Science.gov

Sample records for acoustic cardiographic parameters

  1. Acoustic emission characterization using AE (parameter) delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. H., Jr.; Lee, S. S.

    1983-01-01

    The acoustic emission (AE) parameter delay concept is defined as that particular measured value of a parameter at which a specified baseline level of cumulative AE activity is reached. The parameter can be from any of a broad range of elastic, plastic, viscoelastic, and fracture mechanics parameters, as well as their combinations. Such parameters include stress, load, strain, displacement, time, temperature, loading cycle, unloading stress, stress intensity factor, strain energy release rate, and crack tip plasticity zone size, while the AE activity may be AE event counts, ringdown counts, energy, event duration, etc., as well as their combinations. Attention is given to examples for the AE parameter delay concept, together with various correlations.

  2. 21 CFR 870.2840 - Apex cardiographic transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Apex cardiographic transducer. 870.2840 Section 870.2840 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... of the heart (acceleration, velocity, or displacement) by changes in the mechanical or...

  3. 21 CFR 870.2840 - Apex cardiographic transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Apex cardiographic transducer. 870.2840 Section 870.2840 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... of the heart (acceleration, velocity, or displacement) by changes in the mechanical or...

  4. 21 CFR 870.2840 - Apex cardiographic transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Apex cardiographic transducer. 870.2840 Section 870.2840 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... of the heart (acceleration, velocity, or displacement) by changes in the mechanical or...

  5. 21 CFR 870.2310 - Apex cardiograph (vibrocardiograph).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Apex cardiograph (vibrocardiograph). 870.2310 Section 870.2310 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... the motion of the heart; this device also provides any excitation energy required by the...

  6. 21 CFR 870.2310 - Apex cardiograph (vibrocardiograph).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Apex cardiograph (vibrocardiograph). 870.2310 Section 870.2310 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... the motion of the heart; this device also provides any excitation energy required by the...

  7. 21 CFR 870.2310 - Apex cardiograph (vibrocardiograph).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Apex cardiograph (vibrocardiograph). 870.2310 Section 870.2310 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... the motion of the heart; this device also provides any excitation energy required by the...

  8. 21 CFR 870.2840 - Apex cardiographic transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Apex cardiographic transducer. 870.2840 Section 870.2840 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... of the heart (acceleration, velocity, or displacement) by changes in the mechanical or...

  9. 21 CFR 870.2840 - Apex cardiographic transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Apex cardiographic transducer. 870.2840 Section 870.2840 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2840...

  10. 21 CFR 870.2310 - Apex cardiograph (vibrocardiograph).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Apex cardiograph (vibrocardiograph). 870.2310 Section 870.2310 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2310...

  11. Sensitivity of acoustic predictions to variation of input parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brentner, Kenneth S.; Burley, Casey L.; Marcolini, Michael A.

    1994-01-01

    Rotor noise prediction codes predict the thickness and loading noise produced by a helicopter rotor, given the blade motion, rotor operating conditions, and fluctuating force distribution over the blade surface. However, the criticality of these various inputs, and their respective effects on the predicted acoustic field, have never been fully addressed. This paper examines the importance of these inputs, and the sensitivity of the acoustic predicitions to a variation of each parameter. The effects of collective and cyclic pitch, as well as coning and cyclic flapping, are presented. Blade loading inputs are examined to determine the necessary spatial and temporal resolution, as well as the importance of the chordwise distribution. The acoustic predictions show regions in the acoustic field where significant errors occur when simplified blade motions or blade loadings are used. An assessment of the variation in the predicted acoustic field is balanced by a consideration of Central Processing Unit (CPU) time necessary for the various approximations.

  12. Sensitivity of acoustic predictions to variation of input parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brentner, Kenneth S.; Marcolini, Michael A.; Burley, Casey L.

    1991-01-01

    The noise prediction code WOPWOP predicts the thickness and loading noise produced by a helicopter rotor, given the blade motion, rotor operating conditions, and fluctuating force distribution over the blade surface. However, the criticality of these various inputs, and their respective effects on the predicted acoustic field, have never been fully addressed. This paper examines the importance of these inputs, and the sensitivity of the acoustic predictions to a variation of each parameter. The effects of collective and cyclic pitch, as well as coning and flapping, are presented. Blade loading inputs are examined to determine the necessary spatial and temporal resolution, as well as the importance of the cordwise distribution. The acoustic predictions show regions in the acoustic field where significant errors occur when simplified blade motions or blade loadings are used. An assessment of the variation in the predicted acoustic field is balanced by a consideration of CPU time necessary for the various approximations.

  13. Effect of acoustic field parameters on arc acoustic binding during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding.

    PubMed

    Xie, Weifeng; Fan, Chenglei; Yang, Chunli; Lin, Sanbao

    2016-03-01

    As a newly developed arc welding method, power ultrasound has been successfully introduced into arc and weld pool during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding process. The advanced process for molten metals can be realized by utilizing additional ultrasonic field. Under the action of the acoustic wave, the plasma arc as weld heat source is regulated and its characteristics make an obvious change. Compared with the conventional arc, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc plasma is bound significantly and becomes brighter. To reveal the dependence of the acoustic binding force on acoustic field parameters, a two-dimensional acoustic field model for ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding device is established. The influences of the radiator height, the central pore radius, the radiator radius, and curvature radius or depth of concave radiator surface are discussed using the boundary element method. Then the authors analyze the resonant mode by this relationship curve between acoustic radiation power and radiator height. Furthermore, the best acoustic binding ability is obtained by optimizing the geometric parameters of acoustic radiator. In addition, three concave radiator surfaces including spherical cap surface, paraboloid of revolution, and rotating single curved surface are investigated systematically. Finally, both the calculation and experiment suggest that, to obtain the best acoustic binding ability, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding setup should be operated under the first resonant mode using a radiator with a spherical cap surface, a small central pore, a large section radius and an appropriate curvature radius.

  14. Effect of acoustic field parameters on arc acoustic binding during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding.

    PubMed

    Xie, Weifeng; Fan, Chenglei; Yang, Chunli; Lin, Sanbao

    2016-03-01

    As a newly developed arc welding method, power ultrasound has been successfully introduced into arc and weld pool during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding process. The advanced process for molten metals can be realized by utilizing additional ultrasonic field. Under the action of the acoustic wave, the plasma arc as weld heat source is regulated and its characteristics make an obvious change. Compared with the conventional arc, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc plasma is bound significantly and becomes brighter. To reveal the dependence of the acoustic binding force on acoustic field parameters, a two-dimensional acoustic field model for ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding device is established. The influences of the radiator height, the central pore radius, the radiator radius, and curvature radius or depth of concave radiator surface are discussed using the boundary element method. Then the authors analyze the resonant mode by this relationship curve between acoustic radiation power and radiator height. Furthermore, the best acoustic binding ability is obtained by optimizing the geometric parameters of acoustic radiator. In addition, three concave radiator surfaces including spherical cap surface, paraboloid of revolution, and rotating single curved surface are investigated systematically. Finally, both the calculation and experiment suggest that, to obtain the best acoustic binding ability, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding setup should be operated under the first resonant mode using a radiator with a spherical cap surface, a small central pore, a large section radius and an appropriate curvature radius. PMID:26558995

  15. Field Measurement of the Acoustic Nonlinearity Parameter in Turbine Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinton, Yolanda L.; Na, Jeong K.; Yost, William T.; Kessel, Gregory L.

    2000-01-01

    Nonlinear acoustics techniques were used to measure fatigue in turbine blades in a power generation plant. The measurements were made in the field using a reference based measurement technique, and a reference sample previously measured in the laboratory. The acoustic nonlinearity parameter showed significant increase with fatigue in the blades, as indicated by service age and areas of increased stress. The technique shows promise for effectively measuring fatigue in field applications and predicting subsequent failures.

  16. Study of Acoustic Parameters in Binary Mixture at Variable Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, G.; Tripathy, A.; Paikaray, R.

    2013-11-01

    The acoustical parameters for two binary liquid mixtures, acetone-toluene and acetone-xylene, have been determined for three different frequencies (1 MHz, 3 MHz, and 5 MHz) at 303 K. The acoustical parameters such as isentropic compressibility (), intermolecular free length (), acoustic impedance (), and their excess values are computed for the two systems from the measured ultrasonic velocity and density values. The extent of interactions between the component molecules has been investigated. For the acetone-toluene system, the more negative values of the different excess parameters suggest that the interactions between acetone-toluene molecules are greater compared to the acetone-xylene system. With an increase of frequency, the extent of the interactions becomes weaker in both systems due to thermal relaxation and agitation of the component molecules.

  17. Crystalline structure and symmetry dependence of acoustic nonlinearity parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.

    1994-01-01

    A quantitative measure of elastic wave nonlinearity in crystals is provided by the acoustic nonlinearity parameters. The nonlinearity parameters are defined for arbitrary propagation modes for solids of arbitrary crystalline symmetry and are determined along the pure mode propagation directions for 33 crystals of cubic symmetry from data reported in the literature. The magnitudes of the nonlinearity parameters are found to exhibit a strong dependence on the crystalline structure and symmetries associated with the modal direction in the solid. Calculations based on the Born-Mayer potential for crystals having a dominant repulsive contribution to the elastic constants from the interatomic pair potential suggest that the origin of the structure dependence is associated with the shape rather than the strength of the potential. Considerations based on variations in crystal symmetry during loading along pure mode propagation directions of face-centered-cubic solids provide a qualitative explanation for the dependence of the acoustic nonlinearity parameters on modal direction.

  18. Characterizing tissue with acoustic parameters derived from ultrasound data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littrup, Peter J.; Duric, Nebojsa; Leach, Richard, Jr.; Azevedo, Steve G.; Candy, James V.; Moore, Thomas; Chambers, David H.; Mast, Jeffrey E.; Holsapple, Earle

    2002-04-01

    In contrast to standard reflection ultrasound (US), transmission US holds the promise of more thorough tissue characterization by generating quantitative acoustic parameters. We compare results from a conventional US scanner with data acquired using an experimental circular scanner operating at frequencies of 0.3 - 1.5 MHz. Data were obtained on phantoms and a normal, formalin-fixed, excised breast. Both reflection and transmission-based algorithms were used to generate images of reflectivity, sound speed and attenuation.. Images of the phantoms demonstrate the ability to detect sub-mm features and quantify acoustic properties such as sound speed and attenuation. The human breast specimen showed full field evaluation, improved penetration and tissue definition. Comparison with conventional US indicates the potential for better margin definition and acoustic characterization of masses, particularly in the complex scattering environments of human breast tissue. The use of morphology, in the context of reflectivity, sound speed and attenuation, for characterizing tissue, is discussed.

  19. Characterizing Tissue with Acoustic Parameters Derived from Ultrasound Data

    SciTech Connect

    Littrup, P; Duric, N; Leach, R R; Azevedo, S G; Candy, J V; Moore, T; Chambers, D H; Mast, J E; Johnson, S A; Holsapple, E

    2002-01-23

    In contrast to standard reflection ultrasound (US), transmission US holds the promise of more thorough tissue characterization by generating quantitative acoustic parameters. We compare results from a conventional US scanner with data acquired using an experimental circular scanner operating at frequencies of 0.3 - 1.5 MHz. Data were obtained on phantoms and a normal, formalin-fixed, excised breast. Both reflection and transmission-based algorithms were used to generate images of reflectivity, sound speed and attenuation.. Images of the phantoms demonstrate the ability to detect sub-mm features and quantify acoustic properties such as sound speed and attenuation. The human breast specimen showed full field evaluation, improved penetration and tissue definition. Comparison with conventional US indicates the potential for better margin definition and acoustic characterization of masses, particularly in the complex scattering environments of human breast tissue. The use of morphology, in the context of reflectivity, sound speed and attenuation, for characterizing tissue, is discussed.

  20. Combining whistle acoustic parameters to discriminate Mediterranean odontocetes during passive acoustic monitoring.

    PubMed

    Azzolin, Marta; Gannier, Alexandre; Lammers, Marc O; Oswald, Julie N; Papale, Elena; Buscaino, Giuseppa; Buffa, Gaspare; Mazzola, Salvatore; Giacoma, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic observation can complement visual observation to more effectively monitor occurrence and distribution of marine mammals. For effective acoustic censuses, calibration methods must be determined by joint visual and acoustic studies. Research is still needed in the field of acoustic species identification, particularly for smaller odontocetes. From 1994 to 2012, whistles of four odontocete species were recorded in different areas of the Mediterranean Sea to determine how reliably these vocalizations can be classified to species. Recordings were attributed to species by simultaneous visual observation. The results of this study highlight that the frequency parameters, which are linked to physical features of animals, show lower variability than modulation parameters, which are likely to be more dependent on complex eco-ethological contexts. For all the studied species, minimum and maximum frequencies were linearly correlated with body size. DFA and Classification Tree Analysis (CART) show that these parameters were the most important for classifying species; however, both statistical methods highlighted the need for combining them with the number of contour minima and contour maxima for correct classification. Generally, DFA and CART results reflected both phylogenetic distance (especially for common and striped dolphins) and the size of the species.

  1. Design parameters of a miniaturized piezoelectric underwater acoustic transmitter.

    PubMed

    Li, Huidong; Deng, Zhiqun Daniel; Yuan, Yong; Carlson, Thomas J

    2012-01-01

    PZT ceramics have been widely used in underwater acoustic transducers. However, literature available discussing the design parameters of a miniaturized PZT-based low-duty-cycle transmitter is very limited. This paper discusses some of the design parameters--the backing material, driving voltage, PZT material type, power consumption and the transducer length of a miniaturized acoustic fish tag using a PZT tube. Four different types of PZT were evaluated with respect to the source level, energy consumption and bandwidth of the transducer. The effect of the tube length on the source level is discussed. The results demonstrate that ultralow-density closed-cell foam is the best backing material for the PZT tube. The Navy Type VI PZTs provide the best source level with relatively low energy consumption and that a low transducer capacitance is preferred for high efficiency. A 35% reduction in the transducer length results in 2 dB decrease in source level. PMID:23012534

  2. Design Parameters of a Miniaturized Piezoelectric Underwater Acoustic Transmitter

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huidong; Deng, Zhiqun Daniel; Yuan, Yong; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    PZT ceramics have been widely used in underwater acoustic transducers. However, literature available discussing the design parameters of a miniaturized PZT-based low-duty-cycle transmitter is very limited. This paper discusses some of the design parameters—the backing material, driving voltage, PZT material type, power consumption and the transducer length of a miniaturized acoustic fish tag using a PZT tube. Four different types of PZT were evaluated with respect to the source level, energy consumption and bandwidth of the transducer. The effect of the tube length on the source level is discussed. The results demonstrate that ultralow-density closed-cell foam is the best backing material for the PZT tube. The Navy Type VI PZTs provide the best source level with relatively low energy consumption and that a low transducer capacitance is preferred for high efficiency. A 35% reduction in the transducer length results in 2 dB decrease in source level. PMID:23012534

  3. Statistical Analysis of Acoustic Wave Parameters Near Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabello-Soares, M. Cristina; Bogart, Richard S.; Scherrer, Philip H.

    2016-08-01

    In order to quantify the influence of magnetic fields on acoustic mode parameters and flows in and around active regions, we analyze the differences in the parameters in magnetically quiet regions nearby an active region (which we call “nearby regions”), compared with those of quiet regions at the same disk locations for which there are no neighboring active regions. We also compare the mode parameters in active regions with those in comparably located quiet regions. Our analysis is based on ring-diagram analysis of all active regions observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) during almost five years. We find that the frequency at which the mode amplitude changes from attenuation to amplification in the quiet nearby regions is around 4.2 mHz, in contrast to the active regions, for which it is about 5.1 mHz. This amplitude enhacement (the “acoustic halo effect”) is as large as that observed in the active regions, and has a very weak dependence on the wave propagation direction. The mode energy difference in nearby regions also changes from a deficit to an excess at around 4.2 mHz, but averages to zero over all modes. The frequency difference in nearby regions increases with increasing frequency until a point at which the frequency shifts turn over sharply, as in active regions. However, this turnover occurs around 4.9 mHz, which is significantly below the acoustic cutoff frequency. Inverting the horizontal flow parameters in the direction of the neigboring active regions, we find flows that are consistent with a model of the thermal energy flow being blocked directly below the active region.

  4. Accuracy of cosmological parameters using the baryon acoustic scale

    SciTech Connect

    Thepsuriya, Kiattisak; Lewis, Antony E-mail: antony@cosmologist.info

    2015-01-01

    Percent-level measurements of the comoving baryon acoustic scale standard ruler can be used to break degeneracies in parameter constraints from the CMB alone. The sound horizon at the epoch of baryon drag is often used as a proxy for the scale of the peak in the matter density correlation function, and can conveniently be calculated quickly for different cosmological models. However, the measurements are not directly constraining this scale, but rather a measurement of the full correlation function, which depends on the detailed evolution through decoupling. We assess the level of reliability of parameter constraints based on a simple approximation of the acoustic scale compared to a more direct determination from the full numerical two-point correlation function. Using a five-parameter fitting technique similar to recent BAO data analyses, we find that for standard ΛCDM models and extensions with massive neutrinos and additional relativistic degrees of freedom, the approximation is at better than 0.15% for most parameter combinations varying over reasonable ranges.

  5. Design Parameters of a Miniaturized Piezoelectric Underwater Acoustic Transmitter

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Huidong; Deng, Zhiqun; Yuan, Yong; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-07-02

    The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) project supported by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, has yielded the smallest acoustic fish tag transmitter commercially available to date. In order to study even smaller fish populations and make the transmitter injectable by needles, the JSATS acoustic micro transmitter needs to be further downsized. As part of the transmitter downsizing effort some of the design parameters of the lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramic tube transducer in the transmitter were studied, including the type of PZT, the backing material, the necessary drive voltage, the transmitting bandwidth and the length of the transducer. It was found that, to satisfy the 156-dB source level requirement of JSATS, a square wave with a 10-volt amplitude is required to drive 'soft' PZT transducers. PZT-5H demonstrated the best source level performance. For Navy types I and II, 16 volts or 18 volts were needed. Ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM) closed-cell foam was found to be the backing material providing the highest source level. The effect of tube length on the source level is also demonstrated in this paper, providing quantitative information for downsizing of small piezoelectric transmitters.

  6. Tissue Composition Determination via Measurement of the Acoustic Nonlinearity Parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everbach, Erich Carr

    In this thesis, methods are described by which the concentrations of water, protein, and fat present in a biological tissue can be inferred from measurements made of its bulk acoustic properties, including the acoustic nonlinearity parameter, B/A. We review the physical significance of this parameter and its use as a descriptor in the mixture methodologies of Apfel and Sehgal et al., and explore the theoretical implications of both methodologies and their underlying relations. One important result is that Apfel's methodology applies strictly only to mixtures whose components are finely mixed on the scale of an acoustic wavelength, while Sehgal's methodology applies strictly only to mixtures whose components are arranged in layers or regions of thickness (in the direction of propagation) larger than an acoustic wavelength. Another result is the prediction of a mechanism for enhanced nonlinearity based upon the application of Apfel's perfect-mixture relation for B/A to gas-liquid mixtures. Also in this thesis we describe a new in vitro technique for precise determination of B/A, and use this technique to measure a wide range of protein solutions, lipid oils, and their mixtures, as well as biological tissues. On the basis of these data, we compare and evaluate the mixture methodologies and suggest ways in which these models may be improved and extended. We show that when Apfel's and Sehgal's methodologies are applied to fine and coarse mixtures, respectively, they predict the actual component volume fractions to an accuracy of within 5%. For two-component mixtures, the perfect-mixture relations involving density, sound speed and B/A were obeyed to within about 2%, 3%, and 5%, respectively. For protein solutions, no dependence of B/A with protein molecular weight was observed. Also, no significant dependence of B/A or the inferred component volume fractions was observed for changes in tissue structure including denaturization of proteins, clotting of blood plasma

  7. Dependence of acoustic levitation capabilities on geometric parameters.

    PubMed

    Xie, W J; Wei, B

    2002-08-01

    A two-cylinder model incorporating boundary element method simulations is developed, which builds up the relationship between the levitation capabilities and the geometric parameters of a single-axis acoustic levitator with reference to wavelength. This model proves to be successful in predicting resonant modes of the acoustic field and explaining axial symmetry deviation of the levitated samples near the reflector and emitter. Concave reflecting surfaces of a spherical cap, a paraboloid, and a hyperboloid of revolution are investigated systematically with regard to the dependence of the levitation force on the section radius R(b) and curvature radius R (or depth D) of the reflector. It is found that the levitation force can be remarkably enhanced by choosing an optimum value of R or D, and the possible degree of this enhancement for spherically curved reflectors is the largest. The degree of levitation force enhancement by this means can also be facilitated by enlarging R(b) and employing a lower resonant mode. The deviation of the sample near the reflector is found likely to occur in case of smaller R(b), larger D, and a higher resonant mode. The calculated dependence of levitation force on R, R(b), and the resonant mode is also verified by experiment and finally demonstrated to be in good agreement with experimental results, in which considerably a strong levitation force is achieved to levitate an iridium sphere which has the largest density of 22.6 g/cm(3). PMID:12241309

  8. Methods and apparatus for multi-parameter acoustic signature inspection

    DOEpatents

    Diaz, Aaron A.; Samuel, Todd J.; Valencia, Juan D.; Gervais, Kevin L.; Tucker, Brian J.; Kirihara, Leslie J.; Skorpik, James R.; Reid, Larry D.; Munley, John T.; Pappas, Richard A.; Wright, Bob W.; Panetta, Paul D.; Thompson, Jason S.

    2007-07-24

    A multiparameter acoustic signature inspection device and method are described for non-invasive inspection of containers. Dual acoustic signatures discriminate between various fluids and materials for identification of the same.

  9. Measurement of the Acoustic Nonlinearity Parameter for Biological Media.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobb, Wesley Nelson

    In vitro measurements of the acoustic nonlinearity parameter are presented for several biological media. With these measurements it is possible to predict the distortion of a finite amplitude wave in biological tissues of current diagnostic and research interest. The measurement method is based on the finite amplitude distortion of a sine wave that is emmitted by a piston source. The growth of the second harmonic component of this wave is measured by a piston receiver which is coaxial with and has the same size as the source. The experimental measurements and theory are compared in order to determine the nonlinearity parameter. The density, sound speed, and attenuation for the medium are determined in order to make this comparison. The theory developed for this study accounts for the influence of both diffraction and attenuation on the experimental measurements. The effects of dispersion, tissue inhomogeneity and gas bubbles within the excised tissues are studied. To test the measurement method, experimental results are compared with established values for the nonlinearity parameter of distilled water, ethylene glycol and glycerol. The agreement between these values suggests that the measurement uncertainty is (+OR-) 5% for liquids and (+OR-) 10% for solid tissues. Measurements are presented for dog blood and bovine serum albumen as a function of concentration. The nonlinearity parameters for liver, kidney and spleen are reported for both human and canine tissues. The values for the fresh tissues displayed little variation (6.8 to 7.8). Measurements for fixed, normal and cirrhotic tissues indicated that the nonlinearity parameter does not depend strongly on pathology. However, the values for fixed tissues were somewhat higher than those of the fresh tissues.

  10. Listeners' expectation of room acoustical parameters based on visual cues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valente, Daniel L.

    Despite many studies investigating auditory spatial impressions in rooms, few have addressed the impact of simultaneous visual cues on localization and the perception of spaciousness. The current research presents an immersive audio-visual study, in which participants are instructed to make spatial congruency and quantity judgments in dynamic cross-modal environments. The results of these psychophysical tests suggest the importance of consilient audio-visual presentation to the legibility of an auditory scene. Several studies have looked into audio-visual interaction in room perception in recent years, but these studies rely on static images, speech signals, or photographs alone to represent the visual scene. Building on these studies, the aim is to propose a testing method that uses monochromatic compositing (blue-screen technique) to position a studio recording of a musical performance in a number of virtual acoustical environments and ask subjects to assess these environments. In the first experiment of the study, video footage was taken from five rooms varying in physical size from a small studio to a small performance hall. Participants were asked to perceptually align two distinct acoustical parameters---early-to-late reverberant energy ratio and reverberation time---of two solo musical performances in five contrasting visual environments according to their expectations of how the room should sound given its visual appearance. In the second experiment in the study, video footage shot from four different listening positions within a general-purpose space was coupled with sounds derived from measured binaural impulse responses (IRs). The relationship between the presented image, sound, and virtual receiver position was examined. It was found that many visual cues caused different perceived events of the acoustic environment. This included the visual attributes of the space in which the performance was located as well as the visual attributes of the performer

  11. The mechanical and acoustic properties of two-dimensional pentamode metamaterials with different structural parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xuan; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Zhigao; Zhao, Aiguo; Zhang, Xiangdong; Wu, Tao; Chen, Hong

    2016-09-01

    The effective mechanical and acoustic properties of two-dimensional pentamode metamaterials (PMs) with different structural parameters are investigated in this paper. It is found that with varying structural parameters, the effective bulk modulus and density remain constant as the same as those of water, while the figure of merit, i.e., the ratio of the bulk modulus to the shear modulus (B/G) gradually increases due to the decrease of the shear modulus. However, full wave simulations reveal that with the increase of B/G, the acoustic scattering becomes more and more intense, which indicates that the acoustic properties of pentamode metamaterials gradually deviate from those of water. These anomalous acoustic behaviors are proposed to arise from the existence of the bending modes in pentamode microstructures. Our results show that for pentamode metamaterials, the mechanical properties cannot be simply translated to their acoustic properties, and the structural parameters affect the mechanical and acoustic properties in much different ways.

  12. Relative measurement of acoustic nonlinear parameters and comparison of sensitivity to thermal aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Hogeon; Ren, Gang; Kim, Jongbeom; Jhang, Kyung-Young

    2015-03-01

    The acoustic nonlinearity measurement of ultrasonic waves are being extensively researched as a promising nondestructive evaluation element. In the condition of constant propagation distance and wave number, many researchers have measured the second-order relative acoustic nonlinear parameter, β', that can be simply defined as the ratio of the amplitude of the second harmonic frequency component to the amplitude squared of the fundamental frequency component and compared them in order to identify the acoustic nonlinearity variation according to material degradation. In this study, we extended this concept to the third-order relative acoustic nonlinear parameter, γ', by defining it as the ratio of the amplitude of the third harmonic frequency component to the amplitude cubed of the fundamental frequency component. To investigate its effectiveness as a nondestructive evaluation element for the material property degradation, both the second-order acoustic relative nonlinear parameter and the third-order relative acoustic nonlinear parameter were measured for the aluminum specimens processed by heat treatment for the different times and then contrasted each other. From the experimental results, the third-order acoustic relative nonlinear parameter was more sensitive than the second-order relative acoustic nonlinear parameter that has been widely used although the amplitude of the third harmonic frequency component was lower than the amplitude of the second harmonic frequency component.

  13. Effects of Various Architectural Parameters on Six Room Acoustical Measures in Auditoria.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Wei-Hwa

    The effects of architectural parameters on six room acoustical measures were investigated by means of correlation analyses, factor analyses and multiple regression analyses based on data taken in twenty halls. Architectural parameters were used to estimate acoustical measures taken at individual locations within each room as well as the averages and standard deviations of all measured values in the rooms. The six acoustical measures were Early Decay Time (EDT10), Clarity Index (C80), Overall Level (G), Bass Ratio based on Early Decay Time (BR(EDT)), Treble Ratio based on Early Decay Time (TR(EDT)), and Early Inter-aural Cross Correlation (IACC80). A comprehensive method of quantifying various architectural characteristics of rooms was developed to define a large number of architectural parameters that were hypothesized to effect the acoustical measurements made in the rooms. This study quantitatively confirmed many of the principles used in the design of concert halls and auditoria. Three groups of room architectural parameters such as the parameters associated with the depth of diffusing surfaces were significantly correlated with the hall standard deviations of most of the acoustical measures. Significant differences of statistical relations among architectural parameters and receiver specific acoustical measures were found between a group of music halls and a group of lecture halls. For example, architectural parameters such as the relative distance from the receiver to the overhead ceiling increased the percentage of the variance of acoustical measures that was explained by Barron's revised theory from approximately 70% to 80% only when data were taken in the group of music halls. This study revealed the major architectural parameters which have strong relations with individual acoustical measures forming the basis for a more quantitative method for advancing the theoretical design of concert halls and other auditoria. The results of this study provide

  14. Study of influence of the fiber optic coatings parameters on optical acoustic sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrov, V. S.; Kulikov, A. V.; Plotnikov, M. U.; Efimov, M. E.; Varzhel, S. V.

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents the optical fiber acoustic sensitivity dependence on the coating parameters and the thickness of coating layer. A comparison of data obtained from the theoretical research and experimental estimates of real samples sensitivity in air and water.

  15. Linkage between acoustic parameters and seabed sediment properties in the south-western Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endler, Michael; Endler, Rudolf; Bobertz, Bernd; Leipe, Thomas; Arz, Helge W.

    2015-04-01

    Acoustic profiling methods are widely used to provide a rapid view into geological structures. For the interpretation of acoustic profiling results (single- and multi-beam), reliable geo-acoustic models are needed. Suitable geo-acoustic models covering a wide range of sediment types do not exist to date for the Baltic Sea. Based on surface sediment datasets, geo-acoustic models have been set up for the prediction of acoustical parameters derived from sedimentological data for south-western Baltic Sea surface sediments. Empirical relationships were created to predict key in situ parameters (p-wave velocity, wet bulk density) from sedimentological core data, notably grain density and water content. The Gassmann-Hamilton equations were used to set up a more generic physically based model. For the first time semi-empirical equations for the calculation of the elastic frame modulus and the solid sediment particle modulus were established by an iterative Gassmann-Hamilton fitting procedure. The resulting models have a remarkably good performance with, for example, a calculated sound velocity accuracy of about 17-32 m s-1 depending on model input data. The acoustic impedance of seafloor sediments can be estimated from single-beam echosounding if the contribution of seafloor reflectivity is extracted from the total acoustic signal. The data reveal a strong linkage between acoustic impedance and selected sediment properties (e.g. grain size, water content). This underlines the potential for effective mapping of seafloor sediment properties (e.g. habitat mapping). Furthermore, these geo-acoustic models can be used by marine geologists for a precise linkage between sediment facies identified in longer cores and corresponding acoustic facies recorded by high-resolution seismic profiling in future work.

  16. A computer program for processing impedance cardiographic data: Improving accuracy through user-interactive software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowings, Patricia S.; Naifeh, Karen; Thrasher, Chet

    1988-01-01

    This report contains the source code and documentation for a computer program used to process impedance cardiography data. The cardiodynamic measures derived from impedance cardiography are ventricular stroke column, cardiac output, cardiac index and Heather index. The program digitizes data collected from the Minnesota Impedance Cardiograph, Electrocardiography (ECG), and respiratory cycles and then stores these data on hard disk. It computes the cardiodynamic functions using interactive graphics and stores the means and standard deviations of each 15-sec data epoch on floppy disk. This software was designed on a Digital PRO380 microcomputer and used version 2.0 of P/OS, with (minimally) a 4-channel 16-bit analog/digital (A/D) converter. Applications software is written in FORTRAN 77, and uses Digital's Pro-Tool Kit Real Time Interface Library, CORE Graphic Library, and laboratory routines. Source code can be readily modified to accommodate alternative detection, A/D conversion and interactive graphics. The object code utilizing overlays and multitasking has a maximum of 50 Kbytes.

  17. Impulse source versus dodecahedral loudspeaker for measuring parameters derived from the impulse response in room acoustics.

    PubMed

    San Martín, Ricardo; Arana, Miguel; Machín, Jorge; Arregui, Abel

    2013-07-01

    This study investigates the performance of dodecahedral and impulse sources when measuring acoustic parameters in enclosures according to ISO 3382-1 [Acoustics-Measurement of room acoustic parameters. Part 1: Performance spaces (International Organization for Standardization, Geneva, Switzerland, 2009)]. In general, methods using speakers as a sound source are limited by their frequency response and directivity. On the other hand, getting impulse responses from impulse sources typically involves a lack of repeatability, and it is usually necessary to average several measurements for each position. Through experiments in different auditoriums that recreate typical situations in which the measurement standard is applied, it is found that using impulse sources leads to greater variation in the results, especially at low frequencies. However, this prevents subsequent dispersions due to variables that this technique does not require, such as the orientation of the emitting source. These dispersions may be relevant at high frequencies exceeding the established tolerance criteria for certain parameters. Finally, a new descriptor for dodecahedral sources reflecting the influence their lack of omnidirectionality produces on measuring acoustic parameters is proposed.

  18. Development of explicit diffraction corrections for absolute measurements of acoustic nonlinearity parameters in the quasilinear regime.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyunjo; Zhang, Shuzeng; Cho, Sungjong; Li, Xiongbing

    2016-08-01

    In absolute measurements of acoustic nonlinearity parameters, amplitudes of harmonics must be corrected for diffraction effects. In this study, we develop explicit multi-Gaussian beam (MGB) model-based diffraction corrections for the first three harmonics in weakly nonlinear, axisymmetric sound beams. The effects of making diffraction corrections on nonlinearity parameter estimation are investigated by defining "total diffraction correction (TDC)". The results demonstrate that TDC cannot be neglected even for harmonic generation experiments in the nearfield region. PMID:27186964

  19. Effective parameters in beam acoustic metamaterials based on energy band structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Li; Wu, Jiu Hui; Guan, Dong; Hou, Mingming; Kuan, Lu; Shen, Li

    2016-07-01

    We present a method to calculate the effective material parameters of beam acoustic metamaterials. The effective material parameters of a periodic beam are calculated as an example. The dispersion relations and energy band structures of this beam are calculated. Subsequently, the effective material parameters of the beam are investigated by using the energy band structures. Then, the modal analysis and transmission properties of the beams with finite cells are simulated in order to confirm the correctness of effective approximation. The results show that the periodic beam can be equivalent to the homogeneous beam with dynamic effective material parameters in passband.

  20. A micromechanics model for the acoustic nonlinearity parameter in solids with distributed microcracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Youxuan; Qiu, Yanjun; Jacobs, Laurence J.; Qu, Jianmin

    2016-02-01

    As a longitudinal wave propagates through a linearly elastic solid with distributed cracks, the solid is subjected to cyclic tension and compression. During the tensile cycles, a crack might be open and its faces are traction-free. During the compressive cycles, a crack might be closed and its faces are in contact. Such contact may also be frictional because of crack face roughness. Such tension and compression asymmetry causes acoustic nonlinearity. This paper develops a micromechanics model that relates the crack density to the acoustic nonlinearity parameter. The model is based on a micromechanics homogenization of the cracked solid under dynamic loading. It is shown that the acoustic nonlinearity parameter is proportional to the crack density. Furthermore, the acoustic nonlinearity parameter also depends on the frequency of the wave motion, and the coefficient of friction of the crack faces. Unlike the second harmonic generated by dislocations, the amplitude of the second harmonic due to crack face contact is proportional to the amplitude of the fundamental frequency. To validate the micromechanics model, the finite element method is used to simulate wave propagation in solid with randomly distributed microcracks. The micromechanics model predictions agree well with the finite element simulation results.

  1. Parameter estimation in a structural acoustic system with fully nonlinear coupling conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Smith, Ralph C.

    1994-01-01

    A methodology for estimating physical parameters in a class of structural acoustic systems is presented. The general model under consideration consists of an interior cavity which is separated from an exterior noise source by an enclosing elastic structure. Piezoceramic patches are bonded to or embedded in the structure; these can be used both as actuators and sensors in applications ranging from the control of interior noise levels to the determination of structural flaws through nondestructive evaluation techniques. The presence and excitation of patches, however, changes the geometry and material properties of the structure as well as involves unknown patch parameters, thus necessitating the development of parameter estimation techniques which are applicable in this coupled setting. In developing a framework for approximation, parameter estimation and implementation, strong consideration is given to the fact that the input operator is unbonded due to the discrete nature of the patches. Moreover, the model is weakly nonlinear. As a result of the coupling mechanism between the structural vibrations and the interior acoustic dynamics. Within this context, an illustrating model is given, well-posedness and approximations results are discussed and an applicable parameter estimation methodology is presented. The scheme is then illustrated through several numerical examples with simulations modeling a variety of commonly used structural acoustic techniques for systems excitations and data collection.

  2. A magnetic resonance imaging study on the articulatory and acoustic speech parameters of Malay vowels

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The phonetic properties of six Malay vowels are investigated using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to visualize the vocal tract in order to obtain dynamic articulatory parameters during speech production. To resolve image blurring due to the tongue movement during the scanning process, a method based on active contour extraction is used to track tongue contours. The proposed method efficiently tracks tongue contours despite the partial blurring of MRI images. Consequently, the articulatory parameters that are effectively measured as tongue movement is observed, and the specific shape of the tongue and its position for all six uttered Malay vowels are determined. Speech rehabilitation procedure demands some kind of visual perceivable prototype of speech articulation. To investigate the validity of the measured articulatory parameters based on acoustic theory of speech production, an acoustic analysis based on the uttered vowels by subjects has been performed. As the acoustic speech and articulatory parameters of uttered speech were examined, a correlation between formant frequencies and articulatory parameters was observed. The experiments reported a positive correlation between the constriction location of the tongue body and the first formant frequency, as well as a negative correlation between the constriction location of the tongue tip and the second formant frequency. The results demonstrate that the proposed method is an effective tool for the dynamic study of speech production. PMID:25060583

  3. Retrieval of the equivalent acoustic constitutive parameters of an inhomogeneous fluid-like object by nonlinear full waveform inversion.

    PubMed

    Wirgin, Armand

    2016-02-01

    This study addresses the problem of the acoustic characterization of an inhomogeneous object such as a soft-tissue organ containing a cyst or tumor whose size and/or composition evolve either negatively due to increased disease or positively due to increased response to treatment. The so-called 'corrupted' binary object, probed by a transient, acoustic plane wave, is a tube composed of a homogenous fluid-like (or assumed as such) mantle (medium 1: three acoustic constitutive parameters, one geometric parameter) surrounding a homogeneous fluid-like (or assumed as such) core (medium 2: three acoustic constitutive parameters, one geometric parameter), immersed in a spatially-infinite, homogeneous fluid (host medium 0: two acoustic parameters). The complete inversion of the diffracted acoustic field response of this object involves the retrieval of seven (six acoustic and one geometric) parameters, assuming we know beforehand the outer radius of the tube and acoustic parameters of the host. An alternative to this time-consuming, hazardous (due to the ill-posed nature of the) procedure, is to minimize the discrepancy, between the full waveform response of the binary object to a transient plane wave and the response of a homogeneous cylinder (medium characterized by three acoustic parameters, one geometric parameter) to the same transient plane wave, so as to retrieve the (three so-called equivalent) acoustic parameters of the homogeneous object. Thus, the first inverse problem is replaced by a second one (same assumptions concerning the outer radius of the objects, the host medium, the probe radiation and the sensing configuration as the first one) involving the retrieval of only three (instead of six) acoustic parameters. This procedure is potentially useful if the variation of at least one of the three equivalent parameters is sensitive to the variation of a key parameter of the inhomogeneous body (usually the characteristic dimension or the wavespeed of the core) and

  4. Optimization of input parameters of acoustic-transfection for the intracellular delivery of macromolecules using FRET-based biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Sangpil; Wang, Yingxiao; Shung, K. K.

    2016-03-01

    Acoustic-transfection technique has been developed for the first time. We have developed acoustic-transfection by integrating a high frequency ultrasonic transducer and a fluorescence microscope. High frequency ultrasound with the center frequency over 150 MHz can focus acoustic sound field into a confined area with the diameter of 10 μm or less. This focusing capability was used to perturb lipid bilayer of cell membrane to induce intracellular delivery of macromolecules. Single cell level imaging was performed to investigate the behavior of a targeted single-cell after acoustic-transfection. FRET-based Ca2+ biosensor was used to monitor intracellular concentration of Ca2+ after acoustic-transfection and the fluorescence intensity of propidium iodide (PI) was used to observe influx of PI molecules. We changed peak-to-peak voltages and pulse duration to optimize the input parameters of an acoustic pulse. Input parameters that can induce strong perturbations on cell membrane were found and size dependent intracellular delivery of macromolecules was explored. To increase the amount of delivered molecules by acoustic-transfection, we applied several acoustic pulses and the intensity of PI fluorescence increased step wise. Finally, optimized input parameters of acoustic-transfection system were used to deliver pMax-E2F1 plasmid and GFP expression 24 hours after the intracellular delivery was confirmed using HeLa cells.

  5. On measurement of the acoustic nonlinearity parameter using the finite amplitude insertion substitution (FAIS) technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeqiri, Bajram; Cook, Ashley; Rétat, Lise; Civale, John; ter Haar, Gail

    2015-04-01

    The acoustic nonlinearity parameter, B/A, is an important parameter which defines the way a propagating finite amplitude acoustic wave progressively distorts when travelling through any medium. One measurement technique used to determine its value is the finite amplitude insertion substitution (FAIS) method which has been applied to a range of liquid, tissue and tissue-like media. Importantly, in terms of the achievable measurement uncertainties, it is a relative technique. This paper presents a detailed study of the method, employing a number of novel features. The first of these is the use of a large area membrane hydrophone (30 mm aperture) which is used to record the plane-wave component of the acoustic field. This reduces the influence of diffraction on measurements, enabling studies to be carried out within the transducer near-field, with the interrogating transducer, test cell and detector positioned close to one another, an attribute which assists in controlling errors arising from nonlinear distortion in any intervening water path. The second feature is the development of a model which estimates the influence of finite-amplitude distortion as the acoustic wave travels from the rear surface of the test cell to the detector. It is demonstrated that this can lead to a significant systematic error in B/A measurement whose magnitude and direction depends on the acoustic property contrast between the test material and the water-filled equivalent cell. Good qualitative agreement between the model and experiment is reported. B/A measurements are reported undertaken at (20 ± 0.5) °C for two fluids commonly employed as reference materials within the technical literature: Corn Oil and Ethylene Glycol. Samples of an IEC standardised agar-based tissue-mimicking material were also measured. A systematic assessment of measurement uncertainties is presented giving expanded uncertainties in the range ±7% to ±14%, expressed at a confidence level close to 95

  6. The determination of the acoustic parameters of volcanic rocks from compressional velocity measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carroll, R.D.

    1969-01-01

    A statistical analysis was made of the relationship of various acoustic parameters of volcanic rocks to compressional wave velocities for data obtained in a volcanic region in Nevada. Some additional samples, chiefly granitic rocks, were also included in the study to extend the range of parameters and the variety of siliceous rock types sampled. Laboratory acoustic measurements obtained on 62 dry core samples were grouped with similar measurements obtained from geophysical logging devices at several depth intervals in a hole from which 15 of the core samples had been obtained. The effects of lithostatic and hydrostatic load on changing the rock acoustic parameters measured in the hole were noticeable when compared with the laboratory measurements on the same core. The results of the analyses determined by grouping all of the data, however, indicate that dynamic Young's, shear and bulk modulus, shear velocity, shear and compressional characteristic impedance, as well as amplitude and energy reflection coefficients may be reliably estimated on the basis of the compressional wave velocities of the rocks investigated. Less precise estimates can be made of density based on the rock compressional velocity. The possible extension of these relationships to include many siliceous rocks is suggested. ?? 1969.

  7. Assessment of impact of acoustic and nonacoustic parameters on performance and well-being

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellert, Volker; Weber, Reinhard; Nocke, Christian

    2001-05-01

    It is of interest to estimate the influence of the environment in a specific work place area on the performance and well-being of people. Investigations have been carried out for the cabin environment of an airplane and for class rooms. Acoustics is only one issue of a variety of environmental factors, therefore the combined impact of temperature, humidity, air quality, lighting, vibration, etc. on human perception is the subject of psychophysical research. Methods for the objective assessment of subjective impressions have been developed for applications in acoustics for a long time, e.g., for concert hall acoustics, noise evaluation, and sound design. The methodology relies on questionnaires, measurement of acoustic parameters, ear-related signal processing and analysis, and on correlation of the physical input with subjective output. Methodology and results are presented from measurements of noise and vibration, temperature and humidity in aircraft simulators, and of reverberation, coloring, and lighting in a primary school, and of the environmental perception. [The work includes research with M. Klatte, A. Schick from the Psychology Department of Oldenburg University, and M. Meis from Hoerzentrum Oldenburg GmbH and with the European Project HEACE (for partners see www.heace.org).

  8. Simultaneous evaluation of acoustic nonlinearity parameter and attenuation coefficients using the finite amplitude method

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shuzeng; Li, Xiongbing; Jeong, Hyunjo Cho, Sungjong

    2015-07-15

    A novel method to determine acoustic parameters involved in measuring the nonlinearity parameter of fluids or solids is proposed. The approach is based on the measurement of fundamental and second harmonic pressures with a calibrated receiver, and on a nonlinear least squares data-fitting to multi-Gaussian beam (MGB) equations which explicitly define the attenuation and diffraction effects in the quasilinear regime. Results obtained in water validate the proposed method. The choice of suitable source pressure is discussed with regard to the quasilinear approximation involved. The attenuation coefficients are also acquired in nonlinear regime and their relations are discussed.

  9. Energy analysis during acoustic bubble oscillations: relationship between bubble energy and sonochemical parameters.

    PubMed

    Merouani, Slimane; Hamdaoui, Oualid; Rezgui, Yacine; Guemini, Miloud

    2014-01-01

    In this work, energy analysis of an oscillating isolated spherical bubble in water irradiated by an ultrasonic wave has been theoretically studied for various conditions of acoustic amplitude, ultrasound frequency, static pressure and liquid temperature in order to explain the effects of these key parameters on both sonochemistry and sonoluminescence. The Keller-Miksis equation for the temporal variation of the bubble radius in compressible and viscous medium has been employed as a dynamics model. The numerical calculations showed that the rate of energy accumulation, dE/dt, increased linearly with increasing acoustic amplitude in the range of 1.5-3.0 atm and decreased sharply with increasing frequency in the range 200-1000 kHz. There exists an optimal static pressure at which the power w is highest. This optimum shifts toward a higher value as the acoustic amplitude increases. The energy of the bubble slightly increases with the increase in liquid temperature from 10 to 60 °C. The results of this study should be a helpful means to explain a variety of experimental observations conducted in the field of sonochemistry and sonoluminescence concerning the effects of operational parameters. PMID:23683796

  10. Phylogenetic signal in the acoustic parameters of the advertisement calls of four clades of anurans

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anuran vocalizations, especially their advertisement calls, are largely species-specific and can be used to identify taxonomic affiliations. Because anurans are not vocal learners, their vocalizations are generally assumed to have a strong genetic component. This suggests that the degree of similarity between advertisement calls may be related to large-scale phylogenetic relationships. To test this hypothesis, advertisement calls from 90 species belonging to four large clades (Bufo, Hylinae, Leptodactylus, and Rana) were analyzed. Phylogenetic distances were estimated based on the DNA sequences of the 12S mitochondrial ribosomal RNA gene, and, for a subset of 49 species, on the rhodopsin gene. Mean values for five acoustic parameters (coefficient of variation of root-mean-square amplitude, dominant frequency, spectral flux, spectral irregularity, and spectral flatness) were computed for each species. We then tested for phylogenetic signal on the body-size-corrected residuals of these five parameters, using three statistical tests (Moran’s I, Mantel, and Blomberg’s K) and three models of genetic distance (pairwise distances, Abouheif’s proximities, and the variance-covariance matrix derived from the phylogenetic tree). Results A significant phylogenetic signal was detected for most acoustic parameters on the 12S dataset, across statistical tests and genetic distance models, both for the entire sample of 90 species and within clades in several cases. A further analysis on a subset of 49 species using genetic distances derived from rhodopsin and from 12S broadly confirmed the results obtained on the larger sample, indicating that the phylogenetic signals observed in these acoustic parameters can be detected using a variety of genetic distance models derived either from a variable mitochondrial sequence or from a conserved nuclear gene. Conclusions We found a robust relationship, in a large number of species, between anuran phylogenetic relatedness and

  11. A multi-rate decay model to predict energy-based acoustic parameters in churches (L).

    PubMed

    Martellotta, Francesco

    2009-03-01

    Multi-rate decays are sometimes observed in room acoustics, appearing when markedly different volumes are coupled together and resulting in nonlinear decay curves. Such behavior appears in several churches at the very beginning of the decay process, although in conditions which cannot be explicitly referred to as coupling phenomena. Consequently, multi-rate exponential decays may be suitable to model energy distribution in this group of buildings, providing a more elegant and easily applicable set of equations in place of a previously defined "linear" model, used to adapt Barron's revised theory. The paper shows that the multi-rate approach ensures ease of calculation, without significant loss in accuracy in predicting energy-based acoustic parameters.

  12. Acoustic omni meta-atom for decoupled access to all octants of a wave parameter space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Sukmo; Cho, Choonlae; Jeong, Jun-Ho; Park, Namkyoo

    2016-09-01

    The common behaviour of a wave is determined by wave parameters of its medium, which are generally associated with the characteristic oscillations of its corresponding elementary particles. In the context of metamaterials, the decoupled excitation of these fundamental oscillations would provide an ideal platform for top-down and reconfigurable access to the entire constitutive parameter space; however, this has remained as a conceivable problem that must be accomplished, after being pointed out by Pendry. Here by focusing on acoustic metamaterials, we achieve the decoupling of density ρ, modulus B-1 and bianisotropy ξ, by separating the paths of particle momentum to conform to the characteristic oscillations of each macroscopic wave parameter. Independent access to all octants of wave parameter space (ρ, B-1, ξ)=(+/-,+/-,+/-) is thus realized using a single platform that we call an omni meta-atom; as a building block that achieves top-down access to the target properties of metamaterials.

  13. Acoustic omni meta-atom for decoupled access to all octants of a wave parameter space

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Sukmo; Cho, Choonlae; Jeong, Jun-ho; Park, Namkyoo

    2016-01-01

    The common behaviour of a wave is determined by wave parameters of its medium, which are generally associated with the characteristic oscillations of its corresponding elementary particles. In the context of metamaterials, the decoupled excitation of these fundamental oscillations would provide an ideal platform for top–down and reconfigurable access to the entire constitutive parameter space; however, this has remained as a conceivable problem that must be accomplished, after being pointed out by Pendry. Here by focusing on acoustic metamaterials, we achieve the decoupling of density ρ, modulus B−1 and bianisotropy ξ, by separating the paths of particle momentum to conform to the characteristic oscillations of each macroscopic wave parameter. Independent access to all octants of wave parameter space (ρ, B−1, ξ)=(+/−,+/−,+/−) is thus realized using a single platform that we call an omni meta-atom; as a building block that achieves top–down access to the target properties of metamaterials. PMID:27687689

  14. Numerical investigation and electro-acoustic modeling of measurement methods for the in-duct acoustical source parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Seung-Ho; Ih, Jeong-Guon

    2003-02-01

    It is known that the direct method yields different results from the indirect (or load) method in measuring the in-duct acoustic source parameters of fluid machines. The load method usually comes up with a negative source resistance, although a fairly accurate prediction of radiated noise can be obtained from any method. This study is focused on the effect of the time-varying nature of fluid machines on the output results of two typical measurement methods. For this purpose, a simplified fluid machine consisting of a reservoir, a valve, and an exhaust pipe is considered as representing a typical periodic, time-varying system and the measurement situations are simulated by using the method of characteristics. The equivalent circuits for such simulations are also analyzed by considering the system as having a linear time-varying source. It is found that the results from the load method are quite sensitive to the change of cylinder pressure or valve profile, in contrast to those from the direct method. In the load method, the source admittance turns out to be predominantly dependent on the valve admittance at the calculation frequency as well as the valve and load admittances at other frequencies. In the direct method, however, the source resistance is always positive and the source admittance depends mainly upon the zeroth order of valve admittance.

  15. Quantitative study on characteristic parameters of acoustic behavior habits in budgerigars ( Melopsittacus undula fus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jin-Chang; Chen, Hao; Xu, Mu-Ling; Zhang, Hong

    1994-08-01

    On the bases of the studies of acoustic behavior and pattern recognition of budgerigar calls, the quantitative study on characteristic parameters of acoustic behavior habits in budgerigars is further given in this paper. These results open up a new knowledge for comprehensive analyses of abnormalities of acoustic behavior habits in budgerigars prior to earthquakes. Under indoor lighting, the song calls in budgerigars are possessed of the beginning and ending singing time with the natural characteristics, and of the rhythmic habit of daylight singings and night rests. In daily daylight and night calls, single calls, vari-toned calls, mono-syllabic and multi-syllabic protest calls are respectively possessed of the occupation habit corresponding to behavior activities, and have close acrophases and regular following properties corresponding to half-value phases, and the acrophases delay half-value phases by about half an hour on an average. After reversing lighting, the acrophases of budgerigar calls delay those of the normal lighting by about 12 hours on an average, and the following properties corresponding to half-value phases are irregular.

  16. Effects of vocal training on the acoustic parameters of the singing voice.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Ana P; Rothman, Howard B; Sapienza, Christine; Brown, W S

    2003-12-01

    Vocal training (VT) has, in part, been associated with the distinctions in the physiological, acoustic, and perceptual parameters found in singers' voices versus the voices of nonsingers. This study provides information on the changes in the singing voice as a function of VT over time. Fourteen college voice majors (12 females and 2 males; age range, 17-20 years) were recorded while singing, once a semester, for four consecutive semesters. Acoustic measures included fundamental frequency (F0) and sound pressure level (SPL) of the 10% and 90% levels of the maximum phonational frequency range (MPFR), vibrato pulses per second, vibrato amplitude variation, and the presence of the singer's formant. Results indicated that VT had a significant effect on the MPFR. F0 and SPL of the 90% level of the MPFR and the 90-10% range increased significantly as VT progressed. However, no vibrato or singers' formant differences were detected as a function of training. This longitudinal study not only validates previous cross-sectional research, ie, that VT has a significant effect on the singing voice, but also it demonstrates that these effects can be acoustically detected by the fourth semester of college vocal training. PMID:14740934

  17. A normalized wave number variation parameter for acoustic black hole design.

    PubMed

    Feurtado, Philip A; Conlon, Stephen C; Semperlotti, Fabio

    2014-08-01

    In recent years, the concept of the Acoustic Black Hole has been developed as an efficient passive, lightweight absorber of bending waves in plates and beams. Theory predicts greater absorption for a higher thickness taper power. However, a higher taper power also increases the violation of an underlying theory smoothness assumption. This paper explores the effects of high taper power on the reflection coefficient and spatial change in wave number and discusses the normalized wave number variation as a spatial design parameter for performance, assessment, and optimization. PMID:25096139

  18. Modelling acoustic propagation beneath Antarctic sea ice using measured environmental parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Polly; Duncan, Alec; Bose, Neil; Williams, Guy

    2016-09-01

    Autonomous underwater vehicles are improving and expanding in situ observations of sea ice for the validation of satellite remote sensing and climate models. Missions under sea ice, particularly over large distances (up to 100 km) away from the immediate vicinity of a ship or base, require accurate acoustic communication for monitoring, emergency response and some navigation systems. We investigate the propagation of acoustic signals in the Antarctic seasonal ice zone using the BELLHOP model, examining the influence of ocean and sea ice properties. We processed available observations from around Antarctica to generate input variables such as sound speed, surface reflection coefficient (R) and roughness parameters. The results show that changes in the sound speed profile make the most significant difference to the propagation of the direct path signal. The inclusion of the surface reflected signals from a flat ice surface was found to greatly decrease the transmission loss with range. When ice roughness was added, the transmission loss increased with roughness, in a manner similar to the direct path transmission loss results. The conclusions of this work are that: (1) the accuracy of acoustic modelling in this environment is greatly increased by using realistic sound speed data; (2) a risk averse ranging model would use only the direct path signal transmission; and (3) in a flat ice scenario, much greater ranges can be achieved if the surface reflected transmission paths are included. As autonomous missions under sea ice increase in scale and complexity, it will be increasingly important for operational procedures to include effective modelling of acoustic propagation with representative environmental data.

  19. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  20. Uncertainty quantification of relative acoustic nonlinearity parameter of guided waves for damage detection in composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Ming; Mao, Zhu; Todd, Michael D.; Su, Zhongqing; Qing, Xinlin

    2015-03-01

    Nonlinear guided waves have been studied extensively for the characterization of micro-damage in plate-like structures, such as early-stage fatigue and thermal degradation in metals. Meanwhile, an increasing number of studies have reported the use of nonlinear acoustic techniques for detection of impact damage, fatigue, and thermal fatigue in composite structures. Among these techniques, the (relative) acoustic nonlinearity parameter, extracted from acousto-ultrasonic waves based on second-harmonic generation, has been considered one of the most popular tools for quantifying the detection of nonlinearity in inspected structures. Considering the complex nature of nonlinearities involved in composite materials (even under healthy conditions), and operational/environmental variability and measurement noise, the calculation of the relative acoustic nonlinearity parameter (RANP) from experimental data may suffer from considerable uncertainties, which may impair the quality of damage detection. In this study, we aim to quantify the uncertainty of the magnitude of the RANP estimator in the context of impact damage identification in unidirectional carbon fiber laminates. First, the principles of nonlinear ultrasonics are revisited briefly. A general probability density function of the RANP is then obtained through numerical evaluation in a theoretical setting. Using piezoelectric wavers, continuous sine waves are generated in the sample. Steady-state responses are acquired and processed to produce histograms of the RANP estimates before and after the impact damage. These observed histograms are consistent with the predicted distributions, and examination of the distributions demonstrates the significance of uncertainty quantification when using the RANP for damage detection in composite structures.

  1. Correlations between the in situ acoustic properties and geotechnical parameters of sediments in the Yellow Sea, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Baohua; Han, Tongcheng; Kan, Guangming; Li, Guanbao

    2013-11-01

    Knowledge about the marine sediment acoustic properties is a key to understanding wave propagation in sediments and is very important for military oceanography and ocean engineering. We developed a hydraulic-drived self-contained in situ sediment acoustic measurement system, and measured for the first time the in situ acoustic properties of sediments on 78 stations in the Yellow Sea, China, by employing this system. The relationships between the in situ measured acoustic properties and the onboard or laboratory determined geotechnical parameters were analyzed. Porosity was found to be the dominant factor in reducing velocity in a quadratic fashion; velocity showed an increment with bulk density and a decrement with mean grain size and clay content both with a nonlinear dependence; acoustic attenuation showed a bell-shaped correlation with porosity and mean grain size but reduced with clay content of the sediments. The attenuation results indicate that intergrain friction rather than viscous interactions between pore fluid and solid grains is the dominant loss mechanism in our marine sediments. The relationships established would be used to predict the geotechnical parameters from in situ measured acoustic properties and vice versa, as well as being an indicator of the seafloor processes, potential gas bubbles hazard and gas hydrates resources or other suitable targets of acoustic surveys.

  2. Acoustic analysis of the tremulous voice: assessing the utility of the correlation dimension and perturbation parameters

    PubMed Central

    MacCallum, Julia K.; Zhang, Yu; Jiang, Jack J.

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic analysis may provide a useful means to quantitatively characterize the tremulous voice. Signals were obtained from 25 subjects with diagnoses of either Parkinson's disease or vocal polyps exhibiting vocal tremor. These were compared to signals from 24 subjects with normal voices. Signals were analyzed via correlation dimension and several parameters from the Multi-Dimensional Voice Program (MDVP): percent jitter, percent shimmer, amplitude tremor intensity index (ATRI), frequency tremor intensity index (FTRI), amplitude tremor frequency (Fatr), and fundamental frequency tremor frequency (Fftr). No significant difference was found between the tremor and control groups for ATRI and Fatr. Percent jitter, percent shimmer, FTRI, Fftr, and correlation dimension values were found to be significantly higher in the tremor group than in the control group. We conclude that these parameters may have utility for the clinical quantification of tremor severity and treatment effects. PMID:19909966

  3. Effects of acoustic parameters on bubble cloud dynamics in ultrasound tissue erosion (histotripsy).

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhen; Hall, Timothy L; Fowlkes, J Brian; Cain, Charles A

    2007-07-01

    High intensity pulsed ultrasound can produce significant mechanical tissue fractionation with sharp boundaries ("histotripsy"). At a tissue-fluid interface, histotripsy produces clearly demarcated tissue erosion and the erosion efficiency depends on pulse parameters. Acoustic cavitation is believed to be the primary mechanism for the histotripsy process. To investigate the physical basis of the dependence of tissue erosion on pulse parameters, an optical method was used to monitor the effects of pulse parameters on the cavitating bubble cloud generated by histotripsy pulses at a tissue-water interface. The pulse parameters studied include pulse duration, peak rarefactional pressure, and pulse repetition frequency (PRF). Results show that the duration of growth and collapse (collapse cycle) of the bubble cloud increased with increasing pulse duration, peak rarefactional pressure, and PRF when the next pulse arrived after the collapse of the previous bubble cloud. When the PRF was too high such that the next pulse arrived before the collapse of the previous bubble cloud, only a portion of histotripsy pulses could effectively create and collapse the bubble cloud. The collapse cycle of the bubble cloud also increased with increasing gas concentration. These results may explain previous in vitro results on effects of pulse parameters on tissue erosion.

  4. [Preliminary study of acoustic and aerodynamic parameters after Tucker frontal anterior laryngectomy].

    PubMed

    Giovanni, A; Robert, D; Teston, B; Guarella, M D; Zanaret, M

    1996-01-01

    Currently, not objective method has been demonstrated to be reliable for the evaluation of vocal handicap after partial laryngectomy. Such a tool would allow objective assessment of the post-operative voice and its clinical course as well as a comparison of different surgical techniques in terms of voice quality. We used a EVA device to measure simultaneously acoustic and aerodynamic parameters. We included 23 normal subjects and 34 patients who had undergone a Tucker laryngectomy. All subjects were males. At sustained voice production, acoustic measures of vibration stability (jitter, coefficient of variation in the fundamental frequency, shimmer, coefficient of variation in intensity) and air leak from the glottis (buccal air flow over intensity). The quality of voice in operated patients was judged by a jury of listeners who assigned a global score to voice quality. Results were analyzed to verify the correlation between objective measurements and the jury's score, taken as the reference measurement. The pertinence of the objective measurements was demonstrated for the stability of the frequency and the glottal air leak. Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that total variance of the objective measurements accounted for 84.7% of the scores provided by the jury (R2 = 0.847, p < 0.0001). These satisfactory results emphasize the interest of multiparametric analysis including aerodynamic measurements. These preliminary results led to the hypothesis that objective and subjective measurements could be useful in techniques aimed at improving voice quality (temporal organization of vibratory instability, work on intralaryngeal pressures).

  5. Significance of accurate diffraction corrections for the second harmonic wave in determining the acoustic nonlinearity parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Hyunjo; Zhang, Shuzeng; Li, Xiongbing; Barnard, Dan

    2015-09-15

    The accurate measurement of acoustic nonlinearity parameter β for fluids or solids generally requires making corrections for diffraction effects due to finite size geometry of transmitter and receiver. These effects are well known in linear acoustics, while those for second harmonic waves have not been well addressed and therefore not properly considered in previous studies. In this work, we explicitly define the attenuation and diffraction corrections using the multi-Gaussian beam (MGB) equations which were developed from the quasilinear solutions of the KZK equation. The effects of making these corrections are examined through the simulation of β determination in water. Diffraction corrections are found to have more significant effects than attenuation corrections, and the β values of water can be estimated experimentally with less than 5% errors when the exact second harmonic diffraction corrections are used together with the negligible attenuation correction effects on the basis of linear frequency dependence between attenuation coefficients, α{sub 2} ≃ 2α{sub 1}.

  6. Behavioral assessment of acoustic parameters relevant to signal recognition and preference in a vocal fish.

    PubMed

    McKibben, J R; Bass, A H

    1998-12-01

    Acoustic signal recognition depends on the receiver's processing of the physical attributes of a sound. This study takes advantage of the simple communication sounds produced by plainfin midshipman fish to examine effects of signal variation on call recognition and preference. Nesting male midshipman generate both long duration (> 1 min) sinusoidal-like "hums" and short duration "grunts." The hums of neighboring males often overlap, creating beat waveforms. Presentation of humlike, single tone stimuli, but not grunts or noise, elicited robust attraction (phonotaxis) by gravid females. In two-choice tests, females differentiated and chose between acoustic signals that differed in duration, frequency, amplitude, and fine temporal content. Frequency preferences were temperature dependent, in accord with the known temperature dependence of hum fundamental frequency. Concurrent hums were simulated with two-tone beat stimuli, either presented from a single speaker or produced more naturally by interference between adjacent sources. Whereas certain single-source beats reduced stimulus attractiveness, beats which resolved into unmodulated tones at their sources did not affect preference. These results demonstrate that phonotactic assessment of stimulus relevance can be applied in a teleost fish, and that multiple signal parameters can affect receiver response in a vertebrate with relatively simple communication signals. PMID:9857511

  7. Perceptually relevant parameters for virtual listening simulation of small room acoustics

    PubMed Central

    Zahorik, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    Various physical aspects of room-acoustic simulation techniques have been extensively studied and refined, yet the perceptual attributes of the simulations have received relatively little attention. Here a method of evaluating the perceptual similarity between rooms is described and tested using 15 small-room simulations based on binaural room impulse responses (BRIRs) either measured from a real room or estimated using simple geometrical acoustic modeling techniques. Room size and surface absorption properties were varied, along with aspects of the virtual simulation including the use of individualized head-related transfer function (HRTF) measurements for spatial rendering. Although differences between BRIRs were evident in a variety of physical parameters, a multidimensional scaling analysis revealed that when at-the-ear signal levels were held constant, the rooms differed along just two perceptual dimensions: one related to reverberation time (T60) and one related to interaural coherence (IACC). Modeled rooms were found to differ from measured rooms in this perceptual space, but the differences were relatively small and should be easily correctable through adjustment of T60 and IACC in the model outputs. Results further suggest that spatial rendering using individualized HRTFs offers little benefit over nonindividualized HRTF rendering for room simulation applications where source direction is fixed. PMID:19640043

  8. Parameter-dependence of the acoustic rotation effect of a metamaterial-based field rotator (Presentation Video)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xue; Cheng, JianChun; Liang, Bin

    2015-05-01

    The field rotator is a fascinating device capable to rotate the wave front by a certain angle, which can be regarded as a special kind of illusion. We have theoretically designed and experimentally realized an acoustic field rotator by exploiting acoustic metamaterials with extremely anisotropic parameters. A nearly perfect agreement is observed between the numerical simulation and experimental results. We have also studied the acoustic property of the acoustic rotator, and investigated how various structural parameters affect the performances of such devices, including the operating frequency range and rotation angle, which are of particularly significance for the application. The inspection of the operating frequency range shows the device can work within a considerably broad band as long as the effective medium approximation is valid. The influence of the configuration of the metamaterial unit has also been investigated, illustrating the increase of anisotropy of metamaterial helps to enhance the rotator effect, which can be conveniently attained by elongating each rectangle inserted to the units. Furthermore, we have analyzed the underlying physics to gain a deep insight to the rotation mechanism, and discussed the application of such devices for non-plane wave and the potential of extending the scheme to three-dimensional cases. The realization of acoustic field rotator has opened up a new avenue for the versatile manipulations on acoustic waves and our findings are of significance to their design and characterization, which may pave the way for the practical application of such devices.

  9. Strategies for visco-acoustic waveform inversion: Parameter resolution, preconditioning and regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamei, R.; Pratt, R. G.

    2013-12-01

    Visco-acoustic waveform inversion can potentially yield quantitative images of the distribution of both velocity and the attenuation parameters from seismic data. Simultaneous inversion of velocity and attenuation tend to cause significant ';cross-talk' between the resulting images, reflecting a lack of parameter resolution and indicating the need for pre-conditioning and regularization of the inverse problem.We analyse the cross-talk issue by partitioning the inversion parameters into two classes; the velocity parameter class, and the attenuation parameter class. Both parameters are defined at a reference frequency, and a dispersion relation is assumed that describes these parameters at any other frequency. We formulate the model gradient of the objective function at a forward modelling frequency, and convert them to the reference frequency by employing the Jacobian of the coordinate change represented by the dispersion relation. At a given modelling frequency, the Frechet derivatives corresponding to these two parameter classes differ only by a 90 degree phase shift, meaning that the magnitudes of resulting model updates will be unscaled, and will not reflect the expected magnitudes in realistic (Q>>1) media. Due to the lack of scaling, cross-talk will be enhanced by poor subsurface illumination, by errors in kinematics, and by data noise. Initial results from a suite of synthetic cross-hole tests using a three-layer randomly heterogenous model with both intrinsic and extrinsic (scattering) attenuation demonstrate that cross-talk is a significant problem in attenuation inversion. Using the same model, we further show that cross-talk can be suppressed by varying the attenuation scaling term in our pre-conditioning operator. This strategy is effective for simultaneous inversion of velocity and attenuation, and for sequential inversion (a two-stage approach in which only the velocity models are recovered in the first stage). Further regularization using a smoothing

  10. The influence of acoustic and tactile stimulation on vegetative parameters and EEG in persistent vegetative state.

    PubMed

    Keller, Ingo; Hülsdunk, Angelika; Müller, Friedemann

    2007-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated whether different kinds of stimulation in the persistent vegetative state (PVS) lead to specific patterns of physiological reactions. In addition, a possible effect of stimulating drugs was explored by comparing recordings with and without pharmacological stimulation. Eighteen patients in the PVS were submitted to tactile or acoustic stimulation. The latter consisted of white noise and of the voices of close relatives delivered via a digital voice recorder. Additionally, half of the patients were pharmacologically stimulated with amantadine, L-dopa or amphetamine. The effect of stimulation was assessed by recording the electroencephalogram (EEG), electromyogram (EMG), skin conductance response (SCR) and heart rate (HR). Tactile stimulation was associated with statistically significant increases in EEG and EMG parameters, SCR and HR. White noise stimulation led to significant increases in SCR and EMG parameters. The physiological responses to relatives? voices did not differ from baseline activity. Pharmacological stimulation increased the baseline level of activation, but showed no interaction with sensory stimulation. The data presented indicate that the level of arousal in patients in the PVS can be adequately monitored by measuring SCR, HR and EMG parameters.

  11. Sensitivity of acoustic nonlinearity parameter to the microstructural changes in cement-based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Gun; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Kurtis, Kimberly E.; Jacobs, Laurence J.

    2015-03-01

    This research experimentally investigates the sensitivity of the acoustic nonlinearity parameter to microcracks in cement-based materials. Based on the second harmonic generation (SHG) technique, an experimental setup using non-contact, air-coupled detection is used to receive the consistent Rayleigh surface waves. To induce variations in the extent of microscale cracking in two types of specimens (concrete and mortar), shrinkage reducing admixture (SRA), is used in one set, while a companion specimen is prepared without SRA. A 50 kHz wedge transducer and a 100 kHz air-coupled transducer are implemented for the generation and detection of nonlinear Rayleigh waves. It is shown that the air-coupled detection method provides more repeatable fundamental and second harmonic amplitudes of the propagating Rayleigh waves. The obtained amplitudes are then used to calculate the relative nonlinearity parameter βre, the ratio of the second harmonic amplitude to the square of the fundamental amplitude. The experimental results clearly demonstrate that the nonlinearity parameter (βre) is highly sensitive to the microstructural changes in cement-based materials than the Rayleigh phase velocity and attenuation and that SRA has great potential to avoid shrinkage cracking in cement-based materials.

  12. Non-Invasive Embolus Trap (NET) using Histotripsy --An Acoustic Parameter Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Simone; Maxwell, Adam D.; Owens, Gabe E.; Gurm, Hitinder S.; Cain, Charles A.; Xu, Zhen

    2013-01-01

    Free-flowing particles in a blood vessel were observed to be attracted, trapped, and eroded by a histotripsy bubble cloud. This phenomenon may be used to develop a Non-Invasive Embolus Trap (NET) to prevent embolization. This study investigates the effect of acoustic parameters on the trapping ability of the NET generated by a focused 1.063MHz transducer. The maximum trapping velocity, defined by the maximum mean fluid velocity at which a 3–4 mm particle trapped in a 6 mm diameter vessel phantom, increased linearly with peak negative pressure (P−) and increased as the square root of pulse length and pulse repetition frequency (PRF). At 19.9 MPa P−, 1000 Hz PRF and 10 cycle pulse length, a 3 mm clot-mimicking particle could remain trapped under a background velocity of 9.7 cm/s. Clot fragments treated by NET resulted in debris particles < 75 μm. These results will guide the appropriate selection of NET parameters. PMID:23415285

  13. Neural network predictions of acoustical parameters in multi-purpose performance halls.

    PubMed

    Cheung, L Y; Tang, S K

    2013-09-01

    A detailed binaural sound measurement was carried out in two multi-purpose performance halls of different seating capacities and designs in Hong Kong in the present study. The effectiveness of using neural network in the predictions of the acoustical properties using a limited number of measurement points was examined. The root-mean-square deviation from measurements, statistical parameter distribution matching, and the results of a t-test for vanishing mean difference between simulations and measurements were adopted as the evaluation criteria for the neural network performance. The audience locations relative to the sound source were used as the inputs to the neural network. Results show that the neural network training scheme using nine uniformly located measurement points in each specific hall area is the best choice regardless of the hall setting and design. It is also found that the neural network prediction of hall spaciousness does not require a large amount of training data, but the accuracy of the reverberance related parameter predictions increases with increasing volume of training data.

  14. The Identification of Nanoscale Structures According to a Parameters of Acoustic Structuroscopy Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ababkov, N. V.; Smirnov, A. N.; Bykova, N. V.

    2016-04-01

    The fracture surface of a destroyed steam turbine rotor is studied by acoustic structuroscopy method. The structural-phase state of the metal of the destroyed rotor of a steam turbine is studied using the methods of electron microscopy. It was established that in the areas of control, where the values of the acoustic characteristics have significant differences from the rest of the metal, detected nanocrystalline structure. The possibility of determining the structure of the nanoscale metal by acoustic structuroscopy is shown.

  15. Impact factors and the optimal parameter of acoustic structure quantification in the assessment of liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yang; Liu, Guang-Jian; Liao, Bing; Huang, Guang-Liang; Liang, Jin-Yu; Zhou, Lu-Yao; Wang, Fen; Li, Wei; Xie, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Wei; Lu, Ming-De

    2015-09-01

    The aims of the present study are to assess the impact factors on acoustic structure quantification (ASQ) ultrasound and find the optimal parameter for the assessment of liver fibrosis. Twenty healthy volunteers underwent ASQ examinations to evaluate impact factors in ASQ image acquisition and analysis. An additional 113 patients with liver diseases underwent standardized ASQ examinations, and the results were compared with histologic staging of liver fibrosis. We found that the right liver displayed lower values of ASQ parameters than the left (p = 0.000-0.021). Receive gain experienced no significant impact except gain 70 (p = 0.193-1.000). With regard to different diameter of involved vessels in regions of interest, the group ≤2.0 mm differed significantly with the group 2.1-5.0 mm (p = 0.000-0.033) and the group >5.0 mm (p = 0.000-0.062). However, the region of interest size (p = 0.438-1.000) and depth (p = 0.072-0.764) had no statistical impact. Good intra- and inter-operator reproducibilities were found in both image acquisitions and offline image analyses. In the liver fibrosis study, the focal disturbance ratio had the highest correlation with histologic fibrosis stage (r = 0.67, p < 0.001). In conclusion, the testing position, receive gain and involved vessels were the main factors in ASQ examinations and focal disturbance ratio was the optimal parameter in the assessment of liver fibrosis. PMID:26055966

  16. Analysis of acoustic and physical-mechanical parameters of Cr-Mo-Va steel in the vicinity of the crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Alexander; Logov, Alexander; Ababkov, Nikolai

    2016-01-01

    The efficiency assessment of acoustic quality monitoring application for research of damages, in particular, the cracks arising at long operation of the heat power equipment is resulted in the present work. The differential equations were first derived describing the change in time delay of surface acoustic waves in the vicinity of the crack, which are directly depending on: a) the argument; b) the plane of states in an implicit form from the parameter of model; c) on a plane of conditions for logarithmic characteristics.

  17. Retrieval of Sea-Bed Parameters by the Method of Matching Acoustic Fields on the Basis of Vertical Angular Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerzhakov, B. V.; Kulinich, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    We use the field matching method to solve the inverse problem of estimating the geoacoustic parameters of a stratified sea bed using the objective function based on the norm of difference between the experimental and simulated vertical angular spectra of the acoustic field and combination of the rapid-annealing method with direct search methods for localization of the global minimum of the objective function. To reduce the influence of the ravine effects of the objective function, we use regularization on the basis of mutual correlations of the experimental and simulated vertical angular spectra of the acoustic field. The numerical experiment has been performed to retrieve the parameters of the model waveguide, e.g., the thickness of the water layer and the layer of sediments, the velocity and attenuation coefficients of longitudinal waves, and the density of the sediment layer and the subjacent half-space in the presence of noise interference of different intensity levels.

  18. Multi-parameter Full-waveform Inversion for Acoustic VTI Medium with Surface Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, X.; Jiao, K.; Sun, D.; Huang, W.; Vigh, D.

    2013-12-01

    Full-waveform Inversion (FWI) attracts wide attention recently in oil and gas industry as a new promising tool for high resolution subsurface velocity model building. While the traditional common image point gather based tomography method aims to focus post-migrated data in depth domain, FWI aims to directly fit the observed seismic waveform in either time or frequency domain. The inversion is performed iteratively by updating the velocity fields to reduce the difference between the observed and the simulated data. It has been shown the inversion is very sensitive to the starting velocity fields, and data with long offsets and low frequencies is crucial for the success of FWI to overcome this sensitivity. Considering the importance of data with long offsets and low frequencies, in most geologic environment, anisotropy is an unavoidable topic for FWI especially at long offsets, since anisotropy tends to have more pronounced effects on waves traveled for a great distance. In VTI medium, this means more horizontal velocity will be registered in middle-to-long offset data, while more vertical velocity will be registered in near-to-middle offset data. Up to date, most of real world applications of FWI still remain in isotropic medium, and only a few studies have been shown to account for anisotropy. And most of those studies only account for anisotropy in waveform simulation, but not invert for those anisotropy fields. Multi-parameter inversion for anisotropy fields, even in VTI medium, remains as a hot topic in the field. In this study, we develop a strategy for multi-parameter FWI for acoustic VTI medium with surface seismic data. Because surface seismic data is insensitivity to the delta fields, we decide to hold the delta fields unchanged during our inversion, and invert only for vertical velocity and epsilon fields. Through parameterization analysis and synthetic tests, we find that it is more feasible to invert for the parameterization as vertical and horizontal

  19. The use of acoustic methods to determine the parameters of porous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malecki, Ignacy; Ranachowski, Jerzy

    Porous media are a subject of research in a variety of scientific disciplines, including physics, mechanics, electrical engineering, materials science, and acoustics. The subject of this article is a comparison of the methods used in theoretical mechanics with standard acoustic methods. The authors start by examining the method of static averaging of the mechanical properties of porous media. This method makes it possible to determine substitute static moduli of elasticity, which, however, does not meet the needs of acoustics. More suitable methods include the dynamic methods developed in the works of J. Lewandowski, among others. These methods are based on a motion equation in which the tensor of elasticity is assigned a complex value which accounts for the medium's dynamic properties and losses. The transition from a complex tensor of elasticity to the velocity and damping of an acoustic wave poses no particular problems. On the backdrop of the theory of porous materials used in mechanics, the authors present their own theory for the acoustic properties of these materials. They call it the theory of 'compound obstacles', which initially examines the interference offered by a solitary inclusion in a homogeneous medium to the propagation of an acoustic wave. This is followed by the calculation of the interference caused by a group of inclusions using the concept of the density of obstacles. In turn, this leads to general formulas for acoustic wave velocity and damping as functions of obstacle density. The authors consider examples of a spherical inclusion in a liquid and a hollow spheroidal inclusion in a solid. The article also contains the results of experiments conducted to verify the 'compound obstacles' theory. The authors measured the velocity of an ultrasound wave in electrical engineering porcelain with varying degrees of porosity and in glycerine in which glass balls were suspended.

  20. Measured sound speeds and acoustic nonlinearity parameter in liquid water up to 523 K and 14 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturtevant, Blake T.; Pantea, Cristian; Sinha, Dipen N.

    2016-07-01

    Sound speed in liquid water at temperatures between 275 and 523 K and pressures up to 14 MPa were experimentally determined using a high temperature/high pressure capable acoustic resonance cell. The measurements enabled the determination of the temperature and pressure dependence of sound speed and thus the parameter of acoustic nonlinearly, B/A, over this entire P-T space. Most of the sound speeds measured in this work were found to be within 0.4% of the IAPWS-IF97 formulation, an international standard for calculating sound speed in water as a function of temperature and pressure. The values for B/A determined at laboratory ambient pressure and at temperatures up to 356 K, were found to be in general agreement with values calculated from the IAPWS-IF97 formulation. Additionally, B/A at 293 K was found to be 4.6, in agreement with established literature values.

  1. A PDE-based methodology for modeling, parameter estimation and feedback control in structural and structural acoustic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Brown, D. E.; Metcalf, Vern L.; Silcox, R. J.; Smith, Ralph C.; Wang, Yun

    1994-01-01

    A problem of continued interest concerns the control of vibrations in a flexible structure and the related problem of reducing structure-borne noise in structural acoustic systems. In both cases, piezoceramic patches bonded to the structures have been successfully used as control actuators. Through the application of a controlling voltage, the patches can be used to reduce structural vibrations which in turn lead to methods for reducing structure-borne noise. A PDE-based methodology for modeling, estimating physical parameters, and implementing a feedback control scheme for problems of this type is discussed. While the illustrating example is a circular plate, the methodology is sufficiently general so as to be applicable in a variety of structural and structural acoustic systems.

  2. Parameters effects study on pulse laser for the generation of surface acoustic waves in human skin detection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tingting; Fu, Xing; Dorantes-Gonzalez, Dante J.; Chen, Kun; Li, Yanning; Wu, Sen

    2015-10-01

    Laser-induced Surface Acoustic Waves (LSAWs) has been promisingly and widely used in recent years due to its rapid, high accuracy and non-contact evaluation potential of layered and thin film materials. For now, researchers have applied this technology on the characterization of materials' physical parameters, like Young's Modulus, density, and Poisson's ratio; or mechanical changes such as surface cracks and skin feature like a melanoma. While so far, little research has been done on providing practical guidelines on pulse laser parameters to best generate SAWs. In this paper finite element simulations of the thermos-elastic process based on human skin model for the generation of LSAWs were conducted to give the effects of pulse laser parameters have on the generated SAWs. And recommendations on the parameters to generate strong SAWs for detection and surface characterization without cause any damage to skin are given.

  3. Acoustic Analysis of the Tremulous Voice: Assessing the Utility of the Correlation Dimension and Perturbation Parameters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shao, Jun; MacCallum, Julia K.; Zhang, Yu; Sprecher, Alicia; Jiang, Jack J.

    2010-01-01

    Acoustic analysis may provide a useful means to quantitatively characterize the tremulous voice. Signals were obtained from 25 subjects with diagnoses of either Parkinson's disease or vocal polyps exhibiting vocal tremor. These were compared to signals from 24 subjects with normal voices. Signals were analyzed via correlation dimension and several…

  4. Effect of non-acoustic parameters on heterogeneous sonoporation mediated by single-pulse ultrasound and microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Qin, Peng; Xu, Lin; Han, Tao; Du, Lianfang; Yu, Alfred C H

    2016-07-01

    Sonoporation-transient plasma membrane perforation elicited by the interaction of ultrasound waves with microbubbles--has shown great potential for drug delivery and gene therapy. However, the heterogeneity of sonoporation introduces complexities and challenges in the realization of controllable and predictable drug delivery. The aim of this investigation was to understand how non-acoustic parameters (bubble related and bubble-cell interaction parameters) affect sonoporation. Using a customized ultrasound-exposure and fluorescence-imaging platform, we observed sonoporation dynamics at the single-cell level and quantified exogenous molecular uptake levels to characterize the degree of sonoporation. Sonovue microbubbles were introduced to passively regulate microbubble-to-cell distance and number, and bubble size. 1 MHz ultrasound with 10-cycle pulse duration and 0.6 MPa peak negative pressure were applied to trigger the inertial collapse of microbubbles. Our data revealed the impact of non-acoustic parameters on the heterogeneity of sonoporation. (i) The localized collapse of relatively small bubbles (diameter, D<5.5 μm) led to predictable sonoporation, the degree of which depended on the bubble-to-cell distance (d). No sonoporation was observed when d/D>1, whereas reversible sonoporation occurred when d/D<1. (ii) Large bubbles (D>5.5 μm) exhibited translational movement over large distances, resulting in unpredictable sonoporation. Translation towards the cell surface led to variable reversible sonoporation or irreversible sonoporation, and translation away from the cell caused either no or reversible sonoporation. (iii) The number of bubbles correlated positively with the degree of sonoporation when D<5.5 μm and d/D<1. Localized collapse of two to three bubbles mainly resulted in reversible sonoporation, whereas irreversible sonoporation was more likely following the collapse of four or more bubbles. These findings offer useful insight into the relationship

  5. Estimation of biological parameters of marine organisms using linear and nonlinear acoustic scattering model-based inversion methods.

    PubMed

    Chu, Dezhang; Lawson, Gareth L; Wiebe, Peter H

    2016-05-01

    The linear inversion commonly used in fisheries and zooplankton acoustics assumes a constant inversion kernel and ignores the uncertainties associated with the shape and behavior of the scattering targets, as well as other relevant animal parameters. Here, errors of the linear inversion due to uncertainty associated with the inversion kernel are quantified. A scattering model-based nonlinear inversion method is presented that takes into account the nonlinearity of the inverse problem and is able to estimate simultaneously animal abundance and the parameters associated with the scattering model inherent to the kernel. It uses sophisticated scattering models to estimate first, the abundance, and second, the relevant shape and behavioral parameters of the target organisms. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the abundance, size, and behavior (tilt angle) parameters of marine animals (fish or zooplankton) can be accurately inferred from the inversion by using multi-frequency acoustic data. The influence of the singularity and uncertainty in the inversion kernel on the inversion results can be mitigated by examining the singular values for linear inverse problems and employing a non-linear inversion involving a scattering model-based kernel. PMID:27250181

  6. Open-circuit sensitivity model based on empirical parameters for a capacitive-type MEMS acoustic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaewoo; Jeon, J. H.; Je, C. H.; Lee, S. Q.; Yang, W. S.; Lee, S.-G.

    2016-03-01

    An empirical-based open-circuit sensitivity model for a capacitive-type MEMS acoustic sensor is presented. To intuitively evaluate the characteristic of the open-circuit sensitivity, the empirical-based model is proposed and analysed by using a lumped spring-mass model and a pad test sample without a parallel plate capacitor for the parasitic capacitance. The model is composed of three different parameter groups: empirical, theoretical, and mixed data. The empirical residual stress from the measured pull-in voltage of 16.7 V and the measured surface topology of the diaphragm were extracted as +13 MPa, resulting in the effective spring constant of 110.9 N/m. The parasitic capacitance for two probing pads including the substrate part was 0.25 pF. Furthermore, to verify the proposed model, the modelled open-circuit sensitivity was compared with the measured value. The MEMS acoustic sensor had an open- circuit sensitivity of -43.0 dBV/Pa at 1 kHz with a bias of 10 V, while the modelled open- circuit sensitivity was -42.9 dBV/Pa, which showed good agreement in the range from 100 Hz to 18 kHz. This validates the empirical-based open-circuit sensitivity model for designing capacitive-type MEMS acoustic sensors.

  7. Changing the average frequency of contact calls is associated with changes in other acoustic parameters in the budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmanski, Michael; Dooling, Robert

    2001-05-01

    The most-often produced vocalization of the budgerigar, a small parrot native to Australia, is the short (100-150 ms) frequency-modulated contact call. These calls play a role in maintaining flock dynamics and are believed to act as vocal signatures in these birds. Previous findings in our lab have shown that budgerigars can control the intensity of their vocal behavior and exhibit a robust Lombard effect (Manabe et al., 1998). Recently, we have shown that there is a high degree of stereotypy in contact calls across a number of acoustic parameters (Osmanski and Dooling, 2004). Questions arise concerning the limits of plasticity in these calls and the relation or interdependence among the various parameters. As a first approach to answering these questions, four budgerigars were trained using operant conditioning methods to change the average peak frequency of their contact calls (both upward and downward in frequency) to obtain access to a food reward. Results show that these birds can both increase and decrease the average frequency of their contact calls. Such changes are associated with modifications in a number of other acoustic parameters, suggesting constraints on vocal plasticity. [Work supported by NIH DC-00198 to RJD and NIDCD Training Grant DC-00046.

  8. Flight parameter estimation using instantaneous frequency and time delay measurements from a three-element planar acoustic array.

    PubMed

    Lo, Kam W

    2016-05-01

    The acoustic signal emitted by a turbo-prop aircraft consists of a strong narrowband tone superimposed on a broadband random component. A ground-based three-element planar acoustic array can be used to estimate the full set of flight parameters of a turbo-prop aircraft in transit by measuring the time delay (TD) between the signal received at the reference sensor and the signal received at each of the other two sensors of the array over a sufficiently long period of time. This paper studies the possibility of using instantaneous frequency (IF) measurements from the reference sensor to improve the precision of the flight parameter estimates. A simplified Cramer-Rao lower bound analysis shows that the standard deviations in the estimates of the aircraft velocity and altitude can be greatly reduced when IF measurements are used together with TD measurements. Two flight parameter estimation algorithms that utilize both IF and TD measurements are formulated and their performances are evaluated using both simulated and real data. PMID:27250134

  9. Evaluation of B/A nonlinear parameter using an acoustic self-calibrated pulse-echo method

    SciTech Connect

    Vander Meulen, F.; Haumesser, L.

    2008-05-26

    The objective of this work is to develop an easy-to-build and robust setup for measuring the nonlinearity parameter B/A in fluids using ultrasound. The method is based on the pulse-echo technique, using a single element broadband acoustic transducer, and requires electrical signal measurements. Results obtained in water and denatured alcohol validate the proposed procedure. The choice of a suitable primary wave frequency is discussed with regard to the transducer sensitivity. Further, the influence of the perturbations introduced by the experimental device nonlinearities, and the role of the reflector on the measured second harmonic field amplitude are investigated.

  10. Seismic attenuation parameters in the W-Bohemia/Vogtland region from elastic and acoustic radiative transfer theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaebler, Peter; Eulenfeld, Tom; Wegler, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    We estimate frequency-dependent seismic scattering and intrinsic attenuation parameters for the crustal structure beneath the W-Bohemia/Vogtland swarm earthquake region close to the border of Czech Republic and Germany. The parameter estimations are based on fitting synthetic envelopes modeled using elastic and acoustic radiative transfer theory to observed seismogram envelopes from 14 shallow local events from the October 2008 W-Bohemia/Vogtland earthquake swarm. The two different methods yield similar results for the estimated crustal parameters and show a comparable frequency dependence of both transport mean free path and intrinsic absorption path length. Results suggest, that intrinsic seismic attenuation is larger than attenuation due to scattering of seismic energy in the W-Bohemia/Vogtland region for the investigated epicentral distance range and frequency bands from 3 to 24 Hz. From the elastic simulations we conclude, that forward scattering is required to explain the data, however, the strength of forward scattering is not resolvable. The elastic approach shows smaller errors in the parameter estimation compared to the results of the acoustic simulations. The frequency dependence of the transport mean free path suggests a random medium described by a nearly exponential autocorrelation function. However the parameters describing this random medium, fluctuation strength and correlation length, cannot be estimated independently, but only a combination of the parameters related to the transport mean free path of the medium can be computed. We furthermore conclude from the results of the elastic simulations, that it is not possible to resolve the value of the mean free path of the random medium.

  11. Materials and characterization using acoustic nonlinearity parameters and harmonic generation - Effects of crystalline and amorphous structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Yost, William T.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of material structure on the nonlinearity parameters are reviewed. Problems discussed include definition of nonlinearity parameters, square-law nonlinearity and collinear beam-mixing, structure dependence of the nonlinearity parameters, negative nonlinearity parameters, and implications for materials characterization.

  12. Seismic scattering and absorption parameters in the W-Bohemia/Vogtland region from elastic and acoustic radiative transfer theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaebler, Peter J.; Eulenfeld, Tom; Wegler, Ulrich

    2015-12-01

    In this study, frequency-dependent seismic scattering and intrinsic attenuation parameters for the crustal structure beneath the W-Bohemia/Vogtland swarm earthquake region close to the border of Czech Republic and Germany are estimated. Synthetic seismogram envelopes are modelled using elastic and acoustic radiative transfer theory. Scattering and absorption parameters are determined by fitting these synthetic envelopes to observed seismogram envelopes from 14 shallow local events from the October 2008 W-Bohemia/Vogtland earthquake swarm. The two different simulation approaches yield similar results for the estimated crustal parameters and show a comparable frequency dependence of both transport mean free path and intrinsic absorption path length. Both methods suggest that intrinsic attenuation is dominant over scattering attenuation in the W-Bohemia/Vogtland region for the investigated epicentral distance range and frequency bands from 3 to 24 Hz. Elastic simulations of seismogram envelopes suggest that forward scattering is required to explain the data, however, the degree of forward scattering is not resolvable. Errors in the parameter estimation are smaller in the elastic case compared to results from the acoustic simulations. The frequency decay of the transport mean free path suggests a random medium described by a nearly exponential autocorrelation function. The fluctuation strength and correlation length of the random medium cannot be estimated independently, but only a combination of the parameters related to the transport mean free path of the medium can be computed. Furthermore, our elastic simulations show, that using our numerical method, it is not possible to resolve the value of the mean free path of the random medium.

  13. Materials characterization using acoustic nonlinearity parameters and harmonic generation - Engineering materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T.; Cantrell, John H.

    1990-01-01

    The paper reviews nonlinear bulk compressional wave acoustic measurement systems and the applications of measurements from such systems to engineering materials. Preliminary measurements indicate that it is possible to determine percent second phase precipitates in aluminum alloys, while other measurements show promise in the determination of properties related to the fatigue states of metals. It is also shown that harmonic generation can be used for the study of crack opening loads in compact tension specimens, which in turn gives useful information about the fatigue properties of various engineering materials.

  14. On the selection of loads in the multiload method for measuring the acoustic source parameters of duct systems.

    PubMed

    Jang, Seung-Ho; Ih, Jeong-Guon

    2002-03-01

    The in-duct source can be characterized by two acoustical parameters such as the source strength and the source impedance, which permit the prediction of radiated sound pressure or insertion loss of the whole duct system. One-port acoustic characteristics of an in-duct source can be measured by the multiload method using an overdetermined set of open pipes or side-branch pipes with different lengths as applied loads. The input data, viz. load pressure and load impedance, are usually contaminated by measurement error in the actual measurements, which result in errors in the calculated source parameters. In this paper, the effects of the errors in the input data on the results have been studied numerically, varying the number of loads and their impedances in order to determine what combination of the loads will yield the best result. It is noted that, frequently, only a set of open pipes is used when applying the multiload method to the internal combustion engine sources. A set of pipe lengths, which cause the calculated results to be least sensitive to the input data error, can be found when using open pipe loads. The present work is intended to produce guidelines for preparing an appropriate load set in order to obtain accurate source properties of fluid machines.

  15. Electrostatic Generation of Bulk Acoustic Waves and Electrical Parameters of Si-MEMS Resonators.

    PubMed

    Dulmet, Bernard; Ivan, Mihaela Eugenia; Ballandras, Sylvain

    2016-02-01

    This paper proposes an analytical approach to model the generation of bulk acoustic waves in an electrostatically excited silicon MEMS structure, as well as its electromechanical response in terms of static and dynamic displacements, electromechanical coupling, and motional current. The analysis pertains to the single-port electrostatic drive of trapped-energy thickness-extensional (TE) modes in thin plates. Both asymmetric single-side and symmetric double-side electrostatic gap configurations are modeled. Green's function is used to describe the characteristic of the static displacement of the driven surface of the structure versus the dc bias voltage, which allows us to determine the electrical response of the resonator. Optical and electrical characterizations have been performed on resonator samples operating at 10.3 MHz on the fundamental of TE mode under single-side electrostatic excitation. The various figures of merit depend on the dc bias voltage. Typical values of 9000 for the Q-factor, and of 10(-5) for the electromechanical coupling factor k(2) have been obtained with [Formula: see text] for [Formula: see text]-thick gaps. Here-considered modes have a typical temperature coefficients of frequency (TCF) close to -30 ppm/(°)C. We conclude that the practical usability of such electrostatically excited bulk acoustic waves (BAW) resonators essentially depends on the efficiency of the compensation of feed-through capacitance.

  16. Electrostatic Generation of Bulk Acoustic Waves and Electrical Parameters of Si-MEMS Resonators.

    PubMed

    Dulmet, Bernard; Ivan, Mihaela Eugenia; Ballandras, Sylvain

    2016-02-01

    This paper proposes an analytical approach to model the generation of bulk acoustic waves in an electrostatically excited silicon MEMS structure, as well as its electromechanical response in terms of static and dynamic displacements, electromechanical coupling, and motional current. The analysis pertains to the single-port electrostatic drive of trapped-energy thickness-extensional (TE) modes in thin plates. Both asymmetric single-side and symmetric double-side electrostatic gap configurations are modeled. Green's function is used to describe the characteristic of the static displacement of the driven surface of the structure versus the dc bias voltage, which allows us to determine the electrical response of the resonator. Optical and electrical characterizations have been performed on resonator samples operating at 10.3 MHz on the fundamental of TE mode under single-side electrostatic excitation. The various figures of merit depend on the dc bias voltage. Typical values of 9000 for the Q-factor, and of 10(-5) for the electromechanical coupling factor k(2) have been obtained with [Formula: see text] for [Formula: see text]-thick gaps. Here-considered modes have a typical temperature coefficients of frequency (TCF) close to -30 ppm/(°)C. We conclude that the practical usability of such electrostatically excited bulk acoustic waves (BAW) resonators essentially depends on the efficiency of the compensation of feed-through capacitance. PMID:26642450

  17. A Device for Fetal Monitoring by Means of Control Over Cardiovascular Parameters Based on Acoustic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhlova, L. A.; Seleznev, A. I.; Zhdanov, D. S.; Zemlyakov, I. Yu; Kiseleva, E. Yu

    2016-01-01

    The problem of monitoring fetal health is topical at the moment taking into account a reduction in the level of fertile-age women's health and changes in the concept of perinatal medicine with reconsideration of live birth criteria. Fetal heart rate monitoring is a valuable means of assessing fetal health during pregnancy. The routine clinical measurements are usually carried out by the means of ultrasound cardiotocography. Although the cardiotocography monitoring provides valuable information on the fetal health status, the high quality ultrasound devices are expensive, they are not available for home care use. The recommended number of measurement is also limited. The passive and fully non-invasive acoustic recording provides an alternative low-cost measurement method. The article describes a device for fetal and maternal health monitoring by analyzing the frequency and periodicity of heart beats by means of acoustic signal received on the maternal abdomen. Based on the usage of this device a phonocardiographic fetal telemedicine system, which will allow to reduce the antenatal fetal mortality rate significantly due to continuous monitoring over the state of fetus regardless of mother's location, can be built.

  18. Subjective scaling of spatial room acoustic parameters influenced by visual environmental cues

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Daniel L.; Braasch, Jonas

    2010-01-01

    Although there have been numerous studies investigating subjective spatial impression in rooms, only a few of those studies have addressed the influence of visual cues on the judgment of auditory measures. In the psychophysical study presented here, video footage of five solo music∕speech performers was shown for four different listening positions within a general-purpose space. The videos were presented in addition to the acoustic signals, which were auralized using binaural room impulse responses (BRIR) that were recorded in the same general-purpose space. The participants were asked to adjust the direct-to-reverberant energy ratio (D∕R ratio) of the BRIR according to their expectation considering the visual cues. They were also directed to rate the apparent source width (ASW) and listener envelopment (LEV) for each condition. Visual cues generated by changing the sound-source position in the multi-purpose space, as well as the makeup of the sound stimuli affected the judgment of spatial impression. Participants also scaled the direct-to-reverberant energy ratio with greater direct sound energy than was measured in the acoustical environment. PMID:20968367

  19. Nuclear cardiograph and scintigraphy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaughlin, P.

    1975-01-01

    Extensive advances in the technology of detectors, data analysis systems, and tracers used have resulted in greatly expanded applications of radioisotopes to the assessment of cardiac function and disease. The development of nuclear cardiology has proceeded along four lines: (1) radionuclide angiography, (2) myocardial perfusion imaging, (3) intracoronary microsphere imaging, and (4) regional myocardial blood flow determination using inert gases.

  20. Turboprop and rotary-wing aircraft flight parameter estimation using both narrow-band and broadband passive acoustic signal-processing methods.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, B G; Lo, K W

    2000-10-01

    Flight parameter estimation methods for an airborne acoustic source can be divided into two categories, depending on whether the narrow-band lines or the broadband component of the received signal spectrum is processed to estimate the flight parameters. This paper provides a common framework for the formulation and test of two flight parameter estimation methods: one narrow band, the other broadband. The performances of the two methods are evaluated by applying them to the same acoustic data set, which is recorded by a planar array of passive acoustic sensors during multiple transits of a turboprop fixed-wing aircraft and two types of rotary-wing aircraft. The narrow-band method, which is based on a kinematic model that assumes the source travels in a straight line at constant speed and altitude, requires time-frequency analysis of the acoustic signal received by a single sensor during each aircraft transit. The broadband method is based on the same kinematic model, but requires observing the temporal variation of the differential time of arrival of the acoustic signal at each pair of sensors that comprises the planar array. Generalized cross correlation of each pair of sensor outputs using a cross-spectral phase transform prefilter provides instantaneous estimates of the differential times of arrival of the signal as the acoustic wavefront traverses the array.

  1. Comparison between musical acoustics parameters of an upright and a grand piano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wogram, Klaus; Mori, Taro

    2003-10-01

    ``Why does a grand piano sound so much better than an upright piano?'' This question is frequently discussed. Is it the sound itself, or the inharmonicity, or is it the way of playing the different instruments, or the sound pattern? All these questions have been investigated in the former laboratory of musical acoustics of the PTB by Taro Mori with very interesting results. Results of measurements and subjective hearing tests will be presented, and the method itself will be explained. One of the most interesting findings is that it is nearly impossible to distinguish between an upright and a grand piano in hearing tests by listening only to single tones, sequences of tones or chords. Better results are found by performing complete musical pieces on the instruments under test.

  2. Minimization of sonic-boom parameters in real and isothermal atmospheres. [overpressure and acoustic impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darden, C. M.

    1975-01-01

    The procedure for sonic-boom minimization introduced by Seebass and George for an isothermal atmosphere was converted for use in the real atmosphere by means of the appropriate equations for sonic-boom pressure signature advance, ray-tube area, and acoustic impedance. Results of calculations using both atmospheres indicate that except for low Mach numbers or high altitudes, the isothermal atmosphere with a scale height of 7620 m (25 000 ft) gives a reasonable estimate of the values of overpressure, impulse, and characteristic overpressure obtained by using the real atmosphere. The results also show that for aircraft design studies, propagation of a known F-function, or minimization studies at low supersonic Mach numbers, the isothermal approximation is not adequate.

  3. The effect of temperature dependent tissue parameters on acoustic radiation force induced displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suomi, Visa; Han, Yang; Konofagou, Elisa; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2016-10-01

    Multiple ultrasound elastography techniques rely on acoustic radiation force (ARF) in monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy. However, ARF is dependent on tissue attenuation and sound speed, both of which are also known to change with temperature making the therapy monitoring more challenging. Furthermore, the viscoelastic properties of tissue are also temperature dependent, which affects the displacements induced by ARF. The aim of this study is to quantify the temperature dependent changes in the acoustic and viscoelastic properties of liver and investigate their effect on ARF induced displacements by using both experimental methods and simulations. Furthermore, the temperature dependent viscoelastic properties of liver are experimentally measured over a frequency range of 0.1–200 Hz at temperatures reaching 80 °C, and both conventional and fractional Zener models are used to fit the data. The fractional Zener model was found to fit better with the experimental viscoelasticity data with respect to the conventional model with up to two orders of magnitude lower sum of squared errors (SSE). The characteristics of experimental displacement data were also seen in the simulations due to the changes in attenuation coefficient and lesion development. At low temperatures before thermal ablation, attenuation was found to affect the displacement amplitude. At higher temperature, the decrease in displacement amplitude occurs approximately at 60–70 °C due to the combined effect of viscoelasticity changes and lesion growth overpowering the effect of attenuation. The results suggest that it is necessary to monitor displacement continuously during HIFU therapy in order to ascertain when ablation occurs.

  4. Exploring the Acoustic Parameter Space in Ultrasound Therapy: Defining the Threshold for Cavitational Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieran, Kathleen; Hall, Timothy L.; Parsons, Jessica E.; Wolf, J. Stuart; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Cain, Charles A.; Roberts, William W.

    2007-05-01

    Focused ultrasound energy is capable of noninvasively, nonthermally ablating tissue. However, the relative contributions of thermal and cavitational effects in the therapeutic use of ultrasound are poorly understood. We sought to identify the ultrasound parameter space within which tissue can be ablated by solely mechanical means (cavitation), without a significant thermal component. Methods: Ultrasound energy (750 kHz, 20 microsecond pulses) was applied sequentially in a 3×3 grid configuration to the cortical tissue of ex vivo porcine kidneys submerged in degassed water. While maintaining constant energy density, intensity (0.11-211 kW/cm2) and duty cycle (0.04%-CW) were varied widely. A thermocouple co-localized with the center of each grid provided continuous temperature measurements. Following ablations, the kidneys were examined grossly and histologically. Results: Ablated tissue was classified into one of four discrete morphologic categories: blanched (firm, pale, desiccated tissue), disrupted (cavity containing thin, isochromatic liquid; no blanching), mixed blanched/disrupted (cavity containing pale, thick liquid; minimal blanching), and no grossly visible effect. Morphologically similar lesions clustered together within the ultrasound parameter space. Disrupted lesions had significantly lower maximal temperatures (44.2 °C) than desiccated (67.5 °C; p<0.0001) or mixed (59.4 °C; p<0.0001) lesions. Conclusions: In an ex vivo model, we have defined the ultrasound parameters within which mechanical tissue ablation, with minimal thermal components, is possible. Future research in vivo is directed toward optimizing the parameters for cavitational tissue ablation, and better understanding the impact of tissue perfusion on lesion generation and intralesional temperature rise.

  5. Effects on nonlinearity on the estimation of in situ values of acoustic output parameters.

    PubMed

    Szabo, T L; Clougherty, F; Grossman, C

    1999-01-01

    Water can generate extreme waveform distortion compared to tissue, as indicated by the Goldberg number for water, which is 20 times larger than that of tissue at typical diagnostic ultrasound levels. This result was demonstrated by using tofu as a tissue mimicking material. By adjusting transducer voltage drive levels in water to match the peak rarefactional pressures in water to those of waveforms in tofu, a close correspondence was obtained for the peak compressional pressure and time average intensity with depth. A poorer correspondence was found by comparing tofu waveforms with water waveforms that were compensated for broadband attenuation and driven at the same voltage level as tofu. A simplified broadband derating factor, allowing for band-width adjustment, was shown to be more accurate than the standard monochromatic derating. Several new indicators for quantifying the degree of observed nonlinearity are suggested: a field based nonlinearity parameter, a peak pressure ratio pc/pr, and a second harmonic to fundamental frequency spectral ratio. These indicators may have the potential for more consistent characterization of nonlinear relationships among output parameters and drive levels. PMID:9952078

  6. Detection of defect parameters using nonlinear air-coupled emission by ultrasonic guided waves at contact acoustic nonlinearities.

    PubMed

    Delrue, Steven; Van Den Abeele, Koen

    2015-12-01

    Interaction of ultrasonic guided waves with kissing bonds (closed delaminations and incipient surface breaking cracks) gives rise to nonlinear features at the defect location. This causes higher harmonic frequency ultrasonic radiation into the ambient air, often referred to as Nonlinear Air-Coupled Emission (NACE), which may serve as a nonlinear tag to detect the defects. This paper summarizes the results of a numerical implementation and simulation study of NACE. The developed model combines a 3D time domain model for the nonlinear Lamb wave propagation in delaminated samples with a spectral solution for the nonlinear air-coupled emission. A parametric study is conducted to illustrate the potential of detecting defect location, size and shape by studying the NACE acoustic radiation patterns in different orientation planes. The simulation results prove that there is a good determination potential for the defect parameters, especially when the radiated frequency matches one of the resonance frequencies of the delaminated layer, leading to a Local Defect Resonance (LDR). PMID:26208725

  7. The roles of non-extensivity and dust concentration as bifurcation parameters in dust-ion acoustic traveling waves in magnetized dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Narayan Ghosh, Uday; Kumar Mandal, Pankaj Chatterjee, Prasanta

    2014-03-15

    Dust ion-acoustic traveling waves are studied in a magnetized dusty plasma in presence of static dust and non-extensive distributed electrons in the framework of Zakharov-Kuznesstov-Burgers (ZKB) equation. System of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations is derived from ZKB equation, and equilibrium points are obtained. Nonlinear wave phenomena are studied numerically using fourth order Runge-Kutta method. The change from unstable to stable solution and consequently to asymptotic stable of dust ion acoustic traveling waves is studied through dynamical system approach. It is found that some dramatical features emerge when the non-extensive parameter and the dust concentration parameters are varied. Behavior of the solution of the system changes from unstable to stable and stable to asymptotic stable depending on the value of the non-extensive parameter. It is also observed that when the dust concentration is increased the solution pattern is changed from oscillatory shocks to periodic solution. Thus, non-extensive and dust concentration parameters play crucial roles in determining the nature of the stability behavior of the system. Thus, the non-extensive parameter and the dust concentration parameters can be treated as bifurcation parameters.

  8. Acoustic emission descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witos, Franciszek; Malecki, Ignacy

    The authors present selected problems associated with acoustic emission interpreted as a physical phenomenon and as a measurement technique. The authors examine point sources of acoustic emission in isotropic, homogeneous linearly elastic media of different shapes. In the case of an unbounded medium the authors give the analytical form of the stress field and the wave shift field of the acoustic emission. In the case of a medium which is unbounded plate the authors give a form for the equations which is suitable for numerical calculation of the changes over time of selected acoustic emission values. For acoustic emission as a measurement technique, the authors represent the output signal as the resultant of a mechanical input value which describes the source, the transient function of the medium, and the transient function of specific components of the measurement loop. As an effect of this notation, the authors introduce the distinction between an acoustic measurement signal and an acoustic measurement impulse. The authors define the basic parameters of an arbitrary impulse. The authors extensively discuss the signal functions of acoustic emission impulses and acoustic emission signals defined in this article as acoustic emission descriptors (or signal functions of acoustic emission impulses) and advanced acoustic emission descriptors (which are either descriptors associated with acoustic emission applications or the signal functions of acoustic emission signals). The article also contains the results of experimental research on three different problems in which acoustic emission descriptors associated with acoustic emission pulses, acoustic emission applications, and acoustic emission signals are used. These problems are respectively: a problem of the amplitude-load characteristics of acoustic emission pulses in carbon samples subjected to compound uniaxial compression, the use of acoustic emission to predict the durability characteristics of conveyor belts, and

  9. The correlation between acoustic and magnetic properties in the long working metal boiler drum with the parameters of the electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ababkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The present paper presents comparative analysis of measurement results of acoustic and magnetic properties in long working metal of boiler drums and the results obtained by methods of electronic microscopy. The structure of the metal sample from the fracture zone to the base metal (metal working sample long) and the center of the base metal before welding (weld metal sample) was investigated by electron microscopy. Studies performed by spectral acoustic, magnetic noise and electron microscopic methods were conducted on the same plots and the same samples of long working and weld metal of high-pressure boiler drums. The analysis of research results showed high sensitivity of spectral-acoustic and magnetic-noise methods to definition changes of microstructure parameters. Practical application of spectral-acoustic and magnetic noise NDT method is possible for the detection of irregularities and changes in structural and phase state of the long working and weld metal of boiler drums, made of a special molybdenum steel (such as 20M). The above technique can be used to evaluate the structure and physical-mechanical properties of the long working metal of boiler drums in the energy sector.

  10. Effects of charge design features on parameters of acoustic and seismic waves and cratering, for SMR chemical surface explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitterman, Y.

    2012-04-01

    A series of experimental on-surface shots was designed and conducted by the Geophysical Institute of Israel at Sayarim Military Range (SMR) in Negev desert, including two large calibration explosions: about 82 tons of strong IMI explosives in August 2009, and about 100 tons of ANFO explosives in January 2011. It was a collaborative effort between Israel, CTBTO, USA and several European countries, with the main goal to provide fully controlled ground truth (GT0) infrasound sources in different weather/wind conditions, for calibration of IMS infrasound stations in Europe, Middle East and Asia. Strong boosters and the upward charge detonation scheme were applied to provide a reduced energy release to the ground and an enlarged energy radiation to the atmosphere, producing enhanced infrasound signals, for better observation at far-regional stations. The following observations and results indicate on the required explosives energy partition for this charge design: 1) crater size and local seismic (duration) magnitudes were found smaller than expected for these large surface explosions; 2) small test shots of the same charge (1 ton) conducted at SMR with different detonation directions showed clearly lower seismic amplitudes/energy and smaller crater size for the upward detonation; 3) many infrasound stations at local and regional distances showed higher than expected peak amplitudes, even after application of a wind-correction procedure. For the large-scale explosions, high-pressure gauges were deployed at 100-600 m to record air-blast properties, evaluate the efficiency of the charge design and energy generation, and provide a reliable estimation of the charge yield. Empirical relations for air-blast parameters - peak pressure, impulse and the Secondary Shock (SS) time delay - depending on distance, were developed and analyzed. The parameters, scaled by the cubic root of estimated TNT equivalent charges, were found consistent for all analyzed explosions, except of SS

  11. Theoretical Study of the Effect of Enamel Parameters on Laser-Induced Surface Acoustic Waves in Human Incisor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Ling; Sun, Kaihua; Shen, Zhonghua; Ni, Xiaowu; Lu, Jian

    2015-06-01

    The laser ultrasound technique has great potential for clinical diagnosis of teeth because of its many advantages. To study laser surface acoustic wave (LSAW) propagation in human teeth, two theoretical methods, the finite element method (FEM) and Laguerre polynomial extension method (LPEM), are presented. The full field temperature values and SAW displacements in an incisor can be obtained by the FEM. The SAW phase velocity in a healthy incisor and dental caries is obtained by the LPEM. The methods and results of this work can provide a theoretical basis for nondestructive evaluation of human teeth with LSAWs.

  12. Study of the influence of semiconductor material parameters on acoustic wave propagation modes in GaSb/AlSb bi-layered structures by Legendre polynomial method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othmani, Cherif; Takali, Farid; Njeh, Anouar; Ben Ghozlen, Mohamed Hédi

    2016-09-01

    The propagation of Rayleigh-Lamb waves in bi-layered structures is studied. For this purpose, an extension of the Legendre polynomial (LP) method is proposed to formulate the acoustic wave equation in the bi-layered structures induced by thin film Gallium Antimonide (GaSb) and with Aluminum Antimonide (AlSb) substrate in moderate thickness. Acoustic modes propagating along a bi-layer plate are shown to be quite different than classical Lamb modes, contrary to most of the multilayered structures. The validation of the LP method is illustrated by a comparison between the associated numerical results and those obtained using the ordinary differential equation (ODE) method. The convergency of the LP method is discussed through a numerical example. Moreover, the influences of thin film GaSb parameters on the characteristics Rayleigh-Lamb waves propagation has been studied in detail. Finally, the advantages of the Legendre polynomial (LP) method to analyze the multilayered structures are described. All the developments performed in this work were implemented in Matlab software.

  13. A homogenization approach for characterization of the fluid-solid coupling parameters in Biot's equations for acoustic poroelastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, K.; van Dommelen, J. A. W.; Göransson, P.; Geers, M. G. D.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, a homogenization method is proposed to obtain the parameters of Biot's poroelastic theory from a multiscale perspective. It is assumed that the behavior of a macroscopic material point can be captured through the response of a microscopic Representative Volume Element (RVE) consisting of both a solid skeleton and a gaseous fluid. The macroscopic governing equations are assumed to be Biot's poroelastic equations and the RVE is governed by the conservation of linear momentum and the adopted linear constitutive laws under the isothermal condition. With boundary conditions relying on the macroscopic solid displacement and fluid pressure, the homogenized solid stress and fluid displacement are obtained based on energy consistency. This homogenization framework offers an approach to obtain Biot's parameters directly through the response of the RVE in the regime of Darcy's flow where the pressure gradient is dominating. A numerical experiment is performed in the form of a sound absorption test on a porous material with an idealized partially open microstructure that is described by Biot's equations where the parameters are obtained through the proposed homogenization approach. The result is evaluated by comparison with Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS), showing a superior performance of this approach compared to an alternative semi-phenomenological model for estimating Biot's parameters of the studied porous material.

  14. Nonlinear Acoustics in Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauterborn, Werner; Kurz, Thomas; Akhatov, Iskander

    At high sound intensities or long propagation distances at in fluids sufficiently low damping acoustic phenomena become nonlinear. This chapter focuses on nonlinear acoustic wave properties in gases and liquids. The origin of nonlinearity, equations of state, simple nonlinear waves, nonlinear acoustic wave equations, shock-wave formation, and interaction of waves are presented and discussed. Tables are given for the nonlinearity parameter B/A for water and a range of organic liquids, liquid metals and gases. Acoustic cavitation with its nonlinear bubble oscillations, pattern formation and sonoluminescence (light from sound) are modern examples of nonlinear acoustics. The language of nonlinear dynamics needed for understanding chaotic dynamics and acoustic chaotic systems is introduced.

  15. Acoustical Environment for Academic Buildings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lortie, L.J.

    Discussion of the parameters governing noise control and room acoustics are followed by a demonstration on how to achieve a good acoustical environment. Topics emphasized include--(1) design and control objectives, (2) noise sources and propagation, (3) reverberation parameters, (4) noise control factors and parameters, and (5) sound systems. Also…

  16. Reconstruction of the blood flow pattern by tomography of the acoustic nonlinearity parameter: Computer simulation and physical experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burov, V. A.; Evtukhov, S. N.; Rumyantseva, O. D.

    2008-09-01

    A method is proposed for reconstructing the distribution of the total blood flow velocity vector from the data obtained within the nonlinear parameter tomography scheme. The method calculates the Doppler shift of the combination frequency with the use of the spectral analysis of the combination signal and the moving target selection procedure. Results of numerical simulations are presented, and possibilities of practical application of the method are discussed. A physical experiment is carried out. The results of this experiment are found to be in good agreement with the theory and the numerical model.

  17. Single Tracking Location Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Viscoelasticity Estimation (STL-VE): A Method for Measuring Tissue Viscoelastic Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Langdon, Jonathan H; Elegbe, Etana; McAleavey, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    Single Tracking Location (STL) Shear wave Elasticity Imaging (SWEI) is a method for detecting elastic differences between tissues. It has the advantage of intrinsic speckle bias suppression compared to Multiple Tracking Location (MTL) variants of SWEI. However, the assumption of a linear model leads to an overestimation of the shear modulus in viscoelastic media. A new reconstruction technique denoted Single Tracking Location Viscosity Estimation (STL-VE) is introduced to correct for this overestimation. This technique utilizes the same raw data generated in STL-SWEI imaging. Here, the STL-VE technique is developed by way of a Maximum Likelihood Estimation (MLE) for general viscoelastic materials. The method is then implemented for the particular case of the Kelvin-Voigt Model. Using simulation data, the STL-VE technique is demonstrated and the performance of the estimator is characterized. Finally, the STL-VE method is used to estimate the viscoelastic parameters of ex-vivo bovine liver. We find good agreement between the STL-VE results and the simulation parameters as well as between the liver shear wave data and the modeled data fit. PMID:26168170

  18. Single tracking location acoustic radiation force impulse viscoelasticity estimation (STL-VE): A method for measuring tissue viscoelastic parameters.

    PubMed

    Langdon, Jonathan H; Elegbe, Etana; McAleavey, Stephen A

    2015-07-01

    Single tracking location (STL) shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) is a method for detecting elastic differences between tissues. It has the advantage of intrinsic speckle bias suppression compared with multiple tracking location variants of SWEI. However, the assumption of a linear model leads to an overestimation of the shear modulus in viscoelastic media. A new reconstruction technique denoted single tracking location viscosity estimation (STL-VE) is introduced to correct for this overestimation. This technique utilizes the same raw data generated in STL-SWEI imaging. Here, the STL-VE technique is developed by way of a maximum likelihood estimation for general viscoelastic materials. The method is then implemented for the particular case of the Kelvin-Voigt Model. Using simulation data, the STL-VE technique is demonstrated and the performance of the estimator is characterized. Finally, the STL-VE method is used to estimate the viscoelastic parameters of ex vivo bovine liver. We find good agreement between the STL-VE results and the simulation parameters as well as between the liver shear wave data and the modeled data fit. PMID:26168170

  19. Virtual acoustics displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Fisher, Scott S.; Stone, Philip K.; Foster, Scott H.

    1991-01-01

    The real time acoustic display capabilities are described which were developed for the Virtual Environment Workstation (VIEW) Project at NASA-Ames. The acoustic display is capable of generating localized acoustic cues in real time over headphones. An auditory symbology, a related collection of representational auditory 'objects' or 'icons', can be designed using ACE (Auditory Cue Editor), which links both discrete and continuously varying acoustic parameters with information or events in the display. During a given display scenario, the symbology can be dynamically coordinated in real time with 3-D visual objects, speech, and gestural displays. The types of displays feasible with the system range from simple warnings and alarms to the acoustic representation of multidimensional data or events.

  20. Calibration of acoustic transients.

    PubMed

    Burkard, Robert

    2006-05-26

    This article reviews the appropriate stimulus parameters (click duration, toneburst envelope) that should be used when eliciting auditory brainstem responses from mice. Equipment specifications required to calibrate these acoustic transients are discussed. Several methods of calibrating the level of acoustic transients are presented, including the measurement of peak equivalent sound pressure level (peSPL) and peak sound pressure level (pSPL). It is hoped that those who collect auditory brainstem response thresholds in mice will begin to use standardized methods of acoustic calibration, so that hearing thresholds across mouse strains obtained in different laboratories can more readily be compared.

  1. Acoustical standards in engineering acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhard, Mahlon D.

    2001-05-01

    The Engineering Acoustics Technical Committee is concerned with the evolution and improvement of acoustical techniques and apparatus, and with the promotion of new applications of acoustics. As cited in the Membership Directory and Handbook (2002), the interest areas include transducers and arrays; underwater acoustic systems; acoustical instrumentation and monitoring; applied sonics, promotion of useful effects, information gathering and transmission; audio engineering; acoustic holography and acoustic imaging; acoustic signal processing (equipment and techniques); and ultrasound and infrasound. Evident connections between engineering and standards are needs for calibration, consistent terminology, uniform presentation of data, reference levels, or design targets for product development. Thus for the acoustical engineer standards are both a tool for practices, for communication, and for comparison of his efforts with those of others. Development of many standards depends on knowledge of the way products are put together for the market place and acoustical engineers provide important input to the development of standards. Acoustical engineers and members of the Engineering Acoustics arm of the Society both benefit from and contribute to the Acoustical Standards of the Acoustical Society.

  2. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. The tumor ... press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the symptoms ...

  3. Acoustic telemetry.

    SciTech Connect

    Drumheller, Douglas Schaeffer; Kuszmaul, Scott S.

    2003-08-01

    Broadcasting messages through the earth is a daunting task. Indeed, broadcasting a normal telephone conversion through the earth by wireless means is impossible with todays technology. Most of us don't care, but some do. Industries that drill into the earth need wireless communication to broadcast navigation parameters. This allows them to steer their drill bits. They also need information about the natural formation that they are drilling. Measurements of parameters such as pressure, temperature, and gamma radiation levels can tell them if they have found a valuable resource such as a geothermal reservoir or a stratum bearing natural gas. Wireless communication methods are available to the drilling industry. Information is broadcast via either pressure waves in the drilling fluid or electromagnetic waves in the earth and well tubing. Data transmission can only travel one way at rates around a few baud. Given that normal Internet telephone modems operate near 20,000 baud, these data rates are truly very slow. Moreover, communication is often interrupted or permanently blocked by drilling conditions or natural formation properties. Here we describe a tool that communicates with stress waves traveling through the steel drill pipe and production tubing in the well. It's based on an old idea called Acoustic Telemetry. But what we present here is more than an idea. This tool exists, it's drilled several wells, and it works. Currently, it's the first and only acoustic telemetry tool that can withstand the drilling environment. It broadcasts one way over a limited range at much faster rates than existing methods, but we also know how build a system that can communicate both up and down wells of indefinite length.

  4. Acoustic Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  5. Acoustic seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  6. Humans (Homo sapiens) judge the emotional content of piglet (Sus scrofa domestica) calls based on simple acoustic parameters, not personality, empathy, nor attitude toward animals.

    PubMed

    Maruščáková, Iva L; Linhart, Pavel; Ratcliffe, Victoria F; Tallet, Céline; Reby, David; Špinka, Marek

    2015-05-01

    The vocal expression of emotion is likely driven by shared physiological principles among species. However, which acoustic features promote decoding of emotional state and how the decoding is affected by their listener's psychology remain poorly understood. Here we tested how acoustic features of piglet vocalizations interact with psychological profiles of human listeners to affect judgments of emotional content of heterospecific vocalizations. We played back 48 piglet call sequences recorded in four different contexts (castration, isolation, reunion, nursing) to 60 listeners. Listeners judged the emotional intensity and valence of the recordings and were further asked to attribute a context of emission from four proposed contexts. Furthermore, listeners completed a series of questionnaires assessing their personality (NEO-FFI personality inventory), empathy [Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI)] and attitudes to animals (Animal Attitudes Scale). None of the listeners' psychological traits affected the judgments. On the contrary, acoustic properties of recordings had a substantial effect on ratings. Recordings were rated as more intense with increasing pitch (mean fundamental frequency) and increasing proportion of vocalized sound within each stimulus recording and more negative with increasing pitch and increasing duration of the calls within the recording. More complex acoustic properties (jitter, harmonic-to-noise ratio, and presence of subharmonics) did not seem to affect the judgments. The probability of correct context recognition correlated positively with the assessed emotion intensity for castration and reunion calls, and negatively for nursing calls. In conclusion, listeners judged emotions from pig calls using simple acoustic properties and the perceived emotional intensity might guide the identification of the context.

  7. Topological Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Zhen; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-03-01

    The manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as "topological edge states," has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers.

  8. Topological acoustics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Zhen; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-03-20

    The manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as "topological edge states," has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers.

  9. Speaker verification system using acoustic data and non-acoustic data

    DOEpatents

    Gable, Todd J.; Ng, Lawrence C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Burnett, Greg C.

    2006-03-21

    A method and system for speech characterization. One embodiment includes a method for speaker verification which includes collecting data from a speaker, wherein the data comprises acoustic data and non-acoustic data. The data is used to generate a template that includes a first set of "template" parameters. The method further includes receiving a real-time identity claim from a claimant, and using acoustic data and non-acoustic data from the identity claim to generate a second set of parameters. The method further includes comparing the first set of parameters to the set of parameters to determine whether the claimant is the speaker. The first set of parameters and the second set of parameters include at least one purely non-acoustic parameter, including a non-acoustic glottal shape parameter derived from averaging multiple glottal cycle waveforms.

  10. An asymptotic model in acoustics: acoustic drift equations.

    PubMed

    Vladimirov, Vladimir A; Ilin, Konstantin

    2013-11-01

    A rigorous asymptotic procedure with the Mach number as a small parameter is used to derive the equations of mean flows which coexist and are affected by the background acoustic waves in the limit of very high Reynolds number.

  11. [Acoustic characteristics of classrooms].

    PubMed

    Koszarny, Zbigniew; Chyla, Andrzej

    2003-01-01

    Quality and usefulness of school rooms for transmission of verbal information depends on the two basic parameters: form and quantity of the reverberation time, and profitable line measurements of school rooms from the acoustic point of view. An analysis of the above-mentioned parameters in 48 class rooms and two gymnasiums in schools, which were built in different periods, shows that the most important problem is connected with too long reverberation time and inappropriate acoustic proportions. In schools built in the 1970s, the length of reverberation time is mostly within a low frequency band, while in schools built contemporarily, the maximum length of disappearance time takes place in a quite wide band of 250-2000 Hz. This exceeds optimal values for that kind of rooms at least twice, and five times in the newly built school. A long reverberation time is connected with a low acoustic absorption of school rooms. Moreover, school rooms are characterised by inappropriate acoustic proportions. The classrooms, in their relation to the height, are too long and too wide. It is connected with deterioration of the transmission of verbal information. The data show that this transmission is unequal. Automatically, it leads to a speech disturbance and difficulties with understanding. There is the need for adaptation of school rooms through increase of an acoustic absorption.

  12. Musical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, Colin

    This chapter provides an introduction to the physical and psycho-acoustic principles underlying the production and perception of the sounds of musical instruments. The first section introduces generic aspects of musical acoustics and the perception of musical sounds, followed by separate sections on string, wind and percussion instruments.

  13. Acoustic metafluids.

    PubMed

    Norris, Andrew N

    2009-02-01

    Acoustic metafluids are defined as the class of fluids that allow one domain of fluid to acoustically mimic another, as exemplified by acoustic cloaks. It is shown that the most general class of acoustic metafluids are materials with anisotropic inertia and the elastic properties of what are known as pentamode materials. The derivation uses the notion of finite deformation to define the transformation of one region to another. The main result is found by considering energy density in the original and transformed regions. Properties of acoustic metafluids are discussed, and general conditions are found which ensure that the mapped fluid has isotropic inertia, which potentially opens up the possibility of achieving broadband cloaking. PMID:19206861

  14. [Short-term and long-term therapy with slow-release ISDN. Echographic, vector cardiographic and ergometric findings (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Mengden, H J; Just, H; Giesecke, J

    1978-08-25

    The effect of slow-release isosorbide dinitrate (Maycor retard) on the myocard was investigated in a short-term study (single dose of 20 mg slow-release ISDN) and in a long-term study (2 X 20 mg slow-release ISDN daily) in 10 patients with coronary heart disease. The parameters assessed were heart rate, blood pressure and skin temperature at rest, load ECG, orthogonal ECG and VCG by computer and UCG echocardiography. The reductions of diastolic and systolic ventricular diameter are statistically significant in the short-term and long-term trials. The ejection time decreases. The velocity of circumferential fiber shortening as a measure of myocardial contractility increases highly significantly. R peak and T wave amplitude in the Y lead change significantly. These findings can be interpreted as an expression of improved myocardial tension and a normalization of the contraction and relaxation.

  15. Acoustic transducer for nuclear reactor monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Ahlgren, Frederic F.; Scott, Paul F.

    1977-01-01

    A transducer to monitor a parameter and produce an acoustic signal from which the monitored parameter can be recovered. The transducer comprises a modified Galton whistle which emits a narrow band acoustic signal having a frequency dependent upon the parameter being monitored, such as the temperature of the cooling media of a nuclear reactor. Multiple locations within a reactor are monitored simultaneously by a remote acoustic receiver by providing a plurality of transducers each designed so that the acoustic signal it emits has a frequency distinct from the frequencies of signals emitted by the other transducers, whereby each signal can be unambiguously related to a particular transducer.

  16. Acoustic trauma

    MedlinePlus

    Acoustic trauma is a common cause of sensory hearing loss . Damage to the hearing mechanisms within the inner ... Symptoms include: Partial hearing loss that most often involves ... The hearing loss may slowly get worse. Noises, ringing in ...

  17. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... slow growing tumor which arise primarily from the vestibular portion of the VIII cranial nerve and lie ... you have a "brain tumor" called acoustic neuroma (vestibular schwannoma). You think you are the only one ...

  18. Underwater Acoustics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creasey, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Summarizes the history of underwater acoustics and describes related research studies and teaching activities at the University of Birmingham (England). Also includes research studies on transducer design and mathematical techniques. (SK)

  19. Room Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  20. Acoustic biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Ronen; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  1. Acoustic biosensors.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  2. Controlling sound with acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummer, Steven A.; Christensen, Johan; Alù, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    Acoustic metamaterials can manipulate and control sound waves in ways that are not possible in conventional materials. Metamaterials with zero, or even negative, refractive index for sound offer new possibilities for acoustic imaging and for the control of sound at subwavelength scales. The combination of transformation acoustics theory and highly anisotropic acoustic metamaterials enables precise control over the deformation of sound fields, which can be used, for example, to hide or cloak objects from incident acoustic energy. Active acoustic metamaterials use external control to create effective material properties that are not possible with passive structures and have led to the development of dynamically reconfigurable, loss-compensating and parity-time-symmetric materials for sound manipulation. Challenges remain, including the development of efficient techniques for fabricating large-scale metamaterial structures and converting laboratory experiments into useful devices. In this Review, we outline the designs and properties of materials with unusual acoustic parameters (for example, negative refractive index), discuss examples of extreme manipulation of sound and, finally, provide an overview of future directions in the field.

  3. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Chou, C.H.

    1990-03-20

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system is described in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens. 9 figs.

  4. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Chou, Ching H.

    1990-01-01

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens.

  5. Medical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Kirk W.; Dunmire, Barbrina

    Medical acoustics can be subdivided into diagnostics and therapy. Diagnostics are further separated into auditory and ultrasonic methods, and both employ low amplitudes. Therapy (excluding medical advice) uses ultrasound for heating, cooking, permeablizing, activating and fracturing tissues and structures within the body, usually at much higher amplitudes than in diagnostics. Because ultrasound is a wave, linear wave physics are generally applicable, but recently nonlinear effects have become more important, even in low-intensity diagnostic applications.

  6. A broadband polygonal cloak for acoustic wave designed with linear coordinate transformation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Rongrong; Zheng, Bin; Ma, Chu; Xu, Jun; Fang, Nicholas; Chen, Hongsheng

    2016-07-01

    Previous acoustic cloaks designed with transformation acoustics always involve inhomogeneous material. In this paper, a design of acoustic polygonal cloak is proposed using linear polygonal transformation method. The designed acoustic polygonal cloak has homogeneous and anisotropic parameters, which is much easier to realize in practice. Furthermore, a possible acoustic metamaterial structure to realize the cloak is proposed. Simulation results on the real structure show that the metamaterial acoustic cloak is effective to reduce the scattering of the object. PMID:27475135

  7. Some Sound Advice or a Short Course in School Acoustics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCandless, David

    1977-01-01

    The two major areas of acoustical problems are room acoustics and noise control. Some parameters of these areas are identified to illustrate that the best acoustical solutions occur in comprehensive planning at the very beginning of a project. (Author/MLF)

  8. Acoustic Tooth Cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustically-energized water jet aids in plaque breakdown. Acoustic Wand includes acoustic transducer 1/4 wave plate, and tapered cone. Together elements energize solution of water containing mild abrasive injected into mouth to help prevent calculous buildup.

  9. ACOUSTIC LINERS FOR TURBOFAN ENGINES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minner, G. L.

    1994-01-01

    This program was developed to design acoustic liners for turbofan engines. This program combines results from theoretical models of wave alternation in acoustically treated passages with experimental data from full-scale fan noise suppressors. By including experimentally obtained information, the program accounts for real effects such as wall boundary layers, duct terminations, and sound modal structure. The program has its greatest use in generating a number of design specifications to be used for evaluation of trade-offs. The program combines theoretical and empirical data in designing annular acoustic liners. First an estimate of the noise output of the fan is made based on basic fan aerodynamic design variables. Then, using a target noise spectrum after alternation and the estimated fan noise spectrum, a design spectrum is calculated as their difference. Next, the design spectrum is combined with knowledge of acoustic liner performance and the liner design variables to specify the acoustic design. Details of the liner design are calculated by combining the required acoustic impedance with a mathematical model relating acoustic impedance to the physical structure of the liner. Input to the noise prediction part of the program consists of basic fan operating parameters, distance that the target spectrum is to be measured and the target spectrum. The liner design portion of the program requires the required alternation spectrum, desired values of length to height and several option selection parameters. Output from the noise prediction portion is a noise spectrum consisting of discrete tones and broadband noise. This may be used as input to the liner design portion of the program. The liner design portion of the program produces backing depths, open area ratios, and face plate thicknesses. This program is written in FORTRAN V and has been implemented in batch mode on a UNIVAC 1100 series computer with a central memory requirement of 12K (decimal) of 36 bit words.

  10. Coffee roasting acoustics.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Preston S

    2014-06-01

    Cracking sounds emitted by coffee beans during the roasting process were recorded and analyzed to investigate the potential of using the sounds as the basis for an automated roast monitoring technique. Three parameters were found that could be exploited. Near the end of the roasting process, sounds known as "first crack" exhibit a higher acoustic amplitude than sounds emitted later, known as "second crack." First crack emits more low frequency energy than second crack. Finally, the rate of cracks appearing in the second crack chorus is higher than the rate in the first crack chorus.

  11. Numerical predictions in acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, Jay C.

    1992-01-01

    Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA) involves the calculation of the sound produced by a flow as well as the underlying flowfield itself from first principles. This paper describes the numerical challenges of CAA and recent research efforts to overcome these challenges. In addition, it includes the benefits of CAA in removing restrictions of linearity, single frequency, constant parameters, low Mach numbers, etc. found in standard acoustic analyses as well as means for evaluating the validity of these numerical approaches. Finally, numerous applications of CAA to both classical as well as modern problems of concern to the aerospace industry are presented.

  12. Numerical predictions in acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardin, Jay C.

    Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA) involves the calculation of the sound produced by a flow as well as the underlying flowfield itself from first principles. This paper describes the numerical challenges of CAA and recent research efforts to overcome these challenges. In addition, it includes the benefits of CAA in removing restrictions of linearity, single frequency, constant parameters, low Mach numbers, etc. found in standard acoustic analyses as well as means for evaluating the validity of these numerical approaches. Finally, numerous applications of CAA to both classical as well as modern problems of concern to the aerospace industry are presented.

  13. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1997-12-30

    An acoustic transducer is described comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2,000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers. 4 figs.

  14. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1997-01-01

    An acoustic transducer comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers.

  15. Acoustic field and array response uncertainties in stratified ocean media.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Thomas J; Dhakal, Sagar

    2012-07-01

    The change-of-variables theorem of probability theory is applied to compute acoustic field and array beam power probability density functions (pdfs) in uncertain ocean environments represented by stratified, attenuating ocean waveguide models. Computational studies for one and two-layer waveguides investigate the functional properties of the acoustic field and array beam power pdfs. For the studies, the acoustic parameter uncertainties are represented by parametric pdfs. The field and beam response pdfs are computed directly from the parameter pdfs using the normal-mode representation and the change-of-variables theorem. For two-dimensional acoustic parameter uncertainties of sound speed and attenuation, the field and beam power pdfs exhibit irregular functional behavior and singularities associated with stationary points of the mapping, defined by acoustic propagation, from the parameter space to the field or beam power space. Implications for the assessment of orthogonal polynomial expansion and other methods for computing acoustic field pdfs are discussed.

  16. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    2000-01-01

    An active acoustic transducer tool for use down-hole applications. The tool includes a single cylindrical mandrel including a shoulder defining the boundary of a narrowed portion over which is placed a sandwich-style piezoelectric tranducer assembly. The piezoelectric transducer assembly is prestressed by being placed in a thermal interference fit between the shoulder of the mandrel and the base of an anvil which is likewise positioned over the narrower portion of the mandrel. In the preferred embodiment, assembly of the tool is accomplished using a hydraulic jack to stretch the mandrel prior to emplacement of the cylindrical sandwich-style piezoelectric transducer assembly and anvil. After those elements are positioned and secured, the stretched mandrel is allowed to return substantially to its original (pre-stretch) dimensions with the result that the piezoelectric transducer elements are compressed between the anvil and the shoulder of the mandrel.

  17. Acoustic cryocooler

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Gregory W.; Martin, Richard A.; Radenbaugh, Ray

    1990-01-01

    An acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effective to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15-60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintian a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K.

  18. Rapid geo-acoustic characterization from a surface ship of opportunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heaney, Kevin D.

    2002-05-01

    The recent shift from deep water antisubmarine warfare to the littoral has brought about a dramatic change in the requirements of our understanding of the acoustic environment. In particular, shallow water acoustic propagation is dominated by the interaction of sound with the bottom and is therefore very sensitive to the geo-acoustic parameters of the local sea-floor. The rapid geo-acoustic characterization (RGC) algorithm is presented, that determines a geo-acoustic model that best matches the general acoustic propagation parameters. Using data from a passing surface ship, the time spread, TL versus range and striation slope are measured at various frequencies. These are then matched to a simple two-layer geo-acoustic model based on the empirical curves of Hamilton and Bachman. The resulting estimate does reproduce the global features of the acoustic field that are relevant to acoustic prediction. This method is robust, rapid, and produces the relevant acoustic predictions.

  19. Acoustic characteristics of the medium with gradient change of impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bo; Yang, Desen; Sun, Yu; Shi, Jie; Shi, Shengguo; Zhang, Haoyang

    2015-10-01

    The medium with gradient change of acoustic impedance is a new acoustic structure which developed from multiple layer structures. In this paper, the inclusion is introduced and a new set of equations is developed. It can obtain better acoustic properties based on the medium with gradient change of acoustic impedance. Theoretical formulation has been systematically addressed which demonstrates how the idea of utilizing this method. The sound reflection and absorption coefficients were obtained. At last, the validity and the correctness of this method are assessed by simulations. The results show that appropriate design of parameters of the medium can improve underwater acoustic properties.

  20. Airy acoustical-sheet spinner tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2016-09-01

    The Airy acoustical beam exhibits parabolic propagation and spatial acceleration, meaning that the propagation bending angle continuously increases before the beam trajectory reaches a critical angle where it decays after a propagation distance, without applying any external bending force. As such, it is of particular importance to investigate its properties from the standpoint of acoustical radiation force, spin torque, and particle dynamics theories, in the development of novel particle sorting techniques and acoustically mediated clearing systems. This work investigates these effects on a two-dimensional (2D) circular absorptive structure placed in the field of a nonparaxial Airy "acoustical-sheet" (i.e., finite beam in 2D), for potential applications in surface acoustic waves and acousto-fluidics. Based on the characteristics of the acoustic field, the beam is capable of manipulating the circular cylindrical fluid cross-section and guides it along a transverse or parabolic trajectory. This feature of Airy acoustical beams could lead to a unique characteristic in single-beam acoustical tweezers related to acoustical sieving, filtering, and removal of particles and cells from a section of a small channel. The analysis developed here is based on the description of the nonparaxial Airy beam using the angular spectrum decomposition of plane waves in close association with the partial-wave series expansion method in cylindrical coordinates. The numerical results demonstrate the ability of the nonparaxial Airy acoustical-sheet beam to pull, propel, or accelerate a particle along a parabolic trajectory, in addition to particle confinement in the transverse direction of wave propagation. Negative or positive radiation force and spin torque causing rotation in the clockwise or the anticlockwise direction can occur depending on the nondimensional parameter ka (where k is the wavenumber and a is the radius) and the location of the cylinder in the beam. Applications in

  1. Acoustic hemostasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Lawrence; Beach, Kirk; Carter, Stephen; Chandler, Wayne; Curra, Francesco; Kaczkowski, Peter; Keilman, George; Khokhlova, Vera; Martin, Roy; Mourad, Pierre; Vaezy, Shahram

    2000-07-01

    In cases of severe injury, physicians speak of a "golden hour"—a brief grace period in which quickly applied, proper therapy can save the life of the patient. Much of this mortality results from exsanguination, i.e., bleeding to death—often from internal hemorrhage. The inability of a paramedic to treat breaches in the vascular system deep within the body or to stem the loss of blood from internal organs is a major reason for the high level of mortality associated with blunt trauma. We have undertaken an extensive research program to treat the problem of internal bleeding. Our approach is as follows: (a) We use scanning ultrasound to identify internal bleeding and hemorrhage, (b) we use ultrasound imaging to locate specific breaches in the vascular system, both from damaged vessels and gross damage to the capillary bed, and (c) we use High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) to treat the damaged region and to induce hemostasis. We present a general review of this research with some emphasis on the role of nonlinear acoustics.

  2. Sonification of acoustic emission data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raith, Manuel; Große, Christian

    2014-05-01

    While loading different specimens, acoustic emissions appear due to micro crack formation or friction of already existing crack edges. These acoustic emissions can be recorded using suitable ultrasonic transducers and transient recorders. The analysis of acoustic emissions can be used to investigate the mechanical behavior of different specimens under load. Our working group has undertaken several experiments, monitored with acoustic emission techniques. Different materials such as natural stone, concrete, wood, steel, carbon composites and bone were investigated. Also the experimental setup has been varied. Fire-spalling experiments on ultrahigh performance concrete and pullout experiments on bonded anchors have been carried out. Furthermore uniaxial compression tests on natural stone and animal bone had been conducted. The analysis tools include not only the counting of events but the analysis of full waveforms. Powerful localization algorithms and automatic onset picking techniques (based on Akaikes Information Criterion) were established to handle the huge amount of data. Up to several thousand events were recorded during experiments of a few minutes. More sophisticated techniques like moment tensor inversion have been established on this relatively small scale as well. Problems are related to the amount of data but also to signal-to-noise quality, boundary conditions (reflections) sensor characteristics and unknown and changing Greens functions of the media. Some of the acoustic emissions recorded during these experiments had been transferred into audio range. The transformation into the audio range was done using Matlab. It is the aim of the sonification to establish a tool that is on one hand able to help controlling the experiment in-situ and probably adjust the load parameters according to the number and intensity of the acoustic emissions. On the other hand sonification can help to improve the understanding of acoustic emission techniques for training

  3. Non-Native Production of Thai: Acoustic Measurements and Accentedness Ratings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wayland, Ratree

    1997-01-01

    Reports a study of the production of Thai vowels, consonants, and tones by native English speakers using two forms of evaluation: acoustic measurements and auditory evaluation by native Thai-speaking listeners. The study focused on the differences in acoustic parameters between the two groups and the acoustic parameter influencing native…

  4. Acoustic Gaits: Gait Analysis With Footstep Sounds.

    PubMed

    Altaf, M Umair Bin; Butko, Taras; Juang, Biing-Hwang Fred

    2015-08-01

    We describe the acoustic gaits-the natural human gait quantitative characteristics derived from the sound of footsteps as the person walks normally. We introduce the acoustic gait profile, which is obtained from temporal signal analysis of sound of footsteps collected by microphones and illustrate some of the spatio-temporal gait parameters that can be extracted from the acoustic gait profile by using three temporal signal analysis methods-the squared energy estimate, Hilbert transform and Teager-Kaiser energy operator. Based on the statistical analysis of the parameter estimates, we show that the spatio-temporal parameters and gait characteristics obtained using the acoustic gait profile can consistently and reliably estimate a subset of clinical and biometric gait parameters currently in use for standardized gait assessments. We conclude that the Teager-Kaiser energy operator provides the most consistent gait parameter estimates showing the least variation across different sessions and zones. Acoustic gaits use an inexpensive set of microphones with a computing device as an accurate and unintrusive gait analysis system. This is in contrast to the expensive and intrusive systems currently used in laboratory gait analysis such as the force plates, pressure mats and wearable sensors, some of which may change the gait parameters that are being measured.

  5. Envelope Solitons in Acoustically Dispersive Vitreous Silica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Yost, William T.

    2012-01-01

    Acoustic radiation-induced static strains, displacements, and stresses are manifested as rectified or dc waveforms linked to the energy density of an acoustic wave or vibrational mode via the mode nonlinearity parameter of the material. An analytical model is developed for acoustically dispersive media that predicts the evolution of the energy density of an initial waveform into a series of energy solitons that generates a corresponding series of radiation-induced static strains (envelope solitons). The evolutionary characteristics of the envelope solitons are confirmed experimentally in Suprasil W1 vitreous silica. The value (-11.9 plus or minus 1.43) for the nonlinearity parameter, determined from displacement measurements of the envelope solitons via a capacitive transducer, is in good agreement with the value (-11.6 plus or minus 1.16) obtained independently from acoustic harmonic generation measurements. The agreement provides strong, quantitative evidence for the validity of the model.

  6. Acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2016-05-31

    An acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam includes a housing; a plurality of spaced apart piezo-electric layers disposed within the housing; and a non-linear medium filling between the plurality of layers. Each of the plurality of piezoelectric layers is configured to generate an acoustic wave. The non-linear medium and the plurality of piezo-electric material layers have a matching impedance so as to enhance a transmission of the acoustic wave generated by each of plurality of layers through the remaining plurality of layers.

  7. Acoustically induced structural fatigue of piping systems

    SciTech Connect

    Eisinger, F.L.; Francis, J.T.

    1999-11-01

    Piping systems handling high-pressure and high-velocity steam and various process and hydrocarbon gases through a pressure-reducing device can produce severe acoustic vibration and metal fatigue in the system. It has been previously shown that the acoustic fatigue of the piping system is governed by the relationship between fluid pressure drop and downstream Mach number, and the dimensionless pipe diameter/wall thickness geometry parameter. In this paper, the devised relationship is extended to cover acoustic fatigue considerations of medium and smaller-diameter piping systems.

  8. Canonical Acoustics and Its Application to Surface Acoustic Wave on Acoustic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2016-08-01

    In a conventional formalism of acoustics, acoustic pressure p and velocity field u are used for characterizing acoustic waves propagating inside elastic/acoustic materials. We shall treat some fundamental problems relevant to acoustic wave propagation alternatively by using canonical acoustics (a more concise and compact formalism of acoustic dynamics), in which an acoustic scalar potential and an acoustic vector potential (Φ ,V), instead of the conventional acoustic field quantities such as acoustic pressure and velocity field (p,u) for characterizing acoustic waves, have been defined as the fundamental variables. The canonical formalism of the acoustic energy-momentum tensor is derived in terms of the acoustic potentials. Both the acoustic Hamiltonian density and the acoustic Lagrangian density have been defined, and based on this formulation, the acoustic wave quantization in a fluid is also developed. Such a formalism of acoustic potentials is employed to the problem of negative-mass-density assisted surface acoustic wave that is a highly localized surface bound state (an eigenstate of the acoustic wave equations). Since such a surface acoustic wave can be strongly confined to an interface between an acoustic metamaterial (e.g., fluid-solid composite structures with a negative dynamical mass density) and an ordinary material (with a positive mass density), it will give rise to an effect of acoustic field enhancement on the acoustic interface, and would have potential applications in acoustic device design for acoustic wave control.

  9. What Is an Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acoustic Neuroma An acoustic neuroma, also called a vestibular schwannoma, is a rare benign tumor of the ... Acoustic Neuroma? An acoustic neuroma, known as a vestibular schwannoma, is a benign (non-cancerous) growth that ...

  10. Acoustic behaviors of unsaturated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z.

    2011-12-01

    Soils are unconsolidated granular materials, consisting of solid particles, water and air. Their mechanical and dynamic behaviors are determined by the discrete nature of the media as well as external and inter-particle forces. For unsaturated soils, two factors significantly affect soils acoustic/seismic responses: external pressure and internal water potential/matric suction. In triaxial cell tests, unsaturated soils were subjected to predefined stress paths to undergo stages of normal consolidation, unload-reload cycles, and failure. The stress deformation curve and stress-P-wave velocity were measured and compared. The study revealed that soil's dynamic response to external pressure are similar to those of the load-deformation behaviors and demonstrated that acoustic velocity can be used to monitor the state of stress of soils. In a long term field soil survey, the P-wave velocities were found to be correlated with water potential as expressed as a power-law relationship. The above phenomena can be understood by using the Terzaghi' s the principle of effective stress. The measured results were in good agreement with Brutsaert theory. The effective stress concept can also be applied to explain the observations in a soil pipe flow study in which soil internal erosion processes were monitored and interpreted by the temporal evolution of the P-wave velocity. In addition to above linear acoustic behaviors, soils, like other earth materials, exhibit astonishing non-classical nonlinear behaviors such as end-point memory, hysteresis, strain -dependent shear modulus, resonant frequency shift, and phase shift, harmonics generation, etc. A nonlinear acoustic study of a soil as a function of water content showed that the nonlinear acoustic parameter are much sensitive to the variations of soil water content than that of the acoustic velocity.

  11. Acoustically-Induced Electrical Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    We have observed electrical signals excited by and moving along with an acoustic pulse propagating in a sandstone sample. Using resonance we are now studying the characteristics of this acousto-electric signal and determining its origin and the controlling physical parameters. Four rock samples with a range of porosities, permeabilities, and mineralogies were chosen: Berea, Boise, and Colton sandstones and Austin Chalk. Pore water salinity was varied from deionized water to sea water. Ag-AgCl electrodes were attached to the sample and were interfaced to a 4-wire electrical resistivity system. Under computer control, the acoustic signals were excited and the electrical response was recorded. We see strong acoustically-induced electrical signals in all samples, with the magnitude of the effect for each rock getting stronger as we move from the 1st to the 3rd harmonics in resonance. Given a particular fluid salinity, each rock has its own distinct sensitivity in the induced electrical effect. For example at the 2nd harmonic, Berea Sandstone produces the largest electrical signal per acoustic power input even though Austin Chalk and Boise Sandstone tend to resonate with much larger amplitudes at the same harmonic. Two effects are potentially responsible for this acoustically-induced electrical response: one the co-seismic seismo-electric effect and the other a strain-induced resistivity change known as the acousto-electric effect. We have designed experimental tests to separate these mechanisms. The tests show that the seismo-electric effect is dominant in our studies. We note that these experiments are in a fluid viscosity dominated seismo-electric regime, leading to a simple interpretation of the signals where the electric potential developed is proportional to the local acceleration of the rock. Toward a test of this theory we have measured the local time-varying acoustic strain in our samples using a laser vibrometer.

  12. Acoustic Test Results of Melamine Foam with Application to Payload Fairing Acoustic Attenuation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2014-01-01

    A spacecraft at launch is subjected to a harsh acoustic and vibration environment resulting from the passage of acoustic energy, created during the liftoff of a launch vehicle, through the vehicle's payload fairing. In order to ensure the mission success of the spacecraft it is often necessary to reduce the resulting internal acoustic sound pressure levels through the usage of acoustic attenuation systems. Melamine foam, lining the interior walls of the payload fairing, is often utilized as the main component of such a system. In order to better understand the acoustic properties of melamine foam, with the goal of developing improved acoustic attenuation systems, NASA has recently performed panel level testing on numerous configurations of melamine foam acoustic treatments at the Riverbank Acoustical Laboratory. Parameters assessed included the foam's thickness and density, as well as the effects of a top outer cover sheet material and mass barriers embedded within the foam. This testing followed the ASTM C423 standard for absorption and the ASTM E90 standard for transmission loss. The acoustic test data obtained and subsequent conclusions are the subjects of this paper.

  13. Bioeffects due to acoustic droplet vaporization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    Encapsulated micro- and nano-droplets can be vaporized via ultrasound, a process termed acoustic droplet vaporization. Our interest is primarily motivated by a developmental gas embolotherapy technique for cancer treatment. In this methodology, infarction of tumors is induced by selectively formed vascular gas bubbles that arise from the acoustic vaporization of vascular microdroplets. Additionally, the microdroplets may be used as vehicles for localized drug delivery, with or without flow occlusion. In this talk, we examine the dynamics of acoustic droplet vaporization through experiments and theoretical/computational fluid mechanics models, and investigate the bioeffects of acoustic droplet vaporization on endothelial cells and in vivo. Early timescale vaporization events, including phase change, are directly visualized using ultra-high speed imaging, and the influence of acoustic parameters on droplet/bubble dynamics is discussed. Acoustic and fluid mechanics parameters affecting the severity of endothelial cell bioeffects are explored. These findings suggest parameter spaces for which bioeffects may be reduced or enhanced, depending on the objective of the therapy. This work was supported by NIH grant R01EB006476.

  14. Symptoms of Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ...

  15. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ...

  16. Navy Applications of High-Frequency Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Henry

    2004-11-01

    Although the emphasis in underwater acoustics for the last few decades has been in low-frequency acoustics, motivated by long range detection of submarines, there has been a continuing use of high-frequency acoustics in traditional specialized applications such as bottom mapping, mine hunting, torpedo homing and under ice navigation. The attractive characteristics of high-frequency sonar, high spatial resolution, wide bandwidth, small size and relatively low cost must be balanced against the severe range limitation imposed by attenuation that increases approximately as frequency-squared. Many commercial applications of acoustics are ideally served by high-frequency active systems. The small size and low cost, coupled with the revolution in small powerful signal processing hardware has led to the consideration of more sophisticated systems. Driven by commercial applications, there are currently available several commercial-off-the-shelf products including acoustic modems for underwater communication, multi-beam fathometers, side scan sonars for bottom mapping, and even synthetic aperture side scan sonar. Much of the work in high frequency sonar today continues to be focused on specialized applications in which the application is emphasized over the underlying acoustics. Today's vision for the Navy of the future involves Autonomous Undersea Vehicles (AUVs) and off-board ASW sensors. High-frequency acoustics will play a central role in the fulfillment of this vision as a means of communication and as a sensor. The acoustic communication problems for moving AUVs and deep sensors are discussed. Explicit relationships are derived between the communication theoretic description of channel parameters in terms of time and Doppler spreads and ocean acoustic parameters, group velocities, phase velocities and horizontal wavenumbers. Finally the application of synthetic aperture sonar to the mine hunting problems is described.

  17. Acoustic emission frequency discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugg, Frank E. (Inventor); Graham, Lloyd J. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    In acoustic emission nondestructive testing, broadband frequency noise is distinguished from narrow banded acoustic emission signals, since the latter are valid events indicative of structural flaws in the material being examined. This is accomplished by separating out those signals which contain frequency components both within and beyond (either above or below) the range of valid acoustic emission events. Application to acoustic emission monitoring during nondestructive bond verification and proof loading of undensified tiles on the Space Shuttle Orbiter is considered.

  18. DETECTING BARYON ACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Labatie, A.; Starck, J. L.

    2012-02-20

    Baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) are a feature imprinted in the galaxy distribution by acoustic waves traveling in the plasma of the early universe. Their detection at the expected scale in large-scale structures strongly supports current cosmological models with a nearly linear evolution from redshift z Almost-Equal-To 1000 and the existence of dark energy. In addition, BAOs provide a standard ruler for studying cosmic expansion. In this paper, we focus on methods for BAO detection using the correlation function measurement {xi}-hat. For each method, we want to understand the tested hypothesis (the hypothesis H{sub 0} to be rejected) and the underlying assumptions. We first present wavelet methods which are mildly model-dependent and mostly sensitive to the BAO feature. Then we turn to fully model-dependent methods. We present the method used most often based on the {chi}{sup 2} statistic, but we find that it has limitations. In general the assumptions of the {chi}{sup 2} method are not verified, and it only gives a rough estimate of the significance. The estimate can become very wrong when considering more realistic hypotheses, where the covariance matrix of {xi}-hat depends on cosmological parameters. Instead, we propose to use the {Delta}l method based on two modifications: we modify the procedure for computing the significance and make it rigorous, and we modify the statistic to obtain better results in the case of varying covariance matrix. We verify with simulations that correct significances are different from the ones obtained using the classical {chi}{sup 2} procedure. We also test a simple example of varying covariance matrix. In this case we find that our modified statistic outperforms the classical {chi}{sup 2} statistic when both significances are correctly computed. Finally, we find that taking into account variations of the covariance matrix can change both BAO detection levels and cosmological parameter constraints.

  19. Acoustical scattering cross section of gas bubbles under dual-frequency acoustic excitation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuning; Li, Shengcai

    2015-09-01

    The acoustical scattering cross section is a paramount parameter determining the scattering ability of cavitation bubbles when they are excited by the incident acoustic waves. This parameter is strongly related with many important applications of acoustic cavitation including facilitating the reaction of chemical process, boosting bubble sonoluminescence, and performing non-invasive therapy and drug delivery. In present paper, both the analytical and numerical solutions of acoustical scattering cross section of gas bubbles under dual-frequency excitation are obtained. The validity of the analytical solution is shown with demonstrating examples. The nonlinear characteristics (e.g., harmonics, subharmonics and ultraharmonics) of the scattering cross section curve under dual-frequency approach are investigated. Compared with single-frequency approach, the dual-frequency approach displays more resonances termed as "combination resonances" and could promote the acoustical scattering cross section significantly within a much broader range of bubble sizes due to the generation of more resonances. The influence of several paramount parameters (e.g., acoustic pressure amplitude, power allocations between two acoustic components, and the ratio of the frequencies) in the dual-frequency system on the predictions of scattering cross section has been discussed.

  20. Tutorial on architectural acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Neil; Talaske, Rick; Bistafa, Sylvio

    2002-11-01

    This tutorial is intended to provide an overview of current knowledge and practice in architectural acoustics. Topics covered will include basic concepts and history, acoustics of small rooms (small rooms for speech such as classrooms and meeting rooms, music studios, small critical listening spaces such as home theatres) and the acoustics of large rooms (larger assembly halls, auditoria, and performance halls).

  1. Iso-acoustic focusing of cells for size-insensitive acousto-mechanical phenotyping

    PubMed Central

    Augustsson, Per; Karlsen, Jonas T.; Su, Hao-Wei; Bruus, Henrik; Voldman, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical phenotyping of single cells is an emerging tool for cell classification, enabling assessment of effective parameters relating to cells' interior molecular content and structure. Here, we present iso-acoustic focusing, an equilibrium method to analyze the effective acoustic impedance of single cells in continuous flow. While flowing through a microchannel, cells migrate sideways, influenced by an acoustic field, into streams of increasing acoustic impedance, until reaching their cell-type specific point of zero acoustic contrast. We establish an experimental procedure and provide theoretical justifications and models for iso-acoustic focusing. We describe a method for providing a suitable acoustic contrast gradient in a cell-friendly medium, and use acoustic forces to maintain that gradient in the presence of destabilizing forces. Applying this method we demonstrate iso-acoustic focusing of cell lines and leukocytes, showing that acoustic properties provide phenotypic information independent of size. PMID:27180912

  2. Acoustic attenuation analysis program for ducts with mean flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunze, R. K., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A computerized acoustic attenuation prediction procedure has been developed to evaluate acoustically lined ducts for various geometric and environmental parameters. The analysis procedure is based on solutions to the acoustic wave equation, assuming uniform airflow on a duct cross section, combined with appropriate mathematical lining impedance models. The impedance models included in the analysis procedure are representative of either perforated sheet or porous polyimide impregnated fiberglass facing sheet coupled with a cellular backing space. Advantages and limitations of the analysis procedure are reviewed.

  3. Listening to the acoustics in concert halls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beranek, Leo L.; Griesinger, David

    2001-05-01

    How does acoustics affect the symphonic music performed in a concert hall? The lecture begins with an illustrated discussion of the architectural features that influence the acoustics. Boston Symphony Hall, which was built in 1900 when only one facet of architectural design was known, now rates as one of the world's great halls. How this occurred will be presented. Music is composed with some acoustical environment in mind and this varies with time from the Baroque to the Romantic to the Modern musical period. Conductors vary their interpretation according to the hall they are in. Well-traveled listeners and music critics have favorite halls. The lecture then presents a list of 58 halls rank ordered according to their acoustical quality based on interviews of music critics and conductors. Modern acoustical measurements made in these halls are compared with their rankings. Music recordings will be presented that demonstrate how halls sound that have different measured acoustical parameters. Photographs of a number of recently built halls are shown as examples of how these known acoustical factors have been incorporated into architectural design.

  4. ACOUSTICAL STANDARDS NEWS.

    PubMed

    Stremmel, Neil; Struck, Christopher J

    2016-07-01

    American National Standards (ANSI Standards) developed by Accredited Standards Committees S1, S2, S3, S3/SC 1, and S12 in the areas of acoustics, mechanical vibration and shock, bioacoustics, animal bioacoustics, and noise, respectively, are published by the Acoustical Society of America (ASA). In addition to these standards, ASA publishes a catalog of Acoustical American National Standards. To receive a copy of the latest Standards catalog, please contact Neil Stremmel.Comments are welcomed on all material in Acoustical Standards News.This Acoustical Standards News section in JASA, as well as the National Catalog of Acoustical Standards and other information on the Standards Program of the Acoustical Society of America, are available via the ASA home page: http://acousticalsociety.org. PMID:27475185

  5. Effects of Liner Geometry on Acoustic Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Tracy, Maureen B.; Watson, Willie R.; Parrott, Tony L.

    2002-01-01

    Current aircraft engine nacelles typically contain acoustic liners consisting of perforated sheets bonded onto honeycomb cavities. Numerous models have been developed to predict the acoustic impedance of these liners in the presence of grazing flow, and to use that information with aeroacoustic propagation codes to assess nacelle liner noise suppression. Recent efforts have provided advances in impedance education methodologies that offer more accurate determinations of acoustic liner properties in the presence of grazing flow. The current report provides the results of a parametric study, in which a finite element method was used to assess the effects of variations of the following geometric parameters on liner impedance, with and without the presence of grazing flow: percent open area, sheet thickness, sheet thickness-to-hole diameter ratio and cavity depth. Normal incidence acoustic impedances were determined for eight acoustic liners, consisting of punched aluminum facesheets bonded to hexcell honeycomb cavities. Similar liners were tested in the NASA Langley Research Center grazing incidence tube to determine their response in the presence of grazing flow. The resultant data provide a quantitative assessment of the effects of these perforate, single-layer liner parameters on the acoustic impedance of the liner.

  6. Measuring Acoustic-Radiation Stresses in Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Yost, W. T.

    1986-01-01

    System measures nonlinearity parameters of materials. Uses static strain generated by acoustic wave propagating in material. Since static strain is effectively "dc" component of waveform distortion, problems associated with phase-cancellation artifacts disappear. Further, sign of nonlinearity parameter obtained by simple inspection of measured signal polarity. These features make this system very amenable to use in field. System expected to become standard for acoustic-radiation-stress measurements for solids and liquids and for characterization of material properties related to strength and residual or applied stresses. Also expected to become standard for transducer calibration.

  7. AST Launch Vehicle Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, Janice; Counter, D.; Giacomoni, D.

    2015-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are then used in the prediction of internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components which result in the qualification levels. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic (LOA) environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle. If there is a significant amount of uncertainty in the predictions or if acoustic mitigation options must be implemented, a subscale acoustic test is a feasible pre-launch test option to verify the LOA environments. The NASA Space Launch System (SLS) program initiated the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) to verify the predicted SLS LOA environments and to determine the acoustic reduction with an above deck water sound suppression system. The SMAT was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center and the test article included a 5% scale SLS vehicle model, tower and Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 250 instruments. The SMAT liftoff acoustic results are presented, findings are discussed and a comparison is shown to the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) results.

  8. Coupled vibro-acoustic model updating using frequency response functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehete, D. V.; Modak, S. V.; Gupta, K.

    2016-03-01

    Interior noise in cavities of motorized vehicles is of increasing significance due to the lightweight design of these structures. Accurate coupled vibro-acoustic FE models of such cavities are required so as to allow a reliable design and analysis. It is, however, experienced that the vibro-acoustic predictions using these models do not often correlate acceptably well with the experimental measurements and hence require model updating. Both the structural and the acoustic parameters addressing the stiffness as well as the damping modeling inaccuracies need to be considered simultaneously in the model updating framework in order to obtain an accurate estimate of these parameters. It is also noted that the acoustic absorption properties are generally frequency dependent. This makes use of modal data based methods for updating vibro-acoustic FE models difficult. In view of this, the present paper proposes a method based on vibro-acoustic frequency response functions that allow updating of a coupled FE model by considering simultaneously the parameters associated with both the structural as well as the acoustic model of the cavity. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated through numerical studies on a 3D rectangular box cavity with a flexible plate. Updating parameters related to the material property, stiffness of joints between the plate and the rectangular cavity and the properties of absorbing surfaces of the acoustic cavity are considered. The robustness of the method under presence of noise is also studied.

  9. Applications of acoustics in the measurement of coal slab thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadden, W. J., Jr.; Mills, J. M.; Pierce, A. D.

    1980-01-01

    The determination of the possibility of employing acoustic waves at ultrasonic frequencies for measurements of thicknesses of slabs of coal backed by shale is investigated. Fundamental information concerning the acoustical properties of coal, and the relationship between these properties and the structural and compositional parameters used to characterize coal samples was also sought. The testing device, which utilizes two matched transducers, is described.

  10. Software for Acoustic Rendering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Joel D.

    2003-01-01

    SLAB is a software system that can be run on a personal computer to simulate an acoustic environment in real time. SLAB was developed to enable computational experimentation in which one can exert low-level control over a variety of signal-processing parameters, related to spatialization, for conducting psychoacoustic studies. Among the parameters that can be manipulated are the number and position of reflections, the fidelity (that is, the number of taps in finite-impulse-response filters), the system latency, and the update rate of the filters. Another goal in the development of SLAB was to provide an inexpensive means of dynamic synthesis of virtual audio over headphones, without need for special-purpose signal-processing hardware. SLAB has a modular, object-oriented design that affords the flexibility and extensibility needed to accommodate a variety of computational experiments and signal-flow structures. SLAB s spatial renderer has a fixed signal-flow architecture corresponding to a set of parallel signal paths from each source to a listener. This fixed architecture can be regarded as a compromise that optimizes efficiency at the expense of complete flexibility. Such a compromise is necessary, given the design goal of enabling computational psychoacoustic experimentation on inexpensive personal computers.

  11. Acoustic Translation of an Acoustically Levitated Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Allen, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Acoustic-levitation apparatus uses only one acoustic mode to move sample from one region of chamber to another. Sample heated and cooled quickly by translation between hot and cold regions of levitation chamber. Levitated sample is raised into furnace region by raising plunger. Frequency of sound produced by transducers adjusted by feedback system to maintain (102) resonant mode, which levitates sample midway between transducers and plunger regardless of plunger position.

  12. Liquid Helium Acoustic Microscope.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steer, Andrew Paul

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. In an acoustic microscope, images are generated by monitoring the intensity of the ultrasonic reflection, or echo, from the surface of a sample. In order to achieve this a pulse of acoustic energy is produced by the excitation of a thin film transducer. The pulse thus generated propagates through a crystal and is incident upon the acoustic lens surface, which is the boundary between the crystal and an acoustic coupling liquid. The acoustic lens is a converging element, and brings the ultrasonic beam to a focus within the liquid. A sample, placed at the focus, can act as a reflector, and the returned pulse then contains information regarding the acoustic reflectivity of this specimen. Acoustic pulses are repeatedly launched and detected while the acoustic lens is scanned over the surface of the sample. In this manner an acoustic image is constructed. Acoustic losses in room temperature liquid coupling media represent a considerable source of difficulty in the recovery of acoustic echo signals. At the frequencies of operation required in a microscope which is capable of high resolution, the ultrasonic attenuation is not only large but increases with the square of frequency. In superfluid liquid helium at temperatures below 0.1 K, however, the ultrasonic attenuation becomes negligible. Furthermore, the low sound velocity in liquid helium results in an increase in resolution, since the acoustic wavelength is proportional to velocity. A liquid helium acoustic microscope has been designed and constructed. Details of the various possible detection methods are given, and comparisons are made between them. Measurements of the performance of the system that was adopted are reported. The development of a cooled preamplifier is also described. The variation of reflected signal with object distance has been measured and compared with theoretical predictions. This variation is important in the analysis of acoustic

  13. The prediction of acoustical particle motion using an efficient polynomial curve fit procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, S. E.; Bernhard, R.

    1984-01-01

    A procedure is examined whereby the acoustic model parameters, natural frequencies and mode shapes, in the cavities of transportation vehicles are determined experimentally. The acoustic model shapes are described in terms of the particle motion. The acoustic modal analysis procedure is tailored to existing minicomputer based spectral analysis systems.

  14. Acoustic Levitator Maintains Resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Gaspar, M. S.

    1986-01-01

    Transducer loading characteristics allow resonance tracked at high temperature. Acoustic-levitation chamber length automatically adjusted to maintain resonance at constant acoustic frequency as temperature changes. Developed for containerless processing of materials at high temperatures, system does not rely on microphones as resonance sensors, since microphones are difficult to fabricate for use at temperatures above 500 degrees C. Instead, system uses acoustic transducer itself as sensor.

  15. Modal analysis and intensity of acoustic radiation of the kettledrum.

    PubMed

    Tronchin, Lamberto

    2005-02-01

    The acoustical features of kettledrums have been analyzed by means of modal analysis and acoustic radiation (p/v ratio) measurements. Modal analysis of two different kettledrums was undertaken, exciting the system both by a hammer and a shaker. Up to 15 vibrational modes were clearly identified. Acoustic radiation was studied using two ways. Based on previous experiments of other researchers, a new parameter, called intensity of acoustic radiation (IAR), has been defined and measured. Results show a strict relationship between IAR and the frequency response function (FRF, which is the v/F ratio), and IAR also strongly relates the modal pattern to acoustic radiation. Finally, IAR is proposed for vibro-acoustical characterization of kettledrums and other musical instruments such as strings, pianos, and harpsichords. PMID:15759711

  16. Acoustic dispersive prism

    PubMed Central

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz–1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium. PMID:26739504

  17. Localized acoustic surface modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Mohamed; Chen, Pai-Yen; Bağcı, Hakan

    2016-04-01

    We introduce the concept of localized acoustic surface modes. We demonstrate that they are induced on a two-dimensional cylindrical rigid surface with subwavelength corrugations under excitation by an incident acoustic plane wave. Our results show that the corrugated rigid surface is acoustically equivalent to a cylindrical scatterer with uniform mass density that can be represented using a Drude-like model. This, indeed, suggests that plasmonic-like acoustic materials can be engineered with potential applications in various areas including sensing, imaging, and cloaking.

  18. Low frequency acoustic microscope

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    1986-11-04

    A scanning acoustic microscope is disclosed for the detection and location of near surface flaws, inclusions or voids in a solid sample material. A focused beam of acoustic energy is directed at the sample with its focal plane at the subsurface flaw, inclusion or void location. The sample is scanned with the beam. Detected acoustic energy specularly reflected and mode converted at the surface of the sample and acoustic energy reflected by subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids at the focal plane are used for generating an interference signal which is processed and forms a signal indicative of the subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids.

  19. Acoustic Levitation With Less Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Jacobi, N.

    1983-01-01

    Certain chamber shapes require fewer than three acoustic drivers. Levitation at center of spherical chamber attained using only one acoustic driver. Exitation of lowest spherical mode produces asymmetric acoustic potential well.

  20. Transmission Characteristics of Primate Vocalizations: Implications for Acoustic Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Maciej, Peter; Fischer, Julia; Hammerschmidt, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    Acoustic analyses have become a staple method in field studies of animal vocal communication, with nearly all investigations using computer-based approaches to extract specific features from sounds. Various algorithms can be used to extract acoustic variables that may then be related to variables such as individual identity, context or reproductive state. Habitat structure and recording conditions, however, have strong effects on the acoustic structure of sound signals. The purpose of this study was to identify which acoustic parameters reliably describe features of propagated sounds. We conducted broadcast experiments and examined the influence of habitat type, transmission height, and re-recording distance on the validity (deviation from the original sound) and reliability (variation within identical recording conditions) of acoustic features of different primate call types. Validity and reliability varied independently of each other in relation to habitat, transmission height, and re-recording distance, and depended strongly on the call type. The smallest deviations from the original sounds were obtained by a visually-controlled calculation of the fundamental frequency. Start- and end parameters of a sound were most susceptible to degradation in the environment. Because the recording conditions can have appreciable effects on acoustic parameters, it is advisable to validate the extraction method of acoustic variables from recordings over longer distances before using them in acoustic analyses. PMID:21829682

  1. Acoustics Critical Readiness Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, Kenny

    2010-01-01

    This presentation reviews the status of the acoustic equipment from the medical operations perspective. Included is information about the acoustic dosimeters, sound level meter, and headphones that are planned for use while on orbit. Finally there is information about on-orbit hearing assessments.

  2. Introduction to acoustic emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Possa, G.

    1983-01-01

    Typical acoustic emission signal characteristics are described and techniques which localize the signal source by processing the acoustic delay data from multiple sensors are discussed. The instrumentation, which includes sensors, amplifiers, pulse counters, a minicomputer and output devices is examined. Applications are reviewed.

  3. Aquatic Acoustic Metrics Interface

    SciTech Connect

    2012-12-18

    Fishes and marine mammals may suffer a range of potential effects from exposure to intense underwater sound generated by anthropogenic activities such as pile driving, shipping, sonars, and underwater blasting. Several underwater sound recording (USR) devices have been built to acquire samples of the underwater sound generated by anthropogenic activities. Software becomes indispensable for processing and analyzing the audio files recorded by these USRs. The new Aquatic Acoustic Metrics Interface Utility Software (AAMI) is specifically designed for analysis of underwater sound recordings to provide data in metrics that facilitate evaluation of the potential impacts of the sound on aquatic animals. In addition to the basic functions, such as loading and editing audio files recorded by USRs and batch processing of sound files, the software utilizes recording system calibration data to compute important parameters in physical units. The software also facilitates comparison of the noise sound sample metrics with biological measures such as audiograms of the sensitivity of aquatic animals to the sound, integrating various components into a single analytical frame.

  4. Aquatic Acoustic Metrics Interface

    2012-12-18

    Fishes and marine mammals may suffer a range of potential effects from exposure to intense underwater sound generated by anthropogenic activities such as pile driving, shipping, sonars, and underwater blasting. Several underwater sound recording (USR) devices have been built to acquire samples of the underwater sound generated by anthropogenic activities. Software becomes indispensable for processing and analyzing the audio files recorded by these USRs. The new Aquatic Acoustic Metrics Interface Utility Software (AAMI) is specificallymore » designed for analysis of underwater sound recordings to provide data in metrics that facilitate evaluation of the potential impacts of the sound on aquatic animals. In addition to the basic functions, such as loading and editing audio files recorded by USRs and batch processing of sound files, the software utilizes recording system calibration data to compute important parameters in physical units. The software also facilitates comparison of the noise sound sample metrics with biological measures such as audiograms of the sensitivity of aquatic animals to the sound, integrating various components into a single analytical frame.« less

  5. Isocurvature modes and Baryon Acoustic Oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Mangilli, Anna; Verde, Licia; Beltran, Maria E-mail: licia.verde@icc.ub.edu

    2010-10-01

    The measurement of Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations from galaxy surveys is well known to be a robust and powerful tool to constrain dark energy. This method relies on the knowledge of the size of the acoustic horizon at radiation drag derived from Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropy measurements. In this paper we quantify the effect of non-standard initial conditions in the form of an isocurvature component on the determination of dark energy parameters from future BAO surveys. In particular, if there is an isocurvature component (at a level still allowed by present data) but it is ignored in the CMB analysis, the sound horizon and cosmological parameters determination is biased, and, as a consequence, future surveys may incorrectly suggest deviations from a cosmological constant. In order to recover an unbiased determination of the sound horizon and dark energy parameters, a component of isocurvature perturbations must be included in the model when analyzing CMB data. Fortunately, doing so does not increase parameter errors significantly.

  6. Acoustic ground impedance meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus are presented for measuring the acoustic impedance of a surface in which the surface is used to enclose one end of the chamber of a Helmholz resonator. Acoustic waves are generated in the neck of the resonator by a piston driven by a variable speed motor through a cam assembly. The acoustic waves are measured in the chamber and the frequency of the generated acoustic waves is measured by an optical device. These measurements are used to compute the compliance and conductance of the chamber and surface combined. The same procedure is followed with a calibration plate having infinite acoustic impedance enclosing the chamber of the resonator to compute the compliance and conductance of the chamber alone. Then by subtracting, the compliance and conductance for the surface is obtained.

  7. Ocean acoustic hurricane classification.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Joshua D; Makris, Nicholas C

    2006-01-01

    Theoretical and empirical evidence are combined to show that underwater acoustic sensing techniques may be valuable for measuring the wind speed and determining the destructive power of a hurricane. This is done by first developing a model for the acoustic intensity and mutual intensity in an ocean waveguide due to a hurricane and then determining the relationship between local wind speed and underwater acoustic intensity. From this it is shown that it should be feasible to accurately measure the local wind speed and classify the destructive power of a hurricane if its eye wall passes directly over a single underwater acoustic sensor. The potential advantages and disadvantages of the proposed acoustic method are weighed against those of currently employed techniques. PMID:16454274

  8. Ocean acoustic hurricane classification.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Joshua D; Makris, Nicholas C

    2006-01-01

    Theoretical and empirical evidence are combined to show that underwater acoustic sensing techniques may be valuable for measuring the wind speed and determining the destructive power of a hurricane. This is done by first developing a model for the acoustic intensity and mutual intensity in an ocean waveguide due to a hurricane and then determining the relationship between local wind speed and underwater acoustic intensity. From this it is shown that it should be feasible to accurately measure the local wind speed and classify the destructive power of a hurricane if its eye wall passes directly over a single underwater acoustic sensor. The potential advantages and disadvantages of the proposed acoustic method are weighed against those of currently employed techniques.

  9. Cochlear bionic acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Fuyin; Wu, Jiu Hui; Huang, Meng; Fu, Gang; Bai, Changan

    2014-11-01

    A design of bionic acoustic metamaterial and acoustic functional devices was proposed by employing the mammalian cochlear as a prototype. First, combined with the experimental data in previous literatures, it is pointed out that the cochlear hair cells and stereocilia cluster are a kind of natural biological acoustic metamaterials with the negative stiffness characteristics. Then, to design the acoustic functional devices conveniently in engineering application, a simplified parametric helical structure was proposed to replace actual irregular cochlea for bionic design, and based on the computational results of such a bionic parametric helical structure, it is suggested that the overall cochlear is a local resonant system with the negative dynamic effective mass characteristics. There are many potential applications in the bandboard energy recovery device, cochlear implant, and acoustic black hole.

  10. Acoustic Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, David R.; Sabra, Karim G.

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic waves carry information about their source and collect information about their environment as they propagate. This article reviews how these information-carrying and -collecting features of acoustic waves that travel through fluids can be exploited for remote sensing. In nearly all cases, modern acoustic remote sensing involves array-recorded sounds and array signal processing to recover multidimensional results. The application realm for acoustic remote sensing spans an impressive range of signal frequencies (10-2 to 107 Hz) and distances (10-2 to 107 m) and involves biomedical ultrasound imaging, nondestructive evaluation, oil and gas exploration, military systems, and Nuclear Test Ban Treaty monitoring. In the past two decades, approaches have been developed to robustly localize remote sources; remove noise and multipath distortion from recorded signals; and determine the acoustic characteristics of the environment through which the sound waves have traveled, even when the recorded sounds originate from uncooperative sources or are merely ambient noise.

  11. Acoustic suspension system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An acoustic levitation system is described, with single acoustic source and a small reflector to stably levitate a small object while the object is processed as by coating or heating it. The system includes a concave acoustic source which has locations on opposite sides of its axis that vibrate towards and away from a focal point to generate a converging acoustic field. A small reflector is located near the focal point, and preferably slightly beyond it, to create an intense acoustic field that stably supports a small object near the reflector. The reflector is located about one-half wavelength from the focal point and is concavely curved to a radius of curvature (L) of about one-half the wavelength, to stably support an object one-quarter wavelength (N) from the reflector.

  12. Acoustic integrated extinction

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Andrew N.

    2015-01-01

    The integrated extinction (IE) is defined as the integral of the scattering cross section as a function of wavelength. Sohl et al. (2007 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 122, 3206–3210. (doi:10.1121/1.2801546)) derived an IE expression for acoustic scattering that is causal, i.e. the scattered wavefront in the forward direction arrives later than the incident plane wave in the background medium. The IE formula was based on electromagnetic results, for which scattering is causal by default. Here, we derive a formula for the acoustic IE that is valid for causal and non-causal scattering. The general result is expressed as an integral of the time-dependent forward scattering function. The IE reduces to a finite integral for scatterers with zero long-wavelength monopole and dipole amplitudes. Implications for acoustic cloaking are discussed and a new metric is proposed for broadband acoustic transparency. PMID:27547100

  13. Acoustic wayfinding: A method to measure the acoustic contrast of different paving materials for blind people.

    PubMed

    Secchi, Simone; Lauria, Antonio; Cellai, Gianfranco

    2017-01-01

    Acoustic wayfinding involves using a variety of auditory cues to create a mental map of the surrounding environment. For blind people, these auditory cues become the primary substitute for visual information in order to understand the features of the spatial context and orient themselves. This can include creating sound waves, such as tapping a cane. This paper reports the results of a research about the "acoustic contrast" parameter between paving materials functioning as a cue and the surrounding or adjacent surface functioning as a background. A number of different materials was selected in order to create a test path and a procedure was defined for the verification of the ability of blind people to distinguish different acoustic contrasts. A method is proposed for measuring acoustic contrast generated by the impact of a cane tip on the ground to provide blind people with environmental information on spatial orientation and wayfinding in urban places. PMID:27633240

  14. Investigation of acoustic streaming patterns around oscillating sharp edges

    PubMed Central

    Nama, Nitesh; Huang, Po-Hsun; Huang, Tony Jun; Costanzo, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Oscillating sharp edges have been employed to achieve rapid and homogeneous mixing in microchannels using acoustic streaming. Here we use a perturbation approach to study the flow around oscillating sharp edges in a microchannel. This work extends prior experimental studies to numerically characterize the effect of various parameters on the acoustically induced flow. Our numerical results match well with the experimental results. We investigated multiple device parameters such as the tip angle, oscillation amplitude, and channel dimensions. Our results indicate that, due to the inherent nonlinearity of acoustic streaming, the channel dimensions could significantly impact the flow patterns and device performance. PMID:24903475

  15. Linear phase distribution of acoustical vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Lu; Zheng, Haixiang; Ma, Qingyu; Tu, Juan; Zhang, Dong

    2014-07-14

    Linear phase distribution of phase-coded acoustical vortices was theoretically investigated based on the radiation theory of point source, and then confirmed by experimental measurements. With the proposed criterion of positive phase slope, the possibility of constructing linear circular phase distributions is demonstrated to be determined by source parameters. Improved phase linearity can be achieved at larger source number, lower frequency, smaller vortex radius, and/or longer axial distance. Good agreements are observed between numerical simulations and measurement results for circular phase distributions. The favorable results confirm the feasibility of precise phase control for acoustical vortices and suggest potential applications in particle manipulation.

  16. Generation mechanism for electron acoustic solitary waves

    SciTech Connect

    Kakad, A. P.; Singh, S. V.; Reddy, R. V.; Lakhina, G. S.; Tagare, S. G.; Verheest, F.

    2007-05-15

    Nonlinear electron acoustic solitary waves (EASWs) are studied in a collisionless and unmagnetized plasma consisting of cold background electrons, cold beam electrons, and two different temperature ion species. Using pseudopotential analysis, the properties of arbitrary amplitude EASWs are investigated. The present model supports compressive as well as rarefactive electron acoustic solitary structures. Furthermore, there is an interesting possibility of the coexistence of compressive and rarefactive solitary structures in a specific plasma parameter range. The application of our results in interpreting the salient features of the broadband electrostatic noise in the plasma sheet boundary layer is discussed.

  17. EVALUATION OF ACOUSTIC FORCES ON A PARTICLE IN AEROSOL MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S; Richard Dimenna, R

    2007-09-27

    The acoustic force exerted on a solid particle was evaluated to develop a fundamental understanding of the critical physical parameters or constraints affecting particle motion and capture in a collecting device. The application of an acoustic force to the collection of a range of submicron-to-micron particles in a highly turbulent airflow stream laden with solid particles was evaluated in the presence of other assisting and competing forces. This scoping estimate was based on the primary acoustic force acting directly on particles in a dilute aerosol system, neglecting secondary interparticle effects such as agglomeration of the sub-micron particles. A simplified analysis assuming a stable acoustic equilibrium with an infinite sound speed in the solid shows that for a solid-laden air flow in the presence of a standing wave, particles will move toward the nearest node. The results also show that the turbulent drag force on a 1-{micro}m particle resulting from eddy motion is dominant when compared with the electrostatic force or the ultrasonic acoustic force. At least 180 dB acoustic pressure level at 1 MHz is required for the acoustic force to be comparable to the electrostatic or turbulent drag forces in a high-speed air stream. It is noted that particle size and pressure amplitude are dominant parameters for the acoustic force. When acoustic pressure level becomes very large, the acoustic energy will heat up the surrounding air medium, which may cause air to expand. With an acoustic power of about 600 watts applied to a 2000-lpm air flow, the air temperature can increase by as much as 15 C at the exit of the collector.

  18. Acoustic metamaterial design and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shu

    The explosion of interest in metamaterials is due to the dramatically increased manipulation ability over light as well as sound waves. This material research was stimulated by the opportunity to develop an artificial media with negative refractive index and the application in superlens which allows super-resolution imaging. High-resolution acoustic imaging techniques are the essential tools for nondestructive testing and medical screening. However, the spatial resolution of the conventional acoustic imaging methods is restricted by the incident wavelength of ultrasound. This is due to the quickly fading evanescent fields which carry the subwavelength features of objects. By focusing the propagating wave and recovering the evanescent field, a flat lens with negative-index can potentially overcome the diffraction limit. We present the first experimental demonstration of focusing ultrasound waves through a flat acoustic metamaterial lens composed of a planar network of subwavelength Helmholtz resonators. We observed a tight focus of half-wavelength in width at 60.5 KHz by imaging a point source. This result is in excellent agreement with the numerical simulation by transmission line model in which we derived the effective mass density and compressibility. This metamaterial lens also displays variable focal length at different frequencies. Our experiment shows the promise of designing compact and light-weight ultrasound imaging elements. Moreover, the concept of metamaterial extends far beyond negative refraction, rather giving enormous choice of material parameters for different applications. One of the most interesting examples these years is the invisible cloak. Such a device is proposed to render the hidden object undetectable under the flow of light or sound, by guiding and controlling the wave path through an engineered space surrounding the object. However, the cloak designed by transformation optics usually calls for a highly anisotropic metamaterial, which

  19. Acoustic sniper localization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prado, Gervasio; Dhaliwal, Hardave; Martel, Philip O.

    1997-02-01

    Technologies for sniper localization have received increased attention in recent months as American forces have been deployed to various trouble spots around the world. Among the technologies considered for this task acoustics is a natural choice for various reasons. The acoustic signatures of gunshots are loud and distinctive, making them easy to detect even in high noise background environments. Acoustics provides a passive sensing technology with excellent range and non line of sight capabilities. Last but not least, an acoustic sniper location system can be built at a low cost with off the shelf components. Despite its many advantages, the performance of acoustic sensors can degrade under adverse propagation conditions. Localization accuracy, although good, is usually not accurate enough to pinpoint a sniper's location in some scenarios (for example which widow in a building or behind which tree in a grove). For these more demanding missions, the acoustic sensor can be used in conjunction with an infra red imaging system that detects the muzzle blast of the gun. The acoustic system can be used to cue the pointing system of the IR camera in the direction of the shot's source.

  20. Acoustic cooling engine

    DOEpatents

    Hofler, Thomas J.; Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1988-01-01

    An acoustic cooling engine with improved thermal performance and reduced internal losses comprises a compressible fluid contained in a resonant pressure vessel. The fluid has a substantial thermal expansion coefficient and is capable of supporting an acoustic standing wave. A thermodynamic element has first and second ends and is located in the resonant pressure vessel in thermal communication with the fluid. The thermal response of the thermodynamic element to the acoustic standing wave pumps heat from the second end to the first end. The thermodynamic element permits substantial flow of the fluid through the thermodynamic element. An acoustic driver cyclically drives the fluid with an acoustic standing wave. The driver is at a location of maximum acoustic impedance in the resonant pressure vessel and proximate the first end of the thermodynamic element. A hot heat exchanger is adjacent to and in thermal communication with the first end of the thermodynamic element. The hot heat exchanger conducts heat from the first end to portions of the resonant pressure vessel proximate the hot heat exchanger. The hot heat exchanger permits substantial flow of the fluid through the hot heat exchanger. The resonant pressure vessel can include a housing less than one quarter wavelength in length coupled to a reservoir. The housing can include a reduced diameter portion communicating with the reservoir. The frequency of the acoustic driver can be continuously controlled so as to maintain resonance.

  1. Acoustic mapping velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muste, M.; Baranya, S.; Tsubaki, R.; Kim, D.; Ho, H.; Tsai, H.; Law, D.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of sediment dynamics in rivers is of great importance for various practical purposes. Despite its high relevance in riverine environment processes, the monitoring of sediment rates remains a major and challenging task for both suspended and bed load estimation. While the measurement of suspended load is currently an active area of testing with nonintrusive technologies (optical and acoustic), bed load measurement does not mark a similar progress. This paper describes an innovative combination of measurement techniques and analysis protocols that establishes the proof-of-concept for a promising technique, labeled herein Acoustic Mapping Velocimetry (AMV). The technique estimates bed load rates in rivers developing bed forms using a nonintrusive measurements approach. The raw information for AMV is collected with acoustic multibeam technology that in turn provides maps of the bathymetry over longitudinal swaths. As long as the acoustic maps can be acquired relatively quickly and the repetition rate for the mapping is commensurate with the movement of the bed forms, successive acoustic maps capture the progression of the bed form movement. Two-dimensional velocity maps associated with the bed form migration are obtained by implementing algorithms typically used in particle image velocimetry to acoustic maps converted in gray-level images. Furthermore, use of the obtained acoustic and velocity maps in conjunction with analytical formulations (e.g., Exner equation) enables estimation of multidirectional bed load rates over the whole imaged area. This paper presents a validation study of the AMV technique using a set of laboratory experiments.

  2. Generation of Acoustic Signals from Buried Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonner, J. L.; Reinke, R.; Waxler, R.; Lenox, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    Buried explosions generate both seismic and acoustic signals. The mechanism for the acoustic generation is generally assumed to be large ground motions above the source region that cause atmospheric pressure disturbances which can propagate locally or regionally depending on source size and weather conditions. In order to better understand the factors that control acoustic generation from buried explosions, we conducted a series of 200 lb explosions detonated in and above the dry alluvium and limestones of Kirtland AFB, New Mexico. In this experiment, nicknamed HUMBLE REDWOOD III, we detonated charges at heights of burst of 2 m (no crater) and depths of burst of 7 m (fully confined). The seismic and acoustic signals were recorded on a network of near-source (< 90 m) co-located accelerometer and overpressure sensors, circular rings of acoustic sensors at 0.3 and 1 km, and multiple seismic and infrasound sensors at local-to-regional distances. Near-source acoustic signals for the 200 lb buried explosion in limestone show an impulsive, short-duration (0.04 s) initial peak, followed by a broad duration (0.3 s) negative pressure trough, and finally a second positive pulse (0.18 s duration). The entire width of the acoustic signal generated by this small buried explosion is 0.5 s and results in a 2 Hz peak in spectral energy. High-velocity wind conditions quickly attenuate the signal with few observations beyond 1 km. We have attempted to model these acoustic waveforms by estimating near-source ground motion using synthetic spall seismograms. Spall seismograms have similar characteristics as the observed acoustics and usually include an initial positive motion P wave, followed by -1 g acceleration due to the ballistic free fall of the near surface rock units, and ends with positive accelerations due to "slapdown" of the material. Spall seismograms were synthesized using emplacement media parameters and high-speed video observations of the surface movements. We present a

  3. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium.

  4. PRSEUS Acoustic Panel Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolette, Velicki; Yovanof, Nicolette P.; Baraja, Jaime; Mathur, Gopal; Thrash, Patrick; Pickell, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the development of a novel structural concept, Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS), that addresses the demanding fuselage loading requirements for the Hybrid Wing or Blended Wing Body (BWB) airplane configuration with regards to acoustic response. A PRSEUS panel was designed and fabricated and provided to NASA-LaRC for acoustic response testing in the Structural Acoustics Loads and Transmission (SALT) facility). Preliminary assessments of the sound transmission characteristics of a PRSEUS panel subjected to a representative Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) operating environment were completed for the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program.

  5. Acoustic rotation control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elleman, D. D.; Croonquist, A. P.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A system is described for acoustically controlled rotation of a levitated object, which avoids deformation of a levitated liquid object. Acoustic waves of the same wavelength are directed along perpendicular directions across the object, and with the relative phases of the acoustic waves repeatedly switched so that one wave alternately leads and lags the other by 90 deg. The amount of torque for rotating the object, and the direction of rotation, are controlled by controlling the proportion of time one wave leads the other and selecting which wave leads the other most of the time.

  6. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium. 2 figs.

  7. Acoustic well cleaner

    DOEpatents

    Maki, Jr., Voldi E.; Sharma, Mukul M.

    1997-01-21

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for cleaning the wellbore and the near wellbore region. A sonde is provided which is adapted to be lowered into a borehole and which includes a plurality of acoustic transducers arranged around the sonde. Electrical power provided by a cable is converted to acoustic energy. The high intensity acoustic energy directed to the borehole wall and into the near wellbore region, redissolves or resuspends the material which is reducing the permeability of the formation and/or restricting flow in the wellbore.

  8. Underwater acoustic omnidirectional absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naify, Christina J.; Martin, Theodore P.; Layman, Christopher N.; Nicholas, Michael; Thangawng, Abel L.; Calvo, David C.; Orris, Gregory J.

    2014-02-01

    Gradient index media, which are designed by varying local element properties in given geometry, have been utilized to manipulate acoustic waves for a variety of devices. This study presents a cylindrical, two-dimensional acoustic "black hole" design that functions as an omnidirectional absorber for underwater applications. The design features a metamaterial shell that focuses acoustic energy into the shell's core. Multiple scattering theory was used to design layers of rubber cylinders with varying filling fractions to produce a linearly graded sound speed profile through the structure. Measured pressure intensity agreed with predicted results over a range of frequencies within the homogenization limit.

  9. Topological charge pump by surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Zheng; Shi-Ping, Feng; Shi-Jie, Yang

    2016-06-01

    Quantized electron pumping by the surface acoustic wave across barriers created by a sequence of split metal gates is interpreted from the viewpoint of topology. The surface acoustic wave serves as a one-dimensional periodical potential whose energy spectrum possesses the Bloch band structure. The time-dependent phase plays the role of an adiabatic parameter of the Hamiltonian which induces a geometrical phase. The pumping currents are related to the Chern numbers of the filled bands below the Fermi energy. Based on this understanding, we predict a novel effect of quantized but non-monotonous current plateaus simultaneously pumped by two homodromous surface acoustic waves. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11374036) and the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB821403).

  10. Inverse Doppler Effects in Broadband Acoustic Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Zhai, S L; Zhao, X P; Liu, S; Shen, F L; Li, L L; Luo, C R

    2016-08-31

    The Doppler effect refers to the change in frequency of a wave source as a consequence of the relative motion between the source and an observer. Veselago theoretically predicted that materials with negative refractions can induce inverse Doppler effects. With the development of metamaterials, inverse Doppler effects have been extensively investigated. However, the ideal material parameters prescribed by these metamaterial design approaches are complex and also challenging to obtain experimentally. Here, we demonstrated a method of designing and experimentally characterising arbitrary broadband acoustic metamaterials. These omni-directional, double-negative, acoustic metamaterials are constructed with 'flute-like' acoustic meta-cluster sets with seven double meta-molecules; these metamaterials also overcome the limitations of broadband negative bulk modulus and mass density to provide a region of negative refraction and inverse Doppler effects. It was also shown that inverse Doppler effects can be detected in a flute, which has been popular for thousands of years in Asia and Europe.

  11. Inverse Doppler Effects in Broadband Acoustic Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Zhai, S L; Zhao, X P; Liu, S; Shen, F L; Li, L L; Luo, C R

    2016-01-01

    The Doppler effect refers to the change in frequency of a wave source as a consequence of the relative motion between the source and an observer. Veselago theoretically predicted that materials with negative refractions can induce inverse Doppler effects. With the development of metamaterials, inverse Doppler effects have been extensively investigated. However, the ideal material parameters prescribed by these metamaterial design approaches are complex and also challenging to obtain experimentally. Here, we demonstrated a method of designing and experimentally characterising arbitrary broadband acoustic metamaterials. These omni-directional, double-negative, acoustic metamaterials are constructed with 'flute-like' acoustic meta-cluster sets with seven double meta-molecules; these metamaterials also overcome the limitations of broadband negative bulk modulus and mass density to provide a region of negative refraction and inverse Doppler effects. It was also shown that inverse Doppler effects can be detected in a flute, which has been popular for thousands of years in Asia and Europe. PMID:27578317

  12. Inverse Doppler Effects in Broadband Acoustic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, S. L.; Zhao, X. P.; Liu, S.; Shen, F. L.; Li, L. L.; Luo, C. R.

    2016-08-01

    The Doppler effect refers to the change in frequency of a wave source as a consequence of the relative motion between the source and an observer. Veselago theoretically predicted that materials with negative refractions can induce inverse Doppler effects. With the development of metamaterials, inverse Doppler effects have been extensively investigated. However, the ideal material parameters prescribed by these metamaterial design approaches are complex and also challenging to obtain experimentally. Here, we demonstrated a method of designing and experimentally characterising arbitrary broadband acoustic metamaterials. These omni-directional, double-negative, acoustic metamaterials are constructed with ‘flute-like’ acoustic meta-cluster sets with seven double meta-molecules; these metamaterials also overcome the limitations of broadband negative bulk modulus and mass density to provide a region of negative refraction and inverse Doppler effects. It was also shown that inverse Doppler effects can be detected in a flute, which has been popular for thousands of years in Asia and Europe.

  13. The evolution of sediment acoustic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chotiros, Nicholas P.; Isakson, Marcia J.

    2012-11-01

    Sediment acoustic models contain two connected components, the geo-physical description of the sediment and the model of acoustic processes. Geo-physical descriptors are used in the classification of sediments, and they are based on grain size, density and other physical descriptors. Acoustic sediment models were initially fluid approximations that were simple to implement. As the need for accuracy increased, the fluid model was extended to stratified fluid and visco-elastic models. The latter, with five frequency-independent parameters, appeared to be consistent with sediment acoustic data up to the 1980s. More recent experimental data have revealed discrepancies in the frequency-dependence of attenuation and sound speed, particularly in the case of sandy sediments, which cover a large fraction of the continental shelves. Broad-band acoustic measurements of wave speeds and attenuations are more consistent with a poro-elastic model, consisting of Biot's theory with extensions to account for the physics of granular media. Aside from terminology, there is a fundamental difference between visco-elastic and poro-elastic theories. The former is based on two types of waves, a compressional wave and a shear wave, while the latter has an additional compressional wave, often called the Biot wave. There are currently two approaches to the development of sediment acoustic models: (a) visco-elastic models with frequency dependent parameters that mimic the observed behavior, and (b) poro-elastic models that reflect the physical processes. It is shown that (a) would be a significant improvement over existing models, but (b) is the preferred solution.

  14. Nonlinear Acoustical Assessment of Precipitate Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Yost, William T.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the present work is to show that measurements of the acoustic nonlinearity parameter in heat treatable alloys as a function of heat treatment time can provide quantitative information about the kinetics of precipitate nucleation and growth in such alloys. Generally, information on the kinetics of phase transformations is obtained from time-sequenced electron microscopical examination and differential scanning microcalorimetry. The present nonlinear acoustical assessment of precipitation kinetics is based on the development of a multiparameter analytical model of the effects on the nonlinearity parameter of precipitate nucleation and growth in the alloy system. A nonlinear curve fit of the model equation to the experimental data is then used to extract the kinetic parameters related to the nucleation and growth of the targeted precipitate. The analytical model and curve fit is applied to the assessment of S' precipitation in aluminum alloy 2024 during artificial aging from the T4 to the T6 temper.

  15. Acoustical measurements in ancient Roman theatres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnetani, Andrea; Fausti, Patrizio; Pompoli, Roberto; Prodi, Nicola

    2001-05-01

    The Greek and Roman theatres are among the most precious and spectacular items of cultural heritage in the Mediterranean countries. The theatres are famous not only for their impressive architecture, but also for the acoustic qualities. For this reason it is important to consider these theatres as an acoustical heritage and to study their sound field. Within the activities of the ERATO (identification Evaluation and Revival of the Acoustical heritage of ancient Theatres and Odea) project, acoustical measurements were taken in well-preserved ancient Roman theatres at Aspendos (Turkey) and Jerash (Jordan). Roman theatres have an impressive stage building that forms a back wall in the orchestra area, and it was found that, from the analysis of the acoustical parameters, the reverberation time (e.g., 1.7 s at middle frequencies in the theatre of Aspendos) is quite long compared not only with other open-space theatres but also with closed spaces. Contrary to modern halls the clarity is high and this fact, together with a low sound level in most of the seats, gives the sound field a unique character.

  16. Speaker independent acoustic-to-articulatory inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, An

    Acoustic-to-articulatory inversion, the determination of articulatory parameters from acoustic signals, is a difficult but important problem for many speech processing applications, such as automatic speech recognition (ASR) and computer aided pronunciation training (CAPT). In recent years, several approaches have been successfully implemented for speaker dependent models with parallel acoustic and kinematic training data. However, in many practical applications inversion is needed for new speakers for whom no articulatory data is available. In order to address this problem, this dissertation introduces a novel speaker adaptation approach called Parallel Reference Speaker Weighting (PRSW), based on parallel acoustic and articulatory Hidden Markov Models (HMM). This approach uses a robust normalized articulatory space and palate referenced articulatory features combined with speaker-weighted adaptation to form an inversion mapping for new speakers that can accurately estimate articulatory trajectories. The proposed PRSW method is evaluated on the newly collected Marquette electromagnetic articulography -- Mandarin Accented English (EMA-MAE) corpus using 20 native English speakers. Cross-speaker inversion results show that given a good selection of reference speakers with consistent acoustic and articulatory patterns, the PRSW approach gives good speaker independent inversion performance even without kinematic training data.

  17. Thermal acoustic interaction and flow phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, E. W.; Baroth, E.; Chan, C. K.; Wang, T. G.

    1990-01-01

    In containerless science for material processing, the acoustic fields is used to levitate and to control the position of a heated or cooled sample. The interaction between the temperature and the acoustic fields leads to complicated fluid flow phenomena, resulting in the perturbation of the sample position and the heat transfer process. The physical mechanisms in this thermal-acoustic field were investigated using the technique of holographic interferometry and thermometry. Of particular interest was the heat transfer rate from the sample associated with the sound intensities, normal frequencies of the acoustic standing wave field, and gravitational effects. For metallic spheres with high thermal conductivity, the surface temperature was found to be uniform. The thermal flow phenomenon, which is associated with the circulating flow inside the resonant chamber, was recorded. The heat transfer coefficient at the sample surface was correlated with the acoustic and the gravitational parameters, based on the classical theory of convective heat transfer. These correlations can be used to predict the heat transfer from a spherical object in a zero-gravity environment.

  18. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, G.A.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a compact acoustic refrigeration system that actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment.

  19. Acoustics lecturing in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beristain, Sergio

    2002-11-01

    Some thirty years ago acoustics lecturing started in Mexico at the National Polytechnic Institute in Mexico City, as part of the Bachelor of Science degree in Communications and Electronics Engineering curricula, including the widest program on this field in the whole country. This program has been producing acoustics specialists ever since. Nowadays many universities and superior education institutions around the country are teaching students at the B.Sc. level and postgraduate level many topics related to acoustics, such as Architectural Acoustics, Seismology, Mechanical Vibrations, Noise Control, Audio, Audiology, Music, etc. Also many institutions have started research programs in related fields, with participation of medical doctors, psychologists, musicians, engineers, etc. Details will be given on particular topics and development.

  20. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, G.A.

    1992-11-24

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment. 18 figs.

  1. Acoustic imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard W.

    1979-01-01

    An acoustic imaging system for displaying an object viewed by a moving array of transducers as the array is pivoted about a fixed point within a given plane. A plurality of transducers are fixedly positioned and equally spaced within a laterally extending array and operatively directed to transmit and receive acoustic signals along substantially parallel transmission paths. The transducers are sequentially activated along the array to transmit and receive acoustic signals according to a preestablished sequence. Means are provided for generating output voltages for each reception of an acoustic signal, corresponding to the coordinate position of the object viewed as the array is pivoted. Receptions from each of the transducers are presented on the same display at coordinates corresponding to the actual position of the object viewed to form a plane view of the object scanned.

  2. Acoustic Neuroma Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Platinum Sponsors More from this sponsor... Platinum Sponsor Gold Sponsor University of Colorado Acoustic Neuroma Program Rocky Mountain Gamma Knife Center Gold Sponsor NYU Langone Medical Center Departments of Neurosurgery ...

  3. Acoustic-Levitation Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Granett, D.; Lee, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    Uncontaminated environments for highly-pure material processing provided within completely sealed levitation chamber that suspends particles by acoustic excitation. Technique ideally suited for material processing in low gravity environment of space.

  4. Multimode Acoustic Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M.

    1985-01-01

    There is a need for high temperature containerless processing facilities that can efficiently position and manipulate molten samples in the reduced gravity environment of space. The goal of the research is to develop sophisticated high temperature manipulation capabilities such as selection of arbitrary axes rotation and rapid sample cooling. This program will investigate new classes of acoustic levitation in rectangular, cylindrical and spherical geometries. The program tasks include calculating theoretical expressions of the acoustic forces in these geometries for the excitation of up to three acoustic modes (multimodes). These calculations are used to: (1) determine those acoustic modes that produce stable levitation, (2) isolate the levitation and rotation capabilities to produce more than one axis of rotation, and (3) develop methods to translate samples down long tube cylindrical chambers. Experimental levitators will then be constructed to verify the stable levitation and rotation predictions of the models.

  5. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Gloria A.

    1992-01-01

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits (22), in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine (12, 14) includes first thermodynamic elements (12) for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator (16, 26, 28) includes second thermodynamic elements (16) located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements (16) and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements (16). A resonator volume (18) cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16), first heat pipes (24, 26) transfer heat from the heat load (22) to the second thermodynamic elements (16) and second heat pipes (28, 32) transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to the borehole environment.

  6. Acoustic metamaterials: From local resonances to broad horizons.

    PubMed

    Ma, Guancong; Sheng, Ping

    2016-02-01

    Within a time span of 15 years, acoustic metamaterials have emerged from academic curiosity to become an active field driven by scientific discoveries and diverse application potentials. This review traces the development of acoustic metamaterials from the initial findings of mass density and bulk modulus frequency dispersions in locally resonant structures to the diverse functionalities afforded by the perspective of negative constitutive parameter values, and their implications for acoustic wave behaviors. We survey the more recent developments, which include compact phase manipulation structures, superabsorption, and actively controllable metamaterials as well as the new directions on acoustic wave transport in moving fluid, elastic, and mechanical metamaterials, graphene-inspired metamaterials, and structures whose characteristics are best delineated by non-Hermitian Hamiltonians. Many of the novel acoustic metamaterial structures have transcended the original definition of metamaterials as arising from the collective manifestations of constituent resonating units, but they continue to extend wave manipulation functionalities beyond those found in nature.

  7. Acoustic metamaterials: From local resonances to broad horizons

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Guancong; Sheng, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Within a time span of 15 years, acoustic metamaterials have emerged from academic curiosity to become an active field driven by scientific discoveries and diverse application potentials. This review traces the development of acoustic metamaterials from the initial findings of mass density and bulk modulus frequency dispersions in locally resonant structures to the diverse functionalities afforded by the perspective of negative constitutive parameter values, and their implications for acoustic wave behaviors. We survey the more recent developments, which include compact phase manipulation structures, superabsorption, and actively controllable metamaterials as well as the new directions on acoustic wave transport in moving fluid, elastic, and mechanical metamaterials, graphene-inspired metamaterials, and structures whose characteristics are best delineated by non-Hermitian Hamiltonians. Many of the novel acoustic metamaterial structures have transcended the original definition of metamaterials as arising from the collective manifestations of constituent resonating units, but they continue to extend wave manipulation functionalities beyond those found in nature. PMID:26933692

  8. Estimating surface acoustic impedance with the inverse method.

    PubMed

    Piechowicz, Janusz

    2011-01-01

    Sound field parameters are predicted with numerical methods in sound control systems, in acoustic designs of building and in sound field simulations. Those methods define the acoustic properties of surfaces, such as sound absorption coefficients or acoustic impedance, to determine boundary conditions. Several in situ measurement techniques were developed; one of them uses 2 microphones to measure direct and reflected sound over a planar test surface. Another approach is used in the inverse boundary elements method, in which estimating acoustic impedance of a surface is expressed as an inverse boundary problem. The boundary values can be found from multipoint sound pressure measurements in the interior of a room. This method can be applied to arbitrarily-shaped surfaces. This investigation is part of a research programme on using inverse methods in industrial room acoustics. PMID:21939599

  9. Mesoscale variations in acoustic signals induced by atmospheric gravity waves.

    PubMed

    Chunchuzov, Igor; Kulichkov, Sergey; Perepelkin, Vitaly; Ziemann, Astrid; Arnold, Klaus; Kniffka, Anke

    2009-02-01

    The results of acoustic tomographic monitoring of the coherent structures in the lower atmosphere and the effects of these structures on acoustic signal parameters are analyzed in the present study. From the measurements of acoustic travel time fluctuations (periods 1 min-1 h) with distant receivers, the temporal fluctuations of the effective sound speed and wind speed are retrieved along different ray paths connecting an acoustic pulse source and several receivers. By using a coherence analysis of the fluctuations near spatially distanced ray turning points, the internal wave-associated fluctuations are filtered and their spatial characteristics (coherences, horizontal phase velocities, and spatial scales) are estimated. The capability of acoustic tomography in estimating wind shear near ground is shown. A possible mechanism describing the temporal modulation of the near-ground wind field by ducted internal waves in the troposphere is proposed.

  10. Numerical Techniques in Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    This is the compilation of abstracts of the Numerical Techniques in Acoustics Forum held at the ASME's Winter Annual Meeting. This forum was for informal presentation and information exchange of ongoing acoustic work in finite elements, finite difference, boundary elements and other numerical approaches. As part of this forum, it was intended to allow the participants time to raise questions on unresolved problems and to generate discussions on possible approaches and methods of solution.

  11. Wavefront modulation and subwavelength diffractive acoustics with an acoustic metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yangbo; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Huanyang; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A.

    2014-11-01

    Metasurfaces are a family of novel wavefront-shaping devices with planar profile and subwavelength thickness. Acoustic metasurfaces with ultralow profile yet extraordinary wave manipulating properties would be highly desirable for improving the performance of many acoustic wave-based applications. However, designing acoustic metasurfaces with similar functionality to their electromagnetic counterparts remains challenging with traditional metamaterial design approaches. Here we present a design and realization of an acoustic metasurface based on tapered labyrinthine metamaterials. The demonstrated metasurface can not only steer an acoustic beam as expected from the generalized Snell’s law, but also exhibits various unique properties such as conversion from propagating wave to surface mode, extraordinary beam-steering and apparent negative refraction through higher-order diffraction. Such designer acoustic metasurfaces provide a new design methodology for acoustic signal modulation devices and may be useful for applications such as acoustic imaging, beam steering, ultrasound lens design and acoustic surface wave-based applications.

  12. Wavefront modulation and subwavelength diffractive acoustics with an acoustic metasurface.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yangbo; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Huanyang; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A

    2014-11-24

    Metasurfaces are a family of novel wavefront-shaping devices with planar profile and subwavelength thickness. Acoustic metasurfaces with ultralow profile yet extraordinary wave manipulating properties would be highly desirable for improving the performance of many acoustic wave-based applications. However, designing acoustic metasurfaces with similar functionality to their electromagnetic counterparts remains challenging with traditional metamaterial design approaches. Here we present a design and realization of an acoustic metasurface based on tapered labyrinthine metamaterials. The demonstrated metasurface can not only steer an acoustic beam as expected from the generalized Snell's law, but also exhibits various unique properties such as conversion from propagating wave to surface mode, extraordinary beam-steering and apparent negative refraction through higher-order diffraction. Such designer acoustic metasurfaces provide a new design methodology for acoustic signal modulation devices and may be useful for applications such as acoustic imaging, beam steering, ultrasound lens design and acoustic surface wave-based applications.

  13. Simulating environmental and psychological acoustic factors of the operating room.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Christopher L; Dudaryk, Roman; Ayers, Andrew L; McNeer, Richard R

    2015-12-01

    In this study, an operating room simulation environment was adapted to include quadraphonic speakers, which were used to recreate a composed clinical soundscape. To assess validity of the composed soundscape, several acoustic parameters of this simulated environment were acquired in the presence of alarms only, background noise only, or both. These parameters were also measured for comparison from size-matched operating rooms at Jackson Memorial Hospital. The parameters examined included sound level, reverberation time, and predictive metrics of speech intelligibility in quiet and noise. It was found that the sound levels and acoustic parameters were comparable between the simulated environment and the actual operating rooms. The impact of the background noise on the perception of medical alarms was then examined, and was found to have little impact on the audibility of the alarms. This study is a first in kind report of a comparison between the environmental and psychological acoustical parameters of a hospital simulation environment and actual operating rooms.

  14. Acoustic detection of pneumothorax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansy, Hansen A.; Royston, Thomas J.; Balk, Robert A.; Sandler, Richard H.

    2003-04-01

    This study aims at investigating the feasibility of using low-frequency (<2000 Hz) acoustic methods for medical diagnosis. Several candidate methods of pneumothorax detection were tested in dogs. In the first approach, broadband acoustic signals were introduced into the trachea during end-expiration and transmitted waves were measured at the chest surface. Pneumothorax was found to consistently decrease pulmonary acoustic transmission in the 200-1200-Hz frequency band, while less change was observed at lower frequencies (p<0.0001). The ratio of acoustic energy between low (<220 Hz) and mid (550-770 Hz) frequency bands was significantly different in the control (healthy) and pneumothorax states (p<0.0001). The second approach measured breath sounds in the absence of an external acoustic input. Pneumothorax was found to be associated with a preferential reduction of sound amplitude in the 200- to 700-Hz range, and a decrease of sound amplitude variation (in the 300 to 600-Hz band) during the respiration cycle (p<0.01 for each). Finally, chest percussion was implemented. Pneumothorax changed the frequency and decay rate of percussive sounds. These results imply that certain medical conditions may be reliably detected using appropriate acoustic measurements and analysis. [Work supported by NIH/NHLBI #R44HL61108.

  15. Ocean acoustic reverberation tomography.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wide-angle imaging using ship-towed acoustic sources and networks of ocean bottom seismographs is a common technique for exploring earth structure beneath the oceans. In these studies, the recorded data are dominated by acoustic waves propagating as reverberations in the water column. For surveys with a small receiver spacing (e.g., <10 km), the acoustic wave field densely samples properties of the water column over the width of the receiver array. A method, referred to as ocean acoustic reverberation tomography, is developed that uses the travel times of direct and reflected waves to image ocean acoustic structure. Reverberation tomography offers an alternative approach for determining the structure of the oceans and advancing the understanding of ocean heat content and mixing processes. The technique has the potential for revealing small-scale ocean thermal structure over the entire vertical height of the water column and along long survey profiles or across three-dimensional volumes of the ocean. For realistic experimental geometries and data noise levels, the method can produce images of ocean sound speed on a smaller scale than traditional acoustic tomography. PMID:26723303

  16. Ocean acoustic reverberation tomography.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wide-angle imaging using ship-towed acoustic sources and networks of ocean bottom seismographs is a common technique for exploring earth structure beneath the oceans. In these studies, the recorded data are dominated by acoustic waves propagating as reverberations in the water column. For surveys with a small receiver spacing (e.g., <10 km), the acoustic wave field densely samples properties of the water column over the width of the receiver array. A method, referred to as ocean acoustic reverberation tomography, is developed that uses the travel times of direct and reflected waves to image ocean acoustic structure. Reverberation tomography offers an alternative approach for determining the structure of the oceans and advancing the understanding of ocean heat content and mixing processes. The technique has the potential for revealing small-scale ocean thermal structure over the entire vertical height of the water column and along long survey profiles or across three-dimensional volumes of the ocean. For realistic experimental geometries and data noise levels, the method can produce images of ocean sound speed on a smaller scale than traditional acoustic tomography.

  17. A compact acoustic recorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Ronald

    1989-09-01

    The design and operation of a portable compact acoustic recorder is discussed. Designed to be used in arctic conditions for applications that require portable equipment, the device is configured to fit into a lightweight briefcase. It will operate for eight hours at -40 F with heat provided by a hot water bottle. It has proven to be an effective scientific tool in the measurement of underwater acoustic signals in arctic experiments. It has also been used successfully in warmer climates, e.g., in recording acoustic signals from small boats with no ac power. The acoustic recorder's cost is moderate since it is based on a Sony Walkman Professional (WM-D6C) tape recorder playback unit. A speaker and battery assembly and a hydrophone interface electronic assembly complete the system electronics. The interface assembly supplies a number of functions, including a calibration tone generator, an audio amplifier, and a hydrophone interface. Calibrated acoustic recordings can be made by comparing the calibration tone amplitude with the acoustic signal amplitude. The distortion of the recording is minimized by using a high quality, consumer tape recorder.

  18. Acoustic communication by ants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickling, Robert

    2002-05-01

    Many ant species communicate acoustically by stridulating, i.e., running a scraper over a washboard-like set of ridges. Ants appear to be insensitive to airborne sound. Consequently, myrmecologists have concluded that the stridulatory signals are transmitted through the substrate. This has tended to diminish the importance of acoustic communication, and it is currently believed that ant communication is based almost exclusively on pheromones, with acoustic communication assigned an almost nonexistent role. However, it can be shown that acoustic communication between ants is effective only if the medium is air and not the substrate. How, then, is it possible for ants to appear deaf to airborne sound and yet communicate through the air? An explanation is provided in a paper [R. Hickling and R. L. Brown, ``Analysis of acoustic communication by ants,'' J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 108, 1920-1929 (2000)]. Ants are small relative to the wavelengths they generate. Hence, they create a near field, which is characterized by a major increase in sound velocity (particle velocity of sound) in the vicinity of the source. Hair sensilla on the ants' antennae respond to sound velocity. Thus, ants are able to detect near-field sound from other ants and to exclude extraneous airborne sound.

  19. Dimensional analysis of acoustically propagated signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Scott D.; Thomson, Dennis W.

    1993-01-01

    Traditionally, long term measurements of atmospherically propagated sound signals have consisted of time series of multiminute averages. Only recently have continuous measurements with temporal resolution corresponding to turbulent time scales been available. With modern digital data acquisition systems we now have the capability to simultaneously record both acoustical and meteorological parameters with sufficient temporal resolution to allow us to examine in detail relationships between fluctuating sound and the meteorological variables, particularly wind and temperature, which locally determine the acoustic refractive index. The atmospheric acoustic propagation medium can be treated as a nonlinear dynamical system, a kind of signal processor whose innards depend on thermodynamic and turbulent processes in the atmosphere. The atmosphere is an inherently nonlinear dynamical system. In fact one simple model of atmospheric convection, the Lorenz system, may well be the most widely studied of all dynamical systems. In this paper we report some results of our having applied methods used to characterize nonlinear dynamical systems to study the characteristics of acoustical signals propagated through the atmosphere. For example, we investigate whether or not it is possible to parameterize signal fluctuations in terms of fractal dimensions. For time series one such parameter is the limit capacity dimension. Nicolis and Nicolis were among the first to use the kind of methods we have to study the properties of low dimension global attractors.

  20. Acoustic simulations of Mudejar-Gothic churches.

    PubMed

    Galindo, Miguel; Zamarreño, Teófilo; Girón, Sara

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, an iterative process is used in order to estimate the values of absorption coefficients of those materials of which little is known in the literature, so that an acoustic simulation can be carried out in Mudejar-Gothic churches. The estimation of the scattering coefficients, which is even less developed, is based on the size of the irregularities. This methodology implemented is applied to six Mudejar-Gothic churches of Seville (southern Spain). The simulated monophonic acoustic parameters, both in the frequency domain and as a function of source-receiver distance (spatial distribution), are analyzed and compared with the in situ measures. Good agreement has been found between these sets of values, whereby each parameter is discussed in terms of the just noticeable difference. This procedure for existing buildings, especially for those which are rich in heritage, enables a reliable evaluation of the effect on the maintenance, restoration, and conditioning for new uses, as well as the recreation of the acoustic environment of ancient times. Along these lines, the acoustic influence of the timber roof and the presence of the public in these churches have also been studied.

  1. Acoustic simulations of Mudejar-Gothic churches.

    PubMed

    Galindo, Miguel; Zamarreño, Teófilo; Girón, Sara

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, an iterative process is used in order to estimate the values of absorption coefficients of those materials of which little is known in the literature, so that an acoustic simulation can be carried out in Mudejar-Gothic churches. The estimation of the scattering coefficients, which is even less developed, is based on the size of the irregularities. This methodology implemented is applied to six Mudejar-Gothic churches of Seville (southern Spain). The simulated monophonic acoustic parameters, both in the frequency domain and as a function of source-receiver distance (spatial distribution), are analyzed and compared with the in situ measures. Good agreement has been found between these sets of values, whereby each parameter is discussed in terms of the just noticeable difference. This procedure for existing buildings, especially for those which are rich in heritage, enables a reliable evaluation of the effect on the maintenance, restoration, and conditioning for new uses, as well as the recreation of the acoustic environment of ancient times. Along these lines, the acoustic influence of the timber roof and the presence of the public in these churches have also been studied. PMID:19739734

  2. Estimating colony sizes of emerging bats using acoustic recordings

    PubMed Central

    Kloepper, Laura N.; Linnenschmidt, Meike; Blowers, Zelda; Branstetter, Brian; Ralston, Joel; Simmons, James A.

    2016-01-01

    The decline of bats demands more widespread monitoring of populations for conservation and management. Current censusing methods are either prone to bias or require costly equipment. Here, we report a new method using passive acoustics to determine bat count census from overall acoustic amplitude of the emerging bat stream. We recorded the video and audio of an emerging colony of Mexican free-tailed bats from two cave locations across multiple nights. Instantaneous bat counts were calculated from the video frames, and the bat stream’s acoustic amplitude corresponding to each video frame was determined using three different methods for calculating acoustic intensity. We found a significant link between all three acoustic parameters and bat count, with the highest R2 of 0.742 linking RMS pressure and bat count. Additionally, the relationship between acoustics and population size at one cave location could accurately predict the population size at another cave location. The data were gathered with low-cost, easy-to-operate equipment, and the data analysis can be easily accomplished using automated scripts or with open-source acoustic software. These results are a potential first step towards creating an acoustic model to estimate bat population at large cave colonies worldwide. PMID:27069667

  3. Feature based passive acoustic detection of underwater threats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolkin, Rustam; Sutin, Alexander; Radhakrishnan, Sreeram; Bruno, Michael; Fullerton, Brian; Ekimov, Alexander; Raftery, Michael

    2006-05-01

    Stevens Institute of Technology is performing research aimed at determining the acoustical parameters that are necessary for detecting and classifying underwater threats. This paper specifically addresses the problems of passive acoustic detection of small targets in noisy urban river and harbor environments. We describe experiments to determine the acoustic signatures of these threats and the background acoustic noise. Based on these measurements, we present an algorithm for robustly discriminating threat presence from severe acoustic background noise. Measurements of the target's acoustic radiation signal were conducted in the Hudson River. The acoustic noise in the Hudson River was also recorded for various environmental conditions. A useful discriminating feature can be extracted from the acoustic signal of the threat, calculated by detecting packets of multi-spectral high frequency sound which occur repetitively at low frequency intervals. We use experimental data to show how the feature varies with range between the sensor and the detected underwater threat. We also estimate the effective detection range by evaluating this feature for hydrophone signals, recorded in the river both with and without threat presence.

  4. Measuring acoustic habitats

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Nathan D; Fristrup, Kurt M; Johnson, Mark P; Tyack, Peter L; Witt, Matthew J; Blondel, Philippe; Parks, Susan E

    2015-01-01

    1. Many organisms depend on sound for communication, predator/prey detection and navigation. The acoustic environment can therefore play an important role in ecosystem dynamics and evolution. A growing number of studies are documenting acoustic habitats and their influences on animal development, behaviour, physiology and spatial ecology, which has led to increasing demand for passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) expertise in the life sciences. However, as yet, there has been no synthesis of data processing methods for acoustic habitat monitoring, which presents an unnecessary obstacle to would-be PAM analysts. 2. Here, we review the signal processing techniques needed to produce calibrated measurements of terrestrial and aquatic acoustic habitats. We include a supplemental tutorial and template computer codes in matlab and r, which give detailed guidance on how to produce calibrated spectrograms and statistical analyses of sound levels. Key metrics and terminology for the characterisation of biotic, abiotic and anthropogenic sound are covered, and their application to relevant monitoring scenarios is illustrated through example data sets. To inform study design and hardware selection, we also include an up-to-date overview of terrestrial and aquatic PAM instruments. 3. Monitoring of acoustic habitats at large spatiotemporal scales is becoming possible through recent advances in PAM technology. This will enhance our understanding of the role of sound in the spatial ecology of acoustically sensitive species and inform spatial planning to mitigate the rising influence of anthropogenic noise in these ecosystems. As we demonstrate in this work, progress in these areas will depend upon the application of consistent and appropriate PAM methodologies. PMID:25954500

  5. Ion-acoustic cnoidal waves in a quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, S.; Haas, F.

    2014-10-15

    Nonlinear ion-acoustic cnoidal wave structures are studied in an unmagnetized quantum plasma. Using the reductive perturbation method, a Korteweg-de Vries equation is derived for appropriate boundary conditions and nonlinear periodic wave solutions are obtained. The corresponding analytical solution and numerical plots of the ion-acoustic cnoidal waves and solitons in the phase plane are presented using the Sagdeev pseudo-potential approach. The variations in the nonlinear potential of the ion-acoustic cnoidal waves are studied at different values of quantum parameter H{sub e} which is the ratio of electron plasmon energy to electron Fermi energy defined for degenerate electrons. It is found that both compressive and rarefactive ion-acoustic cnoidal wave structures are formed depending on the value of the quantum parameter. The dependence of the wavelength and frequency on nonlinear wave amplitude is also presented.

  6. Nonlinear acoustics experimental characterization of microstructure evolution in Inconel 617

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Xiaochu; Liu, Yang; Lissenden, Cliff J.

    2014-02-18

    Inconel 617 is a candidate material for the intermediate heat exchanger in a very high temperature reactor for the next generation nuclear power plant. This application will require the material to withstand fatigue-ratcheting interaction at temperatures up to 950°C. Therefore nondestructive evaluation and structural health monitoring are important capabilities. Acoustic nonlinearity (which is quantified in terms of a material parameter, the acoustic nonlinearity parameter, β) has been proven to be sensitive to microstructural changes in material. This research develops a robust experimental procedure to track the evolution of damage precursors in laboratory tested Inconel 617 specimens using ultrasonic bulk waves. The results from the acoustic non-linear tests are compared with stereoscope surface damage results. Therefore, the relationship between acoustic nonlinearity and microstructural evaluation can be clearly demonstrated for the specimens tested.

  7. Acoustic Illusion near Boundaries of Arbitrary Curved Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Weiwei; Liang, Bin; Zhu, Xuefeng; Li, Ruiqi; Zou, Xinye; Wu, Haodong; Yang, Jun; Cheng, Jianchun

    2013-01-01

    We have proposed a scheme and presented the first experimental demonstration of acoustic illusion, by using anisotropic metamaterials to manipulate the acoustic field near boundaries of arbitrary curved geometry. Numerical simulations and experimental results show that in the presence of an illusion cloak, any object can be acoustically transformed into another object. The designed illusion cloak simply comprises positive-index anisotropic materials whose material parameters are non-singular, homogeneous and, moreover, independent of the properties of either the original object or the boundary. PMID:23478430

  8. Unidirectional acoustic probe based on the particle velocity gradient.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shiduo; Fernández Comesaña, Daniel; Carrillo Pousa, Graciano; Yang, Yixin; Xu, Lingji

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the foundations of a unidirectional acoustic probe based on the particle velocity gradient. Highly directional characteristics play a key role in reducing the influence of undesired acoustic sources. These characteristics can be achieved by using multiple acoustic sensors in a spatial gradient arrangement. Two particle velocity sensors possessing the figure eight directivity pattern were used in a first-order gradient configuration to yield a unidirectional probe that can reject most excitations originating from both sides and the rear. The effects of key parameters are thoroughly discussed, and the proposed theory is validated in practice. PMID:27369169

  9. Tapered labyrinthine acoustic metamaterials for broadband impedance matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yangbo; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A.

    2013-11-01

    We present five kinds of labyrinthine or space-coiling acoustic metamaterials with tapered channels and apertures. These designs exhibit negative index behavior with modest dispersion, and also have substantially improved impedance matching compared to previously investigated labyrinthine cells. Experimentally measured effective material parameters are in good agreement with numerically computed results for the first two designs. Numerical results are presented for the other three unit cells. By virtue of their design tunability and small size, these tapered labyrinthine acoustic metamaterials show potential as building blocks for a wide range of acoustic wave manipulation and imaging applications.

  10. Microwave de-embedding techniques applied to acoustics.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Charles M

    2005-07-01

    This paper describes the use of the microwave techniques of time domain reflectometry (TDR) and de-embedding in an acoustical application. Two methods of calibrating the reflectometer are presented to evaluate the consistency of the method. Measured and modeled S-parameters of woodwind instruments are presented. The raw measured data is de-embedded to obtain an accurate measurement. The acoustic TDR setup is described. PMID:16212248

  11. Acoustic Imaging in Helioseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Dean-Yi; Chang, Hsiang-Kuang; Sun, Ming-Tsung; LaBonte, Barry; Chen, Huei-Ru; Yeh, Sheng-Jen; Team, The TON

    1999-04-01

    The time-variant acoustic signal at a point in the solar interior can be constructed from observations at the surface, based on the knowledge of how acoustic waves travel in the Sun: the time-distance relation of the p-modes. The basic principle and properties of this imaging technique are discussed in detail. The helioseismic data used in this study were taken with the Taiwan Oscillation Network (TON). The time series of observed acoustic signals on the solar surface is treated as a phased array. The time-distance relation provides the phase information among the phased array elements. The signal at any location at any time can be reconstructed by summing the observed signal at array elements in phase and with a proper normalization. The time series of the constructed acoustic signal contains information on frequency, phase, and intensity. We use the constructed intensity to obtain three-dimensional acoustic absorption images. The features in the absorption images correlate with the magnetic field in the active region. The vertical extension of absorption features in the active region is smaller in images constructed with shorter wavelengths. This indicates that the vertical resolution of the three-dimensional images depends on the range of modes used in constructing the signal. The actual depths of the absorption features in the active region may be smaller than those shown in the three-dimensional images.

  12. Acoustic emission monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Romrell, Delwin M.

    1977-07-05

    Methods and apparatus for identifying the source location of acoustic emissions generated within an acoustically conductive medium. A plurality of acoustic receivers are communicably coupled to the surface of the medium at a corresponding number of spaced locations. The differences in the reception time of the respective sensors in response to a given acoustic event are measured among various sensor combinations prescribed by the monitoring mode employed. Acoustic reception response encountered subsequent to the reception by a predetermined number of the prescribed sensor combinations are inhibited from being communicated to the processing circuitry, while the time measurements obtained from the prescribed sensor combinations are translated into a position measurement representative of the location on the surface most proximate the source of the emission. The apparatus is programmable to function in six separate and five distinct operating modes employing either two, three or four sensory locations. In its preferred arrangement the apparatus of this invention will re-initiate a monitoring interval if the predetermined number of sensors do not respond to a particular emission within a given time period.

  13. Miniature Sapphire Acoustic Resonator - MSAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Rabi T.; Tjoelker, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    A room temperature sapphire acoustics resonator incorporated into an oscillator represents a possible opportunity to improve on quartz ultrastable oscillator (USO) performance, which has been a staple for NASA missions since the inception of spaceflight. Where quartz technology is very mature and shows a performance improvement of perhaps 1 dB/decade, these sapphire acoustic resonators when integrated with matured quartz electronics could achieve a frequency stability improvement of 10 dB or more. As quartz oscillators are an essential element of nearly all types of frequency standards and reference systems, the success of MSAR would advance the development of frequency standards and systems for both groundbased and flight-based projects. Current quartz oscillator technology is limited by quartz mechanical Q. With a possible improvement of more than x 10 Q with sapphire acoustic modes, the stability limit of current quartz oscillators may be improved tenfold, to 10(exp -14) at 1 second. The electromagnetic modes of sapphire that were previously developed at JPL require cryogenic temperatures to achieve the high Q levels needed to achieve this stability level. However sapphire fs acoustic modes, which have not been used before in a high-stability oscillator, indicate the required Q values (as high as Q = 10(exp 8)) may be achieved at room temperature in the kHz range. Even though sapphire is not piezoelectric, such a high Q should allow electrostatic excitation of the acoustic modes with a combination of DC and AC voltages across a small sapphire disk (approximately equal to l mm thick). The first evaluations under this task will test predictions of an estimated input impedance of 10 kilohms at Q = 10(exp 8), and explore the Q values that can be realized in a smaller resonator, which has not been previously tested for acoustic modes. This initial Q measurement and excitation demonstration can be viewed similar to a transducer converting electrical energy to

  14. ACOUSTICS IN ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DOELLE, LESLIE L.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS WAS--(1) TO COMPILE A CLASSIFIED BIBLIOGRAPHY, INCLUDING MOST OF THOSE PUBLICATIONS ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS, PUBLISHED IN ENGLISH, FRENCH, AND GERMAN WHICH CAN SUPPLY A USEFUL AND UP-TO-DATE SOURCE OF INFORMATION FOR THOSE ENCOUNTERING ANY ARCHITECTURAL-ACOUSTIC DESIGN…

  15. Surface Acoustic Wave Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Fluid manipulations at the microscale and beyond are powerfully enabled through the use of 10-1,000-MHz acoustic waves. A superior alternative in many cases to other microfluidic actuation techniques, such high-frequency acoustics is almost universally produced by surface acoustic wave devices that employ electromechanical transduction in wafer-scale or thin-film piezoelectric media to generate the kinetic energy needed to transport and manipulate fluids placed in adjacent microfluidic structures. These waves are responsible for a diverse range of complex fluid transport phenomena - from interfacial fluid vibration and drop and confined fluid transport to jetting and atomization - underlying a flourishing research literature spanning fundamental fluid physics to chip-scale engineering applications. We highlight some of this literature to provide the reader with a historical basis, routes for more detailed study, and an impression of the field's future directions.

  16. Acoustic particle separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Stoneburner, J. D.; Jacobi, N.; Wang, T. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A method is described which uses acoustic energy to separate particles of different sizes, densities, or the like. The method includes applying acoustic energy resonant to a chamber containing a liquid of gaseous medium to set up a standing wave pattern that includes a force potential well wherein particles within the well are urged towards the center, or position of minimum force potential. A group of particles to be separated is placed in the chamber, while a non-acoustic force such as gravity is applied, so that the particles separate with the larger or denser particles moving away from the center of the well to a position near its edge and progressively smaller lighter particles moving progressively closer to the center of the well. Particles are removed from different positions within the well, so that particles are separated according to the positions they occupy in the well.

  17. Acoustic Levitation Containerless Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whymark, R. R.; Rey, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    This research program consists of the development of acoustic containerless processing systems with applications in the areas of research in material sciences, as well as the production of new materials, solid forms with novel and unusual microstructures, fusion target spheres, and improved optical fibers. Efforts have been focused on the containerless processing at high temperatures for producing new kinds of glasses. Also, some development has occurred in the areas of containerlessly supporting liquids at room temperature, with applications in studies of fluid dynamics, potential undercooling of liquids, etc. The high temperature area holds the greatest promise for producing new kinds of glasses and ceramics, new alloys, and possibly unusual structural shapes, such as very uniform hollow glass shells for fusion target applications. High temperature acoustic levitation required for containerless processing has been demonstrated in low-g environments as well as in ground-based experiments. Future activities include continued development of the signals axis acoustic levitator.

  18. Acoustic energy shaping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. G.; Elleman, D. D. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A suspended mass is shaped by melting all or a selected portion of the mass and applying acoustic energy in varying amounts to different portions of the mass. In one technique for forming an optical waveguide slug, a mass of oval section is suspended and only a portion along the middle of the cross-section is heated to a largely fluid consistency. Acoustic energy is applied to opposite edges of the oval mass to press the unheated opposite edge portions together so as to form bulges at the middle of the mass. In another technique for forming a ribbon of silicon for constructing solar cells, a cylindrical thread of silicon is drawn from a molten mass of silicon, and acoustic energy is applied to opposite sides of the molten thread to flatten it into a ribbon.

  19. Passive broadband acoustic thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anosov, A. A.; Belyaev, R. V.; Klin'shov, V. V.; Mansfel'd, A. D.; Subochev, P. V.

    2016-04-01

    The 1D internal (core) temperature profiles for the model object (plasticine) and the human hand are reconstructed using the passive acoustothermometric broadband probing data. Thermal acoustic radiation is detected by a broadband (0.8-3.5 MHz) acoustic radiometer. The temperature distribution is reconstructed using a priori information corresponding to the experimental conditions. The temperature distribution for the heated model object is assumed to be monotonic. For the hand, we assume that the temperature distribution satisfies the heat-conduction equation taking into account the blood flow. The average error of reconstruction determined for plasticine from the results of independent temperature measurements is 0.6 K for a measuring time of 25 s. The reconstructed value of the core temperature of the hand (36°C) generally corresponds to physiological data. The obtained results make it possible to use passive broadband acoustic probing for measuring the core temperatures in medical procedures associated with heating of human organism tissues.

  20. Latticed pentamode acoustic cloak.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Liu, Xiaoning; Hu, Gengkai

    2015-01-01

    We report in this work a practical design of pentamode acoustic cloak with microstructure. The proposed cloak is assembled by pentamode lattice made of a single-phase solid material. The function of rerouting acoustic wave round an obstacle has been demonstrated numerically. It is also revealed that shear related resonance due to weak shear resistance in practical pentamode lattices punctures broadband feature predicted based on ideal pentamode cloak. As a consequence, the latticed pentamode cloak can only conceal the obstacle in segmented frequency ranges. We have also shown that the shear resonance can be largely reduced by introducing material damping, and an improved broadband performance can be achieved. These works pave the way for experimental demonstration of pentamode acoustic cloak. PMID:26503821

  1. Latticed pentamode acoustic cloak

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi; Liu, Xiaoning; Hu, Gengkai

    2015-01-01

    We report in this work a practical design of pentamode acoustic cloak with microstructure. The proposed cloak is assembled by pentamode lattice made of a single-phase solid material. The function of rerouting acoustic wave round an obstacle has been demonstrated numerically. It is also revealed that shear related resonance due to weak shear resistance in practical pentamode lattices punctures broadband feature predicted based on ideal pentamode cloak. As a consequence, the latticed pentamode cloak can only conceal the obstacle in segmented frequency ranges. We have also shown that the shear resonance can be largely reduced by introducing material damping, and an improved broadband performance can be achieved. These works pave the way for experimental demonstration of pentamode acoustic cloak. PMID:26503821

  2. Wireless Multiplexed Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Wireless Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) Sensor is a new technology for obtaining multiple, real-time measurements under extreme environmental conditions. This project plans to develop a wireless multiplexed sensor system that uses SAW sensors, with no batteries or semiconductors, that are passive and rugged, can operate down to cryogenic temperatures and up to hundreds of degrees C, and can be used to sense a wide variety of parameters over reasonable distances (meters).

  3. Impact of acoustic cavitation on food emulsions.

    PubMed

    Krasulya, Olga; Bogush, Vladimir; Trishina, Victoria; Potoroko, Irina; Khmelev, Sergey; Sivashanmugam, Palani; Anandan, Sambandam

    2016-05-01

    The work explores the experimental and theoretical aspects of emulsification capability of ultrasound to deliver stable emulsions of sunflower oil in water and meat sausages. In order to determine optimal parameters for direct ultrasonic emulsification of food emulsions, a model was developed based on the stability of emulsion droplets in acoustic cavitation field. The study is further extended to investigate the ultrasound induced changes to the inherent properties of raw materials under the experimental conditions of sono-emulsification.

  4. Impact of acoustic cavitation on food emulsions.

    PubMed

    Krasulya, Olga; Bogush, Vladimir; Trishina, Victoria; Potoroko, Irina; Khmelev, Sergey; Sivashanmugam, Palani; Anandan, Sambandam

    2016-05-01

    The work explores the experimental and theoretical aspects of emulsification capability of ultrasound to deliver stable emulsions of sunflower oil in water and meat sausages. In order to determine optimal parameters for direct ultrasonic emulsification of food emulsions, a model was developed based on the stability of emulsion droplets in acoustic cavitation field. The study is further extended to investigate the ultrasound induced changes to the inherent properties of raw materials under the experimental conditions of sono-emulsification. PMID:26603612

  5. PRSA hydrogen tank thermal acoustic oscillation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riemer, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    The power reactant storage assembly (PRSA) hydrogen tank test data were reviewed. Two hundred and nineteen data points illustrating the effect of flow rate, temperature ratio and configuration were identified. The test data were reduced to produce the thermal acoustic oscillation parameters. Frequency and amplitude were determined for model correlation. A comparison of PRSA hydrogen tank test data with the analytical models indicated satisfactory agreement for the supply and poor agreement for the full line.

  6. A New Wave of Acoustics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyer, Robert

    1981-01-01

    Surveys 50 years of acoustical studies by discussing selected topics including the ear, nonlinear representations, underwater sound, acoustical diagnostics, absorption, electrolytes, phonons, magnetic interaction, and superfluidity and the five sounds. (JN)

  7. THE ACOUSTIC CUTOFF FREQUENCY OF THE SUN AND THE SOLAR MAGNETIC ACTIVITY CYCLE

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, A.; Palle, P. L.; Garcia, R. A.

    2011-12-20

    The acoustic cutoff frequency-the highest frequency for acoustic solar eigenmodes-is an important parameter of the solar atmosphere as it determines the upper boundary of the p-mode resonant cavities. At frequencies beyond this value, acoustic disturbances are no longer trapped but are traveling waves. Interference among them gives rise to higher-frequency peaks-the pseudomodes-in the solar acoustic spectrum. The pseudomodes are shifted slightly in frequency with respect to p-modes, making possible the use of pseudomodes to determine the acoustic cutoff frequency. Using data from the GOLF and VIRGO instruments on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory spacecraft, we calculate the acoustic cutoff frequency using the coherence function between both the velocity and intensity sets of data. By using data gathered by these instruments during the entire lifetime of the mission (1996 until the present), a variation in the acoustic cutoff frequency with the solar magnetic activity cycle is found.

  8. Dynamic response analysis of an aircraft structure under thermal-acoustic loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, H.; Li, H. B.; Zhang, W.; Wu, Z. Q.; Liu, B. R.

    2016-09-01

    Future hypersonic aircraft will be exposed to extreme combined environments includes large magnitude thermal and acoustic loads. It presents a significant challenge for the integrity of these vehicles. Thermal-acoustic test is used to test structures for dynamic response and sonic fatigue due to combined loads. In this research, the numerical simulation process for the thermal acoustic test is presented, and the effects of thermal loads on vibro-acoustic response are investigated. To simulate the radiation heating system, Monte Carlo theory and thermal network theory was used to calculate the temperature distribution. Considering the thermal stress, the high temperature modal parameters are obtained with structural finite element methods. Based on acoustic finite element, modal-based vibro-acoustic analysis is carried out to compute structural responses. These researches are very vital to optimum thermal-acoustic test and structure designs for future hypersonic vehicles structure

  9. Acoustic bubble removal method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Elleman, D. D.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for removing bubbles from a liquid bath such as a bath of molten glass to be used for optical elements. Larger bubbles are first removed by applying acoustic energy resonant to a bath dimension to drive the larger bubbles toward a pressure well where the bubbles can coalesce and then be more easily removed. Thereafter, submillimeter bubbles are removed by applying acoustic energy of frequencies resonant to the small bubbles to oscillate them and thereby stir liquid immediately about the bubbles to facilitate their breakup and absorption into the liquid.

  10. Acoustic emission intrusion detector

    DOEpatents

    Carver, Donald W.; Whittaker, Jerry W.

    1980-01-01

    An intrusion detector is provided for detecting a forcible entry into a secured structure while minimizing false alarms. The detector uses a piezoelectric crystal transducer to sense acoustic emissions. The transducer output is amplified by a selectable gain amplifier to control the sensitivity. The rectified output of the amplifier is applied to a Schmitt trigger circuit having a preselected threshold level to provide amplitude discrimination. Timing circuitry is provided which is activated by successive pulses from the Schmitt trigger which lie within a selected time frame for frequency discrimination. Detected signals having proper amplitude and frequency trigger an alarm within the first complete cycle time of a detected acoustical disturbance signal.

  11. Electromechanical acoustic liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheplak, Mark (Inventor); Cattafesta, III, Louis N. (Inventor); Nishida, Toshikazu (Inventor); Horowitz, Stephen Brian (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A multi-resonator-based system responsive to acoustic waves includes at least two resonators, each including a bottom plate, side walls secured to the bottom plate, and a top plate disposed on top of the side walls. The top plate includes an orifice so that a portion of an incident acoustical wave compresses gas in the resonators. The bottom plate or the side walls include at least one compliant portion. A reciprocal electromechanical transducer coupled to the compliant portion of each of the resonators forms a first and second transducer/compliant composite. An electrical network is disposed between the reciprocal electromechanical transducer of the first and second resonator.

  12. Acoustic tooth cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An acoustic oral hygiene unit is described that uses acoustic energy to oscillate mild abrasive particles in a water suspension which is then directed in a low pressure stream onto the teeth. The oscillating abrasives scrub the teeth clean removing food particles, plaque, calculous, and other foreign material from tooth surfaces, interproximal areas, and tooth-gingiva interface more effectively than any previous technique. The relatively low power output and the basic design makes the invention safe and convenient for everyday use in the home without special training. This invention replaces all former means of home dental prophylaxis, and requires no augmentation to fulfill all requirements for daily oral hygienic care.

  13. Densitometry By Acoustic Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Eugene H.

    1989-01-01

    "Static" and "dynamic" methods developed for measuring mass density of acoustically levitated solid particle or liquid drop. "Static" method, unknown density of sample found by comparison with another sample of known density. "Dynamic" method practiced with or without gravitational field. Advantages over conventional density-measuring techniques: sample does not have to make contact with container or other solid surface, size and shape of samples do not affect measurement significantly, sound field does not have to be know in detail, and sample can be smaller than microliter. Detailed knowledge of acoustic field not necessary.

  14. Acoustically Induced Vibration of Structures: Reverberant Vs. Direct Acoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; O'Connell, Michael R.; Tsoi, Wan B.

    2009-01-01

    Large reverberant chambers have been used for several decades in the aerospace industry to test larger structures such as solar arrays and reflectors to qualify and to detect faults in the design and fabrication of spacecraft and satellites. In the past decade some companies have begun using direct near field acoustic testing, employing speakers, for qualifying larger structures. A limited test data set obtained from recent acoustic tests of the same hardware exposed to both direct and reverberant acoustic field testing has indicated some differences in the resulting structural responses. In reverberant acoustic testing, higher vibration responses were observed at lower frequencies when compared with the direct acoustic testing. In the case of direct near field acoustic testing higher vibration responses appeared to occur at higher frequencies as well. In reverberant chamber testing and direct acoustic testing, standing acoustic modes of the reverberant chamber or the speakers and spacecraft parallel surfaces can strongly couple with the fundamental structural modes of the test hardware. In this paper data from recent acoustic testing of flight hardware, that yielded evidence of acoustic standing wave coupling with structural responses, are discussed in some detail. Convincing evidence of the acoustic standing wave/structural coupling phenomenon will be discussed, citing observations from acoustic testing of a simple aluminum plate. The implications of such acoustic coupling to testing of sensitive flight hardware will be discussed. The results discussed in this paper reveal issues with over or under testing of flight hardware that could pose unanticipated structural and flight qualification issues. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the structural modal coupling with standing acoustic waves that has been observed in both methods of acoustic testing. This study will assist the community to choose an appropriate testing method and test setup in

  15. Post Treatment of Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Home What is an AN What is an Acoustic Neuroma? Identifying an AN Symptoms Acoustic Neuroma Keywords Educational Video Pre-Treatment Treatment Options Summary Treatment Options Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions ...

  16. Variable-Position Acoustic Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Stoneburner, J. D.; Jacobi, N.; Wang, T. G.

    1983-01-01

    Method of acoustic levitation supports objects at positions other than acoustic nodes. Acoustic force is varied so it balances gravitational (or other) force, thereby maintaining object at any position within equilibrium range. Levitation method applicable to containerless processing. Such objects as table-tennis balls, hollow plastic spheres, and balsa-wood spheres levitated in laboratory by new method.

  17. Acoustical model of a Shoddy fibre absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, John Peter

    Shoddy fibres or "Shoddies" are a mixture of post-consumer and post-industrial fibres diverted from textile waste streams and recycled into their raw fibre form. They have found widespread use as a raw material for manufacturing sound absorbers that include, but are not limited to: automotive, architectural and home appliance applications. The purpose of this project is to develop a simple acoustic model to describe the acoustic behaviour of sound absorbers composed primarily of Shoddy fibres. The model requires knowledge of the material's bulk density only. To date, these materials have not been the focus of much published research and acoustical designers must rely on models that were developed for other materials or are overly complex. For modelling purposes, an equivalent fluid approach is chosen to balance complexity and accuracy. In deriving the proposed model, several popular equivalent fluid models are selected and the required input parameters for each model identified. The models are: the model of Delaney and Bazley, two models by Miki, the model of Johnson in conjunction with the model of Champoux and Allard and the model of Johnson in conjunction with the model of Lafarge. Characterization testing is carried out on sets of Shoddy absorbers produced using three different manufacturing methods. The measured properties are open porosity, tortuosity, airflow resistivity, the viscous and thermal characteristic lengths and the static thermal permeability. Empirical relationships between model parameters and bulk density are then derived and used to populate the selected models. This yields several 'simplified' models with bulk density as the only parameter. The most accurate model is then selected by comparing each model's prediction to the results of normal incidence sound absorption tests. The model of Johnson-Lafarge populated with the empirical relations is the most accurate model over the range of frequencies considered (approx. 300 Hz - 4000 Hz

  18. Fundamentals of Acoustics. Psychoacoustics and Hearing. Acoustical Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, Durand R.; Ahumada, Al (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    These are 3 chapters that will appear in a book titled "Building Acoustical Design", edited by Charles Salter. They are designed to introduce the reader to fundamental concepts of acoustics, particularly as they relate to the built environment. "Fundamentals of Acoustics" reviews basic concepts of sound waveform frequency, pressure, and phase. "Psychoacoustics and Hearing" discusses the human interpretation sound pressure as loudness, particularly as a function of frequency. "Acoustic Measurements" gives a simple overview of the time and frequency weightings for sound pressure measurements that are used in acoustical work.

  19. Acoustic subwavelength imaging of subsurface objects with acoustic resonant metalens

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Ying; Liu, XiaoJun; Zhou, Chen; Wei, Qi; Wu, DaJian

    2013-11-25

    Early research into acoustic metamaterials has shown the possibility of achieving subwavelength near-field acoustic imaging. However, a major restriction of acoustic metamaterials is that the imaging objects must be placed in close vicinity of the devices. Here, we present an approach for acoustic imaging of subsurface objects far below the diffraction limit. An acoustic metalens made of holey-structured metamaterials is used to magnify evanescent waves, which can rebuild an image at the central plane. Without changing the physical structure of the metalens, our proposed approach can image objects located at certain distances from the input surface, which provides subsurface signatures of the objects with subwavelength spatial resolution.

  20. Pulse analysis of acoustic emission signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, J. R.; Packman, P. F.

    1977-01-01

    A method for the signature analysis of pulses in the frequency domain and the time domain is presented. Fourier spectrum, Fourier transfer function, shock spectrum and shock spectrum ratio were examined in the frequency domain analysis and pulse shape deconvolution was developed for use in the time domain analysis. Comparisons of the relative performance of each analysis technique are made for the characterization of acoustic emission pulses recorded by a measuring system. To demonstrate the relative sensitivity of each of the methods to small changes in the pulse shape, signatures of computer modeled systems with analytical pulses are presented. Optimization techniques are developed and used to indicate the best design parameter values for deconvolution of the pulse shape. Several experiments are presented that test the pulse signature analysis methods on different acoustic emission sources. These include acoustic emission associated with (a) crack propagation, (b) ball dropping on a plate, (c) spark discharge, and (d) defective and good ball bearings. Deconvolution of the first few micro-seconds of the pulse train is shown to be the region in which the significant signatures of the acoustic emission event are to be found.

  1. Pulse analysis of acoustic emission signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, J. R.; Packman, P. F.

    1977-01-01

    A method for the signature analysis of pulses in the frequency domain and the time domain is presented. Fourier spectrum, Fourier transfer function, shock spectrum and shock spectrum ratio were examined in the frequency domain analysis, and pulse shape deconvolution was developed for use in the time domain analysis. Comparisons of the relative performance of each analysis technique are made for the characterization of acoustic emission pulses recorded by a measuring system. To demonstrate the relative sensitivity of each of the methods to small changes in the pulse shape, signatures of computer modeled systems with analytical pulses are presented. Optimization techniques are developed and used to indicate the best design parameters values for deconvolution of the pulse shape. Several experiments are presented that test the pulse signature analysis methods on different acoustic emission sources. These include acoustic emissions associated with: (1) crack propagation, (2) ball dropping on a plate, (3) spark discharge and (4) defective and good ball bearings. Deconvolution of the first few micro-seconds of the pulse train are shown to be the region in which the significant signatures of the acoustic emission event are to be found.

  2. Acoustic and non-acoustic factors in modeling listener-specific performance of sagittal-plane sound localization

    PubMed Central

    Majdak, Piotr; Baumgartner, Robert; Laback, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    The ability of sound-source localization in sagittal planes (along the top-down and front-back dimension) varies considerably across listeners. The directional acoustic spectral features, described by head-related transfer functions (HRTFs), also vary considerably across listeners, a consequence of the listener-specific shape of the ears. It is not clear whether the differences in localization ability result from differences in the encoding of directional information provided by the HRTFs, i.e., an acoustic factor, or from differences in auditory processing of those cues (e.g., spectral-shape sensitivity), i.e., non-acoustic factors. We addressed this issue by analyzing the listener-specific localization ability in terms of localization performance. Directional responses to spatially distributed broadband stimuli from 18 listeners were used. A model of sagittal-plane localization was fit individually for each listener by considering the actual localization performance, the listener-specific HRTFs representing the acoustic factor, and an uncertainty parameter representing the non-acoustic factors. The model was configured to simulate the condition of complete calibration of the listener to the tested HRTFs. Listener-specifically calibrated model predictions yielded correlations of, on average, 0.93 with the actual localization performance. Then, the model parameters representing the acoustic and non-acoustic factors were systematically permuted across the listener group. While the permutation of HRTFs affected the localization performance, the permutation of listener-specific uncertainty had a substantially larger impact. Our findings suggest that across-listener variability in sagittal-plane localization ability is only marginally determined by the acoustic factor, i.e., the quality of directional cues found in typical human HRTFs. Rather, the non-acoustic factors, supposed to represent the listeners' efficiency in processing directional cues, appear to be

  3. Design of a broadband ultra-large area acoustic cloak based on a fluid medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jian; Chen, Tianning; Liang, Qingxuan; Wang, Xiaopeng; Jiang, Ping

    2014-10-01

    A broadband ultra-large area acoustic cloak based on fluid medium was designed and numerically implemented with homogeneous metamaterials according to the transformation acoustics. In the present work, fluid medium as the body of the inclusion could be tuned by changing the fluid to satisfy the variant acoustic parameters instead of redesign the whole cloak. The effective density and bulk modulus of the composite materials were designed to agree with the parameters calculated from the coordinate transformation methodology by using the effective medium theory. Numerical simulation results showed that the sound propagation and scattering signature could be controlled in the broadband ultra-large area acoustic invisibility cloak, and good cloaking performance has been achieved and physically realized with homogeneous materials. The broadband ultra-large area acoustic cloaking properties have demonstrated great potentials in the promotion of the practical applications of acoustic cloak.

  4. Acoustics in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Miriam J.

    This paper explores the issues associated with poor acoustics within schools. Additionally, it suggests remedies for existing buildings and those under renovation, as well as concerns for new construction. The paper discusses the effects of unwanted noise on students in terms of physiological, motivational, and cognitive influences. Issues are…

  5. Improved acoustic levitation apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berge, L. H.; Johnson, J. L.; Oran, W. A.; Reiss, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    Concave driver and reflector enhance and shape levitation forces in acoustic resonance system. Single-mode standing-wave pattern is focused by ring element situated between driver and reflector. Concave surfaces increase levitating forces up to factor of 6 as opposed to conventional flat surfaces, making it possible to suspend heavier objects.

  6. Intelligent Engine Systems: Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojno, John; Martens, Steve; Simpson, Benjamin

    2008-01-01

    An extensive study of new fan exhaust nozzle technologies was performed. Three new uniform chevron nozzles were designed, based on extensive CFD analysis. Two new azimuthally varying variants were defined. All five were tested, along with two existing nozzles, on a representative model-scale, medium BPR exhaust nozzle. Substantial acoustic benefits were obtained from the uniform chevron nozzle designs, the best benefit being provided by an existing design. However, one of the azimuthally varying nozzle designs exhibited even better performance than any of the uniform chevron nozzles. In addition to the fan chevron nozzles, a new technology was demonstrated, using devices that enhance mixing when applied to an exhaust nozzle. The acoustic benefits from these devices applied to medium BPR nozzles were similar, and in some cases superior to, those obtained from conventional uniform chevron nozzles. However, none of the low noise technologies provided equivalent acoustic benefits on a model-scale high BPR exhaust nozzle, similar to current large commercial applications. New technologies must be identified to improve the acoustics of state-of-the-art high BPR jet engines.

  7. Acoustic leak detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Peacock, M.J.

    1993-08-03

    An acoustic leak detection system is described for determining the location of leaks in storage tanks, comprising: (a) sensor means for detecting a leak signal; (b) data acquisition means for digitizing and storing leak signals meeting preset criterion; and (c) analysis means for analyzing the digitized signals and computing the location of the source of the leak signals.

  8. Micro acoustic spectrum analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Schubert, W. Kent; Butler, Michael A.; Adkins, Douglas R.; Anderson, Larry F.

    2004-11-23

    A micro acoustic spectrum analyzer for determining the frequency components of a fluctuating sound signal comprises a microphone to pick up the fluctuating sound signal and produce an alternating current electrical signal; at least one microfabricated resonator, each resonator having a different resonant frequency, that vibrate in response to the alternating current electrical signal; and at least one detector to detect the vibration of the microfabricated resonators. The micro acoustic spectrum analyzer can further comprise a mixer to mix a reference signal with the alternating current electrical signal from the microphone to shift the frequency spectrum to a frequency range that is a better matched to the resonant frequencies of the microfabricated resonators. The micro acoustic spectrum analyzer can be designed specifically for portability, size, cost, accuracy, speed, power requirements, and use in a harsh environment. The micro acoustic spectrum analyzer is particularly suited for applications where size, accessibility, and power requirements are limited, such as the monitoring of industrial equipment and processes, detection of security intrusions, or evaluation of military threats.

  9. Teaching acoustics online

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Andrew; Rossing, Thomas D.

    2003-10-01

    We teach an introductory course in musical acoustics using a Blackboard. Students in this course can access audio and video materials as well as printed materials on our course website. All homework is submitted online, as are tests and examinations. The students also have the opportunity to use synchronous and asynchronous chat rooms to discuss the course with each other or with the instructors.

  10. Acoustics- Version 1.0

    2012-09-13

    This package contains modules that model acoustic sensors and acoustic sources (hearable) in Umbra. It is typically used to represent hearing in characters within Umbra. Typically, the acoustic sensors detect acoustic sources at a given point; however, it also contains the capability to detect bullet cracks by detecting the sound along the bullet path that is closest to the sensor. A memory module, acoustic memory, represents remembered sounds within a given character. Over time, themore » sounds are removed, as a character forgets what it has heard.« less

  11. Acoustics- Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    2012-09-13

    This package contains modules that model acoustic sensors and acoustic sources (hearable) in Umbra. It is typically used to represent hearing in characters within Umbra. Typically, the acoustic sensors detect acoustic sources at a given point; however, it also contains the capability to detect bullet cracks by detecting the sound along the bullet path that is closest to the sensor. A memory module, acoustic memory, represents remembered sounds within a given character. Over time, the sounds are removed, as a character forgets what it has heard.

  12. Acoustically-observable properties of adult gait.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Marshall; Sabatier, James M

    2012-03-01

    An approach has been developed for extracting human gait parameters from micro Doppler sonar grams. Key parameters include average speed of walking, torso velocity, walk cycle time, and peak leg velocity. The approach is a modification of a technique previously used in radar data analysis. It has been adapted because of differences between sonar and radar micro Doppler grams. The approach has been applied to an acoustic data set of 16 female and 60 male walkers. Statistics have been tabulated that illustrate the similarities and dissimilarities between female and male gait. Males tend to walk with larger walk cycle times and peak leg velocities than females.

  13. Acoustically-observable properties of adult gait.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Marshall; Sabatier, James M

    2012-03-01

    An approach has been developed for extracting human gait parameters from micro Doppler sonar grams. Key parameters include average speed of walking, torso velocity, walk cycle time, and peak leg velocity. The approach is a modification of a technique previously used in radar data analysis. It has been adapted because of differences between sonar and radar micro Doppler grams. The approach has been applied to an acoustic data set of 16 female and 60 male walkers. Statistics have been tabulated that illustrate the similarities and dissimilarities between female and male gait. Males tend to walk with larger walk cycle times and peak leg velocities than females. PMID:22423810

  14. Acoustic flowmeters: Their applications in hydraulics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitzsche, Ulf

    Flowmeter installations for viscous and high hydrostatic pressure media are developed. Their usability is considered for characteristic measuring tasks in the field of oil hydraulics. The properties of flow sensors are evaluated by system analysis. Acoustic measuring systems are preferred. Two ultrasonic flowmeters are realized. Simulation models, installation with piezoceramic material parameters, and sound visualization support these developments. A computer aided hydraulic test stand is developed in order to detect the measuring characteristics of this system. Flowmeter applications are shown using the identification of the static and dynamic parameters of an electrohydraulic pilot valve.

  15. Acoustic Analysis Before and After Voice Therapy for Laryngeal Pathology.

    PubMed

    Chhetri, S S; Gautam, R

    2015-01-01

    Background Voice problems caused by pathologies in vocal folds are well known. Some types of laryngeal pathologies have certain acoustic characteristics. Objective evaluation helps characterize the voice and voice problems providing supporting evidences, severity of disorders. It helps assess the response to the treatment and measures the outcomes. Objective The objective of the study is to determine the effectiveness of the voice therapy and quantify the results objectively by voice parameters. Method Study includes 61 patients who presented with different types of laryngeal pathologies. Acoustic analyses and voice assessment was done with Dr. Speech ver 4 (Tiger DRS Inc.). Acoustic parameters including fundamental frequency, jitters, shimmers, Harmonic to noise ratio (HNR), Normalized noise energy (NNE) were analyzed before and after voice therapy. Result Bilateral vocal nodules were the most common pathologies comprising 44.26%. All acoustic parameters showed a significant difference after the therapy (p<0.05) except for NNE. Dysphonia due to vocal fold polyp showed no improvement even after voice therapy (p>0.05). Conclusion Acoustic analysis provides an objective, recordable data regarding the voice parameters and its pathologies. Though, few pathology require alternative therapy rather than voice therapy, overall it has a good effect on glottic closure. As the voice therapy can improve the different indices of voice, it can be viewed as imperative part of treatment and to monitor progression. PMID:27423282

  16. Holograms for acoustics.

    PubMed

    Melde, Kai; Mark, Andrew G; Qiu, Tian; Fischer, Peer

    2016-01-01

    Holographic techniques are fundamental to applications such as volumetric displays, high-density data storage and optical tweezers that require spatial control of intricate optical or acoustic fields within a three-dimensional volume. The basis of holography is spatial storage of the phase and/or amplitude profile of the desired wavefront in a manner that allows that wavefront to be reconstructed by interference when the hologram is illuminated with a suitable coherent source. Modern computer-generated holography skips the process of recording a hologram from a physical scene, and instead calculates the required phase profile before rendering it for reconstruction. In ultrasound applications, the phase profile is typically generated by discrete and independently driven ultrasound sources; however, these can only be used in small numbers, which limits the complexity or degrees of freedom that can be attained in the wavefront. Here we introduce monolithic acoustic holograms, which can reconstruct diffraction-limited acoustic pressure fields and thus arbitrary ultrasound beams. We use rapid fabrication to craft the holograms and achieve reconstruction degrees of freedom two orders of magnitude higher than commercial phased array sources. The technique is inexpensive, appropriate for both transmission and reflection elements, and scales well to higher information content, larger aperture size and higher power. The complex three-dimensional pressure and phase distributions produced by these acoustic holograms allow us to demonstrate new approaches to controlled ultrasonic manipulation of solids in water, and of liquids and solids in air. We expect that acoustic holograms will enable new capabilities in beam-steering and the contactless transfer of power, improve medical imaging, and drive new applications of ultrasound. PMID:27652563

  17. Holograms for acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melde, Kai; Mark, Andrew G.; Qiu, Tian; Fischer, Peer

    2016-09-01

    Holographic techniques are fundamental to applications such as volumetric displays, high-density data storage and optical tweezers that require spatial control of intricate optical or acoustic fields within a three-dimensional volume. The basis of holography is spatial storage of the phase and/or amplitude profile of the desired wavefront in a manner that allows that wavefront to be reconstructed by interference when the hologram is illuminated with a suitable coherent source. Modern computer-generated holography skips the process of recording a hologram from a physical scene, and instead calculates the required phase profile before rendering it for reconstruction. In ultrasound applications, the phase profile is typically generated by discrete and independently driven ultrasound sources; however, these can only be used in small numbers, which limits the complexity or degrees of freedom that can be attained in the wavefront. Here we introduce monolithic acoustic holograms, which can reconstruct diffraction-limited acoustic pressure fields and thus arbitrary ultrasound beams. We use rapid fabrication to craft the holograms and achieve reconstruction degrees of freedom two orders of magnitude higher than commercial phased array sources. The technique is inexpensive, appropriate for both transmission and reflection elements, and scales well to higher information content, larger aperture size and higher power. The complex three-dimensional pressure and phase distributions produced by these acoustic holograms allow us to demonstrate new approaches to controlled ultrasonic manipulation of solids in water, and of liquids and solids in air. We expect that acoustic holograms will enable new capabilities in beam-steering and the contactless transfer of power, improve medical imaging, and drive new applications of ultrasound.

  18. Issues Related to Large Flight Hardware Acoustic Qualification Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Perry, Douglas C.; Kern, Dennis L.

    2011-01-01

    The characteristics of acoustical testing volumes generated by reverberant chambers or a circle of loudspeakers with and without large flight hardware within the testing volume are significantly different. The parameters attributing to these differences are normally not accounted for through analysis or acoustic tests prior to the qualification testing without the test hardware present. In most cases the control microphones are kept at least 2-ft away from hardware surfaces, chamber walls, and speaker surfaces to minimize the impact of the hardware in controlling the sound field. However, the acoustic absorption and radiation of sound by hardware surfaces may significantly alter the sound pressure field controlled within the chamber/speaker volume to a given specification. These parameters often result in an acoustic field that may provide under/over testing scenarios for flight hardware. In this paper the acoustic absorption by hardware surfaces will be discussed in some detail. A simple model is provided to account for some of the observations made from Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft that recently underwent acoustic qualification tests in a reverberant chamber.

  19. Broadband Acoustic Cloaking within an Arbitrary Hard Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Weiwei; García-Chocano, Victor M.; Cervera, F.; Liang, Bin; Zou, Xin-ye; Yin, Lei-lei; Cheng, Jianchun; Sánchez-Dehesa, José

    2015-06-01

    This paper reports the design, fabrication, and experimental validation of a broadband acoustic cloak for the concealing of three-dimensional (3D) objects placed inside an open cavity with arbitrary surfaces. This 3D cavity cloak represents the acoustic analogue of a magician hat, giving the illusion that a cavity with an object is empty. Transformation acoustics is employed to design this cavity cloak, whose parameters represent an anisotropic acoustic metamaterial. A practical realization is made of 14 perforated layers fabricated by drilling subwavelength holes on 1-mm-thick Plexiglas plates. In both simulation and experimental results, concealing of the reference object by the device is shown for airborne sound with wavelengths between 10 cm and 17 cm.

  20. Acoustical power amplification and damping by temperature gradients.

    PubMed

    Biwa, Tetsushi; Komatsu, Ryo; Yazaki, Taichi

    2011-01-01

    Ceperley proposed a concept of a traveling wave heat engine ["A pistonless Stirling engine-The traveling wave heat engine," J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 66, 1508-1513 (1979).] that provided a starting point of thermoacoustics today. This paper verifies experimentally his idea through observation of amplification and strong damping of a plane acoustic traveling wave as it passes through axial temperature gradients. The acoustic power gain is shown to obey a universal curve specified by a dimensionless parameter ωτα; ω is the angular frequency and τα is the relaxation time for the gas to thermally equilibrate with channel walls. As an application of his idea, a three-stage acoustic power amplifier is developed, which attains the gain up to 10 with a moderate temperature ratio of 2.3. PMID:21302995

  1. Acoustical power amplification and damping by temperature gradients.

    PubMed

    Biwa, Tetsushi; Komatsu, Ryo; Yazaki, Taichi

    2011-01-01

    Ceperley proposed a concept of a traveling wave heat engine ["A pistonless Stirling engine-The traveling wave heat engine," J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 66, 1508-1513 (1979).] that provided a starting point of thermoacoustics today. This paper verifies experimentally his idea through observation of amplification and strong damping of a plane acoustic traveling wave as it passes through axial temperature gradients. The acoustic power gain is shown to obey a universal curve specified by a dimensionless parameter ωτα; ω is the angular frequency and τα is the relaxation time for the gas to thermally equilibrate with channel walls. As an application of his idea, a three-stage acoustic power amplifier is developed, which attains the gain up to 10 with a moderate temperature ratio of 2.3.

  2. Acoustic Suppression Systems and Related Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R. (Inventor); Kern, Dennis L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An acoustic suppression system for absorbing and/or scattering acoustic energy comprising a plurality of acoustic targets in a containment is described, the acoustic targets configured to have resonance frequencies allowing the targets to be excited by incoming acoustic waves, the resonance frequencies being adjustable to suppress acoustic energy in a set frequency range. Methods for fabricating and implementing the acoustic suppression system are also provided.

  3. Acoustics in Halls for Speech and Music

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gade, Anders C.

    This chapter deals specifically with concepts, tools, and architectural variables of importance when designing auditoria for speech and music. The focus will be on cultivating the useful components of the sound in the room rather than on avoiding noise from outside or from installations, which is dealt with in Chap. 11. The chapter starts by presenting the subjective aspects of the room acoustic experience according to consensus at the time of writing. Then follows a description of their objective counterparts, the objective room acoustic parameters, among which the classical reverberation time measure is only one of many, but still of fundamental value. After explanations on how these parameters can be measured and predicted during the design phase, the remainder of the chapter deals with how the acoustic properties can be controlled by the architectural design of auditoria. This is done by presenting the influence of individual design elements as well as brief descriptions of halls designed for specific purposes, such as drama, opera, and symphonic concerts. Finally, some important aspects of loudspeaker installations in auditoria are briefly touched upon.

  4. Irregular Reflection of Acoustical Shock Waves and von Neumann Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskar, S.; Coulouvrat, F.; Marchiano, R.

    2006-05-01

    We investigate the reflection of weak acoustical shock waves grazing over a rigid surface. We define a critical parameter and examine the different types of reflection structure depending on this parameter. The study of the step shock is then extended to both N-waves and periodic saw-tooth waves, which are more realistic from an acoustical point of view. The numerical simulations reveal new reflection structures for these two waves which are not observed for step shocks. The results of the model are finally compared for periodic saw-tooth waves to ultrasonic experiments.

  5. Explicit mapping of acoustic regimes for wind instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missoum, Samy; Vergez, Christophe; Doc, Jean-Baptiste

    2014-09-01

    This paper proposes a methodology to map the various acoustic regimes of wind instruments. The maps can be generated in a multidimensional space consisting of design, control parameters, and initial conditions. The boundaries of the maps are obtained explicitly in terms of the parameters using a Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier as well as a dedicated adaptive sampling scheme. The approach is demonstrated on a simplified clarinet model for which several maps are generated based on different criteria. Examples of computation of the probability of occurrence of a specific acoustic regime are also provided. In addition, the approach is demonstrated on a design optimization example for optimal intonation.

  6. Acoustical studies on corrugated tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaguru, Rajavel

    Corrugated tubes and pipes offer greater global flexibility combined with local rigidity. They are used in numerous engineering applications such as vacuum cleaner hosing, air conditioning systems of aircraft and automobiles, HVAC control systems of heating ducts in buildings, compact heat exchangers, medical equipment and offshore gas and oil transportation flexible riser pipelines. Recently there has been a renewed research interest in analyzing the flow through a corrugated tube to understand the underlying mechanism of so called whistling, although the whistling in such a tube was identified in early twentieth century. The phenomenon of whistling in a corrugated tube is interesting because an airflow through a smooth walled tube of similar dimensions will not generate any whistling tones. Study of whistling in corrugated tubes is important because, it not only causes an undesirable noise problem but also results in flow-acoustic coupling. Such a coupling can cause significant structural vibrations due to flow-acoustic-structure interaction. This interaction would cause flow-induced vibrations that could result in severe damage to mechanical systems having corrugated tubes. In this research work, sound generation (whistling) in corrugated tubes due to airflow is analyzed using experimental as well as Computational Fluid Dynamics-Large Eddy Simulation (CFD-LES) techniques. Sound generation mechanisms resulting in whistling have been investigated. The whistling in terms of frequencies and sound pressure levels for different flow velocities are studied. The analytical and experimental studies are carried out to understand the influence of various parameters of corrugated tubes such as cavity length, cavity width, cavity depth, pitch, Reynolds numbers and number of corrugations. The results indicate that there is a good agreement between theoretically calculated, computationally predicted and experimentally measured whistling frequencies and sound pressure levels

  7. Prop Rotor Acoustics for Conceptual Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, Valana L.

    1996-01-01

    The report describes a methodology for the simple prediction of noise generated by a tilt-rotor aircraft in hover and forward flight. In order to avoid the computational penalties associated with exact noise calculations, simplifications to the loading noise calculation and the blade-vortex interaction noise calculation have been introduced. The loading noise computation utilizes a constant chordwise loading assumption, while the BVI noise level is estimated through use of a dimensionless parameter, here termed 'BVI number.' The acoustic computation code, designed as a module for use with VASCOMP, has two modes of operation, one as a quick estimator of acoustic amplitude produced by a tilt rotor with a typical rotor design and the other as a tool for rotor parametric design studies.

  8. Acoustic propagation in a thermally stratified atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanmoorhem, W. K.

    1987-01-01

    Acoustic propagation in an atmosphere with a specific form of temperature profile has been investigated by analytical means. The temperature profile used is representative of an actual atmospheric profile and contains three free parameters. Both lapse and inversion cases have been considered. Although ray solution have been considered the primary emphasis has been on solutions of the acoustic wave equation with point force where the sound speed varies with height above the ground corresponding to the assumed temperature profile. The method used to obtain the solution of the wave equation is based on Hankel transformation of the wave equation, approximate solution of the transformed equation for wavelength small compared to the scale of the temperature (or sound speed) profile, and approximate or numerical inversion of the Hankel transformed solution. The solution displays the characteristics found in experimental data but extensive comparison between the models and experimental data has not been carried out.

  9. Acoustic propagation in a thermally stratified atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanmoorhem, W. K.

    1988-01-01

    Acoustic propagation in an atmosphere with a specific form of a temperature profile has been investigated by analytical means. The temperature profile used is representative of an actual atmospheric profile and contains three free parameters. Both lapse and inversion cases have been considered. Although ray solutions have been considered, the primary emphasis has been on solutions of the acoustic wave equation with point source where the sound speed varies with height above the ground corresponding to the assumed temperature profile. The method used to obtain the solution of the wave equation is based on Hankel transformation of the wave equation, approximate solution of the transformed equation for wavelength small compared to the scale of the temperature (or sound speed) profile, and approximate or numerical inversion of the Hankel transformed solution. The solution displays the characteristics found in experimental data but extensive comparison between the models and experimental data has not been carried out.

  10. Nucleation pressure threshold in acoustic droplet vaporization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Christopher J.; Doering, Charles R.; Kripfgans, Oliver D.

    2016-07-01

    We combine classical nucleation theory with superharmonic focusing to predict necessary pressures to induce nucleation in acoustic droplet vaporization. We show that linear acoustics is a valid approximation to leading order when particle displacements in the sound field are small relative to the radius of the droplet. This is done by perturbation analysis of an axisymmetric compressible inviscid flow about a droplet with small surface perturbations relative to the mean radius subjected to an incoming ultrasonic wave. The necessary nucleation pressure threshold inside the droplet is calculated to be -9.33 ± 0.30 MPa for typical experimental parameters by employing results from classical homogeneous nucleation theory. As a result, we are able to predict if a given incident pressure waveform will induce nucleation.

  11. Acoustic propagation in rigid ducts with blockage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Raheb, M.; Wagner, P.

    1982-01-01

    Acoustic levitation has been suggested for moving nonmagnetic material in furnaces for heat processing in space experiments. Basically, acoustic standing waves under resonant conditions are excited in the cavity of the furnace while the material blockage is located at a pressure node and thus at a maximum gradient. The position of the blockage is controlled by displacing the node as a result of frequency change. The present investigation is concerned with the effect of blockage on the longitudinal and transverse resonances of a cylindrical cavity, taking into account the results of a one-dimensional and three-dimensional (3-D) analysis. Based on a Green's function surface element method, 3-D analysis is tested experimentally and proved to be accurate over a wide range of geometric parameters and boundary shapes. The shift in resonance depends on the change in pressure gradient and duct shortening caused by the blockage.

  12. Acoustic propagation in rigid ducts with blockage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Raheb, M.; Wagner, P.

    1982-09-01

    Acoustic levitation has been suggested for moving nonmagnetic material in furnaces for heat processing in space experiments. Basically, acoustic standing waves under resonant conditions are excited in the cavity of the furnace while the material blockage is located at a pressure node and thus at a maximum gradient. The position of the blockage is controlled by displacing the node as a result of frequency change. The present investigation is concerned with the effect of blockage on the longitudinal and transverse resonances of a cylindrical cavity, taking into account the results of a one-dimensional and three-dimensional (3-D) analysis. Based on a Green's function surface element method, 3-D analysis is tested experimentally and proved to be accurate over a wide range of geometric parameters and boundary shapes. The shift in resonance depends on the change in pressure gradient and duct shortening caused by the blockage.

  13. Multipurpose Acoustic Sensor for Downhole Fluid Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Pantea, Cristian

    2012-05-04

    The projects objectives and purpose are to: (1) development a multipurpose acoustic sensor for downhole fluid monitoring in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) reservoirs over typical ranges of pressures and temperatures and demonstrate its capabilities and performance for different EGS systems; (2) determine in real-time and in a single sensor package several parameters - temperature, pressure, fluid flow and fluid properties; (3) needed in nearly every phase of an EGS project, including Testing of Injection and Production Wells, Reservoir Validation, Inter-well Connectivity, Reservoir Scale Up and Reservoir Sustainability. (4) Current sensors are limited to operating at lower temperatures, but the need is for logging at high temperatures. The present project deals with the development of a novel acoustic-based sensor that can work at temperatures up to 374 C, in inhospitable environments.

  14. Acoustic Scattering from Compact Bubble Clouds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindall, Jeffrey Alan

    In this study, a simple model describing the low -frequency scattering properties of high void fraction bubble clouds in both the free field and near the ocean surface is developed. This model, which is based on an effective medium approximation and acoustically compact scatters, successfully predicts the results of the bubble cloud scattering experiment carried out at Lake Seneca in New York state for frequencies consistent with the model assumptions (Roy et al., 1992). The introduction of the surface is facilitated by the method of images and is subject to the same constraint of low-acoustic frequency imposed by the compact scatterer assumption. This model is not intended to serve as an exact replicate of oceanic bubble cloud scattering. The model herein was kept simple by design, for only then can the complex physical behavior be expressed in a simple analytical form. Simple, analytic theories facilitate the exploration of parameter space, and more importantly serve to illuminate the underlying physics.

  15. Compact acoustic antenna design using labyrinthine metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Chunyu

    2015-05-01

    We present an effective design and architecture for a class of acoustic antennas in air. The work begins with a conformal transformation method that yields the preliminary design, which is constructed using an isotropic but inhomogeneous material. However, the desired material parameters have been unavailable until now. Here we show that by scaling up the refractive index and optimizing the geometry in the preliminary design, a series of square antennas can be achieved to exhibit an excellent beam-collimating effect. An important part of our strategy is that the device's thickness and material properties can be tailored easily to greatly facilitate its realization. It is also demonstrated that the proposed antenna can be made very thin and readily implemented using labyrinthine acoustic metamaterials.

  16. Acoustic environmental accuracy requirements for response determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettitt, M. R.

    1983-01-01

    A general purpose computer program was developed for the prediction of vehicle interior noise. This program, named VIN, has both modal and statistical energy analysis capabilities for structural/acoustic interaction analysis. The analytic models and their computer implementation were verified through simple test cases with well-defined experimental results. The model was also applied in a space shuttle payload bay launch acoustics prediction study. The computer program processes large and small problems with equal efficiency because all arrays are dynamically sized by program input variables at run time. A data base is built and easily accessed for design studies. The data base significantly reduces the computational costs of such studies by allowing the reuse of the still-valid calculated parameters of previous iterations.

  17. Education in acoustics in Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyara, Federico

    2002-11-01

    Over the last decades, education in acoustics (EA) in Argentina has experienced ups and downs due to economic and political issues interfering with long term projects. Unlike other countries, like Chile, where EA has reached maturity in spite of the acoustical industry having shown little development, Argentina has several well-established manufacturers of acoustic materials and equipment but no specific career with a major in acoustics. At the university level, acoustics is taught as a complementary--often elective--course for careers such as architecture, communication engineering, or music. In spite of this there are several research centers with programs covering environmental and community noise, effects of noise on man, acoustic signal processing, musical acoustics and acoustic emission, and several national and international meetings are held each year in which results are communicated and discussed. Several books on a variety of topics such as sound system, architectural acoustics, and noise control have been published as well. Another chapter in EA is technical and vocational education, ranging between secondary and postsecondary levels, with technical training on sound system operation or design. Over the last years there have been several attempts to implement master degrees in acoustics or audio engineering, with little or no success.

  18. Manipulate acoustic waves by impedance matched acoustic metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ying; Mei, Jun; Aljahdali, Rasha

    We design a type of acoustic metasurface, which is composed of carefully designed slits in a rigid thin plate. The effective refractive indices of different slits are different but the impedances are kept the same as that of the host medium. Numerical simulations show that such a metasurface can redirect or reflect a normally incident wave at different frequencies, even though it is impedance matched to the host medium. We show that the underlying mechanisms can be understood by using the generalized Snell's law, and a unified analytic model based on mode-coupling theory. We demonstrate some simple realization of such acoustic metasurface with real materials. The principle is also extended to the design of planar acoustic lens which can focus acoustic waves. Manipulate acoustic waves by impedance matched acoustic metasurfaces.

  19. Acoustic energy harvesting based on a planar acoustic metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Shuibao; Oudich, Mourad; Li, Yong; Assouar, Badreddine

    2016-06-01

    We theoretically report on an innovative and practical acoustic energy harvester based on a defected acoustic metamaterial (AMM) with piezoelectric material. The idea is to create suitable resonant defects in an AMM to confine the strain energy originating from an acoustic incidence. This scavenged energy is converted into electrical energy by attaching a structured piezoelectric material into the defect area of the AMM. We show an acoustic energy harvester based on a meta-structure capable of producing electrical power from an acoustic pressure. Numerical simulations are provided to analyze and elucidate the principles and the performances of the proposed system. A maximum output voltage of 1.3 V and a power density of 0.54 μW/cm3 are obtained at a frequency of 2257.5 Hz. The proposed concept should have broad applications on energy harvesting as well as on low-frequency sound isolation, since this system acts as both acoustic insulator and energy harvester.

  20. The Use of Artificial Neural Networks to Estimate Speech Intelligibility from Acoustic Variables: A Preliminary Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metz, Dale Evan; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A preliminary scheme for estimating the speech intelligibility of hearing-impaired speakers from acoustic parameters, using a computerized artificial neural network to process mathematically the acoustic input variables, is outlined. Tests with 60 hearing-impaired speakers found the scheme to be highly accurate in identifying speakers separated by…

  1. Acoustic resonance in tube bundles -- Comparison of full scale and laboratory test results

    SciTech Connect

    Eisinger, F.L.

    1995-12-01

    Full scale operational data from steam generator tube bundles exposed to hot gases in crossflow are compared with small scale laboratory test results with cold air. Vibration thresholds based on input energy, acoustic particle velocity and effective damping are evaluated and compared. It is shown that these parameters play an important role in the development, or suppression of acoustic resonance.

  2. Structural Acoustics and Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaigne, Antoine

    This structural chapter is devoted to vibrations of structures and to their coupling with the acoustic field. Depending on the context, the radiated sound can be judged as desirable, as is mostly the case for musical instruments, or undesirable, like noise generated by machinery. In architectural acoustics, one main goal is to limit the transmission of sound through walls. In the automobile industry, the engineers have to control the noise generated inside and outside the passenger compartment. This can be achieved by means of passive or active damping. In general, there is a strong need for quieter products and better sound quality generated by the structures in our daily environment.

  3. Radiosurgery of acoustic neurinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Flickinger, J.C.; Lunsford, L.D.; Coffey, R.J.; Linskey, M.E.; Bissonette, D.J.; Maitz, A.H.; Kondziolka, D. )

    1991-01-15

    Eighty-five patients with acoustic neurinomas underwent stereotactic radiosurgery with the gamma unit at the University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, PA) during its first 30 months of operation. Neuroimaging studies performed in 40 patients with more than 1 year follow-up showed that tumors were smaller in 22 (55%), unchanged in 17 (43%), and larger in one (2%). The 2-year actuarial rates for preservation of useful hearing and any hearing were 46% and 62%, respectively. Previously undetected neuropathies of the trigeminal (n = 12) and facial nerves (n = 14) occurred 1 week to 1 year after radiosurgery (median, 7 and 6 months, respectively), and improved at median intervals of 13 and 8 months, respectively, after onset. Hearing loss was significantly associated with increasing average tumor diameter (P = 0.04). No deterioration of any cranial nerve function has yet developed in seven patients with average tumor diameters less than 10 mm. Radiosurgery is an important treatment alternative for selected acoustic neurinoma patients.

  4. A Martian acoustic anemometer.

    PubMed

    Banfield, Don; Schindel, David W; Tarr, Steve; Dissly, Richard W

    2016-08-01

    An acoustic anemometer for use on Mars has been developed. To understand the processes that control the interaction between surface and atmosphere on Mars, not only the mean winds, but also the turbulent boundary layer, the fluxes of momentum, heat and molecular constituents between surface and atmosphere must be measured. Terrestrially this is done with acoustic anemometers, but the low density atmosphere on Mars makes it challenging to adapt such an instrument for use on Mars. This has been achieved using capacitive transducers and pulse compression, and was successfully demonstrated on a stratospheric balloon (simulating the Martian environment) and in a dedicated Mars Wind Tunnel facility. This instrument achieves a measurement accuracy of ∼5 cm/s with an update rate of >20 Hz under Martian conditions. PMID:27586767

  5. Acoustic tractor beam.

    PubMed

    Démoré, Christine E M; Dahl, Patrick M; Yang, Zhengyi; Glynne-Jones, Peter; Melzer, Andreas; Cochran, Sandy; MacDonald, Michael P; Spalding, Gabriel C

    2014-05-01

    Negative radiation forces act opposite to the direction of propagation, or net momentum, of a beam but have previously been challenging to definitively demonstrate. We report an experimental acoustic tractor beam generated by an ultrasonic array operating on macroscopic targets (>1 cm) to demonstrate the negative radiation forces and to map out regimes over which they dominate, which we compare to simulations. The result and the geometrically simple configuration show that the effect is due to nonconservative forces, produced by redirection of a momentum flux from the angled sides of a target and not by conservative forces from a potential energy gradient. Use of a simple acoustic setup provides an easily understood illustration of the negative radiation pressure concept for tractor beams and demonstrates continuous attraction towards the source, against a net momentum flux in the system. PMID:24836252

  6. Acoustic Tractor Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Démoré, Christine E. M.; Dahl, Patrick M.; Yang, Zhengyi; Glynne-Jones, Peter; Melzer, Andreas; Cochran, Sandy; MacDonald, Michael P.; Spalding, Gabriel C.

    2014-05-01

    Negative radiation forces act opposite to the direction of propagation, or net momentum, of a beam but have previously been challenging to definitively demonstrate. We report an experimental acoustic tractor beam generated by an ultrasonic array operating on macroscopic targets (>1 cm) to demonstrate the negative radiation forces and to map out regimes over which they dominate, which we compare to simulations. The result and the geometrically simple configuration show that the effect is due to nonconservative forces, produced by redirection of a momentum flux from the angled sides of a target and not by conservative forces from a potential energy gradient. Use of a simple acoustic setup provides an easily understood illustration of the negative radiation pressure concept for tractor beams and demonstrates continuous attraction towards the source, against a net momentum flux in the system.

  7. Acoustics Discipline Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane; Thomas, Russell

    2007-01-01

    As part of the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Annual Review, a summary of the progress made in 2007 in acoustics research under the Subsonic Fixed Wing project is given. The presentation describes highlights from in-house and external activities including partnerships and NRA-funded research with industry and academia. Brief progress reports from all acoustics Phase 1 NRAs are also included as are outlines of the planned activities for 2008 and all Phase 2 NRAs. N+1 and N+2 technology paths outlined for Subsonic Fixed Wing noise targets. NRA Round 1 progressing with focus on prediction method advancement. NRA Round 2 initiating work focused on N+2 technology, prediction methods, and validation. Excellent partnerships in progress supporting N+1 technology targets and providing key data sets.

  8. Acoustic methodology review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, R. G.

    1982-01-01

    It is important for industry and NASA to assess the status of acoustic design technology for predicting and controlling helicopter external noise in order for a meaningful research program to be formulated which will address this problem. The prediction methodologies available to the designer and the acoustic engineer are three-fold. First is what has been described as a first principle analysis. This analysis approach attempts to remove any empiricism from the analysis process and deals with a theoretical mechanism approach to predicting the noise. The second approach attempts to combine first principle methodology (when available) with empirical data to formulate source predictors which can be combined to predict vehicle levels. The third is an empirical analysis, which attempts to generalize measured trends into a vehicle noise prediction method. This paper will briefly address each.

  9. Acoustic velocity meter systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius

    1985-01-01

    Acoustic velocity meter (AVM) systems operate on the principles that the point-to-point upstream traveltime of an acoustic pulse is longer than the downstream traveltime and that this difference in traveltime can be accurately measured by electronic devices. An AVM system is capable of recording water velocity (and discharge) under a wide range of conditions, but some constraints apply: 1. Accuracy is reduced and performance is degraded if the acoustic path is not a continuous straight line. The path can be bent by reflection if it is too close to a stream boundary or by refraction if it passes through density gradients resulting from variations in either water temperature or salinity. For paths of less than 100 m, a temperature gradient of 0.1' per meter causes signal bending less than 0.6 meter at midchannel, and satisfactory velocity results can be obtained. Reflection from stream boundaries can cause signal cancellation if boundaries are too close to signal path. 2. Signal strength is attenuated by particles or bubbles that absorb, spread, or scatter sound. The concentration of particles or bubbles that can be tolerated is a function of the path length and frequency of the acoustic signal. 3. Changes in streamline orientation can affect system accuracy if the variability is random. 4. Errors relating to signal resolution are much larger for a single threshold detection scheme than for multiple threshold schemes. This report provides methods for computing the effect of various conditions on the accuracy of a record obtained from an AVM. The equipment must be adapted to the site. Field reconnaissance and preinstallation analysis to detect possible problems are critical for proper installation and operation of an AVM system.

  10. Structures and Acoustics Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acquaviva, Cynthia S.

    1999-01-01

    The Structures and Acoustics Division of NASA Glenn Research Center is an international leader in rotating structures, mechanical components, fatigue and fracture, and structural aeroacoustics. Included are disciplines related to life prediction and reliability, nondestructive evaluation, and mechanical drive systems. Reported are a synopsis of the work and accomplishments reported by the Division during the 1996 calendar year. A bibliography containing 42 citations is provided.

  11. Structures and Acoustics Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acquaviva, Cynthia S.

    2001-01-01

    The Structures and Acoustics Division of the NASA Glenn Research Center is an international leader in rotating structures, mechanical components, fatigue and fracture, and structural aeroacoustics. Included in this report are disciplines related to life prediction and reliability, nondestructive evaluation, and mechanical drive systems. Reported is a synopsis of the work and accomplishments completed by the Division during the 1997, 1998, and 1999 calendar years. A bibliography containing 93 citations is provided.

  12. Subwavelength acoustic focusing by surface-wave-resonance enhanced transmission in doubly negative acoustic metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xiaoming; Badreddine Assouar, M. Oudich, Mourad

    2014-11-21

    We present analytical and numerical analyses of a yet unseen lensing paradigm that is based on a solid metamaterial slab in which the wave excitation source is attached. We propose and demonstrate sub-diffraction-limited acoustic focusing induced by surface resonant states in doubly negative metamaterials. The enhancement of evanescent waves across the metamaterial slab produced by their resonant coupling to surface waves is evidenced and quantitatively determined. The effect of metamaterial parameters on surface states, transmission, and wavenumber bandwidth is clearly identified. Based on this concept consisting of a wave source attached on the metamaterial, a high resolution of λ/28.4 is obtained with the optimum effective physical parameters, opening then an exciting way to design acoustic metamaterials for ultrasonic focused imaging.

  13. Acoustic paramagnetic logging tool

    DOEpatents

    Vail, III, William B.

    1988-01-01

    New methods and apparatus are disclosed which allow measurement of the presence of oil and water in geological formations using a new physical effect called the Acoustic Paramagnetic Logging Effect (APLE). The presence of petroleum in formation causes a slight increase in the earth's magnetic field in the vicinity of the reservoir. This is the phenomena of paramagnetism. Application of an acoustic source to a geological formation at the Larmor frequency of the nucleons present causes the paramagnetism of the formation to disappear. This results in a decrease in the earth3 s magnetic field in the vicinity of the oil bearing formation. Repetitively frequency sweeping the acoustic source through the Larmor frequency of the nucleons present (approx. 2 kHz) causes an amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field which is a consequence of the APLE. The amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field is measured with an induction coil gradiometer and provides a direct measure of the amount of oil and water in the excitation zone of the formation . The phase of the signal is used to infer the longitudinal relaxation times of the fluids present, which results in the ability in general to separate oil and water and to measure the viscosity of the oil present. Such measurements may be preformed in open boreholes and in cased well bores.

  14. Fast wideband acoustical holography.

    PubMed

    Hald, Jørgen

    2016-04-01

    Patch near-field acoustical holography methods like statistically optimized near-field acoustical holography and equivalent source method are limited to relatively low frequencies, where the average array-element spacing is less than half of the acoustic wavelength, while beamforming provides useful resolution only at medium-to-high frequencies. With adequate array design, both methods can be used with the same array. But for holography to provide good low-frequency resolution, a small measurement distance is needed, whereas beamforming requires a larger distance to limit sidelobe issues. The wideband holography method of the present paper was developed to overcome that practical conflict. Only a single measurement is needed at a relatively short distance and a single result is obtained covering the full frequency range. The method uses the principles of compressed sensing: A sparse sound field representation is assumed with a chosen set of basis functions, a measurement is taken with an irregular array, and the inverse problem is solved with a method that enforces sparsity in the coefficient vector. Instead of using regularization based on the 1-norm of the coefficient vector, an iterative solution procedure is used that promotes sparsity. The iterative method is shown to provide very similar results in most cases and to be computationally much more efficient. PMID:27106299

  15. Virtual acoustic prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Marty

    2003-10-01

    In this paper the re-creation of 3-D sound fields so the full psycho-acoustic impact of sound sources can be assessed before the manufacture of a product or environment is examined. Using head related transfer functions (HRTFs) coupled with a head tracked set of headphones the sound field at the left and right ears of a listener can be re-created for a set of sound sources. However, the HRTFs require that sources have a defined location and this is not the typical output from numerical codes which describe the sound field as a set of distributed modes. In this paper a method of creating a set of equivalent sources is described such that the standard set of HRTFs can be applied in real time. A structural-acoustic model of a cylinder driving an enclosed acoustic field will be used as an example. It will be shown that equivalent sources can be used to recreate all of the reverberation of the enclosed space. An efficient singular value decomposition technique allows the large number of sources required to be simulated in real time. An introduction to the requirements necessary for 3-D virtual prototyping using high frequency Statistical Energy Analysis models will be presented. [Work supported by AuSim and NASA.

  16. Acoustics, computers and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truchard, James J.

    2003-10-01

    The human ear has created a high standard for the requirements of acoustical measurements. The transient nature of most acoustical signals has limited the success of traditional volt meters. Professor Hixson's pioneering work in electroacoustical measurements at ARL and The University of Texas helped set the stage for modern computer-based measurements. The tremendous performance of modern PCs and extensive libraries of signal processing functions in virtual instrumentation application software has revolutionized the way acoustical measurements are made. Today's analog to digital converters have up to 24 bits of resolution with a dynamic range of over 120 dB and a single PC processor can process 112 channels of FFTs at 4 kHz in real time. Wavelet technology further extends the capabilities for analyzing transients. The tools available for measurements in speech, electroacoustics, noise, and vibration represent some of the most advanced measurement tools available. During the last 50 years, Professor Hixson has helped drive this revolution from simple oscilloscope measurements to the modern high performance computer-based measurements.

  17. Modeling ground vehicle acoustic signatures for analysis and synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Haschke, G.; Stanfield, R.

    1995-07-01

    Security and weapon systems use acoustic sensor signals to classify and identify moving ground vehicles. Developing robust signal processing algorithms for this is expensive, particularly in presence of acoustic clutter or countermeasures. This paper proposes a parametric ground vehicle acoustic signature model to aid the system designer in understanding which signature features are important, developing corresponding feature extraction algorithms and generating low-cost, high-fidelity synthetic signatures for testing. The authors have proposed computer-generated acoustic signatures of armored, tracked ground vehicles to deceive acoustic-sensored smart munitions. They have developed quantitative measures of how accurately a synthetic acoustic signature matches those produced by actual vehicles. This paper describes parameters of the model used to generate these synthetic signatures and suggests methods for extracting these parameters from signatures of valid vehicle encounters. The model incorporates wide-bandwidth and narrow- bandwidth components that are modulated in a pseudo-random fashion to mimic the time dynamics of valid vehicle signatures. Narrow- bandwidth feature extraction techniques estimate frequency, amplitude and phase information contained in a single set of narrow frequency- band harmonics. Wide-bandwidth feature extraction techniques estimate parameters of a correlated-noise-floor model. Finally, the authors propose a method of modeling the time dynamics of the harmonic amplitudes as a means adding necessary time-varying features to the narrow-bandwidth signal components. The authors present results of applying this modeling technique to acoustic signatures recorded during encounters with one armored, tracked vehicle. Similar modeling techniques can be applied to security systems.

  18. Acoustic Force Density Acting on Inhomogeneous Fluids in Acoustic Fields.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Jonas T; Augustsson, Per; Bruus, Henrik

    2016-09-01

    We present a theory for the acoustic force density acting on inhomogeneous fluids in acoustic fields on time scales that are slow compared to the acoustic oscillation period. The acoustic force density depends on gradients in the density and compressibility of the fluid. For microfluidic systems, the theory predicts a relocation of the inhomogeneities into stable field-dependent configurations, which are qualitatively different from the horizontally layered configurations due to gravity. Experimental validation is obtained by confocal imaging of aqueous solutions in a glass-silicon microchip. PMID:27661695

  19. Acoustic Force Density Acting on Inhomogeneous Fluids in Acoustic Fields.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Jonas T; Augustsson, Per; Bruus, Henrik

    2016-09-01

    We present a theory for the acoustic force density acting on inhomogeneous fluids in acoustic fields on time scales that are slow compared to the acoustic oscillation period. The acoustic force density depends on gradients in the density and compressibility of the fluid. For microfluidic systems, the theory predicts a relocation of the inhomogeneities into stable field-dependent configurations, which are qualitatively different from the horizontally layered configurations due to gravity. Experimental validation is obtained by confocal imaging of aqueous solutions in a glass-silicon microchip.

  20. Influence of acoustic anisotropy of paratellurite crystal on the double acousto-optic Bragg light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, A. V.; Voloshinov, V. B.

    2016-09-01

    Influence of acoustic anisotropy on acousto-optic interaction in optically and acoustically anisotropic media is theoretically and experimentally studied. A specific type of acousto-optic diffraction is analyzed with allowance for the phase-matching conditions for two diffraction maxima. Analytical expressions for the phase-mismatch parameters versus the angle between the phase and group velocities of acoustic wave are derived. Light intensity in the diffraction peaks is numerically calculated, and experimental data on the diffraction in the paratellurite crystal at an acoustic walk-off angle of 54° are presented.

  1. A new type of artificial structure to achieve broadband omnidirectional acoustic absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Li-Yang; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Xiao-Liu; Ni, Xu; Chen, Ze-Guo; Lu, Ming-Hui; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2013-10-01

    We present a design for a two-dimensional omnidirectional acoustic absorber that can achieve 98.6% absorption of acoustic waves in water, forming an effective acoustic black hole. This artificial black hole consists of an absorptive core coated with layers of periodically distributed polymer cylinders embedded in water. Effective medium theory describes the response of the coating layers to the acoustic waves. The polymer parameters can be adjusted, allowing practical fabrication of the absorber. Since the proposed structure does not rely on resonances, it is applicable to broad bandwidths. The design might be extended to a variety of applications.

  2. Wireless Acoustic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Paul D.; Dorland, Wade D.; Jolly, Ronald L.

    2007-01-01

    A prototype wireless acoustic measurement system (WAMS) is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/ Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for predicting and measuring noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. The other main subsystem is described in the article on page 8. The WAMS includes analog acoustic measurement instrumentation and analog and digital electronic circuitry combined with computer wireless local-area networking to enable (1) measurement of sound-pressure levels at multiple locations in the sound field of an engine under test and (2) recording and processing of the measurement data. At each field location, the measurements are taken by a portable unit, denoted a field station. There are ten field stations, each of which can take two channels of measurements. Each field station is equipped with two instrumentation microphones, a micro- ATX computer, a wireless network adapter, an environmental enclosure, a directional radio antenna, and a battery power supply. The environmental enclosure shields the computer from weather and from extreme acoustically induced vibrations. The power supply is based on a marine-service lead-acid storage battery that has enough capacity to support operation for as long as 10 hours. A desktop computer serves as a control server for the WAMS. The server is connected to a wireless router for communication with the field stations via a wireless local-area network that complies with wireless-network standard 802.11b of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The router and the wireless network adapters are controlled by use of Linux-compatible driver software. The server runs custom Linux software for synchronizing the recording of measurement data in the field stations. The software includes a module that provides an intuitive graphical user interface through which an operator at the control server

  3. Wireless Acoustic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Paul D.; Dorland, Wade D.

    2005-01-01

    A prototype wireless acoustic measurement system (WAMS) is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for predicting and measuring noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. The other main subsystem is described in "Predicting Rocket or Jet Noise in Real Time" (SSC-00215-1), which appears elsewhere in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs. The WAMS includes analog acoustic measurement instrumentation and analog and digital electronic circuitry combined with computer wireless local-area networking to enable (1) measurement of sound-pressure levels at multiple locations in the sound field of an engine under test and (2) recording and processing of the measurement data. At each field location, the measurements are taken by a portable unit, denoted a field station. There are ten field stations, each of which can take two channels of measurements. Each field station is equipped with two instrumentation microphones, a micro-ATX computer, a wireless network adapter, an environmental enclosure, a directional radio antenna, and a battery power supply. The environmental enclosure shields the computer from weather and from extreme acoustically induced vibrations. The power supply is based on a marine-service lead-acid storage battery that has enough capacity to support operation for as long as 10 hours. A desktop computer serves as a control server for the WAMS. The server is connected to a wireless router for communication with the field stations via a wireless local-area network that complies with wireless-network standard 802.11b of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The router and the wireless network adapters are controlled by use of Linux-compatible driver software. The server runs custom Linux software for synchronizing the recording of measurement data in the field stations. The software includes a module that

  4. Spacecraft Internal Acoustic Environment Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, S. Reynold; Allen, Chris

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the project is to develop an acoustic modeling capability, based on commercial off-the-shelf software, to be used as a tool for oversight of the future manned Constellation vehicles. The use of such a model will help ensure compliance with acoustic requirements. Also, this project includes modeling validation and development feedback via building physical mockups and conducting acoustic measurements to compare with the predictions.

  5. Cloaking an acoustic sensor with single-negative materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Chen; Zhu, Xue-Feng; Xu, Tao; Zou, Xin-Ye; Liang, Bin; Cheng, Jian-Chun

    2015-07-15

    In this review, a brief introduction is given to the development of acoustic superlens cloaks that allow the cloaked object to receive signals while its presence is not sensed by the surrounding, which can be regarded as “cloaking an acoustic sensor”. Remarkably, the designed cloak consists of single-negative materials with parameters independent of the background medium or the sensor system, which is proven to be a magnifying superlens. This has facilitated significantly the design and fabrication of acoustic cloaks that generally require double-negative materials with customized parameters. Such innovative design has then been simplified further as a multi-layered structure comprising of two alternately arranged complementary media with homogeneous isotropic single-negative materials. Based on this, a scattering analyses method is developed for the numerical simulation of such multi-layered cloak structures, which may serve as an efficient approach for the investigation on such devices.

  6. Scaling of membrane-type locally resonant acoustic metamaterial arrays.

    PubMed

    Naify, Christina J; Chang, Chia-Ming; McKnight, Geoffrey; Nutt, Steven R

    2012-10-01

    Metamaterials have emerged as promising solutions for manipulation of sound waves in a variety of applications. Locally resonant acoustic materials (LRAM) decrease sound transmission by 500% over acoustic mass law predictions at peak transmission loss (TL) frequencies with minimal added mass, making them appealing for weight-critical applications such as aerospace structures. In this study, potential issues associated with scale-up of the structure are addressed. TL of single-celled and multi-celled LRAM was measured using an impedance tube setup with systematic variation in geometric parameters to understand the effects of each parameter on acoustic response. Finite element analysis was performed to predict TL as a function of frequency for structures with varying complexity, including stacked structures and multi-celled arrays. Dynamic response of the array structures under discrete frequency excitation was investigated using laser vibrometry to verify negative dynamic mass behavior. PMID:23039544

  7. Acoustic invisibility cloaks of arbitrary shapes for complex background media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jian; Chen, Tianning; Liang, Qingxuan; Wang, Xiaopeng; Xiong, Jie; Jiang, Ping

    2016-04-01

    We report on the theoretical investigation of the acoustic cloaks working in complex background media in this paper. The constitutive parameters of arbitrary-shape cloaks are derived based on the transformation acoustic theory and coordinate transformation technique. The detailed analysis of boundaries conditions and potential applications of the cloaks are also presented in our work. To overcome the difficulty of achieving the materials with ideal parameters in nature, concentric alternating layered isotropic materials is adopted to approximate the required properties of the cloak. Theoretical design and excellent invisibility are demonstrated by numerical simulations. The inhomogeneous medium and arbitrary-shape acoustic cloaks grow closer to real application and may be a new hot spot in future.

  8. Guided acoustic wave inspection system

    DOEpatents

    Chinn, Diane J.

    2004-10-05

    A system for inspecting a conduit for undesirable characteristics. A transducer system induces guided acoustic waves onto said conduit. The transducer system detects the undesirable characteristics of the conduit by receiving guided acoustic waves that contain information about the undesirable characteristics. The conduit has at least two sides and the transducer system utilizes flexural modes of propagation to provide inspection using access from only the one side of the conduit. Cracking is detected with pulse-echo testing using one transducer to both send and receive the guided acoustic waves. Thinning is detected in through-transmission testing where one transducer sends and another transducer receives the guided acoustic waves.

  9. Transition section for acoustic waveguides

    DOEpatents

    Karplus, H.H.B.

    1975-10-28

    A means of facilitating the transmission of acoustic waves with minimal reflection between two regions having different specific acoustic impedances is described comprising a region exhibiting a constant product of cross-sectional area and specific acoustic impedance at each cross-sectional plane along the axis of the transition region. A variety of structures that exhibit this feature is disclosed, the preferred embodiment comprising a nested structure of doubly reentrant cones. This structure is useful for monitoring the operation of nuclear reactors in which random acoustic signals are generated in the course of operation.

  10. Truck acoustic data analyzer system

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, Howard D.; Akerman, Alfred; Ayers, Curtis W.

    2006-07-04

    A passive vehicle acoustic data analyzer system having at least one microphone disposed in the acoustic field of a moving vehicle and a computer in electronic communication the microphone(s). The computer detects and measures the frequency shift in the acoustic signature emitted by the vehicle as it approaches and passes the microphone(s). The acoustic signature of a truck driving by a microphone can provide enough information to estimate the truck speed in miles-per-hour (mph), engine speed in rotations-per-minute (RPM), turbocharger speed in RPM, and vehicle weight.

  11. Acoustic metamaterials with circular sector cavities and programmable densities.

    PubMed

    Akl, W; Elsabbagh, A; Baz, A

    2012-10-01

    Considerable interest has been devoted to the development of various classes of acoustic metamaterials that can control the propagation of acoustical wave energy throughout fluid domains. However, all the currently exerted efforts are focused on studying passive metamaterials with fixed material properties. In this paper, the emphasis is placed on the development of a class of composite one-dimensional acoustic metamaterials with effective densities that are programmed to adapt to any prescribed pattern along the metamaterial. The proposed acoustic metamaterial is composed of a periodic arrangement of cell structures, in which each cell consists of a circular sector cavity bounded by actively controlled flexible panels to provide the capability for manipulating the overall effective dynamic density. The theoretical analysis of this class of multilayered composite active acoustic metamaterials (CAAMM) is presented and the theoretical predictions are determined for a cascading array of fluid cavities coupled to flexible piezoelectric active boundaries forming the metamaterial domain with programmable dynamic density. The stiffness of the piezoelectric boundaries is electrically manipulated to control the overall density of the individual cells utilizing the strong coupling with the fluid domain and using direct acoustic pressure feedback. The interaction between the neighboring cells of the composite metamaterial is modeled using a lumped-parameter approach. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the performance characteristics of the proposed CAAMM and its potential for generating prescribed spatial and spectral patterns of density variation.

  12. Acoustical considerations for secondary uses of government facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Jack B.

    2003-10-01

    Government buildings are by their nature, public and multi-functional. Whether in meetings, presentations, documentation processing, work instructions or dispatch, speech communications are critical. Full-time occupancy facilities may require sleep or rest areas adjacent to active spaces. Rooms designed for some other primary use may be used for public assembly, receptions or meetings. In addition, environmental noise impacts to the building or from the building should be considered, especially where adjacent to hospitals, hotels, apartments or other urban sensitive land uses. Acoustical criteria and design parameters for reverberation, background noise and sound isolation should enhance speech intelligibility and privacy. This presentation looks at unusual spaces and unexpected uses of spaces with regard to room acoustics and noise control. Examples of various spaces will be discussed, including an atrium used for reception and assembly, multi-jurisdictional (911) emergency control center, frequent or long-duration use of emergency generators, renovations of historically significant buildings, and the juxtaposition of acoustically incompatible functions. Brief case histories of acoustical requirements, constraints and design solutions will be presented, including acoustical measurements, plan illustrations and photographs. Acoustical criteria for secondary functional uses of spaces will be proposed.

  13. Variability in English vowels is comparable in articulation and acoustics

    PubMed Central

    Noiray, Aude; Iskarous, Khalil; Whalen, D. H.

    2014-01-01

    The nature of the links between speech production and perception has been the subject of longstanding debate. The present study investigated the articulatory parameter of tongue height and the acoustic F1-F0 difference for the phonological distinction of vowel height in American English front vowels. Multiple repetitions of /i, ɪ, e, ε, æ/ in [(h)Vd] sequences were recorded in seven adult speakers. Articulatory (ultrasound) and acoustic data were collected simultaneously to provide a direct comparison of variability in vowel production in both domains. Results showed idiosyncratic patterns of articulation for contrasting the three front vowel pairs /i-ɪ/, /e-ε/ and /ε-æ/ across subjects, with the degree of variability in vowel articulation comparable to that observed in the acoustics for all seven participants. However, contrary to what was expected, some speakers showed reversals for tongue height for /ɪ/-/e/ that was also reflected in acoustics with F1 higher for /ɪ/ than for /e/. The data suggest the phonological distinction of height is conveyed via speaker-specific articulatory-acoustic patterns that do not strictly match features descriptions. However, the acoustic signal is faithful to the articulatory configuration that generated it, carrying the crucial information for perceptual contrast. PMID:25101144

  14. Powered-Lift Aerodynamics and Acoustics. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Powered lift technology is reviewed. Topics covered include: (1) high lift aerodynamics; (2) high speed and cruise aerodynamics; (3) acoustics; (4) propulsion aerodynamics and acoustics; (5) aerodynamic and acoustic loads; and (6) full-scale and flight research.

  15. Negative refraction induced acoustic concentrator and the effects of scattering cancellation, imaging, and mirage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qi; Cheng, Ying; Liu, Xiao-jun

    2012-07-01

    We present a three-dimensional acoustic concentrator capable of significantly enhancing the sound intensity in the compressive region with scattering cancellation, imaging, and mirage effects. The concentrator shell is built by isotropic gradient negative-index materials, which together with an exterior host medium slab constructs a pair of complementary media. The enhancement factor, which can approach infinity by tuning the geometric parameters, is always much higher than that of a traditional concentrator made by positive-index materials with the same size. The acoustic scattering theory is applied to derive the pressure field distribution of the concentrator, which is consistent with the numerical full-wave simulations. The inherent acoustic impedance match at the interfaces of the shell as well as the inverse processes of “negative refraction—progressive curvature—negative refraction” for arbitrary sound rays can exactly cancel the scattering of the concentrator. In addition, the concentrator shell can also function as an acoustic spherical magnifying superlens, which produces a perfect image with the same shape, with bigger geometric and acoustic parameters located at a shifted position. Then some acoustic mirages are observed whereby the waves radiated from (scattered by) an object located in the center region may seem to be radiated from (scattered by) its image. Based on the mirage effect, we further propose an intriguing acoustic transformer which can transform the sound scattering pattern of one object into another object at will with arbitrary geometric, acoustic, and location parameters.

  16. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Lift-Off Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counter, Douglas D.; Houston, Janie D.

    2011-01-01

    The lift-off acoustic (LOA) environment is an important design factor for any launch vehicle. For the Ares I vehicle, the LOA environments were derived by scaling flight data from other launch vehicles. The Ares I LOA predicted environments are compared to the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) preliminary results.

  17. Inverse Doppler Effects in Broadband Acoustic Metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, S. L.; Zhao, X. P.; Liu, S.; Shen, F. L.; Li, L. L.; Luo, C. R.

    2016-01-01

    The Doppler effect refers to the change in frequency of a wave source as a consequence of the relative motion between the source and an observer. Veselago theoretically predicted that materials with negative refractions can induce inverse Doppler effects. With the development of metamaterials, inverse Doppler effects have been extensively investigated. However, the ideal material parameters prescribed by these metamaterial design approaches are complex and also challenging to obtain experimentally. Here, we demonstrated a method of designing and experimentally characterising arbitrary broadband acoustic metamaterials. These omni-directional, double-negative, acoustic metamaterials are constructed with ‘flute-like’ acoustic meta-cluster sets with seven double meta-molecules; these metamaterials also overcome the limitations of broadband negative bulk modulus and mass density to provide a region of negative refraction and inverse Doppler effects. It was also shown that inverse Doppler effects can be detected in a flute, which has been popular for thousands of years in Asia and Europe. PMID:27578317

  18. Engineering acoustic lenses with help from evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha˚Kansson, Andreas; Sánchez-Dehesa, José; Sánchis, Lorenzo

    2001-05-01

    Optimization engineering through evolutionary algorithms have proven to be very efficient, especially in hard problems containing a large set of optimization parameters. Like evolution this family of algorithms is able to tackle enormous complex problems with fairly simple means. Here, a simple genetic algorithm [J. H. Holland, Adaptation in Natural and Artificial Systems (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 1975)] is used in conjunction with the multiple scattering theory [L. Sánchis et al., Phys. Rev. B 67, 035422 (2003)] to fabricate a new generation of acoustic devices based on a discrete number of cylindrical scatterers. In particular, acoustic lenses [F. Cervera et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 023902 (2002)] with flat surfaces have been designed to focus the sound in a fixed focal point for one or multiple frequencies. Each scatterer is carefully placed using the optimization method within the preset boundary conditions, to maximize the pressure contribution in the chosen focal spot. With this method acoustic lenses with very low f-numbers of the order 0.3 and with amplifications over 12 dB have been estimated using a reduced number of scatterers (~60). Preliminary results obtained from the experimental realization of the designed devices confirm our predictions.

  19. A unidirectional acoustic cloak for multilayered background media with homogeneous metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jian; Chen, Tianning; Liang, Qingxuan; Wang, Xiaopeng; Xiong, Jie; Jiang, Ping

    2015-08-01

    The acoustic cloak, which can make an object hard to detect acoustically in a homogeneous background, has attracted great attention from researchers in recent years. The inhomogeneous background media were considered in this paper. The relative constitutive parameters were derived for acoustic cloaks working in multilayered media. And a unidirectional acoustic cloak for layered background media was proposed, designed and implemented successfully in a wide frequency range. In water and NaCl aqueous solution, the acoustic cloak was designed and realized with homogeneous metamaterials which were composed of steel and porous materials. The effective parameters of the unit cells of the cloak were determined by using the effective medium theory. Numerical results demonstrated excellent cloaking performance and showed that such a device could be physically realized with natural materials which will greatly promote the real applications of an invisibility cloak in inhomogeneous backgrounds.

  20. Acoustic Mechanical Feedthroughs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Badescu, Mircea

    2013-01-01

    Electromagnetic motors can have problems when operating in extreme environments. In addition, if one needs to do mechanical work outside a structure, electrical feedthroughs are required to transport the electric power to drive the motor. In this paper, we present designs for driving rotary and linear motors by pumping stress waves across a structure or barrier. We accomplish this by designing a piezoelectric actuator on one side of the structure and a resonance structure that is matched to the piezoelectric resonance of the actuator on the other side. Typically, piezoelectric motors can be designed with high torques and lower speeds without the need for gears. One can also use other actuation materials such as electrostrictive, or magnetostrictive materials in a benign environment and transmit the power in acoustic form as a stress wave and actuate mechanisms that are external to the benign environment. This technology removes the need to perforate a structure and allows work to be done directly on the other side of a structure without the use of electrical feedthroughs, which can weaken the structure, pipe, or vessel. Acoustic energy is pumped as a stress wave at a set frequency or range of frequencies to produce rotary or linear motion in a structure. This method of transferring useful mechanical work across solid barriers by pumping acoustic energy through a resonant structure features the ability to transfer work (rotary or linear motion) across pressure or thermal barriers, or in a sterile environment, without generating contaminants. Reflectors in the wall of barriers can be designed to enhance the efficiency of the energy/power transmission. The method features the ability to produce a bi-directional driving mechanism using higher-mode resonances. There are a variety of applications where the presence of a motor is complicated by thermal or chemical environments that would be hostile to the motor components and reduce life and, in some instances, not be

  1. Frequency steerable acoustic transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senesi, Matteo

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) is an active research area devoted to the assessment of the structural integrity of critical components of aerospace, civil and mechanical systems. Guided wave methods have been proposed for SHM of plate-like structures using permanently attached piezoelectric transducers, which generate and sense waves to evaluate the presence of damage. Effective interrogation of structural health is often facilitated by sensors and actuators with the ability to perform electronic, i.e. phased array, scanning. The objective of this research is to design an innovative directional piezoelectric transducer to be employed for the localization of broadband acoustic events, or for the generation of Lamb waves for active interrogation of structural health. The proposed Frequency Steerable Acoustic Transducers (FSATs) are characterized by a spatial arrangement of active material which leads to directional characteristics varying with frequency. Thus FSATs can be employed both for directional sensing and generation of guided waves without relying on phasing and control of a large number of channels. The analytical expression of the shape of the FSATs is obtained through a theoretical formulation for continuously distributed active material as part of a shaped piezoelectric device. The FSAT configurations analyzed in this work are a quadrilateral array and a geometry which corresponds to a spiral in the wavenumber domain. The quadrilateral array is experimentally validated, confirming the concept of frequency-dependent directionality. Its limited directivity is improved by the Wavenumber Spiral FSAT (WS-FSAT), which, instead, is characterized by a continuous frequency dependent directionality. Preliminary validations of the WS-FSAT, using a laser doppler vibrometer, are followed by the implementation of the WS-FSAT as a properly shaped piezo transducer. The prototype is first used for localization of acoustic broadband sources. Signal processing

  2. The acoustics of snoring.

    PubMed

    Pevernagie, Dirk; Aarts, Ronald M; De Meyer, Micheline

    2010-04-01

    Snoring is a prevalent disorder affecting 20-40% of the general population. The mechanism of snoring is vibration of anatomical structures in the pharyngeal airway. Flutter of the soft palate accounts for the harsh aspect of the snoring sound. Natural or drug-induced sleep is required for its appearance. Snoring is subject to many influences such as body position, sleep stage, route of breathing and the presence or absence of sleep-disordered breathing. Its presentation may be variable within or between nights. While snoring is generally perceived as a social nuisance, rating of its noisiness is subjective and, therefore, inconsistent. Objective assessment of snoring is important to evaluate the effect of treatment interventions. Moreover, snoring carries information relating to the site and degree of obstruction of the upper airway. If evidence for monolevel snoring at the site of the soft palate is provided, the patient may benefit from palatal surgery. These considerations have inspired researchers to scrutinize the acoustic characteristics of snoring events. Similarly to speech, snoring is produced in the vocal tract. Because of this analogy, existing techniques for speech analysis have been applied to evaluate snoring sounds. It appears that the pitch of the snoring sound is in the low-frequency range (<500 Hz) and corresponds to a fundamental frequency with associated harmonics. The pitch of snoring is determined by vibration of the soft palate, while nonpalatal snoring is more 'noise-like', and has scattered energy content in the higher spectral sub-bands (>500 Hz). To evaluate acoustic properties of snoring, sleep nasendoscopy is often performed. Recent evidence suggests that the acoustic quality of snoring is markedly different in drug-induced sleep as compared with natural sleep. Most often, palatal surgery alters sound characteristics of snoring, but is no cure for this disorder. It is uncertain whether the perceived improvement after palatal surgery, as

  3. Dynamic acoustic tractor beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2015-03-01

    Pulling a sphere and vibrating it around an equilibrium position by amplitude-modulation in the near-field of a single finite circular piston transducer is theoretically demonstrated. Conditions are found where a fluid hexane sphere (with arbitrary radius) chosen as an example, centered on the axis of progressive propagating waves and submerged in non-viscous water, experiences an attractive (steady) force pulling it towards the transducer, as well as an oscillatory force forcing it to vibrate back-and-forth. Numerical predictions for the dynamic force illustrate the theory and suggest an innovative method in designing dynamic acoustical tractor beams.

  4. Wind turbine acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, Harvey H.; Shepherd, Kevin P.

    1990-01-01

    Available information on the physical characteristics of the noise generated by wind turbines is summarized, with example sound pressure time histories, narrow- and broadband frequency spectra, and noise radiation patterns. Reviewed are noise measurement standards, analysis technology, and a method of characterizing wind turbine noise. Prediction methods are given for both low-frequency rotational harmonics and broadband noise components. Also included are atmospheric propagation data showing the effects of distance and refraction by wind shear. Human perception thresholds, based on laboratory and field tests, are given. Building vibration analysis methods are summarized. The bibliography of this report lists technical publications on all aspects of wind turbine acoustics.

  5. Quantum positron acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Metref, Hassina; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2014-12-15

    Nonlinear quantum positron-acoustic (QPA) waves are investigated for the first time, within the theoretical framework of the quantum hydrodynamic model. In the small but finite amplitude limit, both deformed Korteweg-de Vries and generalized Korteweg-de Vries equations governing, respectively, the dynamics of QPA solitary waves and double-layers are derived. Moreover, a full finite amplitude analysis is undertaken, and a numerical integration of the obtained highly nonlinear equations is carried out. The results complement our previously published results on this problem.

  6. Standoff photo acoustic spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Van Neste, Charles W; Senesac, Larry R; Thundat, Thomas George

    2008-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate a variation of photoacoustic spectroscopy that can be used for obtaining spectroscopic information of surface adsorbed chemicals in a standoff fashion. Pulsed light scattered from a target excites an acoustic resonator and the variation of the resonance amplitude as a function of illumination wavelength yields a representation of the absorption spectrum of the target. We report sensitive and selective detection of surface adsorbed compounds such as tributyl phosphate and residues of explosives such as trinitrotoluene at standoff distances ranging from 0.5-20 m, with a detection limit on the order of 100 ng/cm{sup 2}.

  7. Dynamic acoustic tractor beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mitri, F. G.

    2015-03-07

    Pulling a sphere and vibrating it around an equilibrium position by amplitude-modulation in the near-field of a single finite circular piston transducer is theoretically demonstrated. Conditions are found where a fluid hexane sphere (with arbitrary radius) chosen as an example, centered on the axis of progressive propagating waves and submerged in non-viscous water, experiences an attractive (steady) force pulling it towards the transducer, as well as an oscillatory force forcing it to vibrate back-and-forth. Numerical predictions for the dynamic force illustrate the theory and suggest an innovative method in designing dynamic acoustical tractor beams.

  8. Acoustic Markers of Prosodic Boundaries in Spanish Spontaneous Alaryngeal Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuenca, M. H.; Barrio, M. M.

    2010-01-01

    Prosodic information aids segmentation of the continuous speech signal and thereby facilitates auditory speech processing. Durational and pitch variations are prosodic cues especially necessary to convey prosodic boundaries, but alaryngeal speakers have inconsistent control over acoustic parameters such as F0 and duration, being as a result noisy…

  9. An Acoustic Analysis of Young Children's Productions of Word Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollock, Karen E.; And Others

    A study investigated children's use of three acoustic parameters (intensity, fundamental frequency, and duration) in the production of two-syllable nonsense words. Subjects were six children each at ages 2, 3, and 4 years with age-appropriate language skills and normal hearing sensitivity. An examiner produced eight novel two-syllable words of…

  10. Regularities of acoustic emission in coal samples under triaxial compression

    SciTech Connect

    Shkuratnik, V.L.; Filimonov, Y.L.; Kuchurin, S.V.

    2005-02-01

    The results are cited for the experimental study of acoustoemission processes in anthracite samples under triaxial compression by the Karman scheme at the constant rate of axial strain. From a comparison of the stress-strain and acoustoemission curves, the features of acoustic emission parameters in various deformation stages are revealed and the physicomechanical properties of coal are estimated.

  11. Acoustic analysis in Mudejar-Gothic churches: experimental results.

    PubMed

    Galindo, Miguel; Zamarreño, Teófilo; Girón, Sara

    2005-05-01

    This paper describes the preliminary results of research work in acoustics, conducted in a set of 12 Mudejar-Gothic churches in the city of Seville in the south of Spain. Despite common architectural style, the churches feature individual characteristics and have volumes ranging from 3947 to 10 708 m3. Acoustic parameters were measured in unoccupied churches according to the ISO-3382 standard. An extensive experimental study was carried out using impulse response analysis through a maximum length sequence measurement system in each church. It covered aspects such as reverberation (reverberation times, early decay times), distribution of sound levels (sound strength); early to late sound energy parameters derived from the impulse responses (center time, clarity for speech, clarity, definition, lateral energy fraction), and speech intelligibility (rapid speech transmission index), which all take both spectral and spatial distribution into account. Background noise was also measured to obtain the NR indices. The study describes the acoustic field inside each temple and establishes a discussion for each one of the acoustic descriptors mentioned by using the theoretical models available and the principles of architectural acoustics. Analysis of the quality of the spaces for music and speech is carried out according to the most widespread criteria for auditoria. PMID:15957758

  12. Acoustic analysis in Mudejar-Gothic churches: experimental results.

    PubMed

    Galindo, Miguel; Zamarreño, Teófilo; Girón, Sara

    2005-05-01

    This paper describes the preliminary results of research work in acoustics, conducted in a set of 12 Mudejar-Gothic churches in the city of Seville in the south of Spain. Despite common architectural style, the churches feature individual characteristics and have volumes ranging from 3947 to 10 708 m3. Acoustic parameters were measured in unoccupied churches according to the ISO-3382 standard. An extensive experimental study was carried out using impulse response analysis through a maximum length sequence measurement system in each church. It covered aspects such as reverberation (reverberation times, early decay times), distribution of sound levels (sound strength); early to late sound energy parameters derived from the impulse responses (center time, clarity for speech, clarity, definition, lateral energy fraction), and speech intelligibility (rapid speech transmission index), which all take both spectral and spatial distribution into account. Background noise was also measured to obtain the NR indices. The study describes the acoustic field inside each temple and establishes a discussion for each one of the acoustic descriptors mentioned by using the theoretical models available and the principles of architectural acoustics. Analysis of the quality of the spaces for music and speech is carried out according to the most widespread criteria for auditoria.

  13. Acoustic analysis in Mudejar-Gothic churches: Experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo, Miguel; Zamarreño, Teófilo; Girón, Sara

    2005-05-01

    This paper describes the preliminary results of research work in acoustics, conducted in a set of 12 Mudejar-Gothic churches in the city of Seville in the south of Spain. Despite common architectural style, the churches feature individual characteristics and have volumes ranging from 3947 to 10 708 m3. Acoustic parameters were measured in unoccupied churches according to the ISO-3382 standard. An extensive experimental study was carried out using impulse response analysis through a maximum length sequence measurement system in each church. It covered aspects such as reverberation (reverberation times, early decay times), distribution of sound levels (sound strength); early to late sound energy parameters derived from the impulse responses (center time, clarity for speech, clarity, definition, lateral energy fraction), and speech intelligibility (rapid speech transmission index), which all take both spectral and spatial distribution into account. Background noise was also measured to obtain the NR indices. The study describes the acoustic field inside each temple and establishes a discussion for each one of the acoustic descriptors mentioned by using the theoretical models available and the principles of architectural acoustics. Analysis of the quality of the spaces for music and speech is carried out according to the most widespread criteria for auditoria. .

  14. Radiation directivity rotation by acoustic metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Xue; Liang, Bin E-mail: jccheng@nju.edu.cn; Zou, Xin-ye; Cheng, Jian-chun E-mail: jccheng@nju.edu.cn; Zhang, Likun

    2015-08-31

    We use a metamaterial-based scheme to rotate the radiation directivity of sound radiated by a source surrounded by the structure. The rotation is demonstrated through both numerical simulations and experiments. The performance persists within a broadband and is entirely independent of the location and pattern of source inside, suggesting great potential in various practical scenarios where both the signal frequency and source position may vary significantly. We have also investigated the possibility to realize versatile controls of radiation direction by tailoring the structural parameters. Our design with special directivity-steering capability may open route to loudspeaker and auditorium acoustics designs and medical ultrasound applications.

  15. Radiation directivity rotation by acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xue; Zhang, Likun; Liang, Bin; Zou, Xin-ye; Cheng, Jian-chun

    2015-08-01

    We use a metamaterial-based scheme to rotate the radiation directivity of sound radiated by a source surrounded by the structure. The rotation is demonstrated through both numerical simulations and experiments. The performance persists within a broadband and is entirely independent of the location and pattern of source inside, suggesting great potential in various practical scenarios where both the signal frequency and source position may vary significantly. We have also investigated the possibility to realize versatile controls of radiation direction by tailoring the structural parameters. Our design with special directivity-steering capability may open route to loudspeaker and auditorium acoustics designs and medical ultrasound applications.

  16. Cardiorespiratory Responses to Acoustic Noise in Belugas.

    PubMed

    Lyamin, Oleg I; Korneva, Svetlana M; Rozhnov, Viatcheslav V; Mukhametov, Lev M

    2016-01-01

    To date, most research on the adverse effects of anthropogenic noise on marine mammals has focused on auditory and behavioral responses. Other responses have received little attention and are often ignored. In this study, the effect of acoustic noise on heart rate was examined in captive belugas. The data suggest that (1) heart rate can be used as a measure of physiological response (including stress) to noise in belugas and other cetaceans, (2) cardiac response is influenced by parameters of noise and adaptation to repeated exposure, and (3) cetacean calves are more vulnerable to the adverse effect of noise than adults. PMID:26611017

  17. Nonextensive dust-acoustic solitary waves

    SciTech Connect

    Tribeche, M.; Merriche, A.

    2011-03-15

    The seminal paper of Mamun et al. [Phys. Plasmas 3, 702 (1996)] is revisited within the theoretical framework of the Tsallis statistical mechanics. The nonextensivity may originate from the correlation or long-range interactions in the dusty plasma. It is found that depending on whether the nonextensive parameter q is positive or negative, the dust-acoustic (DA) soliton exhibits compression for q<0 and rarefaction for q>0. The lower limit of the Mach number for the existence of DA solitary waves is greater (smaller) than its Maxwellian counterpart in the case of superextensivity (subextensivity).

  18. Improving Acoustics in American Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Peggy B.

    2000-01-01

    This introductory article to a clinical forum describes the following seven articles that discuss the problem of noisy classrooms and resulting reduction in learning, basic principles of noise and reverberation measurements in classrooms, solutions to the problem of poor classroom acoustics, and the development of a classroom acoustics standard.…

  19. Piano acoustics-A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askenfelt, Anders

    2003-10-01

    The design of the piano as we know it today dates back to the second half of the 19th century. The history of studies of the acoustics of the piano begins during the same period. In this talk, known facts and unanswered questions about the acoustics of the piano are reviewed.

  20. Digital Controller For Acoustic Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarver, D. Kent

    1989-01-01

    Acoustic driver digitally controls sound fields along three axes. Allows computerized acoustic levitation and manipulation of small objects for such purposes as containerless processing and nuclear-fusion power experiments. Also used for controlling motion of vibration-testing tables in three dimensions.

  1. The electron geodesic acoustic mode

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, N.; Kaw, P. K.

    2012-09-15

    In this report, a novel new mode, named the electron geodesic acoustic mode, is presented. This mode can occur in toroidal plasmas like the conventional geodesic acoustic mode (GAM). The frequency of this new mode is much larger than that of the conventional GAM by a factor equal to the square root of the ion to electron mass ratio.

  2. Acoustic Emissions Reveal Combustion Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, D. N. R.; Seshan, P. K.

    1983-01-01

    Turbulent-flame acoustic emissions change with air/fuel ratio variations. Acoustic emissions sensed and processed to detect inefficient operation; control system responds by adjusting fuel/air mixture for greater efficiency. Useful for diagnosis of combustion processes and fuel/air control.

  3. Acoustic Levitation With One Driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. G.; Rudnick, I.; Elleman, D. D.; Stoneburner, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    Report discusses acoustic levitation in rectangular chamber using one driver mounted at corner. Placement of driver at corner enables it to couple effectively to acoustic modes along all three axes. Use of single driver reduces cost, complexity and weight of levitation system below those of three driver system.

  4. Acoustic Levitation With One Transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B.

    1987-01-01

    Higher resonator modes enables simplification of equipment. Experimental acoustic levitator for high-temperature containerless processing has round cylindrical levitation chamber and only one acoustic transducer. Stable levitation of solid particle or liquid drop achieved by exciting sound in chamber to higher-order resonant mode that makes potential well for levitated particle or drop at some point within chamber.

  5. Acoustic Similarity and Dichotic Listening.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Peter

    1978-01-01

    An experiment tests conjectures that right ear advantage (REA) has an auditory origin in competition or interference between acoustically similar stimuli and that feature-sharing effect (FSE) has its origin in assignment of features of phonetically similar stimuli. No effect on the REA for acoustic similarity, and a clear effect of acoustic…

  6. Electronic dummy for acoustical testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, B. B.; Di Mattia, A. L.; Rosencheck, A. J.; Stern, M.; Torick, E. L.

    1967-01-01

    Electronic Dummy /ED/ used for acoustical testing represents the average male torso from the Xiphoid process upward and includes an acoustic replica of the human head. This head simulates natural flesh, and has an artificial voice and artificial ears that measure sound pressures at the eardrum or the entrance to the ear canal.

  7. Sound Advice on Classroom Acoustics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturgeon, Julie

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the importance of acoustic standards in classroom design, presenting an interview with the Acoustical Society of America's (ASA's) standards manager which focuses on reasons for the new ASA standards, the standards document (which was written for K-12 classroom but applies to college classrooms), the need to avoid echo and be able to…

  8. Acoustic emission linear pulse holography

    DOEpatents

    Collins, H.D.; Busse, L.J.; Lemon, D.K.

    1983-10-25

    This device relates to the concept of and means for performing Acoustic Emission Linear Pulse Holography, which combines the advantages of linear holographic imaging and Acoustic Emission into a single non-destructive inspection system. This unique system produces a chronological, linear holographic image of a flaw by utilizing the acoustic energy emitted during crack growth. The innovation is the concept of utilizing the crack-generated acoustic emission energy to generate a chronological series of images of a growing crack by applying linear, pulse holographic processing to the acoustic emission data. The process is implemented by placing on a structure an array of piezoelectric sensors (typically 16 or 32 of them) near the defect location. A reference sensor is placed between the defect and the array.

  9. Acoustic Absorption in Porous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Johnston, James C.

    2011-01-01

    An understanding of both the areas of materials science and acoustics is necessary to successfully develop materials for acoustic absorption applications. This paper presents the basic knowledge and approaches for determining the acoustic performance of porous materials in a manner that will help materials researchers new to this area gain the understanding and skills necessary to make meaningful contributions to this field of study. Beginning with the basics and making as few assumptions as possible, this paper reviews relevant topics in the acoustic performance of porous materials, which are often used to make acoustic bulk absorbers, moving from the physics of sound wave interactions with porous materials to measurement techniques for flow resistivity, characteristic impedance, and wavenumber.

  10. Acoustic controlled rotation and orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B. (Inventor); Allen, James L. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Acoustic energy is applied to a pair of locations spaced about a chamber, to control rotation of an object levitated in the chamber. Two acoustic transducers applying energy of a single acoustic mode, one at each location, can (one or both) serve to levitate the object in three dimensions as well as control its rotation. Slow rotation is achieved by initially establishing a large phase difference and/or pressure ratio of the acoustic waves, which is sufficient to turn the object by more than 45 deg, which is immediately followed by reducing the phase difference and/or pressure ratio to maintain slow rotation. A small phase difference and/or pressure ratio enables control of the angular orientation of the object without rotating it. The sphericity of an object can be measured by its response to the acoustic energy.

  11. MEMS Based Acoustic Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheplak, Mark (Inventor); Nishida, Toshikaza (Inventor); Humphreys, William M. (Inventor); Arnold, David P. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Embodiments of the present invention described and shown in the specification aid drawings include a combination responsive to an acoustic wave that can be utilized as a dynamic pressure sensor. In one embodiment of the present invention, the combination has a substrate having a first surface and an opposite second surface, a microphone positioned on the first surface of the substrate and having an input and a first output and a second output, wherein the input receives a biased voltage, and the microphone generates an output signal responsive to the acoustic wave between the first output and the second output. The combination further has an amplifier positioned on the first surface of the substrate and having a first input and a second input and an output, wherein the first input of the amplifier is electrically coupled to the first output of the microphone and the second input of the amplifier is electrically coupled to the second output of the microphone for receiving the output sinual from the microphone. The amplifier is spaced from the microphone with a separation smaller than 0.5 mm.

  12. Opto-acoustic thrombolysis

    DOEpatents

    Celliers, Peter; Da Silva, Luiz; Glinsky, Michael; London, Richard; Maitland, Duncan; Matthews, Dennis; Fitch, Pat

    2000-01-01

    This invention is a catheter-based device for generating an ultrasound excitation in biological tissue. Pulsed laser light is guided through an optical fiber to provide the energy for producing the acoustic vibrations. The optical energy is deposited in a water-based absorbing fluid, e.g. saline, thrombolytic agent, blood or thrombus, and generates an acoustic impulse in the fluid through thermoelastic and/or thermodynamic mechanisms. By pulsing the laser at a repetition rate (which may vary from 10 Hz to 100 kHz) an ultrasonic radiation field can be established locally in the medium. This method of producing ultrasonic vibrations can be used in vivo for the treatment of stroke-related conditions in humans, particularly for dissolving thrombus or treating vasospasm. The catheter can also incorporate thrombolytic drug treatments as an adjunct therapy and it can be operated in conjunction with ultrasonic detection equipment for imaging and feedback control and with optical sensors for characterization of thrombus type and consistency.

  13. Ion acoustic shocks in magneto rotating Lorentzian plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, S.; Akhtar, N.; Hasnain, H.

    2014-12-15

    Ion acoustic shock structures in magnetized homogeneous dissipative Lorentzian plasma under the effects of Coriolis force are investigated. The dissipation in the plasma system is introduced via dynamic viscosity of inertial ions. The electrons are following the kappa distribution function. Korteweg-de Vries Burger (KdVB) equation is derived by using reductive perturbation technique. It is shown that spectral index, magnetic field, kinematic viscosity of ions, rotational frequency, and effective frequency have significant impact on the propagation characteristic of ion acoustic shocks in such plasma system. The numerical solution of KdVB equation is also discussed and transition from oscillatory profile to monotonic shock for different plasma parameters is investigated.

  14. Velocity and rotation measurements in acoustically levitated droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Abhishek; Basu, Saptarshi; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2012-10-01

    The velocity scale inside an acoustically levitated droplet depends on the levitator and liquid properties. Using Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV), detailed velocity measurements have been made in a levitated droplet of different diameters and viscosity. The maximum velocity and rotation are normalized using frequency and amplitude of acoustic levitator, and droplet viscosity. The non-dimensional data are fitted for micrometer- and millimeter-sized droplets levitated in different levitators for different viscosity fluids. It is also shown that the rotational speed of nanosilica droplets at an advanced stage of vaporization compares well with that predicted by exponentially fitted parameters.

  15. Parabolic equation modeling of high frequency acoustic transmission with an evolving sea surface.

    PubMed

    Senne, J; Song, A; Badiey, M; Smith, K B

    2012-09-01

    The present paper examines the temporal evolution of acoustic fields by modeling forward propagation subject to sea surface dynamics with time scales of less than a second to tens of seconds. A time-evolving rough sea surface model is combined with a rough surface formulation of a parabolic equation model for predicting time-varying acoustic fields. Surface waves are generated from surface wave spectra, and stepped in time using a Runge-Kutta integration technique applied to linear evolution equations. This evolving, range-dependent surface information is combined with other environmental parameters and input to the acoustic model, giving an approximation of the time-varying acoustic field. The wide-angle parabolic equation model manages the rough sea surfaces by molding them into the boundary conditions for calculations of the near-surface acoustic field. This merged acoustic model is validated using concurrently-collected acoustic and environmental information, including surface wave spectra. Data to model comparisons demonstrate that the model is able to approximate the ensemble-averaged acoustic intensity at ranges of about a kilometer for acoustic signals of around 15 kHz. Furthermore, the model is shown to capture variations due to surface fluctuations occurring over time scales of less than a second to tens of seconds.

  16. Field observation of low-to-mid-frequency acoustic propagation characteristics of an estuarine salt wedge.

    PubMed

    Reeder, D Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The estuarine environment often hosts a salt wedge, the stratification of which is a function of the tide's range and speed of advance, river discharge volumetric flow rate, and river mouth morphology. Competing effects of temperature and salinity on sound speed in this stratified environment control the degree of acoustic refraction occurring along an acoustic path. A field experiment was carried out in the Columbia River Estuary to test the hypothesis: the estuarine salt wedge is acoustically observable in terms of low-to-mid-frequency acoustic propagation. Linear frequency-modulated acoustic signals in the 500-2000 Hz band were transmitted during the advance and retreat of the salt wedge during May 27-29, 2013. Results demonstrate that the salt wedge front is the dominant physical mechanism controlling acoustic propagation in this environment: received signal energy is relatively stable before and after the passage of the salt wedge front when the acoustic path consists of a single medium (either entirely fresh water or entirely salt water), and suffers a 10-15 dB loss and increased variability during salt wedge front passage. Physical parameters and acoustic propagation modeling corroborate and inform the acoustic observations. PMID:26827001

  17. Multimaterial Acoustic Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chocat, Noemie

    The emergence of multimaterial fibers that combine a multiplicity of solid materials with disparate electrical, optical, and mechanical properties into a single fiber presents new opportunities for extending fiber applications well beyond optical transmission. Fiber reflectors, thermal detectors, photodetectors, chemical sensors, surface-emitting fiber lasers, fiber diodes, and other functional fiber devices have been demonstrated with this approach. Yet, throughout this development and indeed the development of fibers in general, a key premise has remained unchanged : that fibers are essentially static devices incapable of controllably changing their properties at high frequencies. Unique opportunities would arise if a rapid, electrically-driven mechanism for changing fiber properties existed. A wide spectrum of hitherto passive fiber devices could at once become active with applications spanning electronics, mechanics, acoustics, and optics, with the benefits of large surface-area, structural robustness, and mechanical flexibility. This thesis addresses the challenges and opportunities associated with the realization of electromechanical transduction in fibers through the integration of internal piezoelectric and electrostrictive domains. The fundamental challenges related to the fabrication of piezoelectric devices in fiber form are analyzed from a materials perspective, and candidate materials and geometries are selected that are compatible with the thermal drawing process. The first realization of a thermally drawn piezoelectric fiber device is reported and its piezoelectric response is established over a wide range of frequencies. The acoustic properties of piezoelectric fiber devices are characterized and related to their mechanical and geometric properties. Collective effects in multi-fiber constructs are discussed and demonstrated by the realization of a linear phased array of piezoelectric fibers capable of acoustic beam steering. High strain actuation

  18. Propagation of three-dimensional electron-acoustic solitary waves

    SciTech Connect

    Shalaby, M.; El-Sherif, L. S.; El-Labany, S. K.; Sabry, R.

    2011-06-15

    Theoretical investigation is carried out for understanding the properties of three-dimensional electron-acoustic waves propagating in magnetized plasma whose constituents are cold magnetized electron fluid, hot electrons obeying nonthermal distribution, and stationary ions. For this purpose, the hydrodynamic equations for the cold magnetized electron fluid, nonthermal electron density distribution, and the Poisson equation are used to derive the corresponding nonlinear evolution equation, Zkharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equation, in the small- but finite- amplitude regime. The ZK equation is solved analytically and it is found that it supports both solitary and blow-up solutions. It is found that rarefactive electron-acoustic solitary waves strongly depend on the density and temperature ratios of the hot-to-cold electron species as well as the nonthermal electron parameter. Furthermore, there is a critical value for the nonthermal electron parameter, which decides whether the electron-acoustic solitary wave's amplitude is decreased or increased by changing various plasma parameters. Importantly, the change of the propagation angles leads to miss the balance between the nonlinearity and dispersion; hence, the localized pulses convert to explosive/blow-up pulses. The relevance of this study to the nonlinear electron-acoustic structures in the dayside auroral zone in the light of Viking satellite observations is discussed.

  19. Acoustic-radiation stress in solids. I - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, J. H., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The general case of acoustic-radiation stress associated with quasi-compressional and quasi-shear waves propagating in infinite and semiinfinite lossless solids of arbitrary crystalline symmetry is studied. The Boussinesq radiation stress is defined and found to depend directly on an acoustic nonlinearity parameter which characterizes the radiation-induced static strain, a stress-generalized nonlinearity parameter which characterizes the stress nonlinearity, and the energy density of the propagating wave. Application of the Boltzmann-Ehrenfest principle of adiabatic invariance to a self-constrained system described by the nonlinear equations of motion allows the acoustic-radiation-induced static strain to be identified with a self-constrained variation in the time-averaged product of the internal energy density and displacement gradient. The time-averaged product is scaled by the acoustic nonlinearity parameter and represents the first-order nonlinearity in the virial theorem. Finally, the relationship between the Boussinesq and the Cauchy radiation stress is obtained in a closed three-dimensional form.

  20. PORTABLE ACOUSTIC MONITORING PACKAGE (PAMP)

    SciTech Connect

    John L. Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Patrick Browning

    2004-07-20

    The Portable Acoustic Monitoring Package (PAMP) has been designed to record and monitor the acoustic signal in natural gas transmission lines. In particular the three acoustic signals associated with a line leak. The system is portable ({approx}30 lbs) and is designed for line pressures up to 1000 psi. It has become apparent that cataloging of the various background acoustic signals in natural gas transmission line is very important if a system to identify leak signals is to be developed. The low-pressure (0-200 psig) laboratory test phase has been completed and a number of field trials have been conducted. Before the cataloging phase could begin, a few problems identified in field trials identified had to be corrected such as: (1) Decreased microphone sensitivity at line pressures above 250 psig. (2) The inability to deal with large data sets collected when cataloging the variety of signals in a transmission line. (3) The lack of an available online acoustic calibration system. These problems have been solved and the WVU PAMP is now fully functional over the entire pressure range found in the Natural Gas transmission lines in this region. Field portability and reliability have been greatly improved. Data collection and storage have also improved to the point were the full acoustic spectrum of acoustic signals can be accurately cataloged, recorded and described.

  1. Turbofan Acoustic Propagation and Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eversman, Walter

    2000-01-01

    This document describes progress in the development of finite element codes for the prediction of near and far field acoustic radiation from the inlet and aft fan ducts of turbofan engines. The report consists of nine papers which have appeared in archival journals and conference proceedings, or are presently in review for publication. Topics included are: 1. Aft Fan Duct Acoustic Radiation; 2. Mapped Infinite Wave Envelope Elements for Acoustic Radiation in a Uniformly Moving Medium; 3. A Reflection Free Boundary Condition for Propagation in Uniform Flow Using Mapped Infinite Wave Envelope Elements; 4. A Numerical Comparison Between Multiple-Scales and FEM Solution for Sound Propagation in Lined Flow Ducts; 5. Acoustic Propagation at High Frequencies in Ducts; 6. The Boundary Condition at an Impedance Wall in a Nonuniform Duct with Potential Flow; 7. A Reverse Flow Theorem and Acoustic Reciprocity in Compressible Potential Flows; 8. Reciprocity and Acoustics Power in One Dimensional Compressible Potential Flows; and 9. Numerical Experiments on Acoustic Reciprocity in Compressible Potential Flows.

  2. Acoustic sensors using microstructures tunable with energy other than acoustic energy

    DOEpatents

    Datskos, Panagiotis G.

    2003-11-25

    A sensor for detecting acoustic energy includes a microstructure tuned to a predetermined acoustic frequency and a device for detecting movement of the microstructure. A display device is operatively linked to the movement detecting device. When acoustic energy strikes the acoustic sensor, acoustic energy having a predetermined frequency moves the microstructure, where the movement is detected by the movement detecting device.

  3. Acoustic sensors using microstructures tunable with energy other than acoustic energy

    DOEpatents

    Datskos, Panagiotis G.

    2005-06-07

    A sensor for detecting acoustic energy includes a microstructure tuned to a predetermined acoustic frequency and a device for detecting movement of the microstructure. A display device is operatively linked to the movement detecting device. When acoustic energy strikes the acoustic sensor, acoustic energy having a predetermined frequency moves the microstructure, where the movement is detected by the movement detecting device.

  4. Filamentation instability of nonextensive current-driven plasma in the ion acoustic frequency range

    SciTech Connect

    Khorashadizadeh, S. M. Rastbood, E.; Niknam, A. R.

    2014-12-15

    The filamentation and ion acoustic instabilities of nonextensive current-driven plasma in the ion acoustic frequency range have been studied using the Lorentz transformation formulas. Based on the kinetic theory, the possibility of filamentation instability and its growth rate as well as the ion acoustic instability have been investigated. The results of the research show that the possibility and growth rate of these instabilities are significantly dependent on the electron nonextensive parameter and drift velocity. Besides, the increase of electrons nonextensive parameter and drift velocity lead to the increase of the growth rates of both instabilities. In addition, the wavelength region in which the filamentation instability occurs is more stretched in the presence of higher values of drift velocity and nonextensive parameter. Finally, the results of filamentation and ion acoustic instabilities have been compared and the conditions for filamentation instability to be dominant mode of instability have been presented.

  5. Acoustic fault injection tool (AFIT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoess, Jeffrey N.

    1999-05-01

    On September 18, 1997, Honeywell Technology Center (HTC) successfully completed a three-week flight test of its rotor acoustic monitoring system (RAMS) at Patuxent River Flight Test Center. This flight test was the culmination of an ambitious 38-month proof-of-concept effort directed at demonstrating the feasibility of detecting crack propagation in helicopter rotor components. The program was funded as part of the U.S. Navy's Air Vehicle Diagnostic Systems (AVDS) program. Reductions in Navy maintenance budgets and available personnel have dictated the need to transition from time-based to 'condition-based' maintenance. Achieving this will require new enabling diagnostic technologies. The application of acoustic emission for the early detection of helicopter rotor head dynamic component faults has proven the feasibility of the technology. The flight-test results demonstrated that stress-wave acoustic emission technology can detect signals equivalent to small fatigue cracks in rotor head components and can do so across the rotating articulated rotor head joints and in the presence of other background acoustic noise generated during flight operation. During the RAMS flight test, 12 test flights were flown from which 25 Gbyte of digital acoustic data and about 15 hours of analog flight data recorder (FDR) data were collected from the eight on-rotor acoustic sensors. The focus of this paper is to describe the CH-46 flight-test configuration and present design details about a new innovative machinery diagnostic technology called acoustic fault injection. This technology involves the injection of acoustic sound into machinery to assess health and characterize operational status. The paper will also address the development of the Acoustic Fault Injection Tool (AFIT), which was successfully demonstrated during the CH-46 flight tests.

  6. Acoustic cavitation movies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Lawrence A.

    2003-04-01

    Acoustic cavitation is a phenomenon that occurs on microsecond time scales and micron length scales, yet, it has many macroscopic manifestations. Accordingly, it is often difficult, at least for the author, to form realistic physical descriptions of the specific mechanisms through which it expresses itself in our macroscopic world. For example, there are still many who believe that cavitation erosion is due to the shock wave that is emitted by bubble implosion, rather than the liquid jet created on asymmetric collapse...and they may be right. Over the years, the author has accumulated a number of movies and high-speed photographs of cavitation activity, which he uses to form his own visual references. In the time allotted, he will show a number of these movies and photographs and discuss their relevance to existing technological problems. A limited number of CDs containing the presented materials will be available to interested individuals. [Work supported in part by the NIH, USAMRMC, and the ONR.

  7. Wind turbine acoustic standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, D. G.; Shepherd, K. P.; Grosveld, F.

    1981-01-01

    A program is being conducted to develop noise standards for wind turbines which minimize annoyance and which can be used to design specifications. The approach consists of presenting wind turbine noise stimuli to test subjects in a laboratory listening chamber. The responses of the subjects are recorded for a range of stimuli which encompass the designs, operating conditions, and ambient noise levels of current and future installations. Results to date have established the threshold of detectability for a range of impulsive stimuli of the type associated with blade/tower wake interactions. The status of the ongoing psychoacoustic tests, the subjective data, and the approach to the development of acoustic criteria/standards are described.

  8. Electromagnetic acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Alers, George A.; Burns, Jr., Leigh R.; MacLauchlan, Daniel T.

    1988-01-01

    A noncontact ultrasonic transducer for studying the acoustic properties of a metal workpiece includes a generally planar magnetizing coil positioned above the surface of the workpiece, and a generally planar eddy current coil between the magnetizing coil and the workpiece. When a large current is passed through the magnetizing coil, a large magnetic field is applied to the near-surface regions of the workpiece. The eddy current coil can then be operated as a transmitter by passing an alternating current therethrough to excite ultrasonic waves in the surface of the workpiece, or operated as a passive receiver to sense ultrasonic waves in the surface by measuring the output signal. The geometries of the two coils can be varied widely to be effective for different types of ultrasonic waves. The coils are preferably packaged in a housing which does not interfere with their operation, but protects them from a variety of adverse environmental conditions.

  9. Weapons bay acoustic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, L. L.; Shimovetz, R. M.

    1994-09-01

    An aircraft weapons bay exposed to freestream flow experiences an intense aeroacoustic environment in and around the bay. Experience has taught that the intensity of this environment can be severe enough to result in damage to a store, its internal equipment, or the structure of the weapons bay itself. To ensure that stores and sensitive internal equipment can withstand this hazardous environment and successfully complete the mission, they must be qualified to the most severe sound pressure levels anticipated for the mission. If the qualification test levels are too high, the store and its internal equipment will be over designed, resulting in unnecessary costs and possible performance penalties. If the qualification levels are below those experienced in flight, the store or its internal equipment may catastrophically fail during performance of the mission. Thus, it is desirable that the expected levels in weapons bays be accurately predicted. A large number of research efforts have been directed toward understanding flow-induced cavity oscillations. However, the phenomena are still not adequately understood to allow one to predict the fluctuating pressure levels for various configurations and flow conditions. This is especially true at supersonic flow speeds, where only a small amount of data are available. This paper will give a background of flow induced cavity oscillations and discuss predictions, control and suppression, and the future of weapons bay acoustic environments. A large number of research efforts have been directed toward understanding flow-induced cavity oscillations. However, the phenomena are still not adequately understood to allow one to predict the fluctuating pressure levels for various configurations and flow conditions. This is especially true at supersonic flow speeds, where only a small amount of data are available. This paper will give a background of flow induced cavity oscillations and discuss predictions, control and suppression, and

  10. Recent Langley helicopter acoustics contributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Homer G.; Pao, S. P.; Powell, C. A.

    1988-01-01

    The helicopter acoustics program at NASA Langley has included technology for elements of noise control ranging from sources of noise to receivers of noise. The scope of Langley contributions for about the last decade is discussed. Specifically, the resolution of two certification noise quantification issues by subjective acoustics research, the development status of the helicopter system noise prediction program ROTONET are reviewed and the highlights from research on blade rotational, broadband, and blade vortex interaction noise sources are presented. Finally, research contributions on helicopter cabin (or interior) noise control are presented. A bibliography of publications from the Langley helicopter acoustics program for the past 10 years is included.

  11. Acoustic Study of Acted Emotions in Speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rong

    An extensive set of carefully recorded utterances provided a speech database for investigating acoustic correlates among eight emotional states. Four professional actors and four professional actresses simulated the emotional states of joy, conversation, nervousness, anger, sadness, hate, fear, and depression. The values of 14 acoustic parameters were extracted from analyses of the simulated portrayals. Normalization of the parameters was made to reduce the talker-dependence. Correlates of emotion were investigated by means of principal components analysis. Sadness and depression were found to be "ambiguous" with respect to each other, but "unique" with respect to joy and anger in the principal components space. Joy, conversation, nervousness, anger, hate, and fear did not separate well in the space and so exhibited ambiguity with respect to one another. The different talkers expressed joy, anger, sadness, and depression more consistently than the other four emotions. The analysis results were compared with the results of a subjective study using the same speech database and considerable consistency between the two was found.

  12. Challenges in Rotorcraft Acoustic Flight Prediction and Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Challenges associated with rotorcraft acoustic flight prediction and validation are examined. First, an outline of a state-of-the-art rotorcraft aeroacoustic prediction methodology is presented. Components including rotorcraft aeromechanics, high resolution reconstruction, and rotorcraft acoustic prediction arc discussed. Next, to illustrate challenges and issues involved, a case study is presented in which an analysis of flight data from a specific XV-15 tiltrotor acoustic flight test is discussed in detail. Issues related to validation of methodologies using flight test data are discussed. Primary flight parameters such as velocity, altitude, and attitude are discussed and compared for repeated flight conditions. Other measured steady state flight conditions are examined for consistency and steadiness. A representative example prediction is presented and suggestions are made for future research.

  13. Three-dimensional broadband omnidirectional acoustic ground cloak.

    PubMed

    Zigoneanu, Lucian; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A

    2014-04-01

    The control of sound propagation and reflection has always been the goal of engineers involved in the design of acoustic systems. A recent design approach based on coordinate transformations, which is applicable to many physical systems, together with the development of a new class of engineered materials called metamaterials, has opened the road to the unconstrained control of sound. However, the ideal material parameters prescribed by this methodology are complex and challenging to obtain experimentally, even using metamaterial design approaches. Not surprisingly, experimental demonstration of devices obtained using transformation acoustics is difficult, and has been implemented only in two-dimensional configurations. Here, we demonstrate the design and experimental characterization of an almost perfect three-dimensional, broadband, and, most importantly, omnidirectional acoustic device that renders a region of space three wavelengths in diameter invisible to sound. PMID:24608143

  14. Perceptual and acoustic study of professionally trained versus untrained voices.

    PubMed

    Brown, W S; Rothman, H B; Sapienza, C M

    2000-09-01

    Acoustic and perceptual analyses were completed to determine the effect of vocal training on professional singers when speaking and singing. Twenty professional singers and 20 nonsingers, acting as the control, were recorded while sustaining a vowel, reading a modified Rainbow Passage, and singing "America the Beautiful." Acoustic measures included fundamental frequency, duration, percent jitter, percent shimmer, noise-to-harmonic ratio, and determination of the presence or absence of both vibrato and the singer's formant. Results indicated that, whereas certain acoustic parameters differentiated singers from nonsingers within sex, no consistently significant trends were found across males and females for either speaking or singing. The most consistent differences were the presence or absence of the singer's vibrato and formant in the singers versus the nonsingers, respectively. Perceptual analysis indicated that singers could be correctly identified with greater frequency than by chance alone from their singing, but not their speaking utterances. PMID:11021498

  15. Temperature dependence of bulk viscosity in water using acoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, M. J.; Parker, N. G.; Povey, M. J. W.

    2011-01-01

    Despite its fundamental role in the dynamics of compressible fluids, bulk viscosity has received little experimental attention and there remains a paucity of measured data. Acoustic spectroscopy provides a robust and accurate approach to measuring this parameter. Working from the Navier-Stokes model of a compressible fluid one can show that the bulk viscosity makes a significant and measurable contribution to the frequency-squared acoustic attenuation. Here we employ this methodology to determine the bulk viscosity of Millipore water over a temperature range of 7 to 50°C. The measured attenuation spectra are consistent with the theoretical predictions, while the bulk viscosity of water is found to be approximately three times larger than its shear counterpart, reinforcing its significance in acoustic propagation. Moreover, our results demonstrate that this technique can be readily and generally applied to fluids to accurately determine their temperature dependent bulk viscosities.

  16. International Space Station Crew Quarters Ventilation and Acoustic Design Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broyan, James L., Jr.; Cady, Scott M; Welsh, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) United States Operational Segment has four permanent rack sized ISS Crew Quarters (CQs) providing a private crew member space. The CQs use Node 2 cabin air for ventilation/thermal cooling, as opposed to conditioned ducted air-from the ISS Common Cabin Air Assembly (CCAA) or the ISS fluid cooling loop. Consequently, CQ can only increase the air flow rate to reduce the temperature delta between the cabin and the CQ interior. However, increasing airflow causes increased acoustic noise so efficient airflow distribution is an important design parameter. The CQ utilized a two fan push-pull configuration to ensure fresh air at the crew member's head position and reduce acoustic exposure. The CQ ventilation ducts are conduits to the louder Node 2 cabin aisle way which required significant acoustic mitigation controls. The CQ interior needs to be below noise criteria curve 40 (NC-40). The design implementation of the CQ ventilation system and acoustic mitigation are very inter-related and require consideration of crew comfort balanced with use of interior habitable volume, accommodation of fan failures, and possible crew uses that impact ventilation and acoustic performance. Each CQ required 13% of its total volume and approximately 6% of its total mass to reduce acoustic noise. This paper illustrates the types of model analysis, assumptions, vehicle interactions, and trade-offs required for CQ ventilation and acoustics. Additionally, on-orbit ventilation system performance and initial crew feedback is presented. This approach is applicable to any private enclosed space that the crew will occupy.

  17. Convective Heat Transfer in Acoustic Streaming Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinath, Ashok

    1992-01-01

    Convective heat transfer due to acoustic streaming has been studied in the absence of an imposed mean flow. The work is motivated by the need to design and control the thermal features of a suitable experimental rig for the containerless processing of materials by heat treatment of acoustically levitated alloy samples at near zero-gravity. First the problem of heat transfer from an isolated sphere (in a standing sound field) is explored in detail. The streaming Reynolds number, Rs, which characterizes the resulting steady flows, is determined from the acoustic signal. A scale analysis is used to ascertain the importance of buoyancy and viscous dissipation. The steady velocity and temperature fields are determined using asymptotic techniques and numerical methods for the limiting cases of Rs<<1 and Rsgg1. Working correlations for the average Nusselt number are obtained for a wide range of Prandtl numbers. A simple experiment is conducted to verify the predictions for the more relevant case of Rsgg1. The acoustic levitation chamber itself is modelled as a Kundt tube (supporting a plane axial standing sound wave) with insulated side-wall and isothermal end-walls. Analytical solution techniques are used to determine the steady fields close to the tube walls. For the steady recirculatory transport in the core, the numerical solver PHOENICS is adopted for the solution of the complete elliptic form of the governing equations. A study of the effects of a range of acoustic and geometric parameters on the flow and heat transfer is performed and Nusselt number correlations are obtained for air. PHOENICS is also used to study the effects of variable fluid properties and axial side-wall conduction (coupled with radiation). The role of normal/reduced gravity is assessed and suggestions made for terrestrial testing of the levitation apparatus. Finally, with the sample located at a node in the levitation chamber, the effect of the interaction of the streaming flows (on the sphere

  18. Probing Acoustic Nonlinearity by Mixing Surface Acoustic Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, David Howard; Telschow, Kenneth Louis

    2000-07-01

    Measurement methods aimed at determining material properties through nonlinear wave propagation are sensitive to artifacts caused by background nonlinearities inherent in the ultrasonic generation and detection methods. The focus of this paper is to describe our investigation of nonlinear mixing of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) as a means to decrease sensitivity to background nonlinearity and increase spatial sensitivity to acoustic nonlinearity induced by material microstructure.

  19. Effects of subsampling of passive acoustic recordings on acoustic metrics.

    PubMed

    Thomisch, Karolin; Boebel, Olaf; Zitterbart, Daniel P; Samaran, Flore; Van Parijs, Sofie; Van Opzeeland, Ilse

    2015-07-01

    Passive acoustic monitoring is an important tool in marine mammal studies. However, logistics and finances frequently constrain the number and servicing schedules of acoustic recorders, requiring a trade-off between deployment periods and sampling continuity, i.e., the implementation of a subsampling scheme. Optimizing such schemes to each project's specific research questions is desirable. This study investigates the impact of subsampling on the accuracy of two common metrics, acoustic presence and call rate, for different vocalization patterns (regimes) of baleen whales: (1) variable vocal activity, (2) vocalizations organized in song bouts, and (3) vocal activity with diel patterns. To this end, above metrics are compared for continuous and subsampled data subject to different sampling strategies, covering duty cycles between 50% and 2%. The results show that a reduction of the duty cycle impacts negatively on the accuracy of both acoustic presence and call rate estimates. For a given duty cycle, frequent short listening periods improve accuracy of daily acoustic presence estimates over few long listening periods. Overall, subsampling effects are most pronounced for low and/or temporally clustered vocal activity. These findings illustrate the importance of informed decisions when applying subsampling strategies to passive acoustic recordings or analyses for a given target species.

  20. Effects of subsampling of passive acoustic recordings on acoustic metrics.

    PubMed

    Thomisch, Karolin; Boebel, Olaf; Zitterbart, Daniel P; Samaran, Flore; Van Parijs, Sofie; Van Opzeeland, Ilse

    2015-07-01

    Passive acoustic monitoring is an important tool in marine mammal studies. However, logistics and finances frequently constrain the number and servicing schedules of acoustic recorders, requiring a trade-off between deployment periods and sampling continuity, i.e., the implementation of a subsampling scheme. Optimizing such schemes to each project's specific research questions is desirable. This study investigates the impact of subsampling on the accuracy of two common metrics, acoustic presence and call rate, for different vocalization patterns (regimes) of baleen whales: (1) variable vocal activity, (2) vocalizations organized in song bouts, and (3) vocal activity with diel patterns. To this end, above metrics are compared for continuous and subsampled data subject to different sampling strategies, covering duty cycles between 50% and 2%. The results show that a reduction of the duty cycle impacts negatively on the accuracy of both acoustic presence and call rate estimates. For a given duty cycle, frequent short listening periods improve accuracy of daily acoustic presence estimates over few long listening periods. Overall, subsampling effects are most pronounced for low and/or temporally clustered vocal activity. These findings illustrate the importance of informed decisions when applying subsampling strategies to passive acoustic recordings or analyses for a given target species. PMID:26233026

  1. Hybrid optical and acoustic force based sorting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Mahoney, Paul; Brodie, Graham W.; Wang, Han; Demore, Christine E. M.; Cochran, Sandy; Spalding, Gabriel C.; MacDonald, Michael P.

    2014-09-01

    We report the combined use of optical sorting and acoustic levitation to give particle sorting. Differing sizes of microparticles are sorted optically both with and without the aid of acoustic levitation, and the results compared to show that the use of acoustic trapping can increase sorting efficiency. The use of a transparent ultrasonic transducer is also shown to streamline the integration of optics and acoustics. We also demonstrate the balance of optical radiation pressure and acoustic levitation to achieve vertical sorting.

  2. The effective acoustic environment of helicopter crewmen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camp, R. T., Jr.; Mozo, B. T.

    1978-01-01

    Methods of measuring the composite acoustic environment of helicopters in order to quantify the effective acoustic environment of the crewmen and to assess the real acoustic hazards of the personnel are examined. It is indicated that the attenuation characteristics of the helmets and hearing protectors and the variables of the physiology of the human ear be accounted for in determining the effective acoustic environment of Army helicopter crewmen as well as the acoustic hazards of voice communications systems noise.

  3. Study of acoustic correlates associate with emotional speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildirim, Serdar; Lee, Sungbok; Lee, Chul Min; Bulut, Murtaza; Busso, Carlos; Kazemzadeh, Ebrahim; Narayanan, Shrikanth

    2004-10-01

    This study investigates the acoustic characteristics of four different emotions expressed in speech. The aim is to obtain detailed acoustic knowledge on how a speech signal is modulated by changes from neutral to a certain emotional state. Such knowledge is necessary for automatic emotion recognition and classification and emotional speech synthesis. Speech data obtained from two semi-professional actresses are analyzed and compared. Each subject produces 211 sentences with four different emotions; neutral, sad, angry, happy. We analyze changes in temporal and acoustic parameters such as magnitude and variability of segmental duration, fundamental frequency and the first three formant frequencies as a function of emotion. Acoustic differences among the emotions are also explored with mutual information computation, multidimensional scaling and acoustic likelihood comparison with normal speech. Results indicate that speech associated with anger and happiness is characterized by longer duration, shorter interword silence, higher pitch and rms energy with wider ranges. Sadness is distinguished from other emotions by lower rms energy and longer interword silence. Interestingly, the difference in formant pattern between [happiness/anger] and [neutral/sadness] are better reflected in back vowels such as /a/(/father/) than in front vowels. Detailed results on intra- and interspeaker variability will be reported.

  4. Thermally induced acoustic emissions in thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Voyer, J.; Gitzhofer, F.; Boulos, M.I.; Durham, S.

    1995-12-31

    In this study, acoustic emission signals are used to monitor the degradation of plasma sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBC) under thermal cycling conditions. Signal analysis both in time and frequency domains is carried out in order to identify the key parameters which can be used to classify the acoustic emission signals as a function of the damage mechanisms. This classification offers a means of prediction of the long-term behavior of the thermal barrier coating based on the acoustic emission signal signature at the early stages of bench testing. The tests were carried out using an experimental rig that was developed to reproduce thermal conditions encountered inside a combustion chamber. Twelve infrared lamps, each with a power rating of 1,200 W, are used as a heat source. The samples consist of an alloy blade coated with a duplex TBC made of a 150 {micro}m thick bond coat covered with a 300 {micro}m thick partially-stabilized zirconia coating. The maximum surface temperature of the sample was measured to be around 1,000 C. Two broadband transducers are used for acquisition of acoustic emission signals. Measuring the time between signal detection by each of the two transducers provides a means of determination of the location of the source of the acoustic signals. A classification of the signals based on their energy and their maximum peak frequency is presented.

  5. The acoustic correlates of valence depend on emotion family.

    PubMed

    Belyk, Michel; Brown, Steven

    2014-07-01

    The voice expresses a wide range of emotions through modulations of acoustic parameters such as frequency and amplitude. Although the acoustics of individual emotions are well understood, attempts to describe the acoustic correlates of broad emotional categories such as valence have yielded mixed results. In the present study, we analyzed the acoustics of emotional valence for different families of emotion. We divided emotional vocalizations into "motivational," "moral," and "aesthetic" families as defined by the OCC (Ortony, Clore, and Collins) model of emotion. Subjects viewed emotional scenarios and were cued to vocalize congruent exclamations in response to them, for example, "Yay!" and "Damn!". Positive valence was weakly associated with high-pitched and loud vocalizations. However, valence interacted with emotion family for both pitch and amplitude. A general acoustic code for valence does not hold across families of emotion, whereas family-specific codes provide a more accurate description of vocal emotions. These findings are consolidated into a set of "rules of expression" relating vocal dimensions to emotion dimensions.

  6. Sound field simulation and acoustic animation in urban squares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jian; Meng, Yan

    2005-04-01

    Urban squares are important components of cities, and the acoustic environment is important for their usability. While models and formulae for predicting the sound field in urban squares are important for their soundscape design and improvement, acoustic animation tools would be of great importance for designers as well as for public participation process, given that below a certain sound level, the soundscape evaluation depends mainly on the type of sounds rather than the loudness. This paper first briefly introduces acoustic simulation models developed for urban squares, as well as empirical formulae derived from a series of simulation. It then presents an acoustic animation tool currently being developed. In urban squares there are multiple dynamic sound sources, so that the computation time becomes a main concern. Nevertheless, the requirements for acoustic animation in urban squares are relatively low compared to auditoria. As a result, it is important to simplify the simulation process and algorithms. Based on a series of subjective tests in a virtual reality environment with various simulation parameters, a fast simulation method with acceptable accuracy has been explored. [Work supported by the European Commission.

  7. Effect of nonadiabaticity of dust charge variation on dust acoustic waves: generation of dust acoustic shock waves.

    PubMed

    Gupta, M R; Sarkar, S; Ghosh, S; Debnath, M; Khan, M

    2001-04-01

    The effect of nonadiabaticity of dust charge variation arising due to small nonzero values of tau(ch)/tau(d) has been studied where tau(ch) and tau(d) are the dust charging and dust hydrodynamical time scales on the nonlinear propagation of dust acoustic waves. Analytical investigation shows that the propagation of a small amplitude wave is governed by a Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) Burger equation. Notwithstanding the soliton decay, the "soliton mass" is conserved, but the dissipative term leads to the development of a noise tail. Nonadiabaticity generated dissipative effect causes the generation of a dust acoustic shock wave having oscillatory behavior on the downstream side. Numerical investigations reveal that the propagation of a large amplitude dust acoustic shock wave with dust density enhancement may occur only for Mach numbers lying between a minimum and a maximum value whose dependence on the dusty plasma parameters is presented. PMID:11308955

  8. PC and PVC Acoustics Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luzader, Stephen

    1990-01-01

    Described are four musical instruments constructed from polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe. The use of computerized synthesizers to play scales and chords is discussed. Suggestions for other illustrations of acoustics are included. (CW)

  9. Acoustics: Motion controlled by sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neild, Adrian

    2016-09-01

    A simple technique has been developed that produces holograms made of sound waves. These acoustic landscapes are used to manipulate microscale objects, and offer great potential in medical imaging and selective heating. See Letter p.518

  10. Acoustic Characterization of Mesoscale Objects

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, D; Huber, R; Chambers, D; Cole, G; Balogun, O; Spicer, J; Murray, T

    2007-03-13

    This report describes the science and engineering performed to provide state-of-the-art acoustic capabilities for nondestructively characterizing mesoscale (millimeter-sized) objects--allowing micrometer resolution over the objects entire volume. Materials and structures used in mesoscale objects necessitate the use of (1) GHz acoustic frequencies and (2) non-contacting laser generation and detection of acoustic waves. This effort demonstrated that acoustic methods at gigahertz frequencies have the necessary penetration depth and spatial resolution to effectively detect density discontinuities, gaps, and delaminations. A prototype laser-based ultrasonic system was designed and built. The system uses a micro-chip laser for excitation of broadband ultrasonic waves with frequency components reaching 1.0 GHz, and a path-stabilized Michelson interferometer for detection. The proof-of-concept for mesoscale characterization is demonstrated by imaging a micro-fabricated etched pattern in a 70 {micro}m thick silicon wafer.

  11. Ultrasonic Characterization of the Biological Objects of Spherical or Cylindrical Shape Using an Acoustic Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeva, A. R.; Bakulin, E. Yu.; Sinisac, A.; Bajic, N.; Denisova, L. A.; Severin, F. M.; Maev, R. Gr.; Khramtsova, E. A.

    The ability of an acoustic microscope in the investigation of biological objects with irregular surface, layered structure, different physical and acoustical properties has been estimated. Acoustic images and the results of tissue layers thickness measurements have been analyzed with 3 objects: extracted human tooth, cats' knee joint in vitro and human nail in vivo. It has been demonstrated, that unlike metal or polymeric samples the biological objects of a ball or cylindrical shape due to the fine surface irregularities can produce acoustic images of their internal structures, which are in a good correspondence with the real microanatomical parameters. Morphological resemblance of the biological objects shape in acoustical and optical images provides precise measuring of separate tissue layers in a noninvasive mode that can not be performed with any other method

  12. Negative refraction imaging of acoustic metamaterial lens in the supersonic range

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jianning; Wen, Tingdun; Yang, Peng; Zhang, Lu

    2014-05-15

    Acoustic metamaterials with negative refraction index is the most promising method to overcome the diffraction limit of acoustic imaging to achieve ultrahigh resolution. In this paper, we use localized resonant phononic crystal as the unit cell to construct the acoustic negative refraction lens. Based on the vibration model of the phononic crystal, negative quality parameters of the lens are obtained while excited near the system resonance frequency. Simulation results show that negative refraction of the acoustic lens can be achieved when a sound wave transmiting through the phononic crystal plate. The patterns of the imaging field agree well with that of the incident wave, while the dispersion is very weak. The unit cell size in the simulation is 0.0005 m and the wavelength of the sound source is 0.02 m, from which we show that acoustic signal can be manipulated through structures with dimensions much smaller than the wavelength of incident wave.

  13. Attenuation of sound in ducts with acoustic treatment: A generalized approximate equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, E. J.

    1975-01-01

    A generalized approximate equation for duct lining sound attenuation is presented. The specification of two parameters, the maximum possible attenuation and the optimum wall acoustic impedance is shown to completely determine the sound attenuation for any acoustic mode at any selected wall impedance. The equation is based on the nearly circular shape of the constant attenuation contours in the wall acoustic impedance plane. For impedances far from the optimum, the equation reduces to Morse's approximate expression. The equation can be used for initial acoustic liner design. Not least important is the illustrative nature of the solutions which provide an understanding of the duct propagation problem usually obscured in the exact calculations. Sample calculations using the approximate attenuation equation show that the peak and the bandwidth of the sound attenuation spectrum can be represented by quite simple functions of the ratio of actual wall acoustic resistance to optimum resistance.

  14. Change of nonlinear acoustics in ASME grade 122 steel welded joint during creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtani, Toshihiro; Honma, Takumi; Ishii, Yutaka; Tabuchi, Masaaki; Hongo, Hiromichi; Hirao, Masahiko

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we described the changes of two nonlinear acoustic characterizations; resonant frequency shift and three-wave interaction, with electromagnetic acoustic resonance (EMAR) throughout the creep life in the welded joints of ASME Grade 122, one of high Cr ferritic heat resisting steels. EMAR was a combination of the resonant acoustic technique with a non-contact electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT). These nonlinear acoustic parameters decreased from the start to 50% of creep life. After slightly increased, they rapidly increased from 80% of creep life to rupture. We interpreted these phenomena in terms of dislocation recovery, recrystallization, and restructuring related to the initiation and growth of creep void, with support from the SEM and TEM observation.

  15. Status and recent results of the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karg, Timo; IceCube Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) has been deployed to study the feasibility of acoustic neutrino detection in Antarctic ice around the South Pole. An array of four strings equipped with acoustic receivers and transmitters, permanently installed in the upper 500 m of boreholes drilled for the IceCube neutrino observatory, and a retrievable transmitter that can be used in the water filled holes before the installation of the IceCube optical strings are used to measure the ice acoustic properties. These include the sound speed and its depth dependence, the attenuation length, the noise level, and the rate and nature of transient background sources in the relevant frequency range from 10 to 100 kHz. SPATS is operating successfully since January 2007 and has been able to either measure or constrain all parameters. We present the latest results of SPATS and discuss their implications for future acoustic neutrino detection activities in Antarctica.

  16. Study Acoustic Emissions from Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James; Workman,Gary

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this work will be to develop techniques for monitoring the acoustic emissions from carbon epoxy composite structures at cryogenic temperatures. Performance of transducers at temperatures ranging from ambient to cryogenic and the characteristics of acoustic emission from composite structures will be studied and documented. This entire effort is directed towards characterization of structures used in NASA propulsion programs such as the X-33.

  17. Acoustic Rectification in Dispersive Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.

    2008-01-01

    It is shown that the shapes of acoustic radiation-induced static strain and displacement pulses (rectified acoustic pulses) are defined locally by the energy density of the generating waveform. Dispersive properties are introduced analytically by assuming that the rectified pulses are functionally dependent on a phase factor that includes both dispersive and nonlinear terms. The dispersion causes an evolutionary change in the shape of the energy density profile that leads to the generation of solitons experimentally observed in fused silica.

  18. Acoustics Research of Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Ximing; Houston, Janice D.

    2014-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces some of the highest acoustic loading over a broad frequency for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are used in the prediction of the internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle but there are challenges. Present liftoff vehicle acoustic environment prediction methods utilize stationary data from previously conducted hold-down tests; i.e. static firings conducted in the 1960's, to generate 1/3 octave band Sound Pressure Level (SPL) spectra. These data sets are used to predict the liftoff acoustic environments for launch vehicles. To facilitate the accuracy and quality of acoustic loading, predictions at liftoff for future launch vehicles such as the Space Launch System (SLS), non-stationary flight data from the Ares I-X were processed in PC-Signal in two forms which included a simulated hold-down phase and the entire launch phase. In conjunction, the Prediction of Acoustic Vehicle Environments (PAVE) program was developed in MATLAB to allow for efficient predictions of sound pressure levels (SPLs) as a function of station number along the vehicle using semiempirical methods. This consisted, initially, of generating the Dimensionless Spectrum Function (DSF) and Dimensionless Source Location (DSL) curves from the Ares I-X flight data. These are then used in the MATLAB program to generate the 1/3 octave band SPL spectra. Concluding results show major differences in SPLs between the hold-down test data and the processed Ares IX flight data making the Ares I-X flight data more practical for future vehicle acoustic environment predictions.

  19. Acoustic techniques in nuclear safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Olinger, C.T.; Sinha, D.N.

    1995-07-01

    Acoustic techniques can be employed to address many questions relevant to current nuclear technology needs. These include establishing and monitoring intrinsic tags and seals, locating holdup in areas where conventional radiation-based measurements have limited capability, process monitoring, monitoring containers for corrosion or changes in pressure, and facility design verification. These acoustics applications are in their infancy with respect to safeguards and nuclear material management, but proof-of-principle has been demonstrated in many of the areas listed.

  20. Simplified Rotation In Acoustic Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Gaspar, M. S.; Trinh, E. H.

    1989-01-01

    New technique based on old discovery used to control orientation of object levitated acoustically in axisymmetric chamber. Method does not require expensive equipment like additional acoustic drivers of precisely adjustable amplitude, phase, and frequency. Reflecting object acts as second source of sound. If reflecting object large enough, close enough to levitated object, or focuses reflected sound sufficiently, Rayleigh torque exerted on levitated object by reflected sound controls orientation of object.

  1. Stable And Oscillating Acoustic Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B.; Garrett, Steven L.

    1988-01-01

    Sample stability or instability determined by levitating frequency. Degree of oscillation of acoustically levitated object along axis of levitation chamber controlled by varying frequency of acoustic driver for axis above or below frequency of corresponding chamber resonance. Stabilization/oscillation technique applied in normal Earth gravity, or in absence of gravity to bring object quickly to rest at nominal levitation position or make object oscillate in desired range about that position.

  2. ACOUSTIC RECTIFICATION IN DISPERSIVE MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, John H.

    2009-03-03

    It is shown that the shapes of acoustic radiation-induced static strain and displacement pulses (rectified acoustic pulses) are defined locally by the energy density of the generating waveform. Dispersive properties are introduced analytically by assuming that the rectified pulses are functionally dependent on a phase factor that includes both dispersive and nonlinear terms. The dispersion causes an evolutionary change in the shape of the energy density profile that leads to the generation of solitons experimentally observed in fused silica.

  3. Acoustically-driven microfluidic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, A W; Benett, W J; Tarte, L R

    2000-06-23

    We have demonstrated a non-contact method of concentrating and mixing particles in a plastic microfluidic chamber employing acoustic radiation pressure. A flaw cell package has also been designed that integrates liquid sample interconnects, electrical contacts and a removable sample chamber. Experiments were performed on 1, 3, 6, and 10 {micro}m polystyrene beads. Increased antibody binding to a solid-phase substrate was observed in the presence of acoustic mixing due to improve mass transport.

  4. Assessing the accuracy of auralizations computed using a hybrid geometrical-acoustics and wave-acoustics method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Jason E.; Takahashi, Kengo; Shimizu, Yasushi; Yamakawa, Takashi

    2001-05-01

    When based on geometrical acoustics, computational models used for auralization of auditorium sound fields are physically inaccurate at low frequencies. To increase accuracy while keeping computation tractable, hybrid methods using computational wave acoustics at low frequencies have been proposed and implemented in small enclosures such as simplified models of car cabins [Granier et al., J. Audio Eng. Soc. 44, 835-849 (1996)]. The present work extends such an approach to an actual 2400-m3 auditorium using the boundary-element method for frequencies below 100 Hz. The effect of including wave-acoustics at low frequencies is assessed by comparing the predictions of the hybrid model with those of the geometrical-acoustics model and comparing both with measurements. Conventional room-acoustical metrics are used together with new methods based on two-dimensional distance measures applied to time-frequency representations of impulse responses. Despite in situ measurements of boundary impedance, uncertainties in input parameters limit the accuracy of the computed results at low frequencies. However, aural perception ultimately defines the required accuracy of computational models. An algorithmic method for making such evaluations is proposed based on correlating listening-test results with distance measures between time-frequency representations derived from auditory models of the ear-brain system. Preliminary results are presented.

  5. Arctic acoustics ultrasonic modeling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamuel, Jacques R.

    1990-03-01

    A unique collection of laboratory ultrasonic modeling results are presented revealing and characterizing hidden pulsed seismoacoustic wave phenomena from 3-D range dependent liquid/solid boundaries. The research succeeded in isolating and identifying low frequency (10 to 500 Hz) transmission loss mechanisms and provided physical insight into Arctic acoustic problems generally beyond the state-of-the-art of theoretical and numerical analysis. The ultrasonic modeling studies dealt with controversial issues and existing discrepancies on seismo-acoustic waves at water/ice interface, sea ice thickness determination, low frequency transmission loss, and bottom leaky Rayleigh waves. The areas investigated include leaky Rayleigh waves at water/ice interface, leaky flexural waves in floating ice plates, effects of dry/wet cracks in sea ice on plate waves and near grazing acoustic waves, edge waves in floating plates, low frequency backscatter from ice keel width resonances, conversion of underwater acoustic waves into plate waves by keels, nondispersive flexural wave along apex of small angle solid wedge, Scholte and leaky Rayleigh waves along apex of immersed 90 ice wedge, backscatter from trailing edge of floes, floating plate resonances associated with near-grazing underwater acoustic waves, acoustic coupling between adjacent floes, and multiple bottom leaky Rayleigh wave components in water layer over solid bottom.

  6. Opto-acoustic cell permeation

    SciTech Connect

    Visuri, S R; Heredia, N

    2000-03-09

    Optically generated acoustic waves have been used to temporarily permeate biological cells. This technique may be useful for enhancing transfection of DNA into cells or enhancing the absorption of locally delivered drugs. A diode-pumped frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser operating at kHz repetition rates was used to produce a series of acoustic pulses. An acoustic wave was formed via thermoelastic expansion by depositing laser radiation into an absorbing dye. Generated pressures were measured with a PVDF hydrophone. The acoustic waves were transmitted to cultured and plated cells. The cell media contained a selection of normally- impermeable fluorescent-labeled dextran dyes. Following treatment with the opto-acoustic technique, cellular incorporation of dyes, up to 40,000 Molecular Weight, was noted. Control cells that did not receive opto-acoustic treatment had unremarkable dye incorporation. Uptake of dye was quantified via fluorescent microscopic analysis. Trypan Blue membrane exclusion assays and fluorescent labeling assays confirmed the vitality of cells following treatment. This method of enhanced drug delivery has the potential to dramatically reduce required drug dosages and associated side effects and enable revolutionary therapies.

  7. Acoustics Research of Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Ximing; Houston, Janice

    2014-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces high acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are used in the prediction of the internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components. Present liftoff vehicle acoustic environment prediction methods utilize stationary data from previously conducted hold-down tests to generate 1/3 octave band Sound Pressure Level (SPL) spectra. In an effort to update the accuracy and quality of liftoff acoustic loading predictions, non-stationary flight data from the Ares I-X were processed in PC-Signal in two flight phases: simulated hold-down and liftoff. In conjunction, the Prediction of Acoustic Vehicle Environments (PAVE) program was developed in MATLAB to allow for efficient predictions of sound pressure levels (SPLs) as a function of station number along the vehicle using semi-empirical methods. This consisted of generating the Dimensionless Spectrum Function (DSF) and Dimensionless Source Location (DSL) curves from the Ares I-X flight data. These are then used in the MATLAB program to generate the 1/3 octave band SPL spectra. Concluding results show major differences in SPLs between the hold-down test data and the processed Ares I-X flight data making the Ares I-X flight data more practical for future vehicle acoustic environment predictions.

  8. Acoustical evaluation of preschool classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wonyoung; Hodgson, Murray

    2003-10-01

    An investigation was made of the acoustical environments in the Berwick Preschool, Vancouver, in response to complaints by the teachers. Reverberation times (RT), background noise levels (BNL), and in-class sound levels (Leq) were measured for acoustical evaluation in the classrooms. With respect to the measured RT and BNL, none of the classrooms in the preschool were acceptable according to the criteria relevant to this study. A questionnaire was administered to the teachers to assess their subjective responses to the acoustical and nonacoustical environments of the classrooms. Teachers agreed that the nonacoustical environments in the classrooms were fair, but that the acoustical environments had problems. Eight different classroom configurations were simulated to improve the acoustical environments, using the CATT room acoustical simulation program. When the surface absorption was increased, both the RT and speech levels decreased. RASTI was dependent on the volumes of the classrooms when the background noise levels were high; however, it depended on the total absorption of the classrooms when the background noise levels were low. Ceiling heights are critical as well. It is recommended that decreasing the volume of the classrooms is effective. Sound absorptive materials should be added to the walls or ceiling.

  9. Fiber based photonic-crystal acoustic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilic, Onur

    Photonic-crystal slabs are two-dimensional photonic crystals etched into a dielectric layer such as silicon. Standard micro fabrication techniques can be employed to manufacture these structures, which makes it feasible to produce them in large areas, usually an important criterion for practical applications. An appealing feature of these structures is that they can be employed as free-space optical devices such as broadband reflectors. The small thickness of the slab (usually in the vicinity of half a micron) also makes it deflectable. These combined optical and mechanical properties make it possible to employ photonic-crystal slabs in a range of practical applications, including displacement sensors, which in turn can be used for example to detect acoustic waves. An additional benefit of employing a photonic-crystal slab is that it is possible to tailor its optical and mechanical properties by adjusting the geometrical parameters of the structure such as hole radius or shape, pitch, and the slab thickness. By altering the hole radius and pitch, it is possible to make broadband reflectors or sharp transmission filters out of these structures. Adjusting the thickness also affects its deformability, making it possible to make broadband mirrors compliant to acoustic waves. Altering the hole shape, for example by introducing an asymmetry, extends the functionalities of photonic-crystal slabs even further. Breaking the symmetry by introducing asymmetric holes enables polarization-sensitive devices such as retarders, polarization beam splitters, and photonic crystals with additional non-degenerate resonances useful for increased sensitivity in sensors. All these practical advantages of photonic-crystal slabs makes them suitable as key components in micromachined sensor applications. We report one such example of an application of photonic-crystal slabs in the form of a micromachined acoustic sensor. It consists of a Fabry-Perot interferometer made of a photonic

  10. Theoretical vibro-acoustic modeling of acoustic noise transmission through aircraft windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloufi, Badr; Behdinan, Kamran; Zu, Jean

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a fully vibro-acoustic model for sound transmission across a multi-pane aircraft window is developed. The proposed model is efficiently applied for a set of window models to perform extensive theoretical parametric studies. The studied window configurations generally simulate the passenger window designs of modern aircraft classes which have an exterior multi-Plexiglas pane, an interior single acrylic glass pane and a dimmable glass ("smart" glass), all separated by thin air cavities. The sound transmission loss (STL) characteristics of three different models, triple-, quadruple- and quintuple-paned windows identical in size and surface density, are analyzed for improving the acoustic insulation performances. Typical results describing the influence of several system parameters, such as the thicknesses, number and spacing of the window panes, on the transmission loss are then investigated. In addition, a comparison study is carried out to evaluate the acoustic reduction capability of each window model. The STL results show that the higher frequencies sound transmission loss performance can be improved by increasing the number of window panels, however, the low frequency performance is decreased, particularly at the mass-spring resonances.

  11. Nondestructive Evaluation of Metal Fatigue Using Nonlinear Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Safe-life and damage-tolerant design philosophies of high performance structures have driven the development of various methods to evaluate nondestructively the accumulation of damage in such structures resulting from cyclic loading. Although many techniques have proven useful, none has been able to provide an unambiguous, quantitative assessment of damage accumulation at each stage of fatigue from the virgin state to fracture. A method based on nonlinear acoustics is shown to provide such a means to assess the state of metal fatigue. The salient features of an analytical model are presented of the microelastic-plastic nonlinearities resulting from the interaction of an acoustic wave with fatigue-generated dislocation substructures and cracks that predictably evolve during the metal fatigue process. The interaction is quantified by the material (acoustic) nonlinearity parameter extracted from acoustic harmonic generation measurements. The parameters typically increase monotonically by several hundred percent over the fatigue life of the metal, thus providing a unique measure of the state of fatigue. Application of the model to aluminum alloy 2024-T4, 410Cb stainless steel, and IN100 nickel-base superalloy specimens fatigued using different loading conditions yields good agreement between theory and experiment. Application of the model and measurement technique to the on-site inspection of steam turbine blades is discussed.

  12. Nondestructive Evaluation of Metal Fatigue Using Nonlinear Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantrell, John H.

    2009-03-01

    Safe-life and damage-tolerant design philosophies of high performance structures have driven the development of various methods to evaluate nondestructively the accumulation of damage in such structures resulting from cyclic loading. Although many techniques have proven useful, none has been able to provide an unambiguous, quantitative assessment of damage accumulation at each stage of fatigue from the virgin state to fracture. A method based on nonlinear acoustics is shown to provide such a means to assess the state of metal fatigue. The salient features of an analytical model are presented of the microelastic-plastic nonlinearities resulting from the interaction of an acoustic wave with fatigue-generated dislocation substructures and cracks that predictably evolve during the metal fatigue process. The interaction is quantified by the material (acoustic) nonlinearity parameter β extracted from acoustic harmonic generation measurements. The β parameters typically increase monotonically by several hundred percent over the fatigue life of the metal, thus providing a unique measure of the state of fatigue. Application of the model to aluminum alloy 2024-T4 and 410 Cb stainless steel specimens fatigued using different loading conditions yields good agreement between theory and experiment. Application of the model and measurement technique to the on-site inspection of steam turbine blades is discussed.

  13. The Short Time Scale Events of Acoustic Droplet Vaporization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, David S.; Kripfgans, Oliver D.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Bull, Joseph L.

    2012-11-01

    The conversion of a liquid microdroplets to gas bubbles initiated by an acoustic pulse, known as acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV), has been proposed as a method to selectively generate gas emboli for therapeutic purposes (gas embolotherapy), specifically for vascularized tumors. In this study we focused on the first 10 microseconds of the ADV process, namely the gas nucleation site formation and bubble evolution. BSA encapsulated dodecafluoropentane (CAS: 678-26-2) microdroplets were isolated at the bottom of a degassed water bath held at 37°C. Microdroplets, diameters ranging from 5-65 microns, were vaporized using a single pulse (4-16 cycles) from a 7.5 MHz focused single element transducer ranging from 2-5 MPa peak negative pressure and images of the vaporization process were recorded using an ultra-high speed camera (SIM802, Specialised Imaging Ltd). It was observed that typically two gas nuclei were formed in series with one another on axis with ultrasound pulse. However, relative positioning of the nucleation sites within the droplet depended on droplet diameter. Additionally, depending on acoustic parameters the bubble could deform into a toroidal shape. Such dynamics could suggest acoustic parameters that may result in tissue damage. This work is supported by NIH grant R01EB006476.

  14. On noninvasive assessment of acoustic fields acting on the fetus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonets, V. A.; Kazakov, V. V.

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study is to verify a noninvasive technique for assessing the characteristics of acoustic fields in the audible range arising in the uterus under the action of maternal voice, external sounds, and vibrations. This problem is very important in view of actively developed methods for delivery of external sounds to the uterus: music, maternal voice recordings, sounds from outside the mother's body, etc., that supposedly support development of the fetus at the prenatal stage psychologically and cognitively. However, the parameters of acoustic signals have been neither measured nor normalized, which may be dangerous for the fetus and hinder actual assessment of their impact on fetal development. The authors show that at frequencies below 1 kHz, acoustic pressure in the uterus may be measured noninvasively using a hydrophone placed in a soft capsule filled with liquid. It was found that the acoustic field at frequencies up to 1 kHz arising in the uterus under the action of an external sound field has amplitude-frequency parameters close to those of the external field; i.e., the external field penetrates the uterus with hardly any difficulty.

  15. Contour mode resonators with acoustic reflectors

    DOEpatents

    Olsson, Roy H.; Fleming, James G.; Tuck, Melanie R.

    2008-06-10

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) resonator is disclosed which has a linear or ring-shaped acoustic resonator suspended above a substrate by an acoustic reflector. The acoustic resonator can be formed with a piezoelectric material (e.g. aluminum nitride, zinc oxide or PZT), or using an electrostatically-actuated material. The acoustic reflector (also termed an acoustic mirror) uses alternating sections of a relatively low acoustic impedance Z.sub.L material and a relatively high acoustic impedance Z.sub.H material to isolate the acoustic resonator from the substrate. The MEM resonator, which can be formed on a silicon substrate with conventional CMOS circuitry, has applications for forming oscillators, rf filters, and acoustic sensors.

  16. Surface acoustic wave microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiaoyun; Li, Peng; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Stratton, Zackary S.; Nama, Nitesh; Guo, Feng; Slotcavage, Daniel; Mao, Xiaole; Shi, Jinjie; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    The recent introduction of surface acoustic wave (SAW) technology onto lab-on-a-chip platforms has opened a new frontier in microfluidics. The advantages provided by such SAW microfluidics are numerous: simple fabrication, high biocompatibility, fast fluid actuation, versatility, compact and inexpensive devices and accessories, contact-free particle manipulation, and compatibility with other microfluidic components. We believe that these advantages enable SAW microfluidics to play a significant role in a variety of applications in biology, chemistry, engineering, and medicine. In this review article, we discuss the theory underpinning SAWs and their interactions with particles and the contacting fluids in which they are suspended. We then review the SAW-enabled microfluidic devices demonstrated to date, starting with devices that accomplish fluid mixing and transport through the use of travelling SAW; we follow that by reviewing the more recent innovations achieved with standing SAW that enable such actions as particle/cell focusing, sorting, and patterning. Finally, we look forward and appraise where the discipline of SAW microfluidics could go next. PMID:23900527

  17. An acoustic glucose sensor.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ruifen; Stevenson, Adrian C; Lowe, Christopher R

    2012-05-15

    In vivo glucose monitoring is required for tighter glycaemic control. This report describes a new approach to construct a miniature implantable device based on a magnetic acoustic resonance sensor (MARS). A ≈ 600-800 nm thick glucose-responsive poly(acrylamide-co-3-acrylamidophenylboronic acid) (poly(acrylamide-co-3-APB)) film was polymerised on the quartz disc (12 mm in diameter and 0.25 mm thick) of the MARS. The swelling/shrinking of the polymer film induced by the glucose binding to the phenylboronate caused changes in the resonance amplitude of the quartz disc in the MARS. A linear relationship between the response of the MARS and the glucose concentration in the range ≈ 0-15 mM was observed, with the optimum response of the MARS sensor being obtained when the polymer films contained ≈ 20 mol% 3-APB. The MARS glucose sensor also functioned under flow conditions (9 μl/min) with a response almost identical to the sensor under static or non-flow conditions. The results suggest that the MARS could offer a promising strategy for developing a small subcutaneously implanted continuous glucose monitor.

  18. Acoustic Signal Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, William M.; Candy, James V.

    Signal processing refers to the acquisition, storage, display, and generation of signals - also to the extraction of information from signals and the re-encoding of information. As such, signal processing in some form is an essential element in the practice of all aspects of acoustics. Signal processing algorithms enable acousticians to separate signals from noise, to perform automatic speech recognition, or to compress information for more efficient storage or transmission. Signal processing concepts are the building blocks used to construct models of speech and hearing. Now, in the 21st century, all signal processing is effectively digital signal processing. Widespread access to high-speed processing, massive memory, and inexpensive software make signal processing procedures of enormous sophistication and power available to anyone who wants to use them. Because advanced signal processing is now accessible to everybody, there is a need for primers that introduce basic mathematical concepts that underlie the digital algorithms. The present handbook chapter is intended to serve such a purpose.

  19. Ion acoustic traveling waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, G. M.; Burrows, R. H.; Ao, X.; Zank, G. P.; Zank

    2014-04-01

    Models for traveling waves in multi-fluid plasmas give essential insight into fully nonlinear wave structures in plasmas, not readily available from either numerical simulations or from weakly nonlinear wave theories. We illustrate these ideas using one of the simplest models of an electron-proton multi-fluid plasma for the case where there is no magnetic field or a constant normal magnetic field present. We show that the traveling waves can be reduced to a single first-order differential equation governing the dynamics. We also show that the equations admit a multi-symplectic Hamiltonian formulation in which both the space and time variables can act as the evolution variable. An integral equation useful for calculating adiabatic, electrostatic solitary wave signatures for multi-fluid plasmas with arbitrary mass ratios is presented. The integral equation arises naturally from a fluid dynamics approach for a two fluid plasma, with a given mass ratio of the two species (e.g. the plasma could be an electron-proton or an electron-positron plasma). Besides its intrinsic interest, the integral equation solution provides a useful analytical test for numerical codes that include a proton-electron mass ratio as a fundamental constant, such as for particle in cell (PIC) codes. The integral equation is used to delineate the physical characteristics of ion acoustic traveling waves consisting of hot electron and cold proton fluids.

  20. Acoustic ground impedance meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    A compact, portable instrument was developed to measure the acoustic impedance of the ground, or other surfaces, by direct pressure-volume velocity measurement. A Helmholz resonator, constructed of heavy-walled stainless steel but open at the bottom, is positioned over the surface having the unknown impedance. The sound source, a cam-driven piston of known stroke and thus known volume velocity, is located in the neck of the resonator. The cam speed is a variable up to a maximum 3600 rpm. The sound pressure at the test surface is measured by means of a microphone flush-mounted in the wall of the chamber. An optical monitor of the piston displacement permits measurement of the phase angle between the volume velocity and the sound pressure, from which the real and imaginary parts of the impedance can be evaluated. Measurements using a 5-lobed cam can be made up to 300 Hz. Detailed design criteria and results on a soil sample are presented.

  1. Covert underwater acoustic communications.

    PubMed

    Ling, Jun; He, Hao; Li, Jian; Roberts, William; Stoica, Petre

    2010-11-01

    Low probability of detection (LPD) communications are conducted at a low received signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) to deter eavesdroppers to sense the presence of the transmitted signal. Successful detection at intended receiver heavily relies on the processing gain achieved by employing the direct-sequence spread-spectrum (DSSS) technique. For scenarios that lack a sufficiently low SNR to maintain LPD, another metric, referred to as low probability of interception (LPI), is of interest to protect the privacy of the transmitted information. If covert communications take place in underwater acoustic (UWA) environments, then additional challenges are present. The time-varying nature of the UWA channel prevents the employment of a long spreading waveform. Furthermore, UWA environments are frequency-selective channels with long memory, which imposes challenges to the design of the spreading waveform. In this paper, a covert UWA communication system that adopts the DSSS technique and a coherent RAKE receiver is investigated. Emphasis is placed on the design of a spreading waveform that not only accounts for the transceiver structure and frequency-selective nature of the UWA channel, but also possesses a superior LPI. The proposed techniques are evaluated using both simulated and SPACE'08 in-water experimental data.

  2. Passive Acoustic Vessel Localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwal, Pasang Sherpa

    This thesis investigates the development of a low-cost passive acoustic system for localizing moving vessels to monitor areas where human activities such as fishing, snorkeling and poaching are restricted. The system uses several off-the-shelf sensors with unsynchronized clocks where the Time Difference of Arrival (TDOA) or time delay is extracted by cross-correlation of the signal between paired sensors. The cross-correlation function uses phase correlation or Phase Transform (PHAT) which whitens the cross-spectrum in order to de-emphasize dominant frequency components. Using the locations of pairs of sensors as foci, hyperbolic equations can be defined using the time delay between them. With three or more sensors, multiple hyperbolic functions can be calculated which intersect at a unique point: the boat's location. It is also found that increasing separation distances between sensors decreased the correlation between the signals. However larger separation distances have better localization capability than with small distances. Experimental results from the Columbia and Willamette Rivers are presented to demonstrate performance.

  3. Surface acoustic wave microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiaoyun; Li, Peng; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Stratton, Zackary S; Nama, Nitesh; Guo, Feng; Slotcavage, Daniel; Mao, Xiaole; Shi, Jinjie; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2013-09-21

    The recent introduction of surface acoustic wave (SAW) technology onto lab-on-a-chip platforms has opened a new frontier in microfluidics. The advantages provided by such SAW microfluidics are numerous: simple fabrication, high biocompatibility, fast fluid actuation, versatility, compact and inexpensive devices and accessories, contact-free particle manipulation, and compatibility with other microfluidic components. We believe that these advantages enable SAW microfluidics to play a significant role in a variety of applications in biology, chemistry, engineering and medicine. In this review article, we discuss the theory underpinning SAWs and their interactions with particles and the contacting fluids in which they are suspended. We then review the SAW-enabled microfluidic devices demonstrated to date, starting with devices that accomplish fluid mixing and transport through the use of travelling SAW; we follow that by reviewing the more recent innovations achieved with standing SAW that enable such actions as particle/cell focusing, sorting and patterning. Finally, we look forward and appraise where the discipline of SAW microfluidics could go next.

  4. Acoustics of the Intonarumori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafin, Stefania

    2005-04-01

    The Intonarumori were a family of musical instruments invented by the Italian futurist composer and painter Luigi Russolo. Each Intonarumori was made of a wooden parallelepiped sound box, inside which a wheel of different sizes and materials was setting into vibration a catgut or metal string. The pitch of the string was varied by using a lever, while the speed of the wheel was controlled by the performer using a crank. At one end of the string there was a drumhead that transmitted vibrations to the speaker. Unfortunately, all the original Intonarumori were destroyed after a fire during World War II. Since then, researchers have tried to understand the sound production mechanism of such instruments, especially by consulting the patents compiled by Russolo or by reading his book ``The art of noise.'' In this paper we describe the acoustics of the Intonarumori. Based on such description, we propose physical models that simulate such instruments. The intonarumori's string is modeled using a one dimensional waveguide, which is excited either by an impact or a friction model. The body of the instrument is modeled using a 3-D rectangular mesh, while the horn is considered as an omnidirectional radiator.

  5. Acoustic remote probing of the environment. [atmospheric and underwater acoustic data acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pijanowski, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    Atmospheric acoustic probes located either at shore locations near the Chesapeake Bay or on large surface buoys could obtain profiles of wind velocity and turbulence and the temperature and humidity of the atmosphere. At or near the buoy locations, underwater probes located on the bottom could be used to profile current velocity, density, and turbulence and also to determine tide level, wave height, spectrum, and direction. The physical parameter profiles at these earth-surface stations could be used with surface observations by satellite. The most obvious use of data from such a network is to verify and calibrate models of energy exchange between the water of the Bay and the atmosphere.

  6. An Analysis of Consolidation Grouting Effect of Bedrock Based on its Acoustic Velocity Increase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming; Lu, Wen-bo; Zhang, Wen-ju; Yan, Peng; Zhou, Chuang-bing

    2015-05-01

    Acoustic velocity is an important parameter to evaluate the mechanical properties of fractured rock masses. Based on the in situ acoustic velocity measurement data of ~20 hydropower stations in China, we assessed the acoustic velocity increase of rock masses as a result of consolidation grouting in different geological conditions, such as fault sites, weathered areas and excavation-induced damage zones. We established an empirical relationship between the acoustic velocity of rock masses before and after consolidation grouting, and examined the correlation between acoustic velocity and deformation modulus. A case study is presented about a foundation consolidation grouting project for an intake tower of Pubugou Hydropower Station. The results show that different types of rock masses possess distinct ranges for resultant acoustic velocity increase by consolidation grouting. Under a confidence interval of 95 %, the ranges of the increasing rate of acoustic velocity in a faulted zone, weathered zone, and excavation-induced damage zone are observed to be 12.7-43.1, 12.3-31.2, and 6.9-14.5 %, respectively. The acoustic velocity before grouting and its increasing rate can be used to predict the effectiveness of consolidation grouting.

  7. Methods for reconstructing acoustic quantities based on acoustic pressure measurements.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sean F

    2008-11-01

    This paper presents an overview of the acoustic imaging methods developed over the past three decades that enable one to reconstruct all acoustic quantities based on the acoustic pressure measurements taken around a target source at close distances. One such method that has received the most attention is known as near-field acoustical holography (NAH). The original NAH relies on Fourier transforms that are suitable for a surface containing a level of constant coordinate in a source-free region. Other methods are developed to reconstruct the acoustic quantities in three-dimensional space and on an arbitrary three-dimensional source surface. Note that there is a fine difference between Fourier transform based NAH and other methods that is largely overlooked. The former can offer a wave number spectrum, thus enabling visualization of various structural waves of different wavelengths that travel on the surface of a structure; the latter cannot provide such information, which is critical to acquire an in-depth understanding of the interrelationships between structural vibrations and sound radiation. All these methods are discussed in this paper, their advantages and limitations are compared, and the need for further development to analyze the root causes of noise and vibration problems is discussed.

  8. PORTABLE ACOUSTIC MONITORING PACKAGE (PAMP)

    SciTech Connect

    John l. Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Deepak Mehra

    2003-07-01

    The 1st generation acoustic monitoring package was designed to detect and analyze weak acoustic signals inside natural gas transmission lines. Besides a microphone it housed a three-inch diameter aerodynamic acoustic signal amplifier to maximize sensitivity to leak induced {Delta}p type signals. The theory and test results of this aerodynamic signal amplifier was described in the master's degree thesis of our Research Assistant Deepak Mehra who is about to graduate. To house such a large three-inch diameter sensor required the use of a steel 300-psi rated 4 inch weld neck flange, which itself weighed already 29 pounds. The completed 1st generation Acoustic Monitoring Package weighed almost 100 pounds. This was too cumbersome to mount in the field, on an access port at a pipeline shut-off valve. Therefore a 2nd generation and truly Portable Acoustic Monitor was built. It incorporated a fully self-contained {Delta}p type signal sensor, rated for line pressures up to 1000 psi with a base weight of only 6 pounds. This is the Rosemont Inc. Model 3051CD-Range 0, software driven sensor, which is believed to have industries best total performance. Its most sensitive unit was purchased with a {Delta}p range from 0 to 3 inch water. This resulted in the herein described 2nd generation: Portable Acoustic Monitoring Package (PAMP) for pipelines up to 1000 psi. Its 32-pound total weight includes an 18-volt battery. Together with a 3 pound laptop with its 4-channel data acquisition card, completes the equipment needed for field acoustic monitoring of natural gas transmission pipelines.

  9. Experimental and theoretical demonstration of acoustic Bloch oscillations in porous silicon structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lazcano, Z.; Arriaga, J.; Aliev, G. N.

    2014-04-21

    We report the theoretical calculations and the experimental demonstration of acoustic Bloch oscillations and Wannier-Stark ladders in linear tilted multilayer structures based on porous silicon. The considered structures consist of layers with constant porosity alternated by layers with a linear gradient in the parameter η=1/v{sub L}{sup 2} along the growth direction in order to tilt the acoustic band gap. The purpose of this gradient is to mimic the tilted electronic miniband structure of a superlattice semiconductor under an external electric field. In this way, acoustic Wannier-Stark ladders of equidistant modes are formed and they were experimentally confirmed in the transmission spectrum around 1.2 GHz. Their frequency separation defines the period of the acoustic Bloch oscillations. We fabricated three different structures with the same thicknesses but different values in the η parameter to observe the effect on the period of the Bloch oscillations. We measured the acoustic transmission spectra in the frequency domain, and by using the Fourier transform, we obtained the transmission in the time domain. The transmission spectra of the fabricated samples show acoustic Bloch oscillations with periods of 27, 24, and 19 ns. The experimental results are in good agreement with the transfer matrix calculations. The observed phenomenon is the acoustic counterpart of the well known electronic Bloch oscillations.

  10. Overstability of acoustic waves in strongly magnetized anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Uchava, E. S.; Shergelashvili, B. M.; Tevzadze, A. G.; Poedts, S.

    2014-08-15

    We present a linear stability analysis of the perturbation modes in anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows with velocity shear and strong magnetic field. Collisionless or weakly collisional plasma is described within the 16-momentum MHD fluid closure model that takes into account not only the effect of pressure anisotropy but also the effect of anisotropic heat fluxes. In this model, the low frequency acoustic wave is revealed into a standard acoustic mode and higher frequency fast thermo-acoustic and lower frequency slow thermo-acoustic waves. It is shown that thermo-acoustic waves become unstable and grow exponentially when the heat flux parameter exceeds some critical value. It seems that velocity shear makes thermo-acoustic waves overstable even at subcritical heat flux parameters. Thus, when the effect of heat fluxes is not profound acoustic waves will grow due to the velocity shear, while at supercritical heat fluxes the flow reveals compressible thermal instability. Anisotropic thermal instability should be also important in astrophysical environments, where it will limit the maximal value of magnetic field that a low density ionized anisotropic flow can sustain.

  11. Nonperturbing measurements of spatially distributed underwater acoustic fields using a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer.

    PubMed

    Harland, Andy R; Petzing, Jon N; Tyrer, John R

    2004-01-01

    Localized changes in the density of water induced by the presence of an acoustic field cause perturbations in the localized refractive index. This relationship has given rise to a number of nonperturbing optical metrology techniques for recording measurement parameters from underwater acoustic fields. A method that has been recently developed involves the use of a Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) targeted at a fixed, nonvibrating, plate through an underwater acoustic field. Measurements of the rate of change of optical pathlength along a line section enable the identification of the temporal and frequency characteristics of the acoustic wave front. This approach has been extended through the use of a scanning LDV, which facilitates the measurement of a range of spatially distributed parameters. A mathematical model is presented that relates the distribution of pressure amplitude and phase in a planar wave front with the rate of change of optical pathlength measured by the LDV along a specifically orientated laser line section. Measurements of a 1 MHz acoustic tone burst generated by a focused transducer are described and the results presented. Graphical depictions of the acoustic power and phase distribution recorded by the LDV are shown, together with images representing time history during the acoustic wave propagation.

  12. Acoustic communication in plant-animal interactions.

    PubMed

    Schöner, Michael G; Simon, Ralph; Schöner, Caroline R

    2016-08-01

    Acoustic communication is widespread and well-studied in animals but has been neglected in other organisms such as plants. However, there is growing evidence for acoustic communication in plant-animal interactions. While knowledge about active acoustic signalling in plants (i.e. active sound production) is still in its infancy, research on passive acoustic signalling (i.e. reflection of animal sounds) revealed that bat-dependent plants have adapted to the bats' echolocation systems by providing acoustic reflectors to attract their animal partners. Understanding the proximate mechanisms and ultimate causes of acoustic communication will shed light on an underestimated dimension of information transfer between plants and animals. PMID:27423052

  13. Reflective echo tomographic imaging using acoustic beams

    DOEpatents

    Kisner, Roger; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J

    2014-11-25

    An inspection system includes a plurality of acoustic beamformers, where each of the plurality of acoustic beamformers including a plurality of acoustic transmitter elements. The system also includes at least one controller configured for causing each of the plurality of acoustic beamformers to generate an acoustic beam directed to a point in a volume of interest during a first time. Based on a reflected wave intensity detected at a plurality of acoustic receiver elements, an image of the volume of interest can be generated.

  14. Acoustic communication in plant-animal interactions.

    PubMed

    Schöner, Michael G; Simon, Ralph; Schöner, Caroline R

    2016-08-01

    Acoustic communication is widespread and well-studied in animals but has been neglected in other organisms such as plants. However, there is growing evidence for acoustic communication in plant-animal interactions. While knowledge about active acoustic signalling in plants (i.e. active sound production) is still in its infancy, research on passive acoustic signalling (i.e. reflection of animal sounds) revealed that bat-dependent plants have adapted to the bats' echolocation systems by providing acoustic reflectors to attract their animal partners. Understanding the proximate mechanisms and ultimate causes of acoustic communication will shed light on an underestimated dimension of information transfer between plants and animals.

  15. Visualizing coherent phonon propagation in the 100 GHz range: A broadband picosecond acoustics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontecorvo, Emanuele; Ortolani, Michele; Polli, Dario; Ferretti, Marco; Ruocco, Giancarlo; Cerullo, Giulio; Scopigno, Tullio

    2011-01-01

    Building on a 1 kHz amplified Ti:sapphire laser source, we developed a novel pump-probe setup for broadband picosecond acoustics using a white-light continuum probe coupled to an optical multichannel analyzer. The system allows one to access, in a single measurement, acoustic parameters such as sound velocity and attenuation all over the bandwidth of the acoustic wave-packet launched by the pump pulse. We use the setup to measure the sound attenuation in fused silica and observe a dynamic crossover occurring at ≈170 GHz.

  16. Reconstructed imaging of acoustic cloak using time-lapse reversal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chen; Cheng, Ying; Xu, Jian-yi; Li, Bo; Liu, Xiao-jun

    2014-08-01

    We proposed and investigated a solution to the inverse acoustic cloak problem, an anti-stealth technology to make cloaks visible, using the time-lapse reversal (TLR) method. The TLR method reconstructs the image of an unknown acoustic cloak by utilizing scattered acoustic waves. Compared to previous anti-stealth methods, the TLR method can determine not only the existence of a cloak but also its exact geometric information like definite shape, size, and position. Here, we present the process for TLR reconstruction based on time reversal invariance. This technology may have potential applications in detecting various types of cloaks with different geometric parameters.

  17. Analysis of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) Data for Acoustic Velocity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackshire, James L.

    1997-01-01

    Acoustic velocity measurements were taken using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in a Normal Incidence Tube configuration at various frequency, phase, and amplitude levels. This report presents the results of the PIV analysis and data reduction portions of the test and details the processing that was done. Estimates of lower measurement sensitivity levels were determined based on PIV image quality, correlation, and noise level parameters used in the test. Comparison of measurements with linear acoustic theory are presented. The onset of nonlinear, harmonic frequency acoustic levels were also studied for various decibel and frequency levels ranging from 90 to 132 dB and 500 to 3000 Hz, respectively.

  18. Determination of acoustic attenuation in the Hudson River Estuary by means of ship noise observations.

    PubMed

    Roh, Heui-Seol; Sutin, Alexander; Bunin, Barry

    2008-06-01

    Analysis of sound propagation in a complex urban estuary has application to underwater threat detection systems, underwater communication, and acoustic tomography. One of the most important acoustic parameters, sound attenuation, was analyzed in the Hudson River near Manhattan using measurements of acoustic noise generated by passing ships and recorded by a fixed hydrophone. Analysis of the ship noise level for varying distances allowed estimation of the sound attenuation in the frequency band of 10-80 kHz. The effective attenuation coefficient representing the attenuation loss above cylindrical spreading loss had only slight frequency dependence and can be estimated by the frequency independent value of 0.058 dBm.

  19. Acoustic correlates of emotional dimensions in laughter: arousal, dominance, and valence.

    PubMed

    Szameitat, Diana P; Darwin, Chris J; Wildgruber, Dirk; Alter, Kai; Szameitat, Andre J

    2011-06-01

    Although laughter plays an essential part in emotional vocal communication, little is known about the acoustical correlates that encode different emotional dimensions. In this study we examined the acoustical structure of laughter sounds differing along four emotional dimensions: arousal, dominance, sender's valence, and receiver-directed valence. Correlation of 43 acoustic parameters with individual emotional dimensions revealed that each emotional dimension was associated with a number of vocal cues. Common patterns of cues were found with emotional expression in speech, supporting the hypothesis of a common underlying mechanism for the vocal expression of emotions.

  20. Adaptive algorithm for active control of high-amplitude acoustic field in resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Červenka, M.; Bednařík, M.; Koníček, P.

    2008-06-01

    This work is concerned with suppression of nonlinear effects in piston-driven acoustic resonators by means of two-frequency driving technique. An iterative adaptive algorithm is proposed to calculate parameters of the driving signal in order that amplitude of the second harmonics of the acoustic pressure is minimized. Functionality of the algorithm is verified firstly by means of numerical model and secondly, it is used in real computer-controlled experiment. The numerical and experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can be successfully used for generation of high-amplitude shock-free acoustic field in resonators.