernst, Robert K; Goodlett, David R

    2012-08-07

    Surface acoustic wave nebulization (SAWN) is a novel method to transfer nonvolatile analytes directly from the aqueous phase to the gas phase for mass spectrometric analysis. The lower ion energetics of SAWN and its planar nature make it appealing for analytically challenging lipid samples. This challenge is a result of their amphipathic nature, labile nature, and tendency to form aggregates, which readily precipitate clogging capillaries used for electrospray ionization (ESI). Here, we report the use of SAWN to characterize the complex glycolipid, lipid A, which serves as the membrane anchor component of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and has a pronounced tendency to clog nano-ESI capillaries. We also show that unlike ESI SAWN is capable of ionizing labile phospholipids without fragmentation. Lastly, we compare the ease of use of SAWN to the more conventional infusion-based ESI methods and demonstrate the ability to generate higher order tandem mass spectral data of lipid A for automated structure assignment using our previously reported hierarchical tandem mass spectrometry (HiTMS) algorithm. The ease of generating SAWN-MS(n) data combined with HiTMS interpretation offers the potential for high throughput lipid A structure analysis.

  18. Acoustic emission analysis of tooth-composite interfacial debonding.

    PubMed

    Cho, N Y; Ferracane, J L; Lee, I B

    2013-01-01

    This study detected tooth-composite interfacial debonding during composite restoration by means of acoustic emission (AE) analysis and investigated the effects of composite properties and adhesives on AE characteristics. The polymerization shrinkage, peak shrinkage rate, flexural modulus, and shrinkage stress of a methacrylate-based universal hybrid, a flowable, and a silorane-based composite were measured. Class I cavities on 49 extracted premolars were restored with 1 of the 3 composites and 1 of the following adhesives: 2 etch-and-rinse adhesives, 2 self-etch adhesives, and an adhesive for the silorane-based composite. AE analysis was done for 2,000 sec during light-curing. The silorane-based composite exhibited the lowest shrinkage (rate), the longest time to peak shrinkage rate, the lowest shrinkage stress, and the fewest AE events. AE events were detected immediately after the beginning of light-curing in most composite-adhesive combinations, but not until 40 sec after light-curing began for the silorane-based composite. AE events were concentrated at the initial stage of curing in self-etch adhesives compared with etch-and-rinse adhesives. Reducing the shrinkage (rate) of composites resulted in reduced shrinkage stress and less debonding, as evidenced by fewer AE events. AE is an effective technique for monitoring, in real time, the debonding kinetics at the tooth-composite interface.

  19. Thermal Acoustic Oscillation: Causes, Detection, Analysis and Prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christie, Robert J.; Hartwig, Jason W.

    2014-01-01

    The presentation discusses the causes of Thermal Acoustic Oscillations, how it can be detected, analyzed and prevented. It also discusses where it can occur, where it doesn't occur and practical mitigation techniques.

  20. Acoustic modal analysis of a full-scale annular combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karchmer, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    An acoustic modal decomposition of the measured pressure field in a full scale annular combustor installed in a ducted test rig is described. The modal analysis, utilizing a least squares optimization routine, is facilitated by the assumption of randomly occurring pressure disturbances which generate equal amplitude clockwise and counter-clockwise pressure waves, and the assumption of statistical independence between modes. These assumptions are fully justified by the measured cross spectral phases between the various measurement points. The resultant modal decomposition indicates that higher order modes compose the dominant portion of the combustor pressure spectrum in the range of frequencies of interest in core noise studies. A second major finding is that, over the frequency range of interest, each individual mode which is present exists in virtual isolation over significant portions of the spectrum. Finally, a comparison between the present results and a limited amount of data obtained in an operating turbofan engine with the same combustor is made. The comparison is sufficiently favorable to warrant the conclusion that the structure of the combustor pressure field is preserved between the component facility and the engine.

  1. Acoustic emission intensity analysis of corrosion in prestressed concrete piles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vélez, William; Matta, Fabio; Ziehl, Paul

    2014-02-01

    Corrosion of steel strands in prestressed concrete (PC) bridges may lead to substantial damage or collapse well before the end of the design life. Acoustic Emission (AE) is a suitable nondestructive technique to detect and locate corrosion in reinforced and prestressed concrete, which is key to prioritize inspection and maintenance. An effective tool to analyze damage-related AE data is intensity analysis (IA), which is based on two data trends, namely Severity (average signal strength of high amplitude hits) and Historic Index (ratio of the average signal strength of the most recent hits to the average of all hits). IA criteria for corrosion assessment in PC were recently proposed based on empirical evidence from accelerated corrosion tests. In this paper, AE data from prestressed and non-prestressed concrete pile specimens exposed to salt water wet-dry cycling for over 600 days are used to analyze the relation between Severity and Historic Index and actual corrosion. Evidence of corrosion is gained from the inspection of decommissioned specimens. The selection of suitable J and K parameters for IA is discussed, and an IA chart with updated corrosion criteria for PC piles is presented.

  2. Parallel Finite Element Domain Decomposition for Structural/Acoustic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Duc T.; Tungkahotara, Siroj; Watson, Willie R.; Rajan, Subramaniam D.

    2005-01-01

    A domain decomposition (DD) formulation for solving sparse linear systems of equations resulting from finite element analysis is presented. The formulation incorporates mixed direct and iterative equation solving strategics and other novel algorithmic ideas that are optimized to take advantage of sparsity and exploit modern computer architecture, such as memory and parallel computing. The most time consuming part of the formulation is identified and the critical roles of direct sparse and iterative solvers within the framework of the formulation are discussed. Experiments on several computer platforms using several complex test matrices are conducted using software based on the formulation. Small-scale structural examples are used to validate thc steps in the formulation and large-scale (l,000,000+ unknowns) duct acoustic examples are used to evaluate the ORIGIN 2000 processors, and a duster of 6 PCs (running under the Windows environment). Statistics show that the formulation is efficient in both sequential and parallel computing environmental and that the formulation is significantly faster and consumes less memory than that based on one of the best available commercialized parallel sparse solvers.

  3. Acoustic wave network and multivariate analysis for biosensing in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayarajah, Christine N.; Thompson, Michael

    2005-03-01

    Bioanalytical techniques play an important role in monitoring the effects of environmental stress factors on fundamental life processes. In terms of space flight and extraterrestrial research, radiation, altered and microgravity are known to induce changes in gene expression. We report the use of an on-line transverse shear mode (TSM) acoustic wave biosensor to detect the initiation of gene transcription and DNA — drug binding. Since this biosensor offers real-time, label free monitoring of biological processes, it is possible to detect sequential binding steps as demonstrated in this paper. Furthermore, this sensor responds to several factors in the liquid phase such as viscosity, elasticity, surface tension, charge distribution and mass loading, which can in turn be influenced by specific gravity. The sensing device is a piezoelectric quartz crystal onto which the probe molecule (DNA in this case) is immobilized. Change in resonance frequency of the crystal in response to the binding of the target molecule(s), RNA polymerase and actinomycin-D, is fit to an equivalent circuit model from which multidimensional data is extracted. By performing multivariate analysis on this data we are able to observe interactions between several of these data series representing parameters such as motional resistance and capacitance. As well, we are able to observe the dominating parameters (for instance, frequency vs. motional resistance, which in turn can correspond to mass loading vs. energy dissipation) during the course of the experiment, as they vary between the different steps. Such advantages offered by the TSM sensor along with multivariate analysis are indispensable for biotechnological work under the influence of microgravity as several variables come into play.

  4. Modeling ground vehicle acoustic signatures for analysis and synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Haschke, G.; Stanfield, R.

    1995-07-01

    Security and weapon systems use acoustic sensor signals to classify and identify moving ground vehicles. Developing robust signal processing algorithms for this is expensive, particularly in presence of acoustic clutter or countermeasures. This paper proposes a parametric ground vehicle acoustic signature model to aid the system designer in understanding which signature features are important, developing corresponding feature extraction algorithms and generating low-cost, high-fidelity synthetic signatures for testing. The authors have proposed computer-generated acoustic signatures of armored, tracked ground vehicles to deceive acoustic-sensored smart munitions. They have developed quantitative measures of how accurately a synthetic acoustic signature matches those produced by actual vehicles. This paper describes parameters of the model used to generate these synthetic signatures and suggests methods for extracting these parameters from signatures of valid vehicle encounters. The model incorporates wide-bandwidth and narrow- bandwidth components that are modulated in a pseudo-random fashion to mimic the time dynamics of valid vehicle signatures. Narrow- bandwidth feature extraction techniques estimate frequency, amplitude and phase information contained in a single set of narrow frequency- band harmonics. Wide-bandwidth feature extraction techniques estimate parameters of a correlated-noise-floor model. Finally, the authors propose a method of modeling the time dynamics of the harmonic amplitudes as a means adding necessary time-varying features to the narrow-bandwidth signal components. The authors present results of applying this modeling technique to acoustic signatures recorded during encounters with one armored, tracked vehicle. Similar modeling techniques can be applied to security systems.

  5. An acoustical analysis of a room with a concave dome ceiling element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utami, Sentagi S.

    2004-05-01

    Concave surfaces are often considered detrimental in room acoustics, especially because of the impact they have on the distribution of sound energy. This paper explores certain acoustical characteristics and anomalies found in spaces below concave dome ceiling elements. The architectural design of the Darusshollah mosque in East Java, Indonesia is used as a case study with specific spatial and functional concerns. Investigations of the mosque have been conducted through both a 1:12 scale model and a computer model that utilizes ray tracing and image source methods. Analysis techniques are discussed. Results are presented and compared to provide useful insights into the acoustics of such distinctive environments.

  6. Simulation and analysis chain for acoustic ultra-high energy neutrino detectors in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, M.; Anton, G.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Graf, K.; Hößl, J.; Katz, U.; Lahmann, R.; Sieger, C.

    2013-05-01

    Acoustic neutrino detection is a promising approach for large-scale ultra-high energy neutrino detectors in water. In this article, a Monte Carlo simulation chain for acoustic neutrino detection devices in water will be presented. The simulation chain covers the generation of the acoustic pulse produced by a neutrino interaction and its propagation to the sensors within the detector. Currently, ambient and transient noise models for the Mediterranean Sea and simulations of the data acquisition hardware, equivalent to the one used in ANTARES/AMADEUS, are implemented. A pre-selection scheme for neutrino-like signals based on matched filtering is employed, as it is used for on-line filtering. To simulate the whole processing chain for experimental data, signal classification and acoustic source reconstruction algorithms are integrated in an analysis chain. An overview of design and capabilities of the simulation and analysis chain will be presented and preliminary studies will be discussed.

  7. Acoustic source analysis of a rectangular supersonic jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreitzman, Jordan; Nichols, Joseph W.

    2014-11-01

    We apply Goldstein's generalized acoustic analogy to identify acoustic sources in two high-fidelity unstructured large eddy simulation databases of a Mach 1.4 rectangular jet with and without chevrons. Two-point, two-time correlations of the acoustic source terms are evaluated at different positions in the three dimensional flow that develops downstream of the complex nozzle. Two-point statistics are compared to single-point statistics to test the quasi-normality hypothesis and other noise source models for a non-axisymmetric jet. In particular, we assess the predictive capability of a Gaussian model, a fixed-frame model and a modified-distance model. The nozzle geometries used for the simulations exactly match an experimental configuration tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center, allowing for validation in terms of both farfield noise as well as turbulence statistics. We gratefully acknowledge computational resources provided by the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility.

  8. Novel characterization method for fibrous materials using non-contact acoustics: material properties revealed by ultrasonic perturbations.

    PubMed

    Periyaswamy, Thamizhisai; Balasubramanian, Karthikeyan; Pastore, Christopher

    2015-02-01

    Fibrous materials are unique hierarchical complex structures exhibiting a range of mechanical, thermal, optical and electrical properties. The inherent discontinuity at micro and macro levels, heterogeneity and multi-scale porosity differentiates fibrous materials from other engineering materials that are typically continuum in nature. These structural complexities greatly influence the techniques and modalities that can be applied to characterize fibrous materials. Typically, the material response to an applied external force is measured and used as a characteristic number of the specimen. In general, a range of equipment is in use to obtain these numbers to signify the material properties. Nevertheless, obtaining these numbers for materials like fiber ensembles is often time consuming, destructive, and requires multiple modalities. It is hypothesized that the material response to an applied acoustic frequency would provide a robust alternative characterization mode for rapid and non-destructive material analysis. This research proposes applying air-coupled ultrasonic acoustics to characterize fibrous materials. Ultrasonic frequency waves transmitted through fibrous assemblies were feature extracted to understand the correlation between the applied frequency and the material properties. Mechanical and thermal characteristics were analyzed using ultrasonic features such as time of flight, signal velocity, power and the rate of attenuation of signal amplitude. Subsequently, these temporal and spectral characteristics were mapped with the standard low-stress mechanical and thermal properties via an empirical artificial intelligence engine. A high correlation of >0.92 (S.D. 0.06) was observed between the ultrasonic features and the standard measurements. The proposed ultrasonic technique can be used toward rapid characterization of dynamic behavior of flexible fibrous assemblies.

  9. Identification of vibration excitations from acoustic measurements using near field acoustic holography and the force analysis technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pézerat, C.; Leclère, Q.; Totaro, N.; Pachebat, M.

    2009-10-01

    This study presents a method of using acoustic holography and the force analysis technique to identify vibration sources from radiated noise measurements. The structure studied is a plate excited by a shaker on which three measurements were performed: the first is a reference measurement of plate velocity obtained by scanning laser vibrometry, the second is based on sound pressure measurements in the near field of the structure, and the third is the measurement of normal acoustic velocities by using a p-U probe recently developed by Microflown Technologies. This was followed by the application of classical NAH, known as pressure-to-velocity holography and velocity-to-velocity holography to predict the plate velocity field from acoustic measurements at distances of 1 and 5 cm. Afterwards, the force analysis technique, also known as the RIFF technique, is applied with these five data sets. The principle is to inject the displacement field of the structure into its equation of motion and extract the resulting force distribution. This technique requires regularization done by a low-pass filter in the wavenumber domain. Apart from pressure-to-velocity holography at 5 cm, the reconstructed force distribution allows localizing the excitation point in the measurement area. FAT regularization is also shown to improve results as its cutoff wavenumber is optimized with the natural wavenumber of the plate. Lastly, quantitative force values are extracted from force distributions at all frequencies of the band 0-4 kHz studied and compared with the force spectrum measured directly by a piezoelectric sensor.

  10. Dynamical energy analysis for built-up acoustic systems at high frequencies.

    PubMed

    Chappell, D J; Giani, S; Tanner, G

    2011-09-01

    Standard methods for describing the intensity distribution of mechanical and acoustic wave fields in the high frequency asymptotic limit are often based on flow transport equations. Common techniques are statistical energy analysis, employed mostly in the context of vibro-acoustics, and ray tracing, a popular tool in architectural acoustics. Dynamical energy analysis makes it possible to interpolate between standard statistical energy analysis and full ray tracing, containing both of these methods as limiting cases. In this work a version of dynamical energy analysis based on a Chebyshev basis expansion of the Perron-Frobenius operator governing the ray dynamics is introduced. It is shown that the technique can efficiently deal with multi-component systems overcoming typical geometrical limitations present in statistical energy analysis. Results are compared with state-of-the-art hp-adaptive discontinuous Galerkin finite element simulations.

  11. Analysis of Acoustic Synthesizers for Passive Sonar Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-09-01

    Survey: Thirty-three Form lQ8 Work Unit Plars %..,ere studied. This information led to several contacts with various acvernment ornanizations. d. Source ... Study by TAEG, Naval Trainirn Fauipment Center (reference 7), see Appendix A. e. The above data was supplemented for facilities that had ar acoustic

  12. Design and performance analysis of digital acoustic underwater telemetry system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catipovic, J. A.; Baggeroer, A. B.; Vonderheydt, K.; Koelsch, D. E.

    1985-11-01

    The work discusses the design and performance characteristics of a Digital Acoustic Telemetry System (DATS) which incorporates the current state-of-the-art technology and is capable of reliable data transmission at rates useful to a wide range of ocean exploration and development gear.

  13. Acoustical facies analysis at the Ba Lat delta front (Red River Delta, North Vietnam)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Bergh, G. D.; van Weering, Tj. C. E.; Boels, J. F.; Duc, D. M.; Nhuan, M. T.

    2007-02-01

    A shallow penetrating, high-resolution acoustic study was performed in the Ba Lat delta, the major distributary of the Red River System in Northern Vietnam. An acoustic facies map was constructed and the various facies types were validated through analysis of bottom sediments, by a study of gravity cores collected at 22 stations. Analysis of the acoustic profiles and gravity cores revealed the presence of an asymmetrical, S to SW prograding prodelta lobe, in accordance with the prevailing longshore currents to the S. The southern part of this prodelta is detached from the protruding Ba Lat delta front. The prodelta is dominated by muddy sediments with minor thin (<5 cm) sandy and silty layers. The coarser-grained layers decrease in abundance away from the Ba Lat river mouth. Offshore, the modern delta deposits are characterized by an off-lapping contact over a semi-prolonged bottom reflector lacking any sub-bottom reflectors. This semi-prolonged bottom reflector is correlated with sandy deposits of presumably Early Holocene age. Bottom and coastal erosion is restricted to two areas N and SW of the Ba Lat. Erosion in the North is inferred to be due to reduced sediment supply as a result of shifting in 1971 of the main outlet to its present, more southern location. The erosional area along the Hai Hau coast SW of the Ba Lat also has experienced a reduction in sediment supply in the course of the 20th century, when the local Song Vop distributary channel became less active and was completely dammed in the 1970s. Most sediment supplied by the Ba Lat at present bypasses the Hai Hau erosional coastal zone, as the active part of the Ba Lat prodelta is detached from the coast SW of the Ba Lat. An active, NNE-SSW trending fault system with surface expression is located along the offshore edge of the prodelta, and is linked to deeper fault structures in this active neotectonic region. Subsurface reflectors are folded in the vicinity of the fault.

  14. Quantitative Analysis Of Acoustic Emission From Rock Fracture Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodfellow, Sebastian David

    This thesis aims to advance the methods of quantitative acoustic emission (AE) analysis by calibrating sensors, characterizing sources, and applying the results to solve engi- neering problems. In the first part of this thesis, we built a calibration apparatus and successfully calibrated two commercial AE sensors. The ErgoTech sensor was found to have broadband velocity sensitivity and the Panametrics V103 was sensitive to surface normal displacement. These calibration results were applied to two AE data sets from rock fracture experiments in order to characterize the sources of AE events. The first data set was from an in situ rock fracture experiment conducted at the Underground Research Laboratory (URL). The Mine-By experiment was a large scale excavation response test where both AE (10 kHz - 1 MHz) and microseismicity (MS) (1 Hz - 10 kHz) were monitored. Using the calibration information, magnitude, stress drop, dimension and energy were successfully estimated for 21 AE events recorded in the tensile region of the tunnel wall. Magnitudes were in the range -7.5 < Mw < -6.8, which is consistent with other laboratory AE results, and stress drops were within the range commonly observed for induced seismicity in the field (0.1 - 10 MPa). The second data set was AE collected during a true-triaxial deformation experiment, where the objectives were to characterize laboratory AE sources and identify issues related to moving the analysis from ideal in situ conditions to more complex laboratory conditions in terms of the ability to conduct quantitative AE analysis. We found AE magnitudes in the range -7.8 < Mw < -6.7 and as with the in situ data, stress release was within the expected range of 0.1 - 10 MPa. We identified four major challenges to quantitative analysis in the laboratory, which in- hibited our ability to study parameter scaling (M0 ∝ fc -3 scaling). These challenges were 0c (1) limited knowledge of attenuation which we proved was continuously evolving, (2

  15. Surface Acoustic Wave Monitor for Deposition and Analysis of Ultra-Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Jacqueline H. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW) based thin film deposition monitor device and system for monitoring the deposition of ultra-thin films and nanomaterials and the analysis thereof is characterized by acoustic wave device embodiments that include differential delay line device designs, and which can optionally have integral reference devices fabricated on the same substrate as the sensing device, or on a separate device in thermal contact with the film monitoring/analysis device, in order to provide inherently temperature compensated measurements. These deposition monitor and analysis devices can include inherent temperature compensation, higher sensitivity to surface interactions than quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) devices, and the ability to operate at extreme temperatures.

  16. Acoustic vibration analysis for utilization of woody plant in space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chida, Yukari; Yamashita, Masamichi; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Sato, Seigo; Tomita-Yokotani, Kaori; Baba, Keiichi; Suzuki, Toshisada; Motohashi, Kyohei; Sakurai, Naoki; Nakagawa-izumi, Akiko

    2012-07-01

    We are proposing to raise woody plants for space agriculture in Mars. Space agriculture has the utilization of wood in their ecosystem. Nobody knows the real tree shape grown under space environment under the low or micro gravitational conditions such as outer environment. Angiosperm tree forms tension wood for keeping their shape. Tension wood formation is deeply related to gravity, but the details of the mechanism of its formation has not yet been clarified. For clarifying the mechanism, the space experiment in international space station, ISS is the best way to investigate about them as the first step. It is necessary to establish the easy method for crews who examine the experiments at ISS. Here, we are proposing to investigate the possibility of the acoustic vibration analysis for the experiment at ISS. Two types of Japanese cherry tree, weeping and upright types in Prunus sp., were analyzed by the acoustic vibration method. Coefficient-of-variation (CV) of sound speed was calculated by the acoustic vibration analysis. The amount of lignin and decomposed lignin were estimated by both Klason and Py-GC/MS method, respectively. The relationships of the results of acoustic vibration analysis and the inner components in tested woody materials were investigated. After the experiments, we confirm the correlation about them. Our results indicated that the acoustic vibration analysis would be useful for determining the inside composition as a nondestructive method in outer space environment.

  17. Integrated Modeling and Analysis of Physical Oceanographic and Acoustic Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    Oceanographic and Acoustic Processes Timothy F. Duda Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering Department, MS 11 Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Woods... Hole , MA 02543 phone: (508) 289-2495 fax: (508) 457-2194 email: tduda@whoi.edu James F. Lynch Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering...Department, MS 11 Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Woods Hole , MA 02543 phone: (508) 289-2230 fax: (508) 457-2194 email: jlynch@whoi.edu Ying

  18. Perceptually-Driven Signal Analysis for Acoustic Event Classification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-26

    study of musical timbre . Defined as "the subjective attribute of sound which differentiates two or more sounds that have the same loudness, pitch and...therefore a better estimate of the likelihood function. 56 Bibliography [1] J. M. Grey, -AMultidimensional perceptual scaling of musical timbres ...Display, 2005. [10] J. M. Grey, "Perceptual effects of spectral modifications on musical timbres ," Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, vol. 63

  19. MOCHA: Multi-Study Ocean Acoustics Human Effects Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    looking at other odontocetes ( killer whales , Risso’s dolphins, false killer whale , melon- headed whale ) and are now beginning to focus on pilot whales ...ranging killer whales . Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. [submitted] Southall, B.L., Moretti, D.J., Abraham, B., Calambokidis, J., DeRuiter...scientists of existing BRS projects (Sirena sonar trials on sperm whales , Bahamas BRS, SOCAL BRS, Norwegian 3S and 3S2, Cape Hatteras EK60

  20. Integrated Modeling and Analysis of Physical Oceanographic and Acoustic Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    in the abyssal oceans , where typically SIW/Stopo > 1 for tall seamounts and ridges , the entire bottom topography contributes to the generation of...internal waves. In contrast, for (a) (b) 18 moderate ocean depths (say less than 4 km), where typically SIW/Stopo < 1 for seamounts and ridges , the...Oceanographic and Acoustic Processes Timothy F. Duda Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering Department, MS 11 Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods

  1. Integrated Modeling and Analysis of Physical Oceanographic and Acoustic Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    deVries type wave evolution equations and 2D NHP numerical models. 3. Improved 4D deterministic and stochastic acoustic modeling. Improvements to time...Specifically, an analog of the rotation-neglecting Taylor-Goldstein equation was solved , after making reasonable simplifying assumptions. The...positions and sizes than the full NHP model (task 1), but may sacrifice detail and accuracy. Candidate models include those based on Korteweg

  2. Asymptotic Analysis of Ocean Bottom Reflected Acoustic Fields.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    dependence(e-i’t), the reflected spatial part of the acoustic pressure field P in a homogeneous medium due to a point source placed in that medium...reasonable to assume that the water colunm is homogeneous , especially for experiments which involve small source and receiver heights. In many abyssal plain...configuration, a homogeneous layer between two homo- eneous halfspaces. Using a modified uniform asymptotic method, Stickler and Ahluwalia[12] obtained

  3. Analysis of the Acoustic Response of a Railroad Bridge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    atmospheric explosions, surf, missiles, rockets, weather systems and even animal vocalizations [1]. In order for up-going infrasonic energy to be...systems – Animal vocalizations – Urban Noise* PREMISE: Structures generate coupled low-frequency acoustics as fundamental modes of motion What is...rating tests: – Strain Gages (44 Used) • Main Structural Elements – One Train Engine Stringer Bottom Chord Diagonal Chord Diagonal Floor Beam Top

  4. Acoustic effects analysis utilizing speckle pattern with fixed-particle Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakili, Ali; Hollmann, Joseph A.; Holt, R. Glynn; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2016-03-01

    Optical imaging in a turbid medium is limited because of multiple scattering a photon undergoes while traveling through the medium. Therefore, optical imaging is unable to provide high resolution information deep in the medium. In the case of soft tissue, acoustic waves unlike light, can travel through the medium with negligible scattering. However, acoustic waves cannot provide medically relevant contrast as good as light. Hybrid solutions have been applied to use the benefits of both imaging methods. A focused acoustic wave generates a force inside an acoustically absorbing medium known as acoustic radiation force (ARF). ARF induces particle displacement within the medium. The amount of displacement is a function of mechanical properties of the medium and the applied force. To monitor the displacement induced by the ARF, speckle pattern analysis can be used. The speckle pattern is the result of interfering optical waves with different phases. As light travels through the medium, it undergoes several scattering events. Hence, it generates different scattering paths which depends on the location of the particles. Light waves that travel along these paths have different phases (different optical path lengths). ARF induces displacement to scatterers within the acoustic focal volume, and changes the optical path length. In addition, temperature rise due to conversion of absorbed acoustic energy to heat, changes the index of refraction and therefore, changes the optical path length of the scattering paths. The result is a change in the speckle pattern. Results suggest that the average change in the speckle pattern measures the displacement of particles and temperature rise within the acoustic wave focal area, hence can provide mechanical and thermal properties of the medium.

  5. A New Acoustic Portal into the Odontocete Ear and Vibrational Analysis of the Tympanoperiotic Complex

    PubMed Central

    Cranford, Ted W.; Krysl, Petr; Amundin, Mats

    2010-01-01

    Global concern over the possible deleterious effects of noise on marine organisms was catalyzed when toothed whales stranded and died in the presence of high intensity sound. The lack of knowledge about mechanisms of hearing in toothed whales prompted our group to study the anatomy and build a finite element model to simulate sound reception in odontocetes. The primary auditory pathway in toothed whales is an evolutionary novelty, compensating for the impedance mismatch experienced by whale ancestors as they moved from hearing in air to hearing in water. The mechanism by which high-frequency vibrations pass from the low density fats of the lower jaw into the dense bones of the auditory apparatus is a key to understanding odontocete hearing. Here we identify a new acoustic portal into the ear complex, the tympanoperiotic complex (TPC) and a plausible mechanism by which sound is transduced into the bony components. We reveal the intact anatomic geometry using CT scanning, and test functional preconceptions using finite element modeling and vibrational analysis. We show that the mandibular fat bodies bifurcate posteriorly, attaching to the TPC in two distinct locations. The smaller branch is an inconspicuous, previously undescribed channel, a cone-shaped fat body that fits into a thin-walled bony funnel just anterior to the sigmoid process of the TPC. The TPC also contains regions of thin translucent bone that define zones of differential flexibility, enabling the TPC to bend in response to sound pressure, thus providing a mechanism for vibrations to pass through the ossicular chain. The techniques used to discover the new acoustic portal in toothed whales, provide a means to decipher auditory filtering, beam formation, impedance matching, and transduction. These tools can also be used to address concerns about the potential deleterious effects of high-intensity sound in a broad spectrum of marine organisms, from whales to fish. PMID:20694149

  6. The last glaciation and deglaciation of the Northeast Greenland continental shelf revealed by hydro-acoustic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arndt, Jan Erik; Jokat, Wilfried; Dorschel, Boris

    2017-03-01

    About 16% of the Greenland Ice Sheet drains in the area of the Northeast Greenland shelf between 76°N and 80.5°N via marine terminating glaciers. Most of it is via the Northeast Greenland Ice Stream, the largest ice stream of Greenland. During ice ages, the ice sheet extended onto the continental shelf and modern-day cross-shelf troughs were filled by ice streams. In this study, high-resolution hydro-acoustic data acquired during three decades of research were jointly investigated to reveal the past glacial conditions. Our data shows that Westwind Trough and Norske Trough were filled by fast flowing ice streams that extended to the shelf edge during the last glacial maximum. In between the cross-shelf troughs, ice domes resided on shallow banks that may have contributed about a decimetre to global sea level. Most probably these ice domes initiated fast ice flow through sinks in the inter-trough area. In Westwind Trough, ice sheet retreat to the inner shelf after the last glacial maximum was intermittent. In contrast, in Norske Trough the ice sheet retreat appears relatively rapid with no evidences for phases of grounding line stabilization. Probably during the Younger Dryas, the ice sheet readvanced to a mid-shelf position in both troughs documented by grounding zone wedges. During this time, a thick ice shelf was present in Norske Trough releasing tabular icebergs. Ice sheet retreat from the mid-shelf to the coastline during Holocene deglaciation was rapid.

  7. Acoustic emission analysis: A test method for metal joints bonded by adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockmann, W.; Fischer, T.

    1978-01-01

    Acoustic emission analysis is applied to study adhesive joints which had been subjected to mechanical and climatic stresses, taking into account conditions which make results applicable to adhesive joints used in aerospace technology. Specimens consisting of the alloy AlMgSi0.5 were used together with a phenolic resin adhesive, an epoxy resin modified with a polyamide, and an epoxy resin modified with a nitrile. Results show that the acoustic emission analysis provides valuable information concerning the behavior of adhesive joints under load and climatic stresses.

  8. Acoustical analysis of trained and untrained singers onsite before and after prolonged voice use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Christophe E.

    Controlled acoustic environments are important in voice research. Recording environment affects the quality of voice recordings. While sound booths and anechoic chambers are examples of controlled acoustic environments widely used in research, they are both costly and not portable. The long-term goal of this project is to compare the voice usage and efficiency of trained and untrained singers onsite immediately before and after vocal performance. The specific goal of this project is the further of development a Portable Sound Booth (PSB) and standardization of onsite voice recording procedures under controlled conditions. We hypothesized that the simple and controlled acoustic environment provided by the PSB would enable consistent reliable onsite voice recordings and the immediate differences as a consequence of voice usage were measurable. Research has suggested that it would be possible to conduct onsite voice recordings. Proof of concept research titled "Construction and Characterization of a Portable Sound Booth for Onsite Measurement" was conducted before initiating the full research effort. Preliminary findings revealed that: (1) it was possible to make high-quality voice recordings onsite, (2) the use of a Portable Sound Booth (PSB) required further acoustic characterization of its inherent acoustic properties, and (3) testable differences before and after performance were evident. The specific aims were to (1) develop and refine onsite objective voice measurements in the PSB and (2) evaluate use of the PSB to measure voice quality changes before and after voice usage.

  9. Quantitative interactome analysis reveals a chemoresistant edgotype

    PubMed Central

    Chavez, Juan D.; Schweppe, Devin K.; Eng, Jimmy K.; Zheng, Chunxiang; Taipale, Alex; Zhang, Yiyi; Takara, Kohji; Bruce, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Chemoresistance is a common mode of therapy failure for many cancers. Tumours develop resistance to chemotherapeutics through a variety of mechanisms, with proteins serving pivotal roles. Changes in protein conformations and interactions affect the cellular response to environmental conditions contributing to the development of new phenotypes. The ability to understand how protein interaction networks adapt to yield new function or alter phenotype is limited by the inability to determine structural and protein interaction changes on a proteomic scale. Here, chemical crosslinking and mass spectrometry were employed to quantify changes in protein structures and interactions in multidrug-resistant human carcinoma cells. Quantitative analysis of the largest crosslinking-derived, protein interaction network comprising 1,391 crosslinked peptides allows for ‘edgotype' analysis in a cell model of chemoresistance. We detect consistent changes to protein interactions and structures, including those involving cytokeratins, topoisomerase-2-alpha, and post-translationally modified histones, which correlate with a chemoresistant phenotype. PMID:26235782

  10. Thermal Acoustic Oscillation: Causes, Detection, Analysis, and Prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christie, R. J.; Hartwig, J. W.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal Acoustic Oscillations (TAO) can occur in cryogenic systems and produce significant sources of heat. This source of heat can increase the boil off rate of cryogenic propellants in spacecraft storage tanks and reduce mission life. This paper discusses the causes of TAO, how it can be detected, what analyses can be done to predict it, and how to prevent it from occurring.The paper provides practical insight into what can aggravate instability, practical methods for mitigation, and when TAO does not occur. A real life example of a cryogenic system with an unexpected heat source is discussed, along with how TAO was confirmed and eliminated.

  11. An Analysis of the Transient Responses of Acoustic Delay Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okano, Tatsuo; Tominaga, Goroh

    1981-09-01

    Transient responses of acoustic delay lines (ADLs) were simulated on the assumptions that gas molecules in each segment of an ADL were in thermal equilibrium and that the straight-through component in the intruding gas was negligibly small. The flow rate of gas through an orifice was evaluated by using expressions of orifice conductance applicable in a wide pressure range. In order to examine the adequateness of the present method, the results of simulations were compared with several experimental data. The influence of the location of vacuum pumps and of arranging a high speed shutter at the entrance of an ADL were also simulated.

  12. Acoustic Analysis of Plutonium and Nuclear Weapon Components at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, T. A.; Reynolds, J. J.; Rowe, C. A.; Freibert, F. J.; Ten Cate, J. A.; Ulrich, T. J.; Farrow, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    One of the primary missions of Los Alamos National Laboratory is to use science based techniques to certify the nuclear weapons stockpile of the United States. As such we use numerous NDE techniques to monitor materials and systems properties in weapons. Two techniques will be discussed in this presentation, Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy (ARS) and Acoustic Emission (AE). ARS is used to observe manufacturing variations or changes in the plutonium containing component (pit) of the weapon system. Both quantitative and qualitative comparisons can be used to determine variation in the pit components. Piezoelectric transducer driven acoustic resonance experiments will be described along with initial qualitative and more complex analysis and comparison techniques derived from earthquake analysis performed at LANL. Similarly, AE is used to measure the time of arrival of acoustic signals created by mechanical events that can occur in nuclear weapon components. Both traditional time of arrival techniques and more advanced techniques are used to pinpoint the location and type of acoustic emission event. Similar experiments on tensile tests of brittle phases of plutonium metal will be described.

  13. FRP/steel composite damage acoustic emission monitoring and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongsheng; Chen, Zhi

    2015-04-01

    FRP is a new material with good mechanical properties, such as high strength of extension, low density, good corrosion resistance and anti-fatigue. FRP and steel composite has gotten a wide range of applications in civil engineering because of its good performance. As the FRP/steel composite get more and more widely used, the monitor of its damage is also getting more important. To monitor this composite, acoustic emission (AE) is a good choice. In this study, we prepare four identical specimens to conduct our test. During the testing process, the AE character parameters and mechanics properties were obtained. Damaged properties of FRP/steel composite were analyzed through acoustic emission (AE) signals. By the growing trend of AE accumulated energy, the severity of the damage made on FRP/steel composite was estimated. The AE sentry function has been successfully used to study damage progression and fracture emerge release rate of composite laminates. This technique combines the cumulative AE energy with strain energy of the material rather than analyzes the AE information and mechanical separately.

  14. Acoustical analysis and multiple source auralizations of charismatic worship spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Richard W.

    2004-05-01

    Because of the spontaneity and high level of call and response, many charismatic churches have verbal and musical communication problems that stem from highly reverberant sound fields, poor speech intelligibility, and muddy music. This research looks at the subjective dimensions of room acoustics perception that affect a charismatic worship space, which is summarized using the acronym RISCS (reverberation, intimacy, strength, coloration, and spaciousness). The method of research is to obtain acoustical measurements for three worship spaces in order to analyze the objective parameters associated with the RISCS subjective dimensions. For the same spaces, binaural room impulse response (BRIR) measurements are done for different receiver positions in order to create an auralization for each position. The subjective descriptors of RISCS are analyzed through the use of listening tests of the three auralized spaces. The results from the measurements and listening tests are analyzed to determine if listeners' perceptions correlate with the objective parameter results, the appropriateness of the subjective parameters for the use of the space, and which parameters seem to take precedent. A comparison of the multi-source auralization to a conventional single-source auralization was done with the mixed down version of the synchronized multi-track anechoic signals.

  15. Analysis of acoustic reduction using spectral similarity measures.

    PubMed

    Hämäläinen, Annika; Gubian, Michele; ten Bosch, Louis; Boves, Lou

    2009-12-01

    Articulatory and acoustic reduction can manifest itself in the temporal and spectral domains. This study introduces a measure of spectral reduction, which is based on the speech decoding techniques commonly used in automatic speech recognizers. Using data for four frequent Dutch affixes from a large corpus of spontaneous face-to-face conversations, it builds on an earlier study examining the effects of lexical frequency on durational reduction in spoken Dutch [Pluymaekers, M. et al. (2005). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 118, 2561-2569], and compares the proposed measure of spectral reduction with duration as a measure of reduction. The results suggest that the spectral reduction scores capture other aspects of reduction than duration. While duration can--albeit to a moderate degree--be predicted by a number of linguistically motivated variables (such as word frequency, segmental context, and speech rate), the spectral reduction scores cannot. This suggests that the spectral reduction scores capture information that is not directly accounted for by the linguistically motivated variables. The results also show that the spectral reduction scores are able to predict a substantial amount of the variation in duration that the linguistically motivated variables do not account for.

  16. Feigned depression and feigned sleepiness: a voice acoustical analysis.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Nicole; Cannizzaro, Michael S; Harel, Brian T; Snyder, Peter J

    2004-07-01

    We sought to profile the voice acoustical correlates of simulated, or feigned depression by neurologically and psychiatrically healthy control subjects. We also sought to identify the voice acoustical correlates of feigned sleepiness for these same subjects. Twenty-two participants were asked to speak freely about a cartoon, to count from 1 to 10, and to sustain an "a" sound for approximately 5s. These exercises were completed three times (within the same testing session) with three differing sets of instructions to the participants. These three conditions were presented in pseudo-random order to control for any order effects, and all subjects were naïve to the intended purpose of this study. For all three conditions, mean speaking rates and pitch ranges were calculated. A series of paired t tests showed significant differences in the speaking rates (counting numbers and free-speech exercises) between the 'normal' and feigned sleepy conditions, and between the normal and feigned depression conditions, but not between the 'sleepy' and 'depressed' conditions. The results for pitch range, for all speech exercises, were not different between the normal and either the feigned depression or feigned sleepiness conditions. These results indicate that persons feigning depression and sleepiness demonstrate some level of conscious control of their speech rate, but they did not convincingly alter their pitch ranges while feigning depression or sleepiness.

  17. Acoustic Propagation Studies For Sperm Whale Phonation Analysis During LADC Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorovskaia, Natalia A.; Ioup, George E.; Ioup, Juliette W.; Caruthers, Jerald W.

    2004-11-01

    The Littoral Acoustic Demonstration Center (LADC) conducted a series of passive acoustic experiments in the Northern Gulf of Mexico and the Ligurian Sea in 2001 and 2002. Environmental and acoustic moorings were deployed in areas of large concentrations of marine mammals (mainly, sperm whales). Recordings and analysis of whale phonations are among the objectives of the project. Each mooring had a single autonomously recording hydrophone (Environmental Acoustic Recording System (EARS)) obtained from the U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office after modification to record signals up to 5,859 Hz in the Gulf of Mexico and up to 12,500 Hz in the Ligurian Sea. Self-recording environmental sensors, attached to the moorings, and concurrent environmental ship surveys provided the environmental data for the experiments. The results of acoustic simulations of long-range propagation of the broad-band (500-6,000 Hz) phonation pulses from a hypothetical whale location to the recording hydrophone in the experimental environments are presented. The utilization of the simulation results for an interpretation of the spectral features observed in whale clicks and for the development of tracking algorithms from single hydrophone recordings based on the identification of direct and surface and bottom reflected arrivals are discussed. [Research supported by ONR.

  18. A finite difference analysis of the field present behind an acoustically impenetrable two-layer barrier.

    PubMed

    Hurrell, Andrew M

    2008-06-01

    The interaction of an incident sound wave with an acoustically impenetrable two-layer barrier is considered. Of particular interest is the presence of several acoustic wave components in the shadow region of this barrier. A finite difference model capable of simulating this geometry is validated by comparison to the analytical solution for an idealized, hard-soft barrier. A panel comprising a high air-content closed cell foam backed with an elastic (metal) back plate is then examined. The insertion loss of this panel was found to exceed the dynamic range of the measurement system and was thus acoustically impenetrable. Experimental results from such a panel are shown to contain artifacts not present in the diffraction solution, when acoustic waves are incident upon the soft surface. A finite difference analysis of this experimental configuration replicates the presence of the additional field components. Furthermore, the simulated results allow the additional components to be identified as arising from the S(0) and A(0) Lamb modes traveling in the elastic plate. These Lamb mode artifacts are not found to be present in the shadow region when the acoustic waves are incident upon the elastic surface.

  19. Data-driven automated acoustic analysis of human infant vocalizations using neural network tools

    PubMed Central

    Warlaumont, Anne S.; Oller, D. Kimbrough; Buder, Eugene H.; Dale, Rick; Kozma, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Acoustic analysis of infant vocalizations has typically employed traditional acoustic measures drawn from adult speech acoustics, such as f0, duration, formant frequencies, amplitude, and pitch perturbation. Here an alternative and complementary method is proposed in which data-derived spectrographic features are central. 1-s-long spectrograms of vocalizations produced by six infants recorded longitudinally between ages 3 and 11 months are analyzed using a neural network consisting of a self-organizing map and a single-layer perceptron. The self-organizing map acquires a set of holistic, data-derived spectrographic receptive fields. The single-layer perceptron receives self-organizing map activations as input and is trained to classify utterances into prelinguistic phonatory categories (squeal, vocant, or growl), identify the ages at which they were produced, and identify the individuals who produced them. Classification performance was significantly better than chance for all three classification tasks. Performance is compared to another popular architecture, the fully supervised multilayer perceptron. In addition, the network’s weights and patterns of activation are explored from several angles, for example, through traditional acoustic measurements of the network’s receptive fields. Results support the use of this and related tools for deriving holistic acoustic features directly from infant vocalization data and for the automatic classification of infant vocalizations. PMID:20370038

  20. Data-driven automated acoustic analysis of human infant vocalizations using neural network tools.

    PubMed

    Warlaumont, Anne S; Oller, D Kimbrough; Buder, Eugene H; Dale, Rick; Kozma, Robert

    2010-04-01

    Acoustic analysis of infant vocalizations has typically employed traditional acoustic measures drawn from adult speech acoustics, such as f(0), duration, formant frequencies, amplitude, and pitch perturbation. Here an alternative and complementary method is proposed in which data-derived spectrographic features are central. 1-s-long spectrograms of vocalizations produced by six infants recorded longitudinally between ages 3 and 11 months are analyzed using a neural network consisting of a self-organizing map and a single-layer perceptron. The self-organizing map acquires a set of holistic, data-derived spectrographic receptive fields. The single-layer perceptron receives self-organizing map activations as input and is trained to classify utterances into prelinguistic phonatory categories (squeal, vocant, or growl), identify the ages at which they were produced, and identify the individuals who produced them. Classification performance was significantly better than chance for all three classification tasks. Performance is compared to another popular architecture, the fully supervised multilayer perceptron. In addition, the network's weights and patterns of activation are explored from several angles, for example, through traditional acoustic measurements of the network's receptive fields. Results support the use of this and related tools for deriving holistic acoustic features directly from infant vocalization data and for the automatic classification of infant vocalizations.

  1. Continuous adjoint sensitivity analysis for aerodynamic and acoustic optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghayour, Kaveh

    1999-11-01

    A gradient-based shape optimization methodology based on continuous adjoint sensitivities has been developed for two-dimensional steady Euler equations on unstructured meshes and the unsteady transonic small disturbance equation. The continuous adjoint sensitivities of the Helmholtz equation for acoustic applications have also been derived and discussed. The highlights of the developments for the steady two-dimensional Euler equations are the generalization of the airfoil surface boundary condition of the adjoint system to allow a proper closure of the Lagrangian functional associated with a general cost functional and the results for an inverse problem with density as the prescribed target. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that a transformation to the natural coordinate system, in conjunction with the reduction of the governing state equations to the control surface, results in sensitivity integrals that are only a function of the tangential derivatives of the state variables. This approach alleviates the need for directional derivative computations with components along the normal to the control surface, which can render erroneous results. With regard to the unsteady transonic small disturbance equation (UTSD), the continuous adjoint methodology has been successfully extended to unsteady flows. It has been demonstrated that for periodic airfoil oscillations leading to limit-cycle behavior, the Lagrangian functional can be only closed if the time interval of interest spans one or more periods of the flow oscillations after the limit-cycle has been attained. The steady state and limit-cycle sensitivities are then validated by comparing with the brute-force derivatives. The importance of accounting for the flow circulation sensitivity, appearing in the form of a Dirac delta in the wall boundary condition at the trailing edge, has been stressed and demonstrated. Remarkably, the cost of an unsteady adjoint solution is about 0.2 times that of a UTSD solution

  2. Wavelet analysis of baryon acoustic structures in the galaxy distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnalte-Mur, P.; Labatie, A.; Clerc, N.; Martínez, V. J.; Starck, J.-L.; Lachièze-Rey, M.; Saar, E.; Paredes, S.

    2012-06-01

    Context. Baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) are imprinted in the density field by acoustic waves travelling in the plasma of the early universe. Their fixed scale can be used as a standard ruler to study the geometry of the universe. Aims: The BAO have been previously detected using correlation functions and power spectra of the galaxy distribution. We present a new method to detect the real-space structures associated with BAO. These baryon acoustic structures are spherical shells of relatively small density contrast, surrounding high density central regions. Methods: We design a specific wavelet adapted to search for shells, and exploit the physics of the process by making use of two different mass tracers, introducing a specific statistic to detect the BAO features. We show the effect of the BAO signal in this new statistic when applied to the Λ - cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model, using an analytical approximation to the transfer function. We confirm the reliability and stability of our method by using cosmological N-body simulations from the MareNostrum Institut de Ciències de l'Espai (MICE). Results: We apply our method to the detection of BAO in a galaxy sample drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We use the "main" catalogue to trace the shells, and the luminous red galaxies (LRG) as tracers of the high density central regions. Using this new method, we detect, with a high significance, that the LRG in our sample are preferentially located close to the centres of shell-like structures in the density field, with characteristics similar to those expected from BAO. We show that stacking selected shells, we can find their characteristic density profile. Conclusions: We delineate a new feature of the cosmic web, the BAO shells. As these are real spatial structures, the BAO phenomenon can be studied in detail by examining those shells. Full Table 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  3. Analysis of Fumarole Acoustics at Aso Volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, K. F.; Yokoo, A.; Fee, D.; Huang, Y. C.; Yoshikawa, S.; Utsugi, M.; Minami, T.; Ohkura, T.

    2015-12-01

    The lowermost portion of large eruption columns is the momentum-driven, fluid flow portion known as a volcanic jet. The perturbation of the atmosphere from this region produces a sound known as jetting or jet noise. Recent work has shown that this volcanic jet noise produced by a volcano has similar characteristics as the sound from jet and rocket engines. The study of volcanic jet noise has gained much from laboratory jet engine studies; however, jet engines have been engineered to reduce noise thereby limiting their use as a comparison tool to the complex, ever-changing volcanic jet. Previous studies have noted that fumaroles produce jet noise without further detailed investigation. The goal of this work is to enhance our understanding of large-scale volcanic jets by studying an accessible, less hazardous fumarolic jet. We aim to characterize the acoustic signature of fumaroles and evaluate if fumarolic jets scale to that of large volcanic jets. To investigate this, we deployed a 6-element acoustic array at two different locations along the edge of the crater wall at Aso Volcano, Japan from early July through mid-August 2015. Approximately two months before this deployment, the pyroclastic cone within Aso's crater partially collapsed into the vent. The cone was constructed during both ash venting and strombolian-style explosive activity in the last year. After the deployment, on July 13 a new small vent opened on the southwest flank of the pyroclastic cone. The vent is several meters in diameter and has consistent gas jetting which produces audible jet noise. To better capture the acoustic signature of the gas jetting we moved the array to the southwestern edge of the crater. The array is 230 meters from the vent and is positioned 54 degrees from the vertical jet axis, a recording angle usually not feasible in volcanic environments. Preliminary investigations suggest directionality at the source and the influence of topography along the propagation path as

  4. Acoustic Analysis of the Tremulous Voice: Assessing the Utility of the Correlation Dimension and Perturbation Parameters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shao, Jun; MacCallum, Julia K.; Zhang, Yu; Sprecher, Alicia; Jiang, Jack J.

    2010-01-01

    Acoustic analysis may provide a useful means to quantitatively characterize the tremulous voice. Signals were obtained from 25 subjects with diagnoses of either Parkinson's disease or vocal polyps exhibiting vocal tremor. These were compared to signals from 24 subjects with normal voices. Signals were analyzed via correlation dimension and several…

  5. Automated pattern analysis: A newsilent partner in insect acoustic detection studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This seminar reviews methods that have been developed for automated analysis of field-collected sounds used to estimate pest populations and guide insect pest management decisions. Several examples are presented of successful usage of acoustic technology to map insect distributions in field environ...

  6. Quantitative and Descriptive Comparison of Four Acoustic Analysis Systems: Vowel Measurements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burris, Carlyn; Vorperian, Houri K.; Fourakis, Marios; Kent, Ray D.; Bolt, Daniel M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines accuracy and comparability of 4 trademarked acoustic analysis software packages (AASPs): Praat, WaveSurfer, TF32, and CSL by using synthesized and natural vowels. Features of AASPs are also described. Method: Synthesized and natural vowels were analyzed using each of the AASP's default settings to secure 9…

  7. Analysis of random structure-acoustic interaction problems using coupled boundary element and finite element methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh; Pates, Carl S., III

    1994-01-01

    A coupled boundary element (BEM)-finite element (FEM) approach is presented to accurately model structure-acoustic interaction systems. The boundary element method is first applied to interior, two and three-dimensional acoustic domains with complex geometry configurations. Boundary element results are very accurate when compared with limited exact solutions. Structure-interaction problems are then analyzed with the coupled FEM-BEM method, where the finite element method models the structure and the boundary element method models the interior acoustic domain. The coupled analysis is compared with exact and experimental results for a simplistic model. Composite panels are analyzed and compared with isotropic results. The coupled method is then extended for random excitation. Random excitation results are compared with uncoupled results for isotropic and composite panels.

  8. A comprehensive strategy for the analysis of acoustic compressibility and optical deformability on single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tie; Bragheri, Francesca; Nava, Giovanni; Chiodi, Ilaria; Mondello, Chiara; Osellame, Roberto; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine; Cristiani, Ilaria; Minzioni, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    We realized an integrated microfluidic chip that allows measuring both optical deformability and acoustic compressibility on single cells, by optical stretching and acoustophoresis experiments respectively. Additionally, we propose a measurement protocol that allows evaluating the experimental apparatus parameters before performing the cell-characterization experiments, including a non-destructive method to characterize the optical force distribution inside the microchannel. The chip was used to study important cell-mechanics parameters in two human breast cancer cell lines, MCF7 and MDA-MB231. Results indicate that MDA-MB231 has both higher acoustic compressibility and higher optical deformability than MCF7, but statistical analysis shows that optical deformability and acoustic compressibility are not correlated parameters. This result suggests the possibility to use them to analyze the response of different cellular structures. We also demonstrate that it is possible to perform both measurements on a single cell, and that the order of the two experiments does not affect the retrieved values.

  9. A comprehensive strategy for the analysis of acoustic compressibility and optical deformability on single cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tie; Bragheri, Francesca; Nava, Giovanni; Chiodi, Ilaria; Mondello, Chiara; Osellame, Roberto; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine; Cristiani, Ilaria; Minzioni, Paolo

    2016-04-04

    We realized an integrated microfluidic chip that allows measuring both optical deformability and acoustic compressibility on single cells, by optical stretching and acoustophoresis experiments respectively. Additionally, we propose a measurement protocol that allows evaluating the experimental apparatus parameters before performing the cell-characterization experiments, including a non-destructive method to characterize the optical force distribution inside the microchannel. The chip was used to study important cell-mechanics parameters in two human breast cancer cell lines, MCF7 and MDA-MB231. Results indicate that MDA-MB231 has both higher acoustic compressibility and higher optical deformability than MCF7, but statistical analysis shows that optical deformability and acoustic compressibility are not correlated parameters. This result suggests the possibility to use them to analyze the response of different cellular structures. We also demonstrate that it is possible to perform both measurements on a single cell, and that the order of the two experiments does not affect the retrieved values.

  10. FY-93 noncontacting acoustic ultrasonic signature analysis development

    SciTech Connect

    Tow, D.M.; Rodriguez, J.G.; Williamson, R.L.; Blackwood, L.G.

    1994-04-01

    A noncontacting, long-standoff inspection system with proven capabilities in container fill identification has been under development at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The system detects subtle change in container vibration characteristics caused by differences in the physical properties of the fill materials. A container is inspected by acoustically inducting it to vibrate and sensing the vibrational response with a laser vibrometer. A standoff distance of several meters is feasible. In previous work the system proved to be a reliable means of distinguishing between munitions with a variety of chemical fills. During FY-93, the system was modified to improve performance and simplify operation. Other FY-93 accomplishments include progress in modeling the vibrational characteristics of containers and refinements to the statistical classification algorithms. Progress was also made in identifying other applications for this technology.

  11. Operational Performance Analysis of Passive Acoustic Monitoring for Killer Whales

    SciTech Connect

    Matzner, Shari; Fu, Tao; Ren, Huiying; Deng, Zhiqun; Sun, Yannan; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2011-09-30

    For the planned tidal turbine site in Puget Sound, WA, the main concern is to protect Southern Resident Killer Whales (SRKW) due to their Endangered Species Act status. A passive acoustic monitoring system is proposed because the whales emit vocalizations that can be detected by a passive system. The algorithm for detection is implemented in two stages. The first stage is an energy detector designed to detect candidate signals. The second stage is a spectral classifier that is designed to reduce false alarms. The evaluation presented here of the detection algorithm incorporates behavioral models of the species of interest, environmental models of noise levels and potential false alarm sources to provide a realistic characterization of expected operational performance.

  12. Sediment dynamics in paired High Arctic lakes revealed from high-resolution swath bathymetry and acoustic stratigraphy surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normandeau, A.; Lamoureux, S. F.; Lajeunesse, P.; Francus, P.

    2016-09-01

    High Arctic lakes are commonly used for paleoclimatic reconstructions because they are particularly sensitive to climate variability. However, the processes leading to sediment deposition and distribution in these lakes are often poorly understood. Here for the first time in the Canadian High Arctic, we present original data resulting from swath bathymetry and subbottom surveys carried out on two lakes at Cape Bounty, Melville Island. The results reveal the dynamic nature of the lakes, in which mass movement deposits and bedforms on the deltas reflect frequent slope instabilities and hyperpycnal flow activity. The analysis of the mass movement deposits reveals that small blocky debris flows/avalanches, debris flows, and a slide occurred during the Holocene. These mass movements are believed to have been triggered by earthquakes and potentially by permafrost thawing along the shoreline. Altogether, these mass movement deposits cover more than 30% of the lake floors. Additionally, the river deltas on both lakes were mapped and reveal the presence of several gullies and bedforms. The presence of gullies along the delta front indicates that hyperpycnal flows generated at the river mouth can transport sediment in different trajectories downslope, resulting in a different sediment accumulation pattern and record. The dynamic nature of these two lakes suggests that further analysis on sediment transport and distribution within Arctic lakes is required in order to improve paleoclimatic reconstructions.

  13. Acoustic Impedance Analysis with High-Frequency Ultrasound for Identification of Fatty Acid Species in the Liver.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kazuyo; Yoshida, Kenji; Maruyama, Hitoshi; Mamou, Jonathan; Yamaguchi, Tadashi

    2017-03-01

    Acoustic properties of free fatty acids present in the liver were studied as a possible basis for non-invasive ultrasonic diagnosis of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Acoustic impedance was measured for the following types of tissue samples: Four pathologic types of mouse liver, five kinds of FFAs in solvent and five kinds of FFAs in cultured Huh-7 cells. A transducer with an 80-MHz center frequency was incorporated into a scanning acoustic microscopy system. Acoustic impedance was calculated from the amplitude of the signal reflected from the specimen surface. The Kruskal-Wallis test revealed statistically significant differences (p < 0.01) in acoustic impedance not only among pathologic types, but also among the FFAs in solvent and in cultured Huh-7 cells. These results suggest that each of the FFAs, especially palmitate, oleate and palmitoleate acid, can be distinguished from each other, regardless of whether they were in solution or absorbed by cells.

  14. The immediate effects of acoustic trauma on excitation and inhibition in the inferior colliculus: A Wiener-kernel analysis.

    PubMed

    Heeringa, Amarins Nieske; van Dijk, Pim

    2016-01-01

    Noise-induced tinnitus and hyperacusis are thought to correspond to a disrupted balance between excitation and inhibition in the central auditory system. Excitation and inhibition are often studied using pure tones; however, these responses do not reveal inhibition within the excitatory pass band. Therefore, we used a Wiener-kernel analysis, complemented with singular value decomposition (SVD), to investigate the immediate effects of acoustic trauma on excitation and inhibition in the inferior colliculus (IC). Neural responses were recorded from the IC of three anesthetized albino guinea pigs before and immediately after a one-hour bilateral exposure to an 11-kHz tone of 124 dB SPL. Neural activity was recorded during the presentation of a 1-h continuous 70 dB SPL Gaussian-noise stimulus. Spike trains were subjected to Wiener-kernel analysis in which the second-order kernel was decomposed into excitatory and inhibitory components using SVD. Hearing thresholds between 3 and 22 kHz were elevated (13-47 dB) immediately after acoustic trauma. The presence and frequency tuning of excitation and inhibition in units with a low characteristic frequency (CF; < 3 kHz) was not affected, inhibition disappeared whereas excitation was not affected in mid-CF units (3 < CF < 11 kHz), and both excitation and inhibition disappeared in high-CF units (CF > 11 kHz). This specific differentiation could not be identified by tone-evoked receptive-field analysis, in which inhibitory responses disappeared in all units, along with excitatory responses in high-CF units. This study is the first to apply Wiener-kernel analysis, complemented with SVD, to study the effects of acoustic trauma on spike trains derived from the IC. With this analysis, a reduction of inhibition and preservation of good response thresholds was shown in mid-CF units immediately after acoustic trauma. These neurons may mediate noise-induced tinnitus and/or hyperacusis. Moreover, an immediate profound high

  15. Wear detection by means of wavelet-based acoustic emission analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baccar, D.; Söffker, D.

    2015-08-01

    Wear detection and monitoring during operation are complex and difficult tasks especially for materials under sliding conditions. Due to the permanent contact and repetitive motion, the material surface remains during tests non-accessible for optical inspection so that attrition of the contact partners cannot be easily detected. This paper introduces the relevant scientific components of reliable and efficient condition monitoring system for online detection and automated classification of wear phenomena by means of acoustic emission (AE) and advanced signal processing approaches. The related experiments were performed using a tribological system consisting of two martensitic plates, sliding against each other. High sensitive piezoelectric transducer was used to provide the continuous measurement of AE signals. The recorded AE signals were analyzed mainly by time-frequency analysis. A feature extraction module using a novel combination of Short-Time Fourier Transform (STFT) and Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) were used for the first time. A detailed correlation analysis between complex signal characteristics and the surface damage resulting from contact fatigue was investigated. Three wear process stages were detected and could be distinguished. To obtain quantitative and detailed information about different wear phases, the AE energy was calculated using STFT and decomposed into a suitable number of frequency levels. The individual energy distribution and the cumulative AE energy of each frequency components were analyzed using CWT. Results show that the behavior of individual frequency component changes when the wear state changes. Here, specific frequency ranges are attributed to the different wear states. The study reveals that the application of the STFT-/CWT-based AE analysis is an appropriate approach to distinguish and to interpret the different damage states occurred during sliding contact. Based on this results a new generation of condition monitoring

  16. Risk Factors of Acoustic Neuroma: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mantao; Fan, Zuoxu; Cao, Fei; Wang, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Many epidemiological studies have investigated environmental risk factors for the development of acoustic neuroma. However, these results are controversial. We conducted a meta-analysis of case-control studies to identify any potential relationship between history of noise exposure, smoking, allergic diseases, and risk of acoustic neuroma. Materials and Methods We searched PubMed to identify relevant articles. Two researchers evaluated the eligibility and extracted the data independently. Results Eleven case-control studies were included in our meta-analysis. Acoustic neuroma was found to be associated with leisure noise exposure [odds ratio (OR)=1.33, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.05–1.68], but not with occupational noise exposure and ever noise exposure (OR=1.20, 95% CI: 0.84–1.72 and OR=1.15, 95% CI: 0.80–1.65). The OR of acoustic neuroma for ever (versus never) smoking was 0.53 (95% CI: 0.30–0.94), while the subgroup analysis indicated ORs of 0.95 (95% CI: 0.81–1.10) and 0.49 (95% CI: 0.41–0.59) for ex-smoker and current smoker respectively. The ORs for asthma, eczema, and seasonal rhinitis were 0.98 (95% CI: 0.80–1.18), 0.91 (95% CI: 0.76–1.09), and 1.52 (95% CI: 0.90–2.54), respectively. Conclusion Our meta-analysis is suggestive of an elevated risk of acoustic neuroma among individuals who were ever exposed to leisure noise, but not to occupational noise. Our study also indicated a lower acoustic neuroma risk among ever and current cigarette smokers than never smokers, while there was no significant relationship for ex-smokers. No significant associations were found between acoustic neuroma and history of any allergic diseases, such as asthma, eczema, and seasonal rhinitis. PMID:26996581

  17. Analysis of clot formation with acoustic radiation force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, Francesco; Longo, Diane M.; Lawrence, Michael B.; Walker, William F.

    2002-04-01

    Inappropriate blood coagulation plays an important role in diseases including stroke, heart attack, and deep vein thrombosis (DVT). DVT arises when a blood clot forms in a large vein of the leg. DVT is detrimental because the blood flow may be partially or completely obstructed. More importantly, a potentially fatal situation may arise if part of the clot travels to the arteries in the lungs, forming a pulmonary embolism (PE). Characterization of the mechanical properties of DVT could improve diagnosis and suggest appropriate treatment. We are developing a technique to assess mechanical properties of forming thrombi. The technique uses acoustic radiation force as a means to produce small, localized displacements within the sample. Returned ultrasound echoes are processed to estimate the time dependent displacement of the sample. Appropriate mechanical modeling and signal processing produce plots depicting relative mechanical properties (relative elasticity and relative viscosity) and force-free parameters (time constant, damping ratio, and natural frequency). We present time displacement curves of blood samples obtained during coagulation, and show associated relative and force-free parameter plots. These results show that the Voigt model with added mass accurately characterizes blood behavior during clot formation.

  18. A two-beam acoustic system for tissue analysis.

    PubMed

    Sachs, T D; Janney, C D

    1977-03-01

    In the 'thermo-acoustic sensing technique' (TAST), a burst of sound, called the 'thermometer' beam is passed through tissue and its transit time is measured. A focused sound field, called the heating field, then warms a small volume in the path of the therometer beam, in proportion to the absorption. Finally, the therometer beam burst is repeated and its transit time subtracted from that of the initial thermometer burst. This difference measures the velocity perturbation in the tissue produced by the heating field. The transit time difference is td = K integral of infinity-infinity IP dchi where K is the instrument constant, I the heating field intensity, and P a perturbation factor which characterizes the tissues. The integration is carried out along the path of the thermometer beam. The perturbation factor is P = (formula: see text) where C is the specific heat, rho the denisty, V the velocity of sound, (formula: see text) the temperature coefficient of velocity and alpha the heating field absorption coefficient which is apparently sensitive to tissue structure and condition. Experiments on a fixed human brain showed an ability to distinguish between various tissue types combined with a spatial resolution of better than 3 mm. Should predictions based on the data and theory prove correct, TAST may become a non-invasive alternative to biopsy.

  19. Phase Time and Envelope Time in Time-Distance Analysis and Acoustic Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Dean-Yi; Duvall, Thomas L.; Sun, Ming-Tsung; Chang, Hsiang-Kuang; Jimenez, Antonio; Rabello-Soares, Maria Cristina; Ai, Guoxiang; Wang, Gwo-Ping; Goode Philip; Marquette, William; Ehgamberdiev, Shuhrat; Landenkov, Oleg

    1999-01-01

    Time-distance analysis and acoustic imaging are two related techniques to probe the local properties of solar interior. In this study, we discuss the relation of phase time and envelope time between the two techniques. The location of the envelope peak of the cross correlation function in time-distance analysis is identified as the travel time of the wave packet formed by modes with the same w/l. The phase time of the cross correlation function provides information of the phase change accumulated along the wave path, including the phase change at the boundaries of the mode cavity. The acoustic signals constructed with the technique of acoustic imaging contain both phase and intensity information. The phase of constructed signals can be studied by computing the cross correlation function between time series constructed with ingoing and outgoing waves. In this study, we use the data taken with the Taiwan Oscillation Network (TON) instrument and the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) instrument. The analysis is carried out for the quiet Sun. We use the relation of envelope time versus distance measured in time-distance analyses to construct the acoustic signals in acoustic imaging analyses. The phase time of the cross correlation function of constructed ingoing and outgoing time series is twice the difference between the phase time and envelope time in time-distance analyses as predicted. The envelope peak of the cross correlation function between constructed ingoing and outgoing time series is located at zero time as predicted for results of one-bounce at 3 mHz for all four data sets and two-bounce at 3 mHz for two TON data sets. But it is different from zero for other cases. The cause of the deviation of the envelope peak from zero is not known.

  20. Genetic, morphological, and acoustic evidence reveals lack of diversification in the colonization process in an island bird.

    PubMed

    Illera, Juan Carlos; Palmero, Ana M; Laiolo, Paola; Rodríguez, Felipe; Moreno, Ángel C; Navascués, Miguel

    2014-08-01

    Songbirds with recently (i.e., early Holocene) founded populations are suitable models for studying incipient differentiation in oceanic islands. On such systems each colonization event represents a different evolutionary episode that can be studied by addressing sets of diverging phenotypic and genetic traits. We investigate the process of early differentiation in the spectacled warbler (Sylvia conspicillata) in 14 populations separated by sea barriers from three Atlantic archipelagos and from continental regions spanning from tropical to temperate latitudes. Our approach involved the study of sexual acoustic signals, morphology, and genetic data. Mitochondrial DNA did not provide clear population structure. However, microsatellites analyses consistently identified two genetic groups, albeit without correspondence to subspecies classification and little correspondence to geography. Coalescent analyses showed significant evidence for gene flow between the two genetic groups. Discriminant analyses could not correctly assign morphological or acoustic traits to source populations. Therefore, although theory predicting that in isolated populations genetic, morphological, or acoustic traits can lead to radiation, we have strikingly failed to document differentiation on these attributes in a resident passerine throughout three oceanic archipelagos.

  1. Structure borne noise analysis using Helmholtz equation least squares based forced vibro acoustic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, Logesh Kumar

    This dissertation presents a structure-borne noise analysis technology that is focused on providing a cost-effective noise reduction strategy. Structure-borne sound is generated or transmitted through structural vibration; however, only a small portion of the vibration can effectively produce sound and radiate it to the far-field. Therefore, cost-effective noise reduction is reliant on identifying and suppressing the critical vibration components that are directly responsible for an undesired sound. However, current technologies cannot successfully identify these critical vibration components from the point of view of direct contribution to sound radiation and hence cannot guarantee the best cost-effective noise reduction. The technology developed here provides a strategy towards identifying the critical vibration components and methodically suppressing them to achieve a cost-effective noise reduction. The core of this technology is Helmholtz equation least squares (HELS) based nearfield acoustic holography method. In this study, the HELS formulations derived in spherical co-ordinates using spherical wave expansion functions utilize the input data of acoustic pressures measured in the nearfield of a vibrating object to reconstruct the vibro-acoustic responses on the source surface and acoustic quantities in the far field. Using these formulations, three steps were taken to achieve the goal. First, hybrid regularization techniques were developed to improve the reconstruction accuracy of normal surface velocity of the original HELS method. Second, correlations between the surface vibro-acoustic responses and acoustic radiation were factorized using singular value decomposition to obtain orthogonal basis known here as the forced vibro-acoustic components (F-VACs). The F-VACs enables one to identify the critical vibration components for sound radiation in a similar manner that modal decomposition identifies the critical natural modes in a structural vibration. Finally

  2. High transmission acoustic focusing by impedance-matched acoustic meta-surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Jahdali, Rasha; Wu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Impedance is an important issue in the design of acoustic lenses because mismatched impedance is detrimental to real focusing applications. Here, we report two designs of acoustic lenses that focus acoustic waves in water and air, respectively. They are tailored by acoustic meta-surfaces, which are rigid thin plates decorated with periodically distributed sub-wavelength slits. Their respective building blocks are constructed from the coiling-up spaces in water and the layered structures in air. Analytic analysis based on coupled-mode theory and transfer matrix reveals that the impedances of the lenses are matched to those of the background media. With these impedance-matched acoustic lenses, we demonstrate the acoustic focusing effect by finite-element simulations.

  3. Modeling and Sensitivity Analysis of Acoustic Release of Doxorubicin from Unstabilized Pluronic P105 using an Artificial Neural Network Model

    PubMed Central

    Husseini, Ghaleb A.; Abdel-Jabbar, Nabil M.; Mjalli, Farouq S.; Pitt, William G.

    2007-01-01

    This paper models steady state acoustic release of Doxorubicin (Dox) from Pluronic P105 micelles using Artificial Neural Networks (ANN). Previously collected release data were compiled and used to train, validate, and test an ANN model. Sensitivity analysis was then performed on the following operating conditions: ultrasonic frequency, power density, Pluronic P105 concentration, and temperature. The model showed that drug release was most efficient at lower frequencies. The analysis also demonstrated that release increases as the power density increases. Sensitivity plots of ultrasound intensity revealed a drug release threshold of 0.015 W/cm2 and 0.38 W/cm2 at 20 and 70 kHz, respectively. The presence of a power density threshold provides strong evidence that cavitation plays an important role in acoustically activated drug release from polymeric micelles. Based on the developed model, Dox release is not a strong function of temperature, suggesting that thermal effects do not play a major role in the physical mechanism involved. Finally, sensitivity plots of P105 concentration indicated that higher release was observed at lower copolymer concentrations. PMID:17241100

  4. Acoustic neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Vestibular schwannoma; Tumor - acoustic; Cerebellopontine angle tumor; Angle tumor; Hearing loss - acoustic; Tinnitus - acoustic ... Acoustic neuromas have been linked with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). Acoustic neuromas are uncommon.

  5. Synergy of seismic, acoustic, and video signals in blast analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.P.; Stump, B.W.; Weigand, J.

    1997-09-01

    The range of mining applications from hard rock quarrying to coal exposure to mineral recovery leads to a great variety of blasting practices. A common characteristic of many of the sources is that they are detonated at or near the earth`s surface and thus can be recorded by camera or video. Although the primary interest is in the seismic waveforms that these blasts generate, the visual observations of the blasts provide important constraints that can be applied to the physical interpretation of the seismic source function. In particular, high speed images can provide information on detonation times of individuals charges, the timing and amount of mass movement during the blasting process and, in some instances, evidence of wave propagation away from the source. All of these characteristics can be valuable in interpreting the equivalent seismic source function for a set of mine explosions and quantifying the relative importance of the different processes. This paper documents work done at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and Southern Methodist University to take standard Hi-8 video of mine blasts, recover digital images from them, and combine them with ground motion records for interpretation. The steps in the data acquisition, processing, display, and interpretation are outlined. The authors conclude that the combination of video with seismic and acoustic signals can be a powerful diagnostic tool for the study of blasting techniques and seismology. A low cost system for generating similar diagnostics using consumer-grade video camera and direct-to-disk video hardware is proposed. Application is to verification of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty.

  6. Analysis of acoustic and entropy disturbances in a hypersonic wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilden, Thomas; Schröder, Wolfgang; Ali, Syed Raza Christopher; Schreyer, Anne-Marie; Wu, Jie; Radespiel, Rolf

    2016-05-01

    The tunnel noise in a Mach 5.9 Ludwieg tube is determined by two methods, a newly developed cone-probe-DNS method and a reliable hot-wire-Pitot-probe method. The new method combines pressure and heat flux measurements using a cone probe and direct numerical simulation (DNS). The modal analysis is based on transfer functions obtained by the DNS to link the measured quantities to the tunnel noise. The measurements are performed for several unit-Reynolds numbers in the range of 5 ṡ 106 ≤ Re/m ≤ 16 ṡ 106 and probe positions to identify the sensitivities of tunnel noise. The DNS solutions show similar response mechanisms of the cone probe to incident acoustic and entropy waves which leads to high condition numbers of the transfer matrix such that a unique relationship between response and source mechanism can be only determined by neglecting the contribution of the non-acoustic modes to the pressure and heat flux fluctuations. The results of the cone-probe-DNS method are compared to a modal analysis based on the hot-wire-Pitot-probe method which provides reliable results in the frequency range less than 50 kHz. In this low frequency range the findings of the two different mode analyses agree well. At higher frequencies, the newly developed cone-probe-DNS method is still valid. The tunnel noise is dominated by the acoustic mode, since the entropy mode is lower by one order of magnitude and the vorticity mode can be neglected. The acoustic mode is approximately 0.5% at 30 kHz and the cone-probe-DNS data illustrate the acoustic mode to decrease and to asymptotically approach 0.2%.

  7. Effects of different analysis techniques and recording duty cycles on passive acoustic monitoring of killer whales.

    PubMed

    Riera, Amalis; Ford, John K; Ross Chapman, N

    2013-09-01

    Killer whales in British Columbia are at risk, and little is known about their winter distribution. Passive acoustic monitoring of their year-round habitat is a valuable supplemental method to traditional visual and photographic surveys. However, long-term acoustic studies of odontocetes have some limitations, including the generation of large amounts of data that require highly time-consuming processing. There is a need to develop tools and protocols to maximize the efficiency of such studies. Here, two types of analysis, real-time and long term spectral averages, were compared to assess their performance at detecting killer whale calls in long-term acoustic recordings. In addition, two different duty cycles, 1/3 and 2/3, were tested. Both the use of long term spectral averages and a lower duty cycle resulted in a decrease in call detection and positive pod identification, leading to underestimations of the amount of time the whales were present. The impact of these limitations should be considered in future killer whale acoustic surveys. A compromise between a lower resolution data processing method and a higher duty cycle is suggested for maximum methodological efficiency.

  8. Numerical acoustic analysis of a turbulent flow around a bluff body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cianferra, Marta; Ianniello, Sandro; Armenio, Vincenzo

    2016-11-01

    A body invested by a fluid flow gives rise to vortical and turbulent three-dimensional fields, whose structure depends on the shape of the body itself and the Reynolds number. Then, pressure fluctuations occur in the field and propagate far away as noise. The acoustic analogy based on the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FWH) equation represents a rigorous way to deal with the problem, enabling the evaluation of noise through a post-processing of fluid dynamic data. Moreover, the presence of separate source terms theoretically allows to identify the dominant generating noise mechanisms taking place in the flow, which, of course, repre- sents a key information in view of any possible reduction or alteration of the acoustic field. This paper deals with a numerical, FWH-based acoustic analysis of a turbulent flow around a bluff body and, in particular, a 3D square cylinder in a uniform velocity field. The fluid dynamic solution is obtained through Large eddy simulations carried out using a standard Smagorinsky model at different Reynolds numbers. The acoustic solution is pursued by different integral solution forms of the FWH equation, in the attempt of recognizing the main noise sources and pointing out the potentiality and possible weak-points of the alternative numerical approaches.

  9. Passive acoustic telemetry reveals highly variable home range and movement patterns among unicornfish within a marine reserve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshell, A.; Mills, J. S.; Rhodes, K. L.; McIlwain, J.

    2011-09-01

    Marine reserves are the primary management tool for Guam's reef fish fishery. While a build-up of fish biomass has occurred inside reserve boundaries, it is unknown whether reserve size matches the scale of movement of target species. Using passive acoustic telemetry, we quantified movement patterns and home range size of two heavily exploited unicornfish Naso unicornis and Naso lituratus. Fifteen fish ( N. unicornis: n = 7; N. lituratus: n = 4 male, n = 4 female) were fitted with internal acoustic tags and tracked continuously over four months within a remote acoustic receiver array located in a decade-old marine reserve. This approach provided robust estimates of unicornfish movement patterns and home range size. The mean home range of 3.2 ha for N. unicornis was almost ten times larger than that previously recorded from a three-week tracking study of the species in Hawaii. While N. lituratus were smaller in body size, their mean home range (6.8 ha) was over twice that of N. unicornis. Both species displayed strong site fidelity, particularly during nocturnal and crepuscular periods. Although there was some overlap, individual movement patterns and home range size were highly variable within species and between sexes. N. unicornis home range increased with body size, and only the three largest fish home ranges extended into the deeper outer reef slope beyond the shallow reef flat. Both Naso species favoured habitat dominated by corals. Some individuals made predictable daily crepuscular migrations between different locations or habitat types. There was no evidence of significant spillover from the marine reserve into adjacent fished areas. Strong site fidelity coupled with negligible spillover suggests that small-scale reserves, with natural habitat boundaries to emigration, are effective in protecting localized unicornfish populations.

  10. Symmetry analysis for nonlinear time reversal methods applied to nonlinear acoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dos Santos, Serge; Chaline, Jennifer

    2015-10-01

    Using symmetry invariance, nonlinear Time Reversal (TR) and reciprocity properties, the classical NEWS methods are supplemented and improved by new excitations having the intrinsic property of enlarging frequency analysis bandwidth and time domain scales, with now both medical acoustics and electromagnetic applications. The analysis of invariant quantities is a well-known tool which is often used in nonlinear acoustics in order to simplify complex equations. Based on a fundamental physical principle known as symmetry analysis, this approach consists in finding judicious variables, intrinsically scale dependant, and able to describe all stages of behaviour on the same theoretical foundation. Based on previously published results within the nonlinear acoustic areas, some practical implementation will be proposed as a new way to define TR-NEWS based methods applied to NDT and medical bubble based non-destructive imaging. This paper tends to show how symmetry analysis can help us to define new methodologies and new experimental set-up involving modern signal processing tools. Some example of practical realizations will be proposed in the context of biomedical non-destructive imaging using Ultrasound Contrast Agents (ACUs) where symmetry and invariance properties allow us to define a microscopic scale-invariant experimental set-up describing intrinsic symmetries of the microscopic complex system.

  11. Analysis of acoustic signals on CO{sub 2} arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Y.; Morita, T.; Sumitomo, T.; Koga, H.

    1995-12-31

    The sound emitted during the arc welding process is closely related to the welding phenomenon, and sometimes it provides useful information for monitoring and controlling the welding process. It is important to use different kinds of information to control the welding process to improve the quality of controlling system, especially for underwater welding. Because the recovery process of weld defects is a time and money consuming matter, and sometimes it is difficult to monitor the arc condition by a visual system. The fundamental analysis of acoustic signals and their relations with the other parameters such as arc voltage, arc current and a vibration of weld plate had been carried out in order to understand the feature of acoustic signals and to develop effective signal processing algorithm. All of the data were recorded by the cassette recorder. After the experiment was completed, the analysis of recorded data was carried out by using of a signal processor and a computer system.

  12. Acoustic Emission Analysis of Damage Progression in Thermal Barrier Coatings Under Thermal Cyclic Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, Matthew; Zhu, Dongming; Morscher, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Damage evolution of electron beam-physical vapor deposited (EBVD-PVD) ZrO2-7 wt.% Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) under thermal cyclic conditions was monitored using an acoustic emission (AE) technique. The coatings were heated using a laser heat flux technique that yields a high reproducibility in thermal loading. Along with AE, real-time thermal conductivity measurements were also taken using infrared thermography. Tests were performed on samples with induced stress concentrations, as well as calcium-magnesium-alumino-silicate (CMAS) exposure, for comparison of damage mechanisms and AE response to the baseline (as-produced) coating. Analysis of acoustic waveforms was used to investigate damage development by comparing when events occurred, AE event frequency, energy content and location. The test results have shown that AE accumulation correlates well with thermal conductivity changes and that AE waveform analysis could be a valuable tool for monitoring coating degradation and provide insight on specific damage mechanisms.

  13. Analysis of the STS-126 Flow Control Valve Structural-Acoustic Coupling Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Trevor M.; Larko, Jeffrey M.; McNelis, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    During the Space Transportation System mission STS-126, one of the main engine's flow control valves incurred an unexpected failure. A section of the valve broke off during liftoff. It is theorized that an acoustic mode of the flowing fuel, coupled with a structural mode of the valve, causing a high cycle fatigue failure. This report documents the analysis efforts conducted in an attempt to verify this theory. Hand calculations, computational fluid dynamics, and finite element methods are all implemented and analyses are performed using steady-state methods in addition to transient analysis methods. The conclusion of the analyses is that there is a critical acoustic mode that aligns with a structural mode of the valve

  14. Interindividual variability in auditory scene analysis revealed by confidence judgements.

    PubMed

    Pelofi, C; de Gardelle, V; Egré, P; Pressnitzer, D

    2017-02-19

    Because musicians are trained to discern sounds within complex acoustic scenes, such as an orchestra playing, it has been hypothesized that musicianship improves general auditory scene analysis abilities. Here, we compared musicians and non-musicians in a behavioural paradigm using ambiguous stimuli, combining performance, reaction times and confidence measures. We used 'Shepard tones', for which listeners may report either an upward or a downward pitch shift for the same ambiguous tone pair. Musicians and non-musicians performed similarly on the pitch-shift direction task. In particular, both groups were at chance for the ambiguous case. However, groups differed in their reaction times and judgements of confidence. Musicians responded to the ambiguous case with long reaction times and low confidence, whereas non-musicians responded with fast reaction times and maximal confidence. In a subsequent experiment, non-musicians displayed reduced confidence for the ambiguous case when pure-tone components of the Shepard complex were made easier to discern. The results suggest an effect of musical training on scene analysis: we speculate that musicians were more likely to discern components within complex auditory scenes, perhaps because of enhanced attentional resolution, and thus discovered the ambiguity. For untrained listeners, stimulus ambiguity was not available to perceptual awareness.This article is part of the themed issue 'Auditory and visual scene analysis'.

  15. Seismo-acoustic analysis of the Buncefield oil depot explosion in the UK, 2005 December 11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottemöller, L.; Evers, L. G.

    2008-03-01

    A massive vapour cloud explosion occurred at the Buncefield fuel depot near Hemel Hempstead, UK, in the morning of 2005 December 11. The explosion was the result of an overflow from one of the storage tanks with the release of over 300 tons of petrol and generating a vapour cloud that spread over an area of 80000 m2, before being ignited. Considerable damage was caused in the vicinity of the explosion and a total of 43 people were injured. The explosion was detected by seismograph stations in the UK and the Netherlands and by infrasound arrays in the Netherlands. We analysed the seismic recordings to determine the origin time of 06:01:31.45 +/-0.5 s (UTC) from P-wave arrival times. Uncertainties in determination of origin time from acoustic arrival times alone were less than 10 s. Amplitudes of P-, Lg and primary acoustic waves were measured to derive decay relationships as function of distance. From the seismic amplitudes we estimated a yield of 2-10 tons equivalent to a buried explosion. Most seismic stations recorded primary and secondary acoustic waves. We used atmospheric ray tracing to identify the various travel paths, which depend on temperature and wind speed as function of altitude, leading to directional variation. Refracted waves were observed from the troposphere, stratosphere and thermosphere with a good match between observed and calculated traveltimes. The various wave types were also identified through array processing, which provides backazimuth and slowness, of recordings from an infrasound array in the Netherlands. The amplitude of stratospheric refracted acoustic waves recorded by the array microbarometers was used to estimate a yield of 21.6 (+/-5) tons TNT equivalent. We have demonstrated through joint seismo-acoustic analysis of the explosion that both the seismic velocity model and the atmospheric model are sufficient to explain the observed traveltimes.

  16. Stability analysis of thermo-acoustic nonlinear eigenproblems in annular combustors. Part II. Uncertainty quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magri, Luca; Bauerheim, Michael; Nicoud, Franck; Juniper, Matthew P.

    2016-11-01

    Monte Carlo and Active Subspace Identification methods are combined with first- and second-order adjoint sensitivities to perform (forward) uncertainty quantification analysis of the thermo-acoustic stability of two annular combustor configurations. This method is applied to evaluate the risk factor, i.e., the probability for the system to be unstable. It is shown that the adjoint approach reduces the number of nonlinear-eigenproblem calculations by as much as the Monte Carlo samples.

  17. Intervalley scattering by acoustic phonons in two-dimensional MoS2 revealed by double-resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Bruno R; Wang, Yuanxi; Mignuzzi, Sandro; Roy, Debdulal; Terrones, Mauricio; Fantini, Cristiano; Crespi, Vincent H; Malard, Leandro M; Pimenta, Marcos A

    2017-03-09

    Double-resonance Raman scattering is a sensitive probe to study the electron-phonon scattering pathways in crystals. For semiconducting two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides, the double-resonance Raman process involves different valleys and phonons in the Brillouin zone, and it has not yet been fully understood. Here we present a multiple energy excitation Raman study in conjunction with density functional theory calculations that unveil the double-resonance Raman scattering process in monolayer and bulk MoS2. Results show that the frequency of some Raman features shifts when changing the excitation energy, and first-principle simulations confirm that such bands arise from distinct acoustic phonons, connecting different valley states. The double-resonance Raman process is affected by the indirect-to-direct bandgap transition, and a comparison of results in monolayer and bulk allows the assignment of each Raman feature near the M or K points of the Brillouin zone. Our work highlights the underlying physics of intervalley scattering of electrons by acoustic phonons, which is essential for valley depolarization in MoS2.

  18. Intervalley scattering by acoustic phonons in two-dimensional MoS2 revealed by double-resonance Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Bruno R.; Wang, Yuanxi; Mignuzzi, Sandro; Roy, Debdulal; Terrones, Mauricio; Fantini, Cristiano; Crespi, Vincent H.; Malard, Leandro M.; Pimenta, Marcos A.

    2017-01-01

    Double-resonance Raman scattering is a sensitive probe to study the electron-phonon scattering pathways in crystals. For semiconducting two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides, the double-resonance Raman process involves different valleys and phonons in the Brillouin zone, and it has not yet been fully understood. Here we present a multiple energy excitation Raman study in conjunction with density functional theory calculations that unveil the double-resonance Raman scattering process in monolayer and bulk MoS2. Results show that the frequency of some Raman features shifts when changing the excitation energy, and first-principle simulations confirm that such bands arise from distinct acoustic phonons, connecting different valley states. The double-resonance Raman process is affected by the indirect-to-direct bandgap transition, and a comparison of results in monolayer and bulk allows the assignment of each Raman feature near the M or K points of the Brillouin zone. Our work highlights the underlying physics of intervalley scattering of electrons by acoustic phonons, which is essential for valley depolarization in MoS2. PMID:28276472

  19. Intervalley scattering by acoustic phonons in two-dimensional MoS2 revealed by double-resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Bruno R.; Wang, Yuanxi; Mignuzzi, Sandro; Roy, Debdulal; Terrones, Mauricio; Fantini, Cristiano; Crespi, Vincent H.; Malard, Leandro M.; Pimenta, Marcos A.

    2017-03-01

    Double-resonance Raman scattering is a sensitive probe to study the electron-phonon scattering pathways in crystals. For semiconducting two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides, the double-resonance Raman process involves different valleys and phonons in the Brillouin zone, and it has not yet been fully understood. Here we present a multiple energy excitation Raman study in conjunction with density functional theory calculations that unveil the double-resonance Raman scattering process in monolayer and bulk MoS2. Results show that the frequency of some Raman features shifts when changing the excitation energy, and first-principle simulations confirm that such bands arise from distinct acoustic phonons, connecting different valley states. The double-resonance Raman process is affected by the indirect-to-direct bandgap transition, and a comparison of results in monolayer and bulk allows the assignment of each Raman feature near the M or K points of the Brillouin zone. Our work highlights the underlying physics of intervalley scattering of electrons by acoustic phonons, which is essential for valley depolarization in MoS2.

  20. Design and Analysis of Advanced Materials in a Thermal/Acoustic Environment. Delivery Order 0007: Volume 1 - Structural Health Monitoring

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    AFRL-RB-WP-TR-2010-3028 DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF ADVANCED MATERIALS IN A THERMAL/ACOUSTIC ENVIRONMENT Delivery Order 0007: Volume 1‒Structural...Final 15 July 2005 – 30 March 2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF ADVANCED MATERIALS IN A THERMAL/ACOUSTIC ENVIRONMENT Delivery...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Wright State University Department of Mechanical and Materials

  1. Preliminary Work for Modeling the Propellers of an Aircraft as a Noise Source in an Acoustic Boundary Element Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahopoulos, Nickolas; Lyle, Karen H.; Burley, Casey L.

    1998-01-01

    An algorithm for generating appropriate velocity boundary conditions for an acoustic boundary element analysis from the kinematics of an operating propeller is presented. It constitutes the initial phase of Integrating sophisticated rotorcraft models into a conventional boundary element analysis. Currently, the pressure field is computed by a linear approximation. An initial validation of the developed process was performed by comparing numerical results to test data for the external acoustic pressure on the surface of a tilt-rotor aircraft for one flight condition.

  2. Linearized Unsteady Aerodynamic Analysis of the Acoustic Response to Wake/Blade-Row Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verdon, Joseph M.; Huff, Dennis L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The three-dimensional, linearized Euler analysis, LINFLUX, is being developed to provide a comprehensive and efficient unsteady aerodynamic scheme for predicting the aeroacoustic and aeroelastic responses of axial-flow turbomachinery blading. LINFLUX couples a near-field, implicit, wave-split, finite-volume solution to far-field acoustic eigensolutions, to predict the aerodynamic responses of a blade row to prescribed structural and aerodynamic excitations. It is applied herein to predict the acoustic responses of a fan exit guide vane (FEGV) to rotor wake excitations. The intent is to demonstrate and assess the LINFLUX analysis via application to realistic wake/blade-row interactions. Numerical results are given for the unsteady pressure responses of the FEGV, including the modal pressure responses at inlet and exit. In addition, predictions for the modal and total acoustic power levels at the FEGV exit are compared with measurements. The present results indicate that the LINFLUX analysis should be useful in the aeroacoustic design process, and for understanding the three-dimensional flow physics relevant to blade-row noise generation and propagation.

  3. Analysis of concert hall acoustics via visualizations of time-frequency and spatiotemporal responses.

    PubMed

    Pätynen, Jukka; Tervo, Sakari; Lokki, Tapio

    2013-02-01

    Acousticians and other practitioners alike often describe acoustic conditions in performance spaces with standard objective parameters. Apart from a few exceptions, the parameters are calculated by integrating the sound energy of the impulse responses over time; this makes them inadequate for researching the acoustics in detail, especially in the early part of the room impulse response. This paper proposes a method based on time-frequency and spatiotemporal presentations to overcome the lack of detail in the standard analysis. In brief, the proposed methods visualize the cumulative development of the sound field as a function of frequency or direction by forward-integrating the energy in the impulse response in short time frames. Analysis on the measurements from six concert halls concentrates particularly on interpreting the results in light of the seat dip effect. Earlier research has concluded that the seat dip effect is reduced by reflection from low overhead surfaces. In contrast, the current results indicate that the seat dip attenuation in the frequency response is corrected the best when the hall provides most lateral reflections. These findings suggest that the proposed analysis is suitable for explaining concert hall acoustics in detail.

  4. Spatial Laplace transform for complex wavenumber recovery and its application to the analysis of attenuation in acoustic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geslain, A.; Raetz, S.; Hiraiwa, M.; Abi Ghanem, M.; Wallen, S. P.; Khanolkar, A.; Boechler, N.; Laurent, J.; Prada, C.; Duclos, A.; Leclaire, P.; Groby, J.-P.

    2016-10-01

    We present a method for the recovery of complex wavenumber information via spatial Laplace transforms of spatiotemporal wave propagation measurements. The method aids in the analysis of acoustic attenuation phenomena and is applied in three different scenarios: (i) Lamb-like modes in air-saturated porous materials in the low kHz regime, where the method enables the recovery of viscoelastic parameters; (ii) Lamb modes in a Duralumin plate in the MHz regime, where the method demonstrates the effect of leakage on the splitting of the forward S1 and backward S2 modes around the Zero-Group Velocity point; and (iii) surface acoustic waves in a two-dimensional microscale granular crystal adhered to a substrate near 100 MHz, where the method reveals the complex wavenumbers for an out-of-plane translational and two in-plane translational-rotational resonances. This method provides physical insight into each system and serves as a unique tool for analyzing spatiotemporal measurements of propagating waves.

  5. Contribution of the supraglottic larynx to the vocal product: imaging and acoustic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gracco, L. Carol

    1996-04-01

    Horizontal supraglottic laryngectomy is a surgical procedure to remove a mass lesion located in the region of the pharynx superior to the true vocal folds. In contrast to full or partial laryngectomy, patients who undergo horizontal supraglottic laryngectomy often present with little or nor involvement to the true vocal folds. This population provides an opportunity to examine the acoustic consequences of altering the pharynx while sparing the laryngeal sound source. Acoustic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data were acquired in a group of four patients before and after supraglottic laryngectomy. Acoustic measures included the identification of vocal tract resonances and the fundamental frequency of the vocal fold vibration. 3D reconstruction of the pharyngeal portion of each subjects' vocal tract were made from MRIs taken during phonation and volume measures were obtained. These measures reveal a variable, but often dramatic difference in the surgically-altered area of the pharynx and changes in the formant frequencies of the vowel/i/post surgically. In some cases the presence of the tumor created a deviation from the expected formant values pre-operatively with post-operative values approaching normal. Patients who also underwent radiation treatment post surgically tended to have greater constriction in the pharyngeal area of the vocal tract.

  6. [The analysis of increased physical load effect on microcirculation and acoustic properties of human limb skin].

    PubMed

    Grebeniuk, L A

    2014-01-01

    Complex study of limb skin integument has been performed in 20 male "sportsmen of high qualification (track-and-field athletes and wrestlers of Graeco-Roman style) at the age of 17-25 years, as well as in inactive subjects of the same age. The results obtained by us evidence the variability of limb integumentary tissue acoustic properties in sportsmen as manifestation of adaptive response to regular increasedphysical loads experience by them every day. Some differences in microcirculation of skin integument has been established, first of all, those associated with reserve level--higher increase of capillary blood flow in leg skin during functional ischemic test and 66.2% exceeding capillary blood flow reserve index for leg in track-and-field athletes in comparison with that value in non-sportsmen. The speed of propagation of surface acoustic wave in leg skin during testing in different angular directions reliably exceeded the acoustic parameters of femoral integumentary tissue both in the track-and-field athletes and wrestlers examined, and in the subjects of non-sportsmen control group. The speed of propagation of surface acoustic wave in integumentary tissue of limb distal segments have been established to exceed those of proximal segments. When functional test was made in sportsmen for plasticity reserve reveal, modification of the shape of sound velocity envelope curve took place for the change in spatial position of the limb, evidencing the dynamicity of its elastic properties during performing movements of vital function and the presence of certain plastic reserve.

  7. Analysis of acoustic emission signals and monitoring of machining processes

    PubMed

    Govekar; Gradisek; Grabec

    2000-03-01

    Monitoring of a machining process on the basis of sensor signals requires a selection of informative inputs in order to reliably characterize and model the process. In this article, a system for selection of informative characteristics from signals of multiple sensors is presented. For signal analysis, methods of spectral analysis and methods of nonlinear time series analysis are used. With the aim of modeling relationships between signal characteristics and the corresponding process state, an adaptive empirical modeler is applied. The application of the system is demonstrated by characterization of different parameters defining the states of a turning machining process, such as: chip form, tool wear, and onset of chatter vibration. The results show that, in spite of the complexity of the turning process, the state of the process can be well characterized by just a few proper characteristics extracted from a representative sensor signal. The process characterization can be further improved by joining characteristics from multiple sensors and by application of chaotic characteristics.

  8. Development of an Acoustic Signal Analysis Tool “Auto-F” Based on the Temperament Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modegi, Toshio

    The MIDI interface is originally designed for electronic musical instruments but we consider this music-note based coding concept can be extended for general acoustic signal description. We proposed applying the MIDI technology to coding of bio-medical auscultation sound signals such as heart sounds for retrieving medical records and performing telemedicine. Then we have tried to extend our encoding targets including vocal sounds, natural sounds and electronic bio-signals such as ECG, using Generalized Harmonic Analysis method. Currently, we are trying to separate vocal sounds included in popular songs and encode both vocal sounds and background instrumental sounds into separate MIDI channels. And also, we are trying to extract articulation parameters such as MIDI pitch-bend parameters in order to reproduce natural acoustic sounds using a GM-standard MIDI tone generator. In this paper, we present an overall algorithm of our developed acoustic signal analysis tool, based on those research works, which can analyze given time-based signals on the musical temperament scale. The prominent feature of this tool is producing high-precision MIDI codes, which reproduce the similar signals as the given source signal using a GM-standard MIDI tone generator, and also providing analyzed texts in the XML format.

  9. Acoustic Analysis of a Sandwich Non Metallic Panel for Roofs by FEM and Experimental Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto, P. J. García; del Coz Díaz, J. J.; Vilán, J. A. Vilán; Rabanal, F. P. Alvarez

    2007-12-01

    In this paper we have studied the acoustic behavior of a sandwich non metallic panel for roofs by the finite element method (FEM). This new field of analysis is the fully coupled solution of fluid flows with structural interactions, commonly referred to as fluid-structure interaction (FSI). It is the natural next step to take in the simulation of mechanical systems. The finite element analysis of acoustic-fluid/structure interactions using potential-based or displacement-based Lagrangian formulations is now well established. The non-linearity is due to the `fluid-structure interaction' (FSI) that governs the problem. In a very considerable range of problems the fluid displacement remains small while interaction is substantial. In this category falls our problem, in which the structural motion influence and react with the generation of pressures in two reverberation rooms. The characteristic of acoustic insulation of the panel is calculated basing on the pressures for different frequencies and points in the transmission rooms. Finally the conclusions reached are shown.

  10. Three-dimensional coupled mode analysis of internal-wave acoustic ducts.

    PubMed

    Shmelev, Alexey A; Lynch, James F; Lin, Ying-Tsong; Schmidt, Henrik

    2014-05-01

    A fully three-dimensional coupled mode approach is used in this paper to describe the physics of low frequency acoustic signals propagating through a train of internal waves at an arbitrary azimuth. A three layer model of the shallow water waveguide is employed for studying the properties of normal modes and their coupled interaction due to the presence of nonlinear internal waves. Using a robust wave number integration technique for Fourier transform computation and a direct global matrix approach, an accurate three-dimensional coupled mode full field solution is obtained for the tonal signal propagation through straight and parallel internal waves. This approach provides accurate results for arbitrary azimuth and includes the effects of backscattering. This enables one to provide an azimuthal analysis of acoustic propagation and separate the effects of mode coupled transparent resonance, horizontal reflection and refraction, the horizontal Lloyd's mirror, horizontal ducting and anti-ducting, and horizontal tunneling and secondary ducting.

  11. Acoustic Analysis and Design of the E-STA MSA Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittinger, Samantha A.

    2016-01-01

    The Orion European Service Module Structural Test Article (E-STA) Acoustic Test was completed in May 2016 to verify that the European Service Module (ESM) can withstand qualification acoustic environments. The test article required an aft closeout to simulate the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) Stage Adapter (MSA) cavity, however, the flight MSA design was too cost-prohibitive to build. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) had 6 months to design an MSA Simulator that could recreate the qualification prediction MSA cavity sound pressure level to within a reasonable tolerance. This paper summarizes the design and analysis process to arrive at a design for the MSA Simulator, and then compares its performance to the final prediction models created prior to test.

  12. An acoustic emission and acousto-ultrasonic analysis of impact damaged composite pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L. (Principal Investigator); Walker, James L.

    1996-01-01

    The use of acoustic emission to characterize impact damage in composite structures is being performed on composite bottles wrapped with graphite epoxy and kevlar bottles. Further development of the acoustic emission methodology will include neural net analysis and/or other multivariate techniques to enhance the capability of the technique to identify dominant failure mechanisms during fracture. The acousto-ultrasonics technique will also continue to be investigated to determine its ability to predict regions prone to failure prior to the burst tests. Characterization of the stress wave factor before, and after impact damage will be useful for inspection purposes in manufacturing processes. The combination of the two methods will also allow for simple nondestructive tests capable of predicting the performance of a composite structure prior to its being placed in service and during service.

  13. Multi-scale morphology analysis of acoustic emission signal and quantitative diagnosis for bearing fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen-Jing; Cui, Ling-Li; Chen, Dao-Yun

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring of potential bearing faults in operation is of critical importance to safe operation of high speed trains. One of the major challenges is how to differentiate relevant signals to operational conditions of bearings from noises emitted from the surrounding environment. In this work, we report a procedure for analyzing acoustic emission signals collected from rolling bearings for diagnosis of bearing health conditions by examining their morphological pattern spectrum (MPS) through a multi-scale morphology analysis procedure. The results show that acoustic emission signals resulted from a given type of bearing faults share rather similar MPS curves. Further examinations in terms of sample entropy and Lempel-Ziv complexity of MPS curves suggest that these two parameters can be utilized to determine damage modes.

  14. Flap Side-Edge Noise: Acoustic Analysis of Sen's Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, Jay C.; Martin, James E.

    1996-01-01

    The two-dimensional flap side-edge flow model developed by Sen is analyzed to reveal the noise production potential of the proposed mechanism. The model assumes that a vortex will form at the equilibrium position off the side edge of the flap. The vortex is then perturbed away from the equilibrium position by incoming turbulence causing it to oscillate and thus radiate sound. The noise field is calculated three-dimensionally by taking the flap to have a finite chord. Spectra and directivity of the farfield sound are presented. In addition, the effect of retarded time differences is evaluated. The parameters in the model are related to typical aircraft parameters and noise reduction possibilities are proposed.

  15. Acoustic Analysis of Voice in Dysarthria following Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yu-Tsai; Kent, Ray D.; Kent, Jane Finley; Duffy, Joseph R.; Thomas, Jack E.

    2009-01-01

    Although perceptual studies indicate the likelihood of voice disorders in persons with stroke, there have been few objective instrumental studies of voice dysfunction in dysarthria following stroke. This study reports automatic analysis of sustained vowel phonation for 61 speakers with stroke. The results show: (1) men with stroke and healthy…

  16. Vibro-Acoustic Analysis of NASA's Space Shuttle Launch Pad 39A Flame Trench Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margasahayam, Ravi N.

    2009-01-01

    A vital element to NASA's manned space flight launch operations is the Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex 39's launch pads A and B. Originally designed and constructed In the 1960s for the Saturn V rockets used for the Apollo missions, these pads were modified above grade to support Space Shuttle missions. But below grade, each of the pad's original walls (including a 42 feet deep, 58 feet wide, and 450 feet long tunnel designed to deflect flames and exhaust gases, the flame trench) remained unchanged. On May 31, 2008 during the launch of STS-124, over 3500 of the. 22000 interlocking refractory bricks that lined east wall of the flame trench, protecting the pad structure were liberated from pad 39A. The STS-124 launch anomaly spawned an agency-wide initiative to determine the failure root cause, to assess the impact of debris on vehicle and ground support equipment safety, and to prescribe corrective action. The investigation encompassed radar imaging, infrared video review, debris transport mechanism analysis using computational fluid dynamics, destructive testing, and non-destructive evaluation, including vibroacoustic analysis, in order to validate the corrective action. The primary focus of this paper is on the analytic approach, including static, modal, and vibro-acoustic analysis, required to certify the corrective action, and ensure Integrity and operational reliability for future launches. Due to the absence of instrumentation (including pressure transducers, acoustic pressure sensors, and accelerometers) in the flame trench, defining an accurate acoustic signature of the launch environment during shuttle main engine/solid rocket booster Ignition and vehicle ascent posed a significant challenge. Details of the analysis, including the derivation of launch environments, the finite element approach taken, and analysistest/ launch data correlation are discussed. Data obtained from the recent launch of STS-126 from Pad 39A was instrumental in validating the

  17. Development of an Efficient Binaural Simulation for the Analysis of Structural Acoustic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lalime, Aimee L.; Johnson, Marty E.; Rizzi, Stephen A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Binaural or "virtual acoustic" representation has been proposed as a method of analyzing acoustic and vibroacoustic data. Unfortunately, this binaural representation can require extensive computer power to apply the Head Related Transfer Functions (HRTFs) to a large number of sources, as with a vibrating structure. This work focuses on reducing the number of real-time computations required in this binaural analysis through the use of Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) and Equivalent Source Reduction (ESR). The SVD method reduces the complexity of the HRTF computations by breaking the HRTFs into dominant singular values (and vectors). The ESR method reduces the number of sources to be analyzed in real-time computation by replacing sources on the scale of a structural wavelength with sources on the scale of an acoustic wavelength. It is shown that the effectiveness of the SVD and ESR methods improves as the complexity of the source increases. In addition, preliminary auralization tests have shown that the results from both the SVD and ESR methods are indistinguishable from the results found with the exhaustive method.

  18. A comprehensive strategy for the analysis of acoustic compressibility and optical deformability on single cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tie; Bragheri, Francesca; Nava, Giovanni; Chiodi, Ilaria; Mondello, Chiara; Osellame, Roberto; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine; Cristiani, Ilaria; Minzioni, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    We realized an integrated microfluidic chip that allows measuring both optical deformability and acoustic compressibility on single cells, by optical stretching and acoustophoresis experiments respectively. Additionally, we propose a measurement protocol that allows evaluating the experimental apparatus parameters before performing the cell-characterization experiments, including a non-destructive method to characterize the optical force distribution inside the microchannel. The chip was used to study important cell-mechanics parameters in two human breast cancer cell lines, MCF7 and MDA-MB231. Results indicate that MDA-MB231 has both higher acoustic compressibility and higher optical deformability than MCF7, but statistical analysis shows that optical deformability and acoustic compressibility are not correlated parameters. This result suggests the possibility to use them to analyze the response of different cellular structures. We also demonstrate that it is possible to perform both measurements on a single cell, and that the order of the two experiments does not affect the retrieved values. PMID:27040456

  19. Modal analysis and acoustic transmission through offset-core honeycomb sandwich panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathias, Adam Dustin

    The work presented in this thesis is motivated by an earlier research that showed that double, offset-core honeycomb sandwich panels increased thermal resistance and, hence, decreased heat transfer through the panels. This result lead to the hypothesis that these panels could be used for acoustic insulation. Using commercial finite element modeling software, COMSOL Multiphysics, the acoustical properties, specifically the transmission loss across a variety of offset-core honeycomb sandwich panels, is studied for the case of a plane acoustic wave impacting the panel at normal incidence. The transmission loss results are compared with those of single-core honeycomb panels with the same cell sizes. The fundamental frequencies of the panels are also computed in an attempt to better understand the vibrational modes of these particular sandwich-structured panels. To ensure that the finite element analysis software is adequate for the task at hand, two relevant benchmark problems are solved and compared with theory. Results from these benchmark results compared well to those obtained from theory. Transmission loss results from the offset-core honeycomb sandwich panels show increased transmission loss, especially for large cell honeycombs when compared to single-core honeycomb panels.

  20. An Aquatic Acoustic Metrics Interface Utility for Underwater Sound Monitoring and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Huiying; Halvorsen, Michele B.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-05-31

    Fishes and other marine mammals suffer a range of potential effects from intense sound sources generated by anthropogenic underwater processes such as pile driving, shipping, sonars, and underwater blasting. Several underwater sound recording devices (USR) were built to monitor the acoustic sound pressure waves generated by those anthropogenic underwater activities, so the relevant processing software becomes indispensable for analyzing the audio files recorded by these USRs. However, existing software packages did not meet performance and flexibility requirements. In this paper, we provide a detailed description of a new software package, named Aquatic Acoustic Metrics Interface (AAMI), which is a Graphical User Interface (GUI) designed for underwater sound monitoring and analysis. In addition to the general functions, such as loading and editing audio files recorded by USRs, the software can compute a series of acoustic metrics in physical units, monitor the sound's influence on fish hearing according to audiograms from different species of fishes and marine mammals, and batch process the sound files. The detailed applications of the software AAMI will be discussed along with several test case scenarios to illustrate its functionality.

  1. Influencing Factors Analysis of Facial Nerve Function after the Microsurgical Resection of Acoustic Neuroma

    PubMed Central

    Hong, WenMing; Cheng, HongWei; Wang, XiaoJie; Feng, ChunGuo

    2017-01-01

    Objective To explore and analyze the influencing factors of facial nerve function retainment after microsurgery resection of acoustic neurinoma. Methods Retrospective analysis of our hospital 105 acoustic neuroma cases from October, 2006 to January 2012, in the group all patients were treated with suboccipital sigmoid sinus approach to acoustic neuroma microsurgery resection. We adopted researching individual patient data, outpatient review and telephone followed up and the House-Brackmann grading system to evaluate and analyze the facial nerve function. Results Among 105 patients in this study group, complete surgical resection rate was 80.9% (85/105), subtotal resection rate was 14.3% (15/105), and partial resection rate 4.8% (5/105). The rate of facial nerve retainment on neuroanatomy was 95.3% (100/105) and the mortality rate was 2.1% (2/105). Facial nerve function when the patient is discharged from the hospital, also known as immediate facial nerve function which was graded in House-Brackmann: excellent facial nerve function (House-Brackmann I–II level) cases accounted for 75.2% (79/105), facial nerve function III–IV level cases accounted for 22.9% (24/105), and V–VI cases accounted for 1.9% (2/105). Patients were followed up for more than one year, with excellent facial nerve function retention rate (H-B I–II level) was 74.4% (58/78). Conclusion Acoustic neuroma patients after surgery, the long-term (≥1 year) facial nerve function excellent retaining rate was closely related with surgical proficiency, post-operative immediate facial nerve function, diameter of tumor and whether to use electrophysiological monitoring techniques; while there was no significant correlation with the patient’s age, surgical approach, whether to stripping the internal auditory canal, whether there was cystic degeneration, tumor recurrence, whether to merge with obstructive hydrocephalus and the length of the duration of symptoms. PMID:28264236

  2. Source analysis of auditory steady-state responses in acoustic and electric hearing.

    PubMed

    Luke, Robert; De Vos, Astrid; Wouters, Jan

    2017-02-15

    Speech is a complex signal containing a broad variety of acoustic information. For accurate speech reception, the listener must perceive modulations over a range of envelope frequencies. Perception of these modulations is particularly important for cochlear implant (CI) users, as all commercial devices use envelope coding strategies. Prolonged deafness affects the auditory pathway. However, little is known of how cochlear implantation affects the neural processing of modulated stimuli. This study investigates and contrasts the neural processing of envelope rate modulated signals in acoustic and CI listeners. Auditory steady-state responses (ASSRs) are used to study the neural processing of amplitude modulated (AM) signals. A beamforming technique is applied to determine the increase in neural activity relative to a control condition, with particular attention paid to defining the accuracy and precision of this technique relative to other tomographies. In a cohort of 44 acoustic listeners, the location, activity and hemispheric lateralisation of ASSRs is characterised while systematically varying the modulation rate (4, 10, 20, 40 and 80Hz) and stimulation ear (right, left and bilateral). We demonstrate a complex pattern of laterality depending on both modulation rate and stimulation ear that is consistent with, and extends, existing literature. We present a novel extension to the beamforming method which facilitates source analysis of electrically evoked auditory steady-state responses (EASSRs). In a cohort of 5 right implanted unilateral CI users, the neural activity is determined for the 40Hz rate and compared to the acoustic cohort. Results indicate that CI users activate typical thalamic locations for 40Hz stimuli. However, complementary to studies of transient stimuli, the CI population has atypical hemispheric laterality, preferentially activating the contralateral hemisphere.

  3. Single stage, low noise, advanced technology fan. Volume 5: Fan acoustics. Section 1: Results and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jutras, R. R.

    1976-01-01

    The acoustic tests and data analysis for a 0.508-scale fan vehicle of a 111,300 newton (25,000 pound) thrust, full-size engine, which would have application on an advanced transport aircraft, is described. The single-stage advanced technology fan was designed to a pressure ratio of 1.8 at a tip speed of 503 m/sec (1,650 ft/sec) to achieve the desired pressure ratio in a single-stage fan with low radius ratio (0.38), and to maintain adequate stall margin. The fan has 44 tip-shrouded rotor blades and 90 outlet guide vanes. The two basic approaches taken in the acoustic design were: (1) minimization of noise at the source, and (2) suppression of the generated noise in the inlet and bypass exhaust duct. Suppression of the generated noise was accomplished in the inlet through use of the hybrid concept (wall acoustic treatment plus airflow acceleration suppression) and in the exhaust duct with extensive acoustic treatment including a splitter. The goal of the design was attainment of twenty effective perceived noise decibels (20 EPNdB) below current Federal Air Regulation noise standards for a full-scale fan at the takeoff, cutback, and approach conditions. The suppression goal of FAR 36-20 was not reached, but improvements in the technology of both front and aft fan-noise suppression were realized. The suppressed fan noise was shown to be consistent with the proposed federal regulation on aircraft noise.

  4. Nonlinear Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-02-14

    Wester- velt. [60] Streaming. In 1831, Michael Faraday [61] noted that currents of air were set up in the neighborhood of vibrating plates-the first... ducei in the case of a paramettc amy (from Berktay an Leahy 141). C’ "". k•, SEC 10.1 NONLINEAR ACOUSTICS 345 The principal results of their analysis

  5. Refined acoustic modeling and analysis of shotgun microphones.

    PubMed

    Bai, Mingsian R; Lo, Yi-Yang

    2013-04-01

    A shotgun microphone is a highly directional pickup device widely used in noisy environments. The key element that leads to its superior directivity is a tube with multiple slot openings along its length. One traditional way to model the directional response of a shotgun is to assume plane waves traveling in the tube as if it is in the free field. However, the frequency response and directivity predicted by this traveling wave model can differ drastically from practical measurements. In this paper, an in-depth electroacoustic analysis was conducted to examine the problem by considering the standing waves inside the tube with an analogous circuit containing phased pressure sources and T-networks of tube segments. A further refinement is to model the housing diffraction effect with the aid of the equivalent source method (ESM). The on-axis frequency response and directivity pattern predicted by the proposed model are in close agreement with the measurements. From the results, a peculiar bifurcation phenomenon of directivity pattern at the Helmholtz frequency was also noted. While the shotgun behaves like an endfire array above the Helmholtz frequency, it becomes a broadside array below the Helmholtz frequency. The standing wave effect can be mitigated by covering the slot openings with mesh screen, which was found to alter the shotgun response to be closer to that of the traveling wave model above a critical frequency predicted by the half-wavelength rule. A mode-switching model was developed to predict the directional responses of mesh-treated shotguns.

  6. Acoustic cardiac signals analysis: a Kalman filter-based approach.

    PubMed

    Salleh, Sheik Hussain; Hussain, Hadrina Sheik; Swee, Tan Tian; Ting, Chee-Ming; Noor, Alias Mohd; Pipatsart, Surasak; Ali, Jalil; Yupapin, Preecha P

    2012-01-01

    Auscultation of the heart is accompanied by both electrical activity and sound. Heart auscultation provides clues to diagnose many cardiac abnormalities. Unfortunately, detection of relevant symptoms and diagnosis based on heart sound through a stethoscope is difficult. The reason GPs find this difficult is that the heart sounds are of short duration and separated from one another by less than 30 ms. In addition, the cost of false positives constitutes wasted time and emotional anxiety for both patient and GP. Many heart diseases cause changes in heart sound, waveform, and additional murmurs before other signs and symptoms appear. Heart-sound auscultation is the primary test conducted by GPs. These sounds are generated primarily by turbulent flow of blood in the heart. Analysis of heart sounds requires a quiet environment with minimum ambient noise. In order to address such issues, the technique of denoising and estimating the biomedical heart signal is proposed in this investigation. Normally, the performance of the filter naturally depends on prior information related to the statistical properties of the signal and the background noise. This paper proposes Kalman filtering for denoising statistical heart sound. The cycles of heart sounds are certain to follow first-order Gauss-Markov process. These cycles are observed with additional noise for the given measurement. The model is formulated into state-space form to enable use of a Kalman filter to estimate the clean cycles of heart sounds. The estimates obtained by Kalman filtering are optimal in mean squared sense.

  7. Internal strain analysis of ceramics using scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, Renee M.

    1993-03-01

    Quantitative studies of material behavior characteristics are essential for predicting the functionality of a material under its operating conditions. A nonintrusive methodology for measuring the in situ strain of small dimeter (to 11 microns) ceramic fibers under uniaxial tensile loading and the local internal strains of ceramics and ceramic composites under flexural loading is introduced. The strain measurements and experimentally observed mechanical behavior are analyzed in terms of the microstructural development and fracture behavior of each test specimen evaluated. Measurement and analysis of Nicalon silicon carbide (SiC) fiber (15 microns diameter) indicate that the mean elastic modulus of the individual fiber is 185.3 GPa. Deviations observed in the experimentally determined elastic modulus values between specimens were attributed to microstructural variations which occur during processing. Corresponding variations in the fracture surface morphology were also observed. The observed local mechanical behavior of a lithium alumino-silicate (LAS) glass ceramic, a LAS/SiC monofilament composite, and a calcium alumino-silicate (CAS)/SiC fully reinforced composite exhibits nonlinearities and apparent hysteresis due to the subcritical mechanical loading. Local hysteresis in the LAS matrices coincided with the occurrence of multiple fracture initiation sites, localized microcracking, and secondary cracking. The observed microcracking phenomenon was attributed to stress relaxation of residual stresses developed during processing, and local interaction of the crack front with the microstructure. The relaxation strain and stress predicted on apparent mechanical hysteresis effects were defined and correlated with the magnitude of the measured fracture stress for each specimen studied. This quantitative correlation indicated a repeatable measure of the stress at which matrix microcracking occurred for stress relief of each material system. Stress relaxation occurred

  8. Internal strain analysis of ceramics using scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kent, Renee M.

    1993-01-01

    Quantitative studies of material behavior characteristics are essential for predicting the functionality of a material under its operating conditions. A nonintrusive methodology for measuring the in situ strain of small dimeter (to 11 microns) ceramic fibers under uniaxial tensile loading and the local internal strains of ceramics and ceramic composites under flexural loading is introduced. The strain measurements and experimentally observed mechanical behavior are analyzed in terms of the microstructural development and fracture behavior of each test specimen evaluated. Measurement and analysis of Nicalon silicon carbide (SiC) fiber (15 microns diameter) indicate that the mean elastic modulus of the individual fiber is 185.3 GPa. Deviations observed in the experimentally determined elastic modulus values between specimens were attributed to microstructural variations which occur during processing. Corresponding variations in the fracture surface morphology were also observed. The observed local mechanical behavior of a lithium alumino-silicate (LAS) glass ceramic, a LAS/SiC monofilament composite, and a calcium alumino-silicate (CAS)/SiC fully reinforced composite exhibits nonlinearities and apparent hysteresis due to the subcritical mechanical loading. Local hysteresis in the LAS matrices coincided with the occurrence of multiple fracture initiation sites, localized microcracking, and secondary cracking. The observed microcracking phenomenon was attributed to stress relaxation of residual stresses developed during processing, and local interaction of the crack front with the microstructure. The relaxation strain and stress predicted on apparent mechanical hysteresis effects were defined and correlated with the magnitude of the measured fracture stress for each specimen studied. This quantitative correlation indicated a repeatable measure of the stress at which matrix microcracking occurred for stress relief of each material system. Stress relaxation occurred

  9. Comparison of Numerical Models for Vibro-Acoustic Analysis of Structural Panels in Low Modal Density Range Engaging Air Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chimeno-Manguan, M.; Martinz-Calvo, B.; Roibas-Millan, E.; Fajardo, P.; Simon, F.; Lopez-Diez, J.

    2012-07-01

    During launch, satellite and their equipment are subjected to loads of random nature and with a wide frequency range. Their vibro-acoustic response is an important issue to be analysed, for example for folded solar arrays and antennas. The main issue at low modal density is the modelling combinations engaging air layers, structures and external fluid. Depending on the modal density different methodologies, as FEM, BEM and SEA should be considered. This work focuses on the analysis of different combinations of the methodologies previously stated used in order to characterise the vibro-acoustic response of two rectangular sandwich structure panels isolated and engaging an air layer between them under a diffuse acoustic field. Focusing on the modelling of air layers, different models are proposed. To illustrate the phenomenology described and studied, experimental results from an acoustic test on an ARA-MKIII solar array in folded configuration are presented along with numerical results.

  10. A thorough analysis of the short- and mid-term activity-related variations in the solar acoustic frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. R. G.; Cunha, M. S.; Avelino, P. P.; Chaplin, W. J.; Campante, T. L.

    2017-02-01

    The frequencies of the solar acoustic oscillations vary over the activity cycle. The variations in other activity proxies are found to be well correlated with the variations in the acoustic frequencies. However, each proxy has a slightly different time behaviour. Our goal is to characterize the differences between the time behaviour of the frequency shifts and of two other activity proxies, namely the area covered by sunspots and the 10.7-cm flux. We define a new observable that is particularly sensitive to the short-term frequency variations. We then compare the observable when computed from model frequency shifts and from observed frequency shifts obtained with the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) for cycle 23. Our analysis shows that on the shortest time-scales, the variations in the frequency shifts seen in the GONG observations are strongly correlated with the variations in the area covered by sunspots. However, a significant loss of correlation is still found. We verify that the times when the frequency shifts and the sunspot area do not vary in a similar way tend to coincide with the times of the maxima of the quasi-biennial variations seen in the solar seismic data. A similar analysis of the relation between the 10.7-cm flux and the frequency shifts reveals that the short-time variations in the frequency shifts follow even more closely those of the 10.7-cm flux than those of the sunspot area. However, a loss of correlation between frequency shifts and 10.7-cm flux variations is still found around the same times.

  11. Predicting Where a Radiation Will Occur: Acoustic and Molecular Surveys Reveal Overlooked Diversity in Indian Ocean Island Crickets (Mogoplistinae: Ornebius)

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Ben H.; Baudin, Rémy; Franck, Antoine; Hugel, Sylvain; Strasberg, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Recent theory suggests that the geographic location of island radiations (local accumulation of species diversity due to cladogenesis) can be predicted based on island area and isolation. Crickets are a suitable group for testing these predictions, as they show both the ability to reach some of the most isolated islands in the world, and to speciate at small spatial scales. Despite substantial song variation between closely related species in many island cricket lineages worldwide, to date this characteristic has not received attention in the western Indian Ocean islands; existing species descriptions are based on morphology alone. Here we use a combination of acoustics and DNA sequencing to survey these islands for Ornebius crickets. We uncover a small but previously unknown radiation in the Mascarenes, constituting a three-fold increase in the Ornebius species diversity of this archipelago (from two to six species). A further new species is detected in the Comoros. Although double archipelago colonisation is the best explanation for species diversity in the Seychelles, in situ cladogenesis is the best explanation for the six species in the Mascarenes and two species of the Comoros. Whether the radiation of Mascarene Ornebius results from intra- or purely inter- island speciation cannot be determined on the basis of the phylogenetic data alone. However, the existence of genetic, song and ecological divergence at the intra-island scale is suggestive of an intra-island speciation scenario in which ecological and mating traits diverge hand-in-hand. Our results suggest that the geographic location of Ornebius radiations is partially but not fully explained by island area and isolation. A notable anomaly is Madagascar, where our surveys are consistent with existing accounts in finding no Ornebius species present. Possible explanations are discussed, invoking ecological differences between species and differences in environmental history between islands. PMID:26871932

  12. Predicting Where a Radiation Will Occur: Acoustic and Molecular Surveys Reveal Overlooked Diversity in Indian Ocean Island Crickets (Mogoplistinae: Ornebius).

    PubMed

    Warren, Ben H; Baudin, Rémy; Franck, Antoine; Hugel, Sylvain; Strasberg, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Recent theory suggests that the geographic location of island radiations (local accumulation of species diversity due to cladogenesis) can be predicted based on island area and isolation. Crickets are a suitable group for testing these predictions, as they show both the ability to reach some of the most isolated islands in the world, and to speciate at small spatial scales. Despite substantial song variation between closely related species in many island cricket lineages worldwide, to date this characteristic has not received attention in the western Indian Ocean islands; existing species descriptions are based on morphology alone. Here we use a combination of acoustics and DNA sequencing to survey these islands for Ornebius crickets. We uncover a small but previously unknown radiation in the Mascarenes, constituting a three-fold increase in the Ornebius species diversity of this archipelago (from two to six species). A further new species is detected in the Comoros. Although double archipelago colonisation is the best explanation for species diversity in the Seychelles, in situ cladogenesis is the best explanation for the six species in the Mascarenes and two species of the Comoros. Whether the radiation of Mascarene Ornebius results from intra- or purely inter- island speciation cannot be determined on the basis of the phylogenetic data alone. However, the existence of genetic, song and ecological divergence at the intra-island scale is suggestive of an intra-island speciation scenario in which ecological and mating traits diverge hand-in-hand. Our results suggest that the geographic location of Ornebius radiations is partially but not fully explained by island area and isolation. A notable anomaly is Madagascar, where our surveys are consistent with existing accounts in finding no Ornebius species present. Possible explanations are discussed, invoking ecological differences between species and differences in environmental history between islands.

  13. Guidelines for numerical vibration and acoustic analysis of disc brake squeal using simple models of brake systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberst, S.; Lai, J. C. S.; Marburg, S.

    2013-04-01

    Brake squeal has become of increasing concern to the automotive industry but guidelines on how to confidently predict squeal propensity are yet to be established. While it is standard practice to use the complex eigenvalue analysis to predict unstable vibration modes, there have been few attempts to calculate their acoustic radiation. Here guidelines are developed for numerical vibration and acoustic analysis of brake squeal using models of simplified brake systems with friction contact by considering (1) the selection of appropriate elements, contact and mesh; (2) the extraction of surface velocities via forced response; and (3) the calculation of the acoustic response itself. Results indicate that quadratic tetrahedral elements offer the best option for meshing more realistic geometry. A mesh has to be sufficiently fine especially in the contact region to predict mesh-independent unstable vibration modes. Regarding the vibration response, only the direct, steady-state method with a pressurised pad and finite sliding formulation (allowing contact separation) should be used. Comparison of different numerical methods suggest that a obroadband fast multi-pole boundary element method with the Burton-Miller formulation would efficiently solve the acoustic radiation of a full brake system. Results also suggest that a pad lift-off can amplify the acoustic radiation similar to a horn effect. A horn effect is also observed for chamfered pads which are used in practice to reduce the number and strength of unstable vibration modes. These results highlight the importance of optimising the pad shape to reduce acoustic radiation of unstable vibration modes.

  14. Acoustic measurements through analysis of binaural recordings of speech and music

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griesinger, David

    2004-10-01

    This paper will present and demonstrate some recent work on the measurement of acoustic properties from binaural recordings of live performances. It is found that models of the process of stream formation can be used to measure intelligibility, and, when combined with band-limited running cross-correlation, can be used to measure spaciousness and envelopment. Analysis of the running cross correlation during sound onsets can be used to measure the accuracy of azimuth perception. It is additionally found that the ease of detecting fundamental pitch from the upper partials of speech and music can be used as a measure of sound quality, particularly for solo instruments and singers.

  15. Thermal-Acoustic Analysis of a Metallic Integrated Thermal Protection System Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behnke, Marlana N.; Sharma, Anurag; Przekop, Adam; Rizzi, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    A study is undertaken to investigate the response of a representative integrated thermal protection system structure under combined thermal, aerodynamic pressure, and acoustic loadings. A two-step procedure is offered and consists of a heat transfer analysis followed by a nonlinear dynamic analysis under a combined loading environment. Both analyses are carried out in physical degrees-of-freedom using implicit and explicit solution techniques available in the Abaqus commercial finite-element code. The initial study is conducted on a reduced-size structure to keep the computational effort contained while validating the procedure and exploring the effects of individual loadings. An analysis of a full size integrated thermal protection system structure, which is of ultimate interest, is subsequently presented. The procedure is demonstrated to be a viable approach for analysis of spacecraft and hypersonic vehicle structures under a typical mission cycle with combined loadings characterized by largely different time-scales.

  16. Invoking Thomas Kuhn: What Citation Analysis Reveals about Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loving, Cathleen C.; Cobern, William W.

    This paper analyzes how Thomas Kuhn's writings are used by others, especially science education researchers. Previous research in citation analysis is used to frame questions related to who cites Kuhn, in what manner and why. Research questions first focus on the variety of disciplines invoking Kuhn and to what extent Structure of Scientific Revolutions (SSR) is cited. The Web of Science database provides material from 1982 for this analysis. The science education literature is analyzed using back issues from 1985 of the Journal of Research in Science Teaching and Science Education. An article analysis reveals trends in terms of what Kuhnian ideas are most frequently invoked. Results indicate a wide array of disciplines from beekeeping to law cite Kuhn - especially generic citations to SSR. The science education journal analysis reveals pervasive use of the term paradigm, although use is quite varied. The two areas of research in science education most impacted by Kuhn appear to be conceptual change theory and constructivist epistemologies. Additional uses of Kuhn are discussed. The degree to which Kuhn is invoked in ways supporting the theoretical framework of citation analysis, whether his work is misappropriated, and the impact of Kuhn are discussed.

  17. Acoustic Analysis for a Steam Dome and Pipings of a 1,100 MWe-Class Boiling Water Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Yasumi, Kitajima; Masanobu, Watanabe; Keiji, Matsunaga; Tsuyoshi, Hagiwara

    2006-07-01

    For the integrity evaluation of steam dryers in up-rated nuclear power plants, we have applied acoustic analysis to a nuclear power plant steam dome and main steam pipings. We have selected a 1,100 MWe-class boiling water reactor as a subject of the analysis. We have constructed a three-dimensional finite element model, and conducted acoustic analyses. The analysis result suggested that the origin of steam pressure pulsation in high frequency range was due to vortex shedding at standpipes. (authors)

  18. International Space Station Acoustics - A Status Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    It is important to control acoustic noise aboard the International Space Station (ISS) to provide a satisfactory environment for voice communications, crew productivity, alarm audibility, and restful sleep, and to minimize the risk for temporary and permanent hearing loss. Acoustic monitoring is an important part of the noise control process on ISS, providing critical data for trend analysis, noise exposure analysis, validation of acoustic analyses and predictions, and to provide strong evidence for ensuring crew health and safety, thus allowing Flight Certification. To this purpose, sound level meter (SLM) measurements and acoustic noise dosimetry are routinely performed. And since the primary noise sources on ISS include the environmental control and life support system (fans and airflow) and active thermal control system (pumps and water flow), acoustic monitoring will reveal changes in hardware noise emissions that may indicate system degradation or performance issues. This paper provides the current acoustic levels in the ISS modules and sleep stations and is an update to the status presented in 2011. Since this last status report, many payloads (science experiment hardware) have been added and a significant number of quiet ventilation fans have replaced noisier fans in the Russian Segment. Also, noise mitigation efforts are planned to reduce the noise levels of the T2 treadmill and levels in Node 3, in general. As a result, the acoustic levels on the ISS continue to improve.

  19. Preliminary Analysis of Acoustic Measurements from the NASA-Gulfstream Airframe Noise Flight Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Lockhard, David D.; Humphreys, Willliam M.; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Van De Ven, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    The NASA-Gulfstream joint Airframe Noise Flight Test program was conducted at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility during October, 2006. The primary objective of the AFN flight test was to acquire baseline airframe noise data on a regional jet class of transport in order to determine noise source strengths and distributions for model validation. To accomplish this task, two measuring systems were used: a ground-based microphone array and individual microphones. Acoustic data for a Gulfstream G550 aircraft were acquired over the course of ten days. Over twenty-four test conditions were flown. The test matrix was designed to provide an acoustic characterization of both the full aircraft and individual airframe components and included cruise to landing configurations. Noise sources were isolated by selectively deploying individual components (flaps, main landing gear, nose gear, spoilers, etc.) and altering the airspeed, glide path, and engine settings. The AFN flight test program confirmed that the airframe is a major contributor to the noise from regional jets during landing operations. Sound pressure levels from the individual microphones on the ground revealed the flap system to be the dominant airframe noise source for the G550 aircraft. The corresponding array beamform maps showed that most of the radiated sound from the flaps originates from the side edges. Using velocity to the sixth power and Strouhal scaling of the sound pressure spectra obtained at different speeds failed to collapse the data into a single spectrum. The best data collapse was obtained when the frequencies were left unscaled.

  20. Dynamic analysis of submerged microscale plates: the effects of acoustic radiation and viscous dissipation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xianghong

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the dynamic characteristics of micromechanical rectangular plates used as sensing elements in a viscous compressible fluid. A novel modelling procedure for the plate–fluid interaction problem is developed on the basis of linearized Navier–Stokes equations and no-slip conditions. Analytical expression for the fluid-loading impedance is obtained using a double Fourier transform approach. This modelling work provides us an analytical means to study the effects of inertial loading, acoustic radiation and viscous dissipation of the fluid acting on the vibration of microplates. The numerical simulation is conducted on microplates with different boundary conditions and fluids with different viscosities. The simulation results reveal that the acoustic radiation dominates the damping mechanism of the submerged microplates. It is also proved that microplates offer better sensitivities (Q-factors) than the conventional beam type microcantilevers being mass sensing platforms in a viscous fluid environment. The frequency response features of microplates under highly viscous fluid loading are studied using the present model. The dynamics of the microplates with all edges clamped are less influenced by the highly viscous dissipation of the fluid than the microplates with other types of boundary conditions. PMID:27118914

  1. Statistical Analysis and Computer Generation of Spatially Correlated Acoustic Noise (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    this paper, we describe an approach for generating simulated acoustic noise with a spatial correlation coefficient distribution and maximum extreme... correlation coefficient and MEV distributions which drive the computer generation of a large number of simulated acoustic noise signals.

  2. a Psycholinguistic Model for Simultaneous Translation, and Proficiency Assessment by Automated Acoustic Analysis of Discourse.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaghi, Hussein M.

    Two separate but related issues are addressed: how simultaneous translation (ST) works on a cognitive level and how such translation can be objectively assessed. Both of these issues are discussed in the light of qualitative and quantitative analyses of a large corpus of recordings of ST and shadowing. The proposed ST model utilises knowledge derived from a discourse analysis of the data, many accepted facts in the psychology tradition, and evidence from controlled experiments that are carried out here. This model has three advantages: (i) it is based on analyses of extended spontaneous speech rather than word-, syllable-, or clause -bound stimuli; (ii) it draws equally on linguistic and psychological knowledge; and (iii) it adopts a non-traditional view of language called 'the linguistic construction of reality'. The discourse-based knowledge is also used to develop three computerised systems for the assessment of simultaneous translation: one is a semi-automated system that treats the content of the translation; and two are fully automated, one of which is based on the time structure of the acoustic signals whilst the other is based on their cross-correlation. For each system, several parameters of performance are identified, and they are correlated with assessments rendered by the traditional, subjective, qualitative method. Using signal processing techniques, the acoustic analysis of discourse leads to the conclusion that quality in simultaneous translation can be assessed quantitatively with varying degrees of automation. It identifies as measures of performance (i) three content-based standards; (ii) four time management parameters that reflect the influence of the source on the target language time structure; and (iii) two types of acoustical signal coherence. Proficiency in ST is shown to be directly related to coherence and speech rate but inversely related to omission and delay. High proficiency is associated with a high degree of simultaneity and

  3. Acoustic analysis of snoring sounds recorded with a smartphone according to obstruction site in OSAS patients.

    PubMed

    Koo, Soo Kweon; Kwon, Soon Bok; Kim, Yang Jae; Moon, J I Seung; Kim, Young Jun; Jung, Sung Hoon

    2017-03-01

    Snoring is a sign of increased upper airway resistance and is the most common symptom suggestive of obstructive sleep apnea. Acoustic analysis of snoring sounds is a non-invasive diagnostic technique and may provide a screening test that can determine the location of obstruction sites. We recorded snoring sounds according to obstruction level, measured by DISE, using a smartphone and focused on the analysis of formant frequencies. The study group comprised 32 male patients (mean age 42.9 years). The spectrogram pattern, intensity (dB), fundamental frequencies (F 0), and formant frequencies (F 1, F 2, and F 3) of the snoring sounds were analyzed for each subject. On spectrographic analysis, retropalatal level obstruction tended to produce sharp and regular peaks, while retrolingual level obstruction tended to show peaks with a gradual onset and decay. On formant frequency analysis, F 1 (retropalatal level vs. retrolingual level: 488.1 ± 125.8 vs. 634.7 ± 196.6 Hz) and F 2 (retropalatal level vs. retrolingual level: 1267.3 ± 306.6 vs. 1723.7 ± 550.0 Hz) of retrolingual level obstructions showed significantly higher values than retropalatal level obstruction (p < 0.05). This suggests that the upper airway is more severely obstructed with retrolingual level obstruction and that there is a greater change in tongue position. Acoustic analysis of snoring is a non-invasive diagnostic technique that can be easily applied at a relatively low cost. The analysis of formant frequencies will be a useful screening test for the prediction of occlusion sites. Moreover, smartphone can be effective for recording snoring sounds.

  4. Modification of computational auditory scene analysis (CASA) for noise-robust acoustic feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Minseok

    While there have been many attempts to mitigate interferences of background noise, the performance of automatic speech recognition (ASR) still can be deteriorated by various factors with ease. However, normal hearing listeners can accurately perceive sounds of their interests, which is believed to be a result of Auditory Scene Analysis (ASA). As a first attempt, the simulation of the human auditory processing, called computational auditory scene analysis (CASA), was fulfilled through physiological and psychological investigations of ASA. CASA comprised of Zilany-Bruce auditory model, followed by tracking fundamental frequency for voice segmentation and detecting pairs of onset/offset at each characteristic frequency (CF) for unvoiced segmentation. The resulting Time-Frequency (T-F) representation of acoustic stimulation was converted into acoustic feature, gammachirp-tone frequency cepstral coefficients (GFCC). 11 keywords with various environmental conditions are used and the robustness of GFCC was evaluated by spectral distance (SD) and dynamic time warping distance (DTW). In "clean" and "noisy" conditions, the application of CASA generally improved noise robustness of the acoustic feature compared to a conventional method with or without noise suppression using MMSE estimator. The intial study, however, not only showed the noise-type dependency at low SNR, but also called the evaluation methods in question. Some modifications were made to capture better spectral continuity from an acoustic feature matrix, to obtain faster processing speed, and to describe the human auditory system more precisely. The proposed framework includes: 1) multi-scale integration to capture more accurate continuity in feature extraction, 2) contrast enhancement (CE) of each CF by competition with neighboring frequency bands, and 3) auditory model modifications. The model modifications contain the introduction of higher Q factor, middle ear filter more analogous to human auditory system

  5. The discrimination of man-made explosions from earthquakes using seismo-acoustic analysis in the Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, Il-Young; Jeon, Jeong-Soo

    2010-05-01

    Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) operates an infrasound network consisting of seven seismo-acoustic arrays in South Korea. Development of the arrays began in 1999, partially in collaboration with Southern Methodist University, with the goal of detecting distant infrasound signals from natural and anthropogenic phenomena in and around the Korean Peninsula. The main operational purpose of this network is to discriminate man-made seismic events from seismicity including thousands of seismic events per year in the region. The man-made seismic events are major cause of error in estimating the natural seismicity, especially where the seismic activity is weak or moderate such as in the Korean Peninsula. In order to discriminate the man-made explosions from earthquakes, we have applied the seismo-acoustic analysis associating seismic and infrasonic signals generated from surface explosion. The observations of infrasound at multiple arrays made it possible to discriminate surface explosion, because small or moderate size earthquake is not sufficient to generate infrasound. Till now we have annually discriminated hundreds of seismic events in seismological catalog as surface explosions by the seismo-acoustic analysis. Besides of the surface explosions, the network also detected infrasound signals from other sources, such as bolide, typhoons, rocket launches, and underground nuclear test occurred in and around the Korean Peninsula. In this study, ten years of seismo-acoustic data are reviewed with recent infrasonic detection algorithm and association method that finally linked to the seismic monitoring system of the KIGAM to increase the detection rate of surface explosions. We present the long-term results of seismo-acoustic analysis, the detection capability of the multiple arrays, and implications for seismic source location. Since the seismo-acoustic analysis is proved as a definite method to discriminate surface explosion, the analysis will be

  6. Acoustic sensor networks for woodpecker localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Chen, C. E.; Ali, A.; Asgari, S.; Hudson, R. E.; Yao, K.; Estrin, D.; Taylor, C.

    2005-08-01

    Sensor network technology can revolutionize the study of animal ecology by providing a means of non-intrusive, simultaneous monitoring of interaction among multiple animals. In this paper, we investigate design, analysis, and testing of acoustic arrays for localizing acorn woodpeckers using their vocalizations. Each acoustic array consists of four microphones arranged in a square. All four audio channels within the same acoustic array are finely synchronized within a few micro seconds. We apply the approximate maximum likelihood (AML) method to synchronized audio channels of each acoustic array for estimating the direction-of-arrival (DOA) of woodpecker vocalizations. The woodpecker location is estimated by applying least square (LS) methods to DOA bearing crossings of multiple acoustic arrays. We have revealed the critical relation between microphone spacing of acoustic arrays and robustness of beamforming of woodpecker vocalizations. Woodpecker localization experiments using robust array element spacing in different types of environments are conducted and compared. Practical issues about calibration of acoustic array orientation are also discussed.

  7. Comparison of Modal Analysis Methods Applied to a Vibro-Acoustic Test Article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchard, Jocelyn; Pappa, Richard; Buehrle, Ralph; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2001-01-01

    Modal testing of a vibro-acoustic test article referred to as the Aluminum Testbed Cylinder (ATC) has provided frequency response data for the development of validated numerical models of complex structures for interior noise prediction and control. The ATC is an all aluminum, ring and stringer stiffened cylinder, 12 feet in length and 4 feet in diameter. The cylinder was designed to represent typical aircraft construction. Modal tests were conducted for several different configurations of the cylinder assembly under ambient and pressurized conditions. The purpose of this paper is to present results from dynamic testing of different ATC configurations using two modal analysis software methods: Eigensystem Realization Algorithm (ERA) and MTS IDEAS Polyreference method. The paper compares results from the two analysis methods as well as the results from various test configurations. The effects of pressurization on the modal characteristics are discussed.

  8. Optimizing Vowel Formant Measurements in Four Acoustic Analysis Systems for Diverse Speaker Groups

    PubMed Central

    Derdemezis, Ekaterini; Kent, Ray D.; Fourakis, Marios; Reinicke, Emily L.; Bolt, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study systematically assessed the effects of select linear predictive coding (LPC) analysis parameter manipulations on vowel formant measurements for diverse speaker groups using 4 trademarked Speech Acoustic Analysis Software Packages (SAASPs): CSL, Praat, TF32, and WaveSurfer. Method Productions of 4 words containing the corner vowels were recorded from 4 speaker groups with typical development (male and female adults and male and female children) and 4 speaker groups with Down syndrome (male and female adults and male and female children). Formant frequencies were determined from manual measurements using a consensus analysis procedure to establish formant reference values, and from the 4 SAASPs (using both the default analysis parameters and with adjustments or manipulations to select parameters). Smaller differences between values obtained from the SAASPs and the consensus analysis implied more optimal analysis parameter settings. Results Manipulations of default analysis parameters in CSL, Praat, and TF32 yielded more accurate formant measurements, though the benefit was not uniform across speaker groups and formants. In WaveSurfer, manipulations did not improve formant measurements. Conclusions The effects of analysis parameter manipulations on accuracy of formant-frequency measurements varied by SAASP, speaker group, and formant. The information from this study helps to guide clinical and research applications of SAASPs. PMID:26501214

  9. Nondeterministic wave-based methods for low- and mid-frequency response analysis of acoustic field with limited information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Baizhan; Yin, Hui; Yu, Dejie

    2017-02-01

    The response of the acoustic field, especially for the mid-frequency response, is very sensitive to uncertainties rising from manufacturing/construction tolerances, aggressive environmental factors and unpredictable excitations. To quantify these uncertainties with limited information effectively, two nondeterministic models (the interval model and the hybrid probability-interval model) are introduced. And then, two corresponding nondeterministic numerical methods are developed for the low- and mid-frequency response analysis of the acoustic field under these two nondeterministic models. The first one is the interval perturbation wave-based method (IPWBM) which is proposed to predict the maximal values of the low- and mid-frequency responses of the acoustic field under the interval model. The second one is the hybrid perturbation wave-based method (HPWBM) which is proposed to predict the maximal values of expectations and standard variances of the low- and mid-frequency responses of the acoustic field under the hybrid probability-interval model. The effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed nondeterministic numerical methods for the low- and mid-frequency response analysis of the acoustic field under the interval model and the hybrid probability-interval model are investigated by a numerical example.

  10. Improving the performance of acoustic invisibility with multilayer structure based on scattering analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Chen; Yuan, Yin; Kan, Wei-Wei; Yang, Jing; Zou, Xin-Ye

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, acoustic scattering from the system comprised of a cloaked object and the multilayer cloak with only one single pair of isotropic media is analyzed with a recursive numerical method. The designed acoustic parameters of the isotropic cloak media are assumed to be single-negative, and the resulting cloak can reduce acoustic scattering from an acoustic sensor while allowing it to receive external information. Several factors that may influence the performance of the cloak, including the number of layers and the acoustic dissipation of the medium are fully analyzed. Furthermore, the possibility of achieving acoustic invisibility with positive acoustic parameters is proposed by searching the optimum value in the parameter space and minimizing the scattering cross-section. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11274168, 11374157, 11174138, 11174139, 11222442, and 81127901) and the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2010CB327803 and 2012CB921504).

  11. Mathematical Analysis of Biomolecular Network Reveals Connections Between Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guanyu

    2012-02-01

    Connections between cancer and metabolic diseases may consist in the complex network of interactions among a common set of biomolecules. By applying singularity and bifurcation analysis, the phenotypes constrained by the AKT signaling pathway are identified and mapped onto the parameter space, which include cancer and certain metabolic diseases. By considering physiologic properties (sensitivity, robustness and adaptivity) the AKT pathway must possess in order to efficiently sense growth factors and nutrients, the region of normal responses is located. The analysis illuminates the parameter space and reveals system-level mechanisms in regulating biological functions (cell growth, survival, proliferation and metabolism) and how their deregulation may lead to the development of diseases. The analytical expressions summarize the synergistic interactions among many molecules, which provides valuable insights into therapeutic interventions.

  12. Stress-Induced Fracturing of Reservoir Rocks: Acoustic Monitoring and μCT Image Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Srutarshi; Stroisz, Anna M.; Fjær, Erling; Stenebråten, Jørn F.; Lund, Hans K.; Sønstebø, Eyvind F.

    2015-11-01

    Stress-induced fracturing in reservoir rocks is an important issue for the petroleum industry. While productivity can be enhanced by a controlled fracturing operation, it can trigger borehole instability problems by reactivating existing fractures/faults in a reservoir. However, safe fracturing can improve the quality of operations during CO2 storage, geothermal installation and gas production at and from the reservoir rocks. Therefore, understanding the fracturing behavior of different types of reservoir rocks is a basic need for planning field operations toward these activities. In our study, stress-induced fracturing of rock samples has been monitored by acoustic emission (AE) and post-experiment computer tomography (CT) scans. We have used hollow cylinder cores of sandstones and chalks, which are representatives of reservoir rocks. The fracture-triggering stress has been measured for different rocks and compared with theoretical estimates. The population of AE events shows the location of main fracture arms which is in a good agreement with post-test CT image analysis, and the fracture patterns inside the samples are visualized through 3D image reconstructions. The amplitudes and energies of acoustic events clearly indicate initiation and propagation of the main fractures. Time evolution of the radial strain measured in the fracturing tests will later be compared to model predictions of fracture size.

  13. A quantitative acoustic analysis of the vocal repertoire of the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

    PubMed

    Agamaite, James A; Chang, Chia-Jung; Osmanski, Michael S; Wang, Xiaoqin

    2015-11-01

    The common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus), a highly vocal New World primate species, has emerged in recent years as a promising animal model for studying brain mechanisms underlying perception, vocal production, and cognition. The present study provides a quantitative acoustic analysis of a large number of vocalizations produced by marmosets in a social environment within a captive colony. Previous classifications of the marmoset vocal repertoire were mostly based on qualitative observations. In the present study a variety of vocalizations from individually identified marmosets were sampled and multiple acoustic features of each type of vocalization were measured. Results show that marmosets have a complex vocal repertoire in captivity that consists of multiple vocalization types, including both simple calls and compound calls composed of sequences of simple calls. A detailed quantification of the vocal repertoire of the marmoset can serve as a solid basis for studying the behavioral significance of their vocalizations and is essential for carrying out studies that investigate such properties as perceptual boundaries between call types and among individual callers as well as neural coding mechanisms for vocalizations. It can also serve as the basis for evaluating abnormal vocal behaviors resulting from diseases or genetic manipulations.

  14. A quantitative acoustic analysis of the vocal repertoire of the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus)

    PubMed Central

    Agamaite, James A.; Chang, Chia-Jung; Osmanski, Michael S.; Wang, Xiaoqin

    2015-01-01

    The common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus), a highly vocal New World primate species, has emerged in recent years as a promising animal model for studying brain mechanisms underlying perception, vocal production, and cognition. The present study provides a quantitative acoustic analysis of a large number of vocalizations produced by marmosets in a social environment within a captive colony. Previous classifications of the marmoset vocal repertoire were mostly based on qualitative observations. In the present study a variety of vocalizations from individually identified marmosets were sampled and multiple acoustic features of each type of vocalization were measured. Results show that marmosets have a complex vocal repertoire in captivity that consists of multiple vocalization types, including both simple calls and compound calls composed of sequences of simple calls. A detailed quantification of the vocal repertoire of the marmoset can serve as a solid basis for studying the behavioral significance of their vocalizations and is essential for carrying out studies that investigate such properties as perceptual boundaries between call types and among individual callers as well as neural coding mechanisms for vocalizations. It can also serve as the basis for evaluating abnormal vocal behaviors resulting from diseases or genetic manipulations. PMID:26627765

  15. Quantitative analysis of the acoustic repertoire of southern right whales in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Webster, Trudi A; Dawson, Stephen M; Rayment, William J; Parks, Susan E; Van Parijs, Sofie M

    2016-07-01

    Quantitatively describing the acoustic repertoire of a species is important for establishing effective passive acoustic monitoring programs and developing automated call detectors. This process is particularly important when the study site is remote and visual surveys are not cost effective. Little is known about the vocal behavior of southern right whales (Eubalaena australis) in New Zealand. The aim of this study was to describe and quantify their entire vocal repertoire on calving grounds in the sub-Antarctic Auckland Islands. Over three austral winters (2010-2012), 4349 calls were recorded, measured, and classified into 10 call types. The most frequently observed types were pulsive, upcall, and tonal low vocalizations. A long tonal low call (≤15.5 s duration) and a very high call (peak frequency ∼750 Hz) were described for the first time. Random Forest multivariate analysis of 28 measured variables was used to classify calls with a high degree of accuracy (82%). The most important variables for classification were maximum ceiling frequency, number of inflection points, duration, and the difference between the start and end frequency. This classification system proved to be a repeatable, fast, and objective method for categorising right whale calls and shows promise for other vocal taxa.

  16. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... search IRSA's site Unique Hits since January 2003 Acoustic Neuroma Click Here for Acoustic Neuroma Practice Guideline ... to microsurgery. One doctor's story of having an acoustic neuroma In August 1991, Dr. Thomas F. Morgan ...

  17. Acoustic chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Lauterborn, W.; Parlitz, U.; Holzfuss, J.; Billo, A.; Akhatov, I.

    1996-06-01

    Acoustic cavitation, a complex, spatio-temporal dynamical system, is investigated with respect to its chaotic properties. The sound output, the {open_quote}{open_quote}noise{close_quote}{close_quote}, is subjected to time series analysis. The spatial dynamics of the bubble filaments is captured by high speed holographic cinematography and subsequent digital picture processing from the holograms. Theoretical models are put forward for describing the pattern formation. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. A New Semi-automated Method for Assessing Avian Acoustic Networks Reveals that Juvenile and Adult Zebra Finches Have Separate Calling Networks

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Marie S. A.; Soula, Hedi A.; Mariette, Mylene M.; Vignal, Clémentine

    2016-01-01

    Social networks are often inferred from spatial associations, but other parameters like acoustic communication are likely to play a central role in within group interactions. However, it is currently difficult to determine which individual initiates vocalizations, or who responds to whom. To this aim, we designed a method that allows analyzing group vocal network while controlling for spatial networks, by positioning each group member in equidistant individual cages and analyzing continuous vocal interactions semi-automatically. We applied this method to two types of zebra finch groups, composed of either two adult females and two juveniles, or four young adults (juveniles from the first groups). Young often co-occur in the same social group as adults but are likely to have a different social role, which may be reflected in their vocal interactions. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that the social structure of the group influences the parameters of the group vocal network. We found that groups including juveniles presented periods with higher level of activity than groups composed of young adults. Using two types of analyses (Markov analysis and cross-correlation), we showed that juveniles as well as adults were more likely to respond to individuals of their own age-class (i.e. to call one after another, in terms of turn-taking, and within a short time-window, in terms of time delay). When juveniles turned into adulthood, they showed adult characteristics of vocal patterns. Together our results suggest that vocal behavior changes during ontogeny, and individuals are more strongly connected with individuals of the same age-class within acoustic networks. PMID:27965602

  19. Vibro-acoustic modelling of aircraft double-walls with structural links using Statistical Energy Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campolina, Bruno L.

    The prediction of aircraft interior noise involves the vibroacoustic modelling of the fuselage with noise control treatments. This structure is composed of a stiffened metallic or composite panel, lined with a thermal and acoustic insulation layer (glass wool), and structurally connected via vibration isolators to a commercial lining panel (trim). The goal of this work aims at tailoring the noise control treatments taking design constraints such as weight and space optimization into account. For this purpose, a representative aircraft double-wall is modelled using the Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) method. Laboratory excitations such as diffuse acoustic field and point force are addressed and trends are derived for applications under in-flight conditions, considering turbulent boundary layer excitation. The effect of the porous layer compression is firstly addressed. In aeronautical applications, compression can result from the installation of equipment and cables. It is studied analytically and experimentally, using a single panel and a fibrous uniformly compressed over 100% of its surface. When compression increases, a degradation of the transmission loss up to 5 dB for a 50% compression of the porous thickness is observed mainly in the mid-frequency range (around 800 Hz). However, for realistic cases, the effect should be reduced since the compression rate is lower and compression occurs locally. Then the transmission through structural connections between panels is addressed using a four-pole approach that links the force-velocity pair at each side of the connection. The modelling integrates experimental dynamic stiffness of isolators, derived using an adapted test rig. The structural transmission is then experimentally validated and included in the double-wall SEA model as an equivalent coupling loss factor (CLF) between panels. The tested structures being flat, only axial transmission is addressed. Finally, the dominant sound transmission paths are

  20. Testing of containers made of glass-fiber reinforced plastic with the aid of acoustic emission analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolitz, K.; Brockmann, W.; Fischer, T.

    1979-01-01

    Acoustic emission analysis as a quasi-nondestructive test method makes it possible to differentiate clearly, in judging the total behavior of fiber-reinforced plastic composites, between critical failure modes (in the case of unidirectional composites fiber fractures) and non-critical failure modes (delamination processes or matrix fractures). A particular advantage is that, for varying pressure demands on the composites, the emitted acoustic pulses can be analyzed with regard to their amplitude distribution. In addition, definite indications as to how the damages occurred can be obtained from the time curves of the emitted acoustic pulses as well as from the particular frequency spectrum. Distinct analogies can be drawn between the various analytical methods with respect to whether the failure modes can be classified as critical or non-critical.

  1. Theoretical and experimental dynamic analysis aimed at the improvement of an acoustic method for fresco detachment diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Vescovo, Dionisio; Fregolent, Annalisa

    2009-10-01

    An acoustic non-invasive method for the diagnosis of detachment in frescos was previously proposed by the authors. This method is based on the indirect evaluation of the vibrations due to detachments, by means of a surface inspection. In this paper the relations between the dynamics of the structure to be inspected and the operational principles of the acoustic method of diagnosis are presented. The dynamic analysis is carried out using experimental investigations and analytical and numerical models. It shows that the quality of the diagnosis depends on the capability of the acoustic device to excite the structural resonances related to the detachments. These results are useful for future improvements, in particular to enhance the sensitivity of the proposed method.

  2. Genomic analysis of primordial dwarfism reveals novel disease genes.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Ranad; Faqeih, Eissa; Ansari, Shinu; Abdel-Salam, Ghada; Al-Hassnan, Zuhair N; Al-Shidi, Tarfa; Alomar, Rana; Sogaty, Sameera; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2014-02-01

    Primordial dwarfism (PD) is a disease in which severely impaired fetal growth persists throughout postnatal development and results in stunted adult size. The condition is highly heterogeneous clinically, but the use of certain phenotypic aspects such as head circumference and facial appearance has proven helpful in defining clinical subgroups. In this study, we present the results of clinical and genomic characterization of 16 new patients in whom a broad definition of PD was used (e.g., 3M syndrome was included). We report a novel PD syndrome with distinct facies in two unrelated patients, each with a different homozygous truncating mutation in CRIPT. Our analysis also reveals, in addition to mutations in known PD disease genes, the first instance of biallelic truncating BRCA2 mutation causing PD with normal bone marrow analysis. In addition, we have identified a novel locus for Seckel syndrome based on a consanguineous multiplex family and identified a homozygous truncating mutation in DNA2 as the likely cause. An additional novel PD disease candidate gene XRCC4 was identified by autozygome/exome analysis, and the knockout mouse phenotype is highly compatible with PD. Thus, we add a number of novel genes to the growing list of PD-linked genes, including one which we show to be linked to a novel PD syndrome with a distinct facial appearance. PD is extremely heterogeneous genetically and clinically, and genomic tools are often required to reach a molecular diagnosis.

  3. Acoustic analysis of the tremulous voice: assessing the utility of the correlation dimension and perturbation parameters

    PubMed Central

    MacCallum, Julia K.; Zhang, Yu; Jiang, Jack J.

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic analysis may provide a useful means to quantitatively characterize the tremulous voice. Signals were obtained from 25 subjects with diagnoses of either Parkinson's disease or vocal polyps exhibiting vocal tremor. These were compared to signals from 24 subjects with normal voices. Signals were analyzed via correlation dimension and several parameters from the Multi-Dimensional Voice Program (MDVP): percent jitter, percent shimmer, amplitude tremor intensity index (ATRI), frequency tremor intensity index (FTRI), amplitude tremor frequency (Fatr), and fundamental frequency tremor frequency (Fftr). No significant difference was found between the tremor and control groups for ATRI and Fatr. Percent jitter, percent shimmer, FTRI, Fftr, and correlation dimension values were found to be significantly higher in the tremor group than in the control group. We conclude that these parameters may have utility for the clinical quantification of tremor severity and treatment effects. PMID:19909966

  4. Characteristic analysis of underwater acoustic scattering echoes in the wavelet transform domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mei; Li, Xiukun; Yang, Yang; Meng, Xiangxia

    2017-01-01

    Underwater acoustic scattering echoes have time-space structures and are aliasing in time and frequency domains. Different series of echoes properties are not identified when incident angle is unknown. This article investigates variations in target echoes of monostatic sonar to address this problem. The mother wavelet with similar structures has been proposed on the basis of preprocessing signal waveform using matched filter, and the theoretical expressions between delay factor and incident angle are derived in the wavelet domain. Analysis of simulation data and experimental results in free-field pool show that this method can effectively separate geometrical scattering components of target echoes. The time delay estimation obtained from geometrical echoes at a single angle is consistent with target geometrical features, which provides a basis for object recognition without angle information. The findings provide valuable insights for analyzing elastic scattering echoes in actual ocean environment.

  5. A Neural Network/Acoustic Emission Analysis of Impact Damaged Graphite/Epoxy Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.; Hill, Erik v. K.; Workman, Gary L.; Russell, Samuel S.

    1995-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) signal analysis has been used to measure the effects of impact damage on burst pressure in 5.75 inch diameter, inert propellant filled, filament wound pressure vessels. The AE data were collected from fifteen graphite/epoxy pressure vessels featuring five damage states and three resin systems. A burst pressure prediction model was developed by correlating the AE amplitude (frequency) distribution, generated during the first pressure ramp to 800 psig (approximately 25% of the average expected burst pressure for an undamaged vessel) to known burst pressures using a four layered back propagation neural network. The neural network, trained on three vessels from each resin system, was able to predict burst pressures with a worst case error of 5.7% for the entire fifteen bottle set.

  6. Time-Accurate Simulations and Acoustic Analysis of Slat Free-Shear Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Singer, Bart A.; Berkman, Mert E.

    2001-01-01

    A detailed computational aeroacoustic analysis of a high-lift flow field is performed. Time-accurate Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) computations simulate the free shear layer that originates from the slat cusp. Both unforced and forced cases are studied. Preliminary results show that the shear layer is a good amplifier of disturbances in the low to mid-frequency range. The Ffowcs-Williams and Hawkings equation is solved to determine the acoustic field using the unsteady flow data from the RANS calculations. The noise radiated from the excited shear layer has a spectral shape qualitatively similar to that obtained from measurements in a corresponding experimental study of the high-lift system.

  7. Analysis of Acoustic Emission Signals During Laser Spot Welding of SS304 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seounghwan; Ahn, Suneung; Park, Changsoon

    2014-03-01

    In this article, an in-process monitoring scheme for a pulsed Nd:YAG laser spot welding (LSW) is presented. Acoustic emission (AE) was selected for the feedback signal, and the AE data during LSW were sampled and analyzed for varying process conditions such as laser power and pulse duration. In the analysis, possible AE generation sources such as melting and solidification mechanism during welding were investigated using both the time- and frequency-domain signal processings. The results, which show close relationships between LSW and AE signals, were adopted in the feature (input) selection of a back-propagation artificial neural network, to predict the weldability of stainless steel sheets. Processed outputs agree well with LSW experimental data, which confirms the usefulness of the proposed scheme.

  8. Finite element approach analysis for characteristics of electromagnetic acoustic Lamb wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaoming; Li, Songsong

    2016-04-01

    The electromagnetic acoustic Lamb wave, with the advantages of quickly detecting the defect and sensitivity to the defects, is widely used in non-destructive testing of thin sheet. In this paper, the directivity of sound field, Phase velocity, group velocity and particle displacement amplitude of Lamb wave are study based on finite element analysis method. The results show that, for 1mm aluminum, when the excitation frequency 0.64MHz, the displacement amplitude of A0 mode is minimum, and the displacement amplitude S0 mode is largest. Appropriate to increase the displacement amplitude of a mode, while reducing displacement amplitude of another mode, to achieve the excitation of a single mode Lamb wave. It is helpful to the Optimization of transducer parameters, the choice of Lamb wave modes and providing optimal excitation frequency.

  9. The acoustic simulation and analysis of complicated reciprocating compressor piping systems, II: Program structure and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    To, C. W. S.

    1984-09-01

    The main objectives of the investigation reported in this paper, Part II, and its companion paper, Part I, are (a) to provide a formulation, including the mean flow effects and suitable for digital computer automation, of the acoustics of complicated piping systems, and (b) to develop a comprehensive digital computer program for the simulation and analysis of complicated reciprocating compressor piping systems. In this paper, the digital computer program structure and applications of the program developed, written in Fortran IV, are described. It is concluded that the computer program is versatile and user-friendly. It is capable of providing a great deal of information from one set of input data, and is open-ended and modular for updating.

  10. Acoustic source localization using time-difference of arrival and neural-network analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Nan; Dong, Jiancheng; Ying, Ren D.

    2013-03-01

    The developing embedded technology requires revolutions in human-machine interaction. In this paper, we propose a novel method using localization of the taping sound on the table to replace the keyboard as manual input device. The method is applicable with a quad-channel-array collection of acoustic signals, from which the time-of-arrival differences and the position information could be estimated. In practice, as our table is in a limited size and the material properties are complex, the traditional localization algorithm based on time-of-arrival differences contains a sizable margin for error. Furthermore, we use neural-network analysis to improve recognition accuracy. Then experiments and simulations are carried out to verify this signal processing algorithm.

  11. Nonlinear Acoustic Response of an Aircraft Fuselage Sidewall Structure by a Reduced-Order Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przekop, Adam; Rizzi, Stephen A.; Groen, David S.

    2006-01-01

    A reduced-order nonlinear analysis of a structurally complex aircraft fuselage sidewall panel is undertaken to explore issues associated with application of such analyses to practical structures. Of primary interest is the trade-off between computational efficiency and accuracy. An approach to modal basis selection is offered based upon the modal participation in the linear regime. The nonlinear static response to a uniform pressure loading and nonlinear random response to a uniformly distributed acoustic loading are computed. Comparisons of the static response with a nonlinear static solution in physical degrees-of-freedom demonstrate the efficacy of the approach taken for modal basis selection. Changes in the modal participation as a function of static and random loading levels suggest a means for improvement in the basis selection.

  12. Use of high frequency analysis of acoustic emission signals to determine rolling element bearing condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockerill, A.; Holford, K. M.; Bradshaw, T.; Cole, P.; Pullin, R.; Clarke, A.

    2015-07-01

    Acoustic Emission (AE) sensors were used to detect signals arising from a cylindrical roller bearing with artificial defects seeded onto the outer raceway. An SKF N204ECP roller bearing was placed between two double row spherical roller bearings, type SKF 22202E, and loaded between 0.29 and 1.79kN. Speed was constant at 5780rpm. High frequency analysis allowed insight into the condition of the bearings through the determination of an increase in the structural resonances of the system as the size of an artificial defect was increased. As higher loads were applied, frequencies around 100kHz were excited, indicating the release of AE possibly attributed to friction and the plastic deformation as peaks, induced through engraving of the raceway, were flattened and worn down. Sensitivity of AE to this level in bearings indicates the potential of the technique to detect the early stages of bearing failure during life tests.

  13. Characteristic analysis of underwater acoustic scattering echoes in the wavelet transform domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mei; Li, Xiukun; Yang, Yang; Meng, Xiangxia

    2017-03-01

    Underwater acoustic scattering echoes have time-space structures and are aliasing in time and frequency domains. Different series of echoes properties are not identified when incident angle is unknown. This article investigates variations in target echoes of monostatic sonar to address this problem. The mother wavelet with similar structures has been proposed on the basis of preprocessing signal waveform using matched filter, and the theoretical expressions between delay factor and incident angle are derived in the wavelet domain. Analysis of simulation data and experimental results in free-field pool show that this method can effectively separate geometrical scattering components of target echoes. The time delay estimation obtained from geometrical echoes at a single angle is consistent with target geometrical features, which provides a basis for object recognition without angle information. The findings provide valuable insights for analyzing elastic scattering echoes in actual ocean environment.

  14. Sentential influences on acoustic-phonetic processing: A Granger causality analysis of multimodal imaging data

    PubMed Central

    Gow, David W.; Olson, Bruna B.

    2015-01-01

    Sentential context influences the way that listeners identify phonetically ambiguous or perceptual degraded speech sounds. Unfortunately, inherent inferential limitations on the interpretation of behavioral or BOLD imaging results make it unclear whether context influences perceptual processing directly, or acts at a post-perceptual decision stage. In this paper, we use Kalman-filter enabled Granger causation analysis of MR-constrained MEG/EEG data to distinguish between these possibilities. Using a retrospective probe verification task, we found that sentential context strongly affected the interpretation of words with ambiguous initial voicing (e.g. DUSK-TUSK). This behavioral context effect coincided with increased influence by brain regions associated with lexical representation on regions associated with acoustic-phonetic processing. These results support an interactive view of sentence context effects on speech perception. PMID:27595118

  15. Comparison of sonochemiluminescence images using image analysis techniques and identification of acoustic pressure fields via simulation.

    PubMed

    Tiong, T Joyce; Chandesa, Tissa; Yap, Yeow Hong

    2017-05-01

    One common method to determine the existence of cavitational activity in power ultrasonics systems is by capturing images of sonoluminescence (SL) or sonochemiluminescence (SCL) in a dark environment. Conventionally, the light emitted from SL or SCL was detected based on the number of photons. Though this method is effective, it could not identify the sonochemical zones of an ultrasonic systems. SL/SCL images, on the other hand, enable identification of 'active' sonochemical zones. However, these images often provide just qualitative data as the harvesting of light intensity data from the images is tedious and require high resolution images. In this work, we propose a new image analysis technique using pseudo-colouring images to quantify the SCL zones based on the intensities of the SCL images and followed by comparison of the active SCL zones with COMSOL simulated acoustic pressure zones.

  16. Analysis of the acoustic climate of a spa park using the fuzzy set theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sztubecka, Małgorzata; Sztubecki, Jacek

    2016-11-01

    The paper describes the differences between the actual results of the measurement of equivalent sound level and the feelings of people visiting "a Spa Park". Noise, as one of the environmental pollutants, cause detrimental effects on the recipient. Measurements of noise are usually performed in urban areas, especially in the road environments, providing a basis for measures to limit their impact on the environment. Often in the measurement there are ignored areas for recreation. Usually, they do not determine the relationship between the results of measurements of noise equivalent sound level and the individual feelings of the people living in these areas. The analysis was performed with the use of fuzzy set theory. The evaluation of the acoustic climate on the "Spa Park" should be determined on the basis of sound level measurements and questionnaires.

  17. A numerical analysis of tonal acoustics in rotor-stator interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rangwalla, A. A.; Rai, M. M.

    1993-01-01

    In this study, the unsteady, thin-layer, Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a system of patched grids for a rotor-stator configuration of an axial turbine. The study focuses on the plurality of spinning modes that are present in such an interaction. The propagation of these modes in the upstream and downstream regions is analyzed and compared with numerical results. It was found that the numerically calculated tonal acoustics could be affected by the type of numerical boundary conditions employed at the inlet and exit of the computational boundaries and the grid spacing in the upstream and downstream regions. Results in the form of surface pressure amplitudes and the spectra of turbine tones and their far field behavior are presented. Numerical results and experimental data are compared wherever possible. The 'mode-content' for different harmonics of blade-passage frequency is shown to conform with that predicted by a kinematical analysis.

  18. Acoustic emission analysis of fatigue crack growth in 2024-T4 aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.Y.; Ono, K.

    1995-12-31

    Fatigue crack growth experiments have been performed on single-edge cracked Al 2024-T4 specimens. Acoustic emission (AE) signals are collected using a Fracture Wave Detector at various crack growth rate, ranging from 0.25 to 50 {mu}m/cycle. Relationships between signal amplitude, RMS voltage, stress intensity factor range and crack growth rate are examined. Characteristics of AE signals generated are investigated by ICEPAK-based pattern recognition analysis with a trained K-nearest neighbor classifier. AE signals from crack propagation are studied to discriminate features of various signal types and to correlate the waveforms with respect to crack growth rate with different types of AE source. Classification results will be given.

  19. Phase-based dispersion analysis for acoustic array borehole logging data.

    PubMed

    Assous, Said; Elkington, Peter; Linnett, Laurie

    2014-04-01

    A phase-based dispersion analysis method for velocity (slowness) extraction from guided waves recorded by an acoustic borehole logging tool in a geological formation is presented. The technique consists of acquiring waveforms from an array of receivers distributed along the tool and constructing the dispersion characteristic by processing in the frequency domain and exploiting phase information to measure the travel time for each frequency component. The approach is nonparametric and completely data-driven and provides high resolution estimates that do not rely on velocity guesses or assumptions regarding the type of modes. Results are free of the aliases and spurious modes which are characteristic of some prior approaches. Examples of dispersion estimation curves are presented using synthesized flexural waves and field data from wireline dipole sonic tools; results are compared with those from the weighted spectral semblance (WSS) and amplitude and phase slowness estimation (APES) methods to demonstrate the effectiveness and utility of the proposed method.

  20. Numerical analysis of the transportation characteristics of a self-running sliding stage based on near-field acoustic levitation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Kai; Liu, Yuanyuan; Cheng, Miaomiao

    2015-12-01

    Owing to its distinct non-contact and oil-free characteristics, a self-running sliding stage based on near-field acoustic levitation can be used in an environment, which demands clean rooms and zero noise. This paper presents a numerical analysis on the lifting and transportation capacity of a non-contact transportation system. Two simplified structure models, namely, free vibration and force vibration models, are proposed for the study of the displacement amplitude distribution of two cases using the finite element method. After coupling the stage displacement into the film thickness, the Reynolds equation is solved by the finite difference method to obtain the lifting and thrusting forces. Parametric analyses of the effects of amplitude, frequency, and standing wave ratio (SWR) on the sliding stage dynamic performance are investigated. Numerical results show good agreement with published experimental values. The predictions also reveal that greater transportation capacity of the self-running sliding stage is generally achieved at less SWR and at higher amplitude.

  1. Continuous wavelet transform analysis and modal location analysis acoustic emission source location for nuclear piping crack growth monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Mohd, Shukri; Holford, Karen M.; Pullin, Rhys

    2014-02-12

    Source location is an important feature of acoustic emission (AE) damage monitoring in nuclear piping. The ability to accurately locate sources can assist in source characterisation and early warning of failure. This paper describe the development of a novelAE source location technique termed 'Wavelet Transform analysis and Modal Location (WTML)' based on Lamb wave theory and time-frequency analysis that can be used for global monitoring of plate like steel structures. Source location was performed on a steel pipe of 1500 mm long and 220 mm outer diameter with nominal thickness of 5 mm under a planar location test setup using H-N sources. The accuracy of the new technique was compared with other AE source location methods such as the time of arrival (TOA) techniqueand DeltaTlocation. Theresults of the study show that the WTML method produces more accurate location resultscompared with TOA and triple point filtering location methods. The accuracy of the WTML approach is comparable with the deltaT location method but requires no initial acoustic calibration of the structure.

  2. Comparative analysis reveals the underlying mechanism of vertebrate seasonal reproduction.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Keisuke; Yoshimura, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    Animals utilize photoperiodic changes as a calendar to regulate seasonal reproduction. Birds have highly sophisticated photoperiodic mechanisms and functional genomics analysis in quail uncovered the signal transduction pathway regulating avian seasonal reproduction. Birds detect light with deep brain photoreceptors. Long day (LD) stimulus induces secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) from the pars tuberalis (PT) of the pituitary gland. PT-derived TSH locally activates thyroid hormone (TH) in the hypothalamus, which induces gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and hence gonadotropin secretion. However, during winter, low temperatures increase serum TH for adaptive thermogenesis, which accelerates germ cell apoptosis by activating the genes involved in metamorphosis. Therefore, TH has a dual role in the regulation of seasonal reproduction. Studies using TSH receptor knockout mice confirmed the involvement of PT-derived TSH in mammalian seasonal reproduction. In addition, studies in mice revealed that the tissue-specific glycosylation of TSH diversifies its function in the circulation to avoid crosstalk. In contrast to birds and mammals, one of the molecular machineries necessary for the seasonal reproduction of fish are localized in the saccus vasculosus from the photoreceptor to the neuroendocrine output. Thus, comparative analysis is a powerful tool to uncover the universality and diversity of fundamental properties in various organisms.

  3. Generalization of von Neumann analysis for a model of two discrete halfspaces : the acoustic case.

    SciTech Connect

    Haney, Matthew M.

    2006-12-01

    Evaluating the performance of finite-difference algorithms typically uses a technique known as von Neumann analysis. For a given algorithm, application of the technique yields both a dispersion relation valid for the discrete time-space grid and a mathematical condition for stability. In practice, a major shortcoming of conventional von Neumann analysis is that it can be applied only to an idealized numerical model - that of an infinite, homogeneous whole space. Experience has shown that numerical instabilities often arise in finite-difference simulations of wave propagation at interfaces with strong material contrasts. These interface instabilities occur even though the conventional von Neumann stability criterion may be satisfied at each point of the numerical model. To address this issue, I generalize von Neumann analysis for a model of two half-spaces. I perform the analysis for the case of acoustic wave propagation using a standard staggered-grid finite-difference numerical scheme. By deriving expressions for the discrete reflection and transmission coefficients, I study under what conditions the discrete reflection and transmission coefficients become unbounded. I find that instabilities encountered in numerical modeling near interfaces with strong material contrasts are linked to these cases and develop a modified stability criterion that takes into account the resulting instabilities. I test and verify the stability criterion by executing a finite-difference algorithm under conditions predicted to be stable and unstable.

  4. Optimal design and evaluation criteria for acoustic emission pulse signature analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, J. R.; Townsend, M. A.; Packman, P. F.

    1977-01-01

    Successful pulse recording and evaluation is strongly dependent on the instrumentation system selected and the method of analyzing the pulse signature. The paper studies system design, signal analysis techniques, and interdependences with a view toward defining optimal approaches to pulse signal analysis. For this purpose, the instrumentation system is modeled, and analytical pulses, representative of the types of acoustic emissions to be distinguished are passed through the system. Particular attention is given to comparing frequency spectrum analysis and deconvolution referred to as time domain reconstruction of the pulse or pulse train. The possibility of optimal transducer-filter system parameters is investigated. Deconvolution of a pulse is shown to be a superior approach for transient pulse analysis. Reshaping of a transducer output back to the original input pulse is possible and gives an accurate representation of the generating pulse in the time domain. Any definable transducer and filter system can be used for measurement of pulses by means of the deconvolution method. Selection of design variables for general usage is discussed.

  5. Time-domain analysis of resonant acoustic nonlinearity arising from cracks in multilayer ceramic capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Ward L.; Kim, Sudook A.; White, Grady S.; Herzberger, Jaemi; Peterson, Kirsten L.; Heyliger, Paul R.

    2016-02-01

    Acoustic nonlinearity of cracked and uncracked multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCCs) was characterized through time-domain analysis of resonant waveforms following tone-burst excitation. A phase-sensitive receiver was employed to measure the phase, relative to a reference sinusoid, of decaying oscillations of a resonant mode near 1 MHz that was excited through ferroelectric coupling within the barium-titanate-based ceramic of the MLCC. Amplitude dependence of the resonant frequency during decay of the oscillations was characterized through measurements of changes in the resonant phase versus time. Waveforms were analyzed by fitting the recorded RF amplitude versus time to a decaying exponential and inserting the parameters of this fit into a second function to fit the time-dependent phase, with amplitude dependence of the resonant frequency incorporated in the second function. The measurements and analyses were performed on unmounted type-1210 MLCCs before and after quenching in ice water from elevated temperatures. This thermal treatment generated surface-breaking cracks in a fraction of the specimens. Measurements of a nonlinear parameter B of the capacitors before quenching were used to set a range corresponding to plus and minus three standard deviations (±3σ) relative to the mean of a Gaussian fit to the distribution of this parameter. 93 % of the values of B determined for heat-treated MLCCs with cracks were outside of this ±3σ range of the as-received MLCCs, while only 10 % of the values of B for heat-treated MLCCs without visible cracks were outside this range. These results indicate that time-domain nonlinear measurements with tone-burst excitation are a promising approach for rapid nondestructive detection of cracks that have no significant initial effect on the electrical characteristics of an MLCC but can evolve into conductive pathways during service and lead to electrical-device failure. They also illustrate the potential of this approach for

  6. Acoustic emission (AE) health monitoring of diaphragm type couplings using neural network analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godinez-Azcuaga, Valery F.; Shu, Fong; Finlayson, Richard D.; O'Donnell, Bruce

    2005-05-01

    This paper presents the latest results obtained from Acoustic Emission (AE) monitoring and detection of cracks and/or damage in diaphragm couplings, which are used in some aircraft and engine drive systems. Early detection of mechanical failure in aircraft drive train components is a key safety and economical issue with both military and civil sectors of aviation. One of these components is the diaphragm-type coupling, which has been evaluated as the ideal drive coupling for many application requirements such as high speed, high torque, and non-lubrication. Its flexible axial and angular displacement capabilities have made it indispensable for aircraft drive systems. However, diaphragm-type couplings may develop cracks during their operation. The ability to monitor, detect, identify, and isolate coupling cracks on an operational aircraft system is required in order to provide sufficient advance warning to preclude catastrophic failure. It is known that metallic structures generate characteristic Acoustic Emission (AE) during crack growth/propagation cycles. This phenomenon makes AE very attractive among various monitoring techniques for fault detection in diaphragm-type couplings. However, commercially available systems capable of automatic discrimination between signals from crack growth and normal mechanical noise are not readily available. Positive classification of signals requires experienced personnel and post-test data analysis, which tend to be a time-consuming, laborious, and expensive process. With further development of automated classifiers, AE can become a fully autonomous fault detection technique requiring no human intervention after implementation. AE has the potential to be fully integrated with automated query and response mechanisms for system/process monitoring and control.

  7. Room acoustics analysis using circular arrays: an experimental study based on sound field plane-wave decomposition.

    PubMed

    Torres, Ana M; Lopez, Jose J; Pueo, Basilio; Cobos, Maximo

    2013-04-01

    Plane-wave decomposition (PWD) methods using microphone arrays have been shown to be a very useful tool within the applied acoustics community for their multiple applications in room acoustics analysis and synthesis. While many theoretical aspects of PWD have been previously addressed in the literature, the practical advantages of the PWD method to assess the acoustic behavior of real rooms have been barely explored so far. In this paper, the PWD method is employed to analyze the sound field inside a selected set of real rooms having a well-defined purpose. To this end, a circular microphone array is used to capture and process a number of impulse responses at different spatial positions, providing angle-dependent data for both direct and reflected wavefronts. The detection of reflected plane waves is performed by means of image processing techniques applied over the raw array response data and over the PWD data, showing the usefulness of image-processing-based methods for room acoustics analysis.

  8. The Use of Artificial Neural Networks to Estimate Speech Intelligibility from Acoustic Variables: A Preliminary Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metz, Dale Evan; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A preliminary scheme for estimating the speech intelligibility of hearing-impaired speakers from acoustic parameters, using a computerized artificial neural network to process mathematically the acoustic input variables, is outlined. Tests with 60 hearing-impaired speakers found the scheme to be highly accurate in identifying speakers separated by…

  9. An Analysis of Consolidation Grouting Effect of Bedrock Based on its Acoustic Velocity Increase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming; Lu, Wen-bo; Zhang, Wen-ju; Yan, Peng; Zhou, Chuang-bing

    2015-05-01

    Acoustic velocity is an important parameter to evaluate the mechanical properties of fractured rock masses. Based on the in situ acoustic velocity measurement data of ~20 hydropower stations in China, we assessed the acoustic velocity increase of rock masses as a result of consolidation grouting in different geological conditions, such as fault sites, weathered areas and excavation-induced damage zones. We established an empirical relationship between the acoustic velocity of rock masses before and after consolidation grouting, and examined the correlation between acoustic velocity and deformation modulus. A case study is presented about a foundation consolidation grouting project for an intake tower of Pubugou Hydropower Station. The results show that different types of rock masses possess distinct ranges for resultant acoustic velocity increase by consolidation grouting. Under a confidence interval of 95 %, the ranges of the increasing rate of acoustic velocity in a faulted zone, weathered zone, and excavation-induced damage zone are observed to be 12.7-43.1, 12.3-31.2, and 6.9-14.5 %, respectively. The acoustic velocity before grouting and its increasing rate can be used to predict the effectiveness of consolidation grouting.

  10. A dimension-wise analysis method for the structural-acoustic system with interval parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Menghui; Du, Jianke; Wang, Chong; Li, Yunlong

    2017-04-01

    The interval structural-acoustic analysis is mainly accomplished by interval and subinterval perturbation methods. Potential limitations for these intrusive methods include overestimation or interval translation effect for the former and prohibitive computational cost for the latter. In this paper, a dimension-wise analysis method is thus proposed to overcome these potential limitations. In this method, a sectional curve of the system response surface along each input dimensionality is firstly extracted, the minimal and maximal points of which are identified based on its Legendre polynomial approximation. And two input vectors, i.e. the minimal and maximal input vectors, are dimension-wisely assembled by the minimal and maximal points of all sectional curves. Finally, the lower and upper bounds of system response are computed by deterministic finite element analysis at the two input vectors. Two numerical examples are studied to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method and show that, compared to the interval and subinterval perturbation method, a better accuracy is achieved without much compromise on efficiency by the proposed method, especially for nonlinear problems with large interval parameters.

  11. Linear and nonlinear analysis of dust acoustic waves in dissipative space dusty plasmas with trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Hanbaly, A. M.; El-Shewy, E. K.; Sallah, M.; Darweesh, H. F.

    2015-05-01

    The propagation of linear and nonlinear dust acoustic waves in a homogeneous unmagnetized, collisionless and dissipative dusty plasma consisted of extremely massive, micron-sized, negative dust grains has been investigated. The Boltzmann distribution is suggested for electrons whereas vortex-like distribution for ions. In the linear analysis, the dispersion relation is obtained, and the dependence of damping rate of the waves on the carrier wave number , the dust kinematic viscosity coefficient and the ratio of the ions to the electrons temperatures is discussed. In the nonlinear analysis, the modified Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers (mKdV-Burgers) equation is derived via the reductive perturbation method. Bifurcation analysis is discussed for non-dissipative system in the absence of Burgers term. In the case of dissipative system, the tangent hyperbolic method is used to solve mKdV-Burgers equation, and yield the shock wave solution. The obtained results may be helpful in better understanding of waves propagation in the astrophysical plasmas as well as in inertial confinement fusion laboratory plasmas.

  12. Objective assessment of tracheoesophageal and esophageal speech using acoustic analysis of voice.

    PubMed

    Sirić, Ljiljana; Sos, Dario; Rosso, Marinela; Stevanović, Sinisa

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the voice quality of alaryngeal tracheoesophageal and esophageal speech, and to determine which of them is more similar to laryngeal voice production, and thus more acceptable as a rehabilitation method of laryngectomized persons. Objective voice evaluation was performed on a sample of 20 totally laryngectomized subjects of both sexes, average age 61.3 years. Subjects were divided into two groups: 10 (50%) respondents with built tracheoesophageal prosthesis and 10 (50%) who acquired esophageal speech. Testing included 6 variables: 5 parameters of acoustic analysis of voice and one parameter of aerodynamic measurements. The obtained data was statistically analyzed by analysis of variance. Analysis of the data showed a statistically significant difference between the two groups in the terms of intensity, fundamental frequency and maximum phonation time of vowel at a significance level of 5% and confidence interval of 95%. A statistically significant difference was not found between the values of jitter, shimmer, and harmonic-to-noise ratio between tracheoesophageal and esophageal voice. There is no ideal method of rehabilitation and every one of them requires an individual approach to the patient, but the results shows the advantages of rehabilitation by means of installing voice prosthesis.

  13. The Identification of the Deformation Stage of a Metal Specimen Based on Acoustic Emission Data Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zou, Shenao; Yan, Fengying; Yang, Guoan; Sun, Wei

    2017-04-07

    The acoustic emission (AE) signals of metal materials have been widely used to identify the deformation stage of a pressure vessel. In this work, Q235 steel samples with different propagation distances and geometrical structures are stretched to get the corresponding acoustic emission signals. Then the obtained acoustic emission signals are de-noised by empirical mode decomposition (EMD), and then decomposed into two different frequency ranges, i.e., one mainly corresponding to metal deformation and the other mainly corresponding to friction signals. The ratio of signal energy between two frequency ranges is defined as a new acoustic emission characteristic parameter. Differences can be observed at different deformation stages in both magnitude and data distribution range. Compared with other acoustic emission parameters, the proposed parameter is valid in different setups of the propagation medium and the coupled stiffness.

  14. Theoretical Analysis of Transcranial Magneto-Acoustical Stimulation with Hodgkin-Huxley Neuron Model

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yi; Chen, Yudong; Li, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial magneto-acoustical stimulation (TMAS) is a novel stimulation technology in which an ultrasonic wave within a magnetostatic field generates an electric current in an area of interest in the brain to modulate neuronal activities. As a key part of the neural network, neurons transmit information in the nervous system. However, the effect of TMAS on the neuronal firing pattern remains unknown. To address this problem, we investigated the stimulatory mechanism of TMAS on neurons, by using a Hodgkin-Huxley neuron model. The simulation results indicated that the magnetostatic field intensity and ultrasonic power affect the amplitude and interspike interval of neuronal action potential under a continuous wave ultrasound. The simulation results also showed that the ultrasonic power, duty cycle and repetition frequency can alter the firing pattern of neural action potential under pulsed wave ultrasound. This study may help to reveal and explain the biological mechanism of TMAS and to provide a theoretical basis for TMAS in the treatment or rehabilitation of neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:27148032

  15. Physics of thermo-acoustic sound generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daschewski, M.; Boehm, R.; Prager, J.; Kreutzbruck, M.; Harrer, A.

    2013-09-01

    We present a generalized analytical model of thermo-acoustic sound generation based on the analysis of thermally induced energy density fluctuations and their propagation into the adjacent matter. The model provides exact analytical prediction of the sound pressure generated in fluids and solids; consequently, it can be applied to arbitrary thermal power sources such as thermophones, plasma firings, laser beams, and chemical reactions. Unlike existing approaches, our description also includes acoustic near-field effects and sound-field attenuation. Analytical results are compared with measurements of sound pressures generated by thermo-acoustic transducers in air for frequencies up to 1 MHz. The tested transducers consist of titanium and indium tin oxide coatings on quartz glass and polycarbonate substrates. The model reveals that thermo-acoustic efficiency increases linearly with the supplied thermal power and quadratically with thermal excitation frequency. Comparison of the efficiency of our thermo-acoustic transducers with those of piezoelectric-based airborne ultrasound transducers using impulse excitation showed comparable sound pressure values. The present results show that thermo-acoustic transducers can be applied as broadband, non-resonant, high-performance ultrasound sources.

  16. Phosphoproteomic Analysis Reveals Regulatory Mechanisms at the Kidney Filtration Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Rinschen, Markus M.; Wu, Xiongwu; König, Tim; Pisitkun, Trairak; Hagmann, Henning; Pahmeyer, Caroline; Lamkemeyer, Tobias; Kohli, Priyanka; Schnell, Nicole; Schermer, Bernhard; Dryer, Stuart; Brooks, Bernard R.; Beltrao, Pedro; Krueger, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Diseases of the kidney filtration barrier are a leading cause of ESRD. Most disorders affect the podocytes, polarized cells with a limited capacity for self-renewal that require tightly controlled signaling to maintain their integrity, viability, and function. Here, we provide an atlas of in vivo phosphorylated, glomerulus-expressed proteins, including podocyte-specific gene products, identified in an unbiased tandem mass spectrometry–based approach. We discovered 2449 phosphorylated proteins corresponding to 4079 identified high-confidence phosphorylated residues and performed a systematic bioinformatics analysis of this dataset. We discovered 146 phosphorylation sites on proteins abundantly expressed in podocytes. The prohibitin homology domain of the slit diaphragm protein podocin contained one such site, threonine 234 (T234), located within a phosphorylation motif that is mutated in human genetic forms of proteinuria. The T234 site resides at the interface of podocin dimers. Free energy calculation through molecular dynamic simulations revealed a role for T234 in regulating podocin dimerization. We show that phosphorylation critically regulates formation of high molecular weight complexes and that this may represent a general principle for the assembly of proteins containing prohibitin homology domains. PMID:24511133

  17. The cortical analysis of speech-specific temporal structure revealed by responses to sound quilts

    PubMed Central

    Overath, Tobias; McDermott, Josh H; Zarate, Jean Mary; Poeppel, David

    2016-01-01

    Speech contains temporal structure that the brain must analyze to enable linguistic processing. To investigate the neural basis of this analysis, we used sound quilts, stimuli constructed by shuffling segments of a natural sound, approximately preserving its properties on short timescales while disrupting them on longer scales. We generated quilts from foreign speech to eliminate language cues and manipulated the extent of natural acoustic structure by varying the segment length. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we identified bilateral regions of the superior temporal sulcus (STS) whose responses varied with segment length. This effect was absent in primary auditory cortex and did not occur for quilts made from other natural sounds or acoustically matched synthetic sounds, suggesting tuning to speech-specific spectrotemporal structure. When examined parametrically, the STS response increased with segment length up to ~500 ms. Our results identify a locus of speech analysis in human auditory cortex that is distinct from lexical, semantic or syntactic processes. PMID:25984889

  18. Static and dynamic analysis of periodic lattice structures with applications to acoustic cloaks of the pentamode type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Adam Julius

    As a first step towards producing pentamode acoustic cloaks, so named for the type of elasticity required, periodic lattice structured materials are designed that mimic the acoustic properties of water. This material is termed Metal Water and is analyzed in detail. The requirements considered are matching of density and wave speed, this produces a type of metamaterial that couples acoustic wave energy from a background fluid into an elastic medium without reflection. General elastodynamic, scattering, and acoustic cloaking theories are reviewed. In application to scattering, a new method is developed for cylindrically layered elastic media, which combines impedance and matricant propagator matrices in a stable integration scheme. A variety of techniques are used to estimate and improve the homogenized material properties associated with Metal Water. Dispersion curves are found by the application of Bloch-Floquet theory where a new approach that utilizes Euler-Bernoulli beams is developed. Results are compared against finite element methods capable of more accurately determining homogenized properties. Several designs are proposed in two and three dimensions with detailed studies including dispersion curve analysis as well as statically determined properties.

  19. Mobility power flow analysis of coupled plate structure subjected to mechanical and acoustic excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuschieri, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    The mobility power flow approach that was previously applied in the derivation of expressions for the vibrational power flow between coupled plate substructures forming an L configuration and subjected to mechanical loading is generalized. Using the generalized expressions, both point and distributed mechanical loads on one or both of the plates can be considered. The generalized approach is extended to deal with acoustic excitation of one of the plate substructures. In this case, the forces (acoustic pressures) acting on the structure are dependent on the response of the structure because of the scattered pressure component. The interaction between the plate structure and the acoustic fluid leads to the derivation of a corrected mode shape for the plates' normal surface velocity and also for the structure mobility functions. The determination of the scattered pressure components in the expressions for the power flow represents an additional component in the power flow balance for the source plate and the receiver plate. This component represents the radiated acoustical power from the plate structure. For a number of coupled plate substrates, the acoustic pressure generated by one substructure will interact with the motion of another substructure. That is, in the case of the L-shaped plate, acoustic interaction exists between the two plate substructures due to the generation of the acoustic waves by each of the substructures. An approach to deal with this phenomena is described.

  20. Stability analysis for acoustic wave propagation in tilted TI media by finite differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, Peter M.; Duveneck, Eric

    2011-05-01

    Several papers in recent years have reported instabilities in P-wave modelling, based on an acoustic approximation, for inhomogeneous transversely isotropic media with tilted symmetry axis (TTI media). In particular, instabilities tend to occur if the axis of symmetry varies rapidly in combination with strong contrasts of medium parameters, which is typically the case at the foot of a steeply dipping salt flank. In a recent paper, we have proposed and demonstrated a P-wave modelling approach for TTI media, based on rotated stress and strain tensors, in which the wave equations reduce to a coupled set of two second-order partial differential equations for two scalar stress components: a normal component along the variable axis of symmetry and a lateral component of stress in the plane perpendicular to that axis. Spatially constant density is assumed in this approach. A numerical discretization scheme was proposed which uses discrete second-derivative operators for the non-mixed second-order derivatives in the wave equations, and combined first-derivative operators for the mixed second-order derivatives. This paper provides a complete and rigorous stability analysis, assuming a uniformly sampled grid. Although the spatial discretization operator for the TTI acoustic wave equation is not self-adjoint, this operator still defines a complete basis of eigenfunctions of the solution space, provided that the solution space is somewhat restricted at locations where the medium is elliptically anisotropic. First, a stability analysis is given for a discretization scheme, which is purely based on first-derivative operators. It is shown that the coefficients of the central difference operators should satisfy certain conditions. In view of numerical artefacts, such a discretization scheme is not attractive, and the non-mixed second-order derivatives of the wave equation are discretized directly by second-derivative operators. It is shown that this modification preserves

  1. Mitochondrial Genome Analysis Reveals Historical Lineages in Yellowstone Bison.

    PubMed

    Forgacs, David; Wallen, Rick L; Dobson, Lauren K; Derr, James N

    2016-01-01

    Yellowstone National Park is home to one of the only plains bison populations that have continuously existed on their present landscape since prehistoric times without evidence of domestic cattle introgression. Previous studies characterized the relatively high levels of nuclear genetic diversity in these bison, but little is known about their mitochondrial haplotype diversity. This study assessed mitochondrial genomes from 25 randomly selected Yellowstone bison and found 10 different mitochondrial haplotypes with a haplotype diversity of 0.78 (± 0.06). Spatial analysis of these mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotypes did not detect geographic population subdivision (FST = -0.06, p = 0.76). However, we identified two independent and historically important lineages in Yellowstone bison by combining data from 65 bison (defined by 120 polymorphic sites) from across North America representing a total of 30 different mitochondrial DNA haplotypes. Mitochondrial DNA haplotypes from one of the Yellowstone lineages represent descendants of the 22 indigenous bison remaining in central Yellowstone in 1902. The other mitochondrial DNA lineage represents descendants of the 18 females introduced from northern Montana in 1902 to supplement the indigenous bison population and develop a new breeding herd in the northern region of the park. Comparing modern and historical mitochondrial DNA diversity in Yellowstone bison helps uncover a historical context of park restoration efforts during the early 1900s, provides evidence against a hypothesized mitochondrial disease in bison, and reveals the signature of recent hybridization between American plains bison (Bison bison bison) and Canadian wood bison (B. b. athabascae). Our study demonstrates how mitochondrial DNA can be applied to delineate the history of wildlife species and inform future conservation actions.

  2. Mitochondrial Genome Analysis Reveals Historical Lineages in Yellowstone Bison

    PubMed Central

    Derr, James N.

    2016-01-01

    Yellowstone National Park is home to one of the only plains bison populations that have continuously existed on their present landscape since prehistoric times without evidence of domestic cattle introgression. Previous studies characterized the relatively high levels of nuclear genetic diversity in these bison, but little is known about their mitochondrial haplotype diversity. This study assessed mitochondrial genomes from 25 randomly selected Yellowstone bison and found 10 different mitochondrial haplotypes with a haplotype diversity of 0.78 (± 0.06). Spatial analysis of these mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotypes did not detect geographic population subdivision (FST = -0.06, p = 0.76). However, we identified two independent and historically important lineages in Yellowstone bison by combining data from 65 bison (defined by 120 polymorphic sites) from across North America representing a total of 30 different mitochondrial DNA haplotypes. Mitochondrial DNA haplotypes from one of the Yellowstone lineages represent descendants of the 22 indigenous bison remaining in central Yellowstone in 1902. The other mitochondrial DNA lineage represents descendants of the 18 females introduced from northern Montana in 1902 to supplement the indigenous bison population and develop a new breeding herd in the northern region of the park. Comparing modern and historical mitochondrial DNA diversity in Yellowstone bison helps uncover a historical context of park restoration efforts during the early 1900s, provides evidence against a hypothesized mitochondrial disease in bison, and reveals the signature of recent hybridization between American plains bison (Bison bison bison) and Canadian wood bison (B. b. athabascae). Our study demonstrates how mitochondrial DNA can be applied to delineate the history of wildlife species and inform future conservation actions. PMID:27880780

  3. Quantitative flux analysis reveals folate-dependent NADPH production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jing; Ye, Jiangbin; Kamphorst, Jurre J.; Shlomi, Tomer; Thompson, Craig B.; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.

    2014-06-01

    ATP is the dominant energy source in animals for mechanical and electrical work (for example, muscle contraction or neuronal firing). For chemical work, there is an equally important role for NADPH, which powers redox defence and reductive biosynthesis. The most direct route to produce NADPH from glucose is the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, with malic enzyme sometimes also important. Although the relative contribution of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation to ATP production has been extensively analysed, similar analysis of NADPH metabolism has been lacking. Here we demonstrate the ability to directly track, by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, the passage of deuterium from labelled substrates into NADPH, and combine this approach with carbon labelling and mathematical modelling to measure NADPH fluxes. In proliferating cells, the largest contributor to cytosolic NADPH is the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. Surprisingly, a nearly comparable contribution comes from serine-driven one-carbon metabolism, in which oxidation of methylene tetrahydrofolate to 10-formyl-tetrahydrofolate is coupled to reduction of NADP+ to NADPH. Moreover, tracing of mitochondrial one-carbon metabolism revealed complete oxidation of 10-formyl-tetrahydrofolate to make NADPH. As folate metabolism has not previously been considered an NADPH producer, confirmation of its functional significance was undertaken through knockdown of methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (MTHFD) genes. Depletion of either the cytosolic or mitochondrial MTHFD isozyme resulted in decreased cellular NADPH/NADP+ and reduced/oxidized glutathione ratios (GSH/GSSG) and increased cell sensitivity to oxidative stress. Thus, although the importance of folate metabolism for proliferating cells has been long recognized and attributed to its function of producing one-carbon units for nucleic acid synthesis, another crucial function of this pathway is generating reducing power.

  4. Uncertainty analysis of a structural-acoustic problem using imprecise probabilities based on p-box representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ning; Yu, Dejie; Xia, Baizhan; Beer, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Imprecise probabilities can capture epistemic uncertainty, which reflects limited available knowledge so that a precise probabilistic model cannot be established. In this paper, the parameters of a structural-acoustic problem are represented with the aid of p-boxes to capture epistemic uncertainty in the model. To perform the necessary analysis of the structural-acoustic problem with p-boxes, a first-order matrix decomposition perturbation method (FMDPM) for interval analysis is proposed, and an efficient interval Monte Carlo method based on FMDPM is derived. In the implementation of the efficient interval Monte Carlo method based on FMDPM, constant matrices are obtained, first, through an uncertain parameter extraction on the basis of the matrix decomposition technique. Then, these constant matrices are employed to perform multiple interval analyses by using the first-order perturbation method. A numerical example is provided to illustrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the presented approach.

  5. TU-G-210-03: Acoustic Simulations in Transcranial MRgFUS: Treatment Prediction and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, U.

    2015-06-15

    Modeling can play a vital role in predicting, optimizing and analyzing the results of therapeutic ultrasound treatments. Simulating the propagating acoustic beam in various targeted regions of the body allows for the prediction of the resulting power deposition and temperature profiles. In this session we will apply various modeling approaches to breast, abdominal organ and brain treatments. Of particular interest is the effectiveness of procedures for correcting for phase aberrations caused by intervening irregular tissues, such as the skull in transcranial applications or inhomogeneous breast tissues. Also described are methods to compensate for motion in targeted abdominal organs such as the liver or kidney. Douglas Christensen – Modeling for Breast and Brain HIFU Treatment Planning Tobias Preusser – TRANS-FUSIMO - An Integrative Approach to Model-Based Treatment Planning of Liver FUS Urvi Vyas – Acoustic Simulations in Transcranial MRgFUS: Treatment Prediction and Analysis Learning Objectives: Understand the role of acoustic beam modeling for predicting the effectiveness of therapeutic ultrasound treatments. Apply acoustic modeling to specific breast, liver, kidney and transcranial anatomies. Determine how to obtain appropriate acoustic modeling parameters from clinical images. Understand the separate role of absorption and scattering in energy delivery to tissues. See how organ motion can be compensated for in ultrasound therapies. Compare simulated data with clinical temperature measurements in transcranial applications. Supported by NIH R01 HL172787 and R01 EB013433 (DC); EU Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under 270186 (FUSIMO) and 611889 (TRANS-FUSIMO)(TP); and P01 CA159992, GE, FUSF and InSightec (UV)

  6. Experimental study of the structural characteristics of Al melts on the basis of Fourier analysis of acoustic emission signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorontsov, Vadim; Zhuravlev, Danil; Cherepanov, Alexander

    2014-09-01

    This scientific work is devoted to the study of the genetic connection structures of solid and liquid phases. Fourier analysis of signals of acoustic emission (AE) accompanying the melting of high purity aluminum from the melting point up to t=860°C was performed. The experimental data allowed for following the dynamics of the range order of the disorder zones in the melt with increasing melt temperature until their complete destruction.

  7. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. ... can press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the ...

  8. Monitoring and Analysis of In-Pile Phenomena in Advanced Test Reactor using Acoustic Telemetry

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Vivek; Smith, James A.; Jewell, James Keith

    2015-02-01

    The interior of a nuclear reactor presents a particularly harsh and challenging environment for both sensors and telemetry due to high temperatures and high fluxes of energetic and ionizing particles among the radioactive decay products. A number of research programs are developing acoustic-based sensing approach to take advantage of the acoustic transmission properties of reactor cores. Idaho National Laboratory has installed vibroacoustic receivers on and around the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) containment vessel to take advantage of acoustically telemetered sensors such as thermoacoustic (TAC) transducers. The installation represents the first step in developing an acoustic telemetry infrastructure. This paper presents the theory of TAC, application of installed vibroacoustic receivers in monitoring the in-pile phenomena inside the ATR, and preliminary data processing results.

  9. Perceptual and acoustic analysis of lexical stress in Greek speakers with dysarthria.

    PubMed

    Papakyritsis, Ioannis; Müller, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    The study reported in this paper investigated the abilities of Greek speakers with dysarthria to signal lexical stress at the single word level. Three speakers with dysarthria and two unimpaired control participants were recorded completing a repetition task of a list of words consisting of minimal pairs of Greek disyllabic words contrasted by lexical stress location only. Fourteen listeners were asked to determine the attempted stress location for each word pair. Acoustic analyses of duration and intensity ratios, both within and across words, were undertaken to identify possible acoustic correlates of the listeners' judgments concerning stress location. Acoustic and perceptual data indicate that while each participant with dysarthria in this study had some difficulty in signaling stress unambiguously, the pattern of difficulty was different for each speaker. Further, it was found that the relationship between the listeners' judgments of stress location and the acoustic data was not conclusive.

  10. Proper Orthogonal Decomposition Analysis of Shear-Coaxial Injector Flows with and without Transverse Acoustic Forcing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-26

    ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Air Force Research Laboratory (AFMC) AFRL/RZSA 10 E. Saturn Blvd. Edwards AFB CA 93524-7680 AFRL-RZ-ED-VG-2011-435 9...nitrogen jets to pressure perturbations due to transverse acoustic forcing at a pressure antinode ( PAN ). The role of injector exit geometry on the flow...Set-Up: Pressure Antinode • Pressure antinode ( PAN ) – condition of maximum pressure perturbation in the acoustic field • Piezo-sirens forced in

  11. Proper Orthogonal Decomposition Analysis of Shear-Coaxial Injector Flows With and Without Transverse Acoustic Forcing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-13

    ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Air Force Research Laboratory (AFMC) AFRL/RZSA 10 E. Saturn Blvd. Edwards AFB CA 93524-7680 AFRL-RZ-ED-TP-2011-402 9...nitrogen jets to pressure perturbations due to transverse acoustic forcing at a pressure antinode ( PAN ). The role of injector exit geometry on the flow...cryogenic coaxial nitrogen jets to pressure perturbations due to transverse acoustic forcing at a pressure antinode ( PAN ). The role of injector exit

  12. Analysis of the Role of Update Rate and System Latency in Interactive Virtual Acoustic Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Ahumada, Albert (Technical Monitor); Schlickenmaier, Herbert (Technical Monitor); Johnson, Gerald (Technical Monitor); Frey, Mary Anne (Technical Monitor); Schneider, Victor S. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The ultimate goal of virtual acoustics is to simulate the complex acoustic field experienced by a listener freely moving around within an environment. This paper discusses some of the engineering constraints that may be faced during implementation and the perceptual consequences of these constraints. In particular, the perceptual impact of parameters like the update rate and overall system latency of interactive spatial audio systems is addressed.

  13. Chelyabinsk meteoroid entry: analysis of acoustic signals in the area of direct sound propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podobnaya, Elena; Popova, Olga; Glazachev, Dmitry; Rybnov, Yurij; Shuvalov, Valery; Jenniskens, Peter; Kharlamov, Vladimir

    E.Podobnaya, Yu.Rybnov, O.Popova, V. Shuvalov, P. Jenniskens, V.Kharlamov, D.Glazachev The Chelyabinsk airburst of 15 February 2013, was exceptional because of the large kinetic energy of the impacting body and the airburst that was generated, creating significant damage and injuries in a populated area. The meteor and the effects of the airburst were extraordinarily well documented. Numerous video records provided an accurate record of the trajectory and orbit of the cosmic body as well as features of its interaction with the atmosphere (Borovicka et al., 2013; Popova et al. 2013). In this presentation, we discuss the information on shock wave arrival times. Arrival times of the shock wave were derived from the shaking of the camera, the movement of smoke or car exhaust, and the movement of cables in the field of view, as well as directly from the audio record. From the analysis of these shock wave arrival times, the altitudes of the energy deposition were derived (Popova et al. 2013). Borovicka et al (2013) suggested that subsequent acoustic arrivals corresponded to separate fragmentation events. The observed arrival times will be compared with model estimates taking into account the real wind and atmospheric conditions (i.e. sound velocity changes with altitude). Results of numerical simulations will be compared with recorded sound signals. References Borovicka J. et al., 2013, Nature 503, 235 Popova O. et al., 2013, Science, 342, 1096

  14. The two parts of the blackcap song: Acoustic analysis and male responses to playbacks.

    PubMed

    Linossier, Juliette; Courvoisier, Hélène; Aubin, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    Bird songs are complex manifold acoustic signals serving two main functions: mate attraction and territorial defense. The way information is encoded in the song often reflects adaptation to proximate and ultimate constraints. Male blackcaps, Sylvia atricapilla, display versatile songs with two parts, a warble and a whistle, whose functions remain unclear. We showed that the two parts of songs differ in terms of intensity, frequency and temporal parameters. They also contain totally different sets of syllables. Furthermore, the warble is versatile whereas the whistle part shows syllable sharing between individuals leaving closeby. Altogether, the results of our analysis suggest that the two parts encode different information potentially directed to different audiences. In order to test the potential function of these two parts, we performed playback experiments by broadcasting entire songs and each part separately. Warble and whistle alone are sufficient to trigger male responses and males sing both parts in responses to all stimuli, showing that both parts of the song are used in male-male competition. It is suggested that the segregation of information in the blackcap song could be related to public versus private communication, used in both intra- and intersexual contexts, rather than directed to male versus female audiences only.

  15. Monitoring of global acoustic transmissions: Signal processing and preliminary data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frogner, Gary R.

    1991-09-01

    A great deal of controversy exists concerning the possible global warming trend which may occur as a result of a documented increase in atmospheric greenhouse gasses. The 1991 Heard Island Feasibility Experiment tested the feasibility of using transmissions of acoustic energy through major ocean basins of the world to monitor spatially averaged global temperature trends. This thesis documents the Naval Postgraduate School's reception of the phase encoded signal transmitted from the Southern Indian Ocean, development of real-time signal processing software, and preliminary data analysis. Data, received from a 32-channel vertical array suspended in the deep sound channel off the coast of Monterey, CA, was processed using real-time capable software. Data processing to reduce noise, determine SNR, and remove the m-sequence coding was found to be quite sensitive to Doppler frequency shifts. Although the SNR of the raw data was only about -27.5 dB for individual hydrophones, the transmitted signal was detected in both the frequency and time domains. However, the maximum processed signal peak in the time domain had an SNR of only +9 dB which is insufficient for use in a long term global temperature monitoring project. The hydrophone provides inadequate arrival time resolution.

  16. A Legendre spectral element model for sloshing and acoustic analysis in nearly incompressible fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Kishor, D.; Gopalakrishnan, S.; Ganguli, Ranjan

    2010-04-01

    A new spectral finite element formulation is presented for modeling the sloshing and the acoustic waves in nearly incompressible fluids. The formulation makes use of the Legendre polynomials in deriving the finite element interpolation shape functions in the Lagrangian frame of reference. The formulated element uses Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre quadrature scheme for integrating the volumetric stiffness and the mass matrices while the conventional Gauss-Legendre quadrature scheme is used on the rotational stiffness matrix to completely eliminate the zero energy modes, which are normally associated with the Lagrangian FE formulation. The numerical performance of the spectral element formulated here is examined by doing the inf-sup test on a standard rectangular rigid tank partially filled with liquid. The eigenvalues obtained from the formulated spectral element are compared with the conventional equally spaced node locations of the h-type Lagrangian finite element and the predicted results show that these spectral elements are more accurate and give superior convergence. The efficiency and robustness of the formulated elements are demonstrated by solving few standard problems involving free vibration and dynamic response analysis with undistorted and distorted spectral elements, and the obtained results are compared with available results in the published literature.

  17. Using Innovative Acoustic Analysis to Predict the Postoperative Outcomes of Unilateral Vocal Fold Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Tsou, Yung-An; Chen, Wei-Chen; Ke, Hsiang-Chun; Lin, Wen-Yang; Yang, Hsing-Rong; Shie, Dung-Yun; Tsai, Ming-Hsui

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Autologous fat injection laryngoplasty is ineffective for some patients with iatrogenic vocal fold paralysis, and additional laryngeal framework surgery is often required. An acoustically measurable outcome predictor for lipoinjection laryngoplasty would assist phonosurgeons in formulating treatment strategies. Methods. Seventeen thyroid surgery patients with unilateral vocal fold paralysis participated in this study. All subjects underwent lipoinjection laryngoplasty to treat postsurgery vocal hoarseness. After treatment, patients were assigned to success and failure groups on the basis of voice improvement. Linear prediction analysis was used to construct a new voice quality indicator, the number of irregular peaks (NIrrP). It compared with the measures used in the Multi-Dimensional Voice Program (MDVP), such as jitter (frequency perturbation) and shimmer (perturbation of amplitude). Results. By comparing the [i] vowel produced by patients before the lipoinjection laryngoplasty (AUC = 0.98, 95% CI = 0.78–0.99), NIrrP was shown to be a more accurate predictor of long-term surgical outcomes than jitter (AUC = 0.73, 95% CI = 0.47–0.91) and shimmer (AUC = 0.63, 95% CI = 0.37–0.85), as identified by the receiver operating characteristic curve. Conclusions. NIrrP measured using the LP model could be a more accurate outcome predictor than the parameters used in the MDVP. PMID:27738634

  18. [Determination of a Spectrum of Lytic Activity of Bacteriophages by the Method of Acoustic Analysis].

    PubMed

    Guliy, O I; Zaitsev, B D; Kuznetsova, I E; Shikhabudinov, A M; Dykman, L A; Staroverov, S A; Karavaeva, O A; Pavliy, S A; Ignatov, O V

    2015-01-01

    The changes in the electro-acoustic parameters of cell suspension due to the interaction of cells with bacteriophages both in a pure. culture and in the presence of extraneous microflora were investigated. It has been found that the specific changes in the electroacoustic parameters of cell suspension under the action of bacteriophage occur only in microbial cells which are sensitive to the bacteriophage studied. It has been established that a sensor unit allows of distinguishing a situation when the bacterial cells are infected with specific bacteriophages of the control experiments and a situation with no introduction of infection. An approximate criterion of the presence of specific interactions of bacteriophages and cells in suspension was developed. In accordance with this criterion the change in electrical impedance of the sensor unit must not be less than - 1%. In control experiments a standard microbiological technique, plating the cells infected with bacteriophages on solid nutrient medium, was used. For the first time the possibility of using the method of electroacoustic analysis for determination of a spectrum of lytic activity of bacteriophages was shown. The results obtained may be used for development of a new express method for determining the sensitivity to bacteriophages of the microbial cells.

  19. Aquatic Acoustic Metrics Interface Utility for Underwater Sound Monitoring and Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Huiying; Halvorsen, Michele B.; Deng, Zhiqun Daniel; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Fishes and marine mammals may suffer a range of potential effects from exposure to intense underwater sound generated by anthropogenic activities such as pile driving, shipping, sonars, and underwater blasting. Several underwater sound recording (USR) devices have been built to acquire samples of the underwater sound generated by anthropogenic activities. Software becomes indispensable for processing and analyzing the audio files recorded by these USRs. In this paper, we provide a detailed description of a new software package, the Aquatic Acoustic Metrics Interface (AAMI), specifically designed for analysis of underwater sound recordings to provide data in metrics that facilitate evaluation of the potential impacts of the sound on aquatic animals. In addition to the basic functions, such as loading and editing audio files recorded by USRs and batch processing of sound files, the software utilizes recording system calibration data to compute important parameters in physical units. The software also facilitates comparison of the noise sound sample metrics with biological measures such as audiograms of the sensitivity of aquatic animals to the sound, integrating various components into a single analytical frame. The features of the AAMI software are discussed, and several case studies are presented to illustrate its functionality. PMID:22969353

  20. Finite element method analysis of surface acoustic wave devices with microcavities for detection of liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senveli, Sukru U.; Tigli, Onur

    2013-12-01

    This paper introduces the use of finite element method analysis tools to investigate the use of a Rayleigh type surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor to interrogate minute amounts of liquids trapped in microcavities placed on the delay line. Launched surface waves in the ST-X quartz substrate couple to the liquid and emit compressional waves. These waves form a resonant cavity condition and interfere with the surface waves in the substrate. Simulations show that the platform operates in a different mechanism than the conventional mass loading of SAW devices. Based on the proposed detection mechanism, it is able to distinguish between variations of 40% and 90% glycerin based on phase relations while using liquid volumes smaller than 10 pl. Results from shallow microcavities show high correlation with sound velocity parameter of the liquid whereas deeper microcavities display high sensitivities with respect to glycerin concentration. Simulated devices yield a maximum sensitivity of -0.77°/(% glycerin) for 16 μm wavelength operation with 8 μm deep, 24 μm wide, and 24 μm long microcavities.

  1. The phase transformation of methane caused by pressure change during its rise from the seafloor revealed by video observation and acoustic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, C.

    2013-12-01

    Acoustic reflection depending on physical property differences among solid of methane hydrates and methane gas bubbles from seafloor and sea water.By sending ultrasonic waves from the transducer of an echo sounder or a sonar system through the water and measuring the echo of the back-scatterings from the methane hydrates or bubbles,it is possible that a visualized image of the methane plumes is displayed on the display of an echo sounder or a sonar system.Estimates of the amount of the methane plumes are extremely important for the global environment as part of the carbon cycle.The observations were carried out at Umitaka Spur and Joetsu knoll in the Sea of Japan every year since 2004. There are many methane plumes in the same ocean area. Thus, we investigate minutely about methane plumes in this study.In order to recognize estimates of the methane plumes, we observed the image of methane plumes using a remotely operated submarine vehicle (Hyper Dolphin, of the Japan Agency of Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC)), and captured the methane bubble using a funnel.We observe the images of the methane plumes seeping points on the seafloor taken by a high-definition camera loaded in the vehicle, measure the surfacing velocity of the gushed methane plumes, and compute the surfacing velocity of the gas and solid substance using a theoretical formula.The observation was carried out at Umitaka Spur in the Japan Sea. The depth was 1000 m and the seawater temperature was 0.3 C°.From 3 seeping points, we gathered 300ml of methane in 643 seconds in the funnel with an opening of 20 cm in diameter.If it is assumed that the seeping points are equally scattered in the area, the seeping volume per unit area is 5.4×104cm3 per hour, which is 4.7×102m3 per year.The experiment in the ocean revealed the followings.The methane hydrate particles that are seeping out from seafloor are solid substances just above the seafloor.In the studied ocean area, 7.7×104m3 of methane

  2. Quadratic Time-Frequency Analysis of Hydroacoustic Signals as Applied to Acoustic Emissions of Large Whales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bras, Ronan; Victor, Sucic; Damir, Malnar; Götz, Bokelmann

    2014-05-01

    In order to enrich the set of attributes in setting up a large database of whale signals, as envisioned in the Baleakanta project, we investigate methods of time-frequency analysis. The purpose of establishing the database is to increase and refine knowledge of the emitted signal and of its propagation characteristics, leading to a better understanding of the animal migrations in a non-invasive manner and to characterize acoustic propagation in oceanic media. The higher resolution for signal extraction and a better separation from other signals and noise will be used for various purposes, including improved signal detection and individual animal identification. The quadratic class of time-frequency distributions (TFDs) is the most popular set of time-frequency tools for analysis and processing of non-stationary signals. Two best known and most studied members of this class are the spectrogram and the Wigner-Ville distribution. However, to be used efficiently, i.e. to have highly concentrated signal components while significantly suppressing interference and noise simultaneously, TFDs need to be optimized first. The optimization method used in this paper is based on the Cross-Wigner-Ville distribution, and unlike similar approaches it does not require prior information on the analysed signal. The method is applied to whale signals, which, just like the majority of other real-life signals, can generally be classified as multicomponent non-stationary signals, and hence time-frequency techniques are a natural choice for their representation, analysis, and processing. We present processed data from a set containing hundreds of individual calls. The TFD optimization method results into a high resolution time-frequency representation of the signals. It allows for a simple extraction of signal components from the TFD's dominant ridges. The local peaks of those ridges can then be used for the signal components instantaneous frequency estimation, which in turn can be used as

  3. Numerical Analysis of the Acoustic Field of Tip-Clearance Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alavi Moghadam, S. M.; M. Meinke Team; W. Schröder Team

    2015-11-01

    Numerical simulations of the acoustic field generated by a shrouded axial fan are studied by a hybrid fluid-dynamics-acoustics method. In a first step, large-eddy simulations are performed to investigate the dynamics of tip clearance flow for various tip gap sizes and to determine the acoustic sources. The simulations are performed for a single blade out of five blades with periodic boundary conditions in the circumferential direction on a multi-block structured mesh with 1.4 ×108 grid points. The turbulent flow is simulated at a Reynolds number of 9.36 ×105 at undisturbed inflow condition and the results are compared with experimental data. The diameter and strength of the tip vortex increase with the tip gap size, while simultaneously the efficiency of the fan decreases. In a second step, the acoustic field on the near field is determined by solving the acoustic perturbation equations (APE) on a mesh for a single blade consisting of approx. 9.8 ×108 grid points. The overall agreement of the pressure spectrum and its directivity with measurements confirm the correct identification of the sound sources and accurate prediction of the acoustic duct propagation. The results show that the longer the tip gap size the higher the broadband noise level. Senior Scientist, Institute of Aerodynamics, RWTH Aachen University.

  4. Acoustically Induced Vibration of Structures: Reverberant Vs. Direct Acoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; O'Connell, Michael R.; Tsoi, Wan B.

    2009-01-01

    Large reverberant chambers have been used for several decades in the aerospace industry to test larger structures such as solar arrays and reflectors to qualify and to detect faults in the design and fabrication of spacecraft and satellites. In the past decade some companies have begun using direct near field acoustic testing, employing speakers, for qualifying larger structures. A limited test data set obtained from recent acoustic tests of the same hardware exposed to both direct and reverberant acoustic field testing has indicated some differences in the resulting structural responses. In reverberant acoustic testing, higher vibration responses were observed at lower frequencies when compared with the direct acoustic testing. In the case of direct near field acoustic testing higher vibration responses appeared to occur at higher frequencies as well. In reverberant chamber testing and direct acoustic testing, standing acoustic modes of the reverberant chamber or the speakers and spacecraft parallel surfaces can strongly couple with the fundamental structural modes of the test hardware. In this paper data from recent acoustic testing of flight hardware, that yielded evidence of acoustic standing wave coupling with structural responses, are discussed in some detail. Convincing evidence of the acoustic standing wave/structural coupling phenomenon will be discussed, citing observations from acoustic testing of a simple aluminum plate. The implications of such acoustic coupling to testing of sensitive flight hardware will be discussed. The results discussed in this paper reveal issues with over or under testing of flight hardware that could pose unanticipated structural and flight qualification issues. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the structural modal coupling with standing acoustic waves that has been observed in both methods of acoustic testing. This study will assist the community to choose an appropriate testing method and test setup in

  5. Acoustic Seaglider

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-07

    a national naval responsibility. Acoustic sensors on mobile, autonomous platforms will enable basic research topics on temporal and spatial...problem and acoustic navigation and communications within the context of distributed autonomous persistent undersea surveillance sensor networks...Acoustic sensors on mobile, autonomous platforms will enable basic research topics on temporal and spatial coherence and the description of ambient

  6. Acoustic seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  7. Acoustic Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  8. Acoustic visualizations using surface mapping.

    PubMed

    Siltanen, Samuel; Robinson, Philip W; Saarelma, Jukka; Pätynen, Jukka; Tervo, Sakari; Savioja, Lauri; Lokki, Tapio

    2014-06-01

    Sound visualizations have been an integral part of room acoustics studies for more than a century. As acoustic measurement techniques and knowledge of hearing evolve, acousticians need more intuitive ways to represent increasingly complex data. Microphone array processing now allows accurate measurement of spatio-temporal acoustic properties. However, the multidimensional data can be a challenge to display coherently. This letter details a method of mapping visual representations of acoustic reflections from a receiver position to the surfaces from which the reflections originated. The resulting animations are presented as a spatial acoustic analysis tool.

  9. Acoustic mode measurements in the inlet of a model turbofan using a continuously rotating rake: Data collection/analysis techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, David G.; Heidelberg, Laurence; Konno, Kevin

    1993-01-01

    The rotating microphone measurement technique and data analysis procedures are documented which are used to determine circumferential and radial acoustic mode content in the inlet of the Advanced Ducted Propeller (ADP) model. Circumferential acoustic mode levels were measured at a series of radial locations using the Doppler frequency shift produced by a rotating inlet microphone probe. Radial mode content was then computed using a least squares curve fit with the measured radial distribution for each circumferential mode. The rotating microphone technique is superior to fixed-probe techniques because it results in minimal interference with the acoustic modes generated by rotor-stator interaction. This effort represents the first experimental implementation of a measuring technique developed by T. G. Sofrin. Testing was performed in the NASA Lewis Low Speed Anechoic Wind Tunnel at a simulated takeoff condition of Mach 0.2. The design is included of the data analysis software and the performance of the rotating rake apparatus. The effect of experiment errors is also discussed.

  10. Prediction of ultrasound-mediated disruption of cell membranes using machine learning techniques and statistical analysis of acoustic spectra.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eva K; Gallagher, Richard J; Campbell, Ann Melissa; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2004-01-01

    Although biological effects of ultrasound must be avoided for safe diagnostic applications, ultrasound's ability to disrupt cell membranes has attracted interest as a method to facilitate drug and gene delivery. This paper seeks to develop "prediction rules" for predicting the degree of cell membrane disruption based on specified ultrasound parameters and measured acoustic signals. Three techniques for generating prediction rules (regression analysis, classification trees and discriminant analysis) are applied to data obtained from a sequence of experiments on bovine red blood cells. For each experiment, the data consist of four ultrasound parameters, acoustic measurements at 400 frequencies, and a measure of cell membrane disruption. To avoid over-training, various combinations of the 404 predictor variables are used when applying the rule generation methods. The results indicate that the variable combination consisting of ultrasound exposure time and acoustic signals measured at the driving frequency and its higher harmonics yields the best rule for all three rule generation methods. The methods used for deriving the prediction rules are broadly applicable, and could be used to develop prediciton rules in other scenarios involving different cell types or tissues. These rules and the methods used to derive them could be used for real-time feedback about ultrasound's biological effects.

  11. Acoustic mode measurements in the inlet of a model turbofan using a continuously rotating rake - Data collection/analysis techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, David G.; Heidelberg, Laurence; Konno, Kevin

    1993-01-01

    The rotating microphone measurement technique and data analysis procedures are documented which are used to determine circumferential and radial acoustic mode content in the inlet of the Advanced Ducted Propeller (ADP) model. Circumferential acoustic mode levels were measured at a series of radial locations using the Doppler frequency shift produced by a rotating inlet microphone probe. Radial mode content was then computed using a least squares curve fit with the measured radial distribution for each circumferential mode. The rotating microphone technique is superior to fixed-probe techniques because it results in minimal interference with the acoustic modes generated by rotor-stator interaction. This effort represents the first experimental implementation of a measuring technique developed by T. G. Sofrin. Testing was performed in the NASA Lewis Low Speed Anechoic Wind Tunnel at a simulated takeoff condition of Mach 0.2. The design is included of the data analysis software and the performance of the rotating rake apparatus. The effect of experiment errors is also discussed.

  12. Synchronized imaging and acoustic analysis of the upper airway in patients with sleep-disordered breathing.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi-Chung; Huon, Leh-Kiong; Pham, Van-Truong; Chen, Yunn-Jy; Jiang, Sun-Fen; Shih, Tiffany Ting-Fang; Tran, Thi-Thao; Wang, Yung-Hung; Lin, Chen; Tsao, Jenho; Lo, Men-Tzung; Wang, Pa-Chun

    2014-12-01

    Progressive narrowing of the upper airway increases airflow resistance and can produce snoring sounds and apnea/hypopnea events associated with sleep-disordered breathing due to airway collapse. Recent studies have shown that acoustic properties during snoring can be altered with anatomic changes at the site of obstruction. To evaluate the instantaneous association between acoustic features of snoring and the anatomic sites of obstruction, a novel method was developed and applied in nine patients to extract the snoring sounds during sleep while performing dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The degree of airway narrowing during the snoring events was then quantified by the collapse index (ratio of airway diameter preceding and during the events) and correlated with the synchronized acoustic features. A total of 201 snoring events (102 pure retropalatal and 99 combined retropalatal and retroglossal events) were recorded, and the collapse index as well as the soft tissue vibration time were significantly different between pure retropalatal (collapse index, 2 ± 11%; vibration time, 0.2 ± 0.3 s) and combined (retropalatal and retroglossal) snores (collapse index, 13 ± 7% [P ≤ 0.0001]; vibration time, 1.2 ± 0.7 s [P ≤ 0.0001]). The synchronized dynamic MRI and acoustic recordings successfully characterized the sites of obstruction and established the dynamic relationship between the anatomic site of obstruction and snoring acoustics.

  13. Analysis of combustion instability in liquid propellant engines with or without acoustic cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberg, C. L.; Kesselring, R. C.; Warner, C., III; Schuman, M. D.

    1974-01-01

    Analytical studies have been made of the relative combustion stability of various propellant combinations when used with hardware configurations representative of current design practices and with or without acoustic cavities. Two combustion instability models, a Priem-type model and a modification of the Northern Research and Engineering (NREC) instability model, were used to predict the variation in engine stability with changes in operating conditions, hardware characteristics or propellant combination, exclusive of acoustic cavity effects. The NREC model was developed for turbojet engines but is applicable to liquid propellant engines. A steady-state combustion model was used to predict the needed input for the instability models. In addition, preliminary development was completed on a new model to predict the influence of an acoustic cavity with specific allowance for the effects the nozzle, steady flow and combustion.

  14. Analysis of the acoustic response in water and sand of different fiber optic sensing cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Joachim; Facchini, Massimo; Lowell, Mark

    2015-05-01

    Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) is a highly promising technology to efficiently monitor assets for energy production and transportation, both off- and on-shore, such as boreholes, pipelines and risers. The aim of the hereby-presented measurements is to evaluate the sensitivity of the different optical fiber cables to acoustic signals in sand and water, independently from the DAS read-out unit type and manufacturer. Acoustic sensing cables specifically designed by BRUGG Cables are characterized and compared to standard telecommunication cables. The spectral response of each cable was quantified using an all-fiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The response was also measured with calibrated microphones in order to convert the measurements into absolute physical units (Pascal). The measurement campaign is part of an investigation program for a reliable DAS system, which comprises the sensing cable (including installation procedure), the interrogator unit and suitable software.

  15. Acoustic signal characteristics of laser induced cavitation in DDFP droplet: Spectrum and time-frequency analysis.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yi; Qin, Dui; Zhang, Jun; Ma, Chenxiang; Wan, Mingxi

    2015-01-01

    Cavitation has great application potential in microvessel damage and targeted drug delivery. Concerning cavitation, droplet vaporization has been widely investigated in vitro and in vivo with plasmonic nanoparticles. Droplets with a liquid dodecafluoropentane (DDFP) core enclosed in an albumin shell have a stable and simple structure with good characteristics of laser absorbing; thus, DDFP droplets could be an effective aim for laser-induced cavitation. The DDPF droplet was prepared and perfused in a mimic microvessel in the optical microscopic system with a passive acoustic detection module. Three patterns of laser-induced cavitation in the droplets were observed. The emitted acoustic signals showed specific spectrum components at specific time points. It was suggested that a nanosecond laser pulse could induce cavitation in DDPF droplets, and specific acoustic signals would be emitted. Analyzing its characteristics could aid in monitoring the laser-induced cavitation process in droplets, which is meaningful to theranostic application.

  16. Quantifying swallowing function for healthy adults in different age groups using acoustic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Man-Yin

    Dysphagia is a medical condition that can lead to devastating complications including weight loss, aspiration pneumonia, dehydration, and malnutrition; hence, timely identification is essential. Current dysphagia evaluation tools are either invasive, time consuming, or highly dependent on the experience of an individual clinician. The present study aims to develop a non-invasive, quantitative screening tool for dysphagia identification by capturing acoustic data from swallowing and mastication. The first part of this study explores the feasibility of using acoustic data to quantify swallowing and mastication. This study then further identifies mastication and swallowing trends in a neurotypical adult population. An acoustic capture protocol for dysphagia screening is proposed. Finally, the relationship among speaking, lingual and mastication rates are explored. Results and future directions are discussed.

  17. Modeling and experimental analysis of acoustic cavitation bubbles for Burst Wave Lithotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Kazuki; Colonius, Tim; Kreider, Wayne; Maxwell, Adam; Cunitz, Bryan; Bailey, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A combined modeling and experimental study of acoustic cavitation bubbles that are initiated by focused ultrasound waves is reported. Focused ultrasound waves of frequency 335 kHz and peak negative pressure 8 MPa are generated in a water tank by a piezoelectric transducer to initiate cavitation. The resulting pressure field is obtained by direct numerical simulation (DNS) and used to simulate single bubble oscillation. The characteristics of cavitation bubbles observed by high-speed photography qualitatively agree withs the simulation result. Finally, bubble clouds are captured using acoustic B-mode imaging that works in synchronization with high-speed photography. PMID:27087826

  18. Rapid acoustic survey for biodiversity appraisal.

    PubMed

    Sueur, Jérôme; Pavoine, Sandrine; Hamerlynck, Olivier; Duvail, Stéphanie

    2008-01-01

    Biodiversity assessment remains one of the most difficult challenges encountered by ecologists and conservation biologists. This task is becoming even more urgent with the current increase of habitat loss. Many methods-from rapid biodiversity assessments (RBA) to all-taxa biodiversity inventories (ATBI)-have been developed for decades to estimate local species richness. However, these methods are costly and invasive. Several animals-birds, mammals, amphibians, fishes and arthropods-produce sounds when moving, communicating or sensing their environment. Here we propose a new concept and method to describe biodiversity. We suggest to forego species or morphospecies identification used by ATBI and RBA respectively but rather to tackle the problem at another evolutionary unit, the community level. We also propose that a part of diversity can be estimated and compared through a rapid acoustic analysis of the sound produced by animal communities. We produced alpha and beta diversity indexes that we first tested with 540 simulated acoustic communities. The alpha index, which measures acoustic entropy, shows a logarithmic correlation with the number of species within the acoustic community. The beta index, which estimates both temporal and spectral dissimilarities, is linearly linked to the number of unshared species between acoustic communities. We then applied both indexes to two closely spaced Tanzanian dry lowland coastal forests. Indexes reveal for this small sample a lower acoustic diversity for the most disturbed forest and acoustic dissimilarities between the two forests suggest that degradation could have significantly decreased and modified community composition. Our results demonstrate for the first time that an indicator of biological diversity can be reliably obtained in a non-invasive way and with a limited sampling effort. This new approach may facilitate the appraisal of animal diversity at large spatial and temporal scales.

  19. The acoustic analysis of tone differentiation as a means for assessing tone production in speakers of Cantonese

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, Johanna G.; Blamey, Peter J.

    2004-09-01

    This paper reports on a methodology for acoustically analyzing tone production in Cantonese. F0 offset versus F0 onset are plotted for a series of tokens for each of the six tones in the language. These are grouped according to tone type into a set of six ellipses. Qualitative visual observations regarding the degree of differentiation of the ellipses within the tonal space are summarized numerically using two indices, referred to here as Index 1 and Index 2. Index 1 is a ratio of the area of the speaker's tonal space and the average of the areas of the ellipses of the three target tones making up the tonal space. Index 2 is a ratio of the average distance between all six tonal ellipses and the average of the sum of the two axes for all six tone ellipses. Using this methodology, tonal differentiation is compared for three groups of speakers; normally hearing adults; normally hearing children aged from 4-6 years; and, prelinguistically deafened cochlear implant users aged from 4-11 years. A potential conundrum regarding how tone production abilities can outstrip tone perception abilities is explained using the data from the acoustic analyses. It is suggested that young children of the age range tested are still learning to normalize for pitch level differences in tone production. Acoustic analysis of the data thus supports results from tone perception studies and suggests that the methodology is suitable for use in studies investigating tone production in both clinical and research contexts.

  20. Acoustic Data Processing and Transient Signal Analysis for the Hybrid Wing Body 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahr, Christopher J.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M.; Spalt, Taylor B.; Stead, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    An advanced vehicle concept, the HWB N2A-EXTE aircraft design, was tested in NASA Langley's 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel to study its acoustic characteristics for var- ious propulsion system installation and airframe con gurations. A signi cant upgrade to existing data processing systems was implemented, with a focus on portability and a re- duction in turnaround time. These requirements were met by updating codes originally written for a cluster environment and transferring them to a local workstation while en- abling GPU computing. Post-test, additional processing of the time series was required to remove transient hydrodynamic gusts from some of the microphone time series. A novel automated procedure was developed to analyze and reject contaminated blocks of data, under the assumption that the desired acoustic signal of interest was a band-limited sta- tionary random process, and of lower variance than the hydrodynamic contamination. The procedure is shown to successfully identify and remove contaminated blocks of data and retain the desired acoustic signal. Additional corrections to the data, mainly background subtraction, shear layer refraction calculations, atmospheric attenuation and microphone directivity corrections, were all necessary for initial analysis and noise assessments. These were implemented for the post-processing of spectral data, and are shown to behave as expected.

  1. Real time and non-destructive analysis of tablet coating thickness using acoustic microscopy and infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bikiaris, D; Koutri, I; Alexiadis, D; Damtsios, A; Karagiannis, G

    2012-11-15

    Tablet coating thicknesses were estimated using several techniques such as weight gain and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), in comparison with acoustic microscopy and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. Acoustic microscopy, used for the first time in such an application, is based on the physical phenomenon of ultrasound propagation through the materials and the echoes generated by their interfaces. Based on the time of flights (TOFs) of the echoes from the coating surface and the tablet, it is possible to calculate the coating thickness. In order to evaluate the accuracy and robustness of these methods, drug tablets were coated with Kollicoat SR polymer for several times, so that to prepare tablets with different coating thicknesses. Tablets with 3, 6 and 9 wt% coating material have been prepared and based on SEM micrographs it was found that the tablet coating thickness is 71.99 ± 1.2 μm, 92.5 ± 1.7 μm and 132.3 ± 2.1 μm, respectively (SEM analysis). The tablet coating thicknesses measured with acoustic microscopy and infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, were in agreement with those obtained using SEM. This verifies that both techniques can be successfully applied for real time and non-destructive thickness measurements of tablet coating. Furthermore, both techniques, compared with SEM and weight gained measurements, are fast and fully automated.

  2. Data dependent random forest applied to screening for laryngeal disorders through analysis of sustained phonation: acoustic versus contact microphone.

    PubMed

    Verikas, A; Gelzinis, A; Vaiciukynas, E; Bacauskiene, M; Minelga, J; Hållander, M; Uloza, V; Padervinskis, E

    2015-02-01

    Comprehensive evaluation of results obtained using acoustic and contact microphones in screening for laryngeal disorders through analysis of sustained phonation is the main objective of this study. Aiming to obtain a versatile characterization of voice samples recorded using microphones of both types, 14 different sets of features are extracted and used to build an accurate classifier to distinguish between normal and pathological cases. We propose a new, data dependent random forests-based, way to combine information available from the different feature sets. An approach to exploring data and decisions made by a random forest is also presented. Experimental investigations using a mixed gender database of 273 subjects have shown that the perceptual linear predictive cepstral coefficients (PLPCC) was the best feature set for both microphones. However, the linear predictive coefficients (LPC) and linear predictive cosine transform coefficients (LPCTC) exhibited good performance in the acoustic microphone case only. Models designed using the acoustic microphone data significantly outperformed the ones built using data recorded by the contact microphone. The contact microphone did not bring any additional information useful for the classification. The proposed data dependent random forest significantly outperformed the traditional random forest.

  3. Department of Cybernetic Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The development of the theory, instrumentation and applications of methods and systems for the measurement, analysis, processing and synthesis of acoustic signals within the audio frequency range, particularly of the speech signal and the vibro-acoustic signal emitted by technical and industrial equipments treated as noise and vibration sources was discussed. The research work, both theoretical and experimental, aims at applications in various branches of science, and medicine, such as: acoustical diagnostics and phoniatric rehabilitation of pathological and postoperative states of the speech organ; bilateral ""man-machine'' speech communication based on the analysis, recognition and synthesis of the speech signal; vibro-acoustical diagnostics and continuous monitoring of the state of machines, technical equipments and technological processes.

  4. Elastic Wave Propagation Mechanisms in Underwater Acoustic Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    Elastic wave propagation mechanisms in underwater acoustic environments Scott D. Frank Marist College Department of Mathematics Poughkeepsie...conversion from elastic propagation to acoustic propagation, and intense interface waves on underwater acoustic environments with elastic bottoms... acoustic energy in the water column. Elastic material parameters will be varied for analysis of the dissipation of water column acoustic energy

  5. Acoustic-Seismic Coupling in Porous Ground - Measurements and Analysis for On-Site-Inspection Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebsch, Mattes; Gorschlüter, Felix; Altmann, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    During on-site inspections (OSI) of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organisation (CTBTO) a local seismic network can be installed to measure seismic aftershock signals of an assumed underground nuclear explosion. These signals are caused by relaxation processes in and near the cavity created by the explosion and when detected can lead to a localisation of the cavity. This localisation is necessary to take gas samples from the ground which are analysed for radioactive noble gas isotopes to confirm or dismiss the suspicion of a nuclear test. The aftershock signals are of very low magnitude so they can be masked by different sources, in particular periodic disturbances caused by vehicles and aircraft in the inspection area. Vehicles and aircraft (mainly helicopters) will be used for the inspection activities themselves, e.g. for overhead imagery or magnetic-anomaly sensing. While vehicles in contact with the ground can excite soil vibrations directly, aircraft and vehicles alike emit acoustic waves which excite soil vibrations when hitting the ground. These disturbing signals are of periodic nature while the seismic aftershock signals are pulse-shaped, so their separation is possible. The understanding of the coupling of acoustic waves to the ground is yet incomplete, a better understanding is necessary to improve the performance of an OSI, e.g. to address potential consequences for the sensor placement, the helicopter trajectories etc. In a project funded by the Young Scientist Research Award of the CTBTO to one of us (ML), we investigated the acoustic-seismic coupling of airborne signals of jet aircraft and artificially induced ones by a speaker. During a measurement campaign several acoustic and seismic sensors were placed below the take-off trajectory of an airport at 4 km distance. Therefore taking off and landing jet aircraft passed nearly straightly above the setup. Microphones were placed close to the ground to record the sound pressure of incident

  6. Acoustic communication in plant-animal interactions.

    PubMed

    Schöner, Michael G; Simon, Ralph; Schöner, Caroline R

    2016-08-01

    Acoustic communication is widespread and well-studied in animals but has been neglected in other organisms such as plants. However, there is growing evidence for acoustic communication in plant-animal interactions. While knowledge about active acoustic signalling in plants (i.e. active sound production) is still in its infancy, research on passive acoustic signalling (i.e. reflection of animal sounds) revealed that bat-dependent plants have adapted to the bats' echolocation systems by providing acoustic reflectors to attract their animal partners. Understanding the proximate mechanisms and ultimate causes of acoustic communication will shed light on an underestimated dimension of information transfer between plants and animals.

  7. Acoustic Float for Marine Mammal Monitoring

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-30

    a matured technology, and is manufactured mainly by two companies, Webb Research (APEX) and Martec (PROVOR). Our original acoustic float, the...adding another microprocessor inside the float as originally planned, we have reprogrammed the APEX float processor board itself (apf9) by changing... echolocation clicks. The analysis revealed that by using ICI information, the ERMA detector was able to reduce the number of false positive detections to less

  8. Acoustic mapping velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muste, M.; Baranya, S.; Tsubaki, R.; Kim, D.; Ho, H.; Tsai, H.; Law, D.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of sediment dynamics in rivers is of great importance for various practical purposes. Despite its high relevance in riverine environment processes, the monitoring of sediment rates remains a major and challenging task for both suspended and bed load estimation. While the measurement of suspended load is currently an active area of testing with nonintrusive technologies (optical and acoustic), bed load measurement does not mark a similar progress. This paper describes an innovative combination of measurement techniques and analysis protocols that establishes the proof-of-concept for a promising technique, labeled herein Acoustic Mapping Velocimetry (AMV). The technique estimates bed load rates in rivers developing bed forms using a nonintrusive measurements approach. The raw information for AMV is collected with acoustic multibeam technology that in turn provides maps of the bathymetry over longitudinal swaths. As long as the acoustic maps can be acquired relatively quickly and the repetition rate for the mapping is commensurate with the movement of the bed forms, successive acoustic maps capture the progression of the bed form movement. Two-dimensional velocity maps associated with the bed form migration are obtained by implementing algorithms typically used in particle image velocimetry to acoustic maps converted in gray-level images. Furthermore, use of the obtained acoustic and velocity maps in conjunction with analytical formulations (e.g., Exner equation) enables estimation of multidirectional bed load rates over the whole imaged area. This paper presents a validation study of the AMV technique using a set of laboratory experiments.

  9. Criteria and Thresholds for U.S. Navy Acoustic and Explosive Effects Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    Onset, growth, and recovery of in-air temporary threshold shift in a California sea lion ( Zalophus californianus ),” Journal of the Acoustical...audiograms of several California sea lions ( Zalophus californianus ) and Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus) measured using single and multiple...2011b). “California sea lion ( Zalophus californianus ) aerial hearing sensitivity measured using auditory steady-state response and psychophysical

  10. Perturbation and Nonlinear Dynamic Analysis of Acoustic Phonatory Signal in Parkinsonian Patients Receiving Deep Brain Stimulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Victoria S.; Zhou, Xiao Ping; Rahn, Douglas A., III; Wang, Emily Q.; Jiang, Jack J.

    2008-01-01

    Nineteen PD patients who received deep brain stimulation (DBS), 10 non-surgical (control) PD patients, and 11 non-pathologic age- and gender-matched subjects performed sustained vowel phonations. The following acoustic measures were obtained on the sustained vowel phonations: correlation dimension (D[subscript 2]), percent jitter, percent shimmer,…

  11. Analysis of underwater decoupling properties of a locally resonant acoustic metamaterial coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling-Zhi, Huang; Yong, Xiao; Ji-Hong, Wen; Hai-Bin, Yang; Xi-Sen, Wen

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a semi-analytical solution for the vibration and sound radiation of a semi-infinite plate covered by a decoupling layer consisting of locally resonant acoustic metamaterial. Formulations are derived based on a combination use of effective medium theory and the theory of elasticity for the decoupling material. Theoretical results show good agreements between the method developed in this paper and the conventional finite element method (FEM), but the method of this paper is more efficient than FEM. Numerical results also show that system with acoustic metamaterial decoupling layer exhibits significant noise reduction performance at the local resonance frequency of the acoustic metamaterial, and such performance can be ascribed to the vibration suppression of the base plate. It is demonstrated that the effective density of acoustic metamaterial decoupling layer has a great influence on the mechanical impedance of the system. Furthermore, the resonance frequency of locally resonant structure can be effectively predicted by a simple model, and it can be significantly affected by the material properties of the locally resonant structure. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51305448 and 51275519).

  12. Development of an Efficient Binaural Simulation for the Analysis of Structural Acoustic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Marty E.; Lalime, Aimee L.; Grosveld, Ferdinand W.; Rizzi, Stephen A.; Sullivan, Brenda M.

    2003-01-01

    Applying binaural simulation techniques to structural acoustic data can be very computationally intensive as the number of discrete noise sources can be very large. Typically, Head Related Transfer Functions (HRTFs) are used to individually filter the signals from each of the sources in the acoustic field. Therefore, creating a binaural simulation implies the use of potentially hundreds of real time filters. This paper details two methods of reducing the number of real-time computations required by: (i) using the singular value decomposition (SVD) to reduce the complexity of the HRTFs by breaking them into dominant singular values and vectors and (ii) by using equivalent source reduction (ESR) to reduce the number of sources to be analyzed in real-time by replacing sources on the scale of a structural wavelength with sources on the scale of an acoustic wavelength. The ESR and SVD reduction methods can be combined to provide an estimated computation time reduction of 99.4% for the structural acoustic data tested. In addition, preliminary tests have shown that there is a 97% correlation between the results of the combined reduction methods and the results found with the current binaural simulation techniques

  13. Acoustic Analysis of the Voiced-Voiceless Distinction in Dutch Tracheoesophageal Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jongmans, Petra; Wempe, Ton G.; van Tinteren, Harm; Hilgers, Frans J. M.; Pols, Louis C. W.; van As-Brooks, Corina J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Confusions between voiced and voiceless plosives and voiced and voiceless fricatives are common in Dutch tracheoesophageal (TE) speech. This study investigates (a) which acoustic measures are found to convey a correct voicing contrast in TE speech and (b) whether different measures are found in TE speech than in normal laryngeal (NL)…

  14. Crack Propagation Analysis Using Acoustic Emission Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring Systems

    DOE PAGES

    Kral, Zachary; Horn, Walter; Steck, James

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace systems are expected to remain in service well beyond their designed life. Consequently, maintenance is an important issue. A novel method of implementing artificial neural networks and acoustic emission sensors to form a structural health monitoring (SHM) system for aerospace inspection routines was the focus of this research. Simple structural elements, consisting of flat aluminum plates of AL 2024-T3, were subjected to increasing static tensile loading. As the loading increased, designed cracks extended in length, releasing strain waves in the process. Strain wave signals, measured by acoustic emission sensors, were further analyzed in post-processing by artificial neural networks (ANN).more » Several experiments were performed to determine the severity and location of the crack extensions in the structure. ANNs were trained on a portion of the data acquired by the sensors and the ANNs were then validated with the remaining data. The combination of a system of acoustic emission sensors, and an ANN could determine crack extension accurately. The difference between predicted and actual crack extensions was determined to be between 0.004 in. and 0.015 in. with 95% confidence. These ANNs, coupled with acoustic emission sensors, showed promise for the creation of an SHM system for aerospace systems.« less

  15. Articulatory-to-Acoustic Relations in Talkers with Dysarthria: A First Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mefferd, Antje

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The primary purpose of this study was to determine the strength of interspeaker and intraspeaker articulatory-to-acoustic relations of vowel contrast produced by talkers with dysarthria and controls. Methods: Six talkers with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), six talkers with Parkinson's disease (PD), and 12 controls repeated a…

  16. Detection and Resolvability of Pulsed Acoustic Signals Through the South China Sea Basin: A Modeling Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    of the internal wave distribution developed by Hsu and Liu (2000) compiled from hundreds of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images from the First...Hamiltonian Acoustic Raytracing Program for the Ocean (Jones et al., 1986). HARPO traces rays by numerically integrating Hamilton’s equations of motion

  17. Acoustic Modeling and Analysis for the Space Shuttle Main Propulsion System Liner Crack Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casiano, Matthew J.; Zoladz, Tom F.

    2004-01-01

    Cracks were found on bellows flow liners in the liquid hydrogen feedlines of several space shuttle orbiters in 2002. An effort to characterize the fluid environment upstream of the space shuttle main engine low-pressure fuel pump was undertaken to help identify the cause of the cracks and also provide quantitative environments and loads of the region. Part of this effort was to determine the duct acoustics several inches upstream of the low-pressure fuel pump in the region of a bellows joint. A finite element model of the complicated geometry was made using three-dimensional fluid elements. The model was used to describe acoustics in the complex geometry and played an important role in the investigation. Acoustic mode shapes and natural frequencies of the liquid hydrogen in the duct and in the cavity behind the flow liner were determined. Forced response results were generated also by applying an edgetone-like forcing to the liner slots. Studies were conducted for state conditions and also conditions assuming two-phase entrapment in the backing cavity. Highly instrumented single-engine hot fire data confirms the presence of some of the predicted acoustic modes.

  18. Parametric Quantitative Acoustic Analysis of Conversation Produced by Speakers with Dysarthria and Healthy Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Kristin M.; Kent, Raymond D.; Delaney, Amy L.; Duffy, Joseph R.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This study's main purpose was to (a) identify acoustic signatures of hypokinetic dysarthria (HKD) that are robust to phonetic variation in conversational speech and (b) determine specific characteristics of the variability associated with HKD. Method: Twenty healthy control (HC) participants and 20 participants with HKD associated with…

  19. Time-frequency Analysis for Acoustic Emission Signals of Hypervelocity Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W. G.; Pang, B. J.; Zhang, W.; Sun, F.; Guan, G. S.

    The risk of collision of man-made orbital debris with spacecraft in near Earth orbits continues to increase A major of the space debris between 1mm and 10mm can t be well tracked in Earth orbits Damage from these un-tracked debris impacts is a serious hazard to aircraft and spacecraft These on-orbit collisions occur at velocities exceeding 10km s and at these velocities even very small particles can create significant damage The development of in-situ impact detecting system is indispensable for protecting the spacecraft from tragedy malfunction by the debris Acoustic Emission AE detecting technique has been recognized as an important technology for non-destructive detecting due to the AE signals offering a potentially useful additional means of non-invasively gathering concerning the state of spacecrafts Also Acoustic emission health monitoring is able to detect locate and assess impact damage when the spacecrafts is impacted by hypervelocity space debris and micrometeoroids This information can help operators and designers at the ground station take effective measures to maintain the function of spacecraft In this article Acoustic emission AE is used for characterization and location for hypervelocity Impacts Two different Acoustic Emission AE sensors were used to detect the arrival time and signals of the hits Hypervelocity Impacts were generated with a two-stage light-gas gun firing small Aluminum ball projectiles 4mm 6 4mm In the impact studies the signals were recorded with Disp AEwin PAC instruments by the conventional crossing

  20. Two French-Speaking Cases of Foreign Accent Syndrome: An Acoustic-Phonetic Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Johanna-Pascale; Macoir, Joel; Martel-Sauvageau, Vincent; Boudreault, Carol-Ann

    2012-01-01

    Foreign accent syndrome (FAS) is an acquired neurologic disorder in which an individual suddenly and unintentionally speaks with an accent which is perceived as being different from his/her usual accent. This study presents an acoustic-phonetic description of two Quebec French-speaking cases. The first speaker presents a perceived accent shift to…

  1. Crack propagation analysis using acoustic emission sensors for structural health monitoring systems.

    PubMed

    Kral, Zachary; Horn, Walter; Steck, James

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace systems are expected to remain in service well beyond their designed life. Consequently, maintenance is an important issue. A novel method of implementing artificial neural networks and acoustic emission sensors to form a structural health monitoring (SHM) system for aerospace inspection routines was the focus of this research. Simple structural elements, consisting of flat aluminum plates of AL 2024-T3, were subjected to increasing static tensile loading. As the loading increased, designed cracks extended in length, releasing strain waves in the process. Strain wave signals, measured by acoustic emission sensors, were further analyzed in post-processing by artificial neural networks (ANN). Several experiments were performed to determine the severity and location of the crack extensions in the structure. ANNs were trained on a portion of the data acquired by the sensors and the ANNs were then validated with the remaining data. The combination of a system of acoustic emission sensors, and an ANN could determine crack extension accurately. The difference between predicted and actual crack extensions was determined to be between 0.004 in. and 0.015 in. with 95% confidence. These ANNs, coupled with acoustic emission sensors, showed promise for the creation of an SHM system for aerospace systems.

  2. Acoustic and articulatory analysis of French vowels produced by congenitally blind adults and sighted adults.

    PubMed

    Ménard, Lucie; Toupin, Corinne; Baum, Shari R; Drouin, Serge; Aubin, Jérôme; Tiede, Mark

    2013-10-01

    In a previous paper [Ménard et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 126, 1406-1414 (2009)], it was demonstrated that, despite enhanced auditory discrimination abilities for synthesized vowels, blind adult French speakers produced vowels that were closer together in the acoustic space than those produced by sighted adult French speakers, suggesting finer control of speech production in the sighted speakers. The goal of the present study is to further investigate the articulatory effects of visual deprivation on vowels produced by 11 blind and 11 sighted adult French speakers. Synchronous ultrasound, acoustic, and video recordings of the participants articulating the ten French oral vowels were made. Results show that sighted speakers produce vowels that are spaced significantly farther apart in the acoustic vowel space than blind speakers. Furthermore, blind speakers use smaller differences in lip protrusion but larger differences in tongue position and shape than their sighted peers to produce rounding and place of articulation contrasts. Trade-offs between lip and tongue positions were examined. Results are discussed in the light of the perception-for-action control theory.

  3. An Acoustic Analysis of the Genus Microhyla (Anura: Microhylidae) of Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    Wijayathilaka, Nayana

    2016-01-01

    Vocalizing behavior of frogs and toads, once quantified, is useful for systematics, rapid species identification, behavioral experimentation and conservation monitoring. But yet, for many lineages vocalizations remain unknown or poorly quantified, especially in diversity rich tropical regions. Here we provide a quantitative acoustical analysis for all four Sri Lankan congeners of the genus Microhyla. Three of these species are endemic to the island, but Microhyla ornata is regionally widespread. Two of these endemics, M. karunaratnei (Critically Endangered) and M. zeylanica (Endangered), are highly threatened montane isolates; the other, M. mihintalei, is relatively common across the dry lowlands. We recorded and analyzed 100 advertisement calls from five calling males for each species, except for M. zeylanica, which only had 53 calls from three males suitable for analyses. All four species call in choruses and their vocal repertoires are simple compared to most frogs. Their calls contain multiple pulses and no frequency modulation. We quantified eight call characters. Call duration and number of pulses were higher for the two montane isolates (inhabiting cooler habitats at higher altitudes) compared to their lowland congeners. Microhyla zeylanica has the longest call duration (of 1.8 ± 0.12 s) and the highest number of pulses (of 61–92 pulses). The smallest of the species, Microhyla karunaratnei (16.2–18.3 mm), has the highest mean dominant frequency (3.3 ± 0.14 kHz) and pulse rate (77 ± 5.8 pulses per second). The calls separate well in the Principal Component space: PC1 axis is mostly explained by the number of pulses per call and call duration; PC2 is mostly explained by the pulse rate. A canonical means plot of a Discriminant Function analysis shows non-overlapping 95% confidence ellipses. This suggests that some call parameters can be used to distinguish these species effectively. We provide detailed descriptions for eight call properties and compare

  4. Subfield profitability analysis reveals an economic case for cropland diversification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandes, E.; McNunn, G. S.; Schulte, L. A.; Bonner, I. J.; Muth, D. J.; Babcock, B. A.; Sharma, B.; Heaton, E. A.

    2016-01-01

    Public agencies and private enterprises increasingly desire to achieve ecosystem service outcomes in agricultural systems, but are limited by perceived conflicts between economic and ecosystem service goals and a lack of tools enabling effective operational management. Here we use Iowa—an agriculturally homogeneous state representative of the Maize Belt—to demonstrate an economic rationale for cropland diversification at the subfield scale. We used a novel computational framework that integrates disparate but publicly available data to map ˜3.3 million unique potential management polygons (9.3 Mha) and reveal subfield opportunities to increase overall field profitability. We analyzed subfield profitability for maize/soybean fields during 2010-2013—four of the most profitable years in recent history—and projected results for 2015. While cropland operating at a loss of US 250 ha-1 or more was negligible between 2010 and 2013 at 18 000-190 000 ha (<2% of row-crop land), the extent of highly unprofitable land increased to 2.5 Mha, or 27% of row-crop land, in the 2015 projection. Aggregation of these areas to the township level revealed ‘hotspots’ for potential management change in Western, Central, and Northeast Iowa. In these least profitable areas, incorporating conservation management that breaks even (e.g., planting low-input perennials), into low-yielding portions of fields could increase overall cropland profitability by 80%. This approach is applicable to the broader region and differs substantially from the status quo of ‘top-down’ land management for conservation by harnessing private interest to align profitability with the production of ecosystem services.

  5. Two-dimensional acoustic metamaterial structure for potential image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hongwei; Han, Yu; Li, Ying; Pai, Frank

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents modeling, analysis techniques and experiment of for two-Dimensional Acoustic metamaterial Structure for filtering acoustic waves. For a unit cell of an infinite two-Dimensional Acoustic metamaterial Structure, governing equations are derived using the extended Hamilton principle. The concepts of negative effective mass and stiffness and how the spring-mass-damper subsystems create a stopband are explained in detail. Numerical simulations reveal that the actual working mechanism of the proposed acoustic metamaterial structure is based on the concept of conventional mechanical vibration absorbers. It uses the incoming wave in the structure to resonate the integrated membrane-mass-damper absorbers to vibrate in their optical mode at frequencies close to but above their local resonance frequencies to create shear forces and bending moments to straighten the panel and stop the wave propagation. Moreover, a two-dimension acoustic metamaterial structure consisting of lumped mass and elastic membrane is fabricated in the lab. We do experiments on the model and The results validate the concept and show that, for two-dimension acoustic metamaterial structure do exist two vibration modes. For the wave absorption, the mass of each cell should be considered in the design. With appropriate design calculations, the proposed two-dimension acoustic metamaterial structure can be used for absorption of low-frequency waves. Hence this special structure can be used in filtering the waves, and the potential using can increase the ultrasonic imaging quality.

  6. Trophic hierarchies revealed via amino acid isotopic analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite the potential of isotopic methods to illuminate trophic function, accurate estimates of lifetime feeding tendencies have remained elusive. A relatively new approach—referred to as compound-specific isotopic analysis (CSIA)—has emerged, centering on the measurement of 15N:14N ratios in amino ...

  7. Analysis of copy number variations reveals differences among cattle breeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic structural variation is an important and abundant source of genetic and phenotypic variation. Here we describe the first systematic and genome-wide analysis of copy number variations (CNVs) in the modern domesticated cattle using array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) and quanti...

  8. Acoustic Source Bearing Estimation (ASBE) computer program development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiese, Michael R.

    1987-01-01

    A new bearing estimation algorithm (Acoustic Source Analysis Technique - ASAT) and an acoustic analysis computer program (Acoustic Source Bearing Estimation - ASBE) are described, which were developed by Computer Sciences Corporation for NASA Langley Research Center. The ASBE program is used by the Acoustics Division/Applied Acoustics Branch and the Instrument Research Division/Electro-Mechanical Instrumentation Branch to analyze acoustic data and estimate the azimuths from which the source signals radiated. Included are the input and output from a benchmark test case.

  9. Computerized Analysis of Acoustic Characteristics of Patients with Internal Nasal Valve Collapse Before and After Functional Rhinoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Rezaei, Fariba; Omrani, Mohammad Reza; Abnavi, Fateme; Mojiri, Fariba; Golabbakhsh, Marzieh; Barati, Sohrab; Mahaki, Behzad

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic analysis of sounds produced during speech provides significant information about the physiology of larynx and vocal tract. The analysis of voice power spectrum is a fundamental sensitive method of acoustic assessment that provides valuable information about the voice source and characteristics of vocal tract resonance cavities. The changes in long-term average spectrum (LTAS) spectral tilt and harmony to noise ratio (HNR) were analyzed to assess the voice quality before and after functional rhinoplasty in patients with internal nasal valve collapse. Before and 3 months after functional rhinoplasty, 12 participants were evaluated and HNR and LTAS spectral tilt in /a/ and /i/ vowels were estimated. It was seen that an increase in HNR and a decrease in LTAS spectral tilt existed after surgery. Mean LTAS spectral tilt in vowel /a/ decreased from 2.37 ± 1.04 to 2.28 ± 1.17 (P = 0.388), and it was decreased from 4.16 ± 1.65 to 2.73 ± 0.69 in vowel /i/ (P = 0.008). Mean HNR in the vowel /a/ increased from 20.71 ± 3.93 to 25.06 ± 2.67 (P = 0.002), and it was increased from 21.28 ± 4.11 to 25.26 ± 3.94 in vowel /i/ (P = 0.002). Modification of the vocal tract caused the vocal cords to close sufficiently, and this showed that although rhinoplasty did not affect the larynx directly, it changes the structure of the vocal tract and consequently the resonance of voice production. The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in voice parameters after functional rhinoplasty in patients with internal nasal valve collapse by computerized analysis of acoustic characteristics. PMID:26955564

  10. Computerized Analysis of Acoustic Characteristics of Patients with Internal Nasal Valve Collapse Before and After Functional Rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Fariba; Omrani, Mohammad Reza; Abnavi, Fateme; Mojiri, Fariba; Golabbakhsh, Marzieh; Barati, Sohrab; Mahaki, Behzad

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic analysis of sounds produced during speech provides significant information about the physiology of larynx and vocal tract. The analysis of voice power spectrum is a fundamental sensitive method of acoustic assessment that provides valuable information about the voice source and characteristics of vocal tract resonance cavities. The changes in long-term average spectrum (LTAS) spectral tilt and harmony to noise ratio (HNR) were analyzed to assess the voice quality before and after functional rhinoplasty in patients with internal nasal valve collapse. Before and 3 months after functional rhinoplasty, 12 participants were evaluated and HNR and LTAS spectral tilt in /a/ and /i/ vowels were estimated. It was seen that an increase in HNR and a decrease in LTAS spectral tilt existed after surgery. Mean LTAS spectral tilt in vowel /a/ decreased from 2.37 ± 1.04 to 2.28 ± 1.17 (P = 0.388), and it was decreased from 4.16 ± 1.65 to 2.73 ± 0.69 in vowel /i/ (P = 0.008). Mean HNR in the vowel /a/ increased from 20.71 ± 3.93 to 25.06 ± 2.67 (P = 0.002), and it was increased from 21.28 ± 4.11 to 25.26 ± 3.94 in vowel /i/ (P = 0.002). Modification of the vocal tract caused the vocal cords to close sufficiently, and this showed that although rhinoplasty did not affect the larynx directly, it changes the structure of the vocal tract and consequently the resonance of voice production. The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in voice parameters after functional rhinoplasty in patients with internal nasal valve collapse by computerized analysis of acoustic characteristics.

  11. Ocean acoustic reverberation tomography.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wide-angle imaging using ship-towed acoustic sources and networks of ocean bottom seismographs is a common technique for exploring earth structure beneath the oceans. In these studies, the recorded data are dominated by acoustic waves propagating as reverberations in the water column. For surveys with a small receiver spacing (e.g., <10 km), the acoustic wave field densely samples properties of the water column over the width of the receiver array. A method, referred to as ocean acoustic reverberation tomography, is developed that uses the travel times of direct and reflected waves to image ocean acoustic structure. Reverberation tomography offers an alternative approach for determining the structure of the oceans and advancing the understanding of ocean heat content and mixing processes. The technique has the potential for revealing small-scale ocean thermal structure over the entire vertical height of the water column and along long survey profiles or across three-dimensional volumes of the ocean. For realistic experimental geometries and data noise levels, the method can produce images of ocean sound speed on a smaller scale than traditional acoustic tomography.

  12. Don't forget the porpoise: acoustic monitoring reveals fine scale temporal variation between bottlenose dolphin and harbour porpoise in Cardigan Bay SAC.

    PubMed

    Nuuttila, Hanna K; Courtene-Jones, Winnie; Baulch, Sarah; Simon, Malene; Evans, Peter G H

    2017-01-01

    Populations of bottlenose dolphin and harbour porpoise inhabit Cardigan Bay, which was designated a Special Area of Conservation (SAC), with bottlenose dolphin listed as a primary feature for its conservation status. Understanding the abundance, distribution and habitat use of species is fundamental for conservation and the implementation of management. Bottlenose dolphin and harbour porpoise usage of feeding sites within Cardigan Bay SAC was examined using passive acoustic monitoring. Acoustic detections recorded with calibrated T-PODs (acoustic data loggers) indicated harbour porpoise to be present year round and in greater relative abundance than bottlenose dolphin. Fine-scale temporal partitioning between the species occurred at three levels: (1) seasonal differences, consistent between years, with porpoise detections peaking in winter months and dolphin detections in summer months; (2) diel variation, consistent across sites, seasons and years, with porpoise detections highest at night and dolphin detections highest shortly after sunrise; and (3) tidal variation was observed with peak dolphin detections occurring during ebb at the middle of the tidal cycle and before low tide, whereas harbour porpoise detections were highest at slack water, during and after high water with a secondary peak recorded during and after low water. General Additive Models (GAMs) were applied to better understand the effects of each covariate. The reported abundance and distribution of the two species, along with the temporal variation observed, have implications for the design and management of protected areas. Currently, in the UK, no SACs have been formally designated for harbour porpoise while three exist for bottlenose dolphins. Here, we demonstrate a need for increased protection and species-specific mitigation measures for harbour porpoise.

  13. Exceptional structured noncoding RNAs revealed by bacterial metagenome analysis.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Zasha; Perreault, Jonathan; Meyer, Michelle M; Breaker, Ronald R

    2009-12-03

    Estimates of the total number of bacterial species indicate that existing DNA sequence databases carry only a tiny fraction of the total amount of DNA sequence space represented by this division of life. Indeed, environmental DNA samples have been shown to encode many previously unknown classes of proteins and RNAs. Bioinformatics searches of genomic DNA from bacteria commonly identify new noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) such as riboswitches. In rare instances, RNAs that exhibit more extensive sequence and structural conservation across a wide range of bacteria are encountered. Given that large structured RNAs are known to carry out complex biochemical functions such as protein synthesis and RNA processing reactions, identifying more RNAs of great size and intricate structure is likely to reveal additional biochemical functions that can be achieved by RNA. We applied an updated computational pipeline to discover ncRNAs that rival the known large ribozymes in size and structural complexity or that are among the most abundant RNAs in bacteria that encode them. These RNAs would have been difficult or impossible to detect without examining environmental DNA sequences, indicating that numerous RNAs with extraordinary size, structural complexity, or other exceptional characteristics remain to be discovered in unexplored sequence space.

  14. Proteomic Analysis of Hylocereus polyrhizus Reveals Metabolic Pathway Changes

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Qingzhu; Zhou, Qianjun; Gan, Susheng; Wu, Jingyu; Chen, Canbin; Li, Jiaqiang; Ye, Yaoxiong; Zhao, Jietang; Hu, Guibing; Qin, Yonghua

    2016-01-01

    Red dragon fruit or red pitaya (Hylocereus polyrhizus) is the only edible fruit that contains betalains. The color of betalains ranges from red and violet to yellow in plants. Betalains may also serve as an important component of health-promoting and disease-preventing functional food. Currently, the biosynthetic and regulatory pathways for betalain production remain to be fully deciphered. In this study, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based proteomic analyses were used to reveal the molecular mechanism of betalain biosynthesis in H. polyrhizus fruits at white and red pulp stages, respectively. A total of 1946 proteins were identified as the differentially expressed between the two samples, and 936 of them were significantly highly expressed at the red pulp stage of H. polyrhizus. RNA-seq and iTRAQ analyses showed that some transcripts and proteins were positively correlated; they belonged to “phenylpropanoid biosynthesis”, “tyrosine metabolism”, “flavonoid biosynthesis”, “ascorbate and aldarate metabolism”, “betalains biosynthesis” and “anthocyanin biosynthesis”. In betalains biosynthesis pathway, several proteins/enzymes such as polyphenol oxidase, CYP76AD3 and 4,5-dihydroxy-phenylalanine (DOPA) dioxygenase extradiol-like protein were identified. The present study provides a new insight into the molecular mechanism of the betalain biosynthesis at the posttranscriptional level. PMID:27690004

  15. Proteomics Analysis Reveals Previously Uncharacterized Virulence Factors in Vibrio proteolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Ann; Kinch, Lisa N.; de Souza Santos, Marcela; Grishin, Nick V.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Members of the genus Vibrio include many pathogens of humans and marine animals that share genetic information via horizontal gene transfer. Hence, the Vibrio pan-genome carries the potential to establish new pathogenic strains by sharing virulence determinants, many of which have yet to be characterized. Here, we investigated the virulence properties of Vibrio proteolyticus, a Gram-negative marine bacterium previously identified as part of the Vibrio consortium isolated from diseased corals. We found that V. proteolyticus causes actin cytoskeleton rearrangements followed by cell lysis in HeLa cells in a contact-independent manner. In search of the responsible virulence factor involved, we determined the V. proteolyticus secretome. This proteomics approach revealed various putative virulence factors, including active type VI secretion systems and effectors with virulence toxin domains; however, these type VI secretion systems were not responsible for the observed cytotoxic effects. Further examination of the V. proteolyticus secretome led us to hypothesize and subsequently demonstrate that a secreted hemolysin, belonging to a previously uncharacterized clan of the leukocidin superfamily, was the toxin responsible for the V. proteolyticus-mediated cytotoxicity in both HeLa cells and macrophages. Clearly, there remains an armory of yet-to-be-discovered virulence factors in the Vibrio pan-genome that will undoubtedly provide a wealth of knowledge on how a pathogen can manipulate host cells. PMID:27460800

  16. Quantitative proteomic analysis reveals posttranslational responses to aneuploidy in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Dephoure, Noah; Hwang, Sunyoung; O'Sullivan, Ciara; Dodgson, Stacie E; Gygi, Steven P; Amon, Angelika; Torres, Eduardo M

    2014-01-01

    Aneuploidy causes severe developmental defects and is a near universal feature of tumor cells. Despite its profound effects, the cellular processes affected by aneuploidy are not well characterized. Here, we examined the consequences of aneuploidy on the proteome of aneuploid budding yeast strains. We show that although protein levels largely scale with gene copy number, subunits of multi-protein complexes are notable exceptions. Posttranslational mechanisms attenuate their expression when their encoding genes are in excess. Our proteomic analyses further revealed a novel aneuploidy-associated protein expression signature characteristic of altered metabolism and redox homeostasis. Indeed aneuploid cells harbor increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Interestingly, increased protein turnover attenuates ROS levels and this novel aneuploidy-associated signature and improves the fitness of most aneuploid strains. Our results show that aneuploidy causes alterations in metabolism and redox homeostasis. Cells respond to these alterations through both transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03023.001 PMID:25073701

  17. Integrative network analysis reveals molecular mechanisms of blood pressure regulation

    PubMed Central

    Huan, Tianxiao; Meng, Qingying; Saleh, Mohamed A; Norlander, Allison E; Joehanes, Roby; Zhu, Jun; Chen, Brian H; Zhang, Bin; Johnson, Andrew D; Ying, Saixia; Courchesne, Paul; Raghavachari, Nalini; Wang, Richard; Liu, Poching; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Vasan, Ramachandran; Munson, Peter J; Madhur, Meena S; Harrison, David G; Yang, Xia; Levy, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified numerous loci associated with blood pressure (BP). The molecular mechanisms underlying BP regulation, however, remain unclear. We investigated BP-associated molecular mechanisms by integrating BP GWAS with whole blood mRNA expression profiles in 3,679 individuals, using network approaches. BP transcriptomic signatures at the single-gene and the coexpression network module levels were identified. Four coexpression modules were identified as potentially causal based on genetic inference because expression-related SNPs for their corresponding genes demonstrated enrichment for BP GWAS signals. Genes from the four modules were further projected onto predefined molecular interaction networks, revealing key drivers. Gene subnetworks entailing molecular interactions between key drivers and BP-related genes were uncovered. As proof-of-concept, we validated SH2B3, one of the top key drivers, using Sh2b3−/− mice. We found that a significant number of genes predicted to be regulated by SH2B3 in gene networks are perturbed in Sh2b3−/− mice, which demonstrate an exaggerated pressor response to angiotensin II infusion. Our findings may help to identify novel targets for the prevention or treatment of hypertension. PMID:25882670

  18. Genomic analysis reveals selection in Chinese native black pig

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yuhua; Li, Cencen; Tang, Qianzi; Tian, Shilin; Jin, Long; Chen, Jianhai; Li, Mingzhou; Li, Changchun

    2016-01-01

    Identification of genomic signatures that help reveal mechanisms underlying desirable traits in domesticated pigs is of significant biological, agricultural and medical importance. To identify the genomic footprints left by selection during domestication of the Enshi black pig, a typical native and meat-lard breed in China, we generated about 72-fold coverage of the pig genome using pools of genomic DNA representing three different populations of Enshi black pigs from three different locations. Combining this data with the available whole genomes of 13 Chinese wild boars, we identified 417 protein-coding genes embedded in the selected regions of Enshi black pigs. These genes are mainly involved in developmental and metabolic processes, response to stimulus, and other biological processes. Signatures of selection were detected in genes involved in body size and immunity (RPS10 and VASN), lipid metabolism (GSK3), male fertility (INSL6) and developmental processes (TBX19). These findings provide a window into the potential genetic mechanism underlying development of desirable phenotypes in Enshi black pigs during domestication and subsequent artificial selection. Thus, our results illustrate how domestication has shaped patterns of genetic variation in Enshi black pigs and provide valuable genetic resources that enable effective use of pigs in agricultural production. PMID:27808243

  19. Multiple etiologies for Alzheimer disease are revealed by segregation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, V.S.; Connor-Lacke, L.; Cupplies, L.A.; Growdon, J.H.; Farrer, L.A.; Duijn, C.M. van

    1994-11-01

    We have evaluated several transmission models for Alzheimer disease (AD), using the logistic regressive approach in 401 nuclear families of consecutively ascertained and rigorously diagnosed probands. Models postulating no major gene effect, random environmental transmission, recessive inheritance, and sporadic occurrence were rejected under varied assumptions regarding the associations among sex, age, and major gene susceptibility. Transmission of the disorder was not fully explained by a single Mendelian model for all families. Stratification of families as early- and late-onset by using the median of family mean onset ages showed that, regardless of the model studied, two groups of families fit better than a single group. AD in early-onset families is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait with full penetrance in both sexes and has a gene frequency of 1.5%. Dominant inheritance also gave the best fit of the data in late-onset families, but this hypothesis was rejected, suggesting the presence of heterogeneity within this subset. Our study also revealed that genetically nonsusceptible males and females develop AD, indicating the presence of phenocopies within early-onset and late-onset groups. Moreover, our results suggest that the higher risk to females is not solely due to their increased longevity. 50 refs., 5 tabs.

  20. Comparative Genomic Analysis Reveals Ecological Differentiation in the Genus Carnobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Iskandar, Christelle F.; Borges, Frédéric; Taminiau, Bernard; Daube, Georges; Zagorec, Monique; Remenant, Benoît; Leisner, Jørgen J.; Hansen, Martin A.; Sørensen, Søren J.; Mangavel, Cécile; Cailliez-Grimal, Catherine; Revol-Junelles, Anne-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) differ in their ability to colonize food and animal-associated habitats: while some species are specialized and colonize a limited number of habitats, other are generalist and are able to colonize multiple animal-linked habitats. In the current study, Carnobacterium was used as a model genus to elucidate the genetic basis of these colonization differences. Analyses of 16S rRNA gene meta-barcoding data showed that C. maltaromaticum followed by C. divergens are the most prevalent species in foods derived from animals (meat, fish, dairy products), and in the gut. According to phylogenetic analyses, these two animal-adapted species belong to one of two deeply branched lineages. The second lineage contains species isolated from habitats where contact with animal is rare. Genome analyses revealed that members of the animal-adapted lineage harbor a larger secretome than members of the other lineage. The predicted cell-surface proteome is highly diversified in C. maltaromaticum and C. divergens with genes involved in adaptation to the animal milieu such as those encoding biopolymer hydrolytic enzymes, a heme uptake system, and biopolymer-binding adhesins. These species also exhibit genes for gut adaptation and respiration. In contrast, Carnobacterium species belonging to the second lineage encode a poorly diversified cell-surface proteome, lack genes for gut adaptation and are unable to respire. These results shed light on the important genomics traits required for adaptation to animal-linked habitats in generalist Carnobacterium. PMID:28337181

  1. Proteomic Analysis of Hylocereus polyrhizus Reveals Metabolic Pathway Changes.

    PubMed

    Hua, Qingzhu; Zhou, Qianjun; Gan, Susheng; Wu, Jingyu; Chen, Canbin; Li, Jiaqiang; Ye, Yaoxiong; Zhao, Jietang; Hu, Guibing; Qin, Yonghua

    2016-09-28

    Red dragon fruit or red pitaya (Hylocereus polyrhizus) is the only edible fruit that contains betalains. The color of betalains ranges from red and violet to yellow in plants. Betalains may also serve as an important component of health-promoting and disease-preventing functional food. Currently, the biosynthetic and regulatory pathways for betalain production remain to be fully deciphered. In this study, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based proteomic analyses were used to reveal the molecular mechanism of betalain biosynthesis in H. polyrhizus fruits at white and red pulp stages, respectively. A total of 1946 proteins were identified as the differentially expressed between the two samples, and 936 of them were significantly highly expressed at the red pulp stage of H. polyrhizus. RNA-seq and iTRAQ analyses showed that some transcripts and proteins were positively correlated; they belonged to "phenylpropanoid biosynthesis", "tyrosine metabolism", "flavonoid biosynthesis", "ascorbate and aldarate metabolism", "betalains biosynthesis" and "anthocyanin biosynthesis". In betalains biosynthesis pathway, several proteins/enzymes such as polyphenol oxidase, CYP76AD3 and 4,5-dihydroxy-phenylalanine (DOPA) dioxygenase extradiol-like protein were identified. The present study provides a new insight into the molecular mechanism of the betalain biosynthesis at the posttranscriptional level.

  2. Morphometric analysis of posterior fossa in Indian CP angle acoustic schwannoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Patibandla, Mohana Rao; Panigrahi, Manas K.; Gurram, Paniraj L.; Thotakura, Amit Kumar; Kulkarni, Dilip

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To study the morphometry of posterior fossa in Indian CP angle schwannoma patients in order to know its influence on the extent of excision of the CP angle acoustic schwannomas. Materials and Methods: One hundred cases of cerebellopontine angle schwannomas treated surgically by the senior author and 20 controls between January 2006 and June 2011 were consecutively investigated with computed tomography (CT) using the high-resolution CT bone windows before surgery. Evaluation of anatomic parameters of the petrous bone and posterior fossa cavity were done in all patients and controls. Data were entered in Excel software and were analyzed using NCSS software. All possible regression analysis was done to select the important variables to be included in the model to predict the excision of tumor with these variables. A prediction model was developed defining the binary outcome as total excision or subtotal excision as dependent variable and the morphometric data and grading of tumor as independent variables. Results: Interpetrous distance (IP) is the distance between the two petrous apices. Sigmoid distance (IS) distance is the distance between the two sigmoid points. Sigmoid point is the point at which the scalloped impression of the sigmoid sinus straightens to join the occipital bone posteriorly. SAG is the distance between the mid IP point and the mid-point on the inner wall of the occipital bone. The PM angle was 47.8±4.14 degrees (38-58), the PA angle was 42.68±4.47 degrees (34-53), the IP distance was 2.07±0.13 cm (1.5-2.8), the sagittal diameter of posterior fossa was 6.22±0.73 cm (5.1-9.8) and the intersigmoid distance was 9.45±0.73 cm (7.4-11). There was no significant gender difference in the posterior fossa morphometry between patients and controls. Inter-sigmoid distance and the petrous-apex angle were more in the Indians when compared to the European population mentioned in the Mathies and Samii study. Conclusions: The posterior fossa

  3. Global Analysis of ATM Polymorphism Reveals Significant Functional Constraint

    PubMed Central

    Thorstenson, Yvonne R.; Shen, Peidong; Tusher, Virginia G.; Wayne, Tierney L.; Davis, Ronald W.; Chu, Gilbert; Oefner, Peter J.

    2001-01-01

    ATM, the gene that is mutated in ataxia-telangiectasia, is associated with cerebellar degeneration, abnormal proliferation of small blood vessels, and cancer. These clinically important manifestations have stimulated interest in defining the sequence variation in the ATM gene. Therefore, we undertook a comprehensive survey of sequence variation in ATM in diverse human populations. The protein-encoding exons of the gene (9,168 bp) and the adjacent intron and untranslated sequences (14,661 bp) were analyzed in 93 individuals from seven major human populations. In addition, the coding sequence was analyzed in one chimpanzee, one gorilla, one orangutan, and one Old World monkey. In human ATM, 88 variant sites were discovered by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography, which is 96%–100% sensitive for detection of DNA sequence variation. ATM was compared to 14 other autosomal genes for nucleotide diversity. The noncoding regions of ATM had diversity values comparable to other genes, but the coding regions had very low diversity, especially in the last 29% of the protein sequence. A test of the neutral evolution hypothesis, through use of the Hudson/Kreitman/Aguadé statistic, revealed that this region of the human ATM gene was significantly constrained relative to that of the orangutan, the Old World monkey, and the mouse, but not relative to that of the chimpanzee or the gorilla. ATM displayed extensive linkage disequilibrium, consistent with suppression of meiotic recombination at this locus. Seven haplotypes were defined. Two haplotypes accounted for 82% of all chromosomes analyzed in all major populations; two others carrying the same D126E missense polymorphism accounted for 33% of chromosomes in Africa but were never observed outside of Africa. The high frequency of this polymorphism may be due either to a population expansion within Africa or to selective pressure. PMID:11443540

  4. Proteogenomic analysis reveals exosomes are more oncogenic than ectosomes

    PubMed Central

    Liem, Michael; Fonseka, Pamali; Atukorala, Ishara; Ozcitti, Cemil; Mechler, Adam; Adda, Christopher G.; Ang, Ching-Seng; Mathivanan, Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) include the exosomes (30-100 nm) that are produced through the endocytic pathway via the multivesicular bodies and the ectosomes (100-1000 nm) that are released through the budding of the plasma membrane. Despite the differences in the mode of biogenesis and size, reliable markers that can distinguish between exosomes and ectosomes are non-existent. Moreover, the precise functional differences between exosomes and ectosomes remains poorly characterised. Here, using label-free quantitative proteomics, we highlight proteins that could be exploited as markers to discriminate between exosomes and ectosomes. For the first time, a global proteogenomics analysis unveiled the secretion of mutant proteins that are implicated in cancer progression through tumor-derived EVs. Follow up integrated bioinformatics analysis highlighted the enrichment of oncogenic cargo in exosomes and ectosomes. Interestingly, exosomes induced significant cell proliferation and migration in recipient cells compared to ectosomes confirming the oncogenic nature of exosomes. These findings ascertain that cancer cells facilitate oncogenesis by the secretion of mutant and oncoproteins into the tumor microenvironment via exosomes and ectosomes. The integrative proteogenomics approach utilized in this study has the potential to identify disease biomarker candidates which can be later assayed in liquid biopsies obtained from cancer patients. PMID:25944692

  5. Proteogenomic analysis reveals exosomes are more oncogenic than ectosomes.

    PubMed

    Keerthikumar, Shivakumar; Gangoda, Lahiru; Liem, Michael; Fonseka, Pamali; Atukorala, Ishara; Ozcitti, Cemil; Mechler, Adam; Adda, Christopher G; Ang, Ching-Seng; Mathivanan, Suresh

    2015-06-20

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) include the exosomes (30-100 nm) that are produced through the endocytic pathway via the multivesicular bodies and the ectosomes (100-1000 nm) that are released through the budding of the plasma membrane. Despite the differences in the mode of biogenesis and size, reliable markers that can distinguish between exosomes and ectosomes are non-existent. Moreover, the precise functional differences between exosomes and ectosomes remains poorly characterised. Here, using label-free quantitative proteomics, we highlight proteins that could be exploited as markers to discriminate between exosomes and ectosomes. For the first time, a global proteogenomics analysis unveiled the secretion of mutant proteins that are implicated in cancer progression through tumor-derived EVs. Follow up integrated bioinformatics analysis highlighted the enrichment of oncogenic cargo in exosomes and ectosomes. Interestingly, exosomes induced significant cell proliferation and migration in recipient cells compared to ectosomes confirming the oncogenic nature of exosomes. These findings ascertain that cancer cells facilitate oncogenesis by the secretion of mutant and oncoproteins into the tumor microenvironment via exosomes and ectosomes. The integrative proteogenomics approach utilized in this study has the potential to identify disease biomarker candidates which can be later assayed in liquid biopsies obtained from cancer patients.

  6. Network analysis reveals potential markers for pediatric adrenocortical carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kulshrestha, Anurag; Suman, Shikha; Ranjan, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare malignancy with a poor outcome. Molecular mechanisms of pediatric ACC oncogenesis and advancement are not well understood. Accurate and timely diagnosis of the disease requires identification of new markers for pediatric ACC. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified from the gene expression profile of pediatric ACC and obtained from Gene Expression Omnibus. Gene Ontology functional and pathway enrichment analysis was implemented to recognize the functions of DEGs. A protein–protein interaction (PPI) and gene–gene functional interaction (GGI) network of DEGs was constructed. Hub gene detection and enrichment analysis of functional modules were performed. Furthermore, a gene regulatory network incorporating DEGs–microRNAs–transcription factors was constructed and analyzed. A total of 431 DEGs including 228 upregulated and 203 downregulated DEGs were screened. These genes were largely involved in cell cycle, steroid biosynthesis, and p53 signaling pathways. Upregulated genes, CDK1, CCNB1, CDC20, and BUB1B, were identified as the common hubs of PPI and GGI networks. All the four common hub genes were also part of modules of the PPI network. Moreover, all the four genes were also present in the largest module of GGI network. A gene regulatory network consisting of 82 microRNAs and 100 transcription factors was also constructed. CDK1, CCNB1, CDC20, and BUB1B may serve as potential biomarker of pediatric ACC and as potential targets for therapeutic approach, although experimental studies are required to authenticate our findings. PMID:27555782

  7. Gas Hydrate-Sediment Morphologies Revealed by Pressure Core Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, M.; Schultheiss, P.; Roberts, J.; Druce, M.

    2006-12-01

    Analysis of HYACINTH pressure cores collected on IODP Expedition 311 and NGHP Expedition 1 showed gas hydrate layers, lenses, and veins contained in fine-grained sediments as well as gas hydrate contained in coarse-grained layers. Pressure cores were recovered from sediments on the Cascadia Margin off the North American West Coast and in the Krishna-Godavari Basin in the Western Bay of Bengal in water depths of 800- 1400 meters. Recovered cores were transferred to laboratory chambers without loss of pressure and nondestructive measurements were made at in situ pressures and controlled temperatures. Gamma density, P-wave velocity, and X-ray images showed evidence of grain-displacing and pore-filling gas hydrate in the cores. Data highlights include X-ray images of fine-grained sediment cores showing wispy subvertical veins of gas hydrate and P-wave velocity excursions corresponding to grain-displacing layers and pore-filling layers of gas hydrate. Most cores were subjected to controlled depressurization experiments, where expelled gas was collected, analyzed for composition, and used to calculate gas hydrate saturation within the core. Selected cores were stored under pressure for postcruise analysis and subsampling.

  8. Genomic analysis of regulatory network dynamics reveals large topological changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luscombe, Nicholas M.; Madan Babu, M.; Yu, Haiyuan; Snyder, Michael; Teichmann, Sarah A.; Gerstein, Mark

    2004-09-01

    Network analysis has been applied widely, providing a unifying language to describe disparate systems ranging from social interactions to power grids. It has recently been used in molecular biology, but so far the resulting networks have only been analysed statically. Here we present the dynamics of a biological network on a genomic scale, by integrating transcriptional regulatory information and gene-expression data for multiple conditions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We develop an approach for the statistical analysis of network dynamics, called SANDY, combining well-known global topological measures, local motifs and newly derived statistics. We uncover large changes in underlying network architecture that are unexpected given current viewpoints and random simulations. In response to diverse stimuli, transcription factors alter their interactions to varying degrees, thereby rewiring the network. A few transcription factors serve as permanent hubs, but most act transiently only during certain conditions. By studying sub-network structures, we show that environmental responses facilitate fast signal propagation (for example, with short regulatory cascades), whereas the cell cycle and sporulation direct temporal progression through multiple stages (for example, with highly inter-connected transcription factors). Indeed, to drive the latter processes forward, phase-specific transcription factors inter-regulate serially, and ubiquitously active transcription factors layer above them in a two-tiered hierarchy. We anticipate that many of the concepts presented here-particularly the large-scale topological changes and hub transience-will apply to other biological networks, including complex sub-systems in higher eukaryotes.

  9. Genomic analysis of regulatory network dynamics reveals large topological changes.

    PubMed

    Luscombe, Nicholas M; Babu, M Madan; Yu, Haiyuan; Snyder, Michael; Teichmann, Sarah A; Gerstein, Mark

    2004-09-16

    Network analysis has been applied widely, providing a unifying language to describe disparate systems ranging from social interactions to power grids. It has recently been used in molecular biology, but so far the resulting networks have only been analysed statically. Here we present the dynamics of a biological network on a genomic scale, by integrating transcriptional regulatory information and gene-expression data for multiple conditions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We develop an approach for the statistical analysis of network dynamics, called SANDY, combining well-known global topological measures, local motifs and newly derived statistics. We uncover large changes in underlying network architecture that are unexpected given current viewpoints and random simulations. In response to diverse stimuli, transcription factors alter their interactions to varying degrees, thereby rewiring the network. A few transcription factors serve as permanent hubs, but most act transiently only during certain conditions. By studying sub-network structures, we show that environmental responses facilitate fast signal propagation (for example, with short regulatory cascades), whereas the cell cycle and sporulation direct temporal progression through multiple stages (for example, with highly inter-connected transcription factors). Indeed, to drive the latter processes forward, phase-specific transcription factors inter-regulate serially, and ubiquitously active transcription factors layer above them in a two-tiered hierarchy. We anticipate that many of the concepts presented here--particularly the large-scale topological changes and hub transience--will apply to other biological networks, including complex sub-systems in higher eukaryotes.

  10. Genome analysis of the platypus reveals unique signatures of evolution.

    PubMed

    Warren, Wesley C; Hillier, LaDeana W; Marshall Graves, Jennifer A; Birney, Ewan; Ponting, Chris P; Grützner, Frank; Belov, Katherine; Miller, Webb; Clarke, Laura; Chinwalla, Asif T; Yang, Shiaw-Pyng; Heger, Andreas; Locke, Devin P; Miethke, Pat; Waters, Paul D; Veyrunes, Frédéric; Fulton, Lucinda; Fulton, Bob; Graves, Tina; Wallis, John; Puente, Xose S; López-Otín, Carlos; Ordóñez, Gonzalo R; Eichler, Evan E; Chen, Lin; Cheng, Ze; Deakin, Janine E; Alsop, Amber; Thompson, Katherine; Kirby, Patrick; Papenfuss, Anthony T; Wakefield, Matthew J; Olender, Tsviya; Lancet, Doron; Huttley, Gavin A; Smit, Arian F A; Pask, Andrew; Temple-Smith, Peter; Batzer, Mark A; Walker, Jerilyn A; Konkel, Miriam K; Harris, Robert S; Whittington, Camilla M; Wong, Emily S W; Gemmell, Neil J; Buschiazzo, Emmanuel; Vargas Jentzsch, Iris M; Merkel, Angelika; Schmitz, Juergen; Zemann, Anja; Churakov, Gennady; Kriegs, Jan Ole; Brosius, Juergen; Murchison, Elizabeth P; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Smith, Carly; Hannon, Gregory J; Tsend-Ayush, Enkhjargal; McMillan, Daniel; Attenborough, Rosalind; Rens, Willem; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm; Lefèvre, Christophe M; Sharp, Julie A; Nicholas, Kevin R; Ray, David A; Kube, Michael; Reinhardt, Richard; Pringle, Thomas H; Taylor, James; Jones, Russell C; Nixon, Brett; Dacheux, Jean-Louis; Niwa, Hitoshi; Sekita, Yoko; Huang, Xiaoqiu; Stark, Alexander; Kheradpour, Pouya; Kellis, Manolis; Flicek, Paul; Chen, Yuan; Webber, Caleb; Hardison, Ross; Nelson, Joanne; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kym; Delehaunty, Kim; Markovic, Chris; Minx, Pat; Feng, Yucheng; Kremitzki, Colin; Mitreva, Makedonka; Glasscock, Jarret; Wylie, Todd; Wohldmann, Patricia; Thiru, Prathapan; Nhan, Michael N; Pohl, Craig S; Smith, Scott M; Hou, Shunfeng; Nefedov, Mikhail; de Jong, Pieter J; Renfree, Marilyn B; Mardis, Elaine R; Wilson, Richard K

    2008-05-08

    We present a draft genome sequence of the platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus. This monotreme exhibits a fascinating combination of reptilian and mammalian characters. For example, platypuses have a coat of fur adapted to an aquatic lifestyle; platypus females lactate, yet lay eggs; and males are equipped with venom similar to that of reptiles. Analysis of the first monotreme genome aligned these features with genetic innovations. We find that reptile and platypus venom proteins have been co-opted independently from the same gene families; milk protein genes are conserved despite platypuses laying eggs; and immune gene family expansions are directly related to platypus biology. Expansions of protein, non-protein-coding RNA and microRNA families, as well as repeat elements, are identified. Sequencing of this genome now provides a valuable resource for deep mammalian comparative analyses, as well as for monotreme biology and conservation.

  11. Image analysis of weaverbird nests reveals signature weave textures.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Ida E; Backes, André; Walsh, Patrick T; Morgan, Kate V; Meddle, Simone L; Healy, Susan D

    2015-06-01

    In nature, many animals build structures that can be readily measured at the scale of their gross morphology (e.g. length, volume and weight). Capturing individuality as can be done with the structures designed and built by human architects or artists, however, is more challenging. Here, we tested whether computer-aided image texture classification approaches can be used to describe textural variation in the nests of weaverbirds (Ploceus species) in order to attribute nests to the individual weaverbird that built them. We found that a computer-aided texture analysis approach does allow the assignment of a signature to weaverbirds' nests. We suggest that this approach will be a useful tool with which to examine individual variation across a range of animal constructions, not just for nests.

  12. Image analysis of weaverbird nests reveals signature weave textures

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Ida E.; Backes, André; Walsh, Patrick T.; Morgan, Kate V.; Meddle, Simone L.; Healy, Susan D.

    2015-01-01

    In nature, many animals build structures that can be readily measured at the scale of their gross morphology (e.g. length, volume and weight). Capturing individuality as can be done with the structures designed and built by human architects or artists, however, is more challenging. Here, we tested whether computer-aided image texture classification approaches can be used to describe textural variation in the nests of weaverbirds (Ploceus species) in order to attribute nests to the individual weaverbird that built them. We found that a computer-aided texture analysis approach does allow the assignment of a signature to weaverbirds' nests. We suggest that this approach will be a useful tool with which to examine individual variation across a range of animal constructions, not just for nests. PMID:26543586

  13. Genome analysis of the platypus reveals unique signatures of evolution

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Wesley C.; Hillier, LaDeana W.; Marshall Graves, Jennifer A.; Birney, Ewan; Ponting, Chris P.; Grützner, Frank; Belov, Katherine; Miller, Webb; Clarke, Laura; Chinwalla, Asif T.; Yang, Shiaw-Pyng; Heger, Andreas; Locke, Devin P.; Miethke, Pat; Waters, Paul D.; Veyrunes, Frédéric; Fulton, Lucinda; Fulton, Bob; Graves, Tina; Wallis, John; Puente, Xose S.; López-Otín, Carlos; Ordóñez, Gonzalo R.; Eichler, Evan E.; Chen, Lin; Cheng, Ze; Deakin, Janine E.; Alsop, Amber; Thompson, Katherine; Kirby, Patrick; Papenfuss, Anthony T.; Wakefield, Matthew J.; Olender, Tsviya; Lancet, Doron; Huttley, Gavin A.; Smit, Arian F. A.; Pask, Andrew; Temple-Smith, Peter; Batzer, Mark A.; Walker, Jerilyn A.; Konkel, Miriam K.; Harris, Robert S.; Whittington, Camilla M.; Wong, Emily S. W.; Gemmell, Neil J.; Buschiazzo, Emmanuel; Vargas Jentzsch, Iris M.; Merkel, Angelika; Schmitz, Juergen; Zemann, Anja; Churakov, Gennady; Kriegs, Jan Ole; Brosius, Juergen; Murchison, Elizabeth P.; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Smith, Carly; Hannon, Gregory J.; Tsend-Ayush, Enkhjargal; McMillan, Daniel; Attenborough, Rosalind; Rens, Willem; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm; Lefèvre, Christophe M.; Sharp, Julie A.; Nicholas, Kevin R.; Ray, David A.; Kube, Michael; Reinhardt, Richard; Pringle, Thomas H.; Taylor, James; Jones, Russell C.; Nixon, Brett; Dacheux, Jean-Louis; Niwa, Hitoshi; Sekita, Yoko; Huang, Xiaoqiu; Stark, Alexander; Kheradpour, Pouya; Kellis, Manolis; Flicek, Paul; Chen, Yuan; Webber, Caleb; Hardison, Ross; Nelson, Joanne; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kym; Delehaunty, Kim; Markovic, Chris; Minx, Pat; Feng, Yucheng; Kremitzki, Colin; Mitreva, Makedonka; Glasscock, Jarret; Wylie, Todd; Wohldmann, Patricia; Thiru, Prathapan; Nhan, Michael N.; Pohl, Craig S.; Smith, Scott M.; Hou, Shunfeng; Renfree, Marilyn B.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.

    2009-01-01

    We present a draft genome sequence of the platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus. This monotreme exhibits a fascinating combination of reptilian and mammalian characters. For example, platypuses have a coat of fur adapted to an aquatic lifestyle; platypus females lactate, yet lay eggs; and males are equipped with venom similar to that of reptiles. Analysis of the first monotreme genome aligned these features with genetic innovations. We find that reptile and platypus venom proteins have been co-opted independently from the same gene families; milk protein genes are conserved despite platypuses laying eggs; and immune gene family expansions are directly related to platypus biology. Expansions of protein, non-protein-coding RNA and microRNA families, as well as repeat elements, are identified. Sequencing of this genome now provides a valuable resource for deep mammalian comparative analyses, as well as for monotreme biology and conservation. PMID:18464734

  14. Time-Frequency Analysis Reveals Pairwise Interactions in Insect Swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puckett, James G.; Ni, Rui; Ouellette, Nicholas T.

    2015-06-01

    The macroscopic emergent behavior of social animal groups is a classic example of dynamical self-organization, and is thought to arise from the local interactions between individuals. Determining these interactions from empirical data sets of real animal groups, however, is challenging. Using multicamera imaging and tracking, we studied the motion of individual flying midges in laboratory mating swarms. By performing a time-frequency analysis of the midge trajectories, we show that the midge behavior can be segmented into two distinct modes: one that is independent and composed of low-frequency maneuvers, and one that consists of higher-frequency nearly harmonic oscillations conducted in synchrony with another midge. We characterize these pairwise interactions, and make a hypothesis as to their biological function.

  15. Comparative transcriptome analysis reveals vertebrate phylotypic period during organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Irie, Naoki; Kuratani, Shigeru

    2011-01-01

    One of the central issues in evolutionary developmental biology is how we can formulate the relationships between evolutionary and developmental processes. Two major models have been proposed: the 'funnel-like' model, in which the earliest embryo shows the most conserved morphological pattern, followed by diversifying later stages, and the 'hourglass' model, in which constraints are imposed to conserve organogenesis stages, which is called the phylotypic period. Here we perform a quantitative comparative transcriptome analysis of several model vertebrate embryos and show that the pharyngula stage is most conserved, whereas earlier and later stages are rather divergent. These results allow us to predict approximate developmental timetables between different species, and indicate that pharyngula embryos have the most conserved gene expression profiles, which may be the source of the basic body plan of vertebrates. PMID:21427719

  16. Kidney tumor biomarkers revealed by simultaneous multiple matrix metabolomics analysis.

    PubMed

    Ganti, Sheila; Taylor, Sandra L; Abu Aboud, Omran; Yang, Joy; Evans, Christopher; Osier, Michael V; Alexander, Danny C; Kim, Kyoungmi; Weiss, Robert H

    2012-07-15

    Metabolomics is increasingly being used in cancer biology for biomarker discovery and identification of potential novel therapeutic targets. However, a systematic metabolomics study of multiple biofluids to determine their interrelationships and to describe their use as tumor proxies is lacking. Using a mouse xenograft model of kidney cancer, characterized by subcapsular implantation of Caki-1 clear cell human kidney cancer cells, we examined tissue, serum, and urine all obtained simultaneously at baseline (urine) and at, or close to, animal sacrifice (urine, tissue, and plasma). Uniform metabolomics analysis of all three "matrices" was accomplished using gas chromatography- and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Of all the metabolites identified (267 in tissue, 246 in serum, and 267 in urine), 89 were detected in all 3 matrices, and the majority was altered in the same direction. Heat maps of individual metabolites showed that alterations in serum were more closely related to tissue than was urine. Two metabolites, cinnamoylglycine and nicotinamide, were concordantly and significantly (when corrected for multiple testing) altered in tissue and serum, and cysteine-glutathione disulfide showed the highest change (232.4-fold in tissue) of any metabolite. On the basis of these and other considerations, three pathways were chosen for biologic validation of the metabolomic data, resulting in potential therapeutic target identification. These data show that serum metabolomics analysis is a more accurate proxy for tissue changes than urine and that tryptophan degradation (yielding anti-inflammatory metabolites) is highly represented in renal cell carcinoma, and support the concept that PPAR-α antagonism may be a potential therapeutic approach for this disease.

  17. Musical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, Colin

    This chapter provides an introduction to the physical and psycho-acoustic principles underlying the production and perception of the sounds of musical instruments. The first section introduces generic aspects of musical acoustics and the perception of musical sounds, followed by separate sections on string, wind and percussion instruments.

  18. Anisotropic diffraction of bulk acoustic wave beams in lithium niobate.

    PubMed

    Naumenko, Natalya F; Chizhikov, Sergey I; Molchanov, Vladimir Ya; Yushkov, Konstantin B

    2015-12-01

    The formalism of planar diffraction tensor was applied to the analysis of anisotropy of bulk acoustic wave diffraction and to build a full map of anisotropic diffractional coefficients for three bulk acoustic wave modes propagating in lithium niobate. For arbitrary propagation direction the diffractional coefficients derived allow estimation of ultrasonic beam divergence in far-field. Analysis of obtained data revealed that the maxima of acousto-optic figure of merit for anisotropic diffraction in the YZ plane correspond to moderate diffractional spreading of the beams exceeding isotropic diffraction 2-3 times.

  19. Numerical and experimental analysis of high frequency acoustic microscopy and infrared reflectance system for early detection of melanoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karagiannis, Georgios; Apostolidis, Georgios; Georgoulias, Panagiotis

    2016-03-01

    Melanoma is a very malicious type of cancer as it metastasizes early and hence its late diagnosis leads to death. Consequently, early diagnosis of melanoma and its removal is considered the most effective way of treatment. We present a design of a high frequency acoustic microscopy and infrared reflectance system for the early detection of melanoma. Specifically, the identification of morphological changes related to carcinogenesis is required. In this work, we simulate of the propagation of the ultrasonic waves of the order of 100 MHz as well as of electromagnetic waves of the order of 100 THz in melanoma structures targeting to the estimation and optimization of the basic characteristics of the systems. The simulation results of the acoustic microscopy subsystem aim to provide information such as the geometry of the transducer, the center frequency of operation, the focal length where the power transmittance is optimum and the spot size in focal length. As far as the infrared is concerned the optimal frequency range and the spot illumination size of the external probe is provided. This information is next used to assemble a properly designed system which is applied to melanoma phantoms as well as real skin lesions. Finally, the measurement data are visualized to reveal the information of the experimented structures, proving noteworthy accuracy.

  20. Analysis of an existing experiment on the interaction of acoustic waves with a laminar boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schopper, M. R.

    1982-01-01

    The hot-wire anemometer amplitude data contained in the 1977 report of P. J. Shapiro entitled, ""The Influence of Sound Upon Laminar Boundary'' were reevaluated. Because the low-Reynolds number boundary layer disturbance data were misinterpreted, an effort was made to improve the corresponding disturbance growth rate curves. The data are modeled as the sum of upstream and downstream propagating acoustic waves and a wave representing the Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) wave. The amplitude and phase velocity of the latter wave were then adjusted so that the total signal reasonably matched the amplitude and phase angle hot-wire data along the plate laminar boundary layer. The revised rates show growth occurring further upstream than Shapiro found. It appears that the premature growth is due to the adverse pressure gradient created by the shape of the plate. Basic elements of sound propagation in ducts and the experimental and theoretical acoustic-stability literature are reviewed.

  1. Analysis on accuracy improvement of rotor-stator rubbing localization based on acoustic emission beamforming method.

    PubMed

    He, Tian; Xiao, Denghong; Pan, Qiang; Liu, Xiandong; Shan, Yingchun

    2014-01-01

    This paper attempts to introduce an improved acoustic emission (AE) beamforming method to localize rotor-stator rubbing fault in rotating machinery. To investigate the propagation characteristics of acoustic emission signals in casing shell plate of rotating machinery, the plate wave theory is used in a thin plate. A simulation is conducted and its result shows the localization accuracy of beamforming depends on multi-mode, dispersion, velocity and array dimension. In order to reduce the effect of propagation characteristics on the source localization, an AE signal pre-process method is introduced by combining plate wave theory and wavelet packet transform. And the revised localization velocity to reduce effect of array size is presented. The accuracy of rubbing localization based on beamforming and the improved method of present paper are compared by the rubbing test carried on a test table of rotating machinery. The results indicate that the improved method can localize rub fault effectively.

  2. Characterizing noise in nonhuman vocalizations: Acoustic analysis and human perception of barks by coyotes and dogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riede, Tobias; Mitchell, Brian R.; Tokuda, Isao; Owren, Michael J.

    2005-07-01

    Measuring noise as a component of mammalian vocalizations is of interest because of its potential relevance to the communicative function. However, methods for characterizing and quantifying noise are less well established than methods applicable to harmonically structured aspects of signals. Using barks of coyotes and domestic dogs, we compared six acoustic measures and studied how they are related to human perception of noisiness. Measures of harmonic-to-noise-ratio (HNR), percent voicing, and shimmer were found to be the best predictors of perceptual rating by human listeners. Both acoustics and perception indicated that noisiness was similar across coyote and dog barks, but within each species there was significant variation among the individual vocalizers. The advantages and disadvantages of the various measures are discussed.

  3. Finite Element Analysis of Bulk-Acoustic-Wave Devices: Model Setup and Applications.

    PubMed

    Thalhammer, Robert; Larson, John

    2016-04-20

    In this work, the principles of finite element modeling for the electro-acoustic simulation of bulk-acoustic- wave devices will be summarized. We will outline model setup including governing equations and boundary conditions, as well as its efficient computer implementation. Particular emphasis will be given to tailoring the model dimension to the specific requirements of the desired investigation. As 3D simulations still require a major effort, it will be illustrated that various aspects of device physics and design can be addressed already by fast and efficient 2D simulations. Multiple theoretical and experimental evidence will be presented to demonstrate the validity of the modeling concepts. Based on various examples it will be sketched how to benefit from numerical simulations for understanding fundamental effects, designing devices for actual products, and exploring novel technologies.

  4. Stability analysis of thermo-acoustic nonlinear eigenproblems in annular combustors. Part I. Sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magri, Luca; Bauerheim, Michael; Juniper, Matthew P.

    2016-11-01

    We present an adjoint-based method for the calculation of eigenvalue perturbations in nonlinear, degenerate and non-self-adjoint eigenproblems. This method is applied to a thermo-acoustic annular combustor network, the stability of which is governed by a nonlinear eigenproblem. We calculate the first- and second-order sensitivities of the growth rate and frequency to geometric, flow and flame parameters. Three different configurations are analysed. The benchmark sensitivities are obtained by finite difference, which involves solving the nonlinear eigenproblem at least as many times as the number of parameters. By solving only one adjoint eigenproblem, we obtain the sensitivities to any thermo-acoustic parameter, which match the finite-difference solutions at much lower computational cost.

  5. Differential network analysis reveals dysfunctional regulatory networks in gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Mu-Shui; Liu, Bing-Ya; Dai, Wen-Tao; Zhou, Wei-Xin; Li, Yi-Xue; Li, Yuan-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Gastric Carcinoma is one of the most common cancers in the world. A large number of differentially expressed genes have been identified as being associated with gastric cancer progression, however, little is known about the underlying regulatory mechanisms. To address this problem, we developed a differential networking approach that is characterized by including a nascent methodology, differential coexpression analysis (DCEA), and two novel quantitative methods for differential regulation analysis. We first applied DCEA to a gene expression dataset of gastric normal mucosa, adenoma and carcinoma samples to identify gene interconnection changes during cancer progression, based on which we inferred normal, adenoma, and carcinoma-specific gene regulation networks by using linear regression model. It was observed that cancer genes and drug targets were enriched in each network. To investigate the dynamic changes of gene regulation during carcinogenesis, we then designed two quantitative methods to prioritize differentially regulated genes (DRGs) and gene pairs or links (DRLs) between adjacent stages. It was found that known cancer genes and drug targets are significantly higher ranked. The top 4% normal vs. adenoma DRGs (36 genes) and top 6% adenoma vs. carcinoma DRGs (56 genes) proved to be worthy of further investigation to explore their association with gastric cancer. Out of the 16 DRGs involved in two top-10 DRG lists of normal vs. adenoma and adenoma vs. carcinoma comparisons, 15 have been reported to be gastric cancer or cancer related. Based on our inferred differential networking information and known signaling pathways, we generated testable hypotheses on the roles of GATA6, ESRRG and their signaling pathways in gastric carcinogenesis. Compared with established approaches which build genome-scale GRNs, or sub-networks around differentially expressed genes, the present one proved to be better at enriching cancer genes and drug targets, and prioritizing

  6. Analysis of and Techniques for Adaptive Equalization for Underwater Acoustic Communication

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    Keyed QAM Quadrature Amplitude Modulation QPSK Quadrature Phase Shift Keyed 19 continued from last page. . . Acronym Definition RF Radio Frequency...rate was 2400 samples per second and the data packet was 60000 4- QAM modulated symbols. The results again confirm that the proposed method outperforms...communication is quickly becoming a necessity for applications in ocean science, defense, and homeland security. Acoustics remains the only prac- tical means

  7. Phylogenetic analysis reveals a scattered distribution of autumn colours

    PubMed Central

    Archetti, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Leaf colour in autumn is rarely considered informative for taxonomy, but there is now growing interest in the evolution of autumn colours and different hypotheses are debated. Research efforts are hindered by the lack of basic information: the phylogenetic distribution of autumn colours. It is not known when and how autumn colours evolved. Methods Data are reported on the autumn colours of 2368 tree species belonging to 400 genera of the temperate regions of the world, and an analysis is made of their phylogenetic relationships in order to reconstruct the evolutionary origin of red and yellow in autumn leaves. Key Results Red autumn colours are present in at least 290 species (70 genera), and evolved independently at least 25 times. Yellow is present independently from red in at least 378 species (97 genera) and evolved at least 28 times. Conclusions The phylogenetic reconstruction suggests that autumn colours have been acquired and lost many times during evolution. This scattered distribution could be explained by hypotheses involving some kind of coevolutionary interaction or by hypotheses that rely on the need for photoprotection. PMID:19126636

  8. A graphical analysis revealed frailty deficits aggregate and are multidimensional

    PubMed Central

    Sourial, Nadia; Wolfson, Christina; Bergman, Howard; Zhu, Bin; Karunananthan, Sathya; Quail, Jacqueline; Fletcher, John; Weiss, Deborah; Bandeen-Roche, Karen; Béland, François

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationships among seven frailty domains: nutrition, physical activity, mobility, strength, energy, cognition, and mood, using data from three studies. Study Design and Setting Data from three studies were separately analyzed using Multiple Correspondence Analysis (MCA). The graphical output of MCA was used to assess 1) if the presence of deficits in the frailty domains separate from the absence of deficits on the graph, 2) the dimensionality of the domains, 3) the clustering of domains within each dimension and 4) their relationship with age, sex and disability. Results were compared across the studies. Results In two studies, presence of deficits for all domains separated from absence of deficits. In the third study, there was separation in all domains except cognition. Three main dimensions were retained in each study however assigned dimensionality of domains differed. The clustering of mobility with energy and/or strength was consistent across studies. Deficits were associated with older age, female sex and disability. Conclusion Our results suggest that frailty is a multidimensional concept for which the relationships among domains differ according to the population characteristics. These domains, with the possible exception of cognition, appear to aggregate together and share a common underlying construct. PMID:19880286

  9. Network analysis reveals distinct clinical syndromes underlying acute mountain sickness.

    PubMed

    Hall, David P; MacCormick, Ian J C; Phythian-Adams, Alex T; Rzechorzek, Nina M; Hope-Jones, David; Cosens, Sorrel; Jackson, Stewart; Bates, Matthew G D; Collier, David J; Hume, David A; Freeman, Thomas; Thompson, A A Roger; Baillie, John Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is a common problem among visitors at high altitude, and may progress to life-threatening pulmonary and cerebral oedema in a minority of cases. International consensus defines AMS as a constellation of subjective, non-specific symptoms. Specifically, headache, sleep disturbance, fatigue and dizziness are given equal diagnostic weighting. Different pathophysiological mechanisms are now thought to underlie headache and sleep disturbance during acute exposure to high altitude. Hence, these symptoms may not belong together as a single syndrome. Using a novel visual analogue scale (VAS), we sought to undertake a systematic exploration of the symptomatology of AMS using an unbiased, data-driven approach originally designed for analysis of gene expression. Symptom scores were collected from 292 subjects during 1110 subject-days at altitudes between 3650 m and 5200 m on Apex expeditions to Bolivia and Kilimanjaro. Three distinct patterns of symptoms were consistently identified. Although fatigue is a ubiquitous finding, sleep disturbance and headache are each commonly reported without the other. The commonest pattern of symptoms was sleep disturbance and fatigue, with little or no headache. In subjects reporting severe headache, 40% did not report sleep disturbance. Sleep disturbance correlates poorly with other symptoms of AMS (Mean Spearman correlation 0.25). These results challenge the accepted paradigm that AMS is a single disease process and describe at least two distinct syndromes following acute ascent to high altitude. This approach to analysing symptom patterns has potential utility in other clinical syndromes.

  10. Network Analysis Reveals Distinct Clinical Syndromes Underlying Acute Mountain Sickness

    PubMed Central

    Hall, David P.; MacCormick, Ian J. C.; Phythian-Adams, Alex T.; Rzechorzek, Nina M.; Hope-Jones, David; Cosens, Sorrel; Jackson, Stewart; Bates, Matthew G. D.; Collier, David J.; Hume, David A.; Freeman, Thomas; Thompson, A. A. Roger; Baillie, John Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is a common problem among visitors at high altitude, and may progress to life-threatening pulmonary and cerebral oedema in a minority of cases. International consensus defines AMS as a constellation of subjective, non-specific symptoms. Specifically, headache, sleep disturbance, fatigue and dizziness are given equal diagnostic weighting. Different pathophysiological mechanisms are now thought to underlie headache and sleep disturbance during acute exposure to high altitude. Hence, these symptoms may not belong together as a single syndrome. Using a novel visual analogue scale (VAS), we sought to undertake a systematic exploration of the symptomatology of AMS using an unbiased, data-driven approach originally designed for analysis of gene expression. Symptom scores were collected from 292 subjects during 1110 subject-days at altitudes between 3650 m and 5200 m on Apex expeditions to Bolivia and Kilimanjaro. Three distinct patterns of symptoms were consistently identified. Although fatigue is a ubiquitous finding, sleep disturbance and headache are each commonly reported without the other. The commonest pattern of symptoms was sleep disturbance and fatigue, with little or no headache. In subjects reporting severe headache, 40% did not report sleep disturbance. Sleep disturbance correlates poorly with other symptoms of AMS (Mean Spearman correlation 0.25). These results challenge the accepted paradigm that AMS is a single disease process and describe at least two distinct syndromes following acute ascent to high altitude. This approach to analysing symptom patterns has potential utility in other clinical syndromes. PMID:24465370

  11. Differential Network Analysis Reveals Genetic Effects on Catalepsy Modules

    PubMed Central

    Iancu, Ovidiu D.; Oberbeck, Denesa; Darakjian, Priscila; Kawane, Sunita; Erk, Jason; McWeeney, Shannon; Hitzemann, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We performed short-term bi-directional selective breeding for haloperidol-induced catalepsy, starting from three mouse populations of increasingly complex genetic structure: an F2 intercross, a heterogeneous stock (HS) formed by crossing four inbred strains (HS4) and a heterogeneous stock (HS-CC) formed from the inbred strain founders of the Collaborative Cross (CC). All three selections were successful, with large differences in haloperidol response emerging within three generations. Using a custom differential network analysis procedure, we found that gene coexpression patterns changed significantly; importantly, a number of these changes were concordant across genetic backgrounds. In contrast, absolute gene-expression changes were modest and not concordant across genetic backgrounds, in spite of the large and similar phenotypic differences. By inferring strain contributions from the parental lines, we are able to identify significant differences in allelic content between the selected lines concurrent with large changes in transcript connectivity. Importantly, this observation implies that genetic polymorphisms can affect transcript and module connectivity without large changes in absolute expression levels. We conclude that, in this case, selective breeding acts at the subnetwork level, with the same modules but not the same transcripts affected across the three selections. PMID:23555609

  12. Bioimage analysis of Shigella infection reveals targeting of colonic crypts.

    PubMed

    Arena, Ellen T; Campbell-Valois, Francois-Xavier; Tinevez, Jean-Yves; Nigro, Giulia; Sachse, Martin; Moya-Nilges, Maryse; Nothelfer, Katharina; Marteyn, Benoit; Shorte, Spencer L; Sansonetti, Philippe J

    2015-06-23

    Few studies within the pathogenic field have used advanced imaging and analytical tools to quantitatively measure pathogenicity in vivo. In this work, we present a novel approach for the investigation of host-pathogen processes based on medium-throughput 3D fluorescence imaging. The guinea pig model for Shigella flexneri invasion of the colonic mucosa was used to monitor the infectious process over time with GFP-expressing S. flexneri. A precise quantitative imaging protocol was devised to follow individual S. flexneri in a large tissue volume. An extensive dataset of confocal images was obtained and processed to extract specific quantitative information regarding the progression of S. flexneri infection in an unbiased and exhaustive manner. Specific parameters included the analysis of S. flexneri positions relative to the epithelial surface, S. flexneri density within the tissue, and volume of tissue destruction. In particular, at early time points, there was a clear association of S. flexneri with crypts, key morphological features of the colonic mucosa. Numerical simulations based on random bacterial entry confirmed the bias of experimentally measured S. flexneri for early crypt targeting. The application of a correlative light and electron microscopy technique adapted for thick tissue samples further confirmed the location of S. flexneri within colonocytes at the mouth of crypts. This quantitative imaging approach is a novel means to examine host-pathogen systems in a tailored and robust manner, inclusive of the infectious agent.

  13. Consanguinity and late fertility: spatial analysis reveals positive association patterns.

    PubMed

    Lisa, Antonella; Astolfi, Paola; Zei, Gianna; Tentoni, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    The role of consanguinity on human complex traits is an important and controversial issue. In this work we focused on the Sardinian population and examined the effect of consanguineous unions on late female fertility. During the last century the island has been characterized by a high incidence of marriages between relatives, favoured by socio economic conditions and geographical isolation, and by high fertility despite a widespread tendency to delay reproduction. Through spatial analysis techniques, we explored the geographical heterogeneity of consanguinity and late fertility, and identified in Central-Eastern Sardinia a common area with an excess of both traits, where the traits are positively associated. We found that their association did not significantly affect women's fertility in the area, despite the expected negative role of both traits. Intriguingly, this critical zone corresponds well to areas reported by previous studies as being peculiar for a high frequency of centenarians and for lower risk in pregnancy outcome. The proposed approach can be generally exploited to identify target populations on which socioeconomic, biodemographic and genetic data can be collected at the individual level, and deeper analyses carried out to disentangle the determinants of complex biological traits and to investigate their association.

  14. Layered Social Network Analysis Reveals Complex Relationships in Kindergarteners

    PubMed Central

    Golemiec, Mireille; Schneider, Jonathan; Boyce, W. Thomas; Bush, Nicole R.; Adler, Nancy; Levine, Joel D.

    2016-01-01

    The interplay between individuals forms building blocks for social structure. Here, we examine the structure of behavioral interactions among kindergarten classroom with a hierarchy-neutral approach to examine all possible underlying patterns in the formation of layered networks of “reciprocal” interactions. To understand how these layers are coordinated, we used a layered motif approach. Our dual layered motif analysis can therefore be thought of as the dynamics of smaller groups that tile to create the group structure, or alternatively they provide information on what the average child would do in a given local social environment. When we examine the regulated motifs in layered networks, we find that transitivity is at least partially involved in the formation of these layered network structures. We also found complex combinations of the expected reciprocal interactions. The mechanisms used to understand social networks of kindergarten children here are also applicable on a more general scale to any group of individuals where interactions and identities can be readily observed and scored. PMID:26973572

  15. Perception of Male Caller Identity in Koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus): Acoustic Analysis and Playback Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Charlton, Benjamin D.; Ellis, William A. H.; McKinnon, Allan J.; Brumm, Jacqui; Nilsson, Karen; Fitch, W. Tecumseh

    2011-01-01

    The ability to signal individual identity using vocal signals and distinguish between conspecifics based on vocal cues is important in several mammal species. Furthermore, it can be important for receivers to differentiate between callers in reproductive contexts. In this study, we used acoustic analyses to determine whether male koala bellows are individually distinctive and to investigate the relative importance of different acoustic features for coding individuality. We then used a habituation-discrimination paradigm to investigate whether koalas discriminate between the bellow vocalisations of different male callers. Our results show that male koala bellows are highly individualized, and indicate that cues related to vocal tract filtering contribute the most to vocal identity. In addition, we found that male and female koalas habituated to the bellows of a specific male showed a significant dishabituation when they were presented with bellows from a novel male. The significant reduction in behavioural response to a final rehabituation playback shows this was not a chance rebound in response levels. Our findings indicate that male koala bellows are highly individually distinctive and that the identity of male callers is functionally relevant to male and female koalas during the breeding season. We go on to discuss the biological relevance of signalling identity in this species' sexual communication and the potential practical implications of our findings for acoustic monitoring of male population levels. PMID:21633499

  16. Analysis of Acoustic Wave and Current Data Offshore of Mytle Beach, South Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fall, K. A.; Wren, A.

    2008-12-01

    Two bottom boundary layer (BBL) instrument frames have been deployed on the shoreface and inner-shelf of Long Bay, South Carolina offshore of Myrtle Beach as part of a South Carolina Sea Grant funded project to measure sediment transport over two hardbottom habitats. The inshore instrument frame is located on an extensive hardbottom surface 850 meters offshore. The second instrumented frame is secured to a hardbottom surface on the inner-shelf at a distance of approximately 2.5 km offshore. The nearshore BBL observing system is composed of a downward-looking RDI/ Teledyne 1200 kHz Pulse-Coherent Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler, an upward-looking Nortek Acoustic Wave and Current Profiler (AWAC), and an Aquatec Acoustic Backscatter Sensor. As part of this larger study, the wave and current data from the AWAC have been analyzed. Long-term continuous time series data include wave height, wave period, directional wave spectra, and the magnitude and direction of currents in the water column. Within the data set are several wave events, including several frontal passages and Tropical Storm Hanna which hit the Myrtle Beach area in early September. Wave data have been correlated with meteorological data, and a comparison of shoreface wave characteristics during each type of event are presented.

  17. Gigahertz scanning acoustic microscopy analysis of voids in Cu-Sn micro-connects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, G.; Vuorinen, V.; Petzold, M.; Paulasto-Kröckel, M.; Brand, S.

    2017-01-01

    Gigahertz scanning acoustic microscopy (GHz-SAM) is applied to the characterization of bulk voids in the Cu-Sn material system, often used in micro-connects. An increased demand for the development of miniaturized interconnect technologies, such as micro-connects, means that fast characterization methods are required for the assessment and detection of reliability impacting defects. This study attempts to formulate an analytical technique aimed at detecting micro-structural defects in Cu-Sn micro-connects, such as micro-bumps for 1st level interconnects and solid-liquid interdiffusion bonds for nano- and microelectromechanical systems. To study the potential of the analytical method, a specific electroplating chemistry was used that increases the probability of defect formation in the electroplated Cu film. The chemistry is known under certain electroplating overpotentials to promote hydrogen bubble induced voids within the Cu. The samples containing voids were inspected by GHz-SAM with a highly focused acoustic lens operating at 1.12 GHz. To validate the results, GHz-SAM micrographs were compared with focused ion beam prepared cross-sections of the selected samples. Advances in acoustic transducer technology operating in the GHz frequency band allow for micron sized defect examination of materials with enhanced lateral resolution and sub-surface sensitivity.

  18. Time-Accurate Simulations and Acoustic Analysis of Slat Free-Shear-Layer. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Singer, Bart A.; Lockard, David P.

    2002-01-01

    Unsteady computational simulations of a multi-element, high-lift configuration are performed. Emphasis is placed on accurate spatiotemporal resolution of the free shear layer in the slat-cove region. The excessive dissipative effects of the turbulence model, so prevalent in previous simulations, are circumvented by switching off the turbulence-production term in the slat cove region. The justifications and physical arguments for taking such a step are explained in detail. The removal of this excess damping allows the shear layer to amplify large-scale structures, to achieve a proper non-linear saturation state, and to permit vortex merging. The large-scale disturbances are self-excited, and unlike our prior fully turbulent simulations, no external forcing of the shear layer is required. To obtain the farfield acoustics, the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation is evaluated numerically using the simulated time-accurate flow data. The present comparison between the computed and measured farfield acoustic spectra shows much better agreement for the amplitude and frequency content than past calculations. The effect of the angle-of-attack on the slat's flow features radiated acoustic field are also simulated presented.

  19. Perception of male caller identity in Koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus): acoustic analysis and playback experiments.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Benjamin D; Ellis, William A H; McKinnon, Allan J; Brumm, Jacqui; Nilsson, Karen; Fitch, W Tecumseh

    2011-01-01

    The ability to signal individual identity using vocal signals and distinguish between conspecifics based on vocal cues is important in several mammal species. Furthermore, it can be important for receivers to differentiate between callers in reproductive contexts. In this study, we used acoustic analyses to determine whether male koala bellows are individually distinctive and to investigate the relative importance of different acoustic features for coding individuality. We then used a habituation-discrimination paradigm to investigate whether koalas discriminate between the bellow vocalisations of different male callers. Our results show that male koala bellows are highly individualized, and indicate that cues related to vocal tract filtering contribute the most to vocal identity. In addition, we found that male and female koalas habituated to the bellows of a specific male showed a significant dishabituation when they were presented with bellows from a novel male. The significant reduction in behavioural response to a final rehabituation playback shows this was not a chance rebound in response levels. Our findings indicate that male koala bellows are highly individually distinctive and that the identity of male callers is functionally relevant to male and female koalas during the breeding season. We go on to discuss the biological relevance of signalling identity in this species' sexual communication and the potential practical implications of our findings for acoustic monitoring of male population levels.

  20. Finite element analysis of true and pseudo surface acoustic waves in one-dimensional phononic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Graczykowski, B. Alzina, F.; Gomis-Bresco, J.; Sotomayor Torres, C. M.

    2016-01-14

    In this paper, we report a theoretical investigation of surface acoustic waves propagating in one-dimensional phononic crystal. Using finite element method eigenfrequency and frequency response studies, we develop two model geometries suitable to distinguish true and pseudo (or leaky) surface acoustic waves and determine their propagation through finite size phononic crystals, respectively. The novelty of the first model comes from the application of a surface-like criterion and, additionally, functional damping domain. Exemplary calculated band diagrams show sorted branches of true and pseudo surface acoustic waves and their quantified surface confinement. The second model gives a complementary study of transmission, reflection, and surface-to-bulk losses of Rayleigh surface waves in the case of a phononic crystal with a finite number of periods. Here, we demonstrate that a non-zero transmission within non-radiative band gaps can be carried via leaky modes originating from the coupling of local resonances with propagating waves in the substrate. Finally, we show that the transmission, reflection, and surface-to-bulk losses can be effectively optimised by tuning the geometrical properties of a stripe.

  1. Eigenfunction analysis of stochastic backscatter for characterization of acoustic aberration in medical ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varslot, Trond; Krogstad, Harald; Mo, Eirik; Angelsen, Bjørn A.

    2004-06-01

    Presented here is a characterization of aberration in medical ultrasound imaging. The characterization is optimal in the sense of maximizing the expected energy in a modified beamformer output of the received acoustic backscatter. Aberration correction based on this characterization takes the form of an aberration correction filter. The situation considered is frequently found in applications when imaging organs through a body wall: aberration is introduced in a layer close to the transducer, and acoustic backscatter from a scattering region behind the body wall is measured at the transducer surface. The scattering region consists of scatterers randomly distributed with very short correlation length compared to the acoustic wavelength of the transmit pulse. The scatterer distribution is therefore assumed to be δ correlated. This paper shows how maximizing the expected energy in a modified beamformer output signal naturally leads to eigenfunctions of a Fredholm integral operator, where the associated kernel function is a spatial correlation function of the received stochastic signal. Aberration characterization and aberration correction are presented for simulated data constructed to mimic aberration introduced by the abdominal wall. The results compare well with what is obtainable using data from a simulated point source.

  2. Multi-Layer Phase Analysis: Quantifying the Elastic Properties of Soft Tissues and Live Cells with Ultra-High Frequency Scanning Acoustic Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuegen; Akhtar, Riaz; Nijenhuis, Nadja; Wilkinson, Steven J.; Murphy, Lilli; Ballestrem, Christoph; Sherratt, Michael. J.; Watson, Rachel E.B.; Derby, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Scanning acoustic microscopy is potentially a powerful tool for characterising the elastic properties of soft biological tissues and cells. In this paper, we present a method, Multi-Layer Phase Analysis (MLPA), which can be used to extract local speed of sound values, for both thin tissue sections mounted on glass slides and cultured cells grown on cell culture plastic, with a resolution close to 1 μm. The method exploits the phase information that is preserved in the interference between the acoustic wave reflected from the substrate surface and internal reflections from the acoustic lens. In practice, a stack of acoustic images are captured beginning with the acoustic focal point 4 μm above the substrate surface and moving down in 0.1 μm increments. Scanning parameters, such as acoustic wave frequency and gate position, were adjusted to obtain optimal phase and lateral resolution. The data were processed offline to extract the phase information with the contribution of any inclination in the substrate removed prior to the calculation of sound speed. Here, we apply this approach to both skin sections and fibroblast cells, and compare our data with the V(f) (voltage vs frequency) method that has previously been used for characterisation of soft tissues and cells. Compared with the V(f) method, the MPLA method not only reduces signal noise but can be implemented without making a priori assumptions with regards to tissue or cell parameters. PMID:22547273

  3. Functional Tissue Analysis Reveals Successful Cryopreservation of Human Osteoarthritic Synovium

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Marieke; Bennink, Miranda B.; van Lent, Peter L. E. M.; van der Kraan, Peter M.; Koenders, Marije I.; Thurlings, Rogier M.; van de Loo, Fons A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease affecting cartilage and is the most common form of arthritis worldwide. One third of OA patients have severe synovitis and less than 10% have no evidence of synovitis. Moreover, synovitis is predictive for more severe disease progression. This offers a target for therapy but more research on the pathophysiological processes in the synovial tissue of these patients is needed. Functional studies performed with synovial tissue will be more approachable when this material, that becomes available by joint replacement surgery, can be stored for later use. We set out to determine the consequences of slow-freezing of human OA synovial tissue. Therefore, we validated a method that can be applied in every routine laboratory and performed a comparative study of five cryoprotective agent (CPA) solutions. To determine possible deleterious cryopreservation-thaw effects on viability, the synovial tissue architecture, metabolic activity, RNA quality, expression of cryopreservation associated stress genes, and expression of OA characteristic disease genes was studied. Furthermore, the biological activity of the cryopreserved tissue was determined by measuring cytokine secretion induced by the TLR ligands lipopolysaccharides and Pam3Cys. Compared to non frozen synovium, no difference in cell and tissue morphology could be identified in the conditions using the CS10, standard and CryoSFM CPA solution for cryopreservation. However, we observed significantly lower preservation of tissue morphology with the Biofreeze and CS2 media. The other viability assays showed trends in the same direction but were not sensitive enough to detect significant differences between conditions. In all assays tested a clearly lower viability was detected in the condition in which synovium was frozen without CPA solution. This detailed analysis showed that OA synovial tissue explants can be cryopreserved while maintaining the morphology, viability and

  4. Neuronal Networks during Burst Suppression as Revealed by Source Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Reinicke, Christine; Moeller, Friederike; Anwar, Abdul Rauf; Mideksa, Kidist Gebremariam; Pressler, Ronit; Deuschl, Günther; Stephani, Ulrich; Siniatchkin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Burst-suppression (BS) is an electroencephalography (EEG) pattern consisting of alternant periods of slow waves of high amplitude (burst) and periods of so called flat EEG (suppression). It is generally associated with coma of various etiologies (hypoxia, drug-related intoxication, hypothermia, and childhood encephalopathies, but also anesthesia). Animal studies suggest that both the cortex and the thalamus are involved in the generation of BS. However, very little is known about mechanisms of BS in humans. The aim of this study was to identify the neuronal network underlying both burst and suppression phases using source reconstruction and analysis of functional and effective connectivity in EEG. Material/Methods Dynamic imaging of coherent sources (DICS) was applied to EEG segments of 13 neonates and infants with burst and suppression EEG pattern. The brain area with the strongest power in the analyzed frequency (1–4 Hz) range was defined as the reference region. DICS was used to compute the coherence between this reference region and the entire brain. The renormalized partial directed coherence (RPDC) was used to describe the informational flow between the identified sources. Results/Conclusion Delta activity during the burst phases was associated with coherent sources in the thalamus and brainstem as well as bilateral sources in cortical regions mainly frontal and parietal, whereas suppression phases were associated with coherent sources only in cortical regions. Results of the RPDC analyses showed an upwards informational flow from the brainstem towards the thalamus and from the thalamus to cortical regions, which was absent during the suppression phases. These findings may support the theory that a “cortical deafferentiation” between the cortex and sub-cortical structures exists especially in suppression phases compared to burst phases in burst suppression EEGs. Such a deafferentiation may play a role in the poor neurological outcome of

  5. Network analysis reveals multiscale controls on streamwater chemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGuire, Kevin J.; Torgersen, Christian E.; Likens, Gene E.; Buso, Donald C.; Lowe, Winsor H.; Bailey, Scott W.

    2014-01-01

    By coupling synoptic data from a basin-wide assessment of streamwater chemistry with network-based geostatistical analysis, we show that spatial processes differentially affect biogeochemical condition and pattern across a headwater stream network. We analyzed a high-resolution dataset consisting of 664 water samples collected every 100 m throughout 32 tributaries in an entire fifth-order stream network. These samples were analyzed for an exhaustive suite of chemical constituents. The fine grain and broad extent of this study design allowed us to quantify spatial patterns over a range of scales by using empirical semivariograms that explicitly incorporated network topology. Here, we show that spatial structure, as determined by the characteristic shape of the semivariograms, differed both among chemical constituents and by spatial relationship (flow-connected, flow-unconnected, or Euclidean). Spatial structure was apparent at either a single scale or at multiple nested scales, suggesting separate processes operating simultaneously within the stream network and surrounding terrestrial landscape. Expected patterns of spatial dependence for flow-connected relationships (e.g., increasing homogeneity with downstream distance) occurred for some chemical constituents (e.g., dissolved organic carbon, sulfate, and aluminum) but not for others (e.g., nitrate, sodium). By comparing semivariograms for the different chemical constituents and spatial relationships, we were able to separate effects on streamwater chemistry of (i) fine-scale versus broad-scale processes and (ii) in-stream processes versus landscape controls. These findings provide insight on the hierarchical scaling of local, longitudinal, and landscape processes that drive biogeochemical patterns in stream networks.

  6. Conformational diversity analysis reveals three functional mechanisms in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fornasari, María Silvina

    2017-01-01

    Protein motions are a key feature to understand biological function. Recently, a large-scale analysis of protein conformational diversity showed a positively skewed distribution with a peak at 0.5 Å C-alpha root-mean-square-deviation (RMSD). To understand this distribution in terms of structure-function relationships, we studied a well curated and large dataset of ~5,000 proteins with experimentally determined conformational diversity. We searched for global behaviour patterns studying how structure-based features change among the available conformer population for each protein. This procedure allowed us to describe the RMSD distribution in terms of three main protein classes sharing given properties. The largest of these protein subsets (~60%), which we call “rigid” (average RMSD = 0.83 Å), has no disordered regions, shows low conformational diversity, the largest tunnels and smaller and buried cavities. The two additional subsets contain disordered regions, but with differential sequence composition and behaviour. Partially disordered proteins have on average 67% of their conformers with disordered regions, average RMSD = 1.1 Å, the highest number of hinges and the longest disordered regions. In contrast, malleable proteins have on average only 25% of disordered conformers and average RMSD = 1.3 Å, flexible cavities affected in size by the presence of disordered regions and show the highest diversity of cognate ligands. Proteins in each set are mostly non-homologous to each other, share no given fold class, nor functional similarity but do share features derived from their conformer population. These shared features could represent conformational mechanisms related with biological functions. PMID:28192432

  7. Damage analysis of CFRP-confined circular concrete-filled steel tubular columns by acoustic emission techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongsheng; Chen, Zhi; Feng, Quanming; Wang, Yanlei

    2015-08-01

    Damage properties of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) confined circular concrete-filled steel tubular (CCFT) columns were analyzed through acoustic emission (AE) signals. AE characteristic parameters were obtained through axial compression tests. The severity of damage to CFRP-CCFT columns was estimated using the growing trend of AE accumulated energy as basis. The bearing capacity of CFRP-CCFT columns and AE accumulated energy improved as CFRP layers increased. The damage process was studied using a number of crucial AE parameters. The cracks’ mode can be differentiated through the ratio of the rise time to the waveform amplitude and through average frequency analysis. With the use of intensity signal analysis, the damage process of the CFRP-CCFT columns can be classified into three levels that represent different degrees. Based on b-value analysis, the development of the obtained cracks can be defined. Thus, identifying an initial yielding and providing early warning is possible.

  8. Metatranscriptomic Analysis of Groundwater Reveals an Active Anammox Bacterial Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewell, T. N. M.; Karaoz, U.; Thomas, B. C.; Banfield, J. F.; Brodie, E.; Williams, K. H.; Beller, H. R.

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater is a major natural resource, yet little is known about the contribution of microbial anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) activity to subsurface nitrogen cycling. During anammox, energy is generated as ammonium is oxidized under anaerobic conditions to dinitrogen gas, using nitrite as the final electron acceptor. This process is a global sink for fixed nitrogen. Only a narrow range of monophyletic bacteria within the Planctomycetes carries out anammox, and the full extent of their metabolism, and subsequent impact on nitrogen cycling and microbial community structure, is still unknown. Here, we employ a metatranscriptomic analysis on enriched mRNA to identify the abundance and activity of a population of anammox bacteria within an aquifer at Rifle, CO. Planktonic biomass was collected over a two-month period after injection of up to 1.5 mM nitrate. Illumina-generated sequences were mapped to a phylogenetically binned Rifle metagenome database. We identified transcripts for genes with high protein sequence identities (81-98%) to those of anammox strain KSU-1 and to two of the five anammox bacteria genera, Brocadia and Kuenenia, suggesting an active, if not diverse, anammox population. Many of the most abundant anammox transcripts mapped to a single scaffold, indicative of a single dominant anammox species. Transcripts of the genes necessary for the anammox pathway were present, including an ammonium transporter (amtB), nitrite/formate transporter, nitrite reductase (nirK), and hydrazine oxidoreductase (hzoB). The form of nitrite reductase encoded by anammox is species-dependent, and we only identified nirK, with no evidence of anammox nirS. In addition to the anammox pathway we saw evidence of the anammox bacterial dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium pathway (narH, putative nrfA, and nrfB), which provides an alternate means of generating substrates for anammox from nitrate, rather than relying on an external pool. Transcripts for hydroxylamine

  9. Mutant Analysis Reveals Allosteric Regulation of ClpB Disaggregase

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Kamila B.; Bukau, Bernd; Mogk, Axel

    2017-01-01

    The members of the hexameric AAA+ disaggregase of E. coli and S. cerevisiae, ClpB, and Hsp104, cooperate with the Hsp70 chaperone system in the solubilization of aggregated proteins. Aggregate solubilization relies on a substrate threading activity of ClpB/Hsp104 fueled by ATP hydrolysis in both ATPase rings (AAA-1, AAA-2). ClpB/Hsp104 ATPase activity is controlled by the M-domains, which associate to the AAA-1 ring to downregulate ATP hydrolysis. Keeping M-domains displaced from the AAA-1 ring by association with Hsp70 increases ATPase activity due to enhanced communication between protomers. This communication involves conserved arginine fingers. The control of ClpB/Hsp104 activity is crucial, as hyperactive mutants with permanently dissociated M-domains exhibit cellular toxicity. Here, we analyzed AAA-1 inter-ring communication in relation to the M-domain mediated ATPase regulation, by subjecting a conserved residue of the AAA-1 domain subunit interface of ClpB (A328) to mutational analysis. While all A328X mutants have reduced disaggregation activities, their ATPase activities strongly differed. ClpB-A328I/L mutants have reduced ATPase activity and when combined with the hyperactive ClpB-K476C M-domain mutation, suppress cellular toxicity. This underlines that ClpB ATPase activation by M-domain dissociation relies on increased subunit communication. The ClpB-A328V mutant in contrast has very high ATPase activity and exhibits cellular toxicity on its own, qualifying it as novel hyperactive ClpB mutant. ClpB-A328V hyperactivity is however, different from that of M-domain mutants as M-domains stay associated with the AAA-1 ring. The high ATPase activity of ClpB-A328V primarily relies on the AAA-2 ring and correlates with distinct conformational changes in the AAA-2 catalytic site. These findings characterize the subunit interface residue A328 as crucial regulatory element to control ATP hydrolysis in both AAA rings. PMID:28275610

  10. Mutant Analysis Reveals Allosteric Regulation of ClpB Disaggregase.

    PubMed

    Franke, Kamila B; Bukau, Bernd; Mogk, Axel

    2017-01-01

    The members of the hexameric AAA+ disaggregase of E. coli and S. cerevisiae, ClpB, and Hsp104, cooperate with the Hsp70 chaperone system in the solubilization of aggregated proteins. Aggregate solubilization relies on a substrate threading activity of ClpB/Hsp104 fueled by ATP hydrolysis in both ATPase rings (AAA-1, AAA-2). ClpB/Hsp104 ATPase activity is controlled by the M-domains, which associate to the AAA-1 ring to downregulate ATP hydrolysis. Keeping M-domains displaced from the AAA-1 ring by association with Hsp70 increases ATPase activity due to enhanced communication between protomers. This communication involves conserved arginine fingers. The control of ClpB/Hsp104 activity is crucial, as hyperactive mutants with permanently dissociated M-domains exhibit cellular toxicity. Here, we analyzed AAA-1 inter-ring communication in relation to the M-domain mediated ATPase regulation, by subjecting a conserved residue of the AAA-1 domain subunit interface of ClpB (A328) to mutational analysis. While all A328X mutants have reduced disaggregation activities, their ATPase activities strongly differed. ClpB-A328I/L mutants have reduced ATPase activity and when combined with the hyperactive ClpB-K476C M-domain mutation, suppress cellular toxicity. This underlines that ClpB ATPase activation by M-domain dissociation relies on increased subunit communication. The ClpB-A328V mutant in contrast has very high ATPase activity and exhibits cellular toxicity on its own, qualifying it as novel hyperactive ClpB mutant. ClpB-A328V hyperactivity is however, different from that of M-domain mutants as M-domains stay associated with the AAA-1 ring. The high ATPase activity of ClpB-A328V primarily relies on the AAA-2 ring and correlates with distinct conformational changes in the AAA-2 catalytic site. These findings characterize the subunit interface residue A328 as crucial regulatory element to control ATP hydrolysis in both AAA rings.

  11. Modeling Fish Egg Production and Spatial Distribution from Acoustic Data: A Step Forward into the Analysis of Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Ospina-Álvarez, Andrés; Bernal, Miguel; Catalán, Ignacio Alberto; Roos, David; Bigot, Jean-Louis; Palomera, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    To date, there are numerous transport simulation studies demonstrating the relevance of the hydrodynamics for the advection, dispersion and recruitment of early stages of marine organisms. However, the lack of data has conditioned the use of realistic locations for the model setup and configuration in transport studies. This work (I) demonstrates the key role played by the use of the realistic initial position of the eggs of small pelagic fishes in the analysis of late-larval recruitment in coastal nursery areas and (II) provides a general solution for deriving future egg positions and abundances from adult biomass obtained from acoustic surveys and available fecundity data. Using European anchovy in the NW Mediterranean as a case study, we first analyzed the impact of the initial location, timing, egg buoyancy and diel vertical migration of larvae on the potential late-larval recruitment to coastal areas. The results suggested that prior knowledge of the initial spawning grounds may substantially affect the estimates of potential recruitment. We then integrated biological and acoustics-derived data (the biomass and size structure, sex ratio, a weight-batch fecundity model, mean weight, number of fish and mean spawning) to build a predictive model for interannual egg production. This model was satisfactorily contrasted with field data for two years obtained with the Daily Egg Production Method (DEPM). We discuss our results in the context of the fluctuations of European anchovy egg abundance from 2003 through 2010 in the NW Mediterranean and in terms of the potential applicability of the acoustics-based spatial predictive egg production model. PMID:24066063

  12. Acoustic Testing of Flight Hardware Using Loudspeakers: How Much do We Know About This Method of Testing?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Kern, Dennis L

    2011-01-01

    Loudspeakers have been used for acoustic qualification of spacecrafts, reflectors, solar panels, and other acoustically responsive structures for more than a decade. Even though a lot of hardware has been acoustic tested using this method, the nature of the acoustic field generated by controlling an ensemble of speakers with and without the hardware in the test volume has not been thoroughly investigated. Limited measurements from some of the recent speaker tests used to qualify flight hardware have indicated significant spatial variation of the acoustic field within the test volume. Also structural responses have been reported to differ when similar tests were performed using reverberant chambers. Unlike the reverberant chamber acoustic test, for which the acoustic field in most chambers is known to be diffuse except below several tens of Hz where acoustic standing waves and large spatial variations exist, the characteristics of the acoustic field within the speaker test volume has not been quantified. It has only been recently that a detailed acoustic field characterization of speaker testing has been made at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) with involvement of various organizations. To address the impact of non-uniform acoustic field on structures, a series of acoustic tests were performed using a flat panel and a 3-ft cylinder exposed to the field controlled by speakers and repeated in a reverberant chamber. The analysis of the data from this exercise reveals that there are significant differences both in the acoustic field and in the structural responses. In this paper the differences between the two methods are reviewed in some detail and the over- or under-testing of articles that could pose un-anticipated structural and flight qualification issues are discussed. A framework for discussing the validity of the speaker acoustic testing method with the current control system and a path forward for improving it will be provided.

  13. Genome wide analysis of Silurana (Xenopus) tropicalis development reveals dynamic expression using network enrichment analysis.

    PubMed

    Langlois, Valérie S; Martyniuk, Christopher J

    2013-01-01

    Development involves precise timing of gene expression and coordinated pathways for organogenesis and morphogenesis. Functional and sub-network enrichment analysis provides an integrated approach for identifying networks underlying development. The objectives of this study were to characterize early gene regulatory networks over Silurana tropicalis development from NF stage 2 to 46 using a custom Agilent 4×44K microarray. There were >8000 unique gene probes that were differentially expressed between Nieuwkoop-Faber (NF) stage 2 and stage 16, and >2000 gene probes differentially expressed between NF 34 and 46. Gene ontology revealed that genes involved in nucleosome assembly, cell division, pattern specification, neurotransmission, and general metabolism were increasingly regulated throughout development, consistent with active development. Sub-network enrichment analysis revealed that processes such as membrane hyperpolarisation, retinoic acid, cholesterol, and dopamine metabolic gene networks were activated/inhibited over time. This study identifies RNA transcripts that are potentially maternally inherited in an anuran species, provides evidence that the expression of genes involved in retinoic acid receptor signaling may increase prior to those involved in thyroid receptor signaling, and characterizes novel gene expression networks preceding organogenesis which increases understanding of the spatiotemporal embryonic development in frogs.

  14. System approach to robust acoustic echo cancellation through semi-blind source separation based on independent component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Ted S.

    In this dissertation, we build a foundation for what we refer to as the system approach to signal enhancement as we focus on the acoustic echo cancellation (AEC) problem. Such a “system” perspective aims for the integration of individual components, or algorithms, into a cohesive unit for the benefit of the system as a whole to cope with real-world enhancement problems. The standard system identification approach by minimizing the mean square error (MSE) of a linear system is sensitive to distortions that greatly affect the quality of the identification result. Therefore, we begin by examining in detail the technique of using a noise-suppressing nonlinearity in the adaptive filter error feedback-loop of the LMS algorithm when there is an interference at the near end, where the source of distortion may be linear or nonlinear. We provide a thorough derivation and analysis of the error recovery nonlinearity (ERN) that “enhances” the filter estimation error prior to the adaptation to transform the corrupted error’s distribution into a desired one, or very close to it, in order to assist the linear adaptation process. We reveal important connections of the residual echo enhancement (REE) technique to other existing AEC and signal enhancement procedures, where the technique is well-founded in the information-theoretic sense and has strong ties to independent component analysis (ICA), which is the basis for blind source separation (BSS) that permits unsupervised adaptation in the presence of multiple interfering signals. Notably, the single-channel AEC problem can be viewed as a special case of semi-blind source separation (SBSS) where one of the source signals is partially known, i.e., the far-end microphone signal that generates the near-end acoustic echo. Indeed, SBSS optimized via ICA leads to the system combination of the LMS algorithm with the ERN that allows continuous and stable adaptation even during double talk. Next, we extend the system perspective

  15. Acoustic emission analysis of Vickers indentation fracture of cermet and ceramic coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faisal, N. H.; Ahmed, R.

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this work was to develop an instrumented experimental methodology of quantitative material evaluation based on the acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of a dead-weight Vickers indentation. This was to assess the degree of cracking and hence the toughness of thermally sprayed coatings. AE data were acquired during indentation tests on samples of coatings of nominal thickness 250-325 µm at a variety of indentation loads ranging from 49 to 490 N. Measurements were carried out on five different carbide and ceramic coatings (HVOF as-sprayed WC-12%Co (JP5000 and JetKote), HIPed WC-12%Co (JetKote) and as-sprayed Al2O3 (APS/Metco and HVOF/theta-gun)). The raw AE signals recorded during indentation were analysed and the total surface crack length around the indent determined. The results showed that the total surface crack length measured gave fracture toughness (K1c) values which were consistent with the published literature for similar coatings but evaluated using the classical approach (Palmqvist/half-penny model). Hence, the total surface crack length criteria can be applied to ceramic and cermet coatings which may or may not exhibit fracture via radial cracks. The values of K1c measured were 3.4 ± 0.1 MPa m1/2 for high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) (theta-gun) Al2O3, 4.6 ± 0.3 MPa m1/2 for as-sprayed HVOF (JetKote) WC-12%Co, 7.1±0.1 MPa m1/2 for as-sprayed HVOF (JP5000) WC-12%Co and 7.4 ± 0.2 MPa m1/2 for HIPed HVOF (JetKote) WC-12%Co coatings. The crack lengths were then calibrated against the AE response and correlation coefficients evaluated. The values of K1c measured using AE correlations were 3.3 MPa m1/2 for HVOF (theta-gun) Al2O3, 2.6 MPa m1/2 for APS (Metco) Al2O3, 2.5 MPa m1/2 for as-sprayed HVOF (JetKote) WC-12%Co, 6.3 MPa m1/2 for as-sprayed HVOF (JP5000) WC-12%Co and 8.6 MPa m1/2 for HIPed HVOF (JetKote) WC-12%Co coatings. It is concluded that within each category of coating type, AE can be used as a suitable surrogate for crack length

  16. Multi scale analysis by acoustic emission of damage mechanisms in natural fibre woven fabrics/epoxy composites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnafous, C.; Touchard, F.; Chocinski-Arnault, L.

    2010-06-01

    This paper proposes to develop an experimental program to characterize the type and the development of damage in composite with complex microstructure. A multi-scale analysis by acoustic emission has been developed and applied to hemp fibre woven fabrics/epoxy composite. The experimental program consists of tensile tests performed on single yarn, neat epoxy resin and composite materials to identify their AE amplitude signatures. A statistical analysis of AE amplitude signals has been realised and correlated with microscopic observations. Results have enabled to identify three types of damage in composites and their associated AE amplitudes: matrix cracking, interfacial debonding and reinforcement damage and fracture. Tracking of these damage mechanisms in hemp/epoxy composites has been performed to show the process of damage development in natural fibre reinforced composites.

  17. Performance analysis of approximate Affine Projection Algorithm in acoustic feedback cancellation.

    PubMed

    Nikjoo S, Mohammad; Seyedi, Amir; Tehrani, Arash Saber

    2008-01-01

    Acoustic feedback is an annoying problem in several audio applications and especially in hearing aids. Adaptive feedback cancellation techniques have attracted recent attention and show great promise in reducing the deleterious effects of feedback. In this paper, we investigated the performance of a class of adaptive feedback cancellation algorithms viz. the approximated Affine Projection Algorithms (APA). Mixed results were obtained with the natural speech and music data collected from five different commercial hearing aids in a variety of sub-oscillatory and oscillatory feedback conditions. The performance of the approximated APA was significantly better with music stimuli than natural speech stimuli.

  18. Development of a fatigue analysis approach for CFRP structures under acoustic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantini, S.

    1992-10-01

    The evaluation of acoustic fatigue problems on aerospace structural elements is considered through finite element modeling of their dynamic behavior. A computer code was developed for this purpose. In order to validate the approach, RMS (Root Mean Square) computed stresses were compared with corresponding tests recorded on different structural components. S-N curves were established from representative coupon tests of typical panel junctions and stiffener sections at different levels of RMS deformation. These results were used to determine an estimated fatigue life for the full size component, to be correlated by fullscale test.

  19. Stability analysis for two-dimensional ion-acoustic waves in quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Seadawy, A. R.

    2014-05-15

    The quantum hydrodynamic model is applied to two-dimensional ion-acoustic waves in quantum plasmas. The two-dimensional quantum hydrodynamic model is used to obtain a deformed Kortewegde Vries (dKdV) equation by reductive perturbation method. By using the solution of auxiliary ordinary equations, a extended direct algebraic method is described to construct the exact solutions for nonlinear quantum dKdV equation. The present results are describing the generation and evolution of such waves, their interactions, and their stability.

  20. Acoustic data analysis and scenario over watch from an aerostat at the NATO SET-153 field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiff, Christian; Scanlon, Michael

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of the NATO SET-153 field experiment was to provide an opportunity to demonstrate multiple sensor technologies in an urban environment and determine integration capabilities for future development. The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) experimental aerostat was used primarily as a persistent over watch capability as a substitute for a UAV. Continuous video was recorded on the aerostat and segments of video were captured of the scenarios on the ground that the camera was following manually. Some of the segments showing scenario activities will be presented. The captured pictures and video frames have telemetry in the headers that provides the UTM time and the Inertial Navigation System (INS) GPS location and the inertial roll, pitch, and yaw as well as the camera gimbal pan and tilt angles. The timing is useful to synchronize the images with the scenario events providing activity ground truth. The INS, GPS, and camera gimbal angle values can be used with the acoustic solution for the location of a sound source to determine the relative accuracy of the solution if the camera is pointed at the sound source. This method will be confirmed by the use of a propane cannon whose GPS location is logged. During the field experiment, other interesting acoustic events such as vehicle convoys, platoon level firefights with vehicles using blanks, and a UAV helicopter were recorded and will be presented in a quick analysis.

  1. Stability analysis and design of time-domain acoustic impedance boundary conditions for lined duct with mean flow.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Huang, Xun; Zhang, Xin

    2014-11-01

    This work develops the so-called compensated impedance boundary conditions that enable stable time domain simulations of sound propagation in a lined duct with uniform mean flow, which has important practical interest for noise emission by aero-engines. The proposed method is developed analytically from an unusual perspective of control that shows impedance boundary conditions act as closed-loop feedbacks to an overall duct acoustic system. It turns out that those numerical instabilities of time domain simulations are caused by deficient phase margins of the corresponding control-oriented model. A particular instability of very low frequencies in the presence of steady uniform background mean flow, in addition to the well known high frequency numerical instabilities at the grid size, can be identified using this analysis approach. Stable time domain impedance boundary conditions can be formulated by including appropriate phaselead compensators to achieve desired phase margins. The compensated impedance boundary conditions can be simply designed with no empirical parameter, straightforwardly integrated with ordinary linear acoustic models, and efficiently calculated with no need of resolving sheared boundary layers. The proposed boundary conditions are validated by comparing against asymptotic solutions of spinning modal sound propagation in a duct with a hard-soft interface and reasonable agreement is achieved.

  2. An Intelligent Sensor Array Distributed System for Vibration Analysis and Acoustic Noise Characterization of a Linear Switched Reluctance Actuator

    PubMed Central

    Salvado, José; Espírito-Santo, António; Calado, Maria

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a distributed system for analysis and monitoring (DSAM) of vibrations and acoustic noise, which consists of an array of intelligent modules, sensor modules, communication bus and a host PC acting as data center. The main advantages of the DSAM are its modularity, scalability, and flexibility for use of different type of sensors/transducers, with analog or digital outputs, and for signals of different nature. Its final cost is also significantly lower than other available commercial solutions. The system is reconfigurable, can operate either with synchronous or asynchronous modes, with programmable sampling frequencies, 8-bit or 12-bit resolution and a memory buffer of 15 kbyte. It allows real-time data-acquisition for signals of different nature, in applications that require a large number of sensors, thus it is suited for monitoring of vibrations in Linear Switched Reluctance Actuators (LSRAs). The acquired data allows the full characterization of the LSRA in terms of its response to vibrations of structural origins, and the vibrations and acoustic noise emitted under normal operation. The DSAM can also be used for electrical machine condition monitoring, machine fault diagnosis, structural characterization and monitoring, among other applications. PMID:22969364

  3. Room Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  4. Scattering of Acoustic Waves from Ocean Boundaries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    derived reflection coefficients as a function of range along the reverberation track (right). RESULTS Analysis of Acoustic Scattering for Layered and... acoustic interaction with the ocean floor, including penetration through and reflection from smooth and rough water/sediment interfaces, scattering ...can account for the all of the physical processes and variability of acoustic propagation and scattering in ocean environments with special emphasis

  5. Laboratory test and acoustic analysis of cabin treatment for propfan test assessment aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuntz, H. L.; Gatineau, R. J.

    1991-01-01

    An aircraft cabin acoustic enclosure, built in support of the Propfan Test Assessment (PTA) program, is described. Helmholtz resonators were attached to the cabin trim panels to increase the sidewall transmission loss (TL). Resonators (448) were located between the trim panels and fuselage shell. In addition, 152 resonators were placed between the enclosure and aircraft floors. The 600 resonators were each tuned to a 235 Hz resonance frequency. After flight testing on the PTA aircraft, the enclosure was tested in the Kelly Johnson R and D Center Acoustics Lab. Laboratory noise reduction (NR) test results are discussed. The enclosure was placed in a Gulfstream 2 fuselage section. Broadband (138 dB overall SPL) and tonal (149 dB overall SPL) excitations were used in the lab. Tonal excitation simulated the propfan flight test excitation. The fundamental tone was stepped in 2 Hz intervals from 225 through 245 Hz. The resonators increase the NR of the cabin walls around the resonance frequency of the resonator array. The effects of flanking, sidewall absorption, cabin adsorption, resonator loading of trim panels, and panel vibrations are presented. Increases in NR of up to 11 dB were measured.

  6. Analysis of Acoustic Access to the Prostate Through the Abdomen and Perineum for Extracorporeal Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Timothy L.; Hempel, Christopher R.; Sabb, Brian J.; Roberts, William W.

    2010-03-01

    As part of the development of a noninvasive treatment for BPH using histotripsy, this study aimed to measure acoustic access for extracorporeal ablation of the prostate. Both transabdominal and transperineal approaches were considered. The objective was to measure the size and shape of a transducer aperture that could target the prostate without obstruction. CT images obtained from 17 subjects >56 years of age were used to create 3D reconstructions of the lower abdomen and pelvis. Target locations on the urethra at the base, mid, and apex in the prostate were marked along with a transrectal imaging probe. Evenly space rays spanning were traced from each target location towards the perineum and separately towards the abdomen with the maximum x-ray density encountered along each path recorded. The overall free aperture through the perineum was found to be a triangular shaped region bounded by the lower bones of the pelvis and the transrectal probe varying significantly in size between subjects. The free aperture through the abdomen was wedge shaped limited by the pubis also with great subject to subject variability. Average unblocked fractions of an f/1 transducer to target base, veru, and apex through the perineum were 77.0%, 94.4%, and 99.6%, respectively. Averages targeting through the abdomen were 86.1%, 52.3%, and 11.0%. Acoustic access to the prostate for through the perineum was judged to be feasible.

  7. Monitoring and failure analysis of corroded bridge cables under fatigue loading using acoustic emission sensors.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongsheng; Ou, Jinping; Lan, Chengming; Li, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Cables play an important role in cable-stayed systems, but are vulnerable to corrosion and fatigue damage. There is a dearth of studies on the fatigue damage evolution of corroded cable. In the present study, the acoustic emission (AE) technology is adopted to monitor the fatigue damage evolution process. First, the relationship between stress and strain is determined through a tensile test for corroded and non-corroded steel wires. Results show that the mechanical performance of corroded cables is changed considerably. The AE characteristic parameters for fatigue damage are then established. AE energy cumulative parameters can accurately describe the fatigue damage evolution of corroded cables. The failure modes in each phase as well as the type of acoustic emission source are determined based on the results of scanning electron microscopy. The waveform characteristics, damage types, and frequency distribution of the corroded cable at different damage phases are collected. Finally, the number of broken wires and breakage time of the cables are determined according to the variation in the margin index.

  8. Monitoring and Failure Analysis of Corroded Bridge Cables under Fatigue Loading Using Acoustic Emission Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dongsheng; Ou, Jinping; Lan, Chengming; Li, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Cables play an important role in cable-stayed systems, but are vulnerable to corrosion and fatigue damage. There is a dearth of studies on the fatigue damage evolution of corroded cable. In the present study, the acoustic emission (AE) technology is adopted to monitor the fatigue damage evolution process. First, the relationship between stress and strain is determined through a tensile test for corroded and non-corroded steel wires. Results show that the mechanical performance of corroded cables is changed considerably. The AE characteristic parameters for fatigue damage are then established. AE energy cumulative parameters can accurately describe the fatigue damage evolution of corroded cables. The failure modes in each phase as well as the type of acoustic emission source are determined based on the results of scanning electron microscopy. The waveform characteristics, damage types, and frequency distribution of the corroded cable at different damage phases are collected. Finally, the number of broken wires and breakage time of the cables are determined according to the variation in the margin index. PMID:22666009

  9. An acoustic analysis of laughter produced by congenitally deaf and normally hearing college students.

    PubMed

    Makagon, Maja M; Funayama, E Sumie; Owren, Michael J

    2008-07-01

    Relatively few empirical data are available concerning the role of auditory experience in nonverbal human vocal behavior, such as laughter production. This study compared the acoustic properties of laughter in 19 congenitally, bilaterally, and profoundly deaf college students and in 23 normally hearing control participants. Analyses focused on degree of voicing, mouth position, air-flow direction, temporal features, relative amplitude, fundamental frequency, and formant frequencies. Results showed that laughter produced by the deaf participants was fundamentally similar to that produced by the normally hearing individuals, which in turn was consistent with previously reported findings. Finding comparable acoustic properties in the sounds produced by deaf and hearing vocalizers confirms the presumption that laughter is importantly grounded in human biology, and that auditory experience with this vocalization is not necessary for it to emerge in species-typical form. Some differences were found between the laughter of deaf and hearing groups; the most important being that the deaf participants produced lower-amplitude and longer-duration laughs. These discrepancies are likely due to a combination of the physiological and social factors that routinely affect profoundly deaf individuals, including low overall rates of vocal fold use and pressure from the hearing world to suppress spontaneous vocalizations.

  10. Temporal characteristics of coherent flow structures generated over alluvial sand dunes, Mississippi River, revealed by acoustic doppler current profiling and multibeam echo sounding

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czuba, John A.; Oberg, Kevin A.; Best, Jim L.; Parsons, Daniel R.; Simmons, S. M.; Johnson, K.K.; Malzone, C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the flow in the lee of a large sand dune located at the confluence of the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers, USA. Stationary profiles collected from an anchored boat using an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) were georeferenced with data from a real-time kinematic differential global positioning system. A multibeam echo sounder was used to map the bathymetry of the confluence and provided a morphological context for the ADCP measurements. The flow in the lee of a low-angle dune shows good correspondence with current conceptual models of flow over dunes. As expected, quadrant 2 events (upwellings of low-momentum fluid) are associated with high backscatter intensity. Turbulent events generated in the lower lee of a dune near the bed are associated with periods of vortex shedding and wake flapping. Remnant coherent structures that advect over the lower lee of the dune in the upper portion of the water column, have mostly dissipated and contribute little to turbulence intensities. The turbulent events that occupy most of the water column in the upper lee of the dune are associated with periods of wake flapping.

  11. Acoustics Reveals the Presence of a Macrozooplankton Biocline in the Bay of Biscay in Response to Hydrological Conditions and Predator-Prey Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Lezama-Ochoa, Ainhoa; Irigoien, Xabier; Chaigneau, Alexis; Quiroz, Zaida; Lebourges-Dhaussy, Anne; Bertrand, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    Bifrequency acoustic data, hydrological measurements and satellite data were used to study the vertical distribution of macrozooplankton in the Bay of Biscay in relation to the hydrological conditions and fish distribution during spring 2009. The most noticeable result was the observation of a ‘biocline’ during the day i.e., the interface where zooplankton biomass changes more rapidly with depth than it does in the layers above or below. The biocline separated the surface layer, almost devoid of macrozooplankton, from the macrozooplankton-rich deeper layers. It is a specific vertical feature which ties in with the classic diel vertical migration pattern. Spatiotemporal correlations between macrozooplankton and environmental variables (photic depth, thermohaline vertical structure, stratification index and chlorophyll-a) indicate that no single factor explains the macrozooplankton vertical distribution. Rather a set of factors, the respective influence of which varies from region to region depending on the habitat characteristics and the progress of the spring stratification, jointly influence the distribution. In this context, the macrozooplankton biocline is potentially a biophysical response to the search for a particular depth range where light attenuation, thermohaline vertical structure and stratification conditions together provide a suitable alternative to the need for expending energy in reaching deeper water without the risk of being eaten. PMID:24505374

  12. Acoustics reveals the presence of a macrozooplankton biocline in the Bay of Biscay in response to hydrological conditions and predator-prey relationships.

    PubMed

    Lezama-Ochoa, Ainhoa; Irigoien, Xabier; Chaigneau, Alexis; Quiroz, Zaida; Lebourges-Dhaussy, Anne; Bertrand, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    Bifrequency acoustic data, hydrological measurements and satellite data were used to study the vertical distribution of macrozooplankton in the Bay of Biscay in relation to the hydrological conditions and fish distribution during spring 2009. The most noticeable result was the observation of a 'biocline' during the day i.e., the interface where zooplankton biomass changes more rapidly with depth than it does in the layers above or below. The biocline separated the surface layer, almost devoid of macrozooplankton, from the macrozooplankton-rich deeper layers. It is a specific vertical feature which ties in with the classic diel vertical migration pattern. Spatiotemporal correlations between macrozooplankton and environmental variables (photic depth, thermohaline vertical structure, stratification index and chlorophyll-a) indicate that no single factor explains the macrozooplankton vertical distribution. Rather a set of factors, the respective influence of which varies from region to region depending on the habitat characteristics and the progress of the spring stratification, jointly influence the distribution. In this context, the macrozooplankton biocline is potentially a biophysical response to the search for a particular depth range where light attenuation, thermohaline vertical structure and stratification conditions together provide a suitable alternative to the need for expending energy in reaching deeper water without the risk of being eaten.

  13. Study for Identification of Beneficial Uses of Space (BUS). Volume 2: Technical report. Book 4: Development and business analysis of space processed surface acoustic wave devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Preliminary development plans, analysis of required R and D and production resources, the costs of such resources, and, finally, the potential profitability of a commercial space processing opportunity for the production of very high frequency surface acoustic wave devices are presented.

  14. Empirical mode decomposition for analyzing acoustical signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Norden E. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention discloses a computer implemented signal analysis method through the Hilbert-Huang Transformation (HHT) for analyzing acoustical signals, which are assumed to be nonlinear and nonstationary. The Empirical Decomposition Method (EMD) and the Hilbert Spectral Analysis (HSA) are used to obtain the HHT. Essentially, the acoustical signal will be decomposed into the Intrinsic Mode Function Components (IMFs). Once the invention decomposes the acoustic signal into its constituting components, all operations such as analyzing, identifying, and removing unwanted signals can be performed on these components. Upon transforming the IMFs into Hilbert spectrum, the acoustical signal may be compared with other acoustical signals.

  15. Punch stretching process monitoring using acoustic emission signal analysis. II - Application of frequency domain deconvolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Steven Y.; Dornfeld, David A.; Nickerson, Jackson A.

    1987-01-01

    The coloring effect on the acoustic emission signal due to the frequency response of the data acquisition/processing instrumentation may bias the interpretation of AE signal characteristics. In this paper, a frequency domain deconvolution technique, which involves the identification of the instrumentation transfer functions and multiplication of the AE signal spectrum by the inverse of these system functions, has been carried out. In this way, the change in AE signal characteristics can be better interpreted as the result of the change in only the states of the process. Punch stretching process was used as an example to demonstrate the application of the technique. Results showed that, through the deconvolution, the frequency characteristics of AE signals generated during the stretching became more distinctive and can be more effectively used as tools for process monitoring.

  16. Combustion Instability Analysis and the Effects of Drop Size on Acoustic Driving Rocket Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, Brent (Technical Monitor); Ellison, L. Renea; Moser, Marlow D.

    2004-01-01

    High frequency combustion instability, the most destructive kind, is generally solved on a per engine basis. The instability often is the result of compounding acoustic oscillations, usually from the propellant combustion itself. To counteract the instability the chamber geometry can be changed and/or the method of propellant injection can be altered. This experiment will alter the chamber dimensions slightly; using a cylindrical shape of constant diameter and the length will be varied from six to twelve inches in three-inch increments. The main flowfield will be the products of a high OF hydrogen/oxygen flow. The liquid fuel will be injected into this flowfield using a modulated injector. It will allow for varied droplet size, feed rate, spray pattern, and location for the mixture within the chamber. The response will be deduced from the chamber pressure oscillations.

  17. Aerodynamic sound generation due to vortex-aerofoil interaction. Part 2: Analysis of the acoustic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parasarathy, R.; Karamcheti, K.

    1972-01-01

    The Lighthill method was the basic procedure used to analyze the sound field associated with a vortex of modified strength interacting with an airfoil. A free vortex interacting with an airfoil in uniform motion was modeled in order to determine the sound field due to all the acoustic sources, not only on the airfoil surfaces (dipoles), but also the ones distributed on the perturbed flow field (quadrupoles) due to the vortex-airfoil interaction. Because inviscid flow is assumed in the study of the interaction, the quadrupoles considered in the perturbed flow field are entirely due to an unsteady flow field. The effects of airfoil thickness on the second radiation are examined by using a symmetric Joukowski airfoil for the vortex-airfoil interaction. Sound radiation in a plane, far field simplification, and computation of the sound field are discussed.

  18. Analysis of acoustic scattering from fluid bodies using a multipoint source model.

    PubMed

    Boag, A; Leviatan, Y

    1989-01-01

    A moment-method solution is presented for the problem of acoustic scattering from homogeneous fluid bodies. It uses fictitious isotropic point sources to simulate both the field scattered by the body and the field inside the body and, in turn, point-matches the continuity conditions for the normal component of the velocity and for the pressure across the surface of the body. The procedure is simple to execute and is general in that bodies of arbitrary smooth shape can be handled effectively. Perfectly rigid bodies are treated as reduced cases of the general procedure. Results are given and compared with available analytic solutions, which demonstrate the very good performance of the procedure.

  19. Perturbation of mass accretion rate, associated acoustic geometry and stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollimpalli, Deepika A.; Bhattacharya, Sourav; Das, Tapas K.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the stability of stationary integral solutions of an ideal irrotational fluid in a general static and spherically symmetric background, by studying the profile of the perturbation of the mass accretion rate. We consider low angular momentum axisymmetric accretion flows for three different accretion disk models and consider time dependent and radial linear perturbation of the mass accretion rate. First we show that the propagation of such perturbation can be determined by an effective 2 × 2 matrix, which has qualitatively similar acoustic causal properties as one obtains via the perturbation of the velocity potential. Next, using this matrix we analytically address the stability issues, for both standing and travelling wave configurations generated by the perturbation. Finally, based on this general formalism we briefly discuss the explicit example of the Schwarzschild spacetime and compare our results of stability with the existing literature, which instead address this problem via the perturbation of the velocity potential.

  20. An acoustic analysis of the vowel space in young and old cochlear-implant speakers.

    PubMed

    Neumeyer, Veronika; Harrington, Jonathan; Draxler, Christoph

    2010-09-01

    The main purpose of this study was to compare acoustically the vowel spaces of two groups of cochlear implantees (CI) with two age-matched normal hearing groups. Five young test persons (15-25 years) and five older test persons (55-70 years) with CI and two control groups of the same age with normal hearing were recorded. The speech material consisted of five German vowels V = /a, e, i, o, u/ in bilabial and alveolar contexts. The results showed no differences between the two groups on Euclidean distances for the first formant frequency. In contrast, Euclidean distances for F2 of the CI group were shorter than those of the control group, causing their overall vowel space to be compressed. The main differences between the groups are interpreted in terms of the extent to which the formants are associated with visual cues to the vowels. Further results were partially longer vowel durations for the CI speakers.

  1. Modal analysis and dynamic stresses for acoustically excited shuttle insulation tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ojalvo, I. U.; Ogilvie, P. L.

    1975-01-01

    Improvements and extensions to the RESIST computer program developed for determining the normalized modal stress response of shuttle insulation tiles are described. The new version of RESIST can accommodate primary structure panels with closed-cell stringers, in addition to the capability for treating open-cell stringers. In addition, the present version of RESIST numerically solves vibration problems several times faster than its predecessor. A new digital computer program, titled ARREST (Acoustic Response of Reusable Shuttle Tiles) is also described. Starting with modal information contained on output tapes from RESIST computer runs, ARREST determines RMS stresses, deflections and accelerations of shuttle panels with reusable surface insulation tiles. Both programs are applicable to stringer stiffened structural panels with or without reusable surface insulation titles.

  2. Hearing preservation in acoustic neuroma resection: Analysis of petrous bone measurement and intraoperative application

    PubMed Central

    Tanrikulu, Levent; Lohse, Peer; Fahlbusch, Rudolf; Naraghi, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is an increased risk for labyrinthine injury for the resection of acoustic neuromas (AN) on the suboccipital, retrosigmoid approach. Prognostic factors should be analyzed for the postoperative hearing function. Methods: We examined 51 patients with ANs using preoperative intact hearing function. Audiological data were obtained by pure tone audiogram (PTA) and speech audiogram. The preoperative and postoperative anatomical localization of the labyrinth was measured with specific distances regarding the tumor and corresponding anatomy of the posterior fossa by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Results: Postoperative MRI controls confirmed no injuries to the labyrinth (0%). The postoperative hearing results showed 100% hearing preservation for T1-tumors (<1 ml/<1.1 cm), 50% for T2-tumors (1–4 ml/1.1–1.8 cm), 40% for T3-tumors (4–8 ml/1.8–2.3 cm) and 18% for T4-tumors (>8 ml/>2.3 cm). Postoperative deafness was seen in all cases with ventral tumor extension higher than 5.5 mm. Postoperative loss of hearing was seen in all cases with hearing preservation with 6–8% of speech discrimination and an increase in the hearing threshold of 12 dB in the PTA compared to the preoperative hearing status. Conclusion: Petrous bone measurement by high-resolution MRI data enables safe surgical exposure of the internal acoustic canal with avoidance of injury to the labyrinth and a better postoperative prognosis, especially for intrameatal ANs and for the resection of intrameatal portions of larger neuromas. The prognostic factors enable the patients and the surgeon a better estimation of postoperative results regarding deafness and postoperative hypacusis and support a consolidated treatment planning. PMID:28144470

  3. Reproducible Data Processing Research for the CABRI R.I.A. experiments Acoustic Emission signal analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pantera, Laurent

    2015-07-01

    The CABRI facility is an experimental nuclear reactor of the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) designed to study the behaviour of fuel rods at high burnup under Reactivity Initiated Accident (R.I.A.) conditions such as the scenario of a control rod ejection. During the experimental phase, the behaviour of the fuel element generates acoustic waves which can be detected by two microphones placed upstream and downstream from the test device. Studies carried out on the last fourteen tests showed the interest in carrying out temporal and spectral analyses on these signals by showing the existence of signatures which can be correlated with physical phenomena. We want presently to return to this rich data in order to have a new point of view by applying modern signal processing methods. Such an antecedent works resumption leads to some difficulties. Although all the raw data are accessible in the form of text files, analyses and graphics representations were not clear in reproducing from the former studies since the people who were in charge of the original work have left the laboratory and it is not easy when time passes, even with our own work, to be able to remember the steps of data manipulations and the exact setup. Thus we decided to consolidate the availability of the data and its manipulation in order to provide a robust data processing workflow to the experimentalists before doing any further investigations. To tackle this issue of strong links between data, treatments and the generation of documents, we adopted a Reproducible Research paradigm. We shall first present the tools chosen in our laboratory to implement this workflow and, then we shall describe the global perception carried out to continue the study of the Acoustic Emission signals recorded by the two microphones during the last fourteen CABRI R.I.A. tests. (authors)

  4. Entry dynamics and acoustics/infrasonic/seismic analysis for the Neuschwanstein meteorite fall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revelle, D. O.; Brown, P. G.; Spurný, P.

    2004-10-01

    We have analyzed several types of data associated with the well-documented fall of the Neuschwanstein meteorites on April 6, 2002 (a total of three meteorites have been recovered). This includes ground-based photographic and radiometer data as well as infrasound and seismic data from this very significant bolide event (Spurny et al. 2002, 2003). We have also used these data to model the entry of Neuschwanstein, including the expected dynamics, energetics, panchromatic luminosity, and associated fragmentation effects. In addition, we have calculated the differential efficiency of acoustical waves for Neuschwanstein and used these values to compare against the efficiency calculated using available ground-based infrasound data. This new numerical technique has allowed the source height to be determined independent of ray tracing solutions. We have also carried out theoretical ray tracing for a moving point source (not strictly a cylindrical line emission) and for an infinite speed line source. In addition, we have determined the ray turning heights as a function of the source height for both initially upward and downward propagating rays, independent of the explicit ray tracing (detailed propagation path) programs. These results all agree on the origins of the acoustic emission and explicit source heights for Neuschwanstein for the strongest infrasonic signals. Calculated source energies using more than four different independent approaches agree that Neuschwanstein was certainly <500 kg in initial mass, given the initial velocity of 20.95 km/s, resulting in an initial source energy ?0.0157-0.0276 kt TNT equivalent (4.185 × 1012 J). Local source energies at the calculated infrasonic/seismic source altitudes are up to two orders of magnitude smaller than this initial source energy.

  5. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging for the Differentiation of Benign and Malignant Lymph Nodes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Cheng; Xie, Mingxing; Lv, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the overall performance of acoustic radiation force impulse imaging (ARFI) in differentiating between benign and malignant lymph nodes (LNs) by conducting a meta-analysis. Methods PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure were comprehensively searched for potential studies through August 13th, 2016. Studies that investigated the diagnostic power of ARFI for the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant LNs by using virtual touch tissue quantification (VTQ) or virtual touch tissue imaging quantification (VTIQ) were collected. The included articles were published in English or Chinese. Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies-2 (QUADAS-2) was used to evaluate the methodological quality. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, and the area under the summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curve (AUC) were calculated by means of a bivariate mixed-effects regression model. Meta-regression analysis was performed to identify the potential sources of between study heterogeneity. Fagan plot analysis was used to explore the clinical utilities. Publication bias was assessed using Deek’s funnel plot. Results Nine studies involving 1084 LNs from 929 patients were identified to analyze in the meta-analysis. The summary sensitivity and specificity of ARFI in detecting malignant LNs were 0.87 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.83–0.91) and 0.88 (95% CI, 0.82–0.92), respectively. The AUC was 0.93 (95% CI, 0.90–0.95). The pooled DOR was 49.59 (95% CI, 26.11–94.15). Deek’s funnel plot revealed no significant publication bias. Conclusion ARFI is a promising tool for the differentiation of benign and malignant LNs with high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:27855188

  6. Acoustic biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Ronen; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  7. Acoustic biosensors.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors.

  8. Avalanche correlations in the martensitic transition of a Cu-Zn-Al shape memory alloy: analysis of acoustic emission and calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Baró, Jordi; Martín-Olalla, José-María; Romero, Francisco Javier; Gallardo, María Carmen; Salje, Ekhard K H; Vives, Eduard; Planes, Antoni

    2014-03-26

    The existence of temporal correlations during the intermittent dynamics of a thermally driven structural phase transition is studied in a Cu-Zn-Al alloy. The sequence of avalanches is observed by means of two techniques: acoustic emission and high sensitivity calorimetry. Both methods reveal the existence of event clustering in a way that is equivalent to the Omori correlations between aftershocks in earthquakes as are commonly used in seismology.

  9. Numerical analysis for transverse microbead trapping using 30 MHz focused ultrasound in ray acoustics regime.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jungwoo

    2014-01-01

    We have recently devised a remote acoustic manipulation method with high frequency focused ultrasonic beam of 30-200 MHz, and experimentally realized it by the intensity gradient near the beam's focus. A two-dimensional (or transverse) acoustic trapping was demonstrated by directly applying the acoustic radiation force on lipid spheres and leukemia cells that were individually moved towards the focus. Only longitudinal waves were then considered because both target and propagation media involved were fluid e.g., water or phosphate buffer saline. In order for our current technique to be applicable to bead-based assay approaches using micron-sized polystyrene spheres as in optical tweezers, the possibility of microbead trapping must first be investigated from theoretical perspective. In this paper, a simulation study in the ray acoustics regime (bead diameter D>ultrasonic wavelength λ of trapping beam) is thus undertaken by calculating the acoustic radiation force on a polystyrene bead generated from 30 MHz focused beam of Gaussian intensity profile. Analytical trapping models for a bead located in the near-/far fields and on the focal plane are derived by incorporating both longitudinal- and shear force terms into our existing ray acoustics model for liquid targets. The net radiation force is computed by adding the two terms, and the resultant trapping force is defined as a negative net radiation force in the positive transverse direction (y>0). The magnitude of the trapping force and its spatial range are evaluated in the same direction by varying bead size (D=2 λ=100 μm or 3 λ=150 μm), location, and transducer's f-number (= 1 or 2). When the bead size is increased, all force components exerted on the bead is increased in the near field of ultrasound for both f-numbers. With f-number=1 being used, the peak longitudinal-, shear- , and net forces are -3.1 nN, -9.8 nN, and -12.7 nN for D=2 λ, whereas the forces are increased to -5.3 nN, -21.0 nN, and -25.7 n

  10. Ionic association and solvation of the ionic liquid 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride in molecular solvents revealed by vapor pressure osmometry, conductometry, volumetry, and acoustic measurements.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Rahmat; Ebrahimi, Nosaibah

    2011-11-17

    A systematic study of osmotic coefficient, conductivity, volumetric and acoustic properties of solutions of ionic liquid 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([C(6)mim][Cl]) in various molecular solvents has been made at different temperatures in order to study of ionic association and solvation behavior of [C(6)mim][Cl] in different solutions. Precise measurements on electrical conductances of solutions of [C(6)mim][Cl] in water, methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol, 1-butanol, and acetonitrile at 293.15, 298.15, and 303.15 K are reported and analyzed with Barthel's low-concentration chemical model (lcCM) to obtain the limiting molar conductivities and association constants of this ionic liquid in the investigated solvents. Strong ion pairing was found for the ionic liquid in 2-propanol, 1-butanol, and 1-propanol, whereas ion association in acetonitrile, methanol and ethanol is rather weak and in water the ionic liquid is fully dissociated. In the second part of this work, the apparent molar volumes and isentropic compressibilities of [C(6)mim][Cl] in water, methanol, ethanol, acetonitrile, 1-propanol, 2-propanol, and 1-butanol are obtained at the 288.15-313.15 K temperature range at 5 K intervals at atmospheric pressure from the precise measurements of density and sound velocity. The infinite dilution apparent molar volume and isentropic compressibility values of the free ions and ion pairs of [C(6)mim][Cl] in the investigated solvents as well as the excess molar volume of the investigated solutions are determined and their variations with temperature and type of solvents are also studied. Finally, the experimental measurements of osmotic coefficient at 318.15 K for binary solutions of [C(6)mim][Cl] in water, methanol, ethanol, 2-propanol, and acetonitrile are taken using the vapor pressure osmometry (VPO) method and from which the values of the solvent activity, vapor pressure, activity coefficients, and Gibbs free energies are calculated. The results are

  11. Generalization of von Neumann analysis for a model of two discrete half-spaces: The acoustic case

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haney, M.M.

    2007-01-01

    Evaluating the performance of finite-difference algorithms typically uses a technique known as von Neumann analysis. For a given algorithm, application of the technique yields both a dispersion relation valid for the discrete time-space grid and a mathematical condition for stability. In practice, a major shortcoming of conventional von Neumann analysis is that it can be applied only to an idealized numerical model - that of an infinite, homogeneous whole space. Experience has shown that numerical instabilities often arise in finite-difference simulations of wave propagation at interfaces with strong material contrasts. These interface instabilities occur even though the conventional von Neumann stability criterion may be satisfied at each point of the numerical model. To address this issue, I generalize von Neumann analysis for a model of two half-spaces. I perform the analysis for the case of acoustic wave propagation using a standard staggered-grid finite-difference numerical scheme. By deriving expressions for the discrete reflection and transmission coefficients, I study under what conditions the discrete reflection and transmission coefficients become unbounded. I find that instabilities encountered in numerical modeling near interfaces with strong material contrasts are linked to these cases and develop a modified stability criterion that takes into account the resulting instabilities. I test and verify the stability criterion by executing a finite-difference algorithm under conditions predicted to be stable and unstable. ?? 2007 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  12. Overstability of acoustic waves in strongly magnetized anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Uchava, E. S.; Shergelashvili, B. M.; Tevzadze, A. G.; Poedts, S.

    2014-08-15

    We present a linear stability analysis of the perturbation modes in anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows with velocity shear and strong magnetic field. Collisionless or weakly collisional plasma is described within the 16-momentum MHD fluid closure model that takes into account not only the effect of pressure anisotropy but also the effect of anisotropic heat fluxes. In this model, the low frequency acoustic wave is revealed into a standard acoustic mode and higher frequency fast thermo-acoustic and lower frequency slow thermo-acoustic waves. It is shown that thermo-acoustic waves become unstable and grow exponentially when the heat flux parameter exceeds some critical value. It seems that velocity shear makes thermo-acoustic waves overstable even at subcritical heat flux parameters. Thus, when the effect of heat fluxes is not profound acoustic waves will grow due to the velocity shear, while at supercritical heat fluxes the flow reveals compressible thermal instability. Anisotropic thermal instability should be also important in astrophysical environments, where it will limit the maximal value of magnetic field that a low density ionized anisotropic flow can sustain.

  13. Incubation pit analysis and calculation of the hydrodynamic impact pressure from the implosion of an acoustic cavitation bubble.

    PubMed

    Tzanakis, I; Eskin, D G; Georgoulas, A; Fytanidis, D K

    2014-03-01

    An experimental study to evaluate cavitation bubble dynamics is conducted. The aim is to predict the magnitude and statistical distribution of hydrodynamic impact pressure generated from the implosion of various individual acoustic cavitation bubbles near to a rigid boundary, considering geometrical features of the pitted area. A steel sample was subjected to cavitation impacts by an ultrasonic transducer with a 5mm diameter probe. The pitted surface was then examined using high-precision 3D optical interferometer techniques. Only the incubation period where surface is plastically deformed without material loss is taken into account. The exposure time was adjusted in the range of 3-60 s to avoid pit overlapping and a special procedure for pit analysis and characterisation was then followed. Moreover, a high-speed camera device was deployed to capture the implosion mechanisms of cavitation bubbles near to the surface. The geometrical characteristics of single incubation pits as well as pit clusters were studied and their deformation patterns were compared. Consequently, a reverse engineering approach was applied in order the hydrodynamic impact pressure from the implosion of an individual cavitation bubble to be determined. The characteristic parameters of the cavitation implosion process such as hydrodynamic impact pressure and liquid micro-jet impact velocity as well as the hydrodynamic severity of the cavitation impacts were quantified. It was found that the length of the hypotenuse of the orthographic projections from the center of the pit, which basically represents the deformed area of the pit, increases with the hydrodynamic impact aggressiveness in a linear rate. Majority of the hydrodynamic impacts were in the range of 0.4-1 GPa while the corresponding micro-jet velocities were found to be in the range of 200-700 m/s. Outcomes of this study, contribute to further understanding the cavitation intensity from the implosion of acoustically generated bubbles and

  14. The Trajectory, Orbit, and Acoustical analysis of the Park Forest Fireball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, W. N.; Brown, P. G.; Pack, D.; Revelle, D. O.; Yoo, B. B.; Spalding, R. E.; Tagliaferri, E.

    2004-05-01

    The Park Forest meteorite fall of March 27th, 2003 was the first large bolide to occur over a major urban area in modern history. As such, characterizing various aspects of the event has been the subject of particular interest. This has been made possible due to the wide array of different instrument detections. Instrumental recordings of the Park Forest fireball include eyewitness video, optical and infrared light observations by orbiting satellites and acoustic recordings by audible sound, infrasonic and seismic instruments. Optical and infrared satellite observations fused with data from ground based video have allowed an accurate determination of the fireball's trajectory and velocity. The trajectory along with modelled atmospheric conditions has in turn allowed the source regions for audible acoustic and seismic recordings of the fireball's sound waves to be identified. These sources are consistent with the sound waves originating from several major fragmentation points along the fireball's path. Infrasonic recordings appear to be typical of stratospherically ducted waves. The best estimates of the original size of Park Forest is ~1.5m with an observed entry velocity of 20 km/s implying an energy of ~0.5 kTon TNT equivalent. Finally by employing the same model atmosphere, dark flight paths of the soon-to-be meteorites were modelled using the major fragmentation altitudes as possible ejection points. Results show that fragments ranging in size from 5 kg to 2 g agree very well with recovery observations, falling within and around the known meteorite strewn field and being released at altitudes from ~38 - 22 km. This suggests that fragments may have ejected at wide a range of altitudes and that the bolide travelled through the atmosphere as a conglomeration of fragments and not as a single large stone. The observed fragmentation occurred under ram pressures of 2-7 MPa, with early minor disruption under at less than 1 MPa. This provides an estimate for the

  15. Multiscale analysis of the acoustic scattering by many scatterers of impedance type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challa, Durga Prasad; Sini, Mourad

    2016-06-01

    We are concerned with the acoustic scattering problem, at a frequency {κ}, by many small obstacles of arbitrary shapes with impedance boundary condition. These scatterers are assumed to be included in a bounded domain {Ω} in {{R}^3} which is embedded in an acoustic background characterized by an eventually locally varying index of refraction. The collection of the scatterers {D_m, m=1,ldots,M} is modeled by four parameters: their number M, their maximum radius a, their minimum distance d and the surface impedances {λ_m, m=1,ldots,M}. We consider the parameters M, d and {λ_m}'s having the following scaling properties: {M:=M(a)=O(a^{-s}), d:=d(a)≈ a^t} and {λ_m:=λ_m(a)=λ_{m,0}a^{-β}}, as {a→ 0}, with non negative constants s, t and {β} and complex numbers {λ_{m, 0}}'s with eventually negative imaginary parts. We derive the asymptotic expansion of the far-fields with explicit error estimate in terms of a, as {a→ 0}. The dominant term is the Foldy-Lax field corresponding to the scattering by the point-like scatterers located at the centers {z_m}'s of the scatterers {D_m}'s with {λ_m \\vert partial D_m\\vert} as the related scattering coefficients. This asymptotic expansion is justified under the following conditions a ≤ a_0, \\vert Re (λ_{m,0})\\vert ≥ λ_-,quad \\vertλ_{m,0}\\vert ≤ λ_+,quad β < 1,quad 0 ≤ s ≤2-β,quads/3 ≤ t and the error of the approximation is {C a^{3-2β-s}}, as {a → 0}, where the positive constants {a_0, λ_-,λ_+} and C depend only on the a priori uniform bounds of the Lipschitz characters of the obstacles {D_m}'s and the ones of {M(a)a^s} and {d(a)/a^t}. We do not assume the periodicity in distributing the small scatterers. In addition, the scatterers can be arbitrary close since t can be arbitrary large, i.e., we can handle the mesoscale regime. Finally, for spherical scatterers, we can also allow the limit case {β=1} with a slightly better error of the approximation.

  16. An experimental modeling and acoustic emission monitoring of abrasive wear in a steel/diabase pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korchuganov, M. A.; Filippov, A. V.; Tarasov, S. Yu.; Podgornyh, O. A.; Shamarin, N. N.; Filippova, E. O.

    2016-11-01

    The earthmoving of permafrost soil is a critical task for excavation of minerals and construction on new territories. Failure by abrasive wear is the main reason for excavation parts of earthmoving and soil cutting machines. Therefore investigation of this type of wear is a challenge for developing efficient and wear resistant working parts. This paper is focused on conducting tribological experiments with sliding the steel samples over the surface of diabase stone sample where abrasive wear conditions of soil cutting are modeled experimentally. The worn surfaces of all samples have been examined and transfer of metal and stone particles revealed. The acoustic emission (AE) signals have been recorded and related to the results of worn surface analysis. he acoustic emission (AE) signals have been recorded and related to the results of worn surface analysis. As shown the wear intensity correlates to that of acoustic emission. Both acoustic emission signal median frequency and energy are found to be sensitive to the wear mode.

  17. Near-Field Acoustic Power Level Analysis of F31/A31 Open Rotor Model at Simulated Cruise Conditions, Technical Report II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sree, Dave

    2015-01-01

    Near-field acoustic power level analysis of F31A31 open rotor model has been performed to determine its noise characteristics at simulated cruise flight conditions. The non-proprietary parts of the test data obtained from experiments in the 8x6 supersonic wind tunnel were provided by NASA-Glenn Research Center. The tone and broadband components of total noise have been separated from raw test data by using a new data analysis tool. Results in terms of sound pressure levels, acoustic power levels, and their variations with rotor speed, freestream Mach number, and input shaft power, with different blade-pitch setting angles at simulated cruise flight conditions, are presented and discussed. Empirical equations relating models acoustic power level and input shaft power have been developed. The near-field acoustic efficiency of the model at simulated cruise conditions is also determined. It is hoped that the results presented in this work will serve as a database for comparison and improvement of other open rotor blade designs and also for validating open rotor noise prediction codes.

  18. Study of Ocean Bottom Interactions with Acoustic Waves by a New Elastic Wave Propagation Algorithm and an Energy Flow Analysis Technique

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    Study Of Ocean Bottom Interactions With Acoustic Waves By A New Elastic Wave Propagation Algorithm And An Energy Flow Analysis Technique Ru-Shan Wu...imaging to study the wave/sea-bottom interaction, energy partitioning, scattering mechanism and other problems that are crucial for many ocean bottom...Elastic Wave Propagation Algorithm And An Energy Flow Analysis Technique 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR

  19. Interference-induced angle-independent acoustical transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Lehua; Yu, Gaokun Wang, Ning; Wang, Xinlong; Wang, Guibo

    2014-12-21

    It is revealed that the Fano-like interference leads to the extraordinary acoustic transmission through a slab metamaterial of thickness much smaller than the wavelength, with each unit cell consisting of a Helmholtz resonator and a narrow subwavelength slit. More importantly, both the theoretical analysis and experimental measurement show that the angle-independent acoustical transparency can be realized by grafting a Helmholtz resonator and a quarter-wave resonator to the wall of a narrow subwavelength slit in each unit cell of a slit array. The observed phenomenon results from the interferences between the waves propagating in the slit, those re-radiated by the Helmholtz resonator, and those re-radiated by the quarter-wave resonator. The proposed design may find its applications in designing angle-independent acoustical filters and controlling the phase of the transmitted waves.

  20. Acoustic markers of prosodic boundaries in Spanish spontaneous alaryngeal speech.

    PubMed

    Cuenca, M H; Barrio, M M

    2010-11-01

    Prosodic information aids segmentation of the continuous speech signal and thereby facilitates auditory speech processing. Durational and pitch variations are prosodic cues especially necessary to convey prosodic boundaries, but alaryngeal speakers have inconsistent control over acoustic parameters such as F0 and duration, being as a result noisy and less intelligible than normal speech. This case study has investigated whether one Spanish alaryngeal speaker proficient in both oesophageal and tracheoesophageal speech modes used the same acoustic cues for prosodic boundaries in both types of voicing. Pre-boundary lengthening, F0-excursions and pausing (number of pauses and position) were measured in spontaneous speech samples, using Praat. The acoustic analysis has revealed that the subject has relied on a different combination of cues in each type of voicing to convey the presence of prosodic boundaries.

  1. Acoustic signals of Chinese alligators (Alligator sinensis): social communication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianyan; Wang, Ding; Wu, Xiaobing; Wang, Renping; Wang, Chaolin

    2007-05-01

    This paper reports the first systematic study of acoustic signals during social interactions of the Chinese alligator (Alligator sinensis). Sound pressure level (SPL) measurements revealed that Chinese alligators have an elaborate acoustic communication system with both long-distance signal-bellowing-and short-distance signals that include tooting, bubble blowing, hissing, mooing, head slapping and whining. Bellows have high SPL and appear to play an important role in the alligator's long range intercommunion. Sounds characterized by low SPL are short-distance signals used when alligators are in close spatial proximity to one another. The signal spectrographic analysis showed that the acoustic signals of Chinese alligators have a very low dominant frequency, less than 500 Hz. These frequencies are consistent with adaptation to a habitat with high density vegetation. Low dominant frequency sound attenuates less and could therefore cover a larger spatial range by diffraction in a densely vegetated environment relative to a higher dominant frequency sound.

  2. Numerical analysis of the vibroacoustic properties of plates with embedded grids of acoustic black holes.

    PubMed

    Conlon, Stephen C; Fahnline, John B; Semperlotti, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    The concept of an Acoustic Black Hole (ABH) has been developed and exploited as an approach for passively attenuating structural vibration. The basic principle of the ABH relies on proper tailoring of the structure geometrical properties in order to produce a gradual reduction of the flexural wave speed, theoretically approaching zero. For practical systems the idealized "zero" wave speed condition cannot be achieved so the structural areas of low wave speed are treated with surface damping layers to allow the ABH to approach the idealized dissipation level. In this work, an investigation was conducted to assess the effects that distributions of ABHs embedded in plate-like structures have on both vibration and structure radiated sound, focusing on characterizing and improving low frequency performance. Finite Element and Boundary Element models were used to assess the vibration response and radiated sound power performance of several plate configurations, comparing baseline uniform plates with embedded periodic ABH designs. The computed modal loss factors showed the importance of the ABH unit cell low order modes in the overall vibration reduction effectiveness of the embedded ABH plates at low frequencies where the free plate bending wavelengths are longer than the scale of the ABH.

  3. Analysis of in-flight acoustic data for a twin-engined turboprop airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilby, J. F.; Wilby, E. G.

    1988-01-01

    Acoustic measurements were made on the exterior and interior of a general aviation turboprop airplane during four flight tests. The test conditions were carefully controlled and repeated for each flight in order to determine data variability. For the first three flights the cabin was untreated and for the fourth flight the fuselage was treated with glass fiber batts. On the exterior, measured propeller harmonic sound pressure levels showed typical standard deviations of +1.4 dB, -2.3 dB, and turbulent boundary layer pressure levels, +1.2 dB, -1.6. Propeller harmonic levels in the cabin showed greater variability, with typical standard deviations of +2.0 dB, -4.2 dB. When interior sound pressure levels from different flights with different cabin treatments were used to evaluate insertion loss, the standard deviations were typically plus or minus 6.5 dB. This is due in part to the variability of the sound pressure level measurements, but probably is also influenced by changes in the model characteristics of the cabin. Recommendations are made for the planning and performance of future flight tests to measure interior noise of propeller-driven aircraft, either high-speed advanced turboprop or general aviation propellers.

  4. Numerical analysis of acoustically driven viscous flow through a circular hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notomi, Tetsuo; Namba, Masanobu

    1990-12-01

    Periodic viscous flows through a circular hole driven by fluctuating far field pressure are numerically studied. The time-dependent incompressible Navier-Stokes equations formulated with orthogonal curvilinear coordinates are solved by using a finite difference method. The flow patterns are classified into three regimes by fluctuating pressure amplitude and frequency: flows with no laminar separation (high frequency-low pressure range), flows with attached separation bubble (intermediate frequency and pressure range) and flows with detached vortex ring (low frequency-high pressure range). The flow resistance of the circular hole is proportional to the acoustic particle velocity but independent of the viscosity of the fluid and almost invariant with the frequency for the low frequency-high pressure range. On the other hand, for the high frequency-low pressure range, the flow resistance is independent of the periodic pressure amplitude and varies directly with 2/3 powers of frequency. Finally, the predicted circular hole impedance is in good agreement with Ingard and Ising's (1967) experimental data for the orifice impedance.

  5. A study of vocal nonlinearities in humpback whale songs: from production mechanisms to acoustic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cazau, Dorian; Adam, Olivier; Aubin, Thierry; Laitman, Jeffrey T.; Reidenberg, Joy S.

    2016-01-01

    Although mammalian vocalizations are predominantly harmonically structured, they can exhibit an acoustic complexity with nonlinear vocal sounds, including deterministic chaos and frequency jumps. Such sounds are normative events in mammalian vocalizations, and can be directly traceable to the nonlinear nature of vocal-fold dynamics underlying typical mammalian sound production. In this study, we give qualitative descriptions and quantitative analyses of nonlinearities in the song repertoire of humpback whales from the Ste Marie channel (Madagascar) to provide more insight into the potential communication functions and underlying production mechanisms of these features. A low-dimensional biomechanical modeling of the whale’s U-fold (vocal folds homolog) is used to relate specific vocal mechanisms to nonlinear vocal features. Recordings of living humpback whales were searched for occurrences of vocal nonlinearities (instabilities). Temporal distributions of nonlinearities were assessed within sound units, and between different songs. The anatomical production sources of vocal nonlinearities and the communication context of their occurrences in recordings are discussed. Our results show that vocal nonlinearities may be a communication strategy that conveys information about the whale’s body size and physical fitness, and thus may be an important component of humpback whale songs. PMID:27721476

  6. Quantitative acoustic analysis of the vocal repertoire of the golden rocket frog (Anomaloglossus beebei).

    PubMed

    Pettitt, Beth A; Bourne, Godfrey R; Bee, Mark A

    2012-06-01

    This study describes the vocal repertoire of the Guyanan golden rocket frog, Anomaloglossus beebei, a bromeliad specialist with biparental care. Using multivariate analyses of nine call properties, as well as the occurrence of nonlinear phenomena, three signal types were distinguished-advertisement, courtship, and aggressive calls. Although all three call types were composed of a short series of rapidly repeated pulses, advertisement calls were produced at higher amplitudes and had longer pulse durations than both courtship calls and aggressive calls. Courtship calls exhibited lower dominant frequencies than both advertisement and aggressive calls, which had similar dominant frequencies. Aggressive calls had more pulses per call, had longer intervals between calls, and occasionally contained one or two introductory pulses preceding the pulsed call. Several acoustic properties predicted aspects of the signaler's body size and condition. Our study demonstrates the reliability of human observers to differentiate the multiple call types of A. beebei based on hearing calls and observing the social context in which they are produced under field conditions.

  7. Acoustic emission-based sensor analysis and damage classification for structural health monitoring of composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uprety, Bibhisha

    Within the aerospace industry the need to detect and locate impact events, even when no visible damage is present, is important both from the maintenance and design perspectives. This research focused on the use of Acoustic Emission (AE) based sensing technologies to identify impact events and characterize damage modes in composite structures for structural health monitoring. Six commercially available piezoelectric AE sensors were evaluated for use with impact location estimation algorithms under development at the University of Utah. Both active and passive testing were performed to estimate the time of arrival and plate wave mode velocities for impact location estimation. Four sensors were recommended for further comparative investigations. Furthermore, instrumented low-velocity impact experiments were conducted on quasi-isotropic carbon/epoxy composite laminates to initiate specific types of damage: matrix cracking, delamination and fiber breakage. AE signal responses were collected during impacting and the test panels were ultrasonically C-scanned after impact to identify the internal damage corresponding to the AE signals. Matrix cracking and delamination damage produced using more compliant test panels and larger diameter impactor were characterized by lower frequency signals while fiber breakage produced higher frequency responses. The results obtained suggest that selected characteristics of sensor response signals can be used both to determine whether damage is produced during impacting and to characterize the types of damage produced in an impacted composite structure.

  8. 5 Percent Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test: Overpressure Characterization and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvord, David; Casiano, Matthew; McDaniels, Dave

    2011-01-01

    During the ignition of a ducted solid rocket motor (SRM), rapid expansion of injected hot gases from the motor into a confined volume causes the development of a steep fronted wave. This low frequency transient wave propagates outward from the exhaust duct, impinging the vehicle and ground structures. An unsuppressed overpressure wave can potentially cause modal excitation in the structures and vehicle, subsequently leading to damage. This presentation details the ignition transient f indings from the 5% Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT). The primary events of the ignition transient environment induced by the SRM are the ignition overpressure (IOP), duct overpressure (DOP), and source overpressure (SOP). The resulting observations include successful knockdown of the IOP environment through use of a Space Shuttle derived IOP suppression system, a potential load applied to the vehicle stemming from instantaneous asymmetrical IOP and DOP wave impingement, and launch complex geometric influences on the environment. The results are scaled to a full-scale Ares I equivalent and compared with heritage data including Ares I-X and both suppressed and unsuppressed Space Shuttle IOP environments.

  9. Acoustic test and analysis of a counterrotating prop-fan model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magliozzi, Bernard; Brown, Paul; Parzych, David

    1987-01-01

    Results of acoustic tests of a 62.2 cm (24.5 in) diameter model counterrotating Prop-Fan are presented. The model was tested as a tractor and a pusher downstream of a pylon, both at 0 degrees and at 4 degrees angle-of-attack. The effects on noise of spacing between rotors and between the pylons and the rotors were also measured. Effects of rotor spacing were found to cause small changes in noise over the range of spacings tested. The presence of the pylon resulted in a 2 to 3 EPNdB increase in noise. Angle-of-attack effects showed an increase of 3 to 4 EPNdB for the tractor and only about 1 EPNdB for the pusher configuration. Speed was found to be the strongest parameter in minimizing noise. However, the decrease in noise with tip speeds below 200 m/sec (650 ft/sec) became significantly smaller than at higher tip speeds. Comparison of noise spectra between single rotation and counterrotating Prop-Fans showed that the counterrotating Prop-Fan has significantly higher levels of higher frequency noise which radiates in the forward direction. Correlations between measurement and prediction are discussed. Predictions are made of far-field noise during takeoff and near-field noise during cruise.

  10. GPU performance analysis of a nodal discontinuous Galerkin method for acoustic and elastic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modave, A.; St-Cyr, A.; Warburton, T.

    2016-06-01

    Finite element schemes based on discontinuous Galerkin methods possess features amenable to massively parallel computing accelerated with general purpose graphics processing units (GPUs). However, the computational performance of such schemes strongly depends on their implementation. In the past, several implementation strategies have been proposed. They are based exclusively on specialized compute kernels tuned for each operation, or they can leverage BLAS libraries that provide optimized routines for basic linear algebra operations. In this paper, we present and analyze up-to-date performance results for different implementations, tested in a unified framework on a single NVIDIA GTX980 GPU. We show that specialized kernels written with a one-node-per-thread strategy are competitive for polynomial bases up to the fifth and seventh degrees for acoustic and elastic models, respectively. For higher degrees, a strategy that makes use of the NVIDIA cuBLAS library provides better results, able to reach a net arithmetic throughput 35.7% of the theoretical peak value.

  11. Lobed Mixer Design for Noise Suppression Acoustic and Aerodynamic Test Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengle, Vinod G.; Dalton, William N.; Boyd, Kathleen (Technical Monitor); Bridges, James (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A comprehensive database for the acoustic and aerodynamic characteristics of several model-scale lobe mixers of bypass ratio 5 to 6 has been created for mixed jet speeds up to 1080 ft/s at typical take-off (TO) conditions of small-to-medium turbofan engines. The flight effect was simulated for Mach numbers up to 0.3. The static thrust performance and plume data were also obtained at typical TO and cruise conditions. The tests were done at NASA Lewis anechoic dome and ASK's FluiDyne Laboratories. The effect of several lobe mixer and nozzle parameters, such as, lobe scalloping, lobe count, lobe penetration and nozzle length was examined in terms of flyover noise at constant altitude. Sound in the nozzle reference frame was analyzed to understand the source characteristics. Several new concepts, mechanisms and methods are reported for such lobed mixers, such as, "boomerang" scallops, "tongue" mixer, detection of "excess" internal noise sources, and extrapolation of flyover noise data from one flight speed to different flight speeds. Noise reduction of as much as 3 EPNdB was found with a deeply scalloped mixer compared to annular nozzle at net thrust levels of 9500 lb for a 29 in. diameter nozzle after optimizing the nozzle length.

  12. Mass sensitivity analysis and designing of surface acoustic wave resonators for chemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kshetrimayum, Roshan; Yadava, R. D. S.; Tandon, R. P.

    2009-05-01

    The sensitivity of surface acoustic wave (SAW) chemical sensors depends on several factors such as the frequency and phase point of SAW device operation, sensitivity of the SAW velocity to surface mass loading, sensitivity of the SAW oscillator resonance to the loop phase shift, film thickness and oscillator electronics. This paper analyzes the influence of the phase point of operation in SAW oscillator sensors based on two-port resonator devices. It is found that the mass sensitivity will be enhanced if the SAW device has a nonlinear dependence on the frequency (delay ~ frequency-1). This requires the device to generate and operate in a ωτg(ω) = const region in the device passband, where ω denotes the angular frequency of oscillation and τg(ω) denotes the phase slope of the SAW resonator device. A SAW coupled resonator filter (CRF) that take advantage of mode coupling is considered in realizing such a device to help in shaping the phase transfer characteristics of a high mass sensitivity sensor. The device design and simulation results are presented within the coupling-of-modes formalism.

  13. A study of vocal nonlinearities in humpback whale songs: from production mechanisms to acoustic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazau, Dorian; Adam, Olivier; Aubin, Thierry; Laitman, Jeffrey T.; Reidenberg, Joy S.

    2016-10-01

    Although mammalian vocalizations are predominantly harmonically structured, they can exhibit an acoustic complexity with nonlinear vocal sounds, including deterministic chaos and frequency jumps. Such sounds are normative events in mammalian vocalizations, and can be directly traceable to the nonlinear nature of vocal-fold dynamics underlying typical mammalian sound production. In this study, we give qualitative descriptions and quantitative analyses of nonlinearities in the song repertoire of humpback whales from the Ste Marie channel (Madagascar) to provide more insight into the potential communication functions and underlying production mechanisms of these features. A low-dimensional biomechanical modeling of the whale’s U-fold (vocal folds homolog) is used to relate specific vocal mechanisms to nonlinear vocal features. Recordings of living humpback whales were searched for occurrences of vocal nonlinearities (instabilities). Temporal distributions of nonlinearities were assessed within sound units, and between different songs. The anatomical production sources of vocal nonlinearities and the communication context of their occurrences in recordings are discussed. Our results show that vocal nonlinearities may be a communication strategy that conveys information about the whale’s body size and physical fitness, and thus may be an important component of humpback whale songs.

  14. Acoustic methodology review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, R. G.

    1982-01-01

    It is important for industry and NASA to assess the status of acoustic design technology for predicting and controlling helicopter external noise in order for a meaningful research program to be formulated which will address this problem. The prediction methodologies available to the designer and the acoustic engineer are three-fold. First is what has been described as a first principle analysis. This analysis approach attempts to remove any empiricism from the analysis process and deals with a theoretical mechanism approach to predicting the noise. The second approach attempts to combine first principle methodology (when available) with empirical data to formulate source predictors which can be combined to predict vehicle levels. The third is an empirical analysis, which attempts to generalize measured trends into a vehicle noise prediction method. This paper will briefly address each.

  15. Acoustic metamaterial with negative parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hongwei; Yan, Fei; Gu, Hao; Li, Ying

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we present theoretical results on an acoustic metamaterial beam and a bar that exhibit negative effective mass and negative effective stiffness. A one-dimensional acoustic metamaterial with an array of spring-mass subsystems was fabricated. The frequency of the acoustic one dimensional metamaterial structure has the same form as that of the permittivity in metals due to the plasma oscillation. We also provide a theory to explain the simulation results. And we use the concept of conventional mechanical vibration absorbers to reveal the actual working mechanism of the acoustic metamaterials. We explain the two vibrate modes which are optical mode and acoustic mode in detail. When the incoming elastic wave in the acoustic metamaterials to resonate the integrated spring-mass-damper absorbers to vibrate in their optical mode at frequencies close to but above their local resonance frequencies to create shear forces and bending moments to straighten the beam and stop the wave propagation. Moreover, we explain the negative parameter in acoustic metamaterials.

  16. Density of states and dynamical crossover in a dense fluid revealed by exponential mode analysis of the velocity autocorrelation function.

    PubMed

    Bellissima, S; Neumann, M; Guarini, E; Bafile, U; Barocchi, F

    2017-01-01

    Extending a preceding study of the velocity autocorrelation function (VAF) in a simulated Lennard-Jones fluid [Phys. Rev. E 92, 042166 (2015)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.92.042166] to cover higher-density and lower-temperature states, we show that the recently demonstrated multiexponential expansion method allows for a full account and understanding of the basic dynamical processes encompassed by a fundamental quantity as the VAF. In particular, besides obtaining evidence of a persisting long-time tail, we assign specific and unambiguous physical meanings to groups of exponential modes related to the longitudinal and transverse collective dynamics, respectively. We have made this possible by consistently introducing the interpretation of the VAF frequency spectrum as a global density of states in fluids, generalizing a solid-state concept, and by giving to specific spectral components, obtained through the VAF exponential expansion, the corresponding meaning of partial densities of states relative to specific dynamical processes. The clear identification of a high-frequency oscillation of the VAF with the near-top excitation frequency in the dispersion curve of acoustic waves is a neat example of the power of the method. As for the transverse mode contribution, its analysis turns out to be particularly important, because the multiexponential expansion reveals a transition marking the onset of propagating excitations when the density is increased beyond a threshold value. While this finding agrees with the recent literature debating the issue of dynamical crossover boundaries, such as the one identified with the Frenkel line, we can add detailed information on the modes involved in this specific process in the domains of both time and frequency. This will help obtain a still missing full account of transverse dynamics, in both its nonpropagating and propagating aspects which are linked through dynamical transitions depending on both the thermodynamic states and

  17. Density of states and dynamical crossover in a dense fluid revealed by exponential mode analysis of the velocity autocorrelation function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellissima, S.; Neumann, M.; Guarini, E.; Bafile, U.; Barocchi, F.

    2017-01-01

    Extending a preceding study of the velocity autocorrelation function (VAF) in a simulated Lennard-Jones fluid [Phys. Rev. E 92, 042166 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevE.92.042166] to cover higher-density and lower-temperature states, we show that the recently demonstrated multiexponential expansion method allows for a full account and understanding of the basic dynamical processes encompassed by a fundamental quantity as the VAF. In particular, besides obtaining evidence of a persisting long-time tail, we assign specific and unambiguous physical meanings to groups of exponential modes related to the longitudinal and transverse collective dynamics, respectively. We have made this possible by consistently introducing the interpretation of the VAF frequency spectrum as a global density of states in fluids, generalizing a solid-state concept, and by giving to specific spectral components, obtained through the VAF exponential expansion, the corresponding meaning of partial densities of states relative to specific dynamical processes. The clear identification of a high-frequency oscillation of the VAF with the near-top excitation frequency in the dispersion curve of acoustic waves is a neat example of the power of the method. As for the transverse mode contribution, its analysis turns out to be particularly important, because the multiexponential expansion reveals a transition marking the onset of propagating excitations when the density is increased beyond a threshold value. While this finding agrees with the recent literature debating the issue of dynamical crossover boundaries, such as the one identified with the Frenkel line, we can add detailed information on the modes involved in this specific process in the domains of both time and frequency. This will help obtain a still missing full account of transverse dynamics, in both its nonpropagating and propagating aspects which are linked through dynamical transitions depending on both the thermodynamic states and the excitation

  18. Processing of acoustic signals via wavelet & Choi - Williams analysis in three-point bending load of carbon/epoxy and glass/epoxy composites.

    PubMed

    Beheshtizadeh, Nima; Mostafapour, Amir

    2017-04-05

    In this article, acoustic emission method was used for monitoring of flexural loading of GFRP (Glass fiber/epoxy composite) and CFRP (Carbon fiber/epoxy composite) via one acoustical sensor. In order to signal processing, various methods were employed such as wavelet transform, Short time Fourier transform, Choi - Williams transform and etc. Using two signal processing methods, wavelet transform and Choi - Williams transform, for monitoring of GFRP and CFRP specimens, determines strengths and weaknesses of each method and appointed the best analysis for signal processing of three point bending load of this type of composites. Based on information obtained from comparing of CFRP and GFRP, it is resulted that, the ratio of elastic modules and maximum load bearing of CFRP to GFRP is 1.36 and 3.25 respectively. Moreover, based on comparing of two analysis method results, Wavelet analysis was appointed better signal processing method for this type of load and material.

  19. Frequency-Dependent Spherical-Wave Reflection in Acoustic Media: Analysis and Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingnan; Wang, Shangxu; Wang, Jingbo; Dong, Chunhui; Yuan, Sanyi

    2017-02-01

    Spherical-wave reflectivity (SWR), which describes the seismic wave reflection in real subsurface media more accurately than plane-wave reflectivity (PWR), recently, again attracts geophysicists' attention. The recent studies mainly focus on the amplitude variation with offset/angle (AVO/AVA) attributes of SWR. For a full understanding of the reflection mechanism of spherical wave, this paper systematically investigates the frequency-dependent characteristics of SWR in a two-layer acoustic medium model with a planar interface. Two methods are used to obtain SWR. The first method is through the calculation of classical Sommerfeld integral. The other is by 3D wave equation numerical modeling. To enhance computation efficiency, we propose to perform wave equation simulation in cylindrical coordinates, wherein we for the first time implement unsplit convolutional perfectly matched layer as the absorbing boundary. Both methods yield the same results, which demonstrate the validity and accuracy of the computation. From both the numerical tests and the theoretical demonstration, we find that the necessary condition when frequency dependence of SWR occurs is that the upper and lower media have different velocities. At the precritical small angle, the SWR exhibits complicated frequency-dependent characteristics for varying medium parameters. Especially when the impedance of upper medium equals that of lower one, the PWR is zero according to geometric seismics. Whereas the SWR is nonzero: the magnitude of SWR decreases with growing frequency, and approaches that of the corresponding PWR at high frequency; the phase of SWR increases with growing frequency, but approaches 90° or -90° at high frequency. At near- and post-critical angles, large difference exists between SWR and PWR, and the difference is particularly great at low frequencies. Finally, we propose a nonlinear inversion method to estimate physical parameters and interface depth of media by utilizing the frequency

  20. Development of the mathematical model for design and verification of acoustic modal analysis methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siner, Alexander; Startseva, Maria

    2016-10-01

    To reduce the turbofan noise it is necessary to develop methods for the analysis of the sound field generated by the blade machinery called modal analysis. Because modal analysis methods are very difficult and their testing on the full scale measurements are very expensive and tedious it is necessary to construct some mathematical models allowing to test modal analysis algorithms fast and cheap. At this work the model allowing to set single modes at the channel and to analyze generated sound field is presented. Modal analysis of the sound generated by the ring array of point sound sources is made. Comparison of experimental and numerical modal analysis results is presented at this work.