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Sample records for acoustic bubble spectrometer

  1. Acoustic bubble removal method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Elleman, D. D.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for removing bubbles from a liquid bath such as a bath of molten glass to be used for optical elements. Larger bubbles are first removed by applying acoustic energy resonant to a bath dimension to drive the larger bubbles toward a pressure well where the bubbles can coalesce and then be more easily removed. Thereafter, submillimeter bubbles are removed by applying acoustic energy of frequencies resonant to the small bubbles to oscillate them and thereby stir liquid immediately about the bubbles to facilitate their breakup and absorption into the liquid.

  2. Micro Bubble Trapping By Acoustic Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshiki, Yamakoshi

    2005-03-01

    Micro bubble trapping by acoustic energy is a promising technology for a future drug or gene delivery system, because the method can control the bubble dynamics using an applied ultrasonic wave. In this paper, acoustic radiation forces which are applied to the micro bubbles are reviewed as well as their applications for micro bubble manipulation. One of the problems in micro bubble trapping by acoustic energy is that the force applied to the micro bubbles is insufficient for some bubbles. This is severe problem when the bubble has a relatively hard shell. In order to increase the trapping force on the micro bubbles, a novel method is proposed. This method uses seed bubbles in order to manipulate target bubbles.

  3. Acoustically-tuned optical spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sklar, E.

    1981-01-01

    Lens arrangement corrects for aberrations and gives resolution of 0.7 seconds of arc. In spectrometer, light from telescope is relayed by doublet lens to acoustically tuned optical filter. Selected wavelengths are relayed by triplet lens to charge coupled device camera. Intervening cylindrical lens, tilted at 12 degree angle, corrects for astigmatism and coma introduced by two element birefringent crystal in filter.

  4. The Minnaert Bubble: An Acoustic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devaud, Martin; Hocquet, Thierry; Bacri, Jean-Claude; Leroy, Valentin

    2008-01-01

    We propose an "ab initio" introduction to the well-known Minnaert pulsating bubble at graduate level. After a brief recall of the standard stuff, we begin with a detailed discussion of the radial movements of an air bubble in water. This discussion is managed from an acoustic point of view, and using the Lagrangian rather than the Eulerian…

  5. Acoustic Behavior of Vapor Bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosperetti, Andrea; Oguz, Hasan N.

    1996-01-01

    In a microgravity environment vapor bubbles generated at a boiling surface tend to remain near it for a long time. This affects the boiling heat transfer and in particular promotes an early transition to the highly inefficient film boiling regime. This paper describes the physical basis underlying attempts to remove the bubbles by means of pressure radiation forces.

  6. Acoustic Scattering from Compact Bubble Clouds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindall, Jeffrey Alan

    In this study, a simple model describing the low -frequency scattering properties of high void fraction bubble clouds in both the free field and near the ocean surface is developed. This model, which is based on an effective medium approximation and acoustically compact scatters, successfully predicts the results of the bubble cloud scattering experiment carried out at Lake Seneca in New York state for frequencies consistent with the model assumptions (Roy et al., 1992). The introduction of the surface is facilitated by the method of images and is subject to the same constraint of low-acoustic frequency imposed by the compact scatterer assumption. This model is not intended to serve as an exact replicate of oceanic bubble cloud scattering. The model herein was kept simple by design, for only then can the complex physical behavior be expressed in a simple analytical form. Simple, analytic theories facilitate the exploration of parameter space, and more importantly serve to illuminate the underlying physics.

  7. Enhancing acoustic cavitation using artificial crevice bubbles.

    PubMed

    Zijlstra, Aaldert; Fernandez Rivas, David; Gardeniers, Han J G E; Versluis, Michel; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-02-01

    We study the response of pre-defined cavitation nuclei driven continuously in the kHz regime (80, 100 and 200 kHz). The nuclei consist of stabilized gaspockets in cylindrical pits of 30 μm diameter etched in silicon or glass substrates. It is found that above an acoustic pressure threshold the dynamics of the liquid-gas meniscus switches from a stable drum-like vibration to expansion and deformation, frequently resulting in detachment of microbubbles. Just above this threshold small bubbles are continuously and intermittently ejected. At elevated input powers bubble detachment becomes more frequent and cavitation bubble clouds are formed and remain in the vicinity of the pit bubble. Surprisingly, the resulting loss of gas does not lead to deactivation of the pit which can be explained by a rectified gas diffusion process.

  8. Nonlinear Bubble Interactions in Acoustic Pressure Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbat, Tiberiu; Ashgriz, Nasser; Liu, Ching-Shi

    1996-01-01

    The systems consisting of a two-phase mixture, as clouds of bubbles or drops, have shown many common features in their responses to different external force fields. One of particular interest is the effect of an unsteady pressure field applied to these systems, case in which the coupling of the vibrations induced in two neighboring components (two drops or two bubbles) may result in an interaction force between them. This behavior was explained by Bjerknes by postulating that every body that is moving in an accelerating fluid is subjected to a 'kinetic buoyancy' equal with the product of the acceleration of the fluid multiplied by the mass of the fluid displaced by the body. The external sound wave applied to a system of drops/bubbles triggers secondary sound waves from each component of the system. These secondary pressure fields integrated over the surface of the neighboring drop/bubble may result in a force additional to the effect of the primary sound wave on each component of the system. In certain conditions, the magnitude of these secondary forces may result in significant changes in the dynamics of each component, thus in the behavior of the entire system. In a system containing bubbles, the sound wave radiated by one bubble at the location of a neighboring one is dominated by the volume oscillation mode and its effects can be important for a large range of frequencies. The interaction forces in a system consisting of drops are much smaller than those consisting of bubbles. Therefore, as a first step towards the understanding of the drop-drop interaction subject to external pressure fluctuations, it is more convenient to study the bubble interactions. This paper presents experimental results and theoretical predictions concerning the interaction and the motion of two levitated air bubbles in water in the presence of an acoustic field at high frequencies (22-23 KHz).

  9. Robust Acoustic Transducers for Bubble Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    The PICO collaboration utilizes bubble chambers filled with various superheated liquids as targets for dark matter. Acoustic sensors have proved able to distinguish nuclear recoils from radioactive background on an event-by-event basis. We have recently produced a more robust transducer which should be able to operate for years, rather than months, in the challenging environment of a heated high pressure hydraulic fluid outside these chambers. Indiana University South Bend.

  10. Measurement of Bubble Size Distribution Based on Acoustic Propagation in Bubbly Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiongjun; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung; Choi, Jin-Keun; Chahine, Georges

    2013-03-01

    Acoustic properties are strongly affected by bubble size distribution in a bubbly medium. Measurement of the acoustic transmission becomes increasingly difficulty as the void fraction of the bubbly medium increases due to strong attenuation, while acoustic reflection can be measured more easily with increasing void fraction. The ABS ACOUSTIC BUBBLE SPECTROMETER®\\copyright, an instrument for bubble size measurement that is under development tries to take full advantage of the properties of acoustic propagation in bubbly media to extract bubble size distribution. Properties of both acoustic transmission and reflection in the bubbly medium from a range of short single-frequency bursts of acoustic waves at different frequencies are measured in an effort to deduce the bubble size distribution. With the combination of both acoustic transmission and reflection, assisted with validations from photography, the ABS ACOUSTIC BUBBLE SPECTROMETER®\\copyright has the potential to measure bubble size distributions in a wider void fraction range. This work was sponsored by Department of Energy SBIR program

  11. Probing Cell Deformability via Acoustically Actuated Bubbles.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yuliang; Nama, Nitesh; Li, Peng; Mao, Zhangming; Huang, Po-Hsun; Zhao, Chenglong; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-02-17

    An acoustically actuated, bubble-based technique is developed to investigate the deformability of cells suspended in microfluidic devices. A microsized bubble is generated by an optothermal effect near the targeted cells, which are suspended in a microfluidic chamber. Subsequently, acoustic actuation is employed to create localized acoustic streaming. In turn, the streaming flow results in hydrodynamic forces that deform the cells in situ. The deformability of the cells is indicative of their mechanical properties. The method in this study measures mechanical biomarkers from multiple cells in a single experiment, and it can be conveniently integrated with other bioanalysis and drug-screening platforms. Using this technique, the mean deformability of tens of HeLa, HEK, and HUVEC cells is measured to distinguish their mechanical properties. HeLa cells are deformed upon treatment with Cytochalasin. The technique also reveals the deformability of each subpopulation in a mixed, heterogeneous cell sample by the use of both fluorescent markers and mechanical biomarkers. The technique in this study, apart from being relevant to cell biology, will also enable biophysical cellular diagnosis. PMID:26715211

  12. Probing Cell Deformability via Acoustically Actuated Bubbles.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yuliang; Nama, Nitesh; Li, Peng; Mao, Zhangming; Huang, Po-Hsun; Zhao, Chenglong; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-02-17

    An acoustically actuated, bubble-based technique is developed to investigate the deformability of cells suspended in microfluidic devices. A microsized bubble is generated by an optothermal effect near the targeted cells, which are suspended in a microfluidic chamber. Subsequently, acoustic actuation is employed to create localized acoustic streaming. In turn, the streaming flow results in hydrodynamic forces that deform the cells in situ. The deformability of the cells is indicative of their mechanical properties. The method in this study measures mechanical biomarkers from multiple cells in a single experiment, and it can be conveniently integrated with other bioanalysis and drug-screening platforms. Using this technique, the mean deformability of tens of HeLa, HEK, and HUVEC cells is measured to distinguish their mechanical properties. HeLa cells are deformed upon treatment with Cytochalasin. The technique also reveals the deformability of each subpopulation in a mixed, heterogeneous cell sample by the use of both fluorescent markers and mechanical biomarkers. The technique in this study, apart from being relevant to cell biology, will also enable biophysical cellular diagnosis.

  13. LLNL`s acoustic spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, J.

    1997-03-17

    This paper describes the development of a frequency sensitive acoustic transducer that operates in the 10 Hz to 10 kHz regime. This device uses modem silicon microfabrication techniques to form mechanical tines that resonate at specified frequencies. This high-sensitivity device is intended for low-power battery powered applications.

  14. The acoustic emissions of cavitation bubbles in stretched vortices.

    PubMed

    Chang, Natasha A; Ceccio, Steven L

    2011-11-01

    Pairs of unequal strength, counter-rotating vortices were produced in order to examine the inception, dynamics, and acoustic emission of cavitation bubbles in rapidly stretching vortices. The acoustic signatures of these cavitation bubbles were characterized during their inception, growth, and collapse. Growing and collapsing bubbles often produced a sharp, broadband, pop sound. The spectrum of these bubbles, and the peak resonant frequency can generally be related to quiescent flow bubble dynamics and corresponding resonant frequencies. However, some elongated cavitation bubbles produced a short tonal burst, or chirp, with frequencies on the order of a few kilohertz. Theses frequencies are too low to be related to resonant frequencies of a bubble in a quiescent flow. Instead, the frequency content of the acoustic signal during bubble inception and growth is related to the volumetric oscillations of the bubble while it interacted with vortical flow that surrounds the bubble (i.e., the resonant frequency of the vortex-bubble system). A relationship was determined between the observed peak frequency of the oscillations, the highly stretched vortex properties, and the water nuclei content. It was found that different cavitation spectra could relate to different flow and fluid properties and therefore would not scale in the same manner.

  15. Orbital motions of bubbles in an acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirota, Minori; Yamashita, Ko; Inamura, Takao

    2012-09-01

    This experimental study aims to clarify the mechanism of orbital motion of two oscillating bubbles in an acoustic field. Trajectory of the orbital motion on the wall of a spherical levitator was observed using a high-speed video camera. Because of a good repeatability in volume oscillation of bubbles, we were also able to observe the radial motion driven at 24 kHz by stroboscopic like imaging technique. The orbital motions of bubbles raging from 0.13 to 0.18 mm were examined with different forcing amplitude and in different viscous oils. As a result, we found that pairs of bubbles revolve along an elliptic orbit around the center of mass of the bubbles. We also found that the two bubbles perform anti-phase radial oscillation. Although this radial oscillation should result in a repulsive secondary Bjerknes force, the bubbles kept a constant separate distance of about 1 mm, which indicates the existence of centripetal primary Bjerknes force.

  16. Influence of acoustic pressure and bubble sizes on the coalescence of two contacting bubbles in an acoustic field.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Junjie; He, Yong; Yasui, Kyuichi; Kentish, Sandra E; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian; Manasseh, Richard; Lee, Judy

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the coalescence time between two contacting sub-resonance size bubbles was measured experimentally under an acoustic pressure ranging from 10kPa to 120kPa, driven at a frequency of 22.4kHz. The coalescence time obtained under sonication was much longer compared to that calculated by the film drainage theory for a free bubble surface without surfactants. It was found that under the influence of an acoustic field, the coalescence time could be probabilistic in nature, exhibiting upper and lower limits of coalescence times which are prolonged when both the maximum surface approach velocity and secondary Bjerknes force increases. The size of the two contacting bubbles is also important. For a given acoustic pressure, bubbles having a larger average size and size difference were observed to exhibit longer coalescence times. This could be caused by the phase difference between the volume oscillations of the two bubbles, which in turn affects the minimum film thickness reached between the bubbles and the film drainage time. These results will have important implications for developing film drainage theory to account for the effect of bubble translational and volumetric oscillations, bubble surface fluctuations and microstreaming.

  17. An acoustical bubble counter for superheated drop detectors.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Chris; Montvila, Darius; Flynn, David; Brennan, Christopher; d'Errico, Francesco

    2006-01-01

    A new bubble counter has been developed based on the well-established approach of detecting vaporization events acoustically in superheated drop detectors (SDDs). This counter is called the Framework Scientific ABC 1260, and it represents a major improvement over prior versions of this technology. By utilizing advanced acoustic pattern recognition software, the bubble formation event can be differentiated from ambient background noise, as well as from other acoustic signatures. Additional structural design enhancements include a relocation of the electronic components to the bottom of the device; thus allowing for greater stability, easier access to vial SDDs without exposure to system electronics. Upgrades in the electronics permit an increase in the speed of bubble detection by almost 50%, compared with earlier versions of the counters. By positioning the vial on top of the device, temperature and sound insulation can be accommodated for extreme environments. Lead shells can also be utilized for an enhanced response to high-energy neutrons. PMID:16891351

  18. The acoustic signature of bubbles fragmenting in sheared flow.

    PubMed

    Deane, Grant B; Stokes, M Dale

    2006-12-01

    Measurements of the sound of bubbles fragmenting in fluid shear are presented and analyzed. The frequency, amplitude, and decay rate of the acoustic emissions from 1.8-mm-radius bubbles fragmenting between opposed fluid jets have been determined. A broad band of frequencies (1.8 to 30 kHz) is observed with peak pressure amplitudes in the range of 0.03 to 2 Pa. While the peak pressure amplitudes show no significant scaling with frequency, the frequency dependence of the decay rates is consistent with the sum of thermal and acoustic radiation losses.

  19. Bubble-induced acoustic mixing in a microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huaying; Petkovic-Duran, Karolina; Best, Michael; Zhu, Yonggang

    2015-12-01

    Homogeneous and fast mixing of samples at microscale is a critical requirement for successful applications of microfluidics in biochemical analysis, chemical synthesis, drug delivery and nanomaterial synthesis. This paper reports the optimisation of bubble-induced mixing in a microfluidic device in terms of voltage, driving frequency, piezo transducer position and PDMS thickness. The microfluidic device consists of a microwell (with the diameter of 1mm and volume of ~95 nL) with two rectangular bubble traps (400×400μm) on both sides of the well. After the injection of liquid, air bubbles were spontaneously trapped in two rectangular traps. When the frequency of a piezo was equal to the resonance frequency of air bubbles, strong liquid recirculation formed (so called acoustic microstreaming) in the vicinity of the interface of air bubbles and water. The acoustic induced flow of microbeads and mixing of water and fluorescence dye were imaged to study the mixing efficiency. For a given voltage and PDMS thickness, when the piezo was placed on top of the well, the mixing was most vigorous. For a given frequency, the mixing efficiency was directly proportional to the voltage (4-20V) and inversely proportional to the PDMS thickness (0.3-2mm). When the frequency driving the piezo was approaching the resonance frequency of air bubbles, the mixing efficiency was maximal, while when it was far away from the resonance frequency of air bubbles, the mixing efficiency was much lower. This work provides guidance to the design and the application of bubble-induced acoustic mixing in microfluidics.

  20. Acoustic Sensor Design for Dark Matter Bubble Chamber Detectors.

    PubMed

    Felis, Ivan; Martínez-Mora, Juan Antonio; Ardid, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Dark matter bubble chamber detectors use piezoelectric sensors in order to detect and discriminate the acoustic signals emitted by the bubbles grown within the superheated fluid from a nuclear recoil produced by a particle interaction. These sensors are attached to the outside walls of the vessel containing the fluid. The acoustic discrimination depends strongly on the properties of the sensor attached to the outer wall of the vessel that has to meet the requirements of radiopurity and size. With the aim of optimizing the sensor system, a test bench for the characterization of the sensors has been developed. The sensor response for different piezoelectric materials, geometries, matching layers, and backing layers have been measured and contrasted with FEM simulations and analytical models. The results of these studies lead us to have a design criterion for the construction of specific sensors for the next generation of dark matter bubble chamber detectors (250 L). PMID:27294937

  1. Acoustic Sensor Design for Dark Matter Bubble Chamber Detectors.

    PubMed

    Felis, Ivan; Martínez-Mora, Juan Antonio; Ardid, Miguel

    2016-06-10

    Dark matter bubble chamber detectors use piezoelectric sensors in order to detect and discriminate the acoustic signals emitted by the bubbles grown within the superheated fluid from a nuclear recoil produced by a particle interaction. These sensors are attached to the outside walls of the vessel containing the fluid. The acoustic discrimination depends strongly on the properties of the sensor attached to the outer wall of the vessel that has to meet the requirements of radiopurity and size. With the aim of optimizing the sensor system, a test bench for the characterization of the sensors has been developed. The sensor response for different piezoelectric materials, geometries, matching layers, and backing layers have been measured and contrasted with FEM simulations and analytical models. The results of these studies lead us to have a design criterion for the construction of specific sensors for the next generation of dark matter bubble chamber detectors (250 L).

  2. Acoustic Sensor Design for Dark Matter Bubble Chamber Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Felis, Ivan; Martínez-Mora, Juan Antonio; Ardid, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Dark matter bubble chamber detectors use piezoelectric sensors in order to detect and discriminate the acoustic signals emitted by the bubbles grown within the superheated fluid from a nuclear recoil produced by a particle interaction. These sensors are attached to the outside walls of the vessel containing the fluid. The acoustic discrimination depends strongly on the properties of the sensor attached to the outer wall of the vessel that has to meet the requirements of radiopurity and size. With the aim of optimizing the sensor system, a test bench for the characterization of the sensors has been developed. The sensor response for different piezoelectric materials, geometries, matching layers, and backing layers have been measured and contrasted with FEM simulations and analytical models. The results of these studies lead us to have a design criterion for the construction of specific sensors for the next generation of dark matter bubble chamber detectors (250 L). PMID:27294937

  3. Electromagnetically actuated micromanipulator using an acoustically oscillating bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, J. O.; Yang, J. S.; Lee, S. J.; Rhee, K.; Chung, S. K.

    2011-11-01

    A novel non-invasive micromanipulation technique has been developed where a microrobot swimming in an aqueous medium manipulates micro-objects, through electromagnetic actuation using an acoustically oscillating bubble attached to the microrobot as a grasping tool. This micromanipulation concept was experimentally verified; an investigation of electromagnetic actuation and acoustic excitation was also performed. Two-dimensional propulsion of a magnetic piece was demonstrated through electromagnetic actuation, using three pairs of electric coils surrounding the water chamber, and confirming that the propulsion speed of the magnetic piece was linearly proportional to the applied current intensity. Micro-object manipulation was separately demonstrated using an air bubble with glass beads (80 µm diameter) and a steel ball (800 µm diameter) in an aqueous medium. Upon acoustic excitation of the bubble by a piezo-actuator around its resonant frequency, the generated radiation force attracted and captured the neighboring glass beads and steel ball. The grasping force was indirectly measured by exposing the glass beads captured by the oscillating bubble to a stream generated by an auto-syringe pump in a mini-channel. By measuring the maximum speed of the streaming flow when the glass beads detached from the oscillating bubble and flowed downstream, the grasping force was calculated as 50 nN, based on Stokes' drag approximation. Finally, a fish egg was successfully manipulated with the integration of electromagnetic actuation and acoustic excitation, using a mini-robot consisting of a millimeter-sized magnetic piece with a bubble attached to its bottom. This novel micromanipulation may be an efficient tool for both micro device assembly and single-cell manipulation.

  4. Acoustical scattering cross section of gas bubbles under dual-frequency acoustic excitation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuning; Li, Shengcai

    2015-09-01

    The acoustical scattering cross section is a paramount parameter determining the scattering ability of cavitation bubbles when they are excited by the incident acoustic waves. This parameter is strongly related with many important applications of acoustic cavitation including facilitating the reaction of chemical process, boosting bubble sonoluminescence, and performing non-invasive therapy and drug delivery. In present paper, both the analytical and numerical solutions of acoustical scattering cross section of gas bubbles under dual-frequency excitation are obtained. The validity of the analytical solution is shown with demonstrating examples. The nonlinear characteristics (e.g., harmonics, subharmonics and ultraharmonics) of the scattering cross section curve under dual-frequency approach are investigated. Compared with single-frequency approach, the dual-frequency approach displays more resonances termed as "combination resonances" and could promote the acoustical scattering cross section significantly within a much broader range of bubble sizes due to the generation of more resonances. The influence of several paramount parameters (e.g., acoustic pressure amplitude, power allocations between two acoustic components, and the ratio of the frequencies) in the dual-frequency system on the predictions of scattering cross section has been discussed.

  5. Influences of non-uniform pressure field outside bubbles on the propagation of acoustic waves in dilute bubbly liquids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuning; Du, Xiaoze

    2015-09-01

    Predictions of the propagation of the acoustic waves in bubbly liquids is of great importance for bubble dynamics and related applications (e.g. sonochemistry, sonochemical reactor design, biomedical engineering). In the present paper, an approach for modeling the propagation of the acoustic waves in dilute bubbly liquids is proposed through considering the non-uniform pressure field outside the bubbles. This approach is validated through comparing with available experimental data in the literature. Comparing with the previous models, our approach mainly improves the predictions of the attenuation of acoustic waves in the regions with large kR0 (k is the wave number and R0 is the equilibrium bubble radius). Stability of the oscillating bubbles under acoustic excitation are also quantitatively discussed based on the analytical solution.

  6. Comment on "Acoustical observation of bubble oscillations induced by bubble popping"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc, É.; Ollivier, F.; Antkowiak, A.; Wunenburger, R.

    2015-03-01

    We have reproduced the experiment of acoustic monitoring of spontaneous popping of single soap bubbles standing in air reported by Ding et al. [2aa Phys. Rev. E 75, 041601 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevE.75.041601]. By using a single microphone and two different signal acquisition systems recording in parallel the signal at the microphone output, among them the system used by Ding et al., we have experimentally evidenced that the acoustic precursors of bubble popping events detected by Ding et al. actually result from an acausal artifact of the signal processing performed by their acquisition system which lies outside of its prescribed working frequency range. No acoustic precursor of popping could be evidenced with the microphone used in these experiments, whose sensitivity is 1 V Pa-1 and frequency range is 500 Hz-100 kHz.

  7. Comment on "Acoustical observation of bubble oscillations induced by bubble popping".

    PubMed

    Blanc, É; Ollivier, F; Antkowiak, A; Wunenburger, R

    2015-03-01

    We have reproduced the experiment of acoustic monitoring of spontaneous popping of single soap bubbles standing in air reported by Ding et al. [2aaPhys. Rev. E 75, 041601 (2007)]. By using a single microphone and two different signal acquisition systems recording in parallel the signal at the microphone output, among them the system used by Ding et al., we have experimentally evidenced that the acoustic precursors of bubble popping events detected by Ding et al. actually result from an acausal artifact of the signal processing performed by their acquisition system which lies outside of its prescribed working frequency range. No acoustic precursor of popping could be evidenced with the microphone used in these experiments, whose sensitivity is 1VPa-1 and frequency range is 500 Hz-100 kHz. PMID:25871255

  8. Blowing Polymer Bubbles in an Acoustic Levitator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    In new manufacturing process, small gas-filled polymer shells made by injecting gas directly into acoustically levitated prepolymer drops. New process allows sufficient time for precise control of shell geometry. Applications foreseen in fabrication of deuterium/tritium-filled fusion targets and in pharmaceutical coatings. New process also useful in glass blowing and blow molding.

  9. Observation of cavitation bubbles and acoustic streaming in high intensity ultrasound fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemura, Yuuki; Sasaki, Kazuma; Minami, Kyohei; Sato, Toshio; Choi, Pak-Kon; Takeuchi, Shinichi

    2015-07-01

    We observed the behavior of acoustic cavitation by sonochemical luminescence and ultrasound B-mode imaging with ultrasound diagnostic equipment in a standing-wave ultrasound field and focused ultrasound field. Furthermore, in order to investigate the influence of acoustic streaming on acoustic cavitation bubbles, we performed flow analysis of the sound field using particle image velocimetry. We found that acoustic cavitation bubbles are stirred by circulating acoustic streaming and local vortexes occurring in the water tank of the standing-wave ultrasound exposure system. We considered that the acoustic cavitation bubbles are carried away by acoustic streaming due to the high ultrasound pressure in the focused ultrasound field.

  10. Acoustic resonance frequency locked photoacoustic spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Bomse, David S.; Silver, Joel A.

    2003-09-09

    A photoacoustic spectroscopy method and apparatus for maintaining an acoustic source frequency on a sample cell resonance frequency comprising: providing an acoustic source to the sample cell, the acoustic source having a source frequency; repeatedly and continuously sweeping the source frequency across the resonance frequency at a sweep rate; and employing an odd-harmonic of the source frequency sweep rate to maintain the source frequency sweep centered on the resonance frequency.

  11. Acoustic resonance phase locked photoacoustic spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Bomse, David S.; Silver, Joel A.

    2003-08-19

    A photoacoustic spectroscopy method and apparatus for maintaining an acoustic source frequency on a sample cell resonance frequency comprising: providing an acoustic source to the sample cell to generate a photoacoustic signal, the acoustic source having a source frequency; continuously measuring detection phase of the photoacoustic signal with respect to source frequency or a harmonic thereof; and employing the measured detection phase to provide magnitude and direction for correcting the source frequency to the resonance frequency.

  12. The Dynamics of Vapor Bubbles in Acoustic Pressure Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hao, Y.; Prosperetti, A.

    1999-01-01

    In spite of a superficial similarity with gas bubbles, the intimate coupling between dynamical and thermal processes confers to oscillating vapor bubbles some unique characteristics. This paper examines numerically the validity of some asymptotic-theory predictions such as the existence of two resonant radii and a limit size for a given sound amplitude and frequency. It is found that a small vapor bubble in a sound field of sufficient amplitude grows quickly through resonance and continues to grow thereafter at a very slow rate, seemingly indefinitely. Resonance phenomena therefore play a role for a few cycles at most, and reaching a limit size-if one exists at all-is found to require far more than several tens of thousands of cycles. It is also found that some small bubbles may grow or collapse depending on the phase of the sound field. The model accounts in detail for the thermo-fluid-mechanic processes in the vapor. In the second part of the paper, an approximate formulation valid for bubbles small with respect to the thermal penetration length in the vapor is derived and its accuracy examined, The present findings have implications for acoustically enhanced boiling heat transfer and other special applications such as boiling in microgravity.

  13. Energy analysis during acoustic bubble oscillations: relationship between bubble energy and sonochemical parameters.

    PubMed

    Merouani, Slimane; Hamdaoui, Oualid; Rezgui, Yacine; Guemini, Miloud

    2014-01-01

    In this work, energy analysis of an oscillating isolated spherical bubble in water irradiated by an ultrasonic wave has been theoretically studied for various conditions of acoustic amplitude, ultrasound frequency, static pressure and liquid temperature in order to explain the effects of these key parameters on both sonochemistry and sonoluminescence. The Keller-Miksis equation for the temporal variation of the bubble radius in compressible and viscous medium has been employed as a dynamics model. The numerical calculations showed that the rate of energy accumulation, dE/dt, increased linearly with increasing acoustic amplitude in the range of 1.5-3.0 atm and decreased sharply with increasing frequency in the range 200-1000 kHz. There exists an optimal static pressure at which the power w is highest. This optimum shifts toward a higher value as the acoustic amplitude increases. The energy of the bubble slightly increases with the increase in liquid temperature from 10 to 60 °C. The results of this study should be a helpful means to explain a variety of experimental observations conducted in the field of sonochemistry and sonoluminescence concerning the effects of operational parameters. PMID:23683796

  14. Instability of interfaces of gas bubbles in liquids under acoustic excitation with dual frequency.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuning; Du, Xiaoze; Xian, Haizhen; Wu, Yulin

    2015-03-01

    Instability of interfaces of gas bubbles in liquids under acoustic excitation with dual frequency is theoretically investigated. The critical bubble radii dividing stable and unstable regions of bubbles under dual-frequency acoustic excitation are strongly affected by the amplitudes of dual-frequency acoustic excitation rather than the frequencies of dual-frequency excitation. The limitation of the proposed model is also discussed with demonstrating examples.

  15. Effect of static pressure on acoustic energy radiated by cavitation bubbles in viscous liquids under ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Kyuichi; Towata, Atsuya; Tuziuti, Toru; Kozuka, Teruyuki; Kato, Kazumi

    2011-11-01

    The effect of static pressure on acoustic emissions including shock-wave emissions from cavitation bubbles in viscous liquids under ultrasound has been studied by numerical simulations in order to investigate the effect of static pressure on dispersion of nano-particles in liquids by ultrasound. The results of the numerical simulations for bubbles of 5 μm in equilibrium radius at 20 kHz have indicated that the optimal static pressure which maximizes the energy of acoustic waves radiated by a bubble per acoustic cycle increases as the acoustic pressure amplitude increases or the viscosity of the solution decreases. It qualitatively agrees with the experimental results by Sauter et al. [Ultrason. Sonochem. 15, 517 (2008)]. In liquids with relatively high viscosity (∼200 mPa s), a bubble collapses more violently than in pure water when the acoustic pressure amplitude is relatively large (∼20 bar). In a mixture of bubbles of different equilibrium radius (3 and 5 μm), the acoustic energy radiated by a 5 μm bubble is much larger than that by a 3 μm bubble due to the interaction with bubbles of different equilibrium radius. The acoustic energy radiated by a 5 μm bubble is substantially increased by the interaction with 3 μm bubbles.

  16. Characterization of acoustic droplet vaporization for control of bubble generation under flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Kang, Shih-Tsung; Huang, Yi-Luan; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated the manipulation of bubbles generated by acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) under clinically relevant flow conditions. Optical microscopy and high-frequency ultrasound imaging were used to observe bubbles generated by 2-MHz ultrasound pulses at different time points after the onset of ADV. The dependence of the bubble population on droplet concentration, flow velocity, fluid viscosity and acoustic parameters, including acoustic pressure, pulse duration and pulse repetition frequency, was investigated. The results indicated that post-ADV bubble growth spontaneously driven by air permeation markedly affected the bubble population after insonation. The bubbles can grow to a stable equilibrium diameter as great as twice the original diameter in 0.5-1 s, as predicted by the theoretical calculation. The growth trend is independent of flow velocity, but dependent on fluid viscosity and droplet concentration, which directly influence the rate of gas uptake by bubbles and the rate of gas exchange across the wall of the semipermeable tube containing the bubbles and, hence, the gas content of the host medium. Varying the acoustic pressure does not markedly change the formation of bubbles as long as the ADV thresholds of most droplets are reached. Varying pulse duration and pulse repetition frequency markedly reduces the number of bubbles. Lengthening pulse duration favors the production of large bubbles, but reduces the total number of bubbles. Increasing the PRF interestingly provides superior performance in bubble disruption. These results also suggest that an ADV bubble population cannot be assessed simply on the basis of initial droplet size or enhancement of imaging contrast by the bubbles. Determining the optimal acoustic parameters requires careful consideration of their impact on the bubble population produced for different application scenarios.

  17. Frequency spectrum of the noise emitted by two interacting cavitation bubbles in strong acoustic fields.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liang; Liu, Fengbing; Chen, Haosheng; Wang, Jiadao; Chen, Darong

    2012-03-01

    The dynamics and acoustic emission of two interacting cavitation bubbles exposed to strong acoustic fields with a frequency of 515 KHz are investigated numerically in this paper. After comparing the dynamics of a single bubble excited by the given pressure waves, bubbles with ambient radii of 2 and 5 μm were chosen to be studied to discuss the influence of the mutual bubble-bubble interaction on the dynamic behaviors and acoustic emission of the bubbles. The results show that, aside from the external driving pressure waves, the interaction between the bubbles imposes an extra nonlinear effect on the oscillations of the bubbles and that the dynamics of the smaller bubble could be suppressed gradually with the enhancement of this mutual interaction by decreasing the distance between the bubbles. Moreover, the improvement in the oscillation nonlinearity of the bubbles due to the change in the ambient circumstance could readily be observed from the frequency spectra of the bubbles' acoustic emission, which interprets the change by exhibiting an appropriate development of the subharmonics, the ultraharmonics, and the broadband component.

  18. Acoustically coupled gas bubbles in fluids: time-domain phenomena.

    PubMed

    Feuillade, C

    2001-06-01

    In previous work [C. Feuillade, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 98, 1178-1190 (1995)] a coupled oscillator formalism was introduced for describing collective resonances, scattering, and superresonances, of multiple gas bubbles in a fluid. Subsequently, time-domain investigations of the impulse response of coupled systems have disclosed the exact conditions which determine whether the ensemble scattering behavior should be described using: either (a), a multiple scattering; or (b), a self-consistent methodology. The determining factor is the Q of the individual scatterers, and their typical spatial separations in the medium. For highly damped or sparse systems, e.g., scattering from loose schools of swimbladder fish, or from a gassy seabed containing entrained bubbles, the multiple scatter counting approach should be applicable. For more strongly coupled systems, e.g., a dense cloud of resonating bubbles in the water column, energy exchange may be due primarily to radiative cycling rather than scattering, in which case a self-consistent approach is indicated. The result has implications for both volume and bottom scattering applications.

  19. 2-D steering and propelling of acoustic bubble-powered microswimmers.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jian; Yuan, Junqi; Cho, Sung Kwon

    2016-06-21

    This paper describes bi-directional (linear and rotational) propelling and 2-D steering of acoustic bubble-powered microswimmers that are achieved in a centimeter-scale pool (beyond chip level scale). The core structure of a microswimmer is a microtube with one end open in which a gaseous bubble is trapped. The swimmer is propelled by microstreaming flows that are generated when the trapped bubble is oscillated by an external acoustic wave. The bubble oscillation and thus propelling force are highly dependent on the frequency of the acoustic wave and the bubble length. This dependence is experimentally studied by measuring the resonance behaviors of the testing pool and bubble using a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) and by evaluating the generated streaming flows. The key idea in the present 2-D steering is to utilize this dependence. Multiple bubbles with different lengths are mounted on a single microswimmer with a variety of arrangements. By controlling the frequency of the acoustic wave, only frequency-matched bubbles can strongly oscillate and generate strong propulsion. By arranging multiple bubbles of different lengths in parallel but with their openings opposite and switching the frequency of the acoustic wave, bi-directionally linear propelling motions are successfully achieved. The propelling forces are calculated by a CFD analysis using the Ansys Fluent® package. For bi-directional rotations, a similar method but with diagonal arrangement of bubbles on a rectangular swimmer is also applied. The rotation can be easily reversed when the frequency of the acoustic wave is switched. For 2-D steering, short bubbles are aligned perpendicular to long bubbles. It is successfully demonstrated that the microswimmer navigates through a T-junction channel under full control with and without carrying a payload. During the navigation, the frequency is the main control input to select and resonate targeted bubbles. All of these operations are achieved by a single

  20. 2-D steering and propelling of acoustic bubble-powered microswimmers.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jian; Yuan, Junqi; Cho, Sung Kwon

    2016-06-21

    This paper describes bi-directional (linear and rotational) propelling and 2-D steering of acoustic bubble-powered microswimmers that are achieved in a centimeter-scale pool (beyond chip level scale). The core structure of a microswimmer is a microtube with one end open in which a gaseous bubble is trapped. The swimmer is propelled by microstreaming flows that are generated when the trapped bubble is oscillated by an external acoustic wave. The bubble oscillation and thus propelling force are highly dependent on the frequency of the acoustic wave and the bubble length. This dependence is experimentally studied by measuring the resonance behaviors of the testing pool and bubble using a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) and by evaluating the generated streaming flows. The key idea in the present 2-D steering is to utilize this dependence. Multiple bubbles with different lengths are mounted on a single microswimmer with a variety of arrangements. By controlling the frequency of the acoustic wave, only frequency-matched bubbles can strongly oscillate and generate strong propulsion. By arranging multiple bubbles of different lengths in parallel but with their openings opposite and switching the frequency of the acoustic wave, bi-directionally linear propelling motions are successfully achieved. The propelling forces are calculated by a CFD analysis using the Ansys Fluent® package. For bi-directional rotations, a similar method but with diagonal arrangement of bubbles on a rectangular swimmer is also applied. The rotation can be easily reversed when the frequency of the acoustic wave is switched. For 2-D steering, short bubbles are aligned perpendicular to long bubbles. It is successfully demonstrated that the microswimmer navigates through a T-junction channel under full control with and without carrying a payload. During the navigation, the frequency is the main control input to select and resonate targeted bubbles. All of these operations are achieved by a single

  1. Effect of an entrained air bubble on the acoustics of an ink channel.

    PubMed

    Jeurissen, Roger; de Jong, Jos; Reinten, Hans; van den Berg, Marc; Wijshoff, Herman; Versluis, Michel; Lohse, Detlef

    2008-05-01

    Piezo-driven inkjet systems are very sensitive to air entrapment. The entrapped air bubbles grow by rectified diffusion in the ink channel and finally result in nozzle failure. Experimental results on the dynamics of fully grown air bubbles are presented. It is found that the bubble counteracts the pressure buildup necessary for the droplet formation. The channel acoustics and the air bubble dynamics are modeled. For good agreement with the experimental data it is crucial to include the confined geometry into the model: The air bubble acts back on the acoustic field in the channel and thus on its own dynamics. This two-way coupling limits further bubble growth and thus determines the saturation size of the bubble.

  2. Modeling and experimental analysis of acoustic cavitation bubbles for Burst Wave Lithotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Kazuki; Colonius, Tim; Kreider, Wayne; Maxwell, Adam; Cunitz, Bryan; Bailey, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A combined modeling and experimental study of acoustic cavitation bubbles that are initiated by focused ultrasound waves is reported. Focused ultrasound waves of frequency 335 kHz and peak negative pressure 8 MPa are generated in a water tank by a piezoelectric transducer to initiate cavitation. The resulting pressure field is obtained by direct numerical simulation (DNS) and used to simulate single bubble oscillation. The characteristics of cavitation bubbles observed by high-speed photography qualitatively agree withs the simulation result. Finally, bubble clouds are captured using acoustic B-mode imaging that works in synchronization with high-speed photography. PMID:27087826

  3. Acoustic bubble: Controlled and selective micropropulsion and chemical waveform generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Daniel

    The physics governing swimming at the microscale---where viscous forces dominate over inertial---is distinctly different than that at the macroscale. Devices capable of finely controlled swimming at the microscale could enable bold ideas such as targeted drug delivery, non-invasive microsurgery, and precise materials assembly. Progress has already been made towards such artificial microswimmers using several means of actuation: chemical reactions and applied magnetic, electric or acoustic fields. However, the prevailing goal of selective actuation of a single microswimmer from within a group, the first step towards collaborative, guided action by a group of swimmers, has so far not been achieved. Here I present a new class of microswimmer that accomplishes for the first time selective actuation (Chapter 1). The swimmer design eschews the commonly-held design paradigm that microswimmers must use non-reciprocal motion to achieve propulsion; instead, the swimmer is propelled by oscillatory motion of an air bubble trapped within the swimmer's polymer body. This oscillatory motion is driven by a low-power biocompatible acoustic field to the ambient liquid, with meaningful swimmer propulsion occurring only at resonance frequencies of the bubble. This acoustically-powered microswimmer performs controllable rapid translational and rotational motion even in highly viscous liquid. By using a group of swimmers each with a different bubble size (and thus different resonance frequencies) selective actuation of a single swimmer from among the group can be readily achieved. Cellular response to chemical microenvironments depends on the spatiotemporal characteristics of the stimulus, which is central to many biological processes including gene expression, cell migration, differentiation, apoptosis, and intercellular signaling. To date, studies have been limited to digital (or step) chemical stimulation with little control over the temporal counterparts. Microfluidic approaches

  4. Experimental and theoretical studies on the movements of two bubbles in an acoustic standing wave field.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Junjie; He, Yong; Leong, Thomas; Kentish, Sandra E; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian; Manasseh, Richard; Lee, Judy

    2013-10-17

    When subjected to an ultrasonic standing-wave field, cavitation bubbles smaller than the resonance size migrate to the pressure antinodes. As bubbles approach the antinode, they also move toward each other and either form a cluster or coalesce. In this study, the translational trajectory of two bubbles moving toward each other in an ultrasonic standing wave at 22.4 kHz was observed using an imaging system with a high-speed video camera. This allowed the speed of the approaching bubbles to be measured for much closer distances than those reported in the prior literature. The trajectory of two approaching bubbles was modeled using coupled equations of radial and translational motions, showing similar trends with the experimental results. We also indirectly measured the secondary Bjerknes force by monitoring the acceleration when bubbles are close to each other under different acoustic pressure amplitudes. Bubbles begin to accelerate toward each other as the distance between them gets shorter, and this acceleration increases with increasing acoustic pressure. The current study provides experimental data that validates the theory on the movement of bubbles and forces acting between them in an acoustic field that will be useful in understanding bubble coalescence in an acoustic field.

  5. Bubble size distribution in acoustic droplet vaporization via dissolution using an ultrasound wide-beam method.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shanshan; Zong, Yujin; Li, Wusong; Zhang, Siyuan; Wan, Mingxi

    2014-05-01

    Performance and efficiency of numerous cavitation enhanced applications in a wide range of areas depend on the cavitation bubble size distribution. Therefore, cavitation bubble size estimation would be beneficial for biological and industrial applications that rely on cavitation. In this study, an acoustic method using a wide beam with low pressure is proposed to acquire the time intensity curve of the dissolution process for the cavitation bubble population and then determine the bubble size distribution. Dissolution of the cavitation bubbles in saline and in phase-shift nanodroplet emulsion diluted with undegassed or degassed saline was obtained to quantify the effects of pulse duration (PD) and acoustic power (AP) or peak negative pressure (PNP) of focused ultrasound on the size distribution of induced cavitation bubbles. It was found that an increase of PD will induce large bubbles while AP had only a little effect on the mean bubble size in saline. It was also recognized that longer PD and higher PNP increases the proportions of large and small bubbles, respectively, in suspensions of phase-shift nanodroplet emulsions. Moreover, degassing of the suspension tended to bring about smaller mean bubble size than the undegassed suspension. In addition, condensation of cavitation bubble produced in diluted suspension of phase-shift nanodroplet emulsion was involved in the calculation to discuss the effect of bubble condensation in the bubble size estimation in acoustic droplet vaporization. It was shown that calculation without considering the condensation might underestimate the mean bubble size and the calculation with considering the condensation might have more influence over the size distribution of small bubbles, but less effect on that of large bubbles. Without or with considering bubble condensation, the accessible minimum bubble radius was 0.4 or 1.7 μm and the step size was 0.3 μm. This acoustic technique provides an approach to estimate the size

  6. Study on the bubble transport mechanism in an acoustic standing wave field.

    PubMed

    Xi, Xiaoyu; Cegla, Frederic B; Lowe, Michael; Thiemann, Andrea; Nowak, Till; Mettin, Robert; Holsteyns, Frank; Lippert, Alexander

    2011-12-01

    The use of bubbles in applications such as surface chemistry, drug delivery, and ultrasonic cleaning etc. has been enormously popular in the past two decades. It has been recognized that acoustically-driven bubbles can be used to disturb the flow field near a boundary in order to accelerate physical or chemical reactions on the surface. The interactions between bubbles and a surface have been studied experimentally and analytically. However, most of the investigations focused on violently oscillating bubbles (also known as cavitation bubble), less attention has been given to understand the interactions between moderately oscillating bubbles and a boundary. Moreover, cavitation bubbles were normally generated in situ by a high intensity laser beam, little experimental work has been carried out to study the translational trajectory of a moderately oscillating bubble in an acoustic field and subsequent interactions with the surface. This paper describes the design of an ultrasonic test cell and explores the mechanism of bubble manipulation within the test cell. The test cell consists of a transducer, a liquid medium and a glass backing plate. The acoustic field within the multi-layered stack was designed in such a way that it was effectively one dimensional. This was then successfully simulated by a one dimensional network model. The model can accurately predict the impedance of the test cell as well as the mode shape (distribution of particle velocity and stress/pressure field) within the whole assembly. The mode shape of the stack was designed so that bubbles can be pushed from their injection point onto a backing glass plate. Bubble radial oscillation was simulated by a modified Keller-Miksis equation and bubble translational motion was derived from an equation obtained by applying Newton's second law to a bubble in a liquid medium. Results indicated that the bubble trajectory depends on the acoustic pressure amplitude and initial bubble size: an increase of

  7. Acoustic studies for alpha background rejection in dark matter bubble chamber detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bou-Cabo, M.; Felis, I.; Ardid, M.; Collaboration: COUPP Collaboration

    2013-08-08

    COUPP (Chicagoland Observatory for Underground Particle Physics) is an experiment with bubble chambers able to detect dark matter directly either with Spin-Dependent or with Spin-Independent interactions. The target material is a superheated liquid (usually CF3I) that can be bubble nucleated due to nuclear recoils produced by elastic collisions of dark matter particles. The bubble growth inside the chamber is accompanied with an acoustic signature. The acoustic technique has been successfully used to have a good alpha discrimination (about 99%). In this paper, we present different studies and results related with the characterization of the acoustic properties of the detector and the different phenomena involved in the acoustic measurements of the bubble growth, such as sound generation, sound transmission and optimization of piezoelectric transducers.

  8. Bubble-Based Acoustic Radiation Force Using Chirp Insonation to Reduce Standing Wave Effects

    PubMed Central

    Erpelding, Todd N.; Hollman, Kyle W.; O’Donnell, Matthew

    2007-01-01

    Bubble-based acoustic radiation force can measure local viscoelastic properties of tissue. High intensity acoustic waves applied to laser-generated bubbles induce displacements inversely proportional to local Young’s modulus. In certain instances, long pulse durations are desirable but are susceptible to standing wave artifacts, which corrupt displacement measurements. Chirp pulse acoustic radiation force was investigated as a method to reduce standing wave artifacts. Chirp pulses with linear frequency sweep magnitudes of 100, 200, and 300 kHz centered around 1.5 MHz were applied to glass beads within gelatin phantoms and laser-generated bubbles within porcine lenses. The ultrasound transducer was translated axially to vary standing wave conditions, while comparing displacements using chirp pulses and 1.5 MHz tone burst pulses of the same duration and peak rarefactional pressure. Results demonstrated significant reduction in standing wave effects using chirp pulses, with displacement proportional to acoustic intensity and bubble size. PMID:17306697

  9. Effects of ultrasound frequency and acoustic amplitude on the size of sonochemically active bubbles - Theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Merouani, Slimane; Hamdaoui, Oualid; Rezgui, Yacine; Guemini, Miloud

    2013-05-01

    Numerical simulation of chemical reactions inside an isolated spherical bubble of oxygen has been performed for various ambient bubble radii at different frequencies and acoustic amplitudes to study the effects of these two parameters on the range of ambient radius for an active bubble in sonochemical reactions. The employed model combines the dynamic of bubble collapse with the chemical kinetics of single cavitation bubble. Results from this model were compared with some experimental results presented in the literature and good apparent trends between them were observed. The numerical calculations of this study showed that there always exists an optimal ambient bubble radius at which the production of oxidizing species at the end of the bubble collapse attained their upper limit. It was shown that the range of ambient radius for an active bubble increased with increasing acoustic amplitude and decreased with increasing ultrasound frequency. The optimal ambient radius decreased with increasing frequency. Analysis of curves showing optimal ambient radius versus acoustic amplitude for different ultrasonic frequencies indicated that for 200 and 300kHz, the optimal ambient radius increased linearly with increasing acoustic amplitude up to 3atm. However, slight minima of optimal radius were observed for the curves obtained at 500 and 1000kHz. PMID:23187064

  10. Observations of clustering inside oceanic bubble clouds and the effect on short-range acoustic propagation.

    PubMed

    Weber, Thomas C

    2008-11-01

    It has recently been shown [Weber, T. C. et al. (2007). "Acoustic propagation through clustered bubble clouds," IEEE J. Ocean. Eng. 32, 513-523] that gas bubble clustering plays a role in determining the acoustic field characteristics of bubbly fluids. In particular, it has been shown that clustering changes the bubble-induced attenuation as well as the ping-to-ping variability in the acoustic field. The degree to which bubble clustering exists in nature, however, is unknown. This paper describes a method for quantifying bubble clustering using a high frequency (400 kHz) multibeam sonar, and reports on observations of near-surface bubble clustering during a storm (14.6 m/s wind speed) in the Gulf of Maine. The multibeam sonar data are analyzed to estimate the pair correlation function, a measure of bubble clustering. In order to account for clustering in the mean acoustic field, a modification to the effective medium wave number is made. With this modification, the multibeam sonar observations are used to predict the effect of clustering on the attenuation of the mean field for short-range propagation (1 m) at frequencies between 10 and 350 kHz. Results for this specific case show that clustering can cause the attenuation to change by 20%-80% over this frequency range.

  11. Observations of clustering inside oceanic bubble clouds and the effect on short-range acoustic propagation.

    PubMed

    Weber, Thomas C

    2008-11-01

    It has recently been shown [Weber, T. C. et al. (2007). "Acoustic propagation through clustered bubble clouds," IEEE J. Ocean. Eng. 32, 513-523] that gas bubble clustering plays a role in determining the acoustic field characteristics of bubbly fluids. In particular, it has been shown that clustering changes the bubble-induced attenuation as well as the ping-to-ping variability in the acoustic field. The degree to which bubble clustering exists in nature, however, is unknown. This paper describes a method for quantifying bubble clustering using a high frequency (400 kHz) multibeam sonar, and reports on observations of near-surface bubble clustering during a storm (14.6 m/s wind speed) in the Gulf of Maine. The multibeam sonar data are analyzed to estimate the pair correlation function, a measure of bubble clustering. In order to account for clustering in the mean acoustic field, a modification to the effective medium wave number is made. With this modification, the multibeam sonar observations are used to predict the effect of clustering on the attenuation of the mean field for short-range propagation (1 m) at frequencies between 10 and 350 kHz. Results for this specific case show that clustering can cause the attenuation to change by 20%-80% over this frequency range. PMID:19045766

  12. Condition of resonant break-up of gas bubbles by an acoustic wave in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanovskiy, V. V.; Petrov, A. G.

    2016-07-01

    The linear theory of damping of radial vibrations of a bubble in a liquid is constructed by taking into account the key dissipative mechanisms: thermal, viscous, and acoustic. The basic approximation of homobaricity made helps to obtain the results in a convenient and simple form. The results obtained for damping are used further in the description of the forced resonant oscillations of a bubble in an acoustic wave with the frequency equal to the eigenfrequency of the radial oscillation mode and twice as high as the frequency of the deformation oscillation mode (resonance 2:2:1). It is shown that the amplitude of deformation oscillations, which is reasonably large for breaking, is developed at a relatively small pressure amplitude of the exciting acoustic wave, and subharmonics arise in the acoustic-emission spectrum. The condition of bubble break-up is obtained for a fast and slow start of the acoustic wave.

  13. Numerical simulations of acoustic cavitation noise with the temporal fluctuation in the number of bubbles.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Kyuichi; Tuziuti, Toru; Lee, Judy; Kozuka, Teruyuki; Towata, Atsuya; Iida, Yasuo

    2010-02-01

    Numerical simulations of cavitation noise have been performed under the experimental conditions reported by Ashokkumar et al. (2007) [26]. The results of numerical simulations have indicated that the temporal fluctuation in the number of bubbles results in the broad-band noise. "Transient" cavitation bubbles, which disintegrate into daughter bubbles mostly in a few acoustic cycles, generate the broad-band noise as their short lifetimes cause the temporal fluctuation in the number of bubbles. Not only active bubbles in light emission (sonoluminescence) and chemical reactions but also inactive bubbles generate the broad-band noise. On the other hand, "stable" cavitation bubbles do not generate the broad-band noise. The weaker broad-band noise from a low-concentration surfactant solution compared to that from pure water observed experimentally by Ashokkumar et al. is caused by the fact that most bubbles are shape stable in a low-concentration surfactant solution due to the smaller ambient radii than those in pure water. For a relatively high number density of bubbles, the bubble-bubble interaction intensifies the broad-band noise. Harmonics in cavitation noise are generated by both "stable" and "transient" cavitation bubbles which pulsate nonlinearly with the period of ultrasound.

  14. Contributions to the acoustic excitation of bubbles released from a nozzle.

    PubMed

    Czerski, Helen; Deane, Grant B

    2010-11-01

    It has recently been demonstrated that air bubbles released from a nozzle are excited into volume mode oscillations by the collapse of the neck of air formed at the moment of bubble detachment. A pulse of sound is caused by these breathing mode oscillations, and the sound of air-entraining flows is made up of many such pulses emitted as bubbles are created. This paper is an elaboration on a JASA-EL paper, which examined the acoustical excitation of bubbles released from a nozzle. Here, further details of the collapse of a neck of air formed at the moment of bubble formation and its implications for the emission of sound by newly formed bubbles are presented. The role of fluid surface tension was studied using high-speed photography and found to be consistent with a simple model for neck collapse. A re-entrant fluid jet forms inside the bubble just after detachment, and its role in acoustic excitation is assessed. It is found that for slowly-grown bubbles the jet does make a noticeable difference to the total volume decrease during neck collapse, but that it is not a dominant effect in the overall acoustic excitation. PMID:21110560

  15. Instability of sonoluminescing bubbles under a nonspherical symmetrical acoustic-pressure perturbation.

    PubMed

    An, Yu; Lu, Tao; Yang, Bing

    2005-02-01

    The perturbation of nonspherical symmetrical acoustic pressure is added to the equation governing the spherical stability of sonoluminescing bubbles. The numerical calculations of the shape instability of sonoluminescing bubbles with the modified equation are conducted and the results are illustrated accordingly in the p(a) - R0 phase diagrams. The calculated results indicate that the stability region vanishes as the amplitude of the driving acoustic pressure p(a) arrives at the upper threshold ( approximately 1.6 atm) due to the perturbation of a small nonspherical symmetrical acoustic pressure (about a few Pa), which is in consistence with the experimental observations.

  16. A freon-filled, holographic bubble chamber as a high energy photon burst spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Dendooven, P.G.; Lerche, R.A.

    1994-04-26

    A small holographic, freon-filled bubble chamber is being built to measure the energy spectrum of high-energy photons (energy above a few 100 keV) emitted in a short burst (less than about 1 ms duration). The photon energy is calculated from the scattered electron`s energy and direction in the case of Compton scattering or from the electron and positron energies in the case of pair production. Electron and positron energies are determined from the curvature of the tracks in a magnetic field. The use of freon results in a large photon interaction probability. Holography combines good spatial resolution with large depth of field. The main concern for the holographic system is the minimization of the bubble image size, so as to maximize the number of bubbles visible in one hologram. A high energy photon burst spectrometer has several potential applications in Inertial Confinement Fusion research.

  17. A freon-filled, holographic bubble chamber as a high-energy photon burst spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Dendooven, P.G.; Lerche, R.A. )

    1995-01-01

    A small holographic, freon-filled bubble chamber is being built to measure the energy spectrum of high-energy photons (energy above a few 100 keV) emitted in a short burst (less than about 1-[mu]s duration). The photon energy is calculated from the scattered electron's energy and direction in the case of Compton scattering or from the electron and positron energies in the case of pair production. Electron and positron energies are determined from the curvature of the tracks in a magnetic field. The use of freon results in a large photon interaction probability. Holography combines good spatial resolution with large depth of field. The main concern for the holographic system is the minimization of the bubble image size, so as to maximize the number of bubbles visible in one hologram. A high-energy photon burst spectrometer has several potential applications in inertial confinement fusion research.

  18. A propane-filled bubble chamber as a time-independent gamma burst spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, J.F.; Ruiz, C.L.; Cooper, G.W.; Lerche, R.A.

    1996-12-31

    A bubble chamber to be used as a gamma burst spectrometer in Inertial Confinement Fusion research has been proposed. Freon-115 was initially chosen as the working fluid of the bubble chamber due to its larger intrinsic efficiency, low operating temperature and pressure as well as its environmentally benign nature. Initial calculations indicate poor resolution over the energy range of interest, several keV to approximately 20 MeV. Evaluation led the author to consider propane as the working fluid. The resolution ({Delta}p/p) for gamma-ray energies of 2 MeV and 20 Mev are 22.1% and 6.4%, respectively, an improvement of approximately a factor 3. To further enhance the resolution of the chamber they propose increasing the magnetic field strength from 1.5 tesla to 2.0 tesla. They present operating parameters for the propane compared with that of the freon. The simulation tool GEANT will be used to model the response of the spectrometer over the energy range of interest. They discuss the efficiency and resolution of the spectrometer using propane as an operating fluid in the bubble chamber.

  19. The behavior of acoustic bubbles in aqueous solutions containing soluble polymers.

    PubMed

    Tronson, Rohan; Tchea, Michelle F; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian; Grieser, Franz

    2012-11-26

    The effects of the water-soluble polymer polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) on the multibubble sonoluminescence (MBSL) intensity generated in aqueous solutions exposed to ultrasound at the two ultrasound frequencies of 20 and 363 kHz have been examined. In both cases, the presence of PVP, at concentrations of up to 2 g/100 mL, was found to enhance the MBSL intensity emitted from the solutions. On the basis of the intensity behavior of the SL observed from aqueous solutions containing PVP/surfactant and PVP/alcohol mixtures, it is suggested that PVP enhances MBSL by increasing the number of active bubbles in the system by hindering bubble-bubble coalescence processes and probably also by changing the structure of the bubble "clouds" formed at the acoustic antinodes in solution. The influence of PVP on bubble-bubble coalescence rates was also measured to support the interpretation of the MBSL emission experiments.

  20. Nonlinear activity of acoustically driven gas bubble near a rigid boundary

    SciTech Connect

    Maksimov, Alexey

    2015-10-28

    The presence of a boundary can produce considerable changes in the oscillation amplitude of the bubble and its scattered echo. The present study fills a gap in the literature, in that it is concerned theoretically with the bubble activity at relatively small distances from the rigid boundary. It was shown that the bi-spherical coordinates provide separation of variables and are more suitable for analysis of the dynamics of these constrained bubbles. Explicit formulas have been derived which describe the dependence of the bubble emission near a rigid wall on its size and the separation distance between the bubble and the boundary. As applications, time reversal technique for gas leakage detection and radiation forces that are induced by an acoustic wave on a constrained bubble were analyzed.

  1. Implosion of an underwater spark-generated bubble and acoustic energy evaluation using the Rayleigh model.

    PubMed

    Buogo, Silvano; Cannelli, Giovanni B

    2002-06-01

    The growth, collapse, and rebound of a vapor bubble generated by an underwater spark is studied by means of high-speed cinematography, simultaneously acquiring the emitted acoustic signature. Video recordings show that the growth and collapse phases are nearly symmetrical during the first two or three cycles, the bubble shape being approximately spherical. After 2-3 cycles the bubble behavior changes from a collapsing/rebounding regime with sound-emitting implosions to a pulsating regime with no implosions. The motion of the bubble wall during the first collapses was found to be consistent with the Rayleigh model of a cavity in an incompressible liquid, with the inclusion of a vapor pressure term at constant temperature within each bubble cycle. An estimate of the pressure inside the bubble is obtained measuring the collapse time and maximum radius, and the amount of energy converted into acoustical energy upon each implosion is deduced. The resulting value of acoustic efficiency was found to be in agreement with measurements based on the emitted acoustic pulse.

  2. Implosion of an underwater spark-generated bubble and acoustic energy evaluation using the Rayleigh model.

    PubMed

    Buogo, Silvano; Cannelli, Giovanni B

    2002-06-01

    The growth, collapse, and rebound of a vapor bubble generated by an underwater spark is studied by means of high-speed cinematography, simultaneously acquiring the emitted acoustic signature. Video recordings show that the growth and collapse phases are nearly symmetrical during the first two or three cycles, the bubble shape being approximately spherical. After 2-3 cycles the bubble behavior changes from a collapsing/rebounding regime with sound-emitting implosions to a pulsating regime with no implosions. The motion of the bubble wall during the first collapses was found to be consistent with the Rayleigh model of a cavity in an incompressible liquid, with the inclusion of a vapor pressure term at constant temperature within each bubble cycle. An estimate of the pressure inside the bubble is obtained measuring the collapse time and maximum radius, and the amount of energy converted into acoustical energy upon each implosion is deduced. The resulting value of acoustic efficiency was found to be in agreement with measurements based on the emitted acoustic pulse. PMID:12083190

  3. Theoretical estimation of the temperature and pressure within collapsing acoustical bubbles.

    PubMed

    Merouani, Slimane; Hamdaoui, Oualid; Rezgui, Yacine; Guemini, Miloud

    2014-01-01

    Formation of highly reactive species such as OH, H, HO2 and H2O2 due to transient collapse of cavitation bubbles is the primary mechanism of sonochemical reaction. The crucial parameters influencing the formation of radicals are the temperature and pressure achieved in the bubble during the strong collapse. Experimental determinations estimated a temperature of about 5000 K and pressure of several hundreds of MPa within the collapsing bubble. In this theoretical investigation, computer simulations of chemical reactions occurring in an O2-bubble oscillating in water irradiated by an ultrasonic wave have been performed for diverse combinations of various parameters such as ultrasound frequency (20-1000 kHz), acoustic amplitude (up to 0.3 MPa), static pressure (0.03-0.3 MPa) and liquid temperature (283-333 K). The aim of this series of computations is to correlate the production of OH radicals to the temperature and pressure achieved in the bubble during the strong collapse. The employed model combines the dynamic of bubble collapse in acoustical field with the chemical kinetics of single bubble. The results of the numerical simulations revealed that the main oxidant created in an O2 bubble is OH radical. The computer simulations clearly showed the existence of an optimum bubble temperature of about 5200±200 K and pressure of about 250±20 MPa. The predicted value of the bubble temperature for the production of OH radicals is in excellent agreement with that furnished by the experiments. The existence of an optimum bubble temperature and pressure in collapsing bubbles results from the competitions between the reactions of production and those of consumption of OH radicals at high temperatures. PMID:23769748

  4. Prediction of the acoustic and bubble fields in insonified freeze-drying vials.

    PubMed

    Louisnard, O; Cogné, C; Labouret, S; Montes-Quiroz, W; Peczalski, R; Baillon, F; Espitalier, F

    2015-09-01

    The acoustic field and the location of cavitation bubble are computed in vials used for freeze-drying, insonified from the bottom by a vibrating plate. The calculations rely on a nonlinear model of sound propagation in a cavitating liquid [Louisnard, Ultrason. Sonochem., 19, (2012) 56-65]. Both the vibration amplitude and the liquid level in the vial are parametrically varied. For low liquid levels, a threshold amplitude is required to form a cavitation zone at the bottom of the vial. For increasing vibration amplitudes, the bubble field slightly thickens but remains at the vial bottom, and the acoustic field saturates, which cannot be captured by linear acoustics. On the other hand, increasing the liquid level may promote the formation of a secondary bubble structure near the glass wall, a few centimeters below the free liquid surface. These predictions suggest that rather complex acoustic fields and bubble structures can arise even in such small volumes. As the acoustic and bubble fields govern ice nucleation during the freezing step, the final crystal's size distribution in the frozen product may crucially depend on the liquid level in the vial. PMID:25800984

  5. The penetration of acoustic cavitation bubbles into micrometer-scale cavities.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Haresh Anant; Ertunç, Özgür; Lichtenegger, Thomas; Delgado, Antonio; Skupin, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The penetration of acoustically induced cavitation bubbles in micrometer-scale cavities is investigated experimentally by means of high-speed photography and acoustic measurements. Micrometer-scale cavities of different dimensions (width=40 μm, 80 μm, 10 mm and depth=50 μm) are designed to replicate the cross section of microvias in a PCB. The aim here is to present a method for enhancing mass transfer due to the penetration of bubbles in such narrow geometries under the action of ultrasound. The micrometer-scale cavities are placed in a test-cell filled with water and subjected to an ultrasound excitation at 75 kHz. A cavitation bubble cluster is generated at the mouth of the cavity which acts as a continuous source of bubbles that penetrate into the cavity. The radial oscillation characteristics and translation of these bubbles are investigated in detail here. It is observed that the bubbles arrange themselves into streamer-like structures inside the cavity. Parameters such as bubble population and size distribution and their correlation with the phase of the incident ultrasound radiation are investigated in detail here. This provides a valuable insight into the dynamics of bubbles in narrow confined spaces. Mass transfer investigations show that fresh liquid can be continuously introduced in the cavities under the action of ultrasound. Our findings may have important consequences in optimizing the filling processes for microvias with high aspect ratios. PMID:26763751

  6. The penetration of acoustic cavitation bubbles into micrometer-scale cavities.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Haresh Anant; Ertunç, Özgür; Lichtenegger, Thomas; Delgado, Antonio; Skupin, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The penetration of acoustically induced cavitation bubbles in micrometer-scale cavities is investigated experimentally by means of high-speed photography and acoustic measurements. Micrometer-scale cavities of different dimensions (width=40 μm, 80 μm, 10 mm and depth=50 μm) are designed to replicate the cross section of microvias in a PCB. The aim here is to present a method for enhancing mass transfer due to the penetration of bubbles in such narrow geometries under the action of ultrasound. The micrometer-scale cavities are placed in a test-cell filled with water and subjected to an ultrasound excitation at 75 kHz. A cavitation bubble cluster is generated at the mouth of the cavity which acts as a continuous source of bubbles that penetrate into the cavity. The radial oscillation characteristics and translation of these bubbles are investigated in detail here. It is observed that the bubbles arrange themselves into streamer-like structures inside the cavity. Parameters such as bubble population and size distribution and their correlation with the phase of the incident ultrasound radiation are investigated in detail here. This provides a valuable insight into the dynamics of bubbles in narrow confined spaces. Mass transfer investigations show that fresh liquid can be continuously introduced in the cavities under the action of ultrasound. Our findings may have important consequences in optimizing the filling processes for microvias with high aspect ratios.

  7. Acoustic bubble sizes, coalescence, and sonochemical activity in aqueous electrolyte solutions saturated with different gases.

    PubMed

    Brotchie, Adam; Statham, Tom; Zhou, Meifang; Dharmarathne, Leena; Grieser, Franz; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2010-08-01

    Acoustic bubble sizes, coalescence behavior, and sonochemical activity have been investigated in water in the presence of various electrolyte additives (KCl, HCl, and NaNO(3)) and saturating gases-helium, air, and argon. A strong correlation was identified between the bubble radius and the dissolved gas concentration in the cavitation medium. The extent of bubble coalescence for each gas was also studied in different electrolyte solutions. A causal relationship between coalescence and bubble size was inferred. Importantly, the effects of the different electrolytes could be completely attributed to their "salting out" effect on the dissolved gas, providing valuable insight into the contentious issue of ion-specific coalescence inhibition. Extrapolation of the bubble size data to conditions where bubble coalescence is minimal, i.e., zero gas concentration and zero ultrasound exposure time, yielded a bubble radius of 1.5 +/- 0.5 microm at an acoustic frequency of 515 kHz. In addition, the effects of electrolyte concentration and gas type on sonochemical activity were investigated. Sonochemical yields were increased by up to 1 order of magnitude at high electrolyte concentrations. This has been attributed to reduced gas and vapor content in the bubble core prior to collapse and a lower clustering density.

  8. Validation of an approximate model for the thermal behavior in acoustically driven bubbles.

    PubMed

    Stricker, Laura; Prosperetti, Andrea; Lohse, Detlef

    2011-11-01

    The chemical production of radicals inside acoustically driven bubbles is determined by the local temperature inside the bubbles. Therefore, modeling of chemical reaction rates in bubbles requires an accurate evaluation of the temperature field and the heat exchange with the liquid. The aim of the present work is to compare a detailed partial differential equation model in which the temperature field is spatially resolved with an ordinary differential equation model in which the bubble contents are assumed to have a uniform average temperature and the heat exchanges are modeled by means of a boundary layer approximation. The two models show good agreement in the range of pressure amplitudes in which the bubble is spherically stable. PMID:22087996

  9. Acoustic localization in weakly compressible elastic media containing random air bubbles.

    PubMed

    Liang, Bin; Cheng, Jian-chun

    2007-01-01

    We study theoretically the propagation of longitudinal wave in weakly compressible elastic media containing random air bubbles by using a self-consistent method. By inspecting the scattering cross section of an individual bubble and estimating the mean free paths of the elastic wave propagating in the bubbly weakly compressible media, the mode conversion is numerically proved negligible as the longitudinal wave is scattered by the bubbles. On the basis of the bubble dynamic equation, the wave propagation is solved rigorously with the multiple scattering effects incorporated. In a range of frequency slightly above the bubble resonance frequency, the acoustic localization in such a class of media is theoretically identified with even a very small volume fraction of bubbles. We present a method by analyzing the spatial correlation of wave field to identify the phenomenon of localization, which turns out to be effective. The sensibility of the features of localization to the structure parameters is numerically investigated. The spatial distribution of acoustic energy is also studied and the results show that the waves are trapped within a spatial domain adjacent to the source when localization occurs.

  10. Orbital revolution of a pair of bubbles in an acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirota, Minori; Yamashita, Kou; Inamura, Takao

    2011-11-01

    This experimental study aims to clarify the mechanism of orbital motion of two oscillating bubbles in an acoustic field. Trajectory of the orbital motion was observed using a high-speed video camera. Because of a good repeatability in volume oscillation of bubbles, we were also able to observe the radial motion driven at 24 kHz by stroboscopic like imaging; the cyclic bubble oscillation was appeared to slow down by capturing images at the framing rate close to the forcing frequency. The orbital motions of bubbles raging from 0.13 to 0.18 mm were examined with different forcing amplitude and in different viscous oils. As a result, we found that pairs of bubbles revolve along a circular orbit around the center of mass of the orbiting two bubbles. We also found that the two bubbles perform anti-phase radial oscillation. Although this radial oscillation should result in a repulsive secondary Bjerknes force, the bubbles kept a constant separate distance of about 1 mm, which indicates the existence of centripetal primary Bjerknes force. The angular velocity of orbital revolution increases linearly with the increase in Bjerknes force.

  11. Tunneling effects in resonant acoustic scattering of an air bubble in unbounded water.

    PubMed

    Simão, André G; Guimarães, Luiz G

    2016-01-01

    The problem of acoustic scattering of a gaseous spherical bubble immersed within unbounded liquid surrounding is considered in this work. The theory of partial wave expansion related to this problem is revisited. A physical model based on the analogy between acoustic scattering and potential scattering in quantum mechanics is proposed to describe and interpret the acoustical natural oscillation modes of the bubble, namely, the resonances. In this context, a physical model is devised in order to describe the air water interface and the implications of the high density contrast on the various regimes of the scattering resonances. The main results are presented in terms of resonance lifetime periods and quality factors. The explicit numerical calculations are undertaken through an asymptotic analysis considering typical bubble dimensions and underwater sound wavelengths. It is shown that the resonance periods are scaled according to the Minnaert's period, which is the short lived resonance mode, called breathing mode of the bubble. As expected, resonances with longer lifetimes lead to impressive cavity quality Q-factor ranging from 1010 to 105. The present theoretical findings lead to a better understanding of the energy storage mechanism in a bubbly medium. PMID:27331803

  12. Air bubbles in water: a strongly multiple scattering medium for acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Kafesaki, M; Penciu, R S; Economou, E N

    2000-06-26

    Using a newly developed multiple scattering scheme, we calculate band structure and transmission properties for acoustic waves propagating in bubbly water. We prove that the multiple scattering effects are responsible for the creation of wide gaps in the transmission even in the presence of strong positional and size disorder.

  13. Determination of the Accommodation Coefficient Using Vapor/gas Bubble Dynamics in an Acoustic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gumerov, Nail A.; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung; Goumilevski, Alexei G.; Allen, Jeff (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Nonequilibrium liquid/vapor phase transformations can occur in superheated or subcooled liquids in fast processes such as in evaporation in a vacuum. The rate at which such a phase transformation occurs depends on the "condensation" or "accommodation" coefficient, Beta, which is a property of the interface. Existing measurement techniques for Beta are complex and expensive. The development of a relatively inexpensive and reliable technique for measurement of Beta for a wide range of substances and temperatures is of great practical importance. The dynamics of a bubble in an acoustic field strongly depends on the value of Beta. It is known that near the saturation temperature, small vapor bubbles grow under the action of an acoustic field due to "rectified heat transfer." This finding can be used as the basis for an effective measurement technique of Beta. We developed a theory of vapor bubble behavior in an isotropic acoustic wave and in a plane standing acoustic wave. A numerical code was developed which enables simulation of a variety of experimental situations and accurately takes into account slowly evolving temperature. A parametric study showed that the measurement of Beta can be made over a broad range of frequencies and bubble sizes. We found several interesting regimes and conditions which can be efficiently used for measurements of Beta. Measurements of Beta can be performed in both reduced and normal gravity environments.

  14. Quantum Analogies in the Interaction between Acoustic Waves and Bubble Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrales, Miguel A.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Javier

    2014-11-01

    Analogies between quantum mechanical and acoustical propagation phenomena have a great interest in academic research due to their ability to shed light on some complex quantum effects, which are impossible to visualize directly in the macroscopic world. In this talk, we describe a number of these analogies concerning the acoustic behavior of bubble clouds. Firstly, we show that the structure of the collective oscillation modes of a spherical bubble cloud resembles that of the atomic orbitals of a hydrogen atom. Secondly, we present an analogy between some perturbation methods used in quantum-electrodynamics and the computation of the acoustic response of the randomly distributed bubble cloud by considering the contribution to the total scattered pressure of the multiple scattering paths that take place inside the clouds. As an application of this analogy, we obtain the scattering cross-section of a diluted cloud, which remarkably mimics the quantum scattering of an neutron wave when passing through an atomic nucleus. Finally, we numerically reproduce the behavior of an electron in a covalent bond between two hydrogen atoms by simulating the acoustic wave propagation through two neighboring spherical bubble assemblages. Funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness through Grants DPI2011-28356-C03-01 and DPI2011-28356-C03-02.

  15. Enhanced and reduced transmission of acoustic waves with bubble meta-screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretagne, Alice; Tourin, Arnaud; Leroy, Valentin

    2011-11-01

    We present a class of sonic meta-screens for manipulating air-borne acoustic waves at ultrasonic or audible frequencies. Our screens consist of periodic arrangements of air bubbles in water or possibly embedded in a soft elastic matrix. They can be used for soundproofing but also for exalting transmission at an air/water interface or even to achieve enhanced absorption.

  16. A method for estimating time-dependent acoustic cross-sections of bubbles and bubble clouds prior to the steady state

    PubMed

    Clarke; Leighton

    2000-04-01

    Models for the acoustic cross-sections of gas bubbles undergoing steady-state pulsation in liquid have existed for some time. This article presents a theoretical scheme for estimating the cross-sections of single bubbles, and bubble clouds, from the start of insonation onward. In this period the presence of transients can significantly alter the cross-section from the steady-state value. The model combines numerical solutions of the Herring-Keller model with appropriate damping values to calculate the extinction cross-section of a bubble as a function of time in response to a continuous harmonic sound field (it is also shown how the model can be adapted to estimate the time-dependent scatter cross-section). The model is then extended to determine the extinction cross-section area of multiple bubbles of varying population distributions assuming no bubble-bubble interactions. The results have shown that the time taken to reach steady state is dependent on the closeness of the bubble to resonance, and on the driving pressure amplitude. In the response of the population as a whole, the time to reach steady state tends to decrease with increasing values of the driving pressure amplitude; and with the increasing values of the ratio of the numbers of bubbles having radii much larger than resonance to the number of resonant bubbles. The implications of these findings for the use of acoustic pulses are explored.

  17. Acoustic monitoring of gas emissions from the seafloor. Part I: quantifying the volumetric flow of bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblond, Isabelle; Scalabrin, Carla; Berger, Laurent

    2014-09-01

    Three decades of continuous ocean exploration have led us to identify subsurface fluid related processes as a key phenomenon in marine earth science research. The number of seep areas located on the seafloor has been constantly increasing with the use of multi-scale imagery techniques. Due to recent advances in transducer technology and computer processing, multibeam echosounders are now commonly used to detect submarine gas seeps escaping from the seafloor into the water column. A growing number of en- route surveys shows that sites of gas emissions escaping from the seafloor are much more numerous than previously thought. Estimating the temporal variability of the gas flow rate and volumes escaping from the seafloor has thus become a challenge of relevant interest which could be addressed by sea-floor continuous acoustic monitoring. Here, we investigate the feasibility of estimating the volumetric flow rates of gas emissions from horizontal backscattered acoustic signals. Different models based on the acoustic backscattering theory of bubbles are presented. The forward volume backscattering strength and the inversion volumetric flow rate solutions were validated with acoustic measurements from artificial gas flow rates generated in controlled sea-water tank experiments. A sensitivity analysis was carried out to investigate the behavior of the 120-kHz forward solution with respect to model input parameters (horizontal distance between transducer and bubble stream, bubble size distribution and ascent rate). The most sensitive parameter was found to be the distance of the bubble stream which can affect the volume backscattering strength by 20 dB within the horizontal range of 0-200 m. Results were used to derive the detection probability of a bubble stream for a given volume backscattering strength threshold according to different bubble flow rates and horizontal distance.

  18. Dynamics of soap bubble bursting and its implications to volcano acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, V.; Ripepe, M.; Divoux, T.; Legrand, D.; Géminard, J.-C.; Melo, F.

    2010-04-01

    In order to assess the physical mechanisms at stake when giant gas bubbles burst at the top of a magma conduit, laboratory experiments have been performed. An overpressurized gas cavity is initially closed by a thin liquid film, which suddenly bursts. The acoustic signal produced by the bursting is investigated. The key result is that the amplitude and energy of the acoustic signal strongly depend on the film rupture time. As the rupture time is uncontrolled in the experiments and in the field, the measurement of the acoustic excess pressure in the atmosphere, alone, cannot provide any information on the overpressure inside the bubble before explosion. This could explain the low energy partitioning between infrasound, seismic and explosive dynamics often observed on volcanoes.

  19. A method to account for acoustic microstreaming when predicting bubble growth rates produced by rectified diffusion.

    PubMed

    Church, C C

    1988-11-01

    A reinterpretation of existing theory for rectified diffusion, the process by which bubbles in a sound field may grow in radius, is presented in order to quantitate the effect of acoustic microstreaming on bubble growth rates. The 1/t term in the growth rate equation is defined as the "decay term" and t as the "decay time," the time required for the gas concentration in the liquid contacting the bubble to rise (or fall) from its initial to its final value. In the absence of microstreaming, t is the duration of sonification. In the presence of microstreaming, t may be calculated from the streaming velocity and the bubble radius. A comparison between theory and the experimental results of Eller [A. Eller, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 46, 1246-1250 (1969)] and of Gould [R.K. Gould, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 56, 1740-1746 (1974)] shows reasonable agreement in the low kHz range. Theoretical results in the frequency range of 1-10 MHz at 1 and 4 bar are also presented.

  20. Equations of spatial hydrodynamic interaction of weakly nonspherical gas bubbles in liquid in an acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davletshin, A. I.; Khalitova, T. F.

    2016-01-01

    A mathematical model of spatial hydrodynamic interaction of gas bubbles in liquid in an acoustic field taking into account small deformations of their surfaces is proposed. It is a system of ordinary differential equations of the second order in radii of the bubbles, the position vectors of their centers and the amplitudes of deviation of their shape from the spherical one in the form of spherical harmonics. The equations derived are of the first order of accuracy in A / R and of the fourth order in R / D, where R is the characteristic radius of the bubbles, A is the amplitude of characteristic deviation of their surface from the spherical one in the form of spherical harmonics, D is the characteristic distance between bubbles. The derivation of the equations is carried out by the method of spherical functions with the use of the Bernoulli integral, the kinematic and dynamic boundary conditions on the surface of the bubbles. The effects of viscosity and compressibility of the liquid are considered approximately, the gas in the bubbles is assumed homobaric.

  1. Effects of acoustic parameters on bubble cloud dynamics in ultrasound tissue erosion (histotripsy).

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhen; Hall, Timothy L; Fowlkes, J Brian; Cain, Charles A

    2007-07-01

    High intensity pulsed ultrasound can produce significant mechanical tissue fractionation with sharp boundaries ("histotripsy"). At a tissue-fluid interface, histotripsy produces clearly demarcated tissue erosion and the erosion efficiency depends on pulse parameters. Acoustic cavitation is believed to be the primary mechanism for the histotripsy process. To investigate the physical basis of the dependence of tissue erosion on pulse parameters, an optical method was used to monitor the effects of pulse parameters on the cavitating bubble cloud generated by histotripsy pulses at a tissue-water interface. The pulse parameters studied include pulse duration, peak rarefactional pressure, and pulse repetition frequency (PRF). Results show that the duration of growth and collapse (collapse cycle) of the bubble cloud increased with increasing pulse duration, peak rarefactional pressure, and PRF when the next pulse arrived after the collapse of the previous bubble cloud. When the PRF was too high such that the next pulse arrived before the collapse of the previous bubble cloud, only a portion of histotripsy pulses could effectively create and collapse the bubble cloud. The collapse cycle of the bubble cloud also increased with increasing gas concentration. These results may explain previous in vitro results on effects of pulse parameters on tissue erosion.

  2. Exploring bubble oscillation and mass transfer enhancement in acoustic-assisted liquid-liquid extraction with a microfluidic device

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuliang; Chindam, Chandraprakash; Nama, Nitesh; Yang, Shikuan; Lu, Mengqian; Zhao, Yanhui; Mai, John D.; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2015-01-01

    We investigated bubble oscillation and its induced enhancement of mass transfer in a liquid-liquid extraction process with an acoustically-driven, bubble-based microfluidic device. The oscillation of individually trapped bubbles, of known sizes, in microchannels was studied at both a fixed frequency, and over a range of frequencies. Resonant frequencies were analytically identified and were found to be in agreement with the experimental observations. The acoustic streaming induced by the bubble oscillation was identified as the cause of this enhanced extraction. Experiments extracting Rhodanmine B from an aqueous phase (DI water) to an organic phase (1-octanol) were performed to determine the relationship between extraction efficiency and applied acoustic power. The enhanced efficiency in mass transport via these acoustic-energy-assisted processes was confirmed by comparisons against a pure diffusion-based process. PMID:26223474

  3. Effect of dissolved gases in water on acoustic cavitation and bubble growth rate in 0.83 MHz megasonic of interest to wafer cleaning.

    PubMed

    Kang, Bong-Kyun; Kim, Min-Su; Park, Jin-Goo

    2014-07-01

    Changes in the cavitation intensity of gases dissolved in water, including H2, N2, and Ar, have been established in studies of acoustic bubble growth rates under ultrasonic fields. Variations in the acoustic properties of dissolved gases in water affect the cavitation intensity at a high frequency (0.83 MHz) due to changes in the rectified diffusion and bubble coalescence rate. It has been proposed that acoustic bubble growth rates rapidly increase when water contains a gas, such as hydrogen faster single bubble growth due to rectified diffusion, and a higher rate of coalescence under Bjerknes forces. The change of acoustic bubble growth rate in rectified diffusion has an effect on the damping constant and diffusivity of gas at the acoustic bubble and liquid interface. It has been suggested that the coalescence reaction of bubbles under Bjerknes forces is a reaction determined by the compressibility and density of dissolved gas in water associated with sound velocity and density in acoustic bubbles. High acoustic bubble growth rates also contribute to enhanced cavitation effects in terms of dissolved gas in water. On the other hand, when Ar gas dissolves into water under ultrasound field, cavitation behavior was reduced remarkably due to its lower acoustic bubble growth rate. It is shown that change of cavitation intensity in various dissolved gases were verified through cleaning experiments in the single type of cleaning tool such as particle removal and pattern damage based on numerically calculated acoustic bubble growth rates.

  4. Numerical simulations of the aspherical collapse of laser and acoustically generated bubbles.

    PubMed

    Tsiglifis, Kostas; Pelekasis, Nikos A

    2007-04-01

    The details of nonlinear axisymmetric oscillations and collapse of bubbles subject to large internal or external pressure disturbances, are studied via a boundary integral method. Weak viscous effects on the liquid side are accounted for by integrating the equations of motion across the boundary layer that is formed adjacent to the interface. Simulations of single-cavitation bubble luminescence (SCBL) and single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) are performed under conditions similar to reported experimental observations, aiming at capturing the details of bubble collapse. It is shown that any small initial deviation from sphericity, modeled through a small initial elongation along the axis of symmetry, may result in the formation and impact of two counter-propagating jets during collapse of the bubble, provided the amplitude of the initial disturbance is large enough and the viscosity of the surrounding fluid is small enough. Comparison between simulations and experimental observations show that this is the case for bubbles induced via a nano-second laser pulse (SCBL) during a luminescence event. In a similar fashion, simulations show that loss of sphericity accompanied with jet formation and impact during collapse is also possible with acoustically trapped bubbles in a standing pressure wave (SBSL), due to the many afterbounces of the bubble during its collapse phase. In both cases jet impact occurs as a result of P(2) growth in the form of an afterbounce instability. When the sound amplitude is decreased or liquid viscosity is increased the intensity of the afterbounce is decreased and jet impact is suppressed. When the sound amplitude is increased jet formation is superceded by Rayleigh-Taylor instability. In the same context stable luminescence is quenched in experimental observations. In both SCBL and SBSL simulations the severity of jet impact during collapse is quite large, and its local nature quite distinct. This attests to the fact that it is an energy

  5. Passive acoustic derived bubble flux and applications to natural gas seepage in the Mackenzie Delta, NWT, Canada and Coal Oil Point, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culling, D.; Leifer, I.; Dallimore, S.; Alcala, K.

    2012-12-01

    Methane is a prominent greenhouse gas that escapes naturally from thermogenic reservoirs as seepage from marine and lacustrine biogenic sources as bubble ebullition. Geologic methane emissions are critically important contributors to the global methane budget however, few quantitative flux measurements are available for shallow waters. This gap in knowledge is critical as in these settings gas can easily transit as bubbles through the water column and directly influence global atmospheric budgets. Video and active acoustic (sonar) measurements of bubble flux have spatial limitations requiring predictable bubble emission location. Passive acoustics are less affected by these limitations, in addition, they can provide data in water too shallow for effective sonar bubble observations. Lab tests were undertaken to quantify the acoustic signature of bubbles formed in non-cohesive sediments. specifically focusing on mechanisms that complicate interpretation of acoustic data. Lab tests then were compared to field data to provide measurement calibration/validation. The principles behind the acoustic analysis method are based on the Minnaert equation, which relates a bubble radius and acoustic frequency. Bubble size and the resultant acoustic frequency from known flows and capillary tube diameters are well documented; however changing sediment pathways adds to the complexity of bubble formation and the resultant bubble acoustic signal. These complex signals were investigated in a lab tank with a thick, cohesive fine-grained sediment bed, through which bubbles produced by a syringe pump migrated to the sediment-water interface. Then, the resultant bubbles were diverted into clear water and measured from high speed, high definition video, while the acoustic signature of bubble formation was recorded concurrently by a hydrophone. Bubble formation is influenced by currents, which shifts the acoustical signal towards a higher frequency with a more complex pattern than the

  6. Acoustic waves of different geometry in polydisperse bubble liquids: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigmatulin, R. I.; Gubaidullin, D. A.; Fedorov, Yu. V.

    2013-06-01

    A mathematical model that determines the propagation of acoustic waves of different geometry in two-fraction mixtures of liquids with polydispersed gas bubbles of various compositions is presented. A unique dispersion relationship, which takes into account the propagation of the plane, spherical, and cylindrical perturbations in these mixtures, is derived. It is shown that the theoretical curves of the phase velocity and the damping factor agree well with the experimental data involving the resonant frequency range.

  7. An experimental study on resonance of oscillating air/vapor bubbles in water using a two-frequency acoustic apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohsaka, K.

    2003-05-01

    A two-frequency acoustic apparatus is employed to study the growth behavior of vapor-saturated bubbles driven in a volumetric mode. A unique feature of the apparatus is its capability of trapping a bubble by an ultrasonic standing wave while independently driving it into oscillations by a second lower-frequency acoustic wave. It is observed that the growing vapor bubbles exhibit a periodic shape transition between the volumetric and shape modes due to resonant coupling. In order to explain this observation, we performed an experimental investigation on resonant coupling of air bubbles and obtained the following results: First, the induced shape oscillations are actually a mixed mode that contains the volume component, thus, vapor bubbles can grow while they exhibit shape oscillations. Second, the acoustically levitated bubbles are deformed and therefore, degeneracy in resonant frequency is partially removed. As a result, the vapor bubbles exhibit the shape oscillations in both the axisymmetric mode and asymmetric (three-dimensional) modes. Nonlinear effects in addition to the frequency shift and split due to deformation creates overlapping of the coupling ranges for different modes, which leads to the continuous shape oscillations above a certain bubble radius as the bubble grows.

  8. Reply to "Comment on `Acoustical observation of bubble oscillations induced by bubble popping' "

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Junqi

    2015-03-01

    We reported on the sound pressure generated by aqueous foam bursts in our paper [Ding et al., Phys. Rev. E 75, 041601 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevE.75.041601]. Blanc et al., [Phys. Rev. E 91, 036401 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevE.91.036401] found that sound from one of three mechanisms of bubble burst (the prepopping) actually results from an acausal artifact of the signal processing performed by their acquisition system which lies outside of its prescribed working frequency range. We examined the same hardware used in our paper and found that the frequency range is not the cause of the artifact. The prepopping sound was a result from a built-in finite impulse response filter of analog-to-digital converters in the Brüel & Kjær data acquisition system.

  9. Bioeffects caused by changes in acoustic cavitation bubble density and cell concentration: a unified explanation based on cell-to-bubble ratio and blast radius.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, Héctor R; McNamara, Andrew J; Nguyen, Daniel X; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2003-08-01

    Acoustic cavitation has been shown to load drugs, proteins and DNA into viable cells as a complex function of acoustic and nonacoustic parameters. To better understand and quantify this functionality, DU145 prostate cancer cell suspensions at different cell concentrations (2.5 x 10(5) to 4.0 x 10(7) cells/mL) were exposed to 500 kHz ultrasound (US) over a range of acoustic energy exposures (2 to 817 J/cm(2); peak negative pressures of 0.64 to 2.96 MPa; exposure times of 120 to 2000 ms) in the presence of different initial concentrations of Optison contrast agent bubbles (3.6 x 10(4) to 9.3 x 10(7) bubbles/mL). As determined by flow cytometry, molecular uptake of calcein and cell viability both increased with increasing cell density; viability decreased and uptake was unaffected by increasing initial contrast agent concentration. When normalized relative to the initial contrast agent concentration (e.g., cells killed per bubble), bioeffects increased with increasing cell density and decreased with increasing bubble concentration. These varying effects of contrast agent concentration and cell density were unified through an overall correlation with cell-to-bubble ratio. Additional analysis led to estimation of "blast radii" over which bubbles killed or permeabilized cells; these radii were as much as 3 to 90 times the bubble radius. Combined, these results suggest that extensive molecular uptake into cells at high viability occurs for low-energy exposure US applied at a high cell-to-bubble ratio.

  10. Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosperetti, Andrea

    2004-06-01

    Vanitas vanitatum et omnia vanitas: bubbles are emptiness, non-liquid, a tiny cloud shielding a mathematical singularity. Born from chance, a violent and brief life ending in the union with the (nearly) infinite. But a wealth of phenomena spring forth from this nothingness: underwater noise, sonoluminescence, boiling, and many others. Some recent results on a "blinking bubble" micropump and vapor bubbles in sound fields are outlined. The last section describes Leonardo da Vinci's observation of the non-rectlinear ascent of buoyant bubbles and justifies the name Leonardo's paradox recently attributed to this phenomenon.

  11. Nonlinear acoustic propagation in bubbly liquids: Multiple scattering, softening and hardening phenomena.

    PubMed

    Doc, Jean-Baptiste; Conoir, Jean-Marc; Marchiano, Régis; Fuster, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The weakly nonlinear propagation of acoustic waves in monodisperse bubbly liquids is investigated numerically. A hydrodynamic model based on the averaged two-phase fluid equations is coupled with the Rayleigh-Plesset equation to model the dynamics of bubbles at the local scale. The present model is validated in the linear regime by comparing with the Foldy approximation. The analysis of the pressure signals in the linear regime highlights two resonance frequencies: the Minnaert frequency and a multiple scattering resonance that strongly depends on the bubble concentration. For weakly nonlinear regimes, the generation of higher harmonics is observed only for the Minnaert frequency. Linear combinations between the Minnaert harmonics and the multiple scattering resonance are also observed. However, the most significant effect observed is the appearance of softening-hardening effects that share some similarities with those observed for sandstones or cracked materials. These effects are related to the multiple scattering resonance. Downward or upward resonance frequency shifts can be observed depending on the characteristic of the incident wave when increasing the excitation amplitude. It is shown that the frequency shift can be explained assuming that the acoustic wave velocity depends on a law different from those usually encountered for sandstones or cracked materials.

  12. Nonlinear acoustic propagation in bubbly liquids: Multiple scattering, softening and hardening phenomena.

    PubMed

    Doc, Jean-Baptiste; Conoir, Jean-Marc; Marchiano, Régis; Fuster, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The weakly nonlinear propagation of acoustic waves in monodisperse bubbly liquids is investigated numerically. A hydrodynamic model based on the averaged two-phase fluid equations is coupled with the Rayleigh-Plesset equation to model the dynamics of bubbles at the local scale. The present model is validated in the linear regime by comparing with the Foldy approximation. The analysis of the pressure signals in the linear regime highlights two resonance frequencies: the Minnaert frequency and a multiple scattering resonance that strongly depends on the bubble concentration. For weakly nonlinear regimes, the generation of higher harmonics is observed only for the Minnaert frequency. Linear combinations between the Minnaert harmonics and the multiple scattering resonance are also observed. However, the most significant effect observed is the appearance of softening-hardening effects that share some similarities with those observed for sandstones or cracked materials. These effects are related to the multiple scattering resonance. Downward or upward resonance frequency shifts can be observed depending on the characteristic of the incident wave when increasing the excitation amplitude. It is shown that the frequency shift can be explained assuming that the acoustic wave velocity depends on a law different from those usually encountered for sandstones or cracked materials. PMID:27106317

  13. Acoustic-optic spectrometer. 1: Noise contributions and system consideration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, G.

    1984-01-01

    An acousto-optic spectrometer (AOS) used as an IF spectrometer to a heterodyne receiver is modeled as a total power multi-channel integrating receiver. Systematic noise contributions common to all total power, time integrating receivers, as well as noise terms unique to the use of optical elements and photo-detectors in an AOS are identified and discussed. In addition, degradation of signal-to-noise ratio of an unbalanced Dicke receiver compared to a balanced Dicke receiver is found to be due to gain calibration processing and is not an instrumental effect.

  14. Acoustic measurements of the sound-speed profile in the bubbly wake formed by a small motor boat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagle, Svein; Burch, Holly

    2005-01-01

    In situ measurements of the bubble field within wakes generated by a small motorboat show that the bubble field, shortly after the initial turbulent generation period, consists mainly of bubbles with radii between 20 and 200 μm. The subsequent dispersion of the wake field can be described using a model that includes bubble buoyancy and dissolution only, and the air volume fraction within the wakes decay exponentially with an e-folding time of between 40 and 60 s. Simultaneous measurements of sound propagating through the bubbly wake exhibit spectral banding due to waveguide propagation. Inversions using the inverse-square theory developed by Buckingham [Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 335, 513-555 (1991)] show that this acoustic inversion technique provide a viable means of estimating the low-frequency sound-speed profile in an upward refractive bubble layer when dispersion can be neglected. .

  15. Two-bubble acoustic tweezing cytometry for biomechanical probing and stimulation of cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Di; Sun, Yubing; Gudur, Madhu S R; Hsiao, Yi-Sing; Wu, Ziqi; Fu, Jianping; Deng, Cheri X

    2015-01-01

    The study of mechanotransduction relies on tools that are capable of applying mechanical forces to elicit and assess cellular responses. Here we report a new (to our knowledge) technique, called two-bubble acoustic tweezing cytometry (TB-ATC), for generating spatiotemporally controlled subcellular mechanical forces on live cells by acoustic actuation of paired microbubbles targeted to the cell adhesion receptor integrin. By measuring the ultrasound-induced activities of cell-bound microbubbles and the actin cytoskeleton contractile force responses, we determine that TB-ATC elicits mechanoresponsive cellular changes via cyclic, paired displacements of integrin-bound microbubbles driven by the attractive secondary acoustic radiation force (sARF) between the bubbles in an ultrasound field. We demonstrate the feasibility of dual-mode TB-ATC for both subcellular probing and mechanical stimulation. By exploiting the robust and unique interaction of ultrasound with microbubbles, TB-ATC provides distinct advantages for experimentation and quantification of applied forces and cellular responses for biomechanical probing and stimulation of cells.

  16. Two-Bubble Acoustic Tweezing Cytometry for Biomechanical Probing and Stimulation of Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Di; Sun, Yubing; Gudur, Madhu S.R.; Hsiao, Yi-Sing; Wu, Ziqi; Fu, Jianping; Deng, Cheri X.

    2015-01-01

    The study of mechanotransduction relies on tools that are capable of applying mechanical forces to elicit and assess cellular responses. Here we report a new (to our knowledge) technique, called two-bubble acoustic tweezing cytometry (TB-ATC), for generating spatiotemporally controlled subcellular mechanical forces on live cells by acoustic actuation of paired microbubbles targeted to the cell adhesion receptor integrin. By measuring the ultrasound-induced activities of cell-bound microbubbles and the actin cytoskeleton contractile force responses, we determine that TB-ATC elicits mechanoresponsive cellular changes via cyclic, paired displacements of integrin-bound microbubbles driven by the attractive secondary acoustic radiation force (sARF) between the bubbles in an ultrasound field. We demonstrate the feasibility of dual-mode TB-ATC for both subcellular probing and mechanical stimulation. By exploiting the robust and unique interaction of ultrasound with microbubbles, TB-ATC provides distinct advantages for experimentation and quantification of applied forces and cellular responses for biomechanical probing and stimulation of cells. PMID:25564850

  17. Cavitation mapping by sonochemiluminescence with less bubble displacement induced by acoustic radiation force in a 1.2 MHz HIFU.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hui; Qiao, Yangzi; Cao, Hua; Li, Zhaopeng; Wan, Mingxi

    2014-03-01

    An acoustic radiation force counterbalanced appliance was employed to map the cavitation distribution in water. The appliance was made up of a focused ultrasound transducer and an aluminum alloy reflector with the exactly same shape. They were centrosymmetry around the focus of the source transducer. Spatial-temporal dynamics of cavitation bubble clouds in the 1.2 MHz ultrasonic field within this appliance were observed in water. And they were mapped by sonochemiluminescence (SCL) recordings and high-speed photography. There were significant differences in spatial distribution and temporal evolution between normal group and counterbalanced group. The reflector could avoid bubble directional displacement induced by acoustic radiation force under certain electric power (≤50 W). As a result, the SCL intensity in the pre-focal region was larger than that of normal group. In event of high electric power (≥70 W), most of the bubbles were moving in acoustic streaming. When electric power decreased, bubbles kept stable and showed stripe structure in SCL images. Both stationary bubbles and moving bubbles have been captured, and exhibited analytical potential with respect to bubbles in therapeutic ultrasound.

  18. The secondary Bjerknes force between two gas bubbles under dual-frequency acoustic excitation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuning; Zhang, Yuning; Li, Shengcai

    2016-03-01

    The secondary Bjerknes force is one of the essential mechanisms of mutual interactions between bubbles oscillating in a sound field. The dual-frequency acoustic excitation has been applied in several fields such as sonochemistry, biomedicine and material engineering. In this paper, the secondary Bjerknes force under dual-frequency excitation is investigated both analytically and numerically within a large parameter zone. The unique characteristics (i.e., the complicated patterns of the parameter zone for sign change and the combination resonances) of the secondary Bjerknes force under dual-frequency excitation are revealed. Moreover, the influence of several parameters (e.g., the pressure amplitude, the bubble distance and the phase difference between sound waves) on the secondary Bjerknes force is also investigated numerically.

  19. Acoustofluidics 16: acoustics streaming near liquid-gas interfaces: drops and bubbles.

    PubMed

    Sadhal, S S

    2012-08-21

    In this sixteenth part of the series on "Acoustofluidics-exploiting ultrasonic standing waves forces and acoustic streaming in microfluidic systems for cell and particle manipulation," we continue our discussion on the analytical aspects of the streaming phenomenon. In particular, the use of the singular perturbation technique for this class of problems is delineated with a set of examples where fluid-fluid interaction takes place. In this category, we focus on drops and bubbles, and deal specifically with the effect of interfacial mobility on the streaming flow. PMID:22776990

  20. Acoustic backscatter properties of the particle/bubble ultrasound contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Phillips, D; Chen, X; Baggs, R; Rubens, D; Violante, M; Parker, K J

    1998-07-01

    Bubble-based suspensions with diameters in the 1-5 microns range have been developed for use as ultrasound contrast agents. Bubbles of these dimensions have resonance frequencies in the diagnostic ultrasonic range, thus improving their backscatter enhancement capabilities. The durability of these bubbles in the blood stream has been found to be limited, providing impetus for a number of approaches to further stabilize them. One of the approaches has been the development of micrometer-size porous particles or 'nano-sponges' with properties suitable for the entrapment and stabilization of gas bubbles. However, the complex morphology and surface chemistry involved in the production of this type of agent makes it unfeasible to directly measure the volume of the entrained gas. A model based on acoustic scattering principles is proposed which indicates that only a small volume fraction of gas should be necessary to significantly enhance the echogenicity of this type of particle-based contrast agent. In the model, the effective scattering cross-section is evaluated as a function of the volume fraction of gas contained in the overall scatterer and the overall scatterer diameter. Initially, the volume fraction of gas is considered as a discrete entity of single bubble. Using common mixture rules, it is then shown that the gas can be considered to be distributed throughout the particle and still arrive at a result that is similar to that for a single, discrete volume of gas. The main contribution to the increased scattering cross-section is due to the compressibility difference between gas and water. The backscatter coefficient is computed as the product of the resulting differential scattering cross-section and the scatterer number density. This approach facilitates comparison with known backscatter coefficients of biological targets such as liver and blood. Simple experimental results are presented for comparison with the model, and the implications relevant to clinical

  1. Sound scattering from rough bubbly ocean surface based on modified sea surface acoustic simulator and consideration of various incident angles and sub-surface bubbles' radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolghasi, Alireza; Ghadimi, Parviz; Chekab, Mohammad A. Feizi

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study is to improve the capabilities and precision of a recently introduced Sea Surface Acoustic Simulator (SSAS) developed based on optimization of the Helmholtz-Kirchhoff-Fresnel (HKF) method. The improved acoustic simulator, hereby known as the Modified SSAS (MSSAS), is capable of determining sound scattering from the sea surface and includes an extended Hall-Novarini model and optimized HKF method. The extended Hall-Novarini model is used for considering the effects of sub-surface bubbles over a wider range of radii of sub-surface bubbles compared to the previous SSAS version. Furthermore, MSSAS has the capability of making a three-dimensional simulation of scattered sound from the rough bubbly sea surface with less error than that of the Critical Sea Tests (CST) experiments. Also, it presents scattered pressure levels from the rough bubbly sea surface based on various incident angles of sound. Wind speed, frequency, incident angle, and pressure level of the sound source are considered as input data, and scattered pressure levels and scattering coefficients are provided. Finally, different parametric studies were conducted on wind speeds, frequencies, and incident angles to indicate that MSSAS is quite capable of simulating sound scattering from the rough bubbly sea surface, according to the scattering mechanisms determined by Ogden and Erskine. Therefore, it is concluded that MSSAS is valid for both scattering mechanisms and the transition region between them that are defined by Ogden and Erskine.

  2. Sound scattering from rough bubbly ocean surface based on modified sea surface acoustic simulator and consideration of various incident angles and sub-surface bubbles' radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolghasi, Alireza; Ghadimi, Parviz; Chekab, Mohammad A. Feizi

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study is to improve the capabilities and precision of a recently introduced Sea Surface Acoustic Simulator (SSAS) developed based on optimization of the Helmholtz-Kirchhoff-Fresnel (HKF) method. The improved acoustic simulator, hereby known as the Modified SSAS (MSSAS), is capable of determining sound scattering from the sea surface and includes an extended Hall-Novarini model and optimized HKF method. The extended Hall-Novarini model is used for considering the effects of sub-surface bubbles over a wider range of radii of sub-surface bubbles compared to the previous SSAS version. Furthermore, MSSAS has the capability of making a three-dimensional simulation of scattered sound from the rough bubbly sea surface with less error than that of the Critical Sea Tests (CST) experiments. Also, it presents scattered pressure levels from the rough bubbly sea surface based on various incident angles of sound. Wind speed, frequency, incident angle, and pressure level of the sound source are considered as input data, and scattered pressure levels and scattering coefficients are provided. Finally, different parametric studies were conducted on wind speeds, frequencies, and incident angles to indicate that MSSAS is quite capable of simulating sound scattering from the rough bubbly sea surface, according to the scattering mechanisms determined by Ogden and Erskine. Therefore, it is concluded that MSSAS is valid for both scattering mechanisms and the transition region between them that are defined by Ogden and Erskine.

  3. Gaseous bubble oscillations in anisotropic non-Newtonian fluids under influence of high-frequency acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golykh, R. N.

    2016-06-01

    Progress of technology and medicine dictates the ever-increasing requirements (heat resistance, corrosion resistance, strength properties, impregnating ability, etc.) for non-Newtonian fluids and materials produced on their basis (epoxy resin, coating materials, liquid crystals, etc.). Materials with improved properties obtaining is possible by modification of their physicochemical structure. One of the most promising approaches to the restructuring of non-Newtonian fluids is cavitation generated by high-frequency acoustic vibrations. The efficiency of cavitation in non-Newtonian fluid is determined by dynamics of gaseous bubble. Today, bubble dynamics in isotropic non-Newtonian fluids, in which cavitation bubble shape remains spherical, is most full investigated, because the problem reduces to ordinary differential equation for spherical bubble radius. However, gaseous bubble in anisotropic fluids which are most wide kind of non-Newtonian fluids (due to orientation of macromolecules) deviates from spherical shape due to viscosity dependence on shear rate direction. Therefore, the paper presents the mathematical model of gaseous bubble dynamics in anisotropic non-Newtonian fluids. The model is based on general equations for anisotropic non-Newtonian fluid flow. The equations are solved by asymptotic decomposition of fluid flow parameters. It allowed evaluating bubble size and shape evolution depending on rheological properties of liquid and acoustic field characteristics.

  4. The role of large bubbles detected from acoustic measurements on the dynamics of Erta 'Ale lava lake (Ethiopia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouche, E.; Vergniolle, S.; Staudacher, T.; Nercessian, A.; Delmont, J.-C.; Frogneux, M.; Cartault, F.; Le Pichon, A.

    2010-06-01

    The activity at the surface of the lava lake on Erta 'Ale volcano (Ethiopia) shows that large bubbles are regularly breaking at a fixed position on the lava lake. This is also where the small lava fountains are sometimes produced. Since this location is likely to be directly above the volcanic conduit feeding the lava lake, we have done continuous measurements between March 22 and 26, 2003 to understand the degassing of a volcano in permanent activity. The bubble size has been first estimated from videos, which once combined with the acoustic pressure, can constrain the source of the sound. The gas volume and overpressure stayed roughly constant, between 36-700 m3 and 4 × 103-1.8 × 104 Pa, respectively. Simultaneous thermal measurements showed regular peaks, which occurred when the crust was broken by a large bubble, hence gave a direct indication on the typical return time between the bubbles (1 h). These spherical cap bubbles had a high Reynolds number, 4600-20000, therefore a wake, periodically unstable, formed and detached from the bubble bottom. The bubbly wake, if the detachment occurs close to the surface, can explain the duration of lava fountains, measured on the videos. The periodic arrival of bubbly wakes, which mostly detach from the driving spherical cap within the lava lake, could explain the absence of cooling at Erta 'Ale, Erebus (Antartica), Villarica (Chile) and Nyiragongo (Democratic Republic of Congo) without invoking a convective downflow of magma in the conduit, as previously done.

  5. Theoretical model of ice nucleation induced by inertial acoustic cavitation. Part 2: Number of ice nuclei generated by a single bubble.

    PubMed

    Cogné, C; Labouret, S; Peczalski, R; Louisnard, O; Baillon, F; Espitalier, F

    2016-01-01

    In the preceding paper (part 1), the pressure and temperature fields close to a bubble undergoing inertial acoustic cavitation were presented. It was shown that extremely high liquid water pressures but quite moderate temperatures were attained near the bubble wall just after the collapse providing the necessary conditions for ice nucleation. In this paper (part 2), the nucleation rate and the nuclei number generated by a single collapsing bubble were determined. The calculations were performed for different driving acoustic pressures, liquid ambient temperatures and bubble initial radius. An optimal acoustic pressure range and a nucleation temperature threshold as function of bubble radius were determined. The capability of moderate power ultrasound to trigger ice nucleation at low undercooling level and for a wide distribution of bubble sizes has thus been assessed on the theoretical ground. PMID:26384898

  6. An electrochemical and high-speed imaging study of micropore decontamination by acoustic bubble entrapment.

    PubMed

    Offin, Douglas G; Birkin, Peter R; Leighton, Timothy G

    2014-03-14

    Electrochemical and high-speed imaging techniques are used to study the abilities of ultrasonically-activated bubbles to clean out micropores. Cylindrical pores with dimensions (diameter × depth) of 500 μm × 400 μm (aspect ratio 0.8), 125 μm × 350 μm (aspect ratio 2.8) and 50 μm × 200 μm (aspect ratio 4.0) are fabricated in glass substrates. Each pore is contaminated by filling it with an electrochemically inactive blocking organic material (thickened methyl salicylate) before the substrate is placed in a solution containing an electroactive species (Fe(CN)6(3-)). An electrode is fabricated at the base of each pore and the Faradaic current is used to monitor the decontamination as a function of time. For the largest pore, decontamination driven by ultrasound (generated by a horn type transducer) and bulk fluid flow are compared. It is shown that ultrasound is much more effective than flow alone, and that bulk fluid flow at the rates used cannot decontaminate the pore completely, but that ultrasound can. In the case of the 125 μm pore, high-speed imaging is used to elucidate the cleaning mechanisms involved in ultrasonic decontamination and reveals that acoustic bubble entrapment is a key feature. The smallest pore is used to explore the limits of decontamination and it is found that ultrasound is still effective at this size under the conditions employed.

  7. Acoustic Cluster Therapy: In Vitro and Ex Vivo Measurement of Activated Bubble Size Distribution and Temporal Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Healey, Andrew John; Sontum, Per Christian; Kvåle, Svein; Eriksen, Morten; Bendiksen, Ragnar; Tornes, Audun; Østensen, Jonny

    2016-05-01

    Acoustic cluster technology (ACT) is a two-component, microparticle formulation platform being developed for ultrasound-mediated drug delivery. Sonazoid microbubbles, which have a negative surface charge, are mixed with micron-sized perfluoromethylcyclopentane droplets stabilized with a positively charged surface membrane to form microbubble/microdroplet clusters. On exposure to ultrasound, the oil undergoes a phase change to the gaseous state, generating 20- to 40-μm ACT bubbles. An acoustic transmission technique is used to measure absorption and velocity dispersion of the ACT bubbles. An inversion technique computes bubble size population with temporal resolution of seconds. Bubble populations are measured both in vitro and in vivo after activation within the cardiac chambers of a dog model, with catheter-based flow through an extracorporeal measurement flow chamber. Volume-weighted mean diameter in arterial blood after activation in the left ventricle was 22 μm, with no bubbles >44 μm in diameter. After intravenous administration, 24.4% of the oil is activated in the cardiac chambers. PMID:26831341

  8. Acoustic Cluster Therapy: In Vitro and Ex Vivo Measurement of Activated Bubble Size Distribution and Temporal Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Healey, Andrew John; Sontum, Per Christian; Kvåle, Svein; Eriksen, Morten; Bendiksen, Ragnar; Tornes, Audun; Østensen, Jonny

    2016-05-01

    Acoustic cluster technology (ACT) is a two-component, microparticle formulation platform being developed for ultrasound-mediated drug delivery. Sonazoid microbubbles, which have a negative surface charge, are mixed with micron-sized perfluoromethylcyclopentane droplets stabilized with a positively charged surface membrane to form microbubble/microdroplet clusters. On exposure to ultrasound, the oil undergoes a phase change to the gaseous state, generating 20- to 40-μm ACT bubbles. An acoustic transmission technique is used to measure absorption and velocity dispersion of the ACT bubbles. An inversion technique computes bubble size population with temporal resolution of seconds. Bubble populations are measured both in vitro and in vivo after activation within the cardiac chambers of a dog model, with catheter-based flow through an extracorporeal measurement flow chamber. Volume-weighted mean diameter in arterial blood after activation in the left ventricle was 22 μm, with no bubbles >44 μm in diameter. After intravenous administration, 24.4% of the oil is activated in the cardiac chambers.

  9. Evaluating the BD-100R [Bubble Technology Industries] as a neutron spectrometer through pressure variation

    SciTech Connect

    White, B.; Ebert, D.; Munno, F.

    1990-07-01

    Other investigators have evaluated the dose response of neutron bubble dosimeters for possible use as personnel monitors for the U.S. Navy in low level radiation fields. In addition to dose measurements, these devices have been modified to measure the neutron energy spectra. These methods tend to be cumbersome, inaccurate, or both and do not use the same devices as employed in the dosimetry. The BD-100R dosimeter used in this work consists of a test tube containing an elastic polymer with interspersed droplets of two types of Freon; Freon-12 and Freon-114. Each superheated liquid droplet is a potential nucleation site. The minimum energy needed to form a bubble from the nucleation site is given by, E = 16{pi}{gamma}{sup 3}(T)/3({delta}P){sup 2}, where {delta}P is the difference between the vapor pressure of the droplet and the applied pressure. Upon reaching a critical radius, a bubble becomes unstable and grows in size. It may be seen from this equation that the energy deposition required for bubble formation is inversely proportional to the square of the pressure difference. The number of bubbles formed continually decreases with increasing applied pressure, until a pressure is reached where no bubbles are formed since the energy transferred can no longer vaporize the Freon. This investigation is intended to demonstrate the determination of an unknown spectrum utilizing the dosimeter response (number of bubbles formed) as a function of the neutron energy (applied pressure). A set of 12 dosimeters was initially exposed outside the East Beam Port (EBP) at the Maryland University Training Reactor (MUTR). The dosimeters were inside a pressure chamber which could accommodate up to 18 dosimeters. The same set of dosimeters were irradiated using a paraffin moderated PuBe source for which the neutron energy spectrum is unknown. There were eight exposures of six dosimeters at varied pressures in the EBP. The average number of bubbles and standard deviation was measured

  10. Dynamics of two interacting hydrogen bubbles in liquid aluminum under the influence of a strong acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebon, Gerard S. B.; Pericleous, Koulis; Tzanakis, Iakovos; Eskin, Dmitry G.

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasonic melt processing significantly improves the properties of metallic materials. However, this promising technology has not been successfully transferred to the industry because of difficulties in treating large volumes of melt. To circumvent these difficulties, a fundamental understanding of the efficiency of ultrasonic treatment of liquid metals is required. In this endeavor, the dynamics of two interacting hydrogen bubbles in liquid aluminum are studied to determine the effect of a strong acoustic field on their behavior. It is shown that coalescence readily occurs at low frequencies in the range of 16 to 20 kHz; forcing frequencies at these values are likely to promote degassing. Emitted acoustic pressures from relatively isolated bubbles that resonate with the driving frequency are in the megapascal range and these cavitation shock waves are presumed to promote grain refinement by disrupting the growth of the solidification front.

  11. Dynamics of two interacting hydrogen bubbles in liquid aluminum under the influence of a strong acoustic field.

    PubMed

    Lebon, Gerard S B; Pericleous, Koulis; Tzanakis, Iakovos; Eskin, Dmitry G

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasonic melt processing significantly improves the properties of metallic materials. However, this promising technology has not been successfully transferred to the industry because of difficulties in treating large volumes of melt. To circumvent these difficulties, a fundamental understanding of the efficiency of ultrasonic treatment of liquid metals is required. In this endeavor, the dynamics of two interacting hydrogen bubbles in liquid aluminum are studied to determine the effect of a strong acoustic field on their behavior. It is shown that coalescence readily occurs at low frequencies in the range of 16 to 20 kHz; forcing frequencies at these values are likely to promote degassing. Emitted acoustic pressures from relatively isolated bubbles that resonate with the driving frequency are in the megapascal range and these cavitation shock waves are presumed to promote grain refinement by disrupting the growth of the solidification front. PMID:26565329

  12. Mass spectrometric sampling of a liquid surface by nanoliter droplet generation from bursting bubbles and focused acoustic pulses: application to studies of interfacial chemistry.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Daniel A; Wang, Lingtao; Goh, Byoungsook; Kim, Eun Sok; Beauchamp, J L

    2015-03-17

    The complex chemistry occurring at the interface between liquid and vapor phases contributes significantly to the dynamics and evolution of numerous chemical systems of interest, ranging from damage to the human lung surfactant layer to the aging of atmospheric aerosols. This work presents two methodologies to eject droplets from a liquid water surface and analyze them via mass spectrometry. In bursting bubble ionization (BBI), droplet ejection is achieved via the formation of a jet following bubble rupture at the surface of a liquid to yield 250 μm diameter droplets (10 nL volume). In interfacial sampling by an acoustic transducer (ISAT), droplets are produced by focusing pulsed piezoelectric transducer-generated acoustic waves at the surface of a liquid, resulting in the ejection of droplets of 100 μm in diameter (500 pL volume). In both experimental methodologies, ejected droplets are aspirated into the inlet of the mass spectrometer, resulting in the facile formation of gas-phase ions. We demonstrate the ability of this technique to readily generate spectra of surface-active analytes, and we compare the spectra to those obtained by electrospray ionization. Charge measurements indicate that the ejected droplets are near-neutral (<0.1% of the Rayleigh limit), suggesting that gas-phase ion generation occurs in the heated transfer capillary of the instrument in a mechanism similar to thermospray or sonic spray ionization. Finally, we present the oxidation of oleic acid by ozone as an initial demonstration of the ability of ISAT-MS to monitor heterogeneous chemistry occurring at a planar water/air interface. PMID:25699657

  13. Mass spectrometric sampling of a liquid surface by nanoliter droplet generation from bursting bubbles and focused acoustic pulses: application to studies of interfacial chemistry.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Daniel A; Wang, Lingtao; Goh, Byoungsook; Kim, Eun Sok; Beauchamp, J L

    2015-03-17

    The complex chemistry occurring at the interface between liquid and vapor phases contributes significantly to the dynamics and evolution of numerous chemical systems of interest, ranging from damage to the human lung surfactant layer to the aging of atmospheric aerosols. This work presents two methodologies to eject droplets from a liquid water surface and analyze them via mass spectrometry. In bursting bubble ionization (BBI), droplet ejection is achieved via the formation of a jet following bubble rupture at the surface of a liquid to yield 250 μm diameter droplets (10 nL volume). In interfacial sampling by an acoustic transducer (ISAT), droplets are produced by focusing pulsed piezoelectric transducer-generated acoustic waves at the surface of a liquid, resulting in the ejection of droplets of 100 μm in diameter (500 pL volume). In both experimental methodologies, ejected droplets are aspirated into the inlet of the mass spectrometer, resulting in the facile formation of gas-phase ions. We demonstrate the ability of this technique to readily generate spectra of surface-active analytes, and we compare the spectra to those obtained by electrospray ionization. Charge measurements indicate that the ejected droplets are near-neutral (<0.1% of the Rayleigh limit), suggesting that gas-phase ion generation occurs in the heated transfer capillary of the instrument in a mechanism similar to thermospray or sonic spray ionization. Finally, we present the oxidation of oleic acid by ozone as an initial demonstration of the ability of ISAT-MS to monitor heterogeneous chemistry occurring at a planar water/air interface.

  14. Near resonant bubble acoustic cross-section corrections, including examples from oceanography, volcanology, and biomedical ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Ainslie, Michael A; Leighton, Timothy G

    2009-11-01

    The scattering cross-section sigma(s) of a gas bubble of equilibrium radius R(0) in liquid can be written in the form sigma(s)=4piR(0) (2)[(omega(1) (2)omega(2)-1)(2)+delta(2)], where omega is the excitation frequency, omega(1) is the resonance frequency, and delta is a frequency-dependent dimensionless damping coefficient. A persistent discrepancy in the frequency dependence of the contribution to delta from radiation damping, denoted delta(rad), is identified and resolved, as follows. Wildt's [Physics of Sound in the Sea (Washington, DC, 1946), Chap. 28] pioneering derivation predicts a linear dependence of delta(rad) on frequency, a result which Medwin [Ultrasonics 15, 7-13 (1977)] reproduces using a different method. Weston [Underwater Acoustics, NATO Advanced Study Institute Series Vol. II, 55-88 (1967)], using ostensibly the same method as Wildt, predicts the opposite relationship, i.e., that delta(rad) is inversely proportional to frequency. Weston's version of the derivation of the scattering cross-section is shown here to be the correct one, thus resolving the discrepancy. Further, a correction to Weston's model is derived that amounts to a shift in the resonance frequency. A new, corrected, expression for the extinction cross-section is also derived. The magnitudes of the corrections are illustrated using examples from oceanography, volcanology, planetary acoustics, neutron spallation, and biomedical ultrasound. The corrections become significant when the bulk modulus of the gas is not negligible relative to that of the surrounding liquid.

  15. Influence of ultrasound power on acoustic streaming and micro-bubbles formations in a low frequency sono-reactor: mathematical and 3D computational simulation.

    PubMed

    Sajjadi, Baharak; Raman, Abdul Aziz Abdul; Ibrahim, Shaliza

    2015-05-01

    This paper aims at investigating the influence of ultrasound power amplitude on liquid behaviour in a low-frequency (24 kHz) sono-reactor. Three types of analysis were employed: (i) mechanical analysis of micro-bubbles formation and their activities/characteristics using mathematical modelling. (ii) Numerical analysis of acoustic streaming, fluid flow pattern, volume fraction of micro-bubbles and turbulence using 3D CFD simulation. (iii) Practical analysis of fluid flow pattern and acoustic streaming under ultrasound irradiation using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). In mathematical modelling, a lone micro bubble generated under power ultrasound irradiation was mechanistically analysed. Its characteristics were illustrated as a function of bubble radius, internal temperature and pressure (hot spot conditions) and oscillation (pulsation) velocity. The results showed that ultrasound power significantly affected the conditions of hotspots and bubbles oscillation velocity. From the CFD results, it was observed that the total volume of the micro-bubbles increased by about 4.95% with each 100 W-increase in power amplitude. Furthermore, velocity of acoustic streaming increased from 29 to 119 cm/s as power increased, which was in good agreement with the PIV analysis.

  16. Effects of an acoustic diode on the pressure waveform and cavitation bubble dynamics produced by a piezoelectric shock wave generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Songlin; Zhong, Pei

    2003-10-01

    High-speed schlieren imaging, combined with fiber optical probe hydrophone (FOPH) and passive cavitation detection (PCD) were used to access the effects of an acoustic diode (AD) on the pressure waveform and associated cavitation activities produced by a piezoelectric shock wave (PSW) generator. Without the AD, a typical pressure waveform at the focus of the PSW generator consists of a leading shock wave, followed by a tensile wave and several oscillation waves (OWs) of gradually reduced amplitudes. When the AD was placed 30 mm in front of the focus, the amplitude of the tensile wave was reduced and the subsequent OWs were removed. The pulse intensity integral of the tensile wave was reduced by 58%, and subsequently, PSW-induced bubble dynamics were altered significantly. Based on PCD data, the collapse time of cavitation bubble(s) was reduced by about 11%. Although intensive collapse of microbubbles was observed in about 10 μs following the shock front of the original PSW, the forced collapse of microbubbles was not observed when the AD was used, presumably due to the removal of the OWs. Theoretical calculation based on the Gilmore model confirmed these experimental observations. [Work supported by the Whitaker Foundation and NIH.

  17. A dynamic pressure view cell for acoustic stimulation of fluids—Micro-bubble generation and fluid movement in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Robert A.; Shaw, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    The development and baseline operation of an acoustic view cell for observing fluids, and fluid-fluid and fluid-solid interfaces in porous media over the frequency range of 10-5000 Hz is described. This range includes the industrially relevant frequency range 500-5000 Hz that is not covered by existing devices. Pressure waveforms of arbitrary shape are generated in a 17.46 mm ID by 200 mm and 690.5 mm long glass tubes at flow rates up to 200 ml/min using a syringe pump. Peak-to-peak amplitudes exceeding 80 kPa are readily realized at frequencies from 10 to 5000 Hz in bubble free fluids when actuated with 20 Vpp as exemplified using castor oil. At resonant frequencies, peak-to-peak pressure amplitudes exceeding 500 kPa were obtained (castor oil at 2100 Hz when actuated with 20 Vpp). Impacts of vibration on macroscopic liquid-liquid and liquid-vapour interfaces and interface movement are illustrated. Pressure wave transmission and attenuation in a fluid saturated porous medium, randomly packed 250-330 μm spherical silica beads, is also demonstrated. Attenuation differences and frequency shifts in resonant peaks are used to detect the presence and generation of dispersed micro-bubbles (<180 μm diameter), and bubbles within porous media that are not readily visualized. Envisioned applications include assessment of the impacts of vibration on reaction, mass transfer, and flow/flow pattern outcomes. This knowledge will inform laboratory and pilot scale process studies, where nuisance vibrations may affect the interpretation of process outcomes, and large scale or in situ processes in aquifers or hydrocarbon reservoirs where imposed vibration may be deployed to improve aspects of process performance. Future work will include miscible interface observation and quantitative measurements in the bulk and in porous media where the roles of micro-bubbles comprise subjects of special interest.

  18. A dynamic pressure view cell for acoustic stimulation of fluids--Micro-bubble generation and fluid movement in porous media.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Robert A; Shaw, J M

    2015-09-01

    The development and baseline operation of an acoustic view cell for observing fluids, and fluid-fluid and fluid-solid interfaces in porous media over the frequency range of 10-5000 Hz is described. This range includes the industrially relevant frequency range 500-5000 Hz that is not covered by existing devices. Pressure waveforms of arbitrary shape are generated in a 17.46 mm ID by 200 mm and 690.5 mm long glass tubes at flow rates up to 200 ml/min using a syringe pump. Peak-to-peak amplitudes exceeding 80 kPa are readily realized at frequencies from 10 to 5000 Hz in bubble free fluids when actuated with 20 Vpp as exemplified using castor oil. At resonant frequencies, peak-to-peak pressure amplitudes exceeding 500 kPa were obtained (castor oil at 2100 Hz when actuated with 20 Vpp). Impacts of vibration on macroscopic liquid-liquid and liquid-vapour interfaces and interface movement are illustrated. Pressure wave transmission and attenuation in a fluid saturated porous medium, randomly packed 250-330 μm spherical silica beads, is also demonstrated. Attenuation differences and frequency shifts in resonant peaks are used to detect the presence and generation of dispersed micro-bubbles (<180 μm diameter), and bubbles within porous media that are not readily visualized. Envisioned applications include assessment of the impacts of vibration on reaction, mass transfer, and flow/flow pattern outcomes. This knowledge will inform laboratory and pilot scale process studies, where nuisance vibrations may affect the interpretation of process outcomes, and large scale or in situ processes in aquifers or hydrocarbon reservoirs where imposed vibration may be deployed to improve aspects of process performance. Future work will include miscible interface observation and quantitative measurements in the bulk and in porous media where the roles of micro-bubbles comprise subjects of special interest.

  19. Can diving-induced tissue nitrogen supersaturation increase the chance of acoustically driven bubble growth in marine mammals?

    PubMed

    Houser, D S; Howard, R; Ridgway, S

    2001-11-21

    The potential for acoustically mediated causes of stranding in cetaceans (whales and dolphins) is of increasing concern given recent stranding events associated with anthropogenic acoustic activity. We examine a potentially debilitating non-auditory mechanism called rectified diffusion. Rectified diffusion causes gas bubble growth, which in an insonified animal may produce emboli, tissue separation and high, localized pressure in nervous tissue. Using the results of a dolphin dive study and a model of rectified diffusion for low-frequency exposure, we demonstrate that the diving behavior of cetaceans prior to an intense acoustic exposure may increase the chance of rectified diffusion. Specifically, deep diving and slow ascent/descent speed contributes to increased gas-tissue saturation, a condition that amplifies the likelihood of rectified diffusion. The depth of lung collapse limits nitrogen uptake per dive and the surface interval duration influences the amount of nitrogen washout from tissues between dives. Model results suggest that low-frequency rectified diffusion models need to be advanced, that the diving behavior of marine mammals of concern needs to be investigated to identify at-risk animals, and that more intensive studies of gas dynamics within diving marine mammals should be undertaken.

  20. Can diving-induced tissue nitrogen supersaturation increase the chance of acoustically driven bubble growth in marine mammals?

    PubMed

    Houser, D S; Howard, R; Ridgway, S

    2001-11-21

    The potential for acoustically mediated causes of stranding in cetaceans (whales and dolphins) is of increasing concern given recent stranding events associated with anthropogenic acoustic activity. We examine a potentially debilitating non-auditory mechanism called rectified diffusion. Rectified diffusion causes gas bubble growth, which in an insonified animal may produce emboli, tissue separation and high, localized pressure in nervous tissue. Using the results of a dolphin dive study and a model of rectified diffusion for low-frequency exposure, we demonstrate that the diving behavior of cetaceans prior to an intense acoustic exposure may increase the chance of rectified diffusion. Specifically, deep diving and slow ascent/descent speed contributes to increased gas-tissue saturation, a condition that amplifies the likelihood of rectified diffusion. The depth of lung collapse limits nitrogen uptake per dive and the surface interval duration influences the amount of nitrogen washout from tissues between dives. Model results suggest that low-frequency rectified diffusion models need to be advanced, that the diving behavior of marine mammals of concern needs to be investigated to identify at-risk animals, and that more intensive studies of gas dynamics within diving marine mammals should be undertaken. PMID:11894990

  1. Acoustic monitoring of co-seismic changes in gas bubble rupture rate in a hydrothermal reservoir: field evaluation of a possible precursor and mechanism for remote seismic triggering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crews, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    Remotely triggered seismicity is a phenomenon in which an earthquake at one location triggers others over distances up to thousands of kilometers. The mechanism by which low-amplitude dynamic oscillations of the confining stress can produce such an effect, often after a time delay of minutes-to-days, is unclear, but a concentration of remotely triggered seismic events in carbon-dioxide-rich volcanic and geothermal regions suggests that an increase in pore fluid pressure associated with the nucleation and growth of carbon-dioxide gas bubbles may reduce the effective stress in critically loaded geologic faults. While this hypothesis has been tested in bench-scale laboratory experiments, field detection of seismically initiated gas bubble growth in groundwater may provide further evidence for this remote triggering mechanism. In the present study, a hydrophone continuously records the acoustic power spectrum in CH-10B, a hydrothermal well located in Long Valley Caldera, California - a site that is susceptible to remotely seismic triggering. This well exhibits co-seismic changes in water level in response to near and distant earthquakes, including every magnitude-six or greater at any location on Earth. Exploiting the inverse relationship between gas bubble radius and the peak acoustic frequency emitted when a gas bubble ruptures, this investigation seeks to detect changes in the acoustic power spectrum arising from a shift in the size-distribution or count rate of rupturing gas bubbles, coincident with a distant earthquake. By resolving the timing and intensity of the onset of a change in gas bubble rupture rate after the passage of seismic wave from a distant source, it may be possible to establish the extent to which seismically initiated gas bubble growth contributes to co-seismic borehole water level response, pore fluid pressure perturbations, and the onset of remotely triggered seismicity.

  2. Acoustic wave propagation in air-bubble curtains in water. Part 2. Field experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Domenico, S.N.

    1982-03-01

    A field experiment consisted of hydrophone recordings in a pond, 25 ft deep, of signals transmitted through air-bubble curtains from a water gun source. The air curtains issued from one to 13 pipes (20 ft long and spaced at 1.67-ft intervals). Air pressures used in the pipes were 15, 25, and 50 psi. Length and complexity of the signals indicate that reverberations occurred to an increasing extent as the number of consecutive air curtains was increased. Analysis of the first pulse in the recorded signals, after approximate removal of hydrophone and recorder response, indicates that the reverberations occur principally in the bubble-free corridors between air curtains. This pulse broadens and its peak amplitude is delayed linearly as the number of successive air curtains is increased. The peak amplitude is decreased substantially by the first air curtain and thereafter remains between 0.1 and 0.2 of the amplitude without air curtains.

  3. Bubble diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Visuri, Steven R.; Mammini, Beth M.; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Celliers, Peter M.

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is intended as a means of diagnosing the presence of a gas bubble and incorporating the information into a feedback system for opto-acoustic thrombolysis. In opto-acoustic thrombolysis, pulsed laser radiation at ultrasonic frequencies is delivered intraluminally down an optical fiber and directed toward a thrombus or otherwise occluded vessel. Dissolution of the occlusion is therefore mediated through ultrasonic action of propagating pressure or shock waves. A vapor bubble in the fluid surrounding the occlusion may form as a result of laser irradiation. This vapor bubble may be used to directly disrupt the occlusion or as a means of producing a pressure wave. It is desirable to detect the formation and follow the lifetime of the vapor bubble. Knowledge of the bubble formation and lifetime yields critical information as to the maximum size of the bubble, density of the absorbed radiation, and properties of the absorbing material. This information can then be used in a feedback system to alter the irradiation conditions.

  4. Acoustic radiation force on an air bubble and soft fluid spheres in ideal liquids: Example of a high-order Bessel beam of quasi-standing waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2009-04-01

    The partial wave series for the scattering of a high-order Bessel beam (HOBB) of acoustic quasi-standing waves by an air bubble and fluid spheres immersed in water and centered on the axis of the beam is applied to the calculation of the acoustic radiation force. A HOBB refers to a type of beam having an axial amplitude null and an azimuthal phase gradient. Radiation force examples obtained through numerical evaluation of the radiation force function are computed for an air bubble, a hexane, a red blood and mercury fluid spheres in water. The examples were selected to illustrate conditions having progressive, standing and quasi-standing waves with appropriate selection of the waves’ amplitude ratio. An especially noteworthy result is the lack of a specific vibrational mode contribution to the radiation force determined by appropriate selection of the HOBB parameters.

  5. Bubble Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrigan, Jackie

    2004-01-01

    A method of energy production that is capable of low pollutant emissions is fundamental to one of the four pillars of NASA s Aeronautics Blueprint: Revolutionary Vehicles. Bubble combustion, a new engine technology currently being developed at Glenn Research Center promises to provide low emissions combustion in support of NASA s vision under the Emissions Element because it generates power, while minimizing the production of carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxides (NOx), both known to be Greenhouse gases. and allows the use of alternative fuels such as corn oil, low-grade fuels, and even used motor oil. Bubble combustion is analogous to the inverse of spray combustion: the difference between bubble and spray combustion is that spray combustion is spraying a liquid in to a gas to form droplets, whereas bubble combustion involves injecting a gas into a liquid to form gaseous bubbles. In bubble combustion, the process for the ignition of the bubbles takes place on a time scale of less than a nanosecond and begins with acoustic waves perturbing each bubble. This perturbation causes the local pressure to drop below the vapor pressure of the liquid thus producing cavitation in which the bubble diameter grows, and upon reversal of the oscillating pressure field, the bubble then collapses rapidly with the aid of the high surface tension forces acting on the wall of the bubble. The rapid and violent collapse causes the temperatures inside the bubbles to soar as a result of adiabatic heating. As the temperatures rise, the gaseous contents of the bubble ignite with the bubble itself serving as its own combustion chamber. After ignition, this is the time in the bubble s life cycle where power is generated, and CO2, and NOx among other species, are produced. However, the pollutants CO2 and NOx are absorbed into the surrounding liquid. The importance of bubble combustion is that it generates power using a simple and compact device. We conducted a parametric study using CAVCHEM

  6. Deformation of biological cells in the acoustic field of an oscillating bubble

    PubMed Central

    Zinin, Pavel V.; Allen, John S.

    2009-01-01

    In this work we develop a theoretical framework of the interaction of microbubbles with bacteria in the ultrasound field using a shell model of the bacteria, following an approach developed previously [P. V. Zinin et al., Phys. Rev. E 72, 61907 (2005)]. Within the shell model, the motion of the cell in an ultrasonic field is determined by the motion of three components: the internal viscous fluid, a thin elastic shell, and the surrounding viscous fluid. Several conclusions can be drawn from the modeling of sound interaction with a biological cell: (a) the characteristics of a cell’s oscillations in an ultrasonic field are determined both by the elastic properties of the shell the viscosities of all components of the system, (b) for dipole quadrupole oscillations the cell’s shell deforms due to a change in the shell area this oscillation depends on the surface area modulus KA, (c) the relative change in the area has a maximum at frequency fK∼12πKA/(ρa3), where a is the cell’s radius and ρ is its density. It was predicted that deformation of the cell wall at the frequency fK is high enough to rupture small bacteria such as E. coli in which the quality factor of natural vibrations is less than 1 (Q < 1). For bacteria with high value quality factors (Q > 1), the area deformation has a strong peak near a resonance frequency fK; however, the value of the deformation near the resonance frequency is not high enough to produce sufficient mechanical effect. The theoretical framework developed in this work can be extended for describing the deformation of a biological cell under any arbitrary, external periodic force including radiation forces unduced by acoustical (acoustical levitation) or optical waves (optical tweezers). PMID:19391781

  7. Deformation of biological cells in the acoustic field of an oscillating bubble.

    PubMed

    Zinin, Pavel V; Allen, John S

    2009-02-01

    In this work we develop a theoretical framework of the interaction of microbubbles with bacteria in the ultrasound field using a shell model of the bacteria, following an approach developed previously [P. V. Zinin, Phys. Rev. E 72, 61907 (2005)]. Within the shell model, the motion of the cell in an ultrasonic field is determined by the motion of three components: the internal viscous fluid, a thin elastic shell, and the surrounding viscous fluid. Several conclusions can be drawn from the modeling of sound interaction with a biological cell: (a) the characteristics of a cell's oscillations in an ultrasonic field are determined both by the elastic properties of the shell the viscosities of all components of the system, (b) for dipole quadrupole oscillations the cell's shell deforms due to a change in the shell area this oscillation depends on the surface area modulus K{A} , (c) the relative change in the area has a maximum at frequency f{K} approximately 1/2pi square root[K{A}(rhoa;{3})] , where a is the cell's radius and rho is its density. It was predicted that deformation of the cell wall at the frequency f{K} is high enough to rupture small bacteria such as E . coli in which the quality factor of natural vibrations is less than 1 (Q<1). For bacteria with high value quality factors (Q>1) , the area deformation has a strong peak near a resonance frequency f{K} however, the value of the deformation near the resonance frequency is not high enough to produce sufficient mechanical effect. The theoretical framework developed in this work can be extended for describing the deformation of a biological cell under any arbitrary, external periodic force including radiation forces unduced by acoustical (acoustical levitation) or optical waves (optical tweezers). PMID:19391781

  8. The dynamics of histotripsy bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreider, Wayne; Bailey, Michael R.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Crum, Lawrence A.

    2011-09-01

    Histotripsy describes treatments in which high-amplitude acoustic pulses are used to excite bubbles and erode tissue. Though tissue erosion can be directly attributed to bubble activity, the genesis and dynamics of bubbles remain unclear. Histotripsy lesions that show no signs of thermal coagulative damage have been generated with two different acoustic protocols: relatively long acoustic pulses that produce local boiling within milliseconds and relatively short pulses that are higher in amplitude but likely do not produce boiling. While these two approaches are often distinguished as `boiling' versus `cavitation', such labels can obscure similarities. In both cases, a bubble undergoes large changes in radius and vapor is transported into and out of the bubble as it oscillates. Moreover, observations from both approaches suggest that bubbles grow to a size at which they cease to collapse violently. In order to better understand the dynamics of histotripsy bubbles, a single-bubble model has been developed that couples acoustically excited bubble motions to the thermodynamic state of the surrounding liquid. Using this model for bubbles exposed to histotripsy sound fields, simulations suggest that two mechanisms can act separately or in concert to lead to the typically observed bubble growth. First, nonlinear acoustic propagation leads to the evolution of shocks and an asymmetry in the positive and negative pressures that drive bubble motion. This asymmetry can have a rectifying effect on bubble oscillations whereby the bubble grows on average during each acoustic cycle. Second, vapor transport to/from the bubble tends to produce larger bubbles, especially at elevated temperatures. Vapor transport by itself can lead to rectified bubble growth when the ambient temperature exceeds 100 °C (`boiling') or local heating in the vicinity of the bubble leads to a superheated boundary layer.

  9. Novel Acoustic Loading of a Mass Spectrometer: Toward Next-Generation High-Throughput MS Screening.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Ian; Stearns, Rick; Pringle, Steven; Wingfield, Jonathan; Datwani, Sammy; Hall, Eric; Ghislain, Luke; Majlof, Lars; Bachman, Martin

    2016-02-01

    High-throughput, direct measurement of substrate-to-product conversion by label-free detection, without the need for engineered substrates or secondary assays, could be considered the "holy grail" of drug discovery screening. Mass spectrometry (MS) has the potential to be part of this ultimate screening solution, but is constrained by the limitations of existing MS sample introduction modes that cannot meet the throughput requirements of high-throughput screening (HTS). Here we report data from a prototype system (Echo-MS) that uses acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) to transfer femtoliter-scale droplets in a rapid, precise, and accurate fashion directly into the MS. The acoustic source can load samples into the MS from a microtiter plate at a rate of up to three samples per second. The resulting MS signal displays a very sharp attack profile and ions are detected within 50 ms of activation of the acoustic transducer. Additionally, we show that the system is capable of generating multiply charged ion species from simple peptides and large proteins. The combination of high speed and low sample volume has significant potential within not only drug discovery, but also other areas of the industry. PMID:26721821

  10. Novel Acoustic Loading of a Mass Spectrometer: Toward Next-Generation High-Throughput MS Screening.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Ian; Stearns, Rick; Pringle, Steven; Wingfield, Jonathan; Datwani, Sammy; Hall, Eric; Ghislain, Luke; Majlof, Lars; Bachman, Martin

    2016-02-01

    High-throughput, direct measurement of substrate-to-product conversion by label-free detection, without the need for engineered substrates or secondary assays, could be considered the "holy grail" of drug discovery screening. Mass spectrometry (MS) has the potential to be part of this ultimate screening solution, but is constrained by the limitations of existing MS sample introduction modes that cannot meet the throughput requirements of high-throughput screening (HTS). Here we report data from a prototype system (Echo-MS) that uses acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) to transfer femtoliter-scale droplets in a rapid, precise, and accurate fashion directly into the MS. The acoustic source can load samples into the MS from a microtiter plate at a rate of up to three samples per second. The resulting MS signal displays a very sharp attack profile and ions are detected within 50 ms of activation of the acoustic transducer. Additionally, we show that the system is capable of generating multiply charged ion species from simple peptides and large proteins. The combination of high speed and low sample volume has significant potential within not only drug discovery, but also other areas of the industry.

  11. Sensitivity of free radicals production in acoustically driven bubble to the ultrasonic frequency and nature of dissolved gases.

    PubMed

    Merouani, Slimane; Hamdaoui, Oualid; Rezgui, Yacine; Guemini, Miloud

    2015-01-01

    Central events of ultrasonic action are the bubbles of cavitation that can be considered as powered microreactors within which high-energy chemistry occurs. This work presents the results of a comprehensive numerical assessment of frequency and saturating gases effects on single bubble sonochemistry. Computer simulations of chemical reactions occurring inside a bubble oscillating in liquid water irradiated by an ultrasonic wave have been performed for a wide range of ultrasonic frequencies (213-1100kHz) under different saturating gases (O2, air, N2 and H2). For O2 and H2 bubbles, reactions mechanism consisting in 25 reversible chemical reactions were proposed for studying the internal bubble-chemistry whereas 73 reversible reactions were taken into account for air and N2 bubbles. The numerical simulations have indicated that radicals such as OH, H, HO2 and O are created in the bubble during the strong collapse. In all cases, hydroxyl radical (OH) is the main oxidant created in the bubble. The production rate of the oxidants decreases as the driving ultrasonic frequency increases. The production rate of OH radical followed the order O2>air>N2>H2 and the order becomes more remarkable at higher ultrasonic frequencies. The effect of ultrasonic frequency on single bubble sonochemistry was attributed to its significant impact on the cavitation process whereas the effects of gases were attributed to the nature of the chemistry produced in the bubble at the strong collapse. It was concluded that, in addition to the gas solubility, the nature of the internal bubble chemistry is another parameter of a paramount importance that controls the overall sonochemical activity in aqueous solutions. PMID:25112684

  12. Acoustically enhanced bubble growth at low frequencies and its implications for human diver and marine mammal safety.

    PubMed

    Crum, L A; Mao, Y

    1996-05-01

    Computations are made of the conditions necessary to obtain bubble growth by rectified diffusion under a variety of conditions associated with low-frequency sonar propagation in the ocean. The complex issue of microbubble nuclei stabilization is treated by assuming either a sufficient level of supersaturation to stabilize the initial bubble size, or by examining a microbubble nucleus with zero surface tension. The bubble growth rates and thresholds are obtained for a ranged of sound-pressure levels (re: 1 microPa) from 150-220 dB, for initial bubble radii from 1-10 microns, and for levels of the dissolved gas concentration from 100% to 223% of saturation. It was determined that for the range of conditions examined, it was necessary to utilize three different formulations of the equations for bubble growth. The results of these calculations (and assumptions concerning nuclei stabilization) indicate that for SPL's in excess of 210 dB, significant bubble growth can be expected to occur, and divers and marine mammals exposed to these conditions could be at risk. For SPL's below about 190 dB, however, except under relatively extreme conditions of supersaturation, significant bubble growth is unexpected.

  13. Strongly interacting bubbles under an ultrasonic horn.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Kyuichi; Iida, Yasuo; Tuziuti, Toru; Kozuka, Teruyuki; Towata, Atsuya

    2008-01-01

    Numerical simulations of bubble pulsations have been performed for a system of two bubble clouds in order to study the experimentally observed bubble motion under an ultrasonic horn by high-speed video camera. The comparison between the calculated results and the experimental observation of the bubble pulsation has indicated that the bubble pulsation is strongly influenced by the interaction with surrounding bubbles. The expansion of a bubble during the rarefaction phase of ultrasound is strongly reduced by the bubble-bubble interaction. Some bubbles move toward the horn tip due to the secondary Bjerknes force acting from the bubbles near the horn tip. It has also been shown that the acoustic amplitude in the liquid is strongly reduced by cavitation due to the decrease in acoustic radiation resistance.

  14. Stable tridimensional bubble clusters in multi-bubble sonoluminescence (MBSL).

    PubMed

    Rosselló, J M; Dellavale, D; Bonetto, F J

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, stable clusters made of multiple sonoluminescent bubbles are experimentally and theoretically studied. Argon bubbles were acoustically generated and trapped using bi-frequency driving within a cylindrical chamber filled with a sulfuric acid aqueous solution (SA85w/w). The intensity of the acoustic pressure field was strong enough to sustain, during several minutes, a large number of positionally and spatially fixed (without pseudo-orbits) sonoluminescent bubbles over an ellipsoidally-shaped tridimensional array. The dimensions of the ellipsoids were studied as a function of the amplitude of the applied low-frequency acoustic pressure (PAc(LF)) and the static pressure in the fluid (P0). In order to explain the size and shape of the bubble clusters, we performed a series of numerical simulations of the hydrodynamic forces acting over the bubbles. In both cases the observed experimental behavior was in excellent agreement with the numerical results. The simulations revealed that the positionally stable region, mainly determined by the null primary Bjerknes force (F→Bj), is defined as the outer perimeter of an axisymmetric ellipsoidal cluster centered in the acoustic field antinode. The role of the high-frequency component of the pressure field and the influence of the secondary Bjerknes force are discussed. We also investigate the effect of a change in the concentration of dissolved gas on the positional and spatial instabilities through the cluster dimensions. The experimental and numerical results presented in this paper are potentially useful for further understanding and modeling numerous current research topics regarding multi-bubble phenomena, e.g. forces acting on the bubbles in multi-frequency acoustic fields, transient acoustic cavitation, bubble interactions, structure formation processes, atomic and molecular emissions of equal bubbles and nonlinear or unsteady acoustic pressure fields in bubbly media. PMID:24974006

  15. Stable tridimensional bubble clusters in multi-bubble sonoluminescence (MBSL).

    PubMed

    Rosselló, J M; Dellavale, D; Bonetto, F J

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, stable clusters made of multiple sonoluminescent bubbles are experimentally and theoretically studied. Argon bubbles were acoustically generated and trapped using bi-frequency driving within a cylindrical chamber filled with a sulfuric acid aqueous solution (SA85w/w). The intensity of the acoustic pressure field was strong enough to sustain, during several minutes, a large number of positionally and spatially fixed (without pseudo-orbits) sonoluminescent bubbles over an ellipsoidally-shaped tridimensional array. The dimensions of the ellipsoids were studied as a function of the amplitude of the applied low-frequency acoustic pressure (PAc(LF)) and the static pressure in the fluid (P0). In order to explain the size and shape of the bubble clusters, we performed a series of numerical simulations of the hydrodynamic forces acting over the bubbles. In both cases the observed experimental behavior was in excellent agreement with the numerical results. The simulations revealed that the positionally stable region, mainly determined by the null primary Bjerknes force (F→Bj), is defined as the outer perimeter of an axisymmetric ellipsoidal cluster centered in the acoustic field antinode. The role of the high-frequency component of the pressure field and the influence of the secondary Bjerknes force are discussed. We also investigate the effect of a change in the concentration of dissolved gas on the positional and spatial instabilities through the cluster dimensions. The experimental and numerical results presented in this paper are potentially useful for further understanding and modeling numerous current research topics regarding multi-bubble phenomena, e.g. forces acting on the bubbles in multi-frequency acoustic fields, transient acoustic cavitation, bubble interactions, structure formation processes, atomic and molecular emissions of equal bubbles and nonlinear or unsteady acoustic pressure fields in bubbly media.

  16. Experimental and numerical insights into seismo-acoustic signals generated during the expansion of rising and bursting large gas bubbles in low-viscosity magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Stephen; Corder, Steven; James, Michael

    2010-05-01

    Strombolian activity produces gas-rich, magma-poor eruptions suggesting the separation and concentration of volcanic gases within the plumbing system. These gases are assumed to rise as relatively large bubble rafts or individual 'slug' bubbles that can cause detectable seismic activity on interaction with conduit geometry. Rising within the magma column, a gas bubble must expand appreciably in order to maintain magma-static pressure, for instance volume would increase by a factor of c. 200 for a 1 km rise to the magma-atmosphere interface. For a near-conduit-filling gas slug this expansion is one-dimensional (i.e. length-wise) and increases in rate non-linearly on approach to the surface. As they ascend, small gas slugs can expand sufficiently rapidly to maintain approximate magma-static pressure, but large gas slugs become dynamically overpressured. In laboratory experiments, these unsteady flows of gas and liquid generate pressure changes measurable below the gas phase. They also cause apparatus motion that does not apparently relate directly to these changes. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulation of experiments reproduces the pressure changes within the liquid and allows visualisation of the viscous shear force exerted on the conduit wall around and above the slug as it rises and expands. CFD simulations at volcanic scale then give estimates of the various force contributions that could occur in the natural system. During the experiments, pressure change driven by slug expansion and burst was also measured in the ambient atmosphere above the upper liquid surface. We present experimental evidence of a range of burst processes that depend on the degree of gas overpressure in the slug. These processes range from the quiescent formation of a relatively long-lived liquid film that bursts some time after the gas slug has reached the liquid surface, through complex transitional behaviour where the meniscus detaches from the tube walls to form a bubble, to

  17. Nonlinear Bubble Dynamics And The Effects On Propagation Through Near-Surface Bubble Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leighton, Timothy G.

    2004-11-01

    Nonlinear bubble dynamics are often viewed as the unfortunate consequence of having to use high acoustic pressure amplitudes when the void fraction in the near-surface oceanic bubble layer is great enough to cause severe attenuation (e.g. >50 dB/m). This is seen as unfortunate since existing models for acoustic propagation in bubbly liquids are based on linear bubble dynamics. However, the development of nonlinear models does more than just allow quantification of the errors associated with the use of linear models. It also offers the possibility of propagation modeling and acoustic inversions which appropriately incorporate the bubble nonlinearity. Furthermore, it allows exploration and quantification of possible nonlinear effects which may be exploited. As a result, high acoustic pressure amplitudes may be desirable even in low void fractions, because they offer opportunities to gain information about the bubble cloud from the nonlinearities, and options to exploit the nonlinearities to enhance communication and sonar in bubbly waters. This paper presents a method for calculating the nonlinear acoustic cross-sections, scatter, attenuations and sound speeds from bubble clouds which may be inhomogeneous. The method allows prediction of the time dependency of these quantities, both because the cloud may vary and because the incident acoustic pulse may have finite and arbitrary time history. The method can be readily adapted for bubbles in other environments (e.g. clouds of interacting bubbles, sediments, structures, in vivo, reverberant conditions etc.). The possible exploitation of bubble acoustics by marine mammals, and for sonar enhancement, is explored.

  18. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  19. Acoustic Amplification in the Far Infrared Focal Plane Assembly of the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) for the Cassini Mission to Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagopian, John G.; Crooke, Julie

    1998-01-01

    The Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) of the Cassini mission to Saturn has two interferometers covering the far infrared FIR and mid infrared, MIR wavelength region. The FIR is a polarizing Michelson interferometer which presents a collimated output beam to the FIR focal plane. The focal plane consists of a parabolic focus mirror and an analyzer grid, which splits the output beams into transmitted and reflected components. The two polarizations are focussed onto two thermopile detectors; each consisting of a gold black foil welded to the top of two bismuth pyramids. The gold black is 30 microns thick, and the weld area is approximately 2 microns in diameter. The detectors are extremely fragile and the weld can be broken with a miniscule amount of airflow. The detectors consistently passed acoustic testing to qualification levels that simulated the launch environment of the Titan IV launch vehicle. However, they experienced a 50% failure rate when installed in the focal plane assembly during instrument level acoustic tests. A test focal plane was developed with small pressure transducers in the nominal detector locations. These tests indicated over 10 dB of acoustic amplification in the focal plane within the instrument during testing. New techniques were developed to allow testing of the focal plane without over testing the instrument, and modifications were made the focal plane assembly to successfully attenuate the amplification.

  20. The Dynamics of Bubbles and Bubble Clouds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smereka, Peter Stenberg

    In an effort to understand acoustic cavitation noise the dynamics of periodically driven single bubbles and bubble clouds are examined. The single bubble equations are written as a perturbation of a Hamiltonian system and the conditions for resonances to occur are found, these can interact with the nonresonant orbit to produce jump and period-doubling bifurcations. To study the chaotic behavior a map which approximates the Poincare map in the resonant band is derived. The Poincare map is computed numerically which shows the formation of strange attractors which suddenly disappear leaving behind Smale horseshoe maps. The bubble cloud is studied using an averaged two-fluid model for bubbly flow with periodic driving at the boundary. The equations are examined both analytically and numerically. Local and global existence of solutions is proved and the existence of an absorbing set is established. An analysis of the linearized equations combined with estimates on the nonlinearity is used to prove the existence of nonlinear periodic orbit. This periodic orbit is a fixed point of the Poincare map and its stability is determined by finding the spectrum of the linearized Poincare map. This calculation combined with the absorbing set proves that the long term dynamics of the bubble cloud is finite dimensional. Numerical computations show the important attractors are a periodic -two orbit and a quasi-periodic orbit.

  1. Numerical investigation of bubble nonlinear dynamics characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Jie Yang, Desen; Shi, Shengguo; Hu, Bo; Zhang, Haoyang; Jiang, Wei

    2015-10-28

    The complicated dynamical behaviors of bubble oscillation driven by acoustic wave can provide favorable conditions for many engineering applications. On the basis of Keller-Miksis model, the influences of control parameters, including acoustic frequency, acoustic pressure and radius of gas bubble, are discussed by utilizing various numerical analysis methods, Furthermore, the law of power spectral variation is studied. It is shown that the complicated dynamic behaviors of bubble oscillation driven by acoustic wave, such as bifurcation and chaos, further the stimulated scattering processes are revealed.

  2. Bubble levitation and translation under single-bubble sonoluminescence conditions.

    PubMed

    Matula, Thomas J

    2003-08-01

    Bubble levitation in an acoustic standing wave is re-examined for conditions relevant to single-bubble sonoluminescence. Unlike a previous examination [Matula et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 102, 1522-1527 (1997)], the stable parameter space [Pa,R0] is accounted for in this realization. Forces such as the added mass force and drag are included, and the results are compared with a simple force balance that equates the Bjerknes force to the buoyancy force. Under normal sonoluminescence conditions, the comparison is quite favorable. A more complete accounting of the forces shows that a stably levitated bubble does undergo periodic translational motion. The asymmetries associated with translational motion are hypothesized to generate instabilities in the spherical shape of the bubble. A reduction in gravity results in reduced translational motion. It is hypothesized that such conditions may lead to increased light output from sonoluminescing bubbles. PMID:12942960

  3. Bubble levitation and translation under single-bubble sonoluminescence conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matula, Thomas J.

    2003-08-01

    Bubble levitation in an acoustic standing wave is re-examined for conditions relevant to single-bubble sonoluminescence. Unlike a previous examination [Matula et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 102, 1522-1527 (1997)], the stable parameter space [Pa,R0] is accounted for in this realization. Forces such as the added mass force and drag are included, and the results are compared with a simple force balance that equates the Bjerknes force to the buoyancy force. Under normal sonoluminescence conditions, the comparison is quite favorable. A more complete accounting of the forces shows that a stably levitated bubble does undergo periodic translational motion. The asymmetries associated with translational motion are hypothesized to generate instabilities in the spherical shape of the bubble. A reduction in gravity results in reduced translational motion. It is hypothesized that such conditions may lead to increased light output from sonoluminescing bubbles.

  4. Aspherical bubble dynamics and oscillation times

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, A.; Noack, J.; Chapyak, E.J.; Godwin, R.P.

    1999-06-01

    The cavitation bubbles common in laser medicine are rarely perfectly spherical and are often located near tissue boundaries, in vessels, etc., which introduce aspherical dynamics. Here, novel features of aspherical bubble dynamics are explored by time-resolved photography and numerical simulations. The growth-collapse period of cylindrical bubbles of large aspect ratio (length:diameter {approximately}20) differs only slightly from twice the Rayleigh collapse time for a spherical bubble with an equivalent maximum volume. This fact justifies using the temporal interval between the acoustic signals emitted upon bubble creation and collapse to estimate the maximum bubble volume. As a result, hydrophone measurements can provide an estimate of the bubble size and energy even for aspherical bubbles. The change of the oscillation period of bubbles near solid walls and elastic (tissue-like) boundaries relative to that of isolated spherical bubbles is also investigated.

  5. Neutron detection via bubble chambers.

    PubMed

    Jordan, D V; Ely, J H; Peurrung, A J; Bond, L J; Collar, J I; Flake, M; Knopf, M A; Pitts, W K; Shaver, M; Sonnenschein, A; Smart, J E; Todd, L C

    2005-01-01

    Research investigating the application of pressure-cycled bubble chambers to fast neutron detection is described. Experiments with a Halon-filled chamber showed clear sensitivity to an AmBe neutron source and insensitivity to a (137)Cs gamma source. Bubble formation was documented using high-speed photography, and a ceramic piezo-electric transducer element registered the acoustic signature of bubble formation. In a second set of experiments, the bubble nucleation response of a Freon-134a chamber to an AmBe neutron source was documented with high-speed photography.

  6. Stable Multibubble Sonoluminescence Bubble Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Posakony, Gerald J.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Ahmed, Salahuddin

    2006-06-30

    Multibubble standing wave patterns can be generated from a flat piezoceramic transducer element propagating into water. By adding a second transducer positioned at 90 degrees from the transducer generating the standing wave, a 3-dimensional volume of stable single bubbles can be established. Further, the addition of the second transducer stabilizes the bubble pattern so that individual bubbles may be studied. The size of the bubbles and the separation of the standing waves depend on the frequency of operation. Two transducers, operating at frequencies above 500 kHz, provided the most graphic results for the configuration used in this study. At these frequencies stable bubbles exhibit a bright sonoluminescence pattern. Whereas stable SBSL is well-known, stable MBSL has not been previously reported. This paper includes discussions of the acoustic responses, standing wave patterns, and pictorial results of the separation of individual bubble of sonoluminescence in a multibubble sonoluminescence environment.

  7. Cavitation microstreaming generated by a bubble pair in an ultrasound field.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenghui; Cheng, Jianchun

    2013-08-01

    An analytical theory has been developed to calculate the acoustic streaming velocity inside and outside bubbles for the case of a bubble pair suspended in an unbounded viscous liquid, taking into account the two predominant modes of a bubble pair: The volume and translation modes. It was demonstrated that the interaction between bubbles can affect the magnitude and direction of acoustic streaming, especially for tangential components outside of bubbles. The acoustic streaming intensifies as the radius of the neighboring bubble increases and is weakened as the distance between the bubbles increases.

  8. Bubbles in a freshwater lake.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, S A; Stubbs, A R

    1979-05-31

    WHEN the wind is strong enough to produce whitecaps on Loch Ness, patchy 'clouds' of acoustic reflectors are detected well below the surface, the depth to which they penetrate increasing with wind speed (Fig. 1). No seasonal variation in the occurrence of the reflectors has been detected. A biological explanation is therefore discounted and we suggest here that they are bubbles caused by waves breaking and forming whitecaps in deep water. Similar bubble clouds may occur in other lakes and in the sea.

  9. Bubble dynamics in drinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broučková, Zuzana; Trávníček, Zdeněk; Šafařík, Pavel

    2014-03-01

    This study introduces two physical effects known from beverages: the effect of sinking bubbles and the hot chocolate sound effect. The paper presents two simple "kitchen" experiments. The first and second effects are indicated by means of a flow visualization and microphone measurement, respectively. To quantify the second (acoustic) effect, sound records are analyzed using time-frequency signal processing, and the obtained power spectra and spectrograms are discussed.

  10. Improving acoustic determinations of the Boltzmann constant with mass spectrometer measurements of the molar mass of argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Inseok; Pitre, Laurent; Moldover, Michael R.; Zhang, Jintao; Feng, Xiaojuan; Seog Kim, Jin

    2015-10-01

    We determined accurate values of ratios among the average molar masses MAr of 9 argon samples using two completely-independent techniques: (1) mass spectrometry and (2) measured ratios of acoustic resonance frequencies. The two techniques yielded mutually consistent ratios (RMS deviation of 0.16   ×   10-6 MAr from the expected correlation) for the 9 samples of highly-purified, commercially-purchased argon with values of MAr spanning a range of 2   ×   10-6 MAr. Among the 9 argon samples, two were traceable to recent, accurate, argon-based measurements of the Boltzmann constant kB using primary acoustic gas thermometers (AGT). Additionally we determined our absolute values of MAr traceable to two, completely-independent, isotopic-reference standards; one standard was prepared gravimetrically at KRISS in 2006; the other standard was isotopically-enriched 40Ar that was used during NIST’s 1988 measurement of kB and was sent to NIM for this research. The absolute values of MAr determined using the KRISS standard have the relative standard uncertainty ur(MAr)  =  0.70   ×   10-6 (Uncertainties here are one standard uncertainty.); they agree with values of MAr determined at NIM using an AGT within the uncertainty of the comparison ur(MAr)  =  0.93   ×   10-6. If our measurements of MAr are accepted, the difference between two, recent, argon-based, AGT measurements of kB decreases from (2.77   ±   1.43)  ×  10-6 kB to (0.16   ±   1.28)  ×  10-6 kB. This decrease enables the calculation of a meaningful, weighted average value of kB with a uncertainty ur(kB)  ≈  0.6   ×   10-6.

  11. Nonlinear ultrasonic waves in bubbly liquids with nonhomogeneous bubble distribution: Numerical experiments.

    PubMed

    Vanhille, Christian; Campos-Pozuelo, Cleofé

    2009-06-01

    This paper deals with the nonlinear propagation of ultrasonic waves in mixtures of air bubbles in water, but for which the bubble distribution is nonhomogeneous. The problem is modelled by means of a set of differential equations which describes the coupling of the acoustic field and bubbles vibration, and solved in the time domain via the use and adaptation of the SNOW-BL code. The attenuation and nonlinear effects are assumed to be due to the bubbles exclusively. The nonhomogeneity of the bubble distribution is introduced by the presence of bubble layers (or clouds) which can act as acoustic screens, and alters the behaviour of the ultrasonic waves. The effect of the spatial distribution of bubbles on the nonlinearity of the acoustic field is analyzed. Depending on the bubble density, dimension, shape, and position of the layers, its effects on the acoustic field change. Effects such as shielding and resonance of the bubbly layers are especially studied. The numerical experiments are carried out in two configurations: linear and nonlinear, i.e. for low and high excitation pressure amplitude, respectively, and the features of the phenomenon are compared. The parameters of the medium are chosen such as to reproduce air bubbly water involved in the stable cavitation process.

  12. Recalcitrant bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Shanahan, Martin E. R.; Sefiane, Khellil

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that thermocapillary forces may drive bubbles against liquid flow in ‘anomalous' mixtures. Unlike ‘ordinary' liquids, in which bubbles migrate towards higher temperatures, we have observed vapour bubbles migrating towards lower temperatures, therefore against the flow. This unusual behaviour may be explained by the temperature dependence of surface tension of these binary mixtures. Bubbles migrating towards their equilibrium position follow an exponential trend. They finally settle in a stationary position just ‘downstream' of the minimum in surface tension. The exponential trend for bubbles in ‘anomalous' mixtures and the linear trend in pure liquids can be explained by a simple model. For larger bubbles, oscillations were observed. These oscillations can be reasonably explained by including an inertial term in the equation of motion (neglected for smaller bubbles). PMID:24740256

  13. Recalcitrant bubbles.

    PubMed

    Shanahan, Martin E R; Sefiane, Khellil

    2014-04-17

    We demonstrate that thermocapillary forces may drive bubbles against liquid flow in 'anomalous' mixtures. Unlike 'ordinary' liquids, in which bubbles migrate towards higher temperatures, we have observed vapour bubbles migrating towards lower temperatures, therefore against the flow. This unusual behaviour may be explained by the temperature dependence of surface tension of these binary mixtures. Bubbles migrating towards their equilibrium position follow an exponential trend. They finally settle in a stationary position just 'downstream' of the minimum in surface tension. The exponential trend for bubbles in 'anomalous' mixtures and the linear trend in pure liquids can be explained by a simple model. For larger bubbles, oscillations were observed. These oscillations can be reasonably explained by including an inertial term in the equation of motion (neglected for smaller bubbles).

  14. Manipulating bubbles with secondary Bjerknes forces

    SciTech Connect

    Lanoy, Maxime; Derec, Caroline; Leroy, Valentin; Tourin, Arnaud

    2015-11-23

    Gas bubbles in a sound field are submitted to a radiative force, known as the secondary Bjerknes force. We propose an original experimental setup that allows us to investigate in detail this force between two bubbles, as a function of the sonication frequency, as well as the bubbles radii and distance. We report the observation of both attractive and, more interestingly, repulsive Bjerknes force, when the two bubbles are driven in antiphase. Our experiments show the importance of taking multiple scatterings into account, which leads to a strong acoustic coupling of the bubbles when their radii are similar. Our setup demonstrates the accuracy of secondary Bjerknes forces for attracting or repealing a bubble, and could lead to new acoustic tools for noncontact manipulation in microfluidic devices.

  15. Aspherical bubble dynamics and oscillation times

    SciTech Connect

    Godwin, R.P.; Chapyak, E.J.; Noack, J.; Vogel, A.

    1999-03-01

    The cavitation bubbles common in laser medicine are rarely perfectly spherical and are often located near tissue boundaries, in vessels, etc., which introduce aspherical dynamics. Here, novel features of aspherical bubble dynamics are explored. Time-resolved experimental photographs and simulations of large aspect ratio (length:diameter {approximately}20) cylindrical bubble dynamics are presented. The experiments and calculations exhibit similar dynamics. A small high-pressure cylindrical bubble initially expands radially with hardly any axial motion. Then, after reaching its maximum volume, a cylindrical bubble collapses along its long axis with relatively little radial motion. The growth-collapse period of these very aspherical bubbles differs only sightly from twice the Rayleigh collapse time for a spherical bubble with an equivalent maximum volume. This fact justifies using the temporal interval between the acoustic signals emitted upon bubble creation and collapse to estimate the maximum bubble volume. As a result, hydrophone measurements can provide an estimate of the bubble energy even for aspherical bubbles. The prolongation of the oscillation period of bubbles near solid boundaries relative to that of isolated spherical bubbles is also discussed.

  16. Nonlinear bubble dynamics of cavitation.

    PubMed

    An, Yu

    2012-01-01

    For cavitation clouds generated in a standing sound wave driven by an ultrasonic horn, the nonlinear acoustic wave equation governing cavitation dynamics is numerically solved together with the bubble motion equation under an approximation. This conceptual calculation can qualitatively reproduce the observed characteristics of cavitation.

  17. Bubble baryogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Clifford; Dahlen, Alex; Elor, Gilly

    2012-09-01

    We propose an alternative mechanism of baryogenesis in which a scalar baryon undergoes a percolating first-order phase transition in the early Universe. The potential barrier that divides the phases contains explicit B and CP violation and the corresponding instanton that mediates decay is therefore asymmetric. The nucleation and growth of these asymmetric bubbles dynamically generates baryons, which thermalize after percolation; bubble collision dynamics can also add to the asymmetry yield. We present an explicit toy model that undergoes bubble baryogenesis, and numerically study the evolution of the baryon asymmetry through bubble nucleation and growth, bubble collisions, and washout. We discuss more realistic constructions, in which the scalar baryon and its potential arise amongst the color-breaking minima of the MSSM, or in the supersymmetric neutrino seesaw mechanism. Phenomenological consequences, such as gravitational waves, and possible applications to asymmetric dark-matter generation are also discussed.

  18. Bubble fusion: Preliminary estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1995-02-01

    The collapse of a gas-filled bubble in disequilibrium (i.e., internal pressure {much_lt} external pressure) can occur with a significant focusing of energy onto the entrapped gas in the form of pressure-volume work and/or acoustical shocks; the resulting heating can be sufficient to cause ionization and the emission of atomic radiations. The suggestion that extreme conditions necessary for thermonuclear fusion to occur may be possible has been examined parametrically in terms of the ratio of initial bubble pressure relative to that required for equilibrium. In this sense, the disequilibrium bubble is viewed as a three-dimensional ``sling shot`` that is ``loaded`` to an extent allowed by the maximum level of disequilibrium that can stably be achieved. Values of this disequilibrium ratio in the range 10{sup {minus}5}--10{sup {minus}6} are predicted by an idealized bubble-dynamics model as necessary to achieve conditions where nuclear fusion of deuterium-tritium might be observed. Harmonic and aharmonic pressurizations/decompressions are examined as means to achieve the required levels of disequilibrium required to create fusion conditions. A number of phenomena not included in the analysis reported herein could enhance or reduce the small levels of nuclear fusions predicted.

  19. Bubble, Bubble, Toil and Trouble.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Bubbles are a fun way to introduce the concepts of surface tension, intermolecular forces, and the use of surfactants. Presents two activities in which students add chemicals to liquid dishwashing detergent with water in order to create longer lasting bubbles. (ASK)

  20. Plasma formation in underwater gas bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommers, B. S.; Foster, J. E.

    2014-02-01

    The generation of plasma in underwater gas bubbles offers the potential to produce large volume plasma in water while minimizing electrode erosion. Such attributes are desirable for the design of plasma-based water purification systems. In this work, gas bubbles of diameter 0.4-0.7 mm were trapped in the node of a 26.4 kHz underwater acoustic standing wave and pulsed with voltages in the range 10-14 kV. Plasma formation in trapped, isolated bubbles was observed to occur through two separate pathways: (1) plasma generated in the bubble through impact by a liquid streamer and (2) plasma generated in the bubble due solely to the applied electric field. The former case demonstrates the mechanism of so-called streamer hopping in which the discharge transitions from a water streamer to a gaseous surface streamer. Perturbations of the bubble's fluid boundary due to the streamer are also discussed.

  1. Pressure waves in a supersaturated bubbly magma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurzon, I.; Lyakhovsky, V.; Navon, O.; Chouet, B.

    2011-01-01

    We study the interaction of acoustic pressure waves with an expanding bubbly magma. The expansion of magma is the result of bubble growth during or following magma decompression and leads to two competing processes that affect pressure waves. On the one hand, growth in vesicularity leads to increased damping and decreased wave amplitudes, and on the other hand, a decrease in the effective bulk modulus of the bubbly mixture reduces wave velocity, which in turn, reduces damping and may lead to wave amplification. The additional acoustic energy originates from the chemical energy released during bubble growth. We examine this phenomenon analytically to identify conditions under which amplification of pressure waves is possible. These conditions are further examined numerically to shed light on the frequency and phase dependencies in relation to the interaction of waves and growing bubbles. Amplification is possible at low frequencies and when the growth rate of bubbles reaches an optimum value for which the wave velocity decreases sufficiently to overcome the increased damping of the vesicular material. We examine two amplification phase-dependent effects: (1) a tensile-phase effect in which the inserted wave adds to the process of bubble growth, utilizing the energy associated with the gas overpressure in the bubble and therefore converting a large proportion of this energy into additional acoustic energy, and (2) a compressive-phase effect in which the pressure wave works against the growing bubbles and a large amount of its acoustic energy is dissipated during the first cycle, but later enough energy is gained to amplify the second cycle. These two effects provide additional new possible mechanisms for the amplification phase seen in Long-Period (LP) and Very-Long-Period (VLP) seismic signals originating in magma-filled cracks.

  2. Automated bubble sizing using two frequency excitation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelps, Andy D.; Leighton, Timothy G.

    The presence of bubbles in the ocean is an important phenomenon, and studies into a range of effects (atmosphere/ocean gas flux, near surface acoustic propagation, etc.) often require knowledge of their size, number and distribution. Such information is also important for studying bubbles in industrial or clinical systems. Because bubbles are excellent scatterers of sound, with well-defined acoustic resonances which (to a first approximation) are inversely proportional to their size, these measurements lend themselves towards the use of acoustics. At large amplitudes an asymmetry is introduced into the pulsation of the bubble wall, and this nonlinearity is used to detect resonant bubbles. The results presented are of a technique which uses two sound fields incident on the bubble - one high fixed imaging frequency and another lower frequency that is adjusted to match the resonant frequency of the bubble. The nonlinearity gives rise to sum-and-difference coupling of the imaging frequency with the bubble resonance, and with harmonics, subharmonics and ultraharmonics of this resonance. From these the bubble radius can be determined. This paper gives details of investigations into the suitability of this method to actively size bubbles of unknown radius and distribution, and discusses its accuracy and limitations. In addition, the feasibility of automated high-resolution bubble sizing is examined using specialised signal processing and heterodyning techniques.

  3. Bubble-bubble interaction: A potential source of cavitation noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida, Masato

    2009-01-01

    The interaction between microbubbles through pressure pulses has been studied to show that it can be a source of cavitation noise. A recent report demonstrated that the acoustic noise generated by a shrimp originates from the collapse of a cavitation bubble produced when the shrimp closes its snapper claw. The recorded acoustic signal contains a broadband noise that consists of positive and negative pulses, but a theoretical model for single bubbles fails to reproduce the negative ones. Using a nonlinear multibubble model, we have shown here that the negative pulses can be explained by considering the interaction of microbubbles formed after the cavitation bubble has collapsed and fragmented: Positive pulses produced at the collapse of the microbubbles hit and impulsively compress neighboring microbubbles to generate reflected pulses whose amplitudes are negative. Discussing the details of the noise generation process, we have found that no negative pulses are generated if the internal pressure of the reflecting bubble is very high when hit by a positive pulse.

  4. Modeling bubble dynamics and radical kinetics in ultrasound induced microalgal cell disruption.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Yuan, Wenqiao

    2016-01-01

    Microalgal cell disruption induced by acoustic cavitation was simulated through solving the bubble dynamics in an acoustical field and their radial kinetics (chemical kinetics of radical species) occurring in the bubble during its oscillation, as well as calculating the bubble wall pressure at the collapse point. Modeling results indicated that increasing ultrasonic intensity led to a substantial increase in the number of bubbles formed during acoustic cavitation, however, the pressure generated when the bubbles collapsed decreased. Therefore, cumulative collapse pressure (CCP) of bubbles was used to quantify acoustic disruption of a freshwater alga, Scenedesmus dimorphus, and a marine alga, Nannochloropsis oculata and compare with experimental results. The strong correlations between CCP and the intracellular lipid fluorescence density, chlorophyll-a fluorescence density, and cell particle/debris concentration were found, which suggests that the developed models could accurately predict acoustic cell disruption, and can be utilized in the scale up and optimization of the process. PMID:26384877

  5. Bubble size measurements in a bubbly wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karn, Ashish; Hong, Jiarong; Ellis, Christopher; Arndt, Roger

    2014-11-01

    Measurements of bubble size distribution are ubiquitous in many industrial applications. Conventional methods using image analysis to measure bubble size are limited in their robustness and applicability in highly turbulent bubbly flows. These flows usually impose significant challenges for image processing such as a wide range of bubble size distribution, spatial and temporal inhomogeneity of image background including in-focus and out-of-focus bubbles, as well as the excessive presence of bubble clusters. This talk introduces a multi-level image analysis approach to detect a wide size range of bubbles and resolve bubble clusters from images obtained in a turbulent bubbly wake of a ventilated hydrofoil. The proposed approach was implemented to derive bubble size and air ventilation rate from the synthetic images and the experiments, respectively. The results show a great promise in its applicability for online monitoring of bubbly flows in a number of industrial applications. Sponsored by Office of Naval Research and the Department of Energy.

  6. Tiny Bubbles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hy

    1985-01-01

    A simple oxygen-collecting device (easily constructed from glass jars and a lid) can show bubbles released by water plants during photosynthesis. Suggestions are given for: (1) testing the collected gas; (2) using various carbon dioxide sources; and (3) measuring respiration. (DH)

  7. Leverage bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wanfeng; Woodard, Ryan; Sornette, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Leverage is strongly related to liquidity in a market and lack of liquidity is considered a cause and/or consequence of the recent financial crisis. A repurchase agreement is a financial instrument where a security is sold simultaneously with an agreement to buy it back at a later date. Repurchase agreement (repo) market size is a very important element in calculating the overall leverage in a financial market. Therefore, studying the behavior of repo market size can help to understand a process that can contribute to the birth of a financial crisis. We hypothesize that herding behavior among large investors led to massive over-leveraging through the use of repos, resulting in a bubble (built up over the previous years) and subsequent crash in this market in early 2008. We use the Johansen-Ledoit-Sornette (JLS) model of rational expectation bubbles and behavioral finance to study the dynamics of the repo market that led to the crash. The JLS model qualifies a bubble by the presence of characteristic patterns in the price dynamics, called log-periodic power law (LPPL) behavior. We show that there was significant LPPL behavior in the market before that crash and that the predicted range of times predicted by the model for the end of the bubble is consistent with the observations.

  8. Optical cavitation probe using light scattering from bubble clouds.

    PubMed

    Iida, Yasuo; Lee, Judy; Kozuka, Teruyuki; Yasui, Kyuichi; Towata, Atsuya; Tuziuti, Toru

    2009-04-01

    To understand the behaviour of systems containing clouds of bubbles (multibubble system) in real sonochemical reactors, a new diagnosis method, i.e., optical cavitation probe (OCP), has been proposed. When a laser beam is introduced into the cavitation bubble cloud, the scattered light intensity changes by the collective oscillation of cavitation bubbles. The frequency domain spectrum of the scattered light contains rich information on the cavitation bubble clouds, comparable with the acoustic emission spectra detected by a hydrophone. The significant merits of OCP, such as capability for spatially resolved, non-invasive measurement of the cavitation bubble clouds, robustness even in a violent cavitation field have been experimentally demonstrated.

  9. Spatial-temporal dynamics of cavitation bubble clouds in 1.2 MHz focused ultrasound field.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Li, Xiaojing; Wan, Mingxi

    2006-09-01

    Cavitation bubbles have been recognized as being essential to many applications of ultrasound. Temporal evolution and spatial distribution of cavitation bubble clouds induced by a focused ultrasound transducer of 1.2 MHz center frequency are investigated by high-speed photography. It is revealed that at a total acoustic power of 72 W the cavitation bubble cloud first emerges in the focal region where cavitation bubbles are observed to generate, grow, merge and collapse during the initial 600 micros. The bubble cloud then grows upward to the post-focal region, and finally becomes visible in the pre-focal region. The structure of the final bubble cloud is characterized by regional distribution of cavitation bubbles in the ultrasound field. The cavitation bubble cloud structure remains stable when the acoustic power is increased from 25 W to 107 W, but it changes to a more violent form when the acoustic power is further increased to 175 W.

  10. Spatial-temporal dynamics of cavitation bubble clouds in 1.2 MHz focused ultrasound field.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Li, Xiaojing; Wan, Mingxi

    2006-09-01

    Cavitation bubbles have been recognized as being essential to many applications of ultrasound. Temporal evolution and spatial distribution of cavitation bubble clouds induced by a focused ultrasound transducer of 1.2 MHz center frequency are investigated by high-speed photography. It is revealed that at a total acoustic power of 72 W the cavitation bubble cloud first emerges in the focal region where cavitation bubbles are observed to generate, grow, merge and collapse during the initial 600 micros. The bubble cloud then grows upward to the post-focal region, and finally becomes visible in the pre-focal region. The structure of the final bubble cloud is characterized by regional distribution of cavitation bubbles in the ultrasound field. The cavitation bubble cloud structure remains stable when the acoustic power is increased from 25 W to 107 W, but it changes to a more violent form when the acoustic power is further increased to 175 W. PMID:16571378

  11. Models of cylindrical bubble pulsation

    PubMed Central

    Ilinskii, Yurii A.; Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A.; Hay, Todd A.; Hamilton, Mark F.

    2012-01-01

    Three models are considered for describing the dynamics of a pulsating cylindrical bubble. A linear solution is derived for a cylindrical bubble in an infinite compressible liquid. The solution accounts for losses due to viscosity, heat conduction, and acoustic radiation. It reveals that radiation is the dominant loss mechanism, and that it is 22 times greater than for a spherical bubble of the same radius. The predicted resonance frequency provides a basis of comparison for limiting forms of other models. The second model considered is a commonly used equation in Rayleigh-Plesset form that requires an incompressible liquid to be finite in extent in order for bubble pulsation to occur. The radial extent of the liquid becomes a fitting parameter, and it is found that considerably different values of the parameter are required for modeling inertial motion versus acoustical oscillations. The third model was developed by V. K. Kedrinskii [Hydrodynamics of Explosion (Springer, New York, 2005), pp. 23–26] in the form of the Gilmore equation for compressible liquids of infinite extent. While the correct resonance frequency and loss factor are not recovered from this model in the linear approximation, it provides reasonable agreement with observations of inertial motion. PMID:22978863

  12. Molecular emission from single-bubble sonoluminescence.

    PubMed

    Didenko, Y T; McNamara, W B; Suslick, K S

    2000-10-19

    Ultrasound can drive a single gas bubble in water into violent oscillation; as the bubble is compressed periodically, extremely short flashes of light (about 100 ps) are generated with clock-like regularity. This process, known as single-bubble sonoluminescence, gives rise to featureless continuum emission in water (from 200 to 800 nm, with increasing intensity into the ultraviolet). In contrast, the emission of light from clouds of cavitating bubbles at higher acoustic pressures (multi-bubble sonoluminescence) is dominated by atomic and molecular excited-state emission at much lower temperatures. These observations have spurred intense effort to uncover the origin of sonoluminescence and to generalize the conditions necessary for its creation. Here we report a series of polar aprotic liquids that generate very strong single-bubble sonoluminescence, during which emission from molecular excited states is observed. Previously, single-bubble sonoluminescence from liquids other than water has proved extremely elusive. Our results give direct proof of the existence of chemical reactions and the formation of molecular excited states during single-bubble cavitation, and provide a spectroscopic link between single- and multi-bubble sonoluminescence.

  13. Bubble Drag Reduction Requires Large Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verschoof, Ruben A.; van der Veen, Roeland C. A.; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-09-01

    In the maritime industry, the injection of air bubbles into the turbulent boundary layer under the ship hull is seen as one of the most promising techniques to reduce the overall fuel consumption. However, the exact mechanism behind bubble drag reduction is unknown. Here we show that bubble drag reduction in turbulent flow dramatically depends on the bubble size. By adding minute concentrations (6 ppm) of the surfactant Triton X-100 into otherwise completely unchanged strongly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow containing bubbles, we dramatically reduce the drag reduction from more than 40% to about 4%, corresponding to the trivial effect of the bubbles on the density and viscosity of the liquid. The reason for this striking behavior is that the addition of surfactants prevents bubble coalescence, leading to much smaller bubbles. Our result demonstrates that bubble deformability is crucial for bubble drag reduction in turbulent flow and opens the door for an optimization of the process.

  14. Bubble Drag Reduction Requires Large Bubbles.

    PubMed

    Verschoof, Ruben A; van der Veen, Roeland C A; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-09-01

    In the maritime industry, the injection of air bubbles into the turbulent boundary layer under the ship hull is seen as one of the most promising techniques to reduce the overall fuel consumption. However, the exact mechanism behind bubble drag reduction is unknown. Here we show that bubble drag reduction in turbulent flow dramatically depends on the bubble size. By adding minute concentrations (6 ppm) of the surfactant Triton X-100 into otherwise completely unchanged strongly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow containing bubbles, we dramatically reduce the drag reduction from more than 40% to about 4%, corresponding to the trivial effect of the bubbles on the density and viscosity of the liquid. The reason for this striking behavior is that the addition of surfactants prevents bubble coalescence, leading to much smaller bubbles. Our result demonstrates that bubble deformability is crucial for bubble drag reduction in turbulent flow and opens the door for an optimization of the process.

  15. Bubble Drag Reduction Requires Large Bubbles.

    PubMed

    Verschoof, Ruben A; van der Veen, Roeland C A; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-09-01

    In the maritime industry, the injection of air bubbles into the turbulent boundary layer under the ship hull is seen as one of the most promising techniques to reduce the overall fuel consumption. However, the exact mechanism behind bubble drag reduction is unknown. Here we show that bubble drag reduction in turbulent flow dramatically depends on the bubble size. By adding minute concentrations (6 ppm) of the surfactant Triton X-100 into otherwise completely unchanged strongly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow containing bubbles, we dramatically reduce the drag reduction from more than 40% to about 4%, corresponding to the trivial effect of the bubbles on the density and viscosity of the liquid. The reason for this striking behavior is that the addition of surfactants prevents bubble coalescence, leading to much smaller bubbles. Our result demonstrates that bubble deformability is crucial for bubble drag reduction in turbulent flow and opens the door for an optimization of the process. PMID:27636479

  16. Monolithic spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Rajic, S.; Egert, C.M.; Kahl, W.K.; Snyder, W.B. Jr.; Evans, B.M. III; Marlar, T.A.; Cunningham, J.P.

    1998-05-19

    A monolithic spectrometer is disclosed for use in spectroscopy. The spectrometer is a single body of translucent material with positioned surfaces for the transmission, reflection and spectral analysis of light rays. 6 figs.

  17. Monolithic spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Rajic, Slobodan; Egert, Charles M.; Kahl, William K.; Snyder, Jr., William B.; Evans, III, Boyd M.; Marlar, Troy A.; Cunningham, Joseph P.

    1998-01-01

    A monolithic spectrometer is disclosed for use in spectroscopy. The spectrometer is a single body of translucent material with positioned surfaces for the transmission, reflection and spectral analysis of light rays.

  18. Shock formation within sonoluminescence bubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Vuong, V.Q.; Szeri, A.J.; Young, D.A.

    1999-01-01

    A strong case has been made by several authors that sharp, spherically symmetric shocks converging on the center of a spherical bubble driven by a strong acoustic field give rise to rapid compression and heating that produces the brief flash of light known as sonoluminescence. The formation of such shocks is considered. It is found that, although at the main collapse the bubble wall does indeed launch an inwardly-traveling compression wave, and although the subsequent reflection of the wave at the bubble center produces a very rapid temperature peak, the wave is prevented from steepening into a sharp shock by an adverse gradient in the sound speed caused by heat transfer. It is shown that the mathematical characteristics of the flow can be prevented from accumulating into a shock front by this adverse sound speed gradient. A range of results is presented for a variety of bubble ambient radii and sound field amplitudes suggested by experiments. The time scale of the peak temperature in the bubble is set by the dynamics of the compression wave: this is typically in the range 100{endash}300 ps (FWHM) in concert with recent measurements of the sonoluminescence pulse width. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Nonlinear Acoustics in Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauterborn, Werner; Kurz, Thomas; Akhatov, Iskander

    At high sound intensities or long propagation distances at in fluids sufficiently low damping acoustic phenomena become nonlinear. This chapter focuses on nonlinear acoustic wave properties in gases and liquids. The origin of nonlinearity, equations of state, simple nonlinear waves, nonlinear acoustic wave equations, shock-wave formation, and interaction of waves are presented and discussed. Tables are given for the nonlinearity parameter B/A for water and a range of organic liquids, liquid metals and gases. Acoustic cavitation with its nonlinear bubble oscillations, pattern formation and sonoluminescence (light from sound) are modern examples of nonlinear acoustics. The language of nonlinear dynamics needed for understanding chaotic dynamics and acoustic chaotic systems is introduced.

  20. Single Bubble Sonoluminescence in Low Gravity and Optical Radiation Pressure Positioning of the Bubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thiessen, D. B.; Young, J. E.; Marr-Lyon, M. J.; Richardson, S. L.; Breckon, C. D.; Douthit, S. G.; Jian, P. S.; Torruellas, W. E.; Marston, P. L.

    1999-01-01

    Several groups of researchers have demonstrated that high frequency sound in water may be used to cause the regular repeated compression and luminescence of a small bubble of gas in a flask. The phenomenon is known as single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL). It is potentially important because light emitted by the bubble appears to be associated with a significant concentration of energy within the volume of the bubble. Unfortunately, the detailed physical mechanisms causing the radiation of light by oscillating bubbles are poorly understood and there is some evidence that carrying out experiments in a weightless environment may provide helpful clues. In addition, the radiation pressure of laser beams on the bubble may provide a way of simulating weightless experiments in the laboratory. The standard model of SBSL attributes the light emission to heating within the bubble by a spherically imploding shock wave to achieve temperatures of 50,000 K or greater. In an alternative model, the emission is attributed to the impact of a jet of water which is required to span the bubble and the formation of the jet is linked to the buoyancy of the bubble. The coupling between buoyancy and jet formation is a consequence of the displacement of the bubble from a velocity node (pressure antinode) of the standing acoustic wave that drives the radial bubble oscillations. One objective of this grant is to understand SBSL emission in reduced buoyancy on KC-135 parabolic flights. To optimize the design of those experiments and for other reasons which will help resolve the role of buoyancy, laboratory experiments are planned in simulated low gravity in which the radiation pressure of laser light will be used to position the bubble at the acoustic velocity node of the ultrasonic standing wave. Laser light will also be used to push the bubble away from the velocity node, increasing the effective buoyancy. The original experiments on the optical levitation and radiation pressure on bubbles

  1. Bubbles with shock waves and ultrasound: a review.

    PubMed

    Ohl, Siew-Wan; Klaseboer, Evert; Khoo, Boo Cheong

    2015-10-01

    The study of the interaction of bubbles with shock waves and ultrasound is sometimes termed 'acoustic cavitation'. It is of importance in many biomedical applications where sound waves are applied. The use of shock waves and ultrasound in medical treatments is appealing because of their non-invasiveness. In this review, we present a variety of acoustics-bubble interactions, with a focus on shock wave-bubble interaction and bubble cloud phenomena. The dynamics of a single spherically oscillating bubble is rather well understood. However, when there is a nearby surface, the bubble often collapses non-spherically with a high-speed jet. The direction of the jet depends on the 'resistance' of the boundary: the bubble jets towards a rigid boundary, splits up near an elastic boundary, and jets away from a free surface. The presence of a shock wave complicates the bubble dynamics further. We shall discuss both experimental studies using high-speed photography and numerical simulations involving shock wave-bubble interaction. In biomedical applications, instead of a single bubble, often clouds of bubbles appear (consisting of many individual bubbles). The dynamics of such a bubble cloud is even more complex. We shall show some of the phenomena observed in a high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) field. The nonlinear nature of the sound field and the complex inter-bubble interaction in a cloud present challenges to a comprehensive understanding of the physics of the bubble cloud in HIFU. We conclude the article with some comments on the challenges ahead.

  2. Dependence of the characteristics of bubbles on types of sonochemical reactors.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Kyuichi; Tuziuti, Toru; Iida, Yasuo

    2005-01-01

    Computer simulations of bubble oscillations in liquid water irradiated by an ultrasonic wave have revealed that the characteristic of bubbles depends on types of sonochemical reactors: a horn-type reactor and a standing-wave type reactor. When the acoustic amplitude is large at 20 kHz, the bubble content is mostly water vapor even at the end of the bubble collapse and the temperature inside a bubble at the collapse is relatively low. On the other hand, when the acoustic amplitude is relatively low, the bubble content is mostly noncondensable gas at the end of the bubble collapse and the bubble temperature is relatively high. In a horn-type sonochemical reactor, the former type of bubbles are dominant because many bubbles exist near the horn-tip where the acoustic amplitude is large, while in a standing-wave type reactor the latter type of bubbles are dominant because the Bjerknes force gathers bubbles at a region where acoustic amplitude is relatively low.

  3. Disproportionate emission of bubble streams with killer whale biphonic calls: perspectives on production and function.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Ann E; Grebner, Dawn M; Musser, Whitney B; Nash, Juliette S; Crance, Jessica L

    2015-02-01

    Stereotyped pulsed calls were attributed to 11 killer whales (Orcinus orca) with and without synchronous bubble streams in three datasets collected from two facilities from 1993 to 2012. Calls with and without synchronous bubble streams and divergent overlapping high frequency components ("biphonic" vs "monophonic") were compared. Subjects produced bubbles significantly more often when calls had divergent high frequency components. However, acoustic features in one biphonic call shared by five subjects provided little evidence for an acoustic effect of synchronous bubble flow. Disproportionate bubbling supported other evidence that biphonic calls form a distinct category, but suggested a function in short-range communication. PMID:25698045

  4. Disproportionate emission of bubble streams with killer whale biphonic calls: perspectives on production and function.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Ann E; Grebner, Dawn M; Musser, Whitney B; Nash, Juliette S; Crance, Jessica L

    2015-02-01

    Stereotyped pulsed calls were attributed to 11 killer whales (Orcinus orca) with and without synchronous bubble streams in three datasets collected from two facilities from 1993 to 2012. Calls with and without synchronous bubble streams and divergent overlapping high frequency components ("biphonic" vs "monophonic") were compared. Subjects produced bubbles significantly more often when calls had divergent high frequency components. However, acoustic features in one biphonic call shared by five subjects provided little evidence for an acoustic effect of synchronous bubble flow. Disproportionate bubbling supported other evidence that biphonic calls form a distinct category, but suggested a function in short-range communication.

  5. Bubble bath soap poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002762.htm Bubble bath soap poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Bubble bath soap poisoning occurs when someone swallows bubble bath soap. ...

  6. Discrete Bubble Modeling for Cavitation Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jin-Keun; Chahine, Georges; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung

    2007-03-01

    Dynaflow, Inc. has conducted extensive studies on non-spherical bubble dynamics and interactions with solid and free boundaries, vortical flow structures, and other bubbles. From these studies, emerged a simplified Surface Averaged Pressure (SAP) spherical bubble dynamics model and a Lagrangian bubble tracking scheme. In this SAP scheme, the pressure and velocity of the surrounding flow field are averaged on the bubble surface, and then used for the bubble motion and volume dynamics calculations. This model is implemented using the Fluent User Defined Function (UDF) as Discrete Bubble Model (DBM). The Bubble dynamics portion can be solved using an incompressible liquid modified Rayleigh-Plesset equation or a compressible liquid modified Gilmore equation. The Discrete Bubble Model is a very suitable tool for the studies on cavitation inception of foils and turbo machinery, bubble nuclei effects, noise from the bubbles, and can be used in many practical problems in industrial and naval applications associated with flows in pipes, jets, pumps, propellers, ships, and the ocean. Applications to propeller cavitation, wake signatures of waterjet propelled ships, bubble-wake interactions, modeling of cavitating jets, and bubble entrainments around a ship will be presented.

  7. Correlation spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Sinclair, Michael B.; Pfeifer, Kent B.; Flemming, Jeb H.; Jones, Gary D.; Tigges, Chris P.

    2010-04-13

    A correlation spectrometer can detect a large number of gaseous compounds, or chemical species, with a species-specific mask wheel. In this mode, the spectrometer is optimized for the direct measurement of individual target compounds. Additionally, the spectrometer can measure the transmission spectrum from a given sample of gas. In this mode, infrared light is passed through a gas sample and the infrared transmission signature of the gasses present is recorded and measured using Hadamard encoding techniques. The spectrometer can detect the transmission or emission spectra in any system where multiple species are present in a generally known volume.

  8. Neutron Detection via Bubble Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, David V.; Ely, James H.; Peurrung, Anthony J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Collar, J. I.; Flake, Matthew; Knopf, Michael A.; Pitts, W. K.; Shaver, Mark W.; Sonnenschein, Andrew; Smart, John E.; Todd, Lindsay C.

    2005-10-06

    The results of a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) exploratory research project investigating the feasibility of fast neutron detection using a suitably prepared and operated, pressure-cycled bubble chamber are described. The research was conducted along two parallel paths. Experiments with a slow pressure-release Halon chamber at the Enrico Fermi Institute at the University of Chicago showed clear bubble nucleation sensitivity to an AmBe neutron source and insensitivity to the 662 keV gammas from a 137Cs source. Bubble formation was documented via high-speed (1000 frames/sec) photography, and the acoustic signature of bubble formation was detected using a piezo-electric transducer element mounted on the base of the chamber. The chamber’s neutron sensitivity as a function of working fluid temperature was mapped out. The second research path consisted of the design, fabrication, and testing of a fast pressure-release Freon-134a chamber at PNNL. The project concluded with successful demonstrations of the PNNL chamber’s AmBe neutron source sensitivity and 137Cs gamma insensitivity. The source response tests of the PNNL chamber were documented with high-speed photography.

  9. Single Bubble Sonoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farley, Jennifer; Hough, Shane

    2003-05-01

    Single Bubble Sonoluminescence is the emission of light from a single bubble suspended in a liquid caused by a continuum of repeated implosions due to pressure waves generated from a maintained ultrasonic sinusoidal wave source. H. Frenzel and H. Schultz first studied it in 1934 at the University of Cologne. It was not until 1988 with D.F. Gaitan that actual research began with single bubble sonoluminescence. Currently many theories exist attempting to explain the observed bubble phenomenon. Many of these theories require spherical behavior of the bubble. Observation of the bubble has shown that the bubble does not behave spherically in most cases. One explanation for this is known as jet theory. A spectrum of the bubble will give us the mean physical properties of the bubble such as temperature and pressure inside the bubble. Eventually, with the aide of fluorocene dye a full spectrum of the bubble will be obtained.

  10. Energy Measurement of Bubble Bursting Based on Vibration Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Bo; Zhang, Jian-Run; Li, Pu; Le, Van-Quynh

    2012-06-01

    An experimental study of the energy of bubble bursting at the surface of a high-viscosity liquid on a cantilever beam is reported. The sudden bursting event of a bubble at the liquid surface can cause a vibration of the cantilever beam besides the acoustic wave and jet wave. The peaks of the vibration signal from the beam slightly lag the peaks of the acoustic signal, and the energy transferred to the vibration is larger than that transferred to the acoustic wave. The amplitude of the jet wave depends on the thickness of the liquid film and the size of the bubble. The results of the investigation can be used to understand the dynamic characteristics of bubble bursting.

  11. Using sound to study bubble coalescence.

    PubMed

    Kracht, W; Finch, J A

    2009-04-01

    Frothers are surfactants used in flotation to aid generation of small bubbles, an effect attributed to coalescence prevention. Studying coalescence at the moment of bubble creation is a challenge because events occur over a time frame of milliseconds. This communication introduces a novel acoustic technique to study coalescence as bubbles are generated at a capillary. The sound signal was linked to bubble formation and coalescence events using high-speed cinematography. The technique has the resolution to detect events that occur within 1-2 ms. The results show that for common flotation frothers and n-alcohols (C(4)-C(8)) coalescence prevention is not simply related to surface activity. A total stress model is used to give a qualitative explanation to the action observed. Results for salt (sodium chloride) are included for comparison. PMID:19128806

  12. Laboratory comparisons of acoustic and optical sensors for microbubble measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ming Yang; Todoroff, Douglas; Cartmill, John

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a recent comparison between three microbubble size spectrum measurement systems. These systems are the light-scattering bubble counter, the photographic bubble-imaging system, and the acoustic resonator array. Good agreement was formed among these three systems over the bubble size range appropriate for each system.

  13. Light scattering measurements of the repetitive supersonic implosion of a sonoluminescing bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, Bradley P.; Putterman, Seth J.

    1992-12-01

    Light scattering is used to measure the dynamics of the repetitive collapse of a sonoluminescing bubble of gas trapped in water. It is found that the surface of the bubble is collapsing with a supersonic velocity at about the time of light emission which in turn precedes the minimum bubble radius by about 0.03% of the period of the acoustic drive. These observations suggest that the shedding of an imploding shock mediates between the bubble collapse and light emission.

  14. Multidimensional spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Zanni, Martin Thomas; Damrauer, Niels H.

    2010-07-20

    A multidimensional spectrometer for the infrared, visible, and ultraviolet regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, and a method for making multidimensional spectroscopic measurements in the infrared, visible, and ultraviolet regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. The multidimensional spectrometer facilitates measurements of inter- and intra-molecular interactions.

  15. Bubble nonlinear dynamics and stimulated scattering process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jie, Shi; De-Sen, Yang; Sheng-Guo, Shi; Bo, Hu; Hao-Yang, Zhang; Shi-Yong, Hu

    2016-02-01

    A complete understanding of the bubble dynamics is deemed necessary in order to achieve their full potential applications in industry and medicine. For this purpose it is first needed to expand our knowledge of a single bubble behavior under different possible conditions including the frequency and pressure variations of the sound field. In addition, stimulated scattering of sound on a bubble is a special effect in sound field, and its characteristics are associated with bubble oscillation mode. A bubble in liquid can be considered as a representative example of nonlinear dynamical system theory with its resonance, and its dynamics characteristics can be described by the Keller-Miksis equation. The nonlinear dynamics of an acoustically excited gas bubble in water is investigated by using theoretical and numerical analysis methods. Our results show its strongly nonlinear behavior with respect to the pressure amplitude and excitation frequency as the control parameters, and give an intuitive insight into stimulated sound scattering on a bubble. It is seen that the stimulated sound scattering is different from common dynamical behaviors, such as bifurcation and chaos, which is the result of the nonlinear resonance of a bubble under the excitation of a high amplitude acoustic sound wave essentially. The numerical analysis results show that the threshold of stimulated sound scattering is smaller than those of bifurcation and chaos in the common condition. Project supported by the Program for Changjiang Scholars and Innovative Research Team in University, China (Grant No. IRT1228) and the Young Scientists Fund of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11204050 and 11204049).

  16. Interacting bubble clouds and their sonochemical production.

    PubMed

    Stricker, Laura; Dollet, Benjamin; Fernández Rivas, David; Lohse, Detlef

    2013-09-01

    An acoustically driven air pocket trapped in a pit etched on a surface can emit a bubble cluster. When several pits are present, the resulting bubble clusters interact in a nontrivial way. Fernández Rivas et al. [Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 49, 9699-9701 (2010)] observed three different behaviors at increasing driving power: clusters close to their "mother" pits, clusters attracting each other but still well separated, and merging clusters. The last is highly undesirable for technological purposes as it is associated with a reduction of the radical production and an enhancement of the erosion of the reactor walls. In this paper, the conditions for merging to occur are quantified in the case of two clusters, as a function of the following control parameters: driving pressure, distance between the two pits, cluster radius, and number of bubbles within each cluster. The underlying mechanism, governed by the secondary Bjerknes forces, is strongly influenced by the nonlinearity of the bubble oscillations and not directly by the number of nucleated bubbles. The Bjerknes forces are found to dampen the bubble oscillations, thus reducing the radical production. Therefore, the increased number of bubbles at high power could be the key to understanding the experimental observation that, above a certain power threshold, any further increase of the driving does not improve the sonochemical efficiency.

  17. Nonlinear wave interactions in bubble layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, S.; Prosperetti, A.; Ostrovsky, L.

    2003-03-01

    Due to the large compressibility of gas bubbles, layers of a bubbly liquid surrounded by pure liquid exhibit many resonances that can give rise to a strongly nonlinear behavior even for relatively low-level excitation. In an earlier paper [Druzhinin et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 100, 3570 (1996)] it was pointed out that, by exciting the bubbly layer in correspondence of two resonant modes, so chosen that the difference frequency also corresponds to a resonant mode, it might be possible to achieve an efficient parametric generation of a low-frequency signal. The earlier work made use of a simplified model for the bubbly liquid that ignored the dissipation and dispersion introduced by the bubbles. Here a more realistic description of the bubble behavior is used to study the nonlinear oscillations of a bubble layer under both single- and dual-frequency excitation. It is found that a difference-frequency power of the order of 1% can be generated with incident pressure amplitudes of the order of 50 kPa or so. It appears that similar phenomena would occur in other systems, such as porous waterlike or rubberlike media.

  18. On thermonuclear processes in cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigmatulin, R. I.; Lahey, R. T., Jr.; Taleyarkhan, R. P.; West, C. D.; Block, R. C.

    2014-09-01

    The theoretical and experimental foundations of so-called bubble nuclear fusion are reviewed. In the nuclear fusion process, a spherical cavitation cluster ˜ 10-2 m in diameter is produced of spherical bubbles at the center of a cylindrical chamber filled with deuterated acetone using a focused acoustic field having a resonant frequency of about 20 kHz. The acoustically-forced bubbles effectuate volume oscillations with sharp collapses during the compression stage. At the final stages of collapse, the bubble cluster emits 2.5 MeV D-D fusion neutron pulses at a rate of ˜ 2000 per second. The neutron yield is ˜ 10^5 s -1. In parallel, tritium nuclei are produced at the same yield. It is shown numerically that, for bubbles having sufficient molecular mass, spherical shock waves develop in the center of the cluster and that these spherical shock waves (microshocks) produce converging shocks within the interior bubbles, which focus energy on the centers of the bubbles. When these shock waves reflect from the centers of the bubbles, extreme conditions of temperature ( ˜ 10^8 K) and density ( ˜ 10^4 kg m -3) arise in a (nano)spherical region ( ˜ 10-7 m in size) that last for ˜ 10-12 s, during which time about ten D-D fusion neutrons and tritium nuclei are produced in the region. A paradoxical result in our experiments is that it is bubble cluster (not streamer) cavitation and the sufficiently high molecular mass of (and hence the low sound speed in) D-acetone ( C3D6O) vapor (as compared, for example, to deuterated water D2O) which are necessary conditions for the formation of convergent spherical microshock waves in central cluster bubbles. It is these waves that allow the energy to be sufficiently focused in the nanospherical regions near the bubble centers for fusion events to occur. The criticism to which the concept of 'bubble fusion' has been subjected in the literature, in particular, most recently in Uspekhi Fizicheskikh Nauk (Physics - Uspekhi) journal, is

  19. Bubbles with shock waves and ultrasound: a review

    PubMed Central

    Ohl, Siew-Wan; Klaseboer, Evert; Khoo, Boo Cheong

    2015-01-01

    The study of the interaction of bubbles with shock waves and ultrasound is sometimes termed ‘acoustic cavitation'. It is of importance in many biomedical applications where sound waves are applied. The use of shock waves and ultrasound in medical treatments is appealing because of their non-invasiveness. In this review, we present a variety of acoustics–bubble interactions, with a focus on shock wave–bubble interaction and bubble cloud phenomena. The dynamics of a single spherically oscillating bubble is rather well understood. However, when there is a nearby surface, the bubble often collapses non-spherically with a high-speed jet. The direction of the jet depends on the ‘resistance' of the boundary: the bubble jets towards a rigid boundary, splits up near an elastic boundary, and jets away from a free surface. The presence of a shock wave complicates the bubble dynamics further. We shall discuss both experimental studies using high-speed photography and numerical simulations involving shock wave–bubble interaction. In biomedical applications, instead of a single bubble, often clouds of bubbles appear (consisting of many individual bubbles). The dynamics of such a bubble cloud is even more complex. We shall show some of the phenomena observed in a high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) field. The nonlinear nature of the sound field and the complex inter-bubble interaction in a cloud present challenges to a comprehensive understanding of the physics of the bubble cloud in HIFU. We conclude the article with some comments on the challenges ahead. PMID:26442143

  20. SCINTILLATION SPECTROMETER

    DOEpatents

    Bell, P.R.; Francis, J.E.

    1960-06-21

    A portable scintillation spectrometer is described which is especially useful in radio-biological studies for determining the uptake and distribution of gamma -emitting substances in tissue. The spectrometer includes a collimator having a plurality of apertures that are hexagonal in cross section. Two crystals are provided: one is activated to respond to incident rays from the collimator; the other is not activated and shields the first from external radiation.

  1. Experimental Investigations of the Internal Energy of Molecules Evaporated via Laser-induced Acoustic Desorption into a Fourier-transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer (LIAD/FT-ICR)

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Ryan C.; Petzold, Christopher J.; Liu, Ji-ang; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2008-01-01

    The internal energy of neutral gas-phase organic and biomolecules, evaporated by means of laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) into a Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR), was investigated through several experimental approaches. The desorbed molecules were demonstrated not to undergo degradation during the desorption process by collecting LIAD-evaporated molecules and subjecting them to analysis by electrospray ionization/quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry. Previously established gas-phase basicity (GB) values were remeasured for LIAD-evaporated organic molecules and biomolecules with the use of the bracketing method. No endothermic reactions were observed. The remeasured basicity values are in close agreement with the values reported in the literature. The amount of internal energy deposited during LIAD is concluded to be less than a few kcal/mol. Chemical ionization with a series of proton transfer reagents was employed to obtain a breakdown curve for a protonated dipeptide, val-pro, evaporated by LIAD. Comparison of this breakdown curve with a previously published analogous curve obtained by using substrate-assisted laser desorption (SALD) to evaporate the peptide suggests that the molecules evaporated via LIAD have less internal energy than those evaporated via SALD. PMID:17263513

  2. Evaluation of a Novel Approach for Peptide Sequencing: Laser-induced Acoustic Desorption Combined with P(OCH3)2+ Chemical Ionization and Collision-activated Dissociation in a Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Somuramasami, Jayalakshmi; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2007-01-01

    A novel mass spectrometric method has been developed for obtaining sequence information on small peptides. The peptides are desorbed as intact neutral molecules into a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR) by means of laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD). Reactions of the neutral peptides with the dimethoxyphosphenium ion, P(OCH3)2+, occur predominantly by addition of the peptide to P(OCH3)2+ followed by the loss of two methanol molecules, thus yielding product ions with the composition (peptide + P − 2H)+. Upon sustained off-resonance irradiation for collision-activated dissociation (SORI-CAD), the (peptide + P − 2H)+ ions undergo successive losses of CO and NH = CHR or H2O, CO, and NH = CHR to yield sequence-related fragment ions in addition to the regular an- and bn-type ions. Under the same conditions, SORI-CAD of the analogous protonated peptides predominantly yields the regular an- and bn-type ions. The mechanisms of the reactions of peptides with P(OCH3)2+ and the dissociation of the (peptide + P − 2H)+ ions were examined by using model peptides and molecular orbital calculations. PMID:17157527

  3. Cavitation inception by the backscattering of pressure waves from a bubble interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahira, Hiroyuki; Ogasawara, Toshiyuki; Mori, Naoto; Tanaka, Moe

    2015-10-01

    The secondary cavitation that occurs by the backscattering of focused ultrasound from a primary cavitation bubble caused by the negative pressure part of the ultrasound (Maxwell, et al., 2011) might be useful for the energy exchange due to bubble oscillations in High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). The present study is concerned with the cavitation inception by the backscattering of ultrasound from a bubble. In the present experiment, a laser-induced bubble which is generated by a pulsed focused laser beam with high intensity is utilized as a primary cavitation bubble. After generating the bubble, focused ultrasound is emitted to the bubble. The acoustic field and the bubble motion are observed with a high-speed video camera. It is confirmed that the secondary cavitation bubble clouds are generated by the backscattering from the laser-induced bubble. The growth of cavitation bubble clouds is analyzed with the image processing method. The experimental results show that the height and width of the bubble clouds grow in stepwise during their evolution. The direct numerical simulations are also conducted for the backscattering of incident pressure waves from a bubble in order to evaluate a pressure field near the bubble. It is shown that the ratio of a bubble collapse time t0 to a characteristic time of wave propagation tS, η = t0/ts, is an important determinant for generating negative pressure region by backscattering. The minimum pressure location by the backscattering in simulations is in good agreement with the experiment.

  4. Soap Bubbles and Logic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Shellie-helane; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Introduces questions and activities involving soap bubbles which provide students with experiences in prediction and logic. Examines commonly held false conceptions related to the shapes that bubbles take and provides correct explanations for the phenomenon. (ML)

  5. Preheating in bubble collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jun; Piao Yunsong

    2010-08-15

    In a landscape with metastable minima, the bubbles will inevitably nucleate. We show that when the bubbles collide, due to the dramatic oscillation of the field at the collision region, the energy deposited in the bubble walls can be efficiently released by the explosive production of the particles. In this sense, the collision of bubbles is actually highly inelastic. The cosmological implications of this result are discussed.

  6. Beer tapping: dynamics of bubbles after impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantič-Lugo, V.; Cayron, A.; Brun, P.-T.; Gallaire, F.

    2015-12-01

    Beer tapping is a well known prank where a bottle of beer is impacted from the top by a solid object, usually another bottle, leading to a sudden foam overflow. A description of the shock-driven bubble dynamics leading to foaming is presented based on an experimental and numerical study evoking the following physical picture. First, the solid impact produces a sudden downwards acceleration of the bottle creating a strong depression in the liquid bulk. The existing bubbles undergo a strong expansion and a sudden contraction ending in their collapse and fragmentation into a large amount of small bubbles. Second, the bubble clouds present a large surface area to volume ratio, enhancing the CO2 diffusion from the supersaturated liquid, hence growing rapidly and depleting the CO2. The clouds of bubbles migrate upwards in the form of plumes pulling the surrounding liquid with them and eventually resulting in the foam overflow. The sudden pressure drop that triggers the bubble dynamics with a collapse and oscillations is modelled by the Rayleigh-Plesset equation. The bubble dynamics from impact to collapse occurs over a time (tb ≃ 800 μs) much larger than the acoustic time scale of the liquid bulk (tac = 2H/c ≃ 80 μs), for the experimental container of height H = 6 cm and a speed of sound around c ≃ 1500 m/s. This scale separation, together with the comparison of numerical and experimental results, suggests that the pressure drop is controlled by two parameters: the acceleration of the container and the distance from the bubble to the free surface.

  7. The size of active bubbles for the production of hydrogen in sonochemical reaction field.

    PubMed

    Merouani, Slimane; Hamdaoui, Oualid

    2016-09-01

    The sonication of aqueous solution generates microscopic cavitation bubbles that may growth and violently collapse to produce highly reactive species (i.e. OH, HO2 and H2O2), hydrogen and emit light, sonoluminescence. The bubble size is a key parameter that influences the chemical activity of the system. This wok aims to study theoretically the size of active bubbles for the production of hydrogen in ultrasonic cavitation field in water using a single bubble sonochemistry model. The effect of several parameters such as frequency of ultrasound, acoustic intensity and liquid temperature on the range of sonochemically active bubbles for the production of hydrogen was clarified. The numerical simulation results showed that the size of active bubbles is an interval which includes an optimum value at which the production rate of H2 is maximal. It was shown that the range of ambient radius for an active bubble as well as the optimum bubble radius for the production of hydrogen increased with increasing acoustic intensity and decreased with increasing ultrasound frequency and bulk liquid temperature. It was found that the range of ambient bubble radius dependence of the operational conditions followed the same trend as those reported experimentally for sonoluminescing bubbles. Comparison with literature data showed a good agreement between the theoretical determined optimum bubble sizes for the production of hydrogen and the experimental reported sizes for sonoluminescing bubbles. PMID:27150777

  8. The size of active bubbles for the production of hydrogen in sonochemical reaction field.

    PubMed

    Merouani, Slimane; Hamdaoui, Oualid

    2016-09-01

    The sonication of aqueous solution generates microscopic cavitation bubbles that may growth and violently collapse to produce highly reactive species (i.e. OH, HO2 and H2O2), hydrogen and emit light, sonoluminescence. The bubble size is a key parameter that influences the chemical activity of the system. This wok aims to study theoretically the size of active bubbles for the production of hydrogen in ultrasonic cavitation field in water using a single bubble sonochemistry model. The effect of several parameters such as frequency of ultrasound, acoustic intensity and liquid temperature on the range of sonochemically active bubbles for the production of hydrogen was clarified. The numerical simulation results showed that the size of active bubbles is an interval which includes an optimum value at which the production rate of H2 is maximal. It was shown that the range of ambient radius for an active bubble as well as the optimum bubble radius for the production of hydrogen increased with increasing acoustic intensity and decreased with increasing ultrasound frequency and bulk liquid temperature. It was found that the range of ambient bubble radius dependence of the operational conditions followed the same trend as those reported experimentally for sonoluminescing bubbles. Comparison with literature data showed a good agreement between the theoretical determined optimum bubble sizes for the production of hydrogen and the experimental reported sizes for sonoluminescing bubbles.

  9. Sonoluminescence and multi-bubble cavitation phenomena for selected research and industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, Larry; Olsen, Khris; Good, Morris; Bond, Leonard; Posakony, Gerald; Peters, Timothy; Baldwin, David; Wester, Dennis; Ahmed, Salahuddin

    2003-04-01

    Single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL), multi-bubble sonoluminescence (MBSL), multi-bubble sonochemiluminescence (MBSCL) and other high power ultrasound cavitation and noncavitating ultrasound process stream interaction phenomena are known to produce a wide range of both physical and chemical effects that depend upon the system and operating conditions employed. Three interacting regimes are under investigation (a) high power and high frequency (including noncavitating systems), (b) single bubble resonance/sonoluminescence and (c) multi-bubble high power sonochemical processing. In all cases these involve various reactors, including possible schemes for continuous material feeding and processing for selected chemical, nonaqueous fluids and biological research and industrial applications. High power sonochemical and noncavitating ultrasound processing applications and a review of literature pertaining to the potential of high power processing, including fusion are discussed. Work includes the investigation of acoustic fields in reactors, characterization of sonoluminescence spectra, the investigation of system parameters to control maximum bubble temperature and pressure, and acoustic energy partition into light and acoustic emission/shock waves. Effects of various chemical systems on multi-bubble luminescence are being investigated and will be reported. Work to date has emphasized the evaluation of both single and multi-bubble sonoluminescence, spectral measurements, acoustic emission measurements and the observation of a continuous bubble feed phenomenon.

  10. Soap Films and Bubbles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Karen

    1986-01-01

    Develops and explains a format for a workshop which focuses on soap films and bubbles. The plan consists of: a discussion to uncover what children know about bubbles; explanations of the demonstration equipment; the presentation itself; the assembly of the workshop kit; and time to play with the bubbles. (ML)

  11. Brut: Automatic bubble classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaumont, Christopher; Goodman, Alyssa; Williams, Jonathan; Kendrew, Sarah; Simpson, Robert

    2014-07-01

    Brut, written in Python, identifies bubbles in infrared images of the Galactic midplane; it uses a database of known bubbles from the Milky Way Project and Spitzer images to build an automatic bubble classifier. The classifier is based on the Random Forest algorithm, and uses the WiseRF implementation of this algorithm.

  12. Acoustical properties of individual liposome-loaded microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Luan, Ying; Faez, Telli; Gelderblom, Erik; Skachkov, Ilya; Geers, Bart; Lentacker, Ine; van der Steen, Ton; Versluis, Michel; de Jong, Nico

    2012-12-01

    A comparison between phospholipid-coated microbubbles with and without liposomes attached to the microbubble surface was performed using the ultra-high-speed imaging camera (Brandaris 128). We investigated 73 liposome-loaded microbubbles (loaded microbubbles) and 41 microbubbles without liposome loading (unloaded microbubbles) with a diameter ranging from 3-10 μm at frequencies ranging from 0.6-3.8 MHz and acoustic pressures ranging from 5-100 kPa. The experimental data showed nearly the same shell elasticity for the loaded and unloaded bubbles, but the shell viscosity was higher for loaded bubbles compared with unloaded bubbles. For loaded bubbles, a higher pressure threshold for the bubble vibrations was noticed. In addition, an "expansion-only" behavior was observed for up to 69% of the investigated loaded bubbles, which mostly occurred at low acoustic pressures (≤30 kPa). Finally, fluorescence imaging showed heterogeneity of liposome distributions of the loaded bubbles.

  13. Spectrometer gun

    DOEpatents

    Waechter, D.A.; Wolf, M.A.; Umbarger, C.J.

    1981-11-03

    A hand-holdable, battery-operated, microprocessor-based spectrometer gun is described that includes a low-power matrix display and sufficient memory to permit both real-time observation and extended analysis of detected radiation pulses. Universality of the incorporated signal processing circuitry permits operation with various detectors having differing pulse detection and sensitivity parameters.

  14. Spectrometer gun

    DOEpatents

    Waechter, David A.; Wolf, Michael A.; Umbarger, C. John

    1985-01-01

    A hand-holdable, battery-operated, microprocessor-based spectrometer gun includes a low-power matrix display and sufficient memory to permit both real-time observation and extended analysis of detected radiation pulses. Universality of the incorporated signal processing circuitry permits operation with various detectors having differing pulse detection and sensitivity parameters.

  15. HISS spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Greiner, D.E.

    1984-11-01

    This talk describes the Heavy Ion Spectrometer System (HISS) facility at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Bevalac. Three completed experiments and their results are illustrated. The second half of the talk is a detailed discussion of the response of drift chambers to heavy ions. The limitations of trajectory measurement over a large range in incident particle charge are presented.

  16. Vapor bubble generation around gold nano-particles and its application to damaging of cells.

    PubMed

    Kitz, M; Preisser, S; Wetterwald, A; Jaeger, M; Thalmann, G N; Frenz, M

    2011-01-11

    We investigated vapor bubbles generated upon irradiation of gold nanoparticles with nanosecond laser pulses. Bubble formation was studied both with optical and acoustic means on supported single gold nanoparticles and single nanoparticles in suspension. Formation thresholds determined at different wavelengths indicate a bubble formation efficiency increasing with the irradiation wavelength. Vapor bubble generation in Bac-1 cells containing accumulations of the same particles was also investigated at different wavelengths. Similarly, they showed an increasing cell damage efficiency for longer wavelengths. Vapor bubbles generated by single laser pulses were about half the cell size when inducing acute damage.

  17. Numerical simulation of cavitation bubble dynamics induced by ultrasound waves in a high frequency reactor.

    PubMed

    Servant, G; Caltagirone, J P; Gérard, A; Laborde, J L; Hita, A

    2000-10-01

    The use of high frequency ultrasound in chemical systems is of major interest to optimize chemical procedures. Characterization of an open air 477 kHz ultrasound reactor shows that, because of the collapse of transient cavitation bubbles and pulsation of stable cavitation bubbles, chemical reactions are enhanced. Numerical modelling is undertaken to determine the spatio-temporal evolution of cavitation bubbles. The calculus of the emergence of cavitation bubbles due to the acoustic driving (by taking into account interactions between the sound field and bubbles' distribution) gives a cartography of bubbles' emergence within the reactor. Computation of their motion induced by the pressure gradients occurring in the reactor show that they migrate to the pressure nodes. Computed bubbles levitation sites gives a cartography of the chemical activity of ultrasound. Modelling of stable cavitation bubbles' motion induced by the motion of the liquid gives some insight on degassing phenomena. PMID:11062879

  18. The effect of nearby bubbles on array gain.

    PubMed

    Culver, R Lee; Park, J Daniel; Leighton, Timothy G; Coles, David G H

    2011-12-01

    The coherent processing of signals from multiple hydrophones in an array offers improvements in angular resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. When the array is steered in a particular direction, the signals arriving from that direction are added in phase, and any signals arriving from other directions are not. Array gain (AG) is a measure of how much the signal arriving from the steering direction is amplified relative to signals arriving from all other directions. The subject of this paper is the manner in which the AG of an acoustic array operating in water that contains air bubbles is affected by scattering from nearby bubbles. The effects of bubbles on acoustic attenuation and dispersion are considered separately from their effects on AG. Acoustic measurements made in bubbly water using the AB Wood tank at the Institute of Sound and Vibration Research, University of Southampton, in June 2008 show that as bubble density increases, relative phase shifts in individual hydrophone signals increase and signal correlation among the hydrophones is reduced. A theory and numerical simulation linking bubble density at the hydrophone to the AG is in good agreement with the measurements up to the point where multiple scattering becomes important.

  19. Visualization and minimization of disruptive bubble behavior in ultrasonic field.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wonjung; Park, Keunhwan; Oh, Jongkeun; Choi, Jaehyuck; Kim, Ho-Young

    2010-08-01

    Although ultrasonic technology has been successfully adopted for semiconductor cleaning, a recent trend of extreme miniaturization of patterns calls for a novel process that can remove contaminant particles without damaging nanoscale patterns. Unstable bubble oscillations have been hypothesized to cause such surface damages, and here we show direct visualization results that a high acoustic pressure induces bubble instability leading to pattern damages. As a remedy for the conventional ultrasonic cleaning scheme, we introduce a novel cleaning system using dual transducers, in which one transducer generates bubbles with a high acoustic pressure in an acoustically isolated sub-chamber and the other drives the oscillation of bubbles around the cleaning area at a low acoustic pressure. The system is shown to achieve a high cleaning efficiency for submicron-sized particles while significantly suppressing the disruptive bubble instability thereby reducing the detachment of firmly attached nanoparticles. Comparison of the adhesion force of the firmly attached nanoparticles and the yield strength of nanopatterns allows us to anticipate that this scheme is capable of reducing damages of nanopatterns on semiconductor wafers and photomasks.

  20. Numerical Simulation of Bubble Formation in Co-Flowing Mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Abdou, Ashraf A; Wendel, Mark W; Felde, David K; Riemer, Bernie

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we present computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of helium bubble formation and detachment at a submerged needle in stagnant and co-flowing mercury. Since mercury is opaque, visualization of internal gas bubbles was done with proton radiography (pRad) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE2). The acoustic waves emitted at the time of detachment and during subsequent oscillations of the bubble were recorded with a microphone. The Volume of Fluid (VOF) model was used to simulate the unsteady two-phase flow of gas injection in mercury. The VOF model is validated by comparing detailed bubble sizes and shapes at various stages of the bubble growth and detachment, with the experimental measurements at different gas flow rates and mercury velocities. The experimental and computational results show a two-stage bubble formation. The first stage involves growing bubble around the needle, and the second follows as the buoyancy overcomes wall adhesion. The comparison of predicted and measured bubble sizes and shapes at various stages of the bubble growth and detachment is in good agreement.

  1. Tribonucleation of bubbles.

    PubMed

    Wildeman, Sander; Lhuissier, Henri; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2014-07-15

    We report on the nucleation of bubbles on solids that are gently rubbed against each other in a liquid. The phenomenon is found to depend strongly on the material and roughness of the solid surfaces. For a given surface, temperature, and gas content, a trail of growing bubbles is observed if the rubbing force and velocity exceed a certain threshold. Direct observation through a transparent solid shows that each bubble in the trail results from the early coalescence of several microscopic bubbles, themselves detaching from microscopic gas pockets forming between the solids. From a detailed study of the wear tracks, with atomic force and scanning electron microscopy imaging, we conclude that these microscopic gas pockets originate from a local fracturing of the surface asperities, possibly enhanced by chemical reactions at the freshly created surfaces. Our findings will be useful either for preventing undesired bubble formation or, on the contrary, for "writing with bubbles," i.e., creating controlled patterns of microscopic bubbles.

  2. The preparation and characterization of gas bubble containing liposomes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Wei, Xiaohui; Yao, Yanbin; Chai, Qiliang; Chen, Yue; Xu, Yuhong

    2005-01-01

    Liposomes and lipid nano-particles containing gas bubbles have great potentials to be used as ultrasound contrast agents or as drug and gene delivery vehicles. We developed a method to enable in situ CO2gas bubbles formation inside liposomes. The resulted bubbles containing liposomes were shown to be able to effectively echo ultrasound. Their acoustic properties were assessed by ultrasound imaging and intensity analysis. Compared to most other echogenic liposome formulations reported, our method is easier, faster, and more economical. It would be useful for many applications with improvements and optimization.

  3. Consistency in statistical moments as a test for bubble cloud clustering.

    PubMed

    Weber, Thomas C; Lyons, Anthony P; Bradley, David L

    2011-11-01

    Frequency dependent measurements of attenuation and/or sound speed through clouds of gas bubbles in liquids are often inverted to find the bubble size distribution and the void fraction of gas. The inversions are often done using an effective medium theory as a forward model under the assumption that the bubble positions are Poisson distributed (i.e., statistically independent). Under circumstances in which single scattering does not adequately describe the pressure field, the assumption of independence in position can yield large errors when clustering is present, leading to errors in the inverted bubble size distribution. It is difficult, however, to determine the existence of clustering in bubble clouds without the use of specialized acoustic or optical imaging equipment. A method is described here in which the existence of bubble clustering can be identified by examining the consistency between the first two statistical moments of multiple frequency acoustic measurements.

  4. Consistency in statistical moments as a test for bubble cloud clustering.

    PubMed

    Weber, Thomas C; Lyons, Anthony P; Bradley, David L

    2011-11-01

    Frequency dependent measurements of attenuation and/or sound speed through clouds of gas bubbles in liquids are often inverted to find the bubble size distribution and the void fraction of gas. The inversions are often done using an effective medium theory as a forward model under the assumption that the bubble positions are Poisson distributed (i.e., statistically independent). Under circumstances in which single scattering does not adequately describe the pressure field, the assumption of independence in position can yield large errors when clustering is present, leading to errors in the inverted bubble size distribution. It is difficult, however, to determine the existence of clustering in bubble clouds without the use of specialized acoustic or optical imaging equipment. A method is described here in which the existence of bubble clustering can be identified by examining the consistency between the first two statistical moments of multiple frequency acoustic measurements. PMID:22088013

  5. Detecting dark matter with scintillating bubble chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianjie; Dahl, C. Eric; Jin, Miaotianzi; Baxter, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Threshold based direct WIMP dark matter detectors such as the superheated bubble chambers developed by the PICO experiment have demonstrated excellent electron-recoil and alpha discrimination, excellent scalability, ease of change of target fluid, and low cost. However, the nuclear-recoil like backgrounds have been a limiting factor in their dark matter sensitivity. We present a new type of detector, the scintillating bubble chamber, which reads out the scintillation pulse of the scattering events as well as the pressure, temperature, acoustic traces, and bubble images as a conventional bubble chamber does. The event energy provides additional handle to discriminate against the nuclear-recoil like backgrounds. Liquid xenon is chosen as the target fluid in our prototyping detector for its high scintillation yield and suitable vapor pressure which simplifies detector complexity. The detector can be used as an R&D tool to study the backgrounds present in the current PICO bubble chambers or as a prototype for standalone dark matter detectors in the future. Supported by DOE Grant DE-SC0012161.

  6. The Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2012-03-01

    In the fall of 1999 I was shown an Ocean Optics spectrometer-in-the-computer at St. Patricks College at Maynooth, Ireland, and thought that I had seen heaven. Of course, it could not resolve the sodium D-lines (I had done that many years before with a homemade wire diffraction grating ), and I began to realize that inside was some familiar old technology. In this paper I would like to discuss its ancestors.

  7. The Spectrometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    In the fall of 1999 I was shown an Ocean Optics spectrometer-in-the-computer at St. Patricks College at Maynooth, Ireland, and thought that I had seen heaven. Of course, it could not resolve the sodium D-lines (I had done that many years before with a homemade wire diffraction grating), and I began to realize that inside was some familiar old…

  8. Collapse and rebound of a gas-filled spherical bubble immersed in a diagnostic ultrasonic field.

    PubMed

    Aymé-Bellegarda, E J

    1990-08-01

    This work is concerned with the influence of the finite-amplitude distortion of a driving diagnostic ultrasonic field on the collapse and rebound of a gas-filled spherical microbubble, present in the exposed compressible liquid. Such an analysis is especially important since one of the mechanisms for cavitation damage comes from the very large gas pressures generated at bubble collapse and in the subsequent pressure wave formed by bubble rebound. Gilmore's model [F.R. Gilmore, "The growth or collapse of a spherical bubble in a viscous compressible liquid," Hydrodynamics Lab. Rep. No. 26-4, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (1952)] for bubble dynamics is used to obtain the motion of the bubble interface when subjected to a pulsed diagnostic ultrasonic field of large amplitude. Knowledge of the bubble motion allows one to derive the pressure distribution around the bubble. Numerical results over a range of initial bubble sizes, acoustic pressures, and frequencies relevant to medical use show that the strength of the pressure spikes radiated by the rebounding bubble depends upon (i) the acoustic frequency (f), (ii) the initial bubble size (R0), and (iii) the magnitude of the pressure amplitude of the fundamental (PF) in a Fourier series description of the distorted pulse. As the pressure spikes propagate outward from the bubble wall, their strength is attenuated as the reciprocal of the distance from the center of collapse.

  9. Dynamic Nucleation of Ice Induced by a Single Stable Cavitation Bubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohsaka, Kenichi; Trinh, Eugene H.

    1997-01-01

    Dynamic nucleation of ice induced by caviation bubble in undercooled water is observed using an acoustic levitation technique. The observation indicates that a high pressure pulse associated with a collapsing bubble is indeed responsible for the nucleation of a high pressure phase of ice.

  10. A method for predicting the number of active bubbles in sonochemical reactors.

    PubMed

    Merouani, Slimane; Ferkous, Hamza; Hamdaoui, Oualid; Rezgui, Yacine; Guemini, Miloud

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the number of active bubbles in acoustic cavitation field is very important for the prediction of the performance of ultrasonic reactors toward most chemical processes induced by ultrasound. The literature in this field is scarce, probably due to the complicated nature of the phenomena. We introduce here a relatively simple semi-empirical method for predicting the number of active bubbles in an acoustic cavitation field. By coupling the bubble dynamics in an acoustical field with chemical kinetics occurring in the bubble during oscillation, the amount of the radical species OH and HO2 and molecular H2O2 released by a single bubble was estimated. Knowing that the H2O2 measured experimentally during sonication of water comes from the recombination of hydroxyl (OH) and perhydroxyl (HO2) radicals in the liquid phase and assuming that in sonochemistry applications, the cavitation is transient and the bubble fragments at the first collapse, the number of bubbles formed per unit time per unit volume is then easily determined using material balances for H2O2, OH and HO2 in the liquid phase. The effect of ultrasonic frequency on the number of active bubbles was examined. It was shown that increasing ultrasonic frequency leads to a substantial increase in the number of bubbles formed in the reactor. PMID:25127247

  11. A method for predicting the number of active bubbles in sonochemical reactors.

    PubMed

    Merouani, Slimane; Ferkous, Hamza; Hamdaoui, Oualid; Rezgui, Yacine; Guemini, Miloud

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the number of active bubbles in acoustic cavitation field is very important for the prediction of the performance of ultrasonic reactors toward most chemical processes induced by ultrasound. The literature in this field is scarce, probably due to the complicated nature of the phenomena. We introduce here a relatively simple semi-empirical method for predicting the number of active bubbles in an acoustic cavitation field. By coupling the bubble dynamics in an acoustical field with chemical kinetics occurring in the bubble during oscillation, the amount of the radical species OH and HO2 and molecular H2O2 released by a single bubble was estimated. Knowing that the H2O2 measured experimentally during sonication of water comes from the recombination of hydroxyl (OH) and perhydroxyl (HO2) radicals in the liquid phase and assuming that in sonochemistry applications, the cavitation is transient and the bubble fragments at the first collapse, the number of bubbles formed per unit time per unit volume is then easily determined using material balances for H2O2, OH and HO2 in the liquid phase. The effect of ultrasonic frequency on the number of active bubbles was examined. It was shown that increasing ultrasonic frequency leads to a substantial increase in the number of bubbles formed in the reactor.

  12. Gas bubble detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mount, Bruce E. (Inventor); Burchfield, David E. (Inventor); Hagey, John M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A gas bubble detector having a modulated IR source focused through a bandpass filter onto a venturi, formed in a sample tube, to illuminate the venturi with modulated filtered IR to detect the presence of gas bubbles as small as 0.01 cm or about 0.004 in diameter in liquid flowing through the venturi. Means are provided to determine the size of any detected bubble and to provide an alarm in the absence of liquid in the sample tube.

  13. Photophoretic spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, S.; Amani, Y.; Orenstein, A.

    1980-09-01

    An instrument is described which measures the spectral dependence of the radiometric (photophoretic) force on a micron-sized particle in a static configuration. This spectrometer consists of a servo-stabilized Millikan chamber which can be used as a photophoretic balance over the spectral range from 200 nm to 1000 nm. Spectra may be taken in a vacuum as small as 10/sup -4/ torr. The action spectrum of the photophoretic force on a crystallite of CdS is used as an example. The pressure dependence of the force at 500 nm is consistant with a radiometric mechanism.

  14. MASS SPECTROMETER

    DOEpatents

    White, F.A.

    1960-08-23

    A mass spectrometer is designed with a first adjustable magnetic field for resolving an ion beam into beams of selected masses, a second adjustable magnetic field for further resolving the ion beam from the first field into beams of selected masses, a thin foil disposed in the path of the beam between the first and second magnets to dissociate molecular ions incident thereon, an electrostatic field for further resolving the ion beam from the second field into beams of selected masses, and a detector disposed adjacent to the electrostatic field to receive the ion beam.

  15. The effect of viscosity, applied frequency and driven pressure on the laser induced bubble luminescence in water-sulfuric acid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadighi-Bonabi, Rasoul; Alijan Farzad Lahiji, Faezeh; Razeghi, Fatemeh

    2016-06-01

    Production and oscillation of sonoluminescence bubbles by laser pulse in the presence of acoustic field in water and different concentrations of sulfuric acid are investigated. In the presence of acoustic field, the laser causes variable speed of sound, surface tension and density; and the host liquid acts as a compressible one and strongly affects the bubble's dynamics equations. The effect of various concentrations of sulfuric acid as a host liquid on the oscillation of bubble radius, bubble wall velocity and bubble interior temperature is studied. Furthermore, the effect of applied frequency on LI-SCBL in the presence of the acoustic field is investigated and an optimum sound wave frequency for the bubble oscillation and bubble interior temperature in pure water and SA is introduced. Based on the modification of RP equation, by applying the optimum frequency, the results indicate that the maximum bubble radius for LI-SCBL in the presence of the acoustic field is increased up to 7 ×10-4 m as this article presents, which is more than 40% improvement. This amount results in interior temperature of more than three times, from almost 5000 K in the previous works to almost 16 000 K in the present report. This is very similar to the experimental measurements for bubble radius induced by laser. Furthermore, the effects of driving pressure amplitudes on the bubble radius, the bubble interior temperature and the bubble wall velocity in different host liquids and in optimum frequency are investigated.

  16. An experimental investigation of bubble splitting in a bifurcation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderon, Andres; Bull, Joseph L.

    2003-11-01

    It is possible to "starve" cancerous tumors to death by restricting their blood flow. We are investigating a novel gas embolotherapy technique for occluding blood vessels using perfluorocarbon (PFC) bubbles that are produced by the acoustic vaporization of liquid droplets. The droplets are small enough to pass through the microcirculation, but the bubbles are large enough to become stuck and occlude flow. A homogenous distribution of bubbles in the tumor vasculature will occur if bubbles split evenly at bifurcations and will result in uniform occlusion of blood flow to the tumor. These experiments investigate the effects of roll angle, capillary number, and bubble volume on the splitting of bubbles as they pass through a symmetric bifurcation. The bifurcation was designed to match Reynolds, Bond and capillary numbers to the physiologic values for arteries and arterioles. Higher capillary numbers and low roll angles result in more even bubble splitting. For non-zero roll angles and low capillary numbers, bubbles were observed to enter the lower bifurcation before moving backwards into the upper branch. There is also appears to be a critical capillary number for each angle in which the homogeneity is maximum. This work is funded by NSF Grant BES 0301278 and a grant from the Whitaker Foundation.

  17. Gas Bubble Formation in Stagnant and Flowing Mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, Mark W; Abdou, Ashraf A; Riemer, Bernie; Felde, David K

    2007-01-01

    Investigations in the area of two-phase flow at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) facility are progressing. It is expected that the target vessel lifetime could be extended by introducing gas into the liquid mercury target. As part of an effort to validate the two-phase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model, simulations and experiments of gas injection in stagnant and flowing mercury have been completed. The volume of fluid (VOF) method as implemented in ANSYS-CFX, was used to simulate the unsteady two-phase flow of gas injection into stagnant mercury. Bubbles produced at the upwards-oriented vertical gas injector were measured with proton radiography at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The comparison of the CFD results to the radiographic images shows good agreement for bubble sizes and shapes at various stages of the bubble growth, detachment, and gravitational rise. Although several gas flows were measured, this paper focuses on the case with a gas flow rate of 8 cc/min through the 100-micron-diameter injector needle. The acoustic waves emitted due to the detachment of the bubble and during subsequent bubble oscillations were recorded with a microphone, providing a precise measurement of the bubble sizes. As the mercury flow rate increases, the drag force causes earlier bubble detachment and therefore smaller bubbles.

  18. Nonlinear dynamic behavior of microscopic bubbles near a rigid wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suslov, Sergey A.; Ooi, Andrew; Manasseh, Richard

    2012-06-01

    The nonlinear dynamic behavior of microscopic bubbles near a rigid wall is investigated. Oscillations are driven by the ultrasonic pressure field that arises in various biomedical applications such as ultrasound imaging or targeted drug delivery. It is known that, when bubbles approach a blood-vessel wall, their linear dynamic response is modified. This modification may be very useful for real-time detection of bubbles that have found targets; in future therapeutic technologies, it may be useful for controlled release of medical agents encapsulating microbubbles. In this paper, the nonlinear response of microbubbles near a wall is studied. The Keller-Miksis-Parlitz equation is adopted, but modified to account for the presence of a rigid wall. This base model describes the time evolution of the bubble surface, which is assumed to remain spherical, and accounts for the effect of acoustic radiation losses owing to liquid compressibility in the momentum conservation. Two situations are considered: the base case of an isolated bubble in an unbounded medium, and a bubble near a rigid wall. In the latter case, the wall influence is modeled by including a symmetrically oscillating image bubble. The bubble dynamics is traced using a numerical solution of the model equation. Subsequently, Floquet theory is used to accurately detect the bifurcation point where bubble oscillations stop following the driving ultrasound frequency and undergo period-changing bifurcations. Of particular interest is the detection of the subcritical period-tripling and -quadrupling transition. The parametric bifurcation maps are obtained as functions of nondimensional parameters representing the bubble radius, the frequency and pressure amplitude of the driving ultrasound field, and the distance from the wall. It is shown that the presence of the wall generally stabilises the bubble dynamics, so that much larger values of the pressure amplitude are needed to generate nonlinear responses. Thus, a

  19. Analysis of spark-induced bubble experiments using CALE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonson, S. C., III; McAllister, S. W.

    1993-10-01

    Calculations were made using the 2-D hydrodynamics code CALE of underwater bubble oscillations and collapse for two situations of interest in the development of underwater acoustic sources. The first is the case of a single bubble to which energy is added to prolong oscillations. The second is the case of a three-bubble array, which typifies one end element in a linear array. Comparisons were made with a series of experiments with spark-induced bubbles carried out at Tetra Corp. The bubbles were made at a depth of 64 cm with periods of about 400 micro-s. One dimensional calculations were used to study singlebubbles. The 1-D results showed that energy needs to be added at a precise phase in order to promote bubble re-excitation. The experiments showed evidence of losses caused by interaction with the relatively large electrodes upon collapse, leading to a 50 percent reduction in amplitude and period of the second oscillation. When a second discharge was made at the end of the first oscillation, the next oscillation had 80 percent of the amplitude of the first. This can be interpreted either as formation of a new bubble, or as pumping the previous bubble, both occurring in a disturbed environment. Two-dimensional calculations were used to study the three-bubble array. The 2-D results showed significant interaction between the central and side bubbles, leading to jetting. For the particular combination of size and spacing used, jetting occurred in the third oscillation of the bubbles.

  20. Cloud cavitation induced by shock-bubble interaction in a viscoelastic solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguri, Ryota; Ando, Keita

    2015-12-01

    We experimentally study a shock-bubble interaction problem in a viscoelastic solid, which is relevant to shock wave lithotripsy. A gas bubble is produced by focusing an infrared laser pulse into gelatin. A spherical shock is then created, through rapid expansion of plasma that results from the laser focusing, in the vicinity of the gas bubble. The shock-bubble interaction is recorded by a CCD camera with flash illumination of a nanosecond green laser pulse. The observation captures cavitation inception in the gelatin under tension that results from acoustic impedance mismatching at the bubble wall. Namely, the shock reflects at the bubble interface as a rarefaction wave, which induces the nucleation of cavitation bubbles as a result of rupturing the gelatin.

  1. The Action of Pressure-Radiation Forces on Pulsating Vapor Bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hao, Y.; Oguz, N.; Prosperetti, A.

    2001-01-01

    The action of pressure-radiation (or Bjerknes) forces on gas bubbles is well understood. This paper studies the analogous phenomenon for vapor bubbles, about which much less is known. A possible practical application is the removal of boiling bubbles from the neighborhood of a heated surface in the case of a downward facing surface or in the absence of gravity. For this reason, the case of a bubble near a plane rigid surface is considered in detail. It is shown that, when the acoustic wave fronts are parallel to the surface, the bubble remains trapped due to secondary Bjerknes force caused by an "image bubble." When the wave fronts are perpendicular to the surface, on the other hand, the bubble can be made to slide laterally.

  2. Prospects for bubble fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Nigmatulin, R.I.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.

    1995-09-01

    In this paper a new method for the realization of fusion energy is presented. This method is based on the superhigh compression of a gas bubble (deuterium or deuterium/thritium) in heavy water or another liquid. The superhigh compression of a gas bubble in a liquid is achieved through forced non-linear, non-periodic resonance oscillations using moderate amplitudes of forcing pressure. The key feature of this new method is a coordination of the forced liquid pressure change with the change of bubble volume. The corresponding regime of the bubble oscillation has been called {open_quotes}basketball dribbling (BD) regime{close_quotes}. The analytical solution describing this process for spherically symmetric bubble oscillations, neglecting dissipation and compressibility of the liquid, has been obtained. This solution shown no limitation on the supercompression of the bubble and the corresponding maximum temperature. The various dissipation mechanisms, including viscous, conductive and radiation heat losses have been considered. It is shown that in spite of these losses it is possible to achieve very high gas bubble temperatures. This because the time duration of the gas bubble supercompression becomes very short when increasing the intensity of compression, thus limiting the energy losses. Significantly, the calculated maximum gas temperatures have shown that nuclear fusion may be possible. First estimations of the affect of liquid compressibility have been made to determine possible limitations on gas bubble compression. The next step will be to investigate the role of interfacial instability and breaking down of the bubble, shock wave phenomena around and in the bubble and mutual diffusion of the gas and the liquid.

  3. Nucleus factory on cavitation bubble for amyloid β fibril

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Kichitaro; Ogi, Hirotsugu; Adachi, Kanta; Noi, Kentaro; Hirao, Masahiko; Yagi, Hisashi; Goto, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Structural evolution from monomer to fibril of amyloid β peptide is related to pathogenic mechanism of Alzheimer disease, and its acceleration is a long-running problem in drug development. This study reveals that ultrasonic cavitation bubbles behave as catalysts for nucleation of the peptide: The nucleation reaction is highly dependent on frequency and pressure of acoustic wave, and we discover an optimum acoustical condition, at which the reaction-rate constant for nucleation is increased by three-orders-of magnitudes. A theoretical model is proposed for explaining highly frequency and pressure dependent nucleation reaction, where monomers are captured on the bubble surface during its growth and highly condensed by subsequent bubble collapse, so that they are transiently exposed to high temperatures. Thus, the dual effects of local condensation and local heating contribute to dramatically enhance the nucleation reaction. Our model consistently reproduces the frequency and pressure dependences, supporting its essential applicability. PMID:26912021

  4. Nucleus factory on cavitation bubble for amyloid β fibril.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kichitaro; Ogi, Hirotsugu; Adachi, Kanta; Noi, Kentaro; Hirao, Masahiko; Yagi, Hisashi; Goto, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Structural evolution from monomer to fibril of amyloid β peptide is related to pathogenic mechanism of Alzheimer disease, and its acceleration is a long-running problem in drug development. This study reveals that ultrasonic cavitation bubbles behave as catalysts for nucleation of the peptide: The nucleation reaction is highly dependent on frequency and pressure of acoustic wave, and we discover an optimum acoustical condition, at which the reaction-rate constant for nucleation is increased by three-orders-of magnitudes. A theoretical model is proposed for explaining highly frequency and pressure dependent nucleation reaction, where monomers are captured on the bubble surface during its growth and highly condensed by subsequent bubble collapse, so that they are transiently exposed to high temperatures. Thus, the dual effects of local condensation and local heating contribute to dramatically enhance the nucleation reaction. Our model consistently reproduces the frequency and pressure dependences, supporting its essential applicability. PMID:26912021

  5. Nucleus factory on cavitation bubble for amyloid β fibril.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kichitaro; Ogi, Hirotsugu; Adachi, Kanta; Noi, Kentaro; Hirao, Masahiko; Yagi, Hisashi; Goto, Yuji

    2016-02-25

    Structural evolution from monomer to fibril of amyloid β peptide is related to pathogenic mechanism of Alzheimer disease, and its acceleration is a long-running problem in drug development. This study reveals that ultrasonic cavitation bubbles behave as catalysts for nucleation of the peptide: The nucleation reaction is highly dependent on frequency and pressure of acoustic wave, and we discover an optimum acoustical condition, at which the reaction-rate constant for nucleation is increased by three-orders-of magnitudes. A theoretical model is proposed for explaining highly frequency and pressure dependent nucleation reaction, where monomers are captured on the bubble surface during its growth and highly condensed by subsequent bubble collapse, so that they are transiently exposed to high temperatures. Thus, the dual effects of local condensation and local heating contribute to dramatically enhance the nucleation reaction. Our model consistently reproduces the frequency and pressure dependences, supporting its essential applicability.

  6. Nucleus factory on cavitation bubble for amyloid β fibril

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Kichitaro; Ogi, Hirotsugu; Adachi, Kanta; Noi, Kentaro; Hirao, Masahiko; Yagi, Hisashi; Goto, Yuji

    2016-02-01

    Structural evolution from monomer to fibril of amyloid β peptide is related to pathogenic mechanism of Alzheimer disease, and its acceleration is a long-running problem in drug development. This study reveals that ultrasonic cavitation bubbles behave as catalysts for nucleation of the peptide: The nucleation reaction is highly dependent on frequency and pressure of acoustic wave, and we discover an optimum acoustical condition, at which the reaction-rate constant for nucleation is increased by three-orders-of magnitudes. A theoretical model is proposed for explaining highly frequency and pressure dependent nucleation reaction, where monomers are captured on the bubble surface during its growth and highly condensed by subsequent bubble collapse, so that they are transiently exposed to high temperatures. Thus, the dual effects of local condensation and local heating contribute to dramatically enhance the nucleation reaction. Our model consistently reproduces the frequency and pressure dependences, supporting its essential applicability.

  7. Theoretical model for coupled radial and translational motion of two bubbles at arbitrary separation distances.

    PubMed

    Doinikov, Alexander A; Bouakaz, Ayache

    2015-10-01

    A theoretical model is developed that describes nonlinear spherical pulsations and translational motions of two interacting bubbles at arbitrary separation distances between the bubbles. The derivation of the model is based on the multipole expansion of the bubble velocity potentials and the use of the Lagrangian formalism. The model consists of four coupled ordinary differential equations. Two of them are modified Rayleigh-Plesset equations for the radial oscillations of the bubbles and the other two describe the translational displacement of the bubble centers. The equations are not subject to the assumption that the distance between the bubbles is large compared to the bubble radii and hence make it possible to simulate the bubble dynamics starting from large separation distances up to contact between the bubbles providing that the deviation of the bubble shape from sphericity is negligible. Numerical simulations are carried out to demonstrate the capabilities of the developed model. It is shown that the correct modeling of the translational dynamics of the bubbles at small separation distances requires terms accurate up to ninth order in the inverse separation distance. Physical mechanisms are analyzed that lead to the change of the direction of the relative translational motion of the bubbles in finite-amplitude acoustic fields.

  8. Gases in Tektite Bubbles.

    PubMed

    O'keefe, J A; Lowman, P D; Dunning, K L

    1962-07-20

    Spectroscopic analysis of light produced by electrodeless discharge in a tektite bubble showed the main gases in the bubble to be neon, helium, and oxygen. The neon and helium have probably diffused in from the atmosphere, while the oxygen may be atmospheric gas incorporated in the tektite during its formation.

  9. Always Blowing Bubbles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grambo, Gregory

    1995-01-01

    Ways to explore blowing bubbles through observation, experimentation, and discovery are suggested to stimulate gifted children, with attention to such areas as the function of film in the liquid and the reason for the common spherical shape of bubbles. Experiments that children can try and tips for the teacher are presented. (SW)

  10. Clustering in bubbly liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa, Bernardo; Zenit, Roberto

    2004-11-01

    We are conducting experiments to determine the amount of clustering that occurs when small gas bubbles ascend in clean water. In particular, we are interested in flows for which the liquid motion around the bubbles can be described, with a certain degree of accuracy, using potential flow theory. This model is applicable for the case of bubbly liquids in which the Reynolds number is large and the Weber number is small. To clearly observe the formation of bubble clusters we propose the use of a Hele-Shaw-type channel. In this thin channel the bubbles cannot overlap in the depth direction, therefore the identification of bubble clusters cannot be misinterpreted. Direct video image analysis is performed to calculate the velocity and size of the bubbles, as well as the formation of clusters. Although the walls do affect the motion of the bubbles, the clustering phenomena does occur and has the same qualitative behavior as in fully three-dimensional flows. A series of preliminary measurements are presented. A brief discussion of our plans to perform PIV measurements to obtain the liquid velocity fields is also presented.

  11. Cost versus Enrollment Bubbles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vedder, Richard K.; Gillen, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The defining characteristic of a bubble is unsustainable growth that eventually reverses. Bubbles typically arise when uncertainty leads to unsustainable trends, and the authors argue that there are two areas in which higher education has experienced what appear to be unsustainable trends, namely, college costs (the costs to students, parents, and…

  12. Let Them Blow Bubbles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korenic, Eileen

    1988-01-01

    Describes a series of activities and demonstrations involving the science of soap bubbles. Starts with a recipe for bubble solution and gives instructions for several activities on topics such as density, interference colors, optics, static electricity, and galaxy formation. Contains some background information to help explain some of the effects.…

  13. Gases in Tektite Bubbles.

    PubMed

    O'keefe, J A; Lowman, P D; Dunning, K L

    1962-07-20

    Spectroscopic analysis of light produced by electrodeless discharge in a tektite bubble showed the main gases in the bubble to be neon, helium, and oxygen. The neon and helium have probably diffused in from the atmosphere, while the oxygen may be atmospheric gas incorporated in the tektite during its formation. PMID:17801113

  14. Evaporation, Boiling and Bubbles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Evaporation and boiling are both terms applied to the change of a liquid to the vapour/gaseous state. This article argues that it is the formation of bubbles of vapour within the liquid that most clearly differentiates boiling from evaporation although only a minority of chemistry textbooks seems to mention bubble formation in this context. The…

  15. Bubble collision with gravitation

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Dong-il; Lee, Bum-Hoon; Lee, Wonwoo; Yeom, Dong-han E-mail: bhl@sogang.ac.kr E-mail: innocent.yeom@gmail.com

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we study vacuum bubble collisions with various potentials including gravitation, assuming spherical, planar, and hyperbolic symmetry. We use numerical calculations from double-null formalism. Spherical symmetry can mimic the formation of a black hole via multiple bubble collisions. Planar and especially hyperbolic symmetry describes two bubble collisions. We study both cases, when two true vacuum regions have the same field value or different field values, by varying tensions. For the latter case, we also test symmetric and asymmetric bubble collisions, and see details of causal structures. If the colliding energy is sufficient, then the vacuum can be destabilized, and it is also demonstrated. This double-null formalism can be a complementary approach in the context of bubble collisions.

  16. Interfacial Bubble Deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour, Brian; Shabane, Parvis; Cypull, Olivia; Cheng, Shengfeng; Feitosa, Klebert

    Soap bubbles floating at an air-water experience deformations as a result of surface tension and hydrostatic forces. In this experiment, we investigate the nature of such deformations by taking cross-sectional images of bubbles of different volumes. The results show that as their volume increases, bubbles transition from spherical to hemispherical shape. The deformation of the interface also changes with bubble volume with the capillary rise converging to the capillary length as volume increases. The profile of the top and bottom of the bubble and the capillary rise are completely determined by the volume and pressure differences. James Madison University Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4VA Consortium, Research Corporation for Advancement of Science.

  17. The Investigation of the Effects of Gravity on Single Bubble Sonoluminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dzikowicz, Ben; Thiessen, David B.; Marston, Philip

    2000-01-01

    In single bubble following it's rapid collapse each cycle of oscillation of an ultrasonic field. Since widely varying length and time scales affect the bubble dynamics and optical emission processes, it is difficult to anticipate the importance of the effects of gravity present for observations on earth. Our bubble is driven in an acoustically resonating cavity at it's first harmonic mode. The acoustical radiation pressure (Bjerknes force) will then keep it suspended in the center near the pressure antinode. When driven in a region where the diffusive processes balance the bubble it acts in a nonlinear but regular way, emitting a short (approx. 200ps) burst of light each acoustic cycle. Balancing the Bjerknes force with buoyancy, as in, we can see that the bubble should be displaced from the velocity node approximately 20m at normal gravity. Therefore, water flows past the bubble at the time of collapse. Gravitation also changes the ambient pressure at the bubble's location, as Delta.P = rho.g.h this gives a change of approximately -0.5% in our experiment when going from 1.8g to 0g. Studies of ambient pressure changes were also done in order to assess these effects. Inside a pressure sealed chamber a spherical glass cell is filled with distilled water which has been degassed to 120mmHg. A bubble is then trapped in the center and driven by a piezoelectric transducer at 32.2kHz attached to the side of the cell. An optical system is then set up to take strobbed video images along and light emission data simultaneously. Temperature, pressure, drive voltage, and listener voltage are also monitored. PMT output in Volts The radii of the bubbles for both experiment s are fit using the Rayleigh-Plesset equation and the acoustic drive amplitude and the ambient bubble radius are found. There is little change in the acoustic drive amplitude as we expect, since we are not varying the drive voltage. However. the ambient bubble radius goes up considerably. These changes

  18. Oscillatory Dynamics of Single Bubbles and Agglomeration in a Sound Field in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marston, Philip L.; Trinh, Eugene H.; Depew, Jon; Asaki, Thomas J.

    1994-01-01

    A dual-frequency acoustic levitator containing water was developed for studying bubble and drop dynamics in low gravity. It was flown on USML-1 where it was used in the Glovebox facility. High frequency (21 or 63 kHz) ultrasonic waves were modulated by low frequencies to excite shape oscillations on bubbles and oil drops ultrasonically trapped in the water. Bubble diameters were typically close to 1 cm or larger. When such large bubbles are acoustically trapped on the Earth, the acoustic radiation pressure needed to overcome buoyancy tends to shift the natural frequency for quadrupole (n = 2) oscillations above the prediction of Lamb's equation. In low gravity, a much weaker trapping force was used and measurements of n = 2 and 3 mode frequencies were closer to the ideal case. Other video observations in low gravity include: (i) the transient reappearance of a bulge where a small bubble has coalesced with a large one, (ii) observations of the dynamics of bubbles coated by oil indicating that shape oscillations can shift a coated bubble away from the oil-water interface of the coating giving a centering of the core, and (iii) the agglomeration of bubbles induced by the sound field.

  19. Micro Dynamics of Pulsed Laser Induced Bubbles in Dusty Plasma Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, L.-W.; Tsai, C.-Y.; Tseng, Y.-P.; I Lin

    2008-09-07

    We experimentally study the micro dynamics of the laser induced plasma bubble in a dusty plasma liquid formed by negatively charged dust particles suspended in a low pressure rf Ar glow discharge. The plume from the ablation of the suspended dust particles pushes away dust particle and generates a dust-free plasma bubble. It then travels downward. The spatio-temporal evolution of the dust density fluctuation surrounding the bubble is monitored by directly tracking dust motion through optical video microscopy. The micro dynamics of the bubble associated dust acoustic type solitary oscillation in the wake field is investigated and discussed.

  20. The non-linear response of bubble clouds to pressure excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuster, D.; Bergamasco, L.

    2015-12-01

    In this article we numerically investigate the non-linear response of a bubble cloud against a periodic pressure excitation. By exciting a planar bubble curtain with an external acoustic pulse of given amplitude and frequency, we characterize the global dynamic response of the system using phase diagrams representing the void fraction against the excitation pressure. Even in the absence of mass transfer, the void fraction around which the system oscillates increases when increasing the excitation amplitude. We show how the maximum pressures reached during the collapse of bubbles are higher in polydisperse bubble clouds than in monodisperse clouds for strong pressure pulses.

  1. Measurement of the resonance frequency of single bubbles using a laser Doppler vibrometer.

    PubMed

    Argo, Theodore F; Wilson, Preston S; Palan, Vikrant

    2008-06-01

    The behavior of bubbles confined in tubes and channels is important in medical and industrial applications. In these small spaces, traditional means of experimentally observing bubble dynamics are often impossible or significantly perturb the system. A laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) requires a narrow (<1 mm diameter) line-of-sight access for the beam and illumination of the bubble does not perturb its dynamics. LDV measurements of the resonance frequency of a bubble suspended in a small tank are presented to illustrate the utility of this measurement technique. The precision of the technique is similar to the precision of traditional acoustic techniques.

  2. Bubbles, Bubbles: Integrated Investigations with Floating Spheres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeder, Stacy

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author describes integrated science and mathematics activities developed for fourth-grade students to explore and investigate three-dimensional geometric shapes, Bernoulli's principle, estimation, and art with and through bubbles. Students were engaged in thinking and reflection on the questions their teachers asked and were…

  3. Bubble dynamics in a standing sound field: the bubble habitat.

    PubMed

    Koch, P; Kurz, T; Parlitz, U; Lauterborn, W

    2011-11-01

    Bubble dynamics is investigated numerically with special emphasis on the static pressure and the positional stability of the bubble in a standing sound field. The bubble habitat, made up of not dissolving, positionally and spherically stable bubbles, is calculated in the parameter space of the bubble radius at rest and sound pressure amplitude for different sound field frequencies, static pressures, and gas concentrations of the liquid. The bubble habitat grows with static pressure and shrinks with sound field frequency. The range of diffusionally stable bubble oscillations, found at positive slopes of the habitat-diffusion border, can be increased substantially with static pressure. PMID:22088010

  4. Tribonucleation of bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Wildeman, Sander; Lhuissier, Henri; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    We report on the nucleation of bubbles on solids that are gently rubbed against each other in a liquid. The phenomenon is found to depend strongly on the material and roughness of the solid surfaces. For a given surface, temperature, and gas content, a trail of growing bubbles is observed if the rubbing force and velocity exceed a certain threshold. Direct observation through a transparent solid shows that each bubble in the trail results from the early coalescence of several microscopic bubbles, themselves detaching from microscopic gas pockets forming between the solids. From a detailed study of the wear tracks, with atomic force and scanning electron microscopy imaging, we conclude that these microscopic gas pockets originate from a local fracturing of the surface asperities, possibly enhanced by chemical reactions at the freshly created surfaces. Our findings will be useful either for preventing undesired bubble formation or, on the contrary, for “writing with bubbles,” i.e., creating controlled patterns of microscopic bubbles. PMID:24982169

  5. Numerical simulation of shock and bubble dynamics in shockwave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colonius, Tim; Tanguay, Michel

    2002-11-01

    Theoretical evaluation of the efficacy of stone comminution (and potential for tissue damage) during shockwave lithotripsy requires knowledge of the complex stress fields associated with both the incident focussing shock and the dynamics of cavitation bubbles that it induces. While simple models from geometrical acoustics and subsequent modeling of spherical bubbles in isolation (Gilmore equation) can provide estimates, high-speed photography in vitro reveals a far more complex flow with bubble number densities that are sufficiently high such that collective effects associated with a cloud of bubbles are important. This talk will describe a modeling effort aimed at estimating stresses from these complex lithotripter generated flow fields. We compute the time-dependent, compressible, ensemble-averaged two-phase flow equations with a finite-difference scheme. Detailed modeling of the dynamics of bubbles (on the microscale) and high-order weighted essentially nonoscillatory shock-capturing schemes are employed. The model is compared to hydrophone and passive cavitation detection measurements, as well as qualitative comparison with high-speed photography. Finally, we explore collective bubble mechanisms ranging from defocusing and shielding of the stone (for high bubble densities in the focal region) to enhanced stresses due to concerted cloud collapse in a dual-pulse lithotripsy configuration. [Work supported by NIH P01 DK-43881 and NSF under grant CTS-9979258.

  6. Can airborne ultrasound monitor bubble size in chocolate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, N.; Hazlehurst, T.; Povey, M.; Vieira, J.; Sundara, R.; Sandoz, J.-P.

    2014-04-01

    Aerated chocolate products consist of solid chocolate with the inclusion of bubbles and are a popular consumer product in many countries. The volume fraction and size distribution of the bubbles has an effect on their sensory properties and manufacturing cost. For these reasons it is important to have an online real time process monitoring system capable of measuring their bubble size distribution. As these products are eaten by consumers it is desirable that the monitoring system is non contact to avoid food contaminations. In this work we assess the feasibility of using an airborne ultrasound system to monitor the bubble size distribution in aerated chocolate bars. The experimental results from the airborne acoustic experiments were compared with theoretical results for known bubble size distributions using COMSOL Multiphysics. This combined experimental and theoretical approach is used to develop a greater understanding of how ultrasound propagates through aerated chocolate and to assess the feasibility of using airborne ultrasound to monitor bubble size distribution in these systems. The results indicated that a smaller bubble size distribution would result in an increase in attenuation through the product.

  7. Effect of surfactants on single-bubble sonoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Kyuichi

    1998-10-01

    The effect of surfactants on single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) is studied theoretically based on the hot-spot model that a SBSL bubble collapses quasiadiabatically and that the quasi-thermal radiation is the origin of the light emission. Stottlemyer and Apfel [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 102, 1418 (1997)] reported that the surfactant called Triton X-100, which provides free interfacial motion, reduced the magnitude of the light pulse from the bubble. It is clarified by the present study that the effect of the surfactant is caused by the inhibition of condensation of water vapor at the bubble wall at the collapse, which results in lowering the achieved temperature inside a bubble due to the enhancement of the amount of vapor that undergoes endothermal chemical reactions. It is predicted, based on the hot-spot model, that the radiation is not thermalized inside a bubble in the case of SBSL in a solution of the surfactant in water and that the spectrum of SBSL may deviate from the blackbody spectrum and may have some characteristic lines such as the OH line (310 nm). It is suggested that surfactants can be used to enhance the chemical reactions of vapor in sonochemistry. It is also suggested that some of the surfactants are dissociated by the extremely high temperature at the bubble wall at the collapse.

  8. Cosmic bubble collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleban, Matthew

    2011-10-01

    I briefly review the physics of cosmic bubble collisions in false-vacuum eternal inflation. My purpose is to provide an introduction to the subject for readers unfamiliar with it, focussing on recent work related to the prospects for observing the effects of bubble collisions in cosmology. I will attempt to explain the essential physical points as simply and concisely as possible, leaving most technical details to the references. I make no attempt to be comprehensive or complete. I also present a new solution to Einstein's equations that represents a bubble universe after a collision, containing vacuum energy and ingoing null radiation with an arbitrary density profile.

  9. Rotating bubble membrane radiator

    DOEpatents

    Webb, Brent J.; Coomes, Edmund P.

    1988-12-06

    A heat radiator useful for expelling waste heat from a power generating system aboard a space vehicle is disclosed. Liquid to be cooled is passed to the interior of a rotating bubble membrane radiator, where it is sprayed into the interior of the bubble. Liquid impacting upon the interior surface of the bubble is cooled and the heat radiated from the outer surface of the membrane. Cooled liquid is collected by the action of centrifical force about the equator of the rotating membrane and returned to the power system. Details regarding a complete space power system employing the radiator are given.

  10. Linear oscillation of gas bubbles in a viscoelastic material under ultrasound irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hamaguchi, Fumiya; Ando, Keita

    2015-11-15

    Acoustically forced oscillation of spherical gas bubbles in a viscoelastic material is studied through comparisons between experiments and linear theory. An experimental setup has been designed to visualize bubble dynamics in gelatin gels using a high-speed camera. A spherical gas bubble is created by focusing an infrared laser pulse into (gas-supersaturated) gelatin gels. The bubble radius (up to 150 μm) under mechanical equilibrium is controlled by gradual mass transfer of gases across the bubble interface. The linearized bubble dynamics are studied from the observation of spherical bubble oscillation driven by low-intensity, planar ultrasound driven at 28 kHz. It follows from the experiment for an isolated bubble that the frequency response in its volumetric oscillation was shifted to the high frequency side and its peak was suppressed as the gelatin concentration increases. The measurement is fitted to the linearized Rayleigh–Plesset equation coupled with the Voigt constitutive equation that models the behavior of linear viscoelastic solids; the fitting yields good agreement by tuning unknown values of the viscosity and rigidity, indicating that more complex phenomena including shear thinning, stress relaxation, and retardation do not play an important role for the small-amplitude oscillations. Moreover, the cases for bubble-bubble and bubble-wall systems are studied. The observed interaction effect on the linearized dynamics can be explained as well by a set of the Rayleigh–Plesset equations coupled through acoustic radiation among these systems. This suggests that this experimental setup can be applied to validate the model of bubble dynamics with more complex configuration such as a cloud of bubbles in viscoelastic materials.

  11. Linear oscillation of gas bubbles in a viscoelastic material under ultrasound irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, Fumiya; Ando, Keita

    2015-11-01

    Acoustically forced oscillation of spherical gas bubbles in a viscoelastic material is studied through comparisons between experiments and linear theory. An experimental setup has been designed to visualize bubble dynamics in gelatin gels using a high-speed camera. A spherical gas bubble is created by focusing an infrared laser pulse into (gas-supersaturated) gelatin gels. The bubble radius (up to 150 μm) under mechanical equilibrium is controlled by gradual mass transfer of gases across the bubble interface. The linearized bubble dynamics are studied from the observation of spherical bubble oscillation driven by low-intensity, planar ultrasound driven at 28 kHz. It follows from the experiment for an isolated bubble that the frequency response in its volumetric oscillation was shifted to the high frequency side and its peak was suppressed as the gelatin concentration increases. The measurement is fitted to the linearized Rayleigh-Plesset equation coupled with the Voigt constitutive equation that models the behavior of linear viscoelastic solids; the fitting yields good agreement by tuning unknown values of the viscosity and rigidity, indicating that more complex phenomena including shear thinning, stress relaxation, and retardation do not play an important role for the small-amplitude oscillations. Moreover, the cases for bubble-bubble and bubble-wall systems are studied. The observed interaction effect on the linearized dynamics can be explained as well by a set of the Rayleigh-Plesset equations coupled through acoustic radiation among these systems. This suggests that this experimental setup can be applied to validate the model of bubble dynamics with more complex configuration such as a cloud of bubbles in viscoelastic materials.

  12. Sounds of marine seeps: a study of bubble activity near a rigid boundary.

    PubMed

    Maksimov, A O; Burov, B A; Salomatin, A S; Chernykh, D V

    2014-09-01

    A passive acoustic method for detecting environmentally dangerous gas leaks from pipelines and methane naturally leaking from the seabed has been investigated. Gas escape involves the formation and release of bubbles of different sizes. Each bubble emits a sound at a specific frequency. Determination of the bubble radius from the frequency of its signature passive acoustic emission by use of so-called Minnaert formula has a restricted area of applicability near the seabed. The point is that the inertial mass and the damping constant of the birthing bubble are markedly different from those of a free bubble. The theoretical model for the bubble volume oscillations near the seabed has been proposed and an analytical solution has been derived. It was shown that the bispherical coordinates provide separation of variables and are more suitable for analysis of the volume oscillations of these constrained bubbles. Explicit formulas have been derived, which describe the dependence of the bubble emission near a rigid wall on its size and the separation distance between the bubble and the boundary. PMID:25190382

  13. Observations of the collapses and rebounds of millimeter-sized lithotripsy bubbles.

    PubMed

    Kreider, Wayne; Crum, Lawrence A; Bailey, Michael R; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A

    2011-11-01

    Bubbles excited by lithotripter shock waves undergo a prolonged growth followed by an inertial collapse and rebounds. In addition to the relevance for clinical lithotripsy treatments, such bubbles can be used to study the mechanics of inertial collapses. In particular, both phase change and diffusion among vapor and noncondensable gas molecules inside the bubble are known to alter the collapse dynamics of individual bubbles. Accordingly, the role of heat and mass transport during inertial collapses is explored by experimentally observing the collapses and rebounds of lithotripsy bubbles for water temperatures ranging from 20 to 60 °C and dissolved gas concentrations from 10 to 85% of saturation. Bubble responses were characterized through high-speed photography and acoustic measurements that identified the timing of individual bubble collapses. Maximum bubble diameters before and after collapse were estimated and the corresponding ratio of volumes was used to estimate the fraction of energy retained by the bubble through collapse. The rebounds demonstrated statistically significant dependencies on both dissolved gas concentration and temperature. In many observations, liquid jets indicating asymmetric bubble collapses were visible. Bubble rebounds were sensitive to these asymmetries primarily for water conditions corresponding to the most dissipative collapses.

  14. Observations of the collapses and rebounds of millimeter-sized lithotripsy bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Kreider, Wayne; Crum, Lawrence A.; Bailey, Michael R.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.

    2011-01-01

    Bubbles excited by lithotripter shock waves undergo a prolonged growth followed by an inertial collapse and rebounds. In addition to the relevance for clinical lithotripsy treatments, such bubbles can be used to study the mechanics of inertial collapses. In particular, both phase change and diffusion among vapor and noncondensable gas molecules inside the bubble are known to alter the collapse dynamics of individual bubbles. Accordingly, the role of heat and mass transport during inertial collapses is explored by experimentally observing the collapses and rebounds of lithotripsy bubbles for water temperatures ranging from 20 to 60 °C and dissolved gas concentrations from 10 to 85% of saturation. Bubble responses were characterized through high-speed photography and acoustic measurements that identified the timing of individual bubble collapses. Maximum bubble diameters before and after collapse were estimated and the corresponding ratio of volumes was used to estimate the fraction of energy retained by the bubble through collapse. The rebounds demonstrated statistically significant dependencies on both dissolved gas concentration and temperature. In many observations, liquid jets indicating asymmetric bubble collapses were visible. Bubble rebounds were sensitive to these asymmetries primarily for water conditions corresponding to the most dissipative collapses. PMID:22088027

  15. Phase speed and attenuation in bubbly liquids inferred from impedance measurements near the individual bubble resonance frequency.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Preston S; Roy, Ronald A; Carey, William M

    2005-04-01

    In the ocean, natural and artificial processes generate clouds of bubbles that scatter and attenuate sound. Measurements have shown that at the individual bubble resonance frequency, sound propagation in this medium is highly attenuated and dispersive. The existing theory to explain this behavior is deemed adequate away from resonance. However, due to excessive attenuation near resonance, little experimental data exists for a comparison with model predictions. An impedance tube was developed specifically for exploring this regime. The effective medium phase speed and attenuation were inferred from measurements of the surface impedance of a layer of bubbly liquid composed of air bubbles and distilled water, for void fractions from 6.2 x 10(-5) to 5.4 x 10(-4) and bubble sizes centered around 0.62 mm in radius. Improved measurement speed, accuracy, and precision is possible with the new instrument, and both instantaneous and time-averaged measurements were obtained. The phase speed and attenuation at resonance was observed to be sensitive to the bubble population statistics and agreed with an existing model [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 85, 732-746 (1989)], within the uncertainty of the bubble population parameters. Agreement between the model and the data reported here is better than for the data that was available when the model was originally published.

  16. Bulk and integrated acousto-optic spectrometers for molecular astronomy with heterodyne spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, G.; Buhl, D.; Florez, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    A survey of acousto-optic spectrometers for molecular astronomy is presented, noting a technique of combining the acoustic bending of a collimated coherent light beam with a Bragg cell followed by an array of sensitive photodetectors. This acousto-optic spectrometer has a large bandwidth, a large number of channels, high resolution, and is energy efficient. Receiver development has concentrated on high-frequency heterodyne systems for the study of the chemical composition of the interstellar medium. RF spectrometers employing acousto-optic diffraction cells are described. Acousto-optic techniques have been suggested for applications to electronic warfare, electronic countermeasures and electronic support systems. Plans to use integrated optics for the further miniaturization of acousto-optic spectrometers are described. Bulk acousto-optic spectrometers with 300 MHz and 1 GHz bandwidths are being developed for use in the back-end of high-frequency heterodyne receivers for astronomical research.

  17. Forward glory scattering from bubbles.

    PubMed

    Langley, D S; Marston, P L

    1991-08-20

    The scattering enhancement known as the glory was observed in forward scattering from bubbles in liquids. A physical-optics model of the forward glory is detailed, based on transmitted waves reflected within the bubble. Some aspects of the model are compared with the Mie theory and with features in the cross-polarized light from single bubbles. Clouds of small bubbles rising in water show an angular structure in the forward glory light that is useful for estimating the bubble size.

  18. What's in a Bubble?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunderson, Megan

    2000-01-01

    Describes a unit on detergents and bubbles that establishes an interest in the properties of materials and focuses on active learning involving both hands- and minds-on learning rather than passive learning. (ASK)

  19. Blowing magnetic skyrmion bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wanjun; Upadhyaya, Pramey; Zhang, Wei; Yu, Guoqiang; Jungfleisch, M. Benjamin; Fradin, Frank Y.; Pearson, John E.; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; Wang, Kang L.; Heinonen, Olle; te Velthuis, Suzanne G. E.; Hoffmann, Axel

    2015-07-01

    The formation of soap bubbles from thin films is accompanied by topological transitions. Here we show how a magnetic topological structure, a skyrmion bubble, can be generated in a solid-state system in a similar manner. Using an inhomogeneous in-plane current in a system with broken inversion symmetry, we experimentally “blow” magnetic skyrmion bubbles from a geometrical constriction. The presence of a spatially divergent spin-orbit torque gives rise to instabilities of the magnetic domain structures that are reminiscent of Rayleigh-Plateau instabilities in fluid flows. We determine a phase diagram for skyrmion formation and reveal the efficient manipulation of these dynamically created skyrmions, including depinning and motion. The demonstrated current-driven transformation from stripe domains to magnetic skyrmion bubbles could lead to progress in skyrmion-based spintronics.

  20. Chemistry in Soap Bubbles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Albert W. M.; Wong, A.; Lee, H. W.; Lee, H. Y.; Zhou, Ning-Huai

    2002-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experiment in which common chemical gases are trapped inside soap bubbles. Examines the physical and chemical properties of the gases such as relative density and combustion. (Author/MM)

  1. Acoustic velocity meter systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius

    1985-01-01

    Acoustic velocity meter (AVM) systems operate on the principles that the point-to-point upstream traveltime of an acoustic pulse is longer than the downstream traveltime and that this difference in traveltime can be accurately measured by electronic devices. An AVM system is capable of recording water velocity (and discharge) under a wide range of conditions, but some constraints apply: 1. Accuracy is reduced and performance is degraded if the acoustic path is not a continuous straight line. The path can be bent by reflection if it is too close to a stream boundary or by refraction if it passes through density gradients resulting from variations in either water temperature or salinity. For paths of less than 100 m, a temperature gradient of 0.1' per meter causes signal bending less than 0.6 meter at midchannel, and satisfactory velocity results can be obtained. Reflection from stream boundaries can cause signal cancellation if boundaries are too close to signal path. 2. Signal strength is attenuated by particles or bubbles that absorb, spread, or scatter sound. The concentration of particles or bubbles that can be tolerated is a function of the path length and frequency of the acoustic signal. 3. Changes in streamline orientation can affect system accuracy if the variability is random. 4. Errors relating to signal resolution are much larger for a single threshold detection scheme than for multiple threshold schemes. This report provides methods for computing the effect of various conditions on the accuracy of a record obtained from an AVM. The equipment must be adapted to the site. Field reconnaissance and preinstallation analysis to detect possible problems are critical for proper installation and operation of an AVM system.

  2. Cavitation inception by the backscattering of pressure waves from a bubble interface

    SciTech Connect

    Takahira, Hiroyuki Ogasawara, Toshiyuki Mori, Naoto Tanaka, Moe

    2015-10-28

    The secondary cavitation that occurs by the backscattering of focused ultrasound from a primary cavitation bubble caused by the negative pressure part of the ultrasound (Maxwell, et al., 2011) might be useful for the energy exchange due to bubble oscillations in High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). The present study is concerned with the cavitation inception by the backscattering of ultrasound from a bubble. In the present experiment, a laser-induced bubble which is generated by a pulsed focused laser beam with high intensity is utilized as a primary cavitation bubble. After generating the bubble, focused ultrasound is emitted to the bubble. The acoustic field and the bubble motion are observed with a high-speed video camera. It is confirmed that the secondary cavitation bubble clouds are generated by the backscattering from the laser-induced bubble. The growth of cavitation bubble clouds is analyzed with the image processing method. The experimental results show that the height and width of the bubble clouds grow in stepwise during their evolution. The direct numerical simulations are also conducted for the backscattering of incident pressure waves from a bubble in order to evaluate a pressure field near the bubble. It is shown that the ratio of a bubble collapse time t{sub 0} to a characteristic time of wave propagation t{sub S}, η = t{sub 0}/t{sub s}, is an important determinant for generating negative pressure region by backscattering. The minimum pressure location by the backscattering in simulations is in good agreement with the experiment.

  3. Blowing DNA bubbles.

    PubMed

    Severin, N; Zhuang, W; Ecker, C; Kalachev, A A; Sokolov, I M; Rabe, J P

    2006-11-01

    We report here experimental observations which indicate that topologically or covalently formed polymer loops embedded in an ultrathin liquid film on a solid substrate can be "blown" into circular "bubbles" during scanning force microscopy (SFM) imaging. In particular, supercoiled vector DNA has been unraveled, moved, stretched, and overstretched to two times its B-form length and then torn apart. We attribute the blowing of the DNA bubbles to the interaction of the tapping SFM tip with the ultrathin liquid film.

  4. Bubble coalescence in magmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herd, Richard A.; Pinkerton, Harry

    1993-01-01

    The most important factors governing the nature of volcanic eruptions are the primary volatile contents, the ways in which volatiles exsolve, and how the resulting bubbles grow and interact. In this contribution we assess the importance of bubble coalescence. The degree of coalescence in alkali basalts has been measured using Image Analysis techniques and it is suggested to be a process of considerable importance. Binary coalescence events occur every few minutes in basaltic melts with vesicularities greater than around 35 percent.

  5. Clustering in Bubble Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenit, Roberto

    2000-11-01

    A monidisperse bubble suspension is studied experimentally for the limit in which the Weber number is small and the Reynolds number is large. For this regime the suspension can be modeled using potential flow theory to describe the dynamics of the interstitial fluid. Complete theoretical descriptions have been composed (Spelt and Sangani, 1998) to model the behavior of these suspensions. Bubble clustering is a natural instability that arises from the potential flow considerations, in which bubbles tend to align in horizontal rafts as they move upwards. The appearance of bubble clusters was recently corroborated experimentally by Zenit et al. (2000), who found that although clusters did appear, their strength was not as strong as the predictions. Experiments involving gravity driven shear flows are used to explain the nature of the clustering observed in these type of flows. Balances of the bubble phase pressure (in terms of a calculated diffusion coefficient) and the Maxwell pressure (from the potential flow description) are presented to predict the stability of the bubble suspension. The predictions are compared with experimental results.

  6. Measurement of the impuslive force generated by colapsing bubble close to a solid boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Milos; Unger, Jiri; Holata, Jakub; Zima, Patrik

    2012-04-01

    The article presents experimental results of the acoustical and optical study of cavitation bubble collapse close to a solid boundary in water. The bubble was generated by discharge of low-voltage capacitor into a couple of wires closing a simple circuit. Different distances from the solid wall and different maximum bubble radii were studied. The bubble radius was studied using time-resolved photography and by PVDF film sensor glued on the solid boundary. The illumination was provided by high-power led diode. Synchronization of the system was provided by pulse generator connected to an oscilloscope. The impact power of the bubble to the wall was estimated from the time-resolved photography of the bubble and from the PVDF film sensor signal. The PVDF film sensor calibration was performed by a pendulum test to estimate the impact force.

  7. A two-dimensional nonlinear model for the generation of stable cavitation bubbles.

    PubMed

    Vanhille, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Bubbles appear by acoustic cavitation in a liquid when rarefaction pressures attain a specific threshold value in a liquid. Once they are created, the stable cavitation bubbles oscillate nonlinearly and affect the ultrasonic field. Here we present a model developed for the study of bubble generation in a liquid contained in a two-dimensional cavity in which a standing ultrasonic field is established. The model considers dissipation and dispersion due to the bubbles. It also assumes that both the ultrasonic field and the bubble oscillations are nonlinear. The numerical experiments predict where the bubbles are generated from a population of nuclei distributed in the liquid and show how they affect the ultrasonic field. PMID:26964990

  8. Localized removal of layers of metal, polymer, or biomaterial by ultrasound cavitation bubbles.

    PubMed

    Fernandez Rivas, David; Verhaagen, Bram; Seddon, James R T; Zijlstra, Aaldert G; Jiang, Lei-Meng; van der Sluis, Luc W M; Versluis, Michel; Lohse, Detlef; Gardeniers, Han J G E

    2012-09-01

    We present an ultrasonic device with the ability to locally remove deposited layers from a glass slide in a controlled and rapid manner. The cleaning takes place as the result of cavitating bubbles near the deposited layers and not due to acoustic streaming. The bubbles are ejected from air-filled cavities micromachined in a silicon surface, which, when vibrated ultrasonically at a frequency of 200 kHz, generate a stream of bubbles that travel to the layer deposited on an opposing glass slide. Depending on the pressure amplitude, the bubble clouds ejected from the micropits attain different shapes as a result of complex bubble interaction forces, leading to distinct shapes of the cleaned areas. We have determined the removal rates for several inorganic and organic materials and obtained an improved efficiency in cleaning when compared to conventional cleaning equipment. We also provide values of the force the bubbles are able to exert on an atomic force microscope tip.

  9. Small-scale effects of underwater bubble clouds on ocean reflectance: 3-D modeling results.

    PubMed

    Piskozub, Jacek; Stramski, Dariusz; Terrill, Eric; Melville, W Kendall

    2009-07-01

    We examined the effect of individual bubble clouds on remote-sensing reflectance of the ocean with a 3-D Monte Carlo model of radiative transfer. The concentrations and size distribution of bubbles were defined based on acoustical measurements of bubbles in the surface ocean. The light scattering properties of bubbles for various void fractions were calculated using Mie scattering theory. We show how the spatial pattern, magnitude, and spectral behavior of remote-sensing reflectance produced by modeled bubble clouds change due to variations in their geometric and optical properties as well as the background optical properties of the ambient water. We also determined that for realistic sizes of bubble clouds, a plane-parallel horizontally homogeneous geometry (1-D radiative transfer model) is inadequate for modeling water-leaving radiance above the cloud.

  10. Spectra of single-bubble sonoluminescence in water and glycerin-water mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaitan, D. Felipe; Atchley, Anthony A.; Lewia, S. D.; Carlson, J. T.; Maruyama, X. K.; Moran, Michael; Sweider, Darren

    1996-07-01

    A single gas bubble, acoustically levitated in a standing-wave field and oscillating under the action of that field, can emit pulses of blue-white light with duration less than 50 ps. Measurements of the spectrum of this picosecond sonoluminescence with a scanning monochrometer are reported for air bubbles levitated in water and in glycerin-water mixtures. While the spectrum has been reported previously by others for air bubbles in water, the spectrum for air bubbles in water-glycerin mixtures has not. Expected emission lines from glycerin were conspicuously absent, suggesting a different mechanism for light production in single-bubble sonoluminescence. Other conclusions are the spectrum for air bubbles in water is consistent with that previously reported, the radiated energy decreases as the glycerin concentration increases, and the peak of the spectrum appears to shift to longer wavelengths for the water-glycerin mixtures.

  11. Oscillating bubbles: a versatile tool for lab on a chip applications.

    PubMed

    Hashmi, Ali; Yu, Gan; Reilly-Collette, Marina; Heiman, Garrett; Xu, Jie

    2012-11-01

    With the fast development of acoustic and multiphase microfluidics in recent years, oscillating bubbles have drawn more-and-more attention due to their great potential in various Lab on a Chip (LOC) applications. Many innovative bubble-based devices have been explored in the past decade. In this article, we first briefly summarize current understanding of the physics of oscillating bubbles, and then critically summarize recent advancements, including some of our original work, on the applications of oscillating bubbles in microfluidic devices. We intend to highlight the advantages of using oscillating bubbles along with the challenges that accompany them. We believe that these emerging studies on microfluidic oscillating bubbles will be revolutionary to the development of next-generation LOC technologies.

  12. A two-dimensional nonlinear model for the generation of stable cavitation bubbles.

    PubMed

    Vanhille, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Bubbles appear by acoustic cavitation in a liquid when rarefaction pressures attain a specific threshold value in a liquid. Once they are created, the stable cavitation bubbles oscillate nonlinearly and affect the ultrasonic field. Here we present a model developed for the study of bubble generation in a liquid contained in a two-dimensional cavity in which a standing ultrasonic field is established. The model considers dissipation and dispersion due to the bubbles. It also assumes that both the ultrasonic field and the bubble oscillations are nonlinear. The numerical experiments predict where the bubbles are generated from a population of nuclei distributed in the liquid and show how they affect the ultrasonic field.

  13. Nonintrusive Monitoring and Control of Metallurgical Processes by Acoustic Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hao-Ling; Khajavi, Leili Tafaghodi; Barati, Mansoor

    2011-06-01

    The feasibility of developing a new online monitoring technique based on the characteristic acoustic response of gas bubbles in a liquid has been investigated. The method is intended to monitor the chemistry of the liquid through its relation to the bubble sound frequency. A low-temperature model consisting of water and alcohol mixtures was established, and the frequency of bubbles rising under varying concentrations of methanol was measured. It was shown that the frequency of the sound created by bubble pulsation varies with the percentage of alcohol in water. The frequency drops sharply with the increase in methanol content up to 20 wt pct, after which the decreases is gradual. Surface tension seems to be a critical liquid property affecting the sound frequency through its two-fold effects on the bubble size and the pulsation domain. The dependence between the frequency and the liquid composition suggests the feasibility of developing an acoustic-based technique for process control purposes.

  14. Time-scales for quenching single-bubble sonoluminescence in the presence of alcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Jingfeng; Matula, Thomas

    2002-11-01

    A small amount of alcohol added to water dramatically decreases the light intensity from single-bubble sonoluminescence [Weninger et al., J. Phys. Chem. 99, 14195-14197 (1995)]. From an excess accumulation at the bubble surface [Ashokkumar et al., J. Phys. Chem. 104, 8462-8465 (2000)], the molecules evaporate into the bubble interior, reducing the effective adiabatic exponent of the gas, and decreasing the bubble temperature and light output [Toegel et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 2509-2512 (2000)]. There is a debate as to the rate at which alcohol is injected into the bubble interior. One camp favors the notion that molecules must be repetitively injected over many acoustic cycles. Another camp favors the notion that most quenching occurs during a single collapse. An experiment has been conducted in order to resolve the debate. Quenching rates were measured by recording the instantaneous bubble response and corresponding light emission during a sudden increase in pressure. It was found that complete quenching in the presence of methanol requires over 8000 acoustic cycles, while quenching with butanol occurs in about 20 acoustic cycles. These observations are consistent with the view that quenching requires the repetitive injection of alcohol molecules over repetitive acoustic cycles.

  15. Fast bubble dynamics and sizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnecki, Krzysztof; Fouan, Damien; Achaoui, Younes; Mensah, Serge

    2015-11-01

    Single bubble sizing is usually performed by measuring the resonant bubble response using the Dual Frequency Ultrasound Method. However, in practice, the use of millisecond-duration chirp-like waves yields nonlinear distortions of the bubble oscillations. In comparison with the resonant curve obtained under harmonic excitation, it was observed that the bubble dynamic response shifted by up to 20 percent of the resonant frequency with bubble radii of less than 100 μm. In the case of low pressure waves (P < 5 kPa), an approximate formula for the apparent frequency shift is derived. Simulated and experimental bubble responses are analyzed in the time-frequency domain using an enhanced concentrated (reassigned) spectrogram. The difference in the resonant frequency resulted from the persistence of the resonant mode in the bubble response. Numerical simulations in which these findings are extended to pairs of coupled bubbles and to bubble clouds are also presented.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations of bubble nucleation in dark matter detectors.

    PubMed

    Denzel, Philipp; Diemand, Jürg; Angélil, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    Bubble chambers and droplet detectors used in dosimetry and dark matter particle search experiments use a superheated metastable liquid in which nuclear recoils trigger bubble nucleation. This process is described by the classical heat spike model of F. Seitz [Phys. Fluids (1958-1988) 1, 2 (1958)PFLDAS0031-917110.1063/1.1724333], which uses classical nucleation theory to estimate the amount and the localization of the deposited energy required for bubble formation. Here we report on direct molecular dynamics simulations of heat-spike-induced bubble formation. They allow us to test the nanoscale process described in the classical heat spike model. 40 simulations were performed, each containing about 20 million atoms, which interact by a truncated force-shifted Lennard-Jones potential. We find that the energy per length unit needed for bubble nucleation agrees quite well with theoretical predictions, but the allowed spike length and the required total energy are about twice as large as predicted. This could be explained by the rapid energy diffusion measured in the simulation: contrary to the assumption in the classical model, we observe significantly faster heat diffusion than the bubble formation time scale. Finally we examine α-particle tracks, which are much longer than those of neutrons and potential dark matter particles. Empirically, α events were recently found to result in louder acoustic signals than neutron events. This distinction is crucial for the background rejection in dark matter searches. We show that a large number of individual bubbles can form along an α track, which explains the observed larger acoustic amplitudes.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of bubble nucleation in dark matter detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denzel, Philipp; Diemand, Jürg; Angélil, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    Bubble chambers and droplet detectors used in dosimetry and dark matter particle search experiments use a superheated metastable liquid in which nuclear recoils trigger bubble nucleation. This process is described by the classical heat spike model of F. Seitz [Phys. Fluids (1958-1988) 1, 2 (1958), 10.1063/1.1724333], which uses classical nucleation theory to estimate the amount and the localization of the deposited energy required for bubble formation. Here we report on direct molecular dynamics simulations of heat-spike-induced bubble formation. They allow us to test the nanoscale process described in the classical heat spike model. 40 simulations were performed, each containing about 20 million atoms, which interact by a truncated force-shifted Lennard-Jones potential. We find that the energy per length unit needed for bubble nucleation agrees quite well with theoretical predictions, but the allowed spike length and the required total energy are about twice as large as predicted. This could be explained by the rapid energy diffusion measured in the simulation: contrary to the assumption in the classical model, we observe significantly faster heat diffusion than the bubble formation time scale. Finally we examine α -particle tracks, which are much longer than those of neutrons and potential dark matter particles. Empirically, α events were recently found to result in louder acoustic signals than neutron events. This distinction is crucial for the background rejection in dark matter searches. We show that a large number of individual bubbles can form along an α track, which explains the observed larger acoustic amplitudes.

  18. Optical nucleation of bubble clouds in a high pressure spherical resonator.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Phillip; Sampathkumar, A; Murray, Todd W; Gaitan, D Felipe; Glynn Holt, R

    2011-11-01

    An experimental setup for nucleating clouds of bubbles in a high-pressure spherical resonator is described. Using nanosecond laser pulses and multiple phase gratings, bubble clouds are optically nucleated in an acoustic field. Dynamics of the clouds are captured using a high-speed CCD camera. The images reveal cloud nucleation, growth, and collapse and the resulting emission of radially expanding shockwaves. These shockwaves are reflected at the interior surface of the resonator and then reconverge to the center of the resonator. As the shocks reconverge upon the center of the resonator, they renucleate and grow the bubble cloud. This process is repeated over many acoustic cycles and with each successive shock reconvergence, the bubble cloud becomes more organized and centralized so that subsequent collapses give rise to stronger, better defined shockwaves. After many acoustic cycles individual bubbles cannot be distinguished and the cloud is then referred to as a cluster. Sustainability of the process is ultimately limited by the detuning of the acoustic field inside the resonator. The nucleation parameter space is studied in terms of laser firing phase, laser energy, and acoustic power used. PMID:22088012

  19. Optical nucleation of bubble clouds in a high pressure spherical resonator.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Phillip; Sampathkumar, A; Murray, Todd W; Gaitan, D Felipe; Glynn Holt, R

    2011-11-01

    An experimental setup for nucleating clouds of bubbles in a high-pressure spherical resonator is described. Using nanosecond laser pulses and multiple phase gratings, bubble clouds are optically nucleated in an acoustic field. Dynamics of the clouds are captured using a high-speed CCD camera. The images reveal cloud nucleation, growth, and collapse and the resulting emission of radially expanding shockwaves. These shockwaves are reflected at the interior surface of the resonator and then reconverge to the center of the resonator. As the shocks reconverge upon the center of the resonator, they renucleate and grow the bubble cloud. This process is repeated over many acoustic cycles and with each successive shock reconvergence, the bubble cloud becomes more organized and centralized so that subsequent collapses give rise to stronger, better defined shockwaves. After many acoustic cycles individual bubbles cannot be distinguished and the cloud is then referred to as a cluster. Sustainability of the process is ultimately limited by the detuning of the acoustic field inside the resonator. The nucleation parameter space is studied in terms of laser firing phase, laser energy, and acoustic power used.

  20. Nonlinear Raman-Type Acoustic Scattering in Three-Phase Marine Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushkina, N. I.

    2001-03-01

    Stimulated Raman-type acoustic scattering by bubble oscillations in three-phase marine sediments, which consist of a solid frame, the pore water, and air bubbles, is considered. A model is developed for the case of the bubbles surrounded by water. The acoustic properties of the sediments are described on the basis of the Biot theory of sound propagation in a fluid-saturated porous medium. Nonlinear wave equations are obtained for marine sediments containing air bubbles. Expressions for the nonlinear scattering coefficient and the threshold intensity of the exciting sound wave are derived. A possibility of an experimental observation of the scattering process is discussed.

  1. Acousto-optic spectrometer for radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, G.; Buhl, D.; Florez, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    A prototype acousto-optic spectrometer which uses a discrete bulk acoustic wave Itek Bragg cell, 5 mW Helium Neon laser, and a 1024 element Reticon charge coupled photodiode array is described. The analog signals from the photodiode array are digitized, added, and stored in a very high speed custom built multiplexer board which allows synchronous detection of weak signals to be performed. The experiment is controlled and the data are displayed and stored with an LSI-2 microcomputer system with dual floppy discs. The performance of the prototype acousto-optic spectrometer obtained from initial tests is reported.

  2. Statistical equilibrium of bubble oscillations in dilute bubbly flows

    PubMed Central

    Colonius, Tim; Hagmeijer, Rob; Ando, Keita; Brennen, Christopher E.

    2008-01-01

    The problem of predicting the moments of the distribution of bubble radius in bubbly flows is considered. The particular case where bubble oscillations occur due to a rapid (impulsive or step change) change in pressure is analyzed, and it is mathematically shown that in this case, inviscid bubble oscillations reach a stationary statistical equilibrium, whereby phase cancellations among bubbles with different sizes lead to time-invariant values of the statistics. It is also shown that at statistical equilibrium, moments of the bubble radius may be computed using the period-averaged bubble radius in place of the instantaneous one. For sufficiently broad distributions of bubble equilibrium (or initial) radius, it is demonstrated that bubble statistics reach equilibrium on a time scale that is fast compared to physical damping of bubble oscillations due to viscosity, heat transfer, and liquid compressibility. The period-averaged bubble radius may then be used to predict the slow changes in the moments caused by the damping. A benefit is that period averaging gives a much smoother integrand, and accurate statistics can be obtained by tracking as few as five bubbles from the broad distribution. The period-averaged formula may therefore prove useful in reducing computational effort in models of dilute bubbly flow wherein bubbles are forced by shock waves or other rapid pressure changes, for which, at present, the strong effects caused by a distribution in bubble size can only be accurately predicted by tracking thousands of bubbles. Some challenges associated with extending the results to more general (nonimpulsive) forcing and strong two-way coupled bubbly flows are briefly discussed. PMID:19547725

  3. Colliding with a crunching bubble

    SciTech Connect

    Freivogel, Ben; Freivogel, Ben; Horowitz, Gary T.; Shenker, Stephen

    2007-03-26

    In the context of eternal inflation we discuss the fate of Lambda = 0 bubbles when they collide with Lambda< 0 crunching bubbles. When the Lambda = 0 bubble is supersymmetric, it is not completely destroyed by collisions. If the domain wall separating the bubbles has higher tension than the BPS bound, it is expelled from the Lambda = 0 bubble and does not alter its long time behavior. If the domain wall saturates the BPS bound, then it stays inside the Lambda = 0 bubble and removes a finite fraction of future infinity. In this case, the crunch singularity is hidden behind the horizon of a stable hyperbolic black hole.

  4. Acoustical standards in engineering acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhard, Mahlon D.

    2001-05-01

    The Engineering Acoustics Technical Committee is concerned with the evolution and improvement of acoustical techniques and apparatus, and with the promotion of new applications of acoustics. As cited in the Membership Directory and Handbook (2002), the interest areas include transducers and arrays; underwater acoustic systems; acoustical instrumentation and monitoring; applied sonics, promotion of useful effects, information gathering and transmission; audio engineering; acoustic holography and acoustic imaging; acoustic signal processing (equipment and techniques); and ultrasound and infrasound. Evident connections between engineering and standards are needs for calibration, consistent terminology, uniform presentation of data, reference levels, or design targets for product development. Thus for the acoustical engineer standards are both a tool for practices, for communication, and for comparison of his efforts with those of others. Development of many standards depends on knowledge of the way products are put together for the market place and acoustical engineers provide important input to the development of standards. Acoustical engineers and members of the Engineering Acoustics arm of the Society both benefit from and contribute to the Acoustical Standards of the Acoustical Society.

  5. Investigation of bubble-bubble interaction effect during the collapse of multi-bubble system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xueming; Zhang, Lingxin; Wang, Wenfeng

    2014-11-01

    Bubble collapse is not only an important subject among bubble dynamics, but also a key consequence of cavitation. It has been demonstrated that the structural damage is associated with the rapid change in flow fields during bubble collapse. How to model and simulate the behavior of the bubble collapse is now of great interest. In the present study, both theoretical analysis and a direct numerical simulation on the basis of VOF are performed to investigate the collapses of single bubble and bubble cluster. The effect of bubble-bubble interaction on the collapse of multi-bubble system is presented. The work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (11272284, 11332009).

  6. The Dueling Bubble Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Anshuman; Borrell, Marcos; Felts, John; Leal, Gary; Hirsa, Amir

    2007-11-01

    When two drops or bubbles are brought into close proximity to each other, the thin film of the fluid between them drains as they are squeezed together. If the film becomes thin enough that intermolecular forces of attraction overwhelm capillary forces, the drops/bubbles coalesce and the time it takes for this to happen, starting from the point of apparent contact is referred to as the drainage time. One practical version of this scenario occurs during the formation of foams, when the thin film forms between gas bubbles that are growing in volume with time. We performed an experimental study that is intended to mimic this process in which the two drops (or bubbles) in the size range of 50-100 microns diameter are created by oozing a liquid/gas out of two capillaries of diameter less than 100 microns directly facing each other and immersed in a second fluid. We present measurements of drainage times for the cases of very low viscosity ratios PDMS drops in Castor oil (less than 0.05) and bubbles of air in PDMS, and highlight the differences that arise in part due to the different boundary conditions for thin film drainage for liquid-liquid versus gas-liquid systems, and in part due to the different Hamaker constants for the two systems.

  7. Micro bubbles at interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshavarzi, Gholamreza; Wang, Anna; Barber, Tracie; Manoharan, Vinothan

    2014-03-01

    The behaviour of a small micron sized bubbles close to an interface is vital to various interface interaction applications in several industries. Previous studies have focused on understanding the behaviour of large millimetric bubbles reaching an interface. Some of these millimetric bubbles are shown to bounce back, while others penetrate and burst on the interface resulting in possible small micron sized bubbles. However, small micron sized bubble may act different. It has been observed that small microbubbles can act as if they are stabilized at the interface without merging to the fluid over the interface. The dynamics of the microbubble adsorption close to an interface has yet to be well understood.In this study we used digital holography microscopy to explore detailed information on the behaviour of the air microbubble at the interface. This study investigates the position and shape of a microbubble with respect to the interface. The dynamic behavior close to the interface along with where the small microbubble is positioned near an interface will help us in understanding the probability of penetration and merging back to the fluid on top.

  8. BLOWING COSMIC BUBBLES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This NASA Hubble Space Telescope image reveals an expanding shell of glowing gas surrounding a hot, massive star in our Milky Way Galaxy. This shell is being shaped by strong stellar winds of material and radiation produced by the bright star at the left, which is 10 to 20 times more massive than our Sun. These fierce winds are sculpting the surrounding material - composed of gas and dust - into the curve-shaped bubble. Astronomers have dubbed it the Bubble Nebula (NGC 7635). The nebula is 10 light-years across, more than twice the distance from Earth to the nearest star. Only part of the bubble is visible in this image. The glowing gas in the lower right-hand corner is a dense region of material that is getting blasted by radiation from the Bubble Nebula's massive star. The radiation is eating into the gas, creating finger-like features. This interaction also heats up the gas, causing it to glow. Scientists study the Bubble Nebula to understand how hot stars interact with the surrounding material. Credit: Hubble Heritage Team (AURA/STScI/NASA)

  9. A Bubble Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    RCW 79 is seen in the southern Milky Way, 17,200 light-years from Earth in the constellation Centaurus. The bubble is 70-light years in diameter, and probably took about one million years to form from the radiation and winds of hot young stars.

    The balloon of gas and dust is an example of stimulated star formation. Such stars are born when the hot bubble expands into the interstellar gas and dust around it. RCW 79 has spawned at least two groups of new stars along the edge of the large bubble. Some are visible inside the small bubble in the lower left corner. Another group of baby stars appears near the opening at the top.

    NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope easily detects infrared light from the dust particles in RCW 79. The young stars within RCW 79 radiate ultraviolet light that excites molecules of dust within the bubble. This causes the dust grains to emit infrared light that is detected by Spitzer and seen here as the extended red features.

  10. Importance of acoustic shielding in sonochemistry.

    PubMed

    van Iersel, Maikel M; Benes, Nieck E; Keurentjes, Jos T F

    2008-04-01

    It is well known that sonochemistry is less efficient at high acoustic intensities. Many authors have attributed this effect to decoupling losses and shielding of the acoustic wave. In this study we investigate both phenomena for a 20 kHz ultrasound field with an intensity ranging from 40 to 150 W/cm2. Visualization of the bubble cloud has demonstrated that the void fraction below the ultrasound horn increases more than proportional with increasing power input. Nevertheless, the energy coupling between the horn and the liquid remains constant; this implies that decoupling losses are not reinforced for larger bubble clouds. On the contrary, microphone measurements have shown that due to the larger bubble cloud a substantial part of the supplied energy is lost at high power inputs. In striving towards more efficient sonochemistry, reduction of shielding appears as one of the major challenges.

  11. LET dependence of bubbles evaporation pulses in superheated emulsion detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Fulvio, Angela; Huang, Jean; Staib, Lawrence; d'Errico, Francesco

    2015-06-01

    Superheated emulsion detectors are suspensions of metastable liquid droplets in a compliant inert medium. Upon interaction with ionizing radiation, the droplets evaporate, generating visible bubbles. Bubble expansion associated with the boiling of the droplets is accompanied by pressure pulses in both the sonic and ultrasonic frequency range. In this work, we analyzed the signal generated by bubble evaporation in the frequency and time domain. We used octafluoropropane (R-218) based emulsions, sensitive to both photons and neutrons. The frequency content of the detected pulses appears to extend well into the hundreds of kHz, beyond the range used in commercial devices to count bubbles as they are formed (typically 1-10 kHz). Kilohertz components characterize the early part of the waveforms, potentially containing information about the energetics of the explosive bubble initial growth phase. The power spectral density of the acoustic signal produced by neutron-induced evaporation shows a characteristic frequency pattern in the 200-400 kHz range, which is not observed when bubbles evaporate upon gamma ray-induced irradiation. For practical applications, detection of ultrasonic pulses associated with the boiling of the superheated drops can be exploited as a fast readout method, negligibly affected by mechanical ambient noise.

  12. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. The tumor ... press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the symptoms ...

  13. Evaluation and interpretation of bubble size distributions in pulsed megasonic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, M.; Struyf, H.; De Gendt, S.; Glorieux, C.; Brems, S.

    2013-05-01

    The occurrence of acoustic cavitation is incorporating a multitude of interdependent effects that strongly depend on the bubble size. Therefore, bubble size control would be beneficial for biological and industrial processes that rely on acoustic cavitation. A pulsed acoustic field can result in bubble size control and the repeated dissolution and reactivation ("recycling") of potentially active bubbles. As a consequence, a pulsed field can strongly enhance cavitation activity. In this paper, we present a modified methodology for the evaluation of the active bubble size distribution by means of a combination of cavitation noise measurements and ultrasonic pulsing. The key component of this modified methodology is the definition of an upper size limit, below which bubbles—in between subsequent pulses—have to dissolve, in order to be sustainably recycled. This upper limit makes it possible to explain and link the enhancement of cavitation activity to a bubble size distribution. The experimentally determined bubble size distributions for different power densities are interpreted in the frame of numerical calculations of the oscillatory responses of the bubbles to the intermittent driving sound field. The distributions are found to be shaped by the size dependent interplay between bubble pulsations, rectified diffusion, coalescence, and the development of parametrically amplified shape instabilities. Also, a phenomenological reactivation-deactivation model is proposed to explain and quantify the observed enhancement of cavitation activity under pulsed, with respect to continuous sonication. In this model, the pulse-duration determines the magnitude of the reactivation of partially dissolved bubbles and the deactivation of activated bubbles by coalescence. It is shown that the subsequent recycling of previously active bubbles leads to an accumulation of cavitation activity, which saturates after a certain number of pulses. The model is fitted to the experimental

  14. The Bubble Box: Towards an Automated Visual Sensor for 3D Analysis and Characterization of Marine Gas Release Sites.

    PubMed

    Jordt, Anne; Zelenka, Claudius; von Deimling, Jens Schneider; Koch, Reinhard; Köser, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Several acoustic and optical techniques have been used for characterizing natural and anthropogenic gas leaks (carbon dioxide, methane) from the ocean floor. Here, single-camera based methods for bubble stream observation have become an important tool, as they help estimating flux and bubble sizes under certain assumptions. However, they record only a projection of a bubble into the camera and therefore cannot capture the full 3D shape, which is particularly important for larger, non-spherical bubbles. The unknown distance of the bubble to the camera (making it appear larger or smaller than expected) as well as refraction at the camera interface introduce extra uncertainties. In this article, we introduce our wide baseline stereo-camera deep-sea sensor bubble box that overcomes these limitations, as it observes bubbles from two orthogonal directions using calibrated cameras. Besides the setup and the hardware of the system, we discuss appropriate calibration and the different automated processing steps deblurring, detection, tracking, and 3D fitting that are crucial to arrive at a 3D ellipsoidal shape and rise speed of each bubble. The obtained values for single bubbles can be aggregated into statistical bubble size distributions or fluxes for extrapolation based on diffusion and dissolution models and large scale acoustic surveys. We demonstrate and evaluate the wide baseline stereo measurement model using a controlled test setup with ground truth information. PMID:26690168

  15. The Bubble Box: Towards an Automated Visual Sensor for 3D Analysis and Characterization of Marine Gas Release Sites

    PubMed Central

    Jordt, Anne; Zelenka, Claudius; Schneider von Deimling, Jens; Koch, Reinhard; Köser, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Several acoustic and optical techniques have been used for characterizing natural and anthropogenic gas leaks (carbon dioxide, methane) from the ocean floor. Here, single-camera based methods for bubble stream observation have become an important tool, as they help estimating flux and bubble sizes under certain assumptions. However, they record only a projection of a bubble into the camera and therefore cannot capture the full 3D shape, which is particularly important for larger, non-spherical bubbles. The unknown distance of the bubble to the camera (making it appear larger or smaller than expected) as well as refraction at the camera interface introduce extra uncertainties. In this article, we introduce our wide baseline stereo-camera deep-sea sensor bubble box that overcomes these limitations, as it observes bubbles from two orthogonal directions using calibrated cameras. Besides the setup and the hardware of the system, we discuss appropriate calibration and the different automated processing steps deblurring, detection, tracking, and 3D fitting that are crucial to arrive at a 3D ellipsoidal shape and rise speed of each bubble. The obtained values for single bubbles can be aggregated into statistical bubble size distributions or fluxes for extrapolation based on diffusion and dissolution models and large scale acoustic surveys. We demonstrate and evaluate the wide baseline stereo measurement model using a controlled test setup with ground truth information. PMID:26690168

  16. The Bubble Box: Towards an Automated Visual Sensor for 3D Analysis and Characterization of Marine Gas Release Sites.

    PubMed

    Jordt, Anne; Zelenka, Claudius; von Deimling, Jens Schneider; Koch, Reinhard; Köser, Kevin

    2015-12-05

    Several acoustic and optical techniques have been used for characterizing natural and anthropogenic gas leaks (carbon dioxide, methane) from the ocean floor. Here, single-camera based methods for bubble stream observation have become an important tool, as they help estimating flux and bubble sizes under certain assumptions. However, they record only a projection of a bubble into the camera and therefore cannot capture the full 3D shape, which is particularly important for larger, non-spherical bubbles. The unknown distance of the bubble to the camera (making it appear larger or smaller than expected) as well as refraction at the camera interface introduce extra uncertainties. In this article, we introduce our wide baseline stereo-camera deep-sea sensor bubble box that overcomes these limitations, as it observes bubbles from two orthogonal directions using calibrated cameras. Besides the setup and the hardware of the system, we discuss appropriate calibration and the different automated processing steps deblurring, detection, tracking, and 3D fitting that are crucial to arrive at a 3D ellipsoidal shape and rise speed of each bubble. The obtained values for single bubbles can be aggregated into statistical bubble size distributions or fluxes for extrapolation based on diffusion and dissolution models and large scale acoustic surveys. We demonstrate and evaluate the wide baseline stereo measurement model using a controlled test setup with ground truth information.

  17. Acoustic Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  18. Acoustic seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  19. Mechanics of collapsing cavitation bubbles.

    PubMed

    van Wijngaarden, Leen

    2016-03-01

    A brief survey is given of the dynamical phenomena accompanying the collapse of cavitation bubbles. The discussion includes shock waves, microjets and the various ways in which collapsing bubbles produce damage.

  20. Multivariate bubbles and antibubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, John

    2014-08-01

    In this paper we develop models for multivariate financial bubbles and antibubbles based on statistical physics. In particular, we extend a rich set of univariate models to higher dimensions. Changes in market regime can be explicitly shown to represent a phase transition from random to deterministic behaviour in prices. Moreover, our multivariate models are able to capture some of the contagious effects that occur during such episodes. We are able to show that declining lending quality helped fuel a bubble in the US stock market prior to 2008. Further, our approach offers interesting insights into the spatial development of UK house prices.

  1. Heated Gas Bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Fluid Physics is study of the motion of fluids and the effects of such motion. When a liquid is heated from the bottom to the boiling point in Earth's microgravity, small bubbles of heated gas form near the bottom of the container and are carried to the top of the liquid by gravity-driven convective flows. In the same setup in microgravity, the lack of convection and buoyancy allows the heated gas bubbles to grow larger and remain attached to the container's bottom for a significantly longer period.

  2. The Onset of Resonance-Controlled Instability in Spherical Bubble Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, R. Glynn; Gaitan, D. Felipe

    1996-01-01

    Single bubble dynamics are investigated using acoustic techniques for isolation and manipulation. The goal of the investigations is to understand the dynamic origin of the various phenomena that bubbles exhibit: light emission, enhanced mass transport, chaotic and quasiperiodic oscillations, and translations. Once understood, acoustically manipulated bubbles can serve as platforms for materials effects on free surfaces, using surfactants to alter surface rheology and observing how that affects both dynamics and also mass transport. The effects of gravity on the problem will be shown to be significant. The first set of observations from 1g experimentation are presented. These observations are of the onset conditions for instability of the spherical shape of the bubble. For the size range 55-90 microns in diameter we observe instability governed by resonant mode coupling, which is significantly affected by the buoyant force and its effects.

  3. Fluid Dynamics of Bubbly Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, Y. H.; Koch, D. L.; Zenit, R.; Sangani, A.; Kushch, V. I.; Spelt, P. D. M.; Hoffman, M.; Nahra, H.; Fritz, C.; Dolesh, R.

    2002-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to study the average flow properties of inertially dominated bubbly liquids which may be described by a novel analysis. Bubbles with high Reynolds number and low Weber number may produce a fluid velocity disturbance that can be approximated by a potential flow. We studied the behavior of suspensions of bubbles of about 1.5 mm diameter in vertical and inclined channels. The suspension was produced using a bank of 900 glass capillaries with inner diameter of about 100 microns in a quasi-steady fashion. In addition, salt was added to the suspension to prevent bubble-bubble coalescence. As a result, a nearly monodisperse suspension of bubble was produced. By increasing the inclination angle, we were able to explore an increasing amount of shear to buoyancy motion. A pipe flow experiment with the liquid being recirculated is under construction. This will provide an even larger range of shear to buoyancy motion. We are planning a microgravity experiment in which a bubble suspension is subjected to shearing in a couette cell in the absence of a buoyancy-driven relative motion of the two phases. By employing a single-wire, hot film anemometer, we were able to obtain the liquid velocity fluctuations. The shear stress at the wall was measured using a hot film probe flush mounted on the wall. The gas volume fraction, bubble velocity, and bubble velocity fluctuations were measured using a homemade, dual impedance probe. In addition, we also employed a high-speed camera to obtain the bubble size distribution and bubble shape in a dilute suspension. A rapid decrease in bubble velocity for a dilute bubble suspension is attributed to the effects of bubble-wall collisions. The more gradual decrease of bubble velocity as gas volume fraction increases, due to subsequent hindering of bubble motion, is in qualitative agreement with the predictions of Spelt and Sangani for the effects of potential-flow bubble-bubble interactions on the mean velocity. The

  4. Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer and Airborne Emission Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavich, T.; Beer, R.

    1996-01-01

    The Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) is an instrument being developed for the NASA Earth Observing System Chemistry Platform. TES will measure the distribution of ozone and its precursors in the lower atmosphere. The Airborne Emission Spectrometer (AES) is an aircraft precursor to TES. Applicable descriptions are given of instrument design, technology challenges, implementation and operations for both.

  5. A three-dimensional model of an ultrasound contrast agent gas bubble and its mechanical effects on microvessels.

    PubMed

    Hosseinkhah, N; Hynynen, K

    2012-02-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents inside a microvessel, when driven by ultrasound, oscillate and induce mechanical stresses on the vessel wall. These mechanical stresses can produce beneficial therapeutic effects but also induce vessel rupture if the stresses are too high. Therefore, it is important to use sufficiently low pressure amplitudes to avoid rupturing the vessels while still inducing the desired therapeutic effects. In this work, we developed a comprehensive three-dimensional model of a confined microbubble inside a vessel while considering the bubble shell properties, blood viscosity, vessel wall curvature and the mechanical properties of the vessel wall. Two bubble models with the assumption of a spherical symmetric bubble and a simple asymmetrical bubble were simulated. This work was validated with previous experimental results and enabled us to evaluate the microbubbles' behaviour and the resulting mechanical stresses induced on the vessel walls. In this study, the fluid shear and circumferential stresses were evaluated as indicators of the mechanical stresses. The effects of acoustical parameters, vessel viscoelasticity and rigidity, vessel/bubble size and off-centre bubbles on bubble behaviour and stresses on the vessel were investigated. The fluid shear and circumferential stresses acting on the vessel varied with time and location. As the frequency changed, the microbubble oscillated with the highest amplitude at its resonance frequency which was different from the resonance frequency of an unbound bubble. The bubble resonance frequency increased as the rigidity of a flexible vessel increased. The fluid shear and circumferential stresses peaked at frequencies above the bubble's resonance frequency. The more rigid the vessels were, the more damped the bubble oscillations. The synergistic effect of acoustic frequency and vessel elasticity had also been investigated since the circumferential stress showed either an increasing trend or a decreasing one

  6. Cohesion of Bubbles in Foam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Sydney

    1978-01-01

    The free-energy change, or binding energy, of an idealized bubble cluster is calculated on the basis of one mole of gas, and on the basis of a single bubble going from sphere to polyhedron. Some new relations of bubble geometry are developed in the course of the calculation. (BB)

  7. The Early Years: Blowing Bubbles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2016-01-01

    Blowing bubbles is not only a favorite summer activity for young children. Studying bubbles that are grouped together, or "foam," is fun for children and fascinating to many real-world scientists. Foam is widely used--from the bedroom (mattresses) to outer space (insulating panels on spacecraft). Bubble foam can provide children a…

  8. Measurements of fast neutrons by bubble detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, F.; Martinez, H.; Leal, B.; Rangel, J.; Reyes, P. G.

    2013-07-03

    Neutron bubble detectors have been studied using Am-Be and D-D neuron sources, which give limited energy information. The Bubble Detector Spectrometer (BDS) have six different energy thresholds ranging from 10 KeV to 10 Mev. The number of bubbles obtained in each measurement is related to the dose (standardized response R) equivalent neutrons through sensitivity (b / {mu}Sv) and also with the neutron flux (neutrons per unit area) through a relationship that provided by the manufacturer. Bubble detectors were used with six different answers (0.11 b/ {mu}Sv, 0093 b/{mu}Sv, 0.14 b/{mu}Sv, 0.17 b/{mu}Sv, 0051 b/{mu}Sv). To test the response of the detectors (BDS) radiate a set of six of them with different energy threshold, with a source of Am-Be, placing them at a distance of one meter from it for a few minutes. Also, exposed to dense plasma focus Fuego Nuevo II (FN-II FPD) of ICN-UNAM, apparatus which produces fusion plasma, generating neutrons by nuclear reactions of neutrons whose energy emitting is 2.45 MeV. In this case the detectors were placed at a distance of 50 cm from the pinch at 90 Degree-Sign this was done for a certain number of shots. In both cases, the standard response is reported (Dose in {mu}Sv) for each of the six detectors representing an energy range, this response is given by the expression R{sub i}= B{sub i} / S{sub i} where B{sub i} is the number of bubbles formed in each and the detector sensitivity (S{sub i}) is given for each detector in (b / {mu}Sv). Also, reported for both cases, the detected neutron flux (n cm{sup -2}), by a given ratio and the response involves both standardized R, as the average cross section sigma. The results obtained have been compared with the spectrum of Am-Be source. From these measurements it can be concluded that with a combination of bubble detectors, with different responses is possible to measure the equivalent dose in a range of 10 to 100 {mu}Sv fields mixed neutron and gamma, and pulsed generated fusion

  9. Measurements of fast neutrons by bubble detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, F.; Leal, B.; Martınez, H.; Rangel, J.; Reyes, P. G.

    2013-07-01

    Neutron bubble detectors have been studied using Am-Be and D-D neuron sources, which give limited energy information. The Bubble Detector Spectrometer (BDS) have six different energy thresholds ranging from 10 KeV to 10 Mev. The number of bubbles obtained in each measurement is related to the dose (standardized response R) equivalent neutrons through sensitivity (b / μSv) and also with the neutron flux (neutrons per unit area) through a relationship that provided by the manufacturer. Bubble detectors were used with six different answers (0.11 b/ μSv, 0093 b/μSv, 0.14 b/μSv, 0.17 b/μSv, 0051 b/μSv). To test the response of the detectors (BDS) radiate a set of six of them with different energy threshold, with a source of Am-Be, placing them at a distance of one meter from it for a few minutes. Also, exposed to dense plasma focus Fuego Nuevo II (FN-II FPD) of ICN-UNAM, apparatus which produces fusion plasma, generating neutrons by nuclear reactions of neutrons whose energy emitting is 2.45 MeV. In this case the detectors were placed at a distance of 50 cm from the pinch at 90° this was done for a certain number of shots. In both cases, the standard response is reported (Dose in μSv) for each of the six detectors representing an energy range, this response is given by the expression Ri = Bi / Si where Bi is the number of bubbles formed in each and the detector sensitivity (Si) is given for each detector in (b / μSv). Also, reported for both cases, the detected neutron flux (n cm-2), by a given ratio and the response involves both standardized R, as the average cross section sigma. The results obtained have been compared with the spectrum of Am-Be source. From these measurements it can be concluded that with a combination of bubble detectors, with different responses is possible to measure the equivalent dose in a range of 10 to 100 μSv fields mixed neutron and gamma, and pulsed generated fusion devices.

  10. Notes on radial oscillations of gas bubbles in liquids: thermal effects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuning; Li, S C

    2010-11-01

    For oscillations of gas bubbles in liquids, the polytropic exponent and thermal damping constant for the high frequency region have been re-evaluated based on the framework by Prosperetti [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 61, 17-27 (2007)]. It is seen that the approximation of G(1)≪ 1 in Prosperetti (1977) should be dropped for G(1)≥ 10(-2). The ratios of bubble radii to wavelengths are the paramount parameters categorizing the behavior into three different regions.

  11. Compact Infrared Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouroulis, Pantazis

    2009-01-01

    Concentric spectrometer forms are advantageous for constructing a variety of systems spanning the entire visible to infrared range. Spectrometer examples are given, including broadband or high resolution forms. Some issues associated with the Dyson catadioptric type are also discussed.

  12. Mars Airborne Prospecting Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinkraus, J. M.; Wright, M. W.; Rheingans, B. E.; Steinkraus, D. E.; George, W. P.; Aljabri, A.; Hall, J. L.; Scott, D. C.

    2012-06-01

    One novel approach towards addressing the need for innovative instrumentation and investigation approaches is the integration of a suite of four spectrometer systems to form the Mars Airborne Prospecting Spectrometers (MAPS) for prospecting on Mars.

  13. Oscillations of soap bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornek, U.; Müller, F.; Harth, K.; Hahn, A.; Ganesan, S.; Tobiska, L.; Stannarius, R.

    2010-07-01

    Oscillations of droplets or bubbles of a confined fluid in a fluid environment are found in various situations in everyday life, in technological processing and in natural phenomena on different length scales. Air bubbles in liquids or liquid droplets in air are well-known examples. Soap bubbles represent a particularly simple, beautiful and attractive system to study the dynamics of a closed gas volume embedded in the same or a different gas. Their dynamics is governed by the densities and viscosities of the gases and by the film tension. Dynamic equations describing their oscillations under simplifying assumptions have been well known since the beginning of the 20th century. Both analytical description and numerical modeling have made considerable progress since then, but quantitative experiments have been lacking so far. On the other hand, a soap bubble represents an easily manageable paradigm for the study of oscillations of fluid spheres. We use a technique to create axisymmetric initial non-equilibrium states, and we observe damped oscillations into equilibrium by means of a fast video camera. Symmetries of the oscillations, frequencies and damping rates of the eigenmodes as well as the coupling of modes are analyzed. They are compared to analytical models from the literature and to numerical calculations from the literature and this work.

  14. The Liberal Arts Bubble

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agresto, John

    2011-01-01

    The author expresses his doubt that the general higher education bubble will burst anytime soon. Although tuition, student housing, and book costs have all increased substantially, he believes it is still likely that the federal government will continue to pour billions into higher education, largely because Americans have been persuaded that it…

  15. Double Bubble? No Trouble!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Mike I.; Smith, Greg F.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a soap-solution activity involving formation of bubbles encasing the students that requires only readily available materials and can be adapted easily for use with various grade levels. Discusses student learning outcomes including qualitative and quantitative observations and the concept of surface tension. (JRH)

  16. Numerical studies of bubble dynamics in laser thrombolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chapyak, E.J.; Godwin, R.P.

    1996-03-01

    The applicability of modern numerical hydrodynamic methods for modeling the bubble dynamics occurring in Laser Thrombolysis is addressed. An idealized test problem is formulated and comparisons are made between numerical and analytical results. We find that approximately 23% of the available energy is radiated acoustically in one cycle with larger fractions likely to be radiated under more realistic conditions. We conclude that this approach shows promise in helping to optimize design parameters.

  17. Optical scattering methods applicable to drops and bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marston, Philip L.

    1990-01-01

    An overview of optical scattering properties of drops and bubbles is presented. The properties lead to unconventional methods for optically monitoring the size or shape of a scatterer and are applicable to acoustically levitated objects. Several of the methods are applicable to the detection and measurement of small amplitude oscillations. Relevant optical phenomena include: (1) rainbows; (2) diffraction catastrophes from spheroids; (3) critical angle scattering; (4) effects of coatings; (5) glory scattering; and (6) optical levitation.

  18. Energy- and angle-differential neutron fluence measurements with superheated drop (bubble) detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Errico, Francesco; Matzke, Manfred; Siebert, Bernd R. L.

    2002-01-01

    One of the latest additions to the field of neutron spectrometry is based on the active control of the response functions of superheated emulsions. By varying the superheat of the detectors, either changing their operating temperature or applied pressure, it is possible to generate a matrix consisting of nested responses suitable for few-channel energy spectrometry. In the device presented here, a detector is embedded in a recess milled on the surface of a moderating sphere. This sphere has the purpose of introducing an angular dependence in the otherwise nearly isotropic response of the detector. The device relies on the acoustical detection of bubbles and on temperature stepping to vary the superheated emulsion thresholds. In correspondence to each temperature/threshold, measurements are sequentially performed at different angular orientations of the sphere. The response matrix of the system to monoenergetic neutrons was determined as a function of angular position by means of Monte Carlo neutron transport simulations. The directional spectrometer was tested by means of irradiations with a californium neutron source. Energy- and angle-differential unfolding of the detector readings was performed by means of a maximum-entropy technique which does not require a-priori information. The spectrometer operates well with large energy-angle groups, and produces accurate integral values of total fluence, which can be used to derive quantities such as ambient dose equivalent H*(10) or directional dose equivalent H'(10). However, the device presents limitations in unfolding spectra over a finer group structure, and will require the future developments outlined in the conclusions.

  19. A model of bubble growth leading to xylem conduit embolism.

    PubMed

    Hölttä, T; Vesala, T; Nikinmaa, E

    2007-11-01

    The dynamics of a gas bubble inside a water conduit after a cavitation event was modeled. A distinction was made between a typical angiosperm conduit with a homogeneous pit membrane and a typical gymnosperm conduit with a torus-margo pit membrane structure. For conduits with torus-margo type pits pit membrane deflection was also modeled and pit aspiration, the displacement of the pit membrane to the low pressure side of the pit chamber, was found to be possible while the emboli was still small. Concurrent with pit aspiration, the high resistance to water flow out of the conduit through the cell walls or aspirated pits will make the embolism process slow. In case of no pit aspiration and always for conduits with homogeneous pit membranes, embolism growth is more rapid but still much slower than bubble growth in bulk water under similar water tension. The time needed for the embolism to fill a whole conduit was found to be dependent on pit and cell wall conductance, conduit radius, xylem water tension, pressure rise in adjacent conduits due to water freed from the embolising conduit, and the rigidity and structure of the pits in the case of margo-torus type pit membrane. The water pressure in the conduit hosting the bubble was found to occur almost immediately after bubble induction inside a conduit, creating a sudden tension release in the conduit, which can be detected by acoustic and ultra-acoustic monitoring of xylem cavitation.

  20. Bubbly Little Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    In this processed Spitzer Space Telescope image, baby star HH 46/47 can be seen blowing two massive 'bubbles.' The star is 1,140 light-years away from Earth.

    The infant star can be seen as a white spot toward the center of the Spitzer image. The two bubbles are shown as hollow elliptical shells of bluish-green material extending from the star. Wisps of green in the image reveal warm molecular hydrogen gas, while the bluish tints are formed by starlight scattered by surrounding dust.

    These bubbles formed when powerful jets of gas, traveling at 200 to 300 kilometers per second, or about 120 to 190 miles per second, smashed into the cosmic cloud of gas and dust that surrounds HH 46/47. The red specks at the end of each bubble show the presence of hot sulfur and iron gas where the star's narrow jets are currently crashing head-on into the cosmic cloud's gas and dust material.

    Whenever astronomers observe a star, or snap a stellar portrait, through the lens of any telescope, they know that what they are seeing is slightly blurred. To clear up the blurring in Spitzer images, astronomers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory developed an image processing technique for Spitzer called Hi-Res deconvolution.

    This process reduces blurring and makes the image sharper and cleaner, enabling astronomers to see the emissions around forming stars in greater detail. When scientists applied this image processing technique to the Spitzer image of HH 46/47, they were able to see winds from the star and jets of gas that are carving the celestial bubbles.

    This infrared image is a three-color composite, with data at 3.6 microns represented in blue, 4.5 and 5.8 microns shown in green, and 24 microns represented as red.

  1. Experimental and theoretical analysis of secondary Bjerknes forces between two bubbles in a standing wave.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Junjie; He, Yong; Kentish, Sandra E; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian; Manasseh, Richard; Lee, Judy

    2015-04-01

    Bubbles in an acoustic field are affected by forces such as primary and secondary Bjerknes forces, which have been shown to be influenced by acoustic pressure, frequency, bubble size and separation distance between bubbles. However, such studies are predominantly theoretical, and are mostly focused on the sign reversal of the secondary Bjerknes force. This study provides experimental data on the effect of a range of bubble sizes (8-30 μm), distances (⩽0.2 mm), acoustic pressures (20-40 kPa) and frequencies (40-100 kHz) on the relative acceleration of two approaching bubbles. Under these conditions, only variations in the magnitude of the attractive force were observed. Using coupled equations of radial and translational motions, the acceleration and secondary Bjerknes force were calculated and compared to the experimental data. The variations in the magnitude of the secondary Bjerknes forces were explained by simulating bubble radius and coupled volume oscillation as a function of time.

  2. High speed imaging of bubble clouds generated in pulsed ultrasound cavitational therapy--histotripsy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhen; Raghavan, Mekhala; Hall, Timothy L; Chang, Ching-Wei; Mycek, Mary-Ann; Fowlkes, J Brian; Cain, Charles A

    2007-10-01

    Our recent studies have demonstrated that mechanical fractionation of tissue structure with sharply demarcated boundaries can be achieved using short (< 20 micros), high intensity ultrasound pulses delivered at low duty cycles. We have called this technique histotripsy. Histotripsy has potential clinical applications where noninvasive tissue fractionation and/or tissue removal are desired. The primary mechanism of histotripsy is thought to be acoustic cavitation, which is supported by a temporally changing acoustic backscatter observed during the histotripsy process. In this paper, a fast-gated digital camera was used to image the hypothesized cavitating bubble cloud generated by histotripsy pulses. The bubble cloud was produced at a tissue-water interface and inside an optically transparent gelatin phantom which mimics bulk tissue. The imaging shows the following: (1) Initiation of a temporally changing acoustic backscatter was due to the formation of a bubble cloud; (2) The pressure threshold to generate a bubble cloud was lower at a tissue-fluid interface than inside bulk tissue; and (3) at higher pulse pressure, the bubble cloud lasted longer and grew larger. The results add further support to the hypothesis that the histotripsy process is due to a cavitating bubble cloud and may provide insight into the sharp boundaries of histotripsy lesions.

  3. An Euler-Lagrange method considering bubble radial dynamics for modeling sonochemical reactors.

    PubMed

    Jamshidi, Rashid; Brenner, Gunther

    2014-01-01

    Unsteady numerical computations are performed to investigate the flow field, wave propagation and the structure of bubbles in sonochemical reactors. The turbulent flow field is simulated using a two-equation Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) model. The distribution of the acoustic pressure is solved based on the Helmholtz equation using a finite volume method (FVM). The radial dynamics of a single bubble are considered by applying the Keller-Miksis equation to consider the compressibility of the liquid to the first order of acoustical Mach number. To investigate the structure of bubbles, a one-way coupling Euler-Lagrange approach is used to simulate the bulk medium and the bubbles as the dispersed phase. Drag, gravity, buoyancy, added mass, volume change and first Bjerknes forces are considered and their orders of magnitude are compared. To verify the implemented numerical algorithms, results for one- and two-dimensional simplified test cases are compared with analytical solutions. The results show good agreement with experimental results for the relationship between the acoustic pressure amplitude and the volume fraction of the bubbles. The two-dimensional axi-symmetric results are in good agreement with experimentally observed structure of bubbles close to sonotrode.

  4. Use of an ultrasonic reflectance technique to examine bubble size changes in dough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strybulevych, A.; Leroy, V.; Shum, A. L.; Koksel, H. F.; Scanlon, M. G.; Page, J. H.

    2012-12-01

    Bread quality largely depends on the manner in which bubbles are created and manipulated in the dough during processing. We have developed an ultrasonic reflectance technique to monitor bubbles in dough, even at high volume fractions, where near the bubble resonances it is difficult to make measurements using transmission techniques. A broadband transducer centred at 3.5 MHz in a normal incidence wave reflection set-up is used to measure longitudinal velocity and attenuation from acoustic impedance measurements. The technique is illustrated by examining changes in bubbles in dough due to two very different physical effects. In dough made without yeast, a peak in attenuation due to bubble resonance is observed at approximately 2 MHz. This peak diminishes rapidly and shifts to lower frequencies, indicative of Ostwald ripening of bubbles within the dough. The second effect involves the growth of bubble sizes due to gas generated by yeast during fermentation. This process is experimentally challenging to investigate with ultrasound because of very high attenuation. The reflectance technique allows the changes of the velocity and attenuation during fermentation to be measured as a function of frequency and time, indicating bubble growth effects that can be monitored even at high volume fractions of bubbles.

  5. Nonlinear frequency mixing in a resonant cavity: numerical simulations in a bubbly liquid.

    PubMed

    Vanhille, Christian; Campos-Pozuelo, Cleofé; Sinha, Dipen N

    2014-12-01

    The study of nonlinear frequency mixing for acoustic standing waves in a resonator cavity is presented. Two high frequencies are mixed in a highly nonlinear bubbly liquid filled cavity that is resonant at the difference frequency. The analysis is carried out through numerical experiments, and both linear and nonlinear regimes are compared. The results show highly efficient generation of the difference frequency at high excitation amplitude. The large acoustic nonlinearity of the bubbly liquid that is responsible for the strong difference-frequency resonance also induces significant enhancement of the parametric frequency mixing effect to generate second harmonic of the difference frequency. PMID:25064635

  6. Multibubble sonoluminescence spectra of water which resemble single-bubble sonoluminescence

    PubMed

    Didenko; Gordeychuk

    2000-06-12

    Multibubble sonoluminescence (MBSL) spectra of water from cavitation clouds were collected in the presence of different noble gases and at different acoustic intensities. Results show that at high acoustic intensity and with xenon as a dissolved gas the emission of the OH* radical becomes indiscernible from the continuum. These spectra resemble single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) spectra. It is concluded that the source of emission in MBSL and SBSL can be the same, the difference in spectra is due to the higher temperature inside the bubble during SBSL.

  7. Ring Bubbles of Dolphins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Marten, Ken; Psarakos, Suchi; White, Don J.; Merriam, Marshal (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The article discusses how dolphins create and play with three types of air-filled vortices. The underlying physics is discussed. Photographs and sketches illustrating the dolphin's actions and physics are presented. The dolphins engage in this behavior on their own initiative without food reward. These behaviors are done repeatedly and with singleminded effort. The first type is the ejection of bubbles which, after some practice on the part of the dolphin, turn into toroidal vortex ring bubbles by the mechanism of baroclinic torque. These bubbles grow in radius and become thinner as they rise vertically to the surface. One dolphin would blow two in succession and guide them to fuse into one. Physicists call this a vortex reconnection. In the second type, the dolphins first create an invisible vortex ring in the water by swimming on their side and waving their tail fin (also called flukes) vigorously. This vortex ring travels horizontally in the water. The dolphin then turns around, finds the vortex and injects a stream of air into it from its blowhole. The air "fills-out" the core of the vortex ring. Often, the dolphin would knock-off a smaller ring bubble from the larger ring (this also involves vortex reconnection) and steer the smaller ring around the tank. One other dolphin employed a few other techniques for planting air into the fluke vortex. One technique included standing vertically in the water with tail-up, head-down and tail piercing the free surface. As the fluke is waved to create the vortex ring, air is entrained from above the surface. Another technique was gulping air in the mouth, diving down, releasing air bubbles from the mouth and curling them into a ring when they rose to the level of the fluke. In the third type, demonstrated by only one dolphin, the longitudinal vortex created by the dorsal fin on the back is used to produce 10-15 foot long helical bubbles. In one technique she swims in a curved path. This creates a dorsal fin vortex since

  8. Theory of supercompression of vapor bubbles and nanoscale thermonuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Nigmatulin, Robert I.; Akhatov, Iskander Sh.; Topolnikov, Andrey S.; Bolotnova, Raisa Kh.; Vakhitova, Nailya K.; Lahey, Richard T. Jr.; Taleyarkhan, Rusi P.

    2005-10-01

    This paper provides the theoretical basis for energetic vapor bubble implosions induced by a standing acoustic wave. Its primary goal is to describe, explain, and demonstrate the plausibility of the experimental observations by Taleyarkhan et al. [Science 295, 1868 (2002); Phys. Rev. E 69, 036109 (2004)] of thermonuclear fusion for imploding cavitation bubbles in chilled deuterated acetone. A detailed description and analysis of these data, including a resolution of the criticisms that have been raised, together with some preliminary HYDRO code simulations, has been given by Nigmatulin et al. [Vestnik ANRB (Ufa, Russia) 4, 3 (2002); J. Power Energy 218-A, 345 (2004)] and Lahey et al. [Adv. Heat Transfer (to be published)]. In this paper a hydrodynamic shock (i.e., HYDRO) code model of the spherically symmetric motion for a vapor bubble in an acoustically forced liquid is presented. This model describes cavitation bubble cluster growth during the expansion period, followed by a violent implosion during the compression period of the acoustic cycle. There are two stages of the bubble dynamics process. The first, low Mach number stage, comprises almost all the time of the acoustic cycle. During this stage, the radial velocities are much less than the sound speeds in the vapor and liquid, the vapor pressure is very close to uniform, and the liquid is practically incompressible. This process is characterized by the inertia of the liquid, heat conduction, and the evaporation or condensation of the vapor. The second, very short, high Mach number stage is when the radial velocities are the same order, or higher, than the sound speeds in the vapor and liquid. In this stage high temperatures, pressures, and densities of the vapor and liquid take place. The model presented herein has realistic equations of state for the compressible liquid and vapor phases, and accounts for nonequilibrium evaporation/condensation kinetics at the liquid/vapor interface. There are interacting

  9. Theory of supercompression of vapor bubbles and nanoscale thermonuclear fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigmatulin, Robert I.; Akhatov, Iskander Sh.; Topolnikov, Andrey S.; Bolotnova, Raisa Kh.; Vakhitova, Nailya K.; Lahey, Richard T.; Taleyarkhan, Rusi P.

    2005-10-01

    This paper provides the theoretical basis for energetic vapor bubble implosions induced by a standing acoustic wave. Its primary goal is to describe, explain, and demonstrate the plausibility of the experimental observations by Taleyarkhan et al. [Science 295, 1868 (2002); Phys. Rev. E 69, 036109 (2004)] of thermonuclear fusion for imploding cavitation bubbles in chilled deuterated acetone. A detailed description and analysis of these data, including a resolution of the criticisms that have been raised, together with some preliminary HYDRO code simulations, has been given by Nigmatulin et al. [Vestnik ANRB (Ufa, Russia) 4, 3 (2002); J. Power Energy 218-A, 345 (2004)] and Lahey et al. [Adv. Heat Transfer (to be published)]. In this paper a hydrodynamic shock (i.e., HYDRO) code model of the spherically symmetric motion for a vapor bubble in an acoustically forced liquid is presented. This model describes cavitation bubble cluster growth during the expansion period, followed by a violent implosion during the compression period of the acoustic cycle. There are two stages of the bubble dynamics process. The first, low Mach number stage, comprises almost all the time of the acoustic cycle. During this stage, the radial velocities are much less than the sound speeds in the vapor and liquid, the vapor pressure is very close to uniform, and the liquid is practically incompressible. This process is characterized by the inertia of the liquid, heat conduction, and the evaporation or condensation of the vapor. The second, very short, high Mach number stage is when the radial velocities are the same order, or higher, than the sound speeds in the vapor and liquid. In this stage high temperatures, pressures, and densities of the vapor and liquid take place. The model presented herein has realistic equations of state for the compressible liquid and vapor phases, and accounts for nonequilibrium evaporation/condensation kinetics at the liquid/vapor interface. There are interacting

  10. Bubble Proliferation or Dissolution of Cavitation Nuclei in the Beam Path of a Shock-Wave Lithotripter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Spencer; Lautz, Jaclyn; Sankin, Georgy N.; Szeri, Andrew J.; Zhong, Pei

    2015-03-01

    It is hypothesized that the decreased treatment efficiency in contemporary shock-wave lithotripters is related to tensile wave attenuation due to cavitation in the prefocal beam path. Utilizing high-speed imaging of the beam path and focal pressure waveform measurements, tensile attenuation is associated with bubble proliferation. By systematically testing different combinations of pulse-repetition frequency and gas concentration, we modulate the bubble-dissolution time to identify which conditions lead to bubble proliferation and show that reducing bubble proliferation in the beam path significantly improves acoustic transmission and stone comminution efficiency in vitro. In addition to experiments, a bubble-proliferation model is developed that takes gas diffusion across the bubble wall and bubble fragmentation into account. By aligning the model with experimental observations, the number of daughter bubbles produced after a single lithotripter bubble collapse is estimated to be in the range of 253 ˜510 . This finding is on the same order of magnitude with previous measurements of an isolated bubble collapse in a lithotripter field by Pishchalnikov, McAteer, and Williams [BJU Int. 102, 1681 (2008), 10.1111/j.1464-410X.2008.07896.x], and this estimate improves the general understanding of lithotripsy bubble dynamics in the beam path.

  11. Characterization of Bioeffects on Endothelial Cells under Acoustic Droplet Vaporization.

    PubMed

    Seda, Robinson; Li, David S; Fowlkes, J Brian; Bull, Joseph L

    2015-12-01

    Gas embolotherapy is achieved by locally vaporizing microdroplets through acoustic droplet vaporization, which results in bubbles that are large enough to occlude blood flow directed to tumors. Endothelial cells, lining blood vessels, can be affected by these vaporization events, resulting in cell injury and cell death. An idealized monolayer of endothelial cells was subjected to acoustic droplet vaporization using a 3.5-MHz transducer and dodecafluoropentane droplets. Treatments included insonation pressures that varied from 2 to 8 MPa (rarefactional) and pulse lengths that varied from 4 to 16 input cycles. The bubble cloud generated was directly dependent on pressure, but not on pulse length. Cellular damage increased with increasing bubble cloud size, but was limited to the bubble cloud area. These results suggest that vaporization near the endothelium may impact the vessel wall, an effect that could be either deleterious or beneficial depending on the intended overall therapeutic application.

  12. Topological Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Zhen; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-03-01

    The manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as "topological edge states," has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers.

  13. Topological acoustics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Zhen; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-03-20

    The manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as "topological edge states," has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers.

  14. Direct visualization of microalgae rupture by ultrasound-driven bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommella, Angelo; Harun, Irina; Pouliopoulos, Antonis; Choi, James J.; Hellgardt, Klaus; Garbin, Valeria

    2015-11-01

    Cell rupture induced by ultrasound is central to applications in biotechnology. For instance, cell disruption is required in the production of biofuels from microalgae (unicellular species of algae). Ultrasound-induced cavitation, bubble collapse and jetting are exploited to induce sufficiently large viscous stresses to cause rupture of the cell membranes. It has recently been shown that seeding the flow with bubbles that act as cavitation nuclei significantly reduces the energy cost for cell processing. However, a fundamental understanding of the conditions for rupture of microalgae in the complex flow fields generated by ultrasound-driven bubbles is currently lacking. We perform high-speed video microscopy to visualize the miscroscale details of the interaction of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii , microalgae of about 10 μm in size, with ultrasound-driven microbubbles of 2-200 μm in diameter. We investigate the efficiency of cell rupture depending on ultrasound frequency and pressure amplitude (from 10 kPa up to 1 MPa), and the resulting bubble dynamics regimes. In particular we compare the efficiency of membrane rupture in the acoustic microstreaming flow induced by linear oscillations, with the case of violent bubble collapse and jetting. V.G. acknowledges partial support from the European Commission (FP7-PEOPLE-2013-CIG), Grant No. 618333.

  15. Collective oscillations of fresh and salt water bubble plumes

    PubMed

    Orris; Nicholas

    2000-02-01

    Bubble plumes of various void fractions and sizes were produced by varying the flow velocity of a water jet impinging normally on a water surface. The bubbles entrained at the surface were carried downwards by the fluid flow to depths ranging from 33 to 65 cm, and formed roughly cylindrical plumes with diameters ranging from 12 to 27 cm. The acoustic emissions from the plumes were recorded onto digital audio tape using a hydrophone placed outside the cloud at distances ranging from 50 cm to 16.0 m. Closeup video images of the individual bubbles within the plume were also taken in order to gain knowledge of the bubble size distributions. The experiments were performed in both fresh-water and salt-water environments. The fresh-water clouds emitted sounds with a modal structure that was significantly different from that produced by the salt-water clouds. Furthermore, the smaller bubbles present in the salt-water clouds have a fundamental effect on the amplification of turbulence noise, generating sound at significant levels for frequencies up to several hundred Hertz.

  16. Bioeffects due to acoustic droplet vaporization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    Encapsulated micro- and nano-droplets can be vaporized via ultrasound, a process termed acoustic droplet vaporization. Our interest is primarily motivated by a developmental gas embolotherapy technique for cancer treatment. In this methodology, infarction of tumors is induced by selectively formed vascular gas bubbles that arise from the acoustic vaporization of vascular microdroplets. Additionally, the microdroplets may be used as vehicles for localized drug delivery, with or without flow occlusion. In this talk, we examine the dynamics of acoustic droplet vaporization through experiments and theoretical/computational fluid mechanics models, and investigate the bioeffects of acoustic droplet vaporization on endothelial cells and in vivo. Early timescale vaporization events, including phase change, are directly visualized using ultra-high speed imaging, and the influence of acoustic parameters on droplet/bubble dynamics is discussed. Acoustic and fluid mechanics parameters affecting the severity of endothelial cell bioeffects are explored. These findings suggest parameter spaces for which bioeffects may be reduced or enhanced, depending on the objective of the therapy. This work was supported by NIH grant R01EB006476.

  17. CONTINUOUSLY SENSITIVE BUBBLE CHAMBER

    DOEpatents

    Good, R.H.

    1959-08-18

    A radiation detector of the bubble chamber class is described which is continuously sensitive and which does not require the complex pressure cycling equipment characteristic of prior forms of the chamber. The radiation sensitive element is a gas-saturated liquid and means are provided for establishing a thermal gradient across a region of the liquid. The gradient has a temperature range including both the saturation temperature of the liquid and more elevated temperatures. Thus a supersaturated zone is created in which ionizing radiations may give rise to visible gas bubbles indicative of the passage of the radiation through the liquid. Additional means are provided for replenishing the supply of gas-saturated liquid to maintaincontinuous sensitivity.

  18. Mechanisms of gas bubble retention

    SciTech Connect

    Gauglitz, P.A.; Mahoney, L.A.; Mendoza, D.P.; Miller, M.C.

    1994-09-01

    Retention and episodic release of flammable gases are critical safety concerns regarding double-shell tanks (DSTs) containing waste slurries. Previous investigations have concluded that gas bubbles are retained by the slurry that has settled at the bottom of the DST. However, the mechanisms responsible for the retention of these bubbles are not well understood. In addition, the presence of retained gas bubbles is expected to affect the physical properties of the sludge, but essentially no literature data are available to assess the effect of these bubbles. The rheological behavior of the waste, particularly of the settled sludge, is critical to characterizing the tendency of the waste to retain gas bubbles. The objectives of this study are to elucidate the mechanisms contributing to gas bubble retention and release from sludge such as is in Tank 241-SY-101, understand how the bubbles affect the physical properties of the sludge, develop correlations of these physical properties to include in computer models, and collect experimental data on the physical properties of simulated sludges with bubbles. This report presents a theory and experimental observations of bubble retention in simulated sludge and gives correlations and new data on the effect of gas bubbles on sludge yield strength.

  19. Sonoluminescence, sonochemistry and bubble dynamics of single bubble cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatanaka, Shin-ichi

    2012-09-01

    The amount of hydroxyl radicals produced from a single cavitation bubble was quantified by terephthalate dosimetry at various frequencies and pressure amplitudes, while the dynamics of the single bubble was observed by stroboscopic and light-scattering methods. Also, sonoluminescence (SL), sonochemiluminescence (SCL) of luminol, and sodium atom emission (Na*) in the cavitation field were observed. The amount of hydroxyl radicals per cycle as well as the intensity of SL was proportional to pressure amplitude at every frequency performed, and it decreased with increasing frequency. When the single bubble was dancing with a decrease in pressure amplitude, however, the amount of hydroxyl radicals was greater than that for the stable bubble at the higher pressure amplitude and did not significantly decrease with frequency. Furthermore, SCL and Na* were detected only under unstable bubble conditions. These results imply that the instability of bubbles significantly enhances sonochemical efficiency for non-volatile substances in liquid phase.

  20. Acoustic cavitation movies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Lawrence A.

    2003-04-01

    Acoustic cavitation is a phenomenon that occurs on microsecond time scales and micron length scales, yet, it has many macroscopic manifestations. Accordingly, it is often difficult, at least for the author, to form realistic physical descriptions of the specific mechanisms through which it expresses itself in our macroscopic world. For example, there are still many who believe that cavitation erosion is due to the shock wave that is emitted by bubble implosion, rather than the liquid jet created on asymmetric collapse...and they may be right. Over the years, the author has accumulated a number of movies and high-speed photographs of cavitation activity, which he uses to form his own visual references. In the time allotted, he will show a number of these movies and photographs and discuss their relevance to existing technological problems. A limited number of CDs containing the presented materials will be available to interested individuals. [Work supported in part by the NIH, USAMRMC, and the ONR.

  1. Spherical grating spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donoghue, Darragh; Clemens, J. Christopher

    2014-07-01

    We describe designs for spectrometers employing convex dispersers. The Offner spectrometer was the first such instrument; it has almost exclusively been employed on satellite platforms, and has had little impact on ground-based instruments. We have learned how to fabricate curved Volume Phase Holographic (VPH) gratings and, in contrast to the planar gratings of traditional spectrometers, describe how such devices can be used in optical/infrared spectrometers designed specifically for curved diffraction gratings. Volume Phase Holographic gratings are highly efficient compared to conventional surface relief gratings; they have become the disperser of choice in optical / NIR spectrometers. The advantage of spectrometers with curved VPH dispersers is the very small number of optical elements used (the simplest comprising a grating and a spherical mirror), as well as illumination of mirrors off axis, resulting in greater efficiency and reduction in size. We describe a "Half Offner" spectrometer, an even simpler version of the Offner spectrometer. We present an entirely novel design, the Spherical Transmission Grating Spectrometer (STGS), and discuss exemplary applications, including a design for a double-beam spectrometer without any requirement for a dichroic. This paradigm change in spectrometer design offers an alternative to all-refractive astronomical spectrometer designs, using expensive, fragile lens elements fabricated from CaF2 or even more exotic materials. The unobscured mirror layout avoids a major drawback of the previous generation of catadioptric spectrometer designs. We describe laboratory measurements of the efficiency and image quality of a curved VPH grating in a STGS design, demonstrating, simultaneously, efficiency comparable to planar VPH gratings along with good image quality. The stage is now set for construction of a prototype instrument with impressive performance.

  2. Suppressing bubble shielding effect in shock wave lithotripsy by low intensity pulsed ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jen-Chieh; Zhou, Yufeng

    2015-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) has been used as an effective modality to fragment kidney calculi. Because of the bubble shielding effect in the pre-focal region, the acoustic energy delivered to the focus is reduced. Low pulse repetition frequency (PRF) will be applied to dissolve these bubbles for better stone comminution efficiency. In this study, low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) beam was aligned perpendicular to the axis of a shock wave (SW) lithotripter at its focus. The light transmission was used to evaluate the compressive wave and cavitation induced by SWs without or with a combination of LIPUS for continuous sonication. It is found that bubble shielding effect becomes dominated with the SW exposure and has a greater significant effect on cavitation than compressive wave. Using the combined wave scheme, the improvement began at the 5th pulse and gradually increased. Suppression effect on bubble shielding is independent on the trigger delay, but increases with the acoustic intensity and pulse duration of LIPUS. The peak negative and integral area of light transmission signal, which present the compressive wave and cavitation respectively, using our strategy at PRF of 1 Hz are comparable to those using SW alone at PRF of 0.1 Hz. In addition, high-speed photography confirmed the bubble activities in both free field and close to a stone surface. Bubble motion in response to the acoustic radiation force by LIPUS was found to be the major mechanism of suppressing bubble shielding effect. There is a 2.6-fold increase in stone fragmentation efficiency after 1000 SWs at PRF of 1 Hz in combination with LIPUS. In summary, combination of SWs and LIPUS is an effective way of suppressing bubble shielding effect and, subsequently, improving cavitation at the focus for a better outcome.

  3. Noise reduction by the application of an air-bubble curtain in offshore pile driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsouvalas, A.; Metrikine, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    Underwater noise pollution is a by-product of marine industrial operations. In particular, the noise generated when a foundation pile is driven into the soil with an impact hammer is considered to be harmful for the aquatic species. In an attempt to reduce the ecological footprint, several noise mitigation techniques have been investigated. Among the various solutions proposed, the air-bubble curtain is often applied due to its efficacy in noise reduction. In this paper, a model is proposed for the investigation of the sound reduction during marine piling when an air-bubble curtain is placed around the pile. The model consists of the pile, the surrounding water and soil media, and the air-bubble curtain which is positioned at a certain distance from the pile surface. The solution approach is semi-analytical and is based on the dynamic sub-structuring technique and the modal decomposition method. Two main results of the paper can be distinguished. First, a new model is proposed that can be used for predictions of the noise levels in a computationally efficient manner. Second, an analysis is presented of the principal mechanisms that are responsible for the noise reduction due to the application of the air-bubble curtain in marine piling. The understanding of these mechanisms turns to be crucial for the exploitation of the maximum efficiency of the system. It is shown that the principal mechanism of noise reduction depends strongly on the frequency content of the radiated sound and the characteristics of the bubbly medium. For piles of large diameter which radiate most of the acoustic energy at relatively low frequencies, the noise reduction is mainly attributed to the mismatch of the acoustic impedances between the seawater and the bubbly layer. On the contrary, for smaller piles and when the radiated acoustic energy is concentrated at frequencies close to, or higher than, the resonance frequency of the air bubbles, the sound absorption within the bubbly layer

  4. Optical and acoustical dynamics of microbubble contrast agents inside neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Dayton, P A; Chomas, J E; Lum, A F; Allen, J S; Lindner, J R; Simon, S I; Ferrara, K W

    2001-01-01

    Acoustically active microbubbles are used for contrast-enhanced ultrasound assessment of organ perfusion. In regions of inflammation, contrast agents are captured and phagocytosed by activated neutrophils adherent to the venular wall. Using direct optical observation with a high-speed camera and acoustical interrogation of individual bubbles and cells, we assessed the physical and acoustical responses of both phagocytosed and free microbubbles. Optical analysis of bubble radial oscillations during insonation demonstrated that phagocytosed microbubbles experience viscous damping within the cytoplasm and yet remain acoustically active and capable of large volumetric oscillations during an acoustic pulse. Fitting a modified version of the Rayleigh-Plesset equation that describes mechanical properties of thin shells to optical radius-time data of oscillating bubbles provided estimates of the apparent viscosity of the intracellular medium. Phagocytosed microbubbles experienced a viscous damping approximately sevenfold greater than free microbubbles. Acoustical comparison between free and phagocytosed microbubbles indicated that phagocytosed microbubbles produce an echo with a higher mean frequency than free microbubbles in response to a rarefaction-first single-cycle pulse. Moreover, this frequency increase is predicted using the modified Rayleigh-Plesset equation. We conclude that contrast-enhanced ultrasound can detect distinct acoustic signals from microbubbles inside of neutrophils and may provide a unique tool to identify activated neutrophils at sites of inflammation. PMID:11222315

  5. Bubble in a corner flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanden-Broeck, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    The distortion of a two-dimensional bubble (or drop) in a corner of angle delta, due to the flow of an inviscid incompressible fluid around it, is examined theoretically. The flow and the bubble shape are determined as functions of the angle delta, the contact angle beta and the cavitation number gamma. The problem is formulated as an integrodifferential equation for the bubble surface. This equation generalized the integrodifferential equations derived by Vanden-Broeck and Keller. The shape of the bubble is found approximately by using the slender body theory for bubbles. When gamma reaches a critical value gamma sub 0 (beta, delta), opposite sides of the bubble touch each other. Two different families of solution for gamma gamma sub 0 are obtained. In the first family opposite sides touch at one point. In the second family contact is allowed along a segment.

  6. In Search of the Big Bubble

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simoson, Andrew; Wentzky, Bethany

    2011-01-01

    Freely rising air bubbles in water sometimes assume the shape of a spherical cap, a shape also known as the "big bubble". Is it possible to find some objective function involving a combination of a bubble's attributes for which the big bubble is the optimal shape? Following the basic idea of the definite integral, we define a bubble's surface as…

  7. Musical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, Colin

    This chapter provides an introduction to the physical and psycho-acoustic principles underlying the production and perception of the sounds of musical instruments. The first section introduces generic aspects of musical acoustics and the perception of musical sounds, followed by separate sections on string, wind and percussion instruments.

  8. Shock wave-bubble interaction near soft and rigid boundaries during lithotripsy: numerical analysis by the improved ghost fluid method.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kazumichi; Kodama, Tetsuya; Takahira, Hiroyuki

    2011-10-01

    In the case of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), a shock wave-bubble interaction inevitably occurs near the focusing point of stones, resulting in stone fragmentation and subsequent tissue damage. Because shock wave-bubble interactions are high-speed phenomena occurring in tissue consisting of various media with different acoustic impedance values, numerical analysis is an effective method for elucidating the mechanism of these interactions. However, the mechanism has not been examined in detail because, at present, numerical simulations capable of incorporating the acoustic impedance of various tissues do not exist. Here, we show that the improved ghost fluid method (IGFM) can treat shock wave-bubble interactions in various media. Nonspherical bubble collapse near a rigid or soft tissue boundary (stone, liver, gelatin and fat) was analyzed. The reflection wave of an incident shock wave at a tissue boundary was the primary cause for the acceleration or deceleration of bubble collapse. The impulse that was obtained from the temporal evolution of pressure created by the bubble collapse increased the downward velocity of the boundary and caused subsequent boundary deformation. Results of this study showed that the IGFM is a useful method for analyzing the shock wave-bubble interaction near various tissues with different acoustic impedance. PMID:21918295

  9. Shock wave-bubble interaction near soft and rigid boundaries during lithotripsy: numerical analysis by the improved ghost fluid method.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kazumichi; Kodama, Tetsuya; Takahira, Hiroyuki

    2011-10-01

    In the case of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), a shock wave-bubble interaction inevitably occurs near the focusing point of stones, resulting in stone fragmentation and subsequent tissue damage. Because shock wave-bubble interactions are high-speed phenomena occurring in tissue consisting of various media with different acoustic impedance values, numerical analysis is an effective method for elucidating the mechanism of these interactions. However, the mechanism has not been examined in detail because, at present, numerical simulations capable of incorporating the acoustic impedance of various tissues do not exist. Here, we show that the improved ghost fluid method (IGFM) can treat shock wave-bubble interactions in various media. Nonspherical bubble collapse near a rigid or soft tissue boundary (stone, liver, gelatin and fat) was analyzed. The reflection wave of an incident shock wave at a tissue boundary was the primary cause for the acceleration or deceleration of bubble collapse. The impulse that was obtained from the temporal evolution of pressure created by the bubble collapse increased the downward velocity of the boundary and caused subsequent boundary deformation. Results of this study showed that the IGFM is a useful method for analyzing the shock wave-bubble interaction near various tissues with different acoustic impedance.

  10. Acoustic imaging in a water filled metallic pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Kolbe, W.F.; Turko, B.T.; Leskovar, B.

    1984-04-01

    A method is described for the imaging of the interior of a water filled metallic pipe using acoustical techniques. The apparatus consists of an array of 20 acoustic transducers mounted circumferentially around the pipe. Each transducer is pulsed in sequence, and the echos resulting from bubbles in the interior are digitized and processed by a computer to generate an image. The electronic control and digitizing system and the software processing of the echo signals are described. The performance of the apparatus is illustrated by the imaging of simulated bubbles consisting of thin walled glass spheres suspended in the pipe.

  11. Acoustic metafluids.

    PubMed

    Norris, Andrew N

    2009-02-01

    Acoustic metafluids are defined as the class of fluids that allow one domain of fluid to acoustically mimic another, as exemplified by acoustic cloaks. It is shown that the most general class of acoustic metafluids are materials with anisotropic inertia and the elastic properties of what are known as pentamode materials. The derivation uses the notion of finite deformation to define the transformation of one region to another. The main result is found by considering energy density in the original and transformed regions. Properties of acoustic metafluids are discussed, and general conditions are found which ensure that the mapped fluid has isotropic inertia, which potentially opens up the possibility of achieving broadband cloaking. PMID:19206861

  12. Review of scattering and extinction cross-sections, damping factors, and resonance frequencies of a spherical gas bubble.

    PubMed

    Ainslie, Michael A; Leighton, Timothy G

    2011-11-01

    Perhaps the most familiar concepts when discussing acoustic scattering by bubbles are the resonance frequency for bubble pulsation, the bubbles' damping, and their scattering and extinction cross-sections, all of which are used routinely in oceanography, sonochemistry, and biomedicine. The apparent simplicity of these concepts is illusory: there exist multiple, sometimes contradictory definitions for their components. This paper reviews expressions and definitions in the literature for acoustical cross-sections, resonance frequencies, and damping factors of a spherically pulsating gas bubble in an infinite liquid medium, deriving two expressions for "resonance frequency" that are compared and reconciled with two others from the reviewed literature. In order to prevent errors, care is needed by researchers when combining results from different publications that might have used internally correct but mutually inconsistent definitions. Expressions are presented for acoustical cross-sections associated with forced pulsations damped by liquid shear and (oft-neglected) bulk or dilatational viscosities, gas thermal diffusivity, and acoustic re-radiation. The concept of a dimensionless "damping coefficient" is unsuitable for radiation damping because different cross-sections would require different functional forms for this parameter. Instead, terms based on the ratio of bubble radius to acoustic wavelength are included explicitly in the cross-sections where needed.

  13. Droplets, Bubbles and Ultrasound Interactions.

    PubMed

    Shpak, Oleksandr; Verweij, Martin; de Jong, Nico; Versluis, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of droplets and bubbles with ultrasound has been studied extensively in the last 25 years. Microbubbles are broadly used in diagnostic and therapeutic medical applications, for instance, as ultrasound contrast agents. They have a similar size as red blood cells, and thus are able to circulate within blood vessels. Perfluorocarbon liquid droplets can be a potential new generation of microbubble agents as ultrasound can trigger their conversion into gas bubbles. Prior to activation, they are at least five times smaller in diameter than the resulting bubbles. Together with the violent nature of the phase-transition, the droplets can be used for local drug delivery, embolotherapy, HIFU enhancement and tumor imaging. Here we explain the basics of bubble dynamics, described by the Rayleigh-Plesset equation, bubble resonance frequency, damping and quality factor. We show the elegant calculation of the above characteristics for the case of small amplitude oscillations by linearizing the equations. The effect and importance of a bubble coating and effective surface tension are also discussed. We give the main characteristics of the power spectrum of bubble oscillations. Preceding bubble dynamics, ultrasound propagation is introduced. We explain the speed of sound, nonlinearity and attenuation terms. We examine bubble ultrasound scattering and how it depends on the wave-shape of the incident wave. Finally, we introduce droplet interaction with ultrasound. We elucidate the ultrasound-focusing concept within a droplets sphere, droplet shaking due to media compressibility and droplet phase-conversion dynamics.

  14. Bubble Measuring Instrument and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline-Schoder, Robert (Inventor); Magari, Patrick J. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for a non-invasive bubble measuring instrument operable for detecting, distinguishing, and counting gaseous embolisms such as bubbles over a selectable range of bubble sizes of interest. A selected measurement volume in which bubbles may be detected is insonified by two distinct frequencies from a pump transducer and an image transducer. respectively. The image transducer frequency is much higher than the pump transducer frequency. The relatively low-frequency pump signal is used to excite bubbles to resonate at a frequency related to their diameter. The image transducer is operated in a pulse-echo mode at a controllable repetition rate that transmits bursts of high-frequency ultrasonic signal to the measurement volume in which bubbles may be detected and then receives the echo. From the echo or received signal, a beat signal related to the repetition rate may be extracted and used to indicate the presence or absence of a resonant bubble. In a preferred embodiment, software control maintains the beat signal at a preselected frequency while varying the pump transducer frequency to excite bubbles of different diameters to resonate depending on the range of bubble diameters selected for investigation.

  15. Bubble measuring instrument and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline-Schoder, Robert (Inventor); Magari, Patrick J. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for a non-invasive bubble measuring instrument operable for detecting, distinguishing, and counting gaseous embolisms such as bubbles over a selectable range of bubble sizes of interest. A selected measurement volume in which bubbles may be detected is insonified by two distinct frequencies from a pump transducer and an image transducer, respectively. The image transducer frequency is much higher than the pump transducer frequency. The relatively low-frequency pump signal is used to excite bubbles to resonate at a frequency related to their diameter. The image transducer is operated in a pulse-echo mode at a controllable repetition rate that transmits bursts of high-frequency ultrasonic signal to the measurement volume in which bubbles may be detected and then receives the echo. From the echo or received signal, a beat signal related to the repetition rate may be extracted and used to indicate the presence or absence of a resonant bubble. In a preferred embodiment, software control maintains the beat signal at a preselected frequency while varying the pump transducer frequency to excite bubbles of different diameters to resonate depending on the range of bubble diameters selected for investigation.

  16. Helium bubble bursting in tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Sefta, Faiza; Juslin, Niklas; Wirth, Brian D.

    2013-12-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to systematically study the pressure evolution and bursting behavior of sub-surface helium bubbles and the resulting tungsten surface morphology. This study specifically investigates how bubble shape and size, temperature, tungsten surface orientation, and ligament thickness above the bubble influence bubble stability and surface evolution. The tungsten surface is roughened by a combination of adatom “islands,” craters, and pinholes. The present study provides insight into the mechanisms and conditions leading to various tungsten topology changes, which we believe are the initial stages of surface evolution leading to the formation of nanoscale fuzz.

  17. Bubble Measuring Instrument and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline-Schoder, Robert (Inventor); Magari, Patrick J. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for a non-invasive bubble measuring instrument operable for detecting, distinguishing, and counting gaseous embolisms such as bubbles over a selectable range of bubble sizes of interest. A selected measurement volume in which bubbles may be detected is insonified by two distinct frequencies from a pump transducer and an image transducer, respectively. The image transducer frequency is much higher than the pump transducer frequency. The relatively low-frequency pump signal is used to excite bubbles to resonate at a frequency related to their diameter. The image transducer is operated in a pulse-echo mode at a controllable repetition rate that transmits bursts of high-frequency ultrasonic signal to the measurement volume in which bubbles may be detected and then receives the echo. From the echo or received signal, a beat signal related to the repetition rate may be extracted and used to indicate the presence or absence of a resonant bubble. In a preferred embodiment, software control maintains the beat signal at a preselected frequency while varying the pump transducer frequency to excite bubbles of different diameters to resonate depending on the range of bubble diameters selected for investigation.

  18. Bubble Measuring Instrument and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline-Schoder, Robert (Inventor); Magari, Patrick J. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for a non-invasive bubble measuring instrument operable for detecting. distinguishing, and counting gaseous embolisms such as bubbles over a selectable range of bubble sizes of interest. A selected measurement volume in which bubbles may be detected is insonified by two distinct frequencies from a pump transducer and an image transducer, respectively. The image transducer frequency is much higher than the pump transducer frequency. The relatively low-frequency pump signal is used to excite bubbles to resonate at a frequency related to their diameter. The image transducer is operated in a pulse-echo mode at a controllable repetition rate that transmits bursts of high-frequency ultrasonic signal to the measurement volume in which bubbles may be detected and then receive, the echo. From the echo or received signal, a beat signal related to the repetition rate may be extracted and used to indicate the presence or absence of a resonant bubble. In a preferred embodiment, software control maintains the beat signal at a preselected frequency while varying the pump transducer frequency to excite bubbles of different diameters to resonate depending on the range of bubble diameters selected for investigation.

  19. High-frequency sound field and bubble formation in a rat decompression model.

    PubMed

    Shupak, Avi; Arieli, Yehuda; Bitterman, Haim; Brod, Vera; Arieli, Ran; Rosenhause, Giora

    2002-05-01

    High-frequency sound might cause bubble enlargement by rectified diffusion. The purpose of the present study was to investigate gas bubble formation in the immersed diving animal during exposure to high-frequency sound. Anaesthetised rats were subjected to a simulated diving profile while immersed inside a hyperbaric chamber. An acoustic beacon (pinger) was placed ventral to the animal's abdomen, transmitting at an intensity of 208.9 dB re 1 micro Pa and a frequency of 37 kHz. Six groups of eight animals were included in the study as in Table 1, breathing air (n = 4) or Nitrox 72/28 (n = 2), at a depth of 0 m, 30 m or 40 m. Immediately after decompression, the intestinal mesenterium was imaged, and frames were acquired digitally. The number of bubbles and their radii were analysed and compared among the groups. The mean bubble density for group 1 was 1.35 +/- 0.18 bubbles/mm(2), significantly higher when compared with the other groups (p < 0.0001). The average bubble radius for groups 1 and 2 was similar (12.57 +/- 4.1 and 10.63 +/- 1.8 microm, respectively), but significantly larger than in the other groups (p < 0.0002). The percentage of bubbles with a radius greater than 50 microm was significantly higher in group 1 (p < 0.0001). The results suggest that commercially available underwater pingers might enhance bubble growth during deep air diving.

  20. Effect of bubble size on micro-bubble drag reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xiaochun

    2005-11-01

    The effect of bubble size on micro-bubble drag reduction was investigated experimentally in a high-speed turbulent channel flow of water. A variety of near-wall injection techniques were used to create a bubbly turbulent boundary layer. The resulting wall friction force was measured directly by a floating element force balance. The bubble size was determined from photographic imaging. Using compressed nitrogen to force flow through a slot injector located in the plate beneath the boundary layer of the tunnel test section, a surfactant solution (Triton X-100, 19ppm) and salt water solution (35ppt) generated bubbles of average size between ˜500 microns and ˜200 microns and ˜100 microns, respectively (40 < d^+ < 200). In addition hollow spherical glass beads (˜75 microns (d^+ = 30) and specific gravity 0.18) and previously prepared lipid stabilized gas bubbles of ˜ 30 micron (d^+ =12) were injected. The results indicate that the drag reduction is related strongly to the injected gas volume flux and the static pressure in the boundary layer. Changing bubble size had essentially no influence on the measured friction drag, suggesting that friction drag is not a strong function of bubble size. [Sponsored by the Office of Naval Research.

  1. Nonequilibrium bubbles in a flowing langmuir monolayer.

    PubMed

    Muruganathan, Rm; Khattari, Z; Fischer, Th M

    2005-11-24

    We investigate the nonequilibrium behavior of two-dimensional gas bubbles in Langmuir monolayers. A cavitation bubble is induced in liquid expanded phase by locally heating a Langmuir monolayer with an IR-laser. At low IR-laser power the cavitation bubble is immersed in quiescent liquid expanded monolayer. At higher IR-laser power thermo capillary flow around the laser-induced cavitation bubble sets in. The thermo capillary flow is caused by a temperature dependence of the gas/liquid line tension. The slope of the line tension with temperature is determined by measuring the thermo capillary flow velocity. Thermodynamically stable satellite bubbles are generated by increasing the surface area of the monolayer. Those satellite bubbles collide with the cavitation bubble. Upon collision the satellite bubbles either coalesce with the cavitation bubble or slide past the cavitation bubble. Moreover we show that the satellite bubbles can also be produced by the emission from the laser-induced cavitation bubbles.

  2. Laboratory investigation of a passive acoustic method for measurement of underwater gas seep ebullition.

    PubMed

    Greene, Chad A; Wilson, Preston S

    2012-01-01

    Passive acoustic techniques are of interest as a low-power means of quantifying underwater point-source gas ebullition. Toward the development of systems for logging natural seep activity, laboratory experiments were performed that exploited the bubble's Minnaert natural frequency for the measurement of gas flow from a model seep. Results show agreement among acoustic, optical, and gas trap ebullition measurements over the range of emission rates from 0 to 10 bubbles per second. A mathematical model is proposed to account for the real gas behavior of bubbles which cannot be approximated as ideal, such as methane at marine depths exceeding 30 m.

  3. Laboratory investigation of a passive acoustic method for measurement of underwater gas seep ebullition.

    PubMed

    Greene, Chad A; Wilson, Preston S

    2012-01-01

    Passive acoustic techniques are of interest as a low-power means of quantifying underwater point-source gas ebullition. Toward the development of systems for logging natural seep activity, laboratory experiments were performed that exploited the bubble's Minnaert natural frequency for the measurement of gas flow from a model seep. Results show agreement among acoustic, optical, and gas trap ebullition measurements over the range of emission rates from 0 to 10 bubbles per second. A mathematical model is proposed to account for the real gas behavior of bubbles which cannot be approximated as ideal, such as methane at marine depths exceeding 30 m. PMID:22280731

  4. Synchrotron quantification of ultrasound cavitation and bubble dynamics in Al-10Cu melts.

    PubMed

    Xu, W W; Tzanakis, I; Srirangam, P; Mirihanage, W U; Eskin, D G; Bodey, A J; Lee, P D

    2016-07-01

    Knowledge of the kinetics of gas bubble formation and evolution under cavitation conditions in molten alloys is important for the control casting defects such as porosity and dissolved hydrogen. Using in situ synchrotron X-ray radiography, we studied the dynamic behaviour of ultrasonic cavitation gas bubbles in a molten Al-10 wt%Cu alloy. The size distribution, average radius and growth rate of cavitation gas bubbles were quantified under an acoustic intensity of 800 W/cm(2) and a maximum acoustic pressure of 4.5 MPa (45 atm). Bubbles exhibited a log-normal size distribution with an average radius of 15.3 ± 0.5 μm. Under applied sonication conditions the growth rate of bubble radius, R(t), followed a power law with a form of R(t)=αt(β), and α=0.0021 &β=0.89. The observed tendencies were discussed in relation to bubble growth mechanisms of Al alloy melts. PMID:26964960

  5. Synchrotron quantification of ultrasound cavitation and bubble dynamics in Al-10Cu melts.

    PubMed

    Xu, W W; Tzanakis, I; Srirangam, P; Mirihanage, W U; Eskin, D G; Bodey, A J; Lee, P D

    2016-07-01

    Knowledge of the kinetics of gas bubble formation and evolution under cavitation conditions in molten alloys is important for the control casting defects such as porosity and dissolved hydrogen. Using in situ synchrotron X-ray radiography, we studied the dynamic behaviour of ultrasonic cavitation gas bubbles in a molten Al-10 wt%Cu alloy. The size distribution, average radius and growth rate of cavitation gas bubbles were quantified under an acoustic intensity of 800 W/cm(2) and a maximum acoustic pressure of 4.5 MPa (45 atm). Bubbles exhibited a log-normal size distribution with an average radius of 15.3 ± 0.5 μm. Under applied sonication conditions the growth rate of bubble radius, R(t), followed a power law with a form of R(t)=αt(β), and α=0.0021 &β=0.89. The observed tendencies were discussed in relation to bubble growth mechanisms of Al alloy melts.

  6. The Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matheson, E.; Harris, T. J.

    1969-01-01

    Describes the construction and operation of a quadrupole mass spectrometer for experiments in an advanced-teaching laboratory. Discusses the theory of operation of the spectrometer and the factors affecting the resolution. Some examples of mass spectra obtained with this instrument are presented and discussed. (LC)

  7. Effective medium method for sound propagation in a soft medium containing air bubbles.

    PubMed

    Liang, Bin; Zou, Xinye; Cheng, Jianchun

    2008-09-01

    An effective medium method (EMM) is developed to investigate the nonlinear propagation of acoustic waves for soft media containing air bubbles, which accounts for the effects of weak compressibility, viscosity, surrounding pressure, surface tension, and encapsulating shells. Based on the dynamics model of an individual bubble that has included these effects, the EMM is presented by employing a simple perturbation approach to "homogenize" the bubbly soft media. The equations describing the fundamental and the second harmonic waves are derived that applies to three-dimensional cases, and then solved in a one-dimensional case to obtain the effective acoustical parameters of a longitudinal wave. The EMM is compared with the previous theories in three representative cases regarded as simple models of significant practical applications. The results show that the EMM agrees well with the previous theories and can incorporate the additional effects, which may notably affect the accuracy of the results. The limitations of the EMM are also identified and stated.

  8. Effect of surface waves on the secondary Bjerknes force experienced by bubbles in a microfluidic channel.

    PubMed

    Doinikov, Alexander A; Combriat, Thomas; Thibault, Pierre; Marmottant, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    An analytical expression is derived for the secondary Bjerknes force experienced by two cylindrical bubbles in a microfluidic channel with planar elastic walls. The derived expression takes into account that the bubbles generate two types of scattered acoustic waves: bulk waves that propagate in the fluid gap with the speed of sound and Lamb-type surface waves that propagate at the fluid-wall interfaces with a much lower speed than that of the bulk waves. It is shown that the surface waves cause the bubbles to form a bound pair in which the equilibrium interbubble distance is determined by the wavelength of the surface waves, which is much smaller than the acoustic wavelength. Comparison of theoretical and experimental results demonstrates good agreement.

  9. Effect of surface waves on the secondary Bjerknes force experienced by bubbles in a microfluidic channel.

    PubMed

    Doinikov, Alexander A; Combriat, Thomas; Thibault, Pierre; Marmottant, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    An analytical expression is derived for the secondary Bjerknes force experienced by two cylindrical bubbles in a microfluidic channel with planar elastic walls. The derived expression takes into account that the bubbles generate two types of scattered acoustic waves: bulk waves that propagate in the fluid gap with the speed of sound and Lamb-type surface waves that propagate at the fluid-wall interfaces with a much lower speed than that of the bulk waves. It is shown that the surface waves cause the bubbles to form a bound pair in which the equilibrium interbubble distance is determined by the wavelength of the surface waves, which is much smaller than the acoustic wavelength. Comparison of theoretical and experimental results demonstrates good agreement. PMID:27627390

  10. Effect of surface waves on the secondary Bjerknes force experienced by bubbles in a microfluidic channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doinikov, Alexander A.; Combriat, Thomas; Thibault, Pierre; Marmottant, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    An analytical expression is derived for the secondary Bjerknes force experienced by two cylindrical bubbles in a microfluidic channel with planar elastic walls. The derived expression takes into account that the bubbles generate two types of scattered acoustic waves: bulk waves that propagate in the fluid gap with the speed of sound and Lamb-type surface waves that propagate at the fluid-wall interfaces with a much lower speed than that of the bulk waves. It is shown that the surface waves cause the bubbles to form a bound pair in which the equilibrium interbubble distance is determined by the wavelength of the surface waves, which is much smaller than the acoustic wavelength. Comparison of theoretical and experimental results demonstrates good agreement.

  11. Study of acoustic resonance of cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honjo, M.; Tominaga, T.

    Discrete sounds and vibrations from guide vanes due to acoustic resonance in the vane flow path, are experimentally investigated. Other causes of pure sounds in stationary vanes are considered, such as direct radiation from wake shedding vortices, bubble vortices or leading edges, and radial or axial modes of air columns. Two-dimensional cascade tests are performed under various conditions, and the data are compared with theoretical results of flat plate cascades. Three-dimensional ducted guide vane model tests are carried out to apply prototype guide vanes, and to confirm the resonance of the two-dimensional tests. Results show that frequency is more sensitive to chord length than pitch length, and the ratio of the fluctuation frequency to fluid sound velocity/pitch length is independent of the scale. Bubble vortices on concave surfaces or leading edges are not exciting sources; and under the limit of solidity, no exciting energy can generate acoustic resonance in correspondence to the mode.

  12. Dark matter limits froma 15 kg windowless bubble chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Szydagis, Matthew Mark

    2011-03-01

    The COUPP collaboration has successfully used bubble chambers, a technology previously applied only to high-energy physics experiments, as direct dark matter detectors. It has produced the world's most stringent spin-dependent WIMP limits, and increasingly competitive spin-independent limits. These limits were achieved by capitalizing on an intrinsic rejection of the gamma background that all other direct detection experiments must address through high-density shielding and empirically-determined data cuts. The history of COUPP, including its earliest prototypes and latest results, is briefly discussed in this thesis. The feasibility of a new, windowless bubble chamber concept simpler and more inexpensive in design is discussed here as well. The dark matter limits achieved with a 15 kg windowless chamber, larger than any previous COUPP chamber (2 kg, 4 kg), are presented. Evidence of the greater radiopurity of synthetic quartz compared to natural is presented using the data from this 15 kg device, the first chamber to be made from synthetic quartz. The effective reconstruction of the three-dimensional positions of bubbles in a highly distorted optical field, with ninety-degree bottom lighting similar to cloud chamber lighting, is demonstrated. Another innovation described in this thesis is the use of the sound produced by bubbles recorded by an array of piezoelectric sensors as the primary means of bubble detection. In other COUPP chambers, cameras have been used as the primary trigger. Previous work on bubble acoustic signature differentiation using piezos is built upon in order to further demonstrate the ability to discriminate between alpha- and neutron-induced events.

  13. Radiolytic Bubble Gas Hydrogen Compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Hester, J.R.

    2003-02-05

    Radioactive waste solids can trap bubbles containing hydrogen that may pose a flammability risk if they are disturbed and hydrogen is released. Whether a release is a problem or not depends, among other things, on the hydrogen composition of the gas. This report develops a method for estimating the hydrogen composition of trapped bubbles based on waste properties.

  14. Radiolytic Bubble Gas Hydrogen Compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Hester, J.R.

    2001-08-28

    Radioactive waste solids can trap bubbles containing hydrogen that may pose a flammability risk if they are disturbed and hydrogen is released. Whether a release is a problem or not depends, among other things, on the hydrogen composition of the gas. This report develops a method for estimating the hydrogen composition of trapped bubbles based on waste properties.

  15. Tuning bubbly structures in microchannels.

    PubMed

    Vuong, Sharon M; Anna, Shelley L

    2012-06-01

    Foams have many useful applications that arise from the structure and size distribution of the bubbles within them. Microfluidics allows for the rapid formation of uniform bubbles, where bubble size and volume fraction are functions of the input gas pressure, liquid flow rate, and device geometry. After formation, the microchannel confines the bubbles and determines the resulting foam structure. Bubbly structures can vary from a single row ("dripping"), to multiple rows ("alternating"), to densely packed bubbles ("bamboo" and dry foams). We show that each configuration arises in a distinct region of the operating space defined by bubble volume and volume fraction. We describe the boundaries between these regions using geometric arguments and show that the boundaries are functions of the channel aspect ratio. We compare these geometric arguments with foam structures observed in experiments using flow-focusing, T-junction, and co-flow designs to generate stable nitrogen bubbles in aqueous surfactant solution and stable droplets in oil containing dissolved surfactant. The outcome of this work is a set of design parameters that can be used to achieve desired foam structures as a function of device geometry and experimental control parameters.

  16. Bubbles under stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohn, S.

    2003-06-01

    We present an experimental and theoretical investigation of a system composed of two soap bubbles strained between two parallel solid surfaces. The two-bubble cluster can be found in several configurations. The existence and stability of each of these states is studied as a function of the distance between the two facing surfaces. The change of this distance can induce a transition from one configuration to another; we observe that most transitions are subcritical, showing that the system is often trapped in states where the minimum of free energy is only local. The hysteretic transitions are responsible for the dissipation of elastic energy. The existence of more than one stable states for given boundaries conditions combined with the absence of thermalization means that the history of the system has to be taken into account and that there is no unique stress-strain relation. In the present system, because of its simplicity, a complete quantitative analysis of these general processes is obtained. The presented results may contribute to a better understanding of the dynamics of more complex systems such as foams or granular materials where similar processes are at work.

  17. Bubble formation in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.

    1996-01-01

    An extensive experimental program was initiated for the purpose of understanding the mechanisms leading to bubble generation during fluid handling procedures in a microgravity environment. Several key fluid handling procedures typical for PCG experiments were identified for analysis in that program. Experiments were designed to specifically understand how such procedures can lead to bubble formation. The experiments were then conducted aboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft which is capable of simulating a low gravity environment by executing a parabolic flight attitude. However, such a flight attitude can only provide a low gravity environment of approximately 10-2go for a maximum period of 30 seconds. Thus all of the tests conducted for these experiments were designed to last no longer than 20 seconds. Several experiments were designed to simulate some of the more relevant fluid handling procedures during protein crystal growth experiments. These include submerged liquid jet cavitation, filling of a cubical vessel, submerged surface scratch, attached drop growth, liquid jet impingement, and geysering experiments. To date, four separate KC-135 flight campaigns were undertaken specifically for performing these experiments. However, different experiments were performed on different flights.

  18. Bubble formation in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.

    1994-01-01

    Two KC-135 flight campaigns have been conducted to date which are specifically dedicated to study bubble formation in microgravity. The first flight was conducted during March 14-18, 1994, and the other during June 20-24, 1994. The results from the June 1994 flight have not been analyzed yet, while the results from the March flight have been partially analyzed. In the first flight three different experiments were performed, one with the specific aim at determining whether or not cavitation can take place during any of the fluid handling procedures adopted in the shuttle bioprocessing experiments. The other experiments were concerned with duplicating some of the procedures that resulted in bubble formation, namely the NCS filling procedure and the needle scratch of a solid surface. The results from this set of experiments suggest that cavitation did not take place during any of the fluid handling procedures. The results clearly indicate that almost all were generated as a result of the breakup of the gas/liquid interface. This was convincingly demonstrated in the scratch tests as well as in the liquid fill tests.

  19. Bubbles under stress.

    PubMed

    Bohn, S

    2003-06-01

    We present an experimental and theoretical investigation of a system composed of two soap bubbles strained between two parallel solid surfaces. The two-bubble cluster can be found in several configurations. The existence and stability of each of these states is studied as a function of the distance between the two facing surfaces. The change of this distance can induce a transition from one configuration to another; we observe that most transitions are subcritical, showing that the system is often trapped in states where the minimum of free energy is only local. The hysteretic transitions are responsible for the dissipation of elastic energy. The existence of more than one stable states for given boundaries conditions combined with the absence of thermalization means that the history of the system has to be taken into account and that there is no unique stress-strain relation. In the present system, because of its simplicity, a complete quantitative analysis of these general processes is obtained. The presented results may contribute to a better understanding of the dynamics of more complex systems such as foams or granular materials where similar processes are at work. PMID:15011058

  20. Acoustic trauma

    MedlinePlus

    Acoustic trauma is a common cause of sensory hearing loss . Damage to the hearing mechanisms within the inner ... Symptoms include: Partial hearing loss that most often involves ... The hearing loss may slowly get worse. Noises, ringing in ...

  1. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... slow growing tumor which arise primarily from the vestibular portion of the VIII cranial nerve and lie ... you have a "brain tumor" called acoustic neuroma (vestibular schwannoma). You think you are the only one ...

  2. Underwater Acoustics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creasey, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Summarizes the history of underwater acoustics and describes related research studies and teaching activities at the University of Birmingham (England). Also includes research studies on transducer design and mathematical techniques. (SK)

  3. Room Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  4. The electro-acoustic transition process of pulsed corona discharge in conductive water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yifan; Yan, Hui; Wang, Bingzhe; Zhang, Xuming; Liu, Zhen; Yan, Keping

    2014-06-01

    A pulsed corona discharge in conductive water is studied theoretically and experimentally via pre-discharge analysis, thermodynamic and dynamic processes of a plasma-containing bubble, an acoustic signature and energy partitioning. The total particle density and electron density inside the bubble, internal temperature and pressure, bubble radius and bubble wall Mach number are simulated by solving a set of equations including the ideal gas equation, Rayleigh equation and energy balance equation. The bubble radius is also measured by a high-speed charge-coupled device camera on a homemade experimental device. The acoustic waveforms and their power spectral density are calculated indirectly. By using several diagnostic tools, the electrical parameters of the load, light emission from the plasma and acoustic waveforms are recorded simultaneously. Simulation and experimental results of the bubble radius and acoustic signature agree reasonably well over the range of energy inputs from 5 to 30 J per pulse. Different kinds of terminations or intermediates of the energy transition process are analysed through simulation and experimental data. The electro-acoustic efficiency varies from 0.8% to 1.9%, while most of the discharge energy is consumed by circuit loss, Joule heating and thermal radiation, or is transformed into kinetic energy in the water.

  5. Modelling acoustic scattering, sound speed, and attenuation in gassy soft marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Mantouka, A; Dogan, H; White, P R; Leighton, T G

    2016-07-01

    A model for nonlinear gas bubble pulsation in marine sediments is presented. This model is then linearized to determine the resonance frequency and the damping terms for linear radial oscillations. The linear model is then used to predict the effects that such bubble pulsations will have on the sound speed and attenuation of acoustic waves propagating in gassy marine sediment. The results are compared for monodisperse populations against the predictions of a model of Anderson and Hampton and, furthermore, the additional abilities of the model introduced in this paper are discussed. These features include the removal of the sign ambiguities in the expressions, the straightforward implementation for acoustic propagation through polydisperse bubble populations, the capability to estimate bubble size distributions through a full acoustic inversion, and the capability to predict nonlinear effects. PMID:27475152

  6. The Acoustic Properties of Gassy Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Trevor Noel

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Compression wave sound speed and attenuation measurements are made in the laboratory over frequencies in the range from 10 kHz to 1 MHz on samples of estuarine silty clay that have been provided with varying amounts of uniformly distributed gas bubbles. The soil can be idealised as a two phase material of spherical gas pockets within a matrix of saturated soil, where the pocket sizes are in the range from 100 to 2000 μm diameter. It is shown that the acoustic response of this soil is dominated by the gas fraction and bubble size of the gas phase, and by the elastic moduli of the matrix phase, within the frequency range that causes bubbles to pulsate radially (resonate). Below this range, it is shown that the sound speed response is not significantly affected by bubble size, except close to the saturated soil condition. The gas fraction and bubble size distribution of each sample is measured and used, with values of the appropriate elastic moduli from the literature, to provide curves from current theory. The theory is evaluated in comparison to the experiment results, and proposals are made, which may provide the basis for the prediction of the gas fraction and bubble sizes of sea-bed sediments that are suspected of containing gas. Such a process would involve the use of an acoustic probe to obtain in situ sound speed and attenuation measurements using the signal analysis techniques developed in this study.

  7. A Micro-Opto-Mechanical Photoacoustic Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Kotovsky, J

    2008-10-17

    This report describes progress achieved in a one-year LDRD feasibility study of a Photo Acoustic Spectrometer (PAS). Specifically, this team sought to create an all-optical and very small PhotoAcoustic Spectrometer Sensing system (PASS system). The PASS system includes all the hardware needed within a gas environment to analyze the presence of a large variety of molecules. The all-optical PASS system requires only two optical-fibers to communicate with the opto-electronic power and readout systems that exist outside of the gas environment. These systems can be at any distance from the PASS system as signal loss through the optical fibers is very small. The PASS system is intended to be placed in a small space where gases need to be measured and thus must be very small. The size and all-optical constraints placed on the PASS system demand a new design. The PASS system design includes a novel acoustic chamber, optical sensor, power fiber coupling and sensing fiber coupling. Our collaborators at the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) have proven the capabilities of a complete photoacoustic spectrometer that uses a macro-scale PASS system (first 2 references). It was our goal to miniaturize the PASS system and turn it into an all-optical system to allow for its use in confined spaces that prohibit electrical devices. This goal demanded the study of all the system components, selection of an appropriate optical readout system and the design and integration of the optical sensor to the PASS system. A stretch goal was to fabricate a completed PASS system prototype.

  8. Acoustic Droplet Vaporization in Biology and Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, William G.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature regarding the use of acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) in clinical applications of imaging, embolic therapy, and therapeutic delivery. ADV is a physical process in which the pressure waves of ultrasound induce a phase transition that causes superheated liquid nanodroplets to form gas bubbles. The bubbles provide ultrasonic imaging contrast and other functions. ADV of perfluoropentane was used extensively in imaging for preclinical trials in the 1990s, but its use declined rapidly with the advent of other imaging agents. In the last decade, ADV was proposed and explored for embolic occlusion therapy, drug delivery, aberration correction, and high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) sensitization. Vessel occlusion via ADV has been explored in rodents and dogs and may be approaching clinical use. ADV for drug delivery is still in preclinical stages with initial applications to treat tumors in mice. Other techniques are still in preclinical studies but have potential for clinical use in specialty applications. Overall, ADV has a bright future in clinical application because the small size of nanodroplets greatly reduces the rate of clearance compared to larger contrast agent bubbles and yet provides the advantages of ultrasonographic contrast, acoustic cavitation, and nontoxicity of conventional perfluorocarbon contrast agent bubbles. PMID:24350267

  9. Quantitative assessment of reactive oxygen sonochemically generated by cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Jun; Miyashita, Takuya; Taguchi, Kei; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2015-07-01

    Acoustic cavitation bubbles can induce not only a thermal bioeffect but also a chemical bioeffect. When cavitation bubbles collapse and oscillate violently, they produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) that cause irreversible changes to the tissue. A sonosensitizer can promote such ROS generation. A treatment method using a sonosensitizer is called sonodynamic treatment. Rose bengal (RB) is one of the sonosensitizers whose in vivo and in vitro studies have been reported. In sonodynamic treatment, it is important to produce ROS at a high efficiency. For the efficient generation of ROS, a triggered high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) sequence has been proposed. In this study, cavitation bubbles were generated in a chamber where RB solution was sealed, and a high-speed camera captured the behavior of these cavitation bubbles. The amount of ROS was also quantified by a potassium iodide (KI) method and compared with high-speed camera pictures to investigate the effectiveness of the triggered HIFU sequence. As a result, ROS could be obtained efficiently by this sequence.

  10. A Study of Cavitation-Ignition Bubble Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet; Jacqmin, David A.

    2005-01-01

    We present the results of an experimental and computational study of the physics and chemistry of cavitation-ignition bubble combustion (CIBC), a process that occurs when combustible gaseous mixtures are ignited by the high temperatures found inside a rapidly collapsing bubble. The CIBC process was modeled using a time-dependent compressible fluid-dynamics code that includes finite-rate chemistry. The model predicts that gas-phase reactions within the bubble produce CO and other gaseous by-products of combustion. In addition, heat and mechanical energy release through a bubble volume-expansion phase are also predicted by the model. We experimentally demonstrate the CIBC process using an ultrasonically excited cavitation flow reactor with various hydrocarbon-air mixtures in liquid water. Low concentrations (< 160 ppm) of carbon monoxide (CO) emissions from the ultrasonic reactor were measured, and found to be proportional to the acoustic excitation power. The results of the model were consistent with the measured experimental results. Based on the experimental findings, the computational model, and previous reports of the "micro-diesel effect" in industrial hydraulic systems, we conclude that CIBC is indeed possible and exists in ultrasonically- and hydrodynamically-induced cavitation. Finally, estimates of the utility of CIBC process as a means of powering an idealized heat engine are also presented.

  11. The SAGE spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakarinen, J.; Papadakis, P.; Sorri, J.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Greenlees, P. T.; Butler, P. A.; Coleman-Smith, P. J.; Cox, D. M.; Cresswell, J. R.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Konki, J.; Lazarus, I. H.; Letts, S. C.; Mistry, A.; Page, R. D.; Parr, E.; Pucknell, V. F. E.; Rahkila, P.; Sampson, J.; Sandzelius, M.; Seddon, D. A.; Simpson, J.; Thornhill, J.; Wells, D.

    2014-03-01

    The SAGE spectrometer has been constructed for in-beam nuclear structure studies. SAGE combines a Ge-detector array and an electron spectrometer for detection of -rays and internal conversion electrons, respectively, and allows simultaneous observation of both electrons and -rays emitted from excited nuclei. SAGE is set up in the Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä and works in conjunction with the RITU gas-filled recoil separator and the GREAT focal-plane spectrometer allowing the use of the recoil-decay tagging method.

  12. Effects of tissue stiffness, ultrasound frequency, and pressure on histotripsy-induced cavitation bubble behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Lin, Kuang-Wei; Warnez, Matthew T.; Singh, Rahul; Mancia, Lauren; Putnam, Andrew J.; Johnsen, Eric; Cain, Charles; Xu, Zhen

    2015-03-01

    Histotripsy is an ultrasound ablation method that controls cavitation to fractionate soft tissue. In order to effectively fractionate tissue, histotripsy requires cavitation bubbles to rapidly expand from nanometer-sized initial nuclei into bubbles often larger than 50 µm. Using a negative pressure high enough to initiate a bubble cloud and expand bubbles to a sufficient size, histotripsy has been shown capable of completely fractionating soft tissue into acelluar debris resulting in effective tissue removal. Previous work has shown that the histotripsy process is affected by tissue mechanical properties with stiffer tissues showing increased resistance to histotripsy fractionation, which we hypothesize to be caused by impeded bubble expansion in stiffer tissues. In this study, the hypothesis that increases in tissue stiffness cause a reduction in bubble expansion was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. High speed optical imaging was used to capture a series of time delayed images of bubbles produced inside mechanically tunable agarose tissue phantoms using histotripsy pulses produced by 345 kHz, 500 kHz, 1.5 MHz, and 3 MHz histotripsy transducers. The results demonstrated a significant decrease in maximum bubble radius (Rmax) and collapse time (tc) with both increasing Young’s modulus and increasing frequency. Furthermore, results showed that Rmax was not increased by raising the pressure above the intrinsic threshold. Finally, this work demonstrated the potential of using a dual-frequency strategy to modulate the expansion of histotripsy bubbles. Overall, the results of this study improve our understanding of how tissue stiffness and ultrasound parameters affect histotripsy-induced bubble behavior and provide a rational basis to tailor acoustic parameters for treatment of the specific tissues of interest.

  13. Effects of Tissue Stiffness, Ultrasound Frequency, and Pressure on Histotripsy-induced Cavitation Bubble Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Lin, Kuang-Wei; Warnez, Matthew; Singh, Rahul; Mancia, Lauren; Putnam, Andrew J.; Johnsen, Eric; Cain, Charles; Xu, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Histotripsy is an ultrasound ablation method that controls cavitation to fractionate soft tissue. In order to effectively fractionate tissue, histotripsy requires cavitation bubbles to rapidly expand from nanometer-sized initial nuclei into bubbles often larger than 50 microns. Using a negative pressure high enough to initiate a bubble cloud and expand bubbles to a sufficient size, histotripsy has been shown capable of completely fractionating soft tissue into acelluar debris resulting in effective tissue removal. Previous work has shown that the histotripsy process is affected by tissue mechanical properties with stiffer tissues showing increased resistance to histotripsy fractionation, which we hypothesize to be caused by impeded bubble expansion in stiffer tissues. In this study, the hypothesis that increases in tissue stiffness causes a reduction in bubble expansion was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. High speed optical imaging was used to capture a series of time delayed images of bubbles produced inside mechanically tunable agarose tissue phantoms using histotripsy pulses produced by 345 kHz, 500 kHz, 1.5 MHz, and 3 MHz histotripsy transducers. The results demonstrated a significant decrease in maximum bubble radius (Rmax) and collapse time (tc) with both increasing Young’s modulus and increasing frequency. Furthermore, results showed that Rmax was not increased by raising the pressure above the intrinsic threshold. Finally, this work demonstrated the potential of using a dual-frequency strategy to modulate the expansion of histotripsy bubbles. Overall, the results of this study improve our understanding of how tissue stiffness and ultrasound parameters affect histotripsy-induced bubble behavior and provide a rational basis to tailor acoustic parameters for treatment of the specific tissues of interest. PMID:25715732

  14. The bubble legacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht, Jeff

    2010-05-01

    Imagine an optics company - let's call it JDS Uniphase - with a market capitalization approaching the gross domestic product (GDP) of Ireland. Now imagine it merging with a laser company - say, SDL - that has a stock valuation of 41bn, higher than the GDP of Costa Rica. Finally, imagine a start-up with 109m in venture capital in its pocket but no product to its name (Novalux) turning down an offer of 500m as insufficient. It may be hard to believe, but these tales are true: they occurred in the year 2000 - an era when the laser, fibre-optics and photonics industries were the darlings of the financial world. Such was the madcap nature of that brief period that survivors call it simply "the bubble".

  15. Linear Stability Analysis of an Acoustically Vaporized Droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Junaid; Qamar, Adnan; Samtaney, Ravi

    2015-11-01

    Acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) is a phase transition phenomena of a superheat liquid (Dodecafluoropentane, C5F12) droplet to a gaseous bubble, instigated by a high-intensity acoustic pulse. This approach was first studied in imaging applications, and applicable in several therapeutic areas such as gas embolotherapy, thrombus dissolution, and drug delivery. High-speed imaging and theoretical modeling of ADV has elucidated several physical aspects, ranging from bubble nucleation to its subsequent growth. Surface instabilities are known to exist and considered responsible for evolving bubble shapes (non-spherical growth, bubble splitting and bubble droplet encapsulation). We present a linear stability analysis of the dynamically evolving interfaces of an acoustically vaporized micro-droplet (liquid A) in an infinite pool of a second liquid (liquid B). We propose a thermal ADV model for the base state. The linear analysis utilizes spherical harmonics (Ynm, of degree m and order n) and under various physical assumptions results in a time-dependent ODE of the perturbed interface amplitudes (one at the vapor/liquid A interface and the other at the liquid A/liquid B interface). The perturbation amplitudes are found to grow exponentially and do not depend on m. Supported by KAUST Baseline Research Funds.

  16. High-speed observation of bubble cloud generation near a rigid wall by second-harmonic superimposed ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Shin; Yasuda, Jun; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2013-08-01

    Cavitation bubbles are known to accelerate therapeutic effects of ultrasound. Although negative acoustic pressure is the principle factor of cavitation, positive acoustic pressure has a role for bubble cloud formation at a high intensity of focused ultrasound when cavitation bubbles provide pressure release surfaces converting the pressure from highly positive to negative. In this study, the second-harmonic was superimposed onto the fundamental acoustic pressure to emphasize either peak positive or negative pressure. The peak negative and positive pressure emphasized waves were focused on a surface of an aluminum block. Cavitation bubbles induced near the block were observed with a high-speed camera by backlight and the size of the cavitation generation region was measured from the high-speed images. The negative pressure emphasized waves showed an advantage in cavitation inception over the positive pressure emphasized waves. In the sequence of the negative pressure emphasized waves immediately followed by the positive pressure emphasized waves, cavitation bubbles were generated on the block by the former waves and the cavitation region were expanded toward the transducer in the latter waves with high reproducibility. The sequence demonstrated its potential usefulness in enhancing the effects of therapeutic ultrasound at a high acoustic intensity.

  17. Constrained Vapor Bubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J.; Karthikeyan, M.; Plawsky, J.; Wayner, P. C., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The nonisothermal Constrained Vapor Bubble, CVB, is being studied to enhance the understanding of passive systems controlled by interfacial phenomena. The study is multifaceted: 1) it is a basic scientific study in interfacial phenomena, fluid physics and thermodynamics; 2) it is a basic study in thermal transport; and 3) it is a study of a heat exchanger. The research is synergistic in that CVB research requires a microgravity environment and the space program needs thermal control systems like the CVB. Ground based studies are being done as a precursor to flight experiment. The results demonstrate that experimental techniques for the direct measurement of the fundamental operating parameters (temperature, pressure, and interfacial curvature fields) have been developed. Fluid flow and change-of-phase heat transfer are a function of the temperature field and the vapor bubble shape, which can be measured using an Image Analyzing Interferometer. The CVB for a microgravity environment, has various thin film regions that are of both basic and applied interest. Generically, a CVB is formed by underfilling an evacuated enclosure with a liquid. Classification depends on shape and Bond number. The specific CVB discussed herein was formed in a fused silica cell with inside dimensions of 3x3x40 mm and, therefore, can be viewed as a large version of a micro heat pipe. Since the dimensions are relatively large for a passive system, most of the liquid flow occurs under a small capillary pressure difference. Therefore, we can classify the discussed system as a low capillary pressure system. The studies discussed herein were done in a 1-g environment (Bond Number = 3.6) to obtain experience to design a microgravity experiment for a future NASA flight where low capillary pressure systems should prove more useful. The flight experiment is tentatively scheduled for the year 2000. The SCR was passed on September 16, 1997. The RDR is tentatively scheduled for October, 1998.

  18. Doughnut-shaped soap bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Préve, Deison; Saa, Alberto

    2015-10-01

    Soap bubbles are thin liquid films enclosing a fixed volume of air. Since the surface tension is typically assumed to be the only factor responsible for conforming the soap bubble shape, the realized bubble surfaces are always minimal area ones. Here, we consider the problem of finding the axisymmetric minimal area surface enclosing a fixed volume V and with a fixed equatorial perimeter L . It is well known that the sphere is the solution for V =L3/6 π2 , and this is indeed the case of a free soap bubble, for instance. Surprisingly, we show that for V <α L3/6 π2 , with α ≈0.21 , such a surface cannot be the usual lens-shaped surface formed by the juxtaposition of two spherical caps, but is rather a toroidal surface. Practically, a doughnut-shaped bubble is known to be ultimately unstable and, hence, it will eventually lose its axisymmetry by breaking apart in smaller bubbles. Indisputably, however, the topological transition from spherical to toroidal surfaces is mandatory here for obtaining the global solution for this axisymmetric isoperimetric problem. Our result suggests that deformed bubbles with V <α L3/6 π2 cannot be stable and should not exist in foams, for instance.

  19. Doughnut-shaped soap bubbles.

    PubMed

    Préve, Deison; Saa, Alberto

    2015-10-01

    Soap bubbles are thin liquid films enclosing a fixed volume of air. Since the surface tension is typically assumed to be the only factor responsible for conforming the soap bubble shape, the realized bubble surfaces are always minimal area ones. Here, we consider the problem of finding the axisymmetric minimal area surface enclosing a fixed volume V and with a fixed equatorial perimeter L. It is well known that the sphere is the solution for V=L(3)/6π(2), and this is indeed the case of a free soap bubble, for instance. Surprisingly, we show that for V<αL(3)/6π(2), with α≈0.21, such a surface cannot be the usual lens-shaped surface formed by the juxtaposition of two spherical caps, but is rather a toroidal surface. Practically, a doughnut-shaped bubble is known to be ultimately unstable and, hence, it will eventually lose its axisymmetry by breaking apart in smaller bubbles. Indisputably, however, the topological transition from spherical to toroidal surfaces is mandatory here for obtaining the global solution for this axisymmetric isoperimetric problem. Our result suggests that deformed bubbles with V<αL(3)/6π(2) cannot be stable and should not exist in foams, for instance. PMID:26565252

  20. Fuel system bubble dissipation device

    SciTech Connect

    Iseman, W.J.

    1987-11-03

    This patent describes a bubble dissipation device for a fuel system wherein fuel is delivered through a fuel line from a fuel tank to a fuel control with the pressure of the fuel being progressively increased by components including at least one pump stage and an ejector in advance of the pump state. The ejector an ejector casing with a wall defining an elongate tubular flow passage which forms a portion of the fuel line to have all of the fuel flow through the tubular flow passage in flowing from the fuel tank to the fuel control, a nozzle positioned entirely within the tubular flow passage and spaced from the wall to permit fuel flow. The nozzle has an inlet and an outlet with the inlet connected to the pump stage to receive fuel under pressure continuously from the pump stage, a bubble accumulation chamber adjoining and at a level above the ejector casing and operatively connected to the fuel line in advance of the ejector casing. The bubble accumulation chamber is of a size to function as a fuel reservoir and hold an air bubble containing vapor above the level of fuel therein and having an outlet adjacent the bottom thereof operatively connected to the tubular flow passage in the ejector casing at an inlet end, a bubble accumulation chamber inlet above the level of the bubble accumulation chamber outlet whereby fuel can flow through the bubble accumulation chamber from the inlet to the outlet thereof with a bubble in the fuel rising above the fuel level in the bubble accumulation chamber.

  1. Studying bubble-induced methane emissions from the East Siberian Arctic Shelf: the next step towards a quantitative assessment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernykh, D.; Shakhova, N. E.; Semiletov, I. P.; Yusupov, V.; Salomatin, A.; Leifer, I.

    2015-12-01

    Destabilization of subsea permafrost results in increasing permeability for gaseous methane long preserved in seabed deposits within and beneath permafrost. This process manifests as extensive methane ebullition, driving significantly elevated methane aqueous concentrations - up to three orders higher than atmospheric equilibrium. In places, bubbles release as a vigorous flow that often reach the surface; on echograms, such bubble plums create specific flare-like images. To detect, map, monitor, and analyze bubble-induced methane fluxes, in summer 2011 and 2012, sonar data were gathered over extensive seep fields in the East Siberian Arctic Shelf (ESAS) in frame of International Siberian Shelf Study (ISSS). To measure the bubble screen backscattering strength, the acoustic sensors were calibrated using a target ("ideal" sphere) provided by the manufacturer (SIMRAD). To establish a relationship between the backscattering strength of bubbles releasing from the seafloor and methane flux rate, an in-situ calibration using engineered seeps was performed. To apportion fraction of bubbles reaching the sea surface and assess remaining gaseous content of bubbles, in winter 2011-2013, direct in-situ observations of bubbles, ascending from the seafloor, were performed using high-speed high-resolution video camera. Results of inter-calibration between engineered quantitative in-situ calibrations and qualitative calibration recommended by manufacturer were applied to evaluate bubble-induced methane fluxes observed in the ESAS in summer 2011 and 2012.

  2. Ultrasonic scattering cross sections of shell-encapsulated gas bubbles immersed in a viscoelastic liquid: first and second harmonics.

    PubMed

    Machado, João Carlos; Valente, Jefferson Silva

    2003-11-01

    The oscillations of gas bubbles, without shell, immersed in viscoelastic liquids and driven by an acoustic wave have been the subject of several investigations. They demonstrate that the viscosity coefficient and the spring constant of the liquid have significant influence on the scattering cross section of the gas bubble. For shell-encapsulated gas bubbles, the investigations have been concentrated to bubbles immersed in a pure viscous liquid. This present work computes the ultrasonic scattering cross section, first and second harmonics, of shell-encapsulated gas bubbles immersed in a viscoelastic liquid. The theoretical model of the bubble oscillation is based on the generalized Rayleigh-Plesset equation of motion of a spherical cavity immersed in a viscoelastic liquid represented by a three-parameter linear Oldroyd model. The scattering cross section is computed for Albunex type of bubble (shell thickness=15 nm, shell shear viscosity=1.77 Pas, shell modulus of rigidity=88.8 MPa) irradiated by a 3.5 MHz ultrasonic pressure wave with an amplitude of 30 kPa. The results demonstrate that encapsulated bubbles respond independently of the surrounding liquid being pure viscous or viscoelastic as long as the surrounding liquid shear viscosity is as low as 10(-3) Pas. Nevertheless, for higher shear viscosities, the bubble responds differently if the surrounding liquid is pure viscous or viscoelastic. In general, the scattering cross sections of first and second harmonics are larger for the viscoelastic liquid.

  3. Initial growth of sonochemically active and sonoluminescence bubbles at various frequencies.

    PubMed

    Babgi, Bandar; Zhou, Meifang; Aksu, Mecit; Alghamdi, Yousef; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2016-03-01

    The initial growth of acoustic cavitation activity is important in some applications such as therapeutic and diagnostic medicine. The initial growth of cavitation activity has been investigated using sonoluminescence and sonochemical activity (sonochemiluminescence) at 358 kHz, 647 kHz and 1062 kHz and at 5 W, 15 W and 30 W applied power levels. The growth of sonochemically active bubble population is found to be much faster than that of sonoluminescence bubble population at 358 kHz and 647 kHz whereas almost similar growth rate is observed at 1062 kHz for both bubble populations. This suggests that the cavitation bubble resonance size ranges of sonoluminescence and sonochemically active bubbles are different at 358 kHz and 647 kHz, whereas they have similar size range at 1062 kHz. At 358 kHz and 647 kHz, relatively smaller bubbles become chemically active. Possible reasons for such observations have been discussed. The data presented and discussed in this study may be useful in controlling the growth of cavitation bubble population in addition to enhancing the knowledge base in cavitation science. PMID:26584984

  4. Modeling methane bubble growth in fine-grained muddy aquatic sediments: correlation with sediment properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsman, Regina

    2015-04-01

    Gassy sediments contribute to destabilization of aquatic infrastructure, air pollution, and global warming. In the current study a precise shape and size of the buoyant mature methane bubble in fine-grained muddy aquatic sediment is defined by numerical and analytical modeling, their results are in a good agreement. A closed-form analytical solution defining the bubble parameters is developed. It is found that the buoyant mature bubble is elliptical in its front view and resembles an inverted tear drop in its cross-section. The size and shape of the mature bubble strongly correlate with sediment fracture toughness. Bubbles formed in the weaker sediments are smaller and characterized by a larger surface-to volume ratio that induces their faster growth and may lead to their faster dissolution below the sediment-water interface. This may prevent their release to the water column and to the atmosphere. Shapes of the bubbles in the weaker sediments deviate further from the spherical configuration, than those in the stronger sediments. Modeled bubble characteristics, important for the acoustic applications, are in a good agreement with field observations and lab experiments.

  5. Measuring and modeling the bubble population produced by an underwater explosion.

    PubMed

    Holt, Fred D; Lee Culver, R

    2011-11-01

    Underwater explosions have been studied intensively in the United States since 1941 [e.g., R. H. Cole, Underwater Explosions (Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ, 1945), pp. 3-13]. Research to date has primarily focused on the initial shock and subsequent pressure waves caused by the oscillations of the "gas-globe" resulting from charge detonation. These phenomena have relatively short timescales (typically less than 2 s). However, after the gas-globe rises through the water column and breaks the surface, there remains behind a cloud of bubbles and perhaps debris from the explosion container which has been markedly less studied. A recent experiment measured the spatial and temporal acoustic response of the bubble cloud resulting from a 13.6 kg PBXN-111 charge detonated at 15.2 m (50 ft) depth. A directional projector was used to propagate linear frequency-modulated (5-65 kHz) and 40 kHz tonal pulses through the bubble cloud. Two hydrophone arrays were positioned so as to measure the energy lost in propagating through the bubble cloud. Three methods have been utilized to invert measurements and estimate the bubble population. The bubble population estimates have been used to develop a model for the bubble population resulting from an underwater explosion.

  6. Experimental study of the liquid flow near a single sonoluminescent bubble

    PubMed

    Verraes; Lepoint-Mullie; Lepoint; Longuet-Higgins

    2000-07-01

    Tracers (sulphur particles produced in situ by a bubble itself, fuchsin spots and dust) were used to probe the liquid flows in the neighborhood of single sonoluminescent bubbles maintained in levitation in a resonant acoustic setup. The flows caused by the bubble were distinguished clearly from the streamings (mean Lagrangian velocity: approximately 20 microm/s) associated with resonant cells in the absence of a bubble. The liquid flow due to the presence of the bubble formed around it over a few mm. The radial component of the Lagrangian velocities (maximum value measured: approximately 260 microm/s) of this flow evolved as r(-1) , with r as the distance from the bubble, while the tangential component remained approximately constant (approximately 20 microm/s). In the Appendix by M. S. Longuet-Higgins, a simplified model of microstreaming involving a spherical bubble in translational and radial oscillation gives a qualitative description of the experiments. A fairly good agreement was observed between the experiments and the modeling, which involved a dipole flow enclosed in a Stokeslet. PMID:10923877

  7. Bubble Growth in Lunar Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.

    2009-05-01

    Although Moon is usually said to be volatile-"free", lunar basalts are often vesicular with mm-size bubbles. The vesicular nature of the lunar basalts suggests that they contained some initial gas concentration. A recent publication estimated volatile concentrations in lunar basalts (Saal et al. 2008). This report investigates bubble growth on Moon and compares with that on Earth. Under conditions relevant to lunar basalts, bubble growth in a finite melt shell (i.e., growth of multiple regularly-spaced bubbles) is calculated following Proussevitch and Sahagian (1998) and Liu and Zhang (2000). Initial H2O content of 700 ppm (Saal et al. 2008) or lower is used and the effect of other volatiles (such as carbon dioxide, halogens, and sulfur) is ignored. H2O solubility at low pressures (Liu et al. 2005), concentration-dependent diffusivity in basalt (Zhang and Stolper 1991), and lunar basalt viscosity (Murase and McBirney 1970) are used. Because lunar atmospheric pressure is essentially zero, the confining pressure on bubbles is completely supplied by the overlying magma. Due to low H2O content in lunar basaltic melt (700 ppm H2O corresponds to a saturation pressure of 75 kPa), H2O bubbles only grow in the upper 16 m of a basalt flow or lake. A depth of 20 mm corresponds to a confining pressure of 100 Pa. Hence, vesicular lunar rocks come from very shallow depth. Some findings from the modeling are as follows. (a) Due to low confining pressure as well as low viscosity, even though volatile concentration is very low, bubble growth rate is extremely high, much higher than typical bubble growth rates in terrestrial melts. Hence, mm-size bubbles in lunar basalts are not strange. (b) Because the pertinent pressures are so low, bubble pressure due to surface tension plays a main role in lunar bubble growth, contrary to terrestrial cases. (c) Time scale to reach equilibrium bubble size increases as the confining pressure increases. References: (1) Liu Y, Zhang YX (2000) Earth

  8. Partial coalescence of soap bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Daniel M.; Pucci, Giuseppe; Bush, John W. M.

    2015-11-01

    We present the results of an experimental investigation of the merger of a soap bubble with a planar soap film. When gently deposited onto a horizontal film, a bubble may interact with the underlying film in such a way as to decrease in size, leaving behind a smaller daughter bubble with approximately half the radius of its progenitor. The process repeats up to three times, with each partial coalescence event occurring over a time scale comparable to the inertial-capillary time. Our results are compared to the recent numerical simulations of Martin and Blanchette and to the coalescence cascade of droplets on a fluid bath.

  9. The oscillations of vapor bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosperetti, Andrea; Yin, Z.; Yang, B.

    2003-04-01

    Bob Apfel had so many interests that it is impossible-however fitting and desirable-to pay homage to his work as a whole. Some of his early studies were devoted to bubble nucleation at high superheats. In the first part of this paper a recent application of this phenomenon is described. Once a vapor bubble is generated, its subsequent oscillations (free and forced) present analogies and differences with those of a gas bubble: the second part of the paper focuses on this topic. [Work supported by NSF and NASA.

  10. The oscillation of vapor bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosperetti, Andrea; Yin, Zhizhong

    2001-05-01

    Bob Apfel had so many interests that it is impossible-however fitting and desirable-to pay homage to his work as a whole. Some of his early studies were devoted to bubble nucleation at high superheats. In the first part of this paper a recent application of this phenomenon is described. Once a vapor bubble is generated, its subsequent oscillations (free and forced) present analogies and differences with those of a gas bubble: the second part of the paper focuses on this topic. [Work supported by NSF and NASA.

  11. Imaging Fourier transform spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C.L.

    1993-09-13

    This invention is comprised of an imaging Fourier transform spectrometer having a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer providing a series of images to a focal plane array camera. The focal plane array camera is clocked to a multiple of zero crossing occurrences as caused by a moving mirror of the Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and as detected by a laser detector such that the frame capture rate of the focal plane array camera corresponds to a multiple of the zero crossing rate of the Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The images are transmitted to a computer for processing such that representations of the images as viewed in the light of an arbitrary spectral ``fingerprint`` pattern can be displayed on a monitor or otherwise stored and manipulated by the computer.

  12. Composite Spectrometer Prisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckinridge, J. B.; Page, N. A.; Rodgers, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    Efficient linear dispersive element for spectrometer instruments achieved using several different glasses in multiple-element prism. Good results obtained in both two-and three-element prisms using variety of different glass materials.

  13. AUTOMATIC MASS SPECTROMETER

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, M.L.; Tabor, C.D. Jr.

    1961-12-01

    A mass spectrometer for analyzing the components of a gas is designed which is capable of continuous automatic operation such as analysis of samples of process gas from a continuous production system where the gas content may be changing. (AEC)

  14. A Simple Raman Spectrometer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blond, J. P.; Boggett, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses some basic physical ideas about light scattering and describes a simple Raman spectrometer, a single prism monochromator and a multiplier detector. This discussion is intended for British undergraduate physics students. (HM)

  15. Fourier Transform Spectrometer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel F. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) data acquisition system includes an FTS spectrometer that receives a spectral signal and a laser signal. The system further includes a wideband detector, which is in communication with the FTS spectrometer and receives the spectral signal and laser signal from the FTS spectrometer. The wideband detector produces a composite signal comprising the laser signal and the spectral signal. The system further comprises a converter in communication with the wideband detector to receive and digitize the composite signal. The system further includes a signal processing unit that receives the composite signal from the converter. The signal processing unit further filters the laser signal and the spectral signal from the composite signal and demodulates the laser signal, to produce velocity corrected spectral data.

  16. Acoustic biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Ronen; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  17. Acoustic biosensors.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  18. Terminating marine methane bubbles by superhydrophobic sponges.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao; Wu, Yuchen; Su, Bin; Wang, Jingming; Song, Yanlin; Jiang, Lei

    2012-11-14

    Marine methane bubbles are absorbed, steadily stored, and continuously transported based on the employment of superhydrophobic sponges. Antiwetting sponges are water-repellent in the atmosphere and absorb gas bubbles under water. Their capacity to store methane bubbles increases with enhanced submerged depth. Significantly, trapped methane bubbles can be continuously transported driven by differential pressure.

  19. Bubble stimulation efficiency of dinoflagellate bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Deane, Grant B; Stokes, M Dale; Latz, Michael I

    2016-02-01

    Dinoflagellate bioluminescence, a common source of bioluminescence in coastal waters, is stimulated by flow agitation. Although bubbles are anecdotally known to be stimulatory, the process has never been experimentally investigated. This study quantified the flash response of the bioluminescent dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum to stimulation by bubbles rising through still seawater. Cells were stimulated by isolated bubbles of 0.3-3 mm radii rising at their terminal velocity, and also by bubble clouds containing bubbles of 0.06-10 mm radii for different air flow rates. Stimulation efficiency, the proportion of cells producing a flash within the volume of water swept out by a rising bubble, decreased with decreasing bubble radius for radii less than approximately 1 mm. Bubbles smaller than a critical radius in the range 0.275-0.325 mm did not stimulate a flash response. The fraction of cells stimulated by bubble clouds was proportional to the volume of air in the bubble cloud, with lower stimulation levels observed for clouds with smaller bubbles. An empirical model for bubble cloud stimulation based on the isolated bubble observations successfully reproduced the observed stimulation by bubble clouds for low air flow rates. High air flow rates stimulated more light emission than expected, presumably because of additional fluid shear stress associated with collective buoyancy effects generated by the high air fraction bubble cloud. These results are relevant to bioluminescence stimulation by bubbles in two-phase flows, such as in ship wakes, breaking waves, and sparged bioreactors.

  20. Interfacial wave dynamics of a drop with an embedded bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, S.

    2016-02-01

    This article describes how an embedded bubble changes the surface wave of a suspended liquid drop, and how such modifications, if recorded experimentally, can be used to detect voids in typically opaque interior of the fluid. The analysis uses a matrix formalism to predict the frequencies for natural oscillation and the deformation for acoustically induced forced vibration. The theory shows that the embedded cavity causes major shifts in the frequency and amplitude values as well as twofold increase in number of natural modes, indicating multifacetted utility of the results in process diagnostics, material characterizations, and combustion technology.

  1. How does a bubble chamber work?

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinov, D.; Homsi, W.; Luzuriaga, J.; Su, C.K.; Weilert, M.A.; Maris, H.J.

    1998-11-01

    A charged particle passing through a bubble chamber produces a track of bubbles. The way in which these bubbles are produced has been a matter of some controversy. The authors consider the possibility that in helium and hydrogen bubble chambers the production of bubbles is primarily a mechanical process, rather than a thermal process as has often been assumed. The model the authors propose gives results which are in excellent agreement with experiment.

  2. Smashing Bubbles and Vanishing Sugar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Alan

    1979-01-01

    Science activities with soap bubbles for primary school children are described in this article. Another activity involves children in determining the whereabouts of sugar as it dissolves in water. (SA)

  3. Microstreaming from Sessile Semicylindrical Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilgenfeldt, Sascha; Rallabandi, Bhargav; Guo, Lin; Wang, Cheng

    2014-03-01

    Powerful steady streaming flows result from the ultrasonic driving of microbubbles, in particular when these bubbles have semicylindrical cross section and are positioned in contact with a microfluidic channel wall. We have used this streaming in experiment to develop novel methods for trapping and sorting of microparticles by size, as well as for micromixing. Theoretically, we arrive at an analytical description of the streaming flow field through an asymptotic computation that, for the first time, reconciles the boundary layers around the bubble and along the substrate wall, and also takes into account the oscillation modes of the bubble. This approach gives insight into changes in the streaming pattern with bubble size and driving frequency, including a reversal of the flow direction at high frequencies with potentially useful applications. Present address: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Missouri S &T.

  4. Partial coalescence of soap bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucci, G.; Harris, D. M.; Bush, J. W. M.

    2015-06-01

    We present the results of an experimental investigation of the merger of a soap bubble with a planar soap film. When gently deposited onto a horizontal film, a bubble may interact with the underlying film in such a way as to decrease in size, leaving behind a smaller daughter bubble with approximately half the radius of its progenitor. The process repeats up to three times, with each partial coalescence event occurring over a time scale comparable to the inertial-capillary time. Our results are compared to the recent numerical simulations of Martin and Blanchette ["Simulations of surfactant effects on the dynamics of coalescing drops and bubbles," Phys. Fluids 27, 012103 (2015)] and to the coalescence cascade of droplets on a fluid bath.

  5. Magnetism. Blowing magnetic skyrmion bubbles.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wanjun; Upadhyaya, Pramey; Zhang, Wei; Yu, Guoqiang; Jungfleisch, M Benjamin; Fradin, Frank Y; Pearson, John E; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; Wang, Kang L; Heinonen, Olle; te Velthuis, Suzanne G E; Hoffmann, Axel

    2015-07-17

    The formation of soap bubbles from thin films is accompanied by topological transitions. Here we show how a magnetic topological structure, a skyrmion bubble, can be generated in a solid-state system in a similar manner. Using an inhomogeneous in-plane current in a system with broken inversion symmetry, we experimentally "blow" magnetic skyrmion bubbles from a geometrical constriction. The presence of a spatially divergent spin-orbit torque gives rise to instabilities of the magnetic domain structures that are reminiscent of Rayleigh-Plateau instabilities in fluid flows. We determine a phase diagram for skyrmion formation and reveal the efficient manipulation of these dynamically created skyrmions, including depinning and motion. The demonstrated current-driven transformation from stripe domains to magnetic skyrmion bubbles could lead to progress in skyrmion-based spintronics. PMID:26067256

  6. Bubble nucleation in stout beers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. T.; McKechnie, J. S.; Devereux, M. G.

    2011-05-01

    Bubble nucleation in weakly supersaturated solutions of carbon dioxide—such as champagne, sparkling wines, and carbonated beers—is well understood. Bubbles grow and detach from nucleation sites: gas pockets trapped within hollow cellulose fibers. This mechanism appears not to be active in stout beers that are supersaturated solutions of nitrogen and carbon dioxide. In their canned forms these beers require additional technology (widgets) to release the bubbles which will form the head of the beer. We extend the mathematical model of bubble nucleation in carbonated liquids to the case of two gases and show that this nucleation mechanism is active in stout beers, though substantially slower than in carbonated beers and confirm this by observation. A rough calculation suggests that despite the slowness of the process, applying a coating of hollow porous fibers to the inside of a can or bottle could be a potential replacement for widgets.

  7. Magnetism. Blowing magnetic skyrmion bubbles.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wanjun; Upadhyaya, Pramey; Zhang, Wei; Yu, Guoqiang; Jungfleisch, M Benjamin; Fradin, Frank Y; Pearson, John E; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; Wang, Kang L; Heinonen, Olle; te Velthuis, Suzanne G E; Hoffmann, Axel

    2015-07-17

    The formation of soap bubbles from thin films is accompanied by topological transitions. Here we show how a magnetic topological structure, a skyrmion bubble, can be generated in a solid-state system in a similar manner. Using an inhomogeneous in-plane current in a system with broken inversion symmetry, we experimentally "blow" magnetic skyrmion bubbles from a geometrical constriction. The presence of a spatially divergent spin-orbit torque gives rise to instabilities of the magnetic domain structures that are reminiscent of Rayleigh-Plateau instabilities in fluid flows. We determine a phase diagram for skyrmion formation and reveal the efficient manipulation of these dynamically created skyrmions, including depinning and motion. The demonstrated current-driven transformation from stripe domains to magnetic skyrmion bubbles could lead to progress in skyrmion-based spintronics.

  8. Application of the BINS superheated drop detector spectrometer to the {sup 9}Be(p,xn) neutron energy spectrum determination

    SciTech Connect

    Di Fulvio, A.; Ciolini, R.; Mirzajani, N.; Romei, C.; D'Errico, F.; Bedogni, R.; Esposito, J.; Zafiropoulos, D.; Colautti, P.

    2013-07-18

    In the framework of TRASCO-BNCT project, a Bubble Interactive Neutron Spectrometer (BINS) device was applied to the characterization of the angle-and energy-differential neutron spectra generated by the {sup 9}Be(p,xn)reaction. The BINS spectrometer uses two superheated emulsion detectors, sequentially operated at different temperatures and thus provides a series of six sharp threshold responses, covering the 0.1-10 MeV neutron energy range. Spectrum unfolding of the data was performed by means of MAXED code. The obtained angle, energy-differential spectra were compared with those measured with a Bonner sphere spectrometer, a silicon telescope spectrometer and literature data.

  9. Application of the BINS superheated drop detector spectrometer to the 9Be(p,xn) neutron energy spectrum determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Fulvio, A.; Ciolini, R.; Mirzajani, N.; Romei, C.; d'Errico, F.; Bedogni, R.; Esposito, J.; Zafiropoulos, D.; Colautti, P.

    2013-07-01

    In the framework of TRASCO-BNCT project, a Bubble Interactive Neutron Spectrometer (BINS) device was applied to the characterization of the angle-and energy-differential neutron spectra generated by the 9Be(p,xn)reaction. The BINS spectrometer uses two superheated emulsion detectors, sequentially operated at different temperatures and thus provides a series of six sharp threshold responses, covering the 0.1-10 MeV neutron energy range. Spectrum unfolding of the data was performed by means of MAXED code. The obtained angle, energy-differential spectra were compared with those measured with a Bonner sphere spectrometer, a silicon telescope spectrometer and literature data.

  10. Comprehensive experimental and numerical investigations of the effect of frequency and acoustic intensity on the sonolytic degradation of naphthol blue black in water.

    PubMed

    Ferkous, Hamza; Merouani, Slimane; Hamdaoui, Oualid; Rezgui, Yacine; Guemini, Miloud

    2015-09-01

    In the present work, comprehensive experimental and numerical investigations of the effects of frequency and acoustic intensity on the sonochemical degradation of naphthol blue black (NBB) in water have been carried out. The experiments have been examined at three frequencies (585, 860 and 1140 kHz) and over a wide range of acoustic intensities. The observed experimental results have been discussed using a more realistic approach that combines the single bubble sonochemistry and the number of active bubbles. The single bubble yield has been predicted using a model that combines the bubble dynamics with chemical kinetics consisting of series of chemical reactions (73 reversible reactions) occurring inside an air bubble during the strong collapse. The experimental results showed that the sonochemical degradation rate of NBB increased substantially with increasing acoustic intensity and decreased with increasing ultrasound frequency. The numerical simulations revealed that NBB degraded mainly through the reaction with hydroxyl radical (OH), which is the dominant oxidant detected in the bubble during collapse. The production rate of OH radical inside a single bubble followed the same trend as that of NBB degradation rate. It increased with increasing acoustic intensity and decreased with increasing frequency. The enhancing effect of acoustic intensity toward the degradation of NBB was attributed to the rise of both the individual chemical bubble yield and the number of active bubbles with increasing acoustic intensity. The reducing effect of frequency was attributed to the sharp decrease in the chemical bubble yield with increasing frequency, which would not compensated by the rise of the number of active bubbles with the increase in ultrasound frequency. PMID:25753313

  11. Bubble gum simulating abdominal calcifications.

    PubMed

    Geller, E; Smergel, E M

    1992-01-01

    CT examination of the abdomens of two children demonstrated sites of high attenuation in the stomach, which were revealed to be bubble gum. Investigation of the CT appearance of samples of chewing gum showed that it consistently has high attenuation (178-345 HU). The attenuation of gum base, which contains calcium carbonate, was 476 HU. In addition, examination of a volunteer who had swallowed bubble gum confirmed the CT appearance. PMID:1523059

  12. Ultrasonic emissions reveal individual cavitation bubbles in water-stressed wood.

    PubMed

    Ponomarenko, A; Vincent, O; Pietriga, A; Cochard, H; Badel, É; Marmottant, P

    2014-10-01

    Under drought conditions, the xylem of trees that conducts ascending sap produces ultrasonic emissions whose exact origin is not clear. We introduce a new method to record simultaneously both acoustic events and optical observation of the xylem conduits within slices of wood that were embedded in a transparent material setting a hydric stress. In this article, we resolved the rapid development of all cavitation bubbles and demonstrated that each ultrasound emission was linked to the nucleation of one single bubble, whose acoustic energy is an increasing function of the size of the conduit where nucleation occurred and also of the hydric stress. We modelled these observations by the fact that water columns in conduits store elastic energy and release it into acoustic waves when they are broken by cavitation bubbles. Water columns are thus elastic, and not rigid, 'wires of water' set under tension by hydric stresses. Cavitation bubbles are at the origin of an embolism, whose development was followed in our experiments. Such an embolism of sap circulation can result in a fatal condition for living trees. These findings provide new insights for the non-destructive monitoring of embolisms within trees, and suggest a new approach to study porous media under hydric stress.

  13. Ultrasonic emissions reveal individual cavitation bubbles in water-stressed wood

    PubMed Central

    Ponomarenko, A.; Vincent, O.; Pietriga, A.; Cochard, H.; Badel, É.; Marmottant, P.

    2014-01-01

    Under drought conditions, the xylem of trees that conducts ascending sap produces ultrasonic emissions whose exact origin is not clear. We introduce a new method to record simultaneously both acoustic events and optical observation of the xylem conduits within slices of wood that were embedded in a transparent material setting a hydric stress. In this article, we resolved the rapid development of all cavitation bubbles and demonstrated that each ultrasound emission was linked to the nucleation of one single bubble, whose acoustic energy is an increasing function of the size of the conduit where nucleation occurred and also of the hydric stress. We modelled these observations by the fact that water columns in conduits store elastic energy and release it into acoustic waves when they are broken by cavitation bubbles. Water columns are thus elastic, and not rigid, ‘wires of water’ set under tension by hydric stresses. Cavitation bubbles are at the origin of an embolism, whose development was followed in our experiments. Such an embolism of sap circulation can result in a fatal condition for living trees. These findings provide new insights for the non-destructive monitoring of embolisms within trees, and suggest a new approach to study porous media under hydric stress. PMID:25056212

  14. A theoretical investigation of the dynamics of single bubble sonoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Song-Hyo

    Single bubble Sonoluminescence (SBSL) is a phenomenon involving light emission during the implosion of an oscillating gas bubble immersed in liquid. A new one dimensional HYDRO code (HYDRO-RPI) was developed for the analytical study of sonoluminescence phenomenon, including simulations of the shock waves, local gas temperatures and the spectrum of the light emissions. The accuracy of HYDRO-RPI has been verified against known exact solutions. Comparisons with other numerical methods (i.e., the original artificial viscosity method of von Neumann & Richmyer, Noh's shock following method, and the piecewise-parabolic method of Colella & Woodward) have also demonstrated the advantages of HYDRO-RPI. Using a photon transport model which was introduced into HYDRO- RPI, we obtained results for sonoluminescence (SL) radiation, and the duration of the light emission, which showed good agreement with experimental data [Hiller et al., 1992; Gompf et al., 1997]. The dependence of SL radiation on the acoustic incident pressure and equilibrium bubble size was discussed. We found that an order of magnitude change in SL radiation can occur without appreciable change in the maximum and bulk gas temperature inside the bubble. This is consistent with recent SL experiments performed by Delgadino [1999]. In order to economically investigate the various phenomena involved in SBSL, except those related to the high Mach number regime in the final pico-seconds of a collapsing bubble, a simplified hydrodynamic model (RNLB) based on a modified Rayleigh equation, was also developed and compared with the results of HYDRO-RPI to check for self-consistency. In addition, a method of excitation to achieve much higher gas temperatures, and a stability boundary for SBSL, were discussed. The validity of the numerical results for the stability boundary were assessed against experimental data.

  15. Bubbles and foams in microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Huerre, Axel; Miralles, Vincent; Jullien, Marie-Caroline

    2014-09-28

    Microfluidics offers great tools to produce highly-controlled dispersions of gas into liquid, from isolated bubbles to organized microfoams. Potential technological applications are manifold, from novel materials to scaffolds for tissue engineering or enhanced oil recovery. More fundamentally, microfluidics makes it possible to investigate the physics of complex systems such as foams at scales where the capillary forces become dominant, in model experiments involving few well-controlled parameters. In this context, this review does not have the ambition to detail in a comprehensive manner all the techniques and applications involving bubbles and foams in microfluidics. Rather, it focuses on particular consequences of working at the microscale, under confinement, and hopes to provide insight into the physics of such systems. The first part of this work focuses on bubbles, and more precisely on (i) bubble generation, where the confinement can suppress capillary instabilities while inertial effects may play a role, and (ii) bubble dynamics, paying special attention to the lubrication film between bubble and wall and the influence of confinement. The second part addresses the formation and dynamics of microfoams, emphasizing structural differences from macroscopic foams and the influence of the confinement.

  16. An audible demonstration of the speed of sound in bubbly liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Preston S.; Roy, Ronald A.

    2008-10-01

    The speed of sound in a bubbly liquid is strongly dependent upon the volume fraction of the gas phase, the bubble size distribution, and the frequency of the acoustic excitation. At sufficiently low frequencies, the speed of sound depends primarily on the gas volume fraction. This effect can be audibly demonstrated using a one-dimensional acoustic waveguide, in which the flow rate of air bubbles injected into a water-filled tube is varied by the user. The normal modes of the waveguide are excited by the sound of the bubbles being injected into the tube. As the flow rate is varied, the speed of sound varies as well, and hence, the resonance frequencies shift. This can be clearly heard through the use of an amplified hydrophone and the user can create aesthetically pleasing and even musical sounds. In addition, the apparatus can be used to verify a simple mathematical model known as Wood's equation that relates the speed of sound of a bubbly liquid to its void fraction.

  17. Manipulating Liquids With Acoustic Radiation Pressure Phased Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.

    1999-01-01

    High-intensity ultrasound waves can produce the effects of "Acoustic Radiation Pressure" (ARP) and "acoustic streaming." These effects can be used to propel liquid flows and to apply forces that can be used to move or manipulate floating objects or liquid surfaces. NASA's interest in ARP includes the remote-control agitation of liquids and the manipulation of bubbles and drops in liquid experiments and propellant systems. A high level of flexibility is attained by using a high-power acoustic phased array to generate, steer, and focus a beam of acoustic waves. This is called an Acoustic Radiation Pressure Phased Array, or ARPPA. In this approach, many acoustic transducer elements emit wavelets that converge into a single beam of sound waves. Electronically coordinating the timing, or "phase shift," of the acoustic waves makes it possible to form a beam with a predefined direction and focus. Therefore, a user can direct the ARP force at almost any desired point within a liquid volume. ARPPA lets experimenters manipulate objects anywhere in a test volume. This flexibility allow it to be used for multiple purposes, such as to agitate liquids, deploy and manipulate drops or bubbles, and even suppress sloshing in spacecraft propellant tanks.

  18. Coupled dynamics of translation and collapse of acoustically driven microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Anil J; Szeri, Andrew J

    2002-10-01

    Pressure gradients drive the motion of microbubbles relative to liquids in which they are suspended. Examples include the hydrostatic pressure due to a gravitational field, and the pressure gradients in a sound field, useful for acoustic levitation. In this paper, the equations describing the coupled dynamics of radial oscillation and translation of a microbubble are given. The formulation is based on a recently derived expression for the hydrodynamic force on a bubble of changing size in an incompressible liquid [J. Magnaudet and D. Legendre, Phys. Fluids 10, 550-556 (1998)]. The complex interaction between radial and translation dynamics is best understood by examination of the added momentum associated with the liquid motion caused by the moving bubble. Translation is maximized when the bubble collapses violently. The new theory for coupled collapse and translation dynamics is compared to past experiments and to previous theories for decoupled translation dynamics. Special attention is paid to bubbles of relevance in biomedical applications. PMID:12398441

  19. Coupled dynamics of translation and collapse of acoustically driven microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Anil J; Szeri, Andrew J

    2002-10-01

    Pressure gradients drive the motion of microbubbles relative to liquids in which they are suspended. Examples include the hydrostatic pressure due to a gravitational field, and the pressure gradients in a sound field, useful for acoustic levitation. In this paper, the equations describing the coupled dynamics of radial oscillation and translation of a microbubble are given. The formulation is based on a recently derived expression for the hydrodynamic force on a bubble of changing size in an incompressible liquid [J. Magnaudet and D. Legendre, Phys. Fluids 10, 550-556 (1998)]. The complex interaction between radial and translation dynamics is best understood by examination of the added momentum associated with the liquid motion caused by the moving bubble. Translation is maximized when the bubble collapses violently. The new theory for coupled collapse and translation dynamics is compared to past experiments and to previous theories for decoupled translation dynamics. Special attention is paid to bubbles of relevance in biomedical applications.

  20. Bubble-Pen Lithography.

    PubMed

    Lin, Linhan; Peng, Xiaolei; Mao, Zhangming; Li, Wei; Yogeesh, Maruthi N; Rajeeva, Bharath Bangalore; Perillo, Evan P; Dunn, Andrew K; Akinwande, Deji; Zheng, Yuebing

    2016-01-13

    Current lithography techniques, which employ photon, electron, or ion beams to induce chemical or physical reactions for micro/nano-fabrication, have remained challenging in patterning chemically synthesized colloidal particles, which are emerging as building blocks for functional devices. Herein, we develop a new technique - bubble-pen lithography (BPL) - to pattern colloidal particles on substrates using optically controlled microbubbles. Briefly, a single laser beam generates a microbubble at the interface of colloidal suspension and a plasmonic substrate via plasmon-enhanced photothermal effects. The microbubble captures and immobilizes the colloidal particles on the substrate through coordinated actions of Marangoni convection, surface tension, gas pressure, and substrate adhesion. Through directing the laser beam to move the microbubble, we create arbitrary single-particle patterns and particle assemblies with different resolutions and architectures. Furthermore, we have applied BPL to pattern CdSe/ZnS quantum dots on plasmonic substrates and polystyrene (PS) microparticles on two-dimensional (2D) atomic-layer materials. With the low-power operation, arbitrary patterning and applicability to general colloidal particles, BPL will find a wide range of applications in microelectronics, nanophotonics, and nanomedicine.

  1. Bulk and integrated acousto-optic spectrometers for radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, G.; Buhl, D.; Florez, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The development of sensitive heterodyne receivers (front end) in the centimeter and millimeter range, and the construction of sensitive RF spectrometers (back end) enable the spectral lines of interstellar molecules to be detected and identified. A technique was developed which combines acoustic bending of a collimated coherent light beam by a Bragg cell followed by detection by a sensitive array of photodetectors (thus forming an RF acousto-optic spectrometer (AOS). An AOS has wide bandwidth, large number of channels, and high resolution, and is compact, lightweight, and energy efficient. The thrust of receiver development is towards high frequency heterodyne systems, particularly in the millimeter, submillimeter, far infrared, and 10 micron spectral ranges.

  2. Energy concentration and positional stability of sonoluminescent bubbles in sulfuric acid for different static pressures.

    PubMed

    Rosselló, Juan Manuel; Dellavale, Damián; Bonetto, Fabián José

    2013-09-01

    In this study we report several experimental and numerical results on the influence of static pressure (P_{0}) over the main parameters in single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL), using a sulfuric acid aqueous solution (SA) with low concentrations of argon gas dissolved. Bifrequency driving was used in the experiments to enhance spatial stability of the bubbles. The experimental results were compared with simulations provided by a numerical code that models the radial dynamics of the bubbles. The results showed that an increase on the static pressure of the system shifts the Bjerknes instability threshold, allowing the bubble to access higher acoustic pressures (P_{Ac}^{}). Furthermore, a decrease in the measured ambient radius R_{0} and the calculated relative gas concentration c_{∞}/c_{0} were observed. A notorious increment in the bubble collapse violence and energy focusing for P_{0} above 1 bar was achieved. These were mainly indicated by the growth of the bubble expansion ratio (R_{max}/R_{0}), the bubble mechanical energy density, and the maximum bubble wall velocity dR/dt. In agreement with the previous statement, the maximum temperature during the bubble collapse predicted by the model is augmented as well. The use of different harmonics in the ultrasound pressure field regarding energy focusing is also discussed. Finally, we analyzed the stability regions of the R_{0}-P_{Ac}^{} parameter space via numerical predictions for P_{0} above the measured, identifying the shape instabilities as the main limiting agent to obtain further energy concentration in SA systems at high static pressures.

  3. Acoustic analog of a free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zavtrak, S.T.

    1995-12-31

    As well known, at the present time there are many types of laser the operation of which is based on the stimulated emission of light by an active medium. Lasers are generators of coherent electromagnetic waves in the range from ultraviolet to submillimeters. But acoustic analogs of such devices have not been created up to now in spite of the progress in laser technology. Meanwhile, an acoustic laser could have a lot of interesting applications. Recently a theoretical scheme for an acoustic laser was proposed by the present author. A liquid dielectric with dispersed particles was considered as an active medium. The pumping was created by an oscillating electric field deforming dispersed particle volumes. Different types of oils or distilled water can serve as a liquid dielectric with gas bubbles as dispersed particles. Gas bubbles in water can be created by an electrolysis. The phase bunching of the initially incoherent emitters (gas bubbles) was realized by acoustic radiation forces. This scheme is an analog of the free-electron laser (FEL). It was shown that two types of losses must be overcome for the beginning of a generation. The first type results from the energy dissipation in the active medium and the second one is caused by radiation losses at the boundaries of the resonator. The purposes of this report are: (1) to discuss the analogies between the acoustic laser and FEL; (2) to propose an effective scheme of an acoustic laser with a mechanical pumping (by a piezoelectric emitter of the piston type); (3) to consider the schemes of acoustic lasers with the different types of the resonators (rectangular and cylindrical); (4) to discuss the possibility of the creation of an impact acoustic laser (5) to discuss the experimental works which are planned to be carried out in cooperation with prof. L.A. Crum.

  4. FEASTING BLACK HOLE BLOWS BUBBLES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A monstrous black hole's rude table manners include blowing huge bubbles of hot gas into space. At least, that's the gustatory practice followed by the supermassive black hole residing in the hub of the nearby galaxy NGC 4438. Known as a peculiar galaxy because of its unusual shape, NGC 4438 is in the Virgo Cluster, 50 million light-years from Earth. These NASA Hubble Space Telescope images of the galaxy's central region clearly show one of the bubbles rising from a dark band of dust. The other bubble, emanating from below the dust band, is barely visible, appearing as dim red blobs in the close-up picture of the galaxy's hub (the colorful picture at right). The background image represents a wider view of the galaxy, with the central region defined by the white box. These extremely hot bubbles are caused by the black hole's voracious eating habits. The eating machine is engorging itself with a banquet of material swirling around it in an accretion disk (the white region below the bright bubble). Some of this material is spewed from the disk in opposite directions. Acting like high-powered garden hoses, these twin jets of matter sweep out material in their paths. The jets eventually slam into a wall of dense, slow-moving gas, which is traveling at less than 223,000 mph (360,000 kph). The collision produces the glowing material. The bubbles will continue to expand and will eventually dissipate. Compared with the life of the galaxy, this bubble-blowing phase is a short-lived event. The bubble is much brighter on one side of the galaxy's center because the jet smashed into a denser amount of gas. The brighter bubble is 800 light-years tall and 800 light-years across. The observations are being presented June 5 at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Rochester, N.Y. Both pictures were taken March 24, 1999 with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. False colors were used to enhance the details of the bubbles. The red regions in the picture denote the hot gas

  5. The Time Evolution of Streamer Discharges in Single and Multiple Bubbles in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mujovic, Selman; Groele, Joseph; Foster, John

    2015-09-01

    The interaction of plasma with liquid water lies at the heart of a variety of revisited technological applications ranging from water treatment to wound healing. Plasma ignition and propagation in water, however, is poorly understood. It has been theorized that plasma streamer propagation takes place in microbubbles, namely streamer bubble hopping. In this work, discharge development in single and multiple bubble acoustic systems is investigated using high-speed imaging and emission spectroscopy. Optical filters allow for time resolved measurements of specific chemical species as well. Better understanding of these breakdown processes will guide the construction of an effective plasma water purifier. NSF CBET 1336375.

  6. Observation of bubble dynamics within luminescent cavitation clouds: Sonoluminescence at the nano-scale.

    PubMed

    Weninger, K R; Camara, C G; Putterman, S J

    2001-01-01

    Measurements of acoustically driven cavitation luminescence indicate that this phenomenon is robust over a huge parameter space ranging from 10 kHz to >10 MHz. The minimum bubble radius achieved is an upper bound for the size of the light-emitting region and ranges from about 1 microm at 15 kHz to tens of nm at 11 MHz. Although lines can be discerned in the spectra of some cavitation clouds, they sit on top of a broadband continuum which can have greater spectral density in the ultraviolet than is observed for resonantly driven sonoluminescence from a single bubble.

  7. Mechanisms of single bubble cleaning.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Fabian; Mettin, Robert

    2016-03-01

    The dynamics of collapsing bubbles close to a flat solid is investigated with respect to its potential for removal of surface attached particles. Individual bubbles are created by nanosecond Nd:YAG laser pulses focused into water close to glass plates contaminated with melamine resin micro-particles. The bubble dynamics is analysed by means of synchronous high-speed recordings. Due to the close solid boundary, the bubble collapses with the well-known liquid jet phenomenon. Subsequent microscopic inspection of the substrates reveals circular areas clean of particles after a single bubble generation and collapse event. The detailed bubble dynamics, as well as the cleaned area size, is characterised by the non-dimensional bubble stand-off γ=d/Rmax, with d: laser focus distance to the solid boundary, and Rmax: maximum bubble radius before collapse. We observe a maximum of clean area at γ≈0.7, a roughly linear decay of the cleaned circle radius for increasing γ, and no cleaning for γ>3.5. As the main mechanism for particle removal, rapid flows at the boundary are identified. Three different cleaning regimes are discussed in relation to γ: (I) For large stand-off, 1.8<γ<3.5, bubble collapse induced vortex flows touch down onto the substrate and remove particles without significant contact of the gas phase. (II) For small distances, γ<1.1, the bubble is in direct contact with the solid. Fast liquid flows at the substrate are driven by the jet impact with its subsequent radial spreading, and by the liquid following the motion of the collapsing and rebounding bubble wall. Both flows remove particles. Their relative timing, which depends sensitively on the exact γ, appears to determine the extension of the area with forces large enough to cause particle detachment. (III) At intermediate stand-off, 1.1<γ<1.8, only the second bubble collapse touches the substrate, but acts with cleaning mechanisms similar to an effective small γ collapse: particles are removed by

  8. Mechanisms of single bubble cleaning.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Fabian; Mettin, Robert

    2016-03-01

    The dynamics of collapsing bubbles close to a flat solid is investigated with respect to its potential for removal of surface attached particles. Individual bubbles are created by nanosecond Nd:YAG laser pulses focused into water close to glass plates contaminated with melamine resin micro-particles. The bubble dynamics is analysed by means of synchronous high-speed recordings. Due to the close solid boundary, the bubble collapses with the well-known liquid jet phenomenon. Subsequent microscopic inspection of the substrates reveals circular areas clean of particles after a single bubble generation and collapse event. The detailed bubble dynamics, as well as the cleaned area size, is characterised by the non-dimensional bubble stand-off γ=d/Rmax, with d: laser focus distance to the solid boundary, and Rmax: maximum bubble radius before collapse. We observe a maximum of clean area at γ≈0.7, a roughly linear decay of the cleaned circle radius for increasing γ, and no cleaning for γ>3.5. As the main mechanism for particle removal, rapid flows at the boundary are identified. Three different cleaning regimes are discussed in relation to γ: (I) For large stand-off, 1.8<γ<3.5, bubble collapse induced vortex flows touch down onto the substrate and remove particles without significant contact of the gas phase. (II) For small distances, γ<1.1, the bubble is in direct contact with the solid. Fast liquid flows at the substrate are driven by the jet impact with its subsequent radial spreading, and by the liquid following the motion of the collapsing and rebounding bubble wall. Both flows remove particles. Their relative timing, which depends sensitively on the exact γ, appears to determine the extension of the area with forces large enough to cause particle detachment. (III) At intermediate stand-off, 1.1<γ<1.8, only the second bubble collapse touches the substrate, but acts with cleaning mechanisms similar to an effective small γ collapse: particles are removed by

  9. Electron-proton spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winckler, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    An electron-proton spectrometer was designed to measure the geomagnetically trapped radiation in a geostationary orbit at 6.6 earth radii in the outer radiation belt. This instrument is to be flown on the Applications Technology Satellite-F (ATS-F). The electron-proton spectrometer consists of two permanent magnet surface barrier detector arrays and associated electronics capable of selecting and detecting electrons in three energy ranges: (1) 30-50 keV, (2) 150-200 keV, and (3) 500 keV and protons in three energy ranges. The electron-proton spectrometer has the capability of measuring the fluxes of electrons and protons in various directions with respect to the magnetic field lines running through the satellite. One magnet detector array system is implemented to scan between EME north and south through west, sampling the directional flux in 15 steps. The other magnet-detector array system is fixed looking toward EME east.

  10. Compact Grism Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teare, S. W.

    2003-05-01

    Many observatories and instrument builders are retrofitting visible and near-infrared spectrometers into their existing imaging cameras. Camera designs that reimage the focal plane and have the optical filters located in a pseudo collimated beam are ideal candidates for the addition of a spectrometer. One device commonly used as the dispersing element for such spectrometers is a grism. The traditional grism is constructed from a prism that has had a diffraction grating applied on one surface. The objective of such a design is to use the prism wedge angle to select the desired "in-line" or "zero-deviation" wavelength that passes through on axis. The grating on the surface of the prism provides much of the dispersion for the spectrometer. A grism can also be used in a "constant-dispersion" design which provides an almost linear spatial scale across the spectrum. In this paper we provide an overview of the development of a grism spectrometer for use in a near infrared camera and demonstrate that a compact grism spectrometer can be developed on a very modest budget that can be afforded at almost any facility. The grism design was prototyped using visible light and then a final device was constructed which provides partial coverage in the near infrared I, J, H and K astronomical bands using the appropriate band pass filter for order sorting. The near infrared grism presented here provides a spectral resolution of about 650 and velocity resolution of about 450 km/s. The design of this grism relied on a computer code called Xspect, developed by the author, to determine the various critical parameters of the grism. This work was supported by a small equipment grant from NASA and administered by the AAS.

  11. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Chou, C.H.

    1990-03-20

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system is described in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens. 9 figs.

  12. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Chou, Ching H.

    1990-01-01

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens.

  13. The Apollo Alpha Spectrometer.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagoda, N.; Kubierschky, K.; Frank, R.; Carroll, J.

    1973-01-01

    Located in the Science Instrument Module of Apollo 15 and 16, the Alpha Particle Spectrometer was designed to detect and measure the energy of alpha particles emitted by the radon isotopes and their daughter products. The spectrometer sensor consisted of an array of totally depleted silicon surface barrier detectors. Biased amplifier and linear gate techniques were utilized to reduce resolution degradation, thereby permitting the use of a single 512 channel PHA. Sensor identification and in-flight radioactive calibration were incorporated to enhance data reduction.

  14. Comparison of imaging spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C

    2000-01-09

    Realistic signal to noise performance estimates for the various types of instruments being considered for NGST are compared, based on the point source detection values quoted in the available ISIM final reports. The corresponding sensitivity of the various types of spectrometers operating in a full field imaging mode, for both emission line objects and broad spectral distribution objects, is computed and displayed. For the purpose of seeing the earliest galaxies, or the faintest possible emission line sources, the imaging Fourier transform spectrometer emerges superior to all others, by orders of magnitude in speed.

  15. Broad band waveguide spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Goldman, Don S.

    1995-01-01

    A spectrometer for analyzing a sample of material utilizing a broad band source of electromagnetic radiation and a detector. The spectrometer employs a waveguide possessing an entry and an exit for the electromagnetic radiation emanating from the source. The waveguide further includes a surface between the entry and exit portions which permits interaction between the electromagnetic radiation passing through the wave guide and a sample material. A tapered portion forms a part of the entry of the wave guide and couples the electromagnetic radiation emanating from the source to the waveguide. The electromagnetic radiation passing from the exit of the waveguide is captured and directed to a detector for analysis.

  16. Measurements of near-surface bubble plumes in the open ocean with implications for high-frequency sonar performance.

    PubMed

    Trevorrow, Mark V

    2003-11-01

    This study examines near-surface bubble data obtained with a self-contained 200-kHz inverted echo-sounder deployed at Ocean Station Papa (NE Pacific, 1400 km west of Vancouver Is.) over an 81-day period in the spring of 1996. The instrument operated continuously, recording calibrated volume scattering profiles from near-surface bubbles with 3-s and 30-cm resolution. The data show the frequent occurrence of bubbles organized into vertical, plume-like structures, presumably drawn downwards by turbulence and other near-surface circulations. Average bubble plume penetrations of up to 15 m were observed, with maximum penetrations up to 25 m. Within the plumes, the backscatter cross section exhibited an exponential decay with depth, with e-folding scale in the range 0.5 to 3 m, increasing proportionally to the square of average plume depth. Using standard models for bubble scattering, and incorporating recent acoustic resonator measurements of bubble-size distributions along with actual bubble plume data, high-frequency near-surface sonar performance models were developed. These models show that on a ping-to-ping basis the bubble plume structures can induce significant spatial variations in the reverberation level and path-integrated extinction losses to near-surface targets. PMID:14650004

  17. Measurements of near-surface bubble plumes in the open ocean with implications for high-frequency sonar performance.

    PubMed

    Trevorrow, Mark V

    2003-11-01

    This study examines near-surface bubble data obtained with a self-contained 200-kHz inverted echo-sounder deployed at Ocean Station Papa (NE Pacific, 1400 km west of Vancouver Is.) over an 81-day period in the spring of 1996. The instrument operated continuously, recording calibrated volume scattering profiles from near-surface bubbles with 3-s and 30-cm resolution. The data show the frequent occurrence of bubbles organized into vertical, plume-like structures, presumably drawn downwards by turbulence and other near-surface circulations. Average bubble plume penetrations of up to 15 m were observed, with maximum penetrations up to 25 m. Within the plumes, the backscatter cross section exhibited an exponential decay with depth, with e-folding scale in the range 0.5 to 3 m, increasing proportionally to the square of average plume depth. Using standard models for bubble scattering, and incorporating recent acoustic resonator measurements of bubble-size distributions along with actual bubble plume data, high-frequency near-surface sonar performance models were developed. These models show that on a ping-to-ping basis the bubble plume structures can induce significant spatial variations in the reverberation level and path-integrated extinction losses to near-surface targets.

  18. Initial conditions for bubble universes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInnes, Brett

    2008-06-01

    The “bubble universes” of Coleman and De Luccia play a crucial role in string cosmology. Since our own Universe is supposed to be of this kind, bubble cosmology should supply definite answers to the long-standing questions regarding cosmological initial conditions. In particular, it must explain how an initial singularity is avoided, and also how the initial conditions for inflation were established. I argue that the simplest nonanthropic approach to these problems involves a requirement that the spatial sections defined by distinguished bubble observers should not be allowed to have arbitrarily small volumes. Casimir energy is a popular candidate for a quantum effect which can ensure this, but (because it violates energy conditions) there is a danger that it could lead to nonperturbative instabilities in string theory. I make a simple proposal for the initial conditions of a bubble universe, and show that my proposal ensures that the system is nonperturbatively stable. Thus, low-entropy conditions can be established at the beginning of a bubble universe without violating the second law of thermodynamics and without leading to instability in string theory. These conditions are inherited from the ambient spacetime.

  19. Ethnic diversity deflates price bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Sheen S.; Apfelbaum, Evan P.; Bernard, Mark; Bartelt, Valerie L.; Zajac, Edward J.; Stark, David

    2014-01-01

    Markets are central to modern society, so their failures can be devastating. Here, we examine a prominent failure: price bubbles. Bubbles emerge when traders err collectively in pricing, causing misfit between market prices and the true values of assets. The causes of such collective errors remain elusive. We propose that bubbles are affected by ethnic homogeneity in the market and can be thwarted by diversity. In homogenous markets, traders place undue confidence in the decisions of others. Less likely to scrutinize others’ decisions, traders are more likely to accept prices that deviate from true values. To test this, we constructed experimental markets in Southeast Asia and North America, where participants traded stocks to earn money. We randomly assigned participants to ethnically homogeneous or diverse markets. We find a marked difference: Across markets and locations, market prices fit true values 58% better in diverse markets. The effect is similar across sites, despite sizeable differences in culture and ethnic composition. Specifically, in homogenous markets, overpricing is higher as traders are more likely to accept speculative prices. Their pricing errors are more correlated than in diverse markets. In addition, when bubbles burst, homogenous markets crash more severely. The findings suggest that price bubbles arise not only from individual errors or financial conditions, but also from the social context of decision making. The evidence may inform public discussion on ethnic diversity: it may be beneficial not only for providing variety in perspectives and skills, but also because diversity facilitates friction that enhances deliberation and upends conformity. PMID:25404313

  20. Ethnic diversity deflates price bubbles.

    PubMed

    Levine, Sheen S; Apfelbaum, Evan P; Bernard, Mark; Bartelt, Valerie L; Zajac, Edward J; Stark, David

    2014-12-30

    Markets are central to modern society, so their failures can be devastating. Here, we examine a prominent failure: price bubbles. Bubbles emerge when traders err collectively in pricing, causing misfit between market prices and the true values of assets. The causes of such collective errors remain elusive. We propose that bubbles are affected by ethnic homogeneity in the market and can be thwarted by diversity. In homogenous markets, traders place undue confidence in the decisions of others. Less likely to scrutinize others' decisions, traders are more likely to accept prices that deviate from true values. To test this, we constructed experimental markets in Southeast Asia and North America, where participants traded stocks to earn money. We randomly assigned participants to ethnically homogeneous or diverse markets. We find a marked difference: Across markets and locations, market prices fit true values 58% better in diverse markets. The effect is similar across sites, despite sizeable differences in culture and ethnic composition. Specifically, in homogenous markets, overpricing is higher as traders are more likely to accept speculative prices. Their pricing errors are more correlated than in diverse markets. In addition, when bubbles burst, homogenous markets crash more severely. The findings suggest that price bubbles arise not only from individual errors or financial conditions, but also from the social context of decision making. The evidence may inform public discussion on ethnic diversity: it may be beneficial not only for providing variety in perspectives and skills, but also because diversity facilitates friction that enhances deliberation and upends conformity.

  1. Capillarity-Driven Bubble Separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollman, Andrew; Weislogel, Mark; Dreyer, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Techniques for phase separation in the absence of gravity continue to be sought after 5 decades of space flight. This work focuses on the fundamental problem of gas bubble separation in bubbly flows through open wedge-shaped channel in a microgravity environment. The bubbles appear to rise in the channel and coalesce with the free surface. Forces acting on the bubble are the combined effects of surface tension, wetting conditions, and geometry; not buoyancy. A single dimensionless group is identified that characterizes the bubble behavior and supportive experiments are conducted in a terrestrial laboratory, in a 2.1 second drop tower, and aboard the International Space Station as part of the Capillary Channel Flow (CCF) experiments. The data is organized into regime maps that provide insight on passive phase separations for applications ranging from liquid management aboard spacecraft to lab-on-chip technologies. NASA NNX09AP66A, NASA Oregon Space Grant NNX10AK68H, NASA NNX12AO47A, DLR 50WM0535/0845/1145

  2. Development of an optical microscopy system for automated bubble cloud analysis.

    PubMed

    Wesley, Daniel J; Brittle, Stuart A; Toolan, Daniel T W

    2016-08-01

    Recently, the number of uses of bubbles has begun to increase dramatically, with medicine, biofuel production, and wastewater treatment just some of the industries taking advantage of bubble properties, such as high mass transfer. As a result, more and more focus is being placed on the understanding and control of bubble formation processes and there are currently numerous techniques utilized to facilitate this understanding. Acoustic bubble sizing (ABS) and laser scattering techniques are able to provide information regarding bubble size and size distribution with minimal data processing, a major advantage over current optical-based direct imaging approaches. This paper demonstrates how direct bubble-imaging methods can be improved upon to yield high levels of automation and thus data comparable to ABS and laser scattering. We also discuss the added benefits of the direct imaging approaches and how it is possible to obtain considerable additional information above and beyond that which ABS and laser scattering can supply. This work could easily be exploited by both industrial-scale operations and small-scale laboratory studies, as this straightforward and cost-effective approach is highly transferrable and intuitive to use. PMID:27505394

  3. Development of an optical microscopy system for automated bubble cloud analysis.

    PubMed

    Wesley, Daniel J; Brittle, Stuart A; Toolan, Daniel T W

    2016-08-01

    Recently, the number of uses of bubbles has begun to increase dramatically, with medicine, biofuel production, and wastewater treatment just some of the industries taking advantage of bubble properties, such as high mass transfer. As a result, more and more focus is being placed on the understanding and control of bubble formation processes and there are currently numerous techniques utilized to facilitate this understanding. Acoustic bubble sizing (ABS) and laser scattering techniques are able to provide information regarding bubble size and size distribution with minimal data processing, a major advantage over current optical-based direct imaging approaches. This paper demonstrates how direct bubble-imaging methods can be improved upon to yield high levels of automation and thus data comparable to ABS and laser scattering. We also discuss the added benefits of the direct imaging approaches and how it is possible to obtain considerable additional information above and beyond that which ABS and laser scattering can supply. This work could easily be exploited by both industrial-scale operations and small-scale laboratory studies, as this straightforward and cost-effective approach is highly transferrable and intuitive to use.

  4. A reduced-order, single-bubble cavitation model with applications to therapeutic ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Kreider, Wayne; Crum, Lawrence A.; Bailey, Michael R.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.

    2011-01-01

    Cavitation often occurs in therapeutic applications of medical ultrasound such as shock-wave lithotripsy (SWL) and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Because cavitation bubbles can affect an intended treatment, it is important to understand the dynamics of bubbles in this context. The relevant context includes very high acoustic pressures and frequencies as well as elevated temperatures. Relative to much of the prior research on cavitation and bubble dynamics, such conditions are unique. To address the relevant physics, a reduced-order model of a single, spherical bubble is proposed that incorporates phase change at the liquid-gas interface as well as heat and mass transport in both phases. Based on the energy lost during the inertial collapse and rebound of a millimeter-sized bubble, experimental observations were used to tune and test model predictions. In addition, benchmarks from the published literature were used to assess various aspects of model performance. Benchmark comparisons demonstrate that the model captures the basic physics of phase change and diffusive transport, while it is quantitatively sensitive to specific model assumptions and implementation details. Given its performance and numerical stability, the model can be used to explore bubble behaviors across a broad parameter space relevant to therapeutic ultrasound. PMID:22088026

  5. Single bubble perturbation in cavitation proximity of solid glass: hot spot versus distance.

    PubMed

    Radziuk, Darya; Möhwald, Helmuth; Suslick, Kenneth

    2014-02-28

    A systematic study of the energy loss of a cavitation bubble in a close proximity of a glass surface is introduced for the first time in a low acoustic field (1.2-2.4 bar). Single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) is used as a tool to predict the temperature and pressure decrease of bubble (μm) versus surface distance. A glass as a model system is used to imitate the boundary conditions relevant for nano- or micromaterials. SBSL preequilibrated with 5% argon is perturbed by a glass rod with the tip (Z-perturbation) and with the long axis (X-perturbation) at a defined distance. From 2 mm to 500 μm argon-SBSL lines monotonically narrow and the effective emission temperature decreases from 9000 K to 6800 K comparable to multiple bubbles. The electron density decreases by two orders of magnitude in Z-perturbation and is by a factor of two higher in X-perturbation than the unperturbed cavitating bubble. The perturbed single bubble sonoluminescence pressure decreases from 2700 atm to 1200 atm at 2.4 bar. In water new non-SBSL SiO molecular emission lines are observed and OH emission disappears.

  6. Light scattering by bubbles in a bubble chamber.

    PubMed

    Withrington, R J

    1968-01-01

    A discussion of the angular scattering expected from small bubbles in liquids of refractive indices 1.1 and 1.025 is given ogether with the inverse, i.e., of small spheres of the liquids in air. The similarities between the two scattering functions are compared with a view to the simulation of bubble chamber tracks using readily available materials. Fraunhofer scattering is significant on axis while larger angle scattering is geometrical. Some experimental verification of the scattering functions is also reported.

  7. Medical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Kirk W.; Dunmire, Barbrina

    Medical acoustics can be subdivided into diagnostics and therapy. Diagnostics are further separated into auditory and ultrasonic methods, and both employ low amplitudes. Therapy (excluding medical advice) uses ultrasound for heating, cooking, permeablizing, activating and fracturing tissues and structures within the body, usually at much higher amplitudes than in diagnostics. Because ultrasound is a wave, linear wave physics are generally applicable, but recently nonlinear effects have become more important, even in low-intensity diagnostic applications.

  8. Cavitation clouds created by shock scattering from bubbles during histotripsy.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Adam D; Wang, Tzu-Yin; Cain, Charles A; Fowlkes, J Brian; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A; Bailey, Michael R; Xu, Zhen

    2011-10-01

    Histotripsy is a therapy that focuses short-duration, high-amplitude pulses of ultrasound to incite a localized cavitation cloud that mechanically breaks down tissue. To investigate the mechanism of cloud formation, high-speed photography was used to observe clouds generated during single histotripsy pulses. Pulses of 5-20 cycles duration were applied to a transparent tissue phantom by a 1-MHz spherically focused transducer. Clouds initiated from single cavitation bubbles that formed during the initial cycles of the pulse, and grew along the acoustic axis opposite the propagation direction. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that clouds form as a result of large negative pressure generated by the backscattering of shockwaves from a single bubble. The positive-pressure phase of the wave inverts upon scattering and superimposes on the incident negative-pressure phase to create this negative pressure and cavitation. The process repeats with each cycle of the incident wave, and the bubble cloud elongates toward the transducer. Finite-amplitude propagation distorts the incident wave such that the peak-positive pressure is much greater than the peak-negative pressure, which exaggerates the effect. The hypothesis was tested with two modified incident waves that maintained negative pressure but reduced the positive pressure amplitude. These waves suppressed cloud formation which supported the hypothesis.

  9. Potential uses of vacuum bubbles in noise and vibration control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ver, Istvan L.

    1989-01-01

    Vacuum bubbles are new acoustic elements which are dynamically more compliant than the gas volume they replace, but which are statically robust. They are made of a thin metallic shell with vacuum in their cavity. Consequently, they pose no danger in terms of contamination or fire hazard. The potential of the vacuum bubble concept for noise and vibration control was assessed with special emphases on spacecraft and aircraft applications. The following potential uses were identified: (1) as a cladding, to reduce sound radiation of vibrating surfaces and the sound excitation of structures, (2) as a screen, to reflect or absorb an incident sound wave, and (3) as a liner, to increase low frequency sound transmission loss of double walls and to increase the low frequency sound attenuation of muffler baffles. It was found that geometric and material parameters must be controlled to a very high accuracy to obtain optimal performance and that performance is highly sensitive to variations in static pressure. Consequently, it was concluded that vacuum bubbles have more potential in spacecraft applications where static pressure is controlled more than in aircraft applications where large fluctuations in static pressure are common.

  10. Mass Spectrometers in Space!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinckerhoff, William B.

    2012-01-01

    Exploration of our solar system over several decades has benefitted greatly from the sensitive chemical analyses offered by spaceflight mass spectrometers. When dealing with an unknown environment, the broadband detection capabilities of mass analyzers have proven extremely valuable in determining the composition and thereby the basic nature of space environments, including the outer reaches of Earth s atmosphere, interplanetary space, the Moon, and the planets and their satellites. Numerous mass analyzer types, including quadrupole, monopole, sector, ion trap, and time-of-flight have been incorporated in flight instruments and delivered robotically to a variety of planetary environments. All such instruments went through a rigorous process of application-specific development, often including significant miniaturization, testing, and qualification for the space environment. Upcoming missions to Mars and opportunities for missions to Venus, Europa, Saturn, Titan, asteroids, and comets provide new challenges for flight mass spectrometers that push to state of the art in fundamental analytical technique. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) investigation on the recently-launch Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover mission incorporates a quadrupole analyzer to support direct evolved gas as well as gas chromatograph-based analysis of martian rocks and atmosphere, seeking signs of a past or present habitable environment. A next-generation linear ion trap mass spectrometer, using both electron impact and laser ionization, is being incorporated into the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) instrument, which will be flown to Mars in 2018. These and other mass spectrometers and mission concepts at various stages of development will be described.

  11. Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Understanding the global atmospheric changes is difficult with today's current technology. However, with high resolution and nearly continuous observations from a satellite, it's possible to transform our understanding of the atmosphere. To enable the next generation of atmospheric science, a new class of orbiting atmospheric sensors is being developed. The foundation of this advanced concept is the Fourier Transform Spectrometer, or FTS.

  12. Gravity driven flows of bubble suspensions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenit, Roberto; Koch, Donald L.; Sangani, Ashok K.

    1999-11-01

    Experiments on vertical and inclined channels were performed to study the behavior of a mono-dispersed bubble suspension for which the dual limit of large Reynolds number and small Weber number is satisfied. A uniform stream of 1.5 mm diameter bubbles is produced by a bank of identical capillaries and coalescence is inhibited by addition of salt to the water. Measurements of the liquid velocity and bubble-probe collision rate are obtained with a hot wire anemometer. The gas volume fraction, bubble velocity, velocity variance and chord length are measured using a dual impedance probe. Image analysis is used to quantify the distributions of bubble size and aspect ratio. For vertical channels the bubble velocity is observed to decrease as the bubble concentration increases in accord with the predictions of Spelt and Sangani (1998). The bubble velocity variance arises largely due to bubble-wall and bubble-bubble collisions. For inclined channels, the strength of the shear flow is controlled by the extent of bubble segregation and the effective viscosity of the bubble phase. The measurements are compared with solutions of the averaged equations of motion for a range of gas volume fractions and channel inclination angles.

  13. Coalescence of bubbles translating through a tube.

    PubMed

    Almatroushi, Eisa; Borhan, Ali

    2006-09-01

    The results of an experimental study of the interaction and coalescence of two air bubbles translating in a cylindrical tube are presented. Both pressure- and buoyancy-driven motion of the two bubbles in a Newtonian suspending fluid within the tube are considered. The close approach of the two bubbles is examined using image analysis, and measurements of the coalescence time are reported for various bubble size ratios and capillary numbers. For pressure-driven motion of bubbles, coalescence is found to occur in an axisymmetric configuration for all bubble size ratios considered in the experiments. For buoyancy-driven motion, on the other hand, the disturbance flow behind the leading bubble causes the trailing bubble to move radially out toward the tube wall when the trailing bubble size becomes very small compared to the size of the leading bubble. In that case, coalescence occurs in a nonaxisymmetric configuration, with a time scale for coalescence that is substantially larger than that for coalescence in the axisymmetric configuration. When the imposed flow is in the direction of the buoyancy force, coalescence time is independent of bubble size ratio, and decreases as the capillary number increases. Experimental measurements of the radius of the thin liquid film separating the two bubbles are used in conjunction with a simple film drainage model to predict the dependence of the coalescence time on the bubble size ratio. PMID:17124143

  14. Bubbles Responding to Ultrasound Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Bubble and Drop Nonlinear Dynamics (BDND) experiment was designed to improve understanding of how the shape and behavior of bubbles respond to ultrasound pressure. By understanding this behavior, it may be possible to counteract complications bubbles cause during materials processing on the ground. This 12-second sequence came from video downlinked from STS-94, July 5 1997, MET:3/19:15 (approximate). The BDND guest investigator was Gary Leal of the University of California, Santa Barbara. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). Advanced fluid dynamics experiments will be a part of investigations plarned for the International Space Station. (435KB, 13-second MPEG, screen 160 x 120 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) A still JPG composite of this movie is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300162.html.

  15. Effects of coupling, bubble size, and spatial arrangement on chaotic dynamics of microbubble cluster in ultrasonic fields.

    PubMed

    Dzaharudin, Fatimah; Suslov, Sergey A; Manasseh, Richard; Ooi, Andrew

    2013-11-01

    Microbubble clustering may occur when bubbles become bound to targeted surfaces or are grouped by acoustic radiation forces in medical diagnostic applications. The ability to identify the formation of such clusters from the ultrasound echoes may be of practical use. Nonlinear numerical simulations were performed on clusters of microbubbles modeled by the modified Keller-Miksis equations. Encapsulated bubbles were considered to mimic practical applications but the aim of the study was to examine the effects of inter-bubble spacing and bubble size on the dynamical behavior of the cluster and to see if chaotic or bifurcation characteristics could be helpful in diagnostics. It was found that as microbubbles were clustered closer together, their oscillation amplitude for a given applied ultrasound power was reduced, and for inter-bubble spacing smaller than about ten bubble radii nonlinear subharmonics and ultraharmonics were eliminated. For clustered microbubbles, as for isolated microbubbles, an increase in the applied acoustic power caused bifurcations and transition to chaos. The bifurcations preceding chaotic behavior were identified by Floquet analysis and confirmed to be of the period-doubling type. It was found that as the number of microbubbles in a cluster increased, regularization occurred at lower ultrasound power and more windows of order appeared.

  16. Bursting Bubbles and Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Wrenn, Steven P.; Dicker, Stephen M.; Small, Eleanor F.; Dan, Nily R.; Mleczko, Michał; Schmitz, Georg; Lewin, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses various interactions between ultrasound, phospholipid monolayer-coated gas bubbles, phospholipid bilayer vesicles, and cells. The paper begins with a review of microbubble physics models, developed to describe microbubble dynamic behavior in the presence of ultrasound, and follows this with a discussion of how such models can be used to predict inertial cavitation profiles. Predicted sensitivities of inertial cavitation to changes in the values of membrane properties, including surface tension, surface dilatational viscosity, and area expansion modulus, indicate that area expansion modulus exerts the greatest relative influence on inertial cavitation. Accordingly, the theoretical dependence of area expansion modulus on chemical composition - in particular, poly (ethylene glyclol) (PEG) - is reviewed, and predictions of inertial cavitation for different PEG molecular weights and compositions are compared with experiment. Noteworthy is the predicted dependence, or lack thereof, of inertial cavitation on PEG molecular weight and mole fraction. Specifically, inertial cavitation is predicted to be independent of PEG molecular weight and mole fraction in the so-called mushroom regime. In the “brush” regime, however, inertial cavitation is predicted to increase with PEG mole fraction but to decrease (to the inverse 3/5 power) with PEG molecular weight. While excellent agreement between experiment and theory can be achieved, it is shown that the calculated inertial cavitation profiles depend strongly on the criterion used to predict inertial cavitation. This is followed by a discussion of nesting microbubbles inside the aqueous core of microcapsules and how this significantly increases the inertial cavitation threshold. Nesting thus offers a means for avoiding unwanted inertial cavitation and cell death during imaging and other applications such as sonoporation. A review of putative sonoporation mechanisms is then presented, including those

  17. Using micro-3D printing to build acoustically driven microswimmers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertin, Nicolas; Stephan, Olivier; Marmottant, Philippe; Spelman, Tamsin; Lauga, Eric; Dyfcom Team; Complex; Biological Fluids Team

    2015-11-01

    With no protection, a micron-sized free air bubble at room temperature in water has a life span shorter than a few tens of seconds. Using two-photon lithography, which is similar to 3D printing at the micron scale, we can build ``armors'' for these bubbles: micro-capsules with an opening to contain the bubble and extend its life to several hours in biological buffer solutions. When excited by an ultrasound transducer, a 20 μm bubble performs large amplitude oscillations in the capsule opening and generates a powerful acoustic streaming flow (velocity up to dozens of mm/s). A collaboration with the Dept. of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, is helping us predict the true resonance of these capsules and the full surrounding streaming flow. The present Bubbleboost project aims at creating red blood cell sized capsules (~ 10-20 μm) that can move on their own with a non-contact acoustic excitation for drug delivery applications. Another application of this research is in microfluidics: we are able to fabricate fields of capsules able to generate mixing effects in microchannels, or use the bubble-generated flow to guide passing objects at a junction. ERC Grant Agreement Bubbleboost no. 614655.

  18. Cavitation bubble generation and control for HIFU transcranial adaptive focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gâteau, J.; Marsac, L.; Pernot, M.; Aubry, J.-F.; Tanter, M.; Fink, M.

    2009-04-01

    Brain treatment with High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) can be achieved by multichannel arrays through the skull using time-reversal focusing. Such a method requires a reference signal either sent by a real source embedded in brain tissues or computed from a virtual source, using the acoustic properties of the skull deduced from CT images. This noninvasive computational method allows precise focusing, but is time consuming and suffers from unavoidable modeling errors which reduce the accessible acoustic pressure at the focus in comparison with real experimental time-reversal using an implanted hydrophone. Ex vivo simulations with a half skull immersed in a water tank allow us to reach at low amplitude levels a pressure ratio of 83% of the reference pressure (real time reversal) at 1MHz. Using this method to transcranially focus a pulse signal in an agar gel (model for in vivo bubble formation), we induced a cavitation bubble that generated an ultrasonic wave received by the array. Selecting the 1MHz component, the signal was time reversed and re-emitted, allowing 97%±1.1% of pressure ratio to be restored. To target points in the vicinity of the geometrical focus, electronic steering from the reference signal has been achieved. Skull aberrations severely degrade the accessible pressure while moving away from the focus ( ˜90% at 10mm in the focal plane). Nevertheless, inducing cavitation bubbles close to the limit of the primary accessible zone allowed us to acquire multiple references signal to increase the electronic steering area by 50%.

  19. Super Bubble and For Fingers Only.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrow, Lloyd H.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Presents two activities, the "Super Bubble" that challenges students and parents to blow the biggest bubbles and "For Fingers Only" that asks them to duplicate a pattern of blocks using only the sense of touch. (JRH)

  20. Removal of hydrogen bubbles from nuclear reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, R. V.

    1980-01-01

    Method proposed for removing large hydrogen bubbles from nuclear environment uses, in its simplest form, hollow spheres of palladium or platinum. Methods would result in hydrogen bubble being reduced in size without letting more radioactivity outside reactor.